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Sample records for acid mediates regulation

  1. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) binding-mediated gene regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are synthetic oligonucleotides with chemically modified backbones. PNAs can bind to both DNA and RNA targets in a sequence-specific manner to form PNA/DNA and PNA/RNA duplex structures. When bound to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) targets, the PNA molecule replaces one DNA strand in the duplex by strand invasion to form a PNA/DNA/PNA [or (PNA)2/DNA] triplex structure and the displaced DNA strand exists as a singlestranded D-loop. PNA has been used in many studies as research tools for gene regulation and gene targeting. The Dloops generated from the PNA binding have also been demonstrated for its potential in initiating transcription and inducing gene expression. PNA provides a powerful tool to study the mechanism of transcription and an innovative strategy to regulate target gene expression. An understanding of the PNA-mediated gene regulation will have important clinical implications in treatment of many human diseases including genetic, cancerous, and age-related diseases.

  2. Salicylic acid 3-hydroxylase regulates Arabidopsis leaf longevity by mediating salicylic acid catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kewei; Halitschke, Rayko; Yin, Changxi; Liu, Chang-Jun; Gan, Su-Sheng

    2013-09-01

    The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) plays critical roles in plant defense, stress responses, and senescence. Although SA biosynthesis is well understood, the pathways by which SA is catabolized remain elusive. Here we report the identification and characterization of an SA 3-hydroxylase (S3H) involved in SA catabolism during leaf senescence. S3H is associated with senescence and is inducible by SA and is thus a key part of a negative feedback regulation system of SA levels during senescence. The enzyme converts SA (with a Km of 58.29 µM) to both 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA) and 2,5-DHBA in vitro but only 2,3-DHBA in vivo. The s3h knockout mutants fail to produce 2,3-DHBA sugar conjugates, accumulate very high levels of SA and its sugar conjugates, and exhibit a precocious senescence phenotype. Conversely, the gain-of-function lines contain high levels of 2,3-DHBA sugar conjugates and extremely low levels of SA and its sugar conjugates and display a significantly extended leaf longevity. This research reveals an elegant SA catabolic mechanism by which plants regulate SA levels by converting it to 2,3-DHBA to prevent SA overaccumulation. The research also provides strong molecular genetic evidence for an important role of SA in regulating the onset and rate of leaf senescence.

  3. Identification of a fatty acid binding protein4-UCP2 axis regulating microglial mediated neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Cayla M; Xu, Hongliang; Nixon, Joshua P; Bernlohr, David A; Butterick, Tammy A

    2017-02-16

    Hypothalamic inflammation contributes to metabolic dysregulation and the onset of obesity. Dietary saturated fats activate microglia via a nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) mediated pathway to release pro-inflammatory cytokines resulting in dysfunction or death of surrounding neurons. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are lipid chaperones regulating metabolic and inflammatory pathways in response to fatty acids. Loss of FABP4 in peripheral macrophages via either molecular or pharmacologic mechanisms results in reduced obesity-induced inflammation via a UCP2-redox based mechanism. Despite the widespread appreciation for the role of FABP4 in mediating peripheral inflammation, the expression of FABP4 and a potential FABP4-UCP2 axis regulating microglial inflammatory capacity is largely uncharacterized. To that end, we hypothesized that microglial cells express FABP4 and that inhibition would upregulate UCP2 and attenuate palmitic acid (PA)-induced pro-inflammatory response. Gene expression confirmed expression of FABP4 in brain tissue lysate from C57Bl/6J mice and BV2 microglia. Treatment of microglial cells with an FABP inhibitor (HTS01037) increased expression of Ucp2 and arginase in the presence or absence of PA. Moreover, cells exposed to HTS01037 exhibited attenuated expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) compared to PA alone indicating reduced NFκB signaling. Hypothalamic tissue from mice lacking FABP4 exhibit increased UCP2 expression and reduced iNOS, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1; microglial activation marker) expression compared to wild type mice. Further, this effect is negated in microglia lacking UCP2, indicating the FABP4-UCP2 axis is pivotal in obesity induced neuroinflammation. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating a FABP4-UCP2 axis with the potential to modulate the microglial inflammatory response.

  4. Sugar regulation of plastid reversion in citrus epicarp is mediated through organic acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Omer Khidir

    2009-02-01

    The inhibition by sucrose of chromoplast reversion to chloroplast in citrus epicarp was studied by observing the effects of several sugars, sugar metabolites and 1-iodoacetate on chlorophyll reaccumulation in cultured Citrus paradisi Macf. pericarp segments. Pericarp segments of 1 cm in diameter were cut from yellow fruits and cultured on modified medium plus the indicated metabolites and kept under continuous fluorescent light. Accumulation of chlorophyll in the segments was measured with a spectrophotometer fitted with sphere reflectometer. Respiration was determined via., an infrared gas analyzer. Inhibition of regreening was not specific to a particular sugar. The organic acids malate, citrate, succinate, 2-oxoglutarate and especially malonate elicited effects similar to sucrose, but at much lower concentrations. However, malonate inhibition of chlorophyll accumulation was overcome by increased concentrations of glutamine. At concentrations that usually inhibited chlorophyll, malonate did not reduce CO2 production in the presence of glutamine or KNO3. Sucrose effects on regreening were reduced by 1-iodoacetate. These results indicate that sugar regulation of plastid reversion during regreening in citrus epicarp is not directly due to sugars, but is instead mediated through metabolism of sugars to organic acids, especially malonic acid.

  5. Folic acid protects against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity by up-regulating the expression of Dvr1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Zhang, Chen; Gao, Xiao-Bo; Luo, Hai-Yan; Chen, Yang; Li, Hui-hua; Ma, Xu; Lu, Cai-Ling

    2015-11-05

    As a nutritional factor, folic acid can prevent cardiac and neural defects during embryo development. Our previous study showed that arsenic impairs embryo development by down-regulating Dvr1/GDF1 expression in zebrafish. Here, we investigated whether folic acid could protect against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity. We found that folic acid supplementation increases hatching and survival rates, decreases malformation rate and ameliorates abnormal cardiac and neural development of zebrafish embryos exposed to arsenite. Both real-time PCR analysis and whole in-mount hybridization showed that folic acid significantly rescued the decrease in Dvr1 expression caused by arsenite. Subsequently, our data demonstrated that arsenite significantly decreased cell viability and GDF1 mRNA and protein levels in HEK293ET cells, while folic acid reversed these effects. Folic acid attenuated the increase in subcellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and oxidative adaptor p66Shc protein expression in parallel with the changes in GDF1 expression and cell viability. P66Shc knockdown significantly inhibited the production of ROS and the down-regulation of GDF1 induced by arsenite. Our data demonstrated that folic acid supplementation protected against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity by up-regulating the expression of Dvr1/GDF1, and folic acid enhanced the expression of GDF1 by decreasing p66Shc expression and subcellular ROS levels.

  6. Short-chain fatty acids act as antiinflammatory mediators by regulating prostaglandin E_2 and cytokines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mary Ann Cox; James Jackson; Michaela Stanton; Alberto Rojas-Triana; Loretta Bober; Maureen Laverty; Xiaoxin Yang; Feng Zhu; Jianjun Liu; Suke Wang; Frederick Monsma; Galya Vassileva; Maureen Maguire; Eric Gustafson; Marvin Bayne; Chuan-Chu Chou; Daniel Lundell; Chung-Her Jenh

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of short-chain fatty acids(SCFAs) on production of prostaglandin E_2 (PGE_2),cytokines and chemokines in human monocytes.METHODS: Human neutrophils and monocytes were isolated from human whole blood by using 1-Step Polymorph and RosetteSep Human Monocyte Enrichment Cocktail, respectively. Human GPR41 and GPR43 mRNA expression was examined by quantitative realtimepolymerase chain reaction. The calcium flux assay was used to examine the biological activities of SCFAs in human neutrophils and monocytes. The effect of SCFAs on human monocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was studied by measuring PGE_2, cytokines and chemokines in the supernatant.The effect of SCFAs in vivo was examined by intraplantar injection into rat paws.RESULTS: Human GPR43 is highly expressed in human neutrophils and monocytes. SCFAs induce robust calcium flux in human neutrophils, but not in human monocytes. In this study, we show that SCFAs can induce human monocyte release of PGE_2 and that this effect can be enhanced in the presence of lipopolysaccharide(LPS). In addition, we demonstrate that PGE_2 production induced by SCFA was inhibited by pertussis toxin, suggesting the involvement of a receptor-mediated mechanism. Furthermore, SCFAs can specifically inhibit constitutive monocyte chemotactic protein-1(MCP-1) production and LPS-induced interleukin-10(IL-10) production in human monocytes without affecting the secretion of other cytokines and chemokines examined. Similar activities were observed in human PBMC for the release of PGE_2, MCP-1 and IL-10 after SCFA treatment. In addition, SCFAs inhibit LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ in human PBMC. Finally, we show that SCFAs and LPS can induce PGE_2 production in vivo by intraplantar injectioninto rat paws ( P < 0.01).CONCLUSION: SCFAs can have distinct antiinflammatory activities due to their regulation of PGE_2, cytokine and chemokine release from human immune

  7. Effect of hyaluronic acid on the regulation of inflammatory mediators in osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturriaga, V; Bornhardt, T; Manterola, C; Brebi, P

    2017-05-01

    Osteoarthritis is one of the most frequent pathologies affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). There is evidence that the use of intra-articular hyaluronic acid (HA) for the treatment of this disorder achieves positive effects through a reduction in inflammatory mediators. A systematic review of the available evidence regarding the regulation of inflammatory mediators when applying HA in osteoarthritis of the TMJ in humans was performed. The Web of Science, Embase, ScienceDirect, MEDLINE, Scopus, EBSCOhost, and LILACS databases, SciELO library, and search engine Trip Database were searched systematically. Two thousand eight hundred and sixty-three related articles were found, of which only two met the selection criteria (both were clinical trials and evidence level 2b for treatment studies). These two articles represented a population of 87 patients. Both articles reported that the application of HA had a positive effect on the regulation of inflammatory mediators; the mediators studied were those of the plasminogen activator system and levels of nitric oxide. The limited evidence available suggests that the application of HA regulates various inflammatory mediators in osteoarthritic processes in the TMJ. Nevertheless, further evidence in this regard is required, through the study of specific pathologies of the TMJ, complementing the assessment of clinical parameters with molecular studies, and generating good quality clinical studies with larger sample sizes.

  8. Docosahexaenoic Acid Promotes Axon Outgrowth by Translational Regulation of Tau and Collapsin Response Mediator Protein 2 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Toshinari; Mayanagi, Taira; Ichijo, Hiroshi; Fukumoto, Kentaro; Otsuka, Kotaro; Sakai, Akio; Sobue, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    n-3 PUFAs are essential for neuronal development and brain function. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying their biological effects remain unclear. Here we examined the mechanistic action of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the most abundant n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the brain. We found that DHA treatment of cortical neurons resulted in enhanced axon outgrowth that was due to increased axon elongation rates. DHA-mediated axon outgrowth was accompanied by the translational up-regulation of Tau and collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2), two important axon-related proteins, and the activation of Akt and p70 S6 kinase. Consistent with these findings, rapamycin, a potent inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), prevented DHA-mediated axon outgrowth and up-regulation of Tau and CRMP2. In addition, DHA-dependent activation of the Akt-mTOR-S6K pathway enhanced 5'-terminal oligopyrimidine tract-dependent translation of Tau and CRMP2. Therefore, our results revealed an important role for the Akt-mTOR-S6K pathway in DHA-mediated neuronal development.

  9. Enhanced disease susceptibility 1 and salicylic acid act redundantly to regulate resistance gene-mediated signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivathsa C Venugopal

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Resistance (R protein-associated pathways are well known to participate in defense against a variety of microbial pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA and its associated proteinaceous signaling components, including enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1, non-race-specific disease resistance 1 (NDR1, phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4, senescence associated gene 101 (SAG101, and EDS5, have been identified as components of resistance derived from many R proteins. Here, we show that EDS1 and SA fulfill redundant functions in defense signaling mediated by R proteins, which were thought to function independent of EDS1 and/or SA. Simultaneous mutations in EDS1 and the SA-synthesizing enzyme SID2 compromised hypersensitive response and/or resistance mediated by R proteins that contain coiled coil domains at their N-terminal ends. Furthermore, the expression of R genes and the associated defense signaling induced in response to a reduction in the level of oleic acid were also suppressed by compromising SA biosynthesis in the eds1 mutant background. The functional redundancy with SA was specific to EDS1. Results presented here redefine our understanding of the roles of EDS1 and SA in plant defense.

  10. Enhanced disease susceptibility 1 and salicylic acid act redundantly to regulate resistance gene-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Srivathsa C; Jeong, Rae-Dong; Mandal, Mihir K; Zhu, Shifeng; Chandra-Shekara, A C; Xia, Ye; Hersh, Matthew; Stromberg, Arnold J; Navarre, DuRoy; Kachroo, Aardra; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2009-07-01

    Resistance (R) protein-associated pathways are well known to participate in defense against a variety of microbial pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA) and its associated proteinaceous signaling components, including enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1), non-race-specific disease resistance 1 (NDR1), phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4), senescence associated gene 101 (SAG101), and EDS5, have been identified as components of resistance derived from many R proteins. Here, we show that EDS1 and SA fulfill redundant functions in defense signaling mediated by R proteins, which were thought to function independent of EDS1 and/or SA. Simultaneous mutations in EDS1 and the SA-synthesizing enzyme SID2 compromised hypersensitive response and/or resistance mediated by R proteins that contain coiled coil domains at their N-terminal ends. Furthermore, the expression of R genes and the associated defense signaling induced in response to a reduction in the level of oleic acid were also suppressed by compromising SA biosynthesis in the eds1 mutant background. The functional redundancy with SA was specific to EDS1. Results presented here redefine our understanding of the roles of EDS1 and SA in plant defense.

  11. Genetic interaction of two abscisic acid signaling regulators, HY5 and FIERY1, in mediating lateral root formation

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Hao

    2011-01-01

    Root architecture is continuously shaped in a manner that helps plants to better adapt to the environment. Gene regulation at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional levels largely controls this environmental response. Recently, RNA silencing has emerged as an important player in gene regulation and is involved in many aspects of plant development, including lateral root formation. In a recent study, we found that FIERY1, a bifunctional abiotic stress and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling regulator and an endogenous RNA silencing suppressor, mediates auxin response during lateral root formation in Arabidopsis. We proposed that FRY1 regulates lateral root development through its activity on adenosine 3,5-bisphosphate (PAP), a strong inhibitor of exoribonucleases (XRNs). Interestingly, some of the phenotypes of fry1, such as enhanced response to light in repressing hypocotyl elongation and hypersensitivity to ABA in lateral root growth, are opposite to those of another light- and ABA-signaling mutant, hy5. Here we analyzed the hy5 fry1 double mutant for root and hypocotyl growth. We found that the hy5 mutation can suppress the enhanced light sensitivity in fry1 hypocotyl elongation and restore the lateral root formation. The genetic interaction between HY5 and FRY1 indicates that HY5 and FRY1 may act in overlapping pathways that mediate light signaling and lateral root development. © 2011 Landes Bioscience.

  12. Sialic Acid on the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor Regulates PrP-mediated Cell Signaling and Prion Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bate, Clive; Nolan, William; Williams, Alun

    2016-01-01

    The prion diseases occur following the conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into disease-related isoforms (PrP(Sc)). In this study, the role of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor attached to PrP(C) in prion formation was examined using a cell painting technique. PrP(Sc) formation in two prion-infected neuronal cell lines (ScGT1 and ScN2a cells) and in scrapie-infected primary cortical neurons was increased following the introduction of PrP(C). In contrast, PrP(C) containing a GPI anchor from which the sialic acid had been removed (desialylated PrP(C)) was not converted to PrP(Sc). Furthermore, the presence of desialylated PrP(C) inhibited the production of PrP(Sc) within prion-infected cortical neurons and ScGT1 and ScN2a cells. The membrane rafts surrounding desialylated PrP(C) contained greater amounts of sialylated gangliosides and cholesterol than membrane rafts surrounding PrP(C). Desialylated PrP(C) was less sensitive to cholesterol depletion than PrP(C) and was not released from cells by treatment with glimepiride. The presence of desialylated PrP(C) in neurons caused the dissociation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 from PrP-containing membrane rafts and reduced the activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2. These findings show that the sialic acid moiety of the GPI attached to PrP(C) modifies local membrane microenvironments that are important in PrP-mediated cell signaling and PrP(Sc) formation. These results suggest that pharmacological modification of GPI glycosylation might constitute a novel therapeutic approach to prion diseases.

  13. Betulinic acid regulates generation of neuroinflammatory mediators responsible for tissue destruction in multiple sclerosis in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jana BLA(Z)EVSKI; Filip PETKOVI(C); Miljana MOM(C)ILOVI(C); Reinhard PASCHKE; Goran N KALUDEROVI(C); Marija MOSTARICA STOJKOVI(C); Djordje MILJKOVI(C)

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the influences of betulinic acid (BA),a triterpenoid isolated from birch bark,on neuroinflammatory mediators involved in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in vitro.Methods:Encephalitogenic T cells were prepared from draining lymph nodes and spinal cords of Dark Agouti rats 8 to 10 d after immunization with myelin basic protein (MBP) and complete Freund's adjuvant.Macrophages were isolated from the peritoneal cavity of adult untreated rats.Astrocytes were isolated from neonatal rat brains.The cells were cultured and then treated with different agents.IFN-y,IL-17,iNOS and CXCL12 mRNA levels in the cells were analyzed with RT-PCR.iNOS and CXCL12 protein levels were detected using immunoblot.NO and ROS generation was measured using Griess reaction and flow cytometry,respectively.Results:In encephalitogenic T cells stimulated with MBP (10 μg/mL),addition of BA inhibited IL-17 and IFN-γ production in a dosedependent manner.The estimated IC50 values for IL-17 and IFN y were 11.2 and 63.8 μmol/L,respectively.When the macrophages were stimulated with LPS (10 ng/mL),addition of BA (50 μmol/L) significantly increased ROS generation,and suppressed NO generation.The astrocytes were stimulated with ConASn containing numerous inflammatory mediators,which mimicked the inflammatory milieu within CNS; addition of BA (50 μmol/L) significantly increased ROS generation,and blocked ConASn-induced increases in iNOS and CXCL12 mRNA levels,but did not affect iNOS and CXCL12 protein levels.Importantly,in both the macrophages and astrocytes,addition of BA (50 μmol/L) inhibited lipid peroxidation.Conclusion:Besides inhibiting encephalitogenic T cell cytokines and reducing NO generation,BA induces tissue-damaging ROS generation within CNS.

  14. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate-mediated calcium signalling in effector T cells regulates autoimmunity of the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordiglieri, Chiara; Odoardi, Francesca; Zhang, Bo; Nebel, Merle; Kawakami, Naoto; Klinkert, Wolfgang E. F.; Lodygin, Dimtri; Lühder, Fred; Breunig, Esther; Schild, Detlev; Ulaganathan, Vijay Kumar; Dornmair, Klaus; Dammermann, Werner; Potter, Barry V. L.; Guse, Andreas H.

    2010-01-01

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate represents a newly identified second messenger in T cells involved in antigen receptor-mediated calcium signalling. Its function in vivo is, however, unknown due to the lack of biocompatible inhibitors. Using a recently developed inhibitor, we explored the role of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate in autoreactive effector T cells during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the animal model for multiple sclerosis. We provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that calcium signalling controlled by nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate is relevant for the pathogenic potential of autoimmune effector T cells. Live two photon imaging and molecular analyses revealed that nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate signalling regulates T cell motility and re-activation upon arrival in the nervous tissues. Treatment with the nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate inhibitor significantly reduced both the number of stable arrests of effector T cells and their invasive capacity. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interferon-gamma and interleukin-17 were strongly diminished. Consecutively, the clinical symptoms of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis were ameliorated. In vitro, antigen-triggered T cell proliferation and cytokine production were evenly suppressed. These inhibitory effects were reversible: after wash-out of the nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate antagonist, the effector T cells fully regained their functions. The nicotinic acid derivative BZ194 induced this transient state of non-responsiveness specifically in post-activated effector T cells. Naïve and long-lived memory T cells, which express lower levels of the putative nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate receptor, type 1 ryanodine receptor, were not targeted. T cell priming and recall responses in vivo were not reduced. These data indicate that the nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate

  15. Ethylene responses in rice roots and coleoptiles are differentially regulated by a carotenoid isomerase-mediated abscisic acid pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Cui-Cui; Ma, Biao; Collinge, Derek Phillip; Pogson, Barry James; He, Si-Jie; Xiong, Qing; Duan, Kai-Xuan; Chen, Hui; Yang, Chao; Lu, Xiang; Wang, Yi-Qin; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Chu, Cheng-Cai; Sun, Xiao-Hong; Fang, Shuang; Chu, Jin-Fang; Lu, Tie-Gang; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2015-04-01

    Ethylene and abscisic acid (ABA) act synergistically or antagonistically to regulate plant growth and development. ABA is derived from the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway. Here, we analyzed the interplay among ethylene, carotenoid biogenesis, and ABA in rice (Oryza sativa) using the rice ethylene response mutant mhz5, which displays a reduced ethylene response in roots but an enhanced ethylene response in coleoptiles. We found that MHZ5 encodes a carotenoid isomerase and that the mutation in mhz5 blocks carotenoid biosynthesis, reduces ABA accumulation, and promotes ethylene production in etiolated seedlings. ABA can largely rescue the ethylene response of the mhz5 mutant. Ethylene induces MHZ5 expression, the production of neoxanthin, an ABA biosynthesis precursor, and ABA accumulation in roots. MHZ5 overexpression results in enhanced ethylene sensitivity in roots and reduced ethylene sensitivity in coleoptiles. Mutation or overexpression of MHZ5 also alters the expression of ethylene-responsive genes. Genetic studies revealed that the MHZ5-mediated ABA pathway acts downstream of ethylene signaling to inhibit root growth. The MHZ5-mediated ABA pathway likely acts upstream but negatively regulates ethylene signaling to control coleoptile growth. Our study reveals novel interactions among ethylene, carotenogenesis, and ABA and provides insight into improvements in agronomic traits and adaptive growth through the manipulation of these pathways in rice.

  16. Alternative Oxidase Activity in Tobacco Leaf Mitochondria (Dependence on Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle-Mediated Redox Regulation and Pyruvate Activation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlerberghe, G. C.; Day, D. A.; Wiskich, J. T.; Vanlerberghe, A. E.; McIntosh, L.

    1995-10-01

    Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum (cv Petit Havana SR1) containing high levels of mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) protein due to the introduction of a sense transgene(s) of Aox1, the nuclear gene encoding AOX, were used to investigate mechanisms regulating AOX activity. After purification of leaf mitochondria, a large proportion of the AOX protein was present as the oxidized (covalently associated and less active) dimer. High AOX activity in these mitochondria was dependent on both reduction of the protein by DTT (to the noncovalently associated and more active dimer) and its subsequent activation by certain [alpha]-keto acids, particularly pyruvate. Reduction of AOX to its more active form could also be mediated by intramitochondrial reducing power generated by the oxidation of certain tricarboxylic acid cycle substrates, most notably isocitrate and malate. Our evidence suggests that NADPH may be specifically required for AOX reduction. All of the above regulatory mechanisms applied to AOX in wild-type mitochondria as well. Transgenic leaves lacking AOX due to the introduction of an Aox1 antisense transgene or multiple sense transgenes were used to investigate the potential physiological significance of the AOX-regulatory mechanisms. Under conditions in which respiratory carbon metabolism is restricted by the capacity of mitochondrial electron transport, feed-forward activation of AOX by mitochondrial reducing power and pyruvate may act to prevent redirection of carbon metabolism, such as to fermentative pathways.

  17. ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 and SALICYLIC ACID act redundantly to regulate resistance gene-mediated signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance (R) protein–associated pathways are well known to participate in defense against a variety of microbial pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA) and its associated proteinaceous signaling components, including enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1), non–race-specific disease resistance 1 (NDR1), ...

  18. Abscisic Acid, High-Light, and Oxidative Stress Down-Regulate a Photosynthetic Gene via a Promoter Motif Not Involved in Phytochrome-Mediated Transcriptional Regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roberto J. Staneloni; María José Rodriguez-Batiller; Jorge J. Casal

    2008-01-01

    In etiolated seedlings, light perceived by phytochrome promotes the expression of light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein of photosystem Ⅱ (Lhcb) genes. However, excess of photosynthetically active radiation can reduce Lhcb expression. Here, we investigate the convergence and divergence of phytochrome, high-light stress and abscisic acid (ABA)signaling, which could connect these processes. Etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings bearing an Lhcb promoter fused to a reporter were exposed to continuous far-red light to activate phytochrome and not photosynthesis, and treated with ABA. We identified a cis-acting region of the promoter required for down-regulation by ABA. This region contains a CCAC sequence recently found to be necessary for ABI4-binding to an Lhcb promoter. However, we did not find a G-box-binding core motif often associated with the ABI4-binding site in genes promoted by light and repressed by ABI4. Mutations involving this motif also impaired the responses to reduced water potential, the response to high photosynthetic light and the response to methyl viologen but not the response to low temperature or to Norflurazon. We propose a model based on current and previous findings, in which hydrogen peroxide produced in the chloroplasts under high light conditions interacts with the ABA signaling network to regulate Lhcb expression. Since the mutation that affects high-light and methyl viologen responses does not affect phytochrome-mediated responses, the regulation by retrograde and phytochrome signaling can finally be separated at the target promoter level.

  19. TORC1 Inhibits GSK3-Mediated Elo2 Phosphorylation to Regulate Very Long Chain Fatty Acid Synthesis and Autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, Christine; Santos, Aline; Gable, Kenneth;

    2013-01-01

    Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) are essential fatty acids with multiple functions, including ceramide synthesis. Although the components of the VLCFA biosynthetic machinery have been elucidated, how their activity is regulated to meet the cell's metabolic demand remains unknown. The goal...... of this study was to identify mechanisms that regulate the rate of VLCFA synthesis, and we discovered that the fatty acid elongase Elo2 is regulated by phosphorylation. Elo2 phosphorylation is induced upon inhibition of TORC1 and requires GSK3. Expression of nonphosphorylatable Elo2 profoundly alters...... of autophagy. Together, our data reveal a function for TORC1 and GSK3 in the regulation of VLCFA synthesis that has important implications for autophagy and cell homeostasis....

  20. Acid Phosphatase Activity May Affect the Tuber Swelling by Partially Regulating Sucrose-mediated Sugar Resorption in Potato

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-Yong Wang; Yong Lian; De-Wei Zhu

    2008-01-01

    APase activity is involved in regulating many physiological and developmental events by affecting the resorption process.In this study, we investigate the role of APase activity in tuber development in potato. APase activities were mainly localized in cytoplasm, gaps among cells and stroma of amyloplasts of parenchyma cells at the stage of tuber swelling. AP1, encoding a putative APase, was also highly expressed in swelling tubers and a low level of expression was observed in elongated stolons and matured tubers. Inhibition of APase activity by applying Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of APase production and secretion, significantly suppressed the tuber swelling and moderately affected the stolon elongation and the tuberization frequency. During tuber development, sucrose serves as the main soluble sugar for long-distance transportation and resorption. Moreover, Inhibition of APase activity by Brefeldin A markedly reduced the sucrose content in tubers and further decreased the starch accumulation, suggesting that the function of APase in regulating the tuber swelling might be at least artially mediated by the sugar resorption. Exogenous sucrose treatments further indicate the important role of sucrose-mediated sugar resorption in tuber swelling. These results suggest that the APase activity might affect the tuber swelling by partially regulating the sucrose-mediated sugar resorption.

  1. Transcriptional coordination and abscisic acid mediated regulation of sucrose transport and sucrose-to-starch metabolism related genes during grain filling in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Shalini; Liu, Aihua; Deol, Kirandeep K; Kulichikhin, Konstanin; Stasolla, Claudio; Brûlé-Babel, Anita; Ayele, Belay T

    2015-11-01

    Combining physiological, molecular and biochemical approaches, this study investigated the transcriptional coordination and abscisic acid (ABA) mediated regulation of genes involved in sucrose import and its conversion to starch during grain filling in wheat. Sucrose import appears to be mediated by seed localized TaSUT1, mainly TaSUT1D, while sucrose cleavage by TaSuSy2. Temporal overlapping of the transcriptional activation of AGPL1 and AGPS1a that encode AGPase with that of the above genes suggests their significance in the synthesis of ADP-glucose; TaAGPL1A and TaAGPL1D contributing the majority of AGPL1 transcripts. ABA induced repressions of TaSUT1, TaSuSy2, TaAGPL1 and TaAGPS1a imply that ABA negatively regulates sucrose import into the endosperm and its subsequent metabolism to ADP-glucose, the substrate for starch synthesis. The formations of amyloses and amylopectin from ADP-glucose appear to be mediated by specific members of GBSS, and SS, SBE and DBE gene families, and the ABA-induced transcriptional change in most of these genes implies that ABA regulates amylose and amylopectin synthesis. The findings provide insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the coordination and ABA mediated regulation of sucrose transport into the developing endosperm and its subsequent metabolism to starch during grain filling in wheat.

  2. TORC1 Inhibits GSK3-Mediated Elo2 Phosphorylation to Regulate Very Long Chain Fatty Acid Synthesis and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Zimmermann

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs are essential fatty acids with multiple functions, including ceramide synthesis. Although the components of the VLCFA biosynthetic machinery have been elucidated, how their activity is regulated to meet the cell’s metabolic demand remains unknown. The goal of this study was to identify mechanisms that regulate the rate of VLCFA synthesis, and we discovered that the fatty acid elongase Elo2 is regulated by phosphorylation. Elo2 phosphorylation is induced upon inhibition of TORC1 and requires GSK3. Expression of nonphosphorylatable Elo2 profoundly alters the ceramide spectrum, reflecting aberrant VLCFA synthesis. Furthermore, VLCFA depletion results in constitutive activation of autophagy, which requires sphingoid base phosphorylation. This constitutive activation of autophagy diminishes cell survival, indicating that VLCFAs serve to dampen the amplitude of autophagy. Together, our data reveal a function for TORC1 and GSK3 in the regulation of VLCFA synthesis that has important implications for autophagy and cell homeostasis.

  3. Valproic acid mediates miR-124 to down-regulate a novel protein target, GNAI1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Hirotaka; Goh, Wilson W B; Lim, Vania K J; Wong, Limsoon; Sng, Judy C G

    2015-12-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is an anti-convulsant drug that is recently shown to have neuroregenerative therapeutic actions. In this study, we investigate the underlying molecular mechanism of VPA and its effects on Bdnf transcription through microRNAs (miRNAs) and their corresponding target proteins. Using in silico algorithms, we predicted from our miRNA microarray and iTRAQ data that miR-124 is likely to target at guanine nucleotide binding protein alpha inhibitor 1 (GNAI1), an adenylate cyclase inhibitor. With the reduction of GNAI1 mediated by VPA, the cAMP is enhanced to increase Bdnf expression. The levels of GNAI1 protein and Bdnf mRNA can be manipulated with either miR-124 mimic or inhibitor. In summary, we have identified a novel molecular mechanism of VPA that induces miR-124 to repress GNAI1. The implication of miR-124→GNAI1→BDNF pathway with valproic acid treatment suggests that we could repurpose an old drug, valproic acid, as a clinical application to elevate neurotrophin levels in treating neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Inhibition of HMGB1 release via salvianolic acid B-mediated SIRT1 up-regulation protects rats against non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wenjing; Shan, Wen; Gao, Lili; Gao, Dongyan; Hu, Yan; Wang, Guangzhi; Zhang, Ning; Li, Zhenlu; Tian, Xiaofeng; Xu, Wei; Peng, Jinyong; Ma, Xiaochi; Yao, Jihong

    2015-11-03

    The inflammatory mediator high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the regulation of HMGB1 in NAFLD, particularly through sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of SIRT1-mediated inhibition of HMGB1 release in NAFLD and the effect of salvianolic acid B (SalB), which is a water-soluble phenolic acid extracted from Radix Salvia miltiorrhiza, on NAFLD through SIRT1/HMGB1 signaling. In vivo, SalB treatment significantly attenuated high-fat diet (HFD)-induced liver damage, hepatic steatosis, and inflammation. Importantly, SalB significantly inhibited HMGB1 nuclear translocation and release, accompanied by SIRT1 elevation. In HepG2 cells, palmitic acid (PA)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines release were blocked by HMGB1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection. Moreover, pharmacological SIRT1 inhibition by Ex527 induced HMGB1 translocation and release, whereas SIRT1 activation by resveratrol or SalB reversed this trend. SIRT1 siRNA abrogated the SalB-mediated inhibition of HMGB1 acetylation and release, suggesting that SalB-mediated protection occurs by SIRT1 targeting HMGB1 for deacetylation. We are the first to demonstrate that the SIRT1/HMGB1 pathway is a key therapeutic target for controlling NAFLD inflammation and that SalB confers protection against HFD- and PA-induced hepatic steatosis and inflammation through SIRT1-mediated HMGB1 deacetylation.

  5. Specialized Pro-Resolving Mediators from Omega-3 Fatty Acids Improve Amyloid-β Phagocytosis and Regulate Inflammation in Patients with Minor Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiala, Milan; Terrando, Niccolo; Dalli, Jesmond

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss the immunopathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and recent advances in the prevention of minor cognitive impairment (MCI) by nutritional supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids. Defective phagocytosis of amyloid-β (Aβ) and abnormal inflammatory activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) are the two key immune pathologies of MCI and AD patients. The phagocytosis of Aβ by PBMCs of MCI and AD patients is universally defective and the inflammatory gene transcription is heterogeneously deregulated in comparison to normal subjects. Recent studies have discovered a cornucopia of beneficial anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving effects of the specialized proresolving mediators (SPMs) resolvins, protectins, maresins, and their metabolic precursors. Resolvin D1 and other mediators switch macrophages from an inflammatory to a tissue protective/pro-resolving phenotype and increase phagocytosis of Aβ. In a recent study of AD and MCI patients, nutritional supplementation by omega-3 fatty acids individually increased resolvin D1, improved Aβ phagocytosis, and regulated inflammatory genes toward a physiological state, but only in MCI patients. Our studies are beginning to dissect positive factors (adherence to Mediterranean diet with omega-3 and exercise) and negative factors (high fat diet, infections, cancer, and surgeries) in each patient. The in vitro and in vivo effects of omega-3 fatty acids and SPMs suggest that defective phagocytosis and chronic inflammation are related to defective production and/or defective signaling by SPMs in immune cells.

  6. Competitive Interaction Between Plasma Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Arachidonic Acid is Related to Down-Regulation of A Signaling Mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yui, Kunio; Imataka, George; Kawasaki, Yohei

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) may be attributed to altered composition of polyunsaturated fatty acids. We examined the relationships between the plasma ratios of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)/arachidonic acid (AA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)/AA, and biomarkers of AA-related signaling mediators, i.e., ceruloplasmin, transferrin and superoxide dismutase, with the behavioral symptoms of 30 individuals with ASD (mean age, 13.0 years old) and 20 age- and gender-matched normal controls (mean age, 13.6 years old). Behavioral symptoms were assessed using the Aberrant Behavior Checklists (ABC). The ASD group had significantly higher plasma DHA/AA and EPA/AA ratios, as well as ABC scores, compared to the control group. The plasma ceruloplasmin levels in the ASD group were significantly reduced compared to those in the control group. Multiple linear regression demonstrated that plasma DHA/AA ratio was a fitting model for distinguishing the ASD group from the control group. These findings suggested that increased plasma DHA/AA ratio may be related to lower plasma levels of ceruloplasmin, which may contribute to the pathophysiology of behavioral symptoms in 30 individuals with ASD.

  7. Alisol B 23-acetate protects against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes involved in bile acid homeostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Qiang; Chen, Xin-li; Wang, Chang-yuan; Liu, Qi; Sun, Hui-jun; Sun, Peng-yuan; Huo, Xiao-kui; Liu, Zhi-hao; Yao, Ji-hong; Liu, Ke-xin, E-mail: kexinliu@dlmedu.edu.cn

    2015-03-15

    Intrahepatic cholestasis is a clinical syndrome with systemic and intrahepatic accumulation of excessive toxic bile acids that ultimately cause hepatobiliary injury. Appropriate regulation of bile acids in hepatocytes is critically important for protection against liver injury. In the present study, we characterized the protective effect of alisol B 23-acetate (AB23A), a natural triterpenoid, on alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)-induced liver injury and intrahepatic cholestasis in mice and further elucidated the mechanisms in vivo and in vitro. AB23A treatment dose-dependently protected against liver injury induced by ANIT through reducing hepatic uptake and increasing efflux of bile acid via down-regulation of hepatic uptake transporters (Ntcp) and up-regulation of efflux transporter (Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2) expression. Furthermore, AB23A reduced bile acid synthesis through repressing Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1, increased bile acid conjugation through inducing Bal, Baat and bile acid metabolism through an induction in gene expression of Sult2a1. We further demonstrate the involvement of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in the hepatoprotective effect of AB23A. The changes in transporters and enzymes, as well as ameliorative liver histology in AB23A-treated mice were abrogated by FXR antagonist guggulsterone in vivo. In vitro evidences also directly demonstrated the effect of AB23A on FXR activation in a dose-dependent manner using luciferase reporter assay in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, AB23A produces protective effect against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes. - Highlights: • AB23A has at least three roles in protection against ANIT-induced liver injury. • AB23A decreases Ntcp, and increases Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2 expression. • AB23A represses Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1 through inducing Shp and Fgf15 expression. • AB23A increases bile acid metabolism through inducing Sult2a1 expression. • FXR activation is involved

  8. Ethylene Responses in Rice Roots and Coleoptiles Are Differentially Regulated by a Carotenoid Isomerase-Mediated Abscisic Acid Pathway[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Cui-Cui; Ma, Biao; Collinge, Derek Phillip; Pogson, Barry James; He, Si-Jie; Xiong, Qing; Duan, Kai-Xuan; Chen, Hui; Yang, Chao; Lu, Xiang; Wang, Yi-Qin; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Chu, Cheng-Cai; Sun, Xiao-Hong; Fang, Shuang; Chu, Jin-Fang; Lu, Tie-Gang; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene and abscisic acid (ABA) act synergistically or antagonistically to regulate plant growth and development. ABA is derived from the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway. Here, we analyzed the interplay among ethylene, carotenoid biogenesis, and ABA in rice (Oryza sativa) using the rice ethylene response mutant mhz5, which displays a reduced ethylene response in roots but an enhanced ethylene response in coleoptiles. We found that MHZ5 encodes a carotenoid isomerase and that the mutation in mhz5 blocks carotenoid biosynthesis, reduces ABA accumulation, and promotes ethylene production in etiolated seedlings. ABA can largely rescue the ethylene response of the mhz5 mutant. Ethylene induces MHZ5 expression, the production of neoxanthin, an ABA biosynthesis precursor, and ABA accumulation in roots. MHZ5 overexpression results in enhanced ethylene sensitivity in roots and reduced ethylene sensitivity in coleoptiles. Mutation or overexpression of MHZ5 also alters the expression of ethylene-responsive genes. Genetic studies revealed that the MHZ5-mediated ABA pathway acts downstream of ethylene signaling to inhibit root growth. The MHZ5-mediated ABA pathway likely acts upstream but negatively regulates ethylene signaling to control coleoptile growth. Our study reveals novel interactions among ethylene, carotenogenesis, and ABA and provides insight into improvements in agronomic traits and adaptive growth through the manipulation of these pathways in rice. PMID:25841037

  9. A Mediator subunit, MDT-15, integrates regulation of fatty acid metabolism by NHR-49-dependent and -independent pathways in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubert, Stefan; Van Gilst, Marc R; Hansen, Malene; Yamamoto, Keith R

    2006-05-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans Nuclear Hormone Receptor NHR-49 coordinates expression of fatty acid (FA) metabolic genes during periods of feeding and in response to fasting. Here we report the identification of MDT-15, a subunit of the C. elegans Mediator complex, as an NHR-49-interacting protein and transcriptional coactivator. Knockdown of mdt-15 by RNA interference (RNAi) prevented fasting-induced mRNA accumulation of NHR-49 targets in vivo, and fasting-independent expression of other NHR-49 target genes, including two FA-Delta9-desaturases (fat-5, fat-7). Interestingly, mdt-15 RNAi affected additional FA-metabolism genes (including the third FA-Delta9-desaturase, fat-6) that are regulated independently of NHR-49, suggesting that distinct unidentified regulatory factors also recruit MDT-15 to selectively modulate metabolic gene expression. The deregulation of FA-Delta9-desaturases by knockdown of mdt-15 correlated with dramatically decreased levels of unsaturated FAs and multiple deleterious phenotypes (short life span, sterility, uncoordinated locomotion, and morphological defects). Importantly, dietary addition of specific polyunsaturated FAs partially suppressed these pleiotropic phenotypes. Thus, failure to properly govern FA-Delta9-desaturation contributed to decreased nematode viability. Our findings imply that a single subunit of the Mediator complex, MDT-15, integrates the activities of several distinct regulatory factors to coordinate metabolic and hormonal regulation of FA metabolism.

  10. Ascorbic acid partly antagonizes resveratrol mediated heme oxygenase-1 but not paraoxonase-1 induction in cultured hepatocytes - role of the redox-regulated transcription factor Nrf2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hori Osamu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both resveratrol and vitamin C (ascorbic acid are frequently used in complementary and alternative medicine. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms for potential health benefits of resveratrol and its interactions with ascorbic acid. Methods The antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase-1 and paraoxonase-1 were analysed for their mRNA and protein levels in HUH7 liver cells treated with 10 and 25 μmol/l resveratrol in the absence and presence of 100 and 1000 μmol/l ascorbic acid. Additionally the transactivation of the transcription factor Nrf2 and paraoxonase-1 were determined by reporter gene assays. Results Here, we demonstrate that resveratrol induces the antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase-1 and paraoxonase-1 in cultured hepatocytes. Heme oxygenase-1 induction by resveratrol was accompanied by an increase in Nrf2 transactivation. Resveratrol mediated Nrf2 transactivation as well as heme oxygenase-1 induction were partly antagonized by 1000 μmol/l ascorbic acid. Conclusions Unlike heme oxygenase-1 (which is highly regulated by Nrf2 paraoxonase-1 (which exhibits fewer ARE/Nrf2 binding sites in its promoter induction by resveratrol was not counteracted by ascorbic acid. Addition of resveratrol to the cell culture medium produced relatively low levels of hydrogen peroxide which may be a positive hormetic redox-signal for Nrf2 dependent gene expression thereby driving heme oxygenase-1 induction. However, high concentrations of ascorbic acid manifold increased hydrogen peroxide production in the cell culture medium which may be a stress signal thereby disrupting the Nrf2 signalling pathway.

  11. Embryo spacing and implantation timing are differentially regulated by LPA3-mediated lysophosphatidic acid signaling in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Kotaro; Aoki, Junken; Inoue, Asuka; Endo, Tomoko; Amano, Tomokazu; Motoki, Rie; Kanai, Motomu; Ye, Xiaoqin; Chun, Jerold; Matsuki, Norio; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Shibasaki, Masakatsu; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2007-12-01

    In polytocous animals, blastocysts are evenly distributed along each uterine horn and implant. The molecular mechanisms underlying these precise events remain elusive. We recently showed that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has critical roles in the establishment of early pregnancy by affecting embryo spacing and subsequent implantation through its receptor, LPA3. Targeted deletion of Lpa3 in mice resulted in delayed implantation and embryo crowding, which is associated with a dramatic decrease in the prostaglandins and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 expression levels. Exogenous administration of prostaglandins rescued the delayed implantation but did not rescue the defects in embryo spacing, suggesting the role of prostaglandins in implantation downstream of LPA3 signaling. In the present study, to know how LPA3 signaling regulates the embryo spacing, we determined the time course distribution of blastocysts during the preimplantation period. In wild-type (WT) uteri, blastocysts were distributed evenly along the uterine horns at Embryonic Day 3.8 (E3.8), whereas in the Lpa3-deficient uteri, they were clustered in the vicinity of the cervix, suggesting that the mislocalization and resulting crowding of the embryos are the cause of the delayed implantation. However, embryos transferred singly into E2.5 pseudopregnant Lpa3-deficient uterine horns still showed delayed implantation but on-time implantation in WT uteri, indicating that embryo spacing and implantation timing are two segregated events. We also found that an LPA3-specific agonist induced rapid uterine contraction in WT mice but not in Lpa3-deficient mice. Because the uterine contraction is critical for embryo spacing, our results suggest that LPA3 signaling controls embryo spacing via uterine contraction around E3.5.

  12. Release of GTP Exchange Factor Mediated Down-Regulation of Abscisic Acid Signal Transduction through ABA-Induced Rapid Degradation of RopGEFs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waadt, Rainer; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is critical to plant development and stress responses. Abiotic stress triggers an ABA signal transduction cascade, which is comprised of the core components PYL/RCAR ABA receptors, PP2C-type protein phosphatases, and protein kinases. Small GTPases of the ROP/RAC family act as negative regulators of ABA signal transduction. However, the mechanisms by which ABA controls the behavior of ROP/RACs have remained unclear. Here, we show that an Arabidopsis guanine nucleotide exchange factor protein RopGEF1 is rapidly sequestered to intracellular particles in response to ABA. GFP-RopGEF1 is sequestered via the endosome-prevacuolar compartment pathway and is degraded. RopGEF1 directly interacts with several clade A PP2C protein phosphatases, including ABI1. Interestingly, RopGEF1 undergoes constitutive degradation in pp2c quadruple abi1/abi2/hab1/pp2ca mutant plants, revealing that active PP2C protein phosphatases protect and stabilize RopGEF1 from ABA-mediated degradation. Interestingly, ABA-mediated degradation of RopGEF1 also plays an important role in ABA-mediated inhibition of lateral root growth. The presented findings point to a PP2C-RopGEF-ROP/RAC control loop model that is proposed to aid in shutting off ABA signal transduction, to counteract leaky ABA signal transduction caused by “monomeric” PYL/RCAR ABA receptors in the absence of stress, and facilitate signaling in response to ABA. PMID:27192441

  13. Hypocholesterolemic activity of grape seed proanthocyanidin is mediated by enhancement of bile acid excretion and up-regulation of CYP7A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Rui; Zhang, Zesheng; Yu, Hongjian; Huang, Yu; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2010-11-01

    Interest in grape seed proanthocyanidin (GSP) as a cholesterol-lowering nutraceutical is growing. This study was to investigate the effect of GSP on blood cholesterol level and gene expression of cholesterol-regulating enzymes in Golden Syrian hamsters maintained on a 0.1% cholesterol diet. Results affirmed supplementation of 0.5% or 1.0% GSP could decrease plasma total cholesterol and triacylglycerol level. Western blot and real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses demonstrated GSP did not affect sterol regulatory element binding protein-2 and low-density lipoprotein receptor; however, it increased mRNA 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase. GSP had no effect on the protein mass of liver X receptor alpha (LXRα) but it decreased mRNA LXRα. Most importantly, GSP increased not only the protein level of cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) but also mRNA CYP7A1. It was concluded that the hypocholesterolemic activity of GSP was most likely mediated by enhancement of bile acid excretion and up-regulation of CYP7A1.

  14. Valproic acid-mediated transcriptional regulation of human GM3 synthase (hST3Gal V) in SK-N-BE(2)-C human neuroblastoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haw-young KWON; Nam-young KANG; Hyun-mi DAE; Kyoung-sook KIM; Cheorl-ho KIM; Su-il DO; Young-choon LEE

    2008-01-01

    Aim:To investigate whether valproic acid (VPA) modulates human GM3 syn-thase (hST3Gal V) mRNA expression, as a part of ganglioside GM3 biosynthe-sis, in human neuroblastoma cells. Methods: Using RT-PCR and immunofluo-rescent confocal microscopy, we examined hST3Gal V mRNA and GM3 levels during VPA-induced differentiation of human neuroblastoma SK-N-BE(2)-C cells. We characterized the VPA-inducible promoter region within the hST3-Gal V gene using luciferase constructs carrying 5'-deletions of the hST3Gal V promoter. Results: RT-PCR indicated that VPA-mediated hST3Gal V induction is transcriptionally regulated. Functional analysis of the 5'-flanking region of the hST3Gal V gene demonstrated that the -177 to -83 region, which contains a cAMP-responsive element (CRE) at -143, functions as the VPA-inducible promoter by actively binding CRE binding protein (CREB). In addition, site-directed mutagenesis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay indicated that the CRE at -143 is crucial for the VPA-induced expression of hST3Gal V in SK-N-BE(2)-C cells. Conclusion: Our results isolated the core promoter region in the hST3Gal V promoter, a CRE at -143, and demonstrated that it is essential for transcriptional activation of hST3Gal V in VPA-induced SK-N-BE(2)-C cells. Subsequent CREB binding to this CRE mediates VPA-dependent upregulation of hST3Gal V gene expression.

  15. Oleic acid-dependent modulation of Nitric oxide associated 1 protein levels regulates nitric oxide-mediated defense signaling in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The conserved cellular metabolites nitric oxide (NO) and oleic acid (18:1) are well-known regulators of disease physiologies in diverse organism. We show that NO production in plants is regulated via 18:1. Reduction in 18:1 levels, via a genetic mutation in the 18:1-synthesizing gene SUPPRESSOR OF S...

  16. CD44 and TLR4 mediate hyaluronic acid regulation of Lgr5+ stem cell proliferation, crypt fission, and intestinal growth in postnatal and adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehl, Terrence E; Santhanam, Srikanth; Foster, Lynne; Ciorba, Matthew; Stenson, William F

    2015-12-01

    Hyaluronic acid, a glycosaminoglycan in the extracellular matrix, binds to CD44 and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). We previously addressed the role of hyaluronic acid in small intestinal and colonic growth in mice. We addressed the role of exogenous hyaluronic acid by giving hyaluronic acid intraperitoneally and the role of endogenous hyaluronic acid by giving PEP-1, a peptide that blocks hyaluronic acid binding to its receptors. Exogenous hyaluronic acid increased epithelial proliferation but had no effect on intestinal length. PEP-1 resulted in a shortened small intestine and colon and diminished epithelial proliferation. In the current study, we sought to determine whether the effects of hyaluronic acid on growth were mediated by signaling through CD44 or TLR4 by giving exogenous hyaluronic acid or PEP-1 twice a week from 3-8 wk of age to wild-type, CD44(-/-), and TLR4(-/-) mice. These studies demonstrated that signaling through both CD44 and TLR4 were important in mediating the effects of hyaluronic acid on growth in the small intestine and colon. Extending our studies to early postnatal life, we assessed the effects of exogenous hyaluronic acid and PEP-1 on Lgr5(+) stem cell proliferation and crypt fission. Administration of PEP-1 to Lgr5(+) reporter mice from postnatal day 7 to day 14 decreased Lgr5(+) cell proliferation and decreased crypt fission. These studies indicate that endogenous hyaluronic acid increases Lgr5(+) stem cell proliferation, crypt fission, and intestinal lengthening and that these effects are dependent on signaling through CD44 and TLR4.

  17. Essential fatty acids and lipid mediators. Endocannabinoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Caramia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1929 Burr and Burr discovered the essential fatty acids omega-6 and omega-3. Since then, researchers have shown a growing interest in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA as precursors of “lipid mediator” molecules, often with opposing effects, prostaglandins, prostacyclins, thromboxanes, leukotrienes, lipossines, resolvines, protectines, maresins that regulate immunity, platelet aggregation, inflammation, etc. They showed that the balance between omega-3 and omega-6 acids has a profound influence on all the body’s inflammatory responses and a raised level of PUFA omega-3 in tissue correlate with a reduced incidence of degenerative cardiovascular disease, some mental illnesses such as depression, and neuro-degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s. The CYP-catalyzed epoxidation and hydroxylation of arachidonic acid (AA were established recently as the so-called third branch of AGE cascade. Cytochrome P450 (CYP epoxygenases convert AA to four epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET regioisomers, that produce vascular relaxation anti-inflammatory effects on blood vessels and in the kidney, promote angiogenesis, and protect ischemic myocardium and brain. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA are accessible to CYP enzymes in the same way as AA. Metabolites derived from EPA include epoxyeicosatetraenoic acids (EETR and hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acids (19- and 20-HEPE, whereas DHA include epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs hydroxydocosahexaenoic acids (21- and 22-HDoHE. For many of the CYP isoforms, the n-3 PUFAs are the preferred substrates and the available data suggest that some of the vasculo- and cardioprotective effects attributed to dietary n-3 PUFAs may be mediated by CYP-dependent metabolites of EPA and DHA. From AA derives also endocannabinoids like anandamide (N-arachidonoylethanolamine and 2-arachidonoylglycerol, capable of mimicking the pharmacological actions of the active principle of Cannabis sativa preparations such as

  18. A Mediator subunit, MDT-15, integrates regulation of fatty acid metabolism by NHR-49-dependent and -independent pathways in C. elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Taubert, Stefan; Van Gilst, Marc R.; Hansen, Malene; Yamamoto, Keith R.

    2006-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans Nuclear Hormone Receptor NHR-49 coordinates expression of fatty acid (FA) metabolic genes during periods of feeding and in response to fasting. Here we report the identification of MDT-15, a subunit of the C. elegans Mediator complex, as an NHR-49-interacting protein and transcriptional coactivator. Knockdown of mdt-15 by RNA interference (RNAi) prevented fasting-induced mRNA accumulation of NHR-49 targets in vivo, and fasting-independent expression of other NHR-49 ...

  19. Regulation of amino acid transporter trafficking by mTORC1 in primary human trophoblast cells is mediated by the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Fredrick J; Dimasuay, Kris Genelyn; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Changes in placental amino acid transfer directly contribute to altered fetal growth, which increases the risk for perinatal complications and predisposes for the development of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease later in life. Placental amino acid transfer is critically dependent on the expression of specific transporters in the plasma membrane of the trophoblast, the transporting epithelium of the human placenta. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating this process are largely unknown. Nedd4-2 is an ubiquitin ligase that catalyses the ubiquitination of proteins, resulting in proteasomal degradation. We hypothesized that inhibition of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) decreases amino acid uptake in primary human trophoblast (PHT) cells by activation of Nedd4-2, which increases transporter ubiquitination resulting in decreased transporter expression in the plasma membrane. mTORC 1 inhibition increased the expression of Nedd4-2, promoted ubiquitination and decreased the plasma membrane expression of SNAT2 (an isoform of the System A amino acid transporter) and LAT1 (a System L amino acid transporter isoform), resulting in decreased cellular amino acid uptake. Nedd4-2 silencing markedly increased the trafficking of SNAT2 and LAT1 to the plasma membrane, which stimulated cellular amino acid uptake. mTORC1 inhibition by silencing of raptor failed to decrease amino acid transport following Nedd4-2 silencing. In conclusion, we have identified a novel link between mTORC1 signalling and ubiquitination, a common posttranslational modification. Because placental mTORC1 is inhibited in fetal growth restriction and activated in fetal overgrowth, we propose that regulation of placental amino acid transporter ubiquitination by mTORC1 and Nedd4-2 constitutes a molecular mechanisms underlying abnormal fetal growth.

  20. Crucial role for LKB1 to AMPKalpha2 axis in the regulation of CD36-mediated long-chain fatty acid uptake into cardiomyocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habets, Daphna D. J.; Coumans, Will A.; El Hasnaoui, Mohammed;

    2009-01-01

    Enhanced contractile activity increases cardiac long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) uptake via translocation of CD36 to the sarcolemma, similarly to increase in glucose uptake via GLUT4 translocation. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is assumed to mediate contraction-induced LCFA utilization. However......, the stimulating effects of oligomycin and AICAR on palmitate and deoxyglucose uptake and palmitate oxidation were almost completely lost. Moreover, in AMPKalpha2- and LKB1-knockout cardiomyocytes, oligomycin-induced LCFA and deoxyglucose uptake were completely abolished. However, the stimulatory effect...... of dipyridamole on palmitate uptake and oxidation was preserved in AMPKalpha2-kinase-dead cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, in the heart there is a signaling axis consisting of LKB1 and AMPKalpha2 which activation results in enhanced LCFA utilization, similarly to enhanced glucose uptake. In addition, an unknown...

  1. Galectin-8 Induces Apoptosis in Jurkat T Cells by Phosphatidic Acid-mediated ERK1/2 Activation Supported by Protein Kinase A Down-regulation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norambuena, Andrés; Metz, Claudia; Vicuña, Lucas; Silva, Antonia; Pardo, Evelyn; Oyanadel, Claudia; Massardo, Loreto; González, Alfonso; Soza, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Galectins have been implicated in T cell homeostasis playing complementary pro-apoptotic roles. Here we show that galectin-8 (Gal-8) is a potent pro-apoptotic agent in Jurkat T cells inducing a complex phospholipase D/phosphatidic acid signaling pathway that has not been reported for any galectin before. Gal-8 increases phosphatidic signaling, which enhances the activity of both ERK1/2 and type 4 phosphodiesterases (PDE4), with a subsequent decrease in basal protein kinase A activity. Strikingly, rolipram inhibition of PDE4 decreases ERK1/2 activity. Thus Gal-8-induced PDE4 activation releases a negative influence of cAMP/protein kinase A on ERK1/2. The resulting strong ERK1/2 activation leads to expression of the death factor Fas ligand and caspase-mediated apoptosis. Several conditions that decrease ERK1/2 activity also decrease apoptosis, such as anti-Fas ligand blocking antibodies. In addition, experiments with freshly isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, previously stimulated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28, show that Gal-8 is pro-apoptotic on activated T cells, most likely on a subpopulation of them. Anti-Gal-8 autoantibodies from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus block the apoptotic effect of Gal-8. These results implicate Gal-8 as a novel T cell suppressive factor, which can be counterbalanced by function-blocking autoantibodies in autoimmunity. PMID:19276072

  2. Depolarization-mediated regulation of alternative splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok eSharma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing in eukaryotes plays an important role in regulating gene expression by selectively including alternative exons. A wealth of information has been accumulated that explains how alternative exons are selected in a developmental stage- or tissue-specific fashion. However, our knowledge of how cells respond to environmental changes to alter alternative splicing is very limited. For example, although a number of alternative exons have been shown to be regulated by calcium level alterations, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. As calcium signaling in neurons plays a crucial role in essential neuronal functions such as learning and memory formation, it is important to understand how this process is regulated at every level in gene expression. The significance of the dynamic control of alternative splicing in response to changes of calcium levels has been largely unappreciated. In this communication, we will summarize the recent advances in calcium signaling-mediated alternative splicing that have provided some insights into the important regulatory mechanisms. In addition to describing the cis-acting RNA elements on the pre-mRNA molecules that respond to changes of intracellular calcium levels, we will summarize how splicing regulators change and affect alternative splicing in this process. We will also discuss a novel mode of calcium-mediated splicing regulation at the level of chromatin structure and transcription.

  3. FRNK negatively regulates IL-4-mediated inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ritu; Colarusso, Pina; Zhang, Hong; Stevens, Katarzyna M; Patel, Kamala D

    2015-02-15

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-related nonkinase (PTK2 isoform 6 in humans, hereafter referred to as FRNK) is a cytoskeletal regulatory protein that has recently been shown to dampen lung fibrosis, yet its role in inflammation is unknown. Here, we show for the first time that expression of FRNK negatively regulates IL-4-mediated inflammation in a human model of eosinophil recruitment. Mechanistically, FRNK blocks eosinophil accumulation, firm adhesion and transmigration by preventing transcription and protein expression of VCAM-1 and CCL26. IL-4 activates STAT6 to induce VCAM-1 and CCL26 transcription. We now show that IL-4 also increases GATA6 to induce VCAM-1 expression. FRNK blocks IL-4-induced GATA6 transcription but has little effect on GATA6 protein expression and no effect on STAT6 activation. FRNK can block FAK or Pyk2 signaling and we, thus, downregulated these proteins using siRNA to determine whether signaling from either protein is involved in the regulation of VCAM-1 and CCL26. Knockdown of FAK, Pyk2 or both had no effect on VCAM-1 or CCL26 expression, which suggests that FRNK acts independently of FAK and Pyk2 signaling. Finally, we found that IL-4 induces the late expression of endogenous FRNK. In summary, FRNK represents a novel mechanism to negatively regulate IL-4-mediated inflammation.

  4. Fatty acids, lipid mediators, and T-cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Anja J; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Toes, René E M; Ioan-Facsinay, Andreea

    2014-01-01

    Research toward the mechanisms underlying obesity-linked complications has intensified during the last years. As a consequence, it has become clear that metabolism and immunity are intimately linked. Free fatty acids and other lipids acquired in excess by current feeding patterns have been proposed to mediate this link due to their immune modulatory capacity. The functional differences between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, in combination with their dietary intake are believed to modulate the outcome of immune responses. Moreover, unsaturated fatty acids can be oxidized in a tightly regulated and specific manner to generate either potent pro-inflammatory or pro-resolving lipid mediators. These oxidative derivatives of fatty acids have received detailed attention during the last years, as they have proven to have strong immune modulatory capacity, even in pM ranges. Both fatty acids and oxidized fatty acids have been studied especially in relation to macrophage and T-cells functions. In this review, we propose to focus on the effect of fatty acids and their oxidative derivatives on T-cells, as it is an active area of research during the past 5 years. The effect of fatty acids and their derivatives on activation and proliferation of T-cells, as well as the delicate balance between stimulation and lipotoxicity will be discussed. Moreover, the receptors involved in the interaction between free fatty acids and their derivatives with T-cells will be summarized. Finally, the mechanisms involved in modulation of T-cells by fatty acids will be addressed, including cellular signaling and metabolism of T-cells. The in vitro results will be placed in context of in vivo studies both in humans and mice. In this review, we summarize the latest findings on the immune modulatory function of lipids on T-cells and will point out novel directions for future research.

  5. Organic acid mediated repression of sugar utilization in rhizobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Bhagya; Rajput, Mahendrapal Singh; Jog, Rahul; Joshi, Ekta; Bharwad, Krishna; Rajkumar, Shalini

    2016-11-01

    Rhizobia are a class of symbiotic diazotrophic bacteria which utilize C4 acids in preference to sugars and the sugar utilization is repressed as long as C4 acids are present. This can be manifested as a diauxie when rhizobia are grown in the presence of a sugar and a C4 acid together. Succinate, a C4 acid is known to repress utilization of sugars, sugar alcohols, hydrocarbons, etc by a mechanism termed as Succinate Mediated Catabolite Repression (SMCR). Mechanism of catabolite repression determines the hierarchy of carbon source utilization in bacteria. Though the mechanism of catabolite repression has been well studied in model organisms like E. coli, B. subtilis and Pseudomonas sp., mechanism of SMCR in rhizobia has not been well elucidated. C4 acid uptake is important for effective symbioses while mutation in the sugar transport and utilization genes does not affect symbioses. Deletion of hpr and sma0113 resulted in the partial relief of SMCR of utilization of galactosides like lactose, raffinose and maltose in the presence of succinate. However, no such regulators governing SMCR of glucoside utilization have been identified till date. Though rhizobia can utilize multitude of sugars, high affinity transporters for many sugars are yet to be identified. Identifying high affinity sugar transporters and studying the mechanism of catabolite repression in rhizobia is important to understand the level of regulation of SMCR and the key regulators involved in SMCR.

  6. Bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keating, Niamh

    2009-10-01

    In addition to their roles in facilitating lipid digestion and absorption, bile acids are recognized as important regulators of intestinal function. Exposure to bile acids can dramatically influence intestinal transport and barrier properties; in recent years, they have also become appreciated as important factors in regulating cell growth and survival. Indeed, few cells reside within the intestinal mucosa that are not altered to some degree by exposure to bile acids. The past decade saw great advances in the knowledge of how bile acids exert their actions at the cellular and molecular levels. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the role of bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

  7. Ascorbic acid partly antagonizes resveratrol mediated heme oxygenase-1 but not paraoxonase-1 induction in cultured hepatocytes - role of the redox-regulated transcription factor Nrf2

    OpenAIRE

    Hori Osamu; Hashida Koji; Döring Frank; Schmelzer Constance; Schrader Charlotte; Breckwoldt Dorothea; Boesch-Saadatmandi Christine; Wagner Anika E; Matsugo Seiichi; Rimbach Gerald

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Both resveratrol and vitamin C (ascorbic acid) are frequently used in complementary and alternative medicine. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms for potential health benefits of resveratrol and its interactions with ascorbic acid. Methods The antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase-1 and paraoxonase-1 were analysed for their mRNA and protein levels in HUH7 liver cells treated with 10 and 25 μmol/l resveratrol in the absence and presence of 100 and 1000 μmo...

  8. The Kidney and Acid-Base Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeppen, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    Since the topic of the role of the kidneys in the regulation of acid base balance was last reviewed from a teaching perspective (Koeppen BM. Renal regulation of acid-base balance. Adv Physiol Educ 20: 132-141, 1998), our understanding of the specific membrane transporters involved in H+, HCO , and NH transport, and especially how these…

  9. Phytochrome-mediated regulation of plant respiration and photorespiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igamberdiev, Abir U; Eprintsev, Alexander T; Fedorin, Dmitry N; Popov, Vasily N

    2014-02-01

    The expression of genes encoding various enzymes participating in photosynthetic and respiratory metabolism is regulated by light via the phytochrome system. While many photosynthetic, photorespiratory and some respiratory enzymes, such as the rotenone-insensitive NADH and NADPH dehydrogenases and the alternative oxidase, are stimulated by light, succinate dehydrogenase, subunits of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, cytochrome oxidase and fumarase are inhibited via the phytochrome mechanism. The effect of light, therefore, imposes limitations on the tricarboxylic acid cycle and on the mitochondrial electron transport coupled to ATP synthesis, while the non-coupled pathways become activated. Phytochrome-mediated regulation of gene expression also creates characteristic distribution patterns of photosynthetic, photorespiratory and respiratory enzymes across the leaf generating different populations of mitochondria, either enriched by glycine decarboxylase (in the upper part) or by succinate dehydrogenase (in the bottom part of the leaf).

  10. Retinoic acid-mediated gene expression in transgenic reporter zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perz-Edwards, A; Hardison, N L; Linney, E

    2001-01-01

    Retinoic acid-mediated gene activation is important for normal vertebrate development. The size and nature of retinoic acid make it difficult to identify the precise cellular location of this signaling molecule throughout an embryo. Additionally, retinoic acid (RA) signaling is regulated by a complex combination of receptors, coactivators, and antagonizing proteins. Thus, in order to integrate these signals and identify regions within a whole developing embryo where cells can respond transcriptionally to retinoic acid, we have used a reporter transgenic approach. We have generated several stable lines of transgenic zebrafish which use retinoic acid response elements to drive fluorescent protein expression. In these zebrafish lines, transgene expression is localized to regions of the neural tube, retina, notochord, somites, heart, pronephric ducts, branchial arches, and jaw muscles in embryos and larvae. Transgene expression can be induced in additional regions of the neural tube and retina as well as the immature notochord, hatching gland, enveloping cell layer, and fin by exposing embryos to retinoic acid. Treatment with retinoic acid synthase inhibitors, citral and diethylaminobenzaldehyde (DEAB), during neurulation, greatly reduces transgene expression. DEAB treatment of embryos at gastrulation phenocopies the embryonic effects of vitamin A deprivation or targeted disruption of the RA synthase retinaldehyde dehydrogenase-2 in other vertebrates. Together these data suggest that the reporter expression we see in zebrafish is dependent upon conserved vertebrate pathways of RA synthesis.

  11. Abscisic acid, H2O2 and nitric oxide interactions mediated cold-induced S-adenosylmethionine synthetase in Medicago sativa subsp. falcata that confers cold tolerance through up-regulating polyamine oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhenfei; Tan, Jiali; Zhuo, Chunliu; Wang, Congying; Xiang, Bin; Wang, Zengyu

    2014-06-01

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (SAMS) is the key enzyme catalysing the formation of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a precursor of polyamines and ethylene. To investigate the potential role of SAMS in cold tolerance, we isolated MfSAMS1 from the cold-tolerant germplasm Medicago sativa subsp. falcata and analysed the association of SAM-derived polyamines with cold tolerance. The expression of MfSAMS1 in leaves was greatly induced by cold, abscisic acid (ABA), H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO). Our data revealed that ABA, H2O2 and NO interactions mediated the cold-induced MfSAMS1 expression and cold acclimation in falcata. SAM, putrescine, spermidine and spermine levels, ethylene production and polyamine oxidation were sequentially altered in response to cold, indicating that SAMS-derived SAM is preferentially used in polyamine synthesis and homeostasis during cold acclimation. Antioxidant enzyme activities were also induced in response to cold and showed correlation with polyamine oxidation. Overexpression of MfSAMS1 in tobacco resulted in elevated SAM levels, but polyamine levels and ethylene production in the transgenic plants were not significantly changed. Compared to the wild type, transgenic plants had increased levels of apoplastic H2O2, higher transcript levels of genes involved in polyamine synthesis and oxidation, and higher activities of polyamine oxidation and antioxidant enzymes. The results showed that overexpression of MfSAMS1 promoted polyamine synthesis and oxidation, which in turn improved H2 O2 -induced antioxidant protection, as a result enhanced tolerance to freezing and chilling stress in transgenic plants. This is the first report demonstrating that SAMS plays an important role in plant tolerance to cold via up-regulating polyamine oxidation.

  12. Regulation of hepatic gene expression by saturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallim, T; Salter, A M

    2010-01-01

    Diets rich in saturated fatty acids have long been associated with increased plasma cholesterol concentrations and hence increased risk of cardiovascular disease. More recently, they have also been suggested to promote the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. While there is now considerable evidence to suggest that polyunsaturated fatty acids exert many of their effects through regulating the activity of transcription factors, including peroxisome proliferator activated receptors, sterol regulatory binding proteins (SREBPs) and liver X receptor, our understanding of how saturated fatty acids act is still limited. Here we review the potential mechanisms whereby saturated fatty acids modulate hepatic lipid metabolism thereby impacting on the synthesis, storage and secretion of lipids. Evidence is presented that their effects are, at least partly, mediated through modulation of the activity of the SREBP family of transcription factors.

  13. Bile acid biosynthesis and its regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areta Hebanowska

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Bile acid biosynthesis is the main pathway of cholesterol catabolism. Bile acids are more soluble than cholesterol so are easier to excrete. As amphipathic molecules they participate in lipid digestion and absorption in the intestine and they help to excrete free cholesterol with bile. They are also ligands for nuclear receptors regulating the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism. Interconversion of cholesterol into bile acids is an important point of its homeostasis. Seventeen enzymes are engaged in this process and many of them are cytochromes P450. Bile acid synthesis initiation may proceed with the “classical” pathway (starting with cholesterol hydroxylation at the C7α position or the “alternative” pathway (starting with cholesterol hydroxylation at the C27 position. Two additional pathways are possible, though their quantitative significance is small (initiated with cholesterol hydroxylations of C24 and C25 positions. Oxysterols produced are not only intermediates of bile acid biosynthesis but also important regulators of metabolism. Bile acid biosynthesis takes place in the liver, but some enzymes are also present in other organs, where they participate in regulation of cholesterol metabolism. Those enzymes are potential targets for new drugs against cholesterol metabolism disturbances. This article is a brief description of the bile acid biosynthesis pathway and participating enzymes.

  14. PPARs Mediate the Regulation of Energy Metabolism By Long-Chain Fatty Acids%PPARs 在长链脂肪酸调控能量代谢中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚艳; 王宗保; 唐朝克

    2016-01-01

    过氧化物酶体增殖物激活受体α(PPARα)主要在肝脏中表达,饥饿时能诱导β-氧化与生酮作用相关基因和成纤维化生长因子21(FGF21)表达,这在肝脏的饥饿代谢适应中起重要作用。饥饿与耐力训练时,骨骼肌中,过氧化物酶体增殖物激活受体δ(PPARδ)能诱导长链脂肪酸(LCFAs)氧化基因、叉头转录因子(FOXO1)及 PPARδ共激活物α1(PGC1α)表达,其中,FOXO1和 PGC1α能调控糖代谢与线粒体生物发生。脂肪细胞中,PPARγ能介导 LCFAs 调控能量代谢,活化的PPARγ能诱导与 LCFAs 转化为甘油三酯形式储存相关的基因表达。脂联素,PPARγ的另一靶基因,能维持脂肪细胞的胰岛素敏感性。本文就 PPARs 在 LCFAs 调控能量代谢中的作用做一综述。%PPAR-alpha expressed primarily in liver is essential for metabolic adaptation to starvation by inducing genes for beta-oxidation and ketogenesis to increase the utility of LCFAs and fibroblast growth factor 21.PPAR-delta induces genes for LCFA oxidation during fasting and endurance exercise in skeletal muscle.PPAR-delta also regulates glucose metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis by inducing FOXO1 and PGC1-alpha.PPAR-gamma can induces the pathways to store LCFAs as triglycerides in adipocytes . Adiponectin,another important target of PPAR-gamma may maintain insulin sensitivity between adipo-cytes.The present review summarize that PPARs mediate the regulation of energy metabolism by long-chain fatty acids.

  15. A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arceo, Elena; Ellman, Jonathan; Bergman, Robert

    2010-05-03

    An alternative biomass-based route to benzoic acid from the renewable starting materials quinic acid and shikimic acid is described. Benzoic acid is obtained selectively using a highly efficient, one-step formic acid-mediated deoxygenation method.

  16. Fatty Acid Desaturases, Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Regulation, and Biotechnological Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Je Min Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs are considered to be critical nutrients to regulate human health and development, and numerous fatty acid desaturases play key roles in synthesizing PUFAs. Given the lack of delta-12 and -15 desaturases and the low levels of conversion to PUFAs, humans must consume some omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in their diet. Many studies on fatty acid desaturases as well as PUFAs have shown that fatty acid desaturase genes are closely related to different human physiological conditions. Since the first front-end desaturases from cyanobacteria were cloned, numerous desaturase genes have been identified and animals and plants have been genetically engineered to produce PUFAs such as eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. Recently, a biotechnological approach has been used to develop clinical treatments for human physiological conditions, including cancers and neurogenetic disorders. Thus, understanding the functions and regulation of PUFAs associated with human health and development by using biotechnology may facilitate the engineering of more advanced PUFA production and provide new insights into the complexity of fatty acid metabolism.

  17. Fatty Acid Desaturases, Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Regulation, and Biotechnological Advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Je Min; Lee, Hyungjae; Kang, SeokBeom; Park, Woo Jung

    2016-01-04

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are considered to be critical nutrients to regulate human health and development, and numerous fatty acid desaturases play key roles in synthesizing PUFAs. Given the lack of delta-12 and -15 desaturases and the low levels of conversion to PUFAs, humans must consume some omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in their diet. Many studies on fatty acid desaturases as well as PUFAs have shown that fatty acid desaturase genes are closely related to different human physiological conditions. Since the first front-end desaturases from cyanobacteria were cloned, numerous desaturase genes have been identified and animals and plants have been genetically engineered to produce PUFAs such as eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. Recently, a biotechnological approach has been used to develop clinical treatments for human physiological conditions, including cancers and neurogenetic disorders. Thus, understanding the functions and regulation of PUFAs associated with human health and development by using biotechnology may facilitate the engineering of more advanced PUFA production and provide new insights into the complexity of fatty acid metabolism.

  18. Negative regulation of RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling by TRK-fused gene (TFG) protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Na-Rae; Shin, Han-Bo; Kim, Hye-In; Choi, Myung-Soo; Inn, Kyung-Soo, E-mail: innks@khu.ac.kr

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •TRK-fused gene product (TFG) interacts with TRIM25 upon viral infection. •TFG negatively regulates RIG-I mediated antiviral signaling. •TFG depletion leads to enhanced viral replication. •TFG act downstream of MAVS. -- Abstract: RIG-I (retinoic acid inducible gene I)-mediated antiviral signaling serves as the first line of defense against viral infection. Upon detection of viral RNA, RIG-I undergoes TRIM25 (tripartite motif protein 25)-mediated K63-linked ubiquitination, leading to type I interferon (IFN) production. In this study, we demonstrate that TRK-fused gene (TFG) protein, previously identified as a TRIM25-interacting protein, binds TRIM25 upon virus infection and negatively regulates RIG-I-mediated type-I IFN signaling. RIG-I-mediated IFN production and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathways were upregulated by the suppression of TFG expression. Furthermore, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replication was significantly inhibited by small inhibitory hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of TFG, supporting the suppressive role of TFG in RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling. Interestingly, suppression of TFG expression increased not only RIG-I-mediated signaling but also MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein)-induced signaling, suggesting that TFG plays a pivotal role in negative regulation of RNA-sensing, RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) family signaling pathways.

  19. Emotion regulation mediates the effect of childhood trauma on depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopfinger, Lisa; Bockting, C. L. H.; Berking, Matthias; Ebert, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Childhood trauma increases the risks of both depression and dysfunctional emotion regulation, which is a factor that has been strongly linked to depression. Because of these demonstrated relationships, it can be hypothesized that dysfunctional emotion regulation is a mediator of the assoc

  20. Cyclic phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid induce hyaluronic acid synthesis via CREB transcription factor regulation in human skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda-Sano, Katsura; Gotoh, Mari; Morohoshi, Toshiro; Someya, Takao; Murofushi, Hiromu; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko

    2014-09-01

    Cyclic phosphatidic acid (cPA) is a naturally occurring phospholipid mediator and an analog of the growth factor-like phospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). cPA has a unique cyclic phosphate ring at the sn-2 and sn-3 positions of its glycerol backbone. We showed before that a metabolically stabilized cPA derivative, 2-carba-cPA, relieved osteoarthritis pathogenesis in vivo and induced hyaluronic acid synthesis in human osteoarthritis synoviocytes in vitro. This study focused on hyaluronic acid synthesis in human fibroblasts, which retain moisture and maintain health in the dermis. We investigated the effects of cPA and LPA on hyaluronic acid synthesis in human fibroblasts (NB1RGB cells). Using particle exclusion and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, we found that both cPA and LPA dose-dependently induced hyaluronic acid synthesis. We revealed that the expression of hyaluronan synthase 2 messenger RNA and protein is up-regulated by cPA and LPA treatment time dependently. We then characterized the signaling pathways up-regulating hyaluronic acid synthesis mediated by cPA and LPA in NB1RGB cells. Pharmacological inhibition and reporter gene assays revealed that the activation of the LPA receptor LPAR1, Gi/o protein, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) but not nuclear factor κB induced hyaluronic acid synthesis by the treatment with cPA and LPA in NB1RGB cells. These results demonstrate for the first time that cPA and LPA induce hyaluronic acid synthesis in human skin fibroblasts mainly through the activation of LPAR1-Gi/o followed by the PI3K, ERK, and CREB signaling pathway.

  1. Inferring RBP-Mediated Regulation in Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Lafzi

    Full Text Available RNA-binding proteins (RBPs play key roles in post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs. Dysregulations in RBP-mediated mechanisms have been found to be associated with many steps of cancer initiation and progression. Despite this, previous studies of gene expression in cancer have ignored the effect of RBPs. To this end, we developed a lasso regression model that predicts gene expression in cancer by incorporating RBP-mediated regulation as well as the effects of other well-studied factors such as copy-number variation, DNA methylation, TFs and miRNAs. As a case study, we applied our model to Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC data as we found that there are several RBPs differentially expressed in LUSC. Including RBP-mediated regulatory effects in addition to the other features significantly increased the Spearman rank correlation between predicted and measured expression of held-out genes. Using a feature selection procedure that accounts for the adaptive search employed by lasso regularization, we identified the candidate regulators in LUSC. Remarkably, several of these candidate regulators are RBPs. Furthermore, majority of the candidate regulators have been previously found to be associated with lung cancer. To investigate the mechanisms that are controlled by these regulators, we predicted their target gene sets based on our model. We validated the target gene sets by comparing against experimentally verified targets. Our results suggest that the future studies of gene expression in cancer must consider the effect of RBP-mediated regulation.

  2. Soluble Mediators Regulating Immunity in Early Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Aaron Pettengill

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Soluble factors in blood plasma have a substantial impact on both the innate and adaptive immune responses. The complement system, antibodies, and antimicrobial proteins and peptides (APPs, can directly interact with potential pathogens, protecting against systemic infection. The extracellular environment also has a critical influence on immune cell maturation, activation, and effector functions, and many of the factors in plasma, including hormones, vitamins, and purines, have been shown to influence these processes for leukocytes of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. In this review we give particular consideration to soluble mediators in plasma for which age-dependent differences in abundance may influence the ontogeny of immune function.

  3. COMMD1-mediated ubiquitination regulates CFTR trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Drévillon

    Full Text Available The CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein is a large polytopic protein whose biogenesis is inefficient. To better understand the regulation of CFTR processing and trafficking, we conducted a genetic screen that identified COMMD1 as a new CFTR partner. COMMD1 is a protein associated with multiple cellular pathways, including the regulation of hepatic copper excretion, sodium uptake through interaction with ENaC (epithelial sodium channel and NF-kappaB signaling. In this study, we show that COMMD1 interacts with CFTR in cells expressing both proteins endogenously. This interaction promotes CFTR cell surface expression as assessed by biotinylation experiments in heterologously expressing cells through regulation of CFTR ubiquitination. In summary, our data demonstrate that CFTR is protected from ubiquitination by COMMD1, which sustains CFTR expression at the plasma membrane. Thus, increasing COMMD1 expression may provide an approach to simultaneously inhibit ENaC absorption and enhance CFTR trafficking, two major issues in cystic fibrosis.

  4. Promotion of viral internal ribosomal entry site-mediated translation under amino acid starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licursi, Maria; Komatsu, Yumiko; Pongnopparat, Theerawat; Hirasawa, Kensuke

    2012-05-01

    Cap-dependent and internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-mediated translation are regulated differently within cells. Viral IRES-mediated translation often remains active when cellular cap-dependent translation is severely impaired under cellular stresses induced by virus infection. To investigate how cellular stresses influence the efficiency of viral IRES-mediated translation, we used a bicistronic luciferase reporter construct harbouring IRES elements from the following viruses: encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) or human rhinovirus (HRV). NIH3T3 cells transfected with these bicistronic reporter constructs were subjected to different cellular stresses. Increased translation initiation was only observed under amino acid starvation when EMCV or FMDV IRES elements were present. To identify cellular mechanisms that promoted viral IRES-mediated translation, we tested the involvement of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4E-BP), general control non-depressed 2 (GCN2) and eukaryotic initiation factor 2B (eIF2B), as these are known to be modulated under amino acid starvation. Knockdown of 4E-BP1 impaired the promotion of EMCV and FMDV IRES-mediated translation under amino acid starvation, whereas GCN2 and eIF2B were not involved. To further investigate how 4E-BP1 regulates translation initiated by EMCV and FMDV IRES elements, we used a phosphoinositide kinase-3 inhibitor (LY294002), an mTOR inhibitor (Torin1) or leucine starvation to mimic 4E-BP1 dephosphorylation induced by amino acid starvation. 4E-BP1 dephosphorylation induced by the treatments was not sufficient to promote viral IRES-mediated translation. These results suggest that 4E-BP1 regulates EMCV and FMDV IRES-mediated translation under amino acid starvation, but not via its dephosphorylation.

  5. Vitamin-mediated regulation of intestinal immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eKunisawa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The intestine is exposed continuously to complex environments created by numerous injurious and beneficial non-self antigens. The unique mucosal immune system in the intestine maintains the immunologic homeostasis between the host and the external environment. Crosstalk between immunocompetent cells and endogenous (e.g., cytokines and chemokines as well as exogenous factors (e.g., commensal bacteria and dietary materials achieves the vast diversity of intestinal immune functions. In addition to their vital roles as nutrients, vitamins now also are known to have immunologically crucial functions, specifically in regulating host immune responses. In this review, we focus on the immunologic functions of vitamins in regulating intestinal immune responses and their roles in moderating the fine balance between physiologic and pathologic conditions of the intestine.

  6. Negative regulators of brown adipose tissue (BAT)-mediated thermogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bal Krishan; Patil, Mallikarjun; Satyanarayana, Ande

    2014-12-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is specialized for energy expenditure, a process called adaptive thermogenesis. PET-CT scans recently demonstrated the existence of metabolically active BAT in adult humans, which revitalized our interest in BAT. Increasing the amount and/or activity of BAT holds tremendous promise for the treatment of obesity and its associated diseases. PGC1α is the master regulator of UCP1-mediated thermogenesis in BAT. A number of proteins have been identified to influence thermogenesis either positively or negatively through regulating the expression or transcriptional activity of PGC1α. Therefore, BAT activation can be achieved by either inducing the expression of positive regulators of PGC1α or by inhibiting the repressors of the PGC1α/UCP1 pathway. Here, we review the most important negative regulators of PGC1α/UCP1 signaling and their mechanism of action in BAT-mediated thermogenesis.

  7. The molecular clock mediates leptin-regulated bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Loning; Patel, Millan S; Bradley, Allan; Wagner, Erwin F; Karsenty, Gerard

    2005-09-01

    The hormone leptin is a regulator of bone remodeling, a homeostatic function maintaining bone mass constant. Mice lacking molecular-clock components (Per and Cry), or lacking Per genes in osteoblasts, display high bone mass, suggesting that bone remodeling may also be subject to circadian regulation. Moreover, Per-deficient mice experience a paradoxical increase in bone mass following leptin intracerebroventricular infusion. Thus, clock genes may mediate the leptin-dependent sympathetic regulation of bone formation. We show that expression of clock genes in osteoblasts is regulated by the sympathetic nervous system and leptin. Clock genes mediate the antiproliferative function of sympathetic signaling by inhibiting G1 cyclin expression. Partially antagonizing this inhibitory loop, leptin also upregulates AP-1 gene expression, which promotes cyclin D1 expression, osteoblast proliferation, and bone formation. Thus, leptin determines the extent of bone formation by modulating, via sympathetic signaling, osteoblast proliferation through two antagonistic pathways, one of which involves the molecular clock.

  8. Regulation of inflammation by short chain fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinolo, Marco A R; Rodrigues, Hosana G; Nachbar, Renato T; Curi, Rui

    2011-10-01

    The short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) acetate (C(2)), propionate (C(3)) and butyrate (C(4)) are the main metabolic products of anaerobic bacteria fermentation in the intestine. In addition to their important role as fuel for intestinal epithelial cells, SCFAs modulate different processes in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract such as electrolyte and water absorption. These fatty acids have been recognized as potential mediators involved in the effects of gut microbiota on intestinal immune function. SCFAs act on leukocytes and endothelial cells through at least two mechanisms: activation of GPCRs (GPR41 and GPR43) and inhibiton of histone deacetylase (HDAC). SCFAs regulate several leukocyte functions including production of cytokines (TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10), eicosanoids and chemokines (e.g., MCP-1 and CINC-2). The ability of leukocytes to migrate to the foci of inflammation and to destroy microbial pathogens also seems to be affected by the SCFAs. In this review, the latest research that describes how SCFAs regulate the inflammatory process is presented. The effects of these fatty acids on isolated cells (leukocytes, endothelial and intestinal epithelial cells) and, particularly, on the recruitment and activation of leukocytes are discussed. Therapeutic application of these fatty acids for the treatment of inflammatory pathologies is also highlighted.

  9. Regulation of Inflammation by Short Chain Fatty Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato T. Nachbar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The short chain fatty acids (SCFAs acetate (C2, propionate (C3 and butyrate (C4 are the main metabolic products of anaerobic bacteria fermentation in the intestine. In addition to their important role as fuel for intestinal epithelial cells, SCFAs modulate different processes in the gastrointestinal (GI tract such as electrolyte and water absorption. These fatty acids have been recognized as potential mediators involved in the effects of gut microbiota on intestinal immune function. SCFAs act on leukocytes and endothelial cells through at least two mechanisms: activation of GPCRs (GPR41 and GPR43 and inhibiton of histone deacetylase (HDAC. SCFAs regulate several leukocyte functions including production of cytokines (TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10, eicosanoids and chemokines (e.g., MCP-1 and CINC-2. The ability of leukocytes to migrate to the foci of inflammation and to destroy microbial pathogens also seems to be affected by the SCFAs. In this review, the latest research that describes how SCFAs regulate the inflammatory process is presented. The effects of these fatty acids on isolated cells (leukocytes, endothelial and intestinal epithelial cells and, particularly, on the recruitment and activation of leukocytes are discussed. Therapeutic application of these fatty acids for the treatment of inflammatory pathologies is also highlighted.

  10. Regulation of cadherin-mediated adhesion in morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbiner, Barry M

    2005-08-01

    Cadherin cell-adhesion proteins mediate many facets of tissue morphogenesis. The dynamic regulation of cadherins in response to various extracellular signals controls cell sorting, cell rearrangements and cell movements. Cadherins are regulated at the cell surface by an inside-out signalling mechanism that is analogous to the integrins in platelets and leukocytes. Signal-transduction pathways impinge on the catenins (cytoplasmic cadherin-associated proteins), which transduce changes across the membrane to alter the state of the cadherin adhesive bond.

  11. Arabidopsis YAK1 regulates abscisic acid response and drought resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dongjin

    2016-06-06

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone that controls several plant processes such as seed germination, seedling growth, and abiotic stress response. Here, we report that AtYak1 plays an important role in ABA signaling and postgermination growth in Arabidopsis. AtYak1 knockout mutant plants were hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of seed germination, cotyledon greening, seedling growth, and stomatal movement. atyak1-1 mutant plants display reduced drought stress resistance, as evidenced by water loss rate and survival rate. Molecular genetic analysis revealed that AtYak1 deficiency led to elevated expression of stomatal-related gene, MYB60, and down-regulation of several stress-responsive genes. Altogether, these results indicate that AtYak1 plays a role as a positive regulator in ABA-mediated drought response in Arabidopsis. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  12. Key mediators of intracellular amino acids signaling to mTORC1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yehui; Li, Fengna; Tan, Kunrong; Liu, Hongnan; Li, Yinghui; Liu, Yingying; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tang, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2015-05-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is activated by amino acids to promote cell growth via protein synthesis. Specifically, Ras-related guanosine triphosphatases (Rag GTPases) are activated by amino acids, and then translocate mTORC1 to the surface of late endosomes and lysosomes. Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) resides on this surface and directly activates mTORC1. Apart from the presence of intracellular amino acids, Rag GTPases and Rheb, other mediators involved in intracellular amino acid signaling to mTORC1 activation include human vacuolar sorting protein-34 (hVps34) and mitogen-activating protein kinase kinase kinase kinase-3 (MAP4K3). Those molecular links between mTORC1 and its mediators form a complicate signaling network that controls cellular growth, proliferation, and metabolism. Moreover, it is speculated that amino acid signaling to mTORC1 may start from the lysosomal lumen. In this review, we discussed the function of these mediators in mTORC1 pathway and how these mediators are regulated by amino acids in details.

  13. Global mapping of protein phosphorylation events identifies novel signalling hubs mediating fatty acid starvation responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pultz, Dennis; Bennetzen, Martin; Rødkær, Steven Vestergaard;

    2011-01-01

    in a temporal manner in response to inhibition of fatty acid synthesis by cerulenin. By in silico analysis of these phosphorylation events, we have identified the major downstream regulated processes and signalling networks mediating the cellular response to fatty acid starvation. The analysis further...

  14. Amino acid composition of alpha1/alpha2 domains and cytoplasmic tail of MHC class I molecules determine their susceptibility to human cytomegalovirus US11-mediated down-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barel, Martine T; Pizzato, Nathalie; van Leeuwen, Daphne; Bouteiller, Philippe Le; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J; Lenfant, Francoise

    2003-06-01

    During co-evolution with its host, human cytomegalovirus has acquired multiple defense mechanisms to escape from immune recognition. In this study, we focused on US11, which binds to MHC class I heavy chains and mediates their dislocation to the cytosol and subsequent degradation by proteasomes. To examine which domains of class I heavy chains are involved in this process, we constructed chimeric HLA molecules of US11-sensitive and -insensitive class I molecules (HLA-A2 and HLA-G, respectively). Pulse-chase experiments were performed to evaluate protein stability and interactions between class I heavy chains and US11. Flow cytometry was employed to assess the effect of US11 on surface expression of the different chimeras. Our results indicate that the alpha1 and alpha2 domains of HLA molecules are important for the affinity of US11 association. However, the degradation efficiency seems to rely mostly on cytosolic tail residues. We found that the nonclassical HLA-G molecule is insensitive to US11-mediated degradation solely because it lacks essential tail residues. A deletion of the last two tail residues in full-length MHC class I molecules already caused a severe reduction in degradation efficiency. Altogether, our data provide new insights into the mechanism by which US11 down-regulates MHC class I molecules.

  15. Phosphoric Acid-Mediated Synthesis of Vinyl Sulfones through Decarboxylative Coupling Reactions of Sodium Sulfinates with Phenylpropiolic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Guangwei; Mao, Jincheng; Yan, Hong; Zheng, Yang; Zhang, Guoqi

    2015-08-07

    A novel phosphoric acid -mediated synthesis of vinyl sulfones through decarboxylative coupling reactions of sodium sulfinates with phenylpropiolic acids is described. This transformation is efficient and environmentally friendly.

  16. Ligand Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Growth in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, Miyoshi; Sussman, Michael R

    2017-01-01

    Growth and development of multicellular organisms are coordinately regulated by various signaling pathways involving the communication of inter- and intracellular components. To form the appropriate body patterns, cellular growth and development are modulated by either stimulating or inhibiting these pathways. Hormones and second messengers help to mediate the initiation and/or interaction of the various signaling pathways in all complex multicellular eukaryotes. In plants, hormones include small organic molecules, as well as larger peptides and small proteins, which, as in animals, act as ligands and interact with receptor proteins to trigger rapid biochemical changes and induce the intracellular transcriptional and long-term physiological responses. During the past two decades, the availability of genetic and genomic resources in the model plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana, has greatly helped in the discovery of plant hormone receptors and the components of signal transduction pathways and mechanisms used by these immobile but highly complex organisms. Recently, it has been shown that two of the most important plant hormones, auxin and abscisic acid (ABA), act through signaling pathways that have not yet been recognized in animals. For example, auxins stimulate cell elongation by bringing negatively acting transcriptional repressor proteins to the proteasome to be degraded, thus unleashing the gene expression program required for increasing cell size. The "dormancy" inducing hormone, ABA, binds to soluble receptor proteins and inhibits a specific class of protein phosphatases (PP2C), which activates phosphorylation signaling leading to transcriptional changes needed for the desiccation of the seeds prior to entering dormancy. While these two hormone receptors have no known animal counterparts, there are also many similarities between animal and plant signaling pathways. For example, in plants, the largest single gene family in the genome is the protein kinase

  17. Estrogen regulates excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1) expression through sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) transacting FGFR-mediated ERK signaling in rat C6 astroglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C; Yuan, P; Wu, J; Huang, J

    2016-04-05

    Excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1) is one important subtype of the excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), and its absence can increase the vulnerability to oxidative stress in neural tissue. Enhanced expression of EAAC1 can provide neuroprotection in multiple disorders, including ischemia and multiple sclerosis. However, the mechanism regulating EAAC1 expression is not fully understood. Using rat C6 astroglial cells, which specifically express EAAC1, we found that 17β-estradiol (E2) and (±)-1-[(3aR(∗),4S(∗),9bS(∗))-4-(6-bromo-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-3a,4,5,9b-tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinolin-8-yl]-ethanone (G1), an agonist of the G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30), strongly increased EAAC1 protein levels and protected cells from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) toxicity. We further found that E2/G1 activated sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) via GPR30, resulting in the transcription of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), which stimulated its receptor (FGFR) and led to the phosphorylation of FGFR substrate 2α (FRS2α). This triggered downstream ERK1/2 signaling for the expression of EAAC1. Both the knockdown of FGF2 by siRNA and the pharmacological suppression of the FGFR-ERK cascade abolished the E2/G1 effect on EAAC1 expression. Overall, our work characterizes a signaling pathway by which E2 transactivates FGFR-ERK to induce EAAC1 expression in an FGF2-dependent manner. This occurs through SphK1 activation via GPR30 and leads to a resistance to H2O2 toxicity. This signal transduction pathway may provide novel insights into our understanding of the neuroprotective effects of E2 and may reveal new therapeutic targets or drugs for regulating the oxidative toxicity effects of various neurological diseases.

  18. Distinct amino acid-sensing mTOR pathways regulate skeletal myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Mee-Sup; Chen, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in response to amino acid availability controls many cellular and developmental processes. mTOR is a master regulator of myogenic differentiation, but the pathways mediating amino acid signals in this process are not known. Here we examine the Rag GTPases and the class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34, two mediators of amino acid signals upstream of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in cell growth regulation, for their potential involvement in myogenesis. We find that, although both Rag and Vps34 mediate amino acid activation of mTORC1 in C2C12 myoblasts, they have opposing functions in myogenic differentiation. Knockdown of RagA/B enhances, whereas overexpression of active RagB/C mutants impairs, differentiation, and this inhibitory function of Rag is mediated by mTORC1 suppression of the IRS1-PI3K-Akt pathway. On the other hand, Vps34 is required for myogenic differentiation. Amino acids activate a Vps34-phospholipase D1 (PLD1) pathway that controls the production of insulin-like growth factor II, an autocrine inducer of differentiation, through the Igf2 muscle enhancer. The product of PLD, phosphatidic acid, activates the enhancer in a rapamycin-sensitive but mTOR kinase-independent manner. Our results uncover amino acid-sensing mechanisms controlling the homeostasis of myogenesis and underline the versatility and context dependence of mTOR signaling.

  19. NMDA-mediated and Self-induced Bdnf Exon IV Transcriptions are Differentially Regulated in Cultured Cortical Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Fei; Wang, Hongbing

    2009-01-01

    Activity-dependent transcriptional up-regulation of bdnf (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) is involved in regulating many aspects of neuronal functions. The NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid)-mediated and BDNF-mediated exon IV transcription may represent mechanistically different responses, and relevant to activity-dependent changes in neurons. We found that the activities of ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase), CaM KII/IV (calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and IV), PI3K (phosphoi...

  20. MicroRNA-mediated regulation of flower development in grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoczynska, Aleksandra; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Flower structure in grasses is very unique. There are no petals or sepals like in eudicots but instead flowers develop bract-like structures - palea and lemma. Reproductive organs are enclosed by round lodicule that not only protects reproductive organs but also plays an important role during flower opening. The first genetic model for floral organ development was proposed 25 years ago and it was based on the research on model eudicots. Since then, studies have been carried out to answer the question whether this model could be applicable in the case of monocots. Genes from all classes found in eudicots have been also identified in genomes of such monocots like rice, maize or barley. What's more, it seems that miRNA-mediated regulation of floral organ genes that was observed in the case of Arabidopsis thaliana also takes place in monocots. MiRNA172, miRNA159, miRNA171 and miRNA396 regulate expression of floral organ identity genes in barley, rice and maize, affecting various features of the flower structure, ranging from formation of lemma and palea to the development of reproductive organs. A model of floral development in grasses and its genetic regulation is not yet fully characterized. Further studies on both, the model eudicots and grasses, are needed to unravel this topic. This review provides general overview of genetic model of flower organ identity specification in monocots and it's miRNA-mediated regulation.

  1. Valve-regulated lead-acid batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, D.

    Valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries with gelled electrolyte appeared as a niche market during the 1950s. During the 1970s, when glass-fiber felts became available as a further method to immobilize the electrolyte, the market for VRLA batteries expanded rapidly. The immobilized electrolyte offers a number of obvious advantages including the internal oxygen cycle which accommodates the overcharging current without chemical change within the cell. It also suppresses acid stratification and thus opens new fields of application. VRLA batteries, however, cannot be made completely sealed, but require a valve for gas escape, since hydrogen evolution and grid corrosion are unavoidable secondary reactions. These reactions result in water loss, and also must be balanced in order to ensure proper charging of both electrodes. Both secondary reactions have significant activation energies, and can reduce the service life of VRLA batteries, operated at elevated temperature. This effect can be aggravated by the comparatively high heat generation caused by the internal oxygen cycle during overcharging. Temperature control of VRLA batteries, therefore, is important in many applications.

  2. NFAT regulates calcium-sensing receptor-mediated TNF production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    abdullah, huda ismail; Pedraza, Paulina L.; Hao, Shoujin; Rodland, Karin D.; McGiff, John C.; Ferreri, Nicholas R.

    2006-05-01

    Because nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) has been implicated in TNF production as well as osmoregulation and salt and water homeostasis, we addressed whether calcium-sensing receptor (CaR)-mediated TNF production in medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) cells was NFAT dependent. TNF production in response to addition of extracellular Ca2+ (1.2 mM) was abolished in mTAL cells transiently transfected with a dominant-negative CaR construct (R796W) or pretreated with the phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (PI-PLC) inhibitor U-73122. Cyclosporine A (CsA), an inhibitor of the serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin, and a peptide ligand, VIVIT, that selectively inhibits calcineurin-NFAT signaling, also prevented CaR-mediated TNF production. Increases in calcineurin activity in cells challenged with Ca2+ were inhibited after pretreatment with U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that CaR activation increases calcineurin activity in a PI-PLC-dependent manner. Moreover, U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT inhibited CaR-dependent activity of an NFAT construct that drives expression of firefly luciferase in transiently transfected mTAL cells. Collectively, these data verify the role of calcineurin and NFAT in CaR-mediated TNF production by mTAL cells. Activation of the CaR also increased the binding of NFAT to a consensus oligonucleotide, an effect that was blocked by U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that a calcineurin- and NFAT-dependent pathway increases TNF production in mTAL cells. This mechanism likely regulates TNF gene transcription as U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT blocked CaR-dependent activity of a TNF promoter construct. Elucidating CaR-mediated signaling pathways that regulate TNF production in the mTAL will be crucial to understanding mechanisms that regulate extracellular fluid volume and salt balance.

  3. NFAT regulates calcium-sensing receptor-mediated TNF production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Huda Ismail; Pedraza, Paulina L; Hao, Shoujin; Rodland, Karin D; McGiff, John C; Ferreri, Nicholas R

    2006-05-01

    Because nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) has been implicated in TNF production as well as osmoregulation and salt and water homeostasis, we addressed whether calcium-sensing receptor (CaR)-mediated TNF production in medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) cells was NFAT dependent. TNF production in response to addition of extracellular Ca(2+) (1.2 mM) was abolished in mTAL cells transiently transfected with a dominant-negative CaR construct (R796W) or pretreated with the phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (PI-PLC) inhibitor U-73122. Cyclosporine A (CsA), an inhibitor of the serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin, and a peptide ligand, VIVIT, that selectively inhibits calcineurin-NFAT signaling, also prevented CaR-mediated TNF production. Increases in calcineurin activity in cells challenged with Ca(2+) were inhibited after pretreatment with U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that CaR activation increases calcineurin activity in a PI-PLC-dependent manner. Moreover, U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT inhibited CaR-dependent activity of an NFAT construct that drives expression of firefly luciferase in transiently transfected mTAL cells. Collectively, these data verify the role of calcineurin and NFAT in CaR-mediated TNF production by mTAL cells. Activation of the CaR also increased the binding of NFAT to a consensus oligonucleotide, an effect that was blocked by U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that a calcineurin- and NFAT-dependent pathway increases TNF production in mTAL cells. This mechanism likely regulates TNF gene transcription as U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT blocked CaR-dependent activity of a TNF promoter construct. Elucidating CaR-mediated signaling pathways that regulate TNF production in the mTAL will be crucial to understanding mechanisms that regulate extracellular fluid volume and salt balance.

  4. DMPD: Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18703349 Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. Komur...Show Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. PubmedID 18703349 Title Negative r...egulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. Authors Komuro A, Bamm

  5. The Anti-Apoptotic and Cardioprotective Effects of Salvianolic Acid A on Rat Cardiomyocytes following Ischemia/Reperfusion by DUSP-Mediated Regulation of the ERK1/2/JNK Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiuping; Zhu, Shasha; Liu, Yang; Pan, Defeng; Chen, Xiaohu; Li, Dongye

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the effects of salvianolic acid A (SAA) pretreatment on the myocardium during ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and to illuminate the interrelationships among dual specificity protein phosphatase (DUSP) 2/4/16, ERK1/2 and JNK pathways during myocardial I/R, with the ultimate goal of elucidating how SAA exerts cardioprotection against I/R injury (IRI). Wistar rats were divided into the following six groups: control group (CON), I/R group, SAA+I/R group, ERK1/2 inhibitor PD098059+I/R group (PD+I/R), PD+SAA+I/R group, and JNK inhibitor SP600125+I/R group (SP+I/R). The cardioprotective effects of SAA on the myocardium during I/R were investigated with a Langendorff device. Heart rate (HR), left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP), left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), maximum rate of ventricular pressure rise and fall (±dp/dtmax), myocardial infarction areas (MIA), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and cardiomyocytes apoptosis were monitored. To determine the crosstalk betwee JNK and ERK1/2 via DUSP2/4/16 with SAA pretreatment, siRNA-DUSP2/4/16 were performed. The expression levels of Bcl-2, Bax, caspase 3, p-JNK, p-ERK1/2 and DUSP2/4/16 in cardiomyocytes were assayed by Western blot. Our results showed that LDH, MIA and cell apoptosis were decreased, and various parameters of heart function were improved by SAA pretreatment and SP application. In the I/R group, the expression levels of p-ERK1/2 and DUSP4/16 were not significantly different compared with the CON group, however, the protein expression levels of p-ERK1/2, Bcl-2 and DUSP4/16 were higher, while p-JNK, Bax, caspase 3 and DUSP2 levels were reduced among the SAA+I/R, PD+SAA+I/R and SP+I/R groups. The above indices were not significantly different between the SAA+I/R and SP+I/R groups. Compared with the SAA+I/R group, p-ERK1/2 was increased and p-JNK was decreased in the SAA+si-DUSP2+I/R, however, p-ERK was downregulated and p-JNK was upregulated in SAA+si-DUSP4+I

  6. The anti-apoptotic and cardioprotective effects of salvianolic acid a on rat cardiomyocytes following ischemia/reperfusion by DUSP-mediated regulation of the ERK1/2/JNK pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongda Xu

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to observe the effects of salvianolic acid A (SAA pretreatment on the myocardium during ischemia/reperfusion (I/R and to illuminate the interrelationships among dual specificity protein phosphatase (DUSP 2/4/16, ERK1/2 and JNK pathways during myocardial I/R, with the ultimate goal of elucidating how SAA exerts cardioprotection against I/R injury (IRI. Wistar rats were divided into the following six groups: control group (CON, I/R group, SAA+I/R group, ERK1/2 inhibitor PD098059+I/R group (PD+I/R, PD+SAA+I/R group, and JNK inhibitor SP600125+I/R group (SP+I/R. The cardioprotective effects of SAA on the myocardium during I/R were investigated with a Langendorff device. Heart rate (HR, left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP, maximum rate of ventricular pressure rise and fall (±dp/dtmax, myocardial infarction areas (MIA, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, and cardiomyocytes apoptosis were monitored. To determine the crosstalk betwee JNK and ERK1/2 via DUSP2/4/16 with SAA pretreatment, siRNA-DUSP2/4/16 were performed. The expression levels of Bcl-2, Bax, caspase 3, p-JNK, p-ERK1/2 and DUSP2/4/16 in cardiomyocytes were assayed by Western blot. Our results showed that LDH, MIA and cell apoptosis were decreased, and various parameters of heart function were improved by SAA pretreatment and SP application. In the I/R group, the expression levels of p-ERK1/2 and DUSP4/16 were not significantly different compared with the CON group, however, the protein expression levels of p-ERK1/2, Bcl-2 and DUSP4/16 were higher, while p-JNK, Bax, caspase 3 and DUSP2 levels were reduced among the SAA+I/R, PD+SAA+I/R and SP+I/R groups. The above indices were not significantly different between the SAA+I/R and SP+I/R groups. Compared with the SAA+I/R group, p-ERK1/2 was increased and p-JNK was decreased in the SAA+si-DUSP2+I/R, however, p-ERK was downregulated and p-JNK was upregulated in SAA+si-DUSP4

  7. Nitrite attenuated hypochlorous acid-mediated heme degradation in hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Naihao; Li, Jiayu; Ren, Xiaoming; Tian, Rong; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2015-08-05

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is elevated in many inflammatory diseases and causes the accumulation of free iron. Through the Fenton reaction, free iron has the ability to generate free radicals and subsequently is toxic. Recent studies have demonstrated that HOCl participates in heme destruction of hemoglobin (Hb) and free iron release. In this study, it was showed that nitrite (NO2(-)) could prevent HOCl-mediated Hb heme destruction and free iron release. Also, NO2(-) prevented HOCl-mediated loss of Hb peroxidase activity. After the NO2(-)/HOCl treatment, Tyr 42 in α-chain was found to be nitrated in Hb, attenuating the electron transferring abilities of phenolic compounds. The protective effects of NO2(-) on HOCl-induced heme destruction were attributed to its reduction of ferryl Hb and/or direct scavenging of HOCl. Therefore, NO2(-) could show protective effects in some inflammatory diseases by preventing HOCl-mediated heme destruction of hemoproteins and free iron release.

  8. Lysophosphatidic acid as a phospholipid mediator: pathways of synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaits, F; Fourcade, O; Le Balle, F; Gueguen, G; Gaigé, B; Gassama-Diagne, A; Fauvel, J; Salles, J P; Mauco, G; Simon, M F; Chap, H

    1997-06-23

    From very recent studies, including molecular cloning of cDNA coding for membrane receptors, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) reached the status of a novel phospholipid mediator with various biological activities. Another strong argument supporting this view was the discovery that LPA is secreted from activated platelets, resulting in its appearance in serum upon blood coagulation. The metabolic pathways as well as the enzymes responsible for LPA production are poorly characterized. However, a survey of literature data indicates some interesting issues which might be used as the basis for further molecular characterization of phospholipases A able to degrade phosphatidic acid.

  9. Connexin43 hemichannel-mediated regulation of connexin43.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many signaling molecules and pathways that regulate gap junctions (GJs protein expression and function are, in fact, also controlled by GJs. We, therefore, speculated an existence of the GJ channel-mediated self-regulation of GJs. Using a cell culture model in which nonjunctional connexin43 (Cx43 hemichannels were activated by cadmium (Cd(2+, we tested this hypothesis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Incubation of Cx43-transfected LLC-PK1 cells with Cd(2+ led to an increased expression of Cx43. This effect of Cd(2+ was tightly associated with JNK activation. Inhibition of JNK abolished the elevation of Cx43. Further analysis revealed that the changes of JNK and Cx43 were controlled by GSH. Supplement of a membrane-permeable GSH analogue GSH ethyl ester or GSH precursor N-acetyl-cystein abrogated the effects of Cd(2+ on JNK activation and Cx43 expression. Indeed, Cd(2+ induced extracellular release of GSH. Blockade of Cx43 hemichannels with heptanol or Cx43 mimetic peptide Gap26 to prevent the efflux of GSH significantly attenuated the Cx43-elevating effects of Cd(2+. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our results thus indicate that Cd(2+-induced upregulation of Cx43 is through activation of nonjunctional Cx43 hemichannels. Our findings thus support the existence of a hemichannel-mediated self-regulation of Cx43 and provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of Cx43 expression and function.

  10. Unsaturated fatty acids induce mesenchymal stem cells to increase secretion of angiogenic mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andria N; Muffley, Lara A; Bell, Austin N; Numhom, Surawej; Hocking, Anne M

    2012-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) represent emerging cell-based therapies for diabetes and associated complications. Ongoing clinical trials are using exogenous MSC to treat type 1 and 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and non-healing wounds due to diabetes. The majority of these trials are aimed at exploiting the ability of these multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells to release soluble mediators that reduce inflammation and promote both angiogenesis and cell survival at sites of tissue damage. Growing evidence suggests that MSC secretion of soluble factors is dependent on tissue microenvironment. Despite the contribution of fatty acids to the metabolic environment of type 2 diabetes, almost nothing is known about their effects on MSC secretion of growth factors and cytokines. In this study, human bone marrow-derived MSC were exposed to linoleic acid, an omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid, or oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, for seven days in the presence of 5.38 mM glucose. Outcomes measured included MSC proliferation, gene expression, protein secretion and chemotaxis. Linoleic and oleic acids inhibited MSC proliferation and altered MSC expression and secretion of known mediators of angiogenesis. Both unsaturated fatty acids induced MSC to increase secretion of interleukin-6, VEGF and nitric oxide. In addition, linoleic acid but not oleic acid induced MSC to increase production of interleukin-8. Collectively these data suggest that exposure to fatty acids may have functional consequences for MSC therapy. Fatty acids may affect MSC engraftment to injured tissue and MSC secretion of cytokines and growth factors that regulate local cellular responses to injury.

  11. Polyunsaturated fatty acid-derived lipid mediators and T cell function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eNicolaou

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acids are involved in T cell biology both as nutrients important for energy production as well as signalling molecules. In particular, polyunsaturated fatty acids are known to exhibit a range of immunomodulatory properties that progress through T cell mediated events, although the molecular mechanisms of these actions have not yet been fully elucidated. Some of these immune activities are linked to polyunsaturated fatty acid-induced alteration of the composition of cellular membranes and the consequent changes in signalling pathways linked to membrane raft associated proteins. However, significant aspects of the polyunsaturated fatty acid bioactivities are mediated through their transformation to specific lipid mediators, products of cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase or cytochrome P450 enzymatic reactions. Resulting bioactive metabolites including prostaglandins, leukotrienes and endocannabinoids are produced by and/or act upon T leukocytes through cell surface receptors and have been shown to alter T cell activation and differentiation, proliferation, cytokine production, motility and homing events. Detailed appreciation of the mode of action of these lipids presents opportunities for the design and development of therapeutic strategies aimed at regulating T cell function.

  12. Tannic acid-mediated green synthesis of antibacterial silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Yoon; Cha, Song-Hyun; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie

    2016-04-01

    The search for novel antibacterial agents is necessary to combat microbial resistance to current antibiotics. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been reported to be effective antibacterial agents. Tannic acid is a polyphenol compound from plants with antioxidant and antibacterial activities. In this report, AgNPs were prepared from silver ions by tannic acid-mediated green synthesis (TA-AgNPs). The reaction process was facile and involved mixing both silver ions and tannic acid. The absorbance at 423 nm in the UV-Visible spectra demonstrated that tannic acid underwent a reduction reaction to produce TA-AgNPs from silver ions. The synthetic yield of TA-AgNPs was 90.5% based on inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images indicated that spherical-shaped TA-AgNPs with a mean particle size of 27.7-46.7 nm were obtained. Powder high-resolution X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the TA-AgNP structure was face-centered cubic with a zeta potential of -27.56 mV. The hydroxyl functional groups of tannic acid contributed to the synthesis of TA-AgNPs, which was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The in vitro antibacterial activity was measured using the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method. The TA-AgNPs were more effective against Gram-negative bacteria than Gram-positive bacteria. The MIC for the TA-AgNPs in all of the tested strains was in a silver concentration range of 6.74-13.48 μg/mL. The tannic acid-mediated synthesis of AgNPs afforded biocompatible nanocomposites for antibacterial applications.

  13. Endogenous TasiRNAs mediate non-cell autonomous effects on gene regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Schwab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Different classes of small RNAs (sRNAs refine the expression of numerous genes in higher eukaryotes by directing protein partners to complementary nucleic acids, where they mediate gene silencing. Plants encode a unique class of sRNAs, called trans-acting small interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs, which post-transcriptionally regulate protein-coding transcripts, as do microRNAs (miRNAs, and both sRNA classes control development through their targets. TasiRNA biogenesis requires multiple components of the siRNA pathway and also miRNAs. But while 21mer siRNAs originating from transgenes can mediate silencing across several cell layers, miRNA action seems spatially restricted to the producing or closely surrounding cells. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have previously described the isolation of a genetrap reporter line for TAS3a, the major locus producing AUXIN RESPONS FACTOR (ARF-regulating tasiRNAs in the Arabidopsis shoot. Its activity is limited to the adaxial (upper side of leaf primordia, thus spatially isolated from ARF-activities, which are located in the abaxial (lower side. We show here by in situ hybridization and reporter fusions that the silencing activities of ARF-regulating tasiRNAs are indeed manifested non-cell autonomously to spatially control ARF activities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Endogenous tasiRNAs are thus mediators of a mobile developmental signal and might provide effective gene silencing at a distance beyond the reach of most miRNAs.

  14. Arfaptin-1 negatively regulates Arl1-mediated retrograde transport.

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    Lien-Hung Huang

    Full Text Available The small GTPase Arf-like protein 1 (Arl1 is well known for its role in intracellular vesicular transport at the trans-Golgi network (TGN. In this study, we used differential affinity chromatography combined with mass spectrometry to identify Arf-interacting protein 1b (arfaptin-1b as an Arl1-interacting protein and characterized a novel function for arfaptin-1 (including the arfaptin-1a and 1b isoforms in Arl1-mediated retrograde transport. Using a Shiga-toxin subunit B (STxB transportation assay, we demonstrated that knockdown of arfaptin-1 accelerated the retrograde transport of STxB from the endosome to the Golgi apparatus, whereas Arl1 knockdown inhibited STxB transport compared with control cells. Arfaptin-1 overexpression, but not an Arl1 binding-defective mutant (arfaptin-1b-F317A, consistently inhibited STxB transport. Exogenous arfaptin-1 expression did not interfere with the localization of the Arl1-interacting proteins golgin-97 and golgin-245 to the TGN and vice versa. Moreover, we found that the N-terminal region of arfaptin-1 was involved in the regulation of retrograde transport. Our results show that arfaptin-1 acts as a negative regulator in Arl1-mediated retrograde transport and suggest that different functional complexes containing Arl1 form in distinct microdomains and are responsible for different functions.

  15. Cargo recognition and cargo-mediated regulation of unconventional myosins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing; Li, Jianchao; Zhang, Mingjie

    2014-10-21

    Organized motions are hallmarks of living organisms. Such motions range from collective cell movements during development and muscle contractions at the macroscopic scale all the way down to cellular cargo (e.g., various biomolecules and organelles) transportation and mechanoforce sensing at more microscopic scales. Energy required for these biological motions is almost invariably provided by cellular chemical fuels in the form of nucleotide triphosphate. Biological systems have designed a group of nanoscale engines, known as molecular motors, to convert cellular chemical fuels into mechanical energy. Molecular motors come in various forms including cytoskeleton motors (myosin, kinesin, and dynein), nucleic-acid-based motors, cellular membrane-based rotary motors, and so on. The main focus of this Account is one subfamily of actin filament-based motors called unconventional myosins (other than muscle myosin II, the remaining myosins are collectively referred to as unconventional myosins). In general, myosins can use ATP to fuel two types of mechanomotions: dynamic tethering actin filaments with various cellular compartments or structures and actin filament-based intracellular transport. In contrast to rich knowledge accumulated over many decades on ATP hydrolyzing motor heads and their interactions with actin filaments, how various myosins recognize their specific cargoes and whether and how cargoes can in return regulate functions of motors are less understood. Nonetheless, a series of biochemical and structural investigations in the past few years, including works from our own laboratory, begin to shed lights on these latter questions. Some myosins (e.g., myosin-VI) can function both as cellular transporters and as mechanical tethers. To function as a processive transporter, myosins need to form dimers or multimers. To be a mechanical tether, a monomeric myosin is sufficient. It has been shown for myosin-VI that its cellular cargo proteins can play critical roles

  16. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK mediates nutrient regulation of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP in pancreatic beta-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maayan Shaked

    Full Text Available Thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP regulates critical biological processes including inflammation, stress and apoptosis. TXNIP is upregulated by glucose and is a critical mediator of hyperglycemia-induced beta-cell apoptosis in diabetes. In contrast, the saturated long-chain fatty acid palmitate, although toxic to the beta-cell, inhibits TXNIP expression. The mechanisms involved in the opposing effects of glucose and fatty acids on TXNIP expression are unknown. We found that both palmitate and oleate inhibited TXNIP in a rat beta-cell line and islets. Palmitate inhibition of TXNIP was independent of fatty acid beta-oxidation or esterification. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK has an important role in cellular energy sensing and control of metabolic homeostasis; therefore we investigated its involvement in nutrient regulation of TXNIP. As expected, glucose inhibited whereas palmitate stimulated AMPK. Pharmacologic activators of AMPK mimicked fatty acids by inhibiting TXNIP. AMPK knockdown increased TXNIP expression in presence of high glucose with and without palmitate, indicating that nutrient (glucose and fatty acids effects on TXNIP are mediated in part via modulation of AMPK activity. TXNIP is transcriptionally regulated by carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP. Palmitate inhibited glucose-stimulated ChREBP nuclear entry and recruitment to the Txnip promoter, thereby inhibiting Txnip transcription. We conclude that AMPK is an important regulator of Txnip transcription via modulation of ChREBP activity. The divergent effects of glucose and fatty acids on TXNIP expression result in part from their opposing effects on AMPK activity. In light of the important role of TXNIP in beta-cell apoptosis, its inhibition by fatty acids can be regarded as an adaptive/protective response to glucolipotoxicity. The finding that AMPK mediates nutrient regulation of TXNIP may have important implications for the pathophysiology and treatment

  17. Copper(I) mediated cross-coupling of amino acid derived organozinc reagents with acid chlorides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmgaard, Thomas; Tanner, David Ackland

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a straightforward experimental protocol for copper-mediated cross-coupling of amino acid derived beta-amido-alkylzinc iodides 1 and 3 with a range of acid chlorides. The present method uses CuCN center dot 2LiCl as the copper source and for organozinc reagent...... 1 the methodology appears to be limited to reaction with more stable acid chlorides, providing the desired products in moderate yields. When applied to organozinc reagent 3, however, the protocol is more general and provides the products in good yields in all but one of the cases tested....

  18. Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Mediates Glycemic Regulation by Hepatic JNK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Vernia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The cJun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK-signaling pathway is implicated in metabolic syndrome, including dysregulated blood glucose concentration and insulin resistance. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 is a target of the hepatic JNK-signaling pathway and may contribute to the regulation of glycemia. To test the role of FGF21, we established mice with selective ablation of the Fgf21 gene in hepatocytes. FGF21 deficiency in the liver caused marked loss of FGF21 protein circulating in the blood. Moreover, the protective effects of hepatic JNK deficiency to suppress metabolic syndrome in high-fat diet-fed mice were not observed in mice with hepatocyte-specific FGF21 deficiency, including reduced blood glucose concentration and reduced intolerance to glucose and insulin. Furthermore, we show that JNK contributes to the regulation of hepatic FGF21 expression during fasting/feeding cycles. These data demonstrate that the hepatokine FGF21 is a key mediator of JNK-regulated metabolic syndrome.

  19. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification for detection of nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Nathan A; Evans, Thomas C

    2014-01-06

    Sequence-specific isothermal nucleic acid amplification techniques are ideally suited for use in molecular diagnostic applications because they do not require thermal cycling equipment and the reactions are typically fast. One of the most widely cited isothermal techniques is termed loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). This protocol allows amplification times as fast as 5 to 10 min. Furthermore, various methodologies to detect amplification have been applied to LAMP to increase its utility for the point-of-care market. Basic LAMP protocols are provided herein for detection of specific DNA and RNA targets, along with a method to perform multiplex LAMP reactions, permitting even greater flexibility from this powerful technique.

  20. The effect pathway of retinoic acid through regulation of retinoic acid receptor in gastric cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Liu; Qiao Wu; Zheng-Ming Chen; Wen-Jin Su

    2001-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the role of RARa gene in mediating the growth inhibitory effect of ail-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)on gastric cancer cells.``METHODS The expression levels of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in gastric cancer cells were detected by Northern blot. Transient transfection and chlorophenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) assay were used to show the transcriptional activity of β retinoic acid response element (βRARE) and AP-l activity. Cell growth inhibition was determined by MTT assay and anchorage-independent growth assay, respectively. Stable transfection was performed by the method of Lipofectamine, and the cells were screened by G418.``RESULTS ATRA could induce expression level of RARα in MGC80-3, BGCC8823 and SGC-7901 cells obviously,resulting in growth inhibition of these cell lines. After sense RARa gene was transfected into MKN-45 cells that expressed rather Iow level of RARα and could not be induced by ATRA, the cell growth was inhibited by ATRA markedly. In contrast, when antisense RARα gene was transfected into BGC-825 cells, a little inhibitory effect by ATRA was seen, compared with the parallel BGC-823cells. In transient transfection assay, ATRA effectively induced transcriptional activity of βRARE in MGC80-3,BGC.823, SGC-7902 and MKN/RARa cell lines, but not in MKN-45 and BGC/aRARa cell lines. Similar results were observed in measuring anti-AP-l activity by ATRA in these cancer cell lines.``CONCLUSION ATRA inhibits the growth of gastric cancer cells by up-regulating the level of RARa; RARa is the major mediator of ATRA action in gastric cancer cells; and adequate level of RAPa is required for ATRA effect on gastric cancer cells.``

  1. Mechanisms of gene regulation by fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgiadi, A.; Kersten, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of specific dietary fatty acids has been shown to influence risk and progression of several chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, cancer, and arthritis. In recent years, insights into the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of fatty acids have improved consi

  2. GH3-mediated auxin homeostasis links growth regulation with stress adaptation response in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Eun; Park, Ju-Young; Kim, Youn-Sung; Staswick, Paul E; Jeon, Jin; Yun, Ju; Kim, Sun-Young; Kim, Jungmook; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Park, Chung-Mo

    2007-03-30

    Plants constantly monitor environmental fluctuations to optimize their growth and metabolism. One example is adaptive growth occurring in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we demonstrate that GH3-mediated auxin homeostasis is an essential constituent of the complex network of auxin actions that regulates stress adaptation responses in Arabidopsis. Endogenous auxin pool is regulated, at least in part, through negative feedback by a group of auxin-inducible GH3 genes encoding auxin-conjugating enzymes. An Arabidopsis mutant, wes1-D, in which a GH3 gene WES1 is activated by nearby insertion of the (35)S enhancer, exhibited auxin-deficient traits, including reduced growth and altered leaf shape. Interestingly, WES1 is also induced by various stress conditions as well as by salicylic acid and abscisic acid. Accordingly, wes1-D was resistant to both biotic and abiotic stresses, and stress-responsive genes, such as pathogenesis-related genes and CBF genes, were upregulated in this mutant. In contrast, a T-DNA insertional mutant showed reduced stress resistance. We therefore propose that GH3-mediated growth suppression directs reallocation of metabolic resources to resistance establishment and represents the fitness costs of induced resistance.

  3. Regulation of Connexin-Based Channels by Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puebla, Carlos; Retamal, Mauricio A; Acuña, Rodrigo; Sáez, Juan C

    2017-01-01

    In this mini-review, we briefly summarize the current knowledge about the effects of fatty acids (FAs) on connexin-based channels, as well as discuss the limited information about the impact FAs may have on pannexins (Panxs). FAs regulate diverse cellular functions, some of which are explained by changes in the activity of channels constituted by connexins (Cxs) or Panxs, which are known to play critical roles in maintaining the functional integrity of diverse organs and tissues. Cxs are transmembrane proteins that oligomerize into hexamers to form hemichannels (HCs), which in turn can assemble into dodecamers to form gap junction channels (GJCs). While GJCs communicate the cytoplasm of contacting cells, HCs serve as pathways for the exchange of ions and small molecules between the intra and extracellular milieu. Panxs, as well as Cx HCs, form channels at the plasma membrane that enable the interchange of molecules between the intra and extracellular spaces. Both Cx- and Panx-based channels are controlled by several post-translational modifications. However, the mechanism of action of FAs on these channels has not been described in detail. It has been shown however that FAs frequently decrease GJC-mediated cell-cell communication. The opposite effect also has been described for HC or Panx-dependent intercellular communication, where, the acute FA effect can be reversed upon washout. Additionally, changes in GJCs mediated by FAs have been associated with post-translational modifications (e.g., phosphorylation), and seem to be directly related to chemical properties of FAs (e.g., length of carbon chain and/or degree of saturation), but this possible link remains poorly understood.

  4. Regulation of Connexin-Based Channels by Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puebla, Carlos; Retamal, Mauricio A.; Acuña, Rodrigo; Sáez, Juan C.

    2017-01-01

    In this mini-review, we briefly summarize the current knowledge about the effects of fatty acids (FAs) on connexin-based channels, as well as discuss the limited information about the impact FAs may have on pannexins (Panxs). FAs regulate diverse cellular functions, some of which are explained by changes in the activity of channels constituted by connexins (Cxs) or Panxs, which are known to play critical roles in maintaining the functional integrity of diverse organs and tissues. Cxs are transmembrane proteins that oligomerize into hexamers to form hemichannels (HCs), which in turn can assemble into dodecamers to form gap junction channels (GJCs). While GJCs communicate the cytoplasm of contacting cells, HCs serve as pathways for the exchange of ions and small molecules between the intra and extracellular milieu. Panxs, as well as Cx HCs, form channels at the plasma membrane that enable the interchange of molecules between the intra and extracellular spaces. Both Cx- and Panx-based channels are controlled by several post-translational modifications. However, the mechanism of action of FAs on these channels has not been described in detail. It has been shown however that FAs frequently decrease GJC-mediated cell-cell communication. The opposite effect also has been described for HC or Panx-dependent intercellular communication, where, the acute FA effect can be reversed upon washout. Additionally, changes in GJCs mediated by FAs have been associated with post-translational modifications (e.g., phosphorylation), and seem to be directly related to chemical properties of FAs (e.g., length of carbon chain and/or degree of saturation), but this possible link remains poorly understood. PMID:28174541

  5. RNA-Mediated Regulation of HMGA1 Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arndt G. Benecke

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The high mobility group protein A1 (HMGA1 is a master regulator of chromatin structure mediating its major gene regulatory activity by direct interactions with A/T-rich DNA sequences located in the promoter and enhancer regions of a large variety of genes. HMGA1 DNA-binding through three AT-hook motifs results in an open chromatin structure and subsequently leads to changes in gene expression. Apart from its significant expression during development, HMGA1 is over-expressed in virtually every cancer, where HMGA1 expression levels correlate with tumor malignancy. The exogenous overexpression of HMGA1 can lead to malignant cell transformation, assigning the protein a key role during cancerogenesis. Recent studies have unveiled highly specific competitive interactions of HMGA1 with cellular and viral RNAs also through an AT-hook domain of the protein, significantly impacting the HMGA1-dependent gene expression. In this review, we discuss the structure and function of HMGA1-RNA complexes during transcription and epigenomic regulation and their implications in HMGA1-related diseases.

  6. Prox1 regulates the notch1-mediated inhibition of neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Kaltezioti

    Full Text Available Activation of Notch1 signaling in neural progenitor cells (NPCs induces self-renewal and inhibits neurogenesis. Upon neuronal differentiation, NPCs overcome this inhibition, express proneural genes to induce Notch ligands, and activate Notch1 in neighboring NPCs. The molecular mechanism that coordinates Notch1 inactivation with initiation of neurogenesis remains elusive. Here, we provide evidence that Prox1, a transcription repressor and downstream target of proneural genes, counteracts Notch1 signaling via direct suppression of Notch1 gene expression. By expression studies in the developing spinal cord of chick and mouse embryo, we showed that Prox1 is limited to neuronal precursors residing between the Notch1+ NPCs and post-mitotic neurons. Physiological levels of Prox1 in this tissue are sufficient to allow binding at Notch1 promoter and they are critical for proper Notch1 transcriptional regulation in vivo. Gain-of-function studies in the chick neural tube and mouse NPCs suggest that Prox1-mediated suppression of Notch1 relieves its inhibition on neurogenesis and allows NPCs to exit the cell cycle and differentiate. Moreover, loss-of-function in the chick neural tube shows that Prox1 is necessary for suppression of Notch1 outside the ventricular zone, inhibition of active Notch signaling, down-regulation of NPC markers, and completion of neuronal differentiation program. Together these data suggest that Prox1 inhibits Notch1 gene expression to control the balance between NPC self-renewal and neuronal differentiation.

  7. NF-κB p65 recruited SHP regulates PDCD5-mediated apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshed, Farhan; Farhana, Lulu; Dawson, Marcia I; Fontana, Joseph A

    2014-03-01

    Transcription factor NF-κB promotes cell proliferation in response to cell injury. Increasing evidence, however, suggests that NF-κB can also play an apoptotic role depending on the stimulus and cell type. We have previously demonstrated that novel retinoid 4-[3-Cl-(1-adamantyl)-4-hydroxyphenyl]-3-chlorocinnamic acid (3-Cl-AHPC)-mediated apoptosis in breast carcinoma cells requires activation of canonical and non-canonical NF-κB pathways. The mechanism NF-κB uses to induce apoptosis remains largely unknown. NF-κB subunit p65 (RelA) was identified as one potent transcriptional activator in 3-Cl-AHPC-mediated apoptosis in cells. Here we used ChIP-on-chip to identify NF-κB p65 genes activated in 3-Cl-AHPC mediated apoptosis. This paper focuses on one hit: pro-apoptotic protein programmed cell death 5 (PDCD5). 3-Cl-AHPC mediated apoptosis in MDA-MB-468 had three related effects on PDCD5: NF-κB p65 binding to the PDCD5 gene, enhanced PDCD5 promoter activity, and increased PDCD5 protein expression. Furthermore, 3-Cl-AHPC increased orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP) mRNA expression, increased SHP protein bound to NF-κB p65, and found the SHP/NF-κB p65 complex attached to the PDCD5 gene. PDCD5 triggered apoptosis through increased Bax protein and release of cytochrome C from mitochondria to cytosol. Lastly, knockdown of PDCD5 protein expression blocked 3-Cl-AHPC mediated apoptosis, while over-expression of PDCD5 enhanced apoptosis, suggesting PDCD5 is necessary and sufficient for NF-κB p65 mediated apoptosis. Our results demonstrate a novel pathway for NF-κB p65 in regulating apoptosis through SHP and PDCD5.

  8. Regulation of intestinal protein metabolism by amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Julien; Goichon, Alexis; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse

    2013-09-01

    Gut homeostasis plays a major role in health and may be regulated by quantitative and qualitative food intake. In the intestinal mucosa, an intense renewal of proteins occurs, at approximately 50% per day in humans. In some pathophysiological conditions, protein turnover is altered and may contribute to intestinal or systemic diseases. Amino acids are key effectors of gut protein turnover, both as constituents of proteins and as regulatory molecules limiting intestinal injury and maintaining intestinal functions. Many studies have focused on two amino acids: glutamine, known as the preferential substrate of rapidly dividing cells, and arginine, another conditionally essential amino acid. The effects of glutamine and arginine on protein synthesis appear to be model and condition dependent, as are the involved signaling pathways. The regulation of gut protein degradation by amino acids has been minimally documented until now. This review will examine recent data, helping to better understand how amino acids regulate intestinal protein metabolism, and will explore perspectives for future studies.

  9. Adolescent depression and negative life events, the mediating role of cognitive emotion regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stikkelbroek, Y.A.J.; Bodden, Denise; Kleinjan, Marloes; Reijnders, Mirjam; van Baar, Anneloes

    2016-01-01

    Background: Depression during adolescence is a serious mental health problem. Difficulties in regulating evoked emotions after stressful life events are considered to lead to depression. This study examined if depressive symptoms were mediated by various cognitive emotion regulation strategies after

  10. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy Protein BAG3 Negatively Regulates Ebola and Marburg VP40-Mediated Egress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jingjing; Sagum, Cari A.; Bedford, Mark T.; Sudol, Marius; Han, Ziying

    2017-01-01

    Ebola (EBOV) and Marburg (MARV) viruses are members of the Filoviridae family which cause outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever. The filovirus VP40 matrix protein is essential for virus assembly and budding, and its PPxY L-domain motif interacts with WW-domains of specific host proteins, such as Nedd4 and ITCH, to facilitate the late stage of virus-cell separation. To identify additional WW-domain-bearing host proteins that interact with VP40, we used an EBOV PPxY-containing peptide to screen an array of 115 mammalian WW-domain-bearing proteins. Using this unbiased approach, we identified BCL2 Associated Athanogene 3 (BAG3), a member of the BAG family of molecular chaperone proteins, as a specific VP40 PPxY interactor. Here, we demonstrate that the WW-domain of BAG3 interacts with the PPxY motif of both EBOV and MARV VP40 and, unexpectedly, inhibits budding of both eVP40 and mVP40 virus-like particles (VLPs), as well as infectious VSV-EBOV recombinants. BAG3 is a stress induced protein that regulates cellular protein homeostasis and cell survival through chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Interestingly, our results show that BAG3 alters the intracellular localization of VP40 by sequestering VP40 away from the plasma membrane. As BAG3 is the first WW-domain interactor identified that negatively regulates budding of VP40 VLPs and infectious virus, we propose that the chaperone-mediated autophagy function of BAG3 represents a specific host defense strategy to counteract the function of VP40 in promoting efficient egress and spread of virus particles. PMID:28076420

  11. Ellagic acid inhibits iron-mediated free radical formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvi, Luana T.; Moreira, Daniel C.; Andrade, Roberto; Ginani, Janini; Alonso, Antonio; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2017-02-01

    Polyphenols are reported to have some health benefits, which are link to their antioxidant properties. In the case of ellagic acid (EA), there is evidence that it has free radical scavenger properties and that it is able to form complexes with metal ions. However, information on a possible link between the formation of iron-EA complexes and their interference in Haber-Weiss/Fenton reactions was not yet determined. Thus, the present study investigated the in vitro antioxidant mechanism of EA in a system containing ascorbate, Fe(III) and different iron ligands (EDTA, citrate and NTA). Iron-mediated oxidative degradation of 2-deoxyribose was poorly inhibited (by 12%) in the presence of EA (50 μM) and EDTA. When citrate or NTA - which form weak iron complexes - were used, the 2-deoxyribose protection increased to 89-97% and 45%, respectively. EA also presented equivalent inhibitory effects on iron-mediated oxygen uptake and ascorbyl radical formation. Spectral analyses of iron-EA complexes show that EA removes Fe(III) from EDTA within hours, and from citrate within 1 min. This difference in the rate of iron-EA complex formation may explain the antioxidant effects of EA. Furthermore, the EA antioxidant effectiveness was inversely proportional to the Fe(III) concentration, suggesting a competition with EDTA. In conclusion, the results indicate that EA may prevent in vitro free radical formation when it forms a complex with iron ions.

  12. Saturated fatty acids regulate retinoic acid signalling and suppress tumorigenesis by targeting fatty acid-binding protein 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Liraz; Wang, Zeneng; Doud, Mary Kathryn; Hazen, Stanley L; Noy, Noa

    2015-11-23

    Long chain fatty acids (LCFA) serve as energy sources, components of cell membranes and precursors for signalling molecules. Here we show that these biological compounds also regulate gene expression and that they do so by controlling the transcriptional activities of the retinoic acid (RA)-activated nuclear receptors RAR and PPARβ/δ. The data indicate that these activities of LCFA are mediated by FABP5, which delivers ligands from the cytosol to nuclear PPARβ/δ. Both saturated and unsaturated LCFA (SLCFA, ULCFA) bind to FABP5, thereby displacing RA and diverting it to RAR. However, while SLCFA inhibit, ULCFA activate the FABP5/PPARβ/δ pathway. We show further that, by concomitantly promoting the activation of RAR and inhibiting the activation of PPARβ/δ, SLCFA suppress the oncogenic properties of FABP5-expressing carcinoma cells in cultured cells and in vivo. The observations suggest that compounds that inhibit FABP5 may constitute a new class of drugs for therapy of certain types of cancer.

  13. ALPK1 affects testosterone mediated regulation of proinflammatory cytokines production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tzer-Min; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Hsu, Hui-Ting; Chiang, Shang-Lun; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Huang, Chung-Ming; Tu, Hung-Pin; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Ko, Ying-Chin

    2015-11-01

    Alpha-protein kinase 1, also known as alpha-kinase 1 (ALPK1), is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), myocardial infarction, gout and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). In addition to having an inductive effect on the proinflammatory cytokines in monocytic THP1 cells, ALPK1 is expressed abundantly in the mouse testes. Low testosterone levels are commonly associated with arthritis, CKD, type 2 DM, cardiovascular disease and inflammation. The testosterone's anti-inflammatory effect has been demonstrated to reduce proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules. In this study, we found that ALPK1 transgenic mice showed lower levels of testosterone in both the testes and the serum. Decreasing endogenous ALPK1 enhanced testosterone levels and transcripts of testosterone-regulated genes (P450scc, 3beta-HSD, P450C17, 17beta-HSD, StAR, and INSL3) in TM3 Leydig cells. In contrast, increasing testosterone decreased ALPK1 in both TM3 and monocytic THP1 cells. This decrease was accompanied by a reduction of the proinflammatory cytokines. Increased ALPK1 levels attenuated the testosterone effects in THP1 cells. Finally, we also found that ALPK1 increased the release of TNF-alpha and TGF-beta1 in the human embryonic kidney 293 cells, while testosterone inhibited ALPK1 in the primary kidney cells. Taken together, this data suggests that the balance between ALPK1 and testosterone plays a critical role in the testosterone-mediated inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines.

  14. Plant Mediator complex and its critical functions in transcription regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Li, Ling; Qu, Li-Jia

    2016-02-01

    The Mediator complex is an important component of the eukaryotic transcriptional machinery. As an essential link between transcription factors and RNA polymerase II, the Mediator complex transduces diverse signals to genes involved in different pathways. The plant Mediator complex was recently purified and comprises conserved and specific subunits. It functions in concert with transcription factors to modulate various responses. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in understanding the plant Mediator complex and its diverse roles in plant growth, development, defense, non-coding RNA production, response to abiotic stresses, flowering, genomic stability and metabolic homeostasis. In addition, the transcription factors interacting with the Mediator complex are also highlighted.

  15. Reviewing the Tannic Acid Mediated Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufail Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal nanoparticles harbour numerous exceptional physiochemical properties absolutely different from those of bulk metal as a function of their extremely small size and large superficial area to volume. Naked metal nanoparticles are synthesized by various physical and chemical methods. Chemical methods involving metal salt reduction in solution enjoy an extra edge over other protocols owing to their relative facileness and capability of controlling particle size along with the attribute of surface tailoring. Although chemical methods are the easiest, they are marred by the use of hazardous chemicals such as borohydrides. This has led to inclination of scientific community towards eco-friendly agents for the reduction of metal salts to form nanoparticles. Tannic acid, a plant derived polyphenolic compound, is one such agent which embodies characteristics of being harmless and environmentally friendly combined with being a good reducing and stabilizing agent. In this review, first various methods used to prepare metal nanoparticles are highlighted and further tannic acid mediated synthesis of metal nanoparticles is emphasized. This review brings forth the most recent findings on this issue.

  16. Photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid mediated by iron in strongly acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Masaki; Ito, Masataka; Ohkura, Ryouichi; Mino A, Esteban R; Kose, Tomohiro; Okuda, Tetsuji; Nakai, Satoshi; Kawata, Kuniaki; Nishijima, Wataru

    2014-03-15

    The performance of a ferric ion mediated photochemical process for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) decomposition in strongly acidic conditions of pH 2.0 was evaluated in comparison with those in weakly acidic conditions, pH 3.7 or pH 5.0, based on iron species composition and ferric ion regeneration. Complete decomposition of PFOA under UV irradiation was confirmed at pH 2.0, whereas perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA) and other intermediates were accumulated in weakly acidic conditions. Iron states at each pH were evaluated using a chemical equilibrium model, Visual MINTEQ. The main iron species at pH 2.0 is Fe(3+) ion. Although Fe(3+) ion is consumed and is transformed to Fe(2+) ion by photochemical decomposition of PFOA and its intermediates, the produced Fe(2+) ion will change to Fe(3+) ion to restore chemical equilibrium. Continuous decomposition will occur at pH 2.0. However, half of the iron cannot be dissolved at pH 3.7. The main species of dissolved iron is Fe(OH)(2+). At pH 3.7 or higher pH, Fe(3+) ion will only be produced from the oxidation of Fe(2+) ion by hydroxyl radical produced by Fe(OH)(2+) under UV irradiation. These different mechanisms of Fe(3+) regeneration that prevail in strongly and weakly acidic conditions will engender different performances of the ferric ion.

  17. Amino acids and mTOR mediate distinct metabolic checkpoints in mammalian G1 cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Saqcena

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In multicellular organisms, cell division is regulated by growth factors (GFs. In the absence of GFs, cells exit the cell cycle at a site in G1 referred to as the restriction point (R and enter a state of quiescence known as G0. Additionally, nutrient availability impacts on G1 cell cycle progression. While there is a vast literature on G1 cell cycle progression, confusion remains - especially with regard to the temporal location of R relative to nutrient-mediated checkpoints. In this report, we have investigated the relationship between R and a series of metabolic cell cycle checkpoints that regulate passage into S-phase. METHODS: We used double-block experiments to order G1 checkpoints that monitor the presence of GFs, essential amino acids (EEAs, the conditionally essential amino acid glutamine, and inhibition of mTOR. Cell cycle progression was monitored by uptake of [(3H]-thymidine and flow cytometry, and analysis of cell cycle regulatory proteins was by Western-blot. RESULTS: We report here that the GF-mediated R can be temporally distinguished from a series of late G1 metabolic checkpoints mediated by EAAs, glutamine, and mTOR - the mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin. R is clearly upstream from an EAA checkpoint, which is upstream from a glutamine checkpoint. mTOR is downstream from both the amino acid checkpoints, close to S-phase. Significantly, in addition to GF autonomy, we find human cancer cells also have dysregulated metabolic checkpoints. CONCLUSION: The data provided here are consistent with a GF-dependent mid-G1 R where cells determine whether it is appropriate to divide, followed by a series of late-G1 metabolic checkpoints mediated by amino acids and mTOR where cells determine whether they have sufficient nutrients to accomplish the task. Since mTOR inhibition arrests cells the latest in G1, it is likely the final arbiter for nutrient sufficiency prior to committing to replicating the genome.

  18. Ion-mediated nucleic acid helix-helix interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhi-Jie; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2006-07-15

    Salt ions are essential for the folding of nucleic acids. We use the tightly bound ion (TBI) model, which can account for the correlations and fluctuations for the ions bound to the nucleic acids, to investigate the electrostatic free-energy landscape for two parallel nucleic acid helices in the solution of added salt. The theory is based on realistic atomic structures of the helices. In monovalent salt, the helices are predicted to repel each other. For divalent salt, while the mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann theory predicts only the repulsion, the TBI theory predicts an effective attraction between the helices. The helices are predicted to be stabilized at an interhelix distance approximately 26-36 A, and the strength of the attractive force can reach -0.37 k(B)T/bp for helix length in the range of 9-12 bp. Both the stable helix-helix distance and the strength of the attraction are strongly dependent on the salt concentration and ion size. With the increase of the salt concentration, the helix-helix attraction becomes stronger and the most stable helix-helix separation distance becomes smaller. For divalent ions, at very high ion concentration, further addition of ions leads to the weakening of the attraction. Smaller ion size causes stronger helix-helix attraction and stabilizes the helices at a shorter distance. In addition, the TBI model shows that a decrease in the solvent dielectric constant would enhance the ion-mediated attraction. The theoretical findings from the TBI theory agree with the experimental measurements on the osmotic pressure of DNA array as well as the results from the computer simulations.

  19. Notch-mediated lateral inhibition regulates proneural wave propagation when combined with EGF-mediated reaction diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Makoto; Yasugi, Tetsuo; Minami, Yoshiaki; Miura, Takashi; Nagayama, Masaharu

    2016-08-30

    Notch-mediated lateral inhibition regulates binary cell fate choice, resulting in salt and pepper patterns during various developmental processes. However, how Notch signaling behaves in combination with other signaling systems remains elusive. The wave of differentiation in the Drosophila visual center or "proneural wave" accompanies Notch activity that is propagated without the formation of a salt and pepper pattern, implying that Notch does not form a feedback loop of lateral inhibition during this process. However, mathematical modeling and genetic analysis clearly showed that Notch-mediated lateral inhibition is implemented within the proneural wave. Because partial reduction in EGF signaling causes the formation of the salt and pepper pattern, it is most likely that EGF diffusion cancels salt and pepper pattern formation in silico and in vivo. Moreover, the combination of Notch-mediated lateral inhibition and EGF-mediated reaction diffusion enables a function of Notch signaling that regulates propagation of the wave of differentiation.

  20. Xenobiotic, bile acid, and cholesterol transporters: function and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Curtis D; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2010-03-01

    Transporters influence the disposition of chemicals within the body by participating in absorption, distribution, and elimination. Transporters of the solute carrier family (SLC) comprise a variety of proteins, including organic cation transporters (OCT) 1 to 3, organic cation/carnitine transporters (OCTN) 1 to 3, organic anion transporters (OAT) 1 to 7, various organic anion transporting polypeptide isoforms, sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide, apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, peptide transporters (PEPT) 1 and 2, concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNT) 1 to 3, equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 1 to 3, and multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters (MATE) 1 and 2, which mediate the uptake (except MATEs) of organic anions and cations as well as peptides and nucleosides. Efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, such as ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), multidrug resistance proteins (MDR) 1 and 2, bile salt export pump, multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 1 to 9, breast cancer resistance protein, and ATP-binding cassette subfamily G members 5 and 8, are responsible for the unidirectional export of endogenous and exogenous substances. Other efflux transporters [ATPase copper-transporting beta polypeptide (ATP7B) and ATPase class I type 8B member 1 (ATP8B1) as well as organic solute transporters (OST) alpha and beta] also play major roles in the transport of some endogenous chemicals across biological membranes. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of these transporters (both rodent and human) with regard to tissue distribution, subcellular localization, and substrate preferences. Because uptake and efflux transporters are expressed in multiple cell types, the roles of transporters in a variety of tissues, including the liver, kidneys, intestine, brain, heart, placenta, mammary glands, immune cells, and testes are discussed. Attention is also placed upon a variety of

  1. Saturated fatty acids trigger TLR4-mediated inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, D M; Caldas, A P; Oliveira, L L; Bressan, J; Hermsdorff, H H

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) mediate infection-induced inflammation and sterile inflammation by endogenous molecules. Among the TLR family, TLR4 is the best understood. However, while its downstream signaling pathways have been well defined, not all ligands of TLR4 are currently known. Current evidence suggests that saturated fatty acids (SFA) act as non-microbial TLR4 agonists, and trigger its inflammatory response. Thus, our present review provides a new perspective on the potential mechanism by which SFAs could modulate TLR4-induced inflammatory responses: (1) SFAs can be recognized by CD14-TLR4-MD2 complex and trigger inflammatory pathways, similar to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). (2) SFAs lead to modification of gut microbiota with an overproduction of LPS after a high-fat intake, enhancing this natural TLR4 ligand. (3) In addition, this metabolic endotoxemia leads to an oxidative stress thereby producing atherogenic lipids - oxLDL and oxidized phospholipids - which trigger CD36-TLR4-TLR6 inflammatory response. (4) Also, the high SFA consumption increases the lipemia and the mmLDL and oxLDL formation through oxidative modifications of LDL. The mmLDL, unlike oxLDL, is involved in activation of the CD14-TLR4-MD2 inflammatory pathway. Those molecules can induce TLR4 inflammatory response by MyD88-dependent and/or MyD88-independent pathways that, in turn, promotes the expression of proinflammatory transcript factors such as factor nuclear kappa B (NF-κB), which plays a crucial role in the induction of inflammatory mediators (cytokines, chemokines, or costimulatory molecules) implicated in the development and progression of many chronic diseases.

  2. Sucrose-mediated transcriptional regulation of sucrose symporter activity in the phloem.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matt Vaughn Greg Harrington Daniel R Bush

    2002-08-06

    This project was based on our discovery that sucrose acts as a signaling molecule that regulates the activity of a proton-sucrose symporter in sugar beet leaf tissue. A major objective here was determining how sucrose transporter activity is being regulated. When sucrose accumulates in the phloem sucrose transport activity drops dramatically. Western blots of plasma membrane proteins isolated from sucrose treated leaves showed that the loss of sucrose transport activity was proportional to a decline in symporter abundance, demonstrating that sucrose transport is regulated by changes in the amount of BvSUT1 protein. BvSUT1 transcript levels decreased in parallel with the loss of sucrose transport activity. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated that BvSUT1 gene transcription was repressed significantly in nuclei from leaves fed 100 mM exogenous sucrose, showing that sucrose-dependent modulation of BvSUT1 mRNA levels is mediated by changes in transcription. To identify which secondary messenger systems might be involved in regulating symporter activity, we used a variety of pharmacological agents to probe for a role of calcium or protein phosphorylation in sucrose signaling. In a detailed analysis, only okadaic acid altered sucrose transport activity. These results suggest a protein phosphatase is involved. We hypothesized that protein kinase inhibitors would have a neutral affect or increase symporter transcription. Transpirational feeding of the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine had no impact on sucrose transport while calphostin C, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, caused a 60% increase. These data provided good evidence that protein phosphorylation plays a central role in regulating sucrose symporter expression and sucrose transport activity. To determine whether protein phosphorylation is involved in sucrose regulation of proton-sucrose symporter activity, we pre-fed leaves with staurosporine for 4 h and then fed the treated leaves water or 100 mM sucrose

  3. Regulation of Arabidopsis defense responses against Spodoptera littoralis by CPK-mediated calcium signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishihama Nobuaki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant Ca2+ signals are involved in a wide array of intracellular signaling pathways after pest invasion. Ca2+-binding sensory proteins such as Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CPKs have been predicted to mediate the signaling following Ca2+ influx after insect herbivory. However, until now this prediction was not testable. Results To investigate the roles CPKs play in a herbivore response-signaling pathway, we screened the characteristics of Arabidopsis CPK mutants damaged by a feeding generalist herbivore, Spodoptera littoralis. Following insect attack, the cpk3 and cpk13 mutants showed lower transcript levels of plant defensin gene PDF1.2 compared to wild-type plants. The CPK cascade was not directly linked to the herbivory-induced signaling pathways that were mediated by defense-related phytohormones such as jasmonic acid and ethylene. CPK3 was also suggested to be involved in a negative feedback regulation of the cytosolic Ca2+ levels after herbivory and wounding damage. In vitro kinase assays of CPK3 protein with a suite of substrates demonstrated that the protein phosphorylates transcription factors (including ERF1, HsfB2a and CZF1/ZFAR1 in the presence of Ca2+. CPK13 strongly phosphorylated only HsfB2a, irrespective of the presence of Ca2+. Furthermore, in vivo agroinfiltration assays showed that CPK3-or CPK13-derived phosphorylation of a heat shock factor (HsfB2a promotes PDF1.2 transcriptional activation in the defense response. Conclusions These results reveal the involvement of two Arabidopsis CPKs (CPK3 and CPK13 in the herbivory-induced signaling network via HsfB2a-mediated regulation of the defense-related transcriptional machinery. This cascade is not involved in the phytohormone-related signaling pathways, but rather directly impacts transcription factors for defense responses.

  4. Rpi-blb2-Mediated Hypersensitive Cell Death Caused by Phytophthora infestans AVRblb2 Requires SGT1, but not EDS1, NDR1, Salicylic Acid-, Jasmonic Acid-, or Ethylene-Mediated Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Keun Oh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Potato Rpi-blb2 encodes a protein with a coiled-coil-nucleotide binding site and leucine-rich repeat (CC-NBS-LRR motif that recognizes the Phytophthora infestans AVRblb2 effector and triggers hypersensitive cell death (HCD. To better understand the components required for Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in plants, we used virus-induced gene silencing to repress candidate genes in Rpi-blb2-transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants and assayed the plants for AVRblb2 effector. Rpi-blb2 triggers HCD through NbSGT1-mediated pathways, but not NbEDS1- or NbNDR1-mediated pathways. In addition, the role of salicylic acid (SA, jasmonic acid (JA, and ethylene (ET in Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD were analyzed by monitoring of the responses of NbICS1-, NbCOI1-, or NbEIN2-silenced or Rpi-blb2::NahG-transgenic plants. Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in response to AVRblb2 was not associated with SA accumulation. Thus, SA affects Rpi-blb2-mediated resistance against P. infestans, but not Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in response to AVRblb2. Additionally, JA and ET signaling were not required for Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in N. benthamiana. Taken together, these findings suggest that NbSGT1 is a unique positive regulator of Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in response to AVRblb2, but EDS1, NDR1, SA, JA, and ET are not required.

  5. Rpi-blb2-Mediated Hypersensitive Cell Death Caused by Phytophthora infestans AVRblb2 Requires SGT1, but not EDS1, NDR1, Salicylic Acid-, Jasmonic Acid-, or Ethylene-Mediated Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sang-Keun; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Choi, Doil

    2014-09-01

    Potato Rpi-blb2 encodes a protein with a coiled-coil-nucleotide binding site and leucine-rich repeat (CC-NBS-LRR) motif that recognizes the Phytophthora infestans AVRblb2 effector and triggers hypersensitive cell death (HCD). To better understand the components required for Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in plants, we used virus-induced gene silencing to repress candidate genes in Rpi-blb2-transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants and assayed the plants for AVRblb2 effector. Rpi-blb2 triggers HCD through NbSGT1-mediated pathways, but not NbEDS1- or NbNDR1-mediated pathways. In addition, the role of salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and ethylene (ET) in Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD were analyzed by monitoring of the responses of NbICS1-, NbCOI1-, or NbEIN2-silenced or Rpi-blb2::NahG-transgenic plants. Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in response to AVRblb2 was not associated with SA accumulation. Thus, SA affects Rpi-blb2-mediated resistance against P. infestans, but not Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in response to AVRblb2. Additionally, JA and ET signaling were not required for Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in N. benthamiana. Taken together, these findings suggest that NbSGT1 is a unique positive regulator of Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in response to AVRblb2, but EDS1, NDR1, SA, JA, and ET are not required.

  6. GPBAR1/TGR5 mediates bile acid-induced cytokine expression in murine Kupffer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiyu Lou

    Full Text Available GPBAR1/TGR5 is a novel plasma membrane-bound G protein-coupled bile acid (BA receptor. BAs are known to induce the expression of inflammatory cytokines in the liver with unknown mechanism. Here we show that without other external stimuli, TGR5 activation alone induced the expression of interleukin 1β (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α in murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 or murine Kupffer cells. The TGR5-mediated increase of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression was suppressed by JNK inhibition. Moreover, the induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in mouse liver by 1% cholic acid (CA diet was blunted in JNK-/- mice. TGR5 activation by its ligands enhanced the phosphorylation levels, DNA-binding and trans-activities of c-Jun and ATF2 transcription factors. Finally, the induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in Kupffer cells by TGR5 activation correlated with the suppression of Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1 expression in murine hepatocytes. These results suggest that TGR5 mediates the BA-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in murine Kupffer cells through JNK-dependent pathway. This novel role of TGR5 may correlate to the suppression of Cyp7a1 expression in hepatocytes and contribute to the delicate BA feedback regulation.

  7. ASIC3 Mediates Itch Sensation in Response to Coincident Stimulation by Acid and Nonproton Ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Peng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The regulation and mechanisms underlying itch sensation are complex. Here, we report a role for acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3 in mediating itch evoked by certain pruritogens during tissue acidosis. Co-administration of acid with Ser-Leu-Ile-Gly-Arg-Leu-NH2 (SL-NH2 increased scratching behavior in wild-type, but not ASIC3-null, mice, implicating the channel in coincident detection of acidosis and pruritogens. Mechanistically, SL-NH2 slowed desensitization of proton-evoked currents by targeting the previously identified nonproton ligand-sensing domain located in the extracellular region of ASIC3 channels in primary sensory neurons. Ablation of the ASIC3 gene reduced dry-skin-induced scratching behavior and pathological changes under conditions with concomitant inflammation. Taken together, our data suggest that ASIC3 mediates itch sensation via coincident detection of acidosis and nonproton ligands that act at the nonproton ligand-sensing domain of the channel.

  8. Enhancement of neutrophil-mediated killing of Plasmodium falciparum asexual blood forms by fatty acids: importance of fatty acid structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaratilake, L M; Ferrante, A; Robinson, B S; Jaeger, T; Poulos, A

    1997-10-01

    Effects of fatty acids on human neutrophil-mediated killing of Plasmodium falciparum asexual blood forms were investigated by using a quantitative radiometric assay. The results showed that the antiparasitic activity of neutrophils can be greatly increased (>threefold) by short-term treatment with fatty acids with 20 to 24 carbon atoms and at least three double bonds. In particular, the n-3 polyenoic fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, and the n-6 fatty acid, arachidonic acid, significantly enhanced neutrophil antiparasitic activity. This effect was >1.5-fold higher than that induced by an optical concentration of the known agonist cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). At suboptimal concentrations, the combination of arachidonic acid and TNF-alpha caused a synergistic increase in neutrophil-mediated parasite killing. The fatty acid-induced effect was independent of the availability of serum opsonins but dependent on the structure of the fatty acids. The length of the carbon chain, degree of unsaturation, and availability of a free carboxyl group were important determinants of fatty acid activity. The fatty acids which increased neutrophil-mediated killing primed the enhanced superoxide radical generation of neutrophils in response to P. falciparum as detected by chemiluminescence. Scavengers of oxygen radicals significantly reduced the fatty acid-enhanced parasite killing, but cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors had no effect. These findings have identified a new class of immunoenhancers that could be exploited to increase resistance against Plasmodium species.

  9. Role of Bile Acids and Bile Acid Receptors in Metabolic Regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefebvre, Philippe; Cariou, Bertrand; Lien, Fleur; Kuipers, Folkert; Staels, Bart

    2009-01-01

    Lefebvre P, Cariou B, Lien F, Kuipers F, Staels B. Role of Bile Acids and Bile Acid Receptors in Metabolic Regulation. Physiol Rev 89: 147-191,2009; doi: 10.1152/physrev.00010.2008. - The incidence of the metabolic syndrome has taken epidemic proportions in the past decades, contributing to an incre

  10. GROWTH-REGULATING ACTIVITY OF SOME SALTS OF 1-NAPHTHALENACETIC ACID AND 2-NAPHTHOXYACETIC ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Laichici

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The salts of 1-naphthalene acetic acid and 2-naphthoxyacetic acid with ethanolamine have been synthetized. The two salts have been assessed using Tsibulskaya-Vassiliev biological test using agar-agar as the medium. Statistical processing of the data has been carried out. The good results of the bioassay indicate an auxinic growth-regulating activity of the two salts.

  11. NR4A orphan nuclear receptors influence retinoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid signaling via up-regulation of fatty acid binding protein 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volakakis, Nikolaos; Joodmardi, Eliza [Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research Ltd., Box 240, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Perlmann, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.perlmann@licr.ki.se [Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research Ltd., Box 240, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); The Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institute, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-12-25

    The orphan nuclear receptor (NR) Nurr1 is expressed in the developing and adult nervous system and is also induced as an immediate early gene in a variety of cell types. In silico analysis of human promoters identified fatty acid binding protein 5 (FABP5), a protein shown to enhance retinoic acid-mediated PPAR{beta}/{delta} signaling, as a potential Nurr1 target gene. Nurr1 has previously been implicated in retinoid signaling via its heterodimerization partner RXR. Since NRs are commonly involved in cross-regulatory control we decided to further investigate the regulatory relationship between Nurr1 and FABP5. FABP5 expression was up-regulated by Nurr1 and other NR4A NRs in HEK293 cells, and Nurr1 was shown to activate and bind to the FABP5 promoter, supporting that FABP5 is a direct downstream target of NR4A NRs. We also show that the RXR ligand docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) can induce nuclear translocation of FABP5. Moreover, via up-regulation of FABP5 Nurr1 can enhance retinoic acid-induced signaling of PPAR{beta}/{delta} and DHA-induced activation of RXR. We also found that other members of the NR4A orphan NRs can up-regulate FABP5. Thus, our findings suggest that NR4A orphan NRs can influence signaling events of other NRs via control of FABP5 expression levels.

  12. Regulated acid-base transport in the collecting duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Carsten A; Devuyst, Olivier; Bourgeois, Soline; Mohebbi, Nilufar

    2009-05-01

    The renal collecting system serves the fine-tuning of renal acid-base secretion. Acid-secretory type-A intercalated cells secrete protons via a luminally expressed V-type H(+)-ATPase and generate new bicarbonate released by basolateral chloride/bicarbonate exchangers including the AE1 anion exchanger. Efficient proton secretion depends both on the presence of titratable acids (mainly phosphate) and the concomitant secretion of ammonia being titrated to ammonium. Collecting duct ammonium excretion requires the Rhesus protein RhCG as indicated by recent KO studies. Urinary acid secretion by type-A intercalated cells is strongly regulated by various factors among them acid-base status, angiotensin II and aldosterone, and the Calcium-sensing receptor. Moreover, urinary acidification by H(+)-ATPases is modulated indirectly by the activity of the epithelial sodium channel ENaC. Bicarbonate secretion is achieved by non-type-A intercalated cells characterized by the luminal expression of the chloride/bicarbonate exchanger pendrin. Pendrin activity is driven by H(+)-ATPases and may serve both bicarbonate excretion and chloride reabsorption. The activity and expression of pendrin is regulated by different factors including acid-base status, chloride delivery, and angiotensin II and may play a role in NaCl retention and blood pressure regulation. Finally, the relative abundance of type-A and non-type-A intercalated cells may be tightly regulated. Dysregulation of intercalated cell function or abundance causes various syndromes of distal renal tubular acidosis underlining the importance of these processes for acid-base homeostasis.

  13. Photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid mediated by iron in strongly acidic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Masaki, E-mail: mohno@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Environmental Research and Management Center, Hiroshima University, 1-5-3 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8513 (Japan); Ito, Masataka; Ohkura, Ryouichi [Faculty of Applied Life Sciences, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, 265-1, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Mino A, Esteban R. [Environmental Research and Management Center, Hiroshima University, 1-5-3 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8513 (Japan); Kose, Tomohiro [Faculty of Applied Life Sciences, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, 265-1, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Okuda, Tetsuji [Environmental Research and Management Center, Hiroshima University, 1-5-3 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8513 (Japan); Nakai, Satoshi [Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Kawata, Kuniaki [Faculty of Applied Life Sciences, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, 265-1, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Nishijima, Wataru [Environmental Research and Management Center, Hiroshima University, 1-5-3 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8513 (Japan)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was decomposed based on ferric ion performance. • Complete decomposition of PFOA was confirmed in strongly acidic conditions. • Fe{sup 2+} changed to Fe{sup 3+} to restore chemical equilibrium in this condition. • Fe{sup 3+} was only produced from Fe{sup 2+} by hydroxyl radical in weakly acidic conditions. • The Fe{sup 3+} regeneration mechanisms resulted in the performance of Fe{sup 3+} for PFOA. - Abstract: The performance of a ferric ion mediated photochemical process for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) decomposition in strongly acidic conditions of pH 2.0 was evaluated in comparison with those in weakly acidic conditions, pH 3.7 or pH 5.0, based on iron species composition and ferric ion regeneration. Complete decomposition of PFOA under UV irradiation was confirmed at pH 2.0, whereas perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA) and other intermediates were accumulated in weakly acidic conditions. Iron states at each pH were evaluated using a chemical equilibrium model, Visual MINTEQ. The main iron species at pH 2.0 is Fe{sup 3+} ion. Although Fe{sup 3+} ion is consumed and is transformed to Fe{sup 2+} ion by photochemical decomposition of PFOA and its intermediates, the produced Fe{sup 2+} ion will change to Fe{sup 3+} ion to restore chemical equilibrium. Continuous decomposition will occur at pH 2.0. However, half of the iron cannot be dissolved at pH 3.7. The main species of dissolved iron is Fe(OH){sup 2+}. At pH 3.7 or higher pH, Fe{sup 3+} ion will only be produced from the oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} ion by hydroxyl radical produced by Fe(OH){sup 2+} under UV irradiation. These different mechanisms of Fe{sup 3+} regeneration that prevail in strongly and weakly acidic conditions will engender different performances of the ferric ion.

  14. Metabolic reprogramming through fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1 regulates macrophage inflammatory potential and adipose inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy R. Johnson

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: Our findings provide evidence that FATP1 is a novel regulator of MΦ activation through control of substrate metabolism. Absence of FATP1 exacerbated pro-inflammatory activation in vitro and increased local and systemic components of the metabolic syndrome in HFD-fed Fatp1B−/− mice. In contrast, gain of FATP1 activity in MΦs suggested that Fatp1-mediated activation of fatty acids, substrate switch to glucose, oxidative stress, and lipid mediator synthesis are potential mechanisms. We demonstrate for the first time that FATP1 provides a unique mechanism by which the inflammatory tone of adipose and systemic metabolism may be regulated.

  15. Transcriptional regulation of central amino acid metabolism in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the functional characterisation of the transcriptional regulators GlnR, ArgR and AhrC of Lactococcus lactis, which are responsible for the control of genes involved in the metabolism of the amino acids glutamine, glutamate and arginine. A chromosomal glnR deletion mutant was ma

  16. AMPK-independent pathways regulate skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dzamko, Nicolas; Schertzer, Jonathan D.; Ryall, James G.;

    2008-01-01

    with rates of fatty acid oxidation. To address this issue we have investigated the requirement for skeletal muscle AMPK in controlling aminoimidazole-4-carboxymide-1-beta-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) and contraction-stimulated fatty acid oxidation utilizing transgenic mice expressing a muscle-specific kinase......-based approach we identified 18 Ser/Thr protein kinases whose phosphorylation was increased by greater than 25% in contracted KD relative to WT muscle. Utilizing bioinformatics we predicted that extracellular regulated protein-serine kinase (ERK1/2), inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB protein-serine kinase...... beta (IKKbeta) and protein kinase D (PKD) may phosphorylate ACC2 at Ser-221 but during in vitro phosphorylation assays only AMPK phosphorylated ACC2. These data demonstrate that AMPK is not essential for the regulation of fatty acid oxidation by AICAR or muscle contraction....

  17. Identification of beer bitter acids regulating mechanisms of gastric acid secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jessica; Hell, Johannes; Liszt, Kathrin I; Dresel, Michael; Pignitter, Marc; Hofmann, Thomas; Somoza, Veronika

    2012-02-15

    Beer, one of the most consumed beverages worldwide, has been shown to stimulate gastric acid secretion. Although organic acids, formed by fermentation of glucose, are known to be stimulants of gastric acid secretion, very little is known about the effects of different types of beer or the active constituents thereof. In the present study, we compared the effects of different beers on mechanisms of gastric acid secretion. To investigate compound-specific effects on mechanisms of gastric acid secretion, organic acids and bitter compounds were quantified by HPLC-DAD and UPLC-MS/MS and tested in human gastric cancer cells (HGT-1) by means of a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye which determines the intracellular pH as an indicator of proton secretion. The expression of relevant genes, coding the H(+)/K(+)-ATPase, ATP4A, the histamine receptor, HRH2, the acetylcholine receptor, CHRM3, and the somatostatin receptor, SSTR2, was determined by qPCR. Ethanol and the organic acids succinic acid, malic acid, and citric acid were demonstrated to contribute to some extent to the effect of beer. The bitter acids comprising α-, β-, and iso-α-acids were identified as potential key components promoting gastric acid secretion and up-regulation of CHRM3 gene expression by a maximum factor of 2.01 compared to that of untreated control cells with a correlation to their respective bitterness.

  18. Differential regulation of placental amino acid transport by saturated and unsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lager, Susanne; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2014-10-15

    Fatty acids are critical for normal fetal development but may also influence placental function. We have previously reported that oleic acid (OA) stimulates amino acid transport in primary human trophoblasts (PHTs). In other tissues, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids have distinct effects on cellular signaling, for instance, palmitic acid (PA) but not OA reduces IκBα expression. We hypothesized that saturated and unsaturated fatty acids differentially affect trophoblast amino acid transport and cellular signaling. To test this hypothesis, PHTs were cultured in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 50 μM), OA (100 μM), or PA (100 μM). DHA and OA were also combined to test whether DHA could counteract the OA stimulatory effect on amino acid transport. The effects of fatty acids were compared against a vehicle control. Amino acid transport was measured by isotope-labeled tracers. Activation of inflammatory-related signaling pathways and the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway were determined by Western blot analysis. Exposure of PHTs to DHA for 24 h reduced amino acid transport and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, STAT3, mTOR, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1, and ribosomal protein (rp)S6. In contrast, OA increased amino acid transport and phosphorylation of ERK, mTOR, S6 kinase 1, and rpS6. The combination of DHA with OA increased amino acid transport and rpS6 phosphorylation. PA did not affect amino acid transport but reduced IκBα expression. In conclusion, these fatty acids differentially regulated placental amino acid transport and cellular signaling. Taken together, these findings suggest that dietary fatty acids could alter the intrauterine environment by modifying placental function, thereby having long-lasting effects on the developing fetus.

  19. Involvement of atypical protein kinase C in the regulation of cardiac glucose and long-chain fatty acid uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habets, Daphna D J; Luiken, Joost J F P; Ouwens, Margriet;

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The signaling pathways involved in the regulation of cardiac GLUT4 translocation/glucose uptake and CD36 translocation/long-chain fatty acid uptake are not fully understood. We compared in heart/muscle-specific PKC-¿ knockout mice the roles of atypical PKCs (PKC-¿ and PKC-¿) in regulating ca...... to allow optimal stimulation of glucose and fatty acid uptake, indicating that atypical PKCs are necessary but not rate-limiting in the regulation of cardiac substrate uptake and that PKC-¿ and PKC-¿ have interchangeable functions in these processes.......Aim: The signaling pathways involved in the regulation of cardiac GLUT4 translocation/glucose uptake and CD36 translocation/long-chain fatty acid uptake are not fully understood. We compared in heart/muscle-specific PKC-¿ knockout mice the roles of atypical PKCs (PKC-¿ and PKC-¿) in regulating...... cardiac glucose and fatty acid uptake. Results: Neither insulin-stimulated nor AMPK-mediated glucose and fatty acid uptake were inhibited upon genetic PKC-¿ ablation in cardiomyocytes. In contrast, myristoylated PKC-¿ pseudosubstrate inhibited both insulin-stimulated and AMPK-mediated glucose and fatty...

  20. Barrier stabilizing mediators in regulation of microvascular endothelial permeability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Qiao-bing

    2012-01-01

    Increase of microvascular permeability is one of the most important pathological events in the pathogenesis of trauma and bum injury.Massive leakage of fluid from vascular space leads to lose of blood plasma and decrease of effective circulatory blood volume,resulting in formation of severe tissue edema,hypotension or even shock,especially in severe bum injury.Fluid resuscitation has been the only valid approach to sustain patient's blood volume for a long time,due to the lack of overall and profound understanding of the mechanisms of vascular hyperpenneability response.There is an emerging concept in recent years that some so-called barrier stabilizing mediators play a positive role in preventing the increase of vascular permeability.These mediators may be released in response to proinflammatory mediators and serve to restore endothelial barrier function.Some of these stabilizing mediators are important even in quiescent state because they preserve basal vascular permeability at low levels.This review introduces some of these mediators and reveals their underlying signaling mechanisms during endothelial barrier enhancing process.

  1. Lewis acid/Brönsted acid mediated benz-annulation of thiophenes and electron-rich arenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Settu Muhamad; Sivasakthikumaran, Ramakrishnan; Mohanakrishnan, Arasambattu K

    2014-05-16

    A facile preparation of benz-annulated heterocycles were achieved at rt involving a Lewis acid/Brönsted acid mediated annulation of heterocycles using 2,5-dimethoxytetrahydrofuran as a four-carbon synthon. The benz-/naphth-annulation was found to be successful with electron-rich arenes as well.

  2. EETs mediate cardioprotection of salvianolic acids through MAPK signaling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Shoubao Wang; Weiku Zhang; Xiaobin Pang; Li Li; Guorong He; Xiuying Yang; Lianhua Fang; Juntian Zhang; Guanhua Du

    2013-01-01

    Salvianolic acids, including salvianolic acid A (SAA) and salvianolic acid B (SAB), are the main water-soluble bioactive compounds isolated from the Chinese medicinal herb Danshen and have been shown to exert in vitro and in vivo cardiovascular protection. Recent studies suggest that epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), the primary cytochrome P450 2J (CYP2J) epoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid, are involved in the progression of ischemic injury in diverse organs. Here, we investigated th...

  3. REGULATION OF INSURANCE MEDIATION IN CONDITIONS OF EURO INTEGRATION PROCESSES OF UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sholoiko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The review of national and European legislation in the field of regulation of insurance mediation is made. Subjects and object of regulation of insurance mediation are defined. The order of the legislative approximation in conditions of changing legislation of regulation of insurance mediation in European Union is characterized. A comparison of legal provisions to regulate insurance mediation in Ukraine and the EU is done. Suggestions of adaptation national legislation to the European in the area of regulation of insurance mediation in conditions of euro integration processes are represented. The main are the next:-it is advisable to expand the object and the scope of regulation of insurance mediation and set appropriate limits to the subjects for which the sale of insurance products is not the main activity;-it is necessary to introduce a regular improvement of the knowledge and skills for insurance distributors because of the development of insurance conditions and changing of economic environment;-it is necessary to create the order of compulsory professional indemnity insurance in accordance with the requirements of the Directive on insurance distribution;-before the signing of the contract it is necessary to disclosure to customers of insurance products the information about the status of insurance distributors and type of remuneration that they receive;-if the insurance product is in addition to the goods or services, insurance distributor shall inform the client about the possibility of buying various product components separately with the presentation of their characteristics.

  4. FOXO3-mediated up-regulation of Bim contributes to rhein-induced cancer cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiao; Liu, Shu; Yin, Yancun; Li, Mingjin; Wang, Bo; Yang, Li; Jiang, Yangfu

    2015-03-01

    The anthraquinone compound rhein is a natural agent in the traditional Chinese medicine rhubarb. Preclinical studies demonstrate that rhein has anticancer activity. Treatment of a variety of cancer cells with rhein may induce apoptosis. Here, we report that rhein induces atypical unfolded protein response in breast cancer MCF-7 cells and hepatoma HepG2 cells. Rhein induces CHOP expression, eIF2α phosphorylation and caspase cleavage, while it does not induce glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) expression in both MCF-7 and HepG2 cells. Meanwhile, rhein inhibits thapsigargin-induced GRP78 expression and X box-binding protein 1 splicing. In addition, rhein inhibits Akt phosphorylation and stimulates FOXO transactivation activity. Rhein induces Bim expression in MCF-7 and HepG2 cells, which can be abrogated by FOXO3a knockdown. Knockdown of FOXO3a or Bim abrogates rhein-induced caspase cleavage and apoptosis. The chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyrate acid antagonizes the induction of FOXO activation, Bim expression and caspase cleavage by rhein, indicating that protein misfolding may be involved in triggering these deleterious effects. We conclude that FOXO3a-mediated up-regulation of Bim is a key mechanism underlying rhein-induced cancer cells apoptosis.

  5. Hemin-mediated Hemolysis in Erythrocytes: Effects of Ascorbic Acid and Glutathione

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-De LI; Yan-Dan SU; Ming LI; Cheng-Gang ZOU

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, we investigated the effect of ascorbic acid and glutathione on hemolysis induced by hemin in erythrocytes. Ascorbic acid not only enhanced hemolysis, but also induced formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in the presence of hemin. It has been shown that glutathione inhibits hemin-induced hemolysis by mediating hemin degradation. Erythrocytes depleted of glutathione became very sensitive to oxidative stress induced by hemin and ascorbic acid. H2O2 was involved in heminmediated hemolysis in the presence of ascorbic acid. However, a combination of glutathione and ascorbic acid was more effective in inhibiting hemolysis induced by hemin than glutathione alone. Extracellular and intracellular ascorbic acid exhibited a similar effect on hemin-induced hemolysis or inhibition of hemininduced hemolysis by glutathione. The current study indicates that ascorbic acid might function as an antioxidant or prooxidant in hemin-mediated hemolysis, depending on whether glutathione is available.

  6. Identification of 11-amino acid peptides that disrupt Notch-mediated processes in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeh Hsiao-Fong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The conserved Notch signaling pathway regulates cell fate decisions and maintains stem cells in multicellular organisms. Up-regulation of Notch signaling is observed in several types of cancer and is causally involved in proliferation and survival of cancer cells. Thus, it is of great interest to look for anti-Notch reagents for therapeutic purposes. In model animal Drosophila, Notch signaling restricts selection of sensory organ precursors (SOPs during external sensory (ES organ development. To look for novel genes that can suppress Notch signaling, we performed a gain-of-function modifier screen to look for genes that enhance the phenotype of ectopic ES organs induced by overexpression of phyllopod, a gene required for SOP specification. Results From the gain-of-function screen, we discovered that overexpression of polished rice/tarsal-less (pri/tal increases the numbers of ES organs as well as SOPs. pri/tal is a polycistronic gene that contains four short open reading frames encoding three 11-amino acid and one 32-amino acid peptides. Ectopic expression of the 11 amino-acid peptides recapitulates the pri/tal misexpression phenotype in ectopic ES organ formation. In situ hybridization experiment reveals that pri/tal mRNA is expressed in the SOPs of the chemosensory organs and the stretch-sensing chordotonal organs. In Drosophila wing development, the Notch signaling pathway mediates the formation of the dorsal-ventral (DV compartmental boundary and the restriction of the vein width from the primordial veins, the proveins. We also found that pri/tal mRNA is expressed in the DV boundary and the longitudinal proveins, and overexpression of Pri/Tal peptides disrupts the DV boundary formation and helps to expand the width of the wing vein. Genetic analyses further show that a Notch loss-of-function allele strongly enhances these two phenotypes. Cut and E(splmβ are target genes of the Notch pathway in DV boundary formation and

  7. Regulation and limitations to fatty acid oxidation during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jacob; Kiens, Bente

    2012-01-01

    tissue to deliver sufficient fatty acids to exercising muscle has been proposed, but evidence is emerging that factors within the muscle might be of more importance. The high rate of glycolysis during high intensity exercise might be the "driving force" via the increased production of acetyl CoA which...... in turn is trapped by carnitine. This will lead to less availability of free carnitine for fatty acid transport into mitochondria. This review summarizes our present view on how FA metabolism is regulated during exercise with a special focus on the limitations in FA oxidation in the transition from...

  8. Regulation of intestinal mucosal growth by amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Ramesh M; Johnson, Leonard R

    2014-03-01

    Amino acids, especially glutamine (GLN) have been known for many years to stimulate the growth of small intestinal mucosa. Polyamines are also required for optimal mucosal growth, and the inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the first rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis, blocks growth. Certain amino acids, primarily asparagine (ASN) and GLN stimulate ODC activity in a solution of physiological salts. More importantly, their presence is also required before growth factors and hormones such as epidermal growth factor and insulin are able to increase ODC activity. ODC activity is inhibited by antizyme-1 (AZ) whose synthesis is stimulated by polyamines, thus, providing a negative feedback regulation of the enzyme. In the absence of amino acids mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is inhibited, whereas, mTORC2 is stimulated leading to the inhibition of global protein synthesis but increasing the synthesis of AZ via a cap-independent mechanism. These data, therefore, explain why ASN or GLN is essential for the activation of ODC. Interestingly, in a number of papers, AZ has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation, stimulate apoptosis, or increase autophagy. Each of these activities results in decreased cellular growth. AZ binds to and accelerates the degradation of ODC and other proteins shown to regulate proliferation and cell death, such as Aurora-A, Cyclin D1, and Smad1. The correlation between the stimulation of ODC activity and the absence of AZ as influenced by amino acids is high. Not only do amino acids such as ASN and GLN stimulate ODC while inhibiting AZ synthesis, but also amino acids such as lysine, valine, and ornithine, which inhibit ODC activity, increase the synthesis of AZ. The question remaining to be answered is whether AZ inhibits growth directly or whether it acts by decreasing the availability of polyamines to the dividing cells. In either case, evidence strongly suggests that the regulation of AZ synthesis is the

  9. Protective Effect of Unsaturated Fatty Acids on Palmitic Acid-Induced Toxicity in Skeletal Muscle Cells is not Mediated by PPARδ Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumova, Jana; Malisova, Lucia; Andel, Michal; Trnka, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Unsaturated free fatty acids (FFA) are able to prevent deleterious effects of saturated FFA in skeletal muscle cells although the mechanisms involved are still not completely understood. FFA act as endogenous ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), transcription factors regulating the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine whether activation of PPARδ, the most common PPAR subtype in skeletal muscle, plays a role in mediating the protective effect of unsaturated FFA on saturated FFA-induced damage in skeletal muscle cells and to examine an impact on mitochondrial respiration. Mouse C2C12 myotubes were treated for 24 h with different concentrations of saturated FFA (palmitic acid), unsaturated FFA (oleic, linoleic and α-linolenic acid), and their combinations. PPARδ agonist GW501516 and antagonist GSK0660 were also used. Both mono- and polyunsaturated FFA, but not GW501516, prevented palmitic acid-induced cell death. Mono- and polyunsaturated FFA proved to be effective activators of PPARδ compared to saturated palmitic acid; however, in combination with palmitic acid their effect on PPARδ activation was blocked and stayed at the levels observed for palmitic acid alone. Unsaturated FFA at moderate physiological concentrations as well as GW501516, but not palmitic acid, mildly uncoupled mitochondrial respiration. Our results indicate that although unsaturated FFA are effective activators of PPARδ, their protective effect on palmitic acid-induced toxicity is not mediated by PPARδ activation and subsequent induction of lipid regulatory genes in skeletal muscle cells. Other mechanisms, such as mitochondrial uncoupling, may underlie their effect.

  10. Acid sphingomyelinase activity is regulated by membrane lipids and facilitates cholesterol transfer by NPC2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oninla, Vincent O; Breiden, Bernadette; Babalola, Jonathan O; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2014-12-01

    During endocytosis, membrane components move to intraluminal vesicles of the endolysosomal compartment for digestion. At the late endosomes, cholesterol is sorted out mainly by two sterol-binding proteins, Niemann-Pick protein type C (NPC)1 and NPC2. To study the NPC2-mediated intervesicular cholesterol transfer, we developed a liposomal assay system. (Abdul-Hammed, M., B. Breiden, M. A. Adebayo, J. O. Babalola, G. Schwarzmann, and K. Sandhoff. 2010. Role of endosomal membrane lipids and NPC2 in cholesterol transfer and membrane fusion. J. Lipid Res. 51: 1747-1760.) Anionic lipids stimulate cholesterol transfer between liposomes while SM inhibits it, even in the presence of anionic bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP). Preincubation of vesicles containing SM with acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) (SM phosphodiesterase, EC 3.1.4.12) results in hydrolysis of SM to ceramide (Cer), which enhances cholesterol transfer. Besides SM, ASM also cleaves liposomal phosphatidylcholine. Anionic phospholipids derived from the plasma membrane (phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidic acid) stimulate SM and phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by ASM more effectively than BMP, which is generated during endocytosis. ASM-mediated hydrolysis of liposomal SM was also stimulated by incorporation of diacylglycerol (DAG), Cer, and free fatty acids into the liposomal membranes. Conversely, phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis was inhibited by incorporation of cholesterol, Cer, DAG, monoacylglycerol, and fatty acids. Our data suggest that SM degradation by ASM is required for physiological secretion of cholesterol from the late endosomal compartment, and is a key regulator of endolysosomal lipid digestion.

  11. Emotion Regulation and Aggressive Behavior in Preschoolers: The Mediating Role of Social Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmsen, Johanna; Koglin, Ute; Petermann, Franz

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether the relation between maladaptive emotion regulation and aggression was mediated by deviant social information processing (SIP). Participants were 193 preschool children. Emotion regulation and aggression were rated by teachers. Deviant SIP (i.e., attribution of hostile intent, aggressive response generation, aggressive…

  12. Enzymatically mediated incorporation of 2-chlorophenol 4-chlorophenol into humic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, P.; Randall, A.; Jørgensen, O.;

    1994-01-01

    A possible route to chlorinated humic substances in the environment, is an indirect chlorination of humic material by enzymatically mediated incorporation of low molecular weight organo-chlorine compounds into the humic skeleton. The enzymatically mediated incorporation of 2-chlorophenol and 4-ch......-chlorophenol into humic acids by Horseradish Peroxidase is reported. The incorporation is accompanied by a significant polymerization of the chlorophenols. The stability of the chlorinated humic acids as well as the environmental implication are discussed....

  13. Pro-resolving lipid mediators (SPMs and their actions in regulating miRNA in novel resolution circuits in inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles N Serhan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Unresolved inflammation is associated with several widely occurring diseases such as arthritis, periodontal diseases, cancer, and atherosclerosis. Endogenous mechanisms that curtail excessive inflammation and prompt its timely resolution are of considerable interest. In recent years, previously unrecognized chemical mediators derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids were identified that control the acute inflammatory response by activating local resolution programs. Among these are the so-called specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators (SPMs that include lipoxins (LX, resolvins (Rv, protectins (PD, and maresins (MaR, because they are enzymatically biosynthesized during resolution of self-limited inflammation. They each possess distinct chemical structures and regulate cellular pathways by their ability to activate pro-resolving G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs in a stereospecific manner. For instance, RvD1 controls several miRNAs of interest in self-limited acute inflammation that counter-regulate the mediators and proteins that are involved in inflammation. Here, we overview some of the biosynthesis and mechanisms of SPM actions with focus on the recently reported miR involved in their pro-resolving responses that underscore their beneficial actions in the regulation of acute inflammation and its timely resolution. The elucidation of these mechanisms operating in vivo to keep acute inflammation within physiologic boundaries as well as stimulate resolution have opened resolution pharmacology and many new opportunities to target inflammation-related human pathologies via activating resolution mechanisms.

  14. Need satisfaction, motivational regulations and exercise: moderation and mediation effects

    OpenAIRE

    Weman-Josefsson, Karin; Lindwall, Magnus; Ivarsson, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Background Based on the Self-determination theory process model, this study aimed to explore relationships between the latent constructs of psychological need satisfaction, autonomous motivation and exercise behaviour; the mediational role of autonomous motivation in the association of psychological need satisfaction with exercise behaviour; as well as gender and age differences in the aforementioned associations. Methods Adult active members of an Internet-based exercise program (n = 1091) b...

  15. Chemotaxis to cyclic AMP and folic acid is mediated by different G proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesbeke, Fanja; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Wit, René J.W. de; Snaar-Jagalska, B. Ewa

    1990-01-01

    Mutant Frigid A (fgdA) of Dictyostelium discoideum is defective in a functional Gα2 subunit of a G protein and is characterized by a complete blockade of the cyclic AMP-mediated sensory transduction steps, including cyclic AMP relay, chemotaxis and the cyclic GMP response. Folic acid-mediated transm

  16. TOR Pathway-Mediated Juvenile Hormone Synthesis Regulates Nutrient-Dependent Female Reproduction in Nilaparvata lugens (Stål).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kai; Chen, Xia; Liu, Wen-Ting; Zhou, Qiang

    2016-03-28

    The "target of rapamycin" (TOR) nutritional signaling pathway and juvenile hormone (JH) regulation of vitellogenesis has been known for a long time. However, the interplay between these two pathways regulating vitellogenin (Vg) expression remains obscure. Here, we first demonstrated the key role of amino acids (AAs) in activation of Vg synthesis and egg development in Nilaparvata lugens using chemically defined artificial diets. AAs induced the expression of TOR and S6K (S6 kinase), whereas RNAi-mediated silencing of these two TOR pathway genes and rapamycin application strongly inhibited the AAs-induced Vg synthesis. Furthermore, knockdown of Rheb (Ras homologue enriched in brain), TOR, S6K and application of rapamycin resulted in a dramatic reduction in the mRNA levels of jmtN (juvenile hormone acid methyltransferase, JHAMT). Application of JH III on the RNAi (Rheb and TOR) and rapamycin-treated females partially rescued the Vg expression. Conversely, knockdown of either jmtN or met (methoprene-tolerant, JH receptor) and application of JH III had no effects on mRNA levels of Rheb, TOR and S6K and phosphorylation of S6K. In summary, our results demonstrate that the TOR pathway induces JH biosynthesis that in turn regulates AAs-mediated Vg synthesis in N. lugens.

  17. Retinoic acid signalling in thymocytes regulates T cell development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendland, Kerstin; Sitnik, Katarzyna Maria; Kotarsky, Knut

    The Vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) has emerged as an important regulator of peripheral T cell responses. However, whether there is endogenous retinoic acid receptor (RAR) signaling in developing thymocytes and the potential impact of such signals in thymocyte development remains unclear...... further enhanced in recently generated CD69+ CD4+ SP cells. To address the potential biological significance of RA signaling in developing thymocytes, we evaluated T cell development in CD4Cre-dnRAR mice, where RA signaling is blocked in thymocytes from the CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) stage onwards due...... of this cell subset. Collectively, our data suggest a direct role for RA signaling in regulating thymocyte homeostasis and T cell development....

  18. Biotin uptake by mouse and human pancreatic beta cells/islets: a regulated, lipopolysaccharide-sensitive carrier-mediated process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Sekar, Thillai V; Said, Hamid M

    2014-08-01

    Biotin is essential for the normal function of pancreatic beta cells. These cells obtain biotin from their surroundings via transport across their cell membrane. Little is known about the uptake mechanism involved, how it is regulated, and how it is affected by internal and external factors. We addressed these issues using the mouse-derived pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells and freshly isolated mouse and human primary pancreatic beta cells as models. The results showed biotin uptake by pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells occurs via a Na(+)-dependent, carrier-mediated process, that is sensitive to desthiobiotin, as well as to pantothenic acid and lipoate; the process is also saturable as a function of concentration (apparent Km = 22.24 ± 5.5 μM). These cells express the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT), whose knockdown (with doxycycline-inducible shRNA) led to a sever inhibition in biotin uptake. Similarly, uptake of biotin by mouse and human primary pancreatic islets is Na(+)-dependent and carrier-mediated, and both cell types express SMVT. Biotin uptake by pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells is also adaptively regulated (via transcriptional mechanism) by extracellular substrate level. Chronic treatment of pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) leads to inhibition in biotin uptake. This inhibition is mediated via a Toll-Like receptor 4-mediated process and involves a decrease in membrane expression of SMVT. These findings show, for the first time, that pancreatic beta cells/islets take up biotin via a specific and regulated carrier-mediated process, and that the process is sensitive to the effect of LPS.

  19. Difficulties with emotion regulation mediate the relationship between borderline personality disorder symptom severity and interpersonal problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Nathaniel R; Rosenthal, M Zachary; Geiger, Paul J; Erikson, Karen

    2013-08-01

    Problems with interpersonal functioning and difficulties with emotion regulation are core characteristics of borderline personality disorder (BPD). Little is known, however, about the interrelationship between these areas of dysfunction in accounting for BPD symptom severity. The present study examines a model of the relationship between difficulties with emotion regulation and interpersonal dysfunction in a community sample of adults (n = 124) with the full range of BPD symptoms. Results showed that difficulties with emotion regulation fully mediated the relationship between BPD symptom severity and interpersonal dysfunction. An alternative model indicated that interpersonal problems partially mediated the relationship between difficulties with emotion regulation and BPD symptom severity. These findings support existing theories of BPD, which propose that difficulties with emotion regulation may account for the types of interpersonal problems experienced by individuals with BPD and suggest further examination of the possibility that interpersonal dysfunction may worsen these individuals' difficulties with emotion regulation.

  20. Physiological and clinical significance of enterochromaffin-like cell activation in the regulation of gastric acid secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanglin Cui; Helge L Waldum

    2007-01-01

    Gastric acid plays an important role in digesting food (especially protein), iron absorption, and destroying swallowed micro-organisms. H+ is secreted by the oxyntic parietal cells and its secretion is regulated by endocrine, neurocrine and paracrine mechanisms.Gastrin released from the antral G cell is the principal physiological stimulus of gastric acid secretion. Activation of the enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell is accepted as the main source of histamine participating in the regulation of acid secretion and is functionally and trophically controlled by gastrin, which is mediated by gastrin/CCK-2 receptors expressed on the ECL cell. However, longterm hypergastrinemia will induce ECL cell hyperplasia and probably carcinoids. Clinically, potent inhibitors of acid secretion have been prescribed widely to patients with acid-related disorders. Long-term potent acid inhibition evokes a marked increase in plasma gastrin levels,leading to enlargement of oxyntic mucosa with ECL cell hyperplasia. Accordingly, the induction of ECL cell hyperplasia and carcinoids remains a topic of considerable concern, especially in long-term use. In addition, the activation of ECL cells also induces another clinical concern, i.e., rebound acid hypersecretion after acid inhibition. Recent experimental and clinical findings indicate that the activation of ECL cells plays a critical role both physiologically and clinically in the regulation of gastric acid secretion.

  1. Altered Cultivar Resistance of Kimchi Cabbage Seedlings Mediated by Salicylic Acid, Jasmonic Acid and Ethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Hee Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Two cultivars Buram-3-ho (susceptible and CR-Hagwang (moderate resistant of kimchi cabbage seedlings showed differential defense responses to anthracnose (Colletotrichum higginsianum, black spot (Alternaria brassicicola and black rot (Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, Xcc diseases in our previous study. Defense-related hormones salicylic acid (SA, jasmonic acid (JA and ethylene led to different transcriptional regulation of pathogenesis-related (PR gene expression in both cultivars. In this study, exogenous application of SA suppressed basal defenses to C. higginsianum in the 1st leaves of the susceptible cultivar and cultivar resistance of the 2nd leaves of the resistant cultivar. SA also enhanced susceptibility of the susceptible cultivar to A. brassicicola. By contrast, SA elevated disease resistance to Xcc in the resistant cultivar, but not in the susceptible cultivar. Methyl jasmonate (MJ treatment did not affect the disease resistance to C. higginsianum and Xcc in either cultivar, but it compromised the disease resistance to A. brassicicola in the resistant cultivar. Treatment with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC ethylene precursor did not change resistance of the either cultivar to C. higginsianum and Xcc. Effect of ACC pretreatment on the resistance to A. brassicicola was not distinguished between susceptible and resistant cultivars, because cultivar resistance of the resistant cultivar was lost by prolonged moist dark conditions. Taken together, exogenously applied SA, JA and ethylene altered defense signaling crosstalk to three diseases of anthracnose, black spot and black rot in a cultivar-dependent manner.

  2. Carbonic anhydrase 5 regulates acid-base homeostasis in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Postel

    Full Text Available The regulation of the acid-base balance in cells is essential for proper cellular homeostasis. Disturbed acid-base balance directly affects cellular physiology, which often results in various pathological conditions. In every living organism, the protein family of carbonic anhydrases regulate a broad variety of homeostatic processes. Here we describe the identification, mapping and cloning of a zebrafish carbonic anhydrase 5 (ca5 mutation, collapse of fins (cof, which causes initially a collapse of the medial fins followed by necrosis and rapid degeneration of the embryo. These phenotypical characteristics can be mimicked in wild-type embryos by acetazolamide treatment, suggesting that CA5 activity in zebrafish is essential for a proper development. In addition we show that CA5 regulates acid-base balance during embryonic development, since lowering the pH can compensate for the loss of CA5 activity. Identification of selective modulators of CA5 activity could have a major impact on the development of new therapeutics involved in the treatment of a variety of disorders.

  3. Amino acids regulate the intracellular trafficking of the general amino acid permease of Saccharomycescerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Esther J; Kaiser, Chris A

    2002-11-12

    The delivery to the plasma membrane of the general amino acid permease, Gap1p, of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by the quality of the nitrogen source in the growth medium. In an effort to define how different nitrogen sources control Gap1p sorting, we find that mutations in GDH1 and GLN1 that decrease the flux through the glutamate and glutamine synthesis pathways result in increased Gap1p sorting to the plasma membrane. Conversely, deletion of MKS1, which increases glutamate and glutamine synthesis, decreases Gap1p sorting to the plasma membrane. Glutamate and glutamine are not unusual in their ability to regulate Gap1p sorting, because the addition of all natural amino acids and many amino acid analogs to the growth medium results in increased Gap1p sorting to the vacuole. Importantly, amino acids have the capacity to signal Gap1p sorting to the vacuole regardless of whether they can be used as a source of nitrogen. Finally, we show that rapamycin does not affect Gap1p sorting, indicating that Gap1p sorting is not directly influenced by the TOR pathway. Together, these data show that amino acids are a signal for sorting Gap1p to the vacuole and imply that the nitrogen-regulated Gap1p sorting machinery responds to amino acid-like compounds rather than to the overall nutritional status associated with growth on a particular nitrogen source.

  4. EETs mediate cardioprotection of salvianolic acids through MAPK signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoubao Wang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Salvianolic acids, including salvianolic acid A (SAA and salvianolic acid B (SAB, are the main water-soluble bioactive compounds isolated from the Chinese medicinal herb Danshen and have been shown to exert in vitro and in vivo cardiovascular protection. Recent studies suggest that epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs, the primary cytochrome P450 2J (CYP2J epoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid, are involved in the progression of ischemic injury in diverse organs. Here, we investigated the relation between the protective effects of salvianolic acids and EETs/sEH as well as MAPK signaling pathway. In the present study, the rat acute myocardial infarction (AMI model was established by the left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion. Our results showed that salvianolic acids significantly reduced ST-segment elevation and serum levels of CK-MB, LDH, and ALT in AMI rats, and significantly attenuated the caspase 3 expression and reduced the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2. ELISA measurement showed that salvianolic acids significantly increased the 14,15-EET levels in blood and heart, and attenuated hydrolase activity of sEH in heart of AMI rat. Western blotting analysis suggested that salvianolic acids significantly attenuated the phosphorylation of JNK and p38, and increased phosphorylation of ERK in heart. In conclusion, these results indicate that EETs/sEH and MAPK signaling pathways are important processes in cardioprotection of salvianolic acids.

  5. Saturated fatty acids induce post-transcriptional regulation of HAMP mRNA via AU-rich element-binding protein, human antigen R (HuR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sizhao; Mott, Justin L; Harrison-Findik, Duygu Dee

    2015-10-02

    Iron is implicated in fatty liver disease pathogenesis. The human hepcidin gene, HAMP, is the master switch of iron metabolism. The aim of this study is to investigate the regulation of HAMP expression by fatty acids in HepG2 cells. For these studies, both saturated fatty acids (palmitic acid (PA) and stearic acid (SA)) and unsaturated fatty acid (oleic acid (OA)) were used. PA and, to a lesser extent, SA, but not OA, up-regulated HAMP mRNA levels, as determined by real-time PCR. To understand whether PA regulates HAMP mRNA at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level, the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D was employed. PA-mediated induction of HAMP mRNA expression was not blocked by actinomycin D. Furthermore, PA activated HAMP 3'-UTR, but not promoter, activity, as shown by reporter assays. HAMP 3'-UTR harbors a single AU-rich element (ARE). Mutation of this ARE abolished the effect of PA, suggesting the involvement of ARE-binding proteins. The ARE-binding protein human antigen R (HuR) stabilizes mRNA through direct interaction with AREs on 3'-UTR. HuR is regulated by phosphorylation-mediated nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling. PA activated this process. The binding of HuR to HAMP mRNA was also induced by PA in HepG2 cells. Silencing of HuR by siRNA abolished PA-mediated up-regulation of HAMP mRNA levels. PKC is known to phosphorylate HuR. Staurosporine, a broad-spectrum PKC inhibitor, inhibited both PA-mediated translocation of HuR and induction of HAMP expression. Similarly, rottlerin, a novel class PKC inhibitor, abrogated PA-mediated up-regulation of HAMP expression. In conclusion, lipids mediate post-transcriptional regulation of HAMP throughPKC- and HuR-dependent mechanisms.

  6. H2O2 mediates the regulation of ABA catabolism and GA biosynthesis in Arabidopsis seed dormancy and germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yinggao; Ye, Nenghui; Liu, Rui; Chen, Moxian; Zhang, Jianhua

    2010-06-01

    H(2)O(2) is known as a signal molecule in plant cells, but its role in the regulation of aqbscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellic acid (GA) metabolism and hormonal balance is not yet clear. In this study it was found that H(2)O(2) affected the regulation of ABA catabolism and GA biosynthesis during seed imbibition and thus exerted control over seed dormancy and germination. As seen by quantitative RT-PCR (QRT-PCR), H(2)O(2) up-regulated ABA catabolism genes (e.g. CYP707A genes), resulting in a decreased ABA content during imbibition. This action required the participation of nitric oxide (NO), another signal molecule. At the same time, H(2)O(2) also up-regulated GA biosynthesis, as shown by QRT-PCR. When an ABA catabolism mutant, cyp707a2, and an overexpressing plant, CYP707A2-OE, were tested, ABA content was negatively correlated with GA biosynthesis. Exogenously applied GA was able to over-ride the inhibition of germination at low concentrations of ABA, but had no obvious effect when ABA concentrations were high. It is concluded that H(2)O(2) mediates the up-regulation of ABA catabolism, probably through an NO signal, and also promotes GA biosynthesis. High concentrations of ABA inhibit GA biosynthesis but a balance of these two hormones can jointly control the dormancy and germination of Arabidopsis seeds.

  7. microRNA-mediated regulation of the tumor microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Jonathan; Shahi, Payam; Werb, Zena

    2013-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment includes cells such as fibroblasts, immune cells, endothelial cells, as well as extracellular matrix (ECM), proteases, and cytokines. Together, these components participate in a complex crosstalk with neoplastic tumor cells that affects growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs involved in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression and have recently emerged as important players involved in regulating multiple aspects of cancer biology and the tumor microenvironment. Differential miRNA expression in both the epithelial and stromal compartments of tumors compared with normal tissue suggests that miRNAs are important drivers of tumorigenesis and metastasis. This review article summarizes our current understanding of the diverse roles of miRNAs involved in tumor microenvironment regulation and underscores the importance of miRNAs within multiple cell types that contribute to the hallmarks of cancer. PMID:24036551

  8. Mechanisms of microRNA-mediated gene regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are identified as a class of non-protein regulators and a new source for broad control of gene expression in eukaryotes. The past years have witnessed substantial progress in understanding miRNA functions and mechanisms, although a few controversies remain. Various hypotheses and models have been suggested for the mechanisms of miRNA repression, including translational inhibition at the level of initiation or elongation, rapid degradation of the nascent peptide, mRNA degradation, and mRNA sequestration into P bodies (processing bodies) and SGs (stress granules) for degradation or/and storage. Recently, some noncanonical miRNA regulation, such as miRNA activation and de-repression of miRNA inhibition, have been uncovered. This review discusses some recent advances about how miRNAs regulate their targets and various modes of miRNA function.

  9. Translation regulation via nascent polypeptide-mediated ribosome stalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Daniel N; Arenz, Stefan; Beckmann, Roland

    2016-04-01

    As the nascent polypeptide chain is being synthesized, it passes through a tunnel within the large ribosomal subunit. Interaction between the nascent polypeptide chain and the ribosomal tunnel can modulate the translation rate and induce translational stalling to regulate gene expression. In this article, we highlight recent structural insights into how the nascent polypeptide chain, either alone or in cooperation with co-factors, can interact with components of the ribosomal tunnel to regulate translation via inactivating the peptidyltransferase center of the ribosome and inducing ribosome stalling.

  10. Involvement of atypical protein kinase C in the regulation of cardiac glucose and long-chain fatty acid uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphna D.J. Habets

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The signaling pathways involved in the regulation of cardiac GLUT4 translocation/glucose uptake and CD36 translocation/ long-chain fatty acid uptake are not fully understood. We compared in heart/muscle-specific PKC-λ knockout mice the roles of atypical PKCs (PKC-ζ and PKC-λ in regulating cardiac glucose and fatty acid uptake. Results: Neither insulin-stimulated nor AMPK-mediated glucose and fatty acid uptake were inhibited upon genetic PKC-λ ablation in cardiomyocytes. In contrast, myristoylated PKC-ζ pseudosubstrate inhibited both insulin-stimulated and AMPK-mediated glucose and fatty acid uptake by >80% in both wild-type and PKC-λ-knockout cardiomyocytes. In PKC-λ knockout cardiomyocytes, PKC-ζ is the sole remaining atypical PKC isoform, and its expression level is not different from wild-type cardiomyocytes, in which it contributes to 29% and 17% of total atypical PKC expression and phosphorylation, respectively. Conclusion: Taken together, atypical PKCs are necessary for insulin-stimulated and AMPK-mediated glucose uptake into the heart, as well as for insulin-stimulated and AMPK-mediated fatty acid uptake. However, the residual PKC-ζ activity in PKC-λ-knockout cardiomyocytes is sufficient to allow optimal stimulation of glucose and fatty acid uptake, indicating that atypical PKCs are necessary but not rate-limiting in the regulation of cardiac substrate uptake and that PKC-λ and PKC-ζ have interchangeable functions in these processes.

  11. Mediator MED23 regulates basal transcription in vivo via an interaction with P-TEFb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yao, Xiao; Huang, Yan; Hu, Xiangming; Liu, Runzhong; Hou, Dongming; Chen, Ruichuan; Wang, Gang

    2013-01-01

    The Mediator is a multi-subunit complex that transduces regulatory information from transcription regulators to the RNA polymerase II apparatus. Growing evidence suggests that Mediator plays roles in multiple stages of eukaryotic transcription, including elongation. However, the detailed mechanism by which Mediator regulates elongation remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that Mediator MED23 subunit controls a basal level of transcription by recruiting elongation factor P-TEFb, via an interaction with its CDK9 subunit. The mRNA level of Egr1, a MED23-controlled model gene, is reduced 4-5 fold in Med23 (-/-) ES cells under an unstimulated condition, but Med23-deficiency does not alter the occupancies of RNAP II, GTFs, Mediator complex, or activator ELK1 at the Egr1 promoter. Instead, Med23 depletion results in a significant decrease in P-TEFb and RNAP II (Ser2P) binding at the coding region, but no changes for several other elongation regulators, such as DSIF and NELF. ChIP-seq revealed that Med23-deficiency partially reduced the P-TEFb occupancy at a set of MED23-regulated gene promoters. Further, we demonstrate that MED23 interacts with CDK9 in vivo and in vitro. Collectively, these results provide the mechanistic insight into how Mediator promotes RNAP II into transcription elongation.

  12. Valproic acid mediates the synaptic excitatory/inhibitory balance through astrocytes--a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Chuan; Chen, Po See; Hsu, Chien-Wen; Wu, Shou-Jung; Lin, Chieh-Ting; Gean, Po Wu

    2012-04-27

    Valproic acid (VPA) is one of the most widely used anticonvulsant and mood-stabilizing agents for the treatment of epilepsy and bipolar disorder. However, the underlying therapeutic mechanisms of the treatment of each disease remain unclear. Recently, the anti-epileptic effect of VPA has been found to lead to modulation of the synaptic excitatory/inhibitory balance. In addition, the therapeutic action of VPA has been linked to its effect on astrocytes by regulating gene expression at the molecular level, perhaps through an epigenetic mechanism as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. To provide insight into the mechanisms underlying the actions of VPA, this study investigated whether the synaptic excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) balance could be mediated by VPA through astrocytes. First, using the primary rat neuronal, astroglial, and neuro-glial mixed culture systems, we demonstrated that VPA treatment could regulate the mRNA levels of two post-synaptic cell adhesion molecules(neuroligin-1 and neuregulin-1) and two extracellular matrices (neuronal pentraxin-1and thrombospondin-3) in primary rat astrocyte cultures in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, the up-regulation effect of VPA was noted in astrocytes, but not in neurons. In addition, these regulatory effects could be mimicked by sodium butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor, but not by lithium or two other glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta inhibitors. With the known role of these four proteins in regulating the synaptic E/I balance, we further demonstrated that VPA increased excitatory post-synaptic protein (postsynaptic density 95) and inhibitory post-synaptic protein (Gephyrin) in cortical neuro-glial mixed cultures. Our results suggested that VPA might affect the synaptic excitatory/inhibitory balance through its effect on astrocytes. This work provides the basis for future evaluation of the role of astroglial cell adhesion molecules and the extracellular matrix on the control of excitatory and

  13. K-channels inhibited by hydrogen peroxide mediate abscisic acid signaling in Vicia guard cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A number of studies show that environmental stress conditions increase abscisic acid (ABA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels in plant cells. Despite this central role of ABA in altering stomatal aperture by regulating guard cell ion transport, little is known concerning the relationship between ABA and H2O2 in signal transduction leading to stomatal movement. Epidermal strip bioassay illustrated that ABA-inhibited stomatal opening and ABA-induced stomatal closure were abolished partly by externally added catalase (CAT) or diphenylene iodonium (DPI), which are a H2O2 scavenger and a NADPH oxidase inhibitor respectively. In contrast, internally added CAT or DPI nearly completely or partly reversed ABA-induced closure in half-stoma. Consistent with these results, whole-cell patch-clamp analysis showed that intracellular application of CAT or DPI partly abolished ABA-inhibited inward K+ current across the plasma membrane of guard cells. H2O2 mimicked ABA to inhibit inward K+ current, an effect which was reversed by the addition of ascorbic acid (Vc) in patch clamping micropipettes. These results suggested that H2O2 mediated ABA-induced stomatal movement by targeting inward K+ channels at plasma membrane.

  14. Lipase-mediated resolution of branched chain fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinsman, N.W.J.T.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Padt, A. van der; Boom, R.M.; Riet, K. van 't; Groot, A.E. de

    2002-01-01

    Branched chain fatty acids (BCFAs) are fatty acids substituted with alkyl groups. Many of them are chiral and therefore occur in two enantiomeric forms. This review describes their occurrence in Nature, their biosynthesis, their properties as flavours, and their enzymatic kinetic resolution. Many li

  15. Role of mitochondria in programmed cell death mediated by arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huiyong; Zhou, Yunhua; Zhu, Mingjiang; Hou, Sarina; Li, Zi; Zhong, Huiqin; Lu, Jianhong; Meng, Tao; Wang, Junhong; Xia, Lin; Xu, Yue; Wu, Yuncheng

    2013-05-01

    Arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids from cyclooxygenases, lipoxygenases, and cytochrome P450 are important lipid mediators involved in numerous homeostatic and pathophysiological processes. Most eicosanoids act primarily on their respective cell surface G-protein coupled receptors to elicit downstream signaling in an autocrine and paracrine fashion. Emerging evidence indicates that these hormones are also critical in apoptosis in a cell/tissue specific manner. In this review, we summarize the formation of eicosanoids and their roles as mediators in apoptosis, specifically on the roles of mitochondria in mediating these events and the signaling pathways involved. The biological relevance of eicosanoid-mediated apoptosis is also discussed.

  16. Thyroid hormone and retinoic acid interact to regulate zebrafish craniofacial neural crest development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnsack, Brenda L; Kahana, Alon

    2013-01-15

    Craniofacial and ocular morphogenesis require proper regulation of cranial neural crest migration, proliferation, survival and differentiation. Although alterations in maternal thyroid hormone (TH) are associated with congenital craniofacial anomalies, the role of TH on the neural crest has not been previously described. Using zebrafish, we demonstrate that pharmacologic and genetic alterations in TH signaling disrupt cranial neural crest migration, proliferation, and survival, leading to craniofacial, extraocular muscle, and ocular developmental abnormalities. In the rostral cranial neural crest that gives rise to the periocular mesenchyme and the frontonasal process, retinoic acid (RA) rescued migratory defects induced by decreased TH signaling. In the caudal cranial neural crest, TH and RA had reciprocal effects on anterior and posterior pharyngeal arch development. The interactions between TH and RA signaling were partially mediated by the retinoid X receptor. We conclude that TH regulates both rostral and caudal cranial neural crest. Further, coordinated interactions of TH and RA are required for proper craniofacial and ocular development.

  17. Set7 mediated interactions regulate transcriptional networks in embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuano, Natasha K; Okabe, Jun; Ziemann, Mark; Cooper, Mark E; El-Osta, Assam

    2016-11-02

    Histone methylation by lysine methyltransferase enzymes regulate the expression of genes implicated in lineage specificity and cellular differentiation. While it is known that Set7 catalyzes mono-methylation of histone and non-histone proteins, the functional importance of this enzyme in stem cell differentiation remains poorly understood. We show Set7 expression is increased during mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation and is regulated by the pluripotency factors, Oct4 and Sox2. Transcriptional network analyses reveal smooth muscle (SM) associated genes are subject to Set7-mediated regulation. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of Set7 activity confirms this regulation. We observe Set7-mediated modification of serum response factor (SRF) and mono-methylation of histone H4 lysine 4 (H3K4me1) regulate gene expression. We conclude the broad substrate specificity of Set7 serves to control key transcriptional networks in embryonic stem cells.

  18. Warm and harsh parenting as mediators of the relation between maternal and adolescent emotion regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarıtaş, Dilek; Grusec, Joan E; Gençöz, Tülin

    2013-12-01

    Maternal hostility/rejection and warmth were considered as potential mediators of the relation between mothers' and adolescents' emotion regulation. Participants were first-year high school students living in Ankara, Turkey and their mothers (N = 365). Scales assessing emotion regulation difficulties and maternal hostility/rejection and warmth were administered to both the adolescents and their mothers. Maternal hostility/rejection, but not warmth, mediated the relation between maternal and adolescent emotion regulation. For girls there was, additionally, a direct effect of maternal emotion regulation. The different roles played by parental rejection and parental warmth in the development of adolescents' emotion regulation accord with arguments that socialization occurs in different domains and that rejection and warmth are not aspects of the same domain.

  19. Emotion regulation and depressive symptoms: examining the mediation effects of school connectedness in Chinese late adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanhua; Zhao, Guoxiang

    2015-04-01

    This study tested Gross's process model of emotion regulation in a Chinese adolescent sample. It hypothesized that emotion regulation strategies (cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression) would predict adolescents' perception of school connectedness and depressive symptoms. It also posited that school connectedness may be a possible mediator between emotion regulation and depressive symptoms. Participants were 504 adolescents aged 16-18 from two Chinese public upper secondary schools. Structural equation modeling analyses indicated that reappraisal and suppression significantly associated with school connectedness and depressive symptoms, and school connectedness mediated the link between emotion regulation and depressive symptoms, even when the general emotion experiences were controlled. Although boys unexpectedly reported higher level depressive symptoms, the hypothesized model was invariant across gender except for the link between suppression and depressive symptoms. These findings demonstrate that it is meaningful to involve both emotion regulation processes and school connectedness in explaining adolescent depressive symptoms.

  20. The Arabidopsis mediator complex subunit16 positively regulates salicylate-mediated systemic acquired resistance and jasmonate/ethylene-induced defense pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xudong; Wang, Chenggang; Zhang, Yanping; Sun, Yijun; Mou, Zhonglin

    2012-10-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a long-lasting plant immunity against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Biological induction of SAR requires the signal molecule salicylic acid (SA) and involves profound transcriptional changes that are largely controlled by the transcription coactivator nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes1 (NPR1). However, it is unclear how SAR signals are transduced from the NPR1 signaling node to the general transcription machinery. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis thaliana Mediator subunit16 (MED16) is an essential positive regulator of SAR. Mutations in MED16 reduced NPR1 protein levels and completely compromised biological induction of SAR. These mutations also significantly suppressed SA-induced defense responses, altered the transcriptional changes induced by the avirulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) DC3000/avrRpt2, and rendered plants susceptible to both Pst DC3000/avrRpt2 and Pst DC3000. In addition, mutations in MED16 blocked the induction of several jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET)-responsive genes and compromised resistance to the necrotrophic fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria brassicicola. The Mediator complex acts as a bridge between specific transcriptional activators and the RNA polymerase II transcription machinery; therefore, our data suggest that MED16 may be a signaling component in the gap between the NPR1 signaling node and the general transcription machinery and may relay signals from both the SA and the JA/ET pathways.

  1. Emotional maltreatment and disordered eating in adolescents: testing the mediating role of emotion regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Pamela; Newman, Emily Frances; Cossar, Jill; Murray, George

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine if emotion regulation mediates the relationship between emotional maltreatment and disordered eating behavior in adolescents. Participants were 222 secondary school pupils (aged 14-18 years) from a state high school in the UK. Standardized questionnaire measures were used to gather self-report data on emotional abuse and emotional neglect, functional and dysfunctional emotion regulation strategies and disordered eating behavior. Results showed that disordered eating was associated with emotional abuse, dysfunctional emotion regulation and being female. Multiple mediation analysis found an indirect relationship between emotional abuse and disordered eating through dysfunctional emotion regulation. Interestingly, emotional neglect predicted lower levels of functional emotion regulation. The findings support previous research showing emotion regulation to mediate the relationship between childhood abuse and disordered eating in adults and a differential effect of abuse and neglect on emotion regulation. Longitudinal studies are required to confirm the direction of relationships; however these data suggest that dysfunctional emotion regulation is a significant variable in the development of disordered eating and may be a useful target for intervention.

  2. Med1 subunit of the mediator complex in nuclear receptor-regulated energy metabolism, liver regeneration, and hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuzhi; Viswakarma, Navin; Reddy, Janardan K

    2014-01-01

    Several nuclear receptors regulate diverse metabolic functions that impact on critical biological processes, such as development, differentiation, cellular regeneration, and neoplastic conversion. In the liver, some members of the nuclear receptor family, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), liver X receptor (LXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and others, regulate energy homeostasis, the formation and excretion of bile acids, and detoxification of xenobiotics. Excess energy burning resulting from increases in fatty acid oxidation systems in liver generates reactive oxygen species, and the resulting oxidative damage influences liver regeneration and liver tumor development. These nuclear receptors are important sensors of exogenous activators as well as receptor-specific endogenous ligands. In this regard, gene knockout mouse models revealed that some lipid-metabolizing enzymes generate PPARα-activating ligands, while others such as ACOX1 (fatty acyl-CoA oxidase1) inactivate these endogenous PPARα activators. In the absence of ACOX1, the unmetabolized ACOX1 substrates cause sustained activation of PPARα, and the resulting increase in energy burning leads to hepatocarcinogenesis. Ligand-activated nuclear receptors recruit the multisubunit Mediator complex for RNA polymerase II-dependent gene transcription. Evidence indicates that the Med1 subunit of the Mediator is essential for PPARα, PPARγ, CAR, and GR signaling in liver. Med1 null hepatocytes fail to respond to PPARα activators in that these cells do not show induction of peroxisome proliferation and increases in fatty acid oxidation enzymes. Med1-deficient hepatocytes show no increase in cell proliferation and do not give rise to liver tumors. Identification of nuclear receptor-specific coactivators and Mediator subunits should further our understanding of the complexities of metabolic

  3. Gallic acid abolishes the EGFR/Src/Akt/Erk-mediated expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Jung; Lin, Ku-Nan; Jhang, Li-Mei; Huang, Chia-Hui; Lee, Yuan-Chin; Chang, Long-Sen

    2016-05-25

    Several studies have revealed that natural compounds are valuable resources to develop novel agents against dysregulation of the EGF/EGFR-mediated matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression in cancer cells. In view of the findings that EGF/EGFR-mediated MMP-9 expression is closely related to invasion and metastasis of breast cancer. To determine the beneficial effects of gallic acid on the suppression of breast cancer metastasis, we explored the effect of gallic acid on MMP-9 expression in EGF-treated MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Treatment with EGF up-regulated MMP-9 mRNA and protein levels in MCF-7 cells. EGF treatment induced phosphorylation of EGFR and elicited Src activation, subsequently promoting Akt/NFκB (p65) and ERK/c-Jun phosphorylation in MCF-7 cells. Activation of Akt/p65 and ERK/c-Jun was responsible for the MMP-9 up-regulation in EGF-treated cells. Gallic acid repressed the EGF-induced activation of EGFR and Src; furthermore, inactivation of Akt/p65 and ERK/c-Jun was a result of the inhibitory effect of gallic acid on the EGF-induced MMP-9 up-regulation. Over-expression of constitutively active Akt and MEK1 or over-expression of constitutively active Src eradicated the inhibitory effect of gallic acid on the EGF-induced MMP-9 up-regulation. A chromosome conformation capture assay showed that EGF induced a chromosomal loop formation in the MMP-9 promoter via NFκB/p65 and AP-1/c-Jun activation. Treatment with gallic acid, EGFR inhibitor, or Src inhibitor reduced DNA looping. Taken together, our data suggest that gallic acid inhibits the activation of EGFR/Src-mediated Akt and ERK, leading to reduced levels of p65/c-Jun-mediated DNA looping and thus inhibiting MMP-9 expression in EGF-treated MCF-7 cells.

  4. Ion-Mediated Nucleic Acid Helix-Helix Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Zhi-Jie; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2006-01-01

    Salt ions are essential for the folding of nucleic acids. We use the tightly bound ion (TBI) model, which can account for the correlations and fluctuations for the ions bound to the nucleic acids, to investigate the electrostatic free-energy landscape for two parallel nucleic acid helices in the solution of added salt. The theory is based on realistic atomic structures of the helices. In monovalent salt, the helices are predicted to repel each other. For divalent salt, while the mean-field Po...

  5. Medium-chain fatty acids and glutathione derivatives as inhibitors of S-nitrosoglutathione reduction mediated by alcohol dehydrogenase 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staab, Claudia A; Hellgren, Mikko; Grafström, Roland C; Höög, Jan-Olov

    2009-06-15

    Alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3) has emerged as an important regulator of protein S-nitrosation in its function as S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) reductase. GSNO depletion is associated with various disease conditions, emphasizing the potential value of a specific ADH3 inhibitor. The present study investigated inhibition of ADH3-mediated GSNO reduction by various substrate analogues, including medium-chain fatty acids and glutathione derivatives. The observed inhibition type was non-competitive. Similar to the Michaelis constants for the corresponding omega-hydroxy fatty acids, the inhibition constants for fatty acids were in the micromolar range and showed a clear dependency on chain length with optimal inhibitory capacity for eleven and twelve carbons. The most efficient inhibitors found were undecanoic acid, dodecanoic acid and dodecanedioic acid, with no significant difference in inhibition constant. All glutathione-derived inhibitors displayed inhibition constants in the millimolar range, at least three orders of magnitudes higher than the Michaelis constants of the high-affinity substrates GSNO and S-hydroxymethylglutathione. The experimental results as well as docking simulations with GSNO and S-methylglutathione suggest that for ADH3 ligands with a glutathione scaffold, in contrast to fatty acids, a zinc-binding moiety is imperative for correct orientation and stabilization of the hydrophilic glutathione scaffold within a predominantly hydrophobic active site.

  6. sRNA-Mediated Regulation of P-Fimbriae Phase Variation in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandige, Surabhi; Kronborg, Tina; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2015-01-01

    to changing environmental cues. This study aimed to uncover sRNA-mediated gene regulation in the UPEC strain UTI89, during infection of bladder epithelial cells. Hfq is an RNA chaperone known to facilitate and stabilize sRNA and target mRNA interactions with bacterial cells. The co......Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are capable of occupying physiologically distinct intracellular and extracellular niches within the urinary tract. This feat requires the timely regulation of gene expression and small RNAs (sRNAs) are known to mediate such rapid adjustments in response...... to the discovery of a novel virulence-associated trans-acting sRNA-PapR. Deletion of papR was found to enhance adhesion of UTI89 to both bladder and kidney cell lines in a manner independent of type-1 fimbriae. We demonstrate PapR mediated posttranscriptional repression of the P-fimbriae phase regulator gene pap...

  7. The protective effect of salicylic acid on lysozyme against riboflavin-mediated photooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Wang, Hongbao; Cheng, Lingli; Zhu, Hui; Wang, Mei; Wang, Shi-Long

    2011-06-01

    As a metabolite of aspirin in vivo, salicylic acid was proved to protect lysozyme from riboflavin-mediated photooxidation in this study. The antioxidative properties of salicylic acid were further studied by using time-resolved laser flash photolysis of 355 nm. It can quench the triplet state of riboflavin via electron transfer from salicylic acid to the triplet state of riboflavin with a reaction constant of 2.25 × 10 9 M -1 s -1. Mechanism of antioxidant activities of salicylic acid on lysozyme oxidation was discussed. Salicylic acid can serve as a potential antioxidant to quench the triplet state of riboflavin and reduce oxidative pressure.

  8. Regulation of dynein-mediated autophagosomes trafficking by ASM in CASMCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming; Zhang, Qiufang; Li, Pin-Lan; Nguyen, Thaison; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM; gene symbol Smpd1) has been shown to play a crucial role in autophagy maturation by controlling lysosomal fusion with autophagosomes in coronary arterial smooth muscle cells (CASMCs). However, the underlying molecular mechanism by which ASM controls autophagolysosomal fusion remains unknown. In primary cultured CASMCs, lysosomal Ca2+ induced by 7-ketocholesterol (7-Ket, an atherogenic stimulus and autophagy inducer) was markedly attenuated by ASM deficiency or TRPML1 gene silencing suggesting that ASM signaling is required for TRPML1 channel activity and subsequent lysosomal Ca(2+) release. In these CASMCs, ASM deficiency or TRPML1 gene silencing markedly inhibited 7-Ket-induced dynein activation. In addition, 7-Ket-induced autophagosome trafficking, an event associated with lysosomal Ca(2+) release and dynein activity, was significantly inhibited in ASM-deficient (Smpd1(-/-)) CASMCs compared to that in Smpd1(+/+) CASMCs. Finally, overexpression of TRPML1 proteins restored 7-Ket-induced lysosomal Ca(2+) release and autophagosome trafficking in Smpd1-/- CASMCs. Collectively, these results suggest that ASM plays a critical role in regulating lysosomal TRPML1-Ca(2+) signaling and subsequent dynein-mediated autophagosome trafficking, which leads its role in controlling autophagy maturation in CASMCs under atherogenic stimulation.

  9. High and low molecular weight hyaluronic acid differentially regulate human fibrocyte differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu S Maharjan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Following tissue injury, monocytes can enter the tissue and differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes, but little is known about what regulates this differentiation. Extracellular matrix contains high molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HMWHA; ∼2×10(6 Da. During injury, HMWHA breaks down to low molecular weight hyaluronic acid (LMWHA; ∼0.8-8×10(5 Da. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this report, we show that HMWHA potentiates the differentiation of human monocytes into fibrocytes, while LMWHA inhibits fibrocyte differentiation. Digestion of HMWHA with hyaluronidase produces small hyaluronic acid fragments, and these fragments inhibit fibrocyte differentiation. Monocytes internalize HMWHA and LMWHA equally well, suggesting that the opposing effects on fibrocyte differentiation are not due to differential internalization of HMWHA or LMWHA. Adding HMWHA to PBMC does not appear to affect the levels of the hyaluronic acid receptor CD44, whereas adding LMWHA decreases CD44 levels. The addition of anti-CD44 antibodies potentiates fibrocyte differentiation, suggesting that CD44 mediates at least some of the effect of hyaluronic acid on fibrocyte differentiation. The fibrocyte differentiation-inhibiting factor serum amyloid P (SAP inhibits HMWHA-induced fibrocyte differentiation and potentiates LMWHA-induced inhibition. Conversely, LMWHA inhibits the ability of HMWHA, interleukin-4 (IL-4, or interleukin-13 (IL-13 to promote fibrocyte differentiation. CONCLUSIONS: We hypothesize that hyaluronic acid signals at least in part through CD44 to regulate fibrocyte differentiation, with a dominance hierarchy of SAP>LMWHA≥HMWHA>IL-4 or IL-13.

  10. Pivotal Role of PGE2 and IL-10 in the Cross-Regulation of Dendritic Cell-Derived Inflammatory Mediators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hedi Harizi; Norbert Gualde

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to pathogens induces antigen-presenting cells (APC) such as macrophages and dendritic cells (DC) to produce various endogenous mediators, including arachidonic acid (AA)-derived eicosanoids, cytokines, and nitric oxide (NO). Many secreted products of activated APC can act by themselves in an autocrine manner and modulate their function. Moreover, the cross-interaction between endogenous bioactive molecules regulates the function of professional APC with important consequences for their ability to activate and sustain immune and inflammatory responses, and to regulate immune homeostasis. Although neglected for many years when compared to their role in cardiovascular homeostasis, cancer and inflammation, the importance of eicosanoids in immunology is becoming more defined. The role of prostaglandin (PG) E2 (PGE2), one of the best known and most well studied eicosanoids,is of particular interest. It modulates the activities of professional DC by acting on their differentiation, maturation and their ability to secrete cytokines. Uniquely among haematopoietic cytokines, interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a pleiotropic molecule that displays both immunostimulatory and immunoregulatory activities. IL-10 has attached much attention because of its anti-inflammatory properties. It modulates expression of cytokines, soluble mediators and cell surface molecules by cells of myeloid origin, particularly macrophages and DC. We previously reported that PGE2 is a potent inducer of IL-10 in bone marrow-derived DC (BM-DC), and PGE2-induced IL-10 is a key regulator of the BM-DC pro-inflammatory phenotype. BM-DC may be considered as an important model to study complex interactions between endogenous mediators, and autocrine IL-10 plays a pivotal role in the crossregulation of AA-derived lipid mediators, cytokines, and NO, with critical effects on immune and inflammatory responses. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2006;3(4):271-277.

  11. Ca2+ -regulated lysosome fusion mediates angiotensin II-induced lipid raft clustering in mesenteric endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei-Qing; Chen, Wen-Dong; Zhang, Ke; Liu, Jian-Jun; Wu, Yong-Jie; Gao, Ping-Jin

    2016-04-01

    It has been reported that intracellular Ca2+ is involved in lysosome fusion and membrane repair in skeletal cells. Given that angiotensin II (Ang II) elicits an increase in intracellular Ca2+ and that lysosome fusion is a crucial mediator of lipid raft (LR) clustering, we hypothesized that Ang II induces lysosome fusion and activates LR formation in rat mesenteric endothelial cells (MECs). We found that Ang II acutely increased intracellular Ca2+ content, an effect that was inhibited by the extracellular Ca2+ chelator ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-induced Ca2+ release inhibitor 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB). Further study showed that EGTA almost completely blocked Ang II-induced lysosome fusion, the translocation of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) to LR clusters, ASMase activation and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase activation. In contrast, 2-APB had a slight inhibitory effect. Functionally, both the lysosome inhibitor bafilomycin A1 and the ASMase inhibitor amitriptyline reversed Ang II-induced impairment of vasodilation. We conclude that Ca2+ -regulated lysosome fusion mediates the Ang II-induced regulation of the LR-redox signaling pathway and mesenteric endothelial dysfunction.

  12. Tetramethylpyrazine stimulates cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-mediated anion secretion in distal colon of rodents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiong He; Jin-Xia Zhu; Ying Xing; Lai-Ling Tsang; Ning Yang; Dewi Kenneth Rowlands; Yiu-Wa Chung; Hsiao-Chang Chan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), an active compound from Ligustiun Wollichii Franchat, on electrolyte transport across the distal colon of rodents and the mechanism involved.METHODS: The short-circuit current (ISC) technique in conjunction with pharmacological agents and specific inhibitors were used in analyzing the electrolyte transport across the distal colon of rodents. The underlying cellular signaling mechanism was investigated by radioimmunoassay analysis (RIA) and a special mouse model of cystic fibrosis.RESULTS: TMP stimulated a concentration-dependent rise in ISC, which was dependent on both Cl- and HCO3-, and inhibited by apical application of diphenylamine-2,2'-dicarboxylic acid (DPC) and glibenclamide, but resistant to 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid disodium salt hydrate (DIDS). Removal of Na+ from basolateral solution almost completely abolished the ISC response to TMP, but it was insensitive to apical Na+ replacement or apical Na+channel blocker, amiloride. Pretreatment of colonic mucosa with BAPTA-AM, a membrane-permeable selective Ca2+chelator, did not significantly alter the TMP-induced ISC. No additive effect of forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) was observed on the TMP-induced ISc, but it was significantly reduced by a protein kinase A inhibitor, H89.RIA results showed that TMP (1 mmol/L) elicited a significant increase in cellular cAMP production, which was similar to that elicited by the adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin (10 μmol/L). The TMP-elicited ISC as well as forskolin- or IBMX-induced ISC were abolished in mice with homozygous mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) presenting defective CFTR functions and secretions.CONCLUSION: TMP may stimulate cAMP-dependent and CFTR-mediated Cl- and HCO3- secretion. This may have implications in the future development of alternative treatment for constipation.

  13. Condensin-mediated chromosome organization and gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Christine Lau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In many organisms sexual fate is determined by a chromosome-based method which entails a difference in sex chromosome-linked gene dosage. Consequently, a gene regulatory mechanism called dosage compensation equalizes X-linked gene expression between the sexes. Dosage compensation initiates as cells transition from pluripotency to differentiation. In C. elegans, dosage compensation is achieved by the dosage compensation complex (DCC binding to both X chromosomes in hermaphrodites to downregulate gene expression by two fold. The DCC contains a subcomplex (condensin IDC similar to the evolutionarily conserved condensin complexes which play a fundamental role in chromosome dynamics during mitosis. Therefore, mechanisms related to mitotic chromosome condensation are hypothesized to mediate dosage compensation. Consistent with this hypothesis, monomethylation of histone H4 lysine 20 (H4K20 is increased, whereas acetylation of histone H4 lysine 16 (H4K16 is decreased, both on mitotic chromosomes and on interphase dosage compensated X chromosomes in worms. These observations suggest that interphase dosage compensated X chromosomes maintain some characteristics associated with condensed mitotic chromosome. This chromosome state is stably propagated from one cell generation to the next. In this review we will speculate on how the biochemical activities of condensin can achieve both mitotic chromosome compaction and gene repression.

  14. Chirality-mediated polypeptide micelles for regulated drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jianxun; Li, Chen; Zhang, Ying; Xu, Weiguo; Wang, Jincheng; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-01-01

    Two kinds of triblock poly(ethylene glycol)-polyleucine (PEG-PLeu) copolymers were synthesized through the ring-opening polymerization of L-Leu N-carboxyanhydride (NCA), or equivalent D-Leu NCA and L-Leu NCA with amino-terminated PEG as a macroinitiator. The amphiphilic copolymers spontaneously self-assembled into spherical micellar aggregations in an aqueous environment. The micelle with a racemic polypeptide core exhibited smaller critical micelle concentration and diameter compared to those with a levorotatory polypeptide core. A model anthracycline antineoplastic agent, i.e., doxorubicin (DOX), was loaded into micelles through nanoprecipitation, and the PEG-P(D,L-Leu) micelle exhibited higher drug-loading efficacy than that with a P(L-Leu) core-this difference was attributed to the flexible and compact P(L-Leu) core. Sustained in vitro DOX release from micelles with both levorotatory and racemic polypeptide cores was observed, and the DOX-loaded PEG-P(D,L-Leu) micelle exhibited a slower release rate. More interestingly, DOX-loaded micelles exhibited chirality-mediated antitumor efficacy in vitro and in vivo, which are all better than that of free DOX. Furthermore, both enhanced tumor inhibition and excellent security in vivo were confirmed by histopathological or in situ cell apoptosis analyses. Therefore, DOX-loaded PEG-PLeu micelles appear to be an interesting nanoscale polymeric formulation for promising malignancy chemotherapy.

  15. The putrescine biosynthesis pathway in Lactococcus lactis is transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression, mediated by CcpA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Daniel M; del Río, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Martín, María Cruz; Fernández, María; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2013-07-01

    Lactococcus lactis is the lactic acid bacterium most widely used by the dairy industry as a starter for the manufacture of fermented products such as cheese and buttermilk. However, some strains produce putrescine from agmatine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. The proteins involved in this pathway, including those necessary for agmatine uptake and conversion into putrescine, are encoded by the aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC genes, which together form an operon. This paper reports the mechanism of regulation of putrescine biosynthesis in L. lactis. It is shown that the aguBDAC operon, which contains a cre site at the promoter of aguB (the first gene of the operon), is transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) mediated by the catabolite control protein CcpA.

  16. Retinoic acid receptor agonists regulate expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaori, Makoto; Yakushiji, Emi; Ogura, Masatsune; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Hisada, Tetsuya; Uto-Kondo, Harumi; Takiguchi, Shunichi; Terao, Yoshio; Sasaki, Makoto; Komatsu, Tomohiro; Iizuka, Maki; Yogo, Makiko; Uehara, Yoshinari; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Ikewaki, Katsunori

    2012-04-01

    ABC transporter G1 (ABCG1) plays a pivotal role in HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux and atherogenesis. We investigated whether, and how, retinoic acid receptors (RARs) regulate ABCG1 expression in macrophages. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), an RAR ligand, increased ABCG1 protein levels and apoA-I/HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from the macrophages. Both ATRA and other RAR agonists, TTNPB and Am580, increased major transcripts driven by promoter B upstream of exon 5, though minor transcripts driven by promoter A upstream of exon 1 were only increased by ATRA. The stimulatory effects of ATRA on ABCG1 expression were completely abolished in the presence of RAR/RXR antagonists but were only partially canceled in the presence of an LXR antagonist. Adenovirus with overexpressed oxysterol sulfotransferase abolished the LXR pathway, as previously reported, and ATRA-responsiveness in ABCA1/ABCG1 expressions were respectively attenuated by 38 and 22% compared to the control virus. Promoter assays revealed that ABCG1 levels were regulated more by promoter B than promoter A, and ATRA activated promoter B in a liver X receptor-responsive element (LXRE)-dependent manner. Further, LXRE-B in intron 7, but not LXRE-A in intron 5, enhanced ATRA responsiveness under overexpression of all RAR isoforms-RARα/β/γ. In contrast, the activation of promoter B by TTNPB depended on LXRE-B and RARα, but not on RARβ/γ. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation and gel-shift assays revealed a specific and direct repeat 4-dependent binding of RARα to LXRE-B. In conclusion, RAR ligands increase ABCA1/G1 expression and apoA-I/HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophages, and modulate ABCG1 promoter activity via LXRE-dependent mechanisms.

  17. Distinct brain systems mediate the effects of nociceptive input and self-regulation on pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Choong-Wan; Roy, Mathieu; Buhle, Jason T; Wager, Tor D

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive self-regulation can strongly modulate pain and emotion. However, it is unclear whether self-regulation primarily influences primary nociceptive and affective processes or evaluative ones. In this study, participants engaged in self-regulation to increase or decrease pain while experiencing multiple levels of painful heat during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) imaging. Both heat intensity and self-regulation strongly influenced reported pain, but they did so via two distinct brain pathways. The effects of stimulus intensity were mediated by the neurologic pain signature (NPS), an a priori distributed brain network shown to predict physical pain with over 90% sensitivity and specificity across four studies. Self-regulation did not influence NPS responses; instead, its effects were mediated through functional connections between the nucleus accumbens and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. This pathway was unresponsive to noxious input, and has been broadly implicated in valuation, emotional appraisal, and functional outcomes in pain and other types of affective processes. These findings provide evidence that pain reports are associated with two dissociable functional systems: nociceptive/affective aspects mediated by the NPS, and evaluative/functional aspects mediated by a fronto-striatal system.

  18. Distinct brain systems mediate the effects of nociceptive input and self-regulation on pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choong-Wan Woo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive self-regulation can strongly modulate pain and emotion. However, it is unclear whether self-regulation primarily influences primary nociceptive and affective processes or evaluative ones. In this study, participants engaged in self-regulation to increase or decrease pain while experiencing multiple levels of painful heat during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI imaging. Both heat intensity and self-regulation strongly influenced reported pain, but they did so via two distinct brain pathways. The effects of stimulus intensity were mediated by the neurologic pain signature (NPS, an a priori distributed brain network shown to predict physical pain with over 90% sensitivity and specificity across four studies. Self-regulation did not influence NPS responses; instead, its effects were mediated through functional connections between the nucleus accumbens and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. This pathway was unresponsive to noxious input, and has been broadly implicated in valuation, emotional appraisal, and functional outcomes in pain and other types of affective processes. These findings provide evidence that pain reports are associated with two dissociable functional systems: nociceptive/affective aspects mediated by the NPS, and evaluative/functional aspects mediated by a fronto-striatal system.

  19. Complement-Mediated Regulation of Metabolism and Basic Cellular Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Christoph; Kemper, Claudia

    2016-08-16

    Complement is well appreciated as a critical arm of innate immunity. It is required for the removal of invading pathogens and works by directly destroying them through the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells. However, complement activation and function is not confined to the extracellular space but also occurs within cells. Recent work indicates that complement activation regulates key metabolic pathways and thus can impact fundamental cellular processes, such as survival, proliferation, and autophagy. Newly identified functions of complement include a key role in shaping metabolic reprogramming, which underlies T cell effector differentiation, and a role as a nexus for interactions with other effector systems, in particular the inflammasome and Notch transcription-factor networks. This review focuses on the contributions of complement to basic processes of the cell, in particular the integration of complement with cellular metabolism and the potential implications in infection and other disease settings.

  20. lncRNA-mediated regulation of the interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadkhan, Saba; Gunawardane, Lalith S

    2016-01-01

    The interferon (IFN) response is a critical arm of the innate immune response and a major host defense mechanism against viral infections. Following microbial encounter, a series of signaling events lead to transcriptional activation of the IFN genes, which in turn leads to significant changes in the cellular transcriptome by altering the expression of hundreds of target genes. Emerging evidence suggests that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) constitute a major subgroup of the IFN target genes, and further, that the IFN response is subject to regulation by a large number of host- and pathogen-derived lncRNAs. While the vast majority of lncRNAs with potential roles in the IFN response remain unstudied, analysis of a very small subset provides a glimpse of the regulatory impact of this class of RNAs on IFN response.

  1. Cadherin-mediated adhesion regulates posterior body formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasanmi Oluwafoyinsa

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anterior-posterior axis of the vertebrate embryo undergoes a dramatic elongation during early development. Convergence and extension of the mesoderm, occurring during gastrulation, initiates the narrowing and lengthening of the embryo. However the lengthening of the axis continues during post-gastrula stages in the tailbud region, and is thought to involve convergent extension movements as well as other cell behaviors specific to posterior regions. Results We demonstrate here, using a semi-dominant N-cadherin allele, that members of the classical cadherin subfamily of cell-cell adhesion molecules are required for tailbud elongation in the zebrafish. In vivo imaging of cell behaviors suggests that the extension of posterior axial mesodermal cells is impaired in embryos that carry the semi-dominant N-cadherin allele. This defect most likely results from a general loss of cell-cell adhesion in the tailbud region. Consistent with these observations, N-cadherin is expressed throughout the tailbud during post-gastrulation stages. In addition, we show that N-cadherin interacts synergistically with vang-like 2, a member of the non-canonical Wnt signaling/planar cell polarity pathway, to mediate tail morphogenesis. Conclusion We provide the first evidence here that N-cadherin and other members of the classical cadherin subfamily function in parallel with the planar cell polarity pathway to shape the posterior axis during post-gastrulation stages. These findings further highlight the central role that adhesion molecules play in the cellular rearrangements that drive morphogenesis in vertebrates and identify classical cadherins as major contributors to tail development.

  2. A C-terminal acidic domain regulates degradation of the transcriptional coactivator Bob1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, John M; Wong, Christina S F; Möller, Andreas; Nielsen, Peter J

    2013-12-01

    Bob1 (Obf-1 or OCA-B) is a 34-kDa transcriptional coactivator encoded by the Pou2af1 gene that is essential for normal B-cell development and immune responses in mice. During lymphocyte activation, Bob1 protein levels dramatically increase independently of mRNA levels, suggesting that the stability of Bob1 is regulated. We used a fluorescent protein-based reporter system to analyze protein stability in response to genetic and physiological perturbations and show that, while Bob1 degradation is proteasome mediated, it does not require ubiquitination of Bob1. Furthermore, degradation of Bob1 in B cells appears to be largely independent of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Siah. We propose a novel mechanism of Bob1 turnover in B cells, whereby an acidic region in the C terminus of Bob1 regulates the activity of degron signals elsewhere in the protein. Changes that make the C terminus more acidic, including tyrosine phosphorylation-mimetic mutations, stabilize the instable murine Bob1 protein, indicating that B cells may regulate Bob1 stability and activity via signaling pathways. Finally, we show that expressing a stable Bob1 mutant in B cells suppresses cell proliferation and induces changes in surface marker expression commonly seen during B-cell differentiation.

  3. Uric acid as a mediator of diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalal, Diana I; Maahs, David M; Hovind, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Despite advances in the management of patients with diabetes, diabetic nephropathy (DN) remains the most common cause of end-stage renal disease in the United States and worldwide. Inflammation and endothelial dysfunction appear to play a central role in the onset and the progression of DN. Recent...... that implicate uric acid in DN. Based on the evidence we review, we conclude the need for properly planned randomized controlled studies to decrease uric acid levels and assess the impact of such therapy on diabetic kidney disease....

  4. ABI4 regulates primary seed dormancy by regulating the biogenesis of abscisic acid and gibberellins in arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Kai; Zhang, Huawei; Wang, Shengfu; Chen, Mingluan; Wu, Yaorong; Tang, Sanyuan; Liu, Chunyan; Feng, Yuqi; Cao, Xiaofeng; Xie, Qi

    2013-06-01

    Seed dormancy is an important economic trait for agricultural production. Abscisic acid (ABA) and Gibberellins (GA) are the primary factors that regulate the transition from dormancy to germination, and they regulate this process antagonistically. The detailed regulatory mechanism involving crosstalk between ABA and GA, which underlies seed dormancy, requires further elucidation. Here, we report that ABI4 positively regulates primary seed dormancy, while negatively regulating cotyledon greening, by mediating the biogenesis of ABA and GA. Seeds of the Arabidopsis abi4 mutant that were subjected to short-term storage (one or two weeks) germinated significantly more quickly than Wild-Type (WT), and abi4 cotyledons greened markedly more quickly than WT, while the rates of germination and greening were comparable when the seeds were subjected to longer-term storage (six months). The ABA content of dry abi4 seeds was remarkably lower than that of WT, but the amounts were comparable after stratification. Consistently, the GA level of abi4 seeds was increased compared to WT. Further analysis showed that abi4 was resistant to treatment with paclobutrazol (PAC), a GA biosynthesis inhibitor, during germination, while OE-ABI4 was sensitive to PAC, and exogenous GA rescued the delayed germination phenotype of OE-ABI4. Analysis by qRT-PCR showed that the expression of genes involved in ABA and GA metabolism in dry and germinating seeds corresponded to hormonal measurements. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation qPCR (ChIP-qPCR) and transient expression analysis showed that ABI4 repressed CYP707A1 and CYP707A2 expression by directly binding to those promoters, and the ABI4 binding elements are essential for this repression. Accordingly, further genetic analysis showed that abi4 recovered the delayed germination phenotype of cyp707a1 and cyp707a2 and further, rescued the non-germinating phenotype of ga1-t. Taken together, this study suggests that ABI4 is a key factor that

  5. Hydrothermal preparation of LiFePO 4 nanocrystals mediated by organic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jiangfeng; Morishita, Masanori; Kawabe, Yoshiteru; Watada, Masaharu; Takeichi, Nobuhiko; Sakai, Tetsuo

    Well-crystallized LiFePO 4 nanoparticles have been directly synthesized in a short time via hydrothermal process in the presence of organic acid, e.g. citric acid or ascorbic acid. These acid-mediated LiFePO 4 products exhibit a phase-pure and nanocrystal nature with size about 50-100 nm. Two critical roles that the organic acid mediator plays in hydrothermal process are recognized and a rational mechanism is explored. After a post carbon-coating treatment at 600 °C for 1 h, these mediated LiFePO 4 materials show a high electrochemical activity in terms of reversible capacity, cycling stability and rate capability. Particularly, LiFePO 4 mediated by ascorbic acid can deliver a capacity of 162 mAh g -1 at 0.1 C, 154 mAh g -1 at 1 C, and 122 mAh g -1 at 5 C. The crystalline structure, particle morphology, and surface microstructure were characterized by high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. And the electrochemical properties were thoroughly investigated by galvanostatic test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS).

  6. Regulation of BDNF-mediated transcription of immediate early gene Arc by intracellular calcium and calmodulin

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Fei; Luo, Yongneng; Wang, Hongbing

    2009-01-01

    The induction of the immediate early gene Arc is strongly implicated in synaptic plasticity. Although the role of ERK was demonstrated, the regulation of Arc expression is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the major signaling pathways underlying brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-mediated Arc transcription in cultured cortical neurons. The BDNF-stimulated Arc transcription was solely regulated by the Ras-Raf-MAPK signaling through ERK, but not by phosphoinositide 3-kinase ...

  7. miRNA-mediated functional changes through co-regulating function related genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs play important roles in various biological processes involving fairly complex mechanism. Analysis of genome-wide miRNA microarray demonstrate that a single miRNA can regulate hundreds of genes, but the regulative extent on most individual genes is surprisingly mild so that it is difficult to understand how a miRNA provokes detectable functional changes with such mild regulation. RESULTS: To explore the internal mechanism of miRNA-mediated regulation, we re-analyzed the data collected from genome-wide miRNA microarray with bioinformatics assay, and found that the transfection of miR-181b and miR-34a in Hela and HCT-116 tumor cells regulated large numbers of genes, among which, the genes related to cell growth and cell death demonstrated high Enrichment scores, suggesting that these miRNAs may be important in cell growth and cell death. MiR-181b induced changes in protein expression of most genes that were seemingly related to enhancing cell growth and decreasing cell death, while miR-34a mediated contrary changes of gene expression. Cell growth assays further confirmed this finding. In further study on miR-20b-mediated osteogenesis in hMSCs, miR-20b was found to enhance osteogenesis by activating BMPs/Runx2 signaling pathway in several stages by co-repressing of PPARγ, Bambi and Crim1. CONCLUSIONS: With its multi-target characteristics, miR-181b, miR-34a and miR-20b provoked detectable functional changes by co-regulating functionally-related gene groups or several genes in the same signaling pathway, and thus mild regulation from individual miRNA targeting genes could have contributed to an additive effect. This might also be one of the modes of miRNA-mediated gene regulation.

  8. Calcium binding protein-mediated regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels linked to human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasrin NFJATBAKHSH; Zhong-ping FENG

    2011-01-01

    Calcium ion entry through voltage-gated calcium channels is essential for cellular signalling in a wide variety of cells and multiple physiological processes. Perturbations of voltage-gated calcium channel function can lead to pathophysiological consequences. Calcium binding proteins serve as calcium sensors and regulate the calcium channel properties via feedback mechanisms. This review highlights the current evidences of calcium binding protein-mediated channel regulation in human diseases.

  9. Differential regulation of amidase- and formamidase-mediated ammonia production by the Helicobacter pylori fur repressor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H.M. van Vliet (Arnoud); J. Stoof (Jeroen); S.W. Poppelaars (Sophie); S. Bereswill (Stefan); G. Homuth (Georg); M. Kist (Manfred); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); J.G. Kusters (Johannes)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe production of high levels of ammonia allows the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori to survive the acidic conditions in the human stomach. H. pylori produces ammonia through urease-mediated degradation of urea, but it is also able to convert a range of amide

  10. Transcriptional regulation of genes involved in retinoic acid metabolism in Senegalese sole larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boglino, Anaïs; Ponce, Marian; Cousin, Xavier; Gisbert, Enric; Manchado, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was the characterization of transcriptional regulatory pathways mediated by retinoic acid (RA) in Senegalese sole larvae. For this purpose, pre-metamorphic larvae were treated with a low concentration of DEAB, an inhibitor of RALDH enzyme, until the end of metamorphosis. No differences in growth, eye migration or survival were observed. Nevertheless, gene expression analysis revealed a total of 20 transcripts differentially expressed during larval development and only six related with DEAB treatments directly involved in RA metabolism and actions (rdh10a, aldh1a2, crbp1, igf2r, rarg and cyp26a1) to adapt to a low-RA environment. In a second experiment, post-metamorphic larvae were exposed to the all-trans RA (atRA) observing an opposite regulation for those genes involved in RA synthesis and degradation (rdh10a, aldh1a2, crbp1 and cyp26a1) as well as other related with thyroid- (dio2) and IGF-axes (igfbp1, igf2r and igfbp5) to balance RA levels. In a third experiment, DEAB-pretreated post-metamorphic larvae were exposed to atRA and TTNPB (a specific RAR agonist). Both drugs down-regulated rdh10a and aldh1a2 and up-regulated cyp26a1 expression demonstrating their important role in RA homeostasis. Moreover, five retinoic receptors that mediate RA actions, the thyroid receptor thrb, and five IGF binding proteins changed differentially their expression. Overall, this study demonstrates that exogenous RA modulates the expression of some genes involved in the RA synthesis, degradation and cellular transport through RAR-mediated regulatory pathways establishing a negative feedback regulatory mechanism necessary to balance endogenous RA levels and gradients.

  11. Salvianolic acid B-induced microRNA-152 inhibits liver fibrosis by attenuating DNMT1-mediated Patched1 methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fujun; Lu, Zhongqiu; Chen, Bicheng; Wu, Xiaoli; Dong, Peihong; Zheng, Jianjian

    2015-11-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) was reported to be involved in the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), contributing to the development of liver fibrosis. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition can be promoted by the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway. Patched1 (PTCH1), a negative regulatory factor of the Hh signalling pathway, was down-regulated during liver fibrosis and associated with its hypermethylation status. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are reported to play a critical role in the control of various HSCs functions. However, miRNA-mediated epigenetic regulations in EMT during liver fibrosis are seldom studied. In this study, Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) suppressed the activation of HSCs in CCl4 -treated mice and mouse primary HSCs, leading to inhibition of cell proliferation, type I collagen and alpha-smooth muscle actin. We demonstrated that the antifibrotic effects caused by Sal B were, at least in part, via inhibition of EMT and the Hh pathway. In particular, up-regulation of PTCH1 was associated with decreased DNA methylation level after Sal B treatment. Accordingly, DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) was attenuated by Sal B in vivo and in vitro. The knockdown of DNMT1 in Sal B-treated HSCs enhanced PTCH1 expression and its demethylation level. Interestingly, increased miR-152 in Sal B-treated cells was responsible for the hypomethylation of PTCH1 by Sal B. As confirmed by the luciferase activity assay, DNMT1 was a direct target of miR-152. Further studies showed that the miR-152 inhibitor reversed Sal B-mediated PTCH1 up-regulation and DNMT1 down-regulation. Collectively, miR-152 induced by Sal B, contributed to DNMT1 down-regulation and epigenetically regulated PTCH1, resulting in the inhibition of EMT in liver fibrosis.

  12. Saturated fatty acids activate TLR-mediated proinflammatory signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shurong; Rutkowsky, Jennifer M; Snodgrass, Ryan G; Ono-Moore, Kikumi D; Schneider, Dina A; Newman, John W; Adams, Sean H; Hwang, Daniel H

    2012-09-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR2 were shown to be activated by saturated fatty acids (SFAs) but inhibited by docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). However, one report suggested that SFA-induced TLR activation in cell culture systems is due to contaminants in BSA used for solubilizing fatty acids. This report raised doubt about proinflammatory effects of SFAs. Our studies herein demonstrate that sodium palmitate (C16:0) or laurate (C12:0) without BSA solubilization induced phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB α, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p44/42 mitogen-activated-kinase (ERK), and nuclear factor-κB subunit p65, and TLR target gene expression in THP1 monocytes or RAW264.7 macrophages, respectively, when cultured in low FBS (0.25%) medium. C12:0 induced NFκB activation through TLR2 dimerized with TLR1 or TLR6, and through TLR4. Because BSA was not used in these experiments, contaminants in BSA have no relevance. Unlike in suspension cells (THP-1), BSA-solubilized C16:0 instead of sodium C16:0 is required to induce TLR target gene expression in adherent cells (RAW264.7). C16:0-BSA transactivated TLR2 dimerized with TLR1 or TLR6 and through TLR4 as seen with C12:0. These results and additional studies with the LPS sequester polymixin B and in MyD88(-/-) macrophages indicated that SFA-induced activation of TLR2 or TLR4 is a fatty acid-specific effect, but not due to contaminants in BSA or fatty acid preparations.

  13. Phasevarion mediated epigenetic gene regulation in Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogitha N Srikhanta

    Full Text Available Many host-adapted bacterial pathogens contain DNA methyltransferases (mod genes that are subject to phase-variable expression (high-frequency reversible ON/OFF switching of gene expression. In Haemophilus influenzae and pathogenic Neisseria, the random switching of the modA gene, associated with a phase-variable type III restriction modification (R-M system, controls expression of a phase-variable regulon of genes (a "phasevarion", via differential methylation of the genome in the modA ON and OFF states. Phase-variable type III R-M systems are also found in Helicobacter pylori, suggesting that phasevarions may also exist in this key human pathogen. Phylogenetic studies on the phase-variable type III modH gene revealed that there are 17 distinct alleles in H. pylori, which differ only in their DNA recognition domain. One of the most commonly found alleles was modH5 (16% of isolates. Microarray analysis comparing the wild-type P12modH5 ON strain to a P12ΔmodH5 mutant revealed that six genes were either up- or down-regulated, and some were virulence-associated. These included flaA, which encodes a flagella protein important in motility and hopG, an outer membrane protein essential for colonization and associated with gastric cancer. This study provides the first evidence of this epigenetic mechanism of gene expression in H. pylori. Characterisation of H. pylori modH phasevarions to define stable immunological targets will be essential for vaccine development and may also contribute to understanding H. pylori pathogenesis.

  14. Shoot bending promotes flower bud formation by miRNA-mediated regulation in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Libo; Zhang, Dong; Zhao, Caiping; Li, Youmei; Ma, Juanjuan; An, Na; Han, Mingyu

    2016-02-01

    Flower induction in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) trees plays an important life cycle role, but young trees produce fewer and inferior quality flower buds. Therefore, shoot bending has become an important cultural practice, significantly promoting the capacity to develop more flower buds during the growing seasons. Additionally, microRNAs (miRNAs) play essential roles in plant growth, flower induction and stress responses. In this study, we identified miRNAs potentially involved in the regulation of bud growth, and flower induction and development, as well as in the response to shoot bending. Of the 195 miRNAs identified, 137 were novel miRNAs. The miRNA expression profiles revealed that the expression levels of 68 and 27 known miRNAs were down-regulated and up-regulated, respectively, in response to shoot bending, and that the 31 differentially expressed novel miRNAs between them formed five major clusters. Additionally, a complex regulatory network associated with auxin, cytokinin, abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellic acid (GA) plays important roles in cell division, bud growth and flower induction, in which related miRNAs and targets mediated regulation. Among them, miR396, 160, 393, and their targets associated with AUX, miR159, 319, 164, and their targets associated with ABA and GA, and flowering-related miRNAs and genes, regulate bud growth and flower bud formation in response to shoot bending. Meanwhile, the flowering genes had significantly higher expression levels during shoot bending, suggesting that they are involved in this regulatory process. This study provides a framework for the future analysis of miRNAs associated with multiple hormones and their roles in the regulation of bud growth, and flower induction and formation in response to shoot bending in apple trees.

  15. Glutamic Acid Residues in HIV-1 p6 Regulate Virus Budding and Membrane Association of Gag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Friedrich

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 Gag p6 protein regulates the final abscission step of nascent virions from the cell membrane by the action of its two late (l- domains, which recruit Tsg101 and ALIX, components of the ESCRT system. Even though p6 consists of only 52 amino acids, it is encoded by one of the most polymorphic regions of the HIV-1 gag gene and undergoes various posttranslational modifications including sumoylation, ubiquitination, and phosphorylation. In addition, it mediates the incorporation of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr into budding virions. Despite its small size, p6 exhibits an unusually high charge density. In this study, we show that mutation of the conserved glutamic acids within p6 increases the membrane association of Pr55 Gag followed by enhanced polyubiquitination and MHC-I antigen presentation of Gag-derived epitopes, possibly due to prolonged exposure to membrane bound E3 ligases. The replication capacity of the total glutamic acid mutant E0A was almost completely impaired, which was accompanied by defective virus release that could not be rescued by ALIX overexpression. Altogether, our data indicate that the glutamic acids within p6 contribute to the late steps of viral replication and may contribute to the interaction of Gag with the plasma membrane.

  16. Glutamic Acid Residues in HIV-1 p6 Regulate Virus Budding and Membrane Association of Gag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Melanie; Setz, Christian; Hahn, Friedrich; Matthaei, Alina; Fraedrich, Kirsten; Rauch, Pia; Henklein, Petra; Traxdorf, Maximilian; Fossen, Torgils; Schubert, Ulrich

    2016-04-25

    The HIV-1 Gag p6 protein regulates the final abscission step of nascent virions from the cell membrane by the action of its two late (L-) domains, which recruit Tsg101 and ALIX, components of the ESCRT system. Even though p6 consists of only 52 amino acids, it is encoded by one of the most polymorphic regions of the HIV-1 gag gene and undergoes various posttranslational modifications including sumoylation, ubiquitination, and phosphorylation. In addition, it mediates the incorporation of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr into budding virions. Despite its small size, p6 exhibits an unusually high charge density. In this study, we show that mutation of the conserved glutamic acids within p6 increases the membrane association of Pr55 Gag followed by enhanced polyubiquitination and MHC-I antigen presentation of Gag-derived epitopes, possibly due to prolonged exposure to membrane bound E3 ligases. The replication capacity of the total glutamic acid mutant E0A was almost completely impaired, which was accompanied by defective virus release that could not be rescued by ALIX overexpression. Altogether, our data indicate that the glutamic acids within p6 contribute to the late steps of viral replication and may contribute to the interaction of Gag with the plasma membrane.

  17. JUNB PROMOTER REGULATION - RAS MEDIATED TRANSACTIVATION BY C-ETS-1 AND C-ETS-2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    COFFER, P; DEJONGE, M; METTOUCHI, A; BINETRUY, B; GHYSDAEL, J; KRUIJER, W

    1994-01-01

    The Jun gene family encode components of the AP-1 transcription factor complex that regulate a variety of TRE-containing target promoters. Expression of family members is induced by a wide variety of extracellular stimuli and thought to be important in mediating cellular proliferation and differenti

  18. Self-Regulation Mediates the Relationship between Learner Typology and Achievement in At-Risk Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed, Keri; Keogh, Deborah; Borkowski, John G.; Whitman, Thomas; Noria, Christine W.

    2011-01-01

    A person-centered approach was used to explore the mediating role of self-regulation between learner typology at age 8 and academic achievement at age 14 while controlling for domain-specific achievement in a longitudinal sample of 113 children born to adolescent mothers. Children were classified into one of 5 learner typologies at age 8 based on…

  19. Regulation of GPCR-mediated smooth muscle contraction : implications for asthma and pulmonary hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wright, D B; Tripathi, S; Sikarwar, A; Santosh, K T; Perez-Zoghbi, J; Ojo, O O; Irechukwu, N; Ward, J P T; Schaafsma, D

    2013-01-01

    Contractile G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have emerged as key regulators of smooth muscle contraction, both under healthy and diseased conditions. This brief review will discuss some key topics and novel insights regarding GPCR-mediated airway and vascular smooth muscle contraction as discusse

  20. On hexenuronic acid (HexA) removal and mediator coupling to pulp fiber in the laccase/mediator treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Edith M; Du, Xueyu; Gellerstedt, Göran; Li, Jiebing; Fillat, Amanda; García-Ubasart, Jordi; Vidal, Teresa; Colom, Josep F

    2011-02-01

    Flax soda/AQ pulps were treated with different fungal laccase-mediator combinations followed by physical and chemical characterization of the pulps to obtain a thorough understanding of the laccase/mediator effects on hexenuronic acid (HexA) removal and the coupling of mediator onto pulps for fiber functionalization. Large differences were found and the presence of lauryl gallate (LG) during Trametes villosa laccase (TvL) treatment (TvL+LG) resulted in a much larger reduction of pulp-linked HexA than the combination of p-coumaric acid (PCA) and Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase (PcL). A major portion of LG became attached to the pulp as revealed by an increase in the kappa number and further confirmed by thioacidolysis and (1)H NMR analysis of solubilized pulp fractions. Additional experiments with other chemical pulps and isolated pulp xylan and lignin revealed that HexA seems to be the sole pulp component attacked by TvL+LG. As a substrate for TvL, the reaction preference order is PCA>HexA>LG.

  1. Ionic liquid mediated esterification of alcohol with acetic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beilei ZHOU; Yanxiong FANG; Hao GU; Saidan ZHANG; Baohua HUANG; Kun ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Highly efficient esterification of alcohols with acetic acid by using a Bransted acidic ionic liquid, i.e., 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidonium hydrogen sulfate ([Hnmp]HSo4), as catalyst has been realized. The turnover numbers (TON) were able to reach up to 11000 and turnover frequency (TOF) was 846. The catalytic system is suitable for the esterification of long chain aliphatic alcohols, benzyl alcohol and cyclohexanol with good yields of esters. The procedure of separating the product and catalyst is simple, and the catalyst could be reused. [Hnmp]HSO4 had much weaker corrosiveness than H2SO4. The corrosive rate of H2SO4 was 400 times more than that of [Hnmp]HSO4 to stainless steel.

  2. Clathrin-Mediated Auxin Efflux and Maxima Regulate Hypocotyl Hook Formation and Light-Stimulated Hook Opening in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qinqin; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Juan; Yan, Xu; Wang, Chao; Xu, Jian; Pan, Jianwei

    2016-01-04

    The establishment of auxin maxima by PIN-FORMED 3 (PIN3)- and AUXIN RESISTANT 1/LIKE AUX1 (LAX) 3 (AUX1/LAX3)-mediated auxin transport is essential for hook formation in Arabidopsis hypocotyls. Until now, however, the underlying regulatory mechanism has remained poorly understood. Here, we show that loss of function of clathrin light chain CLC2 and CLC3 genes enhanced auxin maxima and thereby hook curvature, alleviated the inhibitory effect of auxin overproduction on auxin maxima and hook curvature, and delayed blue light-stimulated auxin maxima reduction and hook opening. Moreover, pharmacological experiments revealed that auxin maxima formation and hook curvature in clc2 clc3 were sensitive to auxin efflux inhibitors 1-naphthylphthalamic acid and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid but not to the auxin influx inhibitor 1-naphthoxyacetic acid. Live-cell imaging analysis further uncovered that loss of CLC2 and CLC3 function impaired PIN3 endocytosis and promoted its lateralization in the cortical cells but did not affect AUX1 localization. Taken together, these results suggest that clathrin regulates auxin maxima and thereby hook formation through modulating PIN3 localization and auxin efflux, providing a novel mechanism that integrates developmental signals and environmental cues to regulate plant skotomorphogenesis and photomorphogenesis.

  3. Human Prostatic Acid Phosphatase: Structure, Function and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G. Chaney

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAcP is a 100 kDa glycoprotein composed of two subunits. Recent advances demonstrate that cellular PAcP (cPAcP functions as a protein tyrosine phosphatase by dephosphorylating ErbB-2/Neu/HER-2 at the phosphotyrosine residues in prostate cancer (PCa cells, which results in reduced tumorigenicity. Further, the interaction of cPAcP and ErbB-2 regulates androgen sensitivity of PCa cells. Knockdown of cPAcP expression allows androgen-sensitive PCa cells to develop the castration-resistant phenotype, where cells proliferate under an androgen-reduced condition. Thus, cPAcP has a significant influence on PCa cell growth. Interestingly, promoter analysis suggests that PAcP expression can be regulated by NF-κB, via a novel binding sequence in an androgen-independent manner. Further understanding of PAcP function and regulation of expression will have a significant impact on understanding PCa progression and therapy.

  4. Role of Sigma Receptor in Cocaine-Mediated Induction of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein: Implications for HAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lu; Yao, Honghong; Chen, Xufeng; Cai, Yu; Callen, Shannon; Buch, Shilpa

    2016-03-01

    Cocaine abuse has been shown to accelerate the progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-associated neurological disorders (HANDs) partially through increasing neuroinflammatory response mediated by activated astrocytes; however, the detailed molecular mechanism of cocaine-mediated astrocyte activation is unclear. In the current study, we demonstrated increased astrogliosis in the cortical regions of brains from HIV(+) cocaine abusers compared with the HIV(+) group without cocaine abuse. We next sought to explore whether cocaine exposure could result in increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a filament protein critical for astrocyte activation. Exposure of cocaine to astrocytes resulted in rapid translocation of sigma receptor to the plasma membrane with subsequent activation of downstream signaling pathways. Using a pharmacological approach, we provide evidence that cocaine-mediated upregulation of GFAP expression involved activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling with subsequent downstream activation of the early growth response gene 1 (Egr-1). Egr-1 activation, in turn, caused transcriptional regulation of GFAP. Corroboration of these findings in vivo demonstrated increased expression of GFAP in the cortical region of mice treated with cocaine compared with the saline injected controls. A thorough understanding of how cocaine mediates astrogliosis could have implications for the development of therapeutic interventions aimed at HIV-infected cocaine abusers.

  5. The role of RNA structure at 5' untranslated region in microRNA-mediated gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wanjun; Xu, Yuming; Xie, Xueying; Wang, Ting; Ko, Jae-Hong; Zhou, Tong

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the secondary structure of the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of messenger RNA (mRNA) is important for microRNA (miRNA)-mediated gene regulation in humans. mRNAs that are targeted by miRNA tend to have a higher degree of local secondary structure in their 5' UTR; however, the general role of the 5' UTR in miRNA-mediated gene regulation remains unknown. We systematically surveyed the secondary structure of 5' UTRs in both plant and animal species and found a universal trend of increased mRNA stability near the 5' cap in mRNAs that are regulated by miRNA in animals, but not in plants. Intra-genome comparison showed that gene expression level, GC content of the 5' UTR, number of miRNA target sites, and 5' UTR length may influence mRNA structure near the 5' cap. Our results suggest that the 5' UTR secondary structure performs multiple functions in regulating post-transcriptional processes. Although the local structure immediately upstream of the start codon is involved in translation initiation, RNA structure near the 5' cap site, rather than the structure of the full-length 5' UTR sequences, plays an important role in miRNA-mediated gene regulation.

  6. Thioredoxin, a master regulator of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in plant mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daloso, Danilo M; Müller, Karolin; Obata, Toshihiro; Florian, Alexandra; Tohge, Takayuki; Bottcher, Alexandra; Riondet, Christophe; Bariat, Laetitia; Carrari, Fernando; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Buchanan, Bob B; Reichheld, Jean-Philippe; Araújo, Wagner L; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2015-03-17

    Plant mitochondria have a fully operational tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle that plays a central role in generating ATP and providing carbon skeletons for a range of biosynthetic processes in both heterotrophic and photosynthetic tissues. The cycle enzyme-encoding genes have been well characterized in terms of transcriptional and effector-mediated regulation and have also been subjected to reverse genetic analysis. However, despite this wealth of attention, a central question remains unanswered: "What regulates flux through this pathway in vivo?" Previous proteomic experiments with Arabidopsis discussed below have revealed that a number of mitochondrial enzymes, including members of the TCA cycle and affiliated pathways, harbor thioredoxin (TRX)-binding sites and are potentially redox-regulated. We have followed up on this possibility and found TRX to be a redox-sensitive mediator of TCA cycle flux. In this investigation, we first characterized, at the enzyme and metabolite levels, mutants of the mitochondrial TRX pathway in Arabidopsis: the NADP-TRX reductase a and b double mutant (ntra ntrb) and the mitochondrially located thioredoxin o1 (trxo1) mutant. These studies were followed by a comparative evaluation of the redistribution of isotopes when (13)C-glucose, (13)C-malate, or (13)C-pyruvate was provided as a substrate to leaves of mutant or WT plants. In a complementary approach, we evaluated the in vitro activities of a range of TCA cycle and associated enzymes under varying redox states. The combined dataset suggests that TRX may deactivate both mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase and activate the cytosolic ATP-citrate lyase in vivo, acting as a direct regulator of carbon flow through the TCA cycle and providing a mechanism for the coordination of cellular function.

  7. Safety assessment of food and feed from biotechnology-derived crops employing RNA-mediated gene regulation to achieve desired traits: a scientific review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, Jay S; Brower-Toland, Brent; Jackson, Aimee L; Kier, Larry D

    2013-07-01

    Gene expression can be modulated in plants to produce desired traits through agricultural biotechnology. Currently, biotechnology-derived crops are compared to their conventional counterparts, with safety assessments conducted on the genetic modification and the intended and unintended differences. This review proposes that this comparative safety assessment paradigm is appropriate for plants modified to express mediators of RNA-mediated gene regulation, including RNA interference (RNAi), a gene suppression mechanism that naturally occurs in plants and animals. The molecular mediators of RNAi, including long double-stranded RNAs (dsRNA), small interfering RNAs (siRNA), and microRNAs (miRNA), occur naturally in foods; therefore, there is an extensive history of safe consumption. Systemic exposure following consumption of plants containing dsRNAs that mediate RNAi is limited in higher organisms by extensive degradation of ingested nucleic acids and by biological barriers to uptake and efficacy of exogenous nucleic acids. A number of mammalian RNAi studies support the concept that a large margin of safety will exist for any small fraction of RNAs that might be absorbed following consumption of foods from biotechnology-derived plants that employ RNA-mediated gene regulation. Food and feed derived from these crops utilizing RNA-based mechanisms is therefore expected to be as safe as food and feed derived through conventional plant breeding.

  8. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) promotes endurance capacity via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ-mediated mechanism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoo; Kim, Daeyoung; Park, Yeonhwa

    2016-12-01

    Previously, it was reported that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) with exercise training potentially improved endurance capacity via the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ)-mediated mechanism in mice. This study determined the role of exercise and/or CLA in endurance capacity and PPARδ-associated regulators. Male 129Sv/J mice were fed either control (soybean oil) or CLA (0.5%) containing diets for 4 weeks and were further divided into sedentary or training regimes. CLA supplementation significantly reduced body weight and fat mass independent of exercise during the experimental period. Endurance capacity was significantly improved by CLA supplementation, while no effect of exercise was observed. Similarly, CLA treatment significantly increased expressions of sirtuin 1 and PPARγ coactivator-1α, up-stream regulators of PPARδ, in both sedentary and trained animals. With respect to downstream markers of PPARδ, CLA up-regulated the key biomarker needed to stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis, nuclear respiratory factor 1. Moreover, CLA supplementation significantly induced overall genes associated with muscle fibers, such as type I (slow-twitch) and type II (fast twitch). Taken together, it suggests that CLA improves endurance capacity independent of mild-intensity exercise via PPARδ-mediated mechanism.

  9. Structural insights into the regulation of aromatic amino acid hydroxylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2015-12-01

    The aromatic amino acid hydroxylases phenylalanine hydroxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase, and tryptophan hydroxylase are homotetramers, with each subunit containing a homologous catalytic domain and a divergent regulatory domain. The solution structure of the regulatory domain of tyrosine hydroxylase establishes that it contains a core ACT domain similar to that in phenylalanine hydroxylase. The isolated regulatory domain of tyrosine hydroxylase forms a stable dimer, while that of phenylalanine hydroxylase undergoes a monomer-dimer equilibrium, with phenylalanine stabilizing the dimer. These solution properties are consistent with the regulatory mechanisms of the two enzymes, in that phenylalanine hydroxylase is activated by phenylalanine binding to an allosteric site, while tyrosine hydroxylase is regulated by binding of catecholamines in the active site.

  10. TPL-2 Regulates Macrophage Lipid Metabolism and M2 Differentiation to Control TH2-Mediated Immunopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entwistle, Lewis J.; Khoury, Hania; Papoutsopoulou, Stamatia; Mahmood, Radma; Mansour, Nuha R.; Ching-Cheng Huang, Stanley; Pearce, Edward J.; Pedro S. de Carvalho, Luiz; Ley, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent TH2 cytokine responses following chronic helminth infections can often lead to the development of tissue pathology and fibrotic scarring. Despite a good understanding of the cellular mechanisms involved in fibrogenesis, there are very few therapeutic options available, highlighting a significant medical need and gap in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of TH2-mediated immunopathology. In this study, we found that the Map3 kinase, TPL-2 (Map3k8; Cot) regulated TH2-mediated intestinal, hepatic and pulmonary immunopathology following Schistosoma mansoni infection or S. mansoni egg injection. Elevated inflammation, TH2 cell responses and exacerbated fibrosis in Map3k8–/–mice was observed in mice with myeloid cell-specific (LysM) deletion of Map3k8, but not CD4 cell-specific deletion of Map3k8, indicating that TPL-2 regulated myeloid cell function to limit TH2-mediated immunopathology. Transcriptional and metabolic assays of Map3k8–/–M2 macrophages identified that TPL-2 was required for lipolysis, M2 macrophage activation and the expression of a variety of genes involved in immuno-regulatory and pro-fibrotic pathways. Taken together this study identified that TPL-2 regulated TH2-mediated inflammation by supporting lipolysis and M2 macrophage activation, preventing TH2 cell expansion and downstream immunopathology and fibrosis. PMID:27487182

  11. Mitochondrial TCA cycle intermediates regulate body fluid and acid-base balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peti-Peterdi, János

    2013-07-01

    Intrarenal control mechanisms play an important role in the maintenance of body fluid and electrolyte balance and pH homeostasis. Recent discoveries of new ion transport and regulatory pathways in the distal nephron and collecting duct system have helped to better our understanding of these critical kidney functions and identified new potential therapeutic targets and approaches. In this issue of the JCI, Tokonami et al. report on the function of an exciting new paracrine mediator, the mitochondrial the citric acid(TCA) cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), which via its OXGR1 receptor plays an unexpected, nontraditional role in the adaptive regulation of renal HCO(3⁻) secretion and salt reabsorption.

  12. Phytanic acid and pristanic acid, branched-chain fatty acids associated with Refsum disease and other inherited peroxisomal disorders, mediate intracellular Ca2+ signaling through activation of free fatty acid receptor GPR40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruska, Nicol; Reiser, Georg

    2011-08-01

    The accumulation of the two branched-chain fatty acids phytanic acid and pristanic acid is known to play an important role in several diseases with peroxisomal impairment, like Refsum disease, Zellweger syndrome and α-methylacyl-CoA racemase deficiency. Recent studies elucidated that the toxic activity of phytanic acid and pristanic acid is mediated by multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions, generation of reactive oxygen species and Ca2+ deregulation via the InsP3-Ca2+ signaling pathway in glial cells. However, the exact signaling mechanism through which both fatty acids mediate toxicity is still under debate. Here, we studied the ability of phytanic acid and pristanic acid to activate the free fatty acid receptor GPR40, a G-protein-coupled receptor, which was described to be involved in the Ca2+ signaling of fatty acids. We treated HEK 293 cells expressing the GPR40 receptor with phytanic acid or pristanic acid. This resulted in a significant increase in the intracellular Ca2+ level, similar to the effect seen after treatment with the synthetic GPR40 agonist GW9508. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the GPR40 activation might be due to an interaction of the carboxylate moiety of fatty acids with the receptor. Our findings indicate that the phytanic acid- and pristanic acid-mediated Ca2+ deregulation can involve the activation of GPR40. Therefore, we suppose that activation of GPR40 might be part of the signaling cascade of the toxicity of phytanic and pristanic acids.

  13. FAX1, a Novel Membrane Protein Mediating Plastid Fatty Acid Export

    OpenAIRE

    Roland G Roberts

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids made in chloroplasts must be exported into the rest of the cell to be converted into commercially important plant oils. A new study identifies FAX1 as a protein that mediates this crucial transport step. Read the Research Article.

  14. One New Method of Nucleic Acid Amplification-Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification of DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-en FANG; Jian LI; Qin CHEN

    2008-01-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a novel nucleic acid amplification method, which amplifies DNA with high specificity, sensitivity, rapidity and efficiency under isothermal conditions using a set of four specially designed primers and a Bst DNA polymerase with strand displacement activity. The basic principle, characteristics, development of LAMP and its applications are summarized in this article.

  15. Modulation of CpG oligodeoxynucleotide-mediated immune stimulation by locked nucleic acid (LNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollmer, Jörg; Jepsen, Jan Stenvang; Uhlmann, Eugen

    2004-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is an RNA derivative that when introduced into oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN), mediates high efficacy and stability. CpG ODNs are potent immune stimulators and are recognized by toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9). Some phosphorothioate antisense ODNs bearing CpG dinucleotides have...

  16. Role of Rab GTPases and their interacting proteins in mediating metabolic signalling and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Christelle En Lin; Tang, Bor Luen

    2015-06-01

    The vesicular transport pathways, which shuttle materials to and from the cell surface and within the cell, and the metabolic (growth factor and nutrient) signalling pathways, which integrate a variety of extracellular and intracellular signals to mediate growth, proliferation or survival, are both important for cellular physiology. There is evidence to suggest that the transport and metabolic signalling pathways intersect-vesicular transport can affect the regulation of metabolic signals and vice versa. The Rab family GTPases regulate the specificity of vesicular transport steps in the cell. Together with their interacting proteins, Rabs would likely constitute the points of intersection between vesicular transport and metabolic signalling pathways. Examples of these points would include growth factor signalling, glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as autophagy. Many of these processes involve mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) in downstream cascades, or are regulated by TORC signalling. A general functionality of the vesicular transport processes controlled by the Rabs is also important for spatial and temporal regulation of the transmission of metabolic signals between the cell surface and the nucleus. In other cases, specific Rabs and their interacting proteins are known to function in recruiting metabolism-related proteins to target membranes, or may compete with other factors in the TORC signalling pathway as a means of metabolic regulation. We review and discuss herein examples of how Rabs and their interacting proteins can mediate metabolic signalling and regulation in cells.

  17. MicroRNA-mediated cancer metastasis regulation via heterotypic signals in the microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haizhong; Liang, Chunli; Wang, Guangxue; Jia, Sujuan; Zhao, Qian; Xiang, Zhendong; Li, Yuan; Cho, William C; Pestell, Richard G; Liang, Li; Yu, Zuoren

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are thought to regulate tumor progression and metastasis via direct interaction with target genes within cells. Emerging evidence has demonstrated the secretion of miRNAs into environment via cancer cell exosomes, called "exosomal shuttle small RNA". Microenvironmental miRNAs are important mediators of cell-to-cell communication, and they play important roles in regulating cancer metastasis. RNA analysis indicates enrichment of the miRNA population in cell-culturing medium. miRNA-conditioned medium is able to mediate the function of miRNAs in regulating cancer cell migration and invasion. Here we combine our recent work with literature discussing multiple mechanisms through which exosomal miRNAs regulate cancer cell migration, invasion and metastasis. We summarize a heterotypic signaling pathway by which miRNA regulates the cellular secretion and tumor microenvironment in control of breast cancer cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, exosomal miRNAs are able to regulate cancer metastasis via heterotypic signals in the microenvironment.

  18. Regulation of energy metabolism by long-chain fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Manabu T; Yudell, Barbara E; Loor, Juan J

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, excess energy is stored primarily as triglycerides, which are mobilized when energy demands arise. This review mainly focuses on the role of long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) in regulating energy metabolism as ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). PPAR-alpha expressed primarily in liver is essential for metabolic adaptation to starvation by inducing genes for beta-oxidation and ketogenesis and by downregulating energy expenditure through fibroblast growth factor 21. PPAR-delta is highly expressed in skeletal muscle and induces genes for LCFA oxidation during fasting and endurance exercise. PPAR-delta also regulates glucose metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis by inducing FOXO1 and PGC1-alpha. Genes targeted by PPAR-gamma in adipocytes suggest that PPAR-gamma senses incoming non-esterified LCFAs and induces the pathways to store LCFAs as triglycerides. Adiponectin, another important target of PPAR-gamma may act as a spacer between adipocytes to maintain their metabolic activity and insulin sensitivity. Another topic of this review is effects of skin LCFAs on energy metabolism. Specific LCFAs are required for the synthesis of skin lipids, which are essential for water barrier and thermal insulation functions of the skin. Disturbance of skin lipid metabolism often causes apparent resistance to developing obesity at the expense of normal skin function.

  19. Retinoic acid alleviates Con A-induced hepatitis and differentially regulates effector production in NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoo-A; Song, You Chan; Kim, Ga-Young; Choi, Gyeyoung; Lee, Yoon-Sook; Lee, Jung-Mi; Kang, Chang-Yuil

    2012-07-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a diverse regulator of immune responses. Although RA promotes natural killer T (NKT) cell activation in vitro by increasing CD1d expression on antigen-presenting cells (APCs), the direct effects of RA on NKT-cell responses in vivo are not known. In the present study, we demonstrated the effect of RA on the severity of Con A-induced hepatitis and molecular changes of NKT cells. First, we demonstrated that Con A-induced liver damage was ameliorated by RA. In correlation with cytokine levels in serum, RA regulated the production of IFN-γ and IL-4 but not TNF-α by NKT cells without influencing the NKT-cell activation status. However, RA did not alleviate α-GalCer-induced liver injury, even though it reduced IFN-γ and IL-4 but not TNF-α levels in serum. This regulation was also detected when liver mononuclear cells (MNCs) or NKT hybridoma cells were treated with RA in vitro. The regulatory effect of RA on NKT cells was mediated by RAR-α, and RA reduced the phosphorylation of MAPK. These results suggest that RA differentially modulates the production of effector cytokines by NKT cells in hepatitis, and the suppressive effect of RA on hepatitis varies with the pathogenic mechanism of liver injury.

  20. sRNA-Mediated Regulation of P-Fimbriae Phase Variation in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surabhi Khandige

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC are capable of occupying physiologically distinct intracellular and extracellular niches within the urinary tract. This feat requires the timely regulation of gene expression and small RNAs (sRNAs are known to mediate such rapid adjustments in response to changing environmental cues. This study aimed to uncover sRNA-mediated gene regulation in the UPEC strain UTI89, during infection of bladder epithelial cells. Hfq is an RNA chaperone known to facilitate and stabilize sRNA and target mRNA interactions with bacterial cells. The co-immunoprecipitation and high throughput RNA sequencing of Hfq bound sRNAs performed in this study, revealed distinct sRNA profiles in UPEC in the extracellular and intracellular environments. Our findings emphasize the importance of studying regulatory sRNAs in a biologically relevant niche. This strategy also led to the discovery of a novel virulence-associated trans-acting sRNA-PapR. Deletion of papR was found to enhance adhesion of UTI89 to both bladder and kidney cell lines in a manner independent of type-1 fimbriae. We demonstrate PapR mediated posttranscriptional repression of the P-fimbriae phase regulator gene papI and postulate a role for such regulation in fimbrial cross-talk at the population level in UPEC. Our results further implicate the Leucine responsive protein (LRP as a transcriptional activator regulating PapR expression. Our study reports, for the first time, a role for sRNAs in regulation of P-fimbriae phase variation and emphasizes the importance of studying pathogenesis-specific sRNAs within a relevant biological niche.

  1. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK-2) mediated phosphorylation regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and cell growth control of Ras-associated tumor suppressor protein, RASSF2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Gita [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500076 (India); Mahalingam, S., E-mail: mahalingam@iitm.ac.in [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500076 (India); Department of Biotechnology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Cell Biology, Indian Institute of Technology-Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2009-10-01

    Ras GTPase controls the normal cell growth through binding with an array of effector molecules, such as Raf and PI3-kinase in a GTP-dependent manner. RASSF2, a member of the Ras association domain family, is known to be involved in the suppression of cell growth and is frequently down-regulated in various tumor tissues by promoter hypermethylation. In the present study, we demonstrate that RASSF2 shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm by a signal-mediated process and its export from the nucleus is sensitive to leptomycin B. Amino acids between 240 to 260 in the C-terminus of RASSF2 harbor a functional nuclear export signal (NES), which is necessary and sufficient for efficient export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. Substitution of conserved Ile254, Val257 and Leu259 within the minimal NES impaired RASSF2 export from the nucleus. In addition, wild type but not the nuclear export defective RASSF2 mutant interacts with export receptor, CRM-1 and exported from the nucleus. Surprisingly, we observed nucleolar localization for the nuclear export defective mutant suggesting the possibility that RASSF2 may localize in different cellular compartments transiently in a cell cycle dependent manner and the observed nuclear localization for wild type protein may be due to faster export kinetics from the nucleolus. Furthermore, our data suggest that RASSF2 is specifically phosphorylated by MAPK/ERK-2 and the inhibitors of MAPK pathway impair the phosphorylation and subsequently block the export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. These data clearly suggest that ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of RASSF2. Interestingly, nuclear import defective mutant of RASSF2 failed to induce cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase and apoptosis suggesting that RASSF2 regulates cell growth in a nuclear localization dependent manner. Collectively, these data provided evidence for the first time that MAPK/ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation regulates

  2. Comparative Genomics of Regulation of Fatty Acid and Branched-chain Amino Acid Utilization in Proteobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazakov, Alexey E.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Arkin, Adam Paul; Dubchak, Inna; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Alm, Eric

    2008-10-31

    Bacteria can use branched-chain amino acids (ILV, i.e. isoleucine, leucine, valine) and fatty acids (FA) as sole carbon and energy sources convering ILV into acetyl-CoA, propanoyl-CoA and propionyl-CoA, respectively. In this work, we used the comparative genomic approach to identify candidate transcriptional factors and DNA motifs that control ILV and FA utilization pathways in proteobacteria. The metabolic regulons were characterized based on the identification and comparison of candidate transcription factor binding sites in groups of phylogenetically related genomes. The reconstructed ILV/FA regulatory network demonstrates considerable variability and involves six transcriptional factors from the MerR, TetR and GntR families binding to eleven distinct DNA motifs. The ILV degradation genes in gamma- and beta-proteobacteria are mainly regulated by anovel regulator from the MerR family (e.g., LiuR in Pseudomonas aeruginosa) (40 species), in addition, the TetR-type regulator LiuQ was identified in some beta-proteobacteria (8 species). Besides the core set of ILV utilization genes, the LiuR regulon in some lineages is expanded to include genes from other metabolic pathways, such as the glyoxylate shunt and glutamate synthase in the Shewanella species. The FA degradation genes are controlled by four regulators including FadR in gamma-proteobacteria (34 species), PsrA in gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (45 species), FadP in beta-proteobacteria (14 species), and LiuR orthologs in alpha-proteobacteria (22 species). The remarkable variability of the regulatory systems associated with the FA degradation pathway is discussed from the functional and evolutionary points of view.

  3. Regulation of VH replacement by B cell receptor-mediated signaling in human immature B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Lange, Miles D; Hong, Sang Yong; Xie, Wanqin; Xu, Kerui; Huang, Lin; Yu, Yangsheng; Ehrhardt, Götz R A; Zemlin, Michael; Burrows, Peter D; Su, Kaihong; Carter, Robert H; Zhang, Zhixin

    2013-06-01

    VH replacement provides a unique RAG-mediated recombination mechanism to edit nonfunctional IgH genes or IgH genes encoding self-reactive BCRs and contributes to the diversification of Ab repertoire in the mouse and human. Currently, it is not clear how VH replacement is regulated during early B lineage cell development. In this article, we show that cross-linking BCRs induces VH replacement in human EU12 μHC(+) cells and in the newly emigrated immature B cells purified from peripheral blood of healthy donors or tonsillar samples. BCR signaling-induced VH replacement is dependent on the activation of Syk and Src kinases but is inhibited by CD19 costimulation, presumably through activation of the PI3K pathway. These results show that VH replacement is regulated by BCR-mediated signaling in human immature B cells, which can be modulated by physiological and pharmacological treatments.

  4. Biological principles of microRNA-mediated regulation: shared themes amid diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynt, Alex S; Lai, Eric C

    2008-11-01

    Regulation of gene activity by microRNAs is critical to myriad aspects of eukaryotic development and physiology. Amidst an extensive regulatory web that is predicted to involve thousands of transcripts, emergent themes are now beginning to illustrate how microRNAs have been incorporated into diverse settings. These include potent inhibition of individual key targets, fine-tuning of target activity, the coordinated regulation of target batteries, and the reversibility of some aspects of microRNA-mediated repression. Such themes may reflect some of the inherent advantages of exploiting microRNA control in biological circuits, and provide insight into the consequences of microRNA dysfunction in disease.

  5. Regulated release of BDNF by cortical oligodendrocytes is mediated through metabotropic glutamate receptors and the PLC pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issa P Bagayogo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies suggest that OLGs (oligodendrocytes), the myelinating cells of the central nervous system, are also a source of trophic molecules, such as neurotrophins that may influence survival of proximate neurons. What is less clear is how the release of these molecules may be regulated. The present study investigated the effects of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) derived from cortical OLGs on proximate neurons, as well as regulatory mechanisms mediating BDNF release. Initial work determined that BDNF derived from cortical OLGs increased the numbers of VGLUT1 (vesicular glutamate transporter 1)-positive glutamatergic cortical neurons. Furthermore, glutamate acting through metabotropic, and not AMPA/kainate or NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate), receptors increased BDNF release. The PLC (phospholipase C) pathway is a key mediator of metabotropic actions to release BDNF in astrocytes and neurons. Treatment of OLGs with the PLC activator m-3M3FBS [N-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)-2,4,6-trimethylbenzenesulfonamide] induced robust release of BDNF. Moreover, release elicited by the metabotropic receptor agonist ACPD [trans-(1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid] was inhibited by the PLC antagonist U73122, the IP3 (inositol triphosphate 3) receptor inhibitor 2-APB (2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane) and the intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA/AM [1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetra-acetic acid tetrakis(acetoxymethyl ester)]. Taken together, these results suggest that OLG lineage cells release BDNF, a molecule trophic for proximate neurons. BDNF release is regulated by glutamate acting through mGluRs (metabotropic glutamate receptors) and the PLC pathway. Thus glutamate and BDNF may be molecules that support neuron–OLG interactions in the cortex.

  6. Deciphering Cis-Regulatory Element Mediated Combinatorial Regulation in Rice under Blast Infected Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Arindam; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) present at the promoters facilitate the binding of several transcription factors (TFs), thereby altering the consequent gene expressions. Due to the eminent complexity of the regulatory mechanism, the combinatorics of CRE-mediated transcriptional regulation has been elusive. In this work, we have developed a new methodology that quantifies the co-occurrence tendencies of CREs present in a set of promoter sequences; these co-occurrence scores are filtered in three consecutive steps to test their statistical significance; and the significantly co-occurring CRE pairs are presented as networks. These networks of co-occurring CREs are further transformed to derive higher order of regulatory combinatorics. We have further applied this methodology on the differentially up-regulated gene-sets of rice tissues under fungal (Magnaporthe) infected conditions to demonstrate how it helps to understand the CRE-mediated combinatorial gene regulation. Our analysis includes a wide spectrum of biologically important results. The CRE pairs having a strong tendency to co-occur often exhibit very similar joint distribution patterns at the promoters of rice. We couple the network approach with experimental results of plant gene regulation and defense mechanisms and find evidences of auto and cross regulation among TF families, cross-talk among multiple hormone signaling pathways, similarities and dissimilarities in regulatory combinatorics between different tissues, etc. Our analyses have pointed a highly distributed nature of the combinatorial gene regulation facilitating an efficient alteration in response to fungal attack. All together, our proposed methodology could be an important approach in understanding the combinatorial gene regulation. It can be further applied to unravel the tissue and/or condition specific combinatorial gene regulation in other eukaryotic systems with the availability of annotated genomic sequences and suitable

  7. Megakaryocytes Regulate Expression of Pyk2 Isoforms and Caspase-mediated Cleavage of Actin in Osteoblasts*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacena, Melissa A.; Eleniste, Pierre P.; Cheng, Ying-Hua; Huang, Su; Shivanna, Mahesh; Meijome, Tomas E.; Mayo, Lindsey D.; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast (OB) precursors are essential for elaborating the bone-forming activity of mature OBs. However, the mechanisms regulating OB proliferation and function are largely unknown. We reported that OB proliferation is enhanced by megakaryocytes (MKs) via a process that is regulated in part by integrin signaling. The tyrosine kinase Pyk2 has been shown to regulate cell proliferation and survival in a variety of cells. Pyk2 is also activated by integrin signaling and regulates actin remodeling in bone-resorbing osteoclasts. In this study, we examined the role of Pyk2 and actin in the MK-mediated increase in OB proliferation. Calvarial OBs were cultured in the presence of MKs for various times, and Pyk2 signaling cascades in OBs were examined by Western blotting, subcellular fractionation, and microscopy. We found that MKs regulate the temporal expression of Pyk2 and its subcellular localization. We also found that MKs regulate the expression of two alternatively spliced isoforms of Pyk2 in OBs, which may regulate OB differentiation and proliferation. MKs also induced cytoskeletal reorganization in OBs, which was associated with the caspase-mediated cleavage of actin, an increase in focal adhesions, and the formation of apical membrane ruffles. Moreover, BrdU incorporation in MK-stimulated OBs was blocked by the actin-polymerizing agent, jasplakinolide. Collectively, our studies reveal that Pyk2 and actin play an important role in MK-regulated signaling cascades that control OB proliferation and may be important for therapeutic interventions aimed at increasing bone formation in metabolic diseases of the skeleton. PMID:22447931

  8. Megakaryocytes regulate expression of Pyk2 isoforms and caspase-mediated cleavage of actin in osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacena, Melissa A; Eleniste, Pierre P; Cheng, Ying-Hua; Huang, Su; Shivanna, Mahesh; Meijome, Tomas E; Mayo, Lindsey D; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-05-18

    The proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast (OB) precursors are essential for elaborating the bone-forming activity of mature OBs. However, the mechanisms regulating OB proliferation and function are largely unknown. We reported that OB proliferation is enhanced by megakaryocytes (MKs) via a process that is regulated in part by integrin signaling. The tyrosine kinase Pyk2 has been shown to regulate cell proliferation and survival in a variety of cells. Pyk2 is also activated by integrin signaling and regulates actin remodeling in bone-resorbing osteoclasts. In this study, we examined the role of Pyk2 and actin in the MK-mediated increase in OB proliferation. Calvarial OBs were cultured in the presence of MKs for various times, and Pyk2 signaling cascades in OBs were examined by Western blotting, subcellular fractionation, and microscopy. We found that MKs regulate the temporal expression of Pyk2 and its subcellular localization. We also found that MKs regulate the expression of two alternatively spliced isoforms of Pyk2 in OBs, which may regulate OB differentiation and proliferation. MKs also induced cytoskeletal reorganization in OBs, which was associated with the caspase-mediated cleavage of actin, an increase in focal adhesions, and the formation of apical membrane ruffles. Moreover, BrdU incorporation in MK-stimulated OBs was blocked by the actin-polymerizing agent, jasplakinolide. Collectively, our studies reveal that Pyk2 and actin play an important role in MK-regulated signaling cascades that control OB proliferation and may be important for therapeutic interventions aimed at increasing bone formation in metabolic diseases of the skeleton.

  9. Rab5-mediated VE-cadherin internalization regulates the barrier function of the lung microvascular endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junjun; Yao, Wei; Qian, Guisheng; Wei, Zhenghua; Wu, Guangyu; Wang, Guansong

    2015-12-01

    The small GTPase Rab5 has been well defined to control the vesicle-mediated plasma membrane protein transport to the endosomal compartment. However, its function in the internalization of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, an important component of adherens junctions, and as a result regulating the endothelial cell polarity and barrier function remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) simulation markedly enhanced the activation and expression of Rab5 in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs), which is accompanied by VE-cadherin internalization. In parallel, LPS challenge also induced abnormal cell polarity and dysfunction of the endothelial barrier in HPMECs. LPS stimulation promoted the translocation of VE-cadherin from the plasma membrane to intracellular compartments, and intracellularly expressed VE-cadherin was extensively colocalized with Rab5. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of Rab5a expression attenuated the disruption of LPS-induced internalization of VE-cadherin and the disorder of cell polarity. Furthermore, knockdown of Rab5 inhibited the vascular endothelial hyperpermeability and protected endothelial barrier function from LPS injury, both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that Rab5 is a critical mediator of LPS-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction, which is likely mediated through regulating VE-cadherin internalization. These findings provide evidence, implicating that Rab5a is a potential therapeutic target for preventing endothelial barrier disruption and vascular inflammation.

  10. An adverse outcome pathway framework for neural tube and axial defects mediated by modulation of retinoic acid homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonk, Elisa C M; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Piersma, Aldert H

    2015-08-01

    Developmental toxicity can be caused through a multitude of mechanisms and can therefore not be captured through a single simple mechanistic paradigm. However, it may be possible to define a selected group of overarching mechanisms that might allow detection of the vast majority of developmental toxicants. Against this background, we have explored the usefulness of retinoic acid mediated regulation of neural tube and axial patterning as a general mechanism that, when perturbed, may result in manifestations of developmental toxicity that may cover a large part of malformations known to occur in experimental animals and in man. Through a literature survey, we have identified key genes in the regulation of retinoic acid homeostasis, as well as marker genes of neural tube and axial patterning, that may be used to detect developmental toxicants in in vitro systems. A retinoic acid-neural tube/axial patterning adverse outcome pathway (RA-NTA AOP) framework was designed. The framework was tested against existing data of flusilazole exposure in the rat whole embryo culture, the zebrafish embryotoxicity test, and the embryonic stem cell test. Flusilazole is known to interact with retinoic acid homeostasis, and induced common and unique NTA marker gene changes in the three test systems. Flusilazole-induced changes were similar in directionality to gene expression responses after retinoic acid exposure. It is suggested that the RA-NTA framework may provide a general tool to define mechanistic pathways and biomarkers of developmental toxicity that may be used in alternative in vitro assays for the detection of embryotoxic compounds.

  11. HABP2 is a novel regulator of hyaluronan-mediated human lung cancer progression

    OpenAIRE

    Tamara eMirzapoiazova; Nurbek eMambetsariev; Frances E Lennon; Bolot eMambetsariev; Joshua E. Berlind; Ravi eSalgia; Singleton, Patrick A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is a devastating disease with limited treatment options. Many lung cancers have changes in their microenvironment including upregulation of the extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan, hyaluronan (HA), which we have previously demonstrated can regulate the activity of the extracellular serine protease, Hyaluronan Binding Protein 2 (HABP2). This study examined the functional role of HABP2 on HA-mediated human lung cancer dynamics.Methods: Immunohistochemical analysis was...

  12. HABP2 is a Novel Regulator of Hyaluronan-Mediated Human Lung Cancer Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Mirzapoiazova, Tamara; Mambetsariev, Nurbek; Frances E Lennon; Mambetsariev, Bolot; Joshua E. Berlind; Salgia, Ravi; Singleton, Patrick A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is a devastating disease with limited treatment options. Many lung cancers have changes in their microenvironment including upregulation of the extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan, hyaluronan (HA), which we have previously demonstrated can regulate the activity of the extracellular serine protease, hyaluronan binding protein 2 (HABP2). This study examined the functional role of HABP2 on HA-mediated human lung cancer dynamics. Methods Immunohistochemical an...

  13. Regulation of Noxa-mediated apoptosis in Helicobacter pylori–infected gastric epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori induces the antiapoptotic protein myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl1) in human gastric epithelial cells (GECs). Apoptosis of oncogenic protein Mcl1-expressing cells is mainly regulated by Noxa-mediated degradation of Mcl1. We wanted to elucidate the status of Noxa in H. pylori–infected GECs. For this, various GECs such as AGS, MKN45, and KATO III were either infected with H. pylori or left uninfected. The effect of infection was examined by immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, ...

  14. A mediator methylation mystery: JMJD1C demethylates MDC1 to regulate DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian; Matunis, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    Mediator of DNA-damage checkpoint 1 (MDMDC1) has a central role in repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by both homologous recombination and nonhomologous end joining, and its function is regulated by post-translational phosphorylation, ubiquitylation and sumoylation. In this issue, a new study by Watanabe et al. reveals that methylation of MDMDC1 is also critical for its function in DSB repair and specifically affects repair through BRCA1-dependent homologous recombination.

  15. Insulin regulation of the glucagon gene is mediated by an insulin-responsive DNA element.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by insulin deficiency and high plasma glucagon levels, which can be normalized by insulin replacement. It has previously been reported that glucagon gene expression is negatively regulated by insulin at the transcriptional level. By transfection studies, I have now localized a DNA control element that mediates insulin effects on glucagon gene transcription. This element also confers insulin responsiveness to a heterologous promoter. DNA-binding proteins that...

  16. Differential regulation of protein synthesis by amino acids and insulin in peripheral and visceral tissues of neonatal pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryawan, Agus; O'Connor, Pamela M J; Bush, Jill A; Nguyen, Hanh V; Davis, Teresa A

    2009-05-01

    The high efficiency of protein deposition during the neonatal period is driven by high rates of protein synthesis, which are maximally stimulated after feeding. In the current study, we examined the individual roles of amino acids and insulin in the regulation of protein synthesis in peripheral and visceral tissues of the neonate by performing pancreatic glucose-amino acid clamps in overnight-fasted 7-day-old pigs. We infused pigs (n = 8-12/group) with insulin at 0, 10, 22, and 110 ng kg(-0.66) min(-1) to achieve approximately 0, 2, 6 and 30 muU ml(-1) insulin so as to simulate below fasting, fasting, intermediate, and fed insulin levels, respectively. At each insulin dose, amino acids were maintained at the fasting or fed level. In conjunction with the highest insulin dose, amino acids were also allowed to fall below the fasting level. Tissue protein synthesis was measured using a flooding dose of L: -[4-(3)H] phenylalanine. Both insulin and amino acids increased fractional rates of protein synthesis in longissimus dorsi, gastrocnemius, masseter, and diaphragm muscles. Insulin, but not amino acids, increased protein synthesis in the skin. Amino acids, but not insulin, increased protein synthesis in the liver, pancreas, spleen, and lung and tended to increase protein synthesis in the jejunum and kidney. Neither insulin nor amino acids altered protein synthesis in the stomach. The results suggest that the stimulation of protein synthesis by feeding in most tissues of the neonate is regulated by the post-prandial rise in amino acids. However, the feeding-induced stimulation of protein synthesis in skeletal muscles is independently mediated by insulin as well as amino acids.

  17. Work Environment Characteristics and Teacher Well-Being: The Mediation of Emotion Regulation Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hongbiao; Huang, Shenghua; Wang, Wenlan

    2016-09-13

    Based on an adjusted Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model that considers the mediation of personal resources, this study examined the relationships between two characteristics of teachers' work environment (i.e., emotional job demands and trust in colleagues) and two indicators of teachers' well-being (i.e., teaching satisfaction and emotional exhaustion). In particular, the study focused on how emotion regulation strategies (i.e., reappraisal and suppression) mediate these relationships. Data collected from a questionnaire survey of 1115 primary school teachers in Hong Kong was analyzed to test the hypothesized relationships. The results of structural equation modeling indicated that: (1) the emotional job demands of teaching were detrimental to teacher well-being, whereas trust in colleagues was beneficial; (2) both emotion regulation strategies mediated the relationships between both emotional job demands and trust in colleagues and teacher well-being; and (3) teachers who tend to use more reappraisal may be psychologically healthier than those tend to adopt more suppression. These findings support the applicability of the JD-R model to school settings and highlight the role of teachers' emotion regulation in teachers' well-being. Implications for the improvement of school environments and teachers' well-being are identified.

  18. Work Environment Characteristics and Teacher Well-Being: The Mediation of Emotion Regulation Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbiao Yin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on an adjusted Job Demands-Resources (JD-R model that considers the mediation of personal resources, this study examined the relationships between two characteristics of teachers’ work environment (i.e., emotional job demands and trust in colleagues and two indicators of teachers’ well-being (i.e., teaching satisfaction and emotional exhaustion. In particular, the study focused on how emotion regulation strategies (i.e., reappraisal and suppression mediate these relationships. Data collected from a questionnaire survey of 1115 primary school teachers in Hong Kong was analyzed to test the hypothesized relationships. The results of structural equation modeling indicated that: (1 the emotional job demands of teaching were detrimental to teacher well-being, whereas trust in colleagues was beneficial; (2 both emotion regulation strategies mediated the relationships between both emotional job demands and trust in colleagues and teacher well-being; and (3 teachers who tend to use more reappraisal may be psychologically healthier than those tend to adopt more suppression. These findings support the applicability of the JD-R model to school settings and highlight the role of teachers’ emotion regulation in teachers’ well-being. Implications for the improvement of school environments and teachers’ well-being are identified.

  19. Work Environment Characteristics and Teacher Well-Being: The Mediation of Emotion Regulation Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hongbiao; Huang, Shenghua; Wang, Wenlan

    2016-01-01

    Based on an adjusted Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model that considers the mediation of personal resources, this study examined the relationships between two characteristics of teachers’ work environment (i.e., emotional job demands and trust in colleagues) and two indicators of teachers’ well-being (i.e., teaching satisfaction and emotional exhaustion). In particular, the study focused on how emotion regulation strategies (i.e., reappraisal and suppression) mediate these relationships. Data collected from a questionnaire survey of 1115 primary school teachers in Hong Kong was analyzed to test the hypothesized relationships. The results of structural equation modeling indicated that: (1) the emotional job demands of teaching were detrimental to teacher well-being, whereas trust in colleagues was beneficial; (2) both emotion regulation strategies mediated the relationships between both emotional job demands and trust in colleagues and teacher well-being; and (3) teachers who tend to use more reappraisal may be psychologically healthier than those tend to adopt more suppression. These findings support the applicability of the JD-R model to school settings and highlight the role of teachers’ emotion regulation in teachers’ well-being. Implications for the improvement of school environments and teachers’ well-being are identified. PMID:27649216

  20. Protective effects of arachidonic acid against palmitic acid-mediated lipotoxicity in HIT-T15 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young Sik; Kim, Chi Hyun; Kim, Ki Young; Cheon, Hyae Gyeong

    2012-05-01

    Saturated fatty acids have been considered major contributing factors in type 2 diabetes, whereas unsaturated fatty acids have beneficial effects for preventing the development of diabetes. However, the effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids in pancreatic β cells have not been reported. Here, we examined the effects of arachidonic acid (AA) on palmitic acid (PA)-mediated lipotoxicity in clonal HIT-T15 pancreatic β cells. AA prevented the PA-induced lipotoxicity as indicated by cell viability, DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial membrane potential, whereas eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), a non-metabolizable AA, had little effect on PA-induced lipotoxicity. In parallel with its protective effects against PA-induced lipotoxicity, AA restored impaired insulin expression and secretion induced by PA. AA but not ETYA increased intracellular triglyceride (TG) in the presence of PA compared with PA alone, and xanthohumol, a diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) inhibitor, reversed AA-induced protection from PA. Taken together, our results suggest that AA protects against PA-induced lipotoxicity in clonal HIT-T15 pancreatic β cells, and the protective effects may be associated with TG accumulation, possibly through sequestration of lipotoxic PA into TG.

  1. Palmitoleic acid prevents palmitic acid-induced macrophage activation and consequent p38 MAPK-mediated skeletal muscle insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Nicola A; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline P; Cleasby, Mark E

    2014-08-05

    Obesity and saturated fatty acid (SFA) treatment are both associated with skeletal muscle insulin resistance (IR) and increased macrophage infiltration. However, the relative effects of SFA and unsaturated fatty acid (UFA)-activated macrophages on muscle are unknown. Here, macrophages were treated with palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid or both and the effects of the conditioned medium (CM) on C2C12 myotubes investigated. CM from palmitic acid-treated J774s (palm-mac-CM) impaired insulin signalling and insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis, reduced Inhibitor κBα and increased phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase in myotubes. p38 MAPK inhibition or siRNA partially ameliorated these defects, as did addition of tumour necrosis factor-α blocking antibody to the CM. Macrophages incubated with both FAs generated CM that did not induce IR, while palmitoleic acid-mac-CM alone was insulin sensitising. Thus UFAs may improve muscle insulin sensitivity and counteract SFA-mediated IR through an effect on macrophage activation.

  2. Surfactant protein A regulates IgG-mediated phagocytosis in inflammatory neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, Jessica A; Wright, Jo Rae

    2007-12-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP)-A and SP-D have been shown to affect the functions of a variety of innate immune cells and to interact with various immune proteins such as complement and immunoglobulins. The goal of the current study is to test the hypothesis that SP-A regulates IgG-mediated phagocytosis by neutrophils, which are major effector cells of the innate immune response that remove invading pathogens by phagocytosis and by extracellular killing mediated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen. We have previously shown that SP-A stimulates chemotaxis by inflammatory, but not peripheral, neutrophils. To evaluate the ability of SP-A to modulate IgG-mediated phagocytosis, polystyrene beads were coated with BSA and treated with anti-BSA IgG. SP-A significantly and specifically enhanced IgG-mediated phagocytosis by inflammatory neutrophils, but it had no effect on beads not treated with IgG. SP-A bound to IgG-coated beads and enhanced their uptake via direct interactions with the beads as well as direct interactions with the neutrophils. SP-A did not affect reactive oxygen production or binding of IgG to neutrophils and had modest effects on polymerization of actin. These data suggest that SP-A plays an important role in mediating the phagocytic response of neutrophils to IgG-opsonized particles.

  3. The associated regulators and signal pathway in rILl-16/CD4 mediated growth regulation in Jurkat cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    IL-16 is a ligand and chemotactic factor for CD4+ T cells. IL-16 inhibits the CD3 mediated lymphocyteactivation and proliferation. The effects of IL-16 on the target cells are dependent on the cell type, thepresence of co-activators etc. To understand the regulation function and mechanism of IL-16 on targetcells, we used a 130 a.a. recombinant IL-16 to study its effects on the growth of Jurkat T leukemia cellsin vitro. We found that the rIL-16 stimulated the proliferation of Jurkat cells at low dose (10-9M), butinhibited the growth of the cells at higher concentration (10-5M). Results showed that 10-5 M of rIL-16treatment induced an enhanced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. The treatment blocked the expression of FasL, butup-regulated the c-myc and Bid expression in the cells. Pre-treatment of PKC inhibitor or MEK1 inhibitormarkedly increased or decreased the rIL-16 induced growth-inhibiting effects on Jurkat cells, respectively.The results suggested that the rIL-16 might be a regulator for the growth or apoptosis of Jurkat cells ata dose-dependent manner. The growth-inhibiting effects of rIL-16 might be Fas/FasL independent, but,associated with the activation of PKC, up-regulated expression of c-Myc and Bid, and the participation ofthe ERK signal pathway in Jurkat cells.

  4. Acute exposure to long-chain fatty acids impairs {alpha}2-adrenergic receptor-mediated antilipolysis in human adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Jan; Moro, Cédric; Bessière, David; Hejnova, Jindra; Marquès, Marie A; Bajzova, Magda; Lafontan, Max; Crampes, Francois; Berlan, Michel; Stich, Vladimir

    2007-10-01

    The acute in vitro and in vivo effects of long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) on the regulation of adrenergic lipolysis were investigated in human adipose tissue. The effect of a 2 h incubation, without or with LCFA (200 mumol/l), on basal and hormonally induced lipolysis was tested in vitro on isolated fat cells. The lipolytic response to epinephrine was enhanced by suppression of the antilipolytic alpha(2)-adrenergic effect. Then, healthy lean and obese male subjects performed a 45 min exercise bout at 50% of their heart rate reserve either after an overnight fast or 3 h after a high-fat meal (HFM: 95% fat, 5% carbohydrates). Subcutaneous adipose tissue lipolysis was measured by microdialysis in the presence or absence of an alpha-antagonist (phentolamine). In vivo, a HFM increased plasma levels of nonesterified fatty acids in lean and obese subjects. In both groups, the HFM did not alter hormonal responses to exercise. Under fasting conditions, the alpha(2)-adrenergic antilipolytic effect was more pronounced in obese than in lean subjects. The HFM totally suppressed the alpha(2)-adrenergic antilipolytic effect in lean and obese subjects during exercise. LCFAs per se, in vitro as well as in vivo, suppress alpha(2)-adrenergic-mediated antilipolysis in adipose tissue. LCFA-mediated suppression of antilipolytic pathways represents another mechanism whereby a high fat content in the diet might increase adipose tissue lipolysis.

  5. Multivalent ion-mediated nucleic acid helix-helix interactions: RNA versus DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Yuan-Yan; Zhang, Zhong-Liang; Zhang, Jin-Si; Zhu, Xiao-Long; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ion-mediated interaction is critical to the structure and stability of nucleic acids. Recent experiments suggest that the multivalent ion-induced aggregation of double-stranded (ds) RNAs and DNAs may strongly depend on the topological nature of helices, while there is still lack of an understanding on the relevant ion-mediated interactions at atomistic level. In this work, we have directly calculated the potentials of mean force (PMF) between two dsRNAs and between two dsDNAs in Cobalt Hexamm...

  6. Apoplastic peroxidases are required for salicylic acid-mediated defense against Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammarella, Nicole D; Cheng, Zhenyu; Fu, Zheng Qing; Daudi, Arsalan; Bolwell, G Paul; Dong, Xinnian; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2015-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by NADPH oxidases or apoplastic peroxidases play an important role in the plant defense response. Diminished expression of at least two Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase encoding genes, PRX33 (At3g49110) and PRX34 (At3g49120), as a consequence of anti-sense expression of a heterologous French bean peroxidase gene (asFBP1.1), were previously shown to result in reduced levels of ROS following pathogen attack, enhanced susceptibility to a variety of bacterial and fungal pathogens, and reduced levels of callose production and defense-related gene expression in response to the microbe associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules flg22 and elf26. These data demonstrated that the peroxidase-dependent oxidative burst plays an important role in the elicitation of pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). Further work reported in this paper, however, shows that asFBP1.1 antisense plants are not impaired in all PTI-associated responses. For example, some but not all flg22-elicited genes are induced to lower levels by flg22 in asFPB1.1, and callose deposition in asFPB1.1 is similar to wild-type following infiltration with a Pseudomonas syringae hrcC mutant or with non-host P. syringae pathovars. Moreover, asFPB1.1 plants did not exhibit any apparent defect in their ability to mount a hypersensitive response (HR). On the other hand, salicylic acid (SA)-mediated activation of PR1 was dramatically impaired in asFPB1.1 plants. In addition, P. syringae-elicited expression of many genes known to be SA-dependent was significantly reduced in asFBP1.1 plants. Consistent with this latter result, in asFBP1.1 plants the key regulator of SA-mediated responses, NPR1, showed both dramatically decreased total protein abundance and a failure to monomerize, which is required for its translocation into the nucleus.

  7. β-aminobutyric acid mediated drought stress alleviation in maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Arun K; Bhardwaj, Pardeep K; Ghosh, Supriya; Roy, Sankhajit; Saha, Suman; Sherpa, Ang R; Saha, Samir K; Hossain, Zahed

    2016-02-01

    The present study highlights the role of β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) in alleviating drought stress effects in maize (Zea mays L.). Chemical priming was imposed by pretreating 1-week-old plants with 600 μM BABA prior to applying drought stress. Specific activities of key antioxidant enzymes and metabolites (ascorbate and glutathione) levels of ascorbate-glutathione cycle were studied to unravel the priming-induced modulation of plant defense system. Furthermore, changes in endogenous ABA and JA concentrations as well as mRNA expressions of key genes involved in their respective biosynthesis pathways were monitored in BABA-primed (BABA+) and non-primed (BABA-) leaves of drought-challenged plants to better understand the mechanistic insights into the BABA-induced hormonal regulation of plant response to water-deficit stress. Accelerated stomatal closure, high relative water content, and less membrane damage were observed in BABA-primed leaves under water-deficit condition. Elevated APX and SOD activity in non-primed leaves found to be insufficient to scavenge all H2O2 and O2 (·-) resulting in oxidative burst as evident after histochemical staining with NBT and DAB. A higher proline accumulation in non-primed leaves also does not give much protection against drought stress. Increased GR activity supported with the enhanced mRNA and protein expressions might help the BABA-primed plants to maintain a high GSH pool essential for sustaining balanced redox status to counter drought-induced oxidative stress damages. Hormonal analysis suggests that in maize, BABA-potentiated drought tolerance is primarily mediated through JA-dependent pathway by the activation of antioxidant defense systems while ABA biosynthesis pathway also plays an important role in fine-tuning of drought stress response.

  8. TAZ Mediates Lysophosphatidic Acid-Induced Migration and Proliferation of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geun Ok Jeong

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ, a downstream effector of the Hippo pathway, has been reported to regulate organ size, tissue homeostasis, and tumorigenesis by acting as a transcriptional co-activator. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA is a bioactive lipid implicated in tumorigenesis and metastasis of ovarian cancer through activation of G protein-coupled receptors. However, the involvement of TAZ in LPA-induced tumorigenesis of ovarian cancer has not been elucidated. Methods: In order to demonstrate the role of TAZ in LPA-stimulated tumorigenesis, the effects of LPA on TAZ expression and cell migration were determined by Western blotting and chemotaxis analyses in R182 human epithelial ovarian cancer cells. Results and Conclusion: Treatment of R182 cells with the LPA receptor inhibitor Ki16425 blocked LPA-induced cell migration. In addition, transfection of R182 cells with small interfering RNA specific for LPA receptor 1 resulted in abrogation of LPA-stimulated cell migration. LPA induced phosphorylation of ERK and p38 MAP kinase in R182 cells and pretreatment of cells with the MEK-ERK pathway inhibitor U0126, but not the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB202190, resulted in abrogation of LPA-induced cell migration. Pretreatment of R182 cells with U0126 attenuated LPA-induced mRNA levels of TAZ and its transcriptional target genes, such as CTGF and CYR61, without affecting phosphorylation level of YAP. These results suggest that MEK-ERK pathway plays a key role in LPA-induced cell migration and mRNA expression of TAZ in R182 cells, without affecting stability of TAZ protein. In addition, small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of TAZ expression attenuated LPA-stimulated migration of R182 cells. These results suggest that TAZ plays a key role in LPA-stimulated migration of epithelial ovarian cancer cells.

  9. Critical role of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of Small Heterodimer Partner in maintaining bile acid homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kwon, Sanghoon; Byun, Sangwon; Xiao, Zhen; Park, Sean; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Kemper, Byron; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2016-07-14

    Bile acids (BAs) are recently recognized signalling molecules that profoundly affect metabolism. Because of detergent-like toxicity, BA levels must be tightly regulated. An orphan nuclear receptor, Small Heterodimer Partner (SHP), plays a key role in this regulation, but how SHP senses the BA signal for feedback transcriptional responses is not clearly understood. We show an unexpected function of a nucleoporin, RanBP2, in maintaining BA homoeostasis through SUMOylation of SHP. Upon BA signalling, RanBP2 co-localizes with SHP at the nuclear envelope region and mediates SUMO2 modification at K68, which facilitates nuclear transport of SHP and its interaction with repressive histone modifiers to inhibit BA synthetic genes. Mice expressing a SUMO-defective K68R SHP mutant have increased liver BA levels, and upon BA- or drug-induced biliary insults, these mice exhibit exacerbated cholestatic pathologies. These results demonstrate a function of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of SHP in maintaining BA homoeostasis and protecting from the BA hepatotoxicity.

  10. Hyperoxia Elevates Adrenic Acid Peroxidation in Marine Fish and Is Associated with Reproductive Pheromone Mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Long Sirius Chung

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of oxidative stress in the marine ecosystem is a concurring concern in fish reproductive behavior. Marine fish being rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA are precursors of prostaglandin pheromone mediators but also vulnerable to lipid peroxidation. It is yet to be determined if hypoxia or hyperoxia environment, a cumulative effect in the marine ecosystem affect pheromone mediators in fish, and to understand if this is associated with the generation of oxidized lipid products of PUFA. Novel oxidized lipid metabolites, isoprostanoids (15-F2t-isoprostane, 7(RS-7-F2t-dihomo-isoprostane, 17(RS-17-F2t-dihomo-isoprostane, 8-F3t-isoprostane, 4(RS-4-F4t-neuroprostane, 10-F4t-neuroprostane, isofuranoids (isofurans, 10-epi-17(RS-SC-Δ15-11-dihomo-isofuran and neurofurans, hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids and resolvins, PUFA (arachidonic, adrenic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids and prostaglandin pheromone mediators in fish muscle were determined in marine male and female fish muscles before and after interaction in a hypoxia or hyperoxia environment. Reproductive behaviors were also assessed. Our study showed oxidized lipid metabolites of arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic, and docosahexaenoic acids were not influenced by hypoxia and hyperoxia exposure in the fishes and no gender differences were found. However, adrenic acid and its oxidized products, 17(RS-17-F2t-dihomo-isoprostane and 10-epi-17(RS-SC-Δ15-11-dihomo-isofuran showed strong correspondence with male fish pheromone mediators and reproductive behavior when under oxidative stress especially, hyperoxia. The occurrence of hypoxia and hyperoxia in the marine ecosystem may not be detrimental to marine fish and instead presents as being beneficial in reproductive behavior.

  11. Metabolic regulation of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerry D. Cohen

    2009-11-01

    The phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, auxin) is important for many aspects of plant growth, development and responses to the environment yet the routes to is biosynthesis and mechanisms for regulation of IAA levels remain important research questions. A critical issue concerning the biosynthesis if IAA in plants is that redundant pathways for IAA biosynthesis exist in plants. We showed that these redundant pathways and their relative contribution to net IAA production are under both developmental and environmental control. We worked on three fundamental problems related to how plants get their IAA: 1) An in vitro biochemical approach was used to define the tryptophan dependent pathway to IAA using maize endosperm, where relatively large amounts of IAA are produced over a short developmental period. Both a stable isotope dilution and a protein MS approach were used to identify intermediates and enzymes in the reactions. 2) We developed an in vitro system for analysis of tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthesis in maize seedlings and we used a metabolite profiling approach to isolate intermediates in this reaction. 3) Arabidopsis contains a small family of genes that encode potential indolepyruvate decarboxylase enzymes. We cloned these genes and studied plants that are mutant in these genes and that over-express each member in the family in terms of the level and route of IAA biosynthesis. Together, these allowed further development of a comprehensive picture of the pathways and regulatory components that are involved in IAA homeostasis in higher plants.

  12. Hepatic oleate regulates adipose tissue lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhans, Maggie S; Flowers, Matthew T; Harrington, Kristin R; Bond, Laura M; Guo, Chang-An; Anderson, Rozalyn M; Ntambi, James M

    2015-02-01

    Hepatic steatosis is associated with detrimental metabolic phenotypes including enhanced risk for diabetes. Stearoyl-CoA desaturases (SCDs) catalyze the synthesis of MUFAs. In mice, genetic ablation of SCDs reduces hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and protects against diet-induced hepatic steatosis and adiposity. To understand the mechanism by which hepatic MUFA production influences adipose tissue stores, we created two liver-specific transgenic mouse models in the SCD1 knockout that express either human SCD5 or mouse SCD3, that synthesize oleate and palmitoleate, respectively. We demonstrate that hepatic de novo synthesized oleate, but not palmitoleate, stimulate hepatic lipid accumulation and adiposity, reversing the protective effect of the global SCD1 knockout under lipogenic conditions. Unexpectedly, the accumulation of hepatic lipid occurred without induction of the hepatic DNL program. Changes in hepatic lipid composition were reflected in plasma and in adipose tissue. Importantly, endogenously synthesized hepatic oleate was associated with suppressed DNL and fatty acid oxidation in white adipose tissue. Regression analysis revealed a strong correlation between adipose tissue lipid fuel utilization and hepatic and adipose tissue lipid storage. These data suggest an extrahepatic mechanism where endogenous hepatic oleate regulates lipid homeostasis in adipose tissues.

  13. Anacardic acid-mediated changes in membrane potential and pH gradient across liposomal membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyomizu, Masaaki; Okamoto, Katsuyuki; Akiba, Yukio; Nakatsu, Tetsuo; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2002-01-01

    We have previously shown that anacardic acid has an uncoupling effect on oxidative phosphorylation in rat liver mitochondria using succinate as a substrate (Life Sci. 66 (2000) 229-234). In the present study, for clarification of the physicochemical characteristics of anacardic acid, we used a cyanine dye (DiS-C3(5)) and 9-aminoacridine (9-AA) to determine changes of membrane potential (DeltaPsi) and pH difference (DeltapH), respectively, in a liposome suspension in response to the addition of anacardic acid to the suspension. The anacardic acid quenched DiS-C3(5) fluorescence at concentrations higher than 300 nM, with the degree of quenching being dependent on the log concentration of the acid. Furthermore, the K(+) diffusion potential generated by the addition of valinomycin to the suspension decreased for each increase in anacardic acid concentration used over 300 nM, but the sum of the anacardic acid- and valinomycin-mediated quenching was additively increasing. This indicates that the anacardic acid-mediated quenching was not due simply to increments in the K(+) permeability of the membrane. Addition of anacardic acid in the micromolar range to the liposomes with DeltaPsi formed by valinomycin-K(+) did not significantly alter 9-AA fluorescence, but unexpectedly dissipated DeltaPsi. The DeltaPsi preformed by valinomycin-K(+) decreased gradually following the addition of increasing concentrations of anacardic acid. The DeltaPsi dissipation rate was dependent on the pre-existing magnitude of DeltaPsi, and was correlated with the logarithmic concentration of anacardic acid. Furthermore, the initial rate of DeltapH dissipation increased with logarithmic increases in anacardic acid concentration. These results provide the evidence for a unique function of anacardic acid, dissimilar to carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone or valinomycin, in that anacardic acid behaves as both an electrogenic (negative) charge carrier driven by DeltaPsi, and a 'proton

  14. Keratin impact on PKCδ- and ASMase-mediated regulation of hepatocyte lipid raft size - implication for FasR-associated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Stéphane; Loranger, Anne; Omary, M Bishr; Marceau, Normand

    2016-09-01

    Keratins are epithelial cell intermediate filament (IF) proteins that are expressed as pairs in a cell-differentiation-regulated manner. Hepatocytes express the keratin 8 and 18 pair (denoted K8/K18) of IFs, and a loss of K8 or K18, as in K8-null mice, leads to degradation of the keratin partner. We have previously reported that a K8/K18 loss in hepatocytes leads to altered cell surface lipid raft distribution and more efficient Fas receptor (FasR, also known as TNFRSF6)-mediated apoptosis. We demonstrate here that the absence of K8 or transgenic expression of the K8 G62C mutant in mouse hepatocytes reduces lipid raft size. Mechanistically, we find that the lipid raft size is dependent on acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, also known as SMPD1) enzyme activity, which is reduced in absence of K8/K18. Notably, the reduction of ASMase activity appears to be caused by a less efficient redistribution of surface membrane PKCδ toward lysosomes. Moreover, we delineate the lipid raft volume range that is required for an optimal FasR-mediated apoptosis. Hence, K8/K18-dependent PKCδ- and ASMase-mediated modulation of lipid raft size can explain the more prominent FasR-mediated signaling resulting from K8/K18 loss. The fine-tuning of ASMase-mediated regulation of lipid rafts might provide a therapeutic target for death-receptor-related liver diseases.

  15. Yes-associated protein regulates endothelial cell contact-mediated expression of angiopoietin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun-Jung; Zhang, Haiying; Park, Hongryeol; Choi, Kyu-Sung; Lee, Heon-Woo; Agrawal, Vijayendra; Kim, Young-Myeong; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2015-05-12

    Angiogenesis is regulated by the dynamic interaction between endothelial cells (ECs). Hippo-Yes-associated protein (YAP) signalling has emerged as a key pathway that controls organ size and tissue growth by mediating cell contact inhibition. However, the role of YAP in EC has not been defined yet. Here, we show expression of YAP in the developing front of mouse retinal vessels. YAP subcellular localization, phosphorylation and activity are regulated by VE-cadherin-mediated-EC contacts. This VE-cadherin-dependent YAP phosphorylation requires phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt activation. We further identify angiopoietin-2 (ANG-2) as a potential transcriptional target of YAP in regulating angiogenic activity of EC in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of YAP-active form in EC enhances angiogenic sprouting, and this effect is blocked by ANG-2 depletion or soluble Tie-2 treatment. These findings implicate YAP as a critical regulator in angiogenesis and provide new insights into the mechanism coordinating junctional stability and angiogenic activation of ECs.

  16. CHIP mediates down-regulation of nucleobindin-1 in preosteoblast cell line models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Fuying; Wu, Yanping; Zhao, Xinghui; Zhao, Taoran; Meng, Ying; Zhao, Zhanzhong; Guo, Junwei; Chen, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Nucleobindin-1 (NUCB1), also known as Calnuc, is a highly conserved, multifunctional protein widely expressed in tissues and cells. It contains two EF-hand motifs which have been shown to play a crucial role in binding Ca(2+) ions. In this study, we applied comparative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to characterize differentially expressed proteins in HA-CHIP over-expressed and endogenous CHIP depleted MC3T3-E1 stable cell lines, identifying NUCB1 as a novel CHIP/Stub1 targeted protein. NUCB1 interacts with and is down-regulated by CHIP by both proteasomal dependent and independent pathways, suggesting that CHIP-mediated down-regulation of nucleobindin-1 might play a role in osteoblast differentiation. The chaperone protein Hsp70 was found to be important for CHIP and NUCB1 interaction as well as CHIP-mediated NUCB1 down-regulation. Our findings provide new insights into understanding the stability regulation of NUCB1.

  17. Complex regulation of Arabidopsis AGR1/PIN2-mediated root gravitropic response and basipetal auxin transport by cantharidin-sensitive protein phosphatases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Heungsop; Shin, Hwa-Soo; Guo, Zibiao; Blancaflor, Elison B.; Masson, Patrick H.; Chen, Rujin

    2005-01-01

    Polar auxin transport, mediated by two distinct plasma membrane-localized auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins/complexes, plays an important role in many plant growth and developmental processes including tropic responses to gravity and light, development of lateral roots and patterning in embryogenesis. We have previously shown that the Arabidopsis AGRAVITROPIC 1/PIN2 gene encodes an auxin efflux component regulating root gravitropism and basipetal auxin transport. However, the regulatory mechanism underlying the function of AGR1/PIN2 is largely unknown. Recently, protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases, respectively, have been implicated in regulating polar auxin transport and root gravitropism. Here, we examined the effects of chemical inhibitors of protein phosphatases on root gravitropism and basipetal auxin transport, as well as the expression pattern of AGR1/PIN2 gene and the localization of AGR1/PIN2 protein. We also examined the effects of inhibitors of vesicle trafficking and protein kinases. Our data suggest that protein phosphatases, sensitive to cantharidin and okadaic acid, are likely involved in regulating AGR1/PIN2-mediated root basipetal auxin transport and gravitropism, as well as auxin response in the root central elongation zone (CEZ). BFA-sensitive vesicle trafficking may be required for the cycling of AGR1/PIN2 between plasma membrane and the BFA compartment, but not for the AGR1/PIN2-mediated root basipetal auxin transport and auxin response in CEZ cells.

  18. Leishmania Donovani Cell Surface Sialoglycans Regulate Susceptibility for Siglec Mediated Macrophage Invasion and Parasite Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripti De

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Glycoconjugates play a pivotal role in the survival of Leishmania parasites in destructive surroundings. An important constituent present on many glycoconjugates is sialic acid. By virtue of their peripheral position on oligosaccharide chains of glycoconjugates, sialic acids are well suited as molecular determinants of specific biological processes, including the interaction of pathogenic microorganisms with sialylated cellular receptors. Differences in a2,3- and a2,6-sialoglycan patterns detected in clonal virulent Leishmania donovani promastigotes, correlated with the level of a2,3- and a2,6-sialyltransferase activity present in these parasites. The role of macrophage sialic acid-receptors in uptake and survival of L.donovani was studied in the murine macrophage cell line raw 264.7. Macrophage invasion was dependent on the binding to Siglec-1, while suppression of MAPK signaling was mediated through Siglec-5. Sialic acid removal by neuraminidase treatment reduced parasite infectivity. The presence of trypsin resistant sialic acid residues in the neuraminidase treated parasites grown in a serum free medium in presence of sialoglycoconjugates indicated that the parasites could salvage sialic acid from exogenous sialoglycans and reutilize it for de novo glycoprotein sialylation in L.donovani parasites. Thus, our results demonstrate the involvement of sialoglycans in the invasion as well as the survival process of L.donovani parasites.

  19. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors on muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion levels in the facial nucleus following facial nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangfeng Jiang; Dawei Sun; Rui Zhou; Fugao Zhu; Yanqing Wang; Xiuming Wan; Banghua Liu

    2011-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors and nicotine receptors can increase free calcium ion levels in the facial nucleus via different channels following facial nerve injury. In addition, γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors have been shown to negatively regulate free calcium ion levels in the facial nucleus by inhibiting nicotine receptors. The present study investigated the influence of GABAA, γ-aminobutyric acid B (GABAB) and C (GABAC) receptors on muscarinic receptors in rats with facial nerve injury by confocal laser microscopy. GABAA and GABAB receptors exhibited significant dose-dependent inhibitory effects on increased muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion levels following facial nerve injury. Results showed that GABAA and GABAB receptors negatively regulate muscarinic receptor effects and interplay with cholinergic receptors to regulate free calcium ion levels for facial neural regeneration.

  20. Regulation of LXR by fatty acids, insulin, growth hormone and tumor necrosis factor-α in rainbow trout myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Garcia, Lourdes; Sánchez-Gurmaches, Joan; Gutiérrez, Joaquim; Navarro, Isabel

    2011-10-01

    The liver X receptor (LXR) has recently been described in salmonids. In mammals, this receptor is already known as a transcriptional factor that regulates diverse aspects of cholesterol, fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism in various tissues, including muscle. Here we examined LXR in trout myocytes. For this purpose, we analyzed LXR target gene expression and gene profile during myocyte development. In addition, we studied the transcriptional regulation of LXR by hormones, a pro-inflammatory mediator and unsaturated fatty acids. Trout myocytes were incubated with LXR agonists (T091317, 22(R)-hydroxycholesterol) and unsaturated fatty acids for 24h. Furthermore, differentiated myocytes were incubated with insulin and growth hormone (GH) for 3h, 6h and 18h, and with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) for 24h. Samples were also obtained in various stages of cell differentiation. Our results demonstrate that lipoprotein lipase (LPL), fatty acid synthase (FAS), ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α and β (PPARα, β) are target genes of LXR in trout muscle. LXR agonists increased LXR expression, thereby indicating that this receptor is autoregulated. Unsaturated fatty acids downregulated LXR gene expression. This observation suggests a regulatory mechanism of these molecules on LXR-mediated fatty acid synthesis and uptake. TNFα did not modulate LXR gene transcription. Expression of the LXR gene was activated by insulin and GH. These results suggest that LXR may play a lipogenic role through insulin stimulation and a tendency to promote anabolic effects through GH on trout myocytes.

  1. Macrophage-mediated tumor cytotoxicity: role of macrophage surface sialic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, D J

    1983-02-01

    Cell surface sialic acid levels were compared for monocytes and macrophages obtained from normal volunteers and breast cancer patients. Equal quantities of sialic acid were found on the monocytes obtained from normal volunteers and breast cancer patients. Approximately 60% more cell surface sialic acid was found on the macrophages from breast cancer patients than was found on the macrophages from normal volunteers. In order to determine whether cell surface sialic acid had any effect on macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity, macrophages were pretreated with neuraminidase (NANAse) prior to co-cultivation with tumor cells. The normal macrophages, after neuraminidase treatment, no longer retained their ability to kill tumor cells. However, when macrophages from breast cancer patients were treated with NANAse, no difference was observed in the ability of untreated and NANAse treated macrophages to kill tumor cells.

  2. Transcriptional regulation of lycopene metabolism mediated by rootstock during the ripening of grafted watermelons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Qiusheng; Yuan, Jingxian; Gao, Lingyun; Liu, Peng; Cao, Lei; Huang, Yuan; Zhao, Liqiang; Lv, Huifang; Bie, Zhilong

    2017-01-01

    Rootstocks have comprehensive effects on lycopene accumulation in grafted watermelon fruits. However, little is known about lycopene metabolic regulation in grafted watermelon. To address this problem, parallel changes in lycopene contents and the expression of its metabolic genes were analyzed during the fruit ripening of nongrafted watermelon and watermelon grafted onto bottle gourd, pumpkin, and wild watermelon. Results showed that rootstocks mediated the transcriptional regulations of lycopene accumulation in different ways. Bottle gourd and wild watermelon promoted lycopene accumulation in grafted watermelon fruits by upregulating the biosynthetic genes phytoene synthase (PSY) and ζ-carotene desaturase (ZDS), and downregulating the catabolic genes β-carotene hydroxylase (CHYB), zeaxanthin epoxidase (ZEP), 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED), and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD). However, pumpkin did not affect lycopene accumulation by upregulating both biosynthetic and catabolic genes. The rootstock-dependent characteristic of lycopene accumulation in grafted watermelon fruits provided an alternative model for investigating lycopene metabolic regulation.

  3. PI3K/AKT and ERK regulate retinoic acid-induced neuroblastoma cellular differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Jingbo [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Paul, Pritha; Lee, Sora [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Qiao, Lan; Josifi, Erlena; Tiao, Joshua R. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Chung, Dai H., E-mail: dai.chung@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Retinoic acid (RA) induces neuroblastoma cells differentiation, which is accompanied by G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RA resulted in neuroblastoma cell survival and inhibition of DNA fragmentation; this is regulated by PI3K pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RA activates PI3K and ERK1/2 pathway; PI3K pathway mediates RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulation of p21 is necessary for RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. -- Abstract: Neuroblastoma, the most common extra-cranial solid tumor in infants and children, is characterized by a high rate of spontaneous remissions in infancy. Retinoic acid (RA) has been known to induce neuroblastoma differentiation; however, the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways that are responsible for RA-mediated neuroblastoma cell differentiation remain unclear. Here, we sought to determine the cell signaling processes involved in RA-induced cellular differentiation. Upon RA administration, human neuroblastoma cell lines, SK-N-SH and BE(2)-C, demonstrated neurite extensions, which is an indicator of neuronal cell differentiation. Moreover, cell cycle arrest occurred in G1/G0 phase. The protein levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21 and p27{sup Kip}, which inhibit cell proliferation by blocking cell cycle progression at G1/S phase, increased after RA treatment. Interestingly, RA promoted cell survival during the differentiation process, hence suggesting a potential mechanism for neuroblastoma resistance to RA therapy. Importantly, we found that the PI3K/AKT pathway is required for RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Our results elucidated the molecular mechanism of RA-induced neuroblastoma cellular differentiation, which may be important for developing novel therapeutic strategy against poorly differentiated neuroblastoma.

  4. The Pepper CaOSR1 Protein Regulates the Osmotic Stress Response via Abscisic Acid Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chanmi; Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Sung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms, and their growth and development is detrimentally affected by environmental stresses such as drought and high salinity. Defense mechanisms are tightly regulated and complex processes, which respond to changing environmental conditions; however, the precise mechanisms that function under adverse conditions remain unclear. Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of the CaOSR1 gene, which functions in the adaptive response to abiotic stress. We found that CaOSR1 gene expression in pepper leaves was up-regulated after exposure to abscisic acid (ABA), drought, and high salinity. In addition, we demonstrated that the fusion protein of CaOSR1 with green fluorescent protein (GFP) is localized in the nucleus. We used CaOSR1-silenced pepper plants and CaOSR1-OX-overexpressing (OX) transgenic Arabidopsis plants to show that the CaOSR1 protein regulates the osmotic stress response. CaOSR1-silenced pepper plants showed increased drought susceptibility, and this was accompanied by a high transpiration rate. CaOSR1-OX plants displayed phenotypes that were hypersensitive to ABA and hyposensitive to osmotic stress, during the seed germination and seedling growth stages; furthermore, these plants exhibited enhanced drought tolerance at the adult stage, and this was characterized by higher leaf temperatures and smaller stomatal apertures because of ABA hypersensitivity. Taken together, our data indicate that CaOSR1 positively regulates osmotic stress tolerance via ABA-mediated cell signaling. These findings suggest an involvement of a novel protein in ABA and osmotic stress signalings in plants.

  5. Parent Emotion Socialization Practices and Child Self-regulation as Predictors of Child Anxiety: The Mediating Role of Cardiac Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sarah R; Woodruff-Borden, Janet

    2015-08-01

    The importance of the parent-child relationship in emotional development is well supported. The parental role of facilitating a child's self-regulation may provide a more focused approach for examining the role of parenting in child anxiety. The current study hypothesized that parent emotion socialization practices would predict a child's abilities in self-regulation. Given that physiological arousal has been implicated in emotional development, this was hypothesized to mediate the relationship between parental emotion socialization and child emotion regulation to predict child anxiety. Eighty-five parent and child dyads participated in the study. Parents reporting higher degrees of unsupportive emotion socialization were more likely to have children with fewer abilities in emotion regulation. Cardiac responsiveness mediated the relationship between unsupportive emotion socialization and child emotion regulation. The model of cardiac responsiveness mediating the relationship between unsupportive emotion socialization and child emotion regulation failed to reach statistical significance in predicting child anxiety symptoms.

  6. Rosmarinic acid is a homoserine lactone mimic produced by plants that activates a bacterial quorum-sensing regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral-Lugo, Andrés; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Ortega, Alvaro; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel; Krell, Tino

    2016-01-05

    Quorum sensing is a bacterial communication mechanism that controls genes, enabling bacteria to live as communities, such as biofilms. Homoserine lactone (HSL) molecules function as quorum-sensing signals for Gram-negative bacteria. Plants also produce previously unidentified compounds that affect quorum sensing. We identified rosmarinic acid as a plant-derived compound that functioned as an HSL mimic. In vitro assays showed that rosmarinic acid bound to the quorum-sensing regulator RhlR of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and competed with the bacterial ligand N-butanoyl-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL). Furthermore, rosmarinic acid stimulated a greater increase in RhlR-mediated transcription in vitro than that of C4-HSL. In P. aeruginosa, rosmarinic acid induced quorum sensing-dependent gene expression and increased biofilm formation and the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and elastase. Because P. aeruginosa PAO1 infection induces rosmarinic acid secretion from plant roots, our results indicate that rosmarinic acid secretion is a plant defense mechanism to stimulate a premature quorum-sensing response. P. aeruginosa is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects plants and animals; therefore, identification of rosmarinic acid as an inducer of premature quorum-sensing responses may be useful in agriculture and inform human therapeutic strategies.

  7. MicroRNA-30b-mediated regulation of catalase expression in human ARPE-19 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashidul Haque

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxidative injury to retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and retinal photoreceptors has been linked to a number of retinal diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Reactive oxygen species (ROS-mediated gene expression has been extensively studied at transcriptional levels. Also, the post-transcriptional control of gene expression at the level of translational regulation has been recently reported. However, the microRNA (miRNA/miR-mediated post-transcriptional regulation in human RPE cells has not been thoroughly looked at. Increasing evidence points to a potential role of miRNAs in diverse physiological processes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrated for the first time in a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19 that the post-transcriptional control of gene expression via miRNA modulation regulates human catalase, an important and potent component of cell's antioxidant defensive network, which detoxifies hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 radicals. Exposure to several stress-inducing agents including H(2O(2 has been reported to alter miRNA expression profile. Here, we demonstrated that a sublethal dose of H(2O(2 (200 µM up-regulated the expression of miR-30b, a member of the miR-30 family, which inhibited the expression of endogenous catalase both at the transcript and protein levels. However, antisense (antagomirs of miR-30b was not only found to suppress the miR-30b mimics-mediated inhibitions, but also to dramatically increase the expression of catalase even under an oxidant environment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that a microRNA antisense approach could enhance cytoprotective mechanisms against oxidative stress by increasing the antioxidant defense system.

  8. Regulation of Water Deficit-Induced Abscisic Acid Accumulation by Apoplastic Ascorbic Acid in Maize Seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Fang HU; Gui-Fen LI; Zhi-Hui GAO; Lin CHEN; Hui-Bo REN; Wen-Suo JIA

    2005-01-01

    Water deficit-induced abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation is one of the most important stress signaling pathways in plant cells. Redox regulation of cellular signaling has currently attracted particular attention, but much less is known about its roles and mechanisms in plant signaling. Herein, we report that water deficit-induced ABA accumulation could be regulated by ascorbic acid (AA)-controlled redox status in leave apoplast. The AA content in non-stressed leaves was approximately 3 μmol/g FW, corresponding to a mean concentration of 3 mmol/L in a whole cell. Because AA is mainly localized in the cytosol and chloroplasts, the volume of which is much smaller than that of the whole cell, AA content in cytosolic and chloroplast compartments should be much higher than 3 mmol/L. Water deficit-induced ABA accumulation in both leaf and root tissues of maize seedlings was significantly inhibited by AA and reduced glutathione (GSH) at concentrations of 500 μmol/L and was completely blocked by 50 mmol/L AA and GSH. These results suggest that the AA-induced inhibition of ABA accumulation should not occur at sites where AA exists in high concentrations. Although water deficit led to a small increase in the dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) content, no significant changes in AA content were observed in either leaf or root tissues. When compared with the whole leaf cell, the AA content in the apoplastic compartment was much lower (i.e.approximately 70 nmol/g FW, corresponding to 0.7 mmol/L). Water deficit induced a significant decrease (approximately 2.5-fold) in the AA content and an increase (approximately 3.4-fold) in the DHA content in the apoplastic compartment, thus leading to a considerably decreased redox status there, which may have contributed to the relief of AA-induced inhibition of ABA accumulation, alternatively, promoting water deficit-induced ABA accumulation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) could not mimic water deficit in inducing ABA accumulation, suggesting that

  9. Epigenome mapping highlights chromatin-mediated gene regulation in the protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min-Ji; Kim, Mikyoung; Choi, Yeeun; Yi, Myung-hee; Kim, Juri; Park, Soon-Jung; Yong, Tai-Soon; Kim, Hyoung-Pyo

    2017-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is an extracellular flagellated protozoan parasite that causes trichomoniasis, one of the most common non-viral sexually transmitted diseases. To survive and to maintain infection, T. vaginalis adapts to a hostile host environment by regulating gene expression. However, the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation are poorly understood for this parasite. Histone modification has a marked effect on chromatin structure and directs the recruitment of transcriptional machinery, thereby regulating essential cellular processes. In this study, we aimed to outline modes of chromatin-mediated gene regulation in T. vaginalis. Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) alters global transcriptional responses and induces hyperacetylation of histones and hypermethylation of H3K4. Analysis of the genome of T. vaginalis revealed that a number of enzymes regulate histone modification, suggesting that epigenetic mechanisms are important to controlling gene expression in this organism. Additionally, we describe the genome-wide localization of two histone H3 modifications (H3K4me3 and H3K27Ac), which we found to be positively associated with active gene expression in both steady and dynamic transcriptional states. These results provide the first direct evidence that histone modifications play an essential role in transcriptional regulation of T. vaginalis, and may help guide future epigenetic research into therapeutic intervention strategies against this parasite. PMID:28345651

  10. Emotional Regulation and Depression: A Potential Mediator between Heart and Mind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Compare

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A narrative review of the major evidence concerning the relationship between emotional regulation and depression was conducted. The literature demonstrates a mediating role of emotional regulation in the development of depression and physical illness. Literature suggests in fact that the employment of adaptive emotional regulation strategies (e.g., reappraisal causes a reduction of stress-elicited emotions leading to physical disorders. Conversely, dysfunctional emotional regulation strategies and, in particular, rumination and emotion suppression appear to be influential in the pathogenesis of depression and physiological disease. More specifically, the evidence suggests that depression and rumination affect both cognitive (e.g., impaired ability to process negative information and neurobiological mechanisms (e.g., hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis overactivation and higher rates of cortisol production. Understanding the factors that govern the variety of health outcomes that different people experience following exposure to stress has important implications for the development of effective emotion-regulation interventional approaches (e.g., mindfulness-based therapy, emotion-focused therapy, and emotion regulation therapy.

  11. Arabidopsis and Tobacco superman regulate hormone signalling and mediate cell proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nibau, Candida; Di Stilio, Verónica S; Wu, Hen-Ming; Cheung, Alice Y

    2011-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana superman (SUP) plays an important role during flower development by maintaining the boundary between stamens and carpels in the inner two whorls. It was proposed that SUP maintains this boundary by regulating cell proliferation in both whorls, as loss-of-function superman mutants produce more stamens at the expense of carpels. However, the cellular mechanism that underlies SUP function remains unknown. Here Arabidopsis or tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) SUP was overexpressed in tobacco plants to substantiate SUP's role as a regulator of cell proliferation and boundary definition and provide evidence that its biological role may be mediated via hormonal changes. It was found that moderate levels of SUP stimulated cell growth and proliferation, whereas high levels were inhibitory. SUP stimulated auxin- and cytokinin-regulated processes, and cells overexpressing SUP displayed reduced hormone dependency for proliferation and regeneration into plants. SUP also induced proliferation of female traits in the second and third flower whorls and promoted differentiation of petaloid properties in sepals, further supporting a role for SUP as a boundary regulator. Moreover, cytokinin suppressed stamen development and promoted differentiation of carpeloid tissues, suggesting that SUP may regulate male and female development via its effect on cytokinin signalling. Taken together, these observations suggest a model whereby the effect of SUP on cell growth and proliferation involves the modulation of auxin- and cytokinin-regulated processes. Furthermore, differential SUP expression or different sensitivities of different cell types to SUP may determine whether SUP stimulates or suppresses their proliferation.

  12. Regulation of Serum Response Factor and Adiponectin by PPARγ Agonist Docosahexaenoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton Johnson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that significant health benefits involving the regulation of signaling proteins result from the consumption of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs. Serum response factor (SRF is involved in transcriptional regulation of muscle growth and differentiation. SRF levels are increased in the aging heart muscle. It has not been examined whether SRF is made by adipocytes and whether SRF secretion by adipocytes is modulated by PPARγ agonist DHA. Adiponectin is made exclusively by adipocytes. We and others have previously reported that PUFAs such as DHA increase adiponectin levels and secretion in adipocytes. Here we show that DHA downregulates SRF with a simultaneous upregulation of adiponectin and that both these responses are reversible by PPARγ antagonist. Furthermore, there appears to be a direct relationship between DHA exposure and increased levels of membrane-associated high-density adiponectin, as well as lower levels of membrane-associated SRF. Thus, we find that the levels of SRF and adiponectin are inversely related in response to treatment with PPARγ agonist DHA. Decreased levels of SRF along with increase in membrane-associated adiponectin could in part mediate the health benefits of DHA.

  13. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 regulates salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent responses via EDS1 and PAD4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Klaus Peter; Petersen, Morten; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2006-01-01

    Arabidopsis MPK4 has been implicated in plant defense regulation because mpk4 knockout plants exhibit constitutive activation of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defenses, but fail to induce jasmonic acid (JA) defense marker genes in response to JA. We show here that mpk4 mutants are also defective...

  14. Substrate Stiffness Regulates Proinflammatory Mediator Production through TLR4 Activity in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previtera, Michelle L.; Sengupta, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    Clinical data show that disease adversely affects tissue elasticity or stiffness. While macrophage activity plays a critical role in driving disease pathology, there are limited data available on the effects of tissue stiffness on macrophage activity. In this study, the effects of substrate stiffness on inflammatory mediator production by macrophages were investigated. Bone marrow–derived macrophages were grown on polyacrylamide gels that mimicked the stiffness of a variety of soft biological tissues. Overall, macrophages grown on soft substrates produced less proinflammatory mediators than macrophages grown on stiff substrates when the endotoxin LPS was added to media. In addition, the pathways involved in stiffness–regulated proinflammation were investigated. The TLR4 signaling pathway was examined by evaluating TLR4, p–NF–κB p65, MyD88, and p–IκBα expression as well as p–NF–κB p65 translocation. Expression and translocation of the various signaling molecules were higher in macrophages grown on stiff substrates than on soft substrates. Furthermore, TLR4 knockout experiments showed that TLR4 activity enhanced proinflammation on stiff substrates. In conclusion, these results suggest that proinflammatory mediator production initiated by TLR4 is mechanically regulated in macrophages. PMID:26710072

  15. HAb18G/CD147 regulates vinculin-mediated focal adhesion and cytoskeleton organization in cultured human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liang

    Full Text Available Focal adhesions (FAs, integrin-mediated macromolecular complexes located at the cell membrane extracellular interface, have been shown to regulate cell adhesion and migration. Our previous studies have indicated that HAb18G/CD147 (CD147 is involved in cytoskeleton reorganization and FA formation in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cells. However, the precise mechanisms underlying these processes remain unclear. In the current study, we determined that CD147 was involved in vinculin-mediated FA focal adhesion formation in HCC cells. We also found that deletion of CD147 led to reduced vinculin-mediated FA areas (P<0.0001, length/width ratios (P<0.0001, and mean intensities (P<0.0001. CD147 promoted lamellipodia formation by localizing Arp2/3 to the leading edge of the cell. Deletion of CD147 significantly reduced the fluorescence (t1/2 recovery times (22.7±3.3 s of vinculin-mediated focal adhesions (P<0.0001. In cell-spreading assays, CD147 was found to be essential for dynamic focal adhesion enlargement and disassembly. Furthermore, the current data showed that CD147 reduced tyrosine phosphorylation in vinculin-mediated focal adhesions, and enhanced the accumulation of the acidic phospholipid phosphatidylinositol-4, 5-bisphosphate (PIP2. Together, these results revealed that CD147 is involved in vinculin-mediated focal adhesion formation, which subsequently promotes cytoskeleton reorganization to facilitate invasion and migration of human HCC cells.

  16. Okadaic acid and trifluoperazine enhance Agrobacterium-mediated transformation in eastern white pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei; Lin, Jinxing; Newton, Ronald J

    2007-05-01

    Mature zygotic embryos of recalcitrant Christmas tree species eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) were used as explants for Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain GV3101-mediated transformation using the uidA (beta-Glucuronidase) gene as a reporter. Influence of the time of sonication and the concentrations of protein phosphatase inhibitor (okadaic acid) and kinase inhibitor (trifluoperazine) on Agrobacterium-mediated transformation have been evaluated. A high transformation frequency was obtained after embryos were sonicated for 45-50 s, or treated with 1.5-2.0 microM okadaic acid or treated with 100-200 microM trifluoperazine, respectively. Protein phosphatase and kinase inhibitors enhance Agrobacterium-mediated transformation in eastern white pine. A 2-3.5-fold higher rate of hygromycin-resistant callus was obtained with an addition of 2 microM okadaic acid or 150 microM trifluoperazine or sonicated embryos for 45 s. Stable integration of the uidA gene in the plant genome of eastern white pine was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern and northern blot analyses. These results demonstrated that a stable and enhanced transformation system has been established in eastern white pine and this system would provide an opportunity to transfer economically important genes into this Christmas tree species.

  17. Direct interaction between GluR2 and GAPDH regulates AMPAR-mediated excitotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Min

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over-activation of AMPARs (α−amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid subtype glutamate receptors is implicated in excitotoxic neuronal death associated with acute brain insults, such as ischemic stroke. However, the specific molecular mechanism by which AMPARs, especially the calcium-impermeable AMPARs, induce neuronal death remains poorly understood. Here we report the identification of a previously unrecognized molecular pathway involving a direct protein-protein interaction that underlies GluR2-containing AMPAR-mediated excitotoxicity. Agonist stimulation of AMPARs promotes GluR2/GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase complex formation and subsequent internalization. Disruption of GluR2/GAPDH interaction by administration of an interfering peptide prevents AMPAR-mediated excitotoxicity and protects against damage induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD, an in vitro model of brain ischemia.

  18. Metabolic pathways regulated by abscisic acid, salicylic acid and γ-aminobutyric acid in association with improved drought tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Jingjin; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2017-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid (SA) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are known to play roles in regulating plant stress responses. This study was conducted to determine metabolites and associated pathways regulated by ABA, SA and GABA that could contribute to drought tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera). Plants were foliar sprayed with ABA (5 μM), GABA (0.5 mM) and SA (10 μM) or water (untreated control) prior to 25 days drought stress in controlled growth chambers. Application of ABA, GABA or SA had similar positive effects on alleviating drought damages, as manifested by the maintenance of lower electrolyte leakage and greater relative water content in leaves of treated plants relative to the untreated control. Metabolic profiling showed that ABA, GABA and SA induced differential metabolic changes under drought stress. ABA mainly promoted the accumulation of organic acids associated with tricarboxylic acid cycle (aconitic acid, succinic acid, lactic acid and malic acid). SA strongly stimulated the accumulation of amino acids (proline, serine, threonine and alanine) and carbohydrates (glucose, mannose, fructose and cellobiose). GABA enhanced the accumulation of amino acids (GABA, glycine, valine, proline, 5-oxoproline, serine, threonine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid) and organic acids (malic acid, lactic acid, gluconic acid, malonic acid and ribonic acid). The enhanced drought tolerance could be mainly due to the enhanced respiration metabolism by ABA, amino acids and carbohydrates involved in osmotic adjustment (OA) and energy metabolism by SA, and amino acid metabolism related to OA and stress-defense secondary metabolism by GABA.

  19. Antagonism between abscisic acid and gibberellins is partially mediated by ascorbic acid during seed germination in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Nenghui; Zhang, Jianhua

    2012-05-01

    The antagonism between abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellin (GA) plays a key role in controlling seed germination, but the mechanism of antagonism during this process is not known. In the associated study, we investigated the relationship among ABA, reactive oxygen species (ROS), ascorbic acid (ASC) and GA during rice seed germination. ROS production is reduced by ABA, which hence results in decreasing ASC accumulation during imbibition. GA accumulation was also suppressed by a reduced ROS and ASC level, whereas application of exogenous ASC can partially rescue seed germination from ABA treatment. Further results show that production of ASC, which acts as a substrate in GA biosynthesis, was significantly inhibited by lycorine which thus suppressed the accumulation of GA. Consequently, expression of GA biosynthesis genes was suppressed by the low levels of ROS and ASC in ABA-treated seeds. These studies reveal a new role for ASC in mediating the antagonism between ABA and GA during seed germination in rice.

  20. Defluoridation of water using dicarboxylic acids mediated chitosan-polyaniline/zirconium biopolymeric complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu Prabhu, Subbaiah; Meenakshi, Sankaran

    2016-04-01

    The present investigation describes the preparation of hydrogen bonded chitosan-polyaniline/zirconium biopolymeric matrix by grafting method under dicarboxylic acid medium for the removal of fluoride, first time. Herein, the dicarboxylic acids, oxalic acid, malonic acid, succinic acid were used as medium. The synthesized complex was characterized by usual analytical techniques like FTIR, XRD, SEM and EDAX analysis. From the batch equilibrium experiments, the maximum defluoridation capacity (DC) was found to be 8.713 mg/g at room temperature with the minimum contact time of 24 min at 100mg of the sorbent dosage. The temperature study results of adsorption kinetics showed the adsorption behavior could be better described by the pseudo-second-order equation than pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The adsorption isotherm was well fitted by the Freundlich equation rather than Langmuir and D-R isotherms. The mechanism of fluoride removal was ligand exchange at neutral pH and electrostatic attraction at acidic pH of the medium. Regeneration studies were carried out to identify the best regenerant which makes the process cost-effective. Conclusions of this work demonstrate the potential applicability of the dicarboxylic acid mediated chitosan-polyaniline/zirconium complex as an effective adsorbent for fluoride removal from water.

  1. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia U937 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Un-Ho; Song, Kwon-Ho; Motomura, Muneo; Suzuki, Ikukatsu; Gu, Yeun-Hwa; Kang, Yun-Jeong; Moon, Tae-Chul; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2008-03-01

    Caffeic acid phenyl ester (CAPE), a biologically active ingredient of propolis, has several interesting biological properties including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, immunostimulatory, anti-angiogenic, anti-invasive, anti-metastatic and carcinostatic activities. Recently, several groups have reported that CAPE is cytotoxic to tumor cells but not to normal cells. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of CAPE-induced apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia U937 cells. Treatment of U937 cells with CAPE decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. DNA fragmentation assay revealed the typical ladder profile of oligonucleosomal fragments in CAPE-treated U937 cells. In addition, as evidenced by the nuclear DAPI staining experiment, we observed that the nuclear condensation, a typical phenotype of apoptosis, was found in U937 cells treated with 5 microg/ml of CAPE. Therefore, it was suggested that CAPE is a potent agent inducing apoptosis in U937 cells. Apoptotic action of the CAPE was accompanied by release of cytochrome C, reduction of Bcl-2 expression, increase of Bax expression, activation/cleavage of caspase-3 and activation/cleavage of PARP in U937 cells, but not by Fas protein, an initial mediator in the death signaling, or by phospho-eIF2 alpha and CHOP, crucial mediators in ER-mediated apoptosis. From the results, it was concluded that CAPE induces the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis but not death receptors- or ER-mediated apoptosis in U937 cells.

  2. Experiential Avoidance Mediates the Association between Emotion Regulation Abilities and Loneliness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Rui; Zhang, Shilei; Zhang, Qianwen; Fu, Shaoping; Wang, Zhenhong

    2016-01-01

    Experiential avoidance (EA) involves the unwillingness to remain in contact with aversive experiences such as painful feelings, thoughts, and emotions. EA is often associated with the development and maintenance of emotional problems. Since loneliness is characterized by negative emotions such as sadness and pessimism, which is often linked to emotional problems, this study aims to test the mediating effects of EA on the relationship between emotion regulation abilities (ERA) and loneliness in a sample of Chinese adults. Five hundred undergraduates completed questionnaires measuring EA (Acceptance and Action Questionnaire; AAQ-Ⅱ), ERA (Failure-relate action orientation; Action Control Scale, ACS-90) and loneliness (UCLA Loneliness Scale). Structural equation modeling showed that EA fully-mediated the relationship between ERA and loneliness. The findings suggest EA is a key mechanism in explaining why people with high ERA are prone to feeling lower levels of loneliness. In particular, these findings have important implications for designing effective psychological interventions for loneliness. PMID:28030586

  3. Experiential Avoidance Mediates the Association between Emotion Regulation Abilities and Loneliness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Rui; Zhang, Shilei; Zhang, Qianwen; Fu, Shaoping; Wang, Zhenhong

    2016-01-01

    Experiential avoidance (EA) involves the unwillingness to remain in contact with aversive experiences such as painful feelings, thoughts, and emotions. EA is often associated with the development and maintenance of emotional problems. Since loneliness is characterized by negative emotions such as sadness and pessimism, which is often linked to emotional problems, this study aims to test the mediating effects of EA on the relationship between emotion regulation abilities (ERA) and loneliness in a sample of Chinese adults. Five hundred undergraduates completed questionnaires measuring EA (Acceptance and Action Questionnaire; AAQ-Ⅱ), ERA (Failure-relate action orientation; Action Control Scale, ACS-90) and loneliness (UCLA Loneliness Scale). Structural equation modeling showed that EA fully-mediated the relationship between ERA and loneliness. The findings suggest EA is a key mechanism in explaining why people with high ERA are prone to feeling lower levels of loneliness. In particular, these findings have important implications for designing effective psychological interventions for loneliness.

  4. Regulation of Noxa-mediated apoptosis in Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Suvasmita; Das, Lopamudra; Kokate, Shrikant Babanrao; Pratheek, B M; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Goswami, Chandan; Chattopadhyay, Ranajoy; Crowe, Sheila Eileen; Bhattacharyya, Asima

    2015-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori induces the antiapoptotic protein myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl1) in human gastric epithelial cells (GECs). Apoptosis of oncogenic protein Mcl1-expressing cells is mainly regulated by Noxa-mediated degradation of Mcl1. We wanted to elucidate the status of Noxa in H. pylori-infected GECs. For this, various GECs such as AGS, MKN45, and KATO III were either infected with H. pylori or left uninfected. The effect of infection was examined by immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, in vitro binding assay, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy. Infected GECs, surgical samples collected from patients with gastric adenocarcinoma as well as biopsy samples from patients infected with H. pylori showed significant up-regulation of both Mcl1 and Noxa compared with noninfected samples. Coexistence of Mcl1 and Noxa was indicative of an impaired Mcl-Noxa interaction. We proved that Noxa was phosphorylated at Ser(13) residue by JNK in infected GECs, which caused cytoplasmic retention of Noxa. JNK inhibition enhanced Mcl1-Noxa interaction in the mitochondrial fraction of infected cells, whereas overexpression of nonphosphorylatable Noxa resulted in enhanced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in the infected epithelium. Because phosphorylation-dephosphorylation can regulate the apoptotic function of Noxa, this could be a potential target molecule for future treatment approaches for H. pylori-induced gastric cancer.

  5. UCP2 Regulates Embryonic Neurogenesis via ROS-mediated Yap Alternation in the Developing Neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Fen; Shen, Tianjin; Zou, Wenzheng; Jiao, Jianwei

    2017-03-09

    Mitochondrial metabolism is a fundamental process in tissue development. How this process play functions in embryonic neurogenesis remains largely unknown. Here, we show that mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) regulates the embryonic neurogenesis by inhibiting the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which affect the proliferation of progenitors. In the embryonic brains of UCP2 knockdown or condition knockout mice, the proliferation of progenitors is significantly increased, while the differentiation of progenitors is reduced. Furthermore, we identify that Yap is the response protein of UCP2 mediated ROS production. When UCP2 is inactive, the production of ROS are increased. The amount of Yap protein is increased as Yap degradation through ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway is decreased. The defect caused by UCP2 depression can be rescued by Yap down-regulation. Collectively, our results demonstrate that UCP2 regulates embryonic neurogenesis through ROS-mediated Yap alternation, thus shedding new sight on mitochondrial metabolism involved in embryonic neurogenesis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Drosophila CK1-γ, gilgamesh, controls PCP-mediated morphogenesis through regulation of vesicle trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gault, William J; Olguin, Patricio; Weber, Ursula; Mlodzik, Marek

    2012-03-05

    Cellular morphogenesis, including polarized outgrowth, promotes tissue shape and function. Polarized vesicle trafficking has emerged as a fundamental mechanism by which protein and membrane can be targeted to discrete subcellular domains to promote localized protrusions. Frizzled (Fz)/planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling orchestrates cytoskeletal polarization and drives morphogenetic changes in such contexts as the vertebrate body axis and external Drosophila melanogaster tissues. Although regulation of Fz/PCP signaling via vesicle trafficking has been identified, the interplay between the vesicle trafficking machinery and downstream terminal PCP-directed processes is less established. In this paper, we show that Drosophila CK1-γ/gilgamesh (gish) regulates the PCP-associated process of trichome formation through effects on Rab11-mediated vesicle recycling. Although the core Fz/PCP proteins dictate prehair formation broadly, CK1-γ/gish restricts nucleation to a single site. Moreover, CK1-γ/gish works in parallel with the Fz/PCP effector multiple wing hairs, which restricts prehair formation along the perpendicular axis to Gish. Our findings suggest that polarized Rab11-mediated vesicle trafficking regulated by CK1-γ is required for PCP-directed processes.

  7. Msh homeobox genes regulate cadherin-mediated cell adhesion and cell-cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincecum, J M; Fannon, A; Song, K; Wang, Y; Sassoon, D A

    1998-07-01

    Msx-1 and Msx-2 are two closely related homeobox genes expressed in cephalic neural crest tooth buds, the optic cup endocardial cushions, and the developing limb [Hill and Davidson, 1991; Monaghan et al., 1991; Robert et al., 1991]. These sites correspond to regions of active cell segregation and proliferation under the influence of epithelial-mesenchymal cell interactions [Brown et al., 1993; Davidson et al., 1991], suggesting that Msx-1 and Msx-2 regulate cell-cell interactions. We have investigated the potential relationship between expression of the Msh homeobox genes (Msx-1 and Msx-2) and cadherin-mediated cell adhesion and cell sorting. We report that cell lines stably expressing Msx-1 or Msx-2 differentially sort on the basis of Msh gene expression. We demonstrate in vitro that initial cell aggregation involves calcium-dependent adhesion molecules (cadherins) and that Msh genes regulate cadherin-mediated adhesion. These results support the hypothesis that Msh genes play a role in the regulation of cell-cell adhesion and provide a link between the genetic phenomena of homeobox gene expression and cellular events involved in morphogenesis, including cell sorting and proliferation.

  8. [Regulating acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongde; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Rongqing

    2014-07-04

    As cell factories, lactic acid bacteria are widely used in food, agriculture, pharmaceutical and other industries. Acid stress is one the important survival challenges encountered by lactic acid bacteria both in fermentation process and in the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, the development of systems biology and metabolic engineering brings unprecedented opportunity for further elucidating the acid tolerance mechanisms and improving the acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria. This review addresses physiological mechanisms of lactic acid bacteria during acid stress. Moreover, strategies to improve the acid stress resistance of lactic acid were proposed.

  9. Impact of L-FABP and glucose on polyunsaturated fatty acid induction of PPARα-regulated β-oxidative enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Anca D; Huang, Huan; Martin, Gregory G; McIntosh, Avery L; Storey, Stephen M; Landrock, Danilo; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2013-02-01

    Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) is the major soluble protein that binds very-long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) in hepatocytes. However, nothing is known about L-FABP's role in n-3 PUFA-mediated peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα) transcription of proteins involved in long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) β-oxidation. This issue was addressed in cultured primary hepatocytes from wild-type, L-FABP-null, and PPARα-null mice with these major findings: 1) PUFA-mediated increase in the expression of PPARα-regulated LCFA β-oxidative enzymes, LCFA/LCFA-CoA binding proteins (L-FABP, ACBP), and PPARα itself was L-FABP dependent; 2) PPARα transcription, robustly potentiated by high glucose but not maltose, a sugar not taken up, correlated with higher protein levels of these LCFA β-oxidative enzymes and with increased LCFA β-oxidation; and 3) high glucose altered the potency of n-3 relative to n-6 PUFA. This was not due to a direct effect of glucose on PPARα transcriptional activity nor indirectly through de novo fatty acid synthesis from glucose. Synergism was also not due to glucose impacting other signaling pathways, since it was observed only in hepatocytes expressing both L-FABP and PPARα. Ablation of L-FABP or PPARα as well as treatment with MK886 (PPARα inhibitor) abolished/reduced PUFA-mediated PPARα transcription of these genes, especially at high glucose. Finally, the PUFA-enhanced L-FABP distribution into nuclei with high glucose augmentation of the L-FABP/PPARα interaction reveals not only the importance of L-FABP for PUFA induction of PPARα target genes in fatty acid β-oxidation but also the significance of a high glucose enhancement effect in diabetes.

  10. Distinct gut-derived lactic acid bacteria elicit divergent dendritic cell-mediated NK cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Zeuthen, Louise Hjerrild; Christensen, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are abundant in the gastrointestinal tract where they continuously regulate the immune system. NK cells are potently activated by dendritic cells (DCs) matured by inflammatory stimuli, and NK cells are present in the gut epithelium and in mesenteric lymph nodes...

  11. Bile acid effects are mediated by ATP release and purinergic signalling in exocrine pancreatic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowal, Justyna Magdalena; Haanes, Kristian Agmund; Christensen, Nynne;

    2015-01-01

    signalling are other important regulators of similar secretory mechanisms in pancreas. The aim of our study was to elucidate whether there is interplay between ATP and BA signalling. RESULTS: Here we show that CDCA (chenodeoxycholic acid) caused fast and concentration-dependent ATP release from acini (AR42J...

  12. Lithocholic acid induction of the FGF19 promoter in intestinal cells is mediated by PXR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wolfgang Wistuba; Carsten Gnewuch; Gerhard Liebisch; Gerd Schmitz; Thomas Langmann

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of the toxic secondary bile acid lithocholic acid (LCA) on the expression of fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) in intestinal cells and to characterize the pregnane-X-receptor (PXR) response of the FGF19 promoter region.METHODS: The intestinal cell line LS174T was stimulated with various concentrations of chenodeoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid for several time points.FGF19 mRNA levels were determined with quantitative realtime RT-PCR. FGF19 deletion promoter constructs were generated and the LCA response was analzyed in reporter assays. Co-transfections with PXR and RXR were carried out to study FGF19 regulation by these factors.RESULTS: LCA and CDCA strongly up-regulate FGF19 mRNA expression in LS174T cells in a time and dose dependent manner. Using reporter gene assays with several deletion constructs we found that the LCA responsive element in the human FGF19 promoter maps to the proximal regulatory region containing two potential binding sites for PXR. Overexpression of PXR and its dimerization partner retinoid X receptor (RXR) and stimulation with LCA or the potent PXR ligand rifampicin leads to a significant induction of FGF19 promoter activity in intestinal cells.CONCLUSION: LCA induced feedback inhibition of bile acid synthesis in the liver is likely to be regulated by PXR inducing intestinal FGF19 expression.

  13. Stabilizing in vitro ultrasound-mediated gene transfection by regulating cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chia-Wen; Desjouy, Cyril; Chen, Shing-Ru; Lee, Jyun-Lin; Inserra, Claude; Béra, Jean-Christophe; Chen, Wen-Shiang

    2014-03-01

    It is well known that acoustic cavitation can facilitate the inward transport of genetic materials across cell membranes (sonoporation). However, partially due to the unstationary behavior of the initiation and leveling of cavitation, the sonoporation effect is usually unstable, especially in low intensity conditions. A system which is able to regulate the cavitation level during sonication by modulating the applied acoustic intensity with a feedback loop is implemented and its effect on in vitro gene transfection is tested. The regulated system provided better time stability and reproducibility of the cavitation levels than the unregulated conditions. Cultured hepatoma cells (BNL) mixed with 10 μg luciferase plasmids are exposed to 1-MHz pulsed ultrasound with or without cavitation regulation, and the gene transfection efficiency and cell viability are subsequently assessed. Experimental results show that for all exposure intensities (low, medium, and high), stable and intensity dependent, although not higher, gene expression could be achieved in the regulated cavitation system than the unregulated conditions. The cavitation regulation system provides a better control of cavitation and its bioeffect which are crucial important for clinical applications of ultrasound-mediated gene transfection.

  14. DREAM mediated regulation of GCM1 in the human placental trophoblast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Baczyk

    Full Text Available The trophoblast transcription factor glial cell missing-1 (GCM1 regulates differentiation of placental cytotrophoblasts into the syncytiotrophoblast layer in contact with maternal blood. Reduced placental expression of GCM1 and abnormal syncytiotrophoblast structure are features of hypertensive disorder of pregnancy--preeclampsia. In-silico techniques identified the calcium-regulated transcriptional repressor--DREAM (Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator--as a candidate for GCM1 gene expression. Our objective was to determine if DREAM represses GCM1 regulated syncytiotrophoblast formation. EMSA and ChIP assays revealed a direct interaction between DREAM and the GCM1 promoter. siRNA-mediated DREAM silencing in cell culture and placental explant models significantly up-regulated GCM1 expression and reduced cytotrophoblast proliferation. DREAM calcium dependency was verified using ionomycin. Furthermore, the increased DREAM protein expression in preeclamptic placental villi was predominantly nuclear, coinciding with an overall increase in sumolylated DREAM and correlating inversely with GCM1 levels. In conclusion, our data reveal a calcium-regulated pathway whereby GCM1-directed villous trophoblast differentiation is repressed by DREAM. This pathway may be relevant to disease prevention via calcium-supplementation.

  15. Does rumination mediate the relationship between emotion regulation ability and posttraumatic stress disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Ehring

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Trauma-related rumination has been suggested to be involved in the maintenance of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. This view has empirically been supported by extensive evidence using cross-sectional, prospective, and experimental designs. However, it is unclear why trauma survivors engage in rumination despite its negative consequences. The current study aimed to explore the hypothesis that low emotion regulation ability underlies trauma-related rumination. Methods: Emotion regulation ability and trauma-related rumination were assessed in 93 road traffic accident survivors 2 weeks post-trauma. In addition, symptom levels of PTSD were assessed at 2 weeks as well as 1, 3, and 6 months follow-up. Results: Emotion regulation ability was significantly related to trauma-related rumination as well as levels of PTSD symptoms. In addition, the association between low emotion regulation ability and PTSD was mediated by rumination. Conclusions: The findings support the view that rumination is used as a dysfunctional emotion regulation strategy by trauma survivors.

  16. ROTUNDA3 function in plant development by phosphatase 2A-mediated regulation of auxin transporter recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampelias, Michael; Neyt, Pia; De Groeve, Steven; Aesaert, Stijn; Coussens, Griet; Rolčík, Jakub; Bruno, Leonardo; De Winne, Nancy; Van Minnebruggen, Annemie; Van Montagu, Marc; Ponce, María Rosa; Micol, José Luis; Friml, Jiří; De Jaeger, Geert; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke

    2016-03-08

    The shaping of organs in plants depends on the intercellular flow of the phytohormone auxin, of which the directional signaling is determined by the polar subcellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin transport proteins. Phosphorylation dynamics of PIN proteins are affected by the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and the PINOID kinase, which act antagonistically to mediate their apical-basal polar delivery. Here, we identified the ROTUNDA3 (RON3) protein as a regulator of the PP2A phosphatase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana. The RON3 gene was map-based cloned starting from the ron3-1 leaf mutant and found to be a unique, plant-specific gene coding for a protein with high and dispersed proline content. The ron3-1 and ron3-2 mutant phenotypes [i.e., reduced apical dominance, primary root length, lateral root emergence, and growth; increased ectopic stages II, IV, and V lateral root primordia; decreased auxin maxima in indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)-treated root apical meristems; hypergravitropic root growth and response; increased IAA levels in shoot apices; and reduced auxin accumulation in root meristems] support a role for RON3 in auxin biology. The affinity-purified PP2A complex with RON3 as bait suggested that RON3 might act in PIN transporter trafficking. Indeed, pharmacological interference with vesicle trafficking processes revealed that single ron3-2 and double ron3-2 rcn1 mutants have altered PIN polarity and endocytosis in specific cells. Our data indicate that RON3 contributes to auxin-mediated development by playing a role in PIN recycling and polarity establishment through regulation of the PP2A complex activity.

  17. Influence of plant growth regulators on callus mediated regeneration and secondary metabolites synthesis in Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Banerjee, Debarupa; Ghosh, Moumita; Pradhan, Prakash; Gupta, Namrata Shanu; Acharya, Krishnendu; Banerjee, Maitreyi

    2013-01-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal, is an important medicinal plant being the source of extremely important compounds like withanolides and withaferin. Influence of different plant growth regulators (PGRs) were evaluated for induction of callus, callus mediated regeneration and production of secondary metabolites in them. Explants for callusing were collected from plants grown in vitro and maximum callusing (98 %) was obtained on MS medium supplemented with a combination of 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) (0.5 mg l(-1)) and kinetin (KN) (0.2 mg l(-1)). Among different types of calli, best shoot regeneration was observed on green, compact calli produced on MS medium with a combination of 6-benzylamino purine (BAP) and indole butyric acid (IBA). MS medium supplemented with BAP (2 mg l(-1)) showed highest frequency (98 %) of shoot bud regeneration. The micro-shoots were efficiently rooted on MS media supplemented with 0.5 mg l(-1) IBA. Rooted plants were transferred to soil-vermi-compost (1:3; w/w) medium in greenhouse for acclimatization. Presence of withanolide A and withaferin A in calli was validated through high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC). It was interesting to observe that the PGRs showed significant influence on the secondary metabolites production in callus and 2,4-D having the least effect. Histological studies revealed the origin of shoot tip in the callus during regeneration.

  18. c-Cbl regulates αPix-mediated cell migration and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Min Woo; Park, Ji Ho; Yoo, Hee Min; Yang, Seung Wook; Oh, Kyu Hee; Ka, Seung Hyeun; Park, Dong Eun [School of Biological Sciences and Institute for Protein Metabolism, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soon-Tae [Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chin Ha, E-mail: chchung@snu.ac.kr [School of Biological Sciences and Institute for Protein Metabolism, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • c-Cbl ubiquitinates αPix for proteasome-mediated degradation. • C6 and A172 glioma cells lack c-Cbl, which leads to stabilization of αPix. • The accumulated αPix promotes migration and invasion of the cancer cells. • The lack of c-Cbl in the cells appears responsible for their malignant behavior. - Abstract: c-Cbl, a RING-type ubiquitin E3 ligase, down-regulates receptor tyrosine kinases, including EGF receptor, and inhibits cell proliferation. Moreover, c-Cbl mutations are frequently found in patients with myeloid neoplasm. Therefore, c-Cbl is known as a tumor suppressor. αPix is expressed only in highly proliferative and mobile cells, including immune cells, and up-regulated in certain invasive tumors, such as glioblastoma multiforme. Here, we showed that c-Cbl serves as an ubiquitin E3 ligase for proteasome-mediated degradation of αPix, but not βPix. Remarkably, the rat C6 and human A172 glioma cells were unable to express c-Cbl, which leads to a dramatic accumulation of αPix. Depletion of αPix by shRNA markedly reduced the ability of the glioma cells to migrate and invade, whereas complementation of shRNA-insensitive αPix promoted it. These results indicate that c-Cbl negatively regulates αPix-mediated cell migration and invasion and the lack of c-Cbl in the C6 and A172 glioma cells is responsible for their malignant behavior.

  19. cIAP1 regulates TNF-mediated cdc42 activation and filopodia formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marivin, A; Berthelet, J; Cartier, J; Paul, C; Gemble, S; Morizot, A; Boireau, W; Saleh, M; Bertoglio, J; Solary, E; Dubrez, L

    2014-11-27

    Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF) is a cytokine endowed with multiple functions, depending on the cellular and environmental context. TNF receptor engagement induces the formation of a multimolecular complex including the TNFR-associated factor TRAF2, the receptor-interaction protein kinase RIP1 and the cellular inhibitor of apoptosis cIAP1, the latter being essential for NF-κB activation. Here, we show that cIAP1 also regulates TNF-induced actin cytoskeleton reorganization through a cdc42-dependent, NF-κB-independent pathway. Deletion of cIAP1 prevents TNF-induced filopodia and cdc42 activation. The expression of cIAP1 or its E3-ubiquitin ligase-defective mutant restores the ability of cIAP1(-/-) MEFs to produce filopodia, whereas a cIAP1 mutant unable to bind TRAF2 does not. Accordingly, the silencing of TRAF2 inhibits TNF-mediated filopodia formation, whereas silencing of RIP1 does not. cIAP1 directly binds cdc42 and promotes its RhoGDIα-mediated stabilization. TNF decreases cIAP1-cdc42 interaction, suggesting that TNF-induced recruitment of cIAP1/TRAF2 to the receptor releases cdc42, which in turn triggers actin remodeling. cIAP1 also regulates cdc42 activation in response to EGF and HRas-V12 expression. A downregulation of cIAP1 altered the cell polarization, the cell adhesion to endothelial cells and cell intercalation, which are cdc42-dependent processes. Finally, we demonstrated that the deletion of cIAP1 regulated the HRas-V12-mediated transformation process, including anchorage-dependent cell growth, tumour growth in a xenograft model and the development of experimental metastasis in the lung.

  20. Regulation of Ceramide Synthase-Mediated Crypt Epithelium Apoptosis by DNA Damage Repair Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotolo, Jimmy A.; Mesicek, Judith; Maj, Jerzy; Truman, Jean-Philip; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Kolesnick, Richard; Fuks, Zvi

    2015-01-01

    Acute endothelial cell apoptosis and microvascular compromise couple GI tract irradiation to reproductive death of intestinal crypt stem cell clonogens (SCCs) following high-dose radiation. Genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of endothelial apoptosis prevents intestinal damage, but as the radiation dose is escalated, SCCs become directly susceptible to an alternate cell death mechanism, mediated via ceramide synthase (CS)-stimulated de novo synthesis of the pro-apoptotic sphingolipid ceramide, and p53-independent apoptosis of crypt SCCs. We previously reported that ATM deficiency resets the primary radiation lethal pathway, allowing CS-mediated apoptosis at the low-dose range of radiation. The mechanism for this event, termed target reordering, remains unknown. Here we show that inactivation of DNA damage repair pathways signal CS-mediated apoptosis in crypt SCCs, presumably via persistent unrepaired DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). Genetic loss-of-function of sensors and transducers of DNA DSB repair confers the CS-mediated lethal pathway in intestines of sv129/B6Mre11ATLD1/ATLD1 and C57BL/6Prkdc/SCID (SCID) mice exposed to low-dose radiation. In contrast, CS-mediated SCC lethality was mitigated in irradiated gain-of-function Rad50S/S mice, and epistasis studies order Rad50 upstream of Mre11. These studies suggest unrepaired DNA DSBs as causative in target re-ordering in intestinal SCCs. As such, we provide an in vivo model of DNA damage repair that is standardized, can be exploited to understand allele-specific regulation in intact tissue, and is pharmacologically tractable. PMID:20086180

  1. Cigarette smoke regulates VEGFR2-mediated survival signaling in rat lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevenson Christopher S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2-mediated survival signaling is critical to endothelial cell survival, maintenance of the vasculature and alveolar structure and regeneration of lung tissue. Reduced VEGF and VEGFR2 expression in emphysematous lungs has been linked to increased endothelial cell death and vascular regression. Previously, we have shown that CS down-regulated the VEGFR2 and its downstream signaling in mouse lungs. However, the VEGFR2-mediated survival signaling in response to oxidants/cigarette smoke (CS is not known. We hypothesized that CS exposure leads to disruption of VEGFR2-mediated endothelial survival signaling in rat lungs. Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed CS for 3 days, 8 weeks and 6 months to investigate the effect of CS on VEGFR2-mediated survival signaling by measuring the Akt/PI3-kinase/eNOS downstream signaling in rat lungs. Results and Discussion We show that CS disrupts VEGFR2/PI3-kinase association leading to decreased Akt and eNOS phosphorylation. This may further alter the phosphorylation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bad and increase the Bad/Bcl-xl association. However, this was not associated with a significant lung cell death as evidenced by active caspase-3 levels. These data suggest that although CS altered the VEGFR2-mediated survival signaling in the rat lungs, but it was not sufficient to cause lung cell death. Conclusion The rat lungs exposed to CS in acute, sub-chronic and chronic levels may be representative of smokers where survival signaling is altered but was not associated with lung cell death whereas emphysema is known to be associated with lung cell apoptosis.

  2. AGO1 and AGO2 act redundantly in miR408-mediated plantacyanin regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas Maunoury; Hervé Vaucheret

    2011-01-01

    Background : In Arabidopsis, AGO1 and AGO2 associate with small RNAs that exhibit a Uridine and an Adenosine at their 5′ end, respectively. Because most plant miRNAs have a 5′U, AGO1 plays many essential roles in miRNA-mediated regulation of development and stress responses. In contrast, AGO2 has only been implicated in antibacterial defense in association with miR393*, which has a 5′A. AGO2 also participates in antiviral defense in association with viral siRNAs. Principal Findings : This ...

  3. Neutrophil-Mediated Regulation of Innate and Adaptive Immunity: The Role of Myeloperoxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Odobasic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are no longer seen as leukocytes with a sole function of being the essential first responders in the removal of pathogens at sites of infection. Being armed with numerous pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, these phagocytes can also contribute to the development of various autoimmune diseases and can positively or negatively regulate the generation of adaptive immune responses. In this review, we will discuss how myeloperoxidase, the most abundant neutrophil granule protein, plays a key role in the various functions of neutrophils in innate and adaptive immunity.

  4. Regulation of axon guidance by compartmentalized nonsense-mediated mRNA decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colak, Dilek; Ji, Sheng-Jian; Porse, Bo T

    2013-01-01

    show that Robo3.2, a receptor for the Slit family of guidance cues, is synthesized locally within axons of commissural neurons. Robo3.2 translation is induced by floor-plate-derived signals as axons cross the spinal cord midline. Robo3.2 is also a predicted target of the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay...... (NMD) pathway. We find that NMD regulates Robo3.2 synthesis by inducing the degradation of Robo3.2 transcripts in axons that encounter the floor plate. Commissural neurons deficient in NMD proteins exhibit aberrant axonal trajectories after crossing the midline, consistent with misregulation of Robo3...

  5. Phosphatidic acid signaling mediates lung cytokine expression and lung inflammatory injury after hemorrhage in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, E; Bursten, S; Shenkar, R; Allbee, J; Tuder, R; Woodson, P; Guidot, D M; Rice, G; Singer, J W; Repine, J E

    1995-02-01

    Because phosphatidic acid (PA) pathway signaling may mediate many basic reactions involving cytokine-dependent responses, we investigated the effects of CT1501R, a functional inhibitor of the enzyme lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT) which converts lysophosphatidic acid (Lyso-PA) to PA. We found that CT1501R treatment not only prevented hypoxia-induced PA increases and lyso-PA consumption in human neutrophils, but also prevented neutrophil chemotaxis and adherence in vitro, and lung injury and lung neutrophil accumulation in mice subjected to hemorrhage and resuscitation. In addition, CT1501R treatment prevented increases in mRNA levels and protein production of a variety of proinflammatory cytokines in multiple lung cell populations after blood loss and resuscitation. Our results indicate the fundamental role of PA metabolism in the development of acute inflammatory lung injury after blood loss.

  6. Tumour–stromal interactions in acid-mediated invasion: A mathematical model

    KAUST Repository

    Martin, Natasha K.

    2010-12-01

    It is well established that the tumour microenvironment can both promote and suppress tumour growth and invasion, however, most mathematical models of invasion view the normal tissue as inhibiting tumour progression via immune modulation or spatial constraint. In particular, the production of acid by tumour cells and the subsequent creation of a low extracellular pH environment has been explored in several \\'acid-mediated tumour invasion\\' models where the acidic environment facilitates normal cell death and permits tumour invasion. In this paper, we extend the acid-invasion model developed by Gatenby and Gawlinski (1996) to include both the competitive and cooperative interactions between tumour and normal cells, by incorporating the influence of extracellular matrix and protease production at the tumour-stroma interface. Our model predicts an optimal level of tumour acidity which produces both cell death and matrix degradation. Additionally, very aggressive tumours prevent protease production and matrix degradation by excessive normal cell destruction, leading to an acellular (but matrix filled) gap between the tumour and normal tissue, a feature seen in encapsulated tumours. These results suggest, counterintuitively, that increasing tumour acidity may, in some cases, prevent tumour invasion.

  7. Gambogic acid sensitizes ovarian cancer cells to doxorubicin through ROS-mediated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianxia; Yuan, Zhixiang

    2013-09-01

    Ovarian cancer is one human malignancy which has response portly to doxorubicin. The anti-cancer activity of gambogic acid has been tested in in vitro and in vivo studies. In this study, we showed that gambogic acid, a natural compound, could potentiate the anticancer activity of doxorubicin in ovarian cancer through ROS-mediated apoptosis. Platinum-resistant human ovarian cancer cell line (SKOV-3) was treated with gambogic acid, doxorubicin, or the combination of both to investigate cell proliferation and apoptosis. We found that the combination of gambogic acid and doxorubicin causes synergistic loss of cell viability in SKOV-3 cells and this synergistic effect correlated with increased cellular ROS accumulation. Moreover, in vivo results showed that gambogic acid and doxorubicin combination resulted in a synergistic suppressing effect on tumor growth in ovarian cancer mice model. Taken together, the results suggested that doxorubicin in combination with gambogic acid might provide a promising therapeutic strategy to enhance chemosensitivity of ovarian cancer to doxorubicin.

  8. Main Group Lewis Acid-Mediated Transformations of Transition-Metal Hydride Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Ayan; Teets, Thomas S

    2016-08-10

    This Review highlights stoichiometric reactions and elementary steps of catalytic reactions involving cooperative participation of transition-metal hydrides and main group Lewis acids. Included are reactions where the transition-metal hydride acts as a reactant as well as transformations that form the metal hydride as a product. This Review is divided by reaction type, illustrating the diverse roles that Lewis acids can play in mediating transformations involving transition-metal hydrides as either reactants or products. We begin with a discussion of reactions where metal hydrides form direct adducts with Lewis acids, elaborating the structure and dynamics of the products of these reactions. The bulk of this Review focuses on reactions where the transition metal and Lewis acid act in cooperation, and includes sections on carbonyl reduction, H2 activation, and hydride elimination reactions, all of which can be promoted by Lewis acids. Also included is a section on Lewis acid-base secondary coordination sphere interactions, which can influence the reactivity of hydrides. Work from the past 50 years is included, but the majority of this Review focuses on research from the past decade, with the intent of showcasing the rapid emergence of this field and the potential for further development into the future.

  9. Ubiquitin/proteasome pathway regulates levels of retinoic acid receptor gamma and retinoid X receptor alpha in human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjelal, M; Wang, Z; Voorhees, J J; Fisher, G J

    2000-04-15

    Repeated exposure of human skin to solar UV radiation leads to premature aging (photoaging) and skin cancer. UV-induced skin damage can be ameliorated by all-trans retinoic acid treatment. The actions of retinoic acid in skin keratinocytes are mediated primarily by nuclear retinoic acid receptor gamma (RARgamma) and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha). We found that exposure of cultured primary human keratinocytes to UV irradiation (30 mJ/cm2) substantially reduced (50-90%) RARgamma and RXRalpha mRNA and protein within 8 h. The rates of disappearance of RARgamma and RXRalpha proteins after UV exposure or treatment with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide were similar. UV irradiation did not increase the rate of breakdown of RARgamma or RXRalpha but rather reduced their rate of synthesis. The addition of proteasome inhibitors MG132 and LLvL, but not the lysosomal inhibitor E64, prevented loss of RARgamma and RXRalpha proteins after exposure of keratinocytes to either UV radiation or cycloheximide. Soluble extracts from nonirradiated or UV-irradiated keratinocytes possessed similar levels of proteasome activity that degraded RARgamma and RXRalpha proteins in vitro. Furthermore, RARgamma and RXRalpha were polyubiquitinated in intact cells. RXRalpha was found to contain two proline, glutamate/aspartate, serine, and threonine (PEST) motifs, which confer rapid turnover of many short-lived regulatory proteins that are degraded by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. However, the PEST motifs in RXRalpha did not function to regulate its stability, because deletion of the PEST motifs individually or together did not alter ubiquitination or proteasome-mediated degradation of RXRalpha. These results demonstrate that loss of RARgamma and RXRalpha proteins after UV irradiation results from degradation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. Taken together, the data here indicate that ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated breakdown is an important mechanism regulating the levels of

  10. The ATPases of cohesin interface with regulators to modulate cohesin-mediated DNA tethering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çamdere, Gamze; Guacci, Vincent; Stricklin, Jeremiah; Koshland, Douglas

    2015-11-19

    Cohesin tethers together regions of DNA, thereby mediating higher order chromatin organization that is critical for sister chromatid cohesion, DNA repair and transcriptional regulation. Cohesin contains a heterodimeric ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) ATPase comprised of Smc1 and Smc3 ATPase active sites. These ATPases are required for cohesin to bind DNA. Cohesin's DNA binding activity is also promoted by the Eco1 acetyltransferase and inhibited by Wpl1. Recently we showed that after cohesin stably binds DNA, a second step is required for DNA tethering. This second step is also controlled by Eco1 acetylation. Here, we use genetic and biochemical analyses to show that this second DNA tethering step is regulated by cohesin ATPase. Furthermore, our results also suggest that Eco1 promotes cohesion by modulating the ATPase cycle of DNA-bound cohesin in a state that is permissive for DNA tethering and refractory to Wpl1 inhibition.

  11. Subcellular localization of frizzled receptors, mediated by their cytoplasmic tails, regulates signaling pathway specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wu

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The Frizzled (Fz; called here Fz1 and Fz2 receptors have distinct signaling specificities activating either the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway or Fz/planar cell polarity (PCP signaling in Drosophila. The regulation of signaling specificity remains largely obscure. We show that Fz1 and Fz2 have different subcellular localizations in imaginal disc epithelia, with Fz1 localizing preferentially to apical junctional complexes, and Fz2 being evenly distributed basolaterally. The subcellular localization difference directly contributes to the signaling specificity outcome. Whereas apical localization favors Fz/PCP signaling, it interferes with canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Receptor localization is mediated by sequences in the cytoplasmic tail of Fz2 that appear to block apical accumulation. Based on these data, we propose that subcellular Fz localization, through the association with other membrane proteins, is a critical aspect in regulating the signaling specificity within the Wnt/Fz signaling pathways.

  12. Molecular basis for TPR domain-mediated regulation of protein phosphatase 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Roe, S Mark; Cliff, Matthew J; Williams, Mark A; Ladbury, John E; Cohen, Patricia T W; Barford, David

    2005-01-12

    Protein phosphatase 5 (Ppp5) is a serine/threonine protein phosphatase comprising a regulatory tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain N-terminal to its phosphatase domain. Ppp5 functions in signalling pathways that control cellular responses to stress, glucocorticoids and DNA damage. Its phosphatase activity is suppressed by an autoinhibited conformation maintained by the TPR domain and a C-terminal subdomain. By interacting with the TPR domain, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and fatty acids including arachidonic acid stimulate phosphatase activity. Here, we describe the structure of the autoinhibited state of Ppp5, revealing mechanisms of TPR-mediated phosphatase inhibition and Hsp90- and arachidonic acid-induced stimulation of phosphatase activity. The TPR domain engages with the catalytic channel of the phosphatase domain, restricting access to the catalytic site. This autoinhibited conformation of Ppp5 is stabilised by the C-terminal alphaJ helix that contacts a region of the Hsp90-binding groove on the TPR domain. Hsp90 activates Ppp5 by disrupting TPR-phosphatase domain interactions, permitting substrate access to the constitutively active phosphatase domain, whereas arachidonic acid prompts an alternate conformation of the TPR domain, destabilising the TPR-phosphatase domain interface.

  13. NO-mediated regulation of GLUT by T3 and FSH in rat granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Ding, Yu; Liu, Juan; Heng, Dai; Xu, Kaili; Liu, Wenbo; Zhang, Cheng

    2017-03-17

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are important for normal reproductive function. Although 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) enhances follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-induced preantral follicle growth and granulosa cells development in vitro, little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating ovarian development via glucose. In this study, we investigated whether and how T3 combines with FSH to regulate glucose transporter protein (GLUT) expression and glucose uptake in granulosa cells. Here, we present evidence that T3 and FSH co-treatment significantly increased GLUT-1/GLUT-4 expression, and translocation in cells, as well as glucose uptake. These changes were accompanied by upregulation of NOS3 expression, total NOS and NOS3 activity and NO content in granulosa cells. Furthermore, we found that activation of the mTOR and PI3K/Akt pathway is required for the regulation of GLUT expression, translocation, and glucose uptake by hormones. We also found that L-arginine (L-arg) up-regulated GLUT-1/GLUT-4 expression and translocation, which were related to increased glucose uptake, however, these responses were significantly blocked by L-NAME. In addition, inhibiting NO production attenuated T3 and FSH-induced GLUT expression, translocation, and glucose uptake in granulosa cells. Our data demonstrate that T3 and FSH co-treatment potentiates cellular glucose uptake via GLUT upregulation and translocation, which are mediated through the activation of the mTOR/PI3K/Akt pathway. Meanwhile, NOS3/NO are also involved in this regulatory system. These findings suggest that GLUT is a novel mediator of T3 and FSH-induced follicular development.

  14. Abl family kinases regulate FcγR-mediated phagocytosis in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greuber, Emileigh K; Pendergast, Ann Marie

    2012-12-01

    Phagocytosis of Ab-coated pathogens is mediated through FcγRs, which activate intracellular signaling pathways to drive actin cytoskeletal rearrangements. Abl and Arg define a family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases that regulate actin-dependent processes in a variety of cell types, including those important in the adaptive immune response. Using pharmacological inhibition as well as dominant negative and knockout approaches, we demonstrate a role for the Abl family kinases in phagocytosis by macrophages and define a mechanism whereby Abl kinases regulate this process. Bone marrow-derived macrophages from mice lacking Abl and Arg kinases exhibit inefficient phagocytosis of sheep erythrocytes and zymosan particles. Treatment with the Abl kinase inhibitors imatinib and GNF-2 or overexpression of kinase-inactive forms of the Abl family kinases also impairs particle internalization in murine macrophages, indicating Abl kinase activity is required for efficient phagocytosis. Further, Arg kinase is present at the phagocytic cup, and Abl family kinases are activated by FcγR engagement. The regulation of phagocytosis by Abl family kinases is mediated in part by the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). Loss of Abl and Arg expression or treatment with Abl inhibitors reduced Syk phosphorylation in response to FcγR ligation. The link between Abl family kinases and Syk may be direct, as purified Arg kinase phosphorylates Syk in vitro. Further, overexpression of membrane-targeted Syk in cells treated with Abl kinase inhibitors partially rescues the impairment in phagocytosis. Together, these findings reveal that Abl family kinases control the efficiency of phagocytosis in part through the regulation of Syk function.

  15. The volume-regulated anion channel (LRRC8) in nodose neurons is sensitive to acidic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Runping; Lu, Yongjun; Gunasekar, Susheel; Zhang, Yanhui; Benson, Christopher J; Chapleau, Mark W; Sah, Rajan; Abboud, François M

    2017-03-09

    The leucine rich repeat containing protein 8A (LRRC8A), or SWELL1, is an essential component of the volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) that is activated by cell swelling and ionic strength. We report here for the first time to our knowledge its expression in a primary cell culture of nodose ganglia neurons and its localization in the soma, neurites, and neuronal membrane. We show that this neuronal VRAC/SWELL1 senses low external pH (pHo) in addition to hypoosmolarity. A robust sustained chloride current is seen in 77% of isolated nodose neurons following brief exposures to extracellular acid pH. Its activation involves proton efflux, intracellular alkalinity, and an increase in NOX-derived H2O2. The molecular identity of both the hypoosmolarity-induced and acid pHo-conditioned VRAC as LRRC8A (SWELL1) was confirmed by Cre-flox-mediated KO, shRNA-mediated knockdown, and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated LRRC8A deletion in HEK cells and in primary nodose neuronal cultures. Activation of VRAC by low pHo reduces neuronal injury during simulated ischemia and N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced (NMDA-induced) apoptosis. These results identify the VRAC (LRRC8A) as a dual sensor of hypoosmolarity and low pHo in vagal afferent neurons and define the mechanisms of its activation and its neuroprotective potential.

  16. The volume-regulated anion channel (LRRC8) in nodose neurons is sensitive to acidic pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Runping; Lu, Yongjun; Gunasekar, Susheel; Zhang, Yanhui; Benson, Christopher J.; Chapleau, Mark W.; Sah, Rajan; Abboud, François M.

    2017-01-01

    The leucine rich repeat containing protein 8A (LRRC8A), or SWELL1, is an essential component of the volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) that is activated by cell swelling and ionic strength. We report here for the first time to our knowledge its expression in a primary cell culture of nodose ganglia neurons and its localization in the soma, neurites, and neuronal membrane. We show that this neuronal VRAC/SWELL1 senses low external pH (pHo) in addition to hypoosmolarity. A robust sustained chloride current is seen in 77% of isolated nodose neurons following brief exposures to extracellular acid pH. Its activation involves proton efflux, intracellular alkalinity, and an increase in NOX-derived H2O2. The molecular identity of both the hypoosmolarity-induced and acid pHo–conditioned VRAC as LRRC8A (SWELL1) was confirmed by Cre-flox–mediated KO, shRNA-mediated knockdown, and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated LRRC8A deletion in HEK cells and in primary nodose neuronal cultures. Activation of VRAC by low pHo reduces neuronal injury during simulated ischemia and N-methyl-D-aspartate–induced (NMDA-induced) apoptosis. These results identify the VRAC (LRRC8A) as a dual sensor of hypoosmolarity and low pHo in vagal afferent neurons and define the mechanisms of its activation and its neuroprotective potential. PMID:28289711

  17. Abscisic Acid-mediated Epigenetic Processes in Plant Development and Stress Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Viswanathan Chinnusamy; Zhizhong Gong; Jian-Kang Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) regulates diverse plant processes, growth and development under non-stress conditions and plays a pivotal role in abiotic stress tolerance. Although ABA-regulated genetic processes are well known, recent discoveries reveal that epigenetic processes are an integral part of ABA-regulated processes. Epigenetic mechanisms, namely, histone modifications and cytosine DNA methylation-induced modification of genome give rise to epigenomes, which add diversity and complexity to the genome of organisms. Histone monoubiquitination appears to regulate ABA levels in developing seeds through histone H2B monoubiquitination. ABA and H2B ubiquitination dependent chromatin remodeling regulate seed dormancy. Transcription factor networks necessary for seed maturation are repressed by histone deacetylases (HDACs)-dependent and PICKLE chromatin remodeling complexes (CRCs), whereas ABA induces the expression of these genes directly or through repression of HDACs. Abiotic stress-induced ABA regulates stomatal response and stress-responsive gene expression through HDACs and HOS15-dependent histone deacetylation, as well as through the ATP-dependent SWITCH/SUCROSE NONFERMENTING CRC. ABA also probably regulates the abiotic stress response through DNA methylation and short interfering RNA pathways. Further studies on ABA-regulated spigenome will be of immense use to understand the plant development, stress adaptation and stress memory.

  18. What is the Ultimate Goal in Acid-Base Regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Selvakumar; Gopalakrishnan, Maya; Alagesan, Murali; Prakash, E. Sankaranarayanan

    2007-01-01

    It is common to see chapters on acid-base physiology state that the goal of acid-base regulatory mechanisms is to maintain the pH of arterial plasma and not arterial PCO [subscript 2] (Pa[subscript CO[subscript 2

  19. HosA, a MarR Family Transcriptional Regulator, Represses Nonoxidative Hydroxyarylic Acid Decarboxylase Operon and Is Modulated by 4-Hydroxybenzoic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ajit; Ranjan, Akash

    2016-02-23

    Members of the Multiple antibiotic resistance Regulator (MarR) family of DNA binding proteins regulate transcription of a wide array of genes required for virulence and pathogenicity of bacteria. The present study reports the molecular characterization of HosA (Homologue of SlyA), a MarR protein, with respect to its target gene, DNA recognition motif, and nature of its ligand. Through a comparative genomics approach, we demonstrate that hosA is in synteny with nonoxidative hydroxyarylic acid decarboxylase (HAD) operon and is present exclusively within the mutS-rpoS polymorphic region in nine different genera of Enterobacteriaceae family. Using molecular biology and biochemical approach, we demonstrate that HosA binds to a palindromic sequence downstream to the transcription start site of divergently transcribed nonoxidative HAD operon and represses its expression. Furthermore, in silico analysis showed that the recognition motif for HosA is highly conserved in the upstream region of divergently transcribed operon in different genera of Enterobacteriaceae family. A systematic chemical search for the physiological ligand revealed that 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4-HBA) interacts with HosA and derepresses HosA mediated repression of the nonoxidative HAD operon. Based on our study, we propose a model for molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of nonoxidative HAD operon by HosA in Enterobacteriaceae family.

  20. FGF19 regulates cell proliferation, glucose and bile acid metabolism via FGFR4-dependent and independent pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Luen Wu

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19 is a hormone-like protein that regulates carbohydrate, lipid and bile acid metabolism. At supra-physiological doses, FGF19 also increases hepatocyte proliferation and induces hepatocellular carcinogenesis in mice. Much of FGF19 activity is attributed to the activation of the liver enriched FGF Receptor 4 (FGFR4, although FGF19 can activate other FGFRs in vitro in the presence of the coreceptor βKlotho (KLB. In this report, we investigate the role of FGFR4 in mediating FGF19 activity by using Fgfr4 deficient mice as well as a variant of FGF19 protein (FGF19v which is specifically impaired in activating FGFR4. Our results demonstrate that FGFR4 activation mediates the induction of hepatocyte proliferation and the suppression of bile acid biosynthesis by FGF19, but is not essential for FGF19 to improve glucose and lipid metabolism in high fat diet fed mice as well as in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Thus, FGF19 acts through multiple receptor pathways to elicit pleiotropic effects in regulating nutrient metabolism and cell proliferation.

  1. FGF19 regulates cell proliferation, glucose and bile acid metabolism via FGFR4-dependent and independent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ai-Luen; Coulter, Sally; Liddle, Christopher; Wong, Anne; Eastham-Anderson, Jeffrey; French, Dorothy M; Peterson, Andrew S; Sonoda, Junichiro

    2011-03-18

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is a hormone-like protein that regulates carbohydrate, lipid and bile acid metabolism. At supra-physiological doses, FGF19 also increases hepatocyte proliferation and induces hepatocellular carcinogenesis in mice. Much of FGF19 activity is attributed to the activation of the liver enriched FGF Receptor 4 (FGFR4), although FGF19 can activate other FGFRs in vitro in the presence of the coreceptor βKlotho (KLB). In this report, we investigate the role of FGFR4 in mediating FGF19 activity by using Fgfr4 deficient mice as well as a variant of FGF19 protein (FGF19v) which is specifically impaired in activating FGFR4. Our results demonstrate that FGFR4 activation mediates the induction of hepatocyte proliferation and the suppression of bile acid biosynthesis by FGF19, but is not essential for FGF19 to improve glucose and lipid metabolism in high fat diet fed mice as well as in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Thus, FGF19 acts through multiple receptor pathways to elicit pleiotropic effects in regulating nutrient metabolism and cell proliferation.

  2. LEO1 is regulated by PRL-3 and mediates its oncogenic properties in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Phyllis S Y; Zhou, Jianbiao; Cheong, Lip-Lee; Liu, Shaw-Cheng; Qian, Jingru; Guo, Tiannan; Sze, Siu Kwan; Zeng, Qi; Chng, Wee Joo

    2014-06-01

    PRL-3, an oncogenic dual-specificity phosphatase, is overexpressed in 50% of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and associated with poor survival. We found that stable expression of PRL-3 confers cytokine independence and growth advantage of AML cells. However, how PRL-3 mediates these functions in AML is not known. To comprehensively screen for PRL3-regulated proteins in AML, we performed SILAC-based quantitative proteomics analysis and discovered 398 significantly perturbed proteins after PRL-3 overexpression. We show that Leo1, a component of RNA polymerase II-associated factor (PAF) complex, is a novel and important mediator of PRL-3 oncogenic activities in AML. We described a novel mechanism where elevated PRL-3 protein increases JMJD2C histone demethylase occupancy on Leo1 promoter, thereby reducing the H3K9me3 repressive signals and promoting Leo1 gene expression. Furthermore, PRL-3 and Leo1 levels were positively associated in AML patient samples (N=24; PPRL-3 oncogenic phenotypes in AML. Loss of Leo1 leads to destabilization of the PAF complex and downregulation of SOX2 and SOX4, potent oncogenes in myeloid transformation. In conclusion, we identify an important and novel mechanism by which PRL-3 mediates its oncogenic function in AML.

  3. Syndecan-2 regulates melanin synthesis via protein kinase C βII-mediated tyrosinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyejung; Chung, Heesung; Chang, Sung Eun; Choi, Sora; Han, Inn-Oc; Kang, Duk-Hee; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2014-05-01

    Syndecan-2, a transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan that is highly expressed in melanoma cells, regulates melanoma cell functions (e.g. migration). Since melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes, which largely function to synthesize melanin, we investigated the possible involvement of syndecan-2 in melanogenesis. Syndecan-2 expression was increased in human skin melanoma tissues compared with normal skin. In both mouse and human melanoma cells, siRNA-mediated knockdown of syndecan-2 was associated with reduced melanin synthesis, whereas overexpression of syndecan-2 increased melanin synthesis. Similar effects were also detected in human primary epidermal melanocytes. Syndecan-2 expression did not affect the expression of tyrosinase, a key enzyme in melanin synthesis, but instead enhanced the enzymatic activity of tyrosinase by increasing the membrane and melanosome localization of its regulator, protein kinase CβII. Furthermore, UVB caused increased syndecan-2 expression, and this up-regulation of syndecan-2 was required for UVB-induced melanin synthesis. Taken together, these data suggest that syndecan-2 regulates melanin synthesis and could be a potential therapeutic target for treating melanin-associated diseases.

  4. Blimp-1-Dependent IL-10 Production by Tr1 Cells Regulates TNF-Mediated Tissue Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes de Oca, Marcela; Kumar, Rajiv; de Labastida Rivera, Fabian; Amante, Fiona H; Sheel, Meru; Faleiro, Rebecca J; Bunn, Patrick T; Best, Shannon E; Beattie, Lynette; Ng, Susanna S; Edwards, Chelsea L; Muller, Werner; Cretney, Erika; Nutt, Stephen L; Smyth, Mark J; Haque, Ashraful; Hill, Geoffrey R; Sundar, Shyam; Kallies, Axel; Engwerda, Christian R

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is critical for controlling many intracellular infections, but can also contribute to inflammation. It can promote the destruction of important cell populations and trigger dramatic tissue remodeling following establishment of chronic disease. Therefore, a better understanding of TNF regulation is needed to allow pathogen control without causing or exacerbating disease. IL-10 is an important regulatory cytokine with broad activities, including the suppression of inflammation. IL-10 is produced by different immune cells; however, its regulation and function appears to be cell-specific and context-dependent. Recently, IL-10 produced by Th1 (Tr1) cells was shown to protect host tissues from inflammation induced following infection. Here, we identify a novel pathway of TNF regulation by IL-10 from Tr1 cells during parasitic infection. We report elevated Blimp-1 mRNA levels in CD4+ T cells from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) patients, and demonstrate IL-12 was essential for Blimp-1 expression and Tr1 cell development in experimental VL. Critically, we show Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 production by Tr1 cells prevents tissue damage caused by IFNγ-dependent TNF production. Therefore, we identify Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 produced by Tr1 cells as a key regulator of TNF-mediated pathology and identify Tr1 cells as potential therapeutic tools to control inflammation.

  5. Blimp-1-Dependent IL-10 Production by Tr1 Cells Regulates TNF-Mediated Tissue Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes de Oca, Marcela; Kumar, Rajiv; de Labastida Rivera, Fabian; Amante, Fiona H; Sheel, Meru; Faleiro, Rebecca J.; Bunn, Patrick T.; Best, Shannon E.; Beattie, Lynette; Ng, Susanna S.; Edwards, Chelsea L.; Muller, Werner; Cretney, Erika; Nutt, Stephen L.; Smyth, Mark J.; Haque, Ashraful; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Sundar, Shyam; Kallies, Axel; Engwerda, Christian R.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is critical for controlling many intracellular infections, but can also contribute to inflammation. It can promote the destruction of important cell populations and trigger dramatic tissue remodeling following establishment of chronic disease. Therefore, a better understanding of TNF regulation is needed to allow pathogen control without causing or exacerbating disease. IL-10 is an important regulatory cytokine with broad activities, including the suppression of inflammation. IL-10 is produced by different immune cells; however, its regulation and function appears to be cell-specific and context-dependent. Recently, IL-10 produced by Th1 (Tr1) cells was shown to protect host tissues from inflammation induced following infection. Here, we identify a novel pathway of TNF regulation by IL-10 from Tr1 cells during parasitic infection. We report elevated Blimp-1 mRNA levels in CD4+ T cells from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) patients, and demonstrate IL-12 was essential for Blimp-1 expression and Tr1 cell development in experimental VL. Critically, we show Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 production by Tr1 cells prevents tissue damage caused by IFNγ-dependent TNF production. Therefore, we identify Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 produced by Tr1 cells as a key regulator of TNF-mediated pathology and identify Tr1 cells as potential therapeutic tools to control inflammation. PMID:26765224

  6. Melatonin attenuates hypochlorous acid-mediated heme destruction, free iron release, and protein aggregation in hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, Dhiman; Abdulhamid, Ibrahim; Diamond, Michael P; Saed, Ghassan M; Abu-Soud, Husam M

    2012-09-01

    In inflammatory diseases, where hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is elevated, iron homeostasis is disturbed, resulting in accumulation of free iron. Free iron is toxic by virtue of its ability to generate free radicals through the Fenton reaction. HOCl is generated by myeloperoxidase, (MPO) using chloride and hydrogen peroxide as substrates. Recent studies demonstrate that HOCl binds to the heme moiety of hemoglobin (Hb), which generates a transient ferric species whose formation and decay kinetics indicate it participates in protein aggregation, heme destruction, and free iron release. Here, we show that melatonin prevents HOCl-mediated Hb heme destruction and protein aggregation, using a combination of UV-vis spectrophotometry, ferrozine colorimetric assay, and in-gel heme staining. We also show that melatonin treatment prevents HOCl-mediated loss of red blood cell (RBC) viability, indicating biologic relevance of this finding. The mechanism by which melatonin prevents HOCl-mediated Hb heme destruction is by direct scavenging of HOCl and/or through the destabilization of the higher Hb oxidative states intermediates, ferryl porphyrin radical cation Hb-Fe(IV)=O(+π•) and Hb-Fe(IV)=O, which are formed through the reaction of HOCl with Hb. Our work establishes a direct mechanistic link between melatonin and its protective effect in chronic inflammatory diseases. Collectively, in addition to acting as an antioxidant and as a MPO inhibitor, melatonin can also exert its protective effect by inhibiting HOCl-mediated heme destruction of hemoproteins and subsequent free iron release.

  7. Tolerization with BLP down-regulates HMGB1 a critical mediator of sepsis-related lethality.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coffey, J Calvin

    2012-02-03

    Tolerization with bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) affords a significant survival benefit in sepsis. Given that high mobility group box protein-1 (HMGB1) is a recognized mediator of sepsis-related lethality, we determined if tolerization with BLP leads to alterations in HMGB1. In vitro, BLP tolerization led to a reduction in HMGB1 gene transcription. This was mirrored at the protein level, as HMGB1 protein expression and release were reduced significantly in BLP-tolerized human THP-1 monocytic cells. BLP tolerance in vivo led to a highly significant, long-term survival benefit following challenge with lethal dose BLP in C57BL\\/6 mice. This was associated with an attenuation of HMGB1 release into the circulation, as evidenced by negligible serum HMGB1 levels in BLP-tolerized mice. Moreover, HMGB1 levels in peritoneal macrophages from BLP-tolerized mice were reduced significantly. Hence, tolerization with BLP leads to a down-regulation of HMGB1 protein synthesis and release. The improved survival associated with BLP tolerance could thus be explained by a reduction in HMGB1, were the latter associated with lethality in BLP-related sepsis. In testing this hypothesis, it was noted that neutralization of HMGB1, using anti-HMGB1 antibodies, abrogated BLP-associated lethality almost completely. To conclude, tolerization with BLP leads to a down-regulation of HMGB1, thus offering a novel means of targeting the latter. HMGB1 is also a mediator of lethality in BLP-related sepsis.

  8. Bile Acids Function Synergistically To Repress Invasion Gene Expression in Salmonella by Destabilizing the Invasion Regulator HilD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eade, Colleen R; Hung, Chien-Che; Bullard, Brian; Gonzalez-Escobedo, Geoffrey; Gunn, John S; Altier, Craig

    2016-08-01

    Salmonella spp. are carried by and can acutely infect agricultural animals and humans. After ingestion, salmonellae traverse the upper digestive tract and initiate tissue invasion of the distal ileum, a virulence process carried out by the type III secretion system encoded within Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). Salmonellae coordinate SPI-1 expression with anatomical location via environmental cues, one of which is bile, a complex digestive fluid that causes potent repression of SPI-1 genes. The individual components of bile responsible for SPI-1 repression have not been previously characterized, nor have the bacterial signaling processes that modulate their effects been determined. Here, we characterize the mechanism by which bile represses SPI-1 expression. Individual bile acids exhibit repressive activity on SPI-1-regulated genes that requires neither passive diffusion nor OmpF-mediated entry. By using genetic methods, the effects of bile and bile acids were shown to require the invasion gene transcriptional activator hilD and to function independently of known upstream signaling pathways. Protein analysis techniques showed that SPI-1 repression by bile acids is mediated by posttranslational destabilization of HilD. Finally, we found that bile acids function synergistically to achieve the overall repressive activity of bile. These studies demonstrate a common mechanism by which diverse environmental cues (e.g., certain short-chain fatty acids and bile acids) inhibit SPI-1 expression. These data provide information relevant to Salmonella pathogenesis during acute infection in the intestine and during chronic infection of the gallbladder and inform the basis for development of therapeutics to inhibit invasion as a means of repressing Salmonella pathogenicity.

  9. Attachment to parents and peers as a risk factor for adolescent depressive disorders: the mediating role of emotion regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullik, Angelika; Petermann, Franz

    2013-08-01

    This study examined emotion regulation as a mediator in the relationship of attachment and depression in adolescents. Participants (N girls = 127; M age = 14.50; N boys = 121; M age = 14.31) completed self-report questionnaires of attachment to parents and peers, emotion regulation and depression. Models with dysfunctional emotion regulation as a mediation variable were tested via hierarchical multiple regression analyses and bootstrapping procedure. Results revealed significant relations between attachment to parents and peers, dysfunctional emotion regulation and depression. For girls, internal-dysfunctional emotion regulation was a mediator in the relation of attachment to parents and depression and partly mediated the association of attachment to peers. For boys, internal- and external-dysfunctional emotion regulation acted as partly mediators in association of attachment to parents and depression. Results indicate important mechanisms that contribute to the refinement of conceptual models and provide indications for gender specific prevention and intervention for depressive disorders.

  10. KSHV-Mediated Regulation of Par3 and SNAIL Contributes to B-Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Hem C.; Sun, Zhiguo; Upadhyay, Santosh K.; El-Naccache, Darine W.; Singh, Rajnish K.; Sahu, Sushil K.; Robertson, Erle S.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have suggested that Epithelial–Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and transformation is an important step in progression to cancer. Par3 (partitioning-defective protein) is a crucial factor in regulating epithelial cell polarity. However, the mechanism by which the latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA) encoded by Kaposi's Sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) regulates Par3 and EMTs markers (Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition) during viral-mediated B-cell oncogenesis has not been fully explored. Moreover, several studies have demonstrated a crucial role for EMT markers during B-cell malignancies. In this study, we demonstrate that Par3 is significantly up-regulated in KSHV-infected primary B-cells. Further, Par3 interacted with LANA in KSHV positive and LANA expressing cells which led to translocation of Par3 from the cell periphery to a predominantly nuclear signal. Par3 knockdown led to reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptotic induction. Levels of SNAIL was elevated, and E-cadherin was reduced in the presence of LANA or Par3. Interestingly, KSHV infection in primary B-cells led to enhancement of SNAIL and down-regulation of E-cadherin in a temporal manner. Importantly, knockdown of SNAIL, a major EMT regulator, in KSHV cells resulted in reduced expression of LANA, Par3, and enhanced E-cadherin. Also, SNAIL bound to the promoter region of p21 and can regulate its activity. Further a SNAIL inhibitor diminished NF-kB signaling through upregulation of Caspase3 in KSHV positive cells in vitro. This was also supported by upregulation of SNAIL and Par3 in BC-3 transplanted NOD-SCID mice which has potential as a therapeutic target for KSHV-associated B-cell lymphomas. PMID:27463802

  11. KSHV-Mediated Regulation of Par3 and SNAIL Contributes to B-Cell Proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hem C Jha

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies have suggested that Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT and transformation is an important step in progression to cancer. Par3 (partitioning-defective protein is a crucial factor in regulating epithelial cell polarity. However, the mechanism by which the latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA encoded by Kaposi's Sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV regulates Par3 and EMTs markers (Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition during viral-mediated B-cell oncogenesis has not been fully explored. Moreover, several studies have demonstrated a crucial role for EMT markers during B-cell malignancies. In this study, we demonstrate that Par3 is significantly up-regulated in KSHV-infected primary B-cells. Further, Par3 interacted with LANA in KSHV positive and LANA expressing cells which led to translocation of Par3 from the cell periphery to a predominantly nuclear signal. Par3 knockdown led to reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptotic induction. Levels of SNAIL was elevated, and E-cadherin was reduced in the presence of LANA or Par3. Interestingly, KSHV infection in primary B-cells led to enhancement of SNAIL and down-regulation of E-cadherin in a temporal manner. Importantly, knockdown of SNAIL, a major EMT regulator, in KSHV cells resulted in reduced expression of LANA, Par3, and enhanced E-cadherin. Also, SNAIL bound to the promoter region of p21 and can regulate its activity. Further a SNAIL inhibitor diminished NF-kB signaling through upregulation of Caspase3 in KSHV positive cells in vitro. This was also supported by upregulation of SNAIL and Par3 in BC-3 transplanted NOD-SCID mice which has potential as a therapeutic target for KSHV-associated B-cell lymphomas.

  12. MiR-30-regulated autophagy mediates angiotensin II-induced myocardial hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wei; Zhong, Yun; Cheng, Chuanfang; Liu, Benrong; Wang, Li; Li, Aiqun; Xiong, Longgen; Liu, Shiming

    2013-01-01

    Dysregulated autophagy may lead to the development of disease. Role of autophagy and the diagnostic potential of microRNAs that regulate the autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy have not been evaluated. A rat model of cardiac hypertrophy was established using transverse abdominal aortic constriction (operation group). Cardiomyocyte autophagy was enhanced in rats from the operation group, compared with those in the sham operation group. Moreover, the operation group showed up-regulation of beclin-1 (an autophagy-related gene), and down-regulation of miR-30 in cardiac tissue. The effects of inhibition and over-expression of the beclin-1 gene on the expression of hypertrophy-related genes and on autophagy were assessed. Angiotensin II-induced myocardial hypertrophy was found to be mediated by over-expression of the beclin-1 gene. A dual luciferase reporter assay confirmed that beclin-1 was a target gene of miR-30a. miR-30a induced alterations in beclin-1 gene expression and autophagy in cardiomyocytes. Treatment of cardiomyocytes with miR-30a mimic attenuated the Angiotensin II-induced up-regulation of hypertrophy-related genes and decreased in the cardiomyocyte surface area. Conversely, treatment with miR-30a inhibitor enhanced the up-regulation of hypertrophy-related genes and increased the surface area of cardiomyocytes induced by Angiotensin II. In addition, circulating miR-30 was elevated in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, and circulating miR-30 was positively associated with left ventricular wall thickness. Collectively, these above-mentioned results suggest that Angiotensin II induces down-regulation of miR-30 in cardiomyocytes, which in turn promotes myocardial hypertrophy through excessive autophagy. Circulating miR-30 may be an important marker for the diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy.

  13. MiR-30-regulated autophagy mediates angiotensin II-induced myocardial hypertrophy.

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    Wei Pan

    Full Text Available Dysregulated autophagy may lead to the development of disease. Role of autophagy and the diagnostic potential of microRNAs that regulate the autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy have not been evaluated. A rat model of cardiac hypertrophy was established using transverse abdominal aortic constriction (operation group. Cardiomyocyte autophagy was enhanced in rats from the operation group, compared with those in the sham operation group. Moreover, the operation group showed up-regulation of beclin-1 (an autophagy-related gene, and down-regulation of miR-30 in cardiac tissue. The effects of inhibition and over-expression of the beclin-1 gene on the expression of hypertrophy-related genes and on autophagy were assessed. Angiotensin II-induced myocardial hypertrophy was found to be mediated by over-expression of the beclin-1 gene. A dual luciferase reporter assay confirmed that beclin-1 was a target gene of miR-30a. miR-30a induced alterations in beclin-1 gene expression and autophagy in cardiomyocytes. Treatment of cardiomyocytes with miR-30a mimic attenuated the Angiotensin II-induced up-regulation of hypertrophy-related genes and decreased in the cardiomyocyte surface area. Conversely, treatment with miR-30a inhibitor enhanced the up-regulation of hypertrophy-related genes and increased the surface area of cardiomyocytes induced by Angiotensin II. In addition, circulating miR-30 was elevated in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, and circulating miR-30 was positively associated with left ventricular wall thickness. Collectively, these above-mentioned results suggest that Angiotensin II induces down-regulation of miR-30 in cardiomyocytes, which in turn promotes myocardial hypertrophy through excessive autophagy. Circulating miR-30 may be an important marker for the diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy.

  14. Does Anger Regulation Mediate the Discrimination-Mental Health Link among Mexican-Origin Adolescents? A Longitudinal Mediation Analysis Using Multilevel Modeling

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    Park, Irene J. K.; Wang, Lijuan; Williams, David R.; Alegría, Margarita

    2017-01-01

    Although prior research has consistently documented the association between racial/ethnic discrimination and poor mental health outcomes, the mechanisms that underlie this link are still unclear. The present 3-wave longitudinal study tested the mediating role of anger regulation in the discrimination-mental health link among 269 Mexican-origin…

  15. Regulations of the key mediators in inflammation and atherosclerosis by Aspirin in human macrophages

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    Zhang Li

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although its role to prevent secondary cardiovascular complications has been well established, how acetyl salicylic acid (ASA, aspirin regulates certain key molecules in the atherogenesis is still not known. Considering the role of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 to destabilize the atherosclerotic plaques, the roles of the scavenger receptor class BI (SR-BI and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1 to promote cholesterol efflux in the foam cells at the plaques, and the role of NF-κB in the overall inflammation related to the atherosclerosis, we addressed whether these molecules are all related to a common mechanism that may be regulated by acetyl salicylic acid. We investigated the effect of ASA to regulate the expressions and activities of these molecules in THP-1 macrophages. Our results showed that ASA inhibited MMP-9 mRNA expression, and caused the decrease in the MMP-9 activities from the cell culture supernatants. In addition, it inhibited the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 subunit, thus the activity of this inflammatory molecule. On the contrary, acetyl salicylic acid induced the expressions of ABCA1 and SR-BI, two molecules known to reduce the progression of atherosclerosis, at both mRNA and protein levels. It also stimulated the cholesterol efflux out of macrophages. These data suggest that acetyl salicylic acid may alleviate symptoms of atherosclerosis by two potential mechanisms: maintaining the plaque stability via inhibiting activities of inflammatory molecules MMP-9 and NF-κB, and increasing the cholesterol efflux through inducing expressions of ABCA1 and SR-BI.

  16. A conserved patch of hydrophobic amino acids modulates Myb activity by mediating protein-protein interactions.

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    Dukare, Sandeep; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb plays a key role in the control of proliferation and differentiation in hematopoietic progenitor cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and certain non-hematopoietic tumors. c-Myb activity is highly dependent on the interaction with the coactivator p300 which is mediated by the transactivation domain of c-Myb and the KIX domain of p300. We have previously observed that conservative valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions in a conserved stretch of hydrophobic amino acids have a profound effect on Myb activity. Here, we have explored the function of the hydrophobic region as a mediator of protein-protein interactions. We show that the hydrophobic region facilitates Myb self-interaction and binding of the histone acetyl transferase Tip60, a previously identified Myb interacting protein. We show that these interactions are affected by the valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions and suppress Myb activity by interfering with the interaction of Myb and the KIX domain of p300. Taken together, our work identifies the hydrophobic region in the Myb transactivation domain as a binding site for homo- and heteromeric protein interactions and leads to a picture of the c-Myb transactivation domain as a composite protein binding region that facilitates interdependent protein-protein interactions of Myb with regulatory proteins.

  17. Thioredoxin-mediated redox regulation of resistance to endocrine therapy in breast cancer.

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    Penney, Rosalind Brigham; Roy, Deodutta

    2013-08-01

    Resistance to endocrine therapy in breast carcinogenesis due to the redox regulation of the signal transduction system by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is the subject of this review article. Both antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors are thought to prevent cancer through modulating the estrogen receptor function, but other mechanisms cannot be ruled out as these compounds also block metabolism and redox cycling of estrogen and are free radical scavengers. Endocrine therapeutic agents, such as, tamoxifen and other antiestrogens, and the aromatase inhibitor, exemestane, are capable of producing ROS. Aggressive breast cancer cells have high oxidative stress and chronic treatment with exemestane, fulvestrant or tamoxifen may add additional ROS stress. Breast cancer cells receiving long-term antiestrogen treatment appear to adapt to this increased persistent level of ROS. This, in turn, may lead to the disruption of reversible redox signaling that involves redox-sensitive phosphatases, protein kinases, such as, ERK and AKT, and transcription factors, such as, AP-1, NRF-1 and NF-κB. Thioredoxin modulates the expression of estrogen responsive genes through modulating the production of H2O2 in breast cancer cells. Overexpressing thioredoxine reductase 2 and reducing oxidized thioredoxin restores tamoxifen sensitivity to previously resistant breast cancer cells. In summary, it appears that resistance to endocrine therapy may be mediated, in part, by ROS-mediated dysregulation of both estrogen-dependent and estrogen-independent redox-sensitive signaling pathways. Further studies are needed to define the mechanism of action of thioredoxin modifiers, and their effect on the redox regulation that contributes to restoring the antiestrogen-mediated signal transduction system and growth inhibitory action.

  18. STIM1 controls T cell-mediated immune regulation and inflammation in chronic infection.

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    Desvignes, Ludovic; Weidinger, Carl; Shaw, Patrick; Vaeth, Martin; Ribierre, Theo; Liu, Menghan; Fergus, Tawania; Kozhaya, Lina; McVoy, Lauren; Unutmaz, Derya; Ernst, Joel D; Feske, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Chronic infections induce a complex immune response that controls pathogen replication, but also causes pathology due to sustained inflammation. Ca2+ influx mediates T cell function and immunity to infection, and patients with inherited mutations in the gene encoding the Ca2+ channel ORAI1 or its activator stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) are immunodeficient and prone to chronic infection by various pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Here, we demonstrate that STIM1 is required for T cell-mediated immune regulation during chronic Mtb infection. Compared with WT animals, mice with T cell-specific Stim1 deletion died prematurely during the chronic phase of infection and had increased bacterial burdens and severe pulmonary inflammation, with increased myeloid and lymphoid cell infiltration. Although STIM1-deficient T cells exhibited markedly reduced IFN-γ production during the early phase of Mtb infection, bacterial growth was not immediately exacerbated. During the chronic phase, however, STIM1-deficient T cells displayed enhanced IFN-γ production in response to elevated levels of IL-12 and IL-18. The lack of STIM1 in T cells was associated with impaired activation-induced cell death upon repeated TCR engagement and pulmonary lymphocytosis and hyperinflammation in Mtb-infected mice. Chronically Mtb-infected, STIM1-deficient mice had reduced levels of inducible regulatory T cells (iTregs) due to a T cell-intrinsic requirement for STIM1 in iTreg differentiation and excessive production of IFN-γ and IL-12, which suppress iTreg differentiation and maintenance. Thus, STIM1 controls multiple aspects of T cell-mediated immune regulation to limit injurious inflammation during chronic infection.

  19. Salvianolic acid A positively regulates PTEN protein level and inhibits growth of A549 lung cancer cells

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    BI, LEI; CHEN, JIANPING; YUAN, XIAOJING; JIANG, ZEQUN; CHEN, WEIPING

    2013-01-01

    Salvianolic acid A (Sal A) is an effective compound extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza which has been used in the treatment of various diseases. Preliminary data indicate that Sal A treatment has a specific anti-lung cancer effect. However, the manner in which Sal A regulates cancer growth remains unknown. In this study, the A549 lung cancer cell line and its response to Sal A treatment was examined. Results showed that Sal A treatment significantly decreased A549 cell growth, promoted partial apoptosis and increased mitochondrial membrane permeability. Western blot analysis showed that Sal A upregulated the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) protein level, while consistently downregulating Akt phosphorylation. These results indicate that Sal A negatively mediates A549 lung cancer cell line growth or apoptosis, most likely by positively regulating PTEN protein level. PMID:24648921

  20. Lysophosphatidic Acid Up-Regulates Hexokinase II and Glycolysis to Promote Proliferation of Ovarian Cancer Cells

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    Abir Mukherjee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, a blood-borne lipid mediator, is present in elevated concentrations in ascites of ovarian cancer patients and other malignant effusions. LPA is a potent mitogen in cancer cells. The mechanism linking LPA signal to cancer cell proliferation is not well understood. Little is known about whether LPA affects glucose metabolism to accommodate rapid proliferation of cancer cells. Here we describe that in ovarian cancer cells, LPA enhances glycolytic rate and lactate efflux. A real time PCR-based miniarray showed that hexokinase II (HK2 was the most dramatically induced glycolytic gene to promote glycolysis in LPA-treated cells. Analysis of the human HK2 gene promoter identified the sterol regulatory element-binding protein as the primary mediator of LPA-induced HK2 transcription. The effects of LPA on HK2 and glycolysis rely on LPA2, an LPA receptor subtype overexpressed in ovarian cancer and many other malignancies. We further examined the general role of growth factor-induced glycolysis in cell proliferation. Like LPA, epidermal growth factor (EGF elicited robust glycolytic and proliferative responses in ovarian cancer cells. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 and insulin, however, potently stimulated cell proliferation but only modestly induced glycolysis. Consistent with their differential effects on glycolysis, LPA and EGF-dependent cell proliferation was highly sensitive to glycolytic inhibition while the growth-promoting effect of IGF-1 or insulin was more resistant. These results indicate that LPA- and EGF-induced cell proliferation selectively involves up-regulation of HK2 and glycolytic metabolism. The work is the first to implicate LPA signaling in promotion of glucose metabolism in cancer cells.

  1. Amino acids allosterically regulate the thiamine diphosphate-dependent alpha-keto acid decarboxylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werther, Tobias; Spinka, Michael; Tittmann, Kai; Schütz, Anja; Golbik, Ralph; Mrestani-Klaus, Carmen; Hübner, Gerhard; König, Stephan

    2008-02-29

    The gene rv0853c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv codes for a thiamine diphosphate-dependent alpha-keto acid decarboxylase (MtKDC), an enzyme involved in the amino acid degradation via the Ehrlich pathway. Steady state kinetic experiments were performed to determine the substrate specificity of MtKDC. The mycobacterial enzyme was found to convert a broad spectrum of branched-chain and aromatic alpha-keto acids. Stopped-flow kinetics showed that MtKDC is allosterically activated by alpha-keto acids. Even more, we demonstrate that also amino acids are potent activators of this thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzyme. Thus, metabolic flow through the Ehrlich pathway can be directly regulated at the decarboxylation step. The influence of amino acids on MtKDC catalysis was investigated, and implications for other thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzymes are discussed.

  2. CEACAM1 regulates integrin αIIbβ3-mediated functions in platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Jana; Alshahrani, Musaed; Beauchemin, Nicole; Jackson, Denise E

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have implicated that the Ig-ITIM superfamily member, CEACAM1 may regulate integrin function. While CEACAM1 has been demonstrated to play a role as an inhibitory co-receptor of ITAM-associated GPVI/FcR γ-chain signaling pathways in platelets, its physiologic role in integrin αIIbβ3-mediated platelet function is unclear. In this study, we investigate the functional importance of Ceacam1 in murine platelets. We show that CEACAM1 is constitutively associated with integrin αIIbβ3 in resting human and mouse platelets as demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation studies. Using Ceacam1-deficient mice, we show that they have prolonged tail bleeding times and volume of blood lost that is corrected by reconstitution with platelet Ceacam1. Ceacam1(-/-) platelets have moderate integrin αIIbβ3 mediated functional defects with impaired kinetics of platelet spreading on fibrinogen and failure to retract fibrin clots in vitro. This functional integrin αIIbβ3 defect could not be attributed to altered integrin αIIbβ3 expression. Ceacam1(-/-) platelets displayed normal "inside-out" signaling properties as demonstrated by normal agonist-induced binding of soluble (fluorescein isothiocyanate) FITC-fibrinogen, JON/A antibody binding, and increases in cytosolic free calcium levels. This study provides direct evidence that Ceacam1 is essential for normal integrin αIIbβ3-mediated platelet function and that disruption of mouse Ceacam1 induced moderate integrin αIIbβ3-mediated functional defects.

  3. Mechanism of riboflavin uptake by cultured human retinal pigment epithelial ARPE-19 cells: possible regulation by an intracellular Ca2+-calmodulin-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Hamid M; Wang, Shuling; Ma, Thomas Y

    2005-07-15

    In mammalian cells (including those of the ocular system), the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin, RF) assumes an essential role in a variety of metabolic reactions and is critical for normal cellular functions, growth and development. Cells of the human retinal pigment epithelium (hRPE) play an important role in providing a sufficient supply of RF to the retina, but nothing is known about the mechanism of the vitamin uptake by these cells and its regulation. Our aim in the present study was to address this issue using the hRPE ARPE-19 cells as the retinal epithelial model. Our results show RF uptake in the hRPE to be: (1) energy and temperature dependent and occurring without metabolic alteration in the transported substrate, (2) pH but not Na+ dependent, (3) saturable as a function of concentration with an apparent Km of 80 +/- 14 nM, (4) trans-stimulated by unlabelled RF and its structural analogue lumiflavine, (5) cis-inhibited by the RF structural analogues lumiflavine and lumichrome but not by unrelated compounds, and (6) inhibited by the anion transport inhibitors 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS) and 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (SITS) as well as by the Na+ -H+ exchange inhibitor amiloride and the sulfhydryl group inhibitor p-chloromercuriphenylsulphonate (p-CMPS). Maintaining the hRPE cells in a RF-deficient medium led to a specific and significant up-regulation in RF uptake which was mediated via changes in the number and affinity of the RF uptake carriers. While modulating the activities of intracellular protein kinase A (PKA)-, protein kinase C (PKC)-, protein tyrosine kinase (PTK)-, and nitric oxide (NO)-mediated pathways were found to have no role in regulating RF uptake, a role for the Ca2+ -calmodulin-mediated pathway was observed. These studies demonstrate for the first time the involvement of a specialized carrier-mediated mechanism for RF uptake by hRPE cells and show that the process is

  4. Differential Ability of Bovine Antimicrobial Cathelicidins to Mediate Nucleic Acid Sensing by Epithelial Cells

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    Baumann, Arnaud; Kiener, Mirjam Susanna; Haigh, Brendan; Perreten, Vincent; Summerfield, Artur

    2017-01-01

    Cathelicidins encompass a family of cationic peptides characterized by antimicrobial activity and other functions, such as the ability to enhance the sensing of nucleic acids by the innate immune system. The present study aimed to investigate the ability of the bovine cathelicidins indolicidin, bactenecin (Bac)1, Bac5, bovine myeloid antimicrobial peptide (BMAP)-27, BMAP-28, and BMAP-34 to inhibit the growth of bacteria and to enhance the sensing of nucleic acid by the host’s immune system. BMAP-27 was the most effective at killing Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis, and Escherichia coli, and this was dependent on its amphipathic structure and cationic charge. Although most cathelicidins possessed DNA complexing activity, only the alpha-helical BMAP cathelicidins and the cysteine-rich disulfide-bridged Bac1 were able to enhance the sensing of nucleic acids by primary epithelial cells. We also compared these responses with those mediated by neutrophils. Activation of neutrophils with phorbol myristate acetate resulted in degranulation and release of cathelicidins as well as bactericidal activity in the supernatants. However, only supernatants from unstimulated neutrophils were able to promote nucleic acid sensing in epithelial cells. Collectively, the present data support a role for certain bovine cathelicidins in helping the innate immune system to sense nucleic acids. The latter effect is observed at concentrations clearly below those required for direct antimicrobial functions. These findings are relevant in development of future strategies to promote protection at mucosal surfaces against pathogen invasion. PMID:28203238

  5. Regulation of uterine and umbilical amino acid uptakes by maternal amino acid concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thureen, P J; Anderson, S M; Hay, W W

    2000-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that decreased fetal amino acid (AA) supply, produced by maternal hypoaminoacidemia (low AA) during hyperglycemia (HG), is reversible with maternal AA infusion and regulates fetal insulin concentration ([I]). We measured net uterine and umbilical AA uptakes during maternal HG/low AA concentration ([AA]) and after maternal intravenous infusion of a mixed AA solution. After 5 days HG, all maternal [AA] except glycine were decreased >50%, particularly essential [AA] (P infusion increased net uterine uptakes of Val, Leu, Ile, Met, and Ser and net umbilical uptakes of Val, Leu, Ile, Met, Phe, and Arg but did not change net uteroplacental uptake of any AA. Fetal [I] increased 55 +/- 14%, P < 0.001, with correction of fetal [AA], despite the lack of change in fetal glucose concentration. Thus generalized maternal hypoaminoacidemia decreases uterine and umbilical uptakes of primarily the essential AA and decreases fetal branched-chain [AA]. These changes are reversed with correction of maternal [AA], which also increases fetal [I].

  6. Cauliflower mosaic virus protein P6 inhibits signaling responses to salicylic acid and regulates innate immunity.

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    Andrew J Love

    Full Text Available Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV encodes a multifunctional protein P6 that is required for translation of the 35S RNA and also acts as a suppressor of RNA silencing. Here we demonstrate that P6 additionally acts as a pathogenicity effector of an unique and novel type, modifying NPR1 (a key regulator of salicylic acid (SA- and jasmonic acid (JA-dependent signaling and inhibiting SA-dependent defence responses We find that that transgene-mediated expression of P6 in Arabidopsis and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana has profound effects on defence signaling, suppressing expression of representative SA-responsive genes and increasing expression of representative JA-responsive genes. Relative to wild-type Arabidopsis P6-expressing transgenics had greatly reduced expression of PR-1 following SA-treatment, infection by CaMV or inoculation with an avirulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst. Similarly transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana of P6 (including a mutant form defective in translational transactivation activity suppressed PR-1a transcript accumulation in response to Agrobacterium infiltration and following SA-treatment. As well as suppressing the expression of representative SA-regulated genes, P6-transgenic Arabidopsis showed greatly enhanced susceptibility to both virulent and avirulent Pst (titres elevated 10 to 30-fold compared to non-transgenic controls but reduced susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Necrosis following SA-treatment or inoculation with avirulent Pst was reduced and delayed in P6-transgenics. NPR1 an important regulator of SA/JA crosstalk, was more highly expressed in the presence of P6 and introduction of the P6 transgene into a transgenic line expressing an NPR1:GFP fusion resulted in greatly increased fluorescence in nuclei even in the absence of SA. Thus in the presence of P6 an inactive form of NPR1 is mislocalized in the nucleus even in uninduced plants

  7. Stathmin mediates hepatocyte resistance to death from oxidative stress by down regulating JNK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Enpeng; Amir, Muhammad; Lin, Yu; Czaja, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    Stathmin 1 performs a critical function in cell proliferation by regulating microtubule polymerization. This proliferative function is thought to explain the frequent overexpression of stathmin in human cancer and its correlation with a bad prognosis. Whether stathmin also functions in cell death pathways is unclear. Stathmin regulates microtubules in part by binding free tubulin, a process inhibited by stathmin phosphorylation from kinases including c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). The involvement of JNK activation both in stathmin phosphorylation, and in hepatocellular resistance to oxidative stress, led to an examination of the role of stathmin/JNK crosstalk in oxidant-induced hepatocyte death. Oxidative stress from menadione-generated superoxide induced JNK-dependent stathmin phosphorylation at Ser-16, Ser-25 and Ser-38 in hepatocytes. A stathmin knockdown sensitized hepatocytes to both apoptotic and necrotic cell death from menadione without altering levels of oxidant generation. The absence of stathmin during oxidative stress led to JNK overactivation that was the mechanism of cell death as a concomitant knockdown of JNK1 or JNK2 blocked death. Hepatocyte death from JNK overactivation was mediated by the effects of JNK on mitochondria. Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization occurred in stathmin knockdown cells at low concentrations of menadione that triggered apoptosis, whereas mitochondrial β-oxidation and ATP homeostasis were compromised at higher, necrotic menadione concentrations. Stathmin therefore mediates hepatocyte resistance to death from oxidative stress by down regulating JNK and maintaining mitochondrial integrity. These findings demonstrate a new mechanism by which stathmin promotes cell survival and potentially tumor growth.

  8. Stathmin mediates hepatocyte resistance to death from oxidative stress by down regulating JNK.

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    Enpeng Zhao

    Full Text Available Stathmin 1 performs a critical function in cell proliferation by regulating microtubule polymerization. This proliferative function is thought to explain the frequent overexpression of stathmin in human cancer and its correlation with a bad prognosis. Whether stathmin also functions in cell death pathways is unclear. Stathmin regulates microtubules in part by binding free tubulin, a process inhibited by stathmin phosphorylation from kinases including c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK. The involvement of JNK activation both in stathmin phosphorylation, and in hepatocellular resistance to oxidative stress, led to an examination of the role of stathmin/JNK crosstalk in oxidant-induced hepatocyte death. Oxidative stress from menadione-generated superoxide induced JNK-dependent stathmin phosphorylation at Ser-16, Ser-25 and Ser-38 in hepatocytes. A stathmin knockdown sensitized hepatocytes to both apoptotic and necrotic cell death from menadione without altering levels of oxidant generation. The absence of stathmin during oxidative stress led to JNK overactivation that was the mechanism of cell death as a concomitant knockdown of JNK1 or JNK2 blocked death. Hepatocyte death from JNK overactivation was mediated by the effects of JNK on mitochondria. Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization occurred in stathmin knockdown cells at low concentrations of menadione that triggered apoptosis, whereas mitochondrial β-oxidation and ATP homeostasis were compromised at higher, necrotic menadione concentrations. Stathmin therefore mediates hepatocyte resistance to death from oxidative stress by down regulating JNK and maintaining mitochondrial integrity. These findings demonstrate a new mechanism by which stathmin promotes cell survival and potentially tumor growth.

  9. Using Temperature-Sensitive Smart Polymers to Regulate DNA-mediated Nanoassembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamner, Kristen L.

    Nanoparticle (NP) self-assembly has been proven as an effective route to organize nanoscale building blocks into ordered structures for potential technological applications. In order to successfully exploit the self-assembly processes a high level of direction and control is required. In my dissertation research, I synthesized a temperature responsive copolymer (p) to modify gold nanoparticles (AuNP) for controlling self-assembly. The copolymers' ability to regulate DNA-mediated NP self-assembly is a particular focus. In Chapter 2, the results show that by the addition of the p to create thermally responsive NP interfaces allows for controlled aggregation behavior and interparticle distances defined by the transition temperature (TC) of the p, to aid in NP assembly and help to regulate DNA-mediated interactions between NP. The work in Chapter 3 revealed that the reconfigurable conformation of the p sterically regulates the assembly: at T TC, assembly was observed, due the hydrophobic collapse of the p and the subsequent exposure of the complementary DNA bases. In Chapter 4, to gain insight into the mechanism, the rate of assembly was monitored, with DNA lengths that had hydrodynamic diameters more comparable to that of the p, and found the p was capable of slowing the kinetics. I further investigated to find that the addition of p extended the interparticle distances while disrupting the long range ordering. Finally, how the temperature responsive behavior of the p acted on the interparticle distances was probed, and it was found that without p, the interparticle distances expanded, while the addition of p compressed the interparticle distances.

  10. Susceptibility of podocytes to palmitic acid is regulated by stearoyl-CoA desaturases 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, Jonas; Weins, Astrid; Kampe, Kapil; Gruber, Stefan; Lindenmeyer, Maja T; Cohen, Clemens D; Orellana, Jana M; Mundel, Peter; Jehle, Andreas W

    2013-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by dyslipidemia with elevated free fatty acids (FFAs). Loss of podocytes is a hallmark of diabetic nephropathy, and podocytes are highly susceptible to saturated FFAs but not to protective, monounsaturated FFAs. We report that patients with diabetic nephropathy develop alterations in glomerular gene expression of enzymes involved in fatty acid metabolism, including induction of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD)-1, which converts saturated to monounsaturated FFAs. By IHC of human renal biopsy specimens, glomerular SCD-1 induction was observed in podocytes of patients with diabetic nephropathy. Functionally, the liver X receptor agonists TO901317 and GW3965, two known inducers of SCD, increased Scd-1 and Scd-2 expression in cultured podocytes and reduced palmitic acid-induced cell death. Similarly, overexpression of Scd-1 attenuated palmitic acid-induced cell death. The protective effect of TO901317 was associated with a reduction of endoplasmic reticulum stress. It was lost after gene silencing of Scd-1/-2, thereby confirming that the protective effect of TO901317 is mediated by Scd-1/-2. TO901317 also shifted palmitic acid-derived FFAs into biologically inactive triglycerides. In summary, SCD-1 up-regulation in diabetic nephropathy may be part of a protective mechanism against saturated FFA-derived toxic metabolites that drive endoplasmic reticulum stress and podocyte death.

  11. Acid-sensing ion channel 3 mediates peripheral anti-hyperalgesia effects of acupuncture in mice inflammatory pain

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    Chen Wei-Hsin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripheral tissue inflammation initiates hyperalgesia accompanied by tissue acidosis, nociceptor activation, and inflammation mediators. Recent studies have suggested a significantly increased expression of acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3 in both carrageenan- and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA-induced inflammation. This study tested the hypothesis that acupuncture is curative for mechanical hyperalgesia induced by peripheral inflammation. Methods Here we used mechanical stimuli to assess behavioral responses in paw and muscle inflammation induced by carrageenan or CFA. We also used immunohistochemistry staining and western blot methodology to evaluate the expression of ASIC3 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons. Results In comparison with the control, the inflammation group showed significant mechanical hyperalgesia with both intraplantar carrageenan and CFA-induced inflammation. Interestingly, both carrageenan- and CFA-induced hyperalgesia were accompanied by ASIC3 up-regulation in DRG neurons. Furthermore, electroacupuncture (EA at the ST36 rescued mechanical hyperalgesia through down-regulation of ASIC3 overexpression in both carrageenan- and CFA-induced inflammation. Conclusions In addition, electrical stimulation at the ST36 acupoint can relieve mechanical hyperalgesia by attenuating ASIC3 overexpression.

  12. Induction of G2/M arrest by pseudolaric acid B is mediated by activation of the ATM signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-guo MENG; Ling-lingJIANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of pseudolaric acid B (PLAB)-induced cell cycle arrest in human melanoma SK-28 cells. Methods: Cell growth inhibition was detected by MTT assay, the cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry, and protein expression was examined by Western blot analysis.Results: PLAB inhibited the growth of human melanoma ceils and induced G2/M arrest in SK-28 cells, accompanied by an up-regulation of Cdc2 phosphorylation and a subsequent down-regulation of Cdc2 expression. Furthermore, PLAB decreased the expression of Cdc25C phosphatase and increased the expression of Wee1 kinase. Meanwhile, a reduction in Cdc2 activity was party due to induction of the expression of p21wsaf1/cip1 in a p53-dependent manner. In addition, PLAB activated the checkpoint kinase, Chk2, and increased the expression of p53, two major targets of ATM kinase. These effects were inhibited by caffeine, an ATM kinase inhibitor. We also found that PLAB significantly enhanced ATM kinase activity. Conclusion: Taken together, these results suggest that PLAB induced G2/M arrest in human melanoma cells via a mechanism involving the activation of ATM, and the effect of PLAB on Cdc2 activity was mediated via interactions with the Chk2-Cdc25C and p53 signalling pathways, two distinct downstream pathways of ATM. PLAB may be a promising chemopreventive agent for treating human melanoma.

  13. Channel-mediated lactic acid transport: a novel function for aquaglyceroporins in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Gerd P; Desguin, Benoît; Chaumont, François; Hols, Pascal

    2013-09-15

    MIPs (major intrinsic proteins), also known as aquaporins, are membrane proteins that channel water and/or uncharged solutes across membranes in all kingdoms of life. Considering the enormous number of different bacteria on earth, functional information on bacterial MIPs is scarce. In the present study, six MIPs [glpF1 (glycerol facilitator 1)-glpF6] were identified in the genome of the Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum. Heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed that GlpF2, GlpF3 and GlpF4 each facilitated the transmembrane diffusion of water, dihydroxyacetone and glycerol. As several lactic acid bacteria have GlpFs in their lactate racemization operon (GlpF1/F4 phylogenetic group), their ability to transport this organic acid was tested. Both GlpF1 and GlpF4 facilitated the diffusion of D/L-lactic acid. Deletion of glpF1 and/or glpF4 in Lb. plantarum showed that both genes were involved in the racemization of lactic acid and, in addition, the double glpF1 glpF4 mutant showed a growth delay under conditions of mild lactic acid stress. This provides further evidence that GlpFs contribute to lactic acid metabolism in this species. This lactic acid transport capacity was shown to be conserved in the GlpF1/F4 group of Lactobacillales. In conclusion, we have functionally analysed the largest set of bacterial MIPs and demonstrated that the lactic acid membrane permeability of bacteria can be regulated by aquaglyceroporins.

  14. Manufacture and application of valve-regulated lead/acid batteries in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z. [Battery Consultants China, Univ. of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, BJ (China)

    1998-05-18

    This paper introduces the manufacture and application of valve-regulated lead/acid batteries in China. The contents cover the following topics: (i) background development; (ii) materials; (iii) manufacturing technology and equipment; (iv) application and market prospects. (orig.)

  15. Tebuconazole Regulates Fatty Acid Composition of Etiolated Winter Wheat Seedlings

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    A.V. Korsukova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The fatty acid composition of shoots of unhardened and hardened to cold etiolated winter wheat seedlings grown from seeds treated with tebuconazole-based protectant «Bunker» (content of tebuconazole 60 grams per liter, g/L, and the seedlings frost resistance has been studied. It is shown that treatment of winter wheat seeds by «Bunker» preparation (1,5 microliter per gram of seeds, µl/g is accompanied by an increase of the fatty acids unsaturation in the shoots and increase of the seedlings frost resistance (–8°C, 24 h. The most pronounced decrease in the content of saturated palmitic acid and increase in the content of unsaturated α-linolenic acid were observed during cold hardening of winter wheat seedlings grown from seeds treated by tebuconazole-based protectant. It is concluded that the seeds treatment with tebuconazole-based protectant causes changes of fatty acid composition of winter wheat seedlings to increase their frost resistance.

  16. Understanding the role of ETS-mediated gene regulation in complex biological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, Victoria J; LaRue, Amanda C; Turner, David P; Watson, Patricia M; Watson, Dennis K

    2013-01-01

    Ets factors are members of one of the largest families of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors, regulating critical functions in normal cell homeostasis, which when perturbed contribute to tumor progression. The well-documented alterations in ETS factor expression and function during cancer progression result in pleiotropic effects manifested by the downstream effect on their target genes. Multiple ETS factors bind to the same regulatory sites present on target genes, suggesting redundant or competitive functions. The anti- and prometastatic signatures obtained by examining specific ETS regulatory networks will significantly improve our ability to accurately predict tumor progression and advance our understanding of gene regulation in cancer. Coordination of multiple ETS gene functions also mediates interactions between tumor and stromal cells and thus contributes to the cancer phenotype. As such, these new insights may provide a novel view of the ETS gene family as well as a focal point for studying the complex biological control involved in tumor progression. One of the goals of molecular biology is to elucidate the mechanisms that contribute to the development and progression of cancer. Such an understanding of the molecular basis of cancer will provide new possibilities for: (1) earlier detection, as well as better diagnosis and staging of disease; (2) detection of minimal residual disease recurrences and evaluation of response to therapy; (3) prevention; and (4) novel treatment strategies. Increased understanding of ETS-regulated biological pathways will directly impact these areas.

  17. Conservation of the Nrf2-Mediated Gene Regulation of Proteasome Subunits and Glucose Metabolism in Zebrafish

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    Vu Thanh Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Keap1-Nrf2 system is an evolutionarily conserved defense mechanism against oxidative and xenobiotic stress. Besides the exogenous stress response, Nrf2 has been found to regulate numerous cellular functions, including protein turnover and glucose metabolism; however, the evolutionary origins of these functions remain unknown. In the present study, we searched for novel target genes associated with the zebrafish Nrf2 to answer this question. A microarray analysis of zebrafish embryos that overexpressed Nrf2 revealed that 115 candidate genes were targets of Nrf2, including genes encoding proteasome subunits and enzymes involved in glucose metabolism. A real-time quantitative PCR suggested that the expression of 3 proteasome subunits (psma3, psma5, and psmb7 and 2 enzymes involved in glucose metabolism (pgd and fbp1a were regulated by zebrafish Nrf2. We thus next examined the upregulation of these genes by an Nrf2 activator, diethyl maleate, using Nrf2 mutant zebrafish larvae. The results of real-time quantitative PCR and whole-mount in situ hybridization showed that all of these 5 genes were upregulated by diethyl maleate treatment in an Nrf2-dependent manner, especially in the liver. These findings implied that the Nrf2-mediated regulation of the proteasome subunits and glucose metabolism is evolutionarily conserved among vertebrates.

  18. [Regulation of Positive and Negative Emotions as Mediator between Maternal Emotion Socialization and Child Problem Behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fäsche, Anika; Gunzenhauser, Catherine; Friedlmeier, Wolfgang; von Suchodoletz, Antje

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated five to six year old children's ability to regulate negative and positive emotions in relation to psychosocial problem behavior (N=53). It was explored, whether mothers' supportive and nonsupportive strategies of emotion socialization influence children's problem behavior by shaping their emotion regulation ability. Mothers reported on children's emotion regulation and internalizing and externalizing problem behavior via questionnaire, and were interviewed about their preferences for socialization strategies in response to children's expression of negative affect. Results showed that children with more adaptive expression of adequate positive emotions had less internalizing behavior problems. When children showed more control of inadequate negative emotions, children were less internalizing as well as externalizing in their behavior. Furthermore, results indicated indirect relations of mothers' socialization strategies with children's problem behavior. Control of inadequate negative emotions mediated the link between non-supportive strategies on externalizing problem behavior. Results suggest that emotion regulatory processes should be part of interventions to reduce the development of problematic behavior in young children. Parents should be trained in dealing with children's emotions in a constructive way.

  19. MicroRNA-mediated networks underlie immune response regulation in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen-Tsung; Oyang, Yen-Jen; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2014-09-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is a common endocrine malignancy with low death rate but increased incidence and recurrence in recent years. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs with diverse regulatory capacities in eukaryotes and have been frequently implied in human cancer. Despite current progress, however, a panoramic overview concerning miRNA regulatory networks in PTC is still lacking. Here, we analyzed the expression datasets of PTC from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Data Portal and demonstrate for the first time that immune responses are significantly enriched and under specific regulation in the direct miRNA-target network among distinctive PTC variants to different extents. Additionally, considering the unconventional properties of miRNAs, we explore the protein-coding competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) and the modulatory networks in PTC and unexpectedly disclose concerted regulation of immune responses from these networks. Interestingly, miRNAs from these conventional and unconventional networks share general similarities and differences but tend to be disparate as regulatory activities increase, coordinately tuning the immune responses that in part account for PTC tumor biology. Together, our systematic results uncover the intensive regulation of immune responses underlain by miRNA-mediated networks in PTC, opening up new avenues in the management of thyroid cancer.

  20. Yeast Actin-Related Protein ARP6 Negatively Regulates Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Yeast Cell

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    Yumei Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The yeasts, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, are single-cell eukaryotic organisms that can serve as models for human genetic diseases and hosts for large scale production of recombinant proteins in current biopharmaceutical industry. Thus, efficient genetic engineering tools for yeasts are of great research and economic values. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (AMT can transfer T-DNA into yeast cells as a method for genetic engineering. However, how the T-DNA is transferred into the yeast cells is not well established yet. Here our genetic screening of yeast knockout mutants identified a yeast actin-related protein ARP6 as a negative regulator of AMT. ARP6 is a critical member of the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex (SWR-C; knocking out some other components of the complex also increased the transformation efficiency, suggesting that ARP6 might regulate AMT via SWR-C. Moreover, knockout of ARP6 led to disruption of microtubule integrity, higher uptake and degradation of virulence proteins, and increased DNA stability inside the cells, all of which resulted in enhanced transformation efficiency. Our findings have identified molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating AMT and a potential target for enhancing the transformation efficiency in yeast cells.

  1. Yeast Actin-Related Protein ARP6 Negatively Regulates Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Yeast Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yumei; Chen, Zikai; Zhu, Detu; Tu, Haitao; Pan, Shen Quan

    2015-01-01

    The yeasts, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, are single-cell eukaryotic organisms that can serve as models for human genetic diseases and hosts for large scale production of recombinant proteins in current biopharmaceutical industry. Thus, efficient genetic engineering tools for yeasts are of great research and economic values. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (AMT) can transfer T-DNA into yeast cells as a method for genetic engineering. However, how the T-DNA is transferred into the yeast cells is not well established yet. Here our genetic screening of yeast knockout mutants identified a yeast actin-related protein ARP6 as a negative regulator of AMT. ARP6 is a critical member of the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex (SWR-C); knocking out some other components of the complex also increased the transformation efficiency, suggesting that ARP6 might regulate AMT via SWR-C. Moreover, knockout of ARP6 led to disruption of microtubule integrity, higher uptake and degradation of virulence proteins, and increased DNA stability inside the cells, all of which resulted in enhanced transformation efficiency. Our findings have identified molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating AMT and a potential target for enhancing the transformation efficiency in yeast cells.

  2. Bile acid-induced arrhythmia is mediated by muscarinic M2 receptors in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti H Sheikh Abdul Kadir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP is a common disease affecting up to 5% of pregnancies and which can cause fetal arrhythmia and sudden intrauterine death. We previously demonstrated that bile acid taurocholate (TC, which is raised in the bloodstream of ICP, can acutely alter the rate and rhythm of contraction and induce abnormal calcium destabilization in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCM. Apart from their hepatic functions bile acids are ubiquitous signalling molecules with diverse systemic effects mediated by either the nuclear receptor FXR or by a recently discovered G-protein coupled receptor TGR5. We aim to investigate the mechanism of bile-acid induced arrhythmogenic effects in an in-vitro model of the fetal heart. METHODS AND RESULTS: Levels of bile acid transporters and nuclear receptor FXR were studied by quantitative real time PCR, western blot and immunostaining, which showed low levels of expression. We did not observe functional involvement of the canonical receptors FXR and TGR5. Instead, we found that TC binds to the muscarinic M(2 receptor in NRCM and serves as a partial agonist of this receptor in terms of inhibitory effect on intracellular cAMP and negative chronotropic response. Pharmacological inhibition and siRNA-knockdown of the M(2 receptor completely abolished the negative effect of TC on contraction, calcium transient amplitude and synchronisation in NRCM clusters. CONCLUSION: We conclude that in NRCM the TC-induced arrhythmia is mediated by the partial agonism at the M(2 receptor. This mechanism might serve as a promising new therapeutic target for fetal arrhythmia.

  3. Spatial and temporal regulation of biosynthesis of the plant immune signal salicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao-Yu; Zhou, Mian; Yoo, Heejin; Pruneda-Paz, Jose L; Spivey, Natalie Weaver; Kay, Steve A; Dong, Xinnian

    2015-07-28

    The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) is essential for local defense and systemic acquired resistance (SAR). When plants, such as Arabidopsis, are challenged by different pathogens, an increase in SA biosynthesis generally occurs through transcriptional induction of the key synthetic enzyme isochorismate synthase 1 (ICS1). However, the regulatory mechanism for this induction is poorly understood. Using a yeast one-hybrid screen, we identified two transcription factors (TFs), NTM1-like 9 (NTL9) and CCA1 hiking expedition (CHE), as activators of ICS1 during specific immune responses. NTL9 is essential for inducing ICS1 and two other SA synthesis-related genes, phytoalexin-deficient 4 (PAD4) and enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1), in guard cells that form stomata. Stomata can quickly close upon challenge to block pathogen entry. This stomatal immunity requires ICS1 and the SA signaling pathway. In the ntl9 mutant, this response is defective and can be rescued by exogenous application of SA, indicating that NTL9-mediated SA synthesis is essential for stomatal immunity. CHE, the second identified TF, is a central circadian clock oscillator and is required not only for the daily oscillation in SA levels but also for the pathogen-induced SA synthesis in systemic tissues during SAR. CHE may also regulate ICS1 through the known transcription activators calmodulin binding protein 60g (CBP60g) and systemic acquired resistance deficient 1 (SARD1) because induction of these TF genes is compromised in the che-2 mutant. Our study shows that SA biosynthesis is regulated by multiple TFs in a spatial and temporal manner and therefore fills a gap in the signal transduction pathway between pathogen recognition and SA production.

  4. Regulation of rat intrapulmonary arterial tone by arachidonic acid and prostaglandin E2 during hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaoliang Yan

    Full Text Available AIMS: Arachidonic acid (AA and its metabolites, prostaglandins (PG are known to be involved in regulation of vascular homeostasis including vascular tone and vessel wall tension, but their potential role in Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV remains unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of AA and PGE2 on the hypoxic response in isolated rat intrapulmonary arteries (IPAs. METHODS AND RESULTS: We carried out the investigation on IPAs by vessel tension measurement. Isotetrandrine (20 µM significantly inhibited phase I, phase IIb and phase IIc of hypoxic vasoconstriction. Both indomethacin (100 µM and NS398 attenuated KPSS-induced vessel contraction and phase I, phase IIb and phase IIc of HPV, implying that COX-2 plays a primary role in the hypoxic response of rat IPAs. PGE2 alone caused a significant vasoconstriction in isolated rat IPAs. This constriction is mediated by EP4. Blockage of EP4 by L-161982 (1 µM significantly inhibited phase I, phase IIb and phase IIc of hypoxic vasoconstriction. However, AH6809 (3 µM, an antagonist of EP1, EP2, EP3 and DP1 receptors, exerted no effect on KPSS or hypoxia induced vessel contraction. Increase of cellular cAMP by forskolin could significantly reduce KPSS-induced vessel contraction and abolish phase I, phase II b and phase II c of HPV. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrated a vasoconstrictive effect of PGE2 on rat IPAs and this effect is via activation of EP4. Furthermore, our results suggest that intracellular cAMP plays dual roles in regulation of vascular tone, depending on the spatial distribution of cAMP and its coupling with EP receptor and Ca(2+ channels.

  5. Fission yeast arrestin-related trafficking adaptor, Arn1/Any1, is ubiquitinated by Pub1 E3 ligase and regulates endocytosis of Cat1 amino acid transporter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Nakashima

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Tsc1–Tsc2 complex homologous to human tuberous sclerosis complex proteins governs amino acid uptake by regulating the expression and intracellular distribution of amino acid transporters in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here, we performed a genetic screening for molecules that are involved in amino acid uptake and found Arn1 (also known as Any1. Arn1 is homologous to ART1, an arrestin-related trafficking adaptor (ART in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and contains a conserved arrestin motif, a ubiquitination site, and two PY motifs. Overexpression of arn1+ confers canavanine resistance on cells, whereas its disruption causes hypersensitivity to canavanine. We also show that Arn1 regulates endocytosis of the Cat1 amino acid transporter. Furthermore, deletion of arn1+ suppresses a defect of amino acid uptake and the aberrant Cat1 localization in tsc2Δ. Arn1 interacts with and is ubiquitinated by the Pub1 ubiquitin ligase, which is necessary to regulate Cat1 endocytosis. Cat1 undergoes ubiquitinations on lysine residues within the N-terminus, which are mediated, in part, by Arn1 to determine Cat1 localization. Correctively, Arn1 is an ART in S. pombe and contributes to amino acid uptake through regulating Cat1 endocytosis in which Tsc2 is involved.

  6. Sialic acid transport and catabolism are cooperatively regulated by SiaR and CRP in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston Jason W

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transport and catabolism of sialic acid, a critical virulence factor for nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, is regulated by two transcription factors, SiaR and CRP. Results Using a mutagenesis approach, glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN-6P was identified as a co-activator for SiaR. Evidence for the cooperative regulation of both the sialic acid catabolic and transport operons suggested that cooperativity between SiaR and CRP is required for regulation. cAMP was unable to influence the expression of the catabolic operon in the absence of SiaR but was able to induce catabolic operon expression when both SiaR and GlcN-6P were present. Alteration of helical phasing supported this observation by uncoupling SiaR and CRP regulation. The insertion of one half-turn of DNA between the SiaR and CRP operators resulted in the loss of SiaR-mediated repression of the transport operon while eliminating cAMP-dependent induction of the catabolic operon when GlcN-6P was present. SiaR and CRP were found to bind to their respective operators simultaneously and GlcN-6P altered the interaction of SiaR with its operator. Conclusions These results suggest multiple novel features for the regulation of these two adjacent operons. SiaR functions as both a repressor and an activator and SiaR and CRP interact to regulate both operons from a single set of operators.

  7. Biogas Production on Demand Regulated by Butyric Acid Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, K.; Schiffels, J.; Krafft, S.; Kuperjans, I.; Elbers, G.; Selmer, T.

    2016-03-01

    Investigating effects of volatile fatty acids on the biogas process it was observed that butyric acid can be used for transient stimulation of the methane production in biogas plants operating with low energy substrates like cattle manure. Upon addition of butyrate the methane output of the reactors doubled within 24 h and reached almost 3-times higher methane yields within 3-4 days. Butyrate was quantitatively eliminated and the reactors returned to the original productivity state within 3 days when application of butyrate was stopped. The opportunity to use butyrate feeding for increased biogas production on demand is discussed.

  8. Metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by inhibiting FOXO1-mediated transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jun [Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Ren, Pingping; Zhang, Lin [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Wang, Xing Li [Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Chen, Li [Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Shen, Ying H., E-mail: hyshen@bcm.edu [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, TX (United States)

    2010-02-26

    Objective: The accumulation of lipids in macrophages contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Strategies to reduce lipid accumulation in macrophages may have therapeutic potential for preventing and treating atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. The antidiabetic drug metformin has been reported to reduce lipid accumulation in adipocytes. In this study, we examined the effects of metformin on lipid accumulation in macrophages and investigated the mechanisms involved. Methods and results: We observed that metformin significantly reduced palmitic acid (PA)-induced intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages. Metformin promoted the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-1), while reduced the expression of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) which was involved in PA-induced lipid accumulation. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that metformin regulates FABP4 expression at the transcriptional level. We identified forkhead transcription factor FOXO1 as a positive regulator of FABP4 expression. Inhibiting FOXO1 expression with FOXO1 siRNA significantly reduced basal and PA-induced FABP4 expression. Overexpression of wild-type FOXO1 and constitutively active FOXO1 significantly increased FABP4 expression, whereas dominant negative FOXO1 dramatically decreased FABP4 expression. Metformin reduced FABP4 expression by promoting FOXO1 nuclear exclusion and subsequently inhibiting its activity. Conclusions: Taken together, these results suggest that metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by repressing FOXO1-mediated FABP4 transcription. Thus, metformin may have a protective effect against lipid accumulation in macrophages and may serve as a therapeutic agent for preventing and treating atherosclerosis in metabolic syndrome.

  9. Aspects of the regulation of long-chain fatty acid oxidation in bovine liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesse, B.W.; Emery, R.S.; Thomas, J.W.

    1986-09-01

    Factors involved in regulation of bovine hepatic fatty acid oxidation were examined using liver slices. Fatty acid oxidation was measured as the conversion of l-(/sup 14/C) palmitate to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and total (/sup 14/C) acid-soluble metabolites. Extended (5 to 7 d) fasting of Holstein cows had relatively little effect on palmitate oxidation to acid-soluble metabolites by liver slices, although oxidation to CO/sup 2/ was decreased. Feeding a restricted roughage, high concentrate ration to lactating cows resulted in inhibition of palmitate oxidation. Insulin, glucose, and acetate inhibited palmitate oxidation by bovine liver slices. The authors suggest the regulation of bovine hepatic fatty acid oxidation may be less dependent on hormonally induced alterations in enzyme activity as observed in rat liver and more dependent upon action of rumen fermentation products or their metabolites on enzyme systems involved in fatty acid oxidation.

  10. Insulin signaling regulates fatty acid catabolism at the level of CoA activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The insulin/IGF signaling pathway is a highly conserved regulator of metabolism in flies and mammals, regulating multiple physiological functions including lipid metabolism. Although insulin signaling is known to regulate the activity of a number of enzymes in metabolic pathways, a comprehensive understanding of how the insulin signaling pathway regulates metabolic pathways is still lacking. Accepted knowledge suggests the key regulated step in triglyceride (TAG catabolism is the release of fatty acids from TAG via the action of lipases. We show here that an additional, important regulated step is the activation of fatty acids for beta-oxidation via Acyl Co-A synthetases (ACS. We identify pudgy as an ACS that is transcriptionally regulated by direct FOXO action in Drosophila. Increasing or reducing pudgy expression in vivo causes a decrease or increase in organismal TAG levels respectively, indicating that pudgy expression levels are important for proper lipid homeostasis. We show that multiple ACSs are also transcriptionally regulated by insulin signaling in mammalian cells. In sum, we identify fatty acid activation onto CoA as an important, regulated step in triglyceride catabolism, and we identify a mechanistic link through which insulin regulates lipid homeostasis.

  11. MicroRNA and DNA methylation alterations mediating retinoic acid induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, Raymond L; Foley, Niamh H; Bray, Isabella M; Das, Sudipto; Buckley, Patrick G

    2011-10-01

    Many neuroblastoma cell lines can be induced to differentiate into a mature neuronal cell type with retinoic acid and other compounds, providing an important model system for elucidating signalling pathways involved in this highly complex process. Recently, it has become apparent that miRNAs, which act as regulators of gene expression at a post-transcriptional level, are differentially expressed in differentiating cells and play important roles governing many aspects of this process. This includes the down-regulation of DNA methyltransferases that cause the de-methylation and transcriptional activation of numerous protein coding gene sequences. The purpose of this article is to review involvement of miRNAs and DNA methylation alterations in the process of neuroblastoma cell differentiation. A thorough understanding of miRNA and genetic pathways regulating neuroblastoma cell differentiation potentially could lead to targeted therapies for this disease.

  12. Docosahexaenoic acid-derived neuroprotectin D1 induces neuronal survival via secretase- and PPARγ-mediated mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhai Zhao

    Full Text Available Neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1 is a stereoselective mediator derived from the omega-3 essential fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA with potent inflammatory resolving and neuroprotective bioactivity. NPD1 reduces Aβ42 peptide release from aging human brain cells and is severely depleted in Alzheimer's disease (AD brain. Here we further characterize the mechanism of NPD1's neurogenic actions using 3xTg-AD mouse models and human neuronal-glial (HNG cells in primary culture, either challenged with Aβ42 oligomeric peptide, or transfected with beta amyloid precursor protein (βAPP(sw (Swedish double mutation APP695(sw, K595N-M596L. We also show that NPD1 downregulates Aβ42-triggered expression of the pro-inflammatory enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and of B-94 (a TNF-α-inducible pro-inflammatory element and apoptosis in HNG cells. Moreover, NPD1 suppresses Aβ42 peptide shedding by down-regulating β-secretase-1 (BACE1 while activating the α-secretase ADAM10 and up-regulating sAPPα, thus shifting the cleavage of βAPP holoenzyme from an amyloidogenic into the non-amyloidogenic pathway. Use of the thiazolidinedione peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone, the irreversible PPARγ antagonist GW9662, and overexpressing PPARγ suggests that the NPD1-mediated down-regulation of BACE1 and Aβ42 peptide release is PPARγ-dependent. In conclusion, NPD1 bioactivity potently down regulates inflammatory signaling, amyloidogenic APP cleavage and apoptosis, underscoring the potential of this lipid mediator to rescue human brain cells in early stages of neurodegenerations.

  13. Regulation of AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated EPSPs in dendritic trees of thalamocortical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajeunesse, Francis; Kröger, Helmut; Timofeev, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Two main excitatory synapses are formed at the dendritic arbor of first-order nuclei thalamocortical (TC) neurons. Ascending sensory axons primarily establish contacts at large proximal dendrites, whereas descending corticothalamic fibers form synapses on thin distal dendrites. With the use of a multicomparment computational model based on fully reconstructed TC neurons from the ventroposterolateral nucleus of the cat, we compared local responses at the site of stimulation as well as somatic responses induced by both α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR)- and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated currents. We found that AMPAR-mediated responses, when synapses were located at proximal dendrites, induced a larger depolarization at the level of soma, whereas NMDAR-mediated responses were more efficient for synapses located at distal dendrites. The voltage transfer and transfer impedance were higher for NMDAR than for AMPAR activation at any location. For both types of synaptic current and for both input locations at the dendritic arbor, somatic responses were characterized by a low variability despite the large variability found in local responses in dendrites. The large neurons had overall smaller somatic responses than small neurons, but this relation was not found in local dendritic responses. We conclude that in TC cells, the dendritic location of small synaptic inputs does not play a major role in the amplitude of a somatic response, but the size of the neuron does. The variability of response amplitude between cells was much larger than the variability within cells. This suggests possible functional segregation of TC neurons of different size.

  14. IFNγ Regulates Activated Vδ2+ T Cells through a Feedback Mechanism Mediated by Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechter, Karoline; Dorronsoro, Akaitz; Jakobsson, Emma; Ferrin, Izaskun; Lang, Valérie; Sepulveda, Pilar; Pennington, Daniel J.; Trigueros, César

    2017-01-01

    γδ T cells play a role in a wide range of diseases such as autoimmunity and cancer. The majority of circulating human γδ T lymphocytes express a Vγ9Vδ2+ (Vδ2+) T cell receptor (TCR) and following activation release pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we show that IFNγ, produced by Vδ2+ cells, activates mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-mediated immunosupression, which in turn exerts a negative feedback mechanism on γδ T cell function ranging from cytokine production to proliferation. Importantly, this modulatory effect is limited to a short period of time (cell activation, after which MSCs can no longer exert their immunoregulatory capacity. Using genetically modified MSCs with the IFNγ receptor 1 constitutively silenced, we demonstrate that IFNγ is essential to this process. Activated γδ T cells induce expression of several factors by MSCs that participate in the depletion of amino acids. In particular, we show that indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an enzyme involved in L-tryptophan degradation, is responsible for MSC-mediated immunosuppression of Vδ2+ T cells. Thus, our data demonstrate that γδ T cell responses can be immuno-modulated by different signals derived from MSC. PMID:28076364

  15. Ursolic acid attenuates oxidative stress-mediated hepatocellular carcinoma induction by diethylnitrosamine in male Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayathri, Renganathan; Priya, D Kalpana Deepa; Gunassekaran, G R; Sakthisekaran, Dhanapal

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary cancer of the liver in Asian countries. For more than a decade natural dietary agents including fruits, vegetables and spices have drawn a great deal of attention in the prevention of diseases, preferably cancer. Ursolic acid is a natural triterpenoid widely found in food, medicinal herbs, apple peel and other products it has been extensively studied for its anticancer and antioxidant properties. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ursolic acid in diethylnitrosamine (DEN) induced and phenobarbital promoted hepatocarcinogenesis in male Wistar rats. Antioxidant status was assessed by alterations in level of lipid peroxides and protein carbonyls. Damage to plasma membranes was assessed by levels of membrane and tissue ATPases. Liver tissue was homogenized and utilized for estimation of lipid peroxides, protein carbonyls and glycoproteins. Anticoagulated blood was utilized for erythrocyte membrane isolation. Oral administration of UA 20 mg/kg bodyweight for 6 weeks decreased the levels of lipid peroxides and protein carbonyls at a significance of p< 0.05. Activities of membrane and tissue ATPases returned to normal after UA administration. Levels of glycoproteins were also restored after treatment. Histopathological observations were recorded. The findings from the above study suggest the effectiveness of UA in reducing the oxidative stress mediated changes in liver of rats. Since UA has been found to be a potent antioxidant, it can be suggested as an excellent chemopreventive agent in overcoming diseases like cancer which are mediated by free radicals.

  16. Autoimmunity in Arabidopsis acd11 Is Mediated by Epigenetic Regulation of an Immune Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palma, K.; Thorgrimsen, S.; Malinovsky, F.G.;

    2010-01-01

    . In a screen for lazarus (laz) mutants that suppress acd11 death we identified two genes, LAZ2 and LAZ5. LAZ2 encodes the histone lysine methyltransferase SDG8, previously shown to epigenetically regulate flowering time via modification of histone 3 (H3). LAZ5 encodes an RPS4-like R-protein, defined by several...... dominant negative alleles. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses showed that LAZ2/SDG8 is required for LAZ5 expression and H3 lysine 36 trimethylation at LAZ5 chromatin to maintain a transcriptionally active state. We hypothesize that LAZ5 triggers cell death in the absence of ACD11......, and that cell death in other lesion mimic mutants may also be caused by inappropriate activation of R genes. Moreover, SDG8 is required for basal and R protein-mediated pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis, revealing the importance of chromatin remodeling as a key process in plant innate immunity....

  17. Autoimmunity in Arabidopsis acd11 Is Mediated by Epigenetic Regulation of an Immune Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palma, K.; Thorgrimsen, S.; Malinovsky, F.G.;

    2010-01-01

    Certain pathogens deliver effectors into plant cells to modify host protein targets and thereby suppress immunity. These target modifications can be detected by intracellular immune receptors, or Resistance (R) proteins, that trigger strong immune responses including localized host cell death....... In a screen for lazarus (laz) mutants that suppress acd11 death we identified two genes, LAZ2 and LAZ5. LAZ2 encodes the histone lysine methyltransferase SDG8, previously shown to epigenetically regulate flowering time via modification of histone 3 (H3). LAZ5 encodes an RPS4-like R-protein, defined by several......, and that cell death in other lesion mimic mutants may also be caused by inappropriate activation of R genes. Moreover, SDG8 is required for basal and R protein-mediated pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis, revealing the importance of chromatin remodeling as a key process in plant innate immunity....

  18. Regulative effect of anandamide-mediated cannabinoid receptor in rats with visceral hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-qin HE

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the role of anandamide(ANA-mediated cannabinoid receptor 1(CB1 on the acquisition of visceral hypersensitivity in rats, and explore its underlying mechanism. Methods  The visceral hypersensitivity non-noxious/noxious colorectal distension (NNCRD/NCRD model of rat was reproduced by ovalbumin (OVA sensitization combined with NNCRD/NCRD. Fifty-four rats were randomly divided into control group (n=7, saline+CRD group (n=7, OVA+CRD+dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO group (n=8, OVA+CRD+different concentrations of ANA (0.5, 5.0, 10.0mg/kg groups (8 each, and OVA+CRD+ANA+AM251 group (n=8. The expression and quantitative assessment of CB1 were monitored by immunoflurorescence and laser scanning confocal analysis. The visceral sensitivity was evaluated by the area under curve (AUC of myoelectrical activity of abdominal wall muscle. Results  By NCRD at 80mmHg, the density of CB1 immunofluorescence intensity was significantly higher in L4–L6 of the spinal cord of the rats in saline+CRD group compared with that in control group (P 0.05. By NCRD at 80mmHg, the VMR-AUC increased obviously in OVA+CRD+DMSO group as compared with that of saline+CRD group, but it decreased significantly in OVA+CRD+high concentration ANA group (P < 0.05. When AM251 was intravenously given, VMR-AUC increased significantly in OVA+CRD+ANA+AM251 group compared with that in OVA+CRD+different concentrations of ANA groups (P < 0.05. Conclusions Intravenous administration of ANA may mitigate the visceral nociception induced by basic OVAsensitization combined with NCRD stimulation in CB1-mediated manner. It indicated that anandamide-mediated CB1 cannabinoid receptor may regulate the development and maintenance of visceral hypersensitivity.

  19. Nipbl and mediator cooperatively regulate gene expression to control limb development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Muto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Haploinsufficiency for Nipbl, a cohesin loading protein, causes Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS, the most common "cohesinopathy". It has been proposed that the effects of Nipbl-haploinsufficiency result from disruption of long-range communication between DNA elements. Here we use zebrafish and mouse models of CdLS to examine how transcriptional changes caused by Nipbl deficiency give rise to limb defects, a common condition in individuals with CdLS. In the zebrafish pectoral fin (forelimb, knockdown of Nipbl expression led to size reductions and patterning defects that were preceded by dysregulated expression of key early limb development genes, including fgfs, shha, hand2 and multiple hox genes. In limb buds of Nipbl-haploinsufficient mice, transcriptome analysis revealed many similar gene expression changes, as well as altered expression of additional classes of genes that play roles in limb development. In both species, the pattern of dysregulation of hox-gene expression depended on genomic location within the Hox clusters. In view of studies suggesting that Nipbl colocalizes with the mediator complex, which facilitates enhancer-promoter communication, we also examined zebrafish deficient for the Med12 Mediator subunit, and found they resembled Nipbl-deficient fish in both morphology and gene expression. Moreover, combined partial reduction of both Nipbl and Med12 had a strongly synergistic effect, consistent with both molecules acting in a common pathway. In addition, three-dimensional fluorescent in situ hybridization revealed that Nipbl and Med12 are required to bring regions containing long-range enhancers into close proximity with the zebrafish hoxda cluster. These data demonstrate a crucial role for Nipbl in limb development, and support the view that its actions on multiple gene pathways result from its influence, together with Mediator, on regulation of long-range chromosomal interactions.

  20. Potency of individual bile acids to regulate bile acid synthesis and transport genes in primary human hepatocyte cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Hong; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Lei, Xiaohong; Cui, Julia Yue; Ellis, Ewa; Strom, Stephen C; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate their own homeostasis, but the potency of individual bile acids is not known. This study examined the effects of cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on expression of BA synthesis and transport genes in human primary hepatocyte cultures. Hepatocytes were treated with the individual BAs at 10, 30, and 100μM for 48 h, and RNA was extracted for real-time PCR analysis. For the classic pathway of BA synthesis, BAs except for UDCA markedly suppressed CYP7A1 (70-95%), the rate-limiting enzyme of bile acid synthesis, but only moderately (35%) down-regulated CYP8B1 at a high concentration of 100μM. BAs had minimal effects on mRNA of two enzymes of the alternative pathway of BA synthesis, namely CYP27A1 and CYP7B1. BAs increased the two major target genes of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), namely the small heterodimer partner (SHP) by fourfold, and markedly induced fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) over 100-fold. The BA uptake transporter Na(+)-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide was unaffected, whereas the efflux transporter bile salt export pump was increased 15-fold and OSTα/β were increased 10-100-fold by BAs. The expression of the organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3; sixfold), ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter G5 (ABCG5; sixfold), multidrug associated protein-2 (MRP2; twofold), and MRP3 (threefold) were also increased, albeit to lesser degrees. In general, CDCA was the most potent and effective BA in regulating these genes important for BA homeostasis, whereas DCA and CA were intermediate, LCA the least, and UDCA ineffective.

  1. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor mediates the activity-dependent regulation of inhibition in neocortical cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, L C; DeWan, A; Lauer, H M; Turrigiano, G G

    1997-06-15

    The excitability of cortical circuits is modulated by interneurons that release the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. In primate and rodent visual cortex, activity deprivation leads to a decrease in the expression of GABA. This suggests that activity is able to adjust the strength of cortical inhibition, but this has not been demonstrated directly. In addition, the nature of the signal linking activity to GABA expression has not been determined. Activity is known to regulate the expression of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and BDNF has been shown to influence the phenotype of GABAergic interneurons. We use a culture system from postnatal rat visual cortex to test the hypothesis that activity is regulating the strength of cortical inhibition through the regulation of BDNF. Cultures were double-labeled against GABA and the neuronal marker MAP2, and the percentage of neurons that were GABA-positive was determined. Blocking spontaneous activity in these cultures reversibly decreased the number of GABA-positive neurons without affecting neuronal survival. Voltage-clamp analysis of inhibitory currents demonstrated that activity blockade also decreased GABA-mediated inhibition onto pyramidal neurons and raised pyramidal neuron firing rates. All of these effects were prevented by incubation with BDNF during activity blockade, but not by neurotrophin 3 or nerve growth factor. Additionally, blockade of neurotrophin signaling mimicked the effects of activity blockade on GABA expression. These data suggest that activity regulates cortical inhibition through a BDNF-dependent mechanism and that this neurotrophin plays an important role in the control of cortical excitability.

  2. COUP-TFII mediates progesterone regulation of uterine implantation by controlling ER activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Kurihara

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Progesterone and estrogen are critical regulators of uterine receptivity. To facilitate uterine remodeling for embryo attachment, estrogen activity in the uterine epithelia is attenuated by progesterone; however, the molecular mechanism by which this occurs is poorly defined. COUP-TFII (chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II; also known as NR2F2, a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is highly expressed in the uterine stroma and its expression is regulated by the progesterone-Indian hedgehog-Patched signaling axis that emanates from the epithelium. To further assess COUP-TFII uterine function, a conditional COUP-TFII knockout mouse was generated. This mutant mouse is infertile due to implantation failure, in which both embryo attachment and uterine decidualization are impaired. Using this animal model, we have identified a novel genetic pathway in which BMP2 lies downstream of COUP-TFII. Epithelial progesterone-induced Indian hedgehog regulates stromal COUP-TFII, which in turn controls BMP2 to allow decidualization to manifest in vivo. Interestingly, enhanced epithelial estrogen activity, which impedes maturation of the receptive uterus, was clearly observed in the absence of stromal-derived COUP-TFII. This finding is consistent with the notion that progesterone exerts its control of implantation through uterine epithelial-stromal cross-talk and reveals that stromal-derived COUP-TFII is an essential mediator of this complex cross-communication pathway. This finding also provides a new signaling paradigm for steroid hormone regulation in female reproductive biology, with attendant implications for furthering our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie dysregulation of hormonal signaling in such human reproductive disorders as endometriosis and endometrial cancer.

  3. LMTK2-mediated phosphorylation regulates CFTR endocytosis in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Simão; Cihil, Kristine M; Brautigan, David L; Amaral, Margarida D; Farinha, Carlos M; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka

    2014-05-23

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a Cl(-)-selective ion channel expressed in fluid-transporting epithelia. Lemur tyrosine kinase 2 (LMTK2) is a transmembrane protein with serine and threonine but not tyrosine kinase activity. Previous work identified CFTR as an in vitro substrate of LMTK2, suggesting a functional link. Here we demonstrate that LMTK2 co-immunoprecipitates with CFTR and phosphorylates CFTR-Ser(737) in human airway epithelial cells. LMTK2 knockdown or expression of inactive LMTK2 kinase domain increases cell surface density of CFTR by attenuating its endocytosis in human airway epithelial cells. Moreover, LMTK2 knockdown increases Cl(-) secretion mediated by the wild-type and rescued ΔF508-CFTR. Compared with the wild-type CFTR, the phosphorylation-deficient mutant CFTR-S737A shows increased cell surface density and decreased endocytosis. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism of the phospho-dependent inhibitory effect of CFTR-Ser(737) mediated by LMTK2 via endocytosis and inhibition of the cell surface density of CFTR Cl(-) channels. These data indicate that targeting LMTK2 may increase the cell surface density of CFTR Cl(-) channels and improve stability of pharmacologically rescued ΔF508-CFTR in patients with cystic fibrosis.

  4. Mitochondria-Mediated Protein Regulation Mechanism of Polymorphs-Dependent Inhibition of Nanoselenium on Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ge; Guo, Yuming; Yang, Gai; Yang, Lin; Ma, Xiaoming; Wang, Kui; Zhu, Lin; Sun, Jiaojiao; Wang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Hua

    2016-08-01

    The present study was (i) to prepare two types of selenium nanoparticles, namely an amorphous form of selenium quantum dots (A-SeQDs) and a crystalline form of selenium quantum dots (C-SeQDs); and (ii) to investigate the nano-bio interactions of A-SeQDs and C-SeQDs in MCF-7, HepG2, HeLa, NIH/3T3, L929 cells and BRL-3A cells. It was found that A-SeQDs could induce the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, necrosis and death of cells, while C-SeQDs had much weaker effects. This polymorphs-dependent anti-proliferative activity of nano-selenium was scarcely reported. Further investigation demonstrated that A-SeQDs could differentially regulate 61 proteins and several pathways related to stress response, protein synthesis, cell migration and cell cycle, including “p38 MAPK Signaling”, “p53 Signaling”, “14-3-3-mediated Signaling”, “p70S6K Signaling” and “Protein Ubiquitination Pathway”. This was the first report to demonstrate the involvement of protein synthesis and post-translational modification pathways in the anti-proliferative activity associated with NMs. Compared with previously fragmentary studies, this study use a nanomics approach combining bioinformatics and proteomics to systematically investigate the nano-bio interactions of selenium nanoparticles in cancer cells.

  5. Nuclear DISC1 regulates CRE-mediated gene transcription and sleep homeostasis in the fruit fly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamura, N; Ando, T; Maruyama, Y; Fujimuro, M; Mochizuki, H; Honjo, K; Shimoda, M; Toda, H; Sawamura-Yamamoto, T; Makuch, L A; Hayashi, A; Ishizuka, K; Cascella, N G; Kamiya, A; Ishida, N; Tomoda, T; Hai, T; Furukubo-Tokunaga, K; Sawa, A

    2008-12-01

    Disrupted-in-schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) is one of major susceptibility factors for a wide range of mental illnesses, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression and autism spectrum conditions. DISC1 is located in several subcellular domains, such as the centrosome and the nucleus, and interacts with various proteins, including NudE-like (NUDEL/NDEL1) and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4)/CREB2. Nevertheless, a role for DISC1 in vivo remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we have generated a Drosophila model for examining normal functions of DISC1 in living organisms. DISC1 transgenic flies with preferential accumulation of exogenous human DISC1 in the nucleus display disturbance in sleep homeostasis, which has been reportedly associated with CREB signaling/CRE-mediated gene transcription. Thus, in mammalian cells, we characterized nuclear DISC1, and identified a subset of nuclear DISC1 that colocalizes with the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies, a nuclear compartment for gene transcription. Furthermore, we identified three functional cis-elements that regulate the nuclear localization of DISC1. We also report that DISC1 interacts with ATF4/CREB2 and a corepressor N-CoR, modulating CRE-mediated gene transcription.

  6. Deficits in emotion regulation mediate the relationship between childhood abuse and later eating disorder symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Erin E; Fischer, Sarah; Jackson, Joan L; Harding, Hilary G

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship of child maltreatment to both emotion dysregulation and subsequent eating pathology. In an effort to extend previous research, the authors examined the unique impact of childhood emotional abuse (CEA) on emotion dysregulation and eating disorder (ED) symptoms while controlling for the effects of sexual and physical abuse. Structural equation modeling was utilized to simultaneously examine the effects of all three abuse types on multiple dependent variables as well as examine whether deficits in emotion regulation mediated the relationship between abuse and eating pathology. Results from a survey of 1,254 female college students revealed significant paths from abuse subtypes to specific eating disorder symptoms, with CEA evidencing the strongest association with ED symptoms. Additionally, emotion dysregulation was positively associated with ED symptoms, and mediated the effects of emotional abuse on symptoms. Findings support previous research on the enduring effects of emotional abuse as well as highlight the importance of the assessment of CEA in the treatment of ED symptoms.

  7. SET9-Mediated Regulation of TGF-β Signaling Links Protein Methylation to Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilianos Elkouris

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available TGF-β signaling regulates a variety of cellular processes, including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, immune responses, and fibrogenesis. Here, we describe a lysine methylation-mediated mechanism that controls the pro-fibrogenic activity of TGF-β. We find that the methyltransferase Set9 potentiates TGF-β signaling by targeting Smad7, an inhibitory downstream effector. Smad7 methylation promotes interaction with the E3 ligase Arkadia and, thus, ubiquitination-dependent degradation. Depletion or pharmacological inhibition of Set9 results in elevated Smad7 protein levels and inhibits TGF-β-dependent expression of genes encoding extracellular matrix components. The inhibitory effect of Set9 on TGF-β-mediated extracellular matrix production is further demonstrated in mouse models of pulmonary fibrosis. Lung fibrosis induced by bleomycin or Ad-TGF-β treatment was highly compromised in Set9-deficient mice. These results uncover a complex regulatory interplay among multiple Smad7 modifications and highlight the possibility that protein methyltransferases may represent promising therapeutic targets for treating lung fibrosis.

  8. Rab20 regulates phagosome maturation in RAW264 macrophages during Fc gamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youhei Egami

    Full Text Available Rab20, a member of the Rab GTPase family, is known to be involved in membrane trafficking, however its implication in FcγR-mediated phagocytosis is unclear. We examined the spatiotemporal localization of Rab20 during phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized erythrocytes (IgG-Es in RAW264 macrophages. By the live-cell imaging of fluorescent protein-fused Rab20, it was shown that Rab20 was transiently associated with the phagosomal membranes. During the early stage of phagosome formation, Rab20 was not localized on the membranes of phagocytic cups, but was gradually recruited to the newly formed phagosomes. Although Rab20 was colocalized with Rab5 to some extent, the association of Rab20 with the phagosomes persisted even after the loss of Rab5 from the phagosomal membranes. Then, Rab20 was colocalized with Rab7 and Lamp1, late endosomal/lysosomal markers, on the internalized phagosomes. Moreover, our analysis of Rab20 mutant expression revealed that the maturation of phagosomes was significantly delayed in cells expressing the GDP-bound mutant Rab20-T19N. These data suggest that Rab20 is an important component of phagosome and regulates the phagosome maturation during FcγR-mediated phagocytosis.

  9. What makes ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation sensitive to amino Acid limitation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation mechanisms are commonly used to control amino acid biosynthetic operons in bacteria. The mRNA leader of such an operon contains an open reading frame with "regulatory" codons, cognate to the amino acid that is synthesized by the enzymes encoded by the operon. When the amino acid is in short supply, translation of the regulatory codons is slow, which allows transcription to continue into the structural genes of the operon. When amino acid supply is in excess, translation of regulatory codons is rapid, which leads to termination of transcription. We use a discrete master equation approach to formulate a probabilistic model for the positioning of the RNA polymerase and the ribosome in the attenuator leader sequence. The model describes how the current rate of amino acid supply compared to the demand in protein synthesis (signal determines the expression of the amino acid biosynthetic operon (response. The focus of our analysis is on the sensitivity of operon expression to a change in the amino acid supply. We show that attenuation of transcription can be hyper-sensitive for two main reasons. The first is that its response depends on the outcome of a race between two multi-step mechanisms with synchronized starts: transcription of the leader of the operon, and translation of its regulatory codons. The relative change in the probability that transcription is aborted (attenuated can therefore be much larger than the relative change in the time it takes for the ribosome to read a regulatory codon. The second is that the general usage frequencies of codons of the type used in attenuation control are small. A small percentage decrease in the rate of supply of the controlled amino acid can therefore lead to a much larger percentage decrease in the rate of reading a regulatory codon. We show that high sensitivity further requires a particular choice of regulatory codon among several synonymous codons for the

  10. What makes ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation sensitive to amino acid limitation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Elf

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation mechanisms are commonly used to control amino acid biosynthetic operons in bacteria. The mRNA leader of such an operon contains an open reading frame with "regulatory" codons, cognate to the amino acid that is synthesized by the enzymes encoded by the operon. When the amino acid is in short supply, translation of the regulatory codons is slow, which allows transcription to continue into the structural genes of the operon. When amino acid supply is in excess, translation of regulatory codons is rapid, which leads to termination of transcription. We use a discrete master equation approach to formulate a probabilistic model for the positioning of the RNA polymerase and the ribosome in the attenuator leader sequence. The model describes how the current rate of amino acid supply compared to the demand in protein synthesis (signal determines the expression of the amino acid biosynthetic operon (response. The focus of our analysis is on the sensitivity of operon expression to a change in the amino acid supply. We show that attenuation of transcription can be hyper-sensitive for two main reasons. The first is that its response depends on the outcome of a race between two multi-step mechanisms with synchronized starts: transcription of the leader of the operon, and translation of its regulatory codons. The relative change in the probability that transcription is aborted (attenuated can therefore be much larger than the relative change in the time it takes for the ribosome to read a regulatory codon. The second is that the general usage frequencies of codons of the type used in attenuation control are small. A small percentage decrease in the rate of supply of the controlled amino acid can therefore lead to a much larger percentage decrease in the rate of reading a regulatory codon. We show that high sensitivity further requires a particular choice of regulatory codon among several synonymous codons for the

  11. What Makes Ribosome-Mediated Transcriptional Attenuation Sensitive to Amino Acid Limitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elf, Johan; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2005-01-01

    Ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation mechanisms are commonly used to control amino acid biosynthetic operons in bacteria. The mRNA leader of such an operon contains an open reading frame with “regulatory” codons, cognate to the amino acid that is synthesized by the enzymes encoded by the operon. When the amino acid is in short supply, translation of the regulatory codons is slow, which allows transcription to continue into the structural genes of the operon. When amino acid supply is in excess, translation of regulatory codons is rapid, which leads to termination of transcription. We use a discrete master equation approach to formulate a probabilistic model for the positioning of the RNA polymerase and the ribosome in the attenuator leader sequence. The model describes how the current rate of amino acid supply compared to the demand in protein synthesis (signal) determines the expression of the amino acid biosynthetic operon (response). The focus of our analysis is on the sensitivity of operon expression to a change in the amino acid supply. We show that attenuation of transcription can be hyper-sensitive for two main reasons. The first is that its response depends on the outcome of a race between two multi-step mechanisms with synchronized starts: transcription of the leader of the operon, and translation of its regulatory codons. The relative change in the probability that transcription is aborted (attenuated) can therefore be much larger than the relative change in the time it takes for the ribosome to read a regulatory codon. The second is that the general usage frequencies of codons of the type used in attenuation control are small. A small percentage decrease in the rate of supply of the controlled amino acid can therefore lead to a much larger percentage decrease in the rate of reading a regulatory codon. We show that high sensitivity further requires a particular choice of regulatory codon among several synonymous codons for the same amino acid

  12. Matrix stiffness regulation of integrin-mediated mechanotransduction during osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yu-Ru V; Tseng, Kuo-Fung; Lai, Hsiu-Yu; Lin, Chi-Hung; Lee, Oscar K

    2011-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured on extracellular matrices with different stiffness have been shown to possess diverse lineage commitment owing to the extracellular mechanical stimuli sensed by the cells. The aim of this study was to further delineate how matrix stiffness affects intracellular signaling through the mechanotransducers Rho kinase (ROCK) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and subsequently regulates the osteogenic phenotype of MSCs. MSCs were cultured in osteogenic medium on tunable polyacrylamide hydrogels coated with type I collagen with elasticities corresponding to Young's modulus of 7.0 ± 1.2 and 42.1 ± 3.2 kPa. Osteogenic differentiation was increased on stiffer matrices, as evident by type I collagen, osteocalcin, and Runx2 gene expressions and alizarin red S staining for mineralization. Western blot analysis demonstrated an increase in kinase activities of ROCK, FAK, and ERK1/2 on stiffer matrices. Inhibition of FAK, an important mediator of osteogenic differentiation, and inhibition of ROCK, a known mechanotransducer of matrix stiffness during osteogenesis, resulted in decreased expression of osteogenic markers during osteogenic induction. In addition, FAK affects osteogenic differentiation through ERK1/2, whereas ROCK regulates both FAK and ERK1/2. Furthermore, α(2)-integrin was upregulated on stiffer matrices during osteogenic induction, and its knockdown by siRNA downregulated the osteogenic phenotype through ROCK, FAK, and ERK1/2. Taken together, our results provide evidence that the matrix rigidity affects the osteogenic outcome of MSCs through mechanotransduction events that are mediated by α(2)-integrin.

  13. Molecular Network Analysis Suggests Aberrant CREB-Mediated Gene Regulation in the Alzheimer Disease Hippocampus

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    Jun-ichi Satoh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD involves the complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors affecting multiple cellular pathways. Recent advances in systems biology provide a system-level understanding of AD by elucidating the genome-wide molecular interactions. By using KeyMolnet, a bioinformatics tool for analyzing molecular interactions on the curated knowledgebase, we characterized molecular network of 2,883 all stages of AD-related genes (ADGs and 559 incipient AD-related genes (IADGs identified by global gene expression profiling of the hippocampal CA1 region of AD brains in terms of significant clinical and pathological correlations (Blalock et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101: 2173-2178, 2004. By the common upstream search, KeyMolnet identified cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB as the principal transcription factor exhibiting the most significant relevance to molecular networks of both ADGs and IADGs. The CREB-regulated transcriptional network included upregulated and downregulated sets of ADGs and IADGs, suggesting an involvement of generalized deregulation of the CREB signaling pathway in the pathophysiology of AD, beginning at the early stage of the disease. To verify the in silico observations in vivo, we conducted immunohistochemical studies of 11 AD and 13 age-matched control brains by using anti-phoshorylated CREB (pCREB antibody. An abnormal accumulation of pCREB imunoreactivity was identified in granules of granulovacuolar degeneration (GVD in the hippocampal neurons of AD brains. These observations suggest that aberrant CREB-mediated gene regulation serves as a molecular biomarker of AD-related pathological processes, and support the hypothesis that sequestration of pCREB in GVD granules is in part responsible for deregulation of CREB-mediated gene expression in AD hippocampus.

  14. Nitro-fatty acids in plant signaling: New key mediators of nitric oxide metabolism

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    Capilla Mata-Pérez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies in animal systems have shown that NO can interact with fatty acids to generate nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FAs. They are the product of the reaction between reactive nitrogen species and unsaturated fatty acids, and are considered novel mediators of cell signaling based mainly on a proven anti-inflammatory response. Although these signaling mediators have been described widely in animal systems, NO2-FAs have scarcely been studied in plants. Preliminary data have revealed the endogenous presence of free and protein-adducted NO2-FAs in extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO, which appear to be contributing to the cardiovascular benefits associated with the Mediterranean diet. Importantly, new findings have displayed the endogenous occurrence of nitro-linolenic acid (NO2-Ln in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the modulation of NO2-Ln levels throughout this plant's development. Furthermore, a transcriptomic analysis by RNA-seq technology established a clear signaling role for this molecule, demonstrating that NO2-Ln was involved in plant-defense response against different abiotic-stress conditions, mainly by inducing the chaperone network and supporting a conserved mechanism of action in both animal and plant defense processes. Thus, NO2-Ln levels significantly rose under several abiotic-stress conditions, highlighting the strong signaling role of these molecules in the plant-protection mechanism. Finally, the potential of NO2-Ln as a NO donor has recently been described both in vitro and in vivo. Jointly, this ability gives NO2-Ln the potential to act as a signaling molecule by the direct release of NO, due to its capacity to induce different changes mediated by NO or NO-related molecules such as nitration and S-nitrosylation, or by the electrophilic capacity of these molecules through a nitroalkylation mechanism. Here, we describe the current state of the art regarding the advances performed in the field of NO2-FAs in plants and their

  15. New insights into the regulation of plant immunity by amino acid metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeier, Jürgen

    2013-12-01

    Besides defence pathways regulated by classical stress hormones, distinct amino acid metabolic pathways constitute integral parts of the plant immune system. Mutations in several genes involved in Asp-derived amino acid biosynthetic pathways can have profound impact on plant resistance to specific pathogen types. For instance, amino acid imbalances associated with homoserine or threonine accumulation elevate plant immunity to oomycete pathogens but not to pathogenic fungi or bacteria. The catabolism of Lys produces the immune signal pipecolic acid (Pip), a cyclic, non-protein amino acid. Pip amplifies plant defence responses and acts as a critical regulator of plant systemic acquired resistance, defence priming and local resistance to bacterial pathogens. Asp-derived pyridine nucleotides influence both pre- and post-invasion immunity, and the catabolism of branched chain amino acids appears to affect plant resistance to distinct pathogen classes by modulating crosstalk of salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-regulated defence pathways. It also emerges that, besides polyamine oxidation and NADPH oxidase, Pro metabolism is involved in the oxidative burst and the hypersensitive response associated with avirulent pathogen recognition. Moreover, the acylation of amino acids can control plant resistance to pathogens and pests by the formation of protective plant metabolites or by the modulation of plant hormone activity.

  16. Regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis by the global regulator CcpA and the local regulator FabT in Streptococcus mutans

    OpenAIRE

    Faustoferri, R.C.; Hubbard, C.J.; Santiago, B.; Buckley, A.A.; Seifert, T.B.; Quivey, R.G.

    2014-01-01

    SMU.1745c, encoding a putative transcriptional regulator of the MarR family, maps to a location proximal to the fab gene cluster in Streptococcus mutans. Deletion of the SMU.1745c (fabTSm) coding region resulted in a membrane fatty acid composition comprised of longer-chained, unsaturated fatty acids (UFA), compared with the parent strain. Previous reports have indicated a role for FabT in regulation of genes in the fab gene cluster in other organisms, through binding to a palindromic DNA seq...

  17. MiRNA-194 Regulates Palmitic Acid-Induced Toll-Like Receptor 4 Inflammatory Responses in THP-1 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Huiqun; Liu, Chaoqi; Zou, Xiaohua; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Changcheng; Yuan, Ding

    2015-05-13

    There is strong evidence to suggest that inflammatory responses link obesity and diseases, and the understanding of obesity-induced inflammatory mechanisms is central to the pathogenesis of diseases such asnonalcoholic fatty liver disease(NAFLD) and atherosclerosis that are modified by obesity. Based on this, anti-inflammatory treatments become a potential therapies for obesity-related diseases like NAFLD.A critical role of toll-like receptor (TLR) and its downstream molecules such as tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6(TRAF6) has been documented in inflammatory response induced by fatty acid. TLR pathway regulation provides a new insight to controlling the inflammatory response induced by fatty acid. Taken together, our study was aimed to understand the mechanism of fatty acid-mediated inflammation and look for an effective target which can prevent the inflammatory response induced by obesity. In this study, we used the saturated fatty acid palmitic acid (PA) to activate TLR4 signal pathway in human monocyte cells THP-1 that established an intracellular inflammatory model. Followed with activated TLR4, downstream molecular TRAF6 was upregulated and ultimately induced proinflammatory cytokine production. Based on this model, we also found that PA downregulated miR-194 expression with TLR4 activation. Moreover, our results showed that key signal molecular TRAF6 is a target of miR-194, overexpression of miR-194 directly decreased TRAF6 expression and attenuated the release of proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α in PA-activated monocyte THP-1. We conclude that miR-194 negatively regulates the TLR4 signal pathway which is activated by PA through directly negative TRAF6 expression.

  18. Airborne agricultural particulate matter induces inflammatory cytokine secretion by respiratory epithelial cells: mechanisms of regulation by eicosanoid lipid signal mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malireddy, Smitha; Lawson, Courtney; Steinhour, Emily; Hart, Judy; Kotha, Sainath R; Patel, Rishi B; Zhao, Lingying; Wilkins, John R; Marsh, Clay B; Magalang, Ulysses J; Romberger, Debra; Wewers, Mark D; Parinandi, Narasimham L

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the airborne poultry dust (particulate matter, PM)-induced respiratory tract inflammation, a common symptom in agricultural respiratory diseases. The study was based on the hypothesis that poultry PM would induce the release of inflammatory cytokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) by respiratory epithelial cells under the upstream regulation by cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) activation and subsequent formation of cyclooxygenase (COX)- and lipoxygenase (LOX)-catalyzed arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites (eicosanoids). Human lung epithelial cells (A549) in culture were treated with the poultry PM (0.1-1.0 mg) for different lengths of time, following which PLA2 activity, release of eicosanoids and secretion of IL-8 in cells were determined. Poultry PM (1.0 mg/ml) caused a significant activation of PLA2 in a time-dependent manner (15-60 min), which was significantly attenuated by the calcium-chelating agents, cPLA2-specific inhibitor (AACOCF3) and antioxidant (vitamin C) in A549 cells. Poultry PM also significantly induced the release of COX- and LOX-catalyzed eicosanoids (prostaglandins, thromboxane A2 and leukotrienes B4 and C4) and upstream activation of AA LOX in the cells. Poultry PM also significantly induced release of IL-8 by the cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly attenuated by the calcium chelating agents, antioxidants and COX- and LOX-specific inhibitors. The current study for the first time revealed that the poultry PM-induced IL-8 release from the respiratory epithelial cells was regulated upstream by reactive oxygen species, cPLA2-, COX- and LOX-derived eicosanoid lipid signal mediators.

  19. Structural insights into the regulation of aromatic amino acid hydroxylation

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2015-01-01

    The aromatic amino acid hydroxylases phenylalanine hydroxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase, and tryptophan hydroxylase are homotetramers, with each subunit containing a homologous catalytic domain and a divergent regulatory domain. The solution structure of the regulatory domain of tyrosine hydroxylase establishes that it contains a core ACT domain similar to that in phenylalanine hydroxylase. The isolated regulatory domain of tyrosine hydroxylase forms a stable dimer, while that of phenylalanine h...

  20. Folic acid mediates activation of the pro-oncogene STAT3 via the Folate Receptor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Mariann F; Greibe, Eva; Skovbjerg, Signe; Rohde, Sarah; Kristensen, Anders C M; Jensen, Trine R; Stentoft, Charlotte; Kjær, Karina H; Kronborg, Camilla S; Martensen, Pia M

    2015-07-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a well-described pro-oncogene found constitutively activated in several cancer types. Folates are B vitamins that, when taken up by cells through the Reduced Folate Carrier (RFC), are essential for normal cell growth and replication. Many cancer cells overexpress a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored Folate Receptor α (FRα). The function of FRα in cancer cells is still poorly described, and it has been suggested that transport of folate is not its primary function in these cells. We show here that folic acid and folinic acid can activate STAT3 through FRα in a Janus Kinase (JAK)-dependent manner, and we demonstrate that gp130 functions as a transducing receptor for this signalling. Moreover, folic acid can promote dose dependent cell proliferation in FRα-positive HeLa cells, but not in FRα-negative HEK293 cells. After folic acid treatment of HeLa cells, up-regulation of the STAT3 responsive genes Cyclin A2 and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) were verified by qRT-PCR. The identification of this FRα-STAT3 signal transduction pathway activated by folic and folinic acid contributes to the understanding of the involvement of folic acid in preventing neural tube defects as well as in tumour growth. Previously, the role of folates in these diseases has been attributed to their roles as one-carbon unit donors following endocytosis into the cell. Our finding that folic acid can activate STAT3 via FRα adds complexity to the established roles of B9 vitamins in cancer and neural tube defects.

  1. PINK1 positively regulates IL-1β-mediated signaling through Tollip and IRAK1 modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Hyun Jung

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson disease (PD is characterized by a slow, progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantianigra. The cause of neuronal loss in PD is not well understood, but several genetic loci, including PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1, have been linked to early-onset autosomal recessive forms of familial PD. Neuroinflammation greatly contributes to PD neuronal degeneration and pathogenesis. IL-1 is one of the principal cytokines that regulates various immune and inflammatory responses via the activation of the transcription factors NF-κB and activating protein-1. Despite the close relationship between PD and neuroinflammation, the functional roles of PD-linked genes during inflammatory processes remain poorly understood. Methods To explore the functional roles of PINK1 in response to IL-1β stimulation, HEK293 cells, mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from PINK1-null (PINK1−/− and control (PINK1+/+ mice, and 293 IL-1RI cells stably expressing type 1 IL-1 receptor were used. Immunoprecipitation and western blot analysis were performed to detect protein–protein interaction and protein ubiquitination. To confirm the effect of PINK1 on NF-κB activation, NF-κB-dependent firefly luciferase reporter assay was conducted. Results PINK1 specifically binds two components of the IL-1-mediated signaling cascade, Toll-interacting protein (Tollip and IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1. The association of PINK1 with Tollip, a negative regulator of IL-1β signaling, increases upon IL-1β stimulation, which then facilitates the dissociation of Tollip from IRAK1 as well as the assembly of the IRAK1–TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6 complex. PINK1 also enhances Lys63-linked polyubiquitination of IRAK1, an essential modification of recruitment of NF-κB essential modulator and subsequent IκB kinase activation, and increases formation of the intermediate signalosome including IRAK1, TRAF6, and

  2. EAR motif-mediated transcriptional repression in plants: an underlying mechanism for epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagale, Sateesh; Rozwadowski, Kevin

    2011-02-01

    Ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated Amphiphilic Repression (EAR) motif-mediated transcriptional repression is emerging as one of the principal mechanisms of plant gene regulation. The EAR motif, defined by the consensus sequence patterns of either LxLxL or DLNxxP, is the most predominant form of transcriptional repression motif so far identified in plants. Additionally, this active repression motif is highly conserved in transcriptional regulators known to function as negative regulators in a broad range of developmental and physiological processes across evolutionarily diverse plant species. Recent discoveries of co-repressors interacting with EAR motifs, such as TOPLESS (TPL) and AtSAP18, have begun to unravel the mechanisms of EAR motif-mediated repression. The demonstration of genetic interaction between mutants of TPL and AtHDA19, co-complex formation between TPL-related 1 (TPR1) and AtHDA19, as well as direct physical interaction between AtSAP18 and AtHDA19 support a model where EAR repressors, via recruitment of chromatin remodeling factors, facilitate epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Here, we discuss the biological significance of EAR-mediated gene regulation in the broader context of plant biology and present literature evidence in support of a model for EAR motif-mediated repression via the recruitment and action of chromatin modifiers. Additionally, we discuss the possible influences of phosphorylation and ubiquitination on the function and turnover of EAR repressors.

  3. Role of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript in estradiol-mediated neuroprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yun; Zhang, Wenri; Klaus, Judith; Young, Jennifer; Koerner, Ines; Sheldahl, Laird C.; Hurn, Patricia D.; Martínez-Murillo, Francisco; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2006-09-01

    Estrogen reduces brain injury after experimental cerebral ischemia in part through a genomic mechanism of action. Using DNA microarrays, we analyzed the genomic response of the brain to estradiol, and we identified a transcript, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), that is highly induced in the cerebral cortex by estradiol under ischemic conditions. Using in vitro and in vivo models of neural injury, we confirmed and characterized CART mRNA and protein up-regulation by estradiol in surviving neurons, and we demonstrated that i.v. administration of a rat CART peptide is protective against ischemic brain injury in vivo. We further demonstrated binding of cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein to a CART promoter CRE site in ischemic brain and rapid activation by CART of ERK in primary cultured cortical neurons. The findings suggest that CART is an important player in estrogen-mediated neuroprotection and a potential therapeutic agent for stroke and other neurodegenerative diseases. ischemia | stroke | estrogen

  4. Transcriptional regulation of LUX by CBF1 mediates cold input to the circadian clock in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Brenda Y; Sanchez, Sabrina E; Breton, Ghislain; Pruneda-Paz, Jose L; Krogan, Naden T; Kay, Steve A

    2014-07-07

    Circadian clocks allow organisms to anticipate daily changes in the environment to enhance overall fitness. Transcription factors (TFs) play a prominent role in the molecular mechanism but are incompletely described possibly due to functional redundancy, gene family proliferation, and/or lack of context-specific assays. To overcome these, we performed a high-throughput yeast one-hybrid screen using the LUX ARRYHTHMO (LUX) gene promoter as bait against an Arabidopsis TF library. LUX is a unique gene because its mutation causes severe clock defects and transcript maintains high-amplitude cycling in the cold. We report the well-characterized cold-inducible C-repeat (CRT)/drought-responsive element (DRE) binding factor CBF1/DREB1b is a transcriptional regulator of LUX. We show that CBF1 binds the CRT in the LUX promoter, and both genes overlap in temporal and spatial expression. CBF1 overexpression causes upregulation of LUX and also alters other clock gene transcripts. LUX promoter regions including the CRT and Evening Element (EE) are sufficient for high-amplitude transcriptional cycling in the cold, and cold-acclimated lux seedlings are sensitive to freezing stress. Our data show cold signaling is integrated into the clock by CBF-mediated regulation of LUX expression, thereby defining a new transcriptional mechanism for temperature input to the circadian clock.

  5. ROP GTPase-mediated auxin signaling regulates pavement cell interdigitation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deshu Lin; Huibo Ren; Ying Fu

    2015-01-01

    In multicel ular plant organs, cel shape formation depends on molecular switches to transduce developmental or environmental signals and to coordinate cel‐to‐cel communi-cation. Plants have a specific subfamily of the Rho GTPase family, usual y cal ed Rho of Plants (ROP), which serve as a critical signal transducer involved in many cel ular processes. In the last decade, important advances in the ROP‐mediated regulation of plant cel morphogenesis have been made by using Arabidopsis thaliana leaf and cotyledon pavement cel s. Especial y, the auxin‐ROP signaling networks have been demonstrated to control interdigitated growth of pavement cel s to form jigsaw‐puzzle shapes. Here, we review findings related to the discovery of this novel auxin‐signaling mecha-nism at the cel surface. This signaling pathway is to a large extent independent of the wel‐known Transport Inhibitor Response (TIR)–Auxin Signaling F‐Box (AFB) pathway, and instead requires Auxin Binding Protein 1 (ABP1) interaction with the plasma membrane‐localized, transmembrane kinase (TMK) receptor‐like kinase to regulate ROP proteins. Once activated, ROP influences cytoskeletal organization and inhibits endocytosis of the auxin transporter PIN1. The present review focuses on ROP signaling and its self‐organizing feature al owing ROP proteins to serve as a bustling signal decoder and integrator for plant cel morphogenesis.

  6. RhoA-mediated MLC2 regulates actin dynamics for cytokinesis in meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xing; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Cheng-Cheng; Wang, Qiao-Chu; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Xiong, Bo; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2016-01-01

    During oocyte meiosis, the bipolar spindle forms in the central cytoplasm and then migrates to the cortex. Subsequently, the oocyte extrudes the polar body through two successive asymmetric divisions, which are regulated primarily by actin filaments. Myosin light chain2 (MLC2) phosphorylation plays pivotal roles in smooth muscle contraction, stress fiber formation, cell motility and cytokinesis. However, whether MLC2 phosphorylation participates in the oocyte polarization and asymmetric division has not been clarified. The present study investigated the expression and functions of MLC2 during mouse oocyte meiosis. Our result showed that p-MLC2 was localized in the oocyte cortex, with a thickened cap above the chromosomes. Meanwhile, p-MLC2 was also localized in the poles of spindle. Disruption of MLC2 activity by MLC2 knock down (KD) caused the failure of polar body extrusion. Immunofluorescent staining showed that a large proportion of oocytes arrested in telophase stage and failed to undergo cytokinesis after culturing for 12 hours. In the meantime, actin filament staining at oocyte membrane and cytoplasm were reduced in MLC2 KD oocytes. Finally, we found that the phosphorylation of MLC2 protein levels was decreased after disruption of RhoA activity. Above all, our data indicated that the RhoA-mediated MLC2 regulates the actin organization for cytokinesis during mouse oocyte maturation.

  7. MxaY regulates the lanthanide-mediated methanol dehydrogenase switch in Methylomicrobium buryatense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Chu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Many methylotrophs, microorganisms that consume carbon compounds lacking carbon–carbon bonds, use two different systems to oxidize methanol for energy production and biomass accumulation. The MxaFI methanol dehydrogenase (MDH contains calcium in its active site, while the XoxF enzyme contains a lanthanide in its active site. The genes encoding the MDH enzymes are differentially regulated by the presence of lanthanides. In this study, we found that the histidine kinase MxaY controls the lanthanide-mediated switch in Methylomicrobium buryatense 5GB1C. MxaY controls the transcription of genes encoding MxaFI and XoxF at least partially by controlling the transcript levels of the orphan response regulator MxaB. We identify a constitutively active version of MxaY, and identify the mutated residue that may be involved in lanthanide sensing. Lastly, we find evidence to suggest that tight control of active MDH production is required for wild-type growth rates.

  8. Autophagy-mediated Regulation of BACE1 Protein Trafficking and Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tuancheng; Tammineni, Prasad; Agrawal, Chanchal; Jeong, Yu Young; Cai, Qian

    2017-02-03

    β-Site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is the major neuronal β-secretase for amyloid-β generation and is degraded in lysosomes. The autophagy-lysosomal system plays a key role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis in neurons. Recent studies established that nascent autophagosomes in distal axons move predominantly in the retrograde direction toward the soma, where mature lysosomes are mainly located. However, it remains unknown whether autophagy plays a critical role in regulation of BACE1 trafficking and degradation. Here, we report that induction of neuronal autophagy enhances BACE1 turnover, which is suppressed by lysosomal inhibition. A significant portion of BACE1 is recruited to the autophagy pathway and co-migrates robustly with autophagic vacuoles along axons. Moreover, we reveal that autophagic vacuole-associated BACE1 is accumulated in the distal axon of Alzheimer's disease-related mutant human APP transgenic neurons and mouse brains. Inducing autophagy in mutant human APP neurons augments autophagic retention of BACE1 in distal axons, leading to enhanced β-cleavage of APP. This phenotype can be reversed by Snapin-enhanced retrograde transport, which facilitates BACE1 trafficking to lysosomes for degradation. Therefore, our study provides new insights into autophagy-mediated regulation of BACE1 turnover and APP processing, thus building a foundation for future development of potential Alzheimer's disease therapeutic strategies.

  9. Regulating fatty acids in infant formula: critical assessment of U.S. policies and practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Fatty acids in breast-milk such as docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid, commonly known as DHA and ARA, contribute to the healthy development of children in various ways. However, the manufactured versions that are added to infant formula might not have the same health benefits as those in breast-milk. There is evidence that the manufactured additives might cause harm to infants’ health, and they might lead to unwarranted increases in the cost of infant formula. The addition of such fatty acids to infant formula needs to be regulated. In the U.S., the Food and Drug Administration has primary responsibility for regulating the composition of infant formula. The central purpose of this study is to assess the FDA’s efforts with regard to the regulation of fatty acids in infant formula. Methods This study is based on critical analysis of policies and practices described in publicly available documents of the FDA, the manufacturers of fatty acids, and other relevant organizations. The broad framework for this work was set out by the author in his book on Regulating Infant Formula, published in 2011. Results The FDA does not assess the safety or the health impacts of fatty acid additives to infant formula before they are marketed, and there is no systematic assessment after marketing is underway. Rather than making its own independent assessments, the FDA accepts the manufacturers’ claims regarding their products’ safety and effectiveness. Conclusions The FDA is not adequately regulating the use of fatty acid additives to infant formula. This results in exposure of infants to potential risks. Adverse reactions are already on record. Also, the additives have led to increasing costs of infant formula despite the lack of proven benefits to normal, full term infants. There is a need for more effective regulation of DHA and ARA additives to infant formula. PMID:24433303

  10. CFLAP1 and CFLAP2 Are Two bHLH Transcription Factors Participating in Synergistic Regulation of AtCFL1-Mediated Cuticle Development in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibai Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cuticle is a hydrophobic lipid layer covering the epidermal cells of terrestrial plants. Although many genes involved in Arabidopsis cuticle development have been identified, the transcriptional regulation of these genes is largely unknown. Previously, we demonstrated that AtCFL1 negatively regulates cuticle development by interacting with the HD-ZIP IV transcription factor HDG1. Here, we report that two bHLH transcription factors, AtCFL1 associated protein 1 (CFLAP1 and CFLAP2, are also involved in AtCFL1-mediated regulation of cuticle development. CFLAP1 and CFLAP2 interact with AtCFL1 both in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of either CFLAP1 or CFLAP2 led to expressional changes of genes involved in fatty acids, cutin and wax biosynthesis pathways and caused multiple cuticle defective phenotypes such as organ fusion, breakage of the cuticle layer and decreased epicuticular wax crystal loading. Functional inactivation of CFLAP1 and CFLAP2 by chimeric repression technology caused opposite phenotypes to the CFLAP1 overexpressor plants. Interestingly, we find that, similar to the transcription factor HDG1, the function of CFLAP1 in cuticle development is dependent on the presence of AtCFL1. Furthermore, both HDG1 and CFLAP1/2 interact with the same C-terminal C4 zinc finger domain of AtCFL1, a domain that is essential for AtCFL1 function. These results suggest that AtCFL1 may serve as a master regulator in the transcriptional regulation of cuticle development, and that CFLAP1 and CFLAP2 are involved in the AtCFL1-mediated regulation pathway, probably through competing with HDG1 to bind to AtCFL1.

  11. Regulation of Drosophila circadian rhythms by miRNA let-7 is mediated by a regulatory cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenfeng; Liu, Zhenxing; Li, Tianjiao; Zhang, Ruifeng; Xue, Yongbo; Zhong, Yang; Bai, Weiwei; Zhou, Dasen; Zhao, Zhangwu

    2014-11-24

    MicroRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulations are increasingly recognized as important components of the circadian rhythm. Here we identify microRNA let-7, part of the Drosophila let-7-Complex, as a regulator of circadian rhythms mediated by a circadian regulatory cycle. Overexpression of let-7 in clock neurons lengthens circadian period and its deletion attenuates the morning activity peak as well as molecular oscillation. Let-7 regulates the circadian rhythm via repression of CLOCKWORK ORANGE (CWO). Conversely, upregulated cwo in cwo-expressing cells can rescue the phenotype of let-7-Complex overexpression. Moreover, circadian prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) and CLOCK-regulated 20-OH ecdysteroid signalling contribute to the circadian expression of let-7 through the 20-OH ecdysteroid receptor. Thus, we find a regulatory cycle involving PTTH, a direct target of CLOCK, and PTTH-driven miRNA let-7.

  12. New mechanisms that regulate Saccharomyces cerevisiae short peptide transporter achieve balanced intracellular amino acid concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnykov, Artem V

    2016-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to take up large quantities of amino acids in the form of di- and tripeptides via a short peptide transporter, Ptr2p. It is known that PTR2 can be induced by certain peptides and amino acids, and the mechanisms governing this upregulation are understood at the molecular level. We describe two new opposing mechanisms of regulation that emphasize potential toxicity of amino acids: the first is upregulation of PTR2 in a population of cells, caused by amino acid secretion that accompanies peptide uptake; the second is loss of Ptr2p activity, due to transporter internalization following peptide uptake. Our findings emphasize the importance of proper amino acid balance in the cell and extend understanding of peptide import regulation in yeast.

  13. IGF-I regulates redox status in breast cancer cells by activating the amino acid transport molecule xC-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuzhe; Yee, Douglas

    2014-04-15

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGF) stimulate cell growth in part by increasing amino acid uptake. xCT (SLC7A11) encodes the functional subunit of the cell surface transport system xC(-), which mediates cystine uptake, a pivotal step in glutathione synthesis and cellular redox control. In this study, we show that IGF-I regulates cystine uptake and cellular redox status by activating the expression and function of xCT in estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) breast cancer cells by a mechanism that relies on the IGF receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). Breast cancer cell proliferation mediated by IGF-I was suppressed by attenuating xCT expression or blocking xCT activity with the pharmacologic inhibitor sulfasalazine (SASP). Notably, SASP sensitized breast cancer cells to inhibitors of the type I IGF receptor (IGF-IR) in a manner reversed by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Thus, IGF-I promoted the proliferation of ER(+) breast cancer cells by regulating xC(-) transporter function to protect cancer cells from ROS in an IRS-1-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that inhibiting xC(-) transporter function may synergize with modalities that target the IGF-IR to heighten their therapeutic effects.

  14. The Che4 pathway of Myxococcus xanthus regulates type IV pilus-mediated motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlamakis, Hera C; Kirby, John R; Zusman, David R

    2004-06-01

    Myxococcus xanthus co-ordinates cell movement during its complex life cycle using multiple chemotaxis-like signal transduction pathways. These pathways regulate both type IV pilus-mediated social (S) motility and adventurous (A) motility. During a search for new chemoreceptors, we identified the che4 operon, which encodes homologues to a MCP (methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein), two CheWs, a hybrid CheA-CheY, a response regulator and a CheR. Deletion of the che4 operon did not cause swarming or developmental defects in either the wild-type (A(+)S(+)) strain or in a strain sustaining only A motility (A(+)S(-)). However, in a strain displaying only S motility (A(-)S(+)), deletion of the che4 operon or the gene encoding the response regulator, cheY4, caused enhanced vegetative swarming and prevented aggregation and sporulation. In contrast, deletion of mcp4 caused reduced vegetative swarming and enhanced development compared with the parent strain. Single-cell analysis of the motility of the A(-)S(+) parent strain revealed a previously unknown inverse correlation between velocity and reversal frequency. Thus, cells that moved at higher velocities showed a reduced reversal frequency. This co-ordination of reversal frequency and velocity was lost in the mcp4 and cheY4 mutants. The structural components of the S motility apparatus were unaffected in the che4 mutants, suggesting that the Che4 system affects reversal frequency of cells by modulating the function of the type IV pilus.

  15. Regulation of indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis by branched-chain amino acids in Enterobacter cloacae UW5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Cassandra V; Harris, Danielle M M; Patten, Cheryl L

    2015-09-01

    The soil bacterium Enterobacter cloacae UW5 produces the rhizosphere signaling molecule indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) via the indolepyruvate pathway. Expression of indolepyruvate decarboxylase, a key pathway enzyme encoded by ipdC, is upregulated by the transcription factor TyrR in response to aromatic amino acids. Some members of the TyrR regulon may also be controlled by branched-chain amino acids and here we show that expression from the ipdC promoter and production of IAA are downregulated by valine, leucine and isoleucine. Regulation of the IAA synthesis pathway by both aromatic and branched-chain amino acids suggests a broader role for this pathway in bacterial physiology, beyond plant interactions.

  16. Effect of plant growth regulators on fatty acids composition in Jatropha curcas L. callus culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Ludwi Rodríguez; Mendiola, Martha A Rodríguez; Castro, Carlos Arias; Gutiérrez-Miceli, Federico A

    2015-01-01

    The influence of Naphtaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 6-Benzylaminopurine (BAP) on callus formation, its morphology and fatty acids profile were examined from Jatropha curcas L. Embryo from seeds of J. curcas L. were sown in Murashige and skoog (MS) medium with NAA and BAP. All treatments induced callus formation, however callus morphology was different in most of the treatments. Higher callus biomass was presented with 1.0 NAA + 0.5 BAP mg/L. Plant growth regulators modifies the fatty acids profile in callus of J. curcas L. BAP was induced linoleic and linolenic acids.

  17. Carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin conjugated nanoparticles facilitate therapy for folate receptor-positive tumor with the mediation of folic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chang; Li, Hongdan; Shi, Yijie; Wang, Guan; Liu, Liwei; Zhao, Liang; Su, Rongjian

    2014-10-20

    Currently, clinical operation treatments, chemotherapy and radiotherapy just could eliminate local tumor cells. However, chemotherapy and radiotherapy also injury normal cells and lead to serious side effects and toxicities. So, it is necessary to find an effective target cancer carrier that delivers the anticancer agents into tumor cells and reduces normal cells' injury. Folic acid (FA) is a classical targeting agent mediates internalization of chemical drugs into tumor cells which over-express folate receptor (FR) on their surface. We herein report that based on host-guest interaction, NPs decorated by novel folate enhance antitumor drug delivery. BSA-NPs were prepared by desolvation method and carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin (CM-β-CD) was conjugated to the surface of NPs by carbodiimide coupling to hold FA. From in vitro cytotoxicity assay, cell apoptosis study, intracellular ATP level assay and western blot, we can see that FA-CM-β-CD-BSA NPs as good monodispersity, negative charge, and homogenous particle size have a high encapsulation efficiency. The results showed that MTT and cell apoptosis demonstrated that FA-decorated NPs exhibit stronger inhibition rate and induce obvious apoptosis in FR positive Hela cells as compared to free drug and FA undecorated NPs. Moreover, 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) loaded FA-CM-β-CD-BSA NPs down-regulate ATP levels and increase the expression of caspase-3. Taken together, FA-CM-β-CD-BSA NPs enhance FR receptor-mediated endocytosis and lead to more intracellular uptake of drug, inducing the higher apoptosis ratio of cells than free 5-Fu.

  18. The transcriptional coactivator DRIP/mediator complex is involved in vitamin D receptor function and regulates keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Yuko; Chalkley, Robert J; Burlingame, Alma L; Bikle, Daniel D

    2010-10-01

    Mediator is a multisubunit coactivator complex that facilitates transcription of nuclear receptors. We investigated the role of the mediator complex as a coactivator for vitamin D receptor (VDR) in keratinocytes. Using VDR affinity beads, the vitamin D receptor interacting protein (DRIP)/mediator complex was purified from primary keratinocytes, and its subunit composition was determined by mass spectrometry. The complex included core subunits, such as DRIP205/MED1 (MED1), that directly binds to VDR. Additional subunits were identified that are components of the RNA polymerase II complex. The functions of different mediator components were investigated by silencing its subunits. The core subunit MED1 facilitates VDR activity and regulating keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. A newly described subunit MED21 also has a role in promoting keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation, whereas MED10 has an inhibitory role. Blocking MED1/MED21 expression caused hyperproliferation of keratinocytes, accompanied by increases in mRNA expression of the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 and/or glioma-associated oncogene homolog. Blocking MED1 or MED21 expression also resulted in defects in calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation, as indicated by decreased expression of differentiation markers and decreased translocation of E-cadherin to the membrane. These results show that keratinocytes use the transcriptional coactivator mediator to regulate VDR functions and control keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation.

  19. The Transcription Factor p8 Regulates Autophagy in Response to Palmitic Acid Stress via a Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR)-independent Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Sheng-Nan; Lin, Cheng; Chen, Dian-Fu; Li, An-Qi; Dai, Li; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Ling-Ling; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Fan; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2016-02-26

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved degradative process that allows cells to maintain homoeostasis in numerous physiological situations. This process also functions as an essential protective response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which promotes the removal and degradation of unfolded proteins. However, little is known regarding the mechanism by which autophagy is initiated and regulated in response to ER stress. In this study, different types of autophagy were identified in human gastric cancer MKN45 cells in response to the stress induced by nutrient starvation or lipotoxicity in which the regulation of these pathways is mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent or -independent, respectively. Interestingly, we found that p8, a stress-inducible transcription factor, was enhanced in MKN45 cells treated with palmitic acid to induce lipotoxicity. Furthermore, an increase in autophagy was observed in MKN45 cells stably overexpressing p8 using a lentivirus system, and autophagy induced by palmitic acid was blocked by p8 RNAi compared with the control. Western blotting analyses showed that autophagy was regulated by p8 or mTOR in response to the protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase/activating transcription factor 6-mediated ER stress of lipotoxicity or the parkin-mediated mitochondrial stress of nutrient starvation, respectively. Furthermore, our results indicated that autophagy induced by palmitic acid is mTOR-independent, but this autophagy pathway was regulated by p8 via p53- and PKCα-mediated signaling in MKN45 cells. Our findings provide insights into the role of p8 in regulating autophagy induced by the lipotoxic effects of excess fat accumulation in cells.

  20. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulates arsenic trioxide-mediated macrophage innate immune function disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao; Chaudhary, Sandeep C. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Ballestas, Mary E. [Department of Pediatrics Infectious Disease, Children' s of Alabama, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL (United States); Elmets, Craig A. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Robbins, David J. [Department of Surgery, Molecular Oncology Program, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami (United States); Matalon, Sadis [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Deshane, Jessy S. [Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Afaq, Farrukh [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bickers, David R. [Department of Dermatology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic exposure is known to disrupt innate immune functions in humans and in experimental animals. In this study, we provide a mechanism by which arsenic trioxide (ATO) disrupts macrophage functions. ATO treatment of murine macrophage cells diminished internalization of FITC-labeled latex beads, impaired clearance of phagocytosed fluorescent bacteria and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These impairments in macrophage functions are associated with ATO-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway characterized by the enhancement in proteins such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP. The expression of these proteins is altered both at transcriptional and translational levels. Pretreatment with chemical chaperon, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuated the ATO-induced activation in UPR signaling and afforded protection against ATO-induced disruption of macrophage functions. This treatment also reduced ATO-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, treatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prior to ATO exposure, not only reduced ROS production and UPR signaling but also improved macrophage functions. These data demonstrate that UPR signaling and ROS generation are interdependent and are involved in the arsenic-induced pathobiology of macrophage. These data also provide a novel strategy to block the ATO-dependent impairment in innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Inorganic arsenic to humans and experimental animals disrupt innate immune responses. • The mechanism underlying arsenic impaired macrophage functions involves UPR signaling. • Chemical chaperon attenuates arsenic-mediated macrophage function impairment. • Antioxidant, NAC blocks impairment in arsenic-treated macrophage functions.

  1. The plastidial retrograde signal methyl erythritol cyclopyrophosphate is a regulator of salicylic acid and jasmonic acid crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Mark; Xiao, Yanmei; Bjornson, Marta; Wang, Jin-Zheng; Hicks, Derrick; Souza, Amancio de; Wang, Chang-Quan; Yang, Panyu; Ma, Shisong; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2016-03-01

    The exquisite harmony between hormones and their corresponding signaling pathways is central to prioritizing plant responses to simultaneous and/or successive environmental trepidations. The crosstalk between jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) is an established effective mechanism that optimizes and tailors plant adaptive responses. However, the underlying regulatory modules of this crosstalk are largely unknown. Global transcriptomic analyses of mutant plants (ceh1) with elevated levels of the stress-induced plastidial retrograde signaling metabolite 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol cyclopyrophosphate (MEcPP) revealed robustly induced JA marker genes, expected to be suppressed by the presence of constitutively high SA levels in the mutant background. Analyses of a range of genotypes with varying SA and MEcPP levels established the selective role of MEcPP-mediated signal(s) in induction of JA-responsive genes in the presence of elevated SA. Metabolic profiling revealed the presence of high levels of the JA precursor 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA), but near wild type levels of JA in the ceh1 mutant plants. Analyses of coronatine-insensitive 1 (coi1)/ceh1 double mutant plants confirmed that the MEcPP-mediated induction is JA receptor COI1 dependent, potentially through elevated OPDA. These findings identify MEcPP as a previously unrecognized central regulatory module that induces JA-responsive genes in the presence of high SA, thereby staging a multifaceted plant response within the environmental context.

  2. POSSIBLE RELATIONSHIP OF FOLIC ACID SUPPLEMENTATION AND IMPROVED FLOW-MEDIATED DILATION IN PREMENOPAUSAL, EUMENORRHEIC ATHLETIC WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Z. Hoch

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine if six weeks of folic acid supplementation would improve brachial artery endothelial-dependent flow-mediated dilation in eumenorrheic female runners with previously normal serum folate levels. This was a prospective, double-blinded, randomized pilot study with convenience sampling. Sixteen eumenorrheic subjects who were not taking birth control pills and who ran at least 20 miles/week were randomly assigned to 10 mg/day of folic acid supplementation or placebo for at least 6 weeks. Serum folate levels and brachial artery measurements were made during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle, in a sedentary state, following an 8 hour fast; a standard ultrasound technique was used. The brachial artery vasodilator response to reactive hyperemia was similar between the folic acid (6.6% ± 0.8%, mean ± SE and placebo groups (6.5% ± 0.7% at baseline. After six weeks, there was a significantly higher change in flow-mediated dilation for the folic acid group (3.5% ± 0.6% compared to the placebo group (0.1% ± 0.2% (p = 0.01. Serum folate levels also increased significantly in the folic acid group following six weeks of folic acid supplementation. This study demonstrates that brachial artery flow-mediated dilation improves significantly in eumenorrheic female runners with previously normal serum folate levels after 6 weeks of supplementation with folic acid

  3. Enhanced lubrication on tissue and biomaterial surfaces through peptide-mediated binding of hyaluronic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anirudha; Corvelli, Michael; Unterman, Shimon A.; Wepasnick, Kevin A.; McDonnell, Peter; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2014-10-01

    Lubrication is key for the efficient function of devices and tissues with moving surfaces, such as articulating joints, ocular surfaces and the lungs. Indeed, lubrication dysfunction leads to increased friction and degeneration of these systems. Here, we present a polymer-peptide surface coating platform to non-covalently bind hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural lubricant in the body. Tissue surfaces treated with the HA-binding system exhibited higher lubricity values, and in vivo were able to retain HA in the articular joint and to bind ocular tissue surfaces. Biomaterials-mediated strategies that locally bind and concentrate HA could provide physical and biological benefits when used to treat tissue-lubricating dysfunction and to coat medical devices.

  4. Formation of Gd coordination polymer with 1D chains mediated by Bronsted acidic ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qianqian; Han, Ying; Lin, Hechun; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Duan, Chungang; Peng, Hui

    2017-03-01

    One dimensional coordination polymer Gd[(SO4)(NO3)(C2H6SO)2] (1) is prepared through the mediation of Bronsted acid ionic liquid, which crystallized in the monoclinic space of C2/c. In this polymer, adjacent Gd atoms are linked by two SO42- ions to generate a 1-D chain, and all oxygen atoms in SO42- groups are connected to three nearest Gd atoms in μ3:η1:η1:η2 fashion. Gd, S and N from SO42- and NO3- are precisely coplanar. The planar is coordinated by a pair of DMSO molecules, which is parallel and linked by hydrogen bonding to form a three-dimensional supramolecular network. Magnetic susceptibility measurement of 1 reveals weak antiferromagnetic interactions between the Gd (III) ions. It exhibits relatively large magneto-caloric effect with -ΔSm=28.8 J Kg-1 K-1 for ΔH=7 T.

  5. Enhanced lubrication on tissue and biomaterial surfaces through peptide-mediated binding of hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anirudha; Corvelli, Michael; Unterman, Shimon A; Wepasnick, Kevin A; McDonnell, Peter; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2014-10-01

    Lubrication is key for the efficient function of devices and tissues with moving surfaces, such as articulating joints, ocular surfaces and the lungs. Indeed, lubrication dysfunction leads to increased friction and degeneration of these systems. Here, we present a polymer-peptide surface coating platform to non-covalently bind hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural lubricant in the body. Tissue surfaces treated with the HA-binding system exhibited higher lubricity values, and in vivo were able to retain HA in the articular joint and to bind ocular tissue surfaces. Biomaterials-mediated strategies that locally bind and concentrate HA could provide physical and biological benefits when used to treat tissue-lubricating dysfunction and to coat medical devices.

  6. Cell transformation mediated by chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid of polyoma virus-transformed cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Della Valle, G.; Fenton, R.G.; Basilico, C.

    1981-05-01

    To study the mechanism of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-mediated gene transfer, normal rat cells were transfected with total cellular DNA extracted from polyoma virus-transformed cells. This resulted in the appearance of the transformed phenotype in 1 x 10/sup -6/ to 3 x 10/sup -6/ of the transfected cells. Transformation was invariably associated with the acquisition of integrated viral DNA sequences characteristic of the donor DNA. This was caused not by the integration of free DNA molecules, but by the transfer of large DNA fragments (10 to 20 kilobases) containing linked cellular and viral sequences. Although Southern blot analysis showed that integration did not appear to occur in a homologus region of the recipient chromosome, the frequency of transformation was rather high when compared with that of purified polyoma DNA, perhaps due to ''position'' effects or to the high efficiency of recombination of large DNA fragments.

  7. Performance characteristics of a gelled-electrolyte valve-regulated lead-acid battery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Martha; B Hariprakash; S A Gaffoor; A K Shukla

    2003-08-01

    12 V/25 AH gelled-electrolyte valve-regulated lead-acid batteries have been assembled in-house and their performance studied in relation to the absorptive glass-microfibre valve-regulated and flooded-electrolyte counterparts at various discharge rates and temperatures between –40°C and 40°C. Although the performance of the gelled-electrolyte valve-regulated battery is similar to both the absorptive glass-microfibre valve-regulated and flooded-electrolyte lead-acid batteries at temperatures above 0°C, it is superior to both the flooded-electrolyte and absorptive glass-microfibre valve-regulated lead-acid batteries at temperatures between 0°C and -40°C. The latter characteristic is attractive for expanding the application regime of valve-regulated lead-acid batteries. The corrosion rate for the positive grids in the gelled-electrolyte is also lower than both the flooded-electrolyte and absorptive glass-microfibre configurations.

  8. Retinoic acid from the meninges regulates cortical neuron generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, Julie A; Ashique, Amir M; Zarbalis, Konstantinos; Patterson, Katelin P; Hecht, Jonathan H; Kane, Maureen A; Folias, Alexandra E; Choe, Youngshik; May, Scott R; Kume, Tsutomu; Napoli, Joseph L; Peterson, Andrew S; Pleasure, Samuel J

    2009-10-30

    Extrinsic signals controlling generation of neocortical neurons during embryonic life have been difficult to identify. In this study we demonstrate that the dorsal forebrain meninges communicate with the adjacent radial glial endfeet and influence cortical development. We took advantage of Foxc1 mutant mice with defects in forebrain meningeal formation. Foxc1 dosage and loss of meninges correlated with a dramatic reduction in both neuron and intermediate progenitor production and elongation of the neuroepithelium. Several types of experiments demonstrate that retinoic acid (RA) is the key component of this secreted activity. In addition, Rdh10- and Raldh2-expressing cells in the dorsal meninges were either reduced or absent in the Foxc1 mutants, and Rdh10 mutants had a cortical phenotype similar to the Foxc1 null mutants. Lastly, in utero RA treatment rescued the cortical phenotype in Foxc1 mutants. These results establish RA as a potent, meningeal-derived cue required for successful corticogenesis.

  9. SEPTIN2 and STATHMIN Regulate CD99-Mediated Cellular Differentiation in Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Jian

    Full Text Available Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL is a lymphoid neoplasm characterized by Hodgkin's and Reed-Sternberg (H/RS cells, which is regulated by CD99. We previously reported that CD99 downregulation led to the transformation of murine B lymphoma cells (A20 into cells with an H/RS phenotype, while CD99 upregulation induced differentiation of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL cells (L428 into terminal B-cells. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this study, using fluorescence two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS, we have analyzed the alteration of protein expression following CD99 upregulation in L428 cells as well as downregulation of mouse CD99 antigen-like 2 (mCD99L2 in A20 cells. Bioinformatics analysis showed that SEPTIN2 and STATHMIN, which are cytoskeleton proteins, were significantly differentially expressed, and chosen for further validation and functional analysis. Differential expression of SEPTIN2 was found in both models and was inversely correlated with CD99 expression. STATHMIN was identified in the A20 cell line model and its expression was positively correlated with that of CD99. Importantly, silencing of SEPTIN2 with siRNA substantially altered the cellular cytoskeleton in L428 cells. The downregulation of STATHMIN by siRNA promoted the differentiation of H/RS cells toward terminal B-cells. These results suggest that SEPTIN2-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangement and STATHMIN-mediated differentiation may contribute to changes in cell morphology and differentiation of H/RS cells with CD99 upregulation in HL.

  10. FOXM1 mediates resistance to docetaxel in gastric cancer via up-regulating Stathmin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxiao; Yao, Ruyong; Yue, Lu; Qiu, Wensheng; Qi, Weiwei; Liu, Shihai; Yao, Yasai; Liang, Jun

    2014-05-01

    Docetaxel is commonly used as an effective chemotherapeutic drug for gastric cancer patients recently. With the increasing emergence of docetaxel resistance nowadays, identification of suitable biomarkers for predicting chemosensitivity to docetaxel may be a key role for improving therapeutic effects for gastric cancer patients. In this study, we investigated the correlation between the expression of transcription factor forkhead box protein M1 (FOXM1) and chemotherapy response to docetaxel in gastric cancer, the possible mechanism for which was further explored. As a result, FOXM1 overexpression was shown to mediate resistance to docetaxel in gastric cancers. It altered microtubule dynamics to protect tumour cells from docetaxel-induced apoptosis. Mechanistic investigations revealed that tubulin-destabilizing protein Stathmin, which mediated docetaxel resistance in FOXM1-silenced gastric cancer cells, is a direct down-stream target of FOXM1, whereas another microtubule dynamics protein mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK), shown to be related to docetaxel resistance in gastric cancer cells, is not associated with FOXM1 expression significantly. These results were further provided by immunohistochemical analysis, indicating that FOXM1 and Stathmin expression levels were correlated in 103 post-operational gastric cancer specimens. Moreover, when we attenuated FOXM1 expression with FOXM1 inhibitor thiostrepton, docetaxel resistance in gastric cancers was found to be reversed, simultaneously with the down-regulation of FOXM1 and Stathmin. Therefore, FOXM1 can be a useful marker for predicting and monitoring docetaxel response. Through the inhibition of FOXM1, docetaxel resistance can be reversed, and thus FOXM1 could be a new therapeutic target in docetaxel-resistant gastric cancer.

  11. SEPTIN2 and STATHMIN Regulate CD99-Mediated Cellular Differentiation in Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Wenjing; Zhong, Lin; Wen, Jing; Tang, Yao; Qiu, Bo; Wu, Ziqing; Yan, Jinhai; Zhou, Xinhua; Zhao, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is a lymphoid neoplasm characterized by Hodgkin's and Reed-Sternberg (H/RS) cells, which is regulated by CD99. We previously reported that CD99 downregulation led to the transformation of murine B lymphoma cells (A20) into cells with an H/RS phenotype, while CD99 upregulation induced differentiation of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL) cells (L428) into terminal B-cells. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this study, using fluorescence two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), we have analyzed the alteration of protein expression following CD99 upregulation in L428 cells as well as downregulation of mouse CD99 antigen-like 2 (mCD99L2) in A20 cells. Bioinformatics analysis showed that SEPTIN2 and STATHMIN, which are cytoskeleton proteins, were significantly differentially expressed, and chosen for further validation and functional analysis. Differential expression of SEPTIN2 was found in both models and was inversely correlated with CD99 expression. STATHMIN was identified in the A20 cell line model and its expression was positively correlated with that of CD99. Importantly, silencing of SEPTIN2 with siRNA substantially altered the cellular cytoskeleton in L428 cells. The downregulation of STATHMIN by siRNA promoted the differentiation of H/RS cells toward terminal B-cells. These results suggest that SEPTIN2-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangement and STATHMIN-mediated differentiation may contribute to changes in cell morphology and differentiation of H/RS cells with CD99 upregulation in HL.

  12. The Mediation Role of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation in the Relationship between Creative Educational Environment and Metacognitive Self-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maralani, Farnaz Mehdipour

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the mediation role of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation in the relationship between creative educational environment and metacognitive self-regulation. Participants were 300 girls, selected randomly from the girl hostel in university of Tehran. Participants completed Akoal's creative educational environment questionnaire,…

  13. Notch-mediated post-translational control of Ngn3 protein stability regulates pancreatic patterning and cell fate commitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qu, Xiaoling; Afelik, Solomon; Jensen, Jan Nygaard

    2013-01-01

    protein stabilization in the normal mouse pancreas explants. We conclude that the mutually exclusive expression pattern of Ngn3/Hes1 proteins in the mammalian pancreas is partially controlled through Notch-mediated post-translational regulation and we demonstrate that the formation of insulin...

  14. Links between Maternal and Child Psychopathology Symptoms: Mediation through Child Emotion Regulation and Moderation through Maternal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suveg, Cynthia; Shaffer, Anne; Morelen, Diana; Thomassin, Kristel

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the intergenerational transmission of psychopathology symptoms with 7-12 year-old children (N = 97; 44 boys, 53 girls, M age = 9.14, SD = 1.38) and their mothers (M age = 38.46, SD = 6.86). Child emotion regulation mediated the links between maternal psychopathology and child internalizing and externalizing symptoms. In turn,…

  15. Mediating and Moderating Processes in the Relation between Maltreatment and Psychopathology: Mother-Child Relationship Quality and Emotion Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alink, Lenneke R. A.; Cicchetti, Dante; Kim, Jungmeen; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated underlying processes of the effect of maltreatment on psychopathology (i.e., internalizing and externalizing problems) in a group of 111 maltreated and 110 nonmaltreated 7-10 year-old children (60% boys). We tested the moderating and/or mediating roles of emotion regulation and the mother-child relationship quality…

  16. JMJD1C demethylates MDC1 to regulate the RNF8 and BRCA1-mediated chromatin response to DNA breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watanabe, Sugiko; Watanabe, Kenji; Akimov, Vyacheslav;

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin ubiquitylation flanking DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), mediated by RNF8 and RNF168 ubiquitin ligases, orchestrates a two-branch pathway, recruiting repair factors 53BP1 or the RAP80-BRCA1 complex. We report that human demethylase JMJD1C regulates the RAP80-BRCA1 branch of this DNA...

  17. Endogenous n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids attenuate T cell-mediated hepatitis via autophagy activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs exert anti-inflammatory effects in several liver disorders, including cirrhosis, acute liver failure, and fatty liver disease. To date, little is known about their role in immune-mediated liver diseases. In this study, we used fat-1 transgenic mice rich in endogenous n-3 PUFAs to examine the role of n-3 PUFAs in immune-mediated liver injury. Concanavalin A (Con A was administered intravenously to wild-type (WT and fat-1 transgenic mice to induce T cell-mediated hepatitis. Reduced liver damage was shown in Con A-administrated fat-1 transgenic mice, as evidenced by decreased mortality, attenuated hepatic necrosis, lessened serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT activity, and inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17A and IFN-γ. In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs significantly inhibited the activation of hepatic T cells and the differentiation of Th1 cells after Con A challenge. Further studies showed that n-3 PUFAs markedly increased autophagy level in Con A-treated fat-1 T cells compared with the WT counterparts. Blocking hepatic autophagy activity with chloroquine diminished the differences in T cell activation and liver injury between Con A-injected WT and fat-1 transgenic mice. We conclude that n-3 PUFAs limit Con A-induced hepatitis via an autophagy-dependent mechanism, and could be exploited as a new therapeutic approach for autoimmune hepatitis.

  18. Endogenous n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Attenuate T Cell-Mediated Hepatitis via Autophagy Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanli; Tang, Yuan; Wang, Shoujie; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Jia; Lu, Xiao; Bai, Xiaochun; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Chen, Zhengliang; Zuo, Daming

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) exert anti-inflammatory effects in several liver disorders, including cirrhosis, acute liver failure, and fatty liver disease. To date, little is known about their role in immune-mediated liver diseases. In this study, we used fat-1 transgenic mice rich in endogenous n-3 PUFAs to examine the role of n-3 PUFAs in immune-mediated liver injury. Concanavalin A (Con A) was administered intravenously to wild-type (WT) and fat-1 transgenic mice to induce T cell-mediated hepatitis. Reduced liver damage was shown in Con A-administrated fat-1 transgenic mice, as evidenced by decreased mortality, attenuated hepatic necrosis, lessened serum alanine aminotransferase activity, and inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17A, and IFN-γ). In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs significantly inhibited the activation of hepatic T cells and the differentiation of Th1 cells after Con A challenge. Further studies showed that n-3 PUFAs markedly increased autophagy level in Con A-treated fat-1 T cells compared with the WT counterparts. Blocking hepatic autophagy activity with chloroquine diminished the differences in T cell activation and liver injury between Con A-injected WT and fat-1 transgenic mice. We conclude that n-3 PUFAs limit Con A-induced hepatitis via an autophagy-dependent mechanism and could be exploited as a new therapeutic approach for autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:27679638

  19. DMPD: Regulation of arachidonic acid release and cytosolic phospholipase A2activation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10080535 Regulation of arachidonic acid release and cytosolic phospholipase A2activation...on of arachidonic acid release and cytosolic phospholipase A2activation. PubmedID 10080535 Title Regulation ...of arachidonic acid release and cytosolic phospholipase A2activation. Authors Gij

  20. Role of apoptosis in mediating salicylic acid-induced teratogenesis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gyanendra; Sinha, Neeraj; Mahipag G, S N R

    2009-02-01

    Salicylic acid (SAL) is among the most commonly used drugs worldwide and is known to cause congenital malformations and fetal death in animals. In this study, the effect of SAL on major organogenesis period and the role of apoptosis in mediating congenital malformations have been carried out. In the present study, post-implantation rat embryos of day 11 were cultured for 24 h with various concentrations of SAL, i.e. 10, 100, and 1000 microg/ml cultures, respectively. The growth and developmental of each embryo was evaluated and compared with control ones for the presence of any malformations. The SAL decreased all growth and developmental parameters in a concentration-dependent manner, when compared with control. However, exposure to SAL at 10 microg/ml culture did not show any significant effect on embryonic growth and development. Parallel to this, flow cytometric analysis (cell cycle and annexin V binding) and DNA fragmentation assay were carried out followed by quantitation by 3'-OH labeling of cultured rat embryos to evaluate the role of apoptosis in bringing about SAL-induced teratogenesis. All results were found to be dose-dependent and an increase in apoptosis in embryonic tissues may be related to the increased risk of congenital malformations. The data suggested that apoptosis might be involved in mediating teratogenesis of SAL in vitro.

  1. Multivalent ion-mediated nucleic acid helix-helix interactions: RNA versus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuan-Yan; Zhang, Zhong-Liang; Zhang, Jin-Si; Zhu, Xiao-Long; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2015-07-13

    Ion-mediated interaction is critical to the structure and stability of nucleic acids. Recent experiments suggest that the multivalent ion-induced aggregation of double-stranded (ds) RNAs and DNAs may strongly depend on the topological nature of helices, while there is still lack of an understanding on the relevant ion-mediated interactions at atomistic level. In this work, we have directly calculated the potentials of mean force (PMF) between two dsRNAs and between two dsDNAs in Co(NH3)6 (3+) (Co-Hex) solutions by the atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Our calculations show that at low [Co-Hex], the PMFs between B-DNAs and between A-RNAs are both (strongly) repulsive. However, at high [Co-Hex], the PMF between B-DNAs is strongly attractive, while those between A-RNAs and between A-DNAs are still (weakly) repulsive. The microscopic analyses show that for A-form helices, Co-Hex would become 'internal binding' into the deep major groove and consequently cannot form the evident ion-bridge between adjacent helices, while for B-form helices without deep grooves, Co-Hex would exhibit 'external binding' to strongly bridge adjacent helices. In addition, our further calculations show that, the PMF between A-RNAs could become strongly attractive either at very high [Co-Hex] or when the bottom of deep major groove is fixed with a layer of water.

  2. Multivalent ion-mediated nucleic acid helix-helix interactions: RNA versus DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yuan-Yan; Zhang, Jin-Si; Zhu, Xiao-Long; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ion-mediated interaction is critical to the structure and stability of nucleic acids. Recent experiments suggest that the multivalent ion-induced aggregation of double-stranded (ds) RNAs and DNAs may strongly depend on the topological nature of helices, while there is still lack of an understanding on the relevant ion-mediated interactions at atomistic level. In this work, we have directly calculated the potentials of mean force (PMF) between two dsRNAs and between two dsDNAs in Cobalt Hexammine ion (Co-Hex) solutions by the atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Our calculations show that at low [Co-Hex], the PMFs between B-DNAs and between A-RNAs are both (strongly) repulsive.However, at high [Co-Hex], the PMF between B-DNAs is strongly attractive, while those between A-RNAs and between A-DNAs are still (weakly) repulsive. The microscopic analyses show that for A-form helices, Co-Hex would become internal binding into the deep major groove and consequently cannot form the evident ion-bridge between adjac...

  3. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 regulates salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent responses via EDS1 and PAD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodersen, Peter; Petersen, Morten; Bjørn Nielsen, Henrik; Zhu, Shijiang; Newman, Mari-Anne; Shokat, Kevan M; Rietz, Steffen; Parker, Jane; Mundy, John

    2006-08-01

    Arabidopsis MPK4 has been implicated in plant defense regulation because mpk4 knockout plants exhibit constitutive activation of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defenses, but fail to induce jasmonic acid (JA) defense marker genes in response to JA. We show here that mpk4 mutants are also defective in defense gene induction in response to ethylene (ET), and that they are more susceptible than wild-type (WT) to Alternaria brassicicola that induces the ET/JA defense pathway(s). Both SA-repressing and ET/JA-(co)activating functions depend on MPK4 kinase activity and involve the defense regulators EDS1 and PAD4, as mutations in these genes suppress de-repression of the SA pathway and suppress the block of the ET/JA pathway in mpk4. EDS1/PAD4 thus affect SA-ET/JA signal antagonism as activators of SA but as repressors of ET/JA defenses, and MPK4 negatively regulates both of these functions. We also show that the MPK4-EDS1/PAD4 branch of ET defense signaling is independent of the ERF1 transcription factor, and use comparative microarray analysis of ctr1, ctr1/mpk4, mpk4 and WT to show that MPK4 is required for induction of a small subset of ET-regulated genes. The regulation of some, but not all, of these genes involves EDS1 and PAD4.

  4. The Role of Sirt1 in Bile Acid Regulation during Calorie Restriction in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zidong Donna Fu

    Full Text Available Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1 is an NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase that is proposed to mediate many health-promoting effects of calorie restriction (CR. We recently reported that short-term CR increased the bile acid (BA pool size in mice, likely due to increased BA synthesis in liver. Given the important role of Sirt1 in the regulation of glucose, lipid, as well as BA metabolism, we hypothesized that the CR-induced increase in BAs is Sirt1-dependent. To address this, the present study utilized genetically-modified mice that were Sirt1 loss of function (liver knockout, LKO or Sirt1 gain of function (whole body-transgenic, TG. Three genotypes of mice (Sirt1-LKO, wild-type, and Sirt1-TG were each randomly divided into ad libitum or 40% CR feeding for one month. BAs were extracted from various compartments of the enterohepatic circulation, followed by BA profiling by UPLC-MS/MS. CR increased the BA pool size and total BAs in serum, gallbladder, and small intestine. The CR-induced increase in BA pool size correlated with the tendency of increase in the expression of the rate-limiting BA-synthetic enzyme Cyp7a1. However, in contrast to the hypothesis, the CR-induced increase in BA pool size and Cyp7a1 expression was still observed with ablated expression of Sirt1 in liver, and completely suppressed with whole-body overexpression of Sirt1. Furthermore, in terms of BA composition, CR increased the ratio of 12α-hydroxylated BAs regardless of Sirt1 genotypes. In conclusion, the CR-induced alterations in BA pool size, BA profiles, and expression of BA-related genes do not appear to be dependent on Sirt1.

  5. The Role of Sirt1 in Bile Acid Regulation during Calorie Restriction in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zidong Donna; Cui, Julia Yue; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) is an NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase that is proposed to mediate many health-promoting effects of calorie restriction (CR). We recently reported that short-term CR increased the bile acid (BA) pool size in mice, likely due to increased BA synthesis in liver. Given the important role of Sirt1 in the regulation of glucose, lipid, as well as BA metabolism, we hypothesized that the CR-induced increase in BAs is Sirt1-dependent. To address this, the present study utilized genetically-modified mice that were Sirt1 loss of function (liver knockout, LKO) or Sirt1 gain of function (whole body-transgenic, TG). Three genotypes of mice (Sirt1-LKO, wild-type, and Sirt1-TG) were each randomly divided into ad libitum or 40% CR feeding for one month. BAs were extracted from various compartments of the enterohepatic circulation, followed by BA profiling by UPLC-MS/MS. CR increased the BA pool size and total BAs in serum, gallbladder, and small intestine. The CR-induced increase in BA pool size correlated with the tendency of increase in the expression of the rate-limiting BA-synthetic enzyme Cyp7a1. However, in contrast to the hypothesis, the CR-induced increase in BA pool size and Cyp7a1 expression was still observed with ablated expression of Sirt1 in liver, and completely suppressed with whole-body overexpression of Sirt1. Furthermore, in terms of BA composition, CR increased the ratio of 12α-hydroxylated BAs regardless of Sirt1 genotypes. In conclusion, the CR-induced alterations in BA pool size, BA profiles, and expression of BA-related genes do not appear to be dependent on Sirt1.

  6. Small-Nucleic-Acid-Based Therapeutic Strategy Targeting the Transcription Factors Regulating the Vascular Inflammation, Remodeling and Fibrosis in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Won Youn

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis arises when injury to the arterial wall induces an inflammatory cascade that is sustained by a complex network of cytokines, together with accumulation of lipids and fibrous material. Inflammatory cascades involve leukocyte adherence and chemotaxis, which are coordinated by the local secretion of adhesion molecules, chemotactic factors, and cytokines. Transcription factors are critical to the integration of the various steps of the cascade response to mediators of vascular injury, and are induced in a stimulus-dependent and cell-type-specific manner. Several small-nucleic-acid-based therapeutic strategies have recently been developed to target transcription factors: antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, RNA interference, microRNA, and decoy oligodeoxynucleotides. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of these particular targeted therapeutic strategies, toward regulation of the vascular inflammation, remodeling and fibrosis associated with atherosclerosis.

  7. Phosphatidic Acid Interacts with a MYB Transcription Factor and Regulates Its Nuclear Localization and Function in Arabidopsis[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hongyan; Wang, Geliang; Guo, Liang; Wang, Xuemin

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidic acid (PA) has emerged as a class of cellular mediators involved in various cellular and physiological processes, but little is known about its mechanism of action. Here we show that PA interacts with WEREWOLF (WER), a R2R3 MYB transcription factor involved in root hair formation. The PA-interacting region is confined to the end of the R2 subdomain. The ablation of the PA binding motif has no effect on WER binding to DNA, but abolishes its nuclear localization and its function in regulating epidermal cell fate. Inhibition of PA production by phospholipase Dζ also suppresses WER’s nuclear localization, root hair formation, and elongation. These results suggest a role for PA in promoting protein nuclear localization. PMID:24368785

  8. Phosphatidic acid interacts with a MYB transcription factor and regulates its nuclear localization and function in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hongyan; Wang, Geliang; Guo, Liang; Wang, Xuemin

    2013-12-01

    Phosphatidic acid (PA) has emerged as a class of cellular mediators involved in various cellular and physiological processes, but little is known about its mechanism of action. Here we show that PA interacts with werewolf (WER), a R2R3 MYB transcription factor involved in root hair formation. The PA-interacting region is confined to the end of the R2 subdomain. The ablation of the PA binding motif has no effect on WER binding to DNA, but abolishes its nuclear localization and its function in regulating epidermal cell fate. Inhibition of PA production by phospholipase Dζ also suppresses WER's nuclear localization, root hair formation, and elongation. These results suggest a role for PA in promoting protein nuclear localization.

  9. Candida albicans erythroascorbate peroxidase regulates intracellular methylglyoxal and reactive oxygen species independently of D-erythroascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Min-Kyu; Song, Sung-Hyun; Ku, MyungHee; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2015-07-08

    Candida albicans D-erythroascorbate peroxidase (EAPX1), which can catalyze the oxidation of D-erythroascorbic acid (EASC) to water, was observed to be inducible in EAPX1-deficient and EAPX1-overexpressing cells via activity staining. EAPX1-deficient cells have remarkably increased intracellular reactive oxygen species and methylglyoxal independent of the intracellular EASC content. The increased methylglyoxal caused EAPX1-deficient cells to activate catalase-peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase, which led to defects in cell growth, viability, mitochondrial respiration, filamentation and virulence. These findings indicate that EAPX1 mediates cell differentiation and virulence by regulating intracellular methylglyoxal along with oxidative stresses, regardless of endogenous EASC biosynthesis or alternative oxidase expression.

  10. Vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids together regulate lipid metabolism in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaire, Amrita; Rathod, Richa; Kale, Anvita; Joshi, Sadhana

    2015-08-01

    Our recent study indicates that maternal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid status influence plasma and erythrocyte fatty acid profile in dams. The present study examines the effects of prenatal and postnatal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid status on lipid metabolism in the offspring. Pregnant dams were divided into five groups: Control; Vitamin B12 deficient (BD); Vitamin B12 supplemented (BS); Vitamin B12 deficient group supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids (BDO); Vitamin B12 supplemented group with omega-3 fatty acids (BSO). The offspring were continued on the same diets till 3 month of age. Vitamin B12 deficiency increased cholesterol levels (pomega-3 fatty acids together play a crucial role in regulating the genes involved in lipid metabolism in adult offspring.

  11. Lipoic acid: energy metabolism and redox regulation of transcription and cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Lester; Cadenas, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The role of R-α-lipoic acid as a cofactor (lipoyllysine) in mitochondrial energy metabolism is well established. Lipoic acid non-covalently bound and exogenously administered to cells or supplemented in the diet is a potent modulator of the cell's redox status. The diversity of beneficial effects of lipoic acid in a variety of tissues can be mechanistically viewed in terms of thiol/disulfide exchange reactions that modulate the environment's redox and energy status. Lipoic acid-driven thiol/disulfide exchange reactions appear critical for the modulation of proteins involved in cell signaling and transcription factors. This review emphasizes the effects of lipoic acid on PI3K and AMPK signaling and related transcriptional pathways that are integrated by PGC-1α, a critical regulator of energy homoestasis. The effects of lipoic acid on the neuronal energy-redox axis are largely reviewed in terms of their outcomes for aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. SYVN1, NEDD8, and FBXO2 Proteins Regulate ΔF508 Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Ubiquitin-mediated Proteasomal Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Shyam; Osterhaus, Samantha R; Parekh, Kalpaj R; Jacobi, Ashley M; Behlke, Mark A; McCray, Paul B

    2016-12-02

    We previously reported that delivery of a microRNA-138 mimic or siRNA against SIN3A to cultured cystic fibrosis (ΔF508/ΔF508) airway epithelia partially restored ΔF508-cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-mediated cAMP-stimulated Cl(-) conductance. We hypothesized that dissecting this microRNA-138/SIN3A-regulated gene network would identify individual proteins contributing to the rescue of ΔF508-CFTR function. Among the genes in the network, we rigorously validated candidates using functional CFTR maturation and electrolyte transport assays in polarized airway epithelia. We found that depletion of the ubiquitin ligase SYVN1, the ubiquitin/proteasome system regulator NEDD8, or the F-box protein FBXO2 partially restored ΔF508-CFTR-mediated Cl(-) transport in primary cultures of human cystic fibrosis airway epithelia. Moreover, knockdown of SYVN1, NEDD8, or FBXO2 in combination with corrector compound 18 further potentiated rescue of ΔF508-CFTR-mediated Cl(-) conductance. This study provides new knowledge of the CFTR biosynthetic pathway. It suggests that SYVN1 and FBXO2 represent two distinct multiprotein complexes that may degrade ΔF508-CFTR in airway epithelia and identifies a new role for NEDD8 in regulating ΔF508-CFTR ubiquitination.

  13. Generation of reactive oxygen species by a novel berberine–bile acid analog mediates apoptosis in hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qingyong, E-mail: li_qingyong@126.com [Key Laboratory of Forest Plant Ecology (Northeast Forestry University), Ministry of Education (China); Zhang, Li; Zu, Yuangang; Liu, Tianyu; Zhang, Baoyou; He, Wuna [Key Laboratory of Forest Plant Ecology (Northeast Forestry University), Ministry of Education (China)

    2013-04-19

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Anticancer effects of B4, a novel berberine–bile acid analog, were tested. • B4 inhibited cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. • It also stimulated mitochondrial ROS production and membrane depolarization. • Effects of B4 were inhibited by a non-specific ROS scavenger. • Regulation of ROS generation may be a strategy for treating hepatic carcinoma. - Abstract: 2,3-Methenedioxy-9-O-(3′α,7′α-dihydroxy-5′β-cholan-24′-propy-lester) berberine (B4) is a novel berberine–bile acid analog synthesized in our laboratory. Previously, we showed that B4 exerted greater cytotoxicity than berberine in several human cancer cell lines. Therefore, we further evaluated the mechanism governing its anticancer actions in hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells. B4 inhibited the proliferation of SMMC-7721 cells, and stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial membrane depolarization; anti-oxidant capacity was reduced. B4 also induced the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and an increase in poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage products, reflective of caspase-3 activation. Moreover, B4 induced the nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and a rise in DNA fragmentation. Pretreatment with the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) inhibited B4-mediated effects, including cytotoxicity, ROS production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+}, cytochrome c release, PARP cleavage, and AIF translocation. Our data suggest that B4 induces ROS-triggered caspase-dependent and caspase-independent apoptosis pathways in SMMC-7721 cells and that ROS production may be a specific potential strategy for treating hepatic carcinoma.

  14. The E3 deubiquitinase USP17 is a positive regulator of retinoic acid-related orphan nuclear receptor γt (RORγt) in Th17 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lei; Yang, Jing; Wang, Xiuwen; Wu, Qingsi; Yin, Shuying; Li, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Jing; Xing, Yue; Chen, Zuojia; Tsun, Andy; Li, Dan; Piccioni, Miranda; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Qiang; Jiang, Lindi; Bao, Liming; Lv, Ling; Li, Bin

    2014-09-12

    Stable retinoic acid-related orphan nuclear receptor γt (RORγt) expression is pivotal for the development and function of Th17 cells. Here we demonstrate that expression of the transcription factor RORγt can be regulated through deubiquitination, which prevents proteasome-mediated degradation. We establish that USP17 stabilizes RORγt protein expression by reducing RORγt polyubiquitination at its Lys-360 residue. In contrast, knockdown of endogenous USP17 in Th17 cells resulted in decreased RORγt protein levels and down-regulation of Th17-related genes. Furthermore, USP17 expression was up-regulated in CD4(+) T cells from systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Our data reveal a molecular mechanism in which RORγt expression in Th17 cells can be positively regulated by USP17, thereby modulating Th17 cell functions.

  15. PTH1 receptor is involved in mediating cellular response to long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Candelario

    Full Text Available The molecular pathways by which long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA influence skeletal health remain elusive. Both LCPUFA and parathyroid hormone type 1 receptor (PTH1R are known to be involved in bone metabolism while any direct link between the two is yet to be established. Here we report that LCPUFA are capable of direct, PTH1R dependent activation of extracellular ligand-regulated kinases (ERK. From a wide range of fatty acids studied, varying in chain length, saturation, and position of double bonds, eicosapentaenoic (EPA and docosahexaenoic fatty acids (DHA caused the highest ERK phosphorylation. Moreover, EPA potentiated the effect of parathyroid hormone (PTH(1-34 in a superagonistic manner. EPA or DHA dependent ERK phosphorylation was inhibited by the PTH1R antagonist and by knockdown of PTH1R. Inhibition of PTH1R downstream signaling molecules, protein kinases A (PKA and C (PKC, reduced EPA and DHA dependent ERK phosphorylation indicating that fatty acids predominantly activate G-protein pathway and not the β-arrestin pathway. Using picosecond time-resolved fluorescence microscopy and a genetically engineered PTH1R sensor (PTH-CC, we detected conformational responses to EPA similar to those caused by PTH(1-34. PTH1R antagonist blocked the EPA induced conformational response of the PTH-CC. Competitive binding studies using fluorescence anisotropy technique showed that EPA and DHA competitively bind to and alter the affinity of PTH1 receptor to PTH(1-34 leading to a superagonistic response. Finally, we showed that EPA stimulates protein kinase B (Akt phosphorylation in a PTH1R-dependent manner and affects the osteoblast survival pathway, by inhibiting glucocorticoid-induced cell death. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that LCPUFAs, EPA and DHA, can activate PTH1R receptor at nanomolar concentrations and consequently provide a putative molecular mechanism for the action of fatty acids in bone.

  16. Sugar-mediated semidian oscillation of gene expression in the cassava storage root regulates starch synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Christer; Baguma, Yona; Sun, Chuanxin; Boren, Mats; Olsson, Helena; Rosenqvist, Sara; Mutisya, Joel; Rubaihayo, Patrick R.; Jansson, Christer

    2008-01-15

    Starch branching enzyme (SBE) activity in the cassava storage root exhibited a diurnal fluctuation, dictated by a transcriptional oscillation of the corresponding SBE genes. The peak of SBE activity coincided with the onset of sucrose accumulation in the storage, and we conclude that the oscillatory mechanism keeps the starch synthetic apparatus in the storage root sink in tune with the flux of sucrose from the photosynthetic source. When storage roots were uncoupled from the source, SBE expression could be effectively induced by exogenous sucrose. Turanose, a sucrose isomer that cannot be metabolized by plants, mimicked the effect of sucrose, demonstrating that downstream metabolism of sucrose was not necessary for signal transmission. Also glucose and glucose-1-P induced SBE expression. Interestingly, induction by sucrose, turanose and glucose but not glucose-1-P sustained an overt semidian (12-h) oscillation in SBE expression and was sensitive to the hexokinase (HXK) inhibitor glucosamine. These results suggest a pivotal regulatory role for HXK during starch synthesis. Abscisic acid (ABA) was another potent inducer of SBE expression. Induction by ABA was similar to that of glucose-1-P in that it bypassed the semidian oscillator. Both the sugar and ABA signaling cascades were disrupted by okadaic acid, a protein phosphatase inhibitor. Based on these findings, we propose a model for sugar signaling in regulation of starch synthesis in the cassava storage root.

  17. A maize calcium-dependent protein kinase gene, ZmCPK4, positively regulated abscisic acid signaling and enhanced drought stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shanshan; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Li; Pan, Jiaowen; Liu, Yang; Kong, Xiangpei; Zhou, Yan; Li, Dequan

    2013-10-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play essential roles in calcium-mediated signal transductions in plant response to abiotic stress. Several members have been identified to be regulators for plants response to abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. Here, we isolated a subgroup I CDPK gene, ZmCPK4, from maize. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed that the ZmCPK4 transcripts were induced by various stresses and signal molecules. Transient and stable expression of the ZmCPK4-GFP fusion proteins revealed ZmCPK4 localized to the membrane. Moreover, overexpression of ZmCPK4 in the transgenic Arabidopsis enhanced ABA sensitivity in seed germination, seedling growth and stomatal movement. The transgenic plants also enhanced drought stress tolerance. Taken together, the results suggest that ZmCPK4 might be involved in ABA-mediated regulation of stomatal closure in response to drought stress.

  18. Exosome proteomics reveals transcriptional regulator proteins with potential to mediate downstream pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Timothy H; Madsen, Helen J; Hellwinkel, Justin E; Lencioni, Alex M; Graner, Michael W

    2014-11-01

    Exosomes are virus-sized, membrane-enclosed vesicles with origins in the cellular endosomal system, but are released extracellularly. As a population, these tiny vesicles carry relatively enormous amounts of information in their protein, lipid and nucleic acid content, and the vesicles can have profound impacts on recipient cells. This review employs publically-available data combined with gene ontology applications to propose a novel concept, that exosomes transport transcriptional and translational machinery that may have direct impacts on gene expression in recipient cells. Here, we examine the previously published proteomic contents of medulloblastoma-derived exosomes, focusing on transcriptional regulators; we found that there are numerous proteins that may have potential roles in transcriptional and translational regulation with putative influence on downstream, cancer-related pathways. We expanded this search to all of the proteins in the Vesiclepedia database; using gene ontology approaches, we see that these regulatory factors are implicated in many of the processes involved in cancer initiation and progression. This information suggests that some of the effects of exosomes on recipient cells may be due to the delivery of protein factors that can directly and fundamentally change the transcriptional landscape of the cells. Within a tumor environment, this has potential to tilt the advantage towards the cancer.

  19. Genetic enhancement of palmitic acid accumulation in cotton seed oil through RNAi down-regulation of ghKAS2 encoding β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase II (KASII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Wu, Man; Zhang, Baolong; Shrestha, Pushkar; Petrie, James; Green, Allan G; Singh, Surinder P

    2017-01-01

    Palmitic acid (C16:0) already makes up approximately 25% of the total fatty acids in the conventional cotton seed oil. However, further enhancements in palmitic acid content at the expense of the predominant unsaturated fatty acids would provide increased oxidative stability of cotton seed oil and also impart the high melting point required for making margarine, shortening and confectionary products free of trans fatty acids. Seed-specific RNAi-mediated down-regulation of β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase II (KASII) catalysing the elongation of palmitoyl-ACP to stearoyl-ACP has succeeded in dramatically increasing the C16 fatty acid content of cotton seed oil to well beyond its natural limits, reaching up to 65% of total fatty acids. The elevated C16 levels were comprised of predominantly palmitic acid (C16:0, 51%) and to a lesser extent palmitoleic acid (C16:1, 11%) and hexadecadienoic acid (C16:2, 3%), and were stably inherited. Despite of the dramatic alteration of fatty acid composition and a slight yet significant reduction in oil content in these high-palmitic (HP) lines, seed germination remained unaffected. Regiochemical analysis of triacylglycerols (TAG) showed that the increased levels of palmitic acid mainly occurred at the outer positions, while C16:1 and C16:2 were predominantly found in the sn-2 position in both TAG and phosphatidylcholine. Crossing the HP line with previously created high-oleic (HO) and high-stearic (HS) genotypes demonstrated that HP and HO traits could be achieved simultaneously; however, elevation of stearic acid was hindered in the presence of high level of palmitic acid.

  20. Cumulative childhood trauma and psychological maladjustment of sexually abused children in Korea: mediating effects of emotion regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Young; Oh, Kyung Ja

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify the mediating effects of emotion regulation on the association between cumulative childhood trauma and behavior problems in sexually abused children in Korea, using structural equation modeling (SEM). Data were collected on 171 children (ages 6-13 years) referred to a public counseling center for sexual abuse in Seoul, Korea. Cumulative childhood traumas were defined on the basis of number of traumas (physical abuse, witnessing domestic violence, neglect, traumatic separation from parent, and sexual abuse) and the severity and duration of traumas. Children were evaluated by their parents on emotion regulation using the Emotion Regulation Checklist and internalizing and externalizing behavior problems using the Korean-Child Behavior Checklist. SEM analyses confirmed the complete mediation model, in which emotion dysregulation fully mediates the relationship between cumulative childhood traumas and internalizing/externalizing behavior problems. These findings indicate that emotion regulation is an important mechanism that can explain the negative effects of cumulative childhood traumas and that there is a need to focus on emotion regulation in sexually abused children exposed to cumulative trauma.