WorldWideScience

Sample records for acid interactions grant

  1. Allelopathic Interactions Involving Phenolic Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Blum, U.

    1996-01-01

    A major concern regarding allelopathic interactions involving phenolic acids in no-till systems pertains to the fact that concentrations of individual phenolic acids recoverable from field soils are well below levels required for inhibition of germination and seedling growth in laboratory bioassays. Field soils contain a variety of phenolic acids as well as other toxic and nontoxic organic compounds that are available to interact with seeds and roots; whereas in laboratory bioassays, with few...

  2. Metallophilic HgII...HgII interactions in nucleic acids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benda, Ladislav; Tanaka, Y.; Sychrovský, Vladimír; Straka, Michal

    Praha: Matfyzpress, 2011 - (Burda, J.). s. 62-62 ISBN 978-80-7378-180-4. [Modeling Interactions in Biomolecules /5./. 04.09.2011-09.09.2011, Kutná Hora] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/2037; GA ČR GAP205/10/0228 Grant ostatní: European Reintegration Grant(XE) 230955 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : metallophilic HgII...HgII interactions * metallophilic interactions * base stacking * nucleic acids Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  3. Molecular Interaction of Pinic Acid with Sulfuric Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elm, Jonas; Kurten, Theo; Bilde, Merete;

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the molecular interactions between the semivolatile α-pinene oxidation product pinic acid and sulfuric acid using computational methods. The stepwise Gibbs free energies of formation have been calculated utilizing the M06-2X functional, and the stability of the clusters is evaluated...... from the corresponding ΔG values. The first two additions of sulfuric acid to pinic acid are found to be favorable with ΔG values of -9.06 and -10.41 kcal/mol. Addition of a third sulfuric acid molecule is less favorable and leads to a structural rearrangement forming a bridged sulfuric acid-pinic acid...... without the further possibility for attachment of either sulfuric acid or pinic acid. This suggests that pinic acid cannot be a key species in the first steps in nucleation, but the favorable interactions between sulfuric acid and pinic acid imply that pinic acid can contribute to the subsequent growth of...

  4. Bile acid interactions with cholangiocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuefeng Xia; Heather Francis; Shannon Glaser; Gianfranco Alpini; Gene LeSage

    2006-01-01

    Cholangiocytes are exposed to high concentrations of bile acids at their apical membrane. A selective transporter for bile acids, the Apical Sodium Bile Acid Cotransporter (ASBT) (also referred to as Ibat; gene name Slc10a2)is localized on the cholangiocyte apical membrane. On the basolateral membrane, four transport systems have been identified (t-ASBT, multidrug resistance (MDR)3,an unidentified anion exchanger system and organic solute transporter (Ost) heteromeric transporter, OstαOstβ. Together, these transporters unidirectionally move bile acids from ductal bile to the circulation. Bile acids absorbed by cholangiocytes recycle via the peribiliaryplexus back to hepatocytes for re-secretion into bile.This recycling of bile acids between hepatocytes and cholangiocytes is referred to as the cholehepatic shunt pathway. Recent studies suggest that the cholehepatic shunt pathway may contribute in overall hepatobiliary transport of bile acids and to the adaptation to chronic cholestasis due to extrahepatic obstruction. ASBT is acutely regulated by an adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent translocation to the apical membrane and by phosphorylation-dependent ubiquitination and proteasome degradation. ASBT is chronically regulated by changes in gene expression in response to biliary bile acid concentration and inflammatory cytokines.Another potential function of cholangiocyte ASBT is to allow cholangiocytes to sample biliary bile acids in order to activate intracellular signaling pathways. Bile acids trigger changes in intracellular calcium, protein kinase C (PKC), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), mitogenactivated protein (MAP) kinase and extracellular signalregulated protein kinase (ERK) intracellular signals.Bile acids significantly alter cholangiocyte secretion,proliferation and survival. Different bile acids have differential effects on cholangiocyte intracellular signals,and in some instances trigger opposing effects on cholangiocyte secretion

  5. The dynamics in requested and granted loan terms when bank and borrower interact repeatedly

    OpenAIRE

    Kirschenmann, Karolin

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies how credit constraints develop over bank relationships. I analyze a unique dataset of matched loan application and loan contract information and measure credit constraints as the ratio of requested to granted loan amounts. I find that the most important determinants of receiving smaller than requested loan amounts are firm age and size at the time of the first interaction between borrower and bank. Over loan sequences, credit constraints decease most pronouncedly in the beg...

  6. The Dynamics in Requested and Granted Loan Terms when Bank and Borrower Interact Repeatedly

    OpenAIRE

    Kirschenmann, K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies how credit constraints develop over bank relationships. I analyze a unique dataset of matched loan application and loan contract information and measure credit constraints as the ratio of requested to granted loan amounts. I find that the most important determinants of receiving smaller than requested loan amounts are firm age and size at the time of the first interaction between borrower and bank. Over loan sequences, credit constraints decease most pronouncedly in the beg...

  7. Stabilizing Role of Metallophilic HgII ... HgII Interactions in Nucleic Acids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benda, Ladislav; Tanaka, Y.; Sychrovský, Vladimír; Straka, Michal

    Praha: -, 2011. s. 35-35. [Quantum Bioinorganic Chemistry Conference /3./. 25.06.2011-28.06.2011, Český Krumlov] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/2037; GA ČR GAP205/10/0228 Grant ostatní: European Reintegration Grant(XE) 230955 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : metallophilic HgII ... HgII interactions * mispairing nucleic acids * metallophilic interactions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  8. Study of fatty acid-bacteria interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. During our work we investigated fatty acid-bacteria interactions. The antibacterial property of fatty acids was reported by several authors. Despite of them there is not reassuring explanation about the mechanism of the antibacterial activity of these compounds. An effect can considerably change in case of different structured fatty acids. Our earlier studies conduct that small changes in the structures can modify changes in their behavior towards bacteria. The stearic acid does not cause any antibacterial effects during the first few hours of the investigation, may even help the bacterial growth. However, linolic acid (C18:2) shows a strong antibacterial effect during the first hours. After 24 hours this effect wears out and the bacteria have adapted to the stress. We studied the antibacterial activity using direct bioautography. This method has the advantage to allow examining lipophilic compounds. The linoleic acid decomposes in time under different physiological conditions creating numerous oxidized molecules. This may be the reason of its antimicrobial effect. For studying this phenomenon we used infrared and mass spectroscopic methods. We applied infrared spectroscopy for indicating any changes in the spectra of the fatty acids after the interaction of fatty acids with bacteria. So we are able to deduct on what could happen during these process. We paid great attention towards the changes of double bonds, on methylation and demethylation processes. Using mass spectroscopy we searched for oxidized products that may play important role in this process. These studies are only part of our more widespreading investigations, dealing with the antimicrobial properties of fatty acids.

  9. Interaction of Nucleic Acids with the Glycocalyx

    OpenAIRE

    Palte, Michael J.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian cells resist the uptake of nucleic acids. The lipid bilayer of the plasma membrane presents one barrier. Here, we report on a second physicochemical barrier for uptake. To create a sensitive probe for nucleic acid–cell interactions, we synthesized fluorescent conjugates in which lipids are linked to DNA oligonucleotides. We found that these conjugates incorporate readily into the plasma membrane but are not retained there. Expulsion of lipid–oligonucleotide conjugates from the plasm...

  10. Matrix models with Penner interaction inspired by interacting ribonucleic acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pradeep Bhadola; N Deo

    2015-02-01

    The Penner interaction known in studies of moduli space of punctured Riemann surfaces is introduced and studied in the context of random matrix model of homo RNA. An analytic derivation of the generating function is given and the corresponding partition function is derived numerically. An additional dependence of the structure combinatorics factor on (related to the size of the matrix and the interaction strength) is obtained. This factor has a strong effect on the structure combinatorics in the low regime. Databases are scanned for real ribonucleic acid (RNA) structures and pairing information for these RNA structures is computationally extracted. Then the genus is calculated for every structure and plotted as a function of length. The genus distribution function is compared with the prediction from the nonlinear (NL) model. The specific heat and distribution of structure with temperature calculated from the NL model shows that the NL inter-action is biased towards planar structures. The second derivative of specific heat changes phase from a double peaked function for small to a single peak for large . Detailed analysis reveals the presence of the double peak only for genus 0 structures, the higher genii behave normally with . Comparable behaviour is found in studies involving interactions of RNA with osmolytes and monovalent cations in unfolding experiments.

  11. Interaction Mechanism of Anthracene with Benzoic Acid and Its Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Ying-Ying; WANG Xiao-Chang; FAN Xiao-Yuan; ZHAO Bo; JIN Peng-Kang

    2008-01-01

    Interaction mechanism of anthracene, one of the typical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, with benzoic acid and its hydroxyl-substituted derivatives, o-hydroxylbenzoic acid and p-hydroxylbenzoic acid, were studied using FFIR, UV and fluorescence spectra. The experiments confirmed that there was a specific and oriented interaction between anthracene and the aromatic carboxylic acids, and the bonding mode depended on both the chemical struc- ture of reactants and acidity of solution. The π-H hydrogen bond played a main role in the interaction between an-thracene and the aromatic carboxylic proton of benzoic acid or o-hydroxylbenzoic acid when pH≤pK, and the π-π electron donor-acceptor (EDA) interaction increasingly became the main binding mode when pH>pK. The de-crease of interaction intensity of benzoic acid was observed by introducing hydroxyl at its ortho position. The spe-cial D-π-A structure of p-hydroxylbenzoic acid made it easy to form the planar multi-molecule congeries that could interact with anthracene, so the interaction between anthracene and p-hydroxylbenzoic acid always followed the π-π EDA model no matter the solution acidity. For p-hydroxylbenzoic acid, the π-π interaction mode remained un-changed when pH increased from 2.0 to 10.0, and the binding intensity was higher than that between benzoic acid and anthracene because of the formation of the multi-molecule congeries.

  12. Reconstructing Amino Acid Interaction Networks by an Ant Colony Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Gaci, Omar; Balev, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we introduce the notion of protein interaction network. This is a graph whose vertices are the proteins amino acids and whose edges are the interactions between them. We consider the problem of reconstructing protein's interaction network from its amino acid sequence. We rely on a probability that two amino acids interact as a function of their physico-chemical properties coupled to an ant colony system to solve this problem.

  13. Studies of molybdenite interaction with nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potashnikov, Yu.M.; Lutsik, V.I.; Chursanov, Yu.V. (Kalininskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1984-01-01

    Products composition and their effect on the reaction rate of molybdenite with nitric acid are specified. It is shown that alongside with NO, NO/sub 2/ is included in the composition of the products of MoS/sub 2/ and HNO/sub 3/ interaction, and it produces catalytic effect on the process considered. Under the conditions studied, MoS/sub 2/ dissolution proceeds in the mixed regime, conditioned by similar values of molybdenite oxidation rate and reaction product diffusion into solution volume (Esub(act.=28.9 kJ/mol, K/sub 298/=6.3x10/sup -7/, cmxs/sup -1/), and for that to catalytic effect of NO/sub 2/ the dependence V approximately ..cap alpha..sup(-g.37) is observed.

  14. Studies of molybdenite interaction with nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Product composition and their effect on the reaction rate of molybdenite with nitric acid are specified. It is shown that alongside with NO NO2 is included in the composition of the products of MoS2 and HNO3 interaction and it produces catalytic effect on the process considered. Under the conditions studied MoS2 dissolution proceeds in the mixed regime, conditioned by similar values of molybdenite oxidation rate and reaction product diffusion into solution volume (Esub(act.=28.9 kJ/mol, K298=6.3x10-7, cmxs-1), at that due to catalytic effect of NO2 the dependence V approximately αsup(-g.37) is observed

  15. Amino Acid Interaction Network Prediction Using Multi-Objective Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Shiplu Hawlader

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein can be represented by amino acid interaction network. This network is a graph whose vertices are the proteins amino acids and whose edges are the interactions between them. This interaction network is the first step of proteins three-dimensional structure prediction. In this paper we present a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm for interaction prediction and ant colony probabilistic optimization algorithm is used to confirm the interaction.

  16. Ant Colony Approach to Predict Amino Acid Interaction Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Gaci, Omar; Balev, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we introduce the notion of protein interaction network. This is a graph whose vertices are the proteins amino acids and whose edges are the interactions between them. We consider the problem of reconstructing protein's interaction network from its amino acid sequence. An ant colony approach is used to solve this problem.

  17. Interaction of Climate Change and Acid Deposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wright, R. F.; Aherne, J.; Bishop, K.; Dillon, P. J.; Erlandsson, M.; Evans, C. D.; Forsius, M.; Hardekopf, D.W.; Helliwell, R. C.; Hruška, J.; Hutchins, M.; Kaste, O.; Kopáček, Jiří; Krám, P.; Laudon, H.; Moldan, F.; Rogora, M.; Sjoeng, A.M.S.; de Wit, H. A.

    - : Wiley-Blackwell, 2010 - (Kernan, M.; Battarbee, R.; Moss, B.), s. 152-179 ISBN 978-1-4051-7913-3 Grant ostatní: EU(XE) GOCE-CT-2003-505540 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : climate change * recovery from acidification * water chemistry Subject RIV: DJ - Water Pollution ; Quality

  18. Modulating the electronic structure of amino acids: interaction of model lewis acids with anthranilic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Tareq Irshaidat

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of theoretical B3LYP calculations, Yáñez and co-workers (J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2012, 8, 2293) illustrated that beryllium ions are capable of significantly modulating (changing) the electronic structures of imidazole. In this computational organic chemistry study, the interaction of this β-amino acid and five model Lewis acids (BeF1+, Be2+, AlF2(1+), AlF2+, and Al3+) were investigated. Several aspects were addressed: natural bond orbitals, including second order perturbation ana...

  19. Roles of Intrinsic Disorder in Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Dyson, H. Jane

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between proteins and nucleic acids typify the role of disordered segments, linkers, tails and other entities in the function of complexes that must form with high affinity and specificity but which must be capable of dissociating when no longer needed. While much of the emphasis in the literature has been on the interactions of disordered proteins with other proteins, disorder is also frequently observed in nucleic acids (particularly RNA) and in the proteins that interact with t...

  20. Interaction of milk whey protein with common phenolic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Yu, Dandan; Sun, Jing; Guo, Huiyuan; Ding, Qingbo; Liu, Ruihai; Ren, Fazheng

    2014-01-01

    Phenolics-rich foods such as fruit juices and coffee are often consumed with milk. In this study, the interactions of α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin with the phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and coumalic acid) were examined. Fluorescence, CD, and FTIR spectroscopies were used to analyze the binding modes, binding constants, and the effects of complexation on the conformation of whey protein. The results showed that binding constants of each whey protein-phenolic acid interaction ranged from 4 × 105 to 7 × 106 M-n and the number of binding sites n ranged from 1.28 ± 0.13 to 1.54 ± 0.34. Because of these interactions, the conformation of whey protein was altered, with a significant reduction in the amount of α-helix and an increase in the amounts of β-sheet and turn structures.

  1. Interaction of neptunyl ion with humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study of the complexation of NpO2+ ion with humic acid is one of the important factors to understand the behaviour of Np in the natural water receiving discharges of radioactive waste containing Np. The use of solvent extraction methods in the study of complex formations found more wide spread use with the advent of radioactive tracer technique. In the present context, TTA-phenanthroline extraction system has been used to study the formations of Np-humic acid. (author). 4 refs., 2 figs

  2. Interaction of neptunium with humic acid and anaerobic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humic acid and bacteria play an important role in the migration of radionuclides in groundwaters. The interaction of neptunium with humic acid and anaerobic bacteria has been investigated by liquid/liquid and solid/liquid extraction systems. For liquid/liquid extraction, the apparent complex formation constant, βα was obtained from the distribution between two phases of neptunium. For solid/liquid extraction, the ratio of sorption to bacteria, Kd, was measured. Kd of humic acid can be evaluated from βα. The large value of βα and Kd means strong interaction of neptunium with organisms. In order to examine the effect of the nature of organism on interaction, the interaction with humic acid was compared to that with non-sterilized or sterilized mixed anaerobic bacteria. The value of βα of humate depended on neptunium ion concentration as well as pH, which showed the effect of polyelectrolyte properties and heterogeneous composition of humic acid. The comparison of interaction with humic acid and bacteria indicated that the Kd value of humic acid was larger than that of bacteria and more strongly depend on pH. (author)

  3. Interactive Hangman Teaches Amino Acid Structures and Abbreviations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Britney O.; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying…

  4. Interaction between fatty acid salts and the elastin network.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, van J.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the interaction between salts of fatty acids (FAS) and elastin. Absorption of fatty acids in elastin may affect the elasticity of elastin-containing tissue. Such phenomena could, for instance, be of relevance for the understanding of the formation of a

  5. ACID-BASE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN POLYMERS AND FILLERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qingguo; CHEN Fute; HUANG Yuanfu; ZHOU Qingli

    1987-01-01

    Inverse gas chromatography(IGC) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) techniques were applied to determining the relative acid-base strength of polymers and coupling agents. The acid-base characteristics of fillers such as CaCO3 could be altered by treatment with different coupling agents. It was shown that some mechanical properties of filled polymers were obviously associated with acid-base interactions between polymers and fillers.

  6. Heterogeneous Interactions of Acetaldehyde and Sulfuric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsen, R. R.; Ashbourn, S. F. M.; Iraci, L. T.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake of acetaldehyde [CH3CHO] by aqueous sulfuric acid has been studied via Knudsen cell experiments over ranges of temperature (210-250 K) and acid concentration (40-80 wt. %) representative of the upper troposphere. The Henry's law constants for acetaldehyde calculated from these data range from 6 x 10(exp 2) M/atm for 40 wt. % H2SO4 at 228 K to 2 x 10(exp 5) M/atm for 80 wt. % H2SO4 at 212 K. In some instances, acetaldehyde uptake exhibits apparent steady-state loss. The possible sources of this behavior, including polymerization, will be explored. Furthermore, the implications for heterogeneous reactions of aldehydes in sulfate aerosols in the upper troposphere will be discussed.

  7. Hyperammonemic Encephalopathy due to Valproic Acid and Topiramate Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D. Twilla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Valproic acid-induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a rare yet serious adverse drug reaction. Medication interactions such a valproic acid and topiramate can precipitate an event. We present the case of a 52-year-old female that presented with acute mental status change and hypersomnolence due to hyperammonemia caused by a valproic acid derivative. The patient improved after withdrawal of the offending medications and treatment with lactulose. Clinicians should remain hypervigilant in monitoring for valproic acid-induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy and risk factors such as polypharmacy.

  8. Interactions of methoxyacetic acid with androgen receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endocrine disruptive compounds (EDC) alter hormone-stimulated, nuclear receptor-dependent physiological and developmental processes by a variety of mechanisms. One recently identified mode of endocrine disruption is through hormone sensitization, where the EDC modulates intracellular signaling pathways that control nuclear receptor function, thereby regulating receptor transcriptional activity indirectly. Methoxyacetic acid (MAA), the primary, active metabolite of the industrial solvent ethylene glycol monomethyl ether and a testicular toxicant, belongs to this EDC class. Modulation of nuclear receptor activity by MAA could contribute to the testicular toxicity associated with MAA exposure. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of MAA on the transcriptional activity of several nuclear receptors including the androgen receptor (AR), which plays a pivotal role in the development and maturation of spermatocytes. AR transcriptional activity is shown to be increased by MAA through a tyrosine kinase signaling pathway that involves PI3-kinase. In a combinatorial setting with AR antagonists, MAA potentiated the AR response without significantly altering the EC50 for androgen responsiveness, partially alleviating the antagonistic effect of the anti-androgens. Finally, MAA treatment of TM3 mouse testicular Leydig cells markedly increased the expression of Cyp17a1 and Shbg while suppressing Igfbp3 expression by ∼ 90%. Deregulation of these genes may alter androgen synthesis and action in a manner that contributes to MAA-induced testicular toxicity.

  9. Interactions between acidic proteins and crystals: stereochemical requirements in biomineralization.

    OpenAIRE

    Addadi, L; Weiner, S

    1985-01-01

    Acidic matrix macromolecules are intimately involved in biological crystal growth. In vitro experiments, in which crystals of calcium dicarboxylate salts were grown in the presence of aspartic acid-rich proteins, revealed a stereochemical property common to all the interacting faces. Calcite crystals are nucleated on stereochemically analogous faces when proteins are adsorbed onto a rigid substrate. The importance of this property in biomineralization is discussed.

  10. Interaction of neptunium(V) with polyacrylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the quantitative description of the interaction of actinoids with humic substances, it is necessary to clarify the effects of both polyelectrolyte and heterogeneous nature of humic substances. To estimate these effects separately, polyacrylic acid has been selected as representative of well-defined, homogenous polymeric weak acids, and its interaction with Np(V) has been investigated by a solvent extraction method. By expressing the effective concentration of the complexing ligand by the concentration of ionized carboxylate groups, the apparent complex formation constant has been obtained at several pH, ionic strength and average molecular weights. The results indicated that the apparent complex formation constant varied with the degree of ionization(α) of polyacrylic acid and that the manner of variation resembled that of its apparent proton association constant. (author)

  11. Effect of amino acids on the interaction between cobalamin(II) and dehydroascorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereven'kov, I. A.; Thi, Thu Thuy Bui; Salnikov, D. S.; Makarov, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    The kinetics of the reaction between one-electron-reduced cobalamin (cobalamin(II), Cb(II)) and the two-electron-oxidized form of vitamin C (dehydroascorbic acid, DHA) with amino acids in an acidic medium is studied by conventional UV-Vis spectroscopy. It is shown that the oxidation of Cbl(II) by dehydroascorbic acid proceeds only in the presence of sulfur-containing amino acids (cysteine, acetylcysteine). A proposed reaction mechanism includes the step of amino acid coordination on the Co(II)-center through the sulfur atom, along with that of the interaction between this complex and DHA molecules, which results in the formation of ascorbyl radical and the corresponding Co(III) thiolate complex.

  12. Non-covalent Interaction of Perfluorooctanoic Acid with DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG, Xian; SHEN, Rong; CHEN, Ling

    2009-01-01

    Health risk from exposure of perfluorochemicals to wildlife and human has been a subject of concern in many fields such as environmental ecology, toxicology, pathology and life sciences. The interactions of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) with DNA were investigated by equilibrium dialysis, circular dichroism and isothermal titration calorimetry techniques under normal physiological conditions in vitro. The binding of PFOA to DNA was a non-covalent interaction and corresponded to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm in a two-step binding model, in which PFOA climbed along the backbones of DNA and then interacted with the homolateral bases via hydrophobic interactions. The saturation number of PFOA was calculated to be 0.64 per base-pair of DNA. Such an interaction caused the enhancement of circular dichroism spectra of DNA at both 245 and 275 nm, indicating the change of DNA conformation. The acidic media, low electrolyte and temperature ≤35 ℃ are comparatively more favorable for PFOA binding to DNA. This work provides a useful experimental strategy for studying the interactions of perfluorochemicals with biomacromolecules, aiming at a better understanding of the gene toxicity mechanism of perfluorochemicals.

  13. Interaction of humic and fulvic acids with Th(IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding of Th(IV) to three humic and two fulvic acids has been studied using a solvent extraction technique. The results are interpreted to indicate the formation of two types of thorium binding sites in the humic polymer containing one or two carboxylate groups. High complex stability is observed and thorium humate binding constants increase with increasing ionization of the humic (fulvic) acid polyelectrolyte. The results are interpreted using a modified Born equation for electrostatic interaction. Thermodynamic results indicate that the great stability of these complexes is derived from a very favorable complexation entropy. (author)

  14. Micropatterned Surfaces to Study Hyaluronic Acid Interactions with Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, Laura E.; Gerecht, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Cancer invasion and progression involves a motile cell phenotype, which is under complex regulation by growth factors/cytokines and extracellular matrix (ECM) components within the tumor microenvironment. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is one stromal ECM component that is known to facilitate tumor progression by enhancing invasion, growth, and angiogenesis1. Interaction of HA with its cell surface receptor CD44 induces signaling events that promote tumor cell growth, survival, and migration, thereby in...

  15. Interactions of human mannose-binding protein with lipoteichoic acids.

    OpenAIRE

    Polotsky, V Y; Fischer, W; Ezekowitz, R A; Joiner, K A

    1996-01-01

    We explored the interaction of human recombinant mannose-binding protein and lipoteichoic acids (LTAs) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The best ligand was Micrococcus luteus lipomannan, followed by Enterococcus spp. LTA containing mono-, di-, and oligoglucosyl substituents. LTAs lacking terminal sugars (those of Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus) or containing galactosyl substituents (those of Listeria spp. and Lactococcus spp.) were poor ligands. These results are consis...

  16. Physicochemical interactions of maize starch with ferulic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunaratne, Rusiru; Zhu, Fan

    2016-05-15

    Ferulic acid is widely present in diverse foods and has great health benefits. Starch is a major food component and can be flexibly employed to formulate various products. In this study, the effect of ferulic acid addition on various physicochemical properties of normal maize starch was explored. The properties including swelling, pasting, steady shear and dynamic oscillation rheology, gelatinization, retrogradation, and gel texture were affected by ferulic acid to various extents, depending on the addition level. Enzyme susceptibility of granular starch to α-amylase was not affected. These influences may be explained by the functions of solubilized as well as insoluble ferulic acid which was in the form of crystals in starch matrix. On the molecular level, V-type amylose-ferulic acid inclusion complex formation was not observed by both co-precipitation and acidification methods. The results of this study may inspire further studies on the interactions of phenolics with other food ingredients and their role in food quality. PMID:26775984

  17. Interaction of nucleic acids with carbon nanotubes and dendrimers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bidisha Nandy; Mogurampelly Santosh; Prabal K Maiti

    2012-07-01

    Nucleic acid interaction with nanoscale objects like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and dendrimers is of fundamental interest because of their potential application in CNT separation, gene therapy and antisense therapy. Combining nucleic acids with CNTs and dendrimers also opens the door towards controllable self-assembly to generate various supra-molecular and nano-structures with desired morphologies. The interaction between these nanoscale objects also serve as a model system for studying DNA compaction, which is a fundamental process in chromatin organization. By using fully atomistic simulations, here we report various aspects of the interactions and binding modes of DNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA) with CNTs, graphene and dendrimers. Our results give a microscopic picture and mechanism of the adsorption of single- and double-strand DNA (ssDNA and dsDNA) on CNT and graphene. The nucleic acid–CNT interaction is dominated by the dispersive van der Waals (vdW) interaction. In contrast, the complexation of DNA (both ssDNA and dsDNA) and siRNA with various generations of poly-amido-amine (PAMAM) dendrimers is governed by electrostatic interactions. Our results reveal that both the DNA and siRNA form stable complex with the PAMAM dendrimer at a physiological pH when the dendrimer is positively charged due to the protonation of the primary amines. The size and binding energy of the complex increase with increase in dendrimer generation. We also give a summary of the current status in these fields and discuss future prospects.

  18. Carbohydrate metabolism during prolonged exercise and recovery: interactions between pyruvate dehydrogenase, fatty acids, and amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourtzakis, Marina; Saltin, B.; Graham, T.;

    2006-01-01

    During prolonged exercise, carbohydrate oxidation may result from decreased pyruvate production and increased fatty acid supply and ultimately lead to reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity. Pyruvate also interacts with the amino acids alanine, glutamine, and glutamate, whereby the decline...... activity (P < 0.05) and increased PDH kinase 4 mRNA (P < 0.05) during exercise and recovery. At 1 h of exercise, pyruvate production was greatest and was closely linked to glutamate, which was the predominant amino acid taken up during exercise and recovery. Alanine and glutamine were also associated with...... pyruvate metabolism, and they comprised 68% of total amino-acid release during exercise and recovery. Thus reduced pyruvate production was primarily associated with reduced carbohydrate oxidation, whereas the greatest production of pyruvate was related to glutamate, glutamine, and alanine metabolism in...

  19. INTERACTION OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF CHLORINE WITH MALIC ACID, TARTARIC ACID, AND VARIOUS FRUIT JUICES, A SOURCE OF MUTAGENS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The interactions of aqueous solutions of chlorine with some fruit acids (citric acid, DL-malic acid, and L-tartaric acid) at different pH values were studied. iethyl ether extraction followed by GC/MS analysis indicated that a number of mutagens (certain chlorinated propanones an...

  20. Dual Fatty Acid Elongase Complex Interactions in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morineau, Céline; Gissot, Lionel; Bellec, Yannick; Hematy, Kian; Tellier, Frédérique; Renne, Charlotte; Haslam, Richard; Beaudoin, Frédéric; Napier, Johnathan; Faure, Jean-Denis

    2016-01-01

    Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) are involved in plant development and particularly in several cellular processes such as membrane trafficking, cell division and cell differentiation. However, the precise role of VLCFAs in these different cellular processes is still poorly understood in plants. In order to identify new factors associated with the biosynthesis or function of VLCFAs, a yeast multicopy suppressor screen was carried out in a yeast mutant strain defective for fatty acid elongation. Loss of function of the elongase 3 hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydratase PHS1 in yeast and PASTICCINO2 in plants prevents growth and induces cytokinesis defects. PROTEIN TYROSIN PHOSPHATASE-LIKE (PTPLA) previously characterized as an inactive dehydratase was able to restore yeast phs1 growth and VLCFAs elongation but not the plant pas2-1 defects. PTPLA interacted with elongase subunits in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) and its absence induced the accumulation of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA as expected from a dehydratase involved in fatty acid (FA) elongation. However, loss of PTPLA function increased VLCFA levels, an effect that was dependent on the presence of PAS2 indicating that PTPLA activity repressed FA elongation. The two dehydratases have specific expression profiles in the root with PAS2, mostly restricted to the endodermis, while PTPLA was confined in the vascular tissue and pericycle cells. Comparative ectopic expression of PTPLA and PAS2 in their respective domains confirmed the existence of two independent elongase complexes based on PAS2 or PTPLA dehydratase that are functionally interacting. PMID:27583779

  1. Metabolic Interactions between Vitamin A and Conjugated Linoleic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranca Carta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Lipid-soluble molecules share several aspects of their physiology due to their common adaptations to a hydrophilic environment, and may interact to regulate their action in a tissue-specific manner. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA is a fatty acid with a conjugated diene structure that is found in low concentrations in ruminant products and available as a nutritional supplement. CLA has been shown to increase tissue levels of retinol (vitamin A alcohol and its sole specific circulating carrier protein retinol-binding protein (RBP or RBP4. However, the precise mechanism of this action has not been elucidated yet. Here, we provide a summary of the current knowledge in this specific area of research and speculate that retinol and CLA may compete for catabolic pathways modulated by the activity of PPAR-α and RXR heterodimer. We also present preliminary data that may position PPAR-α at the crossroads between the metabolism of lipids and vitamin A.

  2. Grants Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Grants Process provides an overview of the end-to-end lifecycle of grant funding. Learn about the types of funding available and the basics for application, review, award, and on-going administration within the NCI.

  3. Interaction of perfluorooctanoic acid with human serum albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Fang-Fang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA has become a significant issue in many aspects of environmental ecology, toxicology, pathology and life sciences because it may have serious effects on the endocrine, immune and nervous systems and can lead to embryonic deformities and other diseases. Human serum albumin (HSA is the major protein component of blood plasma and is called a multifunctional plasma carrier protein because of its ability to bind an unusually broad spectrum of ligands. Results The interaction of PFOA with HSA was investigated in the normal physiological condition by equilibrium dialysis, fluorospectrometry, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC and circular dichroism (CD. The non-covalent interaction is resulted from hydrogen bond, van der Waals force and hydrophobic stack. PFOA binding to HSA accorded with two-step binding model with the saturation binding numbers of PFOA, only 1 in the hydrophobic intracavity of HSA and 12 on the exposed outer surface. The interaction of PFOA with HSA is spontaneous and results in change of HSA conformation. The possible binding sites were speculated. Conclusion The present work suggested a characterization method for the intermolecular weak interaction. It is potentially useful for elucidating the toxigenicity of perfluorochemicals when combined with biomolecular function effect, transmembrane transport, toxicological testing and the other experiments.

  4. Effects of Abscisic Acid, Gibberellin, Ethylene and Their Interactions on Production of Phenolic Acids in Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge Hairy Roots

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Zongsuo; Ma, Yini; Xu, Tao; Cui, Beimi; Liu, Yan; Guo, Zhixin; Yang, Dongfeng

    2013-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is one of the most important traditional Chinese medicinal plants because of its excellent performance in treating coronary heart disease. Phenolic acids mainly including caffeic acid, rosmarinic acid and salvianolic acid B are a group of active ingredients in S. miltiorrhiza. Abscisic acid (ABA), gibberellin (GA) and ethylene are three important phytohormones. In this study, effects of the three phytohormones and their interactions on phenolic production in S. miltiorrhiz...

  5. Silicon Isotope Fractionation During Acid Water-Igneous Rock Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Boorn, S. H.; van Bergen, M. J.; Vroon, P. Z.

    2007-12-01

    Silica enrichment by metasomatic/hydrothermal alteration is a widespread phenomenon in crustal environments where acid fluids interact with silicate rocks. High-sulfidation epithermal ore deposits and acid-leached residues at hot-spring settings are among the best known examples. Acid alteration acting on basalts has also been invoked to explain the relatively high silica contents of the surface of Mars. We have analyzed basaltic-andesitic lavas from the Kawah Ijen volcanic complex (East Java, Indonesia) that were altered by interaction with highly acid (pH~1) sulfate-chloride water of its crater lake and seepage stream. Quantitative removal of major elements during this interaction has led to relative increase in SiO2 contents. Our silicon isotope data, obtained by HR-MC-ICPMS and reported relative to the NIST RM8546 (=NBS28) standard, show a systematic increase in &δ&&30Si from -0.2‰ (±0.3, 2sd) for unaltered andesites and basalts to +1.5‰ (±0.3, 2sd) for the most altered/silicified rocks. These results demonstrate that silicification induced by pervasive acid alteration is accompanied by significant Si isotope fractionation, so that alterered products become isotopically heavier than the precursor rocks. Despite the observed enrichment in SiO2, the rocks have experienced an overall net loss of silicon upon alteration, if Nb is considered as perfectly immobile. The observed &δ&&30Si values of the alteration products appeared to correlate well with the inferred amounts of silicon loss. These findings would suggest that &28Si is preferentially leached during water-rock interaction, implying that dissolved silica in the ambient lake and stream water is isotopically light. However, layered opaline lake sediments, that are believed to represent precipitates from the silica-saturated water show a conspicuous &30Si-enrichment (+1.2 ± 0.2‰). Because anorganic precipitation is known to discriminate against the heavy isotope (e.g. Basile- Doelsch et al., 2006

  6. Interactions of acidic solutions with sediments: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology is presented for investigating the chemical interactions of acidic solutions with sediments. The MINTEQ geochemical computer code was used to predict solid-phase reactions that might occur when acidic solutions contact neutral sediments which, in turn, may control the concentrations of certain dissolved components. Results of X-ray diffraction analysis of laboratory samples of sediments that have been contacted with acidic uranium mill tailings solutions suggest gypsum and jarosite precipitated. These same mineralogical changes were identified in sediment samples collected from a drained uranium mill evaporation pond (Lucky Mc mine in Wyoming) with a 10-year history of acid attack. Geochemical modeling predicted that these same phases and several amorphous solids not identifiable by X-ray diffraction should have precipitated in the contacted sediments. An equilibrium conceptual model consisting of an assemblage of minerals and amorphous solid phases was then developed to represent a sediment column through which uranium mill tailings solutions were percolated. The MINTEQ code was used to predict effluent solution concentrations resulting from the reactions of the tailings solution with the assemblage of solid phases in the conceptual model. The conceptual model successfully predicted the concentrations of several of the macro-constituents (e.g., Ca, SO4, Al, Fe, and Mn), but was not successful in modeling the concentrations of trace elements. The lack of success in predicting the observed trace metal concentrations suggests that other mechanisms, such as adsorption, must be included in future models. The geochemical modeling methodology coupled with the laboratory and field studies should be applicable to a variety of waste disposal problems

  7. Interaction of perfluoroalkyl acids with human liver fatty acid-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Nan; Li, Juan; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Aiqian; Dai, Jiayin

    2016-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are highly persistent and bioaccumulative, resulting in their broad distribution in humans and the environment. The liver is an important target for PFAAs, but the mechanisms behind PFAAs interaction with hepatocyte proteins remain poorly understood. We characterized the binding of PFAAs to human liver fatty acid-binding protein (hL-FABP) and identified critical structural features in their interaction. The binding interaction of PFAAs with hL-FABP was determined by fluorescence displacement and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) assay. Molecular simulation was conducted to define interactions at the binding sites. ITC measurement revealed that PFOA/PFNA displayed a moderate affinity for hL-FABP at a 1:1 molar ratio, a weak binding affinity for PFHxS and no binding for PFHxA. Moreover, the interaction was mainly mediated by electrostatic attraction and hydrogen bonding. Substitution of Asn111 with Asp caused loss of binding affinity to PFAA, indicating its crucial role for the initial PFAA binding to the outer binding site. Substitution of Arg122 with Gly caused only one molecule of PFAA to bind to hL-FABP. Molecular simulation showed that substitution of Arg122 increased the volume of the outer binding pocket, making it impossible to form intensive hydrophobic stacking and hydrogen bonds with PFOA, and highlighting its crucial role in the binding process. The binding affinity of PFAAs increased significantly with their carbon number. Arg122 and Asn111 played a pivotal role in these interactions. Our findings may help understand the distribution pattern, bioaccumulation, elimination, and toxicity of PFAAs in humans. PMID:25370009

  8. POLYMER/MONTMORILLONITE COMPLEXES: PREPARATION AND INTERACTIONS WITH ROSIN ACID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LihongZhao; WenxiaLiu

    2004-01-01

    Polymer/montmorillonite complexes were preparedvia intercalating polymers of low molecular weightinto layers of montmorillonite and evaluated for theirinteractions with rosin acid. Three polymers fromvarious amines modified by epichlorohydrin and anacidified diethylenetriamine were separatelyintercalated into montmorillonite via direct solutionintercalation. X-ray diffraction patterns areperformed to obtain information about theintercalation of these agents. The examinationrevealed that it was feasible for the directintercalation of polymers, while hard for theunmodified diethylenetriamine. Adsorption isothermcurves were established to assess the efficiency of thevarious montmorillonites including the intercalatedmontmorillonites, the simple mixtures of thecorresponding intercalation agents and ordinarymontmorillonite in removing pitch from watersolution. From the adsorption behavior of varioussamples, it was found that the interaction of themontmorillonite with pitch was not only through vander Waals attraction, but also through electrostaticinteractions. Both the organo-philic and the surfaceelectrostatic properties of the montmorillonites areimportant for successful pitch control.

  9. Acid-base interactions in microbial adhesion to hexadecane and chloroform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, R; Busscher, HJ; Geertsema-Doornbusch, GI; Van Der Mei, HC; Mittal, KL

    2000-01-01

    Acid-base interactions play an important role in adhesion, including microbial adhesion to surfaces. Qualitatively acid-base interactions in microbial adhesion can be demonstrated by comparing adhesion to hexadecane (a negatively charged interface in aqueous solutions, unable to exert acid-base inte

  10. Interaction of trace elements in acid mine drainage solution with humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suteerapataranon, Siripat; Bouby, Muriel; Geckeis, Horst; Fanghänel, Thomas; Grudpan, Kate

    2006-06-01

    The release of metal ions from a coal mining tailing area, Lamphun, Northern Thailand, is studied by leaching tests. Considerable amounts of Mn, Fe, Al, Ni and Co are dissolved in both simulated rain water (pH 4) and 10 mg L(-1) humic acid (HA) solution (Aldrich humic acid, pH 7). Due to the presence of oxidizing pyrite and sulfide minerals, the pH in both leachates decreases down to approximately 3 combined with high sulfate concentrations typical to acid mine drainage (AMD) water composition. Interaction of the acidic leachates upon mixing with ground- and surface water containing natural organic matter is simulated by subsequent dilution (1:100; 1:200; 1:300; 1:500) with a 10 mg L(-1) HA solution (ionic strength: 10(-3) mol L(-1)). Combining asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) with UV/Vis and ICP-MS detection allows for the investigation of metal ion interaction with HA colloid and colloid size evolution. Formation of colloid aggregates is observed by filtration and AsFlFFF depending on the degree of the dilution. While the average HA size is initially found to be 2 nm, metal-HA complexes are always found to be larger. Such observation is attributed to a metal induced HA agglomeration, which is found even at low coverage of HA functional groups with metal ions. Increasing the metal ion to HA ratio, the HA bound metal ions and the HA entities are growing in size from 450 nm. At high metal ion to HA ratios, precipitation of FeOOH phases and HA agglomeration due to colloid charge neutralization by complete saturation of HA complexing sites are responsible for the fact that most of Fe and Al precipitate and are found in a size fraction >450 nm. In the more diluted solutions, HA is more relevant as a carrier for metal ion mobilization. PMID:16631855

  11. Interaction of photosensitive surfactant with DNA and poly acrylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy, E-mail: yuriy.zakrevskyy@fh-koeln.de; Paasche, Jens; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana, E-mail: santer@uni-potsdam.de [Experimental Physics, Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Cywinski, Piotr; Cywinska, Magdalena; Reich, Oliver; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd [Physical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, we investigate interactions and phase transitions in polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes formed between a cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant and two types of polyelectrolytes: natural (DNA) or synthetic (PAA: poly acrylic acid). The construction of a phase diagram allowed distancing between four major phases: extended coil conformation, colloidally stable compacted globules, colloidal instability range, and surfactant-stabilized compact state. Investigation on the complexes’ properties in different phases and under irradiation with UV light provides information about the role of the surfactant's hydrophobic trans isomers both in the formation and destruction of DNA and PAA globules as well as in their colloidal stabilization. The trans isomer shows much stronger affinity to the polyelectrolytes than the hydrophilic cis counterpart. There is no need for complete compensation of the polyelectrolyte charges to reach the complete compaction. On contrary to the findings previously reported in the literature, we demonstrate – for the first time – complete polyelectrolyte compaction which occurs already at 20% of DNA (and at 50% of PAA) charge compensation. The trans isomer plays the main role in the compaction. The aggregation between azobenzene units in the photosensitive surfactant is a driving force of this process. The decompaction can be realized during UV light irradiation and is strongly influenced by the interplay between surfactant-surfactant and surfactant-DNA interactions in the compacted globules.

  12. Interaction of photosensitive surfactant with DNA and poly acrylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we investigate interactions and phase transitions in polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes formed between a cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant and two types of polyelectrolytes: natural (DNA) or synthetic (PAA: poly acrylic acid). The construction of a phase diagram allowed distancing between four major phases: extended coil conformation, colloidally stable compacted globules, colloidal instability range, and surfactant-stabilized compact state. Investigation on the complexes’ properties in different phases and under irradiation with UV light provides information about the role of the surfactant's hydrophobic trans isomers both in the formation and destruction of DNA and PAA globules as well as in their colloidal stabilization. The trans isomer shows much stronger affinity to the polyelectrolytes than the hydrophilic cis counterpart. There is no need for complete compensation of the polyelectrolyte charges to reach the complete compaction. On contrary to the findings previously reported in the literature, we demonstrate – for the first time – complete polyelectrolyte compaction which occurs already at 20% of DNA (and at 50% of PAA) charge compensation. The trans isomer plays the main role in the compaction. The aggregation between azobenzene units in the photosensitive surfactant is a driving force of this process. The decompaction can be realized during UV light irradiation and is strongly influenced by the interplay between surfactant-surfactant and surfactant-DNA interactions in the compacted globules

  13. Interaction of gallic acid with trypsin analyzed by spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Song

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between trypsin and gallic acid (GA were investigated by means of fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, resonance light scattering (RLS spectroscopy, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, and enzymatic inhibition assay. It was found that GA can cause the fluorescence quenching of trypsin during the process of formation of GA-trypsin complex, resulting in inhibition of trypsin activity (IC50 = 3.9 × 10−6 mol/L. The fluorescence spectroscopic data showed that the quenching efficiency can reach about 80%. The binding constants were 1.9371 × 104 L/mol, 1.8192 × 104 L/mol, and 1.7465 × 104 L/mol at three temperatures, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters revealed that hydrogen bonds, van der Waals, hydrophobic, and electrostatic interactions were involved in the binding process of GA to trypsin. Molecular modeling studies illustrated a specific display of binding information and explained most of the experiment phenomena. The microenvironments of tryptophan and tyrosine residue in trypsin were changed by the GA. Results indicated that GA was a strong quencher and inhibitor of trypsin.

  14. Interaction products of sulfuric acid and sulfurous compounds of sour oil and their structural properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to interaction products of sulfuric acid and sulfurous compounds of sour oil and their structural properties. The results of studies of obtaining of sulfides by complex formation with 86% sulfuric acid from sour oil were considered.

  15. Calorimetric study of interaction of barium hydroxide with diluted solutions of hydrofluoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to calorimetric study of interaction of barium hydroxide with diluted solutions of hydrofluoric acid. The calorimetric study of interaction of barium hydroxide with diluted solutions of hydrofluoric acid was carried out in order to determine the thermal effects of reactions. The results of interaction of Ba(OH)4·8H2O with 5, 10, and 20% solution of hydrofluoric acid were considered.

  16. Synergic interaction between ascorbic acid and antibiotics against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Cursino

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out on in vitro combination of ascorbic acid (AA with six antibiotics against 12 multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Synergic activity was detected with AA chloramphenicol, kanamycin, streptomycin and tetracycline. Indifference was observed to any antibiotics and antagonism only for chloramphenicol. Results indicated that multiresistant P. aeruginosa was affected by combination of AA and antibiotics. Future research on ascorbic acid-antimicrobial interactions may find new methods to control strains of multiresistant P. aeruginosa.Investigou-se in vitro o efeito da combinação do ácido ascórbico (AA com seis antibióticos frente a 12 isolados multirresistentes de Pseudomonas aeruginosa. As concentrações inibitórias mínimas (CIM foram determinadas pelo método de diluição em caldo. Foi estudado o efeito do AA nas CIM pelo cálculo das concentrações inibitórias fracionais (CIF. Para quase todas as combinações AA-antibiótico foi detectado efeito sinérgico, exceto para ampicilina e tobramicina. Indiferença foi observada na interação com todos os antibióticos, porém antagonismo foi somente observado para cloranfenicol. Os resultados deste estudo indicam que o sinergismo contra P. aeruginosa resistentes pode ocorrer entre AA e cloranfenicol, canamicina, estreptomicina e tetraciclina, ainda que as linhagens sejam resistentes aos antibióticos individualmente. Além disso, estes resultados encorajam futuros trabalhos in vivo a respeito da interação AA-antimicrobianos na incessante busca de novas alternativas para o controle de linhagens multirresistentes de P.aeruginosa.

  17. Photostability and Interaction of Ascorbic Acid in Cream Formulations

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Sheraz, Muhammad Ali; Ahmed, Sofia; Shaikh, Riaz Hussain; Vaid, Faiyaz H. M.; ur Rehman Khattak, Saif; Ansari, Shakeel A.

    2011-01-01

    The kinetics of photolysis of ascorbic acid in cream formulations on UV irradiation has been studied using a specific spectrophotometric method with a reproducibility of ±5%. The apparent first-order rate constants (kobs) for the photolysis of ascorbic acid in creams have been determined. The photoproducts formed in the cream formulations include dehydroascorbic acid and 2,3-diketogulonic acid. The photolysis of ascorbic acid appears to be affected by the concentration of active ingredient, p...

  18. Interaction of Fatty Acid Genotype and Diet on Changes in Colonic Fatty Acids in a Mediterranean Diet Intervention Study

    OpenAIRE

    Porenta, Shannon R.; Ko, Yi-An; Gruber, Stephen B.; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Baylin, Ana; Raskin, Leonid; Ren, Jianwei; Djuric, Zora

    2013-01-01

    A Mediterranean diet increases intakes of n-3 and n-9 fatty acids and lowers intake of n-6 fatty acids. This can impact colon cancer risk since n-6 fatty acids are metabolized to pro-inflammatory eicosanoids. The purpose of this study was to evaluate interactions of polymorphisms in the fatty acid desaturase genes, FADS1 and FADS2, and changes in diet on fatty acid concentrations in serum and colon. A total of 108 individuals at increased risk of colon cancer were randomized to either a Medit...

  19. Dielectric behavior of irradiated and nonirradiadiated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-crotonic acid interaction in 5% dextrose solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ex. thymus, dissolved in 5% dextrose, was exposed to gamma radiation at doses between 0-5000 Rads. Crotonic acid dissolved in 5% dextrose was added to this irradiated DNA at t=0 and t=24 hrs after irradiation, in concentrations between 0-1.000 mg/ml. The dielectric behavior of the DNA-irradiation-crotonic acid interaction was investigated at T=200C by pH, permittivity (dielectric constant) and conductivity measurements. The pH, permittivity and conductivity measurements exhibit that the effective and critical conditions for the DNA-irradiation-crotonic acid interaction are; low doses of irradiation (350 Rad.), low concentrations of crotonic acid (0.05-0.100 mg/ml) and the addition of crotonic acid 24 hours after the irradiation. These results support and are in good agreement with those results observed with mammalian cells and laboratory animals when the chemical carcinogens are given in conjunction with radiation

  20. Heterogeneous Interaction of Peroxyacetyl Nitrate on Liquid Sulfuric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Renyi; Leu, Ming-Taun

    1996-01-01

    The uptake of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) on liquid sulfuric acid surfaces has been investigated using a fast-flow reactor coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer. PAN was observed to be reversibly adsorbed on sulfuric acid.

  1. USEPA Grants

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is a provisional dataset that contains point locations for all grants given out by the USEPA going back to the 1960s through today. There are many limitations...

  2. Interaction of fatty acid genotype and diet on changes in colonic fatty acids in a Mediterranean diet intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porenta, Shannon R; Ko, Yi-An; Gruber, Stephen B; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Baylin, Ana; Ren, Jianwei; Djuric, Zora

    2013-11-01

    A Mediterranean diet increases intakes of n-3 and n-9 fatty acids and lowers intake of n-6 fatty acids. This can impact colon cancer risk as n-6 fatty acids are metabolized to proinflammatory eicosanoids. The purpose of this study was to evaluate interactions of polymorphisms in the fatty acid desaturase (FADS) genes, FADS1 and FADS2, and changes in diet on fatty acid concentrations in serum and colon. A total of 108 individuals at increased risk of colon cancer were randomized to either a Mediterranean or a Healthy Eating diet. Fatty acids were measured in both serum and colonic mucosa at baseline and after six months. Each individual was genotyped for four single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the FADS gene cluster. Linear regression was used to evaluate the effects of diet, genotype, and the diet by genotype interaction on fatty acid concentrations in serum and colon. Genetic variation in the FADS genes was strongly associated with baseline serum arachidonic acid (n-6) but serum eicosapentaenoic acid (n-3) and colonic fatty acid concentrations were not significantly associated with genotype. After intervention, there was a significant diet by genotype interaction for arachidonic acid concentrations in colon. Subjects who had all major alleles for FADS1/2 and were following a Mediterranean diet had 16% lower arachidonic acid concentrations in the colon after six months of intervention than subjects following the Healthy Eating diet. These results indicate that FADS genotype could modify the effects of changes in dietary fat intakes on arachidonic acid concentrations in the colon. PMID:24022589

  3. Effect of citric acid on noncovalent interactions in biopolymer jellies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuanyzhbek Musabekov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of citric acid on the formation of gels based on gelatine, melon pulp and sugar has been studied. It is found that the structuring of gelatin the presence of melon pulp is due to hydrogen bonds between the amino acids of gelatin and pectin melon by hydrogen bonds. It is shown that the structuring of gelatin and gelatin – melon pulp depends on the concentration of sugar. The addition of acid in the pectin-gelatin composition reduces the pH, the solubility of pectin and accelerates the formation of jelly. This is due to the fact that in the presence of citric acid reduced the degree of dissociation of galacturonic acid. The intensity of the effect of citric acid on the structure in the presence of melon pulp could be explained by the formation of hydrogen bonds between pectin and citric acid.

  4. Interactions between Cooccurring Lactic Acid Bacteria in Honey Bee Hives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokop, Z P; Horton, M A; Newton, I L G

    2015-10-01

    In contrast to the honey bee gut, which is colonized by a few characteristic bacterial clades, the hive of the honey bee is home to a diverse array of microbes, including many lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In this study, we used culture, combined with sequencing, to sample the LAB communities found across hive environments. Specifically, we sought to use network analysis to identify microbial hubs sharing nearly identical operational taxonomic units, evidence which may indicate cooccurrence of bacteria between environments. In the process, we identified interactions between noncore bacterial members (Fructobacillus and Lactobacillaceae) and honey bee-specific "core" members. Both Fructobacillus and Lactobacillaceae colonize brood cells, bee bread, and nectar and may serve the role of pioneering species, establishing an environment conducive to the inoculation by honey bee core bacteria. Coculture assays showed that these noncore bacterial members promote the growth of honey bee-specific bacterial species. Specifically, Fructobacillus by-products in spent medium supported the growth of the Firm-5 honey bee-specific clade in vitro. Metabolic characterization of Fructobacillus using carbohydrate utilization assays revealed that this strain is capable of utilizing the simple sugars fructose and glucose, as well as the complex plant carbohydrate lignin. We tested Fructobacillus for antibiotic sensitivity and found that this bacterium, which may be important for establishment of the microbiome, is sensitive to the commonly used antibiotic tetracycline. Our results point to the possible significance of "noncore" and environmental microbial community members in the modulation of honey bee microbiome dynamics and suggest that tetracycline use by beekeepers should be limited. PMID:26253685

  5. Investigation of molecular interactions in the complex formation of tartaric acid derivatives with di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The molecular interactions in the complex formation of two tartaric acid derivatives with di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid are investigated. The complex formation with a 1:1 stoichiometry between tartaric acid derivatives and D2EHPA can be obtained through UV-Vis titration, NMR chemical shifts and molecular dynamic simulations. Furthermore, the differences of the two complexes on the binding constants and strength of hydrogen bonds can also be determined. Such research will ideally provide insight into ways of regulating the complex forming properties of tartaric acid derivatives for composing or syn- thesizing new chiral resolving agents.

  6. Investigation of molecular interactions in the complex formation of tartaric acid derivatives with di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Bin; ZHAI Zheng; LUO GuangSheng; WANG JiaDing

    2008-01-01

    The molecular interactions in the complex formation of two tartaric acid derivatives with di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid are investigated. The complex formation with a 1:1 stoichiometry between tartaric acid derivatives and D2EHPA can be obtained through UV-Vis titration, NMR chemical shifts and molecular dynamic simulations. Furthermore, the differences of the two complexes on the binding constants and strength of hydrogen bonds can also be determined. Such research will ideally provide insight into ways of regulating the complex forming properties of tartaric acid derivatives for composing or syn-thesizing new chiral resolving agents.

  7. Interaction of sulfuric acid corrosion and mechanical wear of iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengstorff, G. W. P.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Friction and wear experiment were conducted with elemental iron sliding on aluminum oxide in aerated sulfuric acid at concentrations ranging from very dilute (0.00007 N; i.e., 4 ppm) to very concentrated (96 percent acid). Load and reciprocating sliding speed were kept constant. With the most dilute acid concentration of 0.00007 to 0.0002 N, a complex corrosion product formed that was friable and often increased friction and wear. At slightly higher concentrations of 0.001 N, metal losses were essentially by wear alone. Because no buildup of corrosion products occurred, this acid concentration became the standard from which to separate metal loss from direct corrosion and mechanical wear losses. When the acid concentration was increased to 5 percent (1 N), the well-established high corrosion rate of iron in sulfuric acid strongly dominated the total wear loss. This strong corrosion increased to 30 percent acid and decreased somewhat to 50 percent acid in accordance with expectations. However, the low corrosion of iron expected at acid concentrations of 65 to 96 percent was not observed in the wear area. It was apparent that the normal passivating film was being worn away and a galvanic cell established that rapidly attacked the wear area. Under the conditions where direct corrosion losses were highest, the coefficient of friction was the lowest.

  8. Preferential Treatment: Interaction Between Amino Acids and Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crapster-Pregont, E. J.; Cleaves, H. J.; Hazen, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and are important for some models of the origin of life. Polymerization of amino acids from dilute solution is unlikely without a scaffold or catalyst. The surfaces of early Earth minerals are the most likely candidates for this role. The surface adsorption behavior of 12 amino acids (L-alanine, L-serine, L-aspartic acid, L-proline, L- phenylalanine, L-valine, L-arginine, d-amino valeric acid, glycine, L-lysine, L-isoleucine, and B-alanine) on 21 minerals (quartz, calcite, enstatite, illite, olivine, pyrrhotite, pyrite, alkali basalt, albite, analcime, chlorite, barite, hydroxyl apatite, hematite, magnetite, aluminum hydroxide, kaolin, silica gel, corundum, rutile, and montmorillonite) was determined via batch adsorption experiments. Absorption was determined for concentrations between 10-4M and 10-6M in the presence of 0.1M NaCl, and between pH values of 3 and 9 at 25 degrees C. The equilibrated solutions were centrifuged, filtered, derivatized using a fluorescent amino group tag (dansyl-chloride) and analyzed by HPLC. Adsorption was standardized using BET surface area measurements for each mineral to give the number of mols of each amino acid adsorbed per square meter for each mineral. The results indicate an enormous difference in the adsorption of amino acids between minerals, along with major differences in the adsorption of individual amino acids on the same mineral surface. There is also a change in the absorbance of amino acids as the pH changes. Many previous studies of amino acid concentration and catalysis by minerals have used clay minerals because of their high surface areas, however, this data suggests that the surfaces of minerals such as calcite, quartz and pyrite have even higher affinities for amino acids. The results suggest mineral surfaces that could be optimal locations for the polymerization of molecules linked to the origin of life.

  9. Femtosecond spectroscopic study of carminic acid-DNA interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photo-excited carminic acid and carminic acid-DNA complexes in a buffer solution at pH 7 have been examined using a variety of spectroscopy techniques, that are in particular, the femtosecond resolved fluorescence upconversion and transient absorption spectroscopy. The observation of dual fluorescence emission, one peaks at 470 nm and the other at 570 nm, indicates to an excited-state (S1) intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). A detailed analysis of the transient absorption measurements of an aqueous carminic-acid solution at pH 7 yielded four lifetimes for the excited-state (S1): 8, 15, 33 and 46 ps. On the other hand, only two lifetimes, 34 and 47 ps, were observed by fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy because of the detection limitation to the long wavelength edge of the carminic-acid spectrum. The four S1 lifetimes were ascribed to the coexistence of respectively two tautomer (normal and tautomer) forms of carminic acid, in the non-dissociated state (CAH) and in the deprotonated state (CA-). The fluorescence upconversion measurements of carminic acid-DNA complexes exhibited a prolongation of the fluorescence lifetimes. This effect was accepted as evidence for the formation of intercalation complexes between the carminic acid and the DNA. The intercalative binding of the carminic acid to DNA was confirmed by the fluorescence titration experiments resulting to a binding constant of 2 x 105 M-1 that is typical for anthracycline-DNA complexes

  10. Photostability and interaction of ascorbic acid in cream formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Sheraz, Muhammad Ali; Ahmed, Sofia; Shaikh, Riaz Hussain; Vaid, Faiyaz H M; ur Rehman Khattak, Saif; Ansari, Shakeel A

    2011-09-01

    The kinetics of photolysis of ascorbic acid in cream formulations on UV irradiation has been studied using a specific spectrophotometric method with a reproducibility of ± 5%. The apparent first-order rate constants (k(obs)) for the photolysis of ascorbic acid in creams have been determined. The photoproducts formed in the cream formulations include dehydroascorbic acid and 2,3-diketogulonic acid. The photolysis of ascorbic acid appears to be affected by the concentration of active ingredient, pH, and viscosity of the medium and formulation characteristics. The study indicates that the ionized state and redox potentials of ascorbic acid are important factors in the photostability of the vitamin in cream formulations. The viscosity of the humectant present in the creams appears to influence the photostability of ascorbic acid. The results show that the physical stability of the creams is an important factor in the stabilization of the vitamin. In the cream formulations stored in the dark, ascorbic acid undergoes aerobic oxidation and the degradation is affected by similar factors as indicated in the photolysis reactions. The rate of oxidative degradation in the dark is about seventy times slower than that observed in the presence of light. PMID:21735345

  11. Adhesion/decalcification mechanisms of acid interactions with human hard tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, M; Yoshida, Y; Inoue, S; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G; Nomura, Y; Okazaki, M; Shintani, H; Van Meerbeek, B

    2002-01-01

    In order to study adhesion/decalcification mechanisms of acid interactions with human hard tissues such as bones and teeth, the chemical interaction of five carboxylic acids (acetic, citric, lactic, maleic, and oxalic) and two inorganic acids (hydrochloric and nitric) with enamel and two synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) powders with, respectively, a high and a low crystallinity were analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS), and spectrophotometry (S). X-ray diffraction revealed that the crystallinity of the highly crystallized HAp was considerably higher than that of enamel while the crystallinity of the poorly crystallized HAp was similar to that of dentin and bone. XPS of acid-treated enamel demonstrated for all carboxylic acids ionic bonding to calcium of HAp. AAS and S showed for both HAps that all carboxylic and inorganic acids except oxalic acid extracted Ca significantly more than P, leading to a Ca/P ratio close to that of synthetic HAp (2.16 w/w). Oxalic acid extracted hardly any Ca, but substantially more P, leading to a significantly smaller Ca/P ratio than that of HAp. AAS showed that the calcium salt of oxalic acid hardly could be dissolved, whereas the calcium salts of all the other acids were very soluble in their respective acid solution. These results confirm the adhesion/decalcification concept (AD-concept) previously advanced. Depending on the dissolution rate of the respective calcium salts, acids either adhere to or decalcify apatitic substrates. It is concluded that the AD-concept that originally dictated the interaction of carboxylic acids with human hard tissues can be extended to inorganic acids, such as hydrochloric and nitric acid. Furthermore, HAp crystallinity was found not to affect the adhesion/decalcification behavior of acids when interacting with apatitic substrates, so that the AD-concept can be applied to all human hard tissues with varying HAp crystallinity. PMID:11745537

  12. Study of interaction of zirconium- and hafnium tetrachlorides with some amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirconium complexes with α-alanine, anthranilic and nicotinic acids, as well as hafnium complex with anthranilic acid have been synthesized by interaction of zirconium and hafnium tetrachlorides with the amino acids in absolute ethylacetate in dry atmosphere. Coordination of ligands is being deduced from the infrared spectra of the compounds. Tetrachlorides of the metals in non-aqueous media react with amino acids to form compounds involving participation of nitrogen atoms

  13. Copper(II) interactions with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents. I. Salicylic acid and acetylsalicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumas, V; Brumas, B; Berthon, G

    1995-02-15

    Recently a growing body of evidence has accumulated on the beneficial effects of copper compounds toward various models of inflammation, and copper complexes of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown to be more effective in this respect than the parent agents. However, the origin of this activity remains unclear: The ability of NSAIDs to influence copper metabolism is still questionable, and apart from the claimed SOD-like activity of copper salts in vivo, relatively little is known about how copper-NSAID interactions may help regulate the inflammatory process. Before the potential role of copper-NSAID complexes versus inflammation can be elucidated, speciation studies are necessary (i) to analyze the overall influence of these drugs on copper metabolism and (ii) to discriminate the individual complexes likely to represent the active form of the drug in vivo. In this paper, copper(II) complex equilibria with salicylic and acetylsalicylic acids--and benzoic acid used as a reference--as well as the mixed-ligand complex equilibria generated by these binary systems and L-histidine [main low-molar-mass ligand of copper(II) in blood plasma] have been investigated under physiological conditions (37 degrees C; 0.15-M NaCl). Confirming previous observations by others, resulting simulated plasma copper distributions virtually rule out any quantitative influence of salicylate on copper tissue diffusion at therapeutic levels. Even though, as is presently shown, both salicylate and acetylsalicylate may favor the gastrointestinal absorption of copper, it seems unlikely that salicylate can exert its antinflammatory activity predominantly through copper complexation. The assertion that copper-NSAID complexes represent the active forms of NSAIDs therefore seems to be of limited significance for salicylate. PMID:7876837

  14. The fluorescence spectroscopic studies on the interaction of novel aminophosphinic acids with bovine serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six novel aminomethylphosphinic acids have been synthesized and characterized. The interaction between the aminophosphinic acids and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that the fluorescence quenching of BSA by aminophosphinic acids is a result of the formation of aminophosphinic acid–BSA complex; static quenching and non-radiative energy transferring were confirmed to result in the fluorescence quenching. The number of binding sites n, the apparent binding constant KA and the corresponding thermodynamic parameters were calculated at different temperatures. The process of binding of the aminophosphinic acid molecules to BSA was a spontaneous molecular interaction procedure in which entropy increased and Gibbs free energy decreased. Hydrophobic interaction force plays a major role in stabilizing the complex. The effect of aminophosphinic acids on the conformation of BSA was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. -- Graphical abstarct: The binding interactions of the water-soluble aminoalkylphosphinic acids APA 1–6 to bovine serum albumin (BSA) showed that the interaction process was spontaneous and the major interaction forces were found to be hydrophobic. Highlights: ► Binding of novel aminophosphinic acids with bovine serum albumin. ► Hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding attraction play major role in the binding process. ► Binding did not cause conformational changes in the protein. ► The quenching mechanism of fluorescence of BSA by aminophosphinic acids is a static quenching process

  15. Analysis of the interactions of sulfur-containing amino acids in membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Tamayo, José C; Cordomí, Arnau; Olivella, Mireia; Mayol, Eduardo; Fourmy, Daniel; Pardo, Leonardo

    2016-08-01

    The interactions of Met and Cys with other amino acid side chains have received little attention, in contrast to aromatic-aromatic, aromatic-aliphatic or/and aliphatic-aliphatic interactions. Precisely, these are the only amino acids that contain a sulfur atom, which is highly polarizable and, thus, likely to participate in strong Van der Waals interactions. Analysis of the interactions present in membrane protein crystal structures, together with the characterization of their strength in small-molecule model systems at the ab-initio level, predicts that Met-Met interactions are stronger than Met-Cys ≈ Met-Phe ≈ Cys-Phe interactions, stronger than Phe-Phe ≈ Phe-Leu interactions, stronger than the Met-Leu interaction, and stronger than Leu-Leu ≈ Cys-Leu interactions. These results show that sulfur-containing amino acids form stronger interactions than aromatic or aliphatic amino acids. Thus, these amino acids may provide additional driving forces for maintaining the 3D structure of membrane proteins and may provide functional specificity. PMID:27240306

  16. Interaction of humic acid with plutonium(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability constants of the complex of Pu(III) with a humic acid at pH 2.9 and 5.0 were measured using solvent extraction technique. The organic extractant was dinonyl naphthalene sulfonic acid in sodium form (NaD) in benzene, while the humate aqueous phase had a constant ionic strength of 0.5M (NaClO4). The total carboxylate capacity of the humic acid (6.201 Meq g-1) was determined by direct potentiometric titration. The apparent pKa increased as the degree of ionization increased. The lg β1 values of the complex of Pu(III) with humic acid were 2.8 and 3.11 at pH 2.9 and 5.0. (author) 11 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs

  17. Granting Equality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN PUMIN

    2010-01-01

    @@ An amendment to the Electoral Law of the National People's Congress and Local People's Congresses of the People's Republic of China granting equal representation in legislative bodies to rural and urban people was ratified by the National People's Congress(NPC),China's top legislature,on March 14.

  18. Interactions of acidic herbicides bentazon and dicamba with organoclays

    OpenAIRE

    Carrizosa, M. J.; Koskinen, W. C.; Hermosín, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    We determined the sorption mechanism of the acidic herbicides bentazon [3-(1-methylethyl)-1H-2,1,3-benzothiadiazin-4(3H)-one 2,2-dioxide] and dicamba (3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid) on two organoclays, octadecylammonium (ODA)- and hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA)-exchanged Arizona montmorillonite (SAz-1), as part of a study to determine their potential use assorbent materials for ionizable organic pollutants. To determine the mechanisms involved in the sorption process, herbicide-organ...

  19. Conductometric study of lanthanum chloride interaction with potash soaps of higher fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interaction of lanthanum chloride with potassium salts of higher aliphatic acids, containing from 10 to 16 carbon atoms, at room temperature in weakly acid media (pH=5.5) gives rise to neutral soaps of the La[CHsub(3)(CHsub(2))sub(n)COO]sub(3) composition, while in alkaline media (pH=8.0) base soaps of the LaOH[CHsub(3)(CHsub(2))sub(n)COO]sub(2) composition are formed. In acid solutions (pH=2.0) no interaction of lanthanum chloride with potassium soaps of the above carboxylic acids is observed

  20. The in Silico Insight into Carbon Nanotube and Nucleic Acid Bases Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Ali Asghar; Ghalandari, Behafarid; Tabatabaie, Seyed Saleh; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background To explore practical applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in biomedical fields the properties of their interaction with biomolecules must be revealed. Recent years, the interaction of CNTs with biomolecules is a subject of research interest for practical applications so that previous research explored that CNTs have complementary structure properties with single strand DNA (ssDNA). Objectives Hence, the quantum mechanics (QM) method based on ab initio was used for this purpose. Therefore values of binding energy, charge distribution, electronic energy and other physical properties of interaction were studied for interaction of nucleic acid bases and SCNT. Materials and Methods In this study, the interaction between nucleic acid bases and a (4, 4) single-walled carbon nanotube (SCNT) were investigated through calculations within quantum mechanics (QM) method at theoretical level of Hartree-Fock (HF) method using 6-31G basis set. Hence, the physical properties such as electronic energy, total dipole moment, charge distributions and binding energy of nucleic acid bases interaction with SCNT were investigated based on HF method. Results It has been found that the guanine base adsorption is bound stronger to the outer surface of nanotube in comparison to the other bases, consistent with the recent theoretical studies. In the other words, the results explored that guanine interaction with SCNT has optimum level of electronic energy so that their interaction is stable. Also, the calculations illustrated that SCNT interact to nucleic acid bases by noncovalent interaction because of charge distribution an electrostatic area is created in place of interaction. Conclusions Consequently, small diameter SCNT interaction with nucleic acid bases is noncovalent. Also, the results revealed that small diameter SCNT interaction especially SCNT (4, 4) with nucleic acid bases can be useful in practical application area of biomedical fields such detection and drug delivery.

  1. Biomolecular interactions of emerging two-dimensional materials with aromatic amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallineni, Sai Sunil Kumar; Karakaya, Mehmet; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao

    The present work experimentally investigates the interaction of aromatic amino acids, viz., tyrosine, tryptophan, and phenylalanine with novel two-dimensional (2D) materials including graphene (G), graphene oxide (GO), and boron nitride (BN). Photoluminescence, micro-Raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were employed to investigate the nature of interactions and possible charge transfer between 2D materials and amino acids. Consistent with previous theoretical studies, graphene and BN were observed to interact with amino acids through π- π interactions. Furthermore, we found that GO exhibits strong interactions with tryptophan and tyrosine as compared to graphene and BN, which we attribute to the formation of H-bonds between tryptophan and GO as shown theoretically in Ref. 2. On the other hand, phenylalanine did not exhibit much difference in interactions with G, GO, and BN. Clemson Nanomaterials Center, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA.

  2. Characterization of noncovalent interactions between 6-propionyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (PRODAN) and dissolved fulvic and humic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadad, Praveen; Lei, Hongxia; Nanny, Mark A

    2007-11-01

    Noncovalent interactions between the fluorescent probe 6-propionyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (PRODAN) and dissolved Norman Landfill leachate fulvic acid, Suwannee River fulvic acid, Suwannee River humic acid, and Leonardite humic acid were examined as a function of pH, fulvic and humic acid (FA and HA) concentration, and solvent polarity using steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy. Static quenching processes, as indicated by linear Stern-Volmer plots and high K(d) values, were positively correlated with the % aromaticity of the FA and HAs, as well as with solution pH. Results illustrate that for FA molecules with relatively low % aromaticity values, solvophobic interactions between PRODAN and FA are the primary interaction mode. For HA molecules with higher % aromaticity, PRODAN engages in both solvophobic interactions and pi-pi interactions, in particular electron donor-acceptor interactions, via condensed aromatic, electron-accepting moieties inherent within HA molecules. Experiments modifying solvent polarity demonstrated that protonation of carboxylic acid functional groups at low pH ( approximately 4) increased the hydrophobicity of the dissolved FA and HA molecules, thereby enhancing noncovalent interactions with PRODAN through increased solvophobic forces. PMID:17632208

  3. Interaction of Cd and citric acid, EDTA in red soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Adsorption and desorption process of cadmium in redsoil(Ferrisols) as well as the influence by media's pH were investigated in detail with and without citric acid and EDTA. Experimental results clearly showed that Cd adsorption in red soil was affected significantly by the coexisted organic chemicals. In the presence of citric acid and EDTA, Cd adsorption in red soil increased with pH in acid media but decreased in high pH one. Further studies placed stress on the adsorbed Cd in red soil which was found to be existed mainly as exchangeable one at pH<5.5, and desorption rate by 0.10 mol/L NaNO3 gave a peak-shaped curve due to the difference of specifically and nonspecifically adsorbed Cd with pH's change.

  4. Effect of the structure of gallic acid and its derivatives on their interaction with plant ferritin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qunqun; Zhou, Kai; Ning, Yong; Zhao, Guanghua

    2016-12-15

    Gallic acid and its derivatives co-exist with protein components in foodstuffs, but there is few report on their interaction with proteins. On the other hand, plant ferritin represents not only a novel class of iron supplement, but also a new nanocarrier for encapsulation of bioactive nutrients. However, plant ferritin is easy to be degraded by pepsin in the stomach, thereby limiting its application. Herein, we investigated the interaction of gallic acid and its derivatives with recombinant soybean seed H-2 ferritin (rH-2). We found that these phenolic acids interacted with rH-2 in a structure-dependent manner; namely, gallic acid (GA), methyl gallate (MEGA) and propyl gallate (PG) having three HO groups can bind to rH-2, while their analogues with two HO groups cannot. Consequently, such binding largely inhibited ferritin degradation by pepsin. These findings advance our understanding of the relationship between the structure and function of phenolic acids. PMID:27451180

  5. Scale-free behaviour of amino acid pair interactions in folded proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steffen B.; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Mortensen, Rasmus J.;

    2012-01-01

    The protein structure is a cumulative result of interactions between amino acid residues interacting with each other through space and/or chemical bonds. Despite the large number of high resolution protein structures, the ‘‘protein structure code’’ has not been fully identified. Our manuscript...... presents a novel approach to protein structure analysis in order to identify rules for spatial packing of amino acid pairs in proteins. We have investigated 8706 high resolution non-redundant protein chains and quantified amino acid pair interactions in terms of solvent accessibility, spatial and sequence...... are in buried a-helices or b-strands, in a spatial distance of 3.8–4.3A° and in a sequence distance .4 residues. We speculate that the scale free organization of the amino acid pair interactions in the 8D protein structure combined with the clear dominance of pairs of Ala, Ile, Leu and Val is...

  6. Surface interactions of cesium and boric acid with stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, the effects of cesium hydroxide and boric acid on oxidized stainless steel surfaces at high temperatures and near one atmosphere of pressure are investigated. This is the first experimental investigation of this chemical system. The experimental investigations were performed using a mass spectrometer and a mass electrobalance. Surfaces from the different experiments were examined using a scanning electron microscope to identify the presence of deposited species, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis to identify the species deposited on the surface. A better understanding of the equilibrium thermodynamics, the kinetics of the steam-accelerated volatilizations, and the release kinetics are gained by these experiments. The release rate is characterized by bulk vaporization/gas-phase mass transfer data. The analysis couples vaporization, deposition, and desorption of the compounds formed by cesium hydroxide and boric acid under conditions similar to what is expected during certain nuclear reactor accidents. This study shows that cesium deposits on an oxidized stainless steel surface at temperatures between 1000 and 1200 Kelvin. Cesium also deposits on stainless steel surfaces coated with boric oxide in the same temperature ranges. The mechanism for cesium deposition onto the oxide layer was found to involve the chemical reaction between cesium and chromate. Some revaporization in the cesium hydroxide-boric acid system was observed. It has been found that under the conditions given, boric acid will react with cesium hydroxide to form cesium metaborate. A model is proposed for this chemical reaction

  7. ACID Astronomical and Physics Cloud Interactive Desktop: A Prototype of VUI for CTA Science Gateway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimino, P.; Costa, A.; Becciani, U.; Vuerli, C.; Bandieramonte, M.; Petta, C.; Riggi, S.; Sciacca, E.; Vitello, F.; Pistagna, C.

    2014-05-01

    The Astronomical & Physics Cloud Interactive Desktop, developed for the prototype of CTA Science Gateway in Catania, Italy, allows to use many software packages without any installation on the local desktop. The users will be able to exploit, if applicable, the native Graphical User Interface (GUI) of the programs that are available in the ACID environment. For using interactively the remote programs, ACID exploits an "ad hoc" VNC-based User Interface (VUI).

  8. Investigation of interaction preferences in protein-nucleic acid complexes by the evaluation of interaction energy matrix of amino acid-base pairs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubec, Dávid; Vondrášek, Jiří

    Praha: Ústav organické chemie a biochemie AV ČR, 2016. s. 68. ISBN 978-80-86241-55-5. [Prague Protein Spring Meeting 2016: Proteins and their Design /4./. 05.05.2016-08.05.2016, Praha] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : protein-nucleic acid complexes * interaction energy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  9. Nicotinic and iso nicotinic acids: interactions with gamma radiation and acid-base equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The values of pKa1 and pKa2 for nicotinic and iso nicotinic acids in aqueous medium were determined. The effects of gamma radiation about these acids by infrared and ultraviolet spectrophotometry and thermal gravimetric analysis were also studied. It was verified that the radiolysis of acids occurred by the two process of first order, determining the degradation constant and the degradation factors for each one of the solutions. (C.G.C.)

  10. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  11. Quantitative thermodynamic predication of interactions between nucleic acid and non-nucleic acid species using Microsoft excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jiaqi; Li, Na

    2013-09-01

    Proper design of nucleic acid sequences is crucial for many applications. We have previously established a thermodynamics-based quantitative model to help design aptamer-based nucleic acid probes by predicting equilibrium concentrations of all interacting species. To facilitate customization of this thermodynamic model for different applications, here we present a generic and easy-to-use platform to implement the algorithm of the model with Microsoft(®) Excel formulas and VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) macros. Two Excel spreadsheets have been developed: one for the applications involving only nucleic acid species, the other for the applications involving both nucleic acid and non-nucleic acid species. The spreadsheets take the nucleic acid sequences and the initial concentrations of all species as input, guide the user to retrieve the necessary thermodynamic constants, and finally calculate equilibrium concentrations for all species in various bound and unbound conformations. The validity of both spreadsheets has been verified by comparing the modeling results with the experimental results on nucleic acid sequences reported in the literature. This Excel-based platform described here will allow biomedical researchers to rationalize the sequence design of nucleic acid probes using the thermodynamics-based modeling even without relevant theoretical and computational skills. PMID:23849929

  12. Natural and pyrogenic humic acids at goethite and natural oxide surfaces interacting with phosphate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, T.; Mia, S.; Duhaut, P.B.; Molleman, B.

    2013-01-01

    Fulvic and humic acids have a large variability in binding to metal (hydr) oxide surfaces and interact differently with oxyanions, as examined here experimentally. Pyrogenic humic acid has been included in our study since it will be released to the environment in the case of large-scale application

  13. Interactions of aromatic amino acids with heterocyclic ligand: An IR spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyunina, E. Yu.; Badelin, V. G.; Tarasova, G. N.

    2015-09-01

    The interactions of L-phenylalanine and L-tryptophan with nicotinic acid and uracyl in an aqueous buffer solution at pH 7.35 were studied by IR spectroscopy. The contributions of various functional groups to the complexation of aromatic amino acids with heterocyclic ligands were determined from the IR spectra of the starting substances and their mixtures.

  14. Interactions of calcium and fulvic acid at the goethite-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Li Ping; Koopal, Luuk K.; Hiemstra, Tjisse; Meeussen, Johannes C. L.; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H.

    2005-01-01

    Interactions of calcium and fulvic acid (Strichen ) with the surface of goethite were studied with batch and titration experiments. The mutual influence of the interactions on the adsorption of fulvic acid, calcium ions and protons were examined. Adsorption of the fulvic acid to goethite decreased with increase in pH (pH range 3-11). Addition of Ca (1.0 mM) at intermediate and high pH significantly enhanced the adsorption of fulvic acid. Compared to the adsorption to pure goethite, the presence of fulvic acid enhanced the adsorption of Ca significantly. In comparison to the simple linear sum of Ca bound to fulvic acid and goethite, the interactions between goethite and fulvic acid led to a reduced adsorption of Ca at low pH and an enhanced adsorption at high pH. With the adsorption of fulvic acid, protons were released at low pH and coadsorbed at high pH. When Ca was added, fewer protons were released at low pH and fewer coadsorbed at high pH. The experimental results can be adequately described using a surface complexation model, the Ligand and Charge Distribution (LCD) model, in which the CD-MUSIC model for ion adsorption to mineral oxides and the NICA model for ion binding to humics are integrated. In the model calculations, adequate descriptions of the ternary system data (Ca-fulvic acid-goethite) were obtained with parameters derived from three binary systems (fulvic acid-goethite, Ca-goethite and Ca-fulvic acid) without further adjustment. The model calculations suggest that the interactions between Ca and fulvic acid at the surface of goethite are mainly due to the electrostatic effects.

  15. Covalent interaction of ascorbic acid with natural products

    OpenAIRE

    Kesinger, Nicholas G.; Stevens, Jan F.

    2009-01-01

    While ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) is mostly known as a cofactor for proline hydroxylase and as a biological antioxidant, it also forms covalent bonds with natural products which we here refer to as ‘ascorbylation’. A number of natural products containing an ascorbate moiety has been isolated and characterized from a variety of biological sources, ranging from marine algae to flowering plants. Most of these compounds are formed as a result of nucleophilic substitution or addition by ascorbate, e...

  16. Interactions between Cooccurring Lactic Acid Bacteria in Honey Bee Hives

    OpenAIRE

    Rokop, Z. P.; Horton, M. A.; Newton, I. L. G.

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the honey bee gut, which is colonized by a few characteristic bacterial clades, the hive of the honey bee is home to a diverse array of microbes, including many lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In this study, we used culture, combined with sequencing, to sample the LAB communities found across hive environments. Specifically, we sought to use network analysis to identify microbial hubs sharing nearly identical operational taxonomic units, evidence which may indicate cooccurrence of ...

  17. Equilibrium studies on interactions of rare earth ions with phytic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between phytic acid and trivalent rare earth metal ions, viz., Ce3+, Pr3+, Nd3+, Sm3+, Gd3+, Tb3+, Dy3+ and HO3+ has been investigated potentiometrically at 25degC. The proton-ligand stability constants (pKYH) of phytic acid and the stability constants (logK) of metal complexes formed in aqueous medium (μ = 0.1 M NaClO4) have been evaluated. The results indicate that eight protons of phytic acid are highly acidic, two are weakly acidic and two very weakly acidic, titrable in the pH ranges 1.2-4.9, 5.0-8.15 and 8.3-11.0 respectively. The stability of each phytic acid-lanthanide ion complex decreases with an increase in pH and follows the usual trend through the series. (author). 11 refs., 2 tabs

  18. Smithsonian grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Smithsonian Institution has announced the deadlines for a fellowship in residence program and a foreign currency grants program.The residence fellowships support independent research and study in fields that are actively pursued by the various bureaus of the institution. The primary objective of the fellowships is to further the research training of scholars and scientists in the early stages of their professional careers. Proposals will be considered for research, among other topics, in earth sciences; paleobiology; ecological, behavioral, and environmental studies of tropical and temperate zones; and history of science and technology.

  19. Phthalic Acid Chemical Probes Synthesized for Protein-Protein Interaction Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Jen Wu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasticizers are additives that are used to increase the flexibility of plastic during manufacturing. However, in injection molding processes, plasticizers cannot be generated with monomers because they can peel off from the plastics into the surrounding environment, water, or food, or become attached to skin. Among the various plasticizers that are used, 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid (phthalic acid is a typical precursor to generate phthalates. In addition, phthalic acid is a metabolite of diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP. According to Gene_Ontology gene/protein database, phthalates can cause genital diseases, cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, etc. In this study, a silanized linker (3-aminopropyl triethoxyslane, APTES was deposited on silicon dioxides (SiO2 particles and phthalate chemical probes were manufactured from phthalic acid and APTES–SiO2. These probes could be used for detecting proteins that targeted phthalic acid and for protein-protein interactions. The phthalic acid chemical probes we produced were incubated with epithelioid cell lysates of normal rat kidney (NRK-52E cells to detect the interactions between phthalic acid and NRK-52E extracted proteins. These chemical probes interacted with a number of chaperones such as protein disulfide-isomerase A6, heat shock proteins, and Serpin H1. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA software showed that these chemical probes were a practical technique for protein-protein interaction analysis.

  20. Drug Interaction Between Valproic Acid and Meropenem: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Yaşar Özkalkanlı

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To report a probable interaction between meropenem and antiepileptic drugs that resulted in poor control of epileptic seizures. A previously healthy 21 years old woman admitted to emergency department with fever and stiff neck. Her Glasgow Coma Scale score was E3M5V4. Physical examination revealed conscious to tend to fall asleep, closed eyes and normal-sized and reactive pupils. Meropenem and vancomycin were initiated for the suspicion of menengitis. On the 3rd day of the antibiotic therapy generalized tonic clonic seizures were observed. Phenytoin and intravenous (IV thiopental were initiated. The patient was intubated and mechanically ventilated. EEG revealed generalized epileptiform activity. In the following days, seizure activity continued. Levetirasetam, carbamazepine and VPA were added for treatment respectively, but seizures were continued. On the 20th day of meropenem therapy, interaction of carbapenems and anti-epileptic agents was suspected. Antibiotherapy was discontinued. Serum concentrations of VPA increased over the next days and achieved therapeutic levels. On day 21 she was extubated, no seizures occurred over the following 48 hours. She was discharged from the ICU, with blood anti epileptic concentrations within the therapeutic range. Carbapenems have a potential effect of inducing seizures and may also lower serum levels of antiepileptic drugs. Clinicians should be aware of this potential interaction that may be associated with serious adverse effects. Status epilepticus is one of the most important neurologic emergencies, and therapeutic control becomes more difficult as its duration becomes longer. Patients receiving antiepileptics and carbapenem group antibiotics concominantly should be closely monitored due to possible drug interaction between these agents.

  1. Interaction of basic amino acids, polypeptides and proteins with heparin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been made of the relative binding affinities for heparin of L-lysine, L-arginine, poly-L-lysine, poly-L-arginine, protamine, thrombin and antithrombin III. The destruction by different concentrations of organic cations of the heparin-methylene blue complex was determined by visible absorption spectroscopy. The strength of binding of the basic amino acids and polypeptides increased with increasing molecular weight, and decreased at low pH. Pulse radiolysis experiments were used to show the effects of increasing concentrations of L-lysine, poly-L-lysine and protamine sulphate on the reaction of e-sub(aq) with the heparin-methylene blue complex. The results indicate that the binding of basic amino acids and polypeptides to heparin is ionic, and that the enhanced rate of association of antithrombin III to thrombin in the presence of heparin is due to partial or complete charge neutralization of the basic groups in the proteins. (U.K.)

  2. Characterisation of boric acid aerosol behaviour and interactions with stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments have been conducted to determine the physical characteristics of boric acid aerosol. Aqueous solutions of boric acid (either 200 or 2000 ppm boron) were injected at a controlled rate onto a 304 stainless steel cone held at 1000oC. The transport and deposition of the resulting aerosol was studied through a system including pipework and a dilution chamber. Work was also undertaken to characterise the interaction between boric acid and stainless steel. Boric acid was vaporized in steam-argon atmospheres at 300oC and passed over 304 stainless steel coupons held at temperatures between 400 and 1000oC. (author)

  3. Characterisation of boric acid aerosol behaviour and interactions with stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, A.B.; Beard, A.M.; Bennett, P.J.; Benson, C.G.

    1991-03-01

    Experiments have been conducted to determine the physical characteristics of boric acid aerosol. Aqueous solutions of boric acid (either 200 or 2000 ppm boron) were injected at a controlled rate onto a 304 stainless steel cone held at 1000{sup o}C. The transport and deposition of the resulting aerosol was studied through a system including pipework and a dilution chamber. Work was also undertaken to characterise the interaction between boric acid and stainless steel. Boric acid was vaporized in steam-argon atmospheres at 300{sup o}C and passed over 304 stainless steel coupons held at temperatures between 400 and 1000{sup o}C. (author).

  4. Electrostatic interaction of pi-acidic amides with hydrogen-bond acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Snyder, Lawrence B; Langley, David R

    2003-10-01

    Interactions between N-methylacetamide (NMA) and N-methylated derivatives of uracil, isocyanurate and barbituric acid have been studied using ab initio methods at the local MP2/6-31G** level of theory. The results were compared to similar interactions between the oxygen atom of NMA and the pi-clouds of perfluorobenzene, quinone and trimethyltriazine. The pi-acidic amides of isocyanurate and barbituric acid were found to interact with a hydrogen bond acceptor primarily through electrostatic attractions. These groups may be used as alternatives of a hydrogen bond donor to complement a hydrogen bond acceptor or an anion in molecular recognition and drug design. Examples of such interactions were identified through a search of the CSD database. PMID:12951105

  5. Optimizing scoring function of protein-nucleic acid interactions with both affinity and specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Yan

    Full Text Available Protein-nucleic acid (protein-DNA and protein-RNA recognition is fundamental to the regulation of gene expression. Determination of the structures of the protein-nucleic acid recognition and insight into their interactions at molecular level are vital to understanding the regulation function. Recently, quantitative computational approach has been becoming an alternative of experimental technique for predicting the structures and interactions of biomolecular recognition. However, the progress of protein-nucleic acid structure prediction, especially protein-RNA, is far behind that of the protein-ligand and protein-protein structure predictions due to the lack of reliable and accurate scoring function for quantifying the protein-nucleic acid interactions. In this work, we developed an accurate scoring function (named as SPA-PN, SPecificity and Affinity of the Protein-Nucleic acid interactions for protein-nucleic acid interactions by incorporating both the specificity and affinity into the optimization strategy. Specificity and affinity are two requirements of highly efficient and specific biomolecular recognition. Previous quantitative descriptions of the biomolecular interactions considered the affinity, but often ignored the specificity owing to the challenge of specificity quantification. We applied our concept of intrinsic specificity to connect the conventional specificity, which circumvents the challenge of specificity quantification. In addition to the affinity optimization, we incorporated the quantified intrinsic specificity into the optimization strategy of SPA-PN. The testing results and comparisons with other scoring functions validated that SPA-PN performs well on both the prediction of binding affinity and identification of native conformation. In terms of its performance, SPA-PN can be widely used to predict the protein-nucleic acid structures and quantify their interactions.

  6. Methylphosphonates as probes of protein-nucleic acid interactions.

    OpenAIRE

    Noble, S A; Fisher, E F; Caruthers, M H

    1984-01-01

    Deoxydinucleoside methylphosphonates were prepared by chemical synthesis and were introduced stereospecifically into the lac operator at two sites. These sites within d(ApApTpTpGpTpGpApGpCpGpGpApTpApApCpApApTpT), segment I, and d(ApApTpTpGpTpTpApTpCpCpGpCpTpCpApCpApApTpT), segment II, are indicated by p. Each segment containing a chiral methylphosphonate was annealed to the complementary unmodified segment. The interactions of these four modified lac operators with lac repressor were analyzed...

  7. Hydrogeochemical interactions and evolution of acidic solutions in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leachate generated from surface disposal of acidic uranium mill tailings in New Mexico and Colorado significantly alters hydrogeochemical characteristics of subjacent sediments including pH, Eh, mineralogical transformation, and acid neutralizing capacity. Experimental investigations and thermodynamic equilibrium modeling with the geochemical code PHREEQE show that the relatively oxidizing tailings pore water is in near equilibrium with jurbanite (AlOHSO4), gypsum (CaSO4sm-bullet2H2O), strengite (FePO4sm-bullet2H2O), and lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH), and is oversaturated with alunite (KAl3(SO4)2(OH)6), goethite (α-FeOOH), and jarosite (KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6). Ions concentrated in tailings pore water include Mg, Na, Mn, V, Ni, Al, Fe, Ca, K, SO4, NO3, PO4, Mo, Se, As, and U. Leach experiments on tailings material demonstrated that As, Cr, Mo, U, and V are associated with clay minerals, jarosite, and ferric oxyhydroxide coatings. The enrichment factors (clay/sand abundance) for these solutes are greater than unity, which may be the result of anion adsorption below pHzpc literature values for ferric oxyhydroxide, silica gel, and montmorillonite. The concentrations and mobilities of several species and elements follow the order SO4 > NH4 > Al > Mn > NO3 > U > Fe > Se > PO4 > Ni > As > Cd at pH 4.0. Sulfate-dominated leachate reacts with tailings subsoil calcite producing gypsum, which results in a continued decrease in SO4 concentrations. Dissolved concentrations of U, NO3, SO4, and other major ions remain elevated above background concentrations downgradient from the tailings impoundment

  8. Intermolecular interactions of lysobisphosphatidic acid with phosphatidylcholine in mixed bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holopainen, Juha M; Söderlund, Tim; Alakoskela, Juha-Matti; Säily, Matti; Eriksson, Ove; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2005-01-01

    Lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) can be regarded to represent a unique derivative of phosphatidylglycerol. This lipid is highly enriched in late endosomes where it can comprise up to 10-15 mol% of all lipids and in these membranes, LBPA appears to be segregated into microdomains. We studied the thermotropic behavior of pure dioleoyl-LBPA mono- and bilayers using Langmuir-lipid monolayers, electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and fluorescence spectroscopy. LBPA formed metastable, liquid-expanded monolayers at an air/buffer interface, and its compression isotherms lacked any indication for structural phase transitions. Neat LBPA formed multilamellar vesicles with no structural transitions or phase transitions between 10 and 80 degrees C at a pH range of 3.0-7.4. We then proceeded to study mixed LBPA/dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers by DSC and fluorescence spectroscopy. Incorporating increasing amounts of LBPA (up to X(LBPA) (molar fraction)=0.10) decreased the co-operativity of the main transition for DPPC, and a decrease in the main phase transition as well as pretransition temperature of DPPC was observed yet with no effect on the enthalpy of this transition. In keeping with the DSC data for DPPC, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC)/LBPA mixed bilayers were more fluid, and no evidence for lateral phase segregation was observed. These results were confirmed using fluorescence microscopy of Langmuir-lipid films composed of POPC and LBPA up to X(LBPA)=0.50 with no evidence for lateral phase separation. As late endosomes are eminently acidic, we examined the effect of lowering pH on lateral organization of mixed PC/LBPA bilayers by DSC and fluorescence spectroscopy. Even at pH 3.0, we find no evidence of LBPA-induced microdomain formation at LBPA contents found in cellular organelles. PMID:15589226

  9. Anion-π interactions in complexes of proteins and halogen-containing amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borozan, Sunčica Z; Zlatović, Mario V; Stojanović, Srđan Đ

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed the potential influence of anion-π interactions on the stability of complexes of proteins and halogen-containing non-natural amino acids. Anion-π interactions are distance and orientation dependent and our ab initio calculations showed that their energy can be lower than -8 kcal mol(-1), while most of their interaction energies lie in the range from -1 to -4 kcal mol(-1). About 20 % of these interactions were found to be repulsive. We have observed that Tyr has the highest occurrence among the aromatic residues involved in anion-π interactions, while His made the least contribution. Furthermore, our study showed that 67 % of total interactions in the dataset are multiple anion-π interactions. Most of the amino acid residues involved in anion-π interactions tend to be buried in the solvent-excluded environment. The majority of the anion-π interacting residues are located in regions with helical secondary structure. Analysis of stabilization centers for these complexes showed that all of the six residues capable of anion-π interactions are important in locating one or more of such centers. We found that anion-π interacting residues are sometimes involved in simultaneous interactions with halogens as well. With all that in mind, we can conclude that the anion-π interactions can show significant influence on molecular organization and on the structural stability of the complexes of proteins and halogen-containing non-natural amino acids. Their influence should not be neglected in supramolecular chemistry and crystal engineering fields as well. PMID:26910415

  10. Interactions of Night Blue with Nucleic Acids and Determination of Nucleic Acids Using Resonance Light Scattering Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴会灵; 梁宏; 等

    2003-01-01

    The noncovalent interactions of night blue (NB) with several nucleic acids in buffer medium of Britton-Robinson at pH 4.1 have been studied by spectroscopic methods.It is shown that the binding of NB with nucleic acids involves the J-aggregation of NB molecules on the surface of nucleic acids.The aggregation was encouraged by polyanions nucleic acids,in which nucleic acids served for acting templates,In this connection,a new method of nucleic acids with sensitivity at nanogram level is proposed based on the measurement of enhanced resonance light scattering (RLS).The linear range of ctDNA,fsDNA and yRNA is 0.01-2.5,0.03-2.5 and 0.04-1.0 μg/mL,respectively,and the corresponding detection limits(3σ)are 9.4,7.3 and 5.7ng/mL at 2.5×1005mol/L of NB.Synthetic and real samples were analyzed with satisfactory results.

  11. Manipulating fatty acid biosynthesis in microalgae for biofuel through protein-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian L Blatti

    Full Text Available Microalgae are a promising feedstock for renewable fuels, and algal metabolic engineering can lead to crop improvement, thus accelerating the development of commercially viable biodiesel production from algae biomass. We demonstrate that protein-protein interactions between the fatty acid acyl carrier protein (ACP and thioesterase (TE govern fatty acid hydrolysis within the algal chloroplast. Using green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr as a model, a structural simulation of docking CrACP to CrTE identifies a protein-protein recognition surface between the two domains. A virtual screen reveals plant TEs with similar in silico binding to CrACP. Employing an activity-based crosslinking probe designed to selectively trap transient protein-protein interactions between the TE and ACP, we demonstrate in vitro that CrTE must functionally interact with CrACP to release fatty acids, while TEs of vascular plants show no mechanistic crosslinking to CrACP. This is recapitulated in vivo, where overproduction of the endogenous CrTE increased levels of short-chain fatty acids and engineering plant TEs into the C. reinhardtii chloroplast did not alter the fatty acid profile. These findings highlight the critical role of protein-protein interactions in manipulating fatty acid biosynthesis for algae biofuel engineering as illuminated by activity-based probes.

  12. Prohibitin/annexin 2 interaction regulates fatty acid transport in adipose tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, Ahmad; Daquinag, Alexes C.; Staquicini, Daniela I.; An, Zhiqiang; Hajjar, Katherine A.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih; Kolonin, Mikhail G.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously identified prohibitin (PHB) and annexin A2 (ANX2) as proteins interacting on the surface of vascular endothelial cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) of humans and mice. Here, we demonstrate that ANX2 and PHB also interact in adipocytes. Mice lacking ANX2 have normal WAT vascularization, adipogenesis, and glucose metabolism but display WAT hypotrophy due to reduced fatty acid uptake by WAT endothelium and adipocytes. By using cell culture systems in which ANX2/PHB binding is disrupted either genetically or through treatment with a blocking peptide, we show that fatty acid transport efficiency relies on this protein complex. We also provide evidence that the interaction between ANX2 and PHB mediates fatty acid transport from the endothelium into adipocytes. Moreover, we demonstrate that ANX2 and PHB form a complex with the fatty acid transporter CD36. Finally, we show that the colocalization of PHB and CD36 on adipocyte surface is induced by extracellular fatty acids. Together, our results suggest that an unrecognized biochemical interaction between ANX2 and PHB regulates CD36-mediated fatty acid transport in WAT, thus revealing a new potential pathway for intervention in metabolic diseases.

  13. Raman spectroscopic analysis of the interaction between squaric acid and dimethylsulfoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, Stéfanos L.; Edwards, Howell G. M.; de Oliveira, Luiz Fernando C.

    2013-07-01

    The investigation of solutions of squaric acid in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) by Raman spectroscopy has facilitated the observation of the presence of different species derived from squaric acid such as the squarate dianion in solutions of 0.3 M and 0.5 M concentration and the hydrogen-squarate ion in solution concentrations greater than 2.0 M. The method described by Alía and coworkers was used to calculate the two pK values corresponding to the ions produced by squaric acid interacting with DMSO: the hydrogen squarate (pK1 = 0.80) ion and the squarate dianion (pK2 = 0.84). From the spectroscopic data it has been also possible to determine the complex formation between associated squaric acid/DMSO in the proportion squaric acid 1:1 DMSO in which the associated squaric acid is hydrogen-bonded to the S atom in the DMSO structure.

  14. A conserved patch of hydrophobic amino acids modulates Myb activity by mediating protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukare, Sandeep; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb plays a key role in the control of proliferation and differentiation in hematopoietic progenitor cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and certain non-hematopoietic tumors. c-Myb activity is highly dependent on the interaction with the coactivator p300 which is mediated by the transactivation domain of c-Myb and the KIX domain of p300. We have previously observed that conservative valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions in a conserved stretch of hydrophobic amino acids have a profound effect on Myb activity. Here, we have explored the function of the hydrophobic region as a mediator of protein-protein interactions. We show that the hydrophobic region facilitates Myb self-interaction and binding of the histone acetyl transferase Tip60, a previously identified Myb interacting protein. We show that these interactions are affected by the valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions and suppress Myb activity by interfering with the interaction of Myb and the KIX domain of p300. Taken together, our work identifies the hydrophobic region in the Myb transactivation domain as a binding site for homo- and heteromeric protein interactions and leads to a picture of the c-Myb transactivation domain as a composite protein binding region that facilitates interdependent protein-protein interactions of Myb with regulatory proteins. PMID:27080133

  15. On the interaction of caffeine with nucleic acids. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DNA-caffeine interaction at high concentration of caffeine (Cf) leads to an arrangement of Cf molecules outside of the DNA double helix with an orientation parallel to the bases both in the A and B form as demonstrated by infrared linear dichroism. Addition of DNA broadens the 1H NMR lines of Cf in aqueous solution indicating a specific binding. Intercalation is not the predominant mechanism, the deuterium relaxation time T1 = (38 +- 7) ms and the estimated reorientation correlation time tausub(cb) = 0.17 ns of caffeine-8-[2H] in the Cf-DNA complex suggest an outside stacking of the ligand. According to the results a model on the DNA-Cf complex at high Cf concentration (binding process II) is suggested including the caffeine-induced reorientation of the hydration shell of DNA. (Auth.)

  16. Design of Cell-Matrix Interactions in Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogel Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Jonathan; Truong, Norman F.; Segura, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    The design of hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel scaffolds to elicit highly controlled and tunable cell response and behavior is a major field of interest in developing tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. This review will begin with an overview of the biological context of hyaluronic acid, knowledge needed to better understand how to engineer cell-matrix interactions in the scaffolds via the incorporation of different types of signals in order to direct and control cell beh...

  17. Interactions of competent Streptococcus sanguis (Wicky) cells with native or denatured, homologous or heterologous deoxyribonucleic acids.

    OpenAIRE

    Ranhand, J M

    1980-01-01

    Competent cell-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) interactions were examined using tritium-labeled homologous or heterologous native or denatured DNAs and competent Streptococcus sanguis Wicky cells (strain WE4). The DNAs used were extracted from WE4 cells, Escherichia coli B cells, and E. coli bacteriophages T2, T4, T6, and T7. The reactions examined were: (i) total DNA binding, (ii) deoxyribonuclease-resistant DNA binding, and (iii) the production of acid-soluble products from the DNA. Optimal tem...

  18. Effects of Fatty Acids and Glycation on Drug Interactions with Human Serum Albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguizola, Jeanethe A; Basiaga, Sara B G; Hage, David S

    2013-09-01

    The presence of elevated glucose concentrations in diabetes is a metabolic change that leads to an increase in the amount of non-enzymatic glycation that occurs for serum proteins. One protein that is affected by this process is the main serum protein, human serum albumin (HSA), which is also an important carrier agent for many drugs and fatty acids in the circulatory system. Sulfonylureas drugs, used to treat type 2 diabetes, are known to have significant binding to HSA. This study employed ultrafiltration and high-performance affinity chromatography to examine the effects of HSA glycation on the interactions of several sulfonylurea drugs (i.e., acetohexamide, tolbutamide and gliclazide) with fatty acids, whose concentrations in serum are also affected by diabetes. Similar overall changes in binding were noted for these drugs with normal HSA or glycated HSA and in the presence of the fatty acids. For most of the tested drugs, the addition of physiological levels of the fatty acids to normal HSA and glycated HSA produced weaker binding. At low fatty acid concentrations, many of these systems followed a direct competition model while others involved a mixed-mode interaction. In some cases, there was a change in the interaction mechanism between normal HSA and glycated HSA, as seen with linoleic acid. Systems with only direct competition also gave notable changes in the affinities of fatty acids at their sites of drug competition when comparing normal HSA and glycated HSA. This research demonstrated the importance of considering how changes in the concentrations and types of metabolites (e.g., in this case, glucose and fatty acids) can alter the function of a protein such as HSA and its ability to interact with drugs or other agents. PMID:24349966

  19. Manipulating Fatty Acid Biosynthesis in Microalgae for Biofuel through Protein-Protein Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Jillian L Blatti; Joris Beld; Behnke, Craig A; Michael Mendez; Mayfield, Stephen P; Burkart, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Microalgae are a promising feedstock for renewable fuels, and algal metabolic engineering can lead to crop improvement, thus accelerating the development of commercially viable biodiesel production from algae biomass. We demonstrate that protein-protein interactions between the fatty acid acyl carrier protein (ACP) and thioesterase (TE) govern fatty acid hydrolysis within the algal chloroplast. Using green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr) as a model, a structural simulation of docking...

  20. Glucose regulates fatty acid binding protein interaction with lipids and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α

    OpenAIRE

    Hostetler, Heather A.; Balanarasimha, Madhumitha; Huang, Huan; Kelzer, Matthew S.; Kaliappan, Alagammai; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2010-01-01

    Although the pathophysiology of diabetes is characterized by elevated levels of glucose and long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), nuclear mechanisms linking glucose and LCFA metabolism are poorly understood. As the liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) shuttles LCFA to the nucleus, where L-FABP directly interacts with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα), the effect of glucose on these processes was examined. In vitro studies showed that L-FABP strongly bound glucose and glucose-...

  1. Interaction of actinides with amino acids: from peptides to proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural information on complexes of actinides with molecules of biological interest is required to better understand the mechanisms of actinides transport in living organisms, and can contribute to develop new decorporation treatments. Our study is about Th(IV), Np(IV), Pu(IV) and uranyl(VI) cations, which have a high affinity for some protein domains, and Fe(III), which is the natural cation of these biological systems. In this work, chelation of actinides has been brought to light with UV-visible-Near Infra Red spectroscopy, NMR, EPR, and ultrafiltration. Determination of the structure of the complexation site has been undertaken with Exafs measurements, and of the tertiary structure of the protein with SANS measurements. The first approach was to describe the interaction modes between actinides and essential chemical functions of proteins. Thus, the Ac-AspAspProAspAsp-NH2 peptide was studied as a possible chelate of actinides. Polynuclear species with μ-oxo or μ-hydroxo bridges were identified. The iron complex is binuclear, and the actinide ones have a higher nuclearity. The second approach was to study a real case of complexation of actinide with a protein: transferrin. Results show that around physiological ph a mononuclear complex is formed with Np(IV) and Pu(IV), while transferrin does not complex Th(IV) in the same conditions. Characteristic distances of M-transferrin complexes (M = Fe, Np, Pu) were determined. Moreover, the protein seems to be in its close conformation with Pu(IV), and in its open form with Np(IV) and UO22+. (author)

  2. Interaction of deoxyribonucleic acid with β-aminoethylisothiouronium bromide hydrobromide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AET gets converted to MEG and this conversion is facilitated in alkaline pH. Auxochromes like SH, -S-C=NH, NH3+ and H3N+-C (= NH)-NH are responsible for increased absorption and fluorescence with increase in alkalinity. AET binds with DNA (pH range 5.12-5.70 and 7.16-8.56). This binding is by charge neutralisation like NH3+,+H3N-C (=NH)-NH of AET with PO4-3 groups of DNA and ion condensation at the DNA-phosphate backbone by forming relatively stable disulphide radical anion. Effect of dose rate was observed for the complex AET:DNA 10:10 μg/ml (pH range 6.3 to 6.4) for 1.0 Gy and 2.5 Gy. But when the concentration ratio was 25:25μg/ml no such dose rate effect was observed. Up to 10 Gy there was no change in the position of absorption maximum and absorption intensity and fluorescence intensity. Analytical evidences indicate that adenine, quanine, cytosine and thymine interact with AET. The protonation from SH group to the base occur. The binding energy of the bases with AET vary in degree as evidenced by IR spectroscopy. Fluorescence intensity values reached a plateau in the concentration ratio of 2.5:10 μg/ml of AET with the bases. Hence, the protection offered by AET to DNA are by charge neutralization, proton donation to the bases, ion condensation at the phosphate radicals and scavenging of hydroxyl radicals by protons from SH groups of MEG. (author)

  3. Enthalpic Interaction for α-Amino Acid with Alkali Metal Halides in Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU,Yan(卢雁)

    2004-01-01

    The studies of the enthalpic interaction parameters, hxy, hxyy and hxxv, of alkali metal halides with glycine,α-alanine and α-aminobutyric acid were published. Synthetic considering of the results of the studies, some interesting behaviors of the interaction between alkali metal halides and the α-amino acids have been found. The values of hxy will increase with the increase of the number of carbon atoms in alkyl side chain of amino acid molecules and decrease with the increase of the radius of the ions. The increasing of the salt's effect on the hydrophobic hydration structure as the radii of anion is more obvious than as that of cation. The value of hxxy will regularly decrease with the increase of the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain of amino acids and linear increase with the increase of the radius. But the relation of hxxy with the radius of cations is not evident. The value of hxyy will increase with the increase of the radii of the ions. As the increase of the number of carbon atoms of amino acids, hxyy is decreas for the ions which have lager size and there is a maximum value at α-alanine for the ions which have small size. The behaviors of the interaction mentioned above were further discussed in view of electrostatic and structural interactions.

  4. Interaction preferences between nucleobase mimetics and amino acids in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajnic, Matea; Osorio, Juan I; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2015-09-01

    Despite the paramount importance of protein-nucleic acid interactions in different cellular processes, our understanding of such interactions at the atomistic level remains incomplete. We have used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and 15 μs of sampling time to study the behavior of amino acids and amino-acid sidechain analogs in aqueous solutions of different mimetics of naturally occurring nucleobases, including dimethylpyridine (DMP) and unsubstituted purine and pyrimidine rings. By using structural and energetic analysis, we have derived preference scales for the interaction of amino acids and their sidechain analogs with different nucleobase mimetics and have exhaustively compared them with each other. A close correspondence with a standard hydrophobicity measure in the case of the pyrimidine mimetic DMP and purines suggests that the hydrophobic effect is the main defining factor behind such interactions. We analyze our findings in the context of the origin of the genetic code and the recently proposed cognate mRNA-protein complementarity hypothesis. Most importantly, we show that unsubstituted purine and pyrimidine rings alone cannot differentiate between predominantly purine- and pyrimidine-coded amino acids, suggesting that for such specificity to exist, it must primarily reside in ring substituents. PMID:26219945

  5. Interactions of zinc octacarboxyphthalocyanine with selected amino acids and with albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliber, Marta; Broda, Małgorzata A.; Nackiewicz, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Effect of selected amino acids (glycine, L-histidine, L-cysteine, L-serine, L-tryptophan) and albumin on the spectroscopic properties and photostability of zinc octacarboxyphthalocyanine (ZnPcOC) was explored in the phosphate buffer at a pH of 7.0. The photodegradation of ZnPcOC alone and in the presence of amino acids or albumin has been investigated in aqueous phase using UV-366 nm and daylight irradiation. Kinetic analysis showed that the interaction with amino acids or albumin enhances the photostability of ZnPcOC. To answer the question of how zinc phthalocyanine interacts with amino acids extensive DFT calculations were performed. Analysis of the optimized geometry features of ZnPcOC: amino acids complexes in the gas phase and in water environment as well as the BSSE corrected interaction energies indicates that the more likely is the formation of equatorial complexes in which H-bonds are formed between the COOH groups of the phthalocyanine and carboxyl or amino groups of amino acids. UV-Vis spectra calculated by employing time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) are also consistent with this conclusion.

  6. Interaction of Cucurbit(5)uril with U(VI) in formic acid water medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucurbit(n)urils (CBn) are a new class of macrocyclic cage compounds capable of binding organic and inorganic species, owing to their unique pumpkin like structure comprising of both hydrophobic cavity and hydrophilic portal. Complexation of U(VI) with Cucurbit(5)uril (CB5) in 50 wt% formic acid medium has been studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy. In order to understand the species formed, the interaction of formic acid with CB5 was studied by monitoring fluorescence of CB5. Formic was found to form 1:1 species with interaction constant (K) 17.4 M-1. (author)

  7. Biomolecular Interactions and Biological Responses of Emerging Two-Dimensional Materials and Aromatic Amino Acid Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallineni, Sai Sunil Kumar; Shannahan, Jonathan; Raghavendra, Achyut J; Rao, Apparao M; Brown, Jared M; Podila, Ramakrishna

    2016-07-01

    The present work experimentally investigates the interaction of aromatic amino acids viz., tyrosine, tryptophan, and phenylalnine with novel two-dimensional (2D) materials including graphene, graphene oxide (GO), and boron nitride (BN). Photoluminescence, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry were employed to investigate the nature of interactions and possible charge transfer between 2D materials and amino acids. Graphene and GO were found to interact strongly with aromatic amino acids through π-π stacking, charge transfer, and H-bonding. Particularly, it was observed that both physi and chemisorption are prominent in the interactions of GO/graphene with phenylalanine and tryptophan while tyrosine exhibited strong chemisorption on graphene and GO. In contrast, BN exhibited little or no interactions, which could be attributed to localized π-electron clouds around N atoms in BN lattice. Lastly, the adsorption of amino acids on 2D materials was observed to considerably change their biological response in terms of reactive oxygen species generation. More importantly, these changes in the biological response followed the same trends observed in the physi and chemisorption measurements. PMID:27281436

  8. Development of a Quantitative BRET Affinity Assay for Nucleic Acid-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Timothy A; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-01-01

    Protein-nucleic acid interactions play a crucial role in the regulation of diverse biological processes. Elucidating the roles that protein-nucleic acid complexes play in the regulation of transcription, translation, DNA replication, repair and recombination, and RNA processing continues to be a crucial aspect of understanding of cell biology and the mechanisms of disease. In addition, proteins have been demonstrated to interact with antisense oligonucleotide therapeutics in a sequence and chemistry dependent manner, influencing ASO potency and distribution in cells and in vivo. While many assays have been developed to measure protein-nucleic acid interactions, many suffer from lack of throughput and sensitivity, or challenges with protein purification and scalability. In this report we present a new BRET assay for the analysis of DNA-protein interactions which makes use of an extremely bright luciferase as a tag for the binding protein, along with a long-wavelength fluorophore conjugated to the nucleic acid. The resulting assay is high throughput, sensitive, does not require protein purification, and even allows for quantitative characterization of these interactions within the biologically relevant context of whole cells. PMID:27571227

  9. Computational and experimental studies of the interaction between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rozo, Ciro E.; Castillo-León, Jaime; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Rozlosnik, Noemi; Boisen, Anja; O, Fernando Martínez

    2013-01-01

    This work involved the preparation of a conjugate between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid that was obtained without covalent chemical functionalization using a simple “one pot” synthesis method. Subsequently, the conjugate was investigated by a computational hybrid method: our own...... Nlayered Integrated Molecular Orbital and Molecular Mechanics (B3LYP(6–31G(d):UFF)). The results confirmed that the interaction occurred via hydrogen bonding between protons of the glutamic moiety from folic acid and π electrons from the carbon nanotubes. The single-walled carbon nanotube-folic acid...

  10. An Electron Spin Resonance Study of Stearic Acid Interactions in Model Wheat Starch and Gluten Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Pearce, L. E.; Davis, E. A.; Gordon, J.; Miller, W. G.

    1987-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) was used to examine interactions of 16- Doxyl stearic acid in wheat starch-water (starch:water "'1: 1), vital wheat gluten-water and glut en-starch-water model systems, Immobilization of the 16-Doxyl stearic acid, shown by broadIine ESR powder patterns , occurred in wheat starch model systems. In contrast to the starch systems, 16-Doxylstearic acid in gluten-water systems did not display broad line powder patterns. Broadened 3- line ESR spectra were recorded for ...

  11. Effect of UV Irradiation on Interactions of α-Lipoic Acid with Free Radicals

    OpenAIRE

    Paweł Ramos; Piotr Pepliński; Barbara Pilawa

    2013-01-01

    Changes of antioxidant properties of α-lipoic acid (LA) after UV irradiation were studied. LA is the typical drug used in diabetic neuropathy. Quenching of free radicals is an important factor of therapy by using this substance. α-Lipoic acid is exposed to UV irradiation during the storage. The aim of our studies was to examine the effect of UV irradiation on the interactions of LA with free radicals. The α-lipoic acid was irradiated by UVA 315–400 nm light during 10 to 110 minutes by interva...

  12. Thermodynamics of the ethylene glycol pair interaction with some amino acids and benzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Thermodynamics of amino acid solutions in highly aqueous Eg was studied at 298 and 313 K. • The pair interaction parameters were computed using the virial expansion technique. • The results were discussed in terms of solute–Eg pair interactions. - Abstract: We have studied thermodynamics of interaction of benzene and some amino acids with ethylene glycol (Eg) which is a stabilizing agent for proteins in water using calorimetric and solubility data. Enthalpic, entropic and free energy parameters in highly diluted aqueous solutions have been computed at 298 and 313 K using the virial expansion technique and compared with available literature values. The results obtained are discussed in terms of solute–solute interactions and their relation to stability of macromolecules

  13. Analysis of protein-nucleic acid interactions by photochemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Hanno; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2002-01-01

    . Mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a sensitive and efficient analytical technique for determination of such cross-linking sites in proteins. The present review of the field describes a number of MS-based approaches for the characterization of cross-linked protein-nucleic acid complexes and for......Photochemical cross-linking is a commonly used method for studying the molecular details of protein-nucleic acid interactions. Photochemical cross-linking aids in defining nucleic acid binding sites of proteins via subsequent identification of cross-linked protein domains and amino acid residues...... sequencing of peptide-nucleic acid heteroconjugates. The combination of photochemical cross-linking and MS provides a fast screening method to gain insights into the overall structure and formation of protein-oligonucleotide complexes. Because the analytical methods are continuously refined and protein...

  14. Severe rhabdomyolysis as a consequence of the interaction of fusidic acid and atorvastatin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Magee, Ciara N

    2010-11-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a known complication of statin therapy and may be triggered by a pharmacokinetic interaction between a statin and a second medication. Fatal statin-induced rhabdomyolysis has an incidence of 0.15 deaths\\/million prescriptions. We describe 4 cases of severe rhabdomyolysis with the common feature of atorvastatin use and coadministration of fusidic acid. All cases involved long-term therapy with atorvastatin; fusidic acid was introduced for treatment of osteomyelitis or septic arthritis. Three cases occurred in the setting of diabetes mellitus, with 2 in patients with end-stage renal disease, suggesting increased susceptibility to atorvastatin-fusidic acid-induced rhabdomyolysis in these patient populations. Of the 4 patients in this series, 3 died. Fusidic acid is a unique bacteriostatic antimicrobial agent with principal antistaphylococcal activity. There have been isolated reports of rhabdomyolysis attributed to the interaction of statins and fusidic acid, the cause of which is unclear. Fusidic acid does not inhibit the cytochrome P450 3A4 isoenzyme responsible for atorvastatin metabolism; increased atorvastatin levels due to inhibition of the glucuronidation pathway may be responsible. Considering the low frequency of fusidic acid use, the appearance of 4 such cases within a short time and in a small population suggests the probability that development of this potentially fatal complication may be relatively high.

  15. Lactic acid bacteria in dairy food: surface characterization and interactions with food matrix components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgain, J; Scher, J; Francius, G; Borges, F; Corgneau, M; Revol-Junelles, A M; Cailliez-Grimal, C; Gaiani, C

    2014-11-01

    This review gives an overview of the importance of interactions occurring in dairy matrices between Lactic Acid Bacteria and milk components. Dairy products are important sources of biological active compounds of particular relevance to human health. These compounds include immunoglobulins, whey proteins and peptides, polar lipids, and lactic acid bacteria including probiotics. A better understanding of interactions between bioactive components and their delivery matrix may successfully improve their transport to their target site of action. Pioneering research on probiotic lactic acid bacteria has mainly focused on their host effects. However, very little is known about their interaction with dairy ingredients. Such knowledge could contribute to designing new and more efficient dairy food, and to better understand relationships between milk constituents. The purpose of this review is first to provide an overview of the current knowledge about the biomolecules produced on bacterial surface and the composition of the dairy matter. In order to understand how bacteria interact with dairy molecules, adhesion mechanisms are subsequently reviewed with a special focus on the environmental conditions affecting bacterial adhesion. Methods dedicated to investigate the bacterial surface and to decipher interactions between bacteria and abiotic dairy components are also detailed. Finally, relevant industrial implications of these interactions are presented and discussed. PMID:25277266

  16. Interacting quantum fragments-rooted preorganized-interacting fragments attributed relative molecular stability of the Be(II) complexes of nitrilotriacetic acid and nitrilotri-3-propionic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukrowski, Ignacy; Mangondo, Paidamwoyo

    2016-06-01

    A method designed to investigate, on a fundamental level, the origin of relative stability of molecular systems using Be(II) complexes with nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) and nitrilotri-3-propionic acid (NTPA) is described. It makes use of the primary and molecular fragment energy terms as defined in the IQA/F (Interacting Quantum Atoms/Fragments) framework. An extensive classical-type investigation, focused on single descriptors (bond length, density at critical point, the size of metal ion or coordination ring, interaction energy between Be(II) and a donor atom, etc.) showed that it is not possible to explain the experimental trend. The proposed methodology is fundamentally different in that it accounts for the total energy contributions coming from all atoms of selected molecular fragments, and monitors changes in defined energy terms (e.g., fragment deformation, inter- and intra-fragment interaction) on complex formation. By decomposing combined energy terms we identified the origin of relative stability of Be(II) (NTA) and Be(II) (NTPA) complexes. We found that the sum of coordination bonds' strength, as measured by interaction energies between Be(II) ion and donor atoms, favours Be(II) (NTA) but the binding energy of Be(II) ion to the entire ligand correlates well with experimental trend. Surprisingly, the origin of Be(II) (NTPA) being more stable is due to less severe repulsive interactions with the backbone of NTPA (C and H-atoms). This general purpose protocol can be employed not only to investigate the origin of relative stability of any molecular system (e.g., metal complexes) but, in principle, can be used as a predictive tool for, e.g., explaining reaction mechanism. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26993356

  17. Acid-base properties of functionalised tripodal polyamines and their interaction with nucleotides and nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornosa-Ten, Alejandra; Albelda, M Teresa; Frías, Juan C; García-España, Enrique; Llinares, José M; Budimir, Ana; Piantanida, Ivo

    2010-06-01

    Novel, highly positively charged tripodal polyamines with appended heterocyclic moieties revealed an intriguing panel of protonation species within the biologically relevant range. Studied compounds bind nucleotide monophosphates by mostly electrostatic interactions but only the imidazole analogue showed selectivity toward UMP in respect to other nucleotides. Strong binding of all the studied compounds to both ds-DNA and ds-RNA is to some extent selective toward the latter, showing rather rare RNA over DNA preference. PMID:20485792

  18. Fluorescence quenching behaviour of uric acid interacting with water-soluble cationic porphyrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena, E-mail: makarska@hektor.umcs.lublin.pl [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University M. C. Sklodowska Sq. 2, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Borowski, Piotr [Faculty of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University M. C. Sklodowska Sq. 3, 20-031 Lublin (Poland)

    2015-04-15

    The process of association between 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)phenyl]-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H{sub 2}TTMePP) and uric acid as well as its sodium salt has been studied in aqueous NaOH solution analysing its absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectra. The fluorescence quenching effect observed during interactions porphyrin-uric acid compounds points at the fractional accessibility of the fluorophore for the quencher. The association and fluorescence quenching constants are of the order of magnitude of 10{sup 5} mol{sup −1}. The fluorescence lifetimes and the quantum yields of the porphyrin anionic form were established. The results demonstrate that uric acid and its sodium salt can interact with H{sub 2}TTMePP at basic pH and through formation of stacking complexes are able to quench its ability to emission. - Highlights: • Association study of water soluble cationic porphyrin with uric acid. • Porphyrin absorption spectra undergo the bathochromic and hypochromic effects. • Uric acid interacts with porphyrin in inhibiting manner, quenching its emission. • Fluorescence quenching effect testifies for the partial inactivation of a porphyrin. • The association and fluorescence quenching constants were calculated.

  19. Wetland Program Pilot Grants

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Wetland Grant Database (WGD) houses grant data for Wetland Program Development Grants (created by EPA in 1990 under the Clean Water Act Section 104(b)(3)...

  20. Molecular dynamics of sialic acid analogues and their interaction with influenza hemagglutinin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blessia T

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic sialic acid analogues with multiple modifications at different positions(C-1/C-2/C-4/C-8/C-9 are investigated by molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics to determine their conformational preferences and structural stability to interact with their natural receptors. Sialic acids with multiple modifications are soaked in a periodic box of water as solvent. Molecular mechanics and a 2 nanosecond molecular dynamics are done using amber force fields with 30 picosecond equilibrium. Direct and water mediated hydrogen bonds existing in the sialic acid analogues, aiding for their structural stabilization are identified in this study. The accessible conformations of side chain linkages of sialic acid analogues holding multiple substituents are determined from molecular dynamics trajectory at every 1ps interval. Transitions between different minimum energy regions in conformational maps are also noticed in C-1, C-2, C-4, C-8 and C-9 substituents. Docking studies were done to find the binding mode of the sialic acid analogues with Influenza hemagglutinin. This finding provides stereo chemical explanation and conformational preference of sialic acid analogues which may be crucial for the design of sialic acid analogues as inhibitors for different sialic acid specific pathogenic proteins such as influenza toxins and neuraminidases.

  1. Interaction of Atmospheric-Pressure Air Microplasmas with Amino Acids as Fundamental Processes in Aqueous Solution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renwu Zhou

    Full Text Available Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that investigates potential applications of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas in bioengineering, such as for bacterial inactivation and degradation of organic molecules in water. In order to enunciate mechanisms of bacterial inactivation at molecular or atomic levels, we investigated the interaction of atmospheric-pressure air microplasmas with amino acids in aqueous solution by using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS. Results show that the oxidation effect of plasma-induced species on the side chains of the amino acids can be categorized into four types, namely hydroxylation, nitration, dehydrogenation and dimerization. In addition, relative activities of amino acids resulting from plasma treatment come in descending order as follows: sulfur-containing carbon-chain amino acids > aromatic amino acids > five-membered ring amino acids > basic carbon-chain amino acids. Since amino acids are building blocks of proteins vital to the growth and reproduction of bacteria, these results provide an insight into the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by plasma.

  2. Interaction of Atmospheric-Pressure Air Microplasmas with Amino Acids as Fundamental Processes in Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhou, Rusen; Zhuang, Jinxing; Zong, Zichao; Zhang, Xianhui; Liu, Dongping; Bazaka, Kateryna; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2016-01-01

    Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that investigates potential applications of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas in bioengineering, such as for bacterial inactivation and degradation of organic molecules in water. In order to enunciate mechanisms of bacterial inactivation at molecular or atomic levels, we investigated the interaction of atmospheric-pressure air microplasmas with amino acids in aqueous solution by using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Results show that the oxidation effect of plasma-induced species on the side chains of the amino acids can be categorized into four types, namely hydroxylation, nitration, dehydrogenation and dimerization. In addition, relative activities of amino acids resulting from plasma treatment come in descending order as follows: sulfur-containing carbon-chain amino acids > aromatic amino acids > five-membered ring amino acids > basic carbon-chain amino acids. Since amino acids are building blocks of proteins vital to the growth and reproduction of bacteria, these results provide an insight into the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by plasma. PMID:27183129

  3. A `Clicked' Tetrameric Hydroxamic Acid Glycopeptidomimetic Antagonizes Sugar-Lectin Interactions On The Cellular Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Lin; Zang, Yi; Xie, Juan; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; He, Xiao-Peng; Tian, He

    2014-07-01

    A tetrameric N-acetyl galactosaminyl (GalNAc) peptidomimetic was constructed by N-acetylation of repeating proline-based hydroxamic acid units, followed by a convergent `click chemistry' coupling. This novel glycopeptidomimetic was determined to effectively antagonize the interaction between a transmembrane hepatic lectin and GalNAc on the cellular level.

  4. Unnatural amino acids as probes of ligand-receptor interactions and their conformational consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Ahern, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    -edge synthetic and chemical biological approaches. Here we summarize recent advances in the use of site-directed incorporation of unnatural amino acids and chemical probes to study ligand-receptor interactions, determine the location of binding sites, and examine the downstream conformational consequences of...

  5. Effects of non-ionic surfactants on the interactions between cellulases and tannic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Søren Nymand; Bohlin, Christina Helena; Murphy, Leigh;

    2011-01-01

    cellulases to lignin. In the current work we address this hypothesis using tannic acid (TAN) as a general poly-phenolic model compound (for lignin and soluble phenolics) and measure the mutual interactions of cellulases (CBHI, CBHII, EGI, EGII and BG), TAN and NIS (Triton X-100) using isothermal titration...

  6. Synthesis of Metal Porphyrins Tailed with Salicylic Acid and their Interaction with Bovine Serum Albumin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao JIA; Kai WANG; Yi Mei ZHAO; Zao Ying LI

    2004-01-01

    A synthetic method of porphyrins tailed with salicylic substituents is described. Reaction of bromoalkoxyphenyl porphyrin 1 with salicylic acid gave porphyrins 2~5. These new compounds were confirmed by 1H NMR, IR, UV-vis, MS and elemental analysis, and observed their interaction with bovine serum albumin (BSA) in fluorescence spectrum.

  7. Interactions of short chain phenylalkanoic acids within ionic surfactant micelles in aqueous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeem Kashif

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available % SDS KR nema Solubilization and interactions of phenylalkanoic acids induced by cationic surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB and an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS was investigated spectrophotometrically at 25.0°C. The UV spectra of the additives (acids were measured with and without surfactant above and below critical micelle concentration (cmc of the surfactant. The presence of alkyl chain in phenylalkanoic acids is responsible for hydrophobic interaction resulting in shift of the spectra towards longer wavelength (red shift. The value of partition coefficient (Kx between the bulk water and surfactant micelles and in turn standard free energy change of solubilization (ΔGpº were also estimated by measuring the differential absorbance (ΔA of the additives in micellar solutions.

  8. The sensory interactions of organic acids and various flavors in ramen soup systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, M-W; Chung, S-J; Lee, H-S; Kim, Y; Kim, K-O

    2007-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the sensory interactions between various organic acids and flavorants in 3 types of ramen soup ('beef,' seafood, and 'kimchi') when types and levels of organic acids (citric, malic, and lactic) varied. For 'beef' and seafood ramen soup, weak suprathreshold levels of acids (0.0039% to 0.0071%) were applied to the system and medium suprathreshold of acids (0.0128% to 0.0299%) were applied to the kimchi ramen soup. The amount of acid applied to each system was chosen based on the equiweight level. Descriptive analyses were performed separately for each ramen soup system using 8 trained panelists. A total of 11, 13, and 12 flavor descriptors were generated for 'beef,' seafood, and 'kimchi' soup, respectively. Analysis of variance was conducted to evaluate the effect of organic acid on the sensory characteristics of ramen soup. Principal component analysis was conducted to summarize the relationship between the soup samples and attributes. The effect of organic acids on the flavor attributes of ramen soup was dependent on the soup system as well as adding levels of acid. Addition of lactic acid power (at 0.0066%) in 'beef'ramen soup showed enhancement effect on the sour, salty, beefy, 'mushroom' flavor, and fermented soybean paste soup flavor, whereas lactic acid powder (at 0.0071%) showed enhancement effect only on the sour and fermented soybean paste soup flavor in seafood ramen soup due to the strong 'hot' flavor characteristics of the soup. In kimchi ramen soup, flavor attributes congruent to sourness were enhanced by the addition of organic acids to the system. PMID:18034748

  9. Hydrogen-bonding interactions in thiosemicarbazones of carboxylic acids: Structure of 2-ketobutyric acid thiosemicarbazone hemihydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2-Thiosemicarbazonobutanoic acid hemihydrate, C5H9N3O2S.0.5H2O, Mr=184.22, triclinic, Panti 1, a=8.163(2), b=8.868(2), c=12.438(2) A, α=72.99(2), β=79.47(2), γ=84.06(2)deg, V=845.3(3) A3, Z=4, Dx=1.447 Mg m-3, λ(Mo Kα)=0.71073 A, μ=0.332 mm-1, F(000)=392, T=296 K, R=0.038 for 3830 independent reflections with I>3σ(I). Three hydrogen bonds link the two crystallographically independent molecules in a pairwise fashion. The two molecules both have E configurations about each C-N and N-N bond, but differ by nearly 180deg in the orientation of the -COOH group. (orig.)

  10. Thermodynamic studies on the interaction of folic acid with bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Niki S. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Kishore, Nand, E-mail: nandk@chem.iitb.ac.i [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: Thermodynamics of binding of folic acid with bovine serum albumin studied. Effect of co-solutes on binding permitted detailed analysis of interactions. Electrostatic interactions dominate with contribution from hydrogen bonding. No significant conformational change in protein observed upon drug binding. - Abstract: Binding of the vitamin folic acid with bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been studied using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in combination with fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopies. The thermodynamic parameters of binding have been evaluated as a function of temperature, ionic strength, in the presence of nonionic surfactants triton X-100, tetrabutylammonium bromide, and sucrose. The values of the van't Hoff enthalpy calculated from the temperature dependence of the binding constant agree with the calorimetric enthalpies indicating that the binding of folic acid to the BSA is a two state process without involving intermediates. These observations are supported by the intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic measurements. With increase in the ionic strength, reduction in the binding affinity of folic acid to BSA is observed suggesting predominance of electrostatic interactions in the binding. The contribution of hydrophobic interactions in the binding is also demonstrated by decrease in the binding affinity in the presence of tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB). The value of binding affinity in the presence of sucrose indicates that hydrogen bonding also plays a significant contribution in the complexation process. The calorimetric and spectroscopic results provide quantitative information on the binding of folic acid to BSA and suggest that the binding is dominated by electrostatic interactions with contribution from hydrogen bonding.

  11. Molecular interactions in biomineralized hydroxyapatite amino acid modified nanoclay: In silico design of bone biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simulations driven approach to design of a novel biomaterial nanocomposite system is described in this study. Nanoclays modified with amino acids (OMMT) were used to mineralize hydroxyapatite (HAP), mimicking biomineralization. Representative models of organically modified montmorillonite clay (OMMT) and OMMT-hydroxyapatite (OMMT-HAP) were constructed using molecular dynamics and validated using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transforms Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Attractive interactions exist between Ca atoms of HAP and C=O group of aminovaleric acid, indicating chelate formation in OMMT-HAP. Interaction energy maps describe molecular interactions among different constituents and their quantitative contributions in the OMMT and OMMT-HAP systems at both parallel and perpendicular orientations. High attractive and high repulsive interactions were found between PO43− and MMT clay as well as aminovaleric molecules in OMMT-HAP perpendicular and parallel models. Large non-bonded interactions in OMMT-HAP indicate influence of neighboring environment on PO43− in in situ HAPclay. Extensive hydrogen bonds were observed between functional hydrogen atoms of modifier and MMT clay in OMMT-HAP as compared to OMMT. Thus, HAP interacts with clay through the aminovaleric acid. This computational study provides a framework for materials design and selection for biomaterials used in tissue engineering and other areas of regenerative medicine. - Highlights: • Representative models of a hybrid nanoclay-hydroxyapatite biomaterial are built. • Interaction energy maps are constructed using a molecular dynamics. • Quantitative interactions between the three components of the biomaterial are found. • The modeling and experimental approach provides insight into the complex nanomaterial

  12. Molecular interactions in biomineralized hydroxyapatite amino acid modified nanoclay: In silico design of bone biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katti, Dinesh R., E-mail: Dinesh.Katti@ndsu.edu; Sharma, Anurag; Ambre, Avinash H.; Katti, Kalpana S.

    2015-01-01

    A simulations driven approach to design of a novel biomaterial nanocomposite system is described in this study. Nanoclays modified with amino acids (OMMT) were used to mineralize hydroxyapatite (HAP), mimicking biomineralization. Representative models of organically modified montmorillonite clay (OMMT) and OMMT-hydroxyapatite (OMMT-HAP) were constructed using molecular dynamics and validated using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transforms Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Attractive interactions exist between Ca atoms of HAP and C=O group of aminovaleric acid, indicating chelate formation in OMMT-HAP. Interaction energy maps describe molecular interactions among different constituents and their quantitative contributions in the OMMT and OMMT-HAP systems at both parallel and perpendicular orientations. High attractive and high repulsive interactions were found between PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} and MMT clay as well as aminovaleric molecules in OMMT-HAP perpendicular and parallel models. Large non-bonded interactions in OMMT-HAP indicate influence of neighboring environment on PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} in in situ HAPclay. Extensive hydrogen bonds were observed between functional hydrogen atoms of modifier and MMT clay in OMMT-HAP as compared to OMMT. Thus, HAP interacts with clay through the aminovaleric acid. This computational study provides a framework for materials design and selection for biomaterials used in tissue engineering and other areas of regenerative medicine. - Highlights: • Representative models of a hybrid nanoclay-hydroxyapatite biomaterial are built. • Interaction energy maps are constructed using a molecular dynamics. • Quantitative interactions between the three components of the biomaterial are found. • The modeling and experimental approach provides insight into the complex nanomaterial.

  13. Interaction of sulphuric acid solutions with carbonates and feldspar during underground uranium leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of sulphuric acid solutions with calcite, dolomite and alkali feldspar at room temperature is experimentally studied. The mineral ground up to 0.63-1 mm has been mixed with crushed quartz glass and poured over by sulphate solution. The time required for sulphate solution neutralization by these minerals is determined. The interaction of sulphuric acid with calcite occurs very quickly, the solution has a neutral reaction in some days, the process with dolomite proceeds at first quickly up to total neutralization, then its rate sharply drops, the H2SO4 interaction with alkali feldspars proceeds very slowly. To estimate the extent of equilibrium between the solution and carbonates the experimental data are compared with the results of computer calculations of partial equilibria at various degrees of main reaction course. The results can be used in supplement to the processes occurring at underground uranium leaching as well as processes in oxidation and cementation zones of sulphide deposits

  14. Strong Hydrogen Bonded Molecular Interactions between Atmospheric Diamines and Sulfuric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elm, Jonas; Jen, Coty N; Kurtén, Theo; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2016-05-26

    We investigate the molecular interaction between methyl-substituted N,N,N',N'-ethylenediamines, propane-1,3-diamine, butane-1,4-diamine, and sulfuric acid using computational methods. Molecular structure of the diamines and their dimer clusters with sulfuric acid is studied using three density functional theory methods (PW91, M06-2X, and ωB97X-D) with the 6-31++G(d,p) basis set. A high level explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12a/VDZ-F12 method is used to obtain accurate binding energies. The reaction Gibbs free energies are evaluated and compared with values for reactions involving ammonia and atmospherically relevant monoamines (methylamine, dimethylamine, and trimethylamine). We find that the complex formation between sulfuric acid and the studied diamines provides similar or more favorable reaction free energies than dimethylamine. Diamines that contain one or more secondary amino groups are found to stabilize sulfuric acid complexes more efficiently. Elongating the carbon backbone from ethylenediamine to propane-1,3-diamine or butane-1,4-diamine further stabilizes the complex formation with sulfuric acid by up to 4.3 kcal/mol. Dimethyl-substituted butane-1,4-diamine yields a staggering formation free energy of -19.1 kcal/mol for the clustering with sulfuric acid, indicating that such diamines could potentially be a key species in the initial step in the formation of new particles. For studying larger clusters consisting of a diamine molecule with up to four sulfuric acid molecules, we benchmark and utilize a domain local pair natural orbital coupled cluster (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) method. We find that a single diamine is capable of efficiently stabilizing sulfuric acid clusters with up to four acid molecules, whereas monoamines such as dimethylamine are capable of stabilizing at most 2-3 sulfuric acid molecules. PMID:27128188

  15. Soybean Seed Development: Fatty Acid and Phytohormone Metabolism and Their Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quoc Thien; Kisiala, Anna; Andreas, Peter; Neil Emery, R J; Narine, Suresh

    2016-06-01

    Vegetable oil utilization is determined by its fatty acid composition. In soybean and other grain crops, during the seed development oil accumulation is important trait for value in food or industrial applications. Seed development is relatively short and sensitive to unfavorable abiotic conditions. These stresses can lead to a numerous undesirable qualitative as well as quantitative changes in fatty acid production. Fatty acid manipulation which targets a higher content of a specific single fatty acid for food or industrial application has gained more attention. Despite several successes in modifying the ratio of endogenous fatty acids in most domesticated oilseed crops, numerous obstacles in FA manipulation of seed maturation are yet to be overcome. Remarkably, connections with plant hormones have not been well studied despite their critical roles in the regulation and promotion of a plethora of processes in plant growth and development. While activities of phytohormones during the reproductive phase have been partially clarified in seed physiology, the biological role of plant hormones in oil accumulation during seed development has not been investigated. In this review seed development and numerous effects of abiotic stresses are discussed. After describing fatty acid and phytohormone metabolism and their interactions, we postulate that the endogenous plant hormones play important roles in fatty acid production in soybean seeds. PMID:27252591

  16. Dynamics of responses in compatible potato-Potato virus Y interaction are modulated by salicylic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Špela Baebler

    Full Text Available To investigate the dynamics of the potato-Potato virus Y (PVY compatible interaction in relation to salicylic acid-controlled pathways we performed experiments using non-transgenic potato cv. Désirée, transgenic NahG-Désirée, cv. Igor and PVY(NTN, the most aggressive strain of PVY. The importance of salicylic acid in viral multiplication and symptom development was confirmed by pronounced symptom development in NahG-Désirée, depleted in salicylic acid, and reversion of the effect after spraying with 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (a salicylic acid-analogue. We have employed quantitative PCR for monitoring virus multiplication, as well as plant responses through expression of selected marker genes of photosynthetic activity, carbohydrate metabolism and the defence response. Viral multiplication was the slowest in inoculated potato of cv. Désirée, the only asymptomatic genotype in the study. The intensity of defence-related gene expression was much stronger in both sensitive genotypes (NahG-Désirée and cv. Igor at the site of inoculation than in asymptomatic plants (cv. Désirée. Photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism gene expression differed between the symptomatic and asymptomatic phenotypes. The differential gene expression pattern of the two sensitive genotypes indicates that the outcome of the interaction does not rely simply on one regulatory component, but similar phenotypical features can result from distinct responses at the molecular level.

  17. Amino acid alphabet reduction preserves fold information contained in contact interactions in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Armando D

    2015-12-01

    To reduce complexity, understand generalized rules of protein folding, and facilitate de novo protein design, the 20-letter amino acid alphabet is commonly reduced to a smaller alphabet by clustering amino acids based on some measure of similarity. In this work, we seek the optimal alphabet that preserves as much of the structural information found in long-range (contact) interactions among amino acids in natively-folded proteins. We employ the Information Maximization Device, based on information theory, to partition the amino acids into well-defined clusters. Numbering from 2 to 19 groups, these optimal clusters of amino acids, while generated automatically, embody well-known properties of amino acids such as hydrophobicity/polarity, charge, size, and aromaticity, and are demonstrated to maintain the discriminative power of long-range interactions with minimal loss of mutual information. Our measurements suggest that reduced alphabets (of less than 10) are able to capture virtually all of the information residing in native contacts and may be sufficient for fold recognition, as demonstrated by extensive threading tests. In an expansive survey of the literature, we observe that alphabets derived from various approaches-including those derived from physicochemical intuition, local structure considerations, and sequence alignments of remote homologs-fare consistently well in preserving contact interaction information, highlighting a convergence in the various factors thought to be relevant to the folding code. Moreover, we find that alphabets commonly used in experimental protein design are nearly optimal and are largely coherent with observations that have arisen in this work. PMID:26407535

  18. Metabolic activity and symbiotic interactions of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts isolated from water kefir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadie, Jasmin; Gulitz, Anna; Ehrmann, Matthias A; Vogel, Rudi F

    2013-09-01

    Water kefir is a mildly sour and alcoholic drink fermented by a stable microbial multispecies community. With its high sugar content and low amino acid concentration water kefir medium represents a demanding habitat. In this ecological niche only well adapted microorganisms which are fit to the consortium are able to grow and mutually provide essential nutrients. The synergism between main representatives of water kefir yeasts and lactobacilli was studied in a co-culture model system. Co-cultivation of yeasts and lactobacilli in water kefir medium significantly increased cell yield of all interaction partners, delineating the interaction of these water kefir isolates as mutualism. The support of Zygotorulaspora (Z.) florentina was due to the acidification of the medium by the lactobacilli, whereas lactobacilli are improved in growth by the disposal of essential nutrients produced by yeasts. The trophic interaction between Lactobacillus (Lb.) hordei and yeasts is constituted by the release of amino acids and Vitamin B6 from yeasts, whereas Lb. nagelii is supported in growth by their production of amino acids. The interaction of Z. florentina and Lb. nagelii was further examined to reveal that co-cultivation induced the yeast to release arginine, which was essential for Lb. nagelii. PMID:23664259

  19. Kinetic energy releases of small amino acids upon interaction with keV ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In chromatin, DNA is tightly packed into one complex together with histone and non-histone proteins. These proteins are known to protect the DNA against indirect and to some extent even direct radiation damage. Radiation action upon amino acids is thus one of the primary steps in biological radiation action. In this paper we investigate the ionization and fragmentation of the gas-phase amino acids glycine, alanine and valine upon interaction with keV α-particles. High resolution coincidence time-of-flight mass spectrometry is used to determine the dominant fragmentation channels as well as fragment kinetic energies. (authors)

  20. Interaction of Palmitic Acid with Metoprolol Succinate at the Binding Sites of Bovine Serum Albumin

    OpenAIRE

    Mashiur Rahman; Farzana Prianka; Mohammad Shohel; Md. Abdul Mazid

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to characterize the binding profile as well as to notify the interaction of palmitic acid with metoprolol succinate at its binding site on albumin. Methods: The binding of metoprolol succinate to bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied by equilibrium dialysis method (ED) at 27°C and pH 7.4, in order to have an insight in the binding chemistry of the drug to BSA in presence and absence of palmitic acid. The study was carried out using ranitidine as site-1 a...

  1. Kinetic energy releases of small amino acids upon interaction with keV ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bari, S.; Alvarado, F.; Postma, J.; Sobocinski, P.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlatholter, T. [Groningen Univ., KVI Atomic Physics (Netherlands); Schlatholter, T. [Universites P. et M. Curie and D. Diderot, INSP, CNRS UMR 75-88, 75 - Paris (France)

    2009-01-15

    In chromatin, DNA is tightly packed into one complex together with histone and non-histone proteins. These proteins are known to protect the DNA against indirect and to some extent even direct radiation damage. Radiation action upon amino acids is thus one of the primary steps in biological radiation action. In this paper we investigate the ionization and fragmentation of the gas-phase amino acids glycine, alanine and valine upon interaction with keV {alpha}-particles. High resolution coincidence time-of-flight mass spectrometry is used to determine the dominant fragmentation channels as well as fragment kinetic energies. (authors)

  2. [Interactions between dopamine receptor and NMDA/type A γ-aminobutyric acid receptors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Ying; Wei, Ting-Jia; Weng, Jing-Jin; Qin, Jiang-Yuan; Huang, Xi; Su, Ji-Ping

    2016-04-25

    Type A γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAAR) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) are the major inhibitory and excitatory receptors in the central nervous system, respectively. Co-expression of the receptors in the synapse may lead to functional influence between receptors, namely receptor interaction. The interactions between GABAAR and NMDAR can be either positive or negative. However, the mechanisms of interaction between the two receptors remain poorly understood, and potential mechanisms include (1) through a second messenger; (2) by receptors trafficking; (3) by direct interaction; (4) by a third receptor-mediation. Dopamine is the most abundant catecholamine neurotransmitter in the brain, and its receptors, dopamine receptors (DR) can activate multiple signaling pathways. Earlier studies on the interaction between DR and GABAAR/NMDAR have shown some underlying mechanisms, suggesting that DR could mediate the interaction between GABAAR and NMDAR. This paper summarized some recent progresses in the studies of the interaction between DR and NMDAR/GABAAR, providing a further understanding on the interaction between NMDAR and GABAAR mediated by DR. PMID:27108906

  3. Interaction of Palmitic Acid with Metoprolol Succinate at the Binding Sites of Bovine Serum Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashiur Rahman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to characterize the binding profile as well as to notify the interaction of palmitic acid with metoprolol succinate at its binding site on albumin. Methods: The binding of metoprolol succinate to bovine serum albumin (BSA was studied by equilibrium dialysis method (ED at 27°C and pH 7.4, in order to have an insight in the binding chemistry of the drug to BSA in presence and absence of palmitic acid. The study was carried out using ranitidine as site-1 and diazepam as site-2 specific probe. Results: Different analysis of binding of metoprolol succinate to bovine serum albumin suggested two sets of association constants: high affinity association constant (k1 = 11.0 x 105 M-1 with low capacity (n1 = 2 and low affinity association (k2 = 4.0×105 M-1 constant with high capacity (n2 = 8 at pH 7.4 and 27°C. During concurrent administration of palmitic acid and metoprolol succinate in presence or absence of ranitidine or diazepam, it was found that palmitic acid displaced metoprolol succinate from its binding site on BSA resulting reduced binding of metoprolol succinate to BSA. The increment in free fraction of metoprolol succinate was from 26.27% to 55.08% upon the addition of increased concentration of palmitic acid at a concentration of 0×10-5 M to 16×10-5 M. In presence of ranitidine and diazepam, palmitic acid further increases the free fraction of metoprolol succinate from 33.05% to 66.95% and 40.68% to 72.88%, respectively. Conclusion: This data provided the evidence of interaction at higher concentration of palmitic acid at the binding sites on BSA, which might change the pharmacokinetic properties of metoprolol succinate.

  4. Water stress responses of tomato mutants impaired in hormone biosynthesis reveal abscisic acid, jasmonic acid and salicylic acid interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria eMuñoz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the putative crosstalk between JA and ABA in Solanum lycopersicum plants in response to drought, suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2, JA-deficient and flacca (flc, ABA-deficient mutants together with the naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase (NahG transgenic (SA-deficient line were used. Hormone profiling and gene expression of key enzymes in ABA, JA and SA biosynthesis were analyzed during early stages of drought. ABA accumulation was comparable in spr2 and wild type (WT plants whereas expression of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (NCED1 and NCED2 was different, implying a compensation mechanism between NCED genes and an organ-specific regulation of NCED1 expression. JA levels and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase 3 (OPR3 expression in flc plants suggest that ABA regulates the induction of the OPR3 gene in roots. By contrast, ABA treatment to flc plants leads to a reduction of JA and SA contents. Furthermore, different pattern of SA accumulation (and expression of isochorismate synthase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1 was observed between WT seedlings and mutants, suggesting that SA plays an important role on the early response of tomato plants to drought and also that JA and ABA modulate its biosynthesis. Finally, hormone profiling in spr2 and NahG plants indicate a crosstalk between JA and SA that could enhance tolerance of tomato to water stress.

  5. Water Stress Responses of Tomato Mutants Impaired in Hormone Biosynthesis Reveal Abscisic Acid, Jasmonic Acid and Salicylic Acid Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Espinoza, Valeria A; López-Climent, María F; Casaretto, José A; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the putative crosstalk between JA and ABA in Solanum lycopersicum plants in response to drought, suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2, JA-deficient) and flacca (flc, ABA-deficient) mutants together with the naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase (NahG) transgenic (SA-deficient) line were used. Hormone profiling and gene expression of key enzymes in ABA, JA and SA biosynthesis were analyzed during early stages of drought. ABA accumulation was comparable in spr2 and wild type (WT) plants whereas expression of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (NCED1) and NCED2 was different, implying a compensation mechanism between NCED genes and an organ-specific regulation of NCED1 expression. JA levels and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase 3 (OPR3) expression in flc plants suggest that ABA regulates the induction of the OPR3 gene in roots. By contrast, ABA treatment to flc plants leads to a reduction of JA and SA contents. Furthermore, different pattern of SA accumulation (and expression of isochorismate synthase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1) was observed between WT seedlings and mutants, suggesting that SA plays an important role on the early response of tomato plants to drought and also that JA and ABA modulate its biosynthesis. Finally, hormone profiling in spr2 and NahG plants indicate a crosstalk between JA and SA that could enhance tolerance of tomato to water stress. PMID:26635826

  6. Entropy and enthalpy of interaction between amino acid side chains in nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Vaitheeswaran, S

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the stabilities of proteins in nanopores requires a quantitative description of confinement induced interactions between amino acid side chains. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the nature of interactions between the side chain pairs ALA-PHE, SER-ASN and LYS-GLU in bulk water and in water-filled nanopores. The temperature dependence of the bulk solvent potentials of mean force and the interaction free energies in cylindrical and spherical nanopores is used to identify the corresponding entropic and enthalpic components. The entropically stabilized hydrophobic interaction between ALA and PHE in bulk water is enthalpically dominated upon confinement depending on the relative orientations between the side chains. In the case of SER-ASN, hydrogen bonded configurations that are similar in bulk water are thermodynamically distinct in a cylindrical pore, thus making rotamer distributions different from those in the bulk. Remarkably, salt bridge formation between LYS-GLU is stabilized by e...

  7. Growth and shape transformations of giant phospholipid vesicles upon interaction with an aqueous oleic acid suspension

    CERN Document Server

    Peterlin, Primoz; Kogej, Ksenija; Svetina, Sasa; Walde, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of two types of vesicle systems was investigated: micrometer-sized, giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) formed from 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and submicrometer-sized, large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) formed from oleic acid and oleate, both in a buffered aqueous solution (pH=8.8). Individual POPC GUVs were transferred with a micropipette into a suspension of oleic acid/oleate LUVs, and the shape changes of the GUVs were monitored using optical microscopy. The behavior of POPC GUVs upon transfer into a 0.8 mM suspension of oleic acid, in which oleic acid/oleate forms vesicular bilayer structures, was qualitatively different from the behavior upon transfer into a 0.3 mM suspension of oleic acid/oleate, in which oleic acid/oleate is predominantly present in the form of monomers and possibly non-vesicular aggregates. In both cases, changes in vesicle morphology were observed within tens of seconds after the transfer. Vesicle initially started to evaginate. In 60% of the...

  8. Tumour–stromal interactions in acid-mediated invasion: A mathematical model

    KAUST Repository

    Martin, Natasha K.

    2010-12-01

    It is well established that the tumour microenvironment can both promote and suppress tumour growth and invasion, however, most mathematical models of invasion view the normal tissue as inhibiting tumour progression via immune modulation or spatial constraint. In particular, the production of acid by tumour cells and the subsequent creation of a low extracellular pH environment has been explored in several \\'acid-mediated tumour invasion\\' models where the acidic environment facilitates normal cell death and permits tumour invasion. In this paper, we extend the acid-invasion model developed by Gatenby and Gawlinski (1996) to include both the competitive and cooperative interactions between tumour and normal cells, by incorporating the influence of extracellular matrix and protease production at the tumour-stroma interface. Our model predicts an optimal level of tumour acidity which produces both cell death and matrix degradation. Additionally, very aggressive tumours prevent protease production and matrix degradation by excessive normal cell destruction, leading to an acellular (but matrix filled) gap between the tumour and normal tissue, a feature seen in encapsulated tumours. These results suggest, counterintuitively, that increasing tumour acidity may, in some cases, prevent tumour invasion.

  9. Interactions between hydrated cement paste and organic acids: Thermodynamic data and speciation modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interactions of short-chain organic acids with hydrated cement phases affect structure durability in the agro-food and nuclear waste industries but can also be used to modify cement properties. Most previous studies have been experimental, performed at fixed concentrations and pH, without quantitatively discriminating among polyacidity effects, or complexation and salt precipitation processes. This paper addresses such issues by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for acetic, citric, oxalic, succinic acids and a simplified hydrated CEM-I. The thermodynamic constants collected from the literature allow the speciation to be modeled over a wide range of pH and concentrations. Citric and oxalic had a stronger chelating effect than acetic acid, while succinic acid was intermediate. Similarly, Ca-citrate and Ca-oxalate salts were more insoluble than Ca-acetate and Ca-succinate salts. Regarding aluminium complexation, hydroxyls, sulfates, and acid competition was highlighted. The exploration of acid mixtures showed the preponderant effect of oxalate and citrate over acetate and succinate

  10. Interactions between hydrated cement paste and organic acids: Thermodynamic data and speciation modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Windt, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.dewindt@mines-paristech.fr [MINES ParisTech, PSL Research University, Centre de Géosciences, 35 Rue St-Honoré, 77305 Fontainebleau Cedex (France); Bertron, Alexandra; Larreur-Cayol, Steeves; Escadeillas, Gilles [University of Toulouse, UPS/INSA/LMDC, 135 Av. de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France)

    2015-03-15

    Interactions of short-chain organic acids with hydrated cement phases affect structure durability in the agro-food and nuclear waste industries but can also be used to modify cement properties. Most previous studies have been experimental, performed at fixed concentrations and pH, without quantitatively discriminating among polyacidity effects, or complexation and salt precipitation processes. This paper addresses such issues by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for acetic, citric, oxalic, succinic acids and a simplified hydrated CEM-I. The thermodynamic constants collected from the literature allow the speciation to be modeled over a wide range of pH and concentrations. Citric and oxalic had a stronger chelating effect than acetic acid, while succinic acid was intermediate. Similarly, Ca-citrate and Ca-oxalate salts were more insoluble than Ca-acetate and Ca-succinate salts. Regarding aluminium complexation, hydroxyls, sulfates, and acid competition was highlighted. The exploration of acid mixtures showed the preponderant effect of oxalate and citrate over acetate and succinate.

  11. Study on mutual interactions and electronic structures of hyaluronan with Lysine, 6-Aminocaproic acid and Arginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chytil, Martin; Trojan, Martin; Kovalenko, Alexander

    2016-05-20

    Interactions between polyelectrolytes and oppositely charged surfactants have been in a great interest for several decades, yet the conventional surfactants may cause a problem in medical applications. Interactivity between polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) and amino acids Lysine, 6-Aminocaproic acid (6-AcA), and Arginine as an alternative system is reported. The interactions were investigated by means of rheology and electric conductance and the electronic structures were explored by the density functional theory (DFT). Lysine exhibits the strongest interaction of all, which was manifested, e.g. by nearly 6-time drop of the initial viscosity comparing with only 1.3-time lower value in the case of 6-AcA. Arginine interaction with HA was surprisingly weaker in terms of viscosity than that of Lysine due to a lower and delocalized charge density on its guanidine group. According to the DFT calculations, the binding of Lysine to HA was found to be more flexible, while Arginine creates more rigid structure with HA. PMID:26917367

  12. Liver-type fatty acid binding protein interacts with hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α

    OpenAIRE

    McIntosh, Avery L.; Petrescu, Anca D.; Heather A. Hostetler; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) regulates liver type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) gene expression. Conversely as shown herein, L-FABP structurally and functionally also interacts with HNF4α. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between Cy3-HNF4α (donor) and Cy5-L-FABP (acceptor) as well as FRET microscopy detected L-FABP in close proximity (~80 Å) to HNF4α, binding with high affinity Kd ~250–300 nM. Circular dichroism (CD) determined that the HNF4α/L-FABP interaction alte...

  13. Interaction of uranium(VI) and humic acid under neutral pH conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Due to their strong ability for complex and colloid formation, humic acids influence the speciation and consequently the migration behavior of actinide ions in the environment. In order to perform a trustworthy risk assessment for the conception of future nuclear waste repositories as well as for the remediation of former uranium mining and milling areas, reliable thermodynamic data on the interaction of uranium with humic acids under geo-genic conditions are necessary. The U(VI) complexation by humic acids was already the subject of a number of previous investigations. However, these studies were predominately performed in the acidic pH range, where the hydrolysis of the uranyl ion can be neglected. Only few studies exist on the interaction of U(VI) with humic acids under neutral pH conditions where ternary U(VI) humate complexes are formed. In the present study we investigate the complexation of U(VI) by purified Aldrich humic acid at pH 7 under exclusion of CO2 ([HA]: 2 mg/L; [U]: 1 x 10-6-1 x 10-5 M, I: 0.1 M NaClO4). Under the studied experimental conditions and in absence of humic acid, U(VI) occurs in form of the following species: UO2OH+, UO2(OH)2(aq), (UO2)3(OH)5+, (UO2)4(OH)7+. The speciation is dominated by 62- 73 % of (UO2)3(OH)5+. Based on this speciation, the formation of ternary uranyl hydroxy humate complexes is assumed. For determination of the U(VI) and humic acid speciation in solution we apply the conventional time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and TRLFS with ultrafast pulses, respectively. For identification and quantification of the U(VI) species in solution, fluorescence spectra were measured for the relevant U(VI) hydrolysis species. The experimental data are evaluated applying the metal ion charge neutralization model [1], which describes the metal ion complexation by humic acids. [1] Kim, J.I., Czerwinski, K.R.: Complexation of Metal Ions with Humic Acids: Metal Ion Charge

  14. Interactions between prebiotics, probiotics, polyunsaturated fatty acids and polyphenols: diet or supplementation for metabolic syndrome prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Ilaria; Romanelli, Luca; Palmery, Maura

    2014-05-01

    The metabolic syndrome can be prevented by the Mediterranean diet, characterized by fiber, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and polyphenols. However, the composition of the Mediterranean diet, which can be viewed as a natural multiple supplement, is poorly controlled, and its beneficial effects poorly predictable. The metabolic syndrome is associated with intestinal dysbiosis and the gut microbioma seems to be the main target and player in the interactions occurring between probiotics, prebiotics, omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and polyphenols. From the reviewed evidence, it is reasonable to manage growth and metabolism of gut microflora with specific prebiotics and polyphenols. Even though the healthy properties of functional foods and nutraceuticals still need to be fully elucidated, available data suggest that well-designed supplements, containing the better ratio of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and antioxidants, specific probiotic strains, and selected polyphenols and prebiotics, could be useful in metabolic syndrome prevention and treatment. PMID:24467635

  15. Interaction study of amino acids and the peptide aspartame with lanthanide (III) ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interactions between the Nd(III) ion with the amino acids L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid and L-histidine and the peptide aspartame in aqueous solution were studied. The study was conducted by means of electronic spectroscopy with the Judd-Ofelt formalism for transition intensity parameters calculations. Several coordination compounds involving Nd(III), Eu(III), and Tb(III) and the ligands L-histidine and aspartame were synthesized and characterized in the solid state. Mixed compounds involving Eu(III) and Tb(III) with the same ligands were synthesized and characterized also. The characterization were achieved by chemical analysis, melting points, vibrational spectroscopy (IR) and powder X-ray diffractometry. (author)

  16. Equivalent Isopropanol Concentrations of Aromatic Amino Acids Interactions with Lipid Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Merrell A; Ray, Bruce D; Wassall, Stephen R; Petrache, Horia I

    2015-08-01

    We show that the interaction of aromatic amino acids with lipid bilayers can be characterized by conventional 1D [Formula: see text]H NMR spectroscopy using reference spectra obtained in isopropanol-d8/D[Formula: see text]O solutions. We demonstrate the utility of this method with three different peptides containing tyrosine, tryptophan, or phenylalanine amino acids in the presence of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoserine lipid membranes. In each case, we determine an equivalent isopropanol concentration (EIC) for each hydrogen site of aromatic groups, in essence constructing a map of the chemical environment. These EIC maps provide information on relative affinities of aromatic side chains for either PC or PS bilayers and also inform on amino acid orientation preference when bound to membranes. PMID:25691267

  17. Interaction study between Ca2+ and humic acids in brine media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between Ca2+ and humic acids (HA) was studied at ionic strengths from 0.10 to 5.0 m (NaCl) by the solvent extraction technique. The dependence of the stability constants upon pcH (4.7 to 9.0) was interpreted by the polyelectrolyte model of HA. The data was consistent with formation of a single Ca-HA complex. (orig.)

  18. APPLICATION OF THE HARD AND SOFT, ACIDS AND BASES (HSAB) THEORY TO TOXICANT-TARGET INTERACTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    LoPachin, Richard M.; Gavin, Terrence; DeCaprio, Anthony; David S Barber

    2011-01-01

    Many chemical toxicants and/or their active metabolites are electrophiles that cause cell injury by forming covalent bonds with nucleophilic targets on biological macromolecules. Covalent reactions between nucleophilic and electrophilic reagents are however discriminatory, since there is a significant degree of selectivity associated with these interactions. Over the course of the past few decades, the theory of Hard and Soft, Acid and Bases (HSAB) has proven to be a useful tool in predicting...

  19. Four Distances between Pairs of Amino Acids Provide a Precise Description of their Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Mati; Potapov, Vladimir; Schreiber, Gideon

    2009-01-01

    The three-dimensional structures of proteins are stabilized by the interactions between amino acid residues. Here we report a method where four distances are calculated between any two side chains to provide an exact spatial definition of their bonds. The data were binned into a four-dimensional grid and compared to a random model, from which the preference for specific four-distances was calculated. A clear relation between the quality of the experimental data and the tightness of the distan...

  20. Inhibition of Receptor Interacting Protein Kinases Attenuates Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy Induced by Palmitic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Mingyue Zhao; Lihui Lu; Song Lei; Hua Chai; Siyuan Wu; Xiaoju Tang; Qinxue Bao; Li Chen; Wenchao Wu; Xiaojing Liu

    2016-01-01

    Palmitic acid (PA) is known to cause cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Cardiac hypertrophy is one of the important pathological features of PA-induced lipotoxicity, but the mechanism by which PA induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is still unclear. Therefore, our study was to test whether necroptosis, a receptor interacting protein kinase 1 and 3 (RIPK1 and RIPK3-) dependent programmed necrosis, was involved in the PA-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. We used the PA-treated primary neonatal rat cardi...

  1. Fluorescence Quenching and Binding Interaction of l0-Methylacridinium Iodide to Nucleic Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙险峰; 江致勤; 丁兵林

    2003-01-01

    Interaction of 10-methylacridinium iodide (MAI) as fluorescence probe with nucleobases, nucleosides and nucleic acids has been studied by UV-visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that fluorescence of MAI is strongly quenched by the nucleobases, nucleosides and nucleic acids, respectively. The quenching follows the Stern-Volmer linear equation. The fluorescence quenching rate constant (kq) was measured to be 109-1010 (L/mol)/s within the range of diffusion-controlled rate limit, indicating that the interaction between MAI and nucleic acid and their precursors is characteristic of electron transfer mechanism. In addition, the binding interaction model of MAI to calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) was further investigated. Apparent hypochromism in the absorption spectra of MAI was observed when MAI binds to ct-DNA.Three spectroscopic methods, which include (1) UV spectroscopy, (2) fluorescence quenching of MAI, (3) competitive dual-probe method of MAI and ethidium bromide (EB), were utilized to determine the affinity binding constants (K)of MAI and ct-DNA. The binding constants K obtained from the above methods gave consistent data in the same range (1.0-5.5) ×104 L/mol, which lend credibility to these measurements. The binding site number was determined to be 1.9. The influence of thermal denaturation and phosphate concentration on the binding was examined. The binding model of MAI to ct-DNA including intercalation and outside binding was investigated.

  2. A method for computing the inter-residue interaction potentials for reduced amino acid alphabet

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhinav Luthra; Anupam Nath Jha; G K Ananthasuresh; Saraswathi Vishveswara

    2007-08-01

    Inter-residue potentials are extensively used in the design and evaluation of protein structures. However, dealing with all (20×20) interactions becomes computationally difficult in extensive investigations. Hence, it is desirable to reduce the alphabet of 20 amino acids to a smaller number. Currently, several methods of reducing the residue types exist; however a critical assessment of these methods is not available. Towards this goal, here we review and evaluate different methods by comparing with the complete (20×20) matrix of Miyazawa-Jernigan potential, including a method of grouping adopted by us, based on multi dimensional scaling (MDS). The second goal of this paper is the computation of inter-residue interaction energies for the reduced amino acid alphabet, which has not been explicitly addressed in the literature until now. By using a least squares technique, we present a systematic method of obtaining the interaction energy values for any type of grouping scheme that reduces the amino acid alphabet. This can be valuable in designing the protein structures.

  3. Interactions of low molecular weight aromatic acids and amino acids with goethite, kaolinite and bentonite with or without organic matter coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiajia; Jansen, Boris; Cerli, Chiara; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2015-04-01

    Interaction of organic matter molecules with the soil's solid phase is a key factor influencing the stabilization of carbon in soils and thus forms a crucial aspect of the global carbon cycle. While subject of much research attention so far, we still have much to learn about such interactions at the molecular level; in particular in the light of competition between different classes of organic molecules and in the presence of previously adsorbed soil organic matter. We studied the interaction of a group of low molecular weight (LMW) aromatic acids (salicylic, syringic, vanillic and ferulic acid) and amino acids (lysine, glutamic, leucine and phenylalanine) on goethite, kaolinite and bentonite with and without previously adsorbed dissolved organic matter (DOM). For this we used batch experiments at pH = 6.0 where some of the organic compounds were positively charged (i.e. lysine) or negatively charged (i.e. glutamic and salicylic acid) while the minerals also displayed positively (i.e. goethite) or negatively charged surfaces (i.e. bentonite). We found much higher sorption of salicylic acid and lysine than other compounds. On the bare minerals we found a great variety of sorption strength, with salicylic acid strongly adsorbed, while syringic, vanillic and ferulic acid showed little or no adsorption. For the amino acids, protonated lysine showed a stronger affinity to negatively charged kaolinite and bentonite than other amino acids. While deprotonated glutamic acid showed the strongest adsorption on goethite. Leucine and phenylalanine showed hardly any adsorption on any of the minerals. When present concurrently, amino acids decreased the sorption of salicylic acid on the three types of mineral, while the presence of LMW aromatic acids increased the sorption of lysine on kaolinite and bentonite and the sorption of glutamic acid on goethite. The presence of previously adsorbed DOM reduced the sorption of salicylic acid and lysine. The results confirm that

  4. Interaction of copper with fatty acids in Soxhlet ex-traction and its influence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Ming; XIA Yanqing; LEI Tianzhu; QIU Junli; ZHANG Rui

    2008-01-01

    Treatment with metallic copper for the removal of elemental sulfur from bitumen extracted from sedi-mentary rocks or petroleum is the most widely used method. Little attention has been paid, however, to its disadvan-tages. It was observed that copper can interact with some polar organic substances during conventional sulfur re-moval, which can strongly influence the quantitative and qualitative determination of bitumen, as has been con-firmed by interaction of long-chain fatty acids with copper. The copper soap generated was analyzed by element analysis, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), thermal analysis (TG-DSC) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Mechanism of the interaction was investigated and elucidated. Our experimental results would necessitate improvement of the present method for sulfur removal and/or a search for a new one.

  5. INTERACTION OF AMINO ACID WITH ION EXCHANGE RESIN Ⅲ.FURTHER INVESTIGA TION OF SUPEREQUIVALENT ADSORPTION MECHANISM OF AMINO ACID ON ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGHui; SHAOTong; 等

    1994-01-01

    The adsorption isotherms of glycine,alanine and oxidized glutathion on strong acid cation and strong base anion exchange resins from aqueous solutions were measured and the superequivalent adsorptions of glycine and alanine observed.The infrared spectra of glycine adsorbed on the cation and the anion exchange resins,001×7 and 201×7,were measured.From these results,it is concluded that the amino acid adsorption on the ion exchange resin proceeds not only through ion exchange and proton transfer mechanisms,but also through aminecarboxylate interaction between the adsorbed amino acid molecules,and the formation of second layer of amino acid molecules is the mechanism of superequivalent adsorption of amino acid,the carboxylate or amine groups of the first layer of amino acid molecules on the ion exchange resin act as the exchange sites for the second layer of amino acid molecules.

  6. Interactions, structure and properties in poly(lactic acid/thermoplastic polymer blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Imre

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blends were prepared from poly(lactic acid (PLA and three thermoplastics, polystyrene (PS, polycarbonate (PC and poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA. Rheological and mechanical properties, structure and component interactions were determined by various methods. The results showed that the structure and properties of the blends cover a relatively wide range. All three blends have heterogeneous structure, but the size of the dispersed particles differs by an order of magnitude indicating dissimilar interactions for the corresponding pairs. Properties change accordingly, the blend containing the smallest dispersed particles has the largest tensile strength, while PLA/PS blends with the coarsest structure have the smallest. The latter blends are also very brittle. Component interactions were estimated by four different methods, the determination of the size of the dispersed particles, the calculation of the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter from solvent absorption, from solubility parameters, and by the quantitative evaluation of the composition dependence of tensile strength. All approaches led to the same result indicating strong interaction for the PLA/PMMA pair and weak for PLA and PS. A general correlation was established between interactions and the mechanical properties of the blends.

  7. In vitro interaction study of retinoic acid isomers with telmisartan and amlodipine by equilibrium dialysis method using UV spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Susheel John; Johny, Sojimol K.; Paul, David; Ravi, Thengungal Kochupappy

    2011-07-01

    The in vitro protein binding of retinoic acid isomers (isotretinoin and tretinoin) and the antihypertensive drugs (amlodipine and telmisartan) was studied by equilibrium dialysis method. In this study, free fraction of drugs and the % of binding of drugs in the mixture to bovine serum albumin (BSA) were calculated. The influence of retinoic acid isomers on the % of protein binding of telmisartan and amlodipine at physiological pH (7.4) and temperature (37 ± 0.5 °C) was also evaluated. The in vitro displacement interaction study of drugs telmisartan and amlodipine on retinoic acid isomers and also interaction of retinoic acid isomers on telmisartan and amlodipine were carried out.

  8. Bidirectional Interaction of Alanine with Sulfuric Acid in the Presence of Water and the Atmospheric Implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Yu; Ma, Yan; Chen, Jiao; Jiang, Shuai; Liu, Yi-Rong; Wen, Hui; Feng, Ya-Juan; Hong, Yu; Huang, Teng; Huang, Wei

    2016-04-21

    Amino acids are recognized as important components of atmospheric aerosols, which impact on the Earth's climate directly and indirectly. However, much remains unknown about the initial events of nucleation. In this work, the interaction of alanine [NH2CH(CH3)COOH or Ala], one of the most abundant amino acids in the atmosphere, with sulfuric acid (SA) and water (W) has been investigated at the M06-2X/6-311++G(3df, 3pd) level of theory. We have studied thermodynamics of the hydrated (Ala)(SA) core system with up to four water molecules. We found that Ala, with one amino group and one carboxyl group, can interact with H2SO4 and H2O in two directions and that it has a high cluster stabilizing effect similar to that of ammonia, which is one of the key nucleation precursor. The corresponding Gibbs free energies of the (Ala)(SA)(W)n (n = 0-4) clusters formation at 298.15 K predicted that Ala can contribute to the stabilization of small binary clusters. Our results showed that the hydrate distribution is temperature-dependent and that a higher humidity and temperature can contribute to the formation of hydrated clusters. PMID:26997115

  9. Folic acid-polydopamine nanofibers show enhanced ordered-stacking via π-π interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hailong; Yu, Xiang; Liu, Yang; Shi, Zujin; Liu, Huihui; Nie, Zongxiu; Wu, Decheng; Jin, Zhaoxia

    2015-06-21

    Recent research has indicated that polydopamine and synthetic eumelanins are optoelectronic biomaterials in which one-dimensional aggregates composed of ordered-stacking oligomers have been proposed as unique organic semiconductors. However, improving the ordered-stacking of oligomers in polydopamine nanostructures is a big challenge. Herein, we first demonstrate how folic acid molecules influence the morphology and nanostructure of polydopamine via tuning the π-π interactions of oligomers. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry reveals that porphyrin-like tetramers are characteristic of folic acid-polydopamine (FA-PDA) nanofibers. X-ray diffraction combined with simulation studies indicate that these oligomers favour aggregation into graphite-like ordered nanostructures via strong π-π interactions. High-resolution TEM characterization of carbonized FA-PDA hybrids show that in FA-PDA nanofibers the size of the graphite-like domains is over 100 nm. The addition of folic acid in polydopamine enhances the ordered stacking of oligomers in its nanostructure. Our study steps forward to discover the mystery of the structure-property relationship of FA-PDA hybrids. It paves a way to optimize the properties of PDA through the design and selection of oligomer structures. PMID:25959650

  10. Superfund Technical Assistance Grants

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This asset includes data related to the Superfund Technical Assistance Grant program, including grant number, award amounts, award dates, period of performance,...

  11. Interaction Effect of 8-Week Aerobic Exercise and Omega-3 Fatty Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Khedri

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Scientific evidence indicates the impact of aerobic exercise and omega-3 fatty acids - both –are for the improvement of the cardiovascular system .The purpose of this research was about studies interaction effect of 8 weeks aerobic exercise and omega- 3 fatty acids supplementation on plasma adiponectin concentration of elderly men.Materials and Methods: In this study, 36 male non-athletes aged were between 50 to 70 year age range of men aged the city of Genaveh. Statistical sample of 36 male non- athletes in the age range 50 to 70 years old randomly selected in four groups of nine persons, respectively, the first group: exercise supplemental omega-3, Group II: Exercise placebo group: supplementation with omega-3 groups quarter: placebo. Endurance exercise training program includes 24 sessions and 3 sessions per week, with duration and intensity was determined. (55-70% HRmax. Daily supplements of omega-3 fatty acids were 2 Capsule. Blood samples were taken after fasting 14 hours before the study and 48 hours after the last training session was conducted. The data Kolmogrov-Smirnov, t-test, One-Way Anova at significance level of p≤ 0.05 were analyzed in SPSS 17. Results: The results of research after 8 weeks showed that moderate-intensity aerobic exercise and omega-3 fatty acids supplementation, only increased in the exercise + omega-3 fatty acids group (7.8% that could not created a significant increase in plasma adiponectin concentration groups. Also in final of research did not show a significant difference between groups in compare after 8 weeks. Conclusion: The results showed that by aerobic exercise and use of omega-3 fatty acids and increase amounts of adiponectin and its anti boil property, perhaps maybe that, adiponectin by effect of its preservation has a great role in prevention and reduce of cardiovascular diseases.

  12. The interactions between humic acids and Pluronic F127 produce nanoparticles useful for pharmaceutical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Bruna Alice Gomes de; Motta, Fernanda Lopes; Santana, Maria Helena Andrade, E-mail: mariahelena.santana@gmail.com [University of Campinas, Development of Biotechnological Processes Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Humic acids (HAs) are macromolecules composed of a large variety of functional groups including phenols and carboxylic acids, which have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. HAs are completely soluble in aqueous medium in alkaline conditions only. At neutral pH, the protonation of the OH/OOH groups causes the formation of micelle-like structures containing a hydrophobic core. Pluronic F127 (PF127) is a nonionic and non-toxic block copolymer with surfactant properties, which are able to interact with HAs through hydrophobic interactions. In this work, these interactions were studied to determine the potential of HA–PF127 structures for pharmaceutical applications. The HAs used was composed of phenol (15.92 %), carboxylic (13.70 %), and other aromatic groups as characterized by {sup 13}C NMR, GC–MS, and FTIR. Initially, the HA–PF127 interactions were identified by a fivefold decrease in the CMC of PF127. The effects of the HA:PF127 molar ratio were studied by adding naturally occurring HAs to PF127 dispersions under mechanical stirring. The highest ratios, 1:8 and 1:80, favored the formation of submicellar aggregates of approximately 100 nm and zeta potentials of −28.37 and −30.23 mV, respectively. HA–PF127 structures were spherical, with a polydispersity of approximately 0.43. These results show that the interactions between HAs and PF127 produce stable nanoparticles. These nanoparticles may be used as a carrier for hydrophobic bioactives and as an antioxidant or anti-inflammatory agent. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first attempt to develop HA–PF127 nanoparticles.

  13. The interactions between humic acids and Pluronic F127 produce nanoparticles useful for pharmaceutical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humic acids (HAs) are macromolecules composed of a large variety of functional groups including phenols and carboxylic acids, which have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. HAs are completely soluble in aqueous medium in alkaline conditions only. At neutral pH, the protonation of the OH/OOH groups causes the formation of micelle-like structures containing a hydrophobic core. Pluronic F127 (PF127) is a nonionic and non-toxic block copolymer with surfactant properties, which are able to interact with HAs through hydrophobic interactions. In this work, these interactions were studied to determine the potential of HA–PF127 structures for pharmaceutical applications. The HAs used was composed of phenol (15.92 %), carboxylic (13.70 %), and other aromatic groups as characterized by 13C NMR, GC–MS, and FTIR. Initially, the HA–PF127 interactions were identified by a fivefold decrease in the CMC of PF127. The effects of the HA:PF127 molar ratio were studied by adding naturally occurring HAs to PF127 dispersions under mechanical stirring. The highest ratios, 1:8 and 1:80, favored the formation of submicellar aggregates of approximately 100 nm and zeta potentials of −28.37 and −30.23 mV, respectively. HA–PF127 structures were spherical, with a polydispersity of approximately 0.43. These results show that the interactions between HAs and PF127 produce stable nanoparticles. These nanoparticles may be used as a carrier for hydrophobic bioactives and as an antioxidant or anti-inflammatory agent. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first attempt to develop HA–PF127 nanoparticles.

  14. Interaction between toxic azo dye C.I. Acid Red 88 and serum albumins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naveenraj, Selvaraj [Nanomaterials and Solar Energy Conversion Lab, Department of Chemistry, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620015 (India); Solomon, Rajadurai Vijay; Venuvanalingam, Ponnambalam [School of Chemistry, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India); Asiri, Abdullah M. [The Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21413, P.O. Box 80203 (Saudi Arabia); Anandan, Sambandam, E-mail: sanand@nitt.edu [Nanomaterials and Solar Energy Conversion Lab, Department of Chemistry, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620015 (India)

    2013-11-15

    Serum albumin-toxic dye interaction studies will be of paramount importance in the field of toxicology due to its relation towards the distribution and transportation of dye in blood. In this regard, the binding between C.I. Acid Red 88 (AR88) and serum albumins (HSA and BSA) was investigated by using combination of spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods. The fluorescence results revealed that AR88 interact with serum albumins through the combination of static and dynamic quenching mechanism. The distance “r” between serum albumin and AR88 was obtained according to the Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) theory. Synchronous fluorescence and CD spectral results showed alterations in the microenvironment and conformation of serum albumins. The molecular docking method is also employed to understand the interaction of AR88 with serum albumins. All these studies confirm that BSA has more affinity towards AR88 than that of HSA which suggests that AR88 is more easily transported in the body of bovid than human and so it is more hazardous to bovids. -- Highlights: • AR88 interacts with serum albumin through the combination of both static and dynamic quenching mechanism. • The binding site of AR88 in serum albumins is nearer to tryptophan moiety. • Circular Dichroism spectra showed that AR88 alters α-helicity of serum albumin. • This interaction study could be greatly imperative for further investigations in toxicology.

  15. Influence of Humic Acid on Interaction of Ammonium and Potassium Ions on Clay Minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Zhao; CHEN Xiao-Qin; ZHOU Jian-Min; LIU Dai-Huan; WANG Huo-Yan; DU Chang-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Interaction of ammonium (NH4+) and potassium (K+) is typical in field soils.However,the effects of organic matter on interaction of NH4+ and K+ have not been thoroughly investigated.In this study,we examined the changes in major physicochemical properties of three clay minerals (kaolinite,illite,and montmorillonite) after humic acid (HA) coating and evaluated the influences of these changes on the interaction of NH4+ and K+ on clay minerals using batch experiments.After HA coating,the cation exchange capacity (CEC) and specific surface area (SSA) of montmorillonite decreased significantly,while little decrease in CEC and SSA occurred in illite and only a slight increase in CEC was found in kaolinite.Humic acid coating significantly increased cation adsorption and preference for NH4+,and this effect was more obvious on clay minerals with a lower CEC.Results of Fourier transform infrared spectrometry analysis showed that HA coating promoted the formation of H-bonds between the adsorbed NH4+ and the organo-mineral complexes.HA coating increased cation fixation capacity on montmorillonite and kaolinite,but the opposite occurred on illite.In addition,HA coating increased the competitiveness of NH4+ on fixation sites.These results showed that HA coating affected both the nature of clay mineral surfaces and the reactions of NH4+ and K+ with clay minerals,which might influence the availability of nutrient cations to plants in field soils amended with organic matter.

  16. Inhibition of tumor-stromal interaction through HGF/Met signaling by valproic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), which is produced by surrounding stromal cells, including fibroblasts and endothelial cells, has been shown to be a significant factor responsible for cancer cell invasion mediated by tumor-stromal interactions. We found in this study that the anti-tumor agent valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, strongly inhibited tumor-stromal interaction. VPA inhibited HGF production in fibroblasts induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and prostaglandin E2 without any appreciable cytotoxic effect. Other HDAC inhibitors, including butyric acid and trichostatin A (TSA), showed similar inhibitory effects on HGF production stimulated by various inducers. Up-regulations of HGF gene expression induced by PMA and EGF were also suppressed by VPA and TSA. Furthermore, VPA significantly inhibited HGF-induced invasion of HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. VPA, however, did not affect the increases in phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt in HGF-treated HepG2 cells. These results demonstrated that VPA inhibited two critical processes of tumor-stromal interaction, induction of fibroblastic HGF production and HGF-induced invasion of HepG2 cells, and suggest that those activities serve for other anti-tumor mechanisms of VPA besides causing proliferation arrest, differentiation, and/or apoptosis of tumor cells

  17. Direct determination of amino acids by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with charged aerosol detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socia, Adam; Foley, Joe P

    2016-05-13

    A chromatographic analytical method for the direct determination of amino acids by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) was developed. A dual gradient simultaneously varying the pH 3.2 ammonium formate buffer concentration and level of acetonitrile (ACN) in the mobile phase was employed. Using a charged aerosol detector (CAD) and a 2(nd) order regression analysis, the fit of the calibration curve showed R(2) values between 0.9997 and 0.9985 from 1.5mg/mL to 50μg/mL (600ng to 20ng on column). Analyte chromatographic parameters such as the sensitivity of retention to the water fraction in the mobile phase values (mHILIC) were determined as part of method development. A degradation product of glutamine (5-pyrrolidone-2-carboxylic acid; pGlu) was observed and resolved chromatographically with no method modifications. The separation was used to quantitate amino acid content in acid hydrolysates of various protein samples. PMID:27059400

  18. FOXP2 drives neuronal differentiation by interacting with retinoic acid signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen Middelbeek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available FOXP2 was the first gene shown to cause a Mendelian form of speech and language disorder. Although developmentally expressed in many organs, loss of a single copy of FOXP2 leads to a phenotype that is largely restricted to orofacial impairment during articulation and linguistic processing deficits. Why perturbed FOXP2 function affects specific aspects of the developing brain remains elusive. We investigated the role of FOXP2 in neuronal differentiation and found that FOXP2 drives molecular changes consistent with neuronal differentiation in a human model system. We identified a network of FOXP2 regulated genes related to retinoic acid signaling and neuronal differentiation. FOXP2 also produced phenotypic changes associated with neuronal differentiation including increased neurite outgrowth and reduced migration. Crucially, cells expressing FOXP2 displayed increased sensitivity to retinoic acid exposure. This suggests a mechanism by which FOXP2 may be able to increase the cellular differentiation response to environmental retinoic acid cues for specific subsets of neurons in the brain. These data demonstrate that FOXP2 promotes neuronal differentiation by interacting with the retinoic acid signaling pathway and regulates key processes required for normal circuit formation such as neuronal migration and neurite outgrowth. In this way, FOXP2, which is found only in specific subpopulations of neurons in the brain, may drive precise neuronal differentiation patterns and/or control localization and connectivity of these FOXP2 positive cells.

  19. Interactive enhancements of ascorbic acid and iron in hydroxyl radical generation in quinone redox cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Zhu, Tong; Zhao, Jincai; Xu, Bingye

    2012-09-18

    Quinones are toxicological substances in inhalable particulate matter (PM). The mechanisms by which quinones cause hazardous effects can be complex. Quinones are highly active redox molecules that can go through a redox cycle with their semiquinone radicals, leading to formation of reactive oxygen species. Electron spin resonance spectra have been reported for semiquinone radicals in PM, indicating the importance of ascorbic acid and iron in quinone redox cycling. However, these findings are insufficient for understanding the toxicity associated with quinone exposure. Herein, we investigated the interactions among anthraquinone (AQ), ascorbic acid, and iron in hydroxyl radical (·OH) generation through the AQ redox cycling process in a physiological buffer. We measured ·OH concentration and analyzed the free radical process. Our results showed that AQ, ascorbic acid, and iron have synergistic effects on ·OH generation in quinone redox cycling; i.e., ascorbyl radical oxidized AQ to semiquinone radical and started the redox cycling, iron accelerated this oxidation and enhanced ·OH generation through Fenton reactions, while ascorbic acid and AQ could help iron to release from quartz surface and enhance its bioavailability. Our findings provide direct evidence for the redox cycling hypothesis about airborne particle surface quinone in lung fluid. PMID:22891791

  20. Poly(l-lactic acid)-modified silica stationary phase for reversed-phase and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Ohyama, Kaname; Takasago, Shizuka; Kishikawa, Naoya; Kuroda, Naotaka

    2015-01-01

    Poly(L-lactic acid) is a linear aliphatic thermoplastic polyester that can be produced from renewable resources. A poly(L-lactic acid)-modified silica stationary phase was newly prepared by amide bond reaction between amino groups on aminopropyl silica and carboxylic acid groups at the end of the poly(L-lactic acid) chain. The poly(L-lactic acid)-silica column was characterized in reversed-phase liquid chromatography and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with the use of different ...

  1. Enthalpic Pair Interaction of Rubidium Chloride with α-Amino Acid in Water at 298.15K

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡满成; 杨茜; 蒋育澄; 夏树屏

    2005-01-01

    The mixing enthalpies of aqueous heavy rare alkali metal chloride RbC1 solutions with aqueous α-amino acid (Loglycine, L-alanine and α-aminobutyric acid) solutions, as well as the dilution enthalpies of RbC1 and α-amino acid solutions in pure water had been measured at 298.15K. The transfer enthalpies of RbCI from pure water to aqueous α-amino acid solutions could be obtained from these data. The enthalpic pair interaction parameters of RbC1 with α-amino acid in water have been evaluated according to the McMillan-Mayer theory and discussed in terms of the electrostatic interaction, structure interaction and Savage-wood group additivity mode.

  2. Investigation of a mutual interaction force at different pressure amplitudes in sulfuric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the secondary Bjerknes force for two oscillating bubbles in various pressure amplitudes in a concentration of 95% sulfuric acid. The equilibrium radii of the bubbles are assumed to be smaller than 10 μm at a frequency of 37 kHz in various strong driving acoustical fields around 2.0 bars (1 bar=105 Pa). The secondary Bjerknes force is investigated in uncoupled and coupled states between the bubbles, with regard to the quasi-adiabatic model for the bubble interior. It finds that the value of the secondary Bjerknes force depends on the driven pressure of sulfuric acid and its amount would be increased by liquid pressure amplitude enhancement. The results show that the repulsion area of the interaction force would be increased by increasing the driven pressure because of nonlinear oscillation of bubbles. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  3. Molecular interaction of acetylcholinesterase with carnosic acid derivatives: a neuroinformatics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merad, M; Soufi, W; Ghalem, S; Boukli, F; Baig, M H; Ahmad, K; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2014-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive degenerative disease of the brain marked by gradual and irreversible declines in cognitive functions. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) plays a biological role in the termination of nerve impulse transmissions at cholinergic synapses by rapid hydrolysis of its substrate, "acetylcholine". The deficit level of acetylcholine leads to deprived nerve impulse transmission. Thus the cholinesterase inhibitors would reverse the deficit in acetylcholine level and consequently may reverse the memory impairments, which is characteristic of the Alzheimer's disease. The molecular interactions between AChE and Carnosic acid, a well known antioxidant substance found in the leaves of the rosemary plant has always been an area of interest. Here in this study we have performed in silico approach to identify carnosic acid derivatives having the potential of being a possible drug candidate against AChE. The best candidates were selected on the basis of the results of different scoring functions. PMID:24059305

  4. New Theoretical Insight into the Interactions and Properties of Formic Acid: Development of a Quantum-Based Pair Potential for Formic Acid.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roszak, S; Gee, R; Balasubramanian, K; Fried, L

    2005-08-08

    We performed ab initio quantum chemical studies for the development of intra and intermolecular interaction potentials for formic acid for use in molecular dynamics simulations of formic acid molecular crystal. The formic acid structures considered in the ab initio studies include both the cis and trans monomers which are the conformers that have been postulated as part of chains constituting liquid and crystal phases under extreme conditions. Although the cis to trans transformation is not energetically favored, the trans isomer was found as a component of stable gas-phase species. Our decomposition scheme for the interaction energy indicates that the hydrogen bonded complexes are dominated by the Hartree-Fock forces while parallel clusters are stabilized by the electron correlation energy. The calculated three-body and higher interactions are found to be negligible, thus rationalizing the development of an atom-atom pair potential for formic acid based on high-level ab initio calculations of small formic acid clusters. Here we present an atom-atom pair potential that includes both intra- and inter-molecular degrees of freedom for formic acid. The newly developed pair potential is used to examine formic acid in the condensed phase via molecular dynamics simulations. The isothermal compression under hydrostatic pressure obtained from molecular dynamics simulations is in good agreement with experiment. Further, the calculated equilibrium melting temperature is found to be in good agreement with experiment.

  5. New theoretical insight into the interactions and properties of formic acid: development of a quantum-based pair potential for formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszak, Szczepan; Gee, Richard H; Balasubramanian, Krishnan; Fried, Laurence E

    2005-10-01

    We performed ab initio quantum-chemical studies for the development of intra- and intermolecular interaction potentials for formic acid for use in molecular-dynamics simulations of formic acid molecular crystal. The formic acid structures considered in the ab initio studies include both the cis and trans monomers which are the conformers that have been postulated as part of chains constituting liquid and crystal phases under extreme conditions. Although the cis to trans transformation is not energetically favored, the trans isomer was found as a component of stable gas-phase species. Our decomposition scheme for the interaction energy indicates that the hydrogen-bonded complexes are dominated by the Hartree-Fock forces while parallel clusters are stabilized by the electron correlation energy. The calculated three-body and higher interactions are found to be negligible, thus rationalizing the development of an atom-atom pair potential for formic acid based on high-level ab initio calculations of small formic acid clusters. Here we present an atom-atom pair potential that includes both intra- and inter molecular degrees of freedom for formic acid. The newly developed pair potential is used to examine formic acid in the condensed phase via molecular-dynamics simulations. The isothermal compression under hydrostatic pressure obtained from molecular-dynamics simulations is in good agreement with experiment. Further, the calculated equilibrium melting temperature is found to be in good agreement with experiment. PMID:16238411

  6. Laser photolysis of interaction of poly-guanylic acid (5’) with anthraquinone-2-sulfonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马建华; 韩镇辉; 林维真; 姚思德; 王文峰; 林念芸

    2002-01-01

    The electron transfer reaction between triplet anthraquinone-2-sulfonate and poly-guanylic acid (5’) in CH3CN-H2O (97 : 3) has been investigated by 248 nm (KrF) laser flash photolysis. The transient absorption spectra and kinetics obtained from the interaction of triplet anthraquinone-2-sulfonate and poly[G] demonstrate that the primary ionic radical pair, radical cation of poly[G] and radical anion of anthraquinone-2-sulfonate have been detected simultaneously. The free energy changes in the process of the electron transfer were also calculated.

  7. Interaction between rifampin and fusidic acid against methicillin-resistant coagulase-positive and -negative staphylococci.

    OpenAIRE

    Farber, B F; Yee, Y C; Karchmer, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    We studied the interaction between rifampin and fusidic acid against a group of staphylococci. Of the 20 coagulase-positive strains studied, checkerboard studies revealed synergy in 3 and indifference in 17; time-kill studies revealed synergy in 18 of 19 coagulase-positive strains at both 24 and 48 h. Of the 19 coagulase-negative strains, checkerboard studies revealed synergy in 6 and indifference in 13; time-kill studies revealed synergy in 6 of 18 coagulase-negative strains at 24 h and in 1...

  8. Born energy, acid-base equilibrium, structure and interactions of end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nap, R. J.; Tagliazucchi, M.; Szleifer, I., E-mail: igalsz@northwestern.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Chemistry, and Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3100 (United States)

    2014-01-14

    This work addresses the effect of the Born self-energy contribution in the modeling of the structural and thermodynamical properties of weak polyelectrolytes confined to planar and curved surfaces. The theoretical framework is based on a theory that explicitly includes the conformations, size, shape, and charge distribution of all molecular species and considers the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte. Namely, the degree of charge in the polymers is not imposed but it is a local varying property that results from the minimization of the total free energy. Inclusion of the dielectric properties of the polyelectrolyte is important as the environment of a polymer layer is very different from that in the adjacent aqueous solution. The main effect of the Born energy contribution on the molecular organization of an end-grafted weak polyacid layer is uncharging the weak acid (or basic) groups and consequently decreasing the concentration of mobile ions within the layer. The magnitude of the effect increases with polymer density and, in the case of the average degree of charge, it is qualitatively equivalent to a small shift in the equilibrium constant for the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte monomers. The degree of charge is established by the competition between electrostatic interactions, the polymer conformational entropy, the excluded volume interactions, the translational entropy of the counterions and the acid-base chemical equilibrium. Consideration of the Born energy introduces an additional energetic penalty to the presence of charged groups in the polyelectrolyte layer, whose effect is mitigated by down-regulating the amount of charge, i.e., by shifting the local-acid base equilibrium towards its uncharged state. Shifting of the local acid-base equilibrium and its effect on the properties of the polyelectrolyte layer, without considering the Born energy, have been theoretically predicted previously. Account of the Born energy leads

  9. Born energy, acid-base equilibrium, structure and interactions of end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nap, R. J.; Tagliazucchi, M.; Szleifer, I.

    2014-01-01

    This work addresses the effect of the Born self-energy contribution in the modeling of the structural and thermodynamical properties of weak polyelectrolytes confined to planar and curved surfaces. The theoretical framework is based on a theory that explicitly includes the conformations, size, shape, and charge distribution of all molecular species and considers the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte. Namely, the degree of charge in the polymers is not imposed but it is a local varying property that results from the minimization of the total free energy. Inclusion of the dielectric properties of the polyelectrolyte is important as the environment of a polymer layer is very different from that in the adjacent aqueous solution. The main effect of the Born energy contribution on the molecular organization of an end-grafted weak polyacid layer is uncharging the weak acid (or basic) groups and consequently decreasing the concentration of mobile ions within the layer. The magnitude of the effect increases with polymer density and, in the case of the average degree of charge, it is qualitatively equivalent to a small shift in the equilibrium constant for the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte monomers. The degree of charge is established by the competition between electrostatic interactions, the polymer conformational entropy, the excluded volume interactions, the translational entropy of the counterions and the acid-base chemical equilibrium. Consideration of the Born energy introduces an additional energetic penalty to the presence of charged groups in the polyelectrolyte layer, whose effect is mitigated by down-regulating the amount of charge, i.e., by shifting the local-acid base equilibrium towards its uncharged state. Shifting of the local acid-base equilibrium and its effect on the properties of the polyelectrolyte layer, without considering the Born energy, have been theoretically predicted previously. Account of the Born energy leads

  10. Characterization of the interaction between collectin 11 (CL-11, CL-K1) and nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Maiken Lumby; Brandt, Jette; Iyer, Sinduja S C;

    2013-01-01

    Collectins are a group of innate immune proteins that contain collagen-like regions and globular C-type lectin domains. Via the lectin domains, collectins recognize and bind to various microbial carbohydrate patterns. Collectin 11 (CL-11) exists in complex with the complement activating MBL......-associated proteases, MASPs. In the present work, we characterize the interaction between CL-11 and DNA, and show that CL-11 binds to DNA from a variety of origins in a calcium-independent manner. CL-11 binds also to apoptotic cells presenting extracellular DNA on their surface. The binding to DNA is sensitive to...... changes in ionic strength and pH. Competition studies show that CL-11 binds to nucleic acids and carbohydrates via separate binding-sites and oligomericity appears crucial for binding activity. Combined interaction with DNA and mannan strongly increases binding avidity. By surface plasmon resonance we...

  11. Interaction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with perfluorinated sulfonic acid ionomers and surface treatment studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Dhiman, Rajnish; Borghei, Maryam;

    2014-01-01

    equilibrium constant (Keq.) and maximum surface coverage (Γmax) were determined based on the model. In general, the ionomer showed stronger adsorption for MWCNTs (Keq. = 21 − 377 depending on treatment) comparing to Vulcan (Keq. = 18), and slightly lower monolayer coverage. The interaction was found to be...... strongly affected by surface composition, morphology, porosity and oxygen containing functional groups, which are varied with purification and functionalization treatments. The modification of the surface properties was also studied with HR-TEM, BET, porosity measurement, EDXS, XPS, Raman and TG. The......The interaction between high surface area nano-carbon catalyst supports for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and perfluorinated sulfonic acid (Nafion®) ionomer was studied 19 fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (19F-NMR). The method was developed and improved for more...

  12. Charge-transfer interaction mediated organogels from 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid appended pyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe herein the two-component charge-transfer (CT interaction induced organogel formation with 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid appended pyrene (GA-pyrene, 3 as the donor, and 2,4,7-trinitrofluorenone (TNF, 4 as the acceptor. The use of TNF (4 as a versatile electron acceptor in the formation of CT gels is demonstrated through the formation of gels in a variety of solvents. Thermal stability, stoichiometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, optical micrographs, and circular dichroism (CD are performed on these CT gels to investigate their thermal and assembly properties. UV–vis, fluorescence, mass spectrometric as well as variable-temperature 1H NMR experiments on these gels suggest that the CT interaction is one of the major driving forces for the formation of these organogels.

  13. Interaction of anticancer drug methotrexate with nucleic acids analyzed by multi-spectroscopic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Changqun; Chen, Xiaoming; Gong, Hang

    2009-02-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) as an antifolate, which is widely used as chemotherapeutic drugs. A high-dose MTX therapy has a direct toxicity influence on the non-germinal cells, especially the liver cells. It is known that the inject dose for adults is 10-30 mg and is half for children for routine use, while our experiments showed that the optimum dosage of MTX which enhanced the RLS intensities to the maximum is 4.54 ng ml -1. The interaction of methotrexate (MTX) with nucleic acids in aqueous solution in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB), a kind of cationic surfactant similar to the Human cells, were investigated based on the measurements of resonance light scattering (RLS), UV-vis, fluorescence and NMR spectra, etc. The interaction has been proved to give a ternary complex of MTX-CTMAB-DNA in BR buffer (pH 9.30), which exhibits strong enhanced RLS signals at 339.5 nm.

  14. Fundamental Interactions between Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) Oligomers and Au Nanoparticles: Experimental and Theoretical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karna, Molleshree; Balu, Radhakrishnan; Griep, Mark; Mallick, Govind

    2011-03-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations were performed to understand the nature of fundamental interactions between gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and single stranded DNA (ss-DNA). Atomic force microscopic imaging and UV-Visible spectroscopic measurements revealed binding of NPs with ss-DNA under mildly acidic conditions.. Ab initio quantum chemical calculations within the framework of density functional theory provided a possible charge transfer pathway from the DNA base guanine to Au atoms and thus characterizing the interaction as electrostatic. The calculations outline the possible effect of the presence of other bases to guanine mediated charge transfer. Specifically, the presence of an adenine base alters the charge localization at the guanine base and thus prevents charge transfer to NPs.

  15. Interaction of bovine serum albumin protein with self assembled monolayer of mercaptoundecanoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poonia, Monika; Agarwal, Hitesh; Manjuladevi, V.; Gupta, R. K.

    2016-05-01

    Detection of proteins and other biomolecules in liquid phase is the essence for the design of a biosensor. The sensitivity of a sensor can be enhanced by the appropriate functionalization of the sensing area so as to establish the molecular specific interaction. In the present work, we have studied the interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein with a chemically functionalized surface using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The gold-coated quartz crystals (AT-cut/5 MHz) were functionalized by forming self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 11-Mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA). The adsorption characteristics of BSA onto SAM of MUA on quartz crystal are reported. BSA showed the highest affinity for SAM of MUA as compared to pure gold surface. The SAM of MUA provides carboxylated surface which enhances not only the adsorption of the BSA protein but also a very stable BSA-MUA complex in the liquid phase.

  16. Prediction of protein motions from amino acid sequence and its application to protein-protein interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wako Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural flexibility is an important characteristic of proteins because it is often associated with their function. The movement of a polypeptide segment in a protein can be broken down into two types of motions: internal and external ones. The former is deformation of the segment itself, but the latter involves only rotational and translational motions as a rigid body. Normal Model Analysis (NMA can derive these two motions, but its application remains limited because it necessitates the gathering of complete structural information. Results In this work, we present a novel method for predicting two kinds of protein motions in ordered structures. The prediction uses only information from the amino acid sequence. We prepared a dataset of the internal and external motions of segments in many proteins by application of NMA. Subsequently, we analyzed the relation between thermal motion assessed from X-ray crystallographic B-factor and internal/external motions calculated by NMA. Results show that attributes of amino acids related to the internal motion have different features from those related to the B-factors, although those related to the external motion are correlated strongly with the B-factors. Next, we developed a method to predict internal and external motions from amino acid sequences based on the Random Forest algorithm. The proposed method uses information associated with adjacent amino acid residues and secondary structures predicted from the amino acid sequence. The proposed method exhibited moderate correlation between predicted internal and external motions with those calculated by NMA. It has the highest prediction accuracy compared to a naïve model and three published predictors. Conclusions Finally, we applied the proposed method predicting the internal motion to a set of 20 proteins that undergo large conformational change upon protein-protein interaction. Results show significant overlaps between the

  17. Eight supramolecular assemblies constructed from bis(benzimidazole) and organic acids through strong classical hydrogen bonding and weak noncovalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shouwen; Wang, Daqi

    2014-05-01

    Eight crystalline organic acid-base adducts derived from alkane bridged bis(N-benzimidazole) and organic acids (2,4,6-trinitrophenol, p-nitrobenzoic acid, m-nitrobenzoic acid, 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, 5-sulfosalicylic acid and oxalic acid) were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. Of the eight compounds five are organic salts (1, 4, 6, 7 and 8) and the other three (2, 3, and 5) are cocrystals. In all of the adducts except 1 and 8, the ratio of the acid and the base is 2:1. All eight supramolecular assemblies involve extensive intermolecular classical hydrogen bonds as well as other noncovalent interactions. The role of weak and strong noncovalent interactions in the crystal packing is ascertained. These weak interactions combined, all the complexes displayed 3D framework structure. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the classical N+-H⋯O-, O-H⋯O, and O-H⋯N hydrogen bonds (ionic or neutral) and other nonbonding associations between acids and ditopic benzimidazoles are sufficient to bring about the formation of cocrystals or organic salts.

  18. Interactions of the cell-wall glycopolymers of lactic acid bacteria with their bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pierre eChapot-Chartier

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are Gram positive bacteria widely used in the production of fermented food in particular cheese and yoghurts. Bacteriophage infections during fermentation processes have been for many years a major industrial concern and have stimulated numerous research efforts. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of bacteriophage interactions with their host bacteria is required for the development of efficient strategies to fight against infections. The bacterial cell wall plays key roles in these interactions. First, bacteriophages must adsorb at the bacterial surface through specific interactions with receptors that are cell wall components. At next step, phages must overcome the barrier constituted by cell wall peptidoglycan to inject DNA inside bacterial cell. Also at the end of the infection cycle, phages synthesize endolysins able to hydrolyze peptidoglycan and lyse bacterial cells to release phage progeny. In the last decade, concomitant development of genomics and structural analysis of cell wall components allowed considerable advances in the knowledge of their structure and function in several model LAB. Here, we describe the present knowledge on the structure of the cell wall glycopolymers of the best characterized LAB emphasizing their structural variations and we present the available data regarding their role in bacteria-phage specific interactions at the different steps of the infection cycle.

  19. Study of the interaction between 5-sulfosalicylic acid and bovine serum albumin by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Juan, E-mail: zhangjuano13@126.com [Department of Chemistry, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan City, Ningxia Province 750004 (China); Yan, Qianshun; Liu, Jianping; Lu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Yanshu [Department of Chemistry, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan City, Ningxia Province 750004 (China); Wang, Jie; Wang, Shujing [Medical Science Research Center, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan City, Ningxia Province 750004 (China)

    2013-02-15

    The interaction between 5-sulfosalicylic acid (SSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) at pH 7.40 was studied by fluorescence and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy at different temperatures. The results revealed that SSA caused the fluorescence quenching of BSA through a static quenching procedure. The binding constant K was measured by fluorescence quenching method. The thermodynamic parameters, {Delta}H and {Delta}S, were calculated to be 23.16 kJ mol{sup -1}>0 and 162.37 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}>0, respectively, which suggested that the hydrophobic force played a major role in the reaction of SSA on BSA. The distance r between donor (BSA) and acceptor (SSA) was obtained according to the Foerster non-radiation energy transfer theory. The results of synchronous fluorescence spectra, three-dimensional fluorescence spectra and far-UV circular dichroism spectra showed that the interaction between BSA and SSA induced conformational changes in BSA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of BSA with SSA was investigated by FL, UV-vis and CD spectra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {Delta}H, {Delta}G, {Delta}S, K{sub q}, K{sub sv}, K and r were calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrophobic interaction played a major role in the reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conformation of BSA was changed in the presence of SSA.

  20. Study of the interaction between 5-sulfosalicylic acid and bovine serum albumin by fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between 5-sulfosalicylic acid (SSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) at pH 7.40 was studied by fluorescence and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy at different temperatures. The results revealed that SSA caused the fluorescence quenching of BSA through a static quenching procedure. The binding constant K was measured by fluorescence quenching method. The thermodynamic parameters, ΔH and ΔS, were calculated to be 23.16 kJ mol−1>0 and 162.37 J mol−1 K−1>0, respectively, which suggested that the hydrophobic force played a major role in the reaction of SSA on BSA. The distance r between donor (BSA) and acceptor (SSA) was obtained according to the Förster non-radiation energy transfer theory. The results of synchronous fluorescence spectra, three-dimensional fluorescence spectra and far-UV circular dichroism spectra showed that the interaction between BSA and SSA induced conformational changes in BSA. - Highlights: ► Interaction of BSA with SSA was investigated by FL, UV–vis and CD spectra. ► ΔH, ΔG, ΔS, Kq, Ksv, K and r were calculated. ► Hydrophobic interaction played a major role in the reaction. ► Conformation of BSA was changed in the presence of SSA.

  1. Density Functional Theory Study on the Interactions of Metal Ions with Long Chain Deprotonated Carboxylic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehandzhiyski, Aleksandar Y; Riccardi, Enrico; van Erp, Titus S; Koch, Henrik; Åstrand, Per-Olof; Trinh, Thuat T; Grimes, Brian A

    2015-10-01

    In this work, interactions between carboxylate ions and calcium or sodium ions are investigated via density functional theory (DFT). Despite the ubiquitous presence of these interactions in natural and industrial chemical processes, few DFT studies on these systems exist in the literature. Special focus has been placed on determining the influence of the multibody interactions (with up to 4 carboxylates and one metal ion) on an effective pair-interaction potential, such as those used in molecular mechanics (MM). Specifically, DFT calculations are employed to quantify an effective pair-potential that implicitly includes multibody interactions to construct potential energy curves for carboxylate-metal ion pairs. The DFT calculated potential curves are compared to a widely used molecular mechanics force field (OPLS-AA). The calculations indicate that multibody effects do influence the energetic behavior of these ionic pairs and the extent of this influence is determined by a balance between (a) charge transfer from the carboxylate to the metal ions which stabilizes the complex and (b) repulsion between carboxylates, which destabilizes the complex. Additionally, the potential curves of the complexes with 1 and 2 carboxylates and one counterion have been examined to higher separation distance (20 Å) by the use of relaxed scan optimization and constrained density functional theory (CDFT). The results from the relaxed scan optimization indicate that near the equilibrium distance, the charge transfer between the metal ion and the deprotonated carboxylic acid group is significant and leads to non-negligible differences between the DFT and MM potential curves, especially for calcium. However, at longer separation distances the MM calculated interaction potential functions converge to those calculated with CDFT, effectively indicating the approximate domain of the separation distance coordinate where charge transfer between the ions is occurring. PMID:26331433

  2. Spectroscopic investigation on the interaction of maslinic acid with bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina-Bolívar, J.A., E-mail: jmb@uma.es [Department of Applied Physics II, Engineering School, University of Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Galisteo-González, F. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Carnero Ruiz, C. [Department of Applied Physics II, Engineering School, University of Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Medina-O' Donnell, M.; Parra, A. [Department of Organic Chemistry, University of Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    Ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis), steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence, and Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were used to study the interaction between maslinic acid (MA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Binding constants were determined at three different temperatures (298, 304, and 310 K). Spectroscopic analysis revealed that the fluorescence-quenching mechanism between MA and BSA was a static quenching procedure. MA specifically binds to one site of the BSA molecule forming a stable complex with a binding constant of (5.4±0.4)×10{sup 4} M{sup −1} at pH 7.4 and 298 K. From the thermodynamic parameters of the binding process (ΔG{sup 0}, ΔH{sup 0} and ΔS{sup 0}) it can be inferred that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions are the predominant intermolecular forces responsible for the stabilization of the complex. Anisotropy studies revealed that tryptophan residues of BSA undergo motion restrictions as a result of the interaction with MA. The distance between MA and the fluorophore residue of BSA was evaluated according to the theory of Föster for fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Observations from FT-IR spectra and three-dimensional fluorescence indicated changes in the conformation of BSA upon ligand binding. - Highlights: • The interaction between MA and BSA was examined with spectroscopic techniques. • The interaction between MA and BSA was studied at different temperatures. • Fluorescence spectroscopy studies suggest that quenching mechanism is static. • The hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions are predominant forces. • Conformational changes of the protein upon binding of MA were observed.

  3. Effect of gamma irradiation on hyaluronic acid and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Ainee Fatimah; Mohd, Hur Munawar Kabir; Taqiyuddin Mawardi bin Ayob, Muhammad; Rosli, Nur Ratasha Alia Md; Mohamed, Faizal; Radiman, Shahidan; Rahman, Irman Abdul [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    DPPC lipids are the major component constituting the biological membrane, and their importances in various physiological functions are well documented. Hyaluronic acid (HA) in the synovial joint fluid functions as a lubricant, shock absorber and a nutrient carrier. Gamma irradiation has also been found to be effective in depolymerizing and cleaving molecular chains related to free radicals, thus extends with changes in chemical composition as well as its physiological functions. This research are conducted to investigate the hyaluronic acid (HA) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction in form of vesicles and its effect to gamma radiation. The size of DPPC vesicles formed via gentle hydration method is between 100 to 200 nm in diameter. HA (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ml) was added into the vesicles and characterized by using TEM to determine vesicle size distributions, fusion and rupture of DPPC structure. The results demonstrated that the size of the vesicles approximately between 200 to 300 nm which caused by vesicles fusion with HA and formed even larger vesicles. After being irradiated by 0 to 200 Gy, the size of vesicles decreased as HA was degraded. To elucidate the mechanism of these effects, FTIR spectra were carried out and have shown that at absorption bands at 1700–1750 cm{sup −1} due to formation of carboxylic acid and leads to alteration of HA structure.

  4. Effect of gamma irradiation on hyaluronic acid and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ainee Fatimah; Mohd, Hur Munawar Kabir; bin Ayob, Muhammad Taqiyuddin Mawardi; Rosli, Nur Ratasha Alia Md; Mohamed, Faizal; Radiman, Shahidan; Rahman, Irman Abdul

    2014-09-01

    DPPC lipids are the major component constituting the biological membrane, and their importances in various physiological functions are well documented. Hyaluronic acid (HA) in the synovial joint fluid functions as a lubricant, shock absorber and a nutrient carrier. Gamma irradiation has also been found to be effective in depolymerizing and cleaving molecular chains related to free radicals, thus extends with changes in chemical composition as well as its physiological functions. This research are conducted to investigate the hyaluronic acid (HA) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction in form of vesicles and its effect to gamma radiation. The size of DPPC vesicles formed via gentle hydration method is between 100 to 200 nm in diameter. HA (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ml) was added into the vesicles and characterized by using TEM to determine vesicle size distributions, fusion and rupture of DPPC structure. The results demonstrated that the size of the vesicles approximately between 200 to 300 nm which caused by vesicles fusion with HA and formed even larger vesicles. After being irradiated by 0 to 200 Gy, the size of vesicles decreased as HA was degraded. To elucidate the mechanism of these effects, FTIR spectra were carried out and have shown that at absorption bands at 1700-1750 cm-1 due to formation of carboxylic acid and leads to alteration of HA structure.

  5. Nucleic-Acid-Binding Chromophores as Efficient Indicators of Aptamer-Target Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwabena Sarpong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The binding affinity and specificity of nucleic acid aptamers have made them valuable candidates for use as sensors in diagnostic applications. In particular, chromophore-functionalized aptamers offer a relatively simple format for detection and quantification of target molecules. We describe the use of nucleic-acid-staining reagents as an effective tool for detecting and signaling aptamer-target interactions. Aptamers varying in size and structure and targeting a range of molecules have been used in conjunction with commercially available chromophores to indicate and quantify the presence of cognate targets with high sensitivity and selectivity. Our assay precludes the covalent modification of nucleic acids and relies on the differential fluorescence signal of chromophores when complexed with aptamers with or without their cognate target. We also evaluate factors that are critical for the stability of the complex between the aptamer and chromophore in presence or absence of target molecules. Our results indicate the possibility of controlling those factors to enhance the sensitivity of target detection by the aptamers used in such assays.

  6. Natural and pyrogenic humic acids at goethite and natural oxide surfaces interacting with phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, Tjisse; Mia, Shamim; Duhaut, Pierre-Benoît; Molleman, Bastiaan

    2013-08-20

    Fulvic and humic acids have a large variability in binding to metal (hydr) oxide surfaces and interact differently with oxyanions, as examined here experimentally. Pyrogenic humic acid has been included in our study since it will be released to the environment in the case of large-scale application of biochar, potentially creating Darks Earths or Terra Preta soils. A surface complexation approach has been developed that aims to describe the competitive behavior of natural organic matter (NOM) in soil as well as model systems. Modeling points unexpectedly to a strong change of the molecular conformation of humic acid (HA) with a predominant adsorption in the Stern layer domain at low NOM loading. In soil, mineral oxide surfaces remain efficiently loaded by mineral-protected organic carbon (OC), equivalent with a layer thickness of ≥ ~0.5 nm that represents at least 0.1-1.0% OC, while surface-associated OC may be even three times higher. In natural systems, surface complexation modeling should account for this pervasive NOM coverage. With our charge distribution model for NOM (NOM-CD), the pH-dependent oxyanion competition of the organo-mineral oxide fraction can be described. For pyrogenic HA, a more than 10-fold increase in dissolved phosphate is predicted at long-term applications of biochar or black carbon. PMID:23875678

  7. Hydrogeologic controls on the groundwater interactions with an acidic lake in karst terrain, Lake Barco, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T.M.

    1996-01-01

    Transient groundwater interactions and lake stage were simulated for Lake Barco, an acidic seepage lake in the mantled karst of north central Florida. Karst subsidence features affected groundwater flow patterns in the basin and groundwater fluxes to and from the lake. Subsidence features peripheral to the lake intercepted potential groundwater inflow and increased leakage from the shallow perimeter of the lake bed. Simulated groundwater fluxes were checked against net groundwater flow derived from a detailed lake hydrologic budget with short-term lake evaporation computed by the energy budget method. Discrepancies between modeled and budget- derived net groundwater flows indicated that the model underestimated groundwater inflow, possibly contributed to by transient water table mounding near the lake. Recharge from rainfall reduced lake leakage by 10 to 15 times more than it increased groundwater inflow. As a result of the karst setting, the contributing groundwater basin to the lake was 2.4 ha for simulated average rainfall conditions, compared to the topographically derived drainage basin area of 81 ha. Short groundwater inflow path lines and rapid travel times limit the contribution of acid-neutralizing solutes from the basin, making Lake Barco susceptible to increased acidification by acid rain.

  8. Effect of gamma irradiation on hyaluronic acid and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DPPC lipids are the major component constituting the biological membrane, and their importances in various physiological functions are well documented. Hyaluronic acid (HA) in the synovial joint fluid functions as a lubricant, shock absorber and a nutrient carrier. Gamma irradiation has also been found to be effective in depolymerizing and cleaving molecular chains related to free radicals, thus extends with changes in chemical composition as well as its physiological functions. This research are conducted to investigate the hyaluronic acid (HA) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interaction in form of vesicles and its effect to gamma radiation. The size of DPPC vesicles formed via gentle hydration method is between 100 to 200 nm in diameter. HA (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ml) was added into the vesicles and characterized by using TEM to determine vesicle size distributions, fusion and rupture of DPPC structure. The results demonstrated that the size of the vesicles approximately between 200 to 300 nm which caused by vesicles fusion with HA and formed even larger vesicles. After being irradiated by 0 to 200 Gy, the size of vesicles decreased as HA was degraded. To elucidate the mechanism of these effects, FTIR spectra were carried out and have shown that at absorption bands at 1700–1750 cm−1 due to formation of carboxylic acid and leads to alteration of HA structure

  9. Interaction of Dietary Fatty Acids with Tumour Necrosis Factor Family Cytokines during Colon Inflammation and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiřina Hofmanová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal homeostasis is precisely regulated by a number of endogenous regulatory molecules but significantly influenced by dietary compounds. Malfunction of this system may result in chronic inflammation and cancer. Dietary essential n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs and short-chain fatty acid butyrate produced from fibre display anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. Both compounds were shown to modulate the production and activities of TNF family cytokines. Cytokines from the TNF family (TNF-α, TRAIL, and FasL have potent inflammatory activities and can also regulate apoptosis, which plays an important role in cancer development. The results of our own research showed enhancement of apoptosis in colon cancer cells by a combination of either docosahexaenoic acid (DHA or butyrate with TNF family cytokines, especially by promotion of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and modulation of NFκB activity. This review is focused mainly on the interaction of dietary PUFAs and butyrate with these cytokines during colon inflammation and cancer development. We summarised recent knowledge about the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in such effects and outcomes for intestinal cell behaviour and pathologies. Finally, the possible application for the prevention and therapy of colon inflammation and cancer is also outlined.

  10. Chemometric analysis of the interactions among different parameters describing health conditions, breast cancer risk and fatty acids profile in serum of rats supplemented with conjugated linoleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białek, Agnieszka; Zagrodzki, Paweł; Tokarz, Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    We investigated how different doses of conjugated linoleic acids applied for various periods of time influence breast cancer risk and fatty acids profile in serum of rats treated or not with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). We also search for interactions among parameters describing health conditions and cancer risk. Animals were divided into 18 groups with different diet modifications (vegetable oil, 1.0%, 2.0% additions of CLA) and different periods of supplementation. In groups treated with DMBA mammary adenocarcinomas appeared. Due to the complexity of experiment apart from statistical analysis a chemometric tool-Partial Least Square method was applied. Analysis of pairs of correlated parameters allowed to identify some regularities concerning the relationships between fatty acid profiles and clinical features of animals. Fatty acids profile was the result of prolonged exposure to high dose of CLA and DMBA administration. These two factors underlined the differences in fatty acids profiles among clusters of animals. PMID:26926361

  11. Coiled coil interactions for the targeting of liposomes for nucleic acid delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Blenke, Erik E.; van den Dikkenberg, Joep; van Kolck, Bartjan; Kros, Alexander; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    Coiled coil interactions are strong protein-protein interactions that are involved in many biological processes, including intracellular trafficking and membrane fusion. A synthetic heterodimeric coiled-coil forming peptide pair, known as E3 (EIAALEK)3 and K3 (KIAALKE)3 was used to functionalize liposomes encapsulating a splice correcting oligonucleotide or siRNA. These peptide-functionalized vesicles are highly stable in solution but start to cluster when vesicles modified with complementary peptides are mixed together, demonstrating that the peptides quickly coil and crosslink the vesicles. When one of the peptides was anchored to the cell membrane using a hydrophobic cholesterol anchor, vesicles functionalized with the complementary peptide could be docked to these cells, whereas non-functionalized cells did not show any vesicle tethering. Although the anchored peptides do not have a downstream signaling pathway, microscopy pictures revealed that after four hours, the majority of the docked vesicles were internalized by endocytosis. Finally, for the first time, it was shown that the coiled coil assembly at the interface between the vesicles and the cell membrane induces active uptake and leads to cytosolic delivery of the nucleic acid cargo. Both the siRNA and the splice correcting oligonucleotide were functionally delivered, resulting respectively in the silencing or recovery of luciferase expression in the appropriate cell lines. These results demonstrate that the docking to the cell by coiled coil interaction can induce active uptake and achieve the successful intracellular delivery of otherwise membrane impermeable nucleic acids in a highly specific manner.Coiled coil interactions are strong protein-protein interactions that are involved in many biological processes, including intracellular trafficking and membrane fusion. A synthetic heterodimeric coiled-coil forming peptide pair, known as E3 (EIAALEK)3 and K3 (KIAALKE)3 was used to functionalize liposomes

  12. Coiled coil interactions for the targeting of liposomes for nucleic acid delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Blenke, Erik E.; van den Dikkenberg, Joep; van Kolck, Bartjan; Kros, Alexander; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    Coiled coil interactions are strong protein-protein interactions that are involved in many biological processes, including intracellular trafficking and membrane fusion. A synthetic heterodimeric coiled-coil forming peptide pair, known as E3 (EIAALEK)3 and K3 (KIAALKE)3 was used to functionalize liposomes encapsulating a splice correcting oligonucleotide or siRNA. These peptide-functionalized vesicles are highly stable in solution but start to cluster when vesicles modified with complementary peptides are mixed together, demonstrating that the peptides quickly coil and crosslink the vesicles. When one of the peptides was anchored to the cell membrane using a hydrophobic cholesterol anchor, vesicles functionalized with the complementary peptide could be docked to these cells, whereas non-functionalized cells did not show any vesicle tethering. Although the anchored peptides do not have a downstream signaling pathway, microscopy pictures revealed that after four hours, the majority of the docked vesicles were internalized by endocytosis. Finally, for the first time, it was shown that the coiled coil assembly at the interface between the vesicles and the cell membrane induces active uptake and leads to cytosolic delivery of the nucleic acid cargo. Both the siRNA and the splice correcting oligonucleotide were functionally delivered, resulting respectively in the silencing or recovery of luciferase expression in the appropriate cell lines. These results demonstrate that the docking to the cell by coiled coil interaction can induce active uptake and achieve the successful intracellular delivery of otherwise membrane impermeable nucleic acids in a highly specific manner.Coiled coil interactions are strong protein-protein interactions that are involved in many biological processes, including intracellular trafficking and membrane fusion. A synthetic heterodimeric coiled-coil forming peptide pair, known as E3 (EIAALEK)3 and K3 (KIAALKE)3 was used to functionalize liposomes

  13. Transmembrane prostatic acid phosphatase (TMPAP interacts with snapin and deficient mice develop prostate adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana B Quintero

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms underlying prostate carcinogenesis are poorly understood. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, a prostatic epithelial secretion marker, has been linked to prostate cancer since the 1930's. However, the contribution of PAP to the disease remains controversial. We have previously cloned and described two isoforms of this protein, a secretory (sPAP and a transmembrane type-I (TMPAP. The goal in this work was to understand the physiological function of TMPAP in the prostate. We conducted histological, ultra-structural and genome-wide analyses of the prostate of our PAP-deficient mouse model (PAP(-/- with C57BL/6J background. The PAP(-/- mouse prostate showed the development of slow-growing non-metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. In order to find out the mechanism behind, we identified PAP-interacting proteins byyeast two-hybrid assays and a clear result was obtained for the interaction of PAP with snapin, a SNARE-associated protein which binds Snap25 facilitating the vesicular membrane fusion process. We confirmed this interaction by co-localization studies in TMPAP-transfected LNCaP cells (TMPAP/LNCaP cells and in vivo FRET analyses in transient transfected LNCaP cells. The differential gene expression analyses revealed the dysregulation of the same genes known to be related to synaptic vesicular traffic. Both TMPAP and snapin were detected in isolated exosomes. Our results suggest that TMPAP is involved in endo-/exocytosis and disturbed vesicular traffic is a hallmark of prostate adenocarcinoma.

  14. POLYMER/MONTMORILLONITE COMPLEXES:PREPARATION AND INTERACTIONS WITH ROSIN ACID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihong Zhao; Wenxia Liu

    2004-01-01

    Polymer/montmorillonite complexes were prepared via intercalating polymers of low molecular weight into layers of montmorillonite and evaluated for their interactions with rosin acid. Three polymers from various amines modified by epichlorohydrin and an acidified diethylenetriamine were separately intercalated into montmorillonite via direct solution intercalation. X-ray diffraction patterns are performed to obtain information about the intercalation of these agents. The examination revealed that it was feasible for the direct intercalation of polymers, while hard for the unmodified diethylenetriamine. Adsorption isotherm curves were established to assess the efficiency of the various montmorillonites including the intercalated montmorillonites, the simple mixtures of the corresponding intercalation agents and ordinary montmorillonite in removing pitch from water solution. From the adsorption behavior of various samples, it was found that the interaction of the montmorillonite with pitch was not only through van der Waals attraction, but also through electrostatic interactions. Both the organo-philic and the surface electrostatic properties of the montmorillonites are important for successful pitch control.

  15. Interactions between uptake of amino acids and inorganic nitrogen in wheat plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gioseffi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Soil-borne amino acids may constitute a source of nitrogen (N for plants in various terrestrial ecosystems but their importance for total N nutrition is unclear, particularly in nutrient-rich arable soils. One reason for this uncertainty is lack of information on how the absorption of amino acids by plant roots is affected by the simultaneous presence of inorganic N forms. The objective of the present study was to study absorption of glycine (Gly and glutamine (Gln by wheat roots and their interactions with nitrate (NO3 and ammonium (NH4+ during uptake. The underlying hypothesis was that amino acids, when present in nutrient solution together with inorganic N, may lead to down-regulation of the inorganic N uptake, thereby resulting in similar total N uptake rates. Amino acids were enriched with double-labelled 15N and 13C, while NO3 and NH4+ acquisition was determined by their rate of removal from the nutrient solution surrounding the roots. The uptake rates of NO3 and NH4+ did not differ from each other and were generally about twice as high as the uptake rate of organic N when the different N forms were supplied separately in concentrations of 2 mM. Nevertheless, replacement of 50% of the inorganic N with organic N was able to restore the N uptake to the same level as that in the presence of only inorganic N. Co-provision of NO3 did not affect glycine uptake, while the presence of glycine down-regulated NO3 uptake. The ratio between 13C and 15N were lower in shoots than in roots and also lower than the theoretical values, reflecting higher C losses via respiratory processes compared to N losses. It is concluded that organic N can constitute a significant N-source for wheat plants and that there is an interaction

  16. Understanding interactions of oleic acid with basic drugs in solid lipids on different biopharmaceutical levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdravka Misic

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the impact of intestinal supersaturation on absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs has raised much interest among researchers. A focus has been mostly to study excipient effects on maintenance of drug supersaturation. The aim of the present study was to better understand the effects of drug-excipient interactions on the level of the anhydrous formulation, upon dispersion in simple buffer media and, in particular, regarding precipitation kinetics. A solid lipid-based formulation comprising PEG-32 stearate and oleic acid (OA (8:2 w/w was developed as a model. Loratadine (pKa = 4.33 and carvedilol (pKa = 8.74 were chosen as basic drugs. UV/FTIR spectroscopy and viscometry were used to characterize drug-OA molecular interactions in solution, while solid formulations were studied using x-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and van’t Hoff solubility-temperature plots. Precipitation kinetics of drug formulations was real-time monitored in phosphate buffer (pH = 6.5 by focused beam reflectance measurements. It was found that the addition of OA in the formulations resulted in substantial drug solubility increase. Although the drug-OA interactions appeared to be partially lost upon formulation dispersion, the extent of precipitation was markedly lowered compared to the formulations without OA. A Precipitation number (Pnc was introduced as a ratio of a relevant residence time of drug in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT to the induction time (the onset time of crystalline precipitation. Without OA, Pnc was already taking critical values (>1, while the anhydrous formulation was still below saturation for both model drugs. Interestingly, the addition of OA resulted in amorphous instead of crystalline precipitates, which is advantageous for drug re-dissolution and absorption. In conclusion, this study provides an improved understanding of OA and basic drug interactions on different levels of in vitro performance for more rational oral formulation

  17. Influence of cations on noncovalent interactions between 6-propionyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (PRODAN) and dissolved fulvic and humic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadad, Praveen; Nanny, Mark A

    2008-12-01

    The influence of cations (Na(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) on noncovalent interactions between 6-propionyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (PRODAN) and dissolved fulvic acids (FAs) (Norman landfill leachate fulvic acid (NLFA) and Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA)) and dissolved humic acids (HAs) (Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) and Leonardite humic acid (LHA)) was examined using steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy at pH 4, 7 and 10 as a function of cation concentration (up to 25-100mM). Regardless of pH and cation concentration, PRODAN quenching by FA was unaffected by cations. However, interactions between PRODAN and HA decreased in the presence of cations at pH 7 and 10. Cation concentrations below the HA charge density resulted in the greatest decrease of PRODAN quenching, while very little additional decrease in PRODAN quenching occurred at cation concentrations above the HA charge density. This suggests that as the HA carboxylic acid functional groups form inner sphere complexes with divalent cations, intramolecular interactions result in a contraction of the HA molecular structure, thereby preventing PRODAN from associating with the condensed aromatic, electron accepting moieties inherent within HA molecules and responsible for PRODAN quenching. However, once the HA carboxylic acid functional groups are fully titrated with divalent cations, PRODAN quenching is no longer significantly influenced by the further addition of cations, even though these additional cations facilitate intermolecular interactions between the HA molecules to form supramolecular HA aggregates that can continue to increase in size. Regardless of FA and HA type, pH, cation type and concentration, the lack of blue-shifted fluorescence emission spectra indicated that micelle-like hydrophobic regions, amenable to PRODAN partitioning, were not formed by intra- and intermolecular interactions of FA and HA. PMID:18849058

  18. Standard in vitro assays for protein-nucleic acid interactions--gel shift assays for RNA and DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sarah F; Lorsch, Jon R

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of protein-nucleic acid interactions is necessary for the study of a wide variety of biological processes. One straightforward and widely used approach to this problem is the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), in which the binding of a nucleic acid to one or more proteins changes its mobility through a nondenaturing gel matrix. Usually, the mobility of the nucleic acid is reduced, but examples of increased mobility do exist. This type of assay can be used to investigate the affinity of the interaction between the protein and nucleic acid, the specificity of the interaction, the minimal binding site, and the kinetics of the interaction. One particular advantage of EMSA is the ability to analyze multiple proteins, or protein complexes, binding to nucleic acids. This assay is relatively quick and easy and utilizes equipment available in most laboratories; however, there are many variables that can only be determined empirically; therefore, optimization is necessary and can be highly dependent upon the system. The protocol described here is for the poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) binding to an unstructured RNA probe of 43 bases. While this may be a useful protocol for some additional assays, it is recommended that both reaction conditions and gel running conditions be tailored to the individual interaction to be probed. PMID:24674072

  19. Raman scattering investigations of the interaction of a COV with pure and acid doped ice particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facq, S.; Oancea, A.; Focsa, C.; Chazallon, B.

    2009-04-01

    Ice present in polar stratosphere is as well a common component of the troposphere, particularly in cirrus clouds widespread in tropopause and upper troposphere region. With water droplets, ice constitutes the condensed matter that can interact with atmospheric trace gases via many different trapping processes (co-deposition i.e; incorporation during growing ice conditions, adsorption, freezing etc). The incorporation of trace gases in ice surface/volume can both affect the atmospheric chemistry and the ice structure and reactivity. This can therefore modify the nature and composition of the incorporated species in ice, or in the gas phase. Recently, field measurements have demonstrated the presence of nitric acid in ice particles from cirrus clouds(1,2) (concentration between 0.63 wt% and 2.5 wt %). Moreover, laboratory experiments have shown that the uptake of atmospheric trace gases can be enhanced up to 1 or 2 orders of magnitude in these doped ice particles. Among trace gases capable to interact with atmospheric condensed matter figure volatile organic compounds such as aldehydes, ketones and alcohols (ex: ethanol and methanol). They play an important role in the upper troposphere (3,4) and snowpack chemistry (5) as they can be easily photolysed, producing free radicals and so influence the oxidizing capacity and the ozone-budget of the atmosphere (3,4). The temperature range at which these physico-chemical processes occur extents between ~ 190 K and 273K. Interaction between ice and trace gases are therefore largely dependent on the ice surface properties as well as on the phase formation dynamic (crystalline or not). This study aims to examine and characterize the incorporation of a COV (ex: ethanol), at the surface or in the volume of ice formed by different growth mechanisms (vapour deposition or droplets freezing). Vibrational spectra of water OH and ethanol CH-spectral regions are analysed using confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy at different temperatures

  20. Interactions and transport of plutonium-humic acid particles in groundwater environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe Pu adsorption on pure γ-alumina and heterogeneous mineral phases investigated as a function of pH and humic acid (HA) concentration. Information on surface speciation was obtained by using various actinides as valence analogues for Pu. Surface redox transformations of Pu(V) appeared to control Pu uptake onto electron exchanging minerals. A one-dimensional transport experiment of high molecular weight HA in water saturated clayey sand column was performed under reducing conditions. This showed that HA particles larger than 600 nm were retained in the column. The HA breakthrough curve was characterized by extended tailing. Physico-chemical interactions at the mineral surface and particle straining in smaller pore spaces appeared to control HA transport through the soil. The chemical association of Pu with moving HA was investigated by leaching of 238-Pu-doped borosilicate glasses. Enhancement in Pu release rate was observed in HA solutions compared with organic-free groundwater

  1. Role of acid-base interactions in synthesis of cordierite from talc and sillimanite group minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avvakumov E.G.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been found that the mechanical activation of mixtures of sillimanite group minerals with talc and silica additives in grinding-activating devices with periodic and flow action provides significant acceleration of their interaction with formation of cordierite at the subsequent high-temperature treatment. It is shown that the output of cordierite depends on nature of mineral: in mixture with a sillimanite it is considerably higher, than with an andalusite and kyanite, while the rate of mullitization of these minerals has opposite character. It means that the formation of mullite during heat treatment is not a limiting step in synthesis of cordierite. It is shown that the rate of reaction is determined by the difference in the acid-base properties of these minerals, which depend on the coordination of aluminum cations by oxygen ions, different for each of the modifications.

  2. Chronic caffeine or theophylline exposure reduces gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodiazepine receptor site interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, D J; Schiller, G D; Farb, D H

    1988-05-01

    Methylxanthines, such as caffeine and theophylline, are adenosine receptor antagonists that exert dramatic effects upon the behavior of vertebrate animals by increasing attentiveness, anxiety, and convulsive activity. Benzodiazepines, such as flunitrazepam, generally exert behavioral effects that are opposite to those of methylxanthines. We report the finding that chronic exposure of embryonic brain neurons to caffeine or theophylline reduces the ability of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to potentiate the binding of [3H]flunitrazepam to the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor. This theophylline-induced "uncoupling" of GABA- and benzodiazepine-binding site allosteric interactions is blocked by chloroadenosine, an adenosine receptor agonist, indicating that the chronic effects of theophylline are mediated by a site that resembles an adenosine receptor. We speculate that adverse central nervous system effects of long-term exposure to methylxanthines such as in caffeine-containing beverages or theophylline-containing medications may be exerted by a cell-mediated modification of the GABAA receptor. PMID:2835648

  3. The interaction of protein and polysilicic acid: an x-ray and neutron reflection study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to begin to emulate biomineralisation processes whereby an ordered network of silica, directed by an organic template, is constructed. Two preparative routes were applied. In the first method a protein-silica interaction was induced by near-matching the isoelectric point of a thin protein film (bovine milk beta-casein or beta-lactoglobulin) to that of a polysilicic acid sub-phase in order to form a composite material at the air-water interface. The film conformation adopted at the interface was then studied by reflectivity using neutrons and X-rays as a function of film compression and pH. The second method involved a self-assembly process, illustrated here by an attempt to include either hen egg-white lysozyme, bovine milk beta-casein or beta-lactoglobulin into a highly ordered silicate film grown at the air-water interface

  4. pH dependence of the interaction between immunogenic peptides and MHC class II molecules. Evidence for an acidic intracellular compartment being the organelle of interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, S; Buus, Anette Stryhn; Petersen, B L; Buus, S

    1992-01-01

    most notably in the endosome-lysosome compartment in which Ag processing is thought to occur. Thus, Ag processing and interaction with MHC class II molecules can potentially happen in the very same compartment. This yet undefined acidic compartment would have to contain proteolytic enzymes and MHC...

  5. Stabilization of polyion complex nanoparticles composed of poly(amino acid) using hydrophobic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Takami; Watanabe, Kazuki; Kim, Hyungjin; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2010-02-16

    We report the design and preparation of polyion complex (PIC) nanoparticles composed of anionic hydrophobically modified and cationic poly(amino acid) and the effect of hydrophobic interactions on the stability of these PIC nanoparticles under physiological conditions. We selected poly(gamma-glutamic acid) (gamma-PGA) as the biodegradable anionic polymer and poly(epsilon-lysine) (epsilon-PL) as the cationic polymer. Amphiphilic graft copolymers consisting of gamma-PGA and L-phenylalanine (L-Phe) as the hydrophobic side chain were synthesized by grafting L-Phe to gamma-PGA. The PIC nanoparticles were prepared by mixing gamma-PGA-graft-L-Phe (gamma-PGA-Phe) with epsilon-PL in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The formation and stability of the PIC nanoparticles were investigated by dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. Monomodal anionic PIC nanoparticles were obtained using nonstoichiometric mixing ratios. When unmodified gamma-PGA was mixed with epsilon-PL in PBS, the formation of PIC nanoparticles was observed. However, within a few hours after the preparation, the PIC nanoparticles dissolved in the PBS. In contrast, gamma-PGA-Phe/epsilon-PL nanoparticles showed high stability for a prolonged period of time in PBS and over a wide range of pH values. The stability and size of the PIC nanoparticles depended on the gamma-PGA-Phe/epsilon-PL mixing ratio and the hydrophobicity of the gamma-PGA. The improved stability of the PIC nanoparticles was attributed to the formation of hydrophobic domains in the core of the nanoparticles. The fabrication of PIC nanoparticles using hydrophobic interactions was very useful for the stabilization of the nanoparticles. These results will provide a novel concept in the design of carrier systems composed of PIC. It is expected that the gamma-PGA-Phe/epsilon-PL nanoparticles will have great potential as multifunctional carriers for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications, such as drug and vaccine delivery systems. PMID:20017513

  6. Interactions between organic amendments and phosphate fertilizers modify phosphate sorption processes in an acid soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sckefe, C.R.; Patti, A.F.; Clune, T.S.; Jackson, W.R. [Rutherglen Center, Rutherglen, Vic. (Australia)

    2008-07-15

    To determine how organic amendments and phosphate fertilizers interact to modify P sorption processes, three phosphate fertilizers were applied to lignite- and compost-amended acid soil and incubated for either 3 or 26 days. The fertilizers applied were potassium dihydrogen phosphate, triple superphosphate, and diammonium phosphate (DAP). After 3 days of incubation, sorption of all three P sources was decreased in the lignite-amended treatments, whereas P sorption was increased in the compost-amended treatments. Increased incubation time (26 days) resulted in significantly decreased P sorption when DAP was added to lignite-amended treatments. Addition of triple superphosphate increased P sorption in lignite- and compost-amended treatments and decreased solution pH compared with DAP application. In addition to the effect of P source, differences in P sorption between the lignite- and compost-amended treatments were driven by differences in solution chemistry, predominantly solution pH and cation dynamics. Soil amendment and fertilizer addition also increased microbial activity in the incubation systems, as measured by carbon dioxide respiration. It is proposed that the combination of lignite and DAP may contribute to decreased P sorption in acid soils, with the positive effects likely caused by both chemical and biological processes, including the formation of soluble organic-metal complexes.

  7. Drug permeation and cellular interaction of amino acid-coated drug combination powders for pulmonary delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Ville; Bimbo, Luis M; Hirvonen, Jouni; Kauppinen, Esko I; Raula, Janne

    2016-05-17

    The effect of three amino acid coatings (l-leucine, l-valine and l-phenylalanine) on particle integrity, aerosolization properties, cellular interaction, cytocompatibility, and drug permeation properties of drug combination powder particles (beclomethasone dipropionate and salbutamol sulphate) for dry powder inhalation (DPI) was investigated. Particles with crystalline l-leucine coating resulted in intact separated particles, with crystalline l-valine coating in slightly sintered particles and with amorphous l-phenylalanine coating in strongly fused particles. The permeation of beclomethasone dipropionate across a Calu-3 differentiated cell monolayer was increased when compared with its physical mixture. Drug crystal formation was also observed on the Calu-3 cell monolayer. The l-leucine coated particles were further investigated for cytocompatibility in three human pulmonary (Calu-3, A549 and BEAS-2B) and one human macrophage (THP-1) cell lines, where they showed excellent tolerability. The l-leucine coated particles were also examined for their ability to elicit reactive oxygen species in pulmonary BEAS-2B and macrophage THP-1 cell lines. The study showed the influence of the amino acid coatings for particle formation and performance and their feasibility for combination therapy for pulmonary delivery. PMID:27034001

  8. Interactions Between Fatty Acid Transport Proteins, Genes That Encode for Them, and Exercise: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayewardene, Avindra F; Mavros, Yorgi; Reeves, Anneliese; Hancock, Dale P; Gwinn, Tom; Rooney, Kieron B

    2016-08-01

    Long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) movement into skeletal muscle involves a highly mediated process in which lipid rafts are utilized in the cellular membrane, involving numerous putative plasma membrane-associated LCFA transport proteins. The process of LCFA uptake and oxidation is of particular metabolic significance both at rest and during light to moderate exercise. A comprehensive systematic search of electronic databases was conducted to investigate whether exercise alters protein and/or gene expression of putative LCFA transport proteins. There were 31 studies meeting all eligibility criteria, of these 13 utilized an acute exercise protocol and 18 examined chronic exercise adaptations. Seventeen involved a study design incorporating an exercise stimulus, while the remaining 14 incorporated a combined exercise and diet stimulus. Divergent data relating to acute exercise, as well as prolonged exercise training (≥3 weeks), on protein content (PC) response was identified for proteins CD36, FABPpm and CAV1. Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) data did not always correspond to functional PC, supporting previous suggestions of a disconnect due to potentially limiting factors post gene expression. The large array of study designs, cohorts, and primary dependent variables within the studies included in the present review elucidate the complexity of the interaction between exercise and LCFA transport proteins. Summary of the results in the present review validate the need for further targeted investigation within this topic, and provide an important information base for such research. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1671-1687, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26638980

  9. Interactions between Human Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein and Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Selective Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Velkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs act as intracellular shuttles for fatty acids as well as lipophilic xenobiotics to the nucleus, where these ligands are released to a group of nuclear receptors called the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs. PPAR mediated gene activation is ultimately involved in maintenance of cellular homeostasis through the transcriptional regulation of metabolic enzymes and transporters that target the activating ligand. Here we show that liver- (L- FABP displays a high binding affinity for PPAR subtype selective drugs. NMR chemical shift perturbation mapping and proteolytic protection experiments show that the binding of the PPAR subtype selective drugs produces conformational changes that stabilize the portal region of L-FABP. NMR chemical shift perturbation studies also revealed that L-FABP can form a complex with the PPAR ligand binding domain (LBD of PPARα. This protein-protein interaction may represent a mechanism for facilitating the activation of PPAR transcriptional activity via the direct channeling of ligands between the binding pocket of L-FABP and the PPARαLBD. The role of L-FABP in the delivery of ligands directly to PPARα via this channeling mechanism has important implications for regulatory pathways that mediate xenobiotic responses and host protection in tissues such as the small intestine and the liver where L-FABP is highly expressed.

  10. Acidic Microenvironments in Waste Rock Characterized by Neutral Drainage: Bacteria–Mineral Interactions at Sulfide Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Dockrey

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial populations and microbe-mineral interactions were examined in waste rock characterized by neutral rock drainage (NRD. Samples of three primary sulfide-bearing waste rock types (i.e., marble-hornfels, intrusive, exoskarn were collected from field-scale experiments at the Antamina Cu–Zn–Mo mine, Peru. Microbial communities within all samples were dominated by neutrophilic thiosulfate oxidizing bacteria. However, acidophilic iron and sulfur oxidizers were present within intrusive waste rock characterized by bulk circumneutral pH drainage. The extensive development of microbially colonized porous Fe(III (oxyhydroxide and Fe(III (oxyhydroxysulfate precipitates was observed at sulfide-mineral surfaces during examination by field emission-scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (FE-SEM-EDS. Linear combination fitting of bulk extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS spectra for these precipitates indicated they were composed of schwertmannite [Fe8O8(OH6–4.5(SO41–1.75], lepidocrocite [γ-FeO(OH] and K-jarosite [KFe3(OH6(SO42]. The presence of schwertmannite and K-jarosite is indicative of the development of localized acidic microenvironments at sulfide-mineral surfaces. Extensive bacterial colonization of this porous layer and pitting of underlying sulfide-mineral surfaces suggests that acidic microenvironments can play an important role in sulfide-mineral oxidation under bulk circumneutral pH conditions. These findings have important implications for water quality management in NRD settings.

  11. CuO nanoparticles: Synthesis, characterization, optical properties and interaction with amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupric oxide (CuO) nanoparticles with an average size of 6 nm have been successfully prepared by an alcothermal method. The prepared CuO nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. A strong sharp emission under UV excitation is reported from the prepared CuO nanoparticles. The results show that the CuO nanoparticles have high dispersion and narrow size distribution. The fluorescence emission spectra display an intense sharp emission at 365 nm and weak broad intensity emission at 470 nm. Picosecond fluorescence measurements of the nanoparticles suggest bi-exponential function giving time constants of τ1 (330 ps, 94.21%) and τ2 (4.69 ns, 5.79%). In neutral and alkaline solutions, Zeta potential values of CuO nanoparticles are negative, due to the adsorption of COO- group via the coordination of bidentate. At low pH the zeta potential value is positive due to the increased potential of H+ ions in solution. Comparative UV-visible absorption experiments with the model amino acid compounds of positive and negative charges as arginine and aspartic acid, respectively confirmed the negative surface of CuO nanoparticles. The results should be extremely useful for understanding the mode of the interaction with biological systems. This binding process also affects the particle's behavior inside the body.

  12. Interactions between alpha-tocopherol, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and lipoxygenases during embryogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebold, Katie M; Traber, Maret G

    2013-01-01

    α-Tocopherol is a lipid-soluble antioxidant that is specifically required for reproduction and embryogenesis. However, since its discovery, α-tocopherol’s specific biologic functions, other than as an antioxidant, and the mechanism(s) mediating its requirement for embryogenesis, remain unknown. As an antioxidant, α-tocopherol protects polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) from lipid peroxidation. α-Tocopherol is likely required during embryonic development to protect PUFAs that are crucial to development, specifically arachidonic (ARA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids. Additionally, ARA and DHA are metabolized to bioactive lipid mediators via lipoxygenase enzymes and α-tocopherol may directly protect, or it may mediate the production and/or actions of these lipid mediators. In this review, we discuss how α-tocopherol 1) prevents the nonspecific, radical-mediated peroxidation of PUFAs, 2) functions within a greater antioxidant network to modulate the production and/or function of lipid mediators derived from 12- and 12/15-lipoxygenase and 3) modulates 5-lipoxygenase activity. The application and implication of such interactions with be discussed in the context α-tocopherol requirements during embryogenesis. PMID:23920314

  13. Ca and S K-edge XANES studies of calcite-acid mine water interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy metal-rich acidic waters (SO42-, AsO43-, SeO42-, Fe2+, Fe3+, Al3+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+) and related ochreous coatings are common around abandoned sulfide and coal mine sites. This is mainly caused by the natural weathering of pyrite (FeS2), arsenopyrite (FeAsS), and other metal sulfide containing shales. Acid generation in the case of pyrite can be explained by a general reaction: FeS2 + 3.5 O2 + H2O ↔ Fe2+ + SO42- + 2H+. Also, these low pH waters interact with the soils, and mobilize their soluble elements. One of the common remediation strategies is to allow these acid waters to react with limestone (CaCO3-rich rock) and neutralize the pH and precipitate out soluble metals. Yet, the associated problem is the precipitation of Fe and Al oxides and hydroxy sulfate coatings on limestone surfaces, which block calcite reactive sites, and make them ineffective a few hours after initiation of treatment. The main objectives of this research are to examine: (1) the chemistry of limestone surface coatings, and (2) their toxic metal uptake and the conditions that inhibit their formation. Previous molecular studies using X-ray diffraction, and vibrational spectroscopy on limestone surface coatings (sampled from Athens, OH) indicate that the surface-most layer (the layer in contact with water) is composed of schwertmannite (Fe(III)-hydroxy sulfate) like phases. However, white, X-ray amorphous; Al-, sulfate- and carbonate-rich; and Ca-poor phases appeared at the interface between the limestone and the iron oxide coatings. The structure, morphology, and coordination chemistry of component major and trace elements of these white precipitate phases have not previously been examined

  14. Study of the interactions between Eu(III) and Al2O3 particles in the presence of phenolic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of environmental pollution by radionuclides, this work was focused on the interactions occurring in systems containing europium(III) - as a chemical analogue for the actinides Am(III) and Cm(III) -, phenolic acids - lignin degradation products and anti-fungi, naturally occurring in soils, and alumina - representative of sorption sites found in the environment. This study was conducted at different scales of description: the macroscopic scale - to quantify Eu(III) and/or phenolic acids adsorption onto the mineral surface -, and the microscopic scale - to study the chemical environment of Eu(III) using Time-Resolved Luminescence Spectroscopy (TRLS). First, the binary systems, i.e. systems containing only two entities among the three previously cited, were characterized. Complexation constants of Eu(III) by three phenolic acids (4-hydroxybenzoic, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic, and 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acids) were determined and quantum calculations (DFT) were carried out on La(III)-acid complex analogues. Sorption of the acids onto aluminol sites was modelled using surface complexation concepts. Analyses of two ternary systems (containing 4-hydroxybenzoic and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acids) revealed synergistic processes for Eu(III) and phenolic acids sorption onto Al2O3. A spectral fingerprint of ternary complex involving Eu(III)/4-hydroxybenzoic acid/Al2O3 surface sites was evidenced. (author)

  15. Plagiarism in Grant Proposals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markin, Karen M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not news that software exists to check undergraduate papers for plagiarism. What is less well known is that some federal grant agencies are using technology to detect plagiarism in grant proposals. That variety of research misconduct is a growing problem, according to federal experts. The National Science Foundation, in its most recent…

  16. Retinoic acid, local cell-cell interactions, and pattern formation in vertebrate limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, S V; Gardiner, D M

    1992-07-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), a derivative of vitamin A, has remarkable effects on developing and regenerating limbs. These effects include teratogenesis, arising from RA's ability to inhibit growth and pattern formation. They also include pattern duplication, arising as a result of the stimulation of additional growth and pattern formation. In this review we present evidence that the diverse effects of RA are consistent with a singular, underlying explanation. We propose that in all cases exogenously applied RA causes the positional information of pattern formation-competent cells to be reset to a value that is posterior-ventral-proximal with respect to the limb. The diversity of outcomes can be seen as a product of the mode of application of exogenous RA (global versus local) coupled with the unifying concept that growth and pattern formation in both limb development and limb regeneration are controlled by local cell-cell interactions, as formulated in the polar coordinate model. We explore the possibility that the major role of endogenous RA in limb development is in the establishment of the limb field rather than as a diffusible morphogen that specifies graded positional information across the limb as previously proposed. Finally, we interpret the results of the recent finding that RA can turn tail regenerates into limbs, as evidence that intercalary interactions may also be involved in the formation of the primary body axis. PMID:1628749

  17. Spectroscopy characterization of the interaction between brevifolin carboxylic acid and bovine serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jianniao; Xie, Yuhuan; Zhao, Yanchun; Li, Caifeng; Zhao, Shulin

    2011-01-01

    Themechanism of binding of the antivirus drug, brevifolin carboxylic acid (BCA) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy under pseudo-physiological conditions for the first time. A strong fluorescence quenching was observed and the quenching mechanism was considered as static quenching. Various binding parameters were evaluated. The quantitative analysis of CD spectral data revealed that the a-helical content of BSA increased from 48.91% (in free BSA) to 52.46% (in bound form) in the presence of BCA. Based on the Förster's theory of non-radiation energy transfer, the relation of the binding average distance r between the donor (BSA) and acceptor (BCA) and acceptor concentration was determined. The changes in association constants of BCA-BSA in the presence of the common ions are also discussed. From the CD, FT-IR, time-resolved fluorescence and Raman spectroscopic results, it is apparent that the interaction of BCA with BSA causes a conformational change in the protein, and the Trp and Tyr residues are buried in more hydrophobic surroundings. BCA mainly binds to residue Trp 212 located in domain II of BSA by hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bond. PMID:20737652

  18. Study on the Mechanism of Interaction between Phthalate Acid Esters and Bovine Hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zhenxing; Zhao, Jing; You, Hong; Wang, Mingjing

    2016-08-01

    Phthalate acid esters (PAEs) are widely used in plastic products as a series of chemical softeners. However, PAEs, which now exist in many environmental media such as the atmosphere, water, and soil, have been shown to be environmental endocrine disruptors. Hemoglobin is a functional protein that carries oxygen in the red blood cells of animals. This study aims at revealing the interactions between bovine hemoglobin (BHb) and PAEs using spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods. The results indicate that the selected representative PAEs-dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), and dibutyl phthalate (DBP)-can interact with BHb to form BHb-PAE complexes with one binding site, mainly relying on hydrophobic forces, with the affinity order DMP > DEP > DBP, opposite to the order of side-chain length. The binding of PAEs can cause conformational and micro-environmental changes in BHb, which may affect the physiological functions of Hb. Furthermore, molecular docking was applied to define the specific binding sites, the results of which show that all the three PAEs can bind into the central cavity of BHb. The study contributes to expound the toxic mechanism of PAEs in vivo from the point of hematological toxicology. PMID:27379662

  19. Multivalent ion-mediated nucleic acid helix-helix interactions: RNA versus DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yuan-Yan; Zhang, Jin-Si; Zhu, Xiao-Long; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ion-mediated interaction is critical to the structure and stability of nucleic acids. Recent experiments suggest that the multivalent ion-induced aggregation of double-stranded (ds) RNAs and DNAs may strongly depend on the topological nature of helices, while there is still lack of an understanding on the relevant ion-mediated interactions at atomistic level. In this work, we have directly calculated the potentials of mean force (PMF) between two dsRNAs and between two dsDNAs in Cobalt Hexammine ion (Co-Hex) solutions by the atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Our calculations show that at low [Co-Hex], the PMFs between B-DNAs and between A-RNAs are both (strongly) repulsive.However, at high [Co-Hex], the PMF between B-DNAs is strongly attractive, while those between A-RNAs and between A-DNAs are still (weakly) repulsive. The microscopic analyses show that for A-form helices, Co-Hex would become internal binding into the deep major groove and consequently cannot form the evident ion-bridge between adjac...

  20. Four distances between pairs of amino acids provide a precise description of their interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Mati; Potapov, Vladimir; Schreiber, Gideon

    2009-08-01

    The three-dimensional structures of proteins are stabilized by the interactions between amino acid residues. Here we report a method where four distances are calculated between any two side chains to provide an exact spatial definition of their bonds. The data were binned into a four-dimensional grid and compared to a random model, from which the preference for specific four-distances was calculated. A clear relation between the quality of the experimental data and the tightness of the distance distribution was observed, with crystal structure data providing far tighter distance distributions than NMR data. Since the four-distance data have higher information content than classical bond descriptions, we were able to identify many unique inter-residue features not found previously in proteins. For example, we found that the side chains of Arg, Glu, Val and Leu are not symmetrical in respect to the interactions of their head groups. The described method may be developed into a function, which computationally models accurately protein structures. PMID:19680437

  1. Four distances between pairs of amino acids provide a precise description of their interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mati Cohen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional structures of proteins are stabilized by the interactions between amino acid residues. Here we report a method where four distances are calculated between any two side chains to provide an exact spatial definition of their bonds. The data were binned into a four-dimensional grid and compared to a random model, from which the preference for specific four-distances was calculated. A clear relation between the quality of the experimental data and the tightness of the distance distribution was observed, with crystal structure data providing far tighter distance distributions than NMR data. Since the four-distance data have higher information content than classical bond descriptions, we were able to identify many unique inter-residue features not found previously in proteins. For example, we found that the side chains of Arg, Glu, Val and Leu are not symmetrical in respect to the interactions of their head groups. The described method may be developed into a function, which computationally models accurately protein structures.

  2. Spectroscopic studies on the molecular interaction between salicylic acid and riboflavin (B2) in micellar solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between salicylic acid (SA) and riboflavin (RF) was studied by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) in micellar solution. The riboflavin strongly quenches the intrinsic fluorescence of SA by radiative energy transfer. The extent of energy transfer in sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) micellar solution of different concentration is quantified from the energy transfer efficiency data. It is seen that the energy transfer is more efficient in the micellar solution. The critical energy transfer distance (R0) was determined from which the mean distance between SA and RF molecules was calculated. The quenching was found to fit into Stern-Volmer relation. The results on variation of Stern-Volmer constant (Ksv) with quencher concentration obtained at different temperatures suggested the formation of complex between SA and RF. The association constant of complex formation was estimated and found to decrease with temperature. The values of thermodynamic parameters ΔH, ΔG and ΔS at different temperatures were estimated and the results indicated that the molecular interaction between SA and RF is electrostatic in nature.

  3. Ascorbic Acid and BSA Protein in Solution and Films: Interaction and Surface Morphological Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael R. G. Maciel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the study of the interactions between ascorbic acid (AA and bovine serum albumin (BSA in aqueous solution as well as in films (BSA/AA films prepared by the layer-by-layer technique. Regarding to solution studies, a hyperchromism (in the range of ultraviolet was found as a function of AA concentration, which suggested the formation of aggregates from AA and BSA. Binding constant, , determined for aggregates from BSA and AA was found to be about 102 M−1, which indicated low affinity of AA with BSA. For the BSA/AA films, it was also noted that the AA adsorption process and surface morphological structures depended on AA concentration. By changing the contact time between the AA and BSA, a hypochromism was revealed, which was associated to decrease of accessibility of solvent to tryptophan due to formation of aggregates. Furthermore, different morphological structures of aggregates were observed, which were attributed to the diffusion-limited aggregation. Since most of studies of interactions of drugs and proteins are performed in solution, the analysis of these processes by using films can be very valuable because this kind of system is able to employ several techniques of investigation in solid state.

  4. Interactions between ethylene, abscisic acid and cytokinin during germination and seedling establishment in Arabidopsis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Veeraputhiran Subbiah; Karingu Janardhan Reddy

    2010-09-01

    In order to investigate the interaction of the plant hormones ethylene, abscisic acid (ABA) and cytokinin in seed germination and early seedling development, we studied germination in ethylene-related mutants of Arabidopsis. Mutations in the genes etr1 and ein2, which reduce ethylene responses, showed increased dormancy and a delay in germination in comparison with wild type. Mutations in etr1, ein2 and ein6 also resulted in increased sensitivity to ABA with respect to inhibition of germination. Conversely, mutations in ctr1 and eto3, which lead to an increased ethylene response and overproduction of ethylene, respectively, decreased sensitivity to ABA during germination. Increased ABA sensitivity was also effected in wild type seeds by the presence during germination of AgNO3, an inhibitor of ethylene action. The addition of the cytokinin N-6 benzyl adenine (BA) reversed the increased sensitivity of ethylene-resistant mutants to ABA. The action of cytokinin in reversing increased ABA sensitivity of ethylene-resistant mutants also suggests that at least part of the action of cytokinin in promoting germination is independent of its role in stimulating ethylene production. These observations further extend the evidence in support of interaction between ethylene, ABA and cytokinin signalling in controlling seed germination and early seedling development in Arabidopsis.

  5. The interaction of zinc(II) and hydroxamic acids and a metal-triggered Lossen rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchácková, Lucie; Roithová, Jana

    2009-12-14

    The structure and reactivity of a complex of zinc(II), water, acetic acid, and acetohydroxamic acid, in which one of the acids is deprotonated, is investigated by means of mass spectrometry, labeling studies, and density functional calculations to unravel the exceptional binding properties of hydroxamic acids towards zinc-containing enzymes at the molecular level. It is shown that acetohydroxamic acid is deprotonated in the complex, whereas acetic acid is present in its neutral form. The binding energies of the ligands towards zinc increase in the following order: wateracidacid. The structure of the complex and its fragmentation provide experimental evidence for the proposed mode of operation of drugs based on hydroxamic acids. Furthermore, coordinatively unsaturated complexes of zinc and acetohydroxamic acid undergo a zinc-assisted Lossen rearrangement followed by elimination of water if acetohydroxamic acid is present as a neutral ligand, or by loss of methylisocyanate if acetohydroxamic acid is deprotonated. PMID:19937618

  6. Analysis of Protein–Protein Interactions in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 Cell Lines Using Phthalic Acid Chemical

    OpenAIRE

    Shih-Shin Liang; Tsu-Nai Wang; Eing-Mei Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Phthalates are a class of plasticizers that have been characterized as endocrine disrupters, and are associated with genital diseases, cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and nephrotoxicity in the GeneOntology gene/protein database. In this study, we synthesized phthalic acid chemical probes and demonstrated differing protein–protein interactions between MCF-7 cells and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Phthalic acid chemical probes were synthesized using silicon dioxide particle carriers, whi...

  7. Immunoregulatory Effects Triggered by Lactic Acid Bacteria Exopolysaccharides: New Insights into Molecular Interactions with Host Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Laiño

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have demonstrated that lactic acid bacteria (LAB with immunomodulatory capabilities (immunobiotics exert their beneficial effects through several molecules, including cell wall, peptidoglycan, and exopolysaccharides (EPS, that are able to interact with specific host cell receptors. EPS from LAB show a wide heterogeneity in its composition, meaning that biological properties depend on the strain and. therefore, only a part of the mechanism of action has been elucidated for these molecules. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the health-promoting actions of EPS from LAB with special focus on their immunoregulatory actions. In addition, we describe our studies using porcine intestinal epithelial cells (PIE cells as a model to evaluate the molecular interactions of EPS from two immunobiotic LAB strains and the host cells. Our studies showed that EPS from immunobiotic LAB have anti-inflammatory capacities in PIE cells since they are able to reduce the production of inflammatory cytokines in cells challenged with the Toll-like receptor (TLR-4-agonist lipopolysaccharide. The effects of EPS were dependent on TLR2, TLR4, and negative regulators of TLR signaling. We also reported that the radioprotective 105 (RP105/MD1 complex, a member of the TLR family, is partially involved in the immunoregulatory effects of the EPS from LAB. Our work described, for the first time, that LAB and their EPS reduce inflammation in intestinal epithelial cells in a RP105/MD1-dependent manner. A continuing challenge for the future is to reveal more effector-receptor relationships in immunobiotic-host interactions that contribute to the beneficial effects of these bacteria on mucosal immune homeostasis. A detailed molecular understanding should lead to a more rational use of immunobiotics in general, and their EPS in particular, as efficient prevention and therapies for specific immune-related disorders in humans and animals.

  8. Geothermal grant program for local governments: revised grant application manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-03-01

    This revised grant application manual describes the kinds of activities eligible for geothermal grants, who may apply, and how to apply. It also describes the criteria and procedures the California Energy Commission will use in selecting proposals for grant awards.

  9. Interactions of aqueous amino acids and proteins with the (110) surface of ZnS in molecular dynamics simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Nawrocki, Grzegorz; Cieplak, Marek

    2014-01-01

    The growing usage of nanoparticles of zinc sulfide as quantum dots and biosensors calls for a theoretical assessment of interactions of ZnS with biomolecules. We employ the molecular-dynamics-based umbrella sampling method to determine potentials of mean force for 20 single amino acids near the ZnS (110) surface in aqueous solutions. We find that five amino acids do not bind at all and the binding energy of the remaining amino acids does not exceed 4.3 kJ/mol. Such energies are comparable to ...

  10. Genetic and genotype × environment interaction effects for the content of seven essential amino acids in indica rice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. G. Wu; C. H. Shi; X. M. Zhang; T. Katsura

    2004-08-01

    It is necessary for rice breeders to understand the genetic basis of nutrient quality traits of rice. Essential amino acids are most important in determining the nutrient quality of rice grain and can affect the health of people who depend on rice as a staple food. In view of the paucity of genetic information available on essential amino acids in indica rice, we estimated the genetic main effects and genotype × environment (G × E) interaction effects on the content of essential amino acids. Nine cytoplasmic male sterile lines as females and five restorer lines as males were introduced in a North Carolina II design across environments. Estimates of the content of the essential amino acids valine, methionine, leucine and phenylalanine showed that they were mainly controlled by genetic main effects, while the contents of threonine, cysteine and isoleucine were mainly affected by G × E effects. In the case of genetic main effects, both cytoplasmic and maternal genetic effects were predominant for all essential amino acids, indicating that selection for improving essential amino acid content based on maternal performance would be more effective than that based on seeds. The total narrow-sense heritabilities were high and ranged from 0.72 to 0.83. Since general heritabilities for these essential amino acids (except for cysteine) were found to be much larger than G × E interaction heritability, the improvement of content of most essential amino acids under selection would be expected under various environments. Rice varieties such as Zhenan 3, Yinchao 1, T49, 26715, 102 and 1391 should be selected as optimal parents for increasing the content of most essential amino acids, while the total genetic effects from Zhexie 2, Xieqingzao, Gangchao 1, V20, Zuo 5 and Zhenshan 97 were mainly negative and these parents could decrease the contents of most essential amino acids.

  11. ATLAS PHd Grants 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcelloni De Oliveira, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS PHd Grants - We are excited to announce the creation of a dedicated grant scheme (thanks to a donation from Fabiola Gianotti and Peter Jenni following their award from the Fundamental Physics Prize foundation) to encourage young and high-caliber doctoral students in particle physics research (including computing for physics) and permit them to obtain world class exposure, supervision and training within the ATLAS collaboration. This special PhD Grant is aimed at graduate students preparing a doctoral thesis in particle physics (incl. computing for physics) to spend one year at CERN followed by one year support also at the home Institute.

  12. Wetland Program Development Grants (WPDGs)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Wetland Grant Database (WGD) houses grant data for Wetland Program Development Grants (created by EPA in 1990 under the Clean Water Act Section 104(b)(3)...

  13. Interaction of free fatty acids with mitochondria: coupling, uncoupling and permeability transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paola, Marco; Lorusso, Michele

    2006-01-01

    Long chain free fatty acids (FFA) exert, according to their actual concentration, different effects on the energy conserving system of mitochondria. Sub-micromolar concentrations of arachidonic acid (AA) rescue DeltapH-dependent depression of the proton pumping activity of the bc1 complex. This effect appears to be due to a direct interaction of AA with the proton-input mouth of the pump. At micromolar concentrations FFA increase the proton conductance of the inner membrane acting as protonophores. FFA can act as natural uncouplers, causing a mild uncoupling, which prevents reactive oxygen species production in the respiratory resting state. When Ca(2+)-loaded mitochondria are exposed to micromolar concentrations of FFA, the permeability of the inner membrane increases, resulting in matrix swelling, rupture of the outer membrane and release of intermembrane pro-apoptotic proteins. The characteristics of AA-induced swelling appear markedly different in mitochondria isolated from heart or liver. While in the latter it presents the canonical features of the classical permeability transition (PT), in heart mitochondria substantial differences are observed concerning CsA sensitivity, DeltaPsi dependence, reversibility by BSA and specificity for the activating divalent cation. In heart mitochondria, the AA-dependent increase of the inner membrane permeability is affected by ANT ligands such as adenine nucleotides and atractyloside. AA apparently causes a Ca2+-mediated conversion of ANT from a translocator to a channel system. Upon diamide treatment of heart mitochondria, the Ca2+/AA-induced CsA insensitive channel is converted into the classical PT pore. The relevance of these observations in terms of tissue-specific components of the putative PTP and heart ischemic and post-ischemic process is discussed. PMID:16697347

  14. Ca and S K-edge XANES studies of calcite-acid mine water interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myneni, S.C.B.; Perera, R.C.C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Heavy metal-rich acidic waters (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, AsO{sub 4}{sup 3{minus}}, SeO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, Fe{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Al{sup 3+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}) and related ochreous coatings are common around abandoned sulfide and coal mine sites. This is mainly caused by the natural weathering of pyrite (FeS{sub 2}), arsenopyrite (FeAsS), and other metal sulfide containing shales. Acid generation in the case of pyrite can be explained by a general reaction: FeS{sub 2} + 3.5 O{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O {leftrightarrow} Fe{sup 2+} + SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} + 2H{sup +}. Also, these low pH waters interact with the soils, and mobilize their soluble elements. One of the common remediation strategies is to allow these acid waters to react with limestone (CaCO{sub 3}-rich rock) and neutralize the pH and precipitate out soluble metals. Yet, the associated problem is the precipitation of Fe and Al oxides and hydroxy sulfate coatings on limestone surfaces, which block calcite reactive sites, and make them ineffective a few hours after initiation of treatment. The main objectives of this research are to examine: (1) the chemistry of limestone surface coatings, and (2) their toxic metal uptake and the conditions that inhibit their formation. Previous molecular studies using X-ray diffraction, and vibrational spectroscopy on limestone surface coatings (sampled from Athens, OH) indicate that the surface-most layer (the layer in contact with water) is composed of schwertmannite (Fe(III)-hydroxy sulfate) like phases. However, white, X-ray amorphous; Al-, sulfate- and carbonate-rich; and Ca-poor phases appeared at the interface between the limestone and the iron oxide coatings. The structure, morphology, and coordination chemistry of component major and trace elements of these white precipitate phases have not previously been examined.

  15. Physical and functional interactions between the serotonin transporter and the neutral amino acid transporter ASCT2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyer, Pascal; Vandermoere, Franck; Cassier, Elisabeth; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    The activity of serotonergic systems depends on the reuptake of extracellular serotonin via its plasma membrane serotonin [5-HT (5-hydroxytryptamine)] transporter (SERT), a member of the Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent solute carrier 6 family. SERT is finely regulated by multiple molecular mechanisms including its physical interaction with intracellular proteins. The majority of previously identified SERT partners that control its functional activity are soluble proteins, which bind to its intracellular domains. SERT also interacts with transmembrane proteins, but its association with other plasma membrane transporters remains to be established. Using a proteomics strategy, we show that SERT associates with ASCT2 (alanine-serine-cysteine-threonine 2), a member of the solute carrier 1 family co-expressed with SERT in serotonergic neurons and involved in the transport of small neutral amino acids across the plasma membrane. Co-expression of ASCT2 with SERT in HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells affects glycosylation and cell-surface localization of SERT with a concomitant reduction in its 5-HT uptake activity. Conversely, depletion of cellular ASCT2 by RNAi enhances 5-HT uptake in both HEK-293 cells and primary cultured mesencephalon neurons. Mimicking the effect of ASCT2 down-regulation, treatment of HEK-293 cells and neurons with the ASCT2 inhibitor D-threonine also increases 5-HT uptake. Moreover, D-threonine does not enhance further the maximal velocity of 5-HT uptake in cells depleted of ASCT2. Collectively, these findings provide evidence for a complex assembly involving SERT and a member of another solute carrier family, which strongly influences the subcellular distribution of SERT and the reuptake of 5-HT. PMID:27143784

  16. Interaction of antitumor alpha-lactalbumin-oleic acid complexes with artificial and natural membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherelova, Olga M; Kataev, Anatoly A; Grishchenko, Valery M; Knyazeva, Ekaterina L; Permyakov, Sergei E; Permyakov, Eugene A

    2009-06-01

    The specific complexes of human alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) with oleic acid (OA), HAMLET and LA-OA-17 (OA-complexes), possess cytotoxic activity against tumor cells but the mechanism of their cell penetration remains unclear. To explore the molecular mechanisms underlying interaction of the OA-complexes with the cell membrane, their interactions with small unilamellar dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles and electroexcitable plasma membrane of internodal native and perfused cells of the green alga Chara corallina have been studied. The fractionation (Sephadex G-200) of mixtures of the OA-complexes with the vesicles shows that OA-binding increases the affinity of alpha-LA to DPPC vesicles. Calcium association decreases protein affinity to the vesicles; the effect being less pronounced for LA-OA-17. The voltage clamp technique studies show that LA-OA-17, HAMLET, and their constituents produce different modifying effects on the plasmalemmal ionic channels of the Chara corallina cells. The irreversible binding of OA-complexes to the plasmalemma is accompanied by changes in the activation-inactivation kinetics of developing integral transmembrane currents, suppression of the Ca(2+) current and Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) current, and by increase in the nonspecific K(+) leakage currents. The latter reflects development of nonselective permeability of the plasma membrane. The HAMLET-induced effects on the plasmalemmal currents are less pronounced and potentiated by LA-OA-17. The control experiments with OA and intact alpha-LA show their qualitatively different and much less pronounced effects on the transmembrane ionic currents. Thus, the modification of alpha-LA by OA results in an increase in the protein association with the model lipid bilayer and in drastic irreversible changes in permeability of several types of the plasmalemmal ionic channels. PMID:19588235

  17. Photochemical interaction of ascorbic acid with riboflavin, nicotinamide and alpha-tocopherol in cream formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, I; Sheraz, M A; Ahmed, S; Bano, R; Vaid, F H M

    2012-04-01

    The present work is based on a study of the effect of some vitamins such as riboflavin (RF), nicotinamide (NA) and alpha-tocopherol (TP) on the photodegradation of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) (AH₂) in oil-in-water cream formulations using a UV irradiation source. A UV spectrophotometric and the official iodimetric methods have been used for the assay of AH₂ in cream formulations. These methods have been validated in the presence of RF, NA and TP before their application to the creams. The recoveries of AH₂ in the creams are in the range of 90-95% and the reproducibility of the method is within ±5%. The apparent first-order rate constants (k(obs) ) for the photodegradation of AH₂ in the presence of RF, NA and TP, individually, in the creams have been obtained. The second-order rate constants for the photochemical interaction of AH₂ and the vitamins RF, NA and TP have been determined from the plots of k(obs) for AH₂ photolysis versus the individual vitamin concentration along with the values of k₀ from the intercept on the vertical axis. The values of k₀ in the presence of RF and NA are lower than those of the k(obs) , indicating that these vitamins act as photosensitizers for the degradation of AH₂ in creams. On the contrary, the value of k₀ in the presence of TP is higher than that of the k(obs) , suggesting a stabilizing effect of this vitamin on the degradation of AH₂ in creams. The mode of interaction of the individual vitamins with AH₂ on photolysis has been discussed. PMID:22014159

  18. Non-covalent conjugates of single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid for interaction with cells overexpressing folate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Novoa, Leidy V.;

    2013-01-01

    We here present amethod to form a noncovalent conjugate of single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid aimed to interact with cells over-expressing folate receptors. The bonding was obtained without covalent chemical functionalization using a simple, rapid “one pot” synthesis method. The zeta p...

  19. US EPA CARE Grants

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is a provisional dataset that contains point locations for the subset of Community Action for a Renewed Environment (CARE) grants given out by the US EPA. CARE...

  20. Brownfields Grants Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This asset includes all types of information regarding Brownfields grant programs that subsidize/support Brownfield cleanup. This includes EPA's Brownfields Program...

  1. US EPA EJ Grants

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is a provisional dataset that contains point locations for all Environmental Justice (EJ) grants given out by the US EPA. There are many limitations to the...

  2. The Agriculture Grants Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogmann, David W.; Key, Joe

    1981-01-01

    Reviews historical background surrounding the origins of the Competitive Research Grants Office, established in 1978 to support basic research related to agriculture. Describes current controversy within the legislature which threatens its existence. (CS)

  3. Administrative Discretionary Grant Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — This dataset of administrative records contains discretionary grant recipients who were awarded funds by the Institute of Museum and Library Services from fiscal...

  4. Comparison of the nature of interactions of two sialic acid specific lectins Saraca indica and Sambucus nigra with N-acetylneuraminic acid by spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singha, Shuvendu [Department of Natural Science, West Bengal University of Technology, Kolkata 700064 (India); Department of Chemistry, Jadavpur University, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Bose, Partha P. [Department of Biotechnology, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER), Hajipur 844101 (India); Ganguly, Tapan [School of Laser Science and Engineering, Jadavpur University, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Campana, Patricia T. [Escola de Artes, Ciências e Humanidades, Universidade de São Paulo, 03828-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Ghosh, Rina [Department of Chemistry, Jadavpur University, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Chatterjee, Bishnu P., E-mail: cbishnup@gmail.com [Department of Natural Science, West Bengal University of Technology, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2015-04-15

    The present paper deals with the isolation and purification of a new sialic acid binding lectin from the seed integument of Saraca indica (Ashok) and the purified lectin was designated Saracin II. Comparative studies on the interactions of saracin II and another sialic acid specific lectin Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) with N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) were made using UV–vis absorption, steady state and time resolved fluorescence along with circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to reveal the nature and mechanisms of binding of these two lectins with NANA. The experimental observations obtained from UV–vis, steady state and time resolved fluorescence measurements demonstrated that SNA–NANA system formed relatively stronger ground state complex than saracin II–NANA pair. CD measurements further substantiated the propositions made from steady state and time resolved spectroscopic investigations. It was inferred that during interaction of SNA with NANA, the lectin adopted a relatively looser conformation with the extended polypeptide structures leading to the exposure of the hydrophobic cavities which favoured stronger binding with NANA. - Highlights: • Of the two lectins, stronger binding of SNA with NANA is observed. • Full exposure of the hydrophobic cavities of SNA favors the stronger interactions. • Saracin II can be used for the new generation of lectin based-therapeutics.

  5. Interaction of aconitine with bovine serum albumin and effect of atropine sulphate and glycyrrhizic acid on the binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of aconitine with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and effect of atropine sulphate and glycyrrhizic acid on binding constant, binding sites, and conformation were studied in an aqueous buffer solution (pH 7.40) by ultraviolet absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The study results show that aconitine quenched the endogenous fluorescence of BSA via a dynamic quenching procedure. Predominant intermolecular forces between aconitine and BSA were hydrophobic interactions, which stabilized the complex of aconitine–BSA. The distance between the donor and acceptor was 2.62 nm. The conformation of BSA was investigated by synchronous fluorescence techniques, indicating that the microenvironment around tryptophan (Trp) residues was changed. Furthermore, with the addition of atropine sulphate or glycyrrhizic acid, binding constant and the number of binding sites of aconitine to BSA were decreased, and the conformation had no change, which provide an important theoretical support for aconitine detoxification by atropine sulphate and glycyrrhizic acid. - Highlights: ► Effect of atropine or glycyrrhizic acid on aconitine–BSA binding. ► UV–vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques used. ► Aconitine quenched BSA fluorescence via dynamic quenching with r=2.62 nm. ► Atropine sulphate and glycyrrhizic acid decreased KA and n of aconitine–BSA. ► Support for aconitine detoxification by atropine and glycyrrhizic acid.

  6. Rotavirus nonstructural protein 1 antagonizes innate immune response by interacting with retinoic acid inducible gene I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Lan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nonstructural protein 1 (NSP1 of rotavirus has been reported to block interferon (IFN signaling by mediating proteasome-dependent degradation of IFN-regulatory factors (IRFs and (or the β-transducin repeat containing protein (β-TrCP. However, in addition to these targets, NSP1 may subvert innate immune responses via other mechanisms. Results The NSP1 of rotavirus OSU strain as well as the IRF3 binding domain truncated NSP1 of rotavirus SA11 strain are unable to degrade IRFs, but can still inhibit host IFN response, indicating that NSP1 may target alternative host factor(s other than IRFs. Overexpression of NSP1 can block IFN-β promoter activation induced by the retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I, but does not inhibit IFN-β activation induced by the mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS, indicating that NSP1 may target RIG-I. Immunoprecipitation experiments show that NSP1 interacts with RIG-I independent of IRF3 binding domain. In addition, NSP1 induces down-regulation of RIG-I in a proteasome-independent way. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that inhibition of RIG-I mediated type I IFN responses by NSP1 may contribute to the immune evasion of rotavirus.

  7. Reactive oxygen species, abscisic acid and ethylene interact to regulate sunflower seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Sajjad, Yasar; Bazin, Jérémie; Langlade, Nicolas; Cristescu, Simona M; Balzergue, Sandrine; Baudouin, Emmanuel; Bailly, Christophe

    2015-02-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seed dormancy is regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and can be alleviated by incubating dormant embryos in the presence of methylviologen (MV), a ROS-generating compound. Ethylene alleviates sunflower seed dormancy whereas abscisic acid (ABA) represses germination. The purposes of this study were to identify the molecular basis of ROS effect on seed germination and to investigate their possible relationship with hormone signalling pathways. Ethylene treatment provoked ROS generation in embryonic axis whereas ABA had no effect on their production. The beneficial effect of ethylene on germination was lowered in the presence of antioxidant compounds, and MV suppressed the inhibitory effect of ABA. MV treatment did not alter significantly ethylene nor ABA production during seed imbibition. Microarray analysis showed that MV treatment triggered differential expression of 120 probe sets (59 more abundant and 61 less abundant genes), and most of the identified transcripts were related to cell signalling components. Many transcripts less represented in MV-treated seeds were involved in ABA signalling, thus suggesting an interaction between ROS and ABA signalling pathways at the transcriptional level. Altogether, these results shed new light on the crosstalk between ROS and plant hormones in seed germination. PMID:24811898

  8. Factors affecting the interactions between beta-lactoglobulin and fatty acids as revealed in molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Changhong; Wambo, Thierry O

    2015-09-21

    Beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), a bovine dairy protein, is a promiscuously interacting protein that can bind multiple hydrophobic ligands. Fatty acids (FAs), common hydrophobic molecules bound to BLG, are important sources of fuel for life because they yield large quantities of ATP when metabolized. The binding affinity increases with the length of the ligands, indicating the importance of the van der Waals (vdW) interactions between the hydrocarbon tail and the hydrophobic calyx of BLG. An exception to this rule is caprylic acid (OCA) which is two-carbon shorter but has a stronger binding affinity than capric acid. Theoretical calculations in the current literature are not accurate enough to shed light on the underlying physics of this exception. The computed affinity values are greater for longer fatty acids without respect for the caprylic exception and those values are generally several orders of magnitude away from the experimental data. In this work, we used hybrid steered molecular dynamics to accurately compute the binding free energies between BLG and the five saturated FAs of 8 to 16 carbon atoms. The computed binding free energies agree well with experimental data not only in rank but also in absolute values. We gained insights into the exceptional behavior of caprylic acid in the computed values of entropy and electrostatic interactions. We found that the electrostatic interaction between the carboxyl group of caprylic acid and the two amino groups of K60/69 in BLG is much stronger than the vdW force between the OCA's hydrophobic tail and the BLG calyx. This pulls OCA to the top of the beta barrel where it is easier to fluctuate, giving rise to greater entropy of OCA at the binding site. PMID:26272099

  9. Interaction of americium (III) with humic acids and two synthetic analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a recent series of studies on complexation of Am3+ with humic acids and some analogues are summarized and the experimental procedures and method for data analysis applied are presented. The samples are: LBHA(mud-derived humic acid), BHA (humic acid from coastal marine sediments), ALHA (commercial humic acid), SHA (synthetic humic acid), and PMA (poly(maleic) acid). LBHA is the most extensively studied for actinide binding of this group of ligands. Comparison is made of the metal-binding properties of the BHA and ALHA humic acids with those of LBHA to learn the applicability of the results for a particular humic acid, LBHA, to others of different origin. SHA and PMA are often employed in metal-binding and other studies as analogues of natural humic acid. These analogues have a more regular structure and their data may be easier to interpret. Optical spectroscopy, potentiometric titration, and solvent extraction are used in the investigations. The present study supports with qualifications the similarity in actinide binding by humic acids of different origin. It has also indicated that the synthetic humic acid is a suitable analog of natural humic acids for actinide binding studies while PMA more closely mimics a fulvic acid. (N.K.)

  10. Site and chirality selective chemical modifications of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) via Lewis acid-base interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Rajashabala; Scheiner, Steve; Roy, Ajit K; Kar, Tapas

    2015-02-01

    The pristine BNNTs contain both Lewis acid (boron) and Lewis base (nitrogen) centers at their surface. Interactions of ammonia and borane molecules, representatives of Lewis base and acid as adsorbates respectively, with matching sites at the surface of BNNTs, have been explored in the present DFT study. Adsorption energies suggest stronger chemisorption (about 15-20 kcal mol(-1)) of borane than ammonia (about 5-10 kcal mol(-1)) in both armchair (4,4) and zigzag (8,0) variants of the tube. NH3 favors (8,0) over the (4,4) tube, whereas BH3 exhibits the opposite preference, indicating some chirality dependence on acid-base interactions. A new feature of bonding is found in BH3/AlH3-BNNTs (at the edge site) complexes, where one hydrogen of the guest molecule is involved in three-center two-electron bonding, in addition to dative covalent bond (N: → B). This interaction causes a reversal of electron flow from borane/alane to BNNT, making the tube an electron acceptor, suggesting tailoring of electronic properties could be possible by varying strength of incoming Lewis acids. On the contrary, BNNTs always behave as electron acceptor in ammonia complexes. IR, XPS and NMR spectra show some characteristic features of complexes and can help experimentalists to identify not only structures of such complexes but also the location of the guest molecules and design second functionalizations. Interaction with several other neutral BF3, BCl3, BH2CH3 and ionic CH3(+) acids as well as amino group (CH3NH2 and NH2COOH) were also studied. The strongest interaction (>100 kcal mol(-1)) is found in BNNT-CH3(+) complexes and H-bonds are the only source of stability of NH2COOH-BNNT complexes. PMID:25559141

  11. Preferential hydrophobic interactions are responsible for a preference of D-amino acids in the aminoacylation of 5'-AMP with hydrophobic amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, J. C. Jr; Wickramasinghe, N. S.; Sabatini, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the chemistry of aminoacyl AMP to model reactions at the 3' terminus of aminoacyl tRNA for the purpose of understanding the origin of protein synthesis. The present studies relate to the D, L preference in the esterification of 5'-AMP. All N-acetyl amino acids we studied showed faster reaction of the D-isomer, with a generally decreasing preference for D-isomer as the hydrophobicity of the amino acid decreased. The beta-branched amino acids, Ile and Val, showed an extreme preference for D-isomer. Ac-Leu, the gamma-branched amino acid, showed a slightly low D/L ratio relative to its hydrophobicity. The molecular basis for these preferences for D-isomer is understandable in the light of our previous studies and seems to be due to preferential hydrophobic interaction of the D-isomer with adenine. The preference for hydrophobic D-amino acids can be decreased by addition of an organic solvent to the reaction medium. Conversely, peptidylation with Ac-PhePhe shows a preference for the LL isomer over the DD isomer.

  12. A Simulation of the Interaction of Acid Rain with Soil Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Amber L.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Leber, Phyllis A.; Yoder, Claude H.

    2004-01-01

    The atmospheric issue of acid rains is subjected to a five-part laboratory experiment by concentrating on the chemistry of the infiltration process of acid rainwater through soils. This procedure of quantitative scrutiny helps students realize the efficacy of soil minerals in the consumption of surplus acidity in rainwater.

  13. Stability and interactions in mixed monolayers of fatty acid derivatives on artificial sea water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brzozowska, A.M.; Mugele, F.; Duits, M.H.G.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the formation and stability of fatty acid and derivatives films on aqueous sub-phases by means of Langmuir trough experiments. Films were prepared from pure stearic acid (SA), stearyl amine (SAm) and 12-phenyldodecanoic acid (PDA), and from binary systems of SA with either SAm or PDA. For

  14. Interactions of acetylcholinesterase with salvianolic acid B and rosmarinic acid from Salvia miltiorhiza water extract investigated by NMR relaxation rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Wei Yin; Yi Ming Li; Wei Wei; Shan Hao Jiang; Da Yuan Zhu; Wei Hong Du

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand whether the ameliorating effect on old ages memory disorder by the root of Salvia miltiorhiza is related to the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, two main ingredients, salvianolic acid B (1) and rosmarinic acid (2), which were isolated from S. Miltiorhiza water extract, were investigated in vitro by NMR relaxation rate in this work. The results showed that the proton selective relaxation rates and the molecular rotational correlation time of proton pairs for compounds 1 and 2 increased significantly by adding of AChE in mixing solution. The study reveals that the two compounds might bind to the enzyme and have AChE inhibitory effect, which could contribute to the ameliorating effect at some extent on old ages memory disorder.

  15. Control of Paip1-eukayrotic translation initiation factor 3 interaction by amino acids through S6 kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martineau, Yvan; Wang, Xiaoshan; Alain, Tommy; Petroulakis, Emmanuel; Shahbazian, David; Fabre, Bertrand; Bousquet-Dubouch, Marie-Pierre; Monsarrat, Bernard; Pyronnet, Stéphane; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2014-03-01

    The simultaneous interaction of poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) with eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and the mRNA 3' poly(A) tail promotes translation initiation. We previously showed that the interaction of PABP-interacting protein 1 (Paip1) with PABP and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 (eIF3; via the eIF3g subunit) further stimulates translation. Here, we demonstrate that the interaction of eIF3 with Paip1 is regulated by amino acids through the mTORC1 signaling pathway. The Paip1-eIF3 interaction is impaired by the mTORC1 inhibitors, rapamycin and PP242. We show that ribosomal protein S6 kinases 1 and 2 (S6K1/2) promote the interaction of eIF3 with Paip1. The enhancement of Paip1-eIF3 interaction by amino acids is abrogated by an S6K inhibitor or shRNA against S6K1/2. S6K1 interacts with eIF3f and, in vitro, phosphorylates eIF3. Finally, we show that S6K inhibition leads to a reduction in translation by Paip1. We propose that S6K1/2 phosphorylate eIF3 to stimulate Paip1-eIF3 interaction and consequent translation initiation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that eIF3 is a new translation target of the mTOR/S6K pathway. PMID:24396066

  16. Analysis of Protein–Protein Interactions in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 Cell Lines Using Phthalic Acid Chemical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Shin Liang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Phthalates are a class of plasticizers that have been characterized as endocrine disrupters, and are associated with genital diseases, cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and nephrotoxicity in the GeneOntology gene/protein database. In this study, we synthesized phthalic acid chemical probes and demonstrated differing protein–protein interactions between MCF-7 cells and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Phthalic acid chemical probes were synthesized using silicon dioxide particle carriers, which were modified using the silanized linker 3-aminopropyl triethoxyslane (APTES. Incubation with cell lysates from breast cancer cell lines revealed interactions between phthalic acid and cellular proteins in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Subsequent proteomics analyses indicated 22 phthalic acid-binding proteins in both cell types, including heat shock cognate 71-kDa protein, ATP synthase subunit beta, and heat shock protein HSP 90-beta. In addition, 21 MCF-7-specific and 32 MDA-MB-231 specific phthalic acid-binding proteins were identified, including related proteasome proteins, heat shock 70-kDa protein, and NADPH dehydrogenase and ribosomal correlated proteins, ras-related proteins, and members of the heat shock protein family, respectively.

  17. Lactic acid induces aberrant amyloid precursor protein processing by promoting its interaction with endoplasmic reticulum chaperone proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwen Xiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lactic acid, a natural by-product of glycolysis, is produced at excess levels in response to impaired mitochondrial function, high-energy demand, and low oxygen availability. The enzyme involved in the production of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ of Alzheimer's disease, BACE1, functions optimally at lower pH, which led us to investigate a potential role of lactic acid in the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Lactic acid increased levels of Aβ40 and 42, as measured by ELISA, in culture medium of human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y, whereas it decreased APP metabolites, such as sAPPα. In cell lysates, APP levels were increased and APP was found to interact with ER-chaperones in a perinuclear region, as determined by co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence microscopy studies. Lactic acid had only a very modest effect on cellular pH, did increase the levels of ER chaperones Grp78 and Grp94 and led to APP aggregate formation reminiscent of aggresomes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that sustained elevations in lactic acid levels could be a risk factor in amyloidogenesis related to Alzheimer's disease through enhanced APP interaction with ER chaperone proteins and aberrant APP processing leading to increased generation of amyloid peptides and APP aggregates.

  18. Spectroscopic investigation of the interaction between β cyclodextrin and p-aminobenzoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Conventional drugs are usually formulated for the immediate release of the medicinal substances and for obtaining the desired therapeutic effect. A series of researches will conduct in the field of controlled drug release (release of vitamin included in cyclodextrin). Para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA or vitamin B10) is an intermediate in bacterial synthesis of folate, the in the are capable of synthesizing (an important factor in the protein use) from this , and humans lack this . PABA is sometimes marketed as an for use whenever normal PABA synthesis by is insufficient. The is used as a UV filter in sunscreen formulations, as a drug against fibrotic disorders, in treating irritable bowel syndrome. Through controlled release, these systems ensure control of the release and of the absorption of the medicinal substances from the respective system. The aim of this paper was to investigate the possible interactions between PABA and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), to determine the physical-chemical characteristics and the interactions present in the corresponding inclusion compound. The inclusion compounds were prepared by co precipitation, kneading and freeze-drying methods. The so-obtained compounds were characterized by X-ray diffraction, DSC and FTIR spectroscopy. 1H NMR and UV-vis spectroscopic methods were employed to study the inclusion process in aqueous solution. The X-ray powder diffraction patterns demonstrate the inclusion compound formation, especially for the lyophilized product where the amorphous phase dominates. The existence of the inclusion compounds obtained by different methods was confirmed by comparing with DSC and FTIR data of the pure compounds and the (1:1) PABA:β-CD physical mixture. 1H NMR measurements on (1:1) aqueous solution of PABA in D2O allowed us to establish the corresponding PABA's and cyclodextrin's protons implied in the complexation process. 1H NMR and UV-vis data allowed us to obtain the stoichiometry

  19. Ginseng pharmacology: a new paradigm based on gintonin-lysophosphatidic acid receptor interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Yeol eNah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ginseng, the root of Panax ginseng, is used as a traditional medicine. Despite the long history of the use of ginseng, there is no specific scientific or clinical rationale for ginseng pharmacology besides its application as a general tonic. The ambiguous description of ginseng pharmacology might be due to the absence of a predominant active ingredient that represents ginseng pharmacology. Recent studies show that ginseng abundantly contains lysophosphatidic acids (LPAs, which are phospholipid-derived growth factor with diverse biological functions including those claimed to be exhibited by ginseng. LPAs in ginseng form a complex with ginseng proteins, which can bind and deliver LPA to its cognate receptors with a high affinity. As a first messenger, gintonin produces second messenger Ca2+ via G protein-coupled LPA receptors. Ca2+ is an intracellular mediator of gintonin and initiates a cascade of amplifications for further intercellular communications by activation of Ca2+-dependent kinases, receptors, gliotransmitter and neurotransmitter release. Ginsenosides, which have been regarded as primary ingredients of ginseng, cannot elicit intracellular [Ca2+]i transients, since they lack specific cell surface receptor. However, ginsenosides exhibit non-specific ion channel and receptor regulations. This is the key characteristic that distinguishes gintonin from ginsenosides. Although the current discourse on ginseng pharmacology is focused on ginsenosides, gintonin can definitely provide a mode of action for ginseng pharmacology that ginsenosides cannot. This review article introduces a novel concept of ginseng ligand-LPA receptor interaction and proposes to establish a paradigm that shifts the focus from ginsenosides to gintonin as a major ingredient representing ginseng pharmacology.

  20. APPLICATION OF THE HARD AND SOFT, ACIDS AND BASES (HSAB) THEORY TO TOXICANT-TARGET INTERACTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPachin, Richard M.; Gavin, Terrence; DeCaprio, Anthony; Barber, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Many chemical toxicants and/or their active metabolites are electrophiles that cause cell injury by forming covalent bonds with nucleophilic targets on biological macromolecules. Covalent reactions between nucleophilic and electrophilic reagents are however discriminatory, since there is a significant degree of selectivity associated with these interactions. Over the course of the past few decades, the theory of Hard and Soft, Acid and Bases (HSAB) has proven to be a useful tool in predicting the outcome of such reactions. This concept utilizes the inherent electronic characteristic of polarizability to define, for example, reacting electrophiles and nucleophiles as either hard or soft. These HSAB definitions have been successfully applied to chemical-induced toxicity in biological systems. Thus, according to this principle, a toxic electrophile reacts preferentially with biological targets of similar hardness or softness. The soft/hard classification of a xenobiotic electrophile has obvious utility in discerning plausible biological targets and molecular mechanisms of toxicity. The purpose of this Perspective is to discuss the HSAB theory of electrophiles and nucleophiles within a toxicological framework. In principle, covalent bond formation can be described by using the properties of their outermost or frontier orbitals. Because these orbital energies for most chemicals can be calculated using quantum mechanical models, it is possible to quantify the relative softness (σ) or hardness (η) of electrophiles or nucleophiles and to subsequently convert this information into useful indices of reactivity. This atomic level information can provide insight into the design of corroborative laboratory research and thereby help investigators discern corresponding molecular sites and mechanisms of toxicant action. The use of HSAB parameters has also been instrumental in the development and identification of potential nucleophilic cytoprotectants that can scavenge toxic

  1. Application of the Hard and Soft, Acids and Bases (HSAB) theory to toxicant--target interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopachin, Richard M; Gavin, Terrence; Decaprio, Anthony; Barber, David S

    2012-02-20

    Many chemical toxicants and/or their active metabolites are electrophiles that cause cell injury by forming covalent bonds with nucleophilic targets on biological macromolecules. Covalent reactions between nucleophilic and electrophilic reagents are, however, discriminatory since there is a significant degree of selectivity associated with these interactions. Over the course of the past few decades, the theory of Hard and Soft, Acids and Bases (HSAB) has proven to be a useful tool in predicting the outcome of such reactions. This concept utilizes the inherent electronic characteristic of polarizability to define, for example, reacting electrophiles and nucleophiles as either hard or soft. These HSAB definitions have been successfully applied to chemical-induced toxicity in biological systems. Thus, according to this principle, a toxic electrophile reacts preferentially with biological targets of similar hardness or softness. The soft/hard classification of a xenobiotic electrophile has obvious utility in discerning plausible biological targets and molecular mechanisms of toxicity. The purpose of this perspective is to discuss the HSAB theory of electrophiles and nucleophiles within a toxicological framework. In principle, covalent bond formation can be described by using the properties of their outermost or frontier orbitals. Because these orbital energies for most chemicals can be calculated using quantum mechanical models, it is possible to quantify the relative softness (σ) or hardness (η) of electrophiles or nucleophiles and to subsequently convert this information into useful indices of reactivity. This atomic level information can provide insight into the design of corroborative laboratory research and thereby help investigators discern corresponding molecular sites and mechanisms of toxicant action. The use of HSAB parameters has also been instrumental in the development and identification of potential nucleophilic cytoprotectants that can scavenge toxic

  2. Identification of Interactions between Abscisic Acid and Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek M Galka

    Full Text Available Abscisic acid ((+-ABA is a phytohormone involved in the modulation of developmental processes and stress responses in plants. A chemical proteomics approach using an ABA mimetic probe was combined with in vitro assays, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, x-ray crystallography and in silico modelling to identify putative (+-ABA binding-proteins in crude extracts of Arabidopsis thaliana. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco was identified as a putative ABA-binding protein. Radiolabelled-binding assays yielded a Kd of 47 nM for (+-ABA binding to spinach Rubisco, which was validated by ITC, and found to be similar to reported and experimentally derived values for the native ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP substrate. Functionally, (+-ABA caused only weak inhibition of Rubisco catalytic activity (Ki of 2.1 mM, but more potent inhibition of Rubisco activation (Ki of ~ 130 μM. Comparative structural analysis of Rubisco in the presence of (+-ABA with RuBP in the active site revealed only a putative low occupancy (+-ABA binding site on the surface of the large subunit at a location distal from the active site. However, subtle distortions in electron density in the binding pocket and in silico docking support the possibility of a higher affinity (+-ABA binding site in the RuBP binding pocket. Overall we conclude that (+-ABA interacts with Rubisco. While the low occupancy (+-ABA binding site and weak non-competitive inhibition of catalysis may not be relevant, the high affinity site may allow ABA to act as a negative effector of Rubisco activation.

  3. The different interactions of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides with two strawberry varieties and the involvement of salicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-Yu; Zhang, Li-Qing; Song, Li-Li; Duan, Ke; Li, Na; Wang, Yan-Xiu; Gao, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The disease symptoms recognized as 'Anthracnose' are caused by Colletotrichum spp. and lead to large-scale strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa Duchesne) losses worldwide in terms of both quality and production. Little is known regarding the mechanisms underlying the genetic variations in the strawberry-Colletotrichum spp. interaction. In this work, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (C. gloeosporioides) infection was characterized in two varieties exhibiting different susceptibilities, and the involvement of salicylic acid (SA) was examined. Light microscopic observation showed that C. gloeosporioides conidia germinated earlier and faster on the leaf surface of the susceptible cultivar compared with the less-susceptible cultivar. Several PR genes were differentially expressed, with higher-amplitude changes observed in the less-susceptible cultivar. The less-susceptible cultivar contained a higher level of basal SA, and the SA levels increased rapidly upon infection, followed by a sharp decrease before the necrotrophic phase. External SA pretreatment reduced susceptibility and elevated the internal SA levels in both varieties, which were sharply reduced in the susceptible cultivar upon inoculation. The less-susceptible cultivar also displayed a more sensitive and marked increase in the transcripts of NB-LRR genes to C. gloeosporioides, and SA pretreatment differentially induced transcript accumulation in the two varieties during infection. Furthermore, SA directly inhibited the germination of C. gloeosporioides conidia; NB-LRR transcript accumulation in response to SA pretreatment was both dose- and cultivar-dependent. The results demonstrate that the less-susceptible cultivar showed reduced conidia germination. The contribution of SA might involve microbial isolate-specific sensitivity to SA, cultivar/tissue-specific SA homeostasis and signaling, and the sensitivity of R genes and the related defense network to SA and pathogens. PMID:27004126

  4. A theoretical study on the interaction of aromatic amino acids with graphene and single walled carbon nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Chinagandham; Majumder, Chiranjib; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2009-03-28

    In this study we have investigated the interaction of phenylalanine (Phe), histidine (His), tyrosine (Tyr), and tryptophan (Tryp) molecules with graphene and single walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with an aim to understand the effect of curvature on the non-covalent interaction. The calculations are performed using density functional theory and the Moller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (MP2) within linear combination of atomic orbitals-molecular orbital (LCAO-MO) approach. Using these methods, the equilibrium configurations of these complexes were found to be very similar, i.e., the aromatic rings of the amino acids prefer to orient in parallel with respect to the plane of the substrates, which bears the signature of weak pi-pi interactions. The binding strength follows the trend: Hisinteractions, we have calculated the polarizability of the aromatic motifs of the amino acids. Remarkably, we find excellent correlation between the polarizability and the strength of the interaction; the higher the polarizability, greater is the binding strength. Moreover, we have analyzed the electronic densities of state spectrum before and after adsorption of the amino acid moieties. The results reveal that the Fermi level of the free CNT is red-shifted by the adsorption of the amino acids and the degree of shift is consistent with the trend in polarizability of these molecules. PMID:19334893

  5. Investigations of (acid+base) equilibria in systems modelling interactions occurring in biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using the potentiometric microtitration method, acidity constants, Ka, anionic, KAHA-, and cationic, KBHB+, homoconjugation constants, as well as molecular heteroconjugation, KBHA, constants have been determined in (acid+base) systems formed by the following compounds: acetic acid, phenol, n-butylamine, imidazole, and 4(5)-methylimidazole. These compounds constitute fragments of the side chains of amino acids capable of proton exchange in active sites of enzymes. The (acid+base) equilibria were studied in five polar solvents of different properties, namely in aprotic protophobic acetonitrile, acetone and propylene carbonate, in aprotic protophilic dimethyl sulfoxide and in amphiprotic methanol. The lowest values of the acidity constants of the molecular and cationic acids have been found in aprotic protophobic polar solvents - acetonitrile, propylene carbonate and acetone. Their acid strength have been found to depend on solvent basicity expressed as donor numbers, DN. These media, in particular acetonitrile and acetone, are also favourable for establishing molecular homo- and heteroconjugation equilibria. The most stable homocomplexes are formed in the case of acetic acid (KAHA- values range from 2.26 to 3.56 in these media, being more than an order of magnitude higher than those for the remaining compounds). The magnitudes of lgKBHA reveal that the most stable heterocomplexes are formed by n-butylamine and acetic acid that are characterized by the smallest differences in pKa values

  6. Corrosion inhibitor binding in an acidic medium: Interaction of 2-mercaptobenizmidazole with carbon-steel in hydrochloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Carbon-steel inhibited by 2-mercaptobenzimidazole in 1 M HCl is examined with XPS. • Data reveal surface termination as a function of corrosion inhibitor concentration. • N 1s spectra suggest that 2-mercaptobenzimidazole adsorbs in two tautomeric forms. • For well-inhibited substrates, adsorption is on film-free carbon-steel. • 2-Mercaptobenzimidazole apparently binds preferentially to active corrosion sites. - Abstract: Mechanistic understanding of the functionality of organic corrosion inhibitors in acidic media is essential to knowledge-based performance optimization. In this study, we address a key issue hindering progress in this area, namely the chemical nature of the corrosion inhibitor/substrate interface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is employed to reveal the surface termination of carbon-steel, following immersion in 1 M hydrochloric acid inhibited with 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI). Core level spectra indicate that the termination varies as a function of MBI concentration, with the interface consisting of MBI bound to film-free carbon-steel on highly inhibited substrates

  7. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of (lyso)phosphatidic acids, (lyso)phosphatidylserines and other lipid classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cífková, Eva; Hájek, Roman; Lísa, Miroslav; Holčapek, Michal

    2016-03-25

    The goal of this work is a systematic optimization of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) separation of acidic lipid classes (namely phosphatidic acids-PA, lysophosphatidic acids-LPA, phosphatidylserines-PS and lysophosphatidylserines-LPS) and other lipid classes under mass spectrometry (MS) compatible conditions. The main parameters included in this optimization are the type of stationary phases used in HILIC, pH of the mobile phase, the type and concentration of mobile phase additives. Nine HILIC columns with different chemistries (unmodified silica, modified silica using diol, 2-picolylamine, diethylamine and 1-aminoanthracene and hydride silica) are compared with the emphasis on peak shapes of acidic lipid classes. The optimization of pH is correlated with the theoretical calculation of acidobasic equilibria of studied lipid classes. The final method using the hydride column, pH 4 adjusted by formic acid and the gradient of acetonitrile and 40mmol/L of aqueous ammonium formate provides good peak shapes for all analyzed lipid classes including acidic lipids. This method is applied for the identification of lipids in real samples of porcine brain and kidney extracts. PMID:26858118

  8. Mechanisms of Radionuclide-Hyroxycarboxylic Acid Interactions for Decontamination of Metallic Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.J. Francis; C.J. Dodge; J.B. Gillow; G.P. Halada; C.R. Clayton

    2002-04-24

    Is this EMSP program we investigated the key fundamental issues involved in the use of simple and safe methods for the removal of radioactive contamination from equipment and facilities using hydroxycarboxylic acids. Specifically, we investigate (i) the association of uranium with various iron oxides commonly formed on corroding plain carbon steel surfaces, (ii) the association of uranium with corroding metal coupons under a variety of conditions, and (iii) the decontamination of the uranium contaminated metal coupons by citric acid or citric acid formulations containing oxalic acid and hydrogen peroxide.

  9. Interaction between N-Phospho-Amino Acids and Nucleoside in Aqueous Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Nucleosides were phosphorylated with different N- (O, O-diisopropyl) phosphoryl amino acids to give nucleoside mono phosphates in aqueous solution. 2', 3', and 5'-isomers had been confirmed by comparison with authentic samples on the basis of HPLC analysis. The conversion percentage of nucleoside indicated that N- (O, O-diisopropyl) phosphoryl aspartic acid reacted with adenosine and guanosine at a much higher rate than other kinds of N- phosphoryl amino acids, while phosphorylation of cytidine and uridine was relatively easy by using N- (O, O-diisopropyl) phosphoryl threonine. The result could give some clue to the prebiotic code origin of nucleic acid and protein.

  10. Progress towards understanding the interactions between hydroxamic acids and actinide ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BNFL has undertaken a wide-ranging research programme to investigate the fundamental properties of hydroxamic acids and, in particular, their reactions with actinide ions. Most work has focussed on simple hydroxamic acids (R=H and CH3) although some comparative data with more complex molecules including di-hydroxamates have been obtained. Properties of hydroxamic acids studied to date include, hydrolysis in nitric acid, decomposition to gases, pKa's and redox potentials. The redox and co-ordination chemistry of actinides by hydroxamic acids has been investigated using a range of techniques and stability constants for both 4f and 5f hydroxamate complexes have been determined. In conjunction with these fundamental studies, more applied work has been carried out to assess the applications of simple hydroxamic acids under process conditions. A large database of solvent extraction distribution data has been accumulated and, from this, extraction logarithms describing how hydroxamic acid modify actinide extraction in to TBP have been derived. Also the effects of hydroxamic acids on U and Np mass transfer have been studied in single stage centrifugal contactors and this has been modeled theoretically. The third stage of our development work so far has looked at the actual design and testing of novel hydroxamic acid based flowsheets which selectively strip Np(IV) and Py(IV) from a uranium loaded TBP stream. (author)

  11. Mechanisms of Radionuclide-Hyroxycarboxylic Acid Interactions for Decontamination of Metallic Surfaces; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Is this EMSP program we investigated the key fundamental issues involved in the use of simple and safe methods for the removal of radioactive contamination from equipment and facilities using hydroxycarboxylic acids. Specifically, we investigate (i) the association of uranium with various iron oxides commonly formed on corroding plain carbon steel surfaces, (ii) the association of uranium with corroding metal coupons under a variety of conditions, and (iii) the decontamination of the uranium contaminated metal coupons by citric acid or citric acid formulations containing oxalic acid and hydrogen peroxide

  12. Probing Nucleic Acid Interactions and Pre-mRNA Splicing by Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Staněk

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET microscopy is a powerful technique routinely used to monitor interactions between biomolecules. Here, we focus on the techniques that are used for investigating the structure and interactions of nucleic acids (NAs. We present a brief overview of the most commonly used FRET microscopy techniques, their advantages and drawbacks. We list experimental approaches recently used for either in vitro or in vivo studies. Next, we summarize how FRET contributed to the understanding of pre-mRNA splicing and spliceosome assembly.

  13. A rapid and sensitive high-throughput screening method to identify compounds targeting protein–nucleic acids interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Nicole; Guillen, Roboan; Chambers, Jeremy W.; Leng, Fenfei

    2015-01-01

    DNA-binding and RNA-binding proteins are usually considered ‘undruggable’ partly due to the lack of an efficient method to identify inhibitors from existing small molecule repositories. Here we report a rapid and sensitive high-throughput screening approach to identify compounds targeting protein–nucleic acids interactions based on protein–DNA or protein–RNA interaction enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (PDI-ELISA or PRI-ELISA). We validated the PDI-ELISA method using the mammalian high-mobi...

  14. Report on activities and findings under DOE grant “Collaborative research. An Interactive Multi-Model for Consensus on Climate Change”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duane, Gregory S. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Tsonis, Anastasios [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Kocarev, Ljupco [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Tribbia, Joseph [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-10-30

    for inter-model nudging using the DART (Data Assimilation Research Testbed) capability to stop and re-start models in synchrony. It was clearly established that the inter-model nudging adds almost no computational burden to the runs, but there appears to be a problem with the re-initialization software that is still being debugged. Publications: Several papers were published on the basic idea of the interactive multi-model (supermodel) including demonstrations with low-order ODEs. The last of these, a semi-philosophical review paper on the relevance of synchronization generally, encountered considerable resistance but was finally published in Entropy [Duane 2015]. A paper on the ECHAM/COSMOS supermodel, containing the most promising results so far [Shen et al. 2015] is presently under review.

  15. Direct interaction between EgFABP1, a fatty acid binding protein from Echinococcus granulosus, and phospholipid membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L Porfido

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Growth and maintenance of hydatid cysts produced by Echinococcus granulosus have a high requirement for host lipids for biosynthetic processes, membrane building and possibly cellular and developmental signalling. This requires a high degree of lipid trafficking facilitated by lipid transporter proteins. Members of the fatty acid binding protein (FABP family have been identified in Echinococcus granulosus, one of which, EgFABP1 is expressed at the tegumental level in the protoscoleces, but it has also been described in both hydatid cyst fluid and secretions of protoscoleces. In spite of a considerable amount of structural and biophysical information on the FABPs in general, their specific functions remain mysterious. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have investigated the way in which EgFABP1 may interact with membranes using a variety of fluorescence-based techniques and artificial small unilamellar vesicles. We first found that bacterial recombinant EgFABP1 is loaded with fatty acids from the synthesising bacteria, and that fatty acid binding increases its resistance to proteinases, possibly due to subtle conformational changes induced on EgFABP1. By manipulating the composition of lipid vesicles and the ionic environment, we found that EgFABP1 interacts with membranes in a direct contact, collisional, manner to exchange ligand, involving both ionic and hydrophobic interactions. Moreover, we observed that the protein can compete with cytochrome c for association with the surface of small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work constitutes a first approach to the understanding of protein-membrane interactions of EgFABP1. The results suggest that this protein may be actively involved in the exchange and transport of fatty acids between different membranes and cellular compartments within the parasite.

  16. Fatty Acid-binding Proteins Interact with Comparative Gene Identification-58 Linking Lipolysis with Lipid Ligand Shuttling*

    OpenAIRE

    Hofer, Peter; Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Jaeger, Doris; Feiler, Ursula; Arthanari, Haribabu; Mayer, Nicole; Zehender, Fabian; Rechberger, Gerald; Oberer, Monika; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim; Haemmerle, Guenter; Breinbauer, Rolf; Zechner, Rudolf; Preiss-Landl, Karina

    2015-01-01

    Background: A multiprotein complex designated as lipolysome degrades intracellular triglycerides and contains proteins such as adipose triglyceride lipase (Atgl) and its co-activator Cgi-58. Results: Cgi-58 interacts with fatty acid-binding proteins (Fabps), which impact Atgl-mediated lipolysis and lipid signaling. Conclusion: Fabps modulate Atgl-mediated TG hydrolysis and link lipolysis with intracellular lipid ligand shuttling. Significance: Novel mechanistic insights into the regulation of...

  17. Weak intermolecular interactions of chromium, molybdenum and vanadium bis-arene complexes with CH- and OH-acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the method of IR spectroscopy coordination interactions of molybdenum and vanadium organometallic compounds (OMC) (bis-ethyl benzene molybdenum, bisethyl benzene vanadium) with hydroperoxides of ternary butyl and cumyl, as well as with ternary butanol and phenol are investigated. Possible types of OMC coordination with CH- and OH-acids are considered. The role of coordination complexes in the oxidation mechanism of bis-arene derivatives of transition metals by hydroperoxides is discussed

  18. Phase behavior, interaction and properties of acetic acid lignin-containing polyurethane films coupled with aminopropyltriethoxy silane

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, H. H.; Mou, J; Y. H. Ni; G. Q. Fei; C. L. Si; J. Zou

    2013-01-01

    A series of novel acetic acid lignin-containing polyurethane (LPU) films coupled with aminopropyltriethoxy silane (APTS) (LPUSi) or the mixture of APTS and trimethylol propane (TMP) (LPUSiT) were prepared. With 2% APTS addition, the crosslinking density increased, and the resultant films were endowed with good mechanical properties and water resistance. It was also found that the hydrogen bonding interaction between –NH and –C=O of urethane was destroyed, and new hydrogen bonds between APTS a...

  19. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen regulates retinoic acid receptor transcriptional activity through direct protein–protein interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Perrine J; Lardeux, Virginie; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) interact, in a ligand-dependent fashion, with many coregulators that participate in a wide spectrum of biological responses, ranging from embryonic development to cellular growth control. The transactivating function of these ligand-inducible transcription factors reside mainly, but not exclusively, in their ligand-binding domain (AF2), which recruits or dismiss coregulators in a ligand-dependent fashion. However, little is known about AF2-independent function(s...

  20. Wnt/β-Catenin and Retinoic Acid Receptor Signaling Pathways Interact to Regulate Chondrocyte Function and Matrix Turnover*

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuhara, Rika; Yuasa, Takahito; Williams, Julie A.; Byers, Stephen W.; Shah, Salim; Pacifici, Maurizio; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2009-01-01

    Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin and retinoid signaling pathways is known to tilt cartilage matrix homeostasis toward catabolism. Here, we investigated possible interactions between these pathways. We found that all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) treatment of mouse epiphyseal chondrocytes in culture did increase Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the absence or presence of exogenous Wnt3a, as revealed by lymphoid enhancer factor/T-cell factor/β-catenin reporter activity and β-catenin nuclear accumulation. T...

  1. Syntrophic interactions improve power production in formic acid fed MFCs operated with set anode potentials or fixed resistances

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Dan

    2011-10-24

    Formic acid is a highly energetic electron donor but it has previously resulted in low power densities in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Three different set anode potentials (-0.30, -0.15, and +0.15V; vs. a standard hydrogen electrode, SHE) were used to evaluate syntrophic interactions in bacterial communities for formic acid degradation relative to a non-controlled, high resistance system (1,000Ω external resistance). No current was generated at -0.30V, suggesting a lack of direct formic acid oxidation (standard reduction potential: -0.40V). More positive potentials that allowed for acetic acid utilization all produced current, with the best performance at -0.15V. The anode community in the -0.15V reactor, based on 16S rDNA clone libraries, was 58% Geobacter sulfurreducens and 17% Acetobacterium, with lower proportions of these genera found in the other two MFCs. Acetic acid was detected in all MFCs suggesting that current generation by G. sulfurreducens was dependent on acetic acid production by Acetobacterium. When all MFCs were subsequently operated at an external resistance for maximum power production (100Ω for MFCs originally set at -0.15 and +0.15V; 150Ω for the control), they produced similar power densities and exhibited the same midpoint potential of -0.15V in first derivative cyclic voltammetry scans. All of the mixed communities converged to similar proportions of the two predominant genera (ca. 52% G. sulfurreducens and 22% Acetobacterium). These results show that syntrophic interactions can be enhanced through setting certain anode potentials, and that long-term performance produces stable and convergent communities. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Two Arginine Residues of Streptococcus gordonii Sialic Acid-Binding Adhesin Hsa Are Essential for Interaction to Host Cell Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urano-Tashiro, Yumiko; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Oguchi, Riyo; Konishi, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Hsa is a large, serine-rich protein of Streptococcus gordonii DL1 that mediates binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid termini of glycoproteins, including platelet glycoprotein Ibα, and erythrocyte membrane protein glycophorin A, and band 3. The binding of Hsa to platelet glycoprotein Ibα contributes to the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. This interaction appears to be mediated by a second non-repetitive region (NR2) of Hsa. However, the molecular details of the interaction between the Hsa NR2 region and these glycoproteins are not well understood. In the present study, we identified the amino acid residues of the Hsa NR2 region that are involved in sialic acid recognition. To identify the sialic acid-binding site of Hsa NR2 region, we prepared various mutants of Hsa NR2 fused with glutathione transferase. Fusion proteins harboring Arg340 to Asn (R340N) or Arg365 to Asn (R365N) substitutions in the NR2 domain exhibited significantly reduced binding to human erythrocytes and platelets. A sugar-binding assay showed that these mutant proteins abolished binding to α2-3-linked sialic acid. Furthermore, we established S. gordonii DL1 derivatives that encoded the corresponding Hsa mutant protein. In whole-cell assays, these mutant strains showed significant reductions in hemagglutination, in platelet aggregation, and in adhesion to human leukocytes. These results indicate that the Arg340 and Arg365 residues of Hsa play an important role in the binding of Hsa to α2-3-linked sialic acid-containing glycoproteins. PMID:27101147

  3. Mineral-microorganism interactions in Acid Mine Drainage environments: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Cristina; Zotti, Mirca; Pozzolini, Marina; Giovine, Marco; Di Piazza, Simone; Mariotti, Mauro; Lucchetti, Gabriella

    2014-05-01

    Minerals play a key role in controlling the mobility and distribution of metals and metalloids of environmental concern in supergenic environments. These are involved in a variety of processes, spanning the alteration of primary minerals to the formation of secondary authigenic phases and can represent a source or a trap for Potentially Ecotoxic Elements (PTEs). Soil, sediments, and waters heavily polluted with PTEs through AMD processes are a reservoir of a unusual bacteria and fungi well adapted to these toxic environments. Classical studies of biotic weathering have mainly focused on water-mineral interaction and on the ability of microorganism to influence the soil solution chemical composition. In this work, we analyzed two different representative ochreous and greenish-blue AMD colloidal precipitates in order to i) characterize the biota population present in these colloidal minerals and ii) verify the bioaccumulation of PTEs into the fungi and the potential impact of bacteria in the geochemistry of the system. The samples are composed by nanocrystalline goethite which contains high amounts of Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, and Ni and woodwardite that is characterized by Cu, Zn, Ni, Y, and Ce. These precipitates were examined in order to evaluate the presence of fungal strains and to extract bacteria DNA. The preliminary results of fungi characterization show an interesting and selected mycobiota able to survive under unfavourable environmental conditions. A significant number of fungal strains was isolated in pure culture. Most of them belong to the genus Mucor and Penicillium. It is worth noting the presence of Trametes versicolor, a macrofungal lignicolous species already known for heavy metal biosorption capability from aqueous solution (Gülay et al 2003). The same colloidal precipitates have been processed to extract bacteria DNA, using a specific procedure developed for DNA extraction from sediments. The results gave a good yield of nucleic acids and the positive PCR

  4. Diet and gene interactions influence the skeletal response to polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Somm, Emmanuel; Rosen, Clifford J

    2014-11-01

    Diets rich in omega-3s have been thought to prevent both obesity and osteoporosis. However, conflicting findings are reported, probably as a result of gene by nutritional interactions. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor that improves insulin sensitivity but causes weight gain and bone loss. Fish oil is a natural agonist for PPARγ and thus may exert its actions through the PPARγ pathway. We examined the role of PPARγ in body composition changes induced by a fish or safflower oil diet using two strains of C57BL/6J (B6); i.e. B6.C3H-6T (6T) congenic mice created by backcrossing a small locus on Chr 6 from C3H carrying 'gain of function' polymorphisms in the Pparγ gene onto a B6 background, and C57BL/6J mice. After 9months of feeding both diets to female mice, body weight, percent fat and leptin levels were less in mice fed the fish oil vs those fed safflower oil, independent of genotype. At the skeletal level, fish oil preserved vertebral bone mineral density (BMD) and microstructure in B6 but not in 6T mice. Moreover, fish oil consumption was associated with an increase in bone marrow adiposity and a decrease in BMD, cortical thickness, ultimate force and plastic energy in femur of the 6T but not the B6 mice. These effects paralleled an increase in adipogenic inflammatory and resorption markers in 6T but not B6. Thus, compared to safflower oil, fish oil (high ratio omega-3/-6) prevents weight gain, bone loss, and changes in trabecular microarchitecture in the spine with age. These beneficial effects are absent in mice with polymorphisms in the Pparγ gene (6T), supporting the tenet that the actions of n-3 fatty acids on bone microstructure are likely to be genotype dependent. Thus caution must be used in interpreting dietary intervention trials with skeletal endpoints in mice and in humans. PMID:25088402

  5. Interaction between uranium and humic acid (Ⅰ): Adsorption behaviors of U(Ⅵ) in soil humic acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Min; LIAO Jiali; LIU Ning; ZHANG Dong; KANG Houjun; YANG Yuanyou; YANG Yong; JIN Jiannan

    2007-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of uranium on three soil humic acids (HAs), which were extracted from soils of different depths at the same site, were investigated under various experimental conditions. The adsorption results showed that U(Ⅵ) in solutions can be adsorbed by the three soil HAs, with the order of FHA (HA from 5 m depth of soil) >SHA (HA from the surface) >THA (HA from 10 m depth of soil) for adsorption efficiency in each desirable condition, and the adsorption reached equilibrium in about 240 min. Although the maximum adsorption efficiency was adsorption could be described with Langmiur isotherm or Freundlich isotherm equation. The L/S (liquid/solid, mL/g)ratio and pH were important factors influencing the adsorption in our adsorption system besides uranium concentration. The adsorption efficiency decreased with the increase of the L/S ratio and pH at the pH range of 2.0-3.0 for SHA and THA or 2.5 - 6.0 for FHA. However, no significant difference in adsorption of U(Ⅵ) was observed at the experimental temperature. All the results implied that humic substances have different characteristics in samples even collected at the same site.

  6. Interaction between uranium and humic acid. Pt.1: Adsorption behaviors of U(VI) in soil humic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption behaviors of uranium on three soil humic acids (HAs), which were extracted from soils of different depths at the same site, were investigated under various experimental conditions. The adsorption results showed that U(VI) in solutions can be adsorbed by the three soil HAs, with the order of FHA (HA from 5 m depth of soil) >SHA (HA from the surface) >THA (HA from 10 m depth of soil) for adsorption efficiency in each desirable condition, and the adsorption reached equilibrium in about 240 min. Although the maximum adsorption efficiency was achieved at a suitable uranium concentration (10 mg·L-1 U(VI) for SHA and THA, 20 mg·L-l U(VI) for FHA), the adsorption could be described with Langmiur isotherm or Freundlich isotherm equation. The L/S (liquid/solid, mL/g) ratio and pH were important factors influencing the adsorption in our adsorption system besides uranium concentration. The adsorption efficiency decreased with the increase of the L/S ratio and pH at the pH range of 2.0-3.0 for SHA and THA or 2.5-6.0 for FHA. However, no significant difference in adsorption of U(VI) was observed at the experimental temperature. All the results implied that humic substances have different characteristics in samples even collected at the same site. (authors)

  7. Effect of the Range of Interactions on the Properties of Fluids. 2. Structure and Phase Behavior of Acetonitrile, Hydrogen Fluoride, and Formic Acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chialvo, A.A.; Kettler, M.; Nezbeda, Ivo

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 19 (2005), s. 9736-9750. ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072303 Grant ostatní: OBES(US) DE/AC05/00OR22725 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : coulombic interactions * phase behaviour * perturbation theory Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.033, year: 2005

  8. Effect of the Range of Interactions on the Properties of Fluids. 2. Structure and Phase Behavior of Acetonitrile, Hydrogen Fluoride, and Formic Acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chialvo, A.A.; Kettler, M.; Nezbeda, Ivo

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 109, - (2005) , s. 9736-9750. ISSN 1089-5647 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072303 Grant ostatní: OBES(US) DE/AC05/00OR22725 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : coulombic interactions * phase behaviour * perturbation theory Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.679, year: 2003

  9. Impact of nucleic acid self-alignment in a strong magnetic field on the interpretation of indirect spin-spin interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavrinská, A.; Zelinka, J.; Šebera, Jakub; Sychrovský, Vladimír; Fiala, R.; Boelens, R.; Sklenář, V.; Trantírek, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 1 (2016), s. 53-62. ISSN 0925-2738 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-27676S Grant ostatní: AV ČR(CZ) M200551205 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : NMR * DFT calculations * spin-spin interactions * magnetic field Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.141, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10858-015-0005-x

  10. Proton interactions with soil organic matter: the importance of aggregation and the weak acids of humin

    OpenAIRE

    Cooke, J. D.; Tipping, E.; Hamilton-Taylor, J.

    2008-01-01

    Samples of three organic-rich soils (ombrotrophic peat, podzol H-horizon, humic ranker) were extensively washed with dilute nitric acid, dialysed against deionised water, and then subjected to acid-base titrations over the pH range 3 – 10, in 0.3 – 300 mM NaNO3, and with soil concentrations in the range 2 to 150 g l-1. The results for the three soils were quantitatively similar. Comparison of the titration data with previously published results for humic acids isolated from the same soils s...

  11. Study of photorespiration in marine microalgae through the determination of glycolic acid using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigobello-Masini, Marilda; Penteado, José C P; Tiba, Maurício; Masini, Jorge C

    2012-01-01

    Determination of organic acids in intracellular extracts and in the cultivation media of marine microalgae aid investigations about metabolic routes related to assimilation of atmospheric carbon by these organisms, which are known by their role in the carbon dioxide sink. The separation of these acids was investigated by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) using isocratic elution with a mobile phase composed of 70:30 v/v acetonitrile/20 mmol/L ammonium acetate buffer (pH 6.8) and detection at 220 nm. HILIC allowed the determinations of glycolic acid, the most important metabolite for the evaluation of the photorespiration process in algae, to be made with better selectivity than that achieved by reversed phase liquid chromatography, but with less detectability. The concentration of glycolic acid was determined in the cultivation media and in intracellular extracts of the algae Tetraselmis gracilis and Phaeodactylum tricornutum submitted to different conditions of aeration: (i) without forced aeration, (ii) aeration with atmospheric air, and (iii) bubbling with N(2). The concentration of glycolic acid had a higher increase as the cultures were aerated with nitrogen, showing higher photorespiratory flux than that occurring in the cultures aerated with atmospheric air. PMID:22128110

  12. Colorimetric and visual read-out determination of cyanuric acid exploiting the interaction between melamine and silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present two colorimetric procedures for the determination of cyanuric acid, using silver nanoparticle-based (AgNPs) probes. The first is making use of melamine-modified AgNPs which bind to cyanuric acid through hydrogen bonding to form a large conjugate network that enhances the aggregation of AgNPs to produce an absorbance peak at 640 nm and a green coloration. In the second assay, melamine is directly added to the sample in order to form a stable complex with cyanuric acid. AgNPs are then added, resulting in the formation of an absorbance peaking at 525 nm and a color change from green (blank sample) to purple or orange-red as a function of cyanuric acid concentration. Matrix effects, that originate from the interaction of alkaline earth metals with the charged surface of the AgNPs, are mitigated through a matrix-matched calibration. In this manner, spectral transitions can be selectively attributed to the concentration of cyanuric acid, which can be even visually quantified at low mg L−1 levels with minimum sample pre-treatment and without sophisticated instrumentation. (author)

  13. Modeling of geochemical interactions between acidic and neutral fluids in the Onikobe Geothermal Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todaka, Norifumi; Akasaka, Chitoshi; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2003-01-10

    Two types of fluids are encountered in the Onikobe geothermal reservoir, one is neutral and the other is acidic (pH=3). It is hypothesized that acidic fluid might be upwelling along a fault zone and that an impermeable barrier might be present between the acidic and neutral fluid zones. We carried out reactive geothermal transport simulations using TOUGHREACT (Xu and Pruess, 1998 and 2001) to test such a conceptual model. One-dimensional models were used to study the geochemical behavior due to mixing of the two fluids. Mn-rich smectite precipitated near the mixing front and is likely to form an impermeable barrier between regions with acidic and neutral fluids.

  14. Spectrofluorimetric study of the interaction of ciprofloxacin with amino acids in aqueous solution following solvatochromic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Kamal; Mobarrez, Mahsa; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Norouzi, Parviz; Chaichi, Mohammad Javad

    Complexation of a fluoroquinolone derivative (ciprofloxacin), L, and some amino acids has been studied using spectrofluorimetric method. Results indicated that ciprofloxacin have a greater tendency to form a 1:1 complex with aspartic acid and arginine than the other tested molecules. The fluorescence of ciprofloxacin exhibits quenching process while it has been titrated with these amino acids. Formation constant values (Kf) for complex formed between ciprofloxacin and amino acids were also calculated. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° were studied too. Possible reasons for the observed stability sequence were discussed based on the structures proposed for the resulting complexes. Besides the solution studies, solvatochromic properties of the ciprofloxacin are discussed by studying its spectra in a selection of different solvents.

  15. Interaction of Dietary Fatty Acids with Tumour Necrosis Factor Family Cytokines during Colon Inflammation and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jiřina Hofmanová; Nicol Straková; Alena Hyršlová Vaculová; Zuzana Tylichová; Barbora Šafaříková; Belma Skender; Alois Kozubík

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal homeostasis is precisely regulated by a number of endogenous regulatory molecules but significantly influenced by dietary compounds. Malfunction of this system may result in chronic inflammation and cancer. Dietary essential n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and short-chain fatty acid butyrate produced from fibre display anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. Both compounds were shown to modulate the production and activities of TNF family cytokines. Cytokines from the ...

  16. Interactions between Human Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein and Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Selective Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Tony Velkov

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) act as intracellular shuttles for fatty acids as well as lipophilic xenobiotics to the nucleus, where these ligands are released to a group of nuclear receptors called the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs). PPAR mediated gene activation is ultimately involved in maintenance of cellular homeostasis through the transcriptional regulation of metabolic enzymes and transporters that target the activating ligand. Here we show that liver- (L-) FA...

  17. 78 FR 64574 - Grant Guideline, Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... III. Scope of the Program IV. Grant Applications V. Grant Application Review Procedures VI. Compliance... international courts. III. Scope of the Program SJI is offering six types of grants in FY 2014: Project Grants, Technical Assistance (TA) Grants, Curriculum Adaptation and Training (CAT) Grants, Partner Grants,...

  18. Sample Cancer Epidemiology Grant Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute frequently receives questions from investigators for examples of successfully funded grant applications. Several investigators agreed to let the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program post excerpts of their grant applications online.

  19. Androgen and retinoic acid interaction in LNCaP cells, effects on cell proliferation and expression of retinoic acid receptors and epidermal growth factor receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwin Robert J

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modulation of the expression of retinoic acid receptors (RAR α and γ in adult rat prostate by testosterone (T suggests that RAR signaling events might mediate some of the androgen effects on prostate cells. Method In this study, we examined the interactions between T and retinoic acid (RA in cell growth of human prostate carcinoma cells, LNCaP, and their relationship with the expression of RAR and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R. Results Both T and RA, when administered alone, stimulated 3H-thymidine incorporation in LNCaP cells in a dose-dependent manner; the effect of each agent was reciprocally attenuated by the other agent. Testosterone treatment of LNCaP cells also resulted in dose dependent, biphasic increases in RAR α and γ mRNAs; increases paralleled that of 3H-thymidine incorporation and were attenuated by the presence of 100 nM RA. These results suggest a link between RAR signaling and the effect of T on LNCaP cell growth. Gel electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed the presence of putative androgen responsive element (ARE in the promoter region of RAR α gene, suggesting that a direct AR-DNA interaction might mediate the effects of T on RAR α gene. Furthermore, treatment of LNCaP cells with 20 nM T resulted in an increase in EGF-R. In contrast, EGF-R was suppressed by 100 nM RA that also suppressed the effect of T. Conclusions Current results demonstrate interactions between T and RA in the expression of RARs and cell growth in LNCaP cells. The presence of putative ARE in the promoter of the RAR α gene suggests that AR-DNA interaction might mediate the effects of T on RAR α gene. The opposite effects of T and RA on the expression of RAR and EGF-R suggest that signal events of these receptors might be involved in the interaction between T and RA in the control of LNCaP cell growth.

  20. Androgen and retinoic acid interaction in LNCaP cells, effects on cell proliferation and expression of retinoic acid receptors and epidermal growth factor receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modulation of the expression of retinoic acid receptors (RAR) α and γ in adult rat prostate by testosterone (T) suggests that RAR signaling events might mediate some of the androgen effects on prostate cells. In this study, we examined the interactions between T and retinoic acid (RA) in cell growth of human prostate carcinoma cells, LNCaP, and their relationship with the expression of RAR and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R). Both T and RA, when administered alone, stimulated 3H-thymidine incorporation in LNCaP cells in a dose-dependent manner; the effect of each agent was reciprocally attenuated by the other agent. Testosterone treatment of LNCaP cells also resulted in dose dependent, biphasic increases in RAR α and γ mRNAs; increases paralleled that of 3H-thymidine incorporation and were attenuated by the presence of 100 nM RA. These results suggest a link between RAR signaling and the effect of T on LNCaP cell growth. Gel electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed the presence of putative androgen responsive element (ARE) in the promoter region of RAR α gene, suggesting that a direct AR-DNA interaction might mediate the effects of T on RAR α gene. Furthermore, treatment of LNCaP cells with 20 nM T resulted in an increase in EGF-R. In contrast, EGF-R was suppressed by 100 nM RA that also suppressed the effect of T. Current results demonstrate interactions between T and RA in the expression of RARs and cell growth in LNCaP cells. The presence of putative ARE in the promoter of the RAR α gene suggests that AR-DNA interaction might mediate the effects of T on RAR α gene. The opposite effects of T and RA on the expression of RAR and EGF-R suggest that signal events of these receptors might be involved in the interaction between T and RA in the control of LNCaP cell growth

  1. The Citrus transcription factor, CitERF13, regulates citric acid accumulation via a protein-protein interaction with the vacuolar proton pump, CitVHA-c4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shao-jia; Yin, Xue-ren; Xie, Xiu-lan; Allan, Andrew C; Ge, Hang; Shen, Shu-ling; Chen, Kun-song

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids are essential to fruit flavor. The vacuolar H(+) transporting adenosine triphosphatase (V-ATPase) plays an important role in organic acid transport and accumulation. However, less is known of V-ATPase interacting proteins and their relationship with organic acid accumulation. The relationship between V-ATPase and citric acid was investigated, using the citrus tangerine varieties 'Ordinary Ponkan (OPK)' and an early maturing mutant 'Zaoshu Ponkan (ZPK)'. Five V-ATPase genes (CitVHA) were predicted as important to citric acid accumulation. Among the genes, CitVHA-c4 was observed, using a yeast two-hybrid screen, to interact at the protein level with an ethylene response factor, CitERF13. This was verified using bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. A similar interaction was also observed between Arabidopsis AtERF017 (a CitERF13 homolog) and AtVHA-c4 (a CitVHA-c4 homolog). A synergistic effect on citric acid levels was observed between V-ATPase proteins and interacting ERFs when analyzed using transient over-expression in tobacco and Arabidopsis mutants. Furthermore, the transcript abundance of CitERF13 was concomitant with CitVHA-c4. CitERF13 or AtERF017 over-expression leads to significant citric acid accumulation. This accumulation was abolished in an AtVHA-c4 mutant background. ERF-VHA interactions appear to be involved in citric acid accumulation, which was observed in both citrus and Arabidopsis. PMID:26837571

  2. Interactive effects of seawater acidification and elevated temperature on biomineralization and amino acid metabolism in the mussel Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiguo; Liu, Chuang; Huang, Jingliang; Liu, Yangjia; Zheng, Guilan; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-11-01

    Seawater acidification and warming resulting from anthropogenic production of carbon dioxide are increasing threats to marine ecosystems. Previous studies have documented the effects of either seawater acidification or warming on marine calcifiers; however, the combined effects of these stressors are poorly understood. In our study, we examined the interactive effects of elevated carbon dioxide partial pressure (P(CO2)) and temperature on biomineralization and amino acid content in an ecologically and economically important mussel, Mytilus edulis. Adult M. edulis were reared at different combinations of P(CO2) (pH 8.1 and 7.8) and temperature (19, 22 and 25°C) for 2 months. The results indicated that elevated P(CO2) significantly decreased the net calcification rate, the calcium content and the Ca/Mg ratio of the shells, induced the differential expression of biomineralization-related genes, modified shell ultrastructure and altered amino acid content, implying significant effects of seawater acidification on biomineralization and amino acid metabolism. Notably, elevated temperature enhanced the effects of seawater acidification on these parameters. The shell breaking force significantly decreased under elevated P(CO2), but the effect was not exacerbated by elevated temperature. The results suggest that the interactive effects of seawater acidification and elevated temperature on mussels are likely to have ecological and functional implications. This study is therefore helpful for better understanding the underlying effects of changing marine environments on mussels and other marine calcifiers. PMID:26417015

  3. Immobilization of lactobionic acid on the surface of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles and their interaction with hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamruzzaman Selim, K M; Xing, Zhi-Cai; Guo, Haiqing; Kang, Inn-Kyu

    2009-09-01

    In the current study, beta-galactose-carrying lactobionic acid (LA) was conjugated on the surface of mercaptoacetic acid-coated cadmium sulfide nanoparticles (CSNPs) to ensure specific recognition of liver cells (hepatocytes) and to enhance biocompatibility. Maltotrionic acid-coated CSNPs (MCSNPs) were also prepared for use as a control. The results showed that LA-immobilized CSNPs (LCSNPs) were selectively and rapidly internalized into hepatocytes and emitted more intense fluorescence images as well as demonstrated increased biocompatible behavior in vitro than those of CSNPs and MCSNPs. Furthermore, the uptake amount of LCSNPs into hepatocytes was higher than that of CSNPs and MCSNPs. All these results indicate that LCSNPs may find ever-growing applications in biological labels and detection or contrast agents in life science and medical diagnostics. PMID:19365615

  4. Interaction of conjugated bile acids and detergents with a radiosorbent assay of vitamin B-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of conjugated bile acids and detergents on the radiosorbent technique for the determination of vitamin B-12 activity is reported. It is shown that whereas the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 has no effect on the vitamin B-12-radiosorbent assay, the addition of ionic detergents, e.g. glycocholic acid, taurocholic acid or sodium lauryl sulfate, results in a falsely-elevated vitamin B-12 activity presumably due to the disruption of the binding of vitamin B-12 to the intrinsic factor-Sephadex complex. This effect may be of importance not only to the radiosorbent assaying of vitamin B-12, but to the in vivo intestinal absorption of vitamin B-12 as well

  5. Silicon wafer-contaminant interactions in dilute hydrofluoric acid solutions and related fundamentals in colloid and interface science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhan

    With the continuous decrease in device size, it becomes more and more important to have a contamination-free silicon wafer surface. Hydrofluoric acid is inevitably involved in silicon wafer wet cleaning. However, during dilute hydrofluoric acid (DHF) cleaning, particles and noble metals tend to deposit on the silicon wafer surface and the surface roughness could increase. In this study, the mechanisms of particle deposition, noble metal outplating, and the effects of additives were investigated. Particle deposition from DHF solution onto bare silicon surfaces is due to the large van der Waals interaction between silicon and particles. Additives which can increase electrostatic interaction will reduce particle redeposition, and their effectiveness correlates well with the zeta-potential changes on both silicon surface and particles. Direct force measurements between a silicon surface and a silicon nitride surface reveal that additives not only change electrostatic interaction, but change adhesion forces of particles on silicon surfaces also. Nobel metal ions, especially copper ions, tend to deposit on bare silicon surfaces in DHF solution. The nucleation stage of copper deposition is critical and copper preferrentially deposits on surfaces with high defect densities. A novel technique to detect copper outplating in situ was established. Some additives may increase copper deposition due to the formation of copper complex and the subsequent adsorption of the copper complex on silicon surfaces. Some additive reduces copper outplating significantly. Their effects were discussed. Some fundamental aspects of colloid and interface science have been studied as well, including the approximate and numerical solutions of the electric potential distribution near a planar surface in the presence of highly asymmetric electrolytes. More importantly, the surface interaction in a confined/concentrated system was studied and a theory was established. The mysterious long range

  6. An electrostatic/hydrogen bond switch as the basis for the specific interaction of phosphatidic acid with proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijman, Edgar E; Tieleman, D Peter; Testerink, Christa; Munnik, Teun; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Burger, Koert N J; de Kruijff, Ben

    2007-04-13

    Phosphatidic acid (PA) is a minor but important phospholipid that, through specific interactions with proteins, plays a central role in several key cellular processes. The simple yet unique structure of PA, carrying just a phosphomonoester head group, suggests an important role for interactions with the positively charged essential residues in these proteins. We analyzed by solid-state magic angle spinning 31P NMR and molecular dynamics simulations the interaction of low concentrations of PA in model membranes with positively charged side chains of membrane-interacting peptides. Surprisingly, lysine and arginine residues increase the charge of PA, predominantly by forming hydrogen bonds with the phosphate of PA, thereby stabilizing the protein-lipid interaction. Our results demonstrate that this electrostatic/hydrogen bond switch turns the phosphate of PA into an effective and preferred docking site for lysine and arginine residues. In combination with the special packing properties of PA, PA may well be nature's preferred membrane lipid for interfacial insertion of positively charged membrane protein domains. PMID:17277311

  7. Hydrophobically Modified Polyelectrolytes: V. Interaction of Fluorocarbon Modified Poly (acrylic acid) with Various Added Surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU,Hui(周晖); SONG,Guo-Qaiang(宋国强); GUO,Jin-Feng(郭金峰); ZHANG,Yun-xiang (章云祥); DIEING,Reinhold; MA,Lian(马莲); HAEUSSLING,Lukas

    2001-01-01

    The interactions between fiuorocarbon-medified pol(sodium acrylate) and various kinds of added surfactant have been studied by means of viscometric measurement. Association behavior was found in both hydrogenated and fluorinated anionic, nonionic and cationic surfactants. Among them, the interactions between fluorocarbon-modified poly ( sodium acrylate) and cationic surfactants are the strongest, owing to the cooperation of both electrostatic attractions and hydrophobic associations. The anionic surfactants have the weakest effects on the solution properties because of the existence of unfavorable electrostatic repulsion. The hydrophobic interactions between copolymers and fluorinated surfactants are much stronger than those between copolymers and hydrogenated surfactants.

  8. Fatty Acid-binding Proteins Interact with Comparative Gene Identification-58 Linking Lipolysis with Lipid Ligand Shuttling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Peter; Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Jaeger, Doris; Feiler, Ursula; Arthanari, Haribabu; Mayer, Nicole; Zehender, Fabian; Rechberger, Gerald; Oberer, Monika; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim; Haemmerle, Guenter; Breinbauer, Rolf; Zechner, Rudolf; Preiss-Landl, Karina

    2015-07-24

    The coordinated breakdown of intracellular triglyceride (TG) stores requires the exquisitely regulated interaction of lipolytic enzymes with regulatory, accessory, and scaffolding proteins. Together they form a dynamic multiprotein network designated as the "lipolysome." Adipose triglyceride lipase (Atgl) catalyzes the initiating step of TG hydrolysis and requires comparative gene identification-58 (Cgi-58) as a potent activator of enzyme activity. Here, we identify adipocyte-type fatty acid-binding protein (A-Fabp) and other members of the fatty acid-binding protein (Fabp) family as interaction partners of Cgi-58. Co-immunoprecipitation, microscale thermophoresis, and solid phase assays proved direct protein/protein interaction between A-Fabp and Cgi-58. Using nuclear magnetic resonance titration experiments and site-directed mutagenesis, we located a potential contact region on A-Fabp. In functional terms, A-Fabp stimulates Atgl-catalyzed TG hydrolysis in a Cgi-58-dependent manner. Additionally, transcriptional transactivation assays with a luciferase reporter system revealed that Fabps enhance the ability of Atgl/Cgi-58-mediated lipolysis to induce the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. Our studies identify Fabps as crucial structural and functional components of the lipolysome. PMID:25953897

  9. Colorimetric detection of fluoride ion by 5-arylidenebarbituric acids: dual interaction mode for fluoride ion with single receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Chinnusamy; Easwaramoorthi, Shanmugam; Wang, Leeyih

    2014-04-01

    Two 5-arylidenebarbituric acid derivatives (IH and IM) have been synthesized by the Knoevenagel condensation of barbituric acid with 4-N,N-dimethylamino benzaldehyde and studied for anion sensing activities. Both receptors sense fluoride ion with high selectivity and sensitivity and the sensing action has been demonstrated by naked eye detection, UV-visible absorption, and fluorescence spectral changes in the presence of F(-). Indeed, the F(-) sensing mechanism for receptor IH depends on F(-) ion concentration. While at higher concentrations F(-) forms strong hydrogen bonding interaction with the N-H proton of the receptor, at lower concentrations sensing is influenced by the deprotonation of the methylene proton, followed by the chemical reaction, which is also confirmed by the (1)H-NMR technique. On the other hand, when replacing the N-H proton with a methyl group, IM does not show any concentration dependent behaviour with F(-). The F(-) concentration dependent sensing is attributed to the changes in the receptor-anion interaction equilibrium, where at higher F(-) concentrations, F(-) interacts with the receptor through hydrogen bonding and at lower concentrations it induces a chemical reaction. PMID:24500374

  10. Investigation of interaction between molybdenum and salicylic acid and resorcinol in the presence of sodium nitrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of spectrophotometry and ESR spectroscopy were used to investigate complexing in the molybdenum (5.6)-phenol (salicylic acid and resorcinol)-sodium nitrites ternary system. It is shown that Mo(6) only forms unstable complexes of the MoO2L(H2O)2+ composition with nitrosation products of calicylic acid and resorcinol (2-nitrosophenol and 2.4 dinitrosoresorcinol, L) and Mo(5) in the reaction process oxidizes to Mo(6). A limiting stage of Mo(6) complexing with resorcinol in the presence of NaNO2 is the formation of Mo(6) complex with 2.4- dnitrosoresorcinol as an intermediate product

  11. Synthesis of some salicylic acid derivatives and studies of their interaction with uranyl ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some unsubstituted and substituted bis-derivatives of salicylic acid were synthesized and their acidity constants determined spectrophotometrically in 61.10% aqueous ethanol. The stability constants of complexes which these compounds form with the UO22+ ion were determined spectrophotometrically using the method of continuous variation under the following conditions: pH 3.58 and 3.98, 61.10% aqueous ethanol, μ=0.5 (LiCl), 25±1 degC. (author). 3 figs., 2 tabs., 8 refs

  12. Tracing amino acid exchange during host-pathogen interaction by combined stable-isotope time-resolved Raman spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naemat, Abida; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Boitor, Radu A.; Notingher, Ioan

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the temporal and spatial interchange of the aromatic amino acid phenylalanine (Phe) between human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19) and tachyzoites of the apicomplexan protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). Stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is combined with Raman micro-spectroscopy to selectively monitor the incorporation of deuterium-labelled Phe into proteins in individual live tachyzoites. Our results show a very rapid uptake of L-Phe(D8) by the intracellular growing parasite. T. gondii tachyzoites are capable of extracting L-Phe(D8) from host cells as soon as it invades the cell. L-Phe(D8) from the host cell completely replaces the L-Phe within T. gondii tachyzoites 7-9 hours after infection. A quantitative model based on Raman spectra allowed an estimation of the exchange rate of Phe as 0.5-1.6 × 104 molecules/s. On the other hand, extracellular tachyzoites were not able to consume L-Phe(D8) after 24 hours of infection. These findings further our understanding of the amino acid trafficking between host cells and this strictly intracellular parasite. In particular, this study highlights new aspects of the metabolism of amino acid Phe operative during the interaction between T. gondii and its host cell.

  13. Mimicking the inflammatory cell adhesion cascade by nucleic acid aptamer programmed cell-cell interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Weian; Loh, Weili; Droujinine, Ilia A.; Teo, Weisuong; Kumar, Namit; Schafer, Sebastian; Cui, Cheryl H.; Zhang, Liang; Sarkar, Debanjan; Karnik, Rohit; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    Nature has evolved effective cell adhesion mechanisms to deliver inflammatory cells to inflamed tissue; however, many culture-expanded therapeutic cells are incapable of targeting diseased tissues following systemic infusion, which represents a great challenge in cell therapy. Our aim was to develop simple approaches to program cell-cell interactions that would otherwise not exist toward cell targeting and understanding the complex biology of cell-cell interactions. We employed a chemistry ap...

  14. Leptin receptor polymorphisms interact with polyunsaturated fatty acids to augment risk of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Catherine M; Goumidi, Louisa; Bertrais, Sandrine; Field, Martyn R; Ordovas, Jose M; Cupples, L Adrienne; Defoort, Catherine; Lovegrove, Julie A; Drevon, Christian A; Blaak, Ellen E; Gibney, Michael J; Kiec-Wilk, Beata; Karlstrom, Britta; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; McManus, Ross; Hercberg, Serge; Lairon, Denis; Planells, Richard; Roche, Helen M

    2010-02-01

    The leptin receptor (LEPR) is associated with insulin resistance, a key feature of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Gene-fatty acid interactions may affect MetS risk. The objective was to investigate the relationship among LEPR polymorphisms, insulin resistance, and MetS risk and whether plasma fatty acids, a biomarker of dietary fatty acids, modulate this. LEPR polymorphisms (rs10493380, rs1137100, rs1137101, rs12067936, rs1805096, rs2025805, rs3790419, rs3790433, rs6673324, and rs8179183), biochemical measurements, and plasma fatty acid profiles were determined in the LIPGENE-SU.VI.MAX study of MetS cases and matched controls (n = 1754). LEPR rs3790433 GG homozygotes had increased MetS risk compared with the minor A allele carriers [odds ratio (OR) = 1.65; 95% CI: 1.05-2.57; P = 0.028], which may be accounted for by their increased risk of elevated insulin concentrations (OR 2.40; 95% CI: 1.28-4.50; P = 0.006) and insulin resistance (OR = 2.15; 95% CI: 1.18-3.90; P = 0.012). Low (less than median) plasma (n-3) and high (n-6) PUFA status exacerbated the genetic risk conferred by GG homozygosity to hyperinsulinemia (OR 2.92-2.94) and insulin resistance (OR 3.40-3.47). Interestingly, these associations were abolished against a high (n-3) or low (n-6) PUFA background. Importantly, we replicated some of these findings in an independent cohort. Homozygosity for the LEPR rs3790433 G allele was associated with insulin resistance, which may predispose to increased MetS risk. Novel gene-nutrient interactions between LEPR rs3790433 and PUFA suggest that these genetic influences were more evident in individuals with low plasma (n-3) or high plasma (n-6) PUFA. PMID:20032477

  15. Interactions of aqueous amino acids and proteins with the (110) surface of ZnS in molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nawrocki, Grzegorz; Cieplak, Marek [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-03-07

    The growing usage of nanoparticles of zinc sulfide as quantum dots and biosensors calls for a theoretical assessment of interactions of ZnS with biomolecules. We employ the molecular-dynamics-based umbrella sampling method to determine potentials of mean force for 20 single amino acids near the ZnS (110) surface in aqueous solutions. We find that five amino acids do not bind at all and the binding energy of the remaining amino acids does not exceed 4.3 kJ/mol. Such energies are comparable to those found for ZnO (and to hydrogen bonds in proteins) but the nature of the specificity is different. Cysteine can bind with ZnS in a covalent way, e.g., by forming the disulfide bond with S in the solid. If this effect is included within a model incorporating the Morse potential, then the potential well becomes much deeper—the binding energy is close to 98 kJ/mol. We then consider tryptophan cage, a protein of 20 residues, and characterize its events of adsorption to ZnS. We demonstrate the relevance of interactions between the amino acids in the selection of optimal adsorbed conformations and recognize the key role of cysteine in generation of lasting adsorption. We show that ZnS is more hydrophobic than ZnO and that the density profile of water is quite different than that forming near ZnO—it has only a minor articulation into layers. Furthermore, the first layer of water is disordered and mobile.

  16. Interactions of aqueous amino acids and proteins with the (110) surface of ZnS in molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrocki, Grzegorz; Cieplak, Marek

    2014-03-01

    The growing usage of nanoparticles of zinc sulfide as quantum dots and biosensors calls for a theoretical assessment of interactions of ZnS with biomolecules. We employ the molecular-dynamics-based umbrella sampling method to determine potentials of mean force for 20 single amino acids near the ZnS (110) surface in aqueous solutions. We find that five amino acids do not bind at all and the binding energy of the remaining amino acids does not exceed 4.3 kJ/mol. Such energies are comparable to those found for ZnO (and to hydrogen bonds in proteins) but the nature of the specificity is different. Cysteine can bind with ZnS in a covalent way, e.g., by forming the disulfide bond with S in the solid. If this effect is included within a model incorporating the Morse potential, then the potential well becomes much deeper—the binding energy is close to 98 kJ/mol. We then consider tryptophan cage, a protein of 20 residues, and characterize its events of adsorption to ZnS. We demonstrate the relevance of interactions between the amino acids in the selection of optimal adsorbed conformations and recognize the key role of cysteine in generation of lasting adsorption. We show that ZnS is more hydrophobic than ZnO and that the density profile of water is quite different than that forming near ZnO—it has only a minor articulation into layers. Furthermore, the first layer of water is disordered and mobile.

  17. Vesicle interactions with polyamino acids and antibody: in vitro and in vivo studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artificial spherules or vesicles of 900 A in diameter formed from phosphatidylcholine and gangliosides and enclosing /sup 99m/TcO4- (standard preparation) survive intact in the circulation of the mouse. Polyamino acids and protein have been incorporated into and onto the vesicles; such vesicles remain intact as determined by diffusion dialysis studies and by electron paramagnetic resonance studies of vesicles enclosing spin label. In studying the distribution of polyamino acid-vesicles and protein vesicles in vivo, it was found that the latter distribute differently from standard vesicles or free protein alone whereas aromatic polyamino acid-vesicles concentrate in the liver and spleen to a greater extent than standard vesicles. The permeability and stability characteristics of vesicles may be preserved when they are modified by the addition of protein or polyamino acids and that such modification of vesicles may be associated with an alteration of their fate in vivo. The potential exists to use vesicles as carriers of radiopharmaceuticals and other drugs and to direct the vesicles preferentially to tissue targets in vivo. (U.S.)

  18. Interactions between abscisic acid and cytokinins during water stress and subsequent rehydration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíšilová, Jana; Vágner, Martin; Malbeck, Jiří; Trávníčková, Alena; Baťková, Petra

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 49, - (2005), s. 533-540. ISSN 0006-3134 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/02/1099; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA638105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : abscisic acid * cytokinins * water stress Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.792, year: 2005

  19. Interaction of volatiles, sugars and acids on perception of tomato aroma and flavor descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    To better understand the effect of sugars and acid levels on perception of aroma volatiles, intensity of tomato characteristic earthy/medicinal/musty, green/grassy/viny and fruity/floral aroma and flavor descriptors were evaluated using coarsely choped partially deodorized tomato puree spiked with 1...

  20. Phospholipids and poly(glutamic acid)/hydrolyzed gluten: interaction and kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of poly (glutamic acid) (PGA) and Hydrolyzed wheat gluten (HG) on the thermal and kinetics properties of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) was determined using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). A model system containing 3, 6 and 10% PGA or HG was added to 40% LPC aqueous suspension. ...

  1. Computational and experimental studies of the interaction between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rozo, Ciro E.; Castillo-León, Jaime;

    2013-01-01

    This work involved the preparation of a conjugate between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid that was obtained without covalent chemical functionalization using a simple “one pot” synthesis method. Subsequently, the conjugate was investigated by a computational hybrid method: our own N...

  2. Lipophilic antioxidants and polyunsaturated fatty acids in lipoprotein classes: distribution and interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunesen, V.H.; Weber, Christine; Hølmer, Gunhild Kofoed

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the lipoprotein distribution of supplemented coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)), vitamin E, and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Design: Balanced three- period crossover study. Setting: University research unit. Subjects: Eighteen apparently healthy free-living non-smoking volunteers...

  3. Interaction of phytic acid and zinc affecting copper bioavailability in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this investigation were to develop a protocol to measure Cu bioavailability using four different indices of Cu status, and to evaluate the effect of phytic acid on Cu bioavailability using these indices in the rat. Ninety-six Sprague-Dawley male weanling rats were fed a Cu-deficient diet for four weeks. The Cu-depleted rats were divided into twelve groups and fed test diets containing 1, 2, 3, and 10 ug Cu and 0, 0.4 and 0.8% phytic acid at each Cu level. After 3 days of Cu repletion, liver copper (LCu), liver superoxide dismutase (LSOD) activity, serum copper (SCu), and serum ceruloplasmin (CP) were measured. There was a significant decrease in SCu and LCu in rats fed 30 ug Zn/g or 230 ug Zn/g compared to animals fed 12 ug Zn/g. Phytic acid increased the level of Cu in the sera and livers of rats fed the diet with 30 ug Zn/g, but those of rats fed 12 or 230 ug Zn/g did not. Dietary phytic acid appeared to reduce the synthesis of two intestinal proteins: a high molecular weight protein and metallothionein. The incorporation of 35S-cysteine into both proteins increased with increasing levels of dietary Zn. The results of these studied indicated: (1) LCu and SCu are reliable indices of Cu for absorption and utilization in the rat, and (2) phytic acid increases Cu bioavailability by binding dietary Zn and reduces the level of Zn-induced mucosal proteins which allows Cu to be more efficiently absorbed

  4. Poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid interaction with the transgenic flax fibers: FT-IR and Raman spectra of the composite extracted from a GM flax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel-Kwiatkowska, Magdalena; Żuk, Magdalena; Szopa, Jan; Dymińska, Lucyna; Mączka, Mirosław; Hanuza, Jerzy

    2009-07-01

    The FT-IR and FT-Raman studies have been performed on commercial 3-hydroxy-butyric acid, commercial poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid as well as poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid (PHB) produced by bacteria. The data were compared to those obtained for poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid extracted from natural and genetically modified flax. Genetically modified flax was generated by expression of three bacterial genes coding for synthesis of poly-3-hydroxy butyric acid. Thus transgenic flaxes were enhanced with different amount of the PHB. The discussion of polymer structure and vibrational properties has been done in order to get insight into differences among these materials. The interaction between the cellulose of flax fibers and embedded poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid has been also discussed. The spectroscopic data provide evidences for structural changes in cellulose and in PHB when synthesized in fibers. Based on this data it is suggesting that cellulose and PHB interact by hydrogen and ester bonds.

  5. Research on the Interaction of Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer Sensitive Sensor Materials with Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants by Inverse Gas Chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Yang; Qiang Han; Shuya Cao; Feng Huang; Molin Qin; Chenghai Guo; Mingyu Ding

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant) and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant) were used as probes. Chemical an...

  6. Study of Interaction between Red-tide Toxin, Domoic Acid and Double -stranded DNA by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da Zhi LI; Xin Ya HE; Hui WANG; Li SUN; Bing Cheng LIN

    2004-01-01

    The interactions between amnesic red-tide toxin, domoic acid (DA) and 14mer double-stranded DNA (dsDNA with three kinds of sequences) were studied by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). For the dsDNA with a sequence of 5'-CCCCCTATACCCGC-3', the amount of free dsDNA decreases with the increase of added DA; and the signal of DA-dsDNA complex was observed. Meanwhile, the other two dsDNAs, 5'-(C)12GC-3' and 5'-(AT)7-3', the existence of DA could not lead to the change of dsDNA signal and indicated that there is no interaction between DA and these two dsDNAs.

  7. UV-Vis Spectroscopy Study on Interaction between Microperoxidase-11 and Pr Ion Under Acid Rain Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吉红念; 黄晓华; 周青; 陆天虹

    2002-01-01

    Interaction between rare earth ion praseodymium (Pr(Ⅲ)) and MP11 with/without hydrogen ion (H+) in different media( aqueous, phosphate buffer, physiological condition) were studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy. All the results indicate that Pr(Ⅲ) interacts with MP11, increasing the non-planarity of porphyrin periphery, leading MP11 to form two conformations when titrated by Pr(Ⅲ). Excessive Pr(Ⅲ) acts as a contaminant in living organism. H+ and Pr(Ⅲ) have antagonistic effect on MP11, suggesting that at suitable concentration under physiological conditions, Pr(Ⅲ) can be used as biomodulator in protecting plants from acid rain stress or in rehabilitating the harm.

  8. The interaction of equine lysozyme:oleic acid complexes with lipid membranes suggests a cargo off-loading mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Bang; Wilhelm, Kristina; Vad, Brian;

    2010-01-01

    with oleic acids (ELOAs) were shown to possess tinctorial and morphological properties, similar to amyloidal aggregates, and to be cytotoxic. ELOA's interactions with phospholipid membranes appear to be central to its biological action, similar to human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells....... Here, we describe the interaction of ELOA with phospholipid membranes. Confocal scanning laser microscopy shows that ELOA, but not native EL, accumulates on the surface of giant unilamellar vesicles, without inducing significant membrane permeability. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation data...... indicated an essentially non-disruptive binding of ELOA to supported lipid bilayers, leading to formation of highly dissipative and "soft" lipid membrane; at higher concentrations of ELOA, the lipid membrane desorbs from the surface probably as bilayer sheets of vesicles. This membrane rearrangement...

  9. Investigating salt and naphthenic acids interactions in the toxicity of oil sands process water to freshwater invertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hot water extraction process used to produce bitumens from oil sands produces a large volume of oil sands process water (OSPW) that contain elevated concentrations of naphthenic acids (NA) and salts. Many oil sands reclamation projects are proposing the use of OSPW as part of reconstructed wetlands projects. This study investigated the toxicity of OSPW to freshwater invertebrates. The toxic interactions between NA and salinity on freshwater invertebrates were assessed. Bioassays with laboratory-cultured Ceriodaphnia dubia were conducted to determine the toxicity of OSPW from selected water bodies. The study showed that while the concentrations of NAs and salinity were elevated in OSPW waters that caused toxic responses, the concentrations of salinity ions varied greatly among the OSPW samples. Results of the study suggested that ion composition may be a factor in toxicity. Interactions between NAs and salinity were then assessed by performing bioassays with mixtures representing major ion combinations in OSPW.

  10. Spectroscopic and physical measurements on charge-transfer complexes: Interactions between norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin drugs with picric acid and 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid acceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Elfalaky, A.; Elesh, Eman

    2011-03-01

    Charge-transfer complexes formed between norfloxacin (nor) or ciprofloxacin (cip) drugs as donors with picric acid (PA) and/or 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid (DNB) as π-acceptors have been studied spectrophotometrically in methanol solvent at room temperature. The results indicated the formation of CT-complexes with molar ratio1:1 between donor and acceptor at maximum CT-bands. In the terms of formation constant ( KCT), molar extinction coefficient ( ɛCT), standard free energy (Δ Go), oscillator strength ( f), transition dipole moment (μ), resonance energy ( RN) and ionization potential ( ID) were estimated. IR, H NMR, UV-Vis techniques, elemental analyses (CHN) and TG-DTG investigations were used to characterize the structural of charge-transfer complexes. It indicates that the CT interaction was associated with a proton migration from each acceptor to nor or cip donors which followed by appearing intermolecular hydrogen bond. In addition, X-ray investigation was carried out to scrutinize the crystal structure of the resulted CT-complexes.

  11. Final Technical Report - DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER46424

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroud, David [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-08-05

    We present a final report on the activities undertaken under DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER46424, titled "Interaction effects in quasi one-dimensional electronic systems," originally under the direction of Prof. Julia Meyer. The report includes an overview of the grant and the personnel involved, a list of publications acknowledging the grant, and a summary of the results and conclusions drawn from research supported by the grant.

  12. DOE Matching Grant Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funding used to support a portion of the Nuclear Engineering Educational Activities. Upgrade of teaching labs, student support to attend professional conferences, salary support for graduate students. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has funded Purdue University School of Nuclear Engineering during the period of five academic years covered in this report starting in the academic year 1996-97 and ending in the academic year 2000-2001. The total amount of funding for the grant received from DOE is $416K. In the 1990's, Nuclear Engineering Education in the US experienced a significant slow down. Student enrollment, research support, number of degrees at all levels (BS, MS, and PhD), number of accredited programs, University Research and Training Reactors, all went through a decline to alarmingly low levels. Several departments closed down, while some were amalgamated with other academic units (Mechanical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, etc). The School of Nuclear Engineering at Purdue University faced a major challenge when in the mid 90's our total undergraduate enrollment for the Sophomore, Junior and Senior Years dropped in the low 30's. The DOE Matching Grant program greatly strengthened Purdue's commitment to the Nuclear Engineering discipline and has helped to dramatically improve our undergraduate and graduate enrollment, attract new faculty and raise the School of Nuclear Engineering status within the University and in the National scene (our undergraduate enrollment has actually tripled and stands at an all time high of over 90 students; total enrollment currently exceeds 110 students). In this final technical report we outline and summarize how the grant was expended at Purdue University

  13. DOE Matching Grant Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoukalas, L.

    2002-12-31

    Funding used to support a portion of the Nuclear Engineering Educational Activities. Upgrade of teaching labs, student support to attend professional conferences, salary support for graduate students. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has funded Purdue University School of Nuclear Engineering during the period of five academic years covered in this report starting in the academic year 1996-97 and ending in the academic year 2000-2001. The total amount of funding for the grant received from DOE is $416K. In the 1990's, Nuclear Engineering Education in the US experienced a significant slow down. Student enrollment, research support, number of degrees at all levels (BS, MS, and PhD), number of accredited programs, University Research and Training Reactors, all went through a decline to alarmingly low levels. Several departments closed down, while some were amalgamated with other academic units (Mechanical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, etc). The School of Nuclear Engineering at Purdue University faced a major challenge when in the mid 90's our total undergraduate enrollment for the Sophomore, Junior and Senior Years dropped in the low 30's. The DOE Matching Grant program greatly strengthened Purdue's commitment to the Nuclear Engineering discipline and has helped to dramatically improve our undergraduate and graduate enrollment, attract new faculty and raise the School of Nuclear Engineering status within the University and in the National scene (our undergraduate enrollment has actually tripled and stands at an all time high of over 90 students; total enrollment currently exceeds 110 students). In this final technical report we outline and summarize how the grant was expended at Purdue University.

  14. In silico assessment of interaction of sea anemone toxin APETx2 and acid sensing ion channel 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We have made a reasonable model of rat ASIC3 using published structure of chicken ASIC1. • We have docked sea anemone toxin APETx2 on the model. • We have identified two putative sites for toxin binding. • We have argued for plausibility one site over the other. • We have identified the residues that are likely to be critical for APETx2–ASIC3 interaction. - Abstract: Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-gated cation channels that are expressed throughout the nervous system and have been implicated in mediating sensory perception of noxious stimuli. Amongst the six ASIC isoforms, ASIC1a, 1b, 2a and 3 form proton-gated homomers, which differ in their activation and inactivation kinetics, expression profiles and pharmacological modulation; protons do not gate ASIC2b and ASIC4. As with many other ion channels, structure-function studies of ASICs have been greatly aided by the discovery of some toxins that act in isoform-specific ways. ASIC3 is predominantly expressed by sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system where it acts to detect acid as a noxious stimulus and thus plays an important role in nociception. ASIC3 is the only ASIC subunit that is inhibited by the sea anemone (Anthopleura elegantissima)-derived toxin APETx2. However, the molecular mechanism by which APETx2 interacts with ASIC3 remains largely unknown. In this study, we made a homology model of ASIC3 and used extensive protein–protein docking to predict for the first time, the probable sites of APETx2 interaction on ASIC3. Additionally, using computational alanine scanning, we also suggest the ‘hot-spots’ that are likely to be critical for ASIC3–APETx2 interaction

  15. In silico assessment of interaction of sea anemone toxin APETx2 and acid sensing ion channel 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Taufiq, E-mail: mtur2@cam.ac.uk; Smith, Ewan St. John

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We have made a reasonable model of rat ASIC3 using published structure of chicken ASIC1. • We have docked sea anemone toxin APETx2 on the model. • We have identified two putative sites for toxin binding. • We have argued for plausibility one site over the other. • We have identified the residues that are likely to be critical for APETx2–ASIC3 interaction. - Abstract: Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-gated cation channels that are expressed throughout the nervous system and have been implicated in mediating sensory perception of noxious stimuli. Amongst the six ASIC isoforms, ASIC1a, 1b, 2a and 3 form proton-gated homomers, which differ in their activation and inactivation kinetics, expression profiles and pharmacological modulation; protons do not gate ASIC2b and ASIC4. As with many other ion channels, structure-function studies of ASICs have been greatly aided by the discovery of some toxins that act in isoform-specific ways. ASIC3 is predominantly expressed by sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system where it acts to detect acid as a noxious stimulus and thus plays an important role in nociception. ASIC3 is the only ASIC subunit that is inhibited by the sea anemone (Anthopleura elegantissima)-derived toxin APETx2. However, the molecular mechanism by which APETx2 interacts with ASIC3 remains largely unknown. In this study, we made a homology model of ASIC3 and used extensive protein–protein docking to predict for the first time, the probable sites of APETx2 interaction on ASIC3. Additionally, using computational alanine scanning, we also suggest the ‘hot-spots’ that are likely to be critical for ASIC3–APETx2 interaction.

  16. Solution structure of human acidic fibroblast growth factor and interaction with heparin-derived hexasaccharide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) bind to extracellular matrices, especially heparin-like carbohydrates of heparansulfate proteoglycans which stabilize FGFs to protect against inactivation by heat, acid, proteolysis and oxidation. Moreover, binding of FGFs to cell surface proteoglycans promotes to form oligomers, which is essential for receptor oligomerization and activation. In the present study, we determined the solution structure of acidic FGF using a series of triple resonance multi-dimensional NMR experiments and simulated annealing calculations. Furthermore, we prepared the sample complexed with a heparin-derived hexasaccharide which is a minimum unit for aFGF binding. From the chemical shift differences between free aFGF and aFGF-heparin complex, we concluded that the major heparin binding site was located on the regions 110-131 and 17-21. The binding sites are quite similar to those observed for bFGF-heparin hexasaccharide complex, showing that both FGFs recognize heparin- oligosaccharides in a similar manner

  17. Molecular interactions between nucleic acids and antitumor substances by Raman and NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoluzza, A; Fagnano, C; Tosi, R; Tugnoli, V; Morelli, M A; Barbarella, G

    1986-01-01

    1-Methyladenosine (1-MeAdo) and protonated 1-Methyladenosine (1-MeAdo.H+) were chosen as a model to study the molecular interactions between the carcinogen dimethylsulphate (DMS) and the base adenine, and the interactions between the antitumoral electrophilic cis-diamminedichlorophatinum (II) (cis-Pt) and the methylation product of the base, respectively. Raman and multinuclear NMR studies show the molecular perturbations caused by the carcinogen on the base and those of the antitumoral substance on the reaction product base-carcinogen. PMID:3813493

  18. Model heterogeneous acid catalysts and metal-support interactions: A combined surface science and catalysis study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boszormenyi, I.

    1991-05-01

    This (<100 {Angstrom}) silica-alumina layers were tested as potential model heterogeneous acid catalysts for combined surface science and catalysis studies. Three preparation methods were used: oxidation of r3 {times} r3 R30 Al/Si(111) structure in UHV; deposition on Si(lll) from aqueous solution; and argon ion beam sputter deposition in UHV. The homogeneous thin layers are amorphous, and the chemical environment of surface atoms is similar to that of Si, Al and oxygen atoms on high surface area acid catalysts. Since the ion beam-deposited thin layer of silica-alumina has the same composition as the target zeolite this deposition method is a promising tool to prepare model catalysts using practical catalyst targets. The silica-alumina layers are active in cumene cracking, a typical acid catalyzed reaction. In order to clearly distinguish background reactions and the acid catalyzed reaction at least 20 cm{sup 2} catalyst surface area is needed. Two series of model platinum-alumina catalysts were prepared in a combined UHV -- high pressure reactor cell apparatus by depositing alumina on polycrystalline Pt foil and by vapor depositing Pt on a thin alumina layer on Au. Both model surfaces have been prepared with and without chlorine. AES, CO desorption as well as methyl cyclopentane (MCP) hydrogenolysis studies indicate that the Pt surface area is always higher if a chlorination step is involved. Selectivity patterns in MCP ring opening on ``Pt-on-alumina`` and on ``alumina-on-Pt`` are different; only the former is a linear combination of selective and statistical ring opening. Product distribution, however, changes with coverage and reaction time. The properties of the two model catalyst systems and role of chlorine in MCP hydrogenolysis are also discussed.

  19. Model heterogeneous acid catalysts and metal-support interactions: A combined surface science and catalysis study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boszormenyi, I.

    1991-05-01

    This (<100 [Angstrom]) silica-alumina layers were tested as potential model heterogeneous acid catalysts for combined surface science and catalysis studies. Three preparation methods were used: oxidation of r3 [times] r3 R30 Al/Si(111) structure in UHV; deposition on Si(lll) from aqueous solution; and argon ion beam sputter deposition in UHV. The homogeneous thin layers are amorphous, and the chemical environment of surface atoms is similar to that of Si, Al and oxygen atoms on high surface area acid catalysts. Since the ion beam-deposited thin layer of silica-alumina has the same composition as the target zeolite this deposition method is a promising tool to prepare model catalysts using practical catalyst targets. The silica-alumina layers are active in cumene cracking, a typical acid catalyzed reaction. In order to clearly distinguish background reactions and the acid catalyzed reaction at least 20 cm[sup 2] catalyst surface area is needed. Two series of model platinum-alumina catalysts were prepared in a combined UHV -- high pressure reactor cell apparatus by depositing alumina on polycrystalline Pt foil and by vapor depositing Pt on a thin alumina layer on Au. Both model surfaces have been prepared with and without chlorine. AES, CO desorption as well as methyl cyclopentane (MCP) hydrogenolysis studies indicate that the Pt surface area is always higher if a chlorination step is involved. Selectivity patterns in MCP ring opening on Pt-on-alumina'' and on alumina-on-Pt'' are different; only the former is a linear combination of selective and statistical ring opening. Product distribution, however, changes with coverage and reaction time. The properties of the two model catalyst systems and role of chlorine in MCP hydrogenolysis are also discussed.

  20. Effects of Salinity: Calcium Interaction on Growth and Nucleic Acid Metabolism in Five Species of Chenopodiaceae

    OpenAIRE

    ABO-KASSEM, Essam El-Deen Mohaned

    2007-01-01

    Seed germination, seedling growth, and some enzyme activity of nucleic acid metabolism were studied in 5 members of Chenopodiaceae [Beta vulgaris L., Chenopodium quinoa Willd., Spinacea oleracea L., Allenrolfia occidentalis (S.Watson) Kuntze, Atriplex hortensis L.] under NaCl salinity alone or combined with 0.5 mM CaSO4. High salinity delayed radical emergence and decreased germination percentage in all plants. Combined CaSO4 reduced inhibition of seed germination in B. vulgaris, S. oleracea,...

  1. Electron Donor-Acceptor Interaction of 8-Hydroxyquinoline with Citric Acid in Different Solvents: Spectroscopic Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Demelash Jado; Khalid Siraj; Nathan Meka

    2014-01-01

    Charge transfer complex formation between 8-hydroxyquinoline as the electron donor and citric acid as the electron acceptor has been studied spectrophotometrically in ethanol and methanol solvents at room temperature. Absorption band due to charge transfer complex formation was observed near 320 and 325 nm in ethanol and methanol, respectively. The stoichiometric ratio of the complex has been found 3 : 1 by using Job’s and conductometric titration methods. Benesi-Hildebrand equation has been ...

  2. Spectroscopic investigation of the interaction between β-cyclodextrin and ascorbic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inclusion compound of vitamin C (ascorbic acid) with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), prepared by different methods (kneading, co-precipitation and freeze-drying) has been caracterized by several spectroscopic techniques (FTIR, 1H NMR, UV-Vis), powder X-ray diffraction and DSC technique. Based on the chemical shifts observed in the 1H-NMR and on FTIR spectra the tentative conclusion is that vitamin C probably enters the cyclodextrin torus forming the inclusion complex.

  3. Sediment-water interaction in a water reservoir affected by acid mine drainage : experimental and modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Torres Sánchez, Ester

    2013-01-01

    The discharge of acid mine drainage into a water reservoir may seriously affect the water quality. In this setting, sediment is commonly thought to act as a sink for pollutants. However, redox oscillations in the bottom water promoted by stratification-turnover events may significantly alter the metal cycling. A new sequential extraction procedure has been developed to study the metal partitioning in the sediment. The new scheme for iron, sulfur and organic carbon rich sediments was evaluated...

  4. Interaction between carbenoxolone and valproic acid on pentylenetetrazole kindling model of epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Sefil, Fatih; Arık, Aliye E; Acar, Meryem D; Bostancı, Mehmet Ö; Bagirici, Faruk; KOZAN, Ramazan

    2015-01-01

    Gap junctions play an important role in the synchronized neuronal discharges. The main reason of the epileptic seizures is disruption of this synchronization. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to explore the combination valproic acid with carbenoxolone in pentylenetetrazole-kindled rats. In the first set of experiments, pentylenetetrazole (35 mg/kg intraperitoneally was administered to the rats to produce the kindling and then permanent screw electrodes to record electroencephalograp...

  5. Interactions between dietary n-3 fatty acids and genetic variants and risk of disease

    OpenAIRE

    Corella, Dolores; Ordovás, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Nutritional genomics has undergone rapid development and the concept is now very popular with the general public. Therefore, there is increasing demand for knowledge on adapting dietary composition to the genome. Our aim has been to undertake a systematic review so as to find out the level of evidence existing on whether the effects of n-3 fatty acids on health can be modulated by genetic variation. A systematic literature search was conducted on studies that jointly analyse the effect of one...

  6. The interaction of poly(ethylenimine) with nucleic acids and its use in determination of nucleic acids based on light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying-lin; Li, Yuan-zong

    2004-01-01

    For the first time, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) was used to determine nucleic acids with a light scattering technique using a common spectrofluorometer. The interaction of PEI with DNA results in greatly enhanced intensity of light scattering at 300 nm, which is caused by the formation of the big particles between DNA and PEI. Based on this, a new quantitative method for nucleic acid determination in aqueous solutions has been developed. Under the optimum conditions, the enhanced intensity of light scattering is proportional to the concentration of nucleic acid in the range of 0.01-10.0 μg ml -1 for herring sperm DNA (hsDNA), 0.02-10.0 μg ml -1 for calf thymus DNA (ctDNA), 0.02-20.0 μg ml -1 for yeast RNA (yRNA). The detection limits are 5.3, 9.9, and 13.7 ng ml -1, respectively. Synthetic samples were determined satisfactorily. At the same time, the light scattering technique has been successfully used to obtain the information on the effects of pH and ionic strength on the formation and the stability of the DNA/PEI complex, which is important in some fields such as genetic engineering and gene transfer. Using ethidium bromide (EB) as a fluorescent probe, the binding of PEI with hsDNA was studied. Both the binding constant of EB with DNA and the number of binding sites per nucleotide decrease with increasing concentration of PEI, indicating noncompetitive inhibition of EB binding to DNA in the presence of PEI. And the association constant of PEI to DNA obtained is 1.2×10 5 M -1. IR-spectra show that PEI interacts with DNA through both the phosphate groups and the bases of DNA and the formation of DNA/PEI complex may cause the change of the conformation of the DNA secondary structure, which is also proved by UV-spectra.

  7. The acid-catalyzed interaction of melanin with nitrite ions. An EPR investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Matuszak Zenon; Chignell Collin F.; Reszka Krzysztof J.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of synthetic dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) melanin (DM) with nitrite ions, NO2−, in the pH 3.6–7.0 range, has been investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). We found that especially at pH

  8. Grants Process Overview Infographic

    Science.gov (United States)

    This infographic shows the steps in the National Institutes of Health and National Cancer Institute Grants Process. The graphic shows which steps are done by the Principle Investigator, Grantee Institution, and by NIH. The process is represented by a circular flow of steps. Starting from the top and reading clockwise: The Principle Investigator “Initiates Research Idea and Prepares Application” The Grantee Institution “Submits Application” NIH “NIH Center For Scientific Review, Assigns To NCI And To Study Section” NIH “Scientific Review Group (NCI OR CSR) Evaluates for Scientific Merit” NIH “National Cancer Advisory Board Recommends Action” NIH “NCI Evaluates Program Relevance And Need” NIH “NCI Makes Funding Selections And Issues Grant Awards” (NIH) NIH “NCI Monitors Programmatic and Business Management Performance of the Grant” The Grantee Institution “Manages Funds” The Principle Investigator “Conducts Research” Source: www.cancer.gov Icons made by Freepik from http://www.flaticon.com is licensed by CC BY3.0”

  9. Dynamic interactions of the HIV-1 Tat with nucleic acids are critical for Tat activity in reverse transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudier, Christian; Humbert, Nicolas; Chaminade, Françoise; Chen, Yingying; de Rocquigny, Hugues; Godet, Julien; Mauffret, Olivier; Fossé, Philippe; Mély, Yves

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein is thought to stimulate reverse transcription (RTion). The Tat protein and, more specifically, its (44-61) domain were recently shown to promote the annealing of complementary DNA sequences representing the HIV-1 transactivation response element TAR, named dTAR and cTAR, that plays a key role in RTion. Moreover, the kinetic mechanism of the basic Tat(44-61) peptide in this annealing further revealed that this peptide constitutes a representative nucleic acid annealer. To further understand the structure-activity relationships of this highly conserved domain, we investigated by electrophoresis and fluorescence approaches the binding and annealing properties of various Tat(44-61) mutants. Our data showed that the Tyr47 and basic residues of the Tat(44-61) domain were instrumental for binding to cTAR through stacking and electrostatic interactions, respectively, and promoting its annealing with dTAR. Furthermore, the annealing efficiency of the mutants clearly correlates with their ability to rapidly associate and dissociate the complementary oligonucleotides and to promote RTion. Thus, transient and dynamic nucleic acid interactions likely constitute a key mechanistic component of annealers and the role of Tat in the late steps of RTion. Finally, our data suggest that Lys50 and Lys51 acetylation regulates Tat activity in RTion. PMID:24153111

  10. Physical Nature of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Interactions with Its Inhibitors: Testing a Simple Nonempirical Scoring Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giedroyć-Piasecka, Wiktoria; Dyguda-Kazimierowicz, Edyta; Beker, Wiktor; Mor, Marco; Lodola, Alessio; Sokalski, W Andrzej

    2014-12-26

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is an enzyme responsible for the deactivating hydrolysis of fatty acid ethanolamide neuromodulators. FAAH inhibitors have gained considerable interest due to their possible application in the treatment of anxiety, inflammation, and pain. In the context of inhibitor design, the availability of reliable computational tools for predicting binding affinity is still a challenging task, and it is now well understood that empirical scoring functions have several limitations that in principle could be overcome by quantum mechanics. Herein, systematic ab initio analyses of FAAH interactions with a series of inhibitors belonging to the class of the N-alkylcarbamic acid aryl esters have been performed. In contrast to our earlier studies of other classes of enzyme-inhibitor complexes, reasonable correlation with experimental results required us to consider correlation effects along with electrostatic term. Therefore, the simplest comprehensive nonempirical model allowing for qualitative predictions of binding affinities for FAAH ligands consists of electrostatic multipole and second-order dispersion terms. Such a model has been validated against the relative stabilities of the benchmark S66 set of biomolecular complexes. As it does not involve parameters fitted to experimentally derived data, this model offers a unique opportunity for generally applicable inhibitor design and virtual screening. PMID:25420234

  11. Development of an Interaction Assay between Single-Stranded Nucleic Acids Trapped with Silica Particles and Fluorescent Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Maeda

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymers are easily denatured by heating, a change in pH or chemical substances when they are immobilized on a substrate. To prevent denaturation of biopolymers, we developed a method to trap a polynucleotide on a substrate by hydrogen bonding using silica particles with surfaces modified by aminoalkyl chains ([A-AM silane]/SiO2. [A-AM silane]/SiO2 was synthesized by silane coupling reaction of N-2-(aminoethyl-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (A-AM silane with SiO2 particles with a diameter of 5 μm at 100 °C for 20 min. The surface chemical structure of [A-AM silane]/SiO2 was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and molecular orbital calculations. The surface of the silica particles was modified with A-AM silane and primary amine groups were formed. [A-AM silane]/SiO2 was trapped with single-stranded nucleic acids [(Poly-X; X = A (adenine, G (guanine and C (cytosine] in PBS solution at 37 °C for 1 h. The single-stranded nucleic acids were trapped on the surface of the [A-AM silane]/SiO2 by hydrogen bonding to form conjugated materials. The resulting complexes were further conjugated by derivatives of acridine orange (AO as fluorescent labels under the same conditions to form [AO:Poly-X:A-AM silane]/SiO2 complexes. Changes in the fluorescence intensity of these complexes originating from interactions between the single-stranded nucleic acid and aromatic compounds were also evaluated. The change in intensity displayed the order [AO: Poly-G: A-AM silane]/SiO2 > [AO:Poly-A:A-AM silane]/SiO2 >> [AO:Poly-C:A-AM silane]/SiO2. This suggests that the single-stranded nucleic acids conjugated with aminoalkyl chains on the surfaces of SiO2 particles and the change in fluorescence intensity reflected the molecular interaction between AO and the nucleic-acid base in a polynucleotide.

  12. 2H NMR study of dynamics of benzene-d6 interacting with humic and fulvic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Margaret A; Brothers, Lucinda A; Nanny, Mark A

    2011-05-01

    Samples of three humic acids and one fulvic acid with 1% loading of benzene-d(6) in sealed glass tubes have been studied with solid-state deuterium quadrupole-echo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Calculated spectra combining three motional models, two isotropic models and a third more restricted small-angle wobble (SAW) motional model, are fit to the experimental spectra. One isotropic motion (ISO(v)) is assigned to vaporous benzene-d(6) due to the small line width, short T(1), and the loss of this component by about -25 °C when the temperature is lowered. The remaining two motional components, ISO(s) and SAW, are sorbed by the humic or fulvic acid. Benzene-d(6) slowly interacts with the humic substances, progressively filling SAW sites as ISO(s) motion diminishes. Both the sorption and increase in percentage of SAW motion are for the most part complete within 200 days but continue to a lesser extent over a period of a few years. For the SAW motion there are at least two and most likely a series of T(1) values, indicating more than one adsorption environment. Enthalpies of sorption, obtained from application of the van't Hoff equation to the percentages of the different motional models derived from a series of variable temperature spectra, are comparable in magnitude to the enthalpy of vaporization of benzene. In Leonardite humic acid, ΔH and ΔS for the ISO(s) to SAW transition change from positive to negative values with age, implying a transition in the driving force from an entropic effect associated with expansion and deformation in the molecular structure of the humic substance to accommodate benzene-d(6) to an enthalpic effect of strong benzene-d(6)-humic substance interactions. In contrast, at advanced ages, Suwannee River humic and fulvic acids have small positive or near zero ΔH and positive ΔS for the ISO(s) to SAW transition. PMID:21456559

  13. Genotype x Environment interaction for antioxidants and phytic acid contents in bread and durum wheat as influenced by climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Brankovic

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants prevent oxidative stress and exert positive health effects. However, phytic acid among them decreases micronutrients absorption, representing also antinutrient to human and non-ruminant animals. Fifteen bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L. and 15 durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf. genotypes were evaluated across six environments to determine contents of phytic acid (PA, inorganic P (Pi, total yellow pigment, total soluble phenolic compounds, free protein sulfhydryl groups (PSH, and also phytic acid P/Pi (Pp/Pi. The objective of this study was to quantify, for each trait the effects of environment, genotype, and their interaction; and the influence of climatic factors on the Genotype x Environment interaction (GEI by the use of the factorial regression. GEI (P < 0.001 prevailed as source of variation over genotype (P < 0.001 in determining PA content in bread and durum wheat (44.3% and 34.7% of sum of squares-SS, respectively, PSH content in bread and durum wheat (27% and 28.4% of SS, respectively and total soluble phenolic compounds content in durum wheat (35.5% of SS. The major contribution to the GEI represented climatic variables during stages of stem elongation for PA and phenolic compounds, and also flowering, fertilization, grain formation and grain filling for PSH. Total yellow pigment and Pi contents in bread and durum wheat were predominantly determined by genotype (P < 0.001. Models of climatic variables proved to be efficient in the explanation of more than 92% of the SS of GEI for PA and antioxidants contents.

  14. Colloidal precipitates related to Acid Mine Drainage: bacterial diversity and micro fungi-heavy metal interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchetti, G.; Carbone, C.; Consani, S.; Zotti, M.; Di Piazza, S.; Pozzolini, M.; Giovine, M.

    2015-12-01

    In Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) settings colloidal precipitates control the mobility of Potential Toxic Elements (PTEs). Mineral-contaminant relationships (i.e. adsorption, ion-exchange, desorption) are rarely pure abiotic processes. Microbes, mainly bacteria and microfungi, can catalyze several reactions modifying the element speciation, as well as the bioavailability of inorganic pollutants. Soil, sediments, and waters heavily polluted with PTEs through AMD processes are a potential reservoir of extremophile bacteria and fungi exploitable for biotechnological purposes. Two different AMD related colloids, an ochraceous precipitate (deposited in weakly acidic conditions, composed by nanocrystalline goethite) and a greenish-blue precipitate (deposited at near-neutral pH, composed by allophane + woodwardite) were sampled. The aims of this work were to a) characterize the mycobiota present in these colloidal minerals by evaluating the presence of alive fungal propagules and extracting bacteria DNA; b) verify the fungal strains tolerance, and bioaccumulation capability on greenish-blue and ZnSO4 enriched media; c) evaluate potential impact of bacteria in the system geochemistry. The preliminary results show an interesting and selected mycobiota able to survive under unfavourable environmental conditions. A significant number of fungal strains were isolated in pure culture. Among them, species belonging to Penicillium and Trichoderma genera were tested on both greenish-blue and ZnSO4 enriched media. The results show a significant tolerance and bioaccumulation capability to some PTEs. The same colloidal precipitates were processed to extract bacteria DNA by using a specific procedure developed for sediments. The results give a good yield of nucleic acids and a positive PCR amplification of 16S rDNA accomplished the first step for future metagenomic analyses.

  15. Interaction in the boron-fluorine-molybdenum system in hydrochloric acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Existence of heteropolycompounds of the 12-th order with the Keggin structure in the boron-fluorine-molybdenum system in hydrochloric acid media (pH 2.0-2.5) is determined through the spectroscopy (UV, visible, IR, Raman) methods. Its ability to reversible reduction without destruction of the basic structure through monoelectron transition Mo(6) -> Mo(5) is shown. The reduced form is characterized by the component ratio B:F:Mo(5) = 1:3:1 and may be described by brutto formula [BMo5Mo611O38F3]5-. 18 refs., 8 figs

  16. Amino acid residues in the CDC25 guanine nucleotide exchange factor critical for interaction with Ras.

    OpenAIRE

    Park, W.; Mosteller, R D; Broek, D.

    1994-01-01

    Previously we found that negatively charged residues at positions 62, 63, and 69 of H-Ras are involved in binding to the CDC25 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). Using site-directed mutagenesis, we have changed conserved, positively charged residues of CDC25GEF to glutamic acid. We find the nonfunctional CDC25R1374E mutant and the nonfunctional H-RasE63K mutant cooperate in suppression of the loss of CDC25 function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Also, peptides corresponding to residues 1...

  17. [Interaction of divalent metal ions with four-stranded polyriboinosinic acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, V A; Valeev, V A; Gladchenko, G O; Degtiar, M V; Blagoĭ, Iu P

    2000-01-01

    Interaction of Mg2+, Ca2+, Cu2+ ions with the four-stranded poly(I) was studied using differential UV and visible spectroscopies. It was shown that, up to concentrations of approximately 0.1 M, Mg2+ and Ca2+ ions do not bind to heteroatoms of hypoxanthine of the four-stranded poly(I). Cu2+ ions interact with N7 (and/or N1) and O6 (through the water molecule of the hydrate shell of the ion). The latter seems to induce the enolization of hypoxanthine the deprotonation of N1, and, as a result, the transition of the four-stranded helix to single-stranded coils. Single-stranded chains form compact particles with an effective radius of about 100 A. PMID:11094700

  18. Interaction between Ternary Rare Earth Complexes of Cinnamic Acid and Phenanthroline with DNA by Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Dongfang; Ye Yan; Zeng Zhengzhi

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of ternary complexes [RE(phen)(cin)3(H2O)](RE= Nd (III),Ce(III),Eu(III))with calf thymus DNA was investigated by electronic absorption spectroscopy, ethidium bromide(EB)-DNA quenching fluorescent spectra and resonance light scattering. All experimental results indicate that the three complexes bind to DNA by the electrostatic mode and the intercalative mode. It is predicted that these complexes show high anticancer activity or other biologic activity.

  19. The different interactions of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides with two strawberry varieties and the involvement of salicylic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Qing-Yu Zhang; Li-Qing Zhang; Li-Li Song; Ke Duan; Na Li; Yan-Xiu Wang; Qing-Hua Gao

    2016-01-01

    The disease symptoms recognized as ‘Anthracnose’ are caused by Colletotrichum spp. and lead to large-scale strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa Duchesne) losses worldwide in terms of both quality and production. Little is known regarding the mechanisms underlying the genetic variations in the strawberry–Colletotrichum spp. interaction. In this work, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (C. gloeosporioides) infection was characterized in two varieties exhibiting different susceptibilities, and the involvem...

  20. Interaction of the recently approved anticancer drug nintedanib with human acute phase reactant α 1-acid glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Ajmal, Mohammad Rehan; Ponnusamy, Kalaiarasan; Subbarao, Naidu; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-07-01

    A comprehensive study of the interaction of the newly approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Nintedanib (NTB) and Alpha-1 Acid Glycoprotein (AAG) has been carried out by utilizing UV-Vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering and molecular docking techniques. The obtained results showed enhancement of the UV-Vis peak of the protein upon binding to NTB with the fluorescence intensity of AAG is being quenched by NTB via the formation of ground state complex (i.e. Static quenching). Forster distance (Ro) obtained from fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is found to be 2.3 nm. The calculated binding parameters from the modified Stern-Volmer equation showed that NTB binds to AAG with a binding constant in the order of 103. Conformational alteration of the protein upon its binding to NTB was confirmed by the circular dichroism. Dynamic light scattering results showed that the binding interaction of NTB leads to the reduction in hydrodynamic radii of AAG. Dynamic molecular docking results showed that the NTB fits into the central binding cavity in AAG and hydrophobic interaction played the key role in the binding process also the docking studies were performed with methotrexate and clofarabine drugs to look into the common binding regions of these drugs on AAG molecule, it was found that five amino acid residues namely Phe 113, Arg 89, Tyr 126, Phe 48 and Glu 63 were common among the binding regions of three studied drugs this phenomenon of overlapping binding regions may influence the drug transport by the carrier molecule in turn affecting the metabolism of the drug and treatment outcome.

  1. [The molecular mechanism of interaction of trivalent dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) binding to rat hemoglobin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Wang, Wen-Wen; Jin, Hui-Fang; Bao, Ling-Ling; Naranmandura, Hua; Qin, Ying-Jie; Li, Chun-Hui

    2014-05-01

    In our previous work, we found that trivalent dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) have high affinity binding to cysteine residue 13 of rat hemoglobin. However, it is still unknown why arsenic intermediate metabolite DMA(III) has high binding affinity for Cysl3 but not for other cysteine residues 93, 140, 111 and 125. In order to better understand the molecular mechanism of DMA(III) with rat hemoglobin, we have done current study. So, SD rats were divided into control and arsenic-treated groups randomly. Arsenic species in lysate of red blood cells were analyzed by HPLC-ICP-MS, and then determined by a hybrid quadrupole TOF MS. In addition, trivalent DMA(III) binds to different cysteine residues in rat hemoglobin alpha and beta chains were also simulated by Molecular Docking. Only Cys13 in alpha chain is able to bind to DMA(III) from the experiment results. Cys13 of alpha chain in rat hemoglobin is a specific binding site for DMA(III), and we found that amino acids compose pockets structure and surround Cys13 (but not other cysteine residues), make DMA(III) much easy to bind cysteine 13. Taken together, the DMA(III) specific binding to Cys13 is related to spatial structure of Cys13. PMID:25151739

  2. Interaction of limestone grains and acidic solutions from the oxidation of pyrite tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, M. [Departamento de Edafologia, EPS-CITE IIB, Canada San Urbano, Universidad de Almeria, 04120 Almeria (Spain)]. E-mail: msimon@ual.es; Martin, F. [Departamento de Edafologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, 18002 Granada (Spain); Garcia, I. [Departamento de Edafologia, EPS-CITE IIB, Canada San Urbano, Universidad de Almeria, 04120 Almeria (Spain); Bouza, P. [Centro Nacional Patagonico, CONICEF, Boulevard Brown s/n, 9120 Puerto Madryn, Chubut (Argentina); Dorronsoro, C. [Departamento de Edafologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, 18002 Granada (Spain); Aguilar, J. [Departamento de Edafologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, 18002 Granada (Spain)

    2005-05-01

    To characterise the coatings formed and to analyse element partitioning between the aqueous and solid phase, suspensions were prepared with four grain sizes of limestone and three different amounts of acidic solution from oxidized pyrite tailings. In all cases, red coatings with three different layers covered the grain surface, sealing off the acidic solution. The inner layer was composed mainly of basaluminite, the middle layer of schwertmannite, and the outer layer of gypsum and jarosite. Zn, Cd and Tl were co-precipitated by Fe and Al; As and Pb were co-precipitated almost completely by Fe; and Cu formed mainly Cu sulphates. All trace elements reached almost total precipitation at pH 6.3, but the precipitation of As and Pb tended to decrease as the pH rose. Consequently, liming should be calculated so that the soil pH does not exceed 6.3. This calculation should take into account that the armouring of the limestone grains can cause underestimations in the amount of liming material needed. - Basaluminite, schwertmannite and jarosite armored the limestone grains, and almost all trace elements co-precipitated, but the precipitation of As and Pb tended to decrease as the pH rose.

  3. A novel fluorescent vesicular sensor for saccharides based on boronic acid-diol interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujian; He, Zhenfeng; Li, Guowen

    2010-04-15

    A novel amphiphile containing two functional groups of both naphthalene and boronic acid, 2-(hexadecyloxy)-naphthalene-6-boronic acid (HNBA), has been synthesized. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated the formation of bilayer vesicles in the ethanol/water solution (Phi=0.6). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) established the presence of crystal-to-liquid crystal transition at 63.36 degrees C. The vesicular fluorescence properties upon binding with carbohydrates have been studied in ethanol/water buffer at pH 7.4. Addition of saccharides to the vesicular solution, the fluorescent intensities of naphthalene in HNBA vesicles centered at 348 nm decreased dramatically with increasing concentration of saccharides. The change tendency of fluorescent intensities of the HNAB vesicles with concentration of saccharides followed in the order of fructose>galactose>maltose>glucose. The pH profiles of the fluorescence intensity were studied in the absence and in the presence of sugars. Also, the urine sample induced spectral changes of the HNBA vesicles were studied. These results suggest that the HNBA vesicles may be developed as a continuous monitoring and implantable fluorescence vesicular sensor, which might be applied in the practical field. PMID:20188967

  4. Specific interaction of aurintricarboxylic acid with the human immunodeficiency virus/CD4 cell receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The triphenylmethane derivative aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA), but not aurin, selectively prevented the binding of OKT4A/Leu-3a monoclonal antibody (mAb) and, to a lesser extent, OKT4 mAb to the CD4 cell receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The effect was seen within 1 min at an ATA concentration of 10 μM in various T4+ cells (MT-4, U-937, peripheral blood lymphocytes, and monocytes). It was dose-dependent and reversible. ATA prevented the attachment of radiolabeled HIV-1 particles to MT-4 cells, which could be expected as the result of its specific binding to the HIV/CD4 receptor. Other HIV inhibitors such as suramin, fuchsin acid, azidothymidine, dextran sulfate, heparin, and pentosan polysulfate did not affect OKT4A/Leu-3a mAb binding to the CD4 receptor, although the sulfated polysaccharides suppressed HIV-1 adsorption to the cells at concentrations required for complete protection against HIV-1 cytopathogenicity. Thus, ATA is a selective marker molecule for the CD4 receptor. ATA also interfered with the staining of membrane-associated HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120 by a mAb against it. These unusual properties of a small molecule of nonimmunological origin may have important implications for the study of CD4/HIV/AIDS pathogenesis and possibly treatment

  5. The Citrus transcription factor, CitERF13, regulates citric acid accumulation via a protein-protein interaction with the vacuolar proton pump, CitVHA-c4

    OpenAIRE

    Shao-jia Li; Xue-ren Yin; Xiu-lan Xie; Andrew C. Allan; Hang Ge; Shu-ling Shen; Kun-song Chen

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids are essential to fruit flavor. The vacuolar H+ transporting adenosine triphosphatase (V-ATPase) plays an important role in organic acid transport and accumulation. However, less is known of V-ATPase interacting proteins and their relationship with organic acid accumulation. The relationship between V-ATPase and citric acid was investigated, using the citrus tangerine varieties ‘Ordinary Ponkan (OPK)’ and an early maturing mutant ‘Zaoshu Ponkan (ZPK)’. Five V-ATPase genes (CitVHA...

  6. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    , and demonstrated in public settings. We then describe INTERACT, a proposed research project that stages the robotic marionettes in a live performance. The interdisciplinary project brings humanities research to bear on scientific and technological inquiry, and culminates in the development a live......This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  7. Space Technology Research Grants Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Space Technology Research Grants Program will accelerate the development of "push" technologies to support the future space science and exploration...

  8. Genetic analyses of interactions among gibberellin, abscisic acid, and brassinosteroids in the control of flowering time in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata A Domagalska

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic interactions between phytohormones in the control of flowering time in Arabidopsis thaliana have not been extensively studied. Three phytohormones have been individually connected to the floral-timing program. The inductive function of gibberellins (GAs is the most documented. Abscisic acid (ABA has been demonstrated to delay flowering. Finally, the promotive role of brassinosteroids (BRs has been established. It has been reported that for many physiological processes, hormone pathways interact to ensure an appropriate biological response. METHODOLOGY: We tested possible genetic interactions between GA-, ABA-, and BR-dependent pathways in the control of the transition to flowering. For this, single and double mutants deficient in the biosynthesis of GAs, ABA, and BRs were used to assess the effect of hormone deficiency on the timing of floral transition. Also, plants that over-express genes encoding rate-limiting enzymes in each biosynthetic pathway were generated and the flowering time of these lines was investigated. CONCLUSIONS: Loss-of-function studies revealed a complex relationship between GAs and ABA, and between ABA and BRs, and suggested a cross-regulatory relation between GAs to BRs. Gain-of-function studies revealed that GAs were clearly limiting in their sufficiency of action, whereas increases in BRs and ABA led to a more modest phenotypic effect on floral timing. We conclude from our genetic tests that the effects of GA, ABA, and BR on timing of floral induction are only in partially coordinated action.

  9. Hydrogen-bonded complexes resulting from the interaction of alkylated barbituric acid and 2,6-diamidopyridine derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideratou, Z.; Tsiourvas, D.; Paleos, C. M.; Peppas, E.; Anastassopoulou, J.; Theophanides, T.

    1999-06-01

    In the present study a hydrophilic or a lipophilic alkylated barbituric acid derivative was allowed to interact in the melt and in solution with a complementary series of alkylated diamidopyridine derivatives, both hydrophilic or lipophilic. The interaction between the molecules was mainly studied by FT-IR spectroscopy. Phase transitions of reaction mixtures were studied with polarized optical microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. It was found that the molecular recognition of the interacting components is only effective between the molecularly compatible ones. Specifically, employing Methods I and II, (see text) the short chain derivatives form 1 : 1 complexes whereas the long-chain derivatives are only partially complexed. Derivatives of dissimilar lipophilicity do not form complexes employing the same methods. However, comparing the two methods, complexation is more effective employing Method II. The induction of molecular recognition in the presence of an apolar solvent is enhanced in solution, Method III. The equilibrium which was established in solution is shifted to different directions during the evaporation step (Method II), leading either to the formation of complexes or to self-association.

  10. Response surface methodology investigation into the interactions between arsenic and humic acid in water during the coagulation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Malcolm Alexander; Tubić, Aleksandra; Agbaba, Jasmina; Nikić, Jasmina; Maletić, Snežana; Molnar Jazić, Jelena; Dalmacija, Božo

    2016-07-15

    Interactions between arsenic and natural organic matter (NOM) are key limiting factors during the optimisation of drinking water treatment when significant amounts of both must be removed. This work uses Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to investigate how they interact during their simultaneous removal by iron chloride coagulation, using humic acid (HA) as a model NOM substance. Using a three factor Box-Behnken experimental design, As and HA removals were modelled, as well as a combined removal response. ANOVA results showed the significance of the coagulant dose for all three responses. At high initial arsenic concentrations (200μg/l), As removal was significantly hindered by the presence of HA. In contrast, the HA removal response was found to be largely independent of the initial As concentration, with the optimum coagulant dose increasing at increasing HA concentrations. The combined response was similar to the HA removal response, and the interactions evident are most interesting in terms of optimising treatment processes during the preparation of drinking water, highlighting the importance of utilizing RSM for such investigations. The combined response model was successfully validated with two different groundwaters used for drinking water supply in the Republic of Serbia, showing excellent agreement under similar experimental conditions. PMID:27031919

  11. Characterization of putative cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus-like motif of Campylobacter jejuni cytolethal distending toxin C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ho Lai

    Full Text Available Cytolethal distending toxin (CDT produced by Campylobacter jejuni comprises a heterotrimeric complex formed by CdtA, CdtB, and CdtC. Among these toxin subunits, CdtA and CdtC function as essential proteins that mediate toxin binding to cytoplasmic membranes followed by delivery of CdtB into the nucleus. The binding of CdtA/CdtC to the cell surface is mediated by cholesterol, a major component in lipid rafts. Although the putative cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC domain of CDT has been reported from several bacterial pathogens, the protein regions contributing to CDT binding to cholesterol in C. jejuni remain unclear. Here, we selected a potential CRAC-like region present in the CdtC from C. jejuni for analysis. Molecular modeling showed that the predicted functional domain had the shape of a hydrophobic groove, facilitating cholesterol localization to this domain. Mutation of a tyrosine residue in the CRAC-like region decreased direct binding of CdtC to cholesterol rather than toxin intermolecular interactions and led to impaired CDT intoxication. These results provide a molecular link between C. jejuni CdtC and membrane-lipid rafts through the CRAC-like region, which contributes to toxin recognition and interaction with cholesterol.

  12. Interaction of P-aminobenzoic acid with normal and sickel erythrocyte membrane: photoaffinity labelling of the binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premachandra, B.R.

    1986-03-05

    Electron microscopic studies revealed that P-Amino benzoic acid (PABA) could prevent eichinocytosis of red cells in vitro. Equilibrium binding studies with right side out membrane vesicles (ROV) revealed a similar number of binding sites (1.2-1.4 ..mu..mol/mg) and Kd (1.4-1.6 mM) values for both normal and sickle cell membranes. /sup 14/C-Azide analogue of PABA was synthesized as a photoaffinity label to probe its sites of interaction on the erythrocyte membranes. Competitive binding studies of PABA with its azide indicated that both the compounds share common binding sites on the membrane surface since a 20 fold excess of azide inhibited PABA binding in a linear fashion. The azide was covalently incorporated into the membrane components only upon irradiation (52-35% of the label found in the proteins and the rest in lipids). Electrophoretic analysis of photolabelled ROV revealed that the azide interacts chiefly with Band 3 protein. PABA inhibited both high and low affinity calcium (Ca) binding sites situated on either surface of the membrane in a non-competitive manner; however, Ca binding stimulated by Mg-ATP was not affected. Ca transport into inside out vesicles was inhibited by PABA; but it did not affect the calcium ATP-ase activity. The authors studies suggest that the mechanism of action of PABA is mediated by its interaction with Band 3 protein (anion channel), calcium channel and calcium binding sites of erythrocyte membrane.

  13. Energy grant programs 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Commission of the European Community has instituted a host of energy grant schemes of several years duration worth more than 2 billion ECU altogether. It thereby aims at research and development, demonstration and transfer to market of energy technologies, energy conservation, and energy-use efficiency, as well as at the harnessing of renewable energy sources. Besides, there are national German programs worth more than 5 billion DM. EUREKA with its 19 member states is a technology initiative comprising the whole of Europe that equally initiates and funds energy projects for a volume of, currently, about 1.1 billion DM. This guide informs undertakings as well as scientists and researchers on all programs in condensed form. Transparency and topicality, the availability of contact persons and ease of contacting are keys to successful participation. The book is intended as an aid especially for small and medium-sized enterprises as well as for enterprises in the new federal states. (orig.)

  14. Redox labelling of nucleic acids for analyzing nucleotide sequences and monitoring DNA-protein interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojta, Miroslav; Havran, Luděk; Horáková Brázdilová, Petra; Pivoňková, Hana; Kostečka, Pavel; Macíčková-Cahová, Hana; Raindlová, Veronika; Vrábel, Milan; Hocek, Michal

    Praha : Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry AS CR, v. v. i., 2011 - (Hocek, M.), s. 155-158 ISBN 978-80-86241-37-1. - (Collection Symposium Series. 12). [Chemistry of Nucleic Acid Components /15./. Český Krumlov (CZ), 05.06.2011-10.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040903; GA ČR GA203/09/0317; GA AV ČR(CZ) GPP206/11/P739 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : DNA * electrochemistry * redox labeling Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  15. Lipophilic antioxidants and polyunsaturated fatty acids in lipoprotein classes: distribution and interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunesen, V.H.; Weber, Christine; Hølmer, Gunhild Kofoed

    2001-01-01

    (nine women, nine men), mean age 26 +/- 3 y, recruited among the university students; no dropouts. Interventions: Three supplementation periods of 10 days: 100 m/day CoQ(10), 350 mg/day D-alpha -tocopherol, and 2g/day concentrated fish oil. Fasting venous blood samples were collected twice before the...... first period and then after each period. Plasma and isolated lipoproteins were analysed for cholesterol, triacylglycerol, alpha- and gamma -tocopherol, CoQ(10), and fatty acid composition. Results: Significant (P <0.05) increase in CoQ(10) and -tocopherol occurred in all lipoprotein classes after...... supplementation. CoQ(10) was primarily incorporated into low-density lipoprotein (LDL). alpha -tocopherol and fish oil n-3 PUFAs had similar patterns. They were equally distributed between LDL and high-density lipoprotein (HDL), with a smaller part in VLDL. The total sum of PUFA was unchanged following all...

  16. Interactions between major chlorogenic acid isomers and chemical changes in coffee brew that affect antioxidant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ningjian; Xue, Wei; Kennepohl, Pierre; Kitts, David D

    2016-12-15

    Coffee bean source and roasting conditions significantly (p<0.05) affected the content of chlorogenic acid (CGA) isomers, several indices of browning and subsequent antioxidant values. Principal component analysis was used to interpret the correlations between physiochemical and antioxidant parameters of coffee. CGA isomer content was positively correlated (p<0.001) to capacity of coffee to reduce nitric oxide and scavenge Frémy's salt. Indices of browning in roasted coffee were positively correlated (p<0.001) to ABTS and TEMPO radical scavenging capacity, respectively. Only the CGA content of coffee corresponded to intracellular antioxidant capacity measured in Caco-2 intestinal cells. This study concluded that the intracellular antioxidant capacity that best describes potential health benefits of coffee positively corresponds best with CGA content. PMID:27451179

  17. Interaction in aqueous systems containing indium trichloride, hydrogen sulfide and hydrochloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of experimental data on α-In2S3 solubility in hydrochloric solutions the standard value of the Gibbs formation energy of crystal In2S3 (-351.96±5.87 kJ/mol) was refined. The value of solubility product (SP) of crystal indium (3) sulfide, lg SP In2S3 = -75.6 (μ = 0, t = 25 deg C), was obtained. By the methods of physicochemical computer simulation equilibrium composition of the system InCl3-HCl-H2S-H2O at 25, 50, 75 deg C, hydrogen sulfide partial pressure from 103 to 105 Pa, hydrochloric acid concentration 0.01-0.5 mol/lg H2O was determined. Indium phase diagrams in hydrochloric solutions were plotted

  18. Interaction processes of tetravalent actinides in the system humic acid/quartz sand/solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work the influence of HA on the interaction of tetravalent actinides onto quartz sand was investigated in batch and column experiments. HA can affect the sorption of actinides onto mineral surface as a complexing ligand for cations in solutions, and as an adsorbent by modifying the properties of the mineral surface. Batch experiments were performed with Th(IV) as stable tetravalent actinide element. Column experiments were carried out with uranium which is less stable in the tetravalent state under laboratory conditions. Results of the U(IV) migration were compared to the U(VI) migration. (orig.)

  19. Nano carbon supported platinum catalyst interaction behavior with perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer and their interface structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma

    2016-01-01

    behavior of Nafion ionomer on platinized carbon nano fibers (CNFs), carbon nano tubes (CNTs) and amorphous carbon (Vulcan). The interaction is affected by the catalyst surface oxygen groups as well as porosity. Comparisons between the carbon supports and platinized equivalents are carried out. It reveals......, the ionomer may have an adsorption preference to the platinum nano particle rather than to the overall catalyst. This was verified by a close examination on the decomposition temperature of the carbon support and the ionomer. The electrochemical stability of the catalyst ionomer composite electrode suggests...

  20. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists such as...

  1. Interaction of ferroceneboronic acid with diols at aqueous and non-aqueous conditions - signalling and binding abilities of an electrochemical probe for saccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Electrochemical characterisation of ferroceneboronic acid-diol interactions in non-aqueous solutions. • Elucidation of the signalling process and signalling mechanism of the ferroceneboronic acid upon interaction with diols in aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. • Effect of coordination of boron atom on electrochemistry of ferroceneboronic acid in free and bound forms with diols. - Abstract: Ferroceneboronic acid (FcBA) was employed as a model compound for clarification of binding and signalling properties of molecular probe for saccharides. As the simplest electrochemically active boronic acid, its interactions with diverse diols were studied in homogeneous phase under aqueous and non-aqueous conditions. The FcBA-diol system was examined by cyclic voltammetry resulting in two redox pairs corresponding to free and bound forms of FcBA. Redox potential of the bound form of FcBA was shifted in the cathodic direction in aqueous conditions due to coordination of the hydroxyl group to the boron atom. Oppositely, the anodic shift of the redox potential was observed upon the interaction of FcBA with diols in non-aqueous solvents. The binding properties and signalling mechanism of electrochemically active boronic acids were deduced and the assumptions resulting from the electrochemical behaviour were confirmed by 1H and 11B NMR spectroscopies. The binding constants of the tested diols in aqueous and non-aqueous media were determined and compared

  2. different Roles for the axin interactions with the SAMP versus the second twenty amino acid repeat of adenomatous polyposis coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneikert, Jean; Ruppert, Jan Gustav; Behrens, Jürgen; Wenzel, Eva Maria

    2014-01-01

    Wnt signalling is prevented by the proteosomal degradation of β-catenin, which occurs in a destruction complex containing adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), APC-like (APCL), Axin and Axin2. Truncating mutations of the APC gene result in the constitutive stabilisation of β-catenin and the initiation of colon cancer, although tumour cells tolerate the expression of wild-type APCL. Using the colocalisation of overexpressed Axin, APC and APCL constructs as a readout of interaction, we found that Axin interacted with the second twenty amino acid repeat (20R2) of APC and APCL. This interaction involved a domain adjacent to the C-terminal DIX domain of Axin. We identified serine residues within the 20R2 of APCL that were involved in Axin colocalisation, the phosphorylation of truncated APCL and the down-regulation of β-catenin. Our results indicated that Axin, but not Axin2, displaced APC, but not APCL, from the cytoskeleton and stimulated its incorporation into bright cytoplasmic dots that others have recognised as β-catenin destruction complexes. The SAMP repeats in APC interact with the N-terminal RGS domain of Axin. Our data showed that a short domain containing the first SAMP repeat in truncated APC was required to stimulate Axin oligomerisation. This was independent of Axin colocalisation with 20R2. Our data also suggested that the RGS domain exerted an internal inhibitory constraint on Axin oligomerisation. Considering our data and those from others, we discuss a working model whereby β-catenin phosphorylation involves Axin and the 20R2 of APC or APCL and further processing of phospho-β-catenin occurs upon the oligomerisation of Axin that is induced by binding the SAMP repeats in APC. PMID:24722208

  3. Interactions of meteoric smoke particles with sulphuric acid in the Earth's stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. W. Saunders

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nano-sized meteoric smoke particles (MSPs with iron-magnesium silicate compositions, formed in the upper mesosphere as a result of meteoric ablation, may remove sulphuric acid from the gas-phase above 40 km and may also affect the composition and behaviour of supercooled H2SO4-H2O droplets in the global stratospheric aerosol (Junge layer. This study describes a time-resolved spectroscopic analysis of the evolution of the ferric (Fe3+ ion originating from amorphous ferrous (Fe2+-based silicate powders dissolved in varying Wt % sulphuric acid (30–75% solutions over a temperature range of 223–295 K. Complete dissolution of the particles was observed under all conditions. The first-order rate coefficient for dissolution decreases at higher Wt % and lower temperature, which is consistent with the increased solution viscosity limiting diffusion of H2SO4 to the particle surfaces. Dissolution under stratospheric conditions should take less than a week, and is much faster than the dissolution of crystalline Fe2+ compounds. The chemistry climate model UMSLIMCAT (based on the UKMO Unified Model was then used to study the transport of MSPs through the middle atmosphere. A series of model experiments were performed with different uptake coefficients. Setting the concentration of 1.5 nm radius MSPs at 80 km to 3000 cm−3 (based on rocket-borne charged particle measurements, the model matches the reported Wt % Fe values of 0.5–1.0 in Junge layer sulphate particles, and the MSP optical extinction between 40 and 75 km measured by a satellite-borne spectrometer, if the global meteoric input rate is about 20 t d−1. The model indicates that an uptake coefficient ≥0.01 is required to account for the observed two orders of magnitude depletion of H2SO4 vapour above 40 km.

  4. Interactions of meteoric smoke particles with sulphuric acid in the Earth's stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. W. Saunders

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Nano-sized meteoric smoke particles (MSPs with iron-magnesium silicate compositions, formed in the upper mesosphere as a result of meteoric ablation, may remove sulphuric acid from the gas-phase above 40 km and may also affect the composition and behaviour of supercooled H2SO4-H2O droplets in the global stratospheric aerosol (Junge layer.

    This study describes a time-resolved spectroscopic analysis of the evolution of the ferric (Fe3+ ion originating from amorphous ferrous (Fe2+-based silicate powders dissolved in varying Wt % sulphuric acid (30–75 % solutions over a temperature range of 223–295 K. Complete dissolution of the particles was observed under all conditions. The first-order rate coefficient for dissolution decreases at higher Wt % and lower temperature, which is consistent with the increased solution viscosity limiting diffusion of H2SO4 to the particle surfaces. Dissolution under stratospheric conditions should take less than a week, and is much faster than the dissolution of crystalline Fe2+ compounds.

    The chemistry climate model UMSLIMCAT (based on the UKMO Unified Model was then used to study the transport of MSPs through the middle atmosphere. A series of model experiments were performed with different uptake coefficients. Setting the concentration of 1.5 nm radius MSPs at 80 km to 3000 cm−3 (based on rocket-borne charged particle measurements, the model matches the reported Wt % Fe values of 0.5–1.0 in Junge layer sulphate particles, and the MSP optical extinction between 40 and 75 km measured by a satellite-borne spectrometer, if the global meteoric input rate is about 20 tonnes per day. The model indicates that an uptake coefficient ≥0.01 is required to account for the observed two orders of magnitude depletion of H2SO4 vapour above 40 km.

  5. Microbial Communities and a Novel Symbiotic Interaction in Extremely Acidic Mine Drainage at Iron Mountain, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, B. J.; Banfield, J. F.

    2002-12-01

    Culture-independent studies of microbial communities in the acid mine drainage (AMD) system associated with the Richmond ore body at Iron Mountain, CA, demonstrated that the total number of prokaryote lineages is small compared to other environments. Phylogenetic analyses of 232 small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes from six clone libraries revealed some novel lines of descent. Many of the novel clones were from libraries constructed from subaerial biofilms associated with fine grained pyrite. The clones form several distinct groups within the order Thermoplasmatales and are most closely related to Ferroplasma spp. and Thermoplasma spp. Another novel group detected in a pH 1.4 pool and a pH 0.8 biofilm falls within the Rickettsiales (alpha-proteobacteria and related to mitochondria) and is most closely related to a-proteobacterial endosymbionts of Acanthamoeba spp. An oligonucleotide rRNA probe designed to target alpha-proteobacteria revealed that these are protist endosymbionts, and that they are associated with a small percentage (2%) of the total eukaryotes in samples from the Richmond mine. Measurements of the internal pH of these protists show that their cytosol is close to neutral. Thus, protists provide a habitat within the AMD system that is at least 5 pH units less acidic than the surroundings. The uncultured AMD endosymbionts have a conserved 273 nucleotide intervening sequence (IVS) in the variable V1 region of their 16S rRNA gene. The IVS does not match any sequence in current databases, but predicted secondary structure form well defined stem loops. The discovery of inserts within a highly conserved gene is extremely rare. At present we have not identified the protist host. However, it is interesting to note that protists previously shown to have a-proteobacterial endosymbionts possess 18S rRNA genes that contain both IVSs and group I introns. The possibility that the IVS in the AMD bacteria is a result of extensive genetic exchange between a

  6. Interaction indole-3-acetic acid IAA with lectin Canavalia maritima seeds reveal new function of lectins in plant physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Filho, J.C.; Santi-Gadelha, T.; Gadelha, C.A.A.; Delatorre, P. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Teixeira, C.S.; Rocha, B.A.M.; Nobrega, R.B.; Alencar, K.L.L.; Cavada, B.S. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Lectins are a class of proteins of non-immune origin characterized by its capability in interacts specifically and reversibly to mono and oligosaccharides. In plant several possible roles have been suggested including their function in seed maturation, cell wall assembly, defense mechanisms, or rhizobial nodulation of legume roots. Nearly all application and proposed of the plant lectins are based on their specific carbohydrate binding. However, it has been reported that lectins from legumes, might interact with other molecules, such as non proteic amino acids and hydrophobic compounds. This study show the first the crystal structure based on molecular replacement of the Canavalia maritima (CML) complexed with IAA correlated with possible role in plant development. Purified CML was dissolved in 20 mMTrisHCl pH 7.6 containing 5 mM IAA, the suitable co-crystals from CML-IAA complex grew in condition 4 of screen I (0.1 M TrisHCl pH 8.5 and 2.0 M ammonium sulfate). This crystal belong to the orthorhombic space group I222 with unit-cell parameters a = 67.1 ; b = 70.7 , c = 97.7 , The structure was refined at 2.1 of resolution to a final R factor of 20.63 % and an R free of 22.54 %. To check the relative position of the IAA molecule in relation to the biological assemble of the CML, the tetrameric structure was generate by crystallographic symmetry. IAA molecules are positioned in the central cavity. The IAA is stabilized by interacting through hydrogen bounds and Van der Waals forces with the amino acids residues Ser 108 and Asn131, and two water molecules. The hydrophilic interactions occur between IAA and side chains of Ser 108, Asn131 and water molecules 26 and 31 by H-bonds. The OG oxygen from Ser108 display H-bonds with O2 and O3 oxygen atoms from IAA, 3.1 and 2.8 respectively. The tetrameric structure of CML complexed with IAA revels which this protein can act during the seedling in plant development. (author)

  7. Interaction indole-3-acetic acid IAA with lectin Canavalia maritima seeds reveal new function of lectins in plant physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Lectins are a class of proteins of non-immune origin characterized by its capability in interacts specifically and reversibly to mono and oligosaccharides. In plant several possible roles have been suggested including their function in seed maturation, cell wall assembly, defense mechanisms, or rhizobial nodulation of legume roots. Nearly all application and proposed of the plant lectins are based on their specific carbohydrate binding. However, it has been reported that lectins from legumes, might interact with other molecules, such as non proteic amino acids and hydrophobic compounds. This study show the first the crystal structure based on molecular replacement of the Canavalia maritima (CML) complexed with IAA correlated with possible role in plant development. Purified CML was dissolved in 20 mMTrisHCl pH 7.6 containing 5 mM IAA, the suitable co-crystals from CML-IAA complex grew in condition 4 of screen I (0.1 M TrisHCl pH 8.5 and 2.0 M ammonium sulfate). This crystal belong to the orthorhombic space group I222 with unit-cell parameters a = 67.1 ; b = 70.7 , c = 97.7 , The structure was refined at 2.1 of resolution to a final R factor of 20.63 % and an R free of 22.54 %. To check the relative position of the IAA molecule in relation to the biological assemble of the CML, the tetrameric structure was generate by crystallographic symmetry. IAA molecules are positioned in the central cavity. The IAA is stabilized by interacting through hydrogen bounds and Van der Waals forces with the amino acids residues Ser 108 and Asn131, and two water molecules. The hydrophilic interactions occur between IAA and side chains of Ser 108, Asn131 and water molecules 26 and 31 by H-bonds. The OG oxygen from Ser108 display H-bonds with O2 and O3 oxygen atoms from IAA, 3.1 and 2.8 respectively. The tetrameric structure of CML complexed with IAA revels which this protein can act during the seedling in plant development. (author)

  8. Interaction of Pd(II) and Pt(II) Amino Acid Complexes With Dinucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Vicens, Margarita; Caubet, Amparo; Moreno, Virtudes

    1997-01-01

    The interaction of the dinucleotides d(ApG) and d(ApA) with [Pd(aa)Cl2], where aa = L- or D-histidine or the methyl ester of L-histidine, and with [Pt(Met)Cl2], where Met = L-methionine was studied by H1 and C13 NMR and CD measurements. In the case of the L-histidine and L-histidineOMe, the reaction with d(ApG) appeared to give the bifunctional adducts Pd(L-Histidine)N1(1)N7(2) and Pd(L-HisOMe)N1(1)N7(2), but the behavior with D-histidine suggested the formation of the monofunctional adduct P...

  9. Studies on the interaction of the food colorant tartrazine with double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anirban; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2016-05-01

    Interaction of the food additive tartrazine with double-stranded DNA was studied by spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques. Absorbance studies revealed that tartrazine exhibited hypochromism in the presence of DNA without any bathochromic effects. Minor groove displacement assay of DAPI and Hoechst 33258 suggested that tartrazine binds in the minor groove of DNA. The complexation was predominantly entropy driven with a smaller but favorable enthalpic contribution to the standard molar Gibbs energy. The equilibrium constant was evaluated to be (3.68 ± .08) × 10(4) M(-1) at 298.15 K. The negative standard molar heat capacity value along with an enthalpy-entropy compensation phenomenon proposed the involvement of dominant hydrophobic forces in the binding process. Tartrazine enhanced the thermal stability of DNA by 7.53 K under saturation conditions. PMID:26159358

  10. Phase behavior, interaction and properties of acetic acid lignin-containing polyurethane films coupled with aminopropyltriethoxy silane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. H. Wang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel acetic acid lignin-containing polyurethane (LPU films coupled with aminopropyltriethoxy silane (APTS (LPUSi or the mixture of APTS and trimethylol propane (TMP (LPUSiT were prepared. With 2% APTS addition, the crosslinking density increased, and the resultant films were endowed with good mechanical properties and water resistance. It was also found that the hydrogen bonding interaction between –NH and –C=O of urethane was destroyed, and new hydrogen bonds between APTS and LPU were formed. However, when APTS content was greater than 4%, significant phase aggregation were detected, resulting in poor mechanical properties and water resistance. In contrast, the crosslinking density, tensile strength and water resistance can be further improved with TMP addition at 2% APTS. The simultaneous addition of APTS and TMP was beneficial for phase mixing and the formation of uniform network. And the surface morphology of LPUSiT films became smoother and more homogeneous.

  11. Taking Soft Skills for Granted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Gail

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Labor will award a total of $2 billion over the next four years through the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training Grant Program. Grants will support the development and improvement of postsecondary programs of two years or less that use evidence-based or innovative strategies to prepare students…

  12. Apply for Cancer Control Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences funds a large portfolio of grants and contracts. The portfolio currently includes approximately 800 grants valued at nearly $450 million. Here we provide a listing of funding opportunities that are currently accepting applications. Please visit this page regularly as new funding opportunities are added upon approval by NCI.

  13. The Grants World Inside Out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Robert A.

    This book presents a lighthearted examination of the trials and tribulations of university research development and grant acquisition. Fun is poked at the grant acquisition process through a series of characters and their advice: Ann Granters (advice column format) gives directions on how to "wire" a proposal; Bogie tells how to squeeze the most…

  14. LBL coating of type I collagen and hyaluronic acid on aminolyzed PLLA to enhance the cell-material interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Zhao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work is to assemble extracellular matrix components onto poly (L-lactic acid (PLLA films using layer-by-layer (LBL depositing method to enhance the cell-material interaction. To introduce charges onto the hydrophobic and neutral PLLA surface so that the electronic assembly can be processed, poly (ethylene imine (PEI was covalently bonded to modify the PLLA films. Positively charged collagen I (Col I was then deposited onto the aminolyzed PLLA film surface in a LBL assembly manner using hyaluronic acid (HA as a negatively charged polyelectrolyte. The PEI modification efficiency was monitored via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS measurements. The results of Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR and Water contact angle (WCA monitoring the LBL assemble process presented that the HA/Col I deposited alternately onto the PLLA surface. The surface topography of the films was observed by Atomic force microscope (AFM. In vitro osteoblast culture found that the presence of Col I layer greatly improved the cytocompatibility of the PLLA films in terms of cell viability, cell proliferation and Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP expression. Furthermore, osteoblast extensions were found to be directed by contact guidance of the aligned Col I fibrils. Thus, these very flexible systems may allow broad applications for improve the bioactivity of polymeric materials, which might be a potential application for bone tissue engineering.

  15. Exciton interaction in molecular beacons: a sensitive sensor for short range modifications of the nucleic acid structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernacchi, S; Mély, Y

    2001-07-01

    Molecular beacons are hairpin-shaped, single-stranded oligonucleotides constituting sensitive fluorescent DNA probes widely used to report the presence of specific nucleic acids. In its closed form the stem of the hairpin holds the fluorophore covalently attached to one end, close to the quencher, which is covalently attached to the other end. Here we report that in the closed form the fluorophore and the quencher form a ground state intramolecular heterodimer whose spectral properties can be described by exciton theory. Formation of the heterodimers was found to be poorly sensitive to the stem sequence, the respective positions of the dyes and the nature of the nucleic acid (DNA or RNA). The heterodimer allows strong coupling between the transition dipoles of the two chromophores, leading to dramatic changes in the absorption spectrum that are not compatible with a Förster-type fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) mechanism. The excitonic heterodimer and its associated absorption spectrum are extremely sensitive to the orientation of and distance between the dyes. Accordingly, the application of molecular beacons can be extended to monitoring short range modifications of the stem structure. Moreover, the excitonic interaction was also found to operate for doubly end-labeled duplexes. PMID:11433038

  16. Tryptophan regulates thaxtomin A and indole-3-acetic acid production in Streptomyces scabiei and modifies its interactions with radish seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legault, Geneviève S; Lerat, Sylvain; Nicolas, Philippe; Beaulieu, Carole

    2011-09-01

    The virulence of Streptomyces scabiei, the causal agent of common scab, depends mainly on the production of the toxin thaxtomin A. S. scabiei also produces indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) but the role of this hormone in the interaction between pathogenic streptomycetes and plants has not yet been elucidated. Tryptophan is a biosynthetic precursor of both IAA and thaxtomin A. In this study, the effect of tryptophan on thaxtomin A and IAA production as well as its effect on the transcription of the corresponding biosynthetic genes in S. scabiei has been analyzed. In vitro IAA production depended on the availability of tryptophan. However, addition of this amino acid to the culture medium inhibited the biosynthesis of thaxtomin A. Expression of thaxtomin A biosynthetic genes nos and txtA were strongly repressed in the presence of tryptophan; however, modulation of the expression was not observed for the IAA biosynthetic genes iaaM and iaaH. The effects of an exogenous tryptophan supply on S. scabiei virulence were assessed on radish seedlings. Addition of tryptophan reduced symptoms on inoculated radish roots compared with seedlings grown in the absence of the bacterium, by way of inhibition of thaxtomin A production and increase of IAA biosynthesis. PMID:21521002

  17. Interactions between canola meal and flaxseed oil in the diets of White Lohmann hens on fatty acid profile and sensory characteristics of table eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Erin M; Ryland, Donna; Aliani, Michel; House, James D

    2016-08-01

    The current study was designed to assess the fatty acid composition and sensory attributes of eggs procured from hens consuming diets containing canola meal (CM) and/or flax oil (FO). A total of 96 group-caged White Lohmann hens received 1 of 4 isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets for a period of 4 weeks. Diets were arranged in a 2 × 2 factorial design, containing 24% canola meal, 7.5% flax oil, both, or neither (control). All yolk fatty acids were affected by flax oil inclusion, with the exception of stearic acid (SA) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA). Only SA was affected by CM inclusion. Additionally, significant interactions between CM and FO were observed for linoleic acid (LA) and total omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), with DPA approaching significance (P = 0.069). Trained panelists (n = 8) evaluated 7 aroma ('egg', 'creamy', 'buttery', 'salty', 'sweet', 'barny', and 'oceanic') and 6 flavor ('egg', 'creamy', 'buttery', 'salty', 'brothy', and 'oceanic') attributes of cooked egg product. No significant differences (P > 0.05) in aroma attributes were found between eggs from different dietary treatments. However, egg, creamy, buttery, and oceanic flavors were significantly different between the dietary treatments (P acid. This experiment provides evidence that the interaction between CM and FO in the White Lohmann hen diet results in sensory changes of cooked eggs associated in part with changes in yolk fatty acid content. PMID:27252370

  18. 77 FR 62089 - Grant Guideline, Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... Mission of the State Justice Institute II. Eligibility for Award III. Scope of the Program IV. Grant... is prohibited from awarding grants to federal, tribal, and international courts. III. Scope of the..., Curriculum Adaptation and Training (CAT) Grants, Partner Grants, Strategic Initiatives Grants (SIG)...

  19. Molecular Basis of the Receptor Interactions of Polysialic Acid (polySia), polySia Mimetics, and Sulfated Polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiyan; Loers, Gabriele; Schachner, Melitta; Boelens, Rolf; Wienk, Hans; Siebert, Simone; Eckert, Thomas; Kraan, Stefan; Rojas-Macias, Miguel A; Lütteke, Thomas; Galuska, Sebastian P; Scheidig, Axel; Petridis, Athanasios K; Liang, Songping; Billeter, Martin; Schauer, Roland; Steinmeyer, Jürgen; Schröder, Jens-Michael; Siebert, Hans-Christian

    2016-05-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia) and polySia glycomimetic molecules support nerve cell regeneration, differentiation, and neuronal plasticity. With a combination of biophysical and biochemical methods, as well as data mining and molecular modeling techniques, it is possible to correlate specific ligand-receptor interactions with biochemical processes and in vivo studies that focus on the potential therapeutic impact of polySia, polySia glycomimetics, and sulfated polysaccharides in neuronal diseases. With this strategy, the receptor interactions of polySia and polySia mimetics can be understood on a submolecular level. As the HNK-1 glycan also enhances neuronal functions, we tested whether similar sulfated oligo- and polysaccharides from seaweed could be suitable, in addition to polySia, for finding potential new routes into patient care focusing on an improved cure for various neuronal diseases. The knowledge obtained here on the structural interplay between polySia or sulfated polysaccharides and their receptors can be exploited to develop new drugs and application routes for the treatment of neurological diseases and dysfunctions. PMID:27136597

  20. Spectroscopic studies on the molecular interaction between salicylic acid and riboflavin (B{sub 2}) in micellar solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattar, S.L.; Kolekar, G.B. [Fluorescence Spectroscopy Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur-416 004, Maharashtra (India); Patil, S.R., E-mail: srp_fsl@rediffmail.co [Fluorescence Spectroscopy Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur-416 004, Maharashtra (India)

    2010-03-15

    The interaction between salicylic acid (SA) and riboflavin (RF) was studied by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) in micellar solution. The riboflavin strongly quenches the intrinsic fluorescence of SA by radiative energy transfer. The extent of energy transfer in sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) micellar solution of different concentration is quantified from the energy transfer efficiency data. It is seen that the energy transfer is more efficient in the micellar solution. The critical energy transfer distance (R{sub 0}) was determined from which the mean distance between SA and RF molecules was calculated. The quenching was found to fit into Stern-Volmer relation. The results on variation of Stern-Volmer constant (K{sub sv}) with quencher concentration obtained at different temperatures suggested the formation of complex between SA and RF. The association constant of complex formation was estimated and found to decrease with temperature. The values of thermodynamic parameters DELTAH, DELTAG and DELTAS at different temperatures were estimated and the results indicated that the molecular interaction between SA and RF is electrostatic in nature.

  1. A Comprehensive Spectroscopic and Computational Investigation to Probe the Interaction of Antineoplastic Drug Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid with Serum Albumins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusrat, Saima; Siddiqi, Mohammad Khursheed; Zaman, Masihuz; Zaidi, Nida; Ajmal, Mohammad Rehan; Alam, Parvez; Qadeer, Atiyatul; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous drugs that are used as antidote against chemotheray, inflammation or viral infection, gets absorbed and interacts reversibly to the major serum transport protein i.e. albumins, upon entering the circulatory system. To have a structural guideline in the rational drug designing and in the synthesis of drugs with greater efficacy, the binding mechanism of an antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory drug Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) with human and bovine serum albumins (HSA & BSA) were examined by spectroscopic and computational methods. NDGA binds to site II of HSA with binding constant (Kb) ~105 M-1 and free energy (ΔG) ~ -7.5 kcal.mol-1. It also binds at site II of BSA but with lesser binding affinity (Kb) ~105 M-1 and ΔG ~ -6.5 kcal.mol-1. The negative value of ΔG, ΔH and ΔS for both the albumins at three different temperatures confirmed that the complex formation process between albumins and NDGA is spontaneous and exothermic. Furthermore, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions are the main forces involved in complex formation of NDGA with both the albumins as evaluated from fluorescence and molecular docking results. Binding of NDGA to both the albumins alter the conformation and causes minor change in the secondary structure of proteins as indicated by the CD spectra. PMID:27391941

  2. Human Plasma Very Low-Density Lipoproteins Are Stabilized by Electrostatic Interactions and Destabilized by Acidic pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhumita Guha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL are precursors of low-density lipoproteins (LDL, or “bad cholesterol”. Factors affecting structural integrity of VLDL are important for their metabolism. To assess the role of electrostatic interactions in VLDL stability, we determined how solvent ionic conditions affect the heat-induced VLDL remodeling. This remodeling involves VLDL fusion, rupture, and fission of apolipoprotein E-containing high-density lipoprotein-(HDL- like particles similar to those formed during VLDL-to-LDL maturation. Circular dichroism and turbidity show that increasing sodium salt concentration in millimolar range reduces VLDL stability and its enthalpic component. Consequently, favorable electrostatic interactions stabilize VLDL. Reduction in pH from 7.4 to 6.0 reduces VLDL stability, with further destabilization detected at pH < 6, which probably results from titration of the N-terminal α-amino groups and free fatty acids. This destabilization is expected to facilitate endosomal degradation of VLDL, promote their coalescence into lipid droplets in atherosclerotic plaques, and affect their potential use as drug carriers.

  3. Photo-induced interaction of thioglycolic acid (TGA)-capped CdTe quantum dots with cyanine dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelbar, Mostafa F; Fayed, Tarek A; Meaz, Talaat M; Ebeid, El-Zeiny M

    2016-11-01

    The photo-induced interaction of three different sizes of thioglycolic acid (TGA)-capped CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs) with two monomethine cyanine dyes belonging to the thiazole orange (TO) family has been studied. Positively charged cyanines interact with QDs surface which is negatively charged due to capping agent carboxylate ions. The energy transfer parameters including Stern-Volmer constant, Ksv, number of binding sites, n, quenching sphere radius, r, the critical energy transfer distance, R0, and energy transfer efficiencies, E have been calculated. The effect of structure and the number of aggregating molecules have been studied as a function of CdTe QDs particle size. Combining organic and inorganic semiconductors leads to increase of the effective absorption cross section of the QDs which can be utilized in novel nanoscale designs for light-emitting, photovoltaic and sensor applications. A synthesized triplet emission of the studied dyes was observed using CdTe QDs as donors and this is expected to play a potential role in molecular oxygen sensitization and in photodynamic therapy (PDT) applications. PMID:27267278

  4. Decomposition of Intramolecular Interactions Between Amino-Acids in Globular Proteins - A Consequence for Structural Classes of Proteins and Methods of Their Classification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fačkovec, Boris; Vondrášek, Jiří

    Rijeka : InTech, 2011 - (Yang, N.), s. 69-82 ISBN 978-953-307-280-7 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : proteins * amino acids * structural classes * protein architecture * protein stability Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry http://www.intechopen.com/books/ systems - and -computational- biology -molecular- and -cellular-experimental- systems /decomposition-of-intramolecular-interactions-between-amino-acids-in-globular-proteins-a-consequence-

  5. Don't Take Marketing for "Grant"ed: Building Marketing Efforts into Library Grant Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Carol Anne

    2009-01-01

    Libraries frequently apply for grants to help fund special projects and resources, such as purchases for library collections, innovative instructional technologies, and research subscription databases. Grants provide support for cultural events, professional development sessions, new construction, and building renovations. Like other library…

  6. Interactions of Zn(II) Ions with Humic Acids Isolated from Various Type of Soils. Effect of pH, Zn Concentrations and Humic Acids Chemical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguta, Patrycja; Sokołowska, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was the analysis of the interaction between humic acids (HAs) from different soils and Zn(II) ions at wide concentration ranges and at two different pHs, 5 and 7, by using fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy, as well as potentiometric measurements. The presence of a few areas of HAs structures responsible for Zn(II) complexing was revealed. Complexation at α-sites (low humified structures of low-molecular weight and aromatic polycondensation) and β-sites (weakly humified structures) was stronger at pH 7 than 5. This trend was not observed for γ-sites (structures with linearly-condensed aromatic rings, unsaturated bonds and large molecular weight). The amount of metal complexed at pH5 and 7 by α and γ-structures increased with a decrease in humification and aromaticity of HAs, contrary to β-areas where complexation increased with increasing content of carboxylic groups. The stability of complexes was higher at pH 7 and was the highest for γ-structures. At pH 5, stability decreased with C/N increase for α-areas and -COOH content increase for β-sites; stability increased with humification decrease for γ-structures. The stability of complexes at α and β-areas at pH 7 decreased with a drop in HAs humification. FTIR spectra at pH 5 revealed that the most-humified HAs tended to cause bidentate bridging coordination, while in the case of the least-humified HAs, Zn caused bidentate bridging coordination at low Zn additions and bidentate chelation at the highest Zn concentrations. Low Zn doses at pH 7 caused formation of unidentate complexes while higher Zn doses caused bidentate bridging. Such processes were noticed for HAs characterized by high oxidation degree and high oxygen functional group content; where these were low, HAs displayed bidentate bridging or even bidentate chelation. To summarize, the above studies have showed significant impact of Zn concentration, pH and some properties of HAs on complexation reactions of humic

  7. Synthesis, Characterization, and Interaction with Biomolecules of Platinum(II Complexes with Shikimic Acid-Based Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Peng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the active ingredient shikimic acid (SA of traditional Chinese medicine and NH2(CH2nOH, (n=2–6, we have synthesized a series of new water-soluble Pt(II complexes PtLa–eCl2, where La–e are chelating diamine ligands with carbon chain covalently attached to SA (La–e = SA-NH(CH2nNHCH2CH2NH2; La, n=2; Lb, n=3; Lc, n=4; Ld, n=5; Le, n=6. The results of the elemental analysis, LC-MS, capillary electrophoresis, and 1H, 13C NMR indicated that there was only one product (isomer formed under the present experimental conditions, in which the coordinate mode of PtLa–eCl2 was two-amine bidentate. Their in vitro cytotoxic activities were evaluated by MTT method, where these compounds only exhibited low cytotoxicity towards BEL7404, which should correlate their low lipophilicity. The interactions of the five Pt(II complexes with DNA were investigated by agarose gel electrophoresis, which suggests that the Pt(II complexes could induce DNA alteration. We also studied the interactions of the Pt(II complexes with 5′-GMP with ESI-MS and 1H NMR and found that PtLbCl2, PtLcCl2, and PtLdCl2 could react with 5′-GMP to form mono-GMP and bis-GMP adducts. Furthermore, the cell-cycle analysis revealed that PtLbCl2, PtLcCl2 cause cell G2-phase arrest after incubation for 72 h. Overall, these water-soluble Pt(II complexes interact with DNA mainly through covalent binding, which blocks the DNA synthesis and replication and thus induces cytotoxicity that weakens as the length of carbon chain increases.

  8. Theoretical study of chlordecone and surface groups interaction in an activated carbon model under acidic and neutral conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa-Carballo, Juan José; Melchor-Rodríguez, Kenia; Hernández-Valdés, Daniel; Enriquez-Victorero, Carlos; Montero-Alejo, Ana Lilian; Gaspard, Sarra; Jáuregui-Haza, Ulises Javier

    2016-04-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) are widely used in the purification of drinking water without almost any knowledge about the adsorption mechanisms of the persistent organic pollutants. Chlordecone (CLD, Kepone) is an organochlorinated synthetic compound that has been used mainly as agricultural insecticide. CLD has been identified and listed as a persistent organic pollutant by the Stockholm Convention. The selection of the best suited AC for this type of contaminants is mainly an empirical and costly process. A theoretical study of the influence of AC surface groups (SGs) on CLD adsorption is done in order to help understanding the process. This may provide a first selection criteria for the preparation of AC with suitable surface properties. A model of AC consisting of a seven membered ring graphene sheet (coronene) with a functional group on the edge was used to evaluate the influence of the SGs over the adsorption. Multiple Minima Hypersurface methodology (MMH) coupled with PM7 semiempirical Hamiltonian was employed in order to study the interactions of the chlordecone with SGs (hydroxyl and carboxyl) at acidic and neutral pH and different hydration conditions. Selected structures were re-optimized using CAM-B3LYP to achieve a well-defined electron density to characterize the interactions by the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules approach. The deprotonated form of surface carboxyl and hydroxyl groups of AC models show the strongest interactions, suggesting a chemical adsorption. An increase in carboxylic SGs content is proposed to enhance CLD adsorption onto AC at neutral pH conditions. PMID:26945637

  9. Interaction of Adipocyte Fatty Acid-binding Protein (AFABP) and JAK2: AFABP/aP2 AS A REGULATOR OF JAK2 SIGNALING*

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Brian R.; Mazurkiewicz-Muñoz, Anna M.; Suttles, Jill; Carter-Su, Christin; Bernlohr, David A

    2009-01-01

    Adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (AFABP/aP2) facilitates the intracellular solubilization and trafficking of lipids within the aqueous environment of the cell. Studies in the AFABP/aP2 knock-out mouse suggest that the protein may have roles in cellular processes broader than lipid transport. We present herein the finding that AFABP/aP2 interacts with JAK2 in a fatty acid-dependent manner. This interaction was established using yeast two-hybrid analysis, co-immunopr...

  10. Research on the Interaction of Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer Sensitive Sensor Materials with Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants by Inverse Gas Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant were used as probes. Chemical and physical parameters such as heats of absorption and Henry constants of the polymers to DMMP and 2-CEES were determined by inverse gas chromatography. Details concerning absorption performance are also discussed in this paper.

  11. Research on the interaction of hydrogen-bond acidic polymer sensitive sensor materials with chemical warfare agents simulants by inverse gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Cao, Shuya; Huang, Feng; Qin, Molin; Guo, Chenghai; Ding, Mingyu

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant) and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant) were used as probes. Chemical and physical parameters such as heats of absorption and Henry constants of the polymers to DMMP and 2-CEES were determined by inverse gas chromatography. Details concerning absorption performance are also discussed in this paper. PMID:26043177

  12. CONDUCTIVITY METHOD APPLIED TO THE STUDY OF INTERACTION BETWEEN ADSORBENT AND ADSORBATE I.ADSORPTION OF LOW CONCENYRATION OF FREE ACID BY REGENERABLE CHITIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenBingren; HeGuangping; 等

    1997-01-01

    The adsorption of low concentration of free acid by regenerable chitin is followed by electric conductance determination.The effect of acid concentratioin,content of functioinal amino groups,and ionic strength on adsorption was discussed.Experimental results indicate that the active centre of regenerable chitin is the free amino groups on ist surface ,and that the rate of adsorption of free acid was found to be affected by two factors:the interaction between the adsorbent and the adsorbate in solution and that between the adsorbate molecules or ions in solution.

  13. In silico study of interaction between rice proteins enhanced disease susceptibility 1 and phytoalexin deficient 4, the regulators of salicylic acid signalling pathway

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indra Singh; Kavita Shah

    2012-07-01

    Enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1), a plant-specific protein has homology with the eukaryotic lipase in their N-terminal halves and a unique domain at its C-termini. EDS1 is known to be an important regulator of biotic stress and an essential component of basal immunity. EDS1 interacts with its positive co-regulator phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4), resulting in mobilization of the salicylic acid defence pathway. Limited information regarding this interaction in rice is available. To study this interaction, a model of EDS1 and PAD4 proteins from rice was generated and validated with Accelrys DS software version 3.1 using bioinformatics interface. The in silico docking between the two proteins showed a significant protein–protein interaction between rice EDS1 and PAD4, suggesting that they form a dimeric protein complex, which, similar to that in Arabidopsis, is perhaps also important for triggering the salicylic acid signalling pathway in plants.

  14. Chiral quizalofop-ethyl and its metabolite quizalofop-acid in soils: Enantioselective degradation, enzymes interaction and toxicity to Eisenia foetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lin; Liu, Hui; Qu, Han; Xu, Yangguang; Wang, Peng; Sun, Mingjing; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Liu, Donghui

    2016-06-01

    An enantioselective chromatographic method to analyze enantiomers of quizalofop-ethyl and its metabolite quizalofop-acid was established using a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on (R, R) Whelk-O 1 column. The enantioselective degradation kinetics of quizalofop-ethyl and quizalofop-acid in three soils were investigated. Moreover, the interaction with urease and catalase in the soils and the acute toxicity to Eisenia foetida of quizalofop-ethyl were also determined in order to assess their metabolism mechanism and environmental risk. From the results, quizalofop-ethyl was configurationally stable and was hydrolyzed rapidly to quizalofop-acid, which also degraded enantioselectively but slowly, and the inversion of the S-(-)-quizalofop-acid into the R-(+)-quizalofop-acid was observed in Xinxiang soil. In addition, quizalofop-ethyl and quizalofop-acid enantioselectively affected urease activity but not catalase. The acute toxicity assays to earthworm indicated that the racemic quizalofop-ethyl and quizalofop-acid were more toxic than quizalofop-p-ethyl and quizalofop-p-acid respectively, dramatically, the toxicity of the metabolite was much higher than the parent compound. These results revealed the enantioselective degradation of quizalofop-ethyl and quizalofop-acid, and the differences of toxicity among the enantiomers of the parent compound and the metabolite, which should be considered in future environmental risk evaluation. PMID:26971169

  15. Grants Document-Generation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairell, Terri; Kreymer, Lev; Martin, Greg; Sheridan, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    The Grants Document-Generation System (GDGS) software allows the generation of official grants documents for distribution to the appropriate parties. The documents are created after the selection and entry of specific data elements and clauses. GDGS is written in Cold Fusion that resides on an SQL2000 database and is housed on-site at Goddard Space Flight Center. It includes access security written around GSFC's (Goddard Space Flight Center's) LIST system, and allows for the entry of Procurement Request information necessary for the generation of the resulting Grant Award.

  16. GEF small grants programme - overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes the GEF small grants program which seeks to enhance the role of households and communities in conserving global biodiversity, mitigating global climate change, and protecting international waters. Grants up to $50k have been granted for projects in 33 countries, with plans for 12 other countries. The author describes the framework that the program works under, and the methodology followed in developing and planning projects. The approach to climate change concerns is to emphasize the development of non-carbon energy development activities to provide energy sources and economic development.

  17. Integrated Grants Management System (IGMS) Widget

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Integrated Grants Management System (IGMS) widget returns EPA grant awards in a user-specified area of interest as reported by the Grants Information and...

  18. Influences of acid-base property of membrane on interfacial interactions related with membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor based on thermodynamic assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Leihong; Qu, Xiaolu; Zhang, Meijia; Lin, Hongjun; Zhou, Xiaoling; Liao, Bao-Qiang; Mei, Rongwu; Hong, Huachang

    2016-08-01

    Failure of membrane hydrophobicity in predicting membrane fouling requires a more reliable indicator. In this study, influences of membrane acid base (AB) property on interfacial interactions in two different interaction scenarios in a submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) were studied according to thermodynamic approaches. It was found that both the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane and foulant samples in the MBR had relatively high electron donor (γ(-)) component and low electron acceptor (γ(+)) component. For both of interaction scenarios, AB interaction was the major component of the total interaction. The results showed that, the total interaction monotonically decreased with membrane γ(-), while was marginally affected by membrane γ(+), suggesting that γ(-) could act as a reliable indicator for membrane fouling prediction. This study suggested that membrane modification for fouling mitigation should orient to improving membrane surface γ(-) component rather than hydrophilicity. PMID:27155263

  19. Radiation Synthesis of Stimuli-Responsive Hydrogels and Their Interactions with Poly(acrylic acid) and Ionic Surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermo-responsible hydrogels, which undergo a volume phase transition in an aqueous environment induced by a change in temperature, are the most interesting class of stimuli-responsive polymers. Some of them can be successfully used in biomedical fields as controlled drug delivery systems, in tissue engineering, food industry, etc. Most of these responsive hydrogels were obtained by three-dimensional polymerization of amphiphilic monomers such as N-isopropylacrylamide, vinyl methyl ether and N-vinylcaprolactame, which have hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments in their structure simultaneously. We use another approach for synthesis of thermo-sensitive polymers of linear and cross-linked structure. This approach includes copolymerization of monomers having significant difference in hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance of their structure. It allows to regulate the ratio between hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments of synthesized polymer macrochains in the wide range. The possibility for preparation of such thermo-sensitive hydrogels have been demonstrated by γ-radiation copolymerization of hydrophilic (vinyl ether of ethyleneglycol, 2-hydroxyethylacrylate, N-vinylpyrrolidone) and relatively hydrophobic monomers (vinyl butyl ether, vinyl isobutyl ether, hydroxyethylmethacrylate, butylacrylate, methylacrylate). It should be noted that homopolymers based on all above-mentioned monomers have no thermo-sensitive properties. However their copolymerization results in polymers able to undergo volume phase transitions upon increase of temperature. It was shown also the thermo-responsive swelling behavior of such hydrogels can be effectively regulated by varying of their composition and by complex formation with various poly(acids) and ionic surfactants. In particular, more hydrophobic hydrogels were found to absorb the surfactant more effectively because of hydrophobic nature of interaction. Significant increase in swelling ratio was observed for all hydrogels, especially for

  20. Effects of the protonation state in the interaction of an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) amino acid, Lys101, and a non nucleoside RT inhibitor, GW420867X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galembeck, Sérgio E; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Galembeck, Eduardo

    2014-07-01

    Interactions between an inhibitor and amino acids from a binding pocket could help not only to understand the nature of these interactions, but also to support the design of new inhibitors. In this paper, we explore the key interaction between a second generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), GW420867X, and HIV-1 RT amino acid Lys101 (K101), by quantum mechanical methods. The neutral, protonated, and zwitterionic complexes of GW420867X-K101 were studied. The interaction energies were determined by SCS-MP2/def2-cc-pVQZ, and the electron density was analyzed by natural bond orbital (NBO), atoms in molecules (AIM) and reduced gradient analysis. A large increase in the interaction was observed with the tautomerization of neutral or neutral protonated species. The monomers interact by two medium-strength hydrogen bonds, one partially covalent and another noncovalent. There are some van der Waals intramolecular interactions that are topologically unstable. The nature of the intermolecular interactions was also analyzed using quantitative molecular orbital (MO) theory in combination with an energy decomposition analysis (EDA) based on dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT) at BLYP-D/TZ2P. PMID:24965933

  1. Glutamic Acid at Residue 125 of the prM Helix Domain Interacts with Positively Charged Amino Acids in E Protein Domain II for Japanese Encephalitis Virus-Like-Particle Production

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Jia-Guan; Wu, Suh-Chin

    2014-01-01

    Interaction between E and prM proteins in flavivirus-infected cells is a major factor for virus-like particle (VLP) production. The prM helical (prM-H) domain is topologically close to and may interact with domain II of the E protein (EDII). In this study, we investigated prM-H domain amino acid residues facing Japanese encephalitis virus EDII using site-directed mutagenesis to determine their roles in prM-E interaction and VLP production. Our results indicate that negatively charged prM-E125...

  2. Thermodynamics of the interactions of a homologous series of some amino acids with trimethylamine N-oxide: Volumetric, compressibility, and calorimetric studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Sinjan [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Kishore, Nand, E-mail: nandk@chem.iitb.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: > Thermodynamics of interaction of amino acids with trimethy N-oxide (TMAO) studied. > Partial molar properties in aqueous osmolyte provide interaction details. > Volumes, compressibilites, enthalpies indicate predominant hydrophobic interactions. > TMAO exerts its effect both by preferential hydration and hydrophobic interactions. > Results suggest hydrophobic interactions lead to destabilization of the protein. - Abstract: The values of apparent molar volume V{sub 2,{phi}} and apparent molar compressibility K{sub S,2,{phi}} of glycine, L-alanine, DL-{alpha}-amino-n-butyric acid, L-valine, and L-leucine have been determined in the aqueous solution of 1 mol . kg{sup -1} and 2 mol . kg{sup -1} trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) solutions by density and sound velocity measurements. Isothermal titration calorimetry has been employed to determine the values of heats of dilution q of the aqueous solutions of these amino acids in TMAO at temperatures from T = 288.15 K to T = 308.15 K. These data have been used to calculate values of the infinite dilution standard partial molar volume (V{sub 2,m}{sup 0}), standard partial molar isentropic compressibility (K{sub S,2,m}{sup 0}) and limiting enthalpy of dilution ({Delta}{sub dil}H{sup o}) of the amino acids in aqueous TMAO solutions. The standard partial molar volumes of transfer ({Delta}{sub tr}V{sub 2,m}{sup 0}), isentropic compressibility of transfer ({Delta}{sub tr}K{sub S,2,m}{sup 0}), and enthalpy of dilution of transfer ({Delta}{sub tr{Delta}dil}H{sup o}) of amino acids from water to aqueous TMAO solutions have been calculated from the measured quantities for these thermodynamic quantities. The linear correlation of V{sub 2,m}{sup 0} for a homologous series of amino acids has been utilized to calculate the contribution of the charged end groups (NH{sub 3}{sup +}, COO{sup -}), CH{sub 2} groups, and the other alkyl chains of the amino acids to V{sub 2,m}{sup 0}. The results for the partial molar properties of

  3. Interaction of the C-terminal acidic domain of the insulin receptor with histone modulates the receptor kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, V; Kaliman, P; Alengrin, F; Van Obberghen, E

    1995-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of the insulin receptor domain 1270-1280, an acid-rich sequence located in the receptor C-terminus. Antipeptide IgG raised against this sequence were obtained and used to analyze their effect on receptor function. Antipeptide IgG inhibited receptor autophosphorylation at Tyr1146, Tyr1150 and Tyr1151. These sites are known to be key modulators of the receptor activity. Autophosphorylation at other sites may also have been inhibited. The antipeptide antibody decreased the receptor kinase activity measured with poly(Glu80Tyr20) and a synthetic peptide corresponding to the proreceptor sequence 1142-1158. We provide evidence that the effect of the antibody on substrate phosphorylation may result from the control of the phosphorylation level of the receptor. Concerning the action of the antipeptide IgG on the receptor kinase activity, histone did not behave similarly to poly(Glu80Tyr20). The antibody recognizing sequence 1270-1280 competed with histone for an overlapping binding site. Histone also modulated insulin receptor autophosphorylation, supporting the idea that interference with domain 1270-1280 alters the receptor kinase. Our data suggest that the acidic region including residues 1270-1280 of the insulin receptor C-terminus is involved in the following events: (a) receptor binding with histone, an exogenous substrate of the receptor kinase, and (b) the regulation of receptor autophosphorylation and kinase activity. Based on these observations, we would like to propose that this insulin receptor domain could interact with cellular proteins modulating the receptor kinase. PMID:7744039

  4. Furan oxidation based cross-linking: a new approach for the study and targeting of nucleic acid and protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrette, L L G; Gyssels, E; De Laet, N; Madder, A

    2016-01-28

    Furan mediated nucleic acid cross-linking, initially developed for DNA interstrand duplex cross-linking, has matured into a versatile tool for the study of protein and nucleic acid interactions, ready to face its applications. The methodology was initially developed for easy and clean chemical generation of DNA interstrand cross-linked duplexes, but has been further expanded for use with other probes, targets and triggers, now allowing mild biologically significant cross-linking with potential therapeutic benefit. It was shown that the methodology could be repurposed for RNA interstrand cross-linking, which is very relevant in today's antisense approaches or miRNA target identification endeavors. This further illustrates the furan oxidation method's generality and mildness, especially when using red light for oxidation. A complementary antigene approach has been explored through duplex targeting with furan modified triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and DNA binding proteins. Also targeting of peptides and proteins by furan-modified DNA and peptides has been explored. Thorough methodology examination exploring variable reaction conditions in combination with a series of different furan-modified building blocks and application of different activation signals resulted in a detailed understanding of the mechanisms involved and factors influencing the yield and selectivity of the reaction. In order to draw the bigger picture of the scope and limitations of furan-oxidation cross-linking, we here provide a unique side by side comparison and discussion of our published data, supplemented with unpublished results, providing a clear performance report of the currently established furan toolbox and its application potential in various biomacromolecular complexes. PMID:26679922

  5. USAspending.gov Grants and Loans

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — Provides U.S. Federal Spending by agency. The Grants section allows visitors to search for information about federal assistance; including grants, insurance, direct...

  6. Namibia - Vocational Training Grant Fund

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millenium Challenge Corporation — The impact evaluation of the Vocational Training Grant Fund (VTGF) subactivity in Namibia uses a random assignment design to determine the effects of VTGF-funded...

  7. Electrostatic and potential cation-pi forces may guide the interaction of extracellular loop III with Na+ and bile acids for human apical Na+-dependent bile acid transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Antara; Hussainzada, Naissan; Khandelwal, Akash; Swaan, Peter W

    2008-03-01

    The hASBT (human apical Na(+)-dependent bile acid transporter) constitutes a key target of anti-hypercholesterolaemic therapies and pro-drug approaches; physiologically, hASBT actively reclaims bile acids along the terminal ileum via Na(+) co-transport. Previously, TM (transmembrane segment) 7 was identified as part of the putative substrate permeation pathway using SCAM (substitute cysteine accessibility mutagenesis). In the present study, SCAM was extended through EL3 (extracellular loop 3; residues Arg(254)-Val(286)) that leads into TM7 from the exofacial matrix. Activity of most EL3 mutants was significantly hampered upon cysteine substitution, whereas ten (out of 31) were functionally inactive (<10% activity). Since only E282C lacked plasma membrane expression, EL3 amino acids predominantly fulfill critical functional roles during transport. Oppositely charged membrane-impermeant MTS (methanethiosulfonate) reagents {MTSET [(2-trimethylammonium) ethyl MTS] and MTSES [(2-sulfonatoethyl) MTS]} produced mostly similar inhibition profiles wherein only middle and descending loop segments (residues Thr(267)-Val(286)) displayed significant MTS sensitivity. The presence of bile acid substrate significantly reduced the rates of MTS modification for all MTS-sensitive mutants, suggesting a functional association between EL3 residues and bile acids. Activity assessments at equilibrative [Na(+)] revealed numerous Na(+)-sensitive residues, possibly performing auxiliary functions during transport such as transduction of protein conformational changes during translocation. Integration of these data suggests ligand interaction points along EL3 via electrostatic interactions with Arg(256), Glu(261) and probably Glu(282) and a potential cation-pi interaction with Phe(278). We conclude that EL3 amino acids are essential for hASBT activity, probably as primary substrate interaction points using long-range electrostatic attractive forces. PMID:18028035

  8. Optically transparent hydrogels from an auxin-amino-acid conjugate super hydrogelator and its interactions with an entrapped dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Amarendar; Sharma, Aashish; Srivastava, Aasheesh

    2012-06-11

    Low-molecular-weight organic hydrogelators (LMHGs) that can rigidify water into soft materials are desirable in various applications. Herein, we report the excellent hydrogelating properties of a simple synthetic auxin-amino-acid conjugate, naphthalene-1-acetamide of L-phenylalanine (1-NapF, M(w)=333.38 Da), which gelated water even at 0.025 wt %, thereby making it the most-efficient LMHG known. Optically transparent gels that exhibited negligible scattering in the range 350-900 nm were obtained. A large shift from the theoretical pK(a) value of the gelator was observed. The dependence of the minimum gelator concentration (MGC) and the gel-melting temperatures on the pH value indicated the importance of H-bonding between the carboxylate groups on adjacent phenylalanine molecules in the gelator assembly. FTIR spectroscopy of the xerogels showed a β-sheet-like assembly of the gelator. Variable-temperature (1)H NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that π stacking of the aromatic residues was also partly involved in the gelator assembly. TEM of the xerogel showed the presence of a dense network of thin, high-aspect-ratio fibrillar assemblies with diameters of about 5 nm and lengths that exceeded a few microns. Rheology studies showed the formation of stable gels. The entrapment of water-soluble dyes afforded extremely fluorescent gels that involved the formation of J-aggregates by the dye within gel. A strong induced-CD band established that the RhoB molecules were interacting closely with the chiral gelator aggregates. H-bonding and electrostatic interactions, rather than intercalation, seemed to be involved in RhoB binding. The addition of chaotropic reagents, as well as increasing the pH value, disassembled the gel and promoted the release of the entrapped dye with zero-order kinetics. PMID:22532500

  9. ZmABA2, an interacting protein of ZmMPK5, is involved in abscisic acid biosynthesis and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fangfang; Ni, Lan; Liu, Libo; Li, Xi; Zhang, Huan; Zhang, Aying; Tan, Mingpu; Jiang, Mingyi

    2016-02-01

    In maize (Zea mays), the mitogen-activated protein kinase ZmMPK5 has been shown to be involved in abscisic acid (ABA)-induced antioxidant defence and to enhance the tolerance of plants to drought, salt stress and oxidative stress. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, using ZmMPK5 as bait in yeast two-hybrid screening, a protein interacting with ZmMPK5 named ZmABA2, which belongs to a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family, was identified. Pull-down assay and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis and co-immunoprecipitation test confirmed that ZmMPK5 interacts with ZmABA2 in vitro and in vivo. Phosphorylation of Ser173 in ZmABA2 by ZmMPK5 was shown to increase the activity of ZmABA2 and the protein stability. Various abiotic stimuli induced the expression of ZmABA2 in leaves of maize plants. Pharmacological, biochemical and molecular biology and genetic analyses showed that both ZmMPK5 and ZmABA2 coordinately regulate the content of ABA. Overexpression of ZmABA2 in tobacco plants was found to elevate the content of ABA, regulate seed germination and root growth under drought and salt stress and enhance the tolerance of tobacco plants to drought and salt stress. These results suggest that ZmABA2 is a direct target of ZmMPK5 and is involved in ABA biosynthesis and functions. PMID:26096642

  10. Humic acids and their interactions with metallic elements: Cu II, Eu III, Th IV, U VI: contribution of size exclusion chromatography method and research of complexation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interest given to natural organic matter (humic and fulvic acids) as complexing agents of metallic ions in soils and natural waters becomes more and more important in environmental area. Cation - humic matter interactions have a great importance, a better understanding of the contribution of these substances in natural media specially towards radioactive elements with long life time. Interactions are studied by a chromatographic technique of gel filtration: the dynamic equilibrium method is based on the separation of the formed complex humic macromolecule - metallic ion and the free metallic ion, which due to its size penetrates totally in the pores of the gel. Separation mechanisms of the chromatographic support and the contribution of each parameter, are studied as a function of the buffer nature, its concentration, the PH, the gel porosity and the valence of the metallic cation. This study led to the determination of the appropriate experimental conditions for each cation. A study of metallic binding with humic acid has been undertaken with Cu2+, Eu3+, Th4+, Uo22+. These elements, except copper, have been chosen for their properties similar to the transuranic elements. Different samples of humic acids (commercial, podzolic soil, rendzine soil) are also studied. A deeper research of europium - humic acid interactions by means of different treatment models (discrete or gaussian models) has been undertaken in order to determine the number, the binding site strength and the global interaction constants

  11. Oxygenated metabolites of anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol : conformational analysis and interaction with cannabinoid receptors, membrane transporter, and fatty acid amide hydrolase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Stelt, M. van der; Kuik, J.A. van; Zadelhoff, G. van; Leeflang, B.R.; Veldink, G.A.; Finazzi Agrò, A.; Maccarrone, M.

    2002-01-01

    This study was aimed at finding structural requirements for the interaction of the acyl chain of endocannabinoids with cannabinoid receptors, membrane transporter protein, and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). To this end, the flexibility of the acyl chain was restricted by introduction of an 1-hyd

  12. Vectorial acylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Fat1p and fatty acyl-CoA synthetase are interacting components of a fatty acid import complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, Zhiying; Tong, Fumin; Færgeman, Nils J.;

    2003-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fat1p and fatty acyl-CoA synthetase (FACS) are hypothesized to couple import and activation of exogenous fatty acids by a process called vectorial acylation. Molecular genetic and biochemical studies were used to define further the functional and physical interactions ...

  13. Study on the Interaction of Ternary Complex Pd(Ⅱ)-2,2'-bipyridine-L-asparagic acid with DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高恩君; 赵淑敏; 张丹; 刘祁涛

    2005-01-01

    The ternary complex Pd(Ⅱ)-2,2'-bipyridine-L-asparagic acid was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR-spectra and molar conductance. The formula of the complex is Pd(bipy)(L-asp). The interaction of the complex with DNA has been studied by UV-spectra, fluorescence spectra, CD-spectra and gel electrophoresis. The results showed that the interaction of the complex with DNA performed mainly in intercalative mode and the extent of interaction was dependent on the concentration of the complex.

  14. Interactions between zinc, essential fatty acids and prostaglandins: relevance to acrodermatitis enteropathica, total parenteral nutrition, the glucagonoma syndrome, diabetes, anorexia nervosa and sickle cell anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrobin, D F; Cunnane, S C

    1980-03-01

    Many of the features of zinc deficiency and of essential fatty acid (EFA) deficiency are similar in both animals and humans. The two agents interact in various ways. EFAs are important in zinc absorption, probably after conversion to prostaglandins (PGs). Zinc seems necessary for at least two stages in EFA metabolism, the conversion of linoleic acid to gamma-linolenic acid, and the mobilisation of dihomogammalinolenic acid (DGLA) for the synthesis of 1 series PGs. Zinc may also be important in the conversion of DGLA to arachidonic acid and in arachidonic acid mobilisation for 2 series PG formation. These interactions shed considerable light on a number of clinical syndromes, including acrodermatitis enteropathica, total parenteral nutrition, diabetes mellitus, the glucagonoma syndrome and sickle cell anaemia. There is substantial evidence to suggest that anorexia nervosa is due to a combined deficiency of zinc and EFAs. Understanding of the roles of zinc and EFAs in these various clinical situations is likely to lead to improved therapy. PMID:6253772

  15. Electrochemical and theoretical studies on the synergistic interaction and corrosion inhibition of alkyl benzimidazoles and thiosemicarbazide pair on mild steel in hydrochloric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramya, K.; Mohan, Revathi; Anupama, K.K.; Joseph, Abraham, E-mail: drabrahamj@gmail.com

    2015-01-15

    Synergistic hydrogen bonded interaction of alkyl benzimidazoles and thiosemicarbazide (TSC) and its corrosion protection properties on mild steel in hydrochloric acid at different temperatures have been studied using polarization, EIS, adsorption, surface studies and computational methods. The extent of synergistic interaction increases with temperature. Quantum chemical approach used to calculate some electronic properties of the molecules and to ascertain the synergistic interaction, inhibitive effect and molecular structures. The corrosion inhibition efficiencies and the global chemical reactivity relate to some parameters, such as total energy, E{sub HOMO}, E{sub LUMO} and gap energy (ΔE) thiosemicarbazide (TSC) interacts with benzimidazoles derivatives up to a bond length of approximately 1.99Å. This interaction represents the formation of a hydrogen bond between the thiosemicarbazide (TSC) and benzimidazoles. This synergistic interaction of thiosemicarbazide (TSC) and benzimidazole derivatives offer extended inhibition efficiency towards mild steel in hydrochloric acid. - Highlights: • Synergistic interaction between alkyl benzimidazoles and TSC has been studied. • Mechanism involves combination of physisorption and chemisorption. • The adsorption phenomenon obeys Langmuir isotherm. • Inhibition efficiency increases with temperature.

  16. Electrochemical and theoretical studies on the synergistic interaction and corrosion inhibition of alkyl benzimidazoles and thiosemicarbazide pair on mild steel in hydrochloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synergistic hydrogen bonded interaction of alkyl benzimidazoles and thiosemicarbazide (TSC) and its corrosion protection properties on mild steel in hydrochloric acid at different temperatures have been studied using polarization, EIS, adsorption, surface studies and computational methods. The extent of synergistic interaction increases with temperature. Quantum chemical approach used to calculate some electronic properties of the molecules and to ascertain the synergistic interaction, inhibitive effect and molecular structures. The corrosion inhibition efficiencies and the global chemical reactivity relate to some parameters, such as total energy, EHOMO, ELUMO and gap energy (ΔE) thiosemicarbazide (TSC) interacts with benzimidazoles derivatives up to a bond length of approximately 1.99Å. This interaction represents the formation of a hydrogen bond between the thiosemicarbazide (TSC) and benzimidazoles. This synergistic interaction of thiosemicarbazide (TSC) and benzimidazole derivatives offer extended inhibition efficiency towards mild steel in hydrochloric acid. - Highlights: • Synergistic interaction between alkyl benzimidazoles and TSC has been studied. • Mechanism involves combination of physisorption and chemisorption. • The adsorption phenomenon obeys Langmuir isotherm. • Inhibition efficiency increases with temperature

  17. Abscisic acid regulates root growth under osmotic stress conditions via an interacting hormonal network with cytokinin, ethylene and auxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, James H; Topping, Jennifer F; Liu, Junli; Lindsey, Keith

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the mechanisms regulating root development under drought conditions is an important question for plant biology and world agriculture. We examine the effect of osmotic stress on abscisic acid (ABA), cytokinin and ethylene responses and how they mediate auxin transport, distribution and root growth through effects on PIN proteins. We integrate experimental data to construct hormonal crosstalk networks to formulate a systems view of root growth regulation by multiple hormones. Experimental analysis shows: that ABA-dependent and ABA-independent stress responses increase under osmotic stress, but cytokinin responses are only slightly reduced; inhibition of root growth under osmotic stress does not require ethylene signalling, but auxin can rescue root growth and meristem size; osmotic stress modulates auxin transporter levels and localization, reducing root auxin concentrations; PIN1 levels are reduced under stress in an ABA-dependent manner, overriding ethylene effects; and the interplay among ABA, ethylene, cytokinin and auxin is tissue-specific, as evidenced by differential responses of PIN1 and PIN2 to osmotic stress. Combining experimental analysis with network construction reveals that ABA regulates root growth under osmotic stress conditions via an interacting hormonal network with cytokinin, ethylene and auxin. PMID:26889752

  18. Separation of photosensitive substances in humic acids using molecular imprinting method based on electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Xiaoxia; Yu, Chunyan; Wang, Chong; Zhang, Fengjie

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this research was to provide an improved understanding of the existence of photosensitive structure in humic acids (HAs) that are extracted from Changbai Mountain soils. Molecular imprinting technique was used to separate phthalocyanine-like substances from HAs with the mechanisms of electrostatic interactions and intermolecular hydrogen bond. Copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) was used as template molecule and the fraction bound by CuPc-imprinted polymers (MIP) named F (bind) presented higher spectroscopic activity than that of effluent fraction named F (eff). The fluorescence intensity of F(bind) at emission wavelength of 462 nm was 5.5 times as high as that of F(eff) at 458 nm, and the UV-vis absorbance at 254 nm of F(bind) had been increased to 2.5 times as compared with F(eff). The results of this work show the key role of humic substances with special structures in the light or photo involved process.

  19. Synthesis, characterization and binding interactions of amino acids coupled perylene diimides with colloidal doped and undoped TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavery, E.; Nagarajan, N.; Paramaguru, G.; Renganathan, R.

    2015-07-01

    Two sensitizers based on amino acids coupled with perylene moiety having absorption in the visible region have been designed and their interaction with doped and undoped TiO2 for the application of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) has been studied. The synthesized compounds PDI-PA and PDI-AA were characterized using 1H and 13C NMR, Mass and FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. The optical properties and lifetime measurements of the sensitizers were analyzed using various solvents with different polarity. The solvatochromism effect was studied using Lippert-Mataga plot. The electrochemical studies of both dyes were investigated in DMF with various scan rate ranging from 200 to 1000 mV s-1. Colloidal doped and undoped TiO2 was prepared and characterized by using absorption measurements. Binding ability of the sensitizers with the nanoparticles was studied through absorption, fluorescence quenching, cyclic voltammetry and FT-IR measurements. Results obtained from all the above analysis suggest the mode of quenching may be static. The binding constant values were calculated using Kamat-Fox equation indicates the binding behavior of the sensitizers with the nanoparticles. The fluorescence quenching was mainly attributed to electron transfer from the excited state of PDI's to the conduction band of colloidal semiconductors. The electron transfer mechanism was explained based on the Rehm-Weller equation as well as the energy level diagram.

  20. Computational Modeling and Theoretical Calculations on the Interactions between Spermidine and Functional Monomer (Methacrylic Acid in a Molecularly Imprinted Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper theoretically investigates interactions between a template and functional monomer required for synthesizing an efficient molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP. We employed density functional theory (DFT to compute geometry, single-point energy, and binding energy (ΔE of an MIP system, where spermidine (SPD and methacrylic acid (MAA were selected as template and functional monomer, respectively. The geometry was calculated by using B3LYP method with 6-31+(d basis set. Furthermore, 6-311++(d, p basis set was used to compute the single-point energy of the above geometry. The optimized geometries at different template to functional monomer molar ratios, mode of bonding between template and functional monomer, changes in charge on natural bond orbital (NBO, and binding energy were analyzed. The simulation results show that SPD and MAA form a stable complex via hydrogen bonding. At 1 : 5 SPD to MAA ratio, the binding energy is minimum, while the amount of transferred charge between the molecules is maximum; SPD and MAA form a stable complex at 1 : 5 molar ratio through six hydrogen bonds. Optimizing structure of template-functional monomer complex, through computational modeling prior synthesis, significantly contributes towards choosing a suitable pair of template-functional monomer that yields an efficient MIP with high specificity and selectivity.

  1. Thermodynamic studies on the interaction between some amino acids with some rare earth metal ions in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, AbdAllah A.; Bakr, Moustafa F.; Abd El-Fattah, Khaled A

    2003-11-06

    The interactions between the amino acids (glycine and L-threonine) with some rare earth metal ions (Pr{sup 3+}, Nd{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, Gd{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+}) were studied at a wide range from ionic strengths (0.07-0.32 M KNO{sub 3}) and temperatures (25-45 deg. C) in aqueous solutions by using Bjerrum potentiometric method. The stoichiometric and thermodynamic stability constants were calculated as well as the standard thermodynamic parameters ({delta}G deg., {delta}H deg. and {delta}S deg. ) for all possible reactions that occur. The degree of formation (n-bar) for all studied systems was determined and discussed. The thermodynamic parameters differences ({delta}{delta}G deg., {delta}{delta}H deg. and {delta}{delta}S deg. ) were calculated and discussed to determine the factors which control these complexation processes from the thermodynamic point of view.

  2. Interactions of valproic acid with carbamazepine and its metabolites' concentrations, concentrations ratios, and level/dose ratios in epileptic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H; Delgado, M R; Browne, R H

    1995-02-01

    In two groups of epileptic children receiving carbamazepine (CBZ) therapy with or without valproic acid (VPA) comedication, we investigate the drug interactions of VPA on serum CBZ and its metabolites' concentrations, concentration ratios, and level/dose ratios. Serum total and free CBZ-10, 11-epoxide (CBZ-E) concentrations are significantly increased in patients taking CBZ plus VPA, together with higher CBZ-E/CBZ concentration ratios and CBZ-E level/dose ratios. These results reflect the accumulation of CBZ-E. The decreased concentration ratios of trans-10, 11-dihydroxy-10, 11-dihydro-CBZ (CBZ-H)/CBZ-E observed in patients taking CBZ plus VPA suggest an inhibition in the biotransformation from CBZ-E to CBZ-H. Significant negative correlations are found between serum VPA level and CBZ-H/CBZ-E concentration ratios, indicating that the inhibition of CBZ-E hydrolysis by VPA may depend on the concentration of VPA (total or free CBZ-H/CBZ-E concentration ratio = [formula: see text], respectively). VPA concentration also shows significant positive correlations with CBZ-E and CBZ level/dose ratios. Patients taking CBZ plus VPA have significant higher free fractions of CBZ and CBZ-E than do patients on CBZ alone, suggesting a protein-binding displacement by VPA. PMID:8665529

  3. Interaction of acid ceramidase inhibitor LCL521 with tumor response to photodynamic therapy and photodynamic therapy-generated vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Banáth, Judit; Zhang, Wei; Saw, Kyi Min; Szulc, Zdzislaw M; Bielawska, Alicja; Separovic, Duska

    2016-09-15

    Acid ceramidase has been identified as a promising target for cancer therapy. One of its most effective inhibitors, LCL521, was examined as adjuvant to photodynamic therapy (PDT) using mouse squamous cell carcinoma SCCVII model of head and neck cancer. Lethal effects of PDT, assessed by colony forming ability of in vitro treated SCCVII cells, were greatly enhanced when combined with 10 µM LCL521 treatment particularly when preceding PDT. When PDT-treated SCCVII cells are used to vaccinate SCCVII tumor-bearing mice (PDT vaccine protocol), adjuvant LCL521 treatment (75 mg/kg) resulted in a marked retardation of tumor growth. This effect can be attributed to the capacity of LCL521 to effectively restrict the activity of two main immunoregulatory cell populations (Tregs and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, MDSCs) that are known to hinder the efficacy of PDT vaccines. The therapeutic benefit with adjuvant LCL521 was also achieved with SCCVII tumors treated with standard PDT when using immunocompetent mice but not with immunodeficient hosts. The interaction of LCL521 with PDT-based antitumor mechanisms is dominated by immune system contribution that includes overriding the effects of immunoregulatory cells, but could also include a tacit contribution from boosting direct tumor cell kill. PMID:27136745

  4. Specific interactions of alcohols and non-alcohols with a biologically active boronic acid derivative: a spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geethanjali, H S; Melavanki, R M; Nagaraja, D; Patil, N R; Thipperudrappa, J; Kusanur, R A

    2016-08-01

    The photophysical properties of 4-fluoro-2-methoxyphenyl boronic acid (4FMPBA) are characterized using absorption and fluorescence techniques in series of non-alcohols and alcohols. The results are analyzed using different solvent polarity functions and Kamlet and Catalan's multiple regression approaches. The excited state dipole moment and change in dipole moment are calculated using both the solvatochromic shift method and Reichardt's microscopic solvent polarity parameter ETN. The ground state dipole moment is evaluated using quantum chemical calculations. It is found that general solute-solvent and hydrogen bond interactions are operative in this system. A red shift of ~ 9 nm in the emission spectra is observed with an increase in the solvent polarity, which depicts π→π(*) transitions, as well as the possibility of an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) character in the emitting singlet state of 4FMPBA. The relative quantum yield, radiative and non-radiative decay constants are calculated in alkanes and alcohols using the single point method. It is found that the quantum yield of the molecule varies from 16.81% to 50.79% with the change in solvent polarity, indicating the dependence of fluorescence on the solvent environment. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26626020

  5. Are there toxic interactions between salinity and naphthenic acids in the toxicity of oil sands process water to freshwater invertebrates?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, D.; Pasloski, A.; Lanser, B.; Alm, K.; Liber, K. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Large volumes of water are used to extract oil from the oil sands in the Athabasca deposit. The resulting oil sands process water (OSPW) has been proposed for use in future reclamation landscapes. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the toxicity of OSPW to freshwater invertebrates in order to develop environmentally acceptable OSPW reclamation plans. The OSPW generally contains high concentrations of salts and naphthenic acids (NAs), but low levels of other contaminants such as PAHs and metals. This study investigated the combined toxic effect of NAs and salinity on freshwater invertebrates. Laboratory cultured Ceriodaphnia dubia were used initially to determine the toxicity of OSPW from selected water bodies. The pond waters that generated a toxic response had elevated levels of NAs and salinity, but the concentrations of salinity ions varied considerably among ponds. Results suggested that ion composition may be a factor in toxicity. Subsequent bioassays were performed with single salts and with mixtures representing major ion combinations present in the OSPW, such as carbonate, sulphate, chloride and sodium. The interaction between NAs and salinity was evaluated by exposing Ceriodaphnia dubia and Daphnia pulex to mixtures of NAs extracted from OSPW and relevant major ions chosen according to the salt toxicity test results.

  6. Genetic interaction of two abscisic acid signaling regulators, HY5 and FIERY1, in mediating lateral root formation

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Hao

    2011-01-01

    Root architecture is continuously shaped in a manner that helps plants to better adapt to the environment. Gene regulation at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional levels largely controls this environmental response. Recently, RNA silencing has emerged as an important player in gene regulation and is involved in many aspects of plant development, including lateral root formation. In a recent study, we found that FIERY1, a bifunctional abiotic stress and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling regulator and an endogenous RNA silencing suppressor, mediates auxin response during lateral root formation in Arabidopsis. We proposed that FRY1 regulates lateral root development through its activity on adenosine 3,5-bisphosphate (PAP), a strong inhibitor of exoribonucleases (XRNs). Interestingly, some of the phenotypes of fry1, such as enhanced response to light in repressing hypocotyl elongation and hypersensitivity to ABA in lateral root growth, are opposite to those of another light- and ABA-signaling mutant, hy5. Here we analyzed the hy5 fry1 double mutant for root and hypocotyl growth. We found that the hy5 mutation can suppress the enhanced light sensitivity in fry1 hypocotyl elongation and restore the lateral root formation. The genetic interaction between HY5 and FRY1 indicates that HY5 and FRY1 may act in overlapping pathways that mediate light signaling and lateral root development. © 2011 Landes Bioscience.

  7. Potentiometric study on the complexation of calcium with some humic and fulvic acids - dependence of the interaction on calcium concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Humic substances are found as heterogeneous mixtures of organic macromolecular colloids even in deep underground environments used for the geological disposal of radioactive wastes and affect the migration behavior of radionuclides by forming complexes. The presence of higher concentrations of naturally-existing cations such as calcium and iron may affect their interaction with radionuclides. For example, the formation of pseudo-colloidal complexes of radionuclides may be suppressed by the formation of calcium humate complexes or the excess amount of calcium may promote the precipitation of the humate colloids. Thus, to understand and estimate the migration behavior of radionuclides in the presence of naturally-existing cations, it is essential to quantitatively describe the interaction of both radionuclides and naturally-existing cations in a wide range of their concentrations. In our previous study [1], we have proposed the very simplified expression to describe the interaction of humic substances with metal ions, log Kapp log K + a logα - b log[Na+] - m log[M] for Kapp = [ML]/([M][R]), where [ML] and [M] are the concentrations of bound and free metal ion, [R] is that of dissociated proton exchange site and a is the degree of dissociation (charges are omitted). However, since the expression has been derived from the limited experimental observations, the serious concern remained unresolved, that is, the relation of log Kapp to the metal ion concentration (the independence of m on log α) was not well examined. To check this point, the complexation of calcium was studied by potentiometry. Four kinds of humic and fulvic acids obtained from International Humic Substance Society were titrated by NaOH in the absence and presence of various total concentrations of calcium in 0.01 M NaNO3 solution. In the procedure, both pcH (= -log[H+]) and log[Ca2+] were simultaneously measured with glass and ion-selective electrodes. From the

  8. Cancer Risk and Eicosanoid Production: Interaction between the Protective Effect of Long Chain Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Intake and Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenihan-Geels, Georgia; Bishop, Karen S.; Ferguson, Lynnette R.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary inclusion of fish and fish supplements as a means to improve cancer prognosis and prevent tumour growth is largely controversial. Long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3 PUFA), eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, may modulate the production of inflammatory eicosanoids, thereby influencing local inflammatory status, which is important in cancer development. Although in vitro studies have demonstrated inhibition of tumour cell growth and proliferation by LCn-3 PUFA, results from human studies have been mainly inconsistent. Genes involved in the desaturation of fatty acids, as well as the genes encoding enzymes responsible for eicosanoid production, are known to be implicated in tumour development. This review discusses the current evidence for an interaction between genetic polymorphisms and dietary LCn-3 PUFA in the risk for breast, prostate and colorectal cancers, in regards to inflammation and eicosanoid synthesis. PMID:26891335

  9. Concomitant action of structural elements and receptor phosphorylation determines arrestin-3 interaction with the free fatty acid receptor FFA4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butcher, Adrian J; Hudson, Brian D; Shimpukade, Bharat; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Prihandoko, Rudi; Ulven, Trond; Milligan, Graeme; Tobin, Andrew B

    2014-01-01

    In addition to being nutrients, free fatty acids act as signaling molecules by activating a family of G protein-coupled receptors. Among these is FFA4, previously called GPR120, which responds to medium and long chain fatty acids, including health-promoting ω-3 fatty acids, which have been...

  10. Synthesis of novel N1-substituted bicyclic pyrazole amino acids and evaluation of their interaction with glutamate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conti, Paola; Grazioso, Giovanni; di Ventimiglia, Samuele Joppolo;

    2005-01-01

    N1-substituted bicyclic pyrazole amino acids (S)-9a-9c and (R)-9a-9c, which are conformationally constrained analogues of glutamic acid, were prepared via a strategy based on a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The new amino acids were tested for activity at ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors...

  11. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and in vitro antimicrobial, anticancer and antileishmanial activities as well interaction with Salmon sperm DNA of newly synthesized carboxylic acid derivative, 4-(4-methoxy-2-nitrophenylamino)-4-oxobutanoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirajuddin, Muhammad; Ali, Saqib; McKee, Vickie; Ullah, Hameed

    2015-03-01

    This paper stresses on the synthesis, characterization of novel carboxylic acid derivative and its application in pharmaceutics. Carboxylic acid derivatives have a growing importance in medicine, particularly in oncology. A novel carboxylic acid, 4-(4-methoxy-2-nitrophenylamino)-4-oxobutanoic acid, was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, NMR (1H, and 13C), mass spectrometry and single crystal X-ray structural analysis. The structure of the title compound, C11H12N2O6, shows the molecules dimerised by short intramolecular Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The compound was screened for in vitro antimicrobial, anticancer, and antileishmanial activities as well as interaction with SS-DNA. The compound was also checked for in vitro anticancer activity against BHK-21, H-157 and HCEC cell lines, and showed significant anticancer activity. The compound was almost non-toxic towards human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) and did not show more than 7.4% antiproliferative activity when used at the 2.0 μg/mL end concentration. It was also tested for antileishmanial activity against the promastigote form of leishmania major and obtained attractive result. DNA interaction study exposes that the binding mode of the compound with SS-DNA is an intercalative as it results in hypochromism along with minor red shift. A new and efficient strategy to identify pharmacophores sites in carboxylic acid derivative for antibacterial/antifungal activity using Petra, Osiris and Molinspiration (POM) analyses was also carried out.

  12. 40 CFR 35.935 - Grant conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grant conditions. 35.935 Section 35.935 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.935 Grant conditions. In...

  13. 40 CFR 35.2200 - Grant conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grant conditions. 35.2200 Section 35.2200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2200 Grant conditions....

  14. 7 CFR 1709.15 - Grant closeout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... ASSISTANCE TO HIGH ENERGY COST COMMUNITIES General Requirements § 1709.15 Grant closeout. Grant closeout is when all required work is completed, administrative actions relating to the completion of work and... grant agreement for compliance with conditions on property acquired or derived through grant funds....

  15. Proteinases of betaretroviruses bind single-stranded nucleic acids through a novel interaction module, the G-patch

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švec, Martin; Bauerová, Helena; Pichová, Iva; Konvalinka, Jan; Stříšovský, Kvido

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 576, 1/2 (2004), s. 271-276. ISSN 0014-5793 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4055304; GA MŠk LN00A032 Grant ostatní: 5th Framework(XE) QLK2-CT-2001-02360 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : retrovirus * aspartic proteinase * maturation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.843, year: 2004

  16. Chaperone protein HYPK interacts with the first 17 amino acid region of Huntingtin and modulates mutant HTT-mediated aggregation and cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • HYPK reduces mutant HTT-mediated aggregate formation and cytotoxicity. • Interaction of HYPK with HTT requires N-terminal 17 amino acid of HTT (HTT-N17). • Deletion of HTT-N17 leads to SDS-soluble, smaller, nuclear aggregates. • These smaller aggregates do not associate with HYPK and are more cytotoxic. • Maybe, interaction of HYPK with amphipathic HTT-N17 block HTT aggregate formation. - Abstract: Huntington’s disease is a polyglutamine expansion disorder, characterized by mutant HTT-mediated aggregate formation and cytotoxicity. Many reports suggests roles of N-terminal 17 amino acid domain of HTT (HTT-N17) towards subcellular localization, aggregate formation and subsequent pathogenicity induced by N-terminal HTT harboring polyQ stretch in pathogenic range. HYPK is a HTT-interacting chaperone which can reduce N-terminal mutant HTT-mediated aggregate formation and cytotoxicity in neuronal cell lines. However, how HYPK interacts with N-terminal fragment of HTT remained unknown. Here we report that specific interaction of HYPK with HTT-N17 is crucial for the chaperone activity of HYPK. Deletion of HTT-N17 leads to formation of tinier, SDS-soluble nuclear aggregates formed by N-terminal mutant HTT. The increased cytotoxicity imparted by these tiny aggregates might be contributed due to loss of interaction with HYPK

  17. Chaperone protein HYPK interacts with the first 17 amino acid region of Huntingtin and modulates mutant HTT-mediated aggregation and cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, Kamalika Roy [Crystallography and Molecular Biology Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Centre for Neuroscience, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Bhattacharyya, Nitai P., E-mail: nitai_sinp@yahoo.com [Biomedical Genomics Centre, PG Polyclinic Building, 5, Suburbun Hospital Road, Kolkata 700020 (India)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • HYPK reduces mutant HTT-mediated aggregate formation and cytotoxicity. • Interaction of HYPK with HTT requires N-terminal 17 amino acid of HTT (HTT-N17). • Deletion of HTT-N17 leads to SDS-soluble, smaller, nuclear aggregates. • These smaller aggregates do not associate with HYPK and are more cytotoxic. • Maybe, interaction of HYPK with amphipathic HTT-N17 block HTT aggregate formation. - Abstract: Huntington’s disease is a polyglutamine expansion disorder, characterized by mutant HTT-mediated aggregate formation and cytotoxicity. Many reports suggests roles of N-terminal 17 amino acid domain of HTT (HTT-N17) towards subcellular localization, aggregate formation and subsequent pathogenicity induced by N-terminal HTT harboring polyQ stretch in pathogenic range. HYPK is a HTT-interacting chaperone which can reduce N-terminal mutant HTT-mediated aggregate formation and cytotoxicity in neuronal cell lines. However, how HYPK interacts with N-terminal fragment of HTT remained unknown. Here we report that specific interaction of HYPK with HTT-N17 is crucial for the chaperone activity of HYPK. Deletion of HTT-N17 leads to formation of tinier, SDS-soluble nuclear aggregates formed by N-terminal mutant HTT. The increased cytotoxicity imparted by these tiny aggregates might be contributed due to loss of interaction with HYPK.

  18. Analysis of protein-protein interactions in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines using phthalic acid chemical probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shih-Shin; Wang, Tsu-Nai; Tsai, Eing-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Phthalates are a class of plasticizers that have been characterized as endocrine disrupters, and are associated with genital diseases, cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and nephrotoxicity in the GeneOntology gene/protein database. In this study, we synthesized phthalic acid chemical probes and demonstrated differing protein-protein interactions between MCF-7 cells and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Phthalic acid chemical probes were synthesized using silicon dioxide particle carriers, which were modified using the silanized linker 3-aminopropyl triethoxyslane (APTES). Incubation with cell lysates from breast cancer cell lines revealed interactions between phthalic acid and cellular proteins in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Subsequent proteomics analyses indicated 22 phthalic acid-binding proteins in both cell types, including heat shock cognate 71-kDa protein, ATP synthase subunit beta, and heat shock protein HSP 90-beta. In addition, 21 MCF-7-specific and 32 MDA-MB-231 specific phthalic acid-binding proteins were identified, including related proteasome proteins, heat shock 70-kDa protein, and NADPH dehydrogenase and ribosomal correlated proteins, ras-related proteins, and members of the heat shock protein family, respectively. PMID:25402641

  19. Study of the interaction of boron-containing amino acids for the neutron capture therapy with biologically interesting compounds by using 'three-spot zone electrophoresis'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the boron carriers for boron neutron capture therapy, p-borono phenylalanine (BPA) is the boron compound which has been clinically used together with sodium borocaptate. It was found by the electrophoresis behavior that the BPA interacted with organic carboxylic acids in its dissolved state. In this paper, the electrophoresis behavior of general amino acids as seen in three-spot zone electrophoresis and the peculiar interaction of the amino acids having dihydroxyboryl radical are described. Zone electrophoresis has been developed as separation means, and three-spot process excludes the errors due to accidental factors as far as possible. The behaviors of zone electrophoresis of ordinary neutral amino acids, orthoboric acid and p-BPA are reported. For utilizing the features of boron neutron capture therapy, it is necessary to develop the carrier which is singularly taken into cancer cells. There is not a good method for discriminating normal cells and cancer cells. As for the administration of BPA to patients, its solubility is insufficient, therefore, its fructose complex has been used. The research on the biochemical peculiarity of boron is important. (K.I.)

  20. Acidic phospholipid-independent interaction of Yas3p, an Opi1-family transcriptional repressor of Yarrowia lipolytica, with the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Tezaki, Satoshi; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryouichi; Ohta, Akinori

    2015-12-01

    In the n-alkane-assimilating yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, the transcription of ALK1, encoding cytochrome P450, that catalyses n-alkane hydroxylation is activated by a complex composed of Yas1p and Yas2p via a promoter element, ARE1, in response to n-alkanes. An Opi1-family transcription factor, Yas3p, represses the transcription by binding to Yas2p in the nucleus when cultured in glucose-containing medium, but it is localized to the ER, presumably through interaction with acidic phospholipids, phosphatidic acid and/or phospho inositides, when cultured in n-alkane-containing medium. Here, to elucidate the mechanisms regulating the localization of Yas3p, point and deletion mutants of Yas3p were constructed and analysed. The substitution of Trp(360) and Cys(361) by Arg abrogated the localization of Yas3p to the ER and decreased ARE1-mediated transcriptional activation by n-alkane. A Yas3p truncation mutant consisting of residues 259-422 did not bind to acidic phospholipids, but it was localized to the ER in the presence of n-alkane, implying the acidic-phospholipid-independent recruitment of this mutant to the ER in response to n-alkane. The W360R and C361R substitutions in this truncation mutant abolished its localization to the ER. The results suggest that these residues are implicated in the acidic phospholipid-independent interaction of Yas3p to the ER. PMID:26284565