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Sample records for acid metabolism plant

  1. Higher plant metabolism and energetics in hypogravity: Amino acid metabolism in higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazelis, M.

    1976-01-01

    Laboratory's investigation into the amino acid metabolism of dwarf marigolds exposed to an environment of simulated hypogravity is summarized. Using both in vivo, and/or in vitro studies, the following effects of hypogravitational stress have been shown: (1) increased proline incorporation into cell wall protein, (2) inhibition of amino acid decarboxylation, (3) decrease in glutamic acid decarboxylase activity; and (4) decrease in the relative amount of a number of soluble amino acids present in deproteinized extracts of marigold leaves. It is concluded from these data there are several rapid, major alterations in amino acid metabolism associated with hypogravitational stress in marigolds. The mechanism(s) and generality of these effects with regard to other species is still unknown.

  2. How to Do It. Plant Eco-Physiology: Experiments on Crassulacean Acid Metabolism, Using Minimal Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Douglas J. C.

    1990-01-01

    Features of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism plants are presented. Investigations of a complex eco-physiological plant adaptation to the problems of growth in an arid environment are discussed. Materials and procedures for these investigations are described. (CW)

  3. Natural toxins that affect plant amino acid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    A diverse range of natural compounds interfere with the synthesis and other aspects of amino acid metabolism. Some are amino acid analogues, but most are not. This review covers a number of specific natural phytotoxic compounds by molecular target site. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase is of part...

  4. D-erythroascorbic acid: Its preparations, chemistry, and metabolism (fungi and plants). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewus, F.A. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Inst. of Biological Chemistry; Seib, P.A. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). Dept. of Grain Science and Industry

    1991-12-31

    The origin of oxalate in plants has received considerable attention and glycolate metabolism has been generally regarded as a prime precursor candidate although studies on the metabolism of L-ascorbic acid single out that plant constituent as well. Experiments with oxalate-accumulating plants that contain little or no tartaric acid revealed the presence of a comparable L-ascorbic acid metabolism with the exception that the cleavage products were oxalic acid and L-threonic acid or products of L-threonic acid metabolism. A reasonable mechanism for cleavage of L-ascorbic acid at the endiolic bond is found in studies on the photooxygenation of L-ascorbic acid. Presumably, analogs of L-ascorbic acid that differ only in the substituent at C4 also form a hydroperoxide in the presence of alkaline hydrogen peroxide and subsequently yield oxalic acid and the corresponding aldonic acid or its lactone. We became interested in such a possibility when we discovered that L-ascorbic acid was rare or absent in certain yeasts and fungi whereas a L-ascorbic acid analog, D-glycero-pent-2-enono- 1,4-lactone (D-erythroascorbic acid), was present. It has long been known that oxalate occurs in yeasts and fungi and its production plays a role in plant pathogenesis. As to the biosynthetic origin of fungal oxalic acid there is little information although it is generally assumed that oxaloacetate or possibly, glycolate, might be that precursor.

  5. D-erythroascorbic acid: Its preparations, chemistry, and metabolism (fungi and plants)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewus, F.A. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Inst. of Biological Chemistry); Seib, P.A. (Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). Dept. of Grain Science and Industry)

    1991-01-01

    The origin of oxalate in plants has received considerable attention and glycolate metabolism has been generally regarded as a prime precursor candidate although studies on the metabolism of L-ascorbic acid single out that plant constituent as well. Experiments with oxalate-accumulating plants that contain little or no tartaric acid revealed the presence of a comparable L-ascorbic acid metabolism with the exception that the cleavage products were oxalic acid and L-threonic acid or products of L-threonic acid metabolism. A reasonable mechanism for cleavage of L-ascorbic acid at the endiolic bond is found in studies on the photooxygenation of L-ascorbic acid. Presumably, analogs of L-ascorbic acid that differ only in the substituent at C4 also form a hydroperoxide in the presence of alkaline hydrogen peroxide and subsequently yield oxalic acid and the corresponding aldonic acid or its lactone. We became interested in such a possibility when we discovered that L-ascorbic acid was rare or absent in certain yeasts and fungi whereas a L-ascorbic acid analog, D-glycero-pent-2-enono- 1,4-lactone (D-erythroascorbic acid), was present. It has long been known that oxalate occurs in yeasts and fungi and its production plays a role in plant pathogenesis. As to the biosynthetic origin of fungal oxalic acid there is little information although it is generally assumed that oxaloacetate or possibly, glycolate, might be that precursor.

  6. Cell organelles from crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants : II. Compartmentation of enzymes of the crassulacean acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnarrenberger, C; Groß, D; Burkhard, C; Herbert, M

    1980-02-01

    The intracellular distribution of enzymes involved in the Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) has been studied in Bryophyllum calycinum Salisb. and Crassula lycopodioides Lam. After separation of cell organelles by isopycnic centrifugation, enzymes of the Crassulacean acid metabolism were found in the following cell fractions: Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the chloroplasts; NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase in the mitochondria and in the supernatant; NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in the chloroplasts; NADP-dependent malic enzyme in the supernatant and to a minor extent in the chloroplasts; NAD-dependent malic enzyme in the supernatant and to some degree in the mitochondria; and pyruvate; orthophosphate dikinase in the chloroplasts. The activity of the NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase was due to three isoenzymes separated by (NH4)2SO4 gradient solubilization. These isoenzymes represented 17, 78, and 5% of the activity recovered, respectively, in the order of elution. The isoenzyme eluting first was associated with the mitochondria and the second isoenzyme was of cytosolic origin, while the intracellular location of the third isoenzyme was probably the peroxisome. Based on these findings, the metabolic path of Crassulacean acid metabolism within cells of CAM plants is discussed.

  7. Metabolic regulation of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerry D. Cohen

    2009-11-01

    The phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, auxin) is important for many aspects of plant growth, development and responses to the environment yet the routes to is biosynthesis and mechanisms for regulation of IAA levels remain important research questions. A critical issue concerning the biosynthesis if IAA in plants is that redundant pathways for IAA biosynthesis exist in plants. We showed that these redundant pathways and their relative contribution to net IAA production are under both developmental and environmental control. We worked on three fundamental problems related to how plants get their IAA: 1) An in vitro biochemical approach was used to define the tryptophan dependent pathway to IAA using maize endosperm, where relatively large amounts of IAA are produced over a short developmental period. Both a stable isotope dilution and a protein MS approach were used to identify intermediates and enzymes in the reactions. 2) We developed an in vitro system for analysis of tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthesis in maize seedlings and we used a metabolite profiling approach to isolate intermediates in this reaction. 3) Arabidopsis contains a small family of genes that encode potential indolepyruvate decarboxylase enzymes. We cloned these genes and studied plants that are mutant in these genes and that over-express each member in the family in terms of the level and route of IAA biosynthesis. Together, these allowed further development of a comprehensive picture of the pathways and regulatory components that are involved in IAA homeostasis in higher plants.

  8. New insights into the regulation of plant immunity by amino acid metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeier, Jürgen

    2013-12-01

    Besides defence pathways regulated by classical stress hormones, distinct amino acid metabolic pathways constitute integral parts of the plant immune system. Mutations in several genes involved in Asp-derived amino acid biosynthetic pathways can have profound impact on plant resistance to specific pathogen types. For instance, amino acid imbalances associated with homoserine or threonine accumulation elevate plant immunity to oomycete pathogens but not to pathogenic fungi or bacteria. The catabolism of Lys produces the immune signal pipecolic acid (Pip), a cyclic, non-protein amino acid. Pip amplifies plant defence responses and acts as a critical regulator of plant systemic acquired resistance, defence priming and local resistance to bacterial pathogens. Asp-derived pyridine nucleotides influence both pre- and post-invasion immunity, and the catabolism of branched chain amino acids appears to affect plant resistance to distinct pathogen classes by modulating crosstalk of salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-regulated defence pathways. It also emerges that, besides polyamine oxidation and NADPH oxidase, Pro metabolism is involved in the oxidative burst and the hypersensitive response associated with avirulent pathogen recognition. Moreover, the acylation of amino acids can control plant resistance to pathogens and pests by the formation of protective plant metabolites or by the modulation of plant hormone activity.

  9. Coordinations between gene modules control the operation of plant amino acid metabolic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galili Gad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Being sessile organisms, plants should adjust their metabolism to dynamic changes in their environment. Such adjustments need particular coordination in branched metabolic networks in which a given metabolite can be converted into multiple other metabolites via different enzymatic chains. In the present report, we developed a novel "Gene Coordination" bioinformatics approach and use it to elucidate adjustable transcriptional interactions of two branched amino acid metabolic networks in plants in response to environmental stresses, using publicly available microarray results. Results Using our "Gene Coordination" approach, we have identified in Arabidopsis plants two oppositely regulated groups of "highly coordinated" genes within the branched Asp-family network of Arabidopsis plants, which metabolizes the amino acids Lys, Met, Thr, Ile and Gly, as well as a single group of "highly coordinated" genes within the branched aromatic amino acid metabolic network, which metabolizes the amino acids Trp, Phe and Tyr. These genes possess highly coordinated adjustable negative and positive expression responses to various stress cues, which apparently regulate adjustable metabolic shifts between competing branches of these networks. We also provide evidence implying that these highly coordinated genes are central to impose intra- and inter-network interactions between the Asp-family and aromatic amino acid metabolic networks as well as differential system interactions with other growth promoting and stress-associated genome-wide genes. Conclusion Our novel Gene Coordination elucidates that branched amino acid metabolic networks in plants are regulated by specific groups of highly coordinated genes that possess adjustable intra-network, inter-network and genome-wide transcriptional interactions. We also hypothesize that such transcriptional interactions enable regulatory metabolic adjustments needed for adaptation to the stresses.

  10. Metabolic engineering of chloroplasts for artemisinic acid biosynthesis and impact on plant growth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhawna Saxena; Mayavan Subramaniyan; Karan Malhotra; Neel Sarovar Bhavesh; Shobha Devi Potlakayala; Shashi Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Chloroplasts offer high-level transgene expression and transgene containment due to maternal inheritance, and are ideal hosts for biopharmaceutical biosynthesis via multigene engineering. To exploit these advantages, we have expressed 12 enzymes in chloroplasts for the biosynthesis of artemisinic acid (precursor of artemisinin, antimalarial drug) in an alternative plant system. Integration of transgenes into the tobacco chloroplast genome via homologous recombination was confirmed by molecular analysis, and biosynthesis of artemisinic acid in plant leaf tissues was detected with the help of 13C NMR and ESI-mass spectrometry. The excess metabolic flux of isopentenyl pyrophosphate generated by an engineered mevalonate pathway was diverted for the biosynthesis of artemisinic acid. However, expression of megatransgenes impacted the growth of the transplastomic plantlets. By combining two exogenous pathways, artemisinic acid was produced in transplastomic plants, which can be improved further using better metabolic engineering strategies for commercially viable yield of desirable isoprenoid products.

  11. Crassulacean acid metabolism enhances underwater photosynthesis and diminishes photorespiration in the aquatic plant Isoetes australis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole; Rich, S.M.; Pulido Pérez, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Underwater photosynthesis by aquatic plants is often limited by low availability of CO2, and photorespiration can be high. Some aquatic plants utilize crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) photosynthesis. The benefits of CAM for increased underwater photosynthesis and suppression of photorespiration...... were evaluated for Isoetes australis, a submerged plant that inhabits shallow temporary rock pools. • Leaves high or low in malate were evaluated for underwater net photosynthesis and apparent photorespiration at a range of CO2 and O2 concentrations. • CAM activity was indicated by 9.7-fold higher leaf...... malate at dawn, compared with at dusk, and also by changes in the titratable acidity (lmol H+ equivalents) of leaves. Leaves high in malate showed not only higher underwater net photosynthesis at low external CO2 concentrations but also lower apparent photorespiration. Suppression by CAM of apparent...

  12. Relationships between Stomatal Behavior and Internal Carbon Dioxide Concentration in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, W

    1979-06-01

    Measurements of internal gas phase CO(2) concentration, stomatal resistance, and acid content were made in Crassulacean acid metabolism plants growing under natural conditions. High CO(2) concentrations, sometimes in excess of 2%, were observed during the day in a range of taxonomically widely separated plants (Opuntia ficus-indica L., Opuntia basilaris Engelm. and Bigel., Agave desertii Engelm., Yucca schidigera Roezl. ex Ortiges, Ananas comosus [L.] Merr., Aloe vera L., Cattleya sp. and Phalanopsis sp.) and below ambient air concentrations were observed at night.Stomatal resistance was always high when CO(2) concentration was high and experiments in which attempts were made to manipulate internal CO(2) concentrations gave data consistent with stomatal behavior in Crassulacean acid metabolism being controlled by internal CO(2) concentration. Exogenous CO(2) applied in darkness at a concentration similar to those observed in the light caused stomatal resistance to increase.In pads of Opuntia basilaris Engelm. and Bigel. subjected to severe water stress internal gas phase CO(2) concentrations exhibited fluctuations opposite in phase to fluctuations in acid content. Stomatal resistance remained high and the opening response to low CO(2) concentration was almost entirely eliminated.

  13. Salicylic acid-induced changes to growth and phenolic metabolism in Matricaria chamomilla plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovácik, Jozef; Grúz, Jirí; Backor, Martin; Strnad, Miroslav; Repcák, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    The influence of salicylic acid (SA) doses of 50 and 250 microM, for a period of up to 7 days, on selected physiological aspects and the phenolic metabolism of Matricaria chamomilla plants was studied. SA exhibited both growth-promoting (50 microM) and growth-inhibiting (250 microM) properties, the latter being correlated with decrease of chlorophylls, water content and soluble proteins. In terms of phenolic metabolism, it seems that the higher SA dose has a toxic effect, based on the sharp increase in phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity (24 h after application), which is followed by an increase in total soluble phenolics, lignin accumulation and the majority of the 11 detected phenolic acids. Guaiacol-peroxidase activity was elevated throughout the experiment in 250 microM SA-treated plants. In turn, some responses can be explained by mechanisms associated with oxidative stress tolerance; these mitigate acute SA stress (which is indicated by an increase in malondialdehyde content). However, PAL activity decreased with prolonged exposure to SA, indicating its inhibition. Accumulation of coumarin-related compounds (umbelliferone and herniarin) was not affected by SA treatments, while (Z)- and (E)-2-beta-D: -glucopyranosyloxy-4-methoxycinnamic acids increased in the 250 microM SA-treated rosettes. Free SA content in the rosettes increased significantly only in the 250 microM SA treatment, with levels tending to decrease towards the end of the experiment and the opposite trend was observed in the roots.

  14. Crassulacean acid metabolism enhances underwater photosynthesis and diminishes photorespiration in the aquatic plant Isoetes australis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Ole; Rich, Sarah Meghan; Pulido, Cristina; Cawthray, Gregory Robert; Colmer, Timothy David

    2011-04-01

    • Underwater photosynthesis by aquatic plants is often limited by low availability of CO(2), and photorespiration can be high. Some aquatic plants utilize crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) photosynthesis. The benefits of CAM for increased underwater photosynthesis and suppression of photorespiration were evaluated for Isoetes australis, a submerged plant that inhabits shallow temporary rock pools. • Leaves high or low in malate were evaluated for underwater net photosynthesis and apparent photorespiration at a range of CO(2) and O(2) concentrations. • CAM activity was indicated by 9.7-fold higher leaf malate at dawn, compared with at dusk, and also by changes in the titratable acidity (μmol H(+) equivalents) of leaves. Leaves high in malate showed not only higher underwater net photosynthesis at low external CO(2) concentrations but also lower apparent photorespiration. Suppression by CAM of apparent photorespiration was evident at a range of O(2) concentrations, including values below air equilibrium. At a high O(2) concentration of 2.2-fold the atmospheric equilibrium concentration, net photosynthesis was reduced substantially and, although it remained positive in leaves containing high malate concentrations, it became negative in those low in malate. • CAM in aquatic plants enables higher rates of underwater net photosynthesis over large O(2) and CO(2) concentration ranges in floodwaters, via increased CO(2) fixation and suppression of photorespiration.

  15. Differential effects of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) on photosynthesis and chlorophyll metabolism in willow plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Marcelo Pedrosa; Le Manac'h, Sarah Gingras; Maccario, Sophie; Labrecque, Michel; Lucotte, Marc; Juneau, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    We used a willow species (Salix miyabeana cultivar SX64) to examine the differential secondary-effects of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), the principal glyphosate by-product, on chlorophyll metabolism and photosynthesis. Willow plants were treated with different concentrations of glyphosate (equivalent to 0, 1.4, 2.1 and 2.8kgha(-1)) and AMPA (equivalent to 0, 0.28, 1.4 and 2.8kgha(-1)) and evaluations of pigment contents, chlorophyll fluorescence, and oxidative stress markers (hydrogen peroxide content and antioxidant enzyme activities) in leaves were performed after 12h of exposure. We observed that AMPA and glyphosate trigger different mechanisms leading to decreases in chlorophyll content and photosynthesis rates in willow plants. Both chemicals induced ROS accumulation in willow leaves although only glyphosate-induced oxidative damage through lipid peroxidation. By disturbing chlorophyll biosynthesis, AMPA induced decreases in chlorophyll contents, with consequent effects on photosynthesis. With glyphosate, ROS increases were higher than the ROS-sensitive threshold, provoking chlorophyll degradation (as seen by pheophytin accumulation) and invariable decreases in photosynthesis. Peroxide accumulation in both AMPA and glyphosate-treated plants was due to the inhibition of antioxidant enzyme activities. The different effects of glyphosate on chlorophyll contents and photosynthesis as described in the literature may be due to various glyphosate:AMPA ratios in those plants.

  16. Expansion of plants with Crassulacean Acid Metabolism under global environment change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, K.; D'Odorico, P.; Collins, S. L.; Carr, D.

    2016-12-01

    The abundance of plants with Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM) has increased in many drylands worldwide. This is hypothesized to occur because CAM plants store water, take up CO2 at night, exhibit photosynthetic plasticity, and have high water use efficiency. The increased dominance of CAM plants, however, also depends on their competitive relationship with other functional groups, an aspect of CAM plant sensitivity to global environmental change that has remained largely understudied. Here, we investigated the response of CAM plants and their competitive relationships with C3 and C4 plants under global environmental change. We focused on two pairs of CAM and non-CAM species, namely Cylindropuntia imbricata (a constitutive CAM species) and Bouteloua eriopoda (C4 grass), which co-occur in desert grasslands in northern Mexico, and invasive Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (a facultative CAM species) and Bromus mollis (a C3 invasive grass), which coexist in California's coastal grasslands. A set of growth chamber experiments under altered CO2 and water conditions show that C. imbricata outcompeted B. eriopoda under drought conditions, while in well-watered conditions B. eriopoda was a stronger competitor for soil water than C. imbricata. Under drought conditions a more positive response to CO2 enrichment by C. imbricata indirectly disfavored B. eriopoda, which suggests that interspecific competition can outweigh the favorable direct effect of CO2 enrichment on plant growth. A set of greenhouse experiments under water, N, and soil salinity manipulations showed that drought, N deposition, and/or increased soil salinity served as important drivers for success of M. crystallinum invasion, while B. mollis exerted strong competitive effects on M. crystallinum for light and soil nutrients in well-watered conditions. M. crystallinum switched from C3 photosynthesis to CAM photosynthesis as an adaptive strategy in response to moderate intensity of competition from B. mollis, in

  17. Effect of plant proteins and crystalline amino acid supplementation on postprandial plasma amino acid profiles and metabolic response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolland, Marine; Larsen, Bodil Katrine; Holm, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    The use of aquafeeds formulated with plant protein sources supplemented with crystalline amino acids (CAAs) is believed to influence amino acid (AA) uptake patterns and AA metabolic fate. Oxygen consumption and ammonia excretion rates were measured in rainbow trout (468.5 +/- A 86.5 g) force fed 0...... to be caused by an unbalanced dietary AA profile and CAA supplementation, rather than inclusion of plant protein concentrate....

  18. Indole-3-acetic acid metabolism in normal and dwarf micropropagated banana plants (Musa spp. AAA)

    OpenAIRE

    Zaffari,Gilmar Roberto; Peres,Lázaro Eustáquio Pereira; Tcacenco,Fernando Adami; Kerbauy,Gilberto Barbante

    2002-01-01

    Nanism is one of the most frequent type of mutant in micropropagated banana plants from the Cavendish subgroup. The present study aimed at studying some of the hormone factors involved in this type of mutation. Rhizomes from normal and dwarf plants from the cultivar Grand Naine were incubated for 5 d in the presence of [³H]-L-tryptophan, [³H]-indole-3-acetic acid and gibberellin, to quantify the endogenous levels of indole-3-acetic acid-ester, indole-3-acetic acid-amide, free indole-3-acetic ...

  19. Environmental regulation of carbon isotope composition and crassulacean acid metabolism in three plant communities along a water availability gradient

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Expression of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is characterized by extreme variability within and between taxa and its sensitivity to environmental variation. In this study, we determined seasonal fluctuations in CAM photosynthesis with measurements of nocturnal tissue acidification and carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of bulk tissue and extracted sugars in three plant communities along a precipitation gradient (500, 700, and 1,000 mm year−1) on the Yucatan Peninsula. We also related the ...

  20. Nitro-fatty acids in plant signaling: New key mediators of nitric oxide metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capilla Mata-Pérez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies in animal systems have shown that NO can interact with fatty acids to generate nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FAs. They are the product of the reaction between reactive nitrogen species and unsaturated fatty acids, and are considered novel mediators of cell signaling based mainly on a proven anti-inflammatory response. Although these signaling mediators have been described widely in animal systems, NO2-FAs have scarcely been studied in plants. Preliminary data have revealed the endogenous presence of free and protein-adducted NO2-FAs in extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO, which appear to be contributing to the cardiovascular benefits associated with the Mediterranean diet. Importantly, new findings have displayed the endogenous occurrence of nitro-linolenic acid (NO2-Ln in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the modulation of NO2-Ln levels throughout this plant's development. Furthermore, a transcriptomic analysis by RNA-seq technology established a clear signaling role for this molecule, demonstrating that NO2-Ln was involved in plant-defense response against different abiotic-stress conditions, mainly by inducing the chaperone network and supporting a conserved mechanism of action in both animal and plant defense processes. Thus, NO2-Ln levels significantly rose under several abiotic-stress conditions, highlighting the strong signaling role of these molecules in the plant-protection mechanism. Finally, the potential of NO2-Ln as a NO donor has recently been described both in vitro and in vivo. Jointly, this ability gives NO2-Ln the potential to act as a signaling molecule by the direct release of NO, due to its capacity to induce different changes mediated by NO or NO-related molecules such as nitration and S-nitrosylation, or by the electrophilic capacity of these molecules through a nitroalkylation mechanism. Here, we describe the current state of the art regarding the advances performed in the field of NO2-FAs in plants and their

  1. Salicylic acid alleviates NaCl-induced changes in the metabolism of Matricaria chamomilla plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovácik, Jozef; Klejdus, Borivoj; Hedbavny, Josef; Backor, Martin

    2009-07-01

    Influence of 100 mM NaCl and 50 microM salicylic acid (SA) and their combination on the metabolism of chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla) during 7 days was studied. NaCl reduced growth and selected physiological parameters and SA in combined treatment (NaCl + SA) reversed majority of these symptoms. Application of SA reduced NaCl-induced increase of Na+ in the rosettes, but not in the roots. Accumulation of total amino acids was stimulated in NaCl-treated roots, especially due to exceptional increase of proline (4.4-fold). Among phenolic acids, accumulation of protocatechuic acid was the most enhanced in NaCl-exposed leaf rosettes (ca. 3-fold) while chlorogenic and caffeic acids in the roots (2.4- and 2.8-fold, respectively). Total soluble phenols increased after NaCl and SA treatments, but root lignin content was not affected. Activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and shikimate dehydrogenase increased in response to NaCl, but cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase was not affected and polyphenol oxidase decreased. Stress parameters were elevated by NaCl treatment (superoxide radical and malondialdehyde content, activities of catalase, ascorbate- and guaiacol-peroxidase) and substantially prevented by SA, while accumulation of hydrogen peroxide decreased. Overall, SA showed strong beneficial properties against NaCl-induced negative symptoms. Protective effect of SA was the most visible at the level of guaiacol-peroxidase and through amelioration of stress parameters and mineral nutrient contents.

  2. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this process. One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup urine disease. Amino acids are "building blocks" that join together to form ...

  3. Proteomic Insights on the Metabolism of Penicillium janczewskii during the Biotransformation of the Plant Terpenoid Labdanolic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Isabel; Varela, Adélia; Frija, Luís M. T.; Estevão, Mónica A. S.; Planchon, Sébastien; Renaut, Jenny; Afonso, Carlos A. M.; Silva Pereira, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Plant terpenoids compose a natural source of chemodiversity of exceptional value. Many of these compounds own biological/pharmacological activity, others are regarded as unique chemical skeletons for the synthesis of derivatives with improved properties. Functional chemical modification of terpenoids through biotransformation frequently relies on the use of Ascomycota strains, but information on major cellular responses is still largely lacking. Penicillium janczewskii mediates a stereo-selective hydroxylation of labdanolic acid (LA)—terpenoid found abundantly in Cistus ladanifer—producing 3β-hydroxy-labdanolic acid with yields >90%. Herein, combined analyses of mycelial and extracellular differential proteomes demonstrated that the plant terpenoid increased stress responses, especially against oxidative stress (e.g., accumulation of superoxide dismutase) and apparently altered mitochondria functioning. One putative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase differentially accumulated in the secretome and the terpenoid bioconversion was inhibited in vivo in the presence of a P450 inhibitor. The stereo-selective hydroxylation of the plant terpenoid is likely mediated by P450 enzymes, yet its unequivocal identity remains unclear. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that proteomics was used to investigate how a plant terpenoid impacts the metabolism of a filamentous fungus during its efficiently biotransformation. Our findings may encourage the development of new strategies for the valorization of plant natural resources through biotechnology. PMID:28824907

  4. Proteomic Insights on the Metabolism of Penicillium janczewskii during the Biotransformation of the Plant Terpenoid Labdanolic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Martins

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant terpenoids compose a natural source of chemodiversity of exceptional value. Many of these compounds own biological/pharmacological activity, others are regarded as unique chemical skeletons for the synthesis of derivatives with improved properties. Functional chemical modification of terpenoids through biotransformation frequently relies on the use of Ascomycota strains, but information on major cellular responses is still largely lacking. Penicillium janczewskii mediates a stereo-selective hydroxylation of labdanolic acid (LA—terpenoid found abundantly in Cistus ladanifer—producing 3β-hydroxy-labdanolic acid with yields >90%. Herein, combined analyses of mycelial and extracellular differential proteomes demonstrated that the plant terpenoid increased stress responses, especially against oxidative stress (e.g., accumulation of superoxide dismutase and apparently altered mitochondria functioning. One putative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase differentially accumulated in the secretome and the terpenoid bioconversion was inhibited in vivo in the presence of a P450 inhibitor. The stereo-selective hydroxylation of the plant terpenoid is likely mediated by P450 enzymes, yet its unequivocal identity remains unclear. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that proteomics was used to investigate how a plant terpenoid impacts the metabolism of a filamentous fungus during its efficiently biotransformation. Our findings may encourage the development of new strategies for the valorization of plant natural resources through biotechnology.

  5. Vermicompost humic acids modulate the accumulation and metabolism of ROS in rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Andrés Calderín; Santos, Leandro Azevedo; de Souza, Luiz Gilberto Ambrósio; Tavares, Orlando Carlos Huertas; Zonta, Everaldo; Gomes, Ernane Tarcisio Martins; García-Mina, José Maria; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro

    2016-03-15

    This work aims to determine the reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, gene expression, anti-oxidant enzyme activity, and derived effects on membrane lipid peroxidation and certain stress markers (proline and malondialdehyde-MDA) in the roots of unstressed and PEG-stressed rice plants associated with vermicompost humic acid (VCHA) application. The results show that the application of VCHA to the roots of unstressed rice plants caused a slight but significant increase in root ROS accumulation and the gene expression and activity of the major anti-oxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase and peroxidase). This action did not have negative effects on root development, and an increase in both root growth and root proliferation occurred. However, the root proline and MDA concentrations and the root permeability results indicate the development of a type of mild stress associated with VCHA application. When VCHA was applied to PEG-stressed plants, a clear alleviation of the inhibition in root development linked to PEG-mediated osmotic stress was observed. This was associated with a reduction in root ROS production and anti-oxidant enzymatic activity caused by osmotic stress. This alleviation of stress caused by VCHA was also reflected as a reduction in the PEG-mediated concentration of MDA in the root as well as root permeability. In summary, the beneficial action of VCHA on the root development of unstressed or PEG-stressed rice plants clearly involves the modulation of ROS accumulation in roots.

  6. [Reponses of sugar metabolism in seed germination of three various acid-fast plants to acid rain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Hong; Zhou, Qing; Zeng, Qing-Ling

    2008-03-01

    Responses of sugar metabolism during germination of rice (O. sativa ), wheat (T. aestivum) and rape (B. chinensis var. oleifera) seeds to simulated acid rain (pH 2.0, pH 2.5, pH 3.0, pH 3.5, pH 4.0, pH 4.5, pH 5.0) were investigated. The purpose was to clarify the mechanism of acid rain affecting seed germination. The results show that the alpha-amylase activity, contents of soluble sugar and reducing sugar of the rice, wheat and rape seeds decrease with increased stress level (pH 5.0 - 2.0), and are lower than CK. The response order of three indexes to stress level of acid rain is that rice (pH 3.5 - 4.0/53.88% - 77.7%) is smaller than wheat (pH 3.5 - 4.5/58.60% - 89.41%), and rape (pH 4.0 - 5.0/60.14% - 100%) is the smallest, alpha-amylase activity, contents of soluble sugar and reducing sugar of rice increase with prolonged stress time, but the three indexes of wheat and rape increase at first, and then decrease. In the same stress time (3 - 7 d), the three indexes of the three species for all treatment groups are lower than CK, and decrease with increased stress level. The stress time when the maximum damage of a-amylase activity, contents of soluble sugar and reducing sugar appeared is that rice (7 d, 7 d, 7 d) > wheat (7 d, 6 d, 5 d) > rape (3 d, 7 d, 5 d). Responses of three indexes to stress level and stress time of acid rain show that the ability of sugar metabolism resisting acid rain is that rice is stronger than wheat and rape is the worst, and the difference in sugar metabolism of 3 species is one of the internal reasons why the germination indexes behave differently.

  7. Environmental regulation of carbon isotope composition and crassulacean acid metabolism in three plant communities along a water availability gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricalde, M Fernanda; Andrade, José Luis; Durán, Rafael; Dupuy, Juan Manuel; Simá, J Luis; Us-Santamaría, Roberth; Santiago, Louis S

    2010-12-01

    Expression of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is characterized by extreme variability within and between taxa and its sensitivity to environmental variation. In this study, we determined seasonal fluctuations in CAM photosynthesis with measurements of nocturnal tissue acidification and carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)C) of bulk tissue and extracted sugars in three plant communities along a precipitation gradient (500, 700, and 1,000 mm year(-1)) on the Yucatan Peninsula. We also related the degree of CAM to light habitat and relative abundance of species in the three sites. For all species, the greatest tissue acid accumulation occurred during the rainy season. In the 500 mm site, tissue acidification was greater for the species growing at 30% of daily total photon flux density (PFD) than species growing at 80% PFD. Whereas in the two wetter sites, the species growing at 80% total PFD had greater tissue acidification. All species had values of bulk tissue δ(13)C less negative than -20‰, indicating strong CAM activity. The bulk tissue δ(13)C values in plants from the 500 mm site were 2‰ less negative than in plants from the wetter sites, and the only species growing in the three communities, Acanthocereus tetragonus (Cactaceae), showed a significant negative relationship between both bulk tissue and sugar δ(13)C values and annual rainfall, consistent with greater CO(2) assimilation through the CAM pathway with decreasing water availability. Overall, variation in the use of CAM photosynthesis was related to water and light availability and CAM appeared to be more ecologically important in the tropical dry forests than in the coastal dune.

  8. Carbonate extraction process for the metabolic, isozymic and proteomic profiling of rose-scented geranium (Pelargonium sp.), a hyper-acidic plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangwan, Rajender Singh; Sangwan, Neelam Singh; Sharma, Pankaj Kumar; Chaurasiya, Narayan Das; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Tyagi, Bali Ram; Srivastava, Avdhesh Kumar

    2008-01-01

    Rose-scented geranium (Pelargonium sp.) is a valuable monoterpene-yielding plant. It has been well characterised phytochemically through the isolation of >270 secondary metabolites, however, there is hardly any biochemical or metabolic information concerning this plant. Initial attempts to investigate its metabolism failed to produce any enzyme activity in the tissue extracts prepared in routine extraction buffers owing to the intrinsic properties of the tissue matrix. It was recognised that cellular hyper-acidity (cell sap pH approximately 3.0) gave rise to very low protein levels in the extracts, thus prohibiting detection of activities of even primary metabolic enzymes that are usually abundantly present in plants. Tissue extraction in Tris solution without pH adjustment (as used for studies involving citrus and banana) led to little or no improvement. Therefore, a novel approach using sodium carbonate solution as an efficient extraction system for enzymes and proteins from the plant was studied. Functionality of the carbonate extraction has been demonstrated through its effectiveness, a several-fold superior performance, in yielding protein, monitoring primary metabolism and secondary metabolic enzymes, and isozymic and polypeptide profiling. The process may also be helpful in the reliable analysis of other acidic plant tissues.

  9. A plant pathogenic bacterium exploits the tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolic pathway of its insect vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killiny, Nabil; Nehela, Yasser; Hijaz, Faraj; Vincent, Christopher I

    2017-06-08

    Huanglongbing in citrus is caused by a phloem-limited, uncultivable, gram-negative α-proteobacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas). CLas is transmitted by the phloem-sucking insect, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae), in a persistent, circulative, and propagative manner. In this study, we investigated the metabolomic and respiration rates changes in D. citri upon infection with CLas using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas exchange analysis. The level of glycine, L-serine, L-threonine, and gamma-amino butyric acid were higher in CLas-infected D. citri, while L-proline, L-aspartic acid, and L-pyroglutamic acid were lower in CLas-infected D. citri compared with the control. Citric acid was increased in CLas-infected D. citri, whereas malic and succinic acids were reduced. Interestingly, most of the reduced metabolites such as malate, succinate, aspartate, and L-proline are required for the growth of CLas. The increase in citric acid, serine, and glycine indicated that CLas induced glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) in its vector. In agreement with the GC-MS results, the gene expression results also indicated that glycolysis and TCA were induced in CLas-infected D. citri and this was accompanied with an increases in respiration rate. Phosphoric acid and most of the sugar alcohols were higher in CLas-infected D. citri, indicating a response to the biotic stress or cell damage. Only slight increases in the levels of few sugars were observed in CLas-infected D. citri, which indicated that sugars are tightly regulated by D. citri. Our results indicated that CLas induces nutrient and energetic stress in its host insect. This study may provide some insights into the mechanism of colonization of CLas in its vector.

  10. Cell organelles from crassulacean-acid-metabolism (CAM) plants : I. Enzymes in isolated peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, M; Burkhard, C; Schnarrenberger, C

    1978-01-01

    Cell organelles were isolated from the CAM plants Crassula lycopodioides Lam., Bryophyllum calycinum Salisb. and Sedum rubrotinctum R.T. Clausen by isopycnic centrifugation in sucrose gradients. The inclusion of 2.5% Ficoll in the grinding medium proved to be essential for a satisfactory separation of cell organelles during the subsequent centrifugation. Peroxisomes, mitochondria, and whole and broken chloroplasts were at least partially resolved as judged by marker-enzyme-activity profiles. The isolated peroxisomes contained activities of glycollate oxidase, catalase, hydroxypyruvate reductase, glycine aminotransferase, serine-glyoxylate aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase, comparable to activities found in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaf peroxisomes. In contrast to spinach, however, only little, if any, particulate malate dehydrogenase activity could be attributed to isolated peroxisomes of the three CAM plants.

  11. Oxygen-18 incorporation into malic acid during nocturnal carbon dioxide fixation in crassulacean acid metabolism plants: a new approach to estimating in vivo carbonic anhydrase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtum, J.A.M.; Summons, R.; Roeske, C.A.; Comins, H.N.; O' Leary, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants fix carbon dioxide at night by the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate. If CO2 fixation is conducted with TC YO2, then in the absence of carbonic anhydrase, the malate formed by dark CO2 fixation should also contain high levels of carbon-13 and oxygen-18. Conversely, if carbonic anhydrase is present and highly active, oxygen exchange between CO2 and cellular H2O will occur more rapidly than carboxylation, and the ( TC) malate formed will contain little or no oxygen-18 above the natural abundance level. The presence of oxygen-18 in these molecules can be detected either by nuclear magnetic resonance or by mass spectrometry. Studies of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the presence and absence of carbonic anhydrase in vitro confirm the validity of the method. When CAM plants are studied by this method, we find that most species show incorporation of a significant amount of oxygen-18. Comparison of these results with results of isotope fractionation and gas exchange studies permits calculation of the in vivo activity of carbonic anhydrase toward HCO3 compared with that of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. The ratio (carbonic anhydrase activity/phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity) is species dependent and varies from a low of about 7 for Ananas comosus to values near 20 for Hoya carnosa and Bryophyllum pinnatum, 40 for Kalanchoee daigremontiana, and 100 or greater for Bryophyllum tubiflorum, Kalanchoee serrata, and Kalanchoae tomentosa. Carbonic anhydrase activity increases relative to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity at higher temperature. 37 references, 2 figures, 8 tables.

  12. Comparison of polyamine metabolism in tomato plants exposed to different concentrations of salicylic acid under light or dark conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, Zoltán; Poór, Péter; Tari, Irma

    2016-11-01

    In this study the effect of exogenous 0.1 mM and 1 mM salicylic acid (SA) treatments were investigated on polyamine (PA) metabolism in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. cv. Ailsa Craig) leaves in illuminated or dark environments. The former proved to be sublethal and the latter lethal concentration for tomato leaf tissues. While PA biosynthetic genes, arginine- and ornitine decarboxylases or spermidine- and spermine synthases were highly up-regulated by 1 mM SA, the enzymes participating in PA catabolism, diamine- (DAOs, EC 1.4.3.6) and polyamine oxidases (PAOs, EC 1.5.3.3) displayed higher transcript abundance and enzyme activity at 0.1 mM SA. As a result, putrescine and spermine content but not that of spermidine increased after 1 mM SA application, which proved to be higher in the dark than in the light. H2O2 content produced on the effect of 1 mM SA was significantly higher than at 0.1 mM SA in the light. Since there was no coincidence between H2O2 accumulation and terminal PA catabolism, reactive oxygen species produced by photosynthesis and by other sources had more pronounced effect on H2O2 generation at tissue level than DAOs and PAOs. Accordingly, H2O2 in the absence of NO accumulation contributed to the initiation of defence reactions after 0.1 mM SA treatment, while high SA concentration generated simultaneous increase in H2O2 and NO production in the light, which induced cell death within 24 h in illuminated leaves. However, the appearance of necrotic lesions was delayed in the absence of NO if these plants were kept in darkness.

  13. Carotenoid metabolism in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are mostly C40 terpenoids, a class of hydrocarbons that participate in various biological processes in plants, such as photosynthesis, photomorphogenesis, photoprotection, and development. Carotenoids also serve as precursors for two plant hormones and a diverse set of apocarotenoids. Th...

  14. Cellulose metabolism in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takahisa; Yoshida, Kouki; Park, Yong Woo; Konishi, Teruko; Baba, Kei'ichi

    2005-01-01

    Many bacterial genomes contain a cellulose synthase operon together with a cellulase gene, indicating that cellulase is required for cellulose biosynthesis. In higher plants, there is evidence that cell growth is enhanced by the overexpression of cellulase and prevented by its suppression. Cellulase overexpression could modify cell walls not only by trimming off the paracrystalline sites of cellulose microfibrils, but also by releasing xyloglucan tethers between the microfibrils. Mutants for membrane-anchored cellulase (Korrigan) also show a typical phenotype of prevention of cellulose biosynthesis in tissues. All plant cellulases belong to family 9, which endohydrolyzes cellulose, but are not strong enough to cause the bulk degradation of cellulose microfibrils in a plant body. It is hypothesized that cellulase participates primarily in repairing or arranging cellulose microfibrils during cellulose biosynthesis in plants. A scheme for the roles of plant cellulose and cellulases is proposed.

  15. Plant Metabolic Modeling: Achieving New Insight into Metabolism and Metabolic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghalian, Kambiz; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Schreiber, Falk

    2014-01-01

    Models are used to represent aspects of the real world for specific purposes, and mathematical models have opened up new approaches in studying the behavior and complexity of biological systems. However, modeling is often time-consuming and requires significant computational resources for data development, data analysis, and simulation. Computational modeling has been successfully applied as an aid for metabolic engineering in microorganisms. But such model-based approaches have only recently been extended to plant metabolic engineering, mainly due to greater pathway complexity in plants and their highly compartmentalized cellular structure. Recent progress in plant systems biology and bioinformatics has begun to disentangle this complexity and facilitate the creation of efficient plant metabolic models. This review highlights several aspects of plant metabolic modeling in the context of understanding, predicting and modifying complex plant metabolism. We discuss opportunities for engineering photosynthetic carbon metabolism, sucrose synthesis, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in leaves and oil synthesis in seeds and the application of metabolic modeling to the study of plant acclimation to the environment. The aim of the review is to offer a current perspective for plant biologists without requiring specialized knowledge of bioinformatics or systems biology. PMID:25344492

  16. Retinoic acid and iron metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Surajit; Bhattacharyya, Rajasri; Sayal, Kirtimaan

    2014-01-01

    tuberculosis controlling molecules in the days to come. Iron has proven to be essential for pathogenesis of tuberculosis and retinoic acid is known to influence the iron metabolism pathway. Retenoic acid is also known to exhibit antitubercular effect in in vivo system. Therefore there is every possibility...... that retinoic acid by affecting the iron metabolism pathway exhibits its antimycobacterial effect. These aspects are reviewed in the present manuscript for understanding the antimycobacterial role of retinoic acid in the context of iron metabolism and other immunological aspects....

  17. Comparative RNA-Sequence Transcriptome Analysis of Phenolic Acid Metabolism in Salvia miltiorrhiza, a Traditional Chinese Medicine Model Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhenqiao; Guo, Linlin; Liu, Tian; Lin, Caicai; Wang, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge is an important traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). In this study, two S. miltiorrhiza genotypes (BH18 and ZH23) with different phenolic acid concentrations were used for de novo RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). A total of 170,787 transcripts and 56,216 unigenes were obtained. There were 670 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) identified between BH18 and ZH23, 250 of which were upregulated in ZH23, with genes involved in the phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway being the most upregulated genes. Nine genes involved in the lignin biosynthesis pathway were upregulated in BH18 and thus result in higher lignin content in BH18. However, expression profiles of most genes involved in the core common upstream phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway were higher in ZH23 than that in BH18. These results indicated that genes involved in the core common upstream phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway might play an important role in downstream secondary metabolism and demonstrated that lignin biosynthesis was a putative partially competing pathway with phenolic acid biosynthesis. The results of this study expanded our understanding of the regulation of phenolic acid biosynthesis in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:28194403

  18. Comparative RNA-Sequence Transcriptome Analysis of Phenolic Acid Metabolism in Salvia miltiorrhiza, a Traditional Chinese Medicine Model Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenqiao Song

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge is an important traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. In this study, two S. miltiorrhiza genotypes (BH18 and ZH23 with different phenolic acid concentrations were used for de novo RNA sequencing (RNA-seq. A total of 170,787 transcripts and 56,216 unigenes were obtained. There were 670 differentially expressed genes (DEGs identified between BH18 and ZH23, 250 of which were upregulated in ZH23, with genes involved in the phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway being the most upregulated genes. Nine genes involved in the lignin biosynthesis pathway were upregulated in BH18 and thus result in higher lignin content in BH18. However, expression profiles of most genes involved in the core common upstream phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway were higher in ZH23 than that in BH18. These results indicated that genes involved in the core common upstream phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway might play an important role in downstream secondary metabolism and demonstrated that lignin biosynthesis was a putative partially competing pathway with phenolic acid biosynthesis. The results of this study expanded our understanding of the regulation of phenolic acid biosynthesis in S. miltiorrhiza.

  19. Two phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinases coexist in the Crassulacean Acid Metabolism plant Ananas comosus. Isolation and characterization of the smaller 65 kDa form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Mariana; Rius, Sebastián Pablo; Podestá, Florencio Esteban

    2011-06-01

    Two phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK, EC 4.1.1.49) isoforms of 74 and 65 kDa were found to coexist in vivo in pineapple leaves, a constitutive Crassulacean Acid Metabolism plant. The 65 kDa form was not the result of proteolytic cleavage of the larger form since extraction methods reported to prevent PEPCK proteolysis in other plant tissues failed to yield a single immunoreactive PEPCK polypeptide in leaf extracts. In this work, the smaller form of 65 kDa was purified to homogeneity and physically and kinetically characterized and showed parameters compatible with a fully active enzyme. The specific activity was nearly twice higher for decarboxylation of oxaloacetate when compared to carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate. Kinetic parameters fell within the range of those estimated for other plant PEPCKs. Its activity was affected by several metabolites, as shown by inhibition by 3-phosphoglycerate, citrate, malate, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, l-asparagine and activation of the decarboxylating activity by succinate. A break in the Arrhenius plot at about 30°C indicates that PEPCK structure is responsive to changes in temperature. The results indicate that pineapple leaves contain two PEPCK forms. The biochemical characterization of the smaller isoform performed in this work suggests that it could participate in both carbon and nitrogen metabolism in vivo by acting as a decarboxylase.

  20. 2011 Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism, & Function Gordon Research Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher Benning

    2011-02-04

    This is the second Gordon Research Conference on 'Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism & Function'. It covers current topics in lipid structure, metabolism and function in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms including seed plants, algae, mosses and ferns. Work in photosynthetic bacteria is considered as well as it serves the understanding of specific aspects of lipid metabolism in plants. Breakthroughs are discussed in research on plant lipids as diverse as glycerolipids, sphingolipids, lipids of the cell surface, isoprenoids, fatty acids and their derivatives. The program covers nine concepts at the forefront of research under which afore mentioned plant lipid classes are discussed. The goal is to integrate areas such as lipid signaling, basic lipid metabolism, membrane function, lipid analysis, and lipid engineering to achieve a high level of stimulating interaction among diverse researchers with interests in plant lipids. One Emphasis is on the dynamics and regulation of lipid metabolism during plant cell development and in response to environmental factors.

  1. Regulation of primary plant metabolism during plant-pathogen interactions and its contribution to plant defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemencia M Rojas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Plants are constantly exposed to microorganisms in the environment and, as a result, have evolved intricate mechanisms to recognize and defend themselves against potential pathogens. One of these responses is the downregulation of photosynthesis and other processes associated with primary metabolism that are essential for plant growth. It has been suggested that the energy saved by downregulation of primary metabolism is diverted and used for defense responses. However, several studies have shown that upregulation of primary metabolism also occurs during plant-pathogen interactions. We propose that upregulation of primary metabolism modulates signal transduction cascades that lead to plant defense responses. In support of this thought, we here compile evidence from the literature to show that upon exposure to pathogens or elicitors, plants induce several genes associated with primary metabolic pathways, such as those involved in the synthesis or degradation of carbohydrates, amino acids and lipids. In addition, genetic studies have confirmed the involvement of these metabolic pathways in plant defense responses. This review provides a new perspective highlighting the relevance of primary metabolism in regulating plant defense against pathogens with the hope to stimulate further research in this area.

  2. How closely do the delta(13)C values of Crassulacean Acid metabolism plants reflect the proportion of CO(2) fixed during day and night?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Klaus; Holtum, Joseph A M

    2002-08-01

    The extent to which Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant delta(13)C values provide an index of the proportions of CO(2) fixed during daytime and nighttime was assessed. Shoots of seven CAM species (Aloe vera, Hylocereus monocanthus, Kalanchoe beharensis, Kalanchoe daigremontiana, Kalanchoe pinnata, Vanilla pauciflora, and Xerosicyos danguyi) and two C(3) species (teak [Tectona grandis] and Clusia sp.) were grown in a cuvette, and net CO(2) exchange was monitored for up to 51 d. In species exhibiting net dark CO(2) fixation, between 14% and 73.3% of the carbon gain occurred in the dark. delta(13)C values of tissues formed inside the cuvette ranged between -28.7 per thousand and -11.6 per thousand, and correlated linearly with the percentages of carbon gained in the light and in the dark. The delta(13)C values for new biomass obtained solely during the dark and light were estimated as -8.7 per thousand and -26.9 per thousand, respectively. For each 10% contribution of dark CO(2) fixation integrated over the entire experiment, the delta(13)C content of the tissue was, thus, approximately 1.8 per thousand less negative. Extrapolation of the observations to plants previously surveyed under natural conditions suggests that the most commonly expressed version of CAM in the field, "the typical CAM plant," involves plants that gain about 71% to 77% of their carbon by dark fixation, and that the isotopic signals of plants that obtain one-third or less of their carbon in the dark may be confused with C(3) plants when identified on the basis of carbon isotope content alone.

  3. Arabidopsis BPM proteins function as substrate adaptors to a cullin3-based E3 ligase to affect fatty acid metabolism in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liyuan; Lee, Joo Hyun; Weber, Henriette; Tohge, Takayuki; Witt, Sandra; Roje, Sanja; Fernie, Alisdair R; Hellmann, Hanjo

    2013-06-01

    Regulation of transcriptional processes is a critical mechanism that enables efficient coordination of the synthesis of required proteins in response to environmental and cellular changes. Transcription factors require accurate activity regulation because they play a critical role as key mediators assuring specific expression of target genes. In this work, we show that cullin3-based E3 ligases have the potential to interact with a broad range of ethylene response factor (ERF)/APETALA2 (AP2) transcription factors, mediated by Math-BTB/POZ (for Meprin and TRAF [tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor] homolog)-Broad complex, Tramtrack, Bric-a-brac/Pox virus and Zinc finger) proteins. The assembly with an E3 ligase causes degradation of their substrates via the 26S proteasome, as demonstrated for the wrinkled1 ERF/AP2 protein. Furthermore, loss of Math-BTB/POZ proteins widely affects plant development and causes altered fatty acid contents in mutant seeds. Overall, this work demonstrates a link between fatty acid metabolism and E3 ligase activities in plants and establishes CUL3-based E3 ligases as key regulators in transcriptional processes that involve ERF/AP2 family members.

  4. Arabidopsis BPM Proteins Function as Substrate Adaptors to a CULLIN3-Based E3 Ligase to Affect Fatty Acid Metabolism in Plants[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liyuan; Lee, Joo Hyun; Weber, Henriette; Tohge, Takayuki; Witt, Sandra; Roje, Sanja; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Hellmann, Hanjo

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of transcriptional processes is a critical mechanism that enables efficient coordination of the synthesis of required proteins in response to environmental and cellular changes. Transcription factors require accurate activity regulation because they play a critical role as key mediators assuring specific expression of target genes. In this work, we show that CULLIN3-based E3 ligases have the potential to interact with a broad range of ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (ERF)/APETALA2 (AP2) transcription factors, mediated by MATH-BTB/POZ (for Meprin and TRAF [tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor] homolog)-Broad complex, Tramtrack, Bric-a-brac/Pox virus and Zinc finger) proteins. The assembly with an E3 ligase causes degradation of their substrates via the 26S proteasome, as demonstrated for the WRINKLED1 ERF/AP2 protein. Furthermore, loss of MATH-BTB/POZ proteins widely affects plant development and causes altered fatty acid contents in mutant seeds. Overall, this work demonstrates a link between fatty acid metabolism and E3 ligase activities in plants and establishes CUL3-based E3 ligases as key regulators in transcriptional processes that involve ERF/AP2 family members. PMID:23792371

  5. Low- and high-dose plant and marine (n-3) fatty acids do not affect plasma inflammatory markers in adults with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewell, Antonella; Marvasti, Farshad Fani; Harris, William S; Tsao, Philip; Gardner, Christopher D

    2011-12-01

    Chronic inflammation is considered to play a role in the development of cardiovascular disease. Various (n-3) fatty acids (FA) have been reported to have antiinflammatory effects, but there is a lack of consensus in this area, particularly in regard to optimal source(s) and dose(s). This study aimed to determine the effects of high and low doses of (n-3) FA from plant and marine sources on plasma inflammatory marker concentrations. One-hundred adults with metabolic syndrome were randomly assigned to a low or high dose of plant- (2.2 or 6.6 g/d α-linolenic acid) or marine- (1.2 or 3.6 g/d EPA and DHA) derived (n-3) FA or placebo for 8 wk, using a parallel arm design (n = 20/arm). Fasting blood samples collected at 0, 4, and 8 wk were analyzed for concentrations of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), IL-6, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and for cardiovascular risk factors. Baseline concentrations across all 5 groups combined were (mean ± SD) 103 ± 32 ng/L for MCP-1, 1.06 ± 0.56 ng/L for IL-6, and 0.197 ± 0.041 ng/L for sICAM-1. There were no significant differences in 8-wk changes in plasma inflammatory marker concentrations among the 5 groups. Plasma TG and blood pressure decreased significantly more and the LDL cholesterol concentration increased more in the high-dose fish oil group compared to the 8-wk changes in some of the other 4 groups (P ≤ 0.04). In conclusion, no beneficial effects were detected for any of the 3 inflammatory markers investigated in response to (n-3) FA in adults with metabolic syndrome regardless of dose or source.

  6. Diel patterns of water potential components for the crassulacean acid metabolism plant Opuntia ficus-indica when well-watered or droughted

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, G.; Ortega, J.K.E.; Nerd, A.; Nobel, P.S. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Under well-watered conditions, chlorenchyma acidity in cladodes of Opuntia ficus-indica increased substantially at night, fully accounting for the 0.26-megapascal nocturnal increase in osmotic pressure in the outer 2 millimeters. Osmotic pressure in the inner part of the chlorenchyma and in the water-storage parenchyma did not change significantly over 24-hour periods. Three months of drought decreased nocturnal acid accumulation by 73% and essentially abolished transpiration; also, 27% of the chlorenchyma water and 61% of the parenchyma water was lost during such drought, but the average tissue osmotic pressure was little affected. Turgor pressure was maintained in the chlorenchyma after 3 months of drought, although it decreased sevenfold in the water-storage parenchyma compared with the well-watered condition. Moreover, the nocturnal increases in turgor pressure of about 0.08 megapascal in the outer part of the chlorenchyma was also unchanged by such drought. The water potential magnitudes favored water movement from the parenchyma to the chlorenchyma at the end of the night and in the reverse direction during the late afternoon. Experiments with tritiated water support this pattern of water movement, which is also in agreement with predictions based on electric-circuit analog models for Crassulacean acid metabolism plants.

  7. Diel Patterns of Water Potential Components for the Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant Opuntia ficus-indica when Well-Watered or Droughted 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Guillermo; Ortega, Joseph K. E.; Nerd, Avinoam; Nobel, Park S.

    1991-01-01

    Under well-watered conditions, chlorenchyma acidity in cladodes of Opuntia ficus-indica increased substantially at night, fully accounting for the 0.26-megapascal nocturnal increase in osmotic pressure in the outer 2 millimeters. Osmotic pressure in the inner part of the chlorenchyma and in the water-storage parenchyma did not change significantly over 24-hour periods. Three months of drought decreased nocturnal acid accumulation by 73% and essentially abolished transpiration; also, 27% of the chlorenchyma water and 61% of the parenchyma water was lost during such drought, but the average tissue osmotic pressure was little affected. Turgor pressure was maintained in the chlorenchyma after 3 months of drought, although it decreased sevenfold in the water-storage parenchyma compared with the well-watered condition. Moreover, the nocturnal increases in turgor pressure of about 0.08 megapascal in the outer part of the chlorenchyma was also unchanged by such drought. The water potential magnitudes favored water movement from the parenchyma to the chlorenchyma at the end of the night and in the reverse direction during the late afternoon. Experiments with tritiated water support this pattern of water movement, which is also in agreement with predictions based on electric-circuit analog models for Crassulacean acid metabolism plants. PMID:16667964

  8. Thiamine in plants: aspects of its metabolism and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyer, Aymeric

    2010-10-01

    Thiamine diphosphate (vitamin B(1)) plays a fundamental role as an enzymatic cofactor in universal metabolic pathways including glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In addition, thiamine diphosphate has recently been shown to have functions other than as a cofactor in response to abiotic and biotic stress in plants. Recently, several steps of the plant thiamine biosynthetic pathway have been characterized, and a mechanism of feedback regulation of thiamine biosynthesis via riboswitch has been unraveled. This review focuses on these most recent advances made in our understanding of thiamine metabolism and functions in plants. Phenotypes of plant mutants affected in thiamine biosynthesis are described, and genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics data that have increased further our knowledge of plant thiamine metabolic pathways and functions are summarized. Aspects of thiamine metabolism such as catabolism, salvage, and transport in plants are discussed.

  9. Biosynthesis, Metabolism and Physiological Roles of Phytic Acid in Higher Plants%高等植物体中植酸合成、代谢及其生理作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    靳晓琳; 王新坤; 杨润强; 仲磊; 顾振新

    2014-01-01

    本文对植酸及其存在形式、代谢、调控及在高等植物内的生理作用作了介绍。%This article described the existing form, metabolism, regulation and the possible physiological roles of phytic acid in higher plant.

  10. Pyridine metabolism in tea plants: salvage, conjugate formation and catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Deng, Wei-Wei

    2012-11-01

    Pyridine compounds, including nicotinic acid and nicotinamide, are key metabolites of both the salvage pathway for NAD and the biosynthesis of related secondary compounds. We examined the in situ metabolic fate of [carbonyl-(14)C]nicotinamide, [2-(14)C]nicotinic acid and [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinic acid riboside in tissue segments of tea (Camellia sinensis) plants, and determined the activity of enzymes involved in pyridine metabolism in protein extracts from young tea leaves. Exogenously supplied (14)C-labelled nicotinamide was readily converted to nicotinic acid, and some nicotinic acid was salvaged to nicotinic acid mononucleotide and then utilized for the synthesis of NAD and NADP. The nicotinic acid riboside salvage pathway discovered recently in mungbean cotyledons is also operative in tea leaves. Nicotinic acid was converted to nicotinic acid N-glucoside, but not to trigonelline (N-methylnicotinic acid), in any part of tea seedlings. Active catabolism of nicotinic acid was observed in tea leaves. The fate of [2-(14)C]nicotinic acid indicates that glutaric acid is a major catabolite of nicotinic acid; it was further metabolised, and carbon atoms were finally released as CO(2). The catabolic pathway observed in tea leaves appears to start with the nicotinic acid N-glucoside formation; this pathway differs from catabolic pathways observed in microorganisms. Profiles of pyridine metabolism in tea plants are discussed.

  11. Relationships between Photosynthetically Active Radiation, Nocturnal Acid Accumulation, and CO2 Uptake for a Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant, Opuntia ficus-indica1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobel, Park S.; Hartsock, Terry L.

    1983-01-01

    The influences of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and water status on nocturnal Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) were quantitatively examined for a widely cultivated cactus, Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Miller. When the total daily PAR was maintained at 10 moles photons per square meter per day but the instantaneous PAR level varied, the rate of nocturnal H+ accumulation (tissue acidification) became 90% saturated near 700 micromoles per square meter per second, a PAR level typical for similar light saturation of C3 photosynthesis. The total nocturnal H+ accumulation and CO2 uptake reached 90% of maximum for a total daily PAR of about 22 moles per square meter per day. Light compensation occurred near 0 moles per square meter per day for nocturnal H+ accumulation and 4 moles per square meter per day for CO2 uptake. Above a total daily PAR of 36 moles per square meter per day or for an instantaneous PAR of 1150 micromoles per square meter per second for more than 6 hours, the nocturnal H+ accumulation actually decreased. This inhibition, which occurred at PAR levels just above those occurring in the field, was accompanied by a substantial decrease in chlorophyll content over a 1-week period. A minimum ratio of H+ accumulated to CO2 taken up of 2.5 averaged over the night occurred for a total daily PAR of 31 moles per square meter per day under wet conditions. About 2 to 6 hours into the night under such conditions, a minimum H+-to-CO2 ratio of 2.0 was observed. Under progressively drier conditions, both nocturnal H+ accumulation and CO2 uptake decreased, but the H+-to-CO2 ratio increased. A ratio of two H+ per CO2 is consistent with the H+ production accompanying the conversion of starch to malic acid, and it apparently occurs for O. ficus-indica when CAM CO2 uptake is strongly favored over respiratory activity. PMID:16662802

  12. CACODYLIC ACID (DMAV): METABOLISM AND ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cacodylic acid (DMAV) issue paper discusses the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of the various arsenical chemicals; evaluates the appropriate dataset to quantify the potential cancer risk to the organic arsenical herbicides; provides an evaluation of the mode of carcinogenic action (MOA) for DMAV including a consideration of the key events for bladder tumor formation in rats, other potential modes of action; and also considers the human relevance of the proposed animal MOA. As part of tolerance reassessment under the Food Quality Protection Act for the August 3, 2006 deadline, the hazard of cacodylic acid is being reassessed.

  13. Amino Acid Catabolism in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Tatjana M; Nunes Nesi, Adriano; Araújo, Wagner L; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2015-11-02

    Amino acids have various prominent functions in plants. Besides their usage during protein biosynthesis, they also represent building blocks for several other biosynthesis pathways and play pivotal roles during signaling processes as well as in plant stress response. In general, pool sizes of the 20 amino acids differ strongly and change dynamically depending on the developmental and physiological state of the plant cell. Besides amino acid biosynthesis, which has already been investigated in great detail, the catabolism of amino acids is of central importance for adjusting their pool sizes but so far has drawn much less attention. The degradation of amino acids can also contribute substantially to the energy state of plant cells under certain physiological conditions, e.g. carbon starvation. In this review, we discuss the biological role of amino acid catabolism and summarize current knowledge on amino acid degradation pathways and their regulation in the context of plant cell physiology.

  14. EFFECTS OF ACID STRESS ON ENDOGENOUS POLYAMINE AND ACTIVE OXYGEN METABOLISM OF WOODY PLANTS%酸胁迫对林木内源多胺及活性氧代谢的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢寅峰; 沈惠娟; 李梅枝

    1999-01-01

    The content of an endogenous putrescine increased dramatically in four tree species of Robinia pseudocacia Linn., Liriodendron tulipifera Linn., Platanus acerifolia Willd and Gardenia jasminoides Ellis under acid stress, but the content of spermidine and spermine showed no change. The additional D-Arginine(an inhibitor of the putrescine biosynthetic enzymes) to acid medium could inhibited the level of putrescine. However a simultaneous additional D-Arginine and putrescine could reverse the inhibitory effects of D-Arginine. Under the acid stress, the balance of active oxygen metabolism was lost, the content of MDA was accumulated rapidly, the activies of SOD and CAT decreased. Applying exogenous putrescine to acid medium could regulate the balance of active oxygen metabolism, decrease the accumulation of MDA, while increase the activities of SOD and CAT. The results showed putrescine could protect plants from the acid stress.

  15. Posttranslational Protein Modifications in Plant Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2015-11-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins greatly expand proteome diversity, increase functionality, and allow for rapid responses, all at relatively low costs for the cell. PTMs play key roles in plants through their impact on signaling, gene expression, protein stability and interactions, and enzyme kinetics. Following a brief discussion of the experimental and bioinformatics challenges of PTM identification, localization, and quantification (occupancy), a concise overview is provided of the major PTMs and their (potential) functional consequences in plants, with emphasis on plant metabolism. Classic examples that illustrate the regulation of plant metabolic enzymes and pathways by PTMs and their cross talk are summarized. Recent large-scale proteomics studies mapped many PTMs to a wide range of metabolic functions. Unraveling of the PTM code, i.e. a predictive understanding of the (combinatorial) consequences of PTMs, is needed to convert this growing wealth of data into an understanding of plant metabolic regulation.

  16. CO[sub 2] exchange and growth of the Crassulacean acid metabolism plant opuntia ficus-indica under elevated CO[sub 2] in open-top chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, M.; Miller, P.M.; Nobel, P.S. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1993-10-01

    CO[sub 2] uptake, water vapor conductance, and biomass production of Opuntia ficus-indica, a Crassulacean acid metabolism species, were studied at CO[sub 2] concentrations of 370, 520, and 720 [mu]L L[sup [minus]1] in open-top chambers during a 23-week period. Nine weeks after planting, daily net CO[sub 2] uptake for basal cladodes at 520 and 720 [mu]L L[sup [minus]1] of CO[sub 2] was 76 and 98% higher, respectively, than at 370 [mu]L L[sup [minus]1]. Eight weeks after daughter cladodes emerged, their daily net CO[sub 2] uptake was 35 and 49% higher at 520 and 720 [mu]L L[sup [minus]1] of CO[sub 2], respectively, than at 370 L L[sup [minus]1]. Daily water-use efficiency was 88% higher under elevated CO[sub 2] for basal cladodes and 57% higher for daughter cladodes. The daily net CO[sub 2] uptake capacity for basal cladodes increased for 4 weeks after planting and then remained fairly constant, whereas for daughter cladodes, it increased with cladode age, became maximal at 8 to 14 weeks, and then declined. The percentage enhancement in daily net CO[sub 2] uptake caused by elevated CO[sub 2] was greatest initially for basal cladodes and at 8 to 14 weeks for daughter cladodes. The chlorophyll content per unit fresh weight of chlorenchyma for daughter cladodes at 8 weeks was 19 and 62% lower in 520 and 720 [mu]L L[sup [minus]1] of CO[sub 2], respectively, compared with 370 [mu]L L[sup [minus]1]. Despite the reduced chlorophyll content, plant biomass production during 23 weeks in 520 and 720 [mu]L L[sup [minus]1] of CO[sub 2] was 21 and 55% higher, respectively, than at 370 [mu]L L[sup [minus]1]. The root dry weight nearly tripled as the CO[sub 2] concentration was doubled, causing the root/shoot ratio to increase with CO[sub 2] concentration. During the 23-week period, elevated CO[sub 2] significantly increased CO[sub 2] uptake and biomass production of O. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. CO2 Exchange and Growth of the Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant Opuntia ficus-indica under Elevated CO2 in Open-Top Chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, M.; Miller, P. M.; Nobel, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    CO2 uptake, water vapor conductance, and biomass production of Opuntia ficus-indica, a Crassulacean acid metabolism species, were studied at CO2 concentrations of 370, 520, and 720 [mu]L L-1 in open-top chambers during a 23-week period. Nine weeks after planting, daily net CO2 uptake for basal cladodes at 520 and 720 [mu]L L-1 of CO2 was 76 and 98% higher, respectively, than at 370 [mu]L L-1. Eight weeks after daughter cladodes emerged, their daily net CO2 uptake was 35 and 49% higher at 520 and 720 [mu]L L-1 of C02, respectively, than at 370 [mu]L L-1. Daily water-use efficiency was 88% higher under elevated CO2 for basal cladodes and 57% higher for daughter cladodes. The daily net CO2 uptake capacity for basal cladodes increased for 4 weeks after planting and then remained fairly constant, whereas for daughter cladodes, it increased with cladode age, became maximal at 8 to 14 weeks, and then declined. The percentage enhancement in daily net CO2 uptake caused by elevated CO2 was greatest initially for basal cladodes and at 8 to 14 weeks for daughter cladodes. The chlorophyll content per unit fresh weight of chlorenchyma for daughter cladodes at 8 weeks was 19 and 62% lower in 520 and 720 [mu]L L-1 of CO2, respectively, compared with 370 [mu]L L-1. Despite the reduced chlorophyll content, plant biomass production during 23 weeks in 520 and 720 [mu]L L-1 of CO2 was 21 and 55% higher, respectively, than at 370 [mu]L L-1. The root dry weight nearly tripled as the C02 concentration was doubled, causing the root/shoot ratio to increase with CO2 concentration. During the 23-week period, elevated CO2 significantly increased CO2 uptake and biomass production of O. ficus-indica. PMID:12231958

  18. CO2 Exchange and Growth of the Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant Opuntia ficus-indica under Elevated CO2 in Open-Top Chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, M.; Miller, P. M.; Nobel, P. S.

    1993-10-01

    CO2 uptake, water vapor conductance, and biomass production of Opuntia ficus-indica, a Crassulacean acid metabolism species, were studied at CO2 concentrations of 370, 520, and 720 [mu]L L-1 in open-top chambers during a 23-week period. Nine weeks after planting, daily net CO2 uptake for basal cladodes at 520 and 720 [mu]L L-1 of CO2 was 76 and 98% higher, respectively, than at 370 [mu]L L-1. Eight weeks after daughter cladodes emerged, their daily net CO2 uptake was 35 and 49% higher at 520 and 720 [mu]L L-1 of C02, respectively, than at 370 [mu]L L-1. Daily water-use efficiency was 88% higher under elevated CO2 for basal cladodes and 57% higher for daughter cladodes. The daily net CO2 uptake capacity for basal cladodes increased for 4 weeks after planting and then remained fairly constant, whereas for daughter cladodes, it increased with cladode age, became maximal at 8 to 14 weeks, and then declined. The percentage enhancement in daily net CO2 uptake caused by elevated CO2 was greatest initially for basal cladodes and at 8 to 14 weeks for daughter cladodes. The chlorophyll content per unit fresh weight of chlorenchyma for daughter cladodes at 8 weeks was 19 and 62% lower in 520 and 720 [mu]L L-1 of CO2, respectively, compared with 370 [mu]L L-1. Despite the reduced chlorophyll content, plant biomass production during 23 weeks in 520 and 720 [mu]L L-1 of CO2 was 21 and 55% higher, respectively, than at 370 [mu]L L-1. The root dry weight nearly tripled as the C02 concentration was doubled, causing the root/shoot ratio to increase with CO2 concentration. During the 23-week period, elevated CO2 significantly increased CO2 uptake and biomass production of O. ficus-indica.

  19. Plant Specialized Metabolism: the Easy and the Hard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Lu

    2010-01-01

    @@ Although normally termed" plant secondary metabolism", the phrase" plant specialized metabolism" has become instruments, such as gas chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance.

  20. Analysis of the aspartic acid metabolic pathway using mutant genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, R A

    2002-01-01

    Amino acid metabolism is a fundamental process for plant growth and development. Although a considerable amount of information is available, little is known about the genetic control of enzymatic steps or regulation of several pathways. Much of the information about biochemical pathways has arisen from the use of mutants lacking key enzymes. Although mutants were largely used already in the 60's, by bacterial and fungal geneticists, it took plant research a long time to catch up. The advance in this area was rapid in the 80's, which was followed in the 90's by the development of techniques of plant transformation. In this review we present an overview of the aspartic acid metabolic pathway, the key regulatory enzymes and the mutants and transgenic plants produced for lysine and threonine metabolism. We also discuss and propose a new study of high-lysine mutants.

  1. Metabolic Response of Pakchoi Leaves to Amino Acid Nitrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-li; YU Wen-juan; ZHOU Qian; HAN Rui-feng; HUANG Dan-feng

    2014-01-01

    Different nitrogen (N) forms may cause changes in the metabolic profiles of plants. However, few studies have been conducted on the effects of amino acid-N on plant metabolic proifles. The main objective of this study was to identify primary metabolites associated with amino acid-N (Gly, Gln and Ala) through metabolic proifle analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Plants of pakchoi (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis L.), Huawang and Wuyueman cultivars, were grown with different nitrogen forms (i.e., Gly, Gln, Ala, NO3--N, and N starvation) applied under sterile hydroponic conditions. The fresh weight and plant N accumulation of Huawang were greater than those of Wuyueman, which indicates that the former exhibited better N-use efficiency than the latter. The physiological performances of the applied N forms were generally in the order of NO3--N>Gln>Gly>Ala. The metabolic analysis of leaf polar extracts revealed 30 amino acid N-responsive metabolites in the two pakchoi cultivars, mainly consisting of sugars, amino acids, and organic acids. Changes in the carbon metabolism of pakchoi leaves under amino acid treatments occurred via the accumulation of fructose, glucose, xylose, and arabinose. Disruption of amino acid metabolism resulted in accumulation of endogenous Gly in Gly treatment, Pro in Ala treatment, and Asn in three amino acid (Gly, Gln and Ala) treatments. By contrast, the levels of endogenous Gln and Leu decreased. However, this reduction varied among cultivars and amino acid types. Amino acid-N supply also affected the citric acid cycle, namely, the second stage of respiration, where leaves in Gly, Gln and Ala treatments contained low levels of malic, citric and succinic acids compared with leaves in NO3--N treatments. No signiifcant difference in the metabolic responses was observed between the two cultivars which differed in their capability to use N. The response of primary metabolites in pakchoi leaves to amino acid-N supply

  2. Managing sulfur metabolism in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hawkesford, M.J.; De Kok, LJ

    2006-01-01

    Resolution and analysis of genes encoding components of the pathways of primary sulphur assimilation have provided the potential to elucidate how sulphur is managed by plants. Individual roles for members of gene families and regulatory mechanisms operating at gene, cellular and whole plant levels h

  3. Convergent evolution in plant specialized metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichersky, Eran; Lewinsohn, Efraim

    2011-01-01

    Plants synthesize a multitude of compounds that contribute to adaptation to their ecological niches. Such compounds serve as attractants of other living organisms beneficial to the plants or as defense against other biotic as well as abiotic agents. Selection for increased fitness, a never-ending process, has resulted in each plant lineage synthesizing a distinct set of specialized metabolites appropriate for its environment. The total number of specialized metabolites found in the plant kingdom far exceeds the capacity of any one plant genome to encode the necessary enzymes, and just as a plant lineage acquires the ability to make new specialized compounds during evolution, it also loses the ability to make others. Although the ability of plants to make novel, specialized metabolites continues to evolve, there are also many examples in which different plants have independently evolved the ability to make compounds already present in other plant lineages or to make different compounds that fulfill the same role-both are examples of convergent evolution. Here, we discuss many examples of convergent evolution in specialized metabolism. There are many genetic and biochemical mechanisms that can give rise to convergent evolution, and we conclude that, overall, convergent evolution in plant specialized metabolism is surprisingly common.

  4. Expanding the docosahexaenoic acid food web for sustainable production: engineering lower plant pathways into higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, James R; Singh, Surinder P

    2011-01-01

    Algae are becoming an increasingly important component of land plant metabolic engineering projects. Land plants and algae have similar enough genetics to allow relatively straightforward gene transfer and they also share enough metabolic similarities that algal enzymes often function in a plant cell environment. Understanding metabolic systems in algae can provide insights into homologous systems in land plants. As examples, algal models are currently being used by several groups to better understand starch and lipid metabolism and catabolism, fields which have relevance in land plants. Importantly, land plants and algae also have enough metabolic divergence that algal genes can often provide new metabolic traits to plants. Furthermore, many algal genomes have now been sequenced, with many more in progress, and this easy access to genome-wide information has revealed that algal genomes are often relatively simple when compared with plants. One example of the importance of algal, and in particular microalgal, resources to land plant research is the metabolic engineering of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids into oilseed crops which typically uses microalgal genes to extend existing natural plant biosynthetic pathways. This review describes both recent progress and remaining challenges in this field.

  5. Key applications of plant metabolic engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Lau

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Great strides have been made in plant metabolic engineering over the last two decades, with notable success stories including Golden rice. Here, we discuss the field's progress in addressing four long-standing challenges: creating plants that satisfy their own nitrogen requirement, so reducing or eliminating the need for nitrogen fertilizer; enhancing the nutrient content of crop plants; engineering biofuel feed stocks that harbor easy-to-access fermentable saccharides by incorporating self-destructing lignin; and increasing photosynthetic efficiency. We also look to the future at emerging areas of research in this field.

  6. Transporters in plant sulfur metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara eGigolashvili

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur is an essential nutrient, necessary for synthesis of many metabolites. The uptake of sulfate, primary and secondary assimilation, the biosynthesis, storage and final utilisation of sulfur (S containing compounds requires a lot of movement between organs, cells, and organelles. Efficient transport systems of S-containing compounds across the internal barriers or the plasma membrane and organellar membranes are therefore required. Here, we review a current state of knowledge of the transport of a range of S-containing metabolites within and between the cells as well as of their long distance transport. An improved understanding of mechanisms and regulation of transport will facilitate successful engineering of the respective pathways, to improve the plant yield, biotic interaction and nutritional properties of crops.

  7. Connecting proline metabolism and signaling pathways in plant senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu eZhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The amino acid proline has a unique biological role in stress adaptation. Proline metabolism is manipulated under stress by multiple and complex regulatory pathways and can profoundly influence cell death and survival in microorganisms, plants, and animals. Though the effects of proline are mediated by diverse signaling pathways, a common theme appears to be the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS due to proline oxidation being coupled to the respiratory electron transport chain. Considerable research has been devoted to understand how plants exploit proline metabolism in response to abiotic and biotic stress. Here, we review potential mechanisms by which proline metabolism influences plant senescence, namely in the petal and leaf. Recent studies of petal senescence suggest proline content is manipulated to meet energy demands of senescing cells. In the flower and leaf, proline metabolism may influence ROS signaling pathways that delay senescence progression. Future studies focusing on the mechanisms by which proline metabolic shifts occur during senescence may lead to novel methods to rescue crops under stress and to preserve post-harvest agricultural products.

  8. Perspectives for a better understanding of the metabolic integration of photorespiration within a complex plant primary metabolism network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Michael; Dellero, Younès; Keech, Olivier; Betti, Marco; Raghavendra, Agepati S; Sage, Rowan; Zhu, Xin-Guang; Allen, Doug K; Weber, Andreas P M

    2016-05-01

    Photorespiration is an essential high flux metabolic pathway that is found in all oxygen-producing photosynthetic organisms. It is often viewed as a closed metabolic repair pathway that serves to detoxify 2-phosphoglycolic acid and to recycle carbon to fuel the Calvin-Benson cycle. However, this view is too simplistic since the photorespiratory cycle is known to interact with several primary metabolic pathways, including photosynthesis, nitrate assimilation, amino acid metabolism, C1 metabolism and the Krebs (TCA) cycle. Here we will review recent advances in photorespiration research and discuss future priorities to better understand (i) the metabolic integration of the photorespiratory cycle within the complex network of plant primary metabolism and (ii) the importance of photorespiration in response to abiotic and biotic stresses.

  9. Phylogenomic reconstruction of archaeal fatty acid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibrova, Daria V.; Galperin, Michael Y.; Mulkidjanian, Armen Y.

    2014-01-01

    While certain archaea appear to synthesize and/or metabolize fatty acids, the respective pathways still remain obscure. By analyzing the genomic distribution of the key lipid-related enzymes, we were able to identify the likely components of the archaeal pathway of fatty acid metabolism, namely, a combination of the enzymes of bacterial-type β-oxidation of fatty acids (acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase, enoyl-CoA hydratase, and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase) with paralogs of the archaeal acetyl-CoA C-acetyltransferase, an enzyme of the mevalonate biosynthesis pathway. These three β-oxidation enzymes working in the reverse direction could potentially catalyze biosynthesis of fatty acids, with paralogs of acetyl-CoA C-acetyltransferase performing addition of C2 fragments. The presence in archaea of the genes for energy-transducing membrane enzyme complexes, such as cytochrome bc complex, cytochrome c oxidase, and diverse rhodopsins, was found to correlate with the presence of the proposed system of fatty acid biosynthesis. We speculate that because these membrane complexes functionally depend on fatty acid chains, their genes could have been acquired via lateral gene transfer from bacteria only by those archaea that already possessed a system of fatty acid biosynthesis. The proposed pathway of archaeal fatty acid metabolism operates in extreme conditions and therefore might be of interest in the context of biofuel production and other industrial applications. PMID:24818264

  10. Shedding light on ethylene metabolism in higher plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aurineide Rodrigues

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene metabolism in higher plants is regulated by a wide array of endogenous and environmental factors. During most physiological processes, ethylene levels are mainly determined by a strict control of the rate-limiting biosynthetic steps responsible for the production of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC and its subsequent conversion to ethylene. Responsible for these reactions, the key enzymes ACC synthase and ACC oxidase are encoded by multigene families formed by members that can be differentially regulated at the transcription and post-translational levels by specific developmental and environmental signals. Among the wide variety of environmental cues controlling plant ethylene production, light quality, duration and intensity have consistently been demonstrated to influence the metabolism of this plant hormone in diverse plant tissues, organs and species. Although still not completely elucidated, the mechanisms underlying the interaction between light signal transduction and ethylene evolution appears to involve a complex network that includes central transcription factors connecting multiple signaling pathways, which can be reciprocally modulated by ethylene itself, other phytohormones, and specific light wavelengths. Accumulating evidence has indicated particular photoreceptors as essential mediators in light-induced signaling cascades affecting ethylene levels. Therefore, this review specifically focuses on discussing the current knowledge of the potential molecular mechanisms implicated in the light-induced responses affecting ethylene metabolism during the regulation of developmental and metabolic plant responses. Besides presenting the state of the art in this research field, some overlooked mechanisms and future directions to elucidate the exact nature of the light-ethylene interplay in higher plants will also be compiled and discussed.

  11. Stomatal responses to carbon dioxide of isolated epidermis from a C/sub 3/ plant, the Argenteum mutant of Pisum sativum L. , and a crassulacean-acid-metabolism plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana Hamet et Perr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jewer, P.C.; Neales, T.F.; Incoll, L.D.

    1985-01-01

    The response of stomata in isolated epidermis to the concentration of CO/sub 2/ in the gaseous phase was examined in a C/sub 3/ species, the Argenteum mutant of Pisum sativum, and a crassulacean-acid-metabolism (CAM) species, Kalanchoe daigremontiana. Epidermis from leaves of both species was incubated on buffer solutions in the presence of air containing various volume fractions of CO/sub 2/ (0 to 10,000 x 10/sup -6/). In both species and in the light and in darkness, the effect of CO/sub 2/ was to inhibit stomatal opening, the maximum inhibition of opening occurring in the range 0 to 360 x 10/sup -6/. The inhibition of opening per unit change in concentration was greatest between volume fractions of 0 and 240 x 10/sup -6/. There was little further closure above the volume fraction of 360 x 10/sup -6/, i.e. approximately ambient concentration of CO/sub 2/. Thus, although leaves of CAM species may experience much higher internal concentrations of CO/sub 2/ in the light than those of C/sub 3/ plants, this does not affect the sensitivity of their stomata to CO/sub 2/ concentration or the range over which they respond. Stomatal responses to CO/sub 2/ were similar in both the light and the dark, indicating that effects of CO/sub 2/ on stomata occur via mechanisms which are independent of light. The responses of stomata to CO/sub 2/ in the gaseous phase took place without the treatments changing the pH of the buffered solutions. Thus, it is unlikely that CO/sub 2/ elicited stomatal movement by changing either the pH or the HCO/sub 3//sup -//CO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ equilibria. It is suggested that the concentration of dissolved unhydrated CO/sub 2/ may be the effector of stomatal movement and that its activity is related to its reactivity with amines.

  12. Nickel deficiency disrupts metabolism of ureides, amino acids, and organic acids of young pecan foliage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Cheng; Reilly, Charles C; Wood, Bruce W

    2006-02-01

    The existence of nickel (Ni) deficiency is becoming increasingly apparent in crops, especially for ureide-transporting woody perennials, but its physiological role is poorly understood. We evaluated the concentrations of ureides, amino acids, and organic acids in photosynthetic foliar tissue from Ni-sufficient (Ni-S) versus Ni-deficient (Ni-D) pecan (Carya illinoinensis [Wangenh.] K. Koch). Foliage of Ni-D pecan seedlings exhibited metabolic disruption of nitrogen metabolism via ureide catabolism, amino acid metabolism, and ornithine cycle intermediates. Disruption of ureide catabolism in Ni-D foliage resulted in accumulation of xanthine, allantoic acid, ureidoglycolate, and citrulline, but total ureides, urea concentration, and urease activity were reduced. Disruption of amino acid metabolism in Ni-D foliage resulted in accumulation of glycine, valine, isoleucine, tyrosine, tryptophan, arginine, and total free amino acids, and lower concentrations of histidine and glutamic acid. Ni deficiency also disrupted the citric acid cycle, the second stage of respiration, where Ni-D foliage contained very low levels of citrate compared to Ni-S foliage. Disruption of carbon metabolism was also via accumulation of lactic and oxalic acids. The results indicate that mouse-ear, a key morphological symptom, is likely linked to the toxic accumulation of oxalic and lactic acids in the rapidly growing tips and margins of leaflets. Our results support the role of Ni as an essential plant nutrient element. The magnitude of metabolic disruption exhibited in Ni-D pecan is evidence of the existence of unidentified physiological roles for Ni in pecan.

  13. Metabolization of the bacteriostatic agent triclosan in edible plants and its consequences for plant uptake assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macherius, André; Eggen, Trine; Lorenz, Wilhelm; Moeder, Monika; Ondruschka, Jelka; Reemtsma, Thorsten

    2012-10-02

    Persistent environmental contaminants may enter agricultural fields via the application of sewage sludge, by irrigation with treated municipal wastewater or by manuring. It has been shown that such contaminants can be incorporated into crop plants. The metabolism of the bacteriostatic agents triclocarban, triclosan, and its transformation product methyl triclosan was investigated after their uptake into carrot cell cultures. A fast metabolization of triclosan was observed and eight so far unknown phase II metabolites, conjugates with saccharides, disaccharides, malonic acid, and sulfate, were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Triclocarban and methyl triclosan lack a phenolic group and remained unaltered in the cell cultures. Phase I metabolization was not observed for any of the compounds. All eight triclosan conjugates identified in the cell cultures were also detected in extracts of intact carrot plants cultivated on triclosan contaminated soils. Their total amount in the plants was assessed to exceed the amount of the triclosan itself by a factor of 5. This study shows that a disregard of conjugates in studies on plant uptake of environmental contaminants may severely underestimates the extent of uptake into plants and, eventually, the potential human exposure to contaminants via food of plant origin.

  14. Regulation of uric acid metabolism and excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiuolo, Jessica; Oppedisano, Francesca; Gratteri, Santo; Muscoli, Carolina; Mollace, Vincenzo

    2016-06-15

    Purines perform many important functions in the cell, being the formation of the monomeric precursors of nucleic acids DNA and RNA the most relevant one. Purines which also contribute to modulate energy metabolism and signal transduction, are structural components of some coenzymes and have been shown to play important roles in the physiology of platelets, muscles and neurotransmission. All cells require a balanced quantity of purines for growth, proliferation and survival. Under physiological conditions the enzymes involved in the purine metabolism maintain in the cell a balanced ratio between their synthesis and degradation. In humans the final compound of purines catabolism is uric acid. All other mammals possess the enzyme uricase that converts uric acid to allantoin that is easily eliminated through urine. Overproduction of uric acid, generated from the metabolism of purines, has been proven to play emerging roles in human disease. In fact the increase of serum uric acid is inversely associated with disease severity and especially with cardiovascular disease states. This review describes the enzymatic pathways involved in the degradation of purines, getting into their structure and biochemistry until the uric acid formation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Metabolism of fluoranthene in different plant cell cultures and intact plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolb, M.; Harms, H.

    2000-05-01

    The metabolism of fluoranthene was investigated in 11 cell cultures of different plant species using a [{sup 14}C]-labeled standard. Most species metabolized less than 5% of fluoranthene to soluble metabolites and formed less than 5% nonextractable residues during the standardized 48-h test procedure. Higher metabolic rates were observed in lettuce (Lactuca sativa, 6%), wheat (Tricitum aestivum, 9%), and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, 15%). A special high metabolic rate of nearly 50% was determined for the rose species Paul's Scarlet. Chromatographic analysis of metabolites extracted from aseptically grown tomato plants proved that the metabolites detected in the cell cultures were also formed in the intact plants. Metabolites produced in tomato and rose cells from [{sup 14}C]-fluoranthene were conjugated with glucose, glucuronic acid, and other cell components. After acid hydrolyses, the main metabolite of both species was 1-hydroxyfluoranthene as identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. The second metabolite formed by both species was 8-hydroxyfluoranthene. A third metabolite in tomatoes was 3-hydroxyfluoranthene.

  16. Metabolic pathways regulated by abscisic acid, salicylic acid and γ-aminobutyric acid in association with improved drought tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Jingjin; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2017-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid (SA) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are known to play roles in regulating plant stress responses. This study was conducted to determine metabolites and associated pathways regulated by ABA, SA and GABA that could contribute to drought tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera). Plants were foliar sprayed with ABA (5 μM), GABA (0.5 mM) and SA (10 μM) or water (untreated control) prior to 25 days drought stress in controlled growth chambers. Application of ABA, GABA or SA had similar positive effects on alleviating drought damages, as manifested by the maintenance of lower electrolyte leakage and greater relative water content in leaves of treated plants relative to the untreated control. Metabolic profiling showed that ABA, GABA and SA induced differential metabolic changes under drought stress. ABA mainly promoted the accumulation of organic acids associated with tricarboxylic acid cycle (aconitic acid, succinic acid, lactic acid and malic acid). SA strongly stimulated the accumulation of amino acids (proline, serine, threonine and alanine) and carbohydrates (glucose, mannose, fructose and cellobiose). GABA enhanced the accumulation of amino acids (GABA, glycine, valine, proline, 5-oxoproline, serine, threonine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid) and organic acids (malic acid, lactic acid, gluconic acid, malonic acid and ribonic acid). The enhanced drought tolerance could be mainly due to the enhanced respiration metabolism by ABA, amino acids and carbohydrates involved in osmotic adjustment (OA) and energy metabolism by SA, and amino acid metabolism related to OA and stress-defense secondary metabolism by GABA.

  17. Purification and Structural and Kinetic Characterization of the Pyrophosphate:Fructose-6-Phosphate 1-Phosphotransferase from the Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant, Pineapple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripodi, KEJ.; Podesta, F. E.

    1997-03-01

    Pyrphosphate-dependent phosphofructokinase (PFP) was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from illuminated pineapple (Ananas comosus) leaves. The purified enzyme consists of a single subunit of 61.5 kD that is immunologically related to the potato tuber PFP [beta] subunit. The native form of PFP likely consists of a homodimer of 97.2 kD, as determined by gel filtration. PFP's glycolytic activity was strongly dependent on pH, displaying a maximum at pH 7.7 to 7.9. Gluconeogenic activity was relatively constant between pH 6.7 and 8.7. Activation by Fru-2,6-bisphosphate (Fru-2,6-P2) was dependent on assay pH. In the glycolytic direction, it activated about 10-fold at pH 6.7, but only 2-fold at pH 7.7. The gluconeogenic reaction was only weakly affected by Fru-2,6-P2. The true substrates for the PFP forward and reverse reactions were Fru-6-phosphate and Mg-pyrophosphate, and Fru-1,6-P2, orthophosphate, and Mg2+, respectively. The results suggest that pineapple PFP displays regulatory properties consistent with a pH-based regulation of its glycolytic activity, in which a decrease in cytosolic pH caused by nocturnal acidification during Crassulacean acid metabolism, which could curtail its activity, is compensated by a parallel increase in its sensitivity to Fru-2,6-P2. It is also evident that the [beta] subunit alone is sufficient to confer PFP with a high catalytic rate and the regulatory properties associated with activation by Fru-2,6-P2.

  18. Metabolic engineering of Pichia pastoris to produce ricinoleic acid, a hydroxy fatty acid of industrial importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesapyodsuk, Dauenpen; Chen, Yan; Ng, Siew Hon; Chen, Jianan; Qiu, Xiao

    2015-11-01

    Ricinoleic acid (12-hydroxyoctadec-cis-9-enoic acid) has many specialized uses in bioproduct industries, while castor bean is currently the only commercial source for the fatty acid. This report describes metabolic engineering of a microbial system (Pichia pastoris) to produce ricinoleic acid using a "push" (synthesis) and "pull" (assembly) strategy. CpFAH, a fatty acid hydroxylase from Claviceps purpurea, was used for synthesis of ricinoleic acid, and CpDGAT1, a diacylglycerol acyl transferase for the triacylglycerol synthesis from the same species, was used for assembly of the fatty acid. Coexpression of CpFAH and CpDGAT1 produced higher lipid contents and ricinoleic acid levels than expression of CpFAH alone. Coexpression in a mutant haploid strain defective in the Δ12 desaturase activity resulted in a higher level of ricinoleic acid than that in the diploid strain. Intriguingly, the ricinoleic acid produced was mainly distributed in the neutral lipid fractions, particularly the free fatty acid form, but with little in the polar lipids. This work demonstrates the effectiveness of the metabolic engineering strategy and excellent capacity of the microbial system for production of ricinoleic acid as an alternative to plant sources for industrial uses. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Salicylic acid-independent plant defence pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Pieterse, C.M.J.; Loon, L. C. Van

    1999-01-01

    Salicylic acid is an important signalling molecule involved in both locally and systemically induced disease resistance responses. Recent advances in our understanding of plant defence signalling have revealed that plants employ a network of signal transduction pathways, some of which are independent of salicylic acid. Evidence is emerging that jasmonic acid and ethylene play key roles in these salicylic acid-independent pathways. Cross-talk between the salicylic acid-dependent and the salicy...

  20. Cytokines: muscle protein and amino acid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hall, Gerrit

    2012-01-01

    raises TNF-α and IL-6 to moderate levels, has only identified IL-6 as a potent cytokine, decreasing systemic amino acid levels and muscle protein metabolism. The marked decrease in circulatory and muscle amino acid concentrations was observed with a concomitant reduction in both the rates of muscle...... of IL-6 on the regulation of muscle protein metabolism but indirectly via IL-6 reducing amino acid availability. SUMMARY: Recent studies suggest that the best described cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 are unlikely to be the major direct mediators of muscle protein loss in inflammatory diseases. However...... protein synthesis and breakdown, that is, reduced turnover with a minor increase in net muscle degradation. Very similar observations have been made in models of acute inflammation, induced by high-dose endotoxin injection. However, these changes were suggested not to be attributed to a direct effect...

  1. Cytokines: muscle protein and amino acid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hall, Gerrit

    2012-01-01

    raises TNF-α and IL-6 to moderate levels, has only identified IL-6 as a potent cytokine, decreasing systemic amino acid levels and muscle protein metabolism. The marked decrease in circulatory and muscle amino acid concentrations was observed with a concomitant reduction in both the rates of muscle...... protein synthesis and breakdown, that is, reduced turnover with a minor increase in net muscle degradation. Very similar observations have been made in models of acute inflammation, induced by high-dose endotoxin injection. However, these changes were suggested not to be attributed to a direct effect...... of IL-6 on the regulation of muscle protein metabolism but indirectly via IL-6 reducing amino acid availability. SUMMARY: Recent studies suggest that the best described cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 are unlikely to be the major direct mediators of muscle protein loss in inflammatory diseases. However...

  2. Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Secondary Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Qing Yang; Xin Fang; Xiu-Ming Wu; Ying-Bo Mao; Ling-Jian Wang; Xiao-Ya Chen

    2012-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites play critical roles in plant-environment interactions.They are synthesized in different organs or tissues at particular developmental stages,and in response to various environmental stimuli,both biotic and abiotic.Accordingly,corresponding genes are regulated at the transcriptional level by multiple transcription factors.Several families of transcription factors have been identified to participate in controlling the biosynthesis and accumulation of secondary metabolites.These regulators integrate internal (often developmental) and external signals,bind to corresponding cis-elements — which are often in the promoter regions — to activate or repress the expression of enzyme-coding genes,and some of them interact with other transcription factors to form a complex.In this review,we summarize recent research in these areas,with an emphasis on newly-identified transcription factors and their functions in metabolism regulation.

  3. Plant growth, metabolism and adaptation in relation to stress conditions. XXVII. Can ascorbic acid modify the adverse effects of NaCl and mannitol on amino acids, nucleic acids and protein patterns in Vicia faba seedlings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, M E; Hasaneen, M N A; Kazamel, A M S

    2009-03-01

    The adverse effects of either NaCl or mannitol on amino acids, protein patterns and nucleic acids in Vicia faba seeds were investigated. The exogenous addition of 4 mM ascorbic acid to the stressing media in which the broad bean seeds were germinated in combination with either the ionic (NaCl) or osmotic (mannitol) stressor induced significant protective changes in the total amount and in the relative composition of amino acids in general and in proline, glycine, glutamic, aspartic, alanine and serine in particular. It also induced changes in nucleic acids (RNA and DNA) content. These changes occurred throughout the entire period of the experiments (12 days). Separate administration of NaCl or mannitol enhanced the occurrence of particular novel proteins that were not detected in control bean seeds (water medium). Protein banding patterns of broad bean seedlings treated with NaCl or mannitol in combination with 4 mM ascorbic acid showed different de novo protein bands, with different molecular weights, at different stages of seedlings growth, with lower levels or a nearly complete absence of the major stress proteins. The pattern of changes for amino acids and nucleic acids and the range of protein bands extracted from the variously treated broad bean seedlings indicate a positive role of ascorbic acid in the alleviation of the damage effects induced by NaCl and mannitol. The importance of this role in the stress tolerance of broad beans is discussed.

  4. IDH1 mutations alter citric acid cycle metabolism and increase dependence on oxidative mitochondrial metabolism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grassian, Alexandra R; Parker, Seth J; Davidson, Shawn M; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Green, Courtney R; Zhang, Xiamei; Slocum, Kelly L; Pu, Minying; Lin, Fallon; Vickers, Chad; Joud-Caldwell, Carol; Chung, Franklin; Yin, Hong; Handly, Erika D; Straub, Christopher; Growney, Joseph D; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Murphy, Anne N; Pagliarini, Raymond; Metallo, Christian M

    2014-01-01

    .... We observed that under hypoxic conditions, IDH1-mutant cells exhibited increased oxidative tricarboxylic acid metabolism along with decreased reductive glutamine metabolism, but not IDH2-mutant cells...

  5. A survey for isoenzymes of glucosephosphate isomerase, phosphoglucomutase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-Phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in C3-, C 4-and crassulacean-acid-metabolism plants, and green algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, M; Burkhard, C; Schnarrenberger, C

    1979-01-01

    Two isoenzymes each of glucosephosphate isomerase (EC 5.3.1.9), phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.43) were separated by (NH4)2SO4 gradient solubilization and DEAE-cellulose ion-exchange chromatography from green leaves of the C3-plants spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), of the Crassulacean-acid-metabolism plants Crassula lycopodioides Lam., Bryophyllum calycinum Salisb. and Sedum rubrotinctum R.T. Clausen, and from the green algae Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardii. After isolation of cell organelles from spinach leaves by isopyenic centrifugation in sucrose gradients one of two isoenzymes of each of the four enzymes was found to be associated with whole chloroplasts while the other was restricted to the soluble cell fraction, implying the same intracellular distribution of these isoenzymes also in the other species.Among C4-plants, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase were found in only one form in corn (Zea mays L.), sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum L.) and Coix lacrymajobi L., but as two isoenzymes in Atriplex spongiosa L. and Portulaca oleracea L. In corn, the two dehydrogenases were mainly associated with isolated mesophyll protoplasts while in Atriplex spongiosa they were of similar specific activity in both mesophyll protoplasts and bundle-sheath strands. In all five C4-plants three isoenzymes of glucosephosphate isomerase and phosphoglucomutase were found. In corn two were localized in the bundle-sheath strands and the third one in the mesophyll protoplasts. The amount of activity of the enzymes was similar in each of the two cell fractions. Apparently, C4 plants have isoenzymes not only in two cell compartments, but also in physiologically closely linked cell types such as mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells.

  6. Metabolic engineering of micronutrients in crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancquaert, Dieter; De Steur, Hans; Gellynck, Xavier; Van Der Straeten, Dominique

    2017-02-01

    Micronutrient deficiency is a widespread phenomenon, most prevalent in developing countries. Being causally linked to the occurrence of a range of diseases, it affects billions of people worldwide. Enhancing the content of micronutrients in crop products through biotechnology is a promising technique to fight micronutrient malnutrition worldwide. Micronutrient fortification of food products has been implemented in a number of Western countries, but remains inaccessible for poor rural populations in a major part of the developing world. Moreover, evidence of the negative impacts of this practice on human health, at least for some vitamins, is accumulating. Biofortification of crop plants-the enhancement of vitamins and minerals through plant biotechnology-is a promising alternative or complement in the battle against micronutrient deficiencies. Owing to a growing knowledge about vitamin metabolism, as well as mineral uptake and reallocation in plants, it is today possible to enhance micronutrient levels in crop plants, offering a sustainable solution to populations with a suboptimal micronutrient intake. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  7. Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis: A Systemic Metabolic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Orson W.

    2014-01-01

    Uric acid nephrolithiasis is characteristically a manifestation of a systemic metabolic disorder. It has a prevalence of about 10% among all stone formers, the third most common type of kidney stone in the industrialized world. Uric acid stones form primarily due to an unduly acid urine; less deciding factors are hyperuricosuria and a low urine volume. The vast majority of uric acid stone formers have the metabolic syndrome, and not infrequently, clinical gout is present as well. A universal finding is a low baseline urine pH plus insufficient production of urinary ammonium buffer. Persons with gastrointestinal disorders, in particular chronic diarrhea or ostomies, and patients with malignancies with a large tumor mass and high cell turnover comprise a less common but nevertheless important subset. Pure uric acid stones are radiolucent but well visualized on renal ultrasound. A 24 h urine collection for stone risk analysis provides essential insight into the pathophysiology of stone formation and may guide therapy. Management includes a liberal fluid intake and dietary modification. Potassium citrate to alkalinize the urine to a goal pH between 6 and 6.5 is essential, as undissociated uric acid deprotonates into its much more soluble urate form. PMID:25045326

  8. Polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berquin, Isabelle M; Edwards, Iris J; Kridel, Steven J; Chen, Yong Q

    2011-12-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) play important roles in the normal physiology and in pathological states including inflammation and cancer. While much is known about the biosynthesis and biological activities of eicosanoids derived from ω6 PUFA, our understanding of the corresponding ω3 series lipid mediators is still rudimentary. The purpose of this review is not to offer a comprehensive summary of the literature on fatty acids in prostate cancer but rather to highlight some of the areas where key questions remain to be addressed. These include substrate preference and polymorphic variants of enzymes involved in the metabolism of PUFA, the relationship between de novo lipid synthesis and dietary lipid metabolism pathways, the contribution of cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases as well as terminal synthases and prostanoid receptors in prostate cancer, and the potential role of PUFA in angiogenesis and cell surface receptor signaling.

  9. Metabolism of dicarboxylic acids in rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergseth, S; Poisson, J P; Bremer, J

    1990-02-06

    [carboxyl-14C]Dodecanedioic acid (DC12) is metabolized in hepatocytes at a rate about two thirds that of [1-14C]palmitate. Shorter dicarboxylates (sebacic (DC10), suberic (DC8), and adipic (DC6) acid) are formed, mainly DC6, less DC8 and only a little DC10. In hepatocytes from clofibrate-treated rats, more polar products account for most of the breakdown products, presumably because the beta-oxidation proceeds all the way to succinate and acetyl-CoA. [carboxyl-14C]Suberic acid (DC8) is oxidized at a rate only one fifth that of dodecanedioic acid. (+)-Decanoylcarnitine inhibits palmitate oxidation but not the oxidation of dodecanedioic acid. At low concentrations of [carboxyl-14C]dodecanedioic acid or of [1-14C]palmitate, acetylsulfanilamide is more efficiently labeled by the former. High concentrations of dodecanedioic acid inhibit palmitate oxidation and the acetylation of sulfanilamide, presumably because their CoA-esters accumulate in the cytosol. These results indicate that medium-chain dicarboxylic acids are beta-oxidized mainly in the peroxisomes.

  10. Plant diterpene synthases: exploring modularity and metabolic diversity for bioengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbe, Philipp; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2015-07-01

    Plants produce thousands of diterpenoid natural products; some of which are of significant industrial value as biobased pharmaceuticals (taxol), fragrances (sclareol), food additives (steviosides), and commodity chemicals (diterpene resin acids). In nature, diterpene synthase (diTPS) enzymes are essential for generating diverse diterpene hydrocarbon scaffolds. While some diTPSs also form oxygenated compounds, more commonly, oxygenation is achieved by cytochrome P450-dependent mono-oxygenases. Recent genome-, transcriptome-, and metabolome-guided gene discovery and enzyme characterization identified novel diTPS functions that form the core of complex modular pathway systems. Insights into diterpene metabolism may translate into the development of new bioengineered microbial and plant-based production systems.

  11. Metabolic engineering of plants using a disarmed potyvirus vector

    OpenAIRE

    Majer, Eszter

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Plant viruses are obligate intracellular parasites which were used to develop recombinant plant virus vectors to express heterologous proteins and to modify endogenous metabolic pathways of natural products in plants. The main limitation of many plant virus-based systems is the difficulty to co-express various heterologous proteins in the same cell with proper subcellular localization, which is a crucial question in metabolic engineering. This work provides a solution to overcome this pr...

  12. In vivo synthesis of nanomaterials in plants: location of silver nanoparticles and plant metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiol, Luca; Mattiello, Alessandro; Pošćić, Filip; Giordano, Cristiana; Musetti, Rita

    2014-03-01

    Metallic nanoparticles (MeNPs) can be formed in living plants by reduction of the metal ions absorbed as soluble salts. It is very likely that plant metabolism has an important role in MeNP biosynthesis. The in vivo formation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was observed in Brassica juncea, Festuca rubra and Medicago sativa. Plants were grown in Hoagland's solution for 30 days and then exposed for 24 h to a solution of 1,000 ppm AgNO3. In the leaf extracts of control plants, the concentrations of glucose, fructose, ascorbic acid, citric acid and total polyphenols were determined. Total Ag content in plant fractions was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Despite the short exposure time, the Ag uptake and translocation to plant leaves was very high, reaching 6,156 and 2,459 mg kg-1 in B. juncea and F. rubra, respectively. Ultrastructural analysis was performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and AgNPs were detected by TEM X-ray microanalysis. TEM images of plant fractions showed the in vivo formation of AgNPs in the roots, stems and leaves of the plants. In the roots, AgNPs were present in the cortical parenchymal cells, on the cell wall of the xylem vessels and in regions corresponding to the pits. In leaf tissues, AgNPs of different sizes and shapes were located close to the cell wall, as well as in the cytoplasm and within chloroplasts. AgNPs were not observed in the phloem of the three plant species. This is the first report of AgNP synthesis in living plants of F. rubra. The contents of reducing sugars and antioxidant compounds, proposed as being involved in the biosynthesis of AgNPs, were quite different between the species, thus suggesting that it is unlikely that a single substance is responsible for this process.

  13. Photoreceptor effects on plant biomass, resource allocation, and metabolic state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deyue; Seaton, Daniel D; Krahmer, Johanna; Halliday, Karen J

    2016-07-05

    Plants sense the light environment through an ensemble of photoreceptors. Members of the phytochrome class of light receptors are known to play a critical role in seedling establishment, and are among the best-characterized plant signaling components. Phytochromes also regulate adult plant growth; however, our knowledge of this process is rather fragmented. This study demonstrates that phytochrome controls carbon allocation and biomass production in the developing plant. Phytochrome mutants have a reduced CO2 uptake, yet overaccumulate daytime sucrose and starch. This finding suggests that even though carbon fixation is impeded, the available carbon resources are not fully used for growth during the day. Supporting this notion, phytochrome depletion alters the proportion of day:night growth. In addition, phytochrome loss leads to sizeable reductions in overall growth, dry weight, total protein levels, and the expression of CELLULOSE SYNTHASE-LIKE genes. Because cellulose and protein are major constituents of plant biomass, our data point to an important role for phytochrome in regulating these fundamental components of plant productivity. We show that phytochrome loss impacts core metabolism, leading to elevated levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, amino acids, sugar derivatives, and notably the stress metabolites proline and raffinose. Furthermore, the already growth-retarded phytochrome mutants are less responsive to growth-inhibiting abiotic stresses and have elevated expression of stress marker genes. This coordinated response appears to divert resources from energetically costly biomass production to improve resilience. In nature, this strategy may be activated in phytochrome-disabling, vegetation-dense habitats to enhance survival in potentially resource-limiting conditions.

  14. Bile Acid Signaling in Liver Metabolism and Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiangang Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndromes are increasingly recognized as health concerns worldwide. Overnutrition and insulin resistance are the major causes of diabetic hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia in humans. Studies in the past decade provide evidence that bile acids are not just biological detergents facilitating gut nutrient absorption, but also important metabolic regulators of glucose and lipid homeostasis. Pharmacological alteration of bile acid metabolism or bile acid signaling pathways such as using bile acid receptor agonists or bile acid binding resins may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. On the other hand, bile acid signaling is complex, and the molecular mechanisms mediating the bile acid effects are still not completely understood. This paper will summarize recent advances in our understanding of bile acid signaling in regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism, and the potentials of developing novel therapeutic strategies that target bile acid metabolism for the treatment of metabolic disorders.

  15. Arsenic uptake and metabolism in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, F J; Ma, J F; Meharg, A A; McGrath, S P

    2009-03-01

    Arsenic (As) is an element that is nonessential for and toxic to plants. Arsenic contamination in the environment occurs in many regions, and, depending on environmental factors, its accumulation in food crops may pose a health risk to humans.Recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of As uptake and metabolism in plants is reviewed here. Arsenate is taken up by phosphate transporters. A number of the aquaporin nodulin26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs) are able to transport arsenite,the predominant form of As in reducing environments. In rice (Oryza sativa), arsenite uptake shares the highly efficient silicon (Si) pathway of entry to root cells and efflux towards the xylem. In root cells arsenate is rapidly reduced to arsenite, which is effluxed to the external medium, complexed by thiol peptides or translocated to shoots. One type of arsenate reductase has been identified, but its in planta functions remain to be investigated. Some fern species in the Pteridaceae family are able to hyperaccumulate As in above-ground tissues. Hyperaccumulation appears to involve enhanced arsenate uptake, decreased arsenite-thiol complexation and arsenite efflux to the external medium, greatly enhanced xylem translocation of arsenite, and vacuolar sequestration of arsenite in fronds. Current knowledge gaps and future research directions are also identified.

  16. Linking uric acid metabolism to diabetic complications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akifumi; Kushiyama; Kentaro; Tanaka; Shigeko; Hara; Shoji; Kawazu

    2014-01-01

    Hyperuricemia have been thought to be caused by the ingestion of large amounts of purines, and prevention or treatment of hyperuricemia has intended to prevent gout. Xanthine dehydrogenase/xanthine oxidase(XDH/XO) is rate-limiting enzyme of uric acid generation, and allopurinol was developed as a uric acid(UA) generation inhibitor in the 1950 s and has been routinely used for gout prevention since then. Serum UA levels are an important risk factor of disease progression for various diseases, including those related to lifestyle. Recently, other UA generation inhibitors such as febuxostat and topiroxostat were launched. The emergence of these novel medications has promoted new research in the field. Lifestyle-related diseases, such as metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes mellitus, often have a common pathological foundation. As such, hyperuricemia is often present among these patients. Many in vitro and animal studies have implicated inflammation and oxidative stress in UA metabolism and vascular injury because XDH/XO act as one of the major source of reactive oxygen species Many studies on UA levels and associated diseases implicate involvement of UA generation in disease onset and/or progression. Interventional studies for UA generation, not UA excretion revealed XDH/XO can be the therapeutic target forvascular injury and renal dysfunction. In this review, the relationship between UA metabolism and diabetic complications is highlighted.

  17. Influences of soil volume and an elevated CO[sub 2] level on growth and CO[sub 2] exchange for the crassulacean acid metabolism plant Opuntia ficus-indica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobel, P.S.; Cui, M.; Miller, P.M.; Luo, Y. (UCLA-DOE Lab., Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1994-01-01

    Effects of the current (38 Pa) and an elevated (74 Pa) CO[sub 2] partial pressure on root and shoot areas, biomass accumulation and daily net CO[sub 2] exchange were determined for opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Miller, a highly productive Crassulacean acid metabolism species cultivated worldwide. Plants were grown in environmentally controlled rooms for 18 weeks in pots of three soil volumes (2600, 6500 and 26000 cm[sup 3]), the smallest of which was intended to restrict root growth. For plants in the medium-sized soil volume, basal cladodes tended to be thicker and areas of main and lateral roots tended to be greater as the CO[sub 2] level was doubled. Daughter cladodes tended to be initiated sooner at the current compared with the elevated CO[sub 2] level but total areas were similar by 10 weeks. At 10 weeks, daily net CO[sub 2] uptake for the three soil volumes averaged 24% higher for plants growing under elevated compared with current CO-2 levels, but at 18 weeks only 3% enhancement in uptake occurred. Dry weight gain was enhanced 24% by elevated CO[sub 2] during the first 10 weeks but only 8% over 18 weeks. Increasing the soil volume 10-fold led to a greater stimulation of daily net CO[sub 2] uptake and biomass production than did doubling the CO[sub 2] level. At 18 weeks, root biomass doubled and shoot biomass nearly doubled as the soil volume was increased 10-fold; the effects of soil volume tended to be greater for elevated CO[sub 2]. The amount of cladode nitrogen per unit dry weight decreased as the CO[sub 2] level was raised and increased as soil volume increased, the latter suggesting that the effects of soil volume could be due to nitrogen limitations. (au) (30 refs.)

  18. Phenolic metabolism of Matricaria chamomilla plants exposed to nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovácik, Jozef; Klejdus, Borivoj; Backor, Martin

    2009-09-01

    We examined accumulation of phenolic acids, total soluble phenolics and flavonoids, and activities of phenolic metabolism-related enzymes (shikimate dehydrogenase (SKDH), phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD), polyphenol oxidase (PPO)) in Matricaria chamomilla plants exposed to 3, 60 and 120 microM of nickel (Ni) for 10 days. Ni showed low toxicity as indicated by unaltered content of total soluble phenolics in the leaf rosettes. In the roots, the effects of Ni were more visible, including increased total phenolics and PAL activity, but a decrease in PPO activity was observed. CAD activity was not affected by any of the Ni concentrations. Cinnamic acid derivatives were affected more than benzoic acid derivatives. Accumulation of chlorogenic acid, an important antioxidant compound, was enhanced by Ni treatment (ca. 4-fold in 120 microM Ni). Accumulation of protocatechuic acid, a phenol with high chelating strength, even decreased in the leaf rosettes. These observations are discussed in connection to antioxidative properties of phenolic metabolites and previously tested metals (cadmium and copper).

  19. Soybean Aphid Infestation Induces Changes in Fatty Acid Metabolism in Soybean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Kanobe

    Full Text Available The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura is one of the most important insect pests of soybeans in the North-central region of the US. It has been hypothesized that aphids avoid effective defenses by inhibition of jasmonate-regulated plant responses. Given the role fatty acids play in jasmonate-induced plant defenses, we analyzed the fatty acid profile of soybean leaves and seeds from aphid-infested plants. Aphid infestation reduced levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in leaves with a concomitant increase in palmitic acid. In seeds, a reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids was associated with an increase in stearic acid and oleic acid. Soybean plants challenged with the brown stem rot fungus or with soybean cyst nematodes did not present changes in fatty acid levels in leaves or seeds, indicating that the changes induced by aphids are not a general response to pests. One of the polyunsaturated fatty acids, linolenic acid, is the precursor of jasmonate; thus, these changes in fatty acid metabolism may be examples of "metabolic hijacking" by the aphid to avoid the induction of effective defenses. Based on the changes in fatty acid levels observed in seeds and leaves, we hypothesize that aphids potentially induce interference in the fatty acid desaturation pathway, likely reducing FAD2 and FAD6 activity that leads to a reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Our data support the idea that aphids block jasmonate-dependent defenses by reduction of the hormone precursor.

  20. 2007 Plant Metabolic Engineering Gordon Conference and Graduate Research Seminar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erich Grotewold

    2008-09-15

    Plant Metabolic Engineering is an emerging field that integrates a diverse range of disciplines including plant genetics, genomics, biochemistry, chemistry and cell biology. The Gordon-Kenan Graduate Research Seminar (GRS) in Plant Metabolic Engineering was initiated to provide a unique opportunity for future researcher leaders to present their work in this field. It also creates an environment allowing for peer-review and critical assessment of work without the intimidation usually associated with the presence of senior investigators. The GRS immediately precedes the Plant Metabolic Engineering Gordon Research Conference and will be for and by graduate students and post-docs, with the assistance of the organizers listed.

  1. Impacts of diversification of cytochrome P450 on plant metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Masaharu

    2012-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) catalyze a wide variety of monooxygenation reactions in primary and secondary metabolism in plants. The share of P450 genes in each plant genome is estimated to be up to 1%. This implies that the diversification of P450 has made a significant contribution to the ability to acquire the emergence of new metabolic pathways during land plant evolution. The P450 families conserved universally in land plants contribute to their chemical defense mechanisms. Several P450s are involved in the biosynthesis and catabolism of plant hormones. Species-specific P450 families are essential for the biosynthetic pathways of phytochemicals such as terpenoids and alkaloids. Genome wide analysis of the gene clusters including P450 genes will provide a clue to defining the metabolic roles of orphan P450s. Metabolic engineering with plant P450s is an important technology for large-scale production of valuable phytochemicals such as medicines.

  2. Engineering Plant One-Carbon Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Rhodes

    2005-02-09

    reconverted to Met by donating a methyl group to homocysteine, and concurrent operation of this reaction and that mediated by MMT sets up the SMM cycle. The genes encoding the enzymes of the SMM cycle were cloned and characterized during this project. SMM has been hypothesized to be essential as a methyl donor or as a transport form of sulfur, and the SMM cycle has been hypothesized to guard against depletion of the free Met pool by excess AdoMet synthesis, or to regulate AdoMet level and hence the AdoMet/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio (the methylation ratio). To test these hypotheses, we isolated insertional mmt mutants of Arabidopsis and maize. Both mutants lacked the capacity to produce SMM and thus had no SMM cycle. They nevertheless grew and reproduced normally and the seeds of the Arabidopsis mutant had normal sulfur contents. These findings rule out an indispensable role for SMM as a methyl donor or in sulfur transport. The Arabidopsis mutant had significantly higher AdoMet a nd lower S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHCy) levels than the wild type, and consequently a higher methylation ratio (20 vs. 14). Free Met and thiol pools were unaltered in this mutant, although there was a 50% decrease in free threonine (Thr) and changes in other amino acids. These data indicate that the SMM cycle contributes to regulation of AdoMet levels rather than preventing depletion of free Met. Since AdoMet activates Thr synthase, that Thr level was not higher but lower in the mmt mutant implies that AdoMet is sequestered away from Thr synthase, which is chloroplastic. Results obtained with the Arabidopsis mmt mutant and wildtype have been integrated into a metabolic model of the intersecting methylation, SMM, and methionine salvage cycles. This model adequately accounts for the steady-state pool sizes of Met, SMM, AdoMet and AdoHCy in wildtype, and the small changes in AdoMet and AdoHCy levels associated with knockout of MMT. This model is now being used to predict the time-course of changes in

  3. Knocking down mitochondrial iron transporter (MIT) reprograms primary and secondary metabolism in rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigani, Gianpiero; Bashir, Khurram; Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Lehmann, Martin; Casiraghi, Fabio Marco; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Seki, Motoaki; Geigenberger, Peter; Zocchi, Graziano; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2016-03-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient for plant growth and development, and its reduced bioavailability strongly impairs mitochondrial functionality. In this work, the metabolic adjustment in the rice (Oryza sativa) mitochondrial Fe transporter knockdown mutant (mit-2) was analysed. Biochemical characterization of purified mitochondria from rice roots showed alteration in the respiratory chain of mit-2 compared with wild-type (WT) plants. In particular, proteins belonging to the type II alternative NAD(P)H dehydrogenases accumulated strongly in mit-2 plants, indicating that alternative pathways were activated to keep the respiratory chain working. Additionally, large-scale changes in the transcriptome and metabolome were observed in mit-2 rice plants. In particular, a strong alteration (up-/down-regulation) in the expression of genes encoding enzymes of both primary and secondary metabolism was found in mutant plants. This was reflected by changes in the metabolic profiles in both roots and shoots of mit-2 plants. Significant alterations in the levels of amino acids belonging to the aspartic acid-related pathways (aspartic acid, lysine, and threonine in roots, and aspartic acid and ornithine in shoots) were found that are strictly connected to the Krebs cycle. Furthermore, some metabolites (e.g. pyruvic acid, fumaric acid, ornithine, and oligosaccharides of the raffinose family) accumulated only in the shoot of mit-2 plants, indicating possible hypoxic responses. These findings suggest that the induction of local Fe deficiency in the mitochondrial compartment of mit-2 plants differentially affects the transcript as well as the metabolic profiles in root and shoot tissues. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  4. Metabolic engineering for the production of plant isoquinoline alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Andrew; Desgagné-Penix, Isabel

    2016-06-01

    Several plant isoquinoline alkaloids (PIAs) possess powerful pharmaceutical and biotechnological properties. Thus, PIA metabolism and its fascinating molecules, including morphine, colchicine and galanthamine, have attracted the attention of both the industry and researchers involved in plant science, biochemistry, chemical bioengineering and medicine. Currently, access and availability of high-value PIAs [commercialized (e.g. galanthamine) or not (e.g. narciclasine)] is limited by low concentration in nature, lack of cultivation or geographic access, seasonal production and risk of overharvesting wild plant species. Nevertheless, most commercial PIAs are still extracted from plant sources. Efforts to improve the production of PIA have largely been impaired by the lack of knowledge on PIA metabolism. With the development and integration of next-generation sequencing technologies, high-throughput proteomics and metabolomics analyses and bioinformatics, systems biology was used to unravel metabolic pathways allowing the use of metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches to increase production of valuable PIAs. Metabolic engineering provides opportunity to overcome issues related to restricted availability, diversification and productivity of plant alkaloids. Engineered plant, plant cells and microbial cell cultures can act as biofactories by offering their metabolic machinery for the purpose of optimizing the conditions and increasing the productivity of a specific alkaloid. In this article, is presented an update on the production of PIA in engineered plant, plant cell cultures and heterologous micro-organisms.

  5. Amino acids: metabolism, functions, and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guoyao

    2009-05-01

    Recent years have witnessed the discovery that amino acids (AA) are not only cell signaling molecules but are also regulators of gene expression and the protein phosphorylation cascade. Additionally, AA are key precursors for syntheses of hormones and low-molecular weight nitrogenous substances with each having enormous biological importance. Physiological concentrations of AA and their metabolites (e.g., nitric oxide, polyamines, glutathione, taurine, thyroid hormones, and serotonin) are required for the functions. However, elevated levels of AA and their products (e.g., ammonia, homocysteine, and asymmetric dimethylarginine) are pathogenic factors for neurological disorders, oxidative stress, and cardiovascular disease. Thus, an optimal balance among AA in the diet and circulation is crucial for whole body homeostasis. There is growing recognition that besides their role as building blocks of proteins and polypeptides, some AA regulate key metabolic pathways that are necessary for maintenance, growth, reproduction, and immunity. They are called functional AA, which include arginine, cysteine, glutamine, leucine, proline, and tryptophan. Dietary supplementation with one or a mixture of these AA may be beneficial for (1) ameliorating health problems at various stages of the life cycle (e.g., fetal growth restriction, neonatal morbidity and mortality, weaning-associated intestinal dysfunction and wasting syndrome, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, the metabolic syndrome, and infertility); (2) optimizing efficiency of metabolic transformations to enhance muscle growth, milk production, egg and meat quality and athletic performance, while preventing excess fat deposition and reducing adiposity. Thus, AA have important functions in both nutrition and health.

  6. Effects of an energy-restricted diet rich in plant-derived α-linolenic acid on systemic inflammation and endothelial function in overweight-to-obese patients with metabolic syndrome traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egert, Sarah; Baxheinrich, Andrea; Lee-Barkey, Young Hee; Tschoepe, Diethelm; Wahrburg, Ursel; Stratmann, Bernd

    2014-10-28

    Plant-derived α-linolenic acid (ALA) may reduce the risk of CVD, possibly by decreasing systemic inflammation and improving endothelial function. In the present study, the effects of a hypoenergetic diet rich in ALA (3·4 g/d) on the biomarkers of systemic inflammation and vascular function were investigated in eighty-one overweight-to-obese patients with metabolic syndrome traits in comparison with a hypoenergetic diet low in ALA (0·9 g/d, control). After a 6-month dietary intervention, there were significant decreases in the serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), TNF-α, IL-6, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), soluble endothelial selectin (sE-selectin) and asymmetric dimethylarginine in both dietary groups. However, no inter-group differences were observed for all these changes. The serum concentration of YKL-40 (human cartilage glycoprotein 39 or chitinase-3-like protein 1) decreased after the ALA diet when compared with the control diet (Pmetabolic syndrome traits, both vascular function and inflammation are improved during body-weight loss. The high ALA intake led to a more pronounced reduction in the serum concentration of YKL-40 compared with the intake of the low-ALA control diet, indicating the existence of independent favourable physiological effects of ALA during weight loss.

  7. Engineering crassulacean acid metabolism to improve water-use efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borland, Anne M; Hartwell, James; Weston, David J; Schlauch, Karen A; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Tuskan, Gerald A; Yang, Xiaohan; Cushman, John C

    2014-05-01

    Climatic extremes threaten agricultural sustainability worldwide. One approach to increase plant water-use efficiency (WUE) is to introduce crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) into C3 crops. Such a task requires comprehensive systems-level understanding of the enzymatic and regulatory pathways underpinning this temporal CO2 pump. Here we review the progress that has been made in achieving this goal. Given that CAM arose through multiple independent evolutionary origins, comparative transcriptomics and genomics of taxonomically diverse CAM species are being used to define the genetic 'parts list' required to operate the core CAM functional modules of nocturnal carboxylation, diurnal decarboxylation, and inverse stomatal regulation. Engineered CAM offers the potential to sustain plant productivity for food, feed, fiber, and biofuel production in hotter and drier climates.

  8. Engineering Plant One-Carbon Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Rhodes

    2005-02-09

    reconverted to Met by donating a methyl group to homocysteine, and concurrent operation of this reaction and that mediated by MMT sets up the SMM cycle. The genes encoding the enzymes of the SMM cycle were cloned and characterized during this project. SMM has been hypothesized to be essential as a methyl donor or as a transport form of sulfur, and the SMM cycle has been hypothesized to guard against depletion of the free Met pool by excess AdoMet synthesis, or to regulate AdoMet level and hence the AdoMet/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio (the methylation ratio). To test these hypotheses, we isolated insertional mmt mutants of Arabidopsis and maize. Both mutants lacked the capacity to produce SMM and thus had no SMM cycle. They nevertheless grew and reproduced normally and the seeds of the Arabidopsis mutant had normal sulfur contents. These findings rule out an indispensable role for SMM as a methyl donor or in sulfur transport. The Arabidopsis mutant had significantly higher AdoMet a nd lower S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHCy) levels than the wild type, and consequently a higher methylation ratio (20 vs. 14). Free Met and thiol pools were unaltered in this mutant, although there was a 50% decrease in free threonine (Thr) and changes in other amino acids. These data indicate that the SMM cycle contributes to regulation of AdoMet levels rather than preventing depletion of free Met. Since AdoMet activates Thr synthase, that Thr level was not higher but lower in the mmt mutant implies that AdoMet is sequestered away from Thr synthase, which is chloroplastic. Results obtained with the Arabidopsis mmt mutant and wildtype have been integrated into a metabolic model of the intersecting methylation, SMM, and methionine salvage cycles. This model adequately accounts for the steady-state pool sizes of Met, SMM, AdoMet and AdoHCy in wildtype, and the small changes in AdoMet and AdoHCy levels associated with knockout of MMT. This model is now being used to predict the time-course of changes in

  9. Amino acids in the rhizosphere: from plants to microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Luke A

    2013-09-01

    Often referred to as the "building blocks of proteins", the 20 canonical proteinogenic amino acids are ubiquitous in biological systems as the functional units in proteins. Sometimes overlooked are their varying additional roles that include serving as metabolic intermediaries, playing structural roles in bioactive natural products, acting as cosubstrates in enzymatic transformations, and as key regulators of cellular physiology. Amino acids can also serve as biological sources of both carbon and nitrogen and are found in the rhizosphere as a result of lysis or cellular efflux from plants and microbes and proteolysis of existing peptides. While both plants and microbes apparently prefer to take up nitrogen in its inorganic form, their ability to take up and use amino acids may confer a selective advantage in certain environments where organic nitrogen is abundant. Further, certain amino acids (e.g., glutamate and proline) and their betaines (e.g., glycine betaine) serve as compatible solutes necessary for osmoregulation in plants and microbes and can undergo rapid cellular flux. This ability is of particular importance in an ecological niche such as the rhizosphere, which is prone to significant variations in solute concentrations. Amino acids are also shown to alter key phenotypes related to plant root growth and microbial colonization, symbiotic interactions, and pathogenesis in the rhizosphere. This review will focus on the sources, transport mechanisms, and potential roles of the 20 canonical proteinogenic amino acids in the rhizosphere.

  10. Sulfur containing air pollutants and their effects on plant metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kok, L.J.; Maas, F.M.; Stulen, I.; Kuiper, P.J.C.; Mathy, P.

    1988-01-01

    H2S and SO2 affected plant yield at relative low levels without causing visible injury. In general H2S was more toxic than SO2. Short-term exposure (24 to 48 h) of plants to the pollutants affected sulfur, nitrogen and energy metabolism. Both exposure of plants to H2S and SO2 resulted in an accumula

  11. Sulfur containing air pollutants and their effects on plant metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kok, L.J.; Maas, F.M.; Stulen, I.; Kuiper, P.J.C.; Mathy, P.

    1988-01-01

    H2S and SO2 affected plant yield at relative low levels without causing visible injury. In general H2S was more toxic than SO2. Short-term exposure (24 to 48 h) of plants to the pollutants affected sulfur, nitrogen and energy metabolism. Both exposure of plants to H2S and SO2 resulted in an

  12. Omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants in edible wild plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simopoulos, Artemis P

    2004-01-01

    Human beings evolved on a diet that was balanced in the omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and was high in antioxidants. Edible wild plants provide alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and higher amounts of vitamin E and vitamin C than cultivated plants. In addition to the antioxidant vitamins, edible wild plants are rich in phenols and other compounds that increase their antioxidant capacity. It is therefore important to systematically analyze the total antioxidant capacity of wild plants and promote their commercialization in both developed and developing countries. The diets of Western countries have contained increasingly larger amounts of linoleic acid (LA), which has been promoted for its cholesterol-lowering effect. It is now recognized that dietary LA favors oxidative modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and increases platelet response to aggregation. In contrast, ALA intake is associated with inhibitory effects on the clotting activity of platelets, on their response to thrombin, and on the regulation of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism. In clinical studies, ALA contributed to lowering of blood pressure, and a prospective epidemiological study showed that ALA is inversely related to the risk of coronary heart disease in men. Dietary amounts of LA as well as the ratio of LA to ALA appear to be important for the metabolism of ALA to longer-chain omega-3 PUFAs. Relatively large reserves of LA in body fat. as are found in vegans or in the diet of omnivores in Western societies, would tend to slow down the formation of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids from ALA. Therefore, the role of ALA in human nutrition becomes important in terms of long-term dietary intake. One advantage of the consumption of ALA over omega-3 fatty acids from fish is that the problem of insufficient vitamin E intake does not exist with high intake of ALA from plant sources.

  13. Plant Hormones: Metabolism, Signaling and Crosstalk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Jia Qu; Yunde Zhao

    2011-01-01

    @@ Plants synthesize various hormones in response to environmental cues and developmental signals to ensure their proper growth and development.Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms by which plant hormones control growth and development contributes to our understanding of fundamental plant biology and provides tools to improve crops.Because of their critical roles in plant growth and development, plant hormones have been studied extensively since the early days of plant biology.

  14. Understanding the control of acyl flux through the lipid metabolic network of plant oil biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Philip D

    2016-09-01

    Plant oil biosynthesis involves a complex metabolic network with multiple subcellular compartments, parallel pathways, cycles, and pathways that have a dual function to produce essential membrane lipids and triacylglycerol. Modern molecular biology techniques provide tools to alter plant oil compositions through bioengineering, however with few exceptions the final composition of triacylglycerol cannot be predicted. One reason for limited success in oilseed bioengineering is the inadequate understanding of how to control the flux of fatty acids through various fatty acid modification, and triacylglycerol assembly pathways of the lipid metabolic network. This review focuses on the mechanisms of acyl flux through the lipid metabolic network, and highlights where uncertainty resides in our understanding of seed oil biosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner.

  15. Enzymes and Metabolites in Carbohydrate Metabolism of Desiccation Tolerant Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingwei Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Resurrection plants can tolerate extreme water loss. Substantial sugar accumulation is a phenomenon in resurrection plants during dehydration. Sugars have been identified as one important factor contributing to desiccation tolerance. Phylogenetic diversity of resurrection plants reflects the diversity of sugar metabolism in response to dehydration. Sugars, which accumulate during dehydration, have been shown to protect macromolecules and membranes and to scavenge reactive oxygen species. This review focuses on the performance of enzymes participating in sugar metabolism during dehydration stress. The relation between sugar metabolism and other biochemical activities is discussed and open questions as well as potential experimental approaches are proposed.

  16. Salicylic acid-independent plant defence pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, C.M.J.; Loon, L.C. van

    1999-01-01

    Salicylic acid is an important signalling molecule involved in both locally and systemically induced disease resistance responses. Recent advances in our understanding of plant defence signalling have revealed that plants employ a network of signal transduction pathways, some of which are independen

  17. High specificity in plant leaf metabolic responses to arbuscular mycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Rabea; Baier, Markus C; Persicke, Marcus; Müller, Caroline

    2014-05-22

    The chemical composition of plants (phytometabolome) is dynamic and modified by environmental factors. Understanding its modulation allows to improve crop quality and decode mechanisms underlying plant-pest interactions. Many studies that investigate metabolic responses to the environment focus on single model species and/or few target metabolites. However, comparative studies using environmental metabolomics are needed to evaluate commonalities of chemical responses to certain challenges. We assessed the specificity of foliar metabolic responses of five plant species to the widespread, ancient symbiosis with a generalist arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus. Here we show that plant species share a large 'core metabolome' but nevertheless the phytometabolomes are modulated highly species/taxon-specifically. Such a low conservation of responses across species highlights the importance to consider plant metabolic prerequisites and the long time of specific plant-fungus coevolution. Thus, the transferability of findings regarding phytometabolome modulation by an identical AM symbiont is severely limited even between closely related species.

  18. Differential distribution of amino acids in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinod; Sharma, Anket; Kaur, Ravdeep; Thukral, Ashwani Kumar; Bhardwaj, Renu; Ahmad, Parvaiz

    2017-03-15

    Plants are a rich source of amino acids and their individual abundance in plants is of great significance especially in terms of food. Therefore, it is of utmost necessity to create a database of the relative amino acid contents in plants as reported in literature. Since in most of the cases complete analysis of profiles of amino acids in plants was not reported, the units used and the methods applied and the plant parts used were different, amino acid contents were converted into relative units with respect to lysine for statistical analysis. The most abundant amino acids in plants are glutamic acid and aspartic acid. Pearson's correlation analysis among different amino acids showed that there were no negative correlations between the amino acids. Cluster analysis (CA) applied to relative amino acid contents of different families. Alismataceae, Cyperaceae, Capparaceae and Cactaceae families had close proximity with each other on the basis of their relative amino acid contents. First three components of principal component analysis (PCA) explained 79.5% of the total variance. Factor analysis (FA) explained four main underlying factors for amino acid analysis. Factor-1 accounted for 29.4% of the total variance and had maximum loadings on glycine, isoleucine, leucine, threonine and valine. Factor-2 explained 25.8% of the total variance and had maximum loadings on alanine, aspartic acid, serine and tyrosine. 14.2% of the total variance was explained by factor-3 and had maximum loadings on arginine and histidine. Factor-4 accounted 8.3% of the total variance and had maximum loading on the proline amino acid. The relative content of different amino acids presented in this paper is alanine (1.4), arginine (1.8), asparagine (0.7), aspartic acid (2.4), cysteine (0.5), glutamic acid (2.8), glutamine (0.6), glycine (1.0), histidine (0.5), isoleucine (0.9), leucine (1.7), lysine (1.0), methionine (0.4), phenylalanine (0.9), proline (1.1), serine (1.0), threonine (1

  19. Key roles of microsymbiont amino acid metabolism in rhizobia-legume interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Michael Frederick

    2015-01-01

    Rhizobia are bacteria in the α-proteobacterial genera Rhizobium, Sinorhizobium, Mesorhizobium, Azorhizobium and Bradyrhizobium that reduce (fix) atmospheric nitrogen in symbiotic association with a compatible host plant. In free-living and/or symbiotically associated rhizobia, amino acids may, in addition to their incorporation into proteins, serve as carbon, nitrogen or sulfur sources, signals of cellular nitrogen status and precursors of important metabolites. Depending on the rhizobia-host plant combination, microsymbiont amino acid metabolism (biosynthesis, transport and/or degradation) is often crucial to the establishment and maintenance of an effective nitrogen-fixing symbiosis and is intimately interconnected with the metabolism of the plant. This review summarizes past findings and current research directions in rhizobial amino acid metabolism and evaluates the genetic, biochemical and genome expression studies from which these are derived. Specific sections deal with the regulation of rhizobial amino acid metabolism, amino acid transport, and finally the symbiotic roles of individual amino acids in different plant-rhizobia combinations.

  20. Plant biostimulants: physiological responses induced by protein hydrolyzed-based products and humic substances in plant metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serenella Nardi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In recent years, the use of biostimulants in sustainable agriculture has been growing. Biostimulants can be obtained from different organic materials and include humic substances (HS, complex organic materials, beneficial chemical elements, peptides and amino acids, inorganic salts, seaweed extracts, chitin and chitosan derivatives, antitranspirants, amino acids and other N-containing substances. The application of biostimulants to plants leads to higher content of nutrients in their tissue and positive metabolic changes. For these reasons, the development of new biostimulants has become a focus of scientific interest. Among their different functions, biostimulants influence plant growth and nitrogen metabolism, especially because of their content in hormones and other signalling molecules. A significant increase in root hair length and density is often observed in plants treated with biostimulants, suggesting that these substances induce a “nutrient acquisition response” that favors nutrient uptake in plants via an increase in the absorptive surface area. Furthermore, biostimulants positively influence the activity and gene expression of enzymes functioning in the primary and secondary plant metabolism. This article reviews the current literature on two main classes of biostimulants: humic substances and protein-based biostimulants. The characteristic of these biostimulants and their effects on plants are thoroughly described.

  1. Metabolic flux analysis on arachidonic acid fermentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Mingjie; HUANG He; ZHANG Kun; YAN Jie; GAO Zhen

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of flux distributions in metabolic networks has become an important approach for understanding the fermentation characteristics of the process.A model of metabolic flux analysis of arachidonic acid (AA) synthesis in Mortierella alpina ME-1 was established and carbon flux distributions were estimated in different fermentation phases with different concentrations of N-source.During the exponential,decelerating and stationary phase,carbon fluxes to AA were 3.28%,8.80% and 6.97%,respectively,with sufficient N-source broth based on the flux of glucose uptake,and those were increased to 3.95%,19.21% and 39.29%,respectively,by regulating the shifts of carbon fluxes via fermentation with limited N-source broth and adding 0.05%NaNO3 at 96 h.Eventually AA yield was increased from 1.3 to 3.5 g.L-1.These results suggest a way to improve AA fermentation,that is,fermentation with limited N-source broth and adding low concentration N-source during the stationary phase.

  2. Pyroligneous acid-the smoky acidic liquid from plant biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Sindhu; Zakaria, Zainul Akmar

    2015-01-01

    Pyroligneous acid (PA) is a complex highly oxygenated aqueous liquid fraction obtained by the condensation of pyrolysis vapors, which result from the thermochemical breakdown or pyrolysis of plant biomass components such as cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. PA produced by the slow pyrolysis of plant biomass is a yellowish brown or dark brown liquid with acidic pH and usually comprises a complex mixture of guaiacols, catechols, syringols, phenols, vanillins, furans, pyrans, carboxaldehydes, hydroxyketones, sugars, alkyl aryl ethers, nitrogenated derivatives, alcohols, acetic acid, and other carboxylic acids. The phenolic components, namely guaiacol, alkyl guaiacols, syringol, and alkyl syringols, contribute to the smoky odor of PA. PA finds application in diverse areas, as antioxidant, antimicrobial, antiinflammatory, plant growth stimulator, coagulant for natural rubber, and termiticidal and pesticidal agent; is a source for valuable chemicals; and imparts a smoky flavor for food.

  3. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to improve succinic acid production based on metabolic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuma; Hirasawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    We performed metabolic engineering on the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for enhanced production of succinic acid. Aerobic succinic acid production in S. cerevisiae was achieved by disrupting the SDH1 and SDH2 genes, which encode the catalytic subunits of succinic acid dehydrogenase. Increased succinic acid production was achieved by eliminating the ethanol biosynthesis pathways. Metabolic profiling analysis revealed that succinic acid accumulated intracellularly following disruption of the SDH1 and SDH2 genes, which suggests that enhancing the export of intracellular succinic acid outside of cells increases succinic acid production in S. cerevisiae. The mae1 gene encoding the Schizosaccharomyces pombe malic acid transporter was introduced into S. cerevisiae, and as a result, succinic acid production was successfully improved. Metabolic profiling analysis is useful in producing chemicals for metabolic engineering of microorganisms.

  4. Polyhydroxyalknoate synthesis in plants as a tool for biotechnology and basic studies of lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Yves

    2002-03-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are polyesters of hydroxyacids naturally synthesized in bacteria as a carbon reserve. PHAs have properties of biodegradable thermoplastics and elastomers and their synthesis in crop plants is seen as an attractive system for the sustained production of large amounts of polymers at low cost. A variety of PHAs having different physical properties have now been synthesized in a number of transgenic plants, including Arabidopsis thaliana, rape and corn. This has been accomplished through the creation of novel metabolic pathways either in the cytoplasm, plastid or peroxisome of plant cells. Beyond its impact in biotechnology, PHA production in plants can also be used to study some fundamental aspects of plant metabolism. Synthesis of PHA can be used both as an indicator and a modulator of the carbon flux to pathways competing for common substrates, such as acetyl-coenzyme A in fatty acid biosynthesis or 3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A in fatty acid degradation. Synthesis of PHAs in plant peroxisome has been used to demonstrate changes in the flux of fatty acids to the beta-oxidation cycle in transgenic plants and mutants affected in lipid biosynthesis, as well as to study the pathway of degradation of unusual fatty acids.

  5. Hydrochloric acid for treating metabolic alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, A; Yildirim, E; Aras, N; Ercan, F

    1989-09-01

    Six patients with severe metabolic alkalosis were treated with intravenous hydrochloric acid (HCl) infusion. HCl was given through a central venous catheter, at a concentration of 0.1 mEq per ml. At least two of the following criteria were considered for initiation of the therapy: An arterial pH of greater than 7.45, a base excess (BE) of greater than +7 mmol/L, a PaCO2 of greater than 50 mmHg. The HCl amount was calculated using the BE formula, however, two thirds was infused for avoiding excessive acid loading. Patients were monitored by the blood gases, serum electrolytes, hemoglobin, hematocrit, bilirubin determinations and blood smear findings. While a significant decrease was noticed in pH and BE values, moderate changes were detected in PaCO2 due to different ventilatory status of the cases. All laboratory test results remained within normal limits and no complication was encountered. The advantage of the therapy is that less volume is needed for the correction of alkalosis, particularly in the cases requiring fluid restriction. HCl therapy, moreover, is a safe and time-saving method because of having rapid response to the treatment in the critically ill surgical patients.

  6. Effect of phenolic acids on glucose and organic acid metabolism by lactic acid bacteria from wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Francisco M; Figueiredo, Ana R; Hogg, Tim A; Couto, José A

    2009-06-01

    The influence of phenolic (p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic, gallic and protocatechuic) acids on glucose and organic acid metabolism by two strains of wine lactic acid bacteria (Oenococcus oeni VF and Lactobacillus hilgardii 5) was investigated. Cultures were grown in modified MRS medium supplemented with different phenolic acids. Cellular growth was monitored and metabolite concentrations were determined by HPLC-RI. Despite the strong inhibitory effect of most tested phenolic acids on the growth of O. oeni VF, the malolactic activity of this strain was not considerably affected by these compounds. While less affected in its growth, the capacity of L. hilgardii 5 to degrade malic acid was clearly diminished. Except for gallic acid, the addition of phenolic acids delayed the metabolism of glucose and citric acid in both strains tested. It was also found that the presence of hydroxycinnamic acids (p-coumaric, caffeic and ferulic) increased the yield of lactic and acetic acid production from glucose by O. oeni VF and not by L. hilgardii 5. The results show that important oenological characteristics of wine lactic acid bacteria, such as the malolactic activity and the production of volatile organic acids, may be differently affected by the presence of phenolic acids, depending on the bacterial species or strain.

  7. Engineering central metabolism - a grand challenge for plant biologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetlove, Lee J; Nielsen, Jens; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2016-12-22

    The goal of increasing crop productivity and nutrient-use efficiency is being addressed by a number of ambitious research projects seeking to re-engineer photosynthetic biochemistry. Many of these projects will require the engineering of substantial changes in fluxes of central metabolism. However, as has been amply demonstrated in simpler systems such as microbes, central metabolism is extremely difficult to rationally engineer. This is because of multiple layers of regulation that operate to maintain metabolic steady state and because of the highly connected nature of central metabolism. In this review we discuss new approaches for metabolic engineering that have the potential to address these problems and dramatically improve the success with which we can rationally engineer central metabolism in plants. In particular, we advocate the adoption of an iterative 'design-build-test-learn' cycle using fast-to-transform model plants as test beds. This approach can be realised by coupling new molecular tools to incorporate multiple transgenes in nuclear and plastid genomes with computational modelling to design the engineering strategy and to understand the metabolic phenotype of the engineered organism. We also envisage that mutagenesis could be used to fine-tune the balance between the endogenous metabolic network and the introduced enzymes. Finally, we emphasise the importance of considering the plant as a whole system and not isolated organs: the greatest increase in crop productivity will be achieved if both source and sink metabolism are engineered.

  8. Bile acid signaling in metabolic disease and drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiangang; Chiang, John Y L

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein-coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver.

  9. Metabolic profiling reveals altered pattern of central metabolism in navel orange plants as a result of boron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guidong; Dong, Xiaochang; Liu, Leichao; Wu, Lishu; Peng, Shu'ang; Jiang, Cuncang

    2015-04-01

    We focused on the changes of metabolite profiles in navel orange plants under long-term boron (B) deficiency using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) approach. Curling of the leaves and leaf chlorosis were observed only in the upper leaves (present before start of the treatment) of B-deficient plants, while the lower leaves (grown during treatment) did not show any visible symptoms. The metabolites with up-accumulation in B-deficient leaves were mainly proline, l-ornithine, lysine, glucoheptonic acid, fucose, fumarate, oxalate, quinate, myo-inositol and allo-inositol, while the metabolites with down-accumulation in B-deficient leaves were mainly serine, asparagine, saccharic acid, citrate, succinate, shikimate and phytol. The levels of glucose and fructose were increased only in the upper leaves by B deficiency, while starch content was increased in all the leaves and in roots. The increased levels of malate, ribitol, gluconic acid and glyceric acid occurred only in the lower leaves of B-deficient plants. The increased levels of phenols only in the upper leaves indicated that the effects of B on phenol metabolism in citrus plants may be a consequence of disruptions in leaf structure. Metabolites with opposite reactions in upper and lower leaves were mainly glutamine, glycine and pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. To our knowledge, the phenomena of allo-inositol even higher than myo-inositol occurred characterized for the first time in this species. These results suggested that the altered pattern of central metabolism may be either specific or adaptive responses of navel orange plants to B deficiency. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  10. Increased brain fatty acid uptake in metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karmi, Anna; Iozzo, Patricia; Viljanen, Antti

    2010-01-01

    To test whether brain fatty acid uptake is enhanced in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS) and whether weight reduction modifies it.......To test whether brain fatty acid uptake is enhanced in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS) and whether weight reduction modifies it....

  11. [Review: plant polyphenols modulate lipid metabolism and related molecular mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yan-li; Zou, Yu-xiao; Liu, Fan; Li, Hong-zhi

    2015-11-01

    Lipid metabolism disorder is an important risk factor to obesity, hyperlipidemia and type 2 diabetes as well as other chronic metabolic disease. It is also a key target in preventing metabolic syndrome, chronic disease prevention. Plant polyphenol plays an important role in maintaining or improving lipid profile in a variety of ways. including regulating cholesterol absorption, inhibiting synthesis and secretion of triglyceride, and lowering plasma low density lipoprotein oxidation, etc. The purpose of this article is to review the lipid regulation effects of plant polyphenols and its related mechanisms.

  12. Auxin metabolism rates and implications for plant development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M Kramer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies of auxin metabolism rarely express their results as a metabolic rate, although the data obtained would often permit such a calculation to be made. We analyze data from 31 previously published papers to quantify the rates of auxin biosynthesis, conjugation, conjugate hydrolysis, and catabolism in seed plants. Most metabolic pathways have rates in the range 10 nM/h to 1 μM/h, with the exception of auxin conjugation, which has rates as high as ~100 μM/h. The highest rates of auxin conjugation suggests that auxin metabolic sinks may be very small, perhaps as small as a single cell. By contrast, the relatively low rate of auxin biosynthesis requires plants to conserve and recycle auxin during long-distance transport. The consequences for plant development are discussed.

  13. Gene expression in plant lipid metabolism in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Shan Hsiao

    Full Text Available Events in plant lipid metabolism are important during seedling establishment. As it has not been experimentally verified whether lipid metabolism in 2- and 5-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings is diurnally-controlled, quantitative real-time PCR analysis was used to investigate the expression of target genes in acyl-lipid transfer, β-oxidation and triacylglycerol (TAG synthesis and hydrolysis in wild-type Arabidopsis WS and Col-0. In both WS and Col-0, ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN3 (ACBP3, DIACYLGLYCEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE1 (DGAT1 and DGAT3 showed diurnal control in 2- and 5-day-old seedlings. Also, COMATOSE (CTS was diurnally regulated in 2-day-old seedlings and LONG-CHAIN ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE6 (LACS6 in 5-day-old seedlings in both WS and Col-0. Subsequently, the effect of CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1 and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY from the core clock system was examined using the cca1lhy mutant and CCA1-overexpressing (CCA1-OX lines versus wild-type WS and Col-0, respectively. Results revealed differential gene expression in lipid metabolism between 2- and 5-day-old mutant and wild-type WS seedlings, as well as between CCA1-OX and wild-type Col-0. Of the ACBPs, ACBP3 displayed the most significant changes between cca1lhy and WS and between CCA1-OX and Col-0, consistent with previous reports that ACBP3 is greatly affected by light/dark cycling. Evidence of oil body retention in 4- and 5-day-old seedlings of the cca1lhy mutant in comparison to WS indicated the effect of cca1lhy on storage lipid reserve mobilization. Lipid profiling revealed differences in primary lipid metabolism, namely in TAG, fatty acid methyl ester and acyl-CoA contents amongst cca1lhy, CCA1-OX, and wild-type seedlings. Taken together, this study demonstrates that lipid metabolism is subject to diurnal regulation in the early stages of seedling development in Arabidopsis.

  14. Impulsive mathematical modeling of ascorbic acid metabolism in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachar, Mostafa; Raimann, Jochen G; Kotanko, Peter

    2016-03-07

    In this work, we develop an impulsive mathematical model of Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) metabolism in healthy subjects for daily intake over a long period of time. The model includes the dynamics of ascorbic acid plasma concentration, the ascorbic acid absorption in the intestines and a novel approach to quantify the glomerular excretion of ascorbic acid. We investigate qualitative and quantitative dynamics. We show the existence and uniqueness of the global asymptotic stability of the periodic solution. We also perform a numerical simulation for the entire time period based on published data reporting parameters reflecting ascorbic acid metabolism at different oral doses of ascorbic acid.

  15. Metabolic Engineering of Chemical Defence Pathways in Plant Disease Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rook, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce a wide variety of specialized (or secondary) metabolites that function as chemical defence compounds and provide protection against microbial pathogens or herbivores. This chapter focuses on the metabolic engineering of biosynthetic pathways for plant chemical defence compounds...... with antimicrobial properties for use in crop protection. It presents an overview of the metabolic engineering efforts made in the area of plant chemical defence. For in-depth information on the characteristics of a specific class of chemical defence compounds, the reader is referred to the specialized reviews...

  16. Nickel Deficiency Disrupts Metabolism of Ureides, Amino Acids, and Organic Acids of Young Pecan Foliage[OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Cheng; Reilly, Charles C.; Wood, Bruce W.

    2006-01-01

    The existence of nickel (Ni) deficiency is becoming increasingly apparent in crops, especially for ureide-transporting woody perennials, but its physiological role is poorly understood. We evaluated the concentrations of ureides, amino acids, and organic acids in photosynthetic foliar tissue from Ni-sufficient (Ni-S) versus Ni-deficient (Ni-D) pecan (Carya illinoinensis [Wangenh.] K. Koch). Foliage of Ni-D pecan seedlings exhibited metabolic disruption of nitrogen metabolism via ureide catabolism, amino acid metabolism, and ornithine cycle intermediates. Disruption of ureide catabolism in Ni-D foliage resulted in accumulation of xanthine, allantoic acid, ureidoglycolate, and citrulline, but total ureides, urea concentration, and urease activity were reduced. Disruption of amino acid metabolism in Ni-D foliage resulted in accumulation of glycine, valine, isoleucine, tyrosine, tryptophan, arginine, and total free amino acids, and lower concentrations of histidine and glutamic acid. Ni deficiency also disrupted the citric acid cycle, the second stage of respiration, where Ni-D foliage contained very low levels of citrate compared to Ni-S foliage. Disruption of carbon metabolism was also via accumulation of lactic and oxalic acids. The results indicate that mouse-ear, a key morphological symptom, is likely linked to the toxic accumulation of oxalic and lactic acids in the rapidly growing tips and margins of leaflets. Our results support the role of Ni as an essential plant nutrient element. The magnitude of metabolic disruption exhibited in Ni-D pecan is evidence of the existence of unidentified physiological roles for Ni in pecan. PMID:16415214

  17. Uptake, Translocation, Metabolism, and Distribution of Glyphosate in Nontarget Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Mengmeng; Gao, Wanjun; Jiao, Weiting; Zhou, Jie; Li, Yeyun; He, Lili; Hou, Ruyan

    2017-09-06

    The uptake, translocation, metabolism, and distribution behavior of glyphosate in nontarget tea plant were investigated. The negative effects appeared to grown tea saplings when the nutrient solution contained glyphosate above 200 mg L(-1). Glyphosate was highest in the roots of the tea plant, where it was also metabolized to aminomethyl phosphonic acid (AMPA). The glyphosate and AMPA in the roots were transported through the xylem or phloem to the stems and leaves. The amount of AMPA in the entire tea plant was less than 6.0% of the amount of glyphosate. The glyphosate level in fresh tea shoots was less than that in mature leaves at each day. These results indicated that free glyphosate in the soil can be continuously absorbed by, metabolized in, and transported from the roots of the tea tree into edible leaves, and therefore, free glyphosate residues in the soil should be controlled to produce teas free of glyphosate.

  18. Metabolic engineering as a tool for enhanced lactic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyaya, Bikram P; DeVeaux, Linda C; Christopher, Lew P

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic engineering is a powerful biotechnological tool that finds, among others, increased use in constructing microbial strains for higher lactic acid productivity, lower costs and reduced pollution. Engineering the metabolic pathways has concentrated on improving the lactic acid fermentation parameters, enhancing the acid tolerance of production organisms and their abilities to utilize a broad range of substrates, including fermentable biomass-derived sugars. Recent efforts have focused on metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria as they produce high yields and have a small genome size that facilitates their genetic manipulation. We summarize here the current trends in metabolic engineering techniques and strategies for manipulating lactic acid producing organisms developed to address and overcome major challenges in the lactic acid production process.

  19. Effect of stearidonic acid-enriched soybean oil on fatty acid profile and metabolic parameters in lean and obese Zucker rats

    OpenAIRE

    Casey, John M; Banz, William J.; Krul, Elaine S; Butteiger, Dustie N; Goldstein, Daniel A.; Davis, Jeremy E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Consumption of marine-based oils high in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n3PUFAs), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is known to protect against obesity-related pathologies. It is less clear whether traditional vegetable oils with high omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n6PUFA) content exhibit similar therapeutic benefits. As such, this study examined the metabolic effects of a plant-based n3PUFA, stearidonic acid (SDA), in polygenic obese rodents. Me...

  20. Plant-derived therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Brittany L; Raskin, Ilya; Cefalu, William T; Ribnicky, David M

    2010-10-01

    Metabolic syndrome is defined as a set of coexisting metabolic disorders that increase an individual's likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Medicinal plants, some of which have been used for thousands of years, serve as an excellent source of bioactive compounds for the treatment of metabolic syndrome because they contain a wide range of phytochemicals with diverse metabolic effects. In order for botanicals to be effectively used against metabolic syndrome, however, botanical preparations must be characterized and standardized through the identification of their active compounds and respective modes of action, followed by validation in controlled clinical trials with clearly defined endpoints. This review assesses examples of commonly known and partially characterized botanicals to describe specific considerations for the phytochemical, preclinical and clinical characterization of botanicals associated with metabolic syndrome.

  1. Flux analysis in plant metabolic networks: increasing throughput and coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, Björn H

    2014-04-01

    Quantitative information about metabolic networks has been mainly obtained at the level of metabolite contents, transcript abundance, and enzyme activities. However, the active process of metabolism is represented by the flow of matter through the pathways. These metabolic fluxes can be predicted by Flux Balance Analysis or determined experimentally by (13)C-Metabolic Flux Analysis. These relatively complicated and time-consuming methods have recently seen significant improvements at the level of coverage and throughput. Metabolic models have developed from single cell models into whole-organism dynamic models. Advances in lab automation and data handling have significantly increased the throughput of flux measurements. This review summarizes advances to increase coverage and throughput of metabolic flux analysis in plants.

  2. Engineering central metabolism – a grand challenge for plant biologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sweetlove, Lee J.; Nielsen, Jens; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of increasing crop productivity and nutrient-use efficiency is being addressed by a number of ambitious research projects seeking to re-engineer photosynthetic biochemistry. Many of these projects will require the engineering of substantial changes in fluxes of central metabolism. However......, as has been amply demonstrated in simpler systems such as microbes, central metabolism is extremely difficult to rationally engineer. This is because of multiple layers of regulation that operate to maintain metabolic steady state and because of the highly connected nature of central metabolism....... In this review we discuss new approaches for metabolic engineering that have the potential to address these problems and dramatically improve the success with which we can rationally engineer central metabolism in plants. In particular, we advocate the adoption of an iterative ‘design-build-test-learn’ cycle...

  3. Disturbed amino acid metabolism in HIV: association with neuropsychiatric symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna M Gostner

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Blood levels of the amino acid phenylalanine, as well as of the tryptophan breakdown product kynurenine, are found to be elevated in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1-infected patients. Both essential amino acids, tryptophan and phenylalanine are important precursor molecules for neurotransmitter biosynthesis. Thus, dysregulated amino acid metabolism may be related to disease-associated neuropsychiatric symptoms such as development of depression, fatigue, and cognitive impairment.Increased phenylalanine/tyrosine and kynurenine/tryptophan ratios are associated with immune activation in patients with HIV-1 infection and decrease upon effective antiretroviral therapy. Recent large-scale metabolic studies have confirmed the crucial involvement of tryptophan and phenylalanine metabolism in HIV-associated disease. Herein, we summarize the current status of the role of tryptophan and phenylalanine metabolism in HIV disease and discuss how inflammatory stress-associated dysregulation of amino acid metabolism may be part of the pathophysiology of common HIV-associated neuropsychiatric conditions.

  4. Cajal bodies and plant RNA metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intracellular location of components associated with RNA metabolism is a key feature of gene expression regulation, although it is often neglected in favor of more direct factors influencing expression. A number of nuclear and subnuclear compartments exist, each carrying out specific functions. Th...

  5. Culinary plants and their potential impact on metabolic overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Kwon, Oran

    2011-07-01

    Contemporary human behavior has led a large proportion of the population to metabolic overload and obesity. Postprandial hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia evoke redox imbalance in the short term and lead to complex chronic disease in the long term with repeated occurrence. Complex diseases are best prevented with complex components of plants; thus, current nutrition research has begun to focus on the development of plant-based functional foods and dietary supplements for health and well-being. Furthermore, given the wide range of species, parts, and secondary metabolites, culinary plants can contribute significant variety and complexity to the human diet. Although understanding the health benefits of culinary plants has been one of the great challenges in nutritional science due to their inherent complexity, it is an advantageous pursuit. This review will address the challenges and opportunities relating to studies of the health benefits of culinary plants, with an emphasis on obesity attributed to metabolic overload. © 2011 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. Metabolic stimulation of plant phenolics for food preservation and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Dipayan; Shetty, Kalidas

    2014-01-01

    Plant phenolics as secondary metabolites are key to a plant's defense response against biotic and abiotic stresses. These phytochemicals are also increasingly relevant to food preservation and human health in terms of chronic disease management. Phenolic compounds from different food crops with different chemical structures and biological functions have the potential to act as natural antioxidants. Plant-based human foods are rich with these phenolic phytochemicals and can be used effectively for food preservation and bioactive enrichments through metabolic stimulation of key pathways. Phenolic metabolites protect against microbial degradation of plant-based foods during postharvest storage. Phenolics not only provide biotic protection but also help to counter biochemical and physical food deteriorations and to enhance shelf life and nutritional quality. This review summarizes the role of metabolically stimulated plant phenolics in food preservation and their impact on the prevention of oxidative stress-induced human diseases.

  7. Alleviating soil acidity through plant organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meda Anderson R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of water soluble plant extracts on soil acidity. The plant materials were: black oat, oil seed radish, white and blue lupin, gray and dwarf mucuna, Crotalaria spectabilis and C. breviflora, millet, pigeon pea, star grass, mato grosso grass, coffee leaves, sugar cane leaves, rice straw, and wheat straw. Plant extracts were added on soil surface in a PVC soil column at a rate of 1.0 ml min-1. Both soil and drainage water were analyzed for pH, Ca, Al, and K. Plant extracts applied on the soil surface increased soil pH, exchangeable Ca ex and Kex and decreased Al ex. Oil seed radish, black oat, and blue lupin were the best and millet the worst materials to alleviate soil acidity. Oil seed radish markedly increased Al in the drainage water. Chemical changes were associated with the concentrations of basic cations in the plant extract: the higher the concentration the greater the effects in alleviating soil acidity.

  8. Differential diagnosis of (inherited) amino acid metabolism or transport disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Blom (W.); J.G.M. Huijmans (Jan)

    1992-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Disorders of amino acid metabolism or transport are most clearly expressed in urine. Nevertheless the interpretation of abnormalities in urinary amino acid excretion remains difficult. An increase or decrease of almost every amino acid in urine can be due to various eti

  9. Metabolism of amino acid amides in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, H.F.M.; Croes, L.M.; Peeters, W.P.H.; Peters, P.J.H.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1993-01-01

    The metabolism of the natural amino acid L-valine, the unnatural amino acids D-valine, and D-, L-phenylglycine (D-, L-PG), and the unnatural amino acid amides D-, L-phenylglycine amide (D, L-PG-NH2) and L-valine amide (L-Val-NH2) was studied in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633. The organism possessed c

  10. Metabolism of amino acid amides in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, H.F.M.; Croes, L.M.; Peeters, W.P.H.; Peters, P.J.H.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1993-01-01

    The metabolism of the natural amino acid L-valine, the unnatural amino acids D-valine, and D-, L-phenylglycine (D-, L-PG), and the unnatural amino acid amides D-, L-phenylglycine amide (D, L-PG-NH2) and L-valine amide (L-Val-NH2) was studied in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633. The organism possessed

  11. Correlation of uric acid levels and parameters of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibičková, Ľ; Langová, K; Vaverková, H; Kubíčková, V; Karásek, D

    2017-07-18

    Hyperuricemia has been described as associated with the risk of development metabolic syndrome; however the relationship between the uric acid level and particular parameters of metabolic syndrome remained unclear. We performed a cross-sectional study on a cohort of 833 dyslipidemic patients and correlated their levels of uric acid with parameters of insulin resistance, lipid metabolism, C-reactive protein, anthropometric parameters. We also defined patients with hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype and compered their uric acid levels with those without this phenotype. We found that levels of uric acid are associated with parameters of metabolic syndrome. Specifically, dyslipidemia characteristic for metabolic syndrome (low HDL-cholesterol and high triglycerides) correlates better with uric acid levels than parameters of insulin resistance. Also waist circumference correlates better with uric acid levels than body mass index. Patients with hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype had higher levels of uric acid when compared with patients without this phenotype. Serum uric acid levels are even in low levels linearly correlated with parameters of metabolic syndrome (better with typical lipid characteristics than with parameters of insulin resistance) and could be associated with higher cardiovascular risk.

  12. Plant metabolic engineering strategies for the production of pharmaceutical terpenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Lu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical terpenoids belong to the most diverse class of natural products. They have significant curative effects on a variety of diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, malaria and Alzheimer’s disease. Nowadays, elicitors, including biotic and abiotic elicitors, are often used to activate the pathway of secondary metabolism and enhance the production of target terpenoids. Based on Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation, several plant metabolic engineering strategies hold great promise to regulate the biosynthesis of pharmaceutical terpenoids. Overexpressing terpenoids biosynthesis pathway genes in homologous and ectopic plants is an effective strategy to enhance the yield of pharmaceutical terpenoids. Another strategy is to suppress the expression of competitive metabolic pathways. In addition, global regulation which includes regulating the relative transcription factors, endogenous phytohormones and primary metabolism could also markedly increase their yield. All these strategies offer great opportunities to enhance the supply of scarce terpenoids drugs, reduce the price of expensive drugs and improve people's standards of living.

  13. Overcoming the plasticity of plant specialized metabolism for selective diterpene production in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignea, Codruta; Athanasakoglou, Anastasia; Andreadelli, Aggeliki; Apostolaki, Maria; Iakovides, Minas; Stephanou, Euripides G; Makris, Antonios M; Kampranis, Sotirios C

    2017-08-18

    Plants synthesize numerous specialized metabolites (also termed natural products) to mediate dynamic interactions with their surroundings. The complexity of plant specialized metabolism is the result of an inherent biosynthetic plasticity rooted in the substrate and product promiscuity of the enzymes involved. The pathway of carnosic acid-related diterpenes in rosemary and sage involves promiscuous cytochrome P450s whose combined activity results in a multitude of structurally related compounds. Some of these minor products, such as pisiferic acid and salviol, have established bioactivity, but their limited availability prevents further evaluation. Reconstructing carnosic acid biosynthesis in yeast achieved significant titers of the main compound but could not specifically yield the minor products. Specific production of pisiferic acid and salviol was achieved by restricting the promiscuity of a key enzyme, CYP76AH24, through a single-residue substitution (F112L). Coupled with additional metabolic engineering interventions, overall improvements of 24 and 14-fold for pisiferic acid and salviol, respectively, were obtained. These results provide an example of how synthetic biology can help navigating the complex landscape of plant natural product biosynthesis to achieve heterologous production of useful minor metabolites. In the context of plant adaptation, these findings also suggest a molecular basis for the rapid evolution of terpene biosynthetic pathways.

  14. Production of hydroxylated fatty acids in genetically modified plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); Broun, Pierre (Burlingame, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Weston, AU); Boddupalli, Sekhar S. (Manchester, MI)

    2011-08-23

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  15. Metabolic strategies of beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria in beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Andreas J; Behr, Jürgen; von Kamp, Kristina; Vogel, Rudi F

    2016-01-04

    Beer contains only limited amounts of readily fermentable carbohydrates and amino acids. Beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have to come up with metabolic strategies in order to deal with selective nutrient content, high energy demand of hop tolerance mechanisms and a low pH. The metabolism of 26 LAB strains of 6 species and varying spoilage potentialwas investigated in order to define and compare their metabolic capabilities using multivariate statistics and outline possible metabolic strategies. Metabolic capabilities of beer spoilage LAB regarding carbohydrate and amino acids did not correlate with spoilage potential, but with fermentation type (heterofermentative/homofermentative) and species. A shift to mixed acid fermentation by homofermentative (hof) Pediococcus claussenii and Lactobacillus backii was observed as a specific feature of their growth in beer. For heterofermentative (hef) LAB a mostly versatile carbohydrate metabolism could be demonstrated, supplementing the known relevance of organic acids for their growth in beer. For hef LAB a distinct amino acid metabolism, resulting in biogenic amine production, was observed, presumably contributing to energy supply and pH homeostasis.

  16. Simultaneous determination of shikimic acid, salicylic acid and jasmonic acid in wild and transgenic Nicotiana langsdorffii plants exposed to abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalabrin, Elisa; Radaelli, Marta; Capodaglio, Gabriele

    2016-06-01

    The presence and relative concentration of phytohormones may be regarded as a good indicator of an organism's physiological state. The integration of the rolC gene from Agrobacterium rhizogenes and of the rat glucocorticoid receptor (gr) in Nicotiana langsdorffii Weinmann plants has shown to determine various physiological and metabolic effects. The analysis of wild and transgenic N. langsdorffii plants, exposed to different abiotic stresses (high temperature, water deficit, and high chromium concentrations) was conducted, in order to investigate the metabolic effects of the inserted genes in response to the applied stresses. The development of a new analytical procedure was necessary, in order to assure the simultaneous determination of analytes and to obtain an adequately low limit of quantification. For the first time, a sensitive HPLC-HRMS quantitative method for the simultaneous determination of salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and shikimic acid was developed and validated. The method was applied to 80 plant samples, permitting the evaluation of plant stress responses and highlighting some metabolic mechanisms. Salicylic, jasmonic and shikimic acids proved to be suitable for the comprehension of plant stress responses. Chemical and heat stresses showed to induce the highest changes in plant hormonal status, differently affecting plant response. The potential of each genetic modification toward the applied stresses was marked and particularly the resistance of the gr modified plants was evidenced. This work provides new information in the study of N. langsdorffii and transgenic organisms, which could be useful for the further application of these transgenes.

  17. Arsenomics: Omics of Arsenic Metabolism in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudra Deo eTripathi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractArsenic (As contamination of drinking water and groundwater used for irrigation can lead to contamination of the food chain and poses serious health risk to people worldwide. To reduce As intake through the consumption of contaminated food, identification of the mechanisms for As accumulation and detoxification in plant is a prerequisite to develop efficient phytoremediation methods and safer crops with reduced As levels. Transcriptome, proteome and metabolome analysis of any organism reflects the total biological activities at any given time which are responsible for the adaptation of the organism to the surrounding environmental conditions. As these approaches are very important in analyzing plant As transport and accumulation, we termed Arsenomics as approach which deals transcriptome, proteome and metabolome alterations during As exposure. Although, various studies have been performed to understand modulation in transcriptome in response to As, many important questions need to be addressed regarding the translated proteins of plants at proteomic and metabolomic level, resulting in various ecophysiological responses. In this review, the comprehensive knowledge generated in this area has been compiled and analyzed. There is a need to strengthen Arsenomics which will lead to develop of tools to develop As-free plants for safe consumption.

  18. Metabolic engineering of monoterpene biosynthesis in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lücker, J.

    2002-01-01

    Monoterpenes are a large group of compounds that belong to the terpenoid family of natural compounds in plants. They are small, volatile, lipophilic substances of which around one thousand different structures have been identified. Monoterpenes are

  19. EFFECTS OF HYDRAZINES ON THE METABOLISM OF CERTAIN AMINES AND AMINO ACIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AMINES, * AMINO ACIDS , *DIAMINE OXIDASE, TOXICITY, METABOLISM, METABOLISM, DIMETHYLHYDRAZINES, GLUTAMIC ACID, ENZYMES, PHARMACOLOGY, TRACER STUDIES, LABELED SUBSTANCES, RESPIRATION, GASTROINTESTINAL SYSTEM, RATS.

  20. Lactococcus lactis metabolism and gene expression during growth on plant tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golomb, Benjamin L; Marco, Maria L

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have been isolated from living, harvested, and fermented plant materials; however, the adaptations these bacteria possess for growth on plant tissues are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated plant habitat-specific traits of Lactococcus lactis during growth in an Arabidopsis thaliana leaf tissue lysate (ATL). L. lactis KF147, a strain originally isolated from plants, exhibited a higher growth rate and reached 7.9-fold-greater cell densities during growth in ATL than the dairy-associated strain L. lactis IL1403. Transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq) of KF147 identified 853 induced and 264 repressed genes during growth in ATL compared to that in GM17 laboratory culture medium. Genes induced in ATL included those involved in the arginine deiminase pathway and a total of 140 carbohydrate transport and metabolism genes, many of which are involved in xylose, arabinose, cellobiose, and hemicellulose metabolism. The induction of those genes corresponded with L. lactis KF147 nutrient consumption and production of metabolic end products in ATL as measured by gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS) untargeted metabolomic profiling. To assess the importance of specific plant-inducible genes for L. lactis growth in ATL, xylose metabolism was targeted for gene knockout mutagenesis. Wild-type L. lactis strain KF147 but not an xylA deletion mutant was able to grow using xylose as the sole carbon source. However, both strains grew to similarly high levels in ATL, indicating redundancy in L. lactis carbohydrate metabolism on plant tissues. These findings show that certain strains of L. lactis are well adapted for growth on plants and possess specific traits relevant for plant-based food, fuel, and feed fermentations.

  1. Differential diagnosis of (inherited) amino acid metabolism or transport disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, W; Huijmans, J G

    1992-02-01

    Disorders of amino acid metabolism or transport are most clearly expressed in urine. Nevertheless the interpretation of abnormalities in urinary amino acid excretion remains difficult. An increase or decrease of almost every amino acid in urine can be due to various etiology. To differentiate between primary and secondary aminoacido-pathies systematic laboratory investigation is necessary. Early diagnosis of disorders of amino acid metabolism or transport is very important, because most of them can be treated, leading to the prevention of (further) clinical abnormalities. In those disorders, which cannot be treated, early diagnosis in an index-patient may prevent the birth of other siblings by means of genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis.Primary aminoacidopathies can be due to genetically determined transport disorders and enzyme deficiencies in amino acid metabolism or degradation. Secondary aminoacidopathies are the result of abnormal or deficient nutrition, intestinal dysfunction, organ pathology or other metabolic diseases like organic acidurias.A survey of amino acid metabolism and transport abnormalities will be given, illustrated with metabolic pathways and characteristic abnormal amino acid chromatograms.

  2. MeRy-B, a metabolomic database and knowledge base for exploring plant primary metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborde, Catherine; Jacob, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Plant primary metabolites are organic compounds that are common to all or most plant species and are essential for plant growth, development, and reproduction. They are intermediates and products of metabolism involved in photosynthesis and other biosynthetic processes. Primary metabolites belong to different compound families, mainly carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, nucleotides, fatty acids, steroids, or lipids. Until recently, unlike the Human Metabolome Database ( http://www.hmdb.ca ) dedicated to human metabolism, there was no centralized database or repository dedicated exclusively to the plant kingdom that contained information on metabolites and their concentrations in a detailed experimental context. MeRy-B is the first platform for plant (1)H-NMR metabolomic profiles (MeRy-B, http://bit.ly/meryb ), designed to provide a knowledge base of curated plant profiles and metabolites obtained by NMR, together with the corresponding experimental and analytical metadata. MeRy-B contains lists of plant metabolites, mostly primary metabolites and unknown compounds, with information about experimental conditions, the factors studied, and metabolite concentrations for 19 different plant species (Arabidopsis, broccoli, daphne, grape, maize, barrel clover, melon, Ostreococcus tauri, palm date, palm tree, peach, pine tree, eucalyptus, plantain rice, strawberry, sugar beet, tomato, vanilla), compiled from more than 2,300 annotated NMR profiles for various organs or tissues deposited by 30 different private or public contributors in September 2013. Currently, about half of the data deposited in MeRy-B is publicly available. In this chapter, readers will be shown how to (1) navigate through and retrieve data of publicly available projects on MeRy-B website; (2) visualize lists of experimentally identified metabolites and their concentrations in all plant species present in MeRy-B; (3) get primary metabolite list for a particular plant species in MeRy-B; and for a

  3. Natural plant genetic engineer Agrobacterium rhizogenes: role of T-DNA in plant secondary metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sheela

    2012-03-01

    Agrobacterium rhizogenes is a natural plant genetic engineer. It is a gram-negative soil bacterium that induces hairy root formation. Success has been obtained in exploring the molecular mechanisms of transferred DNA (T-DNA) transfer, interaction with host plant proteins, plant defense signaling and integration to plant genome for successful plant genetic transformation. T-DNA and corresponding expression of rol genes alter morphology and plant host secondary metabolism. During transformation, there is a differential loss of a few T-DNA genes. Loss of a few ORFs drastically affect the growth and morphological patterns of hairy roots, expression pattern of biosynthetic pathway genes and accumulation of specific secondary metabolites.

  4. Citric acid cycle and role of its intermediates in metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Muhammad

    2014-04-01

    The citric acid cycle is the final common oxidative pathway for carbohydrates, fats and amino acids. It is the most important metabolic pathway for the energy supply to the body. TCA is the most important central pathway connecting almost all the individual metabolic pathways. In this review article, introduction, regulation and energetics of TCA cycle have been discussed. The present study was carried out to review literature on TCA cycle.

  5. Metabolic pathways regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contributing to heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Jingjin; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2016-07-26

    γ-Aminobutyric acid is a non-protein amino acid involved in various metabolic processes. The objectives of this study were to examine whether increased GABA could improve heat tolerance in cool-season creeping bentgrass through physiological analysis, and to determine major metabolic pathways regulated by GABA through metabolic profiling. Plants were pretreated with 0.5 mM GABA or water before exposed to non-stressed condition (21/19 °C) or heat stress (35/30 °C) in controlled growth chambers for 35 d. The growth and physiological analysis demonstrated that exogenous GABA application significantly improved heat tolerance of creeping bentgrass. Metabolic profiling found that exogenous application of GABA led to increases in accumulations of amino acids (glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine, threonine, serine, and valine), organic acids (aconitic acid, malic acid, succinic acid, oxalic acid, and threonic acid), sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose, galactose, and maltose), and sugar alcohols (mannitol and myo-inositol). These findings suggest that GABA-induced heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass could involve the enhancement of photosynthesis and ascorbate-glutathione cycle, the maintenance of osmotic adjustment, and the increase in GABA shunt. The increased GABA shunt could be the supply of intermediates to feed the tricarboxylic acid cycle of respiration metabolism during a long-term heat stress, thereby maintaining metabolic homeostasis.

  6. [Advances in studies of absorption and utilization of amino acids by plants: A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiao-chuang; Wu, Liang-huan; Ma, Qing-xu; Jin, Qian-yu

    2015-03-01

    Plant can directly take up the intact amino acids, thus bypass the microbial mineralization of organic nitrogen. As an excellent carbon and nitrogen source, there exists competition for amino acid absorption between plant roots.and soil microorganisms. And the total flux of amino acids in soil may be enormous due to the extensive sources and short half-life. Studies on amino acid nitrogen nutritional contribution for plant by the technique of nitrogen isotopic tracer, has become a research topic in recent years ,which will help us better understand the principle of soil fertility. This paper summarized the recent researches on amino acid morphological characteristics in soil and its metabolic mechanism and nitrogen nutritional contribution for plant in different ecosystems, and discussed the present status and development trend of the amino acid circulation mechanism in the plant-soil-microorganism ecosystem and its bioavailability for plant. Finally, the topics of environmental regulating mechanism of amino acid bioavailability, amino acid carbon-nitrogen metabolism, and how to improve the field organic nitrogen management were all the core issues to be resolved.

  7. Gallic acid and gallic acid derivatives: effects on drug metabolizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ow, Yin-Yin; Stupans, Ieva

    2003-06-01

    Gallic acid and its structurally related compounds are found widely distributed in fruits and plants. Gallic acid, and its catechin derivatives are also present as one of the main phenolic components of both black and green tea. Esters of gallic acid have a diverse range of industrial uses, as antioxidants in food, in cosmetics and in the pharmaceutical industry. In addition, gallic acid is employed as a source material for inks, paints and colour developers. Studies utilising these compounds have found them to possess many potential therapeutic properties including anti-cancer and antimicrobial properties. In this review, studies of the effects of gallic acid, its esters, and gallic acid catechin derivatives on Phase I and Phase II enzymes are examined. Many published reports of the effects of the in vitro effects of gallic acid and its derivatives on drug metabolising enzymes concern effects directly on substrate (generally drug or mutagen) metabolism or indirectly through observed effects in Ames tests. In the case of the Ames test an antimutagenic effect may be observed through inhibition of CYP activation of indirectly acting mutagens and/or by scavenging of metabolically generated mutagenic electrophiles. There has been considerable interest in the in vivo effects of the gallate esters because of their incorporation into foodstuffs as antioxidants and in the catechin gallates with their potential role as chemoprotective agents. Principally an induction of Phase II enzymes has been observed however more recent studies using HepG2 cells and primary cultures of human hepatocytes provide evidence for the overall complexity of actions of individual components versus complex mixtures, such as those in food. Further systematic studies of mechanisms of induction and inhibition of drug metabolising enzymes by this group of compounds are warranted in the light of their distribution and consequent ingestion, current uses and suggested therapeutic potential. However, it

  8. Iron deficiency affects nitrogen metabolism in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borlotti Andrea

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitrogen is a principal limiting nutrient in plant growth and development. Among factors that may limit NO3- assimilation, Fe potentially plays a crucial role being a metal cofactor of enzymes of the reductive assimilatory pathway. Very few information is available about the changes of nitrogen metabolism occurring under Fe deficiency in Strategy I plants. The aim of this work was to study how cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. plants modify their nitrogen metabolism when grown under iron deficiency. Results The activity of enzymes involved in the reductive assimilation of nitrate and the reactions that produce the substrates for the ammonium assimilation both at root and at leaf levels in Fe-deficient cucumber plants were investigated. Under Fe deficiency, only nitrate reductase (EC 1.7.1.1 activity decreased both at the root and leaf level, whilst for glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2 and glutamate synthase (EC 1.4.1.14 an increase was found. Accordingly, the transcript analysis for these enzymes showed the same behaviour except for root nitrate reductase which increased. Furthermore, it was found that amino acid concentration greatly decreased in Fe-deficient roots, whilst it increased in the corresponding leaves. Moreover, amino acids increased in the xylem sap of Fe-deficient plants. Conclusions The data obtained in this work provided new insights on the responses of plants to Fe deficiency, suggesting that this nutritional disorder differentially affected N metabolism in root and in leaf. Indeed under Fe deficiency, roots respond more efficiently, sustaining the whole plant by furnishing metabolites (i.e. aa, organic acids to the leaves.

  9. Iron deficiency affects nitrogen metabolism in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borlotti, Andrea; Vigani, Gianpiero; Zocchi, Graziano

    2012-10-11

    Nitrogen is a principal limiting nutrient in plant growth and development. Among factors that may limit NO3- assimilation, Fe potentially plays a crucial role being a metal cofactor of enzymes of the reductive assimilatory pathway. Very few information is available about the changes of nitrogen metabolism occurring under Fe deficiency in Strategy I plants. The aim of this work was to study how cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants modify their nitrogen metabolism when grown under iron deficiency. The activity of enzymes involved in the reductive assimilation of nitrate and the reactions that produce the substrates for the ammonium assimilation both at root and at leaf levels in Fe-deficient cucumber plants were investigated. Under Fe deficiency, only nitrate reductase (EC 1.7.1.1) activity decreased both at the root and leaf level, whilst for glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) and glutamate synthase (EC 1.4.1.14) an increase was found. Accordingly, the transcript analysis for these enzymes showed the same behaviour except for root nitrate reductase which increased. Furthermore, it was found that amino acid concentration greatly decreased in Fe-deficient roots, whilst it increased in the corresponding leaves. Moreover, amino acids increased in the xylem sap of Fe-deficient plants. The data obtained in this work provided new insights on the responses of plants to Fe deficiency, suggesting that this nutritional disorder differentially affected N metabolism in root and in leaf. Indeed under Fe deficiency, roots respond more efficiently, sustaining the whole plant by furnishing metabolites (i.e. aa, organic acids) to the leaves.

  10. Cardio-Metabolic Benefits of Plant-Based Diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Kahleova

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardio-metabolic disease, namely ischemic heart disease, stroke, obesity, and type 2 diabetes, represent substantial health and economic burdens. Almost one half of cardio-metabolic deaths in the U.S. might be prevented through proper nutrition. Plant-based (vegetarian and vegan diets are an effective strategy for improving nutrient intake. At the same time, they are associated with decreased all-cause mortality and decreased risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and coronary heart disease. Evidence suggests that plant-based diets may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease events by an estimated 40% and the risk of cerebral vascular disease events by 29%. These diets also reduce the risk of developing metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes by about one half. Properly planned vegetarian diets are healthful, effective for weight and glycemic control, and provide metabolic and cardiovascular benefits, including reversing atherosclerosis and decreasing blood lipids and blood pressure. The use of plant-based diets as a means of prevention and treatment of cardio-metabolic disease should be promoted through dietary guidelines and recommendations.

  11. Dynamic metabolic flux analysis of plant cell wall synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuewen; Alonso, Ana P; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2013-07-01

    The regulation of plant cell wall synthesis pathways remains poorly understood. This has become a bottleneck in designing bioenergy crops. The goal of this study was to analyze the regulation of plant cell wall precursor metabolism using metabolic flux analysis based on dynamic labeling experiments. Arabidopsis T87 cells were cultured heterotrophically with (13)C labeled sucrose. The time course of ¹³C labeling patterns in cell wall precursors and related sugar phosphates was monitored using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry until steady state labeling was reached. A kinetic model based on mass action reaction mechanisms was developed to simulate the carbon flow in the cell wall synthesis network. The kinetic parameters of the model were determined by fitting the model to the labeling time course data, cell wall composition, and synthesis rates. A metabolic control analysis was performed to predict metabolic regulations that may improve plant biomass composition for biofuel production. Our results describe the routes and rates of carbon flow from sucrose to cell wall precursors. We found that sucrose invertase is responsible for the entry of sucrose into metabolism and UDP-glucose-4-epimerase plays a dominant role in UDP-Gal synthesis in heterotrophic Aradidopsis cells under aerobic conditions. We also predicted reactions that exert strong regulatory influence over carbon flow to cell wall synthesis and its composition.

  12. Biotechnological applications for rosmarinic acid production in plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biotechnological applications for rosmarinic acid production in plant. ... African Journal of Biotechnology. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current ... plant families and in some fern and hornwort species. Rosmarinic acid has a ...

  13. Understanding Plant Nitrogen Metabolism through Metabolomics and Computational Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrin H. Beatty

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive understanding of plant metabolism could provide a direct mechanism for improving nitrogen use efficiency (NUE in crops. One of the major barriers to achieving this outcome is our poor understanding of the complex metabolic networks, physiological factors, and signaling mechanisms that affect NUE in agricultural settings. However, an exciting collection of computational and experimental approaches has begun to elucidate whole-plant nitrogen usage and provides an avenue for connecting nitrogen-related phenotypes to genes. Herein, we describe how metabolomics, computational models of metabolism, and flux balance analysis have been harnessed to advance our understanding of plant nitrogen metabolism. We introduce a model describing the complex flow of nitrogen through crops in a real-world agricultural setting and describe how experimental metabolomics data, such as isotope labeling rates and analyses of nutrient uptake, can be used to refine these models. In summary, the metabolomics/computational approach offers an exciting mechanism for understanding NUE that may ultimately lead to more effective crop management and engineered plants with higher yields.

  14. Quantifying plant phenotypes with isotopic labeling and metabolic flux analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Analyses of metabolic flux using stable isotopes in plants have traditionally been restricted to tissues with presumed homogeneous cell populations such as developing seeds, cell suspensions, or cultured roots and root tips. It is now possible to describe these and other more complex tissues such a...

  15. Volatile science? Metabolic engineering of terpenoids in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aharoni, A.; Jongsma, M.A.; Bouwmeester, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    Terpenoids are important for plant survival and also possess biological properties that are beneficial to humans. Here, we describe the state of the art in terpenoid metabolic engineering, showing that significant progress has been made over the past few years. Subcellular targeting of enzymes has d

  16. Priming by Hexanoic Acid Induce Activation of Mevalonic and Linolenic Pathways and Promotes the Emission of Plant Volatiles

    OpenAIRE

    Eugenio eLlorens; Gemma eCamañes; Leonor eLapeña; Pilar eGarcía-Agustín

    2016-01-01

    Hexanoic acid is a short natural monocarboxylic acid present in some fruits and plants. Previous studies reported that soil drench application of this acid induces effective resistance in tomato plants against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae and in citrus against Alternaria alternata and Xanthomonas citri. In this work, we performed an in deep study of the metabolic changes produced in citrus by the application of hexanoic acid in response to the challenge pathogen Alternaria altern...

  17. Biochemistry and occurrence of O-demethylation in plant metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian Hagel

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Demethylases play a pivitol role in numerous biological processes from covalent histone modification and DNA repair to specialized metabolism in plants and microorganisms. Enzymes that catalyze O- and N-demethylation include 2-oxoglutarate (2OG/Fe(II-dependent dioxygenases, cytochromes P450, Rieske-domain proteins and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD-dependent oxidases. Proposed mechanisms for demethylation by 2OG/Fe(II-dependent enzymes involve hydroxylation at the O- or N-linked methyl group followed by formaldehyde elimination. Members of this enzyme family catalyze a wide variety of reactions in diverse plant metabolic pathways. Recently, we showed that 2OG/Fe(II-dependent dioxygenases catalyze the unique O-demethylation steps of morphine biosynthesis in opium poppy, which provides a rational basis for the widespread occurrence of demethylases in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid metabolism.

  18. Biobased organic acids production by metabolically engineered microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yun; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Bio-based production of organic acids via microbial fermentation has been traditionally used in food industry. With the recent desire to develop more sustainable bioprocesses for production of fuels, chemicals and materials, the market for microbial production of organic acids has been further ex...... performance microbes for production of succinic acid and 3-hydroxypropionic acid. Also, the key limitations and challenges in microbial organic acids production are discussed......Bio-based production of organic acids via microbial fermentation has been traditionally used in food industry. With the recent desire to develop more sustainable bioprocesses for production of fuels, chemicals and materials, the market for microbial production of organic acids has been further...... expanded as organic acids constitute a key group among top building block chemicals that can be produced from renewable resources. Here we review the current status for production of citric acid and lactic acid, and we highlight the use of modern metabolic engineering technologies to develop high...

  19. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreft, Marko; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pat......-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation....

  20. Role of Bile Acids and Bile Acid Receptors in Metabolic Regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefebvre, Philippe; Cariou, Bertrand; Lien, Fleur; Kuipers, Folkert; Staels, Bart

    2009-01-01

    Lefebvre P, Cariou B, Lien F, Kuipers F, Staels B. Role of Bile Acids and Bile Acid Receptors in Metabolic Regulation. Physiol Rev 89: 147-191,2009; doi: 10.1152/physrev.00010.2008. - The incidence of the metabolic syndrome has taken epidemic proportions in the past decades, contributing to an incre

  1. Metabolic Engineering of Tropane Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei ZHANG; Guo-Yin KAI; Bei-Bei LU; Han-Ming ZHANG; Ke-Xuan TANG; Ji-Hong JIANG; Wan-Sheng CHEN

    2005-01-01

    Over the past decade, the evolving commercial importance of so-called plant secondary metabolites has resulted in a great interest in secondary metabolism and, particularly, in the possibilities to enhance the yield of fine metabolites by means of genetic engineering. Plant alkaloids, which constitute one of the largest groups of natural products, provide many pharmacologically active compounds. Several genes in the tropane alkaloids biosynthesis pathways have been cloned, making the metabolic engineering of these alkaloids possible. The content of the target chemical scopolamine could be significantly increased by various approaches, such as introducing genes encoding the key biosynthetic enzymes or genes encoding regulatory proteins to overcome the specific rate-limiting steps. In addition, antisense genes have been used to block competitive pathways. These investigations have opened up new, promising perspectives for increased production in plants or plant cell culture. Recent achievements have been made in the metabolic engineering of plant tropane alkaloids and some new powerful strategies are reviewed in the present paper.

  2. Eicosapentaenoic acid modulates fatty acid metabolism and inflammation in Psammomys obesus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atek-Mebarki, Feriel; Hichami, Aziz; Abdoul-Azize, Souleymane; Bitam, Arezki; Koceïr, Elhadj Ahmed; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2015-02-01

    The desert gerbil, Psammomys obesus, is a unique polygenic animal model of metabolic syndrome (insulin resistance, obesity and type 2 diabetes), and these pathological conditions resemble to those in human beings. In this study, the animals were fed ad libitum either a natural diet (ND) which contained desertic halophile plants or a standard laboratory diet (STD) or a diet which contained eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), hence, termed as EPA diet (EPAD). In EPAD, 50% of total lipid content was replaced by EPA oil. By employing real-time PCR, we assessed liver expression of key genes involved in fatty acid metabolism such as PPAR-α, SREBP-1c, LXR-α and CHREBP. We also studied the expression of two inflammatory genes, i.e., TNF-α and IL-1β, in liver and adipose tissue of these animals. The STD, considered to be a high caloric diet for this animal, triggered insulin resistance and high lipid levels, along with high hepatic SREBP-1c, LXR-α and CHREBP mRNA expression. TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA were also high in liver of STD fed animals. Feeding EPAD improved plasma glucose, insulin and triacylglycerol levels along with hepatic lipid composition. These observations suggest that EPA exerts beneficial effects in P. obesus.

  3. Specific fatty acids as metabolic modulators in the dairy cow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A.A. Pires

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes recent developments on the utilization of specific fatty acids to modulate bovine energy metabolism, with emphasis on the periparturient dairy cow. A number of experiments have assessed the effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids on bovine hepatic energy metabolism using in vitro and in vivo models. Treatment of hepatocytes with specific fatty acids altered energy metabolism in vitro. For example, linolenic acid seemed to decrease hepatocyte triacylglycerol accumulation. This effect was confirmed in vivo, using parenteral infusions of emulsions derived from different fat sources to feed-restricted non-lactating cows. Additionally, polyunsaturated fatty acids can increase whole body response to insulin, potentially enhancing antilipolytic effects of insulin and muscle protein anabolism in the bovine. There is limited literature on the effects of feeding fat sources rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as fish oil and linseed oil, on metabolism of periparturient dairy cows. Available research has yielded conflicting results which need further clarification. On the other hand, specific isomers of conjugated linoleic acid consistently induce milk fat depression and are able to decrease energy export in milk by periparturient dairy cows. Nonetheless, research is still needed to assess whether these effects will ultimately benefit productivity and health status of periparturient dairy cows. Limitations of available methods to protect fatty acids from ruminal biohydrogenation are also addressed.

  4. Bile acids, farnesoid X receptor, atherosclerosis and metabolic control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Folkert; Stroeve, Johanna H. M.; Caron, Sandrine; Staels, Bart

    2007-01-01

    Purpose of review Bile acids are amphiphilic molecules synthesized from cholesterol exclusively in the liver that are essential for effective absorption of dietary fat. In addition to this classical role', bile acids act as signalling molecules that control their own metabolism by activating the nuc

  5. Engineering metabolic highways in Lactococci and other lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de W.M.; Hugenholtz, J.

    2004-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used in industrial food fermentations and are receiving increased attention for use as cell factories for the production of food and pharmaceutical products. Glycolytic conversion of sugars into lactic acid is the main metabolic highway in these Gram-positive

  6. Engineering metabolic highways in Lactococci and other lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de W.M.; Hugenholtz, J.

    2004-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used in industrial food fermentations and are receiving increased attention for use as cell factories for the production of food and pharmaceutical products. Glycolytic conversion of sugars into lactic acid is the main metabolic highway in these Gram-positive ba

  7. Pathophysiological aspect of metabolic acid-base disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nešović-Ostojić Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaing the arterial pH values (in normal range of 7,35-7,45 is one of the main principles of homeostasis. Regulatory responses, including chemical buffering (extracellular, intracellular, sceletal, the regulation of pCO2 by the respiratory system, and the regulation of [HCO3-] by the kidneys, act in concert to maintain normal arterial pH value. The main extracellular chemical buffer is bicarbonate-carbonic acid buffer system. The kidneys contribute to the regulation of hydrogen (and bicarbonate in body fluids in two ways. Proximal tubules are important in bicarbonate reabsorption and distal tubules excrete hydrogen ion (as ammonium ion or titratable acid. There are four simple acid-base disorders: metabolic acidosis and metabolic alkalosis; respiratory acidosis and respiratory alkalosis. Metabolic acidosis can occur because of an increase in endogenous acid production (such as lactate and ketoacids, loss of bicarbonate (as in diarrhea, or accumulation of endogenous acids (as in renal failure. Metabolic acidosis can also be with high and normal (hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis anion gap. Renal tubular acidosis (RTA is a form of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis which occurs when the renal damage primarily affects tubular function. The main problem in distal RTA is reduced H+ excretion in distal tubule. Type 2 RTA is also called proximal RTA because the main problem is greatly impaired reabsorption of bicarbonate in proximal tubule. Impaired cation exchange in distal tubule is the main problem in RTA type 4. Metabolic alkalosis occurs as a result of net gain of [HCO3-] or loss of nonvolatile acid from extracellular fluids. Metabolic alkalosis can be associated with reduced or increased extracellular volume.

  8. Metabolic versatility in full-scale wastewater treatment plants performing enhanced biological phosphorus removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanham, Ana B; Oehmen, Adrian; Saunders, Aaron M; Carvalho, Gilda; Nielsen, Per H; Reis, Maria A M

    2013-12-01

    This study analysed the enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) microbial community and metabolic performance of five full-scale EBPR systems by using fluorescence in situ hybridisation combined with off-line batch tests fed with acetate under anaerobic-aerobic conditions. The phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs) in all systems were stable and showed little variability between each plant, while glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) were present in two of the plants. The metabolic activity of each sludge showed the frequent involvement of the anaerobic tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) in PAO metabolism for the anaerobic generation of reducing equivalents, in addition to the more frequently reported glycolysis pathway. Metabolic variability in the use of the two pathways was also observed, between different systems and in the same system over time. The metabolic dynamics was linked to the availability of glycogen, where a higher utilisation of the glycolysis pathway was observed in the two systems employing side-stream hydrolysis, and the TCA cycle was more active in the A(2)O systems. Full-scale plants that showed higher glycolysis activity also exhibited superior P removal performance, suggesting that promotion of the glycolysis pathway over the TCA cycle could be beneficial towards the optimisation of EBPR systems.

  9. Metabolic analysis of the removal of formic acid by unacclimated activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viggi, Carolina Cruz; Dionisi, Davide; Miccheli, Alfredo; Valerio, Mariacristina; Majone, Mauro

    2010-06-01

    This paper investigates the removal of formic acid by unacclimated biomass from a municipal activated sludge wastewater treatment plant. The biomass was initially able to remove formic acid, but its removal rate and Oxygen Uptake Rate (OUR) decreased with time, until formic acid removal stopped before the formic acid had been exhausted. Formaldehyde was removed in a similar way, whereas the same biomass was simultaneously able to grow and store PHAs when acetic acid was used as substrate. Batch tests with glycine and (13)C NMR analysis were performed, showing that unacclimated biomass was not able to synthesize all the metabolic intermediates from formic acid alone. At least glycine needed to be externally supplemented, in order to activate the serine synthesis pathway. A small amount of formic acid removal in the absence of growth was also possible through formaldehyde formation and its further conversion to formalin (1,2-formaldehyde dimer), whereas no PHAs were formed.

  10. Phytanic acid metabolism in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanders, Ronald J A; Komen, Jasper; Ferdinandusse, Sacha

    2011-09-01

    Phytanic acid (3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecanoic acid) is a branched-chain fatty acid which cannot be beta-oxidized due to the presence of the first methyl group at the 3-position. Instead, phytanic acid undergoes alpha-oxidation to produce pristanic acid (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecanoic acid) plus CO(2). Pristanic acid is a 2-methyl branched-chain fatty acid which can undergo beta-oxidation via sequential cycles of beta-oxidation in peroxisomes and mitochondria. The mechanism of alpha-oxidation has been resolved in recent years as reviewed in this paper, although some of the individual enzymatic steps remain to be identified. Furthermore, much has been learned in recent years about the permeability properties of the peroxisomal membrane with important consequences for the alpha-oxidation process. Finally, we present new data on the omega-oxidation of phytanic acid making use of a recently generated mouse model for Refsum disease in which the gene encoding phytanoyl-CoA 2-hydroxylase has been disrupted.

  11. Integrated Transcriptome and Metabolic Analyses Reveals Novel Insights into Free Amino Acid Metabolism in Huangjinya Tea Cultivar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qunfeng; Liu, Meiya; Ruan, Jianyun

    2017-01-01

    The chlorotic tea variety Huangjinya, a natural mutant, contains enhanced levels of free amino acids in its leaves, which improves the drinking quality of its brewed tea. Consequently, this chlorotic mutant has a higher economic value than the non-chlorotic varieties. However, the molecular mechanisms behind the increased levels of free amino acids in this mutant are mostly unknown, as are the possible effects of this mutation on the overall metabolome and biosynthetic pathways in tea leaves. To gain further insight into the effects of chlorosis on the global metabolome and biosynthetic pathways in this mutant, Huangjinya plants were grown under normal and reduced sunlight, resulting in chlorotic and non-chlorotic leaves, respectively; their leaves were analyzed using transcriptomics as well as targeted and untargeted metabolomics. Approximately 5,000 genes (8.5% of the total analyzed) and ca. 300 metabolites (14.5% of the total detected) were significantly differentially regulated, thus indicating the occurrence of marked effects of light on the biosynthetic pathways in this mutant plant. Considering primary metabolism, including that of sugars, amino acids, and organic acids, significant changes were observed in the expression of genes involved in both nitrogen (N) and carbon metabolism. The suite of changes not only generated an increase in amino acids, including glutamic acid, glutamine, and theanine, but it also elevated the levels of free ammonium, citrate, and α-ketoglutarate, and lowered the levels of mono- and di-saccharides and of caffeine as compared with the non-chlorotic leaves. Taken together, our results suggest that the increased levels of amino acids in the chlorotic vs. non-chlorotic leaves are likely due to increased protein catabolism and/or decreased glycolysis and diminished biosynthesis of nitrogen-containing compounds other than amino acids, including chlorophyll, purines, nucleotides, and alkaloids.

  12. Fact Sheet - Phosphate Fertilizer Production Plants and Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants NESHAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact sheet summarizing National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Phosphate Fertilizer Production Plants and Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants (40 CFR 63 Subparts AA and BB).

  13. Aminomethylphosphonic acid accumulation in plant species treated with glyphosate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Krishna N; Rimando, Agnes M; Duke, Stephen O; Nandula, Vijay K

    2008-03-26

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) is the most frequently detected metabolite of glyphosate in plants. The objective of this study was to determine if there is any correlation of metabolism of glyphosate to AMPA in different plant species and their natural level of resistance to glyphosate. Greenhouse studies were conducted to determine the glyphosate I 50 values (rate required to cause a 50% reduction in plant growth) and to quantify AMPA and shikimate concentrations in selected leguminous and nonleguminous species treated with glyphosate at respective I 50 rates. Coffee senna [ Cassia occidentalis (L.) Link] was the most sensitive ( I 50 = 75 g/ha) and hemp sesbania [ Sesbania herbacea (P.Mill.) McVaugh] was the most resistant ( I 50 = 456 g/ha) to glyphosate. Hemp sesbania was 6-fold and Illinois bundleflower [ Desmanthus illinoensis (Michx.) MacM. ex B.L.Robins. & Fern.] was 4-fold more resistant to glyphosate than coffee senna. Glyphosate was present in all plant species, and its concentration ranged from 0.308 to 38.7 microg/g of tissue. AMPA was present in all leguminous species studied except hemp sesbania. AMPA concentration ranged from 0.119 to 4.77 microg/g of tissue. Shikimate was present in all plant species treated with glyphosate, and levels ranged from 0.053 to 16.5 mg/g of tissue. Non-glyphosate-resistant (non-GR) soybean accumulated much higher shikimate than glyphosate-resistant (GR) soybean. Although some leguminous species were found to be more resistant to glyphosate than others, and there was considerable variation between species in the glyphosate to AMPA levels found, metabolism of glyphosate to AMPA did not appear to be a common factor in explaining natural resistance levels.

  14. Bile acid metabolism in ileostomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huibregtse, K; Hoek, F; Sanders, G T; Tytgat, G N

    1977-04-01

    In ten ileostomy patients, a 14C-cholylglycine breath test was performed. The 14CO2 in the exhaled air and the 14C bile acid quantity and composition and fat content in the subsequent 24 h ileostomy effluent were determined and compared to the values in twenty healthy controls. The results show that in ileostomy patients only minor bile acid-deconjugation occurs in vivo. Deconjugation in the ileostomy bags was found to be mainly responsible for the absence of conjugated bile acids in many of the ileostomy effluent samples. Secondary bile acids were not present in these patients, as determined by TLC. The fecal fat and bile acid excretion was found to be in the normal range in ileostomy patients provided no concomitant ileum resection was present.

  15. Acetobacter pasteurianus metabolic change induced by initial acetic acid to adapt to acetic acid fermentation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Zhang, Renkuan; Yin, Haisong; Bai, Xiaolei; Chang, Yangang; Xia, Menglei; Wang, Min

    2017-08-02

    Initial acetic acid can improve the ethanol oxidation rate of acetic acid bacteria for acetic acid fermentation. In this work, Acetobacter pasteurianus was cultured in ethanol-free medium, and energy production was found to increase by 150% through glucose consumption induced by initial acetic acid. However, oxidation of ethanol, instead of glucose, became the main energy production pathway when upon culturing ethanol containing medium. Proteome assay was used to analyze the metabolism change induced by initial acetic acid, which provided insight into carbon metabolic and energy regulation of A. pasteurianus to adapt to acetic acid fermentation conditions. Results were further confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. In summary, decreased intracellular ATP as a result of initial acetic acid inhibition improved the energy metabolism to produce more energy and thus adapt to the acetic acid fermentation conditions. A. pasteurianus upregulated the expression of enzymes related to TCA and ethanol oxidation to improve the energy metabolism pathway upon the addition of initial acetic acid. However, enzymes involved in the pentose phosphate pathway, the main pathway of glucose metabolism, were downregulated to induce a change in carbon metabolism. Additionally, the enhancement of alcohol dehydrogenase expression promoted ethanol oxidation and strengthened the acetification rate, thereby producing a strong proton motive force that was necessary for energy production and cell tolerance to acetic acid.

  16. Resveratrol biosynthesis: plant metabolic engineering for nutritional improvement of food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovinazzo, Giovanna; Ingrosso, Ilaria; Paradiso, Annalisa; De Gara, Laura; Santino, Angelo

    2012-09-01

    The plant polyphenol trans-resveratrol (3, 5, 4'-trihydroxystilbene) mainly found in grape, peanut and other few plants, displays a wide range of biological effects. Numerous in vitro studies have described various biological effects of resveratrol. In order to provide more information regarding absorption, metabolism, and bioavailability of resveratrol, various research approaches have been performed, including in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models. In recent years, the induction of resveratrol synthesis in plants which normally do not accumulate such polyphenol, has been successfully achieved by molecular engineering. In this context, the ectopic production of resveratrol has been reported to have positive effects both on plant resistance to biotic stress and the enhancement of the nutritional value of several widely consumed fruits and vegetables. The metabolic engineering of plants offers the opportunity to change the content of specific phytonutrients in plant - derived foods. This review focuses on the latest findings regarding on resveratrol bioproduction and its effects on the prevention of the major pathological conditions in man.

  17. Metabolism of amino acids, dipeptides and tetrapeptides by Lactobacillus sakei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinz, Quirin; Schwab, Wilfried

    2012-04-01

    The microbial degradation of proteins, peptides and amino acids generates volatiles involved in the typical flavor of dry fermented sausage. The ability of three Lactobacillus sakei strains to form aroma compounds was investigated. Whole resting cells were fermented in phosphate buffer with equimolar amounts of substrates consisting of dipeptides, tetrapeptides and free amino acids, respectively. Dipeptides disappeared quickly from the solutions whereas tetrapeptides were only partially degraded. In both approaches the concentration of free amino acids increased in the reaction mixture but did not reach the equimolar amount of the initial substrates. When free amino acids were fed to the bacteria their levels decreased only slightly. Although peptides were more rapidly degraded and/or transported into the cells, free amino acids produced higher amounts of volatiles. It is suggested, that after transport into the cell peptides are only partially hydrolyzed to their amino acids, while the rest is metabolized via alternative metabolic pathways. The three L. sakei strains differed to some extend in their ability to metabolize the substrates to volatile compounds. In a few cases this was due to the position of the amino acids within the peptides. Compared to other starter cultures used for the production of dry fermented sausages, the metabolic impact of the L. sakei strains on the formation of volatiles was very low.

  18. Circulating Levels of Uric Acid and Risk for Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Guerra, Alberto F; Morales-López, Herlinda; Garro-Almendaro, Ana K; Vargas-Ayala, German; Durán-Salgado, Montserrat B; Huerta-Ramírez, Saul; Lozano-Nuevo, Jose J

    2017-01-01

    Hyperuricemia leads to insulin resistance, whereas insulin resistance decreases renal excretion of uric acid, both mechanisms link elevated serum uric acid with metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to evaluate the probability for the development of metabolic syndrome in low-income young adults with hyperuricaemia. We evaluated 103 patients less than 40 years of age, from a low-income population, and without history of cardiovascular disease, in all of them the presence of metabolic syndrome was assessed in accordance with the International Diabetes Federation criteria. In all patients, fasting serum uric acid levels were measured; hyperuricaemia was defined as serum uric acid values 6.5 mg/dl in men and 5.1 mg/dl in women. Statistical analysis was performed with odds ratio. 83 of our patients (80.5%) suffered metabolic syndrome, the odds ratio for the presence of metabolic syndrome in patients with hyperuricaemia was 5.1 (p=0.002, I.C 1.8- 14.5). When patients were evaluated by gender a significantly association between hyperuricaemia and metabolic syndrome was found in women (odds ratio 3.6, p=0.048, C.I. 1.0-12.9), and men (odds ratio 10.2, p= 0.015, IC 1.5-13.2). When uric acid was correlated with the components of metabolic syndrome, we only found a positive correlation with waist circumference (r=0.483). Our results showed a significant association between hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome in low-income young adults in Mexico. DR is associated with estimated risk of CVD in type 2 diabetic patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Transport and Metabolism of the Endogenous Auxin Precursor lndole-3-Butyric Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lucia C. Strader; Bonnie Bartel

    2011-01-01

    T Plant growth and morphogenesis depend on the levels and distribution of the plant hormone auxin. Plants tightly regulate cellular levels of the active auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) through synthesis, inactivation, and transport. Although the transporters that move IAA into and out of cells are well characterized and play important roles in development, little is known about the transport of IAA precursors. In this review, we discuss the accumulating evidence suggesting that the IAA precursor indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) is transported independently of the characterized IAA transport machinery along with the recent identification of specific IBA efflux carriers and enzymes suggested to metabolize IBA. These studies have revealed important roles for IBA in maintaining IAA levels and distribution within the plant to support normal development.

  20. Impeded Carbohydrate Metabolism in Rice Plants under Submergence Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malay Kumar ADAK; Nirmalya GHOSH; Dilip Kumar DASGUPTA; Sudha GUPTA

    2011-01-01

    The detrimental effects of submergence on physiological performances of some rice varieties with special references to carbohydrate metabolisms and their allied enzymes during post-flowering stages have been documented and clarified in the present investigation.It was found that photosynthetic rate and concomitant translocation of sugars into the panicles were both related to the yield.The detrimental effects of the complete submergence were recorded in generation of sucrose,starch,sucrose phosphate synthase and phosphorylase activity in the developing panicles of the plants as compared to those under normal or control (i.e.non-submerged) condition.The accumulation of starch was significantly lower in plants under submergence and that was correlated with ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity.Photosynthetic rate was most affected under submergence in varying days of post-flowering and was also related to the down regulation of Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity.However,under normal or control condition,there recorded a steady maintenance of photosynthetic rate at the post-flowering stages and significantly higher values of Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity.Still,photosynthetic rate of the plants under both control and submerged conditions had hardly any significant correlation with sugar accumulation and other enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism like invertase with grain yield.Finally,plants under submergence suffered significant loss of yield by poor grain filling which was related to impeded carbohydrate metabolism in the tissues.It is evident that loss of yield under submergence is attributed both by lower sink size or sink capacity (number of panicles,in this case) as well as subdued carbohydrate metabolism in plants and its subsequent partitioning into the grains.

  1. Uric acid in plants and microorganisms: Biological applications and genetics - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Rehab M; Abdel-Rahman, Tahany M; Naguib, Rasha M

    2017-09-01

    Uric acid increased accumulation and/or reduced excretion in human bodies is closely related to pathogenesis of gout and hyperuricemia. It is highly affected by the high intake of food rich in purine. Uric acid is present in both higher plants and microorganisms with species dependent concentration. Urate-degrading enzymes are found both in plants and microorganisms but the mechanisms by which plant degrade uric acid was found to be different among them. Higher plants produce various metabolites which could inhibit xanthine oxidase and xanthine oxidoreductase, so prohibit the oxidation of hypoxanthine to xanthine then to uric acid in the purine metabolism. However, microorganisms produce group of degrading enzymes uricase, allantoinase, allantoicase and urease, which catalyze the degradation of uric acid to the ammonia. In humans, researchers found that several mutations caused a pseudogenization (silencing) of the uricase gene in ancestral apes which exist as an insoluble crystalloid in peroxisomes. This is in contrast to microorganisms in which uricases are soluble and exist either in cytoplasm or peroxisomes. Moreover, many recombinant uricases with higher activity than the wild type uricases could be induced successfully in many microorganisms. The present review deals with the occurrence of uric acid in plants and other organisms specially microorganisms in addition to the mechanisms by which plant extracts, metabolites and enzymes could reduce uric acid in blood. The genetic and genes encoding for uric acid in plants and microorganisms are also presented.

  2. Regulatory and Functional Aspects of Indolic Metabolism in Plant Systemic Acquired Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Elia; Bellwon, Patricia; Huber, Stefan; Schlaeppi, Klaus; Bernsdorff, Friederike; Vallat-Michel, Armelle; Mauch, Felix; Zeier, Jürgen

    2016-05-02

    Tryptophan-derived, indolic metabolites possess diverse functions in Arabidopsis innate immunity to microbial pathogen infection. Here, we investigate the functional role and regulatory characteristics of indolic metabolism in Arabidopsis systemic acquired resistance (SAR) triggered by the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Indolic metabolism is broadly activated in both P. syringae-inoculated and distant, non-inoculated leaves. At inoculation sites, camalexin, indol-3-ylmethylamine (I3A), and indole-3-carboxylic acid (ICA) are the major accumulating compounds. Camalexin accumulation is positively affected by MYB122, and the cytochrome P450 genes CYP81F1 and CYP81F2. Local I3A production, by contrast, occurs via indole glucosinolate breakdown by PEN2- dependent and independent pathways. Moreover, exogenous application of the defense hormone salicylic acid stimulates I3A generation at the expense of its precursor indol-3-ylmethylglucosinolate (I3M), and the SAR regulator pipecolic acid primes plants for enhanced P. syringae-induced activation of distinct branches of indolic metabolism. In uninfected systemic tissue, the metabolic response is more specific and associated with enhanced levels of the indolics I3A, ICA, and indole-3-carbaldehyde (ICC). Systemic indole accumulation fully depends on functional CYP79B2/3, PEN2, and MYB34/51/122, and requires functional SAR signaling. Genetic analyses suggest that systemically elevated indoles are dispensable for SAR and associated systemic increases of salicylic acid. However, soil-grown but not hydroponically -cultivated cyp79b2/3 and pen2 plants, both defective in indolic secondary metabolism, exhibit pre-induced immunity, which abrogates their intrinsic ability to induce SAR.

  3. Volatile science? Metabolic engineering of terpenoids in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharoni, Asaph; Jongsma, Maarten A; Bouwmeester, Harro J

    2005-12-01

    Terpenoids are important for plant survival and also possess biological properties that are beneficial to humans. Here, we describe the state of the art in terpenoid metabolic engineering, showing that significant progress has been made over the past few years. Subcellular targeting of enzymes has demonstrated that terpenoid precursors in subcellular compartments are not as strictly separated as previously thought and that multistep pathway engineering is feasible, even across cell compartments. These engineered plants show that insect behavior is influenced by terpenoids. In the future, we expect rapid progress in the engineering of terpenoid production in plants. In addition to commercial applications, such transgenic plants should increase our understanding of the biological relevance of these volatile secondary metabolites.

  4. Metabolic engineering with plants for a sustainable biobased economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jong Moon; Zhao, Le; Shanks, Jacqueline V

    2013-01-01

    Plants are bona fide sustainable organisms because they accumulate carbon and synthesize beneficial metabolites from photosynthesis. To meet the challenges to food security and health threatened by increasing population growth and depletion of nonrenewable natural resources, recent metabolic engineering efforts have shifted from single pathways to holistic approaches with multiple genes owing to integration of omics technologies. Successful engineering of plants results in the high yield of biomass components for primary food sources and biofuel feedstocks, pharmaceuticals, and platform chemicals through synthetic biology and systems biology strategies. Further discovery of undefined biosynthesis pathways in plants, integrative analysis of discrete omics data, and diversified process developments for production of platform chemicals are essential to overcome the hurdles for sustainable production of value-added biomolecules from plants.

  5. Novel Approach for High-Throughput Metabolic Screening of Whole Plants by Stable Isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dersch, Lisa Maria; Beckers, Veronique; Rasch, Detlev; Melzer, Guido; Bolten, Christoph; Kiep, Katina; Becker, Horst; Bläsing, Oliver Ernst; Fuchs, Regine; Ehrhardt, Thomas; Wittmann, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Here, we demonstrate whole-plant metabolic profiling by stable isotope labeling and combustion isotope-ratio mass spectrometry for precise quantification of assimilation, translocation, and molecular reallocation of (13)CO2 and (15)NH4NO3 The technology was applied to rice (Oryza sativa) plants at different growth stages. For adult plants, (13)CO2 labeling revealed enhanced carbon assimilation of the flag leaf from flowering to late grain-filling stage, linked to efficient translocation into the panicle. Simultaneous (13)CO2 and (15)NH4NO3 labeling with hydroponically grown seedlings was used to quantify the relative distribution of carbon and nitrogen. Two hours after labeling, assimilated carbon was mainly retained in the shoot (69%), whereas 7% entered the root and 24% was respired. Nitrogen, taken up via the root, was largely translocated into the shoot (85%). Salt-stressed seedlings showed decreased uptake and translocation of nitrogen (69%), whereas carbon metabolism was unaffected. Coupled to a gas chromatograph, labeling analysis provided enrichment of proteinogenic amino acids. This revealed significant protein synthesis in the panicle of adult plants, whereas protein biosynthesis in adult leaves was 8-fold lower than that in seedling shoots. Generally, amino acid enrichment was similar among biosynthetic families and allowed us to infer labeling dynamics of their precursors. On this basis, early and strong (13)C enrichment of Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway and pentose phosphate pathway intermediates indicated high activity of these routes. Applied to mode-of-action analysis of herbicides, the approach showed severe disturbance in the synthesis of branched-chain amino acids upon treatment with imazapyr. The established technology displays a breakthrough for quantitative high-throughput plant metabolic phenotyping.

  6. IDH1 mutations alter citric acid cycle metabolism and increase dependence on oxidative mitochondrial metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassian, Alexandra R; Parker, Seth J; Davidson, Shawn M; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Green, Courtney R; Zhang, Xiamei; Slocum, Kelly L; Pu, Minying; Lin, Fallon; Vickers, Chad; Joud-Caldwell, Carol; Chung, Franklin; Yin, Hong; Handly, Erika D; Straub, Christopher; Growney, Joseph D; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Murphy, Anne N; Pagliarini, Raymond; Metallo, Christian M

    2014-06-15

    Oncogenic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) occur in several types of cancer, but the metabolic consequences of these genetic changes are not fully understood. In this study, we performed (13)C metabolic flux analysis on a panel of isogenic cell lines containing heterozygous IDH1/2 mutations. We observed that under hypoxic conditions, IDH1-mutant cells exhibited increased oxidative tricarboxylic acid metabolism along with decreased reductive glutamine metabolism, but not IDH2-mutant cells. However, selective inhibition of mutant IDH1 enzyme function could not reverse the defect in reductive carboxylation activity. Furthermore, this metabolic reprogramming increased the sensitivity of IDH1-mutant cells to hypoxia or electron transport chain inhibition in vitro. Lastly, IDH1-mutant cells also grew poorly as subcutaneous xenografts within a hypoxic in vivo microenvironment. Together, our results suggest therapeutic opportunities to exploit the metabolic vulnerabilities specific to IDH1 mutation. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Pathway elucidation and metabolic engineering of specialized plant metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Bo

    , these projects have increased revenues on fermentative production of several biochemicals. The use of systems biology is, however, not limited to microorganisms. Recent advances in biotechnology methods have provided a wealth of data within functional genomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, proteomics...... and fluxomics for a considerable number of organisms. Unfortunately, transferring the wealth of data to valuable information for metabolic engineering purposes is a non-obvious task. This PhD thesis describes a palate of tools used in generation of cell factories for production of specialized plant metabolites......, namely the plant defense compounds camalexin and glucosinolates. The thesis shows methodologies for elucidation of biosynthesis pathways and describes how to transfer obtained knowledge of metabolic pathways to other organisms through establishment of a synthetic biology platform. Through pathway...

  8. Nucleotide Metabolism and its Control in Lactic Acid Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilstrup, Mogens; Hammer, Karin; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2005-01-01

    Most metabolic reactions are connected through either their utilization of nucleotides or their utilization of nucleotides or their regulation by these metabolites. In this review the biosynthetic pathways for pyrimidine and purine metabolism in lactic acid bacteria are described including...... the interconversion pathways, the formation of deoxyribonucleotides and the salvage pathways for use of exogenous precursors. The data for the enzymatic and the genetic regulation of these pathways are reviewed, as well as the gene organizations in different lactic acid bacteria. Mutant phenotypes and methods...... for manipulation of nucleotide pools are also discussed. Our aim is to provide an overview of the physiology and genetics of nucleotide metabolism and its regulation that will facilitate the interpretation of data arising from genetics, metabolomics, proteomics, and transcriptomics in lactic acid bacteria....

  9. Metabolic Effects of Dietary Proteins, Amino Acids and The Other Amine Consisting Compounds on Cardiovascular System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Uğur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, first cause of deaths in the world, diet has a vital role. While nutrition programs for the cardiovascular health generally focus on lipids and carbohydrates, effects of proteins are not well concerned. Thus this review is written in order to examine effect of proteins, amino acids, and the other amine consisting compounds on cardiovascular system. Because of that animal or plant derived proteins have different protein composition in different foods such as dairy products, egg, meat, chicken, fish, pulse and grains, their effects on blood pressure and regulation of lipid profile are unlike. In parallel amino acids made up proteins have different effect on cardiovascular system. From this point, sulfur containing amino acids, branched chain amino acids, aromatic amino acids, arginine, ornithine, citrulline, glycine, and glutamine may affect cardiovascular system in different metabolic pathways. In this context, one carbon metabolism, synthesis of hormone, stimulation of signaling pathways and effects of intermediate and final products that formed as a result of amino acids metabolism is determined. Despite the protein and amino acids, some other amine consisting compounds in diet include trimethylamine N-oxide, heterocyclic aromatic amines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and products of Maillard reaction. These amine consisting compounds generally increase the risk for cardiovascular diseases by stimulating oxidative stress, inflammation, and formation of atherosclerotic plaque.

  10. Impact of Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) on Skeletal Muscle Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoo; Kim, Jonggun; Whang, Kwang-Youn; Park, Yeonhwa

    2016-02-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has garnered special attention as a food bioactive compound that prevents and attenuates obesity. Although most studies on the effects of CLA on obesity have focused on the reduction of body fat, a number of studies have demonstrated that CLA also increases lean body mass and enhances physical performances. It has been suggested that these effects may be due in part to physiological changes in the skeletal muscle, such as changes in the muscle fiber type transformation, alteration of the intracellular signaling pathways in muscle metabolism, or energy metabolism. However, the mode of action for CLA in muscle metabolism is not completely understood. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the effects of CLA on skeletal muscle metabolism. Given that CLA not only reduces body fat, but also improves lean mass, there is great potential for the use of CLA to improve muscle metabolism, which would have a significant health impact.

  11. Roles of Chlorogenic Acid on Regulating Glucose and Lipids Metabolism: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengxi Meng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular glucose and lipid metabolic homeostasis is vital for maintaining basic life activities of a cell or an organism. Glucose and lipid metabolic disorders are closely related with the occurrence and progression of diabetes, obesity, hepatic steatosis, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Chlorogenic acid (CGA, one of the most abundant polyphenol compounds in the human diet, is a group of phenolic secondary metabolites produced by certain plant species and is an important component of coffee. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that CGA exerts many biological properties, including antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticarcinogenic activities. Recently, the roles and applications of CGA, particularly in relation to glucose and lipid metabolism, have been highlighted. This review addresses current studies investigating the roles of CGA in glucose and lipid metabolism.

  12. Inhibition of fatty acid metabolism reduces human myeloma cells proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Tirado-Vélez

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is a haematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of plasma cells. It has been proposed that targeting cancer cell metabolism would provide a new selective anticancer therapeutic strategy. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of β-oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis would reduce cell proliferation in human myeloma cells. We evaluated the effect of etomoxir and orlistat on fatty acid metabolism, glucose metabolism, cell cycle distribution, proliferation, cell death and expression of G1/S phase regulatory proteins in myeloma cells. Etomoxir and orlistat inhibited β-oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis respectively in myeloma cells, without altering significantly glucose metabolism. These effects were associated with reduced cell viability and cell cycle arrest in G0/G1. Specifically, etomoxir and orlistat reduced by 40-70% myeloma cells proliferation. The combination of etomoxir and orlistat resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cell proliferation. Orlistat induced apoptosis and sensitized RPMI-8226 cells to apoptosis induction by bortezomib, whereas apoptosis was not altered by etomoxir. Finally, the inhibitory effect of both drugs on cell proliferation was associated with reduced p21 protein levels and phosphorylation levels of retinoblastoma protein. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid metabolism represents a potential therapeutic approach to treat human multiple myeloma.

  13. A metabolic profiling strategy for the dissection of plant defense against fungal pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos A Aliferis

    Full Text Available Here we present a metabolic profiling strategy employing direct infusion Orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS for the monitoring of soybean's (Glycine max L. global metabolism regulation in response to Rhizoctonia solani infection in a time-course. Key elements in the approach are the construction of a comprehensive metabolite library for soybean, which accelerates the steps of metabolite identification and biological interpretation of results, and bioinformatics tools for the visualization and analysis of its metabolome. The study of metabolic networks revealed that infection results in the mobilization of carbohydrates, disturbance of the amino acid pool, and activation of isoflavonoid, α-linolenate, and phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathways of the plant. Components of these pathways include phytoalexins, coumarins, flavonoids, signaling molecules, and hormones, many of which exhibit antioxidant properties and bioactivity helping the plant to counterattack the pathogen's invasion. Unraveling the biochemical mechanism operating during soybean-Rhizoctonia interaction, in addition to its significance towards the understanding of the plant's metabolism regulation under biotic stress, provides valuable insights with potential for applications in biotechnology, crop breeding, and agrochemical and food industries.

  14. A Metabolic Profiling Strategy for the Dissection of Plant Defense against Fungal Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliferis, Konstantinos A.; Faubert, Denis; Jabaji, Suha

    2014-01-01

    Here we present a metabolic profiling strategy employing direct infusion Orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the monitoring of soybean's (Glycine max L.) global metabolism regulation in response to Rhizoctonia solani infection in a time-course. Key elements in the approach are the construction of a comprehensive metabolite library for soybean, which accelerates the steps of metabolite identification and biological interpretation of results, and bioinformatics tools for the visualization and analysis of its metabolome. The study of metabolic networks revealed that infection results in the mobilization of carbohydrates, disturbance of the amino acid pool, and activation of isoflavonoid, α-linolenate, and phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathways of the plant. Components of these pathways include phytoalexins, coumarins, flavonoids, signaling molecules, and hormones, many of which exhibit antioxidant properties and bioactivity helping the plant to counterattack the pathogen's invasion. Unraveling the biochemical mechanism operating during soybean-Rhizoctonia interaction, in addition to its significance towards the understanding of the plant's metabolism regulation under biotic stress, provides valuable insights with potential for applications in biotechnology, crop breeding, and agrochemical and food industries. PMID:25369450

  15. Structural mechanisms of plant glucan phosphatases in starch metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meekins, David A; Vander Kooi, Craig W; Gentry, Matthew S

    2016-07-01

    Glucan phosphatases are a recently discovered class of enzymes that dephosphorylate starch and glycogen, thereby regulating energy metabolism. Plant genomes encode two glucan phosphatases, called Starch EXcess4 (SEX4) and Like Sex Four2 (LSF2), that regulate starch metabolism by selectively dephosphorylating glucose moieties within starch glucan chains. Recently, the structures of both SEX4 and LSF2 were determined, with and without phosphoglucan products bound, revealing the mechanism for their unique activities. This review explores the structural and enzymatic features of the plant glucan phosphatases, and outlines how they are uniquely adapted to perform their cellular functions. We outline the physical mechanisms used by SEX4 and LSF2 to interact with starch glucans: SEX4 binds glucan chains via a continuous glucan-binding platform comprising its dual-specificity phosphatase domain and carbohydrate-binding module, while LSF2 utilizes surface binding sites. SEX4 and LSF2 both contain a unique network of aromatic residues in their catalytic dual-specificity phosphatase domains that serve as glucan engagement platforms and are unique to the glucan phosphatases. We also discuss the phosphoglucan substrate specificities inherent to SEX4 and LSF2, and outline structural features within the active site that govern glucan orientation. This review defines the structural mechanism of the plant glucan phosphatases with respect to phosphatases, starch metabolism and protein-glucan interaction, thereby providing a framework for their application in both agricultural and industrial settings.

  16. The use of metabolic engineering to produce fatty acid-derived biofuel and chemicals in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Production of fatty acid-derived biofuels and chemicals have garnered attention in recent years owing to their potential to replace petroleum and plant oil-derived products. Through the metabolic engineering of the fatty acid metabolism pathway, advanced fuels and chemicals such as free fatty acid, triacylglycerol, biodiesel, fatty alcohols, alkanes/alkene, R-3-hydroxybutyric acid, polyhydroxyalkanoates and flavonoids have been produced. The robustness, high tolerance to organic solvent, good reputation in industrial fermentations and excellent availability of genetic tools make the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae a suitable cell factory for fatty acid-derived biofuels and chemicals production. This review will describe the successful metabolic engineering strategies employed to produce the fatty acid-derived bio-products in S. cerevisiae, including the enhancement of precursors and co-factors supply, promotion of the enzyme expression and activity, elimination of competing pathways, and the improvement of strain tolerance.

  17. Fumaric acid: an overlooked form of fixed carbon in Arabidopsis and other plant species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chia, D.W.; Yoder, T.J.; Reiter, W.D.; Gibson, S.I.

    2000-10-01

    Photoassimilates are used by plants for production of energy, as carbon skeletons and in transport of fixed carbon between different plant organs. Many studies have been devoted to characterizing the factors that. regulate photoassimilate concentrations in different plant species. Most studies examining photoassimilate concentrations in C{sub 3} plants have focused on analyzing starch and soluble sugars. However, work presented here demonstrates that a number of C{sub 3} plants, including the popular model organism Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., and agriculturally important plants, such as soybean [Glycine ma (L.) Merr.], contain significant quantities of furnaric acid. In fact, furnaric acid can accumulate to levels of several mg per g fresh weight in A-abidopsis leaves, often exceeding starch and soluble sugar levels. Furnaric acid is a component of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and, like starch and soluble sugars, can be metabolized to yield energy and carbon skeletons for production of other compounds. Fumaric acid concentrations increase with plant age and light intensity in Arabidopsis leaves. Arabidopsis phloem exudates contain significant quantities of fumaric acid, raising the possibility that fumaric acid may function in carbon transport.

  18. Fatty acid metabolism studies of human epidermal cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelo, C L; Dunham, W R

    1993-12-01

    Adult human epidermal keratinocytes grow rapidly in medium that is essential fatty acid (EFA)-deficient. In this medium they exhibit decreased amounts of the fatty acids, 18:2, 20:3, 20:4, and contain increased amounts of monounsaturated fatty acids. [14C]- and [3H]acetate and radiolabeled fatty acids, 16:0, 18:2, and 20:4 were used to study the fatty acid metabolism of these cells. Label from acetate appeared in 14- to 20-carbon fatty acids, both saturated and monounsaturated. No label was seen in the essential fatty acid 18:2, 18:3, and 20:4. Radiolabel from [9, 10-3H]palmitic acid (16:0) was detected in 16:0, 16:1, 18:0, and 18:1. [14C]linoleic acid (18:2) was converted to 18:3, 20:2, 20:3, and 20:4, demonstrating delta 6 and delta 5 desaturase activity in keratinocytes. Label from acetate, 16:0, or 18:2 was found mostly in the cellular phospholipids while only one third of the label from [14C]arachidonic was found in the phospholipids. [14C]acetate and [14C]18:2 time course data were used to construct a model of the metabolism of these reactants, using coupled, first-order differential equations. The data show that EFA-deficient keratinocytes metabolize fatty acids using pathways previously found in liver; they suggest the positioning of 18:2 desaturase and 18:3 elongase near the plasma membrane; they indicate that for the synthesis of nonessential fatty acids the formation of 18:0 from 16:0 is the rate-determining step; and they show that the conversion of 18:2 to 20:3 is rapid. These experiments demonstrate a method to study lipid enzyme kinetics in living cells.

  19. Designer labels for plant metabolism: statistical design of isotope labeling experiments for improved quantification of flux in complex plant metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nargund, Shilpa; Sriram, Ganesh

    2013-01-27

    Metabolic fluxes are powerful indicators of cell physiology and can be estimated by isotope-assisted metabolic flux analysis (MFA). The complexity of the compartmented metabolic networks of plants has constrained the application of isotope-assisted MFA to them, principally because of poor identifiability of fluxes from the measured isotope labeling patterns. However, flux identifiability can be significantly improved by a priori design of isotope labeling experiments (ILEs). This computational design involves evaluating the effect of different isotope label and isotopomer measurement combinations on flux identifiability, and thereby identifying optimal labels and measurements toward evaluating the fluxes of interest with the highest confidence. This article reports ILE designs for two major, compartmented plant metabolic pathways - the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt. Together, these pathways represent common motifs in plant metabolism including duplication of pathways in different subcellular compartments, reversible reactions and cyclic carbon flow. To compare various ILE designs, we employed statistical A- and D-optimality criteria. Our computations showed that 1,2-(13)C Glc is a powerful and robust label for the plant PPPs, given currently popular isotopomer measurement techniques (single quadrupole mass spectrometry [MS] and 2-D nuclear magnetic resonance [NMR]). Further analysis revealed that this label can estimate several PPP fluxes better than the popular label 1-(13)C Glc. Furthermore, the concurrent measurement of the isotopomers of hexose and pentose moieties synthesized exclusively in the cytosol or the plastid compartments (measurable through intracellular glucose or sucrose, starch, RNA ribose and histidine) considerably improves the identifiability of PPP fluxes in the individual compartments. Additionally, MS-derived isotopomer measurements outperform NMR-derived measurements in identifying PPP fluxes. The

  20. Rat liver metabolism of dicarboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamecq, J; Draye, J P; Brison, J

    1989-04-01

    Recently, we demonstrated in rat liver that dicarboxylic acids containing more than five carbons can be activated by a microsomal dicarboxylyl-CoA synthetase (J. Vamecq, E. de Hoffmann, and F. Van Hoof. Biochem. J. 230: 683-693, 1985). The products of this reaction, dicarboxylyl-CoA esters, were found to be substrates for an H2O2-generating dicarboxylyl-CoA oxidase. In the present work we report that 1) the catalytic center or the essential domains of dicarboxylyl-CoA synthetase are located at the cytosolic aspect of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane; 2) dicarboxylyl-CoA oxidase is optimally active on dodecanedioyl-CoA and is a peroxisomal enzyme; 3) cyanide-insensitive dodecanedioyl-CoA oxidation (NADH production) is catalyzed by rat liver homogenates. Cell fractionation studies disclose that, similar to dodecanedioyl-CoA oxidase (H2O2 production), the cyanide-insensitive dodecanedioyl-CoA oxidizing activity also belongs to peroxisomes; 4) a dodecanedioyl-CoA oxidoreductase reaction can be assayed by the dichlorphenolindophenol procedure in rat liver homogenates, and the activity is abundant in peroxisomal, mitochondrial, and soluble fractions; 5) by contrast with monocarboxylyl-CoA esters, the dicarboxylyl-CoAs are apparently not substrates for mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation; however, the use of dicarboxylylcarnitine esters as direct substrate for mitochondria suggests the existence of an active beta-oxidation of dicarboxylates in these organelles, which is further confirmed by experiments in which mitochondria are permeabilized with digitonin; 6) the in vivo oxidation of infused dodecanedioic acid results in a rapid appearance in urine of medium-chain dicarboxylic acids, with only 30-50% of the infused dose recovered in urine.

  1. Metabolic engineering of plant oils and waxes for use as industrial feedstocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhercke, Thomas; Wood, Craig C; Stymne, Sten; Singh, Surinder P; Green, Allan G

    2013-02-01

    Society has come to rely heavily on mineral oil for both energy and petrochemical needs. Plant lipids are uniquely suited to serve as a renewable source of high-value fatty acids for use as chemical feedstocks and as a substitute for current petrochemicals. Despite the broad variety of acyl structures encountered in nature and the cloning of many genes involved in their biosynthesis, attempts at engineering economic levels of specialty industrial fatty acids in major oilseed crops have so far met with only limited success. Much of the progress has been hampered by an incomplete knowledge of the fatty acid biosynthesis and accumulation pathways. This review covers new insights based on metabolic flux and reverse engineering studies that have changed our view of plant oil synthesis from a mostly linear process to instead an intricate network with acyl fluxes differing between plant species. These insights are leading to new strategies for high-level production of industrial fatty acids and waxes. Furthermore, progress in increasing the levels of oil and wax structures in storage and vegetative tissues has the potential to yield novel lipid production platforms. The challenge and opportunity for the next decade will be to marry these technologies when engineering current and new crops for the sustainable production of oil and wax feedstocks. © 2012 CSIRO Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2012 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Plant interactions alter the predictions of metabolic scaling theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Lin

    Full Text Available Metabolic scaling theory (MST is an attempt to link physiological processes of individual organisms with macroecology. It predicts a power law relationship with an exponent of -4/3 between mean individual biomass and density during density-dependent mortality (self-thinning. Empirical tests have produced variable results, and the validity of MST is intensely debated. MST focuses on organisms' internal physiological mechanisms but we hypothesize that ecological interactions can be more important in determining plant mass-density relationships induced by density. We employ an individual-based model of plant stand development that includes three elements: a model of individual plant growth based on MST, different modes of local competition (size-symmetric vs. -asymmetric, and different resource levels. Our model is consistent with the observed variation in the slopes of self-thinning trajectories. Slopes were significantly shallower than -4/3 if competition was size-symmetric. We conclude that when the size of survivors is influenced by strong ecological interactions, these can override predictions of MST, whereas when surviving plants are less affected by interactions, individual-level metabolic processes can scale up to the population level. MST, like thermodynamics or biomechanics, sets limits within which organisms can live and function, but there may be stronger limits determined by ecological interactions. In such cases MST will not be predictive.

  3. Effect of oxygen deficiency on nitrogen assimilation and amino acid metabolism of soybean root segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Halley Caixeta; Sodek, Ladaslav

    2013-02-01

    Plants submitted to O(2) deficiency present a series of biochemical modifications, affecting overall root metabolism. Here, the effect of hypoxia on the metabolic fate of (15)N derived from (15)NO(3)(-), (15)NO(2)(-) and (15)NH(4)(+) in isolated soybean root segments was followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, to provide a detailed analysis of nitrogen assimilation and amino acid biosynthesis under hypoxia. O(2) deficiency decreased the uptake of the nitrogen sources from the solution, as ratified by the lower (15)NO(3)(-) and (15)NH(4)(+) enrichment in the root segments. Moreover, analysis of endogenous NO(2)(-) and (15)NH(4)(+) levels suggested a slower metabolism of these ions under hypoxia. Accordingly, regardless of the nitrogen source, hypoxia reduced total (15)N incorporation into amino acids. Analysis of (15)N enrichment patterns and amino acid levels suggest a redirecting of amino acid metabolism to alanine and γ-aminobutyric acid synthesis under hypoxia and a differential sensitivity of individual amino acid pathways to this stress. Moreover, the role of glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation both under normoxia and hypoxia was ratified. In comparison with (15)NH(4)(+), (15)NO(2)(-) assimilation into amino acids was more strongly affected by hypoxia and NO(2)(-) accumulated in root segments during this stress, indicating that nitrite reductase may be an additional limiting step. NO(2)(-) accumulation was associated with a higher nitric oxide emission. (15)NO(3)(-) led to much lower (15)N incorporation in both O(2) conditions, probably due to the limited nitrate reductase activity of the root segments. Overall, the present work shows that profound alterations of root nitrogen metabolism occur during hypoxic stress.

  4. Plant interactions alter the predictions of metabolic scaling theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Yue; Berger, Uta; Grimm, Volker;

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic scaling theory (MST) is an attempt to link physiological processes of individual organisms with macroecology. It predicts a power law relationship with an exponent of 24/3 between mean individual biomass and density during densitydependent mortality (self-thinning). Empirical tests have...... produced variable results, and the validity of MST is intensely debated. MST focuses on organisms’ internal physiological mechanisms but we hypothesize that ecological interactions can be more important in determining plant mass-density relationships induced by density. We employ an individual-based model...... of plant stand development that includes three elements: a model of individual plant growth based on MST, different modes of local competition (size-symmetric vs. -asymmetric), and different resource levels. Our model is consistent with the observed variation in the slopes of self-thinning trajectories...

  5. Plant-microbe interactions to probe regulation of plant carbon metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biemelt, Sophia; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2006-02-01

    Plant growth and development is dependent on coordinated assimilate production, distribution and allocation. Application of biochemical and molecular techniques substantially contributed to a better understanding of these processes, although the underlying regulatory mechanisms are still not fully elucidated and attempts to improve crop yield by modulating carbon partitioning were only partially successful. Plant pathogens also interfere with source-sink interaction. To this end they have evolved a wide range of sophisticated strategies to allow their systemic spread, suppression of plant defence and induction of sink function to support nutrient acquisition for their growth. Studying compatible interactions of plants and pathogens like viruses, bacteria and fungi can be exploited to investigate different levels of source-sink regulation. The identification of microbial factors and their host targets involved in regulation of plant primary metabolism may allow developing novel strategies to increase crop yield. Here we will discuss recent studies on plant-microbe interactions aimed at elucidating mechanisms of compatibility.

  6. Engineering Mycorrhizal Symbioses to Alter Plant Metabolism and Improve Crop Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Katherine E.

    2017-01-01

    Creating sustainable bioeconomies for the 21st century relies on optimizing the use of biological resources to improve agricultural productivity and create new products. Arbuscular mycorrhizae (phylum Glomeromycota) form symbiotic relationships with over 80% of vascular plants. In return for carbon, these fungi improve plant health and tolerance to environmental stress. This symbiosis is over 400 million years old and there are currently over 200 known arbuscular mycorrhizae, with dozens of new species described annually. Metagenomic sequencing of native soil communities, from species-rich meadows to mangroves, suggests biologically diverse habitats support a variety of mycorrhizal species with potential agricultural, medical, and biotechnological applications. This review looks at the effect of mycorrhizae on plant metabolism and how we can harness this symbiosis to improve crop health. I will first describe the mechanisms that underlie this symbiosis and what physiological, metabolic, and environmental factors trigger these plant-fungal relationships. These include mycorrhizal manipulation of host genetic expression, host mitochondrial and plastid proliferation, and increased production of terpenoids and jasmonic acid by the host plant. I will then discuss the effects of mycorrhizae on plant root and foliar secondary metabolism. I subsequently outline how mycorrhizae induce three key benefits in crops: defense against pathogen and herbivore attack, drought resistance, and heavy metal tolerance. I conclude with an overview of current efforts to harness mycorrhizal diversity to improve crop health through customized inoculum. I argue future research should embrace synthetic biology to create mycorrhizal chasses with improved symbiotic abilities and potentially novel functions to improve plant health. As the effects of climate change and anthropogenic disturbance increase, the global diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi should be monitored and protected to

  7. Engineering Mycorrhizal Symbioses to Alter Plant Metabolism and Improve Crop Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E. French

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Creating sustainable bioeconomies for the 21st century relies on optimizing the use of biological resources to improve agricultural productivity and create new products. Arbuscular mycorrhizae (phylum Glomeromycota form symbiotic relationships with over 80% of vascular plants. In return for carbon, these fungi improve plant health and tolerance to environmental stress. This symbiosis is over 400 million years old and there are currently over 200 known arbuscular mycorrhizae, with dozens of new species described annually. Metagenomic sequencing of native soil communities, from species-rich meadows to mangroves, suggests biologically diverse habitats support a variety of mycorrhizal species with potential agricultural, medical, and biotechnological applications. This review looks at the effect of mycorrhizae on plant metabolism and how we can harness this symbiosis to improve crop health. I will first describe the mechanisms that underlie this symbiosis and what physiological, metabolic, and environmental factors trigger these plant-fungal relationships. These include mycorrhizal manipulation of host genetic expression, host mitochondrial and plastid proliferation, and increased production of terpenoids and jasmonic acid by the host plant. I will then discuss the effects of mycorrhizae on plant root and foliar secondary metabolism. I subsequently outline how mycorrhizae induce three key benefits in crops: defense against pathogen and herbivore attack, drought resistance, and heavy metal tolerance. I conclude with an overview of current efforts to harness mycorrhizal diversity to improve crop health through customized inoculum. I argue future research should embrace synthetic biology to create mycorrhizal chasses with improved symbiotic abilities and potentially novel functions to improve plant health. As the effects of climate change and anthropogenic disturbance increase, the global diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi should be monitored

  8. Role of proline and pyrroline-5-carboxylate metabolism in plant defense against invading pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarzoo eQamar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C is an intermediate product of both proline biosynthesis and catabolism. Recent evidences indicate that proline-P5C metabolism is tightly regulated in plants, especially during pathogen infection and abiotic stress. However, role of P5C and its metabolism in plants has not yet been fully understood. Studies indicate that P5C synthesized in mitochondria has a role in both resistance (R-gene-mediated and nonhost resistance against invading pathogens. Proline dehydrogenase (ProDH and delta-ornithine amino transferase (δOAT-encoding genes, both involved in P5C synthesis in mitochondria are implicated in defense response of Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana against bacterial pathogens. Such defense response is proposed to involve salicylic acid-dependent pathway, reactive oxygen species (ROS and hypersensitive response (HR-associated cell death. Recently HR, a form of programmed cell death (PCD, has been proposed to be induced by changes in mitochondrial P5C synthesis or the increase in P5C levels per se in plants inoculated with either a host pathogen carrying suitable avirulent (Avr gene or a nonhost pathogen. Consistently, A. thaliana mutant plants deficient in P5C catabolism showed HR like cell death when grown in external P5C or proline supplemented medium. Similarly, yeast and plant cells under oxidative stress were shown to increase ROS production and PCD due to increase in P5C levels. Similar mechanism has also been reported as one of the triggers for apoptosis in mammalian cells. This review critically analyzes results from various studies and enumerates the pathways for regulation of P5C levels in the plant cell, especially in mitochondria, during pathogen infection. Further, mechanisms regulating P5C- mediated defense responses, namely HR are outlined. This review also provides new insights into the differential role of proline-P5C metabolism in plants exposed to pathogen infection.

  9. Plant cell, tissue and organ culture: the most flexible foundations for plant metabolic engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogita, Shinjiro

    2015-05-01

    Significant advances in plant cell, tissue and organ culture (PCTOC) have been made in the last five decades. PCTOC is now thought to be the underlying technique for understanding general or specific biological functions of the plant kingdom, and it is one of the most flexible foundations for morphological, physiological and molecular biological applications of plants. Furthermore, the recent advances in the field of information technology (IT) have enabled access to a large amount of information regarding all aspects of plant biology. For example, sequencing information is stored in mega repositories such as the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), which can be easily accessed by researchers worldwide. To date, the PCTOC and IT combination strategy for regulation of target plant metabolism and the utilization of bioactive plant metabolites for commercial purposes is essential. In this review, the advantages and the limitations of these methodologies, especially regarding the production of bioactive plant secondary metabolites and metabolic engineering in target plants are discussed mainly from the phenotypic view point.

  10. A Review of the Metabolic Origins of Milk Fatty Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamaria COZMA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Milk fat and its fatty acid profile are important determinants of the technological, sensorial, and nutritional properties of milk and dairy products. The two major processes contributing to the presence of fatty acids in ruminant milk are the mammary lipogenesis and the lipid metabolism in the rumen. Among fatty acids, 4:0 to 12:0, almost all 14:0 and about a half of 16:0 in milk fat derive from de novo synthesis within the mammary gland. De novo synthesis utilizes as precursors acetate and butyrate produced through carbohydrates ruminal fermentation and involves acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthetase as key enzymes. The rest of 16:0 and all of the long-chain fatty acids derive from mammary uptake of circulating lipoproteins and nonesterified fatty acids that originate from digestive absorption of lipids and body fat mobilization. Further, long-chain fatty acids as well as medium-chain fatty acids entering the mammary gland can be desaturated via Δ-9 desaturase, an enzyme that acts by adding a cis-9-double bond on the fatty acid chain. Moreover, ruminal biohydrogenation of dietary unsaturated fatty acids results in the formation of numerous fatty acids available for incorporation into milk fat. Ruminal biohydrogenation is performed by rumen microbial population as a means of protection against the toxic effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Within the rumen microorganisms, bacteria are principally responsible for ruminal biohydrogenation when compared to protozoa and anaerobic fungi.

  11. Polyphenols: planting the seeds of treatment for the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniack, E Paul

    2011-06-01

    Greater understanding about the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome and potential causes suggests that plant polyphenols might be useful as a treatment. Dietary excess energy can be stored in adipocytes, leading to the release of proinflammatory cytokines and adipose-related hormones that cause vascular injury. Plant polyphenols, organic compounds found in numerous plant species and their fruits, are being actively studied as potential treatments for components of the metabolic syndrome. Individual polyphenols that have been examined include resveratrol, quercetin, epigallocathechin-3-gallate, and curcumin. Resveratrol lowers weight, blood pressure, glucose, and insulin resistance in rodents, and a human trial is currently underway. Quercetin decreases lipid and glucose levels in obese rats, and in a human investigation of subjects with the metabolic syndrome has lowered blood pressure without significant alteration of lipids. Epigallocathechin-3-gallate-induced weight loss has attenuated glucose levels and insulin resistance in rodents and improved hemoglobin A(1c) and lipid in human studies. Plant extracts also can be used. Grape seed and chokeberry extracts have decreased blood pressure and lipid levels in small human trials. Other human investigations have shown the beneficial effects of cocoa, coffee, carob, and Momordica charantia. Thus far, most studies have involved a small number of subjects and have been of short duration. Future studies should be designed to account for a disease process in which the pathogenic factors may take place for years before disease manifestations take place, the possibly limited bioavailability of polyphenols, and the potential need to provide combinations or modifications of polyphenols. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Nicotinamide metabolism in ferns: formation of nicotinic acid glucoside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Yin, Yuling; Watanabe, Shin

    2011-03-01

    The metabolic fate of [carbonyl-(14)C]nicotinamide was investigated in 9 fern species, Psilotum nudum, Angiopteris evecta, Lygodium japonicum, Acrostichum aureum, Asplenium antiquum, Diplazium subsinuatum, Thelypteris acuminate, Blechnum orientale and Crytomium fortune. All fern species produce a large quantity of nicotinic acid glucoside from [(14)C]nicotinamide, but trigonelline formation is very low. Increases in the release of (14)CO(2) with incubation time was accompanied by decreases in [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinic acid glucoside. There was slight stimulation of nicotinic acid glucoside formation by 250 mM NaCl in mature leaves of the mangrove fern, Acrostichum aureum, but it is unlikely that this compound acts as a compatible solute. Nicotinamide and nicotinic acid salvage for pyridine nucleotide synthesis was detected in all fern species, although this activity was always less than nicotinic acid glucoside synthesis. Predominant formation of nicotinic acid glucoside is characteristic of nicotinic acid metabolism in ferns. This reaction appears to act as a detoxication mechanism, removing excess nicotinic acid.

  13. Transcriptional regulation of central amino acid metabolism in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the functional characterisation of the transcriptional regulators GlnR, ArgR and AhrC of Lactococcus lactis, which are responsible for the control of genes involved in the metabolism of the amino acids glutamine, glutamate and arginine. A chromosomal glnR deletion mutant was ma

  14. Pseudomonas fluorescens induces strain-dependent and strain-independent host plant responses in defense networks, primary metabolism and photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL; Karve, Abhijit A [ORNL; Lu, Tse-Yuan S [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL; Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Jawdy, Sara [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Colonization of plants by nonpathogenic Pseudomonas fluorescens strains can confer enhanced defense capacity against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Few studies, however, have linked defense pathway regulation to primary metabolism and physiology. In this study, physiological data, metabolites, and transcript profiles are integrated to elucidate how molecular networks initiated at the root-microbe interface influence shoot metabolism and whole-plant performance. Experiments with Arabidopsis thaliana were performed using the newly identified P. fluorescens GM30 or P. fluorescens Pf-5 strains. Co-expression networks indicated that Pf-5 and GM30 induced a subnetwork specific to roots enriched for genes participating in RNA regulation, protein degradation, and hormonal metabolism. In contrast, only GM30 induced a subnetwork enriched for calcium signaling, sugar and nutrient signaling, and auxin metabolism, suggesting strain dependence in network architecture. In addition, one subnetwork present in shoots was enriched for genes in secondary metabolism, photosynthetic light reactions, and hormone metabolism. Metabolite analysis indicated that this network initiated changes in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Consistent with this, we observed strain-specific responses in tryptophan and phenylalanine abundance. Both strains reduced host plant carbon gain and fitness, yet provided a clear fitness benefit when plants were challenged with the pathogen P. syringae DC3000.

  15. Biosynthesis of plant-specific stilbene polyketides in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt-Dannert Claudia

    2006-03-01

    -coumaric acid and caffeic acid, can be efficiently converted to stilbene compounds by recombinant E. coli cells expressing plant biosynthetic genes. Optimization of precursor conversion and cyclization of the bulky ferulic acid precursor by host metabolic engineering and protein engineering may afford the synthesis of even more structurally diverse stilbene compounds.

  16. [Tissue culture of medicinal plant and abscisic acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hui-Yong; Zhu, Hong; Yao, Jian-Xun; Jia, Cai-Feng; Shan, Gao-Wei; Li, Min-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) plays a key role in many physiological processes of plants, and it was also applied to fields of medicinal plant biotechnology. The article presents a review of some recent application of ABA in enhancing the production of secondary metabolites of medicinal plants, improving the in vitro conservation in medicinal plant tissue culture system.

  17. Role of mitochondrial transamination in branched chain amino acid metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutson, S.M.; Fenstermacher, D.; Mahar, C.

    1988-03-15

    Oxidative decarboxylation and transamination of 1-/sup 14/C-branched chain amino and alpha-keto acids were examined in mitochondria isolated from rat heart. Transamination was inhibited by aminooxyacetate, but not by L-cycloserine. At equimolar concentrations of alpha-ketoiso(1-/sup 14/C)valerate (KIV) and isoleucine, transamination was increased by disrupting the mitochondria with detergent which suggests transport may be one factor affecting the rate of transamination. Next, the subcellular distribution of the aminotransferase(s) was determined. Branched chain aminotransferase activity was measured using two concentrations of isoleucine as amino donor and (1-/sup 14/C)KIV as amino acceptor. The data show that branched chain aminotransferase activity is located exclusively in the mitochondria in rat heart. Metabolism of extramitochondrial branched chain alpha-keto acids was examined using 20 microM (1-/sup 14/C)KIV and alpha-ketoiso(1-/sup 14/C)caproate (KIC). There was rapid uptake and oxidation of labeled branched chain alpha-keto acid, and, regardless of the experimental condition, greater than 90% of the labeled keto acid substrate was metabolized during the 20-min incubation. When a branched chain amino acid (200 microM) or glutamate (5 mM) was present, 30-40% of the labeled keto acid was transaminated while the remainder was oxidized. Provision of an alternate amino acceptor in the form of alpha-keto-glutarate (0.5 mM) decreased transamination of the labeled KIV or KIC and increased oxidation. Metabolism of intramitochondrially generated branched chain alpha-keto acids was studied using (1-/sup 14/C)leucine and (1-/sup 14/C)valine. Essentially all of the labeled branched chain alpha-keto acid produced by transamination of (1-/sup 14/C)leucine or (1-/sup 14/C)valine with a low concentration of unlabeled branched chain alpha-keto acid (20 microM) was oxidized.

  18. Does iodine biofortification affect oxidative metabolism in lettuce plants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Begoña; Ríos, Juan Jose; Leyva, Rocío; Cervilla, Luis Miguel; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Eva; Rubio-Wilhelmi, María Mar; Rosales, Miguel Angel; Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Romero, Luis

    2011-09-01

    Plants produce low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which form part of basic cell chemical communication; however, different types of stress can lead to an overexpression of ROS that can damage macromolecules essential for plant growth and development. Iodine is vital to human health, and iodine biofortification programs help improve the human intake through plant consumption. This biofortification process has been shown to influence the antioxidant capacity of lettuce plants, suggesting that the oxidative metabolism of the plant may be affected. The results of this study demonstrate that the response to oxidative stress is variable and depends on the form of iodine applied. Application of iodide (I(-)) to lettuce plants produces a reduction in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and an increase in catalase (CAT) and L-galactono dehydrogenase enzyme activities and in the activity of antioxidant compounds such as ascorbate (AA) and glutathione. This did not prove a very effective approach since a dose of 80 μM produced a reduction in the biomass of the plants. For its part, application of iodate (IO (3) (-) ) produced an increase in the activities of SOD, ascorbate peroxidase, and CAT, the main enzymes involved in ROS detoxification; it also increased the concentration of AA and the regenerative activities of the Halliwell-Asada cycle. These data confirm the non-phytotoxicity of IO (3) (-) since there is no lipid peroxidation or biomass reduction. According to our results, the ability of IO (3) (-) to induce the antioxidant system indicates that application of this form of iodine may be an effective strategy to improve the response of plants to different types of stress.

  19. Extraction, purification, methylation and GC-MS analysis of short-chain carboxylic acids for metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivendale, Nathan D; Jewett, Erin M; Hegeman, Adrian D; Cohen, Jerry D

    2016-08-15

    Dynamic metabolic flux analysis requires efficient and effective methods for extraction, purification and analysis of a plethora of naturally-occurring compounds. One area of metabolism that would be highly informative to study using metabolic flux analysis is the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which consists of short-chain carboxylic acids. Here, we describe a newly-developed method for extraction, purification, derivatization and analysis of short-chain carboxylic acids involved in the TCA cycle. The method consists of snap-freezing the plant material, followed by maceration and a 12-15h extraction at -80 °C. The extracts are then subject to reduction (to stabilize β-keto acids), purified by strong anion exchange solid phase extraction and methylated with methanolic HCl. This method could also be readily adapted to quantify many other short-chain carboxylic acids.

  20. Evolution of amino acid metabolism inferred through cladistic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunchillos, Chomin; Lecointre, Guillaume

    2003-11-28

    Because free amino acids were most probably available in primitive abiotic environments, their metabolism is likely to have provided some of the very first metabolic pathways of life. What were the first enzymatic reactions to emerge? A cladistic analysis of metabolic pathways of the 16 aliphatic amino acids and 2 portions of the Krebs cycle was performed using four criteria of homology. The analysis is not based on sequence comparisons but, rather, on coding similarities in enzyme properties. The properties used are shared specific enzymatic activity, shared enzymatic function without substrate specificity, shared coenzymes, and shared functional family. The tree shows that the earliest pathways to emerge are not portions of the Krebs cycle but metabolisms of aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, and glutamine. The views of Horowitz (Horowitz, N. H. (1945) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 31, 153-157) and Cordón (Cordón, F. (1990) Tratado Evolucionista de Biologia, Aguilar, Madrid, Spain), according to which the upstream reactions in the catabolic pathways and the downstream reactions in the anabolic pathways are the earliest in evolution, are globally corroborated; however, with some exceptions. These are due to later opportunistic connections of pathways (actually already suggested by these authors). Earliest enzymatic functions are mostly catabolic; they were deaminations, transaminations, and decarboxylations. From the consensus tree we extracted four time spans for amino acid metabolism development. For some amino acids catabolism and biosynthesis occurred at the same time (Asp, Glu, Lys, Leu, Ala, Val, Ile, Pro, Arg). For others ultimate reactions that use amino acids as a substrate or as a product are distinct in time, with catabolism preceding anabolism for Asn, Gln, and Cys and anabolism preceding catabolism for Ser, Met, and Thr. Cladistic analysis of the structure of biochemical pathways makes hypotheses in biochemical evolution explicit and parsimonious.

  1. Metabolic profiling of the resurrection plant Haberlea rhodopensis during desiccation and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyankova, Daniela; Mladenov, Petko; Berkov, Strahil; Peshev, Darin; Georgieva, Desislava; Djilianov, Dimitar

    2014-12-01

    Desiccation tolerance is among the most important parameters for crop improvement under changing environments. Resurrection plants are useful models for both theoretical and practical studies. We performed metabolite profiling via gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and analyzed the antioxidant capacity of the endemic resurrection plant Haberlea rhodopensis at desiccation and recovery. More than 100 compounds were evaluated. Stress response included changes in both primary and secondary metabolic pathways. The high amounts of the specific glycoside myconoside and some phenolic acids - e.g. syringic and dihydrocaffeic acid under normal conditions tend to show their importance for the priming of H. rhodopensis to withstand severe desiccation and oxidative stress. The accumulation of sucrose (resulting from starch breakdown), total phenols, β-aminoisobutyric acid, β-sitosterol and α-tocopherol increased up to several times at later stages of desiccation. Extracts of H. rhodopensis showed high antioxidant capacity at stress and normal conditions. Myconoside was with the highest antioxidant properties among tested phenolic compounds. Probably, the evolution of resurrection plants under various local environments has resulted in unique desiccation tolerance with specific metabolic background. In our case, it includes the accumulation of a relatively rare compound (myconoside) that contributes alone and together with other common metabolites. Further systems biology studies on the involvement of carbohydrates, phenolic acids and glycosides in the desiccation tolerance and antioxidant capacity of H. rhodopensis will definitely help in achieving the final goal - improving crop drought tolerance. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  2. Altered sucrose metabolism impacts plant biomass production and flower development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Heather D; Beamish, Leigh; Reid, Anya; Park, Ji-Young; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2010-04-01

    Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) was transformed with three genes involved in sucrose metabolism, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase, EC 2.7.7.9), sucrose synthase (SuSy, EC 2.4.1.13) and sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS, EC 2.4.1.14). Plants harbouring the single transgenes were subsequently crossed to produce double and triple transgenic lines, including: 2 x 35S::UGPase x SPS, 4CL::UGPase x SPS, 2 x 35S::SuSy x SPS, 4CL::SuSy x SPS, 2 x 35S::UGPase x SuSy x SPS, and 4CL::UGPase x SuSy x SPS. The ultimate aim of the study was to examine whether it is possible to alter cellulose production through the manipulation of sucrose metabolism genes. While altering sucrose metabolism using UGPase, SuSy and SPS does not have an end effect on cellulose production, their simultaneous overexpression resulted in enhanced primary growth as seen in an increase in height growth, in some cases over 50%. Furthermore, the pyramiding strategy of simultaneously altering the expression of multiple genes in combination resulted in increased time to reproductive bud formation as well as altered flower morphology and foliar stipule formation in 4CL lines. Upregulation of these sucrose metabolism genes appears to directly impact primary growth and therefore biomass production in tobacco.

  3. Metabolic engineering of tomato fruit organic acid content guided by biochemical analysis of an introgression line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Megan J; Osorio, Sonia; Gehl, Bernadette; Baxter, Charles J; Kruger, Nicholas J; Ratcliffe, R George; Fernie, Alisdair R; Sweetlove, Lee J

    2013-01-01

    Organic acid content is regarded as one of the most important quality traits of fresh tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). However, the complexity of carboxylic acid metabolism and storage means that it is difficult to predict the best way to engineer altered carboxylic acid levels. Here, we used a biochemical analysis of a tomato introgression line with increased levels of fruit citrate and malate at breaker stage to identify a metabolic engineering target that was subsequently tested in transgenic plants. Increased carboxylic acid levels in introgression line 2-5 were not accompanied by changes in the pattern of carbohydrate oxidation by pericarp discs or the catalytic capacity of tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes measured in isolated mitochondria. However, there was a significant decrease in the maximum catalytic activity of aconitase in total tissue extracts, suggesting that a cytosolic isoform of aconitase was affected. To test the role of cytosolic aconitase in controlling fruit citrate levels, we analyzed fruit of transgenic lines expressing an antisense construct against SlAco3b, one of the two tomato genes encoding aconitase. A green fluorescent protein fusion of SlAco3b was dual targeted to cytosol and mitochondria, while the other aconitase, SlAco3a, was exclusively mitochondrial when transiently expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves. Both aconitase transcripts were decreased in fruit from transgenic lines, and aconitase activity was reduced by about 30% in the transgenic lines. Other measured enzymes of carboxylic acid metabolism were not significantly altered. Both citrate and malate levels were increased in ripe fruit of the transgenic plants, and as a consequence, total carboxylic acid content was increased by 50% at maturity.

  4. Dynamical Regimes in the Metabolic Cycle of a Higher Plant are Characterized by Different Fractal Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hütt, M.-Th.; Rascher, U.; Lüttge, U.

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) serves as a plant model system for the investigation of circadian rhythmicity. Recently, it has been discovered that propagating waves and, as a result, synchronization and desynchronization of adjacent leaf areas, contribute to an observed temporal variation of the net CO2 uptake of a CAM plant. The underlying biological clock has thus to be considered as a spatiotemporal product of many weakly coupled nonlinear oscillators. Here we study the structure of these spatiotemporal patterns with methods from fractal geometry. The fractal dimension of the spatial pattern is used to characterize the dynamical behavior of the plant. It is seen that the value of the fractal dimension depends significantly on the dynamical regime of the rhythm. In addition, the time variation of the fractal dimension is studied. The implications of these findings for our understanding of circadian rhythmicity are discussed.

  5. Metabolic evolution of Escherichia coli strains that produce organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabar, Tammy; Gong, Wei; Yocum, R Rogers

    2014-10-28

    This invention relates to the metabolic evolution of a microbial organism previously optimized for producing an organic acid in commercially significant quantities under fermentative conditions using a hexose sugar as sole source of carbon in a minimal mineral medium. As a result of this metabolic evolution, the microbial organism acquires the ability to use pentose sugars derived from cellulosic materials for its growth while retaining the original growth kinetics, the rate of organic acid production and the ability to use hexose sugars as a source of carbon. This invention also discloses the genetic change in the microorganism that confers the ability to use both the hexose and pentose sugars simultaneously in the production of commercially significant quantities of organic acids.

  6. Alteration of plant physiology by glyphosate and its by-product aminomethylphosphonic acid: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Marcelo P; Smedbol, Elise; Chalifour, Annie; Hénault-Ethier, Louise; Labrecque, Michel; Lepage, Laurent; Lucotte, Marc; Juneau, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    It is generally claimed that glyphosate kills undesired plants by affecting the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) enzyme, disturbing the shikimate pathway. However, the mechanisms leading to plant death may also be related to secondary or indirect effects of glyphosate on plant physiology. Moreover, some plants can metabolize glyphosate to aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) or be exposed to AMPA from different environmental matrices. AMPA is a recognized phytotoxin, and its co-occurrence with glyphosate could modify the effects of glyphosate on plant physiology. The present review provides an overall picture of alterations of plant physiology caused by environmental exposure to glyphosate and its metabolite AMPA, and summarizes their effects on several physiological processes. It particularly focuses on photosynthesis, from photochemical events to C assimilation and translocation, as well as oxidative stress. The effects of glyphosate and AMPA on several plant physiological processes have been linked, with the aim of better understanding their phytotoxicity and glyphosate herbicidal effects.

  7. Different Narrow-Band Light Ranges Alter Plant Secondary Metabolism and Plant Defense Response to Aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechner, Ole; Neugart, Susanne; Schreiner, Monika; Wu, Sasa; Poehling, Hans-Michael

    2016-10-01

    Light of different wavelengths affects various physiological processes in plants. Short-wavelength radiation (like UV) can activate defense pathways in plants and enhance the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites (such as flavonoids and glucosinolates) responsible for resistance against certain herbivorous insects. The intensity of light-induced, metabolite-based resistance is plant- and insect species-specific and depends on herbivore feeding guild and specialization. In this study, broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) plants were grown for 4 weeks in a climate chamber under conventional fluorescent tubes and were additionally treated with UV-B (310 nm), UV-A (365 or 385 nm), or violet (420 nm) light generated with UV-B tubes or light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The objective was to determine the influence of narrow bandwidths of light (from UV-B to violet) on plant secondary metabolism and on the performance of the cabbage aphid Brevicoryne brassicae (a specialist) and the green peach aphid Myzus persicae (a generalist). Among flavonol glycosides, specific quercetin and kaempferol glycosides increased markedly under UV-B, while among glucosinolates only 4-methoxy-3-indolylmethyl showed a 2-fold increase in plants exposed to UV-B and UV-A. The concentration of 3-indolylmethyl glucosinolate in broccoli plants increased with UV-B treatment. Brevicoryne brassicae adult weights and fecundity were lower on UV-B treated plants compared to UV-A or violet light-treated plants. Adult weights and fecundity of M. persicae were increased under UV-B and UV-A treatments. When specific light wavelengths are used to induce metabolic changes in plants, the specificity of the induced effects on herbivores should be considered.

  8. Metabolic engineering of Yarrowia lipolytica for itaconic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazeck, John; Hill, Andrew; Jamoussi, Mariam; Pan, Anny; Miller, Jarrett; Alper, Hal S

    2015-11-01

    Itaconic acid is a naturally produced organic acid with diverse applications as a replacement for petroleum derived products. However, its industrial viability as a bio-replacement has been restricted due to limitations with native producers. In this light, Yarrowia lipolytica is an excellent potential candidate for itaconic acid production due to its innate capacity to accumulate citric acid cycle intermediates and tolerance to lower pH. Here, we demonstrate the capacity to produce itaconic acid in Y. lipolytica through heterologous expression of the itaconic acid synthesis enzyme, resulting in an initial titer of 33 mg/L. Further optimizations of this strain via metabolic pathway engineering, enzyme localization, and media optimization strategies enabled 4.6g/L of itaconic acid to be produced in bioreactors, representing a 140-fold improvement over initial titer. Moreover, these fermentation conditions did not require additional nutrient supplementation and utilized a low pH condition that enabled the acid form of itaconic acid to be produced. Overall yields (0.058 g/g yield from glucose) and maximum productivity of 0.045 g/L/h still provide areas for future strain improvement. Nevertheless, this work demonstrates that Y. lipolytica has the potential to serve as an industrially relevant platform for itaconic acid production.

  9. Roles for glutathione transferases in plant secondary metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, David P; Skipsey, Mark; Edwards, Robert

    2010-03-01

    Plant glutathione transferases (GSTs) are classified as enzymes of secondary metabolism, but while their roles in catalysing the conjugation and detoxification of herbicides are well known, their endogenous functions are largely obscure. Thus, while the presence of GST-derived S-glutathionylated xenobiotics have been described in many plants, there is little direct evidence for the accumulation of similarly conjugated natural products, despite the presence of a complex and dichotomous metabolic pathway which processes these reaction products. The conservation in glutathione conjugating and processing pathways, the co-regulation of GSTs with inducible plant secondary metabolism and biochemical studies showing the potential of these enzymes to conjugate reactive natural products are all suggestive of important endogenous functions. As a framework for addressing these enigmatic functions we postulate that either: (a) the natural reaction products of GSTs are unstable and undergo reversible S-glutathionylation; (b) the conjugation products of GSTs are very rapidly processed to derived metabolites; (c) GSTs do not catalyse conventional conjugation reactions but instead use glutathione as a cofactor rather than co-substrate; or (d) GSTs are non-catalytic and function as transporter proteins for secondary metabolites and their unstable intermediates. In this review, we describe how enzyme biochemistry and informatics are providing clues as to GST function allowing for the critical evaluation of each of these hypotheses. We also present evidence for the involvement of GSTs in the synthesis of sulfur-containing secondary metabolites such as volatiles and glucosinolates, and the conjugation, transport and storage of reactive oxylipins, phenolics and flavonoids.

  10. THE BIOSYNTHESIS OF HYDROXYBENZOIC ACIDS IN HIGHER PLANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    methylating protocatechuic to vanillic acid or hydroxylating it to yield gallic acid . Demethoxylation of sinapic and dehydroxylation of caffeic acid occurred in...Radioactive para-hydroxybenzoic, vanillic and syringic acids were shown to be synthesized in a variety of plants from the corresponding...hydroxycinnamic acids labelled in the beta-position. Decarboxylation of the hydroxybenzoic acids indicated that nearly all the activity was contained in the

  11. Regulation of intestinal protein metabolism by amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Julien; Goichon, Alexis; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse

    2013-09-01

    Gut homeostasis plays a major role in health and may be regulated by quantitative and qualitative food intake. In the intestinal mucosa, an intense renewal of proteins occurs, at approximately 50% per day in humans. In some pathophysiological conditions, protein turnover is altered and may contribute to intestinal or systemic diseases. Amino acids are key effectors of gut protein turnover, both as constituents of proteins and as regulatory molecules limiting intestinal injury and maintaining intestinal functions. Many studies have focused on two amino acids: glutamine, known as the preferential substrate of rapidly dividing cells, and arginine, another conditionally essential amino acid. The effects of glutamine and arginine on protein synthesis appear to be model and condition dependent, as are the involved signaling pathways. The regulation of gut protein degradation by amino acids has been minimally documented until now. This review will examine recent data, helping to better understand how amino acids regulate intestinal protein metabolism, and will explore perspectives for future studies.

  12. Effect of metabolic regulators on aluminium uptake and toxicity in Matricaria chamomilla plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kováčik, Jozef; Stork, František; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Grúz, Jiři; Hedbavny, Josef

    2012-05-01

    Phenolic metabolism of Al-exposed Matricaria chamomilla plants was modulated with four regulators: 2-aminoindane-2-phosphonic acid (AIP), salicylic acid (SA), sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and dithiothreitol (DTT). Physiological parameters (tissue water content, soluble proteins, reducing sugars, K+ content), root lignin content and free amino acids (increase in root proline and alanine) were the most affected in SA + Al variant, indicating negative impact of SA on Al-induced changes. SNP showed the least visible impact, suggesting protective effect of nitric oxide. Complex comparison between Al alone and combined treatments revealed that SA and DTT stimulated increase in shoot phenolic acids (mainly vanillic acid), sum of flavonols and soluble phenols but decreased the levels of coumarin-related compounds (Z- and E-2-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy-4-methoxycinnamic acids), leading to elevation of shoot Al. Positive correlation between phenolic acids (mainly ferulic and chlorogenic acids), soluble phenols and total Al was found in the roots of SA and DTT variants. These events were not observed in AIP and SNP treatments. These data, to our knowledge for the first time, exactly confirm that phenolic metabolites may affect shoot Al uptake and this relation is rather positive in terms of simple phenols (and negative in terms of coumarin-related compounds).

  13. Comparative functional genomics of amino acid metabolism of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pastink, M.I.

    2009-01-01

    The amino acid metabolism of lactic acid bacteria used as starters in industrial fermentations has profound effects on the quality of the fermented foods. The work described in this PhD thesis was initiated to use genomics technologies and a comparative approach to link the gene content of some well

  14. Analysis of requirements for teaching materials based on the course bioinformatics for plant metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balqis, Widodo, Lukiati, Betty; Amin, Mohamad

    2017-05-01

    A way to improve the quality of learning in the course of Plant Metabolism in the Department of Biology, State University of Malang, is to develop teaching materials. This research evaluates the needs of bioinformatics-based teaching material in the course Plant Metabolism by the Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement, and Evaluate (ADDIE) development model. Data were collected through questionnaires distributed to the students in the Plant Metabolism course of the Department of Biology, University of Malang, and analysis of the plan of lectures semester (RPS). Learning gains of this course show that it is not yet integrated into the field of bioinformatics. All respondents stated that plant metabolism books do not include bioinformatics and fail to explain the metabolism of a chemical compound of a local plant in Indonesia. Respondents thought that bioinformatics can explain examples and metabolism of a secondary metabolite analysis techniques and discuss potential medicinal compounds from local plants. As many as 65% of the respondents said that the existing metabolism book could not be used to understand secondary metabolism in lectures of plant metabolism. Therefore, the development of teaching materials including plant metabolism-based bioinformatics is important to improve the understanding of the lecture material in plant metabolism.

  15. Reliable Metabolic Flux Estimation in Escherichia coli Central Carbon Metabolism Using Intracellular Free Amino Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Okahashi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available 13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA is a tool of metabolic engineering for investigation of in vivo flux distribution. A direct 13C enrichment analysis of intracellular free amino acids (FAAs is expected to reduce time for labeling experiments of the MFA. Measurable FAAs should, however, vary among the MFA experiments since the pool sizes of intracellular free metabolites depend on cellular metabolic conditions. In this study, minimal 13C enrichment data of FAAs was investigated to perform the FAAs-based MFA. An examination of a continuous culture of Escherichia coli using 13C-labeled glucose showed that the time required to reach an isotopically steady state for FAAs is rather faster than that for conventional method using proteinogenic amino acids (PAAs. Considering 95% confidence intervals, it was found that the metabolic flux distribution estimated using FAAs has a similar reliability to that of the PAAs-based method. The comparative analysis identified glutamate, aspartate, alanine and phenylalanine as the common amino acids observed in E. coli under different culture conditions. The results of MFA also demonstrated that the 13C enrichment data of the four amino acids is required for a reliable analysis of the flux distribution.

  16. Nutritional regulation of bile acid metabolism is associated with improved pathological characteristics of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liaset, Bjørn; Hao, Qin; Jørgensen, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are powerful regulators of metabolism, and mice treated orally with cholic acid are protected from dietinduced obesity, hepatic lipid accumulation, and increased plasma triacylglycerol (TAG) and glucose levels. Here, we show that plasma BA concentration in rats was elevated...... metabolism can be modulated by diet and that such modulation may prevent/ameliorate the characteristic features of the metabolic syndrome....... by exchanging the dietary protein source from casein to salmon protein hydrolysate (SPH). Importantly, the SPH-treated rats were resistant to diet-induced obesity. SPH-treated rats had reduced fed state plasma glucose and TAG levels and lower TAG in liver. The elevated plasma BA concentration was associated...

  17. Fusion and metabolism of plant cells as affected by microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampp, R; Hoffmann, E; Schönherr, K; Johann, P; De Filippis, L

    1997-01-01

    Plant cell protoplasts derived from leaf tissue of two different tobacco species (Nicotiana tabacum., N. rustica L.) were exposed to short-term (sounding rocket experiments) and long-term (spacelab) microgravity environments in order to study both (electro) cell fusion and cell metabolism during early and later stages of tissue regeneration. The period of exposure to microgravity varied from 10 min (sounding rocket) to 10 d (space shuttle). The process of electro fusion of protoplasts was improved under conditions of microgravity: the time needed to establish close membrane contact between protoplasts (alignment time) was reduced (5 as compared to 15 s under 1 g) and numbers of fusion products between protoplasts of different specific density were increased by a factor of about 10. In addition, viability of fusion products, as shown by the ability to form callus, increased from about 60% to more than 90%. Regenerated fusion products obtained from both sounding-rocket and spacelab experiments showed a wide range of intermediate properties between the two parental plants. This was verified by isozyme analysis and random amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR). In order to address potential metabolic responses, more general markers such as the overall energy state (ATP/ADP ratio), the redox charge of the diphosphopyridine nucleotide system (NADH/NAD ratio), and the pool size of fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (Fru 2,6 bisp), a regulator of the balance between glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, were determined. Responses of these parameters were different with regard to short-term and long-term exposure. Shortly after transition to reduced gravitation (sounding rocket) ratios of ATP/ADP exhibited strong fluctuation while the pool size of NAD decreased (indicating an increased NADH/NAD ratio) and that of Fru 2,6 bisp increased. As similar changes can be observed under stress conditions, this response is probably indicative of a metabolic stress

  18. Methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT), plant uptake and effects on metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A.R.; Lytle, C.M.; Stone, R.L.; Smith, B.N [Department of Botany and Range Science, Brigham Young University, Provo (United States); Hansen, L.D. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo (United States)

    2000-04-01

    In the USA and Canada, methylcyclopentadienyl manganese (MMT) is currently added to gasoline to replace tetraethyl lead as an antiknock fuel additive. Manganese concentrations in roadside soil and plants are increasing and correlated with distance from the roadway, traffic volume, plant type, and microhabitat. Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings were treated for either five or thirty-five days with different levels of manganous chloride (0-1000ppm). Metabolic heat rates (q) and respiration rates (R{sub CO{sub 2}}), measured calorimetrically, indicated severe stress at Mn concentrations between 10 and 100ppm and at temperatures above 20C. Predicted growth rates (R{sub SG}) also decreased in these circumstances.

  19. Acid-base metabolism: implications for kidney stones formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Bernhard

    2006-04-01

    The physiology and pathophysiology of renal H+ ion excretion and urinary buffer systems are reviewed. The main focus is on the two major conditions related to acid-base metabolism that cause kidney stone formation, i.e., distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) and abnormally low urine pH with subsequent uric acid stone formation. Both the entities can be seen on the background of disturbances of the major urinary buffer system, NH3+ NH4+. On the one hand, reduced distal tubular secretion of H+ ions results in an abnormally high urinary pH and either incomplete or complete dRTA. On the other hand, reduced production/availability of NH4+ is the cause of an abnormally low urinary pH, which predisposes to uric acid stone formation. Most recent research indicates that the latter abnormality may be a renal manifestation of the increasingly prevalent metabolic syndrome. Despite opposite deviations from normal urinary pH values, both the dRTA and uric acid stone formation due to low urinary pH require the same treatment, i.e., alkali. In the dRTA, alkali is needed for improving the body's buffer capacity, whereas the goal of alkali treatment in uric acid stone formers is to increase the urinary pH to 6.2-6.8 in order to minimize uric acid crystallization.

  20. Regulation of energy metabolism by long-chain fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Manabu T; Yudell, Barbara E; Loor, Juan J

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, excess energy is stored primarily as triglycerides, which are mobilized when energy demands arise. This review mainly focuses on the role of long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) in regulating energy metabolism as ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). PPAR-alpha expressed primarily in liver is essential for metabolic adaptation to starvation by inducing genes for beta-oxidation and ketogenesis and by downregulating energy expenditure through fibroblast growth factor 21. PPAR-delta is highly expressed in skeletal muscle and induces genes for LCFA oxidation during fasting and endurance exercise. PPAR-delta also regulates glucose metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis by inducing FOXO1 and PGC1-alpha. Genes targeted by PPAR-gamma in adipocytes suggest that PPAR-gamma senses incoming non-esterified LCFAs and induces the pathways to store LCFAs as triglycerides. Adiponectin, another important target of PPAR-gamma may act as a spacer between adipocytes to maintain their metabolic activity and insulin sensitivity. Another topic of this review is effects of skin LCFAs on energy metabolism. Specific LCFAs are required for the synthesis of skin lipids, which are essential for water barrier and thermal insulation functions of the skin. Disturbance of skin lipid metabolism often causes apparent resistance to developing obesity at the expense of normal skin function.

  1. Oxalic acid alleviates chilling injury in peach fruit by regulating energy metabolism and fatty acid contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Lei; Shan, Timin; Zheng, Yonghua

    2014-10-15

    The effects of postharvest oxalic acid (OA) treatment on chilling injury, energy metabolism and membrane fatty acid content in 'Baifeng' peach fruit stored at 0°C were investigated. Internal browning was significantly reduced by OA treatment in peaches. OA treatment markedly inhibited the increase of ion leakage and the accumulation of malondialdehyde. Meanwhile, OA significantly increased the contents of adenosine triphosphate and energy charge in peach fruit. Enzyme activities of energy metabolism including H(+)-adenosine triphosphatase, Ca(2+)-adenosine triphosphatase, succinic dehydrogenase and cytochrome C oxidase were markedly enhanced by OA treatment. The ratio of unsaturated/saturated fatty acid in OA-treated fruit was significantly higher than that in control fruit. These results suggest that the alleviation in chilling injury by OA may be due to enhanced enzyme activities related to energy metabolism and higher levels of energy status and unsaturated/saturated fatty acid ratio. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Metabolism and metabolic inhibition of gamboglc acid in rat liver microsomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-tong LIU; Kun HAO; Xiao-quan LIU; Guang-Ji WANG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To study the metabolism of gambogic acid (GA) and the effects of selective cytochrome P-450 (CYP450) inhibitors on the metabolism of GA in rat liver microsomes in vitro. Methods: Rat liver micrp,so,rn,e$ were used to perform metabolism studies. Various selective CYP450 inhibitors were used to investigate their effects on the metabolism of GA and the principal CYP450 isoform involved in the formation of major metabolite M1 in rat liver microsomes. Types of inhibition in an enzyme kinetics model were used to model the interaction. Results: GA was rapidly metabolized to two phase Ⅰ metabolites,, M1 and M2, in rat liver microsomes. M1 and M2 were tentatively presumed to be the hydration metabolite and epoxide metabolite of GA, respectively. α-Naphthoflavone uncompetitively inhibited the formation of M1 while ketoconazole, sulfophenazole, diethyl dithiocarbamate and quinidine had little or no inhibitory effects on the formation of M1. Conclusion: GA is rapidly metabolized in rat liver microsomes and M1 is crucial for the elimination of GA. Cytochrome P-450 1A2 is the major rat CYP involved in the metabolism of GA.

  3. Metabolically Engineered Fungal Cells With Increased Content Of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    This invention relates to the production of fatty acids and particularly to the production of the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) arachidonic acid (ARA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in genetically engineered fungal cells, in particular, to metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae...

  4. Increased Brain Fatty Acid Uptake in Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmi, Anna; Iozzo, Patricia; Viljanen, Antti; Hirvonen, Jussi; Fielding, Barbara A.; Virtanen, Kirsi; Oikonen, Vesa; Kemppainen, Jukka; Viljanen, Tapio; Guiducci, Letizia; Haaparanta-Solin, Merja; Någren, Kjell; Solin, Olof; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test whether brain fatty acid uptake is enhanced in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS) and whether weight reduction modifies it. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We measured brain fatty acid uptake in a group of 23 patients with MS and 7 age-matched healthy control subjects during fasting conditions using positron emission tomography (PET) with [11C]-palmitate and [18F]fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid ([18F]-FTHA). Sixteen MS subjects were restudied after 6 weeks of very low calorie diet intervention. RESULTS At baseline, brain global fatty acid uptake derived from [18F]-FTHA was 50% higher in patients with MS compared with control subjects. The mean percentage increment was 130% in the white matter, 47% in the gray matter, and uniform across brain regions. In the MS group, the nonoxidized fraction measured using [11C]-palmitate was 86% higher. Brain fatty acid uptake measured with [18F]-FTHA-PET was associated with age, fasting serum insulin, and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index. Both total and nonoxidized fractions of fatty acid uptake were associated with BMI. Rapid weight reduction decreased brain fatty acid uptake by 17%. CONCLUSIONS To our knowledge, this is the first study on humans to observe enhanced brain fatty acid uptake in patients with MS. Both fatty acid uptake and accumulation appear to be increased in MS patients and reversed by weight reduction. PMID:20566663

  5. Metabolic engineering of Clostridium acetobutylicum for butyric acid production with high butyric acid selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yu-Sin; Im, Jung Ae; Choi, So Young; Lee, Jung Im; Lee, Sang Yup

    2014-05-01

    A typical characteristic of the butyric acid-producing Clostridium is coproduction of both butyric and acetic acids. Increasing the butyric acid selectivity important for economical butyric acid production has been rather difficult in clostridia due to their complex metabolic pathways. In this work, Clostridium acetobutylicum was metabolically engineered for highly selective butyric acid production. For this purpose, the second butyrate kinase of C. acetobutylicum encoded by the bukII gene instead of butyrate kinase I encoded by the buk gene was employed. Furthermore, metabolic pathways were engineered to further enhance the NADH-driving force. Batch fermentation of the metabolically engineered C. acetobutylicum strain HCBEKW (pta(-), buk(-), ctfB(-) and adhE1(-)) at pH 6.0 resulted in the production of 32.5g/L of butyric acid with a butyric-to-acetic acid ratio (BA/AA ratio) of 31.3g/g from 83.3g/L of glucose. By further knocking out the hydA gene (encoding hydrogenase) in the HCBEKW strain, the butyric acid titer was not further improved in batch fermentation. However, the BA/AA ratio (28.5g/g) obtained with the HYCBEKW strain (pta(-), buk(-), ctfB(-), adhE1(-) and hydA(-)) was 1.6 times higher than that (18.2g/g) obtained with the HCBEKW strain at pH 5.0, while no improvement was observed at pH 6.0. These results suggested that the buk gene knockout was essential to get a high butyric acid selectivity to acetic acid in C. acetobutylicum. Copyright © 2014 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tracking the metabolic pulse of plant lipid production with isotopic labeling and flux analyses: Past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Doug K; Bates, Philip D; Tjellström, Henrik

    2015-04-01

    Metabolism is comprised of networks of chemical transformations, organized into integrated biochemical pathways that are the basis of cellular operation, and function to sustain life. Metabolism, and thus life, is not static. The rate of metabolites transitioning through biochemical pathways (i.e., flux) determines cellular phenotypes, and is constantly changing in response to genetic or environmental perturbations. Each change evokes a response in metabolic pathway flow, and the quantification of fluxes under varied conditions helps to elucidate major and minor routes, and regulatory aspects of metabolism. To measure fluxes requires experimental methods that assess the movements and transformations of metabolites without creating artifacts. Isotopic labeling fills this role and is a long-standing experimental approach to identify pathways and quantify their metabolic relevance in different tissues or under different conditions. The application of labeling techniques to plant science is however far from reaching it potential. In light of advances in genetics and molecular biology that provide a means to alter metabolism, and given recent improvements in instrumentation, computational tools and available isotopes, the use of isotopic labeling to probe metabolism is becoming more and more powerful. We review the principal analytical methods for isotopic labeling with a focus on seminal studies of pathways and fluxes in lipid metabolism and carbon partitioning through central metabolism. Central carbon metabolic steps are directly linked to lipid production by serving to generate the precursors for fatty acid biosynthesis and lipid assembly. Additionally some of the ideas for labeling techniques that may be most applicable for lipid metabolism in the future were originally developed to investigate other aspects of central metabolism. We conclude by describing recent advances that will play an important future role in quantifying flux and metabolic operation in plant

  7. Correlation between citric acid and nitrate metabolisms during CAM cycle in the atmospheric bromeliad Tillandsia pohliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freschi, Luciano; Rodrigues, Maria Aurineide; Tiné, Marco Aurélio Silva; Mercier, Helenice

    2010-12-15

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) confers crucial adaptations for plants living under frequent environmental stresses. A wide metabolic plasticity can be found among CAM species regarding the type of storage carbohydrate, organic acid accumulated at night and decarboxylating system. Consequently, many aspects of the CAM pathway control are still elusive while the impact of this photosynthetic adaptation on nitrogen metabolism has remained largely unexplored. In this study, we investigated a possible link between the CAM cycle and the nitrogen assimilation in the atmospheric bromeliad Tillandsia pohliana by simultaneously characterizing the diel changes in key enzyme activities and metabolite levels of both organic acid and nitrate metabolisms. The results revealed that T. pohliana performed a typical CAM cycle in which phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase phosphorylation seemed to play a crucial role to avoid futile cycles of carboxylation and decarboxylation. Unlike all other bromeliads previously investigated, almost equimolar concentrations of malate and citrate were accumulated at night. Moreover, a marked nocturnal depletion in the starch reservoirs and an atypical pattern of nitrate reduction restricted to the nighttime were also observed. Since reduction and assimilation of nitrate requires a massive supply of reducing power and energy and considering that T. pohliana lives overexposed to the sunlight, we hypothesize that citrate decarboxylation might be an accessory mechanism to increase internal CO₂ concentration during the day while its biosynthesis could provide NADH and ATP for nocturnal assimilation of nitrate. Therefore, besides delivering photoprotection during the day, citrate might represent a key component connecting both CAM pathway and nitrogen metabolism in T. pohliana; a scenario that certainly deserves further study not only in this species but also in other CAM plants that nocturnally accumulate citrate

  8. Modeling analysis of the benefits of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) for sustainable agriculture in arid regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, M. S.; Vico, G.; Porporato, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    In view of the pressing needs to sustainably manage water and soil resources, especially in arid and semi-arid regions, here we propose a new carbon assimilation model that couples a simple yet mechanistic description of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) photosynthesis to the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. The model captures the full coupling of the CAM photosynthetic pathway with fluctuations in environmental conditions (cycles of light availability and air humidity, changes in soil moisture as driven by plant transpiration and rainfall occurrence). As such, the model is capable of reproducing the different phases of CAM, including daytime stomatal closure and photosynthesis from malic acid, afternoon stomatal opening for direct carbon assimilation, and nighttime stomatal opening for CO2 uptake and malic acid synthesis. Thanks to its versatility, our model allows us to relate CAM productivity, for both obligate and facultative CAM plants, to various soil moisture conditions including hydroclimatic scenarios of rainfall frequency and intensity as well as different night-time conditions of temperature, wind speed, and humidity. Our analyses show the potential productive benefits of CAM cultivation in dryland environments as feedstock and possible biofuel source, in terms of sustainable water use and economic benefits. In particular, the model is used to explore conditions where CAM plant resiliency to water stress makes these plants a more sustainable alternative to C3 and C4 species for potential deficit irrigation.

  9. 2-Fluoro-L-Fucose Is a Metabolically Incorporated Inhibitor of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharide Fucosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Jose A; Yi, Bo R; Wallace, Ian S

    2015-01-01

    The monosaccharide L-fucose (L-Fuc) is a common component of plant cell wall polysaccharides and other plant glycans, including the hemicellulose xyloglucan, pectic rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) and rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II), arabinogalactan proteins, and N-linked glycans. Mutations compromising the biosynthesis of many plant cell wall polysaccharides are lethal, and as a result, small molecule inhibitors of plant cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis have been developed because these molecules can be applied at defined concentrations and developmental stages. In this study, we characterize novel small molecule inhibitors of plant fucosylation. 2-fluoro-L-fucose (2F-Fuc) analogs caused severe growth phenotypes when applied to Arabidopsis seedlings, including reduced root growth and altered root morphology. These phenotypic defects were dependent upon the L-Fuc salvage pathway enzyme L-Fucose Kinase/ GDP-L-Fucose Pyrophosphorylase (FKGP), suggesting that 2F-Fuc is metabolically converted to the sugar nucleotide GDP-2F-Fuc, which serves as the active inhibitory molecule. The L-Fuc content of cell wall matrix polysaccharides was reduced in plants treated with 2F-Fuc, suggesting that this molecule inhibits the incorporation of L-Fuc into these polysaccharides. Additionally, phenotypic defects induced by 2F-Fuc treatment could be partially relieved by the exogenous application of boric acid, suggesting that 2F-Fuc inhibits RG-II biosynthesis. Overall, the results presented here suggest that 2F-Fuc is a metabolically incorporated inhibitor of plant cellular fucosylation events, and potentially suggest that other 2-fluorinated monosaccharides could serve as useful chemical probes for the inhibition of cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis.

  10. Nucleobase and nucleoside transport and integration into plant metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher eGirke

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide metabolism is an essential process in all living organisms. Besides newly synthesized nucleotides, the recycling (salvage of partially degraded nucleotides i.e. nucleosides and nucleobases serves to keep the homeostasis of the nucleotide pool. Both types of metabolites are substrates of at least six families of transport proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis with a total of 49 members. In the last years several members of such transport proteins have been analyzed allowing to present a more detailed picture of nucleoside and nucleobase transport and the physiological function of these processes. Besides functioning in nucleotide metabolism it turned out that individual members of the before named transporters exhibit the capacity to transport a wide range of different substrates including vitamins and phytohormones. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on nucleobase and nucleoside transport processes in plants and integrate this into nucleotide metabolism in general. Thereby, we will focus on those proteins which have been characterized at the biochemical level.

  11. Nucleobase and nucleoside transport and integration into plant metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girke, Christopher; Daumann, Manuel; Niopek-Witz, Sandra; Möhlmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotide metabolism is an essential process in all living organisms. Besides newly synthesized nucleotides, the recycling (salvage) of partially degraded nucleotides, i.e., nucleosides and nucleobases serves to keep the homeostasis of the nucleotide pool. Both types of metabolites are substrates of at least six families of transport proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) with a total of 49 members. In the last years several members of such transport proteins have been analyzed allowing to present a more detailed picture of nucleoside and nucleobase transport and the physiological function of these processes. Besides functioning in nucleotide metabolism it turned out that individual members of the before named transporters exhibit the capacity to transport a wide range of different substrates including vitamins and phytohormones. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on nucleobase and nucleoside transport processes in plants and integrate this into nucleotide metabolism in general. Thereby, we will focus on those proteins which have been characterized at the biochemical level.

  12. Bile Acids, FXR, and Metabolic Effects of Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier F. Noel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Overweight and obesity represent major risk factors for diabetes and related metabolic diseases. Obesity is associated with a chronic and progressive inflammatory response leading to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D mellitus, although the precise mechanism mediating this inflammatory process remains poorly understood. The most effective intervention for the treatment of obesity, bariatric surgery, leads to glucose normalization and remission of T2D. Recent work in both clinical studies and animal models supports bile acids (BAs as key mediators of these effects. BAs are involved in lipid and glucose homeostasis primarily via the farnesoid X receptor (FXR transcription factor. BAs are also involved in regulating genes involved in inflammation, obesity, and lipid metabolism. Here, we review the novel role of BAs in bariatric surgery and the intersection between BAs and immune, obesity, weight loss, and lipid metabolism genes.

  13. Absorption and metabolism of benzoic acid in growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, N B; Nørgaard, J V; Wamberg, S

    2009-01-01

    Dietary benzoic acid (BA) supplementation causes a pronounced reduction in urinary pH but only small changes in blood pH. The present study aimed to investigate the portal absorption profile, hepatic metabolism of BA, and renal excretion of hippuric acid (HA) underlying the relatively small impact...... of BA on systemic acid-base status. Eight growing pigs (BW = 63 ± 1 kg at sampling) fitted with permanent indwelling catheters in the abdominal aorta, hepatic portal vein, hepatic vein, and mesenteric vein were allocated to 4 sampling blocks and randomly assigned to control (CON; nonsupplemented diet...... portal flux and hepatic uptake of BA was 87 ± 5% and 89 ± 15%, respectively. The recovery of dietary BA as urinary excretion of BA and HA was 0.08 ± 0.02% and 85 ± 7%, respectively. It is concluded that the small impact of BA supplementation on systemic acid-base status was caused by a protracted BA...

  14. Control of immune response by amino acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohmann, Ursula; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-07-01

    The interaction between pathogenic microorganisms and their hosts is regulated by reciprocal survival strategies, including competition for essential nutrients. Though paradoxical, mammalian hosts have learned to take advantage of amino acid catabolism for controlling pathogen invasion and, at the same time, regulating their own immune responses. In this way, ancient catabolic enzymes have acquired novel functions and evolved into new structures with highly specialized functions, which go beyond the struggle for survival. In this review, we analyze the evidence supporting a critical role for the metabolism of various amino acids in regulating different steps of both innate and adaptive immunity.

  15. Metabolism of Cholesterol and Bile Acids by the Gut Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Gérard

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The human gastro-intestinal tract hosts a complex and diverse microbial community, whose collective genetic coding capacity vastly exceeds that of the human genome. As a consequence, the gut microbiota produces metabolites from a large range of molecules that host’s enzymes are not able to convert. Among these molecules, two main classes of steroids, cholesterol and bile acids, denote two different examples of bacterial metabolism in the gut. Therefore, cholesterol is mainly converted into coprostanol, a non absorbable sterol which is excreted in the feces. Moreover, this conversion occurs in a part of the human population only. Conversely, the primary bile acids (cholic and chenodeoxycholic acids are converted to over twenty different secondary bile acid metabolites by the gut microbiota. The main bile salt conversions, which appear in the gut of the whole human population, include deconjugation, oxidation and epimerization of hydroxyl groups at C3, C7 and C12, 7-dehydroxylation, esterification and desulfatation. If the metabolisms of cholesterol and bile acids by the gut microbiota are known for decades, their consequences on human health and disease are poorly understood and only start to be considered.

  16. Metabolism of amino acids in cats with severe cobalamin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruaux, C G; Steiner, J M; Williams, D A

    2001-12-01

    To validate an automated chemiluminescent immunoassay for measuring serum cobalamin concentration in cats, to establish and validate gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques for use in quantification of methylmalonic acid, homocysteine, cysteine, cystathionine, and methionine in sera from cats, and to investigate serum concentrations of methylmalonic acid, methionine, homocysteine, cystathionine, and cysteine as indicators of biochemical abnormalities accompanying severe cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency in cats. Serum samples of 40 cats with severe cobalamin deficiency (serum cobalamin concentration deficiency had significant increases in mean serum concentrations bf methylmalonic acid (9,607 nmol/L), compared with healthy cats (448 nmol/L). Affected cats also had substantial disturbances in amino acid metabolism, compared with healthy cats, with significantly increased serum concentrations of methionine (133.8 vs 101.1 micromol/L) and significantly decreased serum concentrations of cystathionine (449.6 vs 573.2 nmol/L) and cysteine (142.3 vs 163.9 micromol/L). There was not a significant difference in serum concentrations of homocysteine between the 2 groups. Cats with gastrointestinal tract disease may have abnormalities in amino acid metabolism consistent with cobalamin deficiency. Parenteral administration of cobalamin may be necessary to correct these biochemical abnormalities.

  17. Ammonium Metabolism Enzymes Aid Helicobacter pylori Acid Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori possesses a highly active urease to support acid tolerance. Urea hydrolysis occurs inside the cytoplasm, resulting in the production of NH3 that is immediately protonated to form NH4+. This ammonium must be metabolized or effluxed because its presence within the cell is counterproductive to the goal of raising pH while maintaining a viable proton motive force (PMF). Two compatible hypotheses for mitigating intracellular ammonium toxicity include (i) th...

  18. [Determination of scopolin, chlorogenic acid, scopoletin, isochlorogenic acid A, isochlorogenic acid B and isochlorogenic acid C in plants of Erycibe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-kun; Chen, Zhi-yong; Liao, Li-ping; Zhang, Zi-jia; Wang, Zheng-tao

    2015-03-01

    An accurate and reliable analytical method for-simultaneous determination of six active components (scopolin, chlorogenic acid, scopoletin, isochlorogenic acid A, isochlorogenic acid B and isochlorogenic acid C) in plants of Erycibe was developed. Scopolin, chlorogenic acid, scopoletin, isochlorogenic acid A, isochlorogenic acid B and isochlorogenic acid C in the samples were well separated in analytical HPLC by gradual elution with methanol-0.1% formic acid solution. The chromatographic condictions: Agilent Poroshell 120 EC-C18 column, flowing rate being 1 mL x min(-1), detecting wavelength at 345 nm. Good linearities of scopolin, chlorogenic acid, scopoletin, isochlorogenic acid A, isochlorogenic acid B and isochlorogenic acid C were in the range of 0.026 8-2.68, 0.027 0-2.70, 0.008 1-0.81, 0.018 8-1.88, 0.017 6-1.76, 0.019 6-1.96 μg, respectively (r > 0.999 6). The average recoveries of the six components were 98.1%, 98.7%, 100.8%, 100.4%, 99.7%, 101.1%; the relative standard deviations were 2.67%, 2.86%, 2.62%, 1.98%, 2.76%, 2.19%. The method is simple, feasible and reproducible and can be used for the quality control of plants of Erycibe.

  19. Proline Coordination with Fatty Acid Synthesis and Redox Metabolism of Chloroplast and Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Suhas; Villamor, Joji Grace; Lin, Wendar; Sharma, Sandeep; Verslues, Paul E

    2016-10-01

    Proline (Pro) accumulation is one of the most prominent changes in plant metabolism during drought and low water potential; however, the regulation and function of Pro metabolism remain unclear. We used a combination of forward genetic screening based on a Proline Dehydrogenase1 (PDH1) promoter-luciferase reporter (PDH1pro:LUC2) and RNA sequencing of the Pro synthesis mutant p5cs1-4 to identify multiple loci affecting Pro accumulation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Two mutants having high PDH1pro:LUC2 expression and increased Pro accumulation at low water potential were found to be alleles of Cytochrome P450, Family 86, Subfamily A, Polypeptide2 (CYP86A2) and Long Chain Acyl Synthetase2 (LACS2), which catalyze two successive steps in very-long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) synthesis. Reverse genetic experiments found additional VLCFA and lipid metabolism-related mutants with increased Pro accumulation. Altered cellular redox status is a key factor in the coordination of Pro and VLCFA metabolism. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) induced high levels of Pro accumulation and strongly repressed PDH1pro:LUC2 expression. cyp86a2 and lacs2 mutants were hypersensitive to diphenyleneiodonium but could be reverted to wild-type Pro and PDH1pro:LUC2 expression by reactive oxygen species scavengers. The coordination of Pro and redox metabolism also was indicated by the altered expression of chloroplast and mitochondria electron transport genes in p5cs1-4 These results show that Pro metabolism is both influenced by and influences cellular redox status via previously unknown coordination with several metabolic pathways. In particular, Pro and VLCFA synthesis share dual roles to help buffer cellular redox status while producing products useful for stress resistance, namely the compatible solute Pro and cuticle lipids. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Perturbations in the Primary Metabolism of Tomato and Arabidopsis thaliana Plants Infected with the Soil-Borne Fungus Verticillium dahliae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Buhtz

    Full Text Available The hemibiotrophic soil-borne fungus Verticillium dahliae is a major pathogen of a number of economically important crop species. Here, the metabolic response of both tomato and Arabidopsis thaliana to V. dahliae infection was analysed by first using non-targeted GC-MS profiling. The leaf content of both major cell wall components glucuronic acid and xylose was reduced in the presence of the pathogen in tomato but enhanced in A. thaliana. The leaf content of the two tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates fumaric acid and succinic acid was increased in the leaf of both species, reflecting a likely higher demand for reducing equivalents required for defence responses. A prominent group of affected compounds was amino acids and based on the targeted analysis in the root, it was shown that the level of 12 and four free amino acids was enhanced by the infection in, respectively, tomato and A. thaliana, with leucine and histidine being represented in both host species. The leaf content of six free amino acids was reduced in the leaf tissue of diseased A. thaliana plants, while that of two free amino acids was raised in the tomato plants. This study emphasizes the role of primary plant metabolites in adaptive responses when the fungus has colonized the plant.

  1. Metabolic adaptation in transplastomic plants massively accumulating recombinant proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Bally

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recombinant chloroplasts are endowed with an astonishing capacity to accumulate foreign proteins. However, knowledge about the impact on resident proteins of such high levels of recombinant protein accumulation is lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we used proteomics to characterize tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum plastid transformants massively accumulating a p-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD or a green fluorescent protein (GFP. While under the conditions used no obvious modifications in plant phenotype could be observed, these proteins accumulated to even higher levels than ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco, the most abundant protein on the planet. This accumulation occurred at the expense of a limited number of leaf proteins including Rubisco. In particular, enzymes involved in CO(2 metabolism such as nuclear-encoded plastidial Calvin cycle enzymes and mitochondrial glycine decarboxylase were found to adjust their accumulation level to these novel physiological conditions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results document how protein synthetic capacity is limited in plant cells. They may provide new avenues to evaluate possible bottlenecks in recombinant protein technology and to maintain plant fitness in future studies aiming at producing recombinant proteins of interest through chloroplast transformation.

  2. Metabolite and light regulation of metabolism in plants: lessons from the study of a single biochemical pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.C. Oliveira

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available We are using molecular, biochemical, and genetic approaches to study the structural and regulatory genes controlling the assimilation of inorganic nitrogen into the amino acids glutamine, glutamate, aspartate and asparagine. These amino acids serve as the principal nitrogen-transport amino acids in most crop and higher plants including Arabidopsis thaliana. We have begun to investigate the regulatory mechanisms controlling nitrogen assimilation into these amino acids in plants using molecular and genetic approaches in Arabidopsis. The synthesis of the amide amino acids glutamine and asparagine is subject to tight regulation in response to environmental factors such as light and to metabolic factors such as sucrose and amino acids. For instance, light induces the expression of glutamine synthetase (GLN2 and represses expression of asparagine synthetase (ASN1 genes. This reciprocal regulation of GLN2 and ASN1 genes by light is reflected at the level of transcription and at the level of glutamine and asparagine biosynthesis. Moreover, we have shown that the regulation of these genes is also reciprocally controlled by both organic nitrogen and carbon metabolites. We have recently used a reverse genetic approach to study putative components of such metabolic sensing mechanisms in plants that may be conserved in evolution. These components include an Arabidopsis homolog for a glutamate receptor gene originally found in animal systems and a plant PII gene, which is a homolog of a component of the bacterial Ntr system. Based on our observations on the biology of both structural and regulatory genes of the nitrogen assimilatory pathway, we have developed a model for metabolic control of the genes involved in the nitrogen assimilatory pathway in plants.

  3. Action of gibberellins on growth and metabolism of Arabidopsis plants associated with high concentration of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Dimas M; Araújo, Wagner L; Fernie, Alisdair R; Schippers, Jos H M; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2012-12-01

    Although the positive effect of elevated CO(2) concentration [CO(2)] on plant growth is well known, it remains unclear whether global climate change will positively or negatively affect crop yields. In particular, relatively little is known about the role of hormone pathways in controlling the growth responses to elevated [CO(2)]. Here, we studied the impact of elevated [CO(2)] on plant biomass and metabolism in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) in relation to the availability of gibberellins (GAs). Inhibition of growth by the GA biosynthesis inhibitor paclobutrazol (PAC) at ambient [CO(2)] (350 µmol CO(2) mol(-1)) was reverted by elevated [CO(2)] (750 µmol CO(2) mol(-1)). Thus, we investigated the metabolic adjustment and modulation of gene expression in response to changes in growth of plants imposed by varying the GA regime in ambient and elevated [CO(2)]. In the presence of PAC (low-GA regime), the activities of enzymes involved in photosynthesis and inorganic nitrogen assimilation were markedly increased at elevated [CO(2)], whereas the activities of enzymes of organic acid metabolism were decreased. Under ambient [CO(2)], nitrate, amino acids, and protein accumulated upon PAC treatment; however, this was not the case when plants were grown at elevated [CO(2)]. These results suggest that only under ambient [CO(2)] is GA required for the integration of carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolism underlying optimal biomass determination. Our results have implications concerning the action of the Green Revolution genes in future environmental conditions.

  4. Phenolic Acids in Plant-Soil-Microbe System: A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Phenolic acids are very common compounds in pedosphere. The objective of this review was to summarize the current knowledge of the behaviors of phenolic acids in plant-soil-microbe system. When phenolic acids originated from leaching, decomposition and exudation of living and dead plant tissues enter soils, they can react physicochemically with soil particle surfaces and/or incorporate into humic matter. Phenolic acids desorbed from soil particle surfaces and remained in solution phase can be utilized by microbe as carbon sources and absorbed by plants. The degradation products of phenolic acids by microbe include some organic and/or inorganic compounds such as new phenolic acids. In addition, phenolic acids in soils can stimulate population and activity of microbe. Phenolic acids can inhibit plants growth by affecting ion leakage, phytohormone activity, membrane permeability, hydraulic conductivity, net nutrient uptake, and enzyme activity. Behaviors of phenolic acids in soils are influenced by other organic compounds (phenolic acids, methionine, glucose, etc.) and/or inorganic ions. The role of phenolic acids as allelopathic agents should not be neglected only based on their low specific concentrations in natural soils, because numbers and interactions of phenolic acids will increase their allelopathic activities.

  5. Foliar and Seed Application of Amino Acids Affects the Antioxidant Metabolism of the Soybean Crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Walquíria F.; Fagan, Evandro B.; Soares, Luís H.; Umburanas, Renan C.; Reichardt, Klaus; Neto, Durval D.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the application of natural substances on crops has been intensified in order to increase the resistance and yield of the soybean crop. Among these products are included plant biostimulants that may contain algae extracts, amino acids, and plant regulators in their composition. However, there is little information on the isolated effect of each of these constituents. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of the application of isolated amino acids on the antioxidant metabolism of the soybean crop. Experiments were carried out in a greenhouse and in the field with the application of the amino acids glutamate, phenylalanine, cysteine, glycine in seed treatment, and foliar application at V4 growth stage. Antioxidant metabolism constituents evaluated were superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase, hydrogen peroxide content, proline, and lipid peroxidation. In addition, resistance enzymes as polyphenol oxidase and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) were evaluated. In both experiments, the use of cysteine, only in seed treatment and in both seed treatment and foliar application increased the activity of the enzyme PAL and catalase. Also in both experiments, the use of phenylalanine increased the activity of the enzyme PAL when the application was carried out as foliar application or both in seed treatment and foliar application. In the field experiment, the application of glutamate led to an increase in the activity of the catalase and PAL enzymes for seed treatment and foliar application. The use of the set of amino acids was only efficient in foliar application, which led to a greater activity of the enzymes peroxidase, PAL, and polyphenol oxidase. The other enzymes as well as lipid peroxidation and hydrogen peroxide presented different results according to the experiment. Therefore, glutamate, cysteine, phenylalanine, and glycine can act as signaling amino acids in soybean plants, since small doses are enough to increase the activity

  6. Overcoming the plasticity of plant specialized metabolism for selective diterpene production in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ignea, Codruta; Athanasakoglou, Anastasia; Andreadelli, Aggeliki

    2017-01-01

    Plants synthesize numerous specialized metabolites (also termed natural products) to mediate dynamic interactions with their surroundings. The complexity of plant specialized metabolism is the result of an inherent biosynthetic plasticity rooted in the substrate and product promiscuity...

  7. Metabolically engineered cells for the production of polyunsaturated fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to the construction and engineering of cells, more particularly microorganisms for producing PUFAs with four or more double bonds from non-fatty acid substrates through heterologous expression of an oxygen requiring pathway. The invention especially involves...... improvement of the PUFA content in the host organism through fermentation optimization, e.g. decreasing the temperature and/or designing an optimal medium, or through improving the flux towards fatty acids by metabolic engineering, e.g. through over-expression of fatty acid synthases, over-expression of other...... enzymes involved in biosynthesis of the precursor for PUFAs, or codon optimization of the heterologous genes, or expression of heterologous enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of the precursor for PUFAs....

  8. A combined proteomic and transcriptomic analysis on sulfur metabolism pathways of Arabidopsis thaliana under simulated acid rain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tingwu; Chen, Juan A; Wang, Wenhua; Simon, Martin; Wu, Feihua; Hu, Wenjun; Chen, Juan B; Zheng, Hailei

    2014-01-01

    With rapid economic development, most regions in southern China have suffered acid rain (AR) pollution. In our study, we analyzed the changes in sulfur metabolism in Arabidopsis under simulated AR stress which provide one of the first case studies, in which the systematic responses in sulfur metabolism were characterized by high-throughput methods at different levels including proteomic, genomic and physiological approaches. Generally, we found that all of the processes related to sulfur metabolism responded to AR stress, including sulfur uptake, activation and also synthesis of sulfur-containing amino acid and other secondary metabolites. Finally, we provided a catalogue of the detected sulfur metabolic changes and reconstructed the coordinating network of their mutual influences. This study can help us to understand the mechanisms of plants to adapt to AR stress.

  9. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a particular food provides to the body. A chocolate bar has more calories than an apple, so ... acid phenylalanine, needed for normal growth and protein production). Inborn errors of metabolism can sometimes lead to ...

  10. Coupled Metabolic and Photolytic Pathway for Degradation of Pyridinedicarboxylic Acids, Especially Dipicolinic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Amador, José A.; Taylor, Barrie F.

    1990-01-01

    Three isomers of pyridinedicarboxylic acid (PDCA) (2,3-, 2,5-, and 2,6-PDCA) were partially oxidized by marine bacteria when grown aerobically on the corresponding phthalate analogs. The metabolites, unlike the parent PDCAs, absorbed light in the solar actinic range (wavelengths greater than 300 nm) and were readily degraded in sunlight. The principal product from 2,6-PDCA (dipicolinic acid) metabolism was extracted from a culture fluid, purified by column chromatography, and analyzed by UV-v...

  11. Effect of aspartic acid and glutamate on metabolism and acid stress resistance of Acetobacter pasteurianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haisong; Zhang, Renkuan; Xia, Menglei; Bai, Xiaolei; Mou, Jun; Zheng, Yu; Wang, Min

    2017-06-15

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are widely applied in food, bioengineering and medicine fields. However, the acid stress at low pH conditions limits acetic acid fermentation efficiency and high concentration of vinegar production with AAB. Therefore, how to enhance resistance ability of the AAB remains as the major challenge. Amino acids play an important role in cell growth and cell survival under severe environment. However, until now the effects of amino acids on acetic fermentation and acid stress resistance of AAB have not been fully studied. In the present work the effects of amino acids on metabolism and acid stress resistance of Acetobacter pasteurianus were investigated. Cell growth, culturable cell counts, acetic acid production, acetic acid production rate and specific production rate of acetic acid of A. pasteurianus revealed an increase of 1.04, 5.43, 1.45, 3.30 and 0.79-folds by adding aspartic acid (Asp), and cell growth, culturable cell counts, acetic acid production and acetic acid production rate revealed an increase of 0.51, 0.72, 0.60 and 0.94-folds by adding glutamate (Glu), respectively. For a fully understanding of the biological mechanism, proteomic technology was carried out. The results showed that the strengthening mechanism mainly came from the following four aspects: (1) Enhancing the generation of pentose phosphates and NADPH for the synthesis of nucleic acid, fatty acids and glutathione (GSH) throughout pentose phosphate pathway. And GSH could protect bacteria from low pH, halide, oxidative stress and osmotic stress by maintaining the viability of cells through intracellular redox equilibrium; (2) Reinforcing deamination of amino acids to increase intracellular ammonia concentration to maintain stability of intracellular pH; (3) Enhancing nucleic acid synthesis and reparation of impaired DNA caused by acid stress damage; (4) Promoting unsaturated fatty acids synthesis and lipid transport, which resulted in the improvement of cytomembrane

  12. Identification of differences in human and great ape phytanic acid metabolism that could influence gene expression profiles and physiological functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegmund Kimberly D

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been proposed that anatomical differences in human and great ape guts arose in response to species-specific diets and energy demands. To investigate functional genomic consequences of these differences, we compared their physiological levels of phytanic acid, a branched chain fatty acid that can be derived from the microbial degradation of chlorophyll in ruminant guts. Humans who accumulate large stores of phytanic acid commonly develop cerebellar ataxia, peripheral polyneuropathy, and retinitis pigmentosa in addition to other medical conditions. Furthermore, phytanic acid is an activator of the PPAR-alpha transcription factor that influences the expression of genes relevant to lipid metabolism. Results Despite their trace dietary phytanic acid intake, all great ape species had elevated red blood cell (RBC phytanic acid levels relative to humans on diverse diets. Unlike humans, chimpanzees showed sexual dimorphism in RBC phytanic acid levels, which were higher in males relative to females. Cultured skin fibroblasts from all species had a robust capacity to degrade phytanic acid. We provide indirect evidence that great apes, in contrast to humans, derive significant amounts of phytanic acid from the hindgut fermentation of plant materials. This would represent a novel reduction of metabolic activity in humans relative to the great apes. Conclusion We identified differences in the physiological levels of phytanic acid in humans and great apes and propose this is causally related to their gut anatomies and microbiomes. Phytanic acid levels could contribute to cross-species and sex-specific differences in human and great ape transcriptomes, especially those related to lipid metabolism. Based on the medical conditions caused by phytanic acid accumulation, we suggest that differences in phytanic acid metabolism could influence the functions of human and great ape nervous, cardiovascular, and skeletal systems.

  13. Altered cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Robert C; Dorsey, E Ray; Beck, Christopher A; Brenna, J Thomas; Shoulson, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by behavioral abnormalities, cognitive decline, and involuntary movements that lead to a progressive decline in functional capacity, independence, and ultimately death. The pathophysiology of Huntington disease is linked to an expanded trinucleotide repeat of cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) in the IT-15 gene on chromosome 4. There is no disease-modifying treatment for Huntington disease, and novel pathophysiological insights and therapeutic strategies are needed. Lipids are vital to the health of the central nervous system, and research in animals and humans has revealed that cholesterol metabolism is disrupted in Huntington disease. This lipid dysregulation has been linked to specific actions of the mutant huntingtin on sterol regulatory element binding proteins. This results in lower cholesterol levels in affected areas of the brain with evidence that this depletion is pathologic. Huntington disease is also associated with a pattern of insulin resistance characterized by a catabolic state resulting in weight loss and a lower body mass index than individuals without Huntington disease. Insulin resistance appears to act as a metabolic stressor attending disease progression. The fish-derived omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, have been examined in clinical trials of Huntington disease patients. Drugs that combat the dysregulated lipid milieu in Huntington disease may help treat this perplexing and catastrophic genetic disease.

  14. Ascorbic acid metabolism during sweet cherry (Prunus avium) fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Dong; Zhu, Tingting; Ni, Zhiyou; Lin, Lijin; Tang, Yi; Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Xun; Wang, Jin; Lv, Xiulan; Xia, Hui

    2017-01-01

    To elucidate metabolism of ascorbic acid (AsA) in sweet cherry fruit (Prunus avium 'Hongdeng'), we quantified AsA concentration, cloned sequences involved in AsA metabolism and investigated their mRNA expression levels, and determined the activity levels of selected enzymes during fruit development and maturation. We found that AsA concentration was highest at the petal-fall period (0 days after anthesis) and decreased progressively during ripening, but with a slight increase at maturity. AsA did nevertheless continue to accumulate over time because of the increase in fruit fresh weight. Full-length cDNAs of 10 genes involved in the L-galactose pathway of AsA biosynthesis and 10 involved in recycling were obtained. Gene expression patterns of GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP2), L-galactono-1, 4-lactone dehydrogenase (GalLDH), ascorbate peroxidase (APX3), ascorbate oxidase (AO2), glutathione reductase (GR1), and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR1) were in accordance with the AsA concentration pattern during fruit development, indicating that genes involved in ascorbic acid biosynthesis, degradation, and recycling worked in concert to regulate ascorbic acid accumulation in sweet cherry fruit.

  15. Plasticity of crassulacean acid metabolism at subtropical latitudes: a pineapple case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainha, Nuno; Medeiros, Violante P; Câmara, Mariana; Faustino, Hélder; Leite, João P; Barreto, Maria do Carmo; Cruz, Cristina; Pacheco, Carlos A; Ponte, Duarte; Bernardes da Silva, Anabela

    2016-01-01

    Plants with the crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) express high-metabolic plasticity, to adjust to environmental stresses. This article hypothesizes that irradiance and nocturnal temperatures are the major limitations for CAM at higher latitudes such as the Azores (37°45'N). Circadian CAM expression in Ananas comosus L. Merr. (pineapple) was assessed by the diurnal pattern of leaf carbon fixation into l-malate at the solstices and equinoxes, and confirmed by determining maximal phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity in plant material. Metabolic adjustments to environmental conditions were confirmed by gas exchange measurements, and integrated with environmental data to determine CAM's limiting factors: light and temperature. CAM plasticity was observed at the equinoxes, under similar photoperiods, but different environmental conditions. In spring, CAM expression was similar between vegetative and flowering plants, while in autumn, flowering (before anthesis) and fructifying (with fully developed fruit before ripening) plants accumulated more l-malate. Below 100 µmol m(-2) s(-1) , CAM phase I was extended, reducing CAM phase III during the day. Carbon fixation inhibition may occur by two major pathways: nocturnal temperature (<15°C) inhibiting PEPC activity and l-malate accumulation; and low irradiance influencing the interplay between CAM phase I and III, affecting carboxylation and decarboxylation. Both have important consequences for plant development in autumn and winter. Observations were confirmed by flowering time prediction using environmental data, emphasizing that CAM expression had a strong seasonal regulation due to a complex network response to light and temperature, allowing pineapple to survive in environments not suitable for high productivity.

  16. The role of amino acids in improvement in salt tolerance of crop plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd El-Samad H. M.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work has been performed to study the growth and metabolic activities of maize and broad bean plants which are shown to have a degree of sensitivity to salinity and to determine the role of amino acids proline or phenylalanine in increasing the salt tolerance of theses plants. Dry mass, water content, leaf area and photosynthetic pigment of maize and broad bean plants decreased with increasing salinity. These changes were accompanied with a drop in the contents of soluble sugars, soluble proteins and amino acids. This was accompanied by a marked increase in the proline content. When maize and broad bean plants sprayed with proline or phenylalanine the opposite effect was occurred, saccharides as well as proteins progressively increased at all sanitization levels and proline concentration significantly declined. Salinity significantly increased the sodium content in both shoots and roots of maize and broad bean plants, while a decline in the accumulation of K+, Ca++, Mg++ and P was observed. Amino acids treatments markedlyaltered the selectivity of Na+, K+, Ca++ and P in both maize and broad bean plants. Spraying with any of either proline orphenylalanine restricted Na+ uptake and enhanced the uptake of K+, K+/Na+ ratio, Ca++ and P selectivity in maize and broad bean plants.

  17. Plant 9-lox oxylipin metabolism in response to arbuscular mycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León Morcillo, Rafael Jorge; Ocampo, Juan A; García Garrido, José M

    2012-12-01

    The establishment of an Arbuscular Mycorrhizal symbiotic interaction (MA) is a successful strategy to substantially promote plant growth, development and fitness. Numerous studies have supported the hypothesis that plant hormones play an important role in the recognition and establishment of symbiosis. Particular attention has been devoted to jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivates, the jasmonates, which are believed to play a major role in AM symbiosis. Jasmonates belong to a diverse class of lipid metabolites known as oxylipins that include other biologically active molecules. Recent transcriptional analyses revealed upregulation of the oxylipin pathway during AM symbiosis in mycorrhizal tomato roots and point a key regulatory feature for oxylipins during AM symbiosis in tomato, particularly these derived from the action of 9-lipoxygenases (9-LOX). In this mini-review we highlight recent progress understanding the function of oxylipins in the establishment of the AM symbiosis and hypothesize that the activation of the 9-LOX pathway might be part of the activation of host defense responses which will then contribute to both, the control of AM fungal spread and the increased resistance to fungal pathogens in mycorrhizal plants.

  18. Plant 9-lox oxylipin metabolism in response to arbuscular mycorrhiza

    Science.gov (United States)

    León Morcillo, Rafael Jorge; Ocampo, Juan A.; García Garrido, José M.

    2012-01-01

    The establishment of an Arbuscular Mycorrhizal symbiotic interaction (MA) is a successful strategy to substantially promote plant growth, development and fitness. Numerous studies have supported the hypothesis that plant hormones play an important role in the recognition and establishment of symbiosis. Particular attention has been devoted to jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivates, the jasmonates, which are believed to play a major role in AM symbiosis. Jasmonates belong to a diverse class of lipid metabolites known as oxylipins that include other biologically active molecules. Recent transcriptional analyses revealed upregulation of the oxylipin pathway during AM symbiosis in mycorrhizal tomato roots and point a key regulatory feature for oxylipins during AM symbiosis in tomato, particularly these derived from the action of 9-lipoxygenases (9-LOX). In this mini-review we highlight recent progress understanding the function of oxylipins in the establishment of the AM symbiosis and hypothesize that the activation of the 9-LOX pathway might be part of the activation of host defense responses which will then contribute to both, the control of AM fungal spread and the increased resistance to fungal pathogens in mycorrhizal plants. PMID:23073021

  19. Fatty Acid Modulation of the Endocannabinoid System and the Effect on Food Intake and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaan S. Naughton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocannabinoids and their G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR are a current research focus in the area of obesity due to the system’s role in food intake and glucose and lipid metabolism. Importantly, overweight and obese individuals often have higher circulating levels of the arachidonic acid-derived endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG and an altered pattern of receptor expression. Consequently, this leads to an increase in orexigenic stimuli, changes in fatty acid synthesis, insulin sensitivity, and glucose utilisation, with preferential energy storage in adipose tissue. As endocannabinoids are products of dietary fats, modification of dietary intake may modulate their levels, with eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid based endocannabinoids being able to displace arachidonic acid from cell membranes, reducing AEA and 2-AG production. Similarly, oleoyl ethanolamide, a product of oleic acid, induces satiety, decreases circulating fatty acid concentrations, increases the capacity for β-oxidation, and is capable of inhibiting the action of AEA and 2-AG in adipose tissue. Thus, understanding how dietary fats alter endocannabinoid system activity is a pertinent area of research due to public health messages promoting a shift towards plant-derived fats, which are rich sources of AEA and 2-AG precursor fatty acids, possibly encouraging excessive energy intake and weight gain.

  20. Metabolic engineering in the biotechnological production of organic acids in the tricarboxylic acid cycle of microorganisms: Advances and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xian; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Du, Guocheng; Liu, Long; Chen, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Organic acids, which are chemically synthesized, are also natural intermediates in the metabolic pathways of microorganisms, among which the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the most crucial route existing in almost all living organisms. Organic acids in the TCA cycle include citric acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, fumaric acid, l-malic acid, and oxaloacetate, which are building-block chemicals with wide applications and huge markets. In this review, we summarize the synthesis pathways of these organic acids and review recent advances in metabolic engineering strategies that enhance organic acid production. We also propose further improvements for the production of organic acids with systems and synthetic biology-guided metabolic engineering strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dodecanedioic acid overcomes metabolic inflexibility in type 2 diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinari, Serenella; Bertuzzi, Alessandro; Gandolfi, Alberto; Greco, Aldo V; Scarfone, Antonino; Manco, Melania; Mingrone, Geltrude

    2006-11-01

    Metabolically healthy skeletal muscle possesses the ability to switch easily between glucose and fat oxidation in response to homeostatic signals. In type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity, the skeletal muscle shows a great reduction in this metabolic flexibility. A substrate like dodecanedioic acid (C-12), able to increase skeletal muscle glycogen stores via succinyl-CoA formation, might both postpone the fatigue and increase fatty acid utilization, since it does not affect insulin secretion. In healthy volunteers and in type 2 diabetic subjects, the effect of an oral C-12 load was compared with a glucose or water load during prolonged, moderate-intensity, physical exercise. C-12 metabolism was analyzed by a mathematical model. After C-12, diabetics were able to complete the 2 h of exercise. Nonesterified fatty acids increased both during and after the exercise in the C-12 session. C-12 oxidation provided 14% of total energy expenditure, and the sum of C-12 plus lipids oxidized after the C-12 meal was significantly greater than lipids oxidized after the glucose meal (P < 0.025). The fraction of C-12 that entered the central compartment was 47% of that ingested. During the first phase of the exercise ( approximately 60 min), the mean C-12 clearance from the central compartment toward tissues was 2.57 and 1.30 l/min during the second phase of the exercise. In conclusion, C-12 seems to be a suitable energy substrate during exercise, since it reduces muscle fatigue, is rapidly oxidized, and does not stimulate insulin secretion, which implies that lipolysis is not inhibited as reported after glucose ingestion.

  2. Analysis of systemic sulfur metabolism in plants using integrated '-omics' strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Masami Yokota; Saito, Kazuki

    2008-10-01

    Sulfur (S) assimilation by plants plays a key role in the S cycle in nature, and metabolism of the assimilated S provides various compounds that are useful for animals, including humans. It is important to understand the mechanisms involved in systemic S metabolism in order to improve crop agronomy and the production of dietary and nutraceutical plants. Recent advances in '-omic' studies have provided comprehensive insights into S metabolism. These studies may be regarded as important case studies that provide information on the complicated regulatory mechanisms involved in plant metabolism.

  3. Metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria for the production of nutraceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugenholtz, J.; Sybesma, W.; Groot, M.N.; Wisselink, W.; Ladero, V.; Burgess, K.; Sinderen, van D.; Piard, J.C.; Eggink, G.; Smid, E.J.; Savoy, G.; Sesma, F.; Jansen, T.; Hols, P.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2002-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria display a relatively simple and well-described metabolism where the sugar source is converted mainly to lactic acid. Here we will shortly describe metabolic engineering strategies on the level of sugar metabolism, that lead to either the efficient re-routing of the lactococcal

  4. Knowledge-driven approaches for engineering complex metabolic pathways in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Gemma; Twyman, Richard M; Christou, Paul; Capell, Teresa; Zhu, Changfu

    2015-04-01

    Plant metabolic pathways are complex and often feature multiple levels of regulation. Until recently, metabolic engineering in plants relied on the laborious testing of ad hoc modifications to achieve desirable changes in the metabolic profile. However, technological advances in data mining, modeling, multigene engineering and genome editing are now taking away much of the guesswork by allowing the impact of modifications to be predicted more accurately. In this review we discuss recent developments in knowledge-based metabolic engineering strategies, that is the gathering and mining of genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic data to generate models of metabolic pathways that help to define and refine optimal intervention strategies.

  5. Fatty acid metabolism and insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaney, G C; Corkey, B E

    2003-10-01

    Increases in glucose or fatty acids affect metabolism via changes in long-chain acyl-CoA formation and chronically elevated fatty acids increase total cellular CoA. Understanding the response of pancreatic beta cells to increased amounts of fuel and the role that altered insulin secretion plays in the development and maintenance of obesity and Type 2 diabetes is important. Data indicate that the activated form of fatty acids acts as an effector molecule in stimulus-secretion coupling. Glucose increases cytosolic long-chain acyl-CoA because it increases the "switch" compound malonyl-CoA that blocks mitochondrial beta-oxidation, thus implementing a shift from fatty acid to glucose oxidation. We present arguments in support of the following: (i) A source of fatty acid either exogenous or endogenous (derived by lipolysis of triglyceride) is necessary to support normal insulin secretion; (ii) a rapid increase of fatty acids potentiates glucose-stimulated secretion by increasing fatty acyl-CoA or complex lipid concentrations that act distally by modulating key enzymes such as protein kinase C or the exocytotic machinery; (iii) a chronic increase of fatty acids enhances basal secretion by the same mechanism, but promotes obesity and a diminished response to stimulatory glucose; (iv) agents which raise cAMP act as incretins, at least in part, by stimulating lipolysis via beta-cell hormone-sensitive lipase activation. Furthermore, increased triglyceride stores can give higher rates of lipolysis and thus influence both basal and stimulated insulin secretion. These points highlight the important roles of NEFA, LC-CoA, and their esterified derivatives in affecting insulin secretion in both normal and pathological states.

  6. Metabolic Interactions between Vitamin A and Conjugated Linoleic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranca Carta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Lipid-soluble molecules share several aspects of their physiology due to their common adaptations to a hydrophilic environment, and may interact to regulate their action in a tissue-specific manner. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA is a fatty acid with a conjugated diene structure that is found in low concentrations in ruminant products and available as a nutritional supplement. CLA has been shown to increase tissue levels of retinol (vitamin A alcohol and its sole specific circulating carrier protein retinol-binding protein (RBP or RBP4. However, the precise mechanism of this action has not been elucidated yet. Here, we provide a summary of the current knowledge in this specific area of research and speculate that retinol and CLA may compete for catabolic pathways modulated by the activity of PPAR-α and RXR heterodimer. We also present preliminary data that may position PPAR-α at the crossroads between the metabolism of lipids and vitamin A.

  7. Metabolic interactions between vitamin A and conjugated linoleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, Gianfranca; Murru, Elisabetta; Cordeddu, Lina; Ortiz, Berenice; Giordano, Elena; Belury, Martha A; Quadro, Loredana; Banni, Sebastiano

    2014-03-24

    Lipid-soluble molecules share several aspects of their physiology due to their common adaptations to a hydrophilic environment, and may interact to regulate their action in a tissue-specific manner. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a fatty acid with a conjugated diene structure that is found in low concentrations in ruminant products and available as a nutritional supplement. CLA has been shown to increase tissue levels of retinol (vitamin A alcohol) and its sole specific circulating carrier protein retinol-binding protein (RBP or RBP4). However, the precise mechanism of this action has not been elucidated yet. Here, we provide a summary of the current knowledge in this specific area of research and speculate that retinol and CLA may compete for catabolic pathways modulated by the activity of PPAR-α and RXR heterodimer. We also present preliminary data that may position PPAR-α at the crossroads between the metabolism of lipids and vitamin A.

  8. Nucleic acids encoding plant glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase (GPT) and uses thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Anderson, Penelope S.; Knight, Thomas J.

    2016-03-29

    Glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase (GPT) proteins, nucleic acid molecules encoding GPT proteins, and uses thereof are disclosed. Provided herein are various GPT proteins and GPT gene coding sequences isolated from a number of plant species. As disclosed herein, GPT proteins share remarkable structural similarity within plant species, and are active in catalyzing the synthesis of 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline (2-oxoglutaramate), a powerful signal metabolite which regulates the function of a large number of genes involved in the photosynthesis apparatus, carbon fixation and nitrogen metabolism.

  9. From plant surface to plant metabolism: the uncertain fate of foliar-applied nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Victoria; Brown, Patrick H

    2013-01-01

    The application of agrochemical sprays to the aerial parts of crop plants is an important agricultural practice world-wide. While variable effectiveness is often seen in response to foliar treatments, there is abundant evidence showing the beneficial effect of foliar fertilizers in terms of improving the metabolism, quality, and yields of crops. This mini-review is focused on the major bottlenecks associated with the uptake and translocation of foliar-applied nutrient solutions. A better understanding of the complex scenario surrounding the ultimate delivery of foliar-applied nutrients to sink cells and organs is essential for improving the effectiveness and performance of foliar fertilizers.

  10. Influences of wetland plants on weathered acidic mine tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eva Stoltz; Maria Greger [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden). Department of Botany

    2006-11-15

    Establishment of Carex rostrata, Eriophorum angustifolium and Phragmites australis on weathered, acidic mine tailings (pH {approximately} 3) and their effect on pH in tailings were investigated in a field experiment. The amendments, sewage sludge and an ashes-sewage sludge mixture, were used as plant nutrition and their influence on the metal and As concentrations of plant shoots was analysed. An additional experiment was performed in greenhouse with E. angustifolium and sewage sludge as amendments in both weathered and unweathered tailings. After one year, plants grew better in amendments containing ashes in the field, also in those plants the metal and As shoot concentrations were generally lower than in other treatments. After two years, the only surviving plants were found in sewage sludge mixed with ashes. No effect on pH by plants was found in weathered acidic mine tailings in either field- or greenhouse experiment.

  11. Systems rebalancing of metabolism in response to sulfur deprivation, as revealed by metabolome analysis of Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforova, Victoria J; Kopka, Joachim; Tolstikov, Vladimir; Fiehn, Oliver; Hopkins, Laura; Hawkesford, Malcolm J; Hesse, Holger; Hoefgen, Rainer

    2005-05-01

    Sulfur is an essential macro-element in plant and animal nutrition. Plants assimilate inorganic sulfate into two sulfur-containing amino acids, cysteine and methionine. Low supply of sulfate leads to decreased sulfur pools within plant tissues. As sulfur-related metabolites represent an integral part of plant metabolism with multiple interactions, sulfur deficiency stress induces a number of adaptive responses, which must be coordinated. To reveal the coordinating network of adaptations to sulfur deficiency, metabolite profiling of Arabidopsis has been undertaken. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques revealed the response patterns of 6,023 peaks of nonredundant ion traces and relative concentration levels of 134 nonredundant compounds of known chemical structure. Here, we provide a catalogue of the detected metabolic changes and reconstruct the coordinating network of their mutual influences. The observed decrease in biomass, as well as in levels of proteins, chlorophylls, and total RNA, gives evidence for a general reduction of metabolic activity under conditions of depleted sulfur supply. This is achieved by a systemic adjustment of metabolism involving the major metabolic pathways. Sulfur/carbon/nitrogen are partitioned by accumulation of metabolites along the pathway O-acetylserine to serine to glycine, and are further channeled together with the nitrogen-rich compound glutamine into allantoin. Mutual influences between sulfur assimilation, nitrogen imbalance, lipid breakdown, purine metabolism, and enhanced photorespiration associated with sulfur-deficiency stress are revealed in this study. These responses may be assembled into a global scheme of metabolic regulation induced by sulfur nutritional stress, which optimizes resources for seed production.

  12. Phosphatidic acid: a multifunctional stress-signalling lipid in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Testerink; T. Munnik

    2005-01-01

    Phosphatidic acid (PA) has only recently been identified as an important signaling molecule in both plants and animals. Nonetheless, it already promises to rival the importance of the classic second messengers Ca(2+) and cAMP. In plants, its formation is triggered in response to various biotic and a

  13. Iodine effects on phenolic metabolism in lettuce plants under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Begoña; Leyva, Rocio; Romero, Luis; Ruiz, Juan Manuel

    2013-03-20

    Iodine, applied as iodate in biofortification programs (at doses of ≤80 μM), has been confirmed to improve the foliar biomass, antioxidant response, and accumulation of phenol compounds in lettuce plants. The changes in phenolic compounds induced by the iodate application appear to have functional consequences in the response of salt-stressed plants. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine whether the application of iodate can improve the response of severe salinity stress and whether the resistance can be attributed to the phenolic metabolism in lettuce ( Lactuca sativa cv. Philipus), a glycophyte cultivated for food and consumed year round. In this work, the application of iodate, especially at 20 and 40 μM, in lettuce plants under salinity stress (100 mM NaCl) exerted a significantly positive effect on biomass and induced higher activity in the enzymes shikimate dehydrogenase and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase as well as the lower MW phenol-degrading enzyme polyphenol oxidase. This increased hydroxycinnamic acids and derivatives in addition to total phenols, which appear to act as protective compounds against salinity. This study reveals that in agricultural areas affected by this type of stress, the application of iodate may be an effective strategy, as it not only improves lettuce plant growth but also supplements the human diet with phenolic compounds and the trace element iodine.

  14. (-)-Hydroxycitric Acid Nourishes Protein Synthesis via Altering Metabolic Directions of Amino Acids in Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ningning; Li, Longlong; Peng, Mengling; Ma, Haitian

    2016-08-01

    (-)-Hydroxycitric acid (HCA), a major active ingredient of Garcinia Cambogia extracts, had shown to suppress body weight gain and fat accumulation in animals and humans. While, the underlying mechanism of (-)-HCA has not fully understood. Thus, this study was aimed to investigate the effects of long-term supplement with (-)-HCA on body weight gain and variances of amino acid content in rats. Results showed that (-)-HCA treatment reduced body weight gain and increased feed conversion ratio in rats. The content of hepatic glycogen, muscle glycogen, and serum T4 , T3 , insulin, and Leptin were increased in (-)-HCA treatment groups. Protein content in liver and muscle were significantly increased in (-)-HCA treatment groups. Amino acid profile analysis indicated that most of amino acid contents in serum and liver, especially aromatic amino acid and branched amino acid, were higher in (-)-HCA treatment groups. However, most of the amino acid contents in muscle, especially aromatic amino acid and branched amino acid, were reduced in (-)-HCA treatment groups. These results indicated that (-)-HCA treatment could reduce body weight gain through promoting energy expenditure via regulation of thyroid hormone levels. In addition, (-)-HCA treatment could promote protein synthesis by altering the metabolic directions of amino acids. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Something Old, Something New: Conserved Enzymes and the Evolution of Novelty in Plant Specialized Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghe, Gaurav D; Last, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Plants produce hundreds of thousands of small molecules known as specialized metabolites, many of which are of economic and ecological importance. This remarkable variety is a consequence of the diversity and rapid evolution of specialized metabolic pathways. These novel biosynthetic pathways originate via gene duplication or by functional divergence of existing genes, and they subsequently evolve through selection and/or drift. Studies over the past two decades revealed that diverse specialized metabolic pathways have resulted from the incorporation of primary metabolic enzymes. We discuss examples of enzyme recruitment from primary metabolism and the variety of paths taken by duplicated primary metabolic enzymes toward integration into specialized metabolism. These examples provide insight into processes by which plant specialized metabolic pathways evolve and suggest approaches to discover enzymes of previously uncharacterized metabolic networks.

  16. Something Old, Something New: Conserved Enzymes and the Evolution of Novelty in Plant Specialized Metabolism1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghe, Gaurav D.; Last, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Plants produce hundreds of thousands of small molecules known as specialized metabolites, many of which are of economic and ecological importance. This remarkable variety is a consequence of the diversity and rapid evolution of specialized metabolic pathways. These novel biosynthetic pathways originate via gene duplication or by functional divergence of existing genes, and they subsequently evolve through selection and/or drift. Studies over the past two decades revealed that diverse specialized metabolic pathways have resulted from the incorporation of primary metabolic enzymes. We discuss examples of enzyme recruitment from primary metabolism and the variety of paths taken by duplicated primary metabolic enzymes toward integration into specialized metabolism. These examples provide insight into processes by which plant specialized metabolic pathways evolve and suggest approaches to discover enzymes of previously uncharacterized metabolic networks. PMID:26276843

  17. Polyunsaturated fatty acids in pregnancy and metabolic syndrome: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poniedzialek-Czajkowska, Elzbieta; Mierzynski, Radzislaw; Kimber-Trojnar, Zaneta; Leszczynska-Gorzelak, Bozena; Oleszczuk, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This review presents available evidence for possible application of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in pregnant obese women with metabolic syndrome (MS) and focuses on prophylaxis of pregnancy complications associated with MS such as gestational hypertension, preeclampsia and gestational diabetes. Dietary supplementation with n-3 PUFAs has recently become popular and their adequate intake during pregnancy and early childhood is of clinical importance. The results of experimental and epidemiological investigations reveal that n-3 PUFAs, especially α- linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), may decrease the risk of cardiovascular diseases. It is believed that n-3 PUFAs affect a multitude of molecular pathways, involving regulation of gene expression, alteration of physical and chemical properties of cellular membranes and modulation of membrane channels and proteins. A large body of evidence focuses on anti-inflammatory properties of PUFAs which seem to be fundamental in prevention and reversing of insulin resistance, atherogenic dyslipidemia, hypertension, thromboembolism and in improving vascular function. Despite the potential PUFAs benefits of decreasing insulin resistance, their application in order to prevent preeclampsia, gestational hypertension and gestational diabetes mellitus in pregnant women with MS has not yet been established. Numerous reports have revealed that appropriate fetal development, including neuronal, retinal and immune function depends on EPA and DHA which are crucial also for prevention of preterm birth. Thus the supplementation with EPA and DHA is highly recommended during pregnancy although the optimal dosing and treatment strategies still need to be determined.

  18. Dietary trans-fatty acids and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdzisław Kochan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Trans-fatty acids (TFAs, products of partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils, have become more prevalent in our diet since the 1960s, when they replaced animal fats. TFAs also occur naturally in meat and dairy products from ruminants. There is growing evidence that dietary trans-fatty acids may increase the risk of metabolic syndrome. Several studies have demonstrated adverse effects of TFAs on plasma lipids and lipoproteins. In dietary trials, trans-fatty acids have been shown to raise the total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio and Lp(a levels in blood. Moreover, a high intake of TFAs has been associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease. Prospective cohort studies have shown that dietary trans-fatty acids promote abdominal obesity and weight gain. In addition, it appears that TFA consumption may be associated with the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The documented adverse health effects of TFAs emphasise the importance of efforts to reduce the content of partially hydrogenated vegetable oils in foods.

  19. The initial metabolic conversion of levulinic acid in Cupriavidus necator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaremko, Matt; Yu, Jian

    2011-09-20

    Levulinic acid or 4-ketovaleric acid is a potential renewable substrate for production of polyhydroxyalkanoates. In this work, the initial reactions of LA metabolism by Cupriavidus necator were examined in vitro. The organic acid was converted by membrane-bound crude enzymes obtained from the cells pre-grown on LA, while no LA activity was detected from cells pre-grown on acetic acid. Acetyl-CoA and propionyl-CoA were two major intermediates in the initial reactions of LA conversion. A mass balance on propionyl-CoA accounts for 84 mol% of LA added in vitro. It explains an interesting phenomenon that 3-hydroxbutyrate and 3-hydroxyvalerate are two major monomers of the biopolyester formed from LA, instead of 4-hydroxvalerate that has the similar chemical structure of LA as the precursor. A Monod model was used to describe the kinetics of LA utilization as a sole carbon source or a co-substrate of glucose and fructose. The μ(max) and K(m) of LA alone were 0.26 h⁻¹ and 0.01 g/L, respectively. The content and composition of PHA are also dependent on the culture conditions such as carbon to nitrogen ratio. The in vitro observation is supported by the high utilization rate of LA and the high molar percentage of 3HB and 3HV in the PHA derived from LA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Fats for thoughts: An update on brain fatty acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Adele; Koczwara, Justyna Barbara; Gallelli, Cristina Anna; Vergara, Daniele; Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria Vittoria; Gaetani, Silvana; Giudetti, Anna Maria

    2017-03-01

    Brain fatty acid (FA) metabolism deserves a close attention not only for its energetic aspects but also because FAs and their metabolites/derivatives are able to influence many neural functions, contributing to brain pathologies or representing potential targets for pharmacological and/or nutritional interventions. Glucose is the preferred energy substrate for the brain, whereas the role of FAs is more marginal. In conditions of decreased glucose supply, ketone bodies, mainly formed by FA oxidation, are the alternative main energy source. Ketogenic diets or medium-chain fatty acid supplementations were shown to produce therapeutic effects in several brain pathologies. Moreover, the positive effects exerted on brain functions by short-chain FAs and the consideration that they can be produced by intestinal flora metabolism contributed to the better understanding of the link between "gut-health" and "brain-health". Finally, attention was paid also to the regulatory role of essential polyunsaturated FAs and their derivatives on brain homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dietary fatty acids in metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascio, Giuseppe; Schiera, Gabriella; Di Liegro, Italia

    2012-01-01

    In the last few decades, the prevalence of overweight and essential obesity has been undergoing a fast and progressive worldwide increase. Obesity has been in turn linked to type II diabetes, with the total number of diabetic patients worryingly increasing, in the last fifteen years, suggesting a pandemic phenomenon. At the same time, an increase in the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases has been also recorded. Increasing evidence suggests that the diet is involved in such escalation. In particular, the progressive globalization of food industry allowed massive supply, at a relatively low price, of a great variety of pre-packed food and bakery products, with very high energy content. Most of this food contains high amounts of saturated fatty acids (SFA) and of hydrogenated or trans fatty acids (TFA), that probably represent the prominent risk factors in the diet. Herein we will report diffusion and possible impact on health of such molecules, with reference to coronary heart disease, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and diabetes. We will also discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms of action of fatty acids and fatty acid-derivatives which have been involved either in promoting or in preventing human pathologies. Free fatty acids (FFA) are not indeed only essential fuels for the organism. They also act as ligands for both membrane and nuclear receptors involved in different signaling pathways. Notably, some of these pathways can induce cell stress and apoptosis. Most important, FFA can affect glucose-induced insulin secretion and activate β-cell death. These events can be at least in part counteracted by polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  2. Carbohydrate metabolism during prolonged exercise and recovery: interactions between pyruvate dehydrogenase, fatty acids, and amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourtzakis, Marina; Saltin, B.; Graham, T.

    2006-01-01

    at 3 h 23 min ± 11 min). Femoral arterial and venous blood, blood flow measurements, and muscle samples were obtained hourly during exercise and recovery (3 h). Carbohydrate oxidation peaked at 30 min of exercise and subsequently decreased for the remainder of the exercise bout (P ... with pyruvate metabolism, and they comprised 68% of total amino-acid release during exercise and recovery. Thus reduced pyruvate production was primarily associated with reduced carbohydrate oxidation, whereas the greatest production of pyruvate was related to glutamate, glutamine, and alanine metabolism...

  3. Sex-Dependent Programming of Glucose and Fatty Acid Metabolism in Mouse Offspring by Maternal Protein Restriction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Straten, Esther M. E.; Bloks, Vincent W.; van Dijk, Theo H.; Baller, Julius F. W.; Huijkman, Nicolette C. A.; Kuipers, Irma; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Plosch, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    Background: Nutritional conditions during fetal life influence the risk of the development of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases in adult life (metabolic programming). Impaired glucose tolerance and dysregulated fatty acid metabolism are hallmarks of metabolic syndrome. Objective: We aim

  4. Patterns of amino acid metabolism by proliferating human mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Higuera, G.A.; Schop, D.; Spitters, T.W.; Dijkhuizen, R.; Bracke, M.; Bruijn, J.D.; Martens, D.E.; Karperien, M.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.

    2012-01-01

    The nutritional requirements of stem cells have not been determined; in particular, the amino acid metabolism of stem cells is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the amino acid metabolism of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), with focus on two questions: Which amino acids are consume

  5. Defining meal requirements for protein to optimize metabolic roles of amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary protein provides essential amino acids (EAAs) for the synthesis of new proteins plus an array of other metabolic functions; many of these functions are sensitive to postprandial plasma and intracellular amino acid concentrations. Recent research has focused on amino acids as metabolic signal...

  6. Molecular evolution of plant AAP and LHT amino acid transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mechthild eTegeder

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen is an essential mineral nutrient and it is often transported within living organisms in its reduced form, as amino acids. Transport of amino acids across cellular membranes requires proteins, and here we report the phylogenetic analysis across taxa of two amino acid transporter families, the Amino Acid Permeases (AAPs and the Lysine-Histidine-like Transporters (LHTs. We found that the two transporter families form two distinct groups in plants supporting the concept that both are essential. AAP transporters seem to be restricted to land plants. They were found in Selaginella moellindorffii and Physcomitrella patens but not in Chlorophyte, Charophyte or Rhodophyte algae. AAPs were strongly represented in vascular plants, consistent with their major function in phloem (vascular tissue loading of amino acids for sink nitrogen supply. LHTs on the other hand appeared prior to land plants. LHTs were not found in chlorophyte algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carterii. However, the characean alga Klebsormidium flaccidum encodes KfLHT13 and phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is basal to land plant LHTs. This is consistent with the hypothesis that characean algae are ancestral to land plants. LHTs were also found in both Selaginella moellindorffii and Physcomitrella patens as well as in monocots and eudicots. To date, AAPs and LHTs have mainly been characterized in Arabidopsis (eudicots and these studies provide clues to the functions of the newly identified homologs.

  7. Adipose Tissue Branched Chain Amino Acid (BCAA) Metabolism Modulates Circulating BCAA Levels*

    OpenAIRE

    Herman, Mark A.; She, Pengxiang; Peroni, Odile D.; Lynch, Christopher J.; Kahn, Barbara B.

    2010-01-01

    Whereas the role of adipose tissue in glucose and lipid homeostasis is widely recognized, its role in systemic protein and amino acid metabolism is less well-appreciated. In vitro and ex vivo experiments suggest that adipose tissue can metabolize substantial amounts of branched chain amino acids (BCAAs). However, the role of adipose tissue in regulating BCAA metabolism in vivo is controversial. Interest in the contribution of adipose tissue to BCAA metabolism has been renewed with recent obse...

  8. Conjugated linoleic acid isomers: differences in metabolism and biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churruca, Itziar; Fernández-Quintela, Alfredo; Portillo, Maria Puy

    2009-01-01

    The term conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) refers to a mixture of linoleic acid positional and geometric isomers, characterized by having conjugated double bonds, not separated by a methylene group as in linoleic acid. CLA isomers appear as a minor component of the lipid fraction, found mainly in meat and dairy products from cows and sheep. The most abundant isomer is cis-9,trans-11, which represents up to 80% of total CLA in food. These isomers are metabolized in the body through different metabolic pathways, but important differences, that can have physiological consequences, are observed between the two main isomers. The trans-10,cis-12 isomer is more efficiently oxidized than the cis-9,trans-11 isomer, due to the position of its double bounds. Interest in CLA arose in its anticarcinogenic action but there is an increasing amount of specific scientific literature concerning the biological effects and properties of CLA. Numerous biological effects of CLA are due to the separate action of the most studied isomers, cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12. It is also likely that some effects are induced and/or enhanced by these isomers acting synergistically. Although the cis-9,trans-11 isomer is mainly responsible for the anticarcinogenic effect, the trans-10,cis-12 isomer reduces body fat and it is referred as the most effective isomer affecting blood lipids. As far as insulin function is concerned, both isomers seem to be responsible for insulin resistance in humans. Finally, with regard to the immune system it is not clear whether individual isomers of CLA could act similarly or differently.

  9. [Advances in studies on growth metabolism and response mechanisms of medicinal plants under drought stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Can; Zhang, Jun-Yi; Xu, Hu-Chao

    2014-07-01

    Drought stress exerts a considerable effect on growth, physiology and secondary metabolisms of the medicinal plants. It could inhabit the growth of the medicinal plants but promote secretion of secondary metabolites. Other researches indicated that the medicinal plants could depend on the ABA signaling pathway and secreting osmotic substances to resist the drought stress and reduce the damage by it. The article concludes the changes in growth, physiology, secondary metabolisms and response mechanisms of medicinal plants to drought stress that provides a theoretical basis for exploring the relationship between medicinal plants and drought stress.

  10. Good and bad protons: genetic aspects of acidity stress responses in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavrukov, Yuri; Hirai, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Physiological aspects of acidity stress in plants (synonymous with H(+) rhizotoxicity or low-pH stress) have long been a focus of research, in particular with respect to acidic soils where aluminium and H(+) rhizotoxicities often co-occur. However, toxic H(+) and Al(3+) elicit different response mechanisms in plants, and it is important to consider their effects separately. The primary aim of this review was to provide the current state of knowledge regarding the genetics of the specific reactions to low-pH stress in growing plants. A comparison of the results gleaned from quantitative trait loci analysis and global transcriptome profiling of plants in response to high proton concentrations revealed a two-stage genetic response: (i) in the short-term, proton pump H(+)-ATPases present the first barrier in root cells, allocating an excess of H(+) into either the apoplast or vacuole; the ensuing defence signaling system involves auxin, salicylic acid, and methyl jasmonate, which subsequently initiate expression of STOP and DREB transcription factors as well as chaperone ROF; (2) the long-term response includes other genes, such as alternative oxidase and type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, which act to detoxify dangerous reactive oxygen species in mitochondria, and help plants better manage the stress. A range of transporter genes including those for nitrate (NTR1), malate (ALMT1), and heavy metals are often up-regulated by H(+) rhizotoxicity. Expansins, cell-wall-related genes, the γ-aminobutyric acid shunt and biochemical pH-stat genes also reflect changes in cell metabolism and biochemistry in acidic conditions. However, the genetics underlying the acidity stress response of plants is complicated and only fragmentally understood.

  11. Conjugated linoleic acid or omega 3 fatty acids increase mitochondrial biosynthesis and metabolism in skeletal muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughan Roger A; Garcia-Smith Randi; Bisoffi Marco; Conn Carole A; Trujillo Kristina A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Polyunsaturated fatty acids are popular dietary supplements advertised to contribute to weight loss by increasing fat metabolism in liver, but the effects on overall muscle metabolism are less established. We evaluated the effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) or combination omega 3 on metabolic characteristics in muscle cells. Methods Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells were treated with either DMSO control, or CLA or combination omega 3 for 24 or 48 hours. RNA was determine...

  12. [Metabolic syndrome reversion by polyunsaturated fatty acids ingestion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Mondragón, Martha Gabriela; Oliart Ros, Rosa María; Martínez Martinez, Angélica; Méndez Machado, Gustavo Francisco; Angulo Guerrero, Jesús Ofelia

    2013-12-21

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) frequency is growing and diet has an important influence on its evolution. Our objective was to study the effect of 3 sources of polyunsaturated fatty acids on MS parameters in humans. The MS was diagnosed according to the International Diabetes Federation. Three groups of individuals (n=15/group) were quasi-randomly assigned to one of the following treatments during 6 weeks: a) 1.8 g/d n-3 (1.08g eicosapentoaenoic acid+0.72 g docosahexaenoic acid); b) 2.0 g/d conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, 50:50, cis9:trans11, trans10:cis12), and c) 40 g/d walnut. The clinical and biochemical parameters were evaluated at the beginning and the end of the essay. In the group with n-3 the triglycerides level decreased from 183.9 ± 35.2mg/dl to 149.6 ± 29.0mg/dl (P=.007). In the group with walnut the HDL level rose from 41.7 ± 5.2mg/dl to 47.8 ± 5.4 mg/dl (P=.004) and the Castelli index (total cholesterol/HDL) decreased from 4.86 ± 0.97 to 3.82 ± 0.81 (P=.004). There were not significant changes in the CLA group. At the end of the essay, 46.7% of walnut group patients, 46.7% of n-3 group and 20% of CLA group, had no MS. The groups that consumed polyunsaturated fatty acids n-3 and those in walnut in moderate daily doses during 6 weeks had an improvement of the dyslipidemia component of MS, hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL level. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Tracer methods for investigating biosynthetic pathways and the metabolism of bioactive substances in plants. [Herbicides; Plant growth regulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuette, H.R. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Halle/Saale. Inst. fuer Biochemie der Pflanzen)

    1984-03-01

    Proceeding from the general terms of investigating the courses of reactions in plants by means of tracer methods, problems and possibilities of the methods are discussed on the basis of examples referring in particular to double labelling techniques and to the determination of the distribution of radioactivity in the resulting products. Examples of herbicides and plant growth regulators are used for describing metabolism studies.

  14. ACID/HEAVY METAL TOLERANT PLANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 30. The objective of Project 30 was to select populations (i.e., ecotypes) from native, indigenous plant species that demonstrate superior growth characteristics and sustainability on...

  15. Modulation of plant growth and metabolism in cadmium-enriched environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadir, Shaista; Jamshieed, Sumiya; Rasool, Saiema; Ashraf, Muhammad; Akram, Nudrat Aisha; Ahmad, Parvaiz

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a water soluble metal pollutant that is not essential to plant growth.It has attracted attention from soil scientists and plant nutritionists in recent years because of its toxicity and mobility in the soil-plant continuum. Even low levels of Cd (0.1-1 J.!M) cause adverse effects on plant growth and metabolism. Cadmium is known to trigger the synthesis of reactive oxygen species, hinder utilization, uptake and transport of essential nutrients and water, and modify photosynthetic machinery,thereby resulting in plant tissue death. Although the effects of Cd are dose- as well as plant species-dependent, some plants show Cd tolerance through a wide range of cellular responses. Such tolerance results from synthesis of osmolytes,generation of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants and metal-detoxifying peptides, changes in gene expression, and metal ion homeostasis and compartmentalization of ligand-metal complexes. Cd toxicity in plants produces effects on chlorophyllbio synthesis, reduces photosynthesis, and upsets plant water relations and hormonal and/or nutritional balances. All of these effects on plants and on plant metabolism ultimately reduce growth and productivity.In this review, we describe the extent to which Cd affects underlying metabolic processes in plants and how such altered processes affect plant growth. We review the sources of Cd contamination, its uptake, transportation and bioavailability and accumulation in plants, and its antagonistic and synergistic effects with other metals and compounds. We further address the effects of Cd on plant genetics and metabolism,and how plants respond to mitigate the adverse effects of Cd exposure, as well as strategies(e.g., plant breeding) that can reduce the impact of Cd contamination on plants.

  16. Human placenta metabolizes fatty acids: implications for fetal fatty acid oxidation disorders and maternal liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhawat, Prem; Bennett, Michael J; Sadovsky, Yoel; Nelson, D Michael; Rakheja, Dinesh; Strauss, Arnold W

    2003-06-01

    The role of fat metabolism during human pregnancy and in placental growth and function is poorly understood. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation disorders in an affected fetus are associated with maternal diseases of pregnancy, including preeclampsia, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and the hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome called HELLP. We have investigated the developmental expression and activity of six fatty acid beta-oxidation enzymes at various gestational-age human placentas. Placental specimens exhibited abundant expression of all six enzymes, as assessed by immunohistochemical and immunoblot analyses, with greater staining in syncytiotrophoblasts compared with other placental cell types. beta-Oxidation enzyme activities in placental tissues were higher early in gestation and lower near term. Trophoblast cells in culture oxidized tritium-labeled palmitate and myristate in substantial amounts, indicating that the human placenta utilizes fatty acids as a significant metabolic fuel. Thus human placenta derives energy from fatty acid oxidation, providing a potential explanation for the association of fetal fatty acid oxidation disorders with maternal liver diseases in pregnancy.

  17. PROTEIN METABOLISM IN REGENERATING WOUND TISSUE: FUNCTION OF THE SULFUR AMINO ACIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROTEINS, *TISSUES(BIOLOGY), METABOLISM, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), REGENERATION(ENGINEERING), WOUNDS AND INJURIES, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), TRACER STUDIES, METHIONINE, COLLAGEN, TYROSINE, BIOSYNTHESIS, AMINO ACIDS .

  18. Citric Acid Metabolism in Resistant Hypertension: Underlying Mechanisms and Metabolic Prediction of Treatment Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Lorenzo, Marta; Martinez, Paula J; Baldan-Martin, Montserrat; Ruiz-Hurtado, Gema; Prado, Jose Carlos; Segura, Julian; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G; Vivanco, Fernando; Ruilope, Luis Miguel; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria

    2017-11-01

    Resistant hypertension (RH) affects 9% to 12% of hypertensive adults. Prolonged exposure to suboptimal blood pressure control results in end-organ damage and cardiovascular risk. Spironolactone is the most effective drug for treatment, but not all patients respond and side effects are not negligible. Little is known on the mechanisms responsible for RH. We aimed to identify metabolic alterations in urine. In addition, a potential capacity of metabolites to predict response to spironolactone was investigated. Urine was collected from 29 patients with RH and from a group of 13 subjects with pseudo-RH. For patients, samples were collected before and after spironolactone administration and were classified in responders (n=19) and nonresponders (n=10). Nuclear magnetic resonance was applied to identify altered metabolites and pathways. Metabolites were confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Citric acid cycle was the pathway most significantly altered (Pcitric acid cycle and deregulation of reactive oxygen species homeostasis control continue its activation after hypertension was developed. A metabolic panel showing alteration before spironolactone treatment and predicting future response of patients is shown. These molecular indicators will contribute optimizing the rate of control of RH patients with spironolactone. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Metabolic analysis revealed altered amino acid profiles in Lupinus albus organs as a result of boron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Marta; Chicau, Paula; Matias, Helena; Passarinho, José; Pinheiro, Carla; Ricardo, Cândido Pinto

    2011-07-01

    We analysed the changes in the metabolites of Lupinus albus organs (leaf-blades, petioles, apexes, hypocotyls and roots) as a consequence of B deficiency. The deficiency did not affect malate concentration and induced only minor changes in the sugar content, suggesting that the carbohydrate metabolism is little affected by the deficiency. Contrarily, marked changes in the content of free amino acids were observed, with some specific variations associated with the different organs. These changes indicate that various aspects of metabolism implicated in the amino acid accumulation were affected by B deficiency. Most of the detected changes appear to have implications with some stress responses or signalling processes. Asparagine and proline that increase in many stresses also accumulated in petioles, apexes and hypocotyls. Accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid shunt amino acids, indicative of production of reactive oxygen species, occurs in the same three organs and also the roots. The increase in the branched-chain amino acids, observed in all organs, suggests the involvement of B with the cytoskeleton, whereas glycine decrease in leaf-blades and active growing organs (apexes and roots) could be associated with the proposed role of this amino acids in plant signalling in processes that might be associated with the decreased growth rates observed in B deficiency. Despite the admitted importance of free amino acids in plant metabolism, the available information on this matter is scarce. So our results bring new information concerning the effects of B deficiency in the metabolism of the several L. albus organs. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2011.

  20. Characterization of the salt stress vulnerability of three invasive freshwater plant species using a metabolic profiling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouvenot, Lise; Deleu, Carole; Berardocco, Solenne; Haury, Jacques; Thiébaut, Gabrielle

    2015-03-01

    The effects of salt stress on freshwater plants has been little studied up to now, despite the fact that they are expected to present different levels of salt sensitivity or salt resistance depending on the species. The aim of this work was to assess the effect of NaCl at two concentrations on three invasive freshwater species, Elodea canadensis, Myriophyllum aquaticum and Ludwigia grandiflora, by examining morphological and physiological parameters and using metabolic profiling. The growth rate (biomass and stem length) was reduced for all species, whatever the salt treatment, but the response to salt differed between the three species, depending on the NaCl concentration. For E. canadensis, the physiological traits and metabolic profiles were only slightly modified in response to salt, whereas M. aquaticum and L. grandiflora showed great changes. In both of these species, root number, photosynthetic pigment content, amino acids and carbohydrate metabolism were affected by the salt treatments. Moreover, we are the first to report the salt-induced accumulation of compatible solutes in both species. Indeed, in response to NaCl, L. grandiflora mainly accumulated sucrose. The response of M. aquaticum was more complex, because it accumulated not only sucrose and myo-inositol whatever the level of salt stress, but also amino acids such as proline and GABA, but only at high NaCl concentrations. These responses are the metabolic responses typically found in terrestrial plants.

  1. ROSMARINIC ACID AND ITS PLANT SOURCES IN THE CRIMEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Paliy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents data on the content of phenolics and rosmarinic acid in 32 species of aromatic and medicinal plants from Lamiaceae, Asteraceae and Apiaceae families, native to the South Coast of the Crimea. The concentration of phenolic compounds in the studied species was 490.3 – 18511.0 mg/100g of plant raw materials. Rosmarinic acid was found in 15 species from Lamiaceae and Asteraceae families. Rosmarinic acid was not noticed in the studied plants from Apiaceae family. The concentration of rosmarinic acid in the studied plants amounted to 40.6 – 2535.5 mg/100g of plant raw materials. On the basis of the obtained results such species as Origanum vulgare L., Majorana hortensis Moench., Mentha longifolia L., Thymus vulgaris L. (thymol type can be considered as a promising source of rosmarinic acid.

  2. 2009 Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism & Function Gordon Research Conference - February 1- 6 ,2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent D. Chapman

    2009-02-06

    The Gordon Research Conference on 'Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism and Function' has been instituted to accelerate research productivity in the field of plant lipids. This conference will facilitate wide dissemination of research breakthroughs, support recruitment of young scientists to the field of plant lipid metabolism and encourage broad participation of the plant lipid community in guiding future directions for research in plant lipids. This conference will build upon the strengths of the successful, previous biannual meetings of the National Plant Lipid Cooperative (www.plantlipids.org) that began in 1993, but will reflect a broader scope of topics to include the biochemistry, cell biology, metabolic regulation, and signaling functions of plant acyl lipids. Most importantly, this conference also will serve as a physical focal point for the interaction of the plant lipid research community. Applications to attend this conference will be open to all researchers interested in plant lipids and will provide a venue for the presentation of the latest research results, networking opportunities for young scientists, and a forum for the development and exchange of useful lipid resources and new ideas. By bringing together senior- and junior-level scientists involved in plant lipid metabolism, a broad range of insights will be shared and the community of plant lipid researchers will function more as a network of vested partners. This is important for the vitality of the research community and for the perceived value that will encourage conference attendance into the future.

  3. Megaloblastic anaemia: Folic acid and vitamin B12 metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.B. Castellanos-Sinco

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Folic acid and cobalamin are B-group vitamins that play an essential role in many cellular processes. Deficiency in one or both of these vitamins causes megaloblastic anaemia, a disease characterized by the presence of megaloblasts. Megaloblasts occur when inhibition of DNA synthesis causes asynchronous maturation between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Clinical manifestations are similar to those of other types of anaemia, with the exception of cobalamin deficiency megaloblastic anaemia, which presents distinctive neurological symptoms. An understanding of the metabolism of these vitamins will enable clinicians to make the best use and interpretation of laboratory studies and monitor therapeutic strategies, which consist mainly of administering supplements to restore body reserves.

  4. Effect of salicylic acid on tobacco (Nicotiana rustica plant under drought conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghader Habibi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Drought stress impact photosynthesis and stomatal conductance, and may reduce the overall production capacity of plants. Since exogenous application of salicylic acid (SA can partially alleviatebe increased the negative effects tolerance of drought stress by improve the metabolism pathways and increase the net photosynthesison plant photosynthesis and metabolism, the main objective of this study was to clarify the roles of SA in enhancing 28 days tobacco (Nicotiana rustica Basmas tolerance to drought stress (50% FC. The results indicated that foliar application of SA (0.5 mM influenced negatively net CO2 assimilation rate and stomatal conductance and led to reduction of shoot and root dry masses. In contrast, the stress did not reduce significantly the maximal quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII. This that can be explained by enhancement of efficiency for dissipation of excess photon energy in the PSII antenna, determined as non-photochemical quenching, and consequently further protection of PSII from photodamage. Thus, under more drought stress, the reduction of photosynthesis of tobacco plants was due mainly to reduction of stomatal conductance. Under water-deficient conditions, plants showed an increase in chlorophyll a and amino acids concentrations in the leaves when treated with SA while this change for net photosynthesis was negligible. Our results indicated showed that the foliar application of SA had no ameliorative effect on tobacco growth under drought stress, because its effect on elevation of transpiration rate did not increase net photosynthesis under drought condition.

  5. Organic Acids: The Pools of Fixed Carbon Involved in Redox Regulation and Energy Balance in Higher Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Abir U Igamberdiev; Eprintsev, Alexander T.

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids are synthesized in plants as a result of the incomplete oxidation of photosynthetic products and represent the stored pools of fixed carbon accumulated due to different transient times of conversion of carbon compounds in metabolic pathways. When redox level in the cell increases, e.g., in conditions of active photosynthesis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in mitochondria is transformed to a partial cycle supplying citrate for the synthesis of 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate (c...

  6. Influences of wetland plants on weathered acidic mine tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoltz, Eva [Department of Botany, Stockholm University, Lilla Frescativaegen 5, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: eva.stoltz@botan.su.se; Greger, Maria [Department of Botany, Stockholm University, Lilla Frescativaegen 5, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: maria.greger@botan.su.se

    2006-11-15

    Establishment of Carex rostrata, Eriophorum angustifolium and Phragmites australis on weathered, acidic mine tailings (pH {approx}3) and their effect on pH in tailings were investigated in a field experiment. The amendments, sewage sludge and an ashes-sewage sludge mixture, were used as plant nutrition and their influence on the metal and As concentrations of plant shoots was analysed. An additional experiment was performed in greenhouse with E. angustifolium and sewage sludge as amendments in both weathered and unweathered tailings. After one year, plants grew better in amendments containing ashes in the field, also in those plants the metal and As shoot concentrations were generally lower than in other treatments. After two years, the only surviving plants were found in sewage sludge mixed with ashes. No effect on pH by plants was found in weathered acidic mine tailings in either field- or greenhouse experiment. - Wetland plant establishment on acidic mine tailings may contribute to a reduced metal release and a stabilisation of pH.

  7. Microbial diversity and metabolic networks in acid mine drainage habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia eMendez-Garcia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD emplacements are low-complexity natural systems. Low-pH conditions appear to be the main factor underlying the limited diversity of the microbial populations thriving in these environments, although temperature, ionic composition, total organic carbon and dissolved oxygen are also considered to significantly influence their microbial life. This natural reduction in diversity driven by extreme conditions was reflected in several studies on the microbial populations inhabiting the various micro-environments present in such ecosystems. Early studies based on the physiology of the autochthonous microbiota and the growing success of omics technologies have enabled a better understanding of microbial ecology and function in low-pH mine outflows; however, complementary omics-derived data should be included to completely describe their microbial ecology. Furthermore, recent updates on the distribution of eukaryotes and ultra-micro-archaea demand their inclusion in the microbial characterisation of AMD systems. In this review, we present a complete overview of the bacterial, archaeal (including ultra-micro-archaeal and eukaryotic diversity in these ecosystems and include a thorough depiction of the metabolism and element cycling in AMD habitats. We also review different metabolic network structures at the organismal level, which is necessary to disentangle the role of each member of the AMD communities described thus far.

  8. Protein and amino acid metabolism in skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Guoyao.

    1989-01-01

    Isolated chick extensor digitorum communis (EDC) muscles and, in some experiments, rat skeletal muscles were used to study a number of aspects of protein and amino acid metabolism. (1) Chick EDC muscles synthesize and release large amounts of alanine and glutamine, which indirectly obtain their amino groups from branched-chain amino acids (BCAA). (2) Acetoacetate or DL-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate (4 mM) decrease (P < 0.01) alanine synthesis and BCAA transamination in EDC muscles from 24-h fasted chicks by decreasing (P < 0.01) intracellular concentrations of pyruvate due to inhibition of glycolysis. (3) Glutamine is extensively degraded in skeletal muscles from both chicks and rats, thus challenging the traditional view that glutamine oxidation is negligible in skeletal muscle. The cytosolic glutamine aminotransferases L and K in the rat and the mitochondrial phosphate-activated glutaminase in the chick play important roles in the conversion of glutamine to {alpha}-ketoglutarate for further oxidation. (4) Although methionine has been reported to be extensively transaminated in rat skeletal muscle preparations in the absence of other amino acids, transamination of methionine is absent or negligible in chick and rat skeletal muscles in the presence of physiological concentrations of amino acids. (5) Glutamine at 1.0-15 mM increases (P < 0.01) protein synthesis ({sup 3}H-phenylalanine incorporation), and at 10.0-15.0 mM decreases (P < 0.05) protein degradation ({sup 3}H-phenylalanine release from prelabelled protein in vivo) in EDC muscles from fed chicks as compared to muscles incubated in the absence of glutamine. (6) Acetoacetate or DL-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate (4 mM) has a small but significant inhibitory effect (P < 0.05) on the rate of protein synthesis, but has no effect (P > 0.05) on the rate of protein degradation in EDC muscles from fed chicks.

  9. Perspectives on the interactions between metabolism, redox, and epigenetics in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuan; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Zhou, Dao-Xiu

    2016-10-01

    Epigenetic modifications of chromatin usually involve consumption of key metabolites and redox-active molecules. Primary metabolic flux and cellular redox states control the activity of enzymes involved in chromatin modifications, such as DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and histone methylation, which in turn regulate gene expression and/or enzymatic activity of specific metabolic and redox pathways. Thus, coordination of metabolism and epigenetic regulation of gene expression is critical to control growth and development in response to the cellular environment. Much has been learned from animal and yeast cells with regard to the interplay between metabolism and epigenetic regulation, and now the metabolic control of epigenetic pathways in plants is an increasing area of study. Epigenetic mechanisms are largely similar between plant and mammalian cells, but plants display very important differences in both metabolism and metabolic/redox signaling pathways. In this review, we summarize recent developments in the field and discuss perspectives of studying interactions between plant epigenetic and metabolism/redox systems, which are essential for plant adaptation to environmental conditions.

  10. How to eliminate the formation of chlorogenic acids artefacts during plants analysis? Sea sand disruption method (SSDM) in the HPLC analysis of chlorogenic acids and their native derivatives in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wianowska, Dorota; Typek, Rafał; Dawidowicz, Andrzej L

    2015-09-01

    The analytical procedures for determining plant constituents involve the application of sample preparation methods to fully isolate and/or pre-concentrate the analyzed substances. High-temperature liquid extraction is still applied most frequently for this purpose. The present paper shows that high-temperature extraction cannot be applied for the analysis of chlorogenic acids (CQAs) and their derivatives in plants as it causes the CQAs transformation leading to erroneous quantitative estimations of these compounds. Experiments performed on different plants (black elder, hawthorn, nettle, yerba maté, St John's wort and green coffee) demonstrate that the most appropriate method for the estimation of CQAs/CQAs derivatives is sea sand disruption method (SSDM) because it does not induce any transformation and/or degradation processes in the analyzed substances. Owing to the SSDM method application we found that the investigated plants, besides four main CQAs, contain sixteen CQAs derivatives, among them three quinic acids. The application of SSDM in plant analysis not only allows to establish a true concentration of individual CQAs in the examined plants but also to determine which chlorogenic acids derivatives are native plant components and what is their concentration level. What is even more important, the application of SSDM in plant analysis allows to eliminate errors that may arise or might have arisen in the study of chlorogenic acids and their derivatives in plant metabolism.

  11. Uric acid in metabolic syndrome: From an innocent bystander to a central player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanbay, Mehmet; Jensen, Thomas; Solak, Yalcin; Le, Myphuong; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos; Rivard, Chris; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Johnson, Richard J

    2016-04-01

    Uric acid, once viewed as an inert metabolic end-product of purine metabolism, has been recently incriminated in a number of chronic disease states, including hypertension, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and chronic kidney disease. Several experimental and clinical studies support a role for uric acid as a contributory causal factor in these conditions. Here we discuss some of the major mechanisms linking uric acid to metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. At this time the key to understanding the importance of uric acid in these diseases will be the conduct of large clinical trials in which the effect of lowering uric acid on hard clinical outcomes is assessed. Elevated uric acid may turn out to be one of the more important remediable risk factors for metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  12. Metabolic profiling of a myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome discovery cohort reveals disturbances in fatty acid and lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Arnaud; Ruppert, David; Levine, Susan M; Hanson, Maureen R

    2017-01-31

    Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) remains a continuum spectrum disease without biomarkers or simple objective tests, and therefore relies on a diagnosis from a set of symptoms to link the assortment of brain and body disorders to ME/CFS. Although recent studies show various affected pathways, the underlying basis of ME/CFS has yet to be established. In this pilot study, we compare plasma metabolic signatures in a discovery cohort, 17 patients and 15 matched controls, and explore potential metabolic perturbations as the aftermath of the complex interactions between genes, transcripts and proteins. This approach to examine the complex array of symptoms and underlying foundation of ME/CFS revealed 74 differentially accumulating metabolites, out of 361 (P metabolism and glycerophospholipid metabolism, combined with primary bile acid metabolism, as well as glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism and a few other pathways, all involved broadly in fatty acid metabolism. Purines, including ADP and ATP, pyrimidines and several amino acid metabolic pathways were found to be significantly disturbed. Finally, glucose and oxaloacetate were two main metabolites affected that have a major effect on sugar and energy levels. Our work provides a prospective path for diagnosis and understanding of the underlying mechanisms of ME/CFS.

  13. The molecular components of phospho- and glycolipid metabolism in plant cell membranes under the phosphorus deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svietlova N. B.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the aspects of molecular regulation of phosphorus metabolism in plants, the lipid components of membrane structures, has been reviewed. The refocusing of phosphoand glycolipid metabolism is an indicator of phosphorus accessibility in plants. The compensatory mechanisms of substitution of phospholipids with non-phosphorus containing glycolipids in membranes, allow plants to adapt to the phosphate (Pi starvation. Phospholipids are the reserve pool of cellular phosphorus at reutilization of ions in the donor-acceptor system of plants. The mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of genes involved in the synthesis of phospholipids and glycolipids under Pi deficit have been analyzed.

  14. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and oxygenated metabolism in atherothrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichardant, Michel; Calzada, Catherine; Bernoud-Hubac, Nathalie; Lagarde, Michel; Véricel, Evelyne

    2015-04-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies and clinical trials have reported the health benefits of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), including a lower risk of coronary heart diseases. This review mainly focuses on the effects of alpha-linolenic (ALA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids on some risk factors associated with atherothrombosis, including platelet activation, plasma lipid concentrations and oxidative modification of low-density lipoproteins (LDL). Special focus is given to the effects of marine PUFA on the formation of eicosanoids and docosanoids, and to the bioactive properties of some oxygenated metabolites of omega-3 PUFA produced by cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases. The antioxidant effects of marine omega-3 PUFA at low concentrations and the pro-oxidant effects of DHA at high concentrations on the redox status of platelets and LDL are highlighted. Non enzymatic peroxidation end-products deriving from omega-3 PUFA such as hydroxy-hexenals, neuroketals and EPA-derived isoprostanes are also considered in relation to atherosclerosis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Oxygenated metabolism of PUFA: analysis and biological relevance".

  15. Metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids and ketogenesis: an emerging connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnane, Stephen C

    2004-03-01

    This paper summarizes the emerging literature indicating that at least two polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA; linoleate, alpha-linolenate) are moderately ketogenic and that via ketone bodies significant amounts of carbon are recycled from these fatty acids into de novo synthesis of lipids including cholesterol, palmitate, stearate and oleate. This pathway (PUFA carbon recycling) is particularly active in several tissues during the suckling period when, depending on the tissue, >200 fold more carbon from alpha-linolenate can be recycled into newly synthesized lipids than is used to make docosahexaenoate. At least in rats, PUFA carbon recycling also occurs in adults and even during extreme linoleate deficiency. Hence, this pathway should be considered an obligatory component of PUFA metabolism. It is still speculative but part of the clinical benefit of the very high fat ketogenic diet in intractable seizures may be achieved by raising plasma levels of PUFA that have anti-seizure effects, especially arachidonate and docosahexaenoate. Hence, in addition to some PUFA being ketogenic substrates, the state of ketosis involves potentially beneficial changes in PUFA homeostasis. Both the molecular controls on these pathways and their clinical significance still need elucidation.

  16. Salicylic Acid and its Function in Plant Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuanfu An; Zhonglin Mou

    2011-01-01

    The small phenolic compound salicylic acid (SA) plays an important regulatory role in multiple physiological processes including plant immune response. Significant progress has been made during the past two decades in understanding the SA-mediated defense signaling network.Characterization of a number of genes functioning in SA biosynthesis,conjugation, accumulation, signaling, and crosstalk with other hormones such as jasmonic acid, ethylene, abscisic acid, auxin, gibberellic acid,cytokinin, brassinosteroid, and peptide hormones has sketched the finely tuned immune response network. Full understanding of the mechanism of plant immunity will need to take advantage of fast developing genomics tools and bioinformatics techniques. However, elucidating genetic components involved in these pathways by conventional genetics, biochemistry, and molecular biology approaches will continue to be a major task of the community. High-throughput method for SA quantification holds the potential for isolating additional mutants related to SA-mediated defense signaling.

  17. New Development of Acid Regeneration in Steel Pickling Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W F Kladnig

    2008-01-01

    For acid pickling heat treated mild steel and steel products,up to the middle of the last century,sulfuric acid was primarily in use,which has been replaced stepwise by hydrochloric acid since the sixties.During this time,the pickling of high alloyed steel with hydrofluoric acid or mixtures for hydrofluoric acid together with nitric acid has also been applied on industrial scale.The technologies used by several plant contractors hereby show considerable differences in their engineering.The study provides a survey of the progress in the state of art of regeneration technology as well as the use of different pickling media in the form of a review on existing technologies as well as improvements done within the recent years in the area.

  18. Durum wheat seedling responses to simultaneous high light and salinity involve a fine reconfiguration of amino acids and carbohydrate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrow, Pasqualina; Ciarmiello, Loredana F; Annunziata, Maria Grazia; Pacifico, Severina; Iannuzzi, Federica; Mirto, Antonio; D'Amelia, Luisa; Dell'Aversana, Emilia; Piccolella, Simona; Fuggi, Amodio; Carillo, Petronia

    2017-03-01

    Durum wheat plants are extremely sensitive to drought and salinity during seedling and early development stages. Their responses to stresses have been extensively studied to provide new metabolic targets and improving the tolerance to adverse environments. Most of these studies have been performed in growth chambers under low light [300-350 µmol m(-2) s(-1) photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), LL]. However, in nature plants have to face frequent fluctuations of light intensities that often exceed their photosynthetic capacity (900-2000 µmol m(-2) s(-1) ). In this study we investigated the physiological and metabolic changes potentially involved in osmotic adjustment and antioxidant defense in durum wheat seedlings under high light (HL) and salinity. The combined application of the two stresses decreased the water potential and stomatal conductance without reducing the photosynthetic efficiency of the plants. Glycine betaine (GB) synthesis was inhibited, proline and glutamate content decreased, while γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), amides and minor amino acids increased. The expression level and enzymatic activities of Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase, asparagine synthetase and glutamate decarboxylase, as well as other enzymatic activities of nitrogen and carbon metabolism, were analyzed. Antioxidant enzymes and metabolites were also considered. The results showed that the complex interplay seen in durum wheat plants under salinity at LL was simplified: GB and antioxidants did not play a main role. On the contrary, the fine tuning of few specific primary metabolites (GABA, amides, minor amino acids and hexoses) remodeled metabolism and defense processes, playing a key role in the response to simultaneous stresses.

  19. Fatty Acids and NLRP3 Inflammasome-Mediated Inflammation in Metabolic Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Jessica C; Lyons, Claire L; Kennedy, Elaine B; Kirwan, Anna M; Roche, Helen M

    2017-08-21

    Worldwide obesity rates have reached epidemic proportions and significantly contribute to the growing prevalence of metabolic diseases. Chronic low-grade inflammation, a hallmark of obesity, involves immune cell infiltration into expanding adipose tissue. In turn, obesity-associated inflammation can lead to complications in other metabolic tissues (e.g., liver, skeletal muscle, pancreas) through lipotoxicity and inflammatory signaling networks. Importantly, although numerous signaling pathways are known to integrate metabolic and inflammatory processes, the nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor, leucine-rich repeat and pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is now noted to be a key regulator of metabolic inflammation. The NLRP3 inflammasome can be influenced by various metabolites, including fatty acids. Specifically, although saturated fatty acids may promote NLRP3 inflammasome activation, monounsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids have recently been shown to impede NLRP3 activity. Therefore, the NLRP3 inflammasome and associated metabolic inflammation have key roles in the relationships among fatty acids, metabolites, and metabolic disease. This review focuses on the ability of fatty acids to influence inflammation and the NLRP3 inflammasome across numerous metabolic tissues in the body. In addition, we explore some perspectives for the future, wherein recent work in the immunology field clearly demonstrates that metabolic reprogramming defines immune cell functionality. Although there is a paucity of information about how diet and fatty acids modulate this process, it is possible that this will open up a new avenue of research relating to nutrient-sensitive metabolic inflammation.

  20. Mammalian-like Purple Acid Phosphatases in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Introduction Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) comprise of a family of binuclear metal-containing hydrolases, some members of which have been isolated and characterized from animal, plant and fungal sources[1]. PAPs not only catalyze the hydrolyses of a wide range of phosphate esters and anhydrides under acidic reaction conditions,but also catalyze the generation of hydroxyl radicals in a Fenton-like reaction, by virtue of the presence of a redox-active binuclear metal center.

  1. A Preliminary Study of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM) in the Endangered Aquatic Quillwort Isoetes sinensis Palmer in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PangXin-an; WangQing-feng; GituruW.Robert; LiuHong; YangXiao-lin; LiuXing

    2003-01-01

    Isoetes sinensis Palmer (Isoetaceae) is an aquatic or amphibious plant that is critically endangered in China. Previous studies have revealed the crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM)-like photosynthetic pathway occurs commonly in submerged leaves in genus Isoetes. Water chemistry parameters and the titratable acidity content of the plant extract were measured from samples obtained in the early morning (7:00) and late afternoon (15=00) from two I.sinensis populations in China. One population occurs in the eulittoral zone of a freshwater tidal river at low elevation (134 m) and another occurs in a densely vegetated, high elevation (1 100 m) alpine shallow pool. Significant difference sin pH and titratable acidity of the plant extract were detected between the morning and afternoon samples. These changes are associated with diurnal changes in water chemistry. Our results provide the first evidence for the existence of the CAM pathway in the East Asian endemic Isoetes sinensis Palmer.The magnitude of fluctuations in the titratable acidity of the plant extract may be correlated with the severe carbon limitation imposed on the plants by its aquatic habitat.

  2. A Preliminary Study of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM) in the Endangered Aquatic Quillwort Isoetes sinensis Palmer in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pang Xin-an; Wang Qing-feng; Gituru W.Robert; Liu Hong; Yang Xiao-lin; Liu Xing

    2003-01-01

    Isoetes sinensis Palmer (Isoetaceae) is an aquatic or amphibious plant that is critically endangered in China. Previous studies have revealed the crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM)-like photosynthetic pathway occurs com-monly in submerged leaves in genus Isoetes. Water chemistry parameters and the titratable acidity content of the plant extract were measured from samples obtained in the early morning (7:00) and late afternoon (15:00) from two I.sinensis populations in China. One population occurs in the eulittoral zone of a freshwater tidal river at low elevation (134 m) and another occurs in a densely vegetated, high elevation (1 100 m) alpine shallow pool. Significant differences in pH and titratable acidity of the plant extract were detected between the morning and afternoon samples. These changes are associated with diurnalchanges in water chemistry. Our results provide the first evidence for the exist-ence of the CAM pathwa in the East Asian endemic Isoetes sinensis Palmer.The magnitude of fluctuations in the titratable acidity of the plant extract mayb e correlated with the severe carbon limitation imposed on the plants by its aquatic habitat.

  3. Are the effects of nicotinic acid on insulin resistance precipitated by abnormal phosphorous metabolism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AbuSabha Hatem S

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nicotinic acid is a unique cholesterol modifying agent that exerts favorable effects on all cholesterol parameters. It holds promise as one of the main pharmacological agents to treat mixed dyslipidemia in metabolic syndrome and diabetic patients. The use of nicotinic acid has always been haunted with concerns that it might worsen insulin resistance and complicate diabetes management. We will discuss the interaction between phosphorous metabolism and carbohydrate metabolism and the possibility that worsening of insulin resistance could be related to adrug induced alteration in phosphorous metabolism, and the implications of that in medical management of diabetes and metabolic syndrome patients with mixed dyslipidemia.

  4. Obesity and Cancer Progression: Is There a Role of Fatty Acid Metabolism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seher Balaban

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is renewed interest in elucidating the metabolic characteristics of cancer and how these characteristics may be exploited as therapeutic targets. Much attention has centered on glucose, glutamine and de novo lipogenesis, yet the metabolism of fatty acids that arise from extracellular, as well as intracellular, stores as triacylglycerol has received much less attention. This review focuses on the key pathways of fatty acid metabolism, including uptake, esterification, lipolysis, and mitochondrial oxidation, and how the regulators of these pathways are altered in cancer. Additionally, we discuss the potential link that fatty acid metabolism may serve between obesity and changes in cancer progression.

  5. Obesity and Cancer Progression: Is There a Role of Fatty Acid Metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Seher; Lee, Lisa S.; Schreuder, Mark; Hoy, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is renewed interest in elucidating the metabolic characteristics of cancer and how these characteristics may be exploited as therapeutic targets. Much attention has centered on glucose, glutamine and de novo lipogenesis, yet the metabolism of fatty acids that arise from extracellular, as well as intracellular, stores as triacylglycerol has received much less attention. This review focuses on the key pathways of fatty acid metabolism, including uptake, esterification, lipolysis, and mitochondrial oxidation, and how the regulators of these pathways are altered in cancer. Additionally, we discuss the potential link that fatty acid metabolism may serve between obesity and changes in cancer progression. PMID:25866768

  6. Biodegradation of naphtalenesulphonic acid-containing sewages in a two-stage treatment plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krull, R. (Paderborn Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Technische Chemie und Chemische Verfahrenstechnik); Hempel, D.C. (Paderborn Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Technische Chemie und Chemische Verfahrenstechnik)

    1994-05-01

    The production of naphthol the coupling compound in the syntheses of azo-dyes occurs a naphthalenesulphonic acid-containing wastewater. The aerobic biodegradation of a complex mixture of naphthalenemono- and -disulphonic acids with high amounts of inorganic salts was examined in a two-stage plant with specially adapted and immobilized microorganisms fixed on broken sand particles. The plant consists of two airlift-loop reactors. An interposed settling tank separates the two different bacterial communities in the stages. In the first stage the sequential metabolization of naphthalene-2- and -1-sulphonic acid was achieved by strain Pseudomonas testosteroni A[sub 3] at residence times down to 1.5 h. The total degradation of remaining naphthalene-1-sulphonic acid and the degradation of recalcitrant naphthalenedisulphonic acids was obtained by a defined mixed culture in the second unit. Because of the more recalcitrant character of the remaining components in the second stage examinations with Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]-loaded and salt-free wastewater were carried out at mean residence times between 50 and 6.3 h. With salt-loaded sewage an overall degradation of approximately 71% was achieved. The main component in the effluent was non-biodegradable naphthalene-1.5-disulphonic acid. Investigations with salt-free wastewater have shown an increasing overall degradation up to 84%. Thus, in the presence of inorganic salts a considerable inhibition of the biological degradation of the recalcitrant substances in the second unit was found. (orig.)

  7. Defects in muscle branched-chain amino acid oxidation contribute to impaired lipid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles Lerin

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: Our data indicate that impaired muscle BCAA catabolism may contribute to the development of insulin resistance by perturbing both amino acid and fatty acid metabolism and suggest that targeting BCAA metabolism may hold promise for prevention or treatment of T2D.

  8. Targeting amino acid metabolism in cancer growth and anti-tumor immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elitsa; Ananieva

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in amino acid metabolism have revealed that targeting amino acid metabolic enzymes in cancer therapy is a promising strategy for the development of novel therapeutic agents. There are currently several drugs in clinical trials that specifically target amino acid metabolic pathways in tumor cells. In the context of the tumor microenvironment,however,tumor cells form metabolic relationships with immune cells,and they oftencompete for common nutrients. Many tumors evolved to escape immune surveillance by taking advantage of their metabolic flexibility and redirecting nutrients for their own advantage. This review outlines the most recent advances in targeting amino acid metabolic pathways in cancer therapy while giving consideration to the impact these pathways may have on the anti-tumor immune response.

  9. Pseudomonas fluorescens induces strain-dependent and strain-independent host plant responses in defense networks, primary metabolism, photosynthesis, and fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, David J; Pelletier, Dale A; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Jawdy, Sara S; Lu, Tse-Yuan; Allen, Sara M; Melton, Sarah J; Martin, Madhavi Z; Schadt, Christopher W; Karve, Abhijit A; Chen, Jin-Gui; Yang, Xiaohan; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2012-06-01

    Colonization of plants by nonpathogenic Pseudomonas fluorescens strains can confer enhanced defense capacity against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Few studies, however, have linked defense pathway regulation to primary metabolism and physiology. In this study, physiological data, metabolites, and transcript profiles are integrated to elucidate how molecular networks initiated at the root-microbe interface influence shoot metabolism and whole-plant performance. Experiments with Arabidopsis thaliana were performed using the newly identified P. fluorescens GM30 or P. fluorescens Pf-5 strains. Co-expression networks indicated that Pf-5 and GM30 induced a subnetwork specific to roots enriched for genes participating in RNA regulation, protein degradation, and hormonal metabolism. In contrast, only GM30 induced a subnetwork enriched for calcium signaling, sugar and nutrient signaling, and auxin metabolism, suggesting strain dependence in network architecture. In addition, one subnetwork present in shoots was enriched for genes in secondary metabolism, photosynthetic light reactions, and hormone metabolism. Metabolite analysis indicated that this network initiated changes in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Consistent with this, we observed strain-specific responses in tryptophan and phenylalanine abundance. Both strains reduced host plant carbon gain and fitness, yet provided a clear fitness benefit when plants were challenged with the pathogen P. syringae DC3000.

  10. Abscisic acid controlled sex before transpiration in vascular plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdam, Scott A M; Brodribb, Timothy J; Banks, Jo Ann; Hedrich, Rainer; Atallah, Nadia M; Cai, Chao; Geringer, Michael A; Lind, Christof; Nichols, David S; Stachowski, Kye; Geiger, Dietmar; Sussmilch, Frances C

    2016-10-26

    Sexual reproduction in animals and plants shares common elements, including sperm and egg production, but unlike animals, little is known about the regulatory pathways that determine the sex of plants. Here we use mutants and gene silencing in a fern species to identify a core regulatory mechanism in plant sexual differentiation. A key player in fern sex differentiation is the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA), which regulates the sex ratio of male to hermaphrodite tissues during the reproductive cycle. Our analysis shows that in the fern Ceratopteris richardii, a gene homologous to core ABA transduction genes in flowering plants [SNF1-related kinase2s (SnRK2s)] is primarily responsible for the hormonal control of sex determination. Furthermore, we provide evidence that this ABA-SnRK2 signaling pathway has transitioned from determining the sex of ferns to controlling seed dormancy in the earliest seed plants before being co-opted to control transpiration and CO2 exchange in derived seed plants. By tracing the evolutionary history of this ABA signaling pathway from plant reproduction through to its role in the global regulation of plant-atmosphere gas exchange during the last 450 million years, we highlight the extraordinary effect of the ABA-SnRK2 signaling pathway in plant evolution and vegetation function.

  11. Role of ascorbic acid against pathogenesis in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taqi Ahmed Khan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Plants vary considerably in their physiological response to various kinds of environmental stress. To prevent damage caused by pathogenic attack and to acclimate to change in their environment, plants have evolved direct and indirect mechanism for sensing and responding to pathogenic stimuli. Ascorbic acid (AA is found in all eukaryotes including animals and plants and lack completely in prokaryotes except cyanobactaria, have been reported to have a small amount. AA has now gained significant place in plant science, mainly due to its properties (antioxidant and cellular reductant etc., and multifunctional roles in plant growth, development, and regulation of remarkable spectrum of plant cellular mechanisms against environmental stresses. As it is evident from the present review, recent progress on AA potentiality in tolerance of plants to pathogenic attack has been impressive to a greater extent. AA produced in plants as indirect response against pathogenic attack at different sites in plants and its intertwined network cause changes in nuclear gene expression via retrograde signaling pathways, or even into systemic responses, all of which are associated with pathogenic resistance. Indeed, AA plays an important role in resistance to pathogenesis.

  12. Root inoculation with Pseudomonas putida KT2440 induces transcriptional and metabolic changes and systemic resistance in maize plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planchamp, Chantal; Glauser, Gaetan; Mauch-Mani, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 (KT2440) rhizobacteria colonize a wide range of plants. They have been extensively studied for their capacity to adhere to maize seeds, to tolerate toxic secondary metabolites produced by maize roots and to be attracted by maize roots. However, the response of maize plants to KT2440 colonization has not been investigated yet. Maize roots were inoculated with KT2440 and the local (roots) and systemic (leaves) early plant responses were investigated. The colonization behavior of KT2440 following application to maize seedlings was investigated and transcriptional analysis of stress- and defense-related genes as well as metabolite profiling of local and systemic maize tissues of KT2440-inoculated were performed. The local and systemic responses differed and more pronounced changes were observed in roots compared to leaves. Early in the interaction roots responded via jasmonic acid- and abscisic acid-dependent signaling. Interestingly, during later steps, the salicylic acid pathway was suppressed. Metabolite profiling revealed the importance of plant phospholipids in KT2440-maize interactions. An additional important maize secondary metabolite, a form of benzoxazinone, was also found to be differently abundant in roots 3 days after KT2440 inoculation. However, the transcriptional and metabolic changes observed in bacterized plants early during the interaction were minor and became even less pronounced with time, indicating an accommodation state of the plant to the presence of KT2440. Since the maize plants reacted to the presence of KT2440 in the rhizosphere, we also investigated the ability of these bacteria to trigger induced systemic resistance (ISR) against the maize anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum graminicola. The observed resistance was expressed as strongly reduced leaf necrosis and fungal growth in infected bacterized plants compared to non-bacterized controls, showing the potential of KT2440 to act as resistance inducers.

  13. Root inoculation with Pseudomonas putida KT2440 induces transcriptional and metabolic changes and systemic resistance in maize plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal ePlanchamp

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas putida KT2440 (KT2440 rhizobacteria colonize a wide range of plants. They have been extensively studied for their capacity to adhere to maize seeds, to tolerate toxic secondary metabolites produced by maize roots and to be attracted by maize roots. However, the response of maize plants to KT2440 colonization has not been investigated yet. Maize roots were inoculated with KT2440 and the local (roots and systemic (leaves early plant responses were investigated. The colonization behavior of KT2440 following application to maize seedlings was investigated and transcriptional analysis of stress- and defense-related genes as well as metabolite profiling of local and systemic maize tissues of KT2440-inoculated were performed. The local and systemic responses differed and more pronounced changes were observed in roots compared to leaves. Early in the interaction roots responded via jasmonic acid- and abscisic acid-dependent signaling. Interestingly, during later steps, the salicylic acid pathway was suppressed. Metabolite profiling revealed the importance of plant phospholipids in KT2440-maize interactions. An additional important maize secondary metabolite, a form of benzoxazinone, was also found to be differently abundant in roots three days after KT2440 inoculation. However, the transcriptional and metabolic changes observed in bacterized plants early during the interaction were minor and became even less pronounced with time, indicating an accommodation state of the plant to the presence of KT2440. Since the maize plants reacted to the presence of KT2440 in the rhizosphere, we also investigated the ability of these bacteria to trigger induced systemic resistance (ISR against the maize anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum graminicola. The observed resistance was expressed as strongly reduced leaf necrosis and fungal development in infected bacterized plants compared to non-bacterized controls, showing the potential of KT2440 to act as

  14. Effects of host plants on digestive enzymatic activities and some components involved in intermediary metabolism of Chrysodeixis chalcites (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mardani-Talaee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chrysodeixis chalcites (Esper is a serious pest that causes devastating damages in infested areas to many fruits, vegetables, ornamental crops and weeds. In the current study, effects of three host plants including lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.; corn (Zea mays L. and dill (Anethum graveolens L. were determined on digestive enzyme activities and intermediary metabolism of C. chalcites larvae. The highest activities of α-amylase, glucosidases and specific proteases were observed in the larvae fed on dill. Our results showed that C. chalcites larvae had the highest TAG-lipase activity on corn in comparison with other host plants. Significant differences were found among enzymatic activities of acid (ACP and alkaline phosphatases, aspartate aminotransferases and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH in the haemolymph of C. chalcites larvae reared on lemon balm, corn and dill, respectively, although activity of alanine aminotransferase showed no statistically significant differences among different host plants. The enzymatic activity of ACP significantly decreased on dill in comparison with lemon balm and corn. The activity of LDH significantly increased on dill compared with other host plants. These results revealed that dill (A. graveolens is the most appropriate host plant for larvae of C. chalcites as evidenced by the highest digestive enzyme activities and intermediary metabolism.

  15. Valproic Acid Metabolism and its Consequences on Sexual Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrotti, Alberto; Mencaroni, Elisabetta; Cofini, Marta; Castagnino, Miriam; Leo, Antonio; Russo, Emilio; Belcastro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a broad spectrum antiepileptic drug (AED) that is generally regarded as a first-choice agent for most forms of idiopathic and symptomatic generalised epilepsies. Available data suggest that menstrual disorders and certain endocrine manifestations of reproductive system disorders may be more common in women treated with VPA than in those treated with other AEDs. A PubMed search for MEDLINE was undertaken to look for studies using the terms "VPA metabolism", "VPA and sexual functions in men", "VPA and sexual functions in women" and "VPA metabolism and endocrine disorders" as key words. The period covered was approximately 20 years. In women, VPA medication is associated with hyperandrogenism, polycystic ovary/polycystic ovarian syndrome, menstrual disorders and ovulatory failure. Men on VPA therapy show abnormalities in androgens blood levels, sperm motility and erectile dysfunctions. VPA negatively affects the release of luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone and prolactin but also the drug interferes in peripheral endocrine hormones. Its broad inhibitory action on cytochrome and glucuronidation systems can lead to high serum concentration of testosterone, androstenedione and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. VPA-dependent obesity and hyperinsulinemia can further contribute to an increase in sexual dysfunctions. VPA interferes with the endocrine system at multiples levels causing several reproductive and sexual dysfunctions in women and men with epilepsy, especially when administered in pubertal age. Since VPA is a first line AED both in children and adult with epilepsy and long-term medication with this drug is sometimes necessary, it is very important for physicians to implement strict monitoring of patients taking VPA in order to identify these kinds of side effects at an early stage.

  16. Metabolic Effects of a Succinic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. N. Shakh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses promises for clinical use of substrate antihypoxants.Objective: to investigate the efficacy of succinate containing  substrate  antihypoxants  on  systemic  oxygen  consumption,  blood  buffer  capacity,  and  changes  in  the  mixed venous blood level of lactate when they are used in gravely sick patients and victims with marked metabolic posthypoxic disorders.Subjects and methods. The trial enrolled 30 patients and victims who had sustained an episode of severe hypoxia of mixed genesis, the severity of which was evaluated by the APACHE II scale and amounted to 23 to 30 scores with a 46 to 70.3% risk of death. The standard infusion program in this group involved the succinate-containing drug 1.5% reamberin solution  in  a  total  dose  of  800  ml.  A  comparison  group  included  15  patients  who  had  undergone  emergency  extensive surgery for abdominal diseases. 400 ml of 10% glucose solution was used as an infusion medium. Oxygen consumption (VO2ml/min and carbon dioxide production (VCO2ml/min were measured before infusion and monitored for 2 hours. Arterial blood gases and acid-base balance (ABB parameters and mixed venous blood lactate levels were examined. Measurements were made before and 30 minutes after the infusion of reamberin or glucose solution.Results. Infusion of 1.5% reamberin solution was followed by a significant increase in minute oxygen consumption from 281.5±21.2 to 310.4±24.4 ml/min. CO2 production declined (on average, from 223.3±6.5 to 206.5±7.59 ml/min. During infusion of 10% glucose solution, all the patients of the comparison group showed a rise in oxygen consumption from 303.6±33.86 to 443.13±32.1 ml/min, i.e. about 1.5-fold. VCO2 changed similarly. The intravenous infusion of 800 ml of 1.5% reamberin solution raised arterial blood buffer capacity, which was reflected by changes in pH, BE, and HCO3. There was a clear trend for lactate values to drop in the

  17. Trienoic fatty acids and plant tolerance of temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Routaboul Jean-Marc

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The biophysical reactions of light harvesting and electron transport during photosynthesis take place in a uniquely constructed bilayer, the thylakoid. In all photosynthetic eukaryotes, the complement of atypical glycerolipid molecules that form the foundation of this membrane are characterised by sugar head-groups and a very high level of unsaturation in the fatty acids that occupy the central portion of the thylakoid bilayer. alpha-linolenic (18:3 or a combination of 18:3 and hexadecatrienoic (16:3 acids typically account for approximately two-thirds of all thylakoid membrane fatty acids and over 90% of the fatty acids of monogalactosyl diacylglycerol, the major thylakoid lipid [1, 2]. The occurrence of trienoic fatty acids as a major component of the thylakoid membrane is especially remarkable since these fatty acids form highly reactive targets for active oxygen species and free radicals, which are often the by-products of oxygenic photosynthesis. Photosynthesis is one of the most temperature-sensitive functions of plant [3, 4]. There remains a widespread belief that these trienoic fatty acids might have some crucial role in plants to be of such universal occurrence, especially in photosynthesis tolerance of temperature [5].

  18. Arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acids in Araucariaceae, a unique feature among seed plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolff Robert L.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available It is generally admitted that seed plants (spermaphytes are unable to synthesize either arachidonic or eicosapentaenoic acids (AA and EPA, the classic essential fatty acids in animals. We give here chromatographic and spectrometric data showing that species from the primitive family Araucariaceae (gymnosperms are able to synthesize AA and/or EPA in their seeds and leaves. Agathis robusta, in particular, contains AA and EPA in small amounts in its seeds, with no D5-unsaturated polymethylene-interrupted fatty acids (D5-UPIFA with 18 carbon atoms, whereas Araucaria spp. contain both AA and C18 D5-UPIFA. In both species, D5-UPIFA with 20 carbon atoms are present as in all other Coniferophytes. All metabolic intermediates necessary for the biosynthesis of AA and/or EPA have been characterized in Araucariaceae seeds. The relevance of these observations is discussed with regard to the phylogeny of Coniferophytes.

  19. Equilibrium of acidifying and alkalinizing metabolic acid-base disorders in cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Georg-Christian; Doberer, Daniel; Osterreicher, Christoph; Peck-Radosavljevic, Markus; Schmid, Monika; Schneeweiss, Bruno

    2005-06-01

    Conflicting results exist with regard to metabolic acid-base status in liver cirrhosis, when the classic concept of acid-base analysis is applied. The influence of the common disturbances of water, electrolytes and albumin on acid-base status in cirrhosis has not been studied. The aim of this study was to clarify acid-base status in cirrhotic patients by analyzing all parameters with possible impact on acid-base equilibrium. Fifty stable cirrhotic patients admitted to a university hospital. Arterial acid-base status was analyzed using the principles of physical chemistry and compared with 10 healthy controls. Apart from mild hypoalbuminemic alkalosis, acid-base state was normal in Child-Pugh A cirrhosis. Respiratory alkalosis was the net acid-base disorder in Child-Pugh B and C cirrhosis with a normal overall metabolic acid-base state (Base excess-1.0 (-3.6 to 1.6) vs 1.1 (-0.2 to 1.1) mmol/l, P = 0.136, compared with healthy controls, median (interquartile range)). Absence of an apparent metabolic acid-base disorder was based on an equilibrium of hypoalbuminemic alkalosis and of dilutional acidosis and hyperchloremic acidosis. A balance of offsetting acidifying and alkalinizing metabolic acid-base disorders leaves the net metabolic acid-base status unchanged in cirrhosis.

  20. Metabolic syndrome, alcohol consumption and genetic factors are associated with serum uric acid concentration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanka Stibůrková

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Uric acid is the end product of purine metabolism in humans, and increased serum uric acid concentrations lead to gout. The objective of the current study was to identify factors that are independently associated with serum uric acid concentrations in a cohort of Czech control individuals. METHODS: The cohort consisted of 589 healthy subjects aged 18-65 years. We studied the associations between the serum uric acid concentration and the following: (i demographic, anthropometric and other variables previously reported to be associated with serum uric acid concentrations; (ii the presence of metabolic syndrome and the levels of metabolic syndrome components; and (iii selected genetic variants of the MTHFR (c.665C>T, c.1286A>C, SLC2A9 (c.844G>A, c.881G>A and ABCG2 genes (c.421C>A. A backward model selection procedure was used to build two multiple linear regression models; in the second model, the number of metabolic syndrome criteria that were met replaced the metabolic syndrome-related variables. RESULTS: The models had coefficients of determination of 0.59 and 0.53. The serum uric acid concentration strongly correlated with conventional determinants including male sex, and with metabolic syndrome-related variables. In the simplified second model, the serum uric acid concentration positively correlated with the number of metabolic syndrome criteria that were met, and this model retained the explanatory power of the first model. Moderate wine drinking did not increase serum uric acid concentrations, and the urate transporter ABCG2, unlike MTHFR, was a genetic determinant of serum uric acid concentrations. CONCLUSION: Metabolic syndrome, moderate wine drinking and the c.421C>A variant in the ABCG gene are independently associated with the serum uric acid concentration. Our model indicates that uric acid should be clinically monitored in persons with metabolic syndrome.

  1. Discovering the role of mitochondria in the iron deficiency-induced metabolic responses of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigani, Gianpiero

    2012-01-01

    In plants, iron (Fe) deficiency-induced chlorosis is a major problem, affecting both yield and quality of crops. Plants have evolved multifaceted strategies, such as reductase activity, proton extrusion, and specialised storage proteins, to mobilise Fe from the environment and distribute it within the plant. Because of its fundamental role in plant productivity, several issues concerning Fe homeostasis in plants are currently intensively studied. The activation of Fe uptake reactions requires an overall adaptation of the primary metabolism because these activities need the constant supply of energetic substrates (i.e., NADPH and ATP). Several studies concerning the metabolism of Fe-deficient plants have been conducted, but research focused on mitochondrial implications in adaptive responses to nutritional stress has only begun in recent years. Mitochondria are the energetic centre of the root cell, and they are strongly affected by Fe deficiency. Nevertheless, they display a high level of functional flexibility, which allows them to maintain the viability of the cell. Mitochondria represent a crucial target of studies on plant homeostasis, and it might be of interest to concentrate future research on understanding how mitochondria orchestrate the reprogramming of root cell metabolism under Fe deficiency. In this review, I summarise what it is known about the effect of Fe deficiency on mitochondrial metabolism and morphology. Moreover, I present a detailed view of the possible roles of mitochondria in the development of plant responses to Fe deficiency, integrating old findings with new and discussing new hypotheses for future investigations.

  2. Isolation of lactic acid-forming bacteria from biogas plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Jelena; Yüksel-Dadak, Aytül; Dröge, Stefan; König, Helmut

    2017-02-20

    Direct molecular approaches provide hints that lactic acid bacteria play an important role in the degradation process of organic material to methanogenetic substrates in biogas plants. However, their diversity in biogas fermenter samples has not been analyzed in detail yet. For that reason, five different biogas fermenters, which were fed mainly with maize silage and manure from cattle or pigs, were examined for the occurrence of lactic acid-forming bacteria. A total of 197 lactic acid-forming bacterial strains were isolated, which we assigned to 21 species, belonging to the genera Bacillus, Clostridium, Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Streptococcus and Pseudoramibacter-related. A qualitative multiplex system and a real-time quantitative PCR could be developed for most isolates, realized by the selection of specific primers. Their role in biogas plants was discussed on the basis of the quantitative results and on physiological data of the isolates.

  3. Arachidonic acid-metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzymes are targets of {omega}-3 fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Cosima; Markovic, Marija; Blossey, Katrin; Wallukat, Gerd; Fischer, Robert; Dechend, Ralf; Konkel, Anne; von Schacky, Clemens; Luft, Friedrich C; Muller, Dominik N; Rothe, Michael; Schunck, Wolf-Hagen

    2010-10-22

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) protect against cardiovascular disease by largely unknown mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that EPA and DHA may compete with arachidonic acid (AA) for the conversion by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, resulting in the formation of alternative, physiologically active, metabolites. Renal and hepatic microsomes, as well as various CYP isoforms, displayed equal or elevated activities when metabolizing EPA or DHA instead of AA. CYP2C/2J isoforms converting AA to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) preferentially epoxidized the ω-3 double bond and thereby produced 17,18-epoxyeicosatetraenoic (17,18-EEQ) and 19,20-epoxydocosapentaenoic acid (19,20-EDP) from EPA and DHA. We found that these ω-3 epoxides are highly active as antiarrhythmic agents, suppressing the Ca(2+)-induced increased rate of spontaneous beating of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, at low nanomolar concentrations. CYP4A/4F isoforms ω-hydroxylating AA were less regioselective toward EPA and DHA, catalyzing predominantly ω- and ω minus 1 hydroxylation. Rats given dietary EPA/DHA supplementation exhibited substantial replacement of AA by EPA and DHA in membrane phospholipids in plasma, heart, kidney, liver, lung, and pancreas, with less pronounced changes in the brain. The changes in fatty acids were accompanied by concomitant changes in endogenous CYP metabolite profiles (e.g. altering the EET/EEQ/EDP ratio from 87:0:13 to 27:18:55 in the heart). These results demonstrate that CYP enzymes efficiently convert EPA and DHA to novel epoxy and hydroxy metabolites that could mediate some of the beneficial cardiovascular effects of dietary ω-3 fatty acids.

  4. Metabolic engineering for microbial production of aromatic amino acids and derived compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongaerts, J; Krämer, M; Müller, U; Raeven, L; Wubbolts, M

    2001-10-01

    Metabolic engineering to design and construct microorganisms suitable for the production of aromatic amino acids and derivatives thereof requires control of a complicated network of metabolic reactions that partly act in parallel and frequently are in rapid equilibrium. Engineering the regulatory circuits, the uptake of carbon, the glycolytic pathway, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the common aromatic amino acid pathway as well as amino acid importers and exporters that have all been targeted to effect higher productivities of these compounds are discussed.

  5. How prevalent is crassulacean acid metabolism among vascular epiphytes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotz, Gerhard

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in the epiphyte community of a lowland forest of the Atlantic slope of Panama was investigated. I hypothesized that CAM is mostly found in orchids, of which many species are relatively small and/or rare. Thus, the relative proportion of species with CAM should not be a good indicator for the prevalence of this photosynthetic pathway in a community when expressed on an individual or a biomass basis. In 0.4 ha of forest, 103 species of vascular epiphytes with 13,099 individuals were found. As judged from the C isotope ratios and the absence of Kranz anatomy, CAM was detected in 20 species (19.4% of the total), which were members of the families Orchidaceae, Bromeliaceae, and Cactaceae. As predicted, the contribution of CAM epiphytes to the total number of individuals and to total biomass (69.6 kg ha(-1)) was considerably lower (3.6% or 466 individuals and, respectively, 3.0% or 2.1 kg ha(-1)).

  6. Metabolic engineering approaches for production of biochemicals in food and medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sarah A; Roberts, Susan C

    2014-04-01

    Historically, plants are a vital source of nutrients and pharmaceuticals. Recent advances in metabolic engineering have made it possible to not only increase the concentration of desired compounds, but also introduce novel biosynthetic pathways to a variety of species, allowing for enhanced nutritional or commercial value. To improve metabolic engineering capabilities, new transformation techniques have been developed to allow for gene specific silencing strategies or stacking of multiple genes within the same region of the chromosome. The 'omics' era has provided a new resource for elucidation of uncharacterized biosynthetic pathways, enabling novel metabolic engineering approaches. These resources are now allowing for advanced metabolic engineering of plant production systems, as well as the synthesis of increasingly complex products in engineered microbial hosts. The status of current metabolic engineering efforts is highlighted for the in vitro production of paclitaxel and the in vivo production of β-carotene in Golden Rice and other food crops.

  7. Leaf Responses of Micropropagated Apple Plants to Water Stress: Changes in Endogenous Hormones and Their Influence on Carbohydrate Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Tian-hong; LI Shao-hua

    2007-01-01

    The changes in the concentrations of endogenous hormones and their influence on carbohydrate metabolism in leaves of micropropagated Fuji apple plants were studied under water deficiency stress. The results showed that water stress induced a rapid increase in the concentration of abscisic acid (ABA) and led to a decrease in concentrations of both zeatin and gibberellins (GAs). The concentration of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) changed in an independent manner, which was not correlated with the different levels of water stress. With regard to the carbohydrates, the contents of sorbitol and sucrose increased, whereas the content of starch decreased. The increase in the concentration of ABA was significantly correlated with both the increase in the activity of aldose-6-phosphate reductase (A6PR) and the decrease in the activity of sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), indicating that ABA played a regulatory role in sorbitol metabolism. The concentration of ABA was positively correlated to the activity of sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) but negatively correlated to the activities of acid invertase (AI) and ADP-glucose-pyrophosphorylase (ADPGppase) in water-stressed plants, which indicated that ABA promoted sucrose synthesis and inhibited sucrose degradation and starch synthesis at the same time. Under conditions of water stress, the decrease in the level of zeatin was accompanied by a decrease in the activities of SDH and ADPGPPase. GAs concentration showed positive correlation with ADPGPPase activity. IAA showed no significant correlation with any of the enzymes tested in this study. The results of this study suggested that ABA might be one of the key factors regulating the distribution of carbohydrates under water stress. The metabolism of sorbitol and starch under conditions of water stress might be regulated by the combined action of many plant hormones.

  8. Significance of Microbiota in Obesity and Metabolic Diseases and the Modulatory Potential by Medicinal Plant and Food Ingredients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Hoda M.; Wright, Michelle L.; Anil Kumar, N. V.; Qawasmeh, Abdel; Hassan, Sherif T. S.; Mocan, Andrei; Nabavi, Seyed M.; Rastrelli, Luca; Atanasov, Atanas G.; Haddad, Pierre S.

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of three or more metabolic disorders including insulin resistance, obesity, and hyperlipidemia. Obesity has become the epidemic of the twenty-first century with more than 1.6 billion overweight adults. Due to the strong connection between obesity and type 2 diabetes, obesity has received wide attention with subsequent coining of the term “diabesity.” Recent studies have identified unique contributions of the immensely diverse gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of obesity and diabetes. Several mechanisms have been proposed including altered glucose and fatty acid metabolism, hepatic fatty acid storage, and modulation of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1. Importantly, the relationship between unhealthy diet and a modified gut microbiota composition observed in diabetic or obese subjects has been recognized. Similarly, the role of diet rich in polyphenols and plant polysaccharides in modulating gut bacteria and its impact on diabetes and obesity have been the subject of investigation by several research groups. Gut microbiota are also responsible for the extensive metabolism of polyphenols thus modulating their biological activities. The aim of this review is to shed light on the composition of gut microbes, their health importance and how they can contribute to diseases as well as their modulation by polyphenols and polysaccharides to control obesity and diabetes. In addition, the role of microbiota in improving the oral bioavailability of polyphenols and hence in shaping their antidiabetic and antiobesity activities will be discussed. PMID:28713266

  9. Perturbations of amino acid metabolism associated with glyphosate-dependent inhibition of shikimic acid metabolism affect cellular redox homeostasis and alter the abundance of proteins involved in photosynthesis and photorespiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, Pedro Diaz; Driscoll, Simon P; Bulman, Christopher A; Ying, Liu; Emami, Kaveh; Treumann, Achim; Mauve, Caroline; Noctor, Graham; Foyer, Christine H

    2011-09-01

    The herbicide glyphosate inhibits the shikimate pathway of the synthesis of amino acids such as phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. However, much uncertainty remains concerning precisely how glyphosate kills plants or affects cellular redox homeostasis and related processes in glyphosate-sensitive and glyphosate-resistant crop plants. To address this issue, we performed an integrated study of photosynthesis, leaf proteomes, amino acid profiles, and redox profiles in the glyphosate-sensitive soybean (Glycine max) genotype PAN809 and glyphosate-resistant Roundup Ready Soybean (RRS). RRS leaves accumulated much more glyphosate than the sensitive line but showed relatively few changes in amino acid metabolism. Photosynthesis was unaffected by glyphosate in RRS leaves, but decreased abundance of photosynthesis/photorespiratory pathway proteins was observed together with oxidation of major redox pools. While treatment of a sensitive genotype with glyphosate rapidly inhibited photosynthesis and triggered the appearance of a nitrogen-rich amino acid profile, there was no evidence of oxidation of the redox pools. There was, however, an increase in starvation-associated and defense proteins. We conclude that glyphosate-dependent inhibition of soybean leaf metabolism leads to the induction of defense proteins without sustained oxidation. Conversely, the accumulation of high levels of glyphosate in RRS enhances cellular oxidation, possibly through mechanisms involving stimulation of the photorespiratory pathway.

  10. NATURAL PLANT TOXICANT – CYANOGENIC GLYCOSIDE AMYGDALIN: CHARACTERISTIC, METABOLISM AND THE EFFECT ON ANIMAL REPRODUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Eduard Kolesár; Marek Halenár; Adriana Kolesárová; Peter Massányi

    2015-01-01

    The amount of cyanogenic glycosides, as natural plant toxicants, in plants varies with plant species and environmental effects. Cyanogenic glycoside as an amygdalin was detected in apricot kernels, bitter almonds and peach, plum, pear and apple seeds. Amygdalin itself is non-toxic, but its HCN production decomposed by some enzymes is toxic substance. Target of this review was to describe the characteristic, metabolism and possible effects of amygdalin on reproductive processes. Previous studi...

  11. Carbon and nitrogen metabolism in arbuscular mycorrhizal maize plants under low-temperature stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xian-Can; Song, Feng-Bin; Liu, Fulai

    2015-01-01

    Effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus tortuosum on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism of Zea mays L. grown under low-temperature stress was investigated. Maize plants inoculated or not inoculated with AM fungus were grown in a growth chamber at 258C for 4 weeks...... phosphate synthase and amylase activities at low temperature. Moreover, low-temperature stress increased theC :Nratio in the leaves of maize plants, and AM colonisation decreased the root C :N ratio. These results suggested a difference in the C and N metabolism of maize plants at ambient and low...... temperature regimes. AM symbiosis modulated C metabolic enzymes, thereby inducing an accumulation of soluble sugars, which may have contributed to an increased tolerance to low temperature, and therefore higher Pn in maize plants....

  12. Plant metabolic clusters – from genetics to genomics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nützmann, Hans‐Wilhelm; Huang, Ancheng; Osbourn, Anne

    2016-01-01

    ..., and for evolutionary biology more widely, lies in understanding how and why different plants make different kinds of chemicals, and how new natural product pathways are formed. The discovery of new plant natural product pathways and chemistries is now being revolutionized by two key developments. First, breakthroughs in sequencing techn...

  13. Metabolic changes in Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing chalcone synthase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dao, Thi Thanh Hien

    2010-01-01

    The study has shown that it is possible to introduce the heterologous CHS gene in Arabidopsis thaliana and common multicopies of transgenes containing plants were obtained. Analysis of the change in metabolome of CHS transgenic plants, high expression transgenic lines can be identified by markers su

  14. Effects of Butter and Phytanic acid intake on metabolic parameters and T-cell polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drachmann, Tue

    The still growing obesity epidemic is a major risk for our society, as it is associated with the development of the so called metabolic syndrome, which is a clinical diagnosis correlated to development of metabolic disorders. Lack of physical activity, excess energy intake, and nutritional factors...... dairy fat in general and phytanic acid on metabolic parameters, we performed several studies. First, we investigated effects on hepatic lipid metabolism, glucose homeostasis, and circulating metabolic markers, of high fat diets based on butter from high- or low-yield production, a diet based on high...... addition of phytanic acid. Third, we investigated butter and phytanic acid effects on human T-cell polarization, both by in vitro incubation with phytanic acid, and by a 12 weeks intervention with intake of butter. Finally, we performed two human interventions, first one with intake of butter and cheese...

  15. Calcium involved in the poly(γ-glutamic acid)-mediated promotion of Chinese cabbage nitrogen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zongqi; Lei, Peng; Feng, Xiaohai; Xu, Xianju; Liang, Jinfeng; Chi, Bo; Xu, Hong

    2014-07-01

    Plant growth can reportedly be promoted by poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA). However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. To reveal the mechanism of γ-PGA, we designed an experiment that investigated the effect of γ-PGA on the nitrogen metabolism of Chinese cabbage hydroponic cultured at different calcium (Ca) levels and varied exogenous Ca(2+) inhibitors. The results showed that nitrate reductase (NR), glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate synthase, and glutamate dehydrogenase activities in leaves and roots were obviously enhanced by γ-PGA at the normal Ca(2+) level (4.0 mM). Meanwhile, γ-PGA increased the content of total nitrogen, soluble protein, and soluble amino acids in leaves. However, the promotional effect of γ-PGA on fresh weight weakened when Ca(2+) was inadequate. Moreover, γ-PGA not only induced the influx of extracellular Ca(2+) and Ca(2+) in organelles into cytoplasm, but also increased the Ca(2+)-ATPase level to modify Ca(2+) homeostasis in plant cells. In addition, exogenous Ca(2+) inhibitors significantly suppressed the γ-PGA-mediated promotion of cytoplasmic free Ca(2+) level, calmodulin (CaM) content, GS and glutamate dehydrogenase activities. In summary, γ-PGA accelerated the nitrogen metabolism of plants through the Ca(2+)/CaM signaling pathway, thereby improving the growth of the plant.

  16. Maternal omega-3 fatty acids and micronutrients modulate fetal lipid metabolism: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaire, Amrita A; Kale, Anvita A; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2015-07-01

    It is well established that alterations in the mother's diet or metabolism during pregnancy has long-term adverse effects on the lipid metabolism in the offspring. There is growing interest in the role of specific nutrients especially omega-3 fatty acids in the pathophysiology of lipid disorders. A series of studies carried out in humans and rodents in our department have consistently suggested a link between omega-3 fatty acids especially docosahexaenoic acid and micronutrients (vitamin B12 and folic acid) in the one carbon metabolic cycle and its effect on the fatty acid metabolism, hepatic transcription factors and DNA methylation patterns. However the association of maternal intake or metabolism of these nutrients with fetal lipid metabolism is relatively less explored. In this review, we provide insights into the role of maternal omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin B12 and their influence on fetal lipid metabolism through various mechanisms which influence phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase activity, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor, adiponectin signaling pathway and epigenetic process like chromatin methylation. This will help understand the possible mechanisms involved in fetal lipid metabolism and may provide important clues for the prevention of lipid disorders in the offspring.

  17. Metabolic Profiling with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Capillary Electrophoresis-Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Carbon-Nitrogen Status of Tobacco Leaves Across Different Planting Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jieyu; Zhao, Yanni; Hu, Chunxiu; Zhao, Chunxia; Zhang, Junjie; Li, Lili; Zeng, Jun; Peng, Xiaojun; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2016-02-05

    The interaction between carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism can reflect plant growth status and environmental factors. Little is known regarding the connections between C-N metabolism and growing regions under field conditions. To comprehensively investigate the relationship in mature tobacco leaves, we established metabolomics approaches based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (CE-TOF-MS). Approximately 240 polar metabolites were determined. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that the growing region greatly influenced the metabolic profiles of tobacco leaves. A metabolic correlation network and related pathway maps were used to reveal the global overview of the alteration of C-N metabolism across three typical regions. In Yunnan, sugars and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates were closely correlated with amino acid pools. Henan tobacco leaves showed positive correlation between the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) intermediates and C-rich secondary metabolism. In Guizhou, the proline and asparagine had significant links with TCA cycle intermediates and urea cycle, and antioxidant accumulation was observed in response to drought. These results demonstrate that combined analytical approaches have great potential to detect polar metabolites and provide information on C-N metabolism related to planting regional characteristics.

  18. L-Lactic acid production from glycerol coupled with acetic acid metabolism by Enterococcus faecalis without carbon loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Nao; Oba, Mana; Iwamoto, Mariko; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Noguchi, Takuya; Bonkohara, Kaori; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed Ali; Zendo, Takeshi; Shimoda, Mitsuya; Sakai, Kenji; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Glycerol is a by-product in the biodiesel production process and considered as one of the prospective carbon sources for microbial fermentation including lactic acid fermentation, which has received considerable interest due to its potential application. Enterococcus faecalis isolated in our laboratory produced optically pure L-lactic acid from glycerol in the presence of acetic acid. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis using [1, 2-(13)C2] acetic acid proved that the E. faecalis strain QU 11 was capable of converting acetic acid to ethanol during lactic acid fermentation of glycerol. This indicated that strain QU 11 restored the redox balance by oxidizing excess NADH though acetic acid metabolism, during ethanol production, which resulted in lactic acid production from glycerol. The effects of pH control and substrate concentration on lactic acid fermentation were also investigated. Glycerol and acetic acid concentrations of 30 g/L and 10 g/L, respectively, were expected to be appropriate for lactic acid fermentation of glycerol by strain QU 11 at a pH of 6.5. Furthermore, fed-batch fermentation with 30 g/L glycerol and 10 g/L acetic acid wholly exhibited the best performance including lactic acid production (55.3 g/L), lactic acid yield (0.991 mol-lactic acid/mol-glycerol), total yield [1.08 mol-(lactic acid and ethanol)]/mol-(glycerol and acetic acid)], and total carbon yield [1.06 C-mol-(lactic acid and ethanol)/C-mol-(glycerol and acetic acid)] of lactic acid and ethanol. In summary, the strain QU 11 successfully produced lactic acid from glycerol with acetic acid metabolism, and an efficient fermentation system was established without carbon loss.

  19. A Single Residue Switch for Mg2+-dependent Inhibition Characterizes Plant Class II Diterpene Cyclases from Primary and Secondary Metabolism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Francis M.; Prisic, Sladjana; Davenport, Emily K.; Determan, Mara K.; Coates, Robert M.; Peters, Reuben J.

    2010-01-01

    Class II diterpene cyclases mediate the acid-initiated cycloisomerization reaction that serves as the committed step in biosynthesis of the large class of labdane-related diterpenoid natural products, which includes the important gibberellin plant hormones. Intriguingly, these enzymes are differentially susceptible to inhibition by their Mg2+ cofactor, with those involved in gibberellin biosynthesis being more sensitive to such inhibition than those devoted to secondary metabolism, which presumably limits flux toward the potent gibberellin phytohormones. Such inhibition has been suggested to arise from intrasteric Mg2+ binding to the DXDD motif that cooperatively acts as the catalytic acid, whose affinity must then be modulated in some fashion. While further investigating class II diterpene cyclase catalysis, we discovered a conserved basic residue that seems to act as a counter ion to the DXDD motif, enhancing the ability of aspartic acid to carry out the requisite energetically difficult protonation of a carbon-carbon double bond and also affecting inhibitory Mg2+ binding. Notably, this residue is conserved as a histidine in enzymes involved in gibberellin biosynthesis and as an arginine in those dedicated to secondary metabolism. Interchanging the identity of these residues is sufficient to switch the sensitivity of the parent enzyme to inhibition by Mg2+. These striking findings indicate that this is a single residue switch for Mg2+ inhibition, which not only supports the importance of this biochemical regulatory mechanism in limiting gibberellin biosynthesis, but the importance of its release, presumably to enable higher flux, into secondary metabolism. PMID:20430888

  20. Physiological and molecular implications of plant polyamine metabolism during biotic interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco Jiménez Bremont

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During ontogeny, plants interact with a wide variety of microorganisms. The association with mutualistic microbes results in benefits for the plant. By contrast, pathogens may cause a remarkable impairment of plant growth and development. Both types of plant-microbe interactions provoke notable changes in the polyamine (PA metabolism of the host and/or the microbe, being each interaction a complex and dynamic process. It has been well documented that the levels of free and conjugated PAs undergo profound changes in plant tissues during the interaction with microorganisms. In general, this is correlated with a precise and coordinated regulation of PA biosynthetic and catabolic enzymes. Interestingly, some evidence suggests that the relative importance of these metabolic pathways may depend on the nature of the microorganism, a concept that stems from the fact that these amines mediate the activation of plant defense mechanisms. This effect is mediated mostly through PA oxidation, even though part of the response is activated by non-oxidized PAs. In the last years, a great deal of effort has been devoted to profile plant gene expression following microorganism recognition. In addition, the phenotypes of transgenic and mutant plants in PA metabolism genes have been assessed. In this review, we integrated the current knowledge on this field and analyze the possible roles of these amines during the interaction of plants with microbes.

  1. Abscisic Acid Regulation of Root Hydraulic Conductivity and Aquaporin Gene Expression Is Crucial to the Plant Shoot Growth Enhancement Caused by Rhizosphere Humic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaetxea, Maite; Mora, Verónica; Bacaicoa, Eva; Garnica, María; Fuentes, Marta; Casanova, Esther; Zamarreño, Angel M; Iriarte, Juan C; Etayo, David; Ederra, Iñigo; Gonzalo, Ramón; Baigorri, Roberto; García-Mina, Jose M

    2015-12-01

    The physiological and metabolic mechanisms behind the humic acid-mediated plant growth enhancement are discussed in detail. Experiments using cucumber (Cucumis sativus) plants show that the shoot growth enhancement caused by a structurally well-characterized humic acid with sedimentary origin is functionally associated with significant increases in abscisic acid (ABA) root concentration and root hydraulic conductivity. Complementary experiments involving a blocking agent of cell wall pores and water root transport (polyethylenglycol) show that increases in root hydraulic conductivity are essential in the shoot growth-promoting action of the model humic acid. Further experiments involving an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis in root and shoot (fluridone) show that the humic acid-mediated enhancement of both root hydraulic conductivity and shoot growth depended on ABA signaling pathways. These experiments also show that a significant increase in the gene expression of the main root plasma membrane aquaporins is associated with the increase of root hydraulic conductivity caused by the model humic acid. Finally, experimental data suggest that all of these actions of model humic acid on root functionality, which are linked to its beneficial action on plant shoot growth, are likely related to the conformational structure of humic acid in solution and its interaction with the cell wall at the root surface.

  2. Observability of plant metabolic networks is reflected in the correlation of metabolic profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwahn, Kevin; Küken, Anika; Kliebenstein, Daniel James

    2016-01-01

    -of-the-art genome-scale metabolic networks. By using metabolic data profiles from a set of seven environmental perturbations as well as from natural variability, we demonstrate that the data profiles of sensor metabolites are more correlated than those of nonsensor metabolites. This pattern was confirmed...

  3. Progress of succinic acid production from renewable resources: Metabolic and fermentative strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Min; Ma, Jiangfeng; Wu, Mingke; Liu, Rongming; Liang, Liya; Xin, Fengxue; Zhang, Wenming; Jia, Honghua; Dong, Weiliang

    2017-06-03

    Succinic acid is a four-carbon dicarboxylic acid, which has attracted much interest due to its abroad usage as a precursor of many industrially important chemicals in the food, chemicals, and pharmaceutical industries. Facing the shortage of crude oil supply and demand of sustainable development, biological production of succinic acid from renewable resources has become a topic of worldwide interest. In recent decades, robust producing strain selection, metabolic engineering of model strains, and process optimization for succinic acid production have been developed. This review provides an overview of succinic acid producers and cultivation technology, highlight some of the successful metabolic engineering approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Systematic analysis and metabolic regulation of physiological functions for lactic acid bacteria--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongde; Zhang, Juan; Liu, Liming

    2012-01-01

    As cell factories, lactic acid bacteria are widely used in food, agriculture, medicine and other industries, and play a great role in industrial processes. However, lactic acid bacteria encounter various environmental stresses both in industrial processes and in the gastrointestinal tract, which impair their physiological functions and food manufacture efficiency. Recently, the development of metabolic engineering and system biology brings unprecedented opportunity for the physiological modification of lactic acid bacteria. In this review, we addresses the progress of lactic acid bacterium system biology, and based on this, the metabolic engineering strategies for manipulating and optimizing lactic acid bacteria physiological function were summarized.

  5. Clinical relevance of the bile acid receptor TGR5 in metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Nierop, F Samuel; Scheltema, Matthijs J; Eggink, Hannah M

    2016-01-01

    The bile acid receptor TGR5 (also known as GPBAR1) is a promising target for the development of pharmacological interventions in metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. TGR5 is expressed in many metabolically active tissues, but complex enterohep......The bile acid receptor TGR5 (also known as GPBAR1) is a promising target for the development of pharmacological interventions in metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. TGR5 is expressed in many metabolically active tissues, but complex...

  6. Intestinal Crosstalk between Bile Acids and Microbiota and Its Impact on Host Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlström, Annika; Sayin, Sama I; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota is considered a metabolic "organ" that not only facilitates harvesting of nutrients and energy from the ingested food but also produces numerous metabolites that signal through their cognate receptors to regulate host metabolism. One such class of metabolites, bile acids......, is produced in the liver from cholesterol and metabolized in the intestine by the gut microbiota. These bioconversions modulate the signaling properties of bile acids via the nuclear farnesoid X receptor and the G protein-coupled membrane receptor 5, which regulate numerous metabolic pathways in the host...... by altered microbiota composition....

  7. Conjugated linoleic acids influence fatty acid metabolism in ovine ruminal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masur, F; Benesch, F; Pfannkuche, H; Fuhrmann, H; Gäbel, G

    2016-04-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), particularly cis-9,trans-11 (c9t11) and trans-10,cis-12 (t10c12), are used as feed additives to adapt to constantly increasing demands on the performance of lactating cows. Under these feeding conditions, the rumen wall, and the rumen epithelial cells (REC) in particular, are directly exposed to high amounts of CLA. This study determined the effect of CLA on the fatty acid (FA) metabolism of REC and expression of genes known to be modulated by FA. Cultured REC were incubated with c9t11, t10c12, and the structurally similar FA linoleic acid (LA), oleic acid (OA), and trans-vaccenic acid (TVA) for 48 h at a concentration of 100 µM. Cellular FA levels were determined by gas chromatography. Messenger RNA expression levels of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) and monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) 1 and 4 were quantified by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Fatty acid evaluation revealed significant effects of CLA, LA, OA, and TVA on the amount of FA metabolites of β-oxidation and elongation and of metabolites related to desaturation by SCD. The observed changes in FA content point (among others) to the ability of REC to synthesize c9t11 from TVA endogenously. The mRNA expression levels of SCD identified a decrease after CLA, LA, OA, or TVA treatment. In line with the changes in mRNA expression, we found reduced amounts of C16:1n-7 cis-9 and C18:1n-9 cis-9, the main products of SCD. The expression of MCT1 mRNA increased after c9t11 and t10c12 treatment, and CLA c9t11 induced an upregulation of MCT4. Application of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α antagonist suggested that activation of PPARα is involved in the changes of MCT1, MCT4, and SCD mRNA expression induced by c9t11. Participation of PPARγ in the changes of MCT1 and SCD mRNA expression was shown by the application of the respective antagonist. The study demonstrates that exposure to CLA affects both FA metabolism and regulatory pathways within REC.

  8. Sulfur assimilation and glutathione metabolism under cadmium stress in yeast, protists and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Cózatl, David; Loza-Tavera, Herminia; Hernández-Navarro, Andrea; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2005-09-01

    Glutathione (gamma-glu-cys-gly; GSH) is usually present at high concentrations in most living cells, being the major reservoir of non-protein reduced sulfur. Because of its unique redox and nucleophilic properties, GSH serves in bio-reductive reactions as an important line of defense against reactive oxygen species, xenobiotics and heavy metals. GSH is synthesized from its constituent amino acids by two ATP-dependent reactions catalyzed by gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase and glutathione synthetase. In yeast, these enzymes are found in the cytosol, whereas in plants they are located in the cytosol and chloroplast. In protists, their location is not well established. In turn, the sulfur assimilation pathway, which leads to cysteine biosynthesis, involves high and low affinity sulfate transporters, and the enzymes ATP sulfurylase, APS kinase, PAPS reductase or APS reductase, sulfite reductase, serine acetyl transferase, O-acetylserine/O-acetylhomoserine sulfhydrylase and, in some organisms, also cystathionine beta-synthase and cystathionine gamma-lyase. The biochemical and genetic regulation of these pathways is affected by oxidative stress, sulfur deficiency and heavy metal exposure. Cells cope with heavy metal stress using different mechanisms, such as complexation and compartmentation. One of these mechanisms in some yeast, plants and protists is the enhanced synthesis of the heavy metal-chelating molecules GSH and phytochelatins, which are formed from GSH by phytochelatin synthase (PCS) in a heavy metal-dependent reaction; Cd(2+) is the most potent activator of PCS. In this work, we review the biochemical and genetic mechanisms involved in the regulation of sulfate assimilation-reduction and GSH metabolism when yeast, plants and protists are challenged by Cd(2+).

  9. Oleanolic acid alters bile acid metabolism and produces cholestatic liver injury in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jie, E-mail: JLiu@kumc.edu [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Zunyi Medical College, Zunyi 563003 (China); Lu, Yuan-Fu [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Zunyi Medical College, Zunyi 563003 (China); Zhang, Youcai; Wu, Kai Connie [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Fan, Fang [Cytopathology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Klaassen, Curtis D. [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA) is a triterpenoids that exists widely in plants. OA is effective in protecting against hepatotoxicants. Whereas a low dose of OA is hepatoprotective, higher doses and longer-term use of OA produce liver injury. This study characterized OA-induced liver injury in mice. Adult C57BL/6 mice were given OA at doses of 0, 22.5, 45, 90, and 135 mg/kg, s.c., daily for 5 days, and liver injury was observed at doses of 90 mg/kg and above, as evidenced by increases in serum activities of alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase, increases in serum total bilirubin, as well as by liver histopathology. OA-induced cholestatic liver injury was further evidenced by marked increases of both unconjugated and conjugated bile acids (BAs) in serum. Gene and protein expression analysis suggested that livers of OA-treated mice had adaptive responses to prevent BA accumulation by suppressing BA biosynthetic enzyme genes (Cyp7a1, 8b1, 27a1, and 7b1); lowering BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2); and increasing a BA efflux transporter (Ostβ). OA increased the expression of Nrf2 and its target gene, Nqo1, but decreased the expression of AhR, CAR and PPARα along with their target genes, Cyp1a2, Cyp2b10 and Cyp4a10. OA had minimal effects on PXR and Cyp3a11. Taken together, the present study characterized OA-induced liver injury, which is associated with altered BA homeostasis, and alerts its toxicity potential. - Highlights: • Oleanolic acid at higher doses and long-term use may produce liver injury. • Oleanolic acid increased serum ALT, ALP, bilirubin and bile acid concentrations. • OA produced feathery degeneration, inflammation and cell death in the liver. • OA altered bile acid homeostasis, affecting bile acid synthesis and transport.

  10. Upregulated expression of brain enzymatic markers of arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acid metabolism in a rat model of the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Ameer Y

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In animal models, the metabolic syndrome elicits a cerebral response characterized by altered phospholipid and unesterified fatty acid concentrations and increases in pro-apoptotic inflammatory mediators that may cause synaptic loss and cognitive impairment. We hypothesized that these changes are associated with phospholipase (PLA2 enzymes that regulate arachidonic (AA, 20:4n-6 and docosahexaenoic (DHA, 22:6n-6 acid metabolism, major polyunsaturated fatty acids in brain. Male Wistar rats were fed a control or high-sucrose diet for 8 weeks. Brains were assayed for markers of AA metabolism (calcium-dependent cytosolic cPLA2 IVA and cyclooxygenases, DHA metabolism (calcium-independent iPLA2 VIA and lipoxygenases, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, and synaptic integrity (drebrin and synaptophysin. Lipid concentrations were measured in brains subjected to high-energy microwave fixation. Results The high-sucrose compared with control diet induced insulin resistance, and increased phosphorylated-cPLA2 protein, cPLA2 and iPLA2 activity and 12-lipoxygenase mRNA, but decreased BDNF mRNA and protein, and drebrin mRNA. The concentration of several n-6 fatty acids in ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and lysophosphatidylcholine was increased, as was unesterified AA concentration. Eicosanoid concentrations (prostaglandin E2, thromboxane B2 and leukotriene B4 did not change. Conclusion These findings show upregulated brain AA and DHA metabolism and reduced BDNF and drebrin, but no changes in eicosanoids, in an animal model of the metabolic syndrome. These changes might contribute to altered synaptic plasticity and cognitive impairment in rats and humans with the metabolic syndrome.

  11. Fatty acid digestion, synthesis and metabolism in broiler chickens and pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smink, W.

    2012-01-01


    The impact of variation in the composition of dietary fat on digestion, metabolism and synthesis of fatty acids was studied in broiler chickens and in pigs. In young broiler chickens, digestion of unsaturated fatty acids was substantially higher compared with that of saturated fatty acids. Po

  12. Fatty acid digestion, synthesis and metabolism in broiler chickens and pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smink, W.

    2012-01-01


    The impact of variation in the composition of dietary fat on digestion, metabolism and synthesis of fatty acids was studied in broiler chickens and in pigs. In young broiler chickens, digestion of unsaturated fatty acids was substantially higher compared with that of saturated fatty acids.

  13. Fatty acid digestion, synthesis and metabolism in broiler chickens and pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smink, W.

    2012-01-01


    The impact of variation in the composition of dietary fat on digestion, metabolism and synthesis of fatty acids was studied in broiler chickens and in pigs. In young broiler chickens, digestion of unsaturated fatty acids was substantially higher compared with that of saturated fatty acids. Po

  14. Effects of water turbulence on variations in cell ultrastructure and metabolism of amino acids in the submersed macrophyte, Elodea nuttallii (Planch.) H. St. John.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atapaththu, K S S; Miyagi, A; Atsuzawa, K; Kaneko, Y; Kawai-Yamada, M; Asaeda, T

    2015-09-01

    The interactions between macrophytes and water movement are not yet fully understood, and the causes responsible for the metabolic and ultrastructural variations in plant cells as a consequence of turbulence are largely unknown. In the present study, growth, metabolism and ultrastructural changes were evaluated in the aquatic macrophyte Elodea nuttallii, after exposure to turbulence for 30 days. The turbulence was generated with a vertically oscillating horizontal grid. The turbulence reduced plant growth, plasmolysed leaf cells and strengthened cell walls, and plants exposed to turbulence accumulated starch granules in stem chloroplasts. The size of the starch granules increased with the magnitude of the turbulence. Using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS), analysis of the metabolome found metabolite accumulation in response to the turbulence. Asparagine was the dominant amino acid that was concentrated in stressed plants, and organic acids such as citrate, ascorbate, oxalate and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) also accumulated in response to turbulence. These results indicate that turbulence caused severe stress that affected plant growth, cell ultrastructure and some metabolic functions of E. nuttallii. Our findings offer insights to explain the effects of water movement on the functions of aquatic plants.

  15. Reviews of Nitrate Metabolism in Coffee Plants%咖啡硝态氮代谢研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林兴军; 陈鹏; 孙燕; 黄丽芳; 董云萍

    2015-01-01

    咖啡是一种对氮需求量高的作物,氮的吸收、同化对咖啡生长、发育和产量有重要的影响。进入植物体内的硝态氮只有在转化为铵态氮后才能被植物直接利用,这一代谢过程受外界光照、树龄、土壤pH值等因素的影响。综述近些年来有关环境因素对咖啡硝态氮代谢方面影响的研究进展,并讨论叶片和根系硝态氮代谢的差异以及根系硝态氮吸收的生理意义,为进一步开展咖啡施肥技术研究提供依据。%Coffee plants are highly N-demanding plants. Nitrogen assimilation is a vital process for plant growth, directly responsible for crop biomass production and grain yields. Within the plant, nitrate must be first reduced to ammonium before being assimilated into amino acids, the metabolism influenced by factors such as light, plant age, soil pH value.In this review, in order to provide the basis for the further study on the coffee fertilization technology, we summarize the influence of different factor on nitrate metabolism, and discuss the difference of nitrate metabolism between leaves and roots and the physiological significance of root nitrate assimilation.

  16. Impact of metabolism and growth phase on the hydrogen isotopic composition of microbial fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzelmann, Sandra M.; Villanueva, Laura; Sinke-Schoen, Danielle; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms are involved in all elemental cycles and therefore it is important to study their metabolism in the natural environment. A recent technique to investigate this is the hydrogen isotopic composition of microbial fatty acids, i.e., heterotrophic microorganisms produce fatty acids enriched in deuterium (D) while photoautotrophic and chemoautotrophic microorganisms produce fatty acids depleted in D compared to the water in the culture medium (growth water). However, the impact of factors other than metabolism have not been investigated. Here, we evaluate the impact of growth phase compared to metabolism on the hydrogen isotopic composition of fatty acids of different environmentally relevant microorganisms with heterotrophic, photoautotrophic and chemoautotrophic metabolisms. Fatty acids produced by heterotrophs are enriched in D compared to growth water with εlipid/water between 82 and 359‰ when grown on glucose or acetate, respectively. Photoautotrophs (εlipid/water between −149 and −264‰) and chemoautotrophs (εlipid/water between −217 and −275‰) produce fatty acids depleted in D. Fatty acids become, in general, enriched by between 4 and 46‰ with growth phase which is minor compared to the influence of metabolisms. Therefore, the D/H ratio of fatty acids is a promising tool to investigate community metabolisms in nature. PMID:26005437

  17. Toxicity and tolerance of aluminum in plants: tailoring plants to suit to acid soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Hemalatha; Meriga, Balaji; Surapu, Varalakshmi; Gadi, Jogeswar; Sunita, M S L; Suravajhala, Prashanth; Kavi Kishor, P B

    2016-04-01

    Aluminum (Al) stress is one of the serious limiting factors in plant productivity in acidic soils, which constitute about 50 % of the world's potentially arable lands and causes anywhere between 25 and 80 % of yield losses depending upon the species. The mechanism of Al toxicity and tolerance has been examined in plants, which is vital for crop improvement and enhanced food production in the future. Two mechanisms that facilitate Al tolerance in plants are Al exclusion from the roots and the ability to tolerate Al in the symplast or both. Although efforts have been made to unravel Al-resistant factors, many aspects remain unclear. Certain gene families such as MATE, ALMT, ASR, and ABC transporters have been implicated in some plants for resistance to Al which would enhance the opportunities for creating crop plants suitable to grow in acidic soils. Though QTLs have been identified related to Al-tolerance, no crop plant that is tolerant to Al has been evolved so far using breeding or molecular approaches. The remarkable changes that plants experience at the physiological, biochemical and molecular level under Al stress, the vast array of genes involved in Al toxicity-tolerance, the underlying signaling events and the holistic image of the molecular regulation, and the possibility of creating transgenics for Al tolerance are discussed in this review.

  18. A metabolic signature of the beneficial interaction of the endophyte paenibacillus sp. isolate and in vitro-grown poplar plants revealed by metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherling, Christian; Ulrich, Kristina; Ewald, Dietrich; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2009-08-01

    Metabolic profiling via gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry was used to investigate the influence of endophytic bacteria on shoots of in vitro-grown poplar plants free from culturable endophytic bacteria. The results demonstrate that the occurrence of an endophytic Paenibacillus strain strongly affects the composition of the plant metabolites of in vitro-grown poplars. Eleven metabolites were significantly changed between inoculated and non-inoculated poplar plants as determined by two independent experiments. Detected shifts in the primary metabolism of the poplar plants pointed to a mutualistic interaction between bacteria able to fix nitrogen and the host plant with altered nitrogen assimilation patterns. The corresponding metabolic signature comprises increased asparagine and urea levels as well as depleted sugars and organic acids of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. These observations coincide with the fact that the Paenibacillus sp. strain P22 is able to grow without nitrogen in the medium, indicating nitrogen fixation from the air also known from other Paenibacillus spp. In combination with the detected plant-growth-promoting effects of the endophyte Paenibacillus P22, a novel mutualistic interaction is observed.

  19. 2005 Plant Metabolic Engineering Gordon Conference - July 10-15, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eleanore T. Wurtzel

    2006-06-30

    The post-genomic era presents new opportunities for manipulating plant chemistry for improvement of plant traits such as disease and stress resistance and nutritional qualities. This conference will provide a setting for developing multidisciplinary collaborations needed to unravel the dynamic complexity of plant metabolic networks and advance basic and applied research in plant metabolic engineering. The conference will integrate recent advances in genomics, with metabolite and gene expression analyses. Research discussions will explore how biosynthetic pathways interact with regard to substrate competition and channeling, plasticity of biosynthetic enzymes, and investigate the localization, structure, and assembly of biosynthetic metabolons in native and nonnative environments. The meeting will develop new perspectives for plant transgenic research with regard to how transgene expression may influence cellular metabolism. Incorporation of spectroscopic approaches for metabolic profiling and flux analysis combined with mathematical modeling will contribute to the development of rational metabolic engineering strategies and lead to the development of new tools to assess temporal and subcellular changes in metabolite pools. The conference will also highlight new technologies for pathway engineering, including use of heterologous systems, directed enzyme evolution, engineering of transcription factors and application of molecular/genetic techniques for controlling biosynthetic pathways.

  20. Phenylphenalenones protect banana plants from infection by Mycosphaerella fijiensis and are deactivated by metabolic conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, William; Chandran, Jima N; Menezes, Riya C; Otálvaro, Felipe; Schneider, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Phenylphenalenones, polycyclic aromatic natural products from some monocotyledonous plants, are known as phytoalexins in banana (Musa spp.). In this study, (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics along with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry were used to explore the chemical responses of the susceptible 'Williams' and the resistant 'Khai Thong Ruang' Musa varieties to the ascomycete fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis, the agent of the black leaf Sigatoka disease. Principal component analysis discriminated strongly between infected and non-infected plant tissue, mainly because of specialized metabolism induced in response to the fungus. Phenylphenalenones are among the major induced compounds, and the resistance level of the plants was correlated with the progress of the disease. However, a virulent strain of M. fijiensis was able to overcome plant resistance by converting phenylphenalenones to sulfate conjugates. Here, we report the first metabolic detoxification of fungitoxic phenylphenalenones to evade the chemical defence of Musa plants. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The role of fatty acid oxidation in the metabolic reprogramming of activated T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Alan Byersdorfer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Activation represents a significant bioenergetic challenge for T cells, which must undergo metabolic reprogramming to keep pace with increased energetic demands. This review focuses on the role of fatty acid metabolism, both in vitro and in vivo, following T cell activation. Based upon previous studies in the literature, as well as accumulating evidence in allogeneic cells, I propose a multi-step model of in vivo metabolic reprogramming. In this model, a primary determinant of metabolic phenotype is the ubiquity and duration of antigen exposure. The implications of this model, as well as the future challenges and opportunities in studying T cell metabolism, will be discussed.

  2. Role of bile acids in the regulation of the metabolic pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroki; Taoka; Yoko; Yokoyama; Kohkichi; Morimoto; Naho; Kitamura; Tatsuya; Tanigaki; Yoko; Takashina; Kazuo; Tsubota; Mitsuhiro; Watanabe

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that bile acids(BAs)are not only facilitators of dietary lipid absorption but also important signaling molecules exerting multiple physiological functions.Some major signaling pathways involving the nuclear BAs receptor farnesoid X receptor and the G protein-coupled BAs receptor TGR5/M-BAR have been identified to be the targets of BAs.BAs regulate their own homeostasis via signaling pathways.BAs also affect diverse metabolic pathways including glucose metabolism,lipid metabolism and energy expenditure.This paper suggests the mechanism of controlling metabolism via BA signaling and demonstrates that BA signaling is an attractive therapeutic target of the metabolic syndrome.

  3. Polymorphisms in genes encoding acetylsalicylic acid metabolizing enzymes are unrelated to upper gastrointestinal health in cardiovascular patients on acetylsalicylic acid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oijen, M.G.H. van; Huybers, S.; Peters, W.H.M.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As acetylsalicylic acid is metabolized by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A6 (UGT1A6) and cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9), interindividual differences in activity of these enzymes may modulate the effects and side-effects of acetylsalicylic acid. The objective of this study was to assess wheth

  4. Essential polyunsaturated fatty acids in plasma and erythrocytes of children with inborn errors of amino acid metabolism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaardingerbroek, H.; Hornstra, G.; Koning, T.J.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Bakker, H.D.; Klerk, H. de; Rubio-Gozalbo, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    Essential fatty acids (EFAs), and their longer-chain more-unsaturated derivatives (LCPUFAs) in particular, are essential for normal growth and cognitive development during childhood. Children with inborn errors of amino acid metabolism represent a risk population for a reduced LCPUFA status because

  5. Priming by Hexanoic acid induce activation of mevalonic and linolenic pathways and promotes the emission of plant volatiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio eLlorens

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hexanoic acid is a short natural monocarboxylic acid present in some fruits and plants. Previous studies reported that soil drench application of this acid induces effective resistance in tomato plants against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae and in citrus against Alternaria alternata and Xanthomonas citri. In this work, we performed an in deep study of the metabolic changes produced in citrus by the application of hexanoic acid in response to the challenge pathogen Alternaria alternata, focusing on the response of the plant. Moreover, we used 13C labeled hexanoic to analyze its behavior inside the plants. Finally, we studied the volatile emission of the treated plants after the challenge inoculation. Drench application of 13C labeled hexanoic demonstrated that this molecule stays in the roots and is not mobilized to the leaves, suggesting long distance induction of resistance. Moreover, the study of the metabolic profile showed an alteration of more than two hundred molecules differentially induced by the application of the compound and the inoculation with the fungus. Bioinformatics analysis of data showed that most of these altered molecules could be related with the mevalonic and linolenic pathways suggesting the implication of these pathways in the induced resistance mediated by hexanoic acid. Finally, the application of this compound showed an enhancement of the emission of 17 volatile metabolites. Taken together, this study indicates that after the application of hexanoic acid this compound remains in the roots, provoking molecular changes that may trigger the defensive response in the rest of the plant mediated by changes in the mevalonic and linolenic pathways and enhancing the emission of volatile compounds, suggesting for the first time the implication of mevalonic pathway in response to hexanoic application.

  6. [Effects of biological organic fertilizer on microbial community's metabolic activity in a soil planted with chestnut (Castanea mollissima)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Gu, Jie; Hu, Ting; Gao, Hua; Chen, Zhi-Xue; Qin, Qing-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Juan

    2013-06-01

    A field experiment was conducted in Zhashui County of Shaanxi Province, Northwest China in 2011 to study the effects of biological organic fertilizer on the microbial community's metabolic activity in a soil planted with chestnut (Castanea mollissima). Three treatments were installed, i. e., control, compound fertilizer, and biological organic fertilizer. Soil samples were collected at harvest, and the metabolic activity was tested by Biolog method. In the treatment of biological organic fertilizer, the average well color development, Shannon evenness, richness, and McIntosh indices of microbial community were all significantly higher than the other two treatments. As compared with the control, applying biological organic fertilizer improved the ability of soil microbes in utilizing the carbon sources of carbohydrates and polymers, while applying compound fertilizer was in opposite. The principal component analysis demonstrated that there was an obvious difference in the soil microbial community among different treatments, mainly depending on the species of carbohydrates and amino acids.

  7. (13)C Metabolic Flux Analysis for Systematic Metabolic Engineering of S. cerevisiae for Overproduction of Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Amit; Ando, David; Gin, Jennifer; Runguphan, Weerawat; Denby, Charles; Wang, George; Baidoo, Edward E K; Shymansky, Chris; Keasling, Jay D; García Martín, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Efficient redirection of microbial metabolism into the abundant production of desired bioproducts remains non-trivial. Here, we used flux-based modeling approaches to improve yields of fatty acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We combined (13)C labeling data with comprehensive genome-scale models to shed light onto microbial metabolism and improve metabolic engineering efforts. We concentrated on studying the balance of acetyl-CoA, a precursor metabolite for the biosynthesis of fatty acids. A genome-wide acetyl-CoA balance study showed ATP citrate lyase from Yarrowia lipolytica as a robust source of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA and malate synthase as a desirable target for downregulation in terms of acetyl-CoA consumption. These genetic modifications were applied to S. cerevisiae WRY2, a strain that is capable of producing 460 mg/L of free fatty acids. With the addition of ATP citrate lyase and downregulation of malate synthase, the engineered strain produced 26% more free fatty acids. Further increases in free fatty acid production of 33% were obtained by knocking out the cytoplasmic glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which flux analysis had shown was competing for carbon flux upstream with the carbon flux through the acetyl-CoA production pathway in the cytoplasm. In total, the genetic interventions applied in this work increased fatty acid production by ~70%.

  8. 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis for systematic metabolic engineering of S. cerevisiae for overproduction of fatty acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Ghosh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Efficient redirection of microbial metabolism into the abundant production of desired bioproducts remains non-trivial. Here we used flux-based modeling approaches to improve yields of fatty acids in S. cerevisiae. We combined 13C labeling data with comprehensive genome-scale models to shed light onto microbial metabolism and improve metabolic engineering efforts. We concentrated on studying the balance of acetyl-CoA, a precursor metabolite for the biosynthesis of fatty acids. A genome-wide acetyl-CoA balance study showed ATP citrate lyase from Y. lipolytica as a robust source of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA and malate synthase as a desirable target for down-regulation in terms of acetyl-CoA consumption. These genetic modifications were applied to S. cerevisiae WRY2, a strain that is capable of producing 460 mg L of free fatty acids. With the addition of ATP citrate lyase and down-regulation of malate synthase the engineered strain produced 26 per cent more free fatty acids. Further increases in free fatty acid production of 33 per cent were obtained by knocking out the cytoplasmic glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which flux analysis had shown was competing for carbon flux upstream with the carbon flux through the acetyl-CoA production pathway in the cytoplasm. In total, the genetic interventions applied in this work increased fatty acid production by 70 per cent.

  9. Bezafibrate mildly stimulates ketogenesis and fatty acid metabolism in hypertriglyceridemic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay-Mercier, Jennifer; Tessier, Daniel; Plourde, Mélanie; Fortier, Mélanie; Lorrain, Dominique; Cunnane, Stephen C

    2010-07-01

    Our objective was to determine whether bezafibrate, a hypotriglyceridemic drug and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha agonist, is ketogenic and increases fatty acid oxidation in humans. We measured fatty acid metabolism and ketone levels in 13 mildly hypertriglycemic adults (67 +/- 11 years old) during 2 metabolic study days lasting 6 h, 1 day before and 1 day after bezafibrate (400 mg of bezafibrate per day for 12 weeks). beta-Hydroxybutyrate, triglycerides, free fatty acids, fatty acid profiles, insulin, and glucose were measured in plasma, and fatty acid beta-oxidation was measured in breath after an oral 50-mg dose of the fatty acid tracer [U-(13)C]linoleic acid. As expected, 12 weeks on bezafibrate decreased plasma triglycerides by 35%. Bezafibrate tended to raise postprandial beta-hydroxybutyrate, an effect that was significant after normalization to the fasting baseline values (p = 0.03). beta-Oxidation of [U-(13)C]linoleic acid increased by 30% (p = 0.03) after treatment. On the metabolic study day after bezafibrate treatment, postprandial insulin decreased by 26% (p = 0.01), and glucose concentrations were lower 2 to 5 h postprandially. Thus, in hypertriglyceridemic individuals, bezafibrate is mildly ketogenic and significantly changes fatty acid metabolism, effects that may be linked to PPARalpha stimulation and to moderately improved glucose metabolism.

  10. Metabolic engineering to enhance the value of plants as green factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ling; Grotewold, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The promise of plants to serve as the green factories of the future is ever increasing. Plants have been used traditionally for construction, energy, food and feed. Bioactive compounds primarily derived from specialized plant metabolism continue to serve as important scaffold molecules for pharmaceutical drug production. Yet, the past few years have witnessed a growing interest on plants as the ultimate harvesters of carbon and energy from the sun, providing carbohydrate and lipid biofuels that would contribute to balancing atmospheric carbon. How can the metabolic output from plants be increased even further, and what are the bottlenecks? Here, we present what we perceive to be the main opportunities and challenges associated with increasing the efficiency of plants as chemical factories. We offer some perspectives on when it makes sense to use plants as production systems because the amount of biomass needed makes any other system unfeasible. However, there are other instances in which plants serve as great sources of biological catalysts, yet are not necessarily the best-suited systems for production. We also present emerging opportunities for manipulating plant genomes to make plant synthetic biology a reality.

  11. Probing fatty acid metabolism in bacteria, cyanobacteria, green microalgae and diatoms with natural and unnatural fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beld, Joris; Abbriano, Raffaela; Finzel, Kara; Hildebrand, Mark; Burkart, Michael D

    2016-04-01

    In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, fatty acid synthases are responsible for the biosynthesis of fatty acids in an iterative process, extending the fatty acid by two carbon units every cycle. Thus, odd numbered fatty acids are rarely found in nature. We tested whether representatives of diverse microbial phyla have the ability to incorporate odd-chain fatty acids as substrates for their fatty acid synthases and their downstream enzymes. We fed various odd and short chain fatty acids to the bacterium Escherichia coli, cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Major differences were observed, specifically in the ability among species to incorporate and elongate short chain fatty acids. We demonstrate that E. coli, C. reinhardtii, and T. pseudonana can produce longer fatty acid products from short chain precursors (C3 and C5), while Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 lacks this ability. However, Synechocystis can incorporate and elongate longer chain fatty acids due to acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasS) activity, and knockout of this protein eliminates the ability to incorporate these fatty acids. In addition, expression of a characterized AasS from Vibrio harveyii confers a similar capability to E. coli. The ability to desaturate exogenously added fatty acids was only observed in Synechocystis and C. reinhardtii. We further probed fatty acid metabolism of these organisms by feeding desaturase inhibitors to test the specificity of long-chain fatty acid desaturases. In particular, supplementation with thia fatty acids can alter fatty acid profiles based on the location of the sulfur in the chain. We show that coupling sensitive gas chromatography mass spectrometry to supplementation of unnatural fatty acids can reveal major differences between fatty acid metabolism in various organisms. Often unnatural fatty acids have antibacterial or even therapeutic properties. Feeding of short

  12. Amino acid-sensing ion channels in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, Edgar P. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-08-12

    The title of our project is “Amino acid-sensing ion channels in plants”. Its goals are two-fold: to determine the molecular functions of glutamate receptor-like (GLR) proteins, and to elucidate their biological roles (physiological or developmental) in plants. Here is our final technical report. We were highly successful in two of the three aims, modestly successful in the third.

  13. In vitro skin absorption and metabolism of benzoic acid, p-aminobenzoic acid, and benzocaine in the hairless guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, D; Sakr, A; Lichtin, J L; Bronaugh, R L

    1990-11-01

    The percutaneous absorption and metabolism of three structurally related compounds, benzoic acid, p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), and ethyl aminobenzoate (benzocaine), were determined in vitro through hairless guinea pig skin. Benzocaine was also studied in human skin. Absorption of benzocaine was rapid and similar through both viable and nonviable skin. The absorption of the two acidic compounds, benzoic acid and PABA, was greater through nonviable skin. A small portion (6.9%) of absorbed benzoic acid was conjugated with glycine to form hippuric acid. Although N-acetyl-benzocaine had not been observed as a metabolite of benzocaine when studied by other routes of administration, both PABA and benzocaine were extensively N-acetylated during percutaneous absorption. Thus, the metabolism of these compounds should be considered in an accurate assessment of absorption after topical application.

  14. Organic Acids: The Pools of Fixed Carbon Involved in Redox Regulation and Energy Balance in Higher Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir U Igamberdiev

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Organic acids are synthesized in plants as a result of the incomplete oxidation of photosynthetic products and represent the stored pools of fixed carbon accumulated due to different transient times of conversion of carbon compounds in metabolic pathways. When redox level in the cell increases, e.g., in conditions of active photosynthesis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle in mitochondria is transformed to a partial cycle supplying citrate for the synthesis of 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate (citrate valve, while malate is accumulated and participates in the redox balance in different cell compartments (via malate valve. This results in malate and citrate frequently being the most accumulated acids in plants. However, the intensity of reactions linked to the conversion of these compounds can cause preferential accumulation of other organic acids, e.g., fumarate or isocitrate, in higher concentrations than malate and citrate. The secondary reactions, associated with the central metabolic pathways, in particularly with the TCA cycle, result in accumulation of other organic acids that are derived from the intermediates of the cycle. They form the additional pools of fixed carbon and stabilize the TCA cycle. Trans-aconitate is formed from citrate or cis-aconitate, accumulation of hydroxycitrate can be linked to metabolism of 2-oxoglutarate, while 4-hydroxy-2-oxoglutarate can be formed from pyruvate and glyoxylate. Glyoxylate, a product of either glycolate oxidase or isocitrate lyase, can be converted to oxalate. Malonate is accumulated at high concentrations in legume plants. Organic acids play a role in plants in providing redox equilibrium, supporting ionic gradients on membranes, and acidification of the extracellular medium.

  15. Volatile profiling reveals intracellular metabolic changes in Aspergillus parasiticus: veA regulates branched chain amino acid and ethanol metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roze Ludmila V

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Filamentous fungi in the genus Aspergillus produce a variety of natural products, including aflatoxin, the most potent naturally occurring carcinogen known. Aflatoxin biosynthesis, one of the most highly characterized secondary metabolic pathways, offers a model system to study secondary metabolism in eukaryotes. To control or customize biosynthesis of natural products we must understand how secondary metabolism integrates into the overall cellular metabolic network. By applying a metabolomics approach we analyzed volatile compounds synthesized by Aspergillus parasiticus in an attempt to define the association of secondary metabolism with other metabolic and cellular processes. Results Volatile compounds were examined using solid phase microextraction - gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In the wild type strain Aspergillus parasiticus SU-1, the largest group of volatiles included compounds derived from catabolism of branched chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine, and valine; we also identified alcohols, esters, aldehydes, and lipid-derived volatiles. The number and quantity of the volatiles produced depended on media composition, time of incubation, and light-dark status. A block in aflatoxin biosynthesis or disruption of the global regulator veA affected the volatile profile. In addition to its multiple functions in secondary metabolism and development, VeA negatively regulated catabolism of branched chain amino acids and synthesis of ethanol at the transcriptional level thus playing a role in controlling carbon flow within the cell. Finally, we demonstrated that volatiles generated by a veA disruption mutant are part of the complex regulatory machinery that mediates the effects of VeA on asexual conidiation and sclerotia formation. Conclusions 1 Volatile profiling provides a rapid, effective, and powerful approach to identify changes in intracellular metabolic networks in filamentous fungi. 2 VeA coordinates the

  16. Detection and formation scenario of citric acid, pyruvic acid, and other possible metabolism precursors in carbonaceous meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, George; Reed, Chris; Nguyen, Dang; Carter, Malika; Wang, Yi

    2011-08-23

    Carbonaceous meteorites deliver a variety of organic compounds to Earth that may have played a role in the origin and/or evolution of biochemical pathways. Some apparently ancient and critical metabolic processes require several compounds, some of which are relatively labile such as keto acids. Therefore, a prebiotic setting for any such individual process would have required either a continuous distant source for the entire suite of intact precursor molecules and/or an energetic and compact local synthesis, particularly of the more fragile members. To date, compounds such as pyruvic acid, oxaloacetic acid, citric acid, isocitric acid, and α-ketoglutaric acid (all members of the citric acid cycle) have not been identified in extraterrestrial sources or, as a group, as part of a "one pot" suite of compounds synthesized under plausibly prebiotic conditions. We have identified these compounds and others in carbonaceous meteorites and/or as low temperature (laboratory) reaction products of pyruvic acid. In meteorites, we observe many as part of three newly reported classes of compounds: keto acids (pyruvic acid and homologs), hydroxy tricarboxylic acids (citric acid and homologs), and tricarboxylic acids. Laboratory syntheses using (13)C-labeled reactants demonstrate that one compound alone, pyruvic acid, can produce several (nonenzymatic) members of the citric acid cycle including oxaloacetic acid. The isotopic composition of some of the meteoritic keto acids points to interstellar or presolar origins, indicating that such compounds might also exist in other planetary systems.

  17. In high-light-acclimated coffee plants the metabolic machinery is adjusted to avoid oxidative stress rather than to benefit from extra light enhancement in photosynthetic yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Samuel C V; Araújo, Wagner L; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R; DaMatta, Fábio M

    2014-01-01

    Coffee (Coffea arabica L.) has been traditionally considered as shade-demanding, although it performs well without shade and even out-yields shaded coffee. Here we investigated how coffee plants adjust their metabolic machinery to varying light supply and whether these adjustments are supported by a reprogramming of the primary and secondary metabolism. We demonstrate that coffee plants are able to adjust its metabolic machinery to high light conditions through marked increases in its antioxidant capacity associated with enhanced consumption of reducing equivalents. Photorespiration and alternative pathways are suggested to be key players in reductant-consumption under high light conditions. We also demonstrate that both primary and secondary metabolism undergo extensive reprogramming under high light supply, including depression of the levels of intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle that were accompanied by an up-regulation of a range of amino acids, sugars and sugar alcohols, polyamines and flavonoids such as kaempferol and quercetin derivatives. When taken together, the entire dataset is consistent with these metabolic alterations being primarily associated with oxidative stress avoidance rather than representing adjustments in order to facilitate the plants from utilizing the additional light to improve their photosynthetic performance.

  18. In high-light-acclimated coffee plants the metabolic machinery is adjusted to avoid oxidative stress rather than to benefit from extra light enhancement in photosynthetic yield.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel C V Martins

    Full Text Available Coffee (Coffea arabica L. has been traditionally considered as shade-demanding, although it performs well without shade and even out-yields shaded coffee. Here we investigated how coffee plants adjust their metabolic machinery to varying light supply and whether these adjustments are supported by a reprogramming of the primary and secondary metabolism. We demonstrate that coffee plants are able to adjust its metabolic machinery to high light conditions through marked increases in its antioxidant capacity associated with enhanced consumption of reducing equivalents. Photorespiration and alternative pathways are suggested to be key players in reductant-consumption under high light conditions. We also demonstrate that both primary and secondary metabolism undergo extensive reprogramming under high light supply, including depression of the levels of intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle that were accompanied by an up-regulation of a range of amino acids, sugars and sugar alcohols, polyamines and flavonoids such as kaempferol and quercetin derivatives. When taken together, the entire dataset is consistent with these metabolic alterations being primarily associated with oxidative stress avoidance rather than representing adjustments in order to facilitate the plants from utilizing the additional light to improve their photosynthetic performance.

  19. Oxygen Sensing via the Ethylene Response Transcription Factor RAP2.12 Affects Plant Metabolism and Performance under Both Normoxia and Hypoxia1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Melanie Verena; Iyer, Srignanakshi; Lehmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Subgroup-VII-ethylene-response-factor (ERF-VII) transcription factors are involved in the regulation of hypoxic gene expression and regulated by proteasome-mediated proteolysis via the oxygen-dependent branch of the N-end-rule pathway. While research into ERF-VII mainly focused on their role to regulate anoxic gene expression, little is known on the impact of this oxygen-sensing system in regulating plant metabolism and growth. By comparing Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants overexpressing N-end-rule-sensitive and insensitive forms of the ERF-VII-factor RAP2.12, we provide evidence that oxygen-dependent RAP2.12 stability regulates central metabolic processes to sustain growth, development, and anoxic resistance of plants. (1) Under normoxia, overexpression of N-end-rule-insensitive Δ13RAP2.12 led to increased activities of fermentative enzymes and increased accumulation of fermentation products, which were accompanied by decreased adenylate energy states and starch levels, and impaired plant growth and development, indicating a role of oxygen-regulated RAP2.12 degradation to prevent aerobic fermentation. (2) In Δ13RAP2.12-overexpressing plants, decreased carbohydrate reserves also led to a decrease in anoxic resistance, which was prevented by external Suc supply. (3) Overexpression of Δ13RAP2.12 led to decreased respiration rates, changes in the levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, and accumulation of a large number of amino acids, including Ala and γ-amino butyric acid, indicating a role of oxygen-regulated RAP2.12 abundance in controlling the flux-modus of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. (4) The increase in amino acids was accompanied by increased levels of immune-regulatory metabolites. These results show that oxygen-sensing, mediating RAP2.12 degradation is indispensable to optimize metabolic performance, plant growth, and development under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. PMID:27372243

  20. Fish oil and the pan-PPAR agonist tetradecylthioacetic acid affect the amino acid and carnitine metabolism in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodil Bjørndal

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs are important in the regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism. Recent studies have shown that PPARα-activation by WY 14,643 regulates the metabolism of amino acids. We investigated the effect of PPAR activation on plasma amino acid levels using two PPARα activators with different ligand binding properties, tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA and fish oil, where the pan-PPAR agonist TTA is a more potent ligand than omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. In addition, plasma L-carnitine esters were investigated to reflect cellular fatty acid catabolism. Male Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus were fed a high-fat (25% w/w diet including TTA (0.375%, w/w, fish oil (10%, w/w or a combination of both. The rats were fed for 50 weeks, and although TTA and fish oil had hypotriglyceridemic effects in these animals, only TTA lowered the body weight gain compared to high fat control animals. Distinct dietary effects of fish oil and TTA were observed on plasma amino acid composition. Administration of TTA led to increased plasma levels of the majority of amino acids, except arginine and lysine, which were reduced. Fish oil however, increased plasma levels of only a few amino acids, and the combination showed an intermediate or TTA-dominated effect. On the other hand, TTA and fish oil additively reduced plasma levels of the L-carnitine precursor γ-butyrobetaine, as well as the carnitine esters acetylcarnitine, propionylcarnitine, valeryl/isovalerylcarnitine, and octanoylcarnitine. These data suggest that while both fish oil and TTA affect lipid metabolism, strong PPARα activation is required to obtain effects on amino acid plasma levels. TTA and fish oil may influence amino acid metabolism through different metabolic mechanisms.

  1. Ethanol Metabolism in Calluses of Several Selected Plant Species on Two Typical Plant-Growth-Regulator Balanced Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    For investigation on the characteristics of ethanol metabolism in tissues of different plant species,calluses from eight selected plant species were cultured on medium supplemented with ethanol in tightly sealed culture flasks. Changes of the ethanol level were detected by gas chromatography. During the culture period, the calluses of tobacco, potato and petunia were able to catabolize exogenous ethanol, resulting in the prominent decline of the ethanol level in the medium. The calluses of melon and peanut were also able to ca-tabolize ethanol but with lower efficiency. The other three calluses of carrot, soybean and rice did not catabo-lize ethanol but instead produced small to large amount of ethanol, resulting in the increase of the ethanol level in the media. It was also found that changing the balance between auxin and cytokinin could influence only the ethanol metabolism efficiency but could not change the metabolism patterns on ethanol of the cul-tured calluses. It can be concluded that, ethanol metabolism pattern of calluses in cultures is an innate physi-ological characteristic of the respective plant species.

  2. [Percentage of uric acid calculus and its metabolic character in Dongjiang River valley].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Hong-Heng; An, Geng

    2009-02-15

    To study the percentage of uric acid calculus in uroliths and its metabolic character in Dongjiang River valley. To analyze the chemical composition of 290 urinary stones by infrared (IR) spectroscopy and study the ratio changes of uric acid calculus. Uric acid calculus patients and healthy people were studied. Personal characteristics, dietary habits were collected. Conditional logistic regression was used for data analysis and studied the dietary risk factors of uric acid calculus. Patients with uric acid calculus, calcium oxalate and those without urinary calculus were undergone metabolic evaluation analysis. The results of uric acid calculus patients compared to another two groups to analysis the relations between the formation of uric acid calculus and metabolism factors. Uric acid calculi were found in 53 cases (18.3%). The multiple logistic regression analysis suggested that low daily water intake, eating more salted and animal food, less vegetable were very closely associated with uric acid calculus. Comparing to calcium oxalate patients, the urine volume, the value of pH, urine calcium, urine oxalic acid were lower, but uric acid was higher than it. The value of pH, urine oxalic acid and citric acid were lower than them, but uric acid and urine calcium were higher than none urinary calculus peoples. Blood potassium and magnesium were lower than them. The percentage of uric acid stones had obvious advanced. Less daily water intake, eating salted food, eating more animal food, less vegetables and daily orange juice intake, eating sea food are the mainly dietary risk factors to the formation of uric acid calculus. Urine volume, the value of pH, citric acid, urine calcium, urine uric acid and the blood natrium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, uric acid have significant influence to the information of uric acid stones.

  3. Gut microbiota and nuclear receptors in bile acid and lipid metabolism : bile acids, more than soaps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Out, Carolien

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome refers to the combination of obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. Metabolic syndrome increases the chance on cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Strategies to prevent and treat these metabolic derangements are therefore urgently needed. For this purp

  4. Interpreting expression data with metabolic flux models: predicting Mycobacterium tuberculosis mycolic acid production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Colijn

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Metabolism is central to cell physiology, and metabolic disturbances play a role in numerous disease states. Despite its importance, the ability to study metabolism at a global scale using genomic technologies is limited. In principle, complete genome sequences describe the range of metabolic reactions that are possible for an organism, but cannot quantitatively describe the behaviour of these reactions. We present a novel method for modeling metabolic states using whole cell measurements of gene expression. Our method, which we call E-Flux (as a combination of flux and expression, extends the technique of Flux Balance Analysis by modeling maximum flux constraints as a function of measured gene expression. In contrast to previous methods for metabolically interpreting gene expression data, E-Flux utilizes a model of the underlying metabolic network to directly predict changes in metabolic flux capacity. We applied E-Flux to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB. Key components of mycobacterial cell walls are mycolic acids which are targets for several first-line TB drugs. We used E-Flux to predict the impact of 75 different drugs, drug combinations, and nutrient conditions on mycolic acid biosynthesis capacity in M. tuberculosis, using a public compendium of over 400 expression arrays. We tested our method using a model of mycolic acid biosynthesis as well as on a genome-scale model of M. tuberculosis metabolism. Our method correctly predicts seven of the eight known fatty acid inhibitors in this compendium and makes accurate predictions regarding the specificity of these compounds for fatty acid biosynthesis. Our method also predicts a number of additional potential modulators of TB mycolic acid biosynthesis. E-Flux thus provides a promising new approach for algorithmically predicting metabolic state from gene expression data.

  5. Multiple targets of salicylic acid and its derivatives in plants and animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. Klessig

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Salicylic acid (SA is a critical plant hormone that is involved in many processes, including seed germination, root initiation, stomatal closure, floral induction, thermogenesis, and response to abiotic and biotic stresses. Its central role in plant immunity, although extensively studied, is still only partially understood. Classical biochemical approaches and, more recently, genome-wide high-throughput screens have identified more than two dozen plant SA-binding proteins (SABPs, as well as multiple candidates that have yet to be characterized. Some of these proteins bind SA with high affinity, while the affinity others exhibit is low. Given that SA levels vary greatly even within a particular plant species depending on subcellular location, tissue type, developmental stage, and with respect to both time and location after an environmental stimulus such as infection, the presence of SABPs exhibiting a wide range of affinities for SA may provide great flexibility and multiple mechanisms through which SA can act. SA and its derivatives, both natural and synthetic, also have multiple targets in animals/humans. Interestingly, many of these proteins, like their plant counterparts, are associated with immunity or disease development. Two recently identified SABPs, High Mobility Group Box protein (HMGB and Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH, are critical proteins that not only serve key structural or metabolic functions, but also play prominent roles in disease responses in both kingdoms.

  6. Phosphatidic acid produced by phospholipase D promotes RNA replication of a plant RNA virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiwamu Hyodo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic positive-strand RNA [(+RNA] viruses are intracellular obligate parasites replicate using the membrane-bound replicase complexes that contain multiple viral and host components. To replicate, (+RNA viruses exploit host resources and modify host metabolism and membrane organization. Phospholipase D (PLD is a phosphatidylcholine- and phosphatidylethanolamine-hydrolyzing enzyme that catalyzes the production of phosphatidic acid (PA, a lipid second messenger that modulates diverse intracellular signaling in various organisms. PA is normally present in small amounts (less than 1% of total phospholipids, but rapidly and transiently accumulates in lipid bilayers in response to different environmental cues such as biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. However, the precise functions of PLD and PA remain unknown. Here, we report the roles of PLD and PA in genomic RNA replication of a plant (+RNA virus, Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV. We found that RCNMV RNA replication complexes formed in Nicotiana benthamiana contained PLDα and PLDβ. Gene-silencing and pharmacological inhibition approaches showed that PLDs and PLDs-derived PA are required for viral RNA replication. Consistent with this, exogenous application of PA enhanced viral RNA replication in plant cells and plant-derived cell-free extracts. We also found that a viral auxiliary replication protein bound to PA in vitro, and that the amount of PA increased in RCNMV-infected plant leaves. Together, our findings suggest that RCNMV hijacks host PA-producing enzymes to replicate.

  7. Multiple Targets of Salicylic Acid and Its Derivatives in Plants and Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klessig, Daniel F.; Tian, Miaoying; Choi, Hyong Woo

    2016-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a critical plant hormone that is involved in many processes, including seed germination, root initiation, stomatal closure, floral induction, thermogenesis, and response to abiotic and biotic stresses. Its central role in plant immunity, although extensively studied, is still only partially understood. Classical biochemical approaches and, more recently, genome-wide high-throughput screens have identified more than two dozen plant SA-binding proteins (SABPs), as well as multiple candidates that have yet to be characterized. Some of these proteins bind SA with high affinity, while the affinity of others exhibit is low. Given that SA levels vary greatly even within a particular plant species depending on subcellular location, tissue type, developmental stage, and with respect to both time and location after an environmental stimulus such as infection, the presence of SABPs exhibiting a wide range of affinities for SA may provide great flexibility and multiple mechanisms through which SA can act. SA and its derivatives, both natural and synthetic, also have multiple targets in animals/humans. Interestingly, many of these proteins, like their plant counterparts, are associated with immunity or disease development. Two recently identified SABPs, high mobility group box protein and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, are critical proteins that not only serve key structural or metabolic functions but also play prominent roles in disease responses in both kingdoms. PMID:27303403

  8. Metabolic engineering of Ustilago trichophora TZ1 for improved malic acid production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiemo Zambanini

    2017-06-01

    These results open up a wide range of possibilities for further optimization, especially combinatorial metabolic engineering to increase the flux from pyruvate to malic acid and to reduce by-product formation.

  9. Study of stationary phase metabolism via isotopomer analysis of amino acids from an isolated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Afshan S; Tang, Yinjie J; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Martín, Héctor García; Gin, Jennifer; Benke, Peter I; Keasling, Jay D

    2010-01-01

    Microbial production of many commercially important secondary metabolites occurs during stationary phase, and methods to measure metabolic flux during this growth phase would be valuable. Metabolic flux analysis is often based on isotopomer information from proteinogenic amino acids. As such, flux analysis primarily reflects the metabolism pertinent to the growth phase during which most proteins are synthesized. To investigate central metabolism and amino acids synthesis activity during stationary phase, addition of fully (13)C-labeled glucose followed by induction of green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression during stationary phase was used. Our results indicate that Escherichia coli was able to produce new proteins (i.e., GFP) in the stationary phase, and the amino acids in GFP were mostly from degraded proteins synthesized during the exponential growth phase. Among amino acid biosynthetic pathways, only those for serine, alanine, glutamate/glutamine, and aspartate/asparagine had significant activity during the stationary phase.

  10. Study of Stationary Phase Metabolism Via Isotopomer Analysis of Amino Acids from an Isolated Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaikh, AfshanS.; Tang, YinjieJ.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Martin, Hector Garcia; Gin, Jennifer; Benke, Peter; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-09-14

    Microbial production of many commercially important secondary metabolites occurs during stationary phase, and methods to measure metabolic flux during this growth phase would be valuable. Metabolic flux analysis is often based on isotopomer information from proteinogenic amino acids. As such, flux analysis primarily reflects the metabolism pertinent to the growth phase during which most proteins are synthesized. To investigate central metabolism and amino acids synthesis activity during stationary phase, addition of fully 13C-labeled glucose followed by induction of green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression during stationary phase was used. Our results indicate that Escherichia coli was able to produce new proteins (i.e., GFP) in the stationary phase, and the amino acids in GFP were mostly from degraded proteins synthesized during the exponential growth phase. Among amino acid biosynthetic pathways, only those for serine, alanine, glutamate/glutamine, and aspartate/asparagine had significant activity during the stationary phase.

  11. Fatty Acid Binding Proteins—The Evolutionary Crossroads of Inflammatory and Metabolic Responses1

    OpenAIRE

    Makowski, Liza; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.

    2004-01-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are members of a highly conserved family of proteins with the task of protecting a cell’s delicate lipid balance. Yet they fail when faced with metabolic or inflammatory stress, turning the cytosol into an inhospitable environment with less than ideal outcomes. This review will focus on how FABPs direct lipid traffic and simultaneously control inflammatory and metabolic pathways under the pressures of the Metabolic Syndrome.

  12. The effect of humic acids and their complexes with iron on the functional status of plants grown under iron deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abros'kin, D. P.; Fuentes, M.; Garcia-Mina, J. M.; Klyain, O. I.; Senik, S. V.; Volkov, D. S.; Perminova, I. V.; Kulikova, N. A.

    2016-10-01

    The effect of humic acids (HAs) and their iron complexes (Fe-HAs) on the input of the main mineral elements into wheat seedlings, as well as on the efficiency of photosynthesis and the lipid profile of plants, under iron deficiency has been studied. The input of iron from Fe-HA complexes and its predominant accumulation in roots are demonstrated. It is found that HAs increase the efficiency of photosynthesis due to enhanced electron transport in photosystem II. It is shown that the application of HAs and Fe-HAs is accompanied by an enhanced input of Zn into plants, which could increase the antioxidant status of plants under iron deficiency conditions. In addition, a pronounced increase in the content of lipids in plants is revealed, which is indicative of the effect of HAs on plant metabolism. The obtained results suggest that the positive effect of Fe-HAs and HAs on plants under iron deficiency conditions is due to a combination of factors, among which the effect of HAs on the antioxidant status of plants and the plant lipid metabolism predominates.

  13. Flavonoids: a metabolic network mediating plants adaptation to their real estate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouradov, Aidyn; Spangenberg, German

    2014-01-01

    From an evolutionary perspective, the emergence of the sophisticated chemical scaffolds of flavonoid molecules represents a key step in the colonization of Earth's terrestrial environment by vascular plants nearly 500 million years ago. The subsequent evolution of flavonoids through recruitment and modification of ancestors involved in primary metabolism has allowed vascular plants to cope with pathogen invasion and damaging UV light. The functional properties of flavonoids as a unique combination of different classes of compounds vary significantly depending on the demands of their local real estate. Apart from geographical location, the composition of flavonoids is largely dependent on the plant species, their developmental stage, tissue type, subcellular localization, and key ecological influences of both biotic and abiotic origin. Molecular and metabolic cross-talk between flavonoid and other pathways as a result of the re-direction of intermediate molecules have been well investigated. This metabolic plasticity is a key factor in plant adaptive strength and is of paramount importance for early land plants adaptation to their local ecosystems. In human and animal health the biological and pharmacological activities of flavonoids have been investigated in great depth and have shown a wide range of anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, and anti-cancer properties. In this paper we review the application of advanced gene technologies for targeted reprogramming of the flavonoid pathway in plants to understand its molecular functions and explore opportunities for major improvements in forage plants enhancing animal health and production.

  14. Nitric oxide metabolism and indole acetic acid biosynthesis cross-talk in Azospirillum brasilense SM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Vatsala; Tripathi, Chandrakant; Adholeya, Alok; Kochar, Mandira

    2015-04-01

    Production of nitric oxide (NO) and the presence of NO metabolism genes, nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ), nitrous oxide reductase regulator (nosR) and nitric oxide reductase (norB) were identified in the plant-associated bacterium (PAB) Azospirillum brasilense SM. NO presence was confirmed in all overexpressing strains, while improvement in the plant growth response of these strains was mediated by increased NO and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels in the strains. Electron microscopy showed random distribution to biofilm, with surface colonization of pleiomorphic Azospirilla. Quantitative IAA estimation highlighted a crucial role of nosR and norBC in regulating IAA biosynthesis. The NO quencher and donor reduced/blocked IAA biosynthesis by all strains, indicating their common regulatory role in IAA biosynthesis. Tryptophan (Trp) and l-Arginine (Arg) showed higher expression of NO genes tested, while in the case of ipdC, only Trp and IAA increased expression, while Arg had no significant effect. The highest nosR expression in SMnosR in the presence of IAA and Trp, along with its 2-fold IAA level, confirmed the relationship of nosR overexpression with Trp in increasing IAA. These results indicate a strong correlation between IAA and NO in A. brasilense SM and suggest the existence of cross-talk or shared signaling mechanisms in these two growth regulators.

  15. Correlations between levels of serum uric acid and parameters of the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popescu Dana Stefana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether serum uric acid levels are significantly associated with the parameters that contribute to the metabolic syndrome in a rural community from Iasi County, Romania. We observed that the components associated most with the serum levels of uric acid were body mass index, triglycerides, waist circumference and hip circumference. Significant correlations were found for the levels of uric acid and total cholesterol, fasting glycemia, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. The observed correlations point to uric acid as a potential marker of the metabolic syndrome.

  16. Flow cytometric methods to investigate culture heterogeneities for plant metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaurav, Vishal; Kolewe, Martin E; Roberts, Susan C

    2010-01-01

    Plant cell cultures provide an important method for production and supply of a variety of natural products, where conditions can be easily controlled, manipulated, and optimized. Development and optimization of plant cell culture processes require both bioprocess engineering and metabolic engineering approaches. Cultures are generally highly heterogeneous, with significant variability amongst cells in terms of growth, metabolism, and productivity of key metabolites. Taxus cultures produce the important anti-cancer agent Taxol((R)) (i.e., paclitaxel) and have demonstrated significant variability amongst cell populations in culture with regard to paclitaxel accumulation, cell cycle participation, and protein synthesis. To fully understand the link between cellular metabolism and culture behavior and to enable targeted metabolic engineering approaches, cultures need to be studied at a single cell level. This chapter describes the application of plant cell flow cytometric techniques to investigate culture heterogeneity at the single cell level, in order to optimize culture performance through targeted metabolic engineering. Flow cytometric analytical methods are described to study Taxus single cells, protoplasts, and nuclei suspensions with respect to secondary metabolite accumulation, DNA content, cell size, and complexity. Reproducible methods to isolate these single particle suspensions from aggregated Taxus cultures are discussed. Methods to stain both fixed and live cells for a variety of biological markers are provided to enable characterization of cell phenotypes. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) methods are also presented to facilitate isolation of certain plant cell culture populations for both analysis and propagation of superior cell lines for use in bioprocesses.

  17. Omega-3 fatty acids and metabolic syndrome: effects and emerging mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudyal, Hemant; Panchal, Sunil K; Diwan, Vishal; Brown, Lindsay

    2011-10-01

    Epidemiological, human, animal, and cell culture studies show that n-3 fatty acids, especially α-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), reduce the risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. EPA and DHA, rather than ALA, have been the focus of research on the n-3 fatty acids, probably due to the relatively inefficient conversion of ALA to EPA and DHA in rodents and humans. This review will assess our current understanding of the effects and potential mechanisms of actions of individual n-3 fatty acids on multiple risk factors of metabolic syndrome. Evidence for pharmacological responses and the mechanism of action of each of the n-3 fatty acid trio will be discussed for the major risk factors of metabolic syndrome, especially adiposity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and diabetes, hypertension, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Metabolism of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids as well as the interactions of n-3 fatty acids with nutrients, gene expression, and disease states will be addressed to provide a rationale for the use of n-3 fatty acids to reduce the risk factors of metabolic syndrome.

  18. The effects of xanthoangelol E on arachidonic acid metabolism in the gastric antral mucosa and platelet of the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, T; Sakuma, S; Sumiya, T; Nishida, H; Fujimoto, Y; Baba, K; Kozawa, M

    1992-08-01

    The effects of a new chalcone derivative, xanthoangelol E, isolated from Angelica keiskei Koidzumi, on arachidonic acid metabolism in the gastric antral mucosa and platelet of the rabbit were examined. When gastric antral mucosal slices were incubated with xanthoangelol E (0.05-1.0 mM), there was no significant effect on the production of prostaglandin (PG) E2, PGF2 alpha and their metabolites. On the other hand, this compound inhibited effectively the production of thromboxane B2 and 12-hydroxy-5,8,10-heptadecatrienoic acid from exogenous arachidonic acid in platelets, and the concentration required for 50% inhibition (IC50) was approximately 5 microM. The formation of 12-hydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid was also reduced by this drug (IC50, 50 microM). These results suggest that xanthoangelol E has the potential to modulate arachidonic acid metabolism in platelets and that this action may participate in some pharmacological effect of the plant.

  19. The role of energy & fatty acid metabolism in obesity and insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk, Mattijs Maria

    2015-01-01

    In today’s world, more people die from complications of overweight than from underweight. But not all individuals are equally prone to develop metabolic complications, such as obesity and insulin resistance. This thesis focuses on the differences in the energy and fatty acid metabolism that play a r

  20. Systems biology and metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria for improved fermented foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flahaut, N.A.L.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have long been used in industrial dairy and other food fermentations that make use of their metabolic activities leading to products with specific organoleptic properties. Metabolic engineering is a rational approach to steer fermentations toward the production of desired compou

  1. Systems metabolic engineering design: fatty acid production as an emerging case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Ting Wei; Chowdhury, Anupam; Maranas, Costas D; Shanks, Jacqueline V

    2014-05-01

    Increasing demand for petroleum has stimulated industry to develop sustainable production of chemicals and biofuels using microbial cell factories. Fatty acids of chain lengths from C6 to C16 are propitious intermediates for the catalytic synthesis of industrial chemicals and diesel-like biofuels. The abundance of genetic information available for Escherichia coli and specifically, fatty acid metabolism in E. coli, supports this bacterium as a promising host for engineering a biocatalyst for the microbial production of fatty acids. Recent successes rooted in different features of systems metabolic engineering in the strain design of high-yielding medium chain fatty acid producing E. coli strains provide an emerging case study of design methods for effective strain design. Classical metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches enabled different and distinct design paths towards a high-yielding strain. Here we highlight a rational strain design process in systems biology, an integrated computational and experimental approach for carboxylic acid production, as an alternative method. Additional challenges inherent in achieving an optimal strain for commercialization of medium chain-length fatty acids will likely require a collection of strategies from systems metabolic engineering. Not only will the continued advancement in systems metabolic engineering result in these highly productive strains more quickly, this knowledge will extend more rapidly the carboxylic acid platform to the microbial production of carboxylic acids with alternate chain-lengths and functionalities.

  2. [Metabolic pathway and metabolites of total diterpene acid isolated from Pseudolarix kaempferi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Guo, Hong-Zhu; Sun, Jiang-Hao; Xu, Man; Guo, Hui; Sun, Shi-Feng; Guo, De-An

    2014-08-01

    The preliminary metabolic profile of total diterpene acid (TDA) isolated from Pseudolarix kaempferi was investigated by using in vivo and in vitro tests. Pseudolaric acid C2 (PC2) was identified as the predominant metabolite in plasma, urine, bile and feces after both oral and intravenous administrations to rats using HPLC-UV and HPLC-ESI/MS(n), and demethoxydeacetoxypseudolaric acid B (DDPB), a metabolite proposed to be the glucoside of PC2 (PC2G), as well as pseudolaric acid C (PC), pseudolaric acid A (PA), pseudolaric acid A O-beta-D glucopyranoside (PAG), pseudolaric acid B O-beta-D glucopyranoside (PBG) and deacetylpseudolaric acid A (DPA) originated from TDA could also be detected. It was demonstrated by tests that the metabolism of TDA is independent of intestinal microflora, and neither of pepsin and trypsin is in charge of metabolism of TDA, TDA is also stable in both pH environments of gastric tract and intestinal tract. The metabolites of TDA in whole blood in vitro incubation were found to be PC2, DDPB and PC2G, which demonstrated that the metabolic reaction of TDA in vivo is mainly occurred in blood and contributed to be the hydrolysis of plasma esterase to ester bond, as well as the glucosylation reaction. These results clarified the metabolic pathway of TDA for the first time, which is of great significance to the in vivo active form and acting mechanism research of P. kaempferi.

  3. Boronic acids as tools to study (plant) developmental processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthes, Michaela; Torres-Ruiz, Ramón A

    2017-05-04

    Boron (B) is an essential micronutrient for organisms. In plants, B is known to stabilize the cell wall by crosslinking Rhamnogalacturonan II through ester bonds formed with cis-diols of sugar moieties. However, B is believed to be required for additional functions such as stability and function of (plasma membrane) proteins involved in signal transduction pathways. We have recently shown that boronic acids, competitors of B, efficiently induce perfect phenocopies of monopteros mutants. This effect is enigmatic because like B, boronic acids should find numerous cellular targets and thus disturb many biologic processes ending in a spectrum of unspecific embryo phenotypes. Based on chemical characteristics of boronic acids and their derivatives we discuss reasons that could explain this unusual specificity. The peculiarities of this class of compounds could provide new tools for studying developmental processes.

  4. Dietary fatty acids affecting hepatic metabolism and atherosclerosis - mechanisms unravelled using a proteomics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Gutierrez, G.; Roos, B. de

    2009-07-01

    Dietary fatty acids play an important role in the aetiology of coronary heart disease. The effects of dietary fatty acids on lipoprotein metabolism are well described, but additional or alternative mechanisms relating to potential influence on coronary heart disease are not known. This review describes how proteomics techniques have been used to identify proteins that are differentially regulated by dietary fatty acids. Such proteins may reveal pathways by which dietary fatty acids influence disease risk. (Author) 40 refs.

  5. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for efficient free fatty acid production from glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui; Karanjikar, Mukund; San, Ka-Yiu

    2014-09-01

    Crude glycerol, generated as waste by-product in biodiesel production process, has been considered as an important carbon source for converting to value-added bioproducts recently. Free fatty acids (FFAs) can be used as precursors for the production of biofuels or biochemicals. Microbial biosynthesis of FFAs can be achieved by introducing an acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase into Escherichia coli. In this study, the effect of metabolic manipulation of FFAs synthesis cycle, host genetic background and cofactor engineering on FFAs production using glycerol as feed stocks was investigated. The highest concentration of FFAs produced by the engineered stain reached 4.82g/L with the yield of 29.55% (g FFAs/g glycerol), about 83% of the maximum theoretical pathway value by the type II fatty acid synthesis pathway. In addition, crude glycerol from biodiesel plant was also used as feedstock in this study. The FFA production was 3.53g/L with a yield of 24.13%. The yield dropped slightly when crude glycerol was used as a carbon source instead of pure glycerol, while it still can reach about 68% of the maximum theoretical pathway yield.

  6. Plant interactions alter the predictions of metabolic scaling theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Yue; Berger, Uta; Grimm, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic scaling theory (MST) is an attempt to link physiological processes of individual organisms with macroecology. It predicts a power law relationship with an exponent of 24/3 between mean individual biomass and density during densitydependent mortality (self-thinning). Empirical tests have...... processes can scale up to the population level. MST, like thermodynamics or biomechanics, sets limits within which organisms can live and function, but there may be stronger limits determined by ecological interactions. In such cases MST will not be predictive....

  7. Differential tissue accumulation of 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin in Arabidopsis thaliana affects plant chronology, lipid metabolism and seed yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanano, Abdulsamie; Almousally, Ibrahem; Shaban, Mouhnad; Moursel, Nour; Shahadeh, AbdAlbaset; Alhajji, Eskander

    2015-08-11

    Dioxins are one of the most toxic groups of persistent organic pollutants. Their biotransmission through the food chain constitutes a potential risk for human health. Plants as principal actors in the food chain can play a determinant role in removing dioxins from the environment. Due to the lack of data on dioxin/plant research, this study sets out to determine few responsive reactions adopted by Arabidopsis plant towards 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the most toxic congener of dioxins. Using a high resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, we demonstrated that Arabidopsis plant uptakes TCDD by the roots and accumulates it in the vegetative parts in a tissue-specific manner. TCDD mainly accumulated in rosette leaves and mature seeds and less in stem, flowers and immature siliques. Moreover, we observed that plants exposed to high doses of TCDD exhibited a delay in flowering and yielded fewer seeds of a reduced oil content with a low vitality. A particular focus on the plant fatty acid metabolism showed that TCDD caused a significant reduction in C18-unsaturated fatty acid level in plant tissues. Simultaneously, TCDD induced the expression of 9-LOX and 13-LOX genes and the formation of their corresponding hydroperoxides, 9- and 13-HPOD as well as 9- or 13-HPOT, derived from linoleic and linolenic acids, respectively. The current work highlights a side of toxicological effects resulting in the administration of 2,3,7,8-TCDD on the Arabidopsis plant. Similarly to animals, it seems that plants may accumulate TCDD in their lipids by involving few of the FA-metabolizing enzymes for sculpting a specific oxylipins "signature" typified to plant TCDD-tolerance. Together, our results uncover novel responses of Arabidopsis to dioxin, possibly emerging to overcome its toxicity.

  8. Bioengineering of plant (tri)terpenoids: from metabolic engineering of plants to synthetic biology in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Tessa; Pollier, Jacob; Thevelein, Johan M; Goossens, Alain

    2013-10-01

    Terpenoids constitute a large and diverse class of natural products that serve many functions in nature. Most of the tens of thousands of the discovered terpenoids are synthesized by plants, where they function as primary metabolites involved in growth and development, or as secondary metabolites that optimize the interaction between the plant and its environment. Several plant terpenoids are economically important molecules that serve many applications as pharmaceuticals, pesticides, etc. Major challenges for the commercialization of plant-derived terpenoids include their low production levels in planta and the continuous demand of industry for novel molecules with new or superior biological activities. Here, we highlight several synthetic biology methods to enhance and diversify the production of plant terpenoids, with a foresight towards triterpenoid engineering, the least engineered class of bioactive terpenoids. Increased or cheaper production of valuable triterpenoids may be obtained by 'classic' metabolic engineering of plants or by heterologous production of the compounds in other plants or microbes. Novel triterpenoid structures can be generated through combinatorial biosynthesis or directed enzyme evolution approaches. In its ultimate form, synthetic biology may lead to the production of large amounts of plant triterpenoids in in vitro systems or custom-designed artificial biological systems.

  9. Central metabolic responses to the overproduction of fatty acids in Escherichia coli based on 13C-metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lian; Xiao, Yi; Gebreselassie, Nikodimos; Zhang, Fuzhong; Antoniewiez, Maciek R; Tang, Yinjie J; Peng, Lifeng

    2014-03-01

    We engineered a fatty acid overproducing Escherichia coli strain through overexpressing tesA (“pull”) and fadR (“push”) and knocking out fadE (“block”). This “pull-push-block” strategy yielded 0.17 g of fatty acids (C12–C18) per gram of glucose (equivalent to 48% of the maximum theoretical yield) in batch cultures during the exponential growth phase under aerobic conditions. Metabolic fluxes were determined for the engineered E. coli and its control strain using tracer ([1,2-13C]glucose) experiments and 13C-metabolic flux analysis. Cofactor (NADPH) and energy (ATP) balances were also investigated for both strains based on estimated fluxes. Compared to the control strain, fatty acid overproduction led to significant metabolic responses in the central metabolism: (1) Acetic acid secretion flux decreased 10-fold; (2) Pentose phosphate pathway and Entner–Doudoroff pathway fluxes increased 1.5- and 2.0-fold, respectively; (3) Biomass synthesis flux was reduced 1.9-fold; (4) Anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylation flux decreased 1.7-fold; (5) Transhydrogenation flux converting NADH to NADPH increased by 1.7-fold. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed the engineered strain increased the transcription levels of pntA (encoding the membrane-bound transhydrogenase) by 2.1-fold and udhA (encoding the soluble transhydrogenase) by 1.4-fold, which is in agreement with the increased transhydrogenation flux. Cofactor and energy balances analyses showed that the fatty acid overproducing E. coli consumed significantly higher cellular maintenance energy than the control strain. We discussed the strategies to future strain development and process improvements for fatty acid production in E. coli.

  10. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? Choosing the Right Sport for You Shyness Metabolism KidsHealth > For Teens > Metabolism Print A A A ... food through a process called metabolism. What Is Metabolism? Metabolism (pronounced: meh-TAB-uh-lih-zem) is ...

  11. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Revisited: Structure Elucidation and Metabolic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D. John

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases’ many intricate structural and regulatory elements. In this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25360565

  12. Activation of Secondary Metabolism in Citrus Plants Is Associated to Sensitivity to Combined Drought and High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandalinas, Sara I.; Sales, Carlos; Beltrán, Joaquim; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Arbona, Vicent

    2017-01-01

    Drought and heat stresses are two of the most frequent environmental factors that take place simultaneously in the field constraining global crop productivity. Metabolism reconfiguration is often behind the adaptation of plants to adverse environmental conditions. Carrizo citrange and Cleopatra mandarin, two citrus genotypes with contrasting ability to tolerate combined heat and drought conditions, showed different metabolite patterns. Increased levels of phenylpropanoid metabolites were observed in Cleopatra in response to stress, including scopolin, a metabolite involved in defense mechanisms. Tolerant Carrizo accumulated sinapic acid and sinapoyl aldehyde, direct precursors of lignins. Finally, Cleopatra showed an accumulation of flavonols and glycosylated and polymethoxylated flavones such as tangeritin. The activation of flavonoid biosynthesis in Cleopatra could be aimed to mitigate the higher oxidative damage observed in this genotype. In general, limonoids were more severely altered in Cleopatra than in Carrizo in response to stress imposition. To conclude, all metabolite changes observed in Cleopatra suggest the activation of energy metabolism along with metabolic pathways leading to the accumulation of photoprotective and antioxidant secondary metabolites, oriented to mitigate the damaging effects of stress. Conversely, the higher ability of Carrizo to retain a high photosynthetic activity and to cope with oxidative stress allowed the maintenance of the metabolic activity and prevented the accumulation of antioxidant metabolites. PMID:28119698

  13. Activation of Secondary Metabolism in Citrus Plants Is Associated to Sensitivity to Combined Drought and High Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandalinas, Sara I; Sales, Carlos; Beltrán, Joaquim; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Arbona, Vicent

    2016-01-01

    Drought and heat stresses are two of the most frequent environmental factors that take place simultaneously in the field constraining global crop productivity. Metabolism reconfiguration is often behind the adaptation of plants to adverse environmental conditions. Carrizo citrange and Cleopatra mandarin, two citrus genotypes with contrasting ability to tolerate combined heat and drought conditions, showed different metabolite patterns. Increased levels of phenylpropanoid metabolites were observed in Cleopatra in response to stress, including scopolin, a metabolite involved in defense mechanisms. Tolerant Carrizo accumulated sinapic acid and sinapoyl aldehyde, direct precursors of lignins. Finally, Cleopatra showed an accumulation of flavonols and glycosylated and polymethoxylated flavones such as tangeritin. The activation of flavonoid biosynthesis in Cleopatra could be aimed to mitigate the higher oxidative damage observed in this genotype. In general, limonoids were more severely altered in Cleopatra than in Carrizo in response to stress imposition. To conclude, all metabolite changes observed in Cleopatra suggest the activation of energy metabolism along with metabolic pathways leading to the accumulation of photoprotective and antioxidant secondary metabolites, oriented to mitigate the damaging effects of stress. Conversely, the higher ability of Carrizo to retain a high photosynthetic activity and to cope with oxidative stress allowed the maintenance of the metabolic activity and prevented the accumulation of antioxidant metabolites.

  14. Metabolism of chicoric acid by rat liver microsomes and bioactivity comparisons of chicoric acid and its metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Wang, Yutang; Xiao, ChunXia; Wu, Wanqiang; Liu, Xuebo

    2015-06-01

    Chicoric acid has recently become a hot research topic due to its potent bioactivities. However, there are few studies relevant to this acid's pharmacokinetic characteristics and the pharmacological activities of its metabolites. To compare the abilities of chicoric acid and its metaboli