WorldWideScience

Sample records for acid n-terminal sequence

  1. N-terminal amino acid sequence of Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase: comparison with Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Bacillus subtilis Enzymes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, H.; Fietzek, P P; Lampen, J O

    1982-01-01

    The thermostable, liquefying alpha-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis was immunologically cross-reactive with the thermolabile, liquefying alpha-amylase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. Their N-terminal amino acid sequences showed extensive homology with each other, but not with the saccharifying alpha-amylases of Bacillus subtilis.

  2. Barley polyamine oxidase: Characterisation and analysis of the cofactor and the N-terminal amino acid sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radova, A.; Sebela, M.; Galuszka, P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the first purification method developed for the isolation of an homogeneous polyamine oxidase (PAO) from etiolated barley seedlings. The crude enzyme preparation was obtained after initial precipitation of the extract with protamine sulphate and ammonium sulphate. The enzyme...... was further purified to a final homogeneity (by the criteria of isoelectric focusing and SDS-PAGE) using techniques of low pressure chromatography followed by two FPLC steps. The purified yellow enzyme showed visible absorption maxima of a flavoprotein at 380 and 450 nm: the presence of FAD as the cofactor...... was further confirmed by measuring the fluorescence spectra, Barley PAO is an acidic protein (pI 5.4) containing 3% of neutral sugars: its molecular mass determined by SDS-PAGE was 56 kDa, whilst gel permeation chromatography revealed the higher value of 76 kDa. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of barley...

  3. Purification, characterization and N-terminal amino acid sequence of a new major allergen from European chestnut pollen--Cas s 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, T; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K; Ferreira, F; Hirschwehr, R; Ahorn, H; Horak, F; Jager, S; Sperr, W; Kraft, D; Scheiner, O

    1993-11-15

    Pollens from trees of the order Fagales (e.g. birch, alder, hazel, and hornbeam) all contain one major allergen--the main cause for tree pollen allergy. So far the major allergens from birch (Bet v 1), alder (Aln g 1), hazel (Cor a 1), and hornbeam (Car b 1) have been characterized, showing high sequence similarity with each other (1-4). We present the molecular and immunologic characterization of Cas s 1, the major allergen from the European chestnut (Castanea sativa). From aqueous pollen extracts from European chestnut a protein was purified to homogeneity and was subjected to further investigation. The protein revealed a Mr of 22 kDa and was shown to represent the major allergen of the European chestnut (immunoblotting, histamine release) and designated Cas s 1. Despite a marked difference in Mr, Cas s 1 shows significant amino acid sequence similarity at the N-terminus and is antigenically closely related to the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 (17 kDa), as shown by binding to the anti-Bet v 1 monoclonal antibody BIP-1 and by IgE-inhibition tests using recombinant Bet v 1.

  4. Conservation and antigenicity of N-terminal sequences of GP185 from different Plasmodium falciparum isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, R F; Ardeshir, F; Reese, R T

    1986-01-01

    Complementary DNA (cDNA) clones for GP185, a major antigenically diverse glycoprotein of Plasmodium falciparum, were isolated from a cDNA library of the Honduras I/CDC (Honduras I) isolate, and 1052 bp were sequenced. The expression of cDNA fragments in Escherichia coli using the vector pCQV2 allowed verification of the reading frame. This GP185 cDNA sequence, like the cDNA sequence for a homologous gene of the K1 isolate [Hall et al., Nature 311 (1984) 379-382], codes for a polypeptide which is truncated due to multiple, in-frame stop codons. This polypeptide corresponds to the N-terminal 15% of the proposed coding region of the GP185 gene [Holder et al., Nature 317 (1985) 270-273]. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences for the GP185 gene of Honduras I and five other isolates indicated that there are two areas of conserved DNA sequence, one of 310 bp (beginning 181 bp upstream from the proposed initiation codon) and the other of greater than or equal to 360 bp (located entirely within the coding region), separated by a region encoding isolate-specific tandem amino acid repeats. Rat antiserum was raised to a fusion protein derived from the conserved regions and the intervening repeat region of this Honduras I protein. This antiserum bound GP185 on immunoblots of the homologous Honduras I isolate and the heterologous K1 isolate, which has different tandem repeats. Serum from owl monkeys and humans previously infected with P. falciparum reacted with the fusion protein on immunoblots demonstrating that determinants in the N-terminal 15% of GP185 were immunogenic in infected individuals and suggesting that some of these sites are conserved among isolates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Acute effects of N-terminal progastrin fragments on gastric acid secretion in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetze, Jens P; Hansen, Carsten P; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2017-03-01

    We previously identified an N-terminal fragment of progastrin in human antrum and plasma, where it circulates in high concentrations. In this study, we examined the effects of N-terminal progastrin fragments on gastric acid secretion by infusion in healthy individuals. Increasing doses of progastrin fragment 1-35 were infused intravenously during constant gastric acid stimulation by gastrin-17. In addition, the effects of progastrin fragment 1-35, fragment 6-35, and fragment 1-19 on gastrin-17 stimulated acid secretion were tested. The gastrin-17 stimulated acid secretion decreased 30% after administration of a high dose of progastrin fragment 1-35 (P < 0.05). In extension, a 1-h infusion of fragment 1-35 also decreased gastric acid output. In contrast, fragment 6-35 did not affect acid secretion, and a single infusion of gastrin-17 alone did not reveal fading of gastric acid output during the time course of the experiments. The results show that N-terminal fragments of progastrin may acutely affect gastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion in vivo. Structure-function analysis suggests that the N-terminal pentapeptide of progastrin is required for the effect.

  6. A highly conserved N-terminal sequence for teleost vitellogenin with potential value to the biochemistry, molecular biology and pathology of vitellogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folmar, L.D.; Denslow, N.D.; Wallace, R.A.; LaFleur, G.; Gross, T.S.; Bonomelli, S.; Sullivan, C.V.

    1995-01-01

    N-terminal amino acid sequences for vitellogenin (Vtg) from six species of teleost fish (striped bass, mummichog, pinfish, brown bullhead, medaka, yellow perch and the sturgeon) are compared with published N-terminal Vtg sequences for the lamprey, clawed frog and domestic chicken. Striped bass and mummichog had 100% identical amino acids between positions 7 and 21, while pinfish, brown bullhead, sturgeon, lamprey, Xenopus and chicken had 87%, 93%, 60%, 47%, 47-60%) for four transcripts and had 40% identical, respectively, with striped bass for the same positions. Partial sequences obtained for medaka and yellow perch were 100% identical between positions 5 to 10. The potential utility of this conserved sequence for studies on the biochemistry, molecular biology and pathology of vitellogenesis is discussed.

  7. Capping β-hairpin with N-terminal d-amino acid stabilizes peptide scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makwana, Kamlesh M; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2016-05-01

    Various strategies exist to stabilize de novo designed synthetic peptide β-hairpins or β-sheets structures, especially at the non-hydrogen bonding position. However, strategies to stabilize strand termini, which are affected by fraying, are highly limited. Here, by substituting N-terminal aliphatic amino acid with its mirror image counterpart, we achieve a significant increase in scaffold stabilization, resulting from the formation of a terminal aliphatic-aromatic hydrophobic CH…pi cluster. Our extensive solution NMR studies support the incorporation of an N-terminal d-aliphatic amino acid in the design of short β-hairpins, while successfully retaining the overall structural scaffold. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 260-266, 2016.

  8. Identification of evolutionarily conserved non-AUG-initiated N-terminal extensions in human coding sequences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ivanov, Ivaylo P

    2011-05-01

    In eukaryotes, it is generally assumed that translation initiation occurs at the AUG codon closest to the messenger RNA 5\\' cap. However, in certain cases, initiation can occur at codons differing from AUG by a single nucleotide, especially the codons CUG, UUG, GUG, ACG, AUA and AUU. While non-AUG initiation has been experimentally verified for a handful of human genes, the full extent to which this phenomenon is utilized--both for increased coding capacity and potentially also for novel regulatory mechanisms--remains unclear. To address this issue, and hence to improve the quality of existing coding sequence annotations, we developed a methodology based on phylogenetic analysis of predicted 5\\' untranslated regions from orthologous genes. We use evolutionary signatures of protein-coding sequences as an indicator of translation initiation upstream of annotated coding sequences. Our search identified novel conserved potential non-AUG-initiated N-terminal extensions in 42 human genes including VANGL2, FGFR1, KCNN4, TRPV6, HDGF, CITED2, EIF4G3 and NTF3, and also affirmed the conservation of known non-AUG-initiated extensions in 17 other genes. In several instances, we have been able to obtain independent experimental evidence of the expression of non-AUG-initiated products from the previously published literature and ribosome profiling data.

  9. PredSL: A Tool for the N-terminal Sequence-based Prediction of Protein Subcellular Localization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Evangelia I. Petsalaki; Pantelis G. Bagos; Zoi I. Litou; Stavros J. Hamodrakas

    2006-01-01

    The ability to predict the subcellular localization of a protein from its sequence is of great importance, as it provides information about the protein's function.We present a computational tool, PredSL, which utilizes neural networks, Markov chains, profile hidden Markov models, and scoring matrices for the prediction of the subcellular localization of proteins in eukaryotic cells from the N-terminal amino acid sequence. It aims to classify proteins into five groups: chloroplast,thylakoid, mitochondrion, secretory pathway, and "other". When tested in a fivefold cross-validation procedure, PredSL demonstrates 86.7% and 87.1% overall accuracy for the plant and non-plant datasets, respectively. Compared with TargetP, which is the most widely used method to date, and LumenP, the results of PredSL are comparable in most cases. When tested on the experimentally verified proteins of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, PredSL performs comparably if not better than any available algorithm for the same task. Furthermore, PredSL is the only method capable for the prediction of these subcellular localizations that is available as a stand-alone application through the URL:http://bioinformatics.biol.uoa.gr/PredSL/.

  10. Functional dissection of the N-terminal sequence of Clostridium sp. G0005 glucoamylase: identification of components critical for folding the catalytic domain and for constructing the active site structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Matsushima, Yudai; Nagamine, Yusuke; Matsuhashi, Tomoki; Honda, Shotaro; Okuda, Shoi; Ohno, Misa; Sugahara, Yasusato; Shin, Yongchol; Oyama, Fumitaka; Kawakita, Masao

    2017-03-01

    Clostridium sp. G0005 glucoamylase (CGA) is composed of a β-sandwich domain (BD), a linker, and a catalytic domain (CD). In the present study, CGA was expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies when the N-terminal region (39 amino acid residues) of the BD was truncated. To further elucidate the role of the N-terminal region of the BD, we constructed N-terminally truncated proteins (Δ19, Δ24, Δ29, and Δ34) and assessed their solubility and activity. Although all evaluated proteins were soluble, their hydrolytic activities toward maltotriose as a substrate varied: Δ19 and Δ24 were almost as active as CGA, but the activity of Δ29 was substantially lower, and Δ34 exhibited little hydrolytic activity. Subsequent truncation analysis of the N-terminal region sequence between residues 25 and 28 revealed that truncation of less than 26 residues did not affect CGA activity, whereas truncation of 26 or more residues resulted in a substantial loss of activity. Based on further site-directed mutagenesis and N-terminal sequence analysis, we concluded that the 26XaaXaaTrp28 sequence of CGA is important in exhibiting CGA activity. These results suggest that the N-terminal region of the BD in bacterial GAs may function not only in folding the protein into the correct structure but also in constructing a competent active site for catalyzing the hydrolytic reaction.

  11. IRMPD spectroscopy reveals a novel rearrangement reaction for modified peptides that involves elimination of the N-terminal amino acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Stipdonk, M.J.; Patterson, K.; Gibson, J.K.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, peptides were derivatized by reaction with salicylaldehyde to create N-terminal imines (Schiff bases). Collision-induced dissociation of the imine-modified peptides produces a complete series of b and a ions (which reveal sequence). However, an unusual pathway is also observed, one th

  12. Analysis of the distribution of charged residues in the N-terminal region of signal sequences: implications for protein export in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

    OpenAIRE

    von Heijne, G

    1984-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the distribution of charged residues in the N-terminal region of 39 prokaryotic and 134 eukaryotic signal sequences reveals a remarkable similarity between the two samples, both in terms of net charge and in terms of the position of charged residues within the N-terminal region, and suggests that the formyl group on Metf is not removed in prokaryotic signal sequences.

  13. Purification and N-terminal sequence of a serine proteinase-like protein (BMK-CBP) from the venom of the Chinese scorpion (Buthus martensii Karsch).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Rong; Zhang, Yong; Gopalakrishnakone, Ponnampalam

    2008-08-01

    A serine proteinase-like protein was isolated from the venom of Chinese red scorpion (Buthus martensii Karsch) by combination of gel filtration, ion-exchange and reveres-phase chromatography and named BMK-CBP. The apparent molecular weight of BMK-CBP was identified as 33 kDa by SDS-PAGE under non-reducing condition. The sequence of N-terminal 40 amino acids was obtained by Edman degradation. The sequence shows highest similarity to proteinase from insect source. When tested with commonly used substrates of proteinase, no significant hydrolytic activity was observed for BMK-CBP. The purified BMK-CBP was found to bind to the cancer cell line MCF-7 and the cell binding ability was dose-dependent.

  14. The scorpion toxin Bot IX is a potent member of the α-like family and has a unique N-terminal sequence extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Salvatierra, Juan; Bosmans, Frank; Bougis, Pierre E

    2016-09-01

    We report the detailed chemical, immunological and pharmacological characterization of the α-toxin Bot IX from the Moroccan scorpion Buthus occitanus tunetanus venom. Bot IX, which consists of 70 amino acids, is a highly atypical toxin. It carries a unique N-terminal sequence extension and is highly lethal in mice. Voltage clamp recordings on oocytes expressing rat Nav1.2 or insect BgNav1 reveal that, similar to other α-like toxins, Bot IX inhibits fast inactivation of both variants. Moreover, Bot IX belongs to the same structural/immunological group as the α-like toxin Bot I. Remarkably, radioiodinated Bot IX competes efficiently with the classical α-toxin AaH II from Androctonus australis, and displays one of the highest affinities for Nav channels.

  15. NMR solution structure and membrane interaction of the N-terminal sequence (1-30) of the bovine prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biverståhl, Henrik; Andersson, August; Gräslund, Astrid; Mäler, Lena

    2004-11-30

    The structure and membrane interaction of the N-terminal sequence (1-30) of the bovine prion protein (bPrPp) has been investigated by NMR spectroscopy in phospholipid membrane mimetic systems. CD spectroscopy revealed that the peptide adopts a largely alpha-helical structure in zwitterionic bicelles as well as in DHPC micelles but has a less degree of alpha-helix structure in partly charged bicelles. The solution structure of bPrPp was determined in DHPC micelles, and an alpha-helix was found between residues Ser8 and Ile21. The residues within the helical region show slow amide hydrogen exchange. Translational diffusion measurements in zwitterionic q = 0.5 bicelles show that the peptide does not induce aggregation of the bicelles. Increased quadrupolar splittings were observed in the outer part of the (2)H spectrum of DMPC in q = 3.5 bicelles, indicating that the peptide induces a certain degree of order in the bilayer. The amide hydrogen exchange and the (2)H NMR results are consistent with a slight positive hydrophobic mismatch and that bPrPp forms a stable helix that inserts in a transmembrane location in the bilayer. The structure of bPrPp and its position in the membrane may be relevant for the understanding of how the N-terminal (1-30) part of the bovine PrP functions as a cell-penetrating peptide. These findings may lead to a better understanding of how the prion protein accumulates at the membrane surface and also how the conversion into the scrapie form is carried out.

  16. Extreme Thermophilic Polypeptide (ETPMG) Exhibited Strong Antagonism to Magnaporthe grisea and its N-terminal Amino Acid Residues Sequencing%ETPMG极端嗜热多肽N-末端氨基酸测序及其对苗瘟的防效

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周华强; 谭芙蓉; 周颖; 郑爱萍; 李平

    2007-01-01

    Two extreme thermophilic polypeptides were isolated from fermentation liquor of LM-3 bacterium of Paenibacillus polymyxa.The inhibition capacity of 5μL purified polypeptides against Magnaporthe grisea reached to 89.6%.These two polypeptides had a molecular weight of 6 000~7 000 D by SDS-PAGE assay and were recovered from electro-lanes for detection of inhibition activity to M.grisea respectively.One polypeptide with strong inhibition activity was named ETPMG(extreme Thermophilic Polypeptide against M. grisea).and the other without such activity was named ETPL3(extreme Thermophilic Polypeptide from LM-3).N-terminal amino acid residues of ETPMG were then sequenced and the determined sequence was H2N-ANDPR.To evaluate its performance against M. grisea in paddy field at seedling stage,5 oil-in-water(O/W) microbial emulsions were confected.ETPMG was used as the active agent of the five emulsions.According to field evaluation,AB4 performed well with a control effect of 80.73% and the weight fraction of its components was 50∶6.5∶1.75∶41.75(ETPMG∶tween80∶emulsifier OP∶methanol).ETPMG was the first reported polypeptide which combined the extreme thermophilic characteristic and strong antagonistic activity against M.grisea.%本试验用加热法从多粘类芽孢杆菌(Paenibacillus polymyxa)LM-3菌株的发酵液中纯化得到2个极端嗜热多肽.平板拮抗实验表明,5μL纯化多肽对稻瘟病菌(Magnaporthe grisea)抑菌率达89.6%.SDS-PAGE电泳显示纯化多肽分子量介于6 000~7 000 D之间.多肽复性后,其中之一对稻瘟病菌表现出强的拮抗活性,命名为ETPMG(extreme thermophilic polypeptide against M. grisea);另一个则无此活性,命名为ETPL3(extreme thermophilic polypeptide from LM-3).ETPMG经氨基酸测序,获得了其N-末端5个氨基酸序列(H2N-ANDPR).以ETPMG为主效成分配得5种微生物源生防乳剂,对水稻苗瘟进行了田间防效试验.试验结果表明,这5种乳剂的防效都优于LM-3

  17. Monomer DJ-1 and its N-terminal sequence are necessary for mitochondrial localization of DJ-1 mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinatsu Maita

    Full Text Available DJ-1 is a novel oncogene and also a causative gene for familial Parkinson's disease (park7. DJ-1 has multiple functions that include transcriptional regulation, anti-oxidative reaction and chaperone and mitochondrial regulation. Mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in DJ-1-knockout mice and fry, and mitochondrial DJ-1 is more protective against oxidative stress-induced cell death. Although translocation of DJ-1 into mitochondria is enhanced by oxidative stress that leads to oxidation of cysteine 106 (C106 of DJ-1, the characteristics of mitochondrial DJ-1 and the mechanism by which DJ-1 is translocated into mitochondria are poorly understood. In this study, immunostaining, co-immunoprecipitation, cell fractionation and pull-down experiments showed that mutants of glutamine 18 (E18 DJ-1 are localized in mitochondria and do not make homodimers. Likewise, DJ-1 with mutations of two cysteines located in the dimer interface, C46S and C53A, and pathogenic mutants, M26I and L166P DJ-1, were found to be localized in mitochondria and not to make homodimers. Mutant DJ-1 harboring both E18A and C106S, in which C106 is not oxidized, was also localized in mitochondria, indicating that oxidation of C106 is important but not essential for mitochondrial localization of DJ-1. It should be noted that E18A DJ-1 was translocated from mitochondria to the cytoplasm when mitochondrial membrane potential was reduced by treatment of cells with CCCP, an uncoupler of the oxidative phosphorylation system in mitochondria. Furthermore, deletion or substitution of the N-terminal 12 amino acids in DJ-1 resulted in re-localization of E18A, M26I and L166P DJ-1 from mitochondria into the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that a monomer and the N-terminal 12 amino acids are necessary for mitochondrial localization of DJ-1 mutants and that conformation change induced by C106 oxidation or by E18 mutation leads to translocation of DJ-1 into mitochondria.

  18. Monomer DJ-1 and Its N-Terminal Sequence Are Necessary for Mitochondrial Localization of DJ-1 Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maita, Chinatsu; Maita, Hiroshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2013-01-01

    DJ-1 is a novel oncogene and also a causative gene for familial Parkinson’s disease (park7). DJ-1 has multiple functions that include transcriptional regulation, anti-oxidative reaction and chaperone and mitochondrial regulation. Mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in DJ-1-knockout mice and fry, and mitochondrial DJ-1 is more protective against oxidative stress-induced cell death. Although translocation of DJ-1 into mitochondria is enhanced by oxidative stress that leads to oxidation of cysteine 106 (C106) of DJ-1, the characteristics of mitochondrial DJ-1 and the mechanism by which DJ-1 is translocated into mitochondria are poorly understood. In this study, immunostaining, co-immunoprecipitation, cell fractionation and pull-down experiments showed that mutants of glutamine 18 (E18) DJ-1 are localized in mitochondria and do not make homodimers. Likewise, DJ-1 with mutations of two cysteines located in the dimer interface, C46S and C53A, and pathogenic mutants, M26I and L166P DJ-1, were found to be localized in mitochondria and not to make homodimers. Mutant DJ-1 harboring both E18A and C106S, in which C106 is not oxidized, was also localized in mitochondria, indicating that oxidation of C106 is important but not essential for mitochondrial localization of DJ-1. It should be noted that E18A DJ-1 was translocated from mitochondria to the cytoplasm when mitochondrial membrane potential was reduced by treatment of cells with CCCP, an uncoupler of the oxidative phosphorylation system in mitochondria. Furthermore, deletion or substitution of the N-terminal 12 amino acids in DJ-1 resulted in re-localization of E18A, M26I and L166P DJ-1 from mitochondria into the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that a monomer and the N-terminal 12 amino acids are necessary for mitochondrial localization of DJ-1 mutants and that conformation change induced by C106 oxidation or by E18 mutation leads to translocation of DJ-1 into mitochondria. PMID:23326576

  19. Intein-Promoted Cyclization of Aspartic Acid Flanking the Intein Leads to Atypical N-Terminal Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minteer, Christopher J; Siegart, Nicolle M; Colelli, Kathryn M; Liu, Xinyue; Linhardt, Robert J; Wang, Chunyu; Gomez, Alvin V; Reitter, Julie N; Mills, Kenneth V

    2017-02-28

    Protein splicing is a post-translational reaction facilitated by an intein, or intervening protein, which involves the removal of the intein and the ligation of the flanking polypeptides, or exteins. A DNA polymerase II intein from Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab PolII intein) can promote protein splicing in vitro on incubation at high temperature. Mutation of active site residues Cys1, Gln185, and Cys+1 to Ala results in an inactive intein precursor, which cannot promote the steps of splicing, including cleavage of the peptide bond linking the N-extein and intein (N-terminal cleavage). Surprisingly, coupling the inactivating mutations to a change of the residue at the C-terminus of the N-extein (N-1 residue) from the native Asn to Asp reactivates N-terminal cleavage at pH 5. Similar "aspartic acid effects" have been observed in other proteins and peptides but usually only occur at lower pH values. In this case, however, the unusual N-terminal cleavage is abolished by mutations to catalytic active site residues and unfolding of the intein, indicating that this cleavage effect is mediated by the intein active site and the intein fold. We show via mass spectrometry that the reaction proceeds through cyclization of Asp resulting in anhydride formation coupled to peptide bond cleavage. Our results add to the richness of the understanding of the mechanism of protein splicing and provide insight into the stability of proteins at moderately low pH. The results also explain, and may help practitioners avoid, a side reaction that may complicate intein applications in biotechnology.

  20. Detection and functional characterization of a 215 amino acid N-terminal extension in the Xanthomonas type III effector XopD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canonne, Joanne; Marino, Daniel; Noël, Laurent D; Arechaga, Ignacio; Pichereaux, Carole; Rossignol, Michel; Roby, Dominique; Rivas, Susana

    2010-12-22

    During evolution, pathogens have developed a variety of strategies to suppress plant-triggered immunity and promote successful infection. In Gram-negative phytopathogenic bacteria, the so-called type III protein secretion system works as a molecular syringe to inject type III effectors (T3Es) into plant cells. The XopD T3E from the strain 85-10 of Xanthomonas campestris pathovar vesicatoria (Xcv) delays the onset of symptom development and alters basal defence responses to promote pathogen growth in infected tomato leaves. XopD was previously described as a modular protein that contains (i) an N-terminal DNA-binding domain (DBD), (ii) two tandemly repeated EAR (ERF-associated amphiphillic repression) motifs involved in transcriptional repression, and (iii) a C-terminal cysteine protease domain, involved in release of SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) from SUMO-modified proteins. Here, we show that the XopD protein that is produced and secreted by Xcv presents an additional N-terminal extension of 215 amino acids. Closer analysis of this newly identified N-terminal domain shows a low complexity region rich in lysine, alanine and glutamic acid residues (KAE-rich) with high propensity to form coiled-coil structures that confers to XopD the ability to form dimers when expressed in E. coli. The full length XopD protein identified in this study (XopD(1-760)) displays stronger repression of the XopD plant target promoter PR1, as compared to the XopD version annotated in the public databases (XopD(216-760)). Furthermore, the N-terminal extension of XopD, which is absent in XopD(216-760), is essential for XopD type III-dependent secretion and, therefore, for complementation of an Xcv mutant strain deleted from XopD in its ability to delay symptom development in tomato susceptible cultivars. The identification of the complete sequence of XopD opens new perspectives for future studies on the XopD protein and its virulence-associated functions in planta.

  1. Heterologous expression of the isopimaric acid pathway in Nicotiana benthamiana and the effect of N-terminal modifications of the involved cytochrome P450 enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gnanasekaran, Thiyagarajan; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Andersen-Ranberg, Johan;

    2015-01-01

    in the chloroplast and subsequently oxidized by a cytochrome P450, CYP720B4. RESULTS: We transiently expressed the isopimaric acid pathway in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves and enhanced its productivity by the expression of two rate-limiting steps in the pathway (providing the general precursor of diterpenes). This co...... enzymes. CONCLUSIONS: It is possible to localize a diterpenoid pathway from spruce fully within the chloroplast of N. benthamiana and a few modifications of the N-terminal sequences of the CYP720B4 can facilitate the expression of plant P450s in the plastids. The coupling of terpene biosynthesis closer......BACKGROUND: Plant terpenoids are known for their diversity, stereochemical complexity, and their commercial interest as pharmaceuticals, food additives, and cosmetics. Developing biotechnology approaches for the production of these compounds in heterologous hosts can increase their market...

  2. A specific isoform of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix by a N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whatcott, Clifford J. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85728 (United States); Meyer-Ficca, Mirella L.; Meyer, Ralph G. [Department of Animal Biology and Mari Lowe Center for Comparative Oncology, School of Veterinary Medicine, NBC Center for Animal Transgenesis and Germ Cell Research, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, PA 19348 (United States); Jacobson, Myron K., E-mail: mjacobson@pharmacy.arizona.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85728 (United States)

    2009-12-10

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) convert NAD to polymers of ADP-ribose that are converted to free ADP-ribose by poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG). The activation of the nuclear enzyme PARP-1 following genotoxic stress has been linked to release of apoptosis inducing factor from the mitochondria, but the mechanisms by which signals are transmitted between nuclear and mitochondrial compartments are not well understood. The study reported here has examined the relationship between PARG and mitochondria in HeLa cells. Endogenous PARG associated with the mitochondrial fraction migrated in the range of 60 kDa. Transient transfection of cells with PARG expression constructs with amino acids encoded by exon 4 at the N-terminus was targeted to the mitochondria as demonstrated by subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence microscopy of whole cells. Deletion and missense mutants allowed identification of a canonical N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence consisting of the first 16 amino acids encoded by PARG exon 4. Sub-mitochondrial localization experiments indicate that this mitochondrial PARG isoform is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix. The identification of a PARG isoform as a component of the mitochondrial matrix raises several interesting possibilities concerning mechanisms of nuclear-mitochondrial cross talk involved in regulation of cell death pathways.

  3. The role of the N-terminal loop in the function of the colicin E7 nuclease domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czene, Anikó; Németh, Eszter; Zóka, István G.;

    2013-01-01

    stabilization effect of the N-terminal amino acids on the catalytic centre. In agreement with this, the absence of the N-terminal sequences resulted in significantly increased movement of the backbone atoms compared with that in the native NColE7: in ΔN25-NColE7 the amino acid strings between residues 485...

  4. Left-handed helical preference in an achiral peptide chain is induced by an L-amino acid in an N-terminal type II β-turn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Poli, Matteo; De Zotti, Marta; Raftery, James; Aguilar, Juan A; Morris, Gareth A; Clayden, Jonathan

    2013-03-15

    Oligomers of the achiral amino acid Aib adopt helical conformations in which the screw-sense may be controlled by a single N-terminal residue. Using crystallographic and NMR techniques, we show that the left- or right-handed sense of helical induction arises from the nature of the β-turn at the N terminus: the tertiary amino acid L-Val induces a left-handed type II β-turn in both the solid state and in solution, while the corresponding quaternary amino acid L-α-methylvaline induces a right-handed type III β-turn.

  5. Escherichia coli contains a protein that is homologous in function and N-terminal sequence to the protein encoded by the nifS gene of Azotobacter vinelandii and that can participate in the synthesis of the Fe-S cluster of dihydroxy-acid dehydratase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, D H

    1996-07-05

    In this paper, I report the purification of a protein from Escherichia coli that is very similar in sequence, molecular weight, and the reactions it can catalyze to the protein encoded by the Azotobacter vinelandii nifS gene. This E. coli protein contains pyridoxal phosphate as a cofactor and catalyzes the removal of sulfur from cysteine to form alanine and S0. When dithiothreitol is present along with cysteine, the S0 formed is reduced to S2-. This protein has a reactive sulfhydryl group that is essential for activity. As isolated, this sulfhydryl group appears to be in a disulfide linkage with the sulfhydryl group from the phosphopantetheine moiety of the acyl carrier protein. The purified E. coli protein can mobilize the sulfur from cysteine and contribute it to the formation of a [4Fe-4S] cluster on the apoprotein of E. coli dihydroxy-acid dehydratase. A mechanism is proposed for the early stages of the synthesis of Fe-S clusters using this protein and sulfur in the S0 oxidation state.

  6. Characterization, N-terminal sequencing and classification of Tolworthcin 524: A bacteriocin produced by Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. tolworthi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Cano, Rubén D; de la Fuente-Salcido, Norma M; Salcedo-Hernández, Rubén; León-Galván, M Fabiola; Bideshi, Dennis K; Hernández-Guzmán, Gustavo; Barboza-Corona, J Eleazar

    2014-12-01

    Bacteriocins synthesized by entomopathogenic Bacillus thuringiensis are gaining attention owing to their inhibitory effects against a wide variety of pathogenic bacteria. In the present study, we purified and characterized Tolworthcin 524, a bacteriocin synthesized by B. thuringiensis subsp. tolworthi, and compared it with other bacteriocins synthesized by B. thuringiensis. Tolworthcin 524 was separated and purified from the secretome of B. thuringiensis by fast protein liquid chromatography with a gel filtration column to obtain yields of 17% and a specific activity of ∼3600U/mgprotein. The purified product showed two peptides of ∼9 and 6kDa with antimicrobial activity in a gel-screening assay. The purified product was analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis and the resolved peptides of ∼9 and 6kDa with isoelectric points of ∼8 were sequenced. Partial sequences (METPVVQPR and DWTCWSCLVCAACS) were obtained suggesting that the ∼9 and 6kDa correspond to the prebacteriocin and mature Tolworthcin 524, respectively. Sequences showed high identity with Thurincin H and Thuricin 17 and had a conserved motif with other bacteriocins of B. thuringiensis. Based on sequence data, Tolworthcin 524 was classified in subclass II.2 (Thuricin-like peptides) of the Bacillus bacteriocin classification scheme. The larger peptide did not harbor a sequence suggestive of a signal peptide neither did it contain the double-glycine (GG) motif characteristic of the secretion leader recognized by the ABC transport system. Implications of these properties in Tolworthcin 524 secretion are discussed.

  7. Copper and zinc binding properties of the N-terminal histidine-rich sequence of Haemophilus ducreyi Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paksi, Zoltán; Jancsó, Attila; Pacello, Francesca; Nagy, Nóra; Battistoni, Andrea; Gajda, Tamás

    2008-09-01

    The Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu,ZnSOD) isolated from Haemophilus ducreyi possesses a His-rich N-terminal metal binding domain, which has been previously proposed to play a copper(II) chaperoning role. To analyze the metal binding ability and selectivity of the histidine-rich domain we have carried out thermodynamic and solution structural analysis of the copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes of a peptide corresponding to the first 11 amino acids of the enzyme (H(2)N-HGDHMHNHDTK-OH, L). This peptide has highly versatile metal binding ability and provides one and three high affinity binding sites for zinc(II) and copper(II), respectively. In equimolar solutions the MHL complexes are dominant in the neutral pH-range with protonated lysine epsilon-amino group. As a consequence of its multidentate nature, L binds zinc and copper with extraordinary high affinity (K(D,Zn)=1.6x10(-9)M and K(D,Cu)=5.0x10(-12)M at pH 7.4) and appears as the strongest zinc(II) and copper(II) chelator between the His-rich peptides so far investigated. These K(D) values support the already proposed role of the N-terminal His-rich region of H. ducreyi Cu,ZnSOD in copper recruitment under metal starvation, and indicate a similar function in the zinc(II) uptake, too. The kinetics of copper(II) transfer from L to the active site of Cu-free N-deleted H. ducreyi Cu,ZnSOD showed significant pH and copper-to-peptide ratio dependence, indicating specific structural requirements during the metal ion transfer to the active site. Interestingly, the complex CuHL has significant superoxide dismutase like activity, which may suggest multifunctional role of the copper(II)-bound N-terminal His-rich domain of H. ducreyi Cu,ZnSOD.

  8. N-Terminal Peptide Sequence Repetition Influences the Kinetics of Backbone Fragmentation: A Manifestation of the Jahn-Teller Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, David M.; Yang, Hongqian; Zubarev, Roman A.

    2013-11-01

    Analysis of large (>10,000 entries) databases consisting of high-resolution tandem mass spectra of peptide dications revealed with high statistical significance ( P diketopiperazine structure for at least some b2 + ions. When consisting of two identical amino acids, these species should form through intermediates that have a symmetric geometry and, thus, must be subject to the Jahn-Teller effect that reduces the stability of such systems.

  9. Studies on N-terminal glycation of peptides in hypoallergenic infant formulas: quantification of alpha-N-(2-furoylmethyl) amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penndorf, Ilka; Biedermann, Daniela; Maurer, Sarah V; Henle, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    To obtain information about the extent of the early Maillard reaction between the N-termini of peptides and lactose, alpha-N-(2-furoylmethyl) amino acids (FMAAs) were quantified together with epsilon-N-(2-furoylmethyl)lysine (furosine) in acid hydrolyzates of hypoallergenic infant formulas, conventional infant formulas, and human milk samples using RP-HPLC with UV-detection. FMAAs are formed during acid hydrolysis of peptide-bound N-terminal Amadori products (APs), and furosine is formed from the Amadori products of peptide-bound lysine. Unambiguous identification was achieved by means of LC/MS and UV-spectroscopy using independently prepared reference material. The extent of acid-induced conversion of APs to FMAAs was studied by RP-HPLC with chemiluminescent nitrogen detection (CLND). Depending on the corresponding alpha-N-lactulosyl amino acid, between 6.0% and 18.1% of FMAAs were formed during hydrolysis for 23 h at 110 degrees C in 8 N HCl. From epsilon-N-lactulosyllysine, 50% furosine is formed under these conditions. Whereas furosine was detectable in all assayed samples, five different FMAAs, alpha-FM-Lys, alpha-FM-Ala, alpha-FM-Val, alpha-FM-Ile, and alpha-FM-Leu, were exclusively detected in acid hydrolyzates of hypoallergenic infant formulas in amounts ranging from 35 to 396 mumol/100 g protein. Taking the conversion factors into account, modification of N-terminal amino acids in peptides by reducing carbohydrates was between 0.3% and 8.4%. This has to be considered within the discussion concerning the nutritional quality of peptide-containing foods.

  10. Quantification of glycated N-terminal peptide of hemoglobin using derivatization for multiple functional groups of amino acids followed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Yohei; Kinumi, Tomoya; Yamazaki, Taichi; Takatsu, Akiko

    2016-02-01

    A novel method of amino acid analysis using derivatization of multiple functional groups (amino, carboxyl, and phenolic hydroxyl groups) was applied to measure glycated amino acids in order to quantify glycated peptides and evaluate the degree of glycation of peptide. Amino and carboxyl groups of amino acids were derivatized with 1-bromobutane so that the hydrophobicities and basicities of the amino acids, including glycated amino acids, were improved. These derivatized amino acids could be detected with high sensitivity using LC-MS/MS. In this study, 1-deoxyfructosyl-VHLTPE and VHLTPE, which are N-terminal peptides of the β-chains of hemoglobin, were selected as target compounds. After reducing the peptide sample solution with sodium borohydride, the obtained peptides were hydrolyzed with hydrochloric acid. The released amino acids were then derivatized with 1-bromobutane and analyzed with LC-MS/MS. The derivatized amino acids, including glycated amino acids, could be separated using an octadecyl silylated silica column and good sharp peaks were detected. We show a confirmatory experiment that the proposed method can be applied to evaluate the degree of glycation of peptides, using mixtures of glycated and non-glycated peptide.

  11. Runx2-I isoform contributes to fetal bone formation even in the absence of specific N-terminal amino acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Okura

    Full Text Available The Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2 gene encodes the transcription factor Runx2, which is the master regulator of osteoblast development; insufficiency of this protein causes disorders of bone development such as cleidocranial dysplasia. Runx2 has two isoforms, Runx2-II and Runx2-I, and production of each isoform is controlled by a unique promoter: a distal promoter (P1 and a proximal promoter (P2, respectively. Although several studies have focused on differences and similarities between the two Runx2 isoforms, their individual roles in bone formation have not yet been determined conclusively, partly because a Runx2-I-targeted mouse model is not available. In this study, we established a novel Runx2-manipulated mouse model in which the first ATG of Runx2-I was replaced with TGA (a stop codon, and a neomycin-resistant gene (neo cassette was inserted at the first intron of Runx2-I. Homozygous Runx2-Ineo/neo mice showed severely reduced expression of Runx2-I, whereas Runx2-II expression was largely retained. Runx2-Ineo/neo mice showed neonatal lethality, and in these mice, intramembranous ossification was more severely defective than endochondral ossification, presumably because of the greater involvement of Runx2-I, compared with that of Runx2-II in intramembranous ossification. Interestingly, the depletion of neo rescued the above-described phenotypes, indicating that the isoform-specific N-terminal region of Runx2-I is not functionally essential for bone development. Taken together, our results provide a novel clue leading to a better understanding of the roles of Runx2 isoforms in osteoblast development.

  12. N-terminal glycation of proteins and peptides in foods and in vivo: evaluation of N-(2-furoylmethyl)valine in acid hydrolyzates of human hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penndorf, Ilka; Li, Changhao; Schwarzenbolz, Uwe; Henle, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Specific determination of N-(2-furoylmethyl)valine (FM-Val) together with furosine in acid hydrolyzates of human hemoglobin of healthy volunteers (n = 6) and diabetic patients (n = 14) by means of reversed-phase HPLC with electrospray ionization-time-of-flight mass spectroscopy is reported. Whereas FM-Val is formed during acid hydrolysis of the N-terminal hemoglobin adduct N-fructosylvaline, furosine results from acid degradation of lysine residues glycated at the epsilon-amino group. Quantification was based on the use of synthesized isotopomers, namely N-[2-(13C6)furoylmethyl]valine and N-epsilon-[2-(13C6)furoylmethyl]lysine, thus enabling interference-free detection and calibration. Taking the conversion factors into account, the amount of N-terminally bound N-fructosylvaline in human hemoglobin was between 518 and 774 pmol/mg protein for healthy volunteers and between 586 and 1426 pmol/mg protein for diabetic patients. Derivatization at the side chain of peptide-bound lysine residues to N-epsilon-fructosyllysine was from 1156 to 1753 pmol/mg protein for healthy controls and from 1191 to 2409 pmol/mg protein for diabetics. For these patients, the amount of N-fructosylvaline showed good correlation with the values for HbA(1c). The significantly higher relative extent of glycation at the N terminus compared to side-chain glycation points to a specific and intraindividual capacity for enzymatic deglycation in human erythrocytes, which can be assessed using the proposed method.

  13. Characterization of amino acid residues within the N-terminal region of Ubc9 that play a role in Ubc9 nuclear localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekhri, Palak [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, 5947 Gullen Mall, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Tao, Tao [School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China); Kaplan, Feige [Department of Human Genetics, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Zhang, Xiang-Dong, E-mail: xzhang@wayne.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, 5947 Gullen Mall, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2015-02-27

    As the sole E2 enzyme for SUMOylation, Ubc9 is predominantly nuclear. However, the underlying mechanisms of Ubc9 nuclear localization are still not well understood. Here we show that RNAi-depletion of Imp13, an importin known to mediate Ubc9 nuclear import, reduces both Ubc9 nuclear accumulation and global SUMOylation. Furthermore, Ubc9-R13A or Ubc9-H20D mutation previously shown to interrupt the interaction of Ubc9 with nucleus-enriched SUMOs reduces the nuclear enrichment of Ubc9, suggesting that the interaction of Ubc9 with the nuclear SUMOs may enhance Ubc9 nuclear retention. Moreover, Ubc9-R17E mutation, which is known to disrupt the interaction of Ubc9 with both SUMOs and Imp13, causes a greater decrease in Ubc9 nuclear accumulation than Ubc9-R13A or Ubc9-H20D mutation. Lastly, Ubc9-K74A/S89D mutations that perturb the interaction of Ubc9 with nucleus-enriched SUMOylation-consensus motifs has no effect on Ubc9 nuclear localization. Altogether, our results have elucidated that the amino acid residues within the N-terminal region of Ubc9 play a pivotal role in regulation of Ubc9 nuclear localization. - Highlights: • Imp13-mediated nuclear import of Ubc9 is critical for global SUMOylation. • Ubc9 mutations disrupting Ubc9-SUMO interaction decrease Ubc9 nuclear accumulation. • N-terminal amino acid residues of Ubc9 are critical for Ubc9 nuclear enrichment.

  14. The calmodulin-like proteins AtCML4 and AtCML5 are single-pass membrane proteins targeted to the endomembrane system by an N-terminal signal anchor sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruge, Henning; Flosdorff, Sandra; Ebersberger, Ingo; Chigri, Fatima; Vothknecht, Ute C

    2016-06-01

    Calmodulins (CaMs) are important mediators of Ca(2+) signals that are found ubiquitously in all eukaryotic organisms. Plants contain a unique family of calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) that exhibit greater sequence variance compared to canonical CaMs. The Arabidopsis thaliana proteins AtCML4 and AtCML5 are members of CML subfamily VII and possess a CaM domain comprising the characteristic double pair of EF-hands, but they are distinguished from other members of this subfamily and from canonical CaMs by an N-terminal extension of their amino acid sequence. Transient expression of yellow fluorescent protein-tagged AtCML4 and AtCML5 under a 35S-promoter in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells revealed a spherical fluorescence pattern. This pattern was confirmed by transient expression in Arabidopsis protoplasts under the native promoter. Co-localization analyses with various endomembrane marker proteins suggest that AtCML4 and AtCML5 are localized to vesicular structures in the interphase between Golgi and the endosomal system. Further studies revealed AtCML5 to be a single-pass membrane protein that is targeted into the endomembrane system by an N-terminal signal anchor sequence. Self-assembly green fluorescent protein and protease protection assays support a topology with the CaM domain exposed to the cytosolic surface and not the lumen of the vesicles, indicating that AtCML5 could sense Ca(2+) signals in the cytosol. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that AtCML4 and AtCML5 are closely related paralogues originating from a duplication event within the Brassicaceae family. CML4/5-like proteins seem to be universally present in eudicots but are absent in some monocots. Together these results show that CML4/5-like proteins represent a flowering plant-specific subfamily of CMLs with a potential function in vesicle transport within the plant endomembrane system.

  15. Acidic Residues Control the Dimerization of the N-terminal Domain of Black Widow Spiders’ Major Ampullate Spidroin 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Joschka; Schaal, Daniel; Eisoldt, Lukas; Schweimer, Kristian; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Scheibel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Dragline silk is the most prominent amongst spider silks and comprises two types of major ampullate spidroins (MaSp) differing in their proline content. In the natural spinning process, the conversion of soluble MaSp into a tough fiber is, amongst other factors, triggered by dimerization and conformational switching of their helical amino-terminal domains (NRN). Both processes are induced by protonation of acidic residues upon acidification along the spinning duct. Here, the structure and monomer-dimer-equilibrium of the domain NRN1 of Latrodectus hesperus MaSp1 and variants thereof have been investigated, and the key residues for both could be identified. Changes in ionic composition and strength within the spinning duct enable electrostatic interactions between the acidic and basic pole of two monomers which prearrange into an antiparallel dimer. Upon naturally occurring acidification this dimer is stabilized by protonation of residue E114. A conformational change is independently triggered by protonation of clustered acidic residues (D39, E76, E81). Such step-by-step mechanism allows a controlled spidroin assembly in a pH- and salt sensitive manner, preventing premature aggregation of spider silk proteins in the gland and at the same time ensuring fast and efficient dimer formation and stabilization on demand in the spinning duct. PMID:27681031

  16. Isolation of key amino acid residues at the N-terminal end of the core region Streptococcus downei glucansucrase, GTF-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monchois, V; Vignon, M; Russell, R R

    1999-11-01

    Related streptococcal and Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucansucrases are enzymes of medical and biotechnological interest. Molecular modelling has suggested that the catalytic domain contains a circularly permuted version of the (beta/alpha)8 barrel structure found in the amylase superfamily, and site-directed mutagenesis has identified critical amino acids in this region. In this study, sequential N-terminal truncations of Streptococcus downei GTF-I showed that key amino acids are also present in the first one-third of the core domain. Mutations were introduced at Trp-344, Glu-349 and His-355, residues that are conserved in all glucansucrases and lie within a region which is a target for inhibitory antibodies. W344L, E349L and H355V substitutions were assayed for their effect on mutan synthesis and also on oligosaccharide synthesis with various acceptors. It appeared that Trp-344 and His-355 are involved in the action mechanism of GTF-I; His-355 may also play a role in a binding subsite necessary for oligosaccharide and glucan elongation.

  17. Influenza A virus virulence depends on two amino acids in the N-terminal domain of its NS1 protein facilitating inhibition of PKR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierhorn, Kristina L; Jolmes, Fabian; Bespalowa, Julia; Saenger, Sandra; Peteranderl, Christin; Dzieciolowski, Julia; Budt, Matthias; Pleschka, Stephan; Herrmann, Andreas; Herold, Susanne; Wolff, Thorsten

    2017-03-01

    main activity of the amino acids 35 and 46 as the strong attenuation of corresponding mutant viruses in human cells was rescued to a large extent by lowering PKR expression levels. Significantly, this corresponded with restoration of viral virulence for NS1 R35A and R46A mutant viruses in PKR(-/-) mice. Therefore, our data establish a model in which the NS1 N-terminal domain engages in a binding interaction to inhibit activation of PKR and ensure efficient viral propagation and virulence.

  18. A highly basic sequence at the N-terminal region is essential for targeting the DNA replication protein ORC1 to the nucleus in Leishmania donovani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Devanand; Kumar, Diwakar; Saha, Swati

    2012-07-01

    The conserved eukaryotic DNA replication protein ORC1 is one of the constituents of pre-replication complexes that assemble at or very near origins prior to replication initiation. ORC1 has been shown to be constitutively nuclear in Leishmania major. This study investigates the sequences involved in nuclear localization of ORC1 in Leishmania donovani, the causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis. Nuclear localization signals (NLSs) have been reported in only a few Leishmania proteins. Functional analyses have delineated NLSs to regions of ~60 amino acids in length in the tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase I and type II DNA topoisomerase of L. donovani, and in the L. major kinesin KIN13-1. Using a panel of site-directed mutations we have identified a sequence essential for nuclear import of LdORC1. This sequence at the N terminus of the protein comprises residues 2-5 (KRSR), with K2, R3 and R5 being crucial. Independent mutation of the K2 residue causes exclusion of the protein from the nucleus, while mutating the R5 residue leads to diffusion of the protein throughout the cell. This sequence, however, is insufficient for targeting a heterologous protein (β-galactosidase) to the nucleus. Analysis of additional ORC1 mutations and reporter constructs reveals that while the highly basic tetra-amino acid sequence at the N terminus is essential for nuclear localization, the ORC1 NLS in its entirety is more complex, and of a distributive character. Our results suggest that nuclear localization signalling sequences in Leishmania nuclear proteins are more complex than what is typically seen in higher eukaryotes.

  19. Hydrogen-Rich Saline Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Heart Dysfunction by Restoring Fatty Acid Oxidation in Rats by Mitigating C-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Bingdong; Liu, Lidan; Wang, Ni; Tong, Dongyi; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jin

    2015-12-01

    Sepsis is common in intensive care units (ICU) and is associated with high mortality. Cardiac dysfunction complicating sepsis is one of the most important causes of this mortality. This dysfunction is due to myocardial inflammation and reduced production of energy by the heart. A number of studies have shown that hydrogen-rich saline (HRS) has a beneficial effect on sepsis. Therefore, we tested whether HRS prevents cardiac dysfunction by increasing cardiac energy. Four groups of rats received intraperitoneal injections of one of the following solutions: normal saline (NS), HRS, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and LPS plus HRS. Cardiac function was measured by echocardiography 8 h after the injections. Gene and protein expression related to fatty acid oxidation (FAO) were measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot analysis. The injection of LPS compromised heart function through decreased fractional shortening (FS) and increased left ventricular diameter (LVD). The addition of HRS increased FS, palmitate triphosphate, and the ratio of phosphocreatinine (PCr) to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as well as decreasing LVD. The LPS challenge reduced the expression of genes related to FAO, including perioxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), perioxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα), and their downstream targets, in mRNA and protein level, which were attenuated by HRS. However, HRS had little effect on glucose metabolism. Furthermore, HRS inhibited c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the rat heart. Inhibition of JNK by HRS showed beneficial effects on LPS-challenged rats, at least in part, by restoring cardiac FAO.

  20. Roles of N-terminal fatty acid acylations in membrane compartment partitioning: Arabidopsis h-type thioredoxins as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, José A; Micalella, Chiara; Martinez, Aude; Brown, Spencer C; Satiat-Jeunemaître, Béatrice; Meinnel, Thierry; Giglione, Carmela

    2013-03-01

    N-terminal fatty acylations (N-myristoylation [MYR] and S-palmitoylation [PAL]) are crucial modifications affecting 2 to 4% of eukaryotic proteins. The role of these modifications is to target proteins to membranes. Predictive tools have revealed unexpected targets of these acylations in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plants. However, little is known about how N-terminal lipidation governs membrane compartmentalization of proteins in plants. We show here that h-type thioredoxins (h-TRXs) cluster in four evolutionary subgroups displaying strictly conserved N-terminal modifications. It was predicted that one subgroup undergoes only MYR and another undergoes both MYR and PAL. We used plant TRXs as a model protein family to explore the effect of MYR alone or MYR and PAL in the same family of proteins. We used a high-throughput biochemical strategy to assess MYR of specific TRXs. Moreover, various TRX-green fluorescent protein fusions revealed that MYR localized protein to the endomembrane system and that partitioning between this membrane compartment and the cytosol correlated with the catalytic efficiency of the N-myristoyltransferase acting at the N terminus of the TRXs. Generalization of these results was obtained using several randomly selected Arabidopsis proteins displaying a MYR site only. Finally, we demonstrated that a palmitoylatable Cys residue flanking the MYR site is crucial to localize proteins to micropatching zones of the plasma membrane.

  1. Roles of N-Terminal Fatty Acid Acylations in Membrane Compartment Partitioning: Arabidopsis h-Type Thioredoxins as a Case Study[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, José A.; Micalella, Chiara; Martinez, Aude; Brown, Spencer C.; Satiat-Jeunemaître, Béatrice; Meinnel, Thierry; Giglione, Carmela

    2013-01-01

    N-terminal fatty acylations (N-myristoylation [MYR] and S-palmitoylation [PAL]) are crucial modifications affecting 2 to 4% of eukaryotic proteins. The role of these modifications is to target proteins to membranes. Predictive tools have revealed unexpected targets of these acylations in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plants. However, little is known about how N-terminal lipidation governs membrane compartmentalization of proteins in plants. We show here that h-type thioredoxins (h-TRXs) cluster in four evolutionary subgroups displaying strictly conserved N-terminal modifications. It was predicted that one subgroup undergoes only MYR and another undergoes both MYR and PAL. We used plant TRXs as a model protein family to explore the effect of MYR alone or MYR and PAL in the same family of proteins. We used a high-throughput biochemical strategy to assess MYR of specific TRXs. Moreover, various TRX–green fluorescent protein fusions revealed that MYR localized protein to the endomembrane system and that partitioning between this membrane compartment and the cytosol correlated with the catalytic efficiency of the N-myristoyltransferase acting at the N terminus of the TRXs. Generalization of these results was obtained using several randomly selected Arabidopsis proteins displaying a MYR site only. Finally, we demonstrated that a palmitoylatable Cys residue flanking the MYR site is crucial to localize proteins to micropatching zones of the plasma membrane. PMID:23543785

  2. Analysis of the N-terminal positively charged residues of the simian immunodeficiency virus Vif reveals a critical amino acid required for the antagonism of rhesus APOBEC3D, G, and H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Kimberly; Katuwal, Miki; Wang, Yaqiong; Li, Cicy; Stephens, Edward B

    2014-01-20

    Previous studies have shown that apolipoprotein B mRNA editing, enzyme catalytic, polypeptide G (APOBEC3G; hA3G) and F (APOBEC3F; hA3F) proteins interact with a nonlinear binding site located at the N-terminal region of the HIV-1 Vif protein. We have analyzed the role of 12 positively charged amino acids of the N-terminal region of the SIV Vif. Simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIV) were constructed that expressed each of these amino acid substitutions. These viruses were examined for replication in the presence of rhesus macaque APOBEC3 proteins (rhA3A-rhA3H), incorporation of the different A3 proteins into virions, and replication in rhesus macaque PBMC. Similar to other studies, we found that K27 was essential for rhA3G activity and rhA3F but was not important for restriction of SHIVΔvif by rhA3A, rhA3D or rhA3H. Our results identified the arginine at position 14 of the SIV Vif as a critical residue for virus restriction by rhA3D, rhA3G and rhA3H.

  3. Independent repression of bile acid synthesis and activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by activated hepatocyte fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) and bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chundong; Wang, Fen; Jin, Chengliu; Huang, Xinqiang; McKeehan, Wallace L

    2005-05-06

    The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor complex is a regulator of adult organ homeostasis in addition to its central role in embryonic development and wound healing. FGF receptor 4 (FGFR4) is the sole FGFR receptor kinase that is significantly expressed in mature hepatocytes. Previously, we showed that mice lacking mouse FGFR4 (mR4(-/-)) exhibited elevated fecal bile acids, bile acid pool size, and expression of liver cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme for canonical neutral bile acid synthesis. To prove that hepatocyte FGFR4 was a negative regulator of cholesterol metabolism and bile acid synthesis independent of background, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing a constitutively active human FGFR4 (CahR4) in hepatocytes and crossed them with the FGFR4-deficient mice to generate CahR4/mR4(-/-) mice. In mice expressing active FGFR4 in liver, fecal bile acid excretion was 64%, bile acid pool size was 47%, and Cyp7a1 expression was 10-30% of wild-type mice. The repressed level of Cyp7a1 expression was resistant to induction by a high cholesterol diet relative to wild-type mice. Expression of CahR4 in mR4(-/-) mouse livers depressed bile acid synthesis below wild-type levels from the elevated levels observed in mR4(-/-). Levels of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which is part of a pathway implicated in bile acid-mediated repression of synthesis, was 30% of wild-type levels in mR4(-/-) livers, whereas CahR4 livers exhibited an average 2-fold increase. However, cholate still strongly induced phospho-JNK in mR4(-/-) livers. These results confirm that hepatocyte FGFR4 regulates bile acid synthesis by repression of Cyp7a1 expression. Hepatocyte FGFR4 may contribute to the repression of bile acid synthesis through JNK signaling but is not required for activation of JNK signaling by bile acids.

  4. A unique sequence in the N-terminal regulatory region controls the nuclear localization of KLF8 by cooperating with the C-terminal zinc-fingers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tina S Mehta; Heng Lu; Xianhui Wang; Alison M Urvalek; Kim-Hang H Nguyen; Farah Monzur; Jojo D Hammond; Jameson Q Ma; Jihe Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Kruppel-like factor 8 (KLF8) transcription factor plays a critical role in cell cycle progression, oncogenic trans-formation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition and invasion. However, its nuclear localization signal(s) (NLS) has not been identified. KLF8 shares with other KLFs monopartite NLSs (mNLS) and C2H2 zinc fingers (ZFs), both of which have been shown to be the NLSs for some other KLFs. In this report, using PCR-directed mutagenesis and immunofluorescent microscopy, we show that disruption of the mNLSs, deletion of any single ZF, or mutation of the Zn2+-binding or DNA-contacting motifs did not affect the nuclear localization of KLF8. Deletion of>1.5 ZFs from C-terminus, however, caused cytoplasmic accumulation of KLF8. Surprisingly, deletion of amino acid (aa) 151-200 re-gion almost eliminated KLF8 from the nucleus. S165A, K171E or K171R mutation, or treatment with PKC inhibitor led to partial cytoplasmic accumulation. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated that KLF8 interacted with importin-β and this interaction required the ZF motif. Deletion of aa 1-150 or 201-261 region alone did not alter the nuclear lo-calization. BrdU incorporation and cyclin D1 promoter luciferase assays showed that the KLF8 mutants defective in nuclear localization could not promote DNA synthesis or cyclin D1 promoter activation as the wild-type KLF8 did. Taken together, these results suggest that KLF8 has two NLSs, one surrounding S165 and K171 and the other being two tandem ZFs, which are critical for the regulation of KLF8 nuclear localization and its cellular functions.

  5. The 18-kilodalton Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) contains a potential N-terminal dimerization site and a C-terminal nucleic acid-binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, LB; Birkelund, Svend; Holm, A

    1996-01-01

    , in part, be due to Hc1-mediated alterations of DNA topology. To locate putative functional domains within Hc1, polypeptides Hc1(2-57) and Hc1(53-125), corresponding to the N- and C-terminal parts of Hc1, respectively, were generated. By chemical cross-linking with ethylene glycol-bis (succinic acid N...... retardation assays, Hc1(53-125) was shown to contain a domain capable of binding both DNA and RNA. Under the same conditions, Hc1(2-57) had no nucleic acid-binding activity. Electron microscopy of Hc1-DNA and Hc1(53-125)-DNA complexes revealed differences suggesting that the N-terminal part of Hc1 may affect...

  6. NMR assignments of the N-terminal domain of Nephila clavipes spidroin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnham, Stuart; Gaines, William A; Duggan, Brendan M; Marcotte, William R; Hennig, Mirko

    2011-10-01

    The building blocks of spider dragline silk are two fibrous proteins secreted from the major ampullate gland named spidroins 1 and 2 (MaSp1, MaSp2). These proteins consist of a large central domain composed of approximately 100 tandem copies of a 35-40 amino acid repeat sequence. Non-repetitive N and C-terminal domains, of which the C-terminal domain has been implicated to transition from soluble and insoluble states during spinning, flank the repetitive core. The N-terminal domain until recently has been largely unknown due to difficulties in cloning and expression. Here, we report nearly complete assignment for all (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonances in the 14 kDa N-terminal domain of major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1-N) of the golden orb-web spider Nephila clavipes.

  7. New roles for old modifications: emerging roles of N-terminal post-translational modifications in development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, John G; Schaner Tooley, Christine E

    2014-12-01

    The importance of internal post-translational modification (PTM) in protein signaling and function has long been known and appreciated. However, the significance of the same PTMs on the alpha amino group of N-terminal amino acids has been comparatively understudied. Historically considered static regulators of protein stability, additional functional roles for N-terminal PTMs are now beginning to be elucidated. New findings show that N-terminal methylation, along with N-terminal acetylation, is an important regulatory modification with significant roles in development and disease progression. There are also emerging studies on the enzymology and functional roles of N-terminal ubiquitylation and N-terminal propionylation. Here, will discuss the recent advances in the functional studies of N-terminal PTMs, recount the new N-terminal PTMs being identified, and briefly examine the possibility of dynamic N-terminal PTM exchange.

  8. The major peanut allergen Ara h 1 and its cleaved-off N-terminal peptide; possible implications for peanut allergen detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wichers, H.J.; Beijer, de T.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Amerongen, van A.

    2004-01-01

    Ara h 1 was purified from raw peanuts (Arachis hypogaea L.) in the presence or absence of protease inhibitors. N-Terminal amino acid sequences were determined after western blotting. Both purification procedures proved to be very consistent and resulted in identical chromatographic and electrophoret

  9. Retinoic acids acting through retinoid receptors protect hippocampal neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation-mediated cell death by inhibition of c-jun-N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Y; Sato, Y; Koizumi, S; Ohno, Y; Nagao, T; Inoue, K

    2007-06-15

    Retinoic acids (RAs), including all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and 9-cis retinoic acid (9-cis RA), play fundamental roles in a variety of physiological events in vertebrates, through their specific nuclear receptors: retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR). Despite the physiological importance of RA, their functional significance under pathological conditions is not well understood. We examined the effect of ATRA on oxygen/glucose-deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/Rep)-induced neuronal damage in cultured rat hippocampal slices, and found that ATRA significantly reduced neuronal death. The cytoprotective effect of ATRA was observed not only in cornu ammonis (CA) 1 but also in CA2 and dentate gyrus (DG), and was attenuated by selective antagonists for RAR or RXR. By contrast, in the CA3 region, no protective effects of ATRA were observed. The OGD/Rep also increased phosphorylated forms of c-jun-N-terminal kinase (P-JNK) and p38 (P-p38) in hippocampus, and specific inhibitors for these kinases protected neurons. ATRA prevented the increases in P-JNK and P-p38 after OGD/Rep, as well as the decrease in NeuN and its shrinkage, all of which were inhibited by antagonists for RAR or RXR. These findings suggest that the ATRA signaling via retinoid receptors results in the inhibition of JNK and p38 activation, leading to the protection of neurons against OGD/Rep-induced damage in the rat hippocampus.

  10. N-Terminal Fatty Acid Substitution Increases the Leishmanicidal Activity of CA(1-7)M(2-9), a Cecropin-Melittin Hybrid Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicharro, Cristina; Granata, Cesare; Lozano, Rosario; Andreu, David; Rivas, Luis

    2001-01-01

    In order to improve the leishmanicidal activity of the synthetic cecropin A-melittin hybrid peptide CA(1-7)M(2-9) (KWKLFKKIGAVLKVL-NH2), a systematic study of its acylation with saturated linear fatty acids was carried out. Acylation of the Nɛ-7 lysine residue led to a drastic decrease in leishmanicidal activity, whereas acylation at lysine 1, in either the α or the ɛ NH2 group, increased up to 3 times the activity of the peptide against promastigotes and increased up to 15 times the activity of the peptide against amastigotes. Leishmanicidal activity increased with the length of the fatty acid chain, reaching a maximum for the lauroyl analogue (12 carbons). According to the fast kinetics, dissipation of membrane potential, and parasite membrane permeability to the nucleic acid binding probe SYTOX green, the lethal mechanism was directly related to plasma membrane permeabilization. PMID:11502512

  11. Acquisition of a novel eleven amino acid insertion directly N-terminal to a tetrabasic cleavage site confers intracellular cleavage of an H7N7 influenza virus hemagglutinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Brian S.; Sun, Xiangjie; Chung, Changik [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca NY 14853 (United States); New York Center of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester NY 14627 (United States); Whittaker, Gary R., E-mail: grw7@cornell.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca NY 14853 (United States); New York Center of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester NY 14627 (United States)

    2012-12-05

    A critical feature of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (H5N1 and H7N7) is the efficient intracellular cleavage of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein. H7N7 viruses also exist in equine species, and a unique feature of the equine H7N7 HA is the presence of an eleven amino acid insertion directly N-terminal to a tetrabasic cleavage site. Here, we show that three histidine residues within the unique insertion of the equine H7N7 HA are essential for intracellular cleavage. An asparagine residue within the insertion-derived glycosylation site was also found to be essential for intracellular cleavage. The presence of the histidine residues also appear to be involved in triggering fusion, since mutation of the histidine residues resulted in a destabilizing effect. Importantly, the addition of a tetrabasic site and the eleven amino acid insertion conferred efficient intracellular cleavage to the HA of an H7N3 low pathogenicity avian influenza virus. Our studies show that acquisition of the eleven amino acid insertion offers an alternative mechanism for intracellular cleavage of influenza HA.

  12. Single amino-acid substitution in the N-terminal arm altered the tetramer stability of rat muscle lactate dehydrogenase A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN; Chong; (

    2001-01-01

    [1]Price, N. C., Assembly of multi-subunit structures, in Mechanisms of Protein Folding (ed. Pain, R. H.), New York: Oxford University Press, 1994, 160-193.[2]Casal, J. I., Ahern, T. J., Davenport, R. C. et al., Subunit interface of triosephosphate isomerase: Site-directed mutagenesis and characterization of the altered enzyme, Biochemistry, 1987, 26: 1258-1264.[3]Chakerian, A. E., Matthews, K. S., Characterization of mutations in oligomerization domain of lac repressor protein, J. Biol. Chem., 1991, 266: 22206-22214.[4]Mandelman, D., Schwarz, F. P., Li, H. Y. et al., The role of quaternary interactions on the stability and activity of ascorbate peroxidase, Protein Sci., 1998, 7: 2089-2098.[5]Thomas, M. C., Ballantine, S. P., Bethell, S. S. et al., Single amino acid substitutions disrupt tetramer formation in the dihydroneopterin aldolase enzyme of Pneumocystis carinii, Biochemistry, 1998, 37: 11629-11636.[6]Holbrook, J. J., Liljas, A., Steindel, S. J. et al., Lactate dehydrogenase, in The Enzymes (ed. Boyer, P. D.), Vol. 11, 3rd ed., New York: Academic Press, 1975, 191-292.[7]Zettlmeissl, G., Rudolph, R., Jaenicke, R., Reconstitution of lactic dehydrogenase after acid dissociation, Eur. J. Biochem., 1981, 121: 169-175.[8]Zettlmeissl, G., Rudolph, R., Jaenicke, R., Rate-determining folding and association reactions on the reconstitution pathway of porcine skeletal muscle lactic dehydrogenase after denaturation by guanidine hydrochloride, Biochemistry, 1982, 21: 3946-3950.[9]Hermann, R., Jaenicke, R., Rudolph, R., Analysis of the reconstitution of oligomeric enzymes by cross-linking with glutaraldehyde: Kinetics of reassociation of lactic dehydrogenase, Biochemistry, 1981, 20: 5195-5201.[10]Jaenicke, R., Folding and association of protein, Prog. Biophys. Mol. Biol., 1987, 49: 117-237.[11]Opitz, U., Rudolph, R., Jaenicke, R. et al., Proteolytic dimeric of porcine muscle lactate dehydrogenase: Characterization, folding, and

  13. The preparation and application of N-terminal 57 amino acid protein of the follicle-stimulating hormone receptor as a candidate male contraceptive vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Xu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR, which is expressed only on Sertoli cells and plays a key role in spermatogenesis, has been paid attention for its potential in male contraception vaccine research and development. This study introduces a method for the preparation and purification of human FSHR 57-amino acid protein (FSHR-57aa as well as determination of its immunogenicity and antifertility effect. A recombinant pET-28a(+-FSHR-57aa plasmid was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 Star TM (DE3 and the FSHR-57aa protein was separated and collected by cutting the gel and recovering activity by efficient refolding dialysis. The protein was identified by Western blot and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis with a band of nearly 7 kDa and a purity of 97.4%. Male monkeys were immunized with rhFSHR-57aa protein and a gradual rising of specific serum IgG antibody was found which reached a plateau on day 112 (16 weeks after the first immunization. After mating of one male with three female monkeys, the pregnancy rate of those mated with males immunized against FSHR-57aa was significantly decreased while the serum hormone levels of testosterone and estradiol were not disturbed in the control or the FSHR-57aa groups. By evaluating pathological changes in testicular histology, we found that the blood-testis barrier remained intact, in spite of some small damage to Sertoli cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the rhFSHR-57aa protein might be a feasible male contraceptive which could affect sperm production without disturbing hormone levels.

  14. The N-Terminal of Aquareovirus NS80 Is Required for Interacting with Viral Proteins and Viral Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available Reovirus replication and assembly occurs within viral inclusion bodies that formed in specific intracellular compartments of cytoplasm in infected cells. Previous study indicated that aquareovirus NS80 is able to form inclusion bodies, and also can retain viral proteins within its inclusions. To better understand how NS80 performed in viral replication and assembly, the functional regions of NS80 associated with other viral proteins in aquareovirus replication were investigated in this study. Deletion mutational analysis and rotavirus NSP5-based protein association platform were used to detect association regions. Immunofluorescence images indicated that different N-terminal regions of NS80 could associate with viral proteins VP1, VP4, VP6 and NS38. Further co-immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed the interaction between VP1, VP4, VP6 or NS38 with different regions covering the N-terminal amino acid (aa, 1-471 of NS80, respectively. Moreover, removal of NS80 N-terminal sequences required for interaction with proteins VP1, VP4, VP6 or NS38 not only prevented the capacity of NS80 to support viral replication in NS80 shRNA-based replication complementation assays, but also inhibited the expression of aquareovirus proteins, suggesting that N-terminal regions of NS80 are necessary for viral replication. These results provided a foundational basis for further understanding the role of NS80 in viral replication and assembly during aquareovirus infection.

  15. The N-terminal 81-aa fragment is critical for UT-A1 urea transporter bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haidong; Yang, Yuan; Eaton, Douglas C; Sands, Jeff M; Chen, Guangping

    2010-01-01

    The serine protease, furin, is involved in the activation of a number of proteins most notably epithelial sodium channels (ENaC). The urea transporter UT-A1, located in the kidney inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD), is important for urine concentrating ability. UT-A1's amino acid sequence has a consensus furin cleavage site (RSKR) in the N-terminal region. Despite the putative cleavage site, we find that UT-A1, either from the cytosolic or cell surface pool, is not cleaved by furin in CHO cells. This result was further confirmed by an inability of furin to cleave in vitro an (35)S-labeled UT-A1 or the 126 N-terminal UT-A1 fragment. Functionally, mutation of the furin site (R78A, R81A) does not affect UT-A1 urea transport activity. However, deletion of the 81-aa N-terminal portion does not affect UT-A1 cell surface trafficking, but seriously impair UT-A1 urea transport activity. Our results indicate that UT-A1 maturation and activation does not require furin-dependent cleavage. The N-terminal 81-aa fragment is required for proper UT-A1 urea transport activity, but its effect is not through changing UT-A1 membrane trafficking.

  16. Predicting N-terminal myristoylation sites in plant proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podell Sheila

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background N-terminal myristoylation plays a vital role in membrane targeting and signal transduction in plant responses to environmental stress. Although N-myristoyltransferase enzymatic function is conserved across plant, animal, and fungal kingdoms, exact substrate specificities vary, making it difficult to predict protein myristoylation accurately within specific taxonomic groups. Results A new method for predicting N-terminal myristoylation sites specifically in plants has been developed and statistically tested for sensitivity, specificity, and robustness. Compared to previously available methods, the new model is both more sensitive in detecting known positives, and more selective in avoiding false positives. Scores of myristoylated and non-myristoylated proteins are more widely separated than with other methods, greatly reducing ambiguity and the number of sequences giving intermediate, uninformative results. The prediction model is available at http://plantsp.sdsc.edu/myrist.html. Conclusion Superior performance of the new model is due to the selection of a plant-specific training set, covering 266 unique sequence examples from 40 different species, the use of a probability-based hidden Markov model to obtain predictive scores, and a threshold cutoff value chosen to provide maximum positive-negative discrimination. The new model has been used to predict 589 plant proteins likely to contain N-terminal myristoylation signals, and to analyze the functional families in which these proteins occur.

  17. Amino acid sequences of heterotrophic and photosynthetic ferredoxins from the tomato plant (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamide, K; Sakai, H; Aoki, K; Sanada, Y; Wada, K; Green, L S; Yee, B C; Buchanan, B B

    1995-11-01

    Several forms (isoproteins) of ferredoxin in roots, leaves, and green and red pericarps in tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) were earlier identified on the basis of N-terminal amino acid sequence and chromatographic behavior (Green et al. 1991). In the present study, a large scale preparation made possible determination of the full length amino acid sequence of the two ferredoxins from leaves. The ferredoxins characteristic of fruit and root were sequenced from the amino terminus to the 30th residue or beyond. The leaf ferredoxins were confirmed to be expressed in pericarp of both green and red fruit. The ferredoxins characteristic of fruit and root appeared to be restricted to those tissue. The results extend earlier findings in demonstrating that ferredoxin occurs in the major organs of the tomato plant where it appears to function irrespective of photosynthetic competence.

  18. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  19. The N-terminal region of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3) plays an essential role in regulating its plasma membrane trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Se-Eun; Thakkar, Nilay; Oh, Yunseok; Park, Ji Eun; Han, Songhee; Ryoo, Gongmi; Hahn, Hyunggu; Maeng, Sang Hyun; Lim, Young-Ran; Han, Byung Woo; Lee, Wooin

    2017-05-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3) is a major influx transporter mediating the hepatic uptake of various endogenous substrates as well as clinically important drugs such as statins and anticancer drugs. However, molecular mechanisms controlling the membrane trafficking of OATP1B3 have been largely unknown. Several reports recently indicated the presence of a distinct, cancer-type OATP1B3 variant lacking the N-terminal 28 amino acids compared to OATP1B3 expressed in non-malignant hepatocytes. Interestingly, the cancer-type OATP1B3 variant is located predominantly in the cytoplasm, implicating the involvement of the N-terminal region of OATP1B3 in its membrane trafficking. In the current study, we set out to experimentally validate the importance of the N-terminal region of OATP1B3 and to identify responsible sequence motif(s) in that region. A number of truncation or point mutants of OATP1B3 were transiently expressed in HEK293T, HCT-8 or MDCK II cells and their expression in cytoplasmic and surface membrane fractions were analyzed by immunoblotting. Our results indicated that the N-terminal sequence of OATP1B3, in particular, at the amino acid positions between 12 and 28, may be indispensable in its membrane trafficking. Moreover, our results using a fusion construct indicated that the first 50 amino acids of OATP1B3 are sufficient for its membrane localization. The importance of the N-terminal region in membranous localization was shared among the other OATP1B subfamily members, OATP1B1 and rat Oatp1b2. Our efforts to identify the responsible amino acid(s) or structure motif(s) in the N-terminal region did not pinpoint individual amino acids or motifs with putative secondary structures. Our current findings however demonstrate that the N-terminal region is important for the membrane localization of the OATP1B subfamily members and should facilitate future investigations of the mechanisms involved in the regulation and membrane trafficking of

  20. Amino acid sequences and structures of chicken and turkey beta 2-microglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welinder, K G; Jespersen, H M; Walther-Rasmussen, J;

    1991-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequences of chicken and turkey beta 2-microglobulins have been determined by analyses of tryptic, V8-proteolytic and cyanogen bromide fragments, and by N-terminal sequencing. Mass spectrometric analysis of chicken beta 2-microglobulin supports the sequence-derived Mr of 11......,048. The higher apparent Mr obtained for the avian beta 2-microglobulins as compared to human beta 2-microglobulin by SDS-PAGE is not understood. Chicken and turkey beta 2-microglobulin consist of 98 residues and deviate at seven positions: 60, 66, 74-76, 78 and 82. The chicken and turkey sequences are identical...... suggest that the seven chicken to turkey differences are exposed to solvent in the avian MHC class I complex. The key residues of beta 2-microglobulin involved in alpha chain contacts within the MHC class I molecule are highly conserved between chicken and man. This explains that heterologous human beta 2...

  1. Function of the N-terminal segment of the RecA-dependent nuclease Ref.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Angela J; Olsen, Tayla M; Dvorak, Rachel H; Cox, Michael M

    2015-02-18

    The bacteriophage P1 Ref (recombination enhancement function) protein is a RecA-dependent, HNH endonuclease. It can be directed to create targeted double-strand breaks within a displacement loop formed by RecA. The 76 amino acid N-terminal region of Ref is positively charged (25/76 amino acid residues) and inherently unstructured in solution. Our investigation of N-terminal truncation variants shows this region is required for DNA binding, contains a Cys involved in incidental dimerization and is necessary for efficient Ref-mediated DNA cleavage. Specifically, Ref N-terminal truncation variants lacking between 21 and 47 amino acids are more effective RecA-mediated targeting nucleases. We propose a more refined set of options for the Ref-mediated cleavage mechanism, featuring the N-terminal region as an anchor for at least one of the DNA strand cleavage events.

  2. Towards the N-terminal acetylome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xumin; Højrup, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Protein N-terminal acetylation (N(α)-acetylation) is observed widely from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. It gains increased importance in biological field, due to its multiple roles in many aspects of the protein life, such as assembly, stability, activity, and location. Today, mass spectrometry (MS)...

  3. The first N-terminal unprotected (Gly-Aib)n peptide: H-Gly-Aib-Gly-Aib-OtBu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, Renate; Brückner, Hans; Petratos, Kyriacos

    2015-12-01

    Glycine (Gly) is incorporated in roughly half of all known peptaibiotic (nonribosomally biosynthesized antibiotic peptides of fungal origin) sequences and is the residue with the greatest conformational flexibility. The conformational space of Aib (α-aminoisobutyric acid) is severely restricted by the second methyl group attached to the Cα atom. Most of the crystal structures containing Aib are N-terminal protected. Deprotection of the N- or C-terminus of peptides may alter the hydrogen-bonding scheme and/or the structure and may facilitate crystallization. The structure reported here for glycyl-α-aminoisobutyrylglycyl-α-aminoisobutyric acid tert-butyl ester, C16H30N4O5, describes the first N-terminal-unprotected (Gly-Aib)n peptide. The achiral peptide could form an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the C=O group of Gly1 and the N-H group of Aib4. This hydrogen bond is found in all tetrapeptides and N-terminal-protected tripeptides containing Aib, apart from one exception. In the present work, this hydrogen bond is not observed (N...O = 5.88 Å). Instead, every molecule is hydrogen bonded to six other symmetry-related molecules with a total of eight hydrogen bonds per molecule. The backbone conformation starts in the right-handed helical region (and the left-handed helical region for the inverted molecule) and reverses the screw sense in the last two residues.

  4. Functional Characterization of the N-Terminal C2 Domain from Arabidopsis thaliana Phospholipase Dα and Dβ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noiriel, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Most of plant phospholipases D (PLD) exhibit a C2-lipid binding domain of around 130 amino acid residues at their N-terminal region, involved in their Ca2+-dependent membrane binding. In this study, we expressed and partially purified catalytically active PLDα from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPLDα) in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the recombinant AtPLDα was found to be NVEETIGV and thus to lack the first 35 amino acid belonging to the C2 domain, as found in other recombinant or plant purified PLDs. To investigate the impact of such a cleavage on the functionality of C2 domains, we expressed, in E. coli, purified, and refolded the mature-like form of the C2 domain of the AtPLDα along with its equivalent C2 domain of the AtPLDβ, for the sake of comparison. Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer and dot-blot assays, both C2 domains were shown to bind phosphatidylglycerol in a Ca2+-independent manner while phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylserine binding were found to be enhanced in the presence of Ca2+. Amino acid sequence alignment and molecular modeling of both C2 domains with known C2 domain structures revealed the presence of a novel Ca2+-binding site within the C2 domain of AtPLDα. PMID:28101506

  5. Substrate specificity of mammalian N-terminal α-amino methyltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkowski, Janusz J.; Schaner Tooley, Christine E.; Anderson, Lissa C.; Shumilin, Igor A.; Balsbaugh, Jeremy L.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Minor, Wladek; Macara, Ian G.

    2012-01-01

    N-terminal methylation of free α-amino-groups is a post-translational modification of proteins that has been known for 30 years but has been very little studied. In this modification, the initiating M residue is cleaved and the exposed α-amino group is mono- di- or trimethylated by NRMT, a recently identified N-terminal methyltransferase. Currently, all known eukaryotic α-aminomethylated proteins have a unique N-terminal motif, M-X-P-K, where X is A, P, or S. NRMT can also methylate artificial substrates in vitro in which X is G, F, Y, C, M, K, R, N, Q or H. Methylation efficiencies of N-terminal amino acids are variable with respect to the identity of X. Here we use in vitro peptide methylation assays and substrate immunoprecipitations to show that the canonical M-X-P-K methylation motif is not the only one recognized by NRMT. We predict that N-terminal methylation is a widespread post-translational modification, and that there is interplay between N-terminal acetylation and N-terminal methylation. We also use isothermal calorimetry experiments to demonstrate that NRMT can efficiently recognize and bind to its fully methylated products. PMID:22769851

  6. Powdery mildew fungal effector candidates share N-terminal Y/F/WxC-motif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmersen Jeppe

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Powdery mildew and rust fungi are widespread, serious pathogens that depend on developing haustoria in the living plant cells. Haustoria are separated from the host cytoplasm by a plant cell-derived extrahaustorial membrane. They secrete effector proteins, some of which are subsequently transferred across this membrane to the plant cell to suppress defense. Results In a cDNA library from barley epidermis containing powdery mildew haustoria, two-thirds of the sequenced ESTs were fungal and represented ~3,000 genes. Many of the most highly expressed genes encoded small proteins with N-terminal signal peptides. While these proteins are novel and poorly related, they do share a three-amino acid motif, which we named "Y/F/WxC", in the N-terminal of the mature proteins. The first amino acid of this motif is aromatic: tyrosine, phenylalanine or tryptophan, and the last is always cysteine. In total, we identified 107 such proteins, for which the ESTs represent 19% of the fungal clones in our library, suggesting fundamental roles in haustoria function. While overall sequence similarity between the powdery mildew Y/F/WxC-proteins is low, they do have a highly similar exon-intron structure, suggesting they have a common origin. Interestingly, searches of public fungal genome and EST databases revealed that haustoria-producing rust fungi also encode large numbers of novel, short proteins with signal peptides and the Y/F/WxC-motif. No significant numbers of such proteins were identified from genome and EST sequences from either fungi which do not produce haustoria or from haustoria-producing Oomycetes. Conclusion In total, we identified 107, 178 and 57 such Y/F/WxC-proteins from the barley powdery mildew, the wheat stem rust and the wheat leaf rust fungi, respectively. All together, our findings suggest the Y/F/WxC-proteins to be a new class of effectors from haustoria-producing pathogenic fungi.

  7. The N-terminal domain of apolipoprotein B-100: structural characterization by homology modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khachfe Hassan M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apolipoprotein B-100 (apo B-100 stands as one of the largest proteins in humans. Its large size of 4536 amino acids hampers the production of X-ray diffraction quality crystals and hinders in-solution NMR analysis, and thus necessitates a domain-based approach for the structural characterization of the multi-domain full-length apo B. Results The structure of apo B-17 (the N-terminal 17% of apolipoprotein B-100 was predicted by homology modeling based on the structure of the N-terminal domain of lipovitellin (LV, a protein that shares not only sequence similarity with B17, but also a functional aspect of lipid binding and transport. The model structure was first induced to accommodate the six disulfide bonds found in that region, and then optimized using simulated annealing. Conclusion The content of secondary structural elements in this model structure correlates well with the reported data from other biophysical probes. The overall topology of the model conforms with the structural outline corresponding to the apo B-17 domain as seen in the EM representation of the complete LDL structure.

  8. Distinct influence of N-terminal elements on neuronal nitric-oxide synthase structure and catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Koustubh; Adak, Subrata; Aulak, Kulwant S; Santolini, Jerome; McDonald, John F; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2003-09-26

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signal molecule produced in animals by three different NO synthases. Of these, only NOS I (neuronal nitric-oxide synthase; nNOS) is expressed as catalytically active N-terminally truncated forms that are missing either an N-terminal leader sequence required for protein-protein interactions or are missing the leader sequence plus three core structural motifs that in other NOS are required for dimer assembly and catalysis. To understand how the N-terminal elements impact nNOS structure-function, we generated, purified, and extensively characterized variants that were missing the N-terminal leader sequence (Delta296nNOS) or missing the leader sequence plus the three core motifs (Delta349nNOS). Eliminating the leader sequence had no impact on nNOS structure or catalysis. In contrast, additional removal of the core elements weakened but did not destroy the dimer interaction, slowed ferric heme reduction and reactivity of a hemedioxy intermediate, and caused a 10-fold poorer affinity toward substrate l-arginine. This created an nNOS variant with slower and less coupled NO synthesis that is predisposed to generate reactive oxygen species along with NO. Our findings help justify the existence of nNOS N-terminal splice variants and identify specific catalytic changes that create functional differences among them.

  9. Designing a Long Acting Erythropoietin by Fusing Three Carboxyl-Terminal Peptides of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin β Subunit to the N-Terminal and C-Terminal Coding Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuad Fares

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new analog of EPO was designed by fusing one and two CTPs to the N-terminal and C-terminal ends of EPO (EPO-(CTP3, respectively. This analog was expressed and secreted efficiently in CHO cells. The in vitro test shows that the activity of EPO-(CTP3 in TFI-1 cell proliferation assay is similar to that of EPO-WT and commercial rHEPO. However, in vivo studies indicated that treatment once a week with EPO-(CTP3 (15 μg/kg dramatically increased (~8 folds haematocrit as it was compared to rHuEPO. Moreover, it was found that EPO-(CTP3 is more effective than rHuEPO and Aranesp in increasing reticulocyte number in mice blood. The detected circulatory half-lives of rHuEPO, Aranesp, and EPO-(CTP3 following IV injection of 20 IU were 4.4, 10.8, and 13.1 h, respectively. These data established the rational for using this chimera as a long-acting EPO analog in clinics. The therapeutic efficacy of EPO-CTP analog needs to be established in higher animals and in human clinical trials.

  10. Analysis of the secondary structure of a protein's N-terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floare, C. G.; Bogdan, M.; Horovitz, O.; Mocanu, A.; Tomoaia-Cotisel, M.

    2009-08-01

    The major protein component from aleurone cells of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), PACB, is related to 7S globulins present in other cereals and to the vicilin-type 7S globulins of legumes and cotton seed. It contains 4 subunits of about 20, 25, 40 and 50 kDa molecular weights. The N-terminal sequence of 16 amino acids (over 260 atoms) in the protein was previously determined, and our aim is the prediction of its secondary structure. The empirical Chou-Fasman method was applied in an improved version as well as the empirical DSC method (discrimination of protein secondary structure class) with quite similar results. A molecular dynamics simulation was also performed, using the FF99SB forcefield within AMBER version 9.0. Solvation effects were incorporated using the Born model. The results are compared and a 3D model is proposed.

  11. Analysis of the secondary structure of a protein's N-terminal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floare, C G; Bogdan, M [National Institute for R and D of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Horovitz, O; Mocanu, A; Tomoaia-Cotisel, M, E-mail: calin.floare@itim-cj.r [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Department of Physical Chemistry, 11 Arany Janos, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2009-08-01

    The major protein component from aleurone cells of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), PACB, is related to 7S globulins present in other cereals and to the vicilin-type 7S globulins of legumes and cotton seed. It contains 4 subunits of about 20, 25, 40 and 50 kDa molecular weights. The N-terminal sequence of 16 amino acids (over 260 atoms) in the protein was previously determined, and our aim is the prediction of its secondary structure. The empirical Chou-Fasman method was applied in an improved version as well as the empirical DSC method (discrimination of protein secondary structure class) with quite similar results. A molecular dynamics simulation was also performed, using the FF99SB forcefield within AMBER version 9.0. Solvation effects were incorporated using the Born model. The results are compared and a 3D model is proposed.

  12. Protein location prediction using atomic composition and global features of the amino acid sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherian, Betsy Sheena, E-mail: betsy.skb@gmail.com [Centre for Bioinformatics, University of Kerala, Kariyavattom Campus, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala (India); Nair, Achuthsankar S. [Centre for Bioinformatics, University of Kerala, Kariyavattom Campus, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala (India)

    2010-01-22

    Subcellular location of protein is constructive information in determining its function, screening for drug candidates, vaccine design, annotation of gene products and in selecting relevant proteins for further studies. Computational prediction of subcellular localization deals with predicting the location of a protein from its amino acid sequence. For a computational localization prediction method to be more accurate, it should exploit all possible relevant biological features that contribute to the subcellular localization. In this work, we extracted the biological features from the full length protein sequence to incorporate more biological information. A new biological feature, distribution of atomic composition is effectively used with, multiple physiochemical properties, amino acid composition, three part amino acid composition, and sequence similarity for predicting the subcellular location of the protein. Support Vector Machines are designed for four modules and prediction is made by a weighted voting system. Our system makes prediction with an accuracy of 100, 82.47, 88.81 for self-consistency test, jackknife test and independent data test respectively. Our results provide evidence that the prediction based on the biological features derived from the full length amino acid sequence gives better accuracy than those derived from N-terminal alone. Considering the features as a distribution within the entire sequence will bring out underlying property distribution to a greater detail to enhance the prediction accuracy.

  13. A mass-spectrometric method for the estimation of the ratio of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid to glutamic acid at specific sites in proteins. Application to the N-terminal region of bovine prothrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, K; Priddle, J D; Offord, R E; Esnouf, M P

    1980-04-01

    When a polypeptide containing gamma-carboxyglutamic acid is decarboxylated in 2H2O, residue of (gamma gamma-2H2)glutamic acid are formed. Subsequent proteolytic digestion produces peptides which contain at each site 2H2-substituted and unsubstituted glutamic acid in the same ratio as existed for gramma-carboxy-substitution. The peptides may be identified and this ratio determined by combined gas chromatography--mass spectrometry. We also discuss decarboxylation in 3H2O followed by amino-acid analysis and Edman degradation.

  14. Purification, amino acid sequence, and cDNA cloning of trypsin inhibitors from onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshimaru, Masanobu; Watanabe, Akira; Suematsu, Keiko; Hatano, Maki; Terada, Shigeyuki

    2003-08-01

    Three protease inhibitors (OTI-1-3) have been purified from onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs. Molecular masses of these inhibitors were found to be 7,370.2, 7,472.2, and 7,642.6 Da by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), respectively. Based on amino acid composition and N-terminal sequence, OTI-1 and -2 are the N-terminal truncated proteins of OTI-3. All the inhibitors are stable to heat and extreme pH. OTI-3 inhibited trypsin, chymotrypsin, and plasmin with dissociation constants of 1.3 x 10(-9) M, 2.3 x 10(-7) M, and 3.1 x 10(-7) M, respectively. The complete amino acid sequence of OTI-3 showed a significant homology to Bowman-Birk family inhibitors, and the first reactive site (P1) was found to be Arg17 by limited proteolysis by trypsin. The second reactive site (P1) was estimated to be Leu46, that may inhibit chymotrypsin. OTI-3 lacks an S-S bond near the second reactive site, resulting in a low affinity for the enzyme. The sequence of OTI-3 was also ascertained by the nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone encoding a 101-residue precursor of the onion inhibitor.

  15. The complete amino acid sequence of a trypsin inhibitor from Bauhinia variegata var. candida seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ciero, L; Oliva, M L; Torquato, R; Köhler, P; Weder, J K; Camillo Novello, J; Sampaio, C A; Oliveira, B; Marangoni, S

    1998-11-01

    Trypsin inhibitors of two varieties of Bauhinia variegata seeds have been isolated and characterized. Bauhinia variegata candida trypsin inhibitor (BvcTI) and B. variegata lilac trypsin inhibitor (BvlTI) are proteins with Mr of about 20,000 without free sulfhydryl groups. Amino acid analysis shows a high content of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and glycine, and a low content of histidine, tyrosine, methionine, and lysine in both inhibitors. Isoelectric focusing for both varieties detected three isoforms (pI 4.85, 5.00, and 5.15), which were resolved by HPLC procedure. The trypsin inhibitors show Ki values of 6.9 and 1.2 nM for BvcTI and BvlTI, respectively. The N-terminal sequences of the three trypsin inhibitor isoforms from both varieties of Bauhinia variegata and the complete amino acid sequence of B. variegata var. candida L. trypsin inhibitor isoform 3 (BvcTI-3) are presented. The sequences have been determined by automated Edman degradation of the reduced and carboxymethylated proteins of the peptides resulting from Staphylococcus aureus protease and trypsin digestion. BvcTI-3 is composed of 167 residues and has a calculated molecular mass of 18,529. Homology studies with other trypsin inhibitors show that BvcTI-3 belongs to the Kunitz family. The putative active site encompasses Arg (63)-Ile (64).

  16. Affects of N-terminal variation in the SeM protein of Streptococcus equi on antibody and fibrinogen binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoney, John F; DeNegri, Rafaela; Sheoran, Abhineet; Forster, Nathalie

    2010-02-10

    The clonal Streptococcus equi causes equine strangles, a highly contagious suppurative lymphadenopathy and rhinopharyngitis. An important virulence factor and vaccine component, the antiphagocytic fibrinogen binding SeM of S. equi is a surface anchored fibrillar protein. Two recent studies of N. American, Japanese and European isolates have revealed a high frequency of N-terminal amino acid variation in SeM of S. equi CF32 that suggests this region of the protein is subject to immunologic selection pressure. The aims of the present study were firstly to map regions of SeM reactive with convalescent equine IgG and IgA and stimulatory for lymph node cells and secondly to determine effects of N-terminal variation on the functionality of SeM. Variation did not significantly affect fibrinogen binding or susceptibility of S. equi to an opsonic equine serum. Linear epitopes reactive with convalescent IgG and mucosal IgA were concentrated toward the conserved center of SeM. However, IgA but not IgG from every horse reacted with at least one peptide that contained variable sequence. Lymph node cells (CD4+) from horses immunized with SeM were strongly responsive to a peptide (alphaalpha36-138) encoding the entire variable region. SeM (CF32) specific mouse Mab 04D11 which reacted strongly with this larger peptide but not with shorter peptides within that sequence reacted strongly with whole cells of S. equi CF32 but only weakly with cells of any of 14 isolates of S. equi expressing different variants of SeM. These results in combination suggest that N-terminal variation alters a conformational epitope of significance in mucosal IgA and systemic T cell responses but does not affect antibody mediated phagocytosis and killing.

  17. An N-terminal deletion variant of HCN1 in the epileptic WAG/Rij strain modulates HCN current densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemhöner, Konstantin; Kanyshkova, Tatyana; Silbernagel, Nicole; Fernandez-Orth, Juncal; Bittner, Stefan; Kiper, Aytug K; Rinné, Susanne; Netter, Michael F; Meuth, Sven G; Budde, Thomas; Decher, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Rats of the Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rij (WAG/Rij) strain show symptoms resembling human absence epilepsy. Thalamocortical neurons of WAG/Rij rats are characterized by an increased HCN1 expression, a negative shift in I h activation curve, and an altered responsiveness of I h to cAMP. We cloned HCN1 channels from rat thalamic cDNA libraries of the WAG/Rij strain and found an N-terminal deletion of 37 amino acids. In addition, WAG-HCN1 has a stretch of six amino acids, directly following the deletion, where the wild-type sequence (GNSVCF) is changed to a polyserine motif. These alterations were found solely in thalamus mRNA but not in genomic DNA. The truncated WAG-HCN1 was detected late postnatal in WAG/Rij rats and was not passed on to rats obtained from pairing WAG/Rij and non-epileptic August Copenhagen Irish rats. Heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes revealed 2.2-fold increased current amplitude of WAG-HCN1 compared to rat HCN1. While WAG-HCN1 channels did not have altered current kinetics or changed regulation by protein kinases, fluorescence imaging revealed a faster and more pronounced surface expression of WAG-HCN1. Using co-expression experiments, we found that WAG-HCN1 channels suppress heteromeric HCN2 and HCN4 currents. Moreover, heteromeric channels of WAG-HCN1 with HCN2 have a reduced cAMP sensitivity. Functional studies revealed that the gain-of-function of WAG-HCN1 is not caused by the N-terminal deletion alone, thus requiring a change of the N-terminal GNSVCF motif. Our findings may help to explain previous observations in neurons of the WAG/Rij strain and indicate that WAG-HCN1 may contribute to the genesis of absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats.

  18. An N-terminal deletion variant of HCN1 in the epileptic WAG/Rij strain modulates HCN current densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin eWemhöner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rats of the Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rij (WAG/Rij strain show symptoms resembling human absence epilepsy. Thalamocortical neurons of WAG/Rij rats are characterized by an increased HCN1 expression, a negative shift in Ih activation curve, and an altered responsiveness of Ih to cAMP. We cloned HCN1 channels from rat thalamic cDNA libraries of the WAG/Rij strain and found an N-terminal deletion of 37 amino acids. In addition, WAG-HCN1 has a stretch of six amino acids, directly following the deletion, where the wild-type sequence (GNSVCF is changed to a polyserine motif. These alterations were found solely in thalamus mRNA but not in genomic DNA. The truncated WAG-HCN1 was detected late postnatal in WAG/Rij rats and was not passed on to rats obtained from pairing WAG/Rij and non-epileptic August Copenhagen Irish (ACI rats. Heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes revealed 2.2-fold increased current amplitude of WAG-HCN1 compared to rat HCN1. While WAG-HCN1 channels did not have altered current kinetics or changed regulation by protein kinases, fluorescence imaging revealed a faster and more pronounced surface expression of WAG-HCN1. Using co-expression experiments, we found that WAG-HCN1 channels suppress heteromeric HCN2 and HCN4 currents. Moreover, heteromeric channels of WAG HCN1 with HCN2 have a reduced cAMP sensitivity. Functional studies revealed that the gain-of-function of WAG-HCN1 is not caused by the N-terminal deletion alone, thus requiring a change of the N-terminal GNSVCF motif. Our findings may help to explain previous observations in neurons of the WAG/Rij strain and indicate that WAG HCN1 may contribute to the genesis of absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats.

  19. Protease Substrate Profiling by N-Terminal COFRADIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staes, An; Van Damme, Petra; Timmerman, Evy; Ruttens, Bart; Stes, Elisabeth; Gevaert, Kris; Impens, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Detection of (neo-)N-terminal peptides is essential for identifying protease cleavage sites . We here present an update of a well-established and efficient selection method for enriching N-terminal peptides out of peptide mixtures: N-terminal COFRADIC (COmbined FRActional DIagonal Chromatography). This method is based on the old concept of diagonal chromatography, which involves a peptide modification step in between otherwise identical chromatographic separations, with this modification step finally allowing for the isolation of N-terminal peptides by longer retention of non-N-terminal peptides on the resin. N-terminal COFRADIC has been successfully applied in many protease-centric studies, as well as for studies on protein alpha-N-acetylation and on characterizing alternative translation initiation events.

  20. Structure of the N-terminal region of Haemophilus Influenzae HI0017: Implications for function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Liping; Mack, Jamey; Hajduk, Phil; Fesik, Stephen W. [Abbott Laboratories, Pharmaceutical Discovery Division, D46Y, AP10/LL (United States)

    2001-06-15

    Haemophilus influenzae is a gram-negative pathogen that causes infections ranging from asymptomatic colonization of the human upper respiratory tract to serious invasive diseases such as meningitis. Although the genome of Haemophilus influenzae has been completely sequenced, the structure and function of many of these proteins are unknown. HI0017 is one of these uncharacterized proteins. Here we describe the three-dimensional solution structure of the N-terminal portion of HI0017 as determined by NMR spectroscopy. The structure consists of a five-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet and two short {alpha}-helices. It is similar to the C-terminal domain of Diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR). The C-terminal portion of HI0017 has an amino acid sequence that closely resembles pyruvate formate-lyase - an enzyme that converts pyruvate and CoA into acetyl-CoA and formate by a radical mechanism. Based on structural and sequence comparisons, we propose that the C-terminus of HI0017 functions as an enzyme with a glycyl radical mechanism, while the N-terminus participates in protein/protein interactions involving an activase (iron-sulfur protein) and/or the substrate.

  1. Methods for analyzing nucleic acid sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid. The method provides a complex comprising a polymerase enzyme, a target nucleic acid molecule, and a primer, wherein the complex is immobilized on a support Fluorescent label is attached to a terminal phosphate group of the nucleotide or nucleotide analog. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The time duration of the signal from labeled nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated is distinguished from freely diffusing labels by a longer retention in the observation volume for the nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated than for the freely diffusing labels.

  2. The outermost N-terminal region of tapasin facilitates folding of major histocompatibility complex class I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Gustav Andreas; Geironson, Linda; Darabi, Anna

    2009-01-01

    surface for presentation to T cells. The exact mechanisms of Tpn quality control and the criteria for being an optimal peptide are still unknown. Here, we have generated a recombinant fragment of human Tpn, Tpn(1-87) (representing the 87 N-terminal and ER-luminal amino acids of the mature Tpn protein...... localized Tpn. Using overlapping peptides, the epitope of alphaTpn(1-87)/80 was located to Tpn(40-44), which maps to a surface-exposed loop on the Tpn structure. Together, these results demonstrate that the N-terminal region of Tpn can be recombinantly expressed and adopt a structure, which at least...

  3. Intracellular trafficking of the human Wilson protein: the role of the six N-terminal metal-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Michael A; Forbes, John; La Fontaine, Sharon; Cox, Diane; Mercer, Julian F B

    2004-01-01

    The Wilson protein (ATP7B) is a copper-transporting CPx-type ATPase defective in the copper toxicity disorder Wilson disease. In hepatocytes, ATP7B delivers copper to apo-ceruloplasmin and mediates the excretion of excess copper into bile. These distinct functions require the protein to localize at two different subcellular compartments. At the trans-Golgi network, ATP7B transports copper for incorporation into apo-ceruloplasmin. When intracellular copper levels are increased, ATP7B traffics to post-Golgi vesicles in close proximity to the canalicular membrane to facilitate biliary copper excretion. In the present study, we investigated the role of the six N-terminal MBSs (metal-binding sites) in the trafficking process. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we mutated or deleted various combinations of the MBSs and assessed the effect of these changes on the localization and trafficking of ATP7B. Results show that the MBSs required for trafficking are the same as those previously found essential for the copper transport function. Either MBS 5 or MBS 6 alone was sufficient to support the redistribution of ATP7B to vesicular compartments. The first three N-terminal motifs were not required for copper-dependent intracellular trafficking and could not functionally replace sites 4-6 when placed in the same sequence position. Furthermore, the N-terminal region encompassing MBSs 1-5 (amino acids 64-540) was not essential for trafficking, with only one MBS close to the membrane channel, necessary and sufficient to support trafficking. Our findings were similar to those obtained for the closely related ATP7A protein, suggesting similar mechanisms for trafficking between copper-transporting CPx-type ATPases. PMID:14998371

  4. Structural characterization of the N-terminal mineral modification domains from the molluscan crystal-modulating biomineralization proteins, AP7 and AP24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wustman, Brandon A; Morse, Daniel E; Evans, John Spencer

    2004-08-05

    The AP7 and AP24 proteins represent a class of mineral-interaction polypeptides that are found in the aragonite-containing nacre layer of mollusk shell (H. rufescens). These proteins have been shown to preferentially interfere with calcium carbonate mineral growth in vitro. It is believed that both proteins play an important role in aragonite polymorph selection in the mollusk shell. Previously, we demonstrated the 1-30 amino acid (AA) N-terminal sequences of AP7 and AP24 represent mineral interaction/modification domains in both proteins, as evidenced by their ability to frustrate calcium carbonate crystal growth at step edge regions. In this present report, using free N-terminal, C(alpha)-amide "capped" synthetic polypeptides representing the 1-30 AA regions of AP7 (AP7-1 polypeptide) and AP24 (AP24-1 polypeptide) and NMR spectroscopy, we confirm that both N-terminal sequences possess putative Ca (II) interaction polyanionic sequence regions (2 x -DD- in AP7-1, -DDDED- in AP24-1) that are random coil-like in structure. However, with regard to the remaining sequences regions, each polypeptide features unique structural differences. AP7-1 possesses an extended beta-strand or polyproline type II-like structure within the A11-M10, S12-V13, and S28-I27 sequence regions, with the remaining sequence regions adopting a random-coil-like structure, a trait common to other polyelectrolyte mineral-associated polypeptide sequences. Conversely, AP24-1 possesses random coil-like structure within A1-S9 and Q14-N16 sequence regions, and evidence for turn-like, bend, or loop conformation within the G10-N13, Q17-N24, and M29-F30 sequence regions, similar to the structures identified within the putative elastomeric proteins Lustrin A and sea urchin spicule matrix proteins. The similarities and differences in AP7 and AP24 N-terminal domain structure are discussed with regard to joint AP7-AP24 protein modification of calcium carbonate growth.

  5. NRMT2 is an N-terminal monomethylase that primes for its homologue NRMT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkowski, Janusz J; Bonsignore, Lindsay A; Tooley, John G; Wilkey, Daniel W; Merchant, Michael L; Macara, Ian G; Schaner Tooley, Christine E

    2013-12-15

    NRMT (N-terminal regulator of chromatin condensation 1 methyltransferase) was the first eukaryotic methyltransferase identified to specifically methylate the free α-amino group of proteins. Since the discovery of this N-terminal methyltransferase, many new substrates have been identified and the modification itself has been shown to regulate DNA-protein interactions. Sequence analysis predicts one close human homologue of NRMT, METTL11B (methyltransferase-like protein 11B, now renamed NRMT2). We show in the present paper for the first time that NRMT2 also has N-terminal methylation activity and recognizes the same N-terminal consensus sequences as NRMT (now NRMT1). Both enzymes have similar tissue expression and cellular localization patterns. However, enzyme assays and MS experiments indicate that they differ in their specific catalytic functions. Although NRMT1 is a distributive methyltransferase that can mono-, di- and tri-methylate its substrates, NRMT2 is primarily a monomethylase. Concurrent expression of NRMT1 and NRMT2 accelerates the production of trimethylation, and we propose that NRMT2 activates NRMT1 by priming its substrates for trimethylation.

  6. NRMT2 is an N-terminal monomethylase that primes for its homolog NRMT1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkowski, Janusz J.; Bonsignore, Lindsay A.; Tooley, John G.; Wilkey, Daniel W.; Merchant, Michael L.; Macara, Ian G.; Schaner Tooley, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    N-terminal RCC1 methyltransferase (NRMT) was the first eukaryotic methyltransferase identified to specifically methylate the free α-amino group of proteins. Since the discovery of this N-terminal methyltransferase, many new substrates have been identified and the modification itself has been shown to regulate DNA-protein interactions. Sequence analysis predicts one close human homolog of NRMT, Methyltransferase-like protein 11B (METTL11B, now renamed NRMT2). We show here for the first time that NRMT2 also has N-terminal methylation activity and recognizes the same N-terminal consensus sequences as NRMT (now NRMT1). Both enzymes have similar tissue expression and cellular localization patterns. However, enzyme assays and mass spectrometry experiments indicate they differ in their specific catalytic functions. While NRMT1 is a distributive methyltransferase that can mono-, di-, and trimethylate its substrates, NRMT2 is primarily a monomethylase. Concurrent expression of NRMT1 and NRMT2 accelerates the production of trimethylation, and we propose that NRMT2 activates NRMT1 by priming its substrates for trimethylation. PMID:24090352

  7. Vasoinhibins, N-terminal mouse prolactin fragments, participate in mammary gland involution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Michiyo; Maehara, Midori; Watanabe, Tsukasa; Yanagisawa, Yu; Takata, Yukiko; Nakajima, Ryojun; Suzuki, Mika; Harigaya, Toshio

    2014-06-01

    Vasoinhibins are a family of peptides that act on endothelial cells to suppress angiogenesis and promote apoptosis-mediated vascular regression. Vasoinhibins include the N-terminal fragments from prolactin (PRL), GH, and placental lactogen. One of the vasoinhibins, the N-terminal PRL fragment of 16 kDa, is generated by the lysosomal representative protease cathepsin D (Cath D). Because the normal growth and involution of the mammary gland (MG) are profoundly affected by the expansion and regression of blood vessels and also because PRL stimulates the growth and differentiation of MG, we proposed that intact PRL produced during lactation contributes to MG angiogenesis and increased blood flow, whereas during involution, the N-terminal PRL fragment would have proapoptotic effects on mammary epithelial cells (MECs). Therefore, we investigated the production of the N-terminal PRL fragment and its direct effect on the MG. Mouse PRL (mPRL) was proteolytically cleaved by Cath D between amino acids 148 and 149. N-terminal PRL fragment and Cath D expression increased during MG involution. Furthermore, incubation of MG fragments and MCF7 with recombinant 16 kDa mPRL revealed a proapoptotic effect in MECs. Ectopic mPRL in MECs was cleaved to 16 kDa PRL by Cath D in the MG lysosomal fraction. The majority of PRL derived from pituitary gland was cleaved to 16 kDa PRL in culture medium. Therefore, N-terminal PRL fragment increases during the involution period, has a proapoptotic effect on MECs, and is mainly generated by secreted Cath D in the extracellular space of MG.

  8. Differential isotope dansylation labeling combined with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for quantification of intact and N-terminal truncated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yanan; Li, Liang

    2013-08-20

    The N-terminal amino acids of proteins are important structure units for maintaining the biological function, localization, and interaction networks of proteins. Under different biological conditions, one or several N-terminal amino acids could be cleaved from an intact protein due to processes, such as proteolysis, resulting in the change of protein properties. Thus, the ability to quantify the N-terminal truncated forms of proteins is of great importance, particularly in the area of development and production of protein-based drugs where the relative quantity of the intact protein and its truncated form needs to be monitored. In this work, we describe a rapid method for absolute quantification of protein mixtures containing intact and N-terminal truncated proteins. This method is based on dansylation labeling of the N-terminal amino acids of proteins, followed by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis of the proteins into amino acids. It is shown that dansyl labeled amino acids are stable in acidic conditions and can be quantified by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) with the use of isotope analog standards.

  9. Cyclization of the N-Terminal X-Asn-Gly Motif during Sample Preparation for Bottom-Up Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xumin; Højrup, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We, herein, report a novel -17 Da peptide modification corresponding to an N-terminal cyclization of peptides possessing the N-terminal motif of X-Asn-Gly. The cyclization occurs spontaneously during sample preparation for bottom-up proteomics studies. Distinct from the two well-known N......-terminal cyclizations, cyclization of N-terminal glutamine and S-carbamoylmethylcysteine, it is dependent on pH instead of [NH(4)(+)]. The data set from our recent study on large-scale N(α)-modified peptides revealed a sequence requirement for the cyclization event similar to the well-known deamidation of Asn to iso......Asp and Asp. Detailed analysis using synthetic peptides confirmed that the cyclization forms between the N-terminus and its neighboring Asn residue, and the reaction shares the same succinimide intermediate with the Asn deamidation event. As a result, we, here, propose a molecular mechanism for this specific...

  10. Substrate-inhibitor interactions in the kinetics of alpha-amylase inhibition by ragi alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor (RATI) and its various N-terminal fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, N; Gourinath, S; Dey, S; Srinivasan, A; Singh, T P

    2001-04-10

    The ragi alpha-amylase/trypsin bifunctional inhibitor (RATI) from Indian finger millet, Ragi (Eleucine coracana Gaertneri), represents a new class of cereal inhibitor family. It exhibits a completely new motif of trypsin inhibitory site and is not found in any known trypsin inhibitor structures. The alpha-amylase inhibitory site resides at the N-terminal region. These two sites are independent of each other and the inhibitor forms a ternary (1:1:1) complex with trypsin and alpha-amylase. The trypsin inhibition follows a simple competitive inhibition obeying the canonical serine protease inhibitor mechanism. However, the alpha-amylase inhibition kinetics is a complex one if larger (> or =7 glucose units) substrate is used. While a complete inhibition of trypsin activity can be achieved, the inhibition of amylase is not complete even at very high molar concentration. We have isolated the N-terminal fragment (10 amino acids long) by CNBr hydrolysis of RATI. This fragment shows a simple competitive inhibition of alpha-amylase activity. We have also synthesized various peptides homologous to the N-terminal sequence of RATI. These peptides also show a normal competitive inhibition of alpha-amylase with varying potencies. It has also been shown that RATI binds to the larger substrates of alpha-amylase. In light of these observations, we have reexamined the binding of proteinaceous inhibitors to alpha-amylase and its implications on the mechanism and kinetics of inhibition.

  11. 77 FR 65537 - Requirements for Patent Applications Containing Nucleotide Sequence and/or Amino Acid Sequence...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... Amino Acid Sequence Disclosures ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request. SUMMARY: The United States....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract Patent applications that contain nucleotide and/or amino acid...

  12. N-terminal isoforms of the large-conductance Ca²⁺-activated K⁺ channel are differentially modulated by the auxiliary β1-subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorca, Ramón A; Stamnes, Susan J; Pillai, Meghan K; Hsiao, Jordy J; Wright, Michael E; England, Sarah K

    2014-04-04

    The large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK(Ca)) channel is essential for maintaining the membrane in a hyperpolarized state, thereby regulating neuronal excitability, smooth muscle contraction, and secretion. The BK(Ca) α-subunit has three predicted initiation codons that generate proteins with N-terminal ends starting with the amino acid sequences MANG, MSSN, or MDAL. Because the N-terminal region and first transmembrane domain of the α-subunit are required for modulation by auxiliary β1-subunits, we examined whether β1 differentially modulates the N-terminal BK(Ca) α-subunit isoforms. In the absence of β1, all isoforms had similar single-channel conductances and voltage-dependent activation. However, whereas β1 did not modulate the voltage-activation curve of MSSN, β1 induced a significant leftward shift of the voltage activation curves of both the MDAL and MANG isoforms. These shifts, of which the MDAL was larger, occurred at both 10 μM and 100 μM Ca(2+). The β1-subunit increased the open dwell times of all three isoforms and decreased the closed dwell times of MANG and MDAL but increased the closed dwell times of MSSN. The distinct modulation of voltage activation by the β1-subunit may be due to the differential effect of β1 on burst duration and interburst intervals observed among these isoforms. Additionally, we observed that the related β2-subunit induced comparable leftward shifts in the voltage-activation curves of all three isoforms, indicating that the differential modulation of these isoforms was specific to β1. These findings suggest that the relative expression of the N-terminal isoforms can fine-tune BK(Ca) channel activity in cells, highlighting a novel mechanism of BK(Ca) channel regulation.

  13. Towards a functional understanding of protein N-terminal acetylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Arnesen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein N-terminal acetylation is a major modification of eukaryotic proteins. Its functional implications include regulation of protein-protein interactions and targeting to membranes, as demonstrated by studies of a handful of proteins. Fifty years after its discovery, a potential general function of the N-terminal acetyl group carried by thousands of unique proteins remains enigmatic. However, recent functional data suggest roles for N-terminal acetylation as a degradation signal and as a determining factor for preventing protein targeting to the secretory pathway, thus highlighting N-terminal acetylation as a major determinant for the life and death of proteins. These contributions represent new and intriguing hypotheses that will guide the research in the years to come.

  14. N-terminal Protein Processing: A Comparative Proteogenomic Analysis*

    OpenAIRE

    Bonissone, Stefano; Gupta, Nitin; Romine, Margaret; Bradshaw, Ralph A.; Pavel A Pevzner

    2013-01-01

    N-terminal methionine excision (NME) and N-terminal acetylation (NTA) are two of the most common protein post-translational modifications. NME is a universally conserved activity and a highly specific mechanism across all life forms. NTA is very common in eukaryotes but occurs rarely in prokaryotes. By analyzing data sets from yeast, mammals and bacteria (including 112 million spectra from 57 bacterial species), the largest comparative proteogenomics study to date, it is shown that previous a...

  15. Intrinsic structural differences in the N-terminal segment of pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C from different species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, I; Rivas, L; Casals, C;

    2001-01-01

    Predictive studies suggest that the known sequences of the N-terminal segment of surfactant protein SP-C from animal species have an intrinsic tendency to form beta-turns, but there are important differences on the probable location of these motifs in different SP-C species. Our hypothesis...... is that intrinsic structural determinants of the sequence of the N-terminal region of SP-C could define conformation, acylation and perhaps surface properties of the mature protein. To test this hypothesis we have synthesized peptides corresponding to the 13-residue N-terminal sequence of porcine and canine SP-C......-terminal end of SP-C may modulate these intrinsic conformational features and the changes induced could be important for the development of its surface activity. Udgivelsesdato: 2001-May...

  16. Selecting protein N-terminal peptides by combined fractional diagonal chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staes, An; Impens, Francis; Van Damme, Petra; Ruttens, Bart; Goethals, Marc; Demol, Hans; Timmerman, Evy; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Gevaert, Kris

    2011-07-14

    In recent years, procedures for selecting the N-terminal peptides of proteins with analysis by mass spectrometry have been established to characterize protease-mediated cleavage and protein α-N-acetylation on a proteomic level. As a pioneering technology, N-terminal combined fractional diagonal chromatography (COFRADIC) has been used in numerous studies in which these protein modifications were investigated. Derivatization of primary amines--which can include stable isotope labeling--occurs before trypsin digestion so that cleavage occurs after arginine residues. Strong cation exchange (SCX) chromatography results in the removal of most of the internal peptides. Diagonal, reversed-phase peptide chromatography, in which the two runs are separated by reaction with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid, results in the removal of the C-terminal peptides and remaining internal peptides and the fractionation of the sample. We describe here the fully matured N-terminal COFRADIC protocol as it is currently routinely used, including the most substantial improvements (including treatment with glutamine cyclotransferase and pyroglutamyl aminopeptidase to remove pyroglutamate before SCX, and a sample pooling scheme to reduce the overall number of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses) that were made since its original publication. Completion of the N-terminal COFRADIC procedure takes ~5 d.

  17. Amino acid sequence of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase and cDNA sequence encoding Coprinus cinereus peroxidase. A new family of fungal peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baunsgaard, L; Dalbøge, H; Houen, G; Rasmussen, E M; Welinder, K G

    1993-04-01

    Sequence analysis and cDNA cloning of Coprinus peroxidase (CIP) were undertaken to expand the understanding of the relationships of structure, function and molecular genetics of the secretory heme peroxidases from fungi and plants. Amino acid sequencing of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase, and cDNA sequencing of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase showed that the mature proteins are identical in amino acid sequence, 343 residues in size and preceded by a 20-residue signal peptide. Their likely identity to peroxidase from Arthromyces ramosus is discussed. CIP has an 8-residue, glycine-rich N-terminal extension blocked with a pyroglutamate residue which is absent in other fungal peroxidases. The presence of pyroglutamate, formed by cyclization of glutamine, and the finding of a minor fraction of a variant form lacking the N-terminal residue, indicate that signal peptidase cleavage is followed by further enzymic processing. CIP is 40-45% identical in amino-acid sequence to 11 lignin peroxidases from four fungal species, and 42-43% identical to the two known Mn-peroxidases. Like these white-rot fungal peroxidases, CIP has an additional segment of approximately 40 residues at the C-terminus which is absent in plant peroxidases. Although CIP is much more similar to horseradish peroxidase (HRP C) in substrate specificity, specific activity and pH optimum than to white-rot fungal peroxidases, the sequences of CIP and HRP C showed only 18% identity. Hence, CIP qualifies as the first member of a new family of fungal peroxidases. The nine invariant residues present in all plant, fungal and bacterial heme peroxidases are also found in CIP. The present data support the hypothesis that only one chromosomal CIP gene exists. In contrast, a large number of secretory plant and fungal peroxidases are expressed from several peroxidase gene clusters. Analyses of three batches of CIP protein and of 49 CIP clones revealed the existence of only two highly similar alleles indicating less

  18. The 18-kilodalton Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) contains a potential N-terminal dimerization site and a C-terminal nucleic acid-binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lotte Bang; Birkelund, S; Holm, A;

    1996-01-01

    , in part, be due to Hc1-mediated alterations of DNA topology. To locate putative functional domains within Hc1, polypeptides Hc1(2-57) and Hc1(53-125), corresponding to the N- and C-terminal parts of Hc1, respectively, were generated. By chemical cross-linking with ethylene glycol-bis (succinic acid N...

  19. Antiepileptic Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla and Rhynchophylline Involved in the Initiation of c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Phosphorylation of MAPK Signal Pathways in Acute Seizures of Kainic Acid-Treated Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Cheng Hsu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Seizures cause inflammation of the central nervous system. The extent of the inflammation is related to the severity and recurrence of the seizures. Cell surface receptors are stimulated by stimulators such as kainic acid (KA, which causes intracellular mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signal pathway transmission to coordinate a response. It is known that Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR and rhynchophylline (RP have anticonvulsive effects, although the mechanisms remain unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop a novel strategy for treating epilepsy by investigating how UR and RP initiate their anticonvulsive mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats were administered KA (12 mg/kg, i.p. to induce seizure before being sacrificed. The brain was removed 3 h after KA administration. The results indicate that pretreatment with UR (1.0 g/kg, RP (0.25 mg/kg, and valproic acid (VA, 250 mg/kg for 3 d could reduce epileptic seizures and could also reduce the expression of c-Jun aminoterminal kinase phosphorylation (JNKp of MAPK signal pathways in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus brain tissues. Proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α remain unchanged, indicating that the anticonvulsive effect of UR and RP is initially involved in the JNKp MAPK signal pathway during the KA-induced acute seizure period.

  20. The cyanobacterial cell division factor Ftn6 contains an N-terminal DnaD-like domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saguez Cyril

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA replication and cell cycle as well as their relationship have been extensively studied in the two model organisms E. coli and B. subtilis. By contrast, little is known about these processes in cyanobacteria, even though they are crucial to the biosphere, in utilizing solar energy to renew the oxygenic atmosphere and in producing the biomass for the food chain. Recent studies have allowed the identification of several cell division factors that are specifics to cyanobacteria. Among them, Ftn6 has been proposed to function in the recruitment of the crucial FtsZ proteins to the septum or the subsequent Z-ring assembly and possibly in chromosome segregation. Results In this study, we identified an as yet undescribed domain located in the conserved N-terminal region of Ftn6. This 77 amino-acids-long domain, designated here as FND (Ftn6 N-Terminal Domain, exhibits striking sequence and structural similarities with the DNA-interacting module, listed in the PFAM database as the DnaD-like domain (pfam04271. We took advantage of the sequence similarities between FND and the DnaD-like domains to construct a homology 3D-model of the Ftn6 FND domain from the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803. Mapping of the conserved residues exposed onto the FND surface allowed us to identify a highly conserved area that could be engaged in Ftn6-specific interactions. Conclusion Overall, similarities between FND and DnaD-like domains as well as previously reported observations on Ftn6 suggest that FND may function as a DNA-interacting module thereby providing an as yet missing link between DNA replication and cell division in cyanobacteria. Consistently, we also showed that Ftn6 is involved in tolerance to DNA damages generated by UV rays.

  1. Interaction of the N-terminal segment of pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C with interfacial phospholipid films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, Inés; Keough, Kevin M W; Perez-Gil, Jesus

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C is a 35-residue polypeptide composed of a hydrophobic transmembrane alpha-helix and a polycationic, palmitoylated-cysteine containing N-terminal segment. This segment is likely the only structural motif the protein projects out of the bilayer in which SP-C...... is inserted and is therefore a candidate motif to participate in interactions with other bilayers or monolayers. In the present work, we have detected intrinsic ability of a peptide based on the sequence of the N-terminal segment of SP-C to interact and insert spontaneously into preformed zwitterionic....... These results demonstrate that the sequence of the SP-C N-terminal region has intrinsic ability to interact with, insert into, and perturb the structure of zwitterionic and anionic phospholipid films, even in the absence of the palmitic chains attached to this segment in the native protein. This effect has been...

  2. Negative Ion In-Source Decay Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Sequencing Acidic Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, Chelsea L.; Wright, Patience M.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in-source decay was studied in the negative ion mode on deprotonated peptides to determine its usefulness for obtaining extensive sequence information for acidic peptides. Eight biological acidic peptides, ranging in size from 11 to 33 residues, were studied by negative ion mode ISD (nISD). The matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzamide, 1,5-diaminonaphthalene, 5-amino-1-naphthol, 3-aminoquinoline, and 9-aminoacridine were used with each peptide. Optimal fragmentation was produced with 1,5-diaminonphthalene (DAN), and extensive sequence informative fragmentation was observed for every peptide except hirudin(54-65). Cleavage at the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone, producing c' and z' ions, was dominant for all peptides. Cleavage of the N-Cα bond N-terminal to proline residues was not observed. The formation of c and z ions is also found in electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron capture dissociation (ECD), and positive ion mode ISD, which are considered to be radical-driven techniques. Oxidized insulin chain A, which has four highly acidic oxidized cysteine residues, had less extensive fragmentation. This peptide also exhibited the only charged localized fragmentation, with more pronounced product ion formation adjacent to the highly acidic residues. In addition, spectra were obtained by positive ion mode ISD for each protonated peptide; more sequence informative fragmentation was observed via nISD for all peptides. Three of the peptides studied had no product ion formation in ISD, but extensive sequence informative fragmentation was found in their nISD spectra. The results of this study indicate that nISD can be used to readily obtain sequence information for acidic peptides.

  3. NMR Structure of Calmodulin Complexed to an N-terminally Acetylated α-Synuclein Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruschus, James M.; Yap, Thai Leong; Pistolesi, Sara; Maltsev, Alexander S.; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2013-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a calcium binding protein that plays numerous roles in Ca-dependent cellular processes, including uptake and release of neurotransmitters in neurons. α-Synuclein (α-syn), one of the most abundant proteins in central nervous system neurons, helps maintain presynaptic vesicles containing neurotransmitters and moderates their Ca-dependent release into the synapse. Ca-bound CaM interacts with α-syn most strongly at its N-terminus. The N-terminal region of α-syn is important for membrane binding, thus CaM could modulate membrane association of α-syn in a Ca-dependent manner. In contrast, Ca-free CaM has negligible interaction. The interaction with CaM leads to significant signal broadening in both CaM and α-syn NMR spectra, most likely due to conformational exchange. The broadening is much reduced when binding a peptide consisting of the first 19 residues of α-syn. In neurons, most α-syn is acetylated at the N-terminus, and acetylation leads to a ten-fold increase in binding strength for the α-syn peptide (KD = 35 ± 10 μM). The N-terminally acetylated peptide adopts a helical structure at the N-terminus with the acetyl group contacting the N-terminal domain of CaM, and with less ordered helical structure towards the C-terminus of the peptide contacting the CaM C-terminal domain. Comparison with known structures shows the CaM/α-syn complex most closely resembles Ca-bound CaM in a complex with an IQ motif peptide. However, a search comparing the α-syn peptide sequence with known CaM targets, including IQ motifs, found no homologies, thus the N-terminal α-syn CaM binding site appears to be a novel CaM target sequence. PMID:23607618

  4. Correlation between spina bifida manifesta in fetal rats and c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinghuan Ma; Yongxin Bao; Chenghao Li; Fubin Jiao; Hongjie Xin; Zhengwei Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Fetal rat models with neural tube defects were established by injection with retinoic acid at 10 days after conception. The immunofluorescence assay and western blot analysis showed that the number of caspase-3 positive cells in myeloid tissues for spina bifida manifesta was increased. There was also increased phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, a member of the mitogen activated protein kinase family. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation level was positively correlated with caspase-3 expression in myeloid tissues for spina bifida manifesta. Experimental findings indicate that abnormal apoptosis is involved in retinoic acid-induced dominant spina bifida formation in fetal rats, and may be associated with the c-Jun N-terminal kinase signal transduction pathway.

  5. The N-terminal strand modulates immunoglobulin light chain fibrillogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozo-Yauner, Luis del, E-mail: ldelpozo@inmegen.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Medicina Genómica, Periférico Sur No. 4809, Col. Arenal Tepepan, Delegación Tlalpan, México, D.F. C.P. 14610 (Mexico); Wall, Jonathan S. [Departments of Radiology and Medicine, The University of Tennessee Medical Center, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN (United States); González Andrade, Martín [Instituto Nacional de Medicina Genómica, Periférico Sur No. 4809, Col. Arenal Tepepan, Delegación Tlalpan, México, D.F. C.P. 14610 (Mexico); Sánchez-López, Rosana [Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Av. Universidad 2001, Col. Chamilpa Cuernavaca, Morelos C.P. 62210 (Mexico); Rodríguez-Ambriz, Sandra L. [Centro de Desarrollo de Productos Bióticos, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Calle CEPROBI No. 8, Col. San Isidro, Yautepec, Morelos C.P. 62731 (Mexico); Pérez Carreón, Julio I. [Instituto Nacional de Medicina Genómica, Periférico Sur No. 4809, Col. Arenal Tepepan, Delegación Tlalpan, México, D.F. C.P. 14610 (Mexico); and others

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •We evaluated the impact of mutations in the N-terminal strand of 6aJL2 protein. •Mutations destabilized the protein in a position-dependent manner. •Destabilizing mutations accelerated the fibrillogenesis by shortening the lag time. •The effect on the kinetic of fibril elongation by seeding was of different nature. •The N-terminal strand is buried in the fibrillar state of 6aJL2 protein. -- Abstract: It has been suggested that the N-terminal strand of the light chain variable domain (V{sub L}) protects the molecule from aggregation by hindering spurious intermolecular contacts. We evaluated the impact of mutations in the N-terminal strand on the thermodynamic stability and kinetic of fibrillogenesis of the V{sub L} protein 6aJL2. Mutations in this strand destabilized the protein in a position-dependent manner, accelerating the fibrillogenesis by shortening the lag time; an effect that correlated with the extent of destabilization. In contrast, the effect on the kinetics of fibril elongation, as assessed in seeding experiments was of different nature, as it was not directly dependant on the degree of destabilization. This finding suggests different factors drive the nucleation-dependent and elongation phases of light chain fibrillogenesis. Finally, taking advantage of the dependence of the Trp fluorescence upon environment, four single Trp substitutions were made in the N-terminal strand, and changes in solvent exposure during aggregation were evaluated by acrylamide-quenching. The results suggest that the N-terminal strand is buried in the fibrillar state of 6aJL2 protein. This finding suggest a possible explanation for the modulating effect exerted by the mutations in this strand on the aggregation behavior of 6aJL2 protein.

  6. Diversity of the marine picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus assessed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms of 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer sequences Diversidad de las picocianobacterias marinas Prochlorococcus y Synechococcus por medio de polimorfismos de longitud de fragmentos de restricción terminal en secuencias del espaciador transcrito interno del ARNr 16S - 23S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PARIS LAVIN

    2008-12-01

    distribution of these organisms.Con el fin de evaluar la utilización de secuencias del espaciador interno transcrito (ITS en estudios de genética de población de cianobacterias marinas, se amplificó y clonó la secuencia del gen ARNr 16S junto a la region espadadora 16S-23S ARNr de seis cepas de Prochlorococcus y Synechococcus. Se analizaron los amplicones del ITS por electroforesis en gel de gradiente de desnaturalización (DGGE y por polimorfismos de longitud de fragmentos de restricción terminal (T-RFLP. Al aplicar los métodos estándares de estas técnicas, se obtuvo más de una banda o fragmento de restricción terminal (T-RF por cepa o secuencia clonada. Informes en la literatura han sugerido que estas anomalías podrían ser atribuidas a la formación de estructuras secundarias. Por consiguiente, la estructura secundaria de las secuencias de ITS de las cepas de Prochlorococcus y Synechococcus fue modelada a las diferentes temperaturas que se utilizaron durante la reacción en cadena de polimerasa (PCR. Dicho modelamiento predijo la existencia de bucles que podrían persistir incluso durante la temperatura de extensión. Es probable que estos bucles generen productos de PCR con fragmentos incompletos y hebras simples. En este trabajo se modificó el procedimiento del método de T-RFLP añadiendo el partidor marcado en los últimos dos ciclos. Esto resultó, para la mayoría de los casos, la obtención de un solo fragmento de restricción por ribotipo. La aplicación de esta técnica a una muestra del medio ambiente obtenida frente al norte de Chile, demostró que es posible identificar la presencia, y determinar la abundancia relativa, de varios linajes filogenéticos de los géneros Prochlorococcus y Synechococcus que habitan la zona eufótica. El análisis filogenético de las secuencias de ITS obtenidos por clonación y secuenciación de ADN a partir de la misma muestra confirmó la presencia de los diferentes genotipos. Con la modificación propuesta, el m

  7. Specific amplification of gene encoding N-terminal region of catalase-peroxidase protein (KatG-N) for diagnosis of disseminated MAC disease in HIV patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latawa, Romica; Singh, Krishna Kumar; Wanchu, Ajay; Sethi, Sunil; Sharma, Kusum; Sharma, Aman; Laal, Suman; Verma, Indu

    2014-10-01

    Disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) infection is considered as severe complication of advanced HIV/AIDS disease. Currently available various laboratory investigations have not only limited ability to discriminate between MAC infection and tuberculosis but are also laborious and time consuming. The aim of this study was, therefore, to design a molecular-based strategy for specific detection of MAC and its differentiation from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) isolated from the blood specimens of HIV patients. A simple PCR was developed based on the amplification of 120-bp katG-N gene corresponding to the first 40 amino acids of N-terminal catalase-peroxidase (KatG) protein of Mycobacterium avium that shows only ~13% sequence homology by clustal W alignment to N-terminal region of M. tb KatG protein. This assay allowed the accurate and rapid detection of MAC bacteremia, distinguishing it from M. tb in a single PCR reaction without any need for sequencing or hybridization protocol to be performed thereafter. This study produced enough evidence that a significant proportion of Indian HIV patients have disseminated MAC bacteremia, suggesting the utility of M. avium katG-N gene PCR for early detection of MAC disease in HIV patients.

  8. Human choriogonadotropin binds to a lutropin receptor with essentially no N-terminal extension and stimulates cAMP synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, I H; Ji, T H

    1991-07-15

    The lutropin (LH) receptor, which belongs to the family of G-protein coupled receptors, consists of an extracellular hydrophilic N-terminal extension of 341 amino acids and a membrane-embedded C-terminal region of 333 amino acids. This C-terminal region comprises a short N terminus, seven transmembrane domains, three cytoplasmic loops, three exoplasmic loops, and a C terminus. Recently, it was reported that the N-terminal extension of the LH receptor alone or a naturally occurring variant LH receptor similar to the N-terminal extension is capable of binding the hormone with an affinity slightly higher than that of the native receptor. This finding raises a question as to whether the N-terminal extension represents the entire hormone binding site and, if so, how is hormone binding transduced to the activation of a G-protein? In an attempt to answer this important question, we have prepared truncated receptors containing an N-terminal extension as short as 10 amino acids. Surprisingly, the truncated receptors were not only capable of binding the hormone, albeit with low affinities, but also capable of stimulating cAMP synthesis. These results suggest a possibility that the hormone, at least in part, interacts with the membrane-embedded C-terminal region and modulates it to activate adenylate cyclase. The low hormone binding affinities of the truncated receptors taken together with high affinity hormone binding to the N-terminal extension of the LH receptor indicate the existence of two or more contact points between the receptor and the hormone.

  9. Isolation and amino acid sequence of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone precursor-related peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tensen, C P; Verhoeven, A H; Gaus, G; Janssen, K P; Keller, R; Van Herp, F

    1991-01-01

    The crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) is synthesized as part of a larger preprohormone in which the sequence of CHH is N-terminally flanked by a peptide for which the name CPRP (CHH precursor-related peptide) is proposed. Both CHH and CPRP are present in the sinus gland, the neurohemal organ of neurosecretory cells located in the eyestalk of decapod crustaceans. This paper describes the isolation and sequence analysis of CPRPs isolated from sinus glands of the crab Carcinus maenas, the crayfish Orconectes limosus and the lobster Homarus americanus. The published sequence of "peptide H" isolated from the land crab, Cardisoma carnifex, has now been recognized as a CPRP in this species. Sequence comparison reveals a high level of identity for the N-terminal region (residues 1-13) between all four peptides, while identity in the C-terminal domain is high between lobster and crayfish CPRP on the one hand, and between both crab species on the other. Conserved N-terminal residues include a putative monobasic processing site at position 11, which suggests that CPRP may be a biosynthetic intermediate from which a potentially bioactive decapeptide can be derived.

  10. Role of the N-terminal seven residues of surfactant protein B (SP-B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahzad Sharifahmadian

    Full Text Available Breathing is enabled by lung surfactant, a mixture of proteins and lipids that forms a surface-active layer and reduces surface tension at the air-water interface in lungs. Surfactant protein B (SP-B is an essential component of lung surfactant. In this study we probe the mechanism underlying the important functional contributions made by the N-terminal 7 residues of SP-B, a region sometimes called the "insertion sequence". These studies employed a construct of SP-B, SP-B (1-25,63-78, also called Super Mini-B, which is a 41-residue peptide with internal disulfide bonds comprising the N-terminal 7-residue insertion sequence and the N- and C-terminal helices of SP-B. Circular dichroism, solution NMR, and solid state (2H NMR were used to study the structure of SP-B (1-25,63-78 and its interactions with phospholipid bilayers. Comparison of results for SP-B (8-25,63-78 and SP-B (1-25,63-78 demonstrates that the presence of the 7-residue insertion sequence induces substantial disorder near the centre of the lipid bilayer, but without a major disruption of the overall mechanical orientation of the bilayers. This observation suggests the insertion sequence is unlikely to penetrate deeply into the bilayer. The 7-residue insertion sequence substantially increases the solution NMR linewidths, most likely due to an increase in global dynamics.

  11. Natural insertions within the N-terminal region of the coat protein of Maize dwarf mosaic potyvirus (MDMV) have an effect on the RNA stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrik, Kathrin; Sebestyén, Endre; Gell, Gyöngyvér; Balázs, Ervin

    2010-02-01

    A 13 amino acid residue insertion was found in the N-terminal region of the coat protein of several Maize dwarf mosaic virus isolates (MDMV). These insertions seem to be the result of a direct duplication event, but differ in some positions. In order to evaluate the influence of the insertion on the RNA secondary structure and stability, the RNA secondary structures and minimum free energies (MFE) of all existing MDMV coat protein sequences were estimated using three different softwares, the Vienna RNA Package, NUPACK, and UNAFold, and compared to the secondary structure and MFE of various random sequence collections preserving the nucleotide distribution of MDMV. The bioinformatic analysis showed that the insertion stabilizes the RNA structure of the coat protein gene.

  12. Role of N-terminal region of Escherichia coli maltodextrin glucosidase in folding and function of the protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Ashutosh; Singh, Amit K; Shukla, Prakash K; Equbal, Md Javed; Malik, Shikha T; Singh, Tej P; Chaudhuri, Tapan K

    2016-09-01

    Maltodextrin glucosidase (MalZ) hydrolyses short malto-oligosaccharides from the reducing end releasing glucose and maltose in Escherichia coli. MalZ is a highly aggregation prone protein and molecular chaperonins GroEL and GroES assist in the folding of this protein to a substantial level. The N-terminal region of this enzyme appears to be a unique domain as seen in sequence comparison studies with other amylases as well as through homology modelling. The sequence and homology model analysis show a probability of disorder in the N-Terminal region of MalZ. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been reported in the present communication. Based on the crystallographic structure, it has been interpreted that the N-terminal region of the enzyme (Met1-Phe131) might be unstructured or flexible. To understand the role of the N-terminal region of MalZ in its enzymatic activity, and overall stability, a truncated version (Ala111-His616) of MalZ was created. The truncated version failed to fold into an active enzyme both in E. coli cytosol and in vitro even with the assistance of chaperonins GroEL and GroES. Furthermore, the refolding effort of N-truncated MalZ in the presence of isolated N-terminal domain didn't succeed. Our studies suggest that while the structural rigidity or orientation of the N-terminal region of the MalZ protein may not be essential for its stability and function, but the said domain is likely to play an important role in the formation of the native structure of the protein when present as an integral part of the protein.

  13. Clinical significance of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张向阳; 朱继红

    2004-01-01

    @@ Traditionally, it was believed that the natriuretic peptide family (NPs) was composed of four natural peptides, i.e., atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and urodilatin. All of them have the same 17-amino acid ring connected by bisulfate bond, which is essential for their biological activity.1 There are C-terminal and N-terminal tails on the ring. Each peptide encoded by an independent gene has its own tissue specificity and regulation mechanism. It is now suggested that beside the four traditional peptides, their precursors and the peptide fragments released by the activation or hydrolysis of the precursors, such as precursor of ANP and N-terminal proANP (NTANP), precursor of BNP and N-terminal proBNP (NTBNP) are also NPs. Furthermore, an artificially synthesized NP, vasonatrin peptide, is also a new member of NP family. In fish like eel, another peptide named ventricular natriuretic peptide was found. We now have a review on the clinical significance of NTBNP.

  14. Structure of the human histone chaperone FACT Spt16 N-terminal domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcianò, G.; Huang, D. T., E-mail: d.huang@beatson.gla.ac.uk [Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Glasgow G61 1BD, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-22

    The Spt16–SSRP1 heterodimer is a histone chaperone that plays an important role in regulating chromatin assembly. Here, a crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Spt16 is presented and it is shown that this domain may contribute to histone binding. The histone chaperone FACT plays an important role in facilitating nucleosome assembly and disassembly during transcription. FACT is a heterodimeric complex consisting of Spt16 and SSRP1. The N-terminal domain of Spt16 resembles an inactive aminopeptidase. How this domain contributes to the histone chaperone activity of FACT remains elusive. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of human Spt16 is reported at a resolution of 1.84 Å. The structure adopts an aminopeptidase-like fold similar to those of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Spt16 NTDs. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses show that human Spt16 NTD binds histones H3/H4 with low-micromolar affinity, suggesting that Spt16 NTD may contribute to histone binding in the FACT complex. Surface-residue conservation and electrostatic analysis reveal a conserved acidic patch that may be involved in histone binding.

  15. Isolation, amino acid sequence and biological activities of novel long-chain polyamine-associated peptide toxins from the sponge Axinyssa aculeata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Satoko; Jimbo, Mitsuru; Gill, Martin B; Wyhe, L Leanne Lash-Van; Murata, Michio; Nonomura, Ken'ichi; Swanson, Geoffrey T; Sakai, Ryuichi

    2011-09-19

    A novel family of functionalized peptide toxins, aculeines (ACUs), was isolated from the marine sponge Axinyssa aculeate. ACUs are polypeptides with N-terminal residues that are modified by the addition of long-chain polyamines (LCPA). Aculeines were present in the sponge extract as a complex mixture with differing polyamine chain lengths and peptide structures. ACU-A and B, which were purified in this study, share a common polypeptide chain but differ in their N-terminal residue modifications. The amino acid sequence of the polypeptide portion of ACU-A and B was deduced from 3' and 5' RACE, and supported by Edman degradation and mass spectral analysis of peptide fragments. ACU induced convulsions upon intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection in mice, and disrupted neuronal membrane integrity in electrophysiological assays. ACU also lysed erythrocytes with a potency that differed between animal species. Here we describe the isolation, amino acid sequence, and biological activity of this new group of cytotoxic sponge peptides.

  16. Fine tuning of the catalytic activity of colicin e7 nuclease domain by systematic n-terminal mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Németh, Eszter; Körtvélyesi, Tamás; Thulstrup, Peter W.;

    2014-01-01

    The nuclease domain of colicin E7 (NColE7) promotes the nonspecific cleavage of nucleic acids at its C-terminal HNH motif. Interestingly, the deletion of four N-terminal residues (446–449NColE75KRNK) resulted in complete loss of the enzyme activity. R447A mutation was reported to decrease the nuc...

  17. Functional and structural characterization of a synthetic peptide representing the N-terminal domain of prokaryotic pyruvate dehydrogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengeveld, A.F.; Mierlo, van C.P.M.; Hooven, van den H.W.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Kok, de A.

    2002-01-01

    A synthetic peptide (Nterm-E1p) is used to characterize the structure and function of the N-terminal region (amino acid residues 4-45) of the pyruvate dehydrogenase component (E1p) from the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHC) from Azotobacter vinelandii. Activity and binding studies es

  18. Directed evolution of the TALE N-terminal domain for recognition of all 5' bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Brian M; Mercer, Andrew C; Barbas, Carlos F

    2013-11-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins can be designed to bind virtually any DNA sequence. General guidelines for design of TALE DNA-binding domains suggest that the 5'-most base of the DNA sequence bound by the TALE (the N0 base) should be a thymine. We quantified the N0 requirement by analysis of the activities of TALE transcription factors (TALE-TF), TALE recombinases (TALE-R) and TALE nucleases (TALENs) with each DNA base at this position. In the absence of a 5' T, we observed decreases in TALE activity up to >1000-fold in TALE-TF activity, up to 100-fold in TALE-R activity and up to 10-fold reduction in TALEN activity compared with target sequences containing a 5' T. To develop TALE architectures that recognize all possible N0 bases, we used structure-guided library design coupled with TALE-R activity selections to evolve novel TALE N-terminal domains to accommodate any N0 base. A G-selective domain and broadly reactive domains were isolated and characterized. The engineered TALE domains selected in the TALE-R format demonstrated modularity and were active in TALE-TF and TALEN architectures. Evolved N-terminal domains provide effective and unconstrained TALE-based targeting of any DNA sequence as TALE binding proteins and designer enzymes.

  19. The origin of biased sequence depth in sequence-independent nucleic acid amplification and optimization for efficient massive parallel sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toon Rosseel

    Full Text Available Sequence Independent Single Primer Amplification is one of the most widely used random amplification approaches in virology for sequencing template preparation. This technique relies on oligonucleotides consisting of a 3' random part used to prime complementary DNA synthesis and a 5' defined tag sequence for subsequent amplification. Recently, this amplification method was combined with next generation sequencing to obtain viral sequences. However, these studies showed a biased distribution of the resulting sequence reads over the analyzed genomes. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms that lead to biased sequence depth when using random amplification. Avian paramyxovirus type 8 was used as a model RNA virus to investigate these mechanisms. We showed, based on in silico analysis of the sequence depth in relation to GC-content, predicted RNA secondary structure and sequence complementarity to the 3' part of the tag sequence, that the tag sequence has the main contribution to the observed bias in sequence depth. We confirmed this finding experimentally using both fragmented and non-fragmented viral RNAs as well as primers differing in random oligomer length (6 or 12 nucleotides and in the sequence of the amplification tag. The observed oligonucleotide annealing bias can be reduced by extending the random oligomer sequence and by in silico combining sequence data from SISPA experiments using different 5' defined tag sequences. These findings contribute to the optimization of random nucleic acid amplification protocols that are currently required for downstream applications such as viral metagenomics and microarray analysis.

  20. The cDNA sequence for the protein-tyrosine kinase substrate p36 (calpactin I heavy chain) reveals a multidomain protein with internal repeats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarin, C T; Tack, B F; Kristensen, Torsten;

    1986-01-01

    We have isolated and sequenced a full-length cDNA clone for the protein-tyrosine kinase substrate p36 (calpactin I heavy chain). This sequence predicts a 339 amino acid (Mr 38,493) protein containing an N-terminal region of 20 amino acids, known to interact with a 10 kd protein (light chain), and...

  1. A domain in the N-terminal part of Hsp26 is essential for chaperone function and oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslbeck, Martin; Ignatiou, Athanasios; Saibil, Helen; Helmich, Sonja; Frenzl, Elke; Stromer, Thusnelda; Buchner, Johannes

    2004-10-15

    Small heat-shock proteins (Hsps) are ubiquitous molecular chaperones which prevent the unspecific aggregation of non-native proteins. For Hsp26, a cytosolic sHsp from of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it has been shown that, at elevated temperatures, the 24 subunit complex dissociates into dimers. This dissociation is required for the efficient interaction with non-native proteins. Deletion analysis of the protein showed that the N-terminal half of Hsp26 (amino acid residues 1-95) is required for the assembly of the oligomer. Limited proteolysis in combination with mass spectrometry suggested that this region can be divided in two parts, an N-terminal segment including amino acid residues 1-30 and a second part ranging from residues 31-95. To analyze the structure and function of the N-terminal part of Hsp26 we created a deletion mutant lacking amino acid residues 1-30. We show that the oligomeric state and the structure, as determined by size exclusion chromatography and electron microscopy, corresponds to that of the Hsp26 wild-type protein. Furthermore, this truncated version of Hsp26 is active as a chaperone. However, in contrast to full length Hsp26, the truncated version dissociates at lower temperatures and complexes with non-native proteins are less stable than those found with wild-type Hsp26. Our results suggest that the N-terminal segment of Hsp26 is involved in both, oligomerization and chaperone function and that the second part of the N-terminal region (amino acid residues 31-95) is essential for both functions.

  2. Investigating Mutations to Reduce Huntingtin Aggregation by Increasing Htt-N-Terminal Stability and Weakening Interactions with PolyQ Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza-Anthony, Cody; Waldispühl, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal autosomal genetic disorder characterized by an expanded glutamine-coding CAG repeat sequence in the huntingtin (Htt) exon 1 gene. The Htt protein associated with the disease misfolds into toxic oligomers and aggregate fibril structures. Competing models for the misfolding and aggregation phenomena have suggested the role of the Htt-N-terminal region and the CAG trinucleotide repeats (polyQ domain) in affecting aggregation propensities and misfolding. In particular, one model suggests a correlation between structural stability and the emergence of toxic oligomers, whereas a second model proposes that molecular interactions with the extended polyQ domain increase aggregation propensity. In this paper, we computationally explore the potential to reduce Htt aggregation by addressing the aggregation causes outlined in both models. We investigate the mutation landscape of the Htt-N-terminal region and explore amino acid residue mutations that affect its structural stability and hydrophobic interactions with the polyQ domain. Out of the millions of 3-point mutation combinations that we explored, the (L4K E12K K15E) was the most promising mutation combination that addressed aggregation causes in both models. The mutant structure exhibited extreme alpha-helical stability, low amyloidogenicity potential, a hydrophobic residue replacement, and removal of a solvent-inaccessible intermolecular side chain that assists oligomerization. PMID:28096892

  3. Nucleotide sequence of cDNA coding for dianthin 30, a ribosome inactivating protein from Dianthus caryophyllus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legname, G; Bellosta, P; Gromo, G; Modena, D; Keen, J N; Roberts, L M; Lord, J M

    1991-08-27

    Rabbit antibodies raised against dianthin 30, a ribosome inactivating protein from carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus) leaves, were used to identify a full length dianthin precursor cDNA clone from a lambda gt11 expression library. N-terminal amino acid sequencing of purified dianthin 30 and dianthin 32 confirmed that the clone encoded dianthin 30. The cDNA was 1153 basepairs in length and encoded a precursor protein of 293 amino acid residues. The first 23 N-terminal amino acids of the precursor represented the signal sequence. The protein contained a carboxy-terminal region which, by analogy with barley lectin, may contain a vacuolar targeting signal.

  4. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Enhanced Binding Affinity and Sequence Specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA strand, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and binding affinity. Methods of increasing binding affinity and sequence specificity of peptide nucleic aci...

  5. CANADA: designing nucleic acid sequences for nanobiotechnology applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldkamp, Udo

    2010-02-01

    The design of nucleic acid sequences for a highly specific and efficient hybridization is a crucial step in DNA computing and DNA-based nanotechnology applications. The CANADA package contains software tools for designing DNA sequences that meet these and other requirements, as well as for analyzing and handling sequences. CANADA is freely available, including a detailed manual and example input files, at http://ls11-www.cs.uni-dortmund.de/molcomp/downloads.

  6. Representation of protein-sequence information by amino acid subalphabets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C.A.F.; Brunak, Søren

    2004-01-01

    -sequence information, using machine learning strategies, where the primary goal is the discovery of novel powerful representations for use in AI techniques. In the case of proteins and the 20 different amino acids they typically contain, it is also a secondary goal to discover how the current selection of amino acids...

  7. The S-Layer Proteins of Two Bacillus stearothermophilus Wild-Type Strains Are Bound via Their N-Terminal Region to a Secondary Cell Wall Polymer of Identical Chemical Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelseer, Eva Maria; Leitner, Karl; Jarosch, Marina; Hotzy, Christoph; Zayni, Sonja; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit

    1998-01-01

    Two Bacillus stearothermophilus wild-type strains were investigated regarding a common recognition and binding mechanism between the S-layer protein and the underlying cell envelope layer. The S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6 has a molecular weight of 130,000 and assembles into a hexagonally ordered lattice. The S-layer from B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 shows oblique lattice symmetry and is composed of subunits with a molecular weight of 122,000. Immunoblotting, peptide mapping, N-terminal sequencing of the whole S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 and of proteolytic cleavage fragments, and comparison with the S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6 revealed that the two S-layer proteins have identical N-terminal regions but no other extended structurally homologous domains. In contrast to the heterogeneity observed for the S-layer proteins, the secondary cell wall polymer isolated from peptidoglycan-containing sacculi of the different strains showed identical chemical compositions and comparable molecular weights. The S-layer proteins could bind and recrystallize into the appropriate lattice type on native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi from both organisms but not on those extracted with hydrofluoric acid, leading to peptidoglycan of the A1γ chemotype. Affinity studies showed that only proteolytic cleavage fragments possessing the complete N terminus of the mature S-layer proteins recognized native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi as binding sites or could associate with the isolated secondary cell wall polymer, while proteolytic cleavage fragments missing the N-terminal region remained unbound. From the results obtained in this study, it can be concluded that S-layer proteins from B. stearothermophilus wild-type strains possess an identical N-terminal region which is responsible for anchoring the S-layer subunits to a secondary cell wall polymer of identical chemical composition. PMID:9515918

  8. Complete amino acid sequence of the Aspergillus cytotoxin mitogillin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Luna, J.L.; Lopez-Otin, C.; Soriano, F.; Mendez, E.

    1985-02-12

    The complete amino acid sequence of the cytotoxin mitogillin has been determined by sequencing the intact chain and peptide fragments produced by cleavage at methionyl, arginyl, lysyl, and tryptophanyl residues and at one aspartic acid-proline bond. The protein consists of 149 amino acid residues with alanine at the NH/sub 2/ terminus and histidine at the COOH terminus. The calculated Mr of the native mitogillin was 16,867. The native molecule presents two disulfide bridges, one between cysteine residues at positions 5 and 147 and another one between cysteine residues at positions 75 and 131. The amino acid sequence of mitogillin shows 86% homology with another cytotoxic protein called alpha-sarcin.

  9. Dimeric structure of the N-terminal domain of PriB protein from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis solved ab initio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebschner, Dorothee; Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Dauter, Miroslawa; Dauter, Zbigniew; Nowak, Marta; Kur, Józef; Olszewski, Marcin

    2012-12-01

    PriB is one of the components of the bacterial primosome, which catalyzes the reactivation of stalled replication forks at sites of DNA damage. The N-terminal domain of the PriB protein from the thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (TtePriB) was expressed and its crystal structure was solved at the atomic resolution of 1.09 Å by direct methods. The protein chain, which encompasses the first 104 residues of the full 220-residue protein, adopts the characteristic oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) structure consisting of a five-stranded β-barrel filled with hydrophobic residues and equipped with four loops extending from the barrel. In the crystal two protomers dimerize, forming a six-stranded antiparallel β-sheet. The structure of the N-terminal OB domain of T. tengcongensis shows significant differences compared with mesophile PriBs. While in all other known structures of PriB a dimer is formed by two identical OB domains in separate chains, TtePriB contains two consecutive OB domains in one chain. However, sequence comparison of both the N-terminal and the C-terminal domains of TtePriB suggests that they have analogous structures and that the natural protein possesses a structure similar to a dimer of two N-terminal domains.

  10. Structural insights into the human RyR2 N-terminal region involved in cardiac arrhythmias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borko, Ľubomír; Bauerová-Hlinková, Vladena, E-mail: vladena.bauerova@savba.sk; Hostinová, Eva; Gašperík, Juraj [Institute of Molecular Biology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 21, 845 51 Bratislava (Slovakia); Beck, Konrad [Cardiff University School of Dentistry, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XY Wales (United Kingdom); Lai, F. Anthony [Cardiff University School of Medicine, Cardiff CF14 4XN Wales (United Kingdom); Zahradníková, Alexandra, E-mail: vladena.bauerova@savba.sk [Institute of Molecular Biology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 21, 845 51 Bratislava (Slovakia); Institute of Molecular Physiology and Genetics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 5, 833 34 Bratislava (Slovakia); Ševčík, Jozef, E-mail: vladena.bauerova@savba.sk [Institute of Molecular Biology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 21, 845 51 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2014-11-01

    X-ray and solution structures of the human RyR2 N-terminal region were obtained under near-physiological conditions. The structure exhibits a unique network of interactions between its three domains, revealing an important stabilizing role of the central helix. Human ryanodine receptor 2 (hRyR2) mediates calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, enabling cardiomyocyte contraction. The N-terminal region of hRyR2 (amino acids 1–606) is the target of >30 arrhythmogenic mutations and contains a binding site for phosphoprotein phosphatase 1. Here, the solution and crystal structures determined under near-physiological conditions, as well as a homology model of the hRyR2 N-terminal region, are presented. The N-terminus is held together by a unique network of interactions among its three domains, A, B and C, in which the central helix (amino acids 410–437) plays a prominent stabilizing role. Importantly, the anion-binding site reported for the mouse RyR2 N-terminal region is notably absent from the human RyR2. The structure concurs with the differential stability of arrhythmogenic mutations in the central helix (R420W, I419F and I419F/R420W) which are owing to disparities in the propensity of mutated residues to form energetically favourable or unfavourable contacts. In solution, the N-terminus adopts a globular shape with a prominent tail that is likely to involve residues 545–606, which are unresolved in the crystal structure. Docking the N-terminal domains into cryo-electron microscopy maps of the closed and open RyR1 conformations reveals C{sup α} atom movements of up to 8 Å upon channel gating, and predicts the location of the leucine–isoleucine zipper segment and the interaction site for spinophilin and phosphoprotein phosphatase 1 on the RyR surface.

  11. Specificity and versatility of substrate binding sites in four catalytic domains of human N-terminal acetyltransferases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Grauffel

    Full Text Available Nt-acetylation is among the most common protein modifications in eukaryotes. Although thought for a long time to protect proteins from degradation, the role of Nt-acetylation is still debated. It is catalyzed by enzymes called N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs. In eukaryotes, several NATs, composed of at least one catalytic domain, target different substrates based on their N-terminal sequences. In order to better understand the substrate specificity of human NATs, we investigated in silico the enzyme-substrate interactions in four catalytic subunits of human NATs (Naa10p, Naa20p, Naa30p and Naa50p. To date hNaa50p is the only human subunit for which X-ray structures are available. We used the structure of the ternary hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex and a structural model of hNaa10p as a starting point for multiple molecular dynamics simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE, MKG, hNaa10p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE. Nine alanine point-mutants of the hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex were also simulated. Homology models of hNaa20p and hNaa30p were built and compared to hNaa50p and hNaa10p. The simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG reproduce the interactions revealed by the X-ray data. We observed strong hydrogen bonds between MLG and tyrosines 31, 138 and 139. Yet the tyrosines interacting with the substrate's backbone suggest that their role in specificity is limited. This is confirmed by the simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/EEE and hNaa10p/AcCoA/MLG, where these hydrogen bonds are still observed. Moreover these tyrosines are all conserved in hNaa20p and hNaa30p. Other amino acids tune the specificity of the S1' sites that is different for hNaa10p (acidic, hNaa20p (hydrophobic/basic, hNaa30p (basic and hNaa50p (hydrophobic. We also observe dynamic correlation between the ligand binding site and helix [Formula: see text] that tightens under substrate binding. Finally, by comparing the four structures we propose maps of the peptide

  12. Improved recovery of proteome-informative, protein N-terminal peptides by combined fractional diagonal chromatography (COFRADIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staes, An; Van Damme, Petra; Helsens, Kenny; Demol, Hans; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Gevaert, Kris

    2008-04-01

    We previously described a proteome-wide, peptide-centric procedure for sorting protein N-terminal peptides and used these peptides as readouts for protease degradome and xenoproteome studies. This procedure is part of a repertoire of gel-free techniques known as COmbined FRActional DIagonal Chromatography (COFRADIC) and highly enriches for alpha-amino-blocked peptides, including alpha-amino-acetylated protein N-terminal peptides. Here, we introduce two additional steps that significantly increase the fraction of such proteome-informative, N-terminal peptides: strong cation exchange (SCX) segregation of alpha-amino-blocked and alpha-amino-free peptides and an enzymatic step liberating pyroglutamyl peptides for 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS) modification and thus COFRADIC sorting. The SCX step reduces the complexity of the analyte mixture by enriching N-terminal peptides and depleting alpha-amino-free internal peptides as well as proline-starting peptides prior to COFRADIC. The action of pyroglutamyl aminopeptidases prior to the first COFRADIC peptide separation results in greatly diminishing numbers of contaminating pyroglutamyl peptides in peptide maps. We further show that now close to 95% of all COFRADIC-sorted peptides are alpha-amino-acetylated and, using the same amount of starting material, our novel procedure leads to an increased number of protein identifications.

  13. KLF4 N-Terminal Variance Modulates Induced Reprogramming to Pluripotency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Il Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available As the quintessential reprogramming model, OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC re-wire somatic cells to achieve induced pluripotency. Yet, subtle differences in methodology confound comparative studies of reprogramming mechanisms. Employing transposons, we systematically assessed cellular and molecular hallmarks of mouse somatic cell reprogramming by various polycistronic cassettes. Reprogramming responses varied in the extent of initiation and stabilization of transgene-independent pluripotency. Notably, the cassettes employed one of two KLF4 variants, differing only by nine N-terminal amino acids, which generated dissimilar protein stoichiometry. Extending the shorter variant by nine N-terminal amino acids or augmenting stoichiometry by KLF4 supplementation rescued both protein levels and phenotypic disparities, implicating a threshold in determining reprogramming outcomes. Strikingly, global gene expression patterns elicited by published polycistronic cassettes diverged according to each KLF4 variant. Our data expose a Klf4 reference cDNA variation that alters polycistronic factor stoichiometry, predicts reprogramming hallmarks, and guides comparison of compatible public data sets.

  14. N-Terminal Domains in Two-Domain Proteins Are Biased to Be Shorter and Predicted to Fold Faster Than Their C-Terminal Counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etai Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Computational analysis of proteomes in all kingdoms of life reveals a strong tendency for N-terminal domains in two-domain proteins to have shorter sequences than their neighboring C-terminal domains. Given that folding rates are affected by chain length, we asked whether the tendency for N-terminal domains to be shorter than their neighboring C-terminal domains reflects selection for faster-folding N-terminal domains. Calculations of absolute contact order, another predictor of folding rate, provide additional evidence that N-terminal domains tend to fold faster than their neighboring C-terminal domains. A possible explanation for this bias, which is more pronounced in prokaryotes than in eukaryotes, is that faster folding of N-terminal domains reduces the risk for protein aggregation during folding by preventing formation of nonnative interdomain interactions. This explanation is supported by our finding that two-domain proteins with a shorter N-terminal domain are much more abundant than those with a shorter C-terminal domain.

  15. Amino acid sequence repertoire of the bacterial proteome and the occurrence of untranslatable sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navon, Sharon Penias; Kornberg, Guy; Chen, Jin; Schwartzman, Tali; Tsai, Albert; Puglisi, Elisabetta Viani; Puglisi, Joseph D; Adir, Noam

    2016-06-28

    Bioinformatic analysis of Escherichia coli proteomes revealed that all possible amino acid triplet sequences occur at their expected frequencies, with four exceptions. Two of the four underrepresented sequences (URSs) were shown to interfere with translation in vivo and in vitro. Enlarging the URS by a single amino acid resulted in increased translational inhibition. Single-molecule methods revealed stalling of translation at the entrance of the peptide exit tunnel of the ribosome, adjacent to ribosomal nucleotides A2062 and U2585. Interaction with these same ribosomal residues is involved in regulation of translation by longer, naturally occurring protein sequences. The E. coli exit tunnel has evidently evolved to minimize interaction with the exit tunnel and maximize the sequence diversity of the proteome, although allowing some interactions for regulatory purposes. Bioinformatic analysis of the human proteome revealed no underrepresented triplet sequences, possibly reflecting an absence of regulation by interaction with the exit tunnel.

  16. The N-terminal domain of Npro of classical swine fever virus determines its stability and regulates type I IFN production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mine, Junki; Tamura, Tomokazu; Mitsuhashi, Kazuya; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Parchariyanon, Sujira; Pinyochon, Wasana; Ruggli, Nicolas; Tratschin, Jon-Duri; Kida, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2015-07-01

    The viral protein Npro is unique to the genus Pestivirus within the family Flaviviridae. After autocatalytic cleavage from the nascent polyprotein, Npro suppresses type I IFN (IFN-α/β) induction by mediating proteasomal degradation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3). Previous studies found that the Npro-mediated IRF-3 degradation was dependent of a TRASH domain in the C-terminal half of Npro coordinating zinc by means of the amino acid residues C112, C134, D136 and C138. Interestingly, four classical swine fever virus (CSFV) isolates obtained from diseased pigs in Thailand in 1993 and 1998 did not suppress IFN-α/β induction despite the presence of an intact TRASH domain. Through systematic analyses, it was found that an amino acid mutation at position 40 or mutations at positions 17 and 61 in the N-terminal half of Npro of these four isolates were related to the lack of IRF-3-degrading activity. Restoring a histidine at position 40 or both a proline at position 17 and a lysine at position 61 based on the sequence of a functional Npro contributed to higher stability of the reconstructed Npro compared with the Npro from the Thai isolate. This led to enhanced interaction of Npro with IRF-3 along with its degradation by the proteasome. The results of the present study revealed that amino acid residues in the N-terminal domain of Npro are involved in the stability of Npro, in interaction of Npro with IRF-3 and subsequent degradation of IRF-3, leading to downregulation of IFN-α/β production.

  17. Amino acid sequences of proteins from Leptospira serovar pomona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Selmo F

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a partial amino acid sequences from three putative outer envelope proteins from Leptospira serovar pomona. In order to obtain internal fragments for protein sequencing, enzymatic and chemical digestion was performed. The enzyme clostripain was used to digest the proteins 32 and 45 kDa. In situ digestion of 40 kDa molecular weight protein was accomplished using cyanogen bromide. The 32 kDa protein generated two fragments, one of 21 kDa and another of 10 kDa that yielded five residues. A fragment of 24 kDa that yielded nineteen residues of amino acids was obtained from 45 kDa protein. A fragment with a molecular weight of 20 kDa, yielding a twenty amino acids sequence from the 40 kDa protein.

  18. Dimeric structure of the N-terminal domain of PriB protein from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis solved ab initio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebschner, Dorothee [National Cancer Institute, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Brzezinski, Krzysztof [National Cancer Institute, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); University of Bialystok, 15-399 Bialystok (Poland); Dauter, Miroslawa [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Dauter, Zbigniew, E-mail: dauter@anl.gov [National Cancer Institute, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Nowak, Marta; Kur, Józef; Olszewski, Marcin, E-mail: dauter@anl.gov [Gdansk University of Technology, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); National Cancer Institute, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The N-terminal domain of the PriB protein from the thermophilic bacterium T. tengcongensis (TtePriB) was expressed and its crystal structure has been solved at the atomic resolution of 1.09 Å by direct methods. PriB is one of the components of the bacterial primosome, which catalyzes the reactivation of stalled replication forks at sites of DNA damage. The N-terminal domain of the PriB protein from the thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (TtePriB) was expressed and its crystal structure was solved at the atomic resolution of 1.09 Å by direct methods. The protein chain, which encompasses the first 104 residues of the full 220-residue protein, adopts the characteristic oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) structure consisting of a five-stranded β-barrel filled with hydrophobic residues and equipped with four loops extending from the barrel. In the crystal two protomers dimerize, forming a six-stranded antiparallel β-sheet. The structure of the N-terminal OB domain of T. tengcongensis shows significant differences compared with mesophile PriBs. While in all other known structures of PriB a dimer is formed by two identical OB domains in separate chains, TtePriB contains two consecutive OB domains in one chain. However, sequence comparison of both the N-terminal and the C-terminal domains of TtePriB suggests that they have analogous structures and that the natural protein possesses a structure similar to a dimer of two N-terminal domains.

  19. On the activation of bovine plasma factor XIII. Amino acid sequence of the peptide released by thrombin and the terminal residues of the subunit polypeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, S; Iwanaga, S; Suzuki, T

    1975-12-01

    A blood coagulation factor, Factor XIII, was highly purified from bovine fresh plasma by a method similar to those used for human plasma Factor XIII. The isolated Factor XIII consisted of two subunit polypeptides, a and b chains, with molecular weights of 79,000 +/- 2,000 and 75,000 +/- 2,000, respectively. In the conversion of Factor XIII to the active enzyme, Factor XIIIa, by bovine thrombin [EC 3.4.21.5], a peptide was liberated. This peptide, designated tentatively as "activation peptide," was isolated by gel-filtration on a Sephadex G-75 column. It contained a total of 37 amino acid residues with a masked N-terminal residue and C-terminal arginine. The whole amino acid sequence of "Activation peptide" was established by the dansyl-Edman method and standard enzymatic techniques, and the masked N-terminal residue was identified as N-acetylserine by using a rat liver acylamino acid-releasing enzyme. This enzyme specifically cleaved the N-acetylserylglutamyl peptide bond serine and the remaining peptide, which was now reactive to 1-dimethylamino-naphthalene-5-sulfonyl chloride. A comparison of the sequences of human and bovine "Activation peptide" revealed five amino acids replacements, Ser-3 to Thr; Gly-5 to Arg; Ile-14 to Val; Thr-18 to Asn, and Pro-26 to Leu. Another difference was the deletion of Leu-34 in the human peptide. Adsorption chromatography on a hydroxylapatite column in the presence of 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate was developed as a preparative procedure for the resolution of the two subunit polypeptides, a or a' chain and b chain, constituting the protein molecule of Factor XIII or Factor XIIIa. End group analyses on the isolated pure chains revealed that the structural change of Factor XIII during activation with thrombin occurs only in the N-terminal portion of the a chain, not in the N-terminal end of the b chain or in the C-terminal ends of the a and b chains. From these results, it was concluded that the activation of bovine plasma Factor XIII

  20. Molecular cloning and biologically active production of IpaD N-terminal region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesaraki, Mahdi; Saadati, Mojtaba; Honari, Hossein; Olad, Gholamreza; Heiat, Mohammad; Malaei, Fatemeh; Ranjbar, Reza

    2013-07-01

    Shigella is known as pathogenic intestinal bacteria in high dispersion and pathogenic bacteria due to invasive plasmid antigen (Ipa). So far, a number of Ipa proteins have been studied to introduce a new candidate vaccine. Here, for the first time, we examined whether the N-terminal region of IpaD(72-162) could be a proper candidate for Shigella vaccine. Initially, the DNA sequence coding N-terminal region was isolated by PCR from Shigella dysenteriae type I and cloned into pET-28a expression vector. Then, the heterologous protein was expressed, optimized and purified by affinity Ni-NTA column. Western blot analysis using, His-tag and IpaD(72-162) polyclonal antibodies, confirmed the purity and specificity of the recombinant protein, respectively. Subsequently, the high immunogenicity of the antigen was shown by ELISA. The results of the sereny test in Guinea pigs showed that IpaD(72-162) provides a protective system against Shigella flexneri 5a and S. dysenteriae type I.

  1. [Chemical synthesis of lactococcin B and functional evaluation of the N-terminal domain using a truncated synthetic analogue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasta, S; Fajloun, Z; Mansuelle, P; Sabatier, J M; Boudabous, A; Sampieri, F

    2008-01-01

    The lactococcin B (LnB) is a hydrophobic, positively charged bacteriocin, produced by Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris 9B4. It consists of a peptidic chain made up of 47 amino acid residues, and inhibits Lactococcus exclusively. In order to study its biological activity a synthetic lactococcin B (LnBs) was obtained by solid-phase chemical synthesis using a Fmoc strategy. LnBs was shown to be indistinguishable from the natural peptide. In addition, a synthetic (7-47) LnBst analogue was obtained by withdrawal of peptidyl-resin after the 41 cycle of LnBs peptide chain assembly. The synthetic N-terminal truncated (7-47) LnBst analogue was found to be inactive on indicator strains. Our results strongly suggest that the first six N-terminal amino acid residues are involved in the bactericidal activity of LnB.

  2. Conformational unfolding in the N-terminal region of ribonuclease A detected by nonradiative energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWherter, C A; Haas, E; Leed, A R; Scheraga, H A

    1986-04-22

    Unfolding in the N-terminal region of RNase A was studied by the nonradiative energy-transfer technique. RNase A was labeled with a nonfluorescent acceptor (2,4-dinitrophenyl) on the alpha-amino group and a fluorescent donor (ethylenediamine monoamide of 2-naphthoxyacetic acid) on a carboxyl group in the vicinity of residue 50 (75% at Glu-49 and 25% at Asp-53). The distribution of donor labeling sites does not affect the results of this study since they are close in both the sequence and the three-dimensional structure. The sites of labeling were determined by peptide mapping. The derivatives possessed full enzymatic activity and underwent reversible thermal transitions. However, there were some quantitative differences in the thermodynamic parameters. When the carboxyl groups were masked, there was a 5 degrees C lowering of the melting temperature at pH 2 and 4, and no significant change in delta H(Tm). Labeling of the alpha-amino group had no effect on the melting temperature or delta H(Tm) at pH 2 but did result in a dramatic decrease in delta H(Tm) of the unfolding reaction at pH 4. The melting temperature did not change appreciably at pH 4, indicating that an enthalpy/entropy compensation had occurred. The efficiencies of energy transfer determined with both fluorescence intensity and lifetime measurements were in reasonably good agreement. The transfer efficiency dropped from about 60% under folding conditions to roughly 20% when the derivatives were unfolded with disulfide bonds intact and was further reduced to 5% when the disulfide bonds were reduced. The interprobe separation distance was estimated to be 35 +/- 2 A under folding conditions. The contribution to the interprobe distance resulting from the finite size of the probes was treated by using simple geometric considerations and a rotational isomeric state model of the donor probe linkage. With this model, the estimated average interprobe distance of 36 A is in excellent agreement with the

  3. N-terminal {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor polymorphisms do not correlate with bronchodilator response in asthma families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holyroyd, K.J.; Dragwa, C.; Xu, J. [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Family and twin studies have suggested that susceptibility to asthma is inherited. One clinically relevant phenotype in asthma is the bronchodilator response to beta adrenergic therapy (reversibility) which may also be inherited and vary among asthmatics. Two polymorphisms of the {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor common to both asthmatic and normal individuals have been reported. One polymorphism, an amino acid polymorphism at position 16, correlated in one study with the need for long-term corticosteriod use in a population of asthmatics. It is conceivable that the increased use of corticosteroids needed to control symptoms in these patients may be explained by a decreased responsiveness to brochodilators mediated through this amino acid polymorphism in the {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor. However, the response to {beta}{sub 2} bronchodilators was not tested in these patients. In our Dutch asthma families, DNA sequencing of the {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor has been performed for N-terminal polymorphisms at amino acid positions 16 and 27 in over 100 individuals, and no correlation was found with the increase of FEV{sub 1} in response to bronchodilator. Linkage analysis between bronchodilator response and marker D5S412 near the {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor gene was performed in 286 sibpairs from these families. Using a bronchodilator response of >10% in FEV{sub 1} as a qualitative definition of affected individuals, there were 145 unaffected sibpairs, 121 sibpairs where one was affected, and 20 in which both were affected. Linear regression analysis of these sibpair data suggested possible linkage (p=0.007). This supports further examination of the {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor and its regulatory regions for polymorphisms that correlate with the bronchodilator response in asthma families.

  4. Prebiotically plausible mechanisms increase compositional diversity of nucleic acid sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derr, Julien; Manapat, Michael L; Rajamani, Sudha; Leu, Kevin; Xulvi-Brunet, Ramon; Joseph, Isaac; Nowak, Martin A; Chen, Irene A

    2012-05-01

    During the origin of life, the biological information of nucleic acid polymers must have increased to encode functional molecules (the RNA world). Ribozymes tend to be compositionally unbiased, as is the vast majority of possible sequence space. However, ribonucleotides vary greatly in synthetic yield, reactivity and degradation rate, and their non-enzymatic polymerization results in compositionally biased sequences. While natural selection could lead to complex sequences, molecules with some activity are required to begin this process. Was the emergence of compositionally diverse sequences a matter of chance, or could prebiotically plausible reactions counter chemical biases to increase the probability of finding a ribozyme? Our in silico simulations using a two-letter alphabet show that template-directed ligation and high concatenation rates counter compositional bias and shift the pool toward longer sequences, permitting greater exploration of sequence space and stable folding. We verified experimentally that unbiased DNA sequences are more efficient templates for ligation, thus increasing the compositional diversity of the pool. Our work suggests that prebiotically plausible chemical mechanisms of nucleic acid polymerization and ligation could predispose toward a diverse pool of longer, potentially structured molecules. Such mechanisms could have set the stage for the appearance of functional activity very early in the emergence of life.

  5. N-terminal galanin-(1-16) fragment is an agonist at the hippocampal galanin receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisone, G.; Berthold, M.; Bedecs, K.; Unden, A.; Bartfai, T.; Bertorelli, R.; Consolo, S.; Crawley, J.; Martin, B.; Nilsson, S.; (Univ. of Stockholm (Sweden))

    1989-12-01

    The galanin N-terminal fragment (galanin-(1-16)) has been prepared by solid-phase synthesis and by enzymic cleavage of galanin by endoproteinase Asp-N. This peptide fragment displaced {sup 125}I-labeled galanin in receptor autoradiography experiments on rat forebrain and spinal cord and in equilibrium binding experiments from high-affinity binding sites in the ventral hippocampus with an IC50 of approximately 3 nM. In tissue slices of the same brain area, galanin-(1-16), similarly to galanin, inhibited the muscarinic agonist-stimulated breakdown of inositol phospholipids. Upon intracerebroventricular administration, galanin-(1-16) (10 micrograms/15 microliters) also inhibited the scopolamine (0.3 mg/kg, s.c.)-evoked release of acetylcholine, as studied in vivo by microdialysis. Substitution of (L-Trp2) for (D-Trp2) resulted in a 500-fold loss in affinity as compared with galanin-(1-16). It is concluded that, in the ventral hippocampus, the N-terminal galanin fragment (galanin-(1-16)) is recognized by the galanin receptors controlling acetylcholine release and muscarinic agonist-stimulated inositol phospholipid breakdown as a high-affinity agonist and that amino acid residue (Trp2) plays an important role in the receptor-ligand interactions.

  6. An N-terminally truncated envelope protein encoded by a human endogenous retrovirus W locus on chromosome Xq22.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roebke Christina

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously showed that the envelope (env sequence of a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV-W locus on chromosome Xq22.3 is transcribed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The env open reading frame (ORF of this locus is interrupted by a premature stop at codon 39, but otherwise harbors a long ORF for an N-terminally truncated 475 amino acid Env protein, starting at an in-frame ATG at codon 68. We set out to characterize the protein encoded by that ORF. Results Transient expression of the 475 amino acid Xq22.3 HERV-W env ORF produced an N-terminally truncated HERV-W Env protein, as detected by the monoclonal anti-HERV-W Env antibodies 6A2B2 and 13H5A5. Remarkably, reversion of the stop at codon 39 in Xq22.3 HERV-W env reconstituted a full-length HERV-W Xq22.3 Env protein. Similar to the full-length HERV-W Env protein Syncytin-1, reconstituted full-length Xq22.3 HERV-W Env is glycosylated, forms oligomers, and is expressed at the cell surface. In contrast, Xq22.3 HERV-W Env is unglycosylated, does not form oligomers, and is located intracellularly, probably due to lack of a signal peptide. Finally, we reconfirm by immunohistochemistry that monoclonal antibody 6A2B2 detects an antigen expressed in placenta and multiple sclerosis brain lesions. Conclusions A partially defective HERV-W env gene located on chromosome Xq22.3, which we propose to designate ERVWE2, has retained coding capacity and can produce ex vivo an N-terminally truncated Env protein, named N-Trenv. Detection of an antigen by 6A2B2 in placenta and multiple sclerosis lesions opens the possibility that N-Trenv could be expressed in vivo. More generally, our findings are compatible with the idea that defective HERV elements may be capable of producing incomplete HERV proteins that, speculatively, may exert functions in human physiology or pathology.

  7. ELKS controls the pool of readily releasable vesicles at excitatory synapses through its N-terminal coiled-coil domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Richard G; Liu, Changliang; Kaeser, Pascal S

    2016-06-02

    In a presynaptic nerve terminal, synaptic strength is determined by the pool of readily releasable vesicles (RRP) and the probability of release (P) of each RRP vesicle. These parameters are controlled at the active zone and vary across synapses, but how such synapse specific control is achieved is not understood. ELKS proteins are enriched at vertebrate active zones and enhance P at inhibitory hippocampal synapses, but ELKS functions at excitatory synapses are not known. Studying conditional knockout mice for ELKS, we find that ELKS enhances the RRP at excitatory synapses without affecting P. Surprisingly, ELKS C-terminal sequences, which interact with RIM, are dispensable for RRP enhancement. Instead, the N-terminal ELKS coiled-coil domains that bind to Liprin-α and Bassoon are necessary to control RRP. Thus, ELKS removal has differential, synapse-specific effects on RRP and P, and our findings establish important roles for ELKS N-terminal domains in synaptic vesicle priming.

  8. N-terminal arginines modulate plasma-membrane localization of Kv7.1/KCNE1 channel complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenawit Girmatsion

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The slow delayed rectifier current (I(Ks is important for cardiac action potential termination. The underlying channel is composed of Kv7.1 α-subunits and KCNE1 β-subunits. While most evidence suggests a role of KCNE1 transmembrane domain and C-terminus for the interaction, the N-terminal KCNE1 polymorphism 38G is associated with reduced I(Ks and atrial fibrillation (a human arrhythmia. Structure-function relationship of the KCNE1 N-terminus for I(Ks modulation is poorly understood and was subject of this study. METHODS: We studied N-terminal KCNE1 constructs disrupting structurally important positively charged amino-acids (arginines at positions 32, 33, 36 as well as KCNE1 constructs that modify position 38 including an N-terminal truncation mutation. Experimental procedures included molecular cloning, patch-clamp recording, protein biochemistry, real-time-PCR and confocal microscopy. RESULTS: All KCNE1 constructs physically interacted with Kv7.1. I(Ks resulting from co-expression of Kv7.1 with non-atrial fibrillation '38S' was greater than with any other construct. Ionic currents resulting from co-transfection of a KCNE1 mutant with arginine substitutions ('38G-3xA' were comparable to currents evoked from cells transfected with an N-terminally truncated KCNE1-construct ('Δ1-38'. Western-blots from plasma-membrane preparations and confocal images consistently showed a greater amount of Kv7.1 protein at the plasma-membrane in cells co-transfected with the non-atrial fibrillation KCNE1-38S than with any other construct. CONCLUSIONS: The results of our study indicate that N-terminal arginines in positions 32, 33, 36 of KCNE1 are important for reconstitution of I(Ks. Furthermore, our results hint towards a role of these N-terminal amino-acids in membrane representation of the delayed rectifier channel complex.

  9. Structure of the N-terminal fragment of topoisomerase V reveals a new family of topoisomerases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taneja, Bhupesh; Patel, Asmita; Slesarev, Alexei; Mondragon, Alfonso (NWU); (FSI)

    2010-09-02

    Topoisomerases are involved in controlling and maintaining the topology of DNA and are present in all kingdoms of life. Unlike all other types of topoisomerases, similar type IB enzymes have only been identified in bacteria and eukarya. The only putative type IB topoisomerase in archaea is represented by Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V. Despite several common functional characteristics, topoisomerase V shows no sequence similarity to other members of the same type. The structure of the 61 kDa N-terminal fragment of topoisomerase V reveals no structural similarity to other topoisomerases. Furthermore, the structure of the active site region is different, suggesting no conservation in the cleavage and religation mechanism. Additionally, the active site is buried, indicating the need of a conformational change for activity. The presence of a topoisomerase in archaea with a unique structure suggests the evolution of a separate mechanism to alter DNA.

  10. Molecular clone and characterization of c-Jun N-terminal kinases 2 from orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Minglan; Wei, Jingguang; Zhou, Yongcan; Qin, Qiwei

    2016-02-01

    c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2) is a multifunctional mitogen-activated protein kinases involving in cell differentiation and proliferation, apoptosis, immune response and inflammatory conditions. In this study, we reported a new JNK2 (Ec-JNK2) derived from orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides. The full-length cDNA of Ec-JNK2 was 1920 bp in size, containing a 174 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), 483 bp 3'-UTR, and a 1263 bp open reading frame (ORF), which encoded a putative protein of 420 amino acids. The deduced protein sequence of Ec-JNK2 contained a conserved Thr-Pro-Tyr (TPY) motif in the domain of serine/threonine protein kinase (S-TKc). Ec-JNK2 has been found to involve in the immune response to pathogen challenges in vivo, and the infection of Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) in vitro. Immunofluorescence staining showed that Ec-JNK2 was localized in the cytoplasm of grouper spleen (GS) cells, and moved to the nucleus after infecting with SGIV. Ec-JNK2 distributed in all immune-related tissues examined. After challenging with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), SGIV and polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (poly I:C), the mRNA expression of Ec-JNK2 was significantly (P orange-spotted grouper. Over-expressing Ec-JNK2 in fathead minnow (FHM) cells increased the SGIV infection and replication, while over-expressing the dominant-negative Ec-JNK2Δ181-183 mutant decreased it. These results indicated that Ec-JNK2 could be an important molecule in the successful infection and evasion of SGIV.

  11. Importin α1 Mediates Yorkie Nuclear Import via an N-terminal Non-canonical Nuclear Localization Signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shimin; Lu, Yi; Yin, Meng-Xin; Wang, Chao; Wu, Wei; Li, Jinhui; Wu, Wenqing; Ge, Ling; Hu, Lianxin; Zhao, Yun; Zhang, Lei

    2016-04-08

    The Hippo signaling pathway controls organ size by orchestrating cell proliferation and apoptosis. When the Hippo pathway was inactivated, the transcriptional co-activator Yorkie translocates into the nucleus and forms a complex with transcription factor Scalloped to promote the expression of Hippo pathway target genes. Therefore, the nuclear translocation of Yorkie is a critical step in Hippo signaling. Here, we provide evidence that the N-terminal 1-55 amino acids of Yorkie, especially Arg-15, were essential for its nuclear localization. By mass spectrometry and biochemical analyses, we found that Importin α1 can directly interact with the Yorkie N terminus and drive Yorkie into the nucleus. Further experiments show that the upstream component Hippo can inhibit Importin α1-mediated Yorkie nuclear import. Taken together, we identified a potential nuclear localization signal at the N-terminal end of Yorkie as well as a critical role for Importin α1 in Yorkie nuclear import.

  12. Stable expression and characterization of N-terminal tagged recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qinglei; Rajanahally, Saneal; Edson, Mark A.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2009-01-01

    Oocyte-derived growth factors are critically involved in multiple ovarian processes via paracrine actions. Although recombinant proteins have been applied to dissect the physiological functions of these factors, variation of activities among different protein preparations remains an issue. To further elucidate the roles of one of these growth factors, bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15), in mediating oocyte-regulated molecular and cellular events and to explore its potential clinical application, we engineered the human BMP15 sequence to efficiently produce bioactive recombinant human BMP15 (rhBMP15). The proteolytic cleavage site of the hBMP15 precursor was optimized to facilitate the production of the mature protein, and a FLAG-tag was placed at the N-terminus of the mature region to ease purification and avoid potential interference of the tag with the cystine knot structure. The rhBMP15 protein was purified using anti-FLAG M2 affinity gel. Our results demonstrated that the N-terminal tagged rhBMP15 was efficiently processed in HEK-293 cells. Furthermore, the purified rhBMP15 could activate SMAD1/5/8 and induce the transcription of genes encoding cumulus expansion-related transcripts (Ptx3, Has2, Tnfaip6 and Ptgs2), inhibitory SMADs (Smad6 and Smad7), BMP antagonists (Grem1 and Fst), activin/inhibin βA (Inhba) and βB (Inhbb) subunits, etc. Thus, our rhBMP15 containing a genetically modified cleavage sequence and an N-terminal FLAG-tag can be efficiently produced, processed and secreted in a mammalian expression system. The purified rhBMP15 is also biologically active and very stable, and can induce the expression of a variety of mouse granulosa cell genes. PMID:19651638

  13. Structure of the Tropomyosin Overlap Complex from Chicken Smooth Muscle: Insight into the Diversity of N-Terminal Recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frye, Jeremiah; Klenchin, Vadim A.; Rayment, Ivan (UW)

    2010-09-08

    Tropomyosin is a stereotypical {alpha}-helical coiled coil that polymerizes to form a filamentous macromolecular assembly that lies on the surface of F-actin. The interaction between the C-terminal and N-terminal segments on adjacent molecules is known as the overlap region. We report here two X-ray structures of the chicken smooth muscle tropomyosin overlap complex. A novel approach was used to stabilize the C-terminal and N-terminal fragments. Globular domains from both the human DNA ligase binding protein XRCC4 and bacteriophage {phi}29 scaffolding protein Gp7 were fused to 37 and 28 C-terminal amino acid residues of tropomyosin, respectively, whereas the 29 N-terminal amino acids of tropomyosin were fused to the C-terminal helix bundle of microtubule binding protein EB1. The structures of both the XRCC4 and Gp7 fusion proteins complexed with the N-terminal EB1 fusion contain a very similar helix bundle in the overlap region that encompasses {approx}15 residues. The C-terminal coiled coil opens to allow formation of the helix bundle, which is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. These structures are similar to that observed in the NMR structure of the rat skeletal overlap complex [Greenfield, N. J., et al. (2006) J. Mol. Biol. 364, 80-96]. The interactions between the N- and C-terminal coiled coils of smooth muscle tropomyosin show significant curvature, which differs somewhat between the two structures and implies flexibility in the overlap complex, at least in solution. This is likely an important attribute that allows tropomyosin to assemble around the actin filaments. These structures provide a molecular explanation for the role of N-acetylation in the assembly of native tropomyosin.

  14. Structure of the N-terminal domain of the metalloprotease PrtV from Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwin, Aaron; Persson, Cecilia; Mayzel, Maxim; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Öhman, Anders; Karlsson, B Göran; Sauer-Eriksson, A Elisabeth

    2015-12-01

    The metalloprotease PrtV from Vibrio cholerae serves an important function for the ability of bacteria to invade the mammalian host cell. The protein belongs to the family of M6 proteases, with a characteristic zinc ion in the catalytic active site. PrtV constitutes a 918 amino acids (102 kDa) multidomain pre-pro-protein that undergoes several N- and C-terminal modifications to form a catalytically active protease. We report here the NMR structure of the PrtV N-terminal domain (residues 23-103) that contains two short α-helices in a coiled coil motif. The helices are held together by a cluster of hydrophobic residues. Approximately 30 residues at the C-terminal end, which were predicted to form a third helical structure, are disordered. These residues are highly conserved within the genus Vibrio, which suggests that they might be functionally important.

  15. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Biotechnology Invention Disclosures Application Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or Amino Acid Sequences... sequences are specifically excluded from this definition. Sequences with fewer than four specifically... acids are not intended to be embraced by this definition. Any amino acid sequence that contains...

  16. N-terminal aromatic residues closely impact the cytolytic activity of cupiennin 1a, a major spider venom peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn-Nentwig, Lucia; Sheynis, Tania; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Nentwig, Wolfgang; Jelinek, Raz

    2013-12-01

    Cupiennins are small cationic α-helical peptides from the venom of the ctenid spider Cupiennius salei which are characterized by high bactericidal as well as hemolytic activities. To gain insight into the determinants responsible for the broad cytolytic activities, two analogues of cupiennin 1a with different N-terminal hydrophobicities were designed. The insecticidal, bactericidal and hemolytic activities of these analogues were assayed and compared to the native peptide. Specifically, substitution of two N-terminal Phe residues by Ala results in less pronounced insecticidal and cytolytic activity, whereas a substitution by Lys reduces strongly its bactericidal activity and completely diminishes its hemolytic activity up to very high tested concentrations. Biophysical analyses of peptide/bilayer membrane interactions point to distinct interactions of the analogues with lipid bilayers, and dependence upon membrane surface charge. Indeed, we find that lower hemolytic activity was correlated with less surface association of the analogues. In contrast, our data indicate that the reduced bactericidal activity of the two cupiennin 1a analogues likely correspond to greater bilayer-surface localization of the peptides. Overall, ultimate insertion and destruction of the host cell membrane is highly dependent on the presence of Phe-2 and Phe-6 (Cu 1a) or Leu-6 (Cu 2a) in the N-terminal sequences of native cupiennins.

  17. The membranotropic activity of N-terminal peptides from the pore-forming proteins sticholysin I and II is modulated by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions as well as lipid composition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Uris Ros; Lohans Pedrera; Daylín Díaz; Juan C De Karam; Tatiane P Sudbrack; Pedro A Valiente; Diana Martínez; Eduardo M Cilli; Fabiola Pazos; Rosangela Itri; Maria E Lanio; Shirley Schreier; Carlos Álvarez

    2011-12-01

    The sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus produces two pore-forming proteins, sticholysins I and II (St I and St II). Despite their high identity (93%), these toxins exhibit differences in hemolytic activity that can be related to those found in their N-terminal. To clarify the contribution of the N-terminal amino acid residues to the activity of the toxins, we synthesized peptides spanning residues 1–31 of St I (StI1-31) or 1–30 of St II (StII1-30) and demonstrated that StII1-30 promotes erythrocyte lysis to a higher extent than StI1-31. For a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying the peptide activity, here we studied their binding to lipid monolayers and pemeabilizing activity in liposomes. For this, we examined the effect on peptide membranotropic activity of including phospatidic acid and cholesterol in a lipid mixture of phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin. The results suggest the importance of continuity of the 1–10 hydrophobic sequence in StII1-30 for displaying higher binding and activity, in spite of both peptides’ abilities to form pores in giant unilamellar vesicles. Thus, the different peptide membranotropic action is explained in terms of the differences in hydrophobic and electrostatic peptide properties as well as the enhancing role of membrane inhomogeneities.

  18. The amino acid sequence of Escherichia coli cyanase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, C C; Anderson, P M; Wold, F

    1983-01-10

    The amino acid sequence of the enzyme cyanase (cyanate hydrolase) from Escherichia coli has been determined by automatic Edman degradation of the intact protein and of its component peptides. The primary peptides used in the sequencing were produced by cyanogen bromide cleavage at the methionine residues, yielding 4 peptides plus free homoserine from the NH2-terminal methionine, and by trypsin cleavage at the 7 arginine residues after acetylation of the lysines. Secondary peptides required for overlaps and COOH-terminal sequences were produced by chymotrypsin or clostripain cleavage of some of the larger peptides. The complete sequence of the cyanase subunit consists of 156 amino acid residues (Mr 16,350). Based on the observation that the cysteine-containing peptide is obtained as a disulfide-linked dimer, it is proposed that the covalent structure of cyanase is made up of two subunits linked by a disulfide bond between the single cystine residue in each subunit. The native enzyme (Mr 150,000) then appears to be a complex of four or five such subunit dimers.

  19. Lactobacillus kefiri shows inter-strain variations in the amino acid sequence of the S-layer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamud, Mariano; Carasi, Paula; Bronsoms, Sílvia; Trejo, Sebastián A; Serradell, María de Los Angeles

    2017-04-01

    The S-layer is a proteinaceous envelope constituted by subunits that self-assemble to form a two-dimensional lattice that covers the surface of different species of Bacteria and Archaea, and it could be involved in cell recognition of microbes among other several distinct functions. In this work, both proteomic and genomic approaches were used to gain knowledge about the sequences of the S-layer protein (SLPs) encoding genes expressed by six aggregative and sixteen non-aggregative strains of potentially probiotic Lactobacillus kefiri. Peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) analysis confirmed the identity of SLPs extracted from L. kefiri, and based on the homology with phylogenetically related species, primers located outside and inside the SLP-genes were employed to amplify genomic DNA. The O-glycosylation site SASSAS was found in all L. kefiri SLPs. Ten strains were selected for sequencing of the complete genes. The total length of the mature proteins varies from 492 to 576 amino acids, and all SLPs have a calculated pI between 9.37 and 9.60. The N-terminal region is relatively conserved and shows a high percentage of positively charged amino acids. Major differences among strains are found in the C-terminal region. Different groups could be distinguished regarding the mature SLPs and the similarities observed in the PMF spectra. Interestingly, SLPs of the aggregative strains are 100% homologous, although these strains were isolated from different kefir grains. This knowledge provides relevant data for better understanding of the mechanisms involved in SLPs functionality and could contribute to the development of products of biotechnological interest from potentially probiotic bacteria.

  20. The solution structure of the N-terminal domain of human tubulin binding cofactor C reveals a platform for tubulin interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Flor Garcia-Mayoral

    Full Text Available Human Tubulin Binding Cofactor C (TBCC is a post-chaperonin involved in the folding and assembly of α- and β-tubulin monomers leading to the release of productive tubulin heterodimers ready to polymerize into microtubules. In this process it collaborates with other cofactors (TBC's A, B, D, and E and forms a supercomplex with TBCD, β-tubulin, TBCE and α-tubulin. Here, we demonstrate that TBCC depletion results in multipolar spindles and mitotic failure. Accordingly, TBCC is found at the centrosome and is implicated in bipolar spindle formation. We also determine by NMR the structure of the N-terminal domain of TBCC. The TBCC N-terminal domain adopts a spectrin-like fold topology composed of a left-handed 3-stranded α-helix bundle. Remarkably, the 30-residue N-terminal segment of the TBCC N-terminal domain is flexible and disordered in solution. This unstructured region is involved in the interaction with tubulin. Our data lead us to propose a testable model for TBCC N-terminal domain/tubulin recognition in which the highly charged N-terminus as well as residues from the three helices and the loops interact with the acidic hypervariable regions of tubulin monomers.

  1. The Solution Structure of the N-Terminal Domain of Human Tubulin Binding Cofactor C Reveals a Platform for Tubulin Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Mayoral, Mª Flor; Castaño, Raquel; Fanarraga, Monica L.; Zabala, Juan Carlos; Rico, Manuel; Bruix, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Human Tubulin Binding Cofactor C (TBCC) is a post-chaperonin involved in the folding and assembly of α- and β-tubulin monomers leading to the release of productive tubulin heterodimers ready to polymerize into microtubules. In this process it collaborates with other cofactors (TBC's A, B, D, and E) and forms a supercomplex with TBCD, β-tubulin, TBCE and α-tubulin. Here, we demonstrate that TBCC depletion results in multipolar spindles and mitotic failure. Accordingly, TBCC is found at the centrosome and is implicated in bipolar spindle formation. We also determine by NMR the structure of the N-terminal domain of TBCC. The TBCC N-terminal domain adopts a spectrin-like fold topology composed of a left-handed 3-stranded α-helix bundle. Remarkably, the 30-residue N-terminal segment of the TBCC N-terminal domain is flexible and disordered in solution. This unstructured region is involved in the interaction with tubulin. Our data lead us to propose a testable model for TBCC N-terminal domain/tubulin recognition in which the highly charged N-terminus as well as residues from the three helices and the loops interact with the acidic hypervariable regions of tubulin monomers. PMID:22028797

  2. N-terminally truncated GADD34 proteins are convenient translation enhancers in a human cell-derived in vitro protein synthesis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Tominari; Machida, Kodai; Masutani, Mamiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Imataka, Hiroaki

    2010-07-01

    Human cell-derived in vitro protein synthesis systems are useful for the production of recombinant proteins. Productivity can be increased by supplementation with GADD34, a protein that is difficult to express in and purify from E. coli. Deletion of the N-terminal 120 or 240 amino acids of GADD34 improves recovery of this protein from E. coli without compromising its ability to boost protein synthesis in an in vitro protein synthesis system. The use of N-terminally truncated GADD34 proteins in place of full-length GADD34 should improve the utility of human cell-based cell-free protein synthesis systems.

  3. Diversified Structural Basis of a Conserved Molecular Mechanism for pH-Dependent Dimerization in Spider Silk N-Terminal Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otikovs, Martins; Chen, Gefei; Nordling, Kerstin; Landreh, Michael; Meng, Qing; Jörnvall, Hans; Kronqvist, Nina; Rising, Anna; Johansson, Jan; Jaudzems, Kristaps

    2015-08-17

    Conversion of spider silk proteins from soluble dope to insoluble fibers involves pH-dependent dimerization of the N-terminal domain (NT). This conversion is tightly regulated to prevent premature precipitation and enable rapid silk formation at the end of the duct. Three glutamic acid residues that mediate this process in the NT from Euprosthenops australis major ampullate spidroin 1 are well conserved among spidroins. However, NTs of minor ampullate spidroins from several species, including Araneus ventricosus ((Av)MiSp NT), lack one of the glutamic acids. Here we investigate the pH-dependent structural changes of (Av)MiSp NT, revealing that it uses the same mechanism but involves a non-conserved glutamic acid residue instead. Homology modeling of the structures of other MiSp NTs suggests that these harbor different compensatory residues. This indicates that, despite sequence variations, the molecular mechanism underlying pH-dependent dimerization of NT is conserved among different silk types.

  4. Sorting signals, N-terminal modifications and abundance of the chloroplast proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Zybailov

    Full Text Available Characterization of the chloroplast proteome is needed to understand the essential contribution of the chloroplast to plant growth and development. Here we present a large scale analysis by nanoLC-Q-TOF and nanoLC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS of ten independent chloroplast preparations from Arabidopsis thaliana which unambiguously identified 1325 proteins. Novel proteins include various kinases and putative nucleotide binding proteins. Based on repeated and independent MS based protein identifications requiring multiple matched peptide sequences, as well as literature, 916 nuclear-encoded proteins were assigned with high confidence to the plastid, of which 86% had a predicted chloroplast transit peptide (cTP. The protein abundance of soluble stromal proteins was calculated from normalized spectral counts from LTQ-Obitrap analysis and was found to cover four orders of magnitude. Comparison to gel-based quantification demonstrates that 'spectral counting' can provide large scale protein quantification for Arabidopsis. This quantitative information was used to determine possible biases for protein targeting prediction by TargetP and also to understand the significance of protein contaminants. The abundance data for 550 stromal proteins was used to understand abundance of metabolic pathways and chloroplast processes. We highlight the abundance of 48 stromal proteins involved in post-translational proteome homeostasis (including aminopeptidases, proteases, deformylases, chaperones, protein sorting components and discuss the biological implications. N-terminal modifications were identified for a subset of nuclear- and chloroplast-encoded proteins and a novel N-terminal acetylation motif was discovered. Analysis of cTPs and their cleavage sites of Arabidopsis chloroplast proteins, as well as their predicted rice homologues, identified new species-dependent features, which will facilitate improved subcellular localization prediction. No evidence

  5. N-Terminal Presequence-Independent Import of Phosphofructokinase into Hydrogenosomes of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, Petr; Makki, Abhijith Radhakrishna; Zimorski, Verena; Garg, Sriram; Hampl, Vladimír; Hrdý, Ivan; Gould, Sven B; Tachezy, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Mitochondrial evolution entailed the origin of protein import machinery that allows nuclear-encoded proteins to be targeted to the organelle, as well as the origin of cleavable N-terminal targeting sequences (NTS) that allow efficient sorting and import of matrix proteins. In hydrogenosomes and mitosomes, reduced forms of mitochondria with reduced proteomes, NTS-independent targeting of matrix proteins is known. Here, we studied the cellular localization of two glycolytic enzymes in the anaerobic pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis: PPi-dependent phosphofructokinase (TvPPi-PFK), which is the main glycolytic PFK activity of the protist, and ATP-dependent PFK (TvATP-PFK), the function of which is less clear. TvPPi-PFK was detected predominantly in the cytosol, as expected, while all four TvATP-PFK paralogues were imported into T. vaginalis hydrogenosomes, although none of them possesses an NTS. The heterologous expression of TvATP-PFK in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed an intrinsic capability of the protein to be recognized and imported into yeast mitochondria, whereas yeast ATP-PFK resides in the cytosol. TvATP-PFK consists of only a catalytic domain, similarly to "short" bacterial enzymes, while ScATP-PFK includes an N-terminal extension, a catalytic domain, and a C-terminal regulatory domain. Expression of the catalytic domain of ScATP-PFK and short Escherichia coli ATP-PFK in T. vaginalis resulted in their partial delivery to hydrogenosomes. These results indicate that TvATP-PFK and the homologous ATP-PFKs possess internal structural targeting information that is recognized by the hydrogenosomal import machinery. From an evolutionary perspective, the predisposition of ancient ATP-PFK to be recognized and imported into hydrogenosomes might be a relict from the early phases of organelle evolution.

  6. The N-terminal domain of the tomato immune protein Prf contains multiple homotypic and Pto kinase interaction sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saur, Isabel Marie-Luise; Conlan, Brendon Francis; Rathjen, John Paul

    2015-05-01

    Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae bacteria in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is conferred by the Prf recognition complex, composed of the nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeats protein Prf and the protein kinase Pto. The complex is activated by recognition of the P. syringae effectors AvrPto and AvrPtoB. The N-terminal domain is responsible for Prf homodimerization, which brings two Pto kinases into close proximity and holds them in inactive conformation in the absence of either effector. Negative regulation is lost by effector binding to the catalytic cleft of Pto, leading to disruption of its P+1 loop within the activation segment. This change is translated through Prf to a second Pto molecule in the complex. Here we describe a schematic model of the unique Prf N-terminal domain dimer and its interaction with the effector binding determinant Pto. Using heterologous expression in Nicotiana benthamiana, we define multiple sites of N domain homotypic interaction and infer that it forms a parallel dimer folded centrally to enable contact between the N and C termini. Furthermore, we found independent binding sites for Pto at either end of the N-terminal domain. Using the constitutively active mutant ptoL205D, we identify a potential repression site for Pto in the first ∼100 amino acids of Prf. Finally, we find that the Prf leucine-rich repeats domain also binds the N-terminal region, highlighting a possible mechanism for transfer of the effector binding signal to the NB-LRR regulatory unit (consisting of a central nucleotide binding and C-terminal leucine-rich repeats).

  7. Role of N-terminal methionine residues in the redox activity of copper bound to alpha-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Esaú E; Arcos-López, Trinidad; Trujano-Ortiz, Lidia G; Fernández, Claudio O; González, Felipe J; Vela, Alberto; Quintanar, Liliana

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid aggregation of α-synuclein (AS) is one of the hallmarks of Parkinson's disease. The interaction of copper ions with the N-terminal region of AS promotes its amyloid aggregation and metal-catalyzed oxidation has been proposed as a plausible mechanism. The AS(1-6) fragment represents the minimal sequence that models copper coordination to this intrinsically disordered protein. In this study, we evaluated the role of methionine residues Met1 and Met5 in Cu(II) coordination to the AS(1-6) fragment, and in the redox activity of the Cu-AS(1-6) complex. Spectroscopic and electronic structure calculations show that Met1 may play a role as an axial ligand in the Cu(II)-AS(1-6) complex, while Met5 does not participate in metal coordination. Cyclic voltammetry and reactivity studies demonstrate that Met residues play an important role in the reduction and reoxidation processes of this complex. However, Met1 plays a more important role than Met5, as substitution of Met1 by Ile decreases the reduction potential of the Cu-AS(1-6) complex by ~80 mV, causing a significant decrease in its rate of reduction. Reoxidation of the complex by oxygen results in oxidation of the Met residues to sulfoxide, being Met1 more susceptible to copper-catalyzed oxidation than Met5. The sulfoxide species can suffer elimination of methanesulfenic acid, rendering a peptide with no thioether moiety, which would impair the ability of AS to bind Cu(I) ions. Overall, our study underscores the important roles that Met1 plays in copper coordination and the reactivity of the Cu-AS complex.

  8. Proteolytic cleavage of stingray phospholipase A2: Isolation and biochemical characterization of an active N-terminal form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mejdoub Hafedh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian GIB-PLA2 are well characterized. In contrast, much less is known about aquatic ones. The aquatic world contains a wide variety of living species and, hence represents a great potential for discovering new lipolytic enzymes. The aim of this study was to check some biochemical and structural properties of a marine stingray phospholipase A2 (SPLA2. Results The effect of some proteolytic enzymes on SPLA2 was checked. Chymotrypsin and trypsin were able to hydrolyze SPLA2 in different ways. In both cases, only N-terminal fragments were accumulated during the hydrolysis, whereas no C-terminal fragment was obtained in either case. Tryptic and chymotryptic attack generated 13 kDa and 12 kDa forms of SPLA2, respectively. Interestingly, the SPLA2 13 kDa form was inactive, whereas the SPLA2 12 kDa form conserved almost its full phospholipase activity. In the absence of bile slats both native and 12kDa SPLA2 failed to catalyse the hydrolysis of PC emulsion. When bile salts were pre-incubated with the substrate, the native kinetic protein remained linear for more than 25 min, whereas the 12 kDa form activity was found to decrease rapidly. Furthermore, The SPLA2 activity was dependent on Ca2+; other cations (Mg2+, Mn2+, Cd2+ and Zn2+ reduced the enzymatic activity notably, suggesting that the arrangement of the catalytic site presents an exclusive structure for Ca2+. Conclusions Although marine and mammal pancreatic PLA2 share a high amino acid sequence homology, polyclonal antibodies directed against SPLA2 failed to recognize mammal PLA2 like the dromedary pancreatic one. Further investigations are needed to identify key residues involved in substrate recognition responsible for biochemical differences between the 2 classes of phospholipases.

  9. Reaction of the N-terminal methionine residues in cyanase with diethylpyrocarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, P M; Korte, J J; Holcomb, T A

    1994-11-29

    Cyanase is an inducible enzyme in Escherichia coli that catalyzes the reaction of cyanate with bicarbonate to give ammonia and carbon dioxide. The enzyme is a decamer of identical subunits (M(r) = 17,000). Previous studies have shown that modification of either the single cysteine residue or the single histidine residue in each subunit gives an active decameric derivative that dissociates reversibly to inactive dimer derivative, indicating that decameric structure is required for activity and that the SH and imidazole groups are not required for catalytic activity [Anderson, P. M., Korte, J. J., Holcomb, T. A., Cho, Y.-G., Son, C.-M., & Sung, Y.-C. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 15036-15045]. Here the effects of reaction of the reagent diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) with cyanase or mutant cyanases are reported. DEPC reacts stoichiometrically with the histidine residue and at one additional site in each subunit when the enzyme is in the inactive dimer form, preventing reactivation. DEPC reacts stoichiometrically (with the same result on reactivation) at only one site per subunit with the inactive dimer form of cyanase mutants in which the single histidine residue has been replaced by one of several different amino acids by site-directed mutagenesis; the site of the reaction was identified as the amino group of the N-terminal methionine. DEPC does not react with the histidine residue of the active decameric form of wild-type cyanase and does not affect activity of the active decameric form of wild-type or mutant cyanases. Reaction with the N-terminal amino group of methionine apparently prevents reactivation of the mutant enzymes by blocking association to decamer.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Transfer of noncovalent chiral information along an optically inactive helical peptide chain: allosteric control of asymmetry of the C-terminal site by external molecule that binds to the N-terminal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousaka, Naoki; Inai, Yoshihito

    2009-02-20

    This study aims at demonstrating end-to-end transfer of noncovalent chiral information along a peptide chain. The domino-type induction of helical sense is proven by using achiral peptides 1-m of bis-chromophoric sequence with different chain lengths: H-(Aib-Delta(Z)Phe)(m)-(Aib-Delta(Z)Bip)(2)-Aib-OCH(3) [m = 2, 4, and 6; Aib = alpha-aminoisobutyric acid; Delta(Z)Phe = (Z)-alpha,beta-didehydrophenylalanine; Delta(Z)Bip = (Z)-beta-(4,4'-biphenyl)-alpha,beta-didehydroalanine]. They all showed the tendency to adopt a 3(10)-helix. Whereas peptide 1-m originally shows no circular dichroism (CD) signals, marked CD signals were induced at around 270-320 nm based on both the beta-aryl didehydroresidues by chiral Boc-proline (Boc = tert-butoxycarbonyl). The observed CD spectra were interpreted on the basis of the exciton chirality method and theoretical CD simulation of several helical conformations that were energy-minimized. The experimental and theoretical CD analysis reveals that Boc-l-proline induces the preference for a right-handed helicity in the whole chain of 1-m. Such noncovalent chiral induction was not observed in the corresponding N-terminally protected 1-m. Obviously, helicity induction in 1-m originates from the binding of Boc-proline to the N-terminal site. In the 17-mer (1-6), the information of helix sense reaches the 16th residue from the N-terminus. We have monitored precise transfer of noncovalent chiral stimulus along a helical peptide chain. The present study also proposes a primitive allosteric model of a single protein-mimicking backbone. Here chiral molecule binding the N-terminal site of 1-6 controls the chiroptical signals and helical sense of the C-terminal site about 30 A away.

  11. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  12. BNP and N-terminal proBNP are both extracted in the normal kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens Peter; Jensen, Gorm Boje; Møller, Søren;

    2006-01-01

    with catheterization of the femoral artery and femoral and renal veins. Blood sampling from the catheters allowed determination of the arteriovenous extraction ratio of N-terminal proBNP and BNP. Results Neither the peripheral N-terminal proBNP (13, 11, 19 pmol L(-1), NS) nor the BNP plasma concentrations (4, 12, 9...

  13. Acyl-CoA-binding and self-associating properties of a recombinant 13.3 kDa N-terminal fragment of diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1 from oilseed rape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosimann Steven C

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT, EC 2.3.1.20 catalyzes the acyl-CoA-dependent acylation of sn-1, 2-diacylglycerol to generate triacylglycerol and CoA. The deduced amino acid sequence of cDNAs encoding DGAT1 from plants and mammals exhibit a hydrophilic N-terminal region followed by a number of potential membrane-spanning segments, which is consistent with the membrane-bound nature of this enzyme family. In order to gain insight into the structure/function properties of DGAT1 from Brassica napus (BnDGAT1, we produced and partially characterized a recombinant polyHis-tagged N-terminal fragment of the enzyme, BnDGAT1(1–116His6, with calculated molecular mass of 13,278 Da. Results BnDGAT1(1–116His6 was highly purified from bacterial lysate and plate-like monoclinic crystals were grown using this preparation. Lipidex-1000 binding assays and gel electrophoresis indicated that BnDGAT1(1–116His6 interacts with long chain acyl-CoA. The enzyme fragment displayed enhanced affinity for erucoyl (22:1cisΔ13-CoA over oleoyl (18:1cisΔ9-CoA, and the binding process displayed positive cooperativity. Gel filtration chromatography and cross-linking studies indicated that BnDGAT1(1–116His6 self-associated to form a tetramer. Polyclonal antibodies raised against a peptide of 15 amino acid residues representing a segment of BnDGAT1(1–116His6 failed to react with protein in microsomal vesicles following treatment with proteinase K, suggesting that the N-terminal fragment of BnDGAT1 was localized to the cytosolic side of the ER. Conclusion Collectively, these results suggest that BnDGAT1 may be allosterically modulated by acyl-CoA through the N-terminal region and that the enzyme self-associates via interactions on the cytosolic side of the ER.

  14. The N-terminal segment of pulmonary surfactant lipopeptide SP-C has intrinsic propensity to interact with and perturb phospholipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, Inés; Rivas, Luis; Keough, Kevin M W;

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, 13-residue peptides with sequences corresponding to the native N-terminal segment of pulmonary SP-C (surfactant protein C) have been synthesized and their interaction with phospholipid bilayers characterized. The peptides are soluble in aqueous media but associate spontaneou......In the present study, 13-residue peptides with sequences corresponding to the native N-terminal segment of pulmonary SP-C (surfactant protein C) have been synthesized and their interaction with phospholipid bilayers characterized. The peptides are soluble in aqueous media but associate...... aggregation, and leakage of the aqueous content of the vesicles. The lipid-peptide interaction includes a significant hydrophobic component for both zwitterionic and anionic membranes, although the interaction with phosphatidylglycerol bilayers is also electrostatic in nature. The effects of the SP-C N......-terminal peptides on the membrane structure are mediated by significant perturbations of the packing order and mobility of phospholipid acyl chain segments deep in the bilayer, as detected by differential scanning calorimetry and spin-label ESR. These results suggest that the N-terminal region of SP-C, even...

  15. Requirement of the N-terminal residues of human cytomegalovirus UL112-113 proteins for viral growth and oriLyt-dependent DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Eui; Park, Mi Young; Kang, Kyeong Jin; Han, Tae Hee; Lee, Chan Hee; Ahn, Jin-Hyun

    2015-08-01

    The UL112-113 region of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome encodes four phosphoproteins of 34, 43, 50, and 84 kDa that promote viral DNA replication. Co-transfection assays have demonstrated that self-interaction of these proteins via the shared N-termini is necessary for their intranuclear distribution as foci and for the efficient relocation of a viral DNA polymerase processivity factor (UL44) to the viral replication sites. However, the requirement of UL112-113 N-terminal residues for viral growth and DNA replication has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of deletion of the N-terminal regions of UL112-113 proteins on viral growth and oriLyt-dependent DNA replication. A deletion of the entire UL112 region or the region encoding the 25 N-terminal amino-acid residues from the HCMV (Towne strain) bacmid impaired viral growth in bacmid-transfected human fibroblast cells, indicating their requirement for viral growth. In co-immunoprecipitation assays using the genomic gene expressing the four UL112-113 proteins together, the 25 N-terminal amino-acid residues were found to be necessary for stable expression of UL112-113 proteins and their self-interaction. These residues were also required for efficient binding to and relocation of UL44, but not for interaction with IE2, an origin-binding transcription factor. In co-transfection/replication assays, replication of the oriLyt-containing plasmid was promoted by expression of intact UL112-113 proteins, but not by the expression of 25-amino-acid residue-deleted proteins. Our results demonstrate that the 25 N-terminal amino-acid residues of UL112-113 proteins that mediate self-interaction contribute to viral growth by promoting their binding to UL44 and the initiation of oriLyt-dependent DNA replication.

  16. Mutational analysis of Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu in search of a role for the N-terminal region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansilla, Francisco; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Laurberg, M;

    1998-01-01

    We have mutated lysine 2 and arginine 7 in elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli separately either to alanine or glutamic acid. The aim of the work was to reveal the possible interactions between the conserved N-terminal part of the molecule, which is rich in basic residues and aminoacyl...... this activity. Furthermore, arginine 7 seems to play a role in regulating the binding of GTP. The three-dimensional structure of the ternary complex, EF-Tu:GTP:Phe-tRNAPhe, involving Thermus aquaticus EF-Tu and yeast Phe-tRNA(Phe), shows that Arg7 is in a position which permits salt bridge formation with Asp284...

  17. Activation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase and decline of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase activity during brain aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiongqiong; Lam, Philip Y; Han, Derick; Cadenas, Enrique

    2009-04-02

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is often associated with aging and neurodegeneration. c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and its translocation to mitochondria increased as a function of age in rat brain. This was associated with a decrease of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity upon phosphorylation of the E(1alpha) subunit of PDH. Phosphorylation of PDH is likely mediated by PDH kinase, the protein levels and activity of which increased with age. ATP levels were diminished, whereas lactic acid levels increased, thus indicating a shift toward anaerobic glycolysis. The energy transduction deficit due to impairment of PDH activity during aging may be associated with JNK signaling.

  18. Nucleic acid (cDNA) and amino acid sequences of alpha-type gliadins from wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasarda, D D; Okita, T W; Bernardin, J E; Baecker, P A; Nimmo, C C; Lew, E J; Dietler, M D; Greene, F C

    1984-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence for an alpha-type gliadin protein of wheat (Triticum aestivum Linnaeus) endosperm has been derived from a cloned cDNA sequence. An additional cDNA clone that corresponds to about 75% of a similar alpha-type gliadin has been sequenced and shows some important differences. About 97% of the composite sequence of A-gliadin (an alpha-type gliadin fraction) has also been obtained by direct amino acid sequencing. This sequence shows a high degree of similarity with amino acid sequences derived from both cDNA clones and is virtually identical to one of them. On the basis of sequence information, after loss of the signal sequence, the mature alpha-type gliadins may be divided into five different domains, two of which may have evolved from an ancestral gliadin gene, whereas the remaining three contain repeating sequences that may have developed independently. Images PMID:6589619

  19. Identification of an antigenic domain in the N-terminal region of avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) capsid protein that is not common to swine and human HEVs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lizhen; Sun, Yani; Du, Taofeng; Wang, Chengbao; Xiao, Shuqi; Mu, Yang; Zhang, Gaiping; Liu, Lihong; Widén, Frederik; Hsu, Walter H; Zhao, Qin; Zhou, En-Min

    2014-12-01

    The antigenic domains located in the C-terminal 268 amino acid residues of avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) capsid protein have been characterized. This region shares common epitopes with swine and human HEVs. However, epitopes in the N-terminal 338 amino acid residues have never been reported. In this study, an antigenic domain located between amino acids 23 and 85 was identified by indirect ELISA using the truncated recombinant capsid proteins as coating antigens and anti-avian HEV chicken sera as primary antibodies. In addition, this domain did not react with anti-swine and human HEV sera. These results indicated that the N-terminal 338 amino acid residues of avian HEV capsid protein do not share common epitopes with swine and human HEVs. This finding is important for our understanding of the antigenicity of the avian HEV capsid protein. Furthermore, it has important implications in the selection of viral antigens for serological diagnosis.

  20. Yeast strains with N-terminally truncated ribosomal protein S5: implications for the evolution, structure and function of the Rps5/Rps7 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumsden, Thomas; Bentley, Amber A; Beutler, William; Ghosh, Arnab; Galkin, Oleksandr; Komar, Anton A

    2010-03-01

    Ribosomal protein (rp)S5 belongs to the family of the highly conserved rp's that contains rpS7 from prokaryotes and rpS5 from eukaryotes. Alignment of rpS5/rpS7 from metazoans (Homo sapiens), fungi (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and bacteria (Escherichia coli) shows that the proteins contain a conserved central/C-terminal core region and possess variable N-terminal regions. Yeast rpS5 is 69 amino acids (aa) longer than the E. coli rpS7 protein; and human rpS5 is 48 aa longer than the rpS7, respectively. To investigate the function of the yeast rpS5 and in particular the role of its N-terminal region, we obtained and characterized yeast strains in which the wild-type yeast rpS5 was replaced by its truncated variants, lacking 13, 24, 30 and 46 N-terminal amino acids, respectively. All mutant yeast strains were viable and displayed only moderately reduced growth rates, with the exception of the strain lacking 46 N-terminal amino acids, which had a doubling time of about 3 h. Biochemical analysis of the mutant yeast strains suggests that the N-terminal part of the eukaryotic and, in particular, yeast rpS5 may impact the ability of 40S subunits to function properly in translation and affect the efficiency of initiation, specifically the recruitment of initiation factors eIF3 and eIF2.

  1. Conserved N-terminal negative charges support optimally efficient N-type inactivation of Kv1 channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Prince

    Full Text Available N-type inactivation is produced by the binding of a potassium channel's N-terminus within the open pore, blocking conductance. Previous studies have found that introduction of negative charges into N-terminal inactivation domains disrupts inactivation; however, the Aplysia AKv1 N-type inactivation domain contains two negatively charged residues, E2 and E9. Rather than being unusual, sequence analysis shows that this N-terminal motif is highly conserved among Kv1 sequences across many phyla. Conservation analysis shows some tolerance at position 9 for other charged residues, like D9 and K9, whereas position 2 is highly conserved as E2. To examine the functional importance of these residues, site directed mutagenesis was performed and effects on inactivation were recorded by two electrode voltage clamp in Xenopus oocytes. We find that inclusion of charged residues at positions 2 and 9 prevents interactions with non-polar sites along the inactivation pathway increasing the efficiency of pore block. In addition, E2 appears to have additional specific electrostatic interactions that stabilize the inactivated state likely explaining its high level of conservation. One possible explanation for E2's unique importance, consistent with our data, is that E2 interacts electrostatically with a positive charge on the N-terminal amino group to stabilize the inactivation domain at the block site deep within the pore. Simple electrostatic modeling suggests that due to the non-polar environment in the pore in the blocked state, even a 1 Å larger separation between these charges, produced by the E2D substitution, would be sufficient to explain the 65× reduced affinity of the E2D N-terminus for the pore. Finally, our studies support a multi-step, multi-site N-type inactivation model where the N-terminus interacts deep within the pore in an extended like structure placing the most N-terminal residues 35% of the way across the electric field in the pore blocked

  2. Nucleic acid (cDNA) and amino acid sequences of alpha-type gliadins from wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    OpenAIRE

    Kasarda, D.D.; Okita, T W; Bernardin, J. E.; Baecker, P A; Nimmo, C C; Lew, E J; Dietler, M D; Greene, F C

    1984-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence for an alpha-type gliadin protein of wheat (Triticum aestivum Linnaeus) endosperm has been derived from a cloned cDNA sequence. An additional cDNA clone that corresponds to about 75% of a similar alpha-type gliadin has been sequenced and shows some important differences. About 97% of the composite sequence of A-gliadin (an alpha-type gliadin fraction) has also been obtained by direct amino acid sequencing. This sequence shows a high degree of similarity with a...

  3. Synaptic transmission and plasticity require AMPA receptor anchoring via its N-terminal domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jake F; Ho, Hinze; Greger, Ingo H

    2017-01-01

    AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission and are selectively recruited during activity-dependent plasticity to increase synaptic strength. A prerequisite for faithful signal transmission is the positioning and clustering of AMPARs at postsynaptic sites. The mechanisms underlying this positioning have largely been ascribed to the receptor cytoplasmic C-termini and to AMPAR-associated auxiliary subunits, both interacting with the postsynaptic scaffold. Here, using mouse organotypic hippocampal slices, we show that the extracellular AMPAR N-terminal domain (NTD), which projects midway into the synaptic cleft, plays a fundamental role in this process. This highly sequence-diverse domain mediates synaptic anchoring in a subunit-selective manner. Receptors lacking the NTD exhibit increased mobility in synapses, depress synaptic transmission and are unable to sustain long-term potentiation (LTP). Thus, synaptic transmission and the expression of LTP are dependent upon an AMPAR anchoring mechanism that is driven by the NTD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23024.001 PMID:28290985

  4. Thermodynamics of Calcium binding to the Calmodulin N-terminal domain to evaluate site-specific affinity constants and cooperativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccia, Maria Rosa; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Lemaire, David; Brémond, Nicolas; Pardoux, Romain; Blangy, Stéphanie; Guilbaud, Philippe; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2015-07-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an essential Ca(II)-dependent regulator of cell physiology. To understand its interaction with Ca(II) at a molecular level, it is essential to examine Ca(II) binding at each site of the protein, even if it is challenging to estimate the site-specific binding properties of the interdependent CaM-binding sites. In this study, we evaluated the site-specific Ca(II)-binding affinity of sites I and II of the N-terminal domain by combining site-directed mutagenesis and spectrofluorimetry. The mutations had very low impact on the protein structure and stability. We used these binding constants to evaluate the inter-site cooperativity energy and compared it with its lower limit value usually reported in the literature. We found that site I affinity for Ca(II) was 1.5 times that of site II and that cooperativity induced an approximately tenfold higher affinity for the second Ca(II)-binding event, as compared to the first one. We further showed that insertion of a tryptophan at position 7 of site II binding loop significantly increased site II affinity for Ca(II) and the intra-domain cooperativity. ΔH and ΔS parameters were studied by isothermal titration calorimetry for Ca(II) binding to site I, site II and to the entire N-terminal domain. They showed that calcium binding is mainly entropy driven for the first and second binding events. These findings provide molecular information on the structure-affinity relationship of the individual sites of the CaM N-terminal domain and new perspectives for the optimization of metal ion binding by mutating the EF-hand loops sequences.

  5. Secretin N-terminal hexapeptide potentiates insulin release in mouse islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Hans

    1986-01-01

    -6). The consecutive smaller N-terminal peptides Asp-Gly-Thr-Phe-OMe (S3-6) and Gly-Thr-Phe-OMe (S4-6) had no effects while the dipeptide ester Thr-Phe-OMe (S5-6) also potentiated the release of insulin. The results suggest that the N-terminal part of secretin may be involved in the marked in vitro glucose...

  6. Effect of truncation of the N-terminal region of the viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) P protein on viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Sun; Kim, Min Sun; Choi, Seung Hyuk; Kang, Yue Jai; Kim, Ki Hong

    2015-11-01

    The phosphoprotein (P) of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) plays an essential role in viral replication by interconnecting the L protein and the N protein-RNA complex. In this study, to investigate the role of the N-terminal region of the P protein in viral replication, we mutated the first or the first and second or the first, second, and third ATG codon into TGA stop codons. The respective mutants were named P1, P2, and P3. Recombinant VHSVs containing each mutated P gene (rVHSV-P1, -P2, and -P3) were successfully generated by supplying the intact P protein in trans. The rVHSV-P2 and -P3 were not generated from cells expressing truncated P proteins (P1, P2 or P3 protein), but the rVHSV-P1 produced infectious viruses, even in cells without any P-protein-expressing plasmids. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the P gene of rVHSV-P1 showed that a mutation had occurred that resulted in the fourth amino acid (isoleucine, ATT) being changed to methionine (ATG) without a frameshift (P0.5), suggesting that strong selection pressure might facilitate mutations that are advantageous or essential for virus replication. Infectious rVHSV-P2 and -P3 were produced in cells expressing the P0.5 protein, suggesting that the first three amino acids of the P protein of VHSV are dispensable for viral replication. Furthermore, although the P1 protein was shorter than the P0.5 protein by only two amino acid residues, no viruses were produced when the P1 protein was supplied indicating that the fourth and the fifth amino acid residues are indispensable for normal P protein functions involved in viral replication.

  7. A new general pathway for synthesis of reference compounds of N-terminal valine-isocyanate adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ronnie; Rydberg, Per; Westberg, Emelie; Motwani, Hitesh V; Johnstone, Erik; Törnqvist, Margareta

    2010-03-15

    Adducts to Hb could be used as biomarkers to monitor exposure to isocyanates. Particularly useful is the measurement of carbamoylation of N-terminal valines in Hb, after detachment as hydantoins. The synthesis of references from the reactive isocyanates, especially diisocyanates, has been problematic due to side reactions and polymerization of the isocyanate starting material. A simpler, safer, and more general method for the synthesis of valine adducts of isocyanates has been developed using N-[(4-nitrophenyl)carbamate]valine methylamide (NPCVMA) as the key precursor to adducts of various mono- and diisocyanates of interest. By reacting NPCVMA with a range of isocyanate-related amines, carbamoylated valines are formed without the use of the reactive isocyanates. The carbamoylated products synthesized here were cyclized with good yields of the formed hydantoins. The carbamoylated derivative from phenyl isocyanate also showed quantitative yield in a test with cyclization under the conditions used in blood. This new pathway for the preparation of N-carbamoylated model compounds overcomes the above-mentioned problems in the synthesis and is a general and simplified approach, which could make such reference compounds of adducts to N-terminal valine from isocyanates accessible for biomonitoring purposes. The synthesized hydantoins corresponding to adducts from isocyanic acid, methyl isocyanate, phenyl isocyanate, and 2,6-toluene diisocyanate were characterized by LC-MS analysis. The background level of the hydantoin from isocyanic acid in human blood was analyzed with the LC-MS conditions developed.

  8. Electrochemical microfluidic biosensor for the detection of nucleic acid sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goral, Vasiliy N; Zaytseva, Natalya V; Baeumner, Antje J

    2006-03-01

    A microfluidic biosensor with electrochemical detection for the quantification of nucleic acid sequences was developed. In contrast to most microbiosensors that are based on fluorescence for signal generation, it takes advantage of the simplicity and high sensitivity provided by an amperometric and coulorimetric detection system. An interdigitated ultramicroelectrode array (IDUA) was fabricated in a glass chip and integrated directly with microchannels made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). The assembly was packaged into a Plexiglas housing providing fluid and electrical connections. IDUAs were characterized amperometrically and using cyclic voltammetry with respect to static and dynamic responses for the presence of a reversible redox couple-potassium hexacyanoferrate (ii)/hexacyanoferrate (iii) (ferri/ferrocyanide). A combined concentration of 0.5 microM of ferro/ferricyanide was determined as lower limit of detection with a dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude. Background signals were negligible and the IDUA responded in a highly reversible manner to the injection of various volumes and various concentrations of the electrochemical marker. For the detection of nucleic acid sequences, liposomes entrapping the electrochemical marker were tagged with a DNA probe, and superparamagnetic beads were coated with a second DNA probe. A single stranded DNA target sequence hybridized with both probes. The sandwich was captured in the microfluidic channel just upstream of the IDUA via a magnet located in the outside housing. Liposomes were lysed using a detergent and the amount of released ferro/ferricyanide was quantified while passing by the IDUA. Optimal location of the magnet with respect to the IDUA was investigated, the effect of dextran sulfate on the hybridization reaction was studied and the amount of magnetic beads used in the assay was optimized. A dose response curve using varying concentrations of target DNA molecules was carried out demonstrating a limit of

  9. Long-lasting mnemotropic effect of substance P and its N-terminal fragment (SP1-7 on avoidance learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Tomaz

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the long-lasting effect of peripheral injection of the neuropeptide substance P (SP and of some N- or C-terminal SP fragments (SPN and SPC, respectively on retention test performance of avoidance learning. Male Wistar rats (220 to 280 g were trained in an inhibitory step-down avoidance task and tested 24 h or 21 days later. Immediately after the training trial rats received an intraperitoneal injection of SP (50 µg/kg, SPN 1-7 (167 µg/kg or SPC 7-11 (134 µg/kg. Control groups were injected with vehicle or SP 5 h after the training trial. The immediate post-training administration of SP and SPN, but not SPC, facilitated avoidance behavior in rats tested 24 h or 21 days later, i.e., the retention test latencies of the SP and SPN groups were significantly longer (P<0.05, Mann-Whitney U-test during both training-test intervals. These observations suggest that the memory-enhancing effect of SP is long-lasting and that the amino acid sequence responsible for this effect is encoded by its N-terminal part

  10. Structure-Activity Relationships of the Antimicrobial Peptide Arasin 1 — And Mode of Action Studies of the N-Terminal, Proline-Rich Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Victoria S.; Blencke, Hans-Matti; Benincasa, Monica; Haug, Tor; Eksteen, Jacobus J.; Styrvold, Olaf B.; Scocchi, Marco; Stensvåg, Klara

    2013-01-01

    Arasin 1 is a 37 amino acid long proline-rich antimicrobial peptide isolated from the spider crab, Hyas araneus. In this work the active region of arasin 1 was identified through structure-activity studies using different peptide fragments derived from the arasin 1 sequence. The pharmacophore was found to be located in the proline/arginine-rich NH2 terminus of the peptide and the fragment arasin 1(1–23) was almost equally active to the full length peptide. Arasin 1 and its active fragment arasin 1(1–23) were shown to be non-toxic to human red blood cells and arasin 1(1–23) was able to bind chitin, a component of fungal cell walls and the crustacean shell. The mode of action of the fully active N-terminal arasin 1(1–23) was explored through killing kinetic and membrane permeabilization studies. At the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), arasin 1(1–23) was not bactericidal and had no membrane disruptive effect. In contrast, at concentrations of 5×MIC and above it was bactericidal and interfered with membrane integrity. We conclude that arasin 1(1–23) has a different mode of action than lytic peptides, like cecropin P1. Thus, we suggest a dual mode of action for arasin 1(1–23) involving membrane disruption at peptide concentrations above MIC, and an alternative mechanism of action, possibly involving intracellular targets, at MIC. PMID:23326415

  11. Structure-activity relationships of the antimicrobial peptide arasin 1 - and mode of action studies of the N-terminal, proline-rich region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria S Paulsen

    Full Text Available Arasin 1 is a 37 amino acid long proline-rich antimicrobial peptide isolated from the spider crab, Hyas araneus. In this work the active region of arasin 1 was identified through structure-activity studies using different peptide fragments derived from the arasin 1 sequence. The pharmacophore was found to be located in the proline/arginine-rich NH(2 terminus of the peptide and the fragment arasin 1(1-23 was almost equally active to the full length peptide. Arasin 1 and its active fragment arasin 1(1-23 were shown to be non-toxic to human red blood cells and arasin 1(1-23 was able to bind chitin, a component of fungal cell walls and the crustacean shell. The mode of action of the fully active N-terminal arasin 1(1-23 was explored through killing kinetic and membrane permeabilization studies. At the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC, arasin 1(1-23 was not bactericidal and had no membrane disruptive effect. In contrast, at concentrations of 5×MIC and above it was bactericidal and interfered with membrane integrity. We conclude that arasin 1(1-23 has a different mode of action than lytic peptides, like cecropin P1. Thus, we suggest a dual mode of action for arasin 1(1-23 involving membrane disruption at peptide concentrations above MIC, and an alternative mechanism of action, possibly involving intracellular targets, at MIC.

  12. Structure-activity relationships of the antimicrobial peptide arasin 1 - and mode of action studies of the N-terminal, proline-rich region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Victoria S; Blencke, Hans-Matti; Benincasa, Monica; Haug, Tor; Eksteen, Jacobus J; Styrvold, Olaf B; Scocchi, Marco; Stensvåg, Klara

    2013-01-01

    Arasin 1 is a 37 amino acid long proline-rich antimicrobial peptide isolated from the spider crab, Hyas araneus. In this work the active region of arasin 1 was identified through structure-activity studies using different peptide fragments derived from the arasin 1 sequence. The pharmacophore was found to be located in the proline/arginine-rich NH(2) terminus of the peptide and the fragment arasin 1(1-23) was almost equally active to the full length peptide. Arasin 1 and its active fragment arasin 1(1-23) were shown to be non-toxic to human red blood cells and arasin 1(1-23) was able to bind chitin, a component of fungal cell walls and the crustacean shell. The mode of action of the fully active N-terminal arasin 1(1-23) was explored through killing kinetic and membrane permeabilization studies. At the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), arasin 1(1-23) was not bactericidal and had no membrane disruptive effect. In contrast, at concentrations of 5×MIC and above it was bactericidal and interfered with membrane integrity. We conclude that arasin 1(1-23) has a different mode of action than lytic peptides, like cecropin P1. Thus, we suggest a dual mode of action for arasin 1(1-23) involving membrane disruption at peptide concentrations above MIC, and an alternative mechanism of action, possibly involving intracellular targets, at MIC.

  13. Structure of the EMMPRIN N-terminal domain 1: Dimerization via [beta]-strand swapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Jinquan; Teplyakov, Alexey; Obmolova, Galina; Malia, Thomas; Wu, Sheng-Jiun; Beil, Eric; Baker, Audrey; Swencki-Underwood, Bethany; Zhao, Yonghong; Sprenkle, Justin; Dixon, Ken; Sweet, Raymond; Gilliland, Gary L.; (Centocor)

    2010-09-27

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), also known as Hab18G, CD147, Basigin, M6, and neurothelin, is a membrane glycoprotein expressed on the surface of various cell types and many cancer cells. EMMPRIN stimulates adjacent fibroblasts and tumor cells to produce matrix metalloproteinases and plays an important role in tumor invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, spermatogensis and fertilization, cell-cell adhesion and communication, and other biological processes (reviewed in Ref. 1 and references therein). It was demonstrated that the EMMPRIN extracellular domain (ECD), which structurally belongs to the IgG superfamily, can form homo-oligomers in a cis dependent manner and the N-terminal domain 1 (residues 22-101) was necessary and sufficient to mediate this interaction. The crystal structure of the ECD of recombinant human EMMPRIN (Hab18G/CD147) expressed in E. coli was reported at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution (Yu et al. 2008). The construct consists of residues 22-205 of the mature protein and has both an N-terminal IgC2 domain (ND1, residues 22-101) and a C-terminal IgC2 domain (ND2, residues 107-205). The two domains are joined by a five amino acid residue linker that constitutes a flexible hinge between the two domains. The crystal form has four copies of the molecule in the asymmetric unit, each of which has a different inter-domain angle that varies from 121{sup o} to 144{sup o}. The two domains each have a conserved disulfide bridge and both are comprised of two {beta}-sheets formed by strands EBA and GFCC, and DEBA and AGFCC for ND1 and ND2, respectively. Based on the crystal packing in this structure, the authors proposed that lateral packing between the two IgG domains of EMMPRIN ECD represents a potential mechanism for cell adhesion. Here we report the 2.0-{angstrom} crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of EMMPRIN ECD (ND1) expressed in mammalian cells. The overall structure of the domain is very similar to that in the full length

  14. Transcription-dependent nuclear localization of DAZAP1 requires an N-terminal signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yi-Tzu; Wen, Wan-Ching [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Yen, Pauline H., E-mail: pyen@ibms.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm when the nuclear transcription is inhibited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1's transcription-dependent nuclear localization requires N-terminal N42. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SLIRP binds to N42 and may be involved in the process. -- Abstract: Deleted in Azoospermia Associated Protein 1 (DAZAP1) is a ubiquitous hnRNP protein required for normal development and spermatogenesis. It resides predominantly in the nucleus and moves between the nucleus and the cytoplasm via a ZNS shuttling signal at its C-terminus. DAZAP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm when RNA polymerase II activity is inhibited by actinomycin D. Here we report the mapping of a 42-amino acid segment (N42) at the N-terminus of DAZAP1 that is both necessary and sufficient for its transcription-dependent nuclear localization. In addition, using a yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified SLIRP as a N42-binding protein which may regulate DAZAP1 subcellular localization.

  15. N-terminal PDZ-like domain of chromatin organizer SATB1 contributes towards its function as transcription regulator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dimple Notani; Praveena L Ramanujam; P Pavan Kumar; Kamalvishnu P Gottimukkala; Chandan Kumar-Sinha; Sanjeev Galande

    2011-08-01

    The special AT-rich DNA-binding protein 1 (SATB1) is a matrix attachment region (MAR)-binding protein that acts as a global repressor via recruitment of CtBP1:HDAC1-containing co-repressors to its binding targets. The N-terminal PSD95/Dlg-A/ZO-1 (PDZ)-like domain of SATB1 mediates interactions with several chromatin proteins. In the present study, we set out to address whether the PDZ-domain-mediated interactions of SATB1 are critical for its in vivo function as a global repressor. We reasoned that since the N-terminal PDZ-like domain (amino acid residues 1–204) lacks DNA binding activity, it would fail to recruit the interacting partners of SATB1 to its genomic binding sites and hence would not repress the SATB1-regulated genes. Indeed, in vivo MAR-linked luciferase reporter assay revealed that overexpression of the PDZ-like domain resulted in de-repression, indicating that the PDZ-like domain exerts a dominant negative effect on genes regulated by SATB1. Next, we developed a stable dominant negative model in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells that conditionally expressed the N-terminal 1–204 region harbouring the PDZ-like domain of SATB1. To monitor the effect of sequestration of the interaction partners on the global gene regulation by SATB1, transcripts from the induced and uninduced clones were subjected to gene expression profiling. Clustering of expression data revealed that 600 out of 19000 genes analysed were significantly upregulated upon overexpression of the PDZ-like domain. Induced genes were found to be involved in important signalling cascades and cellular functions. These studies clearly demonstrated the role of PDZ domain of SATB1 in global gene regulation presumably through its interaction with other cellular proteins.

  16. Replacement of the C-terminal tetrapeptide (314PAPV317 to 314SSSM317) in interferon regulatory factor-2 alters its N-terminal DNA-binding activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Krishna Prakash; Pramod C Rath

    2010-12-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-2 (IRF-2) is an important transcription factor involved in cell growth regulation, immune response and cancer. IRF-2 can function as a transcriptional repressor and activator depending on its DNA-binding activity and protein–protein interactions. We compared the amino acid sequences of IRF-2 and found a C-terminal tetrapeptide (314PAPV317) of mouse IRF-2 to be different (314SSSM317) from human IRF-2. Recombinant GST-IRF-2 with 314PAPV317 (wild type) and 314SSSM317 (mutant) expressed in Escherichia coli were assessed for DNA-binding activity with 32P-(GAAAGT)4 by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Wild type- and mutant GST-IRF-2 showed similar expression patterns and immunoreactivities but different DNA-binding activities. Mutant (mt) IRF-2 formed higher-molecular-mass, more and stronger DNA–protein complexes in comparison to wild type (wt) IRF-2. Anti-IRF-2 antibody stabilized the DNA–protein complexes formed by both wt IRF-2 and mt IRF-2, resolving the differences. This suggests that PAPV and SSSM sequences at 314-317 in the C-terminal region of mouse and human IRF-2 contribute to conformation of IRF-2 and influence DNA-binding activity of the N-terminal region, indicating intramolecular interactions. Thus, evolution of IRF-2 from murine to human genome has resulted in subtle differences in C-terminal amino acid motifs, which may contribute to qualitative changes in IRF-2-dependent DNA-binding activity and gene expression.

  17. Computer selection of oligonucleotide probes from amino acid sequences for use in gene library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J H; Ye, J H; Wallace, D C

    1984-01-11

    We present a computer program, FINPROBE, which utilizes known amino acid sequence data to deduce minimum redundancy oligonucleotide probes for use in screening cDNA or genomic libraries or in primer extension. The user enters the amino acid sequence of interest, the desired probe length, the number of probes sought, and the constraints on oligonucleotide synthesis. The computer generates a table of possible probes listed in increasing order of redundancy and provides the location of each probe in the protein and mRNA coding sequence. Activation of a next function provides the amino acid and mRNA sequences of each probe of interest as well as the complementary sequence and the minimum dissociation temperature of the probe. A final routine prints out the amino acid sequence of the protein in parallel with the mRNA sequence listing all possible codons for each amino acid.

  18. RNA sequencing identifies upregulated kyphoscoliosis peptidase and phosphatidic acid signaling pathways in muscle hypertrophy generated by transgenic expression of myostatin propeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yuanxin; Yang, Jinzeng; Xu, Zhong; Jing, Lu; Zhao, Shuhong; Li, Xinyun

    2015-04-09

    Myostatin (MSTN), a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, plays a crucial negative role in muscle growth. MSTN mutations or inhibitions can dramatically increase muscle mass in most mammal species. Previously, we generated a transgenic mouse model of muscle hypertrophy via the transgenic expression of the MSTN N-terminal propeptide cDNA under the control of the skeletal muscle-specific MLC1 promoter. Here, we compare the mRNA profiles between transgenic mice and wild-type littermate controls with a high-throughput RNA sequencing method. The results show that 132 genes were significantly differentially expressed between transgenic mice and wild-type control mice; 97 of these genes were up-regulated, and 35 genes were down-regulated in the skeletal muscle. Several genes that had not been reported to be involved in muscle hypertrophy were identified, including up-regulated myosin binding protein H (mybph), and zinc metallopeptidase STE24 (Zmpste24). In addition, kyphoscoliosis peptidase (Ky), which plays a vital role in muscle growth, was also up-regulated in the transgenic mice. Interestingly, a pathway analysis based on grouping the differentially expressed genes uncovered that cardiomyopathy-related pathways and phosphatidic acid (PA) pathways (Dgki, Dgkz, Plcd4) were up-regulated. Increased PA signaling may increase mTOR signaling, resulting in skeletal muscle growth. The findings of the RNA sequencing analysis help to understand the molecular mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy caused by MSTN inhibition.

  19. RNA Sequencing Identifies Upregulated Kyphoscoliosis Peptidase and Phosphatidic Acid Signaling Pathways in Muscle Hypertrophy Generated by Transgenic Expression of Myostatin Propeptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanxin Miao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Myostatin (MSTN, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, plays a crucial negative role in muscle growth. MSTN mutations or inhibitions can dramatically increase muscle mass in most mammal species. Previously, we generated a transgenic mouse model of muscle hypertrophy via the transgenic expression of the MSTN N-terminal propeptide cDNA under the control of the skeletal muscle-specific MLC1 promoter. Here, we compare the mRNA profiles between transgenic mice and wild-type littermate controls with a high-throughput RNA sequencing method. The results show that 132 genes were significantly differentially expressed between transgenic mice and wild-type control mice; 97 of these genes were up-regulated, and 35 genes were down-regulated in the skeletal muscle. Several genes that had not been reported to be involved in muscle hypertrophy were identified, including up-regulated myosin binding protein H (mybph, and zinc metallopeptidase STE24 (Zmpste24. In addition, kyphoscoliosis peptidase (Ky, which plays a vital role in muscle growth, was also up-regulated in the transgenic mice. Interestingly, a pathway analysis based on grouping the differentially expressed genes uncovered that cardiomyopathy-related pathways and phosphatidic acid (PA pathways (Dgki, Dgkz, Plcd4 were up-regulated. Increased PA signaling may increase mTOR signaling, resulting in skeletal muscle growth. The findings of the RNA sequencing analysis help to understand the molecular mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy caused by MSTN inhibition.

  20. Production and applications of an N-terminally-truncated recombinant beta-haemolysin from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M; Singh, A; Sharma, A

    2014-07-01

    The beta-haemolysin of Staphylococcus aureus (SA-hlb) is a secreted neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) implicated in the pathogenesis of infection and responsible for the characteristic in vitro 'hot-cold' haemolytic ability of the bacterium. Here, we describe the production of a biologically active N-terminally-truncated recombinant SA-hlb protein for use in in vitro assays and as a research tool. Using local isolates of S. aureus, we PCR-amplified an SA-hlb DNA sequence of 891 nucleotides, 99 nucleotides shorter than the full-length molecule, before cloning and sequencing (GenBank accession no. JN580071). The pQE.TriSystem vector (Qiagen, Germany) was used to express recombinant SA-hlb (r-SA-hlb) with a C-terminal 8xHis tag in Escherichia coli JM107 cells. Both JM107 lysate and the purified r-SA-hlb possessed hot-cold lytic activity against sheep and buffalo erythrocytes, which was abolished by incubation at ≥90 °C for 30 min or exposure to dithiothreitol, and could be neutralized by bovine immune sera. Purified r-SA-hlb was also cytotoxic to buffalo mononuclear cells and was effective as a coating antigen for indirect ELISA to screen for reactive sera. Importantly, the r-SA-hlb was suitable for use as a β-toxin in the modified CAMP test. We conclude that the r-SA-hlb protein produced was functionally active and has numerous potential applications.

  1. The similarity between N-terminal targeting signals for protein import into different organelles and its evolutionary relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eKunze

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The proper distribution of proteins between the cytosol and various membrane-bound compartments is crucial for the functionality of eukaryotic cells. This requires the cooperation between protein transport machineries that translocate diverse proteins from the cytosol into these compartments and targeting signal(s encoded within the primary sequence of these proteins that define their cellular destination. The mechanisms exerting protein translocation differ remarkably between the compartments, but the predominant targeting signals for mitochondria, chloroplasts and the ER share the N-terminal position, an α-helical structural element and the removal from the core protein by intraorganellar cleavage. Interestingly, similar properties have been described for the peroxisomal targeting signal type 2 mediating the import of a fraction of soluble peroxisomal proteins, whereas other peroxisomal matrix proteins encode the type 1 targeting signal residing at the extreme C-terminus. The structural similarity of N-terminal targeting signals poses a challenge to the specificity of protein transport, but allows the generation of ambiguous targeting signals that mediate dual targeting of proteins into different compartments. Dual targeting might represent an advantage for adaptation processes that involve a redistribution of proteins, because it circumvents the hierarchy of targeting signals. Thus, the co-existence of two equally functional import pathways into peroxisomes might reflect a balance between evolutionary constant and flexible transport routes.

  2. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data. 1.822 Section 1.822 Patents, Trademarks, and... Amino Acid Sequences § 1.822 Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data. (a) The symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data...

  3. Dissecting functions of the N-terminal domain and GAS-site recognition in STAT3 nuclear trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martincuks, Antons; Fahrenkamp, Dirk; Haan, Serge; Herrmann, Andreas; Küster, Andrea; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a ubiquitous transcription factor involved in many biological processes, including hematopoiesis, inflammation and cancer progression. Cytokine-induced gene transcription greatly depends on tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 on a single tyrosine residue with subsequent nuclear accumulation and specific DNA sequence (GAS) recognition. In this study, we analyzed the roles of the conserved STAT3 N-terminal domain (NTD) and GAS-element binding ability of STAT3 in nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. Our results demonstrate the nonessential role of GAS-element recognition for both cytokine-induced and basal nuclear import of STAT3. Substitution of five key amino acids within the DNA-binding domain rendered STAT3 unable to bind to GAS-elements while still maintaining the ability for nuclear localization. In turn, deletion of the NTD markedly decreased nuclear accumulation upon IL-6 treatment resulting in a prolonged accumulation of phosphorylated dimers in the cytoplasm, at the same time preserving specific DNA recognition ability of the truncation mutant. Observed defect in nuclear localization could not be explained by flawed importin-α binding, since both wild-type and NTD deletion mutant of STAT3 could precipitate both full-length and autoinhibitory domain (∆IBB) deletion mutants of importin-α5, as well as ∆IBB-α3 and ∆IBB-α7 isoforms independently of IL-6 stimulation. Despite its inability to translocate to the nucleus upon IL-6 stimulation, the NTD lacking mutant still showed nuclear accumulation in resting cells similar to wild-type upon inhibition of nuclear export by leptomycin B. At the same time, blocking the nuclear export pathway could not rescue cytoplasmic trapping of phosphorylated STAT3 molecules without NTD. Moreover, STAT3 mutant with dysfunctional SH2 domain (R609Q) also localized in the nucleus of unstimulated cells after nuclear export blocking, while upon cytokine treatment the

  4. Identification and functional characterization of N-terminally acetylated proteins in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Goetze

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein modifications play a major role for most biological processes in living organisms. Amino-terminal acetylation of proteins is a common modification found throughout the tree of life: the N-terminus of a nascent polypeptide chain becomes co-translationally acetylated, often after the removal of the initiating methionine residue. While the enzymes and protein complexes involved in these processes have been extensively studied, only little is known about the biological function of such N-terminal modification events. To identify common principles of N-terminal acetylation, we analyzed the amino-terminal peptides from proteins extracted from Drosophila Kc167 cells. We detected more than 1,200 mature protein N-termini and could show that N-terminal acetylation occurs in insects with a similar frequency as in humans. As the sole true determinant for N-terminal acetylation we could extract the (XPX rule that indicates the prevention of acetylation under all circumstances. We could show that this rule can be used to genetically engineer a protein to study the biological relevance of the presence or absence of an acetyl group, thereby generating a generic assay to probe the functional importance of N-terminal acetylation. We applied the assay by expressing mutated proteins as transgenes in cell lines and in flies. Here, we present a straightforward strategy to systematically study the functional relevance of N-terminal acetylations in cells and whole organisms. Since the (XPX rule seems to be of general validity in lower as well as higher eukaryotes, we propose that it can be used to study the function of N-terminal acetylation in all species.

  5. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1996. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, G.; Foley, B.; Korber, B. [eds.] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Div.; Mellors, J.W. [ed.] [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Jeang, K.T. [ed.] [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States). Molecular Virology Section; Wain-Hobson, S. [Pasteur Inst., Paris (France)] [ed.

    1997-04-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) Nuclear Acid Alignments and Sequences; (2) Amino Acid Alignments; (3) Analysis; (4) Related Sequences; and (5) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated throughout the year on the Web site, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov. While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. In addition to the general descriptions of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  6. Nested N-terminal megalin fragments induce high-titer autoantibody and attenuated Heymann nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramontano, Alfonso; Knight, Thomas; Vizzuso, Domenica; Makker, Sudesh P

    2006-07-01

    It was shown previously that an N-terminal fragment (nM60) that encompasses amino acid residues 1 to 563 of megalin could induce active Heymann nephritis (AHN) as efficiently as the native protein. For delineation of a minimal structure within this fragment that is sufficient to induce AHN, smaller protein fragments that encompass residues 1 to 236 (L6), 1 to 195 (L5), 1 to 156 (L4), and 1 to 120 (L3), representing successive C-terminal truncations within ligand-binding repeats of nM60, were cloned and produced in a baculovirus insect cell expression system. Protein fragments L4, L5, and L6 clearly were glycosylated. All four fragments stimulated proliferation of megalin-sensitized lymph node cells and induced high-titer anti-megalin autoantibodies in Lewis rats. A full-blown disease, as assessed by severity of proteinuria, was observed in rats that were immunized with L6 and L5, whereas animals that were immunized with L4 and L3 developed only mild disease. The proteinuria levels correlated with staining for complement (C3, C5b-9) and IgG1 isotype in glomerular immune deposits. The results suggest that one or more molecular determinants on the region that comprises amino acid residues 157 to 236 contribute to the induction of a full-blown form of AHN. Study of the structure, conformation, and posttranslational modifications of these determinants could provide greater insight into the molecular correlates of immunopathogenesis in this disease model.

  7. Autocatalytic activity and substrate specificity of the pestivirus N-terminal protease N{sup pro}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottipati, Keerthi; Acholi, Sudheer [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0647 (United States); Ruggli, Nicolas [Institute of Virology and Immunology, CH-3147 Mittelhäusern (Switzerland); Choi, Kyung H., E-mail: kychoi@utmb.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0647 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Pestivirus N{sup pro} is the first protein translated in the viral polypeptide, and cleaves itself off co-translationally generating the N-terminus of the core protein. Once released, N{sup pro} blocks the host's interferon response by inducing degradation of interferon regulatory factor-3. N{sup pro'}s intracellular autocatalytic activity and lack of trans-activity have hampered in vitro cleavage studies to establish its substrate specificity and the roles of individual residues. We constructed N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins that carry the authentic cleavage site and determined the autoproteolytic activities of N{sup pro} proteins containing substitutions at the predicted catalytic sites Glu22 and Cys69, at Arg100 that forms a salt bridge with Glu22, and at the cleavage site Cys168. Contrary to previous reports, we show that N{sup pro'}s catalytic activity does not involve Glu22, which may instead be involved in protein stability. Furthermore, N{sup pro} does not have specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site even though this residue is conserved throughout the pestivirus genus. - Highlights: • N{sup pro'}s autoproteolysis is studied using N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins. • N-terminal 17 amino acids are dispensable without loss of protease activity. • The putative catalytic residue Glu22 is not involved in protease catalysis. • No specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site despite evolutionary conservation. • N{sup pro} prefers small amino acids with non-branched beta carbons at the P1 position.

  8. Direct interaction of the N-terminal domain of ribosomal protein S1 with protein S2 in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrgazov, Konstantin; Manoharadas, Salim; Kaberdina, Anna C; Vesper, Oliver; Moll, Isabella

    2012-01-01

    Despite of the high resolution structure available for the E. coli ribosome, hitherto the structure and localization of the essential ribosomal protein S1 on the 30 S subunit still remains to be elucidated. It was previously reported that protein S1 binds to the ribosome via protein-protein interaction at the two N-terminal domains. Moreover, protein S2 was shown to be required for binding of protein S1 to the ribosome. Here, we present evidence that the N-terminal domain of S1 (amino acids 1-106; S1(106)) is necessary and sufficient for the interaction with protein S2 as well as for ribosome binding. We show that over production of protein S1(106) affects E. coli growth by displacing native protein S1 from its binding pocket on the ribosome. In addition, our data reveal that the coiled-coil domain of protein S2 (S2α(2)) is sufficient to allow protein S1 to bind to the ribosome. Taken together, these data uncover the crucial elements required for the S1/S2 interaction, which is pivotal for translation initiation on canonical mRNAs in gram-negative bacteria. The results are discussed in terms of a model wherein the S1/S2 interaction surface could represent a possible target to modulate the selectivity of the translational machinery and thereby alter the translational program under distinct conditions.

  9. Interaction between GInB and the N-terminal domain of NifA in Azospirillum brasilense

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU XiaoYu; ZOU XiaoXiao; LI JiLun

    2008-01-01

    Azospirillum brasilense is a diazotroph associated with many important agricultural crops and shows potential as a biofertilizer. NifA, the transcriptional activator of nitrogen fixation (nif) genes, and GInB, one of P,, signal transduction family protein, are key proteins in the regulation of nitrogen fixation in A. brasilense. It was previously reported that the regulation of NifA activity in A. brasilense depends on GInB. We report here that GInB was found to interact directly with the N-terminal domain of NifA in vivo under nitrogen-free conditions and the N-terminal mutant of NifA in which the Tyr residues at position 18 and 53 were replaced by Phe (NifA-N-Y18/53F) strengthened the interaction with GInB. Moreover, we also found that the amino acid residues 66-88 and 165-176 in N-terminus of NifA are responsible for the interaction with GInB.

  10. N-Terminally Myristoylated Feline Foamy Virus Gag Allows Env-Independent Budding of Sub-Viral Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Boum Kim

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Foamy viruses (FVs are distinct retroviruses classified as Spumaretrovirinae in contrast to the other retroviruses, the Orthoretrovirinae. As a unique feature of FVs, Gag is not sufficient for sub-viral particle (SVP release. In primate and feline FVs (PFV and FFV, particle budding completely depends on the cognate FV Env glycoproteins. It was recently shown that an artificially added N-terminal Gag myristoylation signal (myr-signal overcomes this restriction in PFV inducing an Orthoretrovirus-like budding phenotype. Here we show that engineered, heterologous N-terminal myr-signals also induce budding of the distantly related FFV Gag. The budding efficiency depends on the myr-signal and its location relative to the N-terminus of Gag. When the first nine amino acid residues of FFV Gag were replaced by known myr-signals, the budding efficiency as determined by the detection of extracellular SVPs was low. In contrast, adding myr-signals to the intact N‑terminus of FFV Gag resulted in a more efficient SVP release. Importantly, budding of myr-Gag proteins was sensitive towards inhibition of cellular N-myristoyltransferases. As expected, the addition or insertion of myr-signals that allowed Env-independent budding of FFV SVPs also retargeted Gag to plasma membrane-proximal sites and other intracellular membrane compartments. The data confirm that membrane-targeted FV Gag has the capacity of SVP formation.

  11. Bunyaviridae RNA polymerases (L-protein have an N-terminal, influenza-like endonuclease domain, essential for viral cap-dependent transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Reguera

    Full Text Available Bunyaviruses are a large family of segmented RNA viruses which, like influenza virus, use a cap-snatching mechanism for transcription whereby short capped primers derived by endonucleolytic cleavage of host mRNAs are used by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L-protein to transcribe viral mRNAs. It was recently shown that the cap-snatching endonuclease of influenza virus resides in a discrete N-terminal domain of the PA polymerase subunit. Here we structurally and functionally characterize a similar endonuclease in La Crosse orthobunyavirus (LACV L-protein. We expressed N-terminal fragments of the LACV L-protein and found that residues 1-180 have metal binding and divalent cation dependent nuclease activity analogous to that of influenza virus endonuclease. The 2.2 A resolution X-ray crystal structure of the domain confirms that LACV and influenza endonucleases have similar overall folds and identical two metal binding active sites. The in vitro activity of the LACV endonuclease could be abolished by point mutations in the active site or by binding 2,4-dioxo-4-phenylbutanoic acid (DPBA, a known influenza virus endonuclease inhibitor. A crystal structure with bound DPBA shows the inhibitor chelating two active site manganese ions. The essential role of this endonuclease in cap-dependent transcription was demonstrated by the loss of transcriptional activity in a RNP reconstitution system in cells upon making the same point mutations in the context of the full-length LACV L-protein. Using structure based sequence alignments we show that a similar endonuclease almost certainly exists at the N-terminus of L-proteins or PA polymerase subunits of essentially all known negative strand and cap-snatching segmented RNA viruses including arenaviruses (2 segments, bunyaviruses (3 segments, tenuiviruses (4-6 segments, and orthomyxoviruses (6-8 segments. This correspondence, together with the well-known mapping of the conserved polymerase motifs to the

  12. N-terminal extension of the yeast IA3 aspartic proteinase inhibitor relaxes the strict intrinsic selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterburn, Tim J; Phylip, Lowri H; Bur, Daniel; Wyatt, David M; Berry, Colin; Kay, John

    2007-07-01

    Yeast IA(3) aspartic proteinase inhibitor operates through an unprecedented mechanism and exhibits a remarkable specificity for one target enzyme, saccharopepsin. Even aspartic proteinases that are very closely similar to saccharopepsin (e.g. the vacuolar enzyme from Pichia pastoris) are not susceptible to significant inhibition. The Pichia proteinase was selected as the target for initial attempts to engineer IA(3) to re-design the specificity. The IA(3) polypeptides from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces castellii differ considerably in sequence. Alterations made by deletion or exchange of the residues in the C-terminal segment of these polypeptides had only minor effects. By contrast, extension of each of these wild-type and chimaeric polypeptides at its N-terminus by an MK(H)(7)MQ sequence generated inhibitors that displayed subnanomolar potency towards the Pichia enzyme. This gain-in-function was completely reversed upon removal of the extension sequence by exopeptidase trimming. Capture of the potentially positively charged aromatic histidine residues of the extension by remote, negatively charged side-chains, which were identified in the Pichia enzyme by modelling, may increase the local IA(3) concentration and create an anchor that enables the N-terminal segment residues to be harboured in closer proximity to the enzyme active site, thus promoting their interaction. In saccharopepsin, some of the counterpart residues are different and, consistent with this, the N-terminal extension of each IA(3) polypeptide was without major effect on the potency of interaction with saccharopepsin. In this way, it is possible to convert IA(3) polypeptides that display little affinity for the Pichia enzyme into potent inhibitors of this proteinase and thus broaden the target selectivity of this remarkable small protein.

  13. Natural vs. random protein sequences: Discovering combinatorics properties on amino acid words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoni, Daniele; Felici, Giovanni; Vergni, Davide

    2016-02-21

    Casual mutations and natural selection have driven the evolution of protein amino acid sequences that we observe at present in nature. The question about which is the dominant force of proteins evolution is still lacking of an unambiguous answer. Casual mutations tend to randomize protein sequences while, in order to have the correct functionality, one expects that selection mechanisms impose rigid constraints on amino acid sequences. Moreover, one also has to consider that the space of all possible amino acid sequences is so astonishingly large that it could be reasonable to have a well tuned amino acid sequence indistinguishable from a random one. In order to study the possibility to discriminate between random and natural amino acid sequences, we introduce different measures of association between pairs of amino acids in a sequence, and apply them to a dataset of 1047 natural protein sequences and 10,470 random sequences, carefully generated in order to preserve the relative length and amino acid distribution of the natural proteins. We analyze the multidimensional measures with machine learning techniques and show that, to a reasonable extent, natural protein sequences can be differentiated from random ones.

  14. Mutation of the N-Terminal Region of Chikungunya Virus Capsid Protein: Implications for Vaccine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Zaid, Ali; Goh, Lucas Y. H.; Hobson-Peters, Jody; Hall, Roy A.; Merits, Andres

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mosquito-transmitted chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthritogenic alphavirus of the Togaviridae family responsible for frequent outbreaks of arthritic disease in humans. Capsid protein, a structural protein encoded by the CHIKV RNA genome, is able to translocate to the host cell nucleolus. In encephalitic alphaviruses, nuclear translocation induces host cell transcriptional shutoff; however, the role of capsid protein nucleolar localization in arthritogenic alphaviruses remains unclear. Using recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged expression constructs and CHIKV infectious clones, we describe a nucleolar localization sequence (NoLS) in the N-terminal region of capsid protein, previously uncharacterized in CHIKV. Mutation of the NoLS by site-directed mutagenesis reduced efficiency of nuclear import of CHIKV capsid protein. In the virus, mutation of the capsid protein NoLS (CHIKV-NoLS) attenuated replication in mammalian and mosquito cells, producing a small-plaque phenotype. Attenuation of CHIKV-NoLS is likely due to disruption of the viral replication cycle downstream of viral RNA synthesis. In mice, CHIKV-NoLS infection caused no disease signs compared to wild-type CHIKV (CHIKV-WT)-infected mice; lack of disease signs correlated with significantly reduced viremia and decreased expression of proinflammatory factors. Mice immunized with CHIKV-NoLS, challenged with CHIKV-WT at 30 days postimmunization, develop no disease signs and no detectable viremia. Serum from CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice is able to efficiently neutralize CHIKV infection in vitro. Additionally, CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice challenged with the related alphavirus Ross River virus showed reduced early and peak viremia postchallenge, indicating a cross-protective effect. The high degree of CHIKV-NoLS attenuation may improve CHIKV antiviral and rational vaccine design. PMID:28223458

  15. Mutation of the N-Terminal Region of Chikungunya Virus Capsid Protein: Implications for Vaccine Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Taylor

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito-transmitted chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an arthritogenic alphavirus of the Togaviridae family responsible for frequent outbreaks of arthritic disease in humans. Capsid protein, a structural protein encoded by the CHIKV RNA genome, is able to translocate to the host cell nucleolus. In encephalitic alphaviruses, nuclear translocation induces host cell transcriptional shutoff; however, the role of capsid protein nucleolar localization in arthritogenic alphaviruses remains unclear. Using recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP-tagged expression constructs and CHIKV infectious clones, we describe a nucleolar localization sequence (NoLS in the N-terminal region of capsid protein, previously uncharacterized in CHIKV. Mutation of the NoLS by site-directed mutagenesis reduced efficiency of nuclear import of CHIKV capsid protein. In the virus, mutation of the capsid protein NoLS (CHIKV-NoLS attenuated replication in mammalian and mosquito cells, producing a small-plaque phenotype. Attenuation of CHIKV-NoLS is likely due to disruption of the viral replication cycle downstream of viral RNA synthesis. In mice, CHIKV-NoLS infection caused no disease signs compared to wild-type CHIKV (CHIKV-WT-infected mice; lack of disease signs correlated with significantly reduced viremia and decreased expression of proinflammatory factors. Mice immunized with CHIKV-NoLS, challenged with CHIKV-WT at 30 days postimmunization, develop no disease signs and no detectable viremia. Serum from CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice is able to efficiently neutralize CHIKV infection in vitro. Additionally, CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice challenged with the related alphavirus Ross River virus showed reduced early and peak viremia postchallenge, indicating a cross-protective effect. The high degree of CHIKV-NoLS attenuation may improve CHIKV antiviral and rational vaccine design.

  16. Doublet N-Terminal Oriented Proteomics for N-Terminomics and Proteolytic Processing Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Benoit; Jacome, Alvaro Sebastian Vaca; Rompais, Magali; Carapito, Christine; Schaeffer-Reiss, Christine

    2017-01-01

    The study of the N-terminome and the precise identification of proteolytic processing events are key in biology. Dedicated methodologies have been developed as the comprehensive characterization of the N-terminome can hardly be achieved by standard proteomics methods. In this context, we have set up a trimethoxyphenyl phosphonium (TMPP) labeling approach that allows the characterization of both N-terminal and internal digestion peptides in a single experiment. This latter point is a major advantage of our strategy as most N-terminomics methods rely on the enrichment of N-terminal peptides and thus exclude internal peptides.We have implemented a double heavy/light TMPP labeling and an automated data validation workflow that make our doublet N-terminal oriented proteomics (dN-TOP) strategy efficient for high-throughput N-terminome analysis.

  17. Peptides derived from human galectin-3 N-terminal tail interact with its carbohydrate recognition domain in a phosphorylation-dependent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berbís, M. Álvaro [Chemical and Physical Biology Department, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain); André, Sabine [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians University, 80539 Munich (Germany); Cañada, F. Javier [Chemical and Physical Biology Department, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pipkorn, Rüdiger [Central Peptide Synthesis Unit, German Cancer Research Center, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ippel, Hans [Department of Biochemistry, CARIM, University of Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Mayo, Kevin H. [Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Kübler, Dieter [Biomolecular Interactions, German Cancer Research Center, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Gabius, Hans-Joachim [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians University, 80539 Munich (Germany); Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús, E-mail: jjbarbero@cib.csic.es [Chemical and Physical Biology Department, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Galectin-3 is composed of a carbohydrate recognition domain and an N-terminal tail. •Synthetic peptides derived from the tail are shown to interact with the CRD. •This interaction is modulated by Ser- and Tyr-phosphorylation of the peptides. -- Abstract: Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a multi-functional effector protein that functions in the cytoplasm and the nucleus, as well as extracellularly following non-classical secretion. Structurally, Gal-3 is unique among galectins with its carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) attached to a rather long N-terminal tail composed mostly of collagen-like repeats (nine in the human protein) and terminating in a short non-collagenous terminal peptide sequence unique in this lectin family and not yet fully explored. Although several Ser and Tyr sites within the N-terminal tail can be phosphorylated, the physiological significance of this post-translational modification remains unclear. Here, we used a series of synthetic (phospho)peptides derived from the tail to assess phosphorylation-mediated interactions with {sup 15}N-labeled Gal-3 CRD. HSQC-derived chemical shift perturbations revealed selective interactions at the backface of the CRD that were attenuated by phosphorylation of Tyr 107 and Tyr 118, while phosphorylation of Ser 6 and Ser 12 was essential. Controls with sequence scrambling underscored inherent specificity. Our studies shed light on how phosphorylation of the N-terminal tail may impact on Gal-3 function and prompt further studies using phosphorylated full-length protein.

  18. Functional stabilization of an RNA recognition motif by a noncanonical N-terminal expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netter, Catharina; Weber, Gert; Benecke, Heike; Wahl, Markus C

    2009-07-01

    RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) constitute versatile macromolecular interaction platforms. They are found in many components of spliceosomes, in which they mediate RNA and protein interactions by diverse molecular strategies. The human U11/U12-65K protein of the minor spliceosome employs a C-terminal RRM to bind hairpin III of the U12 small nuclear RNA (snRNA). This interaction comprises one side of a molecular bridge between the U11 and U12 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) and is reminiscent of the binding of the N-terminal RRMs in the major spliceosomal U1A and U2B'' proteins to hairpins in their cognate snRNAs. Here we show by mutagenesis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays that the beta-sheet surface and a neighboring loop of 65K C-terminal RRM are involved in RNA binding, as previously seen in canonical RRMs like the N-terminal RRMs of the U1A and U2B'' proteins. However, unlike U1A and U2B'', some 30 residues N-terminal of the 65K C-terminal RRM core are additionally required for stable U12 snRNA binding. The crystal structure of the expanded 65K C-terminal RRM revealed that the N-terminal tail adopts an alpha-helical conformation and wraps around the protein toward the face opposite the RNA-binding platform. Point mutations in this part of the protein had only minor effects on RNA affinity. Removal of the N-terminal extension significantly decreased the thermal stability of the 65K C-terminal RRM. These results demonstrate that the 65K C-terminal RRM is augmented by an N-terminal element that confers stability to the domain, and thereby facilitates stable RNA binding.

  19. The complete amino acid sequence of the basic nuclear protein of bull spermatozoa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coelingh, J.P.; Monfoort, Cornelis H.; Rozijn, Thomas H.; Gevers Leuven, Jan A.; Schiphof, R.; Steyn-Parvé, Elizabeth P.; Braunitzer, Gerhard; Schrank, Barbara; Ruhfus, Annette

    1972-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the basic nuclear protein of bull spermatozoa has been established. The sequence was partially deduced by characterization of peptides isolated from thermolysine and chymotryptic digests of the reduced and S-aminoethylated protein. The complete sequence of the fir

  20. Investigation of the N-terminal coding region of MUC7 alterations in dentistry students with and without caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koç Öztürk L

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Human low-molecular weight salivary mucin (MUC7 is a small, secreted glycoprotein coded by MUC7. In the oral cavity, they inhibit the colonization of oral bacteria, including cariogenic ones, by masking their surface adhesions, thus helping saliva to avoid dental caries. The N-terminal domain is important for low-molecular weight (MG2 mucins to contact with oral microorganisms. In this study, we aimed to identify the N-terminal coding region of the MUC7 gene between individuals with and without caries. Forty-four healthy dental students were enrolled in this study; 24 of them were classified to have caries [decayed, missing, filled-teeth (DMFT = 5.6] according to the World Health Organization (WHO criteria, and 20 of them were caries-free (DMFT = 0. Simplified oral hygiene index (OHI-S and gingival index (GI were used to determine the oral hygiene and gingival conditions. Total protein levels and salivary total protein levels and salivary buffer capacity (SBC were determined by Lowry and Ericsson methods. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood cells of all the participants and genotyping was carried out by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR-sequencing method. No statistical differences were found between two groups in the terms of salivary parameters, oral hygiene and gingival conditions. We detected one common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP that leads to a change of asparagine to lysine at codon 80. This substitution was found in 29.0 and 40.0%, respectively, of the groups with and without caries. No other sequence variations were detected. The SNP found in this study may be a specific polymorphism affecting the Turkish population. Further studies with extended numbers are necessary in order to clarify this finding.

  1. Investigation of the N-terminal coding region of MUC7 alterations in dentistry students with and without caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç Öztürk, L; Yarat, A; Akyuz, S; Furuncuoglu, H

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human low-molecular weight salivary mucin (MUC7) is a small, secreted glycoprotein coded by MUC7. In the oral cavity, they inhibit the colonization of oral bacteria, including cariogenic ones, by masking their surface adhesions, thus helping saliva to avoid dental caries. The N-terminal domain is important for low-molecular weight (MG2) mucins to contact with oral microorganisms. In this study, we aimed to identify the N-terminal coding region of the MUC7 gene between individuals with and without caries. Forty-four healthy dental students were enrolled in this study; 24 of them were classified to have caries [decayed, missing, filled-teeth (DMFT) = 5.6] according to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, and 20 of them were caries-free (DMFT = 0). Simplified oral hygiene index (OHI-S) and gingival index (GI) were used to determine the oral hygiene and gingival conditions. Total protein levels and salivary total protein levels and salivary buffer capacity (SBC) were determined by Lowry and Ericsson methods. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood cells of all the participants and genotyping was carried out by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-sequencing method. No statistical differences were found between two groups in the terms of salivary parameters, oral hygiene and gingival conditions. We detected one common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that leads to a change of asparagine to lysine at codon 80. This substitution was found in 29.0 and 40.0%, respectively, of the groups with and without caries. No other sequence variations were detected. The SNP found in this study may be a specific polymorphism affecting the Turkish population. Further studies with extended numbers are necessary in order to clarify this finding.

  2. The Herpes Simplex Virus Protein pUL31 Escorts Nucleocapsids to Sites of Nuclear Egress, a Process Coordinated by Its N-Terminal Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Claus-Henning; Binz, Anne; Sodeik, Beate; Bauerfeind, Rudolf; Bailer, Susanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Progeny capsids of herpesviruses leave the nucleus by budding through the nuclear envelope. Two viral proteins, the membrane protein pUL34 and the nucleo-phosphoprotein pUL31 form the nuclear egress complex that is required for capsid egress out of the nucleus. All pUL31 orthologs are composed of a diverse N-terminal domain with 1 to 3 basic patches and a conserved C-terminal domain. To decipher the functions of the N-terminal domain, we have generated several Herpes simplex virus mutants and show here that the N-terminal domain of pUL31 is essential with basic patches being critical for viral propagation. pUL31 and pUL34 entered the nucleus independently of each other via separate routes and the N-terminal domain of pUL31 was required to prevent their premature interaction in the cytoplasm. Unexpectedly, a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal embedded in this domain was not required for nuclear import of pUL31. In the nucleus, pUL31 associated with the nuclear envelope and newly formed capsids. Viral mutants lacking the N-terminal domain or with its basic patches neutralized still associated with nucleocapsids but were unable to translocate them to the nuclear envelope. Replacing the authentic basic patches with a novel artificial one resulted in HSV1(17+)Lox-UL31-hbpmp1mp2, that was viable but delayed in nuclear egress and compromised in viral production. Thus, while the C-terminal domain of pUL31 is sufficient for the interaction with nucleocapsids, the N-terminal domain was essential for capsid translocation to sites of nuclear egress and a coordinated interaction with pUL34. Our data indicate an orchestrated sequence of events with pUL31 binding to nucleocapsids and escorting them to the inner nuclear envelope. We propose a common mechanism for herpesviral nuclear egress: pUL31 is required for intranuclear translocation of nucleocapsids and subsequent interaction with pUL34 thereby coupling capsid maturation with primary envelopment. PMID:26083367

  3. The Herpes Simplex Virus Protein pUL31 Escorts Nucleocapsids to Sites of Nuclear Egress, a Process Coordinated by Its N-Terminal Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Funk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Progeny capsids of herpesviruses leave the nucleus by budding through the nuclear envelope. Two viral proteins, the membrane protein pUL34 and the nucleo-phosphoprotein pUL31 form the nuclear egress complex that is required for capsid egress out of the nucleus. All pUL31 orthologs are composed of a diverse N-terminal domain with 1 to 3 basic patches and a conserved C-terminal domain. To decipher the functions of the N-terminal domain, we have generated several Herpes simplex virus mutants and show here that the N-terminal domain of pUL31 is essential with basic patches being critical for viral propagation. pUL31 and pUL34 entered the nucleus independently of each other via separate routes and the N-terminal domain of pUL31 was required to prevent their premature interaction in the cytoplasm. Unexpectedly, a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal embedded in this domain was not required for nuclear import of pUL31. In the nucleus, pUL31 associated with the nuclear envelope and newly formed capsids. Viral mutants lacking the N-terminal domain or with its basic patches neutralized still associated with nucleocapsids but were unable to translocate them to the nuclear envelope. Replacing the authentic basic patches with a novel artificial one resulted in HSV1(17+Lox-UL31-hbpmp1mp2, that was viable but delayed in nuclear egress and compromised in viral production. Thus, while the C-terminal domain of pUL31 is sufficient for the interaction with nucleocapsids, the N-terminal domain was essential for capsid translocation to sites of nuclear egress and a coordinated interaction with pUL34. Our data indicate an orchestrated sequence of events with pUL31 binding to nucleocapsids and escorting them to the inner nuclear envelope. We propose a common mechanism for herpesviral nuclear egress: pUL31 is required for intranuclear translocation of nucleocapsids and subsequent interaction with pUL34 thereby coupling capsid maturation with primary

  4. Domain structures and molecular evolution of class I and class II major histocompatibility gene complex (MHC) products deduced from amino acid and nucleotide sequence homologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, K

    1984-01-01

    Domain structures of class I and class II MHC products were analyzed from a viewpoint of amino acid and nucleotide sequence homologies. Alignment statistics revealed that class I (transplantation) antigen H chains consist of four mutually homologous domains, and that class II (HLA-DR) antigen beta and alpha chains are both composed of three mutually homologous ones. The N-terminal three and two domains of class I and class II (both beta and alpha) gene products, respectively, all of which being approximately 90 residues long, were concluded to be homologous to beta2-microglobulin (beta2M). The membrane-embedded C-terminal shorter domains of these MHC products were also found to be homologous to one another and to the third domain of class I H chains. Class I H chains were found to be more closely related to class II alpha chains than to class II beta chains. Based on these findings, an exon duplication history from a common ancestral gene encoding a beta2M-like primodial protein of one-domain-length up to the contemporary MHC products was proposed.

  5. Selective monoprotection of 1,n-terminal Diols in supercritical carbon dioxide: a striking example of solvent tunable desymmetrization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licence, Peter; Gray, William K; Sokolova, Maia; Poliakoff, Martyn

    2005-01-12

    The reaction between 1,n-terminal diols (n = 3 or 6) with simple alcohols (MeOH, EtOH, and n-PrOH) in supercritical CO(2) over an acid catalyst (Amberlyst 15) leads to two possible products, a mono- and a bis-ether. At 150 degrees C, the selectivity of the reaction with 1,6-hexanediol and MeOH can be switched from 1:20 in favor of the bis-ether at 50 bar to 9:1 in favor of the desymmetrized mono-ether at 200 bar. It is demonstrated that the switch in selectivity is associated with the phase state of the reaction mixture, with monophasic conditions favoring the mono-ether and biphasic conditions favoring the bis-ether. A rationalization of this effect is also presented.

  6. Sequence and crystallization of influenza virus B/Beijing/1/87 neuraminidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burmeister, W.P.; Daniels, R.S.; Dayan, S.; Gagnon, J.; Cusack, S.; Ruigrok, R.W. (EMBL Grenoble Outstation c/o ILL (France))

    1991-01-01

    Influenza B/Beijing/1/87 neuraminidase heads were isolated from virus via trypsin digestion and characterized by PAGE, N-terminal sequencing, electron microscopy, and enzyme activity. The heads were crystallized into two crystal forms; tetragonal plates, like other neuraminidase crystals described before, that diffract to medium resolution (3 A) and a new form consisting of trigonal prisms or needles that diffract to high resolution (at least 2 A). The gene segment coding for neuraminidase was sequenced and compared with the neuraminidase sequence of B/Lee/40. The deduced amino acid sequences for neuraminidase showed only a 7% difference, whereas those for the NB proteins differed by 20%.

  7. Amino acid sequence of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) and northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, John; Beckstead, Robert B; Payne, Jason; Singh, Rakesh K; Mohan, Anand

    2015-08-15

    Myoglobin has an important physiological role in vertebrates, and as the primary sarcoplasmic pigment in meat, influences quality perception and consumer acceptability. In this study, the amino acid sequences of Japanese quail and northern bobwhite myoglobin were deduced by cDNA cloning of the coding sequence from mRNA. Japanese quail myoglobin was isolated from quail cardiac muscles, purified using ammonium sulphate precipitation and gel-filtration, and subjected to multiple enzymatic digestions. Mass spectrometry corroborated the deduced protein amino acid sequence at the protein level. Sequence analysis revealed both species' myoglobin structures consist of 153 amino acids, differing at only three positions. When compared with chicken myoglobin, Japanese quail showed 98% sequence identity, and northern bobwhite 97% sequence identity. The myoglobin in both quail species contained eight histidine residues instead of the nine present in chicken and turkey.

  8. Calmodulin activation of an endoplasmic reticulum-located calcium pump involves an interaction with the N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, I.; Harper, J. F.; Liang, F.; Sze, H.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate how calmodulin regulates a unique subfamily of Ca(2+) pumps found in plants, we examined the kinetic properties of isoform ACA2 identified in Arabidopsis. A recombinant ACA2 was expressed in a yeast K616 mutant deficient in two endogenous Ca(2+) pumps. Orthovanadate-sensitive (45)Ca(2+) transport into vesicles isolated from transformants demonstrated that ACA2 is a Ca(2+) pump. Ca(2+) pumping by the full-length protein (ACA2-1) was 4- to 10-fold lower than that of the N-terminal truncated ACA2-2 (Delta2-80), indicating that the N-terminal domain normally acts to inhibit the pump. An inhibitory sequence (IC(50) = 4 microM) was localized to a region within valine-20 to leucine-44, because a peptide corresponding to this sequence lowered the V(max) and increased the K(m) for Ca(2+) of the constitutively active ACA2-2 to values comparable to the full-length pump. The peptide also blocked the activity (IC(50) = 7 microM) of a Ca(2+) pump (AtECA1) belonging to a second family of Ca(2+) pumps. This inhibitory sequence appears to overlap with a calmodulin-binding site in ACA2, previously mapped between aspartate-19 and arginine-36 (J.F. Harper, B. Hong, I. Hwang, H.Q. Guo, R. Stoddard, J.F. Huang, M.G. Palmgren, H. Sze inverted question mark1998 J Biol Chem 273: 1099-1106). These results support a model in which the pump is kept "unactivated" by an intramolecular interaction between an autoinhibitory sequence located between residues 20 and 44 and a site in the Ca(2+) pump core that is highly conserved between different Ca(2+) pump families. Results further support a model in which activation occurs as a result of Ca(2+)-induced binding of calmodulin to a site overlapping or immediately adjacent to the autoinhibitory sequence.

  9. Molecular cloning of a beta-glucan pattern-recognition lipoprotein from the white shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei: correlations between the deduced amino acid sequence and the native protein structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-Figueroa, María Gabriela; Vargas-Requena, Claudia; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Vargas-Albores, Francisco; Higuera-Ciapara, Inocencio; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Yepiz-Plascencia, Gloria

    2004-06-01

    The hemolymph pattern-recognition beta-glucan binding protein from the white shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei is also a high density lipoprotein (betaGBP-HDL) involved in innate immunity. The betaGBP-HDL full length cDNA sequence determined was 6.3 kb long, and contains a long 3'UTR region with a polyadenylation signal and a poly-A+ tail. The open reading frame is 1454 amino acids long and the N-terminal residue of the mature protein is localized in position 198 of the ORF. Comparison of the betaGBP-HDL amino acid sequence against GenBank detected only significant similarity to betaGBP from the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus. betaGBP-HDL is expressed in hepatopancreas, muscle, pleopods and gills, but not in hemocytes as determined by RT-PCR. We discuss the analysis of the deduced primary sequence in terms of the predicted secondary structure, glucanase-like and RGD motives relevant to its dual roles in defence and lipid transport.

  10. Genetic complementation analysis showed distinct contributions of the N-terminal tail of H2A.Z to epigenetic regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusakabe, Masayuki; Oku, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Ryo; Hori, Tetsuya; Muto, Akihiko; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Harata, Masahiko

    2016-02-01

    H2A.Z is one of the most evolutionally conserved histone variants. In vertebrates, this histone variant has two isoforms, H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2, each of which is coded by an individual gene. H2A.Z is involved in multiple epigenetic regulations, and in humans, it also has relevance to carcinogenesis. In this study, we used the H2A.Z DKO cells, in which both H2A.Z isoform genes could be inducibly knocked out, for the functional analysis of H2A.Z by a genetic complementation assay, as the first example of its kind in vertebrates. Ectopically expressed wild-type H2A.Z and two N-terminal mutants, a nonacetylable H2A.Z mutant and a chimera in which the N-terminal tail of H2A.Z.1 was replaced with that of the canonical H2A, complemented the mitotic defects of H2A.Z DKO cells similarly, suggesting that both acetylation and distinctive sequence of the N-terminal tail of H2A.Z are not required for mitotic progression. In contrast, each one of these three forms of H2A.Z complemented the transcriptional defects of H2A.Z DKO cells differently. These results suggest that the N-terminal tail of vertebrate H2A.Z makes distinctively different contributions to these epigenetic events. Our results also imply that this genetic complementation system is a novel and useful tool for the functional analysis of H2A.Z.

  11. Site directed spin labeling studies of Escherichia coli dihydroorotate dehydrogenase N-terminal extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couto, Sheila G. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sao-carlense 400, C.P. 369, 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Grupo de Biofisica e Fisica Aplicada a Medicina, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Goias, Campus Samambaia, C.P. 131, 74001-970, Goiania, GO (Brazil); Cristina Nonato, M. [Laboratorio de Cristalografia de Proteinas, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. do Cafe S/N, 14040-903, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Costa-Filho, Antonio J., E-mail: ajcosta@ffclrp.usp.br [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sao-carlense 400, C.P. 369, 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EcDHODH is a membrane-associated enzyme and a promising target for drug design. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enzyme's N-terminal extension is responsible for membrane association. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal works as a molecular lid regulating access to the protein interior. -- Abstract: Dihydroorotate dehydrogenases (DHODHs) are enzymes that catalyze the fourth step of the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. In this reaction, DHODH converts dihydroorotate to orotate, using a flavine mononucleotide as a cofactor. Since the synthesis of nucleotides has different pathways in mammals as compared to parasites, DHODH has gained much attention as a promising target for drug design. Escherichia coli DHODH (EcDHODH) is a family 2 DHODH that interacts with cell membranes in order to promote catalysis. The membrane association is supposedly made via an extension found in the enzyme's N-terminal. In the present work, we used site directed spin labeling (SDSL) to specifically place a magnetic probe at positions 2, 5, 19, and 21 within the N-terminal and thus monitor, by using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), dynamics and structural changes in this region in the presence of a membrane model system. Overall, our ESR spectra show that the N-terminal indeed binds to membranes and that it experiences a somewhat high flexibility that could be related to the role of this region as a molecular lid controlling the entrance of the enzyme's active site and thus allowing the enzyme to give access to quinones that are dispersed in the membrane and that are necessary for the catalysis.

  12. The amino acid sequence of elephant (Elephas maximus) myoglobin and the phylogeny of Proboscidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dene, H; Goodman, M; Romero-Herrera, A E

    1980-02-13

    The complete amino acid sequence of skeletal myoglobin from the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) is reported. The functional significance of variations seen when this sequence is compared with that of sperm whale myoglobin is explored in the light of the crystallographic model available for the latter molecule. The phylogenetic implications of the elephant myoglobin amino acid sequence are evaluated by using the maximum parsimony technique. A similar analysis is also presented which incorporates all of the proteins sequenced from the elephant. These results are discussed with respect to current views on proboscidean phylogeny.

  13. Functional analysis of the extended N-terminal region in PLC-δ1 (MlPLC-δ1) from the mud loach, Misgurnus mizolepis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Na Young; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Moo-Sang; Seo, Jung Soo; Jung, Se Hwan; Park, Sung Hwan; Lee, Hyung Ho; Chung, Joon Ki

    2014-01-01

    Mud loach phospholipase C-δ1 (MlPLC-δ1) contains all the characteristic domains found in mammalian PLC-δ isozymes (pleckstrin homology domain, EF-hands, X–Y catalytic region, and C2 domain) as well as an extended 26-amino acid (aa)-long N-terminal region that is an alternative splice form of PLC-δ1 and is novel to vertebrate PLC-δ. In the present structure-function analysis, deletion of the extended N-terminal region caused complete loss of phosphatidylinositol (PI)- and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2)-hydrolyzing activity in MlPLC-δ1. Additionally, recombinant full-length MlPLC-δ1 PLC activity was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by coincubation with the 26-aa protein fragment. Using a protein-lipid overlay assay, both full-length MlPLC-δ1 and the 26-aa protein fragment had substantial affinity for PIP2, whereas deletion of the 26-aa region from MlPLC-δ1 (MlPLC-δ1-deletion) resulted in lower affinity for PIP2. These results suggest that the novel N-terminal exon of MlPLC-δ1 could play an important role in the regulation of PLC-δ1.

  14. NMR solution structure of the N-terminal domain of hERG and its interaction with the S4-S5 linker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qingxin; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Huang, Qiwei; Raida, Manfred [Experimental Therapeutics Center, The Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 31 Biopolis Way Nanos, 03-01, Singapore 138669 (Singapore); Kang, CongBao, E-mail: cbkang@etc.a-star.edu.sg [Experimental Therapeutics Center, The Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 31 Biopolis Way Nanos, 03-01, Singapore 138669 (Singapore)

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} The N-terminal domain (NTD, eag domain) containing 135 residues of hERG was expressed and purified from E. coli cells. {yields} Solution structure of NTD was determined with NMR spectroscopy. {yields} The alpha-helical region (residues 13-23) was demonstrated to possess the characteristics of an amphipathic helix. {yields} NMR titration confirmed the interaction between NTD and the peptide from the S4-S5 linker. -- Abstract: The human Ether-a-go-go Related Gene (hERG) potassium channel mediates the rapid delayed rectifier current (IKr) in the cardiac action potential. Mutations in the 135 amino acid residue N-terminal domain (NTD) cause channel dysfunction or mis-translocation. To study the structure of NTD, it was overexpressed and purified from Escherichia coli cells using affinity purification and gel filtration chromatography. The purified protein behaved as a monomer under purification conditions. Far- and near-UV, circular dichroism (CD) and solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies showed that the purified protein was well-folded. The solution structure of NTD was obtained and the N-terminal residues 13-23 forming an amphipathic helix which may be important for the protein-protein or protein-membrane interactions. NMR titration experiment also demonstrated that residues from 88 to 94 in NTD are important for the molecular interaction with the peptide derived from the S4-S5 linker.

  15. Zinc(II) interactions with brain-derived neurotrophic factor N-terminal peptide fragments: inorganic features and biological perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travaglia, Alessio; La Mendola, Diego; Magrì, Antonio; Pietropaolo, Adriana; Nicoletti, Vincenzo G; Grasso, Giuseppe; Malgieri, Gaetano; Fattorusso, Roberto; Isernia, Carla; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2013-10-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin essential for neuronal differentiation, growth, and survival; it is involved in memory formation and higher cognitive functions. The N-terminal domain of BDNF is crucial for the binding selectivity and activation of its specific TrkB receptor. Zn(2+) ion binding may influence BDNF activity. Zn(2+) complexes with the peptide fragment BDNF(1-12) encompassing the sequence 1-12 of the N-terminal domain of BDNF were studied by means of potentiometry, electrospray mass spectrometry, NMR, and density functional theory (DFT) approaches. The predominant Zn(2+) complex species, at physiological pH, is [ZnL] in which the metal ion is bound to an amino, an imidazole, and two water molecules (NH2, N(Im), and 2O(water)) in a tetrahedral environment. DFT-based geometry optimization of the zinc coordination environment showed a hydrogen bond between the carboxylate and a water molecule bound to zinc in [ZnL]. The coordination features of the acetylated form [AcBDNF(1-12)] and of a single mutated peptide [BDNF(1-12)D3N] were also characterized, highlighting the role of the imidazole side chain as the first anchoring site and ruling out the direct involvement of the aspartate residue in the metal binding. Zn(2+) addition to the cell culture medium induces an increase in the proliferative activity of the BDNF(1-12) peptide and of the whole protein on the SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cell line. The effect of Zn(2+) is opposite to that previously observed for Cu(2+) addition, which determines a decrease in the proliferative activity for both peptide and protein, suggesting that these metals might discriminate and modulate differently the activity of BDNF.

  16. N-terminal of Papaya ringspot virus type-W (PRSV-W) helper component proteinase (HC-Pro) is essential for PRSV systemic infection in zucchini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Yun-Kiam; Duangjit, Janejira; Panyim, Sakol

    2009-06-01

    The Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) is one of the limiting factors affecting papaya and cucurbits production worldwide. PRSV belongs to the potyvirus genus which consists of 30% of known plant viruses. Two serological closely related strains, namely type-P and -W, have been reported. PRSV type-P infects both papaya and cucurbits, while type-W infects only cucurbits. The genome of PRSV Thailand isolate consists of a (+) RNA molecule of 10323 nucleotides, which is first translated into a single polypeptide and further cleaved by three viral encoded proteases into ten gene products. Helper-component proteinase (HC-Pro), which is encoded by the 2nd cistron of the potyviral genome, has been implicated in aphid transmission, viral movement, viral replication and suppression of host viral defense system. Studies of the Tobacco etch virus (TEV), Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV), Onion yellow dwarf virus (OYDV) and Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) indicate that the N-terminal of HC-Pro is dispensable for systemic infection in their respective hosts. However, deletion analysis of the Tobacco vein mottling virus (TVMV) indicates otherwise. In this study, we examined whether HC-Pro is essential for PRSV systemic infection in cucurbits and the role of its N-terminal in systemic infection. Our results indicated that HC-Pro is indispensable for PRSV infection in zucchini. Deletion analysis of PRSV HC-Pro showed that deletion of as few as 54 amino acids at the N-terminal of HC-Pro completely abolished the infectivity of the corresponding cDNA clone. Therefore, it is proposed that the N-terminal of HC-Pro is involved in systemic infection of PRSV, in addition to its conserved function in aphid transmission.

  17. Chromophore incorporation, Pr to Pfr kinetics, and Pfr thermal reversion of recombinant N-terminal fragments of phytochrome A and B chromoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remberg, A; Ruddat, A; Braslavsky, S E; Gärtner, W; Schaffner, K

    1998-07-14

    N-Terminal apoprotein fragments of oat phytochrome A (phyA) of 65 kDa (amino acids 1-595) and potato phyB of 66 kDa (1-596) were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and in the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, and assembled with phytochromobilin (PthetaB; native chromophore) and phycocyanobilin (PCB). The phyA65 apoprotein from yeast showed a monoexponential assembly kinetics after an initial steep rise, whereas the corresponding apoprotein from E. coli showed only a slow monoexponential assembly. The phyB66 apoprotein incorporated either chromophore more slowly than the phyA65s, with biexponential kinetics. With all apoproteins, PthetaB was incorporated faster than PCB. The thermal stabilities of the Pfr forms of the N-terminal halves are similar to those known for the full-length recombinant phytochromes: oat phyA65 Pfr is highly stable, whereas potato phyB66 Pfr is rapidly converted into Pr. Thus, neither the C-terminal domain nor homodimer formation regulates this property. Rather, it is a characteristic of the phytochrome indicating its origin from mono- or dicots. The Pr to Pfr kinetics of the N-terminal phyA65 and phyB66 are different. The primary photoproduct I700 of phyA65-PCB decayed monoexponentially and the PthetaB analogue biexponentially, whereas the phyB66 I700 decayed monoexponentially irrespective of the chromophore incorporated. The formation of Pfr from Pr is faster with the N-terminal halves than with the full-length phytochromes, indicating an involvement of the C-terminal domain in the relatively slow protein conformational changes.

  18. Layered materials with coexisting acidic and basic sites for catalytic one-pot reaction sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motokura, Ken; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2009-06-17

    Acidic montmorillonite-immobilized primary amines (H-mont-NH(2)) were found to be excellent acid-base bifunctional catalysts for one-pot reaction sequences, which are the first materials with coexisting acid and base sites active for acid-base tamdem reactions. For example, tandem deacetalization-Knoevenagel condensation proceeded successfully with the H-mont-NH(2), affording the corresponding condensation product in a quantitative yield. The acidity of the H-mont-NH(2) was strongly influenced by the preparation solvent, and the base-catalyzed reactions were enhanced by interlayer acid sites.

  19. N-terminal pro-C-type natriuretic peptide in serum associated with bone destruction in patients with multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylin, Anne K; Gøtze, Jens P.; Heickendorff, Lene;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To examine whether N-terminal proCNP concentrations in serum is associated with bone destruction in patients with multiple myeloma. MATERIALS & METHODS: N-terminal proCNP and biochemical bone markers were measured in 153 patients. Radiographic bone disease and skeletal-related events were ev...

  20. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Enhanced Binding Affinity, Sequence Specificity and Solubility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA strand, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a group consisting of naturally......-occurring nucleobases and non-naturally-occurring nucleobases attached to a polyamide backbone, and contain C1-C8 alkylamine side chains. Methods of enhancing the solubility, binding affinity and sequence specificity of PNAs are provided....

  1. Genome sequence of the acid-tolerant strain Rhizobium sp. LPU83.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibberg, Daniel; Tejerizo, Gonzalo Torres; Del Papa, María Florencia; Martini, Carla; Pühler, Alfred; Lagares, Antonio; Schlüter, Andreas; Pistorio, Mariano

    2014-04-20

    Rhizobia are important members of the soil microbiome since they enter into nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with different legume host plants. Rhizobium sp. LPU83 is an acid-tolerant Rhizobium strain featuring a broad-host-range. However, it is ineffective in nitrogen fixation. Here, the improved draft genome sequence of this strain is reported. Genome sequence information provides the basis for analysis of its acid tolerance, symbiotic properties and taxonomic classification.

  2. Multiple Genome Sequences of Important Beer-Spoiling Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Andreas J.; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2016-01-01

    Seven strains of important beer-spoiling lactic acid bacteria were sequenced using single-molecule real-time sequencing. Complete genomes were obtained for strains of Lactobacillus paracollinoides, Lactobacillus lindneri, and Pediococcus claussenii. The analysis of these genomes emphasizes the role of plasmids as the genomic foundation of beer-spoiling ability. PMID:27795248

  3. Genome Sequence of Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755, a Butyric Acid-Overproducing Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ling; Zhu, Liying; Xu, Xian; Li, Yanping; Li, Shuang; Huang, He

    2013-05-30

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 is an efficient producer of butyric acid. Here we report a 3.01-Mb assembly of its genome sequence and other useful information, including the coding sequences (CDSs) responsible for an alternative pathway leading to acetate synthesis as well as a series of membrane transport systems.

  4. Genome Sequence of Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755, a Butyric Acid-Overproducing Strain

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 is an efficient producer of butyric acid. Here we report a 3.01-Mb assembly of its genome sequence and other useful information, including the coding sequences (CDSs) responsible for an alternative pathway leading to acetate synthesis as well as a series of membrane transport systems.

  5. Multiple Genome Sequences of Important Beer-Spoiling Lactic Acid Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Geissler, Andreas J.; Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2016-01-01

    Seven strains of important beer-spoiling lactic acid bacteria were sequenced using single-molecule real-time sequencing. Complete genomes were obtained for strains of Lactobacillus paracollinoides, Lactobacillus lindneri, and Pediococcus claussenii. The analysis of these genomes emphasizes the role of plasmids as the genomic foundation of beer-spoiling ability.

  6. Amino Acid Sequence - KOME | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us ...ll_sequence_amino_db.zip File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/kome/LATEST...ta.zip File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/kome/LATEST/kome_ine_full_sequence_amino_db.fasta.zip Fi...date History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Amino Acid Sequence - KOME | LSDB Archive ...

  7. PASTA: Ultra-Large Multiple Sequence Alignment for Nucleotide and Amino-Acid Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirarab, Siavash; Nguyen, Nam; Guo, Sheng; Wang, Li-San; Kim, Junhyong; Warnow, Tandy

    2015-05-01

    We introduce PASTA, a new multiple sequence alignment algorithm. PASTA uses a new technique to produce an alignment given a guide tree that enables it to be both highly scalable and very accurate. We present a study on biological and simulated data with up to 200,000 sequences, showing that PASTA produces highly accurate alignments, improving on the accuracy and scalability of the leading alignment methods (including SATé). We also show that trees estimated on PASTA alignments are highly accurate--slightly better than SATé trees, but with substantial improvements relative to other methods. Finally, PASTA is faster than SATé, highly parallelizable, and requires relatively little memory.

  8. N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide during pharmacological heart rate reduction in hyperthyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, M; Kistorp, C; Corell, P

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that elevated N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels in hyperthyroidism are mainly driven by increased metabolism due to excess thyroid hormones. Therefore, serum levels of N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide were studied during reduced cardiac work load by means...... of pharmacologically induced heart rate reduction in untreated hyperthyroidism. We designed a noncontrolled interventional study. Eighteen women with newly diagnosed hyperthyroidism were evaluated (including an echocardiography) before and after pharmacological heart rate reduction with 360 mg verapamil daily for 6......-index decreased from median 319 to 315 arbitrary units (p=0.039) and free triiodothyronine-index increased from 8.6 to 9.9 arbitrary units (p=0.010). No changes in echocardiographic parameters were observed. A decrease in resting heart rate in untreated hyperthyroidism due to verapamil treatment did not result...

  9. Resin-assisted Enrichment of N-terminal Peptides for Characterizing Proteolytic Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Seo; Dai, Ziyu; Aryal, Uma K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Baker, Scott E.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2013-06-17

    Proteolytic processing is a ubiquitous, irreversible posttranslational modification that plays an important role in cellular regulation in all living organisms. Herein we report a resin-assisted positive selection method for specifically enriching protein N-terminal peptides to facilitate the characterization of proteolytic processing events by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In this approach, proteins are initially reduced and alkylated and their lysine residues are converted to homoarginines. Then, protein N-termini are selectively converted to reactive thiol groups. We demonstrate that these sequential reactions were achieved with nearly quantitative efficiencies. Thiol-containing N-terminal peptides are then captured (>98% efficiency) by a thiol-affinity resin, a significant improvement over the traditional avidin/biotin enrichment. Application to cell lysates of Aspergillus niger, a filamentous fungus of interest for biomass degradation, enabled the identification of 1672 unique protein N-termini and proteolytic cleavage sites from 690 unique proteins.

  10. PRINT: A Protein Bioconjugation Method with Exquisite N-terminal Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sur, Surojit; Qiao, Yuan; Fries, Anja; O'Meally, Robert N.; Cole, Robert N.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Zhou, Shibin

    2015-12-01

    Chemical conjugation is commonly used to enhance the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and potency of protein therapeutics, but often leads to non-specific modification or loss of bioactivity. Here, we present a simple, versatile and widely applicable method that allows exquisite N-terminal specific modification of proteins. Combining reversible side-chain blocking and protease mediated cleavage of a commonly used HIS tag appended to a protein, we generate with high yield and purity exquisitely site specific and selective bio-conjugates of TNF-α by using amine reactive NHS ester chemistry. We confirm the N terminal selectivity and specificity using mass spectral analyses and show near complete retention of the biological activity of our model protein both in vitro and in vivo murine models. We believe that this methodology would be applicable to a variety of potentially therapeutic proteins and the specificity afforded by this technique would allow for rapid generation of novel biologics.

  11. Nucleotide sequences of two fimbrial major subunit genes, pmpA and ucaA, from canine-uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijlsma, I G; van Dijk, L; Kusters, J G; Gaastra, W

    1995-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis strains were isolated from dogs with urinary tract infection (UTI) and fimbriae were prepared from two strains. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the major fimbrial subunits were determined and both sequences appeared identical to the N-terminal amino acid sequence of a urinary cell adhesin (UCA) (Wray, S. K., Hull, S. I., Cook, R. G., Barrish, J. & Hull, R. A., 1986, Infect Immun 54, 43-49). The genes of two different major fimbrial subunits were cloned using oligonucleotide probes that were designed on the basis of the N-terminal UCA sequence. Nucleotide sequencing revealed the complete ucaA gene of 540 bp (from strain IVB247) encoding a polypeptide of 180 amino acids, including a 22 amino acid signal sequence peptide, and the pmpA (P. mirabilis P-like pili) gene of 549 bp (from strain IVB219) encoding a polypeptide of 183 amino acids, including a 23 amino acid signal sequence. Hybridization experiments gave clear indications of the presence of both kinds of fimbriae in many UTI-related canine P. mirabilis isolates. However, the presence of these fimbriae could not be demonstrated in P. vulgaris or other Proteus-related species. Database analysis of amino acid sequences of major subunit proteins revealed that the UcaA protein shares about 56% amino acid identity with the F17A and F111A major fimbrial subunits from bovine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. In turn, the PmpA protein more closely resembled the pyelonephritis-associated pili (Pap)-like major subunit protein from UTI-related E. coli. The evolutionary relationship of UcaA, PmpA and various other fimbrial subunit proteins is presented in a phylogenetic tree.

  12. N-terminal Pro-B-type natriuretic peptide: a measure of significant patent cuctus arteriosus

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    OFarombi-Oghuvbu, IO

    2008-01-24

    Background: B type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a marker for ventricular dysfunction secreted as a pre-prohormone, Pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (ProBNP), and cleaved into BNP and a biologically inactive fragment, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). Little is known about the clinical usefulness of NT-proBNP in preterm infants.\\r\

  13. Receptor binding and adenylate cyclase activities of glucagon analogues modified in the N-terminal region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, R.L.; Pelton, J.T.; Trivedi, D.; Johnson, D.G.; Coy, D.H.; Sueiras-Diaz, J.; Hruby, V.J.

    1986-04-08

    In this study, we determined the ability of four N-terminally modified derivatives of glucagon, (3-Me-His1,Arg12)-, (Phe1,Arg12)-, (D-Ala4,Arg12)-, and (D-Phe4)glucagon, to compete with 125I-glucagon for binding sites specific for glucagon in hepatic plasma membranes and to activate the hepatic adenylate cyclase system, the second step involved in producing many of the physiological effects of glucagon. Relative to the native hormone, (3-Me-His1,Arg12)glucagon binds approximately twofold greater to hepatic plasma membranes but is fivefold less potent in the adenylate cyclase assay. (Phe1,Arg12)glucagon binds threefold weaker and is also approximately fivefold less potent in adenylate cyclase activity. In addition, both analogues are partial agonists with respect to adenylate cyclase. These results support the critical role of the N-terminal histidine residue in eliciting maximal transduction of the hormonal message. (D-Ala4,Arg12)glucagon and (D-Phe4)glucagon, analogues designed to examine the possible importance of a beta-bend conformation in the N-terminal region of glucagon for binding and biological activities, have binding potencies relative to glucagon of 31% and 69%, respectively. (D-Ala4,Arg12)glucagon is a partial agonist in the adenylate cyclase assay system having a fourfold reduction in potency, while the (D-Phe4) derivative is a full agonist essentially equipotent with the native hormone. These results do not necessarily support the role of an N-terminal beta-bend in glucagon receptor recognition. With respect to in vivo glycogenolysis activities, all of the analogues have previously been reported to be full agonists.

  14. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Novel Acidimicrobiaceae Members from an Acid Mine Drainage Biofilm Metagenome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ameet J.; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Yoder, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the family Acidimicrobiaceae are frequently encountered in heavy metal-contaminated acidic environments. However, their phylogenetic and metabolic diversity is poorly resolved. We present draft genome sequences of two novel and phylogenetically distinct Acidimicrobiaceae members assembled from an acid mine drainage biofilm metagenome. PMID:26769942

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces clavuligerus F613-1, an Industrial Producer of Clavulanic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Guangxiang; Zhong, Chuanqing; Zong, Gongli; Fu, Jiafang; Liu, Zhong; Zhang, Guimin; Qin, Ronghuo

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces clavuligerus strain F613-1 is an industrial strain with high-yield clavulanic acid production. In this study, the complete genome sequence of S. clavuligerus strain F613-1 was determined, including one linear chromosome and one linear plasmid, carrying numerous sets of genes involving in the biosynthesis of clavulanic acid.

  16. Complete amino acid sequence of human intestinal aminopeptidase N as deduced from cloned cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowell, G M; Kønigshøfer, E; Danielsen, E M;

    1988-01-01

    The complete primary structure (967 amino acids) of an intestinal human aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) was deduced from the sequence of a cDNA clone. Aminopeptidase N is anchored to the microvillar membrane via an uncleaved signal for membrane insertion. A domain constituting amino acid 250-555 p...

  17. Sequencing and computational analysis of complete genome sequences of Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus from acid lime and pummelo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Basanta K; Johnson, A M Anthony; Sai Gopal, D V R; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2009-08-01

    Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus (CMBV), a member of the Family Caulimoviridae, Genus Badnavirus, is the causative agent of Citrus mosaic disease in India. Although the virus has been detected in several citrus species, only two full-length genomes, one each from Sweet orange and Rangpur lime, are available in publicly accessible databases. In order to obtain a better understanding of the genetic variability of the virus in other citrus mosaic-affected citrus species, we performed the cloning and sequence analysis of complete genomes of CMBV from two additional citrus species, Acid lime and Pummelo. We show that CMBV genomes from the two hosts share high homology with previously reported CMBV sequences and hence conclude that the new isolates represent variants of the virus present in these species. Based on in silico sequence analysis, we predict the possible function of the protein encoded by one of the five ORFs.

  18. Parvalbumins from coelacanth muscle. III. Amino acid sequence of the major component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregui-Adell, J; Pechere, J F

    1978-09-26

    The primary structure of the major parvalbumin (pI = 4.52) from coelacanth muscle (Latimeria chalumnae) has been determined. Sequence analysis of the tryptic peptides, in some cases obtained with beta-trypsin, accounts for the total amino acid content of the protein. Chymotryptic peptides provide appropriate sequence overlaps, to complete the localization of the tryptic peptides. Examination of the amino acid sequence of this protein shows the typical structure of a beta-parvalbumin. Its position in the dendrogram of related calcium-binding proteins corresponds to that usually accepted for crossopterygians.

  19. NAA10 mutation causing a novel intellectual disability syndrome with Long QT due to N-terminal acetyltransferase impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Jillian P.; Støve, Svein I.; McGorrian, Catherine; Galvin, Joseph; Blenski, Marina; Dunne, Aimee; Ennis, Sean; Brett, Francesca; King, Mary D.; Arnesen, Thomas; Lynch, Sally Ann

    2015-01-01

    We report two brothers from a non-consanguineous Irish family presenting with a novel syndrome characterised by intellectual disability, facial dysmorphism, scoliosis and long QT. Their mother has a milder phenotype including long QT. X-linked inheritance was suspected. Whole exome sequencing identified a novel missense variant (c.128 A > C; p.Tyr43Ser) in NAA10 (X chromosome) as the cause of the family’s disorder. Sanger sequencing confirmed that the mutation arose de novo in the carrier mother. NAA10 encodes the catalytic subunit of the major human N-terminal acetylation complex NatA. In vitro assays for the p.Tyr43Ser mutant enzyme showed a significant decrease in catalytic activity and reduced stability compared to wild-type Naa10 protein. NAA10 has previously been associated with Ogden syndrome, Lenz microphthalmia syndrome and non-syndromic developmental delay. Our findings expand the clinical spectrum of NAA10 and suggest that the proposed correlation between mutant Naa10 enzyme activity and phenotype severity is more complex than anticipated; the p.Tyr43Ser mutant enzyme has less catalytic activity than the p.Ser37Pro mutant associated with lethal Ogden syndrome but results in a milder phenotype. Importantly, we highlight the need for cardiac assessment in males and females with NAA10 variants as both patients and carriers can have long QT. PMID:26522270

  20. Amino acid sequence of anionic peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Margaret R; Zhao, Hongwei; Sakharov, Ivan Yu; Li, Qing X

    2014-12-10

    Palm peroxidases are extremely stable and have uncommon substrate specificity. This study was designed to fill in the knowledge gap about the structures of a peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei. The complete amino acid sequence and partial glycosylation were determined by MALDI-top-down sequencing of native windmill palm tree peroxidase (WPTP), MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS of WPTP tryptic peptides, and cDNA sequencing. The propeptide of WPTP contained N- and C-terminal signal sequences which contained 21 and 17 amino acid residues, respectively. Mature WPTP was 306 amino acids in length, and its carbohydrate content ranged from 21% to 29%. Comparison to closely related royal palm tree peroxidase revealed structural features that may explain differences in their substrate specificity. The results can be used to guide engineering of WPTP and its novel applications.

  1. The human receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator. NH2-terminal amino acid sequence and glycosylation variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Rønne, E; Ploug, M;

    1990-01-01

    -PA. The purified protein shows a single 55-60 kDa band after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. It is a heavily glycosylated protein, the deglycosylated polypeptide chain comprising only 35 kDa. The glycosylated protein contains N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and sialic acid......, but no N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. Glycosylation is responsible for substantial heterogeneity in the receptor on phorbol ester-stimulated U937 cells, and also for molecular weight variations among various cell lines. The amino acid composition and the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence are reported....... The protein has a high content of cysteine residues. The NH2-terminal sequence is not closely related to any known sequence. The identification of the purified and sequenced protein with the human u-PA receptor is based on the following findings: 1) the ability of the purified protein to bind u-PA and its...

  2. The crystal structure of Z-Aib-Gly-Aib-Leu-Aib-OtBu, the synthetic, protected N-terminal pentapeptide of trichotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, R; Brueckner, H; Kokkinidis, M

    1991-01-01

    Z-Aib-Gly-Aib-Leu-Aib-OtBu, the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib)-containing N-terminal pentapeptide of the antibiotic trichotoxin, has been studied by x-ray crystallography. The molecule forms a right-handed helix with a reversal of the sense of the helix at the C-terminus. Torsion angles and hydrogen bonding pattern are consistent with a mixed 3(10)-/alpha-helical conformation. In the crystal, continuous columns are formed by head-to-tail arrangement of hydrogen-bonded molecules along the helix axis. The helical columns associate via hydrogen bonds forming closely packed parallel pairs.

  3. Shark myelin basic protein: amino acid sequence, secondary structure, and self-association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, T J; Atkins, A R; Warren, J A; Auton, W P; Smith, R

    1990-09-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) from the Whaler shark (Carcharhinus obscurus) has been purified from acid extracts of a chloroform/methanol pellet from whole brains. The amino acid sequence of the majority of the protein has been determined and compared with the sequences of other MBPs. The shark protein has only 44% homology with the bovine protein, but, in common with other MBPs, it has basic residues distributed throughout the sequence and no extensive segments that are predicted to have an ordered secondary structure in solution. Shark MBP lacks the triproline sequence previously postulated to form a hairpin bend in the molecule. The region containing the putative consensus sequence for encephalitogenicity in the guinea pig contains several substitutions, thus accounting for the lack of activity of the shark protein. Studies of the secondary structure and self-association have shown that shark MBP possesses solution properties similar to those of the bovine protein, despite the extensive differences in primary structure.

  4. Structural Studies of Geosmin Synthase, a Bifunctional Sesquiterpene Synthase with αα Domain Architecture That Catalyzes a Unique Cyclization-Fragmentation Reaction Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Golda G; Lombardi, Patrick M; Pemberton, Travis A; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M; Cole, Kathryn E; Köksal, Mustafa; Murphy, Frank V; Vedula, L Sangeetha; Chou, Wayne K W; Cane, David E; Christianson, David W

    2015-12-01

    Geosmin synthase from Streptomyces coelicolor (ScGS) catalyzes an unusual, metal-dependent terpenoid cyclization and fragmentation reaction sequence. Two distinct active sites are required for catalysis: the N-terminal domain catalyzes the ionization and cyclization of farnesyl diphosphate to form germacradienol and inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), and the C-terminal domain catalyzes the protonation, cyclization, and fragmentation of germacradienol to form geosmin and acetone through a retro-Prins reaction. A unique αα domain architecture is predicted for ScGS based on amino acid sequence: each domain contains the metal-binding motifs typical of a class I terpenoid cyclase, and each domain requires Mg(2+) for catalysis. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of the unliganded N-terminal domain of ScGS and the structure of its complex with three Mg(2+) ions and alendronate. These structures highlight conformational changes required for active site closure and catalysis. Although neither full-length ScGS nor constructs of the C-terminal domain could be crystallized, homology models of the C-terminal domain were constructed on the basis of ∼36% sequence identity with the N-terminal domain. Small-angle X-ray scattering experiments yield low-resolution molecular envelopes into which the N-terminal domain crystal structure and the C-terminal domain homology model were fit, suggesting possible αα domain architectures as frameworks for bifunctional catalysis.

  5. An analysis of amino acid sequences surrounding archaeal glycoprotein sequons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Qarn, Mehtap; Eichler, Jerry

    2007-05-01

    Despite having provided the first example of a prokaryal glycoprotein, little is known of the rules governing the N-glycosylation process in Archaea. As in Eukarya and Bacteria, archaeal N-glycosylation takes place at the Asn residues of Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequons. Since not all sequons are utilized, it is clear that other factors, including the context in which a sequon exists, affect glycosylation efficiency. As yet, the contribution to N-glycosylation made by sequon-bordering residues and other related factors in Archaea remains unaddressed. In the following, the surroundings of Asn residues confirmed by experiment as modified were analyzed in an attempt to define sequence rules and requirements for archaeal N-glycosylation.

  6. An analysis of amino acid sequences surrounding archaeal glycoprotein sequons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehtap Abu-Qarn

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite having provided the first example of a prokaryal glycoprotein, little is known of the rules governing the N-glycosylation process in Archaea. As in Eukarya and Bacteria, archaeal N-glycosylation takes place at the Asn residues of Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequons. Since not all sequons are utilized, it is clear that other factors, including the context in which a sequon exists, affect glycosylation efficiency. As yet, the contribution to N-glycosylation made by sequon-bordering residues and other related factors in Archaea remains unaddressed. In the following, the surroundings of Asn residues confirmed by experiment as modified were analyzed in an attempt to define sequence rules and requirements for archaeal N-glycosylation.

  7. Regulation of Telomere Length Requires a Conserved N-Terminal Domain of Rif2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaizer, Hannah; Connelly, Carla J; Bettridge, Kelsey; Viggiani, Christopher; Greider, Carol W

    2015-10-01

    The regulation of telomere length equilibrium is essential for cell growth and survival since critically short telomeres signal DNA damage and cell cycle arrest. While the broad principles of length regulation are well established, the molecular mechanism of how these steps occur is not fully understood. We mutagenized the RIF2 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to understand how this protein blocks excess telomere elongation. We identified an N-terminal domain in Rif2 that is essential for length regulation, which we have termed BAT domain for Blocks Addition of Telomeres. Tethering this BAT domain to Rap1 blocked telomere elongation not only in rif2Δ mutants but also in rif1Δ and rap1C-terminal deletion mutants. Mutation of a single amino acid in the BAT domain, phenylalanine at position 8 to alanine, recapitulated the rif2Δ mutant phenotype. Substitution of F8 with tryptophan mimicked the wild-type phenylalanine, suggesting the aromatic amino acid represents a protein interaction site that is essential for telomere length regulation.

  8. Contig sequences and their annotation (amino acid sequence and results of homology search), and expression profile - Dicty_cDB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Dicty_cDB Contig sequences and their annotation (amino acid sequence and results of homology search), and expre...s of homology search), and expression profile Description of data contents Contig...TogoDB edition only. Annotation Translated Amino Acid sequence Representative ami....u-tokyo.ac.jp/ ), which is the program to predict the localization of proteins in the cell. Expression prof...o acid sequence and results of homology search), and expression profile - Dicty_cDB | LSDB Archive ...

  9. Conservation of Shannon's redundancy for proteins. [information theory applied to amino acid sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatlin, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    Concepts of information theory are applied to examine various proteins in terms of their redundancy in natural originators such as animals and plants. The Monte Carlo method is used to derive information parameters for random protein sequences. Real protein sequence parameters are compared with the standard parameters of protein sequences having a specific length. The tendency of a chain to contain some amino acids more frequently than others and the tendency of a chain to contain certain amino acid pairs more frequently than other pairs are used as randomness measures of individual protein sequences. Non-periodic proteins are generally found to have random Shannon redundancies except in cases of constraints due to short chain length and genetic codes. Redundant characteristics of highly periodic proteins are discussed. A degree of periodicity parameter is derived.

  10. The N-terminal part of Als1 protein from Candida albicans specifically binds fucose-containing glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Dagmara S; Ielasi, Francesco S; Goossens, Katty V Y; Willaert, Ronnie G

    2011-06-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans expresses on its surface Als (Agglutinin like sequence) proteins, which play an important role in the adhesion to host cells and in the development of candidiasis. The binding specificity of these proteins is broad, as they can bind to various mammalian proteins, such as extracellular matrix proteins, and N- and E-cadherins. The N-terminal part of Als proteins constitutes the substrate-specific binding domain and is responsible for attachment to epithelial and endothelial cells. We have used glycan array screening to identify possible glycan receptors for the binding domain of Als1p-N. Under those conditions, Als1p-N binds specifically to fucose-containing glycans, which adds a lectin function to the functional diversity of the Als1 protein. The binding between Als1p-N and BSA-fucose glycoconjugate was quantitatively characterized using surface plasmon resonance, which demonstrated a weak millimolar affinity between Als1p-N and fucose. Furthermore, we have also quantified the affinity of Als1p-N to the extracellular matrix proteins proteins fibronectin and laminin, which is situated in the micromolar range. Surface plasmon resonance characterization of Als1p-N-Als1p-N interaction was in the micromolar affinity range.

  11. DNA replication checkpoint signaling depends on a Rad53-Dbf4 N-terminal interaction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Chou; Kenworthy, Jessica; Gabrielse, Carrie; Hänni, Christine; Zegerman, Philip; Weinreich, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK) and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) are essential to initiate DNA replication at individual origins. During replication stress, the S-phase checkpoint inhibits the DDK- and CDK-dependent activation of late replication origins. Rad53 kinase is a central effector of the replication checkpoint and both binds to and phosphorylates Dbf4 to prevent late-origin firing. The molecular basis for the Rad53-Dbf4 physical interaction is not clear but occurs through the Dbf4 N terminus. Here we found that both Rad53 FHA1 and FHA2 domains, which specifically recognize phospho-threonine (pT), interacted with Dbf4 through an N-terminal sequence and an adjacent BRCT domain. Purified Rad53 FHA1 domain (but not FHA2) bound to a pT Dbf4 peptide in vitro, suggesting a possible phospho-threonine-dependent interaction between FHA1 and Dbf4. The Dbf4-Rad53 interaction is governed by multiple contacts that are separable from the Cdc5- and Msa1-binding sites in the Dbf4 N terminus. Importantly, abrogation of the Rad53-Dbf4 physical interaction blocked Dbf4 phosphorylation and allowed late-origin firing during replication checkpoint activation. This indicated that Rad53 must stably bind to Dbf4 to regulate its activity.

  12. Gingival Crevicular Fluid Calprotectin, Osteocalcin and Cross-Linked N-Terminal Telopeptid Levels in Health and Different Periodontal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sema Becerik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate gingival crevicular fluid (GCF calprotectin, osteocalcin and cross-linked N-terminal telopeptide (NTx levels in health along with different periodontal diseases.

  13. Immunization with the DNA-encoding N-terminal domain of proteophosphoglycan of Leishmania donovani generates Th1-type immunoprotective response against experimental visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samant, Mukesh; Gupta, Reema; Kumari, Shraddha; Misra, Pragya; Khare, Prashant; Kushawaha, Pramod Kumar; Sahasrabuddhe, Amogh Anant; Dube, Anuradha

    2009-07-01

    Leishmania produce several types of mucin-like glycoproteins called proteophosphoglycans (PPGs) which exist as secretory as well as surface-bound forms in both promastigotes and amastigotes. The structure and function of PPGs have been reported to be species and stage specific as in the case of Leishmania major and Leishmania mexicana; there has been no such information available for Leishmania donovani. We have recently demonstrated that PPG is differentially expressed in sodium stibogluconate-sensitive and -resistant clinical isolates of L. donovani. To further elucidate the structure and function of the ppg gene of L. donovani, a partial sequence of its N-terminal domain of 1.6 kb containing the majority of antigenic determinants, was successfully cloned and expressed in prokaryotic as well as mammalian cells. We further evaluated the DNA-encoding N-terminal domain of the ppg gene as a vaccine in golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) against the L. donovani challenge. The prophylactic efficacy to the tune of approximately 80% was observed in vaccinated hamsters and all of them could survive beyond 6 mo after challenge. The efficacy was supported by a surge in inducible NO synthase, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IL-12 mRNA levels along with extreme down-regulation of TGF-beta, IL-4, and IL-10. A rise in the level of Leishmania-specific IgG2 was also observed which was indicative of enhanced cellular immune response. The results suggest the N-terminal domain of L. donovani ppg as a potential DNA vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis.

  14. Activation of c-Jun N-terminal Kinases by Ribotoxic Stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Yun Ouyang; Yuan-Yuan Wang; Yong-Tang Zheng

    2005-01-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are classic stress-activated protein kinases. Many cellular stresses have been shown to stimulate JNK activation. In this review, we focus on ribotoxic stresses based on their multiple biological potencies including anti-HIV-1 activity. Some of the functions of ribotoxins and the signaling transduction pathway that mediated are mentioned. Different from other stimulators, ribotoxic stresses act on special motifs of 28S rRNA in translationally active mammal ribosomes. Binding and damaging on the motif leads to JNK activation and subsequently biological response to the signal initiator, which is named ribotoxic stress response.

  15. DsbC activation by the N-terminal domain of DsbD

    OpenAIRE

    Goldstone, David; Haebel, Peter W.; Katzen, Federico; Bader, Martin W.; Bardwell, James C. A.; Beckwith, Jon; Metcalf, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The correct formation of disulfide bonds in the periplasm of Escherichia coli involves Dsb proteins, including two related periplasmic disulfide-bond isomerases, DsbC and DsbG. DsbD is a membrane protein required to maintain the functional oxidation state of DsbC and DsbG. In this work, purified proteins were used to investigate the interaction between DsbD and DsbC. A 131-residue N-terminal fragment of DsbD (DsbDα) was expressed and purified and shown to form a fu...

  16. Atomic Force Microscopy Imaging of Filamentous Aggregates from an N-Terminal Peptide Fragment of Barnase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata-Seki, Teiko; Masai, Junji; Yoshida, Kenji; Sato, Kazuki; Yanagawa, Hiroshi

    1993-06-01

    This paper reports the atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging of filamentous aggregates derived from an N-terminal peptide fragment of barnase, a ribonuclease from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The sample was deposited on a freshly cleaved mica surface and observed in ambient conditions. The overall shapes of the filamentous structures imaged with two different kinds of AFMs were similar to those obtained with a transmission electron microscope (TEM), except that the filaments in AFM images were broader than those in TEM images. This broadening phenomenon characteristic of AFM images was explained in terms of the convolution-type distortion of the specimen diameter by the scanning-tip apex.

  17. N-terminal T4 lysozyme fusion facilitates crystallization of a G protein coupled receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaozhong Zou

    Full Text Available A highly crystallizable T4 lysozyme (T4L was fused to the N-terminus of the β(2 adrenergic receptor (β(2AR, a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR for catecholamines. We demonstrate that the N-terminal fused T4L is sufficiently rigid relative to the receptor to facilitate crystallogenesis without thermostabilizing mutations or the use of a stabilizing antibody, G protein, or protein fused to the 3rd intracellular loop. This approach adds to the protein engineering strategies that enable crystallographic studies of GPCRs alone or in complex with a signaling partner.

  18. Human urinary renalase lacks the N-terminal signal peptide crucial for accommodation of its FAD cofactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedchenko, Valerii I; Buneeva, Olga A; Kopylov, Arthur T; Veselovsky, Alexander V; Zgoda, Victor G; Medvedev, Alexei E

    2015-01-01

    Renalase is a recently discovered secretory protein involved in the regulation of blood pressure. Cells synthesize all known isoforms of human renalase (1 and 2) as flavoproteins. Accommodation of FAD in the renalase protein requires the presence of its N-terminal peptide. However, in secretory proteins, such peptides are usually cleaved during their export from the cell. In the present study, we have isolated human renalase from urinary samples of healthy volunteers and human recombinant renalases 1 and 2 expressed in Escherichia coli cells. In these proteins, we investigated the presence of the renalase N-terminal peptide and the FAD cofactor and performed computer-aided molecular analysis of the renalase crystal structure to evaluate possible consequences of removal of the N-terminal peptide. In contrast to human recombinant renalase isoforms 1 and 2 containing non-covalently bound FAD and clearly detectable N-terminal peptide, renalase purified from human urine lacks both the N-terminal signal peptide and FAD. The computer-aided analysis indicates that the removal of this peptide results in inability of the truncated renalase to bind the FAD cofactor. Thus, our results indicate that human renalase secreted in urine lacks its N-terminal peptide, and therefore catalytic activities of urinary renalase reported in the literature cannot be attributed to FAD-dependent mechanisms. We suggest that FAD-dependent catalytic functions are intrinsic properties of intracellular renalases, whereas extracellular renalases act in FAD- and possibly catalytic-independent manner.

  19. Draft genome sequence of the docosahexaenoic acid producing thraustochytrid Aurantiochytrium sp. T66

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Thraustochytrids are unicellular, marine protists, and there is a growing industrial interest in these organisms, particularly because some species, including strains belonging to the genus Aurantiochytrium, accumulate high levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Aurantiochytrium sp. T66 (ATCC PRA-276, with a size of 43 Mbp, and 11,683 predicted protein-coding sequences. The data has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/Genbank under the accession LNGJ00000000. The genome sequence will contribute new insight into DHA biosynthesis and regulation, providing a basis for metabolic engineering of thraustochytrids.

  20. The effects of N-terminal insertion into VSV-G of an scFv peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piechaczyk Marc

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recombinant retroviruses, including lentiviruses, are the most widely used vectors for both in vitro and in vivo stable gene transfer. However, the inability to selectively deliver transgenes into cells of interest limits the use of this technology. Due to its wide tropism, stability and ability to pseudotype a range of viral vectors, vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G is the most commonly used pseudotyping protein. Here, we attempted to engineer this protein for targeting purposes. Chimaeric VSV-G proteins were constructed by linking a cell-directing single-chain antibody (scFv to its N-terminal. We show that the chimaeric VSV-G molecules can integrate into retroviral and lentiviral particles. HIV-1 particles pseudotyped with VSV-G linked to an scFv against human Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I bind strongly and specifically to human cells. Also, this novel molecule preferentially drives lentiviral transduction of human cells, although the titre is considerably lower that viruses pseudotyped with VSV-G. This is likely due to the inefficient fusion activity of the modified protein. To our knowledge, this is the first report where VSV-G was successfully engineered to include a large (253 amino acids exogenous peptide and where attempts were made to change the infection profile of VSV-G pseudotyped vectors.

  1. Sequence Pattern Correlation of Amino Acid in Collision-induced Dissociation Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG,Hao-Wei(宋浩威); YUE,Gui-Hua(岳贵花); LU,Yu(陆宇); YANG,Peng-Yuan(杨芃原); WANG,Hong-Hai(王洪海)

    2002-01-01

    A novel approach of sequence pattern correlation has been applied to predict an expected amino acid sequence from CID ESI-MS spectra. The proposed approach deduces sequence patterns with no help from known protein database such that it is useful to identify an unknown peptide or new protein. The algorithm applies a cross-correlation to match an experimental CID spectrum with predicted sequence pattern generated from fragmentation information. The fragmentation knowledge of both y-series and other non y-series are utilized to generate the predicted sequence patterns. In contrast to the normal de novo approach, the proposed approach is insensitive to mass tolerance and non-susceptive to spectral integrality with no need for selection of a starting point.

  2. SNBRFinder: A Sequence-Based Hybrid Algorithm for Enhanced Prediction of Nucleic Acid-Binding Residues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxia Yang

    Full Text Available Protein-nucleic acid interactions are central to various fundamental biological processes. Automated methods capable of reliably identifying DNA- and RNA-binding residues in protein sequence are assuming ever-increasing importance. The majority of current algorithms rely on feature-based prediction, but their accuracy remains to be further improved. Here we propose a sequence-based hybrid algorithm SNBRFinder (Sequence-based Nucleic acid-Binding Residue Finder by merging a feature predictor SNBRFinderF and a template predictor SNBRFinderT. SNBRFinderF was established using the support vector machine whose inputs include sequence profile and other complementary sequence descriptors, while SNBRFinderT was implemented with the sequence alignment algorithm based on profile hidden Markov models to capture the weakly homologous template of query sequence. Experimental results show that SNBRFinderF was clearly superior to the commonly used sequence profile-based predictor and SNBRFinderT can achieve comparable performance to the structure-based template methods. Leveraging the complementary relationship between these two predictors, SNBRFinder reasonably improved the performance of both DNA- and RNA-binding residue predictions. More importantly, the sequence-based hybrid prediction reached competitive performance relative to our previous structure-based counterpart. Our extensive and stringent comparisons show that SNBRFinder has obvious advantages over the existing sequence-based prediction algorithms. The value of our algorithm is highlighted by establishing an easy-to-use web server that is freely accessible at http://ibi.hzau.edu.cn/SNBRFinder.

  3. Isolation of a Gastrodia Antifungal Protein Gene from a Genomic Library of G. elata and Its Sequence Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new genomic DNA encoding a member of Gastrodia antifungal protein family is isolated and sequenced.This gene contains a 510 bp open reading frame and 531 bp promoter region without introns.Sequence analysis indicates that a 28 amino acids signal peptide exists at the N-terminal.It shows high sequence homology with the mannose-binding lectinsfrom Epipactis hellebo-rine, Listera ovata and Cymbidium hybrid.A putative TATA box and transcription start site is dete cted in the promoter region.

  4. Recombinant N-Terminal Slit2 Inhibits TGF-β-Induced Fibroblast Activation and Renal Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Darren A; Huang, Yi-Wei; Liu, Guang-Ying; Patel, Sajedabanu; Fang, Fei; Zhou, Joyce; Thai, Kerri; Sidiqi, Ahmad; Szeto, Stephen G; Chan, Lauren; Lu, Mingliang; He, Xiaolin; John, Rohan; Gilbert, Richard E; Scholey, James W; Robinson, Lisa A

    2016-09-01

    Fibrosis and inflammation are closely intertwined injury pathways present in nearly all forms of CKD for which few safe and effective therapies exist. Slit glycoproteins signaling through Roundabout (Robo) receptors have been described to have anti-inflammatory effects through regulation of leukocyte cytoskeletal organization. Notably, cytoskeletal reorganization is also required for fibroblast responses to TGF-β Here, we examined whether Slit2 also controls TGF-β-induced renal fibrosis. In cultured renal fibroblasts, which we found to express Slit2 and Robo-1, the bioactive N-terminal fragment of Slit2 inhibited TGF-β-induced collagen synthesis, actin cytoskeletal reorganization, and Smad2/3 transcriptional activity, but the inactive C-terminal fragment of Slit2 did not. In mouse models of postischemic renal fibrosis and obstructive uropathy, treatment with N-terminal Slit2 before or after injury inhibited the development of renal fibrosis and preserved renal function, whereas the C-terminal Slit2 had no effect. Our data suggest that administration of recombinant Slit2 may be a new treatment strategy to arrest chronic injury progression after ischemic and obstructive renal insults by not only attenuating inflammation but also, directly inhibiting renal fibrosis.

  5. Plasma biomarker screening for liver fibrosis with the N-terminal isotope tagging strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, ShuLong; Liu, Xin; Wei, Lai; Wang, HuiFen; Zhang, JiYang; Wei, HanDong; Qian, XiaoHong; Jiang, Ying; He, FuChu

    2011-05-01

    A non-invasive diagnostic approach is crucial for the evaluation of severity of liver disease, treatment decisions, and assessing drug efficacy. This study evaluated plasma proteomic profiling via an N-terminal isotope tagging strategy coupled with liquid chromatography/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry measurement to detect liver fibrosis staging. Pooled plasma from different liver fibrosis stages, which were assessed in advance by the current gold-standard of liver biopsy, was quantitatively analyzed. A total of 72 plasma proteins were found to be dysregulated during the fibrogenesis process, and this finding constituted a valuable candidate plasma biomarker bank for follow-up analysis. Validation results of fibronectin by Western blotting reconfirmed the mass-based data. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis showed four types of metabolic networks for the functional effect of liver fibrosis disease in chronic hepatitis B patients. Consequently, quantitative proteomics via the N-terminal acetyl isotope labeling technique provides an effective and useful tool for screening plasma candidate biomarkers for liver fibrosis. We quantitatively monitored the fibrogenesis process in CHB patients. We discovered many new valuable candidate biomarkers for the diagnosis of liver fibrosis and also partly identified the mechanism involved in liver fibrosis disease. These results provide a clearer understanding of liver fibrosis pathophysiology and will also hopefully lead to improvement of clinical diagnosis and treatment.

  6. In Silico Identification and Characterization of N-Terminal Acetyltransferase Genes of Poplar (Populus trichocarpa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang-Yong Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available N-terminal acetyltransferase (Nats complex is responsible for protein N-terminal acetylation (Nα-acetylation, which is one of the most common covalent modifications of eukaryotic proteins. Although genome-wide investigation and characterization of Nat catalytic subunits (CS and auxiliary subunits (AS have been conducted in yeast and humans they remain unexplored in plants. Here we report on the identification of eleven genes encoding eleven putative Nat CS polypeptides, and five genes encoding five putative Nat AS polypeptides in Populus. We document that the expansion of Nat CS genes occurs as duplicated blocks distributed across 10 of the 19 poplar chromosomes, likely only as a result of segmental duplication events. Based on phylogenetic analysis, poplar Nat CS were assigned to six subgroups, which corresponded well to the Nat CS types (CS of Nat A–F, being consistent with previous reports in humans and yeast. In silico analysis of microarray data showed that in the process of normal development of the poplar, their Nat CS and AS genes are commonly expressed at one relatively low level but share distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. This exhaustive survey of Nat genes in poplar provides important information to assist future studies on their functional role in poplar.

  7. N-terminal palmitoylation is required for Toxoplasma gondii HSP20 inner membrane complex localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Napoli, M G; de Miguel, N; Lebrun, M; Moreno, S N J; Angel, S O; Corvi, M M

    2013-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite and the causative agent of toxoplasmosis. Protein palmitoylation is known to play roles in signal transduction and in enhancing the hydrophobicity of proteins thus contributing to their membrane association. Global inhibition of protein palmitoylation has been shown to affect T. gondii physiology and invasion of the host cell. However, the proteins affected by this modification have been understudied. This paper shows that the small heat shock protein 20 from T. gondii (TgHSP20) is synthesized as a mature protein in the cytosol and is palmitoylated in three cysteine residues. However, its localization at the inner membrane complex (IMC) is dependent only on N-terminal palmitoylation. Absence or incomplete N-terminal palmitoylation causes TgHSP20 to partially accumulate in a membranous structure. Interestingly, TgHSP20 palmitoylation is not responsible for its interaction with the daughter cells IMCs. Together, our data describe the importance of palmitoylation in protein targeting to the IMC in T. gondii.

  8. Amino acid sequences used for clusterintg (Multi FASTA format) - Gclust Server | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Gclust Server Amino acid sequences used for clusterintg (Multi FASTA format) Data detail Data name Amino aci...d sequences used for clusterintg (Multi FASTA format) Description of data contents Amino acid sequences of p...redicted proteins and their annotation for 95 organism species. FASTA format file...5.fa.zip File size: 161MB Simple search URL - Data acquisition method - Data analysis method - Number of data entries - FAST... Site Policy | Contact Us Amino acid sequences used for clusterintg (Multi FASTA format) - Gclust Server | LSDB Archive ...

  9. A design for computer nucleic-acid-sequence storage, retrieval, and manipulation

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    We have designed and built a data-base system for the storage of nucleic-acid sequences. The system consists of a data base (“the library”) and software that manages and provides access to that data base (“the Librarian”).

  10. RevTrans: multiple alignment of coding DNA from aligned amino acid sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Rasmus; Pedersen, Anders Gorm

    2003-01-01

    The simple fact that proteins are built from 20 amino acids while DNA only contains four different bases, means that the 'signal-to-noise ratio' in protein sequence alignments is much better than in alignments of DNA. Besides this information-theoretical advantage, protein alignments also benefit...

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of the Butyric Acid Producer Clostridium tyrobutyricum Strain CIP I-776 (IFP923).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasels, François; Clément, Benjamin; Lopes Ferreira, Nicolas

    2016-03-03

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Clostridium tyrobutyricum CIP I-776 (IFP923), an efficient producer of butyric acid. The genome consists of a single chromosome of 3.19 Mb and provides useful data concerning the metabolic capacities of the strain.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of the Butyric Acid Producer Clostridium tyrobutyricum Strain CIP I-776 (IFP923)

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Clostridium tyrobutyricum CIP I-776 (IFP923), an efficient producer of butyric acid. The genome consists of a single chromosome of 3.19 Mb and provides useful data concerning the metabolic capacities of the strain.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Sorghum Grain Mold Fungus Epicoccum sorghinum, a Producer of Tenuazonic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Rodrigo C.; Davenport, Karen W.; Hovde, Blake; Silva, Danielle; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Correa, Benedito

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The facultative plant pathogen Epicoccum sorghinum is associated with grain mold of sorghum and produces the mycotoxin tenuazonic acid. This fungus can have serious economic impact on sorghum production. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of E. sorghinum (USPMTOX48). PMID:28126937

  14. Nucleic acid sequence-based amplification with oligochromatography for detection of Trypanosoma brucei in clinical samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Mugasa; T. Laurent; G.J. Schoone; P.A. Kager; G.W. Lubega; H.D.F.H. Schallig

    2009-01-01

    Molecular tools, such as real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) and PCR, have been developed to detect Trypanosoma brucei parasites in blood for the diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). Despite good sensitivity, these techniques are not implemented in HAT control pr

  15. Seq2Logo: a method for construction and visualization of amino acid binding motifs and sequence profiles including sequence weighting, pseudo counts and two-sided representation of amino acid enrichment and depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Martin Christen Frølund; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Seq2Logo is a web-based sequence logo generator. Sequence logos are a graphical representation of the information content stored in a multiple sequence alignment (MSA) and provide a compact and highly intuitive representation of the position-specific amino acid composition of binding motifs, active...... sites, etc. in biological sequences. Accurate generation of sequence logos is often compromised by sequence redundancy and low number of observations. Moreover, most methods available for sequence logo generation focus on displaying the position-specific enrichment of amino acids, discarding the equally...... valuable information related to amino acid depletion. Seq2logo aims at resolving these issues allowing the user to include sequence weighting to correct for data redundancy, pseudo counts to correct for low number of observations and different logotype representations each capturing different aspects...

  16. An N-terminal glycine to cysteine mutation in the collagen COL1A1 gene produces moderately severe osteogenesis imperfecta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, W.; Scott, L.; Cohn, D. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is usually due to mutations in the type I procollagen genes COL1A1 and COL1A2. Point mutations close to the N-terminus are generally milder than those near the C-terminus of the molecule (the gradient hypothesis of collagen mutations). We describe a patient with moderately severe OI due to a mutation in the N-terminal portion of the triple helical domain of the {alpha}1(I) chain. Electrophoretic analysis of collagen isolated from fibroblast cultures suggested the abnormal presence of a cysteine in the N-terminal portion of the {alpha}1(I) chain. Five overlapping DNA fragments amplified from fibroblast RNA were screened for mutations using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and heteroduplex analyses. Direct DNA sequence analysis of the single positive fragment demonstrated a G to T transversion, corresponding to a glycine to cysteine substitution at position 226 of the triple helical domain of the {alpha}1(I) chain. The mutation was confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis of amplified genomic DNA. The mutation was not present in fibroblasts from either phenotypically normal parent. Combining this mutation with other reported mutations, glycine to cysteine substitutions at positions 205, 211, 223, and 226 produce a moderately severe phenotype whereas flanking mutations at positions 175 and 382 produce a mild phenotype. This data supports a regional rather than a gradient model of the relationship between the nature and location of type I collagen mutations and OI phenotype.

  17. Structural analysis of the starfish SALMFamide neuropeptides S1 and S2: the N-terminal region of S2 facilitates self-association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otara, Claire B; Jones, Christopher E; Younan, Nadine D; Viles, John H; Elphick, Maurice R

    2014-02-01

    The neuropeptides S1 (GFNSALMFamide) and S2 (SGPYSFNSGLTFamide), which share sequence similarity, were discovered in the starfish Asterias rubens and are prototypical members of the SALMFamide family of neuropeptides in echinoderms. SALMFamide neuropeptides act as muscle relaxants and both S1 and S2 cause relaxation of cardiac stomach and tube foot preparations in vitro but S2 is an order of magnitude more potent than S1. Here we investigated a structural basis for this difference in potency using spectroscopic techniques. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that S1 does not have a defined structure in aqueous solution and this was supported by 2D nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. In contrast, we found that S2 has a well-defined conformation in aqueous solution. However, the conformation of S2 was concentration dependent, with increasing concentration inducing a transition from an unstructured to a structured conformation. Interestingly, this property of S2 was not observed in an N-terminally truncated analogue of S2 (short S2 or SS2; SFNSGLTFamide). Collectively, the data obtained indicate that the N-terminal region of S2 facilitates peptide self-association at high concentrations, which may have relevance to the biosynthesis and/or bioactivity of S2 in vivo.

  18. Effect of size and N-terminal residue characteristics on bacterial cell penetration and antibacterial activity of the proline-rich peptide Bac7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, Filomena; Benincasa, Monica; Zahariev, Sotir; Scocchi, Marco; Berti, Federico; Gennaro, Renato; Tossi, Alessandro

    2015-02-12

    Bac7 is a proline-rich antimicrobial peptide, selective for Gram-negative bacteria, which acts intracellularly after membrane translocation. Progressively shortened fragments of Bac7 allowed determining the minimal sequence required for entry and antimicrobial activity as a 16-residue, N-terminal fragment, while further shortening led to a marked decrease in both functions. Furthermore, two N-terminal arginine residues were required for efficient translocation and activity. Analogues in which these residues were omitted, or where the side chain steric or physicochemical characteristics were systematically altered, were tested on different Escherichia coli strains, including a mutant with a destabilized outer membrane and one lacking the relevant SbmA membrane transport protein. H-bonding capacity, stereochemistry, and charge, in that order, played a determining role for efficient transit through both the outer and cytoplasmic membranes. Our studies allowed building a more detailed model for the mode-of-action of Bac7, and confirming its potential as an anti-infective agent, also suggesting it may be a vehicle for internalization of other antibiotic cargo.

  19. The N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 is essential and sufficient for its caveolae-association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Zhuang [State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Laboratory of System Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Zou, Xinle [State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Wang, Hongzhong; Lei, Jigang; Wu, Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Laboratory of System Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Liao, Kan, E-mail: kliao@sibs.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Laboratory of System Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)

    2015-01-16

    Highlight: • The N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 determines caveolar association. • Different cellular localization of PTRF/cavin-1 influences its serine 389 and 391 phosphorylation state. • PTRF/cavin-1 regulates cell motility via its caveolar association. - Abstract: PTRF/cavin-1 is a protein of two lives. Its reported functions in ribosomal RNA synthesis and in caveolae formation happen in two different cellular locations: nucleus vs. plasma membrane. Here, we identified that the N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 was essential for the protein to be associated with caveolae in plasma membrane. It could counteract the effect of nuclear localization sequence in the molecule (AA 235–251). Deletion of this leucine-zipper motif from PTRF/cavin-1 caused the mutant to be exclusively localized in nuclei. The fusion of this leucine-zipper motif with histone 2A, which is a nuclear protein, could induce the fusion protein to be exported from nucleus. Cell migration was greatly inhibited in PTRF/cavin-1{sup −/−} mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). The inhibited cell motility could only be rescued by exogenous cavin-1 but not the leucine-zipper motif deleted cavin-1 mutant. Plasma membrane dynamics is an important factor in cell motility control. Our results suggested that the membrane dynamics in cell migration is affected by caveolae associated PTRF/cavin-1.

  20. Functional roles of the non-catalytic calcium-binding sites in the N-terminal domain of human peptidylarginine deiminase 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Liang; Tsai, I-Chen; Chang, Chia-Wei; Liao, Ya-Fan; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the functional roles of the N-terminal Ca(2+) ion-binding sites, in terms of enzyme catalysis and stability, of peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4). Amino acid residues located in the N-terminal Ca(2+)-binding site of PAD4 were mutated to disrupt the binding of Ca(2+) ions. Kinetic data suggest that Asp155, Asp157 and Asp179, which directly coordinate Ca3 and Ca4, are essential for catalysis in PAD4. For D155A, D157A and D179A, the k(cat)/K(m,BAEE) values were 0.02, 0.63 and 0.01 s(-1)mM(-1) (20.8 s(-1)mM(-1) for WT), respectively. Asn153 and Asp176 are directly coordinated with Ca3 and indirectly coordinated with Ca5 via a water molecule. However, N153A displayed low enzymatic activity with a k(cat) value of 0.3 s(-1) (13.3 s(-1) for wild-type), whereas D176A retained some catalytic power with a k(cat) of 9.7 s(-1). Asp168 is the direct ligand for Ca5, and Ca5 coordination by Glu252 is mediated by two water molecules. However, mutation of these two residues to Ala did not cause a reduction in the k(cat)/K(m,BAEE) values, which indicates that the binding of Ca5 may not be required for PAD4 enzymatic activity. The possible conformational changes of these PAD4 mutants were examined. Thermal stability analysis of the PAD4 mutants in the absence or presence of Ca(2+) indicated that the conformational stability of the enzyme is highly dependent on Ca(2+) ions. In addition, the results of urea-induced denaturation for the N153, D155, D157 and D179 series mutants further suggest that the binding of Ca(2+) ions in the N-terminal Ca(2+)-binding site stabilizes the overall conformational stability of PAD4. Therefore, our data strongly suggest that the N-terminal Ca(2+) ions play critical roles in the full activation of the PAD4 enzyme.

  1. Functional roles of the non-catalytic calcium-binding sites in the N-terminal domain of human peptidylarginine deiminase 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Liang Liu

    Full Text Available This study investigated the functional roles of the N-terminal Ca(2+ ion-binding sites, in terms of enzyme catalysis and stability, of peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4. Amino acid residues located in the N-terminal Ca(2+-binding site of PAD4 were mutated to disrupt the binding of Ca(2+ ions. Kinetic data suggest that Asp155, Asp157 and Asp179, which directly coordinate Ca3 and Ca4, are essential for catalysis in PAD4. For D155A, D157A and D179A, the k(cat/K(m,BAEE values were 0.02, 0.63 and 0.01 s(-1mM(-1 (20.8 s(-1mM(-1 for WT, respectively. Asn153 and Asp176 are directly coordinated with Ca3 and indirectly coordinated with Ca5 via a water molecule. However, N153A displayed low enzymatic activity with a k(cat value of 0.3 s(-1 (13.3 s(-1 for wild-type, whereas D176A retained some catalytic power with a k(cat of 9.7 s(-1. Asp168 is the direct ligand for Ca5, and Ca5 coordination by Glu252 is mediated by two water molecules. However, mutation of these two residues to Ala did not cause a reduction in the k(cat/K(m,BAEE values, which indicates that the binding of Ca5 may not be required for PAD4 enzymatic activity. The possible conformational changes of these PAD4 mutants were examined. Thermal stability analysis of the PAD4 mutants in the absence or presence of Ca(2+ indicated that the conformational stability of the enzyme is highly dependent on Ca(2+ ions. In addition, the results of urea-induced denaturation for the N153, D155, D157 and D179 series mutants further suggest that the binding of Ca(2+ ions in the N-terminal Ca(2+-binding site stabilizes the overall conformational stability of PAD4. Therefore, our data strongly suggest that the N-terminal Ca(2+ ions play critical roles in the full activation of the PAD4 enzyme.

  2. The importance of hinge sequence for loop function and catalytic activity in the reaction catalyzed by triosephosphate isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, J; Sun, J; Sampson, N S

    2001-04-01

    We have determined the sequence requirements for the N-terminal protein hinge of the active-site lid of triosephosphate isomerase. The codons for the hinge (PVW) were replaced with a genetic library of all possible 8000 amino acid combinations. The most active of these 8000 mutants were selected using in vivo complementation of a triosephosphate isomerase-deficient strain of Escherichia coli, DF502. Approximately 0.3 % of the mutants complement DF502 with an activity that is between 10 and 70 % of wild-type activity. They all contain Pro at the first position. Furthermore, the sequences of these hinge mutants reveal that hydrophobic packing is very important for efficient formation of the enediol intermediate. However, the reduced catalytic activities observed are not due to increased rates of loop opening. To explore the relationship between the N-terminal and C-terminal hinges, three semi-active mutants from the N-terminal hinge selection experiment (PLH, PHS and PTF), and six active C-terminal hinge mutants from previous work (NSS, LWA, YSL, KTK, NPN, KVA) were combined to form 18 "double-hinge" mutants. The activities of these mutants suggest that the N-terminal and C-terminal hinge structures affect one another. It appears that specific side-chain interactions are important for forming a catalytically active enzyme, but not for preventing release of the unstable enediol intermediate from the active site of the enzyme. The independence of intermediate release on amino acid sequence is consistent with the absence of a "universal" hinge sequence in structurally related enzymes.

  3. The DNA replication inhibitor microcin B17 is a forty-three-amino-acid protein containing sixty percent glycine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davagnino, J; Herrero, M; Furlong, D; Moreno, F; Kolter, R

    1986-11-01

    Microcin B17 is a low-molecular-weight protein that inhibits DNA replication in a number of enteric bacteria. It is produced by bacterial strains which harbor a 70-kilobase plasmid called pMccB17. Four plasmid genes (named mcbABCD) are required for its production. The product of the mcbA gene was identified by labelling minicells. The mcbA gene product was slightly larger when a mutation in any of the other three production genes was present. This indicates that these genes are involved in processing the primary mcbA product to yield the active molecule. The mcbA gene product predicted from the nucleotide sequence has 69 amino acids including 28 glycine residues. Microcin B17 was extracted from the cells by boiling in 100 mM acetic acid, 1 mM EDTA, and purified to homogeneity in a single step by high-performance liquid chromatography through a C18 column. The N-terminal amino acid sequence and amino acid composition demonstrated that mcbA is the structural gene for microcin B17. The active molecule is a processed product lacking the first 26 N-terminal residues. The 43 remaining residues include 26 glycines. While microcin B17 is an exported protein, the cleaved N-terminal peptide does not have the characteristic properties of a "signal sequence", which suggests that it is secreted by a mechanism different from that used by most secreted proteins of E. coli.

  4. Hereditary angioedema in a Jordanian family with a novel missense mutation in the C1-inhibitor N-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaradat, Saied A; Caccia, Sonia; Rawashdeh, Rifaat; Melhem, Motasem; Al-Hawamdeh, Ali; Carzaniga, Thomas; Haddad, Hazem

    2016-03-01

    Hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the SERPING1 gene. A Jordanian family, including 14 individuals with C1-INH-HAE clinical symptoms, was studied. In the propositus and his parents, SERPING1 had four mutations leading to amino acid substitutions. Two are known polymorphic variants (c.167T>C; p.Val34Ala and c.1438G>A; p.Val458Met), the others are newly described. One (c.203C>T; p.Thr46Ile) is located in the N-terminal domain of the C1-inhibitor protein and segregates with angioedema symptoms in the family. The other (c.800C>T; p.Ala245Val) belongs to the serpin domain, and derives from the unaffected father. DNA from additional 24 family members were screened for c.203C>T mutation in the target gene. All individuals heterozygous for the c.203C>T mutation had antigenic and functional plasma levels of C1-inhibitor below 50% of normal, confirming the diagnosis of type I C1-INH-HAE. Angioedema symptoms were present in 14 of 16 subjects carrier for the c.203T allele. Among these subjects, those carrying the c.800T variation had more severe and frequent symptoms than subjects without this mutation. This family-based study provides the first evidence that multiple amino acid substitutions in SERPING1 could influence C1-INH-HAE phenotype.

  5. c-Jun N-terminal kinase regulates mitochondrial bioenergetics by modulating pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiongqiong; Lam, Philip Y; Han, Derick; Cadenas, Enrique

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the role of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in mitochondrial signaling and bioenergetics in primary cortical neurons and isolated rat brain mitochondria. Exposure of neurons to either anisomycin (an activator of JNK/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases) or H2O2 resulted in activation (phosphorylation) of JNK (mostly p46(JNK1)) and its translocation to mitochondria. Experiments with mitochondria isolated from either rat brain or primary cortical neurons and incubated with proteinase K revealed that phosphorylated JNK was associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane; this association resulted in the phosphorylation of the E(1alpha) subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase, a key enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate and that links two major metabolic pathways: glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. JNK-mediated phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase was not observed in experiments carried out with mitoplasts, thus suggesting the requirement of intact, functional mitochondria for this effect. JNK-mediated phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase was associated with a decline in its activity and, consequently, a shift to anaerobic pyruvate metabolism: the latter was confirmed by increased accumulation of lactic acid and decreased overall energy production (ATP levels). Pyruvate dehydrogenase appears to be a specific phosphorylation target for JNK, for other kinases, such as protein kinase A and protein kinase C did not elicit pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphorylation and did not decrease the activity of the complex. These results suggest that JNK mediates a signaling pathway that regulates metabolic functions in mitochondria as part of a network that coordinates cytosolic and mitochondrial processes relevant for cell function.

  6. NMR solution structure of the N-terminal domain of hERG and its interaction with the S4-S5 linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingxin; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Huang, Qiwei; Raida, Manfred; Kang, Congbao

    2010-12-03

    The human Ether-à-go-go Related Gene (hERG) potassium channel mediates the rapid delayed rectifier current (IKr) in the cardiac action potential. Mutations in the 135 amino acid residue N-terminal domain (NTD) cause channel dysfunction or mis-translocation. To study the structure of NTD, it was overexpressed and purified from Escherichia coli cells using affinity purification and gel filtration chromatography. The purified protein behaved as a monomer under purification conditions. Far- and near-UV, circular dichroism (CD) and solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies showed that the purified protein was well-folded. The solution structure of NTD was obtained and the N-terminal residues 13-23 forming an amphipathic helix which may be important for the protein-protein or protein-membrane interactions. NMR titration experiment also demonstrated that residues from 88 to 94 in NTD are important for the molecular interaction with the peptide derived from the S4-S5 linker.

  7. N-terminal guanidinylation of TIPP (Tyr-Tic-Phe-Phe) peptides results in major changes of the opioid activity profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltrowska, Grazyna; Nguyen, Thi M-D; Chung, Nga N; Wilkes, Brian C; Schiller, Peter W

    2013-09-15

    Derivatives of peptides of the TIPP (Tyr-Tic-Phe-Phe; Tic=1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid) family containing a guanidino (Guan) function in place of the N-terminal amino group were synthesized in an effort to improve their blood-brain barrier permeability. Unexpectedly, N-terminal amidination significantly altered the in vitro opioid activity profiles. Guan-analogues of TIPP-related δ opioid antagonists showed δ partial agonist or mixed δ partial agonist/μ partial agonist activity. Guanidinylation of the mixed μ agonist/δ antagonists H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Phe-NH2 (DIPP-NH2) and H-Dmt-TicΨ[CH2NH]Phe-Phe-NH2 (DIPP-NH2[Ψ]) converted them to mixed μ agonist/δ agonists. A docking study revealed distinct positioning of DIPP-NH2 and Guan-DIPP-NH2 in the δ receptor binding site. Lys(3)-analogues of DIPP-NH2 and DIPP-NH2[Ψ] (guanidinylated or non-guanidinylated) turned out to be mixed μ/κ agonists with δ antagonist-, δ partial agonist- or δ full agonist activity. Compounds with some of the observed mixed opioid activity profiles have therapeutic potential as analgesics with reduced side effects or for treatment of cocaine addiction.

  8. Relationship between impaired glycation and the N-terminal structure of the Hb Görwihl [beta5(A2)Pro-->Ala] variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shigenori; Nakahari, Takashi; Yamamoto, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    We studied the structural environment surrounding the beta-N-terminal glycation site of a hemoglobin (Hb) molecule in which the proline residue at beta5(A2) was substituted by alanine in silico. By computer analysis that used Protein Data Bank data (PDB ID: 1BZ0), we tried to clarify the reason for impaired glycation of Hb Görwihl [beta5(A2)Pro-->Ala]. On the basis of the results, we predicted that the glycation site would have the following characteristics: 1) glycation of the beta-N-terminus of Hb is probably accelerated by the neighboring histidine residue at beta2(NA2), which acts as an acid-base catalyst via a phosphate-mediated proton transfer; and 2) the mutation beta5(A2)Pro-->Ala would bring about impaired glycation of the N-terminal residue by forming an electrostatic bond between the alpha amino group of beta1(NA1)Val and beta carboxyl group of beta79(EF3)Asp.

  9. Crystallization of Galectin-8 Linker Reveals Intricate Relationship between the N-terminal Tail and the Linker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Si

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Galectin-8 (Gal-8 plays a significant role in normal immunological function as well as in cancer. This lectin contains two carbohydrate recognition domains (CRD connected by a peptide linker. The N-terminal CRD determines ligand binding specificity, whereas the linker has been proposed to regulate overall Gal-8 function, including multimerization and biological activity. Here, we crystallized the Gal-8 N-terminal CRD with the peptide linker using a crystallization condition that contains Ni2+. The Ni2+ ion was found to be complexed between two CRDs via crystal packing contacts. The coordination between Ni2+ and Asp25 plays an indirect role in determining the structure of β-strand F0 and in influencing the linker conformation which could not be defined due to its dynamic nature. The linker was also shortened in situ and crystallized under a different condition, leading to a higher resolution structure refined to 1.08 Å. This crystal structure allowed definition of a short portion of the linker interacting with the Gal-8 N-terminal tail via ionic interactions and hydrogen bonds. Observation of two Gal-8 N-terminal CRD structures implies that the N-terminal tail and the linker may influence each other’s conformation. In addition, under specific crystallization conditions, glycerol could replace lactose and was observed at the carbohydrate binding site. However, glycerol did not show inhibition activity in hemagglutination assay.

  10. Mathematical Characterization of Protein Sequences Using Patterns as Chemical Group Combinations of Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Pabitra Pal; Jana, Siddhartha Sankar

    2016-01-01

    Comparison of amino acid sequence similarity is the fundamental concept behind the protein phylogenetic tree formation. By virtue of this method, we can explain the evolutionary relationships, but further explanations are not possible unless sequences are studied through the chemical nature of individual amino acids. Here we develop a new methodology to characterize the protein sequences on the basis of the chemical nature of the amino acids. We design various algorithms for studying the variation of chemical group transitions and various chemical group combinations as patterns in the protein sequences. The amino acid sequence of conventional myosin II head domain of 14 family members are taken to illustrate this new approach. We find two blocks of maximum length 6 aa as ‘FPKATD’ and ‘Y/FTNEKL’ without repeating the same chemical nature and one block of maximum length 20 aa with the repetition of chemical nature which are common among all 14 members. We also check commonality with another motor protein sub-family kinesin, KIF1A. Based on our analysis we find a common block of length 8 aa both in myosin II and KIF1A. This motif is located in the neck linker region which could be responsible for the generation of mechanical force, enabling us to find the unique blocks which remain chemically conserved across the family. We also validate our methodology with different protein families such as MYOI, Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), Na+/K+-ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase. Altogether, our studies provide a new methodology for investigating the conserved amino acids’ pattern in different proteins. PMID:27930687

  11. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. Amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle ATP-AMP transphosphorylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuby, S A; Palmieri, R H; Frischat, A; Fischer, A H; Wu, L H; Maland, L; Manship, M

    1984-05-22

    The total amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase has been determined, and the single polypeptide chain of 194 amino acid residues starts with N-acetylmethionine and ends with leucyllysine at its carboxyl terminus, in agreement with the earlier data on its amino acid composition [Mahowald, T. A., Noltmann, E. A., & Kuby, S. A. (1962) J. Biol. Chem. 237, 1138-1145] and its carboxyl-terminus sequence [Olson, O. E., & Kuby, S. A. (1964) J. Biol. Chem. 239, 460-467]. Elucidation of the primary structure was based on tryptic and chymotryptic cleavages of the performic acid oxidized protein, cyanogen bromide cleavages of the 14C-labeled S-carboxymethylated protein at its five methionine sites (followed by maleylation of peptide fragments), and tryptic cleavages at its 12 arginine sites of the maleylated 14C-labeled S-carboxymethylated protein. Calf muscle myokinase, whose sequence has also been established, differs primarily from the rabbit muscle myokinase's sequence in the following: His-30 is replaced by Gln-30; Lys-56 is replaced by Met-56; Ala-84 and Asp 85 are replaced by Val-84 and Asn-85. A comparison of the four muscle-type adenylate kinases, whose covalent structures have now been determined, viz., rabbit, calf, porcine, and human [for the latter two sequences see Heil, A., Müller, G., Noda, L., Pinder, T., Schirmer, H., Schirmer, I., & Von Zabern, I. (1974) Eur. J. Biochem. 43, 131-144, and Von Zabern, I., Wittmann-Liebold, B., Untucht-Grau, R., Schirmer, R. H., & Pai, E. F. (1976) Eur. J. Biochem. 68, 281-290], demonstrates an extraordinary degree of homology.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Structure-Function Study of the N-terminal Domain of Exocyst Subunit Sec3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Kyuwon; Knödler, Andreas; Lee, Sung Haeng; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Orlando, Kelly; Zhang, Jian; Foskett, Trevor J.; Guo, Wei; Dominguez, Roberto (UPENN)

    2010-04-19

    The exocyst is an evolutionarily conserved octameric complex involved in polarized exocytosis from yeast to humans. The Sec3 subunit of the exocyst acts as a spatial landmark for exocytosis through its ability to bind phospholipids and small GTPases. The structure of the N-terminal domain of Sec3 (Sec3N) was determined ab initio and defines a new subclass of pleckstrin homology (PH) domains along with a new family of proteins carrying this domain. Respectively, N- and C-terminal to the PH domain Sec3N presents an additional {alpha}-helix and two {beta}-strands that mediate dimerization through domain swapping. The structure identifies residues responsible for phospholipid binding, which when mutated in cells impair the localization of exocyst components at the plasma membrane and lead to defects in exocytosis. Through its ability to bind the small GTPase Cdc42 and phospholipids, the PH domain of Sec3 functions as a coincidence detector at the plasma membrane.

  13. The vasorelaxant effect of adrenomedullin, proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide and amylin in human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasbak, Philip; Eskesen, Karen; Lind, Peter Henrik

    2006-01-01

    In this study we aimed to assess in vivo, the vasodilator effects of adrenomedullin, proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP) and amylin in human skin vasculature and compare the responses to the effects mediated by the endogenous neuropeptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP......) and substance P and to examine the mRNA expression of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CL-R) and receptor-activity modifying proteins, RAMP1, RAMP 2 and RAMP3 in human subcutaneous arteries. Changes in skin blood flow of the forearm were measured using a Laser Doppler Imager after intradermal injection...... of CGRP, adrenomedullin and amylin induces long lasting dilatation of human skin vasculature by activation of CGRP1 receptors. PAMP induces transient vasodilatation. PAMP but not CGRP, adrenomedullin and amylin causes itch sensation and local erythema. The transient effect on vasodilatation as response...

  14. Structural polymorphism in the N-terminal oligomerization domain of NPM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrea, Diana M; Grace, Christy R; Buljan, Marija; Yun, Mi-Kyung; Pytel, Nicholas J; Satumba, John; Nourse, Amanda; Park, Cheon-Gil; Madan Babu, M; White, Stephen W; Kriwacki, Richard W

    2014-03-25

    Nucleophosmin (NPM1) is a multifunctional phospho-protein with critical roles in ribosome biogenesis, tumor suppression, and nucleolar stress response. Here we show that the N-terminal oligomerization domain of NPM1 (Npm-N) exhibits structural polymorphism by populating conformational states ranging from a highly ordered, folded pentamer to a highly disordered monomer. The monomer-pentamer equilibrium is modulated by posttranslational modification and protein binding. Phosphorylation drives the equilibrium in favor of monomeric forms, and this effect can be reversed by Npm-N binding to its interaction partners. We have identified a short, arginine-rich linear motif in NPM1 binding partners that mediates Npm-N oligomerization. We propose that the diverse functional repertoire associated with NPM1 is controlled through a regulated unfolding mechanism signaled through posttranslational modifications and intermolecular interactions.

  15. Copper binding triggers compaction in N-terminal tail of human copper pump ATP7B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondol, Tanumoy; Åden, Jörgen; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2016-02-12

    Protein conformational changes are fundamental to biological reactions. For copper ion transport, the multi-domain protein ATP7B in the Golgi network receives copper from the cytoplasmic copper chaperone Atox1 and, with energy from ATP hydrolysis, moves the metal to the lumen for loading of copper-dependent enzymes. Although anticipated, conformational changes involved in ATP7B's functional cycle remain elusive. Using spectroscopic methods we here demonstrate that the four most N-terminal metal-binding domains in ATP7B, upon stoichiometric copper addition, adopt a more compact arrangement which has a higher thermal stability than in the absence of copper. In contrast to previous reports, no stable complex was found in solution between the metal-binding domains and the nucleotide-binding domain of ATP7B. Metal-dependent movement of the first four metal-binding domains in ATP7B may be a trigger that initiates the overall catalytic cycle.

  16. Increased N-terminal CgA in circulation associated with cardiac reperfusin in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydland, Martin; Kousholt, Birgitte S.; Larsen, Jens Rolighed;

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Acute myocardial infarction causes neurohumoral activation characterized by increased sympathetic activity. CgA is a protein released during sympathoadrenal stress from neuroendocrine tissue. Recently, increased CgA concentrations in circulation have been reported and suggested...... to be an independent predictor of mortality after acute myocardial infarction. Materials & methods: Eighteen pigs underwent 1 h of regional myocardial ischemia followed by 3 h of reperfusion. Blood samples were collected every hour and plasma CgA was measured with two radioimmunoassays. Results: We found a 30......% increase in plasma N-terminal CgA 1 h after re-establishment of coronary blood supply. On the other hand, plasma pancreastatin did not change in response to ischemia or reperfusion but decreased during the entire experiment. Conclusion: Our results suggest a differentiated CgA response in myocardial...

  17. NMR and structural data for Connexin 32 and Connexin 26 N-terminal peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuksel Batir

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we present 1H and 13C chemical shift assignments, secondary structural propensity data and normalized temperature coefficient data for N-terminal peptides of Connexin 26 (Cx26, Cx26G12R and Cx32G12R mutants seen in syndromic deafness and Charcot Marie Tooth Disease respectively, published in “Structural Studies of N-Terminal Mutants of Connexin 26 and Connexin 32 Using 1H NMR Spectroscopy” (Y. Batir, T.A. Bargiello, T.L. Dowd, 2016 [1]. The mutation G12R affects the structure of both Cx26 and Cx32 peptides differently. We present data from secondary structure propensity chemical shift analysis which calculates a secondary structure propensity (SSP score for both disordered or folded peptides and proteins using the difference between the 13C secondary chemical shifts of the Cα and Cβ protons. This data supplements the calculated NMR structures from NOESY data [1]. We present and compare the SSP data for the Cx26 vs Cx26G12R peptides and the Cx32 and Cx32G12R peptides. In addition, we present plots of temperature coefficients obtained for Cx26, Cx26G12R and Cx32G12R peptides collected previously [1] and normalized to their random coil temperature coefficients, “Random coil 1H chemical shifts obtained as a function of temperature and trifluoroethanol concentration for the peptide series GGXGG” (G. Merutka, H.J. Dyson, P.E. Wright, 1995 [2]. Reductions in these normalized temperature coefficients are directly observable for residues in different segments of the peptide and this data informs on solvent accessibility of the NH protons and NH protons which may be more constrained due to the formation of H bonds.

  18. Antimicrobial activity of human prion protein is mediated by its N-terminal region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Pasupuleti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular prion-related protein (PrP(c is a cell-surface protein that is ubiquitously expressed in the human body. The multifunctionality of PrP(c, and presence of an exposed cationic and heparin-binding N-terminus, a feature characterizing many antimicrobial peptides, made us hypothesize that PrP(c could exert antimicrobial activity. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Intact recombinant PrP exerted antibacterial and antifungal effects at normal and low pH. Studies employing recombinant PrP and N- and C-terminally truncated variants, as well as overlapping peptide 20mers, demonstrated that the antimicrobial activity is mediated by the unstructured N-terminal part of the protein. Synthetic peptides of the N-terminus of PrP killed the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as the fungus Candida parapsilosis. Fluorescence studies of peptide-treated bacteria, paired with analysis of peptide effects on liposomes, showed that the peptides exerted membrane-breaking effects similar to those seen after treatment with the "classical" human antimicrobial peptide LL-37. In contrast to LL-37, however, no marked helix induction was detected for the PrP-derived peptides in presence of negatively charged (bacteria-mimicking liposomes. PrP furthermore showed an inducible expression during wounding of human skin ex vivo and in vivo, as well as stimulation of keratinocytes with TGF-alpha in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: The demonstration of an antimicrobial activity of PrP, localisation of its activity to the N-terminal and heparin-binding region, combined with results showing an increased expression of PrP during wounding, indicate that PrPs could have a previously undisclosed role in host defense.

  19. Crystal Structure of the N-terminal Domain of the Group B Streptococcus Alpha C Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auperin,T.; Bolduc, G.; Baron, M.; Heroux, A.; Filman, D.; Madoff, L.; Hogle, J.

    2005-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis among neonates and an important cause of morbidity among pregnant women and immunocompromised adults. Invasive diseases due to GBS are attributed to the ability of the pathogen to translocate across human epithelial surfaces. The alpha C protein (ACP) has been identified as an invasin that plays a role in internalization and translocation of GBS across epithelial cells. The soluble N-terminal domain of ACP (NtACP) blocks the internalization of GBS. We determined the 1.86-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of NtACP comprising residues Ser{sup 52} through Leu{sup 225} of the full-length ACP. NtACP has two domains, an N-terminal {beta}-sandwich and a C-terminal three-helix bundle. Structural and topological alignments reveal that the {beta}-sandwich shares structural elements with the type III fibronectin fold (FnIII), but includes structural elaborations that make it unique. We have identified a potential integrin-binding motif consisting of Lys-Thr-Asp{sup 146}, Arg{sup 110}, and Asp{sup 118}. A similar arrangement of charged residues has been described in other invasins. ACP shows a heparin binding activity that requires NtACP. We propose a possible heparin-binding site, including one surface of the three-helix bundle, and nearby portions of the sandwich and repeat domains. We have validated this prediction using assays of the heparin binding and cell-adhesion properties of engineered fragments of ACP. This is the first crystal structure of a member of the highly conserved Gram-positive surface alpha-like protein family, and it will enable the internalization mechanism of GBS to be dissected at the atomic level.

  20. Purification of Two Novel Sugar Acid-binding Lectins from Haplomitrium Mnioides (bryophyte, Plantae) and their Preliminary Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Hosono, Masahiro; Nitta, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    Two novel sugar acid-binding lectins were purified from Haplomitrium mnioides (Lindb.) Schust. using a procedure consisting of ammonium sulfate precipitation, G-50 gel filtration, hydroxyapatite chromatography, and HW-50 gel filtration. We reported their partial physicochemical properties: molecular weight, affinity for carbohydrates and organic acids, pH stability, and dependence of their hemagglutination activity on metal ions. We also determined their N-terminal amino acid sequences. H. mnioides lectins (HMLs) were monomers (one with a molecular weight of approximately 27 kDa, and the other with a molecular weight of approximately 105 kDa) under both nonreducing and reducing conditions. They were named HML27 and HML105, respectively. Both HMLs had an affinity for N-acetylneuraminic acid, D-glucuronic acid, D-glucaric acid, bovine submaxillary mucin, heparin, and organic acids, such as citrate, 2-oxoglutaric acid, and D-2-hydroxyglutarate. Furthermore, HML27 had an affinity for α-D-galacturonic acid, D-malate, L-malate, and pyruvate, while HML105 had an affinity for D-gluconic acid. HML27 and HML105 are novel plant lectins: they have an affinity for sugar acids and organic acids and specifically recognize the carboxyl group, and there is no homology between their N-terminal amino acid sequences and those of the previously described lectins and agglutinins.

  1. Alignment of the amino terminal amino acid sequence of human cytochrome c oxidase subunits I and II with the sequence of their putative mRNAs.

    OpenAIRE

    CHOMYN, A.; Hunkapiller, M W; Attardi, G

    1981-01-01

    Thirteen of the first fifteen amino acids from the NH2-terminus of the primary sequence of human cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and eleven of the first twelve amino acids of subunit II have been identified by microsequencing procedures. These sequences have been compared with the recently determined 5'-end proximal sequences of the HeLa cell mitochondrial mRNAs and unambiguously aligned with two of them. This alignment has allowed the identification of the putative mRNA for subunit I, and has...

  2. The complete amino acid sequence of the major component myoglobin of Amazon river dolphin (Inia geoffrensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwulet, F E; Bogardt, R A; Jones, B N; Lehman, L D; Gurd, F R

    1975-12-02

    The complete amino acid sequence of the major component myoglobin from Amazon River dolphin, Inia geoffrensis, was determined by specific cleavage of the protein to obtain large peptides which are readily degraded by the automatic sequencer. Three easily separable peptides were obtained by cleaving the protein with cyanogen bromide at the methionine residues and four peptides were obtained by cleaving the methyl-acetimidated protein with trypsin at the arginine residues. From these peptides over 85% of the sequence was completed. The remainder of the sequence was obtained by fragmentation of the large cyanogen bromide peptide with trypsin. This protein differs from that of the common porpoise, Phocoena phocoena, at seven positions, from that of the common dolphin, Delphinus delphis, at 11 positions, and from that of the sperm whale, Physeter catodon, at 15 positions. By comparison of this sequence with the three-dimensional structure of sperm whale myoglobin it appears that those residues close to the heme group are most conserved followed by those in nonhelical regions and lastly by those in the helical segments. All of the substitutions observed in this sequence fit easily into the three-dimensional structure of the sperm whale myoglobin.

  3. The N-Terminal GYPSY Motif Is Required for Pilin-Specific Sortase SrtC1 Functionality in Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain GG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douillard, François P; Rasinkangas, Pia; Bhattacharjee, Arnab; Palva, Airi; de Vos, Willem M

    2016-01-01

    Predominantly identified in pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, sortase-dependent pili are also found in commensal species, such as the probiotic-marketed strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG. Pili are typically associated with host colonization, immune signalling and biofilm formation. Comparative analysis of the N-terminal domains of pilin-specific sortases from various piliated Gram-positive bacteria identified a conserved motif, called GYPSY, within the signal sequence. We investigated the function and role of the GYPSY residues by directed mutagenesis in homologous (rod-shaped) and heterologous (coccoid-shaped) expression systems for pilus formation. Substitutions of some of the GYPSY residues, and more specifically the proline residue, were found to have a direct impact on the degree of piliation of Lb. rhamnosus GG. The present findings uncover a new signalling element involved in the functionality of pilin-specific sortases controlling the pilus biogenesis of Lb. rhamnosus GG and related piliated Gram-positive species.

  4. Amino acid sequence of myoglobin from emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, S P; Joseph, P; Li, S; Beach, C M; Fontaine, M; Steinke, L

    2010-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the primary structure of emu myoglobin (Mb). Emu Mb was isolated from Iliofibularis muscle employing gel-filtration chromatography. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry was employed to determine the exact molecular mass of emu Mb in comparison with horse Mb, and Edman degradation was utilized to characterize the amino acid sequence. The molecular mass of emu Mb was 17,380 Da and was close to those reported for ratite and poultry myoglobins. Similar to myoglobins from meat-producing livestock and birds, emu Mb has 153 amino acids. Emu Mb contains 9 histidines. Proximal and distal histidines, responsible for coordinating oxygen-binding property of Mb, are conserved in emu. Emu Mb shared more than 90% homology with ratite and chicken myoglobins, whereas it demonstrated only less than 70% sequence similarity with ruminant myoglobins.

  5. Stereochemical Sequence Ion Selectivity: Proline versus Pipecolic-acid-containing Protonated Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Guan, Shanshan; Bythell, Benjamin J.

    2017-01-01

    Substitution of proline by pipecolic acid, the six-membered ring congener of proline, results in vastly different tandem mass spectra. The well-known proline effect is eliminated and amide bond cleavage C-terminal to pipecolic acid dominates instead. Why do these two ostensibly similar residues produce dramatically differing spectra? Recent evidence indicates that the proton affinities of these residues are similar, so are unlikely to explain the result [Raulfs et al., J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 25, 1705-1715 (2014)]. An additional hypothesis based on increased flexibility was also advocated. Here, we provide a computational investigation of the "pipecolic acid effect," to test this and other hypotheses to determine if theory can shed additional light on this fascinating result. Our calculations provide evidence for both the increased flexibility of pipecolic-acid-containing peptides, and structural changes in the transition structures necessary to produce the sequence ions. The most striking computational finding is inversion of the stereochemistry of the transition structures leading to "proline effect"-type amide bond fragmentation between the proline/pipecolic acid-congeners: R (proline) to S (pipecolic acid). Additionally, our calculations predict substantial stabilization of the amide bond cleavage barriers for the pipecolic acid congeners by reduction in deleterious steric interactions and provide evidence for the importance of experimental energy regime in rationalizing the spectra.

  6. Stereochemical Sequence Ion Selectivity: Proline versus Pipecolic-acid-containing Protonated Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Guan, Shanshan; Bythell, Benjamin J.

    2016-10-01

    Substitution of proline by pipecolic acid, the six-membered ring congener of proline, results in vastly different tandem mass spectra. The well-known proline effect is eliminated and amide bond cleavage C-terminal to pipecolic acid dominates instead. Why do these two ostensibly similar residues produce dramatically differing spectra? Recent evidence indicates that the proton affinities of these residues are similar, so are unlikely to explain the result [Raulfs et al., J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 25, 1705-1715 (2014)]. An additional hypothesis based on increased flexibility was also advocated. Here, we provide a computational investigation of the "pipecolic acid effect," to test this and other hypotheses to determine if theory can shed additional light on this fascinating result. Our calculations provide evidence for both the increased flexibility of pipecolic-acid-containing peptides, and structural changes in the transition structures necessary to produce the sequence ions. The most striking computational finding is inversion of the stereochemistry of the transition structures leading to "proline effect"-type amide bond fragmentation between the proline/pipecolic acid-congeners: R (proline) to S (pipecolic acid). Additionally, our calculations predict substantial stabilization of the amide bond cleavage barriers for the pipecolic acid congeners by reduction in deleterious steric interactions and provide evidence for the importance of experimental energy regime in rationalizing the spectra.

  7. Three multidomain esterases from the cellulolytic rumen anaerobe Ruminococcus flavefaciens 17 that carry divergent dockerin sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurilia, V; Martin, J C; McCrae, S I; Scott, K P; Rincon, M T; Flint, H J

    2000-06-01

    Three enzymes carrying esterase domains have been identified in the rumen cellulolytic anaerobe Ruminococcus flavefaciens 17. The newly characterized CesA gene product (768 amino acids) includes an N-terminal acetylesterase domain and an unidentified C-terminal domain, while the previously characterized XynB enzyme (781 amino acids) includes an internal acetylesterase domain in addition to its N-terminal xylanase catalytic domain. A third gene, xynE, is predicted to encode a multidomain enzyme of 792 amino acids including a family 11 xylanase domain and a C-terminal esterase domain. The esterase domains from CesA and XynB share significant sequence identity (44%) and belong to carbohydrate esterase family 3; both domains are shown here to be capable of deacetylating acetylated xylans, but no evidence was found for ferulic acid esterase activity. The esterase domain of XynE, however, shares 42% amino acid identity with a family 1 phenolic acid esterase domain identified from Clostridum thermocellum XynZ. XynB, XynE and CesA all contain dockerin-like regions in addition to their catalytic domains, suggesting that these enzymes form part of a cellulosome-like multienzyme complex. The dockerin sequences of CesA and XynE differ significantly from those previously described in R. flavefaciens polysaccharidases, including XynB, suggesting that they might represent distinct dockerin specificities.

  8. Arabidopsis MKS1 is involved in basal immunity and requires an intact N-terminal domain for proper function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Petersen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Innate immune signaling pathways in animals and plants are regulated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades. MAP kinase 4 (MPK4 functions downstream of innate immune receptors via a nuclear substrate MKS1 to regulate the activity of the WRKY33 transcription factor, which in turn controls the production of anti-microbial phytoalexins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigate the role of MKS1 in basal resistance and the importance of its N- and C-terminal domains for MKS1 function. We used the information that mks1 loss-of-function partially suppresses the mpk4 loss-of-function phenotype, and that transgenic expression of functional MKS1 in mpk4/mks1 double mutants reverted the mpk4 dwarf phenotype. Transformation of mks1/mpk4 with mutant versions of MKS1 constructs showed that a single amino acid substitution in a putative MAP kinase docking domain, MKS1-L32A, or a truncated MKS1 version unable to interact with WRKY33, were deficient in reverting the double mutant to the mpk4 phenotype. These results demonstrate functional requirement in MKS1 for the interaction with MPK4 and WRKY33. In addition, nuclear localization of MKS1 was shown to depend on an intact N-terminal domain. Furthermore, loss-of-function mks1 mutants exhibited increased susceptibility to strains of Pseudomonas syringae and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, indicating that MKS1 plays a role in basal defense responses. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, our results indicate that MKS1 function and subcellular location requires an intact N-terminus important for both MPK4 and WRKY33 interactions.

  9. Glutamate dehydrogenase isoforms with N-terminal (His)6- or FLAG-tag retain their kinetic properties and cellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajęcka, Kamilla; Nielsen, Camilla Wendel; Hauge, Anne; Zaganas, Ioannis; Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Plaitakis, Andreas; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a crucial enzyme on the crossroads of amino acid and energy metabolism and it is operating in all domains of life. According to current knowledge GDH is present only in one functional isoform in most animals, including mice. In addition to this housekeeping enzyme (hGDH1 in humans), humans and apes have acquired a second isoform (hGDH2) with a distinct tissue expression profile. In the current study we have cloned both mouse and human GDH constructs containing FLAG and (His)6 small genetically-encoded tags, respectively. The hGDH1 and hGDH2 constructs containing N-terminal (His)6 tags were successfully expressed in Sf9 cells and the recombinant proteins were isolated to ≥95 % purity in a two-step procedure involving ammonium sulfate precipitation and Ni(2+)-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. To explore whether the presence of the FLAG and (His)6 tags affects the cellular localization and functionality of the GDH isoforms, we studied the subcellular distribution of the expressed enzymes as well as their regulation by adenosine diphosphate monopotassium salt (ADP) and guanosine-5'-triphosphate sodium salt (GTP). Through immunoblot analysis of the mitochondrial and cytosolic fraction of the HEK cells expressing the recombinant proteins we found that neither FLAG nor (His)6 tag disturbs the mitochondrial localization of GDH. The addition of the small tags to the N-terminus of the mature mitochondrial mouse GDH1 or human hGDH1 and hGDH2 did not change the ADP activation or GTP inhibition pattern of the proteins as compared to their untagged counterparts. However, the addition of FLAG tag to the C-terminus of the mouse GDH left the recombinant protein fivefold less sensitive to ADP activation. This finding highlights the necessity of the functional characterization of recombinant proteins containing even the smallest available tags.

  10. High efficiency adenovirus-mediated expression of truncated N-terminal huntingtin fragment (htt552) in primary rat astrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linhui Wang; Fang Lin; Junchao Wu; Zhenghong Qin

    2009-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by an expansion of polyglutamine tract in N-terminus of huntingtin (htt).The mutation of htt leads to dysfunction and premature death of striatal and cortical neurons. However, the effects of htt mutation on glia remain largely unknown.This study aimed to establish a glia HD model using an adenoviral vector to express wild-type and mutant N-terminal huntingtin fragment 1-552 amino acids (htt552) in rat primary cortical astrocytes. We have eval-uated optimal conditions for the infection of astrocytes with adenovirai vectors, and the kinetics of the expression of htt552 in astrocytes. The majority of astroeytes expressed the transgene after infection. At 24 h post-infection, the highest rate of infection was 89 + 3% for the wild-type (htt552-18Q) with a multiplicity of infection (m.o.i.) of 80, and the highest rate of infection was 91 +4% for the mutant type (htt552-100Q) with the same viral dose. The duration of expression of htt552 lasted for about 7 days with a relatively high level from 1 to 4 days post-infection. Mutant huntingtin (htt552-100Q) pro-duced the characteristic HD pathology after 3 days by the appearance of cytoplasmic aggregates and intranue-lear inclusions. The result of MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliu mbromide)assay showed that the inhibition of viability by virus on astrocytes was also dose-dependent. To obtain high infection rate and low toxicity, the viral dose with an m.o.i, of 40 was optimal to our cell model. The present study demonstrates that adenovirai-mediated expression of mutant htt provides an advantageous system for his-tological and biochemical analysis of HD pathogenesis in primary cortical astrocyte cultures.

  11. Amino acid sequences mediating vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 binding to integrin alpha 4: homologous DSP sequence found for JC polyoma VP1 coat protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Andrew Meyer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The JC polyoma viral coat protein VP1 was analyzed for amino acid sequences homologies to the IDSP sequence which mediates binding of VLA-4 (integrin alpha 4 to vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. Although the full sequence was not found, a DSP sequence was located near the critical arginine residue linked to infectivity of the virus and binding to sialic acid containing molecules such as integrins (3. For the JC polyoma virus, a DSP sequence was found at residues 70, 71 and 72 with homology also noted for the mouse polyoma virus and SV40 virus. Three dimensional modeling of the VP1 molecule suggests that the DSP loop has an accessible site for interaction from the external side of the assembled viral capsid pentamer.

  12. Amino Acid Sequences Mediating Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Binding to Integrin Alpha 4: Homologous DSP Sequence Found for JC Polyoma VP1 Coat Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The JC polyoma viral coat protein VP1 was analyzed for amino acid sequences homologies to the IDSP sequence which mediates binding of VLA-4 (integrin alpha 4) to vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. Although the full sequence was not found, a DSP sequence was located near the critical arginine residue linked to infectivity of the virus and binding to sialic acid containing molecules such as integrins (3). For the JC polyoma virus, a DSP sequence was found at residues 70, 71 and 72 with homology also noted for the mouse polyoma virus and SV40 virus. Three dimensional modeling of the VP1 molecule suggests that the DSP loop has an accessible site for interaction from the external side of the assembled viral capsid pentamer.

  13. Identification of Amino Acid Sequences with Good Folding Properties in an Off-Lattice Model

    CERN Document Server

    Irbäck, Anders; Potthast, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Folding properties of a two-dimensional toy protein model containing only two amino-acid types, hydrophobic and hydrophilic, respectively, are analyzed. An efficient Monte Carlo procedure is employed to ensure that the ground states are found. The thermodynamic properties are found to be strongly sequence dependent in contrast to the kinetic ones. Hence, criteria for good folders are defined entirely in terms of thermodynamic fluctuations. With these criteria sequence patterns that fold well are isolated. For 300 chains with 20 randomly chosen binary residues approximately 10% meet these criteria. Also, an analysis is performed by means of statistical and artificial neural network methods from which it is concluded that the folding properties can be predicted to a certain degree given the binary numbers characterizing the sequences.

  14. Sequence-selective targeting of duplex DNA by peptide nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    Sequence-selective gene targeting constitutes an attractive drug-discovery approach for genetic therapy, with the aim of reducing or enhancing the activity of specific genes at the transcriptional level, or as part of a methodology for targeted gene repair. The pseudopeptide DNA mimic peptide...... nucleic acid (PNA) can recognize duplex DNA with high sequence specificity and affinity in triplex, duplex and double-duplex invasive modes or non-invasive triplex modes. Novel PNA modification has improved the affinity for DNA recognition via duplex invasion, double-duplex invasion and triplex...... recognition considerably. Such modifications have also resulted in new approaches to targeted gene repair and sequence-selective double-strand cleavage of genomic DNA....

  15. Structure of the fully modified left-handed cyclohexene nucleic acid sequence GTGTACAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robeyns, Koen; Herdewijn, Piet; Van Meervelt, Luc

    2008-02-13

    CeNA oligonucleotides consist of a phosphorylated backbone where the deoxyribose sugars are replaced by cyclohexene moieties. The X-ray structure determination and analysis of a fully modified octamer sequence GTGTACAC, which is the first crystal structure of a carbocyclic-based nucleic acid, is presented. This particular sequence was built with left-handed building blocks and crystallizes as a left-handed double helix. The helix can be characterized as belonging to the (mirrored) A-type family. Crystallographic data were processed up to 1.53 A, and the octamer sequence crystallizes in the space group R32. The sugar puckering is found to adopt the 3H2 half-chair conformation which mimics the C3'-endo conformation of the ribose sugar. The double helices stack on top of each other to form continuous helices, and static disorder is observed due to this end-to-end stacking.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of the Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactobacillus Rhamnosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samat Kozhakhmetov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lactobacilli are a bacteria commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract. Some species of this genus have probiotic properties. The most common of these is Lactobacillus rhamnosus, a microoganism, generally regarded as safe (GRAS. It is also a homofermentative L-(+-lactic acid producer. The genus Lactobacillus is characterized by an extraordinary degree of the phenotypic and genotypic diversity. However, the studies of the genus were conducted mostly with the unequally distributed, non-random choice of species for sequencing; thus, there is only one representative genome from the Lactobacillus rhamnosus clade available to date. The aim of this study was to characterize the genome sequencing of selected strains of Lactobacilli. Methods: 109 samples were isolated from national domestic dairy products in the laboratory of Center for life sciences. After screaning isolates for probiotic properties, a highly active Lactobacillus spp strain was chosen. Genomic DNA was extracted according to the manufacturing protocol (Wizard® Genomic DNA Purification Kit. The Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain was identified as the highly active Lactobacillus strain accoridng to its morphological, cultural, physiological, and biochemical properties, and a genotypic analysis. Results: The genome of Lactobacillus rhamnosus was sequenced using the Roche 454 GS FLX (454 GS FLX platforms. The initial draft assembly was prepared from 14 large contigs (20 all contigs by the Newbler gsAssembler 2.3 (454 Life Sciences, Branford, CT. Conclusion: A full genome-sequencing of selected strains of lactic acid bacteria was made during the study.

  17. Metazoan Remaining Genes for Essential Amino Acid Biosynthesis: Sequence Conservation and Evolutionary Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor R. Costa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Essential amino acids (EAA consist of a group of nine amino acids that animals are unable to synthesize via de novo pathways. Recently, it has been found that most metazoans lack the same set of enzymes responsible for the de novo EAA biosynthesis. Here we investigate the sequence conservation and evolution of all the metazoan remaining genes for EAA pathways. Initially, the set of all 49 enzymes responsible for the EAA de novo biosynthesis in yeast was retrieved. These enzymes were used as BLAST queries to search for similar sequences in a database containing 10 complete metazoan genomes. Eight enzymes typically attributed to EAA pathways were found to be ubiquitous in metazoan genomes, suggesting a conserved functional role. In this study, we address the question of how these genes evolved after losing their pathway partners. To do this, we compared metazoan genes with their fungal and plant orthologs. Using phylogenetic analysis with maximum likelihood, we found that acetolactate synthase (ALS and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT diverged from the expected Tree of Life (ToL relationships. High sequence conservation in the paraphyletic group Plant-Fungi was identified for these two genes using a newly developed Python algorithm. Selective pressure analysis of ALS and BHMT protein sequences showed higher non-synonymous mutation ratios in comparisons between metazoans/fungi and metazoans/plants, supporting the hypothesis that these two genes have undergone non-ToL evolution in animals.

  18. The heparin-binding site in tetranectin is located in the N-terminal region and binding does not involve the carbohydrate recognition domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentsen, R H; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Caterer, N R

    2000-01-01

    in three exons. Exon 3 encodes the carbohydrate recognition domain, which binds to kringle 4 in plasminogen at low levels of Ca(2+). Exon 2 encodes an alpha-helix, which is necessary and sufficient to govern the trimerization of tetranectin by assembling into a triple-helical coiled-coil structural element......Tetranectin is a homotrimeric plasma and extracellular-matrix protein that binds plasminogen and complex sulphated polysaccharides including heparin. In terms of primary and tertiary structure, tetranectin is related to the collectin family of Ca(2+)-binding C-type lectins. Tetranectin is encoded....... Here we show that the heparin-binding site in tetranectin resides not in the carbohydrate recognition domain but within the N-terminal region, comprising the 16 amino acid residues encoded by exon 1. In particular, the lysine residues in the decapeptide segment KPKKIVNAKK (tetranectin residues 6...

  19. Identification and characterization of the mitochondrial targeting sequence and mechanism in human citrate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tsung-Lin; Liao, Ching-Chun; Tsai, Wen-Hui; Lin, Chin-Chih; Yeh, Chin-Wei; Teng, Chiao-Fang; Chang, Wen-Tsan

    2009-08-01

    Citrate synthase (CS), the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, plays a decisive role in regulating energy generation of mitochondrial respiration. Most mitochondrial proteins are synthesized in the cytoplasm as preproteins with an amino (N)-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) that directs mitochondria-specific sorting of the preprotein. However, the MTS and targeting mechanism of the human CS protein are not fully characterized. The human CS gene is a single nuclear gene which transcribes into two mRNA variants, isoform a (CSa) and b (CSb), by alternative splicing of exon 2. CSa encodes 466 amino acids, including a putative N-terminal MTS, while CSb expresses 400 residues with a shorter N terminus, lacking the MTS. Our results indicated that CSa is localized in the mitochondria and the N-terminal 27 amino acids, including a well-conserved RXY downward arrow (S/A) motif (the RHAS sequence), can efficiently target the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) into the mitochondria. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis analysis of the conserved basic amino acids and serine/threonine residues revealed that the R9 residue is essential but all serine/threonine residues are dispensable in the mitochondrial targeting function. Moreover, RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing of the preprotein import receptors, including TOM20, TOM22, and TOM70, showed that all three preprotein import receptors are required for transporting CSa into the mitochondria. In conclusion, we have experimentally identified the mitochondrial targeting sequence of human CSa and elucidated its targeting mechanism. These results provide an important basis for the study of mitochondrial dysfunction due to aberrant CSa trafficking.

  20. Abnormal kinetochore-generated pulling forces from expressing a N-terminally modified Hec1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Mattiuzzo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Highly Expressed in Cancer protein 1 (Hec1 is a constituent of the Ndc80 complex, a kinetochore component that has been shown to have a fundamental role in stable kinetochore-microtubule attachment, chromosome alignment and spindle checkpoint activation at mitosis. HEC1 RNA is found up-regulated in several cancer cells, suggesting a role for HEC1 deregulation in cancer. In light of this, we have investigated the consequences of experimentally-driven Hec1 expression on mitosis and chromosome segregation in an inducible expression system from human cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Overexpression of Hec1 could never be obtained in HeLa clones inducibly expressing C-terminally tagged Hec1 or untagged Hec1, suggesting that Hec1 cellular levels are tightly controlled. On the contrary, a chimeric protein with an EGFP tag fused to the Hec1 N-terminus accumulated in cells and disrupted mitotic division. EGFP- Hec1 cells underwent altered chromosome segregation within multipolar spindles that originated from centriole splitting. We found that EGFP-Hec1 assembled a mutant Ndc80 complex that was unable to rescue the mitotic phenotypes of Hec1 depletion. Kinetochores harboring EGFP-Hec1 formed persisting lateral microtubule-kinetochore interactions that recruited the plus-end depolymerase MCAK and the microtubule stabilizing protein HURP on K-fibers. In these conditions the plus-end kinesin CENP-E was preferentially retained at kinetochores. RNAi-mediated CENP-E depletion further demonstrated that CENP-E function was required for multipolar spindle formation in EGFP-Hec1 expressing cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study suggests that modifications on Hec1 N-terminal tail can alter kinetochore-microtubule attachment stability and influence Ndc80 complex function independently from the intracellular levels of the protein. N-terminally modified Hec1 promotes spindle pole fragmentation by CENP-E-mediated plus-end directed kinetochore

  1. The Tip of the Four N-Terminal α-Helices of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin Contains the Interaction Site with Membrane Phosphatidylserine Facilitating Small GTPases Glucosylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela Chavez, Carolina; Haustant, Georges Michel; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Chenal, Alexandre; Pauillac, Serge; Blondel, Arnaud; Popoff, Michel-Robert

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin (TcsL) is a powerful virulence factor responsible for severe toxic shock in man and animals. TcsL belongs to the large clostridial glucosylating toxin (LCGT) family which inactivates small GTPases by glucosylation with uridine-diphosphate (UDP)-glucose as a cofactor. Notably, TcsL modifies Rac and Ras GTPases, leading to drastic alteration of the actin cytoskeleton and cell viability. TcsL enters cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the N-terminal glucosylating domain (TcsL-cat) into the cytosol. TcsL-cat was found to preferentially bind to phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing membranes and to increase the glucosylation of Rac anchored to the lipid membrane. We have previously reported that the N-terminal four helical bundle structure (1–93 domain) recognizes a broad range of lipids, but that TcsL-cat specifically binds to PS and phosphatidic acid. Here, we show using mutagenesis that the PS binding site is localized on the tip of the four-helix bundle which is rich in positively-charged amino acids. Residues Y14, V15, F17, and R18 on loop 1, between helices 1 and 2, in coordination with R68 from loop 3, between helices 3 and 4, form a pocket which accommodates L-serine. The functional PS-binding site is required for TcsL-cat binding to the plasma membrane and subsequent cytotoxicity. TcsL-cat binding to PS facilitates a high enzymatic activity towards membrane-anchored Ras by about three orders of magnitude as compared to Ras in solution. The PS-binding site is conserved in LCGTs, which likely retain a common mechanism of binding to the membrane for their full activity towards membrane-bound GTPases. PMID:27023605

  2. The Tip of the Four N-Terminal α-Helices of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin Contains the Interaction Site with Membrane Phosphatidylserine Facilitating Small GTPases Glucosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Varela Chavez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin (TcsL is a powerful virulence factor responsible for severe toxic shock in man and animals. TcsL belongs to the large clostridial glucosylating toxin (LCGT family which inactivates small GTPases by glucosylation with uridine-diphosphate (UDP-glucose as a cofactor. Notably, TcsL modifies Rac and Ras GTPases, leading to drastic alteration of the actin cytoskeleton and cell viability. TcsL enters cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the N-terminal glucosylating domain (TcsL-cat into the cytosol. TcsL-cat was found to preferentially bind to phosphatidylserine (PS-containing membranes and to increase the glucosylation of Rac anchored to the lipid membrane. We have previously reported that the N-terminal four helical bundle structure (1–93 domain recognizes a broad range of lipids, but that TcsL-cat specifically binds to PS and phosphatidic acid. Here, we show using mutagenesis that the PS binding site is localized on the tip of the four-helix bundle which is rich in positively-charged amino acids. Residues Y14, V15, F17, and R18 on loop 1, between helices 1 and 2, in coordination with R68 from loop 3, between helices 3 and 4, form a pocket which accommodates L-serine. The functional PS-binding site is required for TcsL-cat binding to the plasma membrane and subsequent cytotoxicity. TcsL-cat binding to PS facilitates a high enzymatic activity towards membrane-anchored Ras by about three orders of magnitude as compared to Ras in solution. The PS-binding site is conserved in LCGTs, which likely retain a common mechanism of binding to the membrane for their full activity towards membrane-bound GTPases.

  3. Identification of a human ABCC10 orthologue in Catharanthus roseus reveals a U12-type intron determinant for the N-terminal domain feature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Taissir El-Guizani; Clotilde Guibert; Saïda Triki; Benoit St-Pierre; Eric Ducos

    2014-04-01

    ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters are members of a large superfamily of proteins that utilize ATP hydrolysis to translocate a wide range of substrates across biological membranes. In general, members of C subfamily (ABCC) are structurally characterized by an additional (N-terminal) transmembrane domain (TMD0). Phylogenetic analysis of plant ABCCs separates their protein sequences into three distinct clusters: I and II are plant specific whereas cluster III contains both human and plant ABCCs. Screening of the Plant Medicinal Genomics Resource database allowed us to identify 16 ABCCs partial sequences in Catharanthus roseus; two of which belong to the unique CrABCC1 transcript that we identified in cluster III. Genomic organization of CrABCC1 TMD0 coding sequence displays an AT-AC U12-type intron that is conserved in higher plant orthologues. We showed that CrABCC1, like its human orthologue ABCC10, produces alternative transcripts that encode protein sequences with a truncated form of TMD0 without the first transmembrane span (TM1). Subcellular localization of CrABCC1 TMD0 variants using yellow fluorescent protein fusions reveals that the TM1 is required for a correct routing of the TMD0 to the tonoplast. Finally, the specific repartition of CrABCC1 orthologues in some species suggests that this gene was lost several times during evolution and that its physiological function may, rely on a common feature of multicellular eukaryotes.

  4. SILProNAQ: A Convenient Approach for Proteome-Wide Analysis of Protein N-Termini and N-Terminal Acetylation Quantitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienvenut, Willy V; Giglione, Carmela; Meinnel, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Protein N-terminal modifications have recently been involved in overall proteostasis through their impact on cell fate and protein life time. This explains the development of new approaches to characterize more precisely the N-terminal end of mature proteins. Although few approaches are available to perform N-terminal enrichment based on positive or negative discriminations, these methods are usually restricted to the enrichment in N-terminal peptides and their characterization by mass spectrometry. Recent investigation highlights both (1) the knowledge of the N-terminal acetylation status of most cytosolic proteins and (2) post-translational addition of this modification on the N-terminus of nuclear coded chloroplast proteins imported in the plastid and after the cleavage of the transit peptide. The workflow involves stable isotope labeling to assess N-acetylation rates followed by Strong Cation eXchange (SCX ) fractionation of the samples to provide protein N-terminal enriched fractions. Combined with mass spectrometry analyses, the technology finally requires extensive data processing. This last step aims first at discriminating the most relevant mature N-termini from the characterized peptides, next at determining its experimental position and then at calculating the N-terminal acetylation yield. Stable-Isotope Protein N-terminal Acetylation Quantification (SILProNAQ) is a complete workflow combining wet-lab techniques together with dry-lab processing to determine the N-terminal acetylation yield of mature proteins for a clearly defined localization.

  5. BETA-N-TERMINAL GLYCOHEMOGLOBINS IN SUBJECTS WITH COMMON HEMOGLOBINOPATHIES - RELATION WITH FRUCTOSAMINE AND MEAN ERYTHROCYTE AGE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MARTINA, WV; MARTIJN, EG; VANDERMOLEN, M; SCHERMER, JG; MUSKIET, FAJ

    1993-01-01

    Amounts of beta-N-terminal glycohemoglobins (HbX1c), serum fructosamine, and erythrocyte polyamines were determined in nondiabetic adults with HbAA, HbAC, HbAS, HbCC, HbSC, HbSS, and HbS/hereditary persistent HbF (HPFH). The groups did not differ in fructosamine concentrations. Mean (95% confidence

  6. Topology of eukaryotic type II membrane proteins: importance of N-terminal positively charged residues flanking the hydrophobic domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, G D; Lamb, R A

    1991-02-22

    We have tested the role of different charged residues flanking the sides of the signal/anchor (S/A) domain of a eukaryotic type II (N(cyt)C(exo)) integral membrane protein in determining its topology. The removal of positively charged residues on the N-terminal side of the S/A yields proteins with an inverted topology, while the addition of positively charged residues to only the C-terminal side has very little effect on orientation. Expression of chimeric proteins composed of domains from a type II protein (HN) and the oppositely oriented membrane protein M2 indicates that the HN N-terminal domain is sufficient to confer a type II topology and that the M2 N-terminal ectodomain can direct a type II topology when modified by adding positively charged residues. These data suggest that eukaryotic membrane protein topology is governed by the presence or absence of an N-terminal signal for retention in the cytoplasm that is composed in part of positive charges.

  7. Expression, purification, and functional characterization of an N-terminal fragment of the tomato mosaic virus resistance protein Tm-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Masahiko; Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Chihoko; Ishikawa, Masayuki; Katoh, Etsuko

    2013-05-01

    Tm-1, the protein product of Tm-1, a semidominant resistance gene of tomato, inhibits tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) replication by binding to ToMV replication proteins. Previous studies suggested the importance of the Tm-1 N-terminal region for its inhibitory activity; however, it has not been determined if the N-terminal region is sufficient for inhibition. Furthermore, the three-dimensional structure of Tm-1 has not been determined. In this study, an N-terminal fragment of Tm-1 (residues 1-431) as a fusion protein containing an upstream maltose-binding protein was expressed in E. coli Rosetta (DE3) cells at 30°C and then purified. The solubility of the fusion protein was greater when the cells were cultured at 30°C than when cultured at lower or higher temperatures. The purified N-terminal Tm-1 fragment from which the maltose-binding protein tag had been removed has inhibitory activity against ToMV RNA replication.

  8. Glutamate dehydrogenase isoforms with N-terminal (His)6- or FLAG-tag retain their kinetic properties and cellular localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pajęcka, Kamilla; Nielsen, Camilla Wendel; Hauge, Anne

    2014-01-01

    containing N-terminal (His)6 tags were successfully expressed in Sf9 cells and the recombinant proteins were isolated to ≥95 % purity in a two-step procedure involving ammonium sulfate precipitation and Ni(2+)-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. To explore whether the presence of the FLAG...

  9. N-terminal fusion tags for effective production of g-protein-coupled receptors in bacterial cell-free systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyukmanova, E N; Shenkarev, Z O; Khabibullina, N F; Kulbatskiy, D S; Shulepko, M A; Petrovskaya, L E; Arseniev, A S; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2012-10-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) constitute one of the biggest families of membrane proteins. In spite of the fact that they are highly relevant to pharmacy, they have remained poorly explored. One of the main bottlenecks encountered in structural-functional studies of GPCRs is the difficulty to produce sufficient amounts of the proteins. Cell-free systems based on bacterial extracts fromE. colicells attract much attention as an effective tool for recombinant production of membrane proteins. GPCR production in bacterial cell-free expression systems is often inefficient because of the problems associated with the low efficiency of the translation initiation process. This problem could be resolved if GPCRs were expressed in the form of hybrid proteins with N-terminal polypeptide fusion tags. In the present work, three new N-terminal fusion tags are proposed for cell-free production of the human β2-adrenergic receptor, human M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, and human somatostatin receptor type 5. It is demonstrated that the application of an N-terminal fragment (6 a.a.) of bacteriorhodopsin fromExiguobacterium sibiricum(ESR-tag), N-terminal fragment (16 а.о.) of RNAse A (S-tag), and Mistic protein fromB. subtilisallows to increase the CF synthesis of the target GPCRs by 5-38 times, resulting in yields of 0.6-3.8 mg from 1 ml of the reaction mixture, which is sufficient for structural-functional studies.

  10. Characterization of an extensin-modifying metalloprotease: N-terminal processing and substrate cleavage pattern of Pectobacterium carotovorum Prt1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Tao; Nyffenegger, Christian; Højrup, Peter;

    2014-01-01

    Compared to other plant cell wall-degrading enzymes, proteases are less well understood. In this study, the extracellular metalloprotease Prt1 from Pectobacterium carotovorum (formerly Erwinia carotovora) was expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized with respect to N-terminal processing...

  11. Functional characterization of a special thermophilic multifunctional amylase OPMA-N and its N-terminal domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Li; Xuejun Zhu; Yanfei Li; Hao Cao; Yingjiu Zhang

    2011-01-01

    A gene encoding a special thermophilic muitifunetional amylase OPMA-N was cloned from Bacillus sp. ZW25311. OPMA-N has an additional 124-residue N-terminal domain compared with typical amylases and forms a relatively independent domain with a IS-pleated sheet and random coil structure. Here we reported an unusual substrate and product specificities of OPMA-N and the impact of the additional N-terminal domain (1-124 aa) on the function and properties of OPMA-N. Both OPMAN (12.82 U/mg) and its N-terminal domain-truncated AOPMA-N (12.55 U/mg) only degraded starch to produce oligosaccharides including maltose, maltotriose, isomaitotriose, and isomaitotetraose, but not to produce glucose. Therefore, the N-terminal domain did not determine its substrate and product specificities that were probably regulated by its C-terminal IS-pleated sheet structure. However, the N-terminal domain of OPMA-N seemed to modulate its catalytic feature, leading to the production of more isomaitotriose and less maltose, and it seemed to contribute to OPMA-N's thermostability since OPMA-N showed higher activity than AOPMA-N in a temperature range from 40 to 80~C and the halflife (tl) was 5 h for OPMA-N and 2 h for AOPMA-N at 60~C. Both OPMA-N and AOPMA-N were Ca-independent, but their activities could be influenced by Cu2+, Niz+, Zn2+, EDTA, SDS (1 mM), or Triton-X100 (1%). Kinetic analysis and starch-adsorption assay indicated that the N-terminal domain of OPMA-N could increase the OPMA-N-starch binding and subsequently increase the catalytic efficiency of OPMA-N for starch. In particular, the N-terminal domain of OPMA-N did not determine its oligomerization, because both OPMA-N and AOPMA-N could exist in the forms of monomer, homodimer, and homooligomer at the same time.

  12. c-Jun N-terminal kinase - c-Jun pathway transactivates Bim to promote osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhiqiang; Chen, Yuxian; Zhang, Rongkai; Dai, Haitao; Zeng, Chun; Zeng, Hua; Feng, Hui; Du, Gengheng; Fang, Hang; Cai, Daozhang

    2014-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative joint disorder. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased apoptosis of chondrocytes in patients and animal models of OA. TNF-α and nitric oxide have been reported to induce chondrocyte ageing; however, the mechanism of chondrocyte apoptosis induced by IL-1β has remained unclear. The aim of this study is to identify the role of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) - c-Jun pathway in regulating induction of Bim, and its implication in chondrocyte apoptosis. This study showed that Bim is upregulated in chondrocytes obtained from the articular cartilage of OA patients and in cultured mouse chondrocytes treated with IL-1β. Upregulation of Bim was found to be critical for chondrocyte apoptosis induced by IL-1β, as revealed by the genetic knockdown of Bim, wherein apoptosis was greatly reduced in the chondrocytes. Moreover, activation of the JNK-c-Jun pathway was observed under IL-1β treatment, as indicated by the increased expression levels of c-Jun protein. Suppression of the JNK-c-Jun pathway, using chemical inhibitors and RNA interference, inhibited the Bim upregulation induced by IL-1β. These findings suggest that the JNK-c-Jun pathway is involved in the upregulation of Bim during OA and that the JNK-c-Jun-Bim pathway is vital for chondrocyte apoptosis.

  13. Tor forms a dimer through an N-terminal helical solenoid with a complex topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baretić, Domagoj; Berndt, Alex; Ohashi, Yohei; Johnson, Christopher M; Williams, Roger L

    2016-04-13

    The target of rapamycin (Tor) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase that regulates a range of anabolic and catabolic processes. Tor is present in two complexes, TORC1 and TORC2, in which the Tor-Lst8 heterodimer forms a common sub-complex. We have determined the cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structure of Tor bound to Lst8. Two Tor-Lst8 heterodimers assemble further into a dyad-symmetry dimer mediated by Tor-Tor interactions. The first 1,300 residues of Tor form a HEAT repeat-containing α-solenoid with four distinct segments: a highly curved 800-residue N-terminal 'spiral', followed by a 400-residue low-curvature 'bridge' and an extended 'railing' running along the bridge leading to the 'cap' that links to FAT region. This complex topology was verified by domain insertions and offers a new interpretation of the mTORC1 structure. The spiral of one TOR interacts with the bridge of another, which together form a joint platform for the Regulatory Associated Protein of TOR (RAPTOR) regulatory subunit.

  14. Tor forms a dimer through an N-terminal helical solenoid with a complex topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baretić, Domagoj; Berndt, Alex; Ohashi, Yohei; Johnson, Christopher M.; Williams, Roger L.

    2016-04-01

    The target of rapamycin (Tor) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase that regulates a range of anabolic and catabolic processes. Tor is present in two complexes, TORC1 and TORC2, in which the Tor-Lst8 heterodimer forms a common sub-complex. We have determined the cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structure of Tor bound to Lst8. Two Tor-Lst8 heterodimers assemble further into a dyad-symmetry dimer mediated by Tor-Tor interactions. The first 1,300 residues of Tor form a HEAT repeat-containing α-solenoid with four distinct segments: a highly curved 800-residue N-terminal 'spiral', followed by a 400-residue low-curvature 'bridge' and an extended `railing' running along the bridge leading to the 'cap' that links to FAT region. This complex topology was verified by domain insertions and offers a new interpretation of the mTORC1 structure. The spiral of one TOR interacts with the bridge of another, which together form a joint platform for the Regulatory Associated Protein of TOR (RAPTOR) regulatory subunit.

  15. Jun N-Terminal Protein Kinase Enhances Middle Ear Mucosal Proliferation during Bacterial Otitis Media▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Masayuki; Ebmeyer, Jörg; Pak, Kwang; Austin, Darrell A.; Melhus, Åsa; Webster, Nicholas J. G.; Ryan, Allen F.

    2007-01-01

    Mucosal hyperplasia is a characteristic component of otitis media. The present study investigated the participation of signaling via the Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinase in middle ear mucosal hyperplasia in animal models of bacterial otitis media. Otitis media was induced by the inoculation of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae into the middle ear cavity. Western blotting revealed that phosphorylation of JNK isoforms in the middle ear mucosa preceded but paralleled mucosal hyperplasia in this in vivo rat model. Nuclear JNK phosphorylation was observed in many cells of both the mucosal epithelium and stroma by immunohistochemistry. In an in vitro model of primary rat middle ear mucosal explants, bacterially induced mucosal growth was blocked by the Rac/Cdc42 inhibitor Clostridium difficile toxin B, the mixed-lineage kinase inhibitor CEP11004, and the JNK inhibitor SP600125. Finally, the JNK inhibitor SP600125 significantly inhibited mucosal hyperplasia during in vivo bacterial otitis media in guinea pigs. Inhibition of JNK in vivo resulted in a diminished proliferative response, as shown by a local decrease in proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein expression by immunohistochemistry. We conclude that activation of JNK is a critical pathway for bacterially induced mucosal hyperplasia during otitis media, influencing tissue proliferation. PMID:17325051

  16. PLC-δ1-Lf, a novel N-terminal extended phospholipase C-δ1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Na Young; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Moo-Sang; Seo, Jung Soo; Kim, Bo Seong; Bak, Hye Jin; Lee, Jin Young; Park, Myoung-Ae; Park, Ju Hyeon; Lee, Hyung Ho; Chung, Joon Ki

    2013-10-10

    Phospholipase C-δ (PLC-δ), a key enzyme in phosphoinositide turnover, is involved in a variety of physiological functions. The widely expressed PLC-δ1 isoform is the best characterized and the most well understood phospholipase family member. However, the functional and molecular mechanisms of PLC-δ1 remain obscure. Here, we identified that the N-terminal region of mouse PLC-δ1 gene has two variants, a novel alternative splicing form, named as long form (mPLC-δ1-Lf) and the previously reported short form (mPLC-δ1-Sf), having exon 2 and exon 1, respectively, while both the gene variants share exons 3-16 for RNA transcription. Furthermore, the expression, identification and enzymatic characterization of the two types of PLC-δ1 genes were compared. Expression of mPLC-δ1-Lf was found to be tissue specific, whereas mPLC-δ1-Sf was widely distributed. The recombinant mPLC-δ1-Sf protein exhibited higher activity than recombinant mPLC-δ1-Lf protein. Although, the general catalytic and regulatory properties of mPLC-δ1-Lf are similar to those of PLC-δ1-Sf isozyme, the mPLC-δ1-Lf showed some distinct regulatory properties, such as tissue-specific expression and lipid binding specificity, particularly for phosphatidylserine.

  17. Calcium-controlled conformational choreography in the N-terminal half of adseverin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumnarnsilpa, Sakesit; Robinson, Robert C.; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Leyrat, Cedric

    2015-09-01

    Adseverin is a member of the calcium-regulated gelsolin superfamily of actin-binding proteins. Here we report the crystal structure of the calcium-free N-terminal half of adseverin (iA1-A3) and the Ca2+-bound structure of A3, which reveal structural similarities and differences with gelsolin. Solution small-angle X-ray scattering combined with ensemble optimization revealed a dynamic Ca2+-dependent equilibrium between inactive, intermediate and active conformations. Increasing calcium concentrations progressively shift this equilibrium from a main population of inactive conformation to the active form. Molecular dynamics simulations of iA1-A3 provided insights into Ca2+-induced destabilization, implicating a critical role for the A2 type II calcium-binding site and the A2A3 linker in the activation process. Finally, mutations that disrupt the A1/A3 interface increase Ca2+-independent F-actin severing by A1-A3, albeit at a lower efficiency than observed for gelsolin domains G1-G3. Together, these data address the calcium dependency of A1-A3 activity in relation to the calcium-independent activity of G1-G3.

  18. Structure and function of the N-terminal domain of the human mitochondrial calcium uniporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngjin; Min, Choon Kee; Kim, Tae Gyun; Song, Hong Ki; Lim, Yunki; Kim, Dongwook; Shin, Kahee; Kang, Moonkyung; Kang, Jung Youn; Youn, Hyung-Seop; Lee, Jung-Gyu; An, Jun Yop; Park, Kyoung Ryoung; Lim, Jia Jia; Kim, Ji Hun; Kim, Ji Hye; Park, Zee Yong; Kim, Yeon-Soo; Wang, Jimin; Kim, Do Han; Eom, Soo Hyun

    2015-10-01

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) is responsible for mitochondrial calcium uptake and homeostasis. It is also a target for the regulation of cellular anti-/pro-apoptosis and necrosis by several oncogenes and tumour suppressors. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the MCU N-terminal domain (NTD) at a resolution of 1.50 Å in a novel fold and the S92A MCU mutant at 2.75 Å resolution; the residue S92 is a predicted CaMKII phosphorylation site. The assembly of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter complex (uniplex) and the interaction with the MCU regulators such as the mitochondrial calcium uptake-1 and mitochondrial calcium uptake-2 proteins (MICU1 and MICU2) are not affected by the deletion of MCU NTD. However, the expression of the S92A mutant or a NTD deletion mutant failed to restore mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in a stable MCU knockdown HeLa cell line and exerted dominant-negative effects in the wild-type MCU-expressing cell line. These results suggest that the NTD of MCU is essential for the modulation of MCU function, although it does not affect the uniplex formation.

  19. An unexpected N-terminal loop in PD-1 dominates binding by nivolumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shuguang; Zhang, Hao; Chai, Yan; Song, Hao; Tong, Zhou; Wang, Qihui; Qi, Jianxun; Wong, Gary; Zhu, Xiaodong; Liu, William J.; Gao, Shan; Wang, Zhongfu; Shi, Yi; Yang, Fuquan; Gao, George F.; Yan, Jinghua

    2017-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy by targeting of immune checkpoint molecules has been a research ‘hot-spot' in recent years. Nivolumab, a human monoclonal antibody targeting PD-1, has been widely used clinically since 2014. However, the binding mechanism of nivolumab to PD-1 has not yet been shown, despite a recent report describing the complex structure of pembrolizumab/PD-1. It has previously been speculated that PD-1 glycosylation is involved in nivolumab recognition. Here we report the complex structure of nivolumab with PD-1 and evaluate the effects of PD-1 N-glycosylation on the interactions with nivolumab. Structural and functional analyses unexpectedly reveal an N-terminal loop outside the IgV domain of PD-1. This loop is not involved in recognition of PD-L1 but dominates binding to nivolumab, whereas N-glycosylation is not involved in binding at all. Nivolumab binds to a completely different area than pembrolizumab. These results provide the basis for the design of future inhibitory molecules targeting PD-1. PMID:28165004

  20. Cdc13 N-Terminal Dimerization DNA Binding and Telomere Length Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Mitchell; J Smith; M Mason; S Harper; D Speicher; F Johnson; E Skordalakes

    2011-12-31

    The essential yeast protein Cdc13 facilitates chromosome end replication by recruiting telomerase to telomeres, and together with its interacting partners Stn1 and Ten1, it protects chromosome ends from nucleolytic attack, thus contributing to genome integrity. Although Cdc13 has been studied extensively, the precise role of its N-terminal domain (Cdc13N) in telomere length regulation remains unclear. Here we present a structural, biochemical, and functional characterization of Cdc13N. The structure reveals that this domain comprises an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding (OB) fold and is involved in Cdc13 dimerization. Biochemical data show that Cdc13N weakly binds long, single-stranded, telomeric DNA in a fashion that is directly dependent on domain oligomerization. When introduced into full-length Cdc13 in vivo, point mutations that prevented Cdc13N dimerization or DNA binding caused telomere shortening or lengthening, respectively. The multiple DNA binding domains and dimeric nature of Cdc13 offer unique insights into how it coordinates the recruitment and regulation of telomerase access to the telomeres.

  1. Jun N-Terminal Kinase 1 Mediates Transcriptional Induction of Matrix Metal loproteinase 9 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Crowe

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cell invasion and metastasis require precise coordination of adherence to extracellular matrix (ECM and controlled degradation of its components. Invasive cells secrete proteolytic enzymes known as matrix metal lop roteinases (MMPs which degrade specific basement membrane molecules. Expression of these enzymes is regulated by multiple signaling mechanisms, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway. One of the terminal effectors of this signaling cascade is jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1 which phosphorylates the transcription factor c-jun, a component of the AP-1 complex. MMP-9 expression is regulated by two well-characterized AP-1 sites in the promoter of this gene. To determine how JNK1 activity regulated MMP-9 expression in human squamous cell carcinoma lines, we overexpressed this kinase in SCC25 cells. JNK1 overexpression induced MMP-9 protein levels and activity in this cell line. Elevated MMP-9 expression correlated with increased invasion of reconstituted basement membranes by JNK1 -overexpressiog clones. Site-directed mutagenesis of the MMP-9 promoter revealed that JNK1 cooperated with its transcription factor target c-jun to increase MMP-9 expression at the transcriptional level via the proximal AP-1 site. These results suggest that elevated JNK1 expression may contribute to increased MMP-9 activity and ECM invasion by tumor cells.

  2. Identification of Two Binding Domains, One for Peptidoglycan and Another for a Secondary Cell Wall Polymer, on the N-Terminal Part of the S-Layer Protein SbsB from Bacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sára, Margit; Egelseer, Eva M.; Dekitsch, Christine; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    1998-01-01

    First studies on the structure-function relationship of the S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p2 revealed the coexistence of two binding domains on its N-terminal part, one for peptidoglycan and another for a secondary cell wall polymer (SCWP). The peptidoglycan binding domain is located between amino acids 1 to 138 of the mature S-layer protein comprising a typical S-layer homologous domain. The SCWP binding domain lies between amino acids 240 to 331 and possesses a high serine plus glycine content. PMID:9852032

  3. Bacteria obtained from a sequencing batch reactor that are capable of growth on dehydroabietic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, W W

    1995-06-01

    Eleven isolates capable of growth on the resin acid dehydroabietic acid (DhA) were obtained from a sequencing batch reactor designed to treat a high-strength process stream from a paper mill. The isolates belonged to two groups, represented by strains DhA-33 and DhA-35, which were characterized. In the bioreactor, bacteria like DhA-35 were more abundant than those like DhA-33. The population in the bioreactor of organisms capable of growth on DhA was estimated to be 1.1 x 10(6) propagules per ml, based on a most-probable-number determination. Analysis of small-subunit rRNA partial sequences indicated that DhA-33 was most closely related to Sphingomonas yanoikuyae (Sab = 0.875) and that DhA-35 was most closely related to Zoogloea ramigera (Sab = 0.849). Both isolates additionally grew on other abietanes, i.e., abietic and palustric acids, but not on the pimaranes, pimaric and isopimaric acids. For DhA-33 and DhA-35 with DhA as the sole organic substrate, doubling times were 2.7 and 2.2 h, respectively, and growth yields were 0.30 and 0.25 g of protein per g of DhA, respectively. Glucose as a cosubstrate stimulated growth of DhA-33 on DhA and stimulated DhA degradation by the culture. Pyruvate as a cosubstrate did not stimulate growth of DhA-35 on DhA and reduced the specific rate of DhA degradation of the culture. DhA induced DhA and abietic acid degradation activities in both strains, and these activities were heat labile. Cell suspensions of both strains consumed DhA at a rate of 6 mumol mg of protein-1 h-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. alpha-Amylase gene of Streptomyces limosus: nucleotide sequence, expression motifs, and amino acid sequence homology to mammalian and invertebrate alpha-amylases.

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the coding and regulatory regions of the alpha-amylase gene (aml) of Streptomyces limosus was determined. High-resolution S1 mapping was used to locate the 5' end of the transcript and demonstrated that the gene is transcribed from a unique promoter. The predicted amino acid sequence has considerable identity to mammalian and invertebrate alpha-amylases, but not to those of plant, fungal, or eubacterial origin. Consistent with this is the susceptibility of the enzym...

  5. Structural diversity of the active N-terminal kinase domain of p90 ribosomal S6 kinase 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Malakhova

    Full Text Available The p90 ribosomal protein kinase 2 (RSK2 is a highly expressed Ser/Thr kinase activated by growth factors and is involved in cancer cell proliferation and tumor promoter-induced cell transformation. RSK2 possesses two non-identical kinase domains, and the structure of its N-terminal domain (NTD, which is responsible for phosphorylation of a variety of substrates, is unknown. The crystal structure of the NTD RSK2 was determined at 1.8 A resolution in complex with AMP-PNP. The N-terminal kinase domain adopted a unique active conformation showing a significant structural diversity of the kinase domain compared to other kinases. The NTD RSK2 possesses a three-stranded betaB-sheet inserted in the N-terminal lobe, resulting in displacement of the alphaC-helix and disruption of the Lys-Glu interaction, classifying the kinase conformation as inactive. The purified protein was phosphorylated at Ser227 in the T-activation loop and exhibited in vitro kinase activity. A key characteristic is the appearance of a new contact between Lys216 (betaB-sheet and the beta-phosphate of AMP-PNP. Mutation of this lysine to alanine impaired both NTDs in vitro and full length RSK2 ex vivo activity, emphasizing the importance of this interaction. Even though the N-terminal lobe undergoes structural re-arrangement, it possesses an intact hydrophobic groove formed between the alphaC-helix, the beta4-strand, and the betaB-sheet junction, which is occupied by the N-terminal tail. The presence of a unique betaB-sheet insert in the N-lobe suggests a different type of activation mechanism for RSK2.

  6. Development of a SCAR (sequence-characterised amplified region) marker for acid resistance-related gene in Lactobacillus plantarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Wen; Li, Kai; Yang, Shi-Ling; Tian, Shu-Fen; He, Ling

    2015-03-01

    A sequence characterised amplified region marker was developed to determine an acid resistance-related gene in Lactobacillus plantarum. A random amplified polymorphic DNA marker named S116-680 was reported to be closely related to the acid resistance of the strains. The DNA band corresponding to this marker was cloned and sequenced with the induction of specific designed PCR primers. The results of PCR test helped to amplify a clear specific band of 680 bp in the tested acid-resistant strains. S116-680 marker would be useful to explore the acid-resistant mechanism of L. plantarum and to screen desirable malolactic fermentation strains.

  7. Prediction of flexible/rigid regions from protein sequences using k-spaced amino acid pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruan Jishou

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditionally, it is believed that the native structure of a protein corresponds to a global minimum of its free energy. However, with the growing number of known tertiary (3D protein structures, researchers have discovered that some proteins can alter their structures in response to a change in their surroundings or with the help of other proteins or ligands. Such structural shifts play a crucial role with respect to the protein function. To this end, we propose a machine learning method for the prediction of the flexible/rigid regions of proteins (referred to as FlexRP; the method is based on a novel sequence representation and feature selection. Knowledge of the flexible/rigid regions may provide insights into the protein folding process and the 3D structure prediction. Results The flexible/rigid regions were defined based on a dataset, which includes protein sequences that have multiple experimental structures, and which was previously used to study the structural conservation of proteins. Sequences drawn from this dataset were represented based on feature sets that were proposed in prior research, such as PSI-BLAST profiles, composition vector and binary sequence encoding, and a newly proposed representation based on frequencies of k-spaced amino acid pairs. These representations were processed by feature selection to reduce the dimensionality. Several machine learning methods for the prediction of flexible/rigid regions and two recently proposed methods for the prediction of conformational changes and unstructured regions were compared with the proposed method. The FlexRP method, which applies Logistic Regression and collocation-based representation with 95 features, obtained 79.5% accuracy. The two runner-up methods, which apply the same sequence representation and Support Vector Machines (SVM and Naïve Bayes classifiers, obtained 79.2% and 78.4% accuracy, respectively. The remaining considered methods are

  8. Nucleic and amino acid sequences relating to a novel transketolase, and methods for the expression thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce (Pullman, WA); Wildung, Mark Raymond (Colfax, WA); Lange, Bernd Markus (Pullman, WA); McCaskill, David G. (Pullman, WA)

    2001-01-01

    cDNAs encoding 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase from peppermint (Mentha piperita) have been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequences have been determined. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences (SEQ ID NO:3, SEQ ID NO:5, SEQ ID NO:7) are provided which code for the expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase from plants. In another aspect the present invention provides for isolated, recombinant DXPS proteins, such as the proteins having the sequences set forth in SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:6 and SEQ ID NO:8. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for plant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthases, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding a plant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate its production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate, or its derivatives such as isopentenyl diphosphate (BP), or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase, or the production of its products.

  9. Amino acid sequences of predicted proteins and their annotation for 95 organism species. - Gclust Server | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us ...Gclust Server Amino acid sequences of predicted proteins and their annotation for 95 organism species. Data ...detail Data name Amino acid sequences of predicted proteins and their annotation for 95 organism species. De...scription of data contents Amino acid sequences of predicted proteins and their a...nload License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Amino acid sequences of predicted pro

  10. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Wang

    Full Text Available Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals.

  11. Three-dimensional structure of N-terminal domain of DnaB helicase and helicase-primase interactions in Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Kashav

    Full Text Available Replication initiation is a crucial step in genome duplication and homohexameric DnaB helicase plays a central role in the replication initiation process by unwinding the duplex DNA and interacting with several other proteins during the process of replication. N-terminal domain of DnaB is critical for helicase activity and for DnaG primase interactions. We present here the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD of H. pylori DnaB (HpDnaB helicase at 2.2 A resolution and compare the structural differences among helicases and correlate with the functional differences. The structural details of NTD suggest that the linker region between NTD and C-terminal helicase domain plays a vital role in accurate assembly of NTD dimers. The sequence analysis of the linker regions from several helicases reveals that they should form four helix bundles. We also report the characterization of H. pylori DnaG primase and study the helicase-primase interactions, where HpDnaG primase stimulates DNA unwinding activity of HpDnaB suggesting presence of helicase-primase cohort at the replication fork. The protein-protein interaction study of C-terminal domain of primase and different deletion constructs of helicase suggests that linker is essential for proper conformation of NTD to interact strongly with HpDnaG. The surface charge distribution on the primase binding surface of NTDs of various helicases suggests that DnaB-DnaG interaction and stability of the complex is most probably charge dependent. Structure of the linker and helicase-primase interactions indicate that HpDnaB differs greatly from E.coli DnaB despite both belong to gram negative bacteria.

  12. Structure of the N-terminal domain of the protein Expansion: an ‘Expansion’ to the Smad MH2 fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beich-Frandsen, Mads; Aragón, Eric [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Llimargas, Marta [Institut de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona, IBMB–CSIC, Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Benach, Jordi [ALBA Synchrotron, BP 1413, km 3.3, Cerdanyola del Vallès (Spain); Riera, Antoni [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franqués 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Pous, Joan [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Platform of Crystallography IBMB–CSIC, Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Macias, Maria J., E-mail: maria.macias@irbbarcelona.org [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA), Passeig Lluís Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-04-01

    Expansion is a modular protein that is conserved in protostomes. The first structure of the N-terminal domain of Expansion has been determined at 1.6 Å resolution and the new Nα-MH2 domain was found to belong to the Smad/FHA superfamily of structures. Gene-expression changes observed in Drosophila embryos after inducing the transcription factor Tramtrack led to the identification of the protein Expansion. Expansion contains an N-terminal domain similar in sequence to the MH2 domain characteristic of Smad proteins, which are the central mediators of the effects of the TGF-β signalling pathway. Apart from Smads and Expansion, no other type of protein belonging to the known kingdoms of life contains MH2 domains. To compare the Expansion and Smad MH2 domains, the crystal structure of the Expansion domain was determined at 1.6 Å resolution, the first structure of a non-Smad MH2 domain to be characterized to date. The structure displays the main features of the canonical MH2 fold with two main differences: the addition of an α-helical region and the remodelling of a protein-interaction site that is conserved in the MH2 domain of Smads. Owing to these differences, to the new domain was referred to as Nα-MH2. Despite the presence of the Nα-MH2 domain, Expansion does not participate in TGF-β signalling; instead, it is required for other activities specific to the protostome phyla. Based on the structural similarities to the MH2 fold, it is proposed that the Nα-MH2 domain should be classified as a new member of the Smad/FHA superfamily.

  13. The nucleotide sequence and genome organization of Plasmopara halstedii virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göpfert Jens C

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only very few viruses of Oomycetes have been studied in detail. Isometric virions were found in different isolates of the oomycete Plasmopara halstedii, the downy mildew pathogen of sunflower. However, complete nucleotide sequences and data on the genome organization were lacking. Methods Viral RNA of different P. halstedii isolates was subjected to nucleotide sequencing and analysis of the viral genome. The N-terminal sequence of the viral coat protein was determined using Top-Down MALDI-TOF analysis. Results The complete nucleotide sequences of both single-stranded RNA segments (RNA1 and RNA2 were established. RNA1 consisted of 2793 nucleotides (nt exclusive its 3' poly(A tract and a single open-reading frame (ORF1 of 2745 nt. ORF1 was framed by a 5' untranslated region (5' UTR of 18 nt and a 3' untranslated region (3' UTR of 30 nt. ORF1 contained motifs of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp and showed similarities to RdRp of Scleropthora macrospora virus A (SmV A and viruses within the Nodaviridae family. RNA2 consisted of 1526 nt exclusive its 3' poly(A tract and a second ORF (ORF2 of 1128 nt. ORF2 coded for the single viral coat protein (CP and was framed by a 5' UTR of 164 nt and a 3' UTR of 234 nt. The deduced amino acid sequence of ORF2 was verified by nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS experiments. Top-Down MALDI-TOF analysis revealed the N-terminal sequence of the CP. The N-terminal sequence represented a region within ORF2 suggesting a proteolytic processing of the CP in vivo. The CP showed similarities to CP of SmV A and viruses within the Tombusviridae family. Fragments of RNA1 (ca. 1.9 kb and RNA2 (ca. 1.4 kb were used to analyze the nucleotide sequence variation of virions in different P. halstedii isolates. Viral sequence variation was 0.3% or less regardless of their host's pathotypes, the geographical origin and the sensitivity towards the fungicide metalaxyl. Conclusions The results showed the presence of a single and new

  14. Study on N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide, heart type fatty acid I combined detection for valuing the elderly patients with severe heart failure (HF) binding protein and cardiac troponin%探讨氨基末端 B 型钠尿肽原、心型脂肪酸结合蛋白和心肌肌钙蛋白 I联合检测用于老年重症心力衰竭(HF)的价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓国坚

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨氨基末端B型钠尿肽原( NT-proBNP )、心型脂肪酸结合蛋白( H-FABP )和心肌肌钙蛋白I( cTnI)联合检测用于老年重症心力衰竭( HF)的价值。方法将我院100例老年重症心力衰竭患者、60例老年非重症心力衰竭患者和60例健康体检者作为研究对象,对患者进行NT-proBNP、H-FABP和cTnI检测,进行6个月随访后,比较三组研究者不良心脏事件的发生情况,评估以上三个指标在预测死亡风险中的应用价值。结果老年重症心力衰竭患者入院首次空腹静脉血测定NT-proBNP、H-FABP和cTnI均明显高于老年非重症心力衰竭组患者和健康体检组体检者;对100例老年重症心力衰竭患者应用NT-proBNP、H-FABP和cTnI 三项联合检查,在心脏不良事件死亡预测准确率(96.00%)、诊断敏感性(96.00%)、死亡预测敏感性(94.00%)、诊断特异性(95.00%)、死亡预测特异性(95.00%)均明显高于单一指标检测效果,具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论氨基末端B型钠尿肽原、心型脂肪酸结合蛋白和心肌肌钙蛋白I联合检测用于老年重症心力衰竭具有较高应用价值,能够有效评估死亡风险及预后效果。%Objective To investigate N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide ( NT proBNP ) , heart fatty acid binding protein ( H-FABP ) and cardiac troponin I ( cTnI ) combined detection for the value of the elderly patients with severe heart failure ( HF ) .Methods 100 cases of elderly patients in our hospital with severe heart failure patients and 60 cases of non elderly patients with severe heart failure and 60 cases of healthy persons as the object of study , for patients of NT proBNP , H-FABP and cTnI detection , followed up for 6 months and compared among the three groups of adverse cardiac events occurrence , the above three indicators in predicting death risk in application value .Results Elderly

  15. Sequence-defined bioactive macrocycles via an acid-catalysed cascade reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porel, Mintu; Thornlow, Dana N.; Phan, Ngoc N.; Alabi, Christopher A.

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic macrocycles derived from sequence-defined oligomers are a unique structural class whose ring size, sequence and structure can be tuned via precise organization of the primary sequence. Similar to peptides and other peptidomimetics, these well-defined synthetic macromolecules become pharmacologically relevant when bioactive side chains are incorporated into their primary sequence. In this article, we report the synthesis of oligothioetheramide (oligoTEA) macrocycles via a one-pot acid-catalysed cascade reaction. The versatility of the cyclization chemistry and modularity of the assembly process was demonstrated via the synthesis of >20 diverse oligoTEA macrocycles. Structural characterization via NMR spectroscopy revealed the presence of conformational isomers, which enabled the determination of local chain dynamics within the macromolecular structure. Finally, we demonstrate the biological activity of oligoTEA macrocycles designed to mimic facially amphiphilic antimicrobial peptides. The preliminary results indicate that macrocyclic oligoTEAs with just two-to-three cationic charge centres can elicit potent antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  16. Amino acid sequence alignment of vertebrate CAPN3/calpain-3/p94

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko Ono

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available CAPN3 is a calpain superfamily member that is predominantly expressed in skeletal muscle. So far, clear CAPN3 orthologs were found only in vertebrates. CAPN3 is a unique protease in that it undergoes extremely rapid and exhaustive autolysis and that autolyzed fragments spontaneously associate each other to reconstitute the proteolytic activity. These unique properties of CAPN3 are dependent on IS1 and IS2, two CAPN3-characterizing sequences that do not exist in other calpains or any other proteases. To understand how IS1 and IS2 are conserved among vertebrates, this data article provides amino acid sequence alignment of representative vertebrate CAPN3s. For further analysis and discussion, see Ono et al. [1

  17. Heterodimeric l-amino acid oxidase enzymes from Egyptian Cerastes cerastes venom: Purification, biochemical characterization and partial amino acid sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. El Hakim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Two l-amino acid oxidase enzyme isoforms, Cc-LAAOI and Cc-LAAOII were purified to apparent homogeneity from Cerastes cerastes venom in a sequential two-step chromatographic protocol including; gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. The native molecular weights of the isoforms were 115 kDa as determined by gel filtration on calibrated Sephacryl S-200 column, while the monomeric molecular weights of the enzymes were, 60, 56 kDa and 60, 53 kDa for LAAOI and LAAOII, respectively. The tryptic peptides of the two isoforms share high sequence homology with other snake venom l-amino acid oxidases. The optimal pH and temperature values of Cc-LAAOI and Cc-LAAOII were 7.8, 50 °C and 7, 60 °C, respectively. The two isoenzymes were thermally stable up to 70 °C. The Km and Vmax values were 0.67 mM, 0.135 μmol/min for LAAOI and 0.82 mM, 0.087 μmol/min for LAAOII. Both isoenzymes displayed high catalytic preference to long-chain, hydrophobic and aromatic amino acids. The Mn2+ ion markedly increased the LAAO activity for both purified isoforms, while Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+ and Ba2+ ions showed a non-significant increase in the enzymatic activity of both isoforms. Furthermore, Zn2+, Ni2+, Co2+, Cu2+ and AL3+ ions markedly inhibited the LAAOI and LAAOII activities. l-Cysteine and reduced glutathione completely inhibited the LAAO activity of both isoenzymes, whereas, β-mercaptoethanol, O-phenanthroline and PMSF completely inhibited the enzymatic activity of LAAOII. Furthermore, iodoacitic acid inhibited the enzymatic activity of LAAOII by 46% and had no effect on the LAAOI activity.

  18. Coiled-coil interaction of N-terminal 36 residues of cyclase-associated protein with adenylyl cyclase is sufficient for its function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae ras pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Y; Shima, F; Sen, H; Tanaka, Y; Yanagihara, C; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    1998-10-23

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, association with the 70-kDa cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is required for proper response of adenylyl cyclase to Ras proteins. We show here that a small segment comprising the N-terminal 36 amino acid residues of CAP is sufficient for association with adenylyl cyclase as well as for its function in the Ras-adenylyl cyclase pathway as assayed by the ability to confer RAS2(Val-19)-dependent heat shock sensitivity to yeast cells. The CAP-binding site of adenylyl cyclase was mapped to a segment of 119 amino acid residues near its C terminus. Both of these regions contained tandem repetitions of a heptad motif alphaXXalphaXXX (where alpha represents a hydrophobic amino acid and X represents any amino acid), suggesting a coiled-coil interaction. When mutants of CAP defective in associating with adenylyl cyclase were isolated by screening of a pool of randomly mutagenized CAP, they were found to carry substitution mutations in one of the key hydrophobic residues in the heptad repeats. Furthermore, mutations of the key hydrophobic residues in the heptad repeats of adenylyl cyclase also resulted in loss of association with CAP. These results indicate the coiled-coil mechanism as a basis of the CAP-adenylyl cyclase interaction.

  19. Sequence selective recognition of double-stranded RNA using triple helix-forming peptide nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengeya, Thomas; Gupta, Pankaj; Rozners, Eriks

    2014-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs are attractive targets for molecular recognition because of the central role they play in gene expression. Since most noncoding RNAs are in a double-helical conformation, recognition of such structures is a formidable problem. Herein, we describe a method for sequence-selective recognition of biologically relevant double-helical RNA (illustrated on ribosomal A-site RNA) using peptide nucleic acids (PNA) that form a triple helix in the major grove of RNA under physiologically relevant conditions. Protocols for PNA preparation and binding studies using isothermal titration calorimetry are described in detail.

  20. Comparative amino acid sequence analysis of hemolysins produced by Vibrio hollisae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    OpenAIRE

    Yoh, M; Honda, T.; Miwatani, T; Tsunasawa, S; Sakiyama, F

    1989-01-01

    Vibrio hollisae produces a hemolysin (Vh-rTDH) that is related to the thermostable direct hemolysin of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp-TDH). Although both hemolysins are essentially similar biologically and immunologically, they differ markedly in heat stability; Vp-TDH is heat stable, whereas Vh-rTDH is heat labile. To elucidate the relationships between their characteristics and molecular structures, we analyzed the amino acid sequence of Vh-rTDH and compared it with that of Vp-TDH. Vh-rTDH con...

  1. High-resolution structure of the N-terminal endonuclease domain of the Lassa virus L polymerase in complex with magnesium ions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor D Wallat

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV causes deadly hemorrhagic fever disease for which there are no vaccines and limited treatments. LASV-encoded L polymerase is required for viral RNA replication and transcription. The functional domains of L-a large protein of 2218 amino acid residues-are largely undefined, except for the centrally located RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP motif. Recent structural and functional analyses of the N-terminal region of the L protein from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV, which is in the same Arenaviridae family as LASV, have identified an endonuclease domain that presumably cleaves the cap structures of host mRNAs in order to initiate viral transcription. Here we present a high-resolution crystal structure of the N-terminal 173-aa region of the LASV L protein (LASV L173 in complex with magnesium ions at 1.72 Å. The structure is highly homologous to other known viral endonucleases of arena- (LCMV NL1, orthomyxo- (influenza virus PA, and bunyaviruses (La Crosse virus NL1. Although the catalytic residues (D89, E102 and K122 are highly conserved among the known viral endonucleases, LASV L endonuclease structure shows some notable differences. Our data collected from in vitro endonuclease assays and a reporter-based LASV minigenome transcriptional assay in mammalian cells confirm structural prediction of LASV L173 as an active endonuclease. The high-resolution structure of the LASV L endonuclease domain in complex with magnesium ions should aid the development of antivirals against lethal Lassa hemorrhagic fever.

  2. High-resolution structure of the N-terminal endonuclease domain of the Lassa virus L polymerase in complex with magnesium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallat, Gregor D; Huang, Qinfeng; Wang, Wenjian; Dong, Haohao; Ly, Hinh; Liang, Yuying; Dong, Changjiang

    2014-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) causes deadly hemorrhagic fever disease for which there are no vaccines and limited treatments. LASV-encoded L polymerase is required for viral RNA replication and transcription. The functional domains of L-a large protein of 2218 amino acid residues-are largely undefined, except for the centrally located RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) motif. Recent structural and functional analyses of the N-terminal region of the L protein from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), which is in the same Arenaviridae family as LASV, have identified an endonuclease domain that presumably cleaves the cap structures of host mRNAs in order to initiate viral transcription. Here we present a high-resolution crystal structure of the N-terminal 173-aa region of the LASV L protein (LASV L173) in complex with magnesium ions at 1.72 Å. The structure is highly homologous to other known viral endonucleases of arena- (LCMV NL1), orthomyxo- (influenza virus PA), and bunyaviruses (La Crosse virus NL1). Although the catalytic residues (D89, E102 and K122) are highly conserved among the known viral endonucleases, LASV L endonuclease structure shows some notable differences. Our data collected from in vitro endonuclease assays and a reporter-based LASV minigenome transcriptional assay in mammalian cells confirm structural prediction of LASV L173 as an active endonuclease. The high-resolution structure of the LASV L endonuclease domain in complex with magnesium ions should aid the development of antivirals against lethal Lassa hemorrhagic fever.

  3. Cloning and expression of Chromobacterium violaceum phenylalanine hydroxylase in Escherichia coli and comparison of amino acid sequence with mammalian aromatic amino acid hydroxylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, A; Liotta, L J; Benkovic, S J

    1991-10-05

    The complete amino acid sequence (296 amino acids) of Chromobacterium violaceum phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) was determined by nucleotide analysis of a DNA clone isolated using both a synthetic oligonucleotide probe based on the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence and an antibody against this enzyme. The ApaL I fragment (approximately 1.9 kilobase pairs) containing the entire PAH gene was subcloned in pBluescript II and induced by isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside. In order to eliminate fusion proteins the XbaI/ClaI fragment which contained the PAH gene from the Bluescript construct was subcloned into pMAC 5-8 containing the TAC promoter. The recombinant protein reacts with antibody raised to authentic C. violaceum PAH and its NH2-terminal 20-amino acid sequence and COOH-terminal amino acid residue were identical with the wild-type protein. Key physical and chemical characteristics of the recombinant protein, i.e. its copper content and Michaelis-Menten parameters, were the same as wild-type. Comparison of amino acid sequences revealed a highly conserved region between C. violaceum PAH and three different mammalian aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. This conserved area may well be a catalytically important domain of these pterin- and metal-requiring aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. The over-expression of C. violaceum PAH in Escherichia coli will facilitate the analysis of the enzyme mechanism by various spectroscopic methods.

  4. Formation Sequences of Iron Minerals in the Acidic Alteration Products and Variation of Hydrothermal Fluid Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, H.; Yoshizawa, M.

    2008-12-01

    Iron minerals have important role in environmental issues not only on the Earth but also other terrestrial planets. Iron mineral species related to alteration products of primary minerals with surface or subsurface fluids are characterized by temperature, acidity and redox conditions of the fluids. We can see various iron- bearing alteration products in alteration products around fumaroles in geothermal/volcanic areas. In this study, zonal structures of iron minerals in alteration products of the geothermal area are observed to elucidate temporal and spatial variation of hydrothermal fluids. Alteration of the pyroxene-amphibole andesite of Garan-dake volcano, Oita, Japan occurs by the acidic hydrothermal fluid to form cristobalite leaching out elements other than Si. Hand specimens with unaltered or weakly altered core and cristobalite crust show various sequences of layers. XRD analysis revealed that the alteration degree is represented by abundance of cristobalite. Intermediately altered layers are characterized by occurrence including alunite, pyrite, kaolinite, goethite and hematite. A specimen with reddish brown core surrounded by cristobalite-rich white crust has brown colored layers at the boundary of core and the crust. Reddish core is characterized by occurrence of crystalline hematite by XRD. Another hand specimen has light gray core, which represents reduced conditions, and white cristobalite crust with light brown and reddish brown layers of ferric iron minerals between the core and the crust. On the other hand, hornblende crystals, typical ferrous iron-bearing mineral of the host rock, are well preserved in some samples with strongly decolorized cristobalite-rich groundmass. Hydrothermal alteration experiments of iron-rich basaltic material shows iron mineral species depend on acidity and temperature of the fluid. Oxidation states of the iron-bearing mineral species are strongly influenced by the acidity and redox conditions. Variations of alteration

  5. New monoclonal antibodies to the Ebola virus glycoprotein: Identification and analysis of the amino acid sequence of the variable domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panina, A A; Aliev, T K; Shemchukova, O B; Dement'yeva, I G; Varlamov, N E; Pozdnyakova, L P; Bokov, M N; Dolgikh, D A; Sveshnikov, P G; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2016-03-01

    We determined the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of variable domains of three new monoclonal antibodies to the glycoprotein of Ebola virus capsid. The framework and hypervariable regions of immunoglobulin heavy and light chains were identified. The primary structures were confirmed using massspectrometry analysis. Immunoglobulin database search showed the uniqueness of the sequences obtained.

  6. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of neurotoxin gene from an environmental isolate of Clostridium sp.: comparison with other clostridial neurotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Aparna; Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Singh, Lokendra

    2006-07-01

    A Clostridium sp. isolated from intestine of decaying fish exhibited 99% sequence identity with C. tetani at 16S rRNA level. It produced a neurotoxin that was neutralized by botulinum antitoxin (A+B+E) as well as tetanus antitoxin. The gene fragments for light chain, C-terminal and N-terminal regions of the heavy chain of the toxin were amplified using three reported primer sets for tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT). The neurotoxin gene fragments were cloned in Escherichia coli and sequenced. The sequences obtained exhibited approximately 98, 99 and 98% sequence identity with reported gene sequences of TeNT/LC, TeNT/HC and TeNT/HN, respectively. The phylogenetic interrelationship between the neurotoxin gene of Clostridium sp. with previously reported gene sequences of Clostridium botulinum A to G and C. tetani was examined by analysis of differences in the nucleotide sequences. Six amino acids were substituted at four different positions in the light chain of neurotoxin from the isolate when compared with the reported closest sequence of TeNT. Of these, four were located in the beta15 motif at a solvent inaccessible, buried region of the protein molecule. One of these substitutions were on the solvent accessible surface residue of alpha1 motif, previously shown to have strong sequence conservation. A substitution of two amino acids observed in N-terminal region of heavy chain were buried residues, located in the beta21 and beta37 motifs showing variability in other related sequences. The C-terminal region responsible for binding to receptor was conserved, showing no changes in the amino acid sequence.

  7. Identification and Analysis of Novel Amino-Acid Sequence Repeats in Bacillus anthracis str. Ames Proteome Using Computational Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Satyanarayana Rao

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available We have identified four repeats and ten domains that are novel in proteins encoded by the Bacillus anthracis str. Ames proteome using automated in silico methods. A “repeat” corresponds to a region comprising less than 55-amino-acid residues that occur more than once in the protein sequence and sometimes present in tandem. A “domain” corresponds to a conserved region with greater than 55-amino-acid residues and may be present as single or multiple copies in the protein sequence. These correspond to (1 57-amino-acid-residue PxV domain, (2 122-amino-acid-residue FxF domain, (3 111-amino-acid-residue YEFF domain, (4 109-amino-acid-residue IMxxH domain, (5 103-amino-acid-residue VxxT domain, (6 84-amino-acid-residue ExW domain, (7 104-amino-acid-residue NTGFIG domain, (8 36-amino-acid-residue NxGK repeat, (9 95-amino-acid-residue VYV domain, (10 75-amino-acid-residue KEWE domain, (11 59-amino-acid-residue AFL domain, (12 53-amino-acid-residue RIDVK repeat, (13 (a 41-amino-acid-residue AGQF repeat and (b 42-amino-acid-residue GSAL repeat. A repeat or domain type is characterized by specific conserved sequence motifs. We discuss the presence of these repeats and domains in proteins from other genomes and their probable secondary structure.

  8. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Vif N-Terminal Residues Selectively Counteract Feline APOBEC3s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qinyong; Zhang, Zeli; Cano Ortiz, Lucía; Franco, Ana Cláudia; Häussinger, Dieter; Münk, Carsten

    2016-12-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) Vif protein counteracts feline APOBEC3s (FcaA3s) restriction factors by inducing their proteasomal degradation. The functional domains in FIV Vif for interaction with FcaA3s are poorly understood. Here, we have identified several motifs in FIV Vif that are important for selective degradation of different FcaA3s. Cats (Felis catus) express three types of A3s: single-domain A3Z2, single-domain A3Z3, and double-domain A3Z2Z3. We proposed that FIV Vif would selectively interact with the Z2 and the Z3 A3s. Indeed, we identified two N-terminal Vif motifs (12LF13 and 18GG19) that specifically interacted with the FcaA3Z2 protein but not with A3Z3. In contrast, the exclusive degradation of FcaA3Z3 was regulated by a region of three residues (M24, L25, and I27). Only a FIV Vif carrying a combination of mutations from both interaction sites lost the capacity to degrade and counteract FcaA3Z2Z3. However, alterations in the specific A3s interaction sites did not affect the cellular localization of the FIV Vif protein and binding to feline A3s. Pulldown experiments demonstrated that the A3 binding region localized to FIV Vif residues 50 to 80, outside the specific A3 interaction domain. Finally, we found that the Vif sites specific to individual A3s are conserved in several FIV lineages of domestic cat and nondomestic cats, while being absent in the FIV Vif of pumas. Our data support a complex model of multiple Vif-A3 interactions in which the specific region for selective A3 counteraction is discrete from a general A3 binding domain.

  9. The MLK family mediates c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation in neuronal apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z; Maroney, A C; Dobrzanski, P; Kukekov, N V; Greene, L A

    2001-07-01

    Neuronal apoptotic death induced by nerve growth factor (NGF) deprivation is reported to be in part mediated through a pathway that includes Rac1 and Cdc42, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases 4 and 7 (MKK4 and -7), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs), and c-Jun. However, additional components of the pathway remain to be defined. We show here that members of the mixed-lineage kinase (MLK) family (including MLK1, MLK2, MLK3, and dual leucine zipper kinase [DLK]) are expressed in neuronal cells and are likely to act between Rac1/Cdc42 and MKK4 and -7 in death signaling. Overexpression of MLKs effectively induces apoptotic death of cultured neuronal PC12 cells and sympathetic neurons, while expression of dominant-negative forms of MLKs suppresses death evoked by NGF deprivation or expression of activated forms of Rac1 and Cdc42. CEP-1347 (KT7515), which blocks neuronal death caused by NGF deprivation and a variety of additional apoptotic stimuli and which selectively inhibits the activities of MLKs, effectively protects neuronal PC12 cells from death induced by overexpression of MLK family members. In addition, NGF deprivation or UV irradiation leads to an increase in both level and phosphorylation of endogenous DLK. These observations support a role for MLKs in the neuronal death mechanism. With respect to ordering the death pathway, dominant-negative forms of MKK4 and -7 and c-Jun are protective against death induced by MLK overexpression, placing MLKs upstream of these kinases. Additional findings place the MLKs upstream of mitochondrial cytochrome c release and caspase activation.

  10. Characterization of niphatenones that inhibit androgen receptor N-terminal domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen A Banuelos

    Full Text Available Androgen ablation therapy causes a temporary reduction in tumor burden in patients with advanced prostate cancer. Unfortunately the malignancy will return to form lethal castration-recurrent prostate cancer (CRPC. The androgen receptor (AR remains transcriptionally active in CRPC in spite of castrate levels of androgens in the blood. AR transcriptional activity resides in its N-terminal domain (NTD. Possible mechanisms of continued AR transcriptional activity may include, at least in part, expression of constitutively active splice variants of AR that lack the C-terminal ligand-binding domain (LBD. Current therapies that target the AR LBD, would not be effective against these AR variants. Currently no drugs are clinically available that target the AR NTD which should be effective against these AR variants as well as full-length AR. Niphatenones were originally isolated and identified in active extracts from Niphates digitalis marine sponge. Here we begin to characterize the mechanism of niphatenones in blocking AR transcriptional activity. Both enantiomers had similar IC50 values of 6 µM for inhibiting the full-length AR in a functional transcriptional assay. However, (S-niphatenone had significantly better activity against the AR NTD compared to (R-niphatenone. Consistent with niphatenones binding to and inhibiting transactivation of AR NTD, niphatenones inhibited AR splice variant. Niphatenone did not affect the transcriptional activity of the related progesterone receptor, but slightly decreased glucocorticoid receptor (GR activity and covalently bound to GR activation function-1 (AF-1 region. Niphatenone blocked N/C interactions of AR without altering either AR protein levels or its intracellular localization in response to androgen. Alkylation with glutathione suggests that niphatenones are not a feasible scaffold for further drug development.

  11. Promoter-dependent activity on androgen receptor N-terminal domain mutations in androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadokoro-Cuccaro, Rieko; Davies, John; Mongan, Nigel P; Bunch, Trevor; Brown, Rosalind S; Audi, Laura; Watt, Kate; McEwan, Iain J; Hughes, Ieuan A

    2014-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) mutations are associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). Missense mutations identified in the AR-N-terminal domain (AR-NTD) are rare, and clinical phenotypes are typically mild. We investigated 7 missense mutations and 2 insertion/deletions located in the AR-NTD. This study aimed to elucidate the pathogenic role of AR-NTD mutants in AIS and to use this knowledge to further define AR-NTD function. AR-NTD mutations (Q120E, A159T, G216R, N235K, G248V, L272F, and P380R) were introduced into AR-expression plasmids. Stably expressing cell lines were established for del57L and ins58L. Transactivation was measured using luciferase reporter constructs under the control of GRE and Pem promoters. Intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and partial proteolysis studies were performed for mutations which showed reduced activities by using a purified AR-AF1 protein. Pem-luciferase reporter activation was reduced for A159T, N235K, and G248V but not the GRE-luciferase reporter. Protein structure analysis detected no significant change in the AR-AF1 region for these mutations. Reduced cellular expression and transactivation activity were observed for ins58L. The mutations Q120E, G216R, L272F, P380R, and del57L showed small or no detectable changes in function. Thus, clinical and experimental analyses have identified novel AR-signalling defects associated with mutations in the structurally disordered AR-NTD domain in patients with AIS.

  12. N-terminal Slit2 inhibits HIV-1 replication by regulating the actin cytoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Appakkudal R

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Slit2 is a ~ 200 kDa secreted glycoprotein that has been recently shown to regulate immune functions. However, not much is known about its role in HIV (human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. Results In the present study, we have shown that the N-terminal fragment of Slit2 (Slit2N (~120 kDa inhibits replication of both CXCR4 and CCR5-tropic HIV-1 viruses in T-cell lines and peripheral blood T-cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated inhibition of HIV-1 infection in resting CD4+ T-cells. In addition, we showed that Slit2N blocks cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1. We have shown that Slit2N inhibits HIV-1 infection by blocking viral entry into T-cells. We also ruled out Slit2N-mediated inhibition of various other steps in the life cycle including binding, integration and viral transcription. Elucidation of the molecular mechanism revealed that Slit2N mediates its functional effects by binding to Robo1 receptor. Furthermore, we found that Slit2N inhibited Gp120-induced Robo1-actin association suggesting that Slit2N may inhibit cytoskeletal rearrangements facilitating HIV-1 entry. Studies into the mechanism of inhibition of HIV-1 revealed that Slit2N abrogated HIV-1 envelope-induced actin cytoskeletal dynamics in both T-cell lines and primary T-cells. We further showed that Slit2N specifically attenuated the HIV-1 envelope-induced signaling pathway consisting of Rac1, LIMK and cofilin that regulates actin polymerization. Conclusions Taken together, our results show that Slit2N inhibits HIV-1 replication through novel mechanisms involving modulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. Our study, thus, provides insights into the role of Slit2N in HIV-1 infection and underscores its potential in limiting viral replication in T-cells.

  13. Multiple amino acid sequence alignment nitrogenase component 1: insights into phylogenetics and structure-function relationships.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Howard

    Full Text Available Amino acid residues critical for a protein's structure-function are retained by natural selection and these residues are identified by the level of variance in co-aligned homologous protein sequences. The relevant residues in the nitrogen fixation Component 1 α- and β-subunits were identified by the alignment of 95 protein sequences. Proteins were included from species encompassing multiple microbial phyla and diverse ecological niches as well as the nitrogen fixation genotypes, anf, nif, and vnf, which encode proteins associated with cofactors differing at one metal site. After adjusting for differences in sequence length, insertions, and deletions, the remaining >85% of the sequence co-aligned the subunits from the three genotypes. Six Groups, designated Anf, Vnf , and Nif I-IV, were assigned based upon genetic origin, sequence adjustments, and conserved residues. Both subunits subdivided into the same groups. Invariant and single variant residues were identified and were defined as "core" for nitrogenase function. Three species in Group Nif-III, Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, Desulfotomaculum kuznetsovii, and Thermodesulfatator indicus, were found to have a seleno-cysteine that replaces one cysteinyl ligand of the 8Fe:7S, P-cluster. Subsets of invariant residues, limited to individual groups, were identified; these unique residues help identify the gene of origin (anf, nif, or vnf yet should not be considered diagnostic of the metal content of associated cofactors. Fourteen of the 19 residues that compose the cofactor pocket are invariant or single variant; the other five residues are highly variable but do not correlate with the putative metal content of the cofactor. The variable residues are clustered on one side of the cofactor, away from other functional centers in the three dimensional structure. Many of the invariant and single variant residues were not previously recognized as potentially critical and their identification

  14. Multiple amino acid sequence alignment nitrogenase component 1: insights into phylogenetics and structure-function relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, James B; Kechris, Katerina J; Rees, Douglas C; Glazer, Alexander N

    2013-01-01

    Amino acid residues critical for a protein's structure-function are retained by natural selection and these residues are identified by the level of variance in co-aligned homologous protein sequences. The relevant residues in the nitrogen fixation Component 1 α- and β-subunits were identified by the alignment of 95 protein sequences. Proteins were included from species encompassing multiple microbial phyla and diverse ecological niches as well as the nitrogen fixation genotypes, anf, nif, and vnf, which encode proteins associated with cofactors differing at one metal site. After adjusting for differences in sequence length, insertions, and deletions, the remaining >85% of the sequence co-aligned the subunits from the three genotypes. Six Groups, designated Anf, Vnf , and Nif I-IV, were assigned based upon genetic origin, sequence adjustments, and conserved residues. Both subunits subdivided into the same groups. Invariant and single variant residues were identified and were defined as "core" for nitrogenase function. Three species in Group Nif-III, Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, Desulfotomaculum kuznetsovii, and Thermodesulfatator indicus, were found to have a seleno-cysteine that replaces one cysteinyl ligand of the 8Fe:7S, P-cluster. Subsets of invariant residues, limited to individual groups, were identified; these unique residues help identify the gene of origin (anf, nif, or vnf) yet should not be considered diagnostic of the metal content of associated cofactors. Fourteen of the 19 residues that compose the cofactor pocket are invariant or single variant; the other five residues are highly variable but do not correlate with the putative metal content of the cofactor. The variable residues are clustered on one side of the cofactor, away from other functional centers in the three dimensional structure. Many of the invariant and single variant residues were not previously recognized as potentially critical and their identification provides the bases for

  15. Purification and characterization of a branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase from Lactobacillus paracasei subsp paracasei CHCC 2115

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thage, B.V.; Rattray, F.P.; Laustsen, M.W.;

    2004-01-01

    Purification and characterization of an aminotransferase (AT) specific for the degradation of branched-chain amino acids from Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei CHCC 2115. Methods and Results: The purification protocol consisted of anion exchange chromatography, affinity chromatography...... of other metal ions, thiol- and carbonyl-binding agents. The N-terminal sequence of the enzyme was SVNIDWNNLGFDYMQLPYRYVAHXKDGVXD, and had at the amino acid level, 60 and 53% identity to a branched-chain amino acid AT of Lact. plantarum and Lactococcus lactis, respectively. Conclusions: The results suggest...

  16. Sequence divergence in two tandemly located pilin genes of Eikenella corrodens.

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Eikenella corrodens normally inhabits the human respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts but is frequently the cause of abscesses at various sites. Using the N-terminal portion of the Moraxella nonliquefaciens pilin gene as a hybridization probe, we cloned two tandemly located pilin genes of E. corrodens 31745, ecpC and ecpD, and expressed the two pilin genes separately in Escherichia coli. A comparison of the predicted amino acid sequences of E. corrodens 31745 EcpC and EcpD revealed consider...

  17. Identification of protein N-termini in Cyanophora paradoxa cyanelles: Transit peptide composition and sequence determinants for precursor maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eKöhler

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Glaucophyta, rhodophyta and chloroplastida represent the three main evolutionary lineages that diverged from a common ancestor after primary endosymbiosis. Comparative analyses between members of these three lineages are a rich source of information on ancestral plastid features. We analyzed the composition and the cleavage site of cyanelle transit peptides from the glaucophyte Cyanophora paradoxa by terminal amine labelling of substrates (TAILS, and compared their characteristics to those of representatives of the chloroplastida. Our data show that transit peptide architecture is similar between members of these two lineages. This entails a comparable modular structure, an overrepresentation of serine or alanine and similarities in the amino acid composition around the processing peptidase cleavage site. The most distinctive difference is the overrepresentation of phenylalanine in the N-terminal 1-10 amino acids of cyanelle transit peptides. A quantitative proteome analysis with periplasm-free cyanelles identified 42 out of 262 proteins without the N-terminal phenylalanine, suggesting that the requirement for phenylalanine in the N-terminal region is not absolute. Proteins in this set are on average of low abundance, suggesting that either alternative import pathways are operating specifically for low abundance proteins or that the gene model annotation is incorrect for proteins with fewer EST sequences. We discuss these two possibilities and provide examples for both interpretations.

  18. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide as a marker of blunt cardiac contusion in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Halil; Sarikaya, Sezgin; Neijmann, Sebnem Tekin; Uysal, Emin; Yucel, Neslihan; Ozucelik, Dogac Niyazi; Okuturlar, Yıldız; Solak, Suleyman; Sever, Nurten; Ayan, Cem

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac contusion is usually caused by blunt chest trauma and, although it is potentially a life-threatening condition, the diagnosis of a myocardial contusion is difficult because of non-specific symptoms and the lack of an ideal test to detect myocardial damage. Cardiac enzymes, such as creatine kinase (CK), creatine kinase MB fraction (CK-MB), cardiac troponin I (cTn-I), and cardiac troponin T (cTn-T) were used in previous studies to demonstrate the blunt cardiac contusion (BCC). Each of these diagnostic tests alone is not effective for diagnosis of BCC. The aim of this study was to investigate the serum heart-type fatty acid binding protein (h-FABP), N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), CK, CK-MB, and cTn-I levels as a marker of BCC in blunt chest trauma in rats. The eighteen Wistar albino rats were randomly allocated to two groups; group I (control) (n=8) and group II (blunt chest trauma) (n=10). Isolated BCC was induced by the method described by Raghavendran et al. (2005). All rats were observed in their cages and blood samples were collected after five hours of trauma for the analysis of serum h-FABP, NT-pro BNP, CK, CK-MB, and cTn-I levels. The mean serum NT-pro BNP was significantly different between group I and II (10.3 ± 2.10 ng/L versus 15.4 ± 3.68 ng/L, respectively; P=0.0001). NT-pro BNP level >13 ng/ml had a sensitivity of 87.5%, a specificity of 70%, a positive predictive value of 70%, and a negative predictive value of 87.5% for predicting blunt chest trauma (area under curve was 0.794 and P=0.037). There was no significant difference between two groups in serum h-FABP, CK, CK-MB and c Tn-I levels. A relation between NT-Pro BNP and BCC was shown in this study. Serum NT-proBNP levels significantly increased with BCC after 5 hours of the blunt chest trauma. The use of NT-proBNP as an adjunct to other diagnostic tests, such as troponins, electrocardiography (ECG), chest x-ray and echocardiogram may be beneficial for diagnosis of

  19. Complete amino acid sequence of a Lolium perenne (perennial rye grass) pollen allergen, Lol p II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, A A; Shenbagamurthi, P; Marsh, D G

    1989-07-05

    The complete amino acid sequence of a Lolium perenne (rye grass) pollen allergen, Lol p II was determined by automated Edman degradation of the protein and selected fragments. Cleavage of the protein by enzymatic and chemical techniques established an unambiguous sequence for the protein. Lol p II contains 97 amino acid residues, with a calculated molecular weight of 10,882. The protein lacks cysteine and glutamine and shows no evidence of glycosylation. Theoretical predictions by Fraga's (Fraga, S. (1982) Can. J. Chem. 60, 2606-2610) and Hopp and Woods' (Hopp, T. P., and Woods, K. R. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 78, 3824-3828) methods indicate the presence of four hydrophilic regions, which may contribute to sequential or parts of conformational B-cell epitopes. Analysis of amphipathic regions by Berzofsky's method indicates the presence of a highly amphipathic region, which may contain, or contribute to, an Ia/T-cell epitope. This latter segment of Lol p II was found to be highly homologous with an antibody-binding segment of the major rye allergen Lol p I and may explain why immune responsiveness to both the allergens is associated with HLA-DR3.

  20. Draft Genome Sequences of Gluconobacter cerinus CECT 9110 and Gluconobacter japonicus CECT 8443, Acetic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Grape Must

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainz, Florencia

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of Gluconobacter cerinus strain CECT9110 and Gluconobacter japonicus CECT8443, acetic acid bacteria isolated from grape must. Gluconobacter species are well known for their ability to oxidize sugar alcohols into the corresponding acids. Our objective was to select strains to oxidize effectively d-glucose. PMID:27365351

  1. Amino acid sequence of versutoxin, a lethal neurotoxin from the venom of the funnel-web spider Atrax versutus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M R; Sheumack, D D; Tyler, M I; Howden, M E

    1988-03-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of versutoxin, a lethal neurotoxic polypeptide isolated from the venom of male and female funnel-web spiders of the species Atrax versutus, was determined. Sequencing was performed in a gas-phase protein sequencer by automated Edman degradation of the S-carboxymethylated toxin and fragments of it produced by reaction with CNBr. Versutoxin consisted of a single chain of 42 amino acid residues. It was found to have a high proportion of basic residues and of cystine. The primary structure showed marked homology with that of robustoxin, a novel neurotoxin recently isolated from the venom of another funnel-web-spider species, Atrax robustus.

  2. Complete amino acid sequence of the myoglobin from the Atlantic bottlenosed dolphin, Tursiops truncatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B N; Vigna, R A; Dwulet, F E; Bogardt, R A; Lehman, L D; Gurd, F R

    1976-10-05

    The complete amino acid sequence of the major component myoglobin from the Atlantic bottlenosed dolphin, Tursiops truncatus, was determined by specific cleavage of the protein to obtain large peptides that are readily degraded by the automatic sequencer. Three easily separable peptides were obtained by cleaving the protein with cyanogen bromide at the 2 methionine residues and 4 peptides were obtained by cleaving the methyl acetimidated protein with trypsin at the 3 arginine residues. By subjecting 4 of these peptides and the apomyoglobin to automatic Edman degradation, over 80% of the covalent structure of the protein was obtained. The remainder of the primary structure was determined by further digestion of the central cyanogen bromide peptide with trypsin and staphylococcal protease. This myoglobin differs from that of the sperm whale, Physter catodon, at 15 positions, from that of the California gray whale, Eschrichtius gibbosus, at 14 positions, from that of the common porpoise, Phocoena phocoena, at 6 positions, and from the myoglobin of the Black Sea dolphin, Delphinus delphis and the Amazon River dolphin, Inia goeffrensis, at 5 and 7 positions, respecitvely. All substitutions observed in this sequence fit easily into the tertiary structure of sperm whale myoglobin.

  3. 龈沟液12 000蛋白质的N-末端氨基酸序列分析及其临床意义%Analysis of N-terminal amino acid sequence of 12 000-protein in gingival crevi cular fluid and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王戎机; 孟焕新; 陈智滨; 曹采方

    2002-01-01

    目的对龈沟液中12 000蛋白质的N-末端氨基酸进行序列分析,鉴定其本质.方法采集快速进展性牙周炎和成人牙周炎患者的龈沟液,采用垂直板聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳分离出12 000蛋白,并将其通过电转移技术转至PVDF膜上,剪下PVDF膜上的目标条带,在491 Protein Sequencer多肽氨基酸序列测定仪上进行N-末端氨基酸序列分析.结果龈沟液中低相对分子质量的12 000蛋白N-末端10个氨基酸的顺序为:Met、Leu、Th r、Glu、Leu、Glu、Lys、Ala、Leu、Asn.经MS-Edman 检索,与该序列相匹配的蛋白是" 钙结合蛋白MRP8",它是钙结合蛋白(Calprotectin)的轻亚基.Calprotectin是白细胞胞 质中的一种蛋白,是败血症、肺炎等一些炎性疾病的标志物.结论龈沟液中12 000蛋白质的本质是钙结合蛋白.

  4. ANCAC: amino acid, nucleotide, and codon analysis of COGs – a tool for sequence bias analysis in microbial orthologs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiler Arno

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The COG database is the most popular collection of orthologous proteins from many different completely sequenced microbial genomes. Per definition, a cluster of orthologous groups (COG within this database exclusively contains proteins that most likely achieve the same cellular function. Recently, the COG database was extended by assigning to every protein both the corresponding amino acid and its encoding nucleotide sequence resulting in the NUCOCOG database. This extended version of the COG database is a valuable resource connecting sequence features with the functionality of the respective proteins. Results Here we present ANCAC, a web tool and MySQL database for the analysis of amino acid, nucleotide, and codon frequencies in COGs on the basis of freely definable phylogenetic patterns. We demonstrate the usefulness of ANCAC by analyzing amino acid frequencies, codon usage, and GC-content in a species- or function-specific context. With respect to amino acids we, at least in part, confirm the cognate bias hypothesis by using ANCAC’s NUCOCOG dataset as the largest one available for that purpose thus far. Conclusions Using the NUCOCOG datasets, ANCAC connects taxonomic, amino acid, and nucleotide sequence information with the functional classification via COGs and provides a GUI for flexible mining for sequence-bias. Thereby, to our knowledge, it is the only tool for the analysis of sequence composition in the light of physiological roles and phylogenetic context without requirement of substantial programming-skills.

  5. Structure of the N-terminal domain of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksiazek, Dorota; Brandstetter, Hans; Israel, Lars; Bourenkov, Gleb P; Katchalova, Galina; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Bartunik, Hans D; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Holak, Tad A

    2003-09-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are widely distributed and highly conserved proteins that regulate actin remodeling in response to cellular signals. The N termini of CAPs play a role in Ras signaling and bind adenylyl cyclase; the C termini bind to G-actin and thereby alter the dynamic rearrangements of the microfilament system. We report here the X-ray structure of the core of the N-terminal domain of the CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum, which comprises residues 51-226, determined by a combination of single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering (SIRAS). The overall structure of this fragment is an alpha helix bundle composed of six antiparallel helices. Results from gel filtration and crosslinking experiments for CAP(1-226), CAP(255-464), and the full-length protein, together with the CAP N-terminal domain structure and the recently determined CAP C-terminal domain structure, provide evidence that the functional structure of CAP is multimeric.

  6. Structure of a double hexamer of the Pyrococcus furiosus minichromosome maintenance protein N-terminal domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meagher, Martin; Enemark, Eric J.

    2016-06-22

    The crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of thePyrococcus furiosusminichromosome maintenance (MCM) protein as a double hexamer is described. The MCM complex is a ring-shaped helicase that unwinds DNA at the replication fork of eukaryotes and archaea. Prior to replication initiation, the MCM complex assembles as an inactive double hexamer at specific sites of DNA. The presented structure is highly consistent with previous MCM double-hexamer structures and shows two MCM hexamers with a head-to-head interaction mediated by the N-terminal domain. Minor differences include a diminished head-to-head interaction and a slightly reduced inter-hexamer rotation.

  7. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and long-term mortality in stable coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Charlotte; Grønning, Bjørn; Køber, Lars;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The level of the inactive N-terminal fragment of pro-brain (B-type) natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a strong predictor of mortality among patients with acute coronary syndromes and may be a strong prognostic marker in patients with chronic coronary heart disease as well. We assessed...... the relationship between N-terminal pro-BNP (NT-pro-BNP) levels and long-term mortality from all causes in a large cohort of patients with stable coronary heart disease. METHODS: NT-pro-BNP was measured in baseline serum samples from 1034 patients referred for angiography because of symptoms or signs of coronary...... of myocardial infarction, angina, hypertension, diabetes, or chronic heart failure; creatinine clearance rate; body-mass index; smoking status; plasma lipid levels; LVEF; and the presence or absence of clinically significant coronary artery disease on angiography. CONCLUSIONS: NT-pro-BNP is a marker of long...

  8. Expression and characterization of the N-terminal half of antistasin, an anticoagulant protein derived from the leech Haementeria officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, L O; Tung, J S; Dunwiddie, C; Alves, K; Lenny, A B; Przysiecki, C; Lehman, D; Nutt, E; Cuca, G C; Law, S W

    1991-02-01

    Antistasin, a 15-kDa anticoagulant protein isolated from the salivary glands of the Mexican leech Haementeria officinalis, has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of factor Xa in the blood coagulation cascade. Antistasin possesses a twofold internal homology between the N- and C-terminal halves of the molecule, suggesting a gene duplication event in the evolution of the antistasin gene. This structural feature also suggests that either or both halves of the protein may possess biological activity if expressed as separate domains. Because the N-terminal domain contains a factor Xa P1-reactive site, we chose to express this domain in an insect cell baculovirus expression system. Characterization of this recombinant half antistasin molecule reveals that the N-terminal domain inhibits factor Xa in vitro, with a K(i) of 1.7 nM.

  9. Recombinant Mitochondrial Transcription Factor A with N-terminal Mitochondrial Transduction Domain Increases Respiration and Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Iyer, Shilpa; Thomas, Ravindar R.; Portell, Francisco R.; Dunham, Lisa D.; Quigley, Caitlin K.; Bennett, James P

    2009-01-01

    We developed a scalable procedure to produce human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) modified with an N-terminal protein transduction domain (PTD) and mitochondrial localization signal (MLS) that allow it to cross membranes and enter mitochondria through its “mitochondrial transduction domain” (MTD=PTD+MLS). Alexa488-labeled MTD-TFAM rapidly entered the mitochondrial compartment of cybrid cells carrying the G11778A LHON mutation. MTD-TFAM reversibly increased respiration and levels ...

  10. Impact of N-terminal acetylation of α-synuclein on its random coil and lipid binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Alexander S; Ying, Jinfa; Bax, Ad

    2012-06-26

    N-Terminal acetylation of α-synuclein (aS), a protein implicated in the etiology of Parkinson's disease, is common in mammals. The impact of this modification on the protein's structure and dynamics in free solution and on its membrane binding properties has been evaluated by high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. While no tetrameric form of acetylated aS could be isolated, N-terminal acetylation resulted in chemical shift perturbations of the first 12 residues of the protein that progressively decreased with the distance from the N-terminus. The directions of the chemical shift changes and small changes in backbone (3)J(HH) couplings are consistent with an increase in the α-helicity of the first six residues of aS, although a high degree of dynamic conformational disorder remains and the helical structure is sampled <20% of the time. Chemical shift and (3)J(HH) data for the intact protein are virtually indistinguishable from those recorded for the corresponding N-terminally acetylated and nonacetylated 15-residue synthetic peptides. An increase in α-helicity at the N-terminus of aS is supported by CD data on the acetylated peptide and by weak medium-range nuclear Overhauser effect contacts indicative of α-helical character. The remainder of the protein has chemical shift values that are very close to random coil values and indistinguishable between the two forms of the protein. No significant differences in the fibrillation kinetics were observed between acetylated and nonacetylated aS. However, the lipid binding properties of aS are strongly impacted by acetylation and exhibit distinct behavior for the first 12 residues, indicative of an initiation role for the N-terminal residues in an "initiation-elongation" process of binding to the membrane.

  11. Prevalence and prognosis of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and elevated N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Christian Malchau; Bay, Morten; Kirk, Vibeke

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the epidemiological features and prognosis of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) and to compare these findings with those from patients with reduced ejection fraction. Furthermore the effects of N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT......-proBNP) requirement in the heart failure diagnosis were assessed by repeating the analyses in the subgroup of patients with elevated NT-proBNP....

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of yeast prion protein Ure2p with shortened N-terminal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    An orthorhombic crystal form of a recombinant yeast prion protein with shortened N-terminal, 90Ure2p, has been obtained. Crystals were grown by the vapordiffusion technique against a mother liquor containing imidazole. Crystals belong to the primitive orthorhombic lattice with the cell parameters a = 54.5 ?, b = 74.7 ?, c = 131.0 ?. The crystals diffract to beyond 3.0 ? resolution at a synchrotron beamline.

  13. Small, N-terminal tags activate Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase activity by disrupting its autoinhibited conformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Burchell

    Full Text Available Parkin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase, mutations in which cause Autosomal Recessive Parkinson's Disease. Many studies aimed at understanding Parkin function, regulation and dysfunction are performed using N-terminal epitope tags. We report here that the use of small tags such as FLAG, cMyc and HA, influence the physical stability and activity of Parkin in and out of cells, perturbing the autoinhibited native state of Parkin, resulting in an active-for-autoubiquitination species.

  14. Human liver phosphatase 2A: cDNA and amino acid sequence of two catalytic subunit isotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arino, J.; Woon, Chee Wai; Brautigan, D.L.; Miller, T.B. Jr.; Johnson, G.L. (Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester (USA))

    1988-06-01

    Two cDNA clones were isolated from a human liver library that encode two phosphatase 2A catalytic subunits. The two cDNAs differed in eight amino acids (97% identity) with three nonconservative substitutions. All of the amino acid substitutions were clustered in the amino-terminal domain of the protein. Amino acid sequence of one human liver clone (HL-14) was identical to the rabbit skeletal muscle phosphatase 2A cDNA (with 97% nucleotide identity). The second human liver clone (HL-1) is encoded by a separate gene, and RNA gel blot analysis indicates that both mRNAs are expressed similarly in several human clonal cell lines. Sequence comparison with phosphatase 1 and 2A indicates highly divergent amino acid sequences at the amino and carboxyl termini of the proteins and identifies six highly conserved regions between the two proteins that are predicted to be important for phosphatase enzymatic activity.

  15. Kadar N-Terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide sebagai Prediktor Luaran Klinis Sindrom Koroner Akut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia Idajanti Tandhana

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma levels of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP levels may reflect the severity of ischemia, although there is no necrosis. A transient ischemia which can increase the heart wall stretch would induces BNP synthesis and release. Synthesis and release of BNP are comparable with the severity of ischemia. The aim of this study was to analyze whether NT-proBNP levels in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS can be used as a predictor for clinical outcome. Studies was held since January to March 2010. Subject were patients with ACS who came to emergency room Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung and were clinically diagnosed according to World Health Organization criteria. Subjects which were suited with the inclusion criteria, stored until assayed. NT-pro BNP concentration was examined by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay method along with creatine kinase muscle brain (enzymatic method and cardiac troponin T (quantitative method. Statistical analysis was performed using the one-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for verifying normality, normally distributed data were analyzed using parametric analysis and abnormal distributed data was assayed using multiple logistic regression analysis to determine the parameters which can be used as predictor for clinical outcome in patients with ACS. Multiple logistic regression analysis on 83 subjects showed predictive value of NT-proBNP levels with OR=1.00, which mean there was no different likelihood in patients with high and low concentration of NT-proBNP to have longer hospitality duration. NT-proBNP β coefficient of 0.001 states that every addition of 1,000 pg/mL of NT-proBNP concentration will increase the length of hospitality duration for one day. On convalesce subjects, the most significant predictive value for predicting clinical outcome cTnT was more better than NT-proBNP concentration in patients with ACS (OR=32.53, 95%CI; 0.58–1,819.26. In conclusions, NT-proBNP is not a major

  16. N-terminal truncation enables crystallization of the receptor-binding domain of the FedF bacterial adhesin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Kerpel, Maia; Van Molle, Inge [Department of Ultrastructure, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Brys, Lea [Department of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Wyns, Lode; De Greve, Henri; Bouckaert, Julie, E-mail: bouckaej@vub.ac.be [Department of Ultrastructure, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2006-12-01

    The N-terminal receptor-binding domain of the FedF adhesin from enterotoxigenic E. coli has been crystallized. This required the deletion of its first 14 residues, which are also cleaved off naturally. FedF is the two-domain tip adhesin of F18 fimbriae from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. Bacterial adherence, mediated by the N-terminal receptor-binding domain of FedF to carbohydrate receptors on intestinal microvilli, causes diarrhoea and oedema disease in newly weaned piglets and induces the secretion of Shiga toxins. A truncate containing only the receptor-binding domain of FedF was found to be further cleaved at its N-terminus. Reconstruction of this N-terminal truncate rendered FedF amenable to crystallization, resulting in crystals with space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and unit-cell parameters a = 36.20, b = 74.64, c = 99.03 Å that diffracted to beyond 2 Å resolution. The binding specificity of FedF was screened for on a glycan array, exposing 264 glycoconjugates, to identify specific receptors for cocrystallization with FedF.

  17. Loss of the N-terminal methyltransferase NRMT1 increases sensitivity to DNA damage and promotes mammary oncogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsignore, Lindsay A.; Butler, Jill Sergesketter; Klinge, Carolyn M.; Tooley, Christine E. Schaner

    2015-01-01

    Though discovered over four decades ago, the function of N-terminal methylation has mostly remained a mystery. Our discovery of the first mammalian N-terminal methyltransferase, NRMT1, has led to the discovery of many new functions for N-terminal methylation, including regulation of DNA/protein interactions, accurate mitotic division, and nucleotide excision repair (NER). Here we test whether NRMT1 is also important for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, and given its previously known roles in cell cycle regulation and the DNA damage response, assay if NRMT1 is acting as a tumor suppressor. We find that NRMT1 knockdown significantly enhances the sensitivity of breast cancer cell lines to both etoposide treatment and γ-irradiation, as well as, increases proliferation rate, invasive potential, anchorage-independent growth, xenograft tumor size, and tamoxifen sensitivity. Interestingly, this positions NRMT1 as a tumor suppressor protein involved in multiple DNA repair pathways, and indicates, similar to BRCA1 and BRCA2, its loss may result in tumors with enhanced sensitivity to diverse DNA damaging chemotherapeutics. PMID:25909287

  18. Conformation Changes N-terminal Involvement and cGMP Signal Relay in the Phosphodiesterase-5 GAF Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H Wang; H Robinson; H Ke

    2011-12-31

    The activity of phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) is specific for cGMP and is regulated by cGMP binding to GAF-A in its regulatory domain. To better understand the regulatory mechanism, x-ray crystallographic and biochemical studies were performed on constructs of human PDE5A1 containing the N-terminal phosphorylation segment, GAF-A, and GAF-B. Superposition of this unliganded GAF-A with the previously reported NMR structure of cGMP-bound PDE5 revealed dramatic conformational differences and suggested that helix H4 and strand B3 probably serve as two lids to gate the cGMP-binding pocket in GAF-A. The structure also identified an interfacial region among GAF-A, GAF-B, and the N-terminal loop, which may serve as a relay of the cGMP signal from GAF-A to GAF-B. N-terminal loop 98-147 was physically associated with GAF-B domains of the dimer. Biochemical analyses showed an inhibitory effect of this loop on cGMP binding and its involvement in the cGMP-induced conformation changes.

  19. The SAS-5 N-terminal domain is a tetramer, with implications for centriole assembly in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimanovskaya, Ekaterina; Qiao, Renping; Lesigang, Johannes; Dong, Gang

    2013-07-01

    The centriole is a conserved microtubule-based organelle essential for both centrosome formation and cilium biogenesis. It has a unique 9-fold symmetry and its assembly is governed by at least five component proteins (SPD-2, ZYG-1, SAS-5, SAS-6 and SAS-4), which are recruited in a hierarchical order. Recently published structural studies of the SAS-6 N-terminal domain have greatly advanced our understanding of the mechanisms of centriole assembly. However, it remains unclear how the weak interaction between the SAS-6 N-terminal head groups could drive the assembly of a closed ring-like structure, and what determines the stacking of multiple rings on top one another in centriole duplication. We recently reported that SAS-5 binds specifically to a very narrow region of the SAS-6 central coiled coil through its C-terminal domain (CTD, residues 391-404). Here, we further demonstrate by both static light scattering and small angle X-ray scattering that the SAS-5 N-terminal domain (NTD, residues 1-260) forms a tetramer. Specifically, we found that the tetramer is formed by SAS-5 residues 82-260, whereas residues 1-81 are intrinsically disordered. Taking these results together, we propose a working model for SAS-5-mediated assembly of the multi-layered central tube structure.

  20. Identification of specific antigenic epitope at N-terminal segment of enterovirus 71 (EV-71) VP1 protein and characterization of its use in recombinant form for early diagnosis of EV-71 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jianhua; Jiang, Bingfu; Xu, Mingjie; Dai, Xing; Purdy, Michael A.; Meng, Jihong

    2014-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV-71) is the main etiologic agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). We sought to identify EV-71 specific antigens and develop serologic assays for acute-phase EV-71 infection. A series of truncated proteins within the N-terminal 100 amino acids (aa) of EV-71 VP1 was expressed in Escherichia coli. Western blot (WB) analysis showed that positions around 11–21 aa contain EV-71-specific antigenic sites, whereas positions 1–5 and 51–100 contain epitopes shared with hum...

  1. Functional phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) expressed in Pichia pastoris correct N-terminal processing and secretion of heterologous proteins expressed using the PHA-E signal peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raemaekers, R J; de Muro, L; Gatehouse, J A; Fordham-Skelton, A P

    1999-10-01

    Phytohemagglutinin (Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin; PHA; E- and L-forms) and snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA) were expressed in Pichia pastoris using native signal peptides, or the Saccharomyces alpha-factor preprosequence, to direct proteins into the secretory pathway. PHA and GNA were present as soluble, functional proteins in culture supernatants when expressed from constructs containing the alpha-factor preprosequence. The recombinant lectins, purified by affinity chromatography, agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes at concentrations similar to the respective native lectins. However, incomplete processing of the signal sequence resulted in PHA-E, PHA-L and GNA with heterogenous N-termini, with the majority of the protein containing N-terminal extensions derived from the alpha-factor prosequence. Polypeptides in which most of the alpha-factor prosequence was present were also glycosylated. Inclusion of Glu-Ala repeats at the C-terminal end of the alpha-factor preprosequence led to efficient processing N-terminal to the Glu-Ala sequence, but inefficient removal of the repeats themselves, resulting in polypeptides with heterogenous N-termini still containing N-terminal extensions. In contrast, PHA expressed with the native signal peptide was secreted, correctly processed, and also fully functional. No expression of GNA from a construct containing the native GNA signal peptide was observed. The PHA-E signal peptide directed correct processing and secretion of both GNA and green fluorescent protein (GFP) when used in expression constructs, and is suggested to have general utility for synthesis of correctly processed proteins in Pichia.

  2. Three in-frame N-terminally different proteins are produced from the repressor locus of the Streptomyces bacteriophage phi C31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M C; Owen, C E

    1991-11-01

    The sequence of the repressor locus, c, of the Streptomyces temperate phage, phi C31, was shown previously to contain an open reading frame encoding a 74 kDa protein. Further analysis of the transcriptional and translational products of the c gene shows a more complex pattern of expression. A nest of three in-frame N-terminally different, C-terminally identical proteins of 74, 54 and 42 kDa were found to be expressed from a corresponding nest of transcripts. The repressor proteins were produced in Escherichia coli and the 42 kDa protein was purified, verified by N-terminal sequencing, and used to raise antibody. The antibody cross-reacted in Western blots with the 74, 54 and 42 kDa proteins expressed in E. coli and Streptomyces lividans and from Streptomyces coelicolor phi C31 lysogens. Analysis of transcription of the c gene by S1 mapping and primer extension showed that the nest of transcripts encoding the repressor protein were induced after heat treatment of the cts locus (Sinclair and Bibb, 1989; this paper). Correspondingly, all three of the repressor proteins were induced. In addition to a promoter, cp1, which lies upstream of the 74 kDa open reading frame, the c locus contained at least one internal promoter, cp2, which transcribes DNA encoding the 54 and 42 kDa proteins. Transcripts initiating from cp3 were observed in RNA preparations from S. lividans containing the c gene deleted for cp1 and cp2, but gene fusions using DNA which should contain any putative promoting activity from this region transcriptionally fused to the xylE gene showed very low levels of expression of catechol 2,3 dioxygenase in S. lividans. The 74 kDa protein was not necessary for super-infection immunity. Data described here and current knowledge of the nature of other 'dual start' genes suggest a model for the regulation of lysis versus lysogeny in phi C31.

  3. Amino acid sequences of neuropeptides in the sinus gland of the land crab Cardisoma carnifex: a novel neuropeptide proteolysis site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, R W

    1987-08-01

    The sinus gland is a major neurosecretory structure in Crustacea. Five peptides, labeled C, D, E, F, and I, isolated from the sinus gland of the land crab have been hypothesized to arise from the incomplete proteolysis at two internal sites on a single biosynthetic intermediate peptide "H", based on amino acid composition additivities and pulse-chase radiolabeling studies. The presence of only a single major precursor for the sinus gland peptides implies that peptide H may be synthesized on a common precursor with crustacean hyperglycemic hormone forms, "J" and "L," and a peptide, "K," similar to peptides with molt inhibiting activity. Here I report amino acid sequences of these peptides. The amino terminal sequence of the parent peptide, H, (and the homologous fragments) proved refractory to Edman degradation. Data from amino acid analysis and carboxypeptidase digestion of the naturally occurring fragments and of fragments produced by endopeptidase digestion were used together with Edman degradation to obtain the sequences. Amino acid analysis of fragments of the naturally occurring "overlap" peptides (those produced by internal cleavage at one site on H) was used to obtain the sequences across the cleavage sites. The amino acid sequence of the land crab peptide H is Arg-Ser-Ala-Asp-Gly-Phe-Gly-Arg-Met-Glu-Ser-Leu-Leu-Thr-Ser-Leu-Arg-Gly- Ser-Ala-Glu- Ser-Pro-Ala-Ala-Leu-Gly-Glu-Ala-Ser-Ala-Ala-His-Pro-Leu-Glu. In vivo cleavage at one site involves excision of arginine from the sequence Leu-Arg-Gly, whereas cleavage at the other site involves excision of serine from the sequence Glu-Ser-Leu. Proteolysis at the latter sequence has not been previously reported in intact secretory granules. The aspartate at position 4 is possibly covalently modified.

  4. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of hamster CENP-A cDNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Javier; Pendón, Carlos; Valdivia, Manuel M

    2002-01-01

    Background The centromere is a specialized locus that mediates chromosome movement during mitosis and meiosis. This chromosomal domain comprises a uniquely packaged form of heterochromatin that acts as a nucleus for the assembly of the kinetochore a trilaminar proteinaceous structure on the surface of each chromatid at the primary constriction. Kinetochores mediate interactions with the spindle fibers of the mitotic apparatus. Centromere protein A (CENP-A) is a histone H3-like protein specifically located to the inner plate of kinetochore at active centromeres. CENP-A works as a component of specialized nucleosomes at centromeres bound to arrays of repeat satellite DNA. Results We have cloned the hamster homologue of human and mouse CENP-A. The cDNA isolated was found to contain an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide consisting of 129 amino acid residues with a C-terminal histone fold domain highly homologous to those of CENP-A and H3 sequences previously released. However, significant sequence divergence was found at the N-terminal region of hamster CENP-A that is five and eleven residues shorter than those of mouse and human respectively. Further, a human serine 7 residue, a target site for Aurora B kinase phosphorylation involved in the mechanism of cytokinesis, was not found in the hamster protein. A human autoepitope at the N-terminal region of CENP-A described in autoinmune diseases is not conserved in the hamster protein. Conclusions We have cloned the hamster cDNA for the centromeric protein CENP-A. Significant differences on protein sequence were found at the N-terminal tail of hamster CENP-A in comparison with that of human and mouse. Our results show a high degree of evolutionary divergence of kinetochore CENP-A proteins in mammals. This is related to the high diverse nucleotide repeat sequences found at the centromere DNA among species and support a current centromere model for kinetochore function and structural plasticity. PMID:12019018

  5. Evolutionary connections of biological kingdoms based on protein and nucleic acid sequence evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayhoff, M. O.

    1983-01-01

    Prokaryotic and eukaryotic evolutionary trees are developed from protein and nucleic-acid sequences by the methods of numerical taxonomy. Trees are presented for bacterial ferredoxins, 5S ribosomal RNA, c-type cytochromes , cytochromes c2 and c', and 5.8S ribosomal RNA; the implications for early evolution are discussed; and a composite tree showing the branching of the anaerobes, aerobes, archaebacteria, and eukaryotes is shown. Single lines are found for all oxygen-evolving photosynthetic forms and for the salt-loving and high-temperature forms of archaebacteria. It is argued that the eukaryote mitochondria, chloroplasts, and cytoplasmic host material are descended from free-living prokaryotes that formed symbiotic associations, with more than one symbiotic event involved in the evolution of each organelle.

  6. The myoglobin of Emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri): amino acid sequence and functional adaptation to extreme conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburrini, M; Romano, M; Giardina, B; di Prisco, G

    1999-02-01

    In the framework of a study on molecular adaptations of the oxygen-transport and storage systems to extreme conditions in Antarctic marine organisms, we have investigated the structure/function relationship in Emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) myoglobin, in search of correlation with the bird life style. In contrast with previous reports, the revised amino acid sequence contains one additional residue and 15 differences. The oxygen-binding parameters seem well adapted to the diving behaviour of the penguin and to the environmental conditions of the Antarctic habitat. Addition of lactate has no major effect on myoglobin oxygenation over a large temperature range. Therefore, metabolic acidosis does not impair myoglobin function under conditions of prolonged physical effort, such as diving.

  7. Repetitive sequence based polymerase chain reaction to differentiate close bacteria strains in acidic sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Ming; YIN Hua-qun; LIU Yi; LIU Jie; LIU Xue-duan

    2008-01-01

    To study the diversity of bacteria strains newly isolated from several acid mine drainage(AMD) sites in China,repetitive sequence based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR),a well established technology for diversity analysis of closely related bacteria strains,was conducted on 30 strains of bacteria Leptospirillum ferriphilium,8 strains of bacteria Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans,as well as the Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans type strain ATCC (American Type Culture Collection) 23270.The results showed that,using ERIC and BOX primer sets,rep-PCR produced highly discriminatory banding patterns.Phylogenetic analysis based on ERIC-PCR banding types was made and the results indicated that rep-PCR could be used as a rapid and highly discriminatory screening technique in studying bacterial diversity,especially in differentiating bacteria within one species in AMD.

  8. The N-terminal domain of the Drosophila retinoblastoma protein Rbf1 interacts with ORC and associates with chromatin in an E2F independent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Ahlander

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The retinoblastoma (Rb tumor suppressor protein can function as a DNA replication inhibitor as well as a transcription factor. Regulation of DNA replication may occur through interaction of Rb with the origin recognition complex (ORC. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterized the interaction of Drosophila Rb, Rbf1, with ORC. Using expression of proteins in Drosophila S2 cells, we found that an N-terminal Rbf1 fragment (amino acids 1-345 is sufficient for Rbf1 association with ORC but does not bind to dE2F1. We also found that the C-terminal half of Rbf1 (amino acids 345-845 interacts with ORC. We observed that the amino-terminal domain of Rbf1 localizes to chromatin in vivo and associates with chromosomal regions implicated in replication initiation, including colocalization with Orc2 and acetylated histone H4. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that Rbf1 can associate with ORC and chromatin through domains independent of the E2F binding site. We infer that Rbf1 may play a role in regulating replication directly through its association with ORC and/or chromatin factors other than E2F. Our data suggest an important role for retinoblastoma family proteins in cell proliferation and tumor suppression through interaction with the replication initiation machinery.

  9. Evidence of evolutionary constraints that influences the sequence composition and diversity of mitochondrial matrix targeting signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R Doyle

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial targeting signals (MTSs are responsible for trafficking nuclear encoded proteins to their final destination within mitochondria. These sequences are diverse, sharing little amino acid homology and vary significantly in length, and although the formation of a positively-charged amphiphilic alpha helix within the MTS is considered to be necessary and sufficient to mediate import, such a feature does not explain their diversity, nor how such diversity influences target sequence function, nor how such dissimilar signals interact with a single, evolutionarily conserved import mechanism. An in silico analysis of 296 N-terminal, matrix destined MTSs from Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Oryza sativa was undertaken to investigate relationships between MTSs, and/or, relationships between an individual targeting signal sequence and the protein that it imports. We present evidence that suggests MTS diversity is influenced in part by physiochemical and N-terminal characteristics of their mature sequences, and that some of these correlated characteristics are evolutionarily maintained across a number of taxa. Importantly, some of these associations begin to explain the variation in MTS length and composition.

  10. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the gene coding for the 57kDa soluble antigen of the salmonid fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Maw-Sheng; Gilbert , Teresa L.; Huang, Chienjin; Landolt, Marsha L.; O'Hara, Patrick J.; Winton, James R.

    1992-01-01

    The complete sequence coding for the 57-kDa major soluble antigen of the salmonid fish pathogen, Renibacterium salmoninarum, was determined. The gene contained an opening reading frame of 1671 nucleotides coding for a protein of 557 amino acids with a calculated Mr value of 57190. The first 26 amino acids constituted a signal peptide. The deduced sequence for amino acid residues 27–61 was in agreement with the 35 N-terminal amino acid residues determined by microsequencing, suggesting the protein in synthesized as a 557-amino acid precursor and processed to produce a mature protein of Mr 54505. Two regions of the protein contained imperfect direct repeats. The first region contained two copies of an 81-residue repeat, the second contained five copies of an unrelated 25-residue repeat. Also, a perfect inverted repeat (including three in-frame UAA stop codons) was observed at the carboxyl-terminus of the gene.

  11. Origin of the NEFA and Nuc signal sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabinos, A; Bhattacharya, D; Kratzin, H D; Hilschmann, N

    1998-03-01

    The human protein NEFA binds calcium, contains a leucine zipper repeat that does not form a homodimer, and is proposed (along with the homologous Nuc protein) to have a common evolutionary history with an EF-hand ancestor. We have isolated and characterized the N-terminal domain of NEFA that contains a signal sequence inferred from both endoproteinase Asp-N (Asp-N) and tryptic digests. Analysis of this N-terminal sequence shows significant similarity to the conserved multiple domains of the mitochondrial carrier family (MCF) proteins. The leader sequence of Nuc is, however, most similar to the signal sequences of membrane and/or secreted proteins (e.g., mouse insulin-like growth factor receptor). We suggest that the divergent NEFA and Nuc N-terminal sequences may have independent origins and that the common high hydrophobicity governs their targeting to the ER. These results provide insights into signal sequence evolution and the multiple origins of protein targeting.

  12. Cloning and sequence analysis of putative type II fatty acid synthase genes from Arachis hypogaea L.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meng-Jun Li; Ai-Qin Li; Han Xia; Chuan-Zhi Zhao; Chang-Sheng Li; Shu-Bo Wan; Yu-Ping Bi; Xing-Jun Wang

    2009-06-01

    The cultivated peanut is a valuable source of dietary oil and ranks fifth among the world oil crops. Plant fatty acid biosynthesis is catalysed by type II fatty acid synthase (FAS) in plastids and mitochondria. By constructing a full-length cDNA library derived from immature peanut seeds and homology-based cloning, candidate genes of acyl carrier protein (ACP), malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase, -ketoacyl-ACP synthase (I, II, III), -ketoacyl-ACP reductase, -hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydrase and enoyl-ACP reductase were isolated. Sequence alignments revealed that primary structures of type II FAS enzymes were highly conserved in higher plants and the catalytic residues were strictly conserved in Escherichia coli and higher plants. Homologue numbers of each type II FAS gene expressing in developing peanut seeds varied from 1 in KASII, KASIII and HD to 5 in ENR. The number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was quite different in each gene. Peanut type II FAS genes were predicted to target plastids except ACP2 and ACP3. The results suggested that peanut may contain two type II FAS systems in plastids and mitochondria. The type II FAS enzymes in higher plants may have similar functions as those in E. coli.

  13. Application of peptide nucleic acids containing azobenzene self-assembled electrochemical biosensors in detecting DNA sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Hybridization of peptide nucleic acids probe containing azobenzene (NH2-TNT4, N-PNAs) with DNA was performed by covalently immobilizing of NH2-TNT4 in sequence on the 3-mercaptopropionic acid self-assembled monolayer modified gold electrode with the helps of N-(3-dimethylaminopropy1)-N’-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS), and the hybrid was coded as N-PNAs/DNA. Using [Fe(CN)6]4-/3- (1:1) as the electrochemical indicator, the electrochemical properties of the N-PNAs self-assembled monolayer (N-PNAs-SAMs) and N-PNAs/DNA hybridization system under the conditions of before and after UV light irradiation were characterized with cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS). Results showed that the redox currents decreased with the increase of irradiation time, suggesting that the ability of the charge transfer on the electrode surface was weakened and the conformation of hybrid system had been changed, and the control of PNAs/DNA hybridization could be realized by UV light irradiation.

  14. Accurate prediction of hot spot residues through physicochemical characteristics of amino acid sequences

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2013-07-23

    Hot spot residues of proteins are fundamental interface residues that help proteins perform their functions. Detecting hot spots by experimental methods is costly and time-consuming. Sequential and structural information has been widely used in the computational prediction of hot spots. However, structural information is not always available. In this article, we investigated the problem of identifying hot spots using only physicochemical characteristics extracted from amino acid sequences. We first extracted 132 relatively independent physicochemical features from a set of the 544 properties in AAindex1, an amino acid index database. Each feature was utilized to train a classification model with a novel encoding schema for hot spot prediction by the IBk algorithm, an extension of the K-nearest neighbor algorithm. The combinations of the individual classifiers were explored and the classifiers that appeared frequently in the top performing combinations were selected. The hot spot predictor was built based on an ensemble of these classifiers and to work in a voting manner. Experimental results demonstrated that our method effectively exploited the feature space and allowed flexible weights of features for different queries. On the commonly used hot spot benchmark sets, our method significantly outperformed other machine learning algorithms and state-of-the-art hot spot predictors. The program is available at http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa/pages/software.aspx. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Cloning and sequence analysis of putative type II fatty acid synthase genes from Arachis hypogaea L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng-Jun; Li, Ai-Qin; Xia, Han; Zhao, Chuan-Zhi; Li, Chang-Sheng; Wan, Shu-Bo; Bi, Yu-Ping; Wang, Xing-Jun

    2009-06-01

    The cultivated peanut is a valuable source of dietary oil and ranks fifth among the world oil crops. Plant fatty acid biosynthesis is catalysed by type II fatty acid synthase (FAS) in plastids and mitochondria. By constructing a full-length cDNA library derived from immature peanut seeds and homology-based cloning, candidate genes of acyl carrier protein (ACP), malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase, beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase (I, II, III), beta-ketoacyl-ACP reductase, beta-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydrase and enoyl-ACP reductase were isolated. Sequence alignments revealed that primary structures of type II FAS enzymes were highly conserved in higher plants and the catalytic residues were strictly conserved in Escherichia coli and higher plants. Homologue numbers of each type II FAS gene expressing in developing peanut seeds varied from 1 in KASII, KASIII and HD to 5 in ENR. The number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was quite different in each gene. Peanut type II FAS genes were predicted to target plastids except ACP2 and ACP3. The results suggested that peanut may contain two type II FAS systems in plastids and mitochondria. The type II FAS enzymes in higher plants may have similar functions as those in E. coli.

  16. Canine amino acid transport system Xc(-): cDNA sequence, distribution and cystine transport activity in lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruo, Takuya; Kanemaki, Nobuyuki; Onda, Ken; Sato, Reiichiro; Ichihara, Nobuteru; Ochiai, Hideharu

    2014-04-01

    The cystine transport activity of a lens epithelial cell line originated from a canine mature cataract was investigated. The distinct cystine transport activity was observed, which was inhibited to 28% by extracellular 1 mM glutamate. The cDNA sequences of canine cysteine/glutamate exchanger (xCT) and 4F2hc were determined. The predicted amino acid sequences were 527 and 533 amino acid polypeptides, respectively. The amino acid sequences of canine xCT and 4F2hc showed high similarities (>80%) to those of humans. The expression of xCT in lens epithelial cell line was confirmed by western blot analysis. RT-PCR analysis revealed high level expression only in the brain, and it was below the detectable level in other tissues.

  17. A novel phytase with sequence similarity to purple acid phosphatases is expressed in cotyledons of germinating soybean seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegeman, C E; Grabau, E A

    2001-08-01

    Phytic acid (myo-inositol hexakisphosphate) is the major storage form of phosphorus in plant seeds. During germination, stored reserves are used as a source of nutrients by the plant seedling. Phytic acid is degraded by the activity of phytases to yield inositol and free phosphate. Due to the lack of phytases in the non-ruminant digestive tract, monogastric animals cannot utilize dietary phytic acid and it is excreted into manure. High phytic acid content in manure results in elevated phosphorus levels in soil and water and accompanying environmental concerns. The use of phytases to degrade seed phytic acid has potential for reducing the negative environmental impact of livestock production. A phytase was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from cotyledons of germinated soybeans (Glycine max L. Merr.). Peptide sequence data generated from the purified enzyme facilitated the cloning of the phytase sequence (GmPhy) employing a polymerase chain reaction strategy. The introduction of GmPhy into soybean tissue culture resulted in increased phytase activity in transformed cells, which confirmed the identity of the phytase gene. It is surprising that the soybean phytase was unrelated to previously characterized microbial or maize (Zea mays) phytases, which were classified as histidine acid phosphatases. The soybean phytase sequence exhibited a high degree of similarity to purple acid phosphatases, a class of metallophosphoesterases.

  18. Human Retroviruses and AIDS. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences: I--II; III--V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, G.; Korber, B. [eds.] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wain-Hobson, S. [ed.] [Laboratory of Molecular Retrovirology, Pasteur Inst.; Smith, R.F. [ed.] [Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Pharmacology; Pavlakis, G.N. [ed.] [National Cancer Inst., Frederick, MD (United States). Cancer Research Facility

    1993-12-31

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (I) HIV and SIV Nucleotide Sequences; (II) Amino Acid Sequences; (III) Analyses; (IV) Related Sequences; and (V) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated at least twice in each year, which accounts for the modes of binding and pagination in the compendium.

  19. Evolutionary genomics of plant genes encoding N-terminal-TM-C2 domain proteins and the similar FAM62 genes and synaptotagmin genes of metazoans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craxton Molly

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synaptotagmin genes are found in animal genomes and are known to function in the nervous system. Genes with a similar domain architecture as well as sequence similarity to synaptotagmin C2 domains have also been found in plant genomes. The plant genes share an additional region of sequence similarity with a group of animal genes named FAM62. FAM62 genes also have a similar domain architecture. Little is known about the functions of the plant genes and animal FAM62 genes. Indeed, many members of the large and diverse Syt gene family await functional characterization. Understanding the evolutionary relationships among these genes will help to realize the full implications of functional studies and lead to improved genome annotation. Results I collected and compared plant Syt-like sequences from the primary nucleotide sequence databases at NCBI. The collection comprises six groups of plant genes conserved in embryophytes: NTMC2Type1 to NTMC2Type6. I collected and compared metazoan FAM62 sequences and identified some similar sequences from other eukaryotic lineages. I found evidence of RNA editing and alternative splicing. I compared the intron patterns of Syt genes. I also compared Rabphilin and Doc2 genes. Conclusion Genes encoding proteins with N-terminal-transmembrane-C2 domain architectures resembling synaptotagmins, are widespread in eukaryotes. A collection of these genes is presented here. The collection provides a resource for studies of intron evolution. I have classified the collection into homologous gene families according to distinctive patterns of sequence conservation and intron position. The evolutionary histories of these gene families are traceable through the appearance of family members in different eukaryotic lineages. Assuming an intron-rich eukaryotic ancestor, the conserved intron patterns distinctive of individual gene families, indicate independent origins of Syt, FAM62 and NTMC2 genes. Resemblances

  20. Binding of the N-Terminal Domain of the Lactococcal Bacteriophage TP901-1 CI Repressor to Its Target DNA: A Crystallography, Small Angle Scattering, and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Kristian Erik Høpfner; Rasmussen, Kim K.; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing

    2013-01-01

    In most temperate bacteriophages, regulation of the choice of lysogenic or lytic life cycle is controlled by a CI repressor protein. Inhibition of transcription is dependent on a helix–turn–helix motif, often located in the N-terminal domain (NTD), which binds to specific DNA sequences (operator...... sites). Here the crystal structure of the NTD of the CI repressor from phage TP901-1 has been determined at 1.6 Å resolution, and at 2.6 Å resolution in complex with a 9 bp double-stranded DNA fragment that constitutes a half-site of the OL operator. This N-terminal construct, comprising residues 2...... by NMR in solution with a full palindromic site. The interactions seen in the complexes (in the crystal and in solution) explain the observed affinity for the OR site that is lower than that for the OL site and the specificity for the recognized DNA sequence in comparison to that for other repressors...

  1. Microwave-assisted acid and base hydrolysis of intact proteins containing disulfide bonds for protein sequence analysis by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiz, Bela; Li, Liang

    2010-09-01

    Controlled hydrolysis of proteins to generate peptide ladders combined with mass spectrometric analysis of the resultant peptides can be used for protein sequencing. In this paper, two methods of improving the microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis process are described to enable rapid sequencing of proteins containing disulfide bonds and increase sequence coverage, respectively. It was demonstrated that proteins containing disulfide bonds could be sequenced by MS analysis by first performing hydrolysis for less than 2 min, followed by 1 h of reduction to release the peptides originally linked by disulfide bonds. It was shown that a strong base could be used as a catalyst for microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis, producing complementary sequence information to that generated by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. However, using either acid or base hydrolysis, amide bond breakages in small regions of the polypeptide chains of the model proteins (e.g., cytochrome c and lysozyme) were not detected. Dynamic light scattering measurement of the proteins solubilized in an acid or base indicated that protein-protein interaction or aggregation was not the cause of the failure to hydrolyze certain amide bonds. It was speculated that there were some unknown local structures that might play a role in preventing an acid or base from reacting with the peptide bonds therein.

  2. Homology analyses of the protein sequences of fatty acid synthases from chicken liver, rat mammary gland, and yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Soo-Ik (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA)); Hammes, G.G. (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (USA))

    1989-11-01

    Homology analyses of the protein sequences of chicken liver and rat mammary gland fatty acid synthases were carried out. The amino acid sequences of the chicken and rat enzymes are 67% identical. If conservative substitutions are allowed, 78% of the amino acids are matched. A region of low homologies exists between the functional domains, in particular around amino acid residues 1059-1264 of the chicken enzyme. Homologies between the active sites of chicken and rat and of chicken and yeast enzymes have been analyzed by an alignment method. A high degree of homology exists between the active sites of the chicken and rat enzymes. However, the chicken and yeast enzymes show a lower degree of homology. The DADPH-binding dinucleotide folds of the {beta}-ketoacyl reductase and the enoyl reductase sites were identified by comparison with a known consensus sequence for the DADP- and FAD-binding dinucleotide folds. The active sites of all of the enzymes are primarily in hydrophobic regions of the protein. This study suggests that the genes for the functional domains of fatty acid synthase were originally separated, and these genes were connected to each other by using different connecting nucleotide sequences in different species. An alternative explanation for the differences in rat and chicken is a common ancestry and mutations in the joining regions during evolution.

  3. HIV-1 Vpr N-terminal tagging affects alternative splicing of the viral genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeyens, Ann; Naessens, Evelien; Van Nuffel, Anouk; Weening, Karin E.; Reilly, Anne-Marie; Claeys, Eva; Trypsteen, Wim; Vandekerckhove, Linos; Eyckerman, Sven; Gevaert, Kris; Verhasselt, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    To facilitate studies on Vpr function in replicating HIV-1, we aimed to tag the protein in an infectious virus. First we showed that N-, but not C-terminal HA/FLAG tagging of Vpr protein preserves Vpr cytopathicity. Cloning the tags into proviral DNA however ablated viral production and replication. By construction of additional viral variants we could show this defect was not protein- but RNA-dependent and sequence specific, and characterized by oversplicing of the genomic RNA. Simulation of genomic RNA folding suggested that introduction of the tag sequence induced an alternative folding structure in a region enriched in splice sites and splicing regulatory sequences. In silico predictions identified the HA/His6-Vpr tagging in HIV-1 to affect mRNA folding less than HA/FLAG-Vpr tagging. In vitro infectivity and mRNA splice pattern improved but did not reach wild-type values. Thus, sequence-specific insertions may interfere with mRNA splicing, possibly due to altered RNA folding. Our results point to the complexity of viral RNA genome sequence interactions. This should be taken into consideration when designing viral manipulation strategies, for both research as for biological interventions. PMID:27721439

  4. Efficient production of HIV-1 virus-like particles from a mammalian expression vector requires the N-terminal capsid domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Jalaguier

    Full Text Available It is now well accepted that the structural protein Pr55(Gag is sufficient by itself to produce HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLPs. This polyprotein precursor contains different domains including matrix, capsid, SP1, nucleocapsid, SP2 and p6. In the present study, we wanted to determine by mutagenesis which region(s is essential to the production of VLPs when Pr55(Gag is inserted in a mammalian expression vector, which allows studying the protein of interest in the absence of other viral proteins. To do so, we first studied a minimal Pr55(Gag sequence called Gag min that was used previously. We found that Gag min fails to produce VLPs when expressed in an expression vector instead of within a molecular clone. This failure occurs early in the cell at the assembly of viral proteins. We then generated a series of deletion and substitution mutants, and examined their ability to produce VLPs by combining biochemical and microscopic approaches. We demonstrate that the matrix region is not necessary, but that the efficiency of VLP production depends strongly on the presence of its basic region. Moreover, the presence of the N-terminal domain of capsid is required for VLP production when Gag is expressed alone. These findings, combined with previous observations indicating that HIV-1 Pr55(Gag-derived VLPs act as potent stimulators of innate and acquired immunity, make the use of this strategy worth considering for vaccine development.

  5. Ureaplasma antigenic variation beyond MBA phase variation: DNA inversions generating chimeric structures and switching in expression of the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Carl-Ulrich R; Rosengarten, Renate; Spergser, Joachim

    2011-02-01

    Phase variation of the major ureaplasma surface membrane protein, the multiple-banded antigen (MBA), with its counterpart, the UU376 protein, was recently discussed as a result of DNA inversion occurring at specific inverted repeats. Two similar inverted repeats to the ones within the mba locus were found in the genome of Ureaplasma parvum serovar 3; one within the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172 and another in the adjacent intergenic spacer region. In this report, we demonstrate on both genomic and protein level that DNA inversion at these inverted repeats leads to alternating expression between UU172 and the neighbouring conserved hypothetical ORF UU171. Sequence analysis of this phase-variable 'UU172 element' from both U. parvum and U. urealyticum strains revealed that it is highly conserved among both species and that it also includes the orthologue of UU144. A third inverted repeat region in UU144 is proposed to serve as an additional potential inversion site from which chimeric genes can evolve. Our results indicate that site-specific recombination events in the genome of U. parvum serovar 3 are dynamic and frequent, leading to a broad spectrum of antigenic variation by which the organism may evade host immune responses.

  6. The relationship between N-terminal prosomatostatin, all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (ZODIAC-35)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Peter R.; Landman, Gijs W. D.; van Essen, Larissa; Struck, Joachim; Groenier, Klaas H.; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Kleefstra, Nanne

    2015-01-01

    Background: The hormone somatostatin inhibits growth hormone release from the pituitary gland and is theoretically linked to diabetes and diabetes related complications. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between levels of the stable somatostatin precursor, N-terminal prosomatostatin (

  7. Complete mapping of substrate translocation highlights the role of LeuT N-terminal segment in regulating transport cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mary Hongying; Bahar, Ivet

    2014-10-01

    Neurotransmitter: sodium symporters (NSSs) regulate neuronal signal transmission by clearing excess neurotransmitters from the synapse, assisted by the co-transport of sodium ions. Extensive structural data have been collected in recent years for several members of the NSS family, which opened the way to structure-based studies for a mechanistic understanding of substrate transport. Leucine transporter (LeuT), a bacterial orthologue, has been broadly adopted as a prototype in these studies. This goal has been elusive, however, due to the complex interplay of global and local events as well as missing structural data on LeuT N-terminal segment. We provide here for the first time a comprehensive description of the molecular events leading to substrate/Na+ release to the postsynaptic cell, including the structure and dynamics of the N-terminal segment using a combination of molecular simulations. Substrate and Na+-release follows an influx of water molecules into the substrate/Na+-binding pocket accompanied by concerted rearrangements of transmembrane helices. A redistribution of salt bridges and cation-π interactions at the N-terminal segment prompts substrate release. Significantly, substrate release is followed by the closure of the intracellular gate and a global reconfiguration back to outward-facing state to resume the transport cycle. Two minimally hydrated intermediates, not structurally resolved to date, are identified: one, substrate-bound, stabilized during the passage from outward- to inward-facing state (holo-occluded), and another, substrate-free, along the reverse transition (apo-occluded).

  8. Complete mapping of substrate translocation highlights the role of LeuT N-terminal segment in regulating transport cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Hongying Cheng

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neurotransmitter: sodium symporters (NSSs regulate neuronal signal transmission by clearing excess neurotransmitters from the synapse, assisted by the co-transport of sodium ions. Extensive structural data have been collected in recent years for several members of the NSS family, which opened the way to structure-based studies for a mechanistic understanding of substrate transport. Leucine transporter (LeuT, a bacterial orthologue, has been broadly adopted as a prototype in these studies. This goal has been elusive, however, due to the complex interplay of global and local events as well as missing structural data on LeuT N-terminal segment. We provide here for the first time a comprehensive description of the molecular events leading to substrate/Na+ release to the postsynaptic cell, including the structure and dynamics of the N-terminal segment using a combination of molecular simulations. Substrate and Na+-release follows an influx of water molecules into the substrate/Na+-binding pocket accompanied by concerted rearrangements of transmembrane helices. A redistribution of salt bridges and cation-π interactions at the N-terminal segment prompts substrate release. Significantly, substrate release is followed by the closure of the intracellular gate and a global reconfiguration back to outward-facing state to resume the transport cycle. Two minimally hydrated intermediates, not structurally resolved to date, are identified: one, substrate-bound, stabilized during the passage from outward- to inward-facing state (holo-occluded, and another, substrate-free, along the reverse transition (apo-occluded.

  9. The EBNA-2 N-Terminal Transactivation Domain Folds into a Dimeric Structure Required for Target Gene Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Friberg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a γ-herpesvirus that may cause infectious mononucleosis in young adults. In addition, epidemiological and molecular evidence links EBV to the pathogenesis of lymphoid and epithelial malignancies. EBV has the unique ability to transform resting B cells into permanently proliferating, latently infected lymphoblastoid cell lines. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA-2 is a key regulator of viral and cellular gene expression for this transformation process. The N-terminal region of EBNA-2 comprising residues 1-58 appears to mediate multiple molecular functions including self-association and transactivation. However, it remains to be determined if the N-terminus of EBNA-2 directly provides these functions or if these activities merely depend on the dimerization involving the N-terminal domain. To address this issue, we determined the three-dimensional structure of the EBNA-2 N-terminal dimerization (END domain by heteronuclear NMR-spectroscopy. The END domain monomer comprises a small fold of four β-strands and an α-helix which form a parallel dimer by interaction of two β-strands from each protomer. A structure-guided mutational analysis showed that hydrophobic residues in the dimer interface are required for self-association in vitro. Importantly, these interface mutants also displayed severely impaired self-association and transactivation in vivo. Moreover, mutations of solvent-exposed residues or deletion of the α-helix do not impair dimerization but strongly affect the functional activity, suggesting that the EBNA-2 dimer presents a surface that mediates functionally important intra- and/or intermolecular interactions. Our study shows that the END domain is a novel dimerization fold that is essential for functional activity. Since this specific fold is a unique feature of EBNA-2 it might provide a novel target for anti-viral therapeutics.

  10. Nucleotide sequence and intergeminiviral homologies of the DNA-A of papaya leaf curl geminivirus from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, S; Hallan, V; Singh, B P; Sane, P V

    1998-06-01

    Coat protein gene, rep protein gene and intergenic region of the genome of a whitefly transmitted geminivirus (WTG) causing severe leaf curl in papaya plants were PCR amplified, cloned and sequenced. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of the putative coat protein product of papaya leaf curl virus (PLCV) with some other mono and bipartite WTGs revealed a maximum of 89.8% homology with Indian cassava mosaic virus. The genomic organization of PLCV-India is similar to other WTGs with bipartite genomes. Comparison of the coat protein N-terminal 70 amino acid sequence (and other biological features) of PLCV with other geminiviruses shows that PLCV is a distinct geminivirus from India and is related to WTGs from the old world.

  11. Heart murmur and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide as predictors of death in 2977 consecutive hospitalized patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kasper; Nielsen, O.W.; Kirk, V.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the prognostic importance of murmur in unselected patients. It is difficult to distinguish between innocent and significant murmurs. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) and BNP have recently been shown to be useful in small series of patients......-pro-BNP, discovery of valvular heart disease by echocardiography yielded no additional prognostic information. Conclusions: Detection of a cardiac murmur during routine medical examination of hospitalized patients is associated with increased risk of death within a year. A blood test for NT-pro-BNP gives significant...

  12. Detection of left ventricular enlargement and impaired systolic function with plasma N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønning, Bjørn Aaris; Nilsson, Jens C.; Søndergaard, Lars

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain- and N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) have been identified as promising markers for heart failure. However, previous studies have revealed that they may hold insufficient diagnostic power for implementation into clinical practice because of a significant...... to investigate the diagnostic potential of NT-proBNP with magnetic resonance imaging as the reference method for the cardiac measurements. METHODS: Forty-eight patients with stable symptomatic heart failure in New York Heart Association functional classifications II to IV were examined once with blood samples...

  13. Prognostic usefulness of anemia and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in outpatients with systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Gustafsson, Finn; Kistorp, Caroline N

    2007-01-01

    N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) and anemia are predictors of outcome in systolic heart failure. It is currently unclear how these 2 markers interact in particular with regard to the prognostic information carried by each risk marker. We therefore tested the hypothesis...... that anemia (World Health Organization criteria, hemoglobin levels ... prospectively at the baseline visit to our heart failure clinic (inclusion criterion left ventricular ejection fraction anemia was 27%. In a multivariate logistic regression model, anemia (p = 0...

  14. The chaperonin assisted and unassisted refolding of rhodanese can be modulated by its N-terminal peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, J A; Horowitz, P M

    1994-01-01

    The in vitro refolding of the monomeric, mitochondrial enzyme rhodanese (thiosulfate: cyanide sulfurtransferase, EC 2.8.1.1), which is assisted by the E. coli chaperonins, is modulated by the 23 amino acid peptide (VHQVLYRALVSTKWLAESVRAGK) corresponding to the amino terminal sequence (1-23) of rhodanese. In the absence of the peptide, a maximum recovery of active enzyme of about 65% is achieved after 90 min of initiation of the chaperonin assisted folding reaction. In contrast, this process is substantially inhibited in the presence of the peptide. The maximum recovery of active enzyme is peptide concentration-dependent. The peptide, however, does not prevent the interaction of rhodanese with the chaperonin 60 (cpn60), which leads to the formation of the cpn60-rhodanese complex. In addition, the peptide does not affect the rate of recovery of active enzyme, although it does affect the extent of recovery. Further, the unassisted refolding of rhodanese is also inhibited by the peptide. Thus, the peptide interferes with the folding of rhodanese in either the chaperonin assisted or the unassisted refolding of the enzyme. A 13 amino acid peptide (STKWLAESVRAGK) corresponding to the amino terminal sequence (11-23) of rhodanese does not show any significant effect on the chaperonin assisted or unassisted refolding of the enzyme. The results suggest that other sequences of rhodanese, in addition to the N-terminus, may be required for the binding of cpn60, in accord with a model in which cpn60 interacts with polypeptides through multiple binding sites.

  15. Site-specific N-terminal labeling of proteins using sortase-mediated reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theile, Christopher S.; Witte, Martin D.; Blom, Annet E. M.; Kundrat, Lenka; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Guimaraes, Carla P.

    2013-01-01

    This protocol describes the use of sortase-mediated reactions to label the N terminus of any given protein of interest. The sortase recognition sequence, LPXTG (for Streptococcus aureus sortase A) or LPXTA (for Staphylococcus pyogenes sortase A), can be appended to a variety of probes such as fluoro

  16. Crystal Structure of the Nephila clavipes Major Ampullate Spidroin 1A N-terminal Domain Reveals Plasticity at the Dimer Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkison, James H; Parnham, Stuart; Marcotte, William R; Olsen, Shaun K

    2016-09-02

    Spider dragline silk is a natural polymer harboring unique physical and biochemical properties that make it an ideal biomaterial. Artificial silk production requires an understanding of the in vivo mechanisms spiders use to convert soluble proteins, called spidroins, into insoluble fibers. Controlled dimerization of the spidroin N-terminal domain (NTD) is crucial to this process. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Nephila clavipes major ampullate spidroin NTD dimer. Comparison of our N. clavipes NTD structure with previously determined Euprosthenops australis NTD structures reveals subtle conformational alterations that lead to differences in how the subunits are arranged at the dimer interface. We observe a subset of contacts that are specific to each ortholog, as well as a substantial increase in asymmetry in the interactions observed at the N. clavipes NTD dimer interface. These asymmetric interactions include novel intermolecular salt bridges that provide new insights into the mechanism of NTD dimerization. We also observe a unique intramolecular "handshake" interaction between two conserved acidic residues that our data suggest adds an additional layer of complexity to the pH-sensitive relay mechanism for NTD dimerization. The results of a panel of tryptophan fluorescence dimerization assays probing the importance of these interactions support our structural observations. Based on our findings, we propose that conformational selectivity and plasticity at the NTD dimer interface play a role in the pH-dependent transition of the NTD from monomer to stably associated dimer as the spidroin progresses through the silk extrusion duct.

  17. Inhibition of Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells by Androgens Is Mediated through Downregulation of c-Jun N-terminal Kinase Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Isabel Lorenzo

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation induces the regression of prostate tumors mainly due to an increase in the apoptosis rate; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying the antiapoptotic actions of androgens are not completely understood. We have studied the antiapoptotic effects of androgens in prostate cancer cells exposed to different proapoptotic stimuli. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling and nuclear fragmentation analyses demonstrated that androgens protect LNCaP prostate cancer cells from apoptosis induced by thapsigargin, the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-phorbol-acetate, or UV irradiation. These three stimuli require the activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK pathway to induce apoptosis and in all three cases, androgen treatment blocks JNK activation. Interestingly, okadaic acid, a phosphatase inhibitor that causes apoptosis in LNCaP cells, induces JNK activation that is also inhibited by androgens. Actinomycin D, the antiandrogen bicalutamide or specific androgen receptor (AR knockdown by small interfering RNA all blocked the inhibition of JNK activation mediated by androgens indicating that this activity requires AR-dependent transcriptional activation. These data suggest that the crosstalk between AR and JNK pathways may have important implications in prostate cancer progression and may provide targets for the development of new therapies.

  18. Electrostatics analysis of the mutational and pH effects of the N-terminal domain self-association of the major ampullate spidroin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso da Silva, Fernando Luís; Pasquali, Samuela; Derreumaux, Philippe; Dias, Luis Gustavo

    2016-07-07

    Spider silk is a fascinating material combining mechanical properties such as maximum strength and high toughness comparable or better than man-made materials, with biocompatible degradability characteristics. Experimental measurements have shown that pH triggers the dimer formation of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of the major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp 1). A coarse-grained model accounting for electrostatics, van der Waals and pH-dependent charge-fluctuation interactions, by means of Monte Carlo simulations, gave us a more comprehensive view of the NTD dimerization process. A detailed analysis of the electrostatic properties and free energy derivatives for the NTD homoassociation was carried out at different pH values and salt concentrations for the protein wild type and for several mutants. We observed an enhancement of dipole-dipole interactions at pH 6 due to the ionization of key amino acids, a process identified as the main driving force for dimerization. Analytical estimates based on the DVLO theory framework corroborate our findings. Molecular dynamics simulations using the OPEP coarse-grained force field for proteins show that the mutant E17Q is subject to larger structural fluctuations when compared to the wild type. Estimates of the association rate constants for this mutant were evaluated by the Debye-Smoluchowski theory and are in agreement with the experimental data when thermally relaxed structures are used instead of the crystallographic data. Our results can contribute to the design of new mutants with specific association properties.

  19. Insights into the Function of the Unstructured N-Terminal Domain of Proteins 4.1R and 4.1G in Erythropoiesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Nunomura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane skeletal protein 4.1R is the prototypical member of a family of four highly paralogous proteins that include 4.1G, 4.1N, and 4.1B. Two isoforms of 4.1R (4.1R135 and 4.1R80, as well as 4.1G, are expressed in erythroblasts during terminal differentiation, but only 4.1R80 is present in mature erythrocytes. One goal in the field is to better understand the complex regulation of cell type and isoform-specific expression of 4.1 proteins. To start answering these questions, we are studying in depth the important functions of 4.1 proteins in the organization and function of the membrane skeleton in erythrocytes. We have previously reported that the binding profiles of 4.1R80 and 4.1R135 to membrane proteins and calmodulin are very different despite the similar structure of the membrane-binding domain of 4.1G and 4.1R135. We have accumulated evidence for those differences being caused by the N-terminal 209 amino acids headpiece region (HP. Interestingly, the HP region is an unstructured domain. Here we present an overview of the differences and similarities between 4.1 isoforms and paralogs. We also discuss the biological significance of unstructured domains.

  20. Molecular insight into the role of the N-terminal extension in the maturation, substrate recognition, and catalysis of a bacterial alginate lyase from polysaccharide lyase family 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Sheng; Wei, Tian-Di; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Li, Chun-Yang; Wang, Peng; Xie, Bin-Bin; Qin, Qi-Long; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Pang, Xiu-Hua; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2014-10-24

    Bacterial alginate lyases, which are members of several polysaccharide lyase (PL) families, have important biological roles and biotechnological applications. The mechanisms for maturation, substrate recognition, and catalysis of PL18 alginate lyases are still largely unknown. A PL18 alginate lyase, aly-SJ02, from Pseudoalteromonas sp. 0524 displays a β-jelly roll scaffold. Structural and biochemical analyses indicated that the N-terminal extension in the aly-SJ02 precursor may act as an intramolecular chaperone to mediate the correct folding of the catalytic domain. Molecular dynamics simulations and mutational assays suggested that the lid loops over the aly-SJ02 active center serve as a gate for substrate entry. Molecular docking and site-directed mutations revealed that certain conserved residues at the active center, especially those at subsites +1 and +2, are crucial for substrate recognition. Tyr(353) may function as both a catalytic base and acid. Based on our results, a model for the catalysis of aly-SJ02 in alginate depolymerization is proposed. Moreover, although bacterial alginate lyases from families PL5, 7, 15, and 18 adopt distinct scaffolds, they share the same conformation of catalytic residues, reflecting their convergent evolution. Our results provide the foremost insight into the mechanisms of maturation, substrate recognition, and catalysis of a PL18 alginate lyase.

  1. Structural and functional insights into the role of the N-terminal Mps1 TPR domain in the SAC (spindle assembly checkpoint).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thebault, Philippe; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y; Dou, Zhen; Blundell, Tom L; Elowe, Sabine; Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M

    2012-12-15

    The SAC (spindle assembly checkpoint) is a surveillance system that ensures the timely and accurate transmission of the genetic material to offspring. The process implies kinetochore targeting of the mitotic kinases Bub1 (budding uninhibited by benzamidine 1), BubR1 (Bub1 related) and Mps1 (monopolar spindle 1), which is mediated by the N-terminus of each kinase. In the present study we report the 1.8 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) crystal structure of the TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) domain in the N-terminal region of human Mps1. The structure reveals an overall high similarity to the TPR motif of the mitotic checkpoint kinases Bub1 and BubR1, and a number of unique features that include the absence of the binding site for the kinetochore structural component KNL1 (kinetochore-null 1; blinkin), and determinants of dimerization. Moreover, we show that a stretch of amino acids at the very N-terminus of Mps1 is required for dimer formation, and that interfering with dimerization results in mislocalization and misregulation of kinase activity. The results of the present study provide an important insight into the molecular details of the mitotic functions of Mps1 including features that dictate substrate selectivity and kinetochore docking.

  2. Identification of tropomyosins as major allergens in antarctic krill and mantis shrimp and their amino acid sequence characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyama, Kanna; Suma, Yota; Ishizaki, Shoichiro; Nagashima, Yuji; Lu, Ying; Ushio, Hideki; Shiomi, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    Tropomyosin represents a major allergen of decapod crustaceans such as shrimps and crabs, and its highly conserved amino acid sequence (>90% identity) is a molecular basis of the immunoglobulin E (IgE) cross-reactivity among decapods. At present, however, little information is available about allergens in edible crustaceans other than decapods. In this study, the major allergen in two species of edible crustaceans, Antarctic krill Euphausia superba and mantis shrimp Oratosquilla oratoria that are taxonomically distinct from decapods, was demonstrated to be tropomyosin by IgE-immunoblotting using patient sera. The cross-reactivity of the tropomyosins from both species with decapod tropomyosins was also confirmed by inhibition IgE immunoblotting. Sequences of the tropomyosins from both species were determined by complementary deoxyribonucleic acid cloning. The mantis shrimp tropomyosin has high sequence identity (>90% identity) with decapod tropomyosins, especially with fast-type tropomyosins. On the other hand, the Antarctic krill tropomyosin is characterized by diverse alterations in region 13-42, the amino acid sequence of which is highly conserved for decapod tropomyosins, and hence, it shares somewhat lower sequence identity (82.4-89.8% identity) with decapod tropomyosins than the mantis shrimp tropomyosin. Quantification by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that Antarctic krill contains tropomyosin at almost the same level as decapods, suggesting that its allergenicity is equivalent to decapods. However, mantis shrimp was assumed to be substantially not allergenic because of the extremely low content of tropomyosin.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CFL1, a Lactic Acid Bacterium Isolated from French Handcrafted Fermented Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghel, Julie; Dugat-Bony, Eric; Irlinger, Françoise; Loux, Valentin; Vidal, Marie; Passot, Stéphanie; Béal, Catherine; Layec, Séverine; Fonseca, Fernanda

    2016-03-03

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) is a lactic acid bacterium widely used for the production of yogurt and cheeses. Here, we report the genome sequence of L. bulgaricus CFL1 to improve our knowledge on its stress-induced damages following production and end-use processes.

  4. Genome Sequence of a Candidate World Health Organization Reference Strain of Zika Virus for Nucleic Acid Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trösemeier, Jan-Hendrik; Musso, Didier; Blümel, Johannes; Thézé, Julien; Pybus, Oliver G.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the sequence of a candidate reference strain of Zika virus (ZIKV) developed on behalf of the World Health Organization (WHO). The ZIKV reference strain is intended for use in nucleic acid amplification (NAT)-based assays for the detection and quantification of ZIKV RNA. PMID:27587826

  5. An N-terminal region of Lassa virus L protein plays a critical role in transcription but not replication of the virus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelke, Michaela; Brunotte, Linda; Busch, Carola; Günther, Stephan

    2010-02-01

    The central domain of the 200-kDa Lassa virus L protein is a putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. N- and C-terminal domains may harbor enzymatic functions important for viral mRNA synthesis, including capping enzymes or cap-snatching endoribonucleases. In the present study, we have employed a large-scale mutagenesis approach to map functionally relevant residues in these regions. The main targets were acidic (Asp and Glu) and basic residues (Lys and Arg) known to form catalytic and binding sites of capping enzymes and endoribonucleases. A total of 149 different mutants were generated and tested in the Lassa virus replicon system. Nearly 25% of evolutionarily highly conserved acidic and basic side chains were dispensable for function of L protein in the replicon context. The vast majority of the remaining mutants had defects in both transcription and replication. Seven residues (Asp-89, Glu-102, Asp-119, Lys-122, Asp-129, Glu-180, and Arg-185) were selectively important for mRNA synthesis. The phenotype was particularly pronounced for Asp-89, Glu-102, and Asp-129, which were indispensable for transcription but could be replaced by a variety of amino acid residues without affecting genome replication. Bioinformatics disclosed the remote similarity of this region to type IIs endonucleases. The mutagenesis was complemented by experiments with the RNA polymerase II inhibitor alpha-amanitin, demonstrating dependence of viral transcription from the cellular mRNA pool. In conclusion, this paper describes an N-terminal region in L protein being important for mRNA, but not genome synthesis. Bioinformatics and cell biological experiments lend support to the hypothesis that this region could be part of a cap-snatching enzyme.

  6. Structural flexibility of Aib-containing peptides: the N-terminal tripeptide of trichotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, R; Brueckner, H; Kokkinidis, M

    1991-01-31

    The sequence Aib-Gly-Aib which corresponds to the N-terminus of the microheterogeneous peptide antibiotic trichotoxin has been studied crystallographically in the context of different protecting groups. Peptides Ac-Aib-Gly-Aib-OH (A) and Z-Aib-Gly-Aib-OH (B) form beta-turns. Both peptides show a remarkable conformational flexibility forming a large variety of beta-turns of different types.

  7. Extraction of Sequence Conservation Features for the Prioritization of Candidate Single Amino Acid Polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxin Wu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Although remarkable success has been achieved by genome-wide association (GWA studies over the past few years, genetic variants discovered in GWA studies can typically account for only a small fraction of heritability of most common diseases. As such, the identification of multiple rare variants that are associated with complex diseases has been receiving more and more attentions. However, most of the recently developed statistical approaches for detecting association of rare variants with diseases require the selection of functional variants before the successive analysis, making an effective bioinformatics method for filtering out non-relevant rare variants indispensible. In this paper, we focus on a specific type of genetic variants called single amino acid polymorphisms (SAAPs. We propose to prioritize candidate SAAPs for a specific disease according to their association scores that are calculated using a guilt-by-association model with a set of features derived from protein sequences. We validate the proposed approach in a systematic way and demonstrate that the proposed model is powerful in distinguishing disease-associated SAAPs for the specific disease of interest.

  8. Solution structure and membrane-binding property of the N-terminal tail domain of human annexin I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, M K; Park, S H; Won, H S; Na, D S; Lee, B J

    2000-11-10

    The conformational preferences of AnxI(N26), a peptide corresponding to residues 2-26 of human annexin I, were investigated using CD and NMR spectroscopy. CD results showed that AnxI(N26) adopts a mainly alpha-helical conformation in membrane-mimetic environments, TFE/water and SDS micelles, while a predominantly random structure with slight helical propensity in aqueous buffer. The helical region of AnxI(N26) showed a nearly identical conformation between in TFE/water and in SDS micelles, except for the orientation of the Trp-12 side-chain, which was quite different between the two. The N-terminal region of the AnxI(N26) helix showed a typical amphipathic nature, which could be stabilized by the neighboring hydrophobic cluster. The helical stability of the peptide in SDS micelles was increased by addition of calcium ions. These results suggest that the N-terminal tail domain of human annexin I interacts with biological membranes in a partially calcium-dependent manner.

  9. Opposing Functions of the N-terminal Acetyltransferases Naa50 and NatA in Sister-chromatid Cohesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Ziye; Ouyang, Zhuqing; Magin, Robert S; Marmorstein, Ronen; Yu, Hongtao

    2016-09-02

    During the cell cycle, sister-chromatid cohesion tethers sister chromatids together from S phase to the metaphase-anaphase transition and ensures accurate segregation of chromatids into daughter cells. N-terminal acetylation is one of the most prevalent protein covalent modifications in eukaryotes and is mediated by a family of N-terminal acetyltransferases (NAT). Naa50 (also called San) has previously been shown to play a role in sister-chromatid cohesion in metazoans. The mechanism by which Naa50 contributes to cohesion is not understood however. Here, we show that depletion of Naa50 in HeLa cells weakens the interaction between cohesin and its positive regulator sororin and causes cohesion defects in S phase, consistent with a role of Naa50 in cohesion establishment. Strikingly, co-depletion of NatA, a heterodimeric NAT complex that physically interacts with Naa50, rescues the sister-chromatid cohesion defects and the resulting mitotic arrest caused by Naa50 depletion, indicating that NatA and Naa50 play antagonistic roles in cohesion. Purified recombinant NatA and Naa50 do not affect each other's NAT activity in vitro Because NatA and Naa50 exhibit distinct substrate specificity, we propose that they modify different effectors and regulate sister-chromatid cohesion in opposing ways.

  10. Sequential pH-driven dimerization and stabilization of the N-terminal domain enables rapid spider silk formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronqvist, Nina; Otikovs, Martins; Chmyrov, Volodymyr; Chen, Gefei; Andersson, Marlene; Nordling, Kerstin; Landreh, Michael; Sarr, Médoune; Jörnvall, Hans; Wennmalm, Stefan; Widengren, Jerker; Meng, Qing; Rising, Anna; Otzen, Daniel; Knight, Stefan D; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Johansson, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling the conversion of spider silk proteins into insoluble fibres, which happens in a fraction of a second and in a defined region of the silk glands, are still unresolved. The N-terminal domain changes conformation and forms a homodimer when pH is lowered from 7 to 6; however, the molecular details still remain to be determined. Here we investigate site-directed mutants of the N-terminal domain from Euprosthenops australis major ampullate spidroin 1 and find that the charged residues D40, R60 and K65 mediate intersubunit electrostatic interactions. Protonation of E79 and E119 is required for structural conversions of the subunits into a dimer conformation, and subsequent protonation of E84 around pH 5.7 leads to the formation of a fully stable dimer. These residues are highly conserved, indicating that the now proposed three-step mechanism prevents premature aggregation of spidroins and enables fast formation of spider silk fibres in general.

  11. Structural evidence for variable oligomerization of the N-terminal domain of cyclase-associated protein (CAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Adlina Mohd; Hu, Nien-Jen; Wlodawer, Alexander; Hofmann, Andreas

    2005-02-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a highly conserved and widely distributed protein that links the nutritional response signaling to cytoskeleton remodeling. In yeast, CAP is a component of the adenylyl cyclase complex and helps to activate the Ras-mediated catalytic cycle of the cyclase. While the N-terminal domain of CAP (N-CAP) provides a binding site for adenylyl cyclase, the C-terminal domain (C-CAP) possesses actin binding activity. Our attempts to crystallize full-length recombinant CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum resulted in growth of orthorhombic crystals containing only the N-terminal domain (residues 42-227) due to auto-proteolytic cleavage. The structure was solved by molecular replacement with data at 2.2 A resolution. The present crystal structure allows the characterization of a head-to-tail N-CAP dimer in the asymmetric unit and a crystallographic side-to-side dimer. Comparison with previously published structures of N-CAP reveals variable modes of dimerization of this domain, but the presence of a common interface for the side-to-side dimer.

  12. N-terminal mono-PEGylation of growth hormone antagonist: correlation of PEG size and pharmacodynamic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling; Ho, Sa V; Wang, Wei; Gao, Jianping; Zhang, Guifeng; Su, Zhiguo; Hu, Tao

    2013-09-10

    Growth hormone antagonist (GHA), an analog of growth hormone (GH), can inhibit GH action and treat acromegaly. However, GHA suffers from a short plasma half-life of 15-20 min that has limited its clinical application. PEGylation, conjugation with polyethylene glycol (PEG), can increase the plasma half-life of GHA. Single PEG attachment (mono-PEGylation) at N-terminus of GHA has the advantages of product homogeneity and minimization of the bioactivity loss. Conjugation of large PEG molecule may increase the plasma half-life but could potentially decrease the bioactivity of GHA, due to the steric shielding effect of PEG. Thus, N-terminal mono-PEGylation of GHA with 20 kDa and 40 kDa PEG were used to look for a balance of the two competing factors. Sedimentation velocity analysis suggested that 40 kDa PEG was more efficient than 20 kDa PEG to elongate the molecular shape of the conjugate. As reflected by marginal suppression of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), GHA conjugated with 40 kDa PEG was statistically indistinguishable from the saline solution that could not inhibit GH action. In contrast, GHA conjugated with 20kDa PEG can apparently inhibit GH action, as reflected by IGF-I suppression of 30-43%. Thus, our work demonstrated the effective therapeutic potency of N-terminally mono-PEGylated GHA.

  13. Calpain-Mediated Processing of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin Generates a Cytosolic Soluble Catalytically Active N-Terminal Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kepa B Uribe

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis, the whooping cough pathogen, secretes several virulence factors among which adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT is essential for establishment of the disease in the respiratory tract. ACT weakens host defenses by suppressing important bactericidal activities of the phagocytic cells. Up to now, it was believed that cell intoxication by ACT was a consequence of the accumulation of abnormally high levels of cAMP, generated exclusively beneath the host plasma membrane by the toxin N-terminal catalytic adenylate cyclase (AC domain, upon its direct translocation across the lipid bilayer. Here we show that host calpain, a calcium-dependent Cys-protease, is activated into the phagocytes by a toxin-triggered calcium rise, resulting in the proteolytic cleavage of the toxin N-terminal domain that releases a catalytically active "soluble AC". The calpain-mediated ACT processing allows trafficking of the "soluble AC" domain into subcellular organella. At least two strategic advantages arise from this singular toxin cleavage, enhancing the specificity of action, and simultaneously preventing an indiscriminate activation of cAMP effectors throughout the cell. The present study provides novel insights into the toxin mechanism of action, as the calpain-mediated toxin processing would confer ACT the capacity for a space- and time-coordinated production of different cAMP "pools", which would play different roles in the cell pathophysiology.

  14. Enhancing the antimicrobial activity of Sus scrofa lysozyme by N-terminal fusion of a sextuple unique homologous peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dewei; Cai, Guolin; Li, Xiaomin; Lu, Jian; Zhang, Liang

    2017-02-10

    Sus scrofa lysozyme (SSL), an important component of the pig immune system, is a potential candidate to replace antibiotics in feed. However, there is little antimicrobial activity of natural SSL against gram-negative bacteria, which limits its application. In this study, a unique peptide (A-W-V-A-W-K) with antimicrobial activity against gram-negative bacteria was discovered and purified from trypsin hydrolysate of natural SSL. This unique peptide was fused to natural SSL and the recombinant fused SSL exhibited improved activity against gram-negative bacteria. The N-terminal fusion likely increased the membrane penetrability and induced programmed bacterial cell death. The recombinant fused SSL also showed higher activity against some gram-positive bacteria with O-acetylation. By N-terminal fusion of the sextuple peptide, the anti-microbial activity, either to gram-positive or negative bacteria, of the recombinant SSL was higher than the fusion of only one copy of the peptide. This study provides a general, feasible, and highly useful strategy to enhance the antimicrobial activity of lysozyme.

  15. Ubiquitin proteasome-dependent degradation of the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1{alpha} via the N-terminal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trausch-Azar, Julie; Leone, Teresa C; Kelly, Daniel P; Schwartz, Alan L

    2010-12-17

    PGC-1α is a potent, inducible transcriptional coactivator that exerts control on mitochondrial biogenesis and multiple cellular energy metabolic pathways. PGC-1α levels are controlled in a highly dynamic manner reflecting regulation at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Here, we demonstrate that PGC-1α is rapidly degraded in the nucleus (t(½ 0.3 h) via the ubiquitin proteasome system. An N-terminal deletion mutant of 182 residues, PGC182, as well as a lysine-less mutant form, are nuclear and rapidly degraded (t(½) 0.5 h), consistent with degradation via the N terminus-dependent ubiquitin subpathway. Both PGC-1α and PGC182 degradation rates are increased in cells under low serum conditions. However, a naturally occurring N-terminal splice variant of 270 residues, NT-PGC-1α is cytoplasmic and stable (t(½>7 h), providing additional evidence that PGC-1α is degraded in the nucleus. These results strongly suggest that the nuclear N terminus-dependent ubiquitin proteasome pathway governs PGC-1α cellular degradation. In contrast, the cellular localization of NT-PCG-1α results in a longer-half-life and possible distinct temporal and potentially biological actions.

  16. The N-terminal pro region mediates retention of unprocessed type-I PME in the Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Sebastian; Rausch, Thomas; Greiner, Steffen

    2009-05-01

    The pectin matrix of the cell wall, a complex and dynamic network, impacts on cell growth, cell shape and signaling processes. A hallmark of pectin structure is the methylesterification status of its major component, homogalacturonan (HGA), which affects the biophysical properties and enzymatic turnover of pectin. The pectin methylesterases (PMEs), responsible for de-esterification, encompass a protein family of more than 60 isoforms in the Arabidopsis genome. The pivotal role of PME in the regulation of pectin properties also requires tight control at the post-translational level. Type-I PMEs are characterized by an N-terminal pro region, which exhibits homology with pectin methylesterase inhibitors (PMEIs). Here, we demonstrate that the proteolytic removal of the N-terminal pro region depends on conserved basic tetrad motifs, occurs in the early secretory pathway, and is required for the subsequent export of the PME core domain to the cell wall. In addition, we demonstrate the involvement of AtS1P, a subtilisin-like protease, in Arabidopsis PME processing. Our results indicate that the pro region operates as an effective retention mechanism, keeping unprocessed PME in the Golgi apparatus. Consequently, pro-protein processing could constitute a post-translational mechanism regulating PME activity.

  17. N-terminal tetrapeptide T/SPLH motifs contribute to multimodal activation of human TRPA1 channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynkova, Anna; Marsakova, Lenka; Vaskova, Jana; Vlachova, Viktorie

    2016-06-01

    Human transient receptor potential ankyrin channel 1 (TRPA1) is a polymodal sensor implicated in pain, inflammation and itching. An important locus for TRPA1 regulation is the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain, through which various exogenous electrophilic compounds such as allyl-isothiocyanate from mustard oil or cinnamaldehyde from cinnamon activate primary afferent nociceptors. This major region is comprised of a tandem set of 17 ankyrin repeats (AR1-AR17), five of them contain a strictly conserved T/SPLH tetrapeptide motif, a hallmark of an important and evolutionarily conserved contribution to conformational stability. Here, we characterize the functional consequences of putatively stabilizing and destabilizing mutations in these important structural units and identify AR2, AR6, and AR11-13 to be distinctly involved in the allosteric activation of TRPA1 by chemical irritants, cytoplasmic calcium, and membrane voltage. Considering the potential involvement of the T/SP motifs as putative phosphorylation sites, we also show that proline-directed Ser/Thr kinase CDK5 modulates the activity of TRPA1, and that T673 outside the AR-domain is its only possible target. Our data suggest that the most strictly conserved N-terminal ARs define the energetics of the TRPA1 channel gate and contribute to chemical-, calcium- and voltage-dependence.

  18. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of a coat protein of an Ukrainian isolate of Potato virus Y: comparison with homologous sequences of other isolates and phylogenetic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budzanivska I. G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Identification of the widespread Ukrainian isolate(s of PVY (Potato virus Y in different potato cultivars and subsequent phylogenetic analysis of detected PVY isolates based on NA and AA sequences of coat protein. Methods. ELISA, RT-PCR, DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Results. PVY has been identified serologically in potato cultivars of Ukrainian selection. In this work we have optimized a method for total RNA extraction from potato samples and offered a sensitive and specific PCR-based test system of own design for diagnostics of the Ukrainian PVY isolates. Part of the CP gene of the Ukrainian PVY isolate has been sequenced and analyzed phylogenetically. It is demonstrated that the Ukrainian isolate of Potato virus Y (CP gene has a higher percentage of homology with the recombinant isolates (strains of this pathogen (approx. 98.8– 99.8 % of homology for both nucleotide and translated amino acid sequences of the CP gene. The Ukrainian isolate of PVY is positioned in the separate cluster together with the isolates found in Syria, Japan and Iran; these isolates possibly have common origin. The Ukrainian PVY isolate is confirmed to be recombinant. Conclusions. This work underlines the need and provides the means for accurate monitoring of Potato virus Y in the agroecosystems of Ukraine. Most importantly, the phylogenetic analysis demonstrated the recombinant nature of this PVY isolate which has been attributed to the strain group O, subclade N:O.

  19. EST sequences and their annotation (amino acid sequence and results of homology search) - Dicty_cDB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available and VS) derived from five developmental stages. Clone ID ID of cDNA clone Atlas ID ID of Atlas database ( ht...tp://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/~tools/bin/ISH/index.html ) and link to Atlas database NBRP ID ID of cDNA c...ir annotations (amino acid sequence, homology search results (with target DBs: dicty EST-DB, DNA-DB and prot...ein-DB)). Links to the Atlas database ( http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/~tools/bin/ISH/index.html ), whic

  20. Differentiation of acetic acid bacteria based on sequence analysis of 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Angel; Mas, Albert

    2011-06-30

    The 16S-23S gene internal transcribed spacer sequence of sixty-four strains belonging to different acetic acid bacteria genera were analyzed, and phylogenetic trees were generated for each genera. The topologies of the different trees were in accordance with the 16S rRNA gene trees, although the similarity percentages obtained between the species was shown to be much lower. These values suggest the usefulness of including the 16S-23S gene internal transcribed spacer region as a part of the polyphasic approach required for the further classification of acetic acid bacteria. Furthermore, the region could be a good target for primer and probe design. It has also been validated for use in the identification of unknown samples of this bacterial group from wine vinegar and fruit condiments.

  1. Identification and analysis of the acetylated status of poplar proteins reveals analogous N-terminal protein processing mechanisms with other eukaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Cai Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The N-terminal protein processing mechanism (NPM including N-terminal Met excision (NME and N-terminal acetylation (N(α-acetylation represents a common protein co-translational process of some eukaryotes. However, this NPM occurred in woody plants yet remains unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To reveal the NPM in poplar, we investigated the N(α-acetylation status of poplar proteins during dormancy by combining tandem mass spectrometry with TiO2 enrichment of acetylated peptides. We identified 58 N-terminally acetylated (N(α-acetylated proteins. Most proteins (47, >81% are subjected to N(α-acetylation following the N-terminal removal of Met, indicating that N(α-acetylation and NME represent a common NPM of poplar proteins. Furthermore, we confirm that poplar shares the analogous NME and N(α-acetylation (NPM to other eukaryotes according to analysis of N-terminal features of these acetylated proteins combined with genome-wide identification of the involving methionine aminopeptidases (MAPs and N-terminal acetyltransferase (Nat enzymes in poplar. The N(α-acetylated reactions and the involving enzymes of these poplar proteins are also identified based on those of yeast and human, as well as the subcellular location information of these poplar proteins. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study represents the first extensive investigation of N(α-acetylation events in woody plants, the results of which will provide useful resources for future unraveling the regulatory mechanisms of N(α-acetylation of proteins in poplar.

  2. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of the nucleic acid sequences encoding the cerebrovascular and plaque amyloid peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robakis, N.K.; Ramakrishna, N.; Wolfe, G.; Wisniewski, H.M.

    1987-05-01

    Amyloid deposits in vessels and neuritic plaques are found in large numbers in the brains of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and adult Downs Syndrome (DS) patients. The partial amino acid sequence of the amyloid peptide has been determined. They used this amino acid sequence to synthesize an oligonucleotide probe specific for the amyloid peptide gene. Screening of a human brain cDNA library with this probe, yielded a clone which contained an insert 1.8 kb. This clone contains a long open reading frame including a region which encodes the 28 amino acids of the amyloid peptide. Northern blots of human brain mRNA detected a transcript of 3.3 kb long which hybridized to their cDNA clone. A similar mRNA was detected in the hamster, mouse, sheep and rabbit brains. Southern blots under stringent hybridization conditions detected sequences homologous to the amyloid gene in the genomes of hamster, mouse, sheep and rabbit suggesting that this gene has been conserved during mammalian evolution. Hybridization under reduced stringency revealed the presence of additional sequences related to the amyloid gene in the genome of the above organisms. Hybridization analysis of human x chinese hamster cell lines DNA showed that the gene encoding the amyloid peptide is located on chromosome 21, suggesting a genetic relationship between AD and DS.

  3. Gene structure and amino acid sequence of Latimeria chalumnae (coelacanth) myelin DM20: phylogenetic relation of the fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohyama, Y; Kasama-Yoshida, H; Sakuma, M; Kobayashi, Y; Cao, Y; Hasegawa, M; Kojima, H; Tamai, Y; Tanokura, M; Kurihara, T

    1999-07-01

    The structure of Latimeria chalumnae (coelacanth) proteolipid protein/DM20 gene excluding exon 1 was determined, and the amino acid sequence of Latimeria DM20 corresponding to exons 2-7 was deduced. The nucleotide sequence of exon 3 suggests that only DM20 isoform is expressed in Latimeria. The structure of proteolipid protein/DM20 gene is well preserved among human, dog, mouse, and Latimeria. Southern blot analysis indicates that Latimeria DM20 gene is a single-copy gene. When the amino acid sequences of DM20 were compared among various species, Latimeria was more similar to tetrapods than other fishes including lungfish, confirming the previous finding by immunoreactivity (Waehneldt and Malotka 1989 J. Neurochem. 52:1941-1943). However, when phylogenetic trees were constructed from the DM20 sequences, lungfish was clearly the closest to tetrapods. Latimeria was situated outside of lungfish by the maximum likelihood method. The apparent similarity of Latimeria DM20 to tetrapod proteolipid protein/DM20 is explained by the slow amino acid substitution rate of Latimeria DM20.

  4. Asymmetric synthesis of vinylogous β-amino acids and their incorporation into mixed backbone oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; An, Hongchan; Mo, Shuting Cynthia; Kodadek, Thomas

    2017-03-27

    Chiral vinylogous β-amino acids (VBAA) were synthesized using enantioselective Mannich reactions of aldehydes with in situ generated N-carbamoyl imines followed by a Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons reaction. The efficiency with which these units could be incorporated into oligomers with different moieties on the C- and N-terminal sides was established, as was the feasibility of sequencing oligomers containing VBAAs by tandem mass spectrometry. The data show that VBAAs will be useful building blocks for the construction of combinatorial libraries of peptidomimetic compounds.

  5. Crystal Structure of Full-length Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv Glycogen Branching Enzyme; Insights of N-Terminal [beta]-Sandwich in Sustrate Specifity and Enzymatic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Kuntal; Kumar, Shiva; Sharma, Shikha; Garg, Saurabh Kumar; Alam, Mohammad Suhail; Xu, H. Eric; Agrawal, Pushpa; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam (NU Sinapore); (Van Andel); (IMT-India)

    2010-07-13

    The open reading frame Rv1326c of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) H37Rv encodes for an {alpha}-1,4-glucan branching enzyme (MtbGlgB, EC 2.4.1.18, Uniprot entry Q10625). This enzyme belongs to glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 13 and catalyzes the branching of a linear glucose chain during glycogenesis by cleaving a 1 {yields} 4 bond and making a new 1 {yields} 6 bond. Here, we show the crystal structure of full-length MtbGlgB (MtbGlgBWT) at 2.33-{angstrom} resolution. MtbGlgBWT contains four domains: N1 {beta}-sandwich, N2 {beta}-sandwich, a central ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} domain that houses the catalytic site, and a C-terminal {beta}-sandwich. We have assayed the amylase activity with amylose and starch as substrates and the glycogen branching activity using amylose as a substrate for MtbGlgBWT and the N1 domain-deleted (the first 108 residues deleted) Mtb{Delta}108GlgB protein. The N1 {beta}-sandwich, which is formed by the first 105 amino acids and superimposes well with the N2 {beta}-sandwich, is shown to have an influence in substrate binding in the amylase assay. Also, we have checked and shown that several GH13 family inhibitors are ineffective against MtbGlgBWT and Mtb{Delta}108GlgB. We propose a two-step reaction mechanism, for the amylase activity (1 {yields} 4 bond breakage) and isomerization (1 {yields} 6 bond formation), which occurs in the same catalytic pocket. The structural and functional properties of MtbGlgB and Mtb{Delta}108GlgB are compared with those of the N-terminal 112-amino acid-deleted Escherichia coli GlgB (EC{Delta}112GlgB).

  6. Characterization of new class III lantibiotics--erythreapeptin, avermipeptin and griseopeptin from Saccharopolyspora erythraea, Streptomyces avermitilis and Streptomyces griseus demonstrates stepwise N-terminal leader processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völler, Ginka H; Krawczyk, Joanna M; Pesic, Alexander; Krawczyk, Bartlomiej; Nachtigall, Jonny; Süssmuth, Roderich D

    2012-05-29

    Lantibiotics are a large group of ribosomally synthesized peptides post-translationally modified to incorporate the amino acid lanthionine. They are classified, according to their biosynthetic pathway and bioactivity, into three major subtypes. Of Actinomycetes type III lantibiotics, only four peptides (SapB, SapT, LabA1, and LabA2) have been described and structurally characterized, although homologous gene clusters are abundant in other Actinomycetes. All these gene clusters share a similar architecture with a characteristic Ser/Ser/Cys motif in precursor peptides, which has previously been suggested to act as a precursor for lanthionine (SapB) and labionin (LabA2) rings. Mass spectrometry screening led to the discovery and characterization of three new representatives of type III lantibiotics: Avermipeptin (Avi), Erythreapeptin (Ery), and Griseopeptin (Gri) from Streptomyces avermitilis DSM 46492, Saccharopolyspora erythraea NRRL 2338, and Streptomyces griseus DSM 40236, respectively. Apart from the assignment of these peptides to their corresponding gene clusters, additional investigations on Avi, Ery and Gri peptides indicate stepwise leader processing by putative aminopeptidase-like protease(s), thus yielding mixtures of differently N-terminal-processed lantibiotic peptides. Similar peptide processing was observed for a heterologously expressed eryth biosynthetic gene cluster expressed in a Streptomyces host system. Remarkably, all isolates of the new type III lantibiotics contain both the amino acids lanthionine and labionin, thus implying dual-mode cyclase activity of the processing lyase-kinase-cyclase enzymes. These findings have implications for the structures and maturation of other type III lantibiotics from Actinomycetes.

  7. Complete genome sequence of Enterococcus mundtii QU 25, an efficient L-(+)-lactic acid-producing bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiwa, Yuh; Yanase, Hiroaki; Hirose, Yuu; Satomi, Shohei; Araya-Kojima, Tomoko; Watanabe, Satoru; Zendo, Takeshi; Chibazakura, Taku; Shimizu-Kadota, Mariko; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2014-08-01

    Enterococcus mundtii QU 25, a non-dairy bacterial strain of ovine faecal origin, can ferment both cellobiose and xylose to produce l-lactic acid. The use of this strain is highly desirable for economical l-lactate production from renewable biomass substrates. Genome sequence determination is necessary for the genetic improvement of this strain. We report the complete genome sequence of strain QU 25, primarily determined using Pacific Biosciences sequencing technology. The E. mundtii QU 25 genome comprises a 3 022 186-bp single circular chromosome (GC content, 38.6%) and five circular plasmids: pQY182, pQY082, pQY039, pQY024, and pQY003. In all, 2900 protein-coding sequences, 63 tRNA genes, and 6 rRNA operons were predicted in the QU 25 chromosome. Plasmid pQY024 harbours genes for mundticin production. We found that strain QU 25 produces a bacteriocin, suggesting that mundticin-encoded genes on plasmid pQY024 were functional. For lactic acid fermentation, two gene clusters were identified-one involved in the initial metabolism of xylose and uptake of pentose and the second containing genes for the pentose phosphate pathway and uptake of related sugars. This is the first complete genome sequence of an E. mundtii strain. The data provide insights into lactate production in this bacterium and its evolution