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Sample records for acid negatively regulates

  1. Abscisic acid is a negative regulator of root gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Woong; Rong, Honglin; Zhang, Hanma; Wang, Myeong-Hyeon

    2009-01-23

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a role in root gravitropism and has led to an intense debate over whether ABA acts similar to auxin by translating the gravitational signal into directional root growth. While tremendous advances have been made in the past two decades in establishing the role of auxin in root gravitropism, little progress has been made in characterizing the role of ABA in this response. In fact, roots of plants that have undetectable levels of ABA and that display a normal gravitropic response have raised some serious doubts about whether ABA plays any role in root gravitropism. Here, we show strong evidence that ABA plays a role opposite to that of auxin and that it is a negative regulator of the gravitropic response of Arabidopsis roots.

  2. ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE 4 negatively regulates flowering through directly promoting Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Kai; Chen, Qian; Wu, Yaorong; Liu, Ruijun; Zhang, Huawei; Wang, Shengfu; Tang, Sanyuan; Yang, Wenyu; Xie, Qi

    2016-01-01

    During the life cycle of a plant, one of the major biological processes is the transition from the vegetative to the reproductive stage. In Arabidopsis, flowering time is precisely controlled by extensive environmental and internal cues. Gibberellins (GAs) promote flowering, while abscisic acid (ABA) is considered as a flowering suppressor. However, the detailed mechanism through which ABA inhibits the floral transition is poorly understood. Here, we report that ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE 4 (ABI4), a key component in the ABA signalling pathway, negatively regulates floral transition by directly promoting FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) transcription. The abi4 mutant showed the early flowering phenotype whereas ABI4-overexpressing (OE-ABI4) plants had delayed floral transition. Consistently, quantitative reverse transcription–PCR (qRT–PCR) assay revealed that the FLC transcription level was down-regulated in abi4, but up-regulated in OE-ABI4. The change in FT level was consistent with the pattern of FLC expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-qPCR (ChIP-qPCR), electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), and tobacco transient expression analysis showed that ABI4 promotes FLC expression by directly binding to its promoter. Genetic analysis demonstrated that OE-ABI4::flc-3 could not alter the flc-3 phenotype. OE-FLC::abi4 showed a markedly delayed flowering phenotype, which mimicked OE-FLC::WT, and suggested that ABI4 acts upstream of FLC in the same genetic pathway. Taken together, these findings suggest that ABA inhibits the floral transition by activating FLC transcription through ABI4. PMID:26507894

  3. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Fukushima, Nobuyuki [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • LPA{sub 5} inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA{sub 5} suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA{sub 5} on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA{sub 1} in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA{sub 5} in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA{sub 5} acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA{sub 1}–LPA{sub 6}) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA{sub 1} inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA{sub 5} in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 5} on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA{sub 5} may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA{sub 1}.

  4. A negative regulator encoded by a rice WRKY gene represses both abscisic acid and gibberellins signaling in aleurone cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong-Lin; Shin, Margaret; Zou, Xiaolu; Huang, Jianzhi; Ho, Tun-hua David; Shen, Qingxi J

    2009-05-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellins (GAs) control several developmental processes including seed maturation, dormancy, and germination. The antagonism of these two hormones is well-documented. However, recent data from transcription profiling studies indicate that they can function as agonists in regulating the expression of many genes although the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we report a rice WRKY gene, OsWRKY24, which encodes a protein that functions as a negative regulator of both GA and ABA signaling. Overexpression of OsWRKY24 via particle bombardment-mediated transient expression in aleurone cells represses the expression of two reporter constructs: the beta-glucuronidase gene driven by the GA-inducible Amy32b alpha-amylase promoter (Amy32b-GUS) and the ABA-inducible HVA22 promoter (HVA22-GUS). OsWRKY24 is unlikely a general repressor because it has little effect on the expression of the luciferase reporter gene driven by a constitutive ubiquitin promoter (UBI-Luciferase). As to the GA signaling, OsWRKY24 differs from OsWRKY51 and -71, two negative regulators specifically function in the GA signaling pathway, in several ways. First, OsWRKY24 contains two WRKY domains while OsWRKY51 and -71 have only one; both WRKY domains are essential for the full repressing activity of OsWRKY24. Second, binding of OsWRKY24 to the Amy32b promoter appears to involve sequences in addition to the TGAC cores of the W-boxes. Third, unlike OsWRKY71, OsWRKY24 is stable upon GA treatment. Together, these data demonstrate that OsWRKY24 is a novel type of transcriptional repressor that inhibits both GA and ABA signaling.

  5. EDR2 negatively regulates salicylic acid-based defenses and cell death during powdery mildew infections of Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Nishimura Marc

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hypersensitive necrosis response (HR of resistant plants to avirulent pathogens is a form of programmed cell death in which the plant sacrifices a few cells under attack, restricting pathogen growth into adjacent healthy tissues. In spite of the importance of this defense response, relatively little is known about the plant components that execute the cell death program or about its regulation in response to pathogen attack. Results We isolated the edr2-6 mutant, an allele of the previously described edr2 mutants. We found that edr2-6 exhibited an exaggerated chlorosis and necrosis response to attack by three pathogens, two powdery mildew and one downy mildew species, but not in response to abiotic stresses or attack by the bacterial leaf speck pathogen. The chlorosis and necrosis did not spread beyond inoculated sites suggesting that EDR2 limits the initiation of cell death rather than its spread. The pathogen-induced chlorosis and necrosis of edr2-6 was correlated with a stimulation of the salicylic acid defense pathway and was suppressed in mutants deficient in salicylic acid signaling. EDR2 encodes a novel protein with a pleckstrin homology and a StAR transfer (START domain as well as a plant-specific domain of unknown function, DUF1336. The pleckstrin homology domain binds to phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate in vitro and an EDR2:HA:GFP protein localizes to endoplasmic reticulum, plasma membrane and endosomes. Conclusion EDR2 acts as a negative regulator of cell death, specifically the cell death elicited by pathogen attack and mediated by the salicylic acid defense pathway. Phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate may have a role in limiting cell death via its effect on EDR2. This role in cell death may be indirect, by helping to target EDR2 to the appropriate membrane, or it may play a more direct role.

  6. A novel branched chain amino acids responsive transcriptional regulator, BCARR, negatively acts on the proteolytic system in Lactobacillus helveticus.

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    Taketo Wakai

    Full Text Available Transcriptional negative regulation of the proteolytic system of Lactobacillus helveticus CM4 in response to amino acids seems to be very important for the control of antihypertensive peptide production; however, it remains poorly understood. A 26-kDa protein with N-terminal cystathionine β-synthase domains (CBS domain protein, which seems to be involved in the regulatory system, was purified by using a DNA-sepharose bound 300-bp DNA fragment corresponding to the upstream regions of the six proteolytic genes that are down-regulated by amino acids. The CBS domain protein bound to a DNA fragment corresponding to the region upstream of the pepV gene in response to branched chain amino acids (BCAAs. The expression of the pepV gene in Escherichia coli grown in BCAA-enriched medium was repressed when the CBS domain protein was co-expressed. These results reveal that the CBS domain protein acts as a novel type of BCAA-responsive transcriptional regulator (BCARR in L. helveticus. From comparative analysis of the promoter regions of the six proteolysis genes, a palindromic AT-rich motif, 5'-AAAAANNCTWTTATT-3', was predicted as the consensus DNA motif for the BCARR protein binding. Footprint analysis using the pepV promotor region and gel shift analyses with the corresponding short DNA fragments strongly suggested that the BCARR protein binds adjacent to the pepV promoter region and affects the transcription level of the pepV gene in the presence of BCAAs. Homology search analysis of the C-terminal region of the BCARR protein suggested the existence of a unique βαββαβ fold structure that has been reported in a variety of ACT (aspartate kinase-chorismate mutase-tyrA domain proteins for sensing amino acids. These results also suggest that the sensing of BCAAs by the ACT domain might promote the binding of the BCARR to DNA sequences upstream of proteolysis genes, which affects the gene expression of the proteolytic system in L. helveticus.

  7. Negative regulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor on free calcium ion levels following facial nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fugao Zhu; Dawei Sun; Yanqing Wang; Rui Zhou; Junfeng Wen; Xiuming Wan; Yanjun Wang; Banghua Liu

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that muscarinic, and nicotinic receptors increase free Ca2+ levels in the facial nerve nucleus via various channels following facial nerve injury. However, intracellular Ca2+ overload can trigger either necrotic or apoptotic cell death. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an important inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, exists in the facial nerve nucleus. It is assumed that GABA negatively regulates free Ca2+ levels in the facial nerve nucleus. The present study investigated GABA type A (GABAA) receptor expression in the facial nerve nucleus in a rat model of facial nerve injury using immunohistochemistry and laser confocal microscopy, as well as the regulatory effects of GABAA receptor on nicotinic receptor response following facial nerve injury. Subunits α1, α3, α5, β1, β2, δ, and γ3 of GABAA receptors were expressed in the facial nerve nucleus following facial nerve injury. In addition, GABAA receptor expression significantly inhibited the increase in nicotinic receptor-mediated free Ca2+ levels in the facial nerve nucleus following facial nerve injury in a concentration-dependent fashion. These results suggest that GABAA receptors exhibit negative effects on nicotinic receptor responses following facial nerve injury.

  8. The zinc finger transcription factor SlZFP2 negatively regulates abscisic acid biosynthesis and fruit ripening in tomato.

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    Weng, Lin; Zhao, Fangfang; Li, Rong; Xu, Changjie; Chen, Kunsong; Xiao, Han

    2015-03-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) regulates plant development and adaptation to environmental conditions. Although the ABA biosynthesis pathway in plants has been thoroughly elucidated, how ABA biosynthetic genes are regulated at the molecular level during plant development is less well understood. Here, we show that the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) zinc finger transcription factor SlZFP2 is involved in the regulation of ABA biosynthesis during fruit development. Overexpression of SlZFP2 resulted in multiple phenotypic changes, including more branches, early flowering, delayed fruit ripening, lighter seeds, and faster seed germination, whereas down-regulation of its expression caused problematic fruit set, accelerated ripening, and inhibited seed germination. SlZFP2 represses ABA biosynthesis during fruit development through direct suppression of the ABA biosynthetic genes NOTABILIS, SITIENS, and FLACCA and the aldehyde oxidase SlAO1. We also show that SlZFP2 regulates fruit ripening through transcriptional suppression of the ripening regulator COLORLESS NON-RIPENING. Using bacterial one-hybrid screening and a selected amplification and binding assay, we identified the (A/T)(G/C)TT motif as the core binding sequence of SlZFP2. Furthermore, by RNA sequencing profiling, we found that 193 genes containing the SlZFP2-binding motifs in their promoters were differentially expressed in 2 d post anthesis fruits between the SlZFP2 RNA interference line and its nontransgenic sibling. We propose that SlZFP2 functions as a repressor to fine-tune ABA biosynthesis during fruit development and provides a potentially valuable tool for dissecting the role of ABA in fruit ripening.

  9. Retinoic acid-induced gene-I (RIG-I) associates with nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-2 (NOD2) to negatively regulate inflammatory signaling.

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    Morosky, Stefanie A; Zhu, Jianzhong; Mukherjee, Amitava; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Coyne, Carolyn B

    2011-08-12

    Cytoplasmic caspase recruiting domain (CARD)-containing molecules often function in the induction of potent antimicrobial responses in order to protect mammalian cells from invading pathogens. Retinoic acid-induced gene-I (RIG-I) and nucleotide binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) serve as key factors in the detection of viral and bacterial pathogens, and in the subsequent initiation of innate immune signals to combat infection. RIG-I and NOD2 share striking similarities in their cellular localization, both localize to membrane ruffles in non-polarized epithelial cells and both exhibit a close association with the junctional complex of polarized epithelia. Here we show that RIG-I and NOD2 not only colocalize to cellular ruffles and cell-cell junctions, but that they also form a direct interaction that is mediated by the CARDs of RIG-I and multiple regions of NOD2. Moreover, we show that RIG-I negatively regulates ligand-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling mediated by NOD2, and that NOD2 negatively regulates type I interferon induction by RIG-I. We also show that the three main Crohn disease-associated mutants of NOD2 (1007fs, R702W, G908R) form an interaction with RIG-I and negatively regulate its signaling to a greater extent than wild-type NOD2. Our results show that in addition to their role in innate immune recognition, RIG-I and NOD2 form a direct interaction at actin-enriched sites within cells and suggest that this interaction may impact RIG-I- and NOD2-dependent innate immune signaling.

  10. AtPUB 19, a U-Box E3 Ubiquitin Ligase, Negatively Regulates Abscisic Acid and Drought Responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Chang Liu; Yao-Rong Wu; Xia-He Huang; Jie Sun; Qi Xie

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitination is an important protein post-translational modification,which is involved in various cellular processes in higher plants,and U-box E3 ligases play important roles in diverse functions in eukaryotes.Here,we describe the functions of Arabidopsis thaliana PUB19 (AtPUB19),which we demonstrated in an in vitro assay to encode a U-box type E3 ubiquitin ligase.AtPUB19 was up-regulated by drought,salt,cold,and abscisic acid (ABA).Down-regulation of AtPUB19led to hypersensitivity to ABA,enhanced ABA-induced stomatal closing,and enhanced drought tolerance,while AtPUB 19overexpression resulted in the reverse phenotypes.Molecular analysis showed that the expression levels of a number of ABA and stress marker genes were altered in both AtPUB 19 overexpressing and atpub 19-1 mutant plants.In summary,our data show that AtPUB19 negatively regulates ABA and drought responses in A.thaliana.

  11. TWEAK Negatively Regulates Human Dicer

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The ribonuclease Dicer plays a central role in the microRNA pathway by processing microRNA precursors (pre-microRNAs) into microRNAs, a class of 19- to 24-nucleotide non-coding RNAs that regulate expression of ≈60% of the genes in humans. To gain further insights into the function and regulation of Dicer in human cells, we performed a yeast two-hybrid (Y2HB) screen using human Dicer double-stranded RNA-binding domain (dsRBD) as bait. This approach identified tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like w...

  12. PAPP2C Interacts with the Atypical Disease Resistance Protein RPW8.2 and Negatively Regulates Salicylic Acid-Dependent Defense Responses in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Ming Wang; Xian-Feng Ma; Yi Zhang; Ming-Cheng Luo; Guo-Liang Wang; Maria Bellizzi; Xing-Yao Xiong; Shun-Yuan Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Many fungal and oomycete pathogens differentiate a feeding structure named the haustorium to extract nutrition from the plant epidermal cell.The atypical resistance (R) protein RPW8.2 activates salicylic acid (SA)-dependent,haustorium-targeted defenses against Golovinomyces spp.,the causal agents of powdery mildew diseases on multiple plant species.How RPW8.2 activates defense remains uncharacterized.Here,we report that RPW8.2 interacts with the phytochrome-associated protein phosphatase type 2C (PAPP2C) in yeast and in planta as evidenced by coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays.Down-regulation of PAPP2C by RNA interference (RNAi) in Col-0 plants lacking RPW8.2 leads to leaf spontaneous cell death and enhanced disease resistance to powdery mildew via the SA-dependent signaling pathway.Moreover,down-regulation of PAPP2C by RNAi in the RPW8.2 background results in strong HR-like cell death,which correlates with elevated RPW8.2 expression.We further demonstrate that hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged PAPP2C prepared from tobacco leaf cells transiently transformed with HA-PAPP2C possesses phosphatase activity.In addition,silencing a rice gene (Os04g0452000) homologous to PAPP2C also results in spontaneous cell death in rice.Combined,our results suggest that RPW8.2 is functionally connected with PAPP2C and that PAPP2C negatively regulates SA-dependent basal defense against powdery mildew in Arabidopsis.

  13. Las-like quorum-sensing system negatively regulates both pyoluteorin and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid production in Pseudomonas sp. M18

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A las-like quorum-sensing system in Pseudomonas sp. M18 was identified, which consisted of lasI and lasR genes encoding LuxI-LuxR type regulator. Several functions of the las system from strain M18 were investigated in this study. The chromosomal inactivation of either lasI or lasR by recombination increased the production of both pyoluteorin (Plt) and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) by 4-5 fold and 2-3 fold over that of the wild type strain of M18, respectively. Production of both antibiotics was restored to wild-type levels after in trans complementation with the wild-type lasI or lasR gene. Expression of the translational fusions pltA’-’lacZ and phzA’-’lacZ further confirmed the negative effect of lasI or lasR on both biosynthetic operons, and it was also demonstrated that the las system was related to the ability of swarming motility and the inhibition of cell growth.

  14. Las-like quorum-sensing system negatively regulates both pyoluteorin and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid production in Pseudomonas sp. M18

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yun; WANG XiaoLei; HUANG XianQing; ZHANG XueHong; XU YuQuan

    2008-01-01

    A las-like quorum-sensing system in Pseudornonas sp. M18 was identified, which consisted of lasl and lasR genes encoding LuxI-LuxR type regulator. Several functions of the las system from strain M18 were investigated in this study. The chromosomal inactivation of either lasl or lasR by recombination increased the production of both pyoluteorin (Pit) and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) by 4-5 fold and 2-3 fold over that of the wild type atrein of M18, respectively. Production of both antibiotics was restored to wild-type levels after in trans complementation with the wild-type lasl or lasR gene. Expression of the translational fusions pltA'-'lacZand phzA'-'lacZfurther confirmed the negative effect of lasl or lasR on both biosynthetic operons, and it was also demonstrated that the las system was related to the ability of swarming motility and the inhibition of cell growth.

  15. Does Glycine Betaine and Salicylic Acid Ameliorate the Negative Effect of Drought on Wheat by Regulating Osmotic Adjustment through Solutes Accumulation?

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    Heshmat S. Aldesuquy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the beneficial effect of foliar application of glycine betaine (10mM, grain presoaking in salicylic acid (0.05 M and their interaction on drought tolerance of two wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cultivars (sensitive, Sakha 94 and resistant, Sakha 93. Osmotic pressure, some osmolytes concentration and grain yield were determined. Water stress caused an increase in osmotic pressure, proline, total soluble nitrogen, total soluble sugars, organic acids, ions (Na+, K+, Ca+2, Mg+2 and Cl- content as well as Na+/K+ ratio in cell sap flag leaves of both wheat cultivars. The resistant variety had higher values of osmotic pressure, proline, organic acids and ions content than the sensitive one. On the other hand, water stress induced marked decrease (P<0.05 in grain yield. The applied chemicals mitigated the effect of water stress on the used wheat cultivars. The effect was more pronounced with glycine betaine + salicylic acid treatment. The applied chemicals increased the osmotic pressure, the osmolytes concentrations as well as the grain yield. Furthermore, the osmotic pressure of flag leaf sap appeared to depend on proline, TSN, TSS, organic acids and the ions content. The economic yield (grain yield was positively correlated with proline, keto-acids and osmotic pressure but negatively correlated with TSN, TSS and citric acid.

  16. Triple Negative Breast Cancer and Metabolic Regulation

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    2015-08-01

    Warburg- like metabolic reprogramming. The Warburg effect is characterized by increased glycolytic flux with increased biosynthesis of amino acids...HBP1 KD tumors and have used the gene expression and NMR analysis to discover an alteration in lipid metabolism . The results are summarized in...execute a multi- disciplinary analysis and discover new aspects to metabolic regulation by HBP1 and by Wnt signaling. Some recent studies have

  17. FRNK negatively regulates IL-4-mediated inflammation.

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    Sharma, Ritu; Colarusso, Pina; Zhang, Hong; Stevens, Katarzyna M; Patel, Kamala D

    2015-02-15

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-related nonkinase (PTK2 isoform 6 in humans, hereafter referred to as FRNK) is a cytoskeletal regulatory protein that has recently been shown to dampen lung fibrosis, yet its role in inflammation is unknown. Here, we show for the first time that expression of FRNK negatively regulates IL-4-mediated inflammation in a human model of eosinophil recruitment. Mechanistically, FRNK blocks eosinophil accumulation, firm adhesion and transmigration by preventing transcription and protein expression of VCAM-1 and CCL26. IL-4 activates STAT6 to induce VCAM-1 and CCL26 transcription. We now show that IL-4 also increases GATA6 to induce VCAM-1 expression. FRNK blocks IL-4-induced GATA6 transcription but has little effect on GATA6 protein expression and no effect on STAT6 activation. FRNK can block FAK or Pyk2 signaling and we, thus, downregulated these proteins using siRNA to determine whether signaling from either protein is involved in the regulation of VCAM-1 and CCL26. Knockdown of FAK, Pyk2 or both had no effect on VCAM-1 or CCL26 expression, which suggests that FRNK acts independently of FAK and Pyk2 signaling. Finally, we found that IL-4 induces the late expression of endogenous FRNK. In summary, FRNK represents a novel mechanism to negatively regulate IL-4-mediated inflammation.

  18. Nitric oxide negatively regulates mammalian adult neurogenesis

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    Packer, Michael A.; Stasiv, Yuri; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Chmielnicki, Eva; Grinberg, Alexander; Westphal, Heiner; Goldman, Steven A.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2003-08-01

    Neural progenitor cells are widespread throughout the adult central nervous system but only give rise to neurons in specific loci. Negative regulators of neurogenesis have therefore been postulated, but none have yet been identified as subserving a significant role in the adult brain. Here we report that nitric oxide (NO) acts as an important negative regulator of cell proliferation in the adult mammalian brain. We used two independent approaches to examine the function of NO in adult neurogenesis. In a pharmacological approach, we suppressed NO production in the rat brain by intraventricular infusion of an NO synthase inhibitor. In a genetic approach, we generated a null mutant neuronal NO synthase knockout mouse line by targeting the exon encoding active center of the enzyme. In both models, the number of new cells generated in neurogenic areas of the adult brain, the olfactory subependyma and the dentate gyrus, was strongly augmented, which indicates that division of neural stem cells in the adult brain is controlled by NO and suggests a strategy for enhancing neurogenesis in the adult central nervous system.

  19. LINGO-1 negatively regulates myelination by oligodendrocytes.

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    Mi, Sha; Miller, Robert H; Lee, Xinhua; Scott, Martin L; Shulag-Morskaya, Svetlane; Shao, Zhaohui; Chang, Jufang; Thill, Greg; Levesque, Melissa; Zhang, Mingdi; Hession, Cathy; Sah, Dinah; Trapp, Bruce; He, Zhigang; Jung, Vincent; McCoy, John M; Pepinsky, R Blake

    2005-06-01

    The control of myelination by oligodendrocytes in the CNS is poorly understood. Here we show that LINGO-1 is an important negative regulator of this critical process. LINGO-1 is expressed in oligodendrocytes. Attenuation of its function by dominant-negative LINGO-1, LINGO-1 RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) or soluble human LINGO-1 (LINGO-1-Fc) leads to differentiation and increased myelination competence. Attenuation of LINGO-1 results in downregulation of RhoA activity, which has been implicated in oligodendrocyte differentiation. Conversely, overexpression of LINGO-1 leads to activation of RhoA and inhibition of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. Treatment of oligodendrocyte and neuron cocultures with LINGO-1-Fc resulted in highly developed myelinated axons that have internodes and well-defined nodes of Ranvier. The contribution of LINGO-1 to myelination was verified in vivo through the analysis of LINGO-1 knockout mice. The ability to recapitulate CNS myelination in vitro using LINGO-1 antagonists and the in vivo effects seen in the LINGO-1 knockout indicate that LINGO-1 signaling may be critical for CNS myelination.

  20. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) affects pollen tube growth via modulating putative Ca2+-permeable membrane channels and is coupled to negative regulation on glutamate decarboxylase.

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    Yu, Guang-Hui; Zou, Jie; Feng, Jing; Peng, Xiong-Bo; Wu, Ju-You; Wu, Ying-Liang; Palanivelu, Ravishankar; Sun, Meng-Xiang

    2014-07-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is implicated in pollen tube growth, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms that it mediates are largely unknown. Here, it is shown that exogenous GABA modulates putative Ca(2+)-permeable channels on the plasma membranes of tobacco pollen grains and pollen tubes. Whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments and non-invasive micromeasurement technology (NMT) revealed that the influx of Ca(2+) increases in pollen tubes in response to exogenous GABA. It is also demonstrated that glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), the rate-limiting enzyme of GABA biosynthesis, is involved in feedback controls of Ca(2+)-permeable channels to fluctuate intracellular GABA levels and thus modulate pollen tube growth. The findings suggest that GAD activity linked with Ca(2+)-permeable channels relays an extracellular GABA signal and integrates multiple signal pathways to modulate tobacco pollen tube growth. Thus, the data explain how GABA mediates the communication between the style and the growing pollen tubes.

  1. Cultural differences in hedonic emotion regulation after a negative event.

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    Miyamoto, Yuri; Ma, Xiaoming; Petermann, Amelia G

    2014-08-01

    Beliefs about emotions can influence how people regulate their emotions. The present research examined whether Eastern dialectical beliefs about negative emotions lead to cultural differences in how people regulate their emotions after experiencing a negative event. We hypothesized that, because of dialectical beliefs about negative emotions prevalent in Eastern culture, Easterners are less motivated than Westerners to engage in hedonic emotion regulation-up-regulation of positive emotions and down-regulation of negative emotions. By assessing online reactions to a recent negative event, Study 1 found that European Americans are more motivated to engage in hedonic emotion regulation. Furthermore, consistent with the reported motivation to regulate emotion hedonically, European Americans show a steeper decline in negative emotions 1 day later than do Asians. By examining retrospective memory of reactions to a past negative event, Study 2 further showed that cultural differences in hedonic emotion regulation are mediated by cultural differences in dialectical beliefs about motivational and cognitive utility of negative emotions, but not by personal deservingness or self-efficacy beliefs. These findings demonstrate the role of cultural beliefs in shaping emotion regulation and emotional experiences.

  2. Vitamin a is a negative regulator of osteoblast mineralization.

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    Thomas Lind

    Full Text Available An excessive intake of vitamin A has been associated with an increased risk of fractures in humans. In animals, a high vitamin A intake leads to a reduction of long bone diameter and spontaneous fractures. Studies in rodents indicate that the bone thinning is due to increased periosteal bone resorption and reduced radial growth. Whether the latter is a consequence of direct effects on bone or indirect effects on appetite and general growth is unknown. In this study we therefore used pair-feeding and dynamic histomorphometry to investigate the direct effect of a high intake of vitamin A on bone formation in rats. Although there were no differences in body weight or femur length compared to controls, there was an approximately halved bone formation and mineral apposition rate at the femur diaphysis of rats fed vitamin A. To try to clarify the mechanism(s behind this reduction, we treated primary human osteoblasts and a murine preosteoblastic cell line (MC3T3-E1 with the active metabolite of vitamin A; retinoic acid (RA, a retinoic acid receptor (RAR antagonist (AGN194310, and a Cyp26 inhibitor (R115866 which blocks endogenous RA catabolism. We found that RA, via RARs, suppressed in vitro mineralization. This was independent of a negative effect on osteoblast proliferation. Alkaline phosphatase and bone gamma carboxyglutamate protein (Bglap, Osteocalcin were drastically reduced in RA treated cells and RA also reduced the protein levels of Runx2 and Osterix, key transcription factors for progression to a mature osteoblast. Normal osteoblast differentiation involved up regulation of Cyp26b1, the major enzyme responsible for RA degradation, suggesting that a drop in RA signaling is required for osteogenesis analogous to what has been found for chondrogenesis. In addition, RA decreased Phex, an osteoblast/osteocyte protein necessary for mineralization. Taken together, our data indicate that vitamin A is a negative regulator of osteoblast mineralization.

  3. Vitamin a is a negative regulator of osteoblast mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Thomas; Sundqvist, Anders; Hu, Lijuan; Pejler, Gunnar; Andersson, Göran; Jacobson, Annica; Melhus, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    An excessive intake of vitamin A has been associated with an increased risk of fractures in humans. In animals, a high vitamin A intake leads to a reduction of long bone diameter and spontaneous fractures. Studies in rodents indicate that the bone thinning is due to increased periosteal bone resorption and reduced radial growth. Whether the latter is a consequence of direct effects on bone or indirect effects on appetite and general growth is unknown. In this study we therefore used pair-feeding and dynamic histomorphometry to investigate the direct effect of a high intake of vitamin A on bone formation in rats. Although there were no differences in body weight or femur length compared to controls, there was an approximately halved bone formation and mineral apposition rate at the femur diaphysis of rats fed vitamin A. To try to clarify the mechanism(s) behind this reduction, we treated primary human osteoblasts and a murine preosteoblastic cell line (MC3T3-E1) with the active metabolite of vitamin A; retinoic acid (RA), a retinoic acid receptor (RAR) antagonist (AGN194310), and a Cyp26 inhibitor (R115866) which blocks endogenous RA catabolism. We found that RA, via RARs, suppressed in vitro mineralization. This was independent of a negative effect on osteoblast proliferation. Alkaline phosphatase and bone gamma carboxyglutamate protein (Bglap, Osteocalcin) were drastically reduced in RA treated cells and RA also reduced the protein levels of Runx2 and Osterix, key transcription factors for progression to a mature osteoblast. Normal osteoblast differentiation involved up regulation of Cyp26b1, the major enzyme responsible for RA degradation, suggesting that a drop in RA signaling is required for osteogenesis analogous to what has been found for chondrogenesis. In addition, RA decreased Phex, an osteoblast/osteocyte protein necessary for mineralization. Taken together, our data indicate that vitamin A is a negative regulator of osteoblast mineralization.

  4. Organelle acidification negatively regulates vacuole membrane fusion in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desfougères, Yann; Vavassori, Stefano; Rompf, Maria; Gerasimaite, Ruta; Mayer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The V-ATPase is a proton pump consisting of a membrane-integral V0 sector and a peripheral V1 sector, which carries the ATPase activity. In vitro studies of yeast vacuole fusion and evidence from worms, flies, zebrafish and mice suggested that V0 interacts with the SNARE machinery for membrane fusion, that it promotes the induction of hemifusion and that this activity requires physical presence of V0 rather than its proton pump activity. A recent in vivo study in yeast has challenged these interpretations, concluding that fusion required solely lumenal acidification but not the V0 sector itself. Here, we identify the reasons for this discrepancy and reconcile it. We find that acute pharmacological or physiological inhibition of V-ATPase pump activity de-acidifies the vacuole lumen in living yeast cells within minutes. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that de-acidification induces vacuole fusion rather than inhibiting it. Cells expressing mutated V0 subunits that maintain vacuolar acidity were blocked in this fusion. Thus, proton pump activity of the V-ATPase negatively regulates vacuole fusion in vivo. Vacuole fusion in vivo does, however, require physical presence of a fusion-competent V0 sector. PMID:27363625

  5. Negative regulators of brown adipose tissue (BAT)-mediated thermogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bal Krishan; Patil, Mallikarjun; Satyanarayana, Ande

    2014-12-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is specialized for energy expenditure, a process called adaptive thermogenesis. PET-CT scans recently demonstrated the existence of metabolically active BAT in adult humans, which revitalized our interest in BAT. Increasing the amount and/or activity of BAT holds tremendous promise for the treatment of obesity and its associated diseases. PGC1α is the master regulator of UCP1-mediated thermogenesis in BAT. A number of proteins have been identified to influence thermogenesis either positively or negatively through regulating the expression or transcriptional activity of PGC1α. Therefore, BAT activation can be achieved by either inducing the expression of positive regulators of PGC1α or by inhibiting the repressors of the PGC1α/UCP1 pathway. Here, we review the most important negative regulators of PGC1α/UCP1 signaling and their mechanism of action in BAT-mediated thermogenesis.

  6. The power of extraverts: testing positive and negative mood regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Hervas

    Full Text Available Extraversion is a personality trait which has been systematically related to positive affect and well-being. One of the mechanisms that may account for these positive outcomes is the ability to regulate the responses to positive, as well as negative, moods. Prior research has found that extraverts' higher positive mood maintenance could explain their higher levels of positive affect. However, research exploring differences between extraverts and introverts in negative mood regulation has yielded mixed results. The aim of the current study was explore the role of different facets of mood regulation displayed by extraverts, ambiverts, and introverts. After been exposed to a sad vs. happy mood induction, participants underwent a mood regulation task. Extraverts and ambiverts exhibited higher positive mood regulation than introverts, but similar mood repair. Thus, this research highlights the importance of positive mood regulation in the psychological functioning of extraverts, and opens new conceptualizations for developing interventions for introverts to improve their positive mood regulation and, hence, overall positive affect and well-being.

  7. Transcription dynamics of inducible genes modulated by negative regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Tang, Moxun; Yu, Jianshe

    2015-06-01

    Gene transcription is a stochastic process in single cells, in which genes transit randomly between active and inactive states. Transcription of many inducible genes is also tightly regulated: It is often stimulated by extracellular signals, activated through signal transduction pathways and later repressed by negative regulations. In this work, we study the nonlinear dynamics of the mean transcription level of inducible genes modulated by the interplay of the intrinsic transcriptional randomness and the repression by negative regulations. In our model, we integrate negative regulations into gene activation process, and make the conventional assumption on the production and degradation of transcripts. We show that, whether or not the basal transcription is temporarily terminated when cells are stimulated, the mean transcription level grows in the typical up and down pattern commonly observed in immune response genes. With the help of numerical simulations, we clarify the delicate impact of the system parameters on the transcription dynamics, and demonstrate how our model generates the distinct temporal gene-induction patterns in mouse fibroblasts discerned in recent experiments.

  8. Bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keating, Niamh

    2009-10-01

    In addition to their roles in facilitating lipid digestion and absorption, bile acids are recognized as important regulators of intestinal function. Exposure to bile acids can dramatically influence intestinal transport and barrier properties; in recent years, they have also become appreciated as important factors in regulating cell growth and survival. Indeed, few cells reside within the intestinal mucosa that are not altered to some degree by exposure to bile acids. The past decade saw great advances in the knowledge of how bile acids exert their actions at the cellular and molecular levels. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the role of bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

  9. Susi, a negative regulator of Drosophila PI3-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittwer, Franz; Jaquenoud, Malika; Brogiolo, Walter; Zarske, Marcel; Wüstemann, Philipp; Fernandez, Rafael; Stocker, Hugo; Wymann, Matthias P; Hafen, Ernst

    2005-06-01

    The Phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Protein Kinase B (PI3K/PKB) signaling pathway controls growth, metabolism, and lifespan in animals, and deregulation of its activity is associated with diabetes and cancer in humans. Here, we describe Susi, a coiled-coil domain protein that acts as a negative regulator of insulin signaling in Drosophila. Whereas loss of Susi function increases body size, overexpression of Susi reduces growth. We provide genetic evidence that Susi negatively regulates dPI3K activity. Susi directly binds to dP60, the regulatory subunit of dPI3K. Since Susi has no overt similarity to known inhibitors of PI3K/PKB signaling, it defines a novel mechanism by which this signaling cascade is kept in check. The fact that Susi is expressed in a circadian rhythm, with highest levels during the night, suggests that Susi attenuates insulin signaling during the fasting period.

  10. Akt is negatively regulated by the MULAN E3 ligase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seunghee Bae; Jongdoo Kim; Hong-Duck Um; In-Chul Park; Su-Jae Lee; Seon Young Nam; Young-Woo Jin; Jae Ho Lee; Sungkwan An; Sun-Yong Kim; Jin Hyuk Jung; Yeongmin Yoon; Hwa Jun Cha; Hyunjin Lee; Karam Kim; Jongran Kim; In-Sook An

    2012-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Akt functions in multiple cellular processes,including cell survival and tumor development.Studies of the mechanisms that negatively regulate Akt have focused on dephosphorylation-mediated inactivation.In this study,we identified a negative regulator of Akt,MULAN,which possesses both a RING finger domain and E3 ubiquitin ligase activity.Akt was found to directly interact with MULAN and to be ubiquitinated by MULAN in vitro and in vivo.Other molecular assays demonstrated that phosphorylated Akt is a substantive target for both interaction with MULAN and ubiquitination by MULAN.The results of the functional studies suggest that the degradation of Akt by MULAN suppresses cell proliferation and viability.These data provide insight into the Akt ubiquitination signaling network.

  11. How Novice EFL Teachers Regulate Their Negative Emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Arizmendi Tejeda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This research report shares the findings that emerged from a qualitative study in which the main objective was to discover whether or not novice English as a foreign language teachers regulate their negative emotions during their initial teaching practice, and if so, how they do this. The data were collected by semi-structured interviews and observations, and analyzed by microanalysis and constant comparative analysis. The participants were five novice teachers who study English at the same university, and who were giving classes as part of their internship. The results from this research revealed that these particular novice English as a foreign language teachers use different emotional strategies to regulate their negative emotions.

  12. Negative confounding by essential fatty acids in methylmercury neurotoxicity associations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Anna L; Mogensen, Ulla Brasch; Bjerve, Kristian S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Methylmercury, a worldwide contaminant of fish and seafood, can cause adverse effects on the developing nervous system. However, long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in seafood provide beneficial effects on brain development. Negative confounding will likely result in underestim......BACKGROUND: Methylmercury, a worldwide contaminant of fish and seafood, can cause adverse effects on the developing nervous system. However, long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in seafood provide beneficial effects on brain development. Negative confounding will likely result...... concentrations of fatty acids were determined in cord serum phospholipids. Neuropsychological performance in verbal, motor, attention, spatial, and memory functions was assessed at 7 years of age. Multiple regression and structural equation models (SEMs) were carried out to determine the confounder...

  13. The Kidney and Acid-Base Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeppen, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    Since the topic of the role of the kidneys in the regulation of acid base balance was last reviewed from a teaching perspective (Koeppen BM. Renal regulation of acid-base balance. Adv Physiol Educ 20: 132-141, 1998), our understanding of the specific membrane transporters involved in H+, HCO , and NH transport, and especially how these…

  14. Regulation of positive and negative emotion: Effects of sociocultural context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara A. Snyder

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has demonstrated that the use of emotion regulation strategies can vary by sociocultural context. In a previous study, we reported changes in the use of two different emotion regulation strategies at an annual alternative cultural event, Burning Man (McRae, Heller, John, & Gross, 2011. In this sociocultural context, as compared to home, participants reported less use of expressive suppression (a strategy generally associated with maladaptive outcomes, and greater use of cognitive reappraisal (a strategy associated with adaptive outcomes. What remained unclear was whether these changes in self-reported emotion regulation strategy use were characterized by changes in the regulation of positive emotion, negative emotion, or both. We addressed this issue in the current study by asking Burning Man participants separate questions about positive and negative emotion. Using multiple datasets, we not only replicated our previous findings, but also found that the decreased use of suppression is primarily driven by reports of decreased suppression of positive emotion at Burning Man. By contrast, the reported increased use of reappraisal is not characterized by differential reappraisal of positive and negative emotion at Burning Man. Moreover, we observed novel individual differences in the magnitude of these effects. The contextual changes in self-reported suppression that we report are strongest for men and younger participants. For those who had previously attended Burning Man, we observed lower levels of self-reported suppression in both sociocultural contexts: Burning Man and home. These findings have implications for understanding the ways in which certain sociocultural contexts may decrease suppression, and possibly minimize its associated maladaptive effects.

  15. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatouma Alimirah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR in prostate cancer (PC is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs. We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in human normal PrECs, the activation of p53 by genotoxic stress or by inhibition of p53 nuclear export downregulated the expression of AR. Furthermore, forced expression of p53 in LNCaP cells decreased the expression of AR. Conversely, knockdown of p53 expression in LNCaP cells increased the AR expression. Consistent with the negative regulation of AR expression by p53, the p53-null HCT116 cells expressed higher levels of AR compared with the isogenic HCT116 cells that express the wildtype p53. Moreover, we noted that in etoposide treated LNCaP cells p53 bound to the promoter region of the AR gene, which contains a potential p53 DNA-binding consensus sequence, in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Together, our observations provide support for the idea that the loss of p53 function in prostate cancer cells contributes to increased expression of AR.

  16. Negative regulation of bacterial quorum sensing tunes public goods cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rashmi; Schuster, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) often coordinates the expression of other, generally more costly public goods involved in virulence and nutrient acquisition. In many Proteobacteria, the basic QS circuitry consists of a synthase that produces a diffusible acyl-homoserine lactone and a cognate receptor that activates public goods expression. In some species, the circuitry also contains negative regulators that have the potential to modulate the timing and magnitude of activation. In this study, we experimentally investigated the contribution of this regulatory function to the evolutionary stability of public goods cooperation in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We compared fitness and public goods expression rates of strains lacking either qteE or qscR, each encoding a distinct negative regulator, with those of the wild-type parent and a signal-blind receptor mutant under defined growth conditions. We found that (1) qteE and qscR mutations behave virtually identically and have a stronger effect on the magnitude than on the timing of expression, (2) high expression in qteE and qscR mutants imposes a metabolic burden under nutrient conditions that advance induction and (3) high expression in qteE and qscR mutants increases population growth when QS is required, but also permits invasion by both wild-type and receptor mutant strains. Our data indicate that negative regulation of QS balances the costs and benefits of public goods by attenuating expression after transition to the induced state. As the cells cannot accurately assess the amount of cooperation needed, such bet-hedging would be advantageous in changing parasitic and nonparasitic environments.

  17. Intracellular LINGO-1 negatively regulates Trk neurotrophin receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meabon, James S; de Laat, Rian; Ieguchi, Katsuaki; Serbzhinsky, Dmitry; Hudson, Mark P; Huber, B Russel; Wiley, Jesse C; Bothwell, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophins, essential regulators of many aspects of neuronal differentiation and function, signal via four receptors, p75, TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. The three Trk paralogs are members of the LIG superfamily of membrane proteins, which share extracellular domains consisting of leucine-rich repeat and C2 Ig domains. Another LIG protein, LINGO-1 has been reported to bind and influence signaling of p75 as well as TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. Here we examine the manner in which LINGO-1 influences the function of TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. We report that Trk activation promotes Trk association with LINGO-1, and that this association promotes Trk degradation by a lysosomal mechanism. This mechanism resembles the mechanism by which another LIG protein, LRIG1, promotes lysosomal degradation of receptor tyrosine kinases such as the EGF receptor. We present evidence indicating that the Trk/LINGO-1 interaction occurs, in part, within recycling endosomes. We show that a mutant form of LINGO-1, with much of the extracellular domain deleted, has the capacity to enhance TrkA signaling in PC12 cells, possibly by acting as an inhibitor of Trk down-regulation by full length LINGO-1. We propose that LINGO-1 functions as a negative feedback regulator of signaling by cognate receptor tyrosine kinases including TrkA, TrkB and TrkC.

  18. Negative regulation of DSS-induced experimental colitis by PILRα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, Kazuki; Kohyama, Masako; Kurashima, Yosuke; Kogure, Yuta; Wang, Jing; Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Suenaga, Tadahiro; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Kunisawa, Jun; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is thought to be a complex multifactorial disease, in which an increased inflammatory response plays an important role. Paired immunoglobulin-like type 2 receptor α (PILRα), well conserved in almost all mammals, is an inhibitory receptor containing immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs in the cytoplasmic domain. PILRα is mainly expressed on myeloid cells and plays an important role in the regulation of inflammation. In the present study, we investigated the function of PILRα in inflammatory bowel disease using PILRα-deficient mice. When mice were orally administered dextran sulfate sodium (DSS), colonic mucosal injury and inflammation were significantly exacerbated in DSS-treated PILRα-deficient mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that neutrophil and macrophage cell numbers were higher in the colons of DSS-treated PILRα-deficient mice than in those of WT mice. Blockade of CXCR2 expressed on neutrophils using a CXCR2 inhibitor decreased the severity of colitis observed in PILRα-deficient mice. These results suggest that PILRα negatively regulates inflammatory colitis by regulating the infiltration of inflammatory cells such as neutrophils and macrophages.

  19. Ceramide and ceramide 1-phosphate are negative regulators of TNF-α production induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józefowski, Szczepan; Czerkies, Maciej; Łukasik, Anna; Bielawska, Alicja; Bielawski, Jacek; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna; Sobota, Andrzej

    2010-12-01

    LPS is a constituent of cell walls of Gram-negative bacteria that, acting through the CD14/TLR4 receptor complex, causes strong proinflammatory activation of macrophages. In murine peritoneal macrophages and J774 cells, LPS at 1-2 ng/ml induced maximal TNF-α and MIP-2 release, and higher LPS concentrations were less effective, which suggested a negative control of LPS action. While studying the mechanism of this negative regulation, we found that in J774 cells, LPS activated both acid sphingomyelinase and neutral sphingomyelinase and moderately elevated ceramide, ceramide 1-phosphate, and sphingosine levels. Lowering of the acid sphingomyelinase and neutral sphingomyelinase activities using inhibitors or gene silencing upregulated TNF-α and MIP-2 production in J774 cells and macrophages. Accordingly, treatment of those cells with exogenous C8-ceramide diminished TNF-α and MIP-2 production after LPS stimulation. Exposure of J774 cells to bacterial sphingomyelinase or interference with ceramide hydrolysis using inhibitors of ceramidases also lowered the LPS-induced TNF-α production. The latter result indicates that ceramide rather than sphingosine suppresses TNF-α and MIP-2 production. Of these two cytokines, only TNF-α was negatively regulated by ceramide 1-phosphate as was indicated by upregulated TNF-α production after silencing of ceramide kinase gene expression. None of the above treatments diminished NO or RANTES production induced by LPS. Together the data indicate that ceramide negatively regulates production of TNF-α and MIP-2 in response to LPS with the former being sensitive to ceramide 1-phosphate as well. We hypothesize that the ceramide-mediated anti-inflammatory pathway may play a role in preventing endotoxic shock and in limiting inflammation.

  20. Arfaptin-1 negatively regulates Arl1-mediated retrograde transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lien-Hung Huang

    Full Text Available The small GTPase Arf-like protein 1 (Arl1 is well known for its role in intracellular vesicular transport at the trans-Golgi network (TGN. In this study, we used differential affinity chromatography combined with mass spectrometry to identify Arf-interacting protein 1b (arfaptin-1b as an Arl1-interacting protein and characterized a novel function for arfaptin-1 (including the arfaptin-1a and 1b isoforms in Arl1-mediated retrograde transport. Using a Shiga-toxin subunit B (STxB transportation assay, we demonstrated that knockdown of arfaptin-1 accelerated the retrograde transport of STxB from the endosome to the Golgi apparatus, whereas Arl1 knockdown inhibited STxB transport compared with control cells. Arfaptin-1 overexpression, but not an Arl1 binding-defective mutant (arfaptin-1b-F317A, consistently inhibited STxB transport. Exogenous arfaptin-1 expression did not interfere with the localization of the Arl1-interacting proteins golgin-97 and golgin-245 to the TGN and vice versa. Moreover, we found that the N-terminal region of arfaptin-1 was involved in the regulation of retrograde transport. Our results show that arfaptin-1 acts as a negative regulator in Arl1-mediated retrograde transport and suggest that different functional complexes containing Arl1 form in distinct microdomains and are responsible for different functions.

  1. Negative regulation of lymphocyte activation by the adaptor protein LAX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Minghua; Granillo, Olivia; Wen, Renren; Yang, Kaiyong; Dai, Xuezhi; Wang, Demin; Zhang, Weiguo

    2005-05-01

    The membrane-associated adaptor protein LAX is a linker for activation of T cells (LAT)-like molecule that is expressed in lymphoid tissues. Upon stimulation of T or B cells, it is phosphorylated and interacts with Grb2 and the p85 subunit of PI3K. LAX, however, is not capable of replacing LAT in the TCR signaling pathway. In this study we report that upon T or B cell activation, the LAX protein was up-regulated dramatically. Although disruption of the LAX gene by homologous recombination had no major impact on lymphocyte development, it caused a significant reduction in CD23 expression on mature B cells. Interestingly, naive LAX(-/-) mice had spontaneous germinal center formation. Compared with normal T and B cells, LAX(-/-) T and B cells were hyperresponsive and had enhanced calcium flux, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, MAPK and Akt activation, and cell survival upon engagement of the T or B AgRs. Our data demonstrate that LAX functions as a negative regulator in lymphocyte signaling.

  2. Annexin A3 as a negative regulator of adipocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takenori; Ito, Yoshimasa; Sato, Asuka; Hosono, Takashi; Niimi, Shingo; Ariga, Toyohiko; Seki, Taiichiro

    2012-10-01

    Annexin A3 is a protein belonging to the annexin family, and it is mainly present in cellular membranes as a phospholipid-binding protein that binds via the calcium ion. However, its physiological function remains to be clarified. We examined the expression of annexin A3 in mouse tissues and found for the first time that annexin A3 mRNA and its protein were expressed more strongly in adipose tissues than in other tissues. In adipose tissues, annexin A3-expressing cells were present in the stromal vascular fraction, and precisely identical to Pref-1-positive preadipocytes, Pref-1 being an epidermal growth factor repeat-containing transmembrane protein that inhibits adipogenesis. In 3T3-L1 cells, used as a model of adipogenesis, annexin A3 was down-regulated at an early phase of adipocyte differentiation, and this pattern paralleled that of Pref-1. Suppression of annexin A3 in these cells with siRNA caused elevation of the PPARγ2 mRNA level and lipid droplet accumulation. In conclusion, our data suggest that annexin A3 is a negative regulator of adipocyte differentiation.

  3. Phosphofructokinase-1 Negatively Regulates Neurogenesis from Neural Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengyun; Qian, Xiaodan; Qin, Cheng; Lin, Yuhui; Wu, Haiyin; Chang, Lei; Luo, Chunxia; Zhu, Dongya

    2016-06-01

    Phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK-1), a major regulatory glycolytic enzyme, has been implicated in the functions of astrocytes and neurons. Here, we report that PFK-1 negatively regulates neurogenesis from neural stem cells (NSCs) by targeting pro-neural transcriptional factors. Using in vitro assays, we found that PFK-1 knockdown enhanced, and PFK-1 overexpression inhibited the neuronal differentiation of NSCs, which was consistent with the findings from NSCs subjected to 5 h of hypoxia. Meanwhile, the neurogenesis induced by PFK-1 knockdown was attributed to the increased proliferation of neural progenitors and the commitment of NSCs to the neuronal lineage. Similarly, in vivo knockdown of PFK-1 also increased neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Finally, we demonstrated that the neurogenesis mediated by PFK-1 was likely achieved by targeting mammalian achaete-scute homologue-1 (Mash 1), neuronal differentiation factor (NeuroD), and sex-determining region Y (SRY)-related HMG box 2 (Sox2). All together, our results reveal PFK-1 as an important regulator of neurogenesis.

  4. DMPD: Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18703349 Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. Komur...Show Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. PubmedID 18703349 Title Negative r...egulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. Authors Komuro A, Bamm

  5. Bile acid biosynthesis and its regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areta Hebanowska

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Bile acid biosynthesis is the main pathway of cholesterol catabolism. Bile acids are more soluble than cholesterol so are easier to excrete. As amphipathic molecules they participate in lipid digestion and absorption in the intestine and they help to excrete free cholesterol with bile. They are also ligands for nuclear receptors regulating the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism. Interconversion of cholesterol into bile acids is an important point of its homeostasis. Seventeen enzymes are engaged in this process and many of them are cytochromes P450. Bile acid synthesis initiation may proceed with the “classical” pathway (starting with cholesterol hydroxylation at the C7α position or the “alternative” pathway (starting with cholesterol hydroxylation at the C27 position. Two additional pathways are possible, though their quantitative significance is small (initiated with cholesterol hydroxylations of C24 and C25 positions. Oxysterols produced are not only intermediates of bile acid biosynthesis but also important regulators of metabolism. Bile acid biosynthesis takes place in the liver, but some enzymes are also present in other organs, where they participate in regulation of cholesterol metabolism. Those enzymes are potential targets for new drugs against cholesterol metabolism disturbances. This article is a brief description of the bile acid biosynthesis pathway and participating enzymes.

  6. Fatty Acid Desaturases, Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Regulation, and Biotechnological Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Je Min Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs are considered to be critical nutrients to regulate human health and development, and numerous fatty acid desaturases play key roles in synthesizing PUFAs. Given the lack of delta-12 and -15 desaturases and the low levels of conversion to PUFAs, humans must consume some omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in their diet. Many studies on fatty acid desaturases as well as PUFAs have shown that fatty acid desaturase genes are closely related to different human physiological conditions. Since the first front-end desaturases from cyanobacteria were cloned, numerous desaturase genes have been identified and animals and plants have been genetically engineered to produce PUFAs such as eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. Recently, a biotechnological approach has been used to develop clinical treatments for human physiological conditions, including cancers and neurogenetic disorders. Thus, understanding the functions and regulation of PUFAs associated with human health and development by using biotechnology may facilitate the engineering of more advanced PUFA production and provide new insights into the complexity of fatty acid metabolism.

  7. Fatty Acid Desaturases, Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Regulation, and Biotechnological Advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Je Min; Lee, Hyungjae; Kang, SeokBeom; Park, Woo Jung

    2016-01-04

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are considered to be critical nutrients to regulate human health and development, and numerous fatty acid desaturases play key roles in synthesizing PUFAs. Given the lack of delta-12 and -15 desaturases and the low levels of conversion to PUFAs, humans must consume some omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in their diet. Many studies on fatty acid desaturases as well as PUFAs have shown that fatty acid desaturase genes are closely related to different human physiological conditions. Since the first front-end desaturases from cyanobacteria were cloned, numerous desaturase genes have been identified and animals and plants have been genetically engineered to produce PUFAs such as eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. Recently, a biotechnological approach has been used to develop clinical treatments for human physiological conditions, including cancers and neurogenetic disorders. Thus, understanding the functions and regulation of PUFAs associated with human health and development by using biotechnology may facilitate the engineering of more advanced PUFA production and provide new insights into the complexity of fatty acid metabolism.

  8. Type One Protein Phosphatase 1 and Its Regulatory Protein Inhibitor 2 Negatively Regulate ABA Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Xie, Shaojun; Batelli, Giorgia; Wang, Bangshing; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Wang, Xingang; Xing, Lu; Lei, Mingguang; Yan, Jun; Zhu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates plant growth, development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The core ABA signaling pathway consists of three major components: ABA receptor (PYR1/PYLs), type 2C Protein Phosphatase (PP2C) and SNF1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2). Nevertheless, the complexity of ABA signaling remains to be explored. To uncover new components of ABA signal transduction pathways, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen for SnRK2-interacting proteins. We found that Type One Protein Phosphatase 1 (TOPP1) and its regulatory protein, At Inhibitor-2 (AtI-2), physically interact with SnRK2s and also with PYLs. TOPP1 inhibited the kinase activity of SnRK2.6, and this inhibition could be enhanced by AtI-2. Transactivation assays showed that TOPP1 and AtI-2 negatively regulated the SnRK2.2/3/6-mediated activation of the ABA responsive reporter gene RD29B, supporting a negative role of TOPP1 and AtI-2 in ABA signaling. Consistent with these findings, topp1 and ati-2 mutant plants displayed hypersensitivities to ABA and salt treatments, and transcriptome analysis of TOPP1 and AtI-2 knockout plants revealed an increased expression of multiple ABA-responsive genes in the mutants. Taken together, our results uncover TOPP1 and AtI-2 as negative regulators of ABA signaling. PMID:26943172

  9. Negative regulation of RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling by TRK-fused gene (TFG) protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Na-Rae; Shin, Han-Bo; Kim, Hye-In; Choi, Myung-Soo; Inn, Kyung-Soo, E-mail: innks@khu.ac.kr

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •TRK-fused gene product (TFG) interacts with TRIM25 upon viral infection. •TFG negatively regulates RIG-I mediated antiviral signaling. •TFG depletion leads to enhanced viral replication. •TFG act downstream of MAVS. -- Abstract: RIG-I (retinoic acid inducible gene I)-mediated antiviral signaling serves as the first line of defense against viral infection. Upon detection of viral RNA, RIG-I undergoes TRIM25 (tripartite motif protein 25)-mediated K63-linked ubiquitination, leading to type I interferon (IFN) production. In this study, we demonstrate that TRK-fused gene (TFG) protein, previously identified as a TRIM25-interacting protein, binds TRIM25 upon virus infection and negatively regulates RIG-I-mediated type-I IFN signaling. RIG-I-mediated IFN production and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathways were upregulated by the suppression of TFG expression. Furthermore, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replication was significantly inhibited by small inhibitory hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of TFG, supporting the suppressive role of TFG in RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling. Interestingly, suppression of TFG expression increased not only RIG-I-mediated signaling but also MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein)-induced signaling, suggesting that TFG plays a pivotal role in negative regulation of RNA-sensing, RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) family signaling pathways.

  10. Drosophila RSK negatively regulates bouton number at the neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Matthias; Raabe, Thomas; Heisenberg, Martin; Sendtner, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Ribosomal S6 kinases (RSKs) are growth factor-regulated serine-threonine kinases participating in the RAS-ERK signaling pathway. RSKs have been implicated in memory formation in mammals and flies. To characterize the function of RSK at the synapse level, we investigated the effect of mutations in the rsk gene on the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in Drosophila larvae. Immunostaining revealed transgenic expressed RSK in presynaptic regions. In mutants with a full deletion or an N-terminal partial deletion of rsk, an increased bouton number was found. Restoring the wild-type rsk function in the null mutant with a genomic rescue construct reverted the synaptic phenotype, and overexpression of the rsk-cDNA in motoneurons reduced bouton numbers. Based on previous observations that RSK interacts with the Drosophila ERK homologue Rolled, genetic epistasis experiments were performed with loss- and gain-of-function mutations in Rolled. These experiments provided evidence that RSK mediates its negative effect on bouton formation at the Drosophila NMJ by inhibition of ERK signaling.

  11. Grouper TRIM13 exerts negative regulation of antiviral immune response against nodavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Youhua; Yang, Min; Yu, Yepin; Yang, Ying; Zhou, Linli; Huang, Xiaohong; Qin, Qiwei

    2016-08-01

    The tripartite motif (TRIM)-containing proteins have attracted particular attention to their multiple functions in different biological processes. TRIM13, a member of the TRIM family, is a RING domain-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase which plays critical roles in diverse cellular processes including cell death, cancer and antiviral immunity. In this study, a TRIM13 homolog from orange spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides (EcTRIM13) was cloned and characterized. The full-length of EcTRIM13 cDNA encoded a polypeptide of 399 amino acids which shared 81% identity with TRIM13 homolog from large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea). Amino acid alignment analysis showed that EcTRIM13 contained conserved RING finger and B-box domain. Expression patterns analysis indicated that EcTRIM13 was abundant in liver, spleen, kidney, intestine and gill. Moreover, the transcript of EcTRIM13 in grouper spleen was differently regulated after injection with Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) or polyinosin-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C). Under fluorescence microscopy, we observed the tubular structure in wild type EcTRIM13 transfected cells, but the RING domain mutant resulted in the fluorescence distribution was changed and the bright punctate fluorescence was evenly situated throughout the cytoplasm, suggesting that the RING domain was essential for its accurate localization. Overexpression of EcTRIM13 in vitro obviously increased the replication of red spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV), and the enhancing effect of EcTRIM13 on virus replication was affected by the RING domain. Furthermore, the ectopic expression of EcTRIM13 not only negatively regulated the interferon promoter activity induced by interferon regulator factor (IRF) 3, IRF7, and melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA5), but also decreased the expression of several interferon related factors. In addition, the overexpression of EcTRIM13 also differently regulated the transcription of pro

  12. A Lexical Framework for Semantic Annotation of Positive and Negative Regulation Relations in Biomedical Pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambach, Sine; Lassen, Tine

    presented here, we analyze 6 frequently used verbs denoting the regulation relations regulates, positively regulates and negatively regulates through corpus analysis, and propose a formal representation of the acquired knowledge as domain speci¯c semantic frames. The acquired knowledge patterns can thus...

  13. Arabidopsis map kinase 4 negatively regulates systemic acquired resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, P; Johansen, Bo; Petersen, M;

    2000-01-01

    Transposon inactivation of Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 produced the mpk4 mutant exhibiting constitutive systemic acquired resistance (SAR) including elevated salicylic acid (SA) levels, increased resistance to virulent pathogens, and constitutive pathogenesis-related gene expression shown by Northern...... of NPR1. PDF1.2 and THI2.1 gene induction by jasmonate was blocked in mpk4 expressing NahG, suggesting that MPK4 is required for jasmonic acid-responsive gene expression....

  14. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 negatively regulates systemic acquired resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, M.; Brodersen, P.; Naested, H.

    2000-01-01

    Transposon inactivation of Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 produced the mpk4 mutant exhibiting constitutive systemic acquired resistance (SAR) including elevated salicylic acid (SA) revels, increased resistance to virulent pathogens, and constitutive pathogenesis-related gene expression shown by Northern...... of NPR1. PDF1.2 and THI2.1 gene induction by jasmonate was blocked in mpk4 expressing NahG, suggesting that MPK4 is required for jasmonic acid-responsive gene expression....

  15. The Dishevelled-binding protein CXXC5 negatively regulates cutaneous wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soung-Hoon; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Kim, Hyun-Yi; Lee, Young-Mi; Kim, Heesu; Nam, Kyoung Ae; Roh, Mi Ryung; Min, Do Sik; Chung, Kee Yang; Choi, Kang-Yell

    2015-06-29

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays important roles in cutaneous wound healing and dermal fibrosis. However, its regulatory mechanism has not been fully elucidated, and a commercially available wound-healing agent targeting this pathway is desirable but currently unavailable. We found that CXXC-type zinc finger protein 5 (CXXC5) serves as a negative feedback regulator of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by interacting with the Dishevelled (Dvl) protein. In humans, CXXC5 protein levels were reduced in epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts of acute wounds. A differential regulation of β-catenin, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and collagen I by overexpression and silencing of CXXC5 in vitro indicated a critical role for this factor in myofibroblast differentiation and collagen production. In addition, CXXC5(-/-) mice exhibited accelerated cutaneous wound healing, as well as enhanced keratin 14 and collagen synthesis. Protein transduction domain (PTD)-Dvl-binding motif (DBM), a competitor peptide blocking CXXC5-Dvl interactions, disrupted this negative feedback loop and activated β-catenin and collagen production in vitro. Co-treatment of skin wounds with PTD-DBM and valproic acid (VPA), a glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) inhibitor which activates the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, synergistically accelerated cutaneous wound healing in mice. Together, these data suggest that CXXC5 would represent a potential target for future therapies aimed at improving wound healing.

  16. Children's Negative Emotionality Combined with Poor Self-Regulation Affects Allostatic Load in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dich, Nadya; Doan, Stacey; Evans, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the concurrent and prospective, longitudinal effects of childhood negative emotionality and self-regulation on allostatic load (AL), a physiological indicator of chronic stress. We hypothesized that negative emotionality in combination with poor self-regulation would predict elevated AL. Mothers reported on children's…

  17. Osteopontin negatively regulates parathyroid hormone receptor signaling in osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Noriaki; Nakashima, Kazuhisa; Rittling, Susan R; Schipani, Ernestina; Hayata, Tadayoshi; Soma, Kunimichi; Denhardt, David T; Kronenberg, Henry M; Ezura, Yoichi; Noda, Masaki

    2008-07-11

    Systemic hormonal control exerts its effect through the regulation of local target tissues, which in turn regulate upstream signals in a feedback loop. The parathyroid hormone (PTH) axis is a well defined hormonal signaling system that regulates calcium levels and bone metabolism. To understand the interplay between systemic and local signaling in bone, we examined the effects of deficiency of the bone matrix protein osteopontin (OPN) on the systemic effects of PTH specifically within osteoblastic cell lineages. Parathyroid hormone receptor (PPR) transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active form of the receptor (caPPR) specifically in cells of the osteoblast lineage have a high bone mass phenotype. In these mice, OPN deficiency further increased bone mass. This increase was associated with conversion of the major intertrabecular cell population from hematopoietic cells to stromal/osteoblastic cells and parallel elevations in histomorphometric and biochemical parameters of bone formation and resorption. Treatment with small interfering RNA (siRNA) for osteopontin enhanced H223R mutant caPPR-induced cAMP-response element (CRE) activity levels by about 10-fold. Thus, in addition to the well known calcemic feedback system for PTH, local feedback regulation by the bone matrix protein OPN also plays a significant role in the regulation of PTH actions.

  18. Regulation of intestinal mucosal growth by amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Ramesh M; Johnson, Leonard R

    2014-03-01

    Amino acids, especially glutamine (GLN) have been known for many years to stimulate the growth of small intestinal mucosa. Polyamines are also required for optimal mucosal growth, and the inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the first rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis, blocks growth. Certain amino acids, primarily asparagine (ASN) and GLN stimulate ODC activity in a solution of physiological salts. More importantly, their presence is also required before growth factors and hormones such as epidermal growth factor and insulin are able to increase ODC activity. ODC activity is inhibited by antizyme-1 (AZ) whose synthesis is stimulated by polyamines, thus, providing a negative feedback regulation of the enzyme. In the absence of amino acids mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is inhibited, whereas, mTORC2 is stimulated leading to the inhibition of global protein synthesis but increasing the synthesis of AZ via a cap-independent mechanism. These data, therefore, explain why ASN or GLN is essential for the activation of ODC. Interestingly, in a number of papers, AZ has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation, stimulate apoptosis, or increase autophagy. Each of these activities results in decreased cellular growth. AZ binds to and accelerates the degradation of ODC and other proteins shown to regulate proliferation and cell death, such as Aurora-A, Cyclin D1, and Smad1. The correlation between the stimulation of ODC activity and the absence of AZ as influenced by amino acids is high. Not only do amino acids such as ASN and GLN stimulate ODC while inhibiting AZ synthesis, but also amino acids such as lysine, valine, and ornithine, which inhibit ODC activity, increase the synthesis of AZ. The question remaining to be answered is whether AZ inhibits growth directly or whether it acts by decreasing the availability of polyamines to the dividing cells. In either case, evidence strongly suggests that the regulation of AZ synthesis is the

  19. Induction of Posttranslational Modifications of Mitochondrial Proteins by ATP Contributes to Negative Regulation of Mitochondrial Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhang

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that ATP regulates mitochondrial function through the AMPK signaling pathway. However, the AMPK-independent pathway remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated ATP surplus in the negative regulation of mitochondrial function with a focus on pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH phosphorylation and protein acetylation. PDH phosphorylation was induced by a high fat diet in the liver of obese mice, which was associated with ATP elevation. In 1c1c7 hepatoma cells, the phosphorylation was induced by palmitate treatment through induction of ATP production. The phosphorylation was associated with a reduction in mitochondria oxygen consumption after 4 h treatment. The palmitate effect was blocked by etomoxir, which inhibited ATP production through suppression of fatty acid β-oxidation. The PDH phosphorylation was induced by incubation of mitochondrial lysate with ATP in vitro without altering the expression of PDH kinase 2 (PDK2 and 4 (PDK4. In addition, acetylation of multiple mitochondrial proteins was induced by ATP in the same conditions. Acetyl-CoA exhibited a similar activity to ATP in induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation. These data suggest that ATP elevation may inhibit mitochondrial function through induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation of mitochondrial proteins. The results suggest an AMPK-independent mechanism for ATP regulation of mitochondrial function.

  20. Intrinsic and extrinsic negative regulators of nuclear protein transport processes

    OpenAIRE

    Sekimoto, Toshihiro; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear–cytoplasmic protein transport is a critical process in cellular events. The identification of transport signals (nuclear localization signal and nuclear export signal) and their receptors has facilitated our understanding of this expanding field. Nuclear transport must be appropriately regulated to deliver proteins through the nuclear pore when their functions are required in the nucleus, and to export them into the cytoplasm when they are not needed in the nucleus. Altered nuclea...

  1. Parental reactions to children's negative emotions: relationships with emotion regulation in children with an anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurrell, Katherine E; Hudson, Jennifer L; Schniering, Carolyn A

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that parental reactions to children's emotions play a significant role in the development of children's emotion regulation (ER) and adjustment. This study compared parent reactions to children's negative emotions between families of anxious and non-anxious children (aged 7-12) and examined associations between parent reactions and children's ER. Results indicated that children diagnosed with an anxiety disorder had significantly greater difficulty regulating a range of negative emotions and were regarded as more emotionally negative and labile by their parents. Results also suggested that mothers of anxious children espoused less supportive parental emotional styles when responding to their children's negative emotions. Supportive and non-supportive parenting reactions to children's negative emotions related to children's emotion regulation skills, with father's non-supportive parenting showing a unique relationship to children's negativity/lability.

  2. Cbl negatively regulates JNK activation and cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew A Sproul; Zhiheng Xu; Michael Wilhelm; Stephen Gire; Lloyd A Greene

    2009-01-01

    Here, we explore the role of Cbl proteins in regulation of neuronal apoptosis. In two paradigms of neuron apopto-sis--nerve growth factor (NGF) deprivation and DNA damage--cellular levels of c-Cbl and Cbl-b fell well before the onset of cell death. NGF deprivation also induced rapid loss of tyrosine phosphorylation (and most likely, activa-tion) of c-Cbl. Targeting e-Cbl and Cbl-b with siRNAs to mimic their loss/inactivation sensitized neuronal cells to death promoted by NGF deprivation or DNA damage. One potential mechanism by which Cbl proteins might affect neuronal death is by regulation of apoptotic c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. We demonstrate that Cbl pro-teins interact with the JNK pathway components mixed lineage kinase (MLK) 3 and POSH and that knockdown of Cbl proteins is sufficient to increase JNK pathway activity. Furthermore, expression of c-Cbl blocks the ability of MLKs to signal to downstream components of the kinase cascade leading to JNK activation and protects neuronal cells from death induced by MLKs, but not from downstream JNK activators. On the basis of these findings, we propose that Cbls suppress cell death in healthy neurons at least in part by inhibiting the ability of MLKs to activate JNK signaling. Apoptotic stimuli lead to loss of Cbl protein/activity, thereby removing a critical brake on JNK acti-vation and on cell death.

  3. Negative auto-regulators trap p53 in their web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiang; Cao, Bo; Lu, Hua

    2017-01-09

    The transcriptional factor p53 activates the expression of a myriad of target genes involving a complicated signalling network, resulting in various cellular outcomes, such as growth arrest, senescence, apoptosis, and metabolic changes, and leading to consequent suppression of tumour growth and progression. Because of the profoundly adverse effect of p53 on growth and proliferation of cancer cells, several feedback mechanisms have been employed by the cells to constrain p53 activity. Two major antagonists MDM2 and MDMX (the long forms) are transcriptionally induced by p53, but in return block p53 activity, forming a negative feedback circuit and rendering chemoresistance of several cancer cells. However, they are not alone, as cancer cells also employ other proteins encoded by p53 target genes to inhibit p53 activity at transcriptional, translational, and posttranslational levels. This essay is thus composed to review a recent progress in understanding the mechanisms for how cancer cells hijack the p53 autoregulation by these proteins for their growth advantage and to discuss the clinical implications of these autoregulatory loops.

  4. Arabidopsis type B cytokinin response regulators ARR1, ARR10, and ARR12 negatively regulate plant responses to drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kien Huu; Ha, Chien Van; Nishiyama, Rie; Watanabe, Yasuko; Leyva-González, Marco Antonio; Fujita, Yasunari; Tran, Uven Thi; Li, Weiqiang; Tanaka, Maho; Seki, Motoaki; Schaller, G Eric; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Tran, L S

    2016-03-15

    In this study, we used a loss-of-function approach to elucidate the functions of three Arabidopsis type B response regulators (ARRs)--namely ARR1, ARR10, and ARR12--in regulating the Arabidopsis plant responses to drought. The arr1,10,12 triple mutant showed a significant increase in drought tolerance versus WT plants, as indicated by its higher relative water content and survival rate on drying soil. This enhanced drought tolerance of arr1,10,12 plants can be attributed to enhanced cell membrane integrity, increased anthocyanin biosynthesis, abscisic acid (ABA) hypersensitivity, and reduced stomatal aperture, but not to altered stomatal density. Further drought-tolerance tests of lower-order double and single mutants indicated that ARR1, ARR10, and ARR12 negatively and redundantly control plant responses to drought, with ARR1 appearing to bear the most critical function among the three proteins. In agreement with these findings, a comparative genome-wide analysis of the leaves of arr1,10,12 and WT plants under both normal and dehydration conditions suggested a cytokinin (CK) signaling-mediated network controlling plant adaptation to drought via many dehydration/drought- and/or ABA-responsive genes that can provide osmotic adjustment and protection to cellular and membrane structures. Expression of all three ARR genes was repressed by dehydration and ABA treatments, inferring that plants down-regulate these genes as an adaptive mechanism to survive drought. Collectively, our results demonstrate that repression of CK response, and thus CK signaling, is one of the strategies plants use to cope with water deficit, providing novel insight for the design of drought-tolerant plants by genetic engineering.

  5. Studies of Negative Ion Reactions: Solvated Ions and Strong Acids,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-07

    both simple and solvated negative tons, Including association of HS04 "(H2 504 )m(HNO3)n with HCI and of NO3- with HNO3 , together with several reactions...of its high vapor pressure. We have measured rate coefficients [91 for the association of HC with HS04 (H2SO4)m(lN03)n for m-0 to 3 and n-O, 1. At the

  6. Expression of Tyrosine Hydroxylase is Negatively Regulated Via Prion Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz, Marcio Henrique Mello; Glezer, Isaias; Xavier, Andre Machado; da Silva, Marcelo Alberti Paiva; Pino, Jessica Monteiro Volejnik; Zamith, Thiago Panaro; Vieira, Taynara Fernanda; Antonio, Bruno Brito; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Martins, Vilma Regina; Lee, Kil Sun

    2016-07-01

    Cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is a glycoprotein of the plasma membrane that plays pleiotropic functions by interacting with multiple signaling complexes at the cell surface. Recently, a number of studies have reported the involvement of PrP(C) in dopamine metabolism and signaling, including its interactions with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine receptors. However, the outcomes reported by independent studies are still debatable. Therefore in this study, we investigated the effects of PrP(C) on the TH expression during the differentiation of N2a cells with dibutyryl-cAMP, a well-known cAMP analog that activates TH transcription. Upon differentiation, TH was induced with concomitant reduction of PrP(C) at protein level, but not at mRNA level. shRNA-mediated PrP(C) reduction increased the basal level of TH at both mRNA and protein levels without dibutyryl-cAMP treatment. This phenotype was reversed by re-expression of PrP(C). PrP(C) knockdown also potentiated the effect of dibutyryl-cAMP on TH expression. Our findings suggest that PrP(C) has suppressive effects on TH expression. As a consequence, altered PrP(C) functions may affect the regulation of dopamine metabolism and related neurological disorders.

  7. Somatostatin Negatively Regulates Parasite Burden and Granulomatous Responses in Cysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Khumbatta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cysticercosis is an infection of tissues with the larval cysts of the cestode, Taenia  solium. While live parasites elicit little or no inflammation, dying parasites initiate a granulomatous reaction presenting as painful muscle nodules or seizures when cysts are located in the brain. We previously showed in the T. crassiceps murine model of cysticercosis that substance P (SP, a neuropeptide, was detected in early granulomas and was responsible for promoting granuloma formation, while somatostatin (SOM, another neuropeptide and immunomodulatory hormone, was detected in late granulomas; SOM’s contribution to granuloma formation was not examined. In the current studies, we used somatostatin knockout (SOM−/− mice to examine the hypothesis that SOM downmodulates granulomatous inflammation in cysticercosis, thereby promoting parasite growth. Our results demonstrated that parasite burden was reduced 5.9-fold in SOM−/− mice compared to WT mice (P<0.05. This reduction in parasite burden in SOM−/− mice was accompanied by a 95% increase in size of their granulomas (P<0.05, which contained a 1.5-fold increase in levels of IFN-γ and a 26-fold decrease in levels of IL-1β (P<0.05 for both compared to granulomas from WT mice. Thus, SOM regulates both parasite burden and granulomatous inflammation perhaps through modulating granuloma production of IFN-γ and IL-1β.

  8. Valve-regulated lead-acid batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, D.

    Valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries with gelled electrolyte appeared as a niche market during the 1950s. During the 1970s, when glass-fiber felts became available as a further method to immobilize the electrolyte, the market for VRLA batteries expanded rapidly. The immobilized electrolyte offers a number of obvious advantages including the internal oxygen cycle which accommodates the overcharging current without chemical change within the cell. It also suppresses acid stratification and thus opens new fields of application. VRLA batteries, however, cannot be made completely sealed, but require a valve for gas escape, since hydrogen evolution and grid corrosion are unavoidable secondary reactions. These reactions result in water loss, and also must be balanced in order to ensure proper charging of both electrodes. Both secondary reactions have significant activation energies, and can reduce the service life of VRLA batteries, operated at elevated temperature. This effect can be aggravated by the comparatively high heat generation caused by the internal oxygen cycle during overcharging. Temperature control of VRLA batteries, therefore, is important in many applications.

  9. SOCS1 mimetics and antagonists: a complementary approach to positive and negative regulation of immune function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chulbul M. Ahmed

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS are inducible intracellular proteins that play essential regulatory roles in both immune and non-immune function. Of the eight known members, SOCS1 and SOCS3 in conjunction with regulatory T cells play key roles in regulation of the immune system. Molecular tools such as gene transfections and siRNA have played a major role in our functional understanding of the SOCS proteins where a key functional domain of 12 amino acid residues called the kinase inhibitory region (KIR has been identified on SOCS1 and SOCS3. KIR plays a key role in inhibition of the JAK2 tyrosine kinase which in turn plays a key role in cytokine signaling. A peptide corresponding to KIR (SOCS1-KIR bound to the activation loop of JAK2 and inhibited tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT1α transcription factor by JAK2. Cell internalized SOCS1-KIR is a potent therapeutic in the experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE mouse model of multiple sclerosis and showed promise in a psoriasis model and a model of diabetes associated cardiovascular disease. By contrast, a peptide, pJAK2(1001-1013, that corresponds to the activation loop of JAK2 is a SOCS1 antagonist. The antagonist enhanced innate and adaptive immune response against a broad range of viruses including herpes simplex virus, vaccinia virus, and an EMC picornavirus. SOCS mimetics and antagonists are thus potential therapeutics for negative and positive regulation of the immune system.

  10. The Role of Depression and Negative Affect Regulation Expectancies in Tobacco Smoking among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Holly E.; Harris, Kari Jo; Catley, Delwyn; Nazir, Niaman

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Expectancies about nicotine's ability to alleviate negative mood states may play a role in the relationship between smoking and depression. The authors examined the role of negative affect regulation expectancies as a potential mediator of depression (history of depression and depressive symptoms) and smoking among college students.…

  11. Mothers' Socialization of Emotion Regulation: The Moderating Role of Children's Negative Emotional Reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabile, Scott P.; Scaramella, Laura V.; Sohr-Preston, Sara L.; Robison, Sarah D.

    2009-01-01

    During the toddler period, children begin to shift from being primarily dependent on parents to regulate their emotions to managing their emotions independently. The present study considers how children's propensity towards negative emotional arousal interacts with mothers' efforts to socialize emotion regulation. Fifty-five low income mothers and…

  12. A Computational Model of the Relation Between Regulation of Negative Emotions and Mood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abro, A.H.; Klein, M.C.A.; Manzoor, A.R.; Tabatabaei, S.A.; Treur, J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a computational model is presented that describes the role of emotion regulation to reduce the influences of negative events on long term mood. The model incorporates an earlier model of mood dynamics and a model for the dynamics of emotion generation and regulation. Example model simu

  13. Metacognitive emotion regulation: children's awareness that changing thoughts and goals can alleviate negative emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elizabeth L; Levine, Linda J; Lench, Heather C; Quas, Jodi A

    2010-08-01

    Metacognitive emotion regulation strategies involve deliberately changing thoughts or goals to alleviate negative emotions. Adults commonly engage in this type of emotion regulation, but little is known about the developmental roots of this ability. Two studies were designed to assess whether 5- and 6-year-old children can generate such strategies and, if so, the types of metacognitive strategies they use. In Study 1, children described how story protagonists could alleviate negative emotions. In Study 2, children recalled times that they personally had felt sad, angry, and scared and described how they had regulated their emotions. In contrast to research suggesting that young children cannot use metacognitive regulation strategies, the majority of children in both studies described such strategies. Children were surprisingly sophisticated in their suggestions for how to cope with negative emotions and tailored their regulatory responses to specific emotional situations.

  14. DMPD: The negative regulation of Toll-like receptor and associated pathways. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17621314 The negative regulation of Toll-like receptor and associated pathways. Lan...) Show The negative regulation of Toll-like receptor and associated pathways. PubmedID 17621314 Title The ne...gative regulation of Toll-like receptor and associated pathways. Authors Lang T,

  15. Arabidopsis ETO1 specifically interacts with and negatively regulates type 2 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito Koji

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Arabidopsis, ETO1 (ETHYLENE-OVERPRODUCER1 is a negative regulator of ethylene evolution by interacting with AtACS5, an isoform of the rate-limiting enzyme, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases (ACC synthase or ACS, in ethylene biosynthetic pathway. ETO1 directly inhibits the enzymatic activity of AtACS5. In addition, a specific interaction between ETO1 and AtCUL3, a constituent of a new type of E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, suggests the molecular mechanism in promoting AtACS5 degradation by the proteasome-dependent pathway. Because orthologous sequences to ETO1 are found in many plant species including tomato, we transformed tomato with Arabidopsis ETO1 to evaluate its ability to suppress ethylene production in tomato fruits. Results Transgenic tomato lines that overexpress Arabidopsis ETO1 (ETO1-OE did not show a significant delay of fruit ripening. So, we performed yeast two-hybrid assays to investigate potential heterologous interaction between ETO1 and three isozymes of ACC synthases from tomato. In the yeast two-hybrid system, ETO1 interacts with LE-ACS3 as well as AtACS5 but not with LE-ACS2 or LE-ACS4, two major isozymes whose gene expression is induced markedly in ripening fruits. According to the classification of ACC synthases, which is based on the C-terminal amino acid sequences, both LE-ACS3 and AtACS5 are categorized as type 2 isozymes and possess a consensus C-terminal sequence. In contrast, LE-ACS2 and LE-ACS4 are type 1 and type 3 isozymes, respectively, both of which do not possess this specific C-terminal sequence. Yeast two-hybrid analysis using chimeric constructs between LE-ACS2 and LE-ACS3 revealed that the type-2-ACS-specific C-terminal tail is required for interaction with ETO1. When treated with auxin to induce LE-ACS3, seedlings of ETO1-OE produced less ethylene than the wild type, despite comparable expression of the LE-ACS3 gene in the wild type. Conclusion These results suggest that ETO1

  16. Salicylic acid 3-hydroxylase regulates Arabidopsis leaf longevity by mediating salicylic acid catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kewei; Halitschke, Rayko; Yin, Changxi; Liu, Chang-Jun; Gan, Su-Sheng

    2013-09-01

    The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) plays critical roles in plant defense, stress responses, and senescence. Although SA biosynthesis is well understood, the pathways by which SA is catabolized remain elusive. Here we report the identification and characterization of an SA 3-hydroxylase (S3H) involved in SA catabolism during leaf senescence. S3H is associated with senescence and is inducible by SA and is thus a key part of a negative feedback regulation system of SA levels during senescence. The enzyme converts SA (with a Km of 58.29 µM) to both 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA) and 2,5-DHBA in vitro but only 2,3-DHBA in vivo. The s3h knockout mutants fail to produce 2,3-DHBA sugar conjugates, accumulate very high levels of SA and its sugar conjugates, and exhibit a precocious senescence phenotype. Conversely, the gain-of-function lines contain high levels of 2,3-DHBA sugar conjugates and extremely low levels of SA and its sugar conjugates and display a significantly extended leaf longevity. This research reveals an elegant SA catabolic mechanism by which plants regulate SA levels by converting it to 2,3-DHBA to prevent SA overaccumulation. The research also provides strong molecular genetic evidence for an important role of SA in regulating the onset and rate of leaf senescence.

  17. The neural correlates of regulating positive and negative emotions in medication-free major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greening, Steven G; Osuch, Elizabeth A; Williamson, Peter C; Mitchell, Derek G V

    2014-05-01

    Depressive cognitive schemas play an important role in the emergence and persistence of major depressive disorder (MDD). The current study adapted emotion regulation techniques to reflect elements of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and related psychotherapies to delineate neurocognitive abnormalities associated with modulating the negative cognitive style in MDD. Nineteen non-medicated patients with MDD and 19 matched controls reduced negative or enhanced positive feelings elicited by emotional scenes while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. Although both groups showed significant emotion regulation success as measured by subjective ratings of affect, the controls were significantly better at modulating both negative and positive emotion. Both groups recruited regions of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) when regulating negative emotions. Only in controls was this accompanied by reduced activity in sensory cortices and amygdala. Similarly, both groups showed enhanced activity in VLPFC and ventral striatum when enhancing positive affect; however, only in controls was ventral striatum activity correlated with regulation efficacy. The results suggest that depression is associated with both a reduced capacity to achieve relief from negative affect despite recruitment of ventral and dorsal prefrontal cortical regions implicated in emotion regulation, coupled with a disconnect between activity in reward-related regions and subjective positive affect.

  18. TRIM11 negatively regulates IFNβ production and antiviral activity by targeting TBK1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younglang Lee

    Full Text Available The innate immune response is a host defense mechanism against infection by viruses and bacteria. Type I interferons (IFNα/β play a crucial role in innate immunity. If not tightly regulated under normal conditions and during immune responses, IFN production can become aberrant, leading to inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In this study, we identified TRIM11 (tripartite motif containing 11 as a novel negative regulator of IFNβ production. Ectopic expression of TRIM11 decreased IFNβ promoter activity induced by poly (I:C stimulation or overexpression of RIG-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene-I signaling cascade components RIG-IN (constitutively active form of RIG-I, MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein, or TBK1 (TANK-binding kinase-1. Conversely, TRIM11 knockdown enhanced IFNβ promoter activity induced by these stimuli. Moreover, TRIM11 overexpression inhibited the phosphorylation and dimerization of IRF3 and expression of IFNβ mRNA. By contrast, TRIM11 knockdown increased the IRF3 phosphorylation and IFNβ mRNA expression. We also found that TRIM11 and TBK1, a key kinase that phosphorylates IRF3 in the RIG-I pathway, interacted with each other through CC and CC2 domain, respectively. This interaction was enhanced in the presence of the TBK1 adaptor proteins, NAP1 (NF-κB activating kinase-associated protein-1, SINTBAD (similar to NAP1 TBK1 adaptor or TANK (TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator. Consistent with its inhibitory role in RIG-I-mediated IFNβ signaling, TRIM11 overexpression enhanced viral infectivity, whereas TRIM11 knockdown produced the opposite effect. Collectively, our results suggest that TRIM11 inhibits RIG-I-mediated IFNβ production by targeting the TBK1 signaling complex.

  19. Negative Regulation of Tumor Suppressor p53 by microRNA miR-504

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in tumor prevention. p53 protein levels and activity are under a tight and complex regulation in cells to maintain the proper function of p53. microRNAs play a key role in the regulation of gene expression. Here we report the regulation of p53 through microRNA miR-504. miR-504 acts as a negative regulator of human p53 through its direct binding to two sites in p53 3′-UTR. Overexpression of miR-504 decreases p53 protein levels and functions in cells, i...

  20. Emotion regulation in broadly defined anorexia nervosa: association with negative affective memory bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Amy; Wade, Tracey D

    2013-08-01

    Theoretical models in anorexia nervosa (AN) implicate difficulties with emotion regulation as a maintaining factor. To date little is known about how different factors might maintain these difficulties. Forty eight women were recruited, 24 receiving treatment for AN (called broadly defined AN) and 24 healthy controls. Self-report measures of difficulties with emotion regulation and current depression were used in addition to computerized tasks which provided measures of social attentional bias and anger-threat bias, as well negative affective memory and recognition bias. Compared to controls, women with AN had significantly higher levels of difficulties with emotion regulation, depression, and negative affective memory bias, as well as lower bias for anger-threat. Simultaneous examination of the two variables that met pre-conditions for mediation of the relationship between group membership and difficulties with emotion regulation (anger-threat bias and negative affective memory) indicated negative affective memory bias to be a mediator, accounting for around one-third of the total effect a diagnosis of AN has on difficulties with emotion regulation. The association of these variables with AN may indicate shared risk factors with depression, and the variety of therapeutic approaches found to be effective with depression may be useful to further incorporate into treatments for AN.

  1. Gibberellins negatively regulate light-induced nitrate reductase activity in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongqiang; Liu, Zhongjuan; Liu, Rongzhi; Wang, Liguang; Bi, Yurong

    2011-12-15

    In the present study, the role of phytohormone gibberellins (GAs) on regulating the nitrate reductase (NR) activity was tested in Arabidopsis seedlings. The NR activity in light-grown Col-0 seedlings was reduced by exogenous GA₃ (an active form of GAs), but enhanced by exogenous paclobutrazol (PAC, a gibberellin biosynthesis inhibitor), suggesting that GAs negatively regulate the NR activity in light-grown seedlings. Light is known to influence the NR activity through both photosynthesis and phytochromes. When etiolated seedlings were transferred to white or red light, both exogenously applied GA₃ and PAC were found to function on the NR activity only in the presence of sucrose, implying that GAs are not involved in light signaling-induced but negatively regulate photoproducts-induced NR activity. NR is regulated by light mainly at two levels: transcript level and post-translational level. Our reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assays showed that GAs did not affect the transcript levels of NIA1 and NIA2, two genes that encode NR proteins. But the divalent cations (especially Mg²⁺) were required for GAs negative regulation of NR activity, in view of the importance of divalent cations during the process of post-translational regulation of NR activity, which indicates that GAs very likely regulate the NR activity at the post-translational level. In the following dark-light shift analyses, GAs were found to accelerate dark-induced decrease, but retard light-induced increase of the NR activity. Furthermore, it was observed that application of G₃ or PAC could impair diurnal variation of the NR activity. These results collectively indicate that GAs play a negative role during light regulation of NR activity in nature.

  2. Strong negative self regulation of Prokaryotic transcription factors increases the intrinsic noise of protein expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins Dafyd J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many prokaryotic transcription factors repress their own transcription. It is often asserted that such regulation enables a cell to homeostatically maintain protein abundance. We explore the role of negative self regulation of transcription in regulating the variability of protein abundance using a variety of stochastic modeling techniques. Results We undertake a novel analysis of a classic model for negative self regulation. We demonstrate that, with standard approximations, protein variance relative to its mean should be independent of repressor strength in a physiological range. Consequently, in that range, the coefficient of variation would increase with repressor strength. However, stochastic computer simulations demonstrate that there is a greater increase in noise associated with strong repressors than predicted by theory. The discrepancies between the mathematical analysis and computer simulations arise because with strong repressors the approximation that leads to Michaelis-Menten-like hyperbolic repression terms ceases to be valid. Because we observe that strong negative feedback increases variability and so is unlikely to be a mechanism for noise control, we suggest instead that negative feedback is evolutionarily favoured because it allows the cell to minimize mRNA usage. To test this, we used in silico evolution to demonstrate that while negative feedback can achieve only a modest improvement in protein noise reduction compared with the unregulated system, it can achieve good improvement in protein response times and very substantial improvement in reducing mRNA levels. Conclusion Strong negative self regulation of transcription may not always be a mechanism for homeostatic control of protein abundance, but instead might be evolutionarily favoured as a mechanism to limit the use of mRNA. The use of hyperbolic terms derived from quasi-steady-state approximation should also be avoided in the analysis of stochastic

  3. dRYBP contributes to the negative regulation of the Drosophila Imd pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Aparicio

    Full Text Available The Drosophila humoral innate immune response fights infection by producing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs through the microbe-specific activation of the Toll or the Imd signaling pathway. Upon systemic infection, the production of AMPs is both positively and negatively regulated to reach a balanced immune response required for survival. Here, we report the function of the dRYBP (drosophila Ring and YY1 Binding Protein protein, which contains a ubiquitin-binding domain, in the Imd pathway. We have found that dRYBP contributes to the negative regulation of AMP production: upon systemic infection with Gram-negative bacteria, Diptericin expression is up-regulated in the absence of dRYBP and down-regulated in the presence of high levels of dRYBP. Epistatic analyses using gain and loss of function alleles of imd, Relish, or skpA and dRYBP suggest that dRYBP functions upstream or together with SKPA, a member of the SCF-E3-ubiquitin ligase complex, to repress the Imd signaling cascade. We propose that the role of dRYBP in the regulation of the Imd signaling pathway is to function as a ubiquitin adaptor protein together with SKPA to promote SCF-dependent proteasomal degradation of Relish. Beyond the identification of dRYBP as a novel component of Imd pathway regulation, our results also suggest that the evolutionarily conserved RYBP protein may be involved in the human innate immune response.

  4. A Novel Approach to Revealing Positive and Negative Co-Regulated Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Hai Zhao; Guo-Ren Wang; Ying Yin; Guang-Yu Xu

    2007-01-01

    As explored by biologists, there is a real and emerging need to identify co-regulated gene clusters, which includeboth positive and negative regulated gene clusters. However, the existing pattern-based and tendency-based clusteringapproaches are only designed for finding positive regulated gene clusters. In this paper, a new subspace clustering modelcalled g-Cluster is proposed for gene expression data. The proposed model has the following advantages: 1) find both positiveand negative co-regulated genes in a shot, 2) get away from the restriction of magnitude transformation relationship amongco-regulated genes, and 3) guarantee quality of clusters and significance of regulations using a novel similarity measurementgCode and a user-specified regulation threshold 5, respectively. No previous work measures up to the task which has been set.Moreover, MDL technique is introduced to avoid insignificant g-Clusters generated. A tree structure, namely GS-tree, is alsodesigned, and two algorithms combined with efficient pruning and optimization strategies to identify all qualified g-Clusters.Extensive experiments are conducted on real and synthetic datasets. The experimental results show that 1) the algorithmis able to find an amount of co-regulated gene clusters missed by previous models, which are potentially of high biologicalsignificance, and 2) the algorithms are effective and efficient, and outperform the existing approaches.

  5. Mechanisms of gene regulation by fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgiadi, A.; Kersten, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of specific dietary fatty acids has been shown to influence risk and progression of several chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, cancer, and arthritis. In recent years, insights into the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of fatty acids have improved consi

  6. Relationships among Burnout, Social Support, and Negative Mood Regulation Expectancies of Elementary School Teachers in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Y.; Lee, Jee Y.; Kim, Jinsook

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of this study are as follows: (1) to determine whether burnout among elementary school teachers in Korea differs on selected demographic variables, (2) to investigate the relationship between burnout and negative mood regulation expectancies, as an internal variable, and social support, as an external variable, and (3) to examine the…

  7. Conflict Management with Friends and Romantic Partners: The Role of Attachment and Negative Mood Regulation Expectancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creasey, Gary; Kershaw, Kathy; Boston, Ada

    1999-01-01

    Studied the degree to which attachment orientations were related to negative mood regulation expectancies and conflict management strategies with best friends and romantic partners in a sample of 140 female college students. Discusses results in relation to previous research on attachment theory and implications for interventions. (SLD)

  8. Evidence that dendritic mitochondria negatively regulate dendritic branching in pyramidal neurons in the neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Toshiya; Murakami, Fujio

    2014-05-14

    The precise branching patterns of dendritic arbors have a profound impact on information processing in individual neurons and the brain. These patterns are established by positive and negative regulation of the dendritic branching. Although the mechanisms for positive regulation have been extensively investigated, little is known about those for negative regulation. Here, we present evidence that mitochondria located in developing dendrites are involved in the negative regulation of dendritic branching. We visualized mitochondria in pyramidal neurons of the mouse neocortex during dendritic morphogenesis using in utero electroporation of a mitochondria-targeted fluorescent construct. We altered the mitochondrial distribution in vivo by overexpressing Mfn1, a mitochondrial shaping protein, or the Miro-binding domain of TRAK2 (TRAK2-MBD), a truncated form of a motor-adaptor protein. We found that dendritic mitochondria were preferentially targeted to the proximal portion of dendrites only during dendritic morphogenesis. Overexpression of Mfn1 or TRAK2-MBD depleted mitochondria from the dendrites, an effect that was accompanied by increased branching of the proximal portion of the dendrites. This dendritic abnormality cannot be accounted for by changes in the distribution of membrane trafficking organelles since the overexpression of Mfn1 did not alter the distributions of the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, or endosomes. Additionally, neither did these constructs impair neuronal viability or mitochondrial function. Therefore, our results suggest that dendritic mitochondria play a critical role in the establishment of the precise branching pattern of dendritic arbors by negatively affecting dendritic branching.

  9. MLK4β functions as a negative regulator of MAPK signaling and cell invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Abi Saab, W F; Brown, M S; Chadee, D N

    2012-01-01

    Mixed lineage kinase (MLK) 4, or MLK4, is a member of the MLK family of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAP3Ks). Typically, MAP3Ks function to activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-signaling pathways and regulate different cellular responses. However, here we report that MLK4β, unlike the other MLKs, negatively regulates the activities of the MAPKs, p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and the MAP2Ks, MEK3 and 6. Our results s...

  10. Emc, a negative HLH regulator with multiple functions in Drosophila development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano, S

    2001-12-20

    Expression and functional analyses of Emc have demonstrated that it is a prototype for a protein required for multiple processes in development. Initially characterized as a negative regulator of sensory organ development, it was later found to regulate many other developmental processes and cell proliferation. Its ability to block the function of bHLH proteins by forming heterodimers, which are ineffective in DNA binding, accounts for the role of Emc in preventing the acquisition of several cell fates which are under the control of bHLH proteins. However, while maintaining this repressive molecular mechanism, emc also appears to act as a positive regulator of differentiation.

  11. Negative auto-regulation increases the input dynamic-range of the arabinose system of Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bren Anat

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene regulation networks are made of recurring regulatory patterns, called network motifs. One of the most common network motifs is negative auto-regulation, in which a transcription factor represses its own production. Negative auto-regulation has several potential functions: it can shorten the response time (time to reach halfway to steady-state, stabilize expression against noise, and linearize the gene's input-output response curve. This latter function of negative auto-regulation, which increases the range of input signals over which downstream genes respond, has been studied by theory and synthetic gene circuits. Here we ask whether negative auto-regulation preserves this function also in the context of a natural system, where it is embedded within many additional interactions. To address this, we studied the negative auto-regulation motif in the arabinose utilization system of Escherichia coli, in which negative auto-regulation is part of a complex regulatory network. Results We find that when negative auto-regulation is disrupted by placing the regulator araC under constitutive expression, the input dynamic range of the arabinose system is reduced by 10-fold. The apparent Hill coefficient of the induction curve changes from about n = 1 with negative auto-regulation, to about n = 2 when it is disrupted. We present a mathematical model that describes how negative auto-regulation can increase input dynamic-range, by coupling the transcription factor protein level to the input signal. Conclusions Here we demonstrate that the negative auto-regulation motif in the native arabinose system of Escherichia coli increases the range of arabinose signals over which the system can respond. In this way, negative auto-regulation may help to increase the input dynamic-range while maintaining the specificity of cooperative regulatory systems. This function may contribute to explaining the common occurrence of negative auto-regulation

  12. Ubiquinol (QH(2)) functions as a negative regulator of purine nucleotide inhibition of Acanthamoeba castellanii mitochondrial uncoupling protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2011-01-01

    We compared the influence of different adenine and guanine nucleotides on the free fatty acid-induced uncoupling protein (UCP) activity in non-phosphorylating Acanthamoeba castellanii mitochondria when the membranous ubiquinone (Q) redox state was varied. The purine nucleotides exhibit an inhibitory effect in the following descending order: GTP>ATP>GDP>ADP≫GMP>AMP. The efficiency of guanine and adenine nucleotides to inhibit UCP-sustained uncoupling in A. castellanii mitochondria depends on the Q redox state. Inhibition by purine nucleotides can be increased with decreasing Q reduction level (thereby ubiquinol, QH₂ concentration) even with nucleoside monophosphates that are very weak inhibitors at the initial respiration. On the other hand, the inhibition can be alleviated with increasing Q reduction level (thereby QH₂ concentration). The most important finding was that ubiquinol (QH₂) but not oxidised Q functions as a negative regulator of UCP inhibition by purine nucleotides. For a given concentration of QH₂, the linoleic acid-induced GTP-inhibited H(+) leak was the same for two types of A. castellanii mitochondria that differ in the endogenous Q content. When availability of the inhibitor (GTP) or the negative inhibition modulator (QH₂) was changed, a competitive influence on the UCP activity was observed. QH₂ decreases the affinity of UCP for GTP and, vice versa, GTP decreases the affinity of UCP for QH₂. These results describe the kinetic mechanism of regulation of UCP affinity for purine nucleotides by endogenous QH₂ in the mitochondria of a unicellular eukaryote.

  13. Teaching the Role of Secretin in the Regulation of Gastric Acid Secretion Using a Classic Paper by Johnson and Grossman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Kristen L. W.

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of gastric acid secretion has been the subject of investigation for over a century. Inhibition of gastrin-induced acid secretion by the intestine-derived hormone secretin provides a classic physiological example of negative feedback in the gastrointestinal tract. A classic paper by Leonard R. Johnson and Morton I. Grossman clearly…

  14. Improved wound management by regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy and regulated, oxygen- enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy through basic science research and clinical assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moris Topaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RNPT should be regarded as a state-of-the-art technology in wound treatment and the most important physical, nonpharmaceutical, platform technology developed and applied for wound healing in the last two decades. RNPT systems maintain the treated wound′s environment as a semi-closed, semi-isolated system applying external physical stimulations to the wound, leading to biological and biochemical effects, with the potential to substantially influence wound-host interactions, and when properly applied may enhance wound healing. RNPT is a simple, safe, and affordable tool that can be utilized in a wide range of acute and chronic conditions, with reduced need for complicated surgical procedures, and antibiotic treatment. This technology has been shown to be effective and safe, saving limbs and lives on a global scale. Regulated, oxygen-enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RO-NPT is an innovative technology, whereby supplemental oxygen is concurrently administered with RNPT for their synergistic effect on treatment and prophylaxis of anaerobic wound infection and promotion of wound healing. Understanding the basic science, modes of operation and the associated risks of these technologies through their fundamental clinical mechanisms is the main objective of this review.

  15. Cut! That’s a wrap: Regulating negative emotion by ending emotion-eliciting situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara eVujovic

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the potentially powerful set of emotion regulation (ER processes that target emotion-eliciting situations. We thus studied the decision to end emotion-eliciting situations in the laboratory. We hypothesized that people would try to end negative situations more frequently than neutral situations to regulate distress. In addition, motivated by the Selection, Optimization, and Compensation with Emotion Regulation framework, we hypothesized that failed attempts to end the situation would prompt either a greater negative emotion or b compensatory use of a different ER process, attentional deployment (AD. Fifty-eight participants (18-26 years old, 67% women viewed negative and neutral pictures and pressed a key whenever they wished to stop viewing them. After key press, the picture disappeared (‘success’ or stayed (‘failure’ on screen. To index emotion, we measured corrugator and electrodermal activity, heart rate, and self-reported arousal. To index overt AD, we measured eye gaze. As their reason for ending the situation, participants more frequently reported being upset by high- than low-arousal negative pictures; they more frequently reported being bored by low- than high-arousal neutral pictures. Nevertheless, participants’ negative emotional responding did not increase in the context of ER failure nor did they use overt AD as a compensatory ER strategy. We conclude that situation-targeted ER processes are used to regulate emotional responses to high-arousal negative and low-arousal neutral situations; ER processes other than overt AD may be used to compensate for ER failure in this context.

  16. LINGO-1 negatively regulates TrkB phosphorylation after ocular hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qing-Ling; Hu, Bing; Li, Xin; Shao, Zhaohui; Shi, Jian-Bo; Wu, Wutian; So, Kwok-Fai; Mi, Sha

    2010-03-01

    The antagonism of LINGO-1, a CNS-specific negative regulator of neuronal survival, was shown to promote short-term survival of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) in an ocular hypertension model. LINGO-1 antagonists, combined with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), can increase the length of neuron survival through an unclear molecular mechanism. To determine the relationship between LINGO-1 and BDNF/TrkB receptor in neuronal protection, we show here that LINGO-1 forms a receptor complex with TrkB and negatively regulates its activation in the retina after ocular hypertension injury. LINGO-1 antagonist antibody 1A7 or soluble LINGO-1 (LINGO-1-Fc) treatment upregulates phospho-TrkB phosphorylation and leads to RGC survival after high intraocular pressure injury. This neuronal protective effect was blocked by anti-BDNF antibody. LINGO-1 antagonism therefore promotes RGC survival by regulating the BDNF and TrkB signaling pathway after ocular hypertension.

  17. Functional analysis of Arabidopsis immune-related MAPKs uncovers a role for MPK3 as negative regulator of inducible defences

    KAUST Repository

    Frei dit Frey, Nicolas

    2014-06-30

    Background Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are key regulators of immune responses in animals and plants. In Arabidopsis, perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) activates the MAPKs MPK3, MPK4 and MPK6. Increasing information depicts the molecular events activated by MAMPs in plants, but the specific and cooperative contributions of the MAPKs in these signalling events are largely unclear. Results In this work, we analyse the behaviour of MPK3, MPK4 and MPK6 mutants in early and late immune responses triggered by the MAMP flg22 from bacterial flagellin. A genome-wide transcriptome analysis reveals that 36% of the flg22-upregulated genes and 68% of the flg22-downregulated genes are affected in at least one MAPK mutant. So far MPK4 was considered as a negative regulator of immunity, whereas MPK3 and MPK6 were believed to play partially redundant positive functions in defence. Our work reveals that MPK4 is required for the regulation of approximately 50% of flg22-induced genes and we identify a negative role for MPK3 in regulating defence gene expression, flg22-induced salicylic acid accumulation and disease resistance to Pseudomonas syringae. Among the MAPK-dependent genes, 27% of flg22-upregulated genes and 76% of flg22-downregulated genes require two or three MAPKs for their regulation. The flg22-induced MAPK activities are differentially regulated in MPK3 and MPK6 mutants, both in amplitude and duration, revealing a highly interdependent network. Conclusions These data reveal a new set of distinct functions for MPK3, MPK4 and MPK6 and indicate that the plant immune signalling network is choreographed through the interplay of these three interwoven MAPK pathways.

  18. Bile acid-activated nuclear receptor FXR suppresses apolipoprotein A-I transcription via a negative FXR response element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudel, Thierry; Sturm, Ekkehard; Duez, Hélène; Torra, Inés Pineda; Sirvent, Audrey; Kosykh, Vladimir; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Dallongeville, Jean; Hum, Dean W.; Kuipers, Folkert; Staels, Bart

    2002-01-01

    Serum levels of HDL are inversely correlated with the risk of coronary heart disease. The anti-atherogenic effect of HDL is partially mediated by its major protein constituent apoA-I. In this study, we identify bile acids that are activators of the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) as negative regulators of human apoA-I expression. Intrahepatocellular accumulation of bile acids, as seen in patients with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis and biliary atresia, was associated with diminished apoA-I serum levels. In human apoA-I transgenic mice, treatment with the FXR agonist taurocholic acid strongly decreased serum concentrations and liver mRNA levels of human apoA-I, which was associated with reduced serum HDL levels. Incubation of human primary hepatocytes and hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells with bile acids resulted in a dose-dependent downregulation of apoA-I expression. Promoter mutation analysis and gel-shift experiments in HepG2 cells demonstrated that bile acid–activated FXR decreases human apoA-I promoter activity by a negative FXR response element mapped to the C site. FXR bound this site and repressed transcription in a manner independent of retinoid X receptor. The nonsteroidal synthetic FXR agonist GW4064 likewise decreased apoA-I mRNA levels and promoter activity in HepG2 cells. PMID:11927623

  19. When death is not a problem: Regulating implicit negative affect under mortality salience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüdecke, Christina; Baumann, Nicola

    2015-12-01

    Terror management theory assumes that death arouses existential anxiety in humans which is suppressed in focal attention. Whereas most studies provide indirect evidence for negative affect under mortality salience by showing cultural worldview defenses and self-esteem strivings, there is only little direct evidence for implicit negative affect under mortality salience. In the present study, we assume that this implicit affective reaction towards death depends on people's ability to self-regulate negative affect as assessed by the personality dimension of action versus state orientation. Consistent with our expectations, action-oriented participants judged artificial words to express less negative affect under mortality salience compared to control conditions whereas state-oriented participants showed the reversed pattern.

  20. N-wasp is essential for the negative regulation of B cell receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaohong Liu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Negative regulation of receptor signaling is essential for controlling cell activation and differentiation. In B-lymphocytes, the down-regulation of B-cell antigen receptor (BCR signaling is critical for suppressing the activation of self-reactive B cells; however, the mechanism underlying the negative regulation of signaling remains elusive. Using genetically manipulated mouse models and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we demonstrate that neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP, which is coexpressed with WASP in all immune cells, is a critical negative regulator of B-cell signaling. B-cell-specific N-WASP gene deletion causes enhanced and prolonged BCR signaling and elevated levels of autoantibodies in the mouse serum. The increased signaling in N-WASP knockout B cells is concurrent with increased accumulation of F-actin at the B-cell surface, enhanced B-cell spreading on the antigen-presenting membrane, delayed B-cell contraction, inhibition in the merger of signaling active BCR microclusters into signaling inactive central clusters, and a blockage of BCR internalization. Upon BCR activation, WASP is activated first, followed by N-WASP in mouse and human primary B cells. The activation of N-WASP is suppressed by Bruton's tyrosine kinase-induced WASP activation, and is restored by the activation of SH2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase that inhibits WASP activation. Our results reveal a new mechanism for the negative regulation of BCR signaling and broadly suggest an actin-mediated mechanism for signaling down-regulation.

  1. Regulation of intestinal protein metabolism by amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Julien; Goichon, Alexis; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse

    2013-09-01

    Gut homeostasis plays a major role in health and may be regulated by quantitative and qualitative food intake. In the intestinal mucosa, an intense renewal of proteins occurs, at approximately 50% per day in humans. In some pathophysiological conditions, protein turnover is altered and may contribute to intestinal or systemic diseases. Amino acids are key effectors of gut protein turnover, both as constituents of proteins and as regulatory molecules limiting intestinal injury and maintaining intestinal functions. Many studies have focused on two amino acids: glutamine, known as the preferential substrate of rapidly dividing cells, and arginine, another conditionally essential amino acid. The effects of glutamine and arginine on protein synthesis appear to be model and condition dependent, as are the involved signaling pathways. The regulation of gut protein degradation by amino acids has been minimally documented until now. This review will examine recent data, helping to better understand how amino acids regulate intestinal protein metabolism, and will explore perspectives for future studies.

  2. The Potato ERF Transcription Factor StERF3 Negatively Regulates Resistance to Phytophthora infestans and Salt Tolerance in Potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhendong; He, Qin; Wang, Haixia; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Ying; Shao, Fang; Xie, Conghua

    2015-05-01

    Ethylene response factors (ERFs) are unique to the plant kingdom and play crucial roles in plant response to various biotic and abiotic stresses. We show here that a potato StERF3, which contains an ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif in its C-terminal region, negatively regulates resistance to Phytophthora infestans and salt tolerance in potato. The StERF3 promoter responds to induction by salicylic acid, ABA ethylene and NaCl, as well as P. infestans, the causal agent of potato late blight disease. StERF3 could bind to the GCC box element of the HIS3 promoter and activate transcription of HIS3 in yeast cells. Importantly, silencing of StERF3 in potato produced an enhanced foliage resistance to P. infestans and elevated plant tolerance to NaCl stress accompanied by the activation of defense-related genes (PR1, NPR1 and WRKY1). In contrast, StERF3-overexpressing plants showed reduced expression of these defense-related genes and enhanced susceptibility to P. infestans, suggesting that StERF3 functions as a negative regulator of downstream defense- and/or stress-related genes in potato. StERF3 is localized to the nucleus. Interestingly, yeast two-hybrid assay and a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) test clarified that StERF3 could interact with other proteins in the cytoplasm which may lead to its re-localization between the nucleus and cytoplasm, revealing a novel means of StERF3 regulation. Taken together, these data provide new insights into the mechanism underlying how StERF3 negatively regulates late blight resistance and abiotic tolerance in potato and may have a potential use in engineering late blight resistance in potato.

  3. [Regulation of Positive and Negative Emotions as Mediator between Maternal Emotion Socialization and Child Problem Behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fäsche, Anika; Gunzenhauser, Catherine; Friedlmeier, Wolfgang; von Suchodoletz, Antje

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated five to six year old children's ability to regulate negative and positive emotions in relation to psychosocial problem behavior (N=53). It was explored, whether mothers' supportive and nonsupportive strategies of emotion socialization influence children's problem behavior by shaping their emotion regulation ability. Mothers reported on children's emotion regulation and internalizing and externalizing problem behavior via questionnaire, and were interviewed about their preferences for socialization strategies in response to children's expression of negative affect. Results showed that children with more adaptive expression of adequate positive emotions had less internalizing behavior problems. When children showed more control of inadequate negative emotions, children were less internalizing as well as externalizing in their behavior. Furthermore, results indicated indirect relations of mothers' socialization strategies with children's problem behavior. Control of inadequate negative emotions mediated the link between non-supportive strategies on externalizing problem behavior. Results suggest that emotion regulatory processes should be part of interventions to reduce the development of problematic behavior in young children. Parents should be trained in dealing with children's emotions in a constructive way.

  4. Instrumental Motives in Negative Emotion Regulation in Daily Life: Frequency, Consistency, and Predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalokerinos, Elise K; Tamir, Maya; Kuppens, Peter

    2016-12-19

    People regulate their emotions not only for hedonic reasons but also for instrumental reasons, to attain the potential benefits of emotions beyond pleasure and pain. However, such instrumental motives have rarely been examined outside the laboratory as they naturally unfold in daily life. To assess whether and how instrumental motives operate outside the laboratory, it is necessary to examine them in response to real and personally relevant stimuli in ecologically valid contexts. In this research, we assessed the frequency, consistency, and predictors of instrumental motives in negative emotion regulation in daily life. Participants (N = 114) recalled the most negative event of their day each evening for 7 days and reported their instrumental motives and negative emotion goals in that event. Participants endorsed performance motives in approximately 1 in 3 events and social, eudaimonic, and epistemic motives in approximately 1 in 10 events. Instrumental motives had substantially higher within- than between-person variance, indicating that they were context-dependent. Indeed, although we found few associations between instrumental motives and personality traits, relationships between instrumental motives and contextual variables were more extensive. Performance, social, and eudaimonic motives were each predicted by a unique pattern of contextual appraisals. Our data demonstrate that instrumental motives play a role in daily negative emotion regulation as people encounter situations that pose unique regulatory demands. (PsycINFO Database Record

  5. Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei cluster 1 type VI secretion system gene expression is negatively regulated by iron and zinc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary N Burtnick

    Full Text Available Burkholderia mallei is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes glanders in humans and animals. Previous studies have demonstrated that the cluster 1 type VI secretion system (T6SS-1 expressed by this organism is essential for virulence in hamsters and is positively regulated by the VirAG two-component system. Recently, we have shown that T6SS-1 gene expression is up-regulated following internalization of this pathogen into phagocytic cells and that this system promotes multinucleated giant cell formation in infected tissue culture monolayers. In the present study, we further investigated the complex regulation of this important virulence factor. To assess T6SS-1 expression, B. mallei strains were cultured in various media conditions and Hcp1 production was analyzed by Western immunoblotting. Transcript levels of several VirAG-regulated genes (bimA, tssA, hcp1 and tssM were also determined using quantitative real time PCR. Consistent with previous observations, T6SS-1 was not expressed during growth of B. mallei in rich media. Curiously, growth of the organism in minimal media (M9G or minimal media plus casamino acids (M9CG facilitated robust expression of T6SS-1 genes whereas growth in minimal media plus tryptone (M9TG did not. Investigation of this phenomenon confirmed a regulatory role for VirAG in this process. Additionally, T6SS-1 gene expression was significantly down-regulated by the addition of iron and zinc to M9CG. Other genes under the control of VirAG did not appear to be as tightly regulated by these divalent metals. Similar results were observed for B. pseudomallei, but not for B. thailandensis. Collectively, our findings indicate that in addition to being positively regulated by VirAG, B. mallei and B. pseudomallei T6SS-1 gene expression is negatively regulated by iron and zinc.

  6. ExsE Is a Negative Regulator for T3SS Gene Expression in Vibrio alginolyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinxin; Lu, Shao-Yeh; Orfe, Lisa H.; Ren, Chun-Hua; Hu, Chao-Qun; Call, Douglas R.; Avillan, Johannetsy J.; Zhao, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) contribute to microbial pathogenesis of Vibrio species, but the regulatory mechanisms are complex. We determined if the classic ExsACDE protein-protein regulatory model from Pseudomonas aeruginosa applies to Vibrio alginolyticus. Deletion mutants in V. alginolyticus demonstrated that, as expected, the T3SS is positively regulated by ExsA and ExsC and negatively regulated by ExsD and ExsE. Interestingly, deletion of exsE enhanced the ability of V. alginolyticus to induce host-cell death while cytotoxicity was inhibited by in trans complementation of this gene in a wild-type strain, a result that differs from a similar experiment with Vibrio parahaemolyticus ExsE. We further showed that ExsE is a secreted protein that does not contribute to adhesion to Fathead minnow epithelial cells. An in vitro co-immunoprecipitation assay confirmed that ExsE binds to ExsC to exert negative regulatory effect on T3SS genes. T3SS in V. alginolyticus can be activated in the absence of physical contact with host cells and a separate regulatory pathway appears to contribute to the regulation of ExsA. Consequently, like ExsE from P. aeruginosa, ExsE is a negative regulator for T3SS gene expression in V. alginolyticus. Unlike the V. parahaemolyticus orthologue, however, deletion of exsE from V. alginolyticus enhanced in vitro cytotoxicity. PMID:27999769

  7. Tomato NAC transcription factor SlSRN1 positively regulates defense response against biotic stress but negatively regulates abiotic stress response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liu

    Full Text Available Biotic and abiotic stresses are major unfavorable factors that affect crop productivity worldwide. NAC proteins comprise a large family of transcription factors that play important roles in plant growth and development as well as in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In a virus-induced gene silencing-based screening to identify genes that are involved in defense response against Botrytis cinerea, we identified a tomato NAC gene SlSRN1 (Solanum lycopersicum Stress-related NAC1. SlSRN1 is a plasma membrane-localized protein with transactivation activity in yeast. Expression of SlSRN1 was significantly induced by infection with B. cinerea or Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000, leading to 6-8 folds higher than that in the mock-inoculated plants. Expression of SlSRN1 was also induced by salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid and by drought stress. Silencing of SlSRN1 resulted in increased severity of diseases caused by B. cinerea and Pst DC3000. However, silencing of SlSRN1 resulted in increased tolerance against oxidative and drought stresses. Furthermore, silencing of SlSRN1 accelerated accumulation of reactive oxygen species but attenuated expression of defense genes after infection by B. cinerea. Our results demonstrate that SlSRN1 is a positive regulator of defense response against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000 but is a negative regulator for oxidative and drought stress response in tomato.

  8. Fatty Acid Oxidation-Driven Src Links Mitochondrial Energy Reprogramming and Oncogenic Properties in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Hyoung; Vithayathil, Sajna; Kumar, Santosh; Sung, Pi-Lin; Dobrolecki, Lacey Elizabeth; Putluri, Vasanta; Bhat, Vadiraja B; Bhowmik, Salil Kumar; Gupta, Vineet; Arora, Kavisha; Wu, Danli; Tsouko, Efrosini; Zhang, Yiqun; Maity, Suman; Donti, Taraka R; Graham, Brett H; Frigo, Daniel E; Coarfa, Cristian; Yotnda, Patricia; Putluri, Nagireddy; Sreekumar, Arun; Lewis, Michael T; Creighton, Chad J; Wong, Lee-Jun C; Kaipparettu, Benny Abraham

    2016-03-08

    Transmitochondrial cybrids and multiple OMICs approaches were used to understand mitochondrial reprogramming and mitochondria-regulated cancer pathways in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Analysis of cybrids and established breast cancer (BC) cell lines showed that metastatic TNBC maintains high levels of ATP through fatty acid β oxidation (FAO) and activates Src oncoprotein through autophosphorylation at Y419. Manipulation of FAO including the knocking down of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (CPT1) and 2 (CPT2), the rate-limiting proteins of FAO, and analysis of patient-derived xenograft models confirmed the role of mitochondrial FAO in Src activation and metastasis. Analysis of TCGA and other independent BC clinical data further reaffirmed the role of mitochondrial FAO and CPT genes in Src regulation and their significance in BC metastasis.

  9. Fatty Acid Oxidation-Driven Src Links Mitochondrial Energy Reprogramming and Oncogenic Properties in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hyoung Park

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Transmitochondrial cybrids and multiple OMICs approaches were used to understand mitochondrial reprogramming and mitochondria-regulated cancer pathways in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC. Analysis of cybrids and established breast cancer (BC cell lines showed that metastatic TNBC maintains high levels of ATP through fatty acid β oxidation (FAO and activates Src oncoprotein through autophosphorylation at Y419. Manipulation of FAO including the knocking down of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (CPT1 and 2 (CPT2, the rate-limiting proteins of FAO, and analysis of patient-derived xenograft models confirmed the role of mitochondrial FAO in Src activation and metastasis. Analysis of TCGA and other independent BC clinical data further reaffirmed the role of mitochondrial FAO and CPT genes in Src regulation and their significance in BC metastasis.

  10. Optomotor-blind negatively regulates Drosophila eye development by blocking Jak/STAT signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen Tsai

    Full Text Available Organ formation requires a delicate balance of positive and negative regulators. In Drosophila eye development, wingless (wg is expressed at the lateral margins of the eye disc and serves to block retinal development. The T-box gene optomotor-blind (omb is expressed in a similar pattern and is regulated by Wg. Omb mediates part of Wg activity in blocking eye development. Omb exerts its function primarily by blocking cell proliferation. These effects occur predominantly in the ventral margin. Our results suggest that the primary effect of Omb is the blocking of Jak/STAT signaling by repressing transcription of upd which encodes the Jak receptor ligand Unpaired.

  11. CARD9 negatively regulates NLRP3-induced IL-1β production on Salmonella infection of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Milton; Tourlomousis, Panagiotis; Wright, John; P Monie, Tom; Bryant, Clare E

    2016-09-27

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a proinflammatory cytokine required for host control of bacterial infections, and its production must be tightly regulated to prevent excessive inflammation. Here we show that caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9), a protein associated with induction of proinflammatory cytokines by fungi, has a negative role on IL-1β production during bacterial infection. Specifically, in response to activation of the nucleotide oligomerization domain receptor pyrin-domain containing protein 3 (NLRP3) by Salmonella infection, CARD9 negatively regulates IL-1β by fine-tuning pro-IL-1β expression, spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK)-mediated NLRP3 activation and repressing inflammasome-associated caspase-8 activity. CARD9 is suppressed during Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, facilitating increased IL-1β production. CARD9 is, therefore, a central signalling hub that coordinates a pathogen-specific host inflammatory response.

  12. CARD9 negatively regulates NLRP3-induced IL-1β production on Salmonella infection of macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Milton; Tourlomousis, Panagiotis; Wright, John; P. Monie, Tom; Bryant, Clare E.

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a proinflammatory cytokine required for host control of bacterial infections, and its production must be tightly regulated to prevent excessive inflammation. Here we show that caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9), a protein associated with induction of proinflammatory cytokines by fungi, has a negative role on IL-1β production during bacterial infection. Specifically, in response to activation of the nucleotide oligomerization domain receptor pyrin-domain containing protein 3 (NLRP3) by Salmonella infection, CARD9 negatively regulates IL-1β by fine-tuning pro-IL-1β expression, spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK)-mediated NLRP3 activation and repressing inflammasome-associated caspase-8 activity. CARD9 is suppressed during Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, facilitating increased IL-1β production. CARD9 is, therefore, a central signalling hub that coordinates a pathogen-specific host inflammatory response. PMID:27670879

  13. DMPD: PI3K and negative regulation of TLR signaling. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available (.svg) HTML File (.html) CSML File (.csml) Open .csml file with CIOPlayer Open .csml file with CIOPlayer - ※...mmunol. 2003 Jul;24(7):358-63. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show PI3K and negative regulation of TLR signal...CIO Playerのご利用上の注意 Open .csml file with CIO Open .csml file with CIO - ※CIOのご利用上の注意 ...

  14. Mindfulness in schizophrenia: Associations with self-reported motivation, emotion regulation, dysfunctional attitudes, and negative symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Naomi T; Horan, William P; Green, Michael F

    2015-10-01

    Mindfulness-based interventions are gaining empirical support as alternative or adjunctive treatments for a variety of mental health conditions, including anxiety, depression, and substance use disorders. Emerging evidence now suggests that mindfulness-based treatments may also improve clinical features of schizophrenia, including negative symptoms. However, no research has examined the construct of mindfulness and its correlates in schizophrenia. In this study, we examined self-reported mindfulness in patients (n=35) and controls (n=25) using the Five-Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire. We examined correlations among mindfulness, negative symptoms, and psychological constructs associated with negative symptoms and adaptive functioning, including motivation, emotion regulation, and dysfunctional attitudes. As hypothesized, patients endorsed lower levels of mindfulness than controls. In patients, mindfulness was unrelated to negative symptoms, but it was associated with more adaptive emotion regulation (greater reappraisal) and beliefs (lower dysfunctional attitudes). Some facets of mindfulness were also associated with self-reported motivation (behavioral activation and inhibition). These patterns of correlations were similar in patients and controls. Findings from this initial study suggest that schizophrenia patients may benefit from mindfulness-based interventions because they (a) have lower self-reported mindfulness than controls and (b) demonstrate strong relationships between mindfulness and psychological constructs related to adaptive functioning.

  15. Phytophthora sojae TatD nuclease positively regulates sporulation and negatively regulates pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linlin; Shen, Danyu; Sun, Nannan; Xu, Jing; Wang, Wen; Dou, Daolong

    2014-10-01

    During pathogenic interactions, both the host and pathogen are exposed to conditions that induce programmed cell death (PCD). Certain aspects of PCD have been recently examined in eukaryotic microbes but not in oomycetes. Here, we identified conserved TatD proteins in Phytophthora sojae; the proteins are key components of DNA degradation in apoptosis. We selected PsTatD4 for further investigation because the enzyme is unique to the oomycete branch of the phylogenetic tree. The purified protein exhibited DNase activity in vitro. Its expression was upregulated in sporangia and later infective stages but downregulated in cysts and during early infection. Functional analysis revealed that the gene was required for sporulation and zoospore production, and the expression levels were associated with the numbers of hydrogen-peroxide-induced terminal dUTP nick end-labeling-positive cells. Furthermore, overexpression of PsTatD4 gene reduced the virulence in a susceptible soybean cultivar. Together, these data suggest that apoptosis may play different roles in the early and late infective stages of P. sojae, and that PsTatD4 is a key regulator of infection. The association of PsTatD4 and apoptosis will lay a foundation to understanding the basic biology of apoptosis and its roles in P. sojae disease cycle.

  16. Negative feedback regulation of Homer 1a on norepinephrine-dependent cardiac hypertrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarello, Carmelina; Bortoloso, Elena; Carpi, Andrea; Furlan, Sandra; Volpe, Pompeo, E-mail: pompeo.volpe@unipd.it

    2013-07-15

    Homers are scaffolding proteins that modulate diverse cell functions being able to assemble signalling complexes. In this study, the presence, sub-cellular distribution and function of Homer 1 was investigated. Homer 1a and Homer 1b/c are constitutively expressed in cardiac muscle of both mouse and rat and in HL-1 cells, a cardiac cell line. As judged by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, Homer 1a displays sarcomeric and peri-nuclear localization. In cardiomyocytes and cultured HL-1 cells, the hypertrophic agonist norepinephrine (NE) induces α{sub 1}-adrenergic specific Homer 1a over-expression, with a two-to-three-fold increase within 1 h, and no up-regulation of Homer 1b/c, as judged by Western blot and qPCR. In HL-1 cells, plasmid-driven over-expression of Homer 1a partially antagonizes activation of ERK phosphorylation and ANF up-regulation, two well-established, early markers of hypertrophy. At the morphometric level, NE-induced increase of cell size is likewise and partially counteracted by exogenous Homer 1a. Under the same experimental conditions, Homer 1b/c does not have any effect on ANF up-regulation nor on cell hypertrophy. Thus, Homer 1a up-regulation is associated to early stages of cardiac hypertrophy and appears to play a negative feedback regulation on molecular transducers of hypertrophy. -- Highlights: • Homer 1a is constitutively expressed in cardiac tissue. • In HL-1 cells, norepinephrine activates signaling pathways leading to hypertrophy. • Homer 1a up-regulation is an early event of norepinephrine-induced hypertrophy. • Homer 1a plays a negative feedback regulation modulating pathological hypertrophy. • Over-expression of Homer 1a per se does not induce hypertrophy.

  17. Lactic acid permeabilizes gram-negative bacteria by disrupting the outer membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakomi, H L; Skyttä, E; Saarela, M; Mattila-Sandholm, T; Latva-Kala, K; Helander, I M

    2000-05-01

    The effect of lactic acid on the outer membrane permeability of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was studied utilizing a fluorescent-probe uptake assay and sensitization to bacteriolysis. For control purposes, similar assays were performed with EDTA (a permeabilizer acting by chelation) and with hydrochloric acid, the latter at pH values corresponding to those yielded by lactic acid, and also in the presence of KCN. Already 5 mM (pH 4.0) lactic acid caused prominent permeabilization in each species, the effect in the fluorescence assay being stronger than that of EDTA or HCl. Similar results were obtained in the presence of KCN, except for P. aeruginosa, for which an increase in the effect of HCl was observed in the presence of KCN. The permeabilization by lactic and hydrochloric acid was partly abolished by MgCl(2). Lactic acid sensitized E. coli and serovar Typhimurium to the lytic action of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) more efficiently than did HCl, whereas both acids sensitized P. aeruginosa to SDS and to Triton X-100. P. aeruginosa was effectively sensitized to lysozyme by lactic acid and by HCl. Considerable proportions of lipopolysaccharide were liberated from serovar Typhimurium by these acids; analysis of liberated material by electrophoresis and by fatty acid analysis showed that lactic acid was more active than EDTA or HCl in liberating lipopolysaccharide from the outer membrane. Thus, lactic acid, in addition to its antimicrobial property due to the lowering of the pH, also functions as a permeabilizer of the gram-negative bacterial outer membrane and may act as a potentiator of the effects of other antimicrobial substances.

  18. HapX positively and negatively regulates the transcriptional response to iron deprivation in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Hee Jung

    Full Text Available The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is a major cause of illness in immunocompromised individuals such as AIDS patients. The ability of the fungus to acquire nutrients during proliferation in host tissue and the ability to elaborate a polysaccharide capsule are critical determinants of disease outcome. We previously showed that the GATA factor, Cir1, is a major regulator both of the iron uptake functions needed for growth in host tissue and the key virulence factors such as capsule, melanin and growth at 37°C. We are interested in further defining the mechanisms of iron acquisition from inorganic and host-derived iron sources with the goal of understanding the nutritional adaptation of C. neoformans to the host environment. In this study, we investigated the roles of the HAP3 and HAPX genes in iron utilization and virulence. As in other fungi, the C. neoformans Hap proteins negatively influence the expression of genes encoding respiratory and TCA cycle functions under low-iron conditions. However, we also found that HapX plays both positive and negative roles in the regulation of gene expression, including a positive regulatory role in siderophore transporter expression. In addition, HapX also positively regulated the expression of the CIR1 transcript. This situation is in contrast to the negative regulation by HapX of genes encoding GATA iron regulatory factors in Aspergillus nidulans and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Although both hapX and hap3 mutants were defective in heme utilization in culture, only HapX made a contribution to virulence, and loss of HapX in a strain lacking the high-affinity iron uptake system did not cause further attenuation of disease. Therefore, HapX appears to have a minimal role during infection of mammalian hosts and instead may be an important regulator of environmental iron uptake functions. Overall, these results indicated that C. neoformans employs multiple strategies for iron acquisition during infection.

  19. The Proteasome Activator PA28γ, a Negative Regulator of p53, Is Transcriptionally Up-Regulated by p53

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    Zhen-Xing Wan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available PA28γ (also called REGγ, 11Sγ or PSME3 negatively regulates p53 activity by promoting its nuclear export and/or degradation. Here, using the RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLM-RACE method, we identified the transcription start site of the PA28γ gene. Assessment with the luciferase assay demonstrated that the sequence −193 to +16 is the basal promoter. Three p53 binding sites were found within the PA28γ promoter utilizing a bioinformatics approach and were confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation and biotinylated DNA affinity precipitation experiments. The p53 protein promotes PA28γ transcription, and p53-stimulated transcription of PA28γ can be inhibited by PA28γ itself. Our results suggest that PA28γ and p53 form a negative feedback loop, which maintains the balance of p53 and PA28γ in cells.

  20. Negative and positive auto-regulation of BMP expression in early eye development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie; Liu, Ying; Filas, Benjamen; Gunhaga, Lena; Beebe, David C

    2015-11-15

    Previous results have shown that Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling is essential for lens specification and differentiation. How BMP signals are regulated in the prospective lens ectoderm is not well defined. To address this issue we have modulated BMP activity in a chicken embryo pre-lens ectoderm explant assay, and also studied transgenic mice, in which the type I BMP receptors, Bmpr1a and Acvr1, are deleted from the prospective lens ectoderm. Our results show that chicken embryo pre-lens ectoderm cells express BMPs and require BMP signaling for lens specification in vitro, and that in vivo inhibition of BMP signals in the mouse prospective lens ectoderm interrupts lens placode formation and prevents lens invagination. Furthermore, our results provide evidence that BMP expression is negatively auto-regulated in the lens-forming ectoderm, decreasing when the tissue is exposed to exogenous BMPs and increasing when BMP signaling is prevented. In addition, eyes lacking BMP receptors in the prospective lens placode develop coloboma in the adjacent wild type optic cup. In these eyes, Bmp7 expression increases in the ventral optic cup and the normal dorsal-ventral gradient of BMP signaling in the optic cup is disrupted. Pax2 becomes undetectable and expression of Sfrp2 increases in the ventral optic cup, suggesting that increased BMP signaling alter their expression, resulting in failure to close the optic fissure. In summary, our results suggest that negative and positive auto-regulation of BMP expression is important to regulate early eye development.

  1. Negative feedback regulation of auxin signaling by ATHB8/ACL5-BUD2 transcription module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baima, Simona; Forte, Valentina; Possenti, Marco; Peñalosa, Andrés; Leoni, Guido; Salvi, Sergio; Felici, Barbara; Ruberti, Ida; Morelli, Giorgio

    2014-06-01

    The role of auxin as main regulator of vascular differentiation is well established, and a direct correlation between the rate of xylem differentiation and the amount of auxin reaching the (pro)cambial cells has been proposed. It has been suggested that thermospermine produced by ACAULIS5 (ACL5) and bushy and dwarf2 (BUD2) is one of the factors downstream to auxin contributing to the regulation of this process in Arabidopsis. Here, we provide an in-depth characterization of the mechanism through which ACL5 modulates xylem differentiation. We show that an increased level of ACL5 slows down xylem differentiation by negatively affecting the expression of homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-ZIP) III and key auxin signaling genes. This mechanism involves the positive regulation of thermospermine biosynthesis by the HD-ZIP III protein Arabidopsis thaliana homeobox8 tightly controlling the expression of ACL5 and BUD2. In addition, we show that the HD-ZIP III protein REVOLUTA contributes to the increased leaf vascularization and long hypocotyl phenotype of acl5 likely by a direct regulation of auxin signaling genes such as like auxin resistant2 (LAX2) and LAX3. We propose that proper formation and differentiation of xylem depend on a balance between positive and negative feedback loops operating through HD-ZIP III genes.

  2. DMPD: When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative regulation of toll-likereceptor signal transduction. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18631453 When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative regulation of toll-...l) Show When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative regulation of toll-likereceptor signal transd...uction. PubmedID 18631453 Title When signaling pathways collide: positive and neg

  3. Negative regulation of the antiviral response by grouper LGP2 against fish viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yepin; Huang, Youhua; Yang, Ying; Wang, Shaowen; Yang, Min; Huang, Xiaohong; Qin, Qiwei

    2016-09-01

    Laboratory of genetics and physiology 2 (LGP2), a member of RIG-I like receptor (RLR) family, plays crucial roles in modulating cellular antiviral response during viral infection. However, the detailed roles of LGP2 in different virus infection were controversial up to now. Here, we cloned a LGP2 gene from orange-spotted grouper (EcLGP2) and investigated its roles in response to grouper virus infection. EcLGP2 encoded a 678-aa protein which shared 83% identity to sea perch (Lateolabrax japonicas). Amino acid alignment showed that EcLGP2 contained three conserved domains, including a DEAD/DEAH box helicase domain, a helicase superfamily C-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain of RIG-I. In healthy grouper, the transcript of EcLGP2 could be predominantly detected in kidney, gill, fin, spleen and skin. Subcellular localization analysis showed that EcLGP2 distributed throughout the cytoplasm in grouper cells. Notably, the intracellular distribution of EcLGP2 was altered at the late stage of Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) infection, but remained unchanged during red-spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) infection. Moreover, overexpression of EcLGP2 in vitro significantly enhanced the viral replication of SGIV and RGNNV, evidenced by the acceleration of CPE occurrence and the up-regulation of the viral gene transcription or protein synthesis. Further studies indicated that overexpression of EcLGP2 decreased the expression level of interferon related molecules or effectors, including IRF3, IRF7, ISG15, IFP35, MXI, MXII, and MDA5, suggesting that the negative feedback of interferon immune response by EcLGP2 might contribute to the enhancement of RGNNV infection. Moreover, the expression levels of pro-inflammation cytokines, including IL-8 and TNFα were significantly decreased, but that of IL-6 was increased by the ectopic expression of EcLGP2. Thus, our results will contribute greatly to understanding the roles of fish LGP2 in innate immune response during

  4. Arabidopsis RAV1 is down-regulated by brassinosteroid and may act as a negative regulator during plant development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Xin HU; Yong Hong WANG; Xin Fang LIU; Jia Yang LI

    2004-01-01

    RAV1 is a novel DNA-binding protein with two distinct DNA-binding domains unique in higher plants,but its role in plant growth and development remains unknown. Using cDNA array,we found that transcription of RAV1 is downregulated by epibrassinolide (epiBL) in Arabidopsis suspension cells. RNA gel blot analysis revealed that epiBL-regulated RAV1 transcription involves neither protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation nor newly synthesized protein,and does not require the functional BRI1,suggesting that this regulation might be through a new BR signaling pathway.Overexpressing RAV1 in Arabidopsis results in a retardation of lateral root and rosette leaf development,and the underexpression causes an earlier flowering phenotype,implying that RAV1 may function as a negative regulatory component of growth and development.

  5. Necdin, a negative growth regulator, is a novel STAT3 target gene down-regulated in human cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Haviland

    Full Text Available Cytokine and growth factor signaling pathways involving STAT3 are frequently constitutively activated in many human primary tumors, and are known for the transcriptional role they play in controlling cell growth and cell cycle progression. However, the extent of STAT3's reach on transcriptional control of the genome as a whole remains an important question. We predicted that this persistent STAT3 signaling affects a wide variety of cellular functions, many of which still remain to be characterized. We took a broad approach to identify novel STAT3 regulated genes by examining changes in the genome-wide gene expression profile by microarray, using cells expressing constitutively-activated STAT3. Using computational analysis, we were able to define the gene expression profiles of cells containing activated STAT3 and identify candidate target genes with a wide range of biological functions. Among these genes we identified Necdin, a negative growth regulator, as a novel STAT3 target gene, whose expression is down-regulated at the mRNA and protein levels when STAT3 is constitutively active. This repression is STAT3 dependent, since inhibition of STAT3 using siRNA restores Necdin expression. A STAT3 DNA-binding site was identified in the Necdin promoter and both EMSA and chromatin immunoprecipitation confirm binding of STAT3 to this region. Necdin expression has previously been shown to be down-regulated in a melanoma and a drug-resistant ovarian cancer cell line. Further analysis of Necdin expression demonstrated repression in a STAT3-dependent manner in human melanoma, prostate and breast cancer cell lines. These results suggest that STAT3 coordinates expression of genes involved in multiple metabolic and biosynthetic pathways, integrating signals that lead to global transcriptional changes and oncogenesis. STAT3 may exert its oncogenic effect by up-regulating transcription of genes involved in promoting growth and proliferation, but also by down-regulating

  6. SAZ, a new SUPERMAN-like protein, negatively regulates a subset of ABA-responsive genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chang-Jie; Aono, Mitsuko; Tamaoki, Masanori; Maeda, Satoru; Sugano, Shoji; Mori, Masaki; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2008-02-01

    Arabidopsis SUPERMAN (SUP) and members of its family are plant-unique C(2)H(2)-type zinc finger genes that have been implicated in plant growth and development. In this paper, we report that a new SUP-family gene, designated as S A- and A BA-downregulated z inc finger gene (SAZ), is involved in the negative regulation of ABA-mediated signaling. SAZ-GUS fusion proteins were predominantly localized in the nuclei when they were transiently expressed in onion epidermal cells. SAZ transcripts were expressed in the leaves and pistils of very young flower buds. In young seedlings, SAZ expression was downregulated in response to environmental stresses such as drought, salt, ozone and ultraviolet-B irradiation. This downregulation was also observed in response to the phytohormones salicylic acid (SA) and abscisic acid (ABA). SA-responsive downregulation of SAZ was not observed in the npr1-1 mutant, indicating that this regulation is NPR1 dependent. RNAi-mediated knockdown of SAZ (SAZ-kd) resulted in elevated expression of the drought- and ABA-responsive genes rd29B and rab18 under unstressed conditions, and it enhanced the response of these genes to drought and ABA treatment. The expression of several other drought- and/or ABA-responsive genes was not affected by SAZ-kd. Based on these results, we propose that SAZ plays a role in repressing a subset of the ABA-mediated stress-responsive genes in unstressed conditions.

  7. Pharmacological Correction of the Negative Effect of Acetylsalicylic Acid on the Energy-Generating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Udut, ScD

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The present paper demonstrates the effect of ASA and its combination with SUC on the energy-producing system of rat heart mitochondria as well as an assessment of SUC preventive application effect on ASA pharmacokinetic parameters. Experiments conducted on outbred male albino rats (200-250 g on a model of a xenobiotic load induced by seven days of intragastric injections of acetylsalicylic acid at a dose of 250 mg/kg have shown inhibition of the oxygen consumption rates in the heart mitochondria as well as a limitation of the succinate-dependent substrate oxidation pathways and a decrease in the mitochondria ATP/ADP coefficient. Succinic acid (50 mg/kg for 7 days was injected as a preventive medication to correct the mitochondrial bioenergetics revealed. A comparative research of the pharmacokinetics of acetylsalicylic acid and acetylsalicylic acid against the background of succinic acid performed on the model of rabbits has shown total similarity in the parameters analyzed. This fact demonstrates the possibility of prevention of mitochondrial dysfunction using the intermediate Krebs cycle. SUC as preventive medication promotes the elimination of ASA-induced negative metabolic shifts in the rat heart mitochondria by normalizing the succinate- and NAD-dependent respiration, oxidative phosphorylation, and therefore, it finds good use in the correction of ASA-induced negative side-effects of an energy-generating system

  8. Drosophila protein kinase N (Pkn) is a negative regulator of actin-myosin activity during oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Tânia; Prudêncio, Pedro; Martinho, Rui Gonçalo

    2014-10-15

    Nurse cell dumping is an actin-myosin based process, where 15 nurse cells of a given egg chamber contract and transfer their cytoplasmic content through the ring canals into the growing oocyte. We isolated two mutant alleles of protein kinase N (pkn) and showed that Pkn negatively-regulates activation of the actin-myosin cytoskeleton during the onset of dumping. Using live-cell imaging analysis we observed that nurse cell dumping rates sharply increase during the onset of fast dumping. Such rate increase was severely impaired in pkn mutant nurse cells due to excessive nurse cell actin-myosin activity and/or loss of tissue integrity. Our work demonstrates that the transition between slow and fast dumping is a discrete event, with at least a five to six-fold dumping rate increase. We show that Pkn negatively regulates nurse cell actin-myosin activity. This is likely to be important for directional cytoplasmic flow. We propose Pkn provides a negative feedback loop to help avoid excessive contractility after local activation of Rho GTPase.

  9. Dynamics of brassinosteroid response modulated by negative regulator LIC in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Zhang

    Full Text Available Brassinosteroids (BRs regulate rice plant architecture, including leaf bending, which affects grain yield. Although BR signaling has been investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana, the components negatively regulating this pathway are less well understood. Here, we demonstrate that Oryza sativa LEAF and TILLER ANGLE INCREASED CONTROLLER (LIC acts as an antagonistic transcription factor of BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT 1 (BZR1 to attenuate the BR signaling pathway. The gain-of-function mutant lic-1 and LIC-overexpressing lines showed erect leaves, similar to BZR1-depleted lines, which indicates the opposite roles of LIC and BZR1 in regulating leaf bending. Quantitative PCR revealed LIC transcription rapidly induced by BR treatment. Image analysis and immunoblotting showed that upon BR treatment LIC proteins translocate from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in a phosphorylation-dependent fashion. Phosphorylation assay in vitro revealed LIC phosphorylated by GSK3-like kinases. For negative feedback, LIC bound to the core element CTCGC in the BZR1 promoter on gel-shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay and repressed its transcription on transient transformation assay. LIC directly regulated target genes such as INCREASED LEAF INCLINATION 1 (ILI1 to oppose the action of BZR1. Repression of LIC in ILI1 transcription in protoplasts was partially rescued by BZR1. Phenotypic analysis of the crossed lines depleted in both LIC and BZR1 suggested that BZR1 functionally depends on LIC. Molecular and physiology assays revealed that LIC plays a dominant role at high BR levels, whereas BZR1 is dominant at low levels. Thus, LIC regulates rice leaf bending as an antagonistic transcription factor of BZR1. The phenotypes of lic-1 and LIC-overexpressing lines in erect leaves contribute to ideal plant architecture. Improving this phenotype may be a potential approach to molecular breeding for high yield in rice.

  10. Social anxiety and emotion regulation in daily life: spillover effects on positive and negative social events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Antonina Savostyanova; Kashdan, Todd B

    2012-01-01

    To minimize the possibility of scrutiny, people with social anxiety difficulties exert great effort to manage their emotions, particularly during social interactions. We examined how the use of two emotion regulation strategies, emotion suppression and cognitive reappraisal, predict the generation of emotions and social events in daily life. Over 14 consecutive days, 89 participants completed daily diary entries on emotions, positive and negative social events, and their regulation of emotions. Using multilevel modeling, we found that when people high in social anxiety relied more on positive emotion suppression, they reported fewer positive social events and less positive emotion on the subsequent day. In contrast, people low in social anxiety reported fewer negative social events on days subsequent to using cognitive reappraisal to reduce distress; the use of cognitive reappraisal did not influence the daily lives of people high in social anxiety. Our findings support theories of emotion regulation difficulties associated with social anxiety. In particular, for people high in social anxiety, maladaptive strategy use contributed to diminished reward responsiveness.

  11. Mechanisms of JAK/STAT pathway negative regulation by the short coreceptor Eye Transformer/Latran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Katherine H; Stec, Wojciech; Brown, Stephen; Zeidler, Martin P

    2016-02-01

    Transmembrane receptors interact with extracellular ligands to transduce intracellular signaling cascades, modulate target gene expression, and regulate processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and homeostasis. As a consequence, aberrant signaling events often underlie human disease. Whereas the vertebrate JAK/STAT signaling cascade is transduced via multiple receptor combinations, the Drosophila pathway has only one full-length signaling receptor, Domeless (Dome), and a single negatively acting receptor, Eye Transformer/Latran (Et/Lat). Here we investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying Et/Lat activity. We demonstrate that Et/Lat negatively regulates the JAK/STAT pathway activity and can bind to Dome, thus reducing Dome:Dome homodimerization by creating signaling-incompetent Dome:Et/Lat heterodimers. Surprisingly, we find that Et/Lat is able to bind to both JAK and STAT92E but, despite the presence of putative cytokine-binding motifs, does not detectably interact with pathway ligands. We find that Et/Lat is trafficked through the endocytic machinery for lysosomal degradation but at a much slower rate than Dome, a difference that may enhance its ability to sequester Dome into signaling-incompetent complexes. Our data offer new insights into the molecular mechanism and regulation of Et/Lat in Drosophila that may inform our understanding of how short receptors function in other organisms.

  12. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 regulates salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent responses via EDS1 and PAD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodersen, Peter; Petersen, Morten; Bjørn Nielsen, Henrik; Zhu, Shijiang; Newman, Mari-Anne; Shokat, Kevan M; Rietz, Steffen; Parker, Jane; Mundy, John

    2006-08-01

    Arabidopsis MPK4 has been implicated in plant defense regulation because mpk4 knockout plants exhibit constitutive activation of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defenses, but fail to induce jasmonic acid (JA) defense marker genes in response to JA. We show here that mpk4 mutants are also defective in defense gene induction in response to ethylene (ET), and that they are more susceptible than wild-type (WT) to Alternaria brassicicola that induces the ET/JA defense pathway(s). Both SA-repressing and ET/JA-(co)activating functions depend on MPK4 kinase activity and involve the defense regulators EDS1 and PAD4, as mutations in these genes suppress de-repression of the SA pathway and suppress the block of the ET/JA pathway in mpk4. EDS1/PAD4 thus affect SA-ET/JA signal antagonism as activators of SA but as repressors of ET/JA defenses, and MPK4 negatively regulates both of these functions. We also show that the MPK4-EDS1/PAD4 branch of ET defense signaling is independent of the ERF1 transcription factor, and use comparative microarray analysis of ctr1, ctr1/mpk4, mpk4 and WT to show that MPK4 is required for induction of a small subset of ET-regulated genes. The regulation of some, but not all, of these genes involves EDS1 and PAD4.

  13. Regulation of negative affect in schizophrenia: the effectiveness of acceptance versus reappraisal and suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Yael; Henry, Julie D; Nangle, Matthew R; Grisham, Jessica R

    2012-01-01

    Although general emotion coping difficulties are well documented in schizophrenia, there has been limited study of specific regulatory strategies such as suppression, reappraisal, and acceptance. In the present study, clinical and control participants were asked to watch video clips selected to elicit negative affect while engaging in one of these three different emotion regulation strategies (counterbalanced), versus a passive viewing condition. The experiential and expressive components of emotion were quantified using self-report and facial electromyography, respectively. A major finding was that, in contrast to control participants, individuals with schizophrenia did not report a greater willingness to reexperience negative emotion after engaging in acceptance. These data are discussed in the context of evidence highlighting the potentially important role of acceptance in understanding affective abnormalities in clinical conditions such as schizophrenia.

  14. MEK kinase 1 is a negative regulator of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labuda, Tord; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Rasmussen, Susanne;

    2006-01-01

    MEK kinase 1 (MEKK1) is a potent JNK-activating kinase, a regulator of T helper cell differentiation, cytokine production and proliferation in vitro. Using mice deficient for MEKK1 activity (Mekk1(DeltaKD)) exclusively in their hematopoietic system, we show that MEKK1 has a negative regulatory role...... in the generation of a virus-specific immune response. Mekk1(DeltaKD) mice challenged with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) showed a fourfold increase in splenic CD8(+) T cell numbers. In contrast, the number of splenic T cells in infected WT mice was only marginally increased. The CD8(+) T cell expansion in Mekk1...... suggest that MEKK1 plays a negative regulatory role in the expansion of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells in vivo....

  15. Evolution of gene network activity by tuning the strength of negative-feedback regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Weilin; Liu, Ping; Xue, Yuan; Acar, Murat

    2015-02-11

    Despite the examples of protein evolution via mutations in coding sequences, we have very limited understanding on gene network evolution via changes in cis-regulatory elements. Using the galactose network as a model, here we show how the regulatory promoters of the network contribute to the evolved network activity between two yeast species. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we combinatorially replace all regulatory network promoters by their counterparts from Saccharomyces paradoxus, measure the resulting network inducibility profiles, and model the results. Lowering relative strength of GAL80-mediated negative feedback by replacing GAL80 promoter is necessary and sufficient to have high network inducibility levels as in S. paradoxus. This is achieved by increasing OFF-to-ON phenotypic switching rates. Competitions performed among strains with or without the GAL80 promoter replacement show strong relationships between network inducibility and fitness. Our results support the hypothesis that gene network activity can evolve by optimizing the strength of negative-feedback regulation.

  16. Antimicrobial resistance of coagulase-negative staphylococci and lactic acid bacteria from industrially produced dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevijo Zdolec

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the susceptibility to clindamycin, tetracycline, amikacin, amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, enrofloxacine, vancomycin, trimethoprim + sulphametoxazol, tobramycin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, penicillin and trimethoprim was tested in coagulase-negative staphylococci (n=78 and lactic acid bacteria (n=30 by means of disk diffusion test and E-test. The isolates were collected from soft and hard cheeses, butter and brine. All isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci were susceptible to clindamycin, amikacin, amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, enrofloxacine, vancomycin, chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin according to CLSI breakpoints. A total of 30 staphylococci isolates (38.46 % were resistant to erythromycin, 18 to penicillin (23.07 %, 4 to tetracycline (5.12 %, and one isolate to trimethoprim, tobramicin and trimethoprim + sulphametoxazol (1.28 %. Among 78 tested staphylococci, 35 of them were resistant to at least one antimicrobial substance (44.87 %. The rate of resistant isolates of different soft cheese types ranged from 22 to 70 %, while resistant staphylococci were absent in hard cheese and brine. The growth of lactic acid bacteria was not influenced by trimethoprim + sulphametoxazol (n=29, vancomycin (n=29, trimethoprim (n=28, amikacin (n=10 and tobramycin (n=10. The results show that significant part of apathogenic microbiota in different dairy products is phenotypically resistant to antimicrobial agents.

  17. Role of Bile Acids and Bile Acid Receptors in Metabolic Regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefebvre, Philippe; Cariou, Bertrand; Lien, Fleur; Kuipers, Folkert; Staels, Bart

    2009-01-01

    Lefebvre P, Cariou B, Lien F, Kuipers F, Staels B. Role of Bile Acids and Bile Acid Receptors in Metabolic Regulation. Physiol Rev 89: 147-191,2009; doi: 10.1152/physrev.00010.2008. - The incidence of the metabolic syndrome has taken epidemic proportions in the past decades, contributing to an incre

  18. GROWTH-REGULATING ACTIVITY OF SOME SALTS OF 1-NAPHTHALENACETIC ACID AND 2-NAPHTHOXYACETIC ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Laichici

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The salts of 1-naphthalene acetic acid and 2-naphthoxyacetic acid with ethanolamine have been synthetized. The two salts have been assessed using Tsibulskaya-Vassiliev biological test using agar-agar as the medium. Statistical processing of the data has been carried out. The good results of the bioassay indicate an auxinic growth-regulating activity of the two salts.

  19. Boronic Acid Group: A Cumbersome False Negative Case in the Process of Drug Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotirios Katsamakas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Herein we present, an exhaustive docking analysis considering the case of autotaxin (ATX. HA155, a small molecule inhibitor of ATX, is co-crystallized. In order to further extract conclusions on the nature of the bond formed between the ligands and the amino acid residues of the active site, density functional theory (DFT calculations were undertaken. However, docking does not provide reproducible results when screening boronic acid derivatives and their binding orientations to protein drug targets. Based on natural bond orbital (NBO calculations, the formed bond between Ser/Thr residues is characterized more accurately as a polar covalent bond instead of a simple nonpolar covalent one. The presented results are acceptable and could be used in screening as an active negative filter for boron compounds. The hydroxyl groups of amino acids are bonded with the inhibitor’s boron atom, converting its hybridization to sp3.

  20. Regulated acid-base transport in the collecting duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Carsten A; Devuyst, Olivier; Bourgeois, Soline; Mohebbi, Nilufar

    2009-05-01

    The renal collecting system serves the fine-tuning of renal acid-base secretion. Acid-secretory type-A intercalated cells secrete protons via a luminally expressed V-type H(+)-ATPase and generate new bicarbonate released by basolateral chloride/bicarbonate exchangers including the AE1 anion exchanger. Efficient proton secretion depends both on the presence of titratable acids (mainly phosphate) and the concomitant secretion of ammonia being titrated to ammonium. Collecting duct ammonium excretion requires the Rhesus protein RhCG as indicated by recent KO studies. Urinary acid secretion by type-A intercalated cells is strongly regulated by various factors among them acid-base status, angiotensin II and aldosterone, and the Calcium-sensing receptor. Moreover, urinary acidification by H(+)-ATPases is modulated indirectly by the activity of the epithelial sodium channel ENaC. Bicarbonate secretion is achieved by non-type-A intercalated cells characterized by the luminal expression of the chloride/bicarbonate exchanger pendrin. Pendrin activity is driven by H(+)-ATPases and may serve both bicarbonate excretion and chloride reabsorption. The activity and expression of pendrin is regulated by different factors including acid-base status, chloride delivery, and angiotensin II and may play a role in NaCl retention and blood pressure regulation. Finally, the relative abundance of type-A and non-type-A intercalated cells may be tightly regulated. Dysregulation of intercalated cell function or abundance causes various syndromes of distal renal tubular acidosis underlining the importance of these processes for acid-base homeostasis.

  1. MDM2/MDMX: Master negative regulators for p53 and RB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Linshan; Zhang, Haibo; Bergholz, Johann; Sun, Shengnan; Xiao, Zhi-Xiong Jim

    2016-03-01

    MDM2 (mouse double minute 2 homolog) and MDMX (double minute X human homolog, also known as MDM4) are critical negative regulators of tumor protein p53. Our recent work shows that MDMX binds to and promotes degradation of retinoblastoma protein (RB) in an MDM2-dependent manner. In a xenograft tumor growth mouse model, silencing of MDMX results in inhibition of p53-deficient tumor growth, which can be effectively reversed by concomitant RB silencing. Thus, MDMX exerts its oncogenic activity via suppression of RB.

  2. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Acts in the Drosophila Mushroom Body to Negatively Regulate Sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Bai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Though evidence is mounting that a major function of sleep is to maintain brain plasticity and consolidate memory, little is known about the molecular pathways by which learning and sleep processes intercept. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk, the gene encoding a tyrosine receptor kinase whose inadvertent activation is the cause of many cancers, is implicated in synapse formation and cognitive functions. In particular, Alk genetically interacts with Neurofibromatosis 1 (Nf1 to regulate growth and associative learning in flies. We show that Alk mutants have increased sleep. Using a targeted RNAi screen we localized the negative effects of Alk on sleep to the mushroom body, a structure important for both sleep and memory. We also report that mutations in Nf1 produce a sexually dimorphic short sleep phenotype, and suppress the long sleep phenotype of Alk. Thus Alk and Nf1 interact in both learning and sleep regulation, highlighting a common pathway in these two processes.

  3. AMPK: positive and negative regulation, and its role in whole-body energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, D Grahame

    2015-04-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a sensor of energy status that, when activated by metabolic stress, maintains cellular energy homeostasis by switching on catabolic pathways and switching off ATP-consuming processes. Recent results suggest that activation of AMPK by the upstream kinase LKB1 in response to nutrient lack occurs at the surface of the lysosome. AMPK is also crucial in regulation of whole body energy balance, particularly by mediating effects of hormones acting on the hypothalamus. Recent crystal structures of complete AMPK heterotrimers have illuminated its complex mechanisms of activation, involving both allosteric activation and increased net phosphorylation mediated by effects on phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Finally, AMPK is negatively regulated by phosphorylation of the 'ST loop' within the catalytic subunit.

  4. Plasma bile acids show a positive correlation with body mass index and are negatively associated with cognitive restraint of eating in obese patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Philip; Hofmann, Tobias; Ahnis, Anne; Elbelt, Ulf; Goebel-Stengel, Miriam; Klapp, Burghard F.; Rose, Matthias; Stengel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids may be involved in the regulation of food intake and energy metabolism. The aim of the study was to investigate the association of plasma bile acids with body mass index (BMI) and the possible involvement of circulating bile acids in the modulation of physical activity and eating behavior. Blood was obtained in a group of hospitalized patients with normal weight (BMI 18.5–25 kg/m2), underweight (anorexia nervosa, BMI 50 kg/m2, n = 14–15/group) and plasma bile acid concentrations assessed. Physical activity and plasma bile acids were measured in a group of patients with anorexia nervosa (BMI 14.6 ± 0.3 kg/m2, n = 43). Lastly, in a population of obese patients (BMI 48.5 ± 0.9 kg/m2, n = 85), psychometric parameters related to disordered eating and plasma bile acids were assessed. Plasma bile acids showed a positive correlation with BMI (r = 0.26, p = 0.03) in the population of patients with broad range of BMI (9–85 kg/m2, n = 74). No associations were observed between plasma bile acids and different parameters of physical activity in anorexic patients (p > 0.05). Plasma bile acids were negatively correlated with cognitive restraint of eating (r = −0.30, p = 0.008), while no associations were observed with other psychometric eating behavior-related parameters (p > 0.05) in obese patients. In conclusion, these data may point toward a role of bile acids in the regulation of body weight. Since plasma bile acids are negatively correlated with the cognitive restraint of eating in obese patients, this may represent a compensatory adaptation to prevent further overeating. PMID:26089773

  5. Plasma bile acids show a positive correlation with body mass index and are negatively associated with cognitive restraint of eating in obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip ePrinz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bile acids may be involved in the regulation of food intake and energy metabolism. The aim of the study was to investigate the association of plasma bile acids with body mass index (BMI and the possible involvement of circulating bile acids in the modulation of physical activity and eating behavior. Blood was obtained in a group of hospitalized patients with normal weight (BMI 18.5-25 kg/m2, underweight (anorexia nervosa, BMI 50 kg/m2, n=14-15/group and plasma bile acid concentrations assessed. Physical activity and plasma bile acids were measured in a group of patients with anorexia nervosa (BMI 14.6±0.3 kg/m2, n=43. Lastly, in a population of obese patients (BMI 48.5±0.9 kg/m2, n=85, psychometric parameters related to disordered eating and plasma bile acids were assessed. Plasma bile acids showed a positive correlation with BMI (r=0.26, p=0.03 in the population of patients with broad range of BMI (9-85 kg/m2, n=74. No associations were observed between plasma bile acids and different parameters of physical activity in anorexic patients (p>0.05. Plasma bile acids were negatively correlated with cognitive restraint of eating (r=-0.30, p=0.008, while no associations were observed with other psychometric eating behavior-related parameters (p>0.05 in obese patients. In conclusion, these data may point towards a role of bile acids in the regulation of body weight. Since plasma bile acids are negatively correlated with the cognitive restraint of eating in obese patients, this may represent a compensatory adaptation to prevent further overeating.

  6. Negative regulation of the innate antiviral immune response by TRIM62 from orange spotted grouper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Huang, Youhua; Yu, Yepin; Zhou, Sheng; Wang, Shaowen; Yang, Min; Qin, Qiwei; Huang, Xiaohong

    2016-10-01

    Increased reports uncovered that mammalian tripartite motif-containing 62 (TRIM62) exerts crucial roles in cancer and innate immune response. However, the roles of fish TRIM62 in antiviral immune response remained uncertain. In this study, a TRIM62 gene was cloned from orange spotted grouper (EcTRIM62) and its roles in grouper RNA virus infection was elucidated in vitro. EcTRIM62 shared 99% and 83% identity to bicolor damselfish (Stegastes partitus) and human (Homo sapiens), respectively. Sequence alignment indicated that EcTRIM62 contained three domains, including a RING-finger domain, a B-box domain and a SPRY domain. In healthy grouper, the transcript of EcTRIM62 was predominantly detected in brain and liver, followed by heart, skin, spleen, fin, gill, intestine, and stomach. Subcellular localization analysis indicated that bright fluorescence spots were observed in the cytoplasm of EcTRIM62-transfected grouper spleen (GS) cells. During red-spotted grouper nervous necrosis (RGNNV) infection, overexpression of EcTRIM62 significantly enhanced the severity of CPE and increased viral gene transcriptions. Furthermore, the ectopic expression of EcTRIM62 significantly decreased the transcription level of interferon signaling molecules, including interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), IRF7, interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15), melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA5), myxovirus resistance gene MXI, and MXII, suggesting that the negative regulation of interferon immune response by EcTRIM62 might directly contributed to its enhancing effect on RGNNV replication. Furthermore, our results also demonstrated that overexpression of EcTRIM62 was able to differently regulate the expression levels of pro-inflammation cytokines. In addition, we found the ectopic expression of EcTIRM62 negatively regulated MDA5-, but not mediator of IRF3 activation (MITA)-induced interferon immune response. Further studies showed that the deletion of RING domain and SPRY domain

  7. Importin beta negatively regulates nuclear membrane fusion and nuclear pore complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Amnon; Chan, Rene C; Lachish-Zalait, Aurelie; Zimmerman, Ella; Elbaum, Michael; Forbes, Douglass J

    2003-11-01

    Assembly of a eukaryotic nucleus involves three distinct events: membrane recruitment, fusion to form a double nuclear membrane, and nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly. We report that importin beta negatively regulates two of these events, membrane fusion and NPC assembly. When excess importin beta is added to a full Xenopus nuclear reconstitution reaction, vesicles are recruited to chromatin but their fusion is blocked. The importin beta down-regulation of membrane fusion is Ran-GTP reversible. Indeed, excess RanGTP (RanQ69L) alone stimulates excessive membrane fusion, leading to intranuclear membrane tubules and cytoplasmic annulate lamellae-like structures. We propose that a precise balance of importin beta to Ran is required to create a correct double nuclear membrane and simultaneously to repress undesirable fusion events. Interestingly, truncated importin beta 45-462 allows membrane fusion but produces nuclei lacking any NPCs. This reveals distinct importin beta-regulation of NPC assembly. Excess full-length importin beta and beta 45-462 act similarly when added to prefused nuclear intermediates, i.e., both block NPC assembly. The importin beta NPC block, which maps downstream of GTPgammaS and BAPTA-sensitive steps in NPC assembly, is reversible by cytosol. Remarkably, it is not reversible by 25 microM RanGTP, a concentration that easily reverses fusion inhibition. This report, using a full reconstitution system and natural chromatin substrates, significantly expands the repertoire of importin beta. Its roles now encompass negative regulation of two of the major events of nuclear assembly: membrane fusion and NPC assembly.

  8. Osa-miR169 Negatively Regulates Rice Immunity against the Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zhao, Sheng-Li; Li, Jin-Lu; Hu, Xiao-Hong; Wang, He; Cao, Xiao-Long; Xu, Yong-Ju; Zhao, Zhi-Xue; Xiao, Zhi-Yuan; Yang, Nan; Fan, Jing; Huang, Fu; Wang, Wen-Ming

    2017-01-01

    miR169 is a conserved microRNA (miRNA) family involved in plant development and stress-induced responses. However, how miR169 functions in rice immunity remains unclear. Here, we show that miR169 acts as a negative regulator in rice immunity against the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae by repressing the expression of nuclear factor Y-A (NF-YA) genes. The accumulation of miR169 was significantly increased in a susceptible accession but slightly fluctuated in a resistant accession upon M. oryzae infection. Consistently, the transgenic lines overexpressing miR169a became hyper-susceptible to different M. oryzae strains associated with reduced expression of defense-related genes and lack of hydrogen peroxide accumulation at the infection site. Consequently, the expression of its target genes, the NF-YA family members, was down-regulated by the overexpression of miR169a at either transcriptional or translational level. On the contrary, overexpression of a target mimicry that acts as a sponge to trap miR169a led to enhanced resistance to M. oryzae. In addition, three of miR169’s target genes were also differentially up-regulated in the resistant accession upon M. oryzae infection. Taken together, our data indicate that miR169 negatively regulates rice immunity against M. oryzae by differentially repressing its target genes and provide the potential to engineer rice blast resistance via a miRNA. PMID:28144248

  9. Transcriptional regulation of central amino acid metabolism in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the functional characterisation of the transcriptional regulators GlnR, ArgR and AhrC of Lactococcus lactis, which are responsible for the control of genes involved in the metabolism of the amino acids glutamine, glutamate and arginine. A chromosomal glnR deletion mutant was ma

  10. AMPK-independent pathways regulate skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dzamko, Nicolas; Schertzer, Jonathan D.; Ryall, James G.;

    2008-01-01

    with rates of fatty acid oxidation. To address this issue we have investigated the requirement for skeletal muscle AMPK in controlling aminoimidazole-4-carboxymide-1-beta-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) and contraction-stimulated fatty acid oxidation utilizing transgenic mice expressing a muscle-specific kinase......-based approach we identified 18 Ser/Thr protein kinases whose phosphorylation was increased by greater than 25% in contracted KD relative to WT muscle. Utilizing bioinformatics we predicted that extracellular regulated protein-serine kinase (ERK1/2), inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB protein-serine kinase...... beta (IKKbeta) and protein kinase D (PKD) may phosphorylate ACC2 at Ser-221 but during in vitro phosphorylation assays only AMPK phosphorylated ACC2. These data demonstrate that AMPK is not essential for the regulation of fatty acid oxidation by AICAR or muscle contraction....

  11. Identification of beer bitter acids regulating mechanisms of gastric acid secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jessica; Hell, Johannes; Liszt, Kathrin I; Dresel, Michael; Pignitter, Marc; Hofmann, Thomas; Somoza, Veronika

    2012-02-15

    Beer, one of the most consumed beverages worldwide, has been shown to stimulate gastric acid secretion. Although organic acids, formed by fermentation of glucose, are known to be stimulants of gastric acid secretion, very little is known about the effects of different types of beer or the active constituents thereof. In the present study, we compared the effects of different beers on mechanisms of gastric acid secretion. To investigate compound-specific effects on mechanisms of gastric acid secretion, organic acids and bitter compounds were quantified by HPLC-DAD and UPLC-MS/MS and tested in human gastric cancer cells (HGT-1) by means of a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye which determines the intracellular pH as an indicator of proton secretion. The expression of relevant genes, coding the H(+)/K(+)-ATPase, ATP4A, the histamine receptor, HRH2, the acetylcholine receptor, CHRM3, and the somatostatin receptor, SSTR2, was determined by qPCR. Ethanol and the organic acids succinic acid, malic acid, and citric acid were demonstrated to contribute to some extent to the effect of beer. The bitter acids comprising α-, β-, and iso-α-acids were identified as potential key components promoting gastric acid secretion and up-regulation of CHRM3 gene expression by a maximum factor of 2.01 compared to that of untreated control cells with a correlation to their respective bitterness.

  12. Differential regulation of placental amino acid transport by saturated and unsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lager, Susanne; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2014-10-15

    Fatty acids are critical for normal fetal development but may also influence placental function. We have previously reported that oleic acid (OA) stimulates amino acid transport in primary human trophoblasts (PHTs). In other tissues, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids have distinct effects on cellular signaling, for instance, palmitic acid (PA) but not OA reduces IκBα expression. We hypothesized that saturated and unsaturated fatty acids differentially affect trophoblast amino acid transport and cellular signaling. To test this hypothesis, PHTs were cultured in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 50 μM), OA (100 μM), or PA (100 μM). DHA and OA were also combined to test whether DHA could counteract the OA stimulatory effect on amino acid transport. The effects of fatty acids were compared against a vehicle control. Amino acid transport was measured by isotope-labeled tracers. Activation of inflammatory-related signaling pathways and the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway were determined by Western blot analysis. Exposure of PHTs to DHA for 24 h reduced amino acid transport and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, STAT3, mTOR, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1, and ribosomal protein (rp)S6. In contrast, OA increased amino acid transport and phosphorylation of ERK, mTOR, S6 kinase 1, and rpS6. The combination of DHA with OA increased amino acid transport and rpS6 phosphorylation. PA did not affect amino acid transport but reduced IκBα expression. In conclusion, these fatty acids differentially regulated placental amino acid transport and cellular signaling. Taken together, these findings suggest that dietary fatty acids could alter the intrauterine environment by modifying placental function, thereby having long-lasting effects on the developing fetus.

  13. Endoglin negatively regulates transforming growth factor beta1-induced profibrotic responses in intestinal fibroblasts.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, J P

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Fibroblasts isolated from strictures in Crohn\\'s disease (CD) exhibit reduced responsiveness to stimulation with transforming growth factor (TGF) beta1. TGF-beta1, acting through the smad pathway, is critical to fibroblast-mediated intestinal fibrosis. The membrane glycoprotein, endoglin, is a negative regulator of TGF-beta1. METHODS: Intestinal fibroblasts were cultured from seromuscular biopsies of patients undergoing intestinal resection for CD strictures or from control patients. Endoglin expression was assessed using confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and western blot. The effect of small interfering (si) RNA-mediated knockdown and plasmid-mediated overexpression of endoglin on fibroblast responsiveness to TGF-beta1 was assessed by examining smad phosphorylation, smad binding element (SBE) promoter activity, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression and ability to contract collagen. RESULTS: Crohn\\'s stricture fibroblasts expressed increased constitutive cell-surface and whole-cell endoglin relative to control cells. Endoglin co-localized with filamentous actin. Fibroblasts treated with siRNA directed against endoglin exhibited enhanced TGF-beta1-mediated smad-3 phosphorylation, and collagen contraction. Cells transfected with an endoglin plasmid did not respond to TGF-beta1 by exhibiting SBE promoter activity or producing CTGF. CONCLUSION: Fibroblasts from strictures in CD express increased constitutive endoglin. Endoglin is a negative regulator of TGF-beta1 signalling in the intestinal fibroblast, modulating smad-3 phosphorylation, SBE promoter activity, CTGF production and collagen contraction.

  14. Negative regulation of receptor tyrosine kinases: unexpected links to c-Cbl and receptor ubiquitylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chanan RUBIN; Gal GUR; Yosef YARDEN

    2005-01-01

    Intracellular signals mediated by the family of receptor tyrosine kinases play pivotal roles in morphogenesis, cell fate determination and pathogenesis. Precise control of signal amplitude and duration is critical for the fidelity and robustness of these processes. Activation of receptor tyrosine kinases by their cognate growth factors not only leads to propagation of the signal through various biochemical cascades, but also sets in motion multiple attenuation mechanisms that ultimately terminate the active state. Early attenuators pre-exist prior to receptor activation and they act to limit signal propagation. Subsequently, late attenuators, such as Lrig and Sprouty, are transcriptionally induced and further act to dampen the signal. Central to the process of signaling attenuation is the role of the E3 ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl. While Cblmediated processes of receptor ubiquitylation and endocytosis are relatively well understood, the links of Cbl to other negative regulators are just now beginning to be appreciated. Here we review some emerging interfaces between Cbl and the transcriptionally induced negative regulators Lrig and Sprouty.

  15. BMX Negatively Regulates BAK Function, Thereby Increasing Apoptotic Resistance to Chemotherapeutic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Joanna L; Storey, Alan

    2015-04-01

    The ability of chemotherapeutic agents to induce apoptosis, predominantly via the mitochondrial (intrinsic) apoptotic pathway, is thought to be a major determinant of the sensitivity of a given cancer to treatment. Intrinsic apoptosis, regulated by the BCL2 family, integrates diverse apoptotic signals to determine cell death commitment and then activates the nodal effector protein BAK to initiate the apoptotic cascade. In this study, we identified the tyrosine kinase BMX as a direct negative regulator of BAK function. BMX associates with BAK in viable cells and is the first kinase to phosphorylate the key tyrosine residue needed to maintain BAK in an inactive conformation. Importantly, elevated BMX expression prevents BAK activation in tumor cells treated with chemotherapeutic agents and is associated with increased resistance to apoptosis and decreased patient survival. Accordingly, BMX expression was elevated in prostate, breast, and colon cancers compared with normal tissue, including in aggressive triple-negative breast cancers where BMX overexpression may be a novel biomarker. Furthermore, BMX silencing potentiated BAK activation, rendering tumor cells hypersensitive to otherwise sublethal doses of clinically relevant chemotherapeutic agents. Our finding that BMX directly inhibits a core component of the intrinsic apoptosis machinery opens opportunities to improve the efficacy of existing chemotherapy by potentiating BAK-driven cell death in cancer cells.

  16. Galangin Abrogates Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Inflammation via Negative Regulation of NF-κB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang-Jian Zha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB has been associated with the development of asthma. Galangin, the active pharmacological ingredient from Alpinia galanga, is reported to have a variety of anti-inflammatory properties in vitro via negative regulation of NF-κB. This study aimed to investigate whether galangin can abrogate ovalbumin- (OVA- induced airway inflammation by negative regulation of NF-κB. BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged with OVA developed airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR and inflammation. Galangin dose dependently inhibited OVA-induced increases in total cell counts, eosinophil counts, and interleukin-(IL- 4, IL-5, and IL-13 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and reduced serum level of OVA-specific IgE. Galangin also attenuated AHR, reduced eosinophil infiltration and goblet cell hyperplasia, and reduced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and vascular cell adhesion protein-1 (VCAM-1 levels in lung tissue. Additionally, galangin blocked inhibitor of κB degradation, phosphorylation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB, and p65 nuclear translocation from lung tissues of OVA-sensitized mice. Similarly, in normal human airway smooth muscle cells, galangin blocked tumor necrosis factor-α induced p65 nuclear translocation and expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, eotaxin, CXCL10, and VCAM-1. These results suggest that galangin can attenuate ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway.

  17. Zac1 functions through TGFβII to negatively regulate cell number in the developing retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Götz Magdalena

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organs are programmed to acquire a particular size during development, but the regulatory mechanisms that dictate when dividing progenitor cells should permanently exit the cell cycle and stop producing additional daughter cells are poorly understood. In differentiated tissues, tumor suppressor genes maintain a constant cell number and intact tissue architecture by controlling proliferation, apoptosis and cell dispersal. Here we report a similar role for two tumor suppressor genes, the Zac1 zinc finger transcription factor and that encoding the cytokine TGFβII, in the developing retina. Results Using loss and gain-of-function approaches, we show that Zac1 is an essential negative regulator of retinal size. Zac1 mutants develop hypercellular retinae due to increased progenitor cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis at late developmental stages. Consequently, supernumerary rod photoreceptors and amacrine cells are generated, the latter of which form an ectopic cellular layer, while other retinal cells are present in their normal number and location. Strikingly, Zac1 functions as a direct negative regulator of a rod fate, while acting cell non-autonomously to modulate amacrine cell number. We implicate TGFβII, another tumor suppressor and cytokine, as a Zac1-dependent amacrine cell negative feedback signal. TGFβII and phospho-Smad2/3, its downstream effector, are expressed at reduced levels in Zac1 mutant retinae, and exogenous TGFβII relieves the mutant amacrine cell phenotype. Moreover, treatment of wild-type retinae with a soluble TGFβ inhibitor and TGFβ receptor II (TGFβRII conditional mutants generate excess amacrine cells, phenocopying the Zac1 mutant phenotype. Conclusion We show here that Zac1 has an essential role in cell number control during retinal development, akin to its role in tumor surveillance in mature tissues. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Zac1 employs a novel cell non-autonomous strategy to

  18. Negative regulation of ABA signaling by WRKY33 is critical for Arabidopsis immunity towards Botrytis cinerea 2100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shouan; Kracher, Barbara; Ziegler, Jörg; Birkenbihl, Rainer P; Somssich, Imre E

    2015-06-15

    The Arabidopsis mutant wrky33 is highly susceptible to Botrytis cinerea. We identified >1680 Botrytis-induced WRKY33 binding sites associated with 1576 Arabidopsis genes. Transcriptional profiling defined 318 functional direct target genes at 14 hr post inoculation. Comparative analyses revealed that WRKY33 possesses dual functionality acting either as a repressor or as an activator in a promoter-context dependent manner. We confirmed known WRKY33 targets involved in hormone signaling and phytoalexin biosynthesis, but also uncovered a novel negative role of abscisic acid (ABA) in resistance towards B. cinerea 2100. The ABA biosynthesis genes NCED3 and NCED5 were identified as direct targets required for WRKY33-mediated resistance. Loss-of-WRKY33 function resulted in elevated ABA levels and genetic studies confirmed that WRKY33 acts upstream of NCED3/NCED5 to negatively regulate ABA biosynthesis. This study provides the first detailed view of the genome-wide contribution of a specific plant transcription factor in modulating the transcriptional network associated with plant immunity.

  19. Ligand binding to WW tandem domains of YAP2 transcriptional regulator is under negative cooperativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchardt, Brett J; Mikles, David C; Hoang, Lawrence M; Bhat, Vikas; McDonald, Caleb B; Sudol, Marius; Farooq, Amjad

    2014-12-01

    YES-associated protein 2 (YAP2) transcriptional regulator drives a multitude of cellular processes, including the newly discovered Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, by virtue of the ability of its WW domains to bind and recruit PPXY-containing ligands to specific subcellular compartments. Herein, we employ an array of biophysical tools to investigate allosteric communication between the WW tandem domains of YAP2. Our data show that the WW tandem domains of YAP2 negatively cooperate when binding to their cognate ligands. Moreover, the molecular origin of such negative cooperativity lies in an unfavorable entropic contribution to the overall free energy relative to ligand binding to isolated WW domains. Consistent with this notion, the WW tandem domains adopt a fixed spatial orientation such that the WW1 domain curves outwards and stacks onto the binding groove of the WW2 domain, thereby sterically hindering ligand binding to both itself and its tandem partner. Although ligand binding to both WW domains disrupts such interdomain stacking interaction, they reorient themselves and adopt an alternative fixed spatial orientation in the liganded state by virtue of their ability to engage laterally so as to allow their binding grooves to point outwards and away from each other. In short, while the ability of WW tandem domains to aid ligand binding is well documented, our demonstration that they may also be subject to negative binding cooperativity represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of the molecular action of this ubiquitous family of protein modules.

  20. Procyanidin dimer B2-mediated IRAK-M induction negatively regulates TLR4 signaling in macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Nak-Yun [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Mi-So [Department of Microbiology, Infection Signaling Network Research Center, College of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Du-Sub [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); School of life sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University 5-ka, Anam-Dong, Sungbuk-ku, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Park, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Woon [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyun-Jin [School of life sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University 5-ka, Anam-Dong, Sungbuk-ku, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Hun [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Eui-Baek, E-mail: ebbyun80@kaeri.re.kr [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Eui-Hong, E-mail: ehbyun80@kongju.ac.k [Department of Food Science and Technology, Kongju National University, Yesan 340-800 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •Pro B2 elevated the expression of IRAK-M, a negative regulator of TLR signaling. •LPS-induced expression of cell surface molecules was inhibited by Pro B2. •LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was inhibited by Pro B2. •Pro B2 inhibited LPS-induced activation of MAPKs and NF-κB through IRAK-M. •Pro B2 inactivated naïve T cells by inhibiting LPS-induced cytokines via IRAK-M. -- Abstract: Polyphenolic compounds have been found to possess a wide range of physiological activities that may contribute to their beneficial effects against inflammation-related diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this anti-inflammatory activity are not completely characterized, and many features remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the molecular basis for the down-regulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signal transduction by procyanidin dimer B2 (Pro B2) in macrophages. Pro B2 markedly elevated the expression of the interleukin (IL)-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK)-M protein, a negative regulator of TLR signaling. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of cell surface molecules (CD80, CD86, and MHC class I/II) and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12p70) were inhibited by Pro B2, and this action was prevented by IRAK-M silencing. In addition, Pro B2-treated macrophages inhibited LPS-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases such as extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase and the translocation of nuclear factor κB and p65 through IRAK-M. We also found that Pro B2-treated macrophages inactivated naïve T cells by inhibiting LPS-induced interferon-γ and IL-2 secretion through IRAK-M. These novel findings provide new insights into the understanding of negative regulatory mechanisms of the TLR4 signaling pathway and the immune-pharmacological role of Pro B2 in the immune response against the development

  1. PKC{eta} is a negative regulator of AKT inhibiting the IGF-I induced proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahaf, Galit; Rotem-Dai, Noa; Koifman, Gabriela; Raveh-Amit, Hadas; Frost, Sigal A.; Livneh, Etta, E-mail: etta@bgu.ac.il

    2012-04-15

    The PI3K-AKT pathway is frequently activated in human cancers, including breast cancer, and its activation appears to be critical for tumor maintenance. Some malignant cells are dependent on activated AKT for their survival; tumors exhibiting elevated AKT activity show sensitivity to its inhibition, providing an Achilles heel for their treatment. Here we show that the PKC{eta} isoform is a negative regulator of the AKT signaling pathway. The IGF-I induced phosphorylation on Ser473 of AKT was inhibited by the PKC{eta}-induced expression in MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cancer cells. This was further confirmed in shRNA PKC{eta}-knocked-down MCF-7 cells, demonstrating elevated phosphorylation on AKT Ser473. While PKC{eta} exhibited negative regulation on AKT phosphorylation it did not alter the IGF-I induced ERK phosphorylation. However, it enhanced ERK phosphorylation when stimulated by PDGF. Moreover, its effects on IGF-I/AKT and PDGF/ERK pathways were in correlation with cell proliferation. We further show that both PKC{eta} and IGF-I confer protection against UV-induced apoptosis and cell death having additive effects. Although the protective effect of IGF-I involved activation of AKT, it was not affected by PKC{eta} expression, suggesting that PKC{eta} acts through a different route to increase cell survival. Hence, our studies show that PKC{eta} provides negative control on AKT pathway leading to reduced cell proliferation, and further suggest that its presence/absence in breast cancer cells will affect cell death, which could be of therapeutic value.

  2. Unkempt is negatively regulated by mTOR and uncouples neuronal differentiation from growth control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélie Avet-Rochex

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal differentiation is exquisitely controlled both spatially and temporally during nervous system development. Defects in the spatiotemporal control of neurogenesis cause incorrect formation of neural networks and lead to neurological disorders such as epilepsy and autism. The mTOR kinase integrates signals from mitogens, nutrients and energy levels to regulate growth, autophagy and metabolism. We previously identified the insulin receptor (InR/mTOR pathway as a critical regulator of the timing of neuronal differentiation in the Drosophila melanogaster eye. Subsequently, this pathway has been shown to play a conserved role in regulating neurogenesis in vertebrates. However, the factors that mediate the neurogenic role of this pathway are completely unknown. To identify downstream effectors of the InR/mTOR pathway we screened transcriptional targets of mTOR for neuronal differentiation phenotypes in photoreceptor neurons. We identified the conserved gene unkempt (unk, which encodes a zinc finger/RING domain containing protein, as a negative regulator of the timing of photoreceptor differentiation. Loss of unk phenocopies InR/mTOR pathway activation and unk acts downstream of this pathway to regulate neurogenesis. In contrast to InR/mTOR signalling, unk does not regulate growth. unk therefore uncouples the role of the InR/mTOR pathway in neurogenesis from its role in growth control. We also identified the gene headcase (hdc as a second downstream regulator of the InR/mTOR pathway controlling the timing of neurogenesis. Unk forms a complex with Hdc, and Hdc expression is regulated by unk and InR/mTOR signalling. Co-overexpression of unk and hdc completely suppresses the precocious neuronal differentiation phenotype caused by loss of Tsc1. Thus, Unk and Hdc are the first neurogenic components of the InR/mTOR pathway to be identified. Finally, we show that Unkempt-like is expressed in the developing mouse retina and in neural stem

  3. Novel polymer-graphite composite grid as a negative current collector for lead-acid batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shukai; Zhang, Hao; Cheng, Jie; Zhang, Wenfeng; Cao, Gaoping; Zhao, Hailei; Yang, Yusheng

    2016-12-01

    We design a novel polymer-graphite composite grid as the negative current collector for lead-acid batteries. With this novel grid, the negative active material (NAM) can deliver a specific capacity of 170 mAh g-1 at a discharge rate of 0.1 C. After that, we conduct structural optimization and surface treatment on the grid to improve its performance. Through the structural optimization, additional lead pastes can be loaded and the cycle stability of the battery is enhanced. By using the optimized grid, the weight of the negative current collector can be remarkably reduced by more than 50%. To handle the serious hydrogen evolution on the graphite surface and the unfavorable adhesion between graphite and NAM, fine PbSO4 particles are coated onto the surface of the graphite grids by chemical deposition. The cells employing the PbSO4-deposition grids exhibit excellent cycling stability as well as low polarization and then high Coulombic efficiency. We present here a possible mechanism that how PbSO4 deposits effectively enhance the performance of negative plates based on the testing results.

  4. Regulation of hepatic gene expression by saturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallim, T; Salter, A M

    2010-01-01

    Diets rich in saturated fatty acids have long been associated with increased plasma cholesterol concentrations and hence increased risk of cardiovascular disease. More recently, they have also been suggested to promote the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. While there is now considerable evidence to suggest that polyunsaturated fatty acids exert many of their effects through regulating the activity of transcription factors, including peroxisome proliferator activated receptors, sterol regulatory binding proteins (SREBPs) and liver X receptor, our understanding of how saturated fatty acids act is still limited. Here we review the potential mechanisms whereby saturated fatty acids modulate hepatic lipid metabolism thereby impacting on the synthesis, storage and secretion of lipids. Evidence is presented that their effects are, at least partly, mediated through modulation of the activity of the SREBP family of transcription factors.

  5. P. brasiliensis virulence is affected by SconC, the negative regulator of inorganic sulfur assimilation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Filipe Menino

    Full Text Available Conidia/mycelium-to-yeast transition of Paracoccidioidesbrasiliensis is a critical step for the establishment of paracoccidioidomycosis, a systemic mycosis endemic in Latin America. Thus, knowledge of the factors that mediate this transition is of major importance for the design of intervention strategies. So far, the only known pre-requisites for the accomplishment of the morphological transition are the temperature shift to 37 °C and the availability of organic sulfur compounds. In this study, we investigated the auxotrophic nature to organic sulfur of the yeast phase of Paracoccidioides, with special attention to P. brasiliensis species. For this, we addressed the role of SconCp, the negative regulator of the inorganic sulfur assimilation pathway, in the dimorphism and virulence of this pathogen. We show that down-regulation of SCONC allows initial steps of mycelium-to-yeast transition in the absence of organic sulfur compounds, contrarily to the wild-type fungus that cannot undergo mycelium-to-yeast transition under such conditions. However, SCONC down-regulated transformants were unable to sustain yeast growth using inorganic sulfur compounds only. Moreover, pulses with inorganic sulfur in SCONC down-regulated transformants triggered an increase of the inorganic sulfur metabolism, which culminated in a drastic reduction of the ATP and NADPH cellular levels and in higher oxidative stress. Importantly, the down-regulation of SCONC resulted in a decreased virulence of P. brasiliensis, as validated in an in vivo model of infection. Overall, our findings shed light on the inability of P. brasiliensis yeast to rely on inorganic sulfur compounds, correlating its metabolism with cellular energy and redox imbalances. Furthermore, the data herein presented reveal SconCp as a novel virulence determinant of P. brasiliensis.

  6. P. brasiliensis Virulence Is Affected by SconC, the Negative Regulator of Inorganic Sulfur Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menino, João Filipe; Saraiva, Margarida; Gomes-Rezende, Jéssica; Sturme, Mark; Pedrosa, Jorge; Castro, António Gil; Ludovico, Paula; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Rodrigues, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Conidia/mycelium-to-yeast transition of Paracoccidioidesbrasiliensis is a critical step for the establishment of paracoccidioidomycosis, a systemic mycosis endemic in Latin America. Thus, knowledge of the factors that mediate this transition is of major importance for the design of intervention strategies. So far, the only known pre-requisites for the accomplishment of the morphological transition are the temperature shift to 37°C and the availability of organic sulfur compounds. In this study, we investigated the auxotrophic nature to organic sulfur of the yeast phase of Paracoccidioides, with special attention to P. brasiliensis species. For this, we addressed the role of SconCp, the negative regulator of the inorganic sulfur assimilation pathway, in the dimorphism and virulence of this pathogen. We show that down-regulation of SCONC allows initial steps of mycelium-to-yeast transition in the absence of organic sulfur compounds, contrarily to the wild-type fungus that cannot undergo mycelium-to-yeast transition under such conditions. However, SCONC down-regulated transformants were unable to sustain yeast growth using inorganic sulfur compounds only. Moreover, pulses with inorganic sulfur in SCONC down-regulated transformants triggered an increase of the inorganic sulfur metabolism, which culminated in a drastic reduction of the ATP and NADPH cellular levels and in higher oxidative stress. Importantly, the down-regulation of SCONC resulted in a decreased virulence of P. brasiliensis, as validated in an in vivo model of infection. Overall, our findings shed light on the inability of P. brasiliensis yeast to rely on inorganic sulfur compounds, correlating its metabolism with cellular energy and redox imbalances. Furthermore, the data herein presented reveal SconCp as a novel virulence determinant of P. brasiliensis. PMID:24066151

  7. Zebrafish foxo3b negatively regulates canonical Wnt signaling to affect early embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun-wei Xie

    Full Text Available FOXO genes are involved in many aspects of development and vascular homeostasis by regulating cell apoptosis, proliferation, and the control of oxidative stress. In addition, FOXO genes have been showed to inhibit Wnt/β-catenin signaling by competing with T cell factor to bind to β-catenin. However, how important of this inhibition in vivo, particularly in embryogenesis is still unknown. To demonstrate the roles of FOXO genes in embryogenesis will help us to further understand their relevant physiological functions. Zebrafish foxo3b gene, an orthologue of mammalian FOXO3, was expressed maternally and distributed ubiquitously during early embryogenesis and later restricted to brain. After morpholino-mediated knockdown of foxo3b, the zebrafish embryos exhibited defects in axis and neuroectoderm formation, suggesting its critical role in early embryogenesis. The embryo-developmental marker gene staining at different stages, phenotype analysis and rescue assays revealed that foxo3b acted its role through negatively regulating both maternal and zygotic Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Moreover, we found that foxo3b could interact with zebrafish β-catenin1 and β-catenin2 to suppress their transactivation in vitro and in vivo, further confirming its role relevant to the inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Taken together, we revealed that foxo3b played a very important role in embryogenesis and negatively regulated maternal and zygotic Wnt/β-catenin signaling by directly interacting with both β-catenin1 and β-catenin2. Our studies provide an in vivo model for illustrating function of FOXO transcription factors in embryogenesis.

  8. Plexin-B2 negatively regulates macrophage motility, Rac, and Cdc42 activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly E Roney

    Full Text Available Plexins are cell surface receptors widely studied in the nervous system, where they mediate migration and morphogenesis though the Rho family of small GTPases. More recently, plexins have been implicated in immune processes including cell-cell interaction, immune activation, migration, and cytokine production. Plexin-B2 facilitates ligand induced cell guidance and migration in the nervous system, and induces cytoskeletal changes in overexpression assays through RhoGTPase. The function of Plexin-B2 in the immune system is unknown. This report shows that Plexin-B2 is highly expressed on cells of the innate immune system in the mouse, including macrophages, conventional dendritic cells, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. However, Plexin-B2 does not appear to regulate the production of proinflammatory cytokines, phagocytosis of a variety of targets, or directional migration towards chemoattractants or extracellular matrix in mouse macrophages. Instead, Plxnb2(-/- macrophages have greater cellular motility than wild type in the unstimulated state that is accompanied by more active, GTP-bound Rac and Cdc42. Additionally, Plxnb2(-/- macrophages demonstrate faster in vitro wound closure activity. Studies have shown that a closely related family member, Plexin-B1, binds to active Rac and sequesters it from downstream signaling. The interaction of Plexin-B2 with Rac has only been previously confirmed in yeast and bacterial overexpression assays. The data presented here show that Plexin-B2 functions in mouse macrophages as a negative regulator of the GTPases Rac and Cdc42 and as a negative regulator of basal cell motility and wound healing.

  9. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs negatively regulate triple-negative breast cancer growth and epithelial:mesenchymal stem cell signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Narayanan

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR is the most highly expressed steroid receptor in breast cancer with 75-95% of estrogen receptor (ER-positive and 40-70% of ER-negative breast cancers expressing AR. Though historically breast cancers were treated with steroidal androgens, their use fell from favor because of their virilizing side effects and the emergence of tamoxifen. Nonsteroidal, tissue selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs may provide a novel targeted approach to exploit the therapeutic benefits of androgen therapy in breast cancer.Since MDA-MB-453 triple-negative breast cancer cells express mutated AR, PTEN, and p53, MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer cells stably expressing wildtype AR (MDA-MB-231-AR were used to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferative effects of SARMs. Microarray analysis and epithelial:mesenchymal stem cell (MSC co-culture signaling studies were performed to understand the mechanisms of action.Dihydrotestosterone and SARMs, but not bicalutamide, inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB-231-AR. The SARMs reduced the MDA-MB-231-AR tumor growth and tumor weight by greater than 90%, compared to vehicle-treated tumors. SARM treatment inhibited the intratumoral expression of genes and pathways that promote breast cancer development through its actions on the AR. SARM treatment also inhibited the metastasis-promoting paracrine factors, IL6 and MMP13, and subsequent migration and invasion of epithelial:MSC co-cultures.1. AR stimulation inhibits paracrine factors that are important for MSC interactions and breast cancer invasion and metastasis. 2. SARMs may provide promise as novel targeted therapies to treat AR-positive triple-negative breast cancer.

  10. Negative regulation of NF-κB by the ING4 tumor suppressor in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara A Byron

    Full Text Available Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-κB is a key mediator of normal immune response but contributes to aggressive cancer cell phenotypes when aberrantly activated. Here we present evidence that the Inhibitor of Growth 4 (ING4 tumor suppressor negatively regulates NF-κB in breast cancer. We surveyed primary breast tumor samples for ING4 protein expression using tissue microarrays and a newly generated antibody. We found that 34% of tumors expressed undetectable to low levels of the ING4 protein (n = 227. Tumors with low ING4 expression were frequently large in size, high grade, and lymph node positive, suggesting that down-regulation of ING4 may contribute to breast cancer progression. In the same tumor set, we found that low ING4 expression correlated with high levels of nuclear phosphorylated p65/RelA (p-p65, an activated form of NF-κB (p = 0.018. Fifty seven percent of ING4-low/p-p65-high tumors were lymph node-positive, indicating a high metastatic tendency of these tumors. Conversely, ectopic expression of ING4 inhibited p65/RelA phosphorylation in T47D and MCF7 breast cancer cells. In addition, ING4 suppressed PMA-induced cell invasion and NF-κB-target gene expression in T47D cells, indicating that ING4 inhibited NF-κB activity in breast cancer cells. Supportive of the ING4 function in the regulation of NF-κB-target gene expression, we found that ING4 expression levels inversely correlated with the expression of NF-κB-target genes in primary breast tumors by analyzing public gene expression datasets. Moreover, low ING4 expression or high expression of the gene signature composed of a subset of ING4-repressed NF-κB-target genes was associated with reduced disease-free survival in breast cancer patients. Taken together, we conclude that ING4 negatively regulates NF-κB in breast cancer. Consequently, down-regulation of ING4 leads to activation of NF-κB, contributing to tumor progression and reduced disease-free patient survival in

  11. Effect of Indoleacetic acid (IAA) on the Negative Phototropism of Rice Root

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MoYi-wei; WANGZhong; QIANShan-qin; GuYun-jie

    2004-01-01

    To explore the effects of IAA on negative phototropism of rice (Oryza sativa L) root, agar block containing IAA was unilaterally applied on root tip to examine the phototropic response of root to exogenous IAA, and microstructure of the bending part was observed with an optical microscope. The growth of seminal roots could be regulated by exogenous IAA as well as light,as a result the root bent towards the site treated, causing asymmetric growth of the root cells at the elongation zone and consequently bending growth. IAA concentration in the shaded side of adventitious root increased much greater at 1.5 h after the start of irradiation. The unequal lateral IAA distribution can be concluded to be the main cause for negative phototropism of rice root.

  12. An Arabidopsis SUMO E3 Ligase, SIZ1, Negatively Regulates Photomorphogenesis by Promoting COP1 Activity

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Xiao-Li

    2016-04-29

    COP1 (CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1), a ubiquitin E3 ligase, is a central negative regulator of photomorphogenesis. However, how COP1 activity is regulated by post-translational modifications remains largely unknown. Here we show that SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) modification enhances COP1 activity. Loss-of-function siz1 mutant seedlings exhibit a weak constitutive photomorphogenic phenotype. SIZ1 physically interacts with COP1 and mediates the sumoylation of COP1. A K193R substitution in COP1 blocks its SUMO modification and reduces COP1 activity in vitro and in planta. Consistently, COP1 activity is reduced in siz1 and the level of HY5, a COP1 target protein, is increased in siz1. Sumoylated COP1 may exhibits higher transubiquitination activity than does non-sumoylated COP1, but SIZ1-mediated SUMO modification does not affect COP1 dimerization, COP1-HY5 interaction, and nuclear accumulation of COP1. Interestingly, prolonged light exposure reduces the sumoylation level of COP1, and COP1 mediates the ubiquitination and degradation of SIZ1. These regulatory mechanisms may maintain the homeostasis of COP1 activity, ensuing proper photomorphogenic development in changing light environment. Our genetic and biochemical studies identify a function for SIZ1 in photomorphogenesis and reveal a novel SUMO-regulated ubiquitin ligase, COP1, in plants.

  13. Voltage gated calcium channels negatively regulate protective immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Gupta

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulates levels and activity of key intracellular second messengers to evade protective immune responses. Calcium release from voltage gated calcium channels (VGCC regulates immune responses to pathogens. In this study, we investigated the roles of VGCC in regulating protective immunity to mycobacteria in vitro and in vivo. Inhibiting L-type or R-type VGCC in dendritic cells (DCs either using antibodies or by siRNA increased calcium influx in an inositol 1,4,5-phosphate and calcium release calcium activated channel dependent mechanism that resulted in increased expression of genes favoring pro-inflammatory responses. Further, VGCC-blocked DCs activated T cells that in turn mediated killing of M. tuberculosis inside macrophages. Likewise, inhibiting VGCC in infected macrophages and PBMCs induced calcium influx, upregulated the expression of pro-inflammatory genes and resulted in enhanced killing of intracellular M. tuberculosis. Importantly, compared to healthy controls, PBMCs of tuberculosis patients expressed higher levels of both VGCC, which were significantly reduced following chemotherapy. Finally, blocking VGCC in vivo in M. tuberculosis infected mice using specific antibodies increased intracellular calcium and significantly reduced bacterial loads. These results indicate that L-type and R-type VGCC play a negative role in M. tuberculosis infection by regulating calcium mobilization in cells that determine protective immunity.

  14. MLK4β functions as a negative regulator of MAPK signaling and cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi Saab, W F; Brown, M S; Chadee, D N

    2012-03-26

    Mixed lineage kinase (MLK) 4, or MLK4, is a member of the MLK family of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAP3Ks). Typically, MAP3Ks function to activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-signaling pathways and regulate different cellular responses. However, here we report that MLK4β, unlike the other MLKs, negatively regulates the activities of the MAPKs, p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and the MAP2Ks, MEK3 and 6. Our results show that MLK4β inhibits sorbitol- and tumor necrosis factor-induced activation of p38. Furthermore, MLK4β interacts with another MLK family member, MLK3, in HCT116 cells. Exogenous expression of MLK4β inhibits activation of MLK3 and also blocks matrix metalloproteinase-9 gelatinase activity and invasion in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells. Collectively, our data establish MLK4β as a novel suppressor of MLK3 activation, MAPK signaling and cell invasion.

  15. Evidence for the negative regulation of phytase gene expression in Streptomyces lividans and Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhris, Ines; Dulermo, Thierry; Chouayekh, Hichem; Virolle, Marie-Joëlle

    2016-01-01

    Sco7697, a gene encoding a phytase, enzyme able to degrade phytate (myo-inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakis phosphate), the most abundant phosphorus storing compound in plants is present in the genome of S. coelicolor, a soil born bacteria with a saprophytic lifestyle. The expression of this gene was previously shown to be induced in conditions of Pi limitation by the response regulator PhoP binding to an operator sequence, the PHO box, located upstream of the -35 promoter sequence. A close examination of the promoter region of sco7697 revealed the presence of another putative operator site, a Direct Repeat (DR), located downstream of the -10 promoter sequence. In order to determine whether this DR played a role in regulation of sco7697 expression, different variants of the phytase gene promoter region were transcriptionally fused to the ß-glucuronidase reporter gene (GUS). As expected, deletion of the PHO box led to abolition of sco7697 induction in conditions of Pi limitation. Interestingly, alteration of the DR correlated with a dramatic increase of GUS expression but only when PhoP was present. These results demonstrated that this DR is the site of strong negative regulation by an unknown repressor. The latter would impede the necessary activation of phytase expression by PhoP.

  16. Characterization of a negative regulator AveI for avermectin biosynthesis in Streptomyces avermitilis NRRL8165.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Lu, Yinhua; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Weiwen; Shu, Dan; Qin, Zhongjun; Yang, Sheng; Jiang, Weihong

    2008-08-01

    A transcriptional activator for actinorhodin biosynthesis, AtrA, was previously characterized in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), and an orthologue of atrA, named aveI, is identified in the Streptomyces avermitilis NRRL8165 genome (Uguru et al., Mol Microbiol, 58:131-150, 2005). In this study, genetic and functional characterization of aveI gene was reported. Deletion of aveI gene led to increased biosynthesis of avermectin B1a by about 16-fold. The increased synthesis of avermectin B1a was suppressed by complementation with either aveI gene or its orthologue gene atrA from S. coelicolor, suggesting AveI and AtrA shared the similar functionality and were negative regulators for avermectin biosynthesis in S. avermitilis. However, when aveI was introduced into S. coelicolor on a multi-copy plasmid, the production of actinorhodin was significantly increased, indicating that aveI had a positive effect on actinorhodin biosynthesis in S. coelicolor, the same as its orthologue atrA. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed AveI can bind specifically to the promoter region of actII-ORF4 in vitro but not that of aveR. Although its mechanism still needs to be defined, the species-differential regulation by the same regulator may represent an example of the evolutional strategy that enables bacteria to adapt the existing molecular machinery to a variety of functionalities for growth and survival.

  17. Negative transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) by nuclear TFAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Jin; Kang, Young Cheol; Park, Wook-Ha; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Pak, Youngmi Kim, E-mail: ykpak@khu.ac.kr

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • TFAM localizes in nuclei and mitochondria of neuronal cells. • Nuclear TFAM does not bind the Tfam promoter. • Nuclear TFAM reduced the Tfam promoter activity via suppressing NRF-1 activity. • A novel self-negative feedback regulation of Tfam gene expression is explored. • FAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations. - Abstract: The nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is synthesized in cytoplasm and transported into mitochondria. TFAM enhances both transcription and replication of mitochondrial DNA. It is unclear, however, whether TFAM plays a role in regulating nuclear gene expression. Here, we demonstrated that TFAM was localized to the nucleus and mitochondria by immunostaining, subcellular fractionation, and TFAM-green fluorescent protein hybrid protein studies. In HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells, human TFAM (hTFAM) overexpression suppressed human Tfam promoter-mediated luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner. The mitochondria targeting sequence-deficient hTFAM also repressed Tfam promoter activity to the same degree as hTFAM. It indicated that nuclear hTFAM suppressed Tfam expression without modulating mitochondrial activity. The repression required for nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), but hTFAM did not bind to the NRF-1 binding site of its promoter. TFAM was co-immunoprecipitated with NRF-1. Taken together, we suggest that nuclear TFAM down-regulate its own gene expression as a NRF-1 repressor, showing that TFAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations.

  18. Yeast Actin-Related Protein ARP6 Negatively Regulates Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Yeast Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumei Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The yeasts, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, are single-cell eukaryotic organisms that can serve as models for human genetic diseases and hosts for large scale production of recombinant proteins in current biopharmaceutical industry. Thus, efficient genetic engineering tools for yeasts are of great research and economic values. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (AMT can transfer T-DNA into yeast cells as a method for genetic engineering. However, how the T-DNA is transferred into the yeast cells is not well established yet. Here our genetic screening of yeast knockout mutants identified a yeast actin-related protein ARP6 as a negative regulator of AMT. ARP6 is a critical member of the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex (SWR-C; knocking out some other components of the complex also increased the transformation efficiency, suggesting that ARP6 might regulate AMT via SWR-C. Moreover, knockout of ARP6 led to disruption of microtubule integrity, higher uptake and degradation of virulence proteins, and increased DNA stability inside the cells, all of which resulted in enhanced transformation efficiency. Our findings have identified molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating AMT and a potential target for enhancing the transformation efficiency in yeast cells.

  19. Negative regulators of insulin signaling revealed in a genome-wide functional screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Min A Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes develops due to a combination of insulin resistance and beta-cell failure and current therapeutics aim at both of these underlying causes. Several negative regulators of insulin signaling are known and are the subject of drug discovery efforts. We sought to identify novel contributors to insulin resistance and hence potentially novel targets for therapeutic intervention. METHODOLOGY: An arrayed cDNA library encoding 18,441 human transcripts was screened for inhibitors of insulin signaling and revealed known inhibitors and numerous potential novel regulators. The novel hits included proteins of various functional classes such as kinases, phosphatases, transcription factors, and GTPase associated proteins. A series of secondary assays confirmed the relevance of the primary screen hits to insulin signaling and provided further insight into their modes of action. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Among the novel hits was PALD (KIAA1274, paladin, a previously uncharacterized protein that when overexpressed led to inhibition of insulin's ability to down regulate a FOXO1A-driven reporter gene, reduced upstream insulin-stimulated AKT phosphorylation, and decreased insulin receptor (IR abundance. Conversely, knockdown of PALD gene expression resulted in increased IR abundance, enhanced insulin-stimulated AKT phosphorylation, and an improvement in insulin's ability to suppress FOXO1A-driven reporter gene activity. The present data demonstrate that the application of arrayed genome-wide screening technologies to insulin signaling is fruitful and is likely to reveal novel drug targets for insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome.

  20. Yeast Actin-Related Protein ARP6 Negatively Regulates Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Yeast Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yumei; Chen, Zikai; Zhu, Detu; Tu, Haitao; Pan, Shen Quan

    2015-01-01

    The yeasts, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, are single-cell eukaryotic organisms that can serve as models for human genetic diseases and hosts for large scale production of recombinant proteins in current biopharmaceutical industry. Thus, efficient genetic engineering tools for yeasts are of great research and economic values. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (AMT) can transfer T-DNA into yeast cells as a method for genetic engineering. However, how the T-DNA is transferred into the yeast cells is not well established yet. Here our genetic screening of yeast knockout mutants identified a yeast actin-related protein ARP6 as a negative regulator of AMT. ARP6 is a critical member of the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex (SWR-C); knocking out some other components of the complex also increased the transformation efficiency, suggesting that ARP6 might regulate AMT via SWR-C. Moreover, knockout of ARP6 led to disruption of microtubule integrity, higher uptake and degradation of virulence proteins, and increased DNA stability inside the cells, all of which resulted in enhanced transformation efficiency. Our findings have identified molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating AMT and a potential target for enhancing the transformation efficiency in yeast cells.

  1. Biofilm Formation and Detachment in Gram-Negative Pathogens Is Modulated by Select Bile Acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Sanchez

    Full Text Available Biofilms are a ubiquitous feature of microbial community structure in both natural and host environments; they enhance transmission and infectivity of pathogens and provide protection from human defense mechanisms and antibiotics. However, few natural products are known that impact biofilm formation or persistence for either environmental or pathogenic bacteria. Using the combination of a novel natural products library from the fish microbiome and an image-based screen for biofilm inhibition, we describe the identification of taurine-conjugated bile acids as inhibitors of biofilm formation against both Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Taurocholic acid (1 was isolated from the fermentation broth of the fish microbiome-derived strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis and identified using standard NMR and MS methods. Screening of the twelve predominant human steroidal bile acid components revealed that a subset of these compounds can inhibit biofilm formation, induce detachment of preformed biofilms under static conditions, and that these compounds display distinct structure-activity relationships against V. cholerae and P. aeruginosa. Our findings highlight the significance of distinct bile acid components in the regulation of biofilm formation and dispersion in two different clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, and suggest that the bile acids, which are endogenous mammalian metabolites used to solubilize dietary fats, may also play a role in maintaining host health against bacterial infection.

  2. Biofilm Formation and Detachment in Gram-Negative Pathogens Is Modulated by Select Bile Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Laura M; Cheng, Andrew T; Warner, Christopher J A; Townsley, Loni; Peach, Kelly C; Navarro, Gabriel; Shikuma, Nicholas J; Bray, Walter M; Riener, Romina M; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Linington, Roger G

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a ubiquitous feature of microbial community structure in both natural and host environments; they enhance transmission and infectivity of pathogens and provide protection from human defense mechanisms and antibiotics. However, few natural products are known that impact biofilm formation or persistence for either environmental or pathogenic bacteria. Using the combination of a novel natural products library from the fish microbiome and an image-based screen for biofilm inhibition, we describe the identification of taurine-conjugated bile acids as inhibitors of biofilm formation against both Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Taurocholic acid (1) was isolated from the fermentation broth of the fish microbiome-derived strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis and identified using standard NMR and MS methods. Screening of the twelve predominant human steroidal bile acid components revealed that a subset of these compounds can inhibit biofilm formation, induce detachment of preformed biofilms under static conditions, and that these compounds display distinct structure-activity relationships against V. cholerae and P. aeruginosa. Our findings highlight the significance of distinct bile acid components in the regulation of biofilm formation and dispersion in two different clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, and suggest that the bile acids, which are endogenous mammalian metabolites used to solubilize dietary fats, may also play a role in maintaining host health against bacterial infection.

  3. Regulation and limitations to fatty acid oxidation during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jacob; Kiens, Bente

    2012-01-01

    tissue to deliver sufficient fatty acids to exercising muscle has been proposed, but evidence is emerging that factors within the muscle might be of more importance. The high rate of glycolysis during high intensity exercise might be the "driving force" via the increased production of acetyl CoA which...... in turn is trapped by carnitine. This will lead to less availability of free carnitine for fatty acid transport into mitochondria. This review summarizes our present view on how FA metabolism is regulated during exercise with a special focus on the limitations in FA oxidation in the transition from...

  4. GlgS, described previously as a glycogen synthesis control protein, negatively regulates motility and biofilm formation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, Mehdi; Montero, Manuel; Almagro, Goizeder; Viale, Alejandro M; Sevilla, Ángel; Cánovas, Manuel; Muñoz, Francisco J; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Bahaji, Abdellatif; Eydallin, Gustavo; Dose, Hitomi; Takeuchi, Rikiya; Mori, Hirotada; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2013-06-15

    Escherichia coli glycogen metabolism involves the regulation of glgBXCAP operon expression and allosteric control of the GlgC [ADPG (ADP-glucose) pyrophosphorylase]-mediated catalysis of ATP and G1P (glucose-1-phosphate) to ADPG linked to glycogen biosynthesis. E. coli glycogen metabolism is also affected by glgS. Though the precise function of the protein it encodes is unknown, its deficiency causes both reduced glycogen content and enhanced levels of the GlgC-negative allosteric regulator AMP. The transcriptomic analyses carried out in the present study revealed that, compared with their isogenic BW25113 wild-type strain, glgS-null (ΔglgS) mutants have increased expression of the operons involved in the synthesis of type 1 fimbriae adhesins, flagella and nucleotides. In agreement, ΔglgS cells were hyperflagellated and hyperfimbriated, and displayed elevated swarming motility; these phenotypes all reverted to the wild-type by ectopic glgS expression. Also, ΔglgS cells accumulated high colanic acid content and displayed increased ability to form biofilms on polystyrene surfaces. F-driven conjugation based on large-scale interaction studies of glgS with all the non-essential genes of E. coli showed that deletion of purine biosynthesis genes complement the glycogen-deficient, high motility and high biofilm content phenotypes of ΔglgS cells. Overall the results of the present study indicate that glycogen deficiency in ΔglgS cells can be ascribed to high flagellar propulsion and high exopolysaccharide and purine nucleotides biosynthetic activities competing with GlgC for the same ATP and G1P pools. Supporting this proposal, glycogen-less ΔglgC cells displayed an elevated swarming motility, and accumulated high levels of colanic acid and biofilm. Furthermore, glgC overexpression reverted the glycogen-deficient, high swarming motility, high colanic acid and high biofilm content phenotypes of ΔglgS cells to the wild-type. As on the basis of the present study Glg

  5. PLK1 is a binding partner and a negative regulator of FOXO3 tumor suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucur, Octavian; Stancu, Andreea Lucia; Muraru, Maria Sinziana; Melet, Armelle; Petrescu, Stefana Maria; Khosravi-Far, Roya

    2014-01-01

    FOXO family members (FOXOs: FOXO1, FOXO3, FOXO4 and FOXO6) are important transcription factors and tumor suppressors controlling cell homeostasis and cell fate. They are characterized by an extraordinary functional diversity, being involved in regulation of cell cycle, proliferation, apoptosis, DNA damage response, oxidative detoxification, cell differentiation and stem cell maintenance, cell metabolism, angiogenesis, cardiac and other organ's development, aging, and other critical cellular processes. FOXOs are tightly regulated by reversible phosphorylation, ubiquitination, acetylation and methylation. Interestingly, the known kinases phosphorylate only a small percentage of the known or predicted FOXOs phosphorylation sites, suggesting that additional kinases that phosphorylate and control FOXOs activity exist. In order to identify novel regulators of FOXO3, we have employed a proteomics screening strategy. Using HeLa cancer cell line and a Tandem Affinity Purification followed by Mass Spectrometry analysis, we identified several proteins as binding partners of FOXO3. Noteworthy, Polo Like Kinase 1 (PLK1) proto-oncogene was one of the identified FOXO3 binding partners. PLK1 plays a critical role during cell cycle (G2-M transition and all phases of mitosis) and in maintenance of genomic stability. Our experimental results presented in this manuscript demonstrate that FOXO3 and PLK1 exist in a molecular complex through most of the phases of the cell cycle, with a higher occurrence in the G2-M cell cycle phases. PLK1 induces translocation of FOXO3 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and suppresses FOXO3 activity, measured by the decrease in the pro-apoptotic Bim protein levels and in the cell cycle inhibitor protein p27. Furthermore, PLK1 can directly phosphorylate FOXO3 in an in vitro kinase assay. These results present the discovery of PLK1 proto-oncogene as a binding partner and a negative regulator of FOXO3 tumor suppressor.

  6. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Alternatively Spliced Isoform Negatively Regulates TLR9 Signaling in Teleost Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nai-Yu; Nagarajan, Govindarajulu; Chiou, Pinwen Peter

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) recognizes and binds unmethylated CpG motifs in DNA, which are found in the genomes of bacteria and DNA viruses. In fish, Tlr9 is highly diverse, with the number of introns ranging from 0 to 4. A fish Tlr9 gene containing two introns has been reported to express two alternatively spliced isoforms, namely gTLR9A (full-length) and gTLR9B (with a truncated Cʹ-terminal signal transducing domain), whose regulation and function remain unclear. Here, we report a unique regulatory mechanism of gTLR9 signaling in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides), whose gTlr9 sequence also contains two introns. We demonstrated that the grouper gTlr9 gene indeed has the capacity to produce two gTLR9 isoforms via alternative RNA splicing. We found that gTLR9B could function as a negative regulator to suppress gTLR9 signaling as demonstrated by the suppression of downstream gene expression. Following stimulation with CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN), gTLR9A and gTLR9B were observed to translocate into endosomes and co-localize with ODN and the adaptor protein gMyD88. Both gTLR9A and gTLR9B could interact with gMyD88; however, gTLR9B could not interact with downstream IRAK4 and TRAF6. Further analysis of the expression profile of gTlr9A and gTlr9B upon immune-stimulation revealed that the two isoforms were differentially regulated in a time-dependent manner. Overall, these data suggest that fish TLR9B functions as a negative regulator, and that its temporal expression is mediated by alternative RNA splicing. This has not been observed in mammalian TLR9s and might have been acquired relatively recently in the evolution of fish. PMID:25955250

  7. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Alternatively Spliced Isoform Negatively Regulates TLR9 Signaling in Teleost Fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Fang-Yao Lee

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 recognizes and binds unmethylated CpG motifs in DNA, which are found in the genomes of bacteria and DNA viruses. In fish, Tlr9 is highly diverse, with the number of introns ranging from 0 to 4. A fish Tlr9 gene containing two introns has been reported to express two alternatively spliced isoforms, namely gTLR9A (full-length and gTLR9B (with a truncated C'-terminal signal transducing domain, whose regulation and function remain unclear. Here, we report a unique regulatory mechanism of gTLR9 signaling in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides, whose gTlr9 sequence also contains two introns. We demonstrated that the grouper gTlr9 gene indeed has the capacity to produce two gTLR9 isoforms via alternative RNA splicing. We found that gTLR9B could function as a negative regulator to suppress gTLR9 signaling as demonstrated by the suppression of downstream gene expression. Following stimulation with CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN, gTLR9A and gTLR9B were observed to translocate into endosomes and co-localize with ODN and the adaptor protein gMyD88. Both gTLR9A and gTLR9B could interact with gMyD88; however, gTLR9B could not interact with downstream IRAK4 and TRAF6. Further analysis of the expression profile of gTlr9A and gTlr9B upon immune-stimulation revealed that the two isoforms were differentially regulated in a time-dependent manner. Overall, these data suggest that fish TLR9B functions as a negative regulator, and that its temporal expression is mediated by alternative RNA splicing. This has not been observed in mammalian TLR9s and might have been acquired relatively recently in the evolution of fish.

  8. Retinoic acid signalling in thymocytes regulates T cell development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendland, Kerstin; Sitnik, Katarzyna Maria; Kotarsky, Knut

    The Vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) has emerged as an important regulator of peripheral T cell responses. However, whether there is endogenous retinoic acid receptor (RAR) signaling in developing thymocytes and the potential impact of such signals in thymocyte development remains unclear...... further enhanced in recently generated CD69+ CD4+ SP cells. To address the potential biological significance of RA signaling in developing thymocytes, we evaluated T cell development in CD4Cre-dnRAR mice, where RA signaling is blocked in thymocytes from the CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) stage onwards due...... of this cell subset. Collectively, our data suggest a direct role for RA signaling in regulating thymocyte homeostasis and T cell development....

  9. amiA is a negative regulator of acetamidase expression in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Jane

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The acetamidase of Mycobacterium smegmatis is a highly inducible enzyme. Expression of this enzyme is increased 100-fold when the substrate acetamide is present. The acetamidase gene is found immediately downstream of three open reading frames. Two of these are proposed to be involved in regulation. Results We constructed a deletion mutant in one of the upstream ORFs (amiA. This mutant (Mad1 showed a constitutively high level of acetamidase expression. We identified four promoters in the upstream region using a β-galactosidase reporter gene. One of these (P2 was inducible in the wild-type, but was constitutively active in Mad1. Conclusions These results demonstrate that amiA encodes a negative regulatory protein which interacts with P2. Since amiA has homology to DNA-binding proteins, it is likely that it exerts the regulatory effect by binding to the promoter to prevent transcription.

  10. SarA is a negative regulator of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Christer; Heinze, C.; Busch, M.

    2012-01-01

    Biofilm formation is essential for Staphylococcus epidermidis pathogenicity in implant-associated infections. Nonetheless, large proportions of invasive S. epidermidis isolates fail to show accumulative biofilm growth in vitro. We here tested the hypothesis that this apparent paradox is related...... to the existence of superimposed regulatory systems suppressing a multi-cellular biofilm life style in vitro. Transposon mutagenesis of clinical significant but biofilm-negative S. epidermidis 1585 was used to isolate a biofilm positive mutant carrying a Tn917 insertion in sarA,chief regulator of staphylococcal...... virulence. Genetic analysis revealed that inactivation of sarA induced biofilm formation via over-expression of the giant 1 MDa extracellular matrix binding protein (Embp), serving as an intercellular adhesin. In addition to Embp, increased extracellular DNA (eDNA) release significantly contributed...

  11. Smart conjugated polymer nanocarrier for healthy weight loss by negative feedback regulation of lipase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Lei; Zhu, Sha; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Pei-Jian; Yao, Xi-Kuang; Qian, Cheng-Gen; Zhang, Can; Jiang, Xi-Qun; Shen, Qun-Dong

    2016-02-01

    Healthy weight loss represents a real challenge when obesity is increasing in prevalence. Herein, we report a conjugated polymer nanocarrier for smart deactivation of lipase and thus balancing calorie intake. After oral administration, the nanocarrier is sensitive to lipase in the digestive tract and releases orlistat, which deactivates the enzyme and inhibits fat digestion. It also creates negative feedback to control the release of itself. The nanocarrier smartly regulates activity of the lipase cyclically varied between high and low levels. In spite of high fat diet intervention, obese mice receiving a single dose of the nanocarrier lose weight over eight days, whereas a control group continues the tendency to gain weight. Daily intragastric administration of the nanocarrier leads to lower weight of livers or fat pads, smaller adipocyte size, and lower total cholesterol level than that of the control group. Near-infrared fluorescence of the nanocarrier reveals its biodistribution.Healthy weight loss represents a real challenge when obesity is increasing in prevalence. Herein, we report a conjugated polymer nanocarrier for smart deactivation of lipase and thus balancing calorie intake. After oral administration, the nanocarrier is sensitive to lipase in the digestive tract and releases orlistat, which deactivates the enzyme and inhibits fat digestion. It also creates negative feedback to control the release of itself. The nanocarrier smartly regulates activity of the lipase cyclically varied between high and low levels. In spite of high fat diet intervention, obese mice receiving a single dose of the nanocarrier lose weight over eight days, whereas a control group continues the tendency to gain weight. Daily intragastric administration of the nanocarrier leads to lower weight of livers or fat pads, smaller adipocyte size, and lower total cholesterol level than that of the control group. Near-infrared fluorescence of the nanocarrier reveals its biodistribution

  12. Interleukin-19 acts as a negative autocrine regulator of activated microglia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Horiuchi

    Full Text Available Activated microglia can exert either neurotoxic or neuroprotective effects, and they play pivotal roles in the pathogenesis and progression of various neurological diseases. In this study, we used cDNA microarrays to show that interleukin-19 (IL-19, an IL-10 family cytokine, is markedly upregulated in activated microglia. Furthermore, we found that microglia are the only cells in the nervous system that express the IL-19 receptor, a heterodimer of the IL-20Rα and IL-20Rβ subunits. IL-19 deficiency increased the production of such pro-inflammatory cytokines as IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α in activated microglia, and IL-19 treatment suppressed this effect. Moreover, in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, we observed upregulation of IL-19 in affected areas in association with disease progression. Our findings demonstrate that IL-19 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine, produced by activated microglia, that acts negatively on microglia in an autocrine manner. Thus, microglia may self-limit their inflammatory response by producing the negative regulator IL-19.

  13. N-cadherin negatively regulates collective Drosophila glial migration through actin cytoskeleton remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Gupta, Tripti; Berzsenyi, Sara; Giangrande, Angela

    2015-03-01

    Cell migration is an essential and highly regulated process. During development, glia cells and neurons migrate over long distances - in most cases collectively - to reach their final destination and build the sophisticated architecture of the nervous system, the most complex tissue of the body. Collective migration is highly stereotyped and efficient, defects in the process leading to severe human diseases that include mental retardation. This dynamic process entails extensive cell communication and coordination, hence, the real challenge is to analyze it in the entire organism and at cellular resolution. We here investigate the impact of the N-cadherin adhesion molecule on collective glial migration, by using the Drosophila developing wing and cell-type specific manipulation of gene expression. We show that N-cadherin timely accumulates in glial cells and that its levels affect migration efficiency. N-cadherin works as a molecular brake in a dosage-dependent manner, by negatively controlling actin nucleation and cytoskeleton remodeling through α/β catenins. This is the first in vivo evidence for N-cadherin negatively and cell autonomously controlling collective migration.

  14. HMGA1: a master regulator of tumor progression in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

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    Sandeep N Shah

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that tumor cells metastasize by co-opting stem cell transcriptional networks, although the molecular underpinnings of this process are poorly understood. Here, we show for the first time that the high mobility group A1 (HMGA1 gene drives metastatic progression in triple negative breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231, Hs578T by reprogramming cancer cells to a stem-like state. Silencing HMGA1 expression in invasive, aggressive breast cancer cells dramatically halts cell growth and results in striking morphologic changes from mesenchymal-like, spindle-shaped cells to cuboidal, epithelial-like cells. Mesenchymal genes (Vimentin, Snail are repressed, while E-cadherin is induced in the knock-down cells. Silencing HMGA1 also blocks oncogenic properties, including proliferation, migration, invasion, and orthotopic tumorigenesis. Metastatic progression following mammary implantation is almost completely abrogated in the HMGA1 knock-down cells. Moreover, silencing HMGA1 inhibits the stem cell property of three-dimensional mammosphere formation, including primary, secondary, and tertiary spheres. In addition, knock-down of HMGA1 depletes cancer initiator/cancer stem cells and prevents tumorigenesis at limiting dilutions. We also discovered an HMGA1 signature in triple negative breast cancer cells that is highly enriched in embryonic stem cells. Together, these findings indicate that HMGA1 is a master regulator of tumor progression in breast cancer by reprogramming cancer cells through stem cell transcriptional networks. Future studies are needed to determine how to target HMGA1 in therapy.

  15. 5-Lipoxygenase negatively regulates Th1 response during Brucella abortus infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahel, Júlia Silveira; de Souza, Mariana Bueno; Gomes, Marco Túlio Ribeiro; Corsetti, Patricia P; Carvalho, Natalia B; Marinho, Fabio A V; de Almeida, Leonardo A; Caliari, Marcelo V; Machado, Fabiana Simão; Oliveira, Sergio Costa

    2015-03-01

    Brucella abortus is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects humans and cattle, causing a chronic inflammatory disease known as brucellosis. A Th1-mediated immune response plays a critical role in host control of this pathogen. Recent findings indicate contrasting roles for lipid mediators in host responses against infections. 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) is an enzyme required for the production of the lipid mediators leukotrienes and lipoxins. To determine the involvement of 5-LO in host responses to B. abortus infection, we intraperitoneally infected wild-type and 5-LO-deficient mice and evaluated the progression of infection and concomitant expression of immune mediators. Here, we demonstrate that B. abortus induced the upregulation of 5-LO mRNA in wild-type mice. Moreover, this pathogen upregulated the production of the lipid mediators leukotriene B4 and lipoxin A4 in a 5-LO-dependent manner. 5-LO-deficient mice displayed lower bacterial burdens in the spleen and liver and less severe liver pathology, demonstrating an enhanced resistance to infection. Host resistance paralleled an increased expression of the proinflammatory mediators interleukin-12 (IL-12), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) during the course of infection. Moreover, we demonstrated that 5-LO downregulated the expression of IL-12 in macrophages during B. abortus infection. Our results suggest that 5-LO has a major involvement in B. abortus infection, by functioning as a negative regulator of the protective Th1 immune responses against this pathogen.

  16. Carbonic anhydrase 5 regulates acid-base homeostasis in zebrafish.

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    Ruben Postel

    Full Text Available The regulation of the acid-base balance in cells is essential for proper cellular homeostasis. Disturbed acid-base balance directly affects cellular physiology, which often results in various pathological conditions. In every living organism, the protein family of carbonic anhydrases regulate a broad variety of homeostatic processes. Here we describe the identification, mapping and cloning of a zebrafish carbonic anhydrase 5 (ca5 mutation, collapse of fins (cof, which causes initially a collapse of the medial fins followed by necrosis and rapid degeneration of the embryo. These phenotypical characteristics can be mimicked in wild-type embryos by acetazolamide treatment, suggesting that CA5 activity in zebrafish is essential for a proper development. In addition we show that CA5 regulates acid-base balance during embryonic development, since lowering the pH can compensate for the loss of CA5 activity. Identification of selective modulators of CA5 activity could have a major impact on the development of new therapeutics involved in the treatment of a variety of disorders.

  17. Amino acids regulate the intracellular trafficking of the general amino acid permease of Saccharomycescerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Esther J; Kaiser, Chris A

    2002-11-12

    The delivery to the plasma membrane of the general amino acid permease, Gap1p, of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by the quality of the nitrogen source in the growth medium. In an effort to define how different nitrogen sources control Gap1p sorting, we find that mutations in GDH1 and GLN1 that decrease the flux through the glutamate and glutamine synthesis pathways result in increased Gap1p sorting to the plasma membrane. Conversely, deletion of MKS1, which increases glutamate and glutamine synthesis, decreases Gap1p sorting to the plasma membrane. Glutamate and glutamine are not unusual in their ability to regulate Gap1p sorting, because the addition of all natural amino acids and many amino acid analogs to the growth medium results in increased Gap1p sorting to the vacuole. Importantly, amino acids have the capacity to signal Gap1p sorting to the vacuole regardless of whether they can be used as a source of nitrogen. Finally, we show that rapamycin does not affect Gap1p sorting, indicating that Gap1p sorting is not directly influenced by the TOR pathway. Together, these data show that amino acids are a signal for sorting Gap1p to the vacuole and imply that the nitrogen-regulated Gap1p sorting machinery responds to amino acid-like compounds rather than to the overall nutritional status associated with growth on a particular nitrogen source.

  18. Regulation of inflammation by short chain fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinolo, Marco A R; Rodrigues, Hosana G; Nachbar, Renato T; Curi, Rui

    2011-10-01

    The short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) acetate (C(2)), propionate (C(3)) and butyrate (C(4)) are the main metabolic products of anaerobic bacteria fermentation in the intestine. In addition to their important role as fuel for intestinal epithelial cells, SCFAs modulate different processes in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract such as electrolyte and water absorption. These fatty acids have been recognized as potential mediators involved in the effects of gut microbiota on intestinal immune function. SCFAs act on leukocytes and endothelial cells through at least two mechanisms: activation of GPCRs (GPR41 and GPR43) and inhibiton of histone deacetylase (HDAC). SCFAs regulate several leukocyte functions including production of cytokines (TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10), eicosanoids and chemokines (e.g., MCP-1 and CINC-2). The ability of leukocytes to migrate to the foci of inflammation and to destroy microbial pathogens also seems to be affected by the SCFAs. In this review, the latest research that describes how SCFAs regulate the inflammatory process is presented. The effects of these fatty acids on isolated cells (leukocytes, endothelial and intestinal epithelial cells) and, particularly, on the recruitment and activation of leukocytes are discussed. Therapeutic application of these fatty acids for the treatment of inflammatory pathologies is also highlighted.

  19. Regulation of Inflammation by Short Chain Fatty Acids

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    Renato T. Nachbar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The short chain fatty acids (SCFAs acetate (C2, propionate (C3 and butyrate (C4 are the main metabolic products of anaerobic bacteria fermentation in the intestine. In addition to their important role as fuel for intestinal epithelial cells, SCFAs modulate different processes in the gastrointestinal (GI tract such as electrolyte and water absorption. These fatty acids have been recognized as potential mediators involved in the effects of gut microbiota on intestinal immune function. SCFAs act on leukocytes and endothelial cells through at least two mechanisms: activation of GPCRs (GPR41 and GPR43 and inhibiton of histone deacetylase (HDAC. SCFAs regulate several leukocyte functions including production of cytokines (TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10, eicosanoids and chemokines (e.g., MCP-1 and CINC-2. The ability of leukocytes to migrate to the foci of inflammation and to destroy microbial pathogens also seems to be affected by the SCFAs. In this review, the latest research that describes how SCFAs regulate the inflammatory process is presented. The effects of these fatty acids on isolated cells (leukocytes, endothelial and intestinal epithelial cells and, particularly, on the recruitment and activation of leukocytes are discussed. Therapeutic application of these fatty acids for the treatment of inflammatory pathologies is also highlighted.

  20. Structural evolution of differential amino acid effector regulation in plant chorismate mutases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Corey S; Xu, Ang; Jez, Joseph M

    2014-10-10

    Chorismate mutase converts chorismate into prephenate for aromatic amino acid biosynthesis. To understand the molecular basis of allosteric regulation in the plant chorismate mutases, we analyzed the three Arabidopsis thaliana chorismate mutase isoforms (AtCM1-3) and determined the x-ray crystal structures of AtCM1 in complex with phenylalanine and tyrosine. Functional analyses show a wider range of effector control in the Arabidopsis chorismate mutases than previously reported. AtCM1 is activated by tryptophan with phenylalanine and tyrosine acting as negative effectors; however, tryptophan, cysteine, and histidine activate AtCM3. AtCM2 is a nonallosteric form. The crystal structure of AtCM1 in complex with tyrosine and phenylalanine identifies differences in the effector sites of the allosterically regulated yeast enzyme and the other two Arabidopsis isoforms. Site-directed mutagenesis of residues in the effector site reveals key features leading to differential effector regulation in these enzymes. In AtCM1, mutations of Gly-213 abolish allosteric regulation, as observed in AtCM2. A second effector site position, Gly-149 in AtCM1 and Asp-132 in AtCM3, controls amino acid effector specificity in AtCM1 and AtCM3. Comparisons of chorismate mutases from multiple plants suggest that subtle differences in the effector site are conserved in different lineages and may lead to specialized regulation of this branch point enzyme.

  1. P90 Ribosomal s6 kinase 2 negatively regulates axon growth in motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Matthias; Pereira, Patricia Marques; Holtmann, Bettina; Simon, Christian M; Hanauer, Andre; Heisenberg, Martin; Sendtner, Michael

    2009-10-01

    Mutations in Ribosomal s6 kinase 2 (Rsk2) are associated with severe neuronal dysfunction in Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS) patients, flies and mice. So far, the mechanisms of how Rsk2 regulates development, maintenance and activity of neurons are not understood. We have investigated the consequences of Rsk2 deficiency in mouse spinal motoneurons. Survival of isolated Rsk2 deficient motoneurons is not reduced, but these cells grow significantly longer neurites. Conversely, overexpression of a constitutively active form of Rsk2 leads to reduced axon growth. Increased axon growth in Rsk2 deficient neurons was accompanied by higher Erk 1/2 phosphorylation, and the knockout phenotype could be rescued by pharmacological inhibition of MAPK/Erk kinase (Mek). These data indicate that Rsk2 negatively regulates axon elongation via the MAPK pathway. Thus, the functional defects observed in the nervous system of CLS patients and animal models with Rsk2 deficiency might be caused by dysregulated neurite growth rather than primary neurodegeneration.

  2. Marburgvirus Hijacks Nrf2-Dependent Pathway by Targeting Nrf2-Negative Regulator Keap1

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    Audrey Page

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Marburg virus (MARV has a high fatality rate in humans, causing hemorrhagic fever characterized by massive viral replication and dysregulated inflammation. Here, we demonstrate that VP24 of MARV binds Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1, a negative regulator of nuclear transcription factor erythroid-derived 2 (Nrf2. Binding of VP24 to Keap1 Kelch domain releases Nrf2 from Keap1-mediated inhibition promoting persistent activation of a panoply of cytoprotective genes implicated in cellular responses to oxidative stress and regulation of inflammatory responses. Increased expression of Nrf2-dependent genes was demonstrated both during MARV infection and upon ectopic expression of MARV VP24. We also show that Nrf2-deficient mice can control MARV infection when compared to lethal infection in wild-type animals, indicating that Nrf2 is critical for MARV infection. We conclude that VP24-driven activation of the Nrf2-dependent pathway is likely to contribute to dysregulation of host antiviral inflammatory responses and that it ensures survival of MARV-infected cells despite these responses.

  3. Akt2 negatively regulates assembly of the POSH-MLK-JNK signaling complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Claudia; Tarras, Samantha; Taylor, Jennifer; Vojtek, Anne B

    2003-11-28

    We demonstrate that POSH, a scaffold for the JNK signaling pathway, binds to Akt2. A POSH mutant that is unable to bind Akt2 (POSH W489A) exhibits enhanced-binding to MLK3, and this increase in binding is accompanied by increased activation of the JNK signaling pathway. In addition, we show that the association of MLK3 with POSH is increased upon inhibition of the endogenous phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway. Thus, the assembly of an active JNK signaling complex by POSH is negatively regulated by Akt2. Further, the level of Akt-phosphorylated MLK3 is reduced in cells expressing the Akt2 binding domain of POSH, which acts as a dominant interfering protein. Taken together, our results support a model in which Akt2 binds to a POSH-MLK-MKK-JNK complex and phosphorylates MLK3; phosphorylation of MLK3 by Akt2 results in the disassembly of the JNK complex bound to POSH and down-regulation of the JNK signaling pathway.

  4. Prostaglandin E2 negatively regulates AMP-activated protein kinase via protein kinase A signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funahashi, Koji; Cao, Xia; Yamauchi, Masako; Kozaki, Yasuko; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kambe, Fukushi

    2009-01-01

    We investigated possible involvement of prostaglandin (PG) E2 in regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). When osteoblastic MG63 cells were cultured in serum-deprived media, Thr-172 phosphorylation of AMPK alpha-subunit was markedly increased. Treatment of the cells with PGE2 significantly reduced the phosphorylation. Ser-79 phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a direct target for AMPK, was also reduced by PGE2. On the other hand, PGE2 reciprocally increased Ser-485 phosphorylation of the alpha-subunit that could be associated with inhibition of AMPK activity. These effects of PGE2 were mimicked by PGE2 receptor EP2 and EP4 agonists and forskolin, but not by EP1 and EP3 agonists, and the effects were suppressed by an adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 and a protein kinase A inhibitor H89. Additionally, the PGE2 effects were duplicated in primary calvarial osteoblasts. Together, the present study demonstrates that PGE2 negatively regulates AMPK activity via activation of protein kinase A signaling pathway.

  5. JMJD6 promotes colon carcinogenesis through negative regulation of p53 by hydroxylation.

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    Feng Wang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Jumonji domain-containing 6 (JMJD6 is a member of the Jumonji C domain-containing family of proteins. Compared to other members of the family, the cellular activity of JMJD6 is still not clearly defined and its biological function is still largely unexplored. Here we report that JMJD6 is physically associated with the tumor suppressor p53. We demonstrated that JMJD6 acts as an α-ketoglutarate- and Fe(II-dependent lysyl hydroxylase to catalyze p53 hydroxylation. We found that p53 indeed exists as a hydroxylated protein in vivo and that the hydroxylation occurs mainly on lysine 382 of p53. We showed that JMJD6 antagonizes p53 acetylation, promotes the association of p53 with its negative regulator MDMX, and represses transcriptional activity of p53. Depletion of JMJD6 enhances p53 transcriptional activity, arrests cells in the G1 phase, promotes cell apoptosis, and sensitizes cells to DNA damaging agent-induced cell death. Importantly, knockdown of JMJD6 represses p53-dependent colon cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in vivo, and significantly, the expression of JMJD6 is markedly up-regulated in various types of human cancer especially in colon cancer, and high nuclear JMJD6 protein is strongly correlated with aggressive clinical behaviors of colon adenocarcinomas. Our results reveal a novel posttranslational modification for p53 and support the pursuit of JMJD6 as a potential biomarker for colon cancer aggressiveness and a potential target for colon cancer intervention.

  6. The PhoP transcription factor negatively regulates avermectin biosynthesis in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Renjun; Liu, Xingchao; Wen, Ying; Song, Yuan; Chen, Zhi; Li, Jilun

    2015-12-01

    Bacteria sense and respond to the stress of phosphate limitation, anticipating Pi deletion/starvation via the two-component PhoR-PhoP system. The role of the response regulator PhoP in primary metabolism and avermectin biosynthesis in Streptomyces avermitilis was investigated. In response to phosphate starvation, S. avermitilis PhoP, like Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans PhoP, activates the expression of phoRP, phoU, and pstS by binding to the PHO boxes in their promoter regions. Avermectin biosynthesis was significantly increased in ΔphoP deletion mutants. Electrophoretic mobility gel shift assay (EMSA) and DNase I footprinting assays showed that PhoP can bind to a PHO box formed by two direct repeat units of 11 nucleotides located downstream of the transcriptional start site of aveR. By negatively regulating the transcription of aveR, PhoP directly affects avermectin biosynthesis in S. avermitilis. PhoP indirectly affects melanogenesis on Casaminoacids Minimal Medium (MMC) lacking supplemental phosphate. Nitrogen metabolism and some key genes involved in morphological differentiation and antibiotic production in S. avermitilis are also under the control of PhoP.

  7. ERK8 is a negative regulator of O-GalNAc glycosylation and cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Joanne; Tham, Keit Min; Gill, David James; Bard-Chapeau, Emilie Anne; Bard, Frederic A

    2014-03-11

    ER O-glycosylation can be induced through relocalisation GalNAc-Transferases from the Golgi. This process markedly stimulates cell migration and is constitutively activated in more than 60% of breast carcinomas. How this activation is achieved remains unclear. Here, we screened 948 signalling genes using RNAi and imaging. We identified 12 negative regulators of O-glycosylation that all control GalNAc-T sub-cellular localisation. ERK8, an atypical MAPK with high basal kinase activity, is a strong hit and is partially localised at the Golgi. Its inhibition induces the relocation of GalNAc-Ts, but not of KDEL receptors, revealing the existence of two separate COPI-dependent pathways. ERK8 down-regulation, in turn, activates cell motility. In human breast and lung carcinomas, ERK8 expression is reduced while ER O-glycosylation initiation is hyperactivated. In sum, ERK8 appears as a constitutive brake on GalNAc-T relocalisation, and the loss of its expression could drive cancer aggressivity through increased cell motility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01828.001.

  8. PCTK3/CDK18 regulates cell migration and adhesion by negatively modulating FAK activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Shinya; Kawamoto, Kohei; Miyamoto, Kenji; Tsuji, Akihiko; Yuasa, Keizo

    2017-01-01

    PCTAIRE kinase 3 (PCTK3) is a member of the cyclin dependent kinase family, but its physiological function remains unknown. We previously reported that PCTK3-knockdown HEK293T cells showed actin accumulation at the leading edge, suggesting that PCTK3 is involved in the regulation of actin reorganization. In this study, we investigated the physiological function and downstream signal transduction molecules of PCTK3. PCTK3 knockdown in HEK293T cells increased cell motility and RhoA/Rho-associated kinase activity as compared with control cells. We also found that phosphorylation at residue Tyr-397 in focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was increased in PCTK3-knockdown cells. FAK phosphorylation at Tyr-397 was increased in response to fibronectin stimulation, whereas its phosphorylation was suppressed by PCTK3. In addition, excessive expression of PCTK3 led to the formation of filopodia during the early stages of cell adhesion in HeLa cells. These results indicate that PCTK3 controls actin cytoskeleton dynamics by negatively regulating the FAK/Rho signaling pathway. PMID:28361970

  9. Arabidopsis MSI1 Is Required for Negative Regulation of the Response to Drought Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cristina Alexandre; Yvonne M(o)ller-Steinbach; Nicole Sch(o)nrock; Wilhelm Gruissem; Lars Hennig

    2009-01-01

    Arabidopsis MSI1 has fundamental functions in plant development.MSI1 is a subunit of Polycomb group protein complexes and Chromatin assembly factor 1,and it interacts with the Retinoblastoma-related protein 1.Altered levels of MSI1 result in pleiotropic phenotypes,reflecting the complexity of MSI1 protein functions.In order to uncover additional functions of MSI1,we performed transcriptional profiling of wild-type and plants with highly reduced MSI1 levels (msil-cs).Surprisingly,the known functions of MSI1 could only account for a minor part of the transcriptional changes in msi1-cs plants.One of the most striking unexpected observations was the up-regulation of a subset of ABA-responsive genes eliciting the response to drought and salt stress.We report that MSI1 can bind to the chromatin of the drought-inducible downstream target RD20 and suggest a new role for MSI1 in the negative regulation of the Arabidopsis drought-stress response.

  10. SREBP-2 negatively regulates FXR-dependent transcription of FGF19 in human intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Masaaki; Hata, Tatsuya; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2014-01-10

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) is a basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor that positively regulates transcription of target genes involved in cholesterol metabolism. In the present study, we have investigated a possible involvement of SREBP-2 in human intestinal expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)19, which is an endocrine hormone involved in the regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism. Overexpression of constitutively active SREBP-2 decreased FGF19 mRNA levels in human colon-derived LS174T cells. In reporter assays, active SREBP-2 overexpression suppressed GW4064/FXR-mediated increase in reporter activities in regions containing the IR-1 motif (+848 to +5200) in the FGF19 gene. The suppressive effect disappeared in reporter activities in the region containing the IR-1 motif when the mutation was introduced into the IR-1 motif. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, binding of the FXR/retinoid X receptor α heterodimer to the IR-1 motif was attenuated by adding active SREBP-2, but SREBP-2 binding to the IR-1 motif was not observed. In chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, specific binding of FXR to the IR-1-containing region of the FGF19 gene (+3214 to +3404) was increased in LS174T cells by treatment with cholesterol and 25-hydroxycholesterol. Specific binding of SREBP-2 to FXR was observed in glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays. These results suggest that SREBP-2 negatively regulates the FXR-mediated transcriptional activation of the FGF19 gene in human intestinal cells.

  11. Negative regulation of the endocytic adaptor disabled-2 (Dab2) in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetrit, David; Barzilay, Lior; Horn, Galit; Bielik, Tom; Smorodinsky, Nechama I; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2011-02-18

    Mitotic cells undergo extensive changes in shape and size through the altered regulation and function of their membrane trafficking machinery. Disabled 2 (Dab2), a multidomain cargo-specific endocytic adaptor and a mediator of signal transduction, is a potential integrator of trafficking and signaling. Dab2 binds effectors of signaling and trafficking that localize to different intracellular compartments. Thus, differential localization is a putative regulatory mechanism of Dab2 function. Furthermore, Dab2 is phosphorylated in mitosis and is thus regulated in the cell cycle. However, a detailed description of the intracellular localization of Dab2 in the different phases of mitosis and an understanding of the functional consequences of its phosphorylation are lacking. Here, we show that Dab2 is progressively displaced from the membrane in mitosis. This phenomenon is paralleled by a loss of co-localization with clathrin. Both phenomena culminate in metaphase/anaphase and undergo partial recovery in cytokinesis. Treatment with 2-methoxyestradiol, which arrests cells at the spindle assembly checkpoint, induces the same effects observed in metaphase cells. Moreover, 2-methoxyestradiol also induced Dab2 phosphorylation and reduced Dab2/clathrin interactions, endocytic vesicle motility, clathrin exchange dynamics, and the internalization of a receptor endowed with an NPXY endocytic signal. Serine/threonine to alanine mutations, of residues localized to the central region of Dab2, attenuated its phosphorylation, reduced its membrane displacement, and maintained its endocytic abilities in mitosis. We propose that the negative regulation of Dab2 is part of an accommodation of the cell to the altered physicochemical conditions prevalent in mitosis, aimed at allowing endocytic activity throughout the cell cycle.

  12. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 is a negative regulator of hepatocyte proliferation downregulated in the regenerating liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui-Ping Xu; Wen-Min Ji; Gijs R van den Brink; Maikel P Peppelenbosch

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the expression and dynamic changes of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 in hepatocytes in the regenerating liver in rats after partial hepatectomy (PH), and examine the effects of BMP-2 on proliferation of human Huh7 hepatoma cells.METHODS: Fifty-four adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: A normal control (NC) group, a partial hepatectomized (PH) group and a sham operated (SO) group. To study the effect of liver regeneration on BMP-2 expression, rats were sacrificed before and at different time points after PH or the sham intervention (6, 12, 24 and 48 h). For each time point, six rats were used in parallel. Expression and distribution of BMP-2 protein were determined in regenerating liver tissue by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Effects of BMP-2 on cell proliferation of human Huh7 hepatoma cell line were assessed using an MTT assay.RESULTS: In the normal liver strong BMP-2 expression was observed around the central and portal veins. The expression of BMP-2 decreased rapidly as measured by both immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis.This decrease was at a maximum of 3.22 fold after 12 h and returned to normal levels at 48 h after PH. No significant changes in BMP-2 immunoreactivity were observed in the SO group. BMP-2 inhibited serum induced Huh7 cell proliferation.CONCLUSION: BMP-2 is expressed in normal adult rat liver and negatively regulates hepatocyte proliferation.The observed down regulation of BMP-2 following partial hepatectomy suggests that such down regulation may be necessary for hepatocyte proliferation.

  13. AmyR is a novel negative regulator of amylovoran production in Erwinia amylovora.

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    Dongping Wang

    Full Text Available In this study, we attempted to understand the role of an orphan gene amyR in Erwinia amylovora, a functionally conserved ortholog of ybjN in Escherichia coli, which has recently been characterized. Amylovoran, a high molecular weight acidic heteropolymer exopolysaccharide, is a virulent factor of E. amylovora. As reported earlier, amylovoran production in an amyR knockout mutant was about eight-fold higher than that in the wild type (WT strain of E. amylovora. When a multicopy plasmid containing the amyR gene was introduced into the amyR mutant or WT strains, amylovoran production was strongly inhibited. Furthermore, amylovoran production was also suppressed in various amylovoran-over-producing mutants, such as grrSA containing multicopies of the amyR gene. Consistent with amylovoran production, an inverse correlation was observed between in vitro expression of amyR and that of amylovoran biosynthetic genes. However, both the amyR knockout mutant and over-expression strains showed reduced levan production, another exopolysaccharide produced by E. amylovora. Virulence assays demonstrated that while the amyR mutant was capable of inducing slightly greater disease severity than that of the WT strain, strains over-expressing the amyR gene did not incite disease on apple shoots or leaves, and only caused reduced disease on immature pear fruits. Microarray studies revealed that amylovoran biosynthesis and related membrane protein-encoding genes were highly expressed in the amyR mutant, but down-regulated in the amyR over-expression strains in vitro. Down-regulation of amylovoran biosynthesis genes in the amyR over-expression strain partially explained why over-expression of amyR led to non-pathogenic or reduced virulence in vivo. These results suggest that AmyR plays an important role in regulating exopolysaccharide production, and thus virulence in E. amylovora.

  14. AmyR is a novel negative regulator of amylovoran production in Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongping; Korban, Schuyler S; Pusey, P Lawrence; Zhao, Youfu

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to understand the role of an orphan gene amyR in Erwinia amylovora, a functionally conserved ortholog of ybjN in Escherichia coli, which has recently been characterized. Amylovoran, a high molecular weight acidic heteropolymer exopolysaccharide, is a virulent factor of E. amylovora. As reported earlier, amylovoran production in an amyR knockout mutant was about eight-fold higher than that in the wild type (WT) strain of E. amylovora. When a multicopy plasmid containing the amyR gene was introduced into the amyR mutant or WT strains, amylovoran production was strongly inhibited. Furthermore, amylovoran production was also suppressed in various amylovoran-over-producing mutants, such as grrSA containing multicopies of the amyR gene. Consistent with amylovoran production, an inverse correlation was observed between in vitro expression of amyR and that of amylovoran biosynthetic genes. However, both the amyR knockout mutant and over-expression strains showed reduced levan production, another exopolysaccharide produced by E. amylovora. Virulence assays demonstrated that while the amyR mutant was capable of inducing slightly greater disease severity than that of the WT strain, strains over-expressing the amyR gene did not incite disease on apple shoots or leaves, and only caused reduced disease on immature pear fruits. Microarray studies revealed that amylovoran biosynthesis and related membrane protein-encoding genes were highly expressed in the amyR mutant, but down-regulated in the amyR over-expression strains in vitro. Down-regulation of amylovoran biosynthesis genes in the amyR over-expression strain partially explained why over-expression of amyR led to non-pathogenic or reduced virulence in vivo. These results suggest that AmyR plays an important role in regulating exopolysaccharide production, and thus virulence in E. amylovora.

  15. Cyclic phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid induce hyaluronic acid synthesis via CREB transcription factor regulation in human skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda-Sano, Katsura; Gotoh, Mari; Morohoshi, Toshiro; Someya, Takao; Murofushi, Hiromu; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko

    2014-09-01

    Cyclic phosphatidic acid (cPA) is a naturally occurring phospholipid mediator and an analog of the growth factor-like phospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). cPA has a unique cyclic phosphate ring at the sn-2 and sn-3 positions of its glycerol backbone. We showed before that a metabolically stabilized cPA derivative, 2-carba-cPA, relieved osteoarthritis pathogenesis in vivo and induced hyaluronic acid synthesis in human osteoarthritis synoviocytes in vitro. This study focused on hyaluronic acid synthesis in human fibroblasts, which retain moisture and maintain health in the dermis. We investigated the effects of cPA and LPA on hyaluronic acid synthesis in human fibroblasts (NB1RGB cells). Using particle exclusion and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, we found that both cPA and LPA dose-dependently induced hyaluronic acid synthesis. We revealed that the expression of hyaluronan synthase 2 messenger RNA and protein is up-regulated by cPA and LPA treatment time dependently. We then characterized the signaling pathways up-regulating hyaluronic acid synthesis mediated by cPA and LPA in NB1RGB cells. Pharmacological inhibition and reporter gene assays revealed that the activation of the LPA receptor LPAR1, Gi/o protein, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) but not nuclear factor κB induced hyaluronic acid synthesis by the treatment with cPA and LPA in NB1RGB cells. These results demonstrate for the first time that cPA and LPA induce hyaluronic acid synthesis in human skin fibroblasts mainly through the activation of LPAR1-Gi/o followed by the PI3K, ERK, and CREB signaling pathway.

  16. Perfectionism, emotion regulation and their relationship to negative affect in patients with social phobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Systla Rukmini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Research on the perfectionism and emotion regulation strategies in anxiety disorders has gained increased attention. These have an important implication for formulation of therapies. Aims: We examined perfectionism, emotion regulation were examined in 30 patients with social phobia (SP and 30 community participants. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional design using a clinical and a community control sample was adopted in this exploratory study. Materials and Methods: Participants were assessed on The Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Frost′s-Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, Ruminative Response Scale of the response style questionnaire, cognitive emotion regulation questionnaire, Social Interaction Anxiety Scale and the Beck′s Depression Inventory. Statistical Analysis: Data was analyzed using independents samples t-test and Pearson′s Product moment correlations and step-wise linear regression. Results: Individuals with SP had higher perfectionism (mean = 100.30, SD = ±17.73, t = 7.29, P < 0.001, rumination (mean = 61.47, SD = ±11.96, t = 6.71, P < 0.001 and lower levels of positive reappraisal (mean = 11.53, SD = ±3.85, t = 4.90, P < 0.001. Perfectionism was correlated with social anxiety (r = 0.44, P < 0.05 and rumination (r = 0.43, P < 0.05, but not with depression. Rumination was positively correlated with both social anxiety (r = 0.513, P < 0.01 and depression (r = 0.485, P < 0.01.Positive reappraisal was negatively correlated with depression (r = -0.396, P < 0.05 and anxiety (r = -0.335, P < 0.05. Acceptance was found to be significantly correlated only to the reflective pondering subscale of rumination. Parental criticism was a significant predictor of social anxiety (F = 11.11, P < 0.01 and brooding predicted depression (F = 10.49, P < 0.01. Conclusions: This study highlights the role of perfectionism as a maintaining factor in SP and the importance of adaptive forms of emotion regulation that need to

  17. Flightless-I (FliI) is a potential negative regulator of the Toll pathway in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang; Qiu, Wei; Chen, Yong-gui; Yuan, Feng-Hua; Li, Chao-Zheng; Yan, Hui; Weng, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Guo

    2015-02-01

    Flightless-I (FliI) is a protein negatively modulates the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway through interacting with Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88). To investigate the function of FliI in innate immune responses in invertebrates, Litopenaeus vannamei FliI (LvFliI) was identified and characterized. The full-length cDNA of LvFliI is 4, 304 bp long, with an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a putative protein of 1292 amino acids, including 12 leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains at the N-terminus and 6 gelsolin homology (GEL) domains at the C-terminus. The LvFliI protein was located in the cytoplasm and LvFliI mRNA was constitutively expressed in healthy L. vannamei, with the highest expression level in the muscle. LvFliI could be up-regulated in hemocytes after lipopolysaccharide (LPS), poly I:C, CpG-ODN2006, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Staphylococcus aureus, and white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenges, suggesting a stimulation response of LvFliI to bacterial and immune stimulant challenges. Upon LPS stimulation, overexpression of LvFliI in Drosophila Schneider 2 cells led to downregulation of Drosophila and shrimp antimicrobial peptide (AMP) genes. Knockdown of LvFliI by RNA interference (RNAi) resulted in an increase of the expression of three shrimp AMP genes (PEN2, crustin, and Lyz1). However, the mortality rates of LvFliI-knockdown shrimp in response to V. parahaemolyticus, S. aureus or WSSV infections were not significantly different from those of the control group. Taken together, all the results suggested that LvFliI may play a negative role in TLR signaling response in L. vannamei.

  18. Electrochemical Investigation of Carbon as Additive to the Negative Electrode of Lead-Acid Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez Matthew M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand of cycle life performance of Pb-acid batteries requires the improvement of the negative Pb electrode’s charge capacity. Electrochemical investigations were performed on Pb electrode and Pb+Carbon (Carbon black and Graphite electrodes to evaluate the ability of the additives to enhance the electrochemical faradaic reactions that occur during the cycle of Pb-acid battery negative electrode. The electrodes were characterized through Cyclic Voltammetry (CV, Potentiodynamic Polarization (PP, and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS. CV revealed that the addition of carbon on the Pb electrode increased anodic and cathodicreactions by tenfold. The kinetics of PbSO4 passivation measured through PPrevealed that the addition of Carbon on the Pb electrode accelerated the oxide formation by tenfold magnitude. The Nyquist plot measured through EIS suggest that the electrochemical mechanism and reaction kinetics is under charge-transfer. From the equivalent circuit and physical model, Pb+CB1 electrode has the lowest EIS parameters while Pb+G has the highest which is attributed to faster faradaic reaction.The Nyquist plot of the passivated Pb+CB1 electrode showed double semicircular shape. The first layer represents to the bulk passive PbSO4 layer and the second layer represents the Carbon+PbSO4 layer. The enhancements upon addition of carbon on the Pb electrode were attributed to the additive’s electrical conductivity and total surface area. The electrochemical active sites for the PbSO4 to nucleate and spread increases upon addition of electrical conductive and high surface area carbon additives.

  19. Lipin-1 regulation of phospholipid synthesis maintains endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis and is critical for triple-negative breast cancer cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jingquan; Zhang, Feng; Tay, Li Wei Rachel; Boroda, Salome; Nian, Weiqi; Levental, Kandice R; Levental, Ilya; Harris, Thurl E; Chang, Jeffrey T; Du, Guangwei

    2017-03-27

    Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism to increase the synthesis of macromolecules for rapid proliferation. Compared to fatty acids, much less is known about the synthesis of phospholipids, which is essential for membrane biogenesis in cancer cells. We found that LPIN1, which encodes lipin-1, a phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) controlling the rate-limiting step in the phospholipid synthesis pathway, is highly up-regulated in basal-like triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Moreover, high LPIN1 expression correlates with the poor prognosis of these patients. Knockdown of LPIN1 increases apoptosis in basal-like TNBC cell lines, whereas it has minimal or less effect on normal human mammary gland epithelial cells (HMECs) and estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cell lines. Fatty acid incorporation and lipidomics analyses showed that LPIN1 knockdown blocks phospholipid synthesis and changes membrane lipid compositions that ultimately induce the activation of 1 of the 3 branches of unfolded protein responses, the inositol-requiring enzyme-1α pathway. We also show for the first time, to our knowledge, that lipin-1 knockdown significantly inhibits tumor growth in vivo using an orthotopic xenograft breast mouse model. Our results suggest that lipin-1 is a potential target for cancer therapy.-He, J., Zhang, F., Tay, L. W. R., Boroda, S., Nian, W., Levental, K. R., Levental, I., Harris, T. E., Chang, J. T., Du, G. Lipin-1 regulation of phospholipid synthesis maintains endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis and is critical for triple-negative breast cancer cell survival.

  20. Antimicrobial peptides targeting Gram-negative pathogens, produced and delivered by lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volzing, Katherine; Borrero, Juan; Sadowsky, Michael J; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2013-11-15

    We present results of tests with recombinant Lactococcus lactis that produce and secrete heterologous antimicrobial peptides with activity against Gram-negative pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella . In an initial screening, the activities of numerous candidate antimicrobial peptides, made by solid state synthesis, were assessed against several indicator pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella strains. Peptides A3APO and Alyteserin were selected as top performers based on high antimicrobial activity against the pathogens tested and on significantly lower antimicrobial activity against L. lactis . Expression cassettes containing the signal peptide of the protein Usp45 fused to the codon-optimized sequence of mature A3APO and Alyteserin were cloned under the control of a nisin-inducible promoter PnisA and transformed into L. lactis IL1403. The resulting recombinant strains were induced to express and secrete both peptides. A3APO- and Alyteserin-containing supernatants from these recombinant L. lactis inhibited the growth of pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella by up to 20-fold, while maintaining the host's viability. This system may serve as a model for the production and delivery of antimicrobial peptides by lactic acid bacteria to target Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria populations.

  1. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy Protein BAG3 Negatively Regulates Ebola and Marburg VP40-Mediated Egress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jingjing; Sagum, Cari A.; Bedford, Mark T.; Sudol, Marius; Han, Ziying

    2017-01-01

    Ebola (EBOV) and Marburg (MARV) viruses are members of the Filoviridae family which cause outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever. The filovirus VP40 matrix protein is essential for virus assembly and budding, and its PPxY L-domain motif interacts with WW-domains of specific host proteins, such as Nedd4 and ITCH, to facilitate the late stage of virus-cell separation. To identify additional WW-domain-bearing host proteins that interact with VP40, we used an EBOV PPxY-containing peptide to screen an array of 115 mammalian WW-domain-bearing proteins. Using this unbiased approach, we identified BCL2 Associated Athanogene 3 (BAG3), a member of the BAG family of molecular chaperone proteins, as a specific VP40 PPxY interactor. Here, we demonstrate that the WW-domain of BAG3 interacts with the PPxY motif of both EBOV and MARV VP40 and, unexpectedly, inhibits budding of both eVP40 and mVP40 virus-like particles (VLPs), as well as infectious VSV-EBOV recombinants. BAG3 is a stress induced protein that regulates cellular protein homeostasis and cell survival through chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Interestingly, our results show that BAG3 alters the intracellular localization of VP40 by sequestering VP40 away from the plasma membrane. As BAG3 is the first WW-domain interactor identified that negatively regulates budding of VP40 VLPs and infectious virus, we propose that the chaperone-mediated autophagy function of BAG3 represents a specific host defense strategy to counteract the function of VP40 in promoting efficient egress and spread of virus particles. PMID:28076420

  2. EphrinA5 suppresses colon cancer development by negatively regulating epidermal growth factor receptor stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong-Hong; Chang, Junn-Liang; Ho, Jar-Yi; Wu, Hsiao-Chun; Chen, Tse-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most common human cancers worldwide. Owing to its aggressiveness and lethality, it is necessary to determine the mechanisms regulating the carcinogenesis of colon cancer. EphrinA5 has been reported to act as a putative tumor suppressor in glioma; however, little is known concerning the role of this protein in the context of colon cancer. To elucidate the biological significance of ephrinA5 in colon cancer, we examined ephrinA5 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression profiles in both colon cancer and normal tissues, using immunohistochemistry on a 96-spot tissue microarray. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments were performed on the human colon cancer cell lines SW480 and WiDr to determine the biological effects of ephrinA5 in relation to cell proliferation, survival, and migration. It was found that ephrinA5 mRNA and protein levels were significantly reduced in colon cancer as compared with normal colon tissue specimens. EphrinA5 expression was also negatively associated with tumor differentiation and clinical stage. In colon cancer cell line models, ephrinA5 exerted an inhibitory effect on EGFR by promoting c-Cbl-mediated EGFR ubiquitination and degradation. EphrinA5 did not affect the transcriptional regulation of EGFR mRNA expression in colon cancer cells. Expression of ephrinA5 suppressed colon cancer cell proliferation, migration, and chemotherapeutic resistance. In conclusion, ephrinA5 inhibited colon cancer progression by promoting c-Cbl-mediated EGFR degradation. Our findings identify a novel mechanism that could be utilized to improve the therapeutic efficiency of EGFR-targeting strategies.

  3. Cereblon negatively regulates TLR4 signaling through the attenuation of ubiquitination of TRAF6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yoon; Wi, Sae Mi; Kang, Jung-Ah; Yang, Taewoo; Park, Chul-Seung; Park, Sung-Gyoo; Chung, Sungkwon; Shim, Jae-Hyuck; Chun, Eunyoung; Lee, Ki-Young

    2016-07-28

    Cereblon (CRBN) is a substrate receptor protein for the CRL4A E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. In this study, we report on a new regulatory role of CRBN in TLR4 signaling. CRBN overexpression leads to suppression of NF-κB activation and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-6 and IL-1β in response to TLR4 stimulation. Biochemical studies revealed interactions between CRBN and TAK1, and TRAF6 proteins. The interaction between CRBN and TAK1 did not affect the association of the TAB1 and TAB2 proteins, which have pivotal roles in the activation of TAK1, whereas the CRBN-TRAF6 interaction critically affected ubiquitination of TRAF6 and TAB2. Binding mapping results revealed that CRBN interacts with the Zinc finger domain of TRAF6, which contains the ubiquitination site of TRAF6, leading to attenuation of ubiquitination of TRAF6 and TAB2. Functional studies revealed that CRBN-knockdown THP-1 cells show enhanced NF-κB activation and p65- or p50-DNA binding activities, leading to up-regulation of NF-κB-dependent gene expression and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in response to TLR4 stimulation. Furthermore, Crbn(-/-) mice exhibit decreased survival in response to LPS challenge, accompanied with marked enhancement of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6. Taken together, our data demonstrate that CRBN negatively regulates TLR4 signaling via attenuation of TRAF6 and TAB2 ubiquitination.

  4. Sli-1, a Negative Regulator of Let-23-Mediated Signaling in C. Elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongeward, G. D.; Clandinin, T. R.; Sternberg, P. W.

    1995-01-01

    By screening for suppressors of hypomorphic mutations of let-23, a receptor tyrosine kinase necessary for vulval induction in Caenorhabditis elegans, we recovered >/=12 mutations defining the sli-1 (suppressor of lineage defect) locus. sli-1 mutations suppress four of five phenotypes associated with hypomorphic alleles of let-23 but do not suppress let-23 null alleles. Thus, a sli-1 mutation does not bypass the requirement for functional let-23 but rather allows more potent LET-23-dependent signaling. Mutations at the sli-1 locus are otherwise silent with respect to vulval differentiation and cause only a low-penetrance abnormal head phenotype. Mutations at sli-1 also suppress the vulval defects but not other defects associated with mutations of sem-5, whose product likely interacts with LET-23 protein during vulval induction. Mutations at sli-1 suppress lin-2, lin-7 and lin-10 mutations but only partially suppress lin-3 and let-60 mutations and do not suppress a lin-45 mutation. The sli-1 locus displays dosage sensitivity: severe reduction of function alleles of sli-1 are semidominant suppressors; a duplication of the sli-1 (+) region enhances the vulvaless phenotype of hypomorphic mutations of let-23. We propose that sli-1 is a negative regulator that acts at or near the LET-23-mediated step of the vulval induction pathway. Our analysis suggests that let-23 can activate distinct signaling pathways in different tissues: one pathway is required for vulval induction; another pathway is involved in hermaphrodite fertilty and is not regulated by sli-1. PMID:7789760

  5. PUF-8 negatively regulates RAS/MAPK signalling to promote differentiation of C. elegans germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaid, Samir; Ariz, Mohd; Chaturbedi, Amaresh; Kumar, Ganga Anil; Subramaniam, Kuppuswamy

    2013-04-01

    Signals that promote germ cell self-renewal by preventing premature meiotic entry are well understood. However, signals that control mitotic proliferation to promote meiotic differentiation have not been well characterized. In Caenorhabditis elegans, GLP-1 Notch signalling promotes the proliferative fate by preventing premature meiotic entry. The germline niche cell, which is the source of the ligand for GLP-1, spatially restricts GLP-1 signalling and thus enables the germ cells that have moved away from the niche to enter meiosis. Here, we show that the suppression of RAS/MAP kinase signalling in the mitotic and meiotic-entry regions is essential for the regulation of the mitosis-meiosis switch by niche signalling. We provide evidence that the conserved PUF family RNA-binding protein PUF-8 and the RAS GAP protein GAP-3 function redundantly to suppress the LET-60 RAS in the mitotic and meiotic entry regions. Germ cells missing both PUF-8 and GAP-3 proliferate in an uncontrolled fashion and fail to undergo meiotic development. MPK-1, the MAP kinase downstream of the LET-60 RAS, is prematurely activated in these cells; downregulation of MPK-1 activation eliminates tumours and restores differentiation. Our results further reveal that PUF-8 negatively regulates LET-60 expression at a post-transcriptional step. LET-60 is misexpressed in the puf-8(-) mutant germlines and PUF-8 physically interacts with the let-60 3' UTR. Furthermore, PUF-8 suppresses let-60 3' UTR-mediated expression in the germ cells that are transitioning from the mitotic to meiotic fate. These results reveal that PUF-8-mediated inhibition of the RAS/MAPK pathway is essential for mitotic-to-meiotic fate transition.

  6. Infant negative reactivity defines the effects of parent-child synchrony on physiological and behavioral regulation of social stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Maayan; Singer, Magi; Kanat-Maymon, Yaniv; Feldman, Ruth

    2015-11-01

    How infants shape their own development has puzzled developmentalists for decades. Recent models suggest that infant dispositions, particularly negative reactivity and regulation, affect outcome by determining the extent of parental effects. Here, we used a microanalytic experimental approach and proposed that infants with varying levels of negative reactivity will be differentially impacted by parent-infant synchrony in predicting physiological and behavioral regulation of increasing social stress during an experimental paradigm. One hundred and twenty-two mother-infant dyads (4-6 months) were observed in the face-to-face still face (SF) paradigm and randomly assigned to three experimental conditions: SF with touch, standard SF, and SF with arms' restraint. Mother-infant synchrony and infant negative reactivity were observed at baseline, and three mechanisms of behavior regulation were microcoded; distress, disengagement, and social regulation. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia baseline, reactivity, and recovery were quantified. Structural equation modeling provided support for our hypothesis. For physiological regulation, infants high in negative reactivity receiving high mother-infant synchrony showed greater vagal withdrawal, which in turn predicted comparable levels of vagal recovery to that of nonreactive infants. In behavioral regulation, only infants low in negative reactivity who received high synchrony were able to regulate stress by employing social engagement cues during the SF phase. Distress was reduced only among calm infants to highly synchronous mothers, and disengagement was lowest among highly reactive infants experiencing high mother-infant synchrony. Findings chart two pathways by which synchrony may bolster regulation in infants of high and low reactivity. Among low reactive infants, synchrony builds a social repertoire for handling interpersonal stress, whereas in highly reactive infants, it constructs a platform for repeated reparation of

  7. Determination of dissolved naphthenic acids in natural waters by using negative-ion electrospray mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headley, John V; Peru, Kerry M; McMartin, Dena W; Winkler, Marcus

    2002-01-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) have been implicated as some of the most toxic substances in oil sands leachates and identified as priority substances impacting on aquatic environments. As a group of compounds, NAs are not well characterized and comprise a large group of saturated aliphatic and alicyclic carboxylic acids found in hydrocarbon deposits (petroleum, oil sands bitumen, and crude oils). Described is an analytical method using negative-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ES/MS) of extracts. Preconcentration was achieved by using a solid-phase extraction procedure utilizing a crosslinked polystyrene-based polymer with acetonitrile elution. Recovery of the Fluka Chemicals NA mixture was highly pH-dependent, with 100% recovery at pH 3.0, but only 66 and 51% recoveries at pHs 7 and 9, respectively. The dissolved phase of the NA was very dependent on sample pH. It is thus critical to measure the pH and determine the appropriate mass profiles to identify NAs in natural waters. The ES/MS analytical procedure proved to be a fast and sensitive method for the recovery and detection of NAs in natural waters, with a detection limit of 0.01 mg/L.

  8. HBV maintains electrostatic homeostasis by modulating negative charges from phosphoserine and encapsidated nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Pei-Yi; Yang, Ching-Jen; Chu, Tien-Hua; Chang, Chih-Hsu; Chiang, Chiayn; Tang, Fan-Mei; Lee, Chih-Yin; Shih, Chiaho

    2016-01-01

    Capsid assembly and stability of hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein (HBc) particles depend on balanced electrostatic interactions between encapsidated nucleic acids and an arginine-rich domain (ARD) of HBc in the capsid interior. Arginine-deficient ARD mutants preferentially encapsidated spliced viral RNA and shorter DNA, which can be fully or partially rescued by reducing the negative charges from acidic residues or serine phosphorylation of HBc, dose-dependently. Similarly, empty capsids without RNA encapsidation can be generated by ARD hyper-phosphorylation in insect, bacteria, and human hepatocytes. De-phosphorylation of empty capsids by phosphatase induced capsid disassembly. Empty capsids can convert into RNA-containing capsids by increasing HBc serine de-phosphorylation. In an HBV replicon system, we observed a reciprocal relationship between viral and non-viral RNA encapsidation, suggesting both non-viral RNA and serine-phosphorylation could serve as a charge balance buffer in maintaining electrostatic homeostasis. In addition, by comparing the biochemistry assay results between a replicon and a non-replicon system, we observed a correlation between HBc de-phosphorylation and viral replication. Balanced electrostatic interactions may be important to other icosahedral particles in nature. PMID:27958343

  9. Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy of the copper-aspartic acid anion and its hydrated complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Haopeng; Bowen, Kit H.; Martínez, Ana; Salpin, Jean-Yves; Schermann, Jean-Pierre

    2010-08-01

    Negative ions of copper-aspartic acid Cu(Asp)- and its hydrated complexes have been produced in the gas phase and studied by anion photoelectron spectroscopy. The vertical detachment energies (VDE) of Cu(Asp)- and Cu(Asp)-(H2O)1,2 were determined to be 1.6, 1.95, and 2.20 eV, respectively. The spectral profiles of Cu(Asp)-(H2O)1 and Cu(Asp)-(H2O)2 closely resembled that of Cu(Asp)-, indicating that hydration had not changed the structure of Cu(Asp)- significantly. The successive shifts to higher electron binding energies by the spectra of the hydrated species provided measures of their stepwise solvation energies. Density functional calculations were performed on anionic Cu(Asp)- and on its corresponding neutral. The agreement between the calculated and measured VDE values implied that the structure of the Cu(Asp)- complex originated with a zwitterionic form of aspartic acid in which a copper atom had inserted into the N-H bond.

  10. Arabidopsis YAK1 regulates abscisic acid response and drought resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dongjin

    2016-06-06

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone that controls several plant processes such as seed germination, seedling growth, and abiotic stress response. Here, we report that AtYak1 plays an important role in ABA signaling and postgermination growth in Arabidopsis. AtYak1 knockout mutant plants were hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of seed germination, cotyledon greening, seedling growth, and stomatal movement. atyak1-1 mutant plants display reduced drought stress resistance, as evidenced by water loss rate and survival rate. Molecular genetic analysis revealed that AtYak1 deficiency led to elevated expression of stomatal-related gene, MYB60, and down-regulation of several stress-responsive genes. Altogether, these results indicate that AtYak1 plays a role as a positive regulator in ABA-mediated drought response in Arabidopsis. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. TIPE2 negatively regulates inflammation by switching arginine metabolism from nitric oxide synthase to arginase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunwei Lou

    Full Text Available TIPE2, the tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha-induced protein 8-like 2 (TNFAIP8L2, plays an essential role in maintaining immune homeostasis. It is highly expressed in macrophages and negatively regulates inflammation through inhibiting Toll-like receptor signaling. In this paper, we utilized RAW264.7 cells stably transfected with a TIPE2 expression plasmid, as well as TIPE2-deficient macrophages to study the roles of TIPE2 in LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO and urea production. The results showed that TIPE2-deficiency significantly upregulated the levels of iNOS expression and NO production in LPS-stimulated macrophages, but decreased mRNA levels of arginase I and urea production. However, TIPE2 overexpression in macrophages was capable of downregulating protein levels of LPS-induced iNOS and NO, but generated greater levels of arginase I and urea production. Furthermore, TIPE2-/- mice had higher iNOS protein levels in lung and liver and higher plasma NO concentrations, but lower levels of liver arginase I compared to LPS-treated WT controls. Interestingly, significant increases in IκB degradation and phosphorylation of JNK, p38, and IκB were observed in TIPE2-deficient macrophages following LPS challenge. These results strongly suggest that TIPE2 plays an important role in shifting L-arginase metabolism from production of NO to urea, during host inflammatory response.

  12. TRIF is a critical negative regulator of TLR agonist mediated activation of dendritic cells in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey S Seregin

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in developing and licensing adjuvants, there is a great need for more potent formulations to enhance immunogenicity of vaccines. An Eimeria tenella derived antigen (rEA augments immune responses against several pathogens in animal models and recently was confirmed to be safe for human use. In this study, we have analyzed the molecular mechanisms underlying rEA activity in mice, and confirmed that rEA activates multiple immune cell types, including DCs, macrophages, NK, B, and T cells. The rEA adjuvant also elicits the induction of pleiotropic pro-inflammatory cytokines, responses that completely depend upon the presence of the TLR adaptor protein MyD88. Surprisingly, we also found that the TRIF adaptor protein acts as a potent negative regulator of TLR agonist-triggered immune responses. For example, IL12 production and the induction of co-stimulatory molecule expression by DCs and IFNγ production by NK cells in vivo were significantly increased in rEA-treated TRIF-KO mice. Importantly, however, TRIF suppressive effects were not restricted to rEA-mediated responses, but were apparent in LPS- or ODN2006-activated DCs as well. Taken together, our findings confirm that rEA is a potent adjuvant, triggering robust activation of the innate immune system, in a manner that is augmented by MyD88 and inhibited by TRIF; thereby unveiling the potential complexities of modulating TLR activity to augment vaccine efficacy.

  13. Novel function of perforin in negatively regulating CD4+T cell activation by affecting calcium signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Enguang Bi; Kairui Mao; Jia Zou; Yuhan Zheng; Bing Sun; Chunjian Huang; Yu Hu; Xiaodong Wu; Weiwen Deng; Guomei Lin; Zhiduo Liu; Lin Tian; Shuhui Sun

    2009-01-01

    Perforin is a pore-forming protein engaged mainly in mediating target T cell death and is employed by cytotoxic Tlymphocytes (CTLs) and natural killer cells. However, whether it also plays a role in conventional CD4+ T cell func-tion remains unclear. Here we report that in perforin-deficient (PKO) mice, CD4+ T cells are hyperproliferative in response to T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation. This feature of hyperproliferation is accompanied by the enhancement both in cell division and in IL-2 secretion. It seems that the perforin deficiency does not influence T cell development in thymus spleen and lymph node. In vivo, perforin deficiency results in increased antigen-specific T cell prolifera-tion and antibody production. Furthermore, PKO mice are more susceptible to experimental autoimmune uveitis. To address the molecular mechanism, we found that after TCR stimulation, CD44 T cells from PKO mice display an increased intracellular calcium flux and subsequently enhance activation of transcription factor NFATI. Our results indicate that perforin plays a negative role in regulating CD4+ T cell activation and immune response by affecting TCR-dependent Ca2+ signaling.

  14. Positive and negative signaling through SLAM receptors regulate synapse organization and thresholds of cytolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fang; Cannons, Jennifer L; Dutta, Mala; Griffiths, Gillian M; Schwartzberg, Pamela L

    2012-06-29

    X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome, characterized by fatal responses to Epstein-Barr virus infection, is caused by mutations affecting the adaptor SAP, which links SLAM family receptors to downstream signaling. Although cytotoxic defects in SAP-deficient T cells are documented, the mechanism remains unclear. We show that SAP-deficient murine CD8(+) T cells exhibited normal cytotoxicity against fibrosarcoma targets, yet had impaired adhesion to and killing of B cell and low-avidity T cell targets. SAP-deficient cytotoxic lymphocytes showed specific defects in immunological synapse organization with these targets, resulting in inefficient actin clearance. In the absence of SAP, signaling through the SLAM family members Ly108 and 2B4 resulted in increased recruitment of the SHP-1 phosphatase, associated with altered SHP-1 localization and decreased activation of Src kinases at the synapse. Hence, SAP and SLAM receptors regulate positive and negative signals required for organizing the T cell:B cell synapse and setting thresholds for cytotoxicity against distinct cellular targets.

  15. Mitochondrial transcription termination factor 2 binds to entire mitochondrial DNA and negatively regulates mitochondrial gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiwei Huang; Min Yu; Yang Jiao; Jie Ma; Mingxing Ma; Zehua Wang; Hong Wu; Deyong Tan

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription termination factor 2 (mTERF2) is a mitochondriai matrix protein that binds to the mitochondriai DNA.Previous studies have shown that overexpression of mTERF2 can inhibit cell proliferation, but the mechanism has not been well defined so far.This study aimed to present the binding pattern of mTERF2 to the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in vivo, and investigated the biological function of mTERF2 on the replication of mtDNA, mRNA transcription, and protein translation.The mTERF2 binding to entire mtDNA was identified via the chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis.The mtDNA replication efficiency and expression levels of mitochondria genes were significantly inhibited when the mTERF2 was overexpressed in HeLa cells.The inhibition level of mtDNA content was the same with the decreased levels of mRNA and mitochondrial protein expression.Overall, the mTERF2 might be a cell growth inhibitor based on its negative effect on mtDNA replication, which eventually own-regulated all of the oxidative phosphorylation components in the mitochondria that were essential for the cell's energy metabolism.

  16. Negative regulation of parathyroid hormone-related protein expression by steroid hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajitani, Takashi; Tamamori-Adachi, Mimi [Department of Biochemistry, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Okinaga, Hiroko [Department of Internal Medicine, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Chikamori, Minoru; Iizuka, Masayoshi [Department of Biochemistry, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Okazaki, Tomoki, E-mail: okbgeni@med.teikyo-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: {yields} Steroid hormones repress expression of PTHrP in the cell lines where the corresponding nuclear receptors are expressed. {yields} Nuclear receptors are required for suppression of PTHrP expression by steroid hormones, except for androgen receptor. {yields} Androgen-induced suppression of PTHrP expression appears to be mediated by estrogen receptor. -- Abstract: Elevated parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is responsible for humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM), which is of clinical significance in treatment of terminal patients with malignancies. Steroid hormones were known to cause suppression of PTHrP expression. However, detailed studies linking multiple steroid hormones to PTHrP expression are lacking. Here we studied PTHrP expression in response to steroid hormones in four cell lines with excessive PTHrP production. Our study established that steroid hormones negatively regulate PTHrP expression. Vitamin D receptor, estrogen receptor {alpha}, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, were required for repression of PTHrP expression by the cognate ligands. A notable exception was the androgen receptor, which was dispensable for suppression of PTHrP expression in androgen-treated cells. We propose a pathway(s) involving nuclear receptors to suppress PTHrP expression.

  17. Negative regulation of TLR-signaling pathways by activating transcription factor-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Mark M; Iparraguirre, Amaya; Kubelka, Lindsey; Weninger, Wolfgang; Hai, Tsonwin; Williams, Bryan R G

    2007-09-15

    Activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3) is rapidly induced by LPS in mouse macrophages and regulates TLR4 responses. We show that ATF3 is rapidly induced by various TLRs in mouse macrophages and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs), as well as plasmacytoid and myeloid subsets of human DCs. In primary macrophages from mice with a targeted deletion of the atf3 gene (ATF3-knockout (KO)), TLR-stimulated levels of IL-12 and IL-6 were elevated relative to responses in wild-type macrophages. Similarly, targeted deletion of atf3 correlated with enhanced responsiveness of myeloid DCs to TLR activation as measured by IL-12 secretion. Ectopic expression of ATF3 antagonized TLR-stimulated IL-12p40 activation in a reporter assay. In vivo, CpG-oligodeoxynucleotide, a TLR9 agonist, given i.p. to ATF3-KO mice resulted in enhanced cytokine production from splenocytes. Furthermore, while ATF3-KO mice challenged with a sublethal dose of PR8 influenza virus were delayed in body weight recovery in comparison to wild type, the ATF3-KO mice showed higher titers of serum neutralizing Ab against PR8 5 mo postinfection. Thus, ATF3 behaves as a negative regulatory transcription factor in TLR pathways and, accordingly, deficiency in atf3 alters responses to immunological challenges in vivo. ATF3 dysregulation merits further exploration in diseases such as type I diabetes and cancer, where altered innate immunity has been implicated in their pathogenesis.

  18. SHP1 tyrosine phosphatase negatively regulates NPM-ALK tyrosine kinase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honorat, Jean-François; Ragab, Ashraf; Lamant, Laurence; Delsol, Georges; Ragab-Thomas, Jeannie

    2006-05-15

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is frequently associated with the 2;5 translocation and expresses the NPM-ALK fusion protein, which possesses a constitutive tyrosine kinase activity. We analyzed SHP1 tyrosine phosphatase expression and activity in 3 ALK-positive ALCL cell lines (Karpas 299, Cost, and SU-DHL1) and in lymph node biopsies (n = 40). We found an inverse correlation between the level of NPM-ALK phosphorylation and SHP1 phosphatase activity. Pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated a SHP1/NPM-ALK association. Furthermore, confocal microscopy performed on ALCL cell lines and biopsy specimens showed the colocalization of the 2 proteins in cytoplasmic bodies containing Y664-phosphorylated NPM-ALK. Dephosphorylation of NPM-ALK by SHP1 demonstrated that NPM-ALK was a SHP1 substrate. Downregulation of SHP1 expression by RNAi in Karpas cells led to hyperphosphorylation of NPM-ALK, STAT3 activation, and increase in cell proliferation. Furthermore, SHP1 overexpression in 3T3 fibroblasts stably expressing NPM-ALK led to the decrease of NPM-ALK phosphorylation, lower cell proliferation, and tumor progression in nude mice. These findings show that SHP1 is a negative regulator of NPM-ALK signaling. The use of tissue microarrays revealed that 50% of ALK-positive ALCLs were positive for SHP1. Our results suggest that SHP1 could be a critical enzyme in ALCL biology and a potential therapeutic target.

  19. Negative density dependence regulates two tree species at later life stage in a temperate forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiefeng Piao

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have demonstrated that tree survival is influenced by negative density dependence (NDD and differences among species in shade tolerance could enhance coexistence via resource partitioning, but it is still unclear how NDD affects tree species with different shade-tolerance guilds at later life stages. In this study, we analyzed the spatial patterns for trees with dbh (diameter at breast height ≥2 cm using the pair-correlation g(r function to test for NDD in a temperate forest in South Korea after removing the effects of habitat heterogeneity. The analyses were implemented for the most abundant shade-tolerant (Chamaecyparis obtusa and shade-intolerant (Quercus serrata species. We found NDD existed for both species at later life stages. We also found Quercus serrata experienced greater NDD compared with Chamaecyparis obtusa. This study indicates that NDD regulates the two abundant tree species at later life stages and it is important to consider variation in species' shade tolerance in NDD study.

  20. Negative density dependence regulates two tree species at later life stage in a temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Tiefeng; Chun, Jung Hwa; Yang, Hee Moon; Cheon, Kwangil

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that tree survival is influenced by negative density dependence (NDD) and differences among species in shade tolerance could enhance coexistence via resource partitioning, but it is still unclear how NDD affects tree species with different shade-tolerance guilds at later life stages. In this study, we analyzed the spatial patterns for trees with dbh (diameter at breast height) ≥2 cm using the pair-correlation g(r) function to test for NDD in a temperate forest in South Korea after removing the effects of habitat heterogeneity. The analyses were implemented for the most abundant shade-tolerant (Chamaecyparis obtusa) and shade-intolerant (Quercus serrata) species. We found NDD existed for both species at later life stages. We also found Quercus serrata experienced greater NDD compared with Chamaecyparis obtusa. This study indicates that NDD regulates the two abundant tree species at later life stages and it is important to consider variation in species' shade tolerance in NDD study.

  1. Negative regulation of NaF-induced apoptosis by Bad-CAII complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, S; Sugiyama, K; Amano, O; Yasui, T; Sakagami, H

    2011-09-05

    Fluoride is used to prevent caries in dentistry. However, its mechanism of cytotoxicity induction is unclear. This study was undertaken to determine whether sodium fluoride (NaF) induces apoptosis in human oral cells and if so, whether Bad protein is involved in the process. NaF showed higher cytotoxicity and apoptosis-inducing activity against human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells (HSC-2) than against human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Western blot analysis showed that NaF enhanced the expression and dephosphorylation of Bad protein. This study demonstrates for the first time that Bad protein forms a complex with carbonic anhydrase II (CAII), and NaF stimulates the detachment of CAII from the Bad-CAII complex and the replacement by the formation of Bad-Bcl-2 complex. Knockdown of Bad and CAII mRNA by siRNA inhibited and enhanced the NaF-induced caspase activation, respectively. The present study suggests that CAII negatively regulates the NaF-induced apoptosis by forming a complex with Bad.

  2. MEK-dependent IL-8 induction regulates the invasiveness of triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangmin; Lee, Jeongmin; Jeon, Myeongjin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Nam, Seok Jin

    2016-04-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) serves as a prognostic marker for breast cancer, and its expression level correlates with metastatic breast cancer and poor prognosis. Here, we investigated the levels of IL-8 expression in a variety of breast cancer cells and the regulatory mechanism of IL-8 in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. Our results showed that IL-8 expression correlated positively with overall survival in basal-type breast cancer patients. The levels of IL-8 mRNA expression and protein secretion were significantly increased in TNBC cells compared with non-TNBC cells. In addition, the invasiveness of the TNBC cells was dramatically increased by IL-8 treatment and then augmented invasion-related proteins such as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 or MMP-9. We observed that elevated IL-8 mRNA expression and protein secretion were suppressed by a specific MEK1/2 inhibitor, UO126. In contrast, the overexpression of constitutively active MEK significantly increased the level of IL-8 mRNA expression in BT474 non-TNBC cells. Finally, we investigated the effect of UO126 on the tumorigenecity of TNBC cells. Our results showed that anchorage-independent growth, cell invasion, and cell migration were also decreased by UO126 in TNBC cells. As such, we demonstrated that IL-8 expression is regulated through MEK/ERK-dependent pathways in TNBC cells. A diversity of MEK blockers, including UO126, may be promising for treating TNBC patients.

  3. Cyclooxygenase-2 regulates TGFβ-induced cancer stemness in triple-negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun; Hachim, Mahmood Y.; Hachim, Ibrahim Y.; Dai, Meiou; Lo, Chieh; Raffa, Fatmah Al; Ali, Suhad; Lebrun, Jean Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), an aggressive subtype of breast cancer, display poor prognosis and exhibit resistance to conventional therapies, partly due to an enrichment in breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). Here, we investigated the role of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a downstream target of TGFβ, in regulating BCSCs in TNBC. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that COX-2 is highly expressed in TNBC and that its expression correlated with poor survival outcome in basal subtype of breast cancer. We also found TGFβ-mediated COX-2 expression to be Smad3-dependent and to be required for BCSC self-renewal and expansion in TNBCs. Knocking down COX-2 expression strikingly blocked TGFβ-induced tumorsphere formation and TGFβ-induced enrichment of the two stem-like cell populations, CD24lowCD44high and ALDH+ BCSCs. Blocking COX-2 activity, using a pharmacological inhibitor also prevented TGFβ-induced BCSC self-renewal. Moreover, we found COX-2 to be required for TGFβ-induced expression of mesenchymal and basal breast cancer markers. In particular, we found that TGFβ-induced expression of fibronectin plays a central role in TGFβ-mediated breast cancer stemness. Together, our results describe a novel role for COX-2 in mediating the TGFβ effects on BCSC properties and imply that targeting the COX-2 pathway may prove useful for the treatment of TNBC by eliminating BCSCs. PMID:28054666

  4. The lin-15 locus encodes two negative regulators of Caenorhabditis elegans vulval development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L S; Tzou, P; Sternberg, P W

    1994-01-01

    During Caenorhabditis elegans vulval development, an inductive signal from the anchor cell stimulates three of the six vulval precursor cells (VPCs) to adopt vulval rather than nonvulval epidermal fates. Genes necessary for this induction include the lin-3 growth factor, the let-23 receptor tyrosine kinase, and let-60 ras. lin-15 is a negative regulator of this inductive pathway. In lin-15 mutant animals, all six VPCs adopt vulval fates, even in the absence of inductive signal. Previous genetic studies suggested that lin-15 is a complex locus with two independently mutable activities, A and B. We have cloned the lin-15 locus by germline transformation and find that it encodes two nonoverlapping transcripts that are transcribed in the same direction. The downstream transcript encodes the lin-15A function; the upstream transcript encodes the lin-15B function. The predicted lin-15A and lin-15B proteins are novel and hydrophilic. We have identified a molecular null allele of lin-15 and have used it to analyze the role of lin-15 in the signaling pathway. We find that lin-15 acts upstream of let-23 and in parallel to the inductive signal. Images PMID:8054684

  5. PERK–KIPK–KCBP signalling negatively regulates root growth in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Tania V.; Haasen, Katrina E.; Aldea-Brydges, May Grace; Sun, He; Zayed, Yara; Indriolo, Emily; Goring, Daphne R.

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis proline-rich, extensin-like receptor-like kinases (PERKs) are a small group of receptor-like kinases that are thought to act as sensors at the cell wall through their predicted proline-rich extracellular domains. In this study, we focused on the characterization of a subclade of three Arabidopsis predicted PERK genes, PERK8, -9, and -10, for which no functions were known. Yeast two-hybrid interaction studies were conducted with the PERK8,- 9, and -10 cytosolic kinase domains, and two members of the Arabidopsis AGC VIII kinase family were identified as interacting proteins: AGC1-9 and the closely related kinesin-like calmodulin-binding protein (KCBP)-interacting protein kinase (KIPK). As KIPK has been identified previously as an interactor of KCBP, these interactions were also examined further and confirmed in this study. Finally, T-DNA mutants for each gene were screened for altered phenotypes under different conditions, and from these screens, a role for the PERK, KIPK, and KCBP genes in negatively regulating root growth was uncovered. PMID:25262228

  6. Mel-18 negatively regulates stem cell-like properties through downregulation of miR-21 in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Hua, Rui-Xi; Du, Yi-Qun; Huang, Ming-Zhu; Liu, Yong; Cheng, Yu Fang; Guo, Wei-Jian

    2016-09-27

    Mel-18, a polycomb group protein, has been reported to act as a tumor suppressor and be down-regulated in several human cancers including gastric cancer. It was also found that Mel-18 negatively regulates self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells and breast cancer stem cells (CSCs). This study aimed to clarify its role in gastric CSCs and explore the mechanisms. We found that low-expression of Mel-18 was correlated with poor prognosis and negatively correlated with overexpression of stem cell markers Oct4, Sox2, and Gli1 in 101 gastric cancer tissues. Mel-18 was down-regulated in cultured spheroid cells, which possess CSCs, and overexpression of Mel-18 inhibits cells sphere-forming ability and tumor growth in vivo. Besides, Mel-18 was lower-expressed in ovary metastatic lesions compared with that in primary lesions of gastric cancer, and Mel-18 overexpression inhibited the migration ability of gastric cancer cells. Interestingly, overexpression of Mel-18 resulted in down-regulation of miR-21 in gastric cancer cells and the expression of Mel-18 was negatively correlated with the expression of miR-21 in gastric cancer tissues. Furthermore, miR-21 overexpression partially restored sphere-forming ability, migration potential and chemo-resistance in Mel-18 overexpressing gastric cancer cells. These results suggests Mel-18 negatively regulates stem cell-like properties through downregulation of miR-21 in gastric cancer cells.

  7. MicroRNA deregulation in triple negative breast cancer reveals a role of miR-498 in regulating BRCA1 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamala, Nerea; Vargas, Maria Teresa; González-Cámpora, Ricardo; Arias, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Andrés-León, Eduardo; Yanowsky, Kira; Llaneza-Folgueras, Ana; Miñambres, Rebeca; Martínez-Delgado, Beatriz; Benítez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that BRCA1 pathway contributes to the behavior of sporadic triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), but little is known about the mechanisms underlying this association. Considering the central role that microRNAs (miRNAs) play in gene expression regulation, the aim of this study was to identify miRNAs specifically deregulated in TNBC and investigate their involvement in BRCA1 regulation. Using locked nucleic acid (LNA)-based microarrays, expression levels of 1919 miRNAs were measured in paraffin-embedded tissues from 122 breast tumors and 11 healthy breast tissue samples. Differential miRNA expression was explored among the main subtypes of breast cancer, and 105 miRNAs were identified as specific for triple negative tumors. In silico prediction revealed that miR-498 and miR-187-5p target BRCA1, and these results were confirmed by luciferase reporter assay. While miR-187-5p was found overexpressed in a luminal B cell line, miR-498 was highly expressed in a triple negative cell line, Hs578T, and its expression was negatively correlated with the levels of BRCA1. We functionally demonstrated that miR-498 inhibits BRCA1 in breast cancer cell lines, and showed that inhibition of miR-498 led to reduced proliferation in the triple negative cell line Hs578T. Our results indicate that miR-498 regulates BRCA1 expression in breast cancer and its overexpression could contribute to the pathogenesis of sporadic TNBC via BRCA1 downregulation. PMID:26933805

  8. Relationships between negative affectivity, emotion regulation, anxiety, and depressive symptoms in adolescents as examined through structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortella-Feliu, Miquel; Balle, Maria; Sesé, Albert

    2010-10-01

    The relationship between negative affectivity (NA) and emotion regulation (ER) in determining anxiety and depressive symptomatology was examined in a large (n=1441) sample of adolescents (12-17 years old). Two models, diverging only as to inclusion or exclusion of a path from NA to negative ER, were analyzed through structural equation modeling; the goal was to explore the mediational or non-mediational role of ER in determining anxiety symptoms. The models yielded similar adequate fit to data, indicating that both NA and negative ER contribute to anxiety symptoms which, in turn, significantly determine depressive symptomatology. The mediational model better captures the relationships revealed in the data, with NA determining negative ER to a great extent. Additionally, most individuals scoring highly in NA also tend to score highly in negative ER, indicating that adolescents with heightened NA are prone to a dysfunctional style of ER.

  9. Regulation of protein C inhibitor (PCI) activity by specific oxidized and negatively charged phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malleier, Julia M; Oskolkova, Olga; Bochkov, Valery; Jerabek, Ingrid; Sokolikova, Barbora; Perkmann, Thomas; Breuss, Johannes; Binder, Bernd R; Geiger, Margarethe

    2007-06-01

    Protein C inhibitor (PCI) is a serpin with affinity for heparin and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). We analyzed the interaction of PCI with different phospholipids and their oxidized forms. PCI bound to oxidized PE (OxPE), and oxidized and unoxidized phosphatidylserine (PS) immobilized on microtiter plates and in aqueous suspension. Binding to OxPE and PS was competed by heparin, but not by the aminophospholipid-binding protein annexin V or the PCI-binding lipid retinoic acid. PS and OxPE stimulated the inhibition of activated protein C (aPC) by PCI in a Ca(++)-dependent manner, indicating that binding of both, aPC (Ca(++) dependent) and PCI (Ca(++) independent), to phospholipids is necessary. A peptide corresponding to the heparin-binding site of PCI abolished the stimulatory effect of PS on aPC inhibition. No stimulatory effect of phospholipids on aPC inhibition was seen with a PCI mutant lacking the heparin-binding site. A heparin-like effect of phospholipids (OxPE) was not seen with antithrombin III, another heparin-binding serpin, suggesting that it is specific for PCI. PCI and annexin V were found to be endogenously colocalized in atherosclerotic plaques, supporting the hypothesis that exposure of oxidized PE and/or PS may be important for the local regulation of PCI activity in vivo.

  10. miR-103 regulates triple negative breast cancer cells migration and invasion through targeting olfactomedin 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Bin; Lei, Xuefeng; Zhang, Lei; Fu, Jia

    2017-03-18

    Our previous study showed olfactomedin 4 (OLFM4) suppressed triple-negative breast cancer cells migration, invasion and metastasis-associated protein MMP 9 expression. OLFM4 was identified as a potential target of miR-103 according to microRNA target databases and published studies. The aim of this study is to validate the relationship between miR-103 and OLFM4, and explore the function and clinical significance of miR-103 in triple-negative breast cancer patients. In our results, miR-103 negatively regulated OLFM4 expression by directly targeting its 3'-UTR. OLFM4 was a functional target of miR-103 to regulate triple-negative breast cancer cells migration, invasion and MMP 9 expression. Moreover, miR-103 overexpression was observed in triple-negative breast cancer tissues and cell lines, and associated with lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis and clinical stage. Univariate and multivariate analyses suggested that miR-103 overexpression was a poor independent prognostic factor for triple-negative breast cancer patients. In conclusion, miR-103 acts as an oncogene miRNA to promote triple-negative breast cancer cells migration and invasion through targeting OLFM4.

  11. Insight into acid-base nucleation experiments by comparison of the chemical composition of positive, negative, and neutral clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Federico; Praplan, Arnaud P; Sarnela, Nina; Dommen, Josef; Kürten, Andreas; Ortega, Ismael K; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Simon, Mario; Tröstl, Jasmin; Jokinen, Tuija; Sipilä, Mikko; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Almeida, Joao; Breitenlechner, Martin; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Kangasluoma, Juha; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Tomé, António; Virtanen, Annele; Viisanen, Yrjö; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Curtius, Joachim; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Donahue, Neil M; Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-12-02

    We investigated the nucleation of sulfuric acid together with two bases (ammonia and dimethylamine), at the CLOUD chamber at CERN. The chemical composition of positive, negative, and neutral clusters was studied using three Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometers: two were operated in positive and negative mode to detect the chamber ions, while the third was equipped with a nitrate ion chemical ionization source allowing detection of neutral clusters. Taking into account the possible fragmentation that can happen during the charging of the ions or within the first stage of the mass spectrometer, the cluster formation proceeded via essentially one-to-one acid-base addition for all of the clusters, independent of the type of the base. For the positive clusters, the charge is carried by one excess protonated base, while for the negative clusters it is carried by a deprotonated acid; the same is true for the neutral clusters after these have been ionized. During the experiments involving sulfuric acid and dimethylamine, it was possible to study the appearance time for all the clusters (positive, negative, and neutral). It appeared that, after the formation of the clusters containing three molecules of sulfuric acid, the clusters grow at a similar speed, independent of their charge. The growth rate is then probably limited by the arrival rate of sulfuric acid or cluster-cluster collision.

  12. Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type z negatively regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Kuboyama

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fyn tyrosine kinase-mediated down-regulation of Rho activity through activation of p190RhoGAP is crucial for oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. Therefore, the loss of function of its counterpart protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP may enhance myelination during development and remyelination in demyelinating diseases. To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether Ptprz, a receptor-like PTP (RPTP expressed abuntantly in oligodendrocyte lineage cells, is involved in this process, because we recently revealed that p190RhoGAP is a physiological substrate for Ptprz. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found an early onset of the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP, a major protein of the myelin sheath, and early initiation of myelination in vivo during development of the Ptprz-deficient mouse, as compared with the wild-type. In addition, oligodendrocytes appeared earlier in primary cultures from Ptprz-deficient mice than wild-type mice. Furthermore, adult Ptprz-deficient mice were less susceptible to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE induced by active immunization with myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG peptide than were wild-type mice. After EAE was induced, the tyrosine phosphorylation of p190RhoGAP increased significantly, and the EAE-induced loss of MBP was markedly suppressed in the white matter of the spinal cord in Ptprz-deficient mice. Here, the number of T-cells and macrophages/microglia infiltrating into the spinal cord did not differ between the two genotypes after MOG immunization. All these findings strongly support the validity of our hypothesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Ptprz plays a negative role in oligodendrocyte differentiation in early central nervous system (CNS development and remyelination in demyelinating CNS diseases, through the dephosphorylation of substrates such as p190RhoGAP.

  13. Complement receptor-3 negatively regulates the phagocytosis of degenerated myelin through tyrosine kinase Syk and cofilin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadas Smadar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intact myelin, which normally surrounds axons, breaks down in Wallerian degeneration following axonal injury and during neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Clearance of degenerated myelin by phagocytosis is essential since myelin impedes repair and exacerbates damage. CR3 (complement receptor-3 is a principal phagocytic receptor in myelin phagocytosis. We studied how tyrosine kinase Syk (spleen tyrosine kinase and cofilin control phagocytosis of degenerated myelin by CR3 in microglia and macrophages. Syk is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that CR3 recruits to convey cellular functions. Cofilin is an actin-depolymerizing protein that controls F-actin (filamentous actin remodeling (i.e., disassembly and reassembly by shifting between active unphosphorylated and inactive phosphorylated states. Results Syk was continuously activated during prolonged phagocytosis. Phagocytosis increased when Syk activity and expression were reduced, suggesting that normally Syk down regulates CR3-mediated myelin phagocytosis. Levels of inactive p-cofilin (phosphorylated cofilin decreased transiently during prolonged phagocytosis. In contrast, p-cofilin levels decreased continuously when Syk activity and expression were continuously reduced, suggesting that normally Syk advances the inactive state of cofilin. Observations also revealed inverse relationships between levels of phagocytosis and levels of inactive p-cofilin, suggesting that active unphosphorylated cofilin advances phagocytosis. Active cofilin could advance phagocytosis by promoting F-actin remodeling, which supports the production of membrane protrusions (e.g., filopodia, which, as we also revealed, are instrumental in myelin phagocytosis. Conclusions CR3 both activates and downregulates myelin phagocytosis at the same time. Activation was previously documented. We presently demonstrate that downregulation is mediated through Syk, which advances the inactive

  14. Negative regulation of active zone assembly by a newly identified SR protein kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervin L Johnson

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Presynaptic, electron-dense, cytoplasmic protrusions such as the T-bar (Drosophila or ribbon (vertebrates are believed to facilitate vesicle movement to the active zone (AZ of synapses throughout the nervous system. The molecular composition of these structures including the T-bar and ribbon are largely unknown, as are the mechanisms that specify their synapse-specific assembly and distribution. In a large-scale, forward genetic screen, we have identified a mutation termed air traffic controller (atc that causes T-bar-like protein aggregates to form abnormally in motoneuron axons. This mutation disrupts a gene that encodes for a serine-arginine protein kinase (SRPK79D. This mutant phenotype is specific to SRPK79D and is not secondary to impaired kinesin-dependent axonal transport. The srpk79D gene is neuronally expressed, and transgenic rescue experiments are consistent with SRPK79D kinase activity being necessary in neurons. The SRPK79D protein colocalizes with the T-bar-associated protein Bruchpilot (Brp in both the axon and synapse. We propose that SRPK79D is a novel T-bar-associated protein kinase that represses T-bar assembly in peripheral axons, and that SRPK79D-dependent repression must be relieved to facilitate site-specific AZ assembly. Consistent with this model, overexpression of SRPK79D disrupts AZ-specific Brp organization and significantly impairs presynaptic neurotransmitter release. These data identify a novel AZ-associated protein kinase and reveal a new mechanism of negative regulation involved in AZ assembly. This mechanism could contribute to the speed and specificity with which AZs are assembled throughout the nervous system.

  15. A mutation of the fission yeast EB1 overcomes negative regulation by phosphorylation and stabilizes microtubules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iimori, Makoto; Ozaki, Kanako [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake cho, Sakyo ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Chikashige, Yuji [Kobe Advanced ICT Research Center, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Kobe, 651-2492 (Japan); Habu, Toshiyuki [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake cho, Sakyo ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe cho, Sakyo ku, Kyoto, 606-8501 (Japan); Hiraoka, Yasushi [Kobe Advanced ICT Research Center, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Kobe, 651-2492 (Japan); Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, 1-3 Yamadaoka, Suita, 565-0871 (Japan); Maki, Takahisa; Hayashi, Ikuko [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, Tsurumi, Yokohama, 230-0045 (Japan); Obuse, Chikashi [Graduate School of Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Matsumoto, Tomohiro, E-mail: tmatsumo@house.rbc.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake cho, Sakyo ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe cho, Sakyo ku, Kyoto, 606-8501 (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Mal3 is a fission yeast homolog of EB1, a plus-end tracking protein (+ TIP). We have generated a mutation (89R) replacing glutamine with arginine in the calponin homology (CH) domain of Mal3. Analysis of the 89R mutant in vitro has revealed that the mutation confers a higher affinity to microtubules and enhances the intrinsic activity to promote the microtubule-assembly. The mutant Mal3 is no longer a + TIP, but binds strongly the microtubule lattice. Live cell imaging has revealed that while the wild type Mal3 proteins dissociate from the tip of the growing microtubules before the onset of shrinkage, the mutant Mal3 proteins persist on microtubules and reduces a rate of shrinkage after a longer pausing period. Consequently, the mutant Mal3 proteins cause abnormal elongation of microtubules composing the spindle and aster. Mal3 is phosphorylated at a cluster of serine/threonine residues in the linker connecting the CH and EB1-like C-terminal motif domains. The phosphorylation occurs in a microtubule-dependent manner and reduces the affinity of Mal3 to microtubules. We propose that because the 89R mutation is resistant to the effect of phosphorylation, it can associate persistently with microtubules and confers a stronger stability of microtubules likely by reinforcing the cylindrical structure. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We characterize a mutation (mal3-89R) in fission yeast homolog of EB1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mutation enhances the activity to assemble microtubules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mal3 is phosphorylated in a microtubule-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phosphorylation negatively regulates the Mal3 activity.

  16. BP1, an Isoform of DLX4 Homeoprotein, Negatively Regulates BRCA1 in Sporadic Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. Kluk, Yebo Fu, Trina A. Formolo, Lei Zhang, Anne K. Hindle, Yan-gao Man, Robert S. Siegel, Patricia E. Berg, Chuxia Deng, Timothy A. McCaffrey, Sidney W. Fu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several lines of evidence point to an important role for BP1, an isoform of DLX4 homeobox gene, in breast carcinogenesis and progression. BRCA1 is a well-known player in the etiology of breast cancer. While familial breast cancer is often marked by BRCA1 mutation and subsequent loss of heterozygosity, sporadic breast cancers exhibit reduced expression of wild type BRCA1, and loss of BRCA1 expression may result in tumor development and progression.Methods: The Cister algorithm and Genomatix program were used to identify potential BP1 binding sites in BRCA1 gene. Real-time PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis were performed to verify the expression of BRCA1 and BP1 in cell lines and breast cancer tissues. Double-stranded siRNA transfection was carried out for silencing BP1 expression. ChIP and EMSA were used to confirm that BP1 specifically binds to BRCA1.Results: A putative BP1 binding site was identified in the first intron of BRCA1, which was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipiation and electrophoresis mobility shift assay. BP1 and BRCA1 expression were inversely correlated in breast cancer cell lines and tissues, suggesting that BP1 may suppress BRCA1 transcription through consensus sequence binding.Conclusions: BP1 homeoprotein represses BRCA1 expression through direct binding to its first intron, which is consistent with a previous study which identified a novel transcriptional repressor element located more than 500 base pairs into the first intron of BRCA1, suggesting that the first intron plays an important role in the negative regulation of BRCA1. Although further functional studies are necessary to confirm its repressor activity towards BRCA1, the elucidation of the role of BP1 in breast tumorigenesis holds great promise in establishing BP1 as a novel target for drug therapy.

  17. RhoB controls endothelial cell morphogenesis in part via negative regulation of RhoA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howe Grant A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent studies have suggested a role for the small GTPase RhoB in the control of processes required for angiogenesis. However, the mechanisms whereby RhoB exerts control over these processes are not well understood. Given the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in pathological angiogenesis, we were interested in examining whether RhoB contributed to VEGF-induced angiogenic processes. To assess this, RhoB was specifically depleted in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, using siRNA-targeted strategies. The effects of RhoB depletion on VEGF-induced angiogenic activities were assessed using a variety of standard in vitro angiogenesis assays to assess endothelial cell viability, migration and capillary morphogenesis. Effects of RhoB depletion on signaling from other Rho family member proteins was also assessed using specific activity assays for RhoA and RhoC. We observed that although RhoB appeared dispensable for HUVEC viability, RhoB was required for endothelial cell migration, sprouting, and capillary morphogenesis. We also observed that siRNA-mediated depletion of RhoB in HUVEC resulted in increased RhoA activation in response to VEGF stimulation. This increased RhoA activation contributed to the cellular morphogenesis defects observed in RhoB-depleted cells, as inhibition of RhoA activity using C3 transferase, or inhibition of the activity of the downstream RhoA effectors Rho-dependent kinases I and II (ROCK I and II led to a partial restoration of capillary morphogenesis in the absence of RhoB. Thus our data indicate that RhoB plays a significant role in VEGF-induced endothelial cell morphogenesis in part by negatively regulating the activity of RhoA and the RhoA/ROCK pathway.

  18. The pif1 helicase, a negative regulator of telomerase, acts preferentially at long telomeres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane A Phillips

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase, the enzyme that maintains telomeres, preferentially lengthens short telomeres. The S. cerevisiae Pif1 DNA helicase inhibits both telomerase-mediated telomere lengthening and de novo telomere addition at double strand breaks (DSB. Here, we report that the association of the telomerase subunits Est2 and Est1 at a DSB was increased in the absence of Pif1, as it is at telomeres, suggesting that Pif1 suppresses de novo telomere addition by removing telomerase from the break. To determine how the absence of Pif1 results in telomere lengthening, we used the single telomere extension assay (STEX, which monitors lengthening of individual telomeres in a single cell cycle. In the absence of Pif1, telomerase added significantly more telomeric DNA, an average of 72 nucleotides per telomere compared to the 45 nucleotides in wild type cells, and the fraction of telomeres lengthened increased almost four-fold. Using an inducible short telomere assay, Est2 and Est1 no longer bound preferentially to a short telomere in pif1 mutant cells while binding of Yku80, a telomere structural protein, was unaffected by the status of the PIF1 locus. Two experiments demonstrate that Pif1 binding is affected by telomere length: Pif1 (but not Yku80 -associated telomeres were 70 bps longer than bulk telomeres, and in the inducible short telomere assay, Pif1 bound better to wild type length telomeres than to short telomeres. Thus, preferential lengthening of short yeast telomeres is achieved in part by targeting the negative regulator Pif1 to long telomeres.

  19. Tctex1d2 Is a Negative Regulator of GLUT4 Translocation and Glucose Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, Yoko; Okada, Shuichi; Yamada, Eijiro; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Yamada, Masanobu

    2015-10-01

    Tctex1d2 (Tctex1 domain containing 2) is an open reading frame that encodes for a functionally unknown protein that contains a Tctex1 domain found in dynein light chain family members. Examination of gene expression during adipogenesis demonstrated a marked increase in Tctex1d2 protein expression that was essentially undetectable in preadipocytes and markedly induced during 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. Tctex1d2 overexpression significantly inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation and 2-deoxyglucose uptake. In contrast, Tctex1d2 knockdown significantly increased insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation and 2-deoxyglucose uptake. However, acute insulin stimulation (up to 30 min) in 3T3-L1 adipocytes with overexpression or knockdown of Tctex1d2 had no effect on Akt phosphorylation, a critical signal transduction target required for GLUT4 translocation. Although overexpression of Tctex1d2 had no significant effect on GLUT4 internalization, Tctex1d2 was found to associate with syntaxin 4 in an insulin-dependent manner and inhibit Doc2b binding to syntaxin 4. In addition, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide rescued the Tctex1d2 inhibition of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation by suppressing the Tctex1d2-syntaxin 4 interaction and increasing Doc2b-Synatxin4 interactions. Taking these results together, we hypothesized that Tctex1d2 is a novel syntaxin 4 binding protein that functions as a negative regulator of GLUT4 plasma membrane translocation through inhibition of the Doc2b-syntaxin 4 interaction.

  20. Human Prostatic Acid Phosphatase: Structure, Function and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G. Chaney

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAcP is a 100 kDa glycoprotein composed of two subunits. Recent advances demonstrate that cellular PAcP (cPAcP functions as a protein tyrosine phosphatase by dephosphorylating ErbB-2/Neu/HER-2 at the phosphotyrosine residues in prostate cancer (PCa cells, which results in reduced tumorigenicity. Further, the interaction of cPAcP and ErbB-2 regulates androgen sensitivity of PCa cells. Knockdown of cPAcP expression allows androgen-sensitive PCa cells to develop the castration-resistant phenotype, where cells proliferate under an androgen-reduced condition. Thus, cPAcP has a significant influence on PCa cell growth. Interestingly, promoter analysis suggests that PAcP expression can be regulated by NF-κB, via a novel binding sequence in an androgen-independent manner. Further understanding of PAcP function and regulation of expression will have a significant impact on understanding PCa progression and therapy.

  1. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) binding-mediated gene regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are synthetic oligonucleotides with chemically modified backbones. PNAs can bind to both DNA and RNA targets in a sequence-specific manner to form PNA/DNA and PNA/RNA duplex structures. When bound to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) targets, the PNA molecule replaces one DNA strand in the duplex by strand invasion to form a PNA/DNA/PNA [or (PNA)2/DNA] triplex structure and the displaced DNA strand exists as a singlestranded D-loop. PNA has been used in many studies as research tools for gene regulation and gene targeting. The Dloops generated from the PNA binding have also been demonstrated for its potential in initiating transcription and inducing gene expression. PNA provides a powerful tool to study the mechanism of transcription and an innovative strategy to regulate target gene expression. An understanding of the PNA-mediated gene regulation will have important clinical implications in treatment of many human diseases including genetic, cancerous, and age-related diseases.

  2. Different Fear-Regulation Behaviors in Toddlerhood: Relations to Preceding Infant Negative Emotionality, Maternal Depression, and Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloggler, Bettina; Pauli-Pott, Ursula

    2008-01-01

    In the study presented, the development of different fear regulation behaviors and their associations with preceding maternal sensitivity and depression is addressed. A sample of 64 mother-child pairs was examined at the children's ages of 4, 12, and 30 months. Four-month negative reactivity and 12- and 30- month behavioral inhibition and fear…

  3. Effect of lactic acid concentration on growth on meat of Gram-negative psychrotrophs from a meatworks.

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, C O; Newton, K G

    1982-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of the lactic acid in meat on gram-negative psychrotrophs appears to be due mainly to the decrease in pH, not to action of the undissociated acid. Species of Pseudomonas were essentially unaffected by the pH of normal meat. Other gram-negative psychrotrophs isolated from a meatworks included a large number of strains which would not grow on meat of normal pH at chill temperatures. Raising either the pH or the incubation temperature allowed many of the pH-sensitive strain...

  4. Limitation of immune tolerance-inducing thymic epithelial cell development by Spi-B-mediated negative feedback regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Nobuko; Shinzawa, Miho; Miyauchi, Maki; Yanai, Hiromi; Tateishi, Ryosuke; Shimo, Yusuke; Ohshima, Daisuke; Matsuo, Koichi; Sasaki, Izumi; Hoshino, Katsuaki; Wu, Guoying; Yagi, Shintaro; Inoue, Jun-ichiro; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Akiyama, Taishin

    2014-11-17

    Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) expressing the autoimmune regulator AIRE and various tissue-specific antigens (TSAs) are critical for preventing the onset of autoimmunity and may attenuate tumor immunity. However, molecular mechanisms controlling mTEC development remain elusive. Here, we describe the roles of the transcription factor Spi-B in mTEC development. Spi-B is rapidly up-regulated by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) cytokine signaling, which triggers mTEC differentiation, and in turn up-regulates CD80, CD86, some TSAs, and the natural inhibitor of RANKL signaling, osteoprotegerin (OPG). Spi-B-mediated OPG expression limits mTEC development in neonates but not in embryos, suggesting developmental stage-specific negative feedback regulation. OPG-mediated negative regulation attenuates cellularity of thymic regulatory T cells and tumor development in vivo. Hence, these data suggest that this negative RANKL-Spi-B-OPG feedback mechanism finely tunes mTEC development and function and may optimize the trade-off between prevention of autoimmunity and induction of antitumor immunity.

  5. Adolescent depression and negative life events, the mediating role of cognitive emotion regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stikkelbroek, Y.A.J.; Bodden, Denise; Kleinjan, Marloes; Reijnders, Mirjam; van Baar, Anneloes

    2016-01-01

    Background: Depression during adolescence is a serious mental health problem. Difficulties in regulating evoked emotions after stressful life events are considered to lead to depression. This study examined if depressive symptoms were mediated by various cognitive emotion regulation strategies after

  6. cvhA Gene of Streptomyces hygroscopicus 10-22 Encodes a Negative Regulator for Mycelia Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heng-An WANG; Lei QIN; Ping LU; Zhi-Xuan PANG; Zi-Xin DENG; Guo-Ping ZHAO

    2006-01-01

    A five-gene cluster cvhABCDE was identified from Streptomyces hygroscopicus 10-22. As the first gene of this cluster, cvhA encoded a putative sensor histidine kinase with a predicted sensor domain consisting of two trans-membrane segments at the N-terminus and a conserved HATPase_c domain at the Cterminus. The C-terminus polypeptide of CvhA expressed in Escherichia coli was purified and shown to be autophosphorylated with [γ-32p]ATP in vitro. The phosphoryl group was acid-labile and basic-stable, which supported histidine as the phosphorylation residue. No obvious difference of mycelia development was observed between the null mutant of cvhA generated by targeted gene replacement and the wild-type parental strain 10-22 grown on solid soya flour medium with 2%-8% glucose or sucrose, but the cvhA mutant could form much more abundant aerial mycelia and spores than the wild-type strain on solid soya flour medium supplemented with 6%-8% mannitol, 6%-8% sorbitol, 4%-6% mannose, or 4%-6% fructose. This phenotype was complemented by the cloned wild-type cvhA gene, and no difference was observed for growth curves of the cvhA mutant and the wild strain in liquid minimal medium with the tested sugars at a concentration of 4%, 6% and 8%. We thus propose that CvhA is likely a sensor histidine kinase and negatively regulates the morphological differentiation in a sugar-dependent manner in S. hygroscopicus 10-22.

  7. Structural insights into the regulation of aromatic amino acid hydroxylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2015-12-01

    The aromatic amino acid hydroxylases phenylalanine hydroxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase, and tryptophan hydroxylase are homotetramers, with each subunit containing a homologous catalytic domain and a divergent regulatory domain. The solution structure of the regulatory domain of tyrosine hydroxylase establishes that it contains a core ACT domain similar to that in phenylalanine hydroxylase. The isolated regulatory domain of tyrosine hydroxylase forms a stable dimer, while that of phenylalanine hydroxylase undergoes a monomer-dimer equilibrium, with phenylalanine stabilizing the dimer. These solution properties are consistent with the regulatory mechanisms of the two enzymes, in that phenylalanine hydroxylase is activated by phenylalanine binding to an allosteric site, while tyrosine hydroxylase is regulated by binding of catecholamines in the active site.

  8. The receptor tyrosine kinase FGFR4 negatively regulates NF-kappaB signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine A Drafahl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: NFκB signaling is of paramount importance in the regulation of apoptosis, proliferation, and inflammatory responses during human development and homeostasis, as well as in many human cancers. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs, including the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors (FGFRs are also important in development and disease. However, a direct relationship between growth factor signaling pathways and NFκB activation has not been previously described, although FGFs have been known to antagonize TNFα-induced apoptosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we demonstrate an interaction between FGFR4 and IKKβ (Inhibitor of NFκB Kinase β subunit, an essential component in the NFκB pathway. This novel interaction was identified utilizing a yeast two-hybrid screen [1] and confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis. We demonstrate tyrosine phosphorylation of IKKβ in the presence of activated FGFR4, but not kinase-dead FGFR4. Following stimulation by TNFα (Tumor Necrosis Factor α to activate NFκB pathways, FGFR4 activation results in significant inhibition of NFκB signaling as measured by decreased nuclear NFκB localization, by reduced NFκB transcriptional activation in electophoretic mobility shift assays, and by inhibition of IKKβ kinase activity towards the substrate GST-IκBα in in vitro assays. FGF19 stimulation of endogenous FGFR4 in TNFα-treated DU145 prostate cancer cells also leads to a decrease in IKKβ activity, concomitant reduction in NFκB nuclear localization, and reduced apoptosis. Microarray analysis demonstrates that FGF19 + TNFα treatment of DU145 cells, in comparison with TNFα alone, favors proliferative genes while downregulating genes involved in apoptotic responses and NFκB signaling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results identify a compelling link between FGFR4 signaling and the NFκB pathway, and reveal that FGFR4 activation leads to a negative effect on NFκB signaling

  9. Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRα Controls Macrophage Metabolic Signaling and A20 Expression to Negatively Regulate TLR-Induced Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuk, Jae-Min; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Soo Yeon; Lee, Hye-Mi; Han, Jeongsu; Dufour, Catherine Rosa; Kim, Jin Kyung; Jin, Hyo Sun; Yang, Chul-Su; Park, Ki-Sun; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Jin-Man; Kweon, Gi Ryang; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Vanacker, Jean-Marc; Moore, David D; Giguère, Vincent; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2015-07-21

    The orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα; NR3B1) is a key metabolic regulator, but its function in regulating inflammation remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ERRα negatively regulates Toll-like receptor (TLR)-induced inflammation by promoting Tnfaip3 transcription and fine-tuning of metabolic reprogramming in macrophages. ERRα-deficient (Esrra(-/-)) mice showed increased susceptibility to endotoxin-induced septic shock, leading to more severe pro-inflammatory responses than control mice. ERRα regulated macrophage inflammatory responses by directly binding the promoter region of Tnfaip3, a deubiquitinating enzyme in TLR signaling. In addition, Esrra(-/-) macrophages showed an increased glycolysis, but impaired mitochondrial respiratory function and biogenesis. Further, ERRα was required for the regulation of NF-κB signaling by controlling p65 acetylation via maintenance of NAD(+) levels and sirtuin 1 activation. These findings unravel a previously unappreciated role for ERRα as a negative regulator of TLR-induced inflammatory responses through inducing Tnfaip3 transcription and controlling the metabolic reprogramming.

  10. Regulation of energy metabolism by long-chain fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Manabu T; Yudell, Barbara E; Loor, Juan J

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, excess energy is stored primarily as triglycerides, which are mobilized when energy demands arise. This review mainly focuses on the role of long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) in regulating energy metabolism as ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). PPAR-alpha expressed primarily in liver is essential for metabolic adaptation to starvation by inducing genes for beta-oxidation and ketogenesis and by downregulating energy expenditure through fibroblast growth factor 21. PPAR-delta is highly expressed in skeletal muscle and induces genes for LCFA oxidation during fasting and endurance exercise. PPAR-delta also regulates glucose metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis by inducing FOXO1 and PGC1-alpha. Genes targeted by PPAR-gamma in adipocytes suggest that PPAR-gamma senses incoming non-esterified LCFAs and induces the pathways to store LCFAs as triglycerides. Adiponectin, another important target of PPAR-gamma may act as a spacer between adipocytes to maintain their metabolic activity and insulin sensitivity. Another topic of this review is effects of skin LCFAs on energy metabolism. Specific LCFAs are required for the synthesis of skin lipids, which are essential for water barrier and thermal insulation functions of the skin. Disturbance of skin lipid metabolism often causes apparent resistance to developing obesity at the expense of normal skin function.

  11. Affect regulation training (ART) for alcohol use disorders: development of a novel intervention for negative affect drinkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiewicz, Paul R; Bradizza, Clara M; Schlauch, Robert C; Coffey, Scott F; Gulliver, Suzy B; Gudleski, Gregory D; Bole, Christopher W

    2013-01-01

    Although negative affect is a common precipitant of alcohol relapse, there are few interventions for alcohol dependence that specifically target negative affect. In this stage 1a/1b treatment development study, several affect regulation strategies (e.g., mindfulness, prolonged exposure, distress tolerance) were combined to create a new treatment supplement called affect regulation training (ART), which could be added to enhance cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for alcohol dependence. A draft therapy manual was given to therapists and treatment experts before being administered to several patients who also provided input. After two rounds of manual development (stage 1a), a pilot randomized clinical trial (N=77) of alcohol-dependent outpatients who reported drinking often in negative affect situations was conducted (stage 1b). Participants received 12-weekly, 90-minute sessions of either CBT for alcohol dependence plus ART (CBT+ART) or CBT plus a healthy lifestyles control condition (CBT+HLS). Baseline, end-of-treatment, and 3- and 6-month posttreatment interviews were conducted. For both treatment conditions, participant ratings of treatment satisfaction were high, with CBT+ART rated significantly higher. Drinking outcome results indicated greater reductions in alcohol use for CBT+ART when compared to CBT+HLS, with moderate effect sizes for percent days abstinent, drinks per day, drinks per drinking day, and percent heavy drinking days. Overall, findings support further research on affect regulation interventions for negative affect drinkers.

  12. sli-3 negatively regulates the LET-23/epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated vulval induction pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Bhagwati P; Liu, Jing; Hwang, Byung J; Moghal, Nadeem; Sternberg, Paul W

    2006-11-01

    The LIN-3-LET-23-mediated inductive signaling pathway plays a major role during vulval development in C. elegans. Studies on the components of this pathway have revealed positive as well as negative regulators that function to modulate the strength and specificity of the signal transduction cascade. We have carried out genetic screens to identify new regulators of this pathway by screening for suppressors of lin-3 vulvaless phenotype. The screens recovered three loci including alleles of gap-1 and a new gene represented by sli-3. Our genetic epistasis experiments suggest that sli-3 functions either downstream or in parallel to nuclear factors lin-1 and sur-2. sli-3 synergistically interacts with the previously identified negative regulators of the let-23 signaling pathway and causes excessive cell proliferation. However, in the absence of any other mutation sli-3 mutant animals display wild-type vulval induction and morphology. We propose that sli-3 functions as a negative regulator of vulval induction and defines a branch of the inductive signaling pathway. We provide evidence that sli-3 interacts with the EGF signaling pathway components during vulval induction but not during viability and ovulation processes. Thus, sli-3 helps define specificity of the EGF signaling to induce the vulva.

  13. Marital conflict and parental responses to infant negative emotions: Relations with toddler emotional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Leslie A; Umemura, Tomo; Jacobvitz, Deborah; Hazen, Nancy

    2015-08-01

    According to family systems theory, children's emotional development is likely to be influenced by family interactions at multiple levels, including marital, mother-child, and father-child interactions, as well as by interrelations between these levels. The purpose of the present study was to examine parents' marital conflict and mothers' and fathers' distressed responses to their infant's negative emotions, assessed when their child was 8 and 24 months old, in addition to interactions between parents' marital conflict and their distressed responses, as predictors of their toddler's negative and flat/withdrawn affect at 24 months. Higher marital conflict during infancy and toddlerhood predicted both increased negative and increased flat/withdrawn affect during toddlerhood. In addition, toddlers' negative (but not flat) affect was related to mothers' distressed responses, but was only related to father's distressed responses when martial conflict was high. Implications of this study for parent education and family intervention were discussed.

  14. Applying a dual process model of self-regulation: The association between executive working memory capacity, negative urgency, and negative mood induction on pre-potent response inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Rachel L; Finn, Peter R

    2015-03-01

    This study tested a dual-process model of self-control where the combination of high impulsivity (negative urgency - NU), weak reflective / control processes (low executive working memory capacity - E-WMC), and a cognitive load is associated with increased failures to inhibit pre-potent responses on a cued go/no-go task. Using a within-subjects design, a cognitive load with and without negative emotional load was implemented to consider situational factors. Results suggested that: (1) high NU was associated with low E-WMC; (2) low E-WMC significantly predicted more inhibitory control failures across tasks; and (3) there was a significant interaction of E-WMC and NU, revealing those with low E-WMC and high NU had the highest rates of inhibitory control failures on all conditions of the task. In conclusion, results suggest that while E-WMC is a strong independent predictor of inhibitory control, NU provides additional information for vulnerability to problems associated with self-regulation.

  15. Comparative Genomics of Regulation of Fatty Acid and Branched-chain Amino Acid Utilization in Proteobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazakov, Alexey E.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Arkin, Adam Paul; Dubchak, Inna; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Alm, Eric

    2008-10-31

    Bacteria can use branched-chain amino acids (ILV, i.e. isoleucine, leucine, valine) and fatty acids (FA) as sole carbon and energy sources convering ILV into acetyl-CoA, propanoyl-CoA and propionyl-CoA, respectively. In this work, we used the comparative genomic approach to identify candidate transcriptional factors and DNA motifs that control ILV and FA utilization pathways in proteobacteria. The metabolic regulons were characterized based on the identification and comparison of candidate transcription factor binding sites in groups of phylogenetically related genomes. The reconstructed ILV/FA regulatory network demonstrates considerable variability and involves six transcriptional factors from the MerR, TetR and GntR families binding to eleven distinct DNA motifs. The ILV degradation genes in gamma- and beta-proteobacteria are mainly regulated by anovel regulator from the MerR family (e.g., LiuR in Pseudomonas aeruginosa) (40 species), in addition, the TetR-type regulator LiuQ was identified in some beta-proteobacteria (8 species). Besides the core set of ILV utilization genes, the LiuR regulon in some lineages is expanded to include genes from other metabolic pathways, such as the glyoxylate shunt and glutamate synthase in the Shewanella species. The FA degradation genes are controlled by four regulators including FadR in gamma-proteobacteria (34 species), PsrA in gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (45 species), FadP in beta-proteobacteria (14 species), and LiuR orthologs in alpha-proteobacteria (22 species). The remarkable variability of the regulatory systems associated with the FA degradation pathway is discussed from the functional and evolutionary points of view.

  16. TOR complex 2-Ypk1 signaling is an essential positive regulator of the general amino acid control response and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahakis, Ariadne; Graef, Martin; Nunnari, Jodi; Powers, Ted

    2014-07-22

    The highly conserved Target of Rapamycin (TOR) kinase is a central regulator of cell growth and metabolism in response to nutrient availability. TOR functions in two structurally and functionally distinct complexes, TOR Complex 1 (TORC1) and TOR Complex 2 (TORC2). Through TORC1, TOR negatively regulates autophagy, a conserved process that functions in quality control and cellular homeostasis and, in this capacity, is part of an adaptive nutrient deprivation response. Here we demonstrate that during amino acid starvation TOR also operates independently as a positive regulator of autophagy through the conserved TORC2 and its downstream target protein kinase, Ypk1. Under these conditions, TORC2-Ypk1 signaling negatively regulates the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin, to enable the activation of the amino acid-sensing eIF2α kinase, Gcn2, and to promote autophagy. Our work reveals that the TORC2 pathway regulates autophagy in an opposing manner to TORC1 to provide a tunable response to cellular metabolic status.

  17. An shRNA-Based Screen of Splicing Regulators Identifies SFRS3 as a Negative Regulator of IL-1β Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Teresa Raquel; D'Almeida, Bruno; Rodrigues, Raquel; Cadima-Couto, Iris; Chora, Ângelo; Oliveira, Mariana; Gama-Carvalho, Margarida; Hacohen, Nir; Moita, Luis F.

    2011-01-01

    The generation of diversity and plasticity of transcriptional programs are key components of effective vertebrate immune responses. The role of Alternative Splicing has been recognized, but it is underappreciated and poorly understood as a critical mechanism for the regulation and fine-tuning of physiological immune responses. Here we report the generation of loss-of-function phenotypes for a large collection of genes known or predicted to be involved in the splicing reaction and the identification of 19 novel regulators of IL-1β secretion in response to E. coli challenge of THP-1 cells. Twelve of these genes are required for IL-1β secretion, while seven are negative regulators of this process. Silencing of SFRS3 increased IL-1β secretion due to elevation of IL-1β and caspase-1 mRNA in addition to active caspase-1 levels. This study points to the relevance of splicing in the regulation of auto-inflammatory diseases. PMID:21611201

  18. A Loss-of-Function Screen for Phosphatases that Regulate Neurite Outgrowth Identifies PTPN12 as a Negative Regulator of TrkB Tyrosine Phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjørn, Malene; Dubreuil, Véronique; Miozzo, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in function of the neurotrophin BDNF are associated with neurodegeneration, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disorders. BDNF promotes axonal outgrowth and branching, regulates dendritic tree morphology and is important for axonal regeneration after injury, responses that largely...... activation of ERK1/2. We also found PTPN12 to negatively regulate phosphorylation of p130cas and FAK, proteins with previously described functions related to cell motility and growth cone behavior. Our data provide the first comprehensive survey of phosphatase function in NT signaling and neurite outgrowth...

  19. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) promotes the epithelial mesenchymal transition of triple negative breast cancer cells via HDAC8/FOXA1 signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao; Luo, Zhi; Yu, Peng-Jiu; Xie, Hui; He, Yu-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACIs) have great therapeutic value for triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients. Interestingly, our present study reveals that suberoyl anilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), one of the most advanced pan-HDAC inhibitor, can obviously promote in vitro motility of MDA-MB-231 and BT-549 cells via induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). SAHA treatment significantly down-regulates the expression of epithelial markers E-cadherin (E-Cad) while up-regulates the mesenchymal markers N-cadherin (N-Cad), vimentin (Vim) and fibronectin (FN). However, SAHA has no effect on the expression and nuclear translocation of EMT related transcription factors including Snail, Slug, Twist and ZEB. While SAHA treatment down-regulates the protein and mRNA expression of FOXA1 and then decreases its nuclear translocation. Over-expression of FOXA1 markedly attenuates SAHA induced EMT of TNBC cells. Further, silence of HDAC8, while not HDAC6, alleviates the down-regulation of FOXA1 and up-regulation of N-Cad and Vim in MDA-MB-231 cells treated with SAHA. Collectively, our present study reveals that SAHA can promote EMT of TNBC cells via HDAC8/FOXA1 signals, which suggests that more attention should be paid when SAHA is used as anti-cancer agent for cancer treatment.

  20. AtDsPTP1 acts as a negative regulator in osmotic stress signalling during Arabidopsis seed germination and seedling establishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Liu, Yinggao; Ye, Nenghui; Zhu, Guohui; Chen, Moxian; Jia, Liguo; Xia, Yiji; Shi, Lu; Jia, Wensuo; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-03-01

    Dual-specificity protein phosphatases (DsPTPs) target both tyrosine and serine/threonine residues and play roles in plant growth and development. We have characterized an Arabidopsis mutant, dsptp1, which shows a higher seed germination rate and better root elongation under osmotic stress than the wild type. By contrast, its overexpression line, DsPTP1-OE, shows inhibited seed germination and root elongation; and its complemented line, DsPTP1-Com, resembles the wild type and rescues DsPTP1-OE under osmotic stress. Expression of AtDsPTP1 is enhanced by osmotic stress in seed coats, bases of rosette leaves, and roots. Compared with the wild type, the dsptp1 mutant shows increased proline accumulation, reduced malondialdehyde (MDA) content and ion leakage, and enhanced antioxidant enzyme activity in response to osmotic stress. AtDsPTP1 regulates the transcript levels of various dehydration-responsive genes under osmotic stress. Abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation in dsptp1 under osmotic stress is reduced with reduced expression of the ABA-biosynthesis gene NCED3 and increased expression of the ABA-catabolism gene CYP707A4. AtDsPTP1 also regulates the expression of key components in the ABA-signalling pathway. In conclusion, AtDsPTP1 regulates ABA accumulation, and acts as a negative regulator in osmotic stress signalling during Arabidospsis seed germination and seedling establishment.

  1. Highly frequent mutations in negative regulators of multiple virulence genes in group A streptococcal toxic shock syndrome isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikebe, Tadayoshi; Ato, Manabu; Matsumura, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Hideki; Sata, Tetsutaro; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Watanabe, Haruo

    2010-04-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is a severe invasive infection characterized by the sudden onset of shock and multiorgan failure; it has a high mortality rate. Although a number of studies have attempted to determine the crucial factors behind the onset of STSS, the responsible genes in group A Streptococcus have not been clarified. We previously reported that mutations of csrS/csrR genes, a two-component negative regulator system for multiple virulence genes of Streptococcus pyogenes, are found among the isolates from STSS patients. In the present study, mutations of another negative regulator, rgg, were also found in clinical isolates of STSS patients. The rgg mutants from STSS clinical isolates enhanced lethality and impaired various organs in the mouse models, similar to the csrS mutants, and precluded their being killed by human neutrophils, mainly due to an overproduction of SLO. When we assessed the mutation frequency of csrS, csrR, and rgg genes among S. pyogenes isolates from STSS (164 isolates) and non-invasive infections (59 isolates), 57.3% of the STSS isolates had mutations of one or more genes among three genes, while isolates from patients with non-invasive disease had significantly fewer mutations in these genes (1.7%). The results of the present study suggest that mutations in the negative regulators csrS/csrR and rgg of S. pyogenes are crucial factors in the pathogenesis of STSS, as they lead to the overproduction of multiple virulence factors.

  2. ABI4 regulates primary seed dormancy by regulating the biogenesis of abscisic acid and gibberellins in arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Kai; Zhang, Huawei; Wang, Shengfu; Chen, Mingluan; Wu, Yaorong; Tang, Sanyuan; Liu, Chunyan; Feng, Yuqi; Cao, Xiaofeng; Xie, Qi

    2013-06-01

    Seed dormancy is an important economic trait for agricultural production. Abscisic acid (ABA) and Gibberellins (GA) are the primary factors that regulate the transition from dormancy to germination, and they regulate this process antagonistically. The detailed regulatory mechanism involving crosstalk between ABA and GA, which underlies seed dormancy, requires further elucidation. Here, we report that ABI4 positively regulates primary seed dormancy, while negatively regulating cotyledon greening, by mediating the biogenesis of ABA and GA. Seeds of the Arabidopsis abi4 mutant that were subjected to short-term storage (one or two weeks) germinated significantly more quickly than Wild-Type (WT), and abi4 cotyledons greened markedly more quickly than WT, while the rates of germination and greening were comparable when the seeds were subjected to longer-term storage (six months). The ABA content of dry abi4 seeds was remarkably lower than that of WT, but the amounts were comparable after stratification. Consistently, the GA level of abi4 seeds was increased compared to WT. Further analysis showed that abi4 was resistant to treatment with paclobutrazol (PAC), a GA biosynthesis inhibitor, during germination, while OE-ABI4 was sensitive to PAC, and exogenous GA rescued the delayed germination phenotype of OE-ABI4. Analysis by qRT-PCR showed that the expression of genes involved in ABA and GA metabolism in dry and germinating seeds corresponded to hormonal measurements. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation qPCR (ChIP-qPCR) and transient expression analysis showed that ABI4 repressed CYP707A1 and CYP707A2 expression by directly binding to those promoters, and the ABI4 binding elements are essential for this repression. Accordingly, further genetic analysis showed that abi4 recovered the delayed germination phenotype of cyp707a1 and cyp707a2 and further, rescued the non-germinating phenotype of ga1-t. Taken together, this study suggests that ABI4 is a key factor that

  3. Perfectionism, Emotion Regulation and Their Relationship to Negative Affect in Patients with Social Phobia

    OpenAIRE

    Systla Rukmini; Sudhir, Paulomi M.; Suresh Bada Math

    2014-01-01

    Context: Research on the perfectionism and emotion regulation strategies in anxiety disorders has gained increased attention. These have an important implication for formulation of therapies. Aims: We examined perfectionism, emotion regulation were examined in 30 patients with social phobia (SP) and 30 community participants. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional design using a clinical and a community control sample was adopted in this exploratory study. Materials and Methods: Participants ...

  4. Functional analysis of a Lemna gibba rbcS promoter regulated by abscisic acid and sugar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Youru Wang

    2013-04-01

    Photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes (PhANGs) are able to respond to multiple environmental and developmental signals, including light, sugar and abscisic acid (ABA). PhANGs have been extensively studied at the level of transcriptional regulation, and several cis-acting elements important for light responsiveness have been identified in their promoter sequences. However, the regulatory elements involved in sugar and ABA regulation of PhANGs have not been completely characterized. A ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit gene (rbcS) promoter (SSU5C promoter) was isolated from duckweed (Lemna gibba). A series of SSU5C promoter 5′ deletion fragments were fused to an intron–gus gene, and transgenic tobacco suspension cell lines were generated. Assay of tobacco suspension cell line harbouring the complete promoter in the fusion construct indicated that SSU5C promoter was negatively regulated by sugar and ABA under the condition of regular photoperiod. 5′ deletion analysis of SSU5C promoter in transgenic tobacco suspension cell lines confirmed that a region between positions $-310$ and $-152$ included the ABA-response region, and that sugar-response cis-acting elements might be located in the region between $-152$ and $-117$. Taken together, our results confirmed that the cis-regulatory region responsible for repression by ABA and sugar in the SSU5C promoter was located between $-310$ and $-117$.

  5. Dlk1 is a negative regulator of emerging hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Mirshekar-Syahkal (Bahar); E. Haak (Esther); G.M. Kimber (Gillian); K. van Leusden (Kevin); K. Harvey (Kirsten); R.A. O'Rourke; J. Laborda (Jorge); S.R. Bauer (Steven); M.F.T.R. de Bruijn (Marella F.T.R); A. Ferguson-Smith (Anne); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine); K. Ottersbach (Katrin)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe first mouse adult-repopulating hematopoietic stem cells emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region at embryonic day (E) 10.5. Their numbers in this region increase thereafter and begin to decline at E12.5, thus pointing to the possible existence of both positive and negative regula

  6. Regioisomers of octanoic acid-containing structured triacylglycerols analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry using ammonia negative ion chemical ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurvinen, J.P.; Mu, Huiling; Kallio, H.

    2001-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry based on ammonia negative ion chemical ionization and sample introduction via direct exposure probe was applied to analysis of regioisomeric structures of octanoic acid containing structured triacylglycerols (TAG) of type MML, MLM, MLL, and LML (M, medium-chain fatty acid......; L, long-chain fatty acid). Collision-induced dissociation of deprotonated parent TAG with argon was used to produce daughter ion spectra with appropriate fragmentation patterns for structure determination. Fatty acids constituting the TAG molecule were identified according to [RCO2](-) ions...... in the daughter ion spectra. With the standard curve for ratios of [M - H - RCO2H - 100](-) ions corresponding to each [RCO2](-) ion, determined with known mixtures of sn-1/3 and sn-2 regioisomers of structured TAG, it was possible to determine the proportions of different regioisomers in unknown samples...

  7. Metabolic regulation of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerry D. Cohen

    2009-11-01

    The phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, auxin) is important for many aspects of plant growth, development and responses to the environment yet the routes to is biosynthesis and mechanisms for regulation of IAA levels remain important research questions. A critical issue concerning the biosynthesis if IAA in plants is that redundant pathways for IAA biosynthesis exist in plants. We showed that these redundant pathways and their relative contribution to net IAA production are under both developmental and environmental control. We worked on three fundamental problems related to how plants get their IAA: 1) An in vitro biochemical approach was used to define the tryptophan dependent pathway to IAA using maize endosperm, where relatively large amounts of IAA are produced over a short developmental period. Both a stable isotope dilution and a protein MS approach were used to identify intermediates and enzymes in the reactions. 2) We developed an in vitro system for analysis of tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthesis in maize seedlings and we used a metabolite profiling approach to isolate intermediates in this reaction. 3) Arabidopsis contains a small family of genes that encode potential indolepyruvate decarboxylase enzymes. We cloned these genes and studied plants that are mutant in these genes and that over-express each member in the family in terms of the level and route of IAA biosynthesis. Together, these allowed further development of a comprehensive picture of the pathways and regulatory components that are involved in IAA homeostasis in higher plants.

  8. Hepatic oleate regulates adipose tissue lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhans, Maggie S; Flowers, Matthew T; Harrington, Kristin R; Bond, Laura M; Guo, Chang-An; Anderson, Rozalyn M; Ntambi, James M

    2015-02-01

    Hepatic steatosis is associated with detrimental metabolic phenotypes including enhanced risk for diabetes. Stearoyl-CoA desaturases (SCDs) catalyze the synthesis of MUFAs. In mice, genetic ablation of SCDs reduces hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and protects against diet-induced hepatic steatosis and adiposity. To understand the mechanism by which hepatic MUFA production influences adipose tissue stores, we created two liver-specific transgenic mouse models in the SCD1 knockout that express either human SCD5 or mouse SCD3, that synthesize oleate and palmitoleate, respectively. We demonstrate that hepatic de novo synthesized oleate, but not palmitoleate, stimulate hepatic lipid accumulation and adiposity, reversing the protective effect of the global SCD1 knockout under lipogenic conditions. Unexpectedly, the accumulation of hepatic lipid occurred without induction of the hepatic DNL program. Changes in hepatic lipid composition were reflected in plasma and in adipose tissue. Importantly, endogenously synthesized hepatic oleate was associated with suppressed DNL and fatty acid oxidation in white adipose tissue. Regression analysis revealed a strong correlation between adipose tissue lipid fuel utilization and hepatic and adipose tissue lipid storage. These data suggest an extrahepatic mechanism where endogenous hepatic oleate regulates lipid homeostasis in adipose tissues.

  9. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2) negatively regulates the expression of antimicrobial peptides by affecting the Stat transcriptional activity in shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie-Jie; Lan, Jiang-Feng; Xu, Ji-Dong; Niu, Guo-Juan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2016-09-01

    The suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family is a kind of negative regulators in the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (Jak/Stat) pathway in mammals and Drosophila. In kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus, SOCS2 is identified and its expression can be stimulated by peptidoglycan and polycytidylic acid. However, if SOCS2 participates in regulating Jak/Stat pathway in shrimp still needs further study. In this study, SOCS2 with Src homology 2 domain and SOCS box was identified in kuruma shrimp, M. japonicus. SOCS2 existed in hemocytes, heart, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestine, the expression of SOCS2 was upregulated significantly in the hemocytes and intestine of shrimp challenged with Vibrio anguillarum at 6 h. To analyze SOCS2 function in shrimp immunity, bacterial clearance and survival rate were analyzed after knockdown of SOCS2 in shrimp challenged with V. anguillarum. Results showed that bacterial clearance increased, and the survival rate improved significantly comparing with controls. The SOCS2 was expressed in Escherichia coli and the recombinant SOCS2 was injected into shrimp, and Stat phosphorylation and translocation were analyzed. The result showed that "overexpression" of SOCS2 declined Stat phosphorylation level and inhibited Stat translocation into the nucleus. After knockdown of SOCS2 in shrimp prior to V. anguillarum infection, the expression level of antimicrobial peptides, including anti-lipopolysaccharide factors C1, C2 and D1, and Crustin I was upregulated significantly, and the expression of the AMPs was declined after recombinant SOCS2 injection. The SOCS2 expression was also decreased in Stat-knockdown shrimp challenged by V. anguillarum at 6 and 12 h. Therefore, SOCS2 negatively regulates the AMP expression by inhibiting Stat phosphorylation and translocation into nucleus in shrimp, meanwhile, SOCS2 expression was also regulated by Jak/Stat pathway.

  10. A20 is a negative regulator of BCL10- and CARMA3-mediated activation of NF-kappaB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilo, Romania; Varricchio, Ettore; Liguoro, Domenico; Leonardi, Antonio; Vito, Pasquale

    2008-04-15

    The molecular complex containing CARMA proteins, BCL10 and TRAF6 has been identified recently as a key component in the signal transduction pathways that regulate activation of the nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) transcription factor. Here, we report that the inducible protein A20 negatively regulates these signaling cascades by means of its deubiquitylation activity. We show that A20 perturbs assembly of the complex containing CARMA3, BCL10 and IKKgamma/NEMO, thereby suppressing activation of NF-kappaB. Together, our results further define the molecular mechanisms that control activation of NF-kappaB and reveal a function for A20 in the regulation of CARMA and BCL10 activity in lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells.

  11. Regulation of alpha-1 acid glycoprotein synthesis by porcine hepatocytes in monolayer culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caperna, T J; Shannon, A E; Stoll, M; Blomberg, L A; Ramsay, T G

    2015-07-01

    Alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP, orosomucoid, ORM-1) is a highly glycosylated mammalian acute-phase protein, which is synthesized primarily in the liver and represents the major serum protein in newborn pigs. Recent data have suggested that the pig is unique in that AGP is a negative acute-phase protein in this species, and its circulating concentration appears to be associated with growth rate. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the regulation of AGP synthesis in hepatocytes prepared from suckling piglets and to provide a framework to compare its regulation with that of haptoglobin (HP), a positive acute-phase protein. Hepatocytes were isolated from preweaned piglets and maintained in serum-free monolayer culture for up to 72 h. The influences of hormones, cytokines, and redox modifiers on the expression and secretion of AGP and HP were determined by relative polymerase chain reaction and by measuring the concentration of each protein secreted into culture medium. The messenger RNA abundance and/or secretion of AGP protein was enhanced by interleukin (IL)-17a, IL-1, and resveratrol and inhibited by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF), oncostatin M, and thyroid hormone (P < 0.05). HP expression and synthesis were upregulated by oncostatin M, IL-6, and dexamethasone and downregulated by TNF (P < 0.01). The overall messenger RNA expression at 24 h was in agreement with the secreted protein patterns confirming that control of these proteins in hepatocytes is largely transcriptional. Moreover, these data support the consideration that AGP is a negative acute-phase reactant and appears to be regulated by cytokines (with the exception of TNF) and hormones primarily in a manner opposite to that of the positive acute-phase protein, HP.

  12. Epigenetic Regulation of microRNA Expression: Targeting the Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    size was monitored by digital caliper and tumor volume calculated with the formula: 4/3πLM2 (L=larger radius, M=smaller radius). Anti- CXCR4 treatment...supplemented with 5% FBS, 1% peni - cillin/streptomycin, 1% essential amino acids, 1% non-essential amino acids and 1% sodium pyruvate) and allowed to adhere...animals received intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of the corresponding drug treatment on a 5-day on and 2-day off schedule for 28 days [18]. Tumor size

  13. SENP2 negatively regulates cellular antiviral response by deSUMOylating IRF3 and conditioning it for ubiquitination and degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Ran; Tian-Tian Liu; Qian Zhou; Shu Li; Ai-Ping Mao; Ying Li; Li-Juan Liu; Jin-Ke Cheng; Hong-Bing Shu

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factor IRF3-mediated type I interferon induction is essential for antiviral innate immunity.We identified the deSUMOylating enzyme Sentrin/SUMO-specific protease (SENP) 2 as a negative regulator of virus-triggered IFN-β induction.Overexpression of SENP2 caused IRF3 deSUMOylation,K48-linked ubiquitination,and degradation,whereas depletion of SENP2 had opposite effects.Both the SUMOylation and K48-linked ubiquitination of IRF3 occurred at iysines 70 and 87,and these processes are competitive.The level of virus-triggered IFN-β was markedly up-regulated and viral replication was reduced in SENP2-deficient cells comparing with wild-type controls.Our findings suggest that SENP2 regulates antiviral innate immunity by deSUMOylating IRF3 and conditioning it for ubiquitination and degradation,and provide an example of cross-talk between the ubiquitin and SUMO pathways in innate immunity.%Transcription factor IRF3-mediated type I interferon induction is essential for antiviral innate immunity. We identified the deSUMOylating enzyme Sentrin/SUMO-specific protease (SENP) 2 as a negative regulator of virus-triggered IFN-p induction. Overexpression of SENP2 caused IRF3 deSUMOylation, K48-linked ubiquitination, and degradation, whereas depletion of SENP2 had opposite effects. Both the SUMOylation and K48-linked ubiquitination of IRF3 occurred at lysines 70 and 87, and these processes are competitive. The level of virus-triggered IFN-β was markedly up-regulated and viral replication was reduced in SENP2-deficient cells comparing with wild-type controls. Our findings suggest that SENP2 regulates antiviral innate immunity by deSUMOylating IRF3 and conditioning it for ubiquitination and degradation, and provide an example of cross-talk between the ubiquitin and SUMO pathways in innate immunity.

  14. Characterization of Adapter Protein NRBP as a Negative Regulator of T Cell Activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hui; LIN Zhi-xin; WU Jun

    2008-01-01

    Adapter proteins can regulate the gene transcriptions in disparate signaling pathway by interacting with multiple signaling molecules, including T cell activation signaling. Nuclear receptor binding protein (NRBP), a novel adapter protein, represents a small family of evolutionarily conserved proteins with homologs in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), Drosophila melanogaster (D.melanogaster), mouse and human. Here, we demonstrated that overexpression of NRBP in Jurkat TAg cells specifically impairs T cell receptor (TCR) or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)/ionomycin-mediated signaling leading to nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) promoter activation. Furthermore, the N-terminal of NRBP is necessary for its regulation of NFAT activation. Finally, we showed that NRBP has minimal effect on both TCR- and PMA-induced CD69 up-regulation in Jurkat TAg cells, which suggests that NRBP may function downstream of protein kinase C (PKC)/Ras pathway.

  15. ST2 negatively regulates TLR2 signaling, but is not required for bacterial lipoprotein-induced tolerance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Liu, Jinghua

    2010-05-15

    Activation of TLR signaling is critical for host innate immunity against bacterial infection. Previous studies reported that the ST2 receptor, a member of the Toll\\/IL-1 receptor superfamily, functions as a negative regulator of TLR4 signaling and maintains LPS tolerance. However, it is undetermined whether ST2 negatively regulates TLR2 signaling and furthermore, whether a TLR2 agonist, bacterial lipoprotein (BLP)-induced tolerance is dependent on ST2. In this study, we show that BLP stimulation-induced production of proinflammatory cytokines and immunocomplex formation of TLR2-MyD88 and MyD88-IL-1R-associated kinase (IRAK) were significantly enhanced in ST2-deficient macrophages compared with those in wild-type controls. Furthermore, overexpression of ST2 dose-dependently attenuated BLP-induced NF-kappaB activation, suggesting a negative regulatory role of ST2 in TLR2 signaling. A moderate but significantly attenuated production of TNF-alpha and IL-6 on a second BLP stimulation was observed in BLP-pretreated, ST2-deficient macrophages, which is associated with substantially reduced IRAK-1 protein expression and downregulated TLR2-MyD88 and MyD88-IRAK immunocomplex formation. ST2-deficient mice, when pretreated with a nonlethal dose of BLP, benefitted from an improved survival against a subsequent lethal BLP challenge, indicating BLP tolerance develops in the absence of the ST2 receptor. Taken together, our results demonstrate that ST2 acts as a negative regulator of TLR2 signaling, but is not required for BLP-induced tolerance.

  16. Identification of a fatty acid binding protein4-UCP2 axis regulating microglial mediated neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Cayla M; Xu, Hongliang; Nixon, Joshua P; Bernlohr, David A; Butterick, Tammy A

    2017-02-16

    Hypothalamic inflammation contributes to metabolic dysregulation and the onset of obesity. Dietary saturated fats activate microglia via a nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) mediated pathway to release pro-inflammatory cytokines resulting in dysfunction or death of surrounding neurons. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are lipid chaperones regulating metabolic and inflammatory pathways in response to fatty acids. Loss of FABP4 in peripheral macrophages via either molecular or pharmacologic mechanisms results in reduced obesity-induced inflammation via a UCP2-redox based mechanism. Despite the widespread appreciation for the role of FABP4 in mediating peripheral inflammation, the expression of FABP4 and a potential FABP4-UCP2 axis regulating microglial inflammatory capacity is largely uncharacterized. To that end, we hypothesized that microglial cells express FABP4 and that inhibition would upregulate UCP2 and attenuate palmitic acid (PA)-induced pro-inflammatory response. Gene expression confirmed expression of FABP4 in brain tissue lysate from C57Bl/6J mice and BV2 microglia. Treatment of microglial cells with an FABP inhibitor (HTS01037) increased expression of Ucp2 and arginase in the presence or absence of PA. Moreover, cells exposed to HTS01037 exhibited attenuated expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) compared to PA alone indicating reduced NFκB signaling. Hypothalamic tissue from mice lacking FABP4 exhibit increased UCP2 expression and reduced iNOS, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1; microglial activation marker) expression compared to wild type mice. Further, this effect is negated in microglia lacking UCP2, indicating the FABP4-UCP2 axis is pivotal in obesity induced neuroinflammation. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating a FABP4-UCP2 axis with the potential to modulate the microglial inflammatory response.

  17. Lsb1 Is a Negative Regulator of Las17 Dependent Actin Polymerization Involved in Endocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Matthias Spiess; Johan-Owen de Craene; Alphée Michelot; Bruno Rinaldi; Aline Huber; Drubin, David G.; Barbara Winsor; Sylvie Friant

    2013-01-01

    The spatial and temporal regulation of actin polymerization is crucial for various cellular processes. Members of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family activate the Arp2/3-complex leading to actin polymerization. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains only one WASP homolog, Las17, that requires additional factors for its regulation. Lsb1 and Lsb2/Pin3 are two yeast homologous proteins bearing an SH3 domain that were identified as Las17-binding proteins. Lsb2/Pin3 that promot...

  18. Negative Regulation of DsbA-L Gene Expression by the Transcription Factor Sp1

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Qichen; Yang, Wenjing; Li, Huating; Hu, Wenxiu; Chen, Lihui; Jiang, Shan; Dong, Kun; Song, Qianqian; Wang, Chen; Chen, Shuo; LIU, FENG; Jia, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    Disulfide-bond A oxidoreductase-like protein (DsbA-L) possesses beneficial effects such as promoting adiponectin multimerization and stability, increasing insulin sensitivity, and enhancing energy metabolism. The expression level of DsbA-L is negatively correlated with obesity in mice and humans, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. To address this question, we generated reporter gene constructs containing the promoter sequence of the mouse DsbA-L gene. Deletion analysis showed that ...

  19. TGIF1 is a negative regulator of MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willer, Anton; Jakobsen, Janus Schou; Ohlsson, E

    2015-01-01

    Members of the TALE (three-amino-acid loop extension) family of atypical homeodomain-containing transcription factors are important downstream effectors of oncogenic fusion proteins involving the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene. A well-characterized member of this protein family is MEIS1, which...

  20. Regulation of Water Deficit-Induced Abscisic Acid Accumulation by Apoplastic Ascorbic Acid in Maize Seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Fang HU; Gui-Fen LI; Zhi-Hui GAO; Lin CHEN; Hui-Bo REN; Wen-Suo JIA

    2005-01-01

    Water deficit-induced abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation is one of the most important stress signaling pathways in plant cells. Redox regulation of cellular signaling has currently attracted particular attention, but much less is known about its roles and mechanisms in plant signaling. Herein, we report that water deficit-induced ABA accumulation could be regulated by ascorbic acid (AA)-controlled redox status in leave apoplast. The AA content in non-stressed leaves was approximately 3 μmol/g FW, corresponding to a mean concentration of 3 mmol/L in a whole cell. Because AA is mainly localized in the cytosol and chloroplasts, the volume of which is much smaller than that of the whole cell, AA content in cytosolic and chloroplast compartments should be much higher than 3 mmol/L. Water deficit-induced ABA accumulation in both leaf and root tissues of maize seedlings was significantly inhibited by AA and reduced glutathione (GSH) at concentrations of 500 μmol/L and was completely blocked by 50 mmol/L AA and GSH. These results suggest that the AA-induced inhibition of ABA accumulation should not occur at sites where AA exists in high concentrations. Although water deficit led to a small increase in the dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) content, no significant changes in AA content were observed in either leaf or root tissues. When compared with the whole leaf cell, the AA content in the apoplastic compartment was much lower (i.e.approximately 70 nmol/g FW, corresponding to 0.7 mmol/L). Water deficit induced a significant decrease (approximately 2.5-fold) in the AA content and an increase (approximately 3.4-fold) in the DHA content in the apoplastic compartment, thus leading to a considerably decreased redox status there, which may have contributed to the relief of AA-induced inhibition of ABA accumulation, alternatively, promoting water deficit-induced ABA accumulation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) could not mimic water deficit in inducing ABA accumulation, suggesting that

  1. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 regulates salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent responses via EDS1 and PAD4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Klaus Peter; Petersen, Morten; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2006-01-01

    Arabidopsis MPK4 has been implicated in plant defense regulation because mpk4 knockout plants exhibit constitutive activation of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defenses, but fail to induce jasmonic acid (JA) defense marker genes in response to JA. We show here that mpk4 mutants are also defective...

  2. Ubiquitin-Specific Peptidase USP22 Negatively Regulates the STAT Signaling Pathway by Deubiquitinating SIRT1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Ao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The ubiquitin-specific peptidase USP22 mediates various cellular and organismal processes, such as cell growth, apoptosis, and tumor malignancy. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate USP22 activity remain poorly understood. Here we identify STAT3 as a new USP22 interactor. Methods:· We used western blotting and RT-PCR to measure key protein, acetylated STAT3, and mRNA levels in HEK293 and colorectal cancer cell lines transfected with expression plasmids or specific siRNAs. Co-immunoprecipitation was used to demonstrate protein-protein interaction and protein complex composition. Results: USP22 overexpression down-regulated STAT3 acetylation by deubiquitinating SIRT1. The three proteins were found to be present in a single protein complex. SiRNA-mediated depletion of endogenous USP22 resulted in SIRT1 destabilization and elevated STAT3 acetylation. Consistent with this finding, USP22 also down-regulated the expression of two known STAT3 target genes, MMP9 and TWIST. Conclusion: We show that USP22 is a new regulator of the SIRT1-STAT3 signaling pathway and report a new mechanistic explanation for cross talk between USP22 and the SIRT1-STAT pathways.

  3. Negative Ion In-Source Decay Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Sequencing Acidic Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, Chelsea L.; Wright, Patience M.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in-source decay was studied in the negative ion mode on deprotonated peptides to determine its usefulness for obtaining extensive sequence information for acidic peptides. Eight biological acidic peptides, ranging in size from 11 to 33 residues, were studied by negative ion mode ISD (nISD). The matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzamide, 1,5-diaminonaphthalene, 5-amino-1-naphthol, 3-aminoquinoline, and 9-aminoacridine were used with each peptide. Optimal fragmentation was produced with 1,5-diaminonphthalene (DAN), and extensive sequence informative fragmentation was observed for every peptide except hirudin(54-65). Cleavage at the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone, producing c' and z' ions, was dominant for all peptides. Cleavage of the N-Cα bond N-terminal to proline residues was not observed. The formation of c and z ions is also found in electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron capture dissociation (ECD), and positive ion mode ISD, which are considered to be radical-driven techniques. Oxidized insulin chain A, which has four highly acidic oxidized cysteine residues, had less extensive fragmentation. This peptide also exhibited the only charged localized fragmentation, with more pronounced product ion formation adjacent to the highly acidic residues. In addition, spectra were obtained by positive ion mode ISD for each protonated peptide; more sequence informative fragmentation was observed via nISD for all peptides. Three of the peptides studied had no product ion formation in ISD, but extensive sequence informative fragmentation was found in their nISD spectra. The results of this study indicate that nISD can be used to readily obtain sequence information for acidic peptides.

  4. Dysbindin and d-amino-acid-oxidase gene polymorphisms associated with positive and negative symptoms in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirgenes, Katrine V; Djurovic, Srdjan; Agartz, Ingrid;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Schizophrenia is a genetically complex disorder with an unknown pathophysiology. Several genes implicated in glutamate metabolism have been associated with the disorder. Recent studies of polymorphisms in the dystrobrevin-binding protein 1 gene (DTNBP1; dysbindin) and D......-amino-acid-oxidase (DAO) gene, both involved in glutamate receptor function, reported associations with negative symptoms and with anxiety and depression, respectively, when measured with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). METHODS: In the present study, the suggested association between dysbindin and DAO...... single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and PANSS scores was analyzed in 155 Norwegian schizophrenia patients. RESULTS: There was a significant association between the dysbindin SNP rs3213207 and severity of both negative symptoms and total symptom load, as well as between the DAO SNP rs2070587 and total...

  5. A loss-of-function screen for phosphatases that regulate neurite outgrowth identifies PTPN12 as a negative regulator of TrkB tyrosine phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malene Ambjørn

    Full Text Available Alterations in function of the neurotrophin BDNF are associated with neurodegeneration, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disorders. BDNF promotes axonal outgrowth and branching, regulates dendritic tree morphology and is important for axonal regeneration after injury, responses that largely result from activation of its tyrosine kinase receptor TrkB. Although intracellular neurotrophin (NT signaling presumably reflects the combined action of kinases and phosphatases, little is known about the contributions of the latter to TrkB regulation. The issue is complicated by the fact that phosphatases belong to multiple independently evolved families, which are rarely studied together. We undertook a loss-of-function RNA-interference-based screen of virtually all known (254 human phosphatases to understand their function in BDNF/TrkB-mediated neurite outgrowth in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. This approach identified phosphatases from diverse families, which either positively or negatively modulate BDNF-TrkB-mediated neurite outgrowth, and most of which have little or no previously established function related to NT signaling. "Classical" protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs accounted for 13% of the candidate regulatory phosphatases. The top classical PTP identified as a negative regulator of BDNF-TrkB-mediated neurite outgrowth was PTPN12 (also called PTP-PEST. Validation and follow-up studies showed that endogenous PTPN12 antagonizes tyrosine phosphorylation of TrkB itself, and the downstream activation of ERK1/2. We also found PTPN12 to negatively regulate phosphorylation of p130cas and FAK, proteins with previously described functions related to cell motility and growth cone behavior. Our data provide the first comprehensive survey of phosphatase function in NT signaling and neurite outgrowth. They reveal the complexity of phosphatase control, with several evolutionarily unrelated phosphatase families cooperating to affect this biological response

  6. Regulator of G protein signaling 20 correlates with clinicopathological features and prognosis in triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quan; Jin, Wenxu; Cai, Yefeng; Yang, Fang; Chen, Endong; Ye, Danrong; Wang, Qingxuan; Guan, Xiaoxiang

    2017-04-08

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a highly aggressive tumor subtype lacking effective prognostic indicators or therapeutic targets. Therefore, finding a novel molecular biomarker for TNBC to achieve target therapy and predict its prognosis is crucial in preventing inappropriate treatment. Regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) families of protein can negatively regulate signaling of heterotrimeric G proteins and are known to be upregulated in various tumors. In this study, we demonstrated that RGS20 was more highly expressed in TNBC tumor tissue than in adjacent normal tissue by analyzing the cancer genome atlas (TCGA) database. However, RGS20 expression was low in all breast cancer and luminal breast cancer patients. Validated by the TCGA cohort, RGS20 was upregulated in lymph node-positive TNBC compared with that in lymph node-negative breast cancer. High expression of RGS20 had a risk of lymph node metastasis, ki-67 > 14%, poor N stage, and poor clinical stage in the immunohistochemistry of tissue microarrays. Moreover, K-M plot analysis showed that TNBC patients with high RGS20 expression had poor relapse-free survival. In summary, the findings revealed that RGS20 was a special TNBC oncogene that promoted tumor progression and influenced TNBC prognosis. This study is the first to show that RGS20 was a special oncogene, and its high expression was significantly associated with the progression and prognosis of TNBC. RGS20 may be a novel molecular biomarker for the targeted therapy and prognosis of TNBC.

  7. Metabolic pathways regulated by abscisic acid, salicylic acid and γ-aminobutyric acid in association with improved drought tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Jingjin; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2017-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid (SA) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are known to play roles in regulating plant stress responses. This study was conducted to determine metabolites and associated pathways regulated by ABA, SA and GABA that could contribute to drought tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera). Plants were foliar sprayed with ABA (5 μM), GABA (0.5 mM) and SA (10 μM) or water (untreated control) prior to 25 days drought stress in controlled growth chambers. Application of ABA, GABA or SA had similar positive effects on alleviating drought damages, as manifested by the maintenance of lower electrolyte leakage and greater relative water content in leaves of treated plants relative to the untreated control. Metabolic profiling showed that ABA, GABA and SA induced differential metabolic changes under drought stress. ABA mainly promoted the accumulation of organic acids associated with tricarboxylic acid cycle (aconitic acid, succinic acid, lactic acid and malic acid). SA strongly stimulated the accumulation of amino acids (proline, serine, threonine and alanine) and carbohydrates (glucose, mannose, fructose and cellobiose). GABA enhanced the accumulation of amino acids (GABA, glycine, valine, proline, 5-oxoproline, serine, threonine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid) and organic acids (malic acid, lactic acid, gluconic acid, malonic acid and ribonic acid). The enhanced drought tolerance could be mainly due to the enhanced respiration metabolism by ABA, amino acids and carbohydrates involved in osmotic adjustment (OA) and energy metabolism by SA, and amino acid metabolism related to OA and stress-defense secondary metabolism by GABA.

  8. Regulation of Connexin-Based Channels by Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puebla, Carlos; Retamal, Mauricio A; Acuña, Rodrigo; Sáez, Juan C

    2017-01-01

    In this mini-review, we briefly summarize the current knowledge about the effects of fatty acids (FAs) on connexin-based channels, as well as discuss the limited information about the impact FAs may have on pannexins (Panxs). FAs regulate diverse cellular functions, some of which are explained by changes in the activity of channels constituted by connexins (Cxs) or Panxs, which are known to play critical roles in maintaining the functional integrity of diverse organs and tissues. Cxs are transmembrane proteins that oligomerize into hexamers to form hemichannels (HCs), which in turn can assemble into dodecamers to form gap junction channels (GJCs). While GJCs communicate the cytoplasm of contacting cells, HCs serve as pathways for the exchange of ions and small molecules between the intra and extracellular milieu. Panxs, as well as Cx HCs, form channels at the plasma membrane that enable the interchange of molecules between the intra and extracellular spaces. Both Cx- and Panx-based channels are controlled by several post-translational modifications. However, the mechanism of action of FAs on these channels has not been described in detail. It has been shown however that FAs frequently decrease GJC-mediated cell-cell communication. The opposite effect also has been described for HC or Panx-dependent intercellular communication, where, the acute FA effect can be reversed upon washout. Additionally, changes in GJCs mediated by FAs have been associated with post-translational modifications (e.g., phosphorylation), and seem to be directly related to chemical properties of FAs (e.g., length of carbon chain and/or degree of saturation), but this possible link remains poorly understood.

  9. Regulation of Connexin-Based Channels by Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puebla, Carlos; Retamal, Mauricio A.; Acuña, Rodrigo; Sáez, Juan C.

    2017-01-01

    In this mini-review, we briefly summarize the current knowledge about the effects of fatty acids (FAs) on connexin-based channels, as well as discuss the limited information about the impact FAs may have on pannexins (Panxs). FAs regulate diverse cellular functions, some of which are explained by changes in the activity of channels constituted by connexins (Cxs) or Panxs, which are known to play critical roles in maintaining the functional integrity of diverse organs and tissues. Cxs are transmembrane proteins that oligomerize into hexamers to form hemichannels (HCs), which in turn can assemble into dodecamers to form gap junction channels (GJCs). While GJCs communicate the cytoplasm of contacting cells, HCs serve as pathways for the exchange of ions and small molecules between the intra and extracellular milieu. Panxs, as well as Cx HCs, form channels at the plasma membrane that enable the interchange of molecules between the intra and extracellular spaces. Both Cx- and Panx-based channels are controlled by several post-translational modifications. However, the mechanism of action of FAs on these channels has not been described in detail. It has been shown however that FAs frequently decrease GJC-mediated cell-cell communication. The opposite effect also has been described for HC or Panx-dependent intercellular communication, where, the acute FA effect can be reversed upon washout. Additionally, changes in GJCs mediated by FAs have been associated with post-translational modifications (e.g., phosphorylation), and seem to be directly related to chemical properties of FAs (e.g., length of carbon chain and/or degree of saturation), but this possible link remains poorly understood. PMID:28174541

  10. Lactic Acid Permeabilizes Gram-Negative Bacteria by Disrupting the Outer Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Alakomi, H.-L.; Skyttä, E.; Saarela, M; Mattila-Sandholm, T.; Latva-Kala, K.; Helander, I M

    2000-01-01

    The effect of lactic acid on the outer membrane permeability of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was studied utilizing a fluorescent-probe uptake assay and sensitization to bacteriolysis. For control purposes, similar assays were performed with EDTA (a permeabilizer acting by chelation) and with hydrochloric acid, the latter at pH values corresponding to those yielded by lactic acid, and also in the presence of KCN. Already 5 mM (pH...

  11. Polyethyleneimine mediated DNA transfection in schistosome parasites and regulation of the WNT signaling pathway by a dominant-negative SmMef2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Liang

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a serious global problem and the second most devastating parasitic disease following malaria. Parasitic worms of the genus Schistosoma are the causative agents of schistosomiasis and infect more than 240 million people worldwide. The paucity of molecular tools to manipulate schistosome gene expression has made an understanding of genetic pathways in these parasites difficult, increasing the challenge of identifying new potential drugs for treatment. Here, we describe the use of a formulation of polyethyleneimine (PEI as an alternative to electroporation for the efficacious transfection of genetic material into schistosome parasites. We show efficient expression of genes from a heterologous CMV promoter and from the schistosome Sm23 promoter. Using the schistosome myocyte enhancer factor 2 (SmMef2, a transcriptional activator critical for myogenesis and other developmental pathways, we describe the development of a dominant-negative form of the schistosome Mef2. Using this mutant, we provide evidence that SmMef2 may regulate genes in the WNT pathway. We also show that SmMef2 regulates its own expression levels. These data demonstrate the use of PEI to facilitate effective transfection of nucleic acids into schistosomes, aiding in the study of schistosome gene expression and regulation, and development of genetic tools for the characterization of molecular pathways in these parasites.

  12. Negative Regulation of STAT3 Protein-mediated Cellular Respiration by SIRT1 Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernier, Michel; Paul, Rajib K; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro;

    2011-01-01

    In mammals, the transcriptional activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is regulated by the deacetylase SIRT1. However, whether the newly described nongenomic actions of STAT3 toward mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are dependent on SIRT1 is unclear....... In this study, Sirt1 gene knock-out murine embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells were used to delineate the role of SIRT1 in the regulation of STAT3 mitochondrial function. Here, we show that STAT3 mRNA and protein levels and the accumulation of serine-phosphorylated STAT3 in mitochondria were increased...... significantly in Sirt1-KO cells as compared with wild-type MEFs. Various mitochondrial bioenergetic parameters, such as the oxygen consumption rate in cell cultures, enzyme activities of the electron transport chain complexes in isolated mitochondria, and production of ATP and lactate, indicated that Sirt1-KO...

  13. Ski and SnoN,potent negative regulators of TGF-β signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Julien Deheuninck; Kunxin Luo

    2009-01-01

    SKi and the closely related SnoN were discovered as oncogenes by their ability to transform chicken embryo fi-broblasts upon overexpression.While elevated expressions of Ski and SnoN have also been reported in many human cancer cells and tissues,consistent with their pro-oncogenic activity,emerging evidence also suggests a potential anti-oncogenic activity for both.In addition,Ski and SnoN have been implicated in regulation of cell differentiation,especially in the muscle and neuronal lineages.Multiple cellular partners of Ski and SnoN have been identified in an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the complex roles of Ski and SnoN.In this review,we summarize recent findings on the biological functions of Ski and SnoN.their mechanisms of action and how theirlevels of expression are regulated.

  14. GSK3beta is a negative regulator of the transcriptional coactivator MAML1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint Just Ribeiro, Mariana; Hansson, Magnus L; Lindberg, Mikael J; Popko-Scibor, Anita E; Wallberg, Annika E

    2009-11-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) is involved in several cellular signaling systems through regulation of the activity of diverse transcription factors such as Notch, p53 and beta-catenin. Mastermind-like 1 (MAML1) was originally identified as a Notch coactivator, but has also been reported to function as a transcriptional coregulator of p53, beta-catenin and MEF2C. In this report, we show that active GSK3beta directly interacts with the MAML1 N-terminus and decreases MAML1 transcriptional activity, suggesting that GSK3beta might target a coactivator in its regulation of gene expression. We have previously shown that MAML1 increases global acetylation of histones, and here we show that the GSK3 inhibitor SB41, further enhances MAML1-dependent histone acetylation in cells. Finally, MAML1 translocates GSK3beta to nuclear bodies; this function requires full-length MAML1 protein.

  15. An aza-anthrapyrazole negatively regulates Th1 activity and suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Matthew P; Leaman, Douglas W; Hazelhurst, Lori A; Hwang, Eun S; Quinn, Anthony

    2016-02-01

    Previously we showed that BBR3378, a novel analog of the anticancer drug mitoxantrone, had the ability to ameliorate ascending paralysis in MOG35-55-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a murine model of human multiple sclerosis, without the drug-induced cardiotoxicity or lymphopenia associated with mitoxantrone therapy. Chemotherapeutic drugs like mitoxantrone, a topoisomerase inhibitor, are thought to provide protection in inflammatory autoimmune diseases like EAE by inducing apoptosis in rapidly proliferating autoreactive lymphocytes. Here, we show that while BR3378 blocked cell division, T cells were still able to respond to antigenic stimulation and upregulate surface molecules indicative of activation. However, in contrast to mitoxantrone, BBR3378 inhibited the production of the proinflammatory cytokine IFN-γ both in recently activated T cell blasts and established Th1 effectors, while sparing the activities of IL-13-producing Th2 cells. IFN-γ is known to be regulated by the transcription factor T-bet. In addition to IFN-γ, in vitro and in vivo exposure to BBR3378 suppressed the expression of other T-bet regulated proteins, including CXCR3 and IL-2Rβ. Microarray analysis revealed BBR3378-induced suppression of additional T-bet regulated genes, suggesting that the drug might disrupt global Th1 programming. Importantly, BBR3378 antagonized ongoing Th1 autoimmune responses in vivo, modulated clinical disease and CNS inflammation in acute and relapsing forms of EAE. Therefore, BBR3378 may be a unique inhibitor of T-bet regulated genes and may have potential as a therapeutic intervention in human autoimmune disease.

  16. Eos negatively regulates human γ-globin gene transcription during erythroid differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Chuan Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human globin gene expression is precisely regulated by a complicated network of transcription factors and chromatin modifying activities during development and erythropoiesis. Eos (Ikaros family zinc finger 4, IKZF4, a member of the zinc finger transcription factor Ikaros family, plays a pivotal role as a repressor of gene expression. The aim of this study was to examine the role of Eos in globin gene regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR detected a gradual decrease in Eos expression during erythroid differentiation of hemin-induced K562 cells and Epo-induced CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HPCs. DNA transfection and lentivirus-mediated gene transfer demonstrated that the enforced expression of Eos significantly represses the expression of γ-globin, but not other globin genes, in K562 cells and CD34+ HPCs. Consistent with a direct role of Eos in globin gene regulation, chromatin immunoprecipitaion and dual-luciferase reporter assays identified three discrete sites located in the DNase I hypersensitivity site 3 (HS3 of the β-globin locus control region (LCR, the promoter regions of the Gγ- and Aγ- globin genes, as functional binding sites of Eos protein. A chromosome conformation capture (3C assay indicated that Eos may repress the interaction between the LCR and the γ-globin gene promoter. In addition, erythroid differentiation was inhibited by enforced expression of Eos in K562 cells and CD34+ HPCs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that Eos plays an important role in the transcriptional regulation of the γ-globin gene during erythroid differentiation.

  17. TAM receptors affect adult brain neurogenesis by negative regulation of microglial cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Rui; Tian, Shifu; Lu, Helen J; Lu, Qingjun; Zheng, Yan; Wang, Xiaomin; Ding, Jixiang; Li, Qiutang; Lu, Qingxian

    2013-12-15

    TAM tyrosine kinases play multiple functional roles, including regulation of the target genes important in homeostatic regulation of cytokine receptors or TLR-mediated signal transduction pathways. In this study, we show that TAM receptors affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis and loss of TAM receptors impairs hippocampal neurogenesis, largely attributed to exaggerated inflammatory responses by microglia characterized by increased MAPK and NF-κB activation and elevated production of proinflammatory cytokines that are detrimental to neuron stem cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Injection of LPS causes even more severe inhibition of BrdU incorporation in the Tyro3(-/-)Axl(-/-)Mertk(-/-) triple-knockout (TKO) brains, consistent with the LPS-elicited enhanced expression of proinflammatory mediators, for example, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and inducible NO synthase, and this effect is antagonized by coinjection of the anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin in wild-type but not TKO brains. Conditioned medium from TKO microglia cultures inhibits neuron stem cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation. IL-6 knockout in Axl(-/-)Mertk(-/-) double-knockout mice overcomes the inflammatory inhibition of neurogenesis, suggesting that IL-6 is a major downstream neurotoxic mediator under homeostatic regulation by TAM receptors in microglia. Additionally, autonomous trophic function of the TAM receptors on the proliferating neuronal progenitors may also promote progenitor differentiation into immature neurons.

  18. PAK1 negatively regulates the activity of the Rho exchange factor NET1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Arthur S; Qin, Huajun; Carr, Heather S; Frost, Jeffrey A

    2005-04-01

    Rho family small G-protein activity is controlled by guanine nucleotide exchange factors that stimulate the release of GDP, thus allowing GTP binding. Once activated, Rho proteins control cell signaling through interactions with downstream effector proteins, leading to changes in cytoskeletal organization and gene expression. The ability of Rho family members to modulate the activity of other Rho proteins is also intrinsic to these processes. In this work we show that the Rac/Cdc42hs-regulated protein kinase PAK1 down-regulates the activity of the RhoA-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor NET1. Specifically, PAK1 phosphorylates NET1 on three sites in vitro: serines 152, 153, and 538. Replacement of serines 152 and 153 with glutamate residues down-regulates the activity of NET1 as an exchange factor in vitro and its ability to stimulate actin stress fiber formation in cells. Using a phospho-specific antibody that recognizes NET1 phosphorylated on serine 152, we show that PAK1 phosphorylates NET1 on this site in cells and that Rac1 stimulates serine 152 phosphorylation in a PAK1-dependent manner. Furthermore, coexpression of constitutively active PAK1 inhibits the ability of NET1 to stimulate actin polymerization only when serines 152 and 153 are present. These data provide a novel mechanism for the control of RhoA activity by Rac1 through the PAK-dependent phosphorylation of NET1 to reduce its activity as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor.

  19. Negative feedback regulation of Wnt signaling via N-linked fucosylation in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lei; Jiang, Hao; Wu, Peng; Marlow, Florence L

    2014-11-15

    L-fucose, a monosaccharide widely distributed in eukaryotes and certain bacteria, is a determinant of many functional glycans that play central roles in numerous biological processes. The molecular mechanism, however, by which fucosylation mediates these processes remains largely elusive. To study how changes in fucosylation impact embryonic development, we up-regulated N-linked fucosylation via over-expression of a key GDP-Fucose transporter, Slc35c1, in zebrafish. We show that Slc35c1 overexpression causes elevated N-linked fucosylation and disrupts embryonic patterning in a transporter activity dependent manner. We demonstrate that patterning defects associated with enhanced N-linked fucosylation are due to diminished canonical Wnt signaling. Chimeric analyses demonstrate that elevated Slc35c1 expression in receiving cells decreases the signaling range of Wnt8a during zebrafish embryogenesis. Moreover, we provide biochemical evidence that this decrease is associated with reduced Wnt8 ligand and elevated Lrp6 coreceptor, which we show are both substrates for N-linked fucosylation in zebrafish embryos. Strikingly, slc35c1 expression is regulated by canonical Wnt signaling. These results suggest that Wnt limits its own signaling activity in part via up-regulation of a transporter, slc35c1 that promotes terminal fucosylation and thereby limits Wnt activity.

  20. miR-181b negatively regulates activation-induced cytidine deaminase in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Yébenes, Virginia G; Belver, Laura; Pisano, David G; González, Susana; Villasante, Aranzazu; Croce, Carlo; He, Lin; Ramiro, Almudena R

    2008-09-29

    Activated B cells reshape their primary antibody repertoire after antigen encounter by two molecular mechanisms: somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR). SHM and CSR are initiated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) through the deamination of cytosine residues on the immunoglobulin loci, which leads to the generation of DNA mutations or double-strand break intermediates. As a bystander effect, endogenous AID levels can also promote the generation of chromosome translocations, suggesting that the fine tuning of AID expression may be critical to restrict B cell lymphomagenesis. To determine whether microRNAs (miRNAs) play a role in the regulation of AID expression, we performed a functional screening of an miRNA library and identified miRNAs that regulate CSR. One such miRNA, miR-181b, impairs CSR when expressed in activated B cells, and results in the down-regulation of AID mRNA and protein levels. We found that the AID 3' untranslated region contains multiple putative binding sequences for miR-181b and that these sequences can be directly targeted by miR-181b. Overall, our results provide evidence for a new regulatory mechanism that restricts AID activity and can therefore be relevant to prevent B cell malignant transformation.

  1. [Regulating acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongde; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Rongqing

    2014-07-04

    As cell factories, lactic acid bacteria are widely used in food, agriculture, pharmaceutical and other industries. Acid stress is one the important survival challenges encountered by lactic acid bacteria both in fermentation process and in the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, the development of systems biology and metabolic engineering brings unprecedented opportunity for further elucidating the acid tolerance mechanisms and improving the acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria. This review addresses physiological mechanisms of lactic acid bacteria during acid stress. Moreover, strategies to improve the acid stress resistance of lactic acid were proposed.

  2. Antibacterial activity of sphingoid bases and fatty acids against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Carol L; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2012-03-01

    There is growing evidence that the role of lipids in innate immunity is more important than previously realized. How lipids interact with bacteria to achieve a level of protection, however, is still poorly understood. To begin to address the mechanisms of antibacterial activity, we determined MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of lipids common to the skin and oral cavity--the sphingoid bases D-sphingosine, phytosphingosine, and dihydrosphingosine and the fatty acids sapienic acid and lauric acid--against four Gram-negative bacteria and seven Gram-positive bacteria. Exact Kruskal-Wallis tests of these values showed differences among lipid treatments (P 500 μg/ml). Sapienic acid (MBC range, 31.3 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mitis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum but not active against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, S. marcescens, P. aeruginosa, Corynebacterium bovis, Corynebacterium striatum, and Corynebacterium jeikeium (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Lauric acid (MBC range, 6.8 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against all bacteria except E. coli, S. marcescens, and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Complete killing was achieved as early as 0.5 h for some lipids but took as long as 24 h for others. Hence, sphingoid bases and fatty acids have different antibacterial activities and may have potential for prophylactic or therapeutic intervention in infection.

  3. A G-protein β subunit, AGB1, negatively regulates the ABA response and drought tolerance by down-regulating AtMPK6-related pathway in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-bei Xu

    Full Text Available Heterotrimeric G-proteins are versatile regulators involved in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. In plants, the function of G-proteins is primarily associated with ABA signaling. However, the downstream effectors and the molecular mechanisms in the ABA pathway remain largely unknown. In this study, an AGB1 mutant (agb1-2 was found to show enhanced drought tolerance, indicating that AGB1 might negatively regulate drought tolerance in Arabidopsis. Data showed that AGB1 interacted with protein kinase AtMPK6 that was previously shown to phosphorylate AtVIP1, a transcription factor responding to ABA signaling. Our study found that transcript levels of three ABA responsive genes, AtMPK6, AtVIP1 and AtMYB44 (downstream gene of AtVIP1, were significantly up-regulated in agb1-2 lines after ABA or drought treatments. Other ABA-responsive and drought-inducible genes, such as RD29A (downstream gene of AtMYB44, were also up-regulated in agb1-2 lines. Furthermore, overexpression of AtVIP1 resulted in hypersensitivity to ABA at seed germination and seedling stages, and significantly enhanced drought tolerance in transgenic plants. These results suggest that AGB1 was involved in the ABA signaling pathway and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis through down-regulating the AtMPK6, AtVIP1 and AtMYB44 cascade.

  4. A G-protein β subunit, AGB1, negatively regulates the ABA response and drought tolerance by down-regulating AtMPK6-related pathway in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong-bei; Chen, Ming; Ma, Ya-nan; Xu, Zhao-shi; Li, Lian-cheng; Chen, Yao-feng; Ma, You-zhi

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are versatile regulators involved in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. In plants, the function of G-proteins is primarily associated with ABA signaling. However, the downstream effectors and the molecular mechanisms in the ABA pathway remain largely unknown. In this study, an AGB1 mutant (agb1-2) was found to show enhanced drought tolerance, indicating that AGB1 might negatively regulate drought tolerance in Arabidopsis. Data showed that AGB1 interacted with protein kinase AtMPK6 that was previously shown to phosphorylate AtVIP1, a transcription factor responding to ABA signaling. Our study found that transcript levels of three ABA responsive genes, AtMPK6, AtVIP1 and AtMYB44 (downstream gene of AtVIP1), were significantly up-regulated in agb1-2 lines after ABA or drought treatments. Other ABA-responsive and drought-inducible genes, such as RD29A (downstream gene of AtMYB44), were also up-regulated in agb1-2 lines. Furthermore, overexpression of AtVIP1 resulted in hypersensitivity to ABA at seed germination and seedling stages, and significantly enhanced drought tolerance in transgenic plants. These results suggest that AGB1 was involved in the ABA signaling pathway and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis through down-regulating the AtMPK6, AtVIP1 and AtMYB44 cascade.

  5. The effect pathway of retinoic acid through regulation of retinoic acid receptor in gastric cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Liu; Qiao Wu; Zheng-Ming Chen; Wen-Jin Su

    2001-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the role of RARa gene in mediating the growth inhibitory effect of ail-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)on gastric cancer cells.``METHODS The expression levels of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in gastric cancer cells were detected by Northern blot. Transient transfection and chlorophenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) assay were used to show the transcriptional activity of β retinoic acid response element (βRARE) and AP-l activity. Cell growth inhibition was determined by MTT assay and anchorage-independent growth assay, respectively. Stable transfection was performed by the method of Lipofectamine, and the cells were screened by G418.``RESULTS ATRA could induce expression level of RARα in MGC80-3, BGCC8823 and SGC-7901 cells obviously,resulting in growth inhibition of these cell lines. After sense RARa gene was transfected into MKN-45 cells that expressed rather Iow level of RARα and could not be induced by ATRA, the cell growth was inhibited by ATRA markedly. In contrast, when antisense RARα gene was transfected into BGC-825 cells, a little inhibitory effect by ATRA was seen, compared with the parallel BGC-823cells. In transient transfection assay, ATRA effectively induced transcriptional activity of βRARE in MGC80-3,BGC.823, SGC-7902 and MKN/RARa cell lines, but not in MKN-45 and BGC/aRARa cell lines. Similar results were observed in measuring anti-AP-l activity by ATRA in these cancer cell lines.``CONCLUSION ATRA inhibits the growth of gastric cancer cells by up-regulating the level of RARa; RARa is the major mediator of ATRA action in gastric cancer cells; and adequate level of RAPa is required for ATRA effect on gastric cancer cells.``

  6. Some methods to regulate low-bias negative differential resistance in σ barrier separating nanoscale molecular transport systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ji-Mei; Liu, Jing; Min, Yi; Zhou, Li-Ping

    2016-12-01

    Using the first-principles method which combines the nonequilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) with density functional theory (DFT), the role of defect, dopant, barrier length and geometric deformation for low-bias negative differential resistance (NDR) in two capped armchair carbon nanotubes (CNTs) sandwiching σ barrier are systematically analyzed. We found that this method can regulate the negative differential resistance (NDR) effects such as current peak and peak position. The adjusting mechanism may originate from orbital interaction and orbital reconstruction. Our calculations try to manipulate the transport characteristics in energy space by simply manipulating the structure in real space, which may promise the potential applications in nanomolecular-electronics in the future.

  7. Rapid testing using the Verigene Gram-negative blood culture nucleic acid test in combination with antimicrobial stewardship intervention against Gram-negative bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bork, Jacqueline T; Leekha, Surbhi; Heil, Emily L; Zhao, LiCheng; Badamas, Rilwan; Johnson, J Kristie

    2015-03-01

    Rapid identification of microorganisms and antimicrobial resistance is paramount for targeted treatment in serious bloodstream infections (BSI). The Verigene Gram-negative blood culture nucleic acid test (BC-GN) is a multiplex, automated molecular diagnostic test for identification of eight Gram-negative (GN) organisms and resistance markers from blood culture with a turnaround time of approximately 2 h. Clinical isolates from adult patients at the University Maryland Medical Center with GN bacteremia from 1 January 2012 to 30 June 2012 were included in this study. Blood culture bottles were spiked with clinical isolates, allowed to incubate, and processed by BC-GN. A diagnostic evaluation was performed. In addition, a theoretical evaluation of time to effective and optimal antibiotic was performed, comparing actual antibiotic administration times from chart review ("control") to theoretical administration times based on BC-GN reporting and antimicrobial stewardship team (AST) review ("intervention"). For organisms detected by the assay, BC-GN correctly identified 95.6% (131/137), with a sensitivity of 97.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 90.7 to 98.4%) and a specificity of 99.5% (95% CI, 98.8 to 99.8%). CTX-M and OXA resistance determinants were both detected. Allowing 12 h from Gram stain for antibiotic implementation, the intervention group had a significantly shorter duration to both effective (3.3 versus 7.0 h; P < 0.01) and optimal (23.5 versus 41.8 h; P < 0.01) antibiotic therapy. BC-GN with AST intervention can potentially decrease time to both effective and optimal antibiotic therapy in GN BSI.

  8. The C-terminal domain of Nrf1 negatively regulates the full-length CNC-bZIP factor and its shorter isoform LCR-F1/Nrf1β; both are also inhibited by the small dominant-negative Nrf1γ/δ isoforms that down-regulate ARE-battery gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiguo Zhang

    Full Text Available The C-terminal domain (CTD, aa 686-741 of nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 1 (Nrf1 shares 53% amino acid sequence identity with the equivalent Neh3 domain of Nrf2, a homologous transcription factor. The Neh3 positively regulates Nrf2, but whether the Neh3-like (Neh3L CTD of Nrf1 has a similar role in regulating Nrf1-target gene expression is unknown. Herein, we report that CTD negatively regulates the full-length Nrf1 (i.e. 120-kDa glycoprotein and 95-kDa deglycoprotein and its shorter isoform LCR-F1/Nrf1β (55-kDa. Attachment of its CTD-adjoining 112-aa to the C-terminus of Nrf2 yields the chimaeric Nrf2-C112Nrf1 factor with a markedly decreased activity. Live-cell imaging of GFP-CTD reveals that the extra-nuclear portion of the fusion protein is allowed to associate with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane through the amphipathic Neh3L region of Nrf1 and its basic c-tail. Thus removal of either the entire CTD or the essential Neh3L portion within CTD from Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β and Nrf2-C112Nrf1, results in an increase in their transcriptional ability to regulate antioxidant response element (ARE-driven reporter genes. Further examinations unravel that two smaller isoforms, 36-kDa Nrf1γ and 25-kDa Nrf1δ, act as dominant-negative inhibitors to compete against Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β and Nrf2. Relative to Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β is a weak activator, that is positively regulated by its Asn/Ser/Thr-rich (NST domain and acidic domain 2 (AD2. Like AD1 of Nrf1, both AD2 and NST domain of LCR-F1/Nrf1β fused within two different chimaeric contexts to yield Gal4D:Nrf1β607 and Nrf1β:C270Nrf2, positively regulate their transactivation activity of cognate Gal4- and Nrf2-target reporter genes. More importantly, differential expression of endogenous ARE-battery genes is attributable to up-regulation by Nrf1 and LCR-F1/Nrf1β and down-regulation by Nrf1γ and Nrf1δ.

  9. The C-terminal domain of Nrf1 negatively regulates the full-length CNC-bZIP factor and its shorter isoform LCR-F1/Nrf1β; both are also inhibited by the small dominant-negative Nrf1γ/δ isoforms that down-regulate ARE-battery gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiguo; Qiu, Lu; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Chen, Jiayu; Ren, Yonggang

    2014-01-01

    The C-terminal domain (CTD, aa 686-741) of nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 1 (Nrf1) shares 53% amino acid sequence identity with the equivalent Neh3 domain of Nrf2, a homologous transcription factor. The Neh3 positively regulates Nrf2, but whether the Neh3-like (Neh3L) CTD of Nrf1 has a similar role in regulating Nrf1-target gene expression is unknown. Herein, we report that CTD negatively regulates the full-length Nrf1 (i.e. 120-kDa glycoprotein and 95-kDa deglycoprotein) and its shorter isoform LCR-F1/Nrf1β (55-kDa). Attachment of its CTD-adjoining 112-aa to the C-terminus of Nrf2 yields the chimaeric Nrf2-C112Nrf1 factor with a markedly decreased activity. Live-cell imaging of GFP-CTD reveals that the extra-nuclear portion of the fusion protein is allowed to associate with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane through the amphipathic Neh3L region of Nrf1 and its basic c-tail. Thus removal of either the entire CTD or the essential Neh3L portion within CTD from Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β and Nrf2-C112Nrf1, results in an increase in their transcriptional ability to regulate antioxidant response element (ARE)-driven reporter genes. Further examinations unravel that two smaller isoforms, 36-kDa Nrf1γ and 25-kDa Nrf1δ, act as dominant-negative inhibitors to compete against Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β and Nrf2. Relative to Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β is a weak activator, that is positively regulated by its Asn/Ser/Thr-rich (NST) domain and acidic domain 2 (AD2). Like AD1 of Nrf1, both AD2 and NST domain of LCR-F1/Nrf1β fused within two different chimaeric contexts to yield Gal4D:Nrf1β607 and Nrf1β:C270Nrf2, positively regulate their transactivation activity of cognate Gal4- and Nrf2-target reporter genes. More importantly, differential expression of endogenous ARE-battery genes is attributable to up-regulation by Nrf1 and LCR-F1/Nrf1β and down-regulation by Nrf1γ and Nrf1δ.

  10. Enhanced performance of Zn(II)-doped lead-acid batteries with electrochemical active carbon in negative mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jiayuan; Hu, Chen; Chen, Liying; Zhang, Dong; Ding, Ping; Chen, Dong; Liu, Hao; Chen, Jian; Wu, Xianzhang; Lai, Xiaokang

    2016-10-01

    The effect and mechanism of Zn(II) on improving the performances of lead-acid cell with electrochemical active carbon (EAC) in negative mass is investigated. The hydrogen evolution of the cell is significantly reduced due to the deposition of Zn on carbon surface and the increased porosity of negative mass. Zn(II) additives can also improve the low-temperature and high-rate capacities of the cell with EAC in negative mass, which ascribes to the formation of Zn on lead and carbon surface that constructs a conductive bridge among the active mass. Under the co-contribution of EAC and Zn(II), the partial-state-of-charge cycle life is greatly prolonged. EAC optimizes the NAM structure and porosity to enhance the charge acceptance and retard the lead sulfate accumulation. Zn(II) additive reduces the hydrogen evolution during charge process and improves the electric conductivity of the negative electrode. The cell with 0.6 wt% EAC and 0.006 wt% ZnO in negative mass exhibits 90% reversible capacity of the initial capacity after 2100 cycles. In contrast, the cell with 0.6 wt% EAC exhibits 84% reversible capacity after 2100 cycles and the control cell with no EAC and Zn(II) exhibits less than 80% reversible capacity after 1350 cycles.

  11. SAUR39, a small auxin-up RNA gene, acts as a negative regulator of auxin synthesis and transport in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Surya; Bi, Yong-Mei; Zhu, Tong; Rothstein, Steven J

    2009-10-01

    The phytohormone auxin plays a critical role for plant growth by regulating the expression of a set of genes. One large auxin-responsive gene family of this type is the small auxin-up RNA (SAUR) genes, although their function is largely unknown. The expression of the rice (Oryza sativa) SAUR39 gene showed rapid induction by transient change in different environmental factors, including auxin, nitrogen, salinity, cytokinin, and anoxia. Transgenic rice plants overexpressing the SAUR39 gene resulted in lower shoot and root growth, altered shoot morphology, smaller vascular tissue, and lower yield compared with wild-type plants. The SAUR39 gene was expressed at higher levels in older leaves, unlike auxin biosynthesis, which occurs largely in the meristematic region. The transgenic plants had a lower auxin level and a reduced polar auxin transport as well as the down-regulation of some putative auxin biosynthesis and transporter genes. Biochemical analysis also revealed that transgenic plants had lower chlorophyll content, higher levels of anthocyanin, abscisic acid, sugar, and starch, and faster leaf senescence compared with wild-type plants at the vegetative stage. Most of these phenomena have been shown to be negatively correlated with auxin level and transport. Transcript profiling revealed that metabolic perturbations in overexpresser plants were largely due to transcriptional changes of genes involved in photosynthesis, senescence, chlorophyll production, anthocyanin accumulation, sugar synthesis, and transport. The lower growth and yield of overexpresser plants was largely recovered by exogenous auxin application. Taken together, the results suggest that SAUR39 acts as a negative regulator for auxin synthesis and transport.

  12. Highly frequent mutations in negative regulators of multiple virulence genes in group A streptococcal toxic shock syndrome isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadayoshi Ikebe

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS is a severe invasive infection characterized by the sudden onset of shock and multiorgan failure; it has a high mortality rate. Although a number of studies have attempted to determine the crucial factors behind the onset of STSS, the responsible genes in group A Streptococcus have not been clarified. We previously reported that mutations of csrS/csrR genes, a two-component negative regulator system for multiple virulence genes of Streptococcus pyogenes, are found among the isolates from STSS patients. In the present study, mutations of another negative regulator, rgg, were also found in clinical isolates of STSS patients. The rgg mutants from STSS clinical isolates enhanced lethality and impaired various organs in the mouse models, similar to the csrS mutants, and precluded their being killed by human neutrophils, mainly due to an overproduction of SLO. When we assessed the mutation frequency of csrS, csrR, and rgg genes among S. pyogenes isolates from STSS (164 isolates and non-invasive infections (59 isolates, 57.3% of the STSS isolates had mutations of one or more genes among three genes, while isolates from patients with non-invasive disease had significantly fewer mutations in these genes (1.7%. The results of the present study suggest that mutations in the negative regulators csrS/csrR and rgg of S. pyogenes are crucial factors in the pathogenesis of STSS, as they lead to the overproduction of multiple virulence factors.

  13. PREX1 Protein Function Is Negatively Regulated Downstream of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Activation by p21-activated Kinases (PAKs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, Douglas; He, John Z; Parsons, Ramon

    2016-09-16

    Downstream of receptor tyrosine kinase and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) stimulation, the phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3)-dependent Rac exchange factor (PREX) family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activates Rho GTPases, leading to important roles for PREX proteins in numerous cellular processes and diseases, including cancer. PREX1 and PREX2 GEF activity is activated by the second messengers PIP3 and Gβγ, and further regulation of PREX GEF activity occurs by phosphorylation. Stimulation of receptor tyrosine kinases by neuregulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) leads to the phosphorylation of PREX1; however, the kinases that phosphorylate PREX1 downstream of these ligands are not known. We recently reported that the p21-activated kinases (PAKs), which are activated by GTP-bound Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1), mediate the phosphorylation of PREX2 after insulin receptor activation. Here we show that certain phosphorylation events on PREX1 after insulin, neuregulin, and IGF1 treatment are PAK-dependent and lead to a reduction in PREX1 binding to PIP3 Like PREX2, PAK-mediated phosphorylation also negatively regulates PREX1 GEF activity. Furthermore, the onset of PREX1 phosphorylation was delayed compared with the phosphorylation of AKT, supporting a model of negative feedback downstream of PREX1 activation. We also found that the phosphorylation of PREX1 after isoproterenol and prostaglandin E2-mediated GPCR activation is partially PAK-dependent and likely also involves protein kinase A, which is known to reduce PREX1 function. Our data point to multiple mechanisms of PREX1 negative regulation by PAKs within receptor tyrosine kinase and GPCR-stimulated signaling pathways that have important roles in diseases such as diabetes and cancer.

  14. Synthesis and regulation of chlorogenic acid in potato: Rerouting phenylpropanoid flux in HQT-silenced lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payyavula, Raja S; Shakya, Roshani; Sengoda, Venkatesan G; Munyaneza, Joseph E; Swamy, Prashant; Navarre, Duroy A

    2015-05-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is the major phenolic sink in potato tubers and can constitute over 90% of total phenylpropanoids. The regulation of CGA biosynthesis in potato and the role of the CGA biosynthetic gene hydroxycinnamoyl CoA:quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HQT) was characterized. A sucrose induced accumulation of CGA correlated with the increased expression of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) rather than HQT. Transient expression of the potato MYB transcription factor StAN1 (anthocyanin 1) in tobacco increased CGA. RNAi suppression of HQT resulted in over a 90% reduction in CGA and resulted in early flowering. The reduction in total phenolics and antioxidant capacity was less than the reduction in CGA, suggesting flux was rerouted into other phenylpropanoids. Network analysis showed distinct patterns in different organs, with anthocyanins and phenolic acids showing negative correlations in leaves and flowers and positive in tubers. Some flavonols increased in flowers, but not in leaves or tubers. Anthocyanins increased in flowers and showed a trend to increase in leaves, but not tubers. HQT suppression increased biosynthesis of caffeoyl polyamines, some of which are not previously reported in potato. Decreased PAL expression and enzyme activity was observed in HQT suppressed lines, suggesting the existence of a regulatory loop between CGA and PAL. Electrophysiology detected no effect of CGA suppression on potato psyllid feeding. Collectively, this research showed that CGA in potatoes is synthesized through HQT and HQT suppression altered phenotype and redirected phenylpropanoid flux.

  15. Rosmarinic acid is a homoserine lactone mimic produced by plants that activates a bacterial quorum-sensing regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral-Lugo, Andrés; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Ortega, Alvaro; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel; Krell, Tino

    2016-01-05

    Quorum sensing is a bacterial communication mechanism that controls genes, enabling bacteria to live as communities, such as biofilms. Homoserine lactone (HSL) molecules function as quorum-sensing signals for Gram-negative bacteria. Plants also produce previously unidentified compounds that affect quorum sensing. We identified rosmarinic acid as a plant-derived compound that functioned as an HSL mimic. In vitro assays showed that rosmarinic acid bound to the quorum-sensing regulator RhlR of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and competed with the bacterial ligand N-butanoyl-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL). Furthermore, rosmarinic acid stimulated a greater increase in RhlR-mediated transcription in vitro than that of C4-HSL. In P. aeruginosa, rosmarinic acid induced quorum sensing-dependent gene expression and increased biofilm formation and the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and elastase. Because P. aeruginosa PAO1 infection induces rosmarinic acid secretion from plant roots, our results indicate that rosmarinic acid secretion is a plant defense mechanism to stimulate a premature quorum-sensing response. P. aeruginosa is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects plants and animals; therefore, identification of rosmarinic acid as an inducer of premature quorum-sensing responses may be useful in agriculture and inform human therapeutic strategies.

  16. Estrogen Negatively Regulates the Pro-apoptotic Function of Mixed Lineage Kinase 3 in Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rangasamy, Velusamy; Mishra, Rajakishore; Mehrotra, Suneet; Sondarva, Gautam; Ray, Rajarshi S.; Rao, Arundhati; Chatterjee,Malay; Rana, Basabi; Rana, Ajay

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen stimulates growth and inhibits apoptosis of breast cancer cells via genomic and non-genomic actions. However, the detailed mechanism by which estrogen inhibits the pro-apoptotic pathways that might impede the normal homeostasis and action of chemotherapeutic drugs in breast cancer cells is not well understood. Here, we report a negative regulation of a pro-apoptotic kinase, Mixed Lineage Kinase 3 (MLK3) by 17β-estradiol (E2) that hinders cytotoxic drug-induced cell death in estrogen ...

  17. Caenorhabditis elegans inositol 5-phosphatase homolog negatively regulates inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate signaling in ovulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Yen Kim; Sternberg, Paul W

    2002-05-01

    Ovulation in Caenorhabditis elegans requires inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP(3)) signaling activated by the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-receptor homolog LET-23. We generated a deletion mutant of a type I 5-phosphatase, ipp-5, and found a novel ovulation phenotype whereby the spermatheca hyperextends to engulf two oocytes per ovulation cycle. The temporal and spatial expression of IPP-5 is consistent with its proposed inhibition of IP(3) signaling in the adult spermatheca. ipp-5 acts downstream of let-23, and interacts with let-23-mediated IP(3) signaling pathway genes. We infer that IPP-5 negatively regulates IP(3) signaling to ensure proper spermathecal contraction.

  18. Negative regulation of caspase 3-cleaved PAK2 activity by protein phosphatase 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The p21-activated kinase 2 (PAK2) is activated by binding of small G proteins, Cdc42 and Rac, or through proteolytic cleavage by caspases or caspase-like proteases. Activation by both small G protein and caspase requires autophosphorylation at Thr-402 of PAK2. Although activation of PAK2 has been investigated for nearly a decade, the mechanism of PAK2 downregulation is unclear. In this study, we have applied the kinetic theory of substrate reaction during modification of enzyme activity to study the regulation mechanism of PAK2 activity by the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1α). On the basis of the kinetic equation of the substrate reaction during the reversible phosphorylation of PAK2, all microscopic kinetic constants for the free enzyme and enzyme-substrate(s) complexes have been determined. The results indicate that (1) PP1α can act directly on phosphorylated Thr-402 in the acti-vation loop of PAK2 and down-regulate its kinase activity; (2) binding of the exogenous protein/peptide substrates at the active site of PAK2 decreases both the rates of PAK2 autoactivation and inactivation. The present method provides a novel approach for studying reversible phosphorylation reactions. The advantage of this method is not only its usefulness in study of substrate effects on enzyme modifica-tion but also its convenience in study of modification reaction directly involved in regulation of enzyme activity. This initial study should provide a foundation for future structural and mechanistic work of protein kinases and phosphatases.

  19. Negative regulation of caspase 3-cleaved PAK2 activity by protein phosphatase 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The p21-activated kinase 2 (PAK2) is activated by binding of small G proteins, Cdc42 and Rac, or through proteolytic cleavage by caspases or caspase-like proteases. Activation by both small G protein and caspase requires autophosphorylation at Thr-402 of PAK2. Although activation of PAK2 has been investigated for nearly a decade, the mechanism of PAK2 downregulation is unclear. In this study, we have applied the kinetic theory of substrate reaction during modification of enzyme activity to study the regulation mechanism of PAK2 activity by the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1α). On the basis of the kinetic equation of the substrate reaction during the reversible phosphorylation of PAK2, all microscopic kinetic constants for the free enzyme and enzyme-substrate(s) complexes have been determined. The results indicate that (1) PP1α can act directly on phosphorylated Thr-402 in the activation loop of PAK2 and down-regulate its kinase activity; (2) binding of the exogenous protein/peptide substrates at the active site of PAK2 decreases both the rates of PAK2 autoactivation and inactivation. The present method provides a novel approach for studying reversible phosphorylation reactions. The advantage of this method is not only its usefulness in study of substrate effects on enzyme modification but also its convenience in study of modification reaction directly involved in regulation of enzyme activity. This initial study should provide a foundation for future structural and mechanistic work of protein kinases and phosphatases.

  20. NF-κB (p65) negatively regulates myocardin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through multiple mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xing-Hua; Wang, Nan; Zhao, Dong-Wei; Zheng, De-Liang; Zheng, Li; Xing, Wen-Jing; Zhou, Hao; Cao, Dong-Sun; Zhang, Tong-Cun

    2014-12-01

    Myocardin is well known to play a key role in the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. But the exact molecular mechanism regulating myocardin stability and transactivity to affect cardiomyocyte hypertrophy has not been studied clearly. We now report that NF-κB (p65) can inhibit myocardin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Then we explore the molecular mechanism of this response. First, we show that p65 can functionally repress myocardin transcriptional activity and also reduce the protein expression of myocardin. Second, the function of myocardin can be regulated by epigenetic modifications. Myocardin sumoylation is known to transactivate cardiac genes, but whether p65 can inhibit SUMO modification of myocardin is still not clear. Our data show that p65 weakens myocardin transcriptional activity through attenuating SUMO modification of myocardin by SUMO1/PIAS1, thereby impairing myocardin-mediated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Furthermore, the expression of myocardin can be regulated by several microRNAs, which play important roles in the development and function of the heart and muscle. We next investigated potential role of miR-1 in cardiac hypotrophy. Our results show that p65 can upregulate the level of miR-1 and miR-1 can decrease protein expression of myocardin in cardiac myocytes. Notably, miR-1 expression is also controlled by myocardin, leading to a feedback loop. These data thus provide important and novel insights into the function that p65 inhibits myocardin-mediated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by downregulating the expression and SUMO modification of myocardin and enhancing the expression of miR-1.

  1. E2F-HDAC complexes negatively regulate the tumor suppressor gene ARHI in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Z; Luo, R Z; Peng, H;

    2006-01-01

    to the P2 region of the ARHI promoter and regulate its activity. Sequence analysis and oligonucleotide competition in electrophoretic mobility shift assays identified an A2 fragment containing an E2F-binding site. Using specific antibodies in supershift assays, we have shown that anti-E2F1 and 4 antibodies...... and increased E2F DNA-binding activity. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that both E2F1 and 4 bind to the ARHI promoter in breast cancer cells in vivo. This binding was reduced when the cells were treated with the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor--trichostatin A (TSA). When SKBr3...

  2. Impaired down-regulation of negative emotion in self-referent social situations in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærstad, Hanne L; Vinberg, Maj; Goldin, Philippe R;

    2016-01-01

    Emotion dysregulation is a core feature of bipolar disorder (BD) that persists into periods of remission. Neuroimaging studies show aberrant neural responses during emotion regulation (ER) in patients with BD relative to healthy controls, but behavioural evidence for ER deficits is sparse...... and conflicting. This study aimed to explore ER in BD using a novel, personally relevant experimental paradigm. Twenty patients with BD and 20 patients with unipolar disorder (UD), in full or partial remission, and 20 healthy controls were given a novel computerised test. Participants were instructed to react...

  3. CRMP4 Inhibits Bone Formation by Negatively Regulating BMP and RhoA Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M.; Figeac, Florence; Larsen, Kenneth H.

    2017-01-01

    We identified the neuroprotein collapsing response mediator protein-4 (CRMP4) as a noncanonical osteogenic factor that regulates the differentiation of mouse bone marrow skeletal stem cells (bone marrow stromal stem cells [mBMSCs]) into osteoblastic cells. CRMP4 is the only member of the CRMP1-CRMP......5 family to be expressed by mBMSCs and in osteoprogenitors of both adult mouse and human bones. In vitro gain-of-function and loss-of-function of CRMP4 in murine stromal cells revealed its inhibitory effect on osteoblast differentiation. In addition, Crmp4-deficient mice (Crmp4(-/-) ) displayed a 40...

  4. Distributed Self-regulation Induced by Negative Feedbacks in Ecological and Economic Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gafiychuk, V V; Ulanowicz, R E; Ulanowicz, Robert E.

    1998-01-01

    We consider an ecological system governed by Lotka-Volterra dynamics and an example of an economic system as a mesomarket with perfect competition. We propose a mechanism for cooperative self-regulation that enables the system under consideration to respond properly to changes in the environment. This mechanism is based on (1) active individual behavior of the system elements at each hierarchical level and (2) self-processing of information caused by the hierarchical organization. It is shown how the proposed mechanism suppresses nonlocal interaction of elements belonging to a particular level as mediated by higher levels.

  5. miR-340 and ZEB1 negative feedback loop regulates TGF-β- mediated breast cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ye-Gong; Wang, Jie; Mao, Jie-Fei; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Xin; Cao, Xu-Chen

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs act as key regulators in carcinogenesis and progression in various cancers. In present study, we explored the role of miR-340 in the breast cancer progression. Our results showed that overexpression of miR-340 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion, whereas depletion of miR-340 promotes breast cancer progression. Molecularly, ZEB1 was identified as a target gene of miR-340 and miR-340 suppressed the expression of ZEB1 by directly binding to the 3′-UTR of ZEB1. Furthermore, ZEB1 transcriptionally suppresses miR-340 expression. The negative feedback loop regulated TGF-β-mediated breast cancer progression. In conclusion, our data suggested that miR-340 acted as a tumor suppressor in breast cancer progression. PMID:27036021

  6. Negative regulation of bone formation by the transmembrane Wnt antagonist Kremen-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Schulze

    Full Text Available Wnt signalling is a key pathway controlling bone formation in mice and humans. One of the regulators of this pathway is Dkk1, which antagonizes Wnt signalling through the formation of a ternary complex with the transmembrane receptors Krm1/2 and Lrp5/6, thereby blocking the induction of Wnt signalling by the latter ones. Here we show that Kremen-2 (Krm2 is predominantly expressed in bone, and that its osteoblast-specific over-expression in transgenic mice (Col1a1-Krm2 results in severe osteoporosis. Histomorphometric analysis revealed that osteoblast maturation and bone formation are disturbed in Col1a1-Krm2 mice, whereas bone resorption is increased. In line with these findings, primary osteoblasts derived from Col1a1-Krm2 mice display a cell-autonomous differentiation defect, impaired canonical Wnt signalling and decreased production of the osteoclast inhibitory factor Opg. To determine whether the observed effects of Krm2 on bone remodeling are physiologically relevant, we analyzed the skeletal phenotype of 24 weeks old Krm2-deficient mice and observed high bone mass caused by a more than three-fold increase in bone formation. Taken together, these data identify Krm2 as a regulator of bone remodeling and raise the possibility that antagonizing KRM2 might prove beneficial in patients with bone loss disorders.

  7. Tolloid-like 1 is negatively regulated by stress and glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Goichiro; Olson, Dawne; Miron, Joel; Clark, Timothy G

    2005-12-14

    Glucocorticoids affect a variety of tissues to enable the organism to adapt to the stress. Hippocampal neurons contain glucocorticoid receptors and respond to elevated glucocorticoid levels by down-regulating the HPA axis. Chronically, however, stress is deleterious to hippocampal neurons. Chronically elevated levels of glucocorticoids result in a decrease in the number of dendritic spines, reduced axonal growth and synaptogenesis, and decreased neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Tolloid-like 1 (Tll-1) is a metalloprotease that potentiates the activity of the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Neurogenesis in the hippocampus of both developing and adult mammals requires BMPs. In this study, we demonstrate that Tll-1 expression is increased in mice that have increased neurogenesis. The Tll-1 promoter contains glucocorticoid response elements which are capable of binding to purified glucocorticoid receptor. Glucocorticoids decrease Tll-1 expression in vitro. Finally, prenatal stress leads to a decrease in Tll-1 mRNA expression in the hippocampus of adult female mice that is not observed in adult male mice indicating that Tll-1 expression is differentially regulated in males and females. The results of this study indicate that Tll-1 is responsive to glucocorticoids and this mechanism might influence neurogenesis in the hippocampus.

  8. Liver X Receptor (LXR) activation negatively regulates visfatin expression in macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayi, Therese Hervee; Rigamonti, Elena [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); INSERM UR1011, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France); Pattou, Francois [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Department of Endocrine Surgery, University Hospital, Lille (France); U859 Biotherapies for Diabetes, INSERM, Lille (France); Staels, Bart, E-mail: bart.staels@pasteur-lille.fr [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); INSERM UR1011, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France); Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); INSERM UR1011, F-59000 Lille (France); UDSL, F-59000 Lille (France); Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille (France)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin expression in human macrophages. {yields} LXR activation leads to a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration. {yields} LXR activation decreased PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin in human macrophages. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue macrophages (ATM) are the major source of visfatin, a visceral fat adipokine upregulated during obesity. Also known to play a role in B cell differentiation (pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF)) and NAD biosynthesis (nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (NAMPT)), visfatin has been suggested to play a role in inflammation. Liver X Receptor (LXR) and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR){gamma} are nuclear receptors expressed in macrophages controlling the inflammatory response. Recently, we reported visfatin as a PPAR{gamma} target gene in human macrophages. In this study, we examined whether LXR regulates macrophage visfatin expression. Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin gene expression in a LXR-dependent manner in human and murine macrophages. The decrease of visfatin mRNA was paralleled by a decrease of protein secretion. Consequently, a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration was observed. Interestingly, LXR activation decreased the PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin gene and protein secretion in human macrophages. Our results identify visfatin as a gene oppositely regulated by the LXR and PPAR{gamma} pathways in human macrophages.

  9. Negative Regulation of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase (RTK Signaling: A Developing Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Ledda

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available ophic factors control cellular physiology by activating specific receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs. While the over activation of RTK signaling pathways is associated with cell growth and cancer, recent findings support the concept that impaired down-regulation or deactivation of RTKs may also be a mechanism involved in tumor formation. Under this perspective, the molecular determinants of RTK signaling inhibition may act as tumor-suppressor genes and have a potential role as tumor markers to monitor and predict disease progression. Here, we review the current understanding of the physiological mechanisms that attenuate RTK signaling and discuss evidence that implicates deregulation of these events in cancer.Abbreviations: BDP1: Brain-derived phosphatase 1; Cbl: Casitas B-lineage lymphoma; CIN-85: Cbl-interacting protein of 85 kDa; DER: Drosophila EGFR; EGFR: Epidermal growth factor receptor; ERK 1/2: Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2; Grb2: Growth factor receptor-bound protein 2; HER2: Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2; LRIG: Leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domain 1; MAPK: Mitogen-activated protein kinase; Mig 6: Mitogen-inducible gene 6; PTEN: Phosphatase and tensin homologue; RET: Rearranged in transformation; RTK: Receptor tyrosine kinase. SH2 domain: Src-homology 2 domain; SH3 domain: Src-homology 3 domain; Spry: Sprouty.

  10. FGF-23 Is a Negative Regulator of Prenatal and Postnatal Erythropoiesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Lindsay M.; Madathil, Sangeetha Vadakke; Casu, Carla; Lanske, Beate; Rivella, Stefano; Sitara, Despina

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal blood cell production is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Bone-derived FGF-23 (fibroblast growth factor-23) regulates phosphate homeostasis and bone mineralization. Genetic deletion of Fgf-23 in mice (Fgf-23−/−) results in hypervitaminosis D, abnormal mineral metabolism, and reduced lymphatic organ size. Elevated FGF-23 levels are linked to CKD and greater risk of CVD, left ventricular hypertrophy, and mortality in dialysis patients. However, whether FGF-23 is involved in the regulation of erythropoiesis is unknown. Here we report that loss of FGF-23 results in increased hematopoietic stem cell frequency associated with increased erythropoiesis in peripheral blood and bone marrow in young adult mice. In particular, these hematopoietic changes are also detected in fetal livers, suggesting that they are not the result of altered bone marrow niche alone. Most importantly, administration of FGF-23 in wild-type mice results in a rapid decrease in erythropoiesis. Finally, we show that the effect of FGF-23 on erythropoiesis is independent of the high vitamin D levels in these mice. Our studies suggest a novel role for FGF-23 in erythrocyte production and differentiation and suggest that elevated FGF-23 levels contribute to the pathogenesis of anemia in patients with CKD and CVD. PMID:24509850

  11. Inhibition of IRF8 Negatively Regulates Macrophage Function and Impairs Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuanyuan; Yang, Zhiyin; Wu, Shan; Xu, Peng; Peng, Yinbo; Yao, Min

    2017-02-01

    The inflammatory response is essential for normal cutaneous wound healing. Macrophages, as critical inflammatory cells, coordinate inflammation and angiogenesis phases during wound healing. It has been reported that the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8), a member of the IRF family, plays a critical role in the development and function of macrophages and is associated with inflammation. However, the role of IRF8 in cutaneous wound healing and its underlying mechanism remain elusive. Through immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, we showed that IRF8 is involved in the wound repair process in mice and patients. Furthermore, we ascertain that the repression of IRF8 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) leads to delayed wound healing. To explore the mechanism by which IRF8 impacts wound healing, we observed its effect on macrophage-related mediators by IHC or real-time PCR. The results demonstrated that the inhibition of IRF8 decreases the mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators associated with M1 macrophage (il-1b, il-6, inos, and tnf-a) but no impact on M2 macrophage-related mediators (arg-1, mrc-1, and il-10) and the number of macrophages in the wounds. Furthermore, the inhibition of IRF8 induced apoptosis in the wounds. In summary, this study demonstrates that the down-regulation of IRF8 in the wound leads to impaired wound healing possibly through the regulation of macrophage function and apoptosis in skin wound.

  12. MicroRNA-146a: A dominant, negative regulator of the innate immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie eBooth

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNA molecules that can play critical roles as regulators of numerous pathways and biological processes including the immune response. Emerging as one of the most important miRNAs to orchestrate immune and inflammatory signaling, often through its recognized target genes, IRAK1 and TRAF6, is microRNA-146a (miR-146a. MiR-146a is one, of a small number of miRNAs, whose expression is strongly induced following challenge of cells with bacterial endotoxin, and prolonged expression has been linked to immune tolerance, implying that it acts as a fine tuning mechanism to prevent an overstimulation of the inflammatory response. In other cells, miR-146a has been shown to play a role in the control of the differentiation of megakaryocytic and monocytic lineages, adaptive immunity and cancer. In this review, we discuss the central role prescribed to miR-146a in innate immunity. We particularly focus on the role played by miR-146a in the regulation and signaling mediated by one of the main pattern recognition receptors, Toll/IL-1 receptors (TLRs. Additionally, we also discuss the role of miR-146a in several classes of autoimmune pathologies where this miRNA has been shown to be dysregulated, as well as its potential role in the pathobiology of neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. FGF-23 is a negative regulator of prenatal and postnatal erythropoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Lindsay M; Madathil, Sangeetha Vadakke; Casu, Carla; Lanske, Beate; Rivella, Stefano; Sitara, Despina

    2014-04-04

    Abnormal blood cell production is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Bone-derived FGF-23 (fibroblast growth factor-23) regulates phosphate homeostasis and bone mineralization. Genetic deletion of Fgf-23 in mice (Fgf-23(-/-)) results in hypervitaminosis D, abnormal mineral metabolism, and reduced lymphatic organ size. Elevated FGF-23 levels are linked to CKD and greater risk of CVD, left ventricular hypertrophy, and mortality in dialysis patients. However, whether FGF-23 is involved in the regulation of erythropoiesis is unknown. Here we report that loss of FGF-23 results in increased hematopoietic stem cell frequency associated with increased erythropoiesis in peripheral blood and bone marrow in young adult mice. In particular, these hematopoietic changes are also detected in fetal livers, suggesting that they are not the result of altered bone marrow niche alone. Most importantly, administration of FGF-23 in wild-type mice results in a rapid decrease in erythropoiesis. Finally, we show that the effect of FGF-23 on erythropoiesis is independent of the high vitamin D levels in these mice. Our studies suggest a novel role for FGF-23 in erythrocyte production and differentiation and suggest that elevated FGF-23 levels contribute to the pathogenesis of anemia in patients with CKD and CVD.

  14. BMP signaling negatively regulates bone mass through sclerostin by inhibiting the canonical Wnt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Ye, Ling; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Mochida, Yoshiyuki; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Kronenberg, Henry M; Feng, Jian Q; Mishina, Yuji

    2008-11-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are known to induce ectopic bone. However, it is largely unknown how BMP signaling in osteoblasts directly regulates endogenous bone. This study investigated the mechanism by which BMP signaling through the type IA receptor (BMPR1A) regulates endogenous bone mass using an inducible Cre-loxP system. When BMPR1A in osteoblasts was conditionally disrupted during embryonic bone development, bone mass surprisingly was increased with upregulation of canonical Wnt signaling. Although levels of bone formation markers were modestly reduced, levels of resorption markers representing osteoclastogenesis were severely reduced, resulting in a net increase in bone mass. The reduction of osteoclastogenesis was primarily caused by Bmpr1a-deficiency in osteoblasts, at least through the RANKL-OPG pathway. Sclerostin (Sost) expression was downregulated by about 90% and SOST protein was undetectable in osteoblasts and osteocytes, whereas the Wnt signaling was upregulated. Treatment of Bmpr1a-deficient calvariae with sclerostin repressed the Wnt signaling and restored normal bone morphology. By gain of Smad-dependent BMPR1A signaling in mice, Sost expression was upregulated and osteoclastogenesis was increased. Finally, the Bmpr1a-deficient bone phenotype was rescued by enhancing BMPR1A signaling, with restoration of osteoclastogenesis. These findings demonstrate that BMPR1A signaling in osteoblasts restrain endogenous bone mass directly by upregulating osteoclastogenesis through the RANKL-OPG pathway, or indirectly by downregulating canonical Wnt signaling through sclerostin, a Wnt inhibitor and a bone mass mediator.

  15. Xenobiotic, bile acid, and cholesterol transporters: function and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Curtis D; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2010-03-01

    Transporters influence the disposition of chemicals within the body by participating in absorption, distribution, and elimination. Transporters of the solute carrier family (SLC) comprise a variety of proteins, including organic cation transporters (OCT) 1 to 3, organic cation/carnitine transporters (OCTN) 1 to 3, organic anion transporters (OAT) 1 to 7, various organic anion transporting polypeptide isoforms, sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide, apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, peptide transporters (PEPT) 1 and 2, concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNT) 1 to 3, equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 1 to 3, and multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters (MATE) 1 and 2, which mediate the uptake (except MATEs) of organic anions and cations as well as peptides and nucleosides. Efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, such as ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), multidrug resistance proteins (MDR) 1 and 2, bile salt export pump, multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 1 to 9, breast cancer resistance protein, and ATP-binding cassette subfamily G members 5 and 8, are responsible for the unidirectional export of endogenous and exogenous substances. Other efflux transporters [ATPase copper-transporting beta polypeptide (ATP7B) and ATPase class I type 8B member 1 (ATP8B1) as well as organic solute transporters (OST) alpha and beta] also play major roles in the transport of some endogenous chemicals across biological membranes. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of these transporters (both rodent and human) with regard to tissue distribution, subcellular localization, and substrate preferences. Because uptake and efflux transporters are expressed in multiple cell types, the roles of transporters in a variety of tissues, including the liver, kidneys, intestine, brain, heart, placenta, mammary glands, immune cells, and testes are discussed. Attention is also placed upon a variety of

  16. CPC,a Single-Repeat R3 MYB,Is a Negative Regulator of Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Fen Zhu; Karen Fitzsimmons; Abha Khandelwal; Robert G.Kranz

    2009-01-01

    Single-repeat R3 MYB transcription factors like CPC (CAPRICE) are known to play roles in developmental processes such as root hair differentiation and trichome initiation.However,none of the six Arabidopsis single-repeat R3 MYB members has been reported to regulate flavonoid biosynthesis.We show here that CPC is a negative regulator of anthocyanin biosynthesis.In the process of using CPC to test GAL4-dependent driver lines,we observed a repression of anthocyanin synthesis upon GAL4-mediated CPC overexpression,We demonstrated that this is not due to an increase in nutrient uptake because of more root hairs.Rather,CPC expression level tightly controls anthocyanin accumulation.Microarray analysis on the whole genome showed that,of 37 000 features tested,85 genes are repressed greater than three-fold by CPC overexpression.Of these 85,seven are late anthocyanin biosynthesis genes.Also,anthocyanin synthesis genes were shown to be down-regulated in 35S::CPC overexpression plants.Transient expression results suggest that CPC competes with the R2R3-MYB transcription factor PAP1/2,which is an activator of anthocyanin biosynthesis genes.This report adds anthocyanin biosynthesis to the set of programs that are under CPC control,indicating that this regulator is not only for developmental programs (e.g.root hairs,trichomes),but can influence anthocyanin pigment synthesis.

  17. Saturated fatty acids regulate retinoic acid signalling and suppress tumorigenesis by targeting fatty acid-binding protein 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Liraz; Wang, Zeneng; Doud, Mary Kathryn; Hazen, Stanley L; Noy, Noa

    2015-11-23

    Long chain fatty acids (LCFA) serve as energy sources, components of cell membranes and precursors for signalling molecules. Here we show that these biological compounds also regulate gene expression and that they do so by controlling the transcriptional activities of the retinoic acid (RA)-activated nuclear receptors RAR and PPARβ/δ. The data indicate that these activities of LCFA are mediated by FABP5, which delivers ligands from the cytosol to nuclear PPARβ/δ. Both saturated and unsaturated LCFA (SLCFA, ULCFA) bind to FABP5, thereby displacing RA and diverting it to RAR. However, while SLCFA inhibit, ULCFA activate the FABP5/PPARβ/δ pathway. We show further that, by concomitantly promoting the activation of RAR and inhibiting the activation of PPARβ/δ, SLCFA suppress the oncogenic properties of FABP5-expressing carcinoma cells in cultured cells and in vivo. The observations suggest that compounds that inhibit FABP5 may constitute a new class of drugs for therapy of certain types of cancer.

  18. Cullin4B/E3-ubiquitin ligase negatively regulates -catenin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rachana Tripathi; Satya Keerthi Kota; Usha K Srinivas

    2007-09-01

    -catenin is the key transducer of Wingless-type MMTV integration site family member (Wnt) signalling, upregulation of which is the cause of cancer of the colon and other tissues. In the absence of Wnt signals, -catenin is targeted to ubiquitin–proteasome-mediated degradation. Here we present the functional characterization of E3-ubiquitin ligase encoded by cul4B. RNAi-mediated knock-down of Cul4B in a mouse cell line C3H T10 (1/2) results in an increase in -catenin levels. Loss-of-function mutation in Drosophila cul4 also shows increased -catenin/Armadillo levels in developing embryos and displays a characteristic naked-cuticle phenotype. Immunoprecipitation experiments suggest that Cul4B and -catenin are part of a signal complex in Drosophila, mouse and human. These preliminary results suggest a conserved role for Cul4B in the regulation of -catenin levels.

  19. The TAM family receptor tyrosine kinase TYRO3 is a negative regulator of type 2 immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Pamela Y.; Carrera Silva, Eugenio A.; De Kouchkovsky, Dimitri; Joannas, Leonel D.; Hao, Liming; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; Eng, Celeste; Licona-Limón, Paula; Weinstein, Jason S.; Herbert, De’Broski R.; Craft, Joseph E.; Flavell, Richard A.; Repetto, Silvia; Correale, Jorge; Burchard, Esteban G.; Torgerson, Dara G.; Ghosh, Sourav; Rothlin, Carla V.

    2016-01-01

    Host responses against metazoan parasites or an array of environmental substances elicit type 2 immunity. Despite its protective function, type 2 immunity also drives allergic diseases. The mechanisms that regulate the magnitude of the type 2 response remain largely unknown. Here, we show that genetic ablation of a receptor tyrosine kinase encoded by Tyro3 in mice or the functional neutralization of its ortholog in human dendritic cells resulted in enhanced type 2 immunity. Furthermore, the TYRO3 agonist PROS1 was induced in T cells by the quintessential type 2 cytokine, interleukin-4. T cell–specific Pros1 knockouts phenocopied the loss of Tyro3. Thus, a PROS1-mediated feedback from adaptive immunity engages a rheostat, TYRO3, on innate immune cells to limit the intensity of type 2 responses. PMID:27034374

  20. The Slx5-Slx8 complex affects sumoylation of DNA repair proteins and negatively regulates recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Rahman, Sadia; Lisby, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Recombination is important for repairing DNA lesions, yet it can also lead to genomic rearrangements. This process must be regulated, and recently, sumoylation-mediated mechanisms were found to inhibit Rad51-dependent recombination. Here, we report that the absence of the Slx5-Slx8 complex, a newly...... identified player in the SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) pathway, led to increased Rad51-dependent and Rad51-independent recombination. The increases were most striking during S phase, suggesting an accumulation of DNA lesions during replication. Consistent with this view, Slx8 protein localized...... propose that, during replication, the Slx5-Slx8 complex helps prevent DNA lesions that are acted upon by recombination. In addition, the complex inhibits Rad51-independent recombination via modulating the sumoylation of DNA repair proteins....

  1. What is the Ultimate Goal in Acid-Base Regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Selvakumar; Gopalakrishnan, Maya; Alagesan, Murali; Prakash, E. Sankaranarayanan

    2007-01-01

    It is common to see chapters on acid-base physiology state that the goal of acid-base regulatory mechanisms is to maintain the pH of arterial plasma and not arterial PCO [subscript 2] (Pa[subscript CO[subscript 2

  2. Moderately high intake of folic acid has a negative impact on mouse embryonic development

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incidence of neural tube defects has diminished considerably since the implementation of food fortification with folic acid (FA). However, the impact of excess FA intake, particularly during pregnancy, requires investigation. In a recent study, we reported that a diet supplemented with 20-fold h...

  3. Amygdalin Regulates Apoptosis and Adhesion in Hs578T Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Min; Moon, Aree

    2016-01-01

    Amygdalin, D-mandelonitrile-β-D-glucoside-6-β-glucoside, belongs to aromatic cyanogenic glycoside group derived from rosaceous plant seed. Mounting evidence has supported the anti-cancer effects of amygdalin. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent against breast cancer cells is not clear. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of amygdalin on the proliferation of human breast cancer cells. Here, we show that amygdalin exerted cytotoxic activities on estrogen receptors (ER)-positive MCF7 cells, and MDA-MB-231 and Hs578T triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. Amygdalin induced apoptosis of Hs578T TNBC cells. Amygdalin downregulated B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), upregulated Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), activated of caspase-3 and cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). Amygdalin activated a pro-apoptotic signaling molecule p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK) in Hs578T cells. Treatment of amygdalin significantly inhibited the adhesion of Hs578T cells, in which integrin α5 may be involved. Taken together, this study demonstrates that amygdalin induces apoptosis and inhibits adhesion of breast cancer cells. The results suggest a potential application of amygdalin as a chemopreventive agent to prevent or alleviate progression of breast cancer, especially TNBC.

  4. Cbl participates in shikonin-induced apoptosis by negatively regulating phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Dan; Xu, Xiao-Man; Zhang, Meng; Jiang, Ting-Shu; Zhang, Yi; Li, Sheng-Qi

    2015-07-01

    Shikonin, a naturally occurring naphthoquinone, exhibits anti-tumorigenic activity. However, its precise mechanisms of action have remained elusive. In the present study, the involvement in the action of shikonin of the ubiquitin ligases Cbl-b and c-Cbl, which are negative regulators of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activation, was investigated. Shikonin was observed to reduce cell viability and induce apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest in lung cancer cells. In addition, shikonin increased the protein levels of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X and p53 and reduced those of Bcl-2. Additionally, shikonin inhibited PI3k/Akt activity and upregulated Cbl protein expression. In addition, a specific inhibitor of PI3K, LY294002, was observed to have a synergistic effect on the proliferation inhibition and apoptotic induction of A549 cells with shikonin. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that Cbl proteins promote shikonin-induced apoptosis by negatively regulating PI3K/Akt signaling in lung cancer cells.

  5. Sirt1 physically interacts with Tip60 and negatively regulates Tip60-mediated acetylation of H2AX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagata, Kazutsune, E-mail: kyamagat@ncc.go.jp [Department of Molecular Oncology Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Kitabayashi, Issay [Department of Molecular Oncology Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2009-12-25

    Sirt1 appear to be NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase that deacetylates histones and several non-histone proteins. In this study, we identified Sirt1 as a physical interaction partner of Tip60, which is a mammalian MYST-type histone acetyl-transferase that specifically acetylates histones H2A and H4. Although Tip60 also acetylates DNA damage-specific histone H2A variant H2AX in response to DNA damage, which is a process required for appropriate DNA damage response, overexpression of Sirt1 represses Tip60-mediated acetylation of H2AX. Furthermore, Sirt1 depletion by RNAi causes excessive acetylation of H2AX, and enhances accumulation of {gamma}-ray irradiation-induced MDC1, BRCA1, and Rad51 foci in nuclei. These findings suggest that Sirt1 functions as negative regulator of Tip60-mediated acetylation of H2AX. Moreover, Sirt1 deacetylates an acetylated Tip60 in response to DNA damage and stimulates proteasome-dependent Tip60 degradation in vivo, suggesting that Sirt1 negatively regulates the protein level of Tip60 in vivo. Sirt1 may thus repress excessive activation of the DNA damage response and Rad51-homologous recombination repair by suppressing the function of Tip60.

  6. MiR-21 promoted proliferation and migration in hepatocellular carcinoma through negative regulation of Navigator-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhipeng, E-mail: dr_zpwang@163.com [The Digestive and Vascural Surgery Center, the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi 830054, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region (China); Yang, Huan [The Department of Liver and Biliary Pancreatic Surgery, Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi 830000, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region (China); Ren, Lei [The Department of General Surgery, Branching Hospital of the First People' s Hospital of Urumqi, 830000, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region (China)

    2015-09-04

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) has been well-established and found to be over-expressed in various human cancers and has been associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression. However, the underlying mechanism of miR-21 involvement in the development and progression of HCC remains to be understood. In the present study, we firstly identified that the Navigator-3 (NAV-3) gene as a novel direct target of miR-21. Knock-down of NAV-3 using shRNA can rescue the effects of anti-miR-21 inhibitor in HCC cell lines, whereas re-expression of miR-21 using transfection with miR-21 mimics phenocopied the NAV-3 knock-down model. Additionally, miR-21 levels inversely correlated with NAV-3 both in HCC cells and tissues. Knock-down of NAV-3 promoted both the proliferation and migration in HCC cells. Together, our findings suggest an important role for miR-21 in the progression of HCC, which negatively regulated Navigator-3 in the migration of HCC. - Highlights: • Navigator-3 (NAV-3) suppresses proliferation, migration and tumorigenesis of HCC cells. • NAV-3 was a novel target of miR-21. • MiR-21 negatively regulates NAV-3 in HCC.

  7. Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) expression is negatively regulated by certain microRNAs in human lung tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Takeshi; Date, Yuko; Nishibatake, Yu; Takane, Hiroshi; Fukuoka, Yasushi; Taniguchi, Yuuji; Burioka, Naoto; Shimizu, Eiji; Nakamura, Hiroshige; Otsubo, Kenji; Ieiri, Ichiro

    2012-07-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) is important to the antitumor effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). DPD gene (DPYD) expression in tumors is correlated with sensitivity to 5-FU. Because the 5-FU accumulated in cancer cells is also rapidly converted into inactivated metabolites through catabolic pathways mediated by DPD, high DPD activity in cancer cells is an important determinant of the response to 5-FU. DPD activity is highly variable and reduced activity causes a high risk of 5-FU toxicity. Genetic variation in DPYD has been proposed as the main factor responsible for the variation in DPD activity. However, only a small proportion of the activity of DPD can be explained by DPYD mutations. In this study, we found that DPYD is a target of the following microRNAs (miRNA): miR-27a, miR-27b, miR-134, and miR-582-5p. In luciferase assays with HepG2 cells, the overexpression of these miRNAs was associated with significantly decreased reporter activity in a plasmid containing the 3'-UTR of DYPD mRNA. The level of DPD protein in MIAPaca-2 cells was also significantly decreased by the overexpression of these four miRNAs. The results suggest that miR-27a, miR-27b, miR-134, and miR-582-5p post-transcriptionally regulate DPD protein expression. The levels of miRNAs in normal lung tissue and lung tumors were compared; miR-27b and miR-134 levels were significantly lower in the tumors than normal tissue (3.64 ± 4.02 versus 9.75 ± 6.58 and 0.64 ± 0.75 versus 1.48 ± 1.39). DPD protein levels were significantly higher in the tumors. Thus, the decreased expression of miR-27b would be responsible for the high levels of DPD protein. This study is the first to show that miRNAs regulate the DPD protein, and provides new insight into 5-FU-based chemotherapy.

  8. Amino acids allosterically regulate the thiamine diphosphate-dependent alpha-keto acid decarboxylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werther, Tobias; Spinka, Michael; Tittmann, Kai; Schütz, Anja; Golbik, Ralph; Mrestani-Klaus, Carmen; Hübner, Gerhard; König, Stephan

    2008-02-29

    The gene rv0853c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv codes for a thiamine diphosphate-dependent alpha-keto acid decarboxylase (MtKDC), an enzyme involved in the amino acid degradation via the Ehrlich pathway. Steady state kinetic experiments were performed to determine the substrate specificity of MtKDC. The mycobacterial enzyme was found to convert a broad spectrum of branched-chain and aromatic alpha-keto acids. Stopped-flow kinetics showed that MtKDC is allosterically activated by alpha-keto acids. Even more, we demonstrate that also amino acids are potent activators of this thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzyme. Thus, metabolic flow through the Ehrlich pathway can be directly regulated at the decarboxylation step. The influence of amino acids on MtKDC catalysis was investigated, and implications for other thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzymes are discussed.

  9. PPARγ negatively regulates T cell activation to prevent follicular helper T cells and germinal center formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hong-Jai; Kim, Do-Hyun; Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Won-Ju; Kim, Ji Yun; Senejani, Alireza G; Hwang, Soo Seok; Kim, Lark Kyun; Tobiasova, Zuzana; Lee, Gap Ryol; Craft, Joseph; Bothwell, Alfred L M; Choi, Je-Min

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a transcription factor that regulates lipid and glucose metabolism. Although studies of PPARγ ligands have demonstrated its regulatory functions in inflammation and adaptive immunity, its intrinsic role in T cells and autoimmunity has yet to be fully elucidated. Here we used CD4-PPARγKO mice to investigate PPARγ-deficient T cells, which were hyper-reactive to produce higher levels of cytokines and exhibited greater proliferation than wild type T cells with increased ERK and AKT phosphorylation. Diminished expression of IκBα, Sirt1, and Foxo1, which are inhibitors of NF-κB, was observed in PPARγ-deficient T cells that were prone to produce all the signature cytokines under Th1, Th2, Th17, and Th9 skewing condition. Interestingly, 1-year-old CD4-PPARγKO mice spontaneously developed moderate autoimmune phenotype by increased activated T cells, follicular helper T cells (TFH cells) and germinal center B cells with glomerular inflammation and enhanced autoantibody production. Sheep red blood cell immunization more induced TFH cells and germinal centers in CD4-PPARγKO mice and the T cells showed increased of Bcl-6 and IL-21 expression suggesting its regulatory role in germinal center reaction. Collectively, these results suggest that PPARγ has a regulatory role for TFH cells and germinal center reaction to prevent autoimmunity.

  10. Positive and Negative Regulation of Cellular Immune Responses in Physiologic Conditions and Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Viganò

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune system has evolved to allow robust responses against pathogens while avoiding autoimmunity. This is notably enabled by stimulatory and inhibitory signals which contribute to the regulation of immune responses. In the presence of a pathogen, a specific and effective immune response must be induced and this leads to antigen-specific T-cell proliferation, cytokines production, and induction of T-cell differentiation toward an effector phenotype. After clearance or control of the pathogen, the effector immune response must be terminated in order to avoid tissue damage and chronic inflammation and this process involves coinhibitory molecules. When the immune system fails to eliminate or control the pathogen, continuous stimulation of T cells prevents the full contraction and leads to the functional exhaustion of effector T cells. Several evidences both in vitro and in vivo suggest that this anergic state can be reverted by blocking the interactions between coinhibitory molecules and their ligands. The potential to revert exhausted or inactivated T-cell responses following selective blocking of their function made these markers interesting targets for therapeutic interventions in patients with persistent viral infections or cancer.

  11. Negative regulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate levels in early-to-late endosome conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Jian, Youli; Sun, Xiaojuan; Yang, Chengkui; Gao, Zhiyang; Zhang, Zhili; Liu, Xuezhao; Li, Yang; Xu, Jing; Jing, Yudong; Mitani, Shohei; He, Sudan; Yang, Chonglin

    2016-01-18

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) plays a central role in endosome fusion, recycling, sorting, and early-to-late endosome conversion, but the mechanisms that determine how the correct endosomal PtdIns3P level is achieved remain largely elusive. Here we identify two new factors, SORF-1 and SORF-2, as essential PtdIns3P regulators in Caenorhabditis elegans. Loss of sorf-1 or sorf-2 leads to greatly elevated endosomal PtdIns3P, which drives excessive fusion of early endosomes. sorf-1 and sorf-2 function coordinately with Rab switching genes to inhibit synthesis of PtdIns3P, allowing its turnover for endosome conversion. SORF-1 and SORF-2 act in a complex with BEC-1/Beclin1, and their loss causes elevated activity of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) complex. In mammalian cells, inactivation of WDR91 and WDR81, the homologs of SORF-1 and SORF-2, induces Beclin1-dependent enlargement of PtdIns3P-enriched endosomes and defective degradation of epidermal growth factor receptor. WDR91 and WDR81 interact with Beclin1 and inhibit PI3K complex activity. These findings reveal a conserved mechanism that controls appropriate PtdIns3P levels in early-to-late endosome conversion.

  12. Hid, Rpr and Grim negatively regulate DIAP1 levels through distinct mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Soon Ji; Huh, Jun R; Muro, Israel; Yu, Hong; Wang, Lijuan; Wang, Susan L; Feldman, R M Renny; Clem, Rollie J; Müller, H-Arno J; Hay, Bruce A

    2002-06-01

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins suppress apoptosis and inhibit caspases. Several IAPs also function as ubiquitin-protein ligases. Regulators of IAP auto-ubiquitination, and thus IAP levels, have yet to be identified. Here we show that Head involution defective (Hid), Reaper (Rpr) and Grim downregulate Drosophila melanogaster IAP1 (DIAP) protein levels. Hid stimulates DIAP1 polyubiquitination and degradation. In contrast to Hid, Rpr and Grim can downregulate DIAP1 through mechanisms that do not require DIAP1 function as a ubiquitin-protein ligase. Observations with Grim suggest that one mechanism by which these proteins produce a relative decrease in DIAP1 levels is to promote a general suppression of protein translation. These observations define two mechanisms through which DIAP1 ubiquitination controls cell death: first, increased ubiquitination promotes degradation directly; second, a decrease in global protein synthesis results in a differential loss of short-lived proteins such as DIAP1. Because loss of DIAP1 is sufficient to promote caspase activation, these mechanisms should promote apoptosis.

  13. Induction of DKK1 by ox-LDL negatively regulates intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Ge, Cheng; Wang, Lin; Liu, Xinxin; Chen, Yifei; Li, Mengmeng; Zhang, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Dickkopf1 (DKK1), a canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway antagonist, is closely associated with cardiovascular disease and adipogenesis. We performed an in vitro study to determine whether oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) increased the expression of DKK1 in macrophages and whether β-catenin and liver X receptor α (LXRα) were involved in this regulation. Induction of DKK1 expression by ox-LDL decreased the level of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) via a Wnt/β-catenin pathway and increased ATP-binding cassette transporter A/G1 (ABCA/G1) levels via a signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway. Lower LOX-1 and higher ABCA/G1 levels inhibited cholesterol loading in macrophages. In conclusion, ox-LDL may induce DKK1 expression in macrophages to inhibit the accumulation of lipids through a mechanism that involves downregulation of LOX-1-mediated lipid uptake and upregulation of ABCA/G1-dependent cholesterol efflux.

  14. Lrrc75b is a novel negative regulator of C2C12 myogenic differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yuechun; Zou, Liyi; Wang, Zonggui; Pan, Yaqiong; Dai, Zhong; Liu, Xinguang; Cui, Liao; Zuo, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    Many transcription factors and signaling molecules involved in the guidance of myogenic differentiation have been investigated in previous studies. However, the precise molecular mechanisms of myogenic differentiation remain largely unknown. In the present study, by performing a meta-analysis of C2C12 myogenic differentiation microarray data, we found that leucine-rich repeat-containing 75B (Lrrc75b), also known as AI646023, a molecule of unknown biological function, was downregulated during C2C12 myogenic differentiation. The knockdown of Lrrc75b using specific siRNA in C2C12 myoblasts markedly enhanced the expression of muscle-specific myogenin and increased myoblast fusion and the myotube diameter. By contrast, the adenovirus-mediated overexpression of Lrrc75b in C2C12 cells markedly inhibited myoblast differentiation accompanied by a decrease in myogenin expression. In addition, the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2) was suppressed in the cells in which Lrrc75b was silenced. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Lrrc75b is a novel suppressor of C2C12 myogenic differentiation by modulating myogenin and Erk1/2 signaling. PMID:27633041

  15. MAGED1 is a negative regulator of bone remodeling in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei; Xu, Lijuan; Ma, Xiao; Xu, Jiake; Wang, Jing; Xian, Mengmeng; Zhou, Xiaotian; Wang, Min; Wang, Fang; Qin, An; Pan, Qiuhui; Wen, Chuanjun

    2015-10-01

    Melanoma antigen family D1 (MAGED1), an important adaptor protein, has been shown to ubiquitously express and play critical roles in many aspects of cellular events and physiological functions. However, its role in bone remodeling remains unknown. We, therefore, analyzed the bone phenotype of Maged1-deficient mice. Maged1-deficient mice displayed a significant osteoporotic phenotype with a marked decrease in bone density and deterioration of trabecular architecture. Histomorphometric analysis demonstrated an increased mineral apposition rate as well as increased osteoclast number and surface in Maged1 knockout mice. At the cellular level, Maged1-deficient osteoblasts exhibited an increased proliferation rate and accelerated differentiation. MAGED1 deficiency also caused a promotion in osteoclastogenesis, and that was attributed to the cell autonomous acceleration of differentiation in osteoclasts and an increased receptor activator of NF-κB ligand/osteoprotegerin ratio, a major index of osteoclastogenesis, in osteoblasts. Thus, we identified MAGED1 as a novel regulator of osteoblastogenesis, osteoclastogenesis, and bone remodeling in a mouse model.

  16. Primary Cilia Negatively Regulate Melanogenesis in Melanocytes and Pigmentation in a Human Skin Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Sung; Park, So Jung; Bae, Il-Hong; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Jeong, In Young; Kim, Hyoung-June; Lee, Youngjin; Park, Hea Chul; Jeon, Hong Bae; Kim, Ki Woo; Lee, Tae Ryong; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilium is an organelle protruding from the cell body that senses external stimuli including chemical, mechanical, light, osmotic, fluid flow, and gravitational signals. Skin is always exposed to the external environment and responds to external stimuli. Therefore, it is possible that primary cilia have an important role in skin. Ciliogenesis was reported to be involved in developmental processes in skin, such as keratinocyte differentiation and hair formation. However, the relation between skin pigmentation and primary cilia is largely unknown. Here, we observed that increased melanogenesis in melanocytes treated with a melanogenic inducer was inhibited by a ciliogenesis inducer, cytochalasin D, and serum-free culture. However, these inhibitory effects disappeared in GLI2 knockdown cells. In addition, activation of sonic hedgehog (SHH)-smoothened (Smo) signaling pathway by a Smo agonist, SAG inhibited melanin synthesis in melanocytes and pigmentation in a human skin model. On the contrary, an inhibitor of primary cilium formation, ciliobrevin A1, activated melanogenesis in melanocytes. These results suggest that skin pigmentation may be regulated partly by the induction of ciliogenesis through Smo-GLI2 signaling. PMID:27941997

  17. Identification of novel non-coding RNA-based negative feedback regulating the expression of the oncogenic transcription factor GLI1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Victoria E; Rahman, Mohammed Ferdous-Ur; Fernandez-Barrena, Maite G; Diao, Yumei; Liapi, Eleni; Sonkoly, Enikö; Ståhle, Mona; Pivarcsi, Andor; Annaratone, Laura; Sapino, Anna; Ramírez Clavijo, Sandra; Bürglin, Thomas R; Shimokawa, Takashi; Ramachandran, Saraswathi; Kapranov, Philipp; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2014-07-01

    Non-coding RNAs are a complex class of nucleic acids, with growing evidence supporting regulatory roles in gene expression. Here we identify a non-coding RNA located head-to-head with the gene encoding the Glioma-associated oncogene 1 (GLI1), a transcriptional effector of multiple cancer-associated signaling pathways. The expression of this three-exon GLI1 antisense (GLI1AS) RNA in cancer cells was concordant with GLI1 levels. siRNAs knockdown of GLI1AS up-regulated GLI1 and increased cellular proliferation and tumor growth in a xenograft model system. Conversely, GLI1AS overexpression decreased the levels of GLI1, its target genes PTCH1 and PTCH2, and cellular proliferation. Additionally, we demonstrate that GLI1 knockdown reduced GLI1AS, while GLI1 overexpression increased GLI1AS, supporting the role of GLI1AS as a target gene of the GLI1 transcription factor. Activation of TGFβ and Hedgehog signaling, two known regulators of GLI1 expression, conferred a concordant up-regulation of GLI1 and GLI1AS in cancer cells. Finally, analysis of the mechanism underlying the interplay between GLI1 and GLI1AS indicates that the non-coding RNA elicits a local alteration of chromatin structure by increasing the silencing mark H3K27me3 and decreasing the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to this locus. Taken together, the data demonstrate the existence of a novel non-coding RNA-based negative feedback loop controlling GLI1 levels, thus expanding the repertoire of mechanisms regulating the expression of this oncogenic transcription factor.

  18. Transcriptional regulation of genes involved in retinoic acid metabolism in Senegalese sole larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boglino, Anaïs; Ponce, Marian; Cousin, Xavier; Gisbert, Enric; Manchado, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was the characterization of transcriptional regulatory pathways mediated by retinoic acid (RA) in Senegalese sole larvae. For this purpose, pre-metamorphic larvae were treated with a low concentration of DEAB, an inhibitor of RALDH enzyme, until the end of metamorphosis. No differences in growth, eye migration or survival were observed. Nevertheless, gene expression analysis revealed a total of 20 transcripts differentially expressed during larval development and only six related with DEAB treatments directly involved in RA metabolism and actions (rdh10a, aldh1a2, crbp1, igf2r, rarg and cyp26a1) to adapt to a low-RA environment. In a second experiment, post-metamorphic larvae were exposed to the all-trans RA (atRA) observing an opposite regulation for those genes involved in RA synthesis and degradation (rdh10a, aldh1a2, crbp1 and cyp26a1) as well as other related with thyroid- (dio2) and IGF-axes (igfbp1, igf2r and igfbp5) to balance RA levels. In a third experiment, DEAB-pretreated post-metamorphic larvae were exposed to atRA and TTNPB (a specific RAR agonist). Both drugs down-regulated rdh10a and aldh1a2 and up-regulated cyp26a1 expression demonstrating their important role in RA homeostasis. Moreover, five retinoic receptors that mediate RA actions, the thyroid receptor thrb, and five IGF binding proteins changed differentially their expression. Overall, this study demonstrates that exogenous RA modulates the expression of some genes involved in the RA synthesis, degradation and cellular transport through RAR-mediated regulatory pathways establishing a negative feedback regulatory mechanism necessary to balance endogenous RA levels and gradients.

  19. Tandem mass spectrometry of poly(methacrylic Acid) oligomers produced by negative mode electrospray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordanengo, Rémi; Viel, Stéphane; Allard-Breton, Béatrice; Thévand, André; Charles, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    Dissociation of small poly(methyl acrylic acid) (PMAA) anions produced by electrospray was characterized by tandem mass spectrometry. Upon collisional activation, singly, and doubly deprotonated PMAA oligomers were shown to fragment via two major reactions, dehydration and decarboxylation. The elimination of a water molecule would occur between two consecutive acid groups in a charged-remote mechanism, giving rise to cyclic anhydrides, and was shown to proceed as many times as pairs of neutral pendant groups were available. As a result, the number of dehydration steps, together with the abundance of the fragment ions produced after the release of all water molecules, revealed the polymerization degree of the molecule in the particular case of doubly charged oligomers. For singly deprotonated molecules, the exact number of MAA units could be reached from the number of carbon dioxide molecules successively eliminated from the fully dehydrated precursor ions. In contrast to dehydration, decarboxylation reactions would proceed via a charge-induced mechanism. The proposed dissociation mechanisms are consistent with results commonly reported in thermal degradation studies of poly(acrylic acid) resins and were supported by accurate mass measurements. These fragmentation rules were successfully applied to characterize a polymeric impurity detected in the tested PMAA sample.

  20. Negative Regulation of Ectoine Uptake and Catabolism in Sinorhizobium meliloti: Characterization of the EhuR Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qinli; Cai, Hanlin; Zhang, Yanfeng; He, Yongzhi; Chen, Lincai; Merritt, Justin; Zhang, Shan; Dong, Zhiyang

    2017-01-01

    Ectoine has osmoprotective effects on Sinorhizobium meliloti that differ from its effects in other bacteria. Ectoine does not accumulate in S. meliloti cells; instead, it is degraded. The products of the ehuABCD-eutABCDE operon were previously discovered to be responsible for the uptake and catabolism of ectoine in S. meliloti However, the mechanism by which ectoine is involved in the regulation of the ehuABCD-eutABCDE operon remains unclear. The ehuR gene, which is upstream of and oriented in the same direction as the ehuABCD-eutABCDE operon, encodes a member of the MocR/GntR family of transcriptional regulators. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and promoter-lacZ reporter fusion experiments revealed that EhuR represses transcription of the ehuABCD-eutABCDE operon, but this repression is inhibited in the presence of ectoine. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting assays revealed that EhuR bound specifically to the DNA regions overlapping the -35 region of the ehuA promoter and the +1 region of the ehuR promoter. Surface plasmon resonance assays further demonstrated direct interactions between EhuR and the two promoters, although EhuR was found to have higher affinity for the ehuA promoter than for the ehuR promoter. In vitro, DNA binding by EhuR could be directly inhibited by a degradation product of ectoine. Our work demonstrates that EhuR is an important negative transcriptional regulator involved in the regulation of ectoine uptake and catabolism and is likely regulated by one or more end products of ectoine catabolism.

  1. MiRNA-194 Regulates Palmitic Acid-Induced Toll-Like Receptor 4 Inflammatory Responses in THP-1 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Huiqun; Liu, Chaoqi; Zou, Xiaohua; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Changcheng; Yuan, Ding

    2015-05-13

    There is strong evidence to suggest that inflammatory responses link obesity and diseases, and the understanding of obesity-induced inflammatory mechanisms is central to the pathogenesis of diseases such asnonalcoholic fatty liver disease(NAFLD) and atherosclerosis that are modified by obesity. Based on this, anti-inflammatory treatments become a potential therapies for obesity-related diseases like NAFLD.A critical role of toll-like receptor (TLR) and its downstream molecules such as tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6(TRAF6) has been documented in inflammatory response induced by fatty acid. TLR pathway regulation provides a new insight to controlling the inflammatory response induced by fatty acid. Taken together, our study was aimed to understand the mechanism of fatty acid-mediated inflammation and look for an effective target which can prevent the inflammatory response induced by obesity. In this study, we used the saturated fatty acid palmitic acid (PA) to activate TLR4 signal pathway in human monocyte cells THP-1 that established an intracellular inflammatory model. Followed with activated TLR4, downstream molecular TRAF6 was upregulated and ultimately induced proinflammatory cytokine production. Based on this model, we also found that PA downregulated miR-194 expression with TLR4 activation. Moreover, our results showed that key signal molecular TRAF6 is a target of miR-194, overexpression of miR-194 directly decreased TRAF6 expression and attenuated the release of proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α in PA-activated monocyte THP-1. We conclude that miR-194 negatively regulates the TLR4 signal pathway which is activated by PA through directly negative TRAF6 expression.

  2. 'Breathing' of the lead-acid battery negative plate during cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlov, D.; Ignatova, S.

    1987-07-01

    By measuring the thickness of the negative plates with and without an expander, during cycling, it was established that the active mass volume pulsates, expanding during discharge and shrinking during charge. This phenomenon is due to the mechanical stress in the lead skeleton structure caused by the PbSO/sub 4/ crystals. At each pulsation of the plate, slight changes in the structural parameters of the active mass are observed. These changes accumulate during cycling causing expansion or shrinking of the active mass. As a result of this the capacity of the plate decreases. These changes in the plate structure depend strongly on the expander.

  3. Sonic hedgehog acts as a negative regulator of {beta}-catenin signaling in the adult tongue epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Fabian T; Schänzer, Anne; Czupalla, Cathrin J; Thom, Sonja; Engels, Knut; Schmidt, Mirko H H; Plate, Karl H; Liebner, Stefan

    2010-07-01

    Wnt/beta-catenin signaling has been implicated in taste papilla development; however, its role in epithelial maintenance and tumor progression in the adult tongue remains elusive. We show Wnt/beta-catenin pathway activation in reporter mice and by nuclear beta-catenin staining in the epithelium and taste papilla of adult mouse and human tongues. beta-Catenin activation in APC(min/+) mice, which carry a mutation in adenomatous poliposis coli (APC), up-regulates Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Jagged-2 (JAG2) in the tongue epithelium without formation of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We demonstrate that Shh suppresses beta-catenin transcriptional activity in a signaling-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. A similar regulation and function was observed for JAG2, suggesting that both pathways negatively regulate beta-catenin, thereby preventing SCC formation in the tongue. This was supported by reduced nuclear beta-catenin in the tongue epithelium of Patched(+/-) mice, exhibiting dominant active Shh signaling. At the invasive front of human tongue cancer, nuclear beta-catenin and Shh were increased, suggesting their participation in tumor progression. Interestingly, Shh but not JAG2 was able to reduce beta-catenin signaling in SCC cells, arguing for a partial loss of negative feedback on beta-catenin transcription in tongue cancer. We show for the first time that the putative Wnt/beta-catenin targets Shh and JAG2 control beta-catenin signaling in the adult tongue epithelium, a function that is partially lost in lingual SCC.

  4. Negative Regulation of Leptin-induced Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Formation by Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Activation in Hypothalamic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, Letizia; Silvestri, Cristoforo; Imperatore, Roberta; Morello, Giovanna; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Martella, Andrea; Cristino, Luigia; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2015-05-29

    The adipocyte-derived, anorectic hormone leptin was recently shown to owe part of its regulatory effects on appetite-regulating hypothalamic neuropeptides to the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons. Leptin is also known to exert a negative regulation on hypothalamic endocannabinoid levels and hence on cannabinoid CB1 receptor activity. Here we investigated the possibility of a negative regulation by CB1 receptors of leptin-mediated ROS formation in the ARC. Through pharmacological and molecular biology experiments we report data showing that leptin-induced ROS accumulation is 1) blunted by arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) in a CB1-dependent manner in both the mouse hypothalamic cell line mHypoE-N41 and ARC neuron primary cultures, 2) likewise blocked by a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) agonist, troglitazone, in a manner inhibited by T0070907, a PPAR-γ antagonist that also inhibited the ACEA effect on leptin, 3) blunted under conditions of increased endocannabinoid tone due to either pharmacological or genetic inhibition of endocannabinoid degradation in mHypoE-N41 and primary ARC neuronal cultures from MAGL(-/-) mice, respectively, and 4) associated with reduction of both PPAR-γ and catalase activity, which are reversed by both ACEA and troglitazone. We conclude that CB1 activation reverses leptin-induced ROS formation and hence possibly some of the ROS-mediated effects of the hormone by preventing PPAR-γ inhibition by leptin, with subsequent increase of catalase activity. This mechanism might underlie in part CB1 orexigenic actions under physiopathological conditions accompanied by elevated hypothalamic endocannabinoid levels.

  5. Quercetin prevents progression of disease in elastase/LPS-exposed mice by negatively regulating MMP expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez Fernando J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by chronic bronchitis, emphysema and irreversible airflow limitation. These changes are thought to be due to oxidative stress and an imbalance of proteases and antiproteases. Quercetin, a plant flavonoid, is a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. We hypothesized that quercetin reduces lung inflammation and improves lung function in elastase/lipopolysaccharide (LPS-exposed mice which show typical features of COPD, including airways inflammation, goblet cell metaplasia, and emphysema. Methods Mice treated with elastase and LPS once a week for 4 weeks were subsequently administered 0.5 mg of quercetin dihydrate or 50% propylene glycol (vehicle by gavage for 10 days. Lungs were examined for elastance, oxidative stress, inflammation, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP activity. Effects of quercetin on MMP transcription and activity were examined in LPS-exposed murine macrophages. Results Quercetin-treated, elastase/LPS-exposed mice showed improved elastic recoil and decreased alveolar chord length compared to vehicle-treated controls. Quercetin-treated mice showed decreased levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, a measure of lipid peroxidation caused by oxidative stress. Quercetin also reduced lung inflammation, goblet cell metaplasia, and mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and muc5AC. Quercetin treatment decreased the expression and activity of MMP9 and MMP12 in vivo and in vitro, while increasing expression of the histone deacetylase Sirt-1 and suppressing MMP promoter H4 acetylation. Finally, co-treatment with the Sirt-1 inhibitor sirtinol blocked the effects of quercetin on the lung phenotype. Conclusions Quercetin prevents progression of emphysema in elastase/LPS-treated mice by reducing oxidative stress, lung inflammation and expression of MMP9 and MMP12.

  6. Aryl hydrocarbon receptors in osteoclast lineage cells are a negative regulator of bone mass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-yong Yu

    Full Text Available Aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhRs play a critical role in various pathological and physiological processes. Although recent research has identified AhRs as a key contributor to bone metabolism following studies in systemic AhR knockout (KO or transgenic mice, the cellular and molecular mechanism(s in this process remain unclear. In this study, we explored the function of AhR in bone metabolism using AhR(RANKΔOc/ΔOc (RANK(Cre/+;AhR(flox/flox mice. We observed enhanced bone mass together with decreased resorption in both male and female 12 and 24-week-old AhR(RANKΔOc/ΔOc mice. Control mice treated with 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC, an AhR agonist, exhibited decreased bone mass and increased bone resorption, whereas AhR(CtskΔOc/ΔOc (Ctsk(Cre/+;AhR(flox/flox mice injected with 3MC appeared to have a normal bone phenotype. In vitro, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs from AhR(RANKΔOc/ΔOc mice exhibited impaired osteoclastogenesis and repressed differentiation with downregulated expression of B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1, and cytochrome P450 genes Cyp1b1 and Cyp1a2. Collectively, our results not only demonstrated that AhR in osteoclast lineage cells is a physiologically relevant regulator of bone resorption, but also highlighted the need for further studies on the skeletal actions of AhR inhibitors in osteoclast lineage cells commonly associated with bone diseases, especially diseases linked to environmental pollutants known to induce bone loss.

  7. Positive and negative regulation of Gli activity by Kif7 in the zebrafish embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Kumar Maurya

    Full Text Available Loss of function mutations of Kif7, the vertebrate orthologue of the Drosophila Hh pathway component Costal2, cause defects in the limbs and neural tubes of mice, attributable to ectopic expression of Hh target genes. While this implies a functional conservation of Cos2 and Kif7 between flies and vertebrates, the association of Kif7 with the primary cilium, an organelle absent from most Drosophila cells, suggests their mechanisms of action may have diverged. Here, using mutant alleles induced by Zinc Finger Nuclease-mediated targeted mutagenesis, we show that in zebrafish, Kif7 acts principally to suppress the activity of the Gli1 transcription factor. Notably, we find that endogenous Kif7 protein accumulates not only in the primary cilium, as previously observed in mammalian cells, but also in cytoplasmic puncta that disperse in response to Hh pathway activation. Moreover, we show that Drosophila Costal2 can substitute for Kif7, suggesting a conserved mode of action of the two proteins. We show that Kif7 interacts with both Gli1 and Gli2a and suggest that it functions to sequester Gli proteins in the cytoplasm, in a manner analogous to the regulation of Ci by Cos2 in Drosophila. We also show that zebrafish Kif7 potentiates Gli2a activity by promoting its dissociation from the Suppressor of Fused (Sufu protein and present evidence that it mediates a Smo dependent modification of the full length form of Gli2a. Surprisingly, the function of Kif7 in the zebrafish embryo appears restricted principally to mesodermal derivatives, its inactivation having little effect on neural tube patterning, even when Sufu protein levels are depleted. Remarkably, zebrafish lacking all Kif7 function are viable, in contrast to the peri-natal lethality of mouse kif7 mutants but similar to some Acrocallosal or Joubert syndrome patients who are homozygous for loss of function KIF7 alleles.

  8. Positive and negative regulation of Gli activity by Kif7 in the zebrafish embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Ashish Kumar; Ben, Jin; Zhao, Zhonghua; Lee, Raymond Teck Ho; Niah, Weixin; Ng, Ashley Shu Mei; Iyu, Audrey; Yu, Weimiao; Elworthy, Stone; van Eeden, Fredericus J M; Ingham, Philip William

    2013-01-01

    Loss of function mutations of Kif7, the vertebrate orthologue of the Drosophila Hh pathway component Costal2, cause defects in the limbs and neural tubes of mice, attributable to ectopic expression of Hh target genes. While this implies a functional conservation of Cos2 and Kif7 between flies and vertebrates, the association of Kif7 with the primary cilium, an organelle absent from most Drosophila cells, suggests their mechanisms of action may have diverged. Here, using mutant alleles induced by Zinc Finger Nuclease-mediated targeted mutagenesis, we show that in zebrafish, Kif7 acts principally to suppress the activity of the Gli1 transcription factor. Notably, we find that endogenous Kif7 protein accumulates not only in the primary cilium, as previously observed in mammalian cells, but also in cytoplasmic puncta that disperse in response to Hh pathway activation. Moreover, we show that Drosophila Costal2 can substitute for Kif7, suggesting a conserved mode of action of the two proteins. We show that Kif7 interacts with both Gli1 and Gli2a and suggest that it functions to sequester Gli proteins in the cytoplasm, in a manner analogous to the regulation of Ci by Cos2 in Drosophila. We also show that zebrafish Kif7 potentiates Gli2a activity by promoting its dissociation from the Suppressor of Fused (Sufu) protein and present evidence that it mediates a Smo dependent modification of the full length form of Gli2a. Surprisingly, the function of Kif7 in the zebrafish embryo appears restricted principally to mesodermal derivatives, its inactivation having little effect on neural tube patterning, even when Sufu protein levels are depleted. Remarkably, zebrafish lacking all Kif7 function are viable, in contrast to the peri-natal lethality of mouse kif7 mutants but similar to some Acrocallosal or Joubert syndrome patients who are homozygous for loss of function KIF7 alleles.

  9. Regulation of uterine and umbilical amino acid uptakes by maternal amino acid concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thureen, P J; Anderson, S M; Hay, W W

    2000-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that decreased fetal amino acid (AA) supply, produced by maternal hypoaminoacidemia (low AA) during hyperglycemia (HG), is reversible with maternal AA infusion and regulates fetal insulin concentration ([I]). We measured net uterine and umbilical AA uptakes during maternal HG/low AA concentration ([AA]) and after maternal intravenous infusion of a mixed AA solution. After 5 days HG, all maternal [AA] except glycine were decreased >50%, particularly essential [AA] (P infusion increased net uterine uptakes of Val, Leu, Ile, Met, and Ser and net umbilical uptakes of Val, Leu, Ile, Met, Phe, and Arg but did not change net uteroplacental uptake of any AA. Fetal [I] increased 55 +/- 14%, P < 0.001, with correction of fetal [AA], despite the lack of change in fetal glucose concentration. Thus generalized maternal hypoaminoacidemia decreases uterine and umbilical uptakes of primarily the essential AA and decreases fetal branched-chain [AA]. These changes are reversed with correction of maternal [AA], which also increases fetal [I].

  10. NF-κB-repressing factor phosphorylation regulates transcription elongation via its interactions with 5'→3' exoribonuclease 2 and negative elongation factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, Sascha; Bartels, Myriam; Schweda, Aike Torben; Resch, Klaus; Pallua, Norbert; Nourbakhsh, Mahtab

    2016-01-01

    NF-κB-repressing factor (NKRF) inhibits transcription elongation by binding to specific sequences in target promoters. Stimuli such as IL-1 have been shown to overcome this inhibitory action and enable the resumption of transcription elongation machinery by an unknown mechanism. Using mass spectrometry and in vitro phosphorylation analyses, we demonstrate that NKRF is phosphorylated within 3 different domains in unstimulated HeLa cells. Phosphoamino acid mapping and mutation analysis of NKRF further suggest that only Ser phosphorylation within aa 421-429 is regulated by IL-1 stimulation. In copurification studies, aa 421-429 is required for interactions between NKRF, 5'→3' exoribonuclease 2 (XRN2) and the negative elongation factor (NELF)-E in HeLa cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments further show that IL-1 stimulation leads to decrease in NKRF aa 421-429 phosphorylation and dissociation of NELF-E and XRN2 by concomitant resumption of transcription elongation of a synthetic reporter or the endogenous NKRF target gene, IL-8. Together, NKRF phosphorylation modulates promoter-proximal transcription elongation of NF-κB/NKRF-regulated genes via direct interactions with elongation complex in response to specific stimuli.

  11. Histone Deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) Negatively Regulates Thermogenic Program in Brown Adipocytes via Coordinated Regulation of Histone H3 Lysine 27 (H3K27) Deacetylation and Methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fenfen; Wu, Rui; Cui, Xin; Zha, Lin; Yu, Liqing; Shi, Hang; Xue, Bingzhong

    2016-02-26

    Inhibiting class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) increases energy expenditure, reduces adiposity, and improves insulin sensitivity in obese mice. However, the precise mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that HDAC1 is a negative regulator of the brown adipocyte thermogenic program. The Hdac1 level is lower in mouse brown fat (BAT) than white fat, is suppressed in mouse BAT during cold exposure or β3-adrenergic stimulation, and is down-regulated during brown adipocyte differentiation. Remarkably, overexpressing Hdac1 profoundly blocks, whereas deleting Hdac1 significantly enhances, β-adrenergic activation-induced BAT-specific gene expression in brown adipocytes. β-Adrenergic activation in brown adipocytes results in a dissociation of HDAC1 from promoters of BAT-specific genes, including uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator 1α (Pgc1α), leading to increased acetylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27), an epigenetic mark of gene activation. This is followed by dissociation of the polycomb repressive complexes, including the H3K27 methyltransferase enhancer of zeste homologue (EZH2), suppressor of zeste 12 (SUZ12), and ring finger protein 2 (RNF2) from (and concomitant recruitment of H3K27 demethylase ubiquitously transcribed tetratricopeptide repeat on chromosome X (UTX) to) Ucp1 and Pgc1α promoters, leading to decreased H3K27 trimethylation, a histone transcriptional repression mark. Thus, HDAC1 negatively regulates the brown adipocyte thermogenic program, and inhibiting Hdac1 promotes BAT-specific gene expression through a coordinated control of increased acetylation and decreased methylation of H3K27, thereby switching the transcriptional repressive state to the active state at the promoters of Ucp1 and Pgc1α. Targeting HDAC1 may be beneficial in prevention and treatment of obesity by enhancing BAT thermogenesis.

  12. Negative Regulation of Anthocynanin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis by a miR156-Targeted SPL Transcription Factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, J.Y.; Liu, C.; Felippes, F. F.; Weigel, D.; Wang, J.-W.

    2011-04-01

    Flavonoids are synthesized through an important metabolic pathway that leads to the production of diverse secondary metabolites, including anthocyanins, flavonols, flavones, and proanthocyanidins. Anthocyanins and flavonols are derived from Phe and share common precursors, dihydroflavonols, which are substrates for both flavonol synthase and dihydroflavonol 4-reductase. In the stems of Arabidopsis thaliana, anthocyanins accumulate in an acropetal manner, with the highest level at the junction between rosette and stem. We show here that this accumulation pattern is under the regulation of miR156-targeted SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) genes, which are deeply conserved and known to have important roles in regulating phase change and flowering. Increased miR156 activity promotes accumulation of anthocyanins, whereas reduced miR156 activity results in high levels of flavonols. We further provide evidence that at least one of the miR156 targets, SPL9, negatively regulates anthocyanin accumulation by directly preventing expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes through destabilization of a MYB-bHLH-WD40 transcriptional activation complex. Our results reveal a direct link between the transition to flowering and secondary metabolism and provide a potential target for manipulation of anthocyanin and flavonol content in plants.

  13. Sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum ATPase is a molecular partner of Wolfram syndrome 1 protein, which negatively regulates its expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatyka, Malgorzata; Da Silva Xavier, Gabriela; Bellomo, Elisa A; Leadbeater, Wendy; Astuti, Dewi; Smith, Joel; Michelangeli, Frank; Rutter, Guy A; Barrett, Timothy G

    2015-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by neurodegeneration and diabetes mellitus. The gene responsible for the syndrome (WFS1) encodes an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident transmembrane protein that is involved in the regulation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), intracellular ion homeostasis, cyclic adenosine monophosphate production and regulation of insulin biosynthesis and secretion. In this study, single cell Ca(2+) imaging with fura-2 and direct measurements of free cytosolic ATP concentration ([ATP]CYT) with adenovirally expressed luciferase confirmed a reduced and delayed rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]CYT), and additionally, diminished [ATP]CYT rises in response to elevated glucose concentrations in WFS1-depleted MIN6 cells. We also observed that sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA) expression was elevated in several WFS1-depleted cell models and primary islets. We demonstrated a novel interaction between WFS1 and SERCA by co-immunoprecipitation in Cos7 cells and with endogenous proteins in human neuroblastoma cells. This interaction was reduced when cells were treated with the ER stress inducer dithiothreitol. Treatment of WFS1-depleted neuroblastoma cells with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 resulted in reduced accumulation of SERCA levels compared with wild-type cells. Together these results reveal a role for WFS1 in the negative regulation of SERCA and provide further insights into the function of WFS1 in calcium homeostasis.

  14. Up-Regulation of RFC3 Promotes Triple Negative Breast Cancer Metastasis and is Associated With Poor Prognosis Via EMT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Yu He

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC was regarded as the most aggressive and mortal subtype of breast cancer (BC since the molecular subtype system has been established. Abundant studies have revealed that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT played a pivotal role during breast cancer metastasis and progression, especially in TNBC. Herein, we showed that inhibition the expression of replication factor C subunit 3 (RFC3 significantly attenuated TNBC metastasis and progression, which was associated with EMT signal pathway. In TNBC cells, knockdown of RFC3 can down-regulate mesenchymal markers and up-regulate epithelial markers, significantly attenuated cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Additionally, silencing RFC3 expression can decrease nude mice tumor volume, weight and relieve lung metastasis in vivo. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that overexpression of RFC3 in TNBC showed increased metastasis, progression and poor prognosis. We confirmed all of these results by immunohistochemistry analysis in 127 human TNBC tissues and found that RFC3 expression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in TNBC. Taken all these findings into consideration, we can conclude that up-regulation of RFC3 promotes TNBC progression through EMT signal pathway. Therefore, RFC3 could be an independent prognostic factor and therapeutic target for TNBC.

  15. Root-expressed maize lipoxygenase 3 negatively regulates induced systemic resistance to Colletotrichum graminicola in shoots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, Nasie N; Mastouri, Fatemeh; Damarwinasis, Ramadhika; Borrego, Eli J; Moran-Diez, Maria E; Kenerley, Charley M; Gao, Xiquan; Kolomiets, Michael V

    2013-01-01

    evidence that SM1 function in ISR, at least in part, by suppressing host ZmLOX3 gene. This study and the genetic tools generated herein will allow the identification of the signals regulating the induction of resistance to aboveground attackers by beneficial soil microorganisms in the future.

  16. Negative Ion Photoelectron Spectroscopy Reveals Thermodynamic Advantage of Organic Acids in Facilitating Formation of Bisulfate Ion Clusters: Atmospheric Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Gao-Lei; Lin, Wei; Deng, Shihu; Zhang, Jian; Zheng, Weijun; Paesani, Francesco; Wang, Xue B.

    2013-03-07

    Recent lab and field measurements have indicated critical roles of organic acids in enhancing new atmospheric aerosol formation. Such findings have stimulated theoretical studies with the aim of understanding interaction of organic acids with common aerosol nucleation precursors like bisulfate (HSO4-). In this Letter, we report a combined negative ion photoelectron spectroscopic and theoretical investigation of molecular clusters formed by HSO4- with succinic acid (SUA, HO2C(CH2)2CO2H), HSO4-(SUA)n (n = 0-2), along with HSO4-(H2O)n and HSO4-(H2SO4)n. It is found that one SUA molecule can stabilize HSO4- by ca. 39 kcal/mol, triple the corresponding value that one water molecule is capable of (ca. 13 kcal/mol). Molecular dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations reveal the most plausible structures of these clusters and attribute the stability of these clusters due to formation of strong hydrogen bonds. This work provides direct experimental evidence showing significant thermodynamic advantage by involving organic acid molecules to promote formation and growth in bisulfate clusters and aerosols.

  17. Manufacture and application of valve-regulated lead/acid batteries in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z. [Battery Consultants China, Univ. of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, BJ (China)

    1998-05-18

    This paper introduces the manufacture and application of valve-regulated lead/acid batteries in China. The contents cover the following topics: (i) background development; (ii) materials; (iii) manufacturing technology and equipment; (iv) application and market prospects. (orig.)

  18. Os2 MAP kinase-mediated osmostress tolerance in Penicillium digitatum is associated with its positive regulation on glycerol synthesis and negative regulation on ergosterol synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingshuang; Chen, Changsheng; Zhu, Congyi; Sun, Xuepeng; Ruan, Ruoxin; Li, Hongye

    2014-01-01

    High osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway is ubiquitously distributed among eukaryotic organisms and plays an important role in adaptation to changes in the environment. In this study, the Hog1 ortholog in Penicillium digitatum, designated Pdos2, was identified and characterized using a gene knock-out strategy. The ΔPdos2 mutant showed a considerably increased sensitivity to salt stress and cell wall-disturbing agents and a slightly increased resistance to fungicides iprodione and fludioxonil, indicating that Pdos2 is involved in response to hyperosmotic stress, regulation of cell wall integrity and sensitivity to fungicides iprodione and fludioxonil. Surprisingly, the mutant was not affected in response to oxidative stress caused by H2O2. The average lesion size in citrus fruits caused by ΔPdos2 mutant was smaller (approximately 25.0% reduction) than that caused by the wild-type strain of P. digitatum at 4 days post inoculation, which suggests that Pdos2 is needed for full virulence of P. digitatum. Interestingly, in the presence of 0.7 M NaCl, the glycerol content was remarkably increased and the ergosterol was decreased in mycelia of the wide-type P. digitatum, whereas the glycerol content was only slightly increased and the ergosterol content remained stable in the ΔPdos2 mutant, suggesting that Pdos2-mediated osmotic adaption is associated with its positive regulation on glycerol synthesis and negative regulation on ergosterol synthesis.

  19. Tebuconazole Regulates Fatty Acid Composition of Etiolated Winter Wheat Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Korsukova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The fatty acid composition of shoots of unhardened and hardened to cold etiolated winter wheat seedlings grown from seeds treated with tebuconazole-based protectant «Bunker» (content of tebuconazole 60 grams per liter, g/L, and the seedlings frost resistance has been studied. It is shown that treatment of winter wheat seeds by «Bunker» preparation (1,5 microliter per gram of seeds, µl/g is accompanied by an increase of the fatty acids unsaturation in the shoots and increase of the seedlings frost resistance (–8°C, 24 h. The most pronounced decrease in the content of saturated palmitic acid and increase in the content of unsaturated α-linolenic acid were observed during cold hardening of winter wheat seedlings grown from seeds treated by tebuconazole-based protectant. It is concluded that the seeds treatment with tebuconazole-based protectant causes changes of fatty acid composition of winter wheat seedlings to increase their frost resistance.

  20. Gibberellin application at pre-bloom in grapevines down-regulates the expressions of VvIAA9 and VvARF7, negative regulators of fruit set initiation, during parthenocarpic fruit development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Jin Jung

    Full Text Available Fruit set is initiated only after fertilization and is tightly regulated primarily by gibberellins (GAs and auxins. The application of either of these hormones induces parthenocarpy, fruit set without fertilization, but the molecular mechanism underlying this induction is poorly understood. In the present study, we have shown that the parthenocarpic fruits induced by GA application at pre-bloom result from the interaction of GA with auxin signaling. The transcriptional levels of the putative negative regulators of fruit set initiation, including Vitis auxin/indole-3-acetic acid transcription factor 9 (VvIAA9, Vitis auxin response factor 7 (VvARF7, and VvARF8 were monitored during inflorescence development in seeded diploid 'Tamnara' grapevines with or without GA application. Without GA application, VvIAA9, VvARF7, and VvARF8 were expressed at a relatively high level before full bloom, but decreased thereafter following pollination. After GA application at 14 days before full bloom (DBF; however, the expression levels of VvIAA9 and VvARF7 declined at 5 DBF prior to pollination. The effects of GA application on auxin levels or auxin signaling were also analyzed by monitoring the expression patterns of auxin biosynthesis genes and auxin-responsive genes with or without GA application. Transcription levels of the auxin biosynthesis genes Vitis anthranilate synthase β subunit (VvASB1-like, Vitis YUCCA2 (VvYUC2, and VvYUC6 were not significantly changed by GA application. However, the expressions of Vitis Gretchen Hagen3.2 (VvGH3.2 and VvGH3.3, auxin-responsive genes, were up-regulated from 2 DBF to full bloom with GA application. Furthermore, the Vitis GA signaling gene, VvDELLA was up-regulated by GA application during 12 DBF to 7 DBF, prior to down-regulation of VvIAA9 and VvARF7. These results suggest that VvIAA9 and VvARF7 are negative regulators of fruit set initiation in grapevines, and GA signaling is integrated with auxin signaling via Vv

  1. LDS1-produced oxylipins are negative regulators of growth, conidiation and fumonisin synthesis in the fungal maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Valeria; Giorni, Paola; Cirlini, Martina; Ludovici, Matteo; Visentin, Ivan; Cardinale, Francesca; Fabbri, Anna A; Fanelli, Corrado; Reverberi, Massimo; Battilani, Paola; Galaverna, Gianni; Dall'Asta, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Oxylipins are fatty acid-derived signaling compounds produced by all eukaryotes so far investigated; in mycotoxigenic fungi, they modulate toxin production and interactions with the host plants. Among the many enzymes responsible for oxylipin generation, Linoleate Diol Synthase 1 (LDS1) produces mainly 8-hydroperoxyoctadecenoic acid and subsequently different di-hydroxyoctadecenoic acids. In this study, we inactivated a copy of the putative LDS1 ortholog (acc. N. FVEG_09294.3) of Fusarium verticillioides, with the aim to investigate its influence on the oxylipin profile of the fungus, on its development, secondary metabolism and virulence. LC-MS/MS oxylipin profiling carried out on the selected mutant strain revealed significant quali-quantitative differences for several oxylipins when compared to the WT strain. The Fvlds1-deleted mutant grew better, produced more conidia, synthesized more fumonisins and infected maize cobs faster than the WT strain. We hypothesize that oxylipins may act as regulators of gene expression in the toxigenic plant pathogen F. verticillioides, in turn causing notable changes in its phenotype. These changes could relate to the ability of oxylipins to re-shape the transcriptional profile of F. verticillioides by inducing chromatin modifications and exerting a direct control on the transcription of secondary metabolism in fungi.

  2. ZFP36L1 negatively regulates plasmacytoid differentiation of BCL1 cells by targeting BLIMP1 mRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Nasir

    Full Text Available The ZFP36/Tis11 family of zinc-finger proteins regulate cellular processes by binding to adenine uridine rich elements in the 3' untranslated regions of various mRNAs and promoting their degradation. We show here that ZFP36L1 expression is largely extinguished during the transition from B cells to plasma cells, in a reciprocal pattern to that of ZFP36 and the plasma cell transcription factor, BLIMP1. Enforced expression of ZFP36L1 in the mouse BCL1 cell line blocked cytokine-induced differentiation while shRNA-mediated knock-down enhanced differentiation. Reconstruction of regulatory networks from microarray gene expression data using the ARACNe algorithm identified candidate mRNA targets for ZFP36L1 including BLIMP1. Genes that displayed down-regulation in plasma cells were significantly over-represented (P = <0.0001 in a set of previously validated ZFP36 targets suggesting that ZFP36L1 and ZFP36 target distinct sets of mRNAs during plasmacytoid differentiation. ShRNA-mediated knock-down of ZFP36L1 in BCL1 cells led to an increase in levels of BLIMP1 mRNA and protein, but not for mRNAs of other transcription factors that regulate plasmacytoid differentiation (xbp1, irf4, bcl6. Finally, ZFP36L1 significantly reduced the activity of a BLIMP1 3' untranslated region-driven luciferase reporter. Taken together, these findings suggest that ZFP36L1 negatively regulates plasmacytoid differentiation, at least in part, by targeting the expression of BLIMP1.

  3. Biogas Production on Demand Regulated by Butyric Acid Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, K.; Schiffels, J.; Krafft, S.; Kuperjans, I.; Elbers, G.; Selmer, T.

    2016-03-01

    Investigating effects of volatile fatty acids on the biogas process it was observed that butyric acid can be used for transient stimulation of the methane production in biogas plants operating with low energy substrates like cattle manure. Upon addition of butyrate the methane output of the reactors doubled within 24 h and reached almost 3-times higher methane yields within 3-4 days. Butyrate was quantitatively eliminated and the reactors returned to the original productivity state within 3 days when application of butyrate was stopped. The opportunity to use butyrate feeding for increased biogas production on demand is discussed.

  4. Aspects of the regulation of long-chain fatty acid oxidation in bovine liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesse, B.W.; Emery, R.S.; Thomas, J.W.

    1986-09-01

    Factors involved in regulation of bovine hepatic fatty acid oxidation were examined using liver slices. Fatty acid oxidation was measured as the conversion of l-(/sup 14/C) palmitate to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and total (/sup 14/C) acid-soluble metabolites. Extended (5 to 7 d) fasting of Holstein cows had relatively little effect on palmitate oxidation to acid-soluble metabolites by liver slices, although oxidation to CO/sup 2/ was decreased. Feeding a restricted roughage, high concentrate ration to lactating cows resulted in inhibition of palmitate oxidation. Insulin, glucose, and acetate inhibited palmitate oxidation by bovine liver slices. The authors suggest the regulation of bovine hepatic fatty acid oxidation may be less dependent on hormonally induced alterations in enzyme activity as observed in rat liver and more dependent upon action of rumen fermentation products or their metabolites on enzyme systems involved in fatty acid oxidation.

  5. Insulin signaling regulates fatty acid catabolism at the level of CoA activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The insulin/IGF signaling pathway is a highly conserved regulator of metabolism in flies and mammals, regulating multiple physiological functions including lipid metabolism. Although insulin signaling is known to regulate the activity of a number of enzymes in metabolic pathways, a comprehensive understanding of how the insulin signaling pathway regulates metabolic pathways is still lacking. Accepted knowledge suggests the key regulated step in triglyceride (TAG catabolism is the release of fatty acids from TAG via the action of lipases. We show here that an additional, important regulated step is the activation of fatty acids for beta-oxidation via Acyl Co-A synthetases (ACS. We identify pudgy as an ACS that is transcriptionally regulated by direct FOXO action in Drosophila. Increasing or reducing pudgy expression in vivo causes a decrease or increase in organismal TAG levels respectively, indicating that pudgy expression levels are important for proper lipid homeostasis. We show that multiple ACSs are also transcriptionally regulated by insulin signaling in mammalian cells. In sum, we identify fatty acid activation onto CoA as an important, regulated step in triglyceride catabolism, and we identify a mechanistic link through which insulin regulates lipid homeostasis.

  6. TRAF1 is a negative regulator of TNF signaling. enhanced TNF signaling in TRAF1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitsikov, E N; Laouini, D; Dunn, I F; Sannikova, T Y; Davidson, L; Alt, F W; Geha, R S

    2001-10-01

    TNF receptor-associated factor 1 (TRAF1) is a unique TRAF protein because it lacks a RING finger domain and is predominantly expressed in activated lymphocytes. To elucidate the function of TRAF1, we generated TRAF1-deficient mice. TRAF1(-/-) mice are viable and have normal lymphocyte development. TRAF1(-/-) T cells exhibit stronger than wild-type (WT) T cell proliferation to anti-CD3 mAb, which persisted in the presence of IL-2 or anti-CD28 antibodies. Activated TRAF1(-/-) T cells, but not TRAF1(+/+) T cells, responded to TNF by proliferation and activation of the NF-kappa B and AP-1 signaling pathways. This TNF effect was mediated by TNFR2 (p75) but not by TNFR1 (p55). Furthermore, skin from TRAF1(-/-) mice was hypersensitive to TNF-induced necrosis. These findings suggest that TRAF1 is a negative regulator of TNF signaling.

  7. The proapoptotic and antimitogenic protein p66SHC acts as a negative regulator of lymphocyte activation and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finetti, Francesca; Pellegrini, Michela; Ulivieri, Cristina; Savino, Maria Teresa; Paccagnini, Eugenio; Ginanneschi, Chiara; Lanfrancone, Luisa; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Baldari, Cosima T

    2008-05-15

    The ShcA locus encodes 3 protein isoforms that differ in tissue specificity, subcellular localization, and function. Among these, p66Shc inhibits TCR coupling to the Ras/MAPK pathway and primes T cells to undergo apoptotic death. We have investigated the outcome of p66Shc deficiency on lymphocyte development and homeostasis. We show that p66Shc(-/-) mice develop an age-related lupus-like autoimmune disease characterized by spontaneous peripheral T- and B-cell activation and proliferation, autoantibody production, and immune complex deposition in kidney and skin, resulting in autoimmune glomerulonephritis and alopecia. p66Shc(-/-) lymphocytes display enhanced proliferation in response to antigen receptor engagement in vitro and more robust immune responses both to vaccination and to allergen sensitization in vivo. The data identify p66Shc as a negative regulator of lymphocyte activation and show that loss of this protein results in breaking of immunologic tolerance and development of systemic autoimmunity.

  8. Agreeableness and the Self-Regulation of Negative Affect: Findings Involving the Neuroticism/Somatic Distress Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ode, Scott; Robinson, Michael D

    2007-12-01

    In the temperament literature, agreeableness has been theoretically linked to effortful control. Further, research in this area has suggested that effortful control may play a broad role in moderating temperament-based tendencies toward negative affect. The present three studies, involving a total of 300 undergraduate participants, sought to extend this perspective to the adult literature by examining potential interactions between agreeableness and neuroticism in predicting reported somatic symptoms. Although such symptoms have been linked to neuroticism, they are not characteristic of the interpersonal concerns linked to agreeableness. Nevertheless, all studies found that agreeableness and neuroticism interacted to predict somatic symptoms such that high levels of agreeableness decoupled the relationship between neuroticism and somatic distress. These findings indicate a broad role for agreeableness in the self-regulation of neuroticism-linked distress.

  9. Caenorhabditis elegans Inositol 5-Phosphatase Homolog Negatively Regulates Inositol 1,4,5-Triphosphate Signaling in Ovulation V⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Yen Kim; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2002-01-01

    Ovulation in Caenorhabditis elegans requires inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) signaling activated by the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-receptor homolog LET-23. We generated a deletion mutant of a type I 5-phosphatase, ipp-5, and found a novel ovulation phenotype whereby the spermatheca hyperextends to engulf two oocytes per ovulation cycle. The temporal and spatial expression of IPP-5 is consistent with its proposed inhibition of IP3 signaling in the adult spermatheca. ipp-5 acts downstream of let-23, and interacts with let-23–mediated IP3 signaling pathway genes. We infer that IPP-5 negatively regulates IP3 signaling to ensure proper spermathecal contraction. PMID:12006659

  10. CKIP-1 is an intrinsic negative regulator of T-cell activation through an interaction with CARMA1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Sakamoto

    Full Text Available The transcription factor NF-κB plays a key regulatory role in lymphocyte activation and generation of immune response. Stimulation of T cell receptor (TCR induces phosphorylation of CARMA1 by PKCθ, resulting in formation of CARMA1-Bcl10-MALT1 (CBM complex at lipid rafts and subsequently leading to NF-κB activation. While many molecular events leading to NF-κB activation have been reported, it is less understood how this activation is negatively regulated. We performed a cell-based screening for negative regulators of TCR-mediated NF-κB activation, using mutagenesis and complementation cloning strategies. Here we show that casein kinase-2 interacting protein-1 (CKIP-1 suppresses PKCθ-CBM-NF-κB signaling. We found that CKIP-1 interacts with CARMA1 and competes with PKCθ for association. We further confirmed that a PH domain of CKIP-1 is required for association with CARMA1 and its inhibitory effect. CKIP-1 represses NF-κB activity in unstimulated cells, and inhibits NF-κB activation induced by stimulation with PMA or constitutively active PKCθ, but not by stimulation with TNFα. Interestingly, CKIP-1 does not inhibit NF-κB activation induced by CD3/CD28 costimulation, which caused dissociation of CKIP-1 from lipid rafts. These data suggest that CKIP-1 contributes maintenance of a resting state on NF-κB activity or prevents T cells from being activated by inadequate signaling. In conclusion, we demonstrate that CKIP-1 interacts with CARMA1 and has an inhibitory effect on PKCθ-CBM-NF-κB signaling.

  11. Coronavirus papain-like proteases negatively regulate antiviral innate immune response through disruption of STING-mediated signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Sun

    Full Text Available Viruses have evolved elaborate mechanisms to evade or inactivate the complex system of sensors and signaling molecules that make up the host innate immune response. Here we show that human coronavirus (HCoV NL63 and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS CoV papain-like proteases (PLP antagonize innate immune signaling mediated by STING (stimulator of interferon genes, also known as MITA/ERIS/MYPS. STING resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and upon activation, forms dimers which assemble with MAVS, TBK-1 and IKKε, leading to IRF-3 activation and subsequent induction of interferon (IFN. We found that expression of the membrane anchored PLP domain from human HCoV-NL63 (PLP2-TM or SARS-CoV (PLpro-TM inhibits STING-mediated activation of IRF-3 nuclear translocation and induction of IRF-3 dependent promoters. Both catalytically active and inactive forms of CoV PLPs co-immunoprecipitated with STING, and viral replicase proteins co-localize with STING in HCoV-NL63-infected cells. Ectopic expression of catalytically active PLP2-TM blocks STING dimer formation and negatively regulates assembly of STING-MAVS-TBK1/IKKε complexes required for activation of IRF-3. STING dimerization was also substantially reduced in cells infected with SARS-CoV. Furthermore, the level of ubiquitinated forms of STING, RIG-I, TBK1 and IRF-3 are reduced in cells expressing wild type or catalytic mutants of PLP2-TM, likely contributing to disruption of signaling required for IFN induction. These results describe a new mechanism used by CoVs in which CoV PLPs negatively regulate antiviral defenses by disrupting the STING-mediated IFN induction.

  12. Deleted in liver cancer 1 (DLC1 negatively regulates Rho/ROCK/MLC pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Chak-Lui Wong

    Full Text Available AIMS: Deleted in liver cancer 1 (DLC1, a member of RhoGTPase activating protein (GAP family, is known to have suppressive activities in tumorigenicity and cancer metastasis. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of how DLC1 suppresses cell motility have not been fully elucidated. Rho-kinase (ROCK is an immediate down-stream effector of RhoA in mediating cellular cytoskeletal events and cell motility. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of DLC1 on Rho/ROCK signaling pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrated that DLC1 negatively regulated ROCK-dependent actomyosin contractility. From immunofluorescence study, we found that ectopic expression of DLC1 abrogated Rho/ROCK-mediated cytoskeletal reorganization including formation of stress fibers and focal adhesions. It also downregulated cortical phosphorylation of myosin light chain 2 (MLC2. These inhibitory events by DLC1 were RhoGAP-dependent, as RhoGAP-deficient mutant of DLC1 (DLC1 K714E abolished these inhibitory events. In addition, from western study, DLC1 inhibited ROCK-related myosin light chain phosphatase targeting unit 1 (MYPT1 phosphorylation at Threonine 853. By examining cell morphology under microscope, we found that ectopic expression of dominant-active ROCK released cells from DLC1-induced cytoskeletal collapse and cell shrinkage. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that DLC1 negatively regulates Rho/ROCK/MLC2. This implicates a ROCK-mediated pathway of DLC1 in suppressing metastasis of HCC cells and enriches our understanding in the molecular mechanisms involved in the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  13. Salvianolic acid A positively regulates PTEN protein level and inhibits growth of A549 lung cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    BI, LEI; CHEN, JIANPING; YUAN, XIAOJING; JIANG, ZEQUN; CHEN, WEIPING

    2013-01-01

    Salvianolic acid A (Sal A) is an effective compound extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza which has been used in the treatment of various diseases. Preliminary data indicate that Sal A treatment has a specific anti-lung cancer effect. However, the manner in which Sal A regulates cancer growth remains unknown. In this study, the A549 lung cancer cell line and its response to Sal A treatment was examined. Results showed that Sal A treatment significantly decreased A549 cell growth, promoted partial apoptosis and increased mitochondrial membrane permeability. Western blot analysis showed that Sal A upregulated the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) protein level, while consistently downregulating Akt phosphorylation. These results indicate that Sal A negatively mediates A549 lung cancer cell line growth or apoptosis, most likely by positively regulating PTEN protein level. PMID:24648921

  14. Alternative Polyadenylation in Triple-Negative Breast Tumors Allows NRAS and c-JUN to Bypass PUMILIO Posttranscriptional Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Wayne O; Lembo, Antonio; Volorio, Angela; Brachtel, Elena; Tian, Bin; Sgroi, Dennis; Provero, Paolo; Dyson, Nicholas

    2016-12-15

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is a process that changes the posttranscriptional regulation and translation potential of mRNAs via addition or deletion of 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) sequences. To identify posttranscriptional-regulatory events affected by APA in breast tumors, tumor datasets were analyzed for recurrent APA events. Motif mapping of the changed 3' UTR regions found that APA-mediated removal of Pumilio regulatory elements (PRE) was unusually common. Breast tumor subtype-specific APA profiling identified triple-negative breast tumors as having the highest levels of APA. To determine the frequency of these events, an independent cohort of triple-negative breast tumors and normal breast tissue was analyzed for APA. APA-mediated shortening of NRAS and c-JUN was seen frequently, and this correlated with changes in the expression of downstream targets. mRNA stability and luciferase assays demonstrated APA-dependent alterations in RNA and protein levels of affected candidate genes. Examination of clinical parameters of these tumors found those with APA of NRAS and c-JUN to be smaller and less proliferative, but more invasive than non-APA tumors. RT-PCR profiling identified elevated levels of polyadenylation factor CSTF3 in tumors with APA. Overexpression of CSTF3 was common in triple-negative breast cancer cell lines, and elevated CSTF3 levels were sufficient to induce APA of NRAS and c-JUN. Our results support the hypothesis that PRE-containing mRNAs are disproportionately affected by APA, primarily due to high sequence similarity in the motifs utilized by polyadenylation machinery and the PUM complex. Cancer Res; 76(24); 7231-41. ©2016 AACR.

  15. Potency of individual bile acids to regulate bile acid synthesis and transport genes in primary human hepatocyte cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Hong; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Lei, Xiaohong; Cui, Julia Yue; Ellis, Ewa; Strom, Stephen C; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate their own homeostasis, but the potency of individual bile acids is not known. This study examined the effects of cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on expression of BA synthesis and transport genes in human primary hepatocyte cultures. Hepatocytes were treated with the individual BAs at 10, 30, and 100μM for 48 h, and RNA was extracted for real-time PCR analysis. For the classic pathway of BA synthesis, BAs except for UDCA markedly suppressed CYP7A1 (70-95%), the rate-limiting enzyme of bile acid synthesis, but only moderately (35%) down-regulated CYP8B1 at a high concentration of 100μM. BAs had minimal effects on mRNA of two enzymes of the alternative pathway of BA synthesis, namely CYP27A1 and CYP7B1. BAs increased the two major target genes of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), namely the small heterodimer partner (SHP) by fourfold, and markedly induced fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) over 100-fold. The BA uptake transporter Na(+)-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide was unaffected, whereas the efflux transporter bile salt export pump was increased 15-fold and OSTα/β were increased 10-100-fold by BAs. The expression of the organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3; sixfold), ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter G5 (ABCG5; sixfold), multidrug associated protein-2 (MRP2; twofold), and MRP3 (threefold) were also increased, albeit to lesser degrees. In general, CDCA was the most potent and effective BA in regulating these genes important for BA homeostasis, whereas DCA and CA were intermediate, LCA the least, and UDCA ineffective.

  16. CaWRKY58, encoding a group I WRKY transcription factor of Capsicum annuum, negatively regulates resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuna; Dang, Fengfeng; Liu, Zhiqin; Wang, Xu; Eulgem, Thomas; Lai, Yan; Yu, Lu; She, Jianju; Shi, Youliang; Lin, Jinhui; Chen, Chengcong; Guan, Deyi; Qiu, Ailian; He, Shuilin

    2013-02-01

    WRKY transcription factors are encoded by large gene families across the plant kingdom. So far, their biological and molecular functions in nonmodel plants, including pepper (Capsicum annuum) and other Solanaceae, remain poorly understood. Here, we report on the functional characterization of a new group I WRKY protein from pepper, termed CaWRKY58. Our data indicate that CaWRKY58 can be localized to the nucleus and can activate the transcription of the reporter β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene driven by the 35S core promoter with two copies of the W-box in its proximal upstream region. In pepper plants infected with the bacterial pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum, CaWRKY58 transcript levels showed a biphasic response, manifested in an early/transient down-regulation and late up-regulation. CaWRKY58 transcripts were suppressed by treatment with methyl jasmonate and abscisic acid. Tobacco plants overexpressing CaWRKY58 did not show any obvious morphological phenotypes, but exhibited disease symptoms of greater severity than did wild-type plants. The enhanced susceptibility of CaWRKY58-overexpressing tobacco plants correlated with the decreased expression of hypersensitive response marker genes, as well as various defence-associated genes. Consistently, CaWRKY58 pepper plants silenced by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) displayed enhanced resistance to the highly virulent R. solanacearum strain FJC100301, and this was correlated with enhanced transcripts of defence-related pepper genes. Our results suggest that CaWRKY58 acts as a transcriptional activator of negative regulators in the resistance of pepper to R. solanacearum infection.

  17. New insights into the regulation of plant immunity by amino acid metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeier, Jürgen

    2013-12-01

    Besides defence pathways regulated by classical stress hormones, distinct amino acid metabolic pathways constitute integral parts of the plant immune system. Mutations in several genes involved in Asp-derived amino acid biosynthetic pathways can have profound impact on plant resistance to specific pathogen types. For instance, amino acid imbalances associated with homoserine or threonine accumulation elevate plant immunity to oomycete pathogens but not to pathogenic fungi or bacteria. The catabolism of Lys produces the immune signal pipecolic acid (Pip), a cyclic, non-protein amino acid. Pip amplifies plant defence responses and acts as a critical regulator of plant systemic acquired resistance, defence priming and local resistance to bacterial pathogens. Asp-derived pyridine nucleotides influence both pre- and post-invasion immunity, and the catabolism of branched chain amino acids appears to affect plant resistance to distinct pathogen classes by modulating crosstalk of salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-regulated defence pathways. It also emerges that, besides polyamine oxidation and NADPH oxidase, Pro metabolism is involved in the oxidative burst and the hypersensitive response associated with avirulent pathogen recognition. Moreover, the acylation of amino acids can control plant resistance to pathogens and pests by the formation of protective plant metabolites or by the modulation of plant hormone activity.

  18. Gallic acid regulates skin photoaging in UVB-exposed fibroblast and hairless mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eunson; Park, Sang-Yong; Lee, Hyun Ji; Lee, Tae Youp; Sun, Zheng-Wang; Yi, Tae Hoo

    2014-12-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is the primary factor in skin photoaging, which is characterized by wrinkle formation, dryness, and thickening. The mechanisms underlying skin photoaging are closely associated with degradation of collagen via upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, which is induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Gallic acid (GA), a phenolic compound, possesses a variety of biological activities including antioxidant and antiinflammatory activities. We investigated the protective effects of GA against photoaging caused by UVB irradiation using normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) in vitro and hairless mice in vivo. The production levels of ROS, interlukin-6, and MMP-1 were significantly suppressed, and type I procollagen expression was stimulated in UVB-irradiated and GA-treated NHDFs. GA treatment inhibited the activity of transcription factor activation protein 1. The effects of GA following topical application and dietary administration were examined by measuring wrinkle formation, histological modification, protein expression, and physiological changes such as stratum corneum hydration, transepidermal water loss, and erythema index. We found that GA decreased dryness, skin thickness, and wrinkle formation via negative modulation of MMP-1 secretion and positive regulation of elastin, type I procollagen, and transforming growth factor-β1. Our data indicate that GA is a potential candidate for the prevention of UVB-induced premature skin aging.

  19. Transcriptomic analysis of Streptomyces clavuligerus ΔccaR::tsr: effects of the cephamycin C-clavulanic acid cluster regulator CcaR on global regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Álvarez, R; Rodríguez-García, A; Santamarta, I; Pérez-Redondo, R; Prieto-Domínguez, A; Martínez-Burgo, Y; Liras, P

    2014-05-01

    Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064 and S. clavuligerus ΔccaR::tsr cultures were grown in asparagine-starch medium, and samples were taken in the exponential and stationary growth phases. Transcriptomic analysis showed that the expression of 186 genes was altered in the ccaR-deleted mutant. These genes belong to the cephamycin C gene cluster, clavulanic acid gene cluster, clavams, holomycin, differentiation, carbon, nitrogen, amino acids or phosphate metabolism and energy production. All the clavulanic acid biosynthesis genes showed Mc values in the order of -4.23. The blip gene-encoding a β-lactamase inhibitory protein was also controlled by the cephamycin C-clavulanic acid cluster regulator (Mc -2.54). The expression of the cephamycin C biosynthesis genes was greatly reduced in the mutant (Mc values up to -7.1), while the genes involved in putative β-lactam resistance were less affected (Mc average -0.88). Genes for holomycin biosynthesis were upregulated. In addition, the lack of clavulanic acid and cephamycin production negatively affected the expression of genes for the clavulanic acid precursor arginine and of miscellaneous genes involved in nitrogen metabolism (amtB, glnB, glnA3, glnA2, glnA1). The transcriptomic results were validated by quantative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and luciferase assay of luxAB-coupled promoters. Transcriptomic analysis of the homologous genes of S. coelicolor validated the results obtained for S. clavuligerus primary metabolism genes.

  20. Regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis by the global regulator CcpA and the local regulator FabT in Streptococcus mutans

    OpenAIRE

    Faustoferri, R.C.; Hubbard, C.J.; Santiago, B.; Buckley, A.A.; Seifert, T.B.; Quivey, R.G.

    2014-01-01

    SMU.1745c, encoding a putative transcriptional regulator of the MarR family, maps to a location proximal to the fab gene cluster in Streptococcus mutans. Deletion of the SMU.1745c (fabTSm) coding region resulted in a membrane fatty acid composition comprised of longer-chained, unsaturated fatty acids (UFA), compared with the parent strain. Previous reports have indicated a role for FabT in regulation of genes in the fab gene cluster in other organisms, through binding to a palindromic DNA seq...

  1. With no lysine L-WNK1 isoforms are negative regulators of the K+-Cl- cotransporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Adriana; de Los Heros, Paola; Melo, Zesergio; Chávez-Canales, María; Murillo-de-Ozores, Adrián R; Moreno, Erika; Bazúa-Valenti, Silvana; Vázquez, Norma; Hadchouel, Juliette; Gamba, Gerardo

    2016-07-01

    The K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporters (KCC1-KCC4) encompass a branch of the SLC12 family of electroneutral cation-coupled chloride cotransporters that translocate ions out of the cell to regulate various factors, including cell volume and intracellular chloride concentration, among others. L-WNK1 is an ubiquitously expressed kinase that is activated in response to osmotic stress and intracellular chloride depletion, and it is implicated in two distinct hereditary syndromes: the renal disease pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) and the neurological disease hereditary sensory neuropathy 2 (HSN2). The effect of L-WNK1 on KCC activity is unknown. Using Xenopus laevis oocytes and HEK-293 cells, we show that the activation of KCCs by cell swelling was prevented by L-WNK1 coexpression. In contrast, the activity of the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter NKCC1 was remarkably increased with L-WNK1 coexpression. The negative effect of L-WNK1 on the KCCs is kinase dependent. Elimination of the STE20 proline-alanine rich kinase (SPAK)/oxidative stress-responsive kinase (OSR1) binding site or the HQ motif required for the WNK-WNK interaction prevented the effect of L-WNK1 on KCCs, suggesting a required interaction between L-WNK1 molecules and SPAK. Together, our data support that NKCC1 and KCCs are coordinately regulated by L-WNK1 isoforms.

  2. Altered Disease Development in the eui Mutants and Eui Overexpressors Indicates that Gibberellins Negatively Regulate Rice Basal Disease Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Lei Yang; Qun Li; Yi-Wen Deng; Yong-Gen Lou; Mu-Yang Wang; Guo-Xing Zhou; Ying-Ying Zhang; Zu-Hua He

    2008-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) form a group of important plant tetracyclic diterpenoid hormones that are involved in many aspects of plant growth and development. Emerging evidence implicates that GAs also play roles in stress responses. However, the role of GAs in biotic stress is largely unknown. Here, we report that knockout or overexpression of the Elongated uppermost internode (Eui) gene encoding a GA deactivating enzyme compromises or increases, respectively, disease resistance to bacterial blight (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oyrzae) and rice blast (Magnaporthe oryzae). Exogenous application of GA and the inhibitor of GA synthesis (uniconazol) could increase disease susceptibility and resistance, respectively, to bacterial blight. Similarly, uniconazol restored disease resistance of the eui mutant and GA3 decreased disease resistance of the Eui overexpressors to bacterial blight. Therefore, the change of resistance attributes to GA levels. In consistency with this, the GA metabolism genes OsGA2Oox2 and OsGA2oxl were down-regulated during pathogen challenge. We also found that PR1a induction was enhanced but the SA level was decreased in the Eui overexpressor, while the JA level was reduced in the eui mutant. Together, our current study indicates that GAs play a negative role in rice basal disease resistance, with EUI as a positive modulator through regulating the level of bioactive GAs.

  3. A20 negatively regulates T cell receptor signaling to NF-kappaB by cleaving Malt1 ubiquitin chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düwel, Michael; Welteke, Verena; Oeckinghaus, Andrea; Baens, Mathijs; Kloo, Bernhard; Ferch, Uta; Darnay, Bryant G; Ruland, Jürgen; Marynen, Peter; Krappmann, Daniel

    2009-06-15

    The Carma1-Bcl10-Malt1 signaling module bridges TCR signaling to the canonical IkappaB kinase (IKK)/NF-kappaB pathway. Covalent attachment of regulatory ubiquitin chains to Malt1 paracaspase directs TCR signaling to IKK activation. Further, the ubiquitin-editing enzyme A20 was recently suggested to suppress T cell activation, but molecular targets for A20 remain elusive. In this paper, we show that A20 regulates the strength and duration of the IKK/NF-kappaB response upon TCR/CD28 costimulation. By catalyzing the removal of K63-linked ubiquitin chains from Malt1, A20 prevents sustained interaction between ubiquitinated Malt1 and the IKK complex and thus serves as a negative regulator of inducible IKK activity. Upon T cell stimulation, A20 is rapidly removed and paracaspase activity of Malt1 has been suggested to cleave A20. Using antagonistic peptides or reconstitution of Malt1(-/-) T cells, we show that Malt1 paracaspase activity is required for A20 cleavage and optimal IL-2 production, but dispensable for initial IKK/NF-kappaB signaling in CD4(+) T cells. However, proteasomal inhibition impairs A20 degradation and impedes TCR/CD28-induced IKK activation. Taken together, A20 functions as a Malt1 deubiquitinating enzyme and proteasomal degradation and de novo synthesis of A20 contributes to balance TCR/CD28-induced IKK/NF-kappaB signaling.

  4. Enhanced Mucosal Defense and Reduced Tumor Burden in Mice with the Compromised Negative Regulator IRAK-M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Daniel E; Zhang, Yao; Diao, Na; Lee, Christina K; Chen, Keqiang; Caswell, Clayton C; Slade, Daniel J; Helm, Richard F; LeRoith, Tanya; Li, Liwu; Allen, Irving C

    2017-02-01

    Aberrant inflammation is a hallmark of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colorectal cancer. IRAK-M is a critical negative regulator of TLR signaling and overzealous inflammation. Here we utilize data from human studies and Irak-m(-/-) mice to elucidate the role of IRAK-M in the modulation of gastrointestinal immune system homeostasis. In human patients, IRAK-M expression is up-regulated during IBD and colorectal cancer. Further functional studies in mice revealed that Irak-m(-/-) animals are protected against colitis and colitis associated tumorigenesis. Mechanistically, our data revealed that the gastrointestinal immune system of Irak-m(-/-) mice is highly efficient at eliminating microbial translocation following epithelial barrier damage. This attenuation of pathogenesis is associated with expanded areas of gastrointestinal associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), increased neutrophil migration, and enhanced T-cell recruitment. Further evaluation of Irak-m(-/-) mice revealed a splice variant that robustly activates NF-κB signaling. Together, these data identify IRAK-M as a potential target for future therapeutic intervention.

  5. Phosphorylation of Minichromosome Maintenance 3 (MCM3) by Checkpoint Kinase 1 (Chk1) Negatively Regulates DNA Replication and Checkpoint Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiangzi; Mayca Pozo, Franklin; Wisotsky, Jacob N; Wang, Benlian; Jacobberger, James W; Zhang, Youwei

    2015-05-08

    Mechanisms controlling DNA replication and replication checkpoint are critical for the maintenance of genome stability and the prevention or treatment of human cancers. Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is a key effector protein kinase that regulates the DNA damage response and replication checkpoint. The heterohexameric minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex is the core component of mammalian DNA helicase and has been implicated in replication checkpoint activation. Here we report that Chk1 phosphorylates the MCM3 subunit of the MCM complex at Ser-205 under normal growth conditions. Mutating the Ser-205 of MCM3 to Ala increased the length of DNA replication track and shortened the S phase duration, indicating that Ser-205 phosphorylation negatively controls normal DNA replication. Upon replicative stress treatment, the inhibitory phosphorylation of MCM3 at Ser-205 was reduced, and this reduction was accompanied with the generation of single strand DNA, the key platform for ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) activation. As a result, the replication checkpoint is activated. Together, these data provide significant insights into the regulation of both normal DNA replication and replication checkpoint activation through the novel phosphorylation of MCM3 by Chk1.

  6. Identification of a novel human MD-2 splice variant that negatively regulates Lipopolysaccharide-induced TLR4 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Pearl; Michelsen, Kathrin S; Sirois, Cherilyn M; Lowe, Emily; Shimada, Kenichi; Crother, Timothy R; Chen, Shuang; Brikos, Constantinos; Bulut, Yonca; Latz, Eicke; Underhill, David; Arditi, Moshe

    2010-06-01

    Myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) is a secreted gp that assembles with TLR4 to form a functional signaling receptor for bacterial LPS. In this study, we have identified a novel alternatively spliced isoform of human MD-2, termed MD-2 short (MD-2s), which lacks the region encoded by exon 2 of the MD-2 gene. Similar to MD-2, MD-2s is glycosylated and secreted. MD-2s also interacted with LPS and TLR4, but failed to mediate LPS-induced NF-kappaB activation and IL-8 production. We show that MD-2s is upregulated upon IFN-gamma, IL-6, and TLR4 stimulation and negatively regulates LPS-mediated TLR4 signaling. Furthermore, MD-2s competitively inhibited binding of MD-2 to TLR4. Our study pinpoints a mechanism that may be used to regulate TLR4 activation at the onset of signaling and identifies MD-2s as a potential therapeutic candidate to treat human diseases characterized by an overly exuberant or chronic immune response to LPS.

  7. HDAC1 negatively regulates Bdnf and Pvalb required for parvalbumin interneuron maturation in an experience-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Dawn X P; Sng, Judy C G

    2016-11-01

    During early postnatal development, neuronal circuits are sculpted by sensory experience provided by the external environment. This experience-dependent regulation of circuitry development consolidates the balance of excitatory-inhibitory (E/I) neurons in the brain. The cortical barrel-column that innervates a single principal whisker is used to provide a clear reference frame for studying the consolidation of E/I circuitry. Sensory deprivation of S1 at birth disrupts the consolidation of excitatory-inhibitory balance by decreasing inhibitory transmission of parvalbumin interneurons. The molecular mechanisms underlying this decrease in inhibition are not completely understood. Our findings show that epigenetic mechanisms, in particular histone deacetylation by histone deacetylases, negatively regulate the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) and parvalbumin (Pvalb) genes during development, which are required for the maturation of parvalbumin interneurons. After whisker deprivation, increased histone deacetylase 1 expression and activity led to increased histone deacetylase 1 binding and decreased histone acetylation at Bdnf promoters I-IV and Pvalb promoter, resulting in the repression of Bdnf and Pvalb gene transcription. The decrease in Bdnf expression further affected parvalbumin interneuron maturation at layer II/III in S1, demonstrated by decreased parvalbumin expression, a marker for parvalbumin interneuron maturation. Knockdown of HDAC1 recovered Bdnf and Pvalb gene transcription and also prevented the decrease of inhibitory synapses accompanying whisker deprivation.

  8. Continuous time Bayesian networks identify Prdm1 as a negative regulator of TH17 cell differentiation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acerbi, Enzo; Viganò, Elena; Poidinger, Michael; Mortellaro, Alessandra; Zelante, Teresa; Stella, Fabio

    2016-03-15

    T helper 17 (TH17) cells represent a pivotal adaptive cell subset involved in multiple immune disorders in mammalian species. Deciphering the molecular interactions regulating TH17 cell differentiation is particularly critical for novel drug target discovery designed to control maladaptive inflammatory conditions. Using continuous time Bayesian networks over a time-course gene expression dataset, we inferred the global regulatory network controlling TH17 differentiation. From the network, we identified the Prdm1 gene encoding the B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 as a crucial negative regulator of human TH17 cell differentiation. The results have been validated by perturbing Prdm1 expression on freshly isolated CD4(+) naïve T cells: reduction of Prdm1 expression leads to augmentation of IL-17 release. These data unravel a possible novel target to control TH17 polarization in inflammatory disorders. Furthermore, this study represents the first in vitro validation of continuous time Bayesian networks as gene network reconstruction method and as hypothesis generation tool for wet-lab biological experiments.

  9. Negative regulation of miRNA-9 on oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 during hypoxic-ischemic brain damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijun Yang; Hong Cui; Ting Cao

    2014-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 plays a key role in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage and myelin repair. miRNA-9 is involved in the occurrence of many related neurological disorders. Bioin-formatics analysis demonstrated that miRNA-9 complementarily, but incompletely, bound oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1, but whether miRNA-9 regulates oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 remains poorly understood. Whole brain slices of 3-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured and divided into four groups:control group;oxygen-glucose deprivation group (treatment with 8% O2+ 92%N2 and sugar-free medium for 60 minutes);transfection control group (after oxygen and glucose deprivation for 60 minutes, transfected with control plasmid) and miRNA-9 transfection group (after oxygen and glucose deprivation for 60 minutes, transfected with miRNA-9 plasmid). From the third day of transfection, and with increasing culture days, oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 expression increased in each group, peaked at 14 days, and then decreased at 21 days. Real-time quantitative PCR results, however, demonstrated that oligoden-drocyte lineage gene 1 expression was lower in the miRNA-9 transfection group than that in the transfection control group at 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after transfection. Results suggested that miRNA-9 possibly negatively regulated oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 in brain tissues during hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  10. Altered disease development in the eui mutants and Eui overexpressors indicates that gibberellins negatively regulate rice basal disease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong-Lei; Li, Qun; Deng, Yi-Wen; Lou, Yong-Gen; Wang, Mu-Yang; Zhou, Guo-Xing; Zhang, Ying-Ying; He, Zu-Hua

    2008-05-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) form a group of important plant tetracyclic diterpenoid hormones that are involved in many aspects of plant growth and development. Emerging evidence implicates that GAs also play roles in stress responses. However, the role of GAs in biotic stress is largely unknown. Here, we report that knockout or overexpression of the Elongated uppermost internode (Eui) gene encoding a GA deactivating enzyme compromises or increases, respectively, disease resistance to bacterial blight (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oyrzae) and rice blast (Magnaporthe oryzae). Exogenous application of GA(3) and the inhibitor of GA synthesis (uniconazol) could increase disease susceptibility and resistance, respectively, to bacterial blight. Similarly, uniconazol restored disease resistance of the eui mutant and GA(3) decreased disease resistance of the Eui overexpressors to bacterial blight. Therefore, the change of resistance attributes to GA levels. In consistency with this, the GA metabolism genes OsGA20ox2 and OsGA2ox1 were down-regulated during pathogen challenge. We also found that PR1a induction was enhanced but the SA level was decreased in the Eui overexpressor, while the JA level was reduced in the eui mutant. Together, our current study indicates that GAs play a negative role in rice basal disease resistance, with EUI as a positive modulator through regulating the level of bioactive GAs.

  11. Wen-Dan Decoction Improves Negative Emotions in Sleep-Deprived Rats by Regulating Orexin-A and Leptin Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengzhi Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wen-Dan Decoction (WDD, a formula of traditional Chinese medicine, has been clinically used for treating insomnia for approximately 800 years. However, the therapeutic mechanisms of WDD remain unclear. Orexin-A plays a key role in the sleep-wake cycle, while leptin function is opposite to orexin-A. Thus, orexin-A and leptin may be important factors in sleep disorders. In this study, 48 rats were divided into control, model, WDD-treated, and diazepam-treated groups. The model of insomnia was produced by sleep deprivation (SD for 14 days. The expressions of orexin-A, leptin, and their receptors in blood serum, prefrontal cortex, and hypothalamus were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunohistochemistry, and real time PCR. Open field tests showed that SD increased both crossing movement (Cm and rearing-movement (Rm times. Orexin-A and leptin levels in blood serum increased after SD but decreased in brain compared to the control group. mRNA expressions of orexin receptor 1 and leptin receptor after SD were decreased in the prefrontal cortex but were increased in hypothalamus. WDD treatment normalized the behavior and upregulated orexin-A, leptin, orexin receptor 1 and leptin receptor in brain. The findings suggest that WDD treatment may regulate SD-induced negative emotions by regulating orexin-A and leptin expression.

  12. Structural insights into the regulation of aromatic amino acid hydroxylation

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2015-01-01

    The aromatic amino acid hydroxylases phenylalanine hydroxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase, and tryptophan hydroxylase are homotetramers, with each subunit containing a homologous catalytic domain and a divergent regulatory domain. The solution structure of the regulatory domain of tyrosine hydroxylase establishes that it contains a core ACT domain similar to that in phenylalanine hydroxylase. The isolated regulatory domain of tyrosine hydroxylase forms a stable dimer, while that of phenylalanine h...

  13. HNF-4alpha Negatively Regulates Hepcidin Expression Through BMPR1A in HepG2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wencai; Wang, Heyang; Zheng, Xuan; Jiang, Xin; Xu, Zheng; Shen, Hui; Li, Min

    2016-09-23

    Hepcidin synthesis is reported to be inadequate according to the body iron store in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) undergoing hepatic iron overload (HIO). However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesize that hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α (HNF-4α) may negatively regulate hepcidin expression and contribute to hepcidin deficiency in NAFLD patients. The effect of HNF-4α on hepcidin expression was observed by transfecting specific HNF-4α small interfering RNA (siRNA) or plasmids into HepG2 cells. Both direct and indirect mechanisms involved in the regulation of HNF-4α on hepcidin were detected by real-time PCR, Western blotting, chromatin immunoprecipitation (chIP), and reporter genes. It was found that HNF-4α suppressed hepcidin messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions in HepG2 cells, and this suppressive effect was independent of the potential HNF-4α response elements. Phosphorylation of SMAD1 but not STAT3 was inactivated by HNF-4α, and the SMAD4 response element was found essential to HNF-4α-induced hepcidin reduction. Neither inhibitory SMADs, SMAD6, and SMAD7 nor BMPR ligands, BMP2, BMP4, BMP6, and BMP7 were regulated by HNF-4α in HepG2 cells. BMPR1A, but not BMPR1B, BMPR2, ActR2A, ActR2B, or HJV, was decreased by HNF-4α, and HNF4α-knockdown-induced stimulation of hepcidin could be entirely blocked when BMPR1A was interfered with at the same time. In conclusion, the present study suggests that HNF-4α has a suppressive effect on hepcidin expression by inactivating the BMP pathway, specifically via BMPR1A, in HepG2 cells.

  14. Histone demethylase retinoblastoma binding protein 2 is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma and negatively regulated by hsa-miR-212.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuming Liang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The H3K4 demethylase retinoblastoma binding protein 2 (RBP2 is involved in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer, but its role and regulation in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is unknown. We determined the function of RBP2 and its regulation in HCC in vitro and in human tissues. METHODS: We analyzed gene expression in 20 specimens each of human HCC and normal liver tissue by quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Proliferation was analyzed by foci formation and senescence by β-galactosidase staining. Promoter activity was detected by luciferase reporter assay. RESULTS: The expression of RBP2 was stronger in cancerous than non-cancerous tissues, but that of its binding microRNA, Homo sapiens miR-212 (hsa-miR-212, showed an opposite pattern. SiRNA knockdown of RBP2 significantly upregulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs, with suppression of HCC cell proliferation and induction of senescence. Overexpression of hsa-miR-212 suppressed RBP2 expression, with inhibited cell proliferation and induced cellular senescence, which coincided with upregulated CDKIs; with low hsa-miR-212 expression, CDKIs were downregulated in HCC tissue. Inhibition of hsa-miR-212 expression upregulated RBP2 expression. Luciferase reporter assay detected the direct binding of hsa-miR-212 to the RBP2 3' UTR. CONCLUSIONS: RBP2 is overexpressed in HCC and negatively regulated by hsa-miR-212. The hsa-miR-212-RBP2-CDKI pathway may be important in the pathogenesis of HCC.

  15. REVEILLE8 and PSEUDO-REPONSE REGULATOR5 form a negative feedback loop within the Arabidopsis circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reetika Rawat

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms provide organisms with an adaptive advantage, allowing them to regulate physiological and developmental events so that they occur at the most appropriate time of day. In plants, as in other eukaryotes, multiple transcriptional feedback loops are central to clock function. In one such feedback loop, the Myb-like transcription factors CCA1 and LHY directly repress expression of the pseudoresponse regulator TOC1 by binding to an evening element (EE in the TOC1 promoter. Another key regulatory circuit involves CCA1 and LHY and the TOC1 homologs PRR5, PRR7, and PRR9. Purification of EE-binding proteins from plant extracts followed by mass spectrometry led to the identification of RVE8, a homolog of CCA1 and LHY. Similar to these well-known clock genes, expression of RVE8 is circadian-regulated with a dawn phase of expression, and RVE8 binds specifically to the EE. However, whereas cca1 and lhy mutants have short period phenotypes and overexpression of either gene causes arrhythmia, rve8 mutants have long-period and RVE8-OX plants have short-period phenotypes. Light input to the clock is normal in rve8, but temperature compensation (a hallmark of circadian rhythms is perturbed. RVE8 binds to the promoters of both TOC1 and PRR5 in the subjective afternoon, but surprisingly only PRR5 expression is perturbed by overexpression of RVE8. Together, our data indicate that RVE8 promotes expression of a subset of EE-containing clock genes towards the end of the subjective day and forms a negative feedback loop with PRR5. Thus RVE8 and its homologs CCA1 and LHY function close to the circadian oscillator but act via distinct molecular mechanisms.

  16. Regulation of triple-negative breast cancer cell metastasis by the tumor-suppressor liver kinase B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, L V; Tate, C R; Hoang, V T; Burks, H E; Gilliam, D; Martin, E C; Elliott, S; Miller, D B; Buechlein, A; Rusch, D; Tang, H; Nephew, K P; Burow, M E; Collins-Burow, B M

    2015-10-05

    Liver kinase B1 (LKB1), also known as serine/threonine kinase 11 (STK11), has been identified as a tumor suppressor in many cancers including breast. Low LKB1 expression has been associated with poor prognosis of breast cancer patients, and we report here a significant association between loss of LKB1 expression and reduced patient survival specifically in the basal subtype of breast cancer. Owing to the aggressive nature of the basal subtype as evidenced by high incidences of metastasis, the purpose of this study was to determine if LKB1 expression could regulate the invasive and metastatic properties of this specific breast cancer subtype. Induction of LKB1 expression in basal-like breast cancer (BLBC)/triple-negative breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and BT-549, inhibited invasiveness in vitro and lung metastatic burden in an orthotopic xenograft model. Further analysis of BLBC cells overexpressing LKB1 by unbiased whole transcriptomics (RNA-sequencing) revealed striking regulation of metastasis-associated pathways, including cell adhesion, extracellular matrix remodeling, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In addition, LKB1 overexpression inhibited EMT-associated genes (CDH2, Vimentin, Twist) and induced the epithelial cell marker CDH1, indicating reversal of the EMT phenotype in the MDA-MB-231 cells. We further demonstrated marked inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase 1 expression and activity via regulation of c-Jun through inhibition of p38 signaling in LKB1-expressing cells. Taken together, these data support future development of LKB1 inducing therapeutics for the suppression of invasion and metastasis of BLBC.

  17. The Hrs/Stam complex acts as a positive and negative regulator of RTK signaling during Drosophila development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Chanut-Delalande

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endocytosis is a key regulatory step of diverse signalling pathways, including receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK signalling. Hrs and Stam constitute the ESCRT-0 complex that controls the initial selection of ubiquitinated proteins, which will subsequently be degraded in lysosomes. It has been well established ex vivo and during Drosophila embryogenesis that Hrs promotes EGFR down regulation. We have recently isolated the first mutations of stam in flies and shown that Stam is required for air sac morphogenesis, a larval respiratory structure whose formation critically depends on finely tuned levels of FGFR activity. This suggest that Stam, putatively within the ESCRT-0 complex, modulates FGF signalling, a possibility that has not been examined in Drosophila yet. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we assessed the role of the Hrs/Stam complex in the regulation of signalling activity during Drosophila development. We show that stam and hrs are required for efficient FGFR signalling in the tracheal system, both during cell migration in the air sac primordium and during the formation of fine cytoplasmic extensions in terminal cells. We find that stam and hrs mutant cells display altered FGFR/Btl localisation, likely contributing to impaired signalling levels. Electron microscopy analyses indicate that endosome maturation is impaired at distinct steps by hrs and stam mutations. These somewhat unexpected results prompted us to further explore the function of stam and hrs in EGFR signalling. We show that while stam and hrs together downregulate EGFR signalling in the embryo, they are required for full activation of EGFR signalling during wing development. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study shows that the ESCRT-0 complex differentially regulates RTK signalling, either positively or negatively depending on tissues and developmental stages, further highlighting the importance of endocytosis in modulating signalling pathways during development.

  18. Regulating fatty acids in infant formula: critical assessment of U.S. policies and practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Fatty acids in breast-milk such as docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid, commonly known as DHA and ARA, contribute to the healthy development of children in various ways. However, the manufactured versions that are added to infant formula might not have the same health benefits as those in breast-milk. There is evidence that the manufactured additives might cause harm to infants’ health, and they might lead to unwarranted increases in the cost of infant formula. The addition of such fatty acids to infant formula needs to be regulated. In the U.S., the Food and Drug Administration has primary responsibility for regulating the composition of infant formula. The central purpose of this study is to assess the FDA’s efforts with regard to the regulation of fatty acids in infant formula. Methods This study is based on critical analysis of policies and practices described in publicly available documents of the FDA, the manufacturers of fatty acids, and other relevant organizations. The broad framework for this work was set out by the author in his book on Regulating Infant Formula, published in 2011. Results The FDA does not assess the safety or the health impacts of fatty acid additives to infant formula before they are marketed, and there is no systematic assessment after marketing is underway. Rather than making its own independent assessments, the FDA accepts the manufacturers’ claims regarding their products’ safety and effectiveness. Conclusions The FDA is not adequately regulating the use of fatty acid additives to infant formula. This results in exposure of infants to potential risks. Adverse reactions are already on record. Also, the additives have led to increasing costs of infant formula despite the lack of proven benefits to normal, full term infants. There is a need for more effective regulation of DHA and ARA additives to infant formula. PMID:24433303

  19. Interferon-inducible IFI16, a negative regulator of cell growth, down-regulates expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynda Li Song

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increased levels of interferon (IFN-inducible IFI16 protein (encoded by the IFI16 gene located at 1q22 in human normal prostate epithelial cells and diploid fibroblasts (HDFs are associated with the onset of cellular senescence. However, the molecular mechanisms by which the IFI16 protein contributes to cellular senescence-associated cell growth arrest remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that increased levels of IFI16 protein in normal HDFs and in HeLa cells negatively regulate the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We optimized conditions for real-time PCR, immunoblotting, and telomere repeat amplification protocol (TRAP assays to detect relatively low levels of hTERT mRNA, protein, and telomerase activity that are found in HDFs. Using the optimized conditions, we report that treatment of HDFs with inhibitors of cell cycle progression, such as aphidicolin or CGK1026, which resulted in reduced steady-state levels of IFI16 mRNA and protein, was associated with increases in hTERT mRNA and protein levels and telomerase activity. In contrast, knockdown of IFI16 expression in cells increased the expression of c-Myc, a positive regulator of hTERT expression. Additionally, over-expression of IFI16 protein in cells inhibited the c-Myc-mediated stimulation of the activity of hTERT-luc-reporter and reduced the steady-state levels of c-Myc and hTERT. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrated that increased levels of IFI16 protein in HDFs down-regulate the expression of hTERT gene. Our observations will serve basis to understand how increased cellular levels of the IFI16 protein may contribute to certain aging-dependent diseases.

  20. Interferon-Inducible IFI16, a Negative Regulator of Cell Growth, Down-Regulates Expression of Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui; Duan, Xin; Alimirah, Fatouma; Choubey, Divaker

    2010-01-01

    Background Increased levels of interferon (IFN)-inducible IFI16 protein (encoded by the IFI16 gene located at 1q22) in human normal prostate epithelial cells and diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) are associated with the onset of cellular senescence. However, the molecular mechanisms by which the IFI16 protein contributes to cellular senescence-associated cell growth arrest remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that increased levels of IFI16 protein in normal HDFs and in HeLa cells negatively regulate the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene. Methodology/Principal Findings We optimized conditions for real-time PCR, immunoblotting, and telomere repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assays to detect relatively low levels of hTERT mRNA, protein, and telomerase activity that are found in HDFs. Using the optimized conditions, we report that treatment of HDFs with inhibitors of cell cycle progression, such as aphidicolin or CGK1026, which resulted in reduced steady-state levels of IFI16 mRNA and protein, was associated with increases in hTERT mRNA and protein levels and telomerase activity. In contrast, knockdown of IFI16 expression in cells increased the expression of c-Myc, a positive regulator of hTERT expression. Additionally, over-expression of IFI16 protein in cells inhibited the c-Myc-mediated stimulation of the activity of hTERT-luc-reporter and reduced the steady-state levels of c-Myc and hTERT. Conclusions/Significance These data demonstrated that increased levels of IFI16 protein in HDFs down-regulate the expression of hTERT gene. Our observations will serve basis to understand how increased cellular levels of the IFI16 protein may contribute to certain aging-dependent diseases. PMID:20052289

  1. Microbial utilization of the industrial wastewater pollutants 2-ethylhexylthioglycolic acid and iso-octylthioglycolic acid by aerobic gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toups, Mario; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2010-04-01

    Industrial wastewater from the production of sulfur containing esters and the resulting products of this synthesis, 2-ethylhexylthioglycolic acid (EHTG) and iso-octylthioglycolic acid (IOTG), were deployed in this study to enrich novel bacterial strains, since no wastewater and EHTG or IOTG degrading microorganisms were hitherto described or available. In addition, nothing is known about the biodegradation of these thiochemicals. The effect of this specific wastewater on the growth behaviour of microorganisms was investigated using three well-known Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida, and Ralstonia eutropha). Concentrations of 5% (v/v) wastewater in complex media completely inhibited growth of these three bacterial strains. Six bacterial strains were successfully isolated, characterized and identified by sequencing their 16S rRNA genes. Two isolates referred to as Achromobacter sp. strain MT-E3 and Pseudomonas sp. strain MT-I1 used EHTG or IOTG, respectively, as well as the wastewater as sole source of carbon and energy for weak growth. More notably, both isolates removed these sulfur containing esters in remarkable amounts from the cultures supernatant. One further isolate was referred to as Klebsiella sp. strain 58 and exhibited an unusual high tolerance against the wastewater's toxicity without utilizing the contaminative compounds. If cultivated with gluconic acid as additional carbon source, the strain grew even in presence of more than 40% (v/v) wastewater. Three other isolates belonging to the genera Bordetella and Pseudomonas tolerated these organic sulfur compounds but showed no degradation abilities.

  2. New mechanisms that regulate Saccharomyces cerevisiae short peptide transporter achieve balanced intracellular amino acid concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnykov, Artem V

    2016-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to take up large quantities of amino acids in the form of di- and tripeptides via a short peptide transporter, Ptr2p. It is known that PTR2 can be induced by certain peptides and amino acids, and the mechanisms governing this upregulation are understood at the molecular level. We describe two new opposing mechanisms of regulation that emphasize potential toxicity of amino acids: the first is upregulation of PTR2 in a population of cells, caused by amino acid secretion that accompanies peptide uptake; the second is loss of Ptr2p activity, due to transporter internalization following peptide uptake. Our findings emphasize the importance of proper amino acid balance in the cell and extend understanding of peptide import regulation in yeast.

  3. Regulation of indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis by branched-chain amino acids in Enterobacter cloacae UW5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Cassandra V; Harris, Danielle M M; Patten, Cheryl L

    2015-09-01

    The soil bacterium Enterobacter cloacae UW5 produces the rhizosphere signaling molecule indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) via the indolepyruvate pathway. Expression of indolepyruvate decarboxylase, a key pathway enzyme encoded by ipdC, is upregulated by the transcription factor TyrR in response to aromatic amino acids. Some members of the TyrR regulon may also be controlled by branched-chain amino acids and here we show that expression from the ipdC promoter and production of IAA are downregulated by valine, leucine and isoleucine. Regulation of the IAA synthesis pathway by both aromatic and branched-chain amino acids suggests a broader role for this pathway in bacterial physiology, beyond plant interactions.

  4. Effect of plant growth regulators on fatty acids composition in Jatropha curcas L. callus culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Ludwi Rodríguez; Mendiola, Martha A Rodríguez; Castro, Carlos Arias; Gutiérrez-Miceli, Federico A

    2015-01-01

    The influence of Naphtaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 6-Benzylaminopurine (BAP) on callus formation, its morphology and fatty acids profile were examined from Jatropha curcas L. Embryo from seeds of J. curcas L. were sown in Murashige and skoog (MS) medium with NAA and BAP. All treatments induced callus formation, however callus morphology was different in most of the treatments. Higher callus biomass was presented with 1.0 NAA + 0.5 BAP mg/L. Plant growth regulators modifies the fatty acids profile in callus of J. curcas L. BAP was induced linoleic and linolenic acids.

  5. Soluble interleukin-1 receptor, a potential negative regulator of orange-spotted grouper Epinephelus coioides interleukin-1 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, D Q; Yao, M; Yi, S B; Li, Y W; Liu, X C; Zhang, Y; Lin, H R

    2013-09-01

    In this study, the cDNA sequence encoding interleukin-1 (Il-1) receptor-like protein of orange-spotted grouper Epinephelus coioides was obtained. The newly identified sequence was named soluble type I Il-1 receptor (sIl-1rI) owing to its structural composition, which had two Ig-like domains, lack of transmembrane region and the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain, similar to the brown rat Rattus norvegicus soluble Il-1rI. In addition, sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis indicated that E. coioides sequence had a closer relationship with Il-1rI than Il-1rII. Real-time PCR revealed that sil-1rI mRNA expression presented a process of decrease, restoration and increase in Cryptocaryon irritans-infected E. coioides. The negative correlation between Il-1β and sil-1rI mRNA in C. irritans-infected head-kidney implied the potential negative regulatory role of sil-1rI in E. coioides Il-1 system. The leucocytes incubated with lipopolysaccharide or polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid exhibited different expression profiles of sil-1rI. Recombinant Il-1β (rIl-1β) protein was capable of inducing sil-1rI mRNA under the concentration of 100 ng ml(-1) , suggesting that high dosage or excess Il-1β would stimulate the expression of sil-1rI to maintain the homoeostasis of E. coioides Il-1 system. For the first time, the role of teleost Il-1rI in parasite infection has been identified, and soluble Il-1r was found in fish.

  6. Shrimp with knockdown of LvSOCS2, a negative feedback loop regulator of JAK/STAT pathway in Litopenaeus vannamei, exhibit enhanced resistance against WSSV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Song, Xuan; Zhang, Zijian; Li, Haoyang; L, Kai; Yin, Bin; He, Jianguo; Li, Chaozheng

    2016-12-01

    JAK/STAT pathway is one of cytokine signaling pathways and mediates diversity immune responses to protect host from viral infection. In this study, LvSOCS2, a member of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) families, has been cloned and identified from Litopenaeus vannamei. The full length of LvSOCS2 is 1601 bp, including an 1194 bp open reading frame (ORF) coding for a putative protein of 397 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of ∼42.3 kDa. LvSOCS2 expression was most abundant in gills and could respond to the challenge of LPS, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Staphhylococcus aureus, Poly (I: C) and white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). There are several STAT binding motifs presented in the proximal promoter region of LvSOCS2 and its expression was induced by LvJAK or LvSTAT protein in a dose dependent manner, suggesting LvSOCS2 could be the transcriptional target gene of JAK/STAT pathway. Moreover, the transcription of DmVir-1, a read out of the activation of JAK/STAT pathway in Drosophila, was promoted by LvJAK but inhibited by LvSOCS2, indicating that LvSOCS2 could be a negative regulator in this pathway and thus can form a negative feedback loop. Our previous study indicated that shrimp JAK/STAT pathway played a positive role against WSSV. In this study, RNAi-mediated knockdown of LvSOCS2 shrimps showed lower susceptibility to WSSV infection and caused lessened virus loads, which further demonstrated that the JAK/STAT pathway could function as an anti-viral immunity in shrimp.

  7. A role for cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase as a negative regulator of glucose signaling for insulin secretion in pancreatic ß-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Claudiane; Joly, Erik; Pepin, Emilie; Barbeau, Annie; Hentsch, Lisa; Pineda, Marco; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Brunengraber, Henri; Prentki, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Cytosolic NADPH may act as one of the signals that couple glucose metabolism to insulin secretion in the pancreatic ß-cell. NADPH levels in the cytoplasm are largely controlled by the cytosolic isoforms of malic enzyme and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDHc). Some studies have provided evidence for a role of malic enzyme in glucose-induced insulin secretion (GIIS) via pyruvate cycling, but the role of IDHc in ß-cell signaling is unsettled. IDHc is an established component of the isocitrate/α-ketoglutarate shuttle that transfers reducing equivalents (NADPH) from the mitochondrion to the cytosol. This shuttle is energy consuming since it is coupled to nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase that uses the mitochondrial proton gradient to produce mitochondrial NADPH and NAD(+) from NADP(+) and NADH. To determine whether flux through IDHc is positively or negatively linked to GIIS, we performed RNAi knockdown experiments in ß-cells. Reduced IDHc expression in INS 832/13 cells and isolated rat islet ß-cells resulted in enhanced GIIS. This effect was mediated at least in part via the KATP-independent amplification arm of GIIS. IDHc knockdown in INS 832/13 cells did not alter glucose oxidation but it reduced fatty acid oxidation and increased lipogenesis from glucose. Metabolome profiling in INS 832/13 cells showed that IDHc knockdown increased isocitrate and NADP(+) levels. It also increased the cellular contents of several metabolites linked to GIIS, in particular some Krebs cycle intermediates, acetyl-CoA, glutamate, cAMP and ATP. The results identify IDHc as a component of the emerging pathways that negatively regulate GIIS.

  8. Ephrin-A2 and-A3 are negative regulators of the regenerative potential of Müller cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Ruilin; Cho Kin-Sang; Chen Dong Feng; Yang Liu

    2014-01-01

    Background In a previous study,we demonstrated that ephrin-A2 and-A3 negatively regulate the growth of neural progenitor cells in the central nervous system.Adult mice deficient in ephrin-A2 and-A3 (A2-/-A3-/-) displayed active ongoing neurogenesis throughout the brain,and mice deficient in ephrin-A3 alone showed increased proliferation of ciliary epithelium derived retinal stem cells.This study aimed to detect that the increase in proliferation and neurogenic potential of Müller cells is influenced by the absence of ephrin-A2 and-A3.Methods We assessed the retinal and Müller cell expression of ephrin-As and their receptor and neural progenitor cell markers by immunostaining and real-time PCR.We cultured purified primary Müller cells derived from wild-type and A2-/-A3-/-mice in a defined culture medium that enables trans-differentiation of Müller cells into retinal neurons.To evaluate proliferating Müller cells in vivo,we injected 5'-ethylnyl-2'-deoxiuridine (EdU) intraperitoneally to adult mice.Results Expression of ephrin-A2/A3 and their receptor EphA4 were detected in the retinas of adult mice,with EphA4 expression particularly enriched in Müller cells.Müller cells of A2-/-A3-/-mice exhibited significantly elevated expression of retinal progenitor cell markers,Pax6 and Chx10,when compared with those from wild-type mice.Moreover,a higher percentage of Müller cells of A2-/-A3-/-mice trans-differentiated and became recoverin+ and β-Ⅲ-tublin+ in the culture than those from wild type mice.Strikingly,an increased number of EdU+ retinal cells was detected in the retinas of adult A2-/-A3-/-mice as compared with wild-type mice.Conclusions Ephrin-A2 and-A3 are negative regulators of the proliferative and neurogenic potentials of Müller cells.Manipulating ephrin-A signaling may thus represent a novel strategy for stimulating neuroregeneration from endogenous progenitors to participate in retinal repair in case of disease or damage.

  9. Keratin-6 driven ODC expression to hair follicle keratinocytes enhances stemness and tumorigenesis by negatively regulating Notch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arumugam, Aadithya; Weng, Zhiping; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Afaq, Farrukh [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Elmets, Craig A. [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

    2014-08-29

    Highlights: • Targeting ODC to hair follicle augments skin carcinogenesis and invasive SCCs. • Hair follicle ODC expands stem cell compartment carrying CD34{sup +}/K15{sup +}/p63{sup +} keratinocytes. • Negatively regulated Notch1 is associated with expansion of stem cell compartment. - Abstract: Over-expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is known to be involved in the epidermal carcinogenesis. However, the mechanism by which it enhances skin carcinogenesis remains undefined. Recently, role of stem cells localized in various epidermal compartments has been shown in the pathogenesis of skin cancer. To direct ODC expression in distinct epidermal compartments, we have developed keratin 6 (K6)-ODC/SKH-1 and keratin 14 (K14)-ODC/SKH-1 mice and employed them to investigate the role of ODC directed to these epidermal compartments on UVB-induced carcinogenesis. K6-driven ODC over-expression directed to outer root sheath (ORS) of hair follicle was more effective in augmenting tumorigenesis as compared to mice where K14-driven ODC expression was directed to inter-follicular epidermal keratinocytes. Chronically UVB-irradiated K6-ODC/SKH-1 developed 15 ± 2.5 tumors/mouse whereas K14-ODC/SKH-1 developed only 6.8 ± 1.5 tumors/mouse. K6-ODC/SKH-1 showed augmented UVB-induced proliferation and much higher pro-inflammatory responses than K14-ODC/SKH-1 mice. Tumors induced in K6-ODC/SKH-1 were rapidly growing, invasive and ulcerative squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) showing decreased expression of epidermal polarity marker E-cadherin and enhanced mesenchymal marker, fibronectin. Interestingly, the number of CD34/CK15/p63 positive stem-like cells was significantly higher in chronically UVB-irradiated K6-ODC/SKH-1 as compared to K14-ODC/SKH-1 mice. Reduced Notch1 expression was correlated with the expansion of stem cell compartment in these animals. However, other signaling pathways such as DNA damage response or mTOR signaling pathways were not significantly different in

  10. Performance characteristics of a gelled-electrolyte valve-regulated lead-acid battery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Martha; B Hariprakash; S A Gaffoor; A K Shukla

    2003-08-01

    12 V/25 AH gelled-electrolyte valve-regulated lead-acid batteries have been assembled in-house and their performance studied in relation to the absorptive glass-microfibre valve-regulated and flooded-electrolyte counterparts at various discharge rates and temperatures between –40°C and 40°C. Although the performance of the gelled-electrolyte valve-regulated battery is similar to both the absorptive glass-microfibre valve-regulated and flooded-electrolyte lead-acid batteries at temperatures above 0°C, it is superior to both the flooded-electrolyte and absorptive glass-microfibre valve-regulated lead-acid batteries at temperatures between 0°C and -40°C. The latter characteristic is attractive for expanding the application regime of valve-regulated lead-acid batteries. The corrosion rate for the positive grids in the gelled-electrolyte is also lower than both the flooded-electrolyte and absorptive glass-microfibre configurations.

  11. Retinoic acid from the meninges regulates cortical neuron generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, Julie A; Ashique, Amir M; Zarbalis, Konstantinos; Patterson, Katelin P; Hecht, Jonathan H; Kane, Maureen A; Folias, Alexandra E; Choe, Youngshik; May, Scott R; Kume, Tsutomu; Napoli, Joseph L; Peterson, Andrew S; Pleasure, Samuel J

    2009-10-30

    Extrinsic signals controlling generation of neocortical neurons during embryonic life have been difficult to identify. In this study we demonstrate that the dorsal forebrain meninges communicate with the adjacent radial glial endfeet and influence cortical development. We took advantage of Foxc1 mutant mice with defects in forebrain meningeal formation. Foxc1 dosage and loss of meninges correlated with a dramatic reduction in both neuron and intermediate progenitor production and elongation of the neuroepithelium. Several types of experiments demonstrate that retinoic acid (RA) is the key component of this secreted activity. In addition, Rdh10- and Raldh2-expressing cells in the dorsal meninges were either reduced or absent in the Foxc1 mutants, and Rdh10 mutants had a cortical phenotype similar to the Foxc1 null mutants. Lastly, in utero RA treatment rescued the cortical phenotype in Foxc1 mutants. These results establish RA as a potent, meningeal-derived cue required for successful corticogenesis.

  12. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-Induced MyD88 Short Expression Is Regulated by Positive IKKβ and CREB Pathways and Negative ERK1/2 Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Carla S.; Miyata, Masanori; Susuki-Miyata, Seiko; Lee, Byung-Cheol; Komatsu, Kensei; Li, Jian-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Airway diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are characterized by excessive inflammation and are exacerbated by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Airway epithelial cells mount the initial innate immune responses to invading pathogens and thus modulate inflammation. While inflammation is necessary to eliminate a pathogen, excessive inflammation can cause damage to the host tissue. Therefore, the inflammatory response must be tightly regulated and deciphering the signaling pathways involved in this response will enhance our understanding of the regulation of the host inflammatory response. NTHi binds to TLR2 and signal propagation requires the adaptor molecule myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88). An alternative spliced form of MyD88 is called MyD88 short (MyD88s) and has been identified in macrophages and embryonic cell lines as a negative regulator of inflammation. However, the role of MyD88s in NTHi-induced inflammation in airway epithelial cells remains unknown. Here we show that NTHi induces MyD88s expression and MyD88s is a negative regulator of inflammation in airway epithelial cells. We further demonstrate that MyD88s is positively regulated by IKKβ and CREB and negatively regulated by ERK1/2 signaling pathways. Taken together these data indicate that airway inflammation is controlled in a negative feedback manner involving MyD88s and suggest that airway epithelial cells are essential to maintain immune homeostasis. PMID:26669856

  13. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-Induced MyD88 Short Expression Is Regulated by Positive IKKβ and CREB Pathways and Negative ERK1/2 Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla S Andrews

    Full Text Available Airway diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are characterized by excessive inflammation and are exacerbated by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi. Airway epithelial cells mount the initial innate immune responses to invading pathogens and thus modulate inflammation. While inflammation is necessary to eliminate a pathogen, excessive inflammation can cause damage to the host tissue. Therefore, the inflammatory response must be tightly regulated and deciphering the signaling pathways involved in this response will enhance our understanding of the regulation of the host inflammatory response. NTHi binds to TLR2 and signal propagation requires the adaptor molecule myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88. An alternative spliced form of MyD88 is called MyD88 short (MyD88s and has been identified in macrophages and embryonic cell lines as a negative regulator of inflammation. However, the role of MyD88s in NTHi-induced inflammation in airway epithelial cells remains unknown. Here we show that NTHi induces MyD88s expression and MyD88s is a negative regulator of inflammation in airway epithelial cells. We further demonstrate that MyD88s is positively regulated by IKKβ and CREB and negatively regulated by ERK1/2 signaling pathways. Taken together these data indicate that airway inflammation is controlled in a negative feedback manner involving MyD88s and suggest that airway epithelial cells are essential to maintain immune homeostasis.

  14. DMPD: Regulation of arachidonic acid release and cytosolic phospholipase A2activation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10080535 Regulation of arachidonic acid release and cytosolic phospholipase A2activation...on of arachidonic acid release and cytosolic phospholipase A2activation. PubmedID 10080535 Title Regulation ...of arachidonic acid release and cytosolic phospholipase A2activation. Authors Gij

  15. MicroRNA (miR396) negatively regulates expression of ceramidase-like genes in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongmei Liu; Diqiu Yu

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 21-23 nucleotide (nt), endogenous RNAs that regulate gene expression by targeting mRNAs for direct cleavage or translational repression in plants. In Arabidopsis, miR396 is encoded by two different loci (MIR396a and M1R396b) and sequence analysis suggests it may target three ceramidase-like genes (Atceramidase-like 1, Atceramidase-like 2 and Atceramidase-like 3). To demonstrate the biological function of miR396, we inserted the synthetic precursors, MIR396a or MIR396b, under the control of the enhanced cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, into a plant transformation vector (pOCA30) and transformed the con-structs into Arabidopsis. The promoter increased miR396 levels by more than 2-fold, indicating appropriate maturation of the synthetic precursor MIR396a or MIR396b transcript in transgenic plants. Microarray analysis showed that the transcript levels of two ceramidase-like genes (Atceramidase-like 1, Atceramidase-like 2) were decreased by more than 2-fold and lactosylceramide 4-α-galactosyltransferase increased by more than 2-fold in transgenic plants compared with the empty vector-transformed plants. Northern blot analysis showed that the mRNA levels of the two ceramidase-like genes were significantly reduced in transgenic plants. These results indicated that miR396 probably plays a crucial role in the ceramide metabolism pathway by negatively regulating the expression of ceramidase-like genes in Arabidopsis.

  16. Developmental signaling pathways regulating mammary stem cells and contributing to the etiology of triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Maria Cristina; Bertolette, Daniel; Castro, Nadia P; Klauzinska, Malgorzata; Cuttitta, Frank; Salomon, David S

    2016-04-01

    Cancer has been considered as temporal and spatial aberrations of normal development in tissues. Similarities between mammary embryonic development and cell transformation suggest that the underlying processes required for mammary gland development are also those perturbed during various stages of mammary tumorigenesis and breast cancer (BC) development. The master regulators of embryonic development Cripto-1, Notch/CSL, and Wnt/β-catenin play key roles in modulating mammary gland morphogenesis and cell fate specification in the embryo through fetal mammary stem cells (fMaSC) and in the adult organism particularly within the adult mammary stem cells (aMaSC), which determine mammary progenitor cell lineages that generate the basal/myoepithelial and luminal compartments of the adult mammary gland. Together with recognized transcription factors and embryonic stem cell markers, these embryonic regulatory molecules can be inappropriately augmented during tumorigenesis to support the tumor-initiating cell (TIC)/cancer stem cell (CSC) compartment, and the effects of their deregulation may contribute for the etiology of BC, in particular the most aggressive subtype of BC, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). This in depth review will present evidence of the involvement of Cripto-1, Notch/CSL, and Wnt/β-catenin in the normal mammary gland morphogenesis and tumorigenesis, from fMaSC/aMaSC regulation to TIC generation and maintenance in TNBC. Specific therapies for treating TNBC by targeting these embryonic pathways in TICs will be further discussed, providing new opportunities to destroy not only the bulk tumor, but also TICs that initiate and promote the metastatic spread and recurrence of this aggressive subtype of BC.

  17. GRK2 negatively regulates IGF-1R signaling pathway and cyclins' expression in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhengyu; Hurtt, Reginald; Gu, Tina; Bodzin, Adam S; Koch, Walter J; Doria, Cataldo

    2013-09-01

    G protein coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) plays a central role in the regulation of a variety of important signaling pathways. Alternation of GRK2 protein level and activity casts profound effects on cell physiological functions and causes diseases such as heart failure, rheumatoid arthritis, and obesity. We have previously reported that overexpression of GRK2 has an inhibitory role in cancer cell growth. To further examine the role of GRK2 in cancer, in this study, we investigated the effects of reduced protein level of GRK2 on insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling pathway in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) HepG2 cells. We created a GRK2 knockdown cell line using a lentiviral vector mediated expression of GRK2 specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Under IGF-1 stimulation, HepG2 cells with reduced level of GRK2 showed elevated total IGF-1R protein expression as well as tyrosine phosphorylation of receptor. In addition, HepG2 cells with reduced level of GRK2 also demonstrated increased tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS1 at the residue 612 and increased phosphorylation of Akt, indicating a stronger activation of IGF-1R signaling pathway. However, HepG2 cells with reduced level of GRK2 did not display any growth advantage in culture as compared with the scramble control cells. We further detected that reduced level of GRK2 induced a small cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase by enhancing the expression of cyclin A, B1, and E. Our results indicate that GRK2 has contrasting roles on HepG2 cell growth by negatively regulating the IGF-1R signaling pathway and cyclins' expression.

  18. Negative regulation of natural killer cell in tumor tissue and peripheral blood of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Anupam; Banerjee, Arunabha; Saikia, Nabajyoti; Phookan, Jyotirmoy; Baruah, Munindra Narayan; Baruah, Shashi

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the key lymphocytes in solid tumors. Its activity is regulated by both germline encoded receptors and cytokine microenvironment. We conducted a case-control study to investigate the activation status of NK cell in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). NK cell activation was assessed in context of NK cell cytotoxicity and transcript expression of NK cell receptors (NKp46 and KIRs) and NK cell associated cytokines (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10, IL-12β, IL-15, IL-18, IL-21, IFN-γ, TNF-α and TGF-β). The results revealed possible mechanisms involved in reduced NK cell activation in peripheral circulation: quantitative deficiency of NK cell number and lowered cytotoxicity together with qualitative NK impairments caused by--(1) decreased expression of NK activating receptor NKp46, (2) increased expression of NK suppressive cytokines--IL-10 and TGF-β and (3) induction of FOXP3(+)CTLA4(+) suppressor cells. On the other hand, in the tumor tissue, escape of NK immune surveillance appeared to be modulated by upregulation of TGF-β and IL-10 together with downregulation of NK cell activating cytokines (IL-2, IL-12β, IL-15, IL-18, IL-21 and IFN-γ) and NK receptors (NKp46 and KIRs). In addition, our study supported the earlier contention that TNF-α and IL-1β expression levels may be used as markers of malignant transformation in oral leukoplakia. In conclusion, the study provided an insight into the negative regulation of NK cell in tumor tissue and peripheral blood of OSCC patients, which can be exploited to boost the current NK cell and cytokine based immunotherapy for the treatment of oral cancer.

  19. MicroRNA-181b negatively regulates the proliferation of human epidermal keratinocytes in psoriasis through targeting TLR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Cheng; Bai, Ming; Yu, Nan-Ze; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Zeng

    2017-02-01

    Our study aims to explore the role of microRNA-181b (miR-181b) and TLR in the regulation of cell proliferation of human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKs) in psoriasis. Twenty-eight patients diagnosed with psoriasis vulgaris were selected as a case group with their lesional and non-lesional skin tissues collected. A control group consisted of 20 patients who underwent plastic surgery with their healthy skin tissues collected. Real-time quantitative fluorescence polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the expressions of miR-181b and TLR4 in HEKs of healthy skin, psoriatic lesional skin and non-lesional skin respectively. The 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of TLR4 combined with miR-181b was verified by a dual-luciferase reporter assay. Western blotting and bromodeoxyuridine were applied for corresponding detection of TLR4 expression and cell mitosis. The expression of miR-181b in HEKs of psoriatic lesional skin was less than healthy skin and psoriatic non-lesional skin. In psoriatic lesional and non-lesional skin, TLR4-positive cell rates and the number of positive cells per square millimetre were higher than healthy skin. The dual-luciferase reporter assay verified that miR-181b targets TLR4. HEKs transfected with miR-181b mimics had decreased expression of TLR4, along with the decrease of mitotic indexes and Brdu labelling indexes. However, HEKs transfected with miR-181b inhibitors showed increased TLR4 expression, mitotic indexes and Brdu labelling indexes. HEKs transfected with both miR-181b inhibitors and siTLR4 had decreased mitotic indexes and Brdu labelling indexes. These results indicate that miR-181b can negatively regulate the proliferation of HEKs in psoriasis by targeting TLR4.

  20. A functional C-terminal TRAF3-binding site in MAVS participates in positive and negative regulation of the IFN antiviral response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suzanne Paz; Rongtuan Lin; John Hiscott; Myriam Vilasco; Steven J Werden; Meztli Arguello; Deshanthe Joseph-Pillai; Tiejun Zhao; Thi Lien-Anh Nguyen; Qiang Sun; Eliane F Meurs

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of viral RNA structures by the cytosolic sensor retinoic acid-inducible gene-Ⅰ (RIG-Ⅰ) results in the activation of signaling cascades that culminate with the generation of the type Ⅰ interferon (IFN) antiviral response. Onset of antiviral and inflammatory responses to viral pathogens necessitates the regulated spatiotemporal recruitment of signaling adapters,kinases and transcriptional proteins to the mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS). We previously demonstrated that the serine/threonine kinase IKKε is recruited to the C-terminal region of MAVS following Sendal or vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection,mediated by Lys63-linked polyubiquitination of MAVS at Lys500,resulting in inhibition of downstream IFN signaling (Paz et al,Mol Cell Biol,2009). In this study,we demonstrate that C-terminus of MAVS harbors a novel TRAF3-binding site in the aa450-468 region of MAVS. A consensus TRAF-interacting motif (TIM),455-PEENEY-460,within this site is required for TRAF3 binding and activation of IFN antiviral response genes,whereas mutation of the TIM eliminates TRAF3 binding and the downstream IFN response. Reconstitution of MAVS-/- mouse embryo fibroblasts with a construct expressing a TIM-mutated version of MAVS failed to restore the antiviral response or block VSV replication,whereas wild-type MAVS reconstituted antiviral inhibition of VSV replication. Furthermore,recruitment of IKKε to an adjacent C-terminal site (aa 468-540) in MAVS via Lys500 ubiquitination decreased TRAF3 binding and protein stability,thus contributing to IKKε-mediated shutdown of the IFN response. This study demonstrates that MAVS harbors a functional C-terminal TRAF3-binding site that participates in positive and negative regulation of the IFN antiviral response.

  1. Vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids together regulate lipid metabolism in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaire, Amrita; Rathod, Richa; Kale, Anvita; Joshi, Sadhana

    2015-08-01

    Our recent study indicates that maternal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid status influence plasma and erythrocyte fatty acid profile in dams. The present study examines the effects of prenatal and postnatal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid status on lipid metabolism in the offspring. Pregnant dams were divided into five groups: Control; Vitamin B12 deficient (BD); Vitamin B12 supplemented (BS); Vitamin B12 deficient group supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids (BDO); Vitamin B12 supplemented group with omega-3 fatty acids (BSO). The offspring were continued on the same diets till 3 month of age. Vitamin B12 deficiency increased cholesterol levels (pomega-3 fatty acids together play a crucial role in regulating the genes involved in lipid metabolism in adult offspring.

  2. Lipoic acid: energy metabolism and redox regulation of transcription and cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Lester; Cadenas, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The role of R-α-lipoic acid as a cofactor (lipoyllysine) in mitochondrial energy metabolism is well established. Lipoic acid non-covalently bound and exogenously administered to cells or supplemented in the diet is a potent modulator of the cell's redox status. The diversity of beneficial effects of lipoic acid in a variety of tissues can be mechanistically viewed in terms of thiol/disulfide exchange reactions that modulate the environment's redox and energy status. Lipoic acid-driven thiol/disulfide exchange reactions appear critical for the modulation of proteins involved in cell signaling and transcription factors. This review emphasizes the effects of lipoic acid on PI3K and AMPK signaling and related transcriptional pathways that are integrated by PGC-1α, a critical regulator of energy homoestasis. The effects of lipoic acid on the neuronal energy-redox axis are largely reviewed in terms of their outcomes for aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Regulation of Toll-like receptors-mediated inflammation by immunobiotics in bovine intestinal epitheliocytes: role of signalling pathways and negative regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio eVillena

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs detect bacterial and viral associated-molecular-patterns (MAMPs via germline-encoded pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs and are responsible for maintaining immunetolerance to the communities of resident commensal bacteria while being also capable to mount immune responses against pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a major class of PRRs expressed on IECs and immune cells, which are involved in the induction of both tolerance and inflammation. In the last decade, experimental and clinical evidence was generated to support the application of probiotics with immunoregulatory capacities (immunobiotics for the prevention and treatment of several gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders in which TLRs exert a significant role. The majority of these studies were performed in mouse and human cell lines and, despite the growing interest in the bovine immune system due to the economic importance of cattle as livestock, only few studies have been conducted on cattle. In this regard, our group have established a bovine intestinal epithelial (BIE cell line originally derived from fetal bovine intestinal epitheliocytes and used this cell line to evaluate the impact of immunobiotics in TLR-mediated inflammation. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge of the beneficial effects of immunobiotics in the regulation of intestinal inflammation/infection in cattle. Especially we discuss the role of TLRs and their negative regulators in both the inflammatory response nd the beneficial effects of immunobiotics in bovine IECs. This review article emphasizes the cellular and molecular interactions of immunobiotics with BIE cells through TLRs and gives the scientific basis for the development of immunomodulatory feed for bovine healthy development.

  4. OsFTIP1-Mediated Regulation of Florigen Transport in Rice Is Negatively Regulated by a Ubiquitin-like Domain Kinase OsUbDKγ4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shiyong; Cheng, Ying; Liu, Lu; Wang, Yanwen; Bao, Shengjie; Zhou, Xuan; Teo, Zhi Wei Norman; Mao, Chuanzao; Gan, Yinbo; Yu, Hao

    2017-03-02

    Flowering time is a critical agronomic trait that determines successful seed production and adaptation of crop plants. Photoperiodic control of this process in flowering plants is mediated by the long-distance mobile signal called florigen partly encoded by FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) in Arabidopsis and its orthologs in other plant species. Despite the progress in understanding FT transport in the dicot model Arabidopsis, the mechanisms of florigen transport in monocots, which provide most of the biomass in agriculture, are unknown. Here we show that rice FT-INTERACTING PROTEIN 1 (OsFTIP1), a member of the family of multiple C2 domain and transmembrane region proteins (MCTPs) and the closest ortholog of Arabidopsis FTIP1, is required for export of RICE FLOWERING LOCUS T 1 (RFT1) from companion cells to sieve elements. This affects RFT1 movement to the shoot apical meristem and its regulation of rice flowering time under long days. We further reveal that a ubiquitin-like domain kinase γ4, OsUbDKγ4, interacts with OsFTIP1, and modulates its degradation in leaves through the 26S proteasome, which in turn affects RFT1 transport to the SAM. Thus, dynamic modulation of OsFTIP1 abundance in leaves by a negative regulator OsUbDKγ4 is integral to the role of OsFTIP1 in mediating RFT1 transport in rice, and provide key evidence for a conserved role of FTIP1-like MCTPs in mediating florigen transport in flowering plants.

  5. Inhibitory Effects of Robo2 on Nephrin: A Crosstalk between Positive and Negative Signals Regulating Podocyte Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueping Fan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Robo2 is the cell surface receptor for the repulsive guidance cue Slit and is involved in axon guidance and neuronal migration. Nephrin is a podocyte slit-diaphragm protein that functions in the kidney glomerular filtration barrier. Here, we report that Robo2 is expressed at the basal surface of mouse podocytes and colocalizes with nephrin. Biochemical studies indicate that Robo2 forms a complex with nephrin in the kidney through adaptor protein Nck. In contrast to the role of nephrin that promotes actin polymerization, Slit2-Robo2 signaling inhibits nephrin-induced actin polymerization. In addition, the amount of F-actin associated with nephrin is increased in Robo2 knockout mice that develop an altered podocyte foot process structure. Genetic interaction study further reveals that loss of Robo2 alleviates the abnormal podocyte structural phenotype in nephrin null mice. These results suggest that Robo2 signaling acts as a negative regulator on nephrin to influence podocyte foot process architecture.

  6. Salinomycin activates AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent autophagy in cultured osteoblastoma cells: a negative regulator against cell apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun-qing Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The malignant osteoblastoma has poor prognosis, thus the search for novel and more efficient chemo-agents against this disease is urgent. Salinomycin induces broad anti-cancer effects both in vivo and in vitro, however, its role in osteoblastoma is still not clear. KEY FINDINGS: Salinomycin induced both apoptosis and autophagy in cultured U2OS and MG-63 osteoblastoma cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA, or by RNA interference (RNAi of light chain 3B (LC3B, enhanced salinomycin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Salinomycin induced a profound AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activation, which was required for autophagy induction. AMPK inhibition by compound C, or by AMPKα RNAi prevented salinomycin-induced autophagy activation, while facilitating cancer cell death and apoptosis. On the other hand, the AMPK agonist AICAR promoted autophagy activation in U2OS cells. Salinomycin-induced AMPK activation was dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS production in osteoblastoma cells. Antioxidant n-acetyl cysteine (NAC significantly inhibited salinomycin-induced AMPK activation and autophagy induction. CONCLUSIONS: Salinomycin activates AMPK-dependent autophagy in osteoblastoma cells, which serves as a negative regulator against cell apoptosis. AMPK-autophagy inhibition might be a novel strategy to sensitize salinomycin's effect in cancer cells.

  7. Positive and negative regulation of FcepsilonRI-mediated signaling by the adaptor protein LAB/NTAL.