WorldWideScience

Sample records for acid oxidation defects

  1. Mutation analysis in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, N; Andresen, B S; Corydon, M J

    2001-01-01

    Mutation analysis of metabolic disorders, such as the fatty acid oxidation defects, offers an additional, and often superior, tool for specific diagnosis compared to traditional enzymatic assays. With the advancement of the structural part of the Human Genome Project and the creation of mutation...... databases, procedures for convenient and reliable genetic analyses are being developed. The most straightforward application of mutation analysis is to specific diagnoses in suspected patients, particularly in the context of family studies and for prenatal/preimplantation analysis. In addition, from...... of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation: very-long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD, also ACADVL), medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD, also ACADM), and short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD, also ACADS) deficiencies. On the basis of this knowledge we discuss current understanding of the structural...

  2. Impaired amino acid metabolism contributes to fasting-induced hypoglycemia in fatty acid oxidation defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houten, S.M.; Herrema, H.; Brinke, te H.; Denis, S.; Ruiter, J.P.N.; Dijk, van Th.; Argmann, C.A.; Ottenhoff, R.; Müller, M.R.; Groen, A.K.; Kuipers, F.; Reijngoud, D.J.; Wanders, R.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation (FAO) as a glucose-sparing process is illustrated by patients with inherited defects in FAO, who may present with life-threatening fasting-induced hypoketotic hypoglycemia. It is unknown why peripheral glucose demand outpaces hepatic

  3. Impaired amino acid metabolism contributes to fasting-induced hypoglycemia in fatty acid oxidation defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houten, Sander M.; Herrema, Hilde; te Brinke, Heleen; Denis, Simone; Ruiter, Jos P. N.; van Dijk, Theo H.; Argmann, Carmen A.; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Müller, Michael; Groen, Albert K.; Kuipers, Folkert; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Wanders, Ronald J. A.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) as a glucose-sparing process is illustrated by patients with inherited defects in FAO, who may present with life-threatening fasting-induced hypoketotic hypoglycemia. It is unknown why peripheral glucose demand outpaces hepatic

  4. Infant with hepatomegaly and hypoglycemia: A setting for fatty acid oxidation defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindranath, Aathira; Pai, Gautham; Srivastava, Anshu; Poddar, Ujjal; Yachha, Surender Kumar

    2017-10-26

    Fatty acid oxidation defects (FAOD) are one of the commonest metabolic liver diseases (MLDs) that can have varied presentations in different age groups. An infant presented with short history of jaundice and irritability, examination showed soft hepatomegaly. Investigations revealed non-ketotic hypoglycemia suggesting FAOD which was later confirmed as carnitine uptake defect with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry and mutation analysis. Patient improved with acute management of metabolic crisis, carnitine supplementation and corn starch therapy with reversal of encephalopathy, reduction in hepatomegaly, maintenance of euglycemia and improvement in liver function tests and creatine phosphokinase on follow up. Non-ketotic hypoglycemia is a characteristic finding in FAODs. Early diagnosis and appropriate management can result in excellent outcomes in patients with FAODs.

  5. Defects at oxide surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Thornton, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the basics and characterization of defects at oxide surfaces. It provides a state-of-the-art review of the field, containing information to the various types of surface defects, describes analytical methods to study defects, their chemical activity and the catalytic reactivity of oxides. Numerical simulations of defective structures complete the picture developed. Defects on planar surfaces form the focus of much of the book, although the investigation of powder samples also form an important part. The experimental study of planar surfaces opens the possibility of applying the large armoury of techniques that have been developed over the last half-century to study surfaces in ultra-high vacuum. This enables the acquisition of atomic level data under well-controlled conditions, providing a stringent test of theoretical methods. The latter can then be more reliably applied to systems such as nanoparticles for which accurate methods of characterization of structure and electronic properties ha...

  6. Thyroid hormone reverses aging-induced myocardial fatty acid oxidation defects and improves the response to acutely increased afterload.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolena Ledee

    Full Text Available Subclinical hypothyroidism occurs during aging in humans and mice and may contribute to the development of heart failure. Aging also impairs myocardial fatty acid oxidation, causing increased reliance on flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH to maintain function. We hypothesize that the metabolic changes in aged hearts make them less tolerant to acutely increased work and that thyroid hormone supplementation reverses these defects.Studies were performed on young (Young, 4-6 months and aged (Old, 22-24 months C57/BL6 mice at standard (50 mmHg and high afterload (80 mmHg. Another aged group received thyroid hormone for 3 weeks (Old-TH, high afterload only. Function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions (Fc to the citric acid cycle (CAC using perfusate with (13C labeled lactate, pyruvate, glucose and unlabeled palmitate and insulin.Old mice maintained cardiac function under standard workload conditions, despite a marked decrease in unlabeled (presumably palmitate Fc and relatively similar individual carbohydrate contributions. However, old mice exhibited reduced palmitate oxidation with diastolic dysfunction exemplified by lower -dP/dT. Thyroid hormone abrogated the functional and substrate flux abnormalities in aged mice.The aged heart shows diminished ability to increase cardiac work due to substrate limitations, primarily impaired fatty acid oxidation. The heart accommodates slightly by increasing efficiency through oxidation of carbohydrate substrates. Thyroid hormone supplementation in aged mice significantly improves cardiac function potentially through restoration of fatty acid oxidation.

  7. Defects in muscle branched-chain amino acid oxidation contribute to impaired lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerin, Carles; Goldfine, Allison B; Boes, Tanner; Liu, Manway; Kasif, Simon; Dreyfuss, Jonathan M; De Sousa-Coelho, Ana Luisa; Daher, Grace; Manoli, Irini; Sysol, Justin R; Isganaitis, Elvira; Jessen, Niels; Goodyear, Laurie J; Beebe, Kirk; Gall, Walt; Venditti, Charles P; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2016-10-01

    Plasma levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are consistently elevated in obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) and can also prospectively predict T2D. However, the role of BCAA in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and T2D remains unclear. To identify pathways related to insulin resistance, we performed comprehensive gene expression and metabolomics analyses in skeletal muscle from 41 humans with normal glucose tolerance and 11 with T2D across a range of insulin sensitivity (SI, 0.49 to 14.28). We studied both cultured cells and mice heterozygous for the BCAA enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (Mut) and assessed the effects of altered BCAA flux on lipid and glucose homeostasis. Our data demonstrate perturbed BCAA metabolism and fatty acid oxidation in muscle from insulin resistant humans. Experimental alterations in BCAA flux in cultured cells similarly modulate fatty acid oxidation. Mut heterozygosity in mice alters muscle lipid metabolism in vivo, resulting in increased muscle triglyceride accumulation, increased plasma glucose, hyperinsulinemia, and increased body weight after high-fat feeding. Our data indicate that impaired muscle BCAA catabolism may contribute to the development of insulin resistance by perturbing both amino acid and fatty acid metabolism and suggest that targeting BCAA metabolism may hold promise for prevention or treatment of T2D.

  8. THYROID HORMONE REVERSES AGING-INDUCED MYOCARDIAL FATTY ACID OXIDATION DEFECTS AND IMPROVES THE RESPONSE TO ACUTELY INCREASED AFTERLOAD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledee, Dolena; Portman, Michael A.; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron

    2013-06-07

    Background: Subclinical hypothyroidism occurs during aging in humans and mice and may contribute to development of heart failure. Aging also impairs myocardial fatty acid oxidation, causing increased reliance on flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) to maintain function. We hypothesize that the metabolic changes in aged hearts make them less tolerant to acutely increased work and that thyroid hormone reverses these defects. Methods: Studies were performed on young (Young, 4-6 months) and aged (Old, 22-24 months) C57/BL6 mice at standard (50 mmHg) and high afterload (80 mmHg). Another aged group received thyroid hormone for 3 weeks (Old-TH, high afterload only). Function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle (CAC) using perfusate with 13C labeled lactate, pyruvate, glucose and unlabeled palmitate and insulin. Results: Cardiac function was similar between Young and Old mice at standard afterload. Palmitate Fc was reduced but no individual carbohydrate contributions differed. CAC and individual substrate fluxes decreased in aged. At high afterload, -dP/dT was decreased in Old versus Young. Similar to low afterload, palmitate Fc was decreased in Old. Thyroid hormone reversed aging-induced changes in palmitate Fc and flux while significantly improving cardiac function. Conclusion: The aged heart shows diminished ability to increase cardiac work due to substrate limitations, primarily impaired fatty acid oxidation. The heart accommodates slightly by increasing efficiency through oxidation of carbohydrate substrates. Thyroid hormone supplementation in aged mice significantly improves cardiac function potentially through restoration of fatty acid oxidation.

  9. Defects in muscle branched-chain amino acid oxidation contribute to impaired lipid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles Lerin

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: Our data indicate that impaired muscle BCAA catabolism may contribute to the development of insulin resistance by perturbing both amino acid and fatty acid metabolism and suggest that targeting BCAA metabolism may hold promise for prevention or treatment of T2D.

  10. Atomistic stimulation of defective oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Minervini, L

    2000-01-01

    defect processes. The predominant intrinsic disorder reaction and the mechanism by which excess oxygen is accommodated are established. Furthermore, the most favourable migration mechanism and pathway for oxygen ions is predicted. Chapters 7 and 8 investigate pyrochlore oxides. These materials are candidates for solid oxide fuel cell components and as actinide host phases. Such applications require a detailed understanding of the defect processes. The defect energies, displayed as contour maps, are able to account for structure stability and, given an appropriate partial charge potential model, to accurately determine the oxygen positional parameter. In particular, the dependence of the positional parameter on intrinsic disorder is predicted. It is demonstrated, by radiation damage experiments, that these results are able to predict the radiation performance of pyrochlore oxides. Atomistic simulation calculations based on energy minimization techniques and classical pair potentials are used to study several i...

  11. Genetic defects in fatty acid beta-oxidation and acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. Molecular pathogenesis and genotype-phenotype relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Bross, Peter; Andresen, Brage S

    2004-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation deficiencies are due to genetic defects in enzymes of fatty acid beta-oxidation and transport proteins. Genetic defects have been identified in most of the genes where nearly all types of sequence variations (mutation types) have been associated with disease......, stability and kinetic properties for this variant enzyme will be discussed in detail and used as a paradigm for the study of other mis-sense variant proteins. We conclude that the total effect of mis-sense sequence variations may comprise an invariable--sequence variation specific--effect on the catalytic......-sense sequence variations are prevalent in these diseases, we will discuss the implications of these types of sequence variations on the processing and folding of mis-sense variant proteins. As the prevalent mis-sense variant K304E MCAD protein has been studied intensively, the investigations on biogenesis...

  12. Heterologous expression of human carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II in yeast: A model for the molecular analysis of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavadini, P.; Invernizzi, F.; Baratta, S. [Istituto Nazionale Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milano (Italy)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The CPT enzyme system, which is composed of two distinct mitochondrial membrane-bound proteins (CPT I and CPT II), provides the mechanism whereby long-chain fatty acids are transferred from the cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix to undergo {beta}-oxidation. Here, we report the development of an expression system for investigating genotype/phenotype correlations in CPT II deficiency and, potentially, other mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation defects. To explore yeast as an expression system, we introduced a cDNA encoding the entire human CPT II precursor into Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression was programmed by using an inducible galactose operon promoter (GAL1). Following induction, human CPT II was expressed at high levels, with activity 4- to 16-fold greater than in human fibroblasts. Levels of expression paralleled those of respiration, being higher in cells grown on a nonfermentable carbon source than in those grown on glucose. Immunoprecipitation of pulse-labeled transformed cells demonstrated that human CPT II expressed in yeast was targeted to mitochondria with correct proteolytic processing of its 25-residue mitochondrial leader sequence. Preliminary results on the expression of a number of mutant CPT II alleles associated with different clinical phenotypes demonstrated the value of this system for examining the functional consequences of disease-causing mutations and investigating genotype/phenotype correlations in patients with CPT II deficiency.

  13. Neural Tube Defects, Folic Acid and Methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Blom, Henk J.

    2013-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common complex congenital malformations resulting from failure of the neural tube closure during embryogenesis. It is established that folic acid supplementation decreases the prevalence of NTDs, which has led to national public health policies regarding folic acid. To date, animal studies have not provided sufficient information to establish the metabolic and/or genomic mechanism(s) underlying human folic acid responsiveness in NTDs. However, several lines of evidence suggest that not only folates but also choline, B12 and methylation metabolisms are involved in NTDs. Decreased B12 vitamin and increased total choline or homocysteine in maternal blood have been shown to be associated with increased NTDs risk. Several polymorphisms of genes involved in these pathways have also been implicated in risk of development of NTDs. This raises the question whether supplementation with B12 vitamin, betaine or other methylation donors in addition to folic acid periconceptional supplementation will further reduce NTD risk. The objective of this article is to review the role of methylation metabolism in the onset of neural tube defects. PMID:24048206

  14. Neural Tube Defects, Folic Acid and Methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk J. Blom

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs are common complex congenital malformations resulting from failure of the neural tube closure during embryogenesis. It is established that folic acid supplementation decreases the prevalence of NTDs, which has led to national public health policies regarding folic acid. To date, animal studies have not provided sufficient information to establish the metabolic and/or genomic mechanism(s underlying human folic acid responsiveness in NTDs. However, several lines of evidence suggest that not only folates but also choline, B12 and methylation metabolisms are involved in NTDs. Decreased B12 vitamin and increased total choline or homocysteine in maternal blood have been shown to be associated with increased NTDs risk. Several polymorphisms of genes involved in these pathways have also been implicated in risk of development of NTDs. This raises the question whether supplementation with B12 vitamin, betaine or other methylation donors in addition to folic acid periconceptional supplementation will further reduce NTD risk. The objective of this article is to review the role of methylation metabolism in the onset of neural tube defects.

  15. (VI) oxide in acetic acid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The oxidation of cyclohexene by chromium (VI) oxide in aqueous and acetic media was studied. The reaction products were analysed using infra red (IR) and gas chromatography coupled with mass (GC/MS) spectroscopy. The major products of the oxidation reaction in acetic acid medium were cyclohexanol, ...

  16. Defects and oxidation resilience in InSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, K. J.; Carvalho, A.; Castro Neto, A. H.

    2017-08-01

    We use density functional theory to study intrinsic defects and oxygen related defects in indium selenide. We find that InSe is prone to oxidation, but however not reacting with oxygen as strongly as phosphorene. The dominant intrinsic defects in In-rich material are the In interstitial, a shallow donor, and the Se vacancy, which introduces deep traps. The latter can be passivated by oxygen, which is isoelectronic with Se. The dominant intrinsic defects in Se-rich material have comparatively higher formation energies.

  17. Amino acids interacting with defected carbon nanotubes: ab initio calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Darvish Ganji

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of a number of amino acids on a defected single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT is investigated by using the density-functional theory (DFT calculations. The adsorption energies and equilibrium distances are calculated for various configurations such as amino acid attaching to defect sites heptagon, pentagon and hexagon in defective tube and also for several molecular orientations with respect to the nanotube surface. The results showed that amino acids prefer to be physisorbed on the outer surface of the defected nanotube with different interaction strength following the hierarchy histidine > glycine > phenylalanine > cysteine. Comparing these findings with those obtained for perfect SWCNTs reveals that the adsorption energy of the amino acids increase for adsorption onto defected CNTs. The adsorption nature has also been evaluated by means of electronics structures analysis within the Mulliken population and DOS spectra for the interacting entities.

  18. Oxide-based protonic conductors: Point defects and transport properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonanos, N.

    2001-01-01

    , hydrogen pumps, fuel cells, etc. The extent to which protonic defects form depends mainly on the partial pressure of water vapour, temperature and basicity of the constituent oxides, while their mobility depends, among other factors, on the metal-oxygen bond length and bond energy. The defect equilibria......A variety of oxides doped with elements of lower valence acquire hydroxyl-type defects when exposed, at high temperature, to atmospheres containing water vapour. Since the hydrogen of the hydroxyl groups is mobile, the oxides display protonic conductivity and may be used as electrolytes in sensors...... that determine the protonic concentrations are considered, with emphasis on the regime of low oxygen partial pressure. The measurement of the thermoelectric power (TEP) and of the H+/D+ isotope effect in conductivity are discussed as a means of characterising the conduction process. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B...

  19. Evaluation of defects in cuprous oxide through exciton luminescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazer, Laszlo, E-mail: jl@laszlofrazer.com [Department of Physics, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Lenferink, Erik J. [Department of Physics, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Chang, Kelvin B. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Stern, Nathaniel P. [Department of Physics, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Ketterson, John B. [Department of Physics, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The various decay mechanisms of excitons in cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) are highly sensitive to defects which can relax selection rules. Here we report cryogenic hyperspectral imaging of exciton luminescence from cuprous oxide crystals grown via the floating zone method showing that the samples have few defects. Some locations, however, show strain splitting of the 1s orthoexciton triplet polariton luminescence. Strain is reduced by annealing. In addition, annealing causes annihilation of oxygen and copper vacancies, which leads to a negative correlation between luminescence of unlike vacancies. - Highlights: • We use luminescence to observe defects in high quality cuprous oxide crystals. • Strain is reduced by annealing. • Annealing causes annihilation of oxygen and copper vacancies.

  20. Defect driven tailoring of colossal dielectricity of Reduced Graphene Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, S.; Mondal, A. [Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Dey, K. [Department of Solid State Physics, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Ray, R., E-mail: juphyruma@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Reduced graphene oxides (RGO) are prepared by two chemical routes. • Defects in RGO are characterized by Raman, FTIR and XPS studies. • Defects tailor colossal dielectricity in RGO. - Abstract: Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) is prepared in two different chemical routes where reduction of graphene oxide is performed by hydrazine hydrate and through high pressure in hydrothermal reactor. Samples are characterized by X-ray powdered diffraction (XRD), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and tunneling electron microscopy (TEM). Types of defects are probed by Raman, FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). UV–vis absorption reveals different optical band gaps of the two RGOs. Conductivity mechanism is studied through I–V measurements displaying different characteristic features which are addressed due to the presence of defects appeared in different synthesis. Significantly high value (∼10{sup 4}) of dielectric permittivity at 10 MHz is attractive for technological application which could be tuned by the defects present in RGO.

  1. Current issues regarding treatment of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiekerkoetter, Ute; Bastin, Jean; Gillingham, Melanie; Morris, Andrew; Wijburg, Frits; Wilcken, Bridget

    2010-01-01

    Treatment recommendations in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO) defects are diverse. With implementation of newborn screening and identification of asymptomatic patients, it is necessary to define whom to treat and how strictly. We here discuss critical questions that are currently under

  2. [Folic acid: Primary prevention of neural tube defects. Literature Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamas Centeno, M J; Miguélez Lago, C

    2016-03-01

    Neural tube defects (NTD) are the most common congenital malformations of the nervous system, they have a multifactorial etiology, are caused by exposure to chemical, physical or biological toxic agents, factors deficiency, diabetes, obesity, hyperthermia, genetic alterations and unknown causes. Some of these factors are associated with malnutrition by interfering with the folic acid metabolic pathway, the vitamin responsible for neural tube closure. Its deficit produce anomalies that can cause abortions, stillbirths or newborn serious injuries that cause disability, impaired quality of life and require expensive treatments to try to alleviate in some way the alterations produced in the embryo. Folic acid deficiency is considered the ultimate cause of the production of neural tube defects, it is clear the reduction in the incidence of Espina Bifida after administration of folic acid before conception, this leads us to want to further study the action of folic acid and its application in the primary prevention of neural tube defects. More than 40 countries have made the fortification of flour with folate, achieving encouraging data of decrease in the prevalence of neural tube defects. This paper attempts to make a literature review, which clarify the current situation and future of the prevention of neural tube defects.

  3. Defects and properties of cadmium oxide based transparent conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Kin Man, E-mail: kinmanyu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Detert, D. M.; Dubon, O. D. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chen, Guibin [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physics Department and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Chemistry of Low Dimensional Materials, Huaiyin Normal University, Jiangsu 223300 (China); Zhu, Wei [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics and The Center for Physical Experiments, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Liu, Chaoping [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Grankowska, S. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Institute of Experimental Physics (IEP UW), Warsaw University, Warsaw (Poland); Hsu, L. [Department of Postsecondary Teaching and Learning, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Walukiewicz, Wladek [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-14

    Transparent conductors play an increasingly important role in a number of semiconductor technologies. This paper reports on the defects and properties of Cadmium Oxide, a transparent conducting oxide which can be potentially used for full spectrum photovoltaics. We carried out a systematic investigation on the effects of defects in CdO thin films undoped and intentionally doped with In and Ga under different deposition and annealing conditions. We found that at low growth temperatures (<200 °C), sputter deposition tends to trap both oxygen vacancies and compensating defects in the CdO film resulting in materials with high electron concentration of ∼2 × 10{sup 20}/cm{sup 3} and mobility in the range of 40–100 cm{sup 2}/V s. Thermal annealing experiments in different ambients revealed that the dominating defects in sputtered CdO films are oxygen vacancies. Oxygen rich CdO films grown by sputtering with increasing O{sub 2} partial pressure in the sputter gas mixture results in films with resistivity from ∼4 × 10{sup −4} to >1 Ω cm due to incorporation of excess O in the form of O-related acceptor defects, likely to be O interstitials. Intentional doping with In and Ga donors leads to an increase of both the electron concentration and the mobility. With proper doping CdO films with electron concentration of more than 10{sup 21 }cm{sup −3} and electron mobility higher than 120 cm{sup 2}/V s can be achieved. Thermal annealing of doped CdO films in N{sub 2} ambient can further improve the electrical properties by removing native acceptors and improving film crystallinity. Furthermore, the unique doping behavior and electrical properties of CdO were explored via simulations based on the amphoteric defect model. A comparison of the calculations and experimental results show that the formation energy of native donors and acceptors at the Fermi stabilization energy is ∼1 eV and that the mobility of sputtered deposited CdO is limited

  4. Neuropsychological Outcomes in Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders: 85 Cases Detected by Newborn Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisbren, Susan E.; Landau, Yuval; Wilson, Jenna; Vockley, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation disorders include conditions in which the transport of activated acyl-Coenzyme A (CoA) into the mitochondria or utilization of these substrates is disrupted or blocked. This results in a deficit in the conversion of fat into energy. Most patients with fatty acid oxidation defects are now identified through…

  5. Defect Engineering and Interface Phenomena in Tin Oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Albar, Arwa

    2017-04-05

    The advance in transparent electronics requires high-performance transparent conducting oxide materials. The microscopic properties of these materials are sensitive to the presence of defects and interfaces and thus fundamental understanding is required for materials engineering. In this thesis, first principles density functional theory is used to investigate the possibility of tuning the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of tin oxide by means of defects and interfaces. Our aim is to reveal unique properties and the parameters to control them as well as to explain the origin of unique phenomena in oxide materials. The stability of native defect in tin monoxide (SnO) under strain is investigated using formation energy calculations. We find that the conductivity (which is controlled by native defects) can be switched from p-type to either n-type or undoped semiconducting by means of applied pressure. We then target inducing magnetism in SnO by 3d transition metal doping. We propose that V doping is efficient to realize spin polarization at high temperature. We discuss different tin oxide interfaces. Metallic states are found to form at the SnO/SnO2 interface with electronic properties that depend on the interface terminations. The origin of these states is explained in terms of charge transfer caused by chemical bonding and band alignment. For the SnO/SnO2 heterostructure, we observe the formation of a two dimensional hole gas at the interface, which is surprising as it cannot be explained by the standard polar catastrophe model. Thus, we propose a charge density discontinuity model to explain our results. The model can be generalized to other polar-polar interfaces. Motivated by technological applications, the electronic and structural properties of the MgO (100)/SnO2 (110) interface are investigated. Depending on the interface termination, we observe the formation of a two dimensional electron gas or spin polarized hole gas. Aiming to identify further

  6. Radiation induced defects and thermoluminescence mechanism in aluminum oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atobe, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Awata, T. [Naruto Univ. of Education, Tokushima (Japan); Okada, M. [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst; Nakagawa, M. [Kagawa Univ., Faculty of Education, Takamatsu, Kagawa (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    The thermoluminescence of the irradiated aluminum oxides were measured to study the radiation induced defects and their behaviors. Neutron and {gamma}-ray irradiation were performed for a shingle crystal of the high purity aluminum oxide. The thermoluminescence glow curve and its activation energy were measured. The spectroscopy measurement on the thermoluminescence and the absorption are also carried out. The observed 430 and 340 nm peaks are discussed relating to the F{sup +} and F centers, respectively. Activation state of the F center transits to 3P state through 1P state by emitting phonons. Trapped electron on 3P state emits phonon of 2.9 eV (430 nm) during transition to the ground state. The above reaction can be written by the equation. F{sup +} + e {yields} (F){sup *} {yields} F + h{nu}(2.9 eV, 470 nm). (Katsuta, H.)

  7. Defect-induced selective oxidation of graphene: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Yu-heng [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002 (China); Lu, Peng-fei [School of Hydraulic, Energy and Power Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, 225127 (China); Wang, Jian, E-mail: phcwj@hotmail.com [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002 (China); Yang, Jin-peng [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002 (China); Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, Chiba, 263-8522 (Japan); Chen, Yong-ping, E-mail: chenyp@yzu.edu.cn [School of Hydraulic, Energy and Power Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, 225127 (China); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Suzhou University of Science and Technology, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215009 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • The oxidizing agent MnO{sub 4} first attacks the defective sites in carbon lattices. • The oxidation process will be easily extended to elsewhere from the defects. • The most preferential reaction locus is identified at the center of the Stone-Wales defect structure. • The preexistence of hydroxyl functional group can substantially decrease energy barrier for oxidization. - Abstract: Controlled oxidation of graphene is extremely important for nanopatterning and chemical functionalization. It is generally assumed in experiments that the oxidizing agent in the liquid-phase oxidation first attacks the defective sites in carbon lattices. To explore how the oxidation in the graphene sheet first begins, we have investigated the oxidization process with the structural defect using the density functional theory. Ten reaction pathways in the frame of the transition state theory are considered. We find that the most preferential reaction locus is located at the center of defect. It has also been observed that the preexistence of hydroxyl functional group on the graphene surface substantially decrease energy barrier for oxidization. Such facilitation of oxidation due to hydroxyl can explain how the oxidation process continues after its first oxidation around defects. The uneven redistributions of electron density caused both by defect and by the hydroxyl functional group account for the mechanism of the oxidization process on graphene sheet. Our calculation fully verifies the experimental assumption and is consistent with the recent experimental observations.

  8. Oxidative Decarboxylation of Levulinic Acid by Cupric Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Lin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, cupric oxides was found to effectively oxidize levulinic acid (LA and lead to the decarboxylation of levulinic acid to 2-butanone. The effects of cupric oxide dosage, reaction time and initial pH value were investigated in batch experiments and a plausible mechanism was proposed. The results showed that LA decarboxylation over cupric oxides at around 300 °C under acidic conditions produced the highest yield of butanone (67.5%. In order to elucidate the catalytic activity of cupric oxides, XRD, AFM, XPS and H2-TPR techniques was applied to examine their molecular surfaces and their effects on the reaction process.

  9. Controlled Defects of Zinc Oxide Nanorods for Efficient Visible Light Photocatalytic Degradation of Phenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Al-Sabahi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Environmental pollution from human and industrial activities has received much attention as it adversely affects human health and bio-diversity. In this work we report efficient visible light photocatalytic degradation of phenol using supported zinc oxide (ZnO nanorods and explore the role of surface defects in ZnO on the visible light photocatalytic activity. ZnO nanorods were synthesized on glass substrates using a microwave-assisted hydrothermal process, while the surface defect states were controlled by annealing the nanorods at various temperatures and were characterized by photoluminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC was used for the evaluation of phenol photocatalytic degradation. ZnO nanorods with high surface defects exhibited maximum visible light photocatalytic activity, showing 50% degradation of 10 ppm phenol aqueous solution within 2.5 h, with a degradation rate almost four times higher than that of nanorods with lower surface defects. The mineralization process of phenol during degradation was also investigated, and it showed the evolution of different photocatalytic byproducts, such as benzoquinone, catechol, resorcinol and carboxylic acids, at different stages. The results from this study suggest that the presence of surface defects in ZnO nanorods is crucial for its efficient visible light photocatalytic activity, which is otherwise only active in the ultraviolet region.

  10. Controlled Defects of Zinc Oxide Nanorods for Efficient Visible Light Photocatalytic Degradation of Phenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sabahi, Jamal; Bora, Tanujjal; Al-Abri, Mohammed; Dutta, Joydeep

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollution from human and industrial activities has received much attention as it adversely affects human health and bio-diversity. In this work we report efficient visible light photocatalytic degradation of phenol using supported zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods and explore the role of surface defects in ZnO on the visible light photocatalytic activity. ZnO nanorods were synthesized on glass substrates using a microwave-assisted hydrothermal process, while the surface defect states were controlled by annealing the nanorods at various temperatures and were characterized by photoluminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used for the evaluation of phenol photocatalytic degradation. ZnO nanorods with high surface defects exhibited maximum visible light photocatalytic activity, showing 50% degradation of 10 ppm phenol aqueous solution within 2.5 h, with a degradation rate almost four times higher than that of nanorods with lower surface defects. The mineralization process of phenol during degradation was also investigated, and it showed the evolution of different photocatalytic byproducts, such as benzoquinone, catechol, resorcinol and carboxylic acids, at different stages. The results from this study suggest that the presence of surface defects in ZnO nanorods is crucial for its efficient visible light photocatalytic activity, which is otherwise only active in the ultraviolet region. PMID:28773363

  11. Off-stoichiometric defect clustering in irradiated oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Sarah; Allen, Todd; EL-Azab, Anter

    2017-04-01

    A cluster dynamics model describing the formation of vacancy and interstitial clusters in irradiated oxides has been developed. The model, which tracks the composition of the oxide matrix and the defect clusters, was applied to the early stage formation of voids and dislocation loops in UO2, and the effects of irradiation temperature and dose rate on the evolution of their densities and composition was investigated. The results show that Frenkel defects dominate the nucleation process in irradiated UO2. The results also show that oxygen vacancies drive vacancy clustering while the migration energy of uranium vacancies is a rate-limiting factor for the nucleation and growth of voids. In a stoichiometric UO2 under irradiation, off-stoichiometric vacancy clusters exist with a higher concentration of hyper-stoichiometric clusters. Similarly, off-stoichiometric interstitial clusters form with a higher concentration of hyper-stoichiometric clusters. The UO2 matrix was found to be hyper-stoichiometric due to the accumulation of uranium vacancies.

  12. Selection and Characterization of Palmitic Acid Responsive Patients with an OXPHOS Complex I Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom E. J. Theunissen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial disorders are genetically and clinically heterogeneous, mainly affecting high energy-demanding organs due to impaired oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. Currently, effective treatments for OXPHOS defects, with complex I deficiency being the most prevalent, are not available. Yet, clinical practice has shown that some complex I deficient patients benefit from a high-fat or ketogenic diet, but it is unclear how these therapeutic diets influence mitochondrial function and more importantly, which complex I patients could benefit from such treatment. Dietary studies in a complex I deficient patient with exercise intolerance showed increased muscle endurance on a high-fat diet compared to a high-carbohydrate diet. We performed whole-exome sequencing to characterize the genetic defect. A pathogenic homozygous p.G212V missense mutation was identified in the TMEM126B gene, encoding an early assembly factor of complex I. A complementation study in fibroblasts confirmed that the p.G212V mutation caused the complex I deficiency. The mechanism turned out to be an incomplete assembly of the peripheral arm of complex I, leading to a decrease in the amount of mature complex I. The patient clinically improved on a high-fat diet, which was supported by the 25% increase in maximal OXPHOS capacity in TMEM126B defective fibroblast by the saturated fatty acid palmitic acid, whereas oleic acid did not have any effect in those fibroblasts. Fibroblasts of other patients with a characterized complex I gene defect were tested in the same way. Patient fibroblasts with complex I defects in NDUFS7 and NDUFAF5 responded to palmitic acid, whereas ACAD9, NDUFA12, and NDUFV2 defects were non-responding. Although the data are too limited to draw a definite conclusion on the mechanism, there is a tendency that protein defects involved in early assembly complexes, improve with palmitic acid, whereas proteins defects involved in late assembly, do not. Our data show at

  13. Zebrafish retinal defects induced by ethanol exposure are rescued by retinoic acid and folic acid supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Pooja; Sarmah, Swapnalee; Marrs, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is caused by prenatal alcohol exposure, producing craniofacial, sensory, motor, and cognitive defects. FASD is highly prevalent in low socioeconomic populations, which are frequently accompanied by malnutrition. FASD-associated ocular pathologies include microphthalmia, optic nerve hypoplasia, and cataracts. The present study characterizes specific retinal tissue defects, identifies ethanol-sensitive stages during retinal development, and dissects the effect of nutrient supplements, such as retinoic acid (RA) and folic acid (FA) on ethanol-induced retinal defects. Exposure to pathophysiological concentrations of ethanol (during midblastula transition through somitogenesis; 2–24 hours post fertilization [hpf]) altered critical transcription factor expression involved in retinal cell differentiation, and produced severe retinal ganglion cell, photoreceptor, and Müller glial differentiation defects. Ethanol exposure did not alter retinal cell differentiation induction, but increased retinal cell death and proliferation. RA and FA nutrient co-supplementation rescued retinal photoreceptor and ganglion cell differentiation defects. Ethanol exposure during retinal morphogenesis stages (16–24 hpf) produced retinal defects like those seen with ethanol exposure between 2–24 hpf. Significantly, during an ethanol-sensitive time window (16–24 hpf), RA co-supplementation moderately rescued these defects, whereas FA co-supplementation showed significant rescue of optic nerve and photoreceptor differentiation defects. Interestingly, RA, but not FA, supplementation after ethanol exposure could reverse ethanol-induced optic nerve and photoreceptor differentiation defects. Our results indicate that various ethanol-sensitive events underlie FASD-associated retinal defects. Nutrient supplements like retinoids and folate were effective in alleviating ethanol-induced retinal defects. PMID:25541501

  14. Control of bovine hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesse, B.W.; Emery, R.S.; Thomas, J.W.

    1986-09-01

    Fatty acid oxidation by bovine liver slices and mitochondria was examined to determine potential regulatory sites of fatty acid oxidation. Conversion of 1-(/sup 14/C)palmitate to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and total (/sup 14/C)acid-soluble metabolites was used to measure fatty acid oxidation. Oxidation of palmitate (1 mM) was linear in both liver slice weight and incubation time. Carnitine stimulated palmitate oxidation; 2 mM dl-carnitine produced maximal stimulation of palmitate oxidation to both CO/sup 2/ and acid-soluble metabolites. Propionate (10 mM) inhibited palmitate oxidation by bovine liver slices. Propionate (.5 to 10 mM) had no effect on palmitate oxidation by mitochondria, but malonyl Coenzyme A, the first committed intermediate of fatty acid synthesis, inhibited mitochondrial palmitate oxidation (inhibition constant = .3 ..mu..M). Liver mitochonndrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase exhibited Michaelis constants for palmitoyl Coenzyme A and l-carnitine of 11.5 ..mu..M and .59 mM, respectively. Long-chain fatty acid oxidation in bovine liver is regulated by mechanisms similar to those in rats but adapted to the unique digestive physiology of the bovine.

  15. Defects in mitochondrial and peroxisomal β-oxidation influence virulence in the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, Matthias; Klose, Jana; Kronstad, James W

    2012-08-01

    An understanding of metabolic adaptation during the colonization of plants by phytopathogenic fungi is critical for developing strategies to protect crops. Lipids are abundant in plant tissues, and fungal phytopathogens in the phylum basidiomycota possess both peroxisomal and mitochondrial β-oxidation pathways to utilize this potential carbon source. Previously, we demonstrated a role for the peroxisomal β-oxidation enzyme Mfe2 in the filamentous growth, virulence, and sporulation of the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis. However, mfe2 mutants still caused disease symptoms, thus prompting a more detailed investigation of β-oxidation. We now demonstrate that a defect in the had1 gene encoding hydroxyacyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase for mitochondrial β-oxidation also influences virulence, although its paralog, had2, makes only a minor contribution. Additionally, we identified a gene encoding a polypeptide with similarity to the C terminus of Mfe2 and designated it Mfe2b; this gene makes a contribution to virulence only in the background of an mfe2Δ mutant. We also show that short-chain fatty acids induce cell death in U. maydis and that a block in β-oxidation leads to toxicity, likely because of the accumulation of toxic intermediates. Overall, this study reveals that β-oxidation has a complex influence on the formation of disease symptoms by U. maydis that includes potential metabolic contributions to proliferation in planta and an effect on virulence-related morphogenesis.

  16. Effects of nanoscale morphology and defects in oxide: optoelectronic functions of zinc oxide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Tadaaki; Duy Dao, Thang; Sugavaneshwar, R. P.; Chen, Kai; Nanda, K. K.

    2016-02-01

    Oxide nanomaterials have been attracting growing interest for both fundamental research and industrial applications ranging from gas sensors, light-emitting devices, to photocatalysts, and solar cells. The optical and electronic properties of oxide nanomaterials are strongly dependent on their surface morphologies as well as defects, such as surface areas, aspect ratios, foreign atom impurities, and oxygen vacancies. In this review, we describe some examples of our recent contributions to the nanomaterials and devices that exhibit remarkable functionalities based on one-dimensional nanostructures of ZnO and their hetero junctions as well as their variants with appropriately incorporated dopants.

  17. Folate Deficiency and Folic Acid Supplementation: The Prevention of Neural-Tube Defects and Congenital Heart Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew E. Czeizel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Diet, particularly vitamin deficiency, is associated with the risk of birth defects. The aim of this review paper is to show the characteristics of common and severe neural-tube defects together with congenital heart defects (CHD as vitamin deficiencies play a role in their origin. The findings of the Hungarian intervention (randomized double-blind and cohort controlled trials indicated that periconceptional folic acid (FA-containing multivitamin supplementation prevented the major proportion (about 90% of neural-tube defects (NTD as well as a certain proportion (about 40% of congenital heart defects. Finally the benefits and drawbacks of three main practical applications of folic acid/multivitamin treatment such as (i dietary intake; (ii periconceptional supplementation; and (iii flour fortification are discussed. The conclusion arrived at is indeed confirmation of Benjamin Franklin’s statement: “An ounce of prevention is better than a pound of care”.

  18. Kinetics of oxidation of acidic amino acids by sodium N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Keywords. Acidic amino acids; bromamine-B; oxidation kinetics, acid medium. 1. Introduction. The chemistry of aromatic sulphonyl haloamines has evoked considerable interest, as they are sources of halonium cations, hypohalite species, and N-anions which act both as bases and nucleophiles. The prominent members of ...

  19. Kinetics of oxidation of acidic amino acids by sodium N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 113; Issue 4. Kinetics of oxidation of acidic amino acids by sodium N-bromobenzenesulphonamide in acid medium: A mechanistic approach ... Department of Post-Graduate Studies in Chemistry, Central College, Bangalore University, Bangalore 560 001, India ...

  20. The Arabidopsis male-sterile mutant dde2-2 is defective in the ALLENE OXIDE SYNTHASE gene encoding one of the key enzymes of the jasmonic acid biosynthesis pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Malek, Bernadette; van der Graaff, Eric; Schneitz, Kay

    2002-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. mutant delayed-dehiscence2-2 (dde2-2) was identified in an En1/Spm1 transposon-induced mutant population screened for plants showing defects in fertility. The dde2-2 mutant allele is defective in the anther dehiscence process and filament elongation and thus e...

  1. Fatty acid omega-oxidation as a rescue pathway for fatty acid oxidation disorders in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Komen, Jasper; Kemp, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) can be degraded via different mechanisms including alpha-, beta- and omega-oxidation. In humans, a range of different genetic diseases has been identified in which either mitochondrial FA beta-oxidation, peroxisomal FA beta-oxidation or FA alpha-oxidation is impaired. Treatment

  2. Characterizing the geometric and electronic structure of defects in the "29" copper surface oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therrien, Andrew J.; Hensley, Alyssa J. R.; Zhang, Renqin; Pronschinske, Alex; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2017-12-01

    The geometric and electronic structural characterization of thin film metal oxides is of fundamental importance to many fields such as catalysis, photovoltaics, and electrochemistry. Surface defects are also well known to impact a material's performance in any such applications. Here, we focus on the "29" oxide Cu2O/Cu(111) surface and we observe two common structural defects which we characterize using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and density functional theory. The defects are proposed to be O vacancies and Cu adatoms, which both show unique topographic and spectroscopic signatures. The spatially resolved electronic and charge state effects of the defects are investigated, and implications for their reactivity are given.

  3. Wet oxidation of salicylic acid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Sergio; Garrido, Laura; Laca, Adriana; Diaz, Mario

    2010-11-15

    Salicylic acid is a frequent pollutant in several industrial wastewaters. Uncatalyzed wet air oxidation, which is a promising technique for the treatment of phenolic effluents, has not been analyzed yet for the removal of salicylic acid. The effect of different conditions of pH (1.3-12.3), pressure (1.0-4.1 MPa), temperature (413-443 K), and initial concentrations (1.45-14.50 mM) on the wet oxidation of salicylate/salicylic acid solutions have here been investigated. The pH value of the reaction media was found to be a key parameter for the rate of the oxidation process with an optimum at pH 3.1, when the concentrations of salicylic acid and salicylate were similar. The oxidation reaction followed pseudofirst-order kinetics with respect to salicylic acid and 0.82 order with respect to dissolved oxygen. Additionally, the evolution of the color during the wet oxidation was analyzed and discussed in relation with the formation of intermediate compounds. Then, a reaction pathway for the noncatalytic wet oxidation of the salicylic acid was proposed.

  4. Oxidation of phenolic acids by soil iron and manganese oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, R.G.; Cheng, H.H.; Harsh, J.B.

    Phenolic acids are intermediary metabolites of many aromatic chemicals and may be involved in humus formation, allelopathy, and nutrient availability. Depending on their structures, six phenolic acids were shown to react at different rates with oxidized forms of Fe and Mn in a Palouse soil (fine-silty, mixed, mesic Pachic Ultic Haploxeroll). Increasing methoxy substitution on the aromatic ring of phenolic acids increased the reaction rate. Reaction rate was also increased for longer carboxyl-containing side chains. After 4 h reaction, little of the applied (10 mg kg/sup -1/ soil) p-hydroxybenzoic or p-coumaric acids had reacted, while 0 to 5, 70, 90, and 100% of the vanillic, ferulic, syringic, and sinapic acids, respectively, had reacted. After 72 h under conditions limiting microbial growth, none of the p-hydroxybenzoic, 30% of the p-coumaric, and 50% of the vanillic acids had reacted. The reaction was shown to be predominantly chemical, and not biological, since phenolic acid extractabilities were similar for Palouse soil and for Palouse soil pretreated with LiOBr to remove organic matter. When the Palouse soil was pretreated with a sodium dithionite-citrate solution to remove Fe and Mn oxides, none of the phenolic acids reacted after 1 h. The reaction of sinapic acid with Palouse soil was shown to produce Fe(II) and soluble Mn as reaction products. The reaction of phenolic acids with soil was thus shown to be an oxidation of the phenolic acids, coupled with a reduction of soil Fe and Mn oxides.

  5. Prevention of Neural-Tube Defects with Periconceptional Folic Acid, Methylfolate, or Multivitamins?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Czeizel, Andrew E; Dudás, István; Paput, László; Bánhidy, Ferenc

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims: To review the main results of intervention trials which showed the efficacy of periconceptional folic acid-containing multivitamin and folic acid supplementation in the prevention of neural-tube defects (NTD...

  6. Fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis in astrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auestad, N.

    1988-01-01

    Astrocytes were derived from cortex of two-day-old rat brain and grown in primary culture to confluence. The metabolism of the fatty acids, octanoate and palmitate, to CO{sub 2} in oxidative respiration and to the formation of ketone bodies was examined by radiolabeled tracer methodology. The net production of acetoacetate was also determined by measurement of its mass. The enzymes in the ketogenic pathway were examined by measuring enzymic activity and/or by immunoblot analyses. Labeled CO{sub 2} and labeled ketone bodies were produced from the oxidation of fatty acids labeled at carboxy- and {omega}-terminal carbons, indicating that fatty acids were oxidized by {beta}-oxidation. The results from the radiolabeled tracer studies also indicated that a substantial proportion of the {omega}-terminal 4-carbon unit of the fatty acids bypassed the {beta}-ketothiolase step of the {beta}-oxidation pathway. The ({sup 14}C)acetoacetate formed from the (1-{sup 14}C)labeled fatty acids, obligated to pass through the acetyl-CoA pool, contained 50% of the label at carbon 3 and 50% at carbon 1. In contrast, the ({sup 14}C)acetoacetate formed from the ({omega}-1)labeled fatty acids contained 90% of the label at carbon 3 and 10% at carbon 1.

  7. Defect engineering of the electronic transport through cuprous oxide interlayers

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, Mohamed M.

    2016-06-03

    The electronic transport through Au–(Cu2O)n–Au junctions is investigated using first-principles calculations and the nonequilibrium Green’s function method. The effect of varying the thickness (i.e., n) is studied as well as that of point defects and anion substitution. For all Cu2O thicknesses the conductance is more enhanced by bulk-like (in contrast to near-interface) defects, with the exception of O vacancies and Cl substitutional defects. A similar transmission behavior results from Cu deficiency and N substitution, as well as from Cl substitution and N interstitials for thick Cu2O junctions. In agreement with recent experimental observations, it is found that N and Cl doping enhances the conductance. A Frenkel defect, i.e., a superposition of an O interstitial and O substitutional defect, leads to a remarkably high conductance. From the analysis of the defect formation energies, Cu vacancies are found to be particularly stable, in agreement with earlier experimental and theoretical work.

  8. The influence of initial defects on mechanical stress and deformation distribution in oxidized silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulinich O. A.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The near-surface silicon layers in silicon – dioxide silicon systems with modern methods of research are investigated. It is shown that these layers have compound structure and their parameters depend on oxidation and initial silicon parameters. It is shown the influence of initial defects on mechanical stress and deformation distribution in oxidized silicon.

  9. Neural tube defects in Costa Rica, 1987-2012: origins and development of birth defect surveillance and folic acid fortification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza-Argüello, María de la Paz; Umaña-Solís, Lila M; Azofeifa, Alejandro; Valencia, Diana; Flores, Alina L; Rodríguez-Aguilar, Sara; Alfaro-Calvo, Thelma; Mulinare, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Our aim was to provide a descriptive overview of how the birth defects surveillance and folic acid fortification programs were implemented in Costa Rica-through the establishment of the Registry Center for Congenital Anomalies (Centro de Registro de Enfermedades Congénitas-CREC), and fortification legislation mandates. We estimated the overall prevalence of neural tube defects (i.e., spina bifida, anencephaly and encephalocele) before and after fortification captured by CREC. Prevalence was calculated by dividing the total number of infants born with neural tube defects by the total number of live births in the country (1987-2012).A total of 1,170 newborns with neural tube defects were identified from 1987 to 2012 (1992-1995 data excluded); 628 were identified during the baseline pre-fortification period (1987-1991; 1996-1998); 191 during the fortification period (1999-2002); and 351 during the post-fortification time period (2003-2012). The overall prevalence of neural tube defects decreased from 9.8 per 10,000 live-births (95 % CI 9.1-10.5) for the pre-fortification period to 4.8 per 10,000 live births (95 % CI 4.3-5.3) for the post-fortification period. Results indicate a statistically significant (P Costa Rica. Costa Rica's experience can serve as an example for other countries seeking to develop and strengthen both their birth defects surveillance and fortification programs.

  10. Neural Tube Defects in Costa Rica, 1987–2012: Origins and Development of Birth Defect Surveillance and Folic Acid Fortification

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Paz Barboza-Argüello, María; Umaña-Solís, Lila M.; Azofeifa, Alejandro; Valencia, Diana; Flores, Alina L.; Rodríguez-Aguilar, Sara; Alfaro-Calvo, Thelma; Mulinare, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to provide a descriptive overview of how the birth defects surveillance and folic acid fortification programs were implemented in Costa Rica—through the establishment of the Registry Center for Congenital Anomalies (Centro de Registro de Enfermedades Congénitas—CREC), and fortification legislation mandates. We estimated the overall prevalence of neural tube defects (i.e., spina bifida, anencephaly and encephalocele) before and after fortification captured by CREC. Prevalence was calculated by dividing the total number of infants born with neural tube defects by the total number of live births in the country (1987–2012).A total of 1,170 newborns with neural tube defects were identified from 1987 to 2012 (1992–1995 data excluded); 628 were identified during the baseline pre-fortification period (1987–1991; 1996–1998); 191 during the fortification period (1999–2002); and 351 during the post-fortification time period (2003–2012). The overall prevalence of neural tube defects decreased from 9.8 per 10,000 live-births (95 % CI 9.1–10.5) for the pre-fortification period to 4.8 per 10,000 live births (95 % CI 4.3–5.3) for the post–fortification period. Results indicate a statistically significant (P Costa Rica. Costa Rica’s experience can serve as an example for other countries seeking to develop and strengthen both their birth defects surveillance and fortification programs. PMID:24952876

  11. Normal and reverse defect annealing in ion implanted II-VI oxide semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarov, Alexander; Galeckas, Augustinas; Wendler, Elke; Ellingsen, Josef; Monakhov, Edouard; Svensson, Bengt G.

    2017-09-01

    Post-implantation annealing is typically used to remove structural defects and electrically activate implanted dopants in semiconductors. However, ion-induced defects and their interaction with dopants in group II oxide semiconductors are not fully understood. Here, we study defect evolution in the course of annealing in CdO and ZnO materials implanted with nitrogen which is one of the most promising candidates for p-type doping. The results of photoluminescence and ion channeling measurements revealed a striking difference in defect behavior between CdO and ZnO. In particular, the defect annealing in CdO exhibits a two stage behavior, the first stage accounting for efficient removal of point defects and small defect clusters, while the second one involves gradual disappearance of extended defects where the sample decomposition can play a role. In contrast, a strong reverse annealing occurs for ZnO with a maximum defect concentration around 900 °C. This effect occurs exclusively for nitrogen ions and is attributed to efficient growth of extended defects promoted by the presence of nitrogen.

  12. Fatty acid omega‐oxidation as a rescue pathway for fatty acid oxidation disorders in humans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wanders, Ronald J. A; Komen, Jasper; Kemp, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) can be degraded via different mechanisms including α‐, β‐ and ω‐oxidation. In humans, a range of different genetic diseases has been identified in which either mitochondrial FA...

  13. Prevention of valproic acid-induced neural tube defects by sildenafil citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiboni, Gian Mario; Ponzano, Adalisa

    2015-08-15

    This study was undertaken to test the effects of sildenafil citrate (SC), a type 5 phosphodiesterase inhibitor, on valproic acid (VPA)-induced teratogenesis. On gestation day (GD) 8, ICR (CD-1) mice were treated by gastric intubation with SC at 0 (vehicle), 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 or 10mg/kg. One hour later, animals received a teratogenic dose of VPA (600mg/kg) or vehicle. Developmental endpoints were evaluated near the end of gestation. Twenty-eighth percent of fetuses exposed to VPA had neural tube defects (exencephaly). Pretreatment with SC at 2.5, 5.0 or 10mg/kg significantly reduced the rate of VPA-induced exencephaly to 15.9%, 13.7%, and 10.0%, respectively. Axial skeletal defects were observed in 75.8% of VPA-exposed fetuses. Pre-treatment with SC at 10mg/kg, but not at lower doses, significantly decreased the rate of skeletally affected fetuses to 61.6%. These results show that SC, which prolongs nitric oxide (NO) signaling action protects from VPA-induced teratogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Complex cardiac defects after ethanol exposure during discrete cardiogenic events in zebrafish: Prevention with folic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmah, Swapnalee; Marrs, James A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) describes a range of birth defects including various congenital heart defects (CHDs). Mechanisms of FASD-associated CHDs are not understood. Whether alcohol interferes with a single critical event or with multiple events in heart formation is not known. RESULTS Our zebrafish embryo experiments showed that ethanol interrupts different cardiac regulatory networks and perturbed multiple steps of cardiogenesis (specification, myocardial migration, looping, chamber morphogenesis and endocardial cushion formation). Ethanol exposure during gastrulation until cardiac specification or during myocardial midline migration did not produce severe or persistent heart development defects. However, exposure comprising gastrulation until myocardial precursor midline fusion or during heart patterning stages produced aberrant heart looping and defective endocardial cushions. Continuous exposure during entire cardiogenesis produced complex cardiac defects leading to severely defective myocardium, endocardium, and endocardial cushions. Supplementation of retinoic acid with ethanol partially rescued early heart developmental defects, but the endocardial cushions did not form correctly. In contrast, supplementation of folic acid rescued normal heart development, including the endocardial cushions. CONCLUSIONS Our results indicate that ethanol exposure interrupted divergent cardiac morphogenesis events causing heart defects. Folic acid supplementation was effective in preventing a wide spectrum of ethanol-induced heart developmental defects. PMID:23832875

  15. Controlled Defects of Zinc Oxide Nanorods for Efficient Visible Light Photocatalytic Degradation of Phenol

    OpenAIRE

    Jamal Al-Sabahi; Tanujjal Bora; Mohammed Al-Abri; Joydeep Dutta

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollution from human and industrial activities has received much attention as it adversely affects human health and bio-diversity. In this work we report efficient visible light photocatalytic degradation of phenol using supported zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods and explore the role of surface defects in ZnO on the visible light photocatalytic activity. ZnO nanorods were synthesized on glass substrates using a microwave-assisted hydrothermal process, while the surface defect states we...

  16. Defect and Magnetic Properties of Reduced Graphene Oxide Prepared from Old Coconut Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniasari; Maulana, A.; Nugraheni, A. Y.; Jayanti, D. N.; Mustofa, S.; Baqiya, M. A.; Darminto

    2017-05-01

    Defect state may be created on the grafitic bonding of carbon atoms as the dangling bonds of the reduced graphene oxide (rGO) compound. In this study, the rGO sample has been prepared by burning the coconut shell in air. The resulted burnt samples were then heated at varying temperatures (400, 700, and 1000°C) for 5 hours in air. Further, a mechanical exfoliation process using ultrasonic vibrator was added to the samples for 5 hours. Characterization using Raman spectroscopy exhibited that the intensity ratio of defect (ID) and graphene (IG) increases, implying the increase of defect number, with respect to the increasing heating temperature. According to the magnetic property measurement using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), it is shown that the magnetization enhances with incerasing number of defects, featuring an occurrence of defect-induced magnetism in rGO.

  17. Amniotic fluid paraoxonase-1 activity, thyroid hormone concentration and oxidant status in neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sak, Sibel; Agacayak, Elif; Tunc, Senem Yaman; Icen, Mehmet Sait; Findik, Fatih Mehmet; Sak, Muhammet Erdal; Yalinkaya, Ahmet; Gul, Talip

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential association between neural tube defects and paraoxonase-1 activity in amniotic fluid. We studied total oxidant status, total antioxidant capacity, paraoxonase-1 activity and thyroid hormone amniotic fluid concentration in fetuses with neural tube defects. The present study was performed at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and the Department of Clinical Biochemistry of Dicle University between September 2011 and June 2013. The study group included 37 amniotic fluid samples from pregnant women (16-20 weeks of gestation) with fetuses affected by neural tube defects. The control group consisted of 36 pregnant women who were diagnosed with a high-risk pregnancy according to first or second trimester aneuploidy screening and were later confirmed on amniocentesis to have genetically normal fetuses. Amniotic fluid paraoxonase-1 activity and total oxidant status were significantly higher (P = 0.023, P = 0.029, respectively) whereas free T4 was significantly lower (P = 0.022) in fetuses with neural tube defects compared with control subjects. In fetuses with neural tube defects, amniotic fluid paraoxonase-1 activity correlated positively with total oxidant status (r = 0.424**, P = 0.010), and amniotic fluid total antioxidant capacity correlated positively with free t4 (r = 0.381*, P = 0.022). This is the first study in the literature to show an association between paraoxonase-1 activity and thyroid hormone concentration and neural tube defects. © 2016 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  18. Defects control in the synthesis of low-dimensional zinc oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Hidetaka; Inoue, Shuhei; Matsumura, Yukihiko

    2017-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has recently gained interest in the semiconductor field. Controlling defects can lead to band-gap engineering and this concept was explored for the synthesis of ZnO with various types of defects. In this study, we describe a method to synthesize quasi one-dimensional ZnO using gold nanoparticles as a template, using which we successfully controlled defect types like oxygen vacancies, oxygen interstitials, and zinc interstitials. Because the rate determination was the generation of Zn, it will be possible to synthesize ZnO with only zinc interstitials by independent supply of CO and O2.

  19. Tibial developmental field defect in valproic acid embryopathy: Report on three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandri, J L; Isidor, B; David, A; Martin-Coignard, D; Ghazouani, J; Ramful, D; Laville, J M; Le Caignec, C

    2010-11-01

    Prenatal exposure to valproic acid (VA) is associated with an increased risk of congenital malformations, especially limb defects like radial ray defects. Tibial developmental field defect in VA embryopathy remains exceptional. We report on three patients presenting with tibial hypo/aplasia associated with either femoral bifurcation or radial ray defect following prenatal exposure to VA. Femoral bifurcation and tibial agenesis has been described in the Gollop-Wolfgang complex and in the tibial agenesis-ectrodactyly syndrome. Tibial agenesis has also been reported in VACTERL association. The relation between prenatal exposure to VA and tibial agenesis is discussed. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. International retrospective cohort study of neural tube defects in relation to folic acid recommendations : are the recommendations working?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botto, LD; Lisi, A; Robert-Gnansia, E; Erickson, JD; Vollset, SE; Mastroiacovo, P; Botting, B; Cocchi, G; de Vigan, C; de Walle, H; Feijoo, M; Irgens, LM; McDonnell, B; Merlob, P; Ritvanen, A; Scarano, G; Siffel, C; Metneki, J; Stoll, C; Smithells, R; Goujard, J

    2005-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of policies and recommendations on folic acid aimed at reducing the occurrence of neural tube defects. Design Retrospective cohort study of births monitored by birth defect registries. Setting 13 birth defects registries monitoring rates of neural tube defects

  1. Study of defect generated visible photoluminescence in zinc oxide nano-particles prepared using PVA templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oudhia, A. [Department of Physics, Government V.Y.T. PG. Autonomous College, Durg, 491001 C.G. (India); Choudhary, A., E-mail: aarti.bhilai@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Government V.Y.T. PG. Autonomous College, Durg, 491001 C.G. (India); Sharma, S.; Aggrawal, S. [Department of Physics, Government V.Y.T. PG. Autonomous College, Durg, 491001 C.G. (India); Dhoble, S.J. [RTM University Nagpur, Maharashtra (India)

    2014-10-15

    Intrinsic defect generated photoluminescence (PL) in zinc oxide nanoparticles (NPs) obtained by a PVA template based wet-chemical process has been studied. A good controllability was achieved on the surface defects, structure and the morphology of ZnO NPs through the variation of solvents used in synthesis. The PL emission strongly depended on the defect structure and morphology. SEM, XRD, annealing and PL excitation studies were used to analyze the types of defects involved in the visible emission as well as the defect concentration. The mechanism for the blue, green and yellow emissions was proposed. The spectral content of the visible emission was controlled through generation/removal of defects through the shape transformation or annealing by focusing on defect origins and broad controls. - Highlights: • ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized using poly-vinyl alcohol template in various solvents. • The structure and morphology of ZnO nanoparticles were depended on dielectric constant and boiling point of solvents. • Photoluminescence properties of ZnO nanoparticles were studied. • Maximum optical absorbance and Photoluminescence intensity were found in ethanolic preparation. • ZnO nanoparticles were annealed at different temperatures for detection of defect emission.

  2. Genetic defects in the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, R.J.R.J.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Smeitink, J.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    The oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system consists of five multiprotein complexes and two mobile electron carriers embedded in the lipid bilayer of the mitochondrial inner membrane. With the exception of complex II and the mobile carriers, the other parts of the OXPHOS system are under dual

  3. Nucleotide precursors prevent folic acid-resistant neural tube defects in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kit-Yi; De Castro, Sandra C P; Savery, Dawn; Copp, Andrew J; Greene, Nicholas D E

    2013-09-01

    Closure of the neural tube during embryogenesis is a crucial step in development of the central nervous system. Failure of this process results in neural tube defects, including spina bifida and anencephaly, which are among the most common birth defects worldwide. Maternal use of folic acid supplements reduces risk of neural tube defects but a proportion of cases are not preventable. Folic acid is thought to act through folate one-carbon metabolism, which transfers one-carbon units for methylation reactions and nucleotide biosynthesis. Hence suboptimal performance of the intervening reactions could limit the efficacy of folic acid. We hypothesized that direct supplementation with nucleotides, downstream of folate metabolism, has the potential to support neural tube closure. Therefore, in a mouse model that exhibits folic acid-resistant neural tube defects, we tested the effect of specific combinations of pyrimidine and purine nucleotide precursors and observed a significant protective effect. Labelling in whole embryo culture showed that nucleotides are taken up by the neurulating embryo and incorporated into genomic DNA. Furthermore, the mitotic index was elevated in neural folds and hindgut of treated embryos, consistent with a proposed mechanism of neural tube defect prevention through stimulation of cellular proliferation. These findings may provide an impetus for future investigations of supplemental nucleotides as a means to prevent a greater proportion of human neural tube defects than can be achieved by folic acid alone.

  4. Characteristics of defect formation in aluminium oxide reinforced bioactive glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szarska, S. [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, 50-370 Wroclaw, Wyb.Wyspianskiego 27 (Poland)], E-mail: stanislawa.szarska@pwr.wroc.pl; Jungner, H. [Dating Laboratory, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Staniewicz-Brudnik, B. [Poland Institute of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Cracow, Wroclawska Street 37a (Poland); Wiatr, M. [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology, 50-370 Wroclaw, Wyb.Wyspianskiego 27 (Poland)

    2007-04-15

    Composite materials containing a bioactive phase (sol-gel-derived bioglass) and a mechanical strength phase (bubble alumina or sintered corundum) are promising materials for repair of living tissues. The microstructure of the biocomposite material, its mechanical properties and the processing routes used are all very strongly interrelated. SEM was used to investigate the phenomena occurring at the two phase interfaces. Porosity is one of the most common defects in this composite, which negatively affects strength. The systems were irradiated with beta radiation at different doses. Absorption and luminescence of these biocomposites were studied with the main attention paid to trap centres. The measurement results prove a high sensitivity of our experimental method to the effects of the surface glass modifications.

  5. Regulating infrared photoresponses in reduced graphene oxide phototransistors by defect and atomic structure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Haixin; Sun, Zhenhua; Saito, Mitsuhiro; Yuan, Qinghong; Zhang, Han; Li, Jinhua; Wang, Zhongchang; Fujita, Takeshi; Ding, Feng; Zheng, Zijian; Yan, Feng; Wu, Hongkai; Chen, Mingwei; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2013-07-23

    Defects play significant roles in properties of graphene and related device performances. Most studies of defects in graphene focus on their influences on electronic or luminescent optical properties, while controlling infrared optoelectronic performance of graphene by defect engineering remains a challenge. In the meantime, pristine graphene has very low infrared photoresponses of ~0.01 A/W due to fast photocarrier dynamics. Here we report regulating infrared photoresponses in reduced graphene oxide phototransistors by defect and atomic structure control for the first time. The infrared optoelectronic transport and photocurrent generation are significantly influenced and well controlled by oxygenous defects and structures in reduced graphene oxide. Moreover, remarkable infrared photoresponses are observed in photoconductor devices based on reduced graphene oxide with an external responsivity of ~0.7 A/W, at least over one order of magnitude higher than that from pristine graphene. External quantum efficiencies of infrared devices reach ultrahigh values of ~97%, which to our knowledge is one of the best efficiencies for infrared photoresponses from nonhybrid, pure graphene or graphene-based derivatives. The flexible infrared photoconductor devices demonstrate no photoresponse degradation even after 1000 bending tests. The results open up new routes to control optoelectronic behaviors of graphene for high-performance devices.

  6. Defects in oxide surfaces studied by atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Thomas; Simon, Georg H; Heinke, Lars; Lichtenstein, Leonid; Heyde, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Surfaces of thin oxide films were investigated by means of a dual mode NC-AFM/STM. Apart from imaging the surface termination by NC-AFM with atomic resolution, point defects in magnesium oxide on Ag(001) and line defects in aluminum oxide on NiAl(110), respectively, were thoroughly studied. The contact potential was determined by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and the electronic structure by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). On magnesium oxide, different color centers, i.e., F(0), F(+), F(2+) and divacancies, have different effects on the contact potential. These differences enabled classification and unambiguous differentiation by KPFM. True atomic resolution shows the topography at line defects in aluminum oxide. At these domain boundaries, STS and KPFM verify F(2+)-like centers, which have been predicted by density functional theory calculations. Thus, by determining the contact potential and the electronic structure with a spatial resolution in the nanometer range, NC-AFM and STM can be successfully applied on thin oxide films beyond imaging the topography of the surface atoms.

  7. Defects in oxide surfaces studied by atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas König

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfaces of thin oxide films were investigated by means of a dual mode NC-AFM/STM. Apart from imaging the surface termination by NC-AFM with atomic resolution, point defects in magnesium oxide on Ag(001 and line defects in aluminum oxide on NiAl(110, respectively, were thoroughly studied. The contact potential was determined by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM and the electronic structure by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS. On magnesium oxide, different color centers, i.e., F0, F+, F2+ and divacancies, have different effects on the contact potential. These differences enabled classification and unambiguous differentiation by KPFM. True atomic resolution shows the topography at line defects in aluminum oxide. At these domain boundaries, STS and KPFM verify F2+-like centers, which have been predicted by density functional theory calculations. Thus, by determining the contact potential and the electronic structure with a spatial resolution in the nanometer range, NC-AFM and STM can be successfully applied on thin oxide films beyond imaging the topography of the surface atoms.

  8. Relation between defective regulation of arachidonic acid release and symptoms in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandvik, B; Brönnegård, M; Gilljam, H; Carlstedt-Duke, J

    1988-01-01

    A hypothesis is formed about the basic defect in CF based on the findings of 1) a defective inhibition of AA release by dexamethasone stimulation of lymphocytes from patients with CF, probably due to a defect in or absence of lipocortin and 2) the essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD) in CF reported by different authors for 25 years. Both in lymphocytes and fibroblasts from patients with CF increased AA release has been demonstrated. AA, substrate for the eicosanoid system (prostaglandins, leukotrienes, hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids, thromboxanes), has been shown to increase mucus release, influence chloride transport and the stimulus-secretion coupling (Ca++ balance), all factors suggested as basic defects in CF. The increased release of AA might explain the development of EFAD, since AA is synthesized from linoleic acid. In animals EFAD gives rise to symptoms similar to those in CF, e.g. defect Na transport, liver steatosis, increased caloric need, disturbed insulin release, increased bacterial colonization of airways, and decreased immune response. Regular supplementation with fat emulsion (Intralipid) to CF patients normalizes the renal Na transport and prevents liver steatosis. We suggest that the basic defect in CF is a defect in or absence of lipocortin, causing an increased release of AA, which regulates synthesis in the eicosanoid system. An increase of the products in this system gives rise to the basic signs and symptoms of CF. The resulting EFAD is dependent on the rate of AA turnover and could explain most of the clinical symptoms and the progression of the disease.

  9. Multivitamins, Folic Acid and Birth Defects: Knowledge, Beliefs and Behaviors of Hispanic Women in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    deRosset, Leslie; Mullenix, Amy; Zhang, Lei

    2009-01-01

    Background: Consumption of folic acid prior to conception can prevent up to 70% of neural tube defect (NTD)-affected pregnancies. In 1992, the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) issued a recommendation that all women of childbearing age capable of becoming pregnant consume 400 [mu]g of folic acid daily to reduce their risk for a NTD-affected…

  10. Quantum Monte Carlo calculation of point defect thermal and optical ionization levels: application to magnesium oxide and zinc oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertekin, Elif; Wagner, Lucas; Grossman, Jeffrey

    2013-03-01

    From electronics to optoelectronics to photovoltaics, point defects influence and dominate the properties of semiconducting materials. Quantitative descriptions of the effect of point defects on electronic, optical, and transport properties are critical to enabling point-defect engineering for materials design. However, accurate prediction of point-defect energetics, thermal ionization energies, and optical transition energies from first principles remains a challenge. We present an approach to calculation of point defect optical and thermal ionization energies based on the highly accurate quantum Monte Carlo methods, and demonstrate it for the oxygen vacancy in the binary ionic compound magnesium oxide and the substitutional nitrogen impurity in zinc oxide. The use of quantum Monte Carlo, an inherently many-body theory that directly treats electron correlation, offers many improvements: it can help overcome the band gap problem in density functional theory and obviate the need for ad-hoc corrections. Our computed optical and thermal ionization energies are in excellent agreement with experimental and/or other high-accuracy results.

  11. Synthesis and structural characterization of defect spinels in the Lithium-Manganese-Oxide system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thackeray, MM

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Lithium-manganese-oxides prepared at moderate temperatures are under investigation as insertion electrodes for rechargeable lithium batteries. The structures of two defect-spinel compounds synthesised by the reaction of MnCO3 and Li2CO3 at 400...

  12. Decreased resistance against in vitro oxidation of LDL from patients with familial defective apolipoprotein B-100

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalenhoef, A. F.; Defesche, J. C.; Kleinveld, H. A.; Demacker, P. N.; Kastelein, J. J.

    1994-01-01

    Familial defective apolipoprotein B-100 (FDB) is caused by a mutation in the receptor-binding region of apolipoprotein B-100, the structural protein of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle. We studied the effect of this mutation on the composition and susceptibility to oxidative modification

  13. Triflic acid catalyzed oxidative lactonization and diacetoxylation of alkenes using peroxyacids as oxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yan-Biao; Gade, Lutz H

    2012-02-03

    A clean and efficient diacetoxylation reaction of alkenes catalyzed by triflic acid using commercially available peroxyacids as the oxidants has been developed. This method was also applied in oxidative lactonizations of unsaturated carboxylic acids in good to high yields.

  14. Surface defects and conduction in polar oxide heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristowe, N. C.; Littlewood, P. B.; Artacho, Emilio

    2011-05-01

    The polar interface between LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 has shown promise as a field effect transistor, with reduced (nanoscale) feature sizes and potentially added functionality over conventional semiconductor systems. However, the mobility of the interfacial two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is lower than desirable. Therefore to progress, the highly debated origin of the 2DEG must be understood. Here we present a case for surface redox reactions as the origin of the 2DEG, in particular surface O vacancies, using a model supported by first-principles calculations that describes the redox formation. In agreement with recent spectroscopic and transport measurements, we predict a stabilization of such redox processes (and hence Ti 3d occupation) with film thickness beyond a critical value, which can be smaller than the critical thickness for 2D electronic conduction, since the surface defects generate trapping potentials that will affect the interface electron mobility. Several other recent experimental results, such as lack of core-level broadening and shifts, find a natural explanation. Pristine systems will likely require changed growth conditions or modified materials with a higher vacancy free energy.

  15. [Defects in TOR regulatory complexes retard aging and carbonyl/oxidative stress development in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homza, B V; Vasyl'kovs'ka, R A; Semchyshyn, H M

    2014-01-01

    TOR signaling pathway first described in yeast S. cerevisiae is the highly conserved regulator of eukaryotic cell growth, aging and stress resistance. The effect of nitrogen sources, in particular amino acids, on the activity of TOR signaling pathway is well studied, however its relation to carbohydrates is poor understood. The aim of the present study is expanding of our understanding of potential role of TOR regulatory complexes in development of carbonyl/oxidative stress that can result from yeast cultivation on glucose and fructose. It has been shown that the level of alpha-dicarbonyl compounds and protein carbonyl groups increased with time of yeast cultivation and was higher in cells grown on fructose that demonstrated their accelerated aging and carbonyl/oxidative stress development as compared with cells grown on glucose. The strains defective in TOR proteins cultivated in the presence of glucose as well as fructose demonstrated lower markers of the stress and aging than parental strain. Thus these data confirmed the previous conclusion on fructose more potent ability to cause carbonyl/oxidative stress and accelerated aging in S. cerevisiae as compared with glucose. However, defects in TOR regulatory complexes retard aging and development of the stress in yeast independent on the type of carbohydrate in the cultivation medium.

  16. Anodic luminescence, structural, photoluminescent, and photocatalytic properties of anodic oxide films grown on niobium in phosphoric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojadinović, Stevan, E-mail: sstevan@ff.bg.ac.rs [University of Belgrade, Faculty of Physics, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Tadić, Nenad [University of Belgrade, Faculty of Physics, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Radić, Nenad [University of Belgrade, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, Department of Catalysis and Chemical Engineering, Njegoševa 12, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Stefanov, Plamen [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Block 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Grbić, Boško [University of Belgrade, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, Department of Catalysis and Chemical Engineering, Njegoševa 12, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Vasilić, Rastko [University of Belgrade, Faculty of Physics, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Anodic luminescence is correlated to the existence of morphological defects in the oxide. • Spectrum under spark discharging reveals only oxygen and hydrogen lines. • Oxide films formed under spark discharging are crystallized and composed of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}. • Photocatalytic activity and photoluminescence of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} films increase with time. - Abstract: This article reports on properties of oxide films obtained by anodization of niobium in phosphoric acid before and after the dielectric breakdown. Weak anodic luminescence of barrier oxide films formed during the anodization of niobium is correlated to the existence of morphological defects in the oxide layer. Small sized sparks generated by dielectric breakdown of formed oxide film cause rapid increase of luminescence intensity. The luminescence spectrum of obtained films on niobium under spark discharging is composed of continuum radiation and spectral lines caused by electronic spark discharging transitions in oxygen and hydrogen atoms. Oxide films formed before the breakdown are amorphous, while after the breakdown oxide films are partly crystalline and mainly composed of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} hexagonal phase. The photocatalytic activity of obtained oxide films after the breakdown was investigated by monitoring the degradation of methyl orange. Increase of the photocatalytic activity with time is related to an increase of oxygen vacancy defects in oxide films formed during the process. Also, higher concentration of oxygen vacancy defects in oxide films results in higher photoluminescence intensity.

  17. Oxidation of positronium atoms on a surface of oxidic catalyst carrier containing acid centres

    CERN Document Server

    Paiziev, A A

    2000-01-01

    By Born approximation the cross section of positronium (Ps) oxidation on acid centres localized on the surface of oxide carriers is calculated. Analysis of the kinetics of elementary processes in porous carriers based on aluminum oxide including processes of annihilation of positron, formation of Ps and oxidation of Ps on acid centres is given.

  18. Defect engineered oxides for enhanced mechanochemical destruction of halogenated organic pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnetta, Giovanni; Huang, Jun; Lu, Mengnan; Wang, Bin; Wang, Yujue; Deng, Shubo; Yu, Gang

    2017-10-01

    Mechanochemical activation of metal oxides is studied by a novel methodology based on solid state reaction with a stable radical specie. Such approach corroborates that vacancy formation by high energy ball milling, also in nonreducible oxides, is responsible for electron release on particles' surfaces. This finding suggests a new defect engineering strategy to improve effectiveness of metal oxides as co-milling reagent for halogenated organic pollutant destruction. Results prove that high valent metal doping of a commonly employed co-milling reagent such as CaO determines 2.5 times faster pollutant degradation rate. This enhancement is due to electron-rich defects generated by the dopant; electrons are transferred to the organic pollutant thus causing its mineralization. The proposed strategy can be easily applied to other reagents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Oxidative stress during diabetic pregnancy disrupts cardiac neural crest migration and causes outflow tract defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Sarah C; Relaix, Frédéric; Sandell, Lisa L; Loeken, Mary R

    2008-06-01

    Maternal diabetes increases risk for congenital malformations, particularly cardiac outflow tract defects. Maternal diabetes inhibits expression of Pax3 in neuroepithelium through hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. The neuroepithelium gives rise to the neural crest, and Pax3 expression in cardiac neural crest (CNC) is required for CNC migration to the heart and for outflow tract septation. Here we tested whether maternal diabetes, through hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress, before the onset of CNC delamination, impairs CNC migration and cardiac outflow tract septation. CNC migration was mapped in mouse embryos whose mothers were diabetic, or transiently hyperglycemic, or in which oxidative stress was transiently induced, using reporters linked to Pax3 expression. CNC apoptosis was examined by TUNEL assay. Outflow tract septation was examined histologically and by gross inspection. Few, if any, migrating CNC cells were observed in embryos of diabetic mice, and this was associated with increased apoptosis along the path of CNC migration. Outflow tract defects were significantly increased in fetuses of diabetic mice. Notably, induction of hyperglycemia or oxidative stress on the day prior to the onset of Pax3 expression and CNC migration also impaired CNC migration, increased apoptosis, and caused outflow tract defects. However, antioxidants administered on the day prior to the onset of Pax3 expression and CNC migration prevented these effects of hyperglycemia or oxidative stress. In diabetic pregnancy, oxidative stress, which inhibits expression of genes required for CNC viability, causes subsequent CNC depletion by apoptosis during migration, which leads to outflow tract defects. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Selenium dioxide catalysed oxidation of acetic acid hydrazide by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Selenium dioxide catalysed acetic acid hydrazide oxidation by bromate was studied in hydrochloric acid medium. The order in oxidant concentration, substrate and catalyst were found to be unity. Increasing hydrogen ion concentration increases the rate of the reaction due to protonation equilibria of the oxidant.

  1. Quinolinic Acid: Neurotoxin or Oxidative Stress Modulator?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Kubicova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Quinolinic acid (2,3-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, QUIN is a well-known neurotoxin. Consequently, QUIN could produce reactive oxygen species (ROS. ROS are generated in reactions catalyzed by transition metals, especially iron (Fe. QUIN can form coordination complexes with iron. A combination of differential pulse voltammetry, deoxyribose degradation and Fe(II autoxidation assays was used for explorating ROS formation in redox reactions that are catalyzed by iron in QUIN-Fe complexes. Differential pulse voltammetry showed an anodic shift of the iron redox potential if iron was liganded by QUIN. In the H2O2/FeCl3/ascorbic acid variant of the deoxyribose degradation assay, the dose-response curve was U-shaped. In the FeCl3/ascorbic acid variant, QUIN unambiguously showed antioxidant effects. In the Fe(II autoxidation assay, QUIN decreased the rate of ROS production caused by Fe(II oxidation. Our study confirms that QUIN toxicity may be caused by ROS generation via the Fenton reaction. This, however, applies only for unnaturally high concentrations that were used in attempts to provide support for the neurotoxic effect. In lower concentrations, we show that by liganding iron, QUIN affects the Fe(II/Fe(III ratios that are beneficial to homeostasis. Our results support the notion that redox chemistry can contribute to explaining the hormetic dose-response effects.

  2. Effects of Uric Acid on Exercise-induced Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    平井, 富弘

    2001-01-01

    We studied effects of uric acid on exercise― induced oxidative stress in humans based on a hypothesis that uric acid acts as an antioxidant to prevent from exercise―induced oxidative stress. Relation between uric acid level in plasma and increase of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS)after the cycle ergometer exercise was examined. Thiobarbituricacid reactive substance in plasma increased after the ergometer exercise. High uric acid in plasma did not result in low increase of TBARS...

  3. Spirulina (arthrospira) protects against valproic acid-induced neural tube defects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalona-Cardoso, Gerardo N; Paniagua-Castro, Norma; Pérez-Pastén, Ricardo; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán

    2012-12-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a potent inducer of neural tube defects in human and mouse, its teratogenicity is associated with its potential to generation of free radicals and increase oxidative stress. Furthermore, spirulina (SP) has shown pharmacological properties against teratogenicity, which are attributed to its antioxidant potential. Accordingly, the present study was performed to investigate the influence of SP on the teratogenicity of VPA in imprinting control region mice and the possible mechanisms of action. VPA (sodium valproate) was administered intraperitoneally to mice on gestation day (GD) 8 at a dose of 600 mg/kg. SP was given orally at 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg daily from GD0 through GD18. The most common finding in fetuses with VPA exposure was exencephaly. SP decreased the incidence of this and other malformations and increased levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. In conclusion, these results illustrate the protective action of SP through its antioxidant activity against VPA-induced teratogenicity.

  4. Cold-storage defects in butter and their relation to the autoxidation of unsaturated fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badings, H.T.

    1970-01-01

    In this thesis investigations are described of the identification of aroma compounds which are formed as a result of oxidative deterioration of butter during cold storage, producing a typical trainy (fishy) off-flavour. As these flavour defects are caused chiefly by autoxidative breakdown of

  5. Paper spray and Kendrick mass defect analysis of block and random ethylene oxide/propylene oxide copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Robert B; Fouquet, Thierry

    2017-10-09

    Paper spray ionization coupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer was applied to the analysis of 13 block and 2 random ethylene oxide/propylene oxide (EO/PO) copolymers as well as to standard samples of poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(propylene oxide) homopolymers. Paper spray mass spectra could be obtained rapidly and, unlike electrospray ionization, were not subject to contamination and sample carryover. For comparison, polyether samples were also measured on a MALDI/TOF system with ultrahigh mass resolving power. MALDI/high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry exhibited single-charge ions characteristic of the polymer distributions whereas the paper spray mass spectra exhibited charge states ranging from one to six charges. Kendrick mass defect plots of the multiple-charge ions in the paper spray mass spectra exhibit isotopic splitting of the Kendrick mass defects, facilitating visualization of the number of charges in each series. The slope of the KMD plots can be used to estimate the percentage of ethylene oxide in the copolymers. In-source fragmentation permitted the distinction between block and random copolymers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Oxidation of hydrogen peroxide by [Ni (cyclam)] in aqueous acidic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    III. (cyclam)]. 3+ in aqueous acidic media. SANKARAN ANURADHA and VENKATAPURAM RAMANUJAM VIJAYARAGHAVAN. ∗. Department of Physical ... oxidation was followed spectrophotometrically by examining the oxidation of nickel(II) complexes of macro- .... stock solution of copper perchlorate was prepared by.

  7. Prevention of neural tube defects in Lrp2 mutant mouse embryos by folic acid supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatino, Julia A; Stokes, Bethany A; Zohn, Irene E

    2017-01-20

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are among the most common structural birth defects in humans and are caused by the complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Periconceptional supplementation with folic acid can prevent NTDs in both mouse models and human populations. A better understanding of how genes and environmental factors interact is critical toward development of rational strategies to prevent NTDs. Low density lipoprotein-related protein 2 (Lrp2) is involved in endocytosis of the folic acid receptor among numerous other nutrients and ligands. We determined the effect of iron and/or folic acid supplementation on the penetrance of NTDs in the Lrp2(null) mouse model. The effects of supplementation on folate and iron status were measured in embryos and dams. Periconceptional dietary supplementation with folic acid did not prevent NTDs in Lrp2 mutant embryos, whereas high levels of folic acid supplementation by intraperitoneal injection reduced incidence of NTDs. Importantly, Lrp2(null/+) dams had reduced blood folate levels that improved with daily intraperitoneal injections of folate but not dietary supplementation. On the contrary, iron supplementation had no effect on the penetrance of NTDs in Lrp2 mutant embryos and negated the preventative effect of folic acid supplementation in Lrp2(null/null) mutants. Lrp2 is required for folate homeostasis in heterozygous dams and high levels of supplementation prevents NTDs. Furthermore, high levels of dietary iron supplementation interfered with folic acid supplementation negating the positive effects of supplementation in this model. Birth Defects Research 109:16-26, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Birth Defects Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors Birth Defects Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Oxidized alginate hydrogels for BMP-2 delivery in long bone defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priddy, Lauren B; Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Stevens, Hazel Y; Krishnan, Laxminarayanan; Uhrig, Brent A; Willett, Nick J; Guldberg, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    Autograft treatment of large bone defects and fracture non-unions is complicated by limited tissue availability and donor site morbidity. Polymeric biomaterials such as alginate hydrogels provide an attractive tissue engineering alternative due to their biocompatibility, injectability, and tunable degradation rates. Irradiated RGD-alginate hydrogels have been used to deliver proteins such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), to promote bone regeneration and restoration of function in a critically sized rat femoral defect model. However, slow degradation of irradiated alginate hydrogels may impede integration and remodeling of the regenerated bone to its native architecture. Oxidation of alginate has been used to promote degradation of alginate matrices. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of alginate oxidation on BMP-2 release and bone regeneration. We hypothesized that oxidized-irradiated alginate hydrogels would elicit an accelerated release of BMP-2, but degrade faster in vivo, facilitating the formation of higher quality, more mature bone compared to irradiated alginate. Indeed, oxidation of irradiated alginate did accelerate in vitro BMP-2 release. Notably, the BMP-2 retained within both constructs was bioactive at 26 days, as observed by induction of alkaline phosphatase activity and positive Alizarin Red S staining of MC3T3-E1 cells. From the in vivo study, robust bone regeneration was observed in both groups through 12 weeks by radiography, micro-CT analyses, and biomechanical testing. Bone mineral density (BMD) was significantly greater for the oxidized-irradiated alginate group at 8 weeks. Histological analyses of bone defects revealed enhanced degradation of oxidized-irradiated alginate and suggested the presence of more mature bone after 12 weeks of healing. PMID:24954001

  9. Reduced coupling of oxidative phosphorylation in vivo precedes electron transport chain defects due to mild oxidative stress in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Siegel

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and mitochondrial function are at the core of many degenerative conditions. However, the interaction between oxidative stress and in vivo mitochondrial function is unclear. We used both pharmacological (2 week paraquat (PQ treatment of wild type mice and transgenic (mice lacking Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1(-/- models to test the effect of oxidative stress on in vivo mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle. Magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy were used to measure mitochondrial ATP and oxygen fluxes and cell energetic state. In both models of oxidative stress, coupling of oxidative phosphorylation was significantly lower (lower P/O at rest in vivo in skeletal muscle and was dose-dependent in the PQ model. Despite this reduction in efficiency, in vivo mitochondrial phosphorylation capacity (ATPmax was maintained in both models, and ex vivo mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized muscle fibers was unchanged following PQ treatment. In association with the reduced P/O, PQ treatment led to a dose-dependent reduction in PCr/ATP ratio and increased phosphorylation of AMPK. These results indicate that oxidative stress uncouples oxidative phosphorylation in vivo and results in energetic stress in the absence of defects in the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

  10. Anti-inflammatory and osteogenesis of complex particles composed of ceric oxide and bioglass on repair of rabbit femoral defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai HUANG

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the anti-inflammatory and osteogenesis of the complex particles composed of ceric oxide and bioglass implanted into rabbit femoral defects.Methods The bilateral penetrating femoral condylar defects of 6mm in diameter were made in 6 adult New Zealand White rabbits,bioglass particles and complex particles composed of ceric oxide and bioglass were randomly implanted into the left or right condylar defect.Animals were sacrificed at 2 and 4 weeks after operation(3 each,specimens from defect sites were harvested for histological examination to observe the inflammatory reaction and calculate the ratio of new bone and grafts on the defect area.Results No inflammatory reaction was found in the defect area filled with bioglass particles or complex particles composed of ceric oxide and bioglass.New bone was observed in the defects 2 weeks after operation,and no significant difference on the bone formation rate existed between the two materials(P > 0.05.The osteogenesis of both materials was more obvious in the 4th week than in the 2nd week(P 0.05.No obvious degradation of the grafts implanted into the defect area occurred in the 4th week compared with that in the 2nd week(P > 0.05.Conclusion The complex particles composed of ceric oxide and bioglass has anti-inflammatory activity and similar osteogenesis to normal bioglass particles,and may be used in the repair of bone defects.

  11. Role of masking oxide on silicon in processes of defect generation at formation of SIMOX structures

    CERN Document Server

    Askinazi, A Y; Miloglyadova, L V

    2002-01-01

    One investigated into Si-SiO sub 2 structures formed by implantation of oxygen ions into silicon (SIMOX-technology) by means of techniques based on measuring of high-frequency volt-farad characteristics and by means of electroluminescence. One determined existence of electrically active centres and of luminescence centres in the formed oxide layer near boundary with silicon. One clarified the role SiO sub 2 masking layer in silicon in defect generation under formation of the masked oxide layer. One established dependence of concentration of electrically active and luminescence centres on thickness of masking layer

  12. Band alignment and defects of the diamond zinc oxide heterojunction; Bandstruktur und Defekte der Diamant-Zinkoxid-Heterostruktur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geithner, Peter

    2008-09-12

    Zinc oxide films were grown on diamond single crystals by rf sputtering of zinc oxide. The valence and conduction band offset was determined by photoelectron spectroscopy. A deep defect occurring in the zinc oxide films on diamond was characterized by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. (orig.)

  13. Oxidatively damaged DNA repair defect in cockayne syndrome and its complementation by heterologous repair proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frosina, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (complementation groups A and B) is a rare autosomal recessive DNA repair disorder characterized by photosensitive skin and severely impaired physical and intellectual development. The Cockayne syndrome A and B proteins intervene in the repair of DNA modifications that block the RNA polymerase in transcribed DNA sequences (transcription-coupled repair). Recent results suggest that they also have a more general role in the repair of oxidative DNA base modifications. Although the phenotypical consequences of defective repair of oxidatively damaged DNA in Cockayne syndrome are not determined, accumulation of oxidized lesions might contribute to delay the physical and intellectual development of these patients. To conceive new therapeutic strategies for this syndrome, we are investigating whether the oxidatively damaged DNA repair defect in Cockayne syndrome might be complemented by heterologous repair proteins, such as the Escherichia coli formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase and endonuclease III. The complementation studies may shed light on the important lesions for the Cockayne syndrome phenotype and offer new tools for future therapies aimed at counteracting the consequences of oxidatively damaged DNA accumulation.

  14. Final Technical Report for DE-SC0001878 [Theory and Simulation of Defects in Oxide Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelikowsky, James R. [University of Texas at Austin

    2014-04-14

    We explored a wide variety of oxide materials and related problems, including materials at the nanoscale and generic problems associated with oxide materials such as the development of more efficient computational tools to examine these materials. We developed and implemented methods to understand the optical and structural properties of oxides. For ground state properties, our work is predominantly based on pseudopotentials and density functional theory (DFT), including new functionals and going beyond the local density approximation (LDA): LDA+U. To study excited state properties (quasiparticle and optical excitations), we use time dependent density functional theory, the GW approach, and GW plus Bethe-Salpeter equation (GW-BSE) methods based on a many-body Green function approaches. Our work focused on the structural, electronic, optical and magnetic properties of defects (such as oxygen vacancies) in hafnium oxide, titanium oxide (both bulk and clusters) and related materials. We calculated the quasiparticle defect states and charge transition levels of oxygen vacancies in monoclinic hafnia. we presented a milestone G0W0 study of two of the crystalline phases of dye-sensitized TiO{sub 2} clusters. We employed hybrid density functional theory to examine the electronic structure of sexithiophene/ZnO interfaces. To identify the possible effect of epitaxial strain on stabilization of the ferromagnetic state of LaCoO{sub 3} (LCO), we compare the total energy of the magnetic and nonmagnetic states of the strained theoretical bulk structure.

  15. Prevalent mutations in fatty acid oxidation disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, N; Andresen, B S; Bross, P

    2000-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The mutational spectrum in a given disease-associated gene is often comprised of a large number of different mutations, of which a single or a few are present in a large proportion of diseased individuals. Such prevalent mutations are known in four genes of the fatty acid oxidation...... carrying the prevalent 985A > G mutation are at risk of developing life-threatening attacks. In SCAD/ethylmalonic aciduria, on the other hand, the presence of the prevalent susceptibility variations, 625A and 511T, in the SCAD gene seems to require additional genetic and cellular factors to be present...... in order to result in a phenotype. For the prevalent mutations in the LCHAD and CPT II genes further data are needed to evaluate the penetrance and risk of manifest disease when carrying these mutations. CONCLUSION: Assessment of the prevalence of a prevalent mutation in the mutation spectrum...

  16. Effect of morphology and defect density on electron transfer of electrochemically reduced graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan, E-mail: yanzhang@sues.edu.cn [School of Material Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China); Hao, Huilian, E-mail: huilian.hao@sues.edu.cn [School of Material Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China); Wang, Linlin, E-mail: wlinlin@mail.ustc.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Different morphologies of ERGO on the surface of GCE were prepared via different methods. • The defect densities of ERGO were controlled by tuning the mass or concentration of GO. • A higher defect density of ERGO accelerates electron transfer rate. • ERGO with more exposed edge planes shows significantly higher electron transfer kinetics. • Both edge planes and defect density contribute to electron transfer of ERGO. - Abstract: Electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) is widely used to construct electrochemical sensors. Understanding the electron transfer behavior of ERGO is essential for its electrode material applications. In this paper, different morphologies of ERGO were prepared via two different methods. Compared to ERGO/GCEs prepared by electrochemical reduction of pre-deposited GO, more exposed edge planes of ERGO are observed on the surface of ERGO-GCE that was constructed by electrophoretic deposition of GO. The defect densities of ERGO were controlled by tuning the mass or concentration of GO. The electron transfer kinetics (k{sup 0}) of GCE with different ERGOs was comparatively investigated. Owing to increased surface areas and decreased defect density, the k{sup 0} values of ERGO/GCE initially increase and then decrease with incrementing of GO mass. When the morphology and surface real areas of ERGO-GCE are the same, an increased defect density induces an accelerated electron transfer rate. k{sup 0} valuesof ERGO-GCEs are about 1 order of magnitude higher than those of ERGO/GCEs due to the difference in the amount of edge planes. This work demonstrates that both defect densities and edge planes of ERGO play crucial roles in electron transfer kinetics.

  17. Folic Acid for the Prevention of Neural Tube Defects : US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calonge, Ned; Petitti, Diana B.; DeWitt, Thomas G.; Dietrich, Allen J.; Gregory, Kimberly D.; Grossman, David; Isham, George; LeFevre, Michael L.; Leipzig, Rosanne M.; Marion, Lucy N.; Melnyk, Bernadette; Moyer, Virginia A.; Ockene, Judith K.; Sawaya, George F.; Schwartz, J. Sanford; Wilt, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Description: In 1996, the U. S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended that all women planning or capable of pregnancy take a multivitamin supplement containing folic acid for the prevention of neural tube defects. This recommendation is an update of the 1996 USPSTF recommendation.

  18. Folic acid supplementation influences the distribution of neural tube defect subtypes : A registry-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman, J. E. H.; Otten, E.; Verheij, J. B. G. M.; de Walle, H. E. K.

    Periconceptional folic acid (FA) reduces neural tube defect (NTD) risk, but seems to have a varying effect per NTD subtype. We aimed to study the effect of FA supplementation on NTD subtype distribution using data from EUROCAT Northern Netherlands. We included all birth types with non-syndromal NTDs

  19. Periconceptional folic acid use and the prevalence of neural tube defects in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pal-de Bruin, Karin M.; van der Heijden, Peter G. M.; Buitendijk, Simone E.; den Ouden, A. Lya

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of increased folic acid intake on the prevalence of neural tube defects (NTD) in The Netherlands. STUDY DESIGN: Using the capture-recapture method, the prevalence of NTD was estimated on the basis of five different registries on births affected by NTD. RESULTS: Total

  20. Studies on the biological oxidation - The oxidation of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) in biological fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Guzmán Barrón, E. S.; Departamento de Medicina, Universidad de Chicago, Chicago, Estados Unidos; Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad de Lima, Lima, Perú; Guzmán Barrón, Alberto; Departamento de Medicina, Universidad de Chicago, Chicago, Estados Unidos; Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad de Lima, Lima, Perú; Klemperer, Friedrich; Departamento de Medicina, Universidad de Chicago, Chicago, Estados Unidos; Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad de Lima, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Biological fluids can be divided according to their behavior toward ascorbic acid into two groups: those having an inhibitory mechanism that protects the ascorbic acid oxidation, and those lacking this mechanism. Animal fluids and some of vegetable origin (those containing dosables amounts of ascorbic acid) corresponding to the first group. Ascorbic acid is protected from oxidation in the fluids by the action of copper catalyst. Fluids from plants (those that contain very little ascorbic acid...

  1. Defective methionine metabolism in the brain after repeated blast exposures might contribute to increased oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, Peethambaran; Rittase, William B; Wilder, Donna M; Wang, Ying; Gist, Irene D; Long, Joseph B

    2017-07-31

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is one of the major disabilities in Service Members returning from recent military operations. The neurobiological underpinnings of bTBI, which are associated with acute and chronic neuropathological and neurobehavioral deficits, are uncertain. Increased oxidative stress in the brain is reported to play a significant role promoting neuronal damage associated with both brain injury and neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, brains of rats exposed to repeated blasts in a shock tube underwent untargeted profiling of primary metabolism by automatic linear exchange/cold injection GC-TOF mass spectrometry and revealed acute and sub-acute disruptions in the metabolism of the essential amino acid methionine and associated antioxidants. Methionine sulfoxide, the oxidized metabolite of methionine, showed a sustained increase in the brain after blast exposure which was associated with a significant decrease in cysteine, the amino acid derived from methionine. Glutathione, the antioxidant synthesized from cysteine, also concomitantly decreased as did the antioxidant ascorbic acid. Reductions in ascorbic acid were accompanied by increased levels of its oxidized metabolite, dehydroascorbic acid and other metabolites such as threonic acid, isothreonic acid, glycolic acid and oxalic acid. Fluorometric analysis of the brains showed acute and sub-acute increase in total reactive oxygen species. In view of the fundamental importance of glutathione in the brain as an antioxidant, including its role in the reduction of dehydroascorbic acid to ascorbic acid, the disruptions in methionine metabolism elicited by blast exposure might prominently contribute to neuronal injury by promoting increased and sustained oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of valinomycin in fibroblasts from patients with fatty acid oxidation disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ndukwe Erlingsson, Uzochi Chimdinma [Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, 2C412 SOM, 50 North Mario Capecchi Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); Iacobazzi, Francesco [Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, 2C412 SOM, 50 North Mario Capecchi Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); Department of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Bari, Piazza Giulio Cesare 11, Policlinico, I-70124 Bari (Italy); Liu, Aiping [ARUP Institute for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, ARUP Laboratories, 500 Chipeta Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (United States); Ardon, Orly; Pasquali, Marzia [Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, 2C412 SOM, 50 North Mario Capecchi Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); ARUP Institute for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, ARUP Laboratories, 500 Chipeta Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (United States); Department of Pathology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); Longo, Nicola, E-mail: Nicola.Longo@hsc.utah.edu [Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, 2C412 SOM, 50 North Mario Capecchi Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); ARUP Institute for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, ARUP Laboratories, 500 Chipeta Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (United States); Department of Pathology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States)

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Valinomycin can cause mitochondrial stress and stimulate fatty acid oxidation. •Cells with VLCAD deficiency fail to increase fatty acid oxidation in response to valinomycin. •Response to valinomycin can help in the diagnosis of VLCAD deficiency. -- Abstract: Disorders of the carnitine cycle and of the beta oxidation spiral impair the ability to obtain energy from fats at time of fasting and stress. This can result in hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, cardiac arrhythmia and other chronic medical problems. The in vitro study of fibroblasts from patients with these conditions is impaired by their limited oxidative capacity. Here we evaluate the capacity of valinomycin, a potassium ionophore that increases mitochondrial respiration, to increase the oxidation of fatty acids in cells from patients with inherited fatty acid oxidation defects. The addition of valinomycin to fibroblasts decreased the accumulation of the lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP{sup +}) at low concentrations due to the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential. At higher doses, valinomycin increased TPP{sup +} accumulation due to the increased potassium permeability of the plasma membrane and subsequent cellular hyperpolarization. The incubation of normal fibroblasts with valinomycin increased [{sup 14}C]-palmitate oxidation (measured as [{sup 14}C]O{sub 2} release) in a dose-dependent manner. By contrast, valinomycin failed to increase palmitate oxidation in fibroblasts from patients with very long chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency. This was not observed in fibroblasts from patients heterozygous for this condition. These results indicate that valinomycin can increase fatty acid oxidation in normal fibroblasts and could be useful to differentiate heterozygotes from patients affected with VLCAD deficiency.

  3. Non-destructive functionalisation for atomic layer deposition of metal oxides on carbon nanotubes: effect of linking agents and defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemnade, N.; Shearer, C. J.; Dieterle, D. J.; Cherevan, A. S.; Gebhardt, P.; Wilde, G.; Eder, D.

    2015-02-01

    The hybridisation of metal oxides and nanocarbons has created a promising new class of functional materials for environmental and sustainable energy applications. The performance of such hybrids can be further improved by rationally designing interfaces and morphologies. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is among the most powerful techniques for the controlled deposition of inorganic compounds, due to its ability to form conformal coatings on porous substrates at low temperatures with high surface sensitivity and atomic control of film thickness. The hydrophobic nature of the nanocarbon surface has so far limited the applicability of ALD on CNTs. Herein we investigate the role of structural defects in CNTs, both intrinsic and induced by acid treatment, on coverage, uniformity and crystallinity of ZnO coatings. Furthermore, we demonstrate the potential of small aromatic molecules, including benzyl alcohol (BA), naphthalene carboxylic acid (NA) and pyrene carboxylic acid (PCA), as active nucleation sites and linking agents. Importantly, only PCA exhibits sufficiently strong interactions with the pristine CNT surface to withstand desorption under reaction conditions. Thus, PCA enables a versatile and non-destructive alternative route for the deposition of highly uniform metal oxide coatings onto pristine CNTs via ALD over a wide temperature range and without the typical surface corrosion induced by covalent functionalisation. Importantly, preliminary tests demonstrated that the improved morphology obtained with PCA has indeed considerably increased the hybrid's photocatalytic activity towards hydrogen evolution via sacrificial water splitting. The concept demonstrated in this work is transferable to a wide range of other inorganic compounds including metal oxides, metal (oxy)nitrides and metal chalcogenides on a variety of nanocarbons.The hybridisation of metal oxides and nanocarbons has created a promising new class of functional materials for environmental and

  4. Mechanistic chemistry of oxidation of balsalazide with acidic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2-hydroxy-5-nitroso-benzoic acid and 3-(4-nitroso-benzoylamino)-propionic acid are identified as the oxidation products of BSZ with both CAT and BAT. The rate of oxidation of BSZ is about five-fold faster with BAT than with CAT. Plausible mechanism and related rate law have been deduced for the observed kinetics.

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some -hydroxy acids ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 116; Issue 6. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some -hydroxy acids by hexamethylenetetramine-bromine ... The oxidation of -deuteriomandelic acid exhibits the presence of a substantial kinetic isotope effect (/ = 5.91 at 298 K). The rates of ...

  6. Platinum nanoparticles–manganese oxide nanorods as novel binary catalysts for formic acid oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    El-Deab, Mohamed S.

    2012-01-01

    The current study proposes a novel binary catalyst system (composed of metal/metal oxide nanoparticles) as a promising electrocatalyst in formic acid oxidation. The electro-catalytic oxidation of formic acid is carried out with binary catalysts of Pt nanoparticles (nano-Pt) and manganese oxide nanorods (nano-MnOx) electrodeposited onto glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. Cyclic voltammetric (CV) measurements showed that unmodified GC and nano-MnOx/GC electrodes have no catalytic activity. While tw...

  7. Intrinsic point defects in zinc oxide. Modeling of structural, electronic, thermodynamic and kinetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erhart, P.

    2006-07-01

    The present dissertation deals with the modeling of zinc oxide on the atomic scale employing both quantum mechanical as well as atomistic methods. The first part describes quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory of intrinsic point defects in ZnO. To begin with, the geometric and electronic structure of vacancies and oxygen interstitials is explored. In equilibrium oxygen interstitials are found to adopt dumbbell and split interstitial configurations in positive and negative charge states, respectively. Semi-empirical self-interaction corrections allow to improve the agreement between the experimental and the calculated band structure significantly; errors due to the limited size of the supercells can be corrected by employing finite-size scaling. The effect of both band structure corrections and finite-size scaling on defect formation enthalpies and transition levels is explored. Finally, transition paths and barriers for the migration of zinc as well as oxygen vacancies and interstitials are determined. The results allow to interpret diffusion experiments and provide a consistent basis for developing models for device simulation. In the second part an interatomic potential for zinc oxide is derived. To this end, the Pontifix computer code is developed which allows to fit analytic bond-order potentials. The code is subsequently employed to obtain interatomic potentials for Zn-O, Zn-Zn, and O-O interactions. To demonstrate the applicability of the potentials, simulations on defect production by ion irradiation are carried out. (orig.)

  8. Tuning the reactivity of Ru nanoparticles by defect engineering of the reduced graphene oxide support

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    We systematically investigated the electronic structure of Ru nanoparticles supported on various local structures on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) by first-principles-based calculations. We showed that Ru nanoparticles prefer to nucleate at these localized defect structures on rGO, which act as strong trapping sites for Ru nanoparticles and inhibit their aggregation. The binding of Ru nanoparticles to rGO, which is dependent on these local defect structures and correlates with the interfacial charge transfer, determines the electronic structure of the composites. Further study reveals that the performance of these composites against oxygen adsorption changes proportionally with the shift of the d-band center of the nanoparticles. The correlation between the defect structures on rGO and the reactivity of the composites suggests that controlled modification of the graphenic support by defect engineering would be an efficient way to fabricate new transition metal/rGO composites with high stability and desired reactivity. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  9. A polarity-induced defect mechanism for conductivity and magnetism at polar-nonpolar oxide interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liping; Zunger, Alex

    2014-10-13

    The discovery of conductivity and magnetism at the polar-nonpolar interfaces of insulating nonmagnetic oxides such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 has raised prospects for attaining interfacial functionalities absent in the component materials. Yet, the microscopic origin of such emergent phenomena remains unclear, posing obstacles to design of improved functionalities. Here we present first principles calculations of electronic and defect properties of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces and reveal a unifying mechanism for the origins of both conductivity and magnetism. We demonstrate that the polar discontinuity across the interface triggers thermodynamically the spontaneous formation of certain defects that in turn cancel the polar field induced by the polar discontinuity. The ionization of the spontaneously formed surface oxygen vacancy defects leads to interface conductivity, whereas the unionized Ti-on-Al antisite defects lead to interface magnetism. The proposed mechanism suggests practical design principles for inducing and controlling both conductivity and magnetism at general polar-nonpolar interfaces.

  10. Emulsifying Property and Antioxidative Activity of Cuttlefish Skin Gelatin Modified with Oxidized Linoleic Acid and Oxidized Tannic Acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aewsiri, T.; Benjakul, S.; Visessanguan, W.; Wierenga, P.A.; Gruppen, H.

    2013-01-01

    Cuttlefish skin gelatins modified with oxidized linoleic acid (OLA) and oxidized tannic acid (OTA) were characterized and determined for emulsifying properties and antioxidative activity. Modification of gelatin with 5% OTA increased the total phenolic content and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl,

  11. Fatty acid beta-oxidation in peroxisomes and mitochondria: the first, unequivocal evidence for the involvement of carnitine in shuttling propionyl-CoA from peroxisomes to mitochondria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakobs, B. S.; Wanders, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated how [1-14C]propionyl-CoA, which is the first product of the peroxisomal beta-oxidation of [1-14C] pristanic acid, is transported to mitochondria for further oxidation in human skin fibroblasts from patients with a defect in the mitochondrial carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase

  12. Surface oxidation of gold nanoparticles supported on a glassy carbon electrode in sulphuric acid medium: contrasts with the behaviour of 'macro' gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Laborda, Eduardo; Crossley, Alison; Compton, Richard G

    2013-03-07

    Consecutive electro-oxidation and reduction cycling of gold macroelectrodes in sulphuric acid medium is a widely-used cleaning and calibration procedure. In this paper this method is applied to electrodeposited nanoparticles revealing significant differences in the electro-oxidation process and the cleaning effectiveness. This suggests a higher density of surface defects on the nanoparticles.

  13. Ascorbic Acid and Beta-Carotene Alleviate Oxidative Effect of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ascorbic Acid and Beta-Carotene Alleviate Oxidative Effect of London King Size® Cigarette Smoke on Tissue Lipids. ... Malondialdehyde production in the tissues was reduced by ascorbic acid and or beta-carotene given daily to the rats. It is implied that ascorbic acid or ... http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/njhbs.v2i1.11451.

  14. Defective transcription-coupled repair of oxidative base damage in Cockayne syndrome patients from XP group G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, P K; Nouspikel, T; Clarkson, S G; Leadon, S A

    1997-02-14

    In normal human cells, damage due to ultraviolet light is preferentially removed from active genes by nucleotide excision repair (NER) in a transcription-coupled repair (TCR) process that requires the gene products defective in Cockayne syndrome (CS). Oxidative damage, including thymine glycols, is shown to be removed by TCR in cells from normal individuals and from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)-A, XP-F, and XP-G patients who have NER defects but not from XP-G patients who have severe CS. Thus, TCR of oxidative damage requires an XPG function distinct from its NER endonuclease activity. These results raise the possibility that defective TCR of oxidative damage contributes to the developmental defects associated with CS.

  15. Sensitivity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae defective in TOR signaling pathway to carbonyl/oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valishkevych B. V.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the influence of carbonyl/oxidative stress induced by glyoxal, methylglyoxal and hydrogen peroxide on the survival of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, defective for different parts of TOR- signaling pathway, grown on glucose or fructose. Methods. The assessment of number of colony-forming units to determine the yeast reproductive ability. Results. It was shown that at certain concentrations the mentioned above toxicants caused an increase in yeast survival, indicating the hormetic effect. Conclusions. The TOR signaling pathway is involved in the hormetic effect, but it is specific for each strain and depends on the type of carbohydrate in the incubation medium.

  16. Preparation of fulvic acid and low-molecular organic acids by oxidation of weathered coal humic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinozuka, T.; Ito, A.; Sasaki, O.; Yazawa, Y.; Yamaguchi, T. [Chiba Institute of Technolgy, Chiba (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry

    2002-07-01

    Weathered coal contains much humic acid and a little fulvic acid. Therefore, the production of fulvic acid, the most valuable humic substance because of its water-solubility, was examined by ozone and hydrogen peroxide oxidation of humic acid extracted form Xinjiang (China) weathered coal. The resulting products of the oxidation were water soluble fulvic acid and organic acids, mainly formic acid and oxalic acid. The product yield of fulvic acid was 20 (C%) and that of organic acids were 39 (C%) for formic and acid 13 (C%) for oxalic acid. The formed fulvic acid showed a higher content of oxygen and carboxyl groups, than those of the extracted one from the original weathered coal.

  17. Folic acid supplement use in the prevention of neural tube defects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Delany, C

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, planned folic acid fortification for the prevention of Neural Tube Defects (NTD) was postponed. Concurrently, the economic recession may have affected dietary folic acid intake, placing increased emphasis on supplement use. This study examined folic acid supplement use in 2009. A cross-sectional survey of 300 ante-natal women was undertaken to assess folic acid knowledge and use. Associations between demographic, obstetric variables and folic acid knowledge and use were examined. A majority, 284\\/297 (96%), had heard of folic acid, and 178\\/297 (60%) knew that it could prevent NTD. Most, 270\\/297 (91%) had taken it during their pregnancy, but only 107\\/297 (36%) had used it periconceptionally. Being older, married, planned pregnancy and better socioeconomic status were associated with periconceptional use. Periconceptional folic acid use in 2009 was very low, little changed from economic status were associated with periconceptional use. Periconceptional folic acid use in 2009 was very low, little changed from earlier years. Continuous promotion efforts are necessary. Close monitoring of folic acid intake and NTD rates is essential, particularly in the absence of fortification.

  18. Polyaniline: Aniline oxidation with strong and weak oxidants under various acidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bláha, Michal, E-mail: blaha@imc.cas.cz [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Trchová, Miroslava; Bober, Patrycja; Morávková, Zuzana [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Prokeš, Jan [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Stejskal, Jaroslav [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2017-06-15

    Aniline was oxidized with three strong inorganic oxidants (ammonium peroxydisulfate, cerium(IV) sulfate, potassium dichromate), two weak inorganic oxidants (iron(III) chloride, silver nitrate), and one organic oxidant (p-benzoquinone) in aqueous solutions of methanesulfonic acid (MSA) of various concentration. Whereas oxidation of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate yielded high-molecular-weight conducting polyaniline (PANI) in the whole acidity range, the oxidation with cerium(IV) sulfate led also to a single product close to PANI with considerably lower molecular weight and lower conductivity. Potassium dichromate gave PANI only at high concentration of MSA. The use of iron(III) chloride yielded composite mixtures of PANI and low-molecular-weight aniline oligomers. The oxidation of aniline with silver nitrate led to composites of silver and an organic part, which was constituted either by aniline oligomers or conducting polyaniline or both. p-Benzoquinone as oxidant produced mainly aniline oligomers with poor conductivity and 2,5-dianilino-p-benzoquinone-like structure detected in FTIR and Raman spectra when oxidation proceeded with weak oxidants. A general model of oxidation with strong and weak oxidants was formulated. - Highlights: • Comparison of aniline oxidation with oxidants of different redox potential. • UV–vis, FTIR and Raman spectroscopies combined with size-exclusion chromatography. • The contents of polymer and oligomers were analyzed and discussed. • General model of aniline oxidation with strong and weak oxidants was formulated.

  19. Periconceptional maternal fever, folic acid intake, and the risk for neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Stephen M; Parker, Samantha E; Mitchell, Allen A; Tinker, Sarah C; Werler, Martha M

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies have shown an association between maternal fever in early pregnancy and neural tube defects (NTDs) such as spina bifida. Periconceptional folic acid intake has been shown to reduce the risk of these outcomes. Using data from the Slone Epidemiology Center Birth Defects Study (1998-2015), we examined the impact of folic acid on the relationship between maternal fever in the periconceptional period (28 days before and after the last menstrual period) and NTDs. Logistic regression models were used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Mothers of 375 cases and 8247 nonmalformed controls were included. We observed an elevated risk for NTDs for fever in the periconceptional period (OR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.5-4.0). This association was weaker for mothers who reported consuming the recommended amount of folic acid (≥400 μg per day; OR: 1.8; 95% CI: 0.8-4.0) than mothers with low folic acid intake (<400 μg per day; OR: 4.2; 95% CI: 2.2-8.2). Our data support an association between maternal periconceptional fever and an increased risk for NTDs and also provide evidence that this association was attenuated for mothers who reported consuming folic acid at recommended levels in the periconceptional period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Charged defects during alpha-irradiation of actinide oxides as revealed by Raman and luminescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohun, R.; Desgranges, L.; Léchelle, J.; Simon, P.; Guimbretière, G.; Canizarès, A.; Duval, F.; Jegou, C.; Magnin, M.; Clavier, N.; Dacheux, N.; Valot, C.; Vauchy, R.

    2016-05-01

    We have recently evidenced an original Raman signature of alpha irradiation-induced defects in UO2. In this study, we aim to determine whether the same signature also exists in different actinide oxides, namely ThO2 and PuO2. Sintered UO2 and ThO2 were initially irradiated with 21 MeV He2+ ions using a cyclotron device and were subjected to an in situ luminescence experiment followed by Raman analysis. In addition, a PuO2 sample which had accumulated self-irradiation damage due to alpha particles was investigated only by Raman measurement. Results obtained for the initially white ThO2 showed that a blue color appeared in the irradiated areas as well as luminescence signals during irradiation. However, Raman spectroscopic analysis showed the absence of Raman signature in ThO2. In contrast, the irradiated UO2 and PuO2 confirmed the presence of the Raman signature but no luminescence peaks were observed. The proposed mechanism involves electronic defects in ThO2, while a coupling between electronic defects and phonons is required to explain the Raman spectra for UO2 and PuO2.

  1. Charged defects during alpha-irradiation of actinide oxides as revealed by Raman and luminescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohun, R.; Desgranges, L.; Léchelle, J. [CEA/DEN/DEC/SESC, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Simon, P.; Guimbretière, G.; Canizarès, A.; Duval, F. [CNRS, UPR 3079 CEMHTI, et Université d’Orléans, 1D avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orléans (France); Jegou, C.; Magnin, M. [CEA/DEN/DTCD, Centre de Marcoule, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Clavier, N.; Dacheux, N. [ICSM, UMR 5257 CEA/CNRS/UM2/ENSCM, Site de Marcoule, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Valot, C. [CEA/DEN/DTEC/SECA/LCC, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Vauchy, R. [CEA/DEN/DEC/SPUA, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2016-05-01

    We have recently evidenced an original Raman signature of alpha irradiation-induced defects in UO{sub 2}. In this study, we aim to determine whether the same signature also exists in different actinide oxides, namely ThO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2}. Sintered UO{sub 2} and ThO{sub 2} were initially irradiated with 21 MeV He{sup 2+} ions using a cyclotron device and were subjected to an in situ luminescence experiment followed by Raman analysis. In addition, a PuO{sub 2} sample which had accumulated self-irradiation damage due to alpha particles was investigated only by Raman measurement. Results obtained for the initially white ThO{sub 2} showed that a blue color appeared in the irradiated areas as well as luminescence signals during irradiation. However, Raman spectroscopic analysis showed the absence of Raman signature in ThO{sub 2}. In contrast, the irradiated UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} confirmed the presence of the Raman signature but no luminescence peaks were observed. The proposed mechanism involves electronic defects in ThO{sub 2}, while a coupling between electronic defects and phonons is required to explain the Raman spectra for UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2}.

  2. The use of folic acid for the prevention of neural tube defects and other congenital anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R Douglas; Davies, Gregory; Désilets, Valérie; Reid, Gregory J; Summers, Anne; Wyatt, Philip; Young, David

    2003-11-01

    To provide information regarding the use of folic acid for the prevention of neural tube defects (NTDs) and other congenital anomalies, in order that physicians, midwives, nurses, and other health-care workers can assist in the education of women in the preconception phase of their health care. OPTION: Folic acid supplementation is problematic, since 50% of pregnancies are unplanned and the health status of women may not be optimal. Folic acid supplementation has been proven to decrease or minimize specific birth defects. A systematic review of the literature, including review and peer-reviewed articles, government publications, the previous Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) Policy Statement of March 1993, and statements from the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, was used to develop a new clinical practice guideline for the SOGC. Peer-review process within the committee structure. The benefit is reduced lethal and severe morbidity birth defects and the harm is minimal. The personal cost is of vitamin supplementation on a daily basis and eating a healthy diet. 1. Women in the reproductive age group should be advised about the benefits of folic acid supplementation during wellness visits (birth control renewal, Pap testing, yearly examination), especially if pregnancy is contemplated. (III-A) 2. Women should be advised to maintain a healthy nutritional diet, as recommended in Canada's Food Guide to Healthy Eating (good or excellent sources of folic acid: broccoli, spinach, peas, Brussels sprouts, corn, beans, lentils, oranges). (III-A) 3. Women who could become pregnant should be advised to take a multivitamin containing 0.4 mg to 1.0 mg of folic acid daily. (II-1A) 4. Women taking a multivitamin with folic acid supplement should be advised not to take more than 1 daily dose of vitamin supplement, as indicated on the product label. (II-2A) 5. Women in intermediate- to high-risk categories for NTDs (NTD-affected previous

  3. AMPK-independent pathways regulate skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dzamko, Nicolas; Schertzer, Jonathan D.; Ryall, James G.

    2008-01-01

    The activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and phosphorylation/inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) is believed to be the principal pathway regulating fatty acid oxidation. However, during exercise AMPK activity and ACC Ser-221 phosphorylation does not always correlate...... with rates of fatty acid oxidation. To address this issue we have investigated the requirement for skeletal muscle AMPK in controlling aminoimidazole-4-carboxymide-1-beta-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) and contraction-stimulated fatty acid oxidation utilizing transgenic mice expressing a muscle-specific kinase...... dead (KD) AMPK alpha2. In wild-type (WT) mice, AICAR and contraction increased AMPK alpha2 and alpha1 activities, the phosphorylation of ACC2 and rates of fatty acid oxidation while tending to reduce malonyl-CoA levels. Despite no activation of AMPK in KD mice, ACC2 phosphorylation was maintained...

  4. Sodium Picosulfate, Magnesium Oxide, and Anhydrous Citric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium picosulfate, magnesium oxide, and anhydrous citric acid combination powder is used to empty the colon (large ... clear view of the walls of the colon. Sodium picosulfate is in a class of medications called ...

  5. Salvianolic acid B Relieves Oxidative Stress in Glucose Absorption ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    levels of ROS as well as antioxidant enzyme activity were determined. Results: ... Keywords: Salvianolic acid B, Blood glucose, Reactive oxygen species, Oxidative stress, Sugar diet. Tropical .... dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-.

  6. Parabanic acid is the singlet oxygen specific oxidation product of uric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Sayaka; Ohkubo, Yuki; Yamamoto, Yorihiro; Fujisawa, Akio

    2017-11-01

    Uric acid quenches singlet oxygen physically or reacts with it, but the oxidation product has not been previously characterized. The present study determined that the product is parabanic acid, which was confirmed by LC/TOFMS analysis. Parabanic acid was stable at acidic pH (acid at neutral or alkaline pH. The total yields of parabanic acid and oxaluric acid based on consumed uric acid were ~100% in clean singlet oxygen production systems such as UVA irradiation of Rose Bengal and thermal decomposition of 3-(1,4-dihydro-1,4-epidioxy-4-methyl-1-naphthyl)propionic acid. However, the ratio of the amount of uric acid consumed to the total amount of singlet oxygen generated was less than 1/180, indicating that most of the singlet oxygen was physically quenched. The total yields of parabanic acid and oxaluric acid were high in the uric acid oxidation systems with hydrogen peroxide plus hypochlorite or peroxynitrite. They became less than a few percent in peroxyl radical-, hypochlorite- or peroxynitrite-induced oxidation of uric acid. These results suggest that parabanic acid could be an in vivo probe of singlet oxygen formation because of the wide distribution of uric acid in human tissues and extracellular spaces. In fact, sunlight exposure significantly increased human skin levels of parabanic acid.

  7. Picolinic acid promoted oxidative decarboxylation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The kinetics and mechanism of picolinic acid promoted reaction of phenylsulfinylacetic acid (PSAA) with Cr(VI) was carried out in aqueous acetonitrile medium under pseudo first order conditions. The reaction follows Michaelis-Menten type of kinetics with respect to PSAA. The catalytic activity by picolinic acid can be ...

  8. Ferrous iron oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: inhibition with benzoic acid, sorbic acid and sodium lauryl sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onysko, S.J.

    1984-07-01

    Acid mine drainage is formed by the weathering or oxidation of pyritic material exposed during coal mining. The rate of pyritic material oxidation can be greatly accelerated by certain acidophilic bacteria such as Thiobacillus ferrooxidans which catalyse the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron. A number of organic compounds, under laboratory conditions, can apparently inhibit both the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron by T. ferrooxidans and the weathering of pyritic material by mixed cultures of acid mine drainage micro-organisms. Sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), an anionic surfactant has proved effective in this respect. Benzoic acid, sorbic acid and SLS at low concentrations, each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of T. ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low pH, sterile, batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations of any of the compounds.

  9. catalyzed oxidation of some amino acids by acid bromate

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Srivastava, S., Tripathi, H. and Singh, K. (2001). Ruthenium(III) Catalysed oxidation of glycerol by acidified KBrO3.Transition Metal. Chemistry 26:727–729. 19. Subramanian, N. Venkata and Thiagarajan, V. (1969). Kinetics and mechanism of ruthenium tetroxide catalysed oxidation of cyclic alcohols by bromate in a base.

  10. Ferrous iron oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: inhibition with benzoic acid, sorbic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onysko, S.J.; Kleinmann, R.L.P.; Erickson, P.M.

    1984-07-01

    Thiobacillus ferrooxidans promote indirect oxidation of pyrite through the catalysis of the oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron, which is an effective oxidant of pyrite. These bacteria also may catalyze direct oxidation of pyrite by oxygen. A number of organic compounds, under laboratory conditions, can apparently inhibit both the oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron by T. ferrooxidans and the weathering of pyritic material by mixed cultures of acid mine drainage microorganisms. In this study, benzoic acid, sorbic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate at low concentrations (5 to 10 mg/liter) each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low-pH, sterile batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations (5 to 50 mg/liter) of any of the compounds.

  11. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of formic acid in wastewater with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-03

    Jul 3, 2016 ... ABSTRACT. The catalytic wet oxidation of formic acid, using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizing agent over naturally-occurring iron ore, was explored. Firstly, the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to its hydroxyl radicals (HO• and HOO•) over naturally-occurring iron ore was investigated. The reaction was ...

  12. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of formic acid in wastewater with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The catalytic wet oxidation of formic acid, using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizing agent over naturally-occurring iron ore, was explored. Firstly, the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to its hydroxyl radicals (HO• and HOO•) over naturally-occurring iron ore was investigated. The reaction was monitored by ATR FTIR by ...

  13. Maternal folic acid supplementation and dietary folate intake and congenital heart defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baohong Mao

    Full Text Available It has been reported that folic acid supplementation before and/or during pregnancy could reduce the risk of congenital heart defects (CHDs. However, the results from limited epidemiologic studies have been inconclusive. We investigated the associations between maternal folic acid supplementation, dietary folate intake, and the risk of CHDs.A birth cohort study was conducted in 2010-2012 at the Gansu Provincial Maternity & Child Care Hospital in Lanzhou, China. After exclusion of stillbirths and multiple births, a total of 94 births were identified with congenital heart defects, and 9,993 births without any birth defects. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate the associations.Compared to non-users, folic acid supplement users before pregnancy had a reduced risk of overall CHDs (OR: 0.42, 95% CI: 0.21-0.86, Ptrend = 0.025 after adjusted for potential confounders. A protective effect was observed for certain subtypes of CHDs (OR: 0.37, 95% CI: 0.16-0.85 for malformation of great arteries; 0.26, 0.10-0.68 for malformation of cardiac septa; 0.34, 0.13-0.93 for Atrial septal defect. A similar protective effect was also seen for multiple CHDs (OR: 0.49, 95% CI: 0.26-0.93, Ptrend = 0.004. Compared with the middle quartiles of dietary folate intake, lower dietary folate intake (<149.88 μg/day during pregnancy were associated with increased risk of overall CHDs (OR: 1.63, 95% CI: 1.01-2.62 and patent ductus arteriosus (OR: 1.85, 95% CI: 1.03-3.32. Women who were non-user folic acid supplement and lower dietary folate intake have almost 2-fold increased CHDs risk in their offspring.Our study suggested that folic acid supplementation before pregnancy was associated with a reduced risk of CHDs, lower dietary folate intake during pregnancy was associated with increased risk. The observed associations varied by CHD subtypes. A synergistic effect of dietary folate intake and folic acid supplementation was also observed.

  14. Engineering the defect state and reducibility of ceria based nanoparticles for improved anti-oxidation performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Jie; Dong, Hao; Lyu, Guang-Ming; Zhang, Huai-Yuan; Ke, Jun; Kang, Li-Qun; Teng, Jia-Li; Sun, Ling-Dong; Si, Rui; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yan-Jun; Zhang, Ya-Wen; Huang, Yun-Hui; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2015-08-01

    Due to their excellent anti-oxidation performance, CeO2 nanoparticles receive wide attention in pharmacological application. Deep understanding of the anti-oxidation mechanism of CeO2 nanoparticles is extremely important to develop potent CeO2 nanomaterials for anti-oxidation application. Here, we report a detailed study on the anti-oxidation process of CeO2 nanoparticles. The valence state and coordination structure of Ce are characterized before and after the addition of H2O2 to understand the anti-oxidation mechanism of CeO2 nanoparticles. Adsorbed peroxide species are detected during the anti-oxidation process, which are responsible for the red-shifted UV-vis absorption spectra of CeO2 nanoparticles. Furthermore, the coordination number of Ce in the first coordination shell slightly increased after the addition of H2O2. On the basis of these experimental results, the reactivity of coordination sites for peroxide species is considered to play a key role in the anti-oxidation performance of CeO2 nanoparticles. Furthermore, we present a robust method to engineer the anti-oxidation performance of CeO2 nanoparticles through the modification of the defect state and reducibility by doping with Gd3+. Improved anti-oxidation performance is also observed in cell culture, where the biocompatible CeO2-based nanoparticles can protect INS-1 cells from oxidative stress induced by H2O2, suggesting the potential application of CeO2 nanoparticles in the treatment of diabetes.Due to their excellent anti-oxidation performance, CeO2 nanoparticles receive wide attention in pharmacological application. Deep understanding of the anti-oxidation mechanism of CeO2 nanoparticles is extremely important to develop potent CeO2 nanomaterials for anti-oxidation application. Here, we report a detailed study on the anti-oxidation process of CeO2 nanoparticles. The valence state and coordination structure of Ce are characterized before and after the addition of H2O2 to understand the anti-oxidation

  15. Platinum nanoparticles–manganese oxide nanorods as novel binary catalysts for formic acid oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed S. El-Deab

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study proposes a novel binary catalyst system (composed of metal/metal oxide nanoparticles as a promising electrocatalyst in formic acid oxidation. The electro-catalytic oxidation of formic acid is carried out with binary catalysts of Pt nanoparticles (nano-Pt and manganese oxide nanorods (nano-MnOx electrodeposited onto glassy carbon (GC electrodes. Cyclic voltammetric (CV measurements showed that unmodified GC and nano-MnOx/GC electrodes have no catalytic activity. While two oxidation peaks were observed at nano-Pt/GC electrode at ca. 0.2 and 0.55 V (corresponding to the direct oxidation of formic acid and the oxidation of the poisoning CO intermediate, respectively. The combined use of nano-MnOx and nano-Pt results in superb enhancement of the direct oxidation pathway. Nano-MnOx is shown to facilitate the oxidation of CO (to CO2 by providing oxygen at low over-potential. This leads to retrieval of Pt active sites necessary for the direct oxidation of formic acid. The higher catalytic activity of nano-MnOx/nano-Pt/GC electrode (with Pt firstly deposited compared to its mirror image electrode (i.e., with MnOx firstly deposited, nano-Pt/nano-MnOx/GC reveals that the order of the electrodeposition is an essential parameter.

  16. Role of folic acid in nitric oxide bioavailability and vascular endothelial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Kenney, W Larry

    2017-01-01

    Folic acid is a member of the B-vitamin family and is essential for amino acid metabolism. Adequate intake of folic acid is vital for metabolism, cellular homeostasis, and DNA synthesis. Since the initial discovery of folic acid in the 1940s, folate deficiency has been implicated in numerous disease states, primarily those associated with neural tube defects in utero and neurological degeneration later in life. However, in the past decade, epidemiological studies have identified an inverse relation between both folic acid intake and blood folate concentration and cardiovascular health. This association inspired a number of clinical studies that suggested that folic acid supplementation could reverse endothelial dysfunction in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recently, in vitro and in vivo studies have begun to elucidate the mechanism(s) through which folic acid improves vascular endothelial function. These studies, which are the focus of this review, suggest that folic acid and its active metabolite 5-methyl tetrahydrofolate improve nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability by increasing endothelial NO synthase coupling and NO production as well as by directly scavenging superoxide radicals. By improving NO bioavailability, folic acid may protect or improve endothelial function, thereby preventing or reversing the progression of CVD in those with overt disease or elevated CVD risk. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The effects of fatty acid composition on lipid oxidation, protein oxidation and color stability in minced pork

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Miao

    2017-01-01

    The literature review covers different aspects of lipid oxidation and protein oxidation in meat.The mechanism of lipid and protein oxidation, factors influencing lipid oxidation, the consequences of protein oxidation, measurement methods, and the interactions between lipid oxidation, protein oxidation and meat color are introduced. The present thesis was aiming to study the effects of different fatty acid composition on lipid oxidation, protein oxidation and meat color in minced pork st...

  18. Translucent tissue defect in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers is associated with oxidative stress accompanying an accelerated aging phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zommick, Daniel H; Kumar, G N Mohan; Knowles, Lisa O; Knowles, N Richard

    2013-12-01

    Translucent tissue defect (TTD) is an undesirable postharvest disorder of potato tubers characterized by the development of random pockets of semi-transparent tissue containing high concentrations of reducing sugars. Translucent areas turn dark during frying due to the Maillard reaction. The newly released cultivar, Premier Russet, is highly resistant to low temperature sweetening, but susceptible to TTD. Symptoms appeared as early as 170 days after harvest and worsened with time in storage (4-9 °C, 95 % RH). In addition to higher concentrations of glucose, fructose and sucrose, TTD resulted in lower dry matter, higher specific activities of starch phosphorylase and glc-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, higher protease activity, loss of protein, and increased concentrations of free amino acids (esp. asparagine and glutamine). The mechanism of TTD is unknown; however, the disorder has similarities with the irreversible senescent sweetening that occurs in tubers during long-term storage, where much of the decline in quality is a consequence of progressive increases in oxidative stress with advancing age. The respiration rate of non-TTD 'Premier Russet' tubers was inherently higher (ca. 40 %) than that of 'Russet Burbank' tubers (a non-TTD cultivar). Moreover, translucent tissue from 'Premier Russet' tubers had a 1.9-fold higher respiration rate than the average of non-translucent tissue and tissue from non-TTD tubers. Peroxidation of membrane lipids during TTD development resulted in increased levels of malondialdehyde and likely contributed to a measurable increase in membrane permeability. Superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and the ratio of oxidized to total glutathione were substantially higher in translucent tissue. TTD tubers also contained twofold less ascorbate than non-TTD tubers. TTD appears to be a consequence of oxidative stress associated with accelerated aging of 'Premier Russet' tubers.

  19. Predicting point defect equilibria across oxide hetero-interfaces: model system of ZrO2/Cr2O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Youssef, Mostafa; Yildiz, Bilge

    2017-02-01

    We present a multi-scale approach to predict equilibrium defect concentrations across oxide/oxide hetero-interfaces. There are three factors that need to be taken into account simultaneously for computing defect redistribution around the hetero-interfaces: the variation of local bonding environment at the interface as epitomized in defect segregation energies, the band offset at the interface, and the equilibration of the chemical potentials of species and electrons via ionic and electronic drift-diffusion fluxes. By including these three factors from the level of first principles calculation, we build a continuum model for defect redistribution by concurrent solution of Poisson's equation for the electrostatic potential and the steady-state equilibrium drift-diffusion equation for each defect. This model solves for and preserves the continuity of the electric displacement field throughout the interfacial core zone and the extended space charge zones. We implement this computational framework to a model hetero-interface between the monoclinic zirconium oxide, m-ZrO2, and the chromium oxide Cr2O3. This interface forms upon the oxidation of zirconium alloys containing chromium secondary phase particles. The model explains the beneficial effect of the oxidized Cr particles on the corrosion and hydrogen resistance of Zr alloys. Under oxygen rich conditions, the ZrO2/Cr2O3 heterojunction depletes the oxygen vacancies and the sum of electrons and holes in the extended space charge zone in ZrO2. This reduces the transport of oxygen and electrons thorough ZrO2 and slows down the metal oxidation rate. The enrichment of free electrons in the space charge zone is expected to decrease the hydrogen uptake through ZrO2. Moreover, our analysis provides a clear anatomy of the components of interfacial electric properties; a zero-Kelvin defect-free contribution and a finite temperature defect contribution. The thorough analytical and numerical treatment presented here quantifies

  20. Kinetics of Oxidation of 3-Benzoylpropionic Acid by N-Chlorobenzamide in Aqueous Acetic Acid Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Mohamed Farook

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of 3-benzoylpropionic acid (KA by N-chlorobenzamide (NCB in aqueous acetic acid medium in the presence of perchloric acid have been investigated. The observed rate of oxidation is first order dependence each in [KA], [NCB] and [H+]. The main product of the oxidation is the corresponding carboxylic acid. The rate decreases with the addition of benzamide, one of the products of the reaction. Variation in ionic strength of the reaction medium has no significant effect on the rate of oxidation. But the rate of the reaction is enhanced by lowering the dielectric constant of the reaction medium. Hypochlorous acidium ion (H2O+Cl, has been postulated as the reactive oxidizing species. A mechanism consistent with observed results have been proposed and the related rate law deduced. The activation parameters have been computed with respect to slow step of the mechanism.

  1. Obstructive heart defects associated with candidate genes, maternal obesity, and folic acid supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xinyu; Cleves, Mario A; Nick, Todd G; Li, Ming; MacLeod, Stewart L; Erickson, Stephen W; Li, Jingyun; Shaw, Gary M; Mosley, Bridget S; Hobbs, Charlotte A

    2015-06-01

    Right-sided and left-sided obstructive heart defects (OHDs) are subtypes of congenital heart defects, in which the heart valves, arteries, or veins are abnormally narrow or blocked. Previous studies have suggested that the development of OHDs involved a complex interplay between genetic variants and maternal factors. Using the data from 569 OHD case families and 1,644 control families enrolled in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS) between 1997 and 2008, we conducted an analysis to investigate the genetic effects of 877 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 60 candidate genes for association with the risk of OHDs, and their interactions with maternal use of folic acid supplements, and pre-pregnancy obesity. Applying log-linear models based on the hybrid design, we identified a SNP in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene (C677T polymorphism) with a main genetic effect on the occurrence of OHDs. In addition, multiple SNPs in betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT and BHMT2) were also identified to be associated with the occurrence of OHDs through significant main infant genetic effects and interaction effects with maternal use of folic acid supplements. We also identified multiple SNPs in glutamate-cysteine ligase, catalytic subunit (GCLC) and DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 3 beta (DNMT3B) that were associated with elevated risk of OHDs among obese women. Our findings suggested that the risk of OHDs was closely related to a combined effect of variations in genes in the folate, homocysteine, or glutathione/transsulfuration pathways, maternal use of folic acid supplements and pre-pregnancy obesity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The comparison of gamma-radiation and electrical stress influences on oxide and interface defects in power VDMOSFET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorić-Veljković Snežana M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of oxide and interface defects in n-channel power vertical double-diffused metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors, firstly degraded by the gamma-irradiation and electric field and subsequently recovered and annealed, is presented. By analyzing the transfer characteristic shifts, the changes of threshold voltage and underlying changes of gate oxide and interface trap densities during the stress (recovery, annealing of investigated devices, it is shown that these two types of stress influence differently on the gate oxide and the SiO2-Si interface. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI171026

  3. Oxidation of furan fatty acids by soybean lipoxygenase-1 in the presence of linoleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batna, A; Spiteller, G

    1994-04-19

    The interaction of furan fatty acids (F-acids) with lipoxygenase was investigated by incubation experiments of a synthetic dialkyl-substituted F-acid with soybean lipoxygenase-1. Originally the oxidation of furan fatty acids was assumed to be directly effected by lipoxygenase. It is now demonstrated that this reaction is a two-step process that requires the presence of lipoxygenase substrates, e.g. linoleic acid. In the first step linoleic acid is converted by the enzyme to the corresponding hydroperoxide. This attacks, probably in a radical reaction, the furan fatty acid to produce a dioxoene compound that can be detected unequivocally by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  4. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Oxidation of Lactic Acid and Mandelic Acid by Pyridinium Chlorochromate in Aqueous Acidic Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapana Jain

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyridinium chlorochromate (PCC act as two electron oxidant in kinetic studies of the oxidation of lactic and mandelic acid in acidic medium. The influence of several factors such as acidity, salts, solvent composition and temperature on the reaction rate has been studied. The reaction shows first order dependence with respect to [PCC] and [H+]. The various thermodynamic parameters have been evaluated. Products as oxoacids and absence of free radical were confirmed. Suitable reaction mechanism has been proposed.

  5. Parameters Free Computational Characterization of Defects in Transition Metal Oxides with Diffusion Quantum Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Juan A.; Krogel, Jaron T.; Kent, Paul R.; Reboredo, Fernando

    Materials based on transition metal oxides (TMO's) are among the most challenging systems for computational characterization. Reliable and practical computations are possible by directly solving the many-body problem for TMO's with quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. These methods are very computationally intensive, but recent developments in algorithms and computational infrastructures have enabled their application to real materials. We will show our efforts on the application of the diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) method to study the formation of defects in binary and ternary TMO and heterostructures of TMO. We will also outline current limitations in hardware and algorithms. This work is supported by the Materials Sciences & Engineering Division of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  6. Oxidative stability of fatty acid alkyl esters: a review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Angelovič

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate and to process the current literary knowledge of the physico-chemical properties of vegetable oil raw used for biodiesel production in terms of its qualitative stability. An object of investigation was oxidative stability of biodiesel. In the study, we focused on the qualitative physico-chemical properties of vegetable oils used for biodiesel production, oxidative degradation and its mechanisms, oxidation of lipids, mechanisms of autooxidation, effectivennes of different synthetic antioxidants in relation to oxidative stability of biodiesel and methods of oxidative stability determination. Knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of vegetable oil as raw material and the factors affecting these properties is critical for the production of quality biodiesel and its sustainability. According to the source of oilseed, variations in the chemical composition of the vegetable oil are expressed by variations in the molar ratio among different fatty acids in the structure. The relative ratio of fatty acids present in the raw material is kept relatively constant after the transesterification reaction. The quality of biodiesel physico-chemical properties is influenced by the chain length and the level of unsaturation of the produced fatty acid alkyl esters. A biodiesel is thermodynamically stable. Its instability primarily occurs from contact of oxygen present in the ambient air that is referred to as oxidative instability. For biodiesel is oxidation stability a general term. It is necessary to distinguish ‘storage stability' and ‘thermal stability', in relation to oxidative degradation, which may occur during extended periods of storage, transportation and end use. Fuel instability problems can be of two related types, short-term oxidative instability and long-term storage instability. Storage instability is defined in terms of solid formation, which can plug nozzles, filters, and degrade engine

  7. On Defect Cluster Aggregation and Non-Reducibilty in Tin-Doped Indium Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warschkow, Oliver; Ellis, Donald E.; Gonzalez, Gabriela; Mason, Thomas O.

    2003-03-01

    The conductivity of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO), a transparent conductor, is critically dependent on the amount of tin-doping and oxygen partial pressure during preparation and annealing. Frank and Kostlin (Appl. Phys. A 27 (1982) 197-206) rationalized the carrier concentration dependence by postulating the formation of two types of neutral defect clusters at medium tin-doping levels: "Reducible" and "non-reducible" defect clusters; so named to indicate their ability to create carriers under reduction. According to Frank and Kostlin, both are composed of a single oxygen interstitial and two tin atoms substituting for indium, positioned in non-nearest and nearest coordination, respectively. This present work, seeking to distinguish reducible and non-reducible clusters by use of an atomistic model, finds only a weak correlation of oxygen interstitial binding energies with the relative positioning of dopants. Instead, the number of tin-dopants in the vicinity of the interstitial has a much larger effect on how strongly it is bound, a simple consequence of Coulomb interactions. We postulate that oxygen interstitials become non-reducible when clustered with three or more Sn_In. This occurs at higher doping levels as reducible clusters aggregate and share tin atoms. A simple probabilistic model, estimating the average number of clusters so aggregated, provides a qualitatively correct description of the carrier density in reduced ITO as a function of Sn doping level.

  8. Acid-free co-operative self-assembly of graphene-ZnO nanocomposites and its defect mediated visible light photocatalytic activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parameshwari, R. [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Jothivenkatachalam, K. [Department of Chemistry, Anna University, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Banks, Craig E. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Manchester Metropolitan University, Chester Street, Manchester M1 5GD (United Kingdom); Jeganathan, K., E-mail: kjeganathan@yahoo.com [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2017-02-01

    We propose an acid-free and environmental friendly surfactant based approach to anchor zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles on graphene. Herein, liquid-phase exfoliated graphene in water by ultrasonic waves has been used to prepare graphene-ZnO (G-ZnO) nanocomposites that circumvent the use of various toxic acids and chemicals which are generally used in the preparation of graphene-based nanocomposites. Oxygen vacancy related defect peaks observed by Raman and photoluminescence confirm the formation of C–O–Zn bond due to the synergistic interaction of carbon and zinc via oxygen atoms in G-ZnO nanocomposites. The enhanced photocatalytic behavior of G-ZnO under visible light as evaluated using the dye Rhodamine B holds its genesis from the intrinsic oxygen defects in G-ZnO. Furthermore, graphene acts as electron sink for accumulation of charges from defect levels of ZnO, which controls recombination of charge carriers. It is envisaged that the acid-free and facile strategy can be a potential route for the preparation of graphene-based hybrid materials using liquid-phase exfoliation methodology.

  9. Acid-free co-operative self-assembly of graphene-ZnO nanocomposites and its defect mediated visible light photocatalytic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameshwari, R.; Jothivenkatachalam, K.; Banks, Craig E.; Jeganathan, K.

    2017-02-01

    We propose an acid-free and environmental friendly surfactant based approach to anchor zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles on graphene. Herein, liquid-phase exfoliated graphene in water by ultrasonic waves has been used to prepare graphene-ZnO (G-ZnO) nanocomposites that circumvent the use of various toxic acids and chemicals which are generally used in the preparation of graphene-based nanocomposites. Oxygen vacancy related defect peaks observed by Raman and photoluminescence confirm the formation of C-O-Zn bond due to the synergistic interaction of carbon and zinc via oxygen atoms in G-ZnO nanocomposites. The enhanced photocatalytic behavior of G-ZnO under visible light as evaluated using the dye Rhodamine B holds its genesis from the intrinsic oxygen defects in G-ZnO. Furthermore, graphene acts as electron sink for accumulation of charges from defect levels of ZnO, which controls recombination of charge carriers. It is envisaged that the acid-free and facile strategy can be a potential route for the preparation of graphene-based hybrid materials using liquid-phase exfoliation methodology.

  10. catalyzed oxidation of some amino acids by acid bromate

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Further, the product analysis by spotting techniques indicates the presence of aldehyde in the reaction mixture. So the product of oxidation should be the glycolic aldehyde (2-hydroxy ethanal) and α-hydroxy propionaldehyde (3- hydroxy propanal) for dl-serine and dl-threonine, respectively. The kinetic results were collected ...

  11. Enhanced glutamic acid production by a H+-ATPase-defective mutant of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Ryo; Wada, Masaru; Takesue, Nobuchika; Tanaka, Kenji; Yokota, Atsushi

    2005-08-01

    Previously we reported that a mutant of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC14067 with reduced H+-ATPase activity, F172-8, showed an approximately two times higher specific rate of glucose consumption than the parent, but no glutamic acid productivity under the standard biotin-limited culture conditions, where biotin concentration was set at 5.5 microg/l in the production medium (Sekine et al., Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol., 57, 534-540 (2001)). In this study, various culture conditions were tested to check the glutamic acid productivity of strain F172-8. The mutant was found to produce glutamic acid under exhaustive biotin limitation, where the biotin concentration of the medium was set at 2.5 microg/l with much smaller inoculum size. When strain F172-8 was cultured under the same biotin-limited conditions using a jar fermentor, 53.7 g/l of glutamic acid was produced from 100 g/l glucose, while the parent produced 34.9 g/l of glutamic acid in a medium with 5.5 microg/l biotin. The glutamic acid yield of strain F172-8 also increased under Tween 40-triggered production conditions (1.2-fold higher than the parent strain). The amounts of biotin-binding enzymes were investigated by Western blot analysis. As compared to the parent, the amount of pyruvate carboxylase was lower in the mutant; however, the amount of acetyl-CoA carboxylase did not significantly change under the glutamic acid production conditions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing that the H+-ATPase-defective mutant of C. glutamicum is useful in glutamic acid production.

  12. Folic acid supplements to prevent neural tube defects: trends in East of Ireland 1996-2002.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ward, M

    2004-10-01

    Promotion of folic acid to prevent neural Tube Defects (NTD) has been ongoing for ten years in Ireland, without a concomitant reduction in the total birth prevalence of NTD. The effectiveness of folic acid promotion as the sole means of primary prevention of NTD is therefore questionable. We examined trends in folic acid knowledge and peri-conceptional use from 1996-2002 with the aim of assessing the value of this approach. From 1996-2002, 300 women attending ante-natal clinics in Dublin hospitals annually were surveyed regarding their knowledge and use of folic acid. During the period the proportion who had heard of folic acid rose from 54% to 94% between 1996 and 2002 (c2 test for trend: p<0.001). Knowledge that folic acid can prevent NTD also rose from 21% to 66% (c2 test for trend: p<0.001). Although the proportion who took folic acid during pregnancy increased from 14% to 83% from 1996 to 2002 (c2 test for trend: p<0.001), peri-conceptional intake did not rise above 24% in any year. There is a high awareness of folic acid and its relation to NTD, which is not matched by peri-conceptional uptake. The main barrier to peri-conceptional uptake is the lack of pregnancy planning. To date promotional campaigns appear to have been ineffective in reducing the prevalence of NTD in Ireland. Consequently, fortification of staple foodstuffs is the only practical and reliable means of primary prevention of NTD.

  13. Zwitterionic versus canonical amino acids over the various defects in zeolites: a two-layer ONIOM calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang; Zhou, Lijun

    2014-10-13

    Defects are often considered as the active sites for chemical reactions. Here a variety of defects in zeolites are used to stabilize zwitterionic glycine that is not self-stable in gas phase; in addition, effects of acidic strengths and zeolite channels on zwitterionic stabilization are demonstrated. Glycine zwitterions can be stabilized by all these defects and energetically prefer to canonical structures over Al and Ga Lewis acidic sites rather than Ti Lewis acidic site, silanol and titanol hydroxyls. For titanol (Ti-OH), glycine interacts with framework Ti and hydroxyl sites competitively, and the former with Lewis acidity predominates. The transformations from canonical to zwitterionic glycine are obviously more facile over Al and Ga Lewis acidic sites than over Ti Lewis acidic site, titanol and silanol hydroxyls. Charge transfers that generally increase with adsorption energies are found to largely decide the zwitterionic stabilization effects. Zeolite channels play a significant role during the stabilization process. In absence of zeolite channels, canonical structures predominate for all defects; glycine zwitterions remain stable over Al and Ga Lewis acidic sites and only with synergy of H-bonding interactions can exist over Ti Lewis acidic site, while automatically transform to canonical structures over silanol and titanol hydroxyls.

  14. Retinol oxidation to retinoic acid in human thyroid glandular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taibi, Gennaro; Gueli, Maria Concetta; Nicotra, Concetta M A; Cocciadiferro, Letizia; Carruba, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    Abstract Retinoic acid is regarded as the retinol metabolite that controls proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells. In the present study, we investigated the potential role of xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) in retinoic acid biosynthesis in human thyroid glandular cells (HTGC). In particular, we observed that cellular retinoids binding proteins (CRBPs) are also implicated in the biosynthetic pathway leading to retinoic acid formation in primary cultures of HTGC, as we have already reported for human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC). After partial protein purification, the enzyme responsible for retinoic acid biosynthesis was identified and quantified as XDH by immunoassay, by its ability to oxidize xanthine to uric acid and its sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of oxypurinol. The evidence of XDH-driven formation of retinoic acid in HTGC cultures further corroborates the potential role of XDH in retinoic acid biosynthesis in the epithelia.

  15. Advanced oxidation of acid and reactive dyes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslan-Alaton, I.; Gursoy, B.H.; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2008-01-01

    The effect of untreated and Fenton-treated acid dyes (C.I. Acid Red 183 and C.I. Acid Orange 51) and a reactive dye (C.I. Reactive Blue 4) on aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic processes was investigated. The optimum Fe2+:H2O2 molar ratio was selected as 1:5 (4:hsp sp="0.25" mM:20:hsp sp="0.25"m...... for the untreated blue, red and orange dyes, respectively. The inhibitory effect of the blue reactive dye on methane production was ∼21% after Fenton treatment. Neither untreated nor treated dyes exhibited an inhibitory effect on denitrification. Aerobic glucose degradation was inhibited by 23-29% by untreated dyes......, whereas Fenton-treated dyes had no inhibitory effect on aerobic glucose degradation....

  16. Light Enhanced Hydrofluoric Acid Passivation: A Sensitive Technique for Detecting Bulk Silicon Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Nicholas E.

    2016-01-01

    A procedure to measure the bulk lifetime (>100 µsec) of silicon wafers by temporarily attaining a very high level of surface passivation when immersing the wafers in hydrofluoric acid (HF) is presented. By this procedure three critical steps are required to attain the bulk lifetime. Firstly, prior to immersing silicon wafers into HF, they are chemically cleaned and subsequently etched in 25% tetramethylammonium hydroxide. Secondly, the chemically treated wafers are then placed into a large plastic container filled with a mixture of HF and hydrochloric acid, and then centered over an inductive coil for photoconductance (PC) measurements. Thirdly, to inhibit surface recombination and measure the bulk lifetime, the wafers are illuminated at 0.2 suns for 1 min using a halogen lamp, the illumination is switched off, and a PC measurement is immediately taken. By this procedure, the characteristics of bulk silicon defects can be accurately determined. Furthermore, it is anticipated that a sensitive RT surface passivation technique will be imperative for examining bulk silicon defects when their concentration is low (<1012 cm-3). PMID:26779939

  17. Metastable defects are the origin of high conductivity in gallium doped zinc oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakutayev, Andriy; Perry, Nicola; Mason, Thomas; Ginley, David; Lany, Stephan

    2014-03-01

    Doping in wide-bandgap materials is often counteracted by formation of intrinsic compensating defects of opposite charge. One prototypical exception to this general rule is gallium doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Ga) used as transparent conductor in numerous applications. High conductivities (1,000-10,000 S/cm) in ZnO:Ga are typically achieved during the growth at 250 - 350C around 10⌃-8 atm. The corresponding electron concentration exceed by a factor of 100,000 the values expected in equilibrium from first principles calculations. In contrast at high temperature and high oxygen partial pressure conductivity of ZnO:Ga measured in-situ shows good agreement with the ab initio theoretical thermodynamic model. The results of this study indicate that degenerate levels of doping in ZnO:Ga transparent conductive oxide used in practical applications are enabled by non-equilibrium concentration of both extrinsic donors and compensating acceptors. This work was supported by U.S. Department of Energy.

  18. Dietary fatty acids and oxidative stress in the heart mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Hélène; Bulteau, Anne Laure; Friguet, Bertrand; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Blier, Pierre U

    2011-01-01

    Our study compared the effects of different oils on oxidative stress in rat heart mitochondria, as well as on plasma parameters used as risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The rats were fed for 16 weeks with coconut, olive, or fish oil diet (saturated, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated fatty acids, respectively). The cardiac mitochondria from rats fed with coconut oil showed the lowest concentration of oxidized proteins and peroxidized lipids. The fish oil diet leads to the highest oxidative stress in cardiac mitochondria, an effect that could be partly prevented by the antioxidant probucol. Total and LDL cholesterols decreased in plasma of rats fed fish oil, compared to olive and coconut oils fed rats. A diet enriched in saturated fatty acids offers strong advantages for the protection against oxidative stress in heart mitochondria. Copyright © 2010 Mitochondria Research Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ferrous Iron Oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: Inhibition with Benzoic Acid, Sorbic Acid, and Sodium Lauryl Sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onysko, Steven J.; Kleinmann, Robert L. P.; Erickson, Patricia M.

    1984-01-01

    Benzoic acid, sorbic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate at low concentrations (5 to 10 mg/liter) each effectively inhibited bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low-pH, sterile batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations (5 to 50 mg/liter) of any of the compounds. PMID:16346592

  20. Defects in tor regulatory complexes retard aging and carbonyl/oxidative stress development in yeast Sассharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. Homza

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available TOR signaling pathway first described in yeast S. сerevisiae is the highly conserved regulator of eukaryotic cell growth, aging and stress resistance. The effect of nitrogen sources, in particular amino acids, on the activity of TOR signaling pathway is well studied, however its relation to carbohydrates is poor understood. The aim of the present study is expanding of our understanding of potential role of TOR regulatory complexes in development of carbonyl/oxidative stress that can result from yeast cultivation on glucose and fructose. It has been shown that the level of α-dicarbonyl compounds and protein carbonyl groups increased with time of yeast cultivation and was higher in cells grown on fructose that demonstrated their accelerated aging and carbonyl/oxidative stress development as compared with cells grown on glucose. The strains defective in TOR proteins cultivated in the presence of glucose as well as fructose demonstrated lower markers of the stress and aging than parental strain. Thus these data confirmed the previous conclusion on fructose more potent ability to cause carbonyl/oxidative stress and accelerated aging in S. cerevisiae as compared with glucose. However, defects in TOR regulatory complexes retard aging and development of the stress in yeast independent on the type of carbohydrate in the cultivation medium.

  1. Bezafibrate in skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Mette Cathrine; Madsen, Karen Lindhardt; Preisler, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether bezafibrate increases fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and lowers heart rate (HR) during exercise in patients with carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II and very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiencies. METHODS: This was a 3-month, randomized, double......, triglyceride, and free fatty acid concentrations; however, there were no changes in palmitate oxidation, FAO, or HR during exercise. CONCLUSION: Bezafibrate does not improve clinical symptoms or FAO during exercise in patients with CPT II and VLCAD deficiencies. These findings indicate that previous in vitro...

  2. Iron (II) ions induced oxidation of ascorbic acid and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlakar, A; Batna, A; Dudda, A; Spiteller, G

    1996-12-01

    Lipid peroxidation (LPO) of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is suspected to be involved in the generation of chronic diseases. A model reaction for LPO is the air oxidation of PUFAs initiated by Fe2+ and ascorbic acid. In the course of such model reactions glycolaldehyde (GLA) was detected as main aldehydic product. Since it is difficult to explain the generat on of GLA by oxidation of PUFAs, it was suspected that GLA might be derived by oxidation of ascorbic acid. This assumption was verified by treatment of ascorbic acid with Fe2+. Produced aldehydic compounds were trapped by addition of pentafluorobenzylhydroxylamine hydrochloride (PFBHA-HCl), trimethylsilylated and finally identified by gas chromatography/mass spectronetry (GC/MS). Oxidation of ascorbic acid with O2 in presence of iron ions produced not only glycolaldehyde (GLA), but also glyceraldehyde (GA), dihydroxyacetone (DA) and formaldehyde. Glyoxal (GO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were detected as trace compounds. The yield of the aldehydic compounds was increased by addition of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) or H2O2. The buffer influenced the reaction considerably: Iron ions react with Tris buffer by producing dihydroxyacetone (DA). Since ascorbic acid is present in biological systems and Fe2+ ions are obviously generated by cell damaging processes, the production of GLA and other aldehydic components might add to the damaging effects of LPO. Glucose suffers also oxidation to short-chain aldehydic compounds in aqueous solution, but this reaction requires addition of equimolar amounts of Fe2+ together with equimolar amounts of H2O2 or 13-hydroperoxy -9-cis-11-trans-octadecadienoic acid (13-HPODE). Therefore this reaction, also influenced by the buffer system, seems to be not of biological relevance.

  3. Prevention of neural tube defects with folic acid: The Chinese experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ai-Guo

    2015-08-08

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are a group of congenital malformations of the central nervous system that are caused by the closure failure of the embryonic neural tube by the 28(th) day of conception. Anencephaly and spina bifida are the two major subtypes. Fetuses with anencephaly are often stillborn or electively aborted due to prenatal diagnosis, or they die shortly after birth. Most infants with spina bifida are live-born and, with proper surgical treatment, can survive into adulthood. However, these children often have life-long physical disabilities. China has one of the highest prevalence of NTDs in the world. Inadequate dietary folate intake is believed to be the main cause of the cluster. Unlike many other countries that use staple fortification with folic acid as the public health strategy to prevent NTDs, the Chinese government provides all women who have a rural household registration and who plan to become pregnant with folic acid supplements, free of charge, through a nation-wide program started in 2009. Two to three years after the initiation of the program, the folic acid supplementation rate increased to 85% in the areas of the highest NTD prevalence. The mean plasma folate level of women during early and mid-pregnancy doubled the level before the program was introduced. However, most women began taking folic acid supplements when they knew that they were pregnant. This is too late for the protection of the embryonic neural tube. In a post-program survey of the women who reported folic acid supplementation, less than a quarter of the women began taking supplements prior to pregnancy, indicating that the remaining three quarters of the fetuses remained unprotected during the time of neural tube formation. Therefore, staple food fortification with folic acid should be considered as a priority in the prevention of NTDs.

  4. Acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen protect against oxidative neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, H; Maharaj, D S; Daya, S

    2006-09-01

    Due to the implication of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative disorders we decided to investigate the antioxidant properties of acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen either alone or in combination. The thiobarbituric acid assay (TBA) and the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) assay were used to investigate quinolinic acid (QA)-induced: lipid peroxidation and superoxide anion generation in the rat hippocampus, in vivo. The study also shows, using cresyl violet staining, the preservation of structural integrity of neuronal cells following treatment with acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen in QA-lesioned rat hippocampus. Furthermore the study sought to determine whether these agents have any effect on endogenous (QA) formation. This study shows that acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen inhibit QA-induced superoxide anion generation, lipid peroxidation and cell damage, in vivo, in the rat hippocampus. In addition these agents inhibit the enzyme, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid oxygenase (3-HAO), responsible for the synthesis of endogenous QA.

  5. The role of oxidized regenerate cellulose to prevent cosmetic defects in oncoplastic breast surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, G; Visconti, G; Terribile, D; Fabbri, C; Magno, S; Di Leone, A; Salgarello, M; Masetti, R

    2012-07-01

    Breast conserving surgery (BCS) combined with postoperative radiotherapy has become the gold standard of locoregional treatment for the majority of patients with early-stage breast cancer, offering equivalent survival and improved body image and lifestyle scores as compared to mastectomy. In an attempt to optimize the oncologic safety and cosmetic results of BCS, oncoplastic procedures (OPP) have been introduced in recent years combining the best principles of surgical oncology with those of plastic surgery. However, even with the use of OPP, cosmetic outcomes may result unsatisfying when a large volume of parenchyma has to be removed, particularly in small-medium size breasts. The aim of this article is to report our preliminary results with the use of oxidized regenerate cellulose (ORC) (Tabotamp fibrillar, Johnson & Johnson; Ethicon, USA) as an agent to prevent cosmetic defects in patients undergoing OPP for breast cancer and to analyze the technical refinements that can enhance its efficacy in optimizing cosmetic defects. Different OPP are selected based on the location and size of the tumor as well as volume and shape of the breast. After excision of the tumor, glandular flaps are created by dissection of the residual parenchyma from the pectoralis and serratus muscles and from the skin. After careful haemostasis, five layers of ORC are positioned on the pectoralis major in the residual cavity and covered by advancement of the glandular flaps. Two additional layers of ORC are positioned above the flaps and covered by cutaneous-subcutaenous flaps. The use of ORC after OPP has shown promising preliminary results, indicating a good tolerability and positive effects on cosmesis. This simple and reliable surgical technique may allow not only to reduce the rate of post-operative bleeding and infection at the surgical site but also to improve cosmetic results.

  6. Interaction of metals with humic acid isolated from oxidized coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdogan, S.; Baysal, A.; Akba, O.; Hamamci, C. [Dicle University, Diyarbakir (Turkey)

    2007-07-01

    The sorption behaviour of divalent cations M{sup 2+} (Cu, Pb and Zn) and trivalent cations M{sup 2+} (Fe, Al) with humic acid isolated from oxidized coal (Hazro, SE Anatolia,Turkey) was followed in aqueous solution. Coal humic acid and metal ion interaction was investigated with special emphasis on the effects of pH, metal ion concentration and humic acid concentration. It has been found that the interaction of humic acid with metal ions in solution increases with pH, decreases with metal ion concentration and increases with humic acid concentration. The differences in sorption ability of particular metal ions on oxidized coal-derived humic acid are Fe> Pb> Cu> Al> Zn and Fe> Pb> Al> Cu> Zn at pH 2.5 and 3.5, respectively, while they are Fe=Pb=Cu=Al> Zn at both pH 4.5 and 5.5. The interaction of some trivalent (Fe, Al) and divalent (Cu, Pb, Zn) metal ions with humic acid prepared from coal was also studied using FTIR spectroscopy. This has proven helpful with respect to metal binding to understand better the potential sites of binding within the humic acid. Infrared spectroscopy showed the participation of COOH and OH groups in binding to the metal ions.

  7. Oxidative cleavage of erucic acid for the synthesis of brassylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed J. Nasrullah; Pooja Thapliyal; Erica N. Pfarr; Nicholas S. Dusek; Kristofer L. Schiele; James A. Bahr

    2010-10-29

    The main focus of this work is to synthesize Brassylic Acid (BA) using oxidative cleavage of Erucic Acid (EA). Crambe (Crambe abyssinica) is an industrial oilseed grown in North Dakota. Crambe has potential as an industrial fatty acid feedstock as a source of Erucic acid (EA). It has approximately 50-60 % of EA, a C{sub 22} monounsaturated fatty acid. Oxidative cleavage of unsaturated fatty acids derived from oilseeds produces long chain (9, 11, and 13 carbon atoms) dibasic and monobasic acids. These acids are known commercial feedstocks for the preparation of nylons, polyesters, waxes, surfactants, and perfumes. Other sources of EA are Rapeseed seed oil which 50-60 % of EA. Rapeseed is grown outside USA. The oxidative cleavage of EA was done using a high throughput parallel pressure reactor system. Kinetics of the reaction shows that BA yields reach a saturation at 12 hours. H{sub 2}WO{sub 4} was found to be the best catalyst for the oxidative cleavage of EA. High yields of BA were obtained at 80 C with bubbling of O{sub 2} or 10 bar of O{sub 2} for 12 hours.

  8. Nitrogen-doped zinc oxide thin films biosensor for determination of uric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Kajal; Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay

    2013-08-07

    Nitrogen-doped zinc oxide thin films (ZnO:N) have been realized as a potential matrix for the development of a uric acid biosensor. The correlation between the change in property of the ZnO film with N doping concentration and its biosensing response has been studied. The nitrogen dopant in a ZnO film alters its defects profile, thus improving the charge transfer characteristics and resulting in an enhanced peak oxidation current in the cyclic voltammogram in comparison to that of the pure ZnO film. The studies reveal that the bio-electrode based on the nitrogen-doped ZnO thin film matrix exhibits better sensitivity (1.1 mA mM(-1) cm(-2)) with linearity over a wide range (0.05 mM to 1.0 mM) of uric acid concentration. A comparatively low value (0.10 mM) of the Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) indicates high affinity of the immobilized uricase towards uric acid. The proposed ZnO:N thin films matrix-based uric acid-biosensor has good reproducibility, a long shelf-life (20 weeks) and high selectivity.

  9. Induction of (omega-1)-oxidation of monocarboxylic acids by acetylsalicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, R K; Getz, G S; Tonsgard, J H

    1993-07-01

    Monocarboxylic acids may be oxidized at the omega- and (omega-1)- positions to form dicarboxylic acids (DCAs) and (omega-1)-hydroxy- or (omega-1)-oxoacids. The significance of this pathway under normal conditions is unknown, but DCAs and (omega-1)-hydroxyacids are prominent features of disease states. The stimulation of this pathway has been linked to induction of fatty acid-binding protein and peroxisomal proliferation. In this study, we examined the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on (omega-1)-oxidation. (Omega-1)-oxidation was assessed in subcellular fractions of rat liver. Rats were fed a normal diet or an ASA-supplemented diet. Products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and by comparison with the properties of authentic synthetic standards. Doses of ASA that produced relatively low serum concentrations (12-24 mg/dl) resulted in as much as a 20-fold increase in the capacity for (omega-1)-oxidation of medium (C12-C15) and long chain (C16-C20) monocarboxylic acids. Normal rat liver oxidizes monocarboxylic acids to (omega-1)-oxoacids, while liver from ASA-treated rats converts these substrates to (omega-1)-oxodicarboxylic acids and (omega-1)-oxoacids. The formation of oxoacids and oxodicarboxylic acids may be due to different enzymes. The formation of oxodicarboxylic acids appears to be more labile than the formation of oxoacids. These two processes also are differentially induced by ASA and have different substrate specificities. These results demonstrate that ASA is a potent stimulant of (omega-1)-oxidation and induces the formation of products that can be shortened in peroxisomes to key metabolic intermediates.

  10. Reduction of birth prevalence rates of neural tube defects after folic acid fortification in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Camelo, Jorge S; Orioli, Iêda M; da Graça Dutra, Maria; Nazer-Herrera, Julio; Rivera, Nelson; Ojeda, María Elena; Canessa, Aurora; Wettig, Elisabeth; Fontannaz, Ana María; Mellado, Cecília; Castilla, Eduardo E

    2005-06-01

    To verify whether the decreasing neural tube defects birth prevalence rates in Chile are due to folic acid fortification or to pre-existing decreasing trends, we performed a population survey using a network of Estudio Colaborativo Latino Americano de Malformaciones Congenitas (ECLAMC, Latin American Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations) maternity hospitals in Chile, between the years 1982 and 2002. Within each maternity hospital, birth prevalence rates of spina bifida and anencephaly were calculated from two pre-fortification periods (1982-1989 and 1990-2000), and from one fortified period (2001-2002). There was no historical trend for spina bifida birth prevalence rates before folic acid fortification, and there was a 51% (minimum 27%, maximum 66%) decrease in the birth prevalence rates of this anomaly in the fortified period. The relative risks of spina bifida were homogeneous among hospitals in the two period comparisons. There was no historical trend for the birth prevalence of anencephaly comparing the two pre-fortified periods, but the relative risks were heterogeneous among hospitals in this comparison. There was a 42% (minimum 10%, maximum 63%) decrease in the birth prevalence rate of anencephaly in the fortified period as compared with the immediately pre-fortified period, with homogeneous relative risks among hospitals. Within the methodological constraints of this study we conclude that the birth prevalence rates for both spina bifida and anencephaly decreased as a result of folic acid fortification, without interference of decreasing secular trends. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Mechanism of Oxidation of Brilliant Cresyl Blue with Acidic Chlorite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diethylamino-8-methyl-phenoxazine chloride) (BB+) by chlorite in the presence of acid is reported. Under [H+]0>[ClO2–]0>[BB+]0 conditions, the oxidation reaction followed pseudo first-order kinetics with respect to BB+. During the reaction, chlorite ...

  12. Peroxisomal fatty acid beta-oxidation in relation to adrenoleukodystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, R. J.; Tager, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a neurological disease characterized by progressive demyelination with destruction of the white matter, and adrenal insufficiency. Biochemically there is accumulation of very-long-chain fatty acids resulting from an impairment in the peroxisomal oxidation of these

  13. Formic Acid Oxidation at Platinum-Bismuth Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lovic, J. D.; Stevanovic, S. I.; Tripkovic, D. V.

    2014-01-01

    Formic acid oxidation was studied on platinum-bismuth deposits on glassy carbon (GC) substrate. The catalysts of equimolar ratio were prepared by potentiostatic deposition using chronocoulometry. Bimetallic structures obtained by two-step process, comprising deposition of Bi followed by deposition...

  14. Fatty acids, lipid and protein oxidation, metmyoglobin reducing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2016-05-23

    May 23, 2016 ... ISSN 0375-1589 (print), ISSN 2221-4062 (online). Publisher: South African Society for Animal Science http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/sajas.v46i2.4. Fatty acids, lipid and protein oxidation, metmyoglobin reducing activity and sensory attributes of biceps femoris muscle in goats fed a canola and palm oil blend.

  15. Effect of ascorbic and folic acids supplementation on oxidative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted on the effect of supplementation of ascorbic and folic acids on the oxidative hormones, enzymatic antioxidants, haematological and biochemical properties of layers exposed to increased heat load. A total of 72 Isa Brown laying hens at 31 weeks of age were randomly divided into four groups ...

  16. Excessive fatty acid oxidation induces muscle atrophy in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukawa, Tomoya; Yan-Jiang, Benjamin Chua; Min-Wen, Jason Chua; Jun-Hao, Elwin Tan; Huang, Dan; Qian, Chao-Nan; Ong, Pauline; Li, Zhimei; Chen, Shuwen; Mak, Shi Ya; Lim, Wan Jun; Kanayama, Hiro-Omi; Mohan, Rosmin Elsa; Wang, Ruiqi Rachel; Lai, Jiunn Herng; Chua, Clarinda; Ong, Hock Soo; Tan, Ker-Kan; Ho, Ying Swan; Tan, Iain Beehuat; Teh, Bin Tean; Shyh-Chang, Ng

    2016-06-01

    Cachexia is a devastating muscle-wasting syndrome that occurs in patients who have chronic diseases. It is most commonly observed in individuals with advanced cancer, presenting in 80% of these patients, and it is one of the primary causes of morbidity and mortality associated with cancer. Additionally, although many people with cachexia show hypermetabolism, the causative role of metabolism in muscle atrophy has been unclear. To understand the molecular basis of cachexia-associated muscle atrophy, it is necessary to develop accurate models of the condition. By using transcriptomics and cytokine profiling of human muscle stem cell-based models and human cancer-induced cachexia models in mice, we found that cachectic cancer cells secreted many inflammatory factors that rapidly led to high levels of fatty acid metabolism and to the activation of a p38 stress-response signature in skeletal muscles, before manifestation of cachectic muscle atrophy occurred. Metabolomics profiling revealed that factors secreted by cachectic cancer cells rapidly induce excessive fatty acid oxidation in human myotubes, which leads to oxidative stress, p38 activation and impaired muscle growth. Pharmacological blockade of fatty acid oxidation not only rescued human myotubes, but also improved muscle mass and body weight in cancer cachexia models in vivo. Therefore, fatty acid-induced oxidative stress could be targeted to prevent cancer-induced cachexia.

  17. Fatty acid composition and oxidative stability of lambs' meat as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fatty acid composition and oxidative stability of lambs' meat as affected by a bioflavonoid antioxidant and fat sources. ... (EE) per kg dry matter (DM), differing in fat source (30 g/kg of either saturated beef tallow or unsaturated soybean oil) and type of antioxidant included (125 g/t of either a synthetic or natural antioxidant).

  18. Chloramines and hypochlorous acid oxidize erythrocyte peroxiredoxin 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Melissa M; Peskin, Alexander V; Vissers, Margreet C; Winterbourn, Christine C

    2009-11-15

    Peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2) is an abundant thiol protein that is readily oxidized in erythrocytes exposed to hydrogen peroxide. We investigated its reactivity in human erythrocytes with hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and chloramines, relevant oxidants in inflammation. Prx2 was oxidized to a disulfide-linked dimer by HOCl, glycine chloramine (GlyCl), and monochloramine (NH(2)Cl) in a dose-dependent manner. In the absence of added glucose, Prx2 and GSH showed similar sensitivities. Second-order rate constants for the reactions of Prx2 with NH(2)Cl and GlyCl were 1.5 x 10(4) and 8 M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The NH(2)Cl value is approximately 10 times higher than that for GSH, whereas Prx2 is approximately 30 times less sensitive than GSH to GlyCl. Thus, the relative sensitivity of Prx2 to GlyCl is greater in the erythrocyte. Oxidation of erythrocyte Prx2 and GSH was less in the presence of glucose, probably because of recycling. High doses of NH(2)Cl resulted in incomplete regeneration of reduced Prx2, suggesting impairment of the recycling mechanism. Our results show that, although HOCl and chloramines are less selective than H(2)O(2), they nevertheless oxidize Prx2. Exposure to these inflammatory oxidants will result in Prx2 oxidation and could compromise the erythrocyte's ability to resist damaging oxidative insult.

  19. Oxidation in fish oil enriched mayonnaise : Ascorbic acid and low pH increase oxidative deterioration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte; Timm Heinrich, Maike; Meyer, Anne S.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of ascorbic acid (0-4000 ppm) and pH (3.8-6.2) on oxidation and levels of iron and copper in various fractions of mayonnaise enriched with 16% fish oil was investigated. Ascorbic acid induced release of iron from the assumed oil- water interface into the aqueous phase at all pH levels......, but this effect of ascorbic acid was strongest at low pH (pH 3.8- 4.2). Ascorbic acid generally promoted formation of volatile oxidation compounds and reduced the peroxide value in mayonnaises. Peroxide values and total volatiles generally increased with decreasing pH values, suggesting that low pH promoted...... oxidation. It is proposed that iron bridges between the egg yolk proteins low-density lipoproteins, lipovitellin, and phosvitin at the oil-water interface are broken at low pH values, whereby iron ions become accessible as oxidation initiators. In the presence of ascorbic acid, oxidation is further enhanced...

  20. Irradiation temperature dependence of production efficiency of lattice defects in some neutron-irradiated oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Moritami [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 5900494 (Japan)]. E-mail: okada@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Atobe, Kozo [Faculty of Science, Naruto University of Education, Naruto, Tokushima 7728502 (Japan); Nakagawa, Masuo [Faculty of Education, Kagawa University, Takamatsu, Kagawa 7608522 (Japan)

    2004-11-01

    Temperature dependence of production efficiency of irradiation-induced defects in neutron-irradiated oxides has been investigated. Some oxide single crystals, MgO, {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (sapphire) and TiO{sub 2} (rutile), were irradiated at several controlled temperatures, 10, 20, 50, 100, 150 and 200 K, using the low-temperature irradiation facility of Kyoto University Reactor (KUR-LTL), and at ambient temperature ({approx}370 K) in the same facility. Irradiation temperature dependence of production efficiency of a 1 {mu}m band in TiO{sub 2} differs greatly from that of anion vacancy (F-type centers) in MgO and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Results for MgO and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} show steep negative gradients from 10 to 370 K, whereas that for TiO{sub 2} includes a valley between 40 and 60 K and a hump at about 130 K, and then disappear at about 200 K. In MgO and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, this behavior can be explained by the recombination of Frenkel pairs, which is activated at higher temperature. In TiO{sub 2}, in addition to the recombination mechanism, a covalent bonding property is thought to be exerted strong influence, and it is suggested that a disappearance of the 1 {mu}m band at above 200 K is due to the recombination process of Frenkel pairs which is caused by the irradiation-induced crystallization.

  1. Evaluation of endogenous nitric oxide synthesis in congenital urea cycle enzyme defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasaka, Hironori; Tsukahara, Hirokazu; Yorifuji, Tohru; Miida, Takashi; Murayama, Kei; Tsuruoka, Tomoko; Takatani, Tomozumi; Kanazawa, Masaki; Kobayashi, Kunihiko; Okano, Yoshiyuki; Takayanagi, Masaki

    2009-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized from arginine and O(2) by nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Citrulline, which is formed as a by-product of the NOS reaction, can be recycled to arginine by the 2 enzymes acting in the urea cycle: argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) and argininosuccinate lyase (ASL). Although the complete urea cycle is expressed only in the liver, ASS and ASL are expressed in other organs including the kidney and vascular endothelium. To examine possible alterations of the NO pathway in urea cycle defects, we measured plasma concentrations of arginine and citrulline and serum concentrations of nitrite/nitrate (NOx(-), stable NO metabolites) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, an endogenous NOS inhibitor) in patients with congenital urea cycle disorders of 3 types: ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency, ASS deficiency, and ASL deficiency. All were receiving oral arginine replacement at the time of this study. The same parameters were also measured in healthy subjects, who participated as controls. The OTC-deficient patients had significantly high NOx(-) and nonsignificantly high ADMA concentrations. Their NOx(-) was significantly positively correlated with arginine. The ASS-deficient patients had significantly low NOx(-) and significantly high ADMA concentrations. The ASL-deficient patients had normal NOx(-) and nonsignificantly high ADMA concentrations. In ASS-deficient and ASL-deficient patients, the NOx(-) was significantly inversely correlated with citrulline. These results suggest that NO synthesis is enhanced in OTC-deficient patients while receiving arginine but that NO synthesis remains low in ASS-deficient patients despite receiving arginine. They also suggest that endogenous NO synthesis is negatively affected by citrulline and ADMA in ASS-deficient and ASL-deficient patients. Although the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood, we infer that the NO pathway might play a role in the pathophysiology related to congenital urea cycle

  2. Green reduction of graphene oxide by ascorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosroshahi, Zahra; Kharaziha, Mahshid; Karimzadeh, Fathallah; Allafchian, Alireza

    2018-01-01

    Graphene, a single layer of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms in a hexagonal (two-dimensional honey-comb) lattice, has attracted strong scientific and technological interest due to its novel and excellent optical, chemical, electrical, mechanical and thermal properties. The solution-processable chemical reduction of Graphene oxide (GO is considered as the most favorable method regarding mass production of graphene. Generally, the reduction of GO is carried out by chemical approaches using different reductants such as hydrazine and sodium borohydride. These components are corrosive, combustible and highly toxic which may be dangerous for personnel health and the environment. Hence, these reducing agents are not promising choice for reducing of graphene oxide (GO). As a consequence, it is necessary for further development and optimization of eco-friendly, natural reducing agent for clean and effective reduction of GO. Ascorbic acid, an eco-friendly and natural reducing agents, having a mild reductive ability and nontoxic property. So, the aim of this research was to green synthesis of GO with ascorbic acid. For this purpose, the required amount of NaOH and ascorbic acid were added to GO solution (0.5 mg/ml) and were heated at 95 °C for 1 hour. According to the X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electrochemical results, GO were reduced with ascorbic acid like hydrazine with better electrochemical properties and ascorbic acid is an ideal substitute for hydrazine in the reduction of graphene oxide process.

  3. Ascorbate and dehydroascorbic acid as reliable biomarkers of oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Lack of post-sampling stability of ascorbate and dehydroascorbic acid and failure to block their in vivo equilibrium have lowered their value as biomarkers of oxidative stress and limited the ability to further investigate their possible role in disease prevention. In the present paper......, the analytical reproducibility was tested by repeated analysis of plasma aliquots from one individual over four years. The plasma was subjected to acidic deproteinization with an equal volume of 10% meta-phosphoric acid containing 2 mM EDTA and analyzed for ascorbate and dehydroascorbic acid by high......-performance liquid chromatography with coulometric detection. In a parallel experiment, stability of human plasma samples treated as above and stored at -80°C for five years was tested in a cohort of 131 individuals. No degradation or shift in the equilibrium between ascorbate and dehydroascorbic acid was observed...

  4. Histidine Regulates Seed Oil Deposition through Abscisic Acid Biosynthesis and β-Oxidation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The storage compounds are deposited into plant seeds during maturation. As the model oilseed species, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has long been studied for seed oil deposition. However, the regulation of this process remains unclear. Through genetic screen with a seed oil body-specific reporter, we isolated low oil1 (loo1) mutant. LOO1 was mapped to HISTIDINE BIOSYNTHESIS NUMBER 1A (HISN1A). HISN1A catalyzes the first step of His biosynthesis. Oil significantly decreased, and conversely proteins markedly increased in hisn1a mutants, indicating that HISN1A regulates both oil accumulation and the oil-protein balance. HISN1A was predominantly expressed in embryos and root tips. Accordingly, the hisn1a mutants exhibited developmental phenotype especially of seeds and roots. Transcriptional profiling displayed that β-oxidation was the major metabolic pathway downstream of HISN1A. β-Oxidation was induced in hisn1a mutants, whereas it was reduced in 35S:HISN1A-transgenic plants. In plants, seed storage oil is broken-down by β-oxidation, which is controlled by abscisic acid (ABA). We found that His activated genes of ABA biosynthesis and correspondingly advanced ABA accumulation. Exogenous ABA rescued the defects of hisn1a mutants, whereas mutation of ABA DEFICIENT2, a key enzyme in ABA biosynthesis, blocked the effect of His on β-oxidation, indicating that ABA mediates His regulation in β-oxidation. Intriguingly, structural analysis showed that a potential His-binding domain was present in the general amino acid sensors GENERAL CONTROL NON-DEREPRESSIBLE2 and PII, suggesting that His may serve as a signal molecule. Taken together, our study reveals that His promotes plant seed oil deposition through ABA biosynthesis and β-oxidation. PMID:27493214

  5. Histidine Regulates Seed Oil Deposition through Abscisic Acid Biosynthesis and β-Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huimin; Wang, Shui

    2016-10-01

    The storage compounds are deposited into plant seeds during maturation. As the model oilseed species, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has long been studied for seed oil deposition. However, the regulation of this process remains unclear. Through genetic screen with a seed oil body-specific reporter, we isolated low oil1 (loo1) mutant. LOO1 was mapped to HISTIDINE BIOSYNTHESIS NUMBER 1A (HISN1A). HISN1A catalyzes the first step of His biosynthesis. Oil significantly decreased, and conversely proteins markedly increased in hisn1a mutants, indicating that HISN1A regulates both oil accumulation and the oil-protein balance. HISN1A was predominantly expressed in embryos and root tips. Accordingly, the hisn1a mutants exhibited developmental phenotype especially of seeds and roots. Transcriptional profiling displayed that β-oxidation was the major metabolic pathway downstream of HISN1A β-Oxidation was induced in hisn1a mutants, whereas it was reduced in 35S:HISN1A-transgenic plants. In plants, seed storage oil is broken-down by β-oxidation, which is controlled by abscisic acid (ABA). We found that His activated genes of ABA biosynthesis and correspondingly advanced ABA accumulation. Exogenous ABA rescued the defects of hisn1a mutants, whereas mutation of ABA DEFICIENT2, a key enzyme in ABA biosynthesis, blocked the effect of His on β-oxidation, indicating that ABA mediates His regulation in β-oxidation. Intriguingly, structural analysis showed that a potential His-binding domain was present in the general amino acid sensors GENERAL CONTROL NON-DEREPRESSIBLE2 and PII, suggesting that His may serve as a signal molecule. Taken together, our study reveals that His promotes plant seed oil deposition through ABA biosynthesis and β-oxidation. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Structure, Raman spectra and defect chemistry modelling of conductive pyrochlore oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, F.W.; Glerup, M.; Holtappels, P.

    2000-01-01

    Mixed ionic-electronic conducting pyrochlore structure oxides, with Pr and Gd on the A site and Zr, Mn, Ce, Sn, In, Mo, and Ti on the B site, were characterised by X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Mn and In have a solubility around x = 0.1-0.2 in Pr2Zr2-xMnxO7 and Pr2Sn2-xInxO7......-O(x) and V-O on the O site, interstitial oxygens O-i", and delocalised electrons and electron holes. Four mass action law expressions govern such a model. The defect model can rationalise why home-valent doping, i.e. substitution of Zr(4+) by Ce(4+), can lead to an increase in ionic conductivity....... The calculated Brouwer diagram for Pr2Zr1.6Ce0.4O7+/-delta is shown. This composition has a transition from mixed ionic p-type to presumably pure ionic conduction around pO(2) = 10(-7.5) atm. At pO(2)

  7. Ag/Au/Pt trimetallic nanoparticles with defects: preparation, characterization, and electrocatalytic activity in methanol oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongthai, Kontee; Pakawanit, Phakkhananan; Chanlek, Narong; Kim, Jun-Hyun; Ananta, Supon; Srisombat, Laongnuan

    2017-09-01

    Two series of Ag x /Au/Pt y trimetallic nanoparticles (Ag x Au1Pt2 with x ranging from 1-5 and Ag4Au1Pt y with y ranging from 1-3) were prepared by a sequential chemical reduction method that involved the deposition of Pt on preformed Ag/Au core-shell particles by systematically controlling the amount of Ag, Au, and Pt metal precursor solutions. The structural changes (the diameters and increased surface roughness from the defective features) and absorption patterns (the significant reduction of the peak intensities) of the nanoparticles examined with TEM and UV-vis spectroscopy indicated the selective incorporation of Pt on the Ag/Au nanoparticles regardless of their compositions. In addition, a combination of WDX, XRD, and XPS analyses quantitatively and qualitatively confirmed the successful formation of the Ag x Au1Pt2 and Ag4Au1Pt y trimetallic nanoparticles. Subsequently, these series of nanoparticles were deposited on multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to evaluate their electrocatalytic property in the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) as a function of their metal compositions. The results showed that the electrocatalytic activities of all Ag4/Au1/Pt y systems were higher than those of typical Pt on the MWCNTs. In particular, the Ag4Au1Pt2 nanoparticles exhibited the highest electrocatalytic property for the MOR, suggesting the importance of the proper combination of metal constituents and structures to regulate the activity in electrocatalytic systems.

  8. SHI induced defects in chemically synthesized graphene oxide for hydrogen storage applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Preetam K., E-mail: preetam.nano@gmail.com; Sharma, Vinay; Rajaura, Rajveer Singh; Singh, M. [Department of Physics, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur-302004, India. (India); Srivastava, Subodh; Vijay, Y. K. [Department of Physics, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur-302004, India. (India); Department of Physics, Vivekananda Global University, Jaipur-303012, India. (India); Sharma, S. S. [Department of Physics, Govt. Women Engineering College, Ajmer-305002, India. (India)

    2016-05-06

    Graphene, due to its unique properties arising from the single carbon layer, is a potential candidate for applications in a variety of fields including sensors, photovoltaics and energy storage. The atomic structure and morphology of the carbon nanomaterials especially graphene can be tailored by energetic ionic irradiation. As graphene sheet is very stable, the surface have less reactivity as compared to the edges of the sheets. By surface modification with energetic ion-beams additional dangling bonds can be formed to enhance the surface activity of the graphene film which could be exploited in a variety of applications. In the present work, graphene oxide was synthesized by improved Hummers’ Method. The irradiation was done with Ag{sup +} ions carrying energy 100 MeV with the fluence of 3×10{sup 13}. Raman spectrum of graphene irradiated by Ag{sup +} beam shows additional disordered peaks of D´ and D+G bands. There is also a decrease in the intensity of D band. AFM images depict the increase in the surface roughness of the films. This can be attributed to the increase in the defects in the flakes and intermixing of adjacent layers by irradiation.

  9. Chemical Bonding, Interfaces and Defects in Hafnium Oxide/Germanium Oxynitride Gate Stacks on Ge (100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, Yasuhiro; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Sun, Yun; /SLAC, SSRL; Kuzum, Duygu; /Stanford U.; Sugawara, Takuya; Saraswat, Krishna C.; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL; McIntyre, Paul C.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.

    2008-10-31

    Correlations among interface properties and chemical bonding characteristics in HfO{sub 2}/GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge MIS stacks were investigated using in-situ remote nitridation of the Ge (100) surface prior to HfO{sub 2} atomic layer deposition (ALD). Ultra thin ({approx}1.1 nm), thermally stable and aqueous etch-resistant GeO{sub x}N{sub y} interfaces layers that exhibited Ge core level photoelectron spectra (PES) similar to stoichiometric Ge{sub 3}N{sub 4} were synthesized. To evaluate GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface defects, the density of interface states (D{sub it}) was extracted by the conductance method across the band gap. Forming gas annealed (FGA) samples exhibited substantially lower D{sub it} ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}) than did high vacuum annealed (HVA) and inert gas anneal (IGA) samples ({approx} 1x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}). Germanium core level photoelectron spectra from similar FGA-treated samples detected out-diffusion of germanium oxide to the HfO{sub 2} film surface and apparent modification of chemical bonding at the GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface, which is related to the reduced D{sub it}.

  10. Amino acids as modulators of endothelium-derived nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakoki, Masao; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Edgell, Cora-Jean S; Maeda, Nobuyo; Smithies, Oliver; Mattson, David L

    2006-08-01

    To examine the mechanisms whereby amino acids modulate nitric oxide (NO) production and blood flow in the renal vasculature, chemiluminescence techniques were used to quantify NO in the renal venous effluent of the isolated, perfused rat kidney as different amino acids were added to the perfusate. The addition of 10(-4) or 10(-3) M cationic amino acids (l-ornithine, l-lysine, or l-homoarginine) or neutral amino acids (l-glutamine, l-leucine, or l-serine) to the perfusate decreased NO and increased renal vascular resistance. Perfusion with anionic amino acids (l-glutamate or l-aspartate) had no effect on either parameter. The effects of the cationic and neutral amino acids were reversed with 10(-3) M l-arginine and prevented by deendothelialization or NO synthase inhibition. The effects of the neutral amino acids but not the cationic amino acids were dependent on extracellular sodium. Cationic and neutral amino acids also decreased calcimycin-induced NO, as assessed by DAF-FM-T fluorescence, in cultured EA.hy926 endothelial cells. Inhibition of system y(+) or y(+)L by siRNA for the cationic amino acid transporter 1 or the CD98/4F2 heavy chain diminished the NO-depleting effects of these amino acids. Finally, transport studies in cultured cells demonstrated that cationic or neutral amino acids in the extracellular space stimulate efflux of l-arginine out of the cell. Thus the present experiments demonstrate that cationic and neutral amino acids can modulate NO production in endothelial cells by altering cellular l-arginine transport through y(+) and y(+)L transport mechanisms.

  11. Defective branched chain amino acid catabolism contributes to cardiac dysfunction and remodeling following myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Fuyang; Xia, Yunlong; Zhao, Shihao; Yan, Wenjun; Wang, Helin; Lee, Yan; Li, Congye; Zhang, Ling; Lian, Kun; Gao, Erhe; Cheng, Hexiang; Tao, Ling

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac metabolic remodeling is a central event during heart failure (HF) development following myocardial infarction (MI). It is well known that myocardial glucose and fatty acid dysmetabolism contribute to post-MI cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. However, the role of amino acid metabolism in post-MI HF remains elusive. Branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are an important group of essential amino acids and function as crucial nutrient signaling in mammalian animals. The present study aimed to determine the role of cardiac BCAA metabolism in post-MI HF progression. Utilizing coronary artery ligation-induced murine MI models, we found that myocardial BCAA catabolism was significantly impaired in response to permanent MI, therefore leading to an obvious elevation of myocardial BCAA abundance. In MI-operated mice, oral BCAA administration further increased cardiac BCAA levels, activated the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, and exacerbated cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. These data demonstrate that BCAAs act as a direct contributor to post-MI cardiac pathologies. Furthermore, these BCAA-mediated deleterious effects were improved by rapamycin cotreatment, revealing an indispensable role of mTOR in BCAA-mediated adverse effects on cardiac function/structure post-MI. Of note, pharmacological inhibition of branched chain ketoacid dehydrogenase kinase (BDK), a negative regulator of myocardial BCAA catabolism, significantly improved cardiac BCAA catabolic disorders, reduced myocardial BCAA levels, and ameliorated post-MI cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. In conclusion, our data provide the evidence that impaired cardiac BCAA catabolism directly contributes to post-MI cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. Moreover, improving cardiac BCAA catabolic defects may be a promising therapeutic strategy against post-MI HF. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Temperature effects on the nitric acid oxidation of industrial grade multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Nadia F., E-mail: nadia@fisica.ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Martinez, Diego Stefani T., E-mail: diegostefani.br@gmail.com; Paula, Amauri J., E-mail: amaurijp@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Laboratorio de Quimica do Estado Solido (LQES), Instituto de Quimica (Brazil); Silveira, Jose V. [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Alves, Oswaldo L., E-mail: oalves@iqm.unicamp.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Laboratorio de Quimica do Estado Solido (LQES), Instituto de Quimica (Brazil); Souza Filho, Antonio G., E-mail: agsf@fisica.ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    In this study, we report an oxidative treatment of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by using nitric acid at different temperatures (25-175 Degree-Sign C). The analyzed materials have diameters varying from 10 to 40 nm and majority lengths between 3 and 6 {mu}m. The characterization results obtained by different techniques (e.g., field emission scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy, Braunauer, Emmet and Teller method, {zeta}-potential and confocal Raman spectroscopy) allowed us to access the effects of temperature treatment on the relevant physico-chemical properties of the MWCNTs samples studied in view of an integrated perspective to use these samples in a bio-toxicological context. Analytical microbalance measurements were used to access the purity of samples (metallic residue) after thermogravimetric analysis. Confocal Raman spectroscopy measurements were used to evaluate the density of structural defects created on the surface of the tubes due to the oxidation process by using 2D Raman image. Finally, we have demonstrated that temperature is an important parameter in the generation of oxidation debris (a byproduct which has not been properly taken into account in the literature) in the industrial grade MWCNTs studied after nitric acid purification and functionalization.

  13. Effect of sulfonylureas on hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, T.B.

    1986-08-01

    In isolated rat livers perfused with oleic acid (0.1 mM), infusion of tolbutamide or glyburide decreased the rate of ketogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was maximal at 2.0 mM and 10 M concentrations of tolbutamide and glyburide, respectively. Neither tolbutamide nor glyburide inhibited ketogenesis in livers perfused with octanoate. The inhibition of hepatic ketogenesis by sulfonylureas was independent of perfusate oleic acid concentration. Additionally, in rat livers perfused with oleic acid in the presence of L-(-)-carnitine (10 mM), submaximal concentrations of tolbutamide and glyburide did not inhibit hepatic ketogenesis. Finally, glyburide infusion into livers perfused with (U- $C)oleic acid (0.1 mM) increased the rate of UC label incorporation into hepatic triglycerides by 2.5-fold. These data suggest that both tolbutamide and glyburide inhibit long-chain fatty acid oxidation by inhibition the key regulatory enzyme, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, most probably by competing with L-(-)-carnitine.

  14. Type 2 diabetes mellitus induces congenital heart defects in murine embryos by increasing oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanqing; Reece, E Albert; Zhong, Jianxiang; Dong, Daoyin; Shen, Wei-Bin; Harman, Christopher R; Yang, Peixin

    2016-09-01

    Maternal type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus are strongly associated with high rates of severe structural birth defects, including congenital heart defects. Studies in type 1 diabetic embryopathy animal models have demonstrated that cellular stress-induced apoptosis mediates the teratogenicity of maternal diabetes leading to congenital heart defect formation. However, the mechanisms underlying maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus-induced congenital heart defects remain largely unknown. We aim to determine whether oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and excessive apoptosis are the intracellular molecular mechanisms underlying maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus-induced congenital heart defects. A mouse model of maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus was established by feeding female mice a high-fat diet (60% fat). After 15 weeks on the high-fat diet, the mice showed characteristics of maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus. Control dams were either fed a normal diet (10% fat) or the high-fat diet during pregnancy only. Female mice from the high-fat diet group and the 2 control groups were mated with male mice that were fed a normal diet. At E12.5, embryonic hearts were harvested to determine the levels of lipid peroxides and superoxide, endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, cleaved caspase 3 and 8, and apoptosis. E17.5 embryonic hearts were harvested for the detection of congenital heart defect formation using India ink vessel patterning and histological examination. Maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus significantly induced ventricular septal defects and persistent truncus arteriosus in the developing heart, along with increasing oxidative stress markers, including superoxide and lipid peroxidation; endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, including protein levels of phosphorylated-protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase, phosphorylated-IRE1α, phosphorylated-eIF2α, C/EBP homologous protein, and binding immunoglobulin protein; endoplasmic reticulum chaperone gene

  15. Hepatic Fatty Acid Oxidation Restrains Systemic Catabolism during Starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The liver is critical for maintaining systemic energy balance during starvation. To understand the role of hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation on this process, we generated mice with a liver-specific knockout of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (Cpt2L−/−, an obligate step in mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation. Fasting induced hepatic steatosis and serum dyslipidemia with an absence of circulating ketones, while blood glucose remained normal. Systemic energy homeostasis was largely maintained in fasting Cpt2L−/− mice by adaptations in hepatic and systemic oxidative gene expression mediated in part by Pparα target genes including procatabolic hepatokines Fgf21, Gdf15, and Igfbp1. Feeding a ketogenic diet to Cpt2L−/− mice resulted in severe hepatomegaly, liver damage, and death with a complete absence of adipose triglyceride stores. These data show that hepatic fatty acid oxidation is not required for survival during acute food deprivation but essential for constraining adipocyte lipolysis and regulating systemic catabolism when glucose is limiting.

  16. Oxidation of hypotaurine and cysteine sulphinic acid by peroxynitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Mario; Amendola, Donatella; Orsini, Emanuela; Boffi, Alberto; Pecci, Laura

    2005-07-01

    Peroxynitrite mediates the oxidation of the sulphinic group of both HTAU (hypotaurine) and CSA (cysteine sulphinic acid), producing the respective sulphonates, TAU (taurine) and CA (cysteic acid). The reaction is associated with extensive oxygen uptake, suggesting that HTAU and CSA are oxidized by the one-electron transfer mechanism to sulphonyl radicals, which may initiate an oxygen-dependent radical chain reaction with the sulphonates as final products. Besides the one-electron mechanism, HTAU and CSA can be oxidized by the two-electron pathway, leading directly to sulphonate formation without oxygen consumption. The apparent second-order rate constants for the direct reaction of peroxynitrite with HTAU and CSA at pH 7.4 and 25 degrees C are 77.4+/-5 and 76.4+/-9 M(-1).s(-1) respectively. For both sulphinates, the apparent second-order rate constants increase sharply with decrease in pH, and the sigmoidal curves obtained are consistent with peroxynitrous acid as the species responsible for sulphinate oxidation. The kinetic data, together with changes in oxygen uptake, sulphinate depletion, sulphonate production, and product distribution of nitrite and nitrate, suggest that oxidation of sulphinates by peroxynitrite may take place by the two reaction pathways whose relative importance depends on reagent concentrations and pH value. In the presence of bicarbonate, the direct reaction of sulphinates with peroxynitrite is inhibited and the oxidative reaction probably involves only the radicals *NO2 and CO3*-, generated by decomposition of the peroxynitrite-CO2 adduct.

  17. Influence of defect luminescence and structural modification on the electrical properties of Magnesium Doped Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoshkumar, B.; Biswas, Amrita; Kalyanaraman, S.; Thangavel, R.; Udayabhanu, G.; Annadurai, G.; Velumani, S.

    2017-06-01

    Magnesium doped zinc oxide nanorod arrays on zinc oxide seed layers were grown by hydrothermal method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns revealed the growth orientation along the preferential (002) direction. The hexagonal morphology was revealed from the field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images. The elemental composition of the samples was confirmed by energy dispersive x-ray analysis spectra (EDS) and mapping dots. Carrier concentration, resistivity and mobility of the samples were obtained by Hall measurements. I-V characteristic curve confirmed the increase in resistivity upon doping. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra exposed the characteristic of UV emission along with defect mediated visible emission in the samples. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were undertaken to study the charge transport property. Owing to the change in the structural parameters and defect concentration the electrical properties of the doped samples were altered.

  18. Maternal use of folic acid supplements and infant risk of neural tube defects in Norway 1999-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildestad, Trude; Øyen, Nina; Klungsøyr, Kari; Nilsen, Roy Miodini; Daltveit, Anne Kjersti; Vollset, Stein Emil

    2016-08-01

    Like most European countries, Norway has refrained from mandatory food fortification with folic acid to reduce the number of neural tube defects. We explored the role of folic acid and multivitamin supplements in the prevention of neural tube defects among newborn infants. We used data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway, 1999-2013. A total of 528,220 women had 880,568 pregnancies resulting in 896,674 live- and stillborn infants, of whom 270 had neural tube defects. Relative risks were estimated with log-binomial regression. From 1999 to 2013, intake of folic acid supplements increased from 4.8% to 27.4%. Vitamin supplement use was more frequent in older, married or cohabiting women and those with lower parity, as well as women who did not smoke during pregnancy. The overall adjusted relative risk of infant neural tube defects associated with maternal vitamin intake before pregnancy relative to no intake was 0.76 (95% confidence interval: 0.53-1.10). When we divided our study period in two (1999-2005 and 2006-2013), we found a significantly reduced risk of neural tube defects overall by vitamin use in the second time period, but not in the first: adjusted relative risk 0.54 (95% confidence interval: 0.31-0.91) and 1.02 (95% confidence interval: 0.63-1.65), respectively. OVER THE FULL STUDY PERIOD, WE FOUND NO STATISTICALLY SIGNIFICANT ASSOCIATION BETWEEN VITAMIN USE AND NEURAL TUBE DEFECTS OVERALL HOWEVER, VITAMIN USE WAS ASSOCIATED WITH A SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER RISK OF NEURAL TUBE DEFECTS IN THE SECOND HALF OF THE STUDY PERIOD, 2006-2013. © 2016 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  19. Formic acid oxidation at platinum-bismuth catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Ksenija Đ.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of heterogeneous catalysis, specifically catalysis on bimetallic surfaces, has seen many advances over the past few decades. Bimetallic catalysts, which often show electronic and chemical properties that are distinct from those of their parent metals, offer the opportunity to obtain new catalysts with enhanced selectivity, activity, and stability. The oxidation of formic acid is of permanent interest as a model reaction for the mechanistic understanding of the electrooxidation of small organic molecules and because of its technical relevance for fuel cell applications. Platinum is one of the most commonly used catalysts for this reaction, despite the fact that it shows a few significant disadvantages: high cost and extreme susceptibility to poisoning by CO. To solve this problem, several approaches have been used, but generally, they all consist in the modification of platinum with a second element. Especially, bismuth has received significant attention as Pt modifier. According to the results presented in this survey dealing with the effects influencing the formic acid oxidation it was found that two types of Pt-Bi bimetallic catalysts (bulk and low loading deposits on GC showed superior catalytic activity in terms of the lower onset potential and oxidation current density, as well as exceptional stability compared to Pt. The findings in this report are important for the understanding of mechanism of formic acid electrooxidation on a bulk alloy and decorated surface, for the development of advanced anode catalysts for direct formic acid fuel cells, as well as for the synthesis of novel low-loading bimetallic catalysts. The use of bimetallic compounds as the anode catalysts is an effective solution to overcoming the problems of the formic acid oxidation current stability for long term applications. In the future, the tolerance of both CO poisoning and electrochemical leaching should be considered as the key factors in the development

  20. Oxidative stability of Liposomes composed of docosahexaenoic acid-containing phospholipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikbjerg, Anders Falk; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Jørgensen, Kent

    2007-01-01

    Oxidative stability of liposomes made of (Docosahexaenoic acid) DHA-containing phosphatidylcholine (PC) was examined during preparation and storage. After preparation of the liposomes, the concentration of primary (conjugated dienes) and secondary oxidation products (Thiobarbituric acid-reactive...

  1. Santonic acid: Zn-HCl-ether reduction and ceric ammonium nitrate oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fondekar, Kamlesh Pai; Malik, Bhiwa; Paknikar, Shashikumar Keshav

    2014-01-01

    Reduction of santonic acid using Zn-HCl-ether yielded succinic anhydride derivatives via pinacolisation followed by rearrangement, whereas oxidation of santonic acid using ceric ammonium nitrate afforded five oxidative decarboxylation products. Dedicated to Prof. TBH McMurry.

  2. Evaluation of oxidative stress in autism: defective antioxidant enzymes and increased lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguid, Nagwa A; Dardir, Ahmed A; Abdel-Raouf, Ehab R; Hashish, Adel

    2011-10-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder of childhood with poorly understood etiology and pathology. This pilot study aims to evaluate the levels of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), a marker of lipid peroxidation, in Egyptian autistic children. Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder of childhood with poorly understood etiology and pathology. The present study included 20 children with autism diagnosed by DSM-IV-TR criteria and Childhood Autism Rating Scale. Controls included 25 age-matched healthy children. Cases were referred to Outpatient Clinic of Children with Special Needs Department, National Research Center, Cairo, Egypt. We compared levels of SOD, GSH-Px, and MDA in children with autism and controls. In children less than 6 years of age, levels of SOD, and GSH-Px were significantly lower in autistic children compared with their controls, while MDA was significantly higher among patients than controls. In children older than 6 years, there was no significant difference in any of these values between cases and controls. We concluded that children with autism are more vulnerable to oxidative stress in the form of increased lipid peroxidation and deficient antioxidant defense mechanism especially at younger children. We highlight that autistic children might benefit from antioxidants supplementation coupled with polyunsaturated fatty acids. Moreover, early assessment of antioxidant status would have better prognosis as it may decrease the oxidative stress before inducing more irreversible brain damage.

  3. Kinetics of inorganic arsenopyrite oxidation in acidic aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKibben, M.A.; Tallant, B.A.; del Angel, J.K. [University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth Science

    2008-02-15

    In an effort to help evaluate the significance of common primary As-bearing minerals in releasing As into surface and ground waters, experiments were performed to determine rate laws for the irreversible inorganic aqueous oxidation of arsenopyrite by dissolved O{sub 2}, Fe{sup 3+} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} in low temperature acidic solutions. Batch reactor run conditions varied from pH 2-4.5 and 10-40{sup o}C at ionic strength 0.01 M. A major constraint on defining and measuring the rate of arsenopyrite oxidation is the non-stoichiometry (incongruency) of the reaction in acidic solutions; As and S are not released completely into solution, apparently remaining behind as more slowly-dissolving solids in an Fe-depleted lattice. Therefore the rate of mineral oxidation (destruction) at low pH is best defined and measured by rates of change in total dissolved Fe concentrations, not by changes in dissolved As or S concentrations or Eh. The measured mineral dissolution rate therefore places an upper limit on actual inorganic As-release rates, providing a conservative basis for geochemical modeling that may over-predict, but not underestimate, As concentrations observed in natural settings. The results indicate that Fe{sup 3+} oxidizes arsenopyrite at least 10 times faster than dissolved O{sub 2}. Nitrate does not oxidize arsenopyrite. At low pH arsenopyrite oxidizes 3-4 orders of magnitude faster than (arsenical) pyrite and 4-5 orders of magnitude faster than realgar and orpiment. Therefore in rocks with low ratios of arsenopyrite to other As-bearing sulfides, including coals and ores, arsenopyrite oxidation can still be the dominant source of As-release from sulfide minerals.

  4. Amino Acid and Peptide Immobilization on Oxidized Nanocellulose: Spectroscopic Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Daneault

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, oxidized nanocellulose (ONC was synthesized and chemically coupled with amino acids and peptides using a two step coupling method at room temperature. First, ONC was activated by N-ethyl-N’-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide hydrochloride, forming a stable active ester in the presence of N-hydroxysuccinimide. Second, the active ester was reacted with the amino group of the amino acid or peptide, forming an amide bond between ONC and the grafted molecule. Using this method, the intermolecular interaction of amino acids and peptides was avoided and uniform coupling of these molecules on ONC was achieved. The coupling reaction was very fast in mild conditions and without alteration of the polysaccharide. The coupling products (ONC-amino acids and ONC-peptides were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by the absorption, emission, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS spectroscopic techniques.

  5. Prevalence of neural tube defects and folic acid knowledge and consumption--Puerto Rico, 1996-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-11

    Birth defects are one of the leading causes of infant mortality in both the mainland United States and Puerto Rico. Neural tube defects (NTDs) are serious birth defects of the spine and brain; two of the most common NTDs are spina bifida and anencephaly. In the United States, NTD prevalence is higher among Hispanic women than among non-Hispanic white or non-Hispanic black women. In Puerto Rico, where most residents are Hispanic, the prevalence of NTDs (8.68 per 10,000 live births) is higher than in the mainland United States (5.59). Consumption of folic acid before and during early pregnancy can prevent NTDs. To assess trends in NTD prevalence and prevalence of knowledge and consumption of folic acid supplements in Puerto Rico, data were analyzed from the Birth Defects Surveillance System (BDSS) for 1996-2005 and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) for 1997-2006. This report describes the results of those analyses, which indicated that prevalence of folic acid knowledge and consumption among women of childbearing age increased from 1997 to 2003 but decreased from 2003 to 2006. During similar periods, NTD prevalence declined from 1996 to 2003 but did not change significantly from 2003 to 2005. To resume the decline in prevalence of NTDs, additional measures might be needed to increase folic acid supplement use among Puerto Rican women of childbearing age.

  6. Formation of silicon carbide defect qubits with optically transparent electrodes and atomic layer deposited silicon oxide surface passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, O. M.; Higa, B.; Liu, B.; Sims, P.; Torres, C.; Davidson, B.; Lerum, L.; Romero, H.; Fahem, M.; Lasher, M.; Barua, R.; deEscobar, A.; Cothern, J.; Simonsen, K.; Ramirez, A. D.; Banks, H.; Carter, S. G.; Gaskill, D. K.; Reinecke, T. L.

    2017-08-01

    Defect qubits in silicon carbide are an emerging system for quantum information science and technology. It is important to passivate and protect the surface to preserve the particular defect configurations as well as to provide means to tune the opto-electronic properties via electronic or opto-electronic gating. In this work, we construct defect qubit device structures that integrate Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) electrodes and a thin atomic layer deposited (ALD) siliconoxide surface passivation. The devices are formed via 12C ion implantation and high temperature annealing of 4H and 6H silicon carbide. The process involves the integration of optically transparent indium tin oxide electrodes and a surface passivation film of silicon-oxide by atomic layer deposition. We find good contact is formed between ITO and SiC, and after complete processing, the measured broad-band photoluminescence (PL) with excitation at 785 nm in a scanning PL system is consistent with the formation of silicon vacancies. We find minimal change in the room temperature emission in regions beneath the ITO electrodes and the SiOx-SiC passivated surface. We evaluate the ability of an electric field to tune the optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) response of the qubit system by simulations of the spectrum with a modified spin Hamiltonian that considers the Stark Effect. We quantify the simulated strength of the electric-field tuning of the energy levels and ODMR response for the various identified spin 3/2 transitions of the silicon vacancy.

  7. The role of functionally defective rare germline variants of sialic acid acetylesterase in autoimmune Addison's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Earn H; MacArthur, Katie; Mitchell, Anna L; Pearce, Simon H S

    2012-01-01

    Background Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is a rare condition with a complex genetic basis. A panel of rare and functionally defective genetic variants in the sialic acid acetylesterase (SIAE) gene has recently been implicated in several common autoimmune conditions. We performed a case–control study to determine whether these rare variants are associated with a rarer condition, AAD. Method We analysed nine SIAE gene variants (W48X, M89V, C196F, C226G, R230W, T312M, Y349C, F404S and R479C) in a United Kingdom cohort of 378 AAD subjects and 387 healthy controls. All samples were genotyped using Sequenom iPlex chemistry to characterise primer extension products. Results A heterozygous rare allele at codon 312 (312*M) was found in one AAD patient (0.13%) but was not detected in the healthy controls. The commoner, functionally recessive variant at codon 89 (89*V) was found to be homozygous in two AAD patients but was only found in the heterozygous state in controls. Taking into account all nine alleles examined, 4/378 (1.06%) AAD patients and 1/387 (0.25%) healthy controls carried the defective SIAE alleles, with a calculated odds ratio of 4.13 (95% CI 0.44–97.45, two-tailed P value 0.212, NS). Conclusion We demonstrated the presence of 89*V homozygotes and the 312*M rare allele in the AAD cohort, but overall, our analysis does not support a role for rare variants in SIAE in the pathogenesis of AAD. However, the relatively small collection of AAD patients limits the power to exclude a small effect. PMID:23011869

  8. Disruption of mitochondrial beta -oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids in the 3,2-trans-enoyl-CoA isomerase-deficient mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Uwe; Stoffel, Wilhelm

    2002-05-31

    Cellular energy metabolism is largely sustained by mitochondrial beta-oxidation of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. To study the role of unsaturated fatty acids in cellular lipid and energy metabolism we generated a null allelic mouse, deficient in 3,2-trans-enoyl-CoA isomerase (ECI) (eci(-/-) mouse). ECI is the link in mitochondrial beta-oxidation of unsaturated and saturated fatty acids and essential for the complete degradation and for maximal energy yield. Mitochondrial beta-oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids is interrupted in eci(-/-)mice at the level of their respective 3-cis- or 3-trans-enoyl-CoA intermediates. Fasting eci(-/-) mice accumulate unsaturated fatty acyl groups in ester lipids and deposit large amounts of triglycerides in hepatocytes (steatosis). Gene expression studies revealed the induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activation in eci(-/-) mice together with peroxisomal beta- and microsomal omega-oxidation enzymes. Combined peroxisomal beta- and microsomal omega-oxidation of the 3-enoyl-CoA intermediates leads to a specific pattern of medium chain unsaturated dicarboxylic acids excreted in the urine in high concentration (dicarboxylic aciduria). The urinary dicarboxylate pattern is a reliable diagnostic marker of the ECI genetic defect. The eci(-/-) mouse might be a model of a yet undefined inborn mitochondrial beta-oxidation disorder lacking the enzyme link that channels the intermediates of unsaturated fatty acids into the beta-oxidation spiral of saturated fatty acids.

  9. Magnetic Properties and Oxygen Defects of Dilute Metal Doped Tin Oxide Based Semiconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Nomura

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemical and magnetic states of iron doped tin oxide (SnO2 as a diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS at room temperature have been investigated using 57Fe Mössbauer spectrometry, XRD and magnetometery. The influence of the doping conditions of SnO2 with iron on the generation of oxygen defects was reviewed and discussed on the basis of ab initio calculations. The magnetic properties depended on preparation conditions, such as thermal decomposition and sol-gel processing as well as 57Fe and super-dilute 57Mn implantation. It was shown that Sb codoping in Fe doped SnO2 increases the saturation magnetization. Doping of Fe(Sb-SnO2 with nonmagnetic Zn ions up to 7 % also increases the magnetization although there is no precipitation of crystalline magnetic phases. The co-doping of two transition metal ions (Fe-Co, Fe-Mn, Fe-Ni and Fe-V in SnO2 matrix enhanced the magnetization as compared with that of single metal ion doped samples. It is suggested from different valence states of doped metal ions that double exchange interactions occur through or near the oxygen vacancies in SnO2. The SnO2 doped with dilute 57Fe may show the intrinsic and/or extrinsic DMS properties. Oxygen vacancies play an important role in the intrinsic DMS. The intrinsic nature of DMS is supported by both, experimental results and ab initio calculations. The long range interactions between diluted magnetic ions are considered to occur through electrons produced by oxygen vacancies or electrons induced by Sb5+ doping.

  10. Raman investigation of laser-induced structural defects of graphite oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Valentino; Torrisi, Lorenzo; Cutroneo, Mariapompea; Havranek, Vladimir; D'Angelo, Giovanna

    2018-01-01

    Since the beginning of intensive studies on graphene and graphitic materials, Raman spectroscopy has always been used as a characterisation technique. This is due to two main reasons: the non-destructive nature of this experimental technique and its ability to distinguish between the plethora of existing carbon materials. One of the most challenging research activities concerns the production of graphene microcircuits. To address this issue, a possible strategy is to directly reduce and pattern graphite oxide (GO) film by laser irradiation. The objective of this study is to evaluate the laser irradiation-induced structural changes on thin GO films by using Micro-Raman spectroscopy. We used as a source a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) and different laser fluences: 15 J/cm2, 7.5 J/cm2 and 5 J/cm2. We have analyzed the modifications of the main Raman contributions of these graphitic materials: the D band (defect induced band), the G band (band due to sp2 hybridized carbon atoms) and the 2D band (D band overtone). In particular, we found out that our figure of merit (FOM) parameters, i.e. the intensity ratio ID/IG (for the D band and G band) and I2D/IG (for the 2D band and G band), change with the laser fluences, revealing a different effect induced by the laser irradiation. The best results are found in the sample irradiated with 5 J/cm2, suggesting that higher fluences do not lead to better results.

  11. Raman investigation of laser-induced structural defects of graphite oxide films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romano Valentino

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of intensive studies on graphene and graphitic materials, Raman spectroscopy has always been used as a characterisation technique. This is due to two main reasons: the non-destructive nature of this experimental technique and its ability to distinguish between the plethora of existing carbon materials. One of the most challenging research activities concerns the production of graphene microcircuits. To address this issue, a possible strategy is to directly reduce and pattern graphite oxide (GO film by laser irradiation. The objective of this study is to evaluate the laser irradiation-induced structural changes on thin GO films by using Micro-Raman spectroscopy. We used as a source a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm and different laser fluences: 15 J/cm2, 7.5 J/cm2 and 5 J/cm2. We have analyzed the modifications of the main Raman contributions of these graphitic materials: the D band (defect induced band, the G band (band due to sp2 hybridized carbon atoms and the 2D band (D band overtone. In particular, we found out that our figure of merit (FOM parameters, i.e. the intensity ratio ID/IG (for the D band and G band and I2D/IG (for the 2D band and G band, change with the laser fluences, revealing a different effect induced by the laser irradiation. The best results are found in the sample irradiated with 5 J/cm2, suggesting that higher fluences do not lead to better results.

  12. Oxide for valve-regulated lead-acid batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, L. T.; Lim, O. V.; Haigh, N. P.; Rand, D. A. J.; Manders, J. E.; Rice, D. M.

    In order to meet the increasing demand for valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries, a new soft lead has been produced by Pasminco Metals. In this material, bismuth is increased to a level that produces a significant improvement in battery cycle life. By contrast, other common impurities, such as arsenic, cobalt, chromium, nickel, antimony and tellurium, that are known to be harmful to VRLA batteries are controlled to very low levels. A bismuth (Bi)-bearing oxide has been manufactured (Barton-pot method) from this soft lead and is characterized in terms of phase composition, particle size distribution, BET surface area, and reactivity. An investigation is also made of the rates of oxygen and hydrogen evolution on pasted electrodes prepared from the Bi-bearing oxide. For comparison, the characteristics and performance of a Bi-free (Barton-pot) oxide, which is manufactured in the USA, are also examined. Increasing the level of bismuth and lowering those of the other impurities in soft lead produces no unusual changes in either the physical or the chemical properties of the resulting Bi-bearing oxide compared with Bi-free oxide. This is very important because there is no need for battery manufacturers to change their paste formulae and paste-mixing procedures on switching to the new Bi-bearing oxide. There is little difference in the rates of oxygen and hydrogen evolution on pasted electrodes prepared from Bi-bearing or Bi-free oxides. On the other hand, these rates increase on the former electrodes when the levels of all the other impurities are made to exceed (by deliberately adding the impurities as oxide powders) the corresponding, specified values for the Bi-bearing oxide. The latter behaviour is particularly noticeable for hydrogen evolution, which is enhanced even further when a negative electrode prepared from Bi-bearing oxide is contaminated through the deposition of impurities added to the sulfuric acid solution. The effects of impurities in the positive

  13. Oxide for valve-regulated lead-acid batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, L.T.; Lim, O.V.; Haigh, N.P.; Rand, D.A.J. [CSIRO, Div. of Minerals, Clayton South, Vic. (Australia); Manders, J.E.; Rice, D.M. [Pasminco Metals, Melbourne, Vic. (Australia)

    1998-05-18

    In order to meet the increasing demand for valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries, a new soft lead has been produced by Pasminco Metals. In this material, bismuth is increased to a level that produces a significant improvement in battery cycle life. By contrast, other common impurities, such as arsenic, cobalt, chromium, nickel, antimony and tellurium, that are known to be harmful to VRLA batteries are controlled to very low levels. A bismuth (Bi)-bearing oxide has been manufactured (Barton-pot method) from this soft lead and is characterized in terms of phase composition, particle size distribution, BET surface area, and reactivity. An investigation is also made of the rates of oxygen and hydrogen evolution on pasted electrodes prepared from the Bi-bearing oxide. For comparison, the characteristics and performance of a Bi-free (Barton-pot) oxide, which is manufactured in the USA, are also examined. Increasing the level of bismuth and lowering those of the other impurities in soft lead produces no unusual changes in either the physical or the chemical properties of the resulting Bi-bearing oxide compared with Bi-free oxide. This is very important because there is no need for battery manufacturers to change their paste formulae and paste-mixing procedures on switching to the new Bi-bearing oxide. There is little difference in the rates of oxygen and hydrogen evolution on pasted electrodes prepared from Bi-bearing or Bi-free oxides. On the other hand, these rates increase on the former electrodes when the levels of all the other impurities are made to exceed (by deliberately adding the impurities as oxide powders) the corresponding, specified values for the Bi-bearing oxide. The latter behaviour is particularly noticeable for hydrogen evolution, which is enhanced even further when a negative electrode prepared from Bi-bearing oxide is contaminated through the deposition of impurities added to the sulfuric acid solution. The effects of impurities in the positive

  14. 40 CFR 721.3680 - Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3680 Ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with... identified generically as ethylene oxide adduct of fatty acid ester with pentaerythritol (PMN P-91-442) is...

  15. Electrocatalysis by nanoparticles: Oxidation of formic acid at manganese oxide nanorods-modified Pt planar and nanohole-arrays

    OpenAIRE

    El-Deab, Mohamed S.

    2010-01-01

    The electro-oxidation of formic acid (an essential reaction in direct formic acid fuel cells) is a challenging process because of the deactivation of anodes by the adsorption of the poisoning intermediate carbon monoxide (CO). Pt electrodes in two geometries (planar and nanohole-array) were modified by the electrodeposition of manganese oxide nanorods (nano-MnOx). The modified Pt electrodes were then tested for their electrocatalytic activity through the electro-oxidation of formic acid in a ...

  16. Graphene Oxide-Gallic Acid Nanodelivery System for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Dorniani, D.; Saifullah, B.; Barahuie, F.; Arulselvan, P.; Hussein, M.Z.; Fakurazi, S; Twyman, L.J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the technological advancement in the biomedical science, cancer remains a life-threatening disease. In this study, we designed an anticancer nanodelivery system using graphene oxide (GO) as nanocarrier for an active anticancer agent gallic acid (GA). The successful formation nanocomposite (GOGA) was characterized using XRD, FTIR, HRTEM, Raman, and UV/Vis spectroscopy. The release study shows that the release of GA from the designed anticancer nanocomposite (GOGA) occurs in a sustained...

  17. DLTS study of annihilation of oxidation induced deep-level defects ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. This paper describes the fabrication of MOS capacitor and DLTS study of annihilation of deep- level defects upon thermal annealing. Ni/SiO2/n-Si MOS structures fabricated on n-type Si wafers were inves- tigated for process-induced deep-level defects. The deep-level traps in Si substrates induced during the pro-.

  18. Oxidation of amino acids and proteins by peroxynitrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacsamana, M.; Gebicki, J. [Macquarie Univ., North Ryde, NSW (Australia). School of Biological Sciences

    1996-12-31

    Recent studies suggested that proteins exposed to free radicals and other strong oxidants generated by living organisms may be the source of damage to tissues even at sites distant from the original point of generation of the reactive species. In examining the ability of biologically significant oxidizing agents to generate protein peroxides, the authors have studied protein peroxidation by peroxynitrite (ONOO{sup -}), known to be a potential source of tissue damage. Treatment of bovine serum albumin, Iysozyme, apotransferrin, insulin or human serum albumin with peroxynitrous acid (POXNA) led to formation of hydroperoxide groups on the proteins, detected by their reaction with iodide. Under optimum conditions, up to one peroxide group formed on each molecule of protein. Hydroxyl radical scavengers, antioxidants, or metal chelators, were unable to affect the quantities of peroxides generated by POXNA. These findings suggest that the oxidation was not mediated by the hydroxyl free radicals. The iodide assay cannot be applied to the measurement of peroxides in presence of nitrite, which is a contaminant of most solutions of POXNA. Nitrite can be easily removed from proteins by molecular filtration, but this method cannot be applied to amino acids. Therefore an amino acid peroxide test based on chemiluminescence was used, which shows promise for general peroxide detection. Extended abstract. 2 refs.

  19. Pre-conception Folic Acid and Multivitamin Supplementation for the Primary and Secondary Prevention of Neural Tube Defects and Other Folic Acid-Sensitive Congenital Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R Douglas; Wilson, R Douglas; Audibert, François; Brock, Jo-Ann; Carroll, June; Cartier, Lola; Gagnon, Alain; Johnson, Jo-Ann; Langlois, Sylvie; Murphy-Kaulbeck, Lynn; Okun, Nanette; Pastuck, Melanie; Deb-Rinker, Paromita; Dodds, Linda; Leon, Juan Andres; Lowel, Hélène L; Luo, Wei; MacFarlane, Amanda; McMillan, Rachel; Moore, Aideen; Mundle, William; O'Connor, Deborah; Ray, Joel; Van den Hof, Michiel

    2015-06-01

    To provide updated information on the pre- and post-conception use of oral folic acid with or without a multivitamin/micronutrient supplement for the prevention of neural tube defects and other congenital anomalies. This will help physicians, midwives, nurses, and other health care workers to assist in the education of women about the proper use and dosage of folic acid/multivitamin supplementation before and during pregnancy. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library in January 2011 using appropriate controlled vocabulary and key words (e.g., folic acid, prenatal multivitamins, folate sensitive birth defects, congenital anomaly risk reduction, pre-conception counselling). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies published in English from 1985 and June 2014. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to June 2014 Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. Costs, risks, and benefits: The financial costs are those of daily vitamin supplementation and eating a healthy folate-enriched diet. The risks are of a reported association of dietary folic acid supplementation with fetal epigenetic modifications and with an increased likelihood of a twin pregnancy. These associations may require consideration before initiating folic acid supplementation. The benefit of folic acid oral supplementation or dietary folate intake combined with a multivitamin/micronutrient supplement is an associated decrease in neural tube defects and perhaps in other specific birth defects and obstetrical complications. The quality of evidence in the document was rated using the criteria

  20. Effects of a chitosan membrane coated with polylactic and polyglycolic acid on bone regeneration in a rat calvarial defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Ui-Won [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of); Song, Kun-Young [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang-Sung [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong-Keun [Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyoo-Sung [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chong-Kwan [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong-Ho [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a chitosan membrane coated with polylactic and polyglycolic acid (PLGA) on bone regeneration in a rat calvarial defect. Surgical implantation of chitosan membranes resulted in enhanced local bone formation at both 2 and 8 weeks. In conclusion, the chitosan membrane coated with PLGA had a significant potential to induce bone formation in the rat calvarial defect model. Within the selected PLGA dose range and observation intervals, there appeared to be no meaningful differences in bone formation.

  1. Ascorbic acid insufficiency induces the severe defect on bone formation via the down-regulation of osteocalcin production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won; Bae, Seyeon; Kim, Hyemin; Kim, Yejin; Choi, Jiwon; Lim, Sun Young; Lee, Hei Jin; Lee, Jihyuk; Choi, Jiyea; Jang, Mirim; Lee, Kyoung Eun; Chung, Sun G.; Hwang, Young-il

    2013-01-01

    The L-gulono-γ-lactone oxidase gene (Gulo) encodes an essential enzyme in the synthesis of ascorbic acid from glucose. On the basis of previous findings of bone abnormalities in Gulo-/- mice under conditions of ascorbic acid insufficiency, we investigated the effect of ascorbic acid insufficiency on factors related to bone metabolism in Gulo-/- mice. Four groups of mice were raised for 4 weeks under differing conditions of ascorbic acid insufficiency, namely, wild type; ascorbic acid-sufficient Gulo-/- mice, 3-week ascorbic acid-insufficient Gulo-/- mice, and 4-week ascorbic acid-insufficient Gulo-/- mice. Four weeks of ascorbic acid insufficiency resulted in significant weight loss in Gulo-/- mice. Interestingly, average plasma osteocalcin levels were significantly decreased in Gulo-/- mice after 3 weeks of ascorbic acid insufficiency. In addition, the tibia weight in ascorbic acid-sufficient Gulo-/- mice was significantly higher than that in the other three groups. Moreover, significant decreases in trabecular bone volume near to the growth plate, as well as in trabecular bone attachment to the growth plate, were evident in 3- or 4-week ascorbic acid-insufficient Gulo-/-. In summary, ascorbic acid insufficiency in Gulo-/- mice results in severe defects in normal bone formation, which are closely related to a decrease in plasma osteocalcin levels. PMID:24386598

  2. The kinetics of oxidation of bilirubin and ascorbic acid in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonov, A. V.; Rumyantsev, E. V.; Kochergin, B. A.; Antina, E. V.

    2012-07-01

    The results of a comparative study of the oxidation of bilirubin, ascorbic acid, and their mixture in aqueous solutions under the action of air oxygen and hydrogen peroxide are presented. The observed and true rate constants for the oxidation reactions were determined. It was shown that the oxidation of tetrapyrrole pigment occurred under these conditions bypassing the stage of biliverdin formation to monopyrrole products. Simultaneous oxidation of bilirubin and ascorbic acid was shown to be accompanied by the inhibition of ascorbic acid oxidation by bilirubin, whereas ascorbic acid itself activated the oxidation of bilirubin.

  3. Oxidation in Acidic Medium of Lignins from Agricultural Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labat, Gisele Aparecida Amaral; Gonçalves, Adilson Roberto

    Agricultural residues as sugarcane straw and bagasse are burned in boilers for generation of energy in sugar and alcohol industries. However, excess of those by-products could be used to obtain products with higher value. Pulping process generates cellulosic pulps and lignin. The lignin could be oxidized and applied in effluent treatments for heavy metal removal. Oxidized lignin presents very strong chelating properties. Lignins from sugarcane straw and bagasse were obtained by ethanol-water pulping. Oxidation of lignins was carried out using acetic acid and Co/Mn/Br catalytical system at 50, 80, and 115 °C for 5 h. Kinetics of the reaction was accomplished by measuring the UV-visible region. Activation energy was calculated for lignins from sugarcane straw and bagasse (34.2 and 23.4 kJ mol-1, respectively). The first value indicates higher cross-linked formation. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy data of samples collected during oxidation are very similar. Principal component analysis applied to spectra shows only slight structure modifications in lignins after oxidation reaction.

  4. Regulation and limitations to fatty acid oxidation during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jacob; Kiens, Bente

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA) as fuel for energy utilization during exercise originate from different sources: FA transported in the circulation either bound to albumin or as triacylglycerol (TG) carried by very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and FA from lipolysis of muscle TG stores (IMTG). Despite a high...... rate of energy expenditure during high intensity exercise the total fatty acid oxidation is suppressed to below that observed during moderate intensity exercise. Although this has been known for many years, the mechanisms behind this phenomenon are still not fully elucidated. A failure of adipose...... tissue to deliver sufficient fatty acids to exercising muscle has been proposed, but evidence is emerging that factors within the muscle might be of more importance. The high rate of glycolysis during high intensity exercise might be the "driving force" via the increased production of acetyl CoA which...

  5. Relationship between fatty acid delivery and fatty acid oxidation during strenuous exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romijn, J. A.; Coyle, E. F.; Sidossis, L. S.; Zhang, X. J.; Wolfe, R. R.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the extent to which decreased plasma free fatty acid (FFA) concentration contributes to the relatively low rates of fat oxidation during high-intensity exercise, we studied FFA metabolism in six endurance-trained cyclists during 20-30 min of exercise [85% of maximal O2 uptake (VO2max)].

  6. Valorization of Lignin by Partial Wet Oxidation Using Sustainable Heteropoly Acid Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abayneh Getachew Demesa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The production of carboxylic acids by partial wet oxidation of alkali lignin at elevated temperatures and pressures was studied experimentally. Two different heteropoly acids, phosphotungstic acid (H3PW12O40 and phosphomolybdic acid (H3PMo12O40, were used to catalyze the oxidation of lignin under hydrothermal conditions. Factors influencing the total yield of carboxylic acids formed during the partial oxidation of lignin were investigated. Formic, acetic and succinic acids were the major products identified. Of the two catalysts used, phosphomolybdic acid gave the most promising results, with carboxylic acid yields and lignin conversions of up to 45% and 95%, respectively.

  7. A point defect model for the general and pitting corrosion on iron-oxide-electrolyte interface deduced from current oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Pagitsas, M; Sazou, D

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of the passive-active oscillatory region of the Fe-0.75 M H sub 2 SO sub 4 system, perturbed by adding small amounts of halide species, allow the distinction between pitting and general corrosion. Complex periodic and aperiodic current oscillations characterize pitting corrosion whereas monoperiodic oscillations of a relaxation type indicate general corrosion. A point defect model (PDM) is considered for the microscopic description of the growth and breakdown of the iron oxide film. The physicochemical processes leading to different types of corrosion can be clarified in terms of the PDM. Occupation of an anion vacancy by a halide ion results in the localized attack of the passive oxide and pitting corrosion. On the other hand, the formation of surface soluble iron complexes is related to the uniform dissolution of the passive oxide and general corrosion.

  8. Fatty Acid Metabolic Defects and Right Ventricular Lipotoxicity in Human Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittain, Evan L; Talati, Megha; Fessel, Joshua P; Zhu, He; Penner, Niki; Calcutt, M Wade; West, James D; Funke, Mitch; Lewis, Gregory D; Gerszten, Robert E; Hamid, Rizwan; Pugh, Meredith E; Austin, Eric D; Newman, John H; Hemnes, Anna R

    2016-05-17

    The mechanisms of right ventricular (RV) failure in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are poorly understood. Abnormalities in fatty acid (FA) metabolism have been described in experimental models of PAH, but systemic and myocardial FA metabolism has not been studied in human PAH. We used human blood, RV tissue, and noninvasive imaging to characterize multiple steps in the FA metabolic pathway in PAH subjects and controls. Circulating free FAs and long-chain acylcarnitines were elevated in PAH patients versus controls. Human RV long-chain FAs were increased and long-chain acylcarnitines were markedly reduced in PAH versus controls. With the use of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, in vivo myocardial triglyceride content was elevated in human PAH versus controls (1.4±1.3% triglyceride versus 0.22±0.11% triglyceride, P=0.02). Ceramide, a mediator of lipotoxicity, was increased in PAH RVs versus controls. Using an animal model of heritable PAH, we demonstrated reduced FA oxidation via failure of palmitoylcarnitine to stimulate oxygen consumption in the PAH RV. Abnormalities in FA metabolism can be detected in the blood and myocardium in human PAH and are associated with in vivo cardiac steatosis and lipotoxicity. Murine data suggest that lipotoxicity may arise from reduction in FA oxidation. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Reduction Rates for Higher Americium Oxidation States in Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Travis Shane [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mincher, Bruce Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schmitt, Nicholas C [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The stability of hexavalent americium was measured using multiple americium concentrations and nitric acid concentrations after contact with the strong oxidant sodium bismuthate. Contrary to our hypotheses Am(VI) was not reduced faster at higher americium concentrations, and the reduction was only zero-order at short time scales. Attempts to model the reduction kinetics using zero order kinetic models showed Am(VI) reduction in nitric acid is more complex than the autoreduction processes reported by others in perchloric acid. The classical zero-order reduction of Am(VI) was found here only for short times on the order of a few hours. We did show that the rate of Am(V) production was less than the rate of Am(VI) reduction, indicating that some Am(VI) undergoes two electron-reduction to Am(IV). We also monitored the Am(VI) reduction in contact with the organic diluent dodecane. A direct comparison of these results with those in the absence of the organic diluent showed the reduction rates for Am(VI) were not statistically different for both systems. Additional americium oxidations conducted in the presence of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) ions showed that Am(VI) is reduced without the typical growth of Am(V) observed in the systems sans Ce ion. This was an interesting result which suggests a potential new reduction/oxidation pathway for Am in the presence of Ce; however, these results were very preliminary, and will require additional experiments to understand the mechanism by which this occurs. Overall, these studies have shown that hexavalent americium is fundamentally stable enough in nitric acid to run a separations process. However, the complicated nature of the reduction pathways based on the system components is far from being rigorously understood.

  10. 'Low-acid' sulfide oxidation using nitrate-enriched groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donn, Michael; Boxall, Naomi; Reid, Nathan; Meakin, Rebecca; Gray, David; Kaksonen, Anna; Robson, Thomas; Shiers, Denis

    2016-04-01

    Acid drainage (AMD/ARD) is undoubtedly one of the largest environmental, legislative and economic challenges facing the mining industry. In Australia alone, at least 60m is spent on AMD related issues annually, and the global cost is estimated to be in the order of tens of billions US. Furthermore, the challenge of safely and economically storing or treating sulfidic wastes will likely intensify because of the trend towards larger mines that process increasingly higher volumes of lower grade ores and the associated sulfidic wastes and lower profit margins. While the challenge of managing potentially acid forming (PAF) wastes will likely intensify, the industrial approaches to preventing acid production or ameliorating the effects has stagnated for decades. Conventionally, PAF waste is segregated and encapsulated in non-PAF tips to limit access to atmospheric oxygen. Two key limitations of the 'cap and cover' approach are: 1) the hazard (PAF) is not actually removed; only the pollutant linkage is severed; and, 2) these engineered structures are susceptible to physical failure in short-to-medium term, potentially re-establishing that pollutant linkage. In an effort to address these concerns, CSIRO is investigating a passive, 'low-acid' oxidation mechanism for sulfide treatment, which can potentially produce one quarter as much acidity compared with pyrite oxidation under atmospheric oxygen. This 'low-acid' mechanism relies on nitrate, rather than oxygen, as the primary electron accepter and the activity of specifically cultured chemolithoautotrophic bacteria and archaea communities. This research was prompted by the observation that, in deeply weathered terrains of Australia, shallow (oxic to sub-oxic) groundwater contacting weathering sulfides are commonly inconsistent with the geochemical conditions produced by ARD. One key characteristic of these aquifers is the natural abundance of nitrate on a regional scale, which becomes depleted around the sulfide bodies, and

  11. Investigation of Influential Parameters in Deep Oxidative Desulfurization of Dibenzothiophene with Hydrogen Peroxide and Formic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Alireza Haghighat Mamaghani; Shohreh Fatemi; Mehrdad Asgari

    2013-01-01

    An effective oxidative system consisting of hydrogen peroxide, formic acid, and sulfuric acid followed by an extractive stage were implemented to remove dibenzothiophene in the simulated fuel oil. The results revealed such a great performance in the case of H2O2 in the presence of formic and sulfuric acids that led to the removal of sulfur compounds. Sulfuric acid was employed to increase the acidity of media as well as catalytic activity together with formic acid. The oxidation reaction was ...

  12. Study of Perfluorophosphonic Acid Surface Modifications on Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalynn Quiñones

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, perfluorinated phosphonic acid modifications were utilized to modify zinc oxide (ZnO nanoparticles because they create a more stable surface due to the electronegativity of the perfluoro head group. Specifically, 12-pentafluorophenoxydodecylphosphonic acid, 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzylphosphonic acid, and (1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorododecylphosphonic acid have been used to form thin films on the nanoparticle surfaces. The modified nanoparticles were then characterized using infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were utilized to determine the particle size of the nanoparticles before and after modification, and to analyze the film coverage on the ZnO surfaces, respectively. Zeta potential measurements were obtained to determine the stability of the ZnO nanoparticles. It was shown that the surface charge increased as the alkyl chain length increases. This study shows that modifying the ZnO nanoparticles with perfluorinated groups increases the stability of the phosphonic acids adsorbed on the surfaces. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to distinguish between chemically and physically bound films on the modified nanoparticles. The higher weight loss for 12-pentafluorophenoxydodecylphosphonic acid and (1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorododecylphosphonic acid modifications corresponds to a higher surface concentration of the modifications, and, ideally, higher surface coverage. While previous studies have shown how phosphonic acids interact with the surfaces of ZnO, the aim of this study was to understand how the perfluorinated groups can tune the surface properties of the nanoparticles.

  13. Lipotoxic Palmitate Impairs the Rate of β-Oxidation and Citric Acid Cycle Flux in Rat Neonatal Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Haffar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Diabetic hearts exhibit intracellular lipid accumulation. This suggests that the degree of fatty acid oxidation (FAO in these hearts is insufficient to handle the elevated lipid uptake. We previously showed that palmitate impaired the rate of FAO in primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Here we were interested in characterizing the site of FAO impairment induced by palmitate since it may shed light on the metabolic dysfunction that leads to lipid accumulation in diabetic hearts. Methods: We measured fatty acid oxidation, acetyl-CoA oxidation, and carnitine palmitoyl transferase (Cpt1b activity. We measured both forward and reverse aconitase activity, as well as NAD+ dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity. We also measured reactive oxygen species using the 2', 7'-Dichlorofluorescin Diacetate (DCFDA assay. Finally we used thin layer chromatography to assess diacylglycerol (DAG levels. Results: We found that palmitate significantly impaired mitochondrial β-oxidation as well as citric acid cycle flux, but not Cpt1b activity. Palmitate negatively affected net aconitase activity and isocitrate dehydrogenase activity. The impaired enzyme activities were not due to oxidative stress but may be due to DAG mediated PKC activation. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that palmitate, a highly abundant fatty acid in human diets, causes impaired β-oxidation and citric acid cycle flux in primary neonatal cardiomyocytes. This metabolic defect occurs prior to cell death suggesting that it is a cause, rather than a consequence of palmitate mediated lipotoxicity. This impaired mitochondrial metabolism can have important implications for metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity.

  14. Mitochondrial free fatty acid β-oxidation supports oxidative phosphorylation and proliferation in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara; Hernández-Esquivel, Luz; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; El Hafidi, Mohammed; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Reséndiz, Ileana; Rodríguez-Zavala, José S; Pacheco-Velázquez, Silvia C; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2015-08-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) is functional and sustains tumor proliferation in several cancer cell types. To establish whether mitochondrial β-oxidation of free fatty acids (FFAs) contributes to cancer OxPhos functioning, its protein contents and enzyme activities, as well as respiratory rates and electrical membrane potential (ΔΨm) driven by FFA oxidation were assessed in rat AS-30D hepatoma and liver (RLM) mitochondria. Higher protein contents (1.4-3 times) of β-oxidation (CPT1, SCAD) as well as proteins and enzyme activities (1.7-13-times) of Krebs cycle (KC: ICD, 2OGDH, PDH, ME, GA), and respiratory chain (RC: COX) were determined in hepatoma mitochondria vs. RLM. Although increased cholesterol content (9-times vs. RLM) was determined in the hepatoma mitochondrial membranes, FFAs and other NAD-linked substrates were oxidized faster (1.6-6.6 times) by hepatoma mitochondria than RLM, maintaining similar ΔΨm values. The contents of β-oxidation, KC and RC enzymes were also assessed in cells. The mitochondrial enzyme levels in human cervix cancer HeLa and AS-30D cells were higher than those observed in rat hepatocytes whereas in human breast cancer biopsies, CPT1 and SCAD contents were lower than in human breast normal tissue. The presence of CPT1 and SCAD in AS-30D mitochondria and HeLa cells correlated with an active FFA utilization in HeLa cells. Furthermore, the β-oxidation inhibitor perhexiline blocked FFA utilization, OxPhos and proliferation in HeLa and other cancer cells. In conclusion, functional mitochondria supported by FFA β-oxidation are essential for the accelerated cancer cell proliferation and hence anti-β-oxidation therapeutics appears as an alternative promising approach to deter malignant tumor growth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Phytanic acid alpha-oxidation: decarboxylation of 2-hydroxyphytanoyl-CoA to pristanic acid in human liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, N. M.; Wanders, R. J.; Schor, D. S.; Jansen, G. A.; Jakobs, C.

    1997-01-01

    The degradation of the first intermediate in the alpha-oxidation of phytanic acid, 2-hydroxyphytanoyl-CoA, was investigated. Human liver homogenates were incubated with 2-hydroxyphytanoyl-CoA or 2-hydroxyphytanic acid, after which formation of 2-ketophytanic acid and pristanic acid were studied.

  16. Refractory Oxide Coatings on Titanium for Nitric Acid Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi Shankar, A.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2014-07-01

    Tantalum and Niobium have good corrosion resistance in nitric acid as well as in molten chloride salt medium encountered in spent fuel nuclear reprocessing plants. Commercially, pure Ti (Cp-Ti) exhibits good corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium; however, in vapor condensates of nitric acid, significant corrosion was observed. In the present study, a thermochemical diffusion method was pursued to coat Ta2O5, Nb2O5, and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5 on Ti to improve the corrosion resistance and enhance the life of critical components in reprocessing plants. The coated samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, profilometry, micro-scratch test, and ASTM A262 Practice-C test in 65 pct boiling nitric acid. The SEM micrograph of the coated samples showed that uniform dense coating containing Ta2O5 and/or Nb2O5 was formed. XRD patterns indicated the formation of TiO2, Ta2O5/Nb2O5, and mixed oxide/solid solution phase on coated Ti samples. ASTM A262 Practice-C test revealed reproducible outstanding corrosion resistance of Ta2O5-coated sample in comparison to Nb2O5- and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5-coated sample. The hardness of the Ta2O5-coated Cp-Ti sample was found to be twice that of uncoated Cp-Ti. The SEM and XRD results confirmed the presence of protective oxide layer (Ta2O5, rutile TiO2, and mixed phase) on coated sample which improved the corrosion resistance remarkably in boiling liquid phase of nitric acid compared to uncoated Cp-Ti and Ti-5Ta-1.8Nb alloy. Three phase corrosion test conducted on Ta2O5-coated samples in boiling 11.5 M nitric acid showed poor corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid due to poor adhesion of the coating. The adhesive strength of the coated samples needs to be optimized in order to improve the corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid.

  17. Phosphonic Acids for Interfacial Engineering of Transparent Conductive Oxides

    KAUST Repository

    Paniagua, Sergio A.

    2016-05-26

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs), such as indium tin oxide and zinc oxide, play an important role as electrode materials in organic-semiconductor devices. The properties of the inorganic-organic interface - the offset between the TCO Fermi level and the relevant transport level, the extent to which the organic semiconductor can wet the oxide surface, and the influence of the surface on semiconductor morphology - significantly affect device performance. This review surveys the literature on TCO modification with phosphonic acids (PAs), which has increasingly been used to engineer these interfacial properties. The first part outlines the relevance of TCO surface modification to organic electronics, surveys methods for the synthesis of PAs, discusses the modes by which they can bind to TCO surfaces, and compares PAs to alternative organic surface modifiers. The next section discusses methods of PA monolayer deposition, the kinetics of monolayer formation, and structural evidence regarding molecular orientation on TCOs. The next sections discuss TCO work-function modification using PAs, tuning of TCO surface energy using PAs, and initiation of polymerizations from TCO-tethered PAs. Finally, studies that examine the use of PA-modified TCOs in organic light-emitting diodes and organic photovoltaics are compared. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  18. Fatty acids and oxidative stress in psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonello Lucio

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine whether there is published evidence for increased oxidative stress in neuropsychiatric disorders. Methods A PubMed search was carried out using the MeSH search term 'oxidative stress' in conjunction with each of the DSM-IV-TR diagnostic categories of the American Psychiatric Association in order to identify potential studies. Results There was published evidence of increased oxidative stress in the following DSM-IV-TR diagnostic categories: mental retardation; autistic disorder; Rett's disorder; attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder; delirium; dementia; amnestic disorders; alcohol-related disorders; amphetamine (or amphetamine-like-related disorders; hallucinogen-related disorders; nicotine-related disorders; opioid-related disorders; schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders; mood disorders; anxiety disorders; sexual dysfunctions; eating disorders; and sleep disorders. Conclusion Most psychiatric disorders are associated with increased oxidative stress. Patients suffering from that subgroup of these psychiatric disorders in which there is increased lipid peroxidation might therefore benefit from fatty acid supplementation (preferably with the inclusion of an antioxidant-rich diet while patients suffering from all these psychiatric disorders might benefit from a change to a whole-food plant-based diet devoid of refined carbohydrate products.

  19. Electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid on platinum nanoparticles with different oxidation levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Chien-Te, E-mail: cthsieh@saturn.yzu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Han-Tsung; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Yu, Po-Yuan [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Chen, Po-Yen; Jang, Bi-Sheng [Materials and Electro-Optics Research Division, National Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology, Taoyuan 325, Taiwan (China)

    2015-01-15

    Herein reported is an atomic layer deposition (ALD) process of platinum (Pt) from (methylcyclopentadienyl) trimethylplatinum (MeCpPtMe{sub 3}) and oxygen (O{sub 2}) for synthesizing the Pt electrocatalysts toward methanol and formic acid oxidation. The as-synthesized Pt catalysts are thermally reduced in 5 vol% H{sub 2} within temperature window of 150–450 °C. The reduction treatment induces a decrease in amount of Pt oxide (Pt–O) species, e.g., PtO and PtO{sub 2}. The presence of Pt–O species not only enhances catalytic activity but also improves anti-poisoning ability toward the oxidation of methanol and formic acid. The improved activity originates from the fact that the Pt–O species, formed by the ALD route, creates a large number of active sites (e.g., Pt–O{sub ads} and Pt–(OH){sub ads}) to strip the CO-adsorbed sites, leading to a high-level of CO tolerance. This work also proposes a stepwise reaction steps to shed some lights on how the Pt–O species promote the catalytic activity. - Highlights: • This study adopts atomic layer deposition (ALD) to grow metallic Pt nanoparticles. • The Pt catalysts show catalytic activity toward methanol and formic acid oxidation. • The reduction treatment induces a decrease in amount of Pt oxide (Pt–O) species. • The Pt–O species creates a number of active sites to strip the CO-adsorbed sites. • A stepwise reaction step concerning the promoted catalytic activity is proposed.

  20. Assays for urinary biomarkers of oxidatively damaged nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weimann, Allan; Broedbaek, Kasper; Henriksen, Trine

    2012-01-01

    -linked immunosorbent assay). The major analytical challenge is specificity. The best combination of selectivity and speed of analysis can be obtained by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometric detection. This, however, is also the most demanding technique with regard to price, complexity...... and skills requirement. The available ELISA methods present considerable specificity problems and cannot be recommended at present. The oxidized nucleic acid metabolites in urine are assumed to originate from the DNA and RNA. However, direct evidence is not available. A possible contribution from...

  1. Electronic Structure of the Perylene / Zinc Oxide Interface: A Computational Study of Photoinduced Electron Transfer and Impact of Surface Defects

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingrui

    2015-07-29

    The electronic properties of dye-sensitized semiconductor surfaces consisting of pery- lene chromophores chemisorbed on zinc oxide via different spacer-anchor groups, have been studied at the density-functional-theory level. The energy distributions of the donor states and the rates of photoinduced electron transfer from dye to surface are predicted. We evaluate in particular the impact of saturated versus unsaturated aliphatic spacer groups inserted between the perylene chromophore and the semiconductor as well as the influence of surface defects on the electron-injection rates.

  2. Ab initio and kinetic modeling studies of formic acid oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marshall, Paul; Glarborg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for oxidation of formic acid (HOCHO) in flames has been developed, based on theoretical work and data from literature. Ab initio calculations were used to obtain rate coefficients for reactions of HOCHO with H, O, and HO2. Modeling predictions with the mechanism...... have been compared to the experimental results of de Wilde and van Tiggelen (1968) who measured the laminar burning velocities for HOCHO flames over a range of stoichiometries and dilution ratios. The modeling predictions are generally satisfactory. The governing reaction mechanisms are outlined based...... on calculations with the kinetic model. Formic acid is consumed mainly by reaction with OH, yielding OCHO, which dissociates rapidly to CO2 + H, and HOCO, which may dissociate to CO + OH or CO2 + H, or react with H, OH, or O2 to form more stable products. The branching fraction of the HOCHO + OH reaction, as well...

  3. Oxidized Fatty Acids as Inter-Kingdom Signaling Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina H. Pohl

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxylipins or oxidized fatty acids are a group of molecules found to play a role in signaling in many different cell types. These fatty acid derivatives have ancient evolutionary origins as signaling molecules and are ideal candidates for inter-kingdom communication. This review discusses examples of the ability of organisms from different kingdoms to “listen” and respond to oxylipin signals during interactions. The interactions that will be looked at are signaling between animals and plants; between animals and fungi; between animals and bacteria and between plants and fungi. This will aid in understanding these interactions, which often have implications in ecology, agriculture as well as human and animal health.

  4. Awareness and intake of folic acid for the prevention of neural tube defects among Lebanese women of childbearing age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr Hage, Claudine; Jalloul, Maya; Sabbah, Mohamad; Adib, Salim M

    2012-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, international recommendations have promoted folic acid supplementation during the periconception period as an effective way of preventing neural tube defects (NTDs). However, the adoption of this recommendation remains insufficient. To assess the awareness and actual intake of folic acid among married Lebanese women aged 18-45 years, a cross-sectional study was conducted among 600 women selected from all five administrative districts in Lebanon, using a multistage cluster sampling procedure. An anonymous questionnaire was completed which covered measures of knowledge and use of folate supplements, as well as demographic, socioeconomic and obstetrical factors. Sixty percent of surveyed women (60%; n = 360) had heard about folic acid. Doctors were the most frequent source of information (61.1%) but only 24.7% of women have been told of the correct period during which folic acid supplementation was useful. Overall, only 6.2% had taken folic acid tablets during the adequate period. Younger age, higher education level and stability/sufficiency of income appeared to be significant predictors of awareness among Lebanese women. Actual folic acid intake was significantly associated with younger age, higher number of pregnancies, planning the last pregnancy and having had that last one after 1990. In Lebanon, the level of folic acid awareness and adequate intake remain relatively low. Several approaches should be used to promote folic acid intake including awareness campaigns, and routine counseling by primary health care physicians on folic acid during preconception visits.

  5. Folic acid usage and associated factors in the prevention of neural tube defects among pregnant women in Ethiopia: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessie, Meselech Ambaw; Zeleke, Ejigu Gebeye; Workie, Shimelash Bitew; Berihun, Ayanaw Worku

    2017-09-21

    Neural tube defects are among the most common birth defects, contributing to miscarriage, infant mortality, severe congenital abnormalities and serious disabilities. It is burdensome to patients, caregivers, healthcare systems and society. It could be reduced if women consume a folic acid supplement before and during the early weeks of pregnancy. This study assesses folic acid usage and associated factors for the prevention of neural tube defects among pregnant women in Ethiopia. Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted on 417 systematically sampled, consented pregnant women that visited Adama hospital medical college for antenatal care during August to November 2014. Pretested interviewer administered questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic, obstetric characteristics and folic acid usage of women. About 48.4% of women took a folic acid supplement at different period of pregnancy; but, only 1.92% of women took the supplement at a protective period against neural tube defects. Age, the early timing of antenatal registration, was a preconception consulted, previous unsuccessful pregnancies and level of folic acid awareness were significantly associated with folic acid usage for prevention of neural tube defects. Folic acid usage during the protective period against neural tube defects among women in Ethiopia is very low, so healthcare plan to improve intake of folic acid is required.

  6. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some α-hydroxy acids by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2004-11-08

    Nov 8, 2004 ... Abstract. The oxidation of lactic acid, mandelic acid and ten monosubstituted mandelic acids by hexa- methylenetetramine-bromine (HABR) in glacial acetic acid, leads to the formation of the corresponding oxoacid. The reaction is first order with respect to each of the hydroxy acids and HABR. It is proposed.

  7. Ruthenium-catalyzed aerobic oxidative decarboxylation of amino acids: a green, zero-waste route to biobased nitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Laurens; Verduyckt, Jasper; Stassen, Ivo; Lagrain, Bert; De Vos, Dirk E

    2015-04-18

    Oxidative decarboxylation of amino acids into nitriles was performed using molecular oxygen as terminal oxidant and a heterogeneous ruthenium hydroxide-based catalyst. A range of amino acids was oxidized in very good yield, using water as the solvent.

  8. Visualizing chemical states and defects induced magnetism of graphene oxide by spatially-resolved-X-ray microscopy and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y F; Singh, Shashi B; Limaye, Mukta V; Shao, Y C; Hsieh, S H; Chen, L Y; Hsueh, H C; Wang, H T; Chiou, J W; Yeh, Y C; Chen, C W; Chen, C H; Ray, Sekhar C; Wang, J; Pong, W F; Takagi, Y; Ohigashi, T; Yokoyama, T; Kosugi, N

    2015-10-20

    This investigation studies the various magnetic behaviors of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxides (rGOs) and elucidates the relationship between the chemical states that involve defects therein and their magnetic behaviors in GO sheets. Magnetic hysteresis loop reveals that the GO is ferromagnetic whereas photo-thermal moderately reduced graphene oxide (M-rGO) and heavily reduced graphene oxide (H-rGO) gradually become paramagnetic behavior at room temperature. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and corresponding X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy were utilized to investigate thoroughly the variation of the C 2p(π*) states that are bound with oxygen-containing and hydroxyl groups, as well as the C 2p(σ*)-derived states in flat and wrinkle regions to clarify the relationship between the spatially-resolved chemical states and the magnetism of GO, M-rGO and H-rGO. The results of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism further support the finding that C 2p(σ*)-derived states are the main origin of the magnetism of GO. Based on experimental results and first-principles calculations, the variation in magnetic behavior from GO to M-rGO and to H-rGO is interpreted, and the origin of ferromagnetism is identified as the C 2p(σ*)-derived states that involve defects/vacancies rather than the C 2p(π*) states that are bound with oxygen-containing and hydroxyl groups on GO sheets.

  9. Arabidopsis thaliana cdd1 mutant uncouples the constitutive activation of salicylic acid signalling from growth defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swain, S.; Roy, S.; Shah, J.; Wees, S.C.M. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Nandi, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Arabidopsis genotypes with a hyperactive salicylic acidmediated signalling pathway exhibit enhanced disease resistance, which is often coupled with growth and developmental defects, such as dwarfing and spontaneous necrotic lesions on the leaves, resulting in reduced biomass yield. In this article,

  10. Lewis acid catalysis and Green oxidations: sequential tandem oxidation processes induced by Mn-hyperaccumulating plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escande, Vincent; Renard, Brice-Loïc; Grison, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Among the phytotechnologies used for the reclamation of degraded mining sites, phytoextraction aims to diminish the concentration of polluting elements in contaminated soils. However, the biomass resulting from the phytoextraction processes (highly enriched in polluting elements) is too often considered as a problematic waste. The manganese-enriched biomass derived from native Mn-hyperaccumulating plants of New Caledonia was presented here as a valuable source of metallic elements of high interest in chemical catalysis. The preparation of the catalyst Eco-Mn1 and reagent Eco-Mn2 derived from Grevillea exul exul and Grevillea exul rubiginosa was investigated. Their unusual polymetallic compositions allowed to explore new reactivity of low oxidative state of manganese-Mn(II) for Eco-Mn1 and Mn(IV) for Eco-Mn2. Eco-Mn1 was used as a Lewis acid to catalyze the acetalization/elimination of aldehydes into enol ethers with high yields; a new green and stereoselective synthesis of (-)-isopulegol via the carbonyl-ene cyclization of (+)-citronellal was also performed with Eco-Mn1. Eco-Mn2 was used as a mild oxidative reagent and controlled the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols into aldehydes with quantitative yields. Oxidative cleavage was interestingly noticed when Eco-Mn2 was used in the presence of a polyol. Eco-Mn2 allowed direct oxidative iodination of ketones without using iodine, which is strongly discouraged by new environmental legislations. Finally, the combination of the properties in the Eco-Mn catalysts and reagents gave them an unprecedented potential to perform sequential tandem oxidation processes through new green syntheses of p-cymene from (-)-isopulegol and (+)-citronellal; and a new green synthesis of functionalized pyridines by in situ oxidation of 1,4-dihydropyridines.

  11. Bone reactions to oxidized titanium implants with electrochemical anion sulphuric acid and phosphoric acid incorporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sul, Young-Taeg; Johansson, Carina B; Kang, Yunmo; Jeon, Dong-Gyun; Albrektsson, Tomas

    2002-01-01

    The importance of the surface properties of implants for a successful osseointegration has been emphasized. It is generally known that bone response to implant surfaces is considerably related to the various surface properties. The purpose of this study was to investigate bone tissue reactions to multifactorial biocompatibility of the surface oxide of electrochemically oxidized titanium implants. The ultimate objective was to improve surface quality, resulting in enhancement of clinical outcomes of osseointegrated implants. Three different surface types of commercially pure titanium (c.p. Ti) implants were prepared. Turned implants were used for controls and test implants were prepared by the micro arc oxidation (MAO) method, either in sulphuric acid (S implants) or in phosphoric acid (P implants). Implants were inserted in the femur and tibia of 10 mature New Zealand White rabbits. The bone response was evaluated by biomechanical tests, histology, and histomorphometry. The follow-up time was 6 weeks. The mean peak values of the removal torque showed significant differences between control and test S implants (p =.022) but showed no significant differences between control and test P implants (p =.195) or between test S and test P implants (p =.457). In addition, the histomorphometric comparisons of the bone-to-metal contact around entire implants demonstrated 186% increase in S implants (p =.028) and 232% increase in P implants (p =.028) compared with the paired control groups. Quantification of the bone area in the threads did not show any significant differences. The present results suggest that the primary mode of action in strong bone response to S implants is mechanical interlocking, and to P implants, it is biochemical interaction. It is possible that the phosphate groups in the titanium oxide of P implants provide potential chemical bonding sites for calcium ions and hydroxyapatite of the bone matrix during biologic mineralization. key words: bone responses

  12. Diffusion of substitutional impurities in silicon at short oxidation times: An insight into point defect kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadis, D. A.; Moskowitz, I.

    1982-10-01

    Oxidation-enhanced diffusion of phosphorus, arsenic, and boron and oxidation-reduced diffusion of antimony in silicon have been studied as a function of oxidation time. Data for the early phase of oxidation in dry oxygen from 5 to 60 min have been obtained. Oxidation-enhanced diffusivities show a steady decrease with decreasing oxidation rate for phosphorus, arsenic, and boron, with enhancements at long oxidation times in agreement with previously reported results. Antimony shows a reduction in diffusivity during oxidation. A model allowing calculation of diffusivity enhancement or reduction for all elements and oxidation times has been developed. The present data support the theory of a dual vacancy-interstitialcy diffusion mechanism for all the elements studied. The fraction of interstitialcy diffusion fI has been calculated, yielding fI=0.38 for phosphorus at 1000 °C, fI=0.30 for boron at 1000 °C, fI=0.35 for arsenic at 1090 °C, and fI=0.015 for antimony at 1100 °C. It has also been shown that the oxidation-induced supersaturation of self-interstitials is accompanied by an undersaturation of vacancies during oxidation. This undersaturation can be explained by a rate-limited bimolecular annihilation mechanism. This theory yields, for the first time, values for the vacancy-interstitial recombination-limited intrinsic vacancy lifetime in silicon under near-equilibrium conditions at high temperature; it also indicates the presence of an energy barrier to this recombination of the order of 1.4 eV.

  13. Safety Evaluation of a Bioglass–Polylactic Acid Composite Scaffold Seeded with Progenitor Cells in a Rat Skull Critical-Size Bone Defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kady, Abeer M.; Arbid, Mahmoud S.; Abd El-Hady, Bothaina M.; Marzi, Ingo; Seebach, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Treating large bone defects represents a major challenge in traumatic and orthopedic surgery. Bone tissue engineering provides a promising therapeutic option to improve the local bone healing response. In the present study tissue biocompatibility, systemic toxicity and tumorigenicity of a newly developed composite material consisting of polylactic acid (PLA) and 20% or 40% bioglass (BG20 and BG40), respectively, were analyzed. These materials were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) and tested in a rat calvarial critical size defect model for 3 months and compared to a scaffold consisting only of PLA. Serum was analyzed for organ damage markers such as GOT and creatinine. Leukocyte count, temperature and free radical indicators were measured to determine the degree of systemic inflammation. Possible tumor occurrence was assessed macroscopically and histologically in slides of liver, kidney and spleen. Furthermore, the concentrations of serum malondialdehyde (MDA) and sodium oxide dismutase (SOD) were assessed as indicators of tumor progression. Qualitative tissue response towards the implants and new bone mass formation was histologically investigated. BG20 and BG40, with or without progenitor cells, did not cause organ damage, long-term systemic inflammatory reactions or tumor formation. BG20 and BG40 supported bone formation, which was further enhanced in the presence of EPCs and MSCs. This investigation reflects good biocompatibility of the biomaterials BG20 and BG40 and provides evidence that additionally seeding EPCs and MSCs onto the scaffold does not induce tumor formation. PMID:24498345

  14. Safety evaluation of a bioglass-polylactic acid composite scaffold seeded with progenitor cells in a rat skull critical-size bone defect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karam Eldesoqi

    Full Text Available Treating large bone defects represents a major challenge in traumatic and orthopedic surgery. Bone tissue engineering provides a promising therapeutic option to improve the local bone healing response. In the present study tissue biocompatibility, systemic toxicity and tumorigenicity of a newly developed composite material consisting of polylactic acid (PLA and 20% or 40% bioglass (BG20 and BG40, respectively, were analyzed. These materials were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC and tested in a rat calvarial critical size defect model for 3 months and compared to a scaffold consisting only of PLA. Serum was analyzed for organ damage markers such as GOT and creatinine. Leukocyte count, temperature and free radical indicators were measured to determine the degree of systemic inflammation. Possible tumor occurrence was assessed macroscopically and histologically in slides of liver, kidney and spleen. Furthermore, the concentrations of serum malondialdehyde (MDA and sodium oxide dismutase (SOD were assessed as indicators of tumor progression. Qualitative tissue response towards the implants and new bone mass formation was histologically investigated. BG20 and BG40, with or without progenitor cells, did not cause organ damage, long-term systemic inflammatory reactions or tumor formation. BG20 and BG40 supported bone formation, which was further enhanced in the presence of EPCs and MSCs. This investigation reflects good biocompatibility of the biomaterials BG20 and BG40 and provides evidence that additionally seeding EPCs and MSCs onto the scaffold does not induce tumor formation.

  15. Electrocatalysis by nanoparticles: Oxidation of formic acid at manganese oxide nanorods-modified Pt planar and nanohole-arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed S. El-Deab

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The electro-oxidation of formic acid (an essential reaction in direct formic acid fuel cells is a challenging process because of the deactivation of anodes by the adsorption of the poisoning intermediate carbon monoxide (CO. Pt electrodes in two geometries (planar and nanohole-array were modified by the electrodeposition of manganese oxide nanorods (nano-MnOx. The modified Pt electrodes were then tested for their electrocatalytic activity through the electro-oxidation of formic acid in a solution of pH 3.45. Two oxidation peaks (Ipd and Ipind were observed at 0.2 and 0.55 V, respectively; these were assigned to the direct and indirect oxidative pathways. A significant enhancement of the direct oxidation of formic acid to CO2 was observed at the modified electrodes, while the formation of the poisoning intermediate CO was suppressed. Ipd increases with surface coverage (θ of nano-MnOx with a concurrent depression of Ipind. An increase in the ratio Ipd/ν1/2 with decreasing potential scan rate (ν indicates that the oxidation process proceeds via a catalytic mechanism. The modification of Pt anodes with manganese oxide nanorods results in a significant improvement of the electrocatalytic activity along with a higher tolerance to CO. Thus nano-MnOx plays a crucial role as a catalytic mediator which facilitates the charge transfer during the direct oxidation of formic acid to CO2.

  16. Protective effect of periconceptional folic acid supplements on the risk of congenital heart defects : a registry-based case-control study in the northern Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beynum, Ingrid M.; Kapusta, Livia; Bakker, Marian K.; den Heijer, Martin; Blom, Henk J.; de Walle, Hermien E. K.

    To investigate the potentially protective of periconceptional folic acid use on the risk of congenital heart defects (CHDs) relative to other non-folate related malformations. We analysed data from a large regional register of birth defects (EUROCAT-Northern Netherlands), over a 10 year period

  17. Protective effect of periconceptional folic acid supplements on the risk of congenital heart defects: a registry-based case-control study in the northern Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijnum, I.M. van; Kapusta, L.; Bakker, M.K.; Heijer, M. den; Blom, H.J.; Walle, H.E. de

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the potentially protective of periconceptional folic acid use on the risk of congenital heart defects (CHDs) relative to other non-folate related malformations. METHODS AND RESULTS: We analysed data from a large regional register of birth defects (EUROCAT-Northern Netherlands),

  18. Engineering the Saccharomyces cerevisiae β-oxidation pathway to increase medium chain fatty acid production as potential biofuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liwei; Zhang, Jianhua; Chen, Wei Ning

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid-derived biofuels and biochemicals can be produced in microbes using β-oxidation pathway engineering. In this study, the β-oxidation pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered to accumulate a higher ratio of medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) when cells were grown on fatty acid-rich feedstock. For this purpose, the haploid deletion strain Δpox1 was obtained, in which the sole acyl-CoA oxidase encoded by POX1 was deleted. Next, the POX2 gene from Yarrowia lipolytica, which encodes an acyl-CoA oxidase with a preference for long chain acyl-CoAs, was expressed in the Δpox1 strain. The resulting Δpox1 [pox2+] strain exhibited a growth defect because the β-oxidation pathway was blocked in peroxisomes. To unblock the β-oxidation pathway, the gene CROT, which encodes carnitine O-octanoyltransferase, was expressed in the Δpox1 [pox2+] strain to transport the accumulated medium chain acyl-coAs out of the peroxisomes. The obtained Δpox1 [pox2+, crot+] strain grew at a normal rate. The effect of these genetic modifications on fatty acid accumulation and profile was investigated when the strains were grown on oleic acids-containing medium. It was determined that the engineered strains Δpox1 [pox2+] and Δpox1 [pox2+, crot+] had increased fatty acid accumulation and an increased ratio of MCFAs. Compared to the wild-type (WT) strain, the total fatty acid production of the strains Δpox1 [pox2+] and Δpox1 [pox2+, crot+] were increased 29.5% and 15.6%, respectively. The intracellular level of MCFAs in Δpox1 [pox2+] and Δpox1 [pox2+, crot+] increased 2.26- and 1.87-fold compared to the WT strain, respectively. In addition, MCFAs in the culture medium increased 3.29-fold and 3.34-fold compared to the WT strain. These results suggested that fatty acids with an increased MCFAs ratio accumulate in the engineered strains with a modified β-oxidation pathway. Our approach exhibits great potential for transforming low value fatty acid-rich feedstock into high

  19. Oxidation of lactic acid by Vanadium(V) in sulphuric acid medium: a kinetic and mechanistic study

    OpenAIRE

    Clementin, Rosilene Maria; Takashima, Keiko

    1993-01-01

    The rate of lactic acid, HL, oxidation by vanadium(V), V(V), in sulphuric acid solution has been measured by monitoring, spectrophotometrically, the absorbance change of vanadium(IV), V(IV) in 760 nm at 30°C. This oxidation is a acid-catalysed, its dependence on acidity being complex. The rate constant or not the ionic strength. This reaction exhibited first order dependence on the V(V) and HL concentrations respectively and minimal dependence on sulphuric acid at lower concentrations (0.25 -...

  20. THE INFLUENCE OF NIOBIUM ON THE ACIDITY AND STRUCTURE OF GAMMA-ALUMINA-SUPPORTED VANADIUM OXIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathler M.N.B.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-alumina-supported niobium oxide was used as a support for vanadium oxides. The influence of the addition of niobium oxide was studied by looking for changes in the structure and acid-base character of superficial species. Vanadium oxide was deposited using the continuous adsorption method; niobium oxide was impregnated using the incipient wetness method. The catalysts were characterized by XPS, UV-visible and IR spectroscopy. Catalytic tests were performed using propane oxidation reaction at 400oC. For coverage below the monolayer, both vanadium and niobium oxides were observed in slightly condensed superficial species. The presence of vanadium oxide on the support was found to increase the Lewis acidity and create some Bronsted acidity. Higher catalytic activity and selectivity for propene were associated with vanadium oxides. The presence of niobium did not contribute to the modification of the chemical properties of superficial vanadium but did decrease the adsorption of vanadium on the alumina.

  1. Electron transport and defect structure in highly conducting reactively sputtered ultrathin tin oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansal, Shikha; Pandya, Dinesh K., E-mail: dkpandya@physics.iitd.ac.in; Kashyap, Subhash C. [Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-02-24

    Electrical conduction behavior of ultrathin (5–110 nm) SnO{sub 2} films reactively sputtered at 150–400 °C substrate temperatures is presented. The surface roughness studies revealed that the films with lower thickness were smoother (≤0.6 nm). Stoichiometry/defect structure of the films obtained from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data and electron mobility are found to be dependent on film thickness and substrate temperature. The observed increase in conductivity of semi-metallic films with decrease in film thickness is attributed to changes in defect structure and surface roughness. Highest value of conductivity of about 715 Ω{sup −1} cm{sup −1} is obtained for 5 nm thick films deposited at 300 °C.

  2. IDH1 mutations alter citric acid cycle metabolism and increase dependence on oxidative mitochondrial metabolism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grassian, Alexandra R; Parker, Seth J; Davidson, Shawn M; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Green, Courtney R; Zhang, Xiamei; Slocum, Kelly L; Pu, Minying; Lin, Fallon; Vickers, Chad; Joud-Caldwell, Carol; Chung, Franklin; Yin, Hong; Handly, Erika D; Straub, Christopher; Growney, Joseph D; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Murphy, Anne N; Pagliarini, Raymond; Metallo, Christian M

    2014-01-01

    .... We observed that under hypoxic conditions, IDH1-mutant cells exhibited increased oxidative tricarboxylic acid metabolism along with decreased reductive glutamine metabolism, but not IDH2-mutant cells...

  3. Effects of a tetracycline blended polylactic and polyglycolic acid membrane on the healing of one-wall intrabony defects in beagle dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il-Young [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Ui-Won [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang-Sung [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong-Keun [Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyoo-Sung [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of); Chai, Jung-Kiu [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chong-Kwan [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong-Ho [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the regenerative effects of a tetracycline blended polylactic and polyglycolic acid (TC-PLGA) and non-blended polylactic and polyglycolic acid (PLGA) barrier membrane on one-wall intrabony defects in beagle dogs. It can be concluded that when used for guided tissue regeneration TC-PLGA membranes show a beneficial effect on one-wall intrabony defects in beagle dogs.

  4. Nucleic acid-based approaches to investigate microbial-related cheese quality defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Daniel J.; Giblin, Linda; McSweeney, Paul L. H.; Sheehan, Jeremiah J.; Cotter, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    The microbial profile of cheese is a primary determinant of cheese quality. Microorganisms can contribute to aroma and taste defects, form biogenic amines, cause gas and secondary fermentation defects, and can contribute to cheese pinking and mineral deposition issues. These defects may be as a result of seasonality and the variability in the composition of the milk supplied, variations in cheese processing parameters, as well as the nature and number of the non-starter microorganisms which come from the milk or other environmental sources. Such defects can be responsible for production and product recall costs and thus represent a significant economic burden for the dairy industry worldwide. Traditional non-molecular approaches are often considered biased and have inherently slow turnaround times. Molecular techniques can provide early and rapid detection of defects that result from the presence of specific spoilage microbes and, ultimately, assist in enhancing cheese quality and reducing costs. Here we review the DNA-based methods that are available to detect/quantify spoilage bacteria, and relevant metabolic pathways in cheeses and, in the process, highlight how these strategies can be employed to improve cheese quality and reduce the associated economic burden on cheese processors. PMID:23346082

  5. Structural and optical investigations of oxygen defects in zinc oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Anshuman; Goswami, Navendu

    2015-06-01

    ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared implementing chemical precipitation method. Structural and optical characterizations of synthesized ZnO NPs were thoroughly probed applying X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV- Visible absorption and fluorescence (FL) spectroscopy. The XRD and TEM analyses revealed hexagonal wurtzite phase with 25-30 nm size. EDX analysis indicated oxygen (O) rich composition of nanoparticles. In accordance with EDX, XPS analysis verifies Oi rich stoichiometry of prepared NPs. Furthermore, concurrence of lattice oxygen (OL), interstitial oxygen (Oi) and oxygen vacancy (VO) in ZnO NPs was demonstrated through XPS analysis. Size quantization of nanoparticles is evident by blue shift of UV-Visible absorption energy. The FL spectroscopic investigations ascertain the existence of several discrete and defect states and radiative transitions occurring therein. Display of visible emission from oxygen defect states and most importantly, excess of Oi defects in prepared ZnO nanoparticles, was well established through FL study.

  6. Nondestructive covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes by selective oxidation of the original defects with K{sub 2}FeO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhao-yang; Xu, Xue-cheng, E-mail: xcxu@phy.ecnu.edu.cn

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nondestructive covalent CNT functionalization is realized by defect oxidation. • A green oxidant K{sub 2}Fe{sup VI}O{sub 4} is used for CNT oxidation for the first time. • Effective CNT oxidation can be achieved at 60 °C in 3 h. • Oxidized CNTs are obtained in yields of above 100 wt%. • FeO{sub 3}, an unusual Fe (VI) specie, is produced when K{sub 2}FeO{sub 4} is dissolved in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. - Abstract: Chemical oxidation is still the major approach to the covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Theoretically, the defects on CNTs are more reactive than skeletal hexagons and should be preferentially oxidized, but conventional oxidation methods, e.g., HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} treatment, have poor reaction selectivity and inevitably consume the C=C bonds in the hexagonal lattices, leading to structural damage, π-electrons loss and weight decrease. In this work, we realized the nondestructive covalent functionalization of CNTs by selective oxidation of the defects. In our method, potassium ferrate K{sub 2}Fe{sup VI}O{sub 4} was employed as an oxidant for CNTs in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} medium. The CNT samples, before and after K{sub 2}FeO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} treatment, were characterized with colloid dispersibility, IR, Raman spectroscopy, FESEM and XPS. The results indicated that (i) CNTs could be effectively oxidized by Fe (VI) under mild condition (60 °C, 3 h), and hydrophilic CNTs with abundant surface −COOH groups were produced; and (ii) Fe (VI) oxidation of CNTs followed a defect-specific oxidation process, that is, only the sp{sup 3}-hybridized carbon atoms on CNT surface were oxidized while the C=C bonds remained unaffected. This selective/nondestructive oxidation afforded oxidized CNTs in yields of above 100 wt%. This paper shows that K{sub 2}FeO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} is an effective, nondestructive and green oxidation system for oxidative functionalization of CNTs and probably other

  7. Triiodothyronine activates lactate oxidation without impairing fatty acid oxidation and improves weaning from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Kajimoto, Hidemi; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides a rescue for children with severe cardiac failure. We previously showed that triiodothyronine (T3) improves cardiac function by modulating pyruvate oxidation during weaning. This study was focused on fatty acid (FA) metabolism modulated by T3 for weaning from ECMO after cardiac injury. Methods: Nineteen immature piglets (9.1-15.3 kg) were separated into 3 groups with ECMO (6.5 hours) and wean: normal circulation (Group-C);transient coronary occlusion (10 minutes) followed by ECMO (Group-IR); and IR with T3 supplementation (Group-IR-T3). 13-Carbon labeled lactate, medium-chain and long-chain FAs were infused as oxidative substrates. Substrate fractional contribution to the citric acid cycle (FC) was analyzed by 13-Carbon nuclear magnetic resonance. Results: ECMO depressed circulating T3 levels to 40% baseline at 4 hours and were restored in Group-IR-T3. Group-IR decreased cardiac power, which was not fully restorable and 2 pigs were lost because of weaning failure. Group-IR also depressed FC-lactate, while the excellent contractile function and energy efficiency in Group-IR-T3 occurred along with a marked FC-lactate increase and [ATP]/[ADP] without either decreasing FC-FAs or elevating myocardial oxygen consumption over Group-C or -IR. Conclusions: T3 releases inhibition of lactate oxidation following ischemia-reperfusion injury without impairing FA oxidation. These findings indicate that T3 depression during ECMO is maladaptive, and that restoring levels improves metabolic flux and enhances contractile function during weaning.

  8. Graphene Oxide-Gallic Acid Nanodelivery System for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorniani, Dena; Saifullah, Bullo; Barahuie, Farahnaz; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Hussein, Mohd Zobir Bin; Fakurazi, Sharida; Twyman, Lance J.

    2016-11-01

    Despite the technological advancement in the biomedical science, cancer remains a life-threatening disease. In this study, we designed an anticancer nanodelivery system using graphene oxide (GO) as nanocarrier for an active anticancer agent gallic acid (GA). The successful formation nanocomposite (GOGA) was characterized using XRD, FTIR, HRTEM, Raman, and UV/Vis spectroscopy. The release study shows that the release of GA from the designed anticancer nanocomposite (GOGA) occurs in a sustained manner in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution at pH 7.4. In in vitro biological studies, normal fibroblast (3T3) and liver cancer cells (HepG2) were treated with different concentrations of GO, GOGA, and GA for 72 h. The GOGA nanocomposite showed the inhibitory effect to cancer cell growth without affecting normal cell growth. The results of this research are highly encouraging to go further for in vivo studies.

  9. Peroxynitrous acid: controversy and consensus surrounding an enigmatic oxidant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppenol, Willem H; Bounds, Patricia L; Nauser, Thomas; Kissner, Reinhard; Rüegger, Heinz

    2012-12-07

    The isomerisation of ONOOH to NO(3)(-) and H(+), some oxidations and all hydroxylations and nitrations of aromatic compounds are first-order in ONOOH and zero-order in the compounds that are modified. These reactions are widely believed to proceed via homolysis of ONOOH into HO˙ and NO(2)˙ to an extent of ca. 30%. We review the evidence pro and contra homolysis in studies that involve (1) thermochemical considerations, (2) isomerisation to NO(3)(-) and H(+), (3) decomposition to NO(2)(-) and O(2), (4) HO˙ scavenger studies, (5) deuterium isotope effects, (6) (18)O-scrambling studies, (7) electrochemistry, (8) CIDNP NMR, and (9) photolysis. Our conclusion is that homolysis may be involved to a minor extent of ca. 5%. The initiation of ONOOH isomerisation may be visualised as an out-of-plane vibration of the terminal HO-group relative to the nitrogen. At ONOO(-) concentrations exceeding 0.1 mM and near neutral pH, disproportionation to NO(2)(-) and O(2) occurs; such disproportionations are typical for peroxy acids. For oxidation and nitration of organic substrates, we favour a mechanism involving initial formation of an adduct between the compound to be oxidised or nitrated and ONOOH.

  10. Supercritical water oxidation of acrylic acid production wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Y M; Wang, S Z; Tang, X Y; Xu, D H; Ma, H H

    2014-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) of wastewater from an acrylic acid manufacturing plant has been studied on a continuous flow experimental system, whose reactor was made of Hastelloy C-276. Experimental conditions included a reaction temperature (T) ranging from 673 to 773K, a residence time (t) ranging from 72.7 to 339s, a constant pressure (P) of 25 MPa and a fixed oxidation coefficient (alpha) of 2.0. Experimental results indicated that reaction temperature and residence time had significant influences on the oxidation reaction, and increasing the two operation parameters could improve both degradation of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N). The COD removal efficiency could reach up to 98.73% at 25 MPa, 773 K and 180.1 s, whereas the destruction efficiency of NH3-N was only 43.71%. We further carried out a kinetic analysis considering the induction period through free radical chain mechanism. It confirms that the power-law rate equation for COD removal was 345 exp(-52200/RT)[COD]1.98[O2]0.17 and for NH3-N removal was 500 exp(-64492.19/RT)[NH3-N]1.87 [O2]0.03. Moreover, the induction time formulations for COD and NH3-N were suspected to be exp(38250/RT)/173 and exp(55690/RT)/15231, respectively. Correspondingly, induction time changed from 2.22 to 5.38 s for COD and 0.38 to 1.38 s for NH3-N. Owing to the catalysis of reactor inner wall surface, more than 97% COD removal was achieved in all samples.

  11. Palladium-catalyzed air-based oxidative coupling of arylboronic acids with H-phosphine oxides leading to aryl phosphine oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tingting; Qiao, Hongwei; Peng, Zhimin; Hu, Gaobo; Wu, Xueji; Gao, Yuxing; Zhao, Yufen

    2014-05-14

    We present a novel and highly efficient methodology that allows for the construction of C-P bonds via the palladium-catalyzed air-based oxidative coupling of various commercially available arylboronic acids with easily oxidized H-phosphine oxides leading to valuable aryl phosphine oxides, particularly triarylphosphine oxides, with the use of air as the green oxidant, broad substrate applicability and good to excellent yields. The described catalytic system should be an efficient complement to the Chan-Lam type reaction and be useful in synthetic programs.

  12. Defective iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by high temperature plasma processing: a magnetic characterisation versus temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, C; Joseph, B; Orpe, P B; Saini, N L; Mukherjee, S; Dziedzic-Kocurek, K; Stanek, J; Di Gioacchino, D; Marcelli, A

    2016-11-04

    Magnetic properties and phase compositions of iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by a high temperature arc plasma route have been investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy and high harmonic magnetic AC susceptibility measurements, and correlated with morphological and structural properties for different synthesis conditions. The Mössbauer spectra precisely determined the presence of different iron-oxide fractions in the investigated nanoparticles, while the high harmonic magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed the occurrence of metastable magnetic phases evolving in temperature and time. This study illustrates magnetic properties and dynamics of the magnetic configurations of iron-oxide nanoparticles grown by high temperature plasma, a process less explored so far but extremely useful for synthesising large numbers of nanoparticles for industrial applications.

  13. Fatty Acid Incubation of Myotubues from Humans with Type 2 Diabetes Leads to Enhanced Release of Beta Oxidation Products Due to Impaired Fatty Acid Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wensaas, Andreas J; Rustan, Arild C; Just, Marlene

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Increased availability of fatty acids is important for accumulation of intracellular lipids and development of insulin resistance in human myotubes. It is unknown whether different types of fatty acids like eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) influence...... these processes. Research Design and Methods: We examined fatty acid and glucose metabolism, and gene expression in cultured human skeletal muscle cells from control and T2D individuals after four days preincubation with EPA or TTA. Results: T2D myotubes exhibited reduced formation of CO(2) from palmitic acid (PA....... EPA markedly enhanced TAG accumulation in myotubes, more pronounced in T2D cells. TAG accumulation and fatty acid oxidation were inversely correlated only after EPA preincubation, and total level of acyl-CoA was reduced. Glucose oxidation (CO(2) formation) was enhanced and lactate production decreased...

  14. A novel functional assay for simultaneous determination of total fatty acid beta-oxidation flux and acylcarnitine profiling in human skin fibroblasts using (2)H(31)-palmitate by isotope ratio mass spectrometry and electrospray tandem mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, Lap-Kay; Tang, Nelson Leung-Sang; Hui, Joannie; Ho, Chung-Shun; Ruiter, Jos; Fok, Tai-Fai; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Lam, Christopher Wai-Kei

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Two separate and complementary assays, total mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation (FAO) flux rate and acylcarnitine profiling, have been used to establish a definitive diagnosis of FAO defects (FAOD) in cultured cells. We developed a novel functional assay for total FAO rate assay by

  15. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid by an enzyme preparation from Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, D. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is oxidized to oxindole-3-acetic acid by Zea mays tissue extracts. Shoot, root, and endosperm tissues have enzyme activities of 1 to 10 picomoles per hour per milligram protein. The enzyme is heat labile, is soluble, and requires oxygen for activity. Cofactors of mixed function oxygenase, peroxidase, and intermolecular dioxygenase are not stimulatory to enzymic activity. A heat-stable, detergent-extractable component from corn enhances enzyme activity 6- to 10-fold. This is the first demonstration of the in vitro enzymic oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid in higher plants.

  16. Mitochondrial defects and oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Michael H; Wang, Xinglong; Zhu, Xiongwei

    2013-09-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD) are the two most common age-related neurodegenerative diseases characterized by prominent neurodegeneration in selective neural systems. Although a small fraction of AD and PD cases exhibit evidence of heritability, among which many genes have been identified, the majority are sporadic without known causes. Molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration and pathogenesis of these diseases remain elusive. Convincing evidence demonstrates oxidative stress as a prominent feature in AD and PD and links oxidative stress to the development of neuronal death and neural dysfunction, which suggests a key pathogenic role for oxidative stress in both AD and PD. Notably, mitochondrial dysfunction is also a prominent feature in these diseases, which is likely to be of critical importance in the genesis and amplification of reactive oxygen species and the pathophysiology of these diseases. In this review, we focus on changes in mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial dynamics, two aspects critical to the maintenance of mitochondrial homeostasis and function, in relationship with oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of AD and PD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ab initio Defect Energetics in LaBO3 Perovskite Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Yueh-Lin; Morgan, Dane; Kleis, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    Perovskite materials of the form ABO3 are a promising family of compounds for use in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathodes. Study of the physics of these compounds under SOFC conditions with ab initio methods is particularly challenging due to high temperatures, exchange of oxygen with O2 gas...

  18. [Treatment of acute full-thickness chondral defects with high molecular weight hyaluronic acid; an experimental model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, D; Espinosa, M; Calvo, R; Scheu, M; Valderrama, J J; Gallegos, M; Conget, P

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of 2 different protocols of intra-articular hyaluronic acid (HA, hylan G-F20) to articular cartilage regeneration in acute full-thickness chondral defects. Full-thickness chondral defects of 3 x 6 mm were performed into the lateral femoral condyles of New Zealand rabbits, treated with a single or three doses of HA. The animals were sacrified at 12 weeks and the regenerated tissue was evaluated by direct observation and histology with the ICRS scale. Macroscopically, in both groups treated with HA the defects were filled with irregular tissue with areas similar to hyaline cartilage and others in which depressed areas with exposed subchondral bone were observed. Histological analysis showed in both groups treated with HA a hyaline-like cartilage compared to control group. However, the score of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) scale did not show differences between the groups treated with HA. The use of single dose or 3 doses of AH in acute chondral lesions has a limited and similar benefit in articular cartilage regeneration. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Intracellular alkalinization by phosphate uptake via type III sodium-phosphate cotransporter participates in high-phosphate-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress and defective insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tuyet Thi; Quan, Xianglan; Xu, Shanhua; Das, Ranjan; Cha, Seung-Kuy; Kong, In Deok; Shong, Minho; Wollheim, Claes B; Park, Kyu-Sang

    2016-12-01

    Elevated plasma levels of inorganic phosphate (Pi) are harmful, causing, among other complications, vascular calcification and defective insulin secretion. The underlying molecular mechanisms of these complications remain poorly understood. We demonstrated the role of Pi transport across the plasmalemma on Pi toxicity in INS-1E rat clonal β cells and rat pancreatic islet cells. Type III sodium-phosphate cotransporters (NaPis) are the predominant Pi transporters expressed in insulin-secreting cells. Transcript and protein levels of sodium-dependent phosphate transporter 1 and 2 (PiT-1 and -2), isotypes of type III NaPi, were up-regulated by high-Pi incubation. In patch-clamp experiments, extracellular Pi elicited a Na(+)-dependent, inwardly rectifying current, which was markedly reduced under acidic extracellular conditions. Cellular uptake of Pi elicited cytosolic alkalinization; intriguingly, this pH change facilitated Pi transport into the mitochondrial matrix. Increased mitochondrial Pi uptake accelerated superoxide generation, mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT), and endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated translational attenuation, leading to reduced insulin content and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Silencing of PiT-1/2 prevented Pi-induced superoxide generation and mPT, and restored insulin secretion. We propose that Pi transport across the plasma membrane and consequent cytosolic alkalinization could be a therapeutic target for protection from Pi toxicity in insulin-secreting cells, as well as in other cell types.-Nguyen, T. T., Quan, X., Xu, S., Das, R., Cha, S.-K., Kong, I. D., Shong, M., Wollheim, C. B., Park, K.-S. Intracellular alkalinization by phosphate uptake via type III sodium-phosphate cotransporter participates in high-phosphate-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress and defective insulin secretion. © FASEB.

  20. Evidence for two enzymatic pathways for omega-oxidation of docosanoic acid in rat liver microsomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Robert-Jan; Ofman, Rob; Valianpour, Fredoen; Kemp, Stephan; Wanders, Ronald J. A.

    2005-01-01

    We studied the omega-oxidation of docosanoic acid (C22:0) in rat liver microsomes. C22:0 and 22-hydroxy-docosanoic acid (omega-hydroxy-C22:0) were used as substrates, and the reaction products were analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. In the presence of NADPH, omega-oxidation of

  1. Hepatic fatty acid oxidation : activity, localization and function of some enzymes involved

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Tol (Arie)

    1971-01-01

    textabstractFatty acid oxidation is an important pathway for energy production in mammals and birds. In animal tissues the enzymes of fatty acid oxidation are located in the mitochondrion. Recent reports suggest that this is not the case in Castor bean endosperm. In this tissue the enzymes of

  2. Chlamydomonas carries out fatty acid β-oxidation in ancestral peroxisomes using a bona fide acyl-CoA oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fantao; Liang, Yuanxue; Légeret, Bertrand; Beyly-Adriano, Audrey; Blangy, Stéphanie; Haslam, Richard P; Napier, Johnathan A; Beisson, Fred; Peltier, Gilles; Li-Beisson, Yonghua

    2017-04-01

    Peroxisomes are thought to have played a key role in the evolution of metabolic networks of photosynthetic organisms by connecting oxidative and biosynthetic routes operating in different compartments. While the various oxidative pathways operating in the peroxisomes of higher plants are fairly well characterized, the reactions present in the primitive peroxisomes (microbodies) of algae are poorly understood. Screening of a Chlamydomonas insertional mutant library identified a strain strongly impaired in oil remobilization and defective in Cre05.g232002 (CrACX2), a gene encoding a member of the acyl-CoA oxidase/dehydrogenase superfamily. The purified recombinant CrACX2 expressed in Escherichia coli catalyzed the oxidation of fatty acyl-CoAs into trans-2-enoyl-CoA and produced H2 O2 . This result demonstrated that CrACX2 is a genuine acyl-CoA oxidase, which is responsible for the first step of the peroxisomal fatty acid (FA) β-oxidation spiral. A fluorescent protein-tagging study pointed to a peroxisomal location of CrACX2. The importance of peroxisomal FA β-oxidation in algal physiology was shown by the impact of the mutation on FA turnover during day/night cycles. Moreover, under nitrogen depletion the mutant accumulated 20% more oil than the wild type, illustrating the potential of β-oxidation mutants for algal biotechnology. This study provides experimental evidence that a plant-type FA β-oxidation involving H2 O2 -producing acyl-CoA oxidation activity has already evolved in the microbodies of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Modeling of Semiconductors and Correlated Oxides with Point Defects by First Principles Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hao

    2014-06-15

    Point defects in silicon, vanadium dioxide, and doped ceria are investigated by density functional theory. Defects involving vacancies and interstitial oxygen and carbon in silicon are after formed in outer space and significantly affect device performances. The screened hybrid functional by Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof is used to calculate formation energies, binding energies, and electronic structures of the defective systems because standard density functional theory underestimates the bang gap of silicon. The results indicate for the A-center a −2 charge state. Tin is proposed to be an effective dopant to suppress the formation of A-centers. For the total energy difference between the A- and B-type carbon related G-centers we find close agreement with the experiment. The results indicate that the C-type G-center is more stable than both the A- and B-types. The electronic structures of the monoclinic and rutile phases of vanadium dioxide are also studied using the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof functional. The ground states of the pure phases obtained by calculations including spin polarization disagree with the experimental observations that the monoclinic phase should not be magnetic, the rutile phase should be metallic, and the monoclinic phase should have a lower total energy than the rutile phase. By tuning the Hartree-Fock fraction α to 10% the agreement with experiments is improved in terms of band gaps and relative energies of the phases. A calculation scheme is proposed to simulate the relationship between the transition temperature of the metal-insulator transition and the dopant concentration in tungsten doped vanadium dioxide. We achieve good agreement with the experimental situation. 18.75% and 25% yttrium, lanthanum, praseodymium, samarium, and gadolinium doped ceria supercells generated by the special quasirandom structure approach are employed to investigate the impact of doping on the O diffusion. The experimental behavior of the conductivity for the

  4. An amino acid substitution in the Drosophila hopTum-l Jak kinase causes leukemia-like hematopoietic defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, H; Hanratty, W P; Dearolf, C R

    1995-01-01

    Proteins of the Jak family of non-receptor kinases play important roles in mammalian hematopoietic signal transduction. They mediate the cellular response to a wide range of cytokines and growth factors. A dominant mutation in a Drosophila Jak kinase, hopscotchTumorous-lethal (hopTum-l), causes hematopoietic defects. Here we conduct a molecular analysis of hopTum-l. We demonstrate that the hopTum-l hematopoietic phenotype is caused by a single amino acid substitution of glycine to glutamic acid at residue 341. We generate a true revertant of the hopTum-l mutation, in which both the molecular lesion and the mutant hematopoietic phenotype revert back to wild type. We also examine the effects of the G341E substitution in transgenic flies. The results indicate that a mutant Jak kinase can cause leukemia-like abnormalities. Images PMID:7729418

  5. Application of layered poly (L-lactic acid cell free scaffold in a rabbit rotator cuff defect model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inui Atsuyuki

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study evaluated the application of a layered cell free poly (L-lactic acid (PLLA scaffold to regenerate an infraspinatus tendon defect in a rabbit model. We hypothesized that PLLA scaffold without cultivated cells would lead to regeneration of tissue with mechanical properties similar to reattached infraspinatus without tendon defects. Methods Layered PLLA fabric with a smooth surface on one side and a pile-finished surface on the other side was used. Novel form of layered PLLA scaffold was created by superimposing 2 PLLA fabrics. Defects of the infraspinatus tendon were created in 32 rabbits and the PLLA scaffolds were transplanted, four rabbits were used as normal control. Contralateral infraspinatus tendons were reattached to humeral head without scaffold implantation. Histological and mechanical evaluations were performed at 4, 8, and 16 weeks after operation. Results At 4 weeks postoperatively, cell migration was observed in the interstice of the PLLA fibers. Regenerated tissue was directly connected to the bone composed mainly of type III collagen, at 16 weeks postoperatively. The ultimate failure load increased in a time-dependent manner and no statistical difference was seen between normal infraspinatus tendon and scaffold group at 8 and 16 weeks postoperatively. There were no differences between scaffold group and reattach group at each time of point. The stiffness did not improve significantly in both groups. Conclusions A novel form of layered PLLA scaffold has the potential to induce cell migration into the scaffold and to bridge the tendon defect with mechanical properties similar to reattached infraspinatus tendon model.

  6. Folic acid fortification and prevalences of neural tube defects, orofacial clefts, and gastroschisis in California, 1989 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Carmichael, Suzan L; Shaw, Gary M

    2016-12-01

    We examined whether prevalences of neural tube defects (NTDs), orofacial clefts, and gastroschisis changed more rapidly after than before folic acid fortification in California. This population-based study used vital statistics and birth defects registry data. The study population included all live births and stillbirths delivered in central California counties from 1989 to 2010. Cases included deliveries with NTDs, orofacial clefts, and gastroschisis. Weighted least squares regression was used to estimate slopes during prefortification (before 1997) and postfortification (after 1998), respectively. The difference of the two slopes with the 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated. For all NTDs combined, slopes indicated that NTD prevalence was decreasing by 8.7 (slope: -8.7; 95% CI, -13.5--3.9) cases per 100,000 deliveries per year before fortification and by 1.7 (slope: -1.7; 95% CI, -3.7-0.3) after fortification; thus the decline had slowed by 7.0 (95% CI, 2.7-11.3) cases per 100,000 deliveries per year. For orofacial clefts, slopes for cleft lip with/without palate as well as for cleft palate alone indicated that the postfortification slope was lower than the prefortification slope suggesting a more accelerated decrease in the postfortification time period. For gastroschisis, the slope after fortification was lower compared with prefortification, indicating a less accelerated prevalence increase in the postfortification time period. Stratification by race/ethnicity did not substantially alter results. We observed a slower decline in prevalence of NTDs, an emergence of a decline in orofacial clefts, and a slower increase in gastroschisis, during the postfortification period in central California, relative to the prefortification period. Birth Defects Research (Part A), 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 106:1032-1041, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. 40 CFR 721.3700 - Fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide adduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... phenol, ethylene oxide adduct. 721.3700 Section 721.3700 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., ethylene oxide adduct. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acid, ester with styrenated phenol, ethylene oxide...

  8. Disordered Manganese Oxide Nano-powder Prepared by Low-temperature Synthesis Followed by Acid Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Koyanaka, Hideki; Hata, Toshihiro; IMAMURA, Yuji

    2005-01-01

    Disordered manganese oxide, prepared by low-temperature synthesis followed by acid treatment is introduced. Aggregated nano-powder of disordered manganese oxide was obtained in this method. The disordered manganese oxide is suitable starting material for the preparation of efficient adsorbents for the removal of harmful metals from the environment.

  9. Kinetics and mechanism of N-chlorosaccharin oxidation of malic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjay Kumar Singh; Hari D. Gupta; Mohammad U. Khan; Santosh S. Baghel

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic study of N-chlorosaccharin (NCSA) oxidation of malic acid (MA) in aqueous acetic acid medium in presence of perchloric acid has been investigated. The reactions exhibit first-order dependency in oxidant and HClO4 while order varies from one to zero in substrate. The reactions are acid catalyzed and retarded by the addition of saccharin, a byproduct of reaction. The rate of oxidation decreases with decrease in dielectric constant of the medium. The effect of temperature on the reaction...

  10. High Performance Nano-Crystalline Oxide Fuel Cell Materials. Defects, Structures, Interfaces, Transport, and Electrochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, Scott [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Poeppelmeier, Ken [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Mason, Tom [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Marks, Lawrence [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Voorhees, Peter [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2016-09-07

    This project addresses fundamental materials challenges in solid oxide electrochemical cells, devices that have a broad range of important energy applications. Although nano-scale mixed ionically and electronically conducting (MIEC) materials provide an important opportunity to improve performance and reduce device operating temperature, durability issues threaten to limit their utility and have remained largely unexplored. Our work has focused on both (1) understanding the fundamental processes related to oxygen transport and surface-vapor reactions in nano-scale MIEC materials, and (2) determining and understanding the key factors that control their long-term stability. Furthermore, materials stability has been explored under the “extreme” conditions encountered in many solid oxide cell applications, i.e, very high or very low effective oxygen pressures, and high current density.

  11. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation alterations in heart failure, ischaemic heart disease and diabetic cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillmore, N; Mori, J; Lopaschuk, G D

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. In many forms of heart disease, including heart failure, ischaemic heart disease and diabetic cardiomyopathies, changes in cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolism contribute to contractile dysfunction and to a decrease in cardiac efficiency. Specific metabolic changes include a relative increase in cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates and an uncoupling of glycolysis from glucose oxidation. In heart failure, overall mitochondrial oxidative metabolism can be impaired while, in ischaemic heart disease, energy production is impaired due to a limitation of oxygen supply. In both of these conditions, residual mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation dominates over mitochondrial glucose oxidation. In diabetes, the ratio of cardiac fatty acid oxidation to glucose oxidation also increases, although primarily due to an increase in fatty acid oxidation and an inhibition of glucose oxidation. Recent evidence suggests that therapeutically regulating cardiac energy metabolism by reducing fatty acid oxidation and/or increasing glucose oxidation can improve cardiac function of the ischaemic heart, the failing heart and in diabetic cardiomyopathies. In this article, we review the cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolic changes that occur in these forms of heart disease, what role alterations in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation have in contributing to cardiac dysfunction and the potential for targeting fatty acid oxidation to treat these forms of heart disease. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24147975

  12. The role of reduced graphene oxide capping on defect induced ferromagnetism of ZnO nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Anand; Misra, S K; Bahadur, D

    2013-03-08

    In this study, the effect of different numbers of layers of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) on the ferromagnetic behavior of zinc oxide-reduced graphene oxide (ZnO-RGO) hybrid architectures has been investigated. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy along with x-ray diffraction of these hybrids confirm that ZnO nanorods are wrapped with different numbers of layers of RGO in a controlled way and their hexagonal phase is unaffected by these layers. Raman and photoelectron spectroscopy of these hybrids reveals that RGO does not alter the nonpolar optical phonon E(2) (high) mode and chemical state of Zn(2+) in ZnO. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra show that RGO passivates singly charged oxygen vacancies (VOS⁺) in ZnO. It correlates the passivation efficiency of VOS⁺ to the number of RGO layers and this has been achieved up to 90% by ∼31 layers of RGO. Due to passivation of VOS⁺ in ZnO by RGO, the ferromagnetic behavior (saturation magnetization and divergence between zero field cooled and field cooled) in ZnO-RGO hybrids is suppressed as compared to ZnO. Combining the EPR and magnetic behavior, a direct link between the passivation of the singly charged oxygen vacancies present on the surface of ZnO nanorods and the number of RGO layers is established.

  13. Point defects and irradiation in oxides: simulations at the atomic scale; Defauts ponctuels et irradiation dans les oxydes: simulation a l'echelle atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocombette, J.P

    2005-12-15

    The studies done by Jean-Paul Crocombette between 1996 and 2005 in the Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique of the Direction de l'Energie Nucleaire in Saclay are presented in this Habilitation thesis. These works were part of the material science researches on the ageing, especially under irradiation, of oxides of interest for the nuclear industry. In this context simulation studies at the atomic scale were performed on two elementary components of ageing under irradiation : point defects and displacement cascades ; using two complementary simulation techniques : ab initio electronic structure calculations and empirical potential molecular dynamics. The first part deals with point defects : self defects (vacancies or interstitials) or hetero-atomic dopants. One first recalls the energetics of such defects in oxides, the specific features of defects calculations and the expected accuracy of these calculations. Then one presents the results obtained on uranium dioxide, oxygen in silver and amorphous silica. The second part tackles the modelling of disintegration recoil nuclei in various?displacement cascades created by crystalline matrices for actinide waste disposal. Cascade calculations give access to the amorphization mechanisms under irradiation of these materials. One thus predicts that the amorphization in zircon takes place directly in the tracks whereas in lanthanum zirconate, the amorphization proceeds through the accumulation of point defects. Finally the prospects of these studies are discussed. (author)

  14. Defective hematopoietic stem cell and lymphoid progenitor development in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome: potential role of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Laureanne Pilar E; Chen, Haiyan; Shatynski, Kristen E; Clark, Sarah; Yuan, Rong; Harrison, David E; Yarowsky, Paul J; Williams, Mark S

    2011-10-15

    Down Syndrome (DS), a genetic disease caused by a triplication of chromosome 21, is characterized by increased markers of oxidative stress. In addition to cognitive defects, patients with DS also display hematologic disorders and increased incidence of infections and leukemia. Using the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS, the goal of this study was to examine hematopoietic stem and lymphoid progenitor cell function in DS. Analysis of hematopoietic progenitor populations showed that Ts65Dn mice possessed fewer functional hematopoietic stem cells and a significantly decreased percentage of bone marrow lymphoid progenitors. Increased reactive oxygen species and markers of oxidative stress were detected in hematopoietic stem cell populations and were associated with a loss of quiescence. Bone marrow progenitor populations expressed diminished levels of the IL-7Rα chain, which was associated with decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Modulating oxidative stress in vitro suggested that oxidative stress selectively leads to decreased IL-7Rα expression, and inhibits the survival of IL-7Rα-expressing hematopoietic progenitors, potentially linking increased reactive oxygen species and immunopathology. The study results identify a link between oxidative stress and diminished IL-7Rα expression and function. Further, the data suggest that this decrease in IL-7Rα is associated with defective hematopoietic development in Down Syndrome. The data suggest that hematopoietic stem and lymphoid progenitor cell defects underlie immune dysfunction in DS and that increased oxidative stress and reduced cytokine signaling may alter hematologic development in Ts65Dn mice.

  15. Chronic exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate induces behavior defects and neurotoxicity through oxidative damages, in vivo and in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Chen

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS is an emerging persistent pollutant which shows multiple adverse health effects. However, the neurotoxicity of PFOS and its mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Using a combination of in vivo and in vitro methods, the present study provides a detailed description of PFOS-induced neurotoxicity. Results showed that the median lethal concentration of PFOS was 2.03 mM in Caenorhabditis elegans for 48 h exposure. 20 µM PFOS caused decrease of locomotor behaviors including forward movement, body bend and head thrash. Additionally, PFOS exposure reduced chemotaxis index of C. elegans, which indicates the decline of chemotaxis learning ability. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP labelled transgenic strains, we found that PFOS caused down-regulated expression of a chemoreceptor gene, gcy-5, in ASE chemosensory neurons, but did not affect cholinergic neurons and dopaminergic neurons. In SH-SY5Y cells, 48 h exposure to 25 µM and 50 µM PFOS induced cell damage, apoptosis and the reactive oxygen species (ROS generation. PFOS caused significant increases of lipid peroxidation and superoxide dismutase activity, but an actual decrease of glutathione peroxidase activity. Furthermore, antioxidant N-acetylcysteine rescued cells from PFOS-induced apoptosis via blocking ROS. Our results demonstrate that chronic exposure to PFOS can cause obvious neurotoxicity and behavior defects. Oxidative damage and anti-oxidative deficit are crucial mechanisms in neurotoxicity of PFOS.

  16. Clarithromycin, trimethoprim, and penicillin and oxidative nucleic acid modifications in humans: randomised, controlled trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Emil List; Cejvanovic, Vanja; Kjær, Laura Kofoed

    2017-01-01

    , phenoxymethylpenicillin (penicillin V), or placebo. Oxidative modifications were measured as 24-h urinary excretion of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo), and plasma levels of malondialdehyde before and after treatment as a measurement of DNA oxidation, RNA oxidation.......7% (95% CI: 5.8–37.6%), but did not influence urinary excretion of 8-oxoGuo. Penicillin V did not influence urinary excretion of 8-oxodG or 8-oxoGuo. None of the antibiotic drugs influenced plasma levels of malondialdehyde. Conclusion Clarithromycin significantly increases oxidative nucleic acid...... modifications. Increased oxidative modifications might explain some of clarithromycin's known adverse reactions. Trimethoprim significantly lowers DNA oxidation but not RNA oxidation. Penicillin V had no effect on oxidative nucleic acid modifications....

  17. Evaluation of effectiveness of hyaluronic acid in combination with bioresorbable membrane (poly lactic acid-poly glycolic acid) for the treatment of infrabony defects in humans: A clinical and radiographic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehdev, Bhumika; Bhongade, Manohar Laxmanrao; Ganji, Kiran Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The combination of biomaterials, bone graft substitutes along with guided tissue regeneration (GTR) has been shown to be an effective modality of periodontal regenerative therapy for infrabony defects. Therefore, the present randomized controlled clinical study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid (HA) in combination with bioresorbable membrane for the treatment of human infrabony defects. Materials and Methods: Twenty four infrabony defects in 20 systemically healthy patients were randomly assigned to test (HA in combination with bioresorbable membrane) and control (bioresorbable membrane alone) treatment groups. Probing pocket depth (PPD), relative attachment level, and relative gingival margin level were measured with a computerized Florida disc probe at baseline and at 6 months follow-up. Radiographic measurements were also evaluated at baseline and at 6 months of postsurgery. Results: At 6 months, the mean reduction in PPD in test group and control group was 4.52 mm and 2.97 mm, respectively. Significantly higher clinical attachment level with a gain of 2.20 mm was found in the test group as compared to control group. In addition, statistically significant greater reduction of radiographic defect depth was observed in the test group. Conclusion: Regenerative approach using hyaloss in combination with GTR for the treatment of human infrabony defects resulted in a significant added benefit in terms of CAL gains, PPD reductions and radiographic defect fill, as well as LBG, compared to the GTR alone. PMID:27041838

  18. Evaluation of effectiveness of hyaluronic acid in combination with bioresorbable membrane (poly lactic acid-poly glycolic acid for the treatment of infrabony defects in humans: A clinical and radiographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhumika Sehdev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The combination of biomaterials, bone graft substitutes along with guided tissue regeneration (GTR has been shown to be an effective modality of periodontal regenerative therapy for infrabony defects. Therefore, the present randomized controlled clinical study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid (HA in combination with bioresorbable membrane for the treatment of human infrabony defects. Materials and Methods: Twenty four infrabony defects in 20 systemically healthy patients were randomly assigned to test (HA in combination with bioresorbable membrane and control (bioresorbable membrane alone treatment groups. Probing pocket depth (PPD, relative attachment level, and relative gingival margin level were measured with a computerized Florida disc probe at baseline and at 6 months follow-up. Radiographic measurements were also evaluated at baseline and at 6 months of postsurgery. Results: At 6 months, the mean reduction in PPD in test group and control group was 4.52 mm and 2.97 mm, respectively. Significantly higher clinical attachment level with a gain of 2.20 mm was found in the test group as compared to control group. In addition, statistically significant greater reduction of radiographic defect depth was observed in the test group. Conclusion: Regenerative approach using hyaloss in combination with GTR for the treatment of human infrabony defects resulted in a significant added benefit in terms of CAL gains, PPD reductions and radiographic defect fill, as well as LBG, compared to the GTR alone.

  19. Lack of the P2X7 receptor protects against AMD-like defects and microparticle accumulation in a chronic oxidative stress-induced mouse model of AMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Kyle A; Lin, C M; Bowes Rickman, Catherine; Yang, Dongli

    2017-01-01

    The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is an ATP-gated ion channel that is a key player in oxidative stress under pathological conditions. The P2X7R is expressed in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and neural retina. Chronic oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Mice lacking Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1) developed chronic oxidative stress as well as AMD-like features, but whether the P2X7R plays a causative role in oxidative stress-induced AMD is unknown. Thus, the main purpose of this study was to test if concurrent knockout (KO) of P2X7R could block AMD-like defects seen in Sod1 KO mice. Using multiple approaches, we demonstrate that Sod1 KO causes AMD-like defects, including positive staining for oxidative stress markers, 3-nitrotyrosine and carboxymethyl lysine, thinning of the RPE and retina, thickening of Bruch's membrane, presence of basal laminar and linear deposits, RPE barrier disruption and accumulation of microglia/macrophages. Moreover, we find that Sod1 KO mice accumulate more microparticles (MPs) within RPE/choroid tissues. Concurrent KO of the P2X7R protects against AMD-like defects and MP accumulation in Sod1 KO mice. Together, we show for the first time, that deficiency of P2X7R prevents in vivo oxidative stress-induced accumulation of MPs and AMD-like defects. This work could potentially lead to novel therapies for AMD and other oxidative stress-driven diseases. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Oxidative Decarboxylation of Levulinic Acid by Silver(I/Persulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Gong

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative decarboxylation of levulinic acid (LA by silver(I/persulfate [Ag(I/S2O82−] has been investigated in this paper. The effects of buffer solution, initial pH value, time and temperature and dosages of Ag(I/S2O82− on the decarboxylation of LA were examined in batch experiments and a reaction scheme was proposed on basis of the reaction process. The experimental results showed that a solution of NaOH-KH2PO4 was comparatively suitable for the LA decarboxylation reaction by silver(I/persulfate. Under optimum conditions (temperature 160 °C, pH 5.0, and time 0.5 h, the rate of LA conversion in NaOH-KH2PO4 solutions with an initial concentration of 0.01 mol LA reached 70.2%, 2-butanone (methyl ethyl ketone was the single product in the gas phase and the resulted molar yield reached 44.2%.

  1. Hydrogen oxidation on gold electrode in perchloric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sustersic, M.G.; Almeida, N.V.; Von Mengershausen, A.E. [Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico Sociales, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, 25 de Mayo N 384, 5730 Villa Mercedes, San Luis (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    The aim of this research is to study the interface gold/perchloric acid solution in presence of hydrogen. The reactive is generated by H{sup +} ion reduction and by saturating the electrolyte with the gaseous H{sub 2}. No evidence of H{sub 2} dissociative adsorption is found. In special conditions, a strongly adsorbed layer is formed from the atoms diffusing from inside of the metal. The mass transport occurs in three ways: the diffusion of H atoms inwards, the diffusion of H atoms back to the surface and the dissolved H{sub 2} diffusion from the bulk electrolyte to the surface. When dissolved H{sub 2} reacts, the reaction is kinetically controlled when the H{sub 2} partial pressure is high, and it is diffusionally controlled when the reactive partial pressure is low. Above 0.7 V, (measured vs. RHE), the (100) plane surface reconstruction lifts, and the rate determining step is the H diffusion towards inside of the metal, and the current suddenly falls. The Hydrogen redox reaction on gold shows reversibility with respect to the potential when the reactives are the H diffusing outwards of the metal and the H{sup +} ion present in the electrolyte. However, the absolute current values of oxidation and reduction are different because the reactive sources are different. (author)

  2. High-resolution Kendrick Mass Defect Analysis of Poly(ethylene oxide)-based Non-ionic Surfactants and Their Degradation Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouquet, Thierry; Shimada, Haruo; Maeno, Katsuyuki; Ito, Kanako; Ozeki, Yuka; Kitagawa, Shinya; Ohtani, Hajime; Sato, Hiroaki

    2017-09-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and the recently introduced high-resolution Kendrick mass defect (HRKMD) analysis are combined to thoroughly characterize non-ionic surfactants made of a poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) core capped by esters of fatty acids. A PEO monostearate surfactant is first analyzed as a proof of principle of the HRKMD analysis conducted with a fraction of EO as the base unit (EO/X with X being an integer) in lieu of EO for a regular KMD analysis. Data visualization is greatly enhanced and the distributions detected in the MALDI mass spectrum are assigned to a pristine (H, OH)-PEO as well as mono- and di-esterified PEO chains with palmitate and stearate end-groups in HRKMD plots computed with EO/45. The MALDI-HRMS/HRKMD analysis is then successfully applied to the more complex case of ethoxylated hydrogenated castor oil (EHCO) found to contain a large number of hydrogenated ricinoleate moieties (up to 14) in its HRKMD plot computed with EO/43, departing from the expected triglyceride structure. The exhaustiveness of the MALDI-HRMS/HRKMD strategy is validated by comparing the so-obtained fingerprints with results from alternative techniques (electrospray ionization MS, size exclusion and liquid adsorption chromatography, ion mobility spectrometry). Finally, aged non-ionic surfactants formed upon hydrolytic degradation are analyzed by MALDI-HRMS/HRKMD to easily assign the degradation products and infer the associated degradation routes. In addition to the hydrolysis of the ester groups observed for EHCO, chain scissions and new polar end-groups are observed in the HRKMD plot of PEO monostearate arising from a competitive oxidative ageing.

  3. Transformation of Unsaturated Fatty Acids/Esters to Corresponding Keto Fatty Acids/Esters by Aerobic Oxidation with Pd(II)/Lewis Acid Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senan, Ahmed M; Zhang, Sicheng; Zeng, Miao; Chen, Zhuqi; Yin, Guochuan

    2017-08-16

    Utilization of renewable biomass to partly replace the fossil resources in industrial applications has attracted attention due to the limited fossil feedstock with the increased environmental concerns. This work introduced a modified Wacker-type oxidation for transformation of unsaturated fatty acids/esters to the corresponding keto fatty acids/esters, in which Cu2+ cation was replaced with common nonredox metal ions, that is, a novel Pd(II)/Lewis acid (LA) catalyst. It was found that adding nonredox metal ions can effectively promote Pd(II)-catalyzed oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids/esters to the corresponding keto fatty acids/esters, even much better than Cu2+, and the promotional effect is highly dependent on the Lewis acidity of added nonredox metal ions. The improved catalytic efficiency is attributed to the formation of heterobimetallic Pd(II)/LA species, and the oxidation mechanism of this Pd(II)/LA catalyst is also briefly discussed.

  4. Defects in the Error Prevention Oxidized Guanine System Potentiate Stationary-Phase Mutagenesis in Bacillus subtilis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidales, Luz E.; Cárdenas, Lluvia C.; Robleto, Eduardo; Yasbin, Ronald E.; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies showed that a Bacillus subtilis strain deficient in mismatch repair (MMR; encoded by the mutSL operon) promoted the production of stationary-phase-induced mutations. However, overexpression of the mutSL operon did not completely suppress this process, suggesting that additional DNA repair mechanisms are involved in the generation of stationary-phase-associated mutants in this bacterium. In agreement with this hypothesis, the results presented in this work revealed that starved B. subtilis cells lacking a functional error prevention GO (8-oxo-G) system (composed of YtkD, MutM, and YfhQ) had a dramatic propensity to increase the number of stationary-phase-induced revertants. These results strongly suggest that the occurrence of mutations is exacerbated by reactive oxygen species in nondividing cells of B. subtilis having an inactive GO system. Interestingly, overexpression of the MMR system significantly diminished the accumulation of mutations in cells deficient in the GO repair system during stationary phase. These results suggest that the MMR system plays a general role in correcting base mispairing induced by oxidative stress during stationary phase. Thus, the absence or depression of both the MMR and GO systems contributes to the production of stationary-phase mutants in B. subtilis. In conclusion, our results support the idea that oxidative stress is a mechanism that generates genetic diversity in starved cells of B. subtilis, promoting stationary-phase-induced mutagenesis in this soil microorganism. PMID:19011023

  5. A Defective Oxidative Burst and Impaired Antigen Presentation are Hallmarks of Human Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Susmita; Mukhopadhyay, Debanjan; Mukherjee, Shibabrata; Ghosh, Susmita; Kumar, Shishir; Sarkar, Kumkum; Pal, Dipankar; Bhowmik, Pratik; Mandal, Kausik; Modak, Dolanchampa; Guha, Subhasish Kamal; Pramanik, Netai; Goswami, Rama Prosad; Saha, Bibhuti; Chatterjee, Mitali

    2015-01-01

    Survival of the Leishmania parasite within monocytes hinges on its ability to effectively nullify their microbicidal effector mechanisms. Accordingly, this study aimed to delineate this biological niche in patients with visceral leishmaniasis (VL). In monocytes, the redox status, antigen presenting capacity, expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), co-stimulatory molecules (CD80/86) and generation of intracellular cytokines (IL-8, IL-1β, IL-10 and LAP-TGF-β1) was measured by flow cytometry, levels of circulating cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-8, IL-4, IL-13, IL-10 and GM-CSF) by ELISA and arginase activity by spectrophotometry. Within monocytes, generation of an oxidative burst was markedly attenuated as evident by decreased generation of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species, concomitant with raised levels of thiols. This was accompanied by lowered frequency of TLR4(+) monocytes, but the arginase activity remained unaltered. Pathogen persistence was enhanced by the predominance of anti-inflammatory cytokines within monocytes, notably IL-10. Alongside, development of adaptive immunity was severely attenuated as manifested by a pronounced impairment of antigen presentation and co-stimulation evident by down regulation of CD54, HLA-DR and CD86. Treatment corrected the redox imbalance and reversed the impaired antigen presentation. In VL, monocyte functions were severely impaired facilitating parasite persistence; anti-leishmanial chemotherapy mediated parasite elimination through modulation of the macrophage microenvironment by restoring its redox status and antigen presenting capacity.

  6. Comparative Evaluation of Diagnostic Tools for Oxidative Deterioration of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid-Enriched Infant Formulas during Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Siefarth

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The challenge in the development of infant formulas enriched with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs is to meet the consumers’ expectations with regard to high nutritional and sensory value. In particular, PUFAs may be prone to fatty acid oxidation that can generate potential rancid, metallic and/or fishy off-flavors. Although such off-flavors pose no health risk, they can nevertheless lead to rejection of products by consumers. Thus, monitoring autoxidation at its early stages is of great importance and finding a suitable analytical tool to perform these evaluations is therefore of high interest in quality monitoring. Two formulations of infant formulas were varied systematically in their mineral composition and their presence of antioxidants to produce 18 model formulas. All models were aged under controlled conditions and their oxidative deterioration was monitored. A quantitative study was performed on seven characteristic odor-active secondary oxidation products in the formulations via two-dimensional high resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry (2D-HRGC-MS/O. The sensitivity of the multi-dimensional GC-MS/O analysis was supported by two additional analytical tools for monitoring autoxidation, namely the analysis of lipid hydroperoxides and conjugated dienes. Furthermore, an aroma profile analysis (APA was performed to reveal the presence and intensities of typical odor qualities generated in the course of fatty acid oxidation. The photometrical analyses of lipid hydroperoxides and conjugated dienes were found to be too insensitive for early indication of the development of sensory defects. By comparison, the 2D-HRGC-MS/O was capable of monitoring peroxidation of PUFAs at low ppb-level in its early stages. Thereby, it was possible to screen oxidative variances on the basis of such volatile markers already within eight weeks after production of the products, which is an earlier indication of oxidative deterioration

  7. Cupric oxide nanowires assembled by nanoparticles in situ with enhancing electrocatalytic oxidation of ascorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuanxi; Liu, Jie; Huang, Xing; Wang, Huanhuan; Zheng, Youdan; Lin, Li; Wang, Siyu; Chen, Song; Jin, Yong

    2014-02-01

    CuO nanowires are facilely fabricated on the surface of AgCuZn alloy in situ by direct oxidation and partial reduction procedures, which shows an improved electrocatalytic activity toward ascorbic acid oxidation. The morphology shows the nanowires are assembled by CuO nanoparticles and we consider the process that the unordered spheres convert to ordered wires is due to the reduction of [1 1 0] and [ 1 bar    1    1 ] crystal planes in CuO. Moreover, the prepared modified electrode displays a high sensitivity of 1660 μA cm-2 mM-1, wide linear range from 0.1 μM to 3.1 mM and a low detection limit of 0.095 μmol (signal/noise = 3). Further, the sensor is also tested for anti-interferences and real samples determination, exhibiting distinguished selectivity, accuracy, and recovery. Such excellent properties are owing to the special structure of the synthesized CuO that would provide more specific surface area and enhanced activity compared with common nanowires. Hence, this work of fabricating CuO nanowires assembled by CuO nanoparticles with high performance might supply a way for facile obtain more electrochemical sensor in this structure.

  8. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some neutral and acidic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The oxidation of eleven amino acids by tetrabutylammonium tribromide (TBATB) in aqueous acetic acid results in the formation of the corresponding carbonyl compounds and ammonia. The reaction is first order with respect to TBATB. Michaelis-Menten type kinetics is observed with some of the amino acids while others ...

  9. The Biochemistry and Physiology of Mitochondrial Fatty Acid β-Oxidation and Its Genetic Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houten, Sander M.; Violante, Sara; Ventura, Fatima V.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) is the major pathway for the degradation of fatty acids and is essential for maintaining energy homeostasis in the human body. Fatty acids are a crucial energy source in the postabsorptive and fasted states when glucose supply is limiting. But even when

  10. Reduction of hydrogen peroxide stress derived from fatty acid beta-oxidation improves fatty acid utilization in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Hidetaka; Hoshino, Yasushi; Nakase, Kentaro; Usuda, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids are a promising raw material for substance production because of their highly reduced and anhydrous nature, which can provide higher fermentation yields than sugars. However, they are insoluble in water and are poorly utilized by microbes in industrial fermentation production. We used fatty acids as raw materials for L-lysine fermentation by emulsification and improved the limited fatty acid-utilization ability of Escherichia coli. We obtained a fatty acid-utilizing mutant strain by laboratory evolution and demonstrated that it expressed lower levels of an oxidative-stress marker than wild type. The intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) concentration of a fatty acid-utilizing wild-type E. coli strain was higher than that of a glucose-utilizing wild-type E. coli strain. The novel mutation rpsA(D210Y) identified in our fatty acid-utilizing mutant strain enabled us to promote cell growth, fatty-acid utilization, and L-lysine production from fatty acid. Introduction of this rpsA(D210Y) mutation into a wild-type strain resulted in lower H₂O₂ concentrations. The overexpression of superoxide dismutase (sodA) increased intracellular H₂O₂ concentrations and inhibited E. coli fatty-acid utilization, whereas overexpression of an oxidative-stress regulator (oxyS) decreased intracellular H₂O₂ concentrations and promoted E. coli fatty acid utilization and L-lysine production. Addition of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger thiourea promoted L-lysine production from fatty acids and decreased intracellular H₂O₂ concentrations. Among the ROS generated by fatty-acid β-oxidation, H₂O₂ critically affected E. coli growth and L-lysine production. This indicates that the regression of ROS stress promotes fatty acid utilization, which is beneficial for fatty acids used as raw materials in industrial production.

  11. Ascorbic acid protects lipids in human plasma and low-density lipoprotein against oxidative damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frei, B. (Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (Unites States))

    1991-12-01

    The authors exposed human blood plasma and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to many different oxidative challenges and followed the temporal consumption of endogenous antioxidants in relation to the initiation of oxidative damage. Under all types of oxidizing conditions, ascorbic acid completely protects lipids in plasma and LDL against detectable peroxidative damage as assessed by a specific and highly sensitive assay for lipid peroxidation. Ascorbic acid proved to be superior to the other water-soluble plasma antioxidants bilirubin, uric acid, and protein thiols as well as to the lipoprotein-associated antioxidants alpha-tocopherol, ubiquinol-10, lycopene, and beta-carotene. Although these antioxidants can lower the rate of detectable lipid peroxidation, they are not able to prevent its initiation. Only ascorbic acid is reactive enough to effectively intercept oxidants in the aqueous phase before they can attack and cause detectable oxidative damage to lipids.

  12. Impact of support oxide acidity in Pt-catalyzed HMF hydrogenation in alcoholic medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Shamery, Katharina; Ly, Nhu; Chan-Thaw, Carine E.

    2017-01-01

    –zirconia and silica–niobia, confirming the peculiar acidity of Nb-oxide compounds in polar liquids: Colloidal spherical platinum nanoparticles were synthesized and then deposited (1 wt%) on the oxide supports. The obtained metallic nanophases were studied in the reduction of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) to valuable......Abstract: Silica and three mixed silica oxides (silica–alumina, silica–niobia, and silica–zirconia) with nominally 5 wt% of the added element (Al, Nb and Zr) were prepared and used as supports for dispersing monometallic Pt-nanoparticles. The presence of the second oxide component on the silica......, respectively. The acid site density of silica–alumina was the highest compared with the other oxides; in general, an important decrease of acid sites density was determined in methanol. The order of the effective acidity in methanol was different from that determined in cyclohexane only for silica...

  13. Overexpression of Fatty-Acid-β-Oxidation-Related Genes Extends the Lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Hae Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the aging process is necessary to ensure that the healthcare needs of an aging population are met. With the trend toward increased human life expectancies, identification of candidate genes affecting the regulation of lifespan and its relationship to environmental factors is essential. Through misexpression screening of EP mutant lines, we previously isolated several genes extending lifespan when ubiquitously overexpressed, including the two genes encoding the fatty-acid-binding protein and dodecenoyl-CoA delta-isomerase involved in fatty-acid β-oxidation, which is the main energy resource pathway in eukaryotic cells. In this study, we analyzed flies overexpressing the two main components of fatty-acid β-oxidation, and found that overexpression of fatty-acid-β-oxidation-related genes extended the Drosophila lifespan. Furthermore, we found that the ability of dietary restriction to extend lifespan was reduced by the overexpression of fatty-acid-β-oxidation-related genes. Moreover, the overexpression of fatty-acid-β-oxidation-related genes enhanced stress tolerance to oxidative and starvation stresses and activated the dFOXO signal, indicating translocation to the nucleus and transcriptional activation of the dFOXO target genes. Overall, the results of this study suggest that overexpression of fatty-acid-β-oxidation-related genes extends lifespan in a dietary-restriction-related manner, and that the mechanism of this process may be related to FOXO activation.

  14. Fundamental Studies of Irradiation-Induced Defect Formation and Fission Product Dynamics in Oxide Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbins, James

    2012-12-19

    The objective of this research program is to address major nuclear fuels performance issues for the design and use of oxide-type fuels in the current and advanced nuclear reactor applications. Fuel performance is a major issue for extending fuel burn-up which has the added advantage of reducing the used fuel waste stream. It will also be a significant issue with respect to developing advanced fuel cycle processes where it may be possible to incorporate minor actinides in various fuel forms so that they can be 'burned' rather than join the used fuel waste stream. The potential to fission or transmute minor actinides and certain long-lived fission product isotopes would transform the high level waste storage strategy by removing the need to consider fuel storage on the millennium time scale.

  15. Surface Activity and Bulk Defect Chemistry of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usiskin, Robert Ezra

    In the first half of this thesis, a new robotic instrument called a scanning impedance probe is presented that can acquire electrochemical impedance spectra in automated fashion from hundreds of thin film microelectrodes with systematically varied properties. Results from this instrument are presented for three catalyst compositions that are commonly considered for use in state-of-the-art solid oxide fuel cell cathodes. For (La0.8Sr0.2) 0.95MnO3+delta; (LSM), the impedance spectra are well fit by a through-the-film reaction pathway. Transport rates are extracted, and the surface activity towards oxygen reduction is found to be correlated with the number of exposed grain boundary sites, suggesting that grain boundaries are more surface-active than grains. For La0.5Sr0.5CoO 3-delta; (LSC), the surface activity degrades 50x initially and then stabilizes at a comparable activity to that of previously measured Ba 0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-delta; films. For Sr0.06Nb0.06Bi1.87O3 (SNB), an example of a doped bismuth oxide, the activity of the metal-SNB boundary is measured. In the second half of this thesis, SrCo0.9Nb0.1O 3-delta; is selected as a case study of perovskites containing Sr and Co, which are the most active oxygen reduction catalysts known. Several bulk properties are measured, and synchrotron data are presented that provide strong evidence of substantial cobalt-oxygen covalency at high temperatures. This covalent bonding may be the underlying source of the high surface activity.

  16. Impairment of PPARαand the Fatty Acid Oxidation Pathway Aggravates Renal Fibrosis during Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ki Wung; Lee, Eun Kyeong; Lee, Mi Kyung; Oh, Goo Taeg; Yu, Byung Pal; Chung, Hae Young

    2018-02-12

    Defects in the renal fatty acid oxidation (FAO) pathway have been implicated in the development of renal fibrosis. Although, compared with young kidneys, aged kidneys show significantly increased fibrosis with impaired kidney function, the mechanisms underlying the effects of aging on renal fibrosis have not been investigated. In this study, we investigated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPAR α ) and the FAO pathway as regulators of age-associated renal fibrosis. The expression of PPAR α and the FAO pathway-associated proteins significantly decreased with the accumulation of lipids in the renal tubular epithelial region during aging in rats. In particular, decreased PPAR α protein expression associated with increased expression of PPAR α -targeting microRNAs. Among the microRNAs with increased expression during aging, miR-21 efficiently decreased PPAR α expression and impaired FAO when ectopically expressed in renal epithelial cells. In cells pretreated with oleic acid to induce lipid stress, miR-21 treatment further enhanced lipid accumulation. Furthermore, treatment with miR-21 significantly exacerbated the TGF- β -induced fibroblast phenotype of epithelial cells. We verified the physiologic importance of our findings in a calorie restriction model. Calorie restriction rescued the impaired FAO pathway during aging and slowed fibrosis development. Finally, compared with kidneys of aged littermate controls, kidneys of aged PPAR α -/- mice showed exaggerated lipid accumulation, with decreased activity of the FAO pathway and a severe fibrosis phenotype. Our results suggest that impaired renal PPAR α signaling during aging aggravates renal fibrosis development, and targeting PPAR α is useful for preventing age-associated CKD. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  17. A comparison between platelet-rich plasma (PRP and hyaluronate acid on the healing of cartilage defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Liu

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich plasma (PRP has offered great promise for the treatment of cartilage degradation, and has been proved to have positive effects on the restoration of cartilage lesions. But no comparative work has been done between PRP and hyaluronate acid (HA concerning their restoring effect on cartilage defect, especially by means of animal experiments and histologic assessments. The purpose of the study was to compare the therapeutic effects of P-PRP and HA on osteoarthritis in rabbit knees. Thirty rabbits were used to establish the animal models by creating a cartilage defect of 5 mm in diameter on the condyles of the femurs, and were randomly divided into three groups: the P-PRP group, HA group and the control group. Then each group was treated with P-PRP, HA or saline solution, respectively. Six and twelve weeks later the rabbits were sacrificed and the samples were collected. The platelet number, the concentrations of growth factors of P-PRP and whole blood, and the IL-1β concentration in the joint fluid were investigated, and the histological assessment of the cartilage were performed according to Mankin's scoring system. Micro-CT was also used to evaluate the restoration of subchondral bone. The platelet concentration in P-PRP is 6.8 fold of that in the whole blood. The IL-1β level in the P-PRP group was lower than in the HA group (p<0.01 and in the control group (p<0.01. The restoration of the defected cartilage as well as the subchondral bone was better in the P-PRP group than in the HA group or the control group (P<0.05. Our data showed that P-PRP is better than HA in promoting the restoration of the cartilage and alleviating the arthritis caused by cartilage damage.

  18. Ferrous iron mediated oxidation of arachidonic acid: studies employing nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, D A; Gerrard, J M; Rao, G H; Krick, T P; White, J G

    1978-10-01

    The oxidation of arachidonic acid by ferrous sulfate provides a useful model to study the role of iron in lipid oxidation reactions. We have employed nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) in the present investigation to evaluate the mechanism of this reaction. In the presence of arachidonic acid, Fe +++, and O2, the yellow dye NBT was rapidly reduced to the blue form, NBTH2. The molar ratio of arachidonic acid to Fe++ in this rapid reaction was 1:1, showing an interaction of one fatty acid molecule per iron molecule. Approximately one molecule of NBT was reduced per four molecules of arachidonic acid and Fe++. Reduction of NBT was accompanied by oxidation of Fe++ to Fe+++, suggesting the transfer of four electrons from the Fe++ to NBT to reduce the dye. Arachidonic acid was found to be unchanged when extracted at the end of the reaction, indicating formation of a complex that could dissociate leaving intact arachidonic acid. Evidence for the presence of such a complex which slowly dissociates during the reaction was obtained after longer incubations with small amounts of arachidonic acid. NBT reduction was not inhibited by agents which hydrolyze superoxide, by catalase or by agents which trap hydroxy radicals. We, therefore, propose a model in which NBT traps a radical generated on the arachidonic acid molecule. The proposed model suggests mechanisms for other fatty acid oxidation reactions such as prostaglandin and hydroperoxy fatty acid synthesis.

  19. Increased hepatic fatty acids uptake and oxidation by LRPPRC-driven oxidative phosphorylation reduces blood lipid levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hyperlipidemia is one of the major risk factors of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. This study aimed to investigate the impact of leucine rich pentatricopeptide repeat containing protein (LRPPRC-driven hepatic oxidative phoshorylation on blood lipid levels. The hepatic LRPPRC level was modulated by liver-specific transgenic or adeno-associated virus 8 carried shRNA targeting Lrpprc (aav-shLrpprc. Mice were fed with a high fat diet to induce obesity. Gene expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and / or western blot. The hepatic ATP level, hepatic and serum lipids contents, and mitochondria oxidative phosphorylation complex activities were measured using specific assay kits. The uptake and oxidation of fatty acid by hepatocytes were assessed using 14C-palmitate. LRPPRC regulated the expression of genes encoded by mitochondrial genome but not those by nuclear genome involved in mitochondria biogenesis, oxidative phosphorylation, and lipid metabolism. Increased oxidative phosphorylation in liver mediated by LRPPRC resulted in the increase of hepatic ATP level. Lrpprc promoted palmitate uptake and oxidation by hypatocytes. The hepatic and serum triglyceride and total cholesterol levels were inversely associated with the hepatic LRPPRC level. These data demonstrated that LRPPRC-driven hepatic oxidative phosphorylation could promote fatty acids uptake and oxidation by hepatocytes and reduce both hepatic and circulating triglyceride and cholesterol levels.

  20. Oxidative stability of milk drinks containing structured lipids produced from sunflower oil and caprylic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timm Heinrich, Maike; Xu, Xuebing; Nielsen, Nina Skall

    2003-01-01

    Milk drinks containing 5% traditional sunflower oil (SO), randomized lipid (RL) or specific structured lipid (SL) (both produced from SO and tricaprylin/caprylic acid) were compared with respect to their particle size, viscosity and oxidative stability during storage. Furthermore, the effect...... of adding potential antioxidants EDTA or gallic acid to the milk drink based on SL was investigated. The lipid type significantly affected the oxidative stability of the milk drinks: Milk drink based on SL oxidized faster than milk drink based on RL or SO. The reduced oxidative stability in the SL milk...

  1. Time resolved study of hydroxyl radical oxidation of oleic acid at the air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinxing; Barraza, Kevin M.; Upton, Kathleen T.; Beauchamp, J. L.

    2017-09-01

    The ubiquity of oleic acid (OA) renders it a poster child for laboratory investigations of environmental oxidation chemistry. In the current study, mechanistic details of the oxidation of OA by hydroxyl radicals at the air-water interface are investigated using field-induced droplet ionization mass spectrometry (FIDI-MS). Products from OH oxidation of both unsaturated and saturated carbon atoms are identified, and mechanisms for both types of oxidation processes are proposed. Uptake of oxygen in the interfacial layer increases linearly with time, consistent with Langmuir-Hinshelwood reaction kinetics. These results provide fundamental knowledge relating to OH initiated degradation of fatty acids in atmospheric aerosols.

  2. The rationale for preventing cancer cachexia: targeting excessive fatty acid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Chao-Nan

    2016-07-21

    Cachexia commonly occurs at the terminal stage of cancer and has largely unclear molecular mechanisms. A recent study published in Nature Medicine, entitled "Excessive fatty acid oxidation induces muscle atrophy in cancer cachexia," reveals that cachectic cancer cells can secrete multiple cytokines that induce excessive fatty acid oxidation, which is responsible for muscle loss in cancer cachexia. Inhibition of fatty acid oxidation using etomoxir can increase muscle mass and body weight in cancer cachexia animal models. The usage of stable cachexia animal models is also discussed in this research highlight.

  3. High glucose-induced oxidative stress represses sirtuin deacetylase expression and increases histone acetylation leading to neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jingwen; Wu, Yanqing; Yang, Peixin

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant epigenetic modifications are implicated in maternal diabetes-induced neural tube defects (NTDs). Because cellular stress plays a causal role in diabetic embryopathy, we investigated the possible role of the stress-resistant sirtuin (SIRT) family histone deacetylases. Among the seven sirtuins (SIRT1-7), pre-gestational maternal diabetes in vivo or high glucose in vitro significantly reduced the expression of SIRT 2 and SIRT6 in the embryo or neural stem cells, respectively. The down-regulation of SIRT2 and SIRT6 was reversed by superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) over-expression in the in vivo mouse model of diabetic embryopathy and the SOD mimetic, tempol and cell permeable SOD, PEGSOD in neural stem cell cultures. 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ), a superoxide generating agent, mimicked high glucose-suppressed SIRT2 and SIRT6 expression. The acetylation of histone 3 at lysine residues 56 (H3K56), H3K14, H3K9, and H3K27, putative substrates of SIRT2 and SIRT6, was increased by maternal diabetes in vivo or high glucose in vitro, and these increases were blocked by SOD1 over-expression or tempol treatment. SIRT2 or SIRT6 over-expression abrogated high glucose-suppressed SIRT2 or SIRT6 expression, and prevented the increase in acetylation of their histone substrates. The potent sirtuin activator (SRT1720) blocked high glucose-increased histone acetylation and NTD formation, whereas the combination of a pharmacological SIRT2 inhibitor and a pan SIRT inhibitor mimicked the effect of high glucose on increased histone acetylation and NTD induction. Thus, diabetes in vivo or high glucose in vitro suppresses SIRT2 and SIRT6 expression through oxidative stress, and sirtuin down-regulation-induced histone acetylation may be involved in diabetes-induced NTDs. The mechanism underlying pre-gestational diabetes-induced neural tube defects (NTDs) is still elusive. Our study unravels a new epigenetic mechanism in which maternal diabetes-induced oxidative stress represses

  4. Effectiveness of Folic Acid Fortified Flour for Prevention of Neural Tube Defects in a High Risk Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haochen; De Steur, Hans; Chen, Gong; Zhang, Xiaotian; Pei, Lijun; Gellynck, Xavier; Zheng, Xiaoying

    2016-03-09

    Despite efforts to tackle folate deficiency and Neural Tube Defects (NTDs) through folic acid fortification, its implementation is still lacking where it is needed most, highlighting the need for studies that evaluate the effectiveness of folic acid fortified wheat flour in a poor, rural, high-risk, NTD region of China. One of the most affected regions, Shanxi Province, was selected as a case study. A community intervention was carried out in which 16,648 women of child-bearing age received fortified flour (eight villages) and a control group received ordinary flour (three villages). NTD birth prevalence and biological indicators were measured two years after program initiation at endline only. The effect on the NTD burden was calculated using the disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) method. In the intervention group, serum folate level was higher than in the control group. NTDs in the intervention group were 68.2% lower than in the control group (OR = 0.313, 95% CI = 0.207-0473, p < 0.001). In terms of DALYs, burden in intervention group was approximately 58.5% lower than in the control group. Flour fortification was associated with lower birth prevalence and burden of NTDs in economically developing regions with a high risk of NTDs. The positive findings confirm the potential of fortification when selecting an appropriate food vehicle and target region. As such, this study provides support for decision makers aiming for the implementation of (mandatory) folic acid fortification in China.

  5. Effectiveness of Folic Acid Fortified Flour for Prevention of Neural Tube Defects in a High Risk Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haochen Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite efforts to tackle folate deficiency and Neural Tube Defects (NTDs through folic acid fortification, its implementation is still lacking where it is needed most, highlighting the need for studies that evaluate the effectiveness of folic acid fortified wheat flour in a poor, rural, high-risk, NTD region of China. One of the most affected regions, Shanxi Province, was selected as a case study. A community intervention was carried out in which 16,648 women of child-bearing age received fortified flour (eight villages and a control group received ordinary flour (three villages. NTD birth prevalence and biological indicators were measured two years after program initiation at endline only. The effect on the NTD burden was calculated using the disability-adjusted life years (DALYs method. In the intervention group, serum folate level was higher than in the control group. NTDs in the intervention group were 68.2% lower than in the control group (OR = 0.313, 95% CI = 0.207–0473, p < 0.001. In terms of DALYs, burden in intervention group was approximately 58.5% lower than in the control group. Flour fortification was associated with lower birth prevalence and burden of NTDs in economically developing regions with a high risk of NTDs. The positive findings confirm the potential of fortification when selecting an appropriate food vehicle and target region. As such, this study provides support for decision makers aiming for the implementation of (mandatory folic acid fortification in China.

  6. Pyrite oxidation under simulated acid rain weathering conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kai; Li, Heping; Wang, Luying; Wen, Xiaoying; Liu, Qingyou

    2017-07-31

    We investigated the electrochemical corrosion behavior of pyrite in simulated acid rain with different acidities and at different temperatures. The cyclic voltammetry, polarization curve, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results showed that pyrite has the same electrochemical interaction mechanism under different simulated acid rain conditions, regardless of acidity or environmental temperature. Either stronger acid rain acidity or higher environmental temperature can accelerate pyrite corrosion. Compared with acid rain having a pH of 5.6 at 25 °C, the prompt efficiency of pyrite weathering reached 104.29% as the acid rain pH decreased to 3.6, and it reached 125.31% as environmental temperature increased to 45 °C. Increasing acidity dramatically decreases the charge transfer resistance, and increasing temperature dramatically decreases the passivation film resistance, when other conditions are held constant. Acid rain always causes lower acidity mine drainage, and stronger acidity or high environmental temperatures cause serious acid drainage. The natural parameters of latitude, elevation, and season have considerable influence on pyrite weathering, because temperature is an important influencing factor. These experimental results are of direct significance for the assessment and management of sulfide mineral acid drainage in regions receiving acid rain.

  7. Oxalic acid capped iron oxide nanorods as a sensing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshu; Baral, Dinesh; Bohidar, H B; Solanki, Pratima R

    2015-08-05

    A label free impedimetric immunosensor has been fabricated using protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio cholerae (Ab) functionalized oxalic acid (OA) capped iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanorods for V. cholerae detection. The structural and morphological studies of Fe3O4 and OA-Fe3O4, were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The average crystalline size of Fe3O4, OA-Fe3O4 nanorods were obtained as about 29±1 and 39±1nm, respectively. The hydrodynamic radius of nanorods is found as 116nm (OA-Fe3O4) and 77nm (Fe3O4) by DLS measurement. Cytotoxicity of Fe3O4 and OA-Fe3O4 nanorods has been investigated in the presence of human epithelial kidney (HEK) cell line 293 using MTT assay. The cell viability and proliferation studies reveal that the OA-Fe3O4 nanorods facilitate cell growth. The results of electrochemical response studies of the fabricated BSA/Ab/OA-Fe2O3/ITO immunosensor exhibits good linearity in the range of 12.5-500ng mL(-1) with low detection limit of 0.5ng mL(-1), sensitivity 0.1Ωng(-1)ml(-1)cm(-2) and reproducibility more than 11 times. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Formic-acid-induced depolymerization of oxidized lignin to aromatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Alireza; Ulbrich, Arne; Coon, Joshua J.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2014-11-01

    Lignin is a heterogeneous aromatic biopolymer that accounts for nearly 30% of the organic carbon on Earth and is one of the few renewable sources of aromatic chemicals. As the most recalcitrant of the three components of lignocellulosic biomass (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), lignin has been treated as a waste product in the pulp and paper industry, where it is burned to supply energy and recover pulping chemicals in the operation of paper mills. Extraction of higher value from lignin is increasingly recognized as being crucial to the economic viability of integrated biorefineries. Depolymerization is an important starting point for many lignin valorization strategies, because it could generate valuable aromatic chemicals and/or provide a source of low-molecular-mass feedstocks suitable for downstream processing. Commercial precedents show that certain types of lignin (lignosulphonates) may be converted into vanillin and other marketable products, but new technologies are needed to enhance the lignin value chain. The complex, irregular structure of lignin complicates chemical conversion efforts, and known depolymerization methods typically afford ill-defined products in low yields (that is, less than 10-20wt%). Here we describe a method for the depolymerization of oxidized lignin under mild conditions in aqueous formic acid that results in more than 60wt% yield of low-molecular-mass aromatics. We present the discovery of this facile C-O cleavage method, its application to aspen lignin depolymerization, and mechanistic insights into the reaction. The broader implications of these results for lignin conversion and biomass refining are also considered.

  9. Perfluorooctanoic acid exposure triggers oxidative stress in the mouse pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Kamendulis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA is used in the manufacture of many industrial and commercial products. PFOA does not readily decompose in the environment, and is biologically persistent. Human epidemiologic and animal studies suggest that PFOA exposure elicits adverse effects on the pancreas. While multiple animal studies have examined PFOA-mediated toxicity in the liver, little is known about the potential adverse effects of PFOA on the pancreas. To address this, we treated C57Bl/6 mice with vehicle, or PFOA at doses of 0.5, 2.5 or 5.0 mg/kg BW/day for 7 days. Significant accumulation of PFOA was found in the serum, liver and pancreas of PFOA-treated animals. Histopathologic examination of the pancreas revealed focal ductal hyperplasia in mice treated with 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg BW/day PFOA, while inflammation was observed only in the high dose group. Elevated serum levels of amylase and lipase were observed in the 2.5 mg/kg BW/day PFOA treatment group. In addition, PFOA exposure resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the level of the lipid peroxidation product 8-iso-PGF2α and induction of the antioxidant response genes Sod1, Sod2, Gpx2 and Nqo1. Our findings provide additional evidence that the pancreas is a target organ for PFOA-mediated toxicity and suggest that oxidative stress may be a mechanism through which PFOA induces histopathological changes in the pancreas.

  10. Nitric oxide and salicylic acid signaling in plant defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klessig, Daniel F.; Durner, Jörg; Noad, Robert; Navarre, Duroy A.; Wendehenne, David; Kumar, Dhirendra; Zhou, Jun Ma; Shah, Jyoti; Zhang, Shuqun; Kachroo, Pradeep; Trifa, Youssef; Pontier, Dominique; Lam, Eric; Silva, Herman

    2000-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays a critical signaling role in the activation of plant defense responses after pathogen attack. We have identified several potential components of the SA signaling pathway, including (i) the H2O2-scavenging enzymes catalase and ascorbate peroxidase, (ii) a high affinity SA-binding protein (SABP2), (iii) a SA-inducible protein kinase (SIPK), (iv) NPR1, an ankyrin repeat-containing protein that exhibits limited homology to IκBα and is required for SA signaling, and (v) members of the TGA/OBF family of bZIP transcription factors. These bZIP factors physically interact with NPR1 and bind the SA-responsive element in promoters of several defense genes, such as the pathogenesis-related 1 gene (PR-1). Recent studies have demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) is another signal that activates defense responses after pathogen attack. NO has been shown to play a critical role in the activation of innate immune and inflammatory responses in animals. Increases in NO synthase (NOS)-like activity occurred in resistant but not susceptible tobacco after infection with tobacco mosaic virus. Here we demonstrate that this increase in activity participates in PR-1 gene induction. Two signaling molecules, cGMP and cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR), which function downstream of NO in animals, also appear to mediate plant defense gene activation (e.g., PR-1). Additionally, NO may activate PR-1 expression via an NO-dependent, cADPR-independent pathway. Several targets of NO in animals, including guanylate cyclase, aconitase, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (e.g., SIPK), are also modulated by NO in plants. Thus, at least portions of NO signaling pathways appear to be shared between plants and animals. PMID:10922045

  11. A comprehensive evaluation of food fortification with folic acid for the primary prevention of neural tube defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Angeline

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periconceptional use of vitamin supplements containing folic acid reduces the risk of a neural tube defect (NTD. In November 1998, food fortification with folic acid was mandated in Canada, as a public health strategy to increase the folic acid intake of all women of childbearing age. We undertook a comprehensive population based study in Newfoundland to assess the benefits and possible adverse effects of this intervention. Methods This study was carried out in women aged 19–44 years and in seniors from November 1997 to March 1998, and from November 2000 to March 2001. The evaluation was comprised of four components: I Determination of rates of NTDs; II Dietary assessment; III Blood analysis; IV Assessment of knowledge and use of folic acid supplements. Results The annual rates of NTDs in Newfoundland varied greatly between 1976 and 1997, with a mean rate of 3.40 per 1,000 births. There was no significant change in the average rates between 1991–93 and 1994–97 (relative risk [RR] 1.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.76–1.34. The rates of NTDs fell by 78% (95% CI 65%–86% after the implementation of folic acid fortification, from an average of 4.36 per 1,000 births during 1991–1997 to 0.96 per 1,000 births during 1998–2001 (RR 0.22, 95% CI 0.14–0.35. The average dietary intake of folic acid due to fortification was 70 μg/day in women aged 19–44 years and 74 μg/day in seniors. There were significant increases in serum and RBC folate levels for women and seniors after mandatory fortification. Among seniors, there were no significant changes in indices typical of vitamin B12 deficiencies, and no evidence of improved folate status masking haematological manifestations of vitamin B12 deficiency. The proportion of women aged 19–44 years taking a vitamin supplement containing folic acid increased from 17% to 28%. Conclusions Based on these findings, mandatory food fortification in Canada should continue at the

  12. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid stimulates hepatocellular exocytosis and mobilizes extracellular Ca++ mechanisms defective in cholestasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuers, U.; NATHANSON, M. H.; Isales, C. M.; Boyer, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    To assess the effects of tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) on bile excretory function, we examined whether TUDCA modulates vesicular exocytosis in the isolated perfused liver of normal rats in the presence of high (1.9 mM) or low (0.19 mM) extracellular Ca++ and in cholestatic rats 24 h after bile

  13. Evaluation of Humic Acid and Tannic Acid Fouling in Graphene Oxide-Coated Ultrafiltration Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Kyoung Hoon; Huang, Yi; Yu, Miao; Her, Namguk; Flora, Joseph R V; Park, Chang Min; Kim, Suhan; Cho, Jaeweon; Yoon, Yeomin

    2016-08-31

    Three commercially available ultrafiltration (UF) membranes (poly(ether sulfone), PES) that have nominal molecular weight cut-offs (5, 10, and 30 kDa) were coated with graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, water contact angle measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to determine the changed physicochemical properties of the membranes after GO coating. The water permeability and single-solute rejection of GO-coated (GOC) membranes for humic acid (HA) molecules were significantly higher by approximately 15% and 55%, respectively, compared to those of pristine UF membranes. However, the GOc membranes for single-solute tannic acid (TA) rejection showed similar trends of higher flux decline versus pristine PES membranes, because the relatively smaller TA molecules were readily adsorbed onto the membrane pores. When the mixed-solute of HA and TA rejection tests were performed, in particular, the adsorbed small TA molecules resulted in irreversible membrane fouling due to cake formation and membrane pore blocking on the membrane surface for the HA molecules. Although both membranes showed significantly higher flux declines for small molecules rejection, the GOc membranes showed better performance than the pristine UF membranes in terms of the rejection of various mixed-solute molecules, due to higher membrane recovery and antifouling capabilities.

  14. Integrating nitric oxide into salicylic acid and jasmonic acid/ ethylene plant defense pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mur, Luis A. J.; Prats, Elena; Pierre, Sandra; Hall, Michael A.; Hebelstrup, Kim H.

    2013-01-01

    Plant defense against pests and pathogens is known to be conferred by either salicylic acid (SA) or jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) pathways, depending on infection or herbivore-grazing strategy. It is well attested that SA and JA/ET pathways are mutually antagonistic allowing defense responses to be tailored to particular biotic stresses. Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a major signal influencing resistance mediated by both signaling pathways but no attempt has been made to integrate NO into established SA/JA/ET interactions. NO has been shown to act as an inducer or suppressor of signaling along each pathway. NO will initiate SA biosynthesis and nitrosylate key cysteines on TGA-class transcription factors to aid in the initiation of SA-dependent gene expression. Against this, S-nitrosylation of NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED PROTEINS1 (NPR1) will promote the NPR1 oligomerization within the cytoplasm to reduce TGA activation. In JA biosynthesis, NO will initiate the expression of JA biosynthetic enzymes, presumably to over-come any antagonistic effects of SA on JA-mediated transcription. NO will also initiate the expression of ET biosynthetic genes but a suppressive role is also observed in the S-nitrosylation and inhibition of S-adenosylmethionine transferases which provides methyl groups for ET production. Based on these data a model for NO action is proposed but we have also highlighted the need to understand when and how inductive and suppressive steps are used. PMID:23818890

  15. Omega-3 fatty acids differentially modulate enzymatic anti-oxidant systems in skeletal muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    da Silva, E. P.; Nachbar, R. T.; Levada-Pires, A. C.; Hirabara, S. M.; Lambertucci, R. H.

    2015-01-01

    During physical activity, increased reactive oxygen species production occurs, which can lead to cell damage and in a decline of individual’s performance and health. The use of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as a supplement to protect the immune system has been increasing; however, their possible benefit to the anti-oxidant system is not well described. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether the omega-3 fatty acids (docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid) can be bene...

  16. Charge carrier transport in defective reduced graphene oxide as quantum dots and nanoplatelets in multilayer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Mawin J. M.; Oliveira, Rafael F.; Almeida, Tiago P.; Hensel Ferreira, Rafael C.; Bufon, Carlos Cesar B.; Rodrigues, Varlei; Pereira-da-Silva, Marcelo A.; Gobbi, Ângelo L.; Piazzetta, Maria H. O.; Riul, Antonio, Jr.

    2017-12-01

    Graphene is a breakthrough 2D material due to its unique mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties, with considerable responsiveness in real applications. However, the coverage of large areas with pristine graphene is a challenge and graphene derivatives have been alternatively exploited to produce hybrid and composite materials that allow for new developments, considering also the handling of large areas using distinct methodologies. For electronic applications there is significant interest in the investigation of the electrical properties of graphene derivatives and related composites to determine whether the characteristic 2D charge transport of pristine graphene is preserved. Here, we report a systematic study of the charge transport mechanisms of reduced graphene oxide chemically functionalized with sodium polystyrene sulfonate (PSS), named as GPSS. GPSS was produced either as quantum dots (QDs) or nanoplatelets (NPLs), being further nanostructured with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) through the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly to produce graphene nanocomposites with molecular level control. Current–voltage (I–V) measurements indicated a meticulous growth of the LbL nanostructures onto gold interdigitated electrodes (IDEs), with a space-charge-limited current dominated by a Mott-variable range hopping mechanism. A 2D intra-planar conduction within the GPSS nanostructure was observed, which resulted in effective charge carrier mobility (μ) of 4.7 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 for the QDs and 34.7 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 for the NPLs. The LbL assemblies together with the dimension of the materials (QDs or NPLs) were favorably used for the fine tuning and control of the charge carrier mobility inside the LbL nanostructures. Such 2D charge conduction mechanism and high μ values inside an interlocked multilayered assembly containing graphene-based nanocomposites are of great interest for organic devices and functionalization of interfaces.

  17. Activated Persulfate Oxidation of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA in Groundwater under Acidic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penghua Yin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA is an emerging contaminant of concern due to its toxicity for human health and ecosystems. However, successful degradation of PFOA in aqueous solutions with a cost-effective method remains a challenge, especially for groundwater. In this study, the degradation of PFOA using activated persulfate under mild conditions was investigated. The impact of different factors on persulfate activity, including pH, temperature (25 °C–50 °C, persulfate dosage and reaction time, was evaluated under different experimental conditions. Contrary to the traditional alkaline-activated persulfate oxidation, it was found that PFOA can be effectively degraded using activated persulfate under acidic conditions, with the degradation kinetics following the pseudo-first-order decay model. Higher temperature, higher persulfate dosage and increased reaction time generally result in higher PFOA degradation efficiency. Experimental results show that a PFOA degradation efficiency of 89.9% can be achieved by activated persulfate at pH of 2.0, with the reaction temperature of 50 °C, molar ratio of PFOA to persulfate as 1:100, and a reaction time of 100 h. The corresponding defluorination ratio under these conditions was 23.9%, indicating that not all PFOA decomposed via fluorine removal. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer analysis results indicate that both SO4−• and •OH contribute to the decomposition of PFOA. It is proposed that PFOA degradation occurs via a decarboxylation reaction triggered by SO4−•, followed by a HF elimination process aided by •OH, which produces one-CF2-unit-shortened perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs, Cn−1F2n−1COOH. The decarboxylation and HF elimination processes would repeat and eventually lead to the complete mineralization all PFCAs.

  18. Effect of Oxygen Defects on the Catalytic Performance of VOx/CeO2 Catalysts for Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yan; Wei, Zhehao; Gao, Feng; Kovarik, Libor; Baylon, Rebecca A.; Peden, Charles HF; Wang, Yong

    2015-05-01

    In this work, CeO2 nanocubes with controlled particle size and dominating (100) facets are synthesized as supports for VOx catalysts. Combined TEM, SEM, XRD, and Raman study reveals that the oxygen vacancy density of CeO2 supports can be tuned by tailoring the particle sizes without altering the dominating facets, where smaller particle sizes result in larger oxygen vacancy densities. At the same vanadium coverage, the VOx catalysts supported on small-sized CeO2 supports with higher oxygen defect densities exhibit promoted redox property and lower activation energy for methoxyl group decomposition, as evidenced by H2-TPR and methanol TPD study. These results further confirm that the presence of oxygen vacancies plays an important role in promoting the activity of VOx species in methanol oxidation. We gratefully acknowledge financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. Part of this work was conducted in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for the DOE by Battelle.

  19. Epididymis response partly compensates for spermatozoa oxidative defects in snGPx4 and GPx5 double mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaïs Noblanc

    Full Text Available We report here that spermatozoa of mice lacking both the sperm nucleus glutathione peroxidase 4 (snGPx4 and the epididymal glutathione peroxidase 5 (GPx5 activities display sperm nucleus structural abnormalities including delayed and defective nuclear compaction, nuclear instability and DNA damage. We show that to counteract the GPx activity losses, the epididymis of the double KO animals mounted an antioxydant response resulting in a strong increase in the global H(2O(2-scavenger activity especially in the cauda epididymis. Quantitative RT-PCR data show that together with the up-regulation of epididymal scavengers (of the thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin system as well as glutathione-S-transferases the epididymis of double mutant animals increased the expression of several disulfide isomerases in an attempt to recover normal disulfide-bridging activity. Despite these compensatory mechanisms cauda-stored spermatozoa of double mutant animals show high levels of DNA oxidation, increased fragmentation and greater susceptibility to nuclear decondensation. Nevertheless, the enzymatic epididymal salvage response is sufficient to maintain full fertility of double KO males whatever their age, crossed with young WT female mice.

  20. Epididymis Response Partly Compensates for Spermatozoa Oxidative Defects in snGPx4 and GPx5 Double Mutant Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblanc, Anaïs; Peltier, Manon; Damon-Soubeyrand, Christelle; Kerchkove, Nicolas; Chabory, Eléonore; Vernet, Patrick; Saez, Fabrice; Cadet, Rémi; Janny, Laurent; Pons-Rejraji, Hanae; Conrad, Marcus; Drevet, Joël R.; Kocer, Ayhan

    2012-01-01

    We report here that spermatozoa of mice lacking both the sperm nucleaus glutathione peroxidase 4 (snGPx4) and the epididymal glutathione peroxidase 5 (GPx5) activities display sperm nucleus structural abnormalities including delayed and defective nuclear compaction, nuclear instability and DNA damage. We show that to counteract the GPx activity losses, the epididymis of the double KO animals mounted an antioxydant response resulting in a strong increase in the global H2O2-scavenger activity especially in the cauda epididymis. Quantitative RT-PCR data show that together with the up-regulation of epididymal scavengers (of the thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin system as well as glutathione-S-transferases) the epididymis of double mutant animals increased the expression of several disulfide isomerases in an attempt to recover normal disulfide-bridging activity. Despite these compensatory mechanisms cauda-stored spermatozoa of double mutant animals show high levels of DNA oxidation, increased fragmentation and greater susceptibility to nuclear decondensation. Nevertheless, the enzymatic epididymal salvage response is sufficient to maintain full fertility of double KO males whatever their age, crossed with young WT female mice. PMID:22719900

  1. Semiconductor quantum dot super-emitters: spontaneous emission enhancement combined with suppression of defect environment using metal-oxide plasmonic metafilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Seyed M.; Wing, Waylin J.; Gutha, Rithvik R.; Sharp, Christina

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate that a metal-oxide plasmonic metafilm consisting of a Si/Al oxide junction in the vicinity of a thin gold layer can quarantine excitons in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots against their defect environments. This process happens while the plasmon fields of the gold layer enhance spontaneous emission decay rates of the quantum dots. We study the emission dynamics of such quantum dots when the distance between the Si/Al oxide junction and the gold thin layer is varied. The results show that for distances less than a critical value the lifetime of the quantum dots can be elongated while they experience intense plasmon fields. This suggests that the metal-oxide metafilm can keep photo-excited electrons in the cores of the quantum dots, suppressing their migration to the surface defect sites. This leads to suppression of Auger recombination, offering quantum dot super-emitters with emission that is enhanced not only by the plasmon fields (Purcell effect), but also by strong suppression of the non-radiative decay caused by the defect sites.

  2. Semiconductor quantum dot super-emitters: spontaneous emission enhancement combined with suppression of defect environment using metal-oxide plasmonic metafilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Seyed M; Wing, Waylin J; Gutha, Rithvik R; Sharp, Christina

    2018-01-05

    We demonstrate that a metal-oxide plasmonic metafilm consisting of a Si/Al oxide junction in the vicinity of a thin gold layer can quarantine excitons in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots against their defect environments. This process happens while the plasmon fields of the gold layer enhance spontaneous emission decay rates of the quantum dots. We study the emission dynamics of such quantum dots when the distance between the Si/Al oxide junction and the gold thin layer is varied. The results show that for distances less than a critical value the lifetime of the quantum dots can be elongated while they experience intense plasmon fields. This suggests that the metal-oxide metafilm can keep photo-excited electrons in the cores of the quantum dots, suppressing their migration to the surface defect sites. This leads to suppression of Auger recombination, offering quantum dot super-emitters with emission that is enhanced not only by the plasmon fields (Purcell effect), but also by strong suppression of the non-radiative decay caused by the defect sites.

  3. Deranged Bioenergetics and Defective Redox Capacity in T Lymphocytes and Neutrophils Are Related to Cellular Dysfunction and Increased Oxidative Stress in Patients with Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko-Jen Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary excretion of N-benzoyl-glycyl-Nε-(hexanonyllysine, a biomarker of oxidative stress, was higher in 26 patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE than in 11 non-SLE patients with connective tissue diseases and in 14 healthy volunteers. We hypothesized that increased oxidative stress in active SLE might be attributable to deranged bioenergetics, defective reduction-oxidation (redox capacity, or other factors. We demonstrated that, compared to normal cells, T lymphocytes (T and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN of active SLE showed defective expression of facilitative glucose transporters GLUT-3 and GLUT-6, which led to increased intracellular basal lactate and decreased ATP production. In addition, the redox capacity, including intracellular GSH levels and the enzyme activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px and γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase (GGT, was decreased in SLE-T. Compared to normal cells, SLE-PMN showed decreased intracellular GSH levels, and GGT enzyme activity was found in SLE-PMN and enhanced expression of CD53, a coprecipitating molecule for GGT. We conclude that deranged cellular bioenergetics and defective redox capacity in T and PMN are responsible for cellular immune dysfunction and are related to increased oxidative stress in active SLE patients.

  4. Surface Oxidation of the High-Strength Steels Electrodeposited with Cu or Fe and the Resultant Defect Formation in Their Coating during the Following Galvanizing and Galvannealing Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Il; Beom, Won-Jin; Park, Chan-Jin; Paik, Doojin; Hong, Moon-Hi

    2010-12-01

    This study examined the surface oxidation of high-strength steels electrodeposited with Cu or Fe and the resultant defect formation in their coating during the following galvanizing and galvannealing processes. The high-strength steels were coated with an Cu or Fe layer by the electroplating method. Then, the coated steels were annealed in a reducing atmosphere, dipped in a molten zinc, and finally transformed into galvannealed steels through the galvannealing process. The formation of Si and Mn oxides on the surface of the high-strength steel was effectively suppressed, and the density of surface defects on the galvanized steel was significantly reduced by the pre-electrodeposition of Cu and Fe. This effect was more prominent for the steels electrodeposited at higher cathodic current densities. The finer electrodeposit layer formed at higher cathodic current density on the steels enabled the suppression of partial surface oxidation by Mn or Si and better wetting of Zn on the surface of the steels in the following galvanizing process. Furthermore, the pre-electrodeposited steels exhibited a smoother surface without surface cracks after the galvannealing process compared with the untreated steel. The diffusion of Fe and Zn in the Zn coating layer in the pre-electrodeposited steels appears to occur more uniformly during the galvannealing process due to the low density of surface defects induced by oxides.

  5. Intra-articular injection of synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells and hyaluronic acid promote regeneration of massive cartilage defects in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav Ogay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether intra-articular injection of synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SD MSCs with low molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HA could promote regeneration of massive cartilage in rabbits. Material and methods: The SD MSCs were harvested from the knees of 10 Flemish giant rabbits, expanded in culture, and characterized. A reproducible 4-mm cylindrical defect was created in the intercondylar groove area using a kit for the mosaic chondroplasty of femoral condyle COR (De Puy, Mitek. The defect was made within the cartilage layer without destruction of subchondral bone. Two weeks after the cartilage defect, SD MSCs (2 × 106 cell/0.15 ml were suspended in 0.5% low molecular weight HA (0.15 ml and injected into the left knee, and HA solution (0.30 ml alone was placed into the right knee. Cartilage regeneration in the experimental and control groups were evaluated by macroscopically and histologically at 10, 30, and 60 days. Results: On day 10, after intra-articular injection of SD MSCs, we observed an early process of cartilage regeneration in the defect area. Histological studies revealed that cartilage defect was covered by a thin layer of spindle-shaped undifferentiated cells and proliferated chodroblasts. In contrast, an injection of HA did not induce reparation of cartilage in the defect area. At 30 days, macroscopic observation showed that the size of cartilage defect after SD MSC injection was significantly smaller than after HA injection. Histological score was also better in the MSC- treated intercondylar defect. At 60 days after MSC treatment, cartilage defect was nearly nonexistent and looked similar to an intact cartilage. Conclusion: Thus, intra-articular injection of SD MSCs can adhere to the defect in the intercondylar area, and promote cartilage regeneration in rabbits.

  6. A novel amino acid modification in sulfatases that is defective in multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, B; Selmer, T; Ingendoh, A; von Figura, K

    1995-07-28

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by a decreased activity of all known sulfatases. The deficiency of sulfatases was proposed to result from the lack of a co- or posttranslational modification that is common to all sulfatases and required for their catalytic activity. Structural analysis of two catalytically active sulfatases revealed that a cysteine residue that is predicted from the cDNA sequence and conserved among all known sulfatases is replaced by a 2-amino-3-oxopropionic acid residue, while in sulfatases derived from MSD cells, this cysteine residue is retained. It is proposed that the co- or posttranslational conversion of a cysteine to 2-amino-3-oxopropionic acid is required for generating catalytically active sulfatases and that deficiency of this protein modification is the cause of MSD.

  7. Phytanic acid alpha-oxidation in peroxisomal disorders: studies in cultured human fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, N. M.; Schor, D. S.; Roe, C. R.; Wanders, R. J.; Jakobs, C.

    1997-01-01

    We studied the alpha-oxidation of phytanic acid in human fibroblasts of controls and patients affected with classical Refsum disease, rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata, generalized peroxisomal disorders and peroxisomal bifunctional protein deficiency. Cultured fibroblasts were incubated with

  8. High-efficiency palladium catalysts supported on ppy-modified C60 for formic acid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhengyu; Yang, Lin; Guo, Yuming; Zheng, Zhi; Hu, Chuangang; Xu, Pengle

    2011-02-14

    A facile preparation of polypyrrole-modified fullerene supported Pd nanoparticles catalyst is introduced; electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the obtained Pd/ppy-C(60) catalyst shows a good electrocatalytic activity and stability for the oxidation of formic acid.

  9. Prevention of neural tube defects by the fortification of flour with folic acid: a population-based retrospective study in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Leonor Maria Pacheco; Lecca, Roberto Carlos Reyes; Cortez-Escalante, Juan Jose; Sanchez, Mauro Niskier; Rodrigues, Humberto Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    To determine if the fortification of wheat and maize flours with iron and folic acid - which became mandatory in Brazil from June 2004 - is effective in the prevention of neural tube defects. Using data from national information systems on births in central, south-eastern and southern Brazil, we determined the prevalence of neural tube defects among live births and stillbirths in a pre-fortification period - i.e. 2001-2004 - and in a post-fortification period - i.e. 2005-2014. We distinguished between anencephaly, encephalocele, meningocele, myelomeningocele and other forms of spina bifida. There were 8554 neural tube defects for 17,925,729 live births notified between 2001 and 2014. For the same period, 2673 neural tube defects were reported for 194,858 stillbirths. The overall prevalence of neural tube defects fell from 0.79 per 1000 pre-fortification to 0.55 per 1000 post-fortification (prevalence ratio, PR: 1.43; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.38-1.50). For stillbirths, prevalence fell from 17.74 per 1000 stillbirths pre-fortification to 11.70 per 1000 stillbirths post-fortification. The corresponding values among live births were 0.57 and 0.44, respectively. The introduction of the mandatory fortification of flour with iron and folic acid in Brazil was followed by a significant reduction in the prevalence of neural tube defects in our study area.

  10. Acid-treated TiO2 nanobelt supported platinum nanoparticles for the catalytic oxidation of formaldehyde at ambient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Weiyi; Xue, Dan; Yuan, Xiaoling; Zheng, Bin; Jia, Mingjun; Zhang, Wenxiang

    2017-07-01

    In this work, two kinds of novel Pt/TiO2 catalysts were prepared by impregnation method using hydrothermally synthesized TiO2 nanobelt (TiNB) and sulfuric acid-treated TiO2 nanoblet (TiNB-ac) as supports, and their catalytic properties were investigated in the oxidation of formaldehyde. It was found that Pt/TiNB-ac exhibits much higher catalytic activity, which can efficiently convert formaldehyde to CO2 and H2O at ambient temperature. The addition of water vapor into the feed stream can further promote the catalytic activity of Pt/TiNB-ac catalyst. A variety of characterization results showed that TiNB-ac possesses much rougher surface, and more defect sites (including abundant chemisorbed oxygen and surface hydroxyl species) due to the treatment by sulfuric acid. These features should be beneficial to achieve high dispersion of Pt nanoparticles on the rough-surface of TiNB-ac, to produce more interface active sites like Pt-O(OH)x-Ti species through the interaction between the Pt naoparticles and the surface hydroxyl species of TiNB-ac support, thus resulting in the formation of highly efficient Pt/TiNB-ac catalyst for the oxidation of formaldehyde under mild conditions.

  11. Oxidation of styrene to benzaldehyde/benzoic acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    selectivity.11Due to the availability of dual oxidation states of metal ion, it offers the catalytic behaviour towards oxidation of alcohols and olefins resulting in aldehydes or ketones. Such properties are tuned by changing the counter cation of the polyoxoanions, for example, Co3[Si2W12O40] is a good catalyst in oxida-.

  12. Phytoagents for Cancer Management: Regulation of Nucleic Acid Oxidation, ROS, and Related Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai-Leng Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of oxidized nucleic acids causes genomic instability leading to senescence, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. Phytoagents are known to reduce the risk of cancer development; whether such effects are through regulating the extent of nucleic acid oxidation remains unclear. Here, we outlined the role of reactive oxygen species in nucleic acid oxidation as a driving force in cancer progression. The consequential relationship between genome instability and cancer progression highlights the importance of modulation of cellular redox level in cancer management. Current epidemiological and experimental evidence demonstrate the effects and modes of action of phytoagents in nucleic acid oxidation and provide rationales for the use of phytoagents as chemopreventive or therapeutic agents. Vitamins and various phytoagents antagonize carcinogen-triggered oxidative stress by scavenging free radicals and/or activating endogenous defence systems such as Nrf2-regulated antioxidant genes or pathways. Moreover, metal ion chelation by phytoagents helps to attenuate oxidative DNA damage caused by transition metal ions. Besides, the prooxidant effects of some phytoagents pose selective cytotoxicity on cancer cells and shed light on a new strategy of cancer therapy. The “double-edged sword” role of phytoagents as redox regulators in nucleic acid oxidation and their possible roles in cancer prevention or therapy are discussed in this review.

  13. A novel glutathione-hydroxycinnamic acid product generated in oxidative wine conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzanquet, Quentin; Barril, Celia; Clark, Andrew C; Dias, Daniel A; Scollary, Geoffrey R

    2012-12-12

    This study characterizes a novel glutathione-substituted dihydroxyphenyl compound formed during the oxidation of white wine and model wine solutions, which may contribute to the synergistic role of glutathione and hydroxycinnamic acids in delaying oxidative coloration. The critical components for the formation of the compound were found to be hydroxycinnamic acids and glutathione, while ascorbic acid enabled the product to accumulate to higher concentrations. The presence of the wine components important in other wine oxidation mechanisms, (+)-catechin, ethanol and/or tartaric acid, was not essential for the formation of this new compound. Via LC-MS/MS, HR-MS and (1)H NMR (1D and 2D NMR) analyses, the major isomer of the compound formed from glutathione and caffeic acid was found to be 4-[(E)-2'-(S)-glutathionyl ethenyl]-catechol (GEC). Equivalent products were also confirmed via LC-MS/MS for other hydroxycinnamic acids (i.e., ferulic and coumaric acids). Only trace amounts of GEC were formed with the quinic ester of caffeic acid (i.e., chlorogenic acid), and no equivalent product was found for cinnamic acid. GEC was detected in a variety of white wines supplemented with glutathione and caffeic acid. A radical mechanism for the formation of the styrene-glutathione derivatives is proposed.

  14. Omega-3 fatty acids differentially modulate enzymatic anti-oxidant systems in skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, E P; Nachbar, R T; Levada-Pires, A C; Hirabara, S M; Lambertucci, R H

    2016-01-01

    During physical activity, increased reactive oxygen species production occurs, which can lead to cell damage and in a decline of individual's performance and health. The use of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as a supplement to protect the immune system has been increasing; however, their possible benefit to the anti-oxidant system is not well described. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether the omega-3 fatty acids (docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid) can be beneficial to the anti-oxidant system in cultured skeletal muscle cells. C2C12 myocytes were differentiated and treated with either eicosapentaenoic acid or docosahexaenoic acid for 24 h. Superoxide content was quantified using the dihydroethidine oxidation method and superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activity, and expression was quantified. We observed that the docosahexaenoic fatty acids caused an increase in superoxide production. Eicosapentaenoic acid induced catalase activity, while docosahexaenoic acid suppressed superoxide dismutase activity. In addition, we found an increased protein expression of the total manganese superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes when cells were treated with eicosapentaenoic acid. Taken together, these data indicate that the use of eicosapentaenoic acid may present both acute and chronic benefits; however, the treatment with DHA may not be beneficial to muscle cells.

  15. Microcontact Printing onto Oxide-Free Silicon via Highly Reactive Acid Fluoride-Functionalized Monolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, L.M.W.; Maat, ter J.; Giesbers, M.; Zuilhof, H.

    2010-01-01

    This work describes a new route for patterning organic monolayers on oxide-free silicon by microcontact printing (µCP) on a preformed, reactive, acid-fluoride-terminated monolayer. This indirect printing approach is fast and easily preserves the oxide-free and well-defined monolayer-silicon

  16. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some neutral and acidic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Addition of bromide ion causes decrease in the oxidation rate but only to a limiting value. The reaction is susceptible to both polar and steric effects of the substituents. A suitable mechanism has been propo- sed. Keywords. Amino acid; tetraalkylammonium tribromide; kinetics; mechanism; oxidation. 1. Introduction.

  17. All-trans retinoic acid increases oxidative metabolism in mature adipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mercader, Josep; Madsen, Lise; Felipe, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    ), and to an increased expression of proteins favoring fat oxidation (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha, uncoupling protein 2, fasting-induced adipose factor, enzymes of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation). These changes paralleled inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein and were...

  18. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Oxidation of Menthol by Potassium Bromate in Acidic Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Ravikant na; Ms. Meena; Shrikant Sharma

    2014-01-01

    No suitable method is available for the estimation of menthol, hence in all kinetic results reported in this chapter, menthol was in excess over potassium bromate and the stoichiometry was also determined under the experimental conditions where menthol (substrate) was in excess over potassium bromate (oxidant). Present study was focused on the analysis of kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of neomenthol by potassium bromate in acidic medium. For oxidizing neomenthol, potassium bromate stock ...

  19. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Oxidation of Neomenthol by Potassium Bromate in Acidic Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Ravikant na

    2014-01-01

    Present study was focused on the analysis of kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of neomenthol by potassium bromate in acidic medium. For oxidizing neomenthol, potassium bromate stock solution (5.0×10─2 mol. dm─3) was prepared by dissolving exactly weighed quantity of potassium bromate in doubly distilled water. The suitable reaction mixtures were prepared and left at 313 K for over 24 hours to ensure complete oxidation of neomenthol15. The unreacted potassium bromate was determined iodometri...

  20. Comparison between conjugated linoleic acid and essential fatty acids in preventing oxidative stress in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiricò, L; Morera, P; Dipasquale, D; Tröscher, A; Bernabucci, U

    2017-03-01

    Some in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated protective effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers against oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation. However, only a few and conflicting studies have been conducted showing the antioxidant potential of essential fatty acids. The objectives of the study were to compare the effects of CLA to other essential fatty acids on the thiol redox status of bovine mammary epithelia cells (BME-UV1) and their protective role against oxidative damage on the mammary gland by an in vitro study. The BME-UV1 cells were treated with complete medium containing 50 μM of cis-9,trans-11 CLA, trans-10,cis-12 CLA, α-linolenic acid, γ-linolenic acid, and linoleic acid. To assess the cellular antioxidant response, glutathione, NADPH, and γ-glutamyl-cysteine ligase activity were measured 48 h after addition of fatty acids (FA). Intracellular reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde production were also assessed in cells supplemented with FA. Reactive oxygen species production after 3 h of H2O2 exposure was assessed to evaluate and to compare the potential protection of different FA against H2O2-induced oxidative stress. All FA treatments induced an intracellular GSH increase, matched by high concentrations of NADPH and an increase of γ-glutamyl-cysteine ligase activity. Cells supplemented with FA showed a reduction in intracellular malondialdehyde levels. In particular, CLA isomers and linoleic acid supplementation showed a better antioxidant cellular response against oxidative damage induced by H2O2 compared with other FA. The Authors. Published by the Federation of Animal Science Societies and Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the American Dairy Science Association®. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/).

  1. Importance of doping, dopant distribution, and defects on electronic band structure alteration of metal oxide nanoparticles: Implications for reactive oxygen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, Navid B., E-mail: navid.saleh@utexas.edu [Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Milliron, Delia J. [McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Aich, Nirupam [Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, 14260 (United States); Katz, Lynn E.; Liljestrand, Howard M.; Kirisits, Mary Jo [Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) are considered to have the potency to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), one of the key mechanisms underlying nanotoxicity. However, the nanotoxicology literature demonstrates a lack of consensus on the dominant toxicity mechanism(s) for a particular MONP. Moreover, recent literature has studied the correlation between band structure of pristine MONPs to their ability to introduce ROS and thus has downplayed the ROS-mediated toxicological relevance of a number of such materials. On the other hand, material science can control the band structure of these materials to engineer their electronic and optical properties and thereby is constantly modulating the pristine electronic structure. Since band structure is the fundamental material property that controls ROS-producing ability, band tuning via introduction of dopants and defects needs careful consideration in toxicity assessments. This commentary critically evaluates the existing material science and nanotoxicity literature and identifies the gap in our understanding of the role of important crystal structure features (i.e., dopants and defects) on MONPs' electronic structure alteration as well as their ROS-generation capability. Furthermore, this commentary provides suggestions on characterization techniques to evaluate dopants and defects on the crystal structure and identifies research needs for advanced theoretical predictions of their electronic band structures and ROS-generation abilities. Correlation of electronic band structure and ROS will not only aid in better mechanistic assessment of nanotoxicity but will be impactful in designing and developing ROS-based applications ranging from water disinfection to next-generation antibiotics and even cancer therapeutics. - Highlights: • Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) • Band structure of pristine MONPs is different than those with dopants/defects • Dopants/defects modulate

  2. Stereoselective and nonstereoselective effects of ibuprofen enantiomers on mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freneaux, E.; Fromenty, B.; Berson, A.; Labbe, G.; Degott, C.; Letteron, P.; Larrey, D.; Pessayre, D. (Unite de Recherches de Physiolopathologie Hepatique (INSERM U-24), Hopital Beaujon, Clichy (France))

    1990-11-01

    The effects of the R-(-) and S-(+)ibuprofen enantiomers were first studied in vitro with mouse liver mitochondria incubated in the presence of various concentrations of exogenous coenzyme A. In the presence of a low concentration of coenzyme A (2.5 microM), the R-(-)enantiomer (which forms an acylcoenzyme A) inhibited stereoselectively the beta oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitic acid but not that of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitoyl-L-carnitine (which can directly enter the mitochondria). In the presence, however, of a concentration of coenzyme A (50 microM) reproducing that present in liver cell cytosol, both enantiomers (2 mM) slightly inhibited the beta oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitic acid and markedly inhibited the beta oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)octanoic acid and (1-{sup 14}C)butyric acid. In vivo, both enantiomers (1 mmol.kg-1) similarly inhibited the formation of ({sup 14}C)CO{sub 2} from (1-{sup 14}C)fatty acids. Both enantiomers similarly decreased plasma ketone bodies. Both similarly increased hepatic triglycerides, and both produced mild microvesicular steatosis of the liver. We conclude that both ibuprofen enantiomers inhibit beta oxidation of fatty acids in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the R-(-)enantiomer may stereoselectively sequester coenzyme A; at low concentrations of coenzyme A in vitro, this may stereoselectively inhibit the mitochondrial uptake and beta oxidation of long chain fatty acids.

  3. Compromised mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis in transgenic mice results in defective protein lipoylation and energy disequilibrium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Smith

    Full Text Available A mouse model with compromised mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis has been engineered in order to assess the role of this pathway in mitochondrial function and overall health. Reduction in the expression of mitochondrial malonyl CoA-acyl carrier protein transacylase, a key enzyme in the pathway encoded by the nuclear Mcat gene, was achieved to varying extents in all examined tissues employing tamoxifen-inducible Cre-lox technology. Although affected mice consumed more food than control animals, they failed to gain weight, were less physically active, suffered from loss of white adipose tissue, reduced muscle strength, kyphosis, alopecia, hypothermia and shortened lifespan. The Mcat-deficient phenotype is attributed primarily to reduced synthesis, in several tissues, of the octanoyl precursors required for the posttranslational lipoylation of pyruvate and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes, resulting in diminished capacity of the citric acid cycle and disruption of energy metabolism. The presence of an alternative lipoylation pathway that utilizes exogenous free lipoate appears restricted to liver and alone is insufficient for preservation of normal energy metabolism. Thus, de novo synthesis of precursors for the protein lipoylation pathway plays a vital role in maintenance of mitochondrial function and overall vigor.

  4. Biologically relevant oxidants and terminology, classification and nomenclature of oxidatively generated damage to nucleobases and 2-deoxyribose in nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cadet, Jean; Loft, Steffen; Olinski, Ryszard

    2012-01-01

    A broad scientific community is involved in investigations aimed at delineating the mechanisms of formation and cellular processing of oxidatively generated damage to nucleic acids. Perhaps as a consequence of this breadth of research expertise, there are nomenclature problems for several of the ...

  5. Lipid oxidation in fish oil enriched mayonnaise : Calcium disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate, but not gallic acid, strongly inhibited oxidative deterioration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Thomsen, Mikael Holm

    2001-01-01

    was attributed to its ability to chelate free metal ions and iron from egg yolk located at the oil-water interface. Gallic acid reduced the levels of both free radicals and lipid hydroperoxides but promoted slightly the oxidative flavor deterioration in mayonnaise and influenced the profile of volatiles. Gallic...

  6. Measurement of the rates of oxindole-3-acetic acid turnover, and indole-3-acetic acid oxidation in Zea mays seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonhebel, H. M.; Bandurski, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    Oxindole-3-acetic acid is the principal catabolite of indole-3-acetic acid in Zea mays seedlings. In this paper measurements of the turnover of oxindole-3-acetic acid are presented and used to calculate the rate of indole-3-acetic acid oxidation. [3H]Oxindole-3-acetic acid was applied to the endosperm of Zea mays seedlings and allowed to equilibrate for 24 h before the start of the experiment. The subsequent decrease in its specific activity was used to calculate the turnover rate. The average half-life of oxindole-3-acetic acid in the shoots was found to be 30 h while that in the kernels had an average half-life of 35h. Using previously published values of the pool sizes of oxindole-3-acetic acid in shoots and kernels from seedlings of the same age and variety, and grown under the same conditions, the rate of indole-3-acetic acid oxidation was calculated to be 1.1 pmol plant-1 h-1 in the shoots and 7.1 pmol plant-1 h-1 in the kernels.

  7. DEFECTS IN CERVICAL VERTEBRAE IN BORIC ACID-EXPOSED RAT EMBRYOS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH ANTERIOR SHIFTS OF HOX GENE EXPRESSION DOMAINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defects in cervical vertebrae in boric acid-exposed rat embryos are associated with anterior shifts of hox gene expression domainsNathalie Wery,1 Michael G. Narotsky,2 Nathalie Pacico,1 Robert J. Kavlock,2 Jacques J. Picard,1 AND Francoise Gofflot,1*1Unit of Developme...

  8. Oxidative stability during storage of structured lipids produced from fish oil and caprylic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nina Skall; Xu, Xuebing; Timm Heinrich, Maike

    2004-01-01

    lipid (SFO), produced by enzymatic interesterification from the same oil and caprylic acid, was compared with the stability of FO. Oils were stored at 2degreesC for 11 wk followed by storage at 20degreesC for 6 wk. In addition, the antioxidative effect of adding the metal chelators EDTA or citric acid...... period, and off-flavors were more pronounced in SFO. The lower oxidative stability of SFO was probably related to the initially lower quality (regarding oxidation products), which is apparently a result of the long production procedure required. Addition of metal chelators did not reduce the oxidation...

  9. Palladium(II)/Brønsted Acid-Catalyzed Enantioselective Oxidative Carbocyclization–Borylation of Enallenes**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tuo; Bartholomeyzik, Teresa; Mazuela, Javier; Willersinn, Jochen; Bäckvall, Jan-E

    2015-01-01

    An enantioselective oxidative carbocyclization–borylation of enallenes that is catalyzed by palladium(II) and a Brønsted acid was developed. Biphenol-type chiral phosphoric acids were superior co-catalysts for inducing the enantioselective cyclization. A number of chiral borylated carbocycles were synthesized in high enantiomeric excess. PMID:25808996

  10. Biological iron(II) oxidation as pre-treatment to limestone neutralisation of acid water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maree, JP

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron (II) should be oxidised to iron (III) before the neutralisation of acid water with limestone, otherwise the oxidation will occur downstream of the neutralisation plant with the formation of acid (reactions 1 and 2). This study aimed...

  11. Serum uric acid levels and leukocyte nitric oxide production in multiple sclerosis patients outside relapses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostert, JP; Ramsaransing, GSM; Heerserna, DJ; Heerings, M; Wilczak, N; De Keyser, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: A number of studies found that patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) have low serum levels of uric acid. It is unclear whether this represents a primary deficit or secondary effect. Uric acid is a scavenger of peroxynitrite, which is the product of nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide.

  12. Biochemical Competition Makes Fatty-Acid beta-Oxidation Vulnerable to Substrate Overload

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eunen, Karen; Simons, Sereh M. J.; Gerding, Albert; Bleeker, Aycha; den Besten, Gijs; Touw, Catharina M. L.; Houten, Sander M.; Groen, Bert K.; Krab, Klaas; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Bakker, Barbara M.

    Fatty-acid metabolism plays a key role in acquired and inborn metabolic diseases. To obtain insight into the network dynamics of fatty-acid beta-oxidation, we constructed a detailed computational model of the pathway and subjected it to a fat overload condition. The model contains reversible and

  13. An innovative zinc oxide-coated zeolite adsorbent for removal of humic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinc oxide (ZnO)-coated zeolite adsorbents were developed by both nitric acid modification and Zn(NO3)2•6H2O functionalization of zeolite. The developed adsorbents were used for the removal of humic acid (HA) from aqueous solutions. The adsorption capacity of the adsorbents at 21...

  14. Natural and pyrogenic humic acids at goethite and natural oxide surfaces interacting with phosphate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, T.; Mia, S.; Duhaut, P.B.; Molleman, B.

    2013-01-01

    Fulvic and humic acids have a large variability in binding to metal (hydr) oxide surfaces and interact differently with oxyanions, as examined here experimentally. Pyrogenic humic acid has been included in our study since it will be released to the environment in the case of large-scale application

  15. Skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation is not directly associated with AMPK or ACC2 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Hakam; Holloway, Graham P; Bonen, Arend

    2011-06-01

    Rescue of palmitate-induced insulin resistance has been linked with improvements in fatty acid oxidation, but importantly, not always with concurrently altered AMPK or ACC2 phosphorylation. Therefore, we examined the interrelationships among AMPK, ACC2, and fatty acid oxidation under 12 controlled conditions in isolated muscle. Incubation of soleus muscle (0-12 h) did not alter fatty acid oxidation, but did increase AMPK and ACC2 phosphorylation (24%-30%). Muscle incubation with palmitate (2 mmol·L(-1)) inhibited palmitate oxidation (∼55%), but paradoxically, this was associated with increased AMPK and ACC2 phosphorylation (∼50%). Addition of an AMPK activator (thujone) to control (no palmitate) muscle increased AMPK and ACC2 phosphorylation (∼25%) but did not alter palmitate oxidation. Addition of AMPK inhibitors, compound C (50 µmol·L(-1)) or adenine 9-β-d-arabinofuranoside (Ara; 2.5 mmol·L(-1)), to thujone-treated muscles (no palmitate) did not alter palmiate oxidation but reduced AMPK phosphorylation (32%-42%), while ACC2 phosphorylation remained above basal level (+14%-18%). Finally, in palmitate-treated muscle, thujone increased AMPK (+100%) and ACC2 phosphorylation (+52%) and restored palmitate oxidation. Compound C or Ara, administered along with thujone in palmitate-treated muscle, only partly blunted palmitate oxidation recovery despite inhibiting AMPK phosphorylation (-22%), although ACC2 phosphorylation remained upregulated (+33%). Among these experiments, AMPK phosphorylation and ACC2 phosphorylation were positively correlated. However, AMPK phosphorylation was not correlated with palmitate oxidation, and unexpectedly, palmitate oxidation was negatively correlated with ACC2 phosphorylation. Our study, in accordance with a growing body of evidence, indicates that neither AMPK phosphorylation nor ACC2 phosphorylation is by itself an appropriate marker of fatty acid oxidation, and further serves to question their regulatory role.

  16. Fatty acids, lipid and protein oxidation, metmyoglobin reducing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of chronic diseases in humans substantiates efforts to modify its lipid profile. ... the lipid profile of ruminant meat could affect its quality attributes and shelf life. ... colour, metmyoglobin reducing activity (MRA) and lipid and protein oxidation in ...

  17. An environment-friendly preparation of reduced graphene oxide nanosheets via amino acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dezhi; Li, Lidong; Guo, Lin

    2011-08-12

    Chemically modified graphene has been studied in many applications due to its excellent electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Among the chemically modified graphenes, reduced graphene oxide is the most important for its structure and properties, which are similar to pristine graphene. Here, we introduce an environment-friendly approach for preparation of reduced graphene oxide nanosheets through the reduction of graphene oxide that employs L-cysteine as the reductant under mild reaction conditions. The conductivity of the reduced graphene oxide nanosheets produced in this way increases by about 10(6) times in comparison to that of graphene oxide. This is the first report about using amino acids as a reductant for the preparation of reduced graphene oxide nanosheets, and this procedure offers an alternative route to large-scale production of reduced graphene oxide nanosheets for applications that require such material.

  18. Densification of ∼5 nm-thick SiO2 layers by nitric acid oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Joo, Soyeong; Park, Tae Joo; Kim, Woo-Byoung

    2017-08-01

    Low-temperature nitric acid (HNO3) oxidation of Si (NAOS) has been used to improve the interface and electrical properties of ∼5 nm-thick SiO2/Si layers produced by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Investigations of the physical properties and electrical characteristics of these thin films revealed that although their thickness is not changed by NAOS, the leakage current density at a gate bias voltage of -1 V decreases by about two orders of magnitude from 1.868 × 10-5 A/cm2. This leakage current density was further reduced by post-metallization annealing (PMA) at 250 °C for 10 min in a 5 vol.% hydrogen atmosphere, eventually reaching a level (5.2 × 10-8 A/cm2) approximately three orders of magnitude less than the as-grown SiO2 layer. This improvement is attributed to a decrease in the concentration of suboxide species (Si1+, Si2+ and Si3+) in the SiO2/Si interface, as well as a decrease in the equilibrium density of defect sites (Nd) and fixed charge density (Nf). The barrier height (Vt) generated by a Poole-Frenkel mechanism also increased from 0.205 to 0.371 eV after NAOS and PMA. The decrease in leakage current density is therefore attributed to a densification of the SiO2 layer in combination with the removal of OH species and increase in interfacial properties at the SiO2/Si interface.

  19. Cardiac fatty acid oxidation in heart failure associated with obesity and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Arata; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2016-10-01

    Obesity and diabetes are major public health problems, and are linked to the development of heart failure. Emerging data highlight the importance of alterations in cardiac energy metabolism as a major contributor to cardiac dysfunction related to obesity and diabetes. Increased rates of fatty acid oxidation and decreased rates of glucose utilization are two prominent changes in cardiac energy metabolism that occur in obesity and diabetes. This metabolic profile is probably both a cause and consequence of a prominent cardiac insulin resistance, which is accompanied by a decrease in both cardiac function and efficiency, and by the accumulation of potentially toxic lipid metabolites in the heart that can further exaggerate insulin resistance and cardiac dysfunction. The high cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates seen in obesity and diabetes are attributable to several factors, including: 1) increased fatty acid supply and uptake into the cardiomyocyte, 2) increased transcription of fatty acid metabolic enzymes, 3) decreased allosteric control of mitochondrial fatty acid uptake and fatty acid oxidation, and 4) increased post-translational acetylation control of various fatty acid oxidative enzymes. Emerging evidence suggests that therapeutic approaches aimed at switching the balance of cardiac energy substrate preference from fatty acid oxidation to glucose use can prevent cardiac dysfunction associated with obesity and diabetes. Modulating acetylation control of fatty acid oxidative enzymes is also a potentially attractive strategy, although presently this is limited to precursors of nicotinamide adenine or nonspecific activators of deacetylation such as resveratrol. This review will focus on the metabolic alterations in the heart that occur in obesity and diabetes, as well as on the molecular mechanisms controlling these metabolic changes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  20. Hydroxyapatite formation on graphene oxide modified with amino acids: arginine versus glutamic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavafoghi, M.; Brodusch, N.; Gauvin, R.; Cerruti, M.

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA, Ca5(PO4)3OH) is the main inorganic component of hard tissues, such as bone and dentine. HA nucleation involves a set of negatively charged phosphorylated proteins known as non-collagenous proteins (NCPs). These proteins attract Ca2+ and PO43− ions and increase the local supersaturation to a level required for HA precipitation. Polar and charged amino acids (AAs) are highly expressed in NCPs, and seem to be responsible for the mineralizing effect of NCPs; however, the individual effect of these AAs on HA mineralization is still unclear. In this work, we investigate the effect of a negatively charged (Glu) and positively charged (Arg) AA bound to carboxylated graphene oxide (CGO) on HA mineralization in simulated body fluids (SBF). Our results show that Arg induces HA precipitation faster and in larger amounts than Glu. We attribute this to the higher stability of the complexes formed between Arg and Ca2+ and PO43− ions, and also to the fact that Arg exposes both carboxyl and amino groups on the surface. These can electrostatically attract both Ca2+ and PO43− ions, thus increasing local supersaturation more than Glu, which exposes carboxyl groups only. PMID:26791001

  1. Hydroxyapatite formation on graphene oxide modified with amino acids: arginine versus glutamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavafoghi, M; Brodusch, N; Gauvin, R; Cerruti, M

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA, Ca5(PO4)3OH) is the main inorganic component of hard tissues, such as bone and dentine. HA nucleation involves a set of negatively charged phosphorylated proteins known as non-collagenous proteins (NCPs). These proteins attract Ca(2+) and PO4(3-) ions and increase the local supersaturation to a level required for HA precipitation. Polar and charged amino acids (AAs) are highly expressed in NCPs, and seem to be responsible for the mineralizing effect of NCPs; however, the individual effect of these AAs on HA mineralization is still unclear. In this work, we investigate the effect of a negatively charged (Glu) and positively charged (Arg) AA bound to carboxylated graphene oxide (CGO) on HA mineralization in simulated body fluids (SBF). Our results show that Arg induces HA precipitation faster and in larger amounts than Glu. We attribute this to the higher stability of the complexes formed between Arg and Ca(2+) and PO4(3-) ions, and also to the fact that Arg exposes both carboxyl and amino groups on the surface. These can electrostatically attract both Ca(2+) and PO4(3-) ions, thus increasing local supersaturation more than Glu, which exposes carboxyl groups only. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. The utilization of oil palm fronds in producing oxalic acid through oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulina, Seri; Rahmadi, Ihwan

    2017-08-01

    As one of the solid waste generated by palm oil plantations, Oil Palm Fronds have the potential to be further processed into useful products since the presence of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Hence, the objective of this study was to utilize oil palm fronds in producing oxalic acid through oxidation process using. To achieve the objective, this study assessed conversion of cellulose, yield and quality of oxalic acid produced. Two stages are carried out, namely oxidation and crystallization. Assays on raw materials revealed the cellulose content of 29.2 percent. The largest yield of oxalic acid was 43.31 percent, the highest conversion of cellulose was 58.86 percent. FTIR and melting point analysis were employed in this study. These analyses indicated that the functional groups have reached the standard of oxalic acid with a melting point of 102.1 °C, which showed that the oxalic acid obtained was oxalic acid dehydrate.

  3. Ferrous iron oxidation by molecular oxygen under acidic conditions: The effect of citrate, EDTA and fulvic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Adele M.; Griffin, Philippa J.; Waite, T. David

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the rates of Fe(II) oxidation by molecular oxygen in the presence of citrate, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) were determined over the pH range 4.0-5.5 and, for all of the ligands investigated, found to be substantially faster than oxidation rates in the absence of any ligand. EDTA was found to be particularly effective in enhancing the rate of Fe(II) oxidation when sufficient EDTA was available to complex all Fe(II) present in solution, with a kinetic model of the process found to adequately describe all results obtained. When Fe(II) was only partially complexed by EDTA, reactions with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and heterogeneous Fe(II) oxidation were found to contribute significantly to the removal rate of iron from solution at different stages of oxidation. This was possible due to the rapid rate at which EDTA enhanced Fe(II) oxidation and formed ROS and Fe(III). The rapid rate of Fe(III) generation facilitated the formation of free ferric ion activities in excess of those required for ferric oxyhydroxide precipitation following Fe(III)-EDTA dissociation. In comparison, the rate of Fe(II) oxidation was slower in the presence of citrate, and therefore the concentrations of free Fe(III) able to form in the initial stages of Fe(II) oxidation were much lower than those formed in the presence of EDTA, despite the resultant Fe(III)-citrate complex being less stable than that of Fe(III)-EDTA. The slower rate of citrate enhanced oxidation also resulted in slower rates of ROS generation, and, as such, oxidation of the remaining inorganic Fe(II) species by ROS was negligible. Overall, this study demonstrates that organic ligands may substantially enhance the rate of Fe(II) oxidation. Even under circumstances where the ligand is not present at sufficient concentrations to complex all of the Fe(II) in solution, ensuing oxidative processes may sustain an enhanced rate of Fe(II) oxidation relative to that of

  4. Serum lipid resistance to oxidation and uric acid levels in subjects with Down's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagyová, A; Sustrová, M; Raslová, K

    2000-01-01

    In subjects with Down's syndrome (DS) increased oxidative stress and consequent oxidative cell damage have been reported. The aim of this study was to assess whether the excessive production of free oxygen radicals in these subjects can affect the copper-induced lipid oxidation resistance measured in fresh whole serum. Since a significant elevation of serum uric acid levels, which is an efficient hydrophilic antioxidant, has been repeatedly reported in subjects with DS, we studied the association between increased serum uric acid levels and lipid resistance to oxidation measured directly in serum samples by monitoring the change in absorbance at 234 nm. The group of subjects with Down's syndrome consisted of 25 individuals (aged 18+/-5 years). Control group included brothers and sisters of subjects with DS (n = 25, aged 17+/-7 years). In subjects with DS, the serum lipid resistance to oxidation (lag time) was significantly higher than in controls (puric acid levels was observed (puric acid concentration was found in subjects with DS (r = 0.48, puric acid levels repeatedly observed in subjects with DS may be associated with an enhanced resistance of serum lipids to oxidation which is thought to play an important role in the atherogenic process.

  5. Influence of pH-control in phosphoric acid treatment of zinc oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoda, H., E-mail: onoda@kpu.ac.jp [Department of Informatics and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto Prefectural University (Japan); Chemel, M. [Ecole de Biologie Industrielle, CERGY Cedex (France)

    2017-04-15

    Zinc oxide is often used as a white pigment for cosmetics; however, it shows photocatalytic activity that causes decomposition of sebum on the skin when exposed to the ultraviolet radiation in sunlight. In this work, zinc oxide was reacted with phosphoric acid at various pH values to synthesize a novel white pigment for cosmetics. The chemical composition, powder properties, photocatalytic activities, colors, and smoothness of these pigments were studied. The obtained materials exhibited X-ray diffraction peaks relating to zinc oxide and phosphate after phosphoric acid treatment. The ratio of zinc phosphate to zinc oxide was estimated from inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy results. Samples treated at pH 4-7 yielded small particles with sub-micrometer sizes. The photocatalytic activity of zinc oxide became lower after phosphoric acid treatment. Samples treated at pH 4-7 showed the same reflectance as zinc oxide in both the ultraviolet and visible ranges. Adjustment of the pH was found to be important in the phosphoric acid treatment of zinc oxide. (author)

  6. Lipid oxidation and fatty acid composition in salt-dried yellow croaker ( Pseudosciaena polyactis) during processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qiuxing; Wu, Yanyan; Li, Laihao; Wang, Yueqi; Yang, Xianqing; Zhao, Yongqiang

    2017-10-01

    Lipid oxidation in salt-dried yellow croaker ( Pseudosciaena polyactis) was evaluated during processing with commonly used analytical indices, such as the peroxide value (POV), the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) value, and oxidative-relative lipoxygenase (LOX) activity. Additionally, fatty acids were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Both POV and TBARS increased significantly ( P lipid oxidation. C18:0, C16:1n7, C19:0, and C22:6n3 showed clear changes in principle component one of a principle components analysis. These fatty acids are potential markers for evaluating lipid oxidation in fish muscle because there was a significant correlation between these markers and TBARS and LOX activity ( P 0.931.

  7. Kinetic and Mechanism of Oxidation of Oxalic Acid by Cerium (IV)

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Ammar J. Mohammed

    2005-01-01

    Kinetic and mechanism studies of the oxidation of oxalic acid by Cerium sulphate have been carried out in acid medium sulphuric acid. The uv- vis. Spectrophotometric technique was used to follow up the reaction and the selected wavelength to be followed was 320 nm. The kinetic study showed that the order of reaction is first order in Ce(IV) and fractional in oxalic acid. The effect of using different concentration of sulphuric acid on the rate of the reaction has been studied a and it was fou...

  8. the roles of gastric acid and nitric oxide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Fujishita, T., Furutani, K and Okabe, S. (2003):. Pharmacological control of gastric acid secretion for the treatment of acid-related peptic disease: past, present and future. Pharmacol. Ther. 98:109-127. Amure, B.O., and Ginsburg, M. (1964). Inhibitors of histamine catabolism and the action of gastrin in the rat. Br. J. Pharmacol.

  9. Oxidation of aromatic alcohols on zeolite-encapsulated copper amino acid complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, S.; Teixeira Florencio, J.M. [Kaiserslautern Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry, Chemical Technology

    1998-12-31

    Copper complexes of the amino acids histidine, arginine and lysine have been introduced into the supercages of zeolite Y and, for the first time, into the large intracrystalline cavities of zeolites EMT and MCM-22. The resulting host/guest compounds are characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, UV/VIS-spectroscopy in the diffuse reflectance mode and by catalytic tests in the liquid-phase oxidation of aromatic alcohols (viz. benzyl alcohol, 2- and 3-methylbenzyl alcohol and 2,5-dimethylbenzyl alcohol) with tertiary-butylhydroperoxide as oxidant. It was observed that intracrystalline copper-amino acid complexes possess remarkable catalytic activity, yielding the corresponding aromatic aldehydes and acids. (orig.)

  10. Novel Approach: Tungsten Oxide Nanoparticle as a Catalyst for Malonic Acid Ester Synthesis via Ozonolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal A. Wasmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malonic acid ester was synthesized via the one-step ozonolysis of palm olein. Malonic acid ester was spectroscopically characterized using gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GC-MS. Tungsten oxide nanoparticles were used as the catalyst, which was characterized via X-ray powder diffraction (XRD and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM. Tungsten oxide provided several advantages as a catalyst for the esterification malonic acid such as simple operation for a precise ozonation method, an excellent yield of approximately 10%, short reaction times of 2 h, and reusability due to its recyclability.

  11. Environmental Enteric Dysfunction is Associated with Carnitine Deficiency and Altered Fatty Acid Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D. Semba

    2017-03-01

    Interpretation: EED is a syndrome characterized by secondary carnitine deficiency, abnormal fatty acid oxidation, alterations in polyphenol and amino acid metabolites, and metabolic dysregulation of sulfur amino acids, tryptophan, and the urea cycle. Future studies are needed to corroborate the presence of secondary carnitine deficiency among children with EED and to understand how these metabolic derangements may negatively affect the growth and development of young children.

  12. Preparation and characterization of dialdehyde starch by one-step acid hydrolysis and oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yingfeng; Liu, Wenjie; Xiao, Junhua; Zhao, Xing; Zhu, Ying; Wu, Yiqiang

    2017-10-01

    Dialdehyde starch was prepared by one-step synthesis of acid hydrolysis and oxidation, using corn starch as the raw material, sodium periodate (NaIO4) as the oxidant, and hydrochloric acid (HCl) as the acid solution. The prepared dialdehyde starch was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The results confirmed that oxidation occurred between the starch and NaIO4. The acid hydrolysis reaction reduced the molecular weight of starch and effectively improved the aldehyde group contents (92.7%). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis indicated that the average particle size decreased after acid hydrolysis and oxidation reaction. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermal gravimetric analyzer (TGA) analysis demonstrated that the crystallinity of the obtained dialdehyde starch showed a downward trend and a decelerated thermal decomposition rate. The starch after acid hydrolysis and oxidation exhibited lower hot paste viscosity and higher reactivity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Application of titanium oxide nanotube films containing gold nanoparticles for the electroanalytical determination of ascorbic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini, Mir Ghasem, E-mail: mg-hosseini@tabrizu.ac.ir; Faraji, Masoud; Momeni, Mohamad Mohsen

    2011-03-31

    Au/TiO{sub 2}/Ti electrodes have been prepared by galvanic deposition of gold particles on TiO{sub 2} nanotube substrates. Titanium oxide nanotubes are fabricated by anodizing titanium foil in a Dimethyl Sulfoxide electrolyte containing fluoride. The scanning electron microscopy results indicated that gold particles are homogeneously deposited on the surface of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes. The TiO{sub 2} layers consist of individual tubes of about 40-80 nm diameters. The electro-catalytic behavior of Au/TiO{sub 2}/Ti and flat gold electrodes for the ascorbic acid electro-oxidation was studied by cyclic voltammetry. The results showed that the flat gold electrode is not suitable for the oxidation of ascorbic acid. However, the Au/TiO{sub 2}/Ti electrodes are shown to possess catalytic activity toward the oxidation reaction. Catalytic oxidation peak current showed a linear dependence on the ascorbic acid concentration and a linear calibration curve is obtained in the concentration range of 1-5 mM of ascorbic acid. Also, determination of ascorbic acid in real samples was evaluated. The obtained results were found to be satisfactory. Finally the effects of interference on the detection of ascorbic acid were investigated.

  14. Study of the kinetic behavior of mandelic acid oxidation by vanadium(V in sulfuric acid medium: effect of CTAB presence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo Augusto Ando

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The mandelic acid oxidation by vanadium (V in sulfuric acid medium was studied at 303 K. The reaction rate was determined spectrophotometrically by means of the formation of vanadium (IV at 760 nm. The oxidation reaction showed first order dependence in terms of vanadium (VThe mandelic acid oxidation by vanadium (V in sulfuric acid medium was studied at 303 K. The reaction rate was determined spectrophotometrically by means of the formation of vanadium (IV at 760 nm. The oxidation reaction showed first order dependence in terms of vanadium (V.

  15. Empirical Modeling of Iron Oxide Dissolution in Sulphuric and Hydrochloric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmelmann, Jan C.; Xu, Hao; Krumm, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    A new approach is presented to an empirical modeling of chemical pickling processes, based on the activation energy of oxide dissolution in hydrochloric acid (HCl) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). The model allows us to calculate pickling times as a function of definite parameters. The main oxide layers on hot-rolled materials are magnetite (Fe3O4), hematite (Fe2O3), and wustite (FeO). On the laboratory scale, the activation energy of each oxide has been determined. FeO is a metastable oxide and has been produced based on magnetite powder in a H2/H2O atmosphere. The oxide powders used for the experimental procedure have been analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction to insure the proper stoichiometry and composition. The model allows us to calculate the time of oxide dissolution based on the parameters temperature, acid concentration, and the composition of the oxide layer. Calculated values are verified by surface potential measurement on industrial oxide layers. The hot-rolled material used for verification is low carbon steel. A comparison between calculated pickling times and experimental data will be presented.

  16. Isolation of Bacteriophage T4 Mutants Defective in the Ability to Degrade Host Deoxyribonucleic Acid 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Huber R.; Snustad, D. Peter; Jorgensen, Sally E.; Koerner, James F.

    1970-01-01

    A method was devised for identifying nonlethal mutants of T4 bacteriophage which lack the capacity to induce degradation of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of their host, Escherichia coli. If a culture is infected in a medium containing hydroxyurea (HU), a compound that blocks de novo deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis by interacting with ribonucleotide reductase, mutant phage that cannot establish the alternate pathway of deoxyribonucleotide production from bacterial DNA will fail to produce progeny. The progeny of 100 phages that survived heavy mutagenesis with hydroxylamine were tested for their ability to multiply in the presence of HU. Four of the cultures lacked this capacity. Cells infected with one of these mutants, designated T4nd28, accumulated double-stranded fragments of host DNA with a molecular weight of approximately 2 × 108 daltons. This mutant failed to induce T4 endonuclease II, an enzyme known to produce single-strand breaks in double-stranded cytosine-containing DNA. The properties of nd28 give strong support to an earlier suggestion that T4 endonuclease II participates in host DNA degradation. The nd28 mutation mapped between T4 genes 32 and 63 and was very close to the latter gene. It is, thus, in the region of the T4 map that is occupied by genes for a number of other enzymes, including deoxycytidylate deaminase, thymidylate synthetase, dihydrofolate reductase, and ribonucleotide reductase, that are nonessential to phage production in rich media. PMID:4914096

  17. High activity of Pt(4)Mo alloy for the electrochemical oxidation of formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojković, Snezana Lj; Tripković, Amalija V; Stevanović, Rade M; Krstajić, Nedeljko V

    2007-12-04

    Surface processes on Pt4Mo alloy well-defined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were studied in acid solution by cyclic voltammetry. It was established that Mo in the alloy is much more resistant toward electrochemical dissolution than pure Mo. During the potential cycling of Pt4Mo surfaces in completely quiescent electrolyte, hydrous Mo-oxide could be generated on Mo sites. Investigation of the formic acid oxidation revealed that this type of Mo-oxide enhances the reaction rate by more than 1 order of magnitude with respect to pure Pt. Surface poisoning by CO(ads) is significantly lower on Pt4Mo alloy than on pure Pt. The effect of hydrous Mo-oxide on the HCOOH oxidation rate was explained through the facilitated removal of the poisoning species and through its possible influence on the intrinsic rate of the direct reaction path.

  18. Protective effect of periconceptional folic acid supplements on the risk of congenital heart defects: a registry-based case-control study in the northern Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beynum, Ingrid M; Kapusta, Livia; Bakker, Marian K; den Heijer, Martin; Blom, Henk J; de Walle, Hermien E K

    2010-02-01

    To investigate the potentially protective of periconceptional folic acid use on the risk of congenital heart defects (CHDs) relative to other non-folate related malformations. We analysed data from a large regional register of birth defects (EUROCAT-Northern Netherlands), over a 10 year period (1996-2005) for a case-control study. The cases were mothers who had delivered infants with isolated or complex heart defects, without any related syndrome or genetic abnormality (n = 611). We used two control groups; one from the EUROCAT database and another from the general population. The registry controls consisted of mothers of children with a known chromosomal or genetic defect, and with infants with other non-folate related congenital malformations (n = 2401). Additional folic acid was taken as a single supplement or as a multivitamin containing folic acid in a dose of >or=400 microg daily. Mothers who had used folate antagonists or who had diabetes, and mothers of children with oral clefts, hypospadias, limb reduction- or neural tube defects, were excluded from both groups. Potentially confounding factors of periconceptional folic acid use in relation to CHD were explored, including baby's birth year, maternal body mass index, education, maternal age at delivery of index baby, smoking behaviour, and alcohol use during pregnancy. Periconceptional folic acid use revealed an odds ratio (OR) of 0.82 (95% CI 0.68-0.98) for all types of CHD relative to other malformations. The estimated relative risk for CHDs of additional folic acid use compared with the general population was comparable [OR 0.74 (95%CI 0.62-0.88)]. Subgroup analysis showed an OR of 0.62 (95% CI 0.47-0.82) for isolated septal defects. The proportions of the potential confounders between mothers of case and control infants did not differ significantly. Our results support the hypothesis that additional periconceptional folic acid use reduces CHD risk in infants. Use of periconceptional folic acid

  19. Kinetics and mechanism of N-chlorosaccharin oxidation of malic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kumar Singh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic study of N-chlorosaccharin (NCSA oxidation of malic acid (MA in aqueous acetic acid medium in presence of perchloric acid has been investigated. The reactions exhibit first-order dependency in oxidant and HClO4 while order varies from one to zero in substrate. The reactions are acid catalyzed and retarded by the addition of saccharin, a byproduct of reaction. The rate of oxidation decreases with decrease in dielectric constant of the medium. The effect of temperature on the reaction has been investigated in the temperature range 313-333 K. The stochiometric studies revealed 1:1 mole ratio. Various thermodynamic parameters have been computed and a possible operative mechanism is proposed.

  20. Oxidative stability of structured lipids produced from sunflower oil and caprylic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timm Heinrich, Maike; Xu, Xuebing; Nielsen, Nina Skall

    2003-01-01

    Traditional sunflower oil (SO), randomized lipid (RL) and specific structured lipid (SL), both produced from SO and tricaprylin/caprylic acid, respectively, were stored for up to 12 wk to compare their oxidative stabilities by chemical and sensory analyses. Furthermore, the effect of adding...... and differences in production/purification, which caused lower tocopherol content and higher initial levels of primary and secondary oxidation products in SL compared with RL and SO. Grindox 117 and gallic acid did not exert a distinct antioxidative effect in the SL oil samples during storage...... a commercial antioxidant blend Grindox 117 (propyl gallate/citric acid/ascorbyl palmitate) or gallic acid to the SL was investigated. The lipid type affected the oxidative stability: SL was less stable than SO and RL. The reduced stability was most likely caused by both the structure of the lipid...

  1. Chemoproteomic Profiling of Acetanilide Herbicides Reveals Their Role in Inhibiting Fatty Acid Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counihan, Jessica L; Duckering, Megan; Dalvie, Esha; Ku, Wan-Min; Bateman, Leslie A; Fisher, Karl J; Nomura, Daniel K

    2017-03-17

    Acetanilide herbicides are among the most widely used pesticides in the United States, but their toxicological potential and mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we have used chemoproteomic platforms to map proteome-wide cysteine reactivity of acetochlor (AC), the most widely used acetanilide herbicide, in vivo in mice. We show that AC directly reacts with >20 protein targets in vivo in mouse liver, including the catalytic cysteines of several thiolase enzymes involved in mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. We show that the fatty acids that are not oxidized, due to impaired fatty acid oxidation, are instead diverted into other lipid pathways, resulting in heightened free fatty acids, triglycerides, cholesteryl esters, and other lipid species in the liver. Our findings show the utility of chemoproteomic approaches for identifying novel mechanisms of toxicity associated with environmental chemicals like acetanilide herbicides.

  2. Impact of Association Colloids on Lipid Oxidation in Triacylglycerols and Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Rika; Suzuki, Karin; Cui, Leqi; McClements, David Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2015-11-25

    The impact of association colloids on lipid oxidation in triacylglycerols and fatty acid ethyl esters was investigated. Association colloids did not affect lipid oxidation of high oleic safflower and high linoleic safflower triacylglycerols, but were prooxidative in fish triacylglycerols. Association colloids retarded aldehyde formation in stripped ethyl oleate, linoleate, and fish oil ethyl esters. Interfacial tension revealed that lipid hydroperoxides were surface active in the presence of the surfactants found in association colloids. The lipid hydroperoxides from ethyl esters were less surface active than triacylglycerol hydroperoxides. Stripping decreased iron and copper concentrations in all oils, but more so in fatty acid ethyl esters. The combination of lower hydroperoxide surface activity and low metal concentrations could explain why association colloids inhibited lipid oxidation in fatty acid ethyl esters. This research suggests that association colloids could be used as an antioxidant technology in fatty acid ethyl esters.

  3. Fatty Acid Oxidation and Cardiovascular Risk during Menopause: A Mitochondrial Connection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo J. Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is a consequence of the normal aging process in women. This fact implies that the physiological and biochemical alterations resulting from menopause often blur with those from the aging process. It is thought that menopause in women presents a higher risk for cardiovascular disease although the precise mechanism is still under discussion. The postmenopause lipid profile is clearly altered, which can present a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Due to the role of mitochondria in fatty acid oxidation, alterations of the lipid profile in the menopausal women will also influence mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation fluxes in several organs. In this paper, we propose that alterations of mitochondrial bioenergetics in the heart, consequence from normal aging and/or from the menopausal process, result in decreased fatty acid oxidation and accumulation of fatty acid intermediates in the cardiomyocyte cytosol, resulting in lipotoxicity and increasing the cardiovascular risk in the menopausal women.

  4. Oxidative acid treatment and characterization of new biocarbon from sustainable Miscanthus biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anstey, Andrew [Bioproducts Discovery and Development Centre (BDDC), Department of Plant Agriculture, Crop Science Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); School of Engineering, Thornbrough Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); Vivekanandhan, Singaravelu [Bioproducts Discovery and Development Centre (BDDC), Department of Plant Agriculture, Crop Science Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); Sustainable Materials and Nanotechnology Lab, Department of Physics, VHNSN College, Virudhunagar 626 001, Tamilnadu (India); Rodriguez-Uribe, Arturo [Bioproducts Discovery and Development Centre (BDDC), Department of Plant Agriculture, Crop Science Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); Misra, Manjusri [Bioproducts Discovery and Development Centre (BDDC), Department of Plant Agriculture, Crop Science Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); School of Engineering, Thornbrough Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); Mohanty, Amar Kumar, E-mail: mohanty@uoguelph.ca [Bioproducts Discovery and Development Centre (BDDC), Department of Plant Agriculture, Crop Science Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); School of Engineering, Thornbrough Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada)

    2016-04-15

    Oxidative acid treatments of biochar produced from Miscanthus were performed in this study using nitric acid, sulfuric acid, and a mixture of both. The structural and morphological changes of the acid-treated biochar were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, organic elemental analysis and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Improved surface functionality of the treated biochars was observed in their respective FT-IR spectra through the presence of nitro and carboxylic acid functional groups. SEM–EDS and elemental analysis revealed a large increase in the oxygen to carbon ratio in the biochar, which was evidence of chemical oxidation from the acid treatment. Further, TGA study showed the reduced thermal stability of acid-treated biochar over 200 °C due to the increased oxygen content. Acid treatments also influenced the graphitic structure of the biochar, as observed in the Raman spectra. The results suggest that biochar can be successfully functionalized for composite applications and provide a sustainable alternative to petroleum-based carbon additives. - Highlights: • Biochar was investigated as a candidate for renewable functionalized carbon. • Oxidative acid treatment was used to modify the carbon structure. • The chemical and morphological properties of the treated biochar were examined. • Successful chemical modification of biochar was verified through characterization. • Biochar shows potential as a sustainable carbon additive for polymer composites.

  5. Role Of Ascorbic Acid In Imparting Tolerance To Plants Against Oxidizing Pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Sharma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ascorbic acid is an antioxidant in plants which play important role in activation of many physiological and defense mechanisms. The level of ascorbic acid in plants is determinant of its tolerance against the adverse effect of oxidizing pollutants. The present study tries to relate the variation in ascorbic acid content with the tolerance and sensitivity of two selected plant species viz. Azadirachtaindica and Pongamiapinnata by calculating their Air Pollution Tolerance Index APTI during winter season from November to March in the urban city Delhi of North India. Moreover ascorbic acid is also an important part of chloroplast it protects different components of photosynthetic system from oxidative stress. Thus to understand the role of ascorbic acid in imparting tolerance to plants against oxidizing pollutants the changes in chlorophyll content of the selected plant species with variation in ambient ozone concentration was analysed. It was found that as per APTI values Azadirachta sp. came under tolerant range with highest ascorbic acid content whereas Pongamia sp. was under intermediate range with less ascorbic acid content. It was statistically established that ozone has no significant relation with chlorophyll content of Azadirachta sp. which has the highest ascorbic acid content. Whereas ambient ozone concentrations showed significant negative relation with the chlorophyll content of Pongamia sp. p 0.05. Thus it was observed that the plants with high ascorbic acid content are tolerant and have greater ability to remediate pollutants.

  6. Effects of folic acid supplementation during different pregnancy periods and relationship with the other primary prevention measures to neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Rui; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Wang, Meng; Gao, Li-Jie; Zhao, Zhong-Tang

    2016-12-01

    To find out the prevention effects of folic acid supplements during different pregnancy periods on neural tube defects (NTDs) and the relationship of folic acid supplements with the other NTDs' primary preventive measures. A 1:1 case-control study was conducted. Four hundred and fifty-nine women who delivered or gestate infants/fetuses with NTDs in the last two years were randomly selected as cases and were matched with women who delivered babies without obvious birth defects as controls. For anencephaly, folic acid supplementation during the periconceptional period and preconceptional period has a 57-83% reduction in risk of NTDs(ORs ranged from 0.17 to 0.43). For spina bifida, folic acid supplementation during the periconceptional period has a 79% reduction in risk of NTDs (OR = 0.21). For encephalocele, folic acid supplementation during the periconceptional period has a 67% reduction in risk of NTDs (OR = 0.33). The prevention effects on NTDs were significant when these preventive measures combined with folic acid supplements during the periconceptional period, with OR 0.04, 0.07, 0.10 and 0.11. The specific effects of folic acid supplementation during different periods show the reduction in the risk of NTDs, anencephaly, spina bifida, encephalocele. During periconceptional period, folic acid supplements have preventive effects on all NTDs' subtypes.

  7. DNA oxidation as a potential molecular mechanism mediating drug-induced birth defects: phenytoin and structurally related teratogens initiate the formation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in vitro and in vivo in murine maternal hepatic and embryonic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Wells, P G

    1995-11-01

    A considerable number of teratogens, including the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin and structurally related drugs and environmental chemicals, may be bioactivated by peroxidases, such as prostaglandin H synthase (PHS) and lipoxygenases (LPOs), to a reactive free radical intermediate that initiates birth defects. However, the molecular targets of the reactive free radical intermediates mediating chemical teratogenesis, and hence the fundamental determinants of susceptibility, are poorly understood. In these studies, a teratogenic dose of phenytoin (65 mg/kg), when injected into pregnant CD-1 mice during organogenesis on gestational day 12, initiated the oxidation of DNA in maternal hepatic and embryonic nuclei, forming 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. Significant maternal and embryonic DNA oxidation occurred at 6 and 3 h, respectively, suggesting relative embryonic deficiencies in free radical-related cytoprotective enzymes, although the rates appeared similar. Maximal DNA oxidation in both maternal and embryonic tissues occurred at 6 h, presumably reflecting the balance of DNA oxidation and repair, the latter of which appeared similar in both tissues. Inhibition of phenytoin-initiated embryonic DNA oxidation by the free radical spin trapping agent alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (41.5 mg/kg), and by acetylsalicylic acid (10 mg/kg), an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase component of PHS, was consistent with the previously reported reduction by these inhibitors of phenytoin-initiated murine birth defects. In vitro studies using a horseradish peroxidase (0.5 mg/ml)-H2O2 (5.45 micrograms/ml) bioactivating system for drug-initiated oxidation of 2'-deoxyguanosine (3.74 mM), indicated that the potency of xenobiotic-initiated formation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine for the structurally related drugs and metabolites phenytoin, 5-(p-hydroxyphenyl)-5-phenylhydantoin, trimethadione, dimethadione, l-mephenytoin, l-nirvanol, d-nirvanol (80 microM each), or thalidomide (64 micro

  8. Homologous Recombination Defective Arabidopsis Mutants Exhibit Enhanced Sensitivity to Abscisic Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit Roy

    Full Text Available Abscisic acid (ABA acts as an important plant hormone in regulating various aspects of plant growth and developmental processes particularly under abiotic stress conditions. An increased ABA level in plant cells inhibits DNA replication and cell division, causing plant growth retardation. In this study, we have investigated the effects of ABA on the growth responses of some major loss-of-function mutants of DNA double-stand break (DSB repair genes in Arabidopsis during seed germination and early stages of seedling growth for understanding the role of ABA in the induction of genome instability in plants. A comparative analysis of ABA sensitivity of wild-type Arabidopsis and the knockout mutant lines related to DSB sensors, including atatm, atatr, the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ pathway genes, and mutants related to homologous recombination (HR pathway genes showed relatively enhanced sensitivity of atatr and HR-related mutants to ABA treatment. The expression levels of HR-related genes were increased in wild-type Arabidopsis (Col-0 during seed germination and early stages of seedling growth. Immunoblotting experiments detected phosphorylation of histone H2AX in wild-type (Col-0 and DSB repair gene mutants after ABA treatment, indicating the activation of DNA damage response due to ABA treatment. Analyses of DSB repair kinetics using comet assay under neutral condition have revealed comparatively slower DSB repair activity in HR mutants. Overall, our results have provided comprehensive information on the possible effect of ABA on DNA repair machinery in plants and also indicated potential functional involvement of HR pathway in repairing ABA induced DNA damage in Arabidopsis.

  9. Neuroprotective Effects of Alpha Lipoic Acid on Haloperidol-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perera Joachim

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Haloperidol is an antipsychotic drug that exerts its' antipsychotic effects by inhibiting dopaminergic neurons. Although the exact pathophysiology of haloperidol extrapyramidal symptoms are not known, the role of reactive oxygen species in inducing oxidative stress has been proposed as one of the mechanisms of prolonged haloperidol-induced neurotoxicity. In the present study, we evaluate the protective effect of alpha lipoic acid against haloperidol-induced oxidative stress in the rat brain. Sprague Dawley rats were divided into control, alpha lipoic acid alone (100 mg/kg p.o for 21 days, haloperidol alone (2 mg/kg i.p for 21 days, and haloperidol with alpha lipoic acid groups (for 21 days. Haloperidol treatment significantly decreased levels of the brain antioxidant enzymes super oxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase and concurrent treatment with alpha lipoic acid significantly reversed the oxidative effects of haloperidol. Histopathological changes revealed significant haloperidol-induced damage in the cerebral cortex, internal capsule, and substantia nigra. Alpha lipoic acid significantly reduced this damage and there were very little neuronal atrophy. Areas of angiogenesis were also seen in the alpha lipoic acid-treated group. In conclusion, the study proves that alpha lipoic acid treatment significantly reduces haloperidol-induced neuronal damage.

  10. 7-deoxyloganetic acid synthase catalyzes a key 3 step oxidation to form 7-deoxyloganetic acid in Catharanthus roseus iridoid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Vonny; Wiens, Brent; Masada-Atsumi, Sayaka; Yu, Fang; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2014-05-01

    Iridoids are key intermediates required for the biosynthesis of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs), as well as quinoline alkaloids. Although most iridoid biosynthetic genes have been identified, one remaining three step oxidation required to form the carboxyl group of 7-deoxyloganetic acid has yet to be characterized. Here, it is reported that virus-induced gene silencing of 7-deoxyloganetic acid synthase (7DLS, CYP76A26) in Catharanthus roseus greatly decreased levels of secologanin and the major MIAs, catharanthine and vindoline in silenced leaves. Functional expression of this gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confirmed its function as an authentic 7DLS that catalyzes the 3 step oxidation of iridodial-nepetalactol to form 7-deoxyloganetic acid. The identification of CYP76A26 removes a key bottleneck for expression of iridoid and related MIA pathways in various biological backgrounds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Solid-state 17O NMR study of benzoic acid adsorption on metal oxide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagaman, Edward W; Chen, Banghao; Jiao, Jian; Parsons, William

    2012-02-01

    Solid-state (17)O NMR spectra of (17)O-labeled benzoic and anisic acids are reported and benzoic acid is used to probe the surface of metal oxides. Complexes formed when benzoic acid is dry mixed with mesoporous silica, and nonporous titania and alumina are characterized. Chemical reactions with silica are not observed. The nature of benzoic acid on silica is a function of the water content of the oxide. The acid disperses in the pores of the silica if the silica is in equilibrium with ambient laboratory humidity. The acid displays high mobility as evidenced by a liquid-like, Lorentzian resonance. Excess benzoic acid remains as the crystalline hydrogen-bonded dimer. Benzoic acid reacts with titania and alumina surfaces in equilibrium with laboratory air to form the corresponding titanium and aluminum benzoates. In both materials the oxygen of the (17)O-labeled acid is bound to the metal, showing the reaction proceeds by bond formation between oxygen deficient metal sites and the oxygen of the carboxylic acid. (27)Al MAS NMR confirms this mechanism for the reaction on alumina. Dry mixing of benzoic acid with alumina rapidly quenches pentacoordinate aluminum sites, excellent evidence that these sites are confined to the surface of the alumina particles. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Voltammetric oxidation of dipyridamole in aqueous acid solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castilho Marilza

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical oxidation of dipyridamole (DIP has been studied in acidified aqueous solutions at platinum electrodes employing cyclic voltammetry and controlled-potential electrolysis. The progress of the anodic oxidation as a function of time was monitored by cyclic voltammetry with platinum ultramicroelectrodes, absorption and fluorescence optical spectroscopies, the resulting integrated charge being indicative of a two electron process. The cyclic voltammograms registered for low scan speeds are characterized by a single irreversible diffusion controlled anodic wave, the related cathodic wave being also observable for scan speeds higher than 1 V s-1. Oxidation reaction stoichiommetric parameters were obtained through Tafel slopes resulting in unitary reaction orders for DIP and H+.

  13. Assembly and Succession of Iron Oxide Microbial Mat Communities in Acidic Geothermal Springs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob P. Beam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biomineralized ferric oxide microbial mats are ubiquitous features on Earth, are common in hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP, WY, USA, and form due to direct interaction between microbial and physicochemical processes. The overall goal of this study was to determine the contribution of different community members to the assembly and succession of acidic high-temperature Fe(III-oxide mat ecosystems. Spatial and temporal changes in Fe(III-oxide accretion and the abundance of relevant community members were monitored over 70 days using sterile glass microscope slides incubated in the outflow channels of two acidic geothermal springs (pH = 3 - 3.5; temperature = 68 - 75 °C in YNP. Hydrogenobaculum spp. were the most abundant taxon identified during early successional stages (4 - 40 d, and have been shown to oxidize arsenite, sulfide, and hydrogen coupled to oxygen reduction. Iron-oxidizing populations of Metallosphaera yellowstonensis were detected within 4 d, and reached steady-state levels within 14 - 30 d, corresponding to visible Fe(III-oxide accretion. Heterotrophic archaea colonized near 30 d, and emerged as the dominant functional guild after 70 d and in mature Fe(III-oxide mats (1 - 2 cm thick. First-order rate constants of Fe(III-oxide accretion ranged from 0.046 - 0.05 d-1, and in situ microelectrode measurements showed that the oxidation of Fe(II is limited by the diffusion of O2 into the Fe(III-oxide mat. The formation of microterracettes also implicated O2 as a major variable controlling microbial growth and subsequent mat morphology. The assembly and succession of Fe(III-oxide mat communities follows a repeatable pattern of colonization by lithoautotrophic organisms, and the subsequent growth of diverse organoheterotrophs. The unique geochemical signatures and micromorphology of extant biomineralized Fe(III-oxide mats are useful for understanding other Fe(II-oxidizing systems.

  14. Assembly and Succession of Iron Oxide Microbial Mat Communities in Acidic Geothermal Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, Jacob P.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Jay, Zackary J.; Kozubal, Mark A.; Jennings, Ryan deM.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Inskeep, William P.

    2016-01-01

    Biomineralized ferric oxide microbial mats are ubiquitous features on Earth, are common in hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP, WY, USA), and form due to direct interaction between microbial and physicochemical processes. The overall goal of this study was to determine the contribution of different community members to the assembly and succession of acidic high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat ecosystems. Spatial and temporal changes in Fe(III)-oxide accretion and the abundance of relevant community members were monitored over 70 days using sterile glass microscope slides incubated in the outflow channels of two acidic geothermal springs (pH = 3–3.5; temperature = 68–75°C) in YNP. Hydrogenobaculum spp. were the most abundant taxon identified during early successional stages (4–40 days), and have been shown to oxidize arsenite, sulfide, and hydrogen coupled to oxygen reduction. Iron-oxidizing populations of Metallosphaera yellowstonensis were detected within 4 days, and reached steady-state levels within 14–30 days, corresponding to visible Fe(III)-oxide accretion. Heterotrophic archaea colonized near 30 days, and emerged as the dominant functional guild after 70 days and in mature Fe(III)-oxide mats (1–2 cm thick). First-order rate constants of Fe(III)-oxide accretion ranged from 0.046 to 0.05 day−1, and in situ microelectrode measurements showed that the oxidation of Fe(II) is limited by the diffusion of O2 into the Fe(III)-oxide mat. The formation of microterracettes also implicated O2 as a major variable controlling microbial growth and subsequent mat morphology. The assembly and succession of Fe(III)-oxide mat communities follows a repeatable pattern of colonization by lithoautotrophic organisms, and the subsequent growth of diverse organoheterotrophs. The unique geochemical signatures and micromorphology of extant biomineralized Fe(III)-oxide mats are also useful for understanding other Fe(II)-oxidizing systems. PMID:26913020

  15. Catalytic oxidation and spectroscopic analysis of simulated wastewater containing acid chrome blue K by using chlorine dioxide as oxidant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fengjun; Shi, Laishun

    2010-01-01

    An activated carbon-MnO(2) catalyst was prepared by the dipping-calcination method using activated carbon as catalyst support. The catalyst was used for the catalytic oxidation of simulated acid chrome blue K wastewater. The COD removal efficiency and decolor efficiency by catalytic oxidation are 72.0% and 87.8%, respectively, at the condition of wastewater's COD is 2,418 mg/L, the optimum pH value is 1.2, the dosage of chlorine dioxide is 1,200 mg/L, the dosage of activated carbon-MnO(2) catalyst is 4 g by reacting 50 min. The COD removal efficiency by catalytic oxidation is great than that of chemical oxidation. The COD removal efficiency only decreased a little after the catalyst used 8 times. The FTIR spectra indicate that the active ingredient of manganese dioxide is linked with activated carbon by chemical bond, not merely mechanical blending. The intermediates during the degradation process were obtained by using online infrared spectrum analysis. The degradation reaction mechanism of acid chrome blue K by chlorine dioxide oxidation was proposed based upon the experiment evidence.

  16. Enzymatic Browning in Sugar Beet Leaves (Beta vulgaris L.): Influence of Caffeic Acid Derivatives, Oxidative Coupling, and Coupled Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissers, Anne; Kiskini, Alexandra; Hilgers, Roelant; Marinea, Marina; Wierenga, Peter Alexander; Gruppen, Harry; Vincken, Jean-Paul

    2017-06-21

    Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) leaves of 8 month (8m) plants showed more enzymatic browning than those of 3 month (3m). Total phenolic content increased from 4.6 to 9.4 mg/g FW in 3m and 8m, respectively, quantitated by reverse-phase-ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet-mass spectrometry (RP-UHPLC-UV-MS). The PPO activity was 6.7 times higher in extracts from 8m than from 3m leaves. Substrate content increased from 0.53 to 2.45 mg/g FW in 3m and 8m, respectively, of which caffeic acid glycosyl esters were most important, increasing 10-fold with age. Caffeic acid glycosides and vitexin derivatives were no substrates. In 3m and 8m, nonsubstrate-to-substrate ratios were 8:1 and 3:1, respectively. A model system showed browning at 3:1 ratio due to formation of products with extensive conjugated systems through oxidative coupling and coupled oxidation. The 8:1 ratio did not turn brown as oxidative coupling occurred without much coupled oxidation. We postulate that differences in nonsubstrate-to-substrate ratio and therewith extent of coupled oxidation explain browning.

  17. Characteristics of Oxidative Storage Stability of Canola Fatty Acid Methyl Ester Stabilised with Antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirto Prakoso

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The storage effects on the oxidation characteristics of fatty acid methyl ester of canola oil (CME were investigated in this study. CME stabilised with two antioxidants, i.e. 2,6-di-tert-bytyl-p-cresol (BHT and 6,6-di-tert-butyl-2, 2’-methylendi-p-cresol (BPH, was stored at 20, 40 and 60°C. The oxidation stability data were measured by the Rancimat test method and it was found that both BHT and BPH addition increased the oxidation resistance of the CME. The results showed that when BPH or BHT was added at a concentration of 100 ppm, the oxidation induction period of the neat CME samples increased from 5.53 h to 6.93 h and 6.14 h, respectively. Comparing both antioxidants, BPH proved to be more effective in increasing the oxidation resistance when both antioxidants were added at the same concentration. Furthermore, the oxidation induction time decreased linearly with the storage time. It was shown that the oxidation occurred rapidly in the first 8 weeks of storage. Later, a kinetic study was undertaken and first-order kinetics were applied to explain the oxidation characteristics of the CME added with antioxidants. This kinetic study focused on exploiting the activation energy values obtained from the Arrhenius equations. Also, the oxidation effects on other quality parameters, including acid value, peroxide value, kinematic viscosity, and water content, were examined.

  18. Oct-2-yn-4-enoyl-CoA as a multifunctional enzyme inhibitor in fatty acid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Long; Liu, Xiaojun; Li, Ding

    2008-06-05

    Oct-2-yn-4-enoyl-CoA was found to be a multifunctional irreversible enzyme inhibitor in fatty acid oxidation mainly targeting mitochondrial trifunctional protein beta-subunit. It can also inactivate enoyl-CoA hydratase 2 and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase. This study increased our understanding for the effect of acetylenic acids on fatty acid oxidation.

  19. the roles of gastric acid and nitric oxide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    metavanadate at (0, 50 and 200 ppm) in drinking water for 10weeks after which ulcer was induced using pylorus ... that can reduce or curb the aggressive factors (gastric acid, abnormal .... Table 4 shows the effects of vanadium on gastric.

  20. Possible role of mtDNA depletion and respiratory chain defects in aristolochic acid I-induced acute nephrotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Zhenzhou, E-mail: jiangcpu@yahoo.com.cn; Bao, Qingli, E-mail: bao_ql@126.com; Sun, Lixin, E-mail: slxcpu@126.com; Huang, Xin, E-mail: huangxinhx66@sohu.com; Wang, Tao, E-mail: wangtao1331@126.com; Zhang, Shuang, E-mail: cat921@sina.com; Li, Han, E-mail: hapo1101@163.com; Zhang, Luyong, E-mail: lyzhang@cpu.edu.cn

    2013-01-15

    This report describes an investigation of the pathological mechanism of acute renal failure caused by toxic tubular necrosis after treatment with aristolochic acid I (AAI) in Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats. The rats were gavaged with AAI at 0, 5, 20, or 80 mg/kg/day for 7 days. The pathologic examination of the kidneys showed severe acute tubular degenerative changes primarily affecting the proximal tubules. Supporting these results, we detected significantly increased concentrations of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) in the rats treated with AAI, indicating damage to the kidneys. Ultrastructural examination showed that proximal tubular mitochondria were extremely enlarged and dysmorphic with loss and disorientation of their cristae. Mitochondrial function analysis revealed that the two indicators for mitochondrial energy metabolism, the respiratory control ratio (RCR) and ATP content, were reduced in a dose-dependent manner after AAI treatment. The RCR in the presence of substrates for complex I was reduced more significantly than in the presence of substrates for complex II. In additional experiments, the activity of respiratory complex I, which is partly encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), was more significantly impaired than that of respiratory complex II, which is completely encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). A real-time PCR assay revealed a marked reduction of mtDNA in the kidneys treated with AAI. Taken together, these results suggested that mtDNA depletion and respiratory chain defects play critical roles in the pathogenesis of kidney injury induced by AAI, and that the same processes might contribute to aristolochic acid-induced nephrotoxicity in humans. -- Highlights: ► AAI-induced acute renal failure in rats and the proximal tubule was the target. ► Tubular mitochondria were morphologically aberrant in ultrastructural examination. ► AAI impair mitochondrial bioenergetic function and mtDNA replication.

  1. Ophthalmic acid is a marker of oxidative stress in plants as in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servillo, Luigi; Castaldo, Domenico; Giovane, Alfonso; Casale, Rosario; D'Onofrio, Nunzia; Cautela, Domenico; Balestrieri, Maria Luisa

    2018-04-01

    Ophthalmic acid (OPH), γ-glutamyl-L-2-aminobutyryl-glycine, a tripeptide analogue of glutathione (GSH), has recently captured considerable attention as a biomarker of oxidative stress in animals. The OPH and GSH biosynthesis, as well as some biochemical behaviors, are very similar. Here, we sought to investigate the presence of OPH in plants and its possible relationship with GSH, known to possess multiple functions in the plant development, growth and response to environmental changes. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis was used to examine the occurrence of OPH in leaves from various plant species, and flours from several plant seeds. Different types of oxidative stress, i.e., water, dark, paraquat, and cadmium stress, were induced in rye, barley, oat, and winter wheat leaves to evaluate the effects on the levels of OPH and its metabolic precursors. OPH and its dipeptide precursor, γ-glutamyl-2-aminobutyric acid, were found to occur in phylogenetically distant plants. Interestingly, the levels of OPH were tightly associated with the oxidative stress tested. Levels of OPH precursors, γ-glutamyl-2-aminobutyric acid and 2-aminobutyric acid, the latter efficiently formed in plants via biosynthetic pathways absent in the animal kingdom, were also found to increase during oxidative stress. OPH occurs in plants and its levels are tightly associated with oxidative stress. OPH behaves as an oxidative stress marker and its biogenesis might occur through a biochemical pathway common to many living organisms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Selective Oxidation of 1,2-Propanediol to Carboxylic Acids Catalyzed by Copper Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wuping; Yin, Hengbo; Lu, Zhipeng; Wang, Aili; Liu, Shuxin; Shen, Lingqin

    2018-05-01

    Copper nanoparticles with different particle sizes were prepared by a wet chemical reduction method in the presence of organic modifiers, such as citric acid (CA), hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide, Tween-80 (Tween), and polyethylene glycol 6000. Selective oxidation of sustainable 1,2-propanediol with O2 to high-valued lactic, formic, and acetic acids catalyzed by the copper nanoparticles in an alkaline medium was investigated. The small-sized CuCA nanoparticles with the average particle size of 15.2 nm favored the formation of acetic and formic acids while the CuTween nanoparticles with the average particle size of 26.9 nm were beneficial to the formation of lactic acid. The size effect of copper nanoparticles on the catalytic oxidation of 1,2-propanediol to the carboxylic acids was obvious.

  3. Hypochlorite-induced oxidation of amino acids, peptides and proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawkins, C L; Pattison, D I; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Activated phagocytes generate the potent oxidant hypochlorite (HOCl) via the release of the enzyme myeloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide. HOCl is known to react with a number of biological targets including proteins, DNA, lipids and cholesterol. Proteins are likely to be major targets for reaction...

  4. Effects of ovariectomy and ascorbic acid supplement on oxidative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of ovariectomy on bone mineral density (BMD) and oxidative state in rats, and the alterations in these effects that vitamin C supplementation may produce. Materials and methods: Twenty female Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into three groups: control (C, ...

  5. Effect of heating on oxidation stability and fatty acid composition of microwave roasted groundnut seed oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas Ali, M; Anowarul Islam, M; Othman, Noor Hidayu; Noor, Ahmadilfitri Md

    2017-12-01

    The oxidative stability and fatty acid composition of groundnut seed oil (GSO) exposed to microwaves were evaluated during heating at 170 °C. During heating, the oxidative indices such as free fatty acid, peroxide value, p -anisidine value, TOTOX, thiobarbituric acid value, specific extinctions, and color value were increased. The increments were found to be higher in unroasted seed oils compared to roasted ones indicating lower release of lipid oxidation products in roasted GSO. After 9 h heating, the relative content of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) decreased to 89.53% and that of saturated fatty acid (SFA) increased to 117.46% in unroasted sample. The relative content of PUFA decreased to 92.05% and that of SFA increased to 105.76% in 7.5 min roasted sample after 9 h of heating. However, the roasting process slowed down the oxidative deterioration of PUFA. With increased heating times, an appreciable loss was more apparent in the triacylglycerol species OLL and OOL in unroasted samples compared to roasted ones. In FTIR, the peak intensities in unroasted samples were markedly changed in comparison with roasted samples during heating. The roasting of groundnut seed prior to the oil extraction reduced the oxidative degradation of oil samples; thereby increasing heat stability.

  6. HDAC5 Integrates ER Stress and Fasting Signals to Regulate Hepatic Fatty Acid Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xinchen; Li, Jian; Lv, Sihan; Yu, Jiamin; Jiang, Junkun; Yao, Jindong; Xiao, Yang; Xu, Bingxin; He, Haiyan; Guo, Fangfei; Zhang, Zhen-Ning; Zhang, Chao; Luan, Bing

    2017-12-11

    Disregulation of fatty acid oxidation, one of the major mechanisms to maintain hepatic lipid homeostasis under fasting conditions, leads to hepatic steatosis. Although obesity and type 2 diabetes-induced ER stress contributes to hepatic steatosis, it is largely unknown how ER stress regulates fatty acid oxidation. Here we show that fasting glucagon stimulates the dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation of HDAC5, where it interacts with PPARα and promotes transcriptional activity of PPARα. As a result, overexpression of HDAC5 but not PPARα binding-deficient HDAC5 in liver improves lipid homeostasis, while RNAi-mediated knockdown of HDAC5 deteriorates hepatic steatosis. ER stress inhibits fatty acid oxidation gene expression via CaMKII-mediated phosphorylation of HDAC5. Most importantly, hepatic overexpression of a phosphorylation-deficient mutant HDAC5 2SA promotes hepatic fatty acid oxidation gene expression, and protects against hepatic steatosis in high-fat-diet (HFD) fed mice. Taken together, we have identified HDAC5 as a novel mediator of hepatic fatty acid oxidation by fasting and ER stress signals and strategies to promote HDAC5 dephosphorylation could serve as new tools for the treatment of obesity-associated hepatic steatosis. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  7. Global transcription analysis of Krebs tricarboxylic acid cycle mutants reveals an alternating pattern of gene expression and effects on hypoxic and oxidative genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCammon, Mark T; Epstein, Charles B; Przybyla-Zawislak, Beata; McAlister-Henn, Lee; Butow, Ronald A

    2003-03-01

    To understand the many roles of the Krebs tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in cell function, we used DNA microarrays to examine gene expression in response to TCA cycle dysfunction. mRNA was analyzed from yeast strains harboring defects in each of 15 genes that encode subunits of the eight TCA cycle enzymes. The expression of >400 genes changed at least threefold in response to TCA cycle dysfunction. Many genes displayed a common response to TCA cycle dysfunction indicative of a shift away from oxidative metabolism. Another set of genes displayed a pairwise, alternating pattern of expression in response to contiguous TCA cycle enzyme defects: expression was elevated in aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase mutants, diminished in alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA ligase mutants, elevated again in succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase mutants, and diminished again in malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase mutants. This pattern correlated with previously defined TCA cycle growth-enhancing mutations and suggested a novel metabolic signaling pathway monitoring TCA cycle function. Expression of hypoxic/anaerobic genes was elevated in alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase mutants, whereas expression of oxidative genes was diminished, consistent with a heme signaling defect caused by inadequate levels of the heme precursor, succinyl-CoA. These studies have revealed extensive responses to changes in TCA cycle function and have uncovered new and unexpected metabolic networks that are wired into the TCA cycle.

  8. Effect of surface oxygen vacancy sites on ethanol synthesis from acetic acid hydrogenation on a defective In2O3(110) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Huisheng; Liu, Jiatao; Chen, Yifei; Li, Guiming; Jiang, Haoxi; Zhang, Minhua

    2018-02-26

    Developing a new type of low-cost and high-efficiency non-noble metal catalyst is beneficial for industrially massive synthesis of alcohols from carboxylic acids which can be obtained from renewable biomass. In this work, the effect of active oxygen vacancies on ethanol synthesis from acetic acid hydrogenation over defective In 2 O 3 (110) surfaces has been studied using periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The relative stabilities of six surface oxygen vacancies from O v1 to O v6 on the In 2 O 3 (110) surface were compared. D1 and D4 surfaces with respective O v1 and O v4 oxygen vacancies were chosen to map out the reaction paths from acetic acid to ethanol. A reaction cycle mechanism between the perfect and defective states of the In 2 O 3 surface was found to catalyze the formation of ethanol from acetic acid hydrogenation. By H 2 reduction the oxygen vacancies on the In 2 O 3 surface play key roles in promoting CH 3 COO* hydrogenation and C-O bond breaking in acetic acid hydrogenation. The acetic acid, in turn, benefits the creation of oxygen vacancies, while the C-O bond breaking of acetic acid refills the oxygen vacancy and, thereby, sustains the catalytic cycle. The In 2 O 3 based catalysts were shown to be advantageous over traditional noble metal catalysts in this paper by theoretical analysis.

  9. Improvement of Pro-Oxidant Capacity of Protocatechuic Acid by Esterification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeraik, Maria Luiza; Petrônio, Maicon S.; Coelho, Dyovani; Regasini, Luis Octavio; Silva, Dulce H. S.; da Fonseca, Luiz Marcos; Machado, Sergio A. S.; Bolzani, Vanderlan S.; Ximenes, Valdecir F.

    2014-01-01

    Pro-oxidant effects of phenolic compounds are usually correlated to the one-electron redox potential of the phenoxyl radicals. Here we demonstrated that, besides their oxidizability, hydrophobicity can also be a decisive factor. We found that esterification of protocatechuic acid (P0) provoked a profound influence in its pro-oxidant capacity. The esters bearing alkyl chains containing two (P2), four (P4) and seven (P7) carbons, but not the acid precursor (P0), were able to exacerbate the oxidation of trolox, α-tocopherol and rifampicin. This effect was also dependent on the catechol moiety, since neither gallic acid nor butyl gallate showed any pro-oxidant effects. A comparison was also made with apocynin, which is well-characterized regarding its pro-oxidant properties. P7 was more efficient than apocynin regarding co-oxidation of trolox. However, P7 was not able to co-oxidize glutathione and NADH, which are targets of the apocynin radical. A correlation was found between pro-oxidant capacity and the stability of the radicals, as suggested by the intensity of the peak current in the differential pulse voltammetry experiments. In conclusion, taking into account that hydroquinone and related moieties are frequently found in biomolecules and quinone-based chemotherapeutics, our demonstration that esters of protocatechuic acid are specific and potent co-catalysts in their oxidations may be very relevant as a pathway to exacerbate redox cycling reactions, which are usually involved in their biological and pharmacological mechanisms of action. PMID:25340774

  10. DEFECTS SIMULATION OF ROLLING STRIP

    OpenAIRE

    Rudolf Mišičko; Tibor Kvačkaj; Martin Vlado; Lucia Gulová; Miloslav Lupták; Jana Bidulská

    2009-01-01

    The defects in the continuous casting slabs can be developed or kept down in principle by rolling technology, especially depend to sort, size and distribution of primary defects, as well as used of rolling parameters. Scope of the article is on observation behavior artificial surface and undersurface defects (scores) without filler (surface defects) and filling by oxides and casting powder (subsurface defects). First phase of hot rolling process have been done by software simulation DEFORM 3D...

  11. SYNTHESIS OF IRON OXIDE-MONTMORILLONITE COMPOSITE AND STUDY OF ITS STRUCTURAL STABILITY AGAINTS SULFURIC ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karna Wijaya

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis and characterization of iron oxide-montmorillonite and its structural stability test with various concentration of sulfuric acid were conducted. Synthesis was performed by treating Na-montmorillonite clay with oligocations of iron, followed by calcinating the intercalation compound of oligocations-montmorillonite at 200oC for 24 hours. Calcined product was then characterized to determine the iron content, basal spacing and its porosities distribution. To test structural stability againts strong acid (i.e. sulfuric acid, the composites were dispersed into solution of sulfuric acid with various concentration, i.e: 1, 2 and 3M for 24 hours. The characterization result, especially from x-ray-diffractometry analysis, demonstrated that modification of montmorillonite using iron (IIIoxide produced so called house of card structure as indicated by its broad, low intensity reflection at 2θ  = 5-6o. The addition of sulphuric acid into composite resulted in probably the formation of face to face arrangements indicated by the appearance of 001 plane reflection. The acid treatment also caused the decrease in the iron content of the iron oxide-montmorillonite as shown by its neutron activated analysis result. The iron content of iron oxide-montmorillonite before the acid treatment was 32,01% w/w, and after the acid treatment was 14.08% w/w (with sulfuric acid of 1M, 6.05% w/w (sulfuric acid of 2M and 5,98% w/w (with sulfuric acid of 3M, respectively. In general, the sulphuric acid treatment to the composite did not distore the 001 planes of the montmorillonite.   Keywords: pillarization, montmorillonite, structure stability

  12. The role of peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA beta-oxidation in bile acid biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, H.; Miwa, A. (Josai Univ., Saitama (Japan))

    1989-11-01

    The physiological role of the peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA beta-oxidizing system (FAOS) is not yet established. We speculated that there might be a relationship between peroxisomal degradation of long-chain fatty acids in the liver and the biosynthesis of bile acids. This was investigated using (1-{sup 14}C)butyric acid and (1-{sup 14}C)lignoceric acid as substrates of FAOS in mitochondria and peroxisomes, respectively. The incorporation of ({sup 14}C)lignoceric acid into primary bile acids was approximately four times higher than that of ({sup 14}C)butyric acid (in terms of C-2 units). The pools of these two fatty acids in the liver were exceedingly small. The incorporations of radioactivity into the primary bile acids were strongly inhibited by administration of aminotriazole, which is a specific inhibitor of peroxisomal FAOS in vivo. Aminotriazole inhibited preferentially the formation of cholate, the major primary bile acid, from both ({sup 14}C)lignoceric acid and ({sup 14}C)butyric acid, rather than the formation of chenodeoxycholate. The former inhibition was about 70% and the latter was approximately 40-50%. In view of reports that cholate is biosynthesized from endogenous cholesterol, the above results indicate that peroxisomal FAOS may have an anabolic function, supplying acetyl CoA for bile acid biosynthesis.

  13. Impact of Fluorescent Lighting on Oxidation of Model Wine Solutions Containing Organic Acids and Iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant-Preece, Paris; Barril, Celia; Schmidtke, Leigh M; Clark, Andrew C

    2017-03-22

    Previous studies have provided evidence that light exposure can increase oxygen consumption in wine and that the photodegradation of iron(III) tartrate could contribute to this process. In the present study, model wine solutions containing iron(III) and various organic acids, either alone or combined, were stored in sealed clear glass wine bottles and exposed to light from fluorescent lamps. Dissolved oxygen was monitored, and afterward the organic acid degradation products were determined and the capacity of the solutions to bind sulfur dioxide, the main wine preservative, was assessed. In the dark controls, little or no dissolved oxygen was consumed and the organic acids were stable. In the irradiated solutions, dissolved oxygen was consumed at a rate that was dependent on the specific organic acid present, and the latter were oxidized to various carbonyl compounds. For the solutions containing tartaric acid, malic acid, and/or citric acid, irradiation increased their sulfur dioxide-binding capacity.

  14. Structure and oxidation capacity of amino acid chloramine derivatives and their effects on platelet aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murina, M A; Chudina, N A; Roshchupkin, D I; Belakina, N S; Sergienko, V I

    2004-12-01

    Comparison of antiaggregation capacity of N-chloramine acids with different position of the chloramine group in the molecule showed that in the most efficient compounds the distance between the chloramine and carboxyl groups was 3-5 carbon atoms. This feature of antiaggregation activity was not related to the difference in oxidation capacity of N-chloramine acids. It was hypothesized that the revealed structural dependence of antiaggregation activity of N-chloramine acids is determined by the structure of platelet membrane, in particular, the presence of a negatively charged group near the site of interaction between N-chloramine acids and platelet membrane.

  15. PPAR{delta} is a fatty acid sensor, which enhances mitochondrial oxidation in insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnskjaer, Kim; Frigerio, Francesca; Boergesen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    is the PPAR subtype expressed at the highest level in insulinoma cells and rat pancreatic islets. Furthermore, PPARdelta displays high transcriptional activity and acts in pronounced synergy with RXR. Interestingly, unsaturated fatty acids mimic the effects of synthetic PPARdelta agonists. Using shRNA......-mediated knockdown we demonstrate that the ability of unsaturated fatty acids to stimulate fatty acid metabolism is dependent on PPARdelta. Activation of PPARdelta increases the fatty acid oxidation potential in INS-1E beta-cells, enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from islets, and protects GSIS...

  16. Structure and friction of stearic acid and oleic acid films adsorbed on iron oxide surfaces in squalane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doig, Michael; Warrens, Chris P; Camp, Philip J

    2014-01-14

    The structure and friction of fatty acid surfactant films adsorbed on iron oxide surfaces lubricated by squalane are examined using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. The structures of stearic acid and oleic acid films under static and shear conditions, and at various surface coverages, are described in detail, and the effects of unsaturation in the tail group are highlighted. At high surface coverage, the measured properties of stearic acid and oleic acid films are seen to be very similar. At low and intermediate surface coverages, the presence of a double bond, as in oleic acid, is seen to give rise to less penetration of lubricant in to the surfactant film and less layering of the lubricant near to the film. The kinetic friction coefficient is measured as a function of shear rate within the hydrodynamic (high shear rate) lubrication regime. Lubricant penetration and layering are observed to be correlated with friction coefficient. The friction coefficient with oleic acid depends only weakly on surface coverage, while stearic acid admits more lubricant penetration, and its friction coefficient increases significantly with decreasing surface coverage. Connections between film structure and friction are discussed.

  17. Oxidation at through-hole defects in fused slurry silicide coated columbium alloys FS-85 and Cb-752

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.

    1973-01-01

    Metal recession and interstitial contamination at 0.08-centimeter-diameter through-hole intentional defects in fused slurry silicide coated FS-85 and Cb-752 columbium alloys were studied to determine the tolerance of these materials to coating defects. Five external pressure reentry simulation exposures to 1320 C and 4.7 x 1,000 N/sq m (maximum pressure) resulted in a consumed metal zone having about twice the initial defect diameter for both alloys with an interstitial contamination zone extending about three to four initial defect diameters. Self-healing occurred in the 1.33 x 10 N/sq m, 1320 C exposures and to a lesser extent in internal pressure reentry cycles to 1320 C and 1.33 x 100 N/sq m (maximum pressure).

  18. Covalent interactions between proteins and oxidation products of caffeoylquinic acid (chlorogenic acid)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prigent, S.V.E.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Koningsveld, van G.A.; Gruppen, H.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The interactions between phenolic compounds and proteins can modify protein properties important in the food industry. To understand the effects of these interactions, the covalent interactions between caffeoylquinic acid (chlorogenic acid, CQA) oxidised by polyphenol oxidase (PPO) at

  19. Copper-catalyzed decarboxylative C-P cross-coupling of alkynyl acids with H-phosphine oxides: a facile and selective synthesis of (E)-1-alkenylphosphine oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Gaobo; Gao, Yuxing; Zhao, Yufen

    2014-09-05

    A novel and efficient copper-catalyzed decarboxylative cross-coupling of alkynyl acids for the stereoselective synthesis of E-alkenylphosphine oxides has been developed. In the presence of 10 mol % of CuCl without added ligand, base, and additive, various alkynyl acids reacted with H-phosphine oxides to afford E-alkenylphosphine oxides with operational simplicity, broad substrate scope, and the stereoselectivity for E-isomers.

  20. Electrochemical oxidation of 243Am(III) in nitric acid by a terpyridyl-derivatized electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dares, C. J.; Lapides, A. M.; Mincher, B. J.; Meyer, T. J.

    2015-11-05

    A high surface area, tin-doped indium oxide electrode surface-derivatized with a terpyridine ligand has been applied to the oxidation of trivalent americium to Am(V) and Am(VI) in nitric acid. Potentials as low as 1.8 V vs. the saturated calomel electrode are used, 0.7 V lower than the 2.6 V potential for one-electron oxidation of Am(III) to Am(IV) in 1 M acid. This simple electrochemical procedure provides, for the first time, a method for accessing the higher oxidation states of Am in non-complexing media for developing the coordination chemistries of Am(V) and Am(VI) and, more importantly, for separation of americium from nuclear waste streams.

  1. Effect of Amine Adlayer on Electrochemical Uric Acid Sensor Conducted on Electrochemically Reduced Graphene Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sumi; Kim, Kyuwon [Incheon National University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The electrochemical biosensing efficiency of uric acid (UA) detection on an electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO)-decorated electrode surface was studied by using various amine linkers used to immobilize ERGO. The amine linkers aminoethylphenyldiazonium , 2,2'-(ethylenedioxy)bis(ethylamine), 3-aminopro-pyltriethoxysilane, and polyethyleneimine were coated on indium-tin-oxide electrode surfaces through chemical or electrochemical deposition methods. ERGO-decorated surfaces were prepared by the electrochemical reduction of graphene oxide (GO), which was immobilized on the amine-coated electrode surfaces through the electrostatic interaction between GO and the ammonium ion of the linker on the surface. We monitored the sensing results of electrochemical UA detection with differential pulse voltammetry. The ERGO-modified surface presented electrocatalytic oxidation of UA and ascorbic acid. Among the different amines tested, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane provided the best biosensing performance in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility.

  2. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molec...

  3. Survival of the Fittest: Overcoming Oxidative Stress at the Extremes of Acid, Heat and Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukari Maezato

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The habitat of metal respiring acidothermophilic lithoautotrophs is perhaps the most oxidizing environment yet identified. Geothermal heat, sulfuric acid and transition metals contribute both individually and synergistically under aerobic conditions to create this niche. Sulfuric acid and metals originating from sulfidic ores catalyze oxidative reactions attacking microbial cell surfaces including lipids, proteins and glycosyl groups. Sulfuric acid also promotes hydrocarbon dehydration contributing to the formation of black “burnt” carbon. Oxidative reactions leading to abstraction of electrons is further impacted by heat through an increase in the proportion of reactant molecules with sufficient energy to react. Collectively these factors and particularly those related to metals must be overcome by thermoacidophilic lithoautotrophs in order for them to survive and proliferate. The necessary mechanisms to achieve this goal are largely unknown however mechanistics insights have been gained through genomic studies. This review focuses on the specific role of metals in this extreme environment with an emphasis on resistance mechanisms in Archaea.

  4. Fatty acid oxidation and carnitine palmitoyltransferase I: emerging therapeutic targets in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Q; Zeng, F; Liu, X; Wang, Q J; Deng, F

    2016-05-19

    Tumor cells exhibit unique metabolic adaptations that are increasingly viewed as potential targets for novel and specific cancer therapies. Among these targets, the carnitine palmitoyltransferase system is responsible for delivering the long-chain fatty acid (FA) from cytoplasm into mitochondria for oxidation, where carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of fatty acid oxidation (FAO). With increasing understanding of the crucial role had by fatty acid oxidation in cancer, CPTI has received renewed attention as a pivotal mediator in cancer metabolic mechanism. CPTI activates FAO and fuels cancer growth via ATP and NADPH production, constituting an essential part of cancer metabolism adaptation. Moreover, CPTI also functionally intertwines with other key pathways and factors to regulate gene expression and apoptosis of cancer cell. Here, we summarize recent findings and update the current understanding of FAO and CPTI in cancer and provide theoretical basis for this enzyme as an emerging potential molecular target in cancer therapeutic intervention.

  5. A kinetic study of the enhancement of solution chemiluminescence of glyoxylic acid oxidation by manganese species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otamonga, Jean-Paul; Abdel-Mageed, Amal; Agater, Irena B; Jewsbury, Roger A

    2015-08-01

    In order to study the mechanism of the enhancement of solution chemiluminescence, the kinetics of the decay of the oxidant and the chemiluminescence emission were followed for oxidations by permanganate, manganese dioxide sol and Mn(3+) (aq) of glyoxylic acid, using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. Results are reported for the glyoxylic acid oxidized under pseudo first-order conditions and in an acidic medium at 25 °C. For permanganate under these conditions, the decay is sigmoidal, consistent with autocatalysis, and for manganese dioxide sol and Mn(3+) it is pseudo first order. The effects of the presence of aqueous formaldehyde and Mn(2+) were observed and a fit to a simple mechanism is discussed. It is concluded that chemiluminescent enhancement in these systems is best explained by reaction kinetics. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Catalytic ozonation of sulfosalicylic acid over manganese oxide supported on mesoporous ceria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Shengtao; Lu, Xiaoyang; Liu, Jia; Zhu, Lin; Ma, Zichuan; Wu, Yinsu

    2016-02-01

    Manganese oxide supported on mesoporous ceria was prepared and used as catalyst for catalytic ozonation of sulfosalicylic acid (SA). Characterization results indicated that the manganese oxide was mostly incorporated into the pores of ceria. The synthesized catalyst exhibited high activity and stability for the mineralization of SA in aqueous solution by ozone, and more than 95% of total organic carbon was removed in 30 min under various conditions. Mechanism studies indicated that SA was mainly degraded by ozone molecules, and hydroxyl radical reaction played an important role for the degradation of its ozonation products (small molecular organic acids). The manganese oxide in the pores of CeO2 improved the adsorption of small molecular organic acids and the generation of hydroxyl radicals from ozone decomposition, resulting in high TOC removal efficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Temperature-Driven Structural and Morphological Evolution of Zinc Oxide Nano-Coalesced Microstructures and Its Defect-Related Photoluminescence Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karkeng Lim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we address the synthesis of nano-coalesced microstructured zinc oxide thin films via a simple thermal evaporation process. The role of synthesis temperature on the structural, morphological, and optical properties of the prepared zinc oxide samples was deeply investigated. The obtained photoluminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy outcomes will be used to discuss the surface structure defects of the prepared samples. The results indicated that the prepared samples are polycrystalline in nature, and the sample prepared at 700 °C revealed a tremendously c-axis oriented zinc oxide. The temperature-driven morphological evolution of the zinc oxide nano-coalesced microstructures was perceived, resulting in transformation of quasi-mountain chain-like to pyramidal textured zinc oxide with increasing the synthesis temperature. The results also impart that the sample prepared at 500 °C shows a higher percentage of the zinc interstitial and oxygen vacancies. Furthermore, the intensity of the photoluminescence emission in the ultraviolet region was enhanced as the heating temperature increased from 500 °C to 700 °C. Lastly, the growth mechanism of the zinc oxide nano-coalesced microstructures is discussed according to the reaction conditions.

  8. Analysis of Chlorogenic Acid Oxidation Pathway in Simulated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    properties used in traditional Chinese herbal medicine. Because it possesses a variety of biological activities, honeysuckle is widely used in pharmaceuticals, beverages, health foods, and other products. One of the major bioactive components of honeysuckle is chlorogenic acid. (CA). Phenolic compounds in plant-based ...

  9. Total Anti-Oxidant Capacity, Flavonoid, Phenolic Acid And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: Methanol was used as the extraction solvent, 2,2 – diphenyl -1- picrylhydrazil (DPPH) for free radical scavenging activity and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Phenolic compounds were measured using Total flavonoid, Phenolic acid and Polyphenols content assay to evaluate the ...

  10. wet oxidation of maleic acid by a pumice supported copper

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    Pumice supported Cu (II) Schiff base catalysts were prepared by surface chemical modification followed by complexation with Cu (II) acetate. ... chemistry of particular pumice does affect both the rate as well as the extent of cyanide .... maleic acid into the reactor and making the solution to 350 ml using distilled water.

  11. The Aerobic Oxidation of Bromide to Dibromine Catalyzed by Homogeneous Oxidation Catalysts and Initiated by Nitrate in Acetic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partenheimer, Walt; Fulton, John L.; Sorensen, Christina M.; Pham, Van Thai; Chen, Yongsheng

    2014-06-01

    A small amount of nitrate, ~0.002 molal, initiates the Co/Mn catalyzed aerobic oxidation of bromide compounds (HBr,NaBr,LiBr) to dibromine in acetic acid at room temperature. At temperatures 40oC or less , the reaction is autocatalytic. Co(II) and Mn(II) themselves and mixed with ionic bromide are known homogeneous oxidation catalysts. The reaction was discovered serendipitously when a Co/Br and Co/Mn/Br catalyst solution was prepared for the aerobic oxidation of methyaromatic compounds and the Co acetate contained a small amount of impurity i.e. nitrate. The reaction was characterized by IR, UV-VIS, MALDI and EXAFS spectroscopies and the coordination chemistry is described. The reaction is inhibited by water and its rate changed by pH. The change in these variables, as well as others, are identical to those observed during homogeneous, aerobic oxidation of akylaromatics. A mechanism is proposed. Accidental addition of a small amount of nitrate compound into a Co/Mn/Br/acetic acid mixture in a large, commercial feedtank is potentially dangerous.

  12. Investigation of Influential Parameters in Deep Oxidative Desulfurization of Dibenzothiophene with Hydrogen Peroxide and Formic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Haghighat Mamaghani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An effective oxidative system consisting of hydrogen peroxide, formic acid, and sulfuric acid followed by an extractive stage were implemented to remove dibenzothiophene in the simulated fuel oil. The results revealed such a great performance in the case of H2O2 in the presence of formic and sulfuric acids that led to the removal of sulfur compounds. Sulfuric acid was employed to increase the acidity of media as well as catalytic activity together with formic acid. The oxidation reaction was followed by a liquid-liquid extraction stage using acetonitrile as a polar solvent to remove produced sulfones from the model fuel. The impact of operating parameters including the molar ratio of formic acid to sulfur (, hydrogen peroxide to sulfur (, and the time of reaction was investigated using Box-Behnken experimental design for oxidation of the model fuel. A significant quadratic model was introduced for the sulfur removal as a function of effective parameters by the statistic analysis.

  13. Influence of different factors on the destruction of films based on polylactic acid and oxidized polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podzorova, M. V.; Tertyshnaya, Yu. V.; Pantyukhov, P. V.; Shibryaeva, L. S.; Popov, A. A.; Nikolaeva, S.

    2016-11-01

    Influence of different environmental factors on the degradation of film samples based on polylactic acid and low density polyethylene with the addition of oxidized polyethylene was studied in this work. Different methods were used to find the relationship between degradation and ultraviolet, moisture, oxygen. It was found that the addition of oxidized polyethylene, used as a model of recycled polyethylene, promotes the degradation of blends.

  14. Heterogeneous Reactions of Acetic Acid with Oxide Surfaces: Effects of Mineralogy and Relative Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mingjin; Larish, Whitney A; Fang, Yuan; Gankanda, Aruni; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-07-21

    We have investigated the heterogeneous uptake of gaseous acetic acid on different oxides including γ-Al2O3, SiO2, and CaO under a range of relative humidity conditions. Under dry conditions, the uptake of acetic acid leads to the formation of both acetate and molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on γ-Al2O3 and CaO and only molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on SiO2. More importantly, under the conditions of this study, dimers are the major form for molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on all three particle surfaces investigated, even at low acetic acid pressures under which monomers are the dominant species in the gas phase. We have also determined saturation surface coverages for acetic acid adsorption on these three oxides under dry conditions as well as Langmuir adsorption constants in some cases. Kinetic analysis shows that the reaction rate of acetic acid increases by a factor of 3-5 for γ-Al2O3 when relative humidity increases from 0% to 15%, whereas for SiO2 particles, acetic acid and water are found to compete for surface adsorption sites.

  15. Modeling the oxidation kinetics of sono-activated persulfate's process on the degradation of humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songlin, Wang; Ning, Zhou; Si, Wu; Qi, Zhang; Zhi, Yang

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound degradation of humic acid has been investigated in the presence of persulfate anions at ultrasonic frequency of 40 kHz. The effects of persulfate anion concentration, ultrasonic power input, humic acid concentration, reaction time, solution pH and temperature on humic acid removal efficiency were studied. It is found that up to 90% humic acid removal efficiency was achieved after 2 h reaction. In this system, sulfate radicals (SO₄⁻·) were considered to be the mainly oxidant to mineralize humic acid while persulfate anion can hardly react with humic acid directly. A novel kinetic model based on sulfate radicals (SO₄⁻·) oxidation was established to describe the humic acid mineralization process mathematically and chemically in sono-activated persulfate system. According to the new model, ultrasound power, persulfate dosage, solution pH and reaction temperature have great influence on humic acid degradation. Different initial concentration of persulfate anions and humic acid, ultrasonic power, initial pH and reaction temperature have been discussed to valid the effectiveness of the model, and the simulated data showed new model had good agreement with the experiments data.

  16. Erythrocyte Sialic Acid Content during Aging in Humans: Correlation with Markers of Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Murtaza Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sialic acids are substituted neuraminic acid derivatives which are typically found at the outermost end of glycan chains on the membrane in all cell types. The role of erythrocyte membrane sialic acids during aging has been established however the relationship between sialic acid and oxidative stress is not fully understood. The present work was undertaken to analyze the relationship between erythrocyte membrane sialic acid with its plasma level, membrane and plasma lipid hydroperoxide levels and plasma total antioxidant capacity. Results show that sialic acid content decreases significantly (P < 0.001 in RBC membrane (r = −0.901 and increases in plasma (r = 0.860 as a function of age in humans. Lipid peroxidation measured in the form of hydroperoxides increases significantly (P < 0.001 in plasma (r = 0.830 and RBC membranes (r = 0.875 with age in humans. The Trolox Equivalent Total Antioxidant Capacity (TETAC of plasma was found to be significantly decreased (P < 0.001, r = −0.844. We observe significant correlations between decrease of erythrocyte membrane sialic acid and plasma lipid hydroperoxide and TETAC. Based on the observed correlations, we hypothesize that increase in oxidative stress during aging may influence the sialic acid decomposition from membrane thereby altering the membrane configuration affecting many enzymatic and transporter activities. Considering the importance of plasma sialic acid as a diagnostic parameter, it is important to establish age-dependent reference.

  17. Effects of Hyaluronic Acid and Hydroxyapatite/Beta-tricalcium Phosphate in Combination on Bone Regeneration of a Critical-size Defect in an Experimental Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diker, Nurettin; Gulsever, Serap; Koroglu, Taner; Yilmaz Akcay, Eda; Oguz, Yener

    2018-02-12

    Hyaluronic acid (HyA) is an outstanding new product in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of HyA on bone regeneration in critical-size calvarial defects. Twenty-four female Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the present study. In each rat, 4 critical-size defects received different treatments: no treatment (control); HyA; Graft; and HyA + Graft combination. New bone formation, defect closure, inflammation, vascular proliferation, immature bone formation, mature bone formation, and bone marrow existence were investigated based on histological findings. The healing parameters related to bone formation (new bone formation, defect closure, immature bone formation) were significantly higher in the HyA group compared with the control group. However, HyA alone was unable to induce sufficient bone regeneration compared with treatments involving graft materials (Graft and HyA + Graft). In the Graft and HyA + Graft groups, prominent enhancement of all healing parameters was noted. The present results demonstrate that HyA alone did not adequately enhance bone regeneration in critical-size defects. Moreover, addition of HyA to a biphasic alloplastic graft material did not result in improved regeneration compared with the graft material alone.

  18. Cerebrovascular defects in Foxc1 mutants correlate with aberrant WNT and VEGF-A pathways downstream of retinoic acid from the meninges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Swati; Choe, Youngshik; Pleasure, Samuel J.; Siegenthaler, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Growth and maturation of the cerebrovasculature is a vital event in neocortical development however mechanisms that control cerebrovascular development remain poorly understood. Mutations in or deletions that include the FOXC1 gene are associated with congenital cerebrovascular anomalies and increased stroke risk in patients. Foxc1 mutant mice display severe cerebrovascular hemorrhage at late gestational ages. While these data demonstrate Foxc1 is required for cerebrovascular development, its broad expression in the brain vasculature combined with Foxc1 mutant’s complex developmental defects have made it difficult to pinpoint its function(s). Using global and conditional Foxc1 mutants, we find 1) significant cerebrovascular growth defects precede cerebral hemorrhage and 2) expression of Foxc1 in neural crest-derived meninges and brain pericytes, though not endothelial cells, is required for normal cerebrovascular development. We provide evidence that reduced levels of meninges-derived retinoic acid (RA), caused by defects in meninges formation in Foxc1 mutants, is a major contributing factor to the cerebrovascular growth defects in Foxc1 mutants. We provide data that suggests that meninges-derived RA ensures adequate growth of the neocortical vasculature via regulating expression of WNT pathway proteins and neural progenitor derived-VEGF-A. Our findings offer the first evidence for a role of the meninges in brain vascular development and provide new insight into potential causes of cerebrovascular defects in patients with FOXC1 mutations. PMID:27671872

  19. Uric acid and allantoin levels in Down syndrome: antioxidant and oxidative stress mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitnanová, Ingrid; Korytár, Peter; Aruoma, Okezie I; Sustrová, Mária; Garaiová, Iveta; Muchová, Jana; Kalnovicová, Terézia; Pueschel, Siegfried; Duracková, Zdenka

    2004-03-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a chromosomal abnormality (trisomy 21) leading to mental retardation, to the characteristic change of individual's phenotype and to the pathological features of Alzheimer disease. Patients with DS have elevated ratio of superoxide dismutase to (catalase plus glutathione peroxidase) with respect to controls in all age categories suggesting that oxidative imbalance contributes to the clinical manifestation of accelerated aging. We report that persons with DS have elevated uric acid levels compared with controls, 348.56+/-22.78 versus 284.00+/-20.86 micromol/l (p=0.018). The levels of hypoxanthine and xanthine in DS children (6.35+/-0.31 and 1.02+/-0.23 micromol/l) were significantly lower than in controls (7.83+/-0.59 and 2.43+/-0.66 micromol/l). This result suggests increased conversion of hypoxanthine and xanthine to uric acid with subsequent free radical-dependent oxidation of uric acid to allantoin, mechanisms potentiated by the oxidative stress in DS. Allantoin is a nonenzymatic oxidative product of uric acid in human. In DS individuals, the levels of allantoin were significantly higher than those in healthy controls (18.58+/-2.27 and 14.07+/-1.07 micromol/l, respectively, p=0.03). Our data supported the presumption of increased oxidative stress in DS.

  20. Counteracting oxidative stress in pregnancy through modulation of maternal micronutrients and omega-3 fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, V; Chavan-Gautam, P; Joshi, S

    2013-01-01

    During pregnancy, oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia and preterm birth leading to poor birth outcome. Hyperhomocysteinemia caused as a consequence of altered micronutrients like folic acid and vitamin B12 is associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species that generate oxidative stress. These micronutrients are important determinants of methyl donor, s-adenosyl methionine while phospholipids are important methyl acceptors in the one-carbon metabolic cycle. A series of our studies in women during pregnancy have demonstrated altered levels of these micronutrients and the negative association of docosahexaenoic acid with homocysteine. Various strategies to counteract oxidative stress during pregnancy such as antioxidant therapy have been examined and found to be inconsistent. In this review, we focus on the role of oxidative stress in pregnancy and discuss the possibility of ameliorating it through modulation of maternal micronutrients and omega 3 fatty acids especially docosahexaenoic acid. We propose for the first time that manipulation of one-carbon metabolism by maternal diet could be a potential mechanism to counteract oxidative stress through homocysteine lowering effects and help in reducing the risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  1. Corrosion behaviour of AISI type 304L stainless steel in nitric acid media containing oxidizing species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ningshen, S. [Corrosion Science and Technology Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Kamachi Mudali, U., E-mail: kamachi@igcar.gov.i [Corrosion Science and Technology Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Ramya, S.; Raj, Baldev [Corrosion Science and Technology Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: Corrosion behaviour of 304L stainless steel has been evaluated in the presence of oxidizing species in nitric acid medium. No significant change in corrosion potential even with increase in temperature and nitric acid concentration in presence of oxidizing ions. Faster passive film dissolution as indicated by low film polarization resistance, with increase in nitric acid concentration and temperature. The presence of oxidizing species further aggravates the corrosion of 304L SS along with increased temperature and nitric acid concentration. - Abstract: The corrosion behaviour of AISI type 304L stainless steel (SS) in different concentration of 0.01 M, 1 M and 5 M HNO{sub 3} in presence of oxidizing ions at different temperatures has been evaluated. The main objective of this study is to assess the corrosion resistance of type 304L SS in non-radioactive conditions encountered during storage of liquid nuclear waste. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS) has clearly brought out the deleterious effect of oxidizing species on the passive film leading to increased corrosion along with increase in HNO{sub 3} concentration and higher temperature.

  2. Acetic Acid Formation by Selective Aerobic Oxidation of Aqueous Ethanol over Heterogeneous Ruthenium Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbanev, Yury; Kegnæs, Søren; Hanning, Christopher William

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalyst systems comprising ruthenium hydroxide supported on different carrier materials, titania, alumina, ceria, and spinel (MgAl2O4), were applied in selective aerobic oxidation ethanol to form acetic acid, an important bulk chemical and food ingredient. The catalysts were...... of catalysts, oxidant pressure, reaction temperature, and substrate concentration were investigated. Quantitative yield of acetic acid was obtained with 1.2 wt % Ru(OH)x/CeO2 under optimized conditions (150 °C, 10 bar O2, 12 h of reaction time, 0.23 mol % Ru to substrate)....

  3. Lipoic acid prevents fructose-induced changes in liver carbohydrate metabolism: Role of oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, María Cecilia; Massa, Maria Laura; Gagliardino, Juan Jose; Francini, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    Fructose administration rapidly induces oxidative stress that triggers compensatory hepatic metabolic changes. We evaluated the effect of an antioxidant, R/S-α-lipoic acid on fructose-induced oxidative stress and carbohydrate metabolism changes. METHODS: Wistar rats were fed a standard commercial diet, the same diet plus 10% fructose in drinking water, or injected with R/S-α-lipoic acid (35mg/kg, i.p.) (control+L and fructose+L). Three weeks thereafter, blood samples were drawn to measure g...

  4. All-trans retinoic acid increases oxidative metabolism in mature adipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mercader, Josep; Madsen, Lise; Felipe, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: In rodents, retinoic acid (RA) treatment favors loss of body fat mass and the acquisition of brown fat features in white fat depots. In this work, we sought to examine to what extent these RA effects are cell autonomous or dependent on systemic factors. METHODS: Parameters of lipid......), and to an increased expression of proteins favoring fat oxidation (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha, uncoupling protein 2, fasting-induced adipose factor, enzymes of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation). These changes paralleled inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein and were...

  5. Dynamic simulations on the mitochondrial fatty acid Beta-oxidation network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinberger Klaus M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria plays an important role in energy metabolism and genetic disorders of this pathway may cause metabolic diseases. Enzyme deficiencies can block the metabolism at defined reactions in the mitochondrion and lead to accumulation of specific substrates causing severe clinical manifestations. Ten of the disorders directly affecting mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation have been well-defined, implicating episodic hypoketotic hypoglycemia provoked by catabolic stress, multiple organ failure, muscle weakness, or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Additionally, syndromes of severe maternal illness (HELLP syndrome and AFLP have been associated with pregnancies carrying a fetus affected by fatty acid oxidation deficiencies. However, little is known about fatty acids kinetics, especially during fasting or exercise when the demand for fatty acid oxidation is increased (catabolic stress. Results A computational kinetic network of 64 reactions with 91 compounds and 301 parameters was constructed to study dynamic properties of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation. Various deficiencies of acyl-CoA dehydrogenase were simulated and verified with measured concentrations of indicative metabolites of screened newborns in Middle Europe and South Australia. The simulated accumulation of specific acyl-CoAs according to the investigated enzyme deficiencies are in agreement with experimental data and findings in literature. Investigation of the dynamic properties of the fatty acid β-oxidation reveals that the formation of acetyl-CoA – substrate for energy production – is highly impaired within the first hours of fasting corresponding to the rapid progress to coma within 1–2 hours. LCAD deficiency exhibits the highest accumulation of fatty acids along with marked increase of these substrates during catabolic stress and the lowest production rate of acetyl-CoA. These findings might confirm gestational loss to

  6. Mechanisms leading to oligomers and SOA through aqueous photooxidation: insights from OH radical oxidation of acetic acid and methylglyoxal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous experiments have demonstrated that the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal produces low volatility products including pyruvate, oxalate and oligomers. These products are found predominantly in the particle phase in the atmosphere, suggesting that methylglyoxal is a precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. Acetic acid plays a central role in the aqueous oxidation of methylglyoxal and it is a ubiquitous product of gas phase photochemistry, making it a potential "aqueous" SOA precursor in its own right. However, the fate of acetic acid upon aqueous-phase oxidation is not well understood. In this research, acetic acid (20 μM–10 mM was oxidized by OH radicals, and pyruvic acid and methylglyoxal experimental samples were analyzed using new analytical methods, in order to better understand the formation of SOA from acetic acid and methylglyoxal. Glyoxylic, glycolic, and oxalic acids formed from acetic acid and OH radicals. In contrast to the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal, the aqueous OH radical oxidation of acetic acid did not produce succinic acid and oligomers. This suggests that the methylgloxal-derived oligomers do not form through the acid catalyzed esterification pathway proposed previously. Using results from these experiments, radical mechanisms responsible for oligomer formation from methylglyoxal oxidation in clouds and wet aerosols are proposed. The importance of acetic acid/acetate as an SOA precursor is also discussed. We hypothesize that this and similar chemistry is central to the daytime formation of oligomers in wet aerosols.

  7. Formic Acid Modified Co3O4-CeO2 Catalysts for CO Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruishu Shang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A formic acid modified catalyst, Co3O4-CeO2, was prepared via facile urea-hydrothermal method and applied in CO oxidation. The Co3O4-CeO2-0.5 catalyst, treated by formic acid at 0.5 mol/L, performed better in CO oxidation with T50 obtained at 69.5 °C and T100 obtained at 150 °C, respectively. The characterization results indicate that after treating with formic acid, there is a more porous structure within the Co3O4-CeO2 catalyst; meanwhile, despite of the slightly decreased content of Co, there are more adsorption sites exposed by acid treatment, as suggested by CO-TPD and H2-TPD, which explains the improvement of catalytic performance.

  8. Novel palladium flower-like nanostructured networks for electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Mingjun; Zou, Liangliang; Yuan, Ting; Huang, Qinghong; Zou, Zhiqing; Li, Xuemei; Yang, Hui

    2014-12-01

    Novel Pd flower-like nanostructured networks are synthesized via a simple CO-assisted reduction. The morphology and size of the Pd nanostructures are found to strongly depend on the temperature and solvent during the synthesis process. Such Pd flower-like nanostructured networks exhibit a much enhanced activity of about 3 times of that on conventional Pd nanoparticles towards the electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid. The specific activity of formic acid oxidation on Pd nanostructures is also greatly improved, indicating that the formation of flower-like nanostructured networks is beneficial for the electrooxidation of formic acid. Thus, it could be served as highly active catalyst for formic acid electrooxidation although the stability needs to be greatly improved.

  9. Highly dispersed Pd nanoparticles on chemically modified graphene with aminophenyl groups for formic acid oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Su-Dong; Shen, Cheng-Min; Tong, Hao; He, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Gang; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2011-11-01

    A novel electrode material based on chemically modified graphene (CMG) with aminophenyl groups is covalently functionalized by a nucleophilic ring-opening reaction between the epoxy groups of graphene oxide and the aminophenyl groups of p-phenylenediamine. Palladium nanoparticles with an average diameter of 4.2 nm are deposited on the CMG by a liquid-phase borohydride reduction. The electrocatalytic activity and stability of the Pd/CMG composite towards formic acid oxidation are found to be higher than those of reduced graphene oxide and commercial carbon materials such as Vulcan XC-72 supported Pd electrocatalysts.

  10. Direct synthesis of graphene nanosheets support Pd nanodendrites for electrocatalytic formic acid oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Su-Dong; Chen, Lin

    2015-11-01

    We report a solvothermal method preparation of dendritic Pd nanoparticles (DPNs) and spherical Pd nanoparticles (SPNs) supported on reduced graphene oxide (RGO). Drastically different morphologies of Pd NPs with nanodendritic structures or spherical structures were observed on graphene by controlling the reduction degree of graphene oxide (GO) under mild conditions. In addition to being a commonplace substrate, GO plays a more important role that relies on its surface groups, which serves as a shape-directing agent to direct the dendritic growth. As a result, the obtained DPNs/RGO catalyst exhibits a significantly enhanced electro-catalytic behavior for the oxidation of formic acid compared to the SPNs/RGO catalyst.

  11. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Oxidation of Neomenthol by Potassium Bromate in Acidic Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikant na

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Present study was focused on the analysis of kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of neomenthol by potassium bromate in acidic medium. For oxidizing neomenthol, potassium bromate stock solution (5.0×10─2 mol. dm─3 was prepared by dissolving exactly weighed quantity of potassium bromate in doubly distilled water. The suitable reaction mixtures were prepared and left at 313 K for over 24 hours to ensure complete oxidation of neomenthol15. The unreacted potassium bromate was determined iodometrically and the results indicate that one mole of potassium bromate is consumed for every three moles of neomenthol which leads to the formation of menthone (ketone.

  12. Amorphous palladium-silicon alloys for the oxidation of formic acid and formaldehyde. A voltammetric investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correia A.N.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid and formaldehyde on Pd and on amorphous Pd(Si was studied by cyclic voltammetry and the results compared with the literature for similar systems. The oxidation of HCOOH on Pd occurs through direct catalytic dehydrogenation via (:C(OH2ads while on Pd(Si this intermediate does not appear to be formed. This is a consequence of the presence of inert Si on the surface that diminishes the probability of adjacent free sites. At high HCOOH concentrations, that intermediate undergoes dehydration on the Pd surface and COads oxidation peak is observed. For HCHO, the oxidation mechanism on both electrode materials appears similar to that previously proposed for Pt. However, the oxides formed on the amorphous Pd(Si alloy are more reactive than those on Pd thus affecting the overall kinetics of the process for both organic molecules, a fact revealed by the increase in anodic currents observed in the voltammograms.

  13. Impact of iron, chelators, and free fatty acids on lipid oxidation in low-moisture crackers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barden, Leann; Vollmer, Daniel; Johnson, David; Decker, Eric

    2015-02-18

    This research strove to understand the relationship between physical structure and oxidative stability in crackers since mechanisms of lipid oxidation are poorly understood in low-moisture foods. Confocal microscopy showed that lipids formed a continuous matrix surrounding starch granules, and starch-lipid, lipid-air, and protein-lipid interfaces were observed. Unlike bulk oils, meats, and emulsions, lipid hydroperoxides exhibited greater stability in low-moisture crackers as hexanal formation was delayed >20 d. Iron, added at 10 times the concentrations normally found in enriched flour, did not increase oxidation rates compared to the control. EDTA may reduce endogenous iron activity but not as greatly as in other matrices. Addition of fatty acids up to 1.0% of total lipid weight did not statistically affect lipid oxidation lag phases. The unique structure of low-moisture foods clearly affects their resistance to metal-promoted lipid oxidation.

  14. Citric acid effects on brain and liver oxidative stress in lipopolysaccharide-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M E; Youness, Eman R; Mohammed, Nadia A; Morsy, Safaa M Youssef; Omara, Enayat A; Sleem, Amany A

    2014-05-01

    Citric acid is a weak organic acid found in the greatest amounts in citrus fruits. This study examined the effect of citric acid on endotoxin-induced oxidative stress of the brain and liver. Mice were challenged with a single intraperitoneal dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 200 μg/kg). Citric acid was given orally at 1, 2, or 4 g/kg at time of endotoxin injection and mice were euthanized 4 h later. LPS induced oxidative stress in the brain and liver tissue, resulting in marked increase in lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde [MDA]) and nitrite, while significantly decreasing reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) showed a pronounced increase in brain tissue after endotoxin injection. The administration of citric acid (1-2 g/kg) attenuated LPS-induced elevations in brain MDA, nitrite, TNF-α, GPx, and PON1 activity. In the liver, nitrite was decreased by 1 g/kg citric acid. GPx activity was increased, while PON1 activity was decreased by citric acid. The LPS-induced liver injury, DNA fragmentation, serum transaminase elevations, caspase-3, and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression were attenuated by 1-2 g/kg citric acid. DNA fragmentation, however, increased after 4 g/kg citric acid. Thus in this model of systemic inflammation, citric acid (1-2 g/kg) decreased brain lipid peroxidation and inflammation, liver damage, and DNA fragmentation.

  15. The effect of defects on the catalytic activity of single Au atom supported carbon nanotubes and reaction mechanism for CO oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sajjad; Fu Liu, Tian; Lian, Zan; Li, Bo; Sheng Su, Dang

    2017-08-23

    The mechanism of CO oxidation by O 2 on a single Au atom supported on pristine, mono atom vacancy (m), di atom vacancy (di) and the Stone Wales defect (SW) on single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) surface is systematically investigated theoretically using density functional theory. We determine that single Au atoms can be trapped effectively by the defects on SWCNTs. The defects on SWCNTs can enhance both the binding strength and catalytic activity of the supported single Au atom. Fundamental aspects such as adsorption energy and charge transfer are elucidated to analyze the adsorption properties of CO and O 2 and co-adsorption of CO and O 2 molecules. It is found that CO binds stronger than O 2 on Au supported SWCNT. We clearly demonstrate that the defected SWCNT surface promotes electron transfer from the supported single Au atom to O 2 molecules. On the other hand, this effect is weaker for pristine SWCNTs. It is observed that the high density of spin-polarized states are localized in the region of the Fermi level due to the strong interactions between Au (5d orbital) and the adjacent carbon (2p orbital) atoms, which influence the catalytic performance. In addition, we elucidate both the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms of CO oxidation by O 2 . For the LH pathway, the barriers of the rate-limiting step are calculated to be 0.02 eV and 0.05 eV for Au/m-SWCNT and Au/di-SWCNT, respectively. To regenerate the active sites, an ER-like reaction occurs to form a second CO 2 molecule. The ER pathway is observed on Au/m-SWCNT, Au/SW-SWCNT and Au/SWCNT in which the Au/m-SWCNT has a smaller barrier. The comparison with a previous study (Lu et al., J. Phys. Chem. C, 2009, 113, 20156-20160.) indicates that the curvature effect of SWCNTs is important for the catalytic property of the supported single Au. Overall, Au/m-SWCNT is identified as the most active catalyst for CO oxidation compared to pristine SWCNT, SW-SWCNT and di-SWCNT. Our findings give a

  16. Electrochemical Oxidative Decarboxylation of Malonic Acid Derivatives: A Method for the Synthesis of Ketals and Ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaofeng; Luo, Xiya; Dochain, Simon; Mathot, Charlotte; Markò, István E

    2015-10-02

    A novel electrochemical oxidative decarboxylation of disubstituted malonic acids leading to dimethoxy ketals is described. In the presence of NH3, a wide range of disubstituted malonic acids was transformed into the corresponding ketals in good to excellent yields under electrochemical conditions. When the crude reaction mixture, obtained after electrolysis, was directly treated with 1 M aq HCl, the initially generated ketals were smoothly transformed into the corresponding ketones in a single vessel operation.

  17. Efficient electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid using Au@Pt dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyyamperumal, Ravikumar; Zhang, Liang; Henkelman, Graeme; Crooks, Richard M

    2013-04-17

    We report electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid using monometallic and bimetallic dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs). The results indicate that the Au147@Pt DENs exhibit better electrocatalytic activity and low CO formation. Theoretical calculations attribute the observed activity to the deformation of nanoparticle structure, slow dehydration of formic acid, and weak binding of CO on Au147@Pt surface. Subsequent experiments confirmed the theoretical predictions.

  18. Effects of β-carotene on the thermal oxidation of fatty acids | Zeb ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The thermal stability of the fatty acids composition of edible oils is of great importance to food manufacturers. Corn oil, rapeseed and sunflower oils were fortified with 50 to 300 μg/g of β-carotene and oxidized using Rancimat (air flow rate 20 L/h) at 110°C for 14 h. Fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) were measured using gas ...

  19. Protective effects of dietary glycine and glutamic acid toward the toxic effects of oxidized mustard oil in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeb, Alam; Rahman, Saleem Ur

    2017-01-25

    The protective role of glycine and glutamic acid against the toxic effects of oxidized oil was studied for the first time. Mustard seed oil was thermally oxidized and characterized for quality characteristics and polyphenolic composition using reversed phase HPLC-DAD. Significant changes in the quality characteristics occurred with thermal oxidation. Fourteen polyphenolic compounds were identified and quantified in oils. Quercetin-3-glucoside, quercetin-3-feruloylsophoroside, catechin, quercetin-3-rutinoside, quercetin-3,7-diglucoside, sinapic acid and vanillic acid hexoside were the major compounds in the fresh and oxidized oil. Oxidized, un-oxidized mustard oils, glycine and glutamic acid were given to rabbits alone or in combination. The biochemical responses were studied in terms of haematological and biochemical parameters and histopathology. It has been observed that biochemical and haematological parameters were adversely affected by the oxidized oil, while supplementation of both amino acids was beneficial in normalizing these parameters. Both amino acids alone have no significant effects, however, oxidized oil affected the liver by enhancing fat accumulation, causing hepatitis, reactive Kupffer cells and necrosis. The co-administration of oxidized oils with glycine or glutamic acid revealed significant recovery of the liver structure and function. In conclusion, glycine or glutamic acid is beneficial and protective against food toxicity and can be considered as an ameliorative food supplement.

  20. Knowledge and periconceptional use of folic acid for the prevention of neural tube defects in ethnic communities in the United Kingdom: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peake, Jordana N; Copp, Andrew J; Shawe, Jill

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is widely accepted that periconceptional supplementation with folic acid can prevent a significant proportion of neural tube defects (NTDs). The present study evaluated how folic acid knowledge and periconceptional use for NTD prevention varies by ethnicity in the United Kingdom (U.K.). METHODS: A literature search was conducted to identify studies that included assessment of folic acid knowledge or use in U.K. women of different ethnicities. Only research and referenced sources published after 1991, the year of the landmark Medical Research Council’s Vitamin Study, were included. A meta-analysis was performed of studies that assessed preconceptional folic acid use in Caucasians and non-Caucasians. RESULTS: Five studies met the inclusion criteria for assessment of knowledge and/or use of folic acid supplements in U.K. women including non-Caucasians. The available evidence indicates that South Asians specifically have less knowledge and lower periconceptional use of folic acid than Caucasians; one study found that West Indian and African women also had lower folic acid uptake. A synthesis of results from three of the studies, in a meta-analysis, shows that Caucasians are almost three times more likely to take folic acid before conception than non-Caucasians. CONCLUSION: From the limited evidence available, U.K. women of non-Caucasian ethnicity appear to have less knowledge and a lower uptake of folic acid supplementation than Caucasians during the periconceptional period. Implementing targeted, innovative education campaigns together with a mandatory fortification policy, including the fortification of ethnic minority foods, will be required for maximum prevention of folic acid–preventable NTDs across different ethnic groups. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 97:444–451, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23873812

  1. Clarithromycin, trimethoprim, and penicillin and oxidative nucleic acid modifications in humans: randomised, controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Emil List; Cejvanovic, Vanja; Kjaer, Laura Kofoed; Pedersen, Morten Thorup; Popik, Sara Daugaard; Hansen, Lina Kallehave; Andersen, Jon Traerup; Jimenez-Solem, Espen; Broedbaek, Kasper; Petersen, Morten; Weimann, Allan; Henriksen, Trine; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen

    2017-08-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) contributes to the effect of bactericidal antibiotics. The formation of ROS is not restricted to bacteria, but also occurs in mammalian cells. Oxidative stress is linked to several diseases. This study investigates whether antibiotic drugs induce oxidative stress in healthy humans as a possible mechanism for adverse reactions to the antibiotic drugs. This study contains information from two randomised, controlled trials. Participants underwent 1 week treatment with clarithromycin, trimethoprim, phenoxymethylpenicillin (penicillin V), or placebo. Oxidative modifications were measured as 24-h urinary excretion of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo), and plasma levels of malondialdehyde before and after treatment as a measurement of DNA oxidation, RNA oxidation, and lipid peroxidation, respectively. Clarithromycin significantly increased urinary excretion of 8-oxodG by 22.0% (95% confidence interval (CI): 3.6-40.4%) and 8-oxoGuo by 14.9% (95% CI: 3.7-26.1%). Further, we demonstrated that trimethoprim significantly lowered urinary excretion of 8-oxodG by 21.7% (95% CI: 5.8-37.6%), but did not influence urinary excretion of 8-oxoGuo. Penicillin V did not influence urinary excretion of 8-oxodG or 8-oxoGuo. None of the antibiotic drugs influenced plasma levels of malondialdehyde. Clarithromycin significantly increases oxidative nucleic acid modifications. Increased oxidative modifications might explain some of clarithromycin's known adverse reactions. Trimethoprim significantly lowers DNA oxidation but not RNA oxidation. Penicillin V had no effect on oxidative nucleic acid modifications. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Assembly and Succession of Iron Oxide Microbial Mat Communities in Acidic Geothermal Springs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beam, Jake; Bernstein, Hans C.; Jay, Z.; Kozubal, Mark; Jennings, Ryan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Inskeep, William P.

    2016-02-15

    Iron oxide microbial mats are ubiquitous geobiological features on Earth and occur in extant acidic hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP), WY, USA, and form as a result of microbial processes. The relative contribution of different organisms to the development of these mat ecosystems is of specific interest. We hypothesized that chemolithoautotrophic organisms contribute to the early development and production of Fe(III)-oxide mats, which could support later-colonizing heterotrophic microorganisms. Sterile glass slides were incubated in the outflow channels of two acidic geothermal springs in YNP, and spatiotemporal changes in Fe(III)-oxide accretion and abundance of relevant community members were measured. Lithoautotrophic Hydrogenobaculum spp. were first colonizers and the most abundant taxa identified during early successional stages (7 – 40 days). Populations of M. yellowstonensis colonized after ~ 7 days, corresponding to visible Fe(III)-oxide accretion. Heterotrophic archaea colonized after 30 days, and emerge as the dominant functional guild in mature iron oxide mats (1 – 2 cm thick) that form after 70 – 120 days. First-order rate constants of iron oxide accretion ranged from 0.05 – 0.046 day-1, and reflected the absolute amount of iron accreted. Micro- and macroscale microterracettes were identified during iron oxide mat development, and suggest that the mass transfer of oxygen limits microbial growth. This was also demonstrated using microelectrode measurements of oxygen as a function of mat depth, which showed steep gradients in oxygen from the aqueous mat interface to ~ 1 mm. The formation and succession of amorphous Fe(III)-oxide mat communities follows a predictable pattern of distinct stages and growth. The successional stages and microbial signatures observed in these extant Fe(III)-oxide mat communities may be relevant to other past or present Fe(III)-oxide mineralizing systems.

  3. The Effect of Sr Modifier Additions on Double Oxide Film Defects in 2L99 Alloy Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Griffiths, W. D.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, Sr modifier (300 ppm) was added to 2L99 alloy sand castings to investigate its effect on bifilm defects in the castings. Two different sand molds were used in this study, with good and bad running system designs, to introduce different amounts of bifilm defects into the castings. The mechanical properties of the modified 2L99 castings were compared to the properties of unmodified castings and showed that with high bifilm defect contents (H) the Sr addition reduced the Weibull modulus of the UTS by 67 pct and the Position Parameter by 5 pct, and introduced a bimodal distribution into the Weibull plot of the pct Elongation. However, for castings with low bifilm defect content (L), the Weibull moduli of both the UTS and pct Elongation were significantly improved (by 78 and 73 pct, respectively) with the addition of Sr. The Position Parameter of the pct Elongation was improved by 135 pct. The results suggested that a desirable modification effect can only be achieved while the bifilm defect content in a casting was low.

  4. Catalytic oxidative conversion of cellulosic biomass to formic acid and acetic acid with exceptionally high yields

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jizhe

    2014-09-01

    Direct conversion of raw biomass materials to fine chemicals is of great significance from both economic and ecological perspectives. In this paper, we report that a Keggin-type vanadium-substituted phosphomolybdic acid catalyst, namely H4PVMo11O40, is capable of converting various biomass-derived substrates to formic acid and acetic acid with high selectivity in a water medium and oxygen atmosphere. Under optimized reaction conditions, H4PVMo11O40 gave an exceptionally high yield of formic acid (67.8%) from cellulose, far exceeding the values achieved in previous catalytic systems. Our study demonstrates that heteropoly acids are generally effective catalysts for biomass conversion due to their strong acidities, whereas the composition of metal addenda atoms in the catalysts has crucial influence on the reaction pathway and the product selectivity. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Dissolution study of thorium-uranium oxides in aqueous triflic acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulemela, E.; Bergeron, A.; Stoddard, T. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories - CNL, 286 Plant Rd., Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2016-07-01

    The dissolution of sintered mixed oxides of thorium with uranium in various concentrations of trifluoromethanesulfonic (triflic) acid solutions was investigated under reflux conditions to evaluate the suitability of the method. Various fragment sizes (1.00 mm < x < 7.30 mm) of sintered (Th,U)O{sub 2} and simulated high-burnup nuclear fuel (SIMFUEL) were almost completely dissolved in a few hours, which implies that triflic acid could be used as an alternative to the common dissolution method, involving nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid mixture. The influence of acid concentration, composition of the solids, and reaction time on the dissolution yield of Th and U ions was studied using Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The dissolution rate was found to depend upon the triflic acid concentration and size of the solid fragments, with near complete dissolution for the smallest fragments occurring in boiling 87% w/w triflic acid. The formation of Th and U ions in solution appears to occur at the same rate as the triflic acid simultaneously reacts with the constituent oxides as evidenced by the results of a constant U/Th concentration ratio with the progress of the dissolution. (authors)

  6. Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Formic Acid in an Alkaline Solution with Graphene-Oxide- Supported Ag and Pd Alloy Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyoung Soon; Yun, Mira; Jeong, Haesang; Jeon, Seungwon

    2015-08-01

    The electrocatalytic activities of metal-decorated graphene oxide (GO) catalysts were investigated. Electrochemically reduced GO-S-(CH2)4-S-Pd [ERGO-S-(CH2)4-S-Pd] and GO-S-(CH2)4-S-PdAg alloy [ERGO-S-(CH2)4-S-PdAg] were obtained through the electrochemical reduction of GO-S-(CH2)4-S-Pd and GO-S-(CH2)4-S-PdAg in a pH 5 PBS solution. It was demonstrated that the application of ERGO-S-(CH2)4-S-Pd and ERGO-S-(CH2)4-S-PdAg used in a modified GCE improves the electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid. The addition of an Ag nanoparticle with a carbon chain-Pd in the electrode provides an electrode with very interesting properties for the electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid. The ERGO-S-(CH2)4-S-Pd and ERGO-S-(CH2)4-S-PdAg were characterized via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). ERGO-S-(CH2)4-S-Pd and ERGO-S-(CH2)4-S-PdAg can be employed for the electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid. The electrochemical behaviors of this electrode were investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS).

  7. Ozone oxidation of oleic acid surface films decreases aerosol cloud condensation nuclei activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwier, A. N.; Sareen, N.; Lathem, T. L.; Nenes, A.; McNeill, V. F.

    2011-08-01

    Heterogeneous oxidation of aerosols composed of pure oleic acid (C18H34O2, an unsaturated fatty acid commonly found in continental and marine aerosol) by gas-phase O3 is known to increase aerosol hygroscopicity and activity as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Whether this trend is preserved when the oleic acid is internally mixed with other electrolytes is unknown and addressed in this study. We quantify the CCN activity of sodium salt aerosols (NaCl and Na2SO4) internally mixed with sodium oleate (SO) and oleic acid (OA). We find that particles containing roughly one monolayer of SO/OA show similar CCN activity to pure salt particles, whereas a tenfold increase in organic concentration slightly depresses CCN activity. O3 oxidation of these multicomponent aerosols has little effect on the critical diameter for CCN activation for unacidified particles at all conditions studied, and the activation kinetics of the CCN are similar in each case to those of pure salts. SO-containing particles which are acidified to atmospherically relevant pH before analysis in order to form oleic acid, however, show depressed CCN activity upon oxidation. This effect is more pronounced at higher organic concentrations. The behavior after oxidation is consistent with the disappearance of the organic surface film, supported by Köhler Theory Analysis (KTA). The κ-Köhler calculations show a small decrease in hygroscopicity after oxidation. The important implication of this finding is that oxidative aging may not always enhance the hygroscopicity of internally mixed inorganic-organic aerosols.

  8. Aerosol Fragmentation Driven by Coupling of Acid-Base and Free-Radical Chemistry in the Heterogeneous Oxidation of Aqueous Citric Acid by OH Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Matthew J; Wiegel, Aaron A; Wilson, Kevin R; Houle, Frances A

    2017-08-10

    A key uncertainty in the heterogeneous oxidation of carboxylic acids by hydroxyl radicals (OH) in aqueous-phase aerosol is how the free-radical reaction pathways might be altered by acid-base chemistry. In particular, if acid-base reactions occur concurrently with acyloxy radical formation and unimolecular decomposition of alkoxy radicals, there is a possibility that differences in reaction pathways impact the partitioning of organic carbon between the gas and aqueous phases. To examine these questions, a kinetic model is developed for the OH-initiated oxidation of citric acid aerosol at high relative humidity. The reaction scheme, containing both free-radical and acid-base elementary reaction steps with physically validated rate coefficients, accurately predicts the experimentally observed molecular composition, particle size, and average elemental composition of the aerosol upon oxidation. The difference between the two reaction channels centers on the reactivity of carboxylic acid groups. Free-radical reactions mainly add functional groups to the carbon skeleton of neutral citric acid, because carboxylic acid moieties deactivate the unimolecular fragmentation of alkoxy radicals. In contrast, the conjugate carboxylate groups originating from acid-base equilibria activate both acyloxy radical formation and carbon-carbon bond scission of alkoxy radicals, leading to the formation of low molecular weight, highly oxidized products such as oxalic and mesoxalic acid. Subsequent hydration of carbonyl groups in the oxidized products increases the aerosol hygroscopicity and accelerates the substantial water uptake and volume growth that accompany oxidation. These results frame the oxidative lifecycle of atmospheric aerosol: it is governed by feedbacks between reactions that first increase the particle oxidation state, then eventually promote water uptake and acid-base chemistry. When coupled to free-radical reactions, acid-base channels lead to formation of low molecular

  9. Defect Chemistry and Electrical Conductivity of Sm-Doped La1-xSrxCoO3-δ for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björketun, Mårten; Castelli, Ivano Eligio; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2017-01-01

    We have calculated the electrical conductivity of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode contact material La1-xSrxCoO3-δ at 900 K. Experimental trends in conductivity against x, and against δ for fixed x, are correctly reproduced for x ≲ 0.8. Furthermore, we have studied the chemistry of neutral...... and charged intrinsic and extrinsic defects (dopants) in La0.5Sr0.5CoO3 and have calculated the conductivity of the doped systems. In particular, we find that doping with Sm on the La site should enhance the conductivity, a prediction that is subsequently confirmed by electrical conductivity measurements....

  10. Dual Phases of Respiration Chain Defect-Augmented mROS-Mediated mCa2+ Stress during Oxidative Insult in Normal and ρ0 RBA1 Astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-I Peng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC deficits, resulting in augmented mitochondrial ROS (mROS generation, underlie pathogenesis of astrocytes. However, mtDNA-depleted cells (ρ0 lacking RC have been reported to be either sensitive or resistant to apoptosis. In this study, we sought to determine the effects of RC-enhanced mitochondrial stress following oxidative insult. Using noninvasive fluorescence probe-coupled laser scanning imaging microscopy, the ability to resist oxidative stress and levels of mROS formation and mitochondrial calcium (mCa2+ were compared between two different astrocyte cell lines, control and ρ0 astrocytes, over time upon oxidative stress. Our results showed that the cytoplasmic membrane becomes permeated with YO-PRO-1 dye at 150 and 130 minutes in RBA-1 and ρ0 astrocytes, respectively. In contrast to RBA-1, 30 minutes after 20 mM H2O2 exposure, ρ0 astrocytes formed marked plasma membrane blebs, lost the ability to retain Mito-R, and showed condensation of nuclei. Importantly, H2O2-induced ROS and accompanied mCa2+ elevation in control showed higher levels than ρ0 at early time point but vice versa at late time point. Our findings underscore dual phase of RC-defective cells harboring less mitochondrial stress due to low RC activity during short-term oxidative stress but augmented mROS-mediated mCa2+ stress during severe oxidative insult.

  11. Release of free amino acids upon oxidation of peptides and proteins by hydroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fobang; Lai, Senchao; Tong, Haijie; Lakey, Pascale S J; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Weller, Michael G; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kampf, Christopher J

    2017-03-01

    Hydroxyl radical-induced oxidation of proteins and peptides can lead to the cleavage of the peptide, leading to a release of fragments. Here, we used high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) and pre-column online ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA) derivatization-based amino acid analysis by HPLC with diode array detection and fluorescence detection to identify and quantify free amino acids released upon oxidation of proteins and peptides by hydroxyl radicals. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), ovalbumin (OVA) as model proteins, and synthetic tripeptides (comprised of varying compositions of the amino acids Gly, Ala, Ser, and Met) were used for reactions with hydroxyl radicals, which were generated by the Fenton reaction of iron ions and hydrogen peroxide. The molar yields of free glycine, aspartic acid, asparagine, and alanine per peptide or protein varied between 4 and 55%. For protein oxidation reactions, the molar yields of Gly (∼32-55% for BSA, ∼10-21% for OVA) were substantially higher than those for the other identified amino acids (∼5-12% for BSA, ∼4-6% for OVA). Upon oxidation of tripeptides with Gly in C-terminal, mid-chain, or N-terminal positions, Gly was preferentially released when it was located at the C-terminal site. Overall, we observe evidence for a site-selective formation of free amino acids in the OH radical-induced oxidation of peptides and proteins, which may be due to a reaction pathway involving nitrogen-centered radicals.

  12. Omega-hydroxylation of phytanic acid in rat liver microsomes: implications for Refsum disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komen, J. C.; Duran, M.; Wanders, R. J. A.

    2004-01-01

    The 3-methyl-branched fatty acid phytanic acid is degraded by the peroxisomal alpha-oxidation route because the 3-methyl group blocks beta-oxidation. In adult Refsum disease (ARD), peroxisomal alpha-oxidation is defective, which is caused by mutations in the gene coding for phytanoyl-CoA hydroxylase

  13. Defects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Lucia; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2015-01-01

    This volume, number 91 in the Semiconductor and Semimetals series, focuses on defects in semiconductors. Defects in semiconductors help to explain several phenomena, from diffusion to getter, and to draw theories on materials' behavior in response to electrical or mechanical fields. The volume includes chapters focusing specifically on electron and proton irradiation of silicon, point defects in zinc oxide and gallium nitride, ion implantation defects and shallow junctions in silicon and germanium, and much more. It will help support students and scientists in their experimental and theoret

  14. Statics and dynamics of nitrous oxide and nitrogen oxide adsorption on acid-resisting adsorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalev, S.D.; Starobinets, S.E.; Kefer, P.G.; Puzanov, I.S.

    1982-01-01

    The basic quantitative characteristics of statics of nitrous oxide and nitrogen oxide adsorption on H - mordenite, Na - erionite, KSM silica gel and also dynamics of N/sub 2/O and NO adsorption on H - mordenite are obtained to develop the adsorption method of nitrogen oxide release from technological gaseous mixture of power plant with a dissociating coolant. The parameters ''n'' and ''E'' of the equation of the theory of volumetric filling in N/sub 2/O adsorption on H-mordenite are equal to 2.5 and 16.4 kj respectively, the height of the operating layer is 0.08-0.15 m with gaseous flow velocity 0.05-0.2 m/sec. NO adsorption is localized and isn't accompanied by disproportionation to N/sub 2/O and NO/sub 2/ with concentrations less than 20 vol.%.

  15. Fatty acid oxidation changes and the correlation with oxidative stress in different preeclampsia-like mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Ding

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD expression is decreased in placenta of some cases of preeclampsia (PE which may result in free fatty acid (FFA increased. High FFA level will induce oxidative stress, so abnormal long-chain fatty acid-oxidation may participate in the pathogenesis of PE through oxidative stress pathway. METHODS: PE-like groups were ApoC3 transgenic mice with abnormal fatty acid metabolism, classical PE-like models with injection of Nw-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NA or lipopolysaccharide (LPS and the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS mouse model with β2GPI injection (ApoC3+NS, ApoC3+L-NA, L-NA, LPS and β2GPI groups. The control group was wild-type mice with normal saline injection. Except for β2GPI mice, the other mice were subdivided into pre-implantation (Pre and mid-pregnancy (Mid subgroups by injection time. RESULTS: All PE-like groups showed hypertension and proteinuria except ApoC3+NS mice only showed hypertension. Serum FFA levels increased significantly except in LPS group compared to controls (P<0.05. LCHAD mRNA and protein expression in the liver and placenta was significantly higher for ApoC3+NS, ApoC3+L-NA and β2GPI mice and lower for L-NA mice than controls (P<0.05 but did not differ between LPS mice and controls. P47phox mRNA and protein expression in the liver significantly increased in all PE-like groups except LPS group, while P47phox expression in the placenta only significantly increased in L-NA and β2GPI groups. CONCLUSIONS: Abnormal long-chain fatty acid-oxidation may play a different role in different PE-like models and in some cases participate in the pathogenesis of PE through oxidative stress pathway.

  16. Oxidation of carboxylic acids regenerates hydroxyl radicals in the unpolluted and nighttime troposphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Gabriel

    2010-07-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) controls the removal of organic compounds from the troposphere. Atmospheric chemistry models significantly under-predict OH levels in unpolluted environments, implying that they are regenerated via some unknown mechanism(s). This work uses computational chemistry to demonstrate that the photochemical oxidation of alkyl carboxylic acids can efficiently regenerate the hydroxyl radical via unimolecular decomposition of alpha-carboxyalkylperoxy radicals. For acetic acid and propanoic acid the proposed mechanism is predicted to dominate in the unpolluted lower troposphere, and it may also operate to some extent in the mid to upper troposphere. Alkyl carboxylic acids are also predicted to act as a new source of nighttime OH throughout the planetary boundary layer, where OH levels are also under-predicted. The thermodynamic requirements for reactions of this class are discussed, and some candidate OH-reforming molecules particularly relevant to aromatic photooxidation are identified. Adopting a broader perspective, the alpha-carboxyalkyl radical precursors that react with O(2) to form the unstable alpha-carboxyalkylperoxy type radicals are also expected to form during combustion, in the interste