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Sample records for acid glycosaminoglycan mucopolysaccharide

  1. Acid mucopolysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003368.htm Acid mucopolysaccharides To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acid mucopolysaccharides is a test that measures the amount ...

  2. Mucopolysaccharide in the blood of a patient with neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, P. M. G.; Dykes, J. R. W.; Holt, Shirley; Ridley, J. W.; Steel, A. E.

    1970-01-01

    In a case of neuroblastoma the presence of an abnormal blood constituent was suspected from the raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate, sludging of the red cells, marked rouleaux formation, an atypical Leishman stain, increased plasma viscosity, and a distorted protein electrophoresis pattern. The abnormal constituent was shown to be a mucopolysaccharide which was either hyaluronic acid or chondroitin sulphate. Images PMID:4192677

  3. 21 CFR 862.1505 - Mucopolysaccharides (nonquantitative) test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry... mucopolysaccharides (nonquantitative) test system is a device intended to measure the levels of mucopolysaccharides in...

  4. Mucopolysaccharides from psyllium involved in wound healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, W.; Das, P. K.; Middelkoop, E.; Verschoor, J.; Storey, L.; Regnier, C.

    2001-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharides derived from the husk of psyllium (Plantago ovata) have properties beneficial for wound cleansing and wound healing. Recent studies indicate that these mucopolysaccharides also limit scar formation. Our in vitro and in vivo studies aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved,

  5. Basic Amino Acid Residues of Human Eosinophil Derived Neurotoxin Essential for Glycosaminoglycan Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ta-Jen; Chang, Wei-Tang; Tomiya, Noboru; Lee, Yuan-Chuan; Chang, Hao-Teng; Chen, Chien-Jung; Kuo, Ping-Hsueh; Fan, Tan-chi; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2013-01-01

    Human eosinophil derived neurotoxin (EDN), a granule protein secreted by activated eosinophils, is a biomarker for asthma in children. EDN belongs to the human RNase A superfamily possessing both ribonucleolytic and antiviral activities. EDN interacts with heparin oligosaccharides and heparin sulfate proteoglycans on bronchial epithelial Beas-2B cells. In this study, we demonstrate that the binding of EDN to cells requires cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), and the binding strength between EDN and GAGs depends on the sulfation levels of GAGs. Furthermore, in silico computer modeling and in vitro binding assays suggest critical roles for the following basic amino acids located within heparin binding regions (HBRs) of EDN 34QRRCKN39 (HBR1), 65NKTRKN70 (HBR2), and 113NRDQRRD119 (HBR3) and in particular Arg35, Arg36, and Arg38 within HBR1, and Arg114 and Arg117 within HBR3. Our data suggest that sulfated GAGs play a major role in EDN binding, which in turn may be related to the cellular effects of EDN. PMID:24065103

  6. Multiple deficiency of mucopolysaccharide sulfatases in mucosulfatidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basner, R; von Figura, K; Glössl, J; Klein, U; Kresse, H; Mlekusch, W

    1979-12-01

    Fibroblasts of four patients affected with mucosulfatidosis (multiple sulfatase deficiency, Austin variant of metachromatic leukodystrophy) were assayed for activities of the five sulfatases known to degrade mucopolysaccharides. These were iduronide 2-sulfate sulfatase, sulfamidase, N-acetyl-galactosamine 6-sulfate sulfatase, arylsulfatase B (N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfate sulfatase), and N-acetylglucosamine 6-sulfate sulfatase. The activities of these five sulfatases were severely depressed, thus confirming the known deficiency of arylsulfatase B and the absence of the Hunter and Sanfilippo III A corrective factors that have iduronide 2-sulfate sulfatase and sulfamidase activity, respectively. Together with earlier reports of the deficiencies of arylsulfatases A and C, cholesteryl sulfatase, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfatae, mucosulfatidosis is now characterized by the deficiency of nine different sulfatases.

  7. Experimental approaches to the interaction of the prion protein with nucleic acids and glycosaminoglycans: Modulators of the pathogenic conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jerson L; Vieira, Tuane C R G; Gomes, Mariana P B; Rangel, Luciana P; Scapin, Sandra M N; Cordeiro, Yraima

    2011-03-01

    The concept that transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are caused only by proteins has changed the traditional paradigm that disease transmission is due solely to an agent that carries genetic information. The central hypothesis for prion diseases proposes that the conversion of a cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into a misfolded, β-sheet-rich isoform (PrP(Sc)) accounts for the development of (TSE). There is substantial evidence that the infectious material consists chiefly of a protein, PrP(Sc), with no genomic coding material, unlike a virus particle, which has both. However, prions seem to have other partners that chaperone their activities in converting the PrP(C) into the disease-causing isoform. Nucleic acids (NAs) and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are the most probable accomplices of prion conversion. Here, we review the recent experimental approaches that have been employed to characterize the interaction of prion proteins with nucleic acids and glycosaminoglycans. A PrP recognizes many nucleic acids and GAGs with high affinities, and this seems to be related to a pathophysiological role for this interaction. A PrP binds nucleic acids and GAGs with structural selectivity, and some PrP:NA complexes can become proteinase K-resistant, undergoing amyloid oligomerization and conversion to a β-sheet-rich structure. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that endogenous polyanions (such as NAs and GAGs) may accelerate the rate of prion disease progression by acting as scaffolds or lattices that mediate the interaction between PrP(C) and PrP(Sc) molecules. In addition to a still-possible hypothesis that nucleic acids and GAGs, especially those from the host, may modulate the conversion, the recent structural characterization of the complexes has raised the possibility of developing new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Degradation of matrix glycosaminoglycans by peroxynitrite/peroxynitrous acid: evidence for a hydroxyl-radical-like mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennett, Eleanor C; Davies, Michael J

    2007-04-15

    The oxidant peroxynitrite/peroxynitrous acid (ONOO-/ONOOH) is generated at sites of inflammation via reaction of O2.- with .NO. Previous studies have shown that these species can oxidize cellular targets, but few data are available on damage to extracellular matrix and its components, despite evidence for matrix modification in a number of pathologies. In the current study we show that reaction of ONOO-/ONOOH with glycosaminoglycans results in extensive polymer fragmentation. Bolus authentic ONOO-/ONOOH modifies hyaluronan, heparin, and chondroitin, dermatan, and heparan sulfates, in a concentration-dependent, but O2-independent, manner. The ONOO-/ONOOH generator 3-(4-morpholinyl)sydnoneimine produces similar time- and concentration-dependent damage. These reactions generate specific polymer fragments via cleavage at disaccharide intervals. Studies at different pH values, and in the presence of bicarbonate, are consistent with ONOOH, rather than the carbonate adduct, CO3.- or ONOO-, being the source of damage. EPR spin trapping experiments have provided evidence for the formation of carbon-centered radicals on glycosaminoglycans and related monosaccharides; the similarity of these spectra to those obtained with authentic HO. is consistent with fragmentation being induced by this oxidant. These data suggest that extracellular matrix fragmentation at sites of inflammation may be due, in part, to the formation and reactions of ONOOH.

  9. A jasmonic acid derivative improves skin healing and induces changes in proteoglycan expression and glycosaminoglycan structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriet, Elodie; Jäger, Sibylle; Tran, Christian; Bastien, Philippe; Michelet, Jean-François; Minondo, Anne-Marie; Formanek, Florian; Dalko-Csiba, Maria; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Breton, Lionel; Vivès, Romain R

    2017-09-01

    Jasmonates are plant hormones that exhibit anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties and have therefore raised interest for human health applications. The molecular basis of these activities remains poorly understood, although increasing evidence suggests that a variety of mechanisms may be involved. Recently, we have reported that a jasmonate derivative (JAD) displayed anti-aging effects on human skin by inducing extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Based on this observation, we have investigated here the effects of JAD on proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) polysaccharides, which are major cell-surface/ECM components and are involved in a multitude of biological processes. In parallel, we have examined the ability of JAD to promote growth factor activities and improve skin wound healing. Proteoglycan expression was analyzed on epidermal primary keratinocytes and reconstituted skin epidermis, using electron/immunofluorescence microscopy, western blotting and flow cytometry. GAG composition was determined by disaccharide analysis. Finally, biological activities of JAD were assessed in cellulo, in FGF-7 induced migration/proliferation assays, as well as in vivo, using a suction blister model performed on 24 healthy volunteers. JAD was found to induce expression of major skin proteoglycans and to induce subtle changes in GAG structure. In parallel, we showed that JAD promoted FGF-7 and improved skin healing by accelerating epithelial repair in vivo. This study highlights JAD as a promising compound for investigating GAG structure-function relationships and for applications in skin cosmetic /corrective strategies. We propose here a novel mechanism, by which jasmonate derivatives may elicit biological activities in mammals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Suppression of glycosaminoglycan synthesis by articular cartilage, but not of hyaluronic acid synthesis by synovium, after exposure to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugenberg, S.T.; Myers, S.L.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-04-01

    We recently found that injection of 2 mCi of yttrium 90 (90Y; approximately 23,000 rads) into normal canine knees stimulated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis by femoral condylar cartilage. The present investigation was conducted to determine whether radiation affects cartilage metabolism directly. Rates of GAG synthesis and degradation in normal canine articular cartilage were studied following irradiation. Cultured synovium from the same knees was treated similarly, to determine the effects of irradiation on hyaluronic acid synthesis. Twenty-four hours after exposure to 1,000 rads, 10,000 rads, or 50,000 rads, 35S-GAG synthesis by the cartilage was 93%, 69%, and 37%, respectively, of that in control, nonirradiated cartilage. The effect was not rapidly reversible: 120 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, GAG synthesis remained at only 28% of the control level. Autoradiography showed marked suppression of 35S uptake by chondrocytes after irradiation. Cartilage GAG degradation was also increased following irradiation: 4 hours and 8 hours after exposure to 50,000 rads, the cartilage GAG concentration was only 66% and 54%, respectively, of that at time 0, while corresponding values for control, nonirradiated cartilage were 90% and 87%. In contrast to its effects on cartilage GAG metabolism, radiation at these levels had no effect on synovial hyaluronic acid synthesis.

  11. Broad-spectrum antiviral activity of chebulagic acid and punicalagin against viruses that use glycosaminoglycans for entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liang-Tzung; Chen, Ting-Ying; Lin, Song-Chow; Chung, Chueh-Yao; Lin, Ta-Chen; Wang, Guey-Horng; Anderson, Robert; Lin, Chun-Ching; Richardson, Christopher D

    2013-08-07

    We previously identified two hydrolyzable tannins, chebulagic acid (CHLA) and punicalagin (PUG) that blocked herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) entry and spread. These compounds inhibited viral glycoprotein interactions with cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Based on this property, we evaluated their antiviral efficacy against several different viruses known to employ GAGs for host cell entry. Extensive analysis of the tannins' mechanism of action was performed on a panel of viruses during the attachment and entry steps of infection. Virus-specific binding assays and the analysis of viral spread during treatment with these compounds were also conducted. CHLA and PUG were effective in abrogating infection by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), dengue virus (DENV), measles virus (MV), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), at μM concentrations and in dose-dependent manners without significant cytotoxicity. Moreover, the natural compounds inhibited viral attachment, penetration, and spread, to different degrees for each virus. Specifically, the tannins blocked all these steps of infection for HCMV, HCV, and MV, but had little effect on the post-fusion spread of DENV and RSV, which could suggest intriguing differences in the roles of GAG-interactions for these viruses. CHLA and PUG may be of value as broad-spectrum antivirals for limiting emerging/recurring viruses known to engage host cell GAGs for entry. Further studies testing the efficacy of these tannins in vivo against certain viruses are justified.

  12. Activities of sulfatases for the degradation of acidic glycosaminoglycans in cultured skin fibroblasts from two siblings with multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, R; Fujibayashi, S; Tachi, N; Wagatsuma, K; Nakao, T; Ikeno, T; Tsugawa, S; Sukegawa, K; Orii, T

    1983-04-01

    Cultured skin fibroblasts from two siblings with multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) were assayed for the activities of sulfatases known to degrade acidic glycosaminoglycans (AGAG). There were iduronate sulfatase, arylsulfatase B, heparan sulfate (HS) sulfatase, N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase, HS-derived N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase, and two keratan sulfate (KS)-derived N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulfate sulfatases. The activities of sulfatases required for the degradation of HS were reduced to a greater extent than those for the degradation of dermatan sulfate (DS), and those of sulfatases associated with basic defect of Morquio disease type A were moderately decreased or normal. On the other hand, urinary excretion of AGAG in both patients was increased about 10-fold compared to controls, and especially, the excretion of HS and DS was increased about 150-fold and 50-fold, respectively. Keratan sulfate was not detected. The results suggest that in patients with MSD the degradation of HS might be affected to a greater extent than that of DS.

  13. The recovery and characterization of acid glycosaminoglycans in normal human urine. Influence of a circadian rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J E; Newton, D J

    1975-01-01

    A method is described for the recovery of acid GAG (AGAG) as solid Ba salts from relatively small volumes (100+/-50 ml) of normal adult human urine. It is pointed out that (a) the amount recovered, (b) the molecular characteristics (i.e. molecular weight and charge density), (c) the ionic strength at which the AGAG are recovered and (d) the "critical electrolyte concentrations" of the AGAG-precipitating reagent (or anion exchanger) are inseparably linked, and that different fractions are obtained by variations in any parameter. Our product is defined as that fraction of heterodisperse material precipitated at room temperature by cetyl trimethylammonium bromide from urine diluted with 3 volumes of 0.05 M sodium acetate buffer pH 5.7, in the presence of asbestos powder. It is less degraded than other AGAG remaining in the urine supernatant. The product contained three electrophoretically separa0le components, characterized by susceptibility to pronase digestion, infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy, hexosamine identification, tests for uronic and sialic acids, and the "critical electrolyte concentrations" of their Alcian blue complexes, as "chondroitin sulphate", "heparan sulphate" and acid glycoprotein. The method is simple, rapid and suita0le for use on multiple samples. The product is directly usable in electrophoretic analyses, etc. Using this method AGAG was recovered from the urine of nine males and five females, aged 25-43, collected during a 24-hr cycle, in six 4-hr aliquots. The ratios of "chondroitin sulphate" to "heparan sulphate" quantitated from the electrophoretic strip, showed a marked peak in every subject at 18-22 hrs.

  14. Hydrolyzable Tannins (Chebulagic Acid and Punicalagin) Target Viral Glycoprotein-Glycosaminoglycan Interactions To Inhibit Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Entry and Cell-to-Cell Spread▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liang-Tzung; Chen, Ting-Ying; Chung, Chueh-Yao; Noyce, Ryan S.; Grindley, T. Bruce; McCormick, Craig; Lin, Ta-Chen; Wang, Guey-Horng; Lin, Chun-Ching; Richardson, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a common human pathogen that causes lifelong latent infection of sensory neurons. Non-nucleoside inhibitors that can limit HSV-1 recurrence are particularly useful in treating immunocompromised individuals or cases of emerging acyclovir-resistant strains of herpesvirus. We report that chebulagic acid (CHLA) and punicalagin (PUG), two hydrolyzable tannins isolated from the dried fruits of Terminalia chebula Retz. (Combretaceae), inhibit HSV-1 entry at noncytotoxic doses in A549 human lung cells. Experiments revealed that both tannins targeted and inactivated HSV-1 viral particles and could prevent binding, penetration, and cell-to-cell spread, as well as secondary infection. The antiviral effect from either of the tannins was not associated with induction of type I interferon-mediated responses, nor was pretreatment of the host cell protective against HSV-1. Their inhibitory activities targeted HSV-1 glycoproteins since both natural compounds were able to block polykaryocyte formation mediated by expression of recombinant viral glycoproteins involved in attachment and membrane fusion. Our results indicated that CHLA and PUG blocked interactions between cell surface glycosaminoglycans and HSV-1 glycoproteins. Furthermore, the antiviral activities from the two tannins were significantly diminished in mutant cell lines unable to produce heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate and could be rescued upon reconstitution of heparan sulfate biosynthesis. We suggest that the hydrolyzable tannins CHLA and PUG may be useful as competitors for glycosaminoglycans in the management of HSV-1 infections and that they may help reduce the risk for development of viral drug resistance during therapy with nucleoside analogues. PMID:21307190

  15. Hydrolyzable tannins (chebulagic acid and punicalagin) target viral glycoprotein-glycosaminoglycan interactions to inhibit herpes simplex virus 1 entry and cell-to-cell spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liang-Tzung; Chen, Ting-Ying; Chung, Chueh-Yao; Noyce, Ryan S; Grindley, T Bruce; McCormick, Craig; Lin, Ta-Chen; Wang, Guey-Horng; Lin, Chun-Ching; Richardson, Christopher D

    2011-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a common human pathogen that causes lifelong latent infection of sensory neurons. Non-nucleoside inhibitors that can limit HSV-1 recurrence are particularly useful in treating immunocompromised individuals or cases of emerging acyclovir-resistant strains of herpesvirus. We report that chebulagic acid (CHLA) and punicalagin (PUG), two hydrolyzable tannins isolated from the dried fruits of Terminalia chebula Retz. (Combretaceae), inhibit HSV-1 entry at noncytotoxic doses in A549 human lung cells. Experiments revealed that both tannins targeted and inactivated HSV-1 viral particles and could prevent binding, penetration, and cell-to-cell spread, as well as secondary infection. The antiviral effect from either of the tannins was not associated with induction of type I interferon-mediated responses, nor was pretreatment of the host cell protective against HSV-1. Their inhibitory activities targeted HSV-1 glycoproteins since both natural compounds were able to block polykaryocyte formation mediated by expression of recombinant viral glycoproteins involved in attachment and membrane fusion. Our results indicated that CHLA and PUG blocked interactions between cell surface glycosaminoglycans and HSV-1 glycoproteins. Furthermore, the antiviral activities from the two tannins were significantly diminished in mutant cell lines unable to produce heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate and could be rescued upon reconstitution of heparan sulfate biosynthesis. We suggest that the hydrolyzable tannins CHLA and PUG may be useful as competitors for glycosaminoglycans in the management of HSV-1 infections and that they may help reduce the risk for development of viral drug resistance during therapy with nucleoside analogues.

  16. Total and single species of uronic acid-bearing glycosaminoglycans in urine of newborns of 2-3days of age for early diagnosis application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Francesca; Galeotti, Fabio; Zampini, Lucia; Padella, Lucia; Tomanin, Rosella; Concolino, Daniela; Fiumara, Agata; Galeazzi, Tiziana; Coppa, Giovanni; Gabrielli, Orazio; Volpi, Nicola

    2016-12-01

    Urine are easily accessible and relatively simple to process and uronic acid-bearing glycosaminoglycans (UA-GAGs) may serve as biomarkers for several diseases, like for mucopolysaccharidosis. We report a study from a large cohort of healthy newborns of 2-3days to have a basic profile of total content of urinary UA-GAGs, their composition and structural signatures utilizing a rapid extractive method and sensitive separation of enzymatic released disaccharides by capillary electrophoresis-light induced fluorescence. Results were also compared with those obtained from normal adult subjects. A total of UA-GAGs content of ~35μg/mg creatinine was observed in 331 newborns versus 1.5μg/mg creatinine of adult urine composed of ~90% chondroitin sulfate (CS), ~7% heparan sulfate (HS) and ~3% hyaluronic acid (HA). No significant differences were observed with adults. Specific ratios between the main CS disaccharides were informative of a significant greater 4-sulfation and charge density for newborn compared to adults. The HS from newborn urine was mainly composed by the non-sulfated (~64%) and mono-sulfated (~28%) disaccharides. No significant differences were observed versus adult urine. The present method is able to measure changes in UA-GAG composition and their structure independently of the age of subjects and rapidly applicable to the newborn diagnosis without necessity to have creatinine levels. Moreover, modifications in charge density values as well as the presence of sulfate groups in specific positions may be indicative of altered conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of helium-neon laser on the mucopolysaccharide induction in experimental osteoarthritic cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y-S; Huang, M-H; Chai, C-Y

    2006-04-01

    To investigate the effects of mucopolysaccharide induction after treatment by low power laser for experimental osteoarthritis (OA). Seventy-two rats with three different degrees of papain induced OA over right knee joints were collected for helium-neon (He-Ne) laser treatment. The severity of induced arthritis was measured by 99mTc bone scan and classified into three groups (I-III) by their radioactivity ratios (right to left knee joints). The rats in each group were further divided into study subgroups (Is, IIs, and IIIs) and control subgroups (Ic, IIc, and IIIc) randomly. The arthritic knees in study subgroups received He-Ne laser treatment, and those in controls received sham laser treatment. The changes of arthritic severity after treatment and follow-up 2 months later were measured. The histopathological changes were evaluated through light microscope after disarticulation of sections (H.E. stain), and the changes of mucopolysaccharide density in cartilage matrix were measured by Optimas scanner analyzer after Alcian blue (AB) stain. The densities of mucopolysaccharide induced after treatment in arthritic cartilage were compared and correlated with their histopathological changes. The density of mucopolysaccharide rose at the initial stage of induced arthritis, and decreased progressively in later stages. The densities of mucopolysaccharide in treated rats increased upon complete laser treatment more than those of the controls, which is closely related with the improvement in histopathological findings, but conversely with the changes in arthritic severity. He-Ne laser treatment will enhance the biosynthesis of arthritic cartilage, and results in the improvement of arthritic histopathological changes.

  18. Regulation of sulfated glycosaminoglycan production by prostaglandin E2 in cultured lung fibroblasts

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    Karlinsky, J.B.; Goldstein, R.H. (Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (USA))

    1989-08-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has been shown to increase the synthesis of hyaluronic acid in cultured fibroblasts by increasing the activity of hyaluronate synthetase, a group of plasma membrane-bound synthetic enzymes. We examined whether PGE2 also increased the activity of those enzyme systems involved in the synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan in the human embryonic lung fibroblast. Exposure of cells to PGE2 resulted in dose-dependent increases in glucosamine incorporation into all sulfated glycosaminoglycan subtypes. PGE2 at 10(-7) mol/L increased total glycosaminoglycan per dish to 21.6 +/- 3.1 micrograms versus 12.0 +/- 2.5 micrograms in control untreated cultures. Stimulation of endogenous PGE2 production by bradykinin had a similar effect on glycosaminoglycan synthesis. To examine whether PGE2 affected sulfated glycosaminoglycan protein core production, cells were labeled with tritiated glucosamine in the presence of cycloheximide. Under these conditions, incorporation of radiolabel into all glycosaminoglycan subtypes was reduced. However, when exogenous sulfated glycosaminoglycan chain initiator (p-nitrophenyl beta-D-xyloside) was added, incorporation of tritiated glucosamine into sulfated glycosaminoglycan increased but not to levels found in control cultures. Application of PGE2 to cultures treated with cycloheximide alone, or to cultures treated with cycloheximide plus xyloside, increased tritiated glucosamine incorporation into chondroitin, dermatan sulfate, and to a lesser extent into heparan sulfate. We conclude that PGE2 stimulates synthesis of all sulfated glycosaminoglycan even in the absence of new protein core production, probably by increasing activities of sulfated glycosaminoglycan synthetase enzymes. PGE2 stimulation of heparan sulfate synthesis is partially dependent on the availability of heparan sulfate-specific protein core.

  19. GLYCOSAMINOGLYCANS AND PROTEOGLYCANS IN PALMAR FASCIA OF PATIENTS WITH DUPUYTREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Priscilla Carneiro Hirai; Kobayashi, Elsa Yoko; Lenzi, Luiz Guilherme de Saboya; Dos Santos, João Baptista Gomes; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Faloppa, Flávio

    2016-01-01

    : To evaluate and compare the behavior of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in Dupuytren disease (DD). : This is an experimental study with 23 patients diagnosed with DD. Tissue collected through fasciectomy with incision type Brunner or McCash were evaluated by electrophoresis for identification of GAGs. The quantification was carried out by immunofluorescence and dosage of proteins for different types of glycosaminoglycans. The results were expressed in percentage and statistically evaluated. : A significant increase was observed through eletrophoresis in GAGs, as compared to the control (p<0.05). Immunofluorescence of hyaluronic acid was reduced (23 times) when compared to the control (p<0.0001). : An increase of sulfated GAGs in Dupuytren's disease, mainly dermatan sulfate, was evident from our results, as well as a pronounced decrease of hyaluronic acid in the palmar aponeurosis from the same patients. Level of Evidence III, Case-Control Study.

  20. Glycosaminoglycan and proteoglycan in skin aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hun; Oh, Jang-Hee; Chung, Jin Ho

    2016-09-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and proteoglycans (PGs) are abundant structural components of the extracellular matrix in addition to collagen fibers. Hyaluronic acid (HA), one of GAGs, forms proteoglycan aggregates, which are large complexes of HA and HA-binding PGs. Their crosslinking to other matrix proteins such as the collagen network results in the formation of supermolecular structures and functions to increase tissue stiffness. Skin aging can be classified as intrinsic aging and photoaging based on the phenotypes and putative mechanism. While intrinsic aging is characterized by a thinned epidermis and fine wrinkles caused by advancing age, photoaging is characterized by deep wrinkles, skin laxity, telangiectasias, and appearance of lentigines and is mainly caused by chronic sun exposure. The major molecular mechanism governing skin aging processes has been attributed to the loss of mature collagen and increased matrix metalloproteinase expression. However, various strategies focusing on collagen turnover remain unsatisfactory for the reversal or prevention of skin aging. Although the expression of GAGs and PGs in the skin and their regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood, we and others have elucidated various changes in GAGs and PGs in aged skin, suggesting that these molecules are important contributors to skin aging. In this review, we focus on skin-abundant GAGs and PGs and their changes in human skin during the skin aging process. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Glycosaminoglycan blotting and detection after electrophoresis separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, Nicola; Maccari, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Separation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) by electrophoresis and their characterization to the microgram level are integral parts of biochemical research. Their blotting on membranes after electrophoresis offers the advantage to perform further analysis on single separated species such as identification with antibodies and/or recovery of single band. A method for the blotting and immobilizing of several nonsulfated and sulfated complex GAGs on membranes made hydrophilic and positively charged by cationic detergent after their separation by conventional agarose-gel electrophoresis is illustrated. This approach to the study of these complex macromolecules utilizes the capacity of agarose-gel electrophoresis to separate single species of polysaccharides from mixtures and the membrane technology for further preparative and analytical uses. Nitrocellulose membranes are derivatized with the cationic detergent cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) and mixtures of GAGs are capillary blotted after their separation in agarose-gel electrophoresis. Single purified species of variously sulfated polysaccharides are transferred on derivatized membranes with an efficiency of 100 % and stained with alcian blue (irreversible staining) and toluidine blue (reversible staining). This enables a lower amount limit of detection of 0.1 μg. Nonsulfated polyanions, for example hyaluronic acid (HA), may also be transferred to membranes with a limit of detection of approximately 0.1-0.5 μg after irreversible or reversible staining. The membranes may be stained with reversible staining and the same lanes used for immunological detection or other applications.

  2. Determinants of Glycosaminoglycan (GAG Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Prydz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Proteoglycans (PGs are glycosylated proteins of biological importance at cell surfaces, in the extracellular matrix, and in the circulation. PGs are produced and modified by glycosaminoglycan (GAG chains in the secretory pathway of animal cells. The most common GAG attachment site is a serine residue followed by a glycine (-ser-gly-, from which a linker tetrasaccharide extends and may continue as a heparan sulfate, a heparin, a chondroitin sulfate, or a dermatan sulfate GAG chain. Which type of GAG chain becomes attached to the linker tetrasaccharide is influenced by the structure of the protein core, modifications occurring to the linker tetrasaccharide itself, and the biochemical environment of the Golgi apparatus, where GAG polymerization and modification by sulfation and epimerization take place. The same cell type may produce different GAG chains that vary, depending on the extent of epimerization and sulfation. However, it is not known to what extent these differences are caused by compartmental segregation of protein cores en route through the secretory pathway or by differential recruitment of modifying enzymes during synthesis of different PGs. The topic of this review is how different aspects of protein structure, cellular biochemistry, and compartmentalization may influence GAG synthesis.

  3. Host glycosaminoglycan confers susceptibility to bacterial infection in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Miriam J; Wong, Sandra L; Nybakken, Kent; Carey, Vincent J; Madoff, Lawrence C

    2009-02-01

    Many pathogens engage host cell surface glycosaminoglycans, but redundancy in pathogen adhesins and host glycosaminoglycan-anchoring proteins (heparan sulfate proteoglycans) has limited the understanding of the importance of glycosaminoglycan binding during infection. The alpha C protein of group B streptococcus, a virulence determinant for this neonatal human pathogen, binds to host glycosaminoglycan and mediates the entry of bacteria into human cells. We studied alpha C protein-glycosaminoglycan binding in Drosophila melanogaster, whose glycosaminoglycan repertoire resembles that of humans but whose genome includes only three characterized membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan genes. The knockdown of glycosaminoglycan polymerases or of heparan sulfate proteoglycans reduced the cellular binding of alpha C protein. The interruption of alpha C protein-glycosaminoglycan binding was associated with longer host survival and a lower bacterial burden. These data indicate that the glycosaminoglycan-alpha C protein interaction involves multiple heparan sulfate proteoglycans and impairs bacterial killing. Host glycosaminoglycans, anchored by multiple proteoglycans, thereby determine susceptibility to infection. Because there is homology between Drosophila and human glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan structures and many pathogens express glycosaminoglycan-binding structures, our data suggest that interfering with glycosaminoglycan binding may protect against infections in humans.

  4. The Effects of Mucopolysaccharide Polysulphate on Hydration and Elasticity of Human Skin

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    Rungsima Wanitphakdeedecha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mucopolysaccharide polysulphate (MPS has been used in medicine as an anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic agent for over 50 years. Its chemical structure permits considerable hydrogen bonding with adjacent water molecules, which effectively leads to hydration of the surrounding tissue. In addition, it stimulates endogenous hyaluronate synthesis, resulting in an increase in water-binding capacity and viscoelasticity of the skin. Objective. To study the efficacy of 0.1% MPS on hydration and elasticity of human skin. Methods. The first part of this study was a randomized double blind placebo-controlled study which included 60 female volunteers aged 30–45 years with dry skin, defined by Corneometer CM 825. The volunteers were treated with either 0.1% MPS or vehicle control. All subjects were asked to apply 1 g of cream to their face twice daily for a total period of 4 weeks. Skin hydration and elasticity were measured at baseline and week 4 with Corneometer CM 825 and cutometer MPA 580, respectively, at forehead and both cheeks. The second part of this study focused on the efficacy of 0.1% MPS on skin hydration after single application. 20 female volunteers aged 30–45 years with dry skin, defined by Corneometer CM 825, were recruited to the study. All subjects were asked to apply 2 g of 0.1% MPS cream on entirely randomly selected forearm. Skin hydration at the middle of both forearms was measured at baseline, immediately after application, and every 1 hour after application for a period of 10 hours. Results. 57 subjects (28 in vehicle control group, 29 in MPS completed treatment protocol. The baseline skin hydration of both groups was not significantly different (P=0.47. Hower, there was a statistically significant difference in skin hydration at 4 weeks between MPS and placebo group (P=0.01. Skin elasticity was significantly improved at week 4 in both groups (vehicle-control, P<0.01, and MPS, P<0.01. However, no

  5. Plasmodium vivax adherence to placental glycosaminoglycans.

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    Kesinee Chotivanich

    Full Text Available Plasmodium vivax infections seldom kill directly but do cause indirect mortality by reducing birth weight and causing abortion. Cytoadherence and sequestration in the microvasculature are central to the pathogenesis of severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria, but the contribution of cytoadherence to pathology in other human malarias is less clear.The adherence properties of P. vivax infected red blood cells (PvIRBC were evaluated under static and flow conditions.P. vivax isolates from 33 patients were studied. None adhered to immobilized CD36, ICAM-1, or thrombospondin, putative ligands for P. falciparum vascular cytoadherence, or umbilical vein endothelial cells, but all adhered to immobilized chondroitin sulphate A (CSA and hyaluronic acid (HA, the receptors for adhesion of P. falciparum in the placenta. PvIRBC also adhered to fresh placental cells (N = 5. Pre-incubation with chondroitinase prevented PvIRBC adherence to CSA, and reduced binding to HA, whereas preincubation with hyaluronidase prevented adherence to HA, but did not reduce binding to CSA significantly. Pre-incubation of PvIRBC with soluble CSA and HA reduced binding to the immobilized receptors and prevented placental binding. PvIRBC adhesion was prevented by pre-incubation with trypsin, inhibited by heparin, and reduced by EGTA. Under laminar flow conditions the mean (SD shear stress reducing maximum attachment by 50% was 0.06 (0.02 Pa but, having adhered, the PvIRBC could then resist detachment by stresses up to 5 Pa. At 37 °C adherence began approximately 16 hours after red cell invasion with maximal adherence at 30 hours. At 39 °C adherence began earlier and peaked at 24 hours.Adherence of P. vivax-infected erythrocytes to glycosaminoglycans may contribute to the pathogenesis of vivax malaria and lead to intrauterine growth retardation.

  6. Histochemical analyses of glycosaminoglycans in the synovial membrane of the canine knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, D; Tsukise, A

    2001-03-01

    The accurate localization and nature of glycosaminoglycans in the synovial membrane of the canine knee joint were examined histochemically by means of the selective sensitized diamine procedures based upon high and low iron diamine stainings in combination with enzyme digestions. Using these methods, it was possible to clearly and easily detect exceedingly small amounts of glycosaminoglycans in synovial tissues, which cannot be visualized by methods employed to date. The sensitized high iron diamine (S-HID) procedure resulted in positive reactions of varying intensities in the intercellular matrix of synovial intima, and in the extracellular matrix and small capillary walls of the superficial layer in the synovial subintima, and also reacted vividly in the extracellular matrix and blood vessel walls of the deeper layer in the synovial subintima. In particular, the sensitized low iron diamine (S-LID) procedure resulted in positive reactions of the extracellular matrix in the synovial subintimal layers. The S-HID and S-LID procedures combined with the enzyme digestions proved that glycosaminoglycan molecular species such as chondroitin sulfate A/C, dermatan sulfate, heparan sulfate and hyaluronic acid are present in various concentrations in the synovial membrane of the canine knee joint. The present results were discussed with reference to the histophysiological and pathophysiological functions of glycosaminoglycans in the synovium of domestic mammals.

  7. Polysulfated glycosaminoglycan accelerates net synthesis of collagen and glycosaminoglycans by arthritic equine cartilage tissues and chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glade, M J

    1990-05-01

    Low molecular weight polysulfated glycosaminoglycan (PSGAG) stimulated net collagen and glycosaminoglycan synthesis by normal and arthritic equine fetlock cartilage tissues in organ culture. Arthritic tissues were more sensitive to PSGAG stimulation. The rates of cartilage-specific type-II collagen and chondroitin sulfate-rich glycosaminoglycan synthesis by confluent chondrocyte cell cultures obtained from normal and arthritic equine cartilage tissues were increased by 25 and 50 mg of PSGAG/ml. Cells from arthritic cartilage were also more sensitive to the presence of PSGAG. In addition, concentrations of PSGAG (25 and 50 mg/ml) approximate to those in synovial fluid after intra-articular injection of 250 mg of PSGAG inhibited the rate of collagen and glycosaminoglycan degradation in cell culture. These findings suggest that PSGAG may have a role in the healing of mild cartilage degeneration by encouraging the production of replacement hyaline matrix materials, while delaying their subsequent degradation. In contrast, growth of cell cultures was inhibited by PSGAG, suggesting that these compounds may fail to stimulate chondrocyte replication, a prerequisite for tissue regeneration. Nonetheless, these observations provide direct evidence of a truly chondroprotective role for low molecular weight PSGAG in the treatment of equine degenerative joint disease.

  8. Composition and structure elucidation of human milk glycosaminoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppa, Giovanni V; Gabrielli, Orazio; Buzzega, Dania; Zampini, Lucia; Galeazzi, Tiziana; Maccari, Francesca; Bertino, Enrico; Volpi, Nicola

    2011-03-01

    To date, there is no complete structural characterization of human milk glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) available nor do any data exist on their composition in bovine milk. Total GAGs were determined on extracts from human and bovine milk. Samples were subjected to digestion with specific enzymes, treated with nitrous acid, and analyzed by agarose-gel electrophoresis and high-performance liquid chromatography for their structural characterization. Quantitative analyses yielded ∼7 times more GAGs in human milk than in bovine milk. In particular, galactosaminoglycans, chondroitin sulfate (CS) and dermatan sulfate (DS), were found to differ considerably from one type of milk to the other. In fact, hardly any DS was observed in human milk, but a low-sulfated CS having a very low charge density of 0.36 was found. On the contrary, bovine milk galactosaminoglycans were demonstrated to be composed of ∼66% DS and 34% CS for a total charge density of 0.94. Structural analysis performed by heparinases showed a prevalence of fast-moving heparin over heparan sulfate, accounting for ∼30-40% of total GAGs in both milk samples and showing lower sulfation in human (2.03) compared with bovine (2.28). Hyaluronic acid was found in minor amounts. This study offers the first full characterization of the GAGs in human milk, providing useful data to gain a better understanding of their physiological role, as well as of their fundamental contribution to the health of the newborn.

  9. RNA Contaminates Glycosaminoglycans Extracted from Cells and Tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemst, J.J. van; Loeven, M.A.; Graaf, M.J.J. de; Berden, J.H.; Rabelink, T.J.; Smit, C.H.; Vlag, J. van der

    2016-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are linear negatively charged polysaccharides and important components of extracellular matrices and cell surface glycan layers such as the endothelial glycocalyx. The GAG family includes sulfated heparin, heparan sulfate (HS), dermatan sulfate (DS), chondroitin sulfate

  10. Radiation synovectomy stimulates glycosaminoglycan synthesis by normal articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, S.L.; Slowman, S.D.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-07-01

    Radiation synovectomy has been considered a therapeutic alternative to surgical synovectomy. Whether intraarticular irradiation affects the composition or biochemistry, and therefore the biomechanical properties, of normal articular cartilage has not been established. In the present study, yttrium 90 silicate was injected into one knee of nine normal adult dogs, and three other dogs received nonradioactive yttrium silicate. When the animals were killed 4 to 13 weeks after the injection, synovium from the irradiated knees showed areas of necrosis and fibrosis. Up to 29% less hyaluronate was synthesized in vitro by the synovial intima from irradiated knees than by the intima from the contralateral knees (mean difference 18%). Morphologic abnormalities were not observed in articular cartilage from either the irradiated or control knees, nor did the water content or concentrations of uronic acid or DNA in cartilage from the irradiated knees differ from that in cartilage from the contralateral knees. However, net /sup 35/SO/sub 4/-labeled glycosaminoglycan synthesis in organ cultures of cartilage from irradiated knees was increased (mean difference 21%, p = 0.03) in comparison with that in cultures of contralateral knee cartilage.

  11. Structure and anticoagulant properties of sulfated glycosaminoglycans from primitive Chordates

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    MAURO S. G. PAVÃO

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Dermatan sulfates and heparin, similar to the mammalian glycosaminoglycans, but with differences in the degree and position of sulfation were previously isolated from the body of the ascidian Styela plicata and Ascidia nigra. These differences produce profound effects on their anticoagulant properties. S. plicata dermatan sulfate composed by 2-O-sulfatedalpha-L-iduronic acid and 4-O-sulfated N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosamine residues is a potent anticoagulant due to a high heparin cofactor II activity. Surprisingly, it has a lower potency to prevent thrombus formation on an experimental model and a lower bleeding effect in rats than the mammalian dermatan sulfate. In contrast, A. nigra dermatan sulfate, also enriched in 2-O-sulfated alpha-L-iduronic acid, but in this case sulfated at O-6 of the N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosamine units, has no in vitro or in vivo anticoagulant activity, does not prevent thrombus formation but shows a bleeding effect similar to the mammalian glycosaminoglycan. Ascidian heparin, composed by 2-O-sulfated alpha-L-iduronic acid, N- and 6-O-sulfated glucosamine (75% and alpha-L-iduronic acid, N- and 6-O-sulfated glucosamine (25% disaccharide units has an anticoagulant activity 10 times lower than the mammalian heparin, is about 20 times less potent in the inhibition of thrombin by antithrombin, but has the same heparin cofactor II activity as mammalian heparin.Dermatam sulfato e heparina semelhantes aos glicosaminoglicanos de mamíferos, mas apresentando diferenças no grau e posição de sulfatação foram previamente isolados do corpo das ascídias Styela plicata e Ascidia nigra. Estas diferenças produzem efeitos profundos nas suas propriedades anticoagulantes. O dermatam sulfato de S. plicata, composto por resíduos de ácido alfa-L-idurônico 2-O-sulfatados e N-acetilgalactosamina 4-O-sulfatados é um potente anticoagulante devido a sua alta atividade de cofator II da heparina. Surpreendentemente, este polímero possui uma

  12. Anti-aging effect and gene expression profiling of dung beetle glycosaminoglycan in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Mi Young; Kim, Ban Ji; Kim, Ha Jeong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Jung, Yi-Sook; Park, Kun-Koo

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the anti-aging effect of a newly prepared insect-derived compound, dung beetle glycosaminoglycan (GAG), given intraperitoneally to old SD rats as part of their diet for 1 month. Insect GAG administration was found to be related to a reduction in oxidative damage, hepato-cellular biomarker levels, protein carbonyl content, and malondialdehyde concentration. The anti-aging-related molecular genetic mechanisms of dung beetle GAG are not yet fully elucidated. Catharsius molossus (a type of dung beetle) GAG (CaG) possessed anti-aging activities; it reduced the serum level of creatinine kinase, had aortic vasorelaxant activities and cardioprotective actions, and maintained a normal glucose level in treated rats. Microarray analysis was performed with a rat 30 K cDNA clone set array to identify the gene-expression profiles of 14-month-old SD rats treated with dung beetle glycosaminoglycan 5 mg/kg (CaG5) over a 1-month period, which was done to investigate its anti-aging effect as compared to that of either Bombus ignitus (a type of bumblebee) queen GAG 5 mg/kg (IQG5) or chondroitin sulfate 10 mg/kg. CaG5 and IQG5 had marked anti-inflammatory effects, bringing about inhibition of free fatty acid, uric acid, sGPT, IL-1 beta, and CK values. In addition, anticoagulant and antithrombotic effects were seen: the concentration of factor 1 (fibrinogen) was increased in CaG- treated rat plasma. The CaG5-treated rat group, compared to the control, displayed upregulation of 131 genes, including lipocalin 2 (Lbp) and a serine peptidase inhibitor, Kaszal type3 (Spink3), and 64 downregulated genes, including lysyl oxidase (Lox), serine dehydratase (sds), and retinol saturase (Retsat). Our data suggest that dung beetle glycosaminoglycan may be a helpful treatment for aged rats, which indicates its potential as a therapeutic biomaterial for aging.

  13. Allosteric Inhibition of Factor XIIIa. Non-Saccharide Glycosaminoglycan Mimetics, but Not Glycosaminoglycans, Exhibit Promising Inhibition Profile.

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    Rami A Al-Horani

    Full Text Available Factor XIIIa (FXIIIa is a transglutaminase that catalyzes the last step in the coagulation process. Orthostery is the only approach that has been exploited to design FXIIIa inhibitors. Yet, allosteric inhibition of FXIIIa is a paradigm that may offer a key advantage of controlled inhibition over orthosteric inhibition. Such an approach is likely to lead to novel FXIIIa inhibitors that do not carry bleeding risks. We reasoned that targeting a collection of basic amino acid residues distant from FXIIIa's active site by using sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs or non-saccharide GAG mimetics (NSGMs would lead to the discovery of the first allosteric FXIIIa inhibitors. We tested a library of 22 variably sulfated GAGs and NSGMs against human FXIIIa to discover promising hits. Interestingly, although some GAGs bound to FXIIIa better than NSGMs, no GAG displayed any inhibition. An undecasulfated quercetin analog was found to inhibit FXIIIa with reasonable potency (efficacy of 98%. Michaelis-Menten kinetic studies revealed an allosteric mechanism of inhibition. Fluorescence studies confirmed close correspondence between binding affinity and inhibition potency, as expected for an allosteric process. The inhibitor was reversible and at least 9-fold- and 26-fold selective over two GAG-binding proteins factor Xa (efficacy of 71% and thrombin, respectively, and at least 27-fold selective over a cysteine protease papain. The inhibitor also inhibited the FXIIIa-mediated polymerization of fibrin in vitro. Overall, our work presents the proof-of-principle that FXIIIa can be allosterically modulated by sulfated non-saccharide agents much smaller than GAGs, which should enable the design of selective and safe anticoagulants.

  14. Glycosaminoglycan sulphation affects the seeded misfolding of a mutant prion protein.

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    Victoria A Lawson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The accumulation of protease resistant conformers of the prion protein (PrP(res is a key pathological feature of prion diseases. Polyanions, including RNA and glycosaminoglycans have been identified as factors that contribute to the propagation, transmission and pathogenesis of prion disease. Recent studies have suggested that the contribution of these cofactors to prion propagation may be species specific. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In this study a cell-free assay was used to investigate the molecular basis of polyanion stimulated PrP(res formation using brain tissue or cell line derived murine PrP. Enzymatic depletion of endogenous nucleic acids or heparan sulphate (HS from the PrP(C substrate was found to specifically prevent PrP(res formation seeded by mouse derived PrP(Sc. Modification of the negative charge afforded by the sulphation of glycosaminoglycans increased the ability of a familial PrP mutant to act as a substrate for PrP(res formation, while having no effect on PrP(res formed by wildtype PrP. This difference may be due to the observed differences in the binding of wild type and mutant PrP for glycosaminoglycans. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Cofactor requirements for PrP(res formation are host species and prion strain specific and affected by disease associated mutations of the prion protein. This may explain both species and strain dependent propagation characteristics and provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of familial prion disease. It further highlights the challenge of designing effective therapeutics against a disease which effects a range of mammalian species, caused by range of aetiologies and prion strains.

  15. Compositional analysis and structural elucidation of glycosaminoglycans in chicken eggs

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhangguo; Zhang, Fuming; Li, Lingyun; Li, Guoyun; He, Wenqing; Linhardt, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) have numerous applications in the fields of pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, nutraceuticals, and foods. GAGs are also critically important in the developmental biology of all multicellular animals. GAGs were isolated from chicken egg components including yolk, thick egg white, thin egg white, membrane, calcified shell matrix supernatant, and shell matrix deposit. Disaccharide compositional analysis was performed using ultra high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spec...

  16. Human milk glycosaminoglycans: the state of the art and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coppa Giovanni Valentino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recently, a complete characterization and detailed evaluation of the glycosaminoglycans of human milk were performed. The total glycosaminoglycans content in milk from healthy mothers having delivered term or preterm newborns showed a constant pattern which was essentially composed of two main polysaccharides: chondroitin sulfate (60-70% and heparin (30-40%. Moreover, considerable variations of glycosaminoglycans concentration were found during the first month of lactation, the highest values being present in colostrum compared to mature milk. Metabolism and potential biological functions of human milk glycosaminoglycans are hypothesized and future studies are encouraged.

  17. Characterization and flocculation properties of biopolymeric flocculant (glycosaminoglycan) produced by Cellulomonas sp. Okoh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwodo, U U; Okoh, A I

    2013-05-01

    Bioflocculant production potential of an actinobacteria isolated from a freshwater environment was evaluated and the bioflocculant characterized. 16S rDNA nucleotide sequence and BLAST analysis was used to identify the actinobacteria and fermentation conditions, and nutritional requirements were evaluated for optimal bioflocculant production. Chemical analyses, FTIR, 1H NMR spectrometry and SEM imaging of the purified bioflocculant were carried out. The 16S rDNA nucleotide sequences showed 93% similarities to three Cellulomonas species (strain 794, Cellulomonas flavigena DSM 20109 and Cellulomonas flavigena NCIMB 8073), and the sequences was deposited in GenBank as Cellulomonas sp. Okoh (accession number HQ537132). Bioflocculant was optimally produced at an initial pH 7, incubation temperature 30°C, agitation speed of 160 rpm and an inoculum size of 2% (vol/vol) of cell density 1·5 × 10(8) cfu ml(-1). Glucose (88·09% flocculating activity; yield: 4·04 ± 0·33 g l(-1)), (NH(4))2 NO(3) (82·74% flocculating activity; yield: 4·47 ± 0·55 g l(-1)) and MgCl(2) (90·40% flocculating activity; yield: 4·41 g l(-1)) were the preferred nutritional source. Bioflocculant chemical analyses showed carbohydrate, protein and uronic acids in the proportion of 28·9, 19·3 and 18·7% in CPB and 31·4, 18·7 and 32·1% in PPB, respectively. FTIR and 1H NMR indicated the presence of carboxyl, hydroxyl and amino groups amongst others typical of glycosaminoglycan. SEM imaging revealed horizontal pleats of membranous sheets closely packed. Cellulomonas sp. produces bioflocculant predominantly composed of glycosaminoglycan polysaccharides with high flocculation activity. High flocculation activity suggests suitability for industrial applications; hence, it may serve to replace the hazardous flocculant used in water treatment. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Localization of glycosaminoglycan substitution sites on domain V of mouse perlecan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tapanadechopone, P; Hassell, J R; Rigatti, B

    1999-01-01

    Perlecan, the predominant basement membrane proteoglycan, has previously been shown to contain glycosaminoglycans attached at serine residues, numbers 65, 71, and 76, in domain I. However, the C-terminal domains IV and V of this molecule may also be substituted with glycosaminoglycan chains, but ...

  19. [Influence of glycosaminoglycan synthesis of cultured cornea stroma cells by variation of culture condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleckmann, H; Kresse, H

    1979-06-15

    Cultured cells derived from bovine corneal stroma synthesize all types of sulfated glycosaminoglycans and distribute these macromolecules into topographically different compartments in a reproducible manner. Each compartment is characterized by a typical glycosaminoglycan distribution pattern. Corneal fibroblasts synthesize in vitro only small amounts of keratan sulfate in contrast to the in vivo conditions. We have, therefore, investigated the synthesis and topographical distribution of sulfated glycosaminoglycans as influenced by different culture conditions. The following results were obtained: 1) Cocultivation of epithelial and stromal fibroblasts from bovine cornea led to an increased incorporation of radiosulfate into sulfated glycosaminoglycans by about 50% as compared to the theoretical value. Glycosaminoglycan distribution of mixed cultures into different compartments showed no similarity compared with pure epithelial or stromal fibroblasts. 2) Addition of native or heat inactivated anterior chamber fluid to the culture medium was followed by a twofold increase of [35S]-sulfate incorporation and by an augmented intracellular and pericellular accumulation of labeled macromolecules. 3) Reduction of the incubation temperature led to a reduced synthesis of glycosaminoglycans without influencing their topographical distribution. Growth of stromal cells on type I collagen was accompanied by a reduced glycosaminoglycan synthesis of about 25%. Extracellular macromolecules reached only half of the normal value, while intracellularly their concentration was slightly increased. 4) None of the variations of the culture condition led to a significant change of the distribution pattern of sulfated glycosaminoglycans. Especially, no significant increase of keratan sulfate biosynthesis could be detected.

  20. Sequence analysis and domain motifs in the porcine skin decorin glycosaminoglycan chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue; Yang, Bo; Solakyildirim, Kemal; Solakylidirim, Kemal; Joo, Eun Ji; Toida, Toshihiko; Higashi, Kyohei; Linhardt, Robert J; Li, Lingyun

    2013-03-29

    Decorin proteoglycan is comprised of a core protein containing a single O-linked dermatan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chain. Although the sequence of the decorin core protein is determined by the gene encoding its structure, the structure of its GAG chain is determined in the Golgi. The recent application of modern MS to bikunin, a far simpler chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, suggests that it has a single or small number of defined sequences. On this basis, a similar approach to sequence the decorin of porcine skin much larger and more structurally complex dermatan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate GAG chain was undertaken. This approach resulted in information on the consistency/variability of its linkage region at the reducing end of the GAG chain, its iduronic acid-rich domain, glucuronic acid-rich domain, and non-reducing end. A general motif for the porcine skin decorin GAG chain was established. A single small decorin GAG chain was sequenced using MS/MS analysis. The data obtained in the study suggest that the decorin GAG chain has a small or a limited number of sequences.

  1. Human Genetic Disorders and Knockout Mice Deficient in Glycosaminoglycan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Mizumoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs are constructed through the stepwise addition of respective monosaccharides by various glycosyltransferases and maturated by epimerases and sulfotransferases. The structural diversity of GAG polysaccharides, including their sulfation patterns and sequential arrangements, is essential for a wide range of biological activities such as cell signaling, cell proliferation, tissue morphogenesis, and interactions with various growth factors. Studies using knockout mice of enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of the GAG side chains of proteoglycans have revealed their physiological functions. Furthermore, mutations in the human genes encoding glycosyltransferases, sulfotransferases, and related enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of GAGs cause a number of genetic disorders including chondrodysplasia, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes. This review focused on the increasing number of glycobiological studies on knockout mice and genetic diseases caused by disturbances in the biosynthetic enzymes for GAGs.

  2. The Motile Breast Cancer Phenotype Roles of Proteoglycans/Glycosaminoglycans

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    Dragana Nikitovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The consecutive stages of cancer growth and dissemination are obligatorily perpetrated through specific interactions of the tumor cells with their microenvironment. Importantly, cell-associated and tumor microenvironment glycosaminoglycans (GAGs/proteoglycan (PG content and distribution are markedly altered during tumor pathogenesis and progression. GAGs and PGs perform multiple functions in specific stages of the metastatic cascade due to their defined structure and ability to interact with both ligands and receptors regulating cancer pathogenesis. Thus, GAGs/PGs may modulate downstream signaling of key cellular mediators including insulin growth factor receptor (IGFR, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, estrogen receptors (ERs, or Wnt members. In the present review we will focus on breast cancer motility in correlation with their GAG/PG content and critically discuss mechanisms involved. Furthermore, new approaches involving GAGs/PGs as potential prognostic/diagnostic markers or as therapeutic agents for cancer-related pathologies are being proposed.

  3. [Glycosaminoglycans in subepithelial opacity after excimer laser keratectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayasu, K; Gotoh, T; Ishikawa, T; Kanai, A

    1996-05-01

    We evaluated histochemically the characteristics of glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans in the corneal subepithelial opacity after excimer laser keratectomy on rabbit corneas. We also performed the same evaluations on the cornea after mechanical keratectomy. Twenty days after the operations, the area immediately subjacent to the epithelium showed strong staining with toluidine blue, alcian blue, and colloidal iron. However, after treatment with chondroitinase ABC or chondroitinase AC, alcian blue staining in this area decreased dramatically. Antilarge proteoglycan antibody also reacted strongly in this area. Histochemical and immunohistochemical examination of the cornea where mechanical keratectomy was done showed basically similar findings with the cornea of excimer laser keratectomy. These results suggest that large-molecula proteoglycans with chondroitine sulfate side chains become localized in the subepithelial area after two different kinds of keratectomies. We presume from histochemical and immunohistochemical observations that the subepithelial opacity observed after excimer laser keratectomy is not a special reaction to excimer laser but simply a corneal scar formed after stromal resection.

  4. Shortwave diathermy effects on 35S-sulfate uptake and glycosaminoglycan concentration in rabbit knee tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanharanta, H; Eronen, I; Videman, T

    1982-01-01

    The effect of shortwave diathermy on glycosaminoglycan metabolism in different connective tissues of rabbit knee was studied by both autoradiography and radioactivity measurements and quantification of the separated glycosaminoglycans. Of 30 rabbits used, 12 received 100W shortwave diathermy to the right knee 10 minutes a day for 5 days. Autoradiography clearly showed a higher uptake of 35S-sulfate by the capsular tissues of the knee treated with shortwave diathermy than in the contralateral knee. The most prominent feature of the biochemical analysis was the increase in the galactosamine (43%) and glucosamine (26%) concentrations of the collateral ligament glycosaminoglycans of the treated knee.

  5. Glycosaminoglycans are involved in pathogen adherence to corneal epithelial cells differently for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz García

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The epithelium of the cornea is continuously exposed to pathogens, and adhesion to epithelial cells is regarded as an essential first step in bacterial pathogenesis. In this article, the involvement of glycosaminoglycans in the adhesion of various pathogenic bacteria to corneal epithelial cells is analyzed. All microorganisms use glycosaminoglycans as receptors, but arranged in different patterns depending on the Gram-type of the bacterium. The heparan sulfate chains of syndecans are the main receptors, though other molecular species also seem to be involved, particularly in Gram-negative bacteria. Adherence is inhibited differentially by peptides, including heparin binding sequences, indicating the participation of various groups of Gram-positive and -negative adhesins. The length of the saccharides produces a major effect, and low molecular weight chains inhibit the binding of Gram-negative microorganisms but increase the adherence of Gram-positives. Pathogen adhesion appears to occur preferentially through sulfated domains, and is very dependent on N- and 6-O-sulfation of the glucosamine residue and, to a lesser extent, 2-O sulfation of uronic acid. These data show the differential use of corneal receptors, which could facilitate the development of new anti-infective strategies.

  6. A study on the relationship between radiologic classification and glycosaminoglycan analysis of cystic fluids in oral region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, In Woo; You, Dong Soo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-08-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the correlationship between radiologic classifications of cysts in oral region and glycosaminoglycan analysis of cystic fluids using cellulose acetate electrophoresis. The materials for this study consisted of 37 cases-8 periapical cysts, 10 dentigerous cysts, 10 primordial cysts, 2 residual cyst, 3 incisive canal cysts, 2 post-operative maxillary cysts, 1 mucocele on maxillary sinus, and 1 unicystic ameloblastoma-diagnosed as cystic lesions radiologically. The obtained results were as follows: 1. At the stepwise discriminant analysis, four variables-low mobility material, hiparin, hyaluronic acid, and dermatan sulfate- were used to define diagnostic model for the odontogenic cyst. The model produced a seventeenths of 100% and a specificity of 85%. 2. The intensities of heparin and chondroitin-4-sulfate were greater in dentigerous cyst than periapical cyst (p<0.05). 3. It showed no statistically significant difference in glycosaminoglycan of the cystic fluids between dentigerous cyst and primordial cyst (p<0.05). 4. On the fluids of the cysts originated from maxillary sinus, there were especially high intensities of heparin and dermatan sulfate, and low intensity of chondroitin-4-sulfate. 5. On the fluids of unicystic ameloblastoma, there were high intensity of dermatan sulfate and low intensity of chondroitin-4-sulfate.

  7. Different Use of Cell Surface Glycosaminoglycans As Adherence Receptors to Corneal Cells by Gram Positive and Gram Negative Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Beatriz; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Rodríguez, David; Alcalde, Ignacio; García-Suárez, Olivia; Alfonso, José F.; Baamonde, Begoña; Fernández-Vega, Andrés; Vazquez, Fernando; Quirós, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    The epithelium of the cornea is continuously exposed to pathogens, and adhesion to epithelial cells is regarded as an essential first step in bacterial pathogenesis. In this article, the involvement of glycosaminoglycans in the adhesion of various pathogenic bacteria to corneal epithelial cells is analyzed. All microorganisms use glycosaminoglycans as receptors, but arranged in different patterns depending on the Gram-type of the bacterium. The heparan sulfate chains of syndecans are the main receptors, though other molecular species also seem to be involved, particularly in Gram-negative bacteria. Adherence is inhibited differentially by peptides, including heparin binding sequences, indicating the participation of various groups of Gram-positive, and -negative adhesins. The length of the saccharides produces a major effect, and low molecular weight chains inhibit the binding of Gram-negative microorganisms but increase the adherence of Gram-positives. Pathogen adhesion appears to occur preferentially through sulfated domains, and is very dependent on N- and 6-O-sulfation of the glucosamine residue and, to a lesser extent, 2-O sulfation of uronic acid. These data show the differential use of corneal receptors, which could facilitate the development of new anti-infective strategies. PMID:27965938

  8. Inhibition of glycosaminoglycan incorporation influences collagen network formation during cartilage matrix production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Y.M.; Koevoet, W.; Jansen, K.M.B.; Verhaar, J.A.N.; Groot, J. de; Vanosch, G.J.V.M.

    2009-01-01

    To understand cartilage degenerative diseases and improve repair procedures, we investigate the influence of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on cartilage matrix biochemistry and functionality. Bovine articular chondrocytes were cultured in alginate beads with(out) para-nitrophenyl-beta-d-xyloside (PNPX)

  9. Altered interaction and distribution of glycosaminoglycans and growth factors in mucopolysaccharidosis type I bone disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, S.D.K.; Wagemans, T.; Ijlst, L.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.; van Kuppevelt, T.H.; Everts, V.; Wijburg, F.A.; van Vlies, N.

    2016-01-01

    The mucopolysaccharidoses (MPSs) comprise a group of lysosomal storage disorders characterized by deficient degradation and subsequent accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Progressive bone and joint disease are a major cause of morbidity, and current therapeutic strategies have limited effect

  10. Increased deposition of glycosaminoglycans and altered structure of heparan sulfate in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westergren-Thorsson, G.; Hedstrom, U.; Nybom, A.; Tykesson, E.; Ahrman, E.; Hornfelt, M.; Maccarana, M.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Dellgren, G.; Wildt, M.; Zhou, X.H.; Eriksson, L.; Bjermer, L.; Hallgren, O.

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by aberrant deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) constituents, including glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), that may play a role in remodelling processes by influencing critical mediators such as growth factors. We hypothesize that GAGs may be altered

  11. Review on complement analysis method and the roles of glycosaminoglycans in the complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lian; Li, Yan; Ijaz, Muhammad; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Lian, Qianqian; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-12-10

    Complement system is composed of over 30 proteins and it plays important roles in self-defence and inflammation. There are three activation pathways, including classical pathway, alternative pathway and lectin pathway, in complement system, and they are associated with many diseases such as osteoarthritis and age-related macular degeneration. Modulation of the complement system may be a promising strategy in the treatment of related diseases. Glycosaminoglycans are anionic linear polysaccharides without branches. They are one kind of multi-functional macromolecules which have great potential in regulating complement system. This review is organized around two aspects between the introduction of complement system and the interaction of glycosaminoglycans with complement system. Three complement activation pathways and the biological significance were introduced first. Then functional analysis methods were compared to provide a strategy for potential glycosaminoglycans screen. Finally, the roles of glycosaminoglycans played in the complement system were summed up. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Modulation of Glycosaminoglycans Affects PrPSc Metabolism but Does Not Block PrPSc Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Hanna; Graßmann, Andrea; Bester, Romina; Hossinger, André; Möhl, Christoph; Paulsen, Lydia; Groschup, Martin H; Schätzl, Hermann; Vorberg, Ina

    2015-10-01

    Mammalian prions are unconventional infectious agents composed primarily of the misfolded aggregated host prion protein PrP, termed PrP(Sc). Prions propagate by the recruitment and conformational conversion of cellular prion protein into abnormal prion aggregates on the cell surface or along the endocytic pathway. Cellular glycosaminoglycans have been implicated as the first attachment sites for prions and cofactors for cellular prion replication. Glycosaminoglycan mimetics and obstruction of glycosaminoglycan sulfation affect prion replication, but the inhibitory effects on different strains and different stages of the cell infection have not been thoroughly addressed. We examined the effects of a glycosaminoglycan mimetic and undersulfation on cellular prion protein metabolism, prion uptake, and the establishment of productive infections in L929 cells by two mouse-adapted prion strains. Surprisingly, both treatments reduced endogenous sulfated glycosaminoglycans but had divergent effects on cellular PrP levels. Chemical or genetic manipulation of glycosaminoglycans did not prevent PrP(Sc) uptake, arguing against their roles as essential prion attachment sites. However, both treatments effectively antagonized de novo prion infection independently of the prion strain and reduced PrP(Sc) formation in chronically infected cells. Our results demonstrate that sulfated glycosaminoglycans are dispensable for prion internalization but play a pivotal role in persistently maintained PrP(Sc) formation independent of the prion strain. Recently, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) became the focus of neurodegenerative disease research as general attachment sites for cell invasion by pathogenic protein aggregates. GAGs influence amyloid formation in vitro. GAGs are also found in intra- and extracellular amyloid deposits. In light of the essential role GAGs play in proteinopathies, understanding the effects of GAGs on protein aggregation and aggregate dissemination is crucial for

  13. Chondroitin sulphate glycosaminoglycans contribute to widespread inferior biomechanics in tendon after focal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Rachel K; Smith, Margaret M; Martin, Joshua H; Clarke, Jillian L; Dart, Andrew J; Little, Christopher B; Clarke, Elizabeth C

    2016-09-06

    Both mechanical and structural properties of tendon change after injury however the causal relationship between these properties is presently unclear. This study aimed to determine the extent of biomechanical change in post-injury tendon pathology and whether the sulphated glycosaminoglycans (glycosaminoglycans) present are a causal factor in these changes. Equine superficial digital flexor tendons (SDF tendons) were surgically-injured in vivo (n=6 injured, n=6 control). Six weeks later they were harvested and regionally dissected into twelve regions around the lesion (equal medial/lateral, proximal/distal). Glycosaminoglycans were removed by enzymatic (chondroitinase) treatment. Elastic modulus (modulus) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) were measured under uniaxial tension to failure, and tendon glycosaminoglycan content was measured by spectrophotometry. Compared to healthy tendons, pathology induced by the injury decreased modulus (-38%; 95%CI -49% to -28%; Ptendon. Chondroitinase-mediated glycosaminoglycan removal (50%; 95%CI 21-79%; Ptendons caused a significant increase in modulus (5.6MPa/µg removed; 95%CI 0.31-11; P=0.038) and UTS (1.0MPa per µg removed; 95%CI 0.043-2; P=0.041). These results demonstrate that the chondroitin/dermatan sulphate glycosaminoglycans that accumulate in pathological tendon post-injury are partly responsible for the altered biomechanical properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of the metabolism of glycosaminoglycans in patients with interstitial cystis

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    Marcos Lucon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC pathogenesis is not fully known, but evidence shows that glycosaminoglycans (GAG of bladder urothelium can participate in its genesis. The loss of these compounds facilitates the contact of urine compounds with deeper portions of bladder wall triggering an inflammatory process. We investigated GAG in urine and tissue of PBS/IC and pure stress urinary incontinence (SUI patients to better understand its metabolism. Materials and Methods: Tissue and urine of 11 patients with PBS/IC according to NIDDK criteria were compared to 11 SUI patients. Tissue samples were analyzed by histological, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence methods. Statistical analysis were performed using t Student test and Anova, considering significant when p < 0.05. Results: PBS/IC patients had lower concentration of GAG in urine when compared to SUI (respectively 0.45 ± 0.11 x 0.62 ± 0.13 mg/mg creatinine, p < 0.05. However, there was no reduction of the content of GAG in the urothelium of both groups. Immunofluorescence showed that PBS/IC patients had a stronger staining of TGF-beta, decorin (a proteoglycan of chondroitin/dermatan sulfate, fibronectin and hyaluronic acid. Conclusion: the results suggest that GAG may be related to the ongoing process of inflammation and remodeling of the dysfunctional urothelium that is present in the PBS/IC.

  15. Mechanistic and therapeutic overview of glycosaminoglycans: the unsung heroes of biomolecular signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Khushboo; Poluri, Krishna Mohan

    2016-02-01

    Immune regulation is a complex biological signaling pathway in which several classes of biomolecules and small molecules play a complacent role to mediate this process. Glycoimmunology is a rapidly evolving research area that deals with the structure, binding interactions and immunological functions of glycans. Great deal of information regarding proteins and nucleic acids in molecular recognition events have been established owing to their well-established structural features and straight forward replication, transcription and translation principles. However considering the complexities of template free synthesis and structural heterogeneity, role of carbohydrates in immune regulation are still unsung to a large extent. In the current review, we illuminate the canonical structural features, emerging and significant pathophysiological functions of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), the negatively charged linear carbohydrate molecules that are primarily present on all types of cell surfaces and extra cellular matrix. A snap shot of their association with protein counterparts of diversified protein families has been updated exclusively to provide mechanistic insights into their cellular signaling functions. Eventually, this review throws light on the recent biomedical/biotechnological advances of GAG based biomarkers, nutraceuticals, therapeutics, and nanocomposites for inflammatory, immune disorders and their invaluable contribution in tissue engineering.

  16. Extraction and quantification of sulfated glycosaminoglycan content in five different aquatic species of Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Lokwani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To extract, characterize and quantify glycosaminoglycans (GAGs from the body of cuttlefish, tennis-ball sea cucumber, shrimp, seabass and fresh water fish Nile tilapia. Methods: The extracted crude powder was evaluated for the content of GAGs. The qualitative analysis of sulfated pattern and other important functional groups related with GAGs were explained in the form of Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy data. Proteins and nucleic acid in the crude extract were determined by the ultraviolet spectrophotometer, while the quantification of total sulfated GAGs and estimation of N-sulfated and O-sulfated GAGs in the crude mixture were performed by using Blyscan kit. Results: The sulfated pattern and other important functional groups related with GAGs were intercepted in Fourier transform infrared analysis. Blyscan quantification method reported that a rare variety of sea cucumber (tennis-ball sea cucumber emerged as a rich source of GAGs with high values of both N-sulfated and O-sulfated GAGs in comparison to its other counterparts. Conclusions: Findings in this study point out the potential of tennis-ball sea cucumber, a rare variety of sea cucumber to act as an alternative source for GAG extraction for commercial purpose.

  17. The identification of proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans in archaeological human bones and teeth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvette M Coulson-Thomas

    Full Text Available Bone tissue is mineralized dense connective tissue consisting mainly of a mineral component (hydroxyapatite and an organic matrix comprised of collagens, non-collagenous proteins and proteoglycans (PGs. Extracellular matrix proteins and PGs bind tightly to hydroxyapatite which would protect these molecules from the destructive effects of temperature and chemical agents after death. DNA and proteins have been successfully extracted from archaeological skeletons from which valuable information has been obtained; however, to date neither PGs nor glycosaminoglycan (GAG chains have been studied in archaeological skeletons. PGs and GAGs play a major role in bone morphogenesis, homeostasis and degenerative bone disease. The ability to isolate and characterize PG and GAG content from archaeological skeletons would unveil valuable paleontological information. We therefore optimized methods for the extraction of both PGs and GAGs from archaeological human skeletons. PGs and GAGs were successfully extracted from both archaeological human bones and teeth, and characterized by their electrophoretic mobility in agarose gel, degradation by specific enzymes and HPLC. The GAG populations isolated were chondroitin sulfate (CS and hyaluronic acid (HA. In addition, a CSPG was detected. The localization of CS, HA, three small leucine rich PGs (biglycan, decorin and fibromodulin and glypican was analyzed in archaeological human bone slices. Staining patterns were different for juvenile and adult bones, whilst adolescent bones had a similar staining pattern to adult bones. The finding that significant quantities of PGs and GAGs persist in archaeological bones and teeth opens novel venues for the field of Paleontology.

  18. Glycosaminoglycans from bovine eye vitreous humour and interaction with collagen type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yanfei; Yu, Yanlei; Lin, Lei; Liu, Xinyue; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Peipei; Hoffman, Pauline; Kim, So Young; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J

    2018-01-05

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) play an important role in stabilizing the gel state of eye vitreous humour. In this study, the composition of GAGs present in bovine eye vitreous was characterized through disaccharide analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The interaction of GAGs with collagen type II was assessed using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The percentage of hyaluronic acid (HA), chondroitin sulfate (CS) and heparan sulfate (HS), of total GAG, were 96.2%, 3.5% and 0.3%, respectively. The disaccharide composition of CS consisted of 4S (49%), 0S (38%) 6S (12%), 2S6S (1.5%) and 2S4S (0.3%). The disaccharide composition of HS consisted of 0S (80%), NS2S (7%), NS (7%), 6S (4%), NS6S (2%), and TriS, 2S and 4S6S (each at 0.1%). The average molecular weights of CS and HS were 148 kDa and 204 kDa, respectively. SPR reveals that collagen type II binds to heparin (primarily composed of TriS) with a binding affinity (K D) of 755 nM and interacts with other GAGs, including CSB and CSE. Both bovine vitreous CS and HS interact with collagen type II, with vitreous HS showing a higher binding affinity.

  19. The contribution of skin glycosaminoglycans to the regulation of sodium homeostasis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugár, D; Agócs, R; Tatár, E; Tóth, G; Horváth, P; Sulyok, E; Szabó, A J

    2017-08-07

    The glycosaminoglycan (GAG) molecules are a group of high molecular weight, negatively charged polysaccharides present abundantly in the mammalian organism. By their virtue of ion and water binding capacity, they may affect the redistribution of body fluids and ultimately the blood pressure. Data from the literature suggests that the mitogens Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF)-A and VEGF-C are able to regulate the amount and charge density of GAGs and their detachment from the cell surface. Based on these findings we investigated the relationship between the level of dietary sodium intake, the expression levels of VEGF-A and VEGF-C, and the amount of the skin GAGs hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulphate in an in vivo rat model. Significant correlation between dietary sodium intake, skin sodium levels and GAG content was found. We confirmed the GAG synthesizing role of VEGF-C but failed to prove that GAGs are degraded by VEGF-A. No significant difference in blood pressure was registered between the different dietary groups. A quotient calculated form the ion and water content of the skin tissue samples suggests that - in contrast to previous findings - the osmotically inactive ions and bound water fractions are proportional.

  20. Defined surface immobilization of glycosaminoglycan molecules for probing and modulation of cell-material interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Luo, Ying

    2013-07-08

    As one important category of biological molecules on the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix (ECM), glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) have been widely studied for biomedical applications. With the understanding that the biological functions of GAGs are driven by the complex dynamics of physiological and pathological processes, methodologies are desired to allow the elucidation of cell-GAG interactions with molecular level precision. In this study, a microtiter plate-based system was devised through a new surface modification strategy involving polydopamine (PDA) and GAG molecules functionalized with hydrazide chemical groups. A small library of GAGs including hyaluronic acid (with different molecular weights), heparin, and chondroitin sulfate was successfully immobilized via defined binding sites onto the microtiter plate surface under facile aqueous conditions. The methodology then allowed parallel studies of the GAG-modified surfaces in a high-throughput format. The results show that immobilized GAGs possess distinct properties to mediate protein adsorption, cell adhesion, and inflammatory responses, with each property showing dependence on the type and molecular weight of specific GAG molecules. The PDA-assisted immobilization of hydrazide-functionalized GAGs allows biomimetic attachment of GAG molecules and retains their bioactivity, providing a new methodology to systematically probe fundamental cell-GAG interactions to modulate the bioactivity and biocompatibility of biomaterials.

  1. Structural characterization of the skin glycosaminoglycans in patients with pseudoxanthoma elasticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Francesca; Volpi, Nicola

    2008-10-01

    Complex polysaccharides, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), their amount, and fine structure were determined in the skin (epidermis + dermis) of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE)-affected patients in comparison with healthy subjects. Nonlesional skin GAGs were extracted and specifically determined by enzymatic treatment and high-performance liquid chromatography separation. Dermatan sulfate (DS) and hyaluronic acid (HA) were found to be the major GAG species in normal subjects, with contents of approximately 20% for DS and 58% for HA. The chondroitin sulfate (CS) content (unsaturated six-sulfated disaccharide) was approximately 21%. Skin from patients with PXE showed similar HA (61%), DS (22%), and CS (16.7%) contents. No change in the total charge density or nonsulfated/sulfated GAG ratio was noted in PXE-affected subjects, and no modification of the position of the sulfate groups (4s/6s) on the CS/DS backbone. A significant increase (approximately 88%; P < 0.01) in the total amount of GAGs (HA + DS + CS) was found in the PXE group vs. normal subjects, however. In the skin of PXE-affected patients, the altered metabolic processes produce an increase in the total amount of GAGs able to accumulate salts, in particular calcium ions, within the elastic fibers, producing ion precipitates that affect the organization of the matrix fiber.

  2. Metabolic fate of milk glycosaminoglycans in breastfed and formula fed newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Francesca; Mantovani, Veronica; Gabrielli, Orazio; Carlucci, Antonio; Zampini, Lucia; Galeazzi, Tiziana; Galeotti, Fabio; Coppa, Giovanni V; Volpi, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the content, structure and residual percentages of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the feces of seven breastfed newborns after ingesting a known amount of milk were studied. A comparison was made with five newborns fed with formula milk. Characterization of GAGs from milk and feces samples was performed according to previous methodology. Compared to the ingested GAGs present in milk, residual feces GAGs of breastfed newborns were 99 % of human milk GAGs are utilized as opposed to ~96 % of formula milk. Hyaluronic acid utilization was found to be fairly similar contrary to chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate and heparan sulfate, which were found to be ~10-18 times lower in formula milk fed children. Our new results further demonstrate that the elevated content of human milk GAGs passes undigested through the entire digestive system of newborns, possibly protecting the infant from infections. In the distal gastrointestinal tract, these complex macromolecules are catabolized by a cohort of bacterial enzymes and constituent monosaccharides/oligosaccharides utilized for further metabolic purposes potentially useful for bacteria metabolism or internalized by intestinal cells. Thanks to their elevated structural heterogeneity, milk GAGs are used differently depending on their distinct primary structure. Finally, a different utilization and availability was observed for human milk GAGs compared to formula milk due to their various composition and structural heterogeneity.

  3. Capillary blotting of glycosaminoglycans on nitrocellulose membranes after agarose-gel electrophoresis separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, Nicola; Maccari, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    A method for the blotting and immobilizing of several nonsulfated and sulfated complex polysaccharides on membranes made hydrophilic and positively charged by cationic detergent after their separation by conventional agarose gel electrophoresis is illustrated. This new approach to the study of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) utilizes the capacity of agarose gel electrophoresis to separate single species of polysaccharides from mixtures and the membrane technology for further preparative and analytical uses.Nitrocellulose membranes are derivatized with the cationic detergent cetylpyridinium chloride and mixtures of GAGs are capillary blotted after their separation in agarose gel electrophoresis. Single purified species of variously sulfated polysaccharides are transferred on derivatized membranes with an efficiency of 100% and stained with alcian blue (irreversible staining) and toluidine blue (reversible staining). This enables a lower amount limit of detection of 0.1 microg. Nonsulfated polyanions, for example hyaluronic acid, may also be transferred to membranes with a limit of detection of approximately 0.1-0.5 microg after irreversible or reversible staining. The membranes may be stained with reversible staining and the same lanes are used for immunological detection or other applications.

  4. The Effect of Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs on Amyloid Aggregation and Toxicity

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    Clara Iannuzzi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is a protein folding disorder in which normally soluble proteins are deposited extracellularly as insoluble fibrils, impairing tissue structure and function. Charged polyelectrolytes such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs are frequently found associated with the proteinaceous deposits in tissues of patients affected by amyloid diseases. Experimental evidence indicate that they can play an active role in favoring amyloid fibril formation and stabilization. Binding of GAGs to amyloid fibrils occurs mainly through electrostatic interactions involving the negative polyelectrolyte charges and positively charged side chains residues of aggregating protein. Similarly to catalyst for reactions, GAGs favor aggregation, nucleation and amyloid fibril formation functioning as a structural templates for the self-assembly of highly cytotoxic oligomeric precursors, rich in β-sheets, into harmless amyloid fibrils. Moreover, the GAGs amyloid promoting activity can be facilitated through specific interactions via consensus binding sites between amyloid polypeptide and GAGs molecules. We review the effect of GAGs on amyloid deposition as well as proteins not strictly related to diseases. In addition, we consider the potential of the GAGs therapy in amyloidosis.

  5. Compositional analysis and structural elucidation of glycosaminoglycans in chicken eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhangguo; Zhang, Fuming; Li, Lingyun; Li, Guoyun; He, Wenqing; Linhardt, Robert J

    2014-11-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) have numerous applications in the fields of pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, nutraceuticals, and foods. GAGs are also critically important in the developmental biology of all multicellular animals. GAGs were isolated from chicken egg components including yolk, thick egg white, thin egg white, membrane, calcified shell matrix supernatant, and shell matrix deposit. Disaccharide compositional analysis was performed using ultra high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results of these analyses showed that all four families of GAGs were detected in all egg components. Keratan sulfate was found in egg whites (thick and thin) and shell matrix (calcified shell matrix supernatant and deposit) with high level. Chondroitin sulfates were much more plentiful in both shell matrix components and membrane. Hyaluronan was plentiful in both shell matrix components and membrane, but was only present in a trace of quantities in the yolk. Heparan sulfate was plentiful in the shell matrix deposit but was present in a trace of quantities in the egg content components (yolk, thick and thin egg whites). Most of the chondroitin and heparan sulfate disaccharides were present in the GAGs found in chicken eggs with the exception of chondroitin and heparan sulfate 2,6-disulfated disaccharides. Both CS and HS in the shell matrix deposit contained the most diverse chondroitin and heparan sulfate disaccharide compositions. Eggs might provide a potential new source of GAGs.

  6. Calorimetric analysis of gelatine-glycosaminoglycans blend system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanungo, Ivy; Chellappa, Nisha; Fathima, N Nishad; Rao, J Raghava

    2011-10-01

    Gelatine is one of the most valuable natural polymers used for drug delivery applications. Gelatine-GAGs based composite system has been shown to act as good scaffolds for tissue engineering. The objective of the present study is to investigate the calorimetric properties of microporous gelatine-GAGs based blend, which were modified by co-crosslinking with a naturally occurring crosslinking agent genipin. The melting temperature (T(m)), enthalpy change (ΔH(m)) and heat capacity change (ΔC(p)) were systematically calculated over the experimentally observed systems using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The thermoporometry results suggest that the concentration of the glycosaminoglycans plays an important role in the pore size distribution of the blend matrices. The circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies provide the valuable information about the structural features of the biodegradable blend that can be utilized for various biomedical applications. The results provide new insights into the thermal stability of blend and suggest potential strategies for its manipulation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Anti-Obesity Effect of Bombus ignitus Queen Glycosaminoglycans in Rats on a High-Fat Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Mi Young; Kim, Ban Ji; Kim, Ha Jeong; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Jee, Sang Duck; Hwang, Jae Sam; Park, Kun-Koo

    2017-03-22

    The mechanism of functional insect glycosaminoglycan (GAG) on obesity caused a high fat diet has not yet been elucidated. Therefore, insect glycosaminoglycans derived from Isaria sinclairii , Bombus ignitus (a type of bumblebee) queen, and Gryllus bimaculatus were purified and investigated as a potential functional food. 14-week old male Wistar rats were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 6 weeks. There were five groups that received daily intraperitoneal administration of phosphate buffered saline (PBS, control), GbG (GAG from Gryllus bimaculatus ) 10 mg/kg, ISG (GAG from Isaria sinclairii ) 10 mg/kg, IQG (GAG from Bombus ignites ) 10 mg/kg, or Pravastatin (2 mg/kg). All treatments were performed for one month. IQG produced a potential anti-inflammatory effect with the inhibition of c-reactive protein and sero-biochemical parameters of phospholipids and free fatty acids indicative of an anti-hyperlipidemic effect. Abdominal and epididymidal fat weight were reduced in conjunction with a mild increase in body weight. The level of laminin in HMVEC-C cells or fibronectin in HFD rat hepatocytes was significantly affected by these GAG treatments, which regulated adipogenesis and adipocyte function. Compared to the control rats, IQG-treated rats displayed up-regulation of 87 genes (test:control ratio >2.0) including fatty acid synthase and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, with the down-regulation of 47 genes including the uridine diphosphate (UDP) glycosyltransferase 2 families, polypeptidase B, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1. The data suggest that IQG could potentially prevent or treat fatty liver or hyperlipidemia.

  8. Evaluation of glycosaminoglycans and heparanase in placentas of women with preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famá, Eduardo Augusto Brosco; Souza, Renan Salvioni; Melo, Carina Mucciolo; Melo Pompei, Luciano; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida Silva

    2014-11-01

    Preeclampsia is a multisystem disorder whose etiology remains unclear. It is already known that circulation of soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) is directly involved in pre-eclampsia development. However, the molecular mechanisms involved with sFlt-1 shedding are still unidentified. We identified, quantified glycosaminoglycans and determined the enzymatic activity of heparanase in placentas of women with preeclampsia, in order to possibly explain if these compounds could be related to cellular processes involved with preeclampsia. A total of 45 samples collected from placentas, 15 samples from placentas of preeclampsia women and 30 samples from non-affected women. Heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate were identified and quantified by agarose gel electrophoresis, whilst hyaluronic acid was quantified by an ELISA like assay. Heparanase activity was determined using biotynilated heparan sulfate as substrate. The results showed that dermatan sulfate (P=0.019), heparan sulfate levels (P=0.015) and heparanase activity (P=0.006) in preeclampsia were significantly higher than in the control group. There was no significant difference between the groups for hyaluronic acid expression in placentas (P=0.110). The present study is the first to demonstrate directly the increase of heparan sulfate in human placentas from patients with preeclampsia, suggesting that endogenous heparan sulfate could be involved in the release of sFlt-1 from placenta, increasing the level of circulating sFlt-1. Alterations of extracellular matrix components in placentas with preeclampsia raise the possibility that heparan sulfate released by heparanase is involved in mechanisms of preeclampsia development. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Changes in glycosaminoglycan structure on differentiation of human embryonic stem cells towards mesoderm and endoderm lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasimli, Leyla; Hickey, Anne Marie; Yang, Bo; Li, Guoyun; dela Rosa, Mitche; Nairn, Alison V; Kulik, Michael J; Dordick, Jonathan S; Moremen, Kelley W; Dalton, Stephen; Linhardt, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Proteoglycans are found on the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix, and serve as prime sites for interaction with signaling molecules. Proteoglycans help regulate pathways that control stem cell fate, and therefore represent an excellent tool to manipulate these pathways. Despite their importance, there is a dearth of data linking glycosaminoglycan structure within proteoglycans with stem cell differentiation. Human embryonic stem cell line WA09 (H9) was differentiated into early mesoderm and endoderm lineages, and the glycosaminoglycanomic changes accompanying these transitions were studied using transcript analysis, immunoblotting, immunofluorescence and disaccharide analysis. Pluripotent H9 cell lumican had no glycosaminoglycan chains whereas in splanchnic mesoderm lumican was glycosaminoglycanated. H9 cells have primarily non-sulfated heparan sulfate chains. On differentiation towards splanchnic mesoderm and hepatic lineages N-sulfo group content increases. Differences in transcript expression of NDST1, HS6ST2 and HS6ST3, three heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzymes, within splanchnic mesoderm cells compared to H9 cells correlate to changes in glycosaminoglycan structure. Differentiation of embryonic stem cells markedly changes the proteoglycanome. The glycosaminoglycan biosynthetic pathway is complex and highly regulated, and therefore, understanding the details of this pathway should enable better control with the aim of directing stem cell differentiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Adsorption of glycosaminoglycans to the cell surface is responsible for cellular donnan effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenfeld, Daniel; Kathagen, Nadine; Prehm, Peter

    2014-07-01

    In previous publications, we showed that extracellular glycosaminoglycans reduced the membrane potential, caused cell blebbing and swelling and decreased the intracellular pH independently of cell surface receptors. These phenomena were explained by Donnan effects. The effects were so large that they could not be attributed to glycosaminoglycans in solution. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that glycosaminoglycans were concentrated on the cell membrane and analysed the mechanism of adsorption by fluorescent hyaluronan, chondroitin sulphate and heparin. The influence of the CD44 receptor was evaluated by comparing CD44 expressing human fibroblasts with CD44 deficient HEK cells. Higher amounts of glycosaminoglycans adsorbed to fibroblasts than to HEK cells. When the membrane potential was annihilated by substituting NaCl by KCl in the medium, adsorption was reduced and intracellular pH decrease was abolished. To eliminate other cellular interfering factors, potential-dependent adsorption was demonstrated for hyaluronan which adsorbed to inert gold foils in physiological salt concentrations at pH 7.2 and surface potentials up to 120 mV. From these results, we conclude that large cellular Donnan effects of glycosaminoglycans results from receptor mediated, hydrophobic and ionic adsorption to cell surfaces. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Melatonin-induced glycosaminoglycans augmentation in myocardium remote to infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobnik, J; Tosik, D; Piera, L; Szczepanowska, A; Olczak, S; Zielinska, A; Liberski, P P; Ciosek, J

    2013-12-01

    Elevated levels of collagen as well as transient increases of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) have been shown in the myocardium remote to the infarction. The aim of the study is to observe the effect of melatonin on the accumulation of collagen and GAG in the left ventricle wall, remote to the infarction. A second aim is to determine whether the effect of the pineal indole is mediated by the membrane melatonin receptors of heart fibroblasts. Rats with myocardial infarction induced by ligation of the left coronary artery were treated with melatonin at a dose of 60 μg/100 g b.w. or vehicle (2% ethanol in 0.9% NaCl). The results were compared with an untreated control. In the second part of the study, the fibroblasts from the non-infarcted part of myocardium were isolated and cultured. Melatonin at a range of concentrations from 10(-8) M to 10(-6) M was applied to the fibroblast cultures. In the final part of the study, the influence of luzindole (10(-6) M), the melatonin membrane receptor inhibitor, on melatonin-induced GAG augmentation was investigated. Both collagen and GAG content were measured in the experiment. Melatonin elevated GAG content in the myocardium remote to the infarcted heart. Collagen level was not changed by pineal indoleamine. Fibroblasts isolated from the myocardium varied in shape from fusiform to spindle-shaped. Moreover, the pineal hormone (10(-7)M and 10(-6)M) increased GAG accumulation in the fibroblast culture. Luzindole inhibited melatonin-induced elevation of GAG content at 10(-6)M. Melatonin increased GAG content in the myocardium remote to infarction. This effect was dependent on the direct influence of the pineal indole on the heart fibroblasts. The melatonin-induced GAG elevation is blocked by luzindole, the melatonin membrane receptors inhibitor, indicating a direct effect of this indole.

  12. Sulphated glycosaminoglycans support an assortment of planarian rhabdite structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Matthew J

    2017-05-15

    Planaria are soft-bodied, bilateral flatworms of the phylum Platyhelminthes. They are covered in cilia and use ciliary-gliding to traverse the substratum while hunting. Their body surface is covered in a layer of viscous slime primarily derived from specialised secretory granules known as rhabdites. The slime must somehow stay associated with the surface of the animal in aqueous environments whilst also lubricating the interface of the animal and the surfaces over which the animal moves. The slime prevents damage to the animal's soft body and also contributes to adhesion to the substratum. In order to gain insight into how it might achieve these diverse functions, we performed electron microscopic examination of the slime's structure. Analysis of two freshwater flatworms from the UK Schmidtea polychroa (Schmidt, 1861) and Polycelis tenuis (Ijima, 1884) revealed a high level of organisation of the slime layer and a variety of ejected slime structures. We show that these structures are rich in sulphated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs). Most of these (269 of 285 examined) appear to be topologically closed spheroids that we name ball-GAGs. Another class appears to burst to release flower- and star-like clusters which adhere to motile cilia. We also observe fibrous nets that are associated with entrapped bacteria. Examination of the structure of rhabdites ejected onto a porous surface suggests a mechanism by which their structure allows them to both bind to the porous surface and provide a smooth layer over which the animal could glide. Such sGAG-based structures might provide models for the design of artificial biomimetic replacements for tears, saliva, bio-compatible lubricants or drug-delivery vehicles. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Periodontitis destructions are restored by synthetic glycosaminoglycan mimetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallam-Laroye, C; Escartin, Q; Zlowodzki, A-S; Barritault, D; Caruelle, J-P; Baroukh, B; Saffar, J-L; Colombier, M-L

    2006-12-01

    Periodontitis are bacterium-driven inflammatory diseases that destroy tooth-supporting tissues whose complete restoration is not currently possible. RGTA, a new class of agents, have this capacity in an animal model. Periodontitis was induced in hamsters and, starting 8 weeks later, injected RG1503, a glycosaminoglycan synthesized from a 40 kDa dextran behaving like a heparan sulfate mimetic (1.5 mg kg(-1) w(-1)) or saline for 8 weeks. The three periodontium compartments were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and morphometry. The gingival extracellular matrix disorganized by inflammation was restoring under treatment. The collagen network was repaired and resumed its previous organization. Fibrillin-1 expression was restored so that the elastic network rebuilt at a distance from the pocket and began to reconstruct near the pocket. Apoptotic cell numbers were decreased in the pocket epithelium, and more so in the infiltrated connective tissue. The continuity and the thickness of the basement membrane were restored and testified normalization of epithelium connective tissue interaction. The amount of alveolar bone increased around the first molar, and the interradicular bone was rebuilt. The root cementum was thickened and the number of proliferating cells in the periodontal ligament was increased close to the cementum. RG1503 treatment induces potent anabolic reactions in the extracellular matrices of the different tissues of the periodontium and recruitment of progenitors. In particular, the cell proliferation close to the root surface suggests the reformation of a functional attachment apparatus. These results demonstrate that RG1503 reverses the degenerative changes induced by inflammation and favors the conditions of a regenerative process. Thus, RGTA, a known matrix component mimetic and protector, may be considered as a new therapeutic tool to regenerate the tissues destroyed by periodontitis.

  14. Assay for Glycosaminoglycans by Tandem Mass Spectrometry and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Shimada, Tsutomu; Mason, Robert W; Kelly, Joan; LaMarr, William A; Yasuda, Eriko; Shibata, Yuniko; Futatsumori, Hideyuki; Montaño, Adriana M; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Orii, Tadao

    2014-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are distributed in the whole body and play a variety of important physiological roles associated with inflammation, growth, coagulation, fibrinolysis, lipolysis, and cell-matrix biology. Accumulation of undegraded GAGs in lysosomes gives rise to a distinct clinical syndrome, mucopolysaccharidoses. Measurement of each specific GAG in a variety of specimens is urgently required to understand GAG interaction with other molecules, physiological status of patients, and prognosis and pathogenesis of the disease. We established a highly sensitive and accurate tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for measurements of disaccharides derived from four specific GAGs [dermatan sulfate (DS), heparan sulfate (HS), keratan sulfate (KS), and chondroitin sulfate (CS)]. Disaccharides were produced by specific enzyme digestion of each GAG, and quantified by negative ion mode of multiple reaction monitoring. Subclasses of HS and GAGs with identical molecular weights can be separated using a Hypercarbcolumn (2.0 mm×50 mm, 5 μm) with an aectonitrile gradient in ammonium acetate (pH 11.0). We also developed a GAG assay by RapidFire with tandem mass spectrometry (RF-MS/MS). The RF system consists of an integrated solid phase extraction robot that binds and de-salts samples from assay plates and directly injects them into a MS/MS detector, reducing sample processing time to ten seconds. RF-MS/MS consequently yields much faster throughput than conventional LC-MS/MS-based methods. However, the RF system does not have a chromatographic step, and therefore, cannot distinguish GAGs that have identical molecular weights. Both methods can be applied to analysis of dried blood spots, blood, and urine specimens. In this article, we compare the assay methods for GAGs and describe their potential applications. PMID:25068074

  15. RNA Contaminates Glycosaminoglycans Extracted from Cells and Tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper J van Gemst

    Full Text Available Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs are linear negatively charged polysaccharides and important components of extracellular matrices and cell surface glycan layers such as the endothelial glycocalyx. The GAG family includes sulfated heparin, heparan sulfate (HS, dermatan sulfate (DS, chondroitin sulfate (CS, keratan sulfate, and non-sulfated hyaluronan. Because relative expression of GAGs is dependent on cell-type and niche, isolating GAGs from cell cultures and tissues may provide insight into cell- and tissue-specific GAG structure and functions. In our objective to obtain structural information about the GAGs expressed on a specialized mouse glomerular endothelial cell culture (mGEnC-1 we adapted a recently published GAG isolation protocol, based on cell lysis, proteinase K and DNase I digestion. Analysis of the GAGs contributing to the mGEnC-1 glycocalyx indicated a large HS and a minor CS content on barium acetate gel. However, isolated GAGs appeared resistant to enzymatic digestion by heparinases. We found that these GAG extracts were heavily contaminated with RNA, which co-migrated with HS in barium acetate gel electrophoresis and interfered with 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB assays, resulting in an overestimation of GAG yields. We hypothesized that RNA may be contaminating GAG extracts from other cell cultures and possibly tissue, and therefore investigated potential RNA contaminations in GAG extracts from two additional cell lines, human umbilical vein endothelial cells and retinal pigmental epithelial cells, and mouse kidney, liver, spleen and heart tissue. GAG extracts from all examined cell lines and tissues contained varying amounts of contaminating RNA, which interfered with GAG quantification using DMMB assays and characterization of GAGs by barium acetate gel electrophoresis. We therefore recommend routinely evaluating the RNA content of GAG extracts and propose a robust protocol for GAG isolation that includes an RNA digestion step.

  16. Water content and glycosaminoglycan disaccharide concentration of the canine meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, J S; McLaughlin, R M; Griffith, G

    1998-02-01

    To determine the regional composition of water and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) disaccharides of the canine meniscus. 52 menisci from the stifle of dogs. Regional sections of each meniscus were weighed, dried, and reweighed to determine water content. Dried tissue specimens were subjected to enzymatic digestion. Analysis and quantification of disaccharide degradation products were performed, using high-performance liquid chromatography. Water content was approximately 65% in polar and central regions of the canine meniscus. Water content of the central region of the lateral meniscus was significantly higher than that of the medial meniscus (P = 0.0090). Chondroitinase digestion of canine meniscal tissue yielded detectable delta Di-HA, delta Di-4S, and delta Di-6S GAG disaccharides. Disaccharides specific to dermatan sulfate and chondroitin D or E sulfate were not detected. Concentrations of delta Di-4S and delta Di-6S were significantly greater in the lateral central region, compared with the medial central region (P = 0.0005 and 0.0002, respectively). Water content and delta Di-4S and delta Di-6S concentrations were significantly lower in the central region of the medial meniscus, compared with the central region of the lateral meniscus. Reduced tissue hydration of the medial central region may have been a direct result of its overall decrease in total GAG content. The ability to evaluate subtle differences in tissue GAG composition by analytical measurement of their constituent disaccharides may aid in the understanding of the complex material properties of the normal and diseased meniscus, which may be applied to the study of meniscal healing and biomechanics.

  17. RNA Contaminates Glycosaminoglycans Extracted from Cells and Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gemst, Jasper J; Loeven, Markus A; de Graaf, Mark J J; Berden, Jo H M; Rabelink, Ton J; Smit, Cornelis H; van der Vlag, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are linear negatively charged polysaccharides and important components of extracellular matrices and cell surface glycan layers such as the endothelial glycocalyx. The GAG family includes sulfated heparin, heparan sulfate (HS), dermatan sulfate (DS), chondroitin sulfate (CS), keratan sulfate, and non-sulfated hyaluronan. Because relative expression of GAGs is dependent on cell-type and niche, isolating GAGs from cell cultures and tissues may provide insight into cell- and tissue-specific GAG structure and functions. In our objective to obtain structural information about the GAGs expressed on a specialized mouse glomerular endothelial cell culture (mGEnC-1) we adapted a recently published GAG isolation protocol, based on cell lysis, proteinase K and DNase I digestion. Analysis of the GAGs contributing to the mGEnC-1 glycocalyx indicated a large HS and a minor CS content on barium acetate gel. However, isolated GAGs appeared resistant to enzymatic digestion by heparinases. We found that these GAG extracts were heavily contaminated with RNA, which co-migrated with HS in barium acetate gel electrophoresis and interfered with 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assays, resulting in an overestimation of GAG yields. We hypothesized that RNA may be contaminating GAG extracts from other cell cultures and possibly tissue, and therefore investigated potential RNA contaminations in GAG extracts from two additional cell lines, human umbilical vein endothelial cells and retinal pigmental epithelial cells, and mouse kidney, liver, spleen and heart tissue. GAG extracts from all examined cell lines and tissues contained varying amounts of contaminating RNA, which interfered with GAG quantification using DMMB assays and characterization of GAGs by barium acetate gel electrophoresis. We therefore recommend routinely evaluating the RNA content of GAG extracts and propose a robust protocol for GAG isolation that includes an RNA digestion step.

  18. Glycosaminoglycan synthesis in amiodarone-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farinas, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAG) have previously been demonstrated to be synthesized in greater than normal amounts following a single intratracheal insufflation of bleomycin in hamsters. This suggests that GAG may play a role in the propagation of pulmonary fibrotic reactions. To further test this hypothesis, GAG synthesis was studied in a new hamster model of interstitial lung injury, induced by the cardiac drug, aminodarone. Animals received a single intratracheal instillation of 1.25 mg aminodarone. At 4, 9, and 21 days post-insufflation, the animals were sacrificed, their lungs removed, and 1 mm fragments placed in explant culture for 6 hours at 37/sup 0/C in the presence of /sup 35/S-sulfate. The labeled GAG were isolated and measured for /sup 35/S incorporation. The author then isolated the hexosamine portions of the respective GAGs, Heparan Sulfate (HEP S), Chondroitin-6-Sulfate (Ch-6-S) and Chondroitin-4-Sulfate and Dermatan Sulfate (CH-4-S and DS) using the enzyme ABC and paper chromatography. They also studied the GAG content and distribution in hamster lung fibroblasts incorporated with /sup 35/S for 48 hours and subjected to either 0, 0.01 mg, 0.1 mg, or 1 mg of aminodarone. GAG synthesis is increased at an early stage following the induction of lung injury by aminodarone and remains elevated for a 3 week period. The change in GAG distribution boards elevated CH-4-S and DS may be characteristic of interstitial diseases in general. The GAGs that are synthesized by fibroblasts may be responsible for the increased CH-4-S and DS synthesis.

  19. Glycosaminoglycan composition of the large freshwater mollusc bivalve Anodonta anodonta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, Nicola; Maccari, Francesca

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, glycosaminoglycans from the body of the large freshwater mollusc bivalve Anodonta anodonta were recovered at about 0.6 mg/g of dry tissue, composed of chondroitin sulfate (approximately 38%), nonsulfated chondroitin (about 21%), and heparin (41%). This last polysaccharide was found to consist of a large percentage (approximately 88%) of a fast-moving species possessing a lower molecular mass and sulfate group amount and about 12% of a more sulfated, slow-moving component having a greater molecular mass. The chondroitin sulfate was composed of approximately 28% of the 6-sulfated disaccharide, 46% of the 4-sulfated disaccharide, and about 26% of the nonsulfated disaccharide, with a charge density value of 0.74. Heparin was subjected to the oligosaccharide mapping after treatment with heparinase and then separation of the resulting unsaturated oligosaccharides by SAX-HPLC. A heparin sample from Anodonta anodonta showed a degree of sulfation similar to that of bovine mucosal heparin because of the presence of approximately the same mol % of the trisulfated disaccharide (DeltaUA2S(1-->4)-alpha-D-GlcN2S6S), a slight modification of the other oligosaccharides, and a significant increase of the disaccharide bearing the sulfate group in position 3 of the N-sulfoglucosamine 6-sulfate (-->4)-beta-D-GlcA(1-->4)-alpha-D-GlcN2S3S6S(1-->) part of the ATIII-binding region. However, the anticoagulant activity of mollusc heparin was quite similar to that of pharmaceutical grade heparin. The data obtained again emphasize the heterogeneity of GAGs from molluscs.

  20. Sulphated glycosaminoglycans support an assortment of planarian rhabdite structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Hayes

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Planaria are soft-bodied, bilateral flatworms of the phylum Platyhelminthes. They are covered in cilia and use ciliary-gliding to traverse the substratum while hunting. Their body surface is covered in a layer of viscous slime primarily derived from specialised secretory granules known as rhabdites. The slime must somehow stay associated with the surface of the animal in aqueous environments whilst also lubricating the interface of the animal and the surfaces over which the animal moves. The slime prevents damage to the animal's soft body and also contributes to adhesion to the substratum. In order to gain insight into how it might achieve these diverse functions, we performed electron microscopic examination of the slime's structure. Analysis of two freshwater flatworms from the UK Schmidtea polychroa (Schmidt, 1861 and Polycelis tenuis (Ijima, 1884 revealed a high level of organisation of the slime layer and a variety of ejected slime structures. We show that these structures are rich in sulphated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs. Most of these (269 of 285 examined appear to be topologically closed spheroids that we name ball-GAGs. Another class appears to burst to release flower- and star-like clusters which adhere to motile cilia. We also observe fibrous nets that are associated with entrapped bacteria. Examination of the structure of rhabdites ejected onto a porous surface suggests a mechanism by which their structure allows them to both bind to the porous surface and provide a smooth layer over which the animal could glide. Such sGAG-based structures might provide models for the design of artificial biomimetic replacements for tears, saliva, bio-compatible lubricants or drug-delivery vehicles.

  1. Progress in structural analysis of glycosaminoglycans and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-06

    Mar 6, 2012 ... acid is easy to form lactone, uronic acid is determined and identified by GC analysis after reduction ... easier to be hydrolyzed by acid and avoids lactone production and use of uronic acid standard (Kakit ... isolation and determination for unsaturated disaccharides after treatment with chondroitinase ABC is ...

  2. Variation of corneal glycosaminoglycan values of hares in relation to environmental pollution by industrial emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miková, M; Nováková, E

    1979-09-01

    In localities contaminated by industrial emissions a significant decrease in keratan sulfate and chondroitin 4-sulfate occurs in the cornea of the hare. The changes also occur in hares living near small emission sources with a local emission zone; therefore they should not be neglected, especially if the area is used for recreation, as in the case reported here. The decrease in glycosaminoglycan values is more pronounced in adults than in juveniles, because of the length of exposure. Relatively large amounts of keratan sulfate in the glycosaminoglycan fraction correspond to changes expected in a prematurely senescent tissue. Because of the painstaking laboratory work required, assessment of glycosaminoglycans could be used for special bioindication purposes but would not be suitable for routine monitoring.

  3. Glycosaminoglycan backbone is not required for the modulation of hemostasis: effect of different heparin derivatives and non-glycosaminoglycan analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouças, Rodrigo I; Jarrouge-Bouças, Thais R; Lima, Marcelo A; Trindade, Edvaldo S; Moraes, Fabio A; Cavalheiro, Renan P; Tersariol, Ivarne L S; Hoppenstead, Debra; Fareed, Jawed; Nader, Helena B

    2012-06-01

    Heparin and its derivatives are known to regulate a variety of pathophysiological events related to vascular biology. In the present manuscript we examine a variety of heparinomimetics biochemically (electrophoretic behavior and enzymatic degradation) and pharmacologically (in vitro anticoagulant activity and in vivo hemorrhagic and antithrombotic tests) as well as their interactions with cells from the vessel wall using a time resolved fluorometric method and confocal microscopy. Data were determined for unfractionated heparin (UFH), enoxaparin, synthetic heparin pentasaccharide, C3 heparin derived oligosaccharides and phosphosulfomannan (PI-88). While being structurally distinct from UFH, all compounds exhibited anticoagulant, antithrombotic and hemorrhagic activities. In addition, besides the pentasaccharide, they all stimulated the synthesis of an antithrombotic heparan sulfate present at the cell surface and secreted by endothelial cells. Also, like UFH, they interacted with both endothelial and smooth muscle cells and dislodged UFH from its binding sites in a dose dependent manner but, with distinct saturable curves showing that the binding of polymeric structures to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins does not depend on a glycosaminoglycan backbone. The data also suggest a common pathway, which does not depend on the presence of the conventionally accepted antithrombin binding pentasaccharide, for ECM dependent activity of the heparinomimetic stimulated synthesis of antithrombotic heparan sulfate. Notably, although of similar molecular weight as well as polymeric backbone, the synthetic heparin pentasaccharide showed significant hemorrhagic action and negligible antithrombotic activity in a venous thrombosis model, contrasting with C3, that displayed negligible hemorrhagic effect and potent antithrombotic action. These results provide evidence that structurally unrelated polymers can elicit similar hemostatic activities and show that polymeric sequence is

  4. IL-8 dictates glycosaminoglycan binding and stability of IL-18 in cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reeves, Emer P

    2010-02-01

    Dysregulation of airway inflammation contributes to lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF). Inflammation is mediated by inflammatory cytokines, including IL-8, which illustrates an increase in biological half-life and proinflammatory activity when bound to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). The aim of this project was to compare IL-8 and IL-18 for their relative stability, activity, and interaction with GAGs, including chondroitin sulfate, hyaluronic acid, and heparan sulfate, present in high quantities in the lungs of patients with CF. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected from patients with CF (n = 28), non-CF controls (n = 14), and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 12). Increased levels of IL-8 and reduced concentrations of IL-18 were detected in bronchial samples obtained from CF individuals. The low level of IL-18 was not a defect in IL-18 production, as the pro- and mature forms of the molecule were expressed and produced by CF epithelial cells and monocytes. There was, however, a marked competition between IL-8 and IL-18 for binding to GAGs. A pronounced loss of IL-18 binding capacity occurred in the presence of IL-8, which displaced IL-18 from these anionic-matrices, rendering the cytokine susceptible to proteolytic degradation by neutrophil elastase. As a biological consequence of IL-18 degradation, reduced levels of IL-2 were secreted by Jurkat T lymphocytes. In conclusion, a novel mechanism has been identified highlighting the potential of IL-8 to determine the fate of other inflammatory molecules, such as IL-18, within the inflammatory milieu of the CF lung.

  5. A Modified Glycosaminoglycan, GM-0111, Inhibits Molecular Signaling Involved in Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Justin R; Pulsipher, Abigail; Rao, Narayanam V; Kennedy, Thomas P; Prestwich, Glenn D; Ryan, Maria E; Lee, Won Yong

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is characterized by microbial infection, inflammation, tissue breakdown, and accelerated loss of alveolar bone matrix. Treatment targeting these multiple stages of the disease provides ways to treat or prevent periodontitis. Certain glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) block multiple inflammatory mediators as well as suppress bacterial growth, suggesting that these GAGs may be exploited as a therapeutic for periodontitis. We investigated the effects of a synthetic GAG, GM-0111, on various molecular events associated with periodontitis: growth of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans) pathogenic bacteria associated with periodontitis; activation of pro-inflammatory signaling through TLR2 and TLR4 in mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cells and heterologously expressed HEK 293 cells; osteoclast formation and bone matrix resorption in cultured mouse pre-osteoclasts. (1) GM-0111 suppressed the growth of P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans even at 1% (w/v) solution. The antibacterial effects of GM-0111 were stronger than hyaluronic acid (HA) or xylitol in P. gingivalis at all concentrations and comparable to xylitol in A. actinomycetemcomitans at ≥2% (w/v) solution. We also observed that GM-0111 suppressed biofilm formation of P. gingivalis and these effects were much stronger than HA. (2) GM-0111 inhibited TLR-mediated pro-inflammatory cellular signaling both in macrophage and HEK 293 cells with higher selectivity for TLR2 than TLR4 (IC50 of 1-10 ng/mL vs. > 100 μg/mL, respectively). (3) GM-0111 blocked RANKL-induced osteoclast formation (as low as 300 ng/mL) and bone matrix resorption. While GM-0111 showed high affinity binding to RANKL, it did not interfere with RANKL/RANK/NF-κB signaling, suggesting that GM-0111 inhibits osteoclast formation by a RANKL-RANK-independent mechanism. We report that GM-0111 inhibits multiple molecular events involved in periodontitis, spanning from the early pro

  6. Partial reversal by beta-D-xyloside of salicylate-induced inhibition of glycosaminoglycan synthesis in articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmoski, M.J.; Brandt, K.D.

    1982-09-01

    While net /sup 35/S-glycosaminoglycan synthesis in normal canine articular cartilage was suppressed by 10(-3)M sodium salicylate to about 70% of the control value, addition of xyloside (10(-6)M-10(-3)M) to the salicylate-treated cultures led to a concentration-dependent increase in glycosaminoglycan synthesis, which rose to 120-237% of controls. Similar results were obtained when /sup 3/H-glucosamine was used to measure glycosaminoglycan synthesis, confirming that salicylate suppresses and xyloside stimulates net glycosaminoglycan synthesis, and not merely sulfation. Salicylate (10-3)M) did not affect the activity of xylosyl or galactosyl transferase prepared from canine knee cartilage, and net protein synthesis was unaltered by either salicylate or xyloside. The proportion of newly synthesized proteoglycans existing as aggregates when cartilage was cultured with xyloside was similar to that in controls, although the average hydrodynamic size of disaggregated proteoglycans and of sulfated glycosaminoglycans was diminished.

  7. Interaction of Zika Virus Envelope Protein with Glycosaminoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Young; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Xinyue; Fraser, Keith; Lin, Lei; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Fuming; Dordick, Jonathan S; Linhardt, Robert J

    2017-02-28

    In February 2016, the World Health Organization declared a Public Health Emergency of International Concern on Zika Virus (ZIKV), because of its association with severe fetal anomalies of congenitally infected humans. This has led to urgent efforts by academic, federal, and industry research groups to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of ZIKV and to develop detection methods, therapeutic strategies, and vaccines. Although we still do not have the entire picture of the pathogenesis of ZIKV, extensive research has been conducted on related pathogenic flaviviruses (i.e., dengue virus, West Nile virus, and yellow fever virus). Binding to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) through its envelope protein is the first step in successful host cell invasion of dengue virus. In this study, we examined ZIKV envelope protein (ZIKV E) binding to GAGs in a real time interaction study using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to explore the role of GAGs in host cell entry of ZIKV into placenta and brain. ZIKV E strongly binds (KD = 443 nM) pharmaceutical heparin (HP), a highly sulfated GAG, and binds with lower avidity to less sulfated GAGs, suggesting that the ZIKV E-GAG interaction may be electrostatically driven. Using SPR competition assays with various chain length HP oligosaccharides (from 4 to 18 saccharide units in length), we observed that ZIKV E preferentially binds to longer HP oligosaccharides (with 8-18 saccharides). Next, we examined GAGs prepared from human placentas to determine if they bound ZIKV E, possibly mediating placental cell invasion of ZIKV. Compositional analysis of these GAGs as well as SPR binding studies showed that both chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate GAGs, present on the placenta, showed low-micromolar interactions with ZIKV E. Both porcine brain CS and HS also showed micromolar binding with ZIKV E. Moreover, heparan sulfate with a higher TriS content, the dominant repeating unit of HP, shows a high affinity for ZIKV E. These results suggest

  8. Hyaluronidase-inhibitory activities of glycosaminoglycans from Liparis tessellatus eggs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ticar, Bernadeth F.; Rohmah, Zuliyati; Mussatto, Solange Ines

    2017-01-01

    acids; and 23.5, 19.0, and 7.5% acetylhexosamines and hexosamines, respectively. Hyaluronidase inhibitory effects of the fractions are in the order F3>F2>F1>Ascorbic acid, with F3 having the highest inhibition among the fractions and that of the standard, ascorbic acid. The ESI-MS/MS confirmed...

  9. [THE QUANTIFICATION OF SULPHATED GLYCOSAMINOGLYCANS IN RAT URINE IN EXPERIMENTAL HEMORRHAGIC CYSTITIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, V E; Shmurak, V I

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the study of the excretion of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAG) in the urine of rats in experimental hemorrhagic cystitis induced by cyclophosphamide and treated with glycosaminoglycan replacement therapy. Rats were given intraperitoneal injections of cyclophosphamide at a dose of 100 mg per 1 kg body weight and subsequently treated with intragastric administration of the combined preparation of glycosaminoglycans containing glucosamine hydrochloride and chondroitin sulfate at a dose of 10 and 100 mg per 1 kg of body weight. Within 24 or 72 hours after cystitis induction there was a statistically significant increase in urinary GAG excretion. The study also found a decrease (from 1.34 to 1.22 mg/dL) in urinary GAG within 0 to 72 hours following induction of acute cystitis without glycosaminoglycan therapy. In the subchronic model of inflammation in the bladder, upon repeated administration of low doses of cyclophosphamide (50 mg/kg), decrease in urinary GAG within 0 to 72 hours (1,32±0,13 mg/dL) as well as increased excretion after 96 hours at a concentration of 2,29±0,13 mg/L after initiation cystitis were found.

  10. Oncofetal chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans are key players in integrin signaling and tumor cell motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Thomas Mandel; Bento Ayres Pereira, Marina Maria; Al Nakouzi, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Many tumors express proteoglycans modified with oncofetal chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan chains (ofCS), which are normally restricted to the placenta. However, the role of ofCS in cancer is largely unknown. The function of ofCS in cancer was analyzed using the recombinant ofCS-binding VAR2...

  11. Reduced supportive capacity of bone marrow stroma upon chemotherapy is mediated via changes in glycosaminoglycan profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zweegman, Sonja; Kessler, Floortje L.; Kerkhoven, Ron M.; Heimerikx, Mike; Celie, Johanna W. A. M.; Janssen, Jeroen J. W. M.; Huijgens, Peter C.; Drager, Angelika M.; van den Born, Jacob

    High dose chemotherapy and radiation have been found to impair the hematopoiesis-supportive capacity of bone marrow stroma. We now provide evidence for an important role of chemotherapy-induced alterations in stromal glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in reduction of the supportive properties of stromal

  12. The assessment of early glycosaminoglycan concentration changes in the kidney of diabetic rats by critical electrolyte concentration staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourghasem, Mohsen; Nasiri, Ebrahim; Sum, Shima; Shafi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) has a pivot role in renal function and homeostasis. Analysis of GAG amount generally serves to determine GAG alteration due to diabetes mellitus. Critical Electrolyte Concentration (CEC) staining can be an efficacy method to study GAG amount changes. Based on an experimental study, 20 male rats were randomly divided equally into two experimental and control groups. Diabetes mellitus was induced by a single sub cutaneous injection (120 mg/kg) of alloxan monohydrate. After 8 weeks, diabetic kidneys were paraffin embedded and sectioned at 5μm on a microtome. Slides were prepared and studied after staining by Critical Electrolyte Concentration (CEC 1 -4). In this study, we succeeded to show a decrease of hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate concentration in diabetic kidney at 8 weeks diabetic rats which are earlier signs compared to those reported previously. In contrary, no significant changes in heparin sulfate and keratin sulfate have been seen. Diabetic nephropathy is a progressive disease and earlier diagnosis makes a better treatment design to reduce its development. CEC staining is able to determine degradation of hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate synthesis in diabetic kidney of rats in an earlier time.

  13. A Modified Glycosaminoglycan, GM-0111, Inhibits Molecular Signaling Involved in Periodontitis.

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    Justin R Savage

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is characterized by microbial infection, inflammation, tissue breakdown, and accelerated loss of alveolar bone matrix. Treatment targeting these multiple stages of the disease provides ways to treat or prevent periodontitis. Certain glycosaminoglycans (GAGs block multiple inflammatory mediators as well as suppress bacterial growth, suggesting that these GAGs may be exploited as a therapeutic for periodontitis.We investigated the effects of a synthetic GAG, GM-0111, on various molecular events associated with periodontitis: growth of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans pathogenic bacteria associated with periodontitis; activation of pro-inflammatory signaling through TLR2 and TLR4 in mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cells and heterologously expressed HEK 293 cells; osteoclast formation and bone matrix resorption in cultured mouse pre-osteoclasts.(1 GM-0111 suppressed the growth of P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans even at 1% (w/v solution. The antibacterial effects of GM-0111 were stronger than hyaluronic acid (HA or xylitol in P. gingivalis at all concentrations and comparable to xylitol in A. actinomycetemcomitans at ≥2% (w/v solution. We also observed that GM-0111 suppressed biofilm formation of P. gingivalis and these effects were much stronger than HA. (2 GM-0111 inhibited TLR-mediated pro-inflammatory cellular signaling both in macrophage and HEK 293 cells with higher selectivity for TLR2 than TLR4 (IC50 of 1-10 ng/mL vs. > 100 μg/mL, respectively. (3 GM-0111 blocked RANKL-induced osteoclast formation (as low as 300 ng/mL and bone matrix resorption. While GM-0111 showed high affinity binding to RANKL, it did not interfere with RANKL/RANK/NF-κB signaling, suggesting that GM-0111 inhibits osteoclast formation by a RANKL-RANK-independent mechanism.We report that GM-0111 inhibits multiple molecular events involved in periodontitis, spanning from the

  14. Oxidation of glycosaminoglycans by free radicals and reactive oxidative species: A review of investigative methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, B J

    2015-05-01

    Glycosaminoglycans, in particular hyaluronan (HA), and proteoglycans are components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM plays a key role in the regulation of cellular behaviour and alterations to it can modulate both the development of human diseases as well as controlling normal biochemical processes such as cell signalling and pro-inflammatory responses. For these reasons, in vitro fragmentation studies of glycosaminoglycans by free radicals and oxidative species are seen to be relevant to the understanding of in vivo studies of damage to the ECM. A wide range of investigative techniques have therefore been applied to gain insights into the relative fragmentation effects of several reactive oxidative species with the ultimate goal of determining mechanisms of fragmentation at the molecular level. These methods are reviewed here.

  15. Periodontal Ligament Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Increase Proliferation and Glycosaminoglycans Formation of Temporomandibular Joint Derived Fibrochondrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Jianli Zhang; Fujun Guo; Jianqiang Mi; Zhiye Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders are common disease in maxillofacial surgery. The aim of this study is to regenerate fibrocartilage with a mixture of TMJ fibrochondrocytes and periodontal ligament derived mesenchymal stem cells (PD-MSCs). Materials and Methods. Fibrochondrocytes and PD-MSC were cocultured (ratio 1 : 1) for 3 weeks. Histology and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) assay were performed to examine the deposition of GAG. Green florescent protein (GFP) was used to track ...

  16. Sulphated glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans in the developing vertebral column of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    OpenAIRE

    Hannesson, Kirsten O.; Ytteborg, Elisabeth; Takle, Harald; Enersen, Grethe; B?verfjord, Grete; Mona E Pedersen

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the distribution of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the developing vertebral column of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) at 700, 900, 1100 and 1400?d? was examined by light microscopy. The mineralization pattern was outlined by Alizarin red S and soft structures by Alcian blue. The temporal and spatial distribution patterns of different types of GAGs: chondroitin-4-sulphate/dermatan sulphate, chondroitin-6-sulphate, chondroitin-0-sulphate and keratan sulphate were add...

  17. Repellent guidance of regenerating optic axons by chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Catherina G.; Becker, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    We analyzed the role of chondroitin sulfate (CS) glycosaminoglycans, putative inhibitors of axonal regeneration in mammals, in the regenerating visual pathway of adult zebrafish. In the adult, CS immunoreactivity was not detectable before or after an optic nerve crush in the optic nerve and tract but was constitutively present in developing and adult nonretinorecipient pretectal brain nuclei, where CSs may form a boundary preventing regenerating optic fibers from growing into these inappropri...

  18. Exogenous glycosaminoglycans coat damaged bladder surfaces in experimentally damaged mouse bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurst Robert E

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstital cystitis is often treated with exogenous glycosaminoglycans such as heparin, chondroitin sulphate (Uracyst, hyaluronate (Cystistat or the semi-synthetic pentosan polysulphate (Elmiron. The mechanism of action is presumed to be due to a coating of the bladder surface to replace the normally present chondroitin sulphate and heparan sulphate lost as a result of the disease. This study used fluorescent labelled chondroitin sulphate to track the distribution of glycosaminoglycans administered intravesically to mouse bladder that had been damaged on the surface. Methods The surfaces of mouse bladders were damaged by 3 mechanisms – trypsin, 10 mM HCl, and protamine sulphate. Texas Red-labeled chondroitin sulphate was instilled into the bladders of animals with damaged bladders and controls instilled only with saline. Bladders were harvested, frozen, and sectioned for examination by fluorescence. Results The normal mouse bladder bound a very thin layer of the labelled chondroitin sulphate on the luminal surface. Trypsin- and HCl-damaged bladders bound the labelled chondroitin sulphate extensively on the surface with little penetration into the bladder muscle. Protamine produced less overt damage, and much less labelling was seen, presumably due to loss of the label as it complexed with the protamine intercalated into the bladder surface. Conclusion Glycosaminoglycan administered intravesically does bind to damaged bladder. Given that the changes seen following bladder damage resemble those seen naturally in interstitial cystitis, the mechanisms proposed for the action of these agents is consistent with a coating of damaged bladder.

  19. Glycosaminoglycans affect the interaction of human plasma kallikrein with plasminogen, factor XII and inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gozzo A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Human plasma kallikrein, a serine proteinase, plays a key role in intrinsic blood clotting, in the kallikrein-kinin system, and in fibrinolysis. The proteolytic enzymes involved in these processes are usually controlled by specific inhibitors and may be influenced by several factors including glycosaminoglycans, as recently demonstrated by our group. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of glycosaminoglycans (30 to 250 µg/ml on kallikrein activity on plasminogen and factor XII and on the inhibition of kallikrein by the plasma proteins C1-inhibitor and antithrombin. Almost all available glycosaminoglycans (heparin, heparan sulfate, bovine and tuna dermatan sulfate, chondroitin 4- and 6-sulfates reduced (1.2 to 3.0 times the catalytic efficiency of kallikrein (in a nanomolar range on the hydrolysis of plasminogen (0.3 to 1.8 µM and increased (1.9 to 7.7 times the enzyme efficiency in factor XII (0.1 to 10 µM activation. On the other hand, heparin, heparan sulfate, and bovine and tuna dermatan sulfate improved (1.2 to 3.4 times kallikrein inhibition by antithrombin (1.4 µM, while chondroitin 4- and 6-sulfates reduced it (1.3 times. Heparin and heparan sulfate increased (1.4 times the enzyme inhibition by the C1-inhibitor (150 nM.

  20. Fine Structure of Glycosaminoglycans from Fresh and Decellularized Porcine Cardiac Valves and Pericardium

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    Antonio Cigliano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac valves are dynamic structures, exhibiting a highly specialized architecture consisting of cells and extracellular matrix with a relevant proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan content, collagen and elastic fibers. Biological valve substitutes are obtained from xenogenic cardiac and pericardial tissues. To overcome the limits of such non viable substitutes, tissue engineering approaches emerged to create cell repopulated decellularized scaffolds. This study was performed to determine the glycosaminoglycans content, distribution, and disaccharides composition in porcine aortic and pulmonary valves and in pericardium before and after a detergent-based decellularization procedure. The fine structural characteristics of galactosaminoglycans chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate were examined by FACE. Furthermore, the mechanical properties of decellularized pericardium and its propensity to be repopulated by in vitro seeded fibroblasts were investigated. Results show that galactosaminoglycans and hyaluronan are differently distributed between pericardium and valves and within heart valves themselves before and after decellularization. The distribution of glycosaminoglycans is also dependent from the vascular district and topographic localization. The decellularization protocol adopted resulted in a relevant but not selective depletion of galactosaminoglycans. As a whole, data suggest that both decellularized porcine heart valves and bovine pericardium represent promising materials bearing the potential for future development of tissue engineered heart valve scaffolds.

  1. A color-code for glycosaminoglycans identification by means of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis stained with the cationic carbocyanine dye Stains-all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, João Pedro Souza; Oliveira, Caroline Pacheco; Tovar, Ana Maria Freire; Mourão, Paulo Antonio de Souza; Vilanova, Eduardo

    2018-02-01

    Cationic dyes such as toluidin blue are commonly employed to visualize glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on electrophoresis gels; however, the carbocyanine-based dye Stains-all have been increasingly used to stain the non-sulfated hyaluronic acid and other GAGs in submicrogram quantities. In this short communication, we demonstrate that Stains-all is able to stain the most common GAGs on polyacrylamide gels with distinct and contrasting colors in a reproducible manner. We also show that this staining method is useful to identify GAGs present both in mixtures and in submicrogram quantities. Therefore, Stains-all has shown to be useful in identifying GAGs on polyacrylamide gels with basis on their specific colors, at least on screening level. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Changes Of Hydration Level In Type I Collagen And Glycosaminoglycans Synthesized In The Rat’s Skin Under The Mechanical Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandr M. Ponomarenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes of Hydratation Level Of Type I Collagen And Glycosaminoglycans That Are Synthesized In The Rat’s Skin Under The Mechanical Stress. The effect of the mechanical stress on the levels of hydratation of type I collagen and glycosaminoglycans that are synthesized in it, has been studied in vitro using the rats’ skin. The measured hydration of isotherms has shown that mechanical stress in the skin increases and decreases the amount of absorbed water in glycosaminoglycans and in collagen, respectively. Сalculated the average amounts of water molecules in collagen tripeptide and glycosaminoglycans disaccharide unit in the inside and outside layers of their hydrate shells

  3. Hyaluronidase-inhibitory activities of glycosaminoglycans from Liparis tessellatus eggs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ticar, Bernadeth F.; Rohmah, Zuliyati; Mussatto, Solange Ines

    2017-01-01

    Polysaccharide fractions isolated from L. tessellatus eggs were purified and eluted using the DEAE-sepharose fast flow column. These were collected, tested and pooled based on their sugars content: F1, F2, and F3 which contain 26.8, 23.3, and 20.2% sulfated glycans; 34.5, 38.2, and 45.0% uronic a...... the presence of uronic acids on F3, which could be a 0,2A2 fragment plus loss of methyl group which is very common among nonmethylated, sulfated disaccharides.......Polysaccharide fractions isolated from L. tessellatus eggs were purified and eluted using the DEAE-sepharose fast flow column. These were collected, tested and pooled based on their sugars content: F1, F2, and F3 which contain 26.8, 23.3, and 20.2% sulfated glycans; 34.5, 38.2, and 45.0% uronic...

  4. Preparation and characterization of deuterium-labeled glycosaminoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naggi, A; Casu, B; Crippa, B; Magnaghi, S; Silvestro, L; Torri, G

    1994-01-01

    Heparin, NAcHep, DS, and CS were labeled with deuterium by N-reacetylating, with the deuterated acetic anhydride (CD3CO)2O, GAGs previously N-deacetylated (by hydrazinolysis) to the desired extent. Degrees of deuteration of the present preparations, as determined by 2H- and 1H-NMR were 15%, 51%, 49%, and 79% for heparin, NAcHep, DS, and CS, respectively. The NMR analysis (including the 13C spectra) of the labeled products indicated that deuterium labeling did not involve any substantial modification of the GAG structures. Also NMR signals associated with specific sequences of heparin for antithrombin and of DS for heparin cofactor II were essentially the same in the unlabeled and in the deuterated GAGs. The substantial retention of the original structure was confirmed by data on the degree of sulfation (by conductimetry) and on the electrophoretic mobility in acid buffer. On the other hand, HPLC/SEC data indicated some depolymerization of heparin and DS in the N-deacetylation step of the labeling reactions. HPLC/MS spectrometry permitted a clear identification of disaccharide and tetrasaccharide fragments obtained from deuterated GAGs by enzymic (heparinase, chondroitinase ABC) or chemical depolymerization (deaminative cleavage, Smith degradation), opening new prospects for studies of human pharmacokinetics, with differentiation of exogenous from endogenous GAGs.

  5. Hypoxia-mimicking bioactive glass/collagen glycosaminoglycan composite scaffolds to enhance angiogenesis and bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Elaine; Partap, Sonia; Azevedo, Maria M; Jell, Gavin; Stevens, Molly M; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2015-06-01

    One of the biggest challenges in regenerative medicine is promoting sufficient vascularisation of tissue-engineered constructs. One approach to overcome this challenge is to target the cellular hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α) pathway, which responds to low oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and results in the activation of numerous pro-angiogenic genes including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Cobalt ions are known to mimic hypoxia by artificially stabilising the HIF-1α transcription factor. Here, resorbable bioactive glass particles (38 μm and 100 μm) with cobalt ions incorporated into the glass network were used to create bioactive glass/collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds optimised for bone tissue engineering. Inclusion of the bioactive glass improved the compressive modulus of the resulting composite scaffolds while maintaining high degrees of porosity (>97%). Moreover, in vitro analysis demonstrated that the incorporation of cobalt bioactive glass with a mean particle size of 100 μm significantly enhanced the production and expression of VEGF in endothelial cells, and cobalt bioactive glass/collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffold conditioned media also promoted enhanced tubule formation. Furthermore, our results prove the ability of these scaffolds to support osteoblast cell proliferation and osteogenesis in all bioactive glass/collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds irrespective of the particle size. In summary, we have developed a hypoxia-mimicking tissue-engineered scaffold with pro-angiogenic and pro-osteogenic capabilities that may encourage bone tissue regeneration and overcome the problem of inadequate vascularisation of grafts commonly seen in the field of tissue engineering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Using isothermal titration calorimetry to determine thermodynamic parameters of protein-glycosaminoglycan interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Amit K; Rösgen, Jörg; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    It has now become increasingly clear that a complete atomic description of how biomacromolecules recognize each other requires knowledge not only of the structures of the complexes but also of how kinetics and thermodynamics drive the binding process. In particular, such knowledge is lacking for protein-glycosaminoglycan (GAG) complexes. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the only technique that can provide various thermodynamic parameters-enthalpy, entropy, free energy (binding constant), and stoichiometry-from a single experiment. Here we describe different factors that must be taken into consideration in carrying out ITC titrations to obtain meaningful thermodynamic data of protein-GAG interactions.

  7. Effect of Withania somnifera on glycosaminoglycan synthesis in carrageenin-induced air pouch granuloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begum, V.H.; Sadique, J.

    1987-12-01

    The effect of W. somnifera on glycosaminoglycan synthesis in the granulation tissue of carrageenin-induced air pouch granuloma was studied. W. somnifera was shown to exert significant inhibitory effect on incorporation of /sup 35/S into the granulation tissue. The uncoupling effect on oxidative phosphorylation (ADP/O ratio reduction) was also observed in the mitochondria of granulation tissue. Further, Mg/sup 2 +/ dependent ATPase activity was found to be influenced by W. somnifera. W. somnifera also reduced the succinate dehydrogenase enzyme activity in the mitochondria of granulation tissue.

  8. Glycosaminoglycans are interactants of Langerin: comparison with gp120 highlights an unexpected calcium-independent binding mode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Chabrol

    Full Text Available Langerin is a C-type lectin specifically expressed in Langerhans cells. As recently shown for HIV, Langerin is thought to capture pathogens and mediate their internalisation into Birbeck Granules for elimination. However, the precise functions of Langerin remain elusive, mostly because of the lack of information on its binding properties and physiological ligands. Based on recent reports that Langerin binds to sulfated sugars, we conducted here a comparative analysis of Langerin interaction with mannose-rich HIV glycoprotein gp120 and glycosaminoglycan (GAGs, a family of sulfated polysaccharides expressed at the surface of most mammalian cells. Our results first revealed that Langerin bound to these different glycans through very distinct mechanisms and led to the identification of a novel, GAG-specific binding mode within Langerin. In contrast to the canonical lectin domain, this new binding site showed no Ca(2+-dependency, and could only be detected in entire, trimeric extracellular domains of Langerin. Interestingly binding to GAGs, did not simply rely on a net charge effect, but rather on more discrete saccharide features, such as 6-O-sulfation, or iduronic acid content. Using molecular modelling simulations, we proposed a model of Langerin/heparin complex, which located the GAG binding site at the interface of two of the three Carbohydrate-recognition domains of the protein, at the edge of the a-helix coiled-coil. To our knowledge, the binding properties that we have highlighted here for Langerin, have never been reported for C-type lectins before. These findings provide new insights towards the understanding of Langerin biological functions.

  9. The expression of glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans in the uterine cervix of albino rats after local hyaluronidase infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Guilherme Negrão; Camano, Luiz; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Medeiros, Valquíria; Martins, João Roberto Maciel; Souza, Eduardo

    2014-06-01

    To assess the local effect of hyaluronidase injection on the expression of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and proteoglycans (PGs) in the extracellular matrix of the uterine cervix from pregnant albino rats. Ten pregnant rats were divided into two groups on day 18 of pregnancy. The experimental group (Gexp) of rats received an intracervical infusion of 0.02 mL of hyaluronidase diluted to 1 mL with distilled water, whereas the control group (Gc) received 1 mL of distilled water. On day 20 of pregnancy, the pregnant rats were sacrificed and the uterine cervixes from all rats were then dissected. The qualitative expression of hyaluronic acid (HA) was assessed by immunohistochemistry and quantified by sandwich ELISA. To compare the quantitative GAG values between groups, a Student's t-test for independent samples was performed. PGs were also assessed by immunohistochemical analysis. The electrophoretic profile of newly synthesized radioactively labeled GAGs degraded by specific enzymes showed that there were two predominant GAGs in both Gc and Gexp, i.e. heparan sulfate (HS) and a mixture of hondroitin sulfate (CS) and dermatan sulfate (DS). The concentrations of GAGs showed a significant reduction of CS/DS (p < 0.004) and HS (p < 0.005) relative to Gc. HA staining was less intense in the lamina propria and area surrounding the blood vessels in Gexp compared to Gc. The HA contents were also significantly reduced (p < 0.012). Intracervical hyaluronidase infusion promoted a significant reduction in the concentration of sulfated GAGs as assessed by both qualitative (histochemical) and quantitative (fluorometric) measurements of HA.

  10. Synergistic Effects of a Mixture of Glycosaminoglycans to Inhibit Adipogenesis and Enhance Chondrocyte Features in Multipotent Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar D. Petrov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells affect homeostasis of adipose and joint tissues. Factors influencing their differentiation fate are of interest for both obesity and joint problems. We studied the impact of a mixture of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs (hyaluronic acid: dermatan sulfate 1:0.25, w/w used in an oral supplement for joint discomfort (Oralvisc™ on the differentiation fate of multipotent cells. Methods: Primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs were used as a model system. Post-confluent monolayer MEF cultures non-stimulated or hormonally stimulated to adipogenesis were chronically exposed to the GAGs mixture, its individual components or vehicle. The appearance of lipid laden cells, lipid accumulation and expression of selected genes at the mRNA and protein level was assessed. Results: Exposure to the GAGs mixture synergistically suppressed spontaneous adipogenesis and induced the expression of cartilage extracellular matrix proteins, aggrecan core protein, decorin and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein. Hormonally-induced adipogenesis in the presence of the GAGs mixture resulted in decreased adipogenic differentiation, down-regulation of adipogenic/lipogenic factors and genes for insulin resistance-related adipokines (resistin and retinol binding protein 4, and up-regulation of oxidative metabolism-related genes. Adipogenesis in the presence of dermatan sulfate, the minor component of the mixture, was not impaired but resulted in smaller lipid droplets and the induction of a more complete brown adipocyte-related transcriptional program in the cells in the adipose state. Conclusions: The Oralvisc™ GAGs mixture can tip the adipogenic/chondrogenic fate balance of multipotent cells away from adipogenesis while favoring chondrocyte related gene expression. The mixture and its dermatan sulfate component also have modulatory effects of interest on hormonally-induced adipogenesis and on metabolic and secretory capabilities of

  11. Computational modelling suggests good, bad and ugly roles of glycosaminoglycans in arterial wall mechanics and mechanobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccabianca, S.; Bellini, C.; Humphrey, J. D.

    2014-01-01

    The medial layer of large arteries contains aggregates of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan and the proteoglycan versican. It is increasingly thought that these aggregates play important mechanical and mechanobiological roles despite constituting only a small fraction of the normal arterial wall. In this paper, we offer a new hypothesis that normal aggregates of hyaluronan and versican pressurize the intralamellar spaces, and thereby put into tension the radial elastic fibres that connect the smooth muscle cells to the elastic laminae, which would facilitate mechanosensing. This hypothesis is supported by novel computational simulations using two complementary models, a mechanistically based finite-element mixture model and a phenomenologically motivated continuum hyperelastic model. That is, the simulations suggest that normal aggregates of glycosaminoglycans/proteoglycans within the arterial media may play equally important roles in supporting (i.e. a structural role) and sensing (i.e. an instructional role) mechanical loads. Additional simulations suggest further, however, that abnormal increases in these aggregates, either distributed or localized, may over-pressurize the intralamellar units. We submit that these situations could lead to compromised mechanosensing, anoikis and/or reduced structural integrity, each of which represent fundamental aspects of arterial pathologies seen, for example, in hypertension, ageing and thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. PMID:24920112

  12. Therapeutic effects of Semecarpus anacardium Linn. nut milk extract on the changes associated with collagen and glycosaminoglycan metabolism in adjuvant arthritic Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramprasath, Vanu Ramkumar; Shanthi, Palanivelu; Sachdanandam, Panchanatham

    2006-07-25

    The effect of milk extract of Semecarpus anacardium Linn. nut milk extract (SA) was studied to gain some insight into this intriguing disease with reference to collagen metabolism. Arthritis was induced in rats by injecting Freund's complete adjuvant containing 10mg of heat killed mycobacterium tuberculosis in 1 ml paraffin oil (0.1 ml) into the left hind paw of the rat intradermally. After 14 days of induction, SA (150 mg/kg body weight/day) was administered orally by gastric intubations for 14 days. Decreased levels of collagen and glycosaminoglycans (GAGS) components (chondroitin sulphate, heparan sulphate, hyaluronic acid) and increase in the levels of connective tissue degrading lysosomal glycohydrolases such as acid phosphatase, beta-glucuronidase, beta-N-acetyl glucosaminidase and cathepsin-D observed in arthritic animals were reverted back to near normal levels upon treatment with SA. The drug effectively regulated the uriniray markers of collagen metabolism namely hexosamine, hexuronic acid, hydroxyproline and total GAGS. Electron microscopic studies also revealed the protective effect of SA. Hence, it can be suggested that SA very effectively regulate the collagen metabolism that derange during arthritic condition.

  13. Mechanism of action and efficacy of RX-111, a thieno[2,3-c]pyridine derivative and small molecule inhibitor of protein interaction with glycosaminoglycans (SMIGs), in delayed-type hypersensitivity, TNBS-induced colitis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Nicholas; Koppel, Juraj; Zsila, Ferenc; Juhas, Stefan; Il'kova, Gabriela; Kogan, Faina Yurgenzon; Lahmy, Orly; Wildbaum, Gizi; Karin, Nathan; Zhuk, Regina; Gregor, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Elucidate the mechanism of action of the small molecule inhibitor of protein binding to glycosaminoglycans, RX-111 and assay its anti-inflammatory activity in animal models of inflammatory disease. The glycosaminoglycan, heparin, was used in the mechanism of action study of RX-111. Human T lymphocytes and umbilical vein endothelial cells were used to assay the in vitro activity of RX-111. Mouse and rat models of disease were used to assay the anti-inflammatory activity of RX-111 in vivo. Circular dichroism and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy were used to study the binding of RX-111 to the glycosaminoglycan, heparin. T lymphocyte rolling on endothelial cells under shear flow was used to assay RX-111 activity in vitro. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and tri-nitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in mice and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats were used to assay anti-inflammatory activity of RX-111 in vivo. RX-111 was shown to bind directly to heparin. It inhibited leukocyte rolling on endothelial cells under shear flow and reduced inflammation in the mouse model of DTH. RX-111 was efficacious in the mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease, TNBS-induced colitis and the rat model of multiple sclerosis, EAE. RX-111 exercises its broad spectrum anti-inflammatory activity by a singular mechanism of action, inhibition of protein binding to the cell surface GAG, heparan sulfate. RX-111 and related thieno[2,3-c]pyridine derivatives are potential therapeutics for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  14. Purified glycosaminoglycans from cooked haddock may enhance Fe uptake via endocytosis in a Caco-2 cell culture model

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study aims to understand the enhancing effect of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), such as chondroitin/dermatan structures, on Fe uptake to Caco-2 cells. High sulfated GAGs were selectively purified from cooked haddock. An in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell culture model was used to evaluate Fe uptake (ce...

  15. Alterations of overused supraspinatus tendon: a possible role of glycosaminoglycans and HARP/pleiotrophin in early tendon pathology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attia, M.; Scott, A.; Duchesnay, A.; Carpentier, G.; Soslowsky, L.J.; Huynh, M.B.; Kuppevelt, T. van; Gossard, C.; Courty, J.; Tassoni, M.C.; Martelly, I.

    2012-01-01

    Supraspinatus tendon overuse injuries lead to significant pain and disability in athletes and workers. Despite the prevalence and high social cost of these injuries, the early pathological events are not well known. We analyzed the potential relation between glycosaminoglycan (GAG) composition and

  16. LL-37 complexation with glycosaminoglycans in cystic fibrosis lungs inhibits antimicrobial activity, which can be restored by hypertonic saline.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bergsson, Gudmundur

    2009-07-01

    There is an abundance of antimicrobial peptides in cystic fibrosis (CF) lungs. Despite this, individuals with CF are susceptible to microbial colonization and infection. In this study, we investigated the antimicrobial response within the CF lung, focusing on the human cathelicidin LL-37. We demonstrate the presence of the LL-37 precursor, human cathelicidin precursor protein designated 18-kDa cationic antimicrobial protein, in the CF lung along with evidence that it is processed to active LL-37 by proteinase-3. We demonstrate that despite supranormal levels of LL-37, the lung fluid from CF patients exhibits no demonstrable antimicrobial activity. Furthermore Pseudomonas killing by physiological concentrations of exogenous LL-37 is inhibited by CF bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid due to proteolytic degradation of LL-37 by neutrophil elastase and cathepsin D. The endogenous LL-37 in CF BAL fluid is protected from this proteolysis by interactions with glycosaminoglycans, but while this protects LL-37 from proteolysis it results in inactivation of LL-37 antimicrobial activity. By digesting glycosaminoglycans in CF BAL fluid, endogenous LL-37 is liberated and the antimicrobial properties of CF BAL fluid restored. High sodium concentrations also liberate LL-37 in CF BAL fluid in vitro. This is also seen in vivo in CF sputum where LL-37 is complexed to glycosaminoglycans but is liberated following nebulized hypertonic saline resulting in increased antimicrobial effect. These data suggest glycosaminoglycan-LL-37 complexes to be potential therapeutic targets. Factors that disrupt glycosaminoglycan-LL-37 aggregates promote the antimicrobial effects of LL-37 with the caveat that concomitant administration of antiproteases may be needed to protect the now liberated LL-37 from proteolytic cleavage.

  17. The involvement of glycosaminoglycans in airway disease associated with cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reeves, Emer P

    2012-02-01

    Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) present with severe airway destruction and extensive bronchiectasis. It has been assumed that these structural airway changes have occurred secondary to infection and inflammation, but recent studies suggest that glycosaminoglycan (GAG) remodelling may be an important independent parallel process. Evidence is accumulating that not only the concentration, but also sulphation of GAGs is markedly increased in CF bronchial cells and tissues. Increased expression of GAGs and, in particular, heparan sulphate, has been linked to a sustained inflammatory response and neutrophil recruitment to the CF airways. This present review discusses the biological role of GAGs in the lung, as well as their involvement in CF respiratory disease, and their potential as therapeutic targets.

  18. Glycosaminoglycan-Based Biohybrid Hydrogels: A Sweet and Smart Choice for Multifunctional Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenberg, Uwe; Liang, Yingkai; Kiick, Kristi L; Werner, Carsten

    2016-10-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) govern important functional characteristics of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in living tissues. Incorporation of GAGs into biomaterials opens up new routes for the presentation of signaling molecules, providing control over development, homeostasis, inflammation, and tumor formation and progression. Recent approaches to GAG-based materials are reviewed, highlighting the formation of modular, tunable biohybrid hydrogels by covalent and non-covalent conjugation schemes, including both theory-driven design concepts and advanced processing technologies. Examples of the application of the resulting materials in biomedical studies are provided. For perspective, solid-phase and chemoenzymatic oligosaccharide synthesis methods for GAG-derived motifs, rational and high-throughput design strategies for GAG-based materials, and the utilization of the factor-scavenging characteristics of GAGs are highlighted. © 2016 The Authors. Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. (19)F labelled glycosaminoglycan probes for solution NMR and non-linear (CARS) microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Marcelo A; Cavalheiro, Renan P; M Viana, Gustavo; Meneghetti, Maria C Z; Rudd, Timothy R; Skidmore, Mark A; Powell, Andrew K; Yates, Edwin A

    2017-06-01

    Studying polysaccharide-protein interactions under physiological conditions by conventional techniques is challenging. Ideally, macromolecules could be followed by both in vitro spectroscopy experiments as well as in tissues using microscopy, to enable a proper comparison of results over these different scales but, often, this is not feasible. The cell surface and extracellular matrix polysaccharides, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) lack groups that can be detected selectively in the biological milieu. The introduction of (19)F labels into GAG polysaccharides is explored and the interaction of a labelled GAG with the heparin-binding protein, antithrombin, employing (19)F NMR spectroscopy is followed. Furthermore, the ability of (19)F labelled GAGs to be imaged using CARS microscopy is demonstrated. (19)F labelled GAGs enable both (19)F NMR protein-GAG binding studies in solution at the molecular level and non-linear microscopy at a microscopic scale to be conducted on the same material, essentially free of background signals.

  20. Strength and Persistence of Energy-Based Vessel Seals Rely on Tissue Water and Glycosaminoglycan Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Eric A; Cezo, James D; Fankell, Douglas P; Taylor, Kenneth D; Rentschler, Mark E; Ferguson, Virginia L

    2016-11-01

    Vessel ligation using energy-based surgical devices is steadily replacing conventional closure methods during minimally invasive and open procedures. In exploring the molecular nature of thermally-induced tissue bonds, novel applications for surgical resection and repair may be revealed. This work presents an analysis of the influence of unbound water and hydrophilic glycosaminoglycans on the formation and resilience of vascular seals via: (a) changes in pre-fusion tissue hydration, (b) the enzymatic digestion of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) prior to fusion and (c) the rehydration of vascular seals following fusion. An 11% increase in pre-fusion unbound water led to an 84% rise in vascular seal strength. The digestion of GAGs prior to fusion led to increases of up to 82% in seal strength, while the rehydration of native and GAG-digested vascular seals decreased strengths by 41 and 44%, respectively. The effects of increased unbound water content prior to fusion combined with the effects of seal rehydration after fusion suggest that the heat-induced displacement of tissue water is a major contributor to tissue adhesion during energy-based vessel sealing. The effects of pre-fusion GAG-digestion on seal integrity indicate that GAGs are inhibitory to the bond formation process during thermal ligation. GAG digestion may allow for increased water transport and protein interaction during the fusion process, leading to the formation of stronger bonds. These findings provide insight into the physiochemical nature of the fusion bond, its potential for optimization in vascular closure and its application to novel strategies for vascular resection and repair.

  1. The diagnostic role of glycosaminoglycans in pleural effusions: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dougekou Georgia

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pleural effusions are classified into transudates and exudates. Various criteria have been used with Light's et al being the most accepted ones. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs have been detected during pleural fluids (PF analysis in various causes. In this pilot study, we investigated: (a the usefulness of GAGs in the assessment of pleural effusions, and (b whether and in what way GAGs correlate with established criteria used to indicate an exudate. Methods LDH, total protein, cholesterol and GAG levels were measured in pleural fluid and serum from 50 patients with pleural effusion. GAG levels were defined by the photometric method of Hata. The discriminative properties of pleural GAGs (pGAG, pleural fluid/serum GAG ratio (GAGR, serum GAGs (sGAG and serum LDH (sLDH were explored with ROC analysis. Results According to ROC analysis, pGAG and GAGR exhibited satisfactory discriminative properties in the separation of pleural effusions. For GAGR, at a 1.1 cut off point, sensitivity and specificity reached 75.6%; 95%CI: 60.5–87.1 and 100%; 95%CI: 47.8–100, respectively. For pGAG at a cut off value of 8.4 μg/ml, these percentages changed to 86.7%; 95%CI: 73.2–94.9 and 100%; 95%CI: 47.8–100. The study also revealed the differential role of sGAG between malignancies and benign cases, scoring 68.8%; 95%CI: 50.0–83.9 for sensitivity, and 84.6%; 95%CI: 54.5–97.6 for specificity at a 7.8 μg/ml cut off. Conclusion Our results suggest that glycosaminoglycan measurement of both serum and pleural effusions could be useful for simultaneous differentiation of exudates from transudates, and of malignant from benign exudates.

  2. Increased deposition of glycosaminoglycans and altered structure of heparan sulfate in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Hedström, Ulf; Nybom, Annika; Tykesson, Emil; Åhrman, Emma; Hornfelt, Marie; Maccarana, Marco; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Dellgren, Göran; Wildt, Marie; Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Eriksson, Leif; Bjermer, Leif; Hallgren, Oskar

    2017-02-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by aberrant deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) constituents, including glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), that may play a role in remodelling processes by influencing critical mediators such as growth factors. We hypothesize that GAGs may be altered in IPF and that this contribute to create a pro-fibrotic environment. The aim of this study was therefore to examine the fine structure of heparan sulfate (HS), chondroitin/dermatan sulfate (CS/DS) and hyaluronan (HA) in lung samples from IPF patients and from control subjects. GAGs in lung samples from severe IPF patients and donor lungs were analyzed with HPLC. HS was assessed by immunohistochemistry and collagen was quantified as hydroxyproline content. The total amount of HS, CS/DS and HA was increased in IPF lungs but there was no significant difference in the total collagen content. We found a relative increase in total sulfation of HS due to increment of 2-O, 6-O and N-sulfation and a higher proportion of sulfation in CS/DS. Highly sulfated HS was located in the border zone between denser areas and more normal looking alveolar parenchyma in basement membranes of blood vessels and airways, that were immuno-positive for perlecan, as well as on the cell surface of spindle-shaped cells in the alveolar interstitium. These findings show for the first time that both the amount and structure of glycosaminoglycans are altered in IPF. These changes may contribute to the tissue remodelling in IPF by altering growth factor retention and activity, creating a pro-fibrotic ECM landscape. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Hypoxia promotes primitive glycosaminoglycan-rich extracellular matrix composition in developing heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amofa, Dorothy; Hulin, Alexia; Nakada, Yuji; Sadek, Hesham A; Yutzey, Katherine E

    2017-12-01

    During postnatal heart valve development, glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-rich valve primordia transform into stratified valve leaflets composed of GAGs, fibrillar collagen, and elastin layers accompanied by decreased cell proliferation as well as thinning and elongation. The neonatal period is characterized by the transition from a uterine environment to atmospheric O2, but the role of changing O2 levels in valve extracellular matrix (ECM) composition or morphogenesis is not well characterized. Here, we show that tissue hypoxia decreases in mouse aortic valves in the days after birth, concomitant with ECM remodeling and cell cycle arrest of valve interstitial cells. The effects of hypoxia on late embryonic valve ECM composition, Sox9 expression, and cell proliferation were examined in chicken embryo aortic valve organ cultures. Maintenance of late embryonic chicken aortic valve organ cultures in a hypoxic environment promotes GAG expression, Sox9 nuclear localization, and indicators of hyaluronan remodeling but does not affect fibrillar collagen content or cell proliferation. Chronic hypoxia also promotes GAG accumulation in murine adult heart valves in vivo. Together, these results support a role for hypoxia in maintaining a primitive GAG-rich matrix in developing heart valves before birth and also in the induction of hyaluronan remodeling in adults.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Tissue hypoxia decreases in mouse aortic valves after birth, and exposure to hypoxia promotes glycosaminoglycan accumulation in cultured chicken embryo valves and adult murine heart valves. Thus, hypoxia maintains a primitive extracellular matrix during heart valve development and promotes extracellular matrix remodeling in adult mice, as occurs in myxomatous disease. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Propolis Induces Chondroitin/Dermatan Sulphate and Hyaluronic Acid Accumulation in the Skin of Burned Wound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Olczyk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycans during the wound repair allowed us to apply the burn model in which therapeutic efficacy of propolis and silver sulfadiazine was compared. Burns were inflicted on four pigs. Glycosaminoglycans isolated from healthy and burned skin were quantified using a hexuronic acid assay, electrophoretic fractionation, and densitometric analyses. Using the reverse-phase HPLC the profile of sulfated disaccharides released by chondroitinase ABC from chondroitin/dermatan sulfates was estimated. Chondroitin/dermatan sulfates and hyaluronic acid were found in all samples. Propolis stimulated significant changes in the content of particular glycosaminoglycan types during burn healing. Glycosaminoglycans alterations after silver sulfadiazine application were less expressed. Propolis maintained high contribution of 4-O-sulfated disaccharides to chondroitin/dermatan sulfates structure and low level of 6-O-sulfated ones throughout the observed period of healing. Propolis led to preservation of significant contribution of disulfated disaccharides especially 2,4-O-disulfated ones to chondroitin sulfates/dermatan sulfates structure throughout the observed period of healing. Our findings demonstrate that propolis accelerates the burned tissue repair by stimulation of the wound bed glycosaminoglycan accumulation needed for granulation, tissue growth, and wound closure. Moreover, propolis accelerates chondroitin/dermatan sulfates structure modification responsible for binding growth factors playing the crucial role in the tissue repair.

  5. Glycomics expression analysis of sulfated glycosaminoglycans of human colorectal cancer tissues and non-neoplastic mucosa by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marolla, Ana Paula Cleto [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Waisberg, Jaques [Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Saba, Gabriela Tognini [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Waisberg, Daniel Reis [Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Margeotto, Fernando Beani; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    To determine the presence of glycosaminoglycans in the extracellular matrix of connective tissue from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissues, since it has a central role in tumor development and progression. Tissue samples from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissues were obtained from 64 operated patients who had colorectal carcinoma with no distant metastases. Expressions of heparan sulphate, chondroitin sulphate, dermatan sulphate and their fragments were analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, with the technique for extraction and quantification of glycosaminoglycans after proteolysis and electrophoresis. The statistical analysis included mean, standard deviation, and Student’s t test. The glycosaminoglycans extracted from colorectal tissue showed three electrophoretic bands in agarose gel. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry showed characteristic disaccharide fragments from glycosaminoglycans, indicating their structural characterization in the tissues analyzed. Some peaks in the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry were not characterized as fragments of sugars, indicating the presence of fragments of the protein structure of proteoglycans generated during the glycosaminoglycan purification. The average amount of chondroitin and dermatan increased in the neoplastic tissue compared to normal tissue (p=0.01). On the other hand, the average amount of heparan decreased in the neoplastic tissue compared to normal tissue (p= 0.03). The method allowed the determination of the glycosaminoglycans structural profile in colorectal tissue from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissue. Neoplastic tissues showed greater amounts of chondroitin sulphate and dermatan sulphate compared to non-neoplastic tissues, while heparan sulphate was decreased in neoplastic tissues.

  6. Peptide p5 binds both heparinase-sensitive glycosaminoglycans and fibrils in patient-derived AL amyloid extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Emily B.; Williams, Angela [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Heidel, Eric [Department of Surgery, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Macy, Sallie [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Kennel, Stephen J. [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Wall, Jonathan S., E-mail: jwall@utmck.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States)

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •Polybasic peptide p5 binds human light chain amyloid extracts. •The binding of p5 with amyloid involves both glycosaminoglycans and fibrils. •Heparinase treatment led to a correlation between p5 binding and fibril content. •p5 binding to AL amyloid requires electrostatic interactions. -- Abstract: In previously published work, we have described heparin-binding synthetic peptides that preferentially recognize amyloid deposits in a mouse model of reactive systemic (AA) amyloidosis and can be imaged by using positron and single photon emission tomographic imaging. We wanted to extend these findings to the most common form of visceral amyloidosis, namely light chain (AL); however, there are no robust experimental animal models of AL amyloidosis. To further define the binding of the lead peptide, p5, to AL amyloid, we characterized the reactivity in vitro of p5 with in situ and patient-derived AL amyloid extracts which contain both hypersulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as well as amyloid fibrils. Histochemical staining demonstrated that the peptide specifically localized with tissue-associated AL amyloid deposits. Although we anticipated that p5 would undergo electrostatic interactions with the amyloid-associated glycosaminoglycans expressing heparin-like side chains, no significant correlation between peptide binding and glycosaminoglycan content within amyloid extracts was observed. In contrast, following heparinase I treatment, although overall binding was reduced, a positive correlation between peptide binding and amyloid fibril content became evident. This interaction was further confirmed using synthetic light chain fibrils that contain no carbohydrates. These data suggest that p5 can bind to both the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and protein fibril components of AL amyloid. Understanding these complex electrostatic interactions will aid in the optimization of synthetic peptides for use as amyloid imaging agents and potentially as

  7. A role for the endothelial glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan in neutrophil recruitment by endothelial cells cultured for prolonged periods

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Lynn M.; Rainger, G.Ed; Nash, Gerard B

    2009-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) presented on the surface of endothelial cells (ECs) are believed to influence leukocyte recruitment during inflammation, but their roles remain uncertain. Here we report an in vitro model of prolonged culture of human EC in which the contributions of heparan sulphate (HS) and hyaluronan (HA) to the process of neutrophil recruitment could be studied. Previously, we reported that increasing EC culture duration (up to 20?days) enhanced neutrophil recruitment in response...

  8. Changes of Proteoglycan Expression and Glycosaminoglycan Constituents in the Intervillous Space of the Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension Placenta

    OpenAIRE

    Matsukura, Daisuke; Yokoyama, Yoshihito; Tanaka, Kanji; Ozaki, Takashi; Mizunuma, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    The changes in proteoglycan (PG) expression and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) constituents in theintervillous space of the pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIR) placenta were investigated. PGs and GAGs werepurified from the extract of the placental intervillous space by the DEAE-Sephacel column and salt-concentrationgradient method. and the GAG sugar chains were released by the actinase and cellulase treatments. Thesugar chains from the placentas of normal pregnancy and PIR were compared by cellulos...

  9. Positive effect of oral supplementation with glycosaminoglycans and antioxidants on the regeneration of osteochondral defects in the knee joint

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Handl, M.; Amler, Evžen; Bräun, K.; Holzheu, J.; Imhoff, A.B.; Lytvynets, Andrej; Filová, Eva; Kotyk, Arnošt; Martínek, V.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 2 (2007), s. 243-249 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1ET400110403; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500390702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Cartilage * Glycosaminoglycans * Oral supplementatio Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.505, year: 2007

  10. Comparison of Engineered Peptide-Glycosaminoglycan Microfibrous Hybrid Scaffolds for Potential Applications in Cartilage Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Romanelli

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances in tissue engineering have enabled the ability to design and fabricate biomaterials at the nanoscale that can actively mimic the natural cellular environment of host tissue. Of all tissues, cartilage remains difficult to regenerate due to its avascular nature. Herein we have developed two new hybrid polypeptide-glycosaminoglycan microfibrous scaffold constructs and compared their abilities to stimulate cell adhesion, proliferation, sulfated proteoglycan synthesis and soluble collagen synthesis when seeded with chondrocytes. Both constructs were designed utilizing self-assembled Fmoc-protected valyl cetylamide nanofibrous templates. The peptide components of the constructs were varied. For Construct I a short segment of dentin sialophosphoprotein followed by Type I collagen were attached to the templates using the layer-by-layer approach. For Construct II, a short peptide segment derived from the integrin subunit of Type II collagen binding protein expressed by chondrocytes was attached to the templates followed by Type II collagen. To both constructs, we then attached the natural polymer N-acetyl glucosamine, chitosan. Subsequently, the glycosaminoglycan chondroitin sulfate was then attached as the final layer. The scaffolds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In vitro culture studies were carried out in the presence of chondrocyte cells for both scaffolds and growth morphology was determined through optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy taken at different magnifications at various days of culture. Cell proliferation studies indicated that while both constructs were biocompatible and supported the growth and adhesion of chondrocytes, Construct II stimulated cell adhesion at higher rates and resulted in the formation of three dimensional cell-scaffold matrices within 24 h. Proteoglycan

  11. Glycosaminoglycan chemical exchange saturation transfer of lumbar intervertebral discs in patients with spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleich, Christoph; Müller-Lutz, Anja; Matuschke, Felix; Sewerin, Philipp; Sengewein, Ruben; Schmitt, Benjamin; Ostendorf, Benedikt; Wittsack, Hans-Jörg; Stanke, Karolin; Antoch, Gerald; Miese, Falk

    2015-10-01

    To assess glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of lumbar intervertebral discs (IVD) in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) using glycosaminoglycan chemical exchange saturation transfer (gagCEST). Ninety lumbar intervertebral discs of nine patients with SpA and nine age-matched healthy controls (eight patients with ankylosing spondylitis; one patient with spondylitis related to inflammatory bowel disease; mean age: 44.1 ± 14.0 years; range: 27-72 years) were examined with a 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner in this prospective study. The MRI protocol included standard morphological, sagittal T2 -weighted (T2 w) images to assess Pfirrmann score of the five lumbar IVDs (L1 to S1) and biochemical imaging with gagCEST to calculate a region of interest analysis of nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF). Prior to statistical testing of gagCEST effects (MTRasym values in percent) in patients and controls, IVDs were classified according to the Pfirrmann score. Significantly lower gagCEST values of NP and AF were found in SpA patients compared with healthy volunteers (NP: 1.41% ± 0.41%, P = 0.001; 95% confidence interval, CI [0.600%-2.226%]; AF: 1.19% ± 0.32%, P < 0.001; CI [0.560%-1.822%]) by comparing the differences of the means. Pooled nondegenerative IVDs (Pfirrmann 1 and 2) had significantly lower gagCEST effects in patients suffering from SpA compared with healthy controls in NP (P < 0.001; CI [1.176%-2.337%]) and AF (P < 0.001; CI [0.858%-1.779%]). No significant difference of MTRasym values was found in degenerative IVDs between patients and controls in NP (P = 0.204; CI [-0.504%-2.170%]). GagCEST analysis of morphologically nondegenerative IVDs (Pfirrmann score 1 and 2) in T2 w images demonstrated significantly lower GAG values in patients with spondyloarthritis in NP and AF, possibly representing a depletion of GAG in spondyloarthritis in the absence of morphologic degeneration. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Inhibition of chemokine-glycosaminoglycan interactions in donor tissue reduces mouse allograft vasculopathy and transplant rejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erbin Dai

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Binding of chemokines to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs is classically described as initiating inflammatory cell migration and creating tissue chemokine gradients that direct local leukocyte chemotaxis into damaged or transplanted tissues. While chemokine-receptor binding has been extensively studied during allograft transplantation, effects of glycosaminoglycan (GAG interactions with chemokines on transplant longevity are less well known. Here we examine the impact of interrupting chemokine-GAG interactions and chemokine-receptor interactions, both locally and systemically, on vascular disease in allografts.Analysis of GAG or CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2 deficiency were coupled with the infusion of viral chemokine modulating proteins (CMPs in mouse aortic allograft transplants (n = 239 mice. Inflammatory cell invasion and neointimal hyperplasia were significantly reduced in N-deacetylase-N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1(f/fTekCre(+ heparan sulfate (GAG-deficient (Ndst1(-/-, p<0.044 and CCR2-deficient (Ccr2(-/-, p<0.04 donor transplants. Donor tissue GAG or CCR2 deficiency markedly reduced inflammation and vasculopathy, whereas recipient deficiencies did not. Treatment with three CMPs was also investigated; Poxviral M-T1 blocks CC chemokine receptor binding, M-T7 blocks C, CC, and CXC GAG binding, and herpesviral M3 binds receptor and GAG binding for all classes. M-T7 reduced intimal hyperplasia in wild type (WT (Ccr2(+/+, p< or =0.003 and Ccr2(-/-, p

  13. Ruthenium(II)- and copper(I)-catalyzed synthesis of click-xylosides and assessment of their glycosaminoglycan priming activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencio, Caitlin P; Garud, Dinesh R; Doi, Yosuke; Bi, Yiling; Vankayalapati, Hariprasad; Koketsu, Mamoru; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2017-11-15

    Xylosides are small molecules that serve as primers of glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis. Xyloside mediated modulation of biological functions depends on the extent of priming activity and fine structures of primed GAG chains. In earlier studies, copper (Cu) catalyzed synthesis of click-xylosides and their priming activity were extensively documented. In the current study, ruthenium (Ru) mediated catalysis was employed to synthesize xylosides with a 1,5-linkage between the xylose and the triazole ring instead of a 1,4-linkage as found in Cu-catalyzed click-xyloside synthesis. Mono- and bis-click-xylosides were synthesized using each catalytic method and their glycosaminoglycan priming activity was assessed in vitro using a cellular system. Ru-catalyzed click-xylosides showed a higher priming activity as measured by incorporation of radioactive sulfate into primed glycosaminoglycan chains. This study demonstrates that altering the linkage of the aglycone to the triazole ring changes the priming activity. Computational modeling provides a molecular rationale for higher priming ability of Ru-mediated click-xylosides. Higher GAG priming activity is attributed to the formation of more stable interactions between the 1,5-linked xylosides and β-1,4-galactosyltransferase 7 (β4GalT7). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Increase of glycosaminoglycans and metalloproteinases 2 and 9 in liver extracellular matrix on early stages of extrahepatic cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Pedro Luiz Rodrigues; Castañon, Maria Christina Marques Nogueira; Nagaoka, Márcia Regina; Aguiar, Jair Adriano Kopke de

    2014-01-01

    Cholestasis produces hepatocellular injury, leukocyte infiltration, ductular cells proliferation and fibrosis of liver parenchyma by extracellular matrix replacement. Analyze bile duct ligation effect upon glycosaminoglycans content and matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs) activities. Animals (6-8 weeks; n = 40) were euthanized 2, 7 or 14 days after bile duct ligation or Sham-surgery. Disease evolution was analyzed by body and liver weight, seric direct bilirubin, globulins, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (Alk-P), alanine and aspartate aminotransferases (ALT and AST), tissue myeloperoxidase and MMP-9, pro MMP-2 and MMP-2 activities, histopathology and glycosaminoglycans content. Cholestasis caused cellular damage with elevation of globulins, GGT, Alk-P, ALT, AST. There was neutrophil infiltration observed by the increasing of myeloperoxidase activity on 7 (P = 0.0064) and 14 (P = 0.0002) groups which leads to the magnification of tissue injuries. Bile duct ligation increased pro-MMP-2 (P = 0.0667), MMP-2 (P = 0.0003) and MMP-9 (P<0.0001) activities on 14 days indicating matrix remodeling and establishment of inflammatory process. Bile duct ligation animals showed an increasing on dermatan sulfate and/or heparan sulfate content reflecting extracellular matrix production and growing mitosis due to parenchyma depletion. Cholestasis led to many changes on rats' liver parenchyma, as so as on its extracellular matrix, with major alterations on MMPs activities and glycosaminoglycans content.

  15. INCREASE OF GLYCOSAMINOGLYCANS AND METALLOPROTEINASES 2 AND 9 IN LIVER EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX ON EARLY STAGES OF EXTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Luiz Rodrigues GUEDES

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Cholestasis produces hepatocellular injury, leukocyte infiltration, ductular cells proliferation and fibrosis of liver parenchyma by extracellular matrix replacement. Objective Analyze bile duct ligation effect upon glycosaminoglycans content and matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs activities. Methods Animals (6-8 weeks; n = 40 were euthanized 2, 7 or 14 days after bile duct ligation or Sham-surgery. Disease evolution was analyzed by body and liver weight, seric direct bilirubin, globulins, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT, alkaline phosphatase (Alk-P, alanine and aspartate aminotransferases (ALT and AST, tissue myeloperoxidase and MMP-9, pro MMP-2 and MMP-2 activities, histopathology and glycosaminoglycans content. Results Cholestasis caused cellular damage with elevation of globulins, GGT, Alk-P, ALT, AST. There was neutrophil infiltration observed by the increasing of myeloperoxidase activity on 7 (P = 0.0064 and 14 (P = 0.0002 groups which leads to the magnification of tissue injuries. Bile duct ligation increased pro-MMP-2 (P = 0.0667, MMP-2 (P = 0.0003 and MMP-9 (P<0.0001 activities on 14 days indicating matrix remodeling and establishment of inflammatory process. Bile duct ligation animals showed an increasing on dermatan sulfate and/or heparan sulfate content reflecting extracellular matrix production and growing mitosis due to parenchyma depletion. Conclusions Cholestasis led to many changes on rats’ liver parenchyma, as so as on its extracellular matrix, with major alterations on MMPs activities and glycosaminoglycans content.

  16. Glycosaminoglycans analogs from marine invertebrates: structure, biological effects, and potential as new therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavão, Mauro S. G.

    2014-01-01

    In this review, several glycosaminoglycan analogs obtained from different marine invertebrate are reported. The structure, biological activity and mechanism of action of these unique molecules are detailed reviewed and exemplified by experiments in vitro and in vivo. Among the glycans studied are low-sulfated heparin-like polymers from ascidians, containing significant anticoagulant activity and no bleeding effect; dermatan sulfates with significant neurite outgrowth promoting activity and anti-P-selectin from ascidians, and a unique fucosylated chondroitin sulfate from sea cucumbers, possessing anticoagulant activity after oral administration and high anti P- and L-selectin activities. The therapeutic value and safety of these invertebrate glycans have been extensively proved by several experimental animal models of diseases, including thrombosis, inflammation and metastasis. These invertebrate glycans can be obtained in high concentrations from marine organisms that have been used as a food source for decades, and usually obtained from marine farms in sufficient quantities to be used as starting material for new therapeutics. PMID:25309878

  17. Use of a commercial agarose gel for analysis of urinary glycosaminoglycans in mucopolysaccharidoses

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    Ana Carolina Breier

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS are a group of inherited metabolic disorders caused by deficiency of enzymes that degrade glycosaminoglycans (GAGs. Urinary excretion of GAGs is a common feature of MPS, and is considered their major biomarker. We aimed to adapt the GAG electrophoresis method to a commercial agarose gel which would be able to separate urinary GAGs in a simpler way with good sensitivity and reproducibility. Urine samples from patients previously diagnosed with MPS I, IV, and VI were used as electrophoretic standards. Samples from patients on enzyme replacement therapy (ERT were also assessed. Commercial agarose gel electrophoresis was effective, showing proper definition and separation of GAG bands. Detection sensitivity exceeded 0.1 µg and band reproducibility were consistent. GAG bands quantified in urine samples from patients on ERT correlated very strongly (correlation coefficient = 0.98 with total GAG concentrations. This application of gel electrophoresis demonstrates the possibility of monitoring patients with MPS treated with ERT by analyzing separately the GAGs excreted in urine. We suggest this process should be applied to MPS screening as well as to follow-up of patients on treatment.

  18. Xyloside primed glycosaminoglycans alter hair bundle micromechanical coupling and synaptic transmission: Pharmacokinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holman, Holly A.; Nguyen, Lynn Y. [Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Tran, Vy M.; Arungundram, Sailaja; Kalita, Mausam [Medicinal Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Kuberan, Balagurunathan [Medicinal Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Neuroscience Program, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Rabbitt, Richard D. [Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Neuroscience Program, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Otolaryngology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are ubiquitous in the inner ear, and disorders altering their structure or production often result in debilitating hearing and balance deficits. The specific mechanisms responsible for loss of hair-cell function are not well understood. We recently reported that introduction of a novel BODIPY conjugated xyloside (BX) into the endolymph primes fluorescent GAGs in vivo [6, 15]. Confocal and two-photon fluorescence imaging revealed rapid turnover and assembly of a glycocalyx enveloping the kinocilia and extending into the cupula, a structure that presumably serves as a mechanical link between the hair bundle and the cupula. Extracellular fluorescence was also observed around the basolateral surface of hair cells and surrounding afferent nerve projections into the crista. Single unit afferent recordings during mechanical hair bundle stimulation revealed temporary interruption of synaptic transmission following BX administration followed by recovery, demonstrating an essential role for GAGs in function of the hair cell synapse. In the present work we present a pharmacokinetic model to quantify the time course of BX primed GAG production and turnover in the ear.

  19. Periodontal Ligament Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Increase Proliferation and Glycosaminoglycans Formation of Temporomandibular Joint Derived Fibrochondrocytes

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    Jianli Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ disorders are common disease in maxillofacial surgery. The aim of this study is to regenerate fibrocartilage with a mixture of TMJ fibrochondrocytes and periodontal ligament derived mesenchymal stem cells (PD-MSCs. Materials and Methods. Fibrochondrocytes and PD-MSC were cocultured (ratio 1 : 1 for 3 weeks. Histology and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs assay were performed to examine the deposition of GAG. Green florescent protein (GFP was used to track PD-MSC. Conditioned medium of PD-MSCs was collected to study the soluble factors. Gene expression of fibrochondrocytes cultured in conditioned medium was tested by quantitative PCR (qPCR. Results. Increased proliferation of TMJ-CH was observed in coculture pellets when compared to monoculture. Enhanced GAG production in cocultures was shown by histology and GAG quantification. Tracing of GFP revealed the fact that PD-MSC disappears after coculture with TMJ-CH for 3 weeks. In addition, conditioned medium of PD-MSC was also shown to increase the proliferation and GAG deposition of TMJ-CH. Meanwhile, results of qPCR demonstrated that conditioned medium enhanced the expression levels of matrix-related genes in TMJ-CH. Conclusions. Results from this study support the mechanism of MSC-chondrocyte interaction, in which MSCs act as secretor of soluble factors that stimulate proliferation and extracellular matrix deposition of chondrocytes.

  20. Periodontal ligament mesenchymal stromal cells increase proliferation and glycosaminoglycans formation of temporomandibular joint derived fibrochondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianli; Guo, Fujun; Mi, Jianqiang; Zhang, Zhiye

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders are common disease in maxillofacial surgery. The aim of this study is to regenerate fibrocartilage with a mixture of TMJ fibrochondrocytes and periodontal ligament derived mesenchymal stem cells (PD-MSCs). Fibrochondrocytes and PD-MSC were cocultured (ratio 1 : 1) for 3 weeks. Histology and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) assay were performed to examine the deposition of GAG. Green florescent protein (GFP) was used to track PD-MSC. Conditioned medium of PD-MSCs was collected to study the soluble factors. Gene expression of fibrochondrocytes cultured in conditioned medium was tested by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Increased proliferation of TMJ-CH was observed in coculture pellets when compared to monoculture. Enhanced GAG production in cocultures was shown by histology and GAG quantification. Tracing of GFP revealed the fact that PD-MSC disappears after coculture with TMJ-CH for 3 weeks. In addition, conditioned medium of PD-MSC was also shown to increase the proliferation and GAG deposition of TMJ-CH. Meanwhile, results of qPCR demonstrated that conditioned medium enhanced the expression levels of matrix-related genes in TMJ-CH. Results from this study support the mechanism of MSC-chondrocyte interaction, in which MSCs act as secretor of soluble factors that stimulate proliferation and extracellular matrix deposition of chondrocytes.

  1. Glycosaminoglycan Monosaccharide Blocks Analysis by Quantum Mechanics, Molecular Dynamics, and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

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    Sergey A. Samsonov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs play an important role in many biological processes in the extracellular matrix. In a theoretical approach, structures of monosaccharide building blocks of natural GAGs and their sulfated derivatives were optimized by a B3LYP6311ppdd//B3LYP/6-31+G(d method. The dependence of the observed conformational properties on the applied methodology is described. NMR chemical shifts and proton-proton spin-spin coupling constants were calculated using the GIAO approach and analyzed in terms of the method's accuracy and sensitivity towards the influence of sulfation, O1-methylation, conformations of sugar ring, and ω dihedral angle. The net sulfation of the monosaccharides was found to be correlated with the 1H chemical shifts in the methyl group of the N-acetylated saccharides both theoretically and experimentally. The ω dihedral angle conformation populations of free monosaccharides and monosaccharide blocks within polymeric GAG molecules were calculated by a molecular dynamics approach using the GLYCAM06 force field and compared with the available NMR and quantum mechanical data. Qualitative trends for the impact of sulfation and ring conformation on the chemical shifts and proton-proton spin-spin coupling constants were obtained and discussed in terms of the potential and limitations of the computational methodology used to be complementary to NMR experiments and to assist in experimental data assignment.

  2. Exopolysaccharides produced by marine bacteria and their applications as glycosaminoglycan-like molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbarre-Ladrat, Christine; Sinquin, Corinne; Lebellenger, Lou; Zykwinska, Agata; Colliec-Jouault, Sylvia

    2014-10-01

    Although polysaccharides are ubiquitous and the most abundant renewable bio-components, their studies, covered by the glycochemistry and glycobiology fields, remain a challenge due to their high molecular diversity and complexity. Polysaccharides are industrially used in food products; human therapeutics fall into a more recent research field and pharmaceutical industry is looking for more and more molecules with enhanced activities. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) found in animal tissues play a critical role in cellular physiological and pathological processes as they bind many cellular components. Therefore, they present a great potential for the design and preparation of therapeutic drugs. On the other hand, microorganisms producing exopolysaccharides (EPS) are renewable resources meeting well the actual industrial demand. In particular, the diversity of marine microorganisms is still largely unexplored offering great opportunities to discover high value products such as new molecules and biocatalysts. EPS-producing bacteria from the marine environment will be reviewed with a focus on marine-derived EPS from bacteria isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Information on chemical and structural features, putative pathways of biosynthesis, novel strategies for chemical and enzymatic modifications and potentialities in the biomedical field will be provided. An integrated approach should be used to increase the basic knowledge on these compounds and their applications; new clean environmentally friendly processes for the production of carbohydrate bio-active compounds should also be proposed for a sustainable industry.

  3. Exopolysaccharides produced by marine bacteria and their applications as glycosaminoglycan-like molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbarre-Ladrat, Christine; Sinquin, Corinne; Lebellenger, Lou; Zykwinska, Agata; Colliec-Jouault, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Although polysaccharides are ubiquitous and the most abundant renewable bio-components, their studies, covered by the glycochemistry and glycobiology fields, remain a challenge due to their high molecular diversity and complexity. Polysaccharides are industrially used in food products; human therapeutics fall into a more recent research field and pharmaceutical industry is looking for more and more molecules with enhanced activities. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) found in animal tissues play a critical role in cellular physiological and pathological processes as they bind many cellular components. Therefore, they present a great potential for the design and preparation of therapeutic drugs. On the other hand, microorganisms producing exopolysaccharides (EPS) are renewable resources meeting well the actual industrial demand. In particular, the diversity of marine microorganisms is still largely unexplored offering great opportunities to discover high value products such as new molecules and biocatalysts. EPS-producing bacteria from the marine environment will be reviewed with a focus on marine-derived EPS from bacteria isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Information on chemical and structural features, putative pathways of biosynthesis, novel strategies for chemical and enzymatic modifications and potentialities in the biomedical field will be provided. An integrated approach should be used to increase the basic knowledge on these compounds and their applications; new clean environmentally friendly processes for the production of carbohydrate bioactive compounds should also be proposed for a sustainable industry. PMID:25340049

  4. Optimization of papain hydrolysis conditions for release of glycosaminoglycans from the chicken keel cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vien, Nguyen Thi; Nguyen, Pham Bao; Cuong, Lam Duc; An, Trinh Thi Thua; Dao, Dong Thi Anh

    2017-09-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are natural biocompounds which join to construct cartilage tissuses, it can be extracted from cartilage of sharks, pigs, cows, chickens, etc. GAGs contain a Chondroitin sulfate (CS) content which is a supplement of functional food used for preventing and supporting treatment of arthritis and eye diseases. Therefore, the GAGs extraction from byproducts of the industry of cattle and poultry slaughter to identify the CS content by papain enzyme is necessary. In this study, the optimal hydrolysis conditions were obtained by response surface methodology (RSM). The independent variables were coded as: pH (x1), enzyme concentration (x2), incubation temperature (x3) and hydrolysis time (x4). The results of the analysis of variance (ANOVA) shown that the variables actively affected GAGs content. The optimal conditions of hydrolysis were derived at pH of 7.1, ratio of enzyme per substances of 0.62% w/wpo, temperature of 65°C and hydrolysis time of 230 minutes, GAGs content reached 14.3% of the dry matter of raw material. Analyzes by HPLC revealed that 56.17% of the dry preparations of GAGs were CS compound, were equivalent to 8.11% of the dry matter of chicken keel cartilage. Molecular weight of the dry preparations GAGs was 259.6 kDa. The dry preparations included the contents of moisture 12.2%, protein 8.42%, lipid 0%, ash 10.03% and extracted GAGs 69.35%.

  5. Cell-Penetrating Ability of Peptide Hormones: Key Role of Glycosaminoglycans Clustering

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    Armelle Tchoumi Neree

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, the potential usage of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs for the intracellular delivery of various molecules has prompted the identification of novel peptidic identities. However, cytotoxic effects and unpredicted immunological responses have often limited the use of various CPP sequences in the clinic. To overcome these issues, the usage of endogenous peptides appears as an appropriate alternative approach. The hormone pituitary adenylate-cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP38 has been recently identified as a novel and very efficient CPP. This 38-residue polycationic peptide is a member of the secretin/glucagon/growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH superfamily, with which PACAP38 shares high structural and conformational homologies. In this study, we evaluated the cell-penetrating ability of cationic peptide hormones in the context of the expression of cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs. Our results indicated that among all peptides evaluated, PACAP38 was unique for its potent efficiency of cellular uptake. Interestingly, the abilities of the peptides to reach the intracellular space did not correlate with their binding affinities to sulfated GAGs, but rather to their capacity to clustered heparin in vitro. This study demonstrates that the uptake efficiency of a given cationic CPP does not necessarily correlate with its affinity to sulfated GAGs and that its ability to cluster GAGs should be considered for the identification of novel peptidic sequences with potent cellular penetrating properties.

  6. New roles of glycosaminoglycans in α-synuclein aggregation in a cellular model of Parkinson disease.

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    Sonia Lehri-Boufala

    Full Text Available The causes of Parkinson disease (PD remain mysterious, although some evidence supports mitochondrial dysfunctions and α-synuclein accumulation in Lewy bodies as major events. The abnormal accumulation of α-synuclein has been associated with a deficiency in the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. Cathepsin D (cathD, the major lysosomal protease responsible of α-synuclein degradation was described to be up-regulated in PD model. As glycosaminoglycans (GAGs regulate cathD activity, and have been recently suggested to participate in PD physiopathology, we investigated their role in α-synuclein accumulation by their intracellular regulation of cathD activity. In a classical neuroblastoma cell model of PD induced by MPP+, the genetic expression of GAGs-biosynthetic enzymes was modified, leading to an increase of GAGs amounts whereas intracellular level of α-synuclein increased. The absence of sulfated GAGs increased intracellular cathD activity and limited α-synuclein accumulation. GAGs effects on cathD further suggested that specific sequences or sulfation patterns could be responsible for this regulation. The present study identifies, for the first time, GAGs as new regulators of the lysosome degradation pathway, regulating cathD activity and affecting two main biological processes, α-synuclein aggregation and apoptosis. Finally, this opens new insights into intracellular GAGs functions and new fields of investigation for glycobiological approaches in PD and neurobiology.

  7. Sulphated glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans in the developing vertebral column of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannesson, Kirsten O; Ytteborg, Elisabeth; Takle, Harald; Enersen, Grethe; Bæverfjord, Grete; Pedersen, Mona E

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, the distribution of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the developing vertebral column of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) at 700, 900, 1100 and 1400 d° was examined by light microscopy. The mineralization pattern was outlined by Alizarin red S and soft structures by Alcian blue. The temporal and spatial distribution patterns of different types of GAGs: chondroitin-4-sulphate/dermatan sulphate, chondroitin-6-sulphate, chondroitin-0-sulphate and keratan sulphate were addressed by immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies against the different GAGs. The specific pattern obtained with the different antibodies suggests a unique role of the different GAG types in pattern formation and mineralization. In addition, the distribution of the different GAG types in normal and malformed vertebral columns from 15 g salmon was compared. A changed expression pattern of GAGs was found in the malformed vertebrae, indicating the involvement of these molecules during the pathogenesis. The molecular size of proteoglycans (PGs) in the vertebrae carrying GAGs was analysed with western blotting, and mRNA transcription of the PGs aggrecan, decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin and lumican by real-time qPCR. Our study reveals the importance of GAGs in development of vertebral column also in Atlantic salmon and indicates that a more comprehensive approach is necessary to completely understand the processes involved.

  8. The Good the Bad and the Ugly of Glycosaminoglycans in Tissue Engineering Applications

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    Bethanie I. Ayerst

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available High sulfation, low cost, and the status of heparin as an already FDA- and EMA- approved product, mean that its inclusion in tissue engineering (TE strategies is becoming increasingly popular. However, the use of heparin may represent a naïve approach. This is because tissue formation is a highly orchestrated process, involving the temporal expression of numerous growth factors and complex signaling networks. While heparin may enhance the retention and activity of certain growth factors under particular conditions, its binding ‘promiscuity’ means that it may also inhibit other factors that, for example, play an important role in tissue maintenance and repair. Within this review we focus on articular cartilage, highlighting the complexities and highly regulated processes that are involved in its formation, and the challenges that exist in trying to effectively engineer this tissue. Here we discuss the opportunities that glycosaminoglycans (GAGs may provide in advancing this important area of regenerative medicine, placing emphasis on the need to move away from the common use of heparin, and instead focus research towards the utility of specific GAG preparations that are able to modulate the activity of growth factors in a more controlled and defined manner, with less off-target effects.

  9. Heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans modulate migration and survival in zebrafish primordial germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ke-Hsuan; Liu, I-Hsuan

    2014-06-01

    Early in embryonic development, primordial germ cells (PGCs) are specified and migrate from the site of their origin to where the gonad develops, following a specific route. Heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (HS-GAGs) are ubiquitous in extracellular matrix and the cell surface and have long been speculated to play a role during the migration of PGCs. In line with this speculation, whole-mount immunohistochemistry revealed the existence of HS-GAGs in the vicinity of migrating PGCs in early zebrafish embryos. To examine the roles of HS-GAGs during PGC migration, zebrafish heparanase 1 (hpse1), which degrades HS-GAGs, was cloned and overexpressed specifically in PGCs. The guidance signal for the migration of PGCs was disrupted with the overexpression of hpse1, as cluster formation and marginal localization at the blastoderm were significantly perturbed at 6 hours postfertilization. Furthermore, the number of PGCs was significantly decreased with the lack of vicinal HS-GAGs, as observed in the whole-mount in situ hybridization and quantitative PCR of the PGC marker gene vasa. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling indicated significantly increased apoptosis in PGCs overexpressing hpse1, suggesting that HS-GAGs contribute to the maintenance of PGC survival. In conclusion, HS-GAGs play multifaceted roles in PGCs during migration and are required both for guidance signals and multiplication of PGCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) can bind heparin and other glycosaminoglycans through its RNase active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent, Marc; Nogués, M Victòria; Boix, Ester

    2011-01-01

    The eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) is an eosinophil-secreted RNase involved in the immune host defense, with a cytotoxic activity against a wide range of pathogens. During inflammation and eosinophilia disorders, ECP is secreted to the inflammation area, where it would contribute to the immune response. ECP secretion causes also severe damage to the host own tissues. ECP presents a high affinity for heparin and this property might be crucial for its immunomodulating properties, antipathogen action, and its toxicity against eukaryotic cells. ECP, also known as human RNase 3, belongs to the mammalian RNase A superfamily and its RNase activity is required for some of its biological properties. We have now proven that ECP heparin binding affinity depends on its RNase catalytic site, as the enzymatic activity is blocked by heparin. We have applied molecular modeling to analyze ECP binding to heparin representative probes, and identified protein residues at the catalytic and substrate binding sites that could contribute to the interaction. ECP affinity for heparin and other negatively charged glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) can explain not only its binding to the eukaryote cells glycocalix but also the reported high affinity for the specific carbohydrates at bacteria cell wall, promoting its antimicrobial action. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Glycosaminoglycan-Mediated Downstream Signaling of CXCL8 Binding to Endothelial Cells

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    Rupert Derler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The recruitment of leukocytes, mediated by endothelium bound chemokine gradients, is a vital process in inflammation. The highly negatively charged, unbranched polysaccharide family of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, such as heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate mediate chemokine immobilization. Specifically the binding of CXCL8 (interleukin 8 to GAGs on endothelial cell surfaces is known to regulate neutrophil recruitment. Currently, it is not clear if binding of CXCL8 to GAGs leads to endothelial downstream signaling in addition to the typical CXCR1/CXCR2 (C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 1 and 2-mediated signaling which activates neutrophils. Here we have investigated the changes in protein expression of human microvascular endothelial cells induced by CXCL8. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα stimulation was used to mimic an inflammatory state which allowed us to identify syndecan-4 (SDC4 as the potential proteoglycan co-receptor of CXCL8 by gene array, real-time PCR and flow cytometry experiments. Enzymatic GAG depolymerization via heparinase III and chondroitinase ABC was used to emulate the effect of glycocalyx remodeling on CXCL8-induced endothelial downstream signaling. Proteomic analyses showed changes in the expression pattern of a number of endothelial proteins such as Zyxin and Caldesmon involved in cytoskeletal organization, cell adhesion and cell mobility. These results demonstrate for the first time a potential role of GAG-mediated endothelial downstream signaling in addition to the well-known CXCL8-CXCR1/CXCR2 signaling pathways in neutrophils.

  12. Synthetic Oligosaccharide Libraries and Microarray Technology: A Powerful Combination for the Success of Current Glycosaminoglycan Interactomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomin, Vitor H; Wang, Xu

    2017-11-20

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are extracellular matrix and/or cell-surface sulfated glycans crucial to the regulation of various signaling proteins, the functions of which are essential in many pathophysiological systems. Because structural heterogeneity is high in GAG chains and purification is difficult, the use of structurally defined GAG oligosaccharides from natural sources as molecular models in both biophysical and pharmacological assays is limited. To overcome this obstacle, GAG-like oligosaccharides of well-defined structures are currently being synthesized by chemical and/or enzymatic means in many research groups around the world. These synthetic GAG oligosaccharides serve as useful molecular tools in studies of GAG-protein interactions. In this review, besides discussing the commonest routes used for the synthesis of GAG oligosaccharides, we also survey some libraries of these synthetic models currently available for research and discuss their activities in interaction studies with functional proteins, especially through the microarray approach. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Localization and characterization of sulfated glycosaminoglycans in the body of the earthworm Eisenia andrei (Oligochaeta, Annelida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Hanna B F; Mateus, Samuel H; Ferreira, Laina C; Ribeiro, Cristiane C; Palumbo-Junior, Antonio; Domingos, Maria-Aparecida O; Cinelli, Leonardo P; Costa-Filho, Adilson; Nasciutti, Luiz E; Silva, Luiz-Claudio F

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the compartmental distribution of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (S-GAGs) in adults and their occurrence during the development of the earthworm Eisenia andrei. S-GAGs were extracted from the body of earthworms to identify their composition and the time of their appearance and disappearance in embryonic, newborn, juvenile, and adult earthworms. S-GAGs were also analyzed in earthworm tissue using histochemical metachromatic staining. Purified S-GAGs obtained from the whole body of adult earthworms were composed of chondroitin sulfate (CS) and heparan sulfate (HS). In addition, an unknown, highly sulfated polysaccharide (HSP) was detected. In order to characterize specifically the S-GAG composition in the integument, earthworms were dissected and as much as possible of their viscera was removed. HS and CS were the predominant sulfated polysaccharides in the dissected integument, whereas in viscera, CS, HS and the HSP were found in proportions similar to those identified in the body. The qualitative S-GAG composition in juveniles was similar to that obtained from adult earthworms. CS was the predominant S-GAG in newborn earthworms, accompanied by lesser amounts of HS and by tiny amounts of the HSP. This study provides a detailed descriptive account of the pattern of S-GAG synthesis during development, and also the characterization of the tissue distribution of these compounds in the body of earthworms. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of a Glycosaminoglycan Derived, Selectin Targeting Anti-Adhesive Coating to Treat Endothelial Cell Dysfunction

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    James R. Wodicka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cell (EC dysfunction is associated with many disease states including deep vein thrombosis (DVT, chronic kidney disease, sepsis and diabetes. Loss of the glycocalyx, a thin glycosaminoglycan (GAG-rich layer on the EC surface, is a key feature of endothelial dysfunction and increases exposure of EC adhesion molecules such as selectins, which are involved in platelet binding to ECs. Once bound, platelets cause thrombus formation and an increased inflammatory response. We have developed a GAG derived, selectin targeting anti-adhesive coating (termed EC-SEAL consisting of a dermatan sulfate backbone and multiple selectin-binding peptides designed to bind to inflamed endothelium and prevent platelet binding to create a more quiescent endothelial state. Multiple EC-SEAL variants were evaluated and the lead variant was found to preferentially bind to selectin-expressing ECs and smooth muscle cells (SMCs and inhibit platelet binding and activation in a dose-dependent manner. In an in vivo model of DVT, treatment with the lead variant resulted in reduced thrombus formation. These results indicate that EC-SEAL has promise as a potential therapeutic in the treatment of endothelial dysfunction.

  15. The murid herpesvirus-4 gH/gL binds to glycosaminoglycans.

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    Laurent Gillet

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The first contact a virus makes with cells is an important determinant of its tropism. Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4 is highly dependent on glycosaminoglycans (GAGs for cell binding. Its first contact is therefore likely to involve a GAG-binding virion glycoprotein. We have previously identified two such proteins, gp70 and gp150. Gp70 binds strongly to GAGs. However, deleting it makes little difference to MuHV-4 cell binding or GAG-dependence. Deleting gp150, by contrast, frees MuHV-4 from GAG dependence. This implies that GAGs normally displace gp150 to allow GAG-independent cell binding. But the gp150 GAG interaction is weak, and so would seem unlikely to make an effective first contact. Since neither gp70 nor gp150 matches the expected profile of a first contact glycoprotein, our understanding of MuHV-4 GAG interactions must be incomplete. Here we relate the seemingly disconnected gp70 and gp150 GAG interactions by showing that the MuHV-4 gH/gL also binds to GAGs. gH/gL-blocking and gp70-blocking antibodies individually had little effect on cell binding, but together were strongly inhibitory. Thus, there was redundancy in GAG binding between gp70 and gH/gL. Gp150-deficient MuHV-4 largely resisted blocks to gp70 and gH/gL binding, consistent with its GAG independence. The failure of wild-type MuHV-4 to do the same argues that gp150 is normally engaged only down-stream of gp70 or gH/gL. MuHV-4 GAG dependence is consequently two-fold: gp70 or gH/gL binding provides virions with a vital first foothold, and gp150 is then engaged to reveal GAG-independent binding.

  16. Xylosyltransferase-I regulates glycosaminoglycan synthesis during the pathogenic process of human osteoarthritis.

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    Narayanan Venkatesan

    Full Text Available Loss of glycosaminoglycan (GAG chains of proteoglycans (PGs is an early event of osteoarthritis (OA resulting in cartilage degradation that has been previously demonstrated in both huma and experimental OA models. However, the mechanism of GAG loss and the role of xylosyltransferase-I (XT-I that initiates GAG biosynthesis onto PG molecules in the pathogenic process of human OA are unknown. In this study, we have characterized XT-I expression and activity together with GAG synthesis in human OA cartilage obtained from different regions of the same joint, defined as "normal", "late-stage" or adjacent to "late-stage". The results showed that GAG synthesis and content increased in cartilage from areas flanking OA lesions compared to cartilage from macroscopically "normal" unaffected regions, while decreased in "late-stage" OA cartilage lesions. This increase in anabolic state was associated with a marked upregulation of XT-I expression and activity in cartilage "next to lesion" while a decrease in the "late-stage" OA cartilage. Importantly, XT-I inhibition by shRNA or forced-expression with a pCMV-XT-I construct correlated with the modulation of GAG anabolism in human cartilage explants. The observation that XT-I gene expression was down-regulated by IL-1β and up-regulated by TGF-β1 indicates that these cytokines may play a role in regulating GAG content in human OA. Noteworthy, expression of IL-1β receptor (IL-1R1 was down-regulated whereas that of TGF-β1 was up-regulated in early OA cartilage. Theses observations may account for upregulation of XT-I and sustained GAG synthesis prior to the development of cartilage lesions during the pathogenic process of OA.

  17. Xylosyltransferase-I regulates glycosaminoglycan synthesis during the pathogenic process of human osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Narayanan; Barré, Lydia; Bourhim, Mustapha; Magdalou, Jacques; Mainard, Didier; Netter, Patrick; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie; Ouzzine, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Loss of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains of proteoglycans (PGs) is an early event of osteoarthritis (OA) resulting in cartilage degradation that has been previously demonstrated in both huma and experimental OA models. However, the mechanism of GAG loss and the role of xylosyltransferase-I (XT-I) that initiates GAG biosynthesis onto PG molecules in the pathogenic process of human OA are unknown. In this study, we have characterized XT-I expression and activity together with GAG synthesis in human OA cartilage obtained from different regions of the same joint, defined as "normal", "late-stage" or adjacent to "late-stage". The results showed that GAG synthesis and content increased in cartilage from areas flanking OA lesions compared to cartilage from macroscopically "normal" unaffected regions, while decreased in "late-stage" OA cartilage lesions. This increase in anabolic state was associated with a marked upregulation of XT-I expression and activity in cartilage "next to lesion" while a decrease in the "late-stage" OA cartilage. Importantly, XT-I inhibition by shRNA or forced-expression with a pCMV-XT-I construct correlated with the modulation of GAG anabolism in human cartilage explants. The observation that XT-I gene expression was down-regulated by IL-1β and up-regulated by TGF-β1 indicates that these cytokines may play a role in regulating GAG content in human OA. Noteworthy, expression of IL-1β receptor (IL-1R1) was down-regulated whereas that of TGF-β1 was up-regulated in early OA cartilage. Theses observations may account for upregulation of XT-I and sustained GAG synthesis prior to the development of cartilage lesions during the pathogenic process of OA.

  18. Xylosyltransferase-I Regulates Glycosaminoglycan Synthesis during the Pathogenic Process of Human Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Narayanan; Barré, Lydia; Bourhim, Mustapha; Magdalou, Jacques; Mainard, Didier; Netter, Patrick; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie; Ouzzine, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Loss of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains of proteoglycans (PGs) is an early event of osteoarthritis (OA) resulting in cartilage degradation that has been previously demonstrated in both huma and experimental OA models. However, the mechanism of GAG loss and the role of xylosyltransferase-I (XT-I) that initiates GAG biosynthesis onto PG molecules in the pathogenic process of human OA are unknown. In this study, we have characterized XT-I expression and activity together with GAG synthesis in human OA cartilage obtained from different regions of the same joint, defined as “normal”, “late-stage” or adjacent to “late-stage”. The results showed that GAG synthesis and content increased in cartilage from areas flanking OA lesions compared to cartilage from macroscopically “normal” unaffected regions, while decreased in “late-stage” OA cartilage lesions. This increase in anabolic state was associated with a marked upregulation of XT-I expression and activity in cartilage “next to lesion” while a decrease in the “late-stage” OA cartilage. Importantly, XT-I inhibition by shRNA or forced-expression with a pCMV-XT-I construct correlated with the modulation of GAG anabolism in human cartilage explants. The observation that XT-I gene expression was down-regulated by IL-1β and up-regulated by TGF-β1 indicates that these cytokines may play a role in regulating GAG content in human OA. Noteworthy, expression of IL-1β receptor (IL-1R1) was down-regulated whereas that of TGF-β1 was up-regulated in early OA cartilage. Theses observations may account for upregulation of XT-I and sustained GAG synthesis prior to the development of cartilage lesions during the pathogenic process of OA. PMID:22479506

  19. Biomimetic fiber assembled gradient hydrogel to engineer glycosaminoglycan enriched and mineralized cartilage: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Neethu; Wilson, Jijo; Joseph, Dexy; Vaikkath, Dhanesh; Nair, Prabha D

    2015-12-01

    The study investigated the potential of electrospun fiber assembled hydrogel, with physical gradients of chondroitin sulfate (CS) and sol-gel-derived bioactive glass (BG), to engineer hyaline and mineralized cartilage in a single 3D system. Electrospun poly(caprolactone) (PCL) fibers incorporated with 0.1% w/w of CS (CSL) and 0.5% w/w of CS (CSH), 2.4% w/w of BG (BGL) and 12.5% w/w of BG (BGH) were fabricated. The CS showed a sustained release up to 3 days from CSL and 14 days from CSH fibers. Chondrocytes secreted hyaline like matrix with higher sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG), collagen type II and aggrecan on CSL and CSH fibers. Mineralization was observed on BGL and BGH fibers when incubated in simulated body fluid for 14 days. Chondrocytes cultured on these fibers secreted a mineralized matrix that consisted of sGAG, hypertrophic proteins, collagen type X, and osteocalcin. The CS and BG incorporated PCL fiber mats were assembled in an agarose-gelatin hydrogel to generate a 3D hybrid scaffold. The signals in the fibers diffused and generated continuous opposing gradients of CS (chondrogenic signal) and BG (mineralization) in the hydrogel. The chondrocytes were encapsulated in hybrid scaffolds; live dead assay at 48 h showed viable cells. Cells maintained their phenotype and secreted specific extracellular matrix (ECM) in response to signals within the hydrogel. Continuous opposing gradients of sGAG enriched and mineralized ECM were observed surrounding each cell clusters on gradient hydrogel after 14 days of culture in response to the physical gradients of raw materials CS and BG. A construct with gradient mineralization might accelerate integration to subchondral bone during in vivo regeneration. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Enterovirus 71 uses cell surface heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan as an attachment receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chee Wah; Poh, Chit Laa; Sam, I-Ching; Chan, Yoke Fun

    2013-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-71) infections are usually associated with mild hand, foot, and mouth disease in young children but have been reported to cause severe neurological complications with high mortality rates. To date, four EV-71 receptors have been identified, but inhibition of these receptors by antagonists did not completely abolish EV-71 infection, implying that there is an as yet undiscovered receptor(s). Since EV-71 has a wide range of tissue tropisms, we hypothesize that EV-71 infections may be facilitated by using receptors that are widely expressed in all cell types, such as heparan sulfate. In this study, heparin, polysulfated dextran sulfate, and suramin were found to significantly prevent EV-71 infection. Heparin inhibited infection by all the EV-71 strains tested, including those with a single-passage history. Neutralization of the cell surface anionic charge by polycationic poly-d-lysine and blockage of heparan sulfate by an anti-heparan sulfate peptide also inhibited EV-71 infection. Interference with heparan sulfate biosynthesis either by sodium chlorate treatment or through transient knockdown of N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 and exostosin-1 expression reduced EV-71 infection in RD cells. Enzymatic removal of cell surface heparan sulfate by heparinase I/II/III inhibited EV-71 infection. Furthermore, the level of EV-71 attachment to CHO cell lines that are variably deficient in cell surface glycosaminoglycans was significantly lower than that to wild-type CHO cells. Direct binding of EV-71 particles to heparin-Sepharose columns under physiological salt conditions was demonstrated. We conclude that EV-71 infection requires initial binding to heparan sulfate as an attachment receptor.

  1. Apoptosis induced by granzyme B-glycosaminoglycan complexes: implications for granule-mediated apoptosis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, J P; Spaeny-Dekking, L H; Wang, B; Seth, P; Hack, C E; Froelich, C J

    1999-05-01

    Lymphocyte granule-mediated apoptosis occurs by perforin-mediated intracellular delivery of granule-associated serine proteases (granzymes). A granule-associated proteoglycan, namely serglycin, that contains chondroitin 4-sulfate (CS) glycosaminoglycans is present in the granules of cytotoxic cells. Serglycin acts as scaffold for packaging the positively charged granzymes and probably chaperones the proteases secreted extracellularly. To learn how the interaction of granzyme B (GrB) with serglycin might influence the apoptotic potential of this proteases, we have evaluated a model system where desalted CS is combined with isolated human granzyme. CS-GrB complexes were very stable, remaining undissociated in salt concentrations upwards to 500 mM (pH 7.4). On the basis of a capture enzyme immunoassay that accurately detects GrB, equivalent amounts of active free and CS-GrB, delivered by perforin or adenovirus, efficiently induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells and produced a similar time-dependent increase in caspase-3-like activity. CS-GrB processed isolated caspases-3 and -7 less efficiently than free granzyme. However, when added to cytosolic extracts, rates of processing were nearly equivalent for the two forms, suggesting cationic GrB may nonspecifically bind cytosolic proteins, leading to reduce proteolytic activity. Finally, GrB was found to be exocytosed from lymphocyte-activated killer cells as a neutral, high macromolecular weight complex, which possessed apoptotic activity. Collectively, the results indicate that neutral, high m.w. GrB has the capacity to induce cell death and will be useful to study the mechanism of cytotoxic cell-mediated apoptosis in vitro.

  2. Negative Electron Transfer Dissociation Sequencing of Increasingly Sulfated Glycosaminoglycan Oligosaccharides on an Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Franklin E.; Riley, Nicholas M.; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.; Amster, I. Jonathan

    2017-09-01

    The structural characterization of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) carbohydrates remains an important target for analytical chemists attributable to challenges introduced by the natural complexity of these mixtures and the defined need for molecular-level details to elucidate biological structure-function relationships. Tandem mass spectrometry has proven to be the most powerful technique for this purpose. Previously, electron detachment dissociation (EDD), in comparison to other methods of ion activation, has been shown to provide the largest number of useful cleavages for de novo sequencing of GAG oligosaccharides, but such experiments are restricted to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers (FTICR-MS). Negative electron transfer dissociation (NETD) provides similar fragmentation results, and can be achieved on any mass spectrometry platform that is designed to accommodate ion-ion reactions. Here, we examine for the first time the effectiveness of NETD-Orbitrap mass spectrometry for the structural analysis of GAG oligosaccharides. Compounds ranging in size from tetrasaccharides to decasaccharides were dissociated by NETD, producing both glycosidic and cross-ring cleavages that enabled the location of sulfate modifications. The highly-sulfated, heparin-like synthetic GAG, ArixtraTM, was also successfully sequenced by NETD. In comparison to other efforts to sequence GAG chains without fully ionized sulfate constituents, the occurrence of sulfate loss peaks is minimized by judicious precursor ion selection. The results compare quite favorably to prior results with electron detachment dissociation (EDD). Significantly, the duty cycle of the NETD experiment is sufficiently short to make it an effective tool for on-line separations, presenting a straightforward path for selective, high-throughput analysis of GAG mixtures. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Prognostic value of plasma and urine glycosaminoglycan scores in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Gatto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The prognosis of metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC vastly improved since the introduction of antiangiogenic targeted therapy. However, it is still unclear which biological processes underlie ccRCC aggressiveness and affect prognosis. Here, we checked whether a recently discovered systems biomarker based on plasmatic or urinary measurements of glycosaminoglycans aggregated into diagnostic scores correlated with ccRCC prognosis.Thirty-one patients with a diagnosis of ccRCC (23 metastatic were prospectively enrolled and their urine and plasma biomarker scores were correlated to progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS as either a dichotomous (Low vs. High or a continuous variable in a multivariate survival analysis.The survival difference between High vs. Low-scored patients was significant in the case of urine scores (2-year PFS rate = 53.3% vs. 100%, p = 310-4 and 2-year OS rate = 73.3% vs. 100%, p = 0.0078 and in the case of OS for plasma scores (2-year PFS rate = 60% vs. 84%, p = 0.0591 and 2-year OS rate = 66.7% vs. 90%, p = 0.0206. In multivariate analysis, the urine biomarker score was an independent predictor of PFS (HR: 4.62, 95% CI: 1.66 to 12.83, p = 0.003 and OS (HR: 10.13, 95% CI: 1.80 to 57.04, p = 0.009.This is the first report on an association between plasma or urine GAG scores and the prognosis of ccRCC patients. Prospective trials validating the prognostic and predictive role of this novel systems biomarker are warranted.

  4. Contribution of glycosaminoglycans to the microstructural integrity of fibrillar and fiber crimps in tendons and ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, Marco; De Pasquale, Viviana; Martini, Désirée; Quaranta, Marilisa; Macciocca, Maria; Dionisi, Alessio; Ottani, Vittoria

    2010-10-01

    The biomechanical roles of both tendons and ligaments are fulfilled by the extracellular matrix of these tissues. In particular, tension is mainly transmitted and resisted by protein (collagen, elastin) fibers, whereas compression is opposed by water-soluble glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). GAGs spanning the interfibrillar spaces and interacting with fibrils through the interfibrillar proteoglycans also seem to play a part in transmitting and resisting tensile stresses. Both tendons and ligaments showing similar composition, but different functional roles and collagen array, exhibit periodic undulations of collagen fibers or crimps. Each crimp is composed of many knots of each single fibril or fibrillar crimps. Fibrillar and fiber crimps play a mechanical role in absorbing the initial loading during elongation of both tendons and ligaments, and in recoiling fibrils and fibers when tissues have to return to their original length. This study investigated whether GAGs covalently attached to proteoglycan core proteins directly affect the 3D microstructural integrity of fibrillar crimp regions and fiber crimps in both tendons and ligaments. Achilles tendons and medial collateral ligaments of the knee from eight female Sprague-Dawley rats (90 days old) incubated in a chondroitinase ABC solution to remove GAGs were observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). In addition, isolated fibrils of these tissues obtained by mechanical disruption were analyzed by a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Both Achilles tendons and medial collateral ligaments of the rats after chemical or mechanical removal of GAGs still showed crimps and fibrillar crimps comparable to tissues with a normal GAG content. All fibrils in the fibrillar crimp region always twisted leftwards, thus changing their running plane, and then sharply bent, changing their course on a new plane. These data suggest that GAGs do not affect structural integrity or fibrillar crimp functions that seem mainly related

  5. Characteristics of glycosaminoglycans in chicken eggshells and the influence of disaccharide composition on eggshell properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Sun, X.; Cai, C.; He, W.; Zhang, F.; Linhardt, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAG) are linear, highly negatively charged polysaccharides that may perform an important role in biomineralization. GAG were isolated from chicken eggshell membranes and calcified shells. Disaccharide compositional analysis was performed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. All 4 groups of GAG — hyaluronan (HA), keratan sulfate (KS), chondroitin sulfate (CS), and heparan sulfate (HS) — were detected in shell membranes and in calcified shells. HA was the most plentiful GAG in shell membranes, and CS was the most abundant in calcified shells. The CS present, in both membranes and calcified shells, consisted primarily of 6SCS-C, 4SCS-A, and 0SCS-0 disaccharides. Neither 4S6SCS-E nor 2SCS was detectable in shell components. Small amounts of 2S4SCS-B were detected in membranes and TriSCS, and 2S4SCS-B and 2S6SCS-D were detected in calcified shells. HS in calcified shells contained all disaccharides except for 2S6S. In shell membranes, HS contained primarily NS and 0S as well as small amounts of TriS, NS2S, NS6SHS, and 6S, but neither 2S6S nor 2S was detectable. The disaccharide composition of membrane CS, as well as membrane and calcified shell HS, were very similar in all eggshells. In contrast, the composition of calcified shell CS disaccharides was highly variable. In membranes, both HA and KS content showed a correlation with egg shape index. The 4SCS-A content correlated with eggshell strength, and 0SCS-0 correlated with eggshell strength and calcified shell thickness. HS content and its disaccharide composition showed no apparent correlation to properties of calcified shells. In calcified shells, only HS 6S correlated with egg shape index. This study suggests that GAG content and disaccharide composition of shell membranes might impact the quality of chicken eggshells. PMID:27287383

  6. Multitasking Human Lectin Galectin-3 Interacts with Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans and Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaga, Melanie L; Fan, Ni; Fueri, Ashli L; Brown, Robert K; Bandyopadhyay, Purnima; Dam, Tarun K

    2016-08-16

    Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) binding proteins (GAGBPs), including growth factors, cytokines, morphogens, and extracellular matrix proteins, interact with both free GAGs and those covalently linked to proteoglycans. Such interactions modulate a variety of cellular and extracellular events, such as cell growth, metastasis, morphogenesis, neural development, and inflammation. GAGBPs are structurally and evolutionarily unrelated proteins that typically recognize internal sequences of sulfated GAGs. GAGBPs are distinct from the other major group of glycan binding proteins, lectins. The multifunctional human galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a β-galactoside binding lectin that preferentially binds to N-acetyllactosamine moieties on glycoconjugates. Here, we demonstrate through microcalorimetric and spectroscopic data that Gal-3 possesses the characteristics of a GAGBP. Gal-3 interacts with unmodified heparin, chondroitin sulfate-A (CSA), -B (CSB), and -C (CSC) as well as chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). While heparin, CSA, and CSC bind with micromolar affinity, the affinity of CSPGs is nanomolar. Significantly, CSA, CSC, and a bovine CSPG were engaged in multivalent binding with Gal-3 and formed noncovalent cross-linked complexes with the lectin. Binding of sulfated GAGs was completely abolished when Gal-3 was preincubated with β-lactose. Cross-linking of Gal-3 by CSA, CSC, and the bovine CSPG was reversed by β-lactose. Both observations strongly suggest that GAGs primarily occupy the lactose/LacNAc binding site of Gal-3. Hill plot analysis of calorimetric data reveals that the binding of CSA, CSC, and a bovine CSPG to Gal-3 is associated with progressive negative cooperativity effects. Identification of Gal-3 as a GAGBP should help to reveal new functions of Gal-3 mediated by GAGs and proteoglycans.

  7. [Histochemical changes of the glycosaminoglycans in the uterine cervix of pregnant rats after local injection of hyaluronidase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Viviane Almeida de Alcântara; Luz, Mônica Regina Lourenço; Souza, Guilherme Negrão de; Fernandes Júnior, João Antão; Simões, Manuel de Jesus; Camano, Luiz; Souza, Eduardo de

    2008-07-01

    to study the histochemical changes related to the uterine cervix glycosaminoglycan of the albino female rat, after local administration of hyaluronidases at the end of pregnancy. ten female rats with positive pregnancy tests were randomly distributed in two numerically equal groups. The control group (Cg) was built up with rats that received a single dose of 1 mL of distilled water in the uterine cervix, under anesthesia, at the 18th pregnancy day. In the experimental group (Exg), the rats received 0.02 mL of hyaluronidase, diluted in 0.98 mL of distilled water (1 mL as a total), under the same conditions as the Cg. At the 20th pregnancy day, the rats were anesthetized once again and submitted to dissection, and the cervix prepared for histochemical study with alcian blue dye and its blockades (pH=0.5, pH=2.5, methylation and saponification). strongly positive reaction in the lamina propria (+3) has been seen in the Cg, and negative reaction in the Exg, with pH=0.5 alcian blue staining. With pH=2.5, staining has also been strongly positive (+4) in the Cg, and weakly positive (+1) in the Exg slide. After methylation, both groups have shown negative reaction, with pH=2.5 alcian blue staining. The lamina propria staining became negative after methylation in both groups, followed by saponification and enzymatic digestion on slide. there is clear predominance of sulphated glycosaminoglycans in the Cg as compared to the Exg and a small amount of identified carboxylated glycosaminoglycans in the Exg. The changes evidenced in the extracellular matrix have suggested that the hyaluronidase injected in the uterine cervix has promoted biochemical changes compatible with cervix maturation.

  8. Effect of heparin and related glycosaminoglycan on PDGF-induced lung fibroblast proliferation, chemotactic response and matrix metalloproteinases activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Sasaki

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast migration, proliferation, extacellular matrix protein synthesis and degradation are the key events in various biological and pathological processes in pulmonary fibrosis. In addition, biopsy specimens from the lungs of patients with plumomary fibrosis show increased numbers of mast cells which have metachromatic granules containing heparin, histamin and proteases. Little is known about how these products influence pulmonary fibrosis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of heparin and related glycosaminoglycans on PDGF-induced lung fibroblast proliferation and chemotactic response in vitro. In addition, we examined the effect of heparin on both the induction of matorix metalloproteinases (MMPs and MMPs activity in lung fibroblasts in vitro.

  9. Glycosaminoglycans enhance the fibrillation propensity of the ß2-microglobulin cleavage variant--¿K58-ß2m

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corlin, Dorthe B; Johnsen, Christina K; Nissen, Mogens H

    2010-01-01

    in the musculoskeletal system, but the initiating events leading to ß2m amyloidogenesis and the molecular mechanisms underlying amyloid fibril formation are still unclear. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and metal ions have been shown to be related to the onset of protein aggregation and to promote de novo fiber formation...... when heparan sulfate is present have increased length and diameter, and possess enhanced stability and seeding properties. However, when copper ions are present the fibrils are short, thin and less stable, and form at a slower rate. We suggest that heparan sulfate stabilizes the cleaved monomers...

  10. Autoradiographic visualization of glycoproteins and glycosaminoglycans in the epithelio-mesenchymal interface of developing mouse tooth germ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurmerinta, K. (Helsinki Univ. (Finland))

    1982-01-01

    The turnover of basement membrane macromolecules during tooth morphogenesis and odontoblast differentiation was examined by light microscopic autoradiography using /sup 3/H-fucose, /sup 35/S-sulfate and /sup 3/H-glucosamine. Marked incorporation into the basement membrane was found throughout the progressive development. Pulse-chase experiments and prelabeling of tissue components indicated that glycoproteins and glycosaminoglycans in the dental basement membrane are mainly derived from the enamel epithelium. During odontoblast differentiation, incorporation was increased at the epitheliomesenchymal interface at the site of differentiating mesenchymal cells. From these sites the label also disappeared rapidly. This suggests that the active remodeling of extracellular matrix is related to odontoblast differentiation.

  11. Identification of a glycosaminoglycan binding region of the alpha C protein that mediates entry of group B Streptococci into host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Miriam J; Filman, David J; Prophete, Gina A; Hogle, James M; Madoff, Lawrence C

    2007-04-06

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) frequently colonizes the human gastrointestinal and gynecological tracts and less frequently causes deep tissue infections. The transition between colonization and infection depends upon the ability of the organism to cross epithelial barriers. The alpha C protein (ACP) on the surface of GBS contributes to this process. A virulence factor in mouse models of infection, and prototype for a family of Gram-positive bacterial surface proteins, ACP facilitates GBS entry into human cervical epithelial cells and movement across cell layers. ACP binds to host cell surface glycosaminoglycan (GAG). From crystallography, we have identified a cluster of basic residues (BR2) that is a putative GAG binding area in Domain 2, near the junction of the N-terminal domain of ACP and the first of a series of tandem amino acid repeats. D2-R, a protein construct including this region, binds to cells similarly to full-length ACP. We now demonstrate that the predicted charged BR2 residues confer GAG binding; site-directed mutagenesis of these residues (Arg(172), Arg(185), or Lys(196)) eliminates cell-binding activity of construct D2-R. In addition, we have constructed a GBS strain expressing a variant ACP with a charge-neutralizing substitution at residue 185. This strain enters host cells less effectively than does the wild-type strain and similarly to an ACP null mutant strain. The point mutant strain transcytoses similarly to the wild-type strain. These data indicate that GAG-binding activity underlies ACP-mediated cellular entry of GBS. GBS entry into host cells and transcytosis of host cells may occur by distinct mechanisms.

  12. CXCL9-Derived Peptides Differentially Inhibit Neutrophil Migration In Vivo through Interference with Glycosaminoglycan Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Vanheule

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Several acute and chronic inflammatory diseases are driven by accumulation of activated leukocytes due to enhanced chemokine expression. In addition to specific G protein-coupled receptor-dependent signaling, chemokine–glycosaminoglycan (GAG interactions are important for chemokine activity in vivo. Therefore, the GAG–chemokine interaction has been explored as target for inhibition of chemokine activity. It was demonstrated that CXCL9(74-103 binds with high affinity to GAGs, competed with active chemokines for GAG binding and thereby inhibited CXCL8- and monosodium urate (MSU crystal-induced neutrophil migration to joints. To evaluate the affinity and specificity of the COOH-terminal part of CXCL9 toward different GAGs in detail, we chemically synthesized several COOH-terminal CXCL9 peptides including the shorter CXCL9(74-93. Compared to CXCL9(74-103, CXCL9(74-93 showed equally high affinity for heparin and heparan sulfate (HS, but lower affinity for binding to chondroitin sulfate (CS and cellular GAGs. Correspondingly, both peptides competed with equal efficiency for CXCL8 binding to heparin and HS but not to cellular GAGs. In addition, differences in anti-inflammatory activity between both peptides were detected in vivo. CXCL8-induced neutrophil migration to the peritoneal cavity and to the knee joint were inhibited with similar potency by intravenous or intraperitoneal injection of CXCL9(74-103 or CXCL9(74-93, but not by CXCL9(86-103. In contrast, neutrophil extravasation in the MSU crystal-induced gout model, in which multiple chemoattractants are induced, was not affected by CXCL9(74-93. This could be explained by (1 the lower affinity of CXCL9(74-93 for CS, the most abundant GAG in joints, and (2 by reduced competition with GAG binding of CXCL1, the most abundant ELR+ CXC chemokine in this gout model. Mechanistically we showed by intravital microscopy that fluorescent CXCL9(74-103 coats the vessel wall in vivo and that CXCL9

  13. A small molecule glycosaminoglycan mimetic blocks Plasmodium invasion of the mosquito midgut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derrick K Mathias

    Full Text Available Malaria transmission-blocking (T-B interventions are essential for malaria elimination. Small molecules that inhibit the Plasmodium ookinete-to-oocyst transition in the midgut of Anopheles mosquitoes, thereby blocking sporogony, represent one approach to achieving this goal. Chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans (CS-GAGs on the Anopheles gambiae midgut surface are putative ligands for Plasmodium falciparum ookinetes. We hypothesized that our synthetic polysulfonated polymer, VS1, acting as a decoy molecular mimetic of midgut CS-GAGs confers malaria T-B activity. In our study, VS1 repeatedly reduced midgut oocyst development by as much as 99% (P<0.0001 in mosquitoes fed with P. falciparum and Plasmodium berghei. Through direct-binding assays, we observed that VS1 bound to two critical ookinete micronemal proteins, each containing at least one von Willebrand factor A (vWA domain: (i circumsporozoite protein and thrombospondin-related anonymous protein-related protein (CTRP and (ii vWA domain-related protein (WARP. By immunofluorescence microscopy, we observed that VS1 stains permeabilized P. falciparum and P. berghei ookinetes but does not stain P. berghei CTRP knockouts or transgenic parasites lacking the vWA domains of CTRP while retaining the thrombospondin repeat region. We produced structural homology models of the first vWA domain of CTRP and identified, as expected, putative GAG-binding sites on CTRP that align closely with those predicted for the human vWA A1 domain and the Toxoplasma gondii MIC2 adhesin. Importantly, the models also identified patches of electropositive residues that may extend CTRP's GAG-binding motif and thus potentiate VS1 binding. Our molecule binds to a critical, conserved ookinete protein, CTRP, and exhibits potent malaria T-B activity. This study lays the framework for a high-throughput screen of existing libraries of safe compounds to identify those with potent T-B activity. We envision that such compounds when

  14. Extraction and Biochemical Characterization of Sulphated Glycosaminoglycans from Chicken Keel Cartilage

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    Humaira Majeed Khan1, Muhammad Ashraf2, Abu Saeed Hashmi3, Mansur-ud-Din Ahmad4 and Aftab Ahmad Anjum5

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to explore the potential and cheaper source of major and abundantly found sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs in chicken keel cartilage. Chicken is comparatively readily accessible to all the communities of Pakistan and its cartilages are the rich source of sulphated GAGs. The GAGs were extracted from prewashed and ground keel cartilages (n=3 of chicken using 3 M MgCl2, dialyzed, digested with papain, precipitated with three volumes of ethanol, and finally lyophilized to dry powder. The dry products were used for proximate analysis (carbohydrates 65.49±0.10, crude protein 12.82±0.26, ash 11.12±.56, moisture 9.88±0.32 and fat 0.69±0.14%. Dimethylmethylene blue binding (DMMB assay was performed to determine the quantity of total GAGs in each group of product and protein contents were estimated by Bradford method. Identification of extracted samples of GAGs was performed with FTIR spectrometer using KBr disc and purity of the samples was determined by SDS-PAGE. Quantity of total GAGs in extracted samples was 70.77±2.27% and estimated amount of protein was 4.64±0.29%. FTIR spectra of standard and samples of CS showed identical and characteristic peaks in finger print region. Finger print region revealed the presence of C-O-S, S=O, -COO, -C-C, R-SO2–R, -CONH2 and R-SO2-NH2 molecules. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed the presence of 77.8 and 50.5 kDa proteins in all extracted samples of GAGs. It can be concluded that chicken keel cartilage is the potential and cheap source of GAGs. Analysis by SDS-PAGE revealed that most of the non-collagen protein can be removed by three volumes of solvent extraction and FTIR is an advance technique for identification of GAGs in mid infrared region (400-4000 cm-1.

  15. (S)-[6]-Gingerol inhibits TGF-β-stimulated biglycan synthesis but not glycosaminoglycan hyperelongation in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamato, Danielle; Babaahmadi Rezaei, Hossein; Getachew, Robel; Thach, Lyna; Guidone, Daniel; Osman, Narin; Roufogalis, Basil; Duke, Colin C; Tran, Van Hoan; Zheng, Wenhua; Little, Peter J

    2013-07-01

    (S)-[6]-Gingerol is under investigation for a variety of therapeutic uses. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β stimulates proteoglycan synthesis, leading to increased binding of low-density lipoproteins, which is the initiating step in atherosclerosis. We evaluated the effects of (S)-[6]-gingerol on these TGF-β-mediated proteoglycan changes to explore its potential as an anti-atherosclerotic agent. Purified (S)-[6]-gingerol was assessed for its effects on proteoglycan synthesis by [(35) S]-sulfate incorporation into glycosaminoglycan chains and [(35) S]-Met/Cys incorporation into proteoglycans and total proteins in human vascular smooth muscle cells. Biglycan level was assessed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reactions and the effects of (S)-[6]-gingerol on TGF-β signalling by assessment of the phosphorylation of Smads and Akt by western blotting. (S)-[6]-Gingerol concentration-dependently inhibited TGF-β-stimulated proteoglycan core protein synthesis, and this was not secondary to inhibition of total protein synthesis. (S)-[6]-Gingerol inhibited biglycan mRNA expression. (S)-[6]-Gingerol did not inhibit TGF-β-stimulated glycosaminoglycan hyperelongation or phosphorylation of Smad 2, in either the carboxy terminal or linker region, or Akt phosphorylation. The activity of (S)-[6]-gingerol to inhibit TGF-β-stimulated biglycan synthesis suggests a potential role for ginger in the prevention of atherosclerosis or other lipid-binding diseases. The signalling studies indicate a novel site of action of (S)-[6]-gingerol in inhibiting TGF-β responses. © 2013 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  16. Unusual Glycosaminoglycans from a Deep Sea Hydrothermal Bacterium Improve Fibrillar Collagen Structuring and Fibroblast Activities in Engineered Connective Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Guezennec

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymers produced by marine organisms can offer useful tools for regenerative medicine. Particularly, HE800 exopolysaccharide (HE800 EPS secreted by a deep-sea hydrothermal bacterium displays an interesting glycosaminoglycan-like feature resembling hyaluronan. Previous studies demonstrated its effectiveness to enhance in vivo bone regeneration and to support osteoblastic cell metabolism in culture. Thus, in order to assess the usefulness of this high-molecular weight polymer in tissue engineering and tissue repair, in vitro reconstructed connective tissues containing HE800 EPS were performed. We showed that this polysaccharide promotes both collagen structuring and extracellular matrix settle by dermal fibroblasts. Furthermore, from the native HE800 EPS, a low-molecular weight sulfated derivative (HE800 DROS displaying chemical analogy with heparan-sulfate, was designed. Thus, it was demonstrated that HE800 DROS mimics some properties of heparan-sulfate, such as promotion of fibroblast proliferation and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP secretion. Therefore, we suggest that the HE800EPS family can be considered as an innovative biotechnological source of glycosaminoglycan-like compounds useful to design biomaterials and drugs for tissue engineering and repair.

  17. Glycosaminoglycan chemical exchange saturation transfer in human lumbar intervertebral discs: Effect of saturation pulse and relationship with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Tatsuhiro; Togao, Osamu; Tokunaga, Chiaki; Funatsu, Ryohei; Yamashita, Yasuo; Kobayashi, Kouji; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Honda, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the dependence of saturation pulse power and duration on glycosaminoglycan chemical exchange saturation transfer (gagCEST) imaging and assess the degeneration of human lumbar intervertebral discs (IVDs) using this method. All images were acquired on a 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. The CEST effects were measured in the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) phantoms with different concentrations. In the human study, CEST effects were measured in the nucleus pulposus of IVD. We compared the CEST effects among the different saturation pulse powers (0.4, 0.8, and 1.6 μT) or durations (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 sec) at each Pfirrmann grade (I-V). The relationship between the CEST effects and low back pain was also evaluated. The phantom study showed high correlations between the CEST effects and GAG concentration (R 2  = 0.863, P low back pain were significantly lower than those in the groups without pain (P pain (P = 0.0216). The contrast of gagCEST imaging in the lumbar IVDs varied with saturation pulse power and duration. GagCEST imaging may serve as a tool for evaluating IVD degeneration in the lumbar spine. 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:863-871. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  18. Specific binding of the glycosaminoglycan /sup 3/H-heparin to bull, monkey, and rabbit spermatozoa in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handrow, R.R.; Boehm, S.K.; Lenz, R.W.; Robinson, J.A.; Ax, R.L.

    In Vitro binding and some binding parameters of the glycosaminoglycan heparin to viable epididymal or ejaculated bull spermatozoa, ejaculated rabbit spermatozoa, and frozen-thawed rhesus monkey spermatozoa were investigated. Nonspecific binding was affected only by the concentration of /sup 3/H-heparin, whereas specific binding was saturable, reversible, and dependent on the pH, temperature, and calcium concentration of the incubation medium. Magnesium concentration dependence was observed in the presence of calcium but could not be detected in the absence of calcium. Bound /sup 3/H-heparin was displaced by several orders of magnitude greater concentrations of chondroitin sulfate. Scatchard plot analysis suggested multiple binding affinities for /sup 3/H-heparin to spermatozoa. /sup 3/H-heparin was shown to bind to sperm heads and flagella. Fluorescein-labeled heparin bound to acrosomal, postacrosomal, and flagellar membranes. It was concluded that the specific binding of heparin involved a proteinaceous component on, or intercalated with, spermatozoal membranes. Thus, glycosaminoglycans present in the female reproductive tract may contribute to sperm capacitation and enhance the likelihood of successful fertilization in mammals.

  19. Effects of a urolith prevention diet on urine compositions of glycosaminoglycans, Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein, and nephrocalcin in cats with calcium oxalate urolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulich, Jody P; Osborne, Carl A; Carvalho, Mauricio; Nakagawa, Yasushi

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate urine concentrations of glycosaminoglycans, Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein, and nephrocalcin in cats fed a diet formulated to prevent calcium oxalate uroliths. 10 cats with calcium oxalate urolithiasis. In a previous study conducted in accordance with a balanced crossover design, cats were sequentially fed 2 diets (the diet each cat was consuming prior to urolith detection and a diet formulated to prevent calcium oxalate uroliths). Each diet was fed for 8 weeks. At the end of each 8-week period, a 72-hour urine sample was collected. Concentrations of glycosaminoglycans, Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein, and the 4 isoforms of nephrocalcin in urine samples collected during that previous study were measured in the study reported here. RESULTS; Diet had no effect on the quantity of Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein and nephrocalcin in urine. However, the urine concentration of glycosaminoglycans was significantly higher during consumption of the urolith prevention diet. Feeding a urolith prevention diet increased the urine concentration of glycosaminoglycans, which are glycoprotein inhibitors of growth and aggregation of calcium oxalate crystals.

  20. Evaluation of early healing events around mesenchymal stem cell-seeded collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffold. An experimental study in Wistar rats.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alhag, Mohamed

    2011-03-01

    Tissue engineering using cell-seeded biodegradable scaffolds offers a new bone regenerative approach that might circumvent many of the limitations of current therapeutic modalities. The aim of this experiment was to study the early healing events around mesenchymal stem cell-seeded collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds.

  1. Fibromodulin deficiency reduces collagen structural network but not glycosaminoglycan content in a syngeneic model of colon carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, P Olof; Kalamajski, Sebastian; Maccarana, Marco; Oldberg, Åke; Rubin, Kristofer

    2017-01-01

    Tumor barrier function in carcinoma represents a major challenge to treatment and is therefore an attractive target for increasing drug delivery. Variables related to tumor barrier include aberrant blood vessels, high interstitial fluid pressure, and the composition and structure of the extracellular matrix. One of the proteins associated with dense extracellular matrices is fibromodulin, a collagen fibrillogenesis modulator expressed in tumor stroma but scarce in normal loose connective tissues. Here, we investigated the effects of fibromodulin on stroma ECM in a syngeneic murine colon carcinoma model. We show that fibromodulin deficiency decreased collagen fibril thickness but glycosaminoglycan content and composition were unchanged. Furthermore, vascular density, pericyte coverage and macrophage amount were unaffected. Fibromodulin can therefore be a unique effector of dense collagen matrix assembly in tumor stroma and, without affecting other major matrix components or the cellular composition, can function as a main agent in tumor barrier function.

  2. The effect of glycosaminoglycan enzymes and proteases on the viscosity of alpaca seminal plasma and sperm function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw-Young, C M; Stuart, C; Evans, G; Maxwell, W M C

    2013-05-01

    In order to advance the development of cryopreservation and other assisted reproductive technologies in camelids it is necessary to eliminate the viscous component of the seminal plasma without impairing sperm function. It has been postulated that glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) or proteoglycans are responsible for this viscosity. This study investigated the effect of the GAG enzymes hyaluronidase, chondroitinase ABC and keratanase and the proteases papain and proteinase K on seminal plasma viscosity and sperm function in order to aid identification of the cause of seminal plasma viscosity and propose methods for the reduction of viscosity. Sperm motility, DNA integrity, acrosome integrity and viability were assessed during 2h incubation. All enzymes reduced seminal plasma viscosity compared to control (Palpaca seminal plasma viscosity. Papain treatment of alpaca semen may be a suitable technique for reduction of seminal plasma viscosity prior to sperm cryopreservation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Histomorphometry and detection of glycosaminoglycans in the endocervical epithelium of pregnant rats after local administration of hyaluronidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Monica Regina Lourenço; Araujo Júnior, E; Camano, Luiz; de Simües, Manuel Jesus; de Souza, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to detect the presence of glycosaminoglycans and to investigate histomorphometric aspects of the endocervical epithelium in pregnant rats after local administration of hyaluronidase. Ten pregnant rats were randomly distributed into two groups. On day 18 of pregnancy 1 mL of distilled water and 0.02 mL of hyaluronidase were administered to the control group (CG) and the study group (SG), respectively On day 20 the rats were sacrificed, followed by dissection and removal of the uterine cervix, which was prepared for histomorphometry (endocervical epithelium thickness and leucocyte infiltration) and for immunohistochemistry with alcian blue reaction and its respective blockers. The paired Student t test was used to compare the groups. The SG was characterized by reduced epithelial thickness (mean: 291.01 +/- 71.1 vs. 764.30 +/- 50.94; p < 0.0001) and a larger number of eosinophils (mean: 3.72 +/- 1.60 vs. 0.54 +/- 0.70; p < 0.0001). Alcian blue staining (pH 0.5) indicated a very strong reaction (3+) for the CG. With pH 2.5, the staining was also very intense (4+) in the CG. With methylation, both groups showed negative reactions after alcian blue staining (pH 2.5). With the methylation reaction followed by saponification and with enzymatic digestion of the lamina, staining showed a weak reaction (1+) in both groups. The SG presented with significant alterations related to the reduction of epithelial thickness and an increase in leucocyte infiltration. Furthermore, the use of hyaluronidase resulted in a significant decrease of the sulfated glycosaminoglycans.

  4. A molecular dynamics-based algorithm for evaluating the glycosaminoglycan mimicking potential of synthetic, homogenous, sulfated small molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Nagarajan

    Full Text Available Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs are key natural biopolymers that exhibit a range of biological functions including growth and differentiation. Despite this multiplicity of function, natural GAG sequences have not yielded drugs because of problems of heterogeneity and synthesis. Recently, several homogenous non-saccharide glycosaminoglycan mimetics (NSGMs have been reported as agents displaying major therapeutic promise. Yet, it remains unclear whether sulfated NSGMs structurally mimic sulfated GAGs. To address this, we developed a three-step molecular dynamics (MD-based algorithm to compare sulfated NSGMs with GAGs. In the first step of this algorithm, parameters related to the range of conformations sampled by the two highly sulfated molecules as free entities in water were compared. The second step compared identity of binding site geometries and the final step evaluated comparable dynamics and interactions in the protein-bound state. Using a test case of interactions with fibroblast growth factor-related proteins, we show that this three-step algorithm effectively predicts the GAG structure mimicking property of NSGMs. Specifically, we show that two unique dimeric NSGMs mimic hexameric GAG sequences in the protein-bound state. In contrast, closely related monomeric and trimeric NSGMs do not mimic GAG in either the free or bound states. These results correspond well with the functional properties of NSGMs. The results show for the first time that appropriately designed sulfated NSGMs can be good structural mimetics of GAGs and the incorporation of a MD-based strategy at the NSGM library screening stage can identify promising mimetics of targeted GAG sequences.

  5. RX-207, a Small Molecule Inhibitor of Protein Interaction with Glycosaminoglycans (SMIGs), Reduces Experimentally Induced Inflammation and Increases Survival Rate in Cecal Ligation and Puncture (CLP)-Induced Sepsis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Juhás, Štefan; Harris, N.; Ilková, G.; Rehák, P.; Zsila, F.; Kogan, F. Y.; Lahmy, O.; Zhuk, R.; Gregor, P.; Koppel, J.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 1 (2018), s. 307-314 ISSN 0360-3997 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : heparin binding protein * glycosaminoglycan * neutrophil Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.955, year: 2016

  6. Glycosaminoglycan-depolymerizing enzymes produced by anaerobic bacteria isolated from the human mouth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipler, L S; Embery, G

    1985-01-01

    A number of obligately anaerobic bacteria, some implicated in periodontal disease, were screened for their ability to produce enzymes capable of degrading hyaluronic acid and chondroitin-4-sulphate. Two screening methods were used following anaerobic incubation at 37 degrees C for 7 days. One involved incorporating the respective substrates and bovine-serum albumin into agar plates and, after incubation, flooding the plates with 2 M acetic acid. Clear zones were produced around colonies which produced enzymes capable of depolymerizing the substrates. The second was a sensitive spectrophotometric procedure based on the ability of certain bacteria to produce eliminase enzymes, which degrade the substrates to unsaturated products having a characteristic u.v. absorption at 232 nm. Strains of Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides melaninogenicus degraded both substrates whereas Bacteroides asaccharolyticus degraded neither substrate by either method. Some bacteria gave negative results with the plate method whereas the more sensitive spectrophotometric assay proved positive. The number of anaerobic bacteria capable of degrading hyaluronic acid and chondroitin-4-sulphate in vitro may therefore have been underestimated in previous studies.

  7. Articular cartilage thickness and glycosaminoglycan distribution in the young canine knee joint after remobilization of the immobilized limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviranta, I; Tammi, M; Jurvelin, J; Arokoski, J; Säämänen, A M; Helminen, H J

    1994-03-01

    The recovery of articular cartilage from atrophy induced by joint immobilization was investigated in immature dogs. In a previous study, we showed that 11 weeks of immobilization of the knee (stifle) joint of young dogs reduced the concentration of articular cartilage glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) by 13-47%. In the present study, right hindlimbs from six female beagles were immobilized for 11 weeks, as in the previous study, and then were remobilized for 15 weeks. Cartilage from the knee joint was compared with cartilage from nonimmobilized knees of eight age-matched control beagles. Histological samples taken from 11 different locations of the knee joint were stained with safranin O, and microspectrophotometry was used to demonstrate distribution of GAGs in the tissue. After remobilization, GAG concentration was restored in the patellofemoral region and tibial condyles. On the summits of the femoral condyles, and especially at the periphery of the femoral condyles, GAG concentration remained 8-26% less than the control values. On the summits, the thickness of the uncalcified cartilage was as much as 15% less than in the age-matched controls. Consequently, the changes induced by unloading were reversible to a great extent, but a full restoration of articular cartilage was not obtained at all sites of the knee joint within the 15 weeks of remobilization. Immobilization of the skeletally immature joint therefore may affect the development of articular cartilage in such a way that very slow recovery or permanent alterations are induced.

  8. Inflammation-induced brain endothelial activation leads to uptake of electrostatically stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles via sulfated glycosaminoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Dominique; Millward, Jason M; Schnorr, Jörg; Taupitz, Matthias; Stangl, Verena; Paul, Friedemann; Wagner, Susanne; Wuerfel, Jens T; Sack, Ingolf; Ludwig, Antje; Infante-Duarte, Carmen

    2017-05-01

    Based on our previous data on the presence of very small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (VSOP) on brain endothelial structures during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), we investigated the mechanisms of VSOP binding on inflamed brain endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro. After intravenous application, VSOP were detected in brain endothelial cells of EAE animals at peak disease and prior to clinical onset. In vitro, inflammatory stimuli increased VSOP uptake by brain endothelial bEnd.3 cells, which we confirmed in primary endothelial cells and in bEnd.3 cells cultured under shear stress. Transmission electron microscopy and blocking experiments revealed that during inflammation VSOP were endocytosed by bEnd.3. Modified sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAG) on inflamed brain endothelial cells were the primary binding site for VSOP, as GAG degradation and inhibition of GAG sulfation reduced VSOP uptake. Thus, VSOP-based MRI is sensitive to visualize early neuroinflammatory processes such as GAG modifications on brain endothelial cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Substrate Deprivation Therapy to Reduce Glycosaminoglycan Synthesis Improves Aspects of Neurological and Skeletal Pathology in MPS I Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainslie L. K. Derrick-Roberts

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I is the most common form of the MPS group of genetic diseases. MPS I results from a deficiency in the lysosomal enzyme α-l-iduronidase, leading to accumulation of undegraded heparan and dermatan sulphate glycosaminoglycan (GAG chains in patient cells. MPS children suffer from multiple organ failure and die in their teens to early twenties. In particular, MPS I children also suffer from profound mental retardation and skeletal disease that restricts growth and movement. Neither brain nor skeletal disease is adequately treated by current therapy approaches. To overcome these barriers to effective therapy we have developed and tested a treatment called substrate deprivation therapy (SDT. MPS I knockout mice were treated with weekly intravenous injections of 1 mg/kg rhodamine B for six months to assess the efficacy of SDT. Mice were assessed using biochemistry, micro-CT and a battery of behaviour tests to determine the outcome of treatment. A reduction in female bodyweight gain was observed with the treatment as well as a decrease in lung GAG. Behavioural studies showed slight improvements in inverted grid and significant improvements in learning ability for female MPS I mice treated with rhodamine B. Skeletal disease also improved with a reduction in bone mineral volume observed. Overall, rhodamine B is safe to administer to MPS I knockout mice where it had an effect on improving aspects of neurological and skeletal disease symptoms and may therefore provide a potential therapy or adjunct therapy for MPS I patients.

  10. Respiratory syncytial virus grown in Vero cells contains a truncated attachment protein that alters its infectivity and dependence on glycosaminoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwilas, Steven; Liesman, Rachael M; Zhang, Liqun; Walsh, Edward; Pickles, Raymond J; Peeples, Mark E

    2009-10-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) contains a heavily glycosylated 90-kDa attachment glycoprotein (G). Infection of HEp-2 and Vero cells in culture depends largely on virion G protein binding to cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). This GAG-dependent phenotype has been described for RSV grown in HEp-2 cells, but we have found that it is greatly reduced by a single passage in Vero cells. Virions produced from Vero cells primarily display a 55-kDa G glycoprotein. This smaller G protein represents a post-Golgi compartment form that is lacking its C terminus, indicating that the C terminus is required for GAG dependency. Vero cell-grown virus infected primary well-differentiated human airway epithelial (HAE) cell cultures 600-fold less efficiently than did HEp-2 cell-grown virus, indicating that the C terminus of the G protein is also required for virus attachment to this model of the in vivo target cells. This reduced infectivity for HAE cell cultures is not likely to be due to the loss of GAG attachment since heparan sulfate, the primary GAG used by RSV for attachment to HEp-2 cells, is not detectable at the apical surface of HAE cell cultures where RSV enters. Growing RSV stocks in Vero cells could dramatically reduce the initial infection of the respiratory tract in animal models or in volunteers receiving attenuated virus vaccines, thereby reducing the efficiency of infection or the efficacy of the vaccine.

  11. Digestibility of fucosylated glycosaminoglycan from sea cucumber and its effects on digestive enzymes under simulated salivary and gastrointestinal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Longyan; Qin, Yujing; Guan, Ruowei; Zheng, Wenqi; Liu, Jikai; Zhao, Jinhua

    2018-04-15

    The digestibility of fucosylated glycosaminoglycan (FG) and its effects on digestive enzymes were investigated using an in vitro digestion model. Results showed that the molecular weight and the reducing sugar content of FG were not significantly changed, and no free monosaccharides released from FG were detected after the salivary, gastric and intestinal digestion, indicating that both the backbone and the sulfated fucose branches of FG are resistant to be cleaved in the saliva and gastrointestinal tract environments. Furthermore, FG can dose-dependently inhibit digestive enzymes such as α-amylase, pepsin and pancreatic lipase in different degrees under the simulated digestion conditions due to the sulfate and carboxyl groups. These physiological effects of FG may help control the postprandial glucose concentration and have the potential in the prevention or treatment of reflux disease and obesity. The findings may provide information on the digestibility and beneficial physiological effects of FG as a potential natural product to promote human health. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Microstructure and glycosaminoglycan ratio of canine cornea after reconstructive transplantation with glycerin-preserved porcine amniotic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Keiko; Yamashita, Kazuto; Izumisawa, Yasuharu; Kotani, Tadao

    2008-01-01

    Although amniotic membranes of canine, feline, and equine species have some advantages as corneal transplantation material in many canine ocular diseases, their softness, thinness, and low availability can pose problems. As an alternative, the more abundant porcine amniotic membranes may be used. This paper describes the use of glycerin-preserved porcine amniotic membranes in corneal transplantation in eight normal dogs. A 0.4-mm deep recipient bed in the axial cornea of the OS of all dogs was created using an 8-mm Barron radial vacuum trephine. The recipient bed was then filled with amnion, and the entire cornea was covered with another piece of the glycerin-preserved membrane. The ocular signs evaluated were corneal opacity and corneal vascularization. The dogs were euthanized on days 5, 10, 20, or 40 after surgery, and samples were collected to evaluate corneal thickness, parenchymal cell number, mean collagen fibril diameter, collagen fibril content and the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) ratio. Corneal opacity was observed immediately after surgery. Restoration of corneal transparency, regression of corneal vascularization, and visualization of the pupil and iris were noted on day 40. The clinical observations were supported histologically by regained corneal thickness, parenchymal cell number, mean collagen fibril diameter, collagen fibril content, and GAG ratio, suggesting that this technique may be a novel method for the treatment of ocular surface disorders.

  13. Human milk glycosaminoglycans inhibit in vitro the adhesion of Escherichia coli and Salmonella fyris to human intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppa, Giovanni V; Facinelli, Bruna; Magi, Gloria; Marini, Emanuela; Zampini, Lucia; Mantovani, Veronica; Galeazzi, Tiziana; Padella, Lucia; Marchesiello, Rita L; Santoro, Lucia; Coscia, Alessandra; Peila, Chiara; Volpi, Nicola; Gabrielli, Orazio

    2016-04-01

    Breast-fed infants have a lower incidence of acute gastroenteritis due to the presence of several anti-infective factors in human milk. The aim of this work is to study the capacity of human milk glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) to inhibit the adhesion of some common pathogenic bacteria. GAGs were isolated from a pool of milk samples collected from different mothers during the first month of lactation. Experiments were carried out to study the ability of GAGs to inhibit the adhesion of two intestinal micro-organisms (enteropathogenic Escherichia coli serotype 0119 and Salmonella fyris) to Caco-2 and Int-407 cell lines. The study showed that the GAGs had an anti-adhesive effect on the two pathogenic strains studied with different degrees of inhibition. In particular, in the presence of human milk GAGs, the adhesion of S. fyris to Caco-2 cells and to Int-407 cells of both tested strains was significantly reduced. Our results demonstrated that GAGs in human milk can be one of the important defensive factors against acute diarrheal infections in breast-fed infants.

  14. Immunogenetic Profiling for Gastric Cancers Identifies Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans as Major and Functional B Cell Antigens in Human Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Hiroto; Komura, Daisuke; Konishi, Hiroki; Suzuki, Ryohei; Yamamoto, Asami; Kakiuchi, Miwako; Sato, Reiko; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Shogo; Tatsuno, Kenji; Oshima, Takashi; Nomura, Sachiyo; Seto, Yasuyuki; Fukayama, Masashi; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Shumpei

    2017-08-01

    Recent successes in tumor immunotherapies have highlighted the importance of tumor immunity. However, most of the work conducted to date has been on T cell immunity, while the role of B cell immunity in cancer remains more elusive. In this study, immunogenetic repertoire profiling for tumor-infiltrating B and T cells in gastric cancers was carried out to help reveal the architecture of B cell immunity in cancer. Humoral immunity in cancer was shown to involve oligoclonal expansions of tumor-specific and private B cell repertoires. We find that B cell repertoires in cancer are shaped by somatic hypermutation (SHM) either with or without positive selection biases, the latter of which tended to be auto-reactive. Importantly, we identified sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) as major functional B cell antigens among gastric tumors. Furthermore, natural anti-sulfated GAG antibodies discovered in gastric cancer tissues showed robust growth-suppressive functions against a wide variety of human malignancies of various organs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) Sulfatases from the Human Gut Symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron Reveals the First GAG-specific Bacterial Endosulfatase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Jonathan E.; Vilén, Eric Morssing; Namburi, Ramesh Babu; Benjdia, Alhosna; Beneteau, Julie; Malleron, Annie; Bonnaffé, David; Driguez, Pierre-Alexandre; Descroix, Karine; Lassalle, Gilbert; Le Narvor, Christine; Sandström, Corine; Spillmann, Dorothe; Berteau, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of the microbiota in human physiology, the molecular bases that govern the interactions between these commensal bacteria and their host remain poorly understood. We recently reported that sulfatases play a key role in the adaptation of a major human commensal bacterium, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, to its host (Benjdia, A., Martens, E. C., Gordon, J. I., and Berteau, O. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 25973–25982). We hypothesized that sulfatases are instrumental for this bacterium, and related Bacteroides species, to metabolize highly sulfated glycans (i.e. mucins and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs)) and to colonize the intestinal mucosal layer. Based on our previous study, we investigated 10 sulfatase genes induced in the presence of host glycans. Biochemical characterization of these potential sulfatases allowed the identification of GAG-specific sulfatases selective for the type of saccharide residue and the attachment position of the sulfate group. Although some GAG-specific bacterial sulfatase activities have been described in the literature, we report here for the first time the identity and the biochemical characterization of four GAG-specific sulfatases. Furthermore, contrary to the current paradigm, we discovered that B. thetaiotaomicron possesses an authentic GAG endosulfatase that is active at the polymer level. This type of sulfatase is the first one to be identified in a bacterium. Our study thus demonstrates that bacteria have evolved more sophisticated and diverse GAG sulfatases than anticipated and establishes how B. thetaiotaomicron, and other major human commensal bacteria, can metabolize and potentially tailor complex host glycans. PMID:25002587

  16. Structural Basis of Native CXCL7 Monomer Binding to CXCR2 Receptor N-Domain and Glycosaminoglycan Heparin

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    Aaron J. Brown

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available CXCL7, a chemokine highly expressed in platelets, orchestrates neutrophil recruitment during thrombosis and related pathophysiological processes by interacting with CXCR2 receptor and sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAG. CXCL7 exists as monomers and dimers, and dimerization (~50 μM and CXCR2 binding (~10 nM constants indicate that CXCL7 is a potent agonist as a monomer. Currently, nothing is known regarding the structural basis by which receptor and GAG interactions mediate CXCL7 function. Using solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, we characterized the binding of CXCL7 monomer to the CXCR2 N-terminal domain (CXCR2Nd that constitutes a critical docking site and to GAG heparin. We found that CXCR2Nd binds a hydrophobic groove and that ionic interactions also play a role in mediating binding. Heparin binds a set of contiguous basic residues indicating a prominent role for ionic interactions. Modeling studies reveal that the binding interface is dynamic and that GAG adopts different binding geometries. Most importantly, several residues involved in GAG binding are also involved in receptor interactions, suggesting that GAG-bound monomer cannot activate the receptor. Further, this is the first study that describes the structural basis of receptor and GAG interactions of a native monomer of the neutrophil-activating chemokine family.

  17. Artificial Extracellular Matrices with Oversulfated Glycosaminoglycan Derivatives Promote the Differentiation of Osteoblast-Precursor Cells and Premature Osteoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute Hempel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAG are components of the bone marrow stem cell niche and to a minor extent of mature bone tissue with important functions in regulating stem cell lineage commitment and differentiation. We anticipated that artificial extracellular matrices (aECM composed of collagen I and synthetically oversulfated GAG derivatives affect preferentially the differentiation of osteoblast-precursor cells and early osteoblasts. A set of gradually sulfated chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronan derivatives was used for the preparation of aECM. All these matrices were analysed with human bone marrow stromal cells to identify the most potent aECM and to determine the influence of the degree and position of sulfate groups and the kind of disaccharide units on the osteogenic differentiation. Oversulfated GAG derivatives with a sulfate group at the C-6 position of the N-acetylglycosamine revealed the most pronounced proosteogenic effect as determined by tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition. A subset of the aECM was further analysed with different primary osteoblasts and cell lines reflecting different maturation stages to test whether the effect of sulfated GAG derivatives depends on the maturation status of the cells. It was shown that the proosteogenic effect of aECM was most prominent in early osteoblasts.

  18. Artificial Extracellular Matrices with Oversulfated Glycosaminoglycan Derivatives Promote the Differentiation of Osteoblast-Precursor Cells and Premature Osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Ute; Preissler, Carolin; Möller, Stephanie; Becher, Jana; Rauner, Martina; Hofbauer, Lorenz C.; Dieter, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAG) are components of the bone marrow stem cell niche and to a minor extent of mature bone tissue with important functions in regulating stem cell lineage commitment and differentiation. We anticipated that artificial extracellular matrices (aECM) composed of collagen I and synthetically oversulfated GAG derivatives affect preferentially the differentiation of osteoblast-precursor cells and early osteoblasts. A set of gradually sulfated chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronan derivatives was used for the preparation of aECM. All these matrices were analysed with human bone marrow stromal cells to identify the most potent aECM and to determine the influence of the degree and position of sulfate groups and the kind of disaccharide units on the osteogenic differentiation. Oversulfated GAG derivatives with a sulfate group at the C-6 position of the N-acetylglycosamine revealed the most pronounced proosteogenic effect as determined by tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition. A subset of the aECM was further analysed with different primary osteoblasts and cell lines reflecting different maturation stages to test whether the effect of sulfated GAG derivatives depends on the maturation status of the cells. It was shown that the proosteogenic effect of aECM was most prominent in early osteoblasts. PMID:24864267

  19. Effect of castration on renal glycosaminoglycans and their urinary excretion in male and female rats with chronic renal failure

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    Lemos, C.C.S. [Disciplina de Nefrologia, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Tovar, A.M.F. [Laboratório de Tecido Conjuntivo, Instituto de Bioquímica Médica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Guimarães, M.A.M. [Departamento de Patologia e Laboratórios, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bregman, R. [Disciplina de Nefrologia, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-08-10

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) participate in a variety of processes in the kidney, and evidence suggests that gender-related hormones participate in renal function. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship of GAGs, gender, and proteinuria in male and female rats with chronic renal failure (CRF). GAGs were analyzed in total kidney tissue and 24-h urine of castrated (c), male (M), and female (F) Wistar control (C) rats (CM, CMc, CF, CFc) and after 30 days of CRF induced by 5/6 nephrectomy (CRFM, CRFMc, CRFF, CRFFc). Total GAG quantification and composition were determined using agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, respectively. Renal GAGs were higher in CF compared to CM. CRFM presented an increase in renal GAGs, heparan sulfate (HS), and proteinuria, while castration reduced these parameters. However, CRFF and CRFFc groups showed a decrease in renal GAGs concomitant with an increase in proteinuria. Our results suggest that, in CRFM, sex hormones quantitatively alter GAGs, mainly HS, and possibly the glomerular filtration barrier, leading to proteinuria. The lack of this response in CRFMc, where HS did not increase, corroborates this theory. This pattern was not observed in females. Further studies of CRF are needed to clarify gender-dependent differences in HS synthesis.

  20. Host cell heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans are ligands for OspF-related proteins of the Lyme disease spirochete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Pin; Bhowmick, Rudra; Coburn, Jenifer; Leong, John M

    2015-10-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, spreads from the site of the tick bite to tissues such as heart, joints and the nervous tissues. Host glycosaminoglycans, highly modified repeating disaccharides that are present on cell surfaces and in extracellular matrix, are common targets of microbial pathogens during tissue colonization. While several dermatan sulfate-binding B. burgdorferi adhesins have been identified, B. burgdorferi adhesins documented to promote spirochetal binding to heparan sulfate have not yet been identified. OspEF-related proteins (Erps), a large family of plasmid-encoded surface lipoproteins that are produced in the mammalian host, can be divided into the OspF-related, OspEF-leader peptide (Elp) and OspE-related subfamilies. We show here that a member of the OspF-related subfamily, ErpG, binds to heparan sulfate and when produced on the surface of an otherwise non-adherent B. burgdorferi strain, ErpG promotes heparan sulfate-mediated bacterial attachment to the glial but not the endothelial, synovial or respiratory epithelial cells. Six other OspF-related proteins were capable of binding heparan sulfate, whereas representative OspE-related and Elp proteins lacked this activity. These results indicate that OspF-related proteins are heparan sulfate-binding adhesins, at least one of which promotes bacterial attachment to glial cells. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Extraction of Glycosaminoglycans Containing Glucosamine and Chondroitin Sulfate from Chicken Claw Cartilage

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    Tri Dewanti Widyaningsih

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chicken cartilage (claw is a waste of chicken cuts which are widely available in Indonesia. Cartilage part of chicken claw becomes a potential source of chondroitin sulfate (CS and glucosamine (GS. This study aims to determine the most optimal extraction methods of CS and GS from cartilage of chicken claw. Various types of extraction methods used in this study are taken from the extraction by using boiling water (2 and 2.5 hours, acetic acid (7 and 17 hours, as well as proteolysis by papain (24 and 48 hours. Parameters observed include chemical characteristics of powdered cartilage of chicken claw as well as CS and GS levels in powdered cartilage of chicken claw extract. The results of this research show that the levels of CS and GS of chicken claw cartilage powder were 2.17% and 13%. Meanwhile, the highest GS level was obtained from the extraction with water treatment for 2.5 hours which was 8.1%. The treatment and duration of extraction will significantly affect the number of GS which was produced. The highest content of CS was obtained from the extraction with the enzyme treatment for 48 hours which was 2.47%. The best treatment is the extraction with water treatment for 2.5 hours which were the extracts with GS levels of 8.1% and 2.03% CS was selected through the analysis of multiple attribute.

  2. A role for the endothelial glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan in neutrophil recruitment by endothelial cells cultured for prolonged periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Lynn M; Rainger, G Ed; Nash, Gerard B

    2009-11-15

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) presented on the surface of endothelial cells (ECs) are believed to influence leukocyte recruitment during inflammation, but their roles remain uncertain. Here we report an in vitro model of prolonged culture of human EC in which the contributions of heparan sulphate (HS) and hyaluronan (HA) to the process of neutrophil recruitment could be studied. Previously, we reported that increasing EC culture duration (up to 20 days) enhanced neutrophil recruitment in response to low dose (1 U/ml) but not high dose (100 U/ml) of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF). Here we found that HS and HA were present at much higher levels on the surface of day 20 cultures than day 3 cultures. Neutrophil recruitment on both day 3 and day 20 ECs was mediated through CXCR chemokine receptors and interleukin-8 (IL-8). In addition, mRNA levels for TNF receptors, signalling pathway constituents, adhesion receptors, and chemokines involved in neutrophil recruitment were similar for day 3 and day 20 ECs. To test whether the enhanced neutrophil recruitment on day 20 EC was mediated by GAGs, they were removed enzymatically. Removal of HA (but not HS) inhibited neutrophil recruitment, as did antibody blockade of CD44, a counter-receptor for HA on neutrophils. Supernatants from hyaluronidase-treated day 20 ECs were more potent in activating neutrophils than supernatants from untreated EC. Thus, HA has a role in neutrophil recruitment that is revealed in long-term cultures where it increases potency of response to sub-optimal levels of TNF. This effect appears to occur through a dual mechanism involving chemokine presentation and interaction with CD44.

  3. Characterization of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) sulfatases from the human gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron reveals the first GAG-specific bacterial endosulfatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Jonathan E; Vilén, Eric Morssing; Namburi, Ramesh Babu; Benjdia, Alhosna; Beneteau, Julie; Malleron, Annie; Bonnaffé, David; Driguez, Pierre-Alexandre; Descroix, Karine; Lassalle, Gilbert; Le Narvor, Christine; Sandström, Corine; Spillmann, Dorothe; Berteau, Olivier

    2014-08-29

    Despite the importance of the microbiota in human physiology, the molecular bases that govern the interactions between these commensal bacteria and their host remain poorly understood. We recently reported that sulfatases play a key role in the adaptation of a major human commensal bacterium, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, to its host (Benjdia, A., Martens, E. C., Gordon, J. I., and Berteau, O. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 25973-25982). We hypothesized that sulfatases are instrumental for this bacterium, and related Bacteroides species, to metabolize highly sulfated glycans (i.e. mucins and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs)) and to colonize the intestinal mucosal layer. Based on our previous study, we investigated 10 sulfatase genes induced in the presence of host glycans. Biochemical characterization of these potential sulfatases allowed the identification of GAG-specific sulfatases selective for the type of saccharide residue and the attachment position of the sulfate group. Although some GAG-specific bacterial sulfatase activities have been described in the literature, we report here for the first time the identity and the biochemical characterization of four GAG-specific sulfatases. Furthermore, contrary to the current paradigm, we discovered that B. thetaiotaomicron possesses an authentic GAG endosulfatase that is active at the polymer level. This type of sulfatase is the first one to be identified in a bacterium. Our study thus demonstrates that bacteria have evolved more sophisticated and diverse GAG sulfatases than anticipated and establishes how B. thetaiotaomicron, and other major human commensal bacteria, can metabolize and potentially tailor complex host glycans. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Effect of Aloe vera application on the content and molecular arrangement of glycosaminoglycans during calcaneal tendon healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aro, Andrea Aparecida de; Esquisatto, Marcelo Augusto Marretto; Nishan, Umar; Perez, Mylena Oliveira; Rodrigues, Rodney Alexandre Ferreira; Foglio, Mary Ann; Carvalho, João Ernesto de; Gomes, Laurecir; Vidal, Benedicto De Campos; Pimentel, Edson Rosa

    2014-12-01

    Although several treatments for tendon lesions have been proposed, successful tendon repair remains a great challenge for orthopedics, especially considering the high incidence of re-rupture of injured tendons. Our aim was to evaluate the pharmacological potential of Aloe vera on the content and arrangement of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) during tendon healing, which was based on the effectiveness of A. vera on collagen organization previously observed by our group. In rats, a partial calcaneal tendon transection was performed with subsequent topical A. vera application at the injury site. The tendons were treated with A. vera ointment for 7 days and excised on the 7(th) , 14(th) , or 21(st) day post-surgery. Control rats received ointment without A. vera. A higher content of GAGs and a lower amount of dermatan sulfate were detected in the A. vera-treated group on the 14(th) day compared with the control. Also at 14 days post-surgery, a lower dichroic ratio in toluidine blue stained sections was observed in A. vera-treated tendons compared with the control. No differences were observed in the chondroitin-6-sulfate and TGF-β1 levels between the groups, and higher amount of non-collagenous proteins was detected in the A. vera-treated group on the 21(st) day, compared with the control group. No differences were observed in the number of fibroblasts, inflammatory cells and blood vessels between the groups. The application of A. vera during tendon healing modified the arrangement of GAGs and increased the content of GAGs and non-collagenous proteins. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Biochemical imaging of cervical intervertebral discs with glycosaminoglycan chemical exchange saturation transfer magnetic resonance imaging: feasibility and initial results

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    Schleich, Christoph; Mueller-Lutz, Anja; Zimmermann, Lisa; Boos, Johannes; Wittsack, Hans-Joerg; Antoch, Gerald; Miese, Falk [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Dusseldorf (Germany); Schmitt, Benjamin [Siemens Ltd. Australia, Healthcare Sector, Macquarie Park, NSW (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    To evaluate glycosaminoglycan chemical exchange saturation transfer (gagCEST) imaging at 3T in the assessment of the GAG content of cervical IVDs in healthy volunteers. Forty-two cervical intervertebral discs of seven healthy volunteers (four females, three males; mean age: 21.4 ± 1.4 years; range: 19-24 years) were examined at a 3T MRI scanner in this prospective study. The MRI protocol comprised standard morphological, sagittal T2 weighted (T2w) images to assess the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based grading system for cervical intervertebral disc degeneration (IVD) and biochemical imaging with gagCEST to calculate a region-of-interest analysis of nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF). GagCEST of cervical IVDs was technically successful at 3T with significant higher gagCEST values in NP compared to AF (1.17 % ± 1.03 % vs. 0.79 % ± 1.75 %; p = 0.005). We found topological differences of gagCEST values of the cervical spine with significant higher gagCEST effects in lower IVDs (r = 1; p = 0). We could demonstrate a significant, negative correlation between gagCEST values and cervical disc degeneration of NP (r = -0.360; p = 0.019). Non-degenerated IVDs had significantly higher gagCEST effects compared to degenerated IVDs in NP (1.76 % ± 0.92 % vs. 0.52 % ± 1.17 %; p < 0.001). Biochemical imaging of cervical IVDs is feasible at 3T. GagCEST analysis demonstrated a topological GAG distribution of the cervical spine. The depletion of GAG in the NP with increasing level of morphological degeneration can be assessed using gagCEST imaging. (orig.)

  6. Corneal Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans and Their Effects on Trigeminal Nerve Growth Cone Behavior In Vitro: Roles for ECM in Cornea Innervation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwend, Tyler; Deaton, Ryan J.; Zhang, Yuntao; Caterson, Bruce; Conrad, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Sensory trigeminal nerve growth cones innervate the cornea in a highly coordinated fashion. The purpose of this study was to determine if extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycans (ECM–GAGs), including keratan sulfate (KS), dermatan sulfate (DS), and chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) and C (CSC), polymerized in developing eyefronts, may provide guidance cues to nerves during cornea innervation. Methods. Immunostaining using antineuron-specific-β-tubulin and monoclonal antibodies for KS, DS, and CSA/C was performed on eyefronts from embryonic day (E) 9 to E14 and staining visualized by confocal microscopy. Effects of purified GAGs on trigeminal nerve growth cone behavior were tested using in vitro neuronal explant cultures. Results. At E9 to E10, nerves exiting the pericorneal nerve ring grew as tight fascicles, advancing straight toward the corneal stroma. In contrast, upon entering the stroma, nerves bifurcated repeatedly as they extended anteriorly toward the epithelium. KS was localized in the path of trigeminal nerves, whereas DS and CSA/C–rich areas were avoided by growth cones. When E10 trigeminal neurons were cultured on different substrates comprised of purified GAG molecules, their neurite growth cone behavior varied depending on GAG type, concentration, and mode of presentation (immobilized versus soluble). High concentrations of immobilized KS, DS, and CSA/C inhibited neurite growth to varying degrees. Neurites traversing lower, permissive concentrations of immobilized DS and CSA/C displayed increased fasciculation and decreased branching, whereas KS caused decreased fasciculation and increased branching. Enzymatic digestion of sulfated GAGs canceled their effects on trigeminal neurons. Conclusions. Data herein suggest that GAGs may direct the movement of trigeminal nerve growth cones innervating the cornea. PMID:23132805

  7. Hyaluronic acid: A promising mediator for periodontal regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bansal Jyoti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid (HA is a natural-non sulphated high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan that forms a critical component of the extracellular matrix and contributes significantly to tissue hydrodynamics, cell migration and proliferation. The use of HA in the treatment of inflammatory process is established in medical areas such as orthopedics, dermatology and ophthalmology. In the field of dentistry, hyaluronate has shown anti-inflammatory, antiedematous and anti-bacterial effects for the treatment of gingivitis and periodontitis. Due to its potential role in modulation of wound healing, its administration to periodontal wound sites could achieve comparable beneficial effects in periodontal tissue regeneration and periodontal disease treatment.

  8. Platelet-derived growth factor-stimulated versican synthesis but not glycosaminoglycan elongation in vascular smooth muscle is mediated via Akt phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Narin; Getachew, Robel; Thach, Lyna; Wang, Haitao; Su, Xiaoying; Zheng, Wenhua; Little, Peter J

    2014-05-01

    Proteoglycans are associated with the initiation of atherosclerosis due to their binding of apolipoproteins on lipid particles leading to retention in the vessel wall. The signaling pathways through which growth factors regulate the synthesis and structure of proteoglycans are potential therapeutic targets. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is present in atherosclerotic plaques and activates phosphorylation of the serine/threonine kinase Akt. We have investigated the role of Akt in the signaling pathways for proteoglycan core protein expression and elongation of glycosaminoglycan chains on proteoglycans secreted by human vascular smooth muscle cells. The pharmacological inhibitor of Akt phosphorylation, SN30978, blocked PDGF stimulated phosphorylation of Akt. SN30978 caused concentration dependent inhibition of PDGF stimulated radiosulfate incorporation into secreted proteoglycans and the response was blocked by the PDGF receptor antagonists Ki11502 and imatinib. Analysis of the size of the biglycan molecules by SDS-PAGE showed that PDGF increased the apparent size of biglycan but this effect on glycosaminoglycan chain elongation was blocked by Ki11502 but not by SN30978. PDGF also stimulated total protein core protein synthesis assessed as (35)S-methionine/cysteine incorporation and specifically the expression of versican mRNA. Both of these responses were blocked by SN30978. This data shows that PDGF-stimulated proteoglycan core protein synthesis but not glycosaminoglycan chain elongation is mediated via Akt phosphorylation. These data identify potential pathways for the development of agents which can pharmacologically regulate individual components of the synthesis of proteoglycans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of lumbar intervertebral disc glycosaminoglycan content by gadolinium-enhanced MRI before and after 21-days of head-down-tilt bedrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timmo Koy

    Full Text Available During spaceflight, it has been shown that intervertebral discs (IVDs increase in height, causing elongation of the spine up to several centimeters. Astronauts frequently report dull lower back pain that is most likely of discogenic origin and may result from IVD expansion. It is unknown whether disc volume solely increases by water influx, or if the content of glycosaminoglycans also changes in microgravity. Aim of this pilot study was to investigate effects of the spaceflight analog of bedrest on the glycosaminoglycan content of human lumbar IVDs. Five healthy, non-smoking, male human subjects of European descent were immobilized in 6° head-down-tilt bedrest for 21 days. Subjects remained in bed 24 h a day with at least one shoulder on the mattress. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI scans were taken according to the delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (dGEMRIC protocol before and after bedrest. The outcome measures were T1 and ΔT1. Scans were performed before and after administration of the contrast agent Gd-DOTA, and differences between T1-values of both scans (ΔT1 were computed. ΔT1 is the longitudinal relaxation time in the tissue and inversely related to the glycosaminoglycan-content. For data analysis, IVDs L1/2 to L4/5 were semi-automatically segmented. Zones were defined and analyzed separately. Results show a highly significant decrease in ΔT1 (p<0.001 after bedrest in all IVDs, and in all areas of the IVDs. The ΔT1-decrease was most prominent in the nucleus pulposus and in L4/5, and was expressed slightly more in the posterior than anterior IVD. Unexpected negative ΔT1-values were found in Pfirrmann-grade 2-discs after bedrest. Significantly lower T1 before contrast agent application was found after bedrest compared to before bedrest. According to the dGEMRIC-literature, the decrease in ΔT1 may be interpreted as an increase in glycosaminoglycans in healthy IVDs during bedrest. This interpretation seems

  10. Characterization of acidic polysaccharides from the mollusks through acid hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jiuling; Wen, Chengrong; Lu, Jiaojiao; Teng, Nan; Song, Shuang; Zhu, Beiwei

    2015-10-05

    Uronic acid-containing polysaccharides (UACPs) including glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) exist widely in nature. Herein we propose an elegant methodology to identify UACPs by analyzing their disaccharides produced from the acid hydrolysis using HPLC-MS(n) upon 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP) derivatization. Based on the optimization of experimental conditions by the single factor experiment and orthogonal test design, the combination of 1.3M TFA at 105°C for 3h is found to be the optimum. Subsequently, these conditions were applied to investigate the distribution of UACPs in 20 selected species of edible Bivalvia and Gastropoda. PMP-disaccharides derived from UACPs in mollusks were identified by comparing the retention time and mass spectra with those of the reference PMP-disaccharides from hyaluronic acid (HA), chondroitin sulfate (CS), heparin (HP), and AGSP with →4)-GlcA(1→2)-Man(1→ repeating units. The analysis reveals the prevalence of CS in the shellfishes as well as the HP, and existence of three non-GAG UACPs in 7 mollusks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The effects of glycosaminoglycan content on the compressive modulus of cartilage engineered in type II collagen scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, E; Vickers, S M; Frank, E; Grodzinsky, A J; Spector, M

    2008-10-01

    The current study determined the unconfined compressive modulus of tissue-engineered constructs with varying sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) density produced by goat articular chondrocytes in type II collagen scaffolds prepared with a range of cross-link densities and various times in culture. The purpose of this work is to establish a basis for future studies employing constructs of selected maturity (e.g., 25%, 50%, or 75% normal GAG content) for cartilage repair in vivo. Porous scaffolds (8 mm diameter by 2 mm thick) were fabricated from porcine type II collagen by freeze-drying, followed by dehydrothermal treatment and carbodiimide cross-linking. In a pilot study, passage 3 adult caprine articular chondrocytes isolated from one goat were grown in scaffolds with six cross-link densities for 2, 3, 4, and 6 weeks (n=3). The goal was to select scaffold cross-link densities and times in culture that would produce constructs with approximately 25%, 50% and 75% the GAG density of native articular cartilage. Based on the results of the pilot study, chondrocytes from three goats were grown in scaffolds with two cross-link densities for three time periods: 3, 5, and 9 weeks (n=6; one of the cross-link groups was run in quadruplicate). The equilibrium modulus from unconfined compression testing of these samples was correlated with GAG content. There was a notable increase in GAG density with decreasing cross-link density. Histological analysis verified a chondrogenic phenotype and revealed various amounts of GAG and type II collagen-containing cartilage. The correlation between modulus and GAG density had a linear coefficient of determination of 0.60. One group with a mean GAG density of 22 microg/mm(3), which was 140% the GAG density of normal caprine articular cartilage, averaged a compressive modulus of 31.5 kPa, which was 10% of caprine articular cartilage tested in this study. The GAG density and modulus of tissue-engineered constructs can be controlled by the

  12. The effects of cross-linking of collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds on compressive stiffness, chondrocyte-mediated contraction, proliferation and biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C R; Grodzinsky, A J; Spector, M

    2001-12-01

    The healing of articular cartilage defects may be improved by the use of implantable three-dimensional matrices. The present study investigated the effects of four cross-linking methods on the compressive stiffness of collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) matrices and the interaction between adult canine articular chondrocytes and the matrix: dehydrothermal treatment (DHT), ultraviolet irradiation (UV), glutaraldehyde treatment (GTA), and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC). The degree and kinetics of chondrocyte-mediated contraction, chondrocyte proliferation, and protein and glycosaminoglycan synthesis were evaluated over a four-week period in vitro. Cell-mediated contraction of the matrices varied with cross-linking: the most compliant DHT and UV matrices contracted the most (60% reduction in matrix diameter) and stiffest EDAC matrices contracted the least (30% reduction in matrix diameter). All cross-linking protocols permitted cell proliferation and matrix synthesis as measured by DNA content and radiolabeled sulfate and proline incorporation, respectively. During the first week in culture, a lower level of proliferation was seen in the GTA matrices but over the four-week culture period, the GTA and EDAC matrices provided for the greatest cell proliferation. On day 2, there was a significantly lower rate of 3H-proline incorporation in the GTA matrices (pcollagen in DHT and UV matrices at the early time points. These findings serve as a foundation for future studies of tissue engineering of articular cartilage and the association of chondrocyte contraction and the processes of mitosis and biosynthesis.

  13. Avaliação dos glicosaminoglicanos do tecido periuretral de pacientes com e sem prolapso genital Evaluation of glycosaminoglycans of periurethral tissue in patients with and without pelvic organ prolapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Cezar Feldner Jr

    2008-04-01

    tissue during surgery and assessed by biochemical methods. The GAGs were obtained by proteolysis and precipitated by trichloroacetic acid. The relative concentration of sulfated GAGs was determined by densitometry of toluidine blue stained gel using a spectrophotometer with a 525 nm wavelength. Data were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA. RESULTS: In the two groups dermatan sulphate (DS was the predominant glycosaminoglycan (85%, followed by chondroitin sulphate (CS and heparan sulphate (HS. Women with pelvic organ prolapse had significantly more total GAGs, DS and HS. Differences in CS were not observed. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed altered biochemical characteristics in the extracellular matrix of periurethral tissue and also accumulation of GAGs, DS and CS, in women with pelvic organ prolapse.

  14. Mechanism of action and efficacy of RX-111, a thieno[2,3-c]pyridine derivative and small molecule inhibitor of protein interaction with glycosaminoglycans (SMIGs), in delayed-type hypersensitivity, TNBS-induced colitis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harris, N.; Koppel, J.; Zsila, F.; Juhás, Štefan; Ilková, G.; Kogan, F. Y.; Lahmy, O.; Wildbaum, G.; Karin, N.; Zhuk, R.; Gregor, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 4 (2016), s. 285-294 ISSN 1023-3830 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : small molecule drug * glycosaminoglycan * heparin binding protein * heparan sulfate * inflammation * autoimmune disease Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.659, year: 2016

  15. Reactivating the extracellular matrix synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans to improve the human skin aspect and its mechanical properties

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    Chajra H

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hanane Chajra,1 Daniel Auriol,1 Francine Joly,2 Aurélie Pagnon,3 Magda Rodrigues,4 Sophie Allart,4 Gérard Redziniak,5 Fabrice Lefevre1 1Libragen, Induchem (Givaudan Active Beauty, Toulouse, 2Sephra Pharma, Puteaux, 3Novotec, Bron, 4Centre de Physiopathologie de Toulouse-Purpan, Toulouse, 5Cosmetic Inventions, Antony, France Background: The aim of this study was to demonstrate that a defined cosmetic composition is able to induce an increase in the production of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs and/or proteoglycans and finally to demonstrate that the composition, through its combined action of enzyme production and synthesis of macromolecules, modulates organization and skin surface aspect with a benefit in antiaging applications. Materials and methods: Gene expression was studied by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction using normal human dermal fibroblasts isolated from a 45-year-old donor skin dermis. De novo synthesis of sGAGs and proteoglycans was determined using Blyscan™ assay and/or immunohistochemical techniques. These studies were performed on normal human dermal fibroblasts (41- and 62-year-old donors and on human skin explants. Dermis organization was studied either ex vivo on skin explants using bi-photon microscopy and transmission electron microscopy or directly in vivo on human volunteers by ultrasound technique. Skin surface modification was investigated in vivo using silicone replicas coupled with macrophotography, and the mechanical properties of the skin were studied using Cutometer. Results: It was first shown that mRNA expression of several genes involved in the synthesis pathway of sGAG was stimulated. An increase in the de novo synthesis of sGAGs was shown at the cellular level despite the age of cells, and this phenomenon was clearly related to the previously observed stimulation of mRNA expression of genes. An increase in the expression of the corresponding core protein of decorin, perlecan

  16. Rotavirus NSP4 is secreted from infected cells as an oligomeric lipoprotein and binds to glycosaminoglycans on the surface of non-infected cells

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    Didsbury Alicia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonstructural glycoprotein 4 (NSP4 encoded by rotavirus is the only viral protein currently believed to function as an enterotoxin. NSP4 is synthesized as an intracellular transmembrane glycoprotein and as such is essential for virus assembly. Infection of polarized Caco-2 cells with rotavirus also results in the secretion of glycosylated NSP4 apparently in a soluble form despite retention of its transmembrane domain. We have examined the structure, solubility and cell-binding properties of this secreted form of NSP4 to further understand the biochemical basis for its enterotoxic function. We show here that NSP4 is secreted as discrete detergent-sensitive oligomers in a complex with phospholipids and demonstrate that this secreted form of NSP4 can bind to glycosaminoglycans present on the surface of a range of different cell types. Methods NSP4 was purified from the medium of infected cells after ultracentrifugation and ultrafiltration by successive lectin-affinity and ion exchange chromatography. Oligomerisation of NSP4 was examined by density gradient centrifugation and chemical crosslinking and the lipid content was assessed by analytical thin layer chromatography and flame ionization detection. Binding of NSP4 to various cell lines was measured using a flow cytometric-based assay. Results Secreted NSP4 formed oligomers that contained phospholipid but dissociated to a dimeric species in the presence of non-ionic detergent. The purified glycoprotein binds to the surface of various non-infected cells of distinct lineage. Binding of NSP4 to HT-29, a cell line of intestinal origin, is saturable and independent of divalent cations. Complementary biochemical approaches reveal that NSP4 binds to sulfated glycosaminoglycans on the plasma membrane. Conclusion Our study is the first to analyze an authentic (i.e. non-recombinant form of NSP4 that is secreted from virus-infected cells. Despite retention of the transmembrane domain

  17. PSEUDOSCLERODERMAL SYNDROME IN DIABETES MELLITUS

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    T. A. Nevskaya

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin thicking simulating scleroderma is not rare in diabetes mellitus (about 2% among patients with diabetes mellitus, however it is not well known to rheumatologists and endocrinologists. The basis of the syndrome are the abnormalities of collagen and glycosaminoglycans metabolism accompanying by the acid mucopolysaccharides accumulation in the deep part of the reticular dermis. Three cases of pseudosclerodrma in patients with long-standing complicated insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus are presented. The main clinical manifestations of pseudoscleroderma were marked cutaneous induration of the neck, body and proximal parts of extremities liked that of scleredema of Buschke ( 2 patients, and primary paraarticular induration leaded to the flexion contractures liked that of paraneoplastic scleroderma ( I patient. Possible mechanisms of development, clinical and morphological peculiarities and treatment for this syndrome are discussed.

  18. A Multivariate Mixture Model to Estimate the Accuracy of Glycosaminoglycan Identifications Made by Tandem Mass Spectrometry (MS/MS) and Database Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yulun; Schliekelman, Paul; Orlando, Ron; Sharp, Joshua S

    2017-02-01

    We present a statistical model to estimate the accuracy of derivatized heparin and heparan sulfate (HS) glycosaminoglycan (GAG) assignments to tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra made by the first published database search application, GAG-ID. Employing a multivariate expectation-maximization algorithm, this statistical model distinguishes correct from ambiguous and incorrect database search results when computing the probability that heparin/HS GAG assignments to spectra are correct based upon database search scores. Using GAG-ID search results for spectra generated from a defined mixture of 21 synthesized tetrasaccharide sequences as well as seven spectra of longer defined oligosaccharides, we demonstrate that the computed probabilities are accurate and have high power to discriminate between correctly, ambiguously, and incorrectly assigned heparin/HS GAGs. This analysis makes it possible to filter large MS/MS database search results with predictable false identification error rates. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Molecular cloning of a novel glucuronokinase/putative pyrophosphorylase from zebrafish acting in an UDP-glucuronic acid salvage pathway.

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    Roman Gangl

    Full Text Available In animals, the main precursor for glycosaminoglycan and furthermore proteoglycan biosynthesis, like hyaluronic acid, is UDP-glucuronic acid, which is synthesized via the nucleotide sugar oxidation pathway. Mutations in this pathway cause severe developmental defects (deficiency in the initiation of heart valve formation. In plants, UDP-glucuronic acid is synthesized via two independent pathways. Beside the nucleotide sugar oxidation pathway, a second minor route to UDP-glucuronic acid exist termed the myo-inositol oxygenation pathway. Within this myo-inositol is ring cleaved into glucuronic acid, which is subsequently converted to UDP-glucuronic acid by glucuronokinase and UDP-sugar pyrophosphorylase. Here we report on a similar, but bifunctional enzyme from zebrafish (Danio rerio which has glucuronokinase/putative pyrophosphorylase activity. The enzyme can convert glucuronic acid into UDP-glucuronic acid, required for completion of the alternative pathway to UDP-glucuronic acid via myo-inositol and thus establishes a so far unknown second route to UDP-glucuronic acid in animals. Glucuronokinase from zebrafish is a member of the GHMP-kinase superfamily having unique substrate specificity for glucuronic acid with a Km of 31 ± 8 µM and accepting ATP as the only phosphate donor (Km: 59 ± 9 µM. UDP-glucuronic acid pyrophosphorylase from zebrafish has homology to bacterial nucleotidyltransferases and requires UTP as nucleosid diphosphate donor. Genes for bifunctional glucuronokinase and putative UDP-glucuronic acid pyrophosphorylase are conserved among some groups of lower animals, including fishes, frogs, tunicates, and polychaeta, but are absent from mammals. The existence of a second pathway for UDP-glucuronic acid biosynthesis in zebrafish likely explains some previous contradictory finding in jekyll/ugdh zebrafish developmental mutants, which showed residual glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans in knockout mutants of UDP

  20. Degradation of extracellular matrix by peroxynitrite/peroxynitrous acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennett, Eleanor C; Davies, Michael J

    2008-09-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides strength and elasticity to tissues and plays a key role in regulating cell behavior; damage to this material is believed to be a major factor in many inflammatory diseases. Peroxynitrite/peroxynitrous acid, which is generated at elevated levels at sites of inflammation, is believed to play a role in ECM damage; however, the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here we examined the reactions of bolus peroxynitrite, and that generated in a time-dependent manner by SIN-1 decomposition, with ECM isolated from a vascular smooth muscle cell line and porcine thoracic aorta. Bolus peroxynitrite caused the release of ECM glycosaminoglycans and proteins, the formation of 3-nitroTyr, and the detection of ECM-derived radicals (by immuno-spin trapping) in a concentration-dependent manner. Release and nitration of ECM components were modulated by the local pH and bicarbonate. SIN-1 caused the release of glycosaminoglycan, but not protein, from vascular smooth muscle cell-derived ECM in a concentration-, time-, and pH-dependent manner. The data presented here suggest that peroxynitrite-mediated damage to ECM occurs via a radical-mediated pathway. These reactions may contribute to ECM damage at sites of inflammation and play a role in disease progression, including rupture of atherosclerotic lesions.

  1. RX-207, a Small Molecule Inhibitor of Protein Interaction with Glycosaminoglycans (SMIGs), Reduces Experimentally Induced Inflammation and Increases Survival Rate in Cecal Ligation and Puncture (CLP)-Induced Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhas, Stefan; Harris, Nicholas; Il'kova, Gabriela; Rehák, Pavol; Zsila, Ferenc; Yurgenzon Kogan, Faina; Lahmy, Orly; Zhuk, Regina; Gregor, Paul; Koppel, Juraj

    2018-02-01

    The fused quinazolinone derivative, RX-207, is chemically and functionally related to small molecule inhibitors of protein binding to glycosaminoglycans (SMIGs). Composed of a planar aromatic amine scaffold, it inhibits protein binding to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). RX-207 reduced neutrophil migration in thioglycollate-induced peritonitis (37%), inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema (32%) and cerulein-induced pancreatitis (28%), and increased animal survival in the mouse model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis (60%). The mechanism of RX-207 action, analyzed by UV spectroscopy, confirmed that which was elucidated for chemically related anti-inflammatory SMIGs. RX-207 binding to cell surface GAGs can account for the inhibition of neutrophil recruitment via the micro-vasculature and as a consequence, the reduction of neutrophil mediated tissue damage in the animal models of inflammation and improved survival of mice in CLP-induced sepsis.

  2. Cartilage collagen damage in hip osteoarthritis similar to that seen in knee osteoarthritis; a case–control study of relationship between collagen, glycosaminoglycan and cartilage swelling

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    Hosseininia Shahrzad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It remains to be shown whether OA shares molecular similarities between different joints in humans. This study provides evidence for similarities in cartilage molecular damage in osteoarthritic (OA joints. Methods Articular cartilage from osteoarthritic hip joints were analysed and compared to non-OA controls regarding collagen, glycosaminoglycan and water content. Femoral heads from 16 osteoarthritic (OA and 20 reference patients were obtained from hip replacement surgery due to OA and femoral neck fracture, respectively. Cartilage histological changes were assessed by Mankin grading and denatured collagen type II immunostaining and cartilage was extracted by α-chymotrypsin. Hydroxyproline and Alcian blue binding assays were used to measure collagen and glycosaminoglycan (GAG content, respectively. Results Mankin and immunohistology scores were significantly higher in hip OA samples than in reference samples. Cartilage water content was 6% higher in OA samples than in references. 2.5 times more collagen was extracted from OA than from reference samples. There was a positive association between water content and percentage of extractable collagen pool (ECP in both groups. The amounts of collagen per wet and dry weights did not differ statistically between OA and reference cartilage. % Extractable collagen was not related to collagen per dry weight in either group. However when collagen was expressed by wet weight there was a negative correlation between % extractable and collagen in OA cartilage. The amount of GAG per wet weight was similar in both groups but the amount of GAG per dry weight was higher in OA samples compared to reference samples, which suggests a capacity for GAG biosynthesis in hip OA cartilage. Neither of the studied parameters was related to age in either group. Conclusions Increased collagen extractability and water content in human hip cartilage is associated with OA pathology and can be observed at

  3. DC-SIGN and L-SIGN Are Attachment Factors That Promote Infection of Target Cells by Human Metapneumovirus in the Presence or Absence of Cellular Glycosaminoglycans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Leah; Gerstenberg, Kathleen; Ana-Sosa-Batiz, Fernanda; Parsons, Matthew S.; Farrukee, Rubaiyea; Krabbe, Mark; Spann, Kirsten; Brooks, Andrew G.; Londrigan, Sarah L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is well established that glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) function as attachment factors for human metapneumovirus (HMPV), concentrating virions at the cell surface to promote interaction with other receptors for virus entry and infection. There is increasing evidence to suggest that multiple receptors may exhibit the capacity to promote infectious entry of HMPV into host cells; however, definitive identification of specific transmembrane receptors for HMPV attachment and entry is complicated by the widespread expression of cell surface GAGs. pgsA745 Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are deficient in the expression of cell surface GAGs and resistant to HMPV infection. Here, we demonstrate that the expression of the Ca2+-dependent C-type lectin receptor (CLR) DC-SIGN (CD209L) or L-SIGN (CD209L) rendered pgsA745 cells permissive to HMPV infection. Unlike infection of parental CHO cells, HMPV infection of pgsA745 cells expressing DC-SIGN or L-SIGN was dynamin dependent and inhibited by mannan but not by pretreatment with bacterial heparinase. Parental CHO cells expressing DC-SIGN/L-SIGN also showed enhanced susceptibility to dynamin-dependent HMPV infection, confirming that CLRs can promote HMPV infection in the presence or absence of GAGs. Comparison of pgsA745 cells expressing wild-type and endocytosis-defective mutants of DC-SIGN/L-SIGN indicated that the endocytic function of CLRs was not essential but could contribute to HMPV infection of GAG-deficient cells. Together, these studies confirm a role for CLRs as attachment factors and entry receptors for HMPV infection. Moreover, they define an experimental system that can be exploited to identify transmembrane receptors and entry pathways where permissivity to HMPV infection can be rescued following the expression of a single cell surface receptor. IMPORTANCE On the surface of CHO cells, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) function as the major attachment factor for human metapneumoviruses (HMPV), promoting dynamin

  4. Effects of adeno-associated virus (AAV) of transforming growth factors beta1 and beta3 (TGFbeta1,3) on promoting synthesis of glycosaminoglycan and collagen type II of dedifferentiated nucleus pulposus (NP) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, JiaMing; Hu, YouGu; Wang, DeChun

    2007-10-01

    The effects of AAV-TGFbeta(1) and AAV-TGFbeta(3) on promoting synthesis of glycosaminoglycan and collagen type II of dedifferentiated rabbit lumbar disc NP cells were studied in this work. The rabbit lumbar disc NP cells were isolated and cultured. The earlier and later dedifferentiated NP cells were established by subculture. The AAV transfection efficiency to dedifferentiated NP cells was analyzed with AAV-EGFP in vitro. After dedifferentiated NP cells were transfected by AAV-TGFbeta(1) or AAV-TGFbeta(3), their biological effects on promoting synthesis of glycosaminoglycan or collagen type II were detected and compared by the methods of (35)S incorporation or immunoblotting. The experimental results showed that AAV could transfect efficiently the earlier dedifferentiated NP cells, but its transfection rate was shown to be at a low level to the later dedifferentiated NP cells. Both AAV-TGFbeta(1) and AAV-TGFbeta(3) could promote the earlier dedifferentiated NP cells to synthesize glycosaminoglycan and collagen type II, and the effect of AAV-TGFbeta(1) was better than that of AAV-TGFbeta(3). For the later dedifferentiated NP cells, the AAV-TGFbeta(3) could promote their synthesis, but AAV-TGFbeta(1) could slightly inhibit their synthesis. Therefore, AAV-TGFbeta(1) and AAV-TGFbeta(3) could be used for the earlier dedifferentiated NP cells, and the TGFbeta(3) could be used as the objective gene for the later dedifferentiated NP cells.

  5. Ring-Mesh Model of Proteoglycan Glycosaminoglycan Chains in Tendon based on Three-dimensional Reconstruction by Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takafumi; Kametani, Kiyokazu; Koyama, Yoh-Ichi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Imamura, Yasutada; Takehana, Kazushige; Hiramatsu, Kohzy

    2016-11-04

    Tendons are composed of collagen fibrils and proteoglycan predominantly consisting of decorin. Decorin is located on the d-band of collagen fibrils, and its glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains have been observed between collagen fibrils with transmission electron microscopy. GAG chains have been proposed to interact with each other or with collagen fibrils, but its three-dimensional organization remains unclear. In this report, we used focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy to examine the three-dimensional organization of the GAG chain in the Achilles tendon of mature rats embedded in epoxy resin after staining with Cupromeronic blue, which specifically stains GAG chains. We used 250 serial back-scattered electron images of longitudinal sections with a 10-nm interval for reconstruction. Three-dimensional images revealed that GAG chains form a ring mesh-like structure with each ring surrounding a collagen fibril at the d-band and fusing with adjacent rings to form the planar network. This ring mesh model of GAG chains suggests that more than two GAG chains may interact with each other around collagen fibrils, which could provide new insights into the roles of GAG chains. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Prevention of anti-microbial peptide LL-37-induced apoptosis and ATP release in the urinary bladder by a modified glycosaminoglycan.

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    Won Yong Lee

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis (IC, often referred to in combination with painful bladder syndrome, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the bladder. Current therapies primarily focus on replenishing urothelial glycosaminoglycan (GAG layer using GAG analogs and managing pain with supportive therapies. However, the elusive etiology of IC and the lack of animal models to study the disease have been major hurdles developing more effective therapeutics. Previously, we showed an increased urinary concentration of antimicrobial peptide LL-37 in spina bifida patients and used LL-37 to develop a mouse model of cystitis that mimics important clinical findings of IC. Here we investigate (1 the molecular mechanism of LL-37 induced cystitis in cultured human urothelial cells and in mice, (2 the protective effects of GM-0111, a modified GAG, within the context of this mechanism, (3 the physiological and molecular markers that correlate with the severity of the inflammation, and (4 the protective effects of several GAGs using these biomarkers in our LL-37 induced cystitis model. We find that LL-37 quickly induces release of ATP and apoptosis in the urothelium. These changes can be inhibited by a chemically-modified GAG, GM-0111. Furthermore, we also find that GAG analogs provide varying degrees of protection against LL-37 challenge in mice. These findings suggest that GM-0111 and possibly GAG molecules prevent the development of cystitis by blocking the apoptosis and the concurrent release of ATP from the urothelium.

  7. The TSG-6 and IαI Interaction Promotes a Transesterification Cleaving the Protein-Glycosaminoglycan-Protein (PGP) Cross-link

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanggaard, Kristian Wejse; Karring, Henrik; Valnickova, Zuzana

    2005-01-01

    During co-incubation of human inter-α-inhibitor (IαI) and human tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene 6 protein (TSG-6) SDS-stable interactions are formed between the two proteins. We have analyzed the products of this reaction and characterized the mechanism of complex formation. Following......, were formed. The formation of these complexes was prevented by the addition of hyaluronan. The cross-links stabilizing these complexes displaying properties similar to the protein-glycosaminoglycan-protein (PGP) cross-link. The TSG-6-containing SDS-stable complexes were composed of HC1·TSG-6 or HC2·TSG......-6 exclusively. Both glycosylated and non-glycosylated TSG-6 participated in the complex formation. The HC·TSG-6 cross-links were different from the PGP cross-link and were determined to be ester bonds between the α-carbonyl of the C-terminal Asp of the heavy chain and most likely a hydroxyl group...

  8. Glycosaminoglycans Regulate CXCR3 Ligands at Distinct Levels: Protection against Processing by Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV/CD26 and Interference with Receptor Signaling

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    Mieke Metzemaekers

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 direct chemotaxis of mainly T cells and NK cells through activation of their common CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR3. They are inactivated upon NH2-terminal cleavage by dipeptidyl peptidase IV/CD26. In the present study, we found that different glycosaminoglycans (GAGs protect the CXCR3 ligands against proteolytic processing by CD26 without directly affecting the enzymatic activity of CD26. In addition, GAGs were shown to interfere with chemokine-induced CXCR3 signaling. The observation that heparan sulfate did not, and heparin only moderately, altered CXCL10-induced T cell chemotaxis in vitro may be explained by a combination of protection against proteolytic inactivation and altered receptor interaction as observed in calcium assays. No effect of CD26 inhibition was found on CXCL10-induced chemotaxis in vitro. However, treatment of mice with the CD26 inhibitor sitagliptin resulted in an enhanced CXCL10-induced lymphocyte influx into the joint. This study reveals a dual role for GAGs in modulating the biological activity of CXCR3 ligands. GAGs protect the chemokines from proteolytic cleavage but also directly interfere with chemokine–CXCR3 signaling. These data support the hypothesis that both GAGs and CD26 affect the in vivo chemokine function.

  9. Reduction of the anticoagulant activity of glycosaminoglycans on the surface of the vascular endothelium by endotoxin and neutrophils: evaluation by an amidolytic assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyderman, R S; Klein, N J; Shennan, G I; Levin, M

    1992-09-15

    The processes that underlie the coagulopathy observed in severe infection are not fully understood, but seem to be due to an imbalance in the antithrombotic, and prothrombotic properties of the vascular endothelium. Sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) present on the vessel wall represent an important component of the non-thrombogenic nature of the endothelium. We have modified an amidolytic assay to study the functional ability of GAGs on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECS), and investigate the effect of E. coli endotoxin and neutrophils on HUVEC surface anticoagulant activity (SAA). Neither endotoxin alone, nor separated neutrophils at lower concentrations (less than 10(6) neutrophils per ml), had major effects on endothelial SAA. When activated neutrophils were incubated with HUVECS pre-stimulated with endotoxin, a significant decrease in SAA was seen using either plasma (mean percentage of control 67.8% +/- sem 7.8; p < 0.02) or purified ATIII (mean percentage of control 69% +/- sem 4.6; p < 0.001). We suggest that alterations in endothelial surface GAGs may occur during sepsis and inflammation, and that this may have important consequences for vascular function. This system will allow the further study of the role of GAGs in the intravascular thrombosis of severe sepsis, and other inflammatory diseases.

  10. Complementing the sugar code: role of GAGs and sialic acid in complement regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex eLangford-Smith

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sugar molecules play a vital role on both microbial and mammalian cells, where they are involved in cellular communication, govern microbial virulence and modulate host immunity and inflammatory responses. The complement cascade, as part of a host’s innate immune system, is a potent weapon against invading bacteria but has to be tightly regulated to prevent inappropriate attack and damage to host tissues. A number of complement regulators, such as factor H and properdin, interact with sugar molecules, such as glycosaminoglycans and sialic acid, on host and pathogen membranes and direct the appropriate complement response by either promoting the binding of complement activators or inhibitors. The binding of these complement regulators to sugar molecules can vary from location to location, due to their different specificities and because distinct structural and functional subpopulations of sugars are found in different human organs, such as the brain, kidney and eye. This review will cover recent studies that have provided important new insights into the role of glycosaminoglycans and sialic acid in complement regulation and how sugar recognition may be compromised in disease

  11. Immunomodulating activities of acidic sulphated polysaccharides obtained from the seaweed Ulva rigida C. Agardh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiro, José M; Castro, Rosario; Arranz, Jon A; Lamas, Jesús

    2007-07-01

    Water-soluble acidic polysaccharides from the cell walls of Ulva rigida are mainly composed of disaccharides that contain glucuronic acid and sulphated rhamnose. The structure of disaccharides resembles that of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) as they both contain glucuronic acid and sulphated sugars. Glycosaminoglycans occur in the extracellular matrix of animal connective tissues but can also be produced by leucocytes at inflammatory sites. Certain types of GAGs can even activate macrophages and therefore the acidic polysaccharides from U. rigida probably modulate macrophage activity. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of U. rigida polysaccharides on several RAW264.7 murine macrophage activities, including expression of inflammatory cytokines and receptors, nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 (PGE(2)) production, and nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS-2) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression. U. rigida acidic polysaccharides induced a more than two-fold increase in the expression of several chemokines (chemokine (C motif) ligand 1, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 22 and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 14 (Cxcl14)) and in the expression of IL6 signal transducer and IL12 receptor beta 1. Incubation of macrophages with U. rigida polysaccharides also induced an increase in nitrite production, although this effect decreased considerably after desulphation of polysaccharides, suggesting that the sulphate group is important for the stimulatory capacity of these molecules. U. rigida polysaccharides also stimulated macrophage secretion of PGE(2) and induced an increase in COX-2 and NOS-2 expression. The results indicate that U. rigida acid polysaccharide can be used as an experimental immunostimulant for analysing inflammatory responses related to macrophage functions. In addition, these polysaccharides may also be of clinical interest for modifying certain macrophage activities in diseases where macrophage function is impaired or needs

  12. Effects of oral administration of N-acetyl-d-glucosamine on plasma and urine concentrations of glycosaminoglycans in cats with idiopathic cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchaphanpong, Jinnapat; Asawakarn, Tanong; Pusoonthornthum, Rosama

    2011-06-01

    To determine the effects of once-daily oral administration of N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (NAG) on plasma and urine glycosaminoglycan (GAG) concentrations in cats with idiopathic cystitis (IC). 19 cats with IC and 10 clinically normal cats. Cats with IC were randomly assigned to receive 250 mg of NAG in capsule form orally once daily for 28 days (n = 12) or a placebo (capsule containing cellulose) orally once daily for the same period (7). In cats with IC, plasma and urine GAG concentrations and urine creatinine concentration were measured on days 0 (immediately before first dose), 7, 14, 21, 28, and 56. For purposes of comparison, those variables were measured in 10 clinically normal cats on day 0. Mean ± SEM urine GAG-to-creatinine concentration ratios (day 0 data) for cats with IC and clinically normal cats differed significantly (3.11 ± 0.62 μg/mL and 14.23 ± 3.47 μg/mL, respectively). For cats with IC, mean plasma GAG concentration in NAG-treated cats (39.96 ± 5.34 μg/mL) was higher than that in placebo-treated cats (24.20 ± 3.35 μg/mL) on day 21. In the NAG-treated cats, plasma GAG concentration on days 21 (39.96 ± 5.34 μg/mL) and 28 (39.91 ± 6.74 μg/mL) differed significantly from the day 0 concentration (27.46 ± 3.90μg/mL). Cats with IC have lower urinary GAG-to-creatinine concentration ratios than did clinically normal cats. Administration of NAG (250 mg, PO, q 24 h) significantly increased plasma GAG concentrations in cats with IC after 21 days of treatment.

  13. Holothurian glycosaminoglycan inhibits metastasis and thrombosis via targeting of nuclear factor-κB/tissue factor/Factor Xa pathway in melanoma B16F10 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Daohai; Wang, Sheng; Tao, Li; Wang, Aiyun; Chen, Wenxing; Zhu, Zhijie; Zheng, Shizhong; Gao, Xiang; Lu, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Holothurian glycosaminoglycan (hGAG) is a high-molecular-weight form of fucosylated chondroitin sulfate and has an antithrombotic effect. Our previous studies demonstrated that hGAG efficiently inhibited tumor cell metastasis. The interplays between thrombosis and tumor progression may have a major impact on hematogenous metastasis. In this study, we demonstrated that the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells treated with hGAG displayed a significant reduction of metastasis and coagulation capacity in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies revealed that hGAG treatment in B16F10 cells remarkably inhibited the formation of fibrin through attenuating the generation of activated Factor Xa (FXa), without affecting the expression of urokinase (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) that involved in fibrinolysis. Moreover, hGAG treatment downregulated the transcription and protein expression of tissue factor (TF). Promoter deletions, site mutations and functional studies identified that the nuclear transcription factor NF-κB binding region is responsible for hGAG-induced inhibition of TF expression. While the hGAG treatment of B16F10 cells was unable to inhibit NF-κB expression and phosphorylation, hGAG significantly prevented nuclear translocation of NF-κB from the cytosol, a potential mechanism underlying the transcriptional suppression of TF. Moreover, hGAG markedly suppressed the activation of p38MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways, the central regulators for the expression of metastasis-related matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Consequently, hGAG exerts a dual function in the inhibition of metastasis and coagulation activity in mouse melanoma B16F10 cells. Our studies suggest hGAG to be a promising therapeutic agent for metastatic cancer treatment.

  14. Collagen and Glycosaminoglycan Profiles in the Canine Cervix during Different Stages of the Estrous Cycle and in Open- and Closed-Cervix Pyometra

    Science.gov (United States)

    LINHARATTANARUKSA, Pichanun; SRISUWATANASAGUL, Sayamon; PONGLOWHAPAN, Suppawiwat; KHALID, Muhammad; CHATDARONG, Kaywalee

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The extracellular matrix of the cervix that comprises collagen, elastin, proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) is thought to have an essential role in cervical relaxation. This study investigated the proportion of collagen and smooth muscle as well as the GAGs in cervices obtained from healthy bitches at different stages of the estrous cycle and bitches with open- and closed-cervix pyometra. Cervices were collected after ovariohysterectomy. The proportion of collagen to smooth muscle was determined using Masson’s trichrome staining. Alcian blue staining was used to evaluate the relative distribution of cervical GAGs. The proportion of cervical collagen relative to smooth muscle was higher at estrus compared to anestrus (P≤0.05). It was also higher (P≤0.05) in bitches with open- compared to those with closed-cervix pyometra. Overall, hyaluronan (HA) was the predominant GAG in the canine cervix. In the luminal epithelium, the staining intensity for HA was stronger in estrus than in anestrus (P≤0.05), but not in diestrus (P>0.05). On the contrary, the intensity for the combined keratan sulfate (KS) and heparan sulfate (HS) was stronger in anestrus than in estrus and diestrus (P≤0.05). In bitches with pyometra, the staining intensity of the stroma for KS and HS was weaker in open- compared to closed-cervix pyometra (P≤0.05). Collectively, the different profiles of collagen and GAG suggest that the metabolism of both collagen and GAGs in the canine cervix is associated with hormonal statuses during the estrous cycle and cervical patency of bitches with pathological uterine conditions, such as pyometra. PMID:24152876

  15. The designer aminoglycoside NB84 significantly reduces glycosaminoglycan accumulation associated with MPS I-H in the Idua-W392X mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Belakhov, Valery; Kandasamy, Jeyakumar; Baasov, Timor; Li, Su-Chen; Li, Yu-Teh; Bedwell, David M; Keeling, Kim M

    2012-01-01

    Suppression therapy utilizes compounds that suppress translation termination at in-frame premature termination codons (PTCs) to restore full-length, functional protein. This approach may provide a treatment for diseases caused by nonsense mutations such as mucopolysaccharidosis type I-Hurler (MPS I-H). MPS I-H is a lysosomal storage disease caused by severe α-L-iduronidase deficiency and subsequent lysosomal glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation. MPS I-H represents a good target for suppression therapy because the majority of MPS I-H patients carry nonsense mutations, and restoration of even a small amount of functional α-L-iduronidase may attenuate the MPS I-H phenotype. In this study, we investigated the efficiency of suppression therapy agents to suppress the Idua-W392X nonsense mutation in an MPS I-H mouse model. The drugs tested included the conventional aminoglycosides gentamicin, G418, amikacin, and paromomycin. In addition, the designer aminoglycosides NB54 and NB84, two compounds previously designed to mediate efficient PTC suppression with reduced toxicity, were also examined. Overall, NB84 suppressed the Idua-W392X nonsense mutation much more efficiently than any of the other compounds tested. NB84 treatment restored enough functional α-L-iduronidase activity to partially reverse abnormal GAG accumulation and lysosomal abundance in mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from the Idua-W392X mouse. Finally, in vivo administration of NB84 to Idua-W392X mice significantly reduced urine GAG excretion and tissue GAG storage. Together, these results suggest that NB84-mediated suppression therapy has the potential to attenuate the MPS I-H disease phenotype. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A Simple Method for Discovering Druggable, Specific Glycosaminoglycan-Protein Systems. Elucidation of Key Principles from Heparin/Heparan Sulfate-Binding Proteins.

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    Aurijit Sarkar

    Full Text Available Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs affect human physiology and pathology by modulating more than 500 proteins. GAG-protein interactions are generally assumed to be ionic and nonspecific, but specific interactions do exist. Here, we present a simple method to identify the GAG-binding site (GBS on proteins that in turn helps predict high specific GAG-protein systems. Contrary to contemporary thinking, we found that the electrostatic potential at basic arginine and lysine residues neither identifies the GBS consistently, nor its specificity. GBSs are better identified by considering the potential at neutral hydrogen bond donors such as asparagine or glutamine sidechains. Our studies also reveal that an unusual constellation of ionic and non-ionic residues in the binding site leads to specificity. Nature engineers the local environment of Asn45 of antithrombin, Gln255 of 3-O-sulfotransferase 3, Gln163 and Asn167 of 3-O-sulfotransferase 1 and Asn27 of basic fibroblast growth factor in the respective GBSs to induce specificity. Such residues are distinct from other uncharged residues on the same protein structure in possessing a significantly higher electrostatic potential, resultant from the local topology. In contrast, uncharged residues on nonspecific GBSs such as thrombin and serum albumin possess a diffuse spread of electrostatic potential. Our findings also contradict the paradigm that GAG-binding sites are simply a collection of contiguous Arg/Lys residues. Our work demonstrates the basis for discovering specifically interacting and druggable GAG-protein systems based on the structure of protein alone, without requiring access to any structure-function relationship data.

  17. Chondroitin sulfate, hyaluronic acid and chitin/chitosan production using marine waste sources: characteristics, applications and eco-friendly processes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, José Antonio; Rodríguez-Amado, Isabel; Montemayor, María Ignacia; Fraguas, Javier; González, María Del Pilar; Murado, Miguel Anxo

    2013-03-11

    In the last decade, an increasing number of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), chitin and chitosan applications have been reported. Their commercial demands have been extended to different markets, such as cosmetics, medicine, biotechnology, food and textiles. Marine wastes from fisheries and aquaculture are susceptible sources for polymers but optimized processes for their recovery and production must be developed to satisfy such necessities. In the present work, we have reviewed different alternatives reported in the literature to produce and purify chondroitin sulfate (CS), hyaluronic acid (HA) and chitin/chitosan (CH/CHs) with the aim of proposing environmentally friendly processes by combination of various microbial, chemical, enzymatic and membranes strategies and technologies.

  18. Chondroitin Sulfate, Hyaluronic Acid and Chitin/Chitosan Production Using Marine Waste Sources: Characteristics, Applications and Eco-Friendly Processes: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Anxo Murado

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, an increasing number of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, chitin and chitosan applications have been reported. Their commercial demands have been extended to different markets, such as cosmetics, medicine, biotechnology, food and textiles. Marine wastes from fisheries and aquaculture are susceptible sources for polymers but optimized processes for their recovery and production must be developed to satisfy such necessities. In the present work, we have reviewed different alternatives reported in the literature to produce and purify chondroitin sulfate (CS, hyaluronic acid (HA and chitin/chitosan (CH/CHs with the aim of proposing environmentally friendly processes by combination of various microbial, chemical, enzymatic and membranes strategies and technologies.

  19. A comparison of glycosaminoglycan distributions, keratan sulphate sulphation patterns and collagen fibril architecture from central to peripheral regions of the bovine cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Leona T Y; Harris, Anthony M; Tanioka, Hidetoshi; Yagi, Naoto; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Caterson, Bruce; Quantock, Andrew J; Young, Robert D; Meek, Keith M

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated changes in collagen fibril architecture and the sulphation status of keratan sulphate (KS) glycosaminoglycan (GAG) epitopes from central to peripheral corneal regions. Freshly excised adult bovine corneal tissue was examined as a function of radial position from the centre of the cornea outwards. Corneal thickness, tissue hydration, hydroxyproline content, and the total amount of sulphated GAG were all measured. High and low-sulphated epitopes of keratan sulphate were studied by immunohistochemistry and quantified by ELISA. Chondroitin sulphate (CS) and dermatan sulphate (DS) distributions were observed by immunohistochemistry following specific enzyme digestions. Electron microscopy and X-ray fibre diffraction were used to ascertain collagen fibril architecture. The bovine cornea was 1021±5.42 μm thick at its outer periphery, defined as 9-12 mm from the corneal centre, compared to 844±8.10 μm at the centre. The outer periphery of the cornea was marginally, but not significantly, more hydrated than the centre (H=4.3 vs. H=3.7), and was more abundant in hydroxyproline (0.12 vs. 0.06 mg/mg dry weight of cornea). DMMB assays indicated no change in the total amount of sulphated GAG across the cornea. Immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of both high- and low-sulphated epitopes of KS, as well as DS, throughout the cornea, and CS only in the peripheral cornea before the limbus. Quantification by ELISA, disclosed that although both high- and low-sulphated KS remained constant throughout stromal depth at different radial positions, high-sulphated epitopes remained constant from the corneal centre to outer-periphery, whereas low-sulphated epitopes increased significantly. Both small angle X-ray diffraction and TEM analysis revealed that collagen fibril diameter remained relatively constant until the outer periphery was reached, after which fibrils became more widely spaced (from small angle x-ray diffraction analysis) and of larger diameter

  20. The effects of an oral preparation containing hyaluronic acid (Oralvisc®) on obese knee osteoarthritis patients determined by pain, function, bradykinin, leptin, inflammatory cytokines, and heavy water analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, F R; Zvirbulis, R A; Zonca, B; Li, K W; Turner, S M; Pasierb, M; Wilton, P; Martinez-Puig, D; Wu, W

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an oral preparation containing hyaluronic acid on osteoarthritic knee joint pain and function as well as changes in inflammatory cytokines, bradykinin, and leptin. We also used heavy water to determine the turnover rates of glycosaminoglycans in synovial fluid. This was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study of 40 subjects over a period of 3 months. Visual analog scale, Western Ontario McMaster pain, and WOMAC function scores were recorded. Serum and synovial fluid were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for inflammatory cytokines, bradykinin, and leptin. In 20 subjects, terminal heavy water ingestion was used for spectral analyses of serum and joint fluid samples. There were statistically significant improvements in pain and function. Both serum and synovial fluid samples showed significant decreases for a majority of inflammatory cytokines, leptin, and bradykinin in the oral hyaluronic acid preparation group. Heavy water analyses revealed a significant decrease in hyaluronic acid turnover in the synovial fluid of the treatment group. A preparation containing hyaluronic acid and other glycosaminoglycans holds promise for a safe and effective agent for the treatment for patients with knee osteoarthritis and who are overweight. Further studies will be required to see whether this is a disease-modifying agent.

  1. Ascorbic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascorbic acid is used to prevent and treat scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C ... Ascorbic acid comes in extended-release (long-acting) capsules and tablets, lozenges, syrup, chewable tablets, and liquid drops ...

  2. Mefenamic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefenamic acid is used to relieve mild to moderate pain, including menstrual pain (pain that happens before or during a menstrual period). Mefenamic acid is in a class of medications called NSAIDs. ...

  3. Obeticholic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeticholic acid is used alone or in combination with ursodiol (Actigall, Urso) to treat primary biliary cholangitis (PBC; a ... were not treated successfully with ursodiol alone. Obeticholic acid is in a class of medications called farnesoid ...

  4. Ethacrynic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  5. Amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  6. Hyaluronic Acid Conjugates as Vectors for the Active Targeting of Drugs, Genes and Nanocomposites in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Arpicco

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid (HA is a naturally-occurring glycosaminoglycan and a major component of the extracellular matrix. Low levels of the hyaluronic acid receptor CD44 are found on the surface of epithelial, hematopoietic, and neuronal cells; it is overexpressed in many cancer cells, and in particular in tumor-initiating cells. HA has recently attracted considerable interest in the field of developing drug delivery systems, having been used, as such or encapsulated in different types of nanoassembly, as ligand to prepare nano-platforms for actively targeting drugs, genes, and diagnostic agents. This review describes recent progress made with the several chemical strategies adopted to synthesize conjugates and prepare novel delivery systems with improved behaviors.

  7. Fatty acids - trans fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The data supporting a negative effect of dietary trans fatty acids on cardiovascular disease risk is consistent. The primary dietary sources of trans fatty acids include partially hydrogenated fat and rudiment fat. The adverse effect of trans fatty acids on plasma lipoprotein profiles is consisten...

  8. Endometrial Osseous Metaplasia: Case Report with Literature Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [8]. Roth and Taylor (1966) demonstrated the presence of acid mucopolysaccharides, thereby supporting the capability of mature endometrial stromal cells to undergo cartilaginous metaplasia in response to chronic inflammation or trauma. The.

  9. Ibotenic acid and thioibotenic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermit, Mette B; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Nielsen, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we have determined and compared the pharmacological profiles of ibotenic acid and its isothiazole analogue thioibotenic acid at native rat ionotropic glutamate (iGlu) receptors and at recombinant rat metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors expressed in mammalian cell lines....... Thioibotenic acid has a distinct pharmacological profile at group III mGlu receptors compared with the closely structurally related ibotenic acid; the former is a potent (low microm) agonist, whereas the latter is inactive. By comparing the conformational energy profiles of ibotenic and thioibotenic acid...... with the conformations preferred by the ligands upon docking to mGlu1 and models of the other mGlu subtypes, we propose that unlike other subtypes, group III mGlu receptor binding sites require a ligand conformation at an energy level which is prohibitively expensive for ibotenic acid, but not for thioibotenic acid...

  10. Okadaic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H; Severinsen, Mai C K

    2014-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a polyether fatty acid produced by marine dinoflagellates and the causative agent of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning. The effect of OA on apical endocytosis in the small intestine was studied in organ cultured porcine mucosal explants. Within 0.5-1 h of culture, the toxin caused...... in acidic organelles, implying a different toxic mechanism of action. We propose that rapid induction of LBs, an indicator of phospholipidosis, should be included in the future toxicity profile of OA....

  11. Anesthetic management of a child with Hunter′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmeet Kaur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hunter′s syndrome is a member of a group of recessively inherited metabolic disorders termed mucopolysaccharidoses, caused by deficiency of lysosomal enzymes required for degradation of mucopolysaccharides or glycosaminoglycans, leading to accumulation of partially degraded glycosaminoglycans in various tissues. This leads to various anatomical abnormalities and systemic involvement, posing a challenge to an anesthetist. We present the anesthetic management of a 4-year old child with Hunter′s disease with anticipated difficult airway, who presented for adenotonsillectomy and repair of umbilical and inguinal hernia.

  12. Valproic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and spinal cord and can also cause lower intelligence in babies exposed to valproic acid before birth. ... all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any ...

  13. Carnosic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birtić, Simona; Dussort, Pierre; Pierre, François-Xavier; Bily, Antoine C; Roller, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Carnosic acid (salvin), which possesses antioxidative and antimicrobial properties, is increasingly exploited within the food, nutritional health and cosmetics industries. Since its first extraction from a Salvia species (∼70 years ago) and its identification (∼50 years ago), numerous articles and patents (∼400) have been published on specific food and medicinal applications of Rosmarinus and Salvia plant extracts abundant in carnosic acid. In contrast, relevant biochemical, physiological or molecular studies in planta have remained rare. In this overview, recent advances in understanding of carnosic acid distribution, biosynthesis, accumulation and role in planta, and its applications are summarised. We also discuss the deficiencies in our understanding of the relevant biochemical processes, and suggest the molecular targets of carnosic acid. Finally, future perspectives and studies related to its potential roles are highlighted. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Acid Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likens, Gene E.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the fact that the acidity of rain and snow falling on parts of the U.S. and Europe has been rising. The reasons are still not entirely clear and the consequences have yet to be well evaluated. (MLH)

  15. Folic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... okra, asparagus, fruits (such as bananas, melons, and lemons) beans, yeast, mushrooms, meat (such as beef liver ... after angioplasty. There is inconsistent evidence on the benefits of taking folic acid after a procedure to ...

  16. HALO-109-301: a Phase III trial of PEGPH20 (with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel) in hyaluronic acid-high stage IV pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Gary J; Tempero, Margaret; Corrie, Pippa G

    2018-01-01

    The outlook for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer remains poor, despite significant advances in our understanding of pancreatic tumor biology. One emerging theme highlights the distinct composition of the pancreatic tumor microenvironment. Hyaluronic acid is a hydrophilic glycosaminoglycan whose production within the tumor leads to increased interstitial tumor pressure, thereby limiting the access of potentially effective circulating anticancer drugs via reduced tumor perfusion. PEGylated rHuPH20 is a multiply PEGylated recombinant human hyaluronidase that has shown promising efficacy in preclinical models and early phase clinical trials in pancreatic cancer patients. Here, we discuss these findings, and the rationale for the ongoing randomized Phase III trial (HALO-109-301), which seeks to definitively define the efficacy of PEGylated rHuPH20 alongside gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel in previously untreated, hyaluronic acid-high, stage IV pancreatic cancer.

  17. Regulating Chondrogenesis of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells with a Retinoic Acid Receptor-Beta Inhibitor: Differential Sensitivity of Chondral Versus Osteochondral Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solvig Diederichs

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Main objective was to investigate whether the synthetic retinoic acid receptor (RAR-β antagonist LE135 is able to drive in vitro chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs or improve differentiation by suppressing hypertrophic chondrocyte development. Methods: Chondrogenesis of human bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived MSCs was induced in micromass pellet culture for six weeks. Effects of LE135 alone and in combinatorial treatment with TGF-β on deposition of cartilaginous matrix including collagen type II and glycosaminoglycans, on deposition of non-hyaline cartilage collagens type I and X, and on hypertrophy markers including alkaline phosphatase (ALP, indian hedghehog (IHH and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13 were assessed. Results: LE135 was no inducer of chondrogenesis and failed to stimulate deposition of collagen type II and glycosaminoglycans. Moreover, addition of LE135 to TGF-β-treated pellets inhibited cartilaginous matrix deposition and gene expression of COL2A1. In contrast, non-hyaline cartilage collagens were less sensitive to LE135 and hypertrophy markers remained unaffected. Conclusion: This demonstrates a differential sensitivity of chondral versus endochondral differentiation pathways to RARβ signaling; however, opposite to the desired direction. The relevance of trans-activating versus trans-repressing RAR signaling, including effects on activator protein (AP-1 is discussed and implications for overcoming current limits of hMSC chondrogenesis are considered.

  18. Hyaluronic Acid Coating Enhances Biocompatibility of Nonwoven PGA Scaffold and Cartilage Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xunxun; Wang, Wenbo; Zhang, Wenjie; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhou, Guangdong; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Wei

    2017-02-01

    Synthetic polymers such as polyglycolic acid (PGA) fibers are the traditional tissue engineering scaffolds that are widely used for engineering a variety of soft tissues. However, the major disadvantage of this polymer material is its released acidic degradation products that trigger inflammatory response and fibrotic process, which affects the biocompatibility and the quality of the engineered tissues. In this study, the effect of hyaluronic acid (HA) coating on improving PGA biocompatibility was explored. The results showed that 1% HA solution could better coat PGA fibers than other tested concentrations of HA, and coated PGA exhibited less inflammatory reaction upon in vivo subcutaneous implantation. In vitro characterization demonstrated that HA coating could enhance cell adhesion to the scaffold and reduce gene expression of IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, and α-SMA. It also decreased the acidity of degradation products in vitro. Furthermore, coated PGA could engineer better cartilages in vitro with higher content of total collagen and glycosaminoglycan, as well as higher gene expression levels of collagen II, aggrecan, and Sox9. Collectively, the data indicate that HA coating can significantly enhance the biocompatibility of this traditional scaffold material, which also enhances the quality of engineered tissues.

  19. Horizontal gene transfer contributed to the evolution of extracellular surface structures: the freshwater polyp Hydra is covered by a complex fibrous cuticle containing glycosaminoglycans and proteins of the PPOD and SWT (sweet tooth) families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, Angelika; Doxey, Andrew C; Hess, Michael W; Pfaller, Kristian; Salvenmoser, Willi; Deutzmann, Rainer; Geissner, Andreas; Pauly, Barbara; Altstätter, Johannes; Münder, Sandra; Heim, Astrid; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; McConkey, Brendan J; David, Charles N

    2012-01-01

    The single-cell layered ectoderm of the fresh water polyp Hydra fulfills the function of an epidermis by protecting the animals from the surrounding medium. Its outer surface is covered by a fibrous structure termed the cuticle layer, with similarity to the extracellular surface coats of mammalian epithelia. In this paper we have identified molecular components of the cuticle. We show that its outermost layer contains glycoproteins and glycosaminoglycans and we have identified chondroitin and chondroitin-6-sulfate chains. In a search for proteins that could be involved in organising this structure we found PPOD proteins and several members of a protein family containing only SWT (sweet tooth) domains. Structural analyses indicate that PPODs consist of two tandem β-trefoil domains with similarity to carbohydrate-binding sites found in lectins. Experimental evidence confirmed that PPODs can bind sulfated glycans and are secreted into the cuticle layer from granules localized under the apical surface of the ectodermal epithelial cells. PPODs are taxon-specific proteins which appear to have entered the Hydra genome by horizontal gene transfer from bacteria. Their acquisition at the time Hydra evolved from a marine ancestor may have been critical for the transition to the freshwater environment.

  20. Horizontal gene transfer contributed to the evolution of extracellular surface structures: the freshwater polyp Hydra is covered by a complex fibrous cuticle containing glycosaminoglycans and proteins of the PPOD and SWT (sweet tooth families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Böttger

    Full Text Available The single-cell layered ectoderm of the fresh water polyp Hydra fulfills the function of an epidermis by protecting the animals from the surrounding medium. Its outer surface is covered by a fibrous structure termed the cuticle layer, with similarity to the extracellular surface coats of mammalian epithelia. In this paper we have identified molecular components of the cuticle. We show that its outermost layer contains glycoproteins and glycosaminoglycans and we have identified chondroitin and chondroitin-6-sulfate chains. In a search for proteins that could be involved in organising this structure we found PPOD proteins and several members of a protein family containing only SWT (sweet tooth domains. Structural analyses indicate that PPODs consist of two tandem β-trefoil domains with similarity to carbohydrate-binding sites found in lectins. Experimental evidence confirmed that PPODs can bind sulfated glycans and are secreted into the cuticle layer from granules localized under the apical surface of the ectodermal epithelial cells. PPODs are taxon-specific proteins which appear to have entered the Hydra genome by horizontal gene transfer from bacteria. Their acquisition at the time Hydra evolved from a marine ancestor may have been critical for the transition to the freshwater environment.

  1. Residual glycosaminoglycan accumulation in mitral and aortic valves of a patient with attenuated MPS I (Scheie syndrome after 6 years of enzyme replacement therapy: Implications for early diagnosis and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Sato

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS is an inherited metabolic disease caused by deficiency of the enzymes needed for glycosaminoglycan (GAG degradation. MPS type I is caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-l-iduronidase and is classified into Hurler syndrome, Scheie syndrome, and Hurler–Scheie syndrome based on disease severity and onset. Cardiac complications such as left ventricular hypertrophy, cardiac valve disease, and coronary artery disease are often observed in MPS type I. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT has been available for MPS type I, but the efficacy of this treatment for cardiac valve disease is unknown. We report on a 56-year-old female patient with attenuated MPS I (Scheie syndrome who developed aortic and mitral stenosis and coronary artery narrowing. The cardiac valve disease progressed despite ERT and she finally underwent double valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting. The pathology of the cardiac valves revealed GAG accumulation and lysosomal enlargement in both the mitral and aortic valves. Zebra body formation was also confirmed using electron microscopy. Our results suggest that ERT had limited efficacy in previously established cardiac valve disease. Early diagnosis and initiation of ERT is crucial to avoid further cardiac complications in MPS type I.

  2. Polymeric microcapsules poduction from sodium alginic acid for cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Vale Campos Lisboa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Development of polymeric materials has been increasingly emphasized in Biomedicine. Here, we evaluate the use of microcapsules made of Biodritin®, a biocompatible polymer compound which contains sodium alginic acid, a natural polymer extracted from algae, and Cis-Chondroitin sulfate, a glycosaminoglycan from the extracellular matrix. Gelation of this polymer into microcapsules is achieved by dropping the compound into BaCl2 or CaCl2 gelling solutions. A functional microcapsule is dependent on its permeability, mechanical stability, immunoisolation capacity and biocompatibility. The mechanical stability of Biodritin-barium and Biodritin-calcium microcapsules was investigated after rotational stress upon in vitro culture and in vivo implantation. Viability studies of encapsulated cells were also performed to assess other functional parameters of the microcapsules. When subject to rotational stress, Biodritin-barium microcapsules exhibited breaks, whereas the Biodritin-calcium microcapsules did not. Both kinds of Biodritin® microcapsules proved to be mechanically resistant in in vitro and in vivo studies. However, the Biodritin-calcium material was found to be more elastic while the Biodritin-barium microcapsules displayed a more plastic behavior. These properties seem to be determinant for viability of the encapsulated cell’s, since the Biodritin-calcium microcapsules presented more viable cells than the Biodritin-barium microcapsules.

  3. Lipoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Tetikcok

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lipoic acid, which is defined as a miralce antioxidan, is used by many departments. Eventhough clinical using data are very limited , it is used in treatment of diabetic neuropathy, physical therapy and rehabilitation clinic, dermatology clinic, geriatric clinics. It has usage area for cosmetic purposes. Although there are reports there are the direction of the effectiveness in these areas, the works done are not enough. Today lipoic acid , used in many areas ,is evaluated as universal antioxidant [J Contemp Med 2015; 5(3.000: 206-209

  4. Perfluorooctanoic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voogt, P.; Wexler, P.

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, 335-67-1) is used in fluoropolymer production and firefighting foams and persists in the environment. Human exposure to PFOA is mostly through the diet. PFOA primarily affects the liver and can cause developmental and reproductive toxic effects in test animals.

  5. Properties of acid polysaccharides and their chemical modification; Sansei tato no seijo to kagaku shushoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogamo, A. [Kitasato Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-03-25

    Polysaccharides are in presence throughout the kingdoms of animals, vegetables, and microbes, participating in biotic activities. It has been disclosed of late that they are closely related to biotic functions, and complex saccharides, such as glycosaminoglycan (CAG), which constitute the sugar chain are attracting attention above all. This report centers on CAG and discusses the properties of acid polysaccharides, their chemical modification, and applications. CAG in organisms combines with proteins such as collagen for the formation of connective tissues, and also combines in quantities in covalent bond with proteins that constitute thin and long high-molecular cores for the formation of gigantic molecules called proteoglycan. It is an acid sugar chain in which uronic acid and amino sugar having amino groups intertwine each other. The basic reactions to be utilized for the production of highly active saccharides on the basis of this structure are the lowering of molecular weight and sulfation. Activity against HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) is observed in marine alga saccharide carageenan, and studies are under way for variously modifying it for development into medicine. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Fibrin and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid hybrid scaffold promotes early chondrogenesis of articular chondrocytes: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idrus Ruszymah BH

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic- and naturally derived- biodegradable polymers have been widely used to construct scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA are bioresorbable and biocompatible, rendering them as a promising tool for clinical application. To minimize cells lost during the seeding procedure, we used the natural polymer fibrin to immobilize cells and to provide homogenous cells distribution in PLGA scaffolds. We evaluated in vitro chondrogenesis of rabbit articular chondrocytes in PLGA scaffolds using fibrin as cell transplantation matrix. Methods PLGA scaffolds were soaked in chondrocytes-fibrin suspension (1 × 106cells/scaffold and polymerized by dropping thrombin-calcium chloride (CaCl2 solution. PLGA-seeded chondrocytes was used as control. All constructs were cultured for a maximum of 21 days. Cell proliferation activity was measured at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days in vitro using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl-2-, 5-diphenyltetrazolium-bromide (MTT assay. Morphological observation, histology, immunohistochemistry (IHC, gene expression and sulphated-glycosaminoglycan (sGAG analyses were performed at each time point of 1, 2 and 3 weeks to elucidate in vitro cartilage development and deposition of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM. Results Cell proliferation activity was gradually increased from day-1 until day-14 and declined by day-21. A significant cartilaginous tissue formation was detected as early as 2-week in fibrin/PLGA hybrid construct as confirmed by the presence of cartilage-isolated cells and lacunae embedded within basophilic ECM. Cartilage formation was remarkably evidenced after 3 weeks. Presence of cartilage-specific proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan (GAG in fibrin/PLGA hybrid constructs were confirmed by positive Safranin O and Alcian Blue staining. Collagen type II exhibited intense immunopositivity at the pericellular matrix. Chondrogenic properties were further

  7. Levulinic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Hachuła

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The title compound (systematic name: 4-oxopentanoic acid, C5H8O3, is close to planar (r.m.s. deviation = 0.0762 Å. In the crystal, the molecules interact via O—H...O hydrogen bonds in which the hydroxy O atoms act as donors and the ketone O atoms in adjacent molecules as acceptors, forming C(7 chains along [20-1].

  8. Efeitos dos glicosaminoglicanos e sulfato de condroitina A sobre a cartilagem articular normal e com doença articular degenerativa em cães Glycosaminoglycans and chondroitin sulphate "A" effects on normal and osteoarthritic articular cartilage in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.T. Vieira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se os efeitos dos precursores dos glicosaminoglicanos (GAG e do sulfato de condroitina A (SC sobre a histomorfometria da cartilagem articular normal ou de cartilagem de cães com doença articular degenerativa (DAD experimental. Os grupos experimentais constituíram-se de animais com articulação direita normal, que não foi submetida a procedimento cirúrgico, e com articulação esquerda osteoartrótica e que foi submetida à intervenção cirúrgica. Os grupos foram subdivididos em animais com articulação não tratada e tratada, portanto: normais (N (n=5, NGAG (n=5 e NSC (n=4; e osteoartróticos (O (n=5, OGAG (n=5 e OSC (n=4. Secções de cartilagens do fêmur, da tíbia e da patela foram utilizadas neste estudo. Nos normais (N, NGAG e NSC, não se encontraram lesões que caracterizassem a DAD, embora tenha havido diminuição na celularidade nos de NGAG e NSC, em relação a N. Foram observadas alterações em graus variáveis entre os grupos osteoartróticos. Houve redução acentuada dos condrócitos no grupo O em comparação aos normais enquanto os grupos osteoartróticos tratados apresentaram celularidade semelhante aos normais tratados. Estes resultados foram confirmados pela análise do índice de proporção (IP, que se mostrou elevado em O, indicando menor síntese de proteoglicanos. Não houve diferença significativa entre os IPs dos grupos osteoartróticos tratados (OGAG, OSC apesar do comportamento distinto do OSC ao assemelhar-se aos grupos N e NSC. Estes resultados sugeriram que o SC agiu na cartilagem osteoartrótica de maneira mais eficaz, reduzindo a perda de proteoglicanos e estimulando a viabilidade celular e a atividade metabólica.The effects of precursors of glycosaminoglycans (GAG and chondroitin sulphate A (CS on the histomorphometry of normal articular cartilage and with experimental degenerative joint disease (DJD in dogs were evaluated. The groups were constituted as follows: normal joints were not

  9. Poly(γ-glutamic acid) and poly(γ-glutamic acid)-based nanocomplexes enhance type II collagen production in intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Joana C; Pereira, Catarina Leite; Teixeira, Graciosa Q; Silva, Ricardo V; Caldeira, Joana; Grad, Sibylle; Gonçalves, Raquel M; Barbosa, Mário A

    2017-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration often leads to low back pain, which is one of the major causes of disability worldwide, affecting more than 80% of the population. Although available treatments for degenerated IVD decrease symptoms' progression, they fail to address the underlying causes and to restore native IVD properties. Poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) has recently been shown to support the production of chondrogenic matrix by mesenchymal stem/stromal cells. γ-PGA/chitosan (Ch) nanocomplexes (NCs) have been proposed for several biomedical applications, showing advantages compared with either polymer alone. Hence, this study explores the potential of γ-PGA and γ-PGA/Ch NCs for IVD regeneration. Nucleotomised bovine IVDs were cultured ex vivo upon injection of γ-PGA (pH 7.4) and γ-PGA/Ch NCs (pH 5.0 and pH 7.4). Tissue metabolic activity and nucleus pulposus DNA content were significantly reduced when NCs were injected in acidic-buffered solution (pH 5.0). However, at pH 7.4, both γ-PGA and NCs promoted sulphated glycosaminoglycan production and significant type II collagen synthesis, as determined at the protein level. This study is a first proof of concept that γ-PGA and γ-PGA/Ch NCs promote recovery of IVD native matrix, opening new perspectives on the development of alternative therapeutic approaches for IVD degeneration.

  10. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  11. Novel use of a flowable collagen-glycosaminoglycan matrix (Integra™ Flowable Wound Matrix) combined with percutaneous cannula scar tissue release in treatment of post-burn malfunction of the hand--A preliminary 6 month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirche, C; Senghaas, A; Fischer, S; Hollenbeck, S T; Kremer, T; Kneser, U

    2016-02-01

    Long-term function following severe burns to the hand may be poor secondary to scar adhesions to the underlying tendons, webspaces, and joints. In this pilot study, we report the feasibility of applying a pasty dermal matrix combined with percutaneous cannula teno- and adhesiolysis. In this 6 month follow-up pilot study, we included eight hands in five patients with hand burns undergoing minimal-invasive, percutaneous cannula adhesiolysis and injection of INTEGRA™ Flowable Wound Matrix for a pilot study of this new concept. The flowable collagen-glycosaminoglycan wound matrix (FCGWM) was applied with a buttoned 2mm cannula to induce formation of a neo-gliding plane. Post treatment follow-up was performed to assess active range of motion (AROM), grip strength, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score, Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) and quality of life Short-Form (SF)-36 questionnaire. No complications were detected associated with the treatment of FCGWM injection. The mean improvement (AROM) at 6 months was 30.6° for digits 2-5. The improvement in the DASH score was a mean of 9 points out of 100. The VSS improved by a mean of 2 points out of 14. The study demonstrates the feasibility and safety of percutaneous FCGWM for dermal augmentation after burn. Results from this pilot study show improvements in AROM for digits 2-5, functional scores from the patient's perspective (DASH) and scar quality (VSS). The flowable form of established INTEGRA™ wound matrix offers the advantage of minimal-invasive injection after scar release in the post-burned hand with a reduction in the risk of postsurgical re-scarring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  12. Is T1ρ Mapping an Alternative to Delayed Gadolinium-enhanced MR Imaging of Cartilage in the Assessment of Sulphated Glycosaminoglycan Content in Human Osteoarthritic Knees? An in Vivo Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tiel, Jasper; Kotek, Gyula; Reijman, Max; Bos, Pieter K; Bron, Esther E; Klein, Stefan; Nasserinejad, Kazem; van Osch, Gerjo J V M; Verhaar, Jan A N; Krestin, Gabriel P; Weinans, Harrie; Oei, Edwin H G

    2016-05-01

    To determine if T1ρ mapping can be used as an alternative to delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) in the quantification of cartilage biochemical composition in vivo in human knees with osteoarthritis. This study was approved by the institutional review board. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Twelve patients with knee osteoarthritis underwent dGEMRIC and T1ρ mapping at 3.0 T before undergoing total knee replacement. Outcomes of dGEMRIC and T1ρ mapping were calculated in six cartilage regions of interest. Femoral and tibial cartilages were harvested during total knee replacement. Cartilage sulphated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) and collagen content were assessed with dimethylmethylene blue and hydroxyproline assays, respectively. A four-dimensional multivariate mixed-effects model was used to simultaneously assess the correlation between outcomes of dGEMRIC and T1ρ mapping and the sGAG and collagen content of the articular cartilage. T1 relaxation times at dGEMRIC showed strong correlation with cartilage sGAG content (r = 0.73; 95% credibility interval [CI] = 0.60, 0.83) and weak correlation with cartilage collagen content (r = 0.40; 95% CI: 0.18, 0.58). T1ρ relaxation times did not correlate with cartilage sGAG content (r = 0.04; 95% CI: -0.21, 0.28) or collagen content (r = -0.05; 95% CI = -0.31, 0.20). dGEMRIC can help accurately measure cartilage sGAG content in vivo in patients with knee osteoarthritis, whereas T1ρ mapping does not appear suitable for this purpose. Although the technique is not completely sGAG specific and requires a contrast agent, dGEMRIC is a validated and robust method for quantifying cartilage sGAG content in human osteoarthritis subjects in clinical research. (©) RSNA, 2015.

  13. High levels of serum hyaluronic acid in adults with dermatomyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alana Ausciutti Victorino

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background / objectives. Hyaluronic acid (HA is rarely described in dermatomyositis (DM. Thus, we determined any clinical association of serum levels of hyaluronic acid (HA in patients with dermatomyositis (DM. Materials and Methods. This cross-sectional single-center analysis 75 DM and 75 healthy individuals, during the period from January 2012 to July 2013. An anti-HA antibody assay was performed using specific ELISA/EIA kits, according to the manufacturer’s protocol. Results. The patients with DM and control subjects had comparable demographic distributions (p>0.05. The median time duration between disease diagnosis and initial symptoms was 6.0 [3.0-12.0] months, with a median DM disease duration of 4.0 [1.0-7.0] years. The median level of serum HA was significantly increased in patients with DM compared to the control group [329.0 (80.0-958.0 vs. 133.0 (30.0-262.0 ng/mL, respectively; p0.05. Serum HA also did not correlate with gender, ethnicity, auto-antibodies or drug use (p>0.05, but did correlate with cutaneous features, such as photosensitivity (p=0.001, “shawl” sign (p=0.018, “V-neck” sign (p=0.005 and cuticular hypertrophy (p=0.014. Conclusions. A high level of serum AH was observed in DM compared to healthy individuals. In DM, HA did not correlate to demographic, auto-antibodies and therapy parameters. However, HA correlated specifically with some cutaneous features, suggesting that this glycosaminoglycan could be involved in modulating cutaneous inflammation in this population. More studies are necessary to understand the correlation between AH and patients with DM.

  14. Ferrocenylphosphonic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Zhang Yang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, [Fe(C5H5(C5H6O3P], the phosphate group is bonded to the ferrocene unit with a P—C bond length of 1.749 (3 Å. In the crystal, six ferrocenylphosphonic acid molecules are connected by 12 strong intermolecular O—H...O hydrogen bonds, leading to the formation of a highly distorted octahedral cage. The volume of the octahedral cage is about 270 Å3.

  15. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teens a Voice in Health Care Decisions Folic Acid and Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Folic Acid and ... conception and during early pregnancy . What Is Folic Acid? Folic acid, sometimes called folate, is a B ...

  16. New bioactive fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to the new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octad...

  17. Genetic basis for hyper production of hyaluronic acid in natural and engineered microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Juliana Davies; Carvalho, Lucas Silva; Gomes, Antônio Milton Vieira; Queiroz, Lúcio Rezende; Magalhães, Beatriz Simas; Parachin, Nádia Skorupa

    2016-07-01

    Hyaluronic acid, or HA, is a rigid and linear biopolymer belonging to the class of the glycosaminoglycans, and composed of repeating units of the monosaccharides glucuronic acid and N-acetylglucosamine. HA has multiple important functions in the human body, due to its properties such as bio-compatibility, lubricity and hydrophilicity, it is widely applied in the biomedical, food, health and cosmetic fields. The growing interest in this molecule has motivated the discovery of new ways of obtaining it. Traditionally, HA has been extracted from rooster comb-like animal tissues. However, due to legislation laws HA is now being produced by bacterial fermentation using Streptococcus zooepidemicus, a natural producer of HA, despite it being a pathogenic microorganism. With the expansion of new genetic engineering technologies, the use of organisms that are non-natural producers of HA has also made it possible to obtain such a polymer. Most of the published reviews have focused on HA formulation and its effects on different body tissues, whereas very few of them describe the microbial basis of HA production. Therefore, for the first time this review has compiled the molecular and genetic bases for natural HA production in microorganisms together with the main strategies employed for heterologous production of HA.

  18. Optimization of medium components for high-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid production by Streptococcus sp. ID9102 via a statistical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Jong-Hyuk; Song, Jung-Min; Kang, Jae-Hoon; Kang, Dae-Jung

    2009-11-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), linear high-molecular-weight glycosaminoglycan produced from Streptococcus sp., has raised interest in the medical and cosmetics industries because of the various biological functions of HA. In this paper, we report on the optimization of medium components for HA production in Streptococcus sp. ID9102 (KCTC 11935BP) by two-step optimization (one-factor-at-a-time and taguchi orthogonal array design). In the first step, medium components, such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphate, and mineral sources, were selected for HA production in Streptococcus sp. ID9102 (KCTC 11935BP) using the one-factor-at-a-time method. In the second step, the concentration of the selected medium components was optimized using taguchi orthogonal array design. The design for medium optimization was developed and analyzed using MINITAB 14 software. In addition, the effect of amino acid and organic acid, such as glutamine, glutamate, and oxalic acid, was studied for HA production in Streptococcus sp. ID9102 (KCTC 11935BP). Through these processes, the optimum medium comprising 4% glucose, 0.75% yeast extract, 1.0% casein peptone, 0.25% K(2)HPO(4), 0.05% MgCl(2), 0.5% NaCl, 0.04% glutamine, 0.06% glutamate, and 0.02% oxalic acid was determined. We were able to produce HA with a molecular weight of 5.9 x 10(6) at a productivity of 6.94 g/l on pilot scale fermentation.

  19. Engineering S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus towards concurrent production of hyaluronic acid and chondroitin biopolymers of biomedical interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, Donatella; Iacono, Ileana Dello; Carlino, Elisabetta; Finamore, Rosario; Restaino, Odile F; Diana, Paola; Bedini, Emiliano; Schiraldi, Chiara

    2017-12-01

    Glycosaminoglycans, such as hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulphate, are not only more and more required as main ingredients in cosmeceutical and nutraceutical preparations, but also as active principles in medical devices and pharmaceutical products. However, while biotechnological production of hyaluronic acid is industrially established through fermentation of Streptococcus spp. and recently Bacillus subtilis, biotechnological chondroitin is not yet on the market. A non-hemolytic and hyaluronidase negative S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus mutant strain was engineered in this work by the addition of two E. coli K4 genes, namely kfoA and kfoC, involved in the biosynthesis of chondroitin-like polysaccharide. Chondroitin is the precursor of chondroitin sulphate, a nutraceutical present on the market as anti-arthritic drug, that is lately being studied for its intrinsic bioactivity. In small scale bioreactor batch experiments the production of about 1.46 ± 0.38 g/L hyaluronic acid and 300 ± 28 mg/L of chondroitin with an average molecular weight of 1750 and 25 kDa, respectively, was demonstrated, providing an approach to the concurrent production of both biopolymers in a single fermentation.

  20. [Teichoic acids from lactic acid bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livins'ka, O P; Harmasheva, I L; Kovalenko, N K

    2012-01-01

    The current view of the structural diversity of teichoic acids and their involvement in the biological activity of lactobacilli has been reviewed. The mechanisms of effects of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, in particular adhesive and immunostimulating functions have been described. The prospects of the use of structure data of teichoic acid in the assessment of intraspecific diversity of lactic acid bacteria have been also reflected.

  1. Methods for measuring exchangeable protons in glycosaminoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beecher, Consuelo N; Larive, Cynthia K

    2015-01-01

    Recent NMR studies of the exchangeable protons of GAGs in aqueous solution, including those of the amide, sulfamate, and hydroxyl moieties, have demonstrated potential for the detection of intramolecular hydrogen bonds, providing insights into secondary structure preferences. GAG amide protons are observable by NMR over wide pH and temperature ranges; however, specific solution conditions are required to reduce the exchange rate of the sulfamate and hydroxyl protons and allow their detection by NMR. Building on the vast body of knowledge on detection of hydrogen bonds in peptides and proteins, a variety of methods can be used to identify hydrogen bonds in GAGs including temperature coefficient measurements, evaluation of chemical shift differences between oligo- and monosaccharides, and relative exchange rates measured through line shape analysis and EXSY spectra. Emerging strategies to allow direct detection of hydrogen bonds through heteronuclear couplings offer promise for the future. Molecular dynamic simulations are important in this effort both to predict and confirm hydrogen bond donors and acceptors.

  2. Histochemical determination of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 15% alcoholadministered embryos, while the heparine and heparane sulphate were dense around cells migrating from the NT, staining specificities were decreased in 20% alcohol-administered embryos in same regions. Increased alcohol degrees cause decrease of the GAG types in both areas. Key words: Neural tube ...

  3. Antiproliferative heparin (glycosaminoglycans) isolated from giant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... source of these sulfated polysaccharides (Nader and. Dietrich, 1989) and it often corresponds up to 90% of the total GAG content of these organisms. Heparin and heap- rin-like substances have a wide range of important biolo- gical activities including inhibition of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell ...

  4. Antiproliferative heparin (glycosaminoglycans) isolated from giant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heparin was isolated from two bivalve mollusks, Tridacna maxima (giant clam) and Perna viridis (green mussel). The isolated heparin was quantified in crude as well as purified samples and they were estimated as 2.72 and 2.2 g/kg (in crude) and 260 and 248 mg/g (in purified samples) in T. maxima and P. viridis, ...

  5. Uric acid test (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... for testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  6. Uric acid - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003616.htm Uric acid urine test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The uric acid urine test measures the level of uric acid ...

  7. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003565.htm Methylmalonic acid blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The methylmalonic acid blood test measures the amount of methylmalonic acid ...

  8. Plasma amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  9. Mitochondrial Targeted Doxorubicin-Triphenylphosphonium Delivered by Hyaluronic Acid Modified and pH Responsive Nanocarriers to Breast Tumor: in Vitro and in Vivo Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui-Na; Guo, Ning-Ning; Wang, Tian-Tian; Guo, Wang-Wei; Lin, Meng-Ting; Huang-Fu, Ming-Yi; Vakili, Mohammad Reza; Xu, Wen-Hong; Chen, Jie-Jian; Wei, Qi-Chun; Han, Min; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2018-02-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the major obstacle for chemotherapy. In a previous study, we have successfully synthesized a novel doxorubicin (DOX) derivative modified by triphenylphosphonium (TPP) to realize mitochondrial delivery of DOX and showed the potential of this compound to overcome DOX resistance in MDA-MB-435/DOX cells.1 To introduce specificity for DOX-TPP to cancer cells, here we report on the conjugation of DOX-TPP to hyaluronic acid (HA) by hydrazone bond with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) as the acid-responsive linker, producing HA-hydra-DOX-TPP nanoparticles. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a natural water-soluble linear glycosaminoglycan, which was hypothesized to increase the accumulation of nanoparticles containing DOX-TPP in the mitochondria of tumor cells upon systemic administration, overcoming DOX resistance, in vivo. Our results showed HA-hydra-DOX-TPP to self-assemble to core/shell nanoparticles of good dispersibility and effective release of DOX-TPP from the HA-hydra-DOX-TPP conjugate in cancer cells, which was followed by enhanced DOX mitochondria accumulation. The HA-hydra-DOX-TPP nanoparticles also showed improved anticancer effects, better tumor cell apoptosis, and better safety profile compared to free DOX in MCF-7/ADR bearing mice.

  10. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Chiba (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  11. Perfil de glicosaminoglicanos sulfatados no útero de camundongas durante o ciclo estral Profile of sulphated glycosaminoglycans content in the murine uterus during the different phases of the estrous cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Célia Teixeira Gomes

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Quantificar glicosaminoglicanos sulfatados (GAGs no útero de camundongas durante o ciclo estral. MÉTODOS: Utilizaram-se quatro grupos de camundongas virgens com 100 dias de idade (n= 10 cada conforme a fase ciclo estral: proestro, estro, metaestro e diestro. Amostras da porção média dos cornos uterinos foram preparadas para observação em microscopia de luz (H/E e Alcian blue + PAS. Os GAGs foram extraídos e caracterizados por eletroforese em gel de agarose. Os dados foram analisados pelo teste t de Student não pareado. RESULTADOS: À microscopia de luz, os GAGs sulfatados apresentam-se em todas as camadas do útero, em especial no endométrio, entre as fibras colágenas, na membrana basal e ao redor dos fibroblastos. A análise bioquímica mostrou haver dermatam sulfato (DS, condroitim sulfato (CS e heparam sulfato (HS durante todas as fases do ciclo estral. Não houve separação eletroforética clara entre DS e CS, de modo que estes dois GAGs foram considerados em conjunto (DS+CS (proestro = 0,854 ± 0,192; estro = 1,073 ± 0,254; metaestro = 1,003 ± 0,255; e diestro = 0,632 ± 0,443 µg/mg. Os resultados de HS foram: proestro = 0,092 ± 0,097; estro = 0,180 ± 0,141; metaestro = 0,091 ± 0,046; e diestro = 0,233 ± 0,147 µg/mg. A concentração DS+CS apresentou-se maior no estro (ação estrogênica e a do HS no diestro (ação progestagênica. CONCLUSÃO: Os GAGs no útero de camundongas sofrem alterações durante as fases do ciclo estral, refletindo o constante processo de renovação, sendo modulados pelos hormônios sexuais.OBJECTIVE: Identification and quantitation of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs in the uterus of female mice during the estrous cycle. METHODS: Four groups (n = 10 each of virgin, 100-day old female mice were assembled according to the estrous cycle phase: proestrus, estrus, metaestrus and diestrus. Samples of the median portion of uterine horns were processed for light microscopy examination (H

  12. Effect of hyaluronic acid in bone formation and its applications in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ningbo; Wang, Xin; Qin, Lei; Zhai, Min; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Ji; Li, Dehua

    2016-06-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), the simplest glycosaminoglycan, participates in several important biological procedures, including mediation of cellular signaling, regulation of cell adhesion and proliferation, and manipulation of cell differentiation. The effect of HA on cell proliferation and differentiation depends on its molecular weight (MW) and concentration. Moreover, the properties of high viscosity, elasticity, highly negative charge, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and nonimmunogenicity make HA attractive in tissue engineering and disease treatment. This review comprises an overview of the effect of HA on cell proliferation and differentiation in vitro, the role of HA in bone regeneration in vivo, and the clinical applications of HA in dentistry, focusing on the mechanism underlining the effect of MW and concentration of HA on cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. It is expected that practical progress of HA both in laboratory-based experiments and clinical applications will be achieved in the next few years. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1560-1569, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Epsilon-aminocaproic acid is a useful fibrin degradation inhibitor for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupcsik, Laszlo; Alini, Mauro; Stoddart, Martin J

    2009-08-01

    Fibrin is a hydrogel carrier widely used in cartilage tissue engineering. It is rapidly degraded by plasmin, which is produced by the cells. epsilon-Aminocaproic acid (EACA) can be used to inhibit this enzyme and thus save the fibrin carrier. In this study we investigated the effect of EACA on the transforming growth factor beta-1-induced chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). To assess this, we used the standard pellet culture system, and EACA treatment was compared to an untreated chondrogenic control. To investigate differentiation, real-time RT-PCR was used on chondrocytic marker genes: aggrecan, collagen types II and X, and the SRY-related HMG-box gene 9 (SOX9). Also, specific glycosaminoglycan production was measured. Safranin-O/fast green staining was used to localize proteoglycans and collagens within the pellet. All results concur that EACA did not affect the chondrogenic differentiation process at 5 muM concentration, which is adequate to inhibit fibrin degradation. Therefore, it is a useful plasmin inhibitor for cartilage tissue engineering with hMSCs.

  14. Development and characterization of hyaluronic acid-lysine nanoparticles with potential as innovative dermal filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Carneiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Skin aging causes changes such as wrinkles and flaccidity leading to a large demand for aesthetic procedures, including dermal filling. A key agent in dermal filling is hyaluronic acid (HA, which is a naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan. However, it is a hydrophilic macromolecule that experiences great difficulty in crossing the skin barrier causing most commercial formulations containing it to be injectable, which in turn brings risks since they involve an invasive technique. In that sense, the aim of this study was to develop and characterize nanoparticles obtained from ionic interaction between HA and lysine (Lys for use as a potential agent of dermal filling for topical application, increasing and improving its applicability and safety. To this end, nanoparticles were obtained by dripping of Lys over HA under magnetic stirring. A nanometric size was confirmed and a suitable surface charge was obtained by zeta potential. Nanoparticles were almost spherical in shape with a smooth surface. Interaction between raw materials for preparing nanoparticles was studied by FTIR and NMR spectroscopy and an ionic interaction was confirmed. These physicochemical features suggest that obtained nanoparticles can be further used as a topical dermal filling.

  15. Symptoms of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in Individuals with Mucopolysaccharide Disease Type III (Sanfilippo Syndrome): A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfenden, C.; Wittkowski, A.; Hare, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in many genetic disorders is well documented but not as yet in Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III). MPS III is a recessively inherited metabolic disorder and evidence suggests that symptoms of ASD present in MPS III. This systematic review examined the extant literature on the symptoms of ASD…

  16. Symptoms of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in Individuals with Mucopolysaccharide Disease Type III (Sanfilippo Syndrome): A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfenden, C.; Wittkowski, A.; Hare, D.J.

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in many genetic disorders is well documented but not as yet in Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III). MPS III is a recessively inherited metabolic disorder and evidence suggests that symptoms of ASD present in MPS III. This systematic review examined the extant literature on the symptoms of ASD in MPS III and quality assessed a total of 16 studies. Results indicated that difficulties within speech, language and communication consistent with ...

  17. Comparative analysis of poly-glycolic acid-based hybrid polymer starter matrices for in vitro tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generali, Melanie; Kehl, Debora; Capulli, Andrew K; Parker, Kevin K; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Weber, Benedikt

    2017-10-01

    Biodegradable scaffold matrixes form the basis of any in vitro tissue engineering approach by acting as a temporary matrix for cell proliferation and extracellular matrix deposition until the scaffold is replaced by neo-tissue. In this context several synthetic polymers have been investigated, however a concise systematic comparative analyses is missing. Therefore, the present study systematically compares three frequently used polymers for the in vitro engineering of extracellular matrix based on poly-glycolic acid (PGA) under static as well as dynamic conditions. Ultra-structural analysis was used to examine the polymers structure. For tissue engineering (TE) three human fibroblast cell lines were seeded on either PGA-poly-4-hydroxybutyrate (P4HB), PGA-poly-lactic acid (PLA) or PGA-poly-caprolactone (PCL) patches. These patches were analyzed after 21days of culture qualitative by histology and quantitative by determining the amount of DNA, glycosaminoglycan and hydroxyproline. We found that PGA-P4HB and PGA-PLA scaffolds enhance tissue formation significantly higher than PGA-PCL scaffolds (p<0.05). Polymer remnants were visualized by polarization microscopy. In addition, biomechanical properties of the tissue engineered patches were determined in comparison to native tissue. This study may allow future studies to specifically select certain polymer starter matrices aiming at specific tissue properties of the bioengineered constructs in vitro. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Composite active site of chondroitin lyase ABC accepting both epimers of uronic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaya, D.; Hahn, Bum-Soo; Bjerkan, Tonje Marita; Kim, Wan Seok; Park, Nam Young; Sim, Joon-Soo; Kim, Yeong-Shik; Cygler, M. (Catholic Univ of Korea); (NUST); (McGill); (Nat); (Natural Products Res Inst, Korea)

    2008-03-19

    Enzymes have evolved as catalysts with high degrees of stereospecificity. When both enantiomers are biologically important, enzymes with two different folds usually catalyze reactions with the individual enantiomers. In rare cases a single enzyme can process both enantiomers efficiently, but no molecular basis for such catalysis has been established. The family of bacterial chondroitin lyases ABC comprises such enzymes. They can degrade both chondroitin sulfate (CS) and dermatan sulfate (DS) glycosaminoglycans at the nonreducing end of either glucuronic acid (CS) or its epimer iduronic acid (DS) by a {beta}-elimination mechanism, which commences with the removal of the C-5 proton from the uronic acid. Two other structural folds evolved to perform these reactions in an epimer-specific fashion: ({alpha}/{alpha}){sub 5} for CS (chondroitin lyases AC) and {beta}-helix for DS (chondroitin lyases B); their catalytic mechanisms have been established at the molecular level. The structure of chondroitinase ABC from Proteus vulgaris showed surprising similarity to chondroitinase AC, including the presence of a Tyr-His-Glu-Arg catalytic tetrad, which provided a possible mechanism for CS degradation but not for DS degradation. We determined the structure of a distantly related Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron chondroitinase ABC to identify additional structurally conserved residues potentially involved in catalysis. We found a conserved cluster located {approx}12 {angstrom} from the catalytic tetrad. We demonstrate that a histidine in this cluster is essential for catalysis of DS but not CS. The enzyme utilizes a single substrate-binding site while having two partially overlapping active sites catalyzing the respective reactions. The spatial separation of the two sets of residues suggests a substrate-induced conformational change that brings all catalytically essential residues close together.

  19. Development of a novel metastatic breast cancer score based on hyaluronic acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mezayen, Hatem A; Toson, El-Shahat A; Darwish, Hossam; Metwally, Fatheya M

    2013-03-01

    Tumor metastasis involves the dissemination of malignant cells into the basement membrane, and the vascular system contributes to the circulating pool of these markers. In this context, our aim has been focused on the development of a non-invasive score based on degradation of the backbone of glycosaminoglycans of the extracellular matrix; namely hyaluronic acid (HA), for the assessment of metastasis in patients with breast cancer. HA level was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; CA 15.3 was determined by microparticle enzyme immunoassay; hyaluronidase, N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase, β-glucuronidase, glucuronic acid, and glucosamine were assayed by standard colorimetric techniques in 217 patients with breast cancer. Statistical analyses were performed by logistic regression and receiver-operating characteristic analysis curves. The multivariate discriminant analysis selects a score based on absolute values of the six biochemical markers: metastatic breast cancer score (MBCS) = [1.04 (Numerical constant) + 0.003 × CA 15.3 (U/l) + 0.001 × HA (ng/ml) + 0.004 × hyaluronidase (mg N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine/ml/18 h) + 0.001 × N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (μmol/ml/min) + 0.026 × glucuronic acid (ng/ml) + 0.003 × glucosamine (μg/dl)]. This function correctly classified 87 % of metastatic breast cancer at cut-off value = 0.85 (i.e., great than 0.85 indicates patients with metastatic breast cancer and less than 0.85 indicates patients with non-metastatic breast cancer). MBCS is a novel, non-invasive, and simple score which can be applied to discriminate patients with metastatic breast cancer.

  20. Hunter′s syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N S Savitha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hunter′s syndrome or mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS type II is an X-linked recessive mucopolysaccharide disorder caused by a defect in the metabolism of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs characterized by involvement of nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, and mucoskeletal systems along with numerous oral manifestations. This is a case report of a 13-year-old boy referred to the Department of Pediatric Dentistry with a chief complaint of irregularly placed teeth from a general physician. Here we highlight the pivotal role of pediatric dentists in diagnosis and treatment planning for patients diagnosed with such systemic conditions and the provision of advanced dental care in the management of the same.

  1. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  2. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the ... the blood in people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of ...

  3. Uric Acid Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Uric Acid Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At a ... Also Known As Serum Urate UA Formal Name Uric Acid This article was last reviewed on May 17, ...

  4. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this process. One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup urine disease. Amino acids are "building blocks" that join together to form ...

  5. Methylmalonic Acid Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA) ... Ratio Valproic Acid Vancomycin Vanillylmandelic Acid (VMA) VAP Vitamin A Vitamin B12 and Folate Vitamin D Tests ...

  6. Aminolevulinic Acid Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminolevulinic acid is used in combination with photodynamic therapy (PDT; special blue light) to treat actinic keratoses (small crusty ... skin cancer) of the face or scalp. Aminolevulinic acid is in a class of medications called photosensitizing ...

  7. Acid-fast stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003766.htm Acid-fast stain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines ...

  8. Valproic Acid and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... questions. We have answers. Fact Sheets Share Valproic Acid and Pregnancy Wednesday, 01 July 2015 In every ... This sheet talks about whether exposure to valproic acid may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  9. Azelaic Acid Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azelaic acid gel and foam is used to clear the bumps, lesions, and swelling caused by rosacea (a skin ... redness, flushing, and pimples on the face). Azelaic acid cream is used to treat the pimples and ...

  10. Zoledronic Acid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is used to prevent or treat osteoporosis (condition in which the bones become thin and weak ... of life,' end of regular menstrual periods). Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is also used to treat osteoporosis in ...

  11. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  12. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. ... before the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  13. The Nucleic Acid Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Helen M; Westbrook, John; Feng, Zukang; Iype, Lisa; Schneider, Bohdan; Zardecki, Christine

    2002-06-01

    The Nucleic Acid Database was established in 1991 as a resource to assemble and distribute structural information about nucleic acids. Over the years, the NDB has developed generalized software for processing, archiving, querying and distributing structural data for nucleic acid-containing structures. The architecture and capabilities of the Nucleic Acid Database, as well as some of the research enabled by this resource, are presented in this article.

  14. Immunoglobulin and fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition comprising 0.1-10 w/w % immunoglobulin (Ig), 4-14 w/w % saturated fatty acids, 4-14 w/w % mono-unsaturated fatty acids and 0-5 w/w % poly-unsaturated fatty acids, wherein the weight percentages are based on the content of dry matter in the composition...

  15. Amino acids and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; van den Akker, Chris H.; de Groof, Femke; van der Schoor, Sophie R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids and protein are key factors for growth. The neonatal period requires the highest intake in life to meet the demands. Those demands include amino acids for growth, but proteins and amino acids also function as signalling molecules and function as neurotransmitters. Often the nutritional

  16. Stomach acid test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour (mEq/ ...

  17. The Acid Rain Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  18. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  19. Property changes of urinary nanocrystallites and urine of uric acid stone formers after taking potassium citrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guang-Na; Ouyang, Jian-Ming, E-mail: toyjm@jnu.edu.cn; Xue, Jun-Fa; Shang, Yun-Feng

    2013-10-15

    The property changes of urinary nanocrystallites in 20 cases of uric acid (UA) stone formers after 1 week of potassium citrate (K{sub 3}cit) intake were comparatively studied by X-ray diffraction analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nanoparticle size analysis, and transmission electron microscopy. Before K{sub 3}cit intake, the urinary crystallites mainly contained UA and calcium oxalate. After K{sub 3}cit intake, the components changed to urate and UA; the qualities, species, and amounts of aggregated crystallites decreased; urine pH, citrate, and glycosaminoglycan excretions increased; and UA excretion, Zeta potential, and crystallite size decreased. The stability of crystallites followed the order: controls > patients after taking K{sub 3}cit > patients before taking K{sub 3}cit. Therefore, the components of urinary stones were closely related to the components of urinary crystallites. - Graphical abstract: The relationships among stone components, urinary crystallite components, and urine pH were established. The crystallites stability order was: controls > patients after taking K{sub 3}cit > patients before taking K{sub 3}cit. Highlights: • Urine crystallite property of uric acid stone former after K{sub 3}cit intake was studied. • The components of crystallites in urine are closely related to type of stones. • After K{sub 3}cit intake the qualities and species of crystallites decreased. • After K{sub 3}cit intake the amount of aggregated crystallites decreased. • The stability of urinary crystallites of UA patients increased after taking K{sub 3}cit.

  20. Demospongic Acids Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Barnathan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The well-known fatty acids with a D5,9 unsaturation system were designated for a long period as demospongic acids, taking into account that they originally occurred in marine Demospongia sponges. However, such acids have also been observed in various marine sources with a large range of chain-lengths (C16–C32 and from some terrestrial plants with short acyl chains (C18–C19. Finally, the D5,9 fatty acids appear to be a particular type of non-methylene-interrupted fatty acids (NMA FAs. This article reviews the occurrence of these particular fatty acids in marine and terrestrial organisms and shows the biosynthetic connections between D5,9 fatty acids and other NMI FAs.

  1. Boric acid and boronic acids inhibition of pigeonpea urease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Ravi Charan; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2006-08-01

    Urease from the seeds of pigeonpea was competitively inhibited by boric acid, butylboronic acid, phenylboronic acid, and 4-bromophenylboronic acid; 4-bromophenylboronic acid being the strongest inhibitor, followed by boric acid > butylboronic acid > phenylboronic acid, respectively. Urease inhibition by boric acid is maximal at acidic pH (5.0) and minimal at alkaline pH (10.0), i.e., the trigonal planar B(OH)3 form is a more effective inhibitor than the tetrahedral B(OH)4 -anionic form. Similarly, the anionic form of phenylboronic acid was least inhibiting in nature.

  2. The potential of 3-dimensional construct engineered from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/fibrin hybrid scaffold seeded with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for in vitro cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahman, Rozlin; Mohamad Sukri, Norhamiza; Md Nazir, Noorhidayah; Ahmad Radzi, Muhammad Aa'zamuddin; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Che Ahmad, Aminudin; Hashi, Abdurezak Abdulahi; Abdul Rahman, Suzanah; Sha'ban, Munirah

    2015-08-01

    Articular cartilage is well known for its simple uniqueness of avascular and aneural structure that has limited capacity to heal itself when injured. The use of three dimensional construct in tissue engineering holds great potential in regenerating cartilage defects. This study evaluated the in vitro cartilaginous tissue formation using rabbit's bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs)-seeded onto poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) PLGA/fibrin and PLGA scaffolds. The in vitro cartilaginous engineered constructs were evaluated by gross inspection, histology, cell proliferation, gene expression and sulphated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) production at week 1, 2 and 3. After 3 weeks of culture, the PLGA/fibrin construct demonstrated gross features similar to the native tissue with smooth, firm and glistening appearance, superior histoarchitectural and better cartilaginous extracellular matrix compound in concert with the positive glycosaminoglycan accumulation on Alcian blue. Significantly higher cell proliferation in PLGA/fibrin construct was noted at day-7, day-14 and day-21 (p<0.05 respectively). Both constructs expressed the accumulation of collagen type II, collagen type IX, aggrecan and sox9, showed down-regulation of collagen type I as well as produced relative sGAG content with PLGA/fibrin construct exhibited better gene expression in all profiles and showed significantly higher relative sGAG content at each time point (p<0.05). This study suggested that with optimum in vitro manipulation, PLGA/fibrin when seeded with pluripotent non-committed BMSCs has the capability to differentiate into chondrogenic lineage and may serve as a prospective construct to be developed as functional tissue engineered cartilage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  4. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  5. The Effect of Chondroitin Sulphate and Hyaluronic Acid on Chondrocytes Cultured within a Fibrin-Alginate Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Little

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is a painful degenerative joint disease that could be better managed if tissue engineers can develop methods to create long-term engineered articular cartilage tissue substitutes. Many of the tissue engineered cartilage constructs currently available lack the chemical stimuli and cell-friendly environment that promote the matrix accumulation and cell proliferation needed for use in joint cartilage repair. The goal of this research was to test the efficacy of using a fibrin-alginate hydrogel containing hyaluronic acid (HA and/or chondroitin sulphate (CS supplements for chondrocyte culture. Neonatal porcine chondrocytes cultured in fibrin-alginate hydrogels retained their phenotype better than chondrocytes cultured in monolayer, as evidenced by analysis of their relative expression of type II versus type I collagen mRNA transcripts. HA or CS supplementation of the hydrogels increased matrix glycosaminoglycan (GAG production during the first week of culture. However, the effects of these supplements on matrix accumulation were not additive and were no longer observed after two weeks of culture. Supplementation of the hydrogels with CS or a combination of both CS and HA increased the chondrocyte cell population after two weeks of culture. Statistical analysis indicated that the HA and CS treatment effects on chondrocyte numbers may be additive. This research suggests that supplementation with CS and/or HA has positive effects on cartilage matrix production and chondrocyte proliferation in three-dimensional (3D fibrin-alginate hydrogels.

  6. Development and characterisation of chondroitin sulfate- and hyaluronic acid-incorporated sorbitan ester nanoparticles as gene delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Piñeiro, I; Pensado, A; Badiola, I; Sanchez, A

    2018-01-17

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are natural polymers that are broadly used in gene delivery systems to increase stability as well as decrease toxicity and nonspecific interactions, thereby increasing transfection efficiency. In this work, we propose sorbitan ester-based lipid nanoparticles (SENS) functionalised with the GAGs chondroitin sulfate (CS) and hyaluronic acid (HA) as gene delivery systems. For this purpose, we describe the design and evaluation of these nanosystems loaded with plasmid DNA, including an evaluation of their physicochemical characteristics, stability properties, ability to protect and efficiently transfect cells with Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein plasmid (pEGFP) in vitro, and biocompatibility both in vitro and in vivo. We confirm that molecules with high biological value and targeting potential, such as HA and CS, can be successfully incorporated into our recently developed sorbitan ester-based nanoparticles (SENS) and that this incorporation leads to effective stabilisation of both nanosystems as well as protects plasmid DNA. We demonstrated that the aforementioned incorporation of HA and CS enables long-term stability of the nanosystems in both liquid and lyophilised states, which is a remarkable property that can aid in their transfer to industry. The ability of these functionalised nanosystems to transfect the A549 cell line without compromising cell viability was also shown, as well as their innocuous safety profile in vivo. Thus, we provide valuable evidence of the suitable properties and potential of these hybrid nanoparticles as gene delivery systems. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Glycolic Acid 15% Plus Salicylic Acid 2%

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Blanco, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Background: Facial flat warts are a contagious viral disease that can cause disturbing cosmetic problems. Topical glycolic acid has been reported to be effective in dermatological treatment depending on the exfoliant capacity, but has not often been reported to be effective in the treatment of facial flat warts. Objective: The aim of this paper was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of glycolic acid 15% topical gel plus salicylic acid 2% in the treatment of recalcitrant facial flat warts. Methods: A total of 20 consecutive patients 7 to 16 years of age with recalcitrant facial flat warts were enrolled in this study. Patients having warts by the eye and lip regions were excluded from the study. A fine layer of face gel was applied to the treatment area once daily. Most of the participants had tried different treatments with no success. Assessments for the response and the occurrence of side effects were performed every two weeks at Weeks 2, 4, 6, and 8. Results: All the patients were clinically cured within eight weeks. Seven patients cleared in four weeks, and 13 patients cleared in eight weeks. No noticeable adverse events were related to the skin. Conclusion: Topical gel of glycolic acid 15% plus salicylic acid 2% is safe and effective when applied to facial flat warts once daily until clearance and may be considered as first-line treatment. PMID:21938272

  8. Lewis Acid Organocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereda, Oksana; Tabassum, Sobia; Wilhelm, René

    The term Lewis acid catalysts generally refers to metal salts like aluminium chloride, titanium chloride and zinc chloride. Their application in asymmetric catalysis can be achieved by the addition of enantiopure ligands to these salts. However, not only metal centers can function as Lewis acids. Compounds containing carbenium, silyl or phosphonium cations display Lewis acid catalytic activity. In addition, hypervalent compounds based on phosphorus and silicon, inherit Lewis acidity. Furthermore, ionic liquids, organic salts with a melting point below 100 °C, have revealed the ability to catalyze a range of reactions either in substoichiometric amount or, if used as the reaction medium, in stoichiometric or even larger quantities. The ionic liquids can often be efficiently recovered. The catalytic activity of the ionic liquid is explained by the Lewis acidic nature of their cations. This review covers the survey of known classes of metal-free Lewis acids and their application in catalysis.

  9. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  10. Mechanism involved in enhancement of osteoblast differentiation by hyaluronic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Michinao [Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Science, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Ariyoshi, Wataru [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Iwanaga, Kenjiro [Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Science, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Okinaga, Toshinori [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Habu, Manabu [Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Science, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Yoshioka, Izumi [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Medicine of Sensory and Motor Organs, University of Miyazaki, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Tominaga, Kazuhiro [Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Science, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Oral Bioresearch Center, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Nishihara, Tatsuji, E-mail: tatsujin@kyu-dent.ac.jp [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Oral Bioresearch Center, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} In this study was to investigate the effects of HA on osteoblast differentiation induced by BMP-2. {yields} MG63 cells were incubated with BMP-2 and HA for various time periods. {yields} Phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8, p38, and ERK proteins was determined by western blot analysis. To elucidate the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8, stimulated cells were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy. {yields} HA enhanced BMP-2 induces osteoblastic differentiation in MG63 cells via down-regulation of BMP-2 antagonists and ERK phosphorylation. -- Abstract: Objectives: Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is expected to be utilized to fill bone defects and promote healing of fractures. However, it is unable to generate an adequate clinical response for use in bone regeneration. Recently, it was reported that glycosaminoglycans, including heparin, heparan sulfate, keratan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, chondroitin-4-sulfate, chondroitin-6-sulfate, and hyaluronic acid (HA), regulate BMP-2 activity, though the mechanism by which HA regulates osteogenic activities has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of HA on osteoblast differentiation induced by BMP-2. Materials and methods: Monolayer cultures of osteoblastic lineage MG63 cells were incubated with BMP-2 and HA for various time periods. To determine osteoblastic differentiation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in the cell lysates was quantified. Phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8, p38, and ERK proteins was determined by Western blot analysis. To elucidate the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8, stimulated cells were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy. To further elucidate the role of HA in enhancement of BMP-2-induced Smad signaling, mRNA expressions of the BMP-2 receptor antagonists noggin and follistatin were detected using real-time RT-PCR. Results: BMP-2-induced ALP activation, Smad 1/5/8 phosphorylation, and

  11. A simple chemical method for the determination of dermatan sulfate in the presence of chondroitin 4-sulfate and chondroitin 6-sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, T; Kanada, K; Tsuji, A

    1975-02-01

    A simple chemical method for the determination of individual mucopolysaccharides in mixtures of dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfates by means of a single reagent was established, utilizing the difference in reaction rates of these polysaccharides with orcinol. To each 1 ml of a sample mixture of standard dermatan sulfate and standard chondroitin sulfate (either 4- or 6-sulfate) was added 3 ml of orcinol reagent and the resulting solution was heated in a boiling-water bath. After 20 and 60 min reaction, absorbances at 660 nm were measured and the concentrations of individual mucopolysaccharides were calculated. High reproducibility was observed for the determination of dermatan sulfate in the presence of chondroitin sulfates. In addition, orcinol reaction for 90 min employing D-glucuronolactone as a standard appeared to be of practical value in the estimation of the uronic acid content of these mucopolysaccharides.

  12. Facts about Folic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Other Health Outcomes Folic Acid Fortification and Supplementation Neural Tube Defects Surveillance References Data and Statistics Research Birth Defects COUNT Articles & Key Findings Recommendations Links to ...

  13. Folic Acid Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Other Health Outcomes Folic Acid Fortification and Supplementation Neural Tube Defects Surveillance References Data and Statistics Research Birth Defects COUNT Articles & Key Findings Recommendations Links to ...

  14. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  15. Parenteral Nutrition: Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2017-03-10

    There is growing interest in nutrition therapies that deliver a generous amount of protein, but not a toxic amount of energy, to protein-catabolic critically ill patients. Parenteral amino acids can achieve this goal. This article summarizes the biochemical and nutritional principles that guide parenteral amino acid therapy, explains how parenteral amino acid solutions are formulated, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of different parenteral amino acid products with enterally-delivered whole protein products in the context of protein-catabolic critical illness.

  16. Fusidic acid in dermatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schöfer, Helmut; Simonsen, Lene

    1995-01-01

    Studies on the clinical efficacy of fusidic acid in skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs), notably those due to Staphylococcus aureus, are reviewed. Oral fusidic acid (tablets dosed at 250 mg twice daily, or a suspension for paediatric use at 20 mg/kg/day given as two daily doses) has shown good...... efficacy and tolerability. Similarly, plain fusidic acid cream or ointment used two or three times daily in SSTIs such as impetigo are clinically and bacteriologically effective, with minimal adverse events. Combination formulations of fusidic acid with 1% hydrocortisone or 0.1% betamethasone achieve...

  17. Azetidinic amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Bunch, Lennart; Chopin, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    A set of ten azetidinic amino acids, that can be envisioned as C-4 alkyl substituted analogues of trans-2-carboxyazetidine-3-acetic acid (t-CAA) and/or conformationally constrained analogues of (R)- or (S)-glutamic acid (Glu) have been synthesized in a diastereo- and enantiomerically pure form from...... of two diastereoisomers that were easily separated and converted in two steps into azetidinic amino acids. Azetidines 35-44 were characterized in binding studies on native ionotropic Glu receptors and in functional assays at cloned metabotropic receptors mGluR1, 2 and 4, representing group I, II and III...

  18. A Chondroitin Sulfate and Hyaluronic Acid Lyase with Poor Activity to Glucuronyl 4,6-O-disulfated N-acetylgalactosamine (E-type)-containing Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chune; Wang, Qingbin; Wang, Shumin; Wang, Wenshuang; Jiao, Runmiao; Han, Wenjun; Li, Fuchuan

    2018-02-02

    GlcUAβ1-3GalNAc(4S,6S) (E unit)-rich domains have been shown to play key roles in various biological functions of chondroitin sulfate (CS). However, an enzyme that can specifically isolate such domains through the selective digestion of other domains in polysaccharides has not yet been reported. Here, we identified a glycosaminoglycan lyase from a marine bacterium Vibrio sp. FC509. This enzyme efficiently degraded hyaluronic acid (HA) and CS variants, but not E unit-rich CS-E, into unsaturated disaccharides; therefore, we designated this enzyme a CS-E-resisted HA/CS lyase (HCLase Er). We isolated a series of resistant oligosaccharides from the final product of a low-sulfated CS-E exhaustively digested by HCLase Er and found that the E units were dramatically accumulate in these resistant oligosaccharides. By determining the structures of several resistant tetrasaccharides, we observed that all of them possessed a Δ 4,5 HexUAα1-3GalNAc(4S,6S) at their nonreducing ends, indicating that the disulfation of GalNAc abrogates HCLase Er activity on the β1-4 linkage between the E unit and the following disaccharide. Δ 4,5 HexUAα1-3GalNAc(4S,6S)β1-4GlcUAβ1-3GalNAc(4S,6S) was most strongly resistant to HCLase Er. To our knowledge, this study is the first reporting a glycosaminoglycan lyase specifically inhibited by both 4- O - and 6- O -sulfation of GalNAc. Site-directed and truncation mutagenesis experiments indicated that HCLase Er may use a general acid-base catalysis mechanism and that an extra domain (Gly 739 -Gln 796 ) is critical for its activity. This enzyme will be a useful tool for structural analyses and for prepareing bioactive oligosaccharides of HA and CS variants, particularly from E unit-rich CS chains. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  20. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  1. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  2. Locked nucleic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jan Stenvang; Sørensen, Mads D; Wengel, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is a class of nucleic acid analogs possessing very high affinity and excellent specificity toward complementary DNA and RNA, and LNA oligonucleotides have been applied as antisense molecules both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we briefly describe the basic physioc...

  3. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  4. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  5. Salicylic Acid Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... product less often. Talk to your doctor or check the package label for more information.Apply a small amount of the salicylic acid product ... in salicylic acid products. Ask your pharmacist or check the package label for a list of the ingredients.do not apply any of the following products to the skin ...

  6. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are absorbed in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, M.R.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Katan, M.B.

    2001-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid, an ester of caffeic acid and quinic acid, is a major phenolic compound in coffee; daily intake in coffee drinkers is 0.5-1 g. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are antioxidants in vitro and might therefore contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, data on the

  7. 2-Methylaspartic acid monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray J. Butcher

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C5H9NO4·H2O, is an isomer of the α-amino acid glutamic acid that crystallizes from water in its zwitterionic form as a monohydrate. It is not one of the 20 proteinogenic α-amino acids that are used in living systems and differs from the natural amino acids in that it has an α-methyl group rather than an α-H atom. In the crystal, an O—H...O hydrogen bond is present between the acid and water molecules while extensive N—H...O and O—H...O hydrogen bonds link the components into a three-dimensional array.

  8. [The connective tissues, from the origin of the concept to its "Maturation" to extracellular matrix. Application to ocular tissues. Contribution to the history of medical sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labat-Robert, J; Robert, L; Pouliquen, Y

    2011-06-01

    The "Tissue" concept emerged apparently in the medical literature at about the French revolution, during the second half of the 18(th) century. It was found in the texts written by the physicians of Béarn and Montpellier, the Bordeu-s and also by the famous physician, Felix Vicq d'Azyr, the last attending physician of the queen Marie-Antoinette, "Bordeu et al. (1775) et Pouliquen (2009)". It was elaborated into a coherent doctrine somewhat later by Xavier Bichat, considered as the founder of modern pathological anatomy, Bichat. With the advent of histochemistry, from the beginning of the 20(th) century, several of the principal macromolecular components of connective tissues, collagens, elastin, "acid mucopolysaccharides" (later glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans) and finally structural glycoproteins were characterized. These constituents of connective tissues were then designated as components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), closely associated to the cellular components of these tissues by adhesive (structural) glycoproteins as fibronectin, several others and cell receptors, "recognising" ECM-components as integrins, the elastin-receptor and others. This molecular arrangement fastens cells to the ECM-components they synthesize and mediates the exchange of informations between the cells to the ECM (inside-out) and also from the ECM-components to the cells (outside-in). This macromolecular arrangement is specific for each tissue as a result of the differentiation of their cellular components. It is also the basis and condition of the fulfillment of the specific functions of differentiated tissues. This is a short description of the passage of the "tissue" concept from its vague origin towards its precise identification at the cellular and molecular level up to the recognition of its functional importance and its establishment as an autonomous science. This can be considered as a new example of the importance of metaphors for the progress of science, Keller

  9. Trans Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Ellin

    1997-09-01

    Fats and their various fatty acid components seem to be a perennial concern of nutritionists and persons concerned with healthful diets. Advice on the consumption of saturated, polyunsaturated, monounsaturated, and total fat bombards us from magazines and newspapers. One of the newer players in this field is the group of trans fatty acids found predominantly in partially hydrogenated fats such as margarines and cooking fats. The controversy concerning dietary trans fatty acids was recently addressed in an American Heart Association (AHA) science advisory (1) and in a position paper from the American Society of Clinical Nutrition/American Institute of Nutrition (ASCN/AIN) (2). Both reports emphasize that the best preventive strategy for reducing risk for cardiovascular disease and some types of cancer is a reduction in total and saturated fats in the diet, but a reduction in the intake of trans fatty acids was also recommended. Although the actual health effects of trans fatty acids remain uncertain, experimental evidence indicates that consumption of trans fatty acids adversely affects serum lipid levels. Since elevated levels of serum cholesterol and triacylglycerols are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, it follows that intake of trans fatty acids should be minimized.

  10. Hyaluronic acid auto-crosslinked polymer (ACP): Reaction monitoring, process investigation and hyaluronidase stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluda, Stefano; Pavan, Mauro; Galesso, Devis; Guarise, Cristian

    2016-10-04

    Hyaluronic Acid (HA) is a non-sulphated glycosaminoglycan that, despite its high molecular weight, is soluble in water and is not resistant to enzymatic degradation, the latter of which hinders its wider application as a biomedical material. Auto-crosslinked polymer (ACP) gels of HA are fully biocompatible hydrogels that exhibit improved viscoelastic properties and prolonged in vivo residence times compared to the native polymer. Crosslinking is achieved through a base-catalysed reaction consisting of the activation of HA carboxyl groups by 2-chloro-1-methylpyridinium iodide (CMPI) and subsequent nucleophilic acyl substitution by the hydroxyl groups of HA in organic solvent. In this study, a number of ACP hydrogels have been obtained via reactions using varying ratios of CMPI to HA. The crosslinking reaction was monitored by rheological measurements in organic solvents during CMPI addition to the reaction mixture. The ACP intermediates, powders and hydrogels were characterized, helping to elucidate the crosslinking process. A two-step mechanism was proposed to explain the observed trends in viscosity and particle size. Syntheses were carried out by varying the reaction temperature, respectively at 0 °C, 25 °C and 45 °C in N-Methyl-2-Pyrrolidone (NMP), as well as the solvent respectively in NMP, DMSO and DMF at 25 °C. Interestingly, varying these parameters did not substantially affect the degree of crosslinking but likely did influence the intra/inter-molecular crosslinking ratio and, therefore, the viscoelastic properties. A wide range of crosslinking densities was confirmed through ESEM analysis. Finally, a comparative hyaluronidase degradation assay revealed that the ACPs exhibited a higher resistance toward enzymatic cleavage at low elastic modulus compared to other more chemically resistant, crosslinked HAs. These observations demonstrated the importance of crosslinking density of matrix structures on substrate availability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  11. GLYCOSYLTRANSFERASE GLYCOSYLATING FLAVOKERMESIC ACID AND/OR KERMESIC ACID

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    An isolated glycosyltransferase (GT) polypeptide capable of: (I): conjugating glucose to flavokermesic acid (FK); and/or (II): conjugating glucose to kermesic acid (KA) and use of this GT to e.g. make Carminic acid.......An isolated glycosyltransferase (GT) polypeptide capable of: (I): conjugating glucose to flavokermesic acid (FK); and/or (II): conjugating glucose to kermesic acid (KA) and use of this GT to e.g. make Carminic acid....

  12. Citric acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berovic, Marin; Legisa, Matic

    2007-01-01

    Citric acid is a commodity chemical produced and consumed throughout The World. It is used mainly in the food and beverage industry, primarily as an acidulant. Although it is one of the oldest industrial fermentations, its World production is still in rapid increasing. Global production of citric acid in 2007 was over 1.6 million tones. Biochemistry of citric acid fermentation, various microbial strains, as well as various substrates, technological processes and product recovery are presented. World production and economics aspects of this strategically product of bulk biotechnology are discussed.

  13. Halogenated fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Wesén, Clas; Sundin, Peter

    1997-01-01

    , chlorinated lipids have been found in meat exposed to hypochlorite disinfected water, and in chlorine-treated flour and in products made from such flour. Following exposure to chlorine bleached pulp mill effluents, aquatic organisms may have elevated concentrations of chlorinated fatty acids in their lipids....... However, a natural production of halogenated fatty acids is also possible. In this paper we summarize the present knowledge of the occurrence of halogenated fatty acids in lipids and suggested ways of their formation. In Part II (Trends Anal. Chem. 16 (1997) 274) we deal with methods...

  14. Bile acid sequestrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Sonne, David P; Knop, Filip K

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized in the liver from cholesterol and have traditionally been recognized for their role in absorption of lipids and in cholesterol homeostasis. In recent years, however, bile acids have emerged as metabolic signaling molecules that are involved in the regulation of lipid...... of the enterohepatic circulation. This increases bile acid synthesis and consequently reduces serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Also, BASs improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Despite a growing understanding of the impact of BASs on glucose metabolism, the mechanisms behind their glucose...

  15. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    degradation of sulfated glycosamino- glycans.1. Mucopolysaccharides (or glycosamin- oglycans) are large macromolecules composed of repeating frequently sul- fated, disaccharide units attached to a protein core. A series of lysosomal acid hydrolases degrades the glycosamino- glycans by step-wise removal of the.

  16. A histochemical study of bone marrow hypoplasia in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornbleet, P J; Moir, R C; Wolf, P L

    1977-06-23

    The bone marrow in patients with anorexia nervosa is commonly hypoplastic with transformation of marrow fat. The normal fat cells which appear clear and open in the marrow are surrounded by an amorphous, gelatinous material, thought to represent an increase in the ordinary acid mucopolysaccharide ground substance of the bone marrow. Since this lesion has a similar appearance grossly and microscopically to the lesion of serous fat atrophy found in cachectic patients, we have compared the histochemical properties of this amorphous material in a bone marrow from a patient with anorexia nervosa and from cachectic patients with epicardial serous fat atrophy and with the background substance in hypoplastic marrows. Both this fat-associated deposition in the bone marrow and serous fat atrophy were found to be predominantly a hyaluronic acid mucopolysaccharide. In contrast, the background substance contained a less acid mucopolysaccharide. The increase in bone marrow acid mucopolysaccharide in anorexia nervosa may represent a serous fat atrophy change rather than an increase in ground substance.

  17. Cell-surface mucosubstances from trypsin disaggregation of normal and virus-transformed lines of baby-hamster kidney cells (Short Communication)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnikin, S. Megan; Allen, Adrian

    1973-01-01

    Cell disaggregation by trypsin solubilizes significantly less mucosubstance from the surface of polyoma-virus-transformed baby-hamster kidney cells than from the same non-transformed cell line. The mucosubstance, which consists of both acid mucopolysaccharides and mucoproteins, also differs qualitatively in the two cell lines. PMID:4357713

  18. Book 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    degradation of sulfated glycosamino- glycans.1. Mucopolysaccharides (or glycosamin- oglycans) are large macromolecules composed of repeating frequently sul- fated, disaccharide units attached to a protein core. A series of lysosomal acid hydrolases degrades the glycosamino- glycans by step-wise removal of the.

  19. Acid Lipase Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... offers free searches of biomedical literature through an Internet service called PubMed. To search, go to: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/PubMed . The NLM also offers extensive ... Publications Definition Acid ...

  20. Acid rain: An overview

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary of the effects of acid rain and related processes, sources, issues, corrective actions, research, current law, potential solutions, political solutions,...

  1. Boric acid poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skin lotions Some paints Some rodent and ant pesticides Photography chemicals Powders to kill roaches Some eye ... 1031. National Library of Medicine, Specialized Information Services, Toxicology Data Network. Boric acid. Toxnet.nlm.nih.gov ...

  2. Alpha Hydroxy Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sensitivity. FDA also has collaborated with the National Toxicology Program (NTP) to assess the safety of the long-term use of AHAs. This study determined that glycolic acid did not affect photocarcinogenesis ( ...

  3. Folic acid in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnant females of all ages: 600 mcg/day Breastfeeding females of all ages: 500 mcg/day Alternative Names Folic acid; Polyglutamyl folacin; Pteroylmonoglutamate; Folate Images Vitamin B9 benefits Vitamin B9 source References Institute of Medicine, Food ...

  4. Lipoic Acid Synthase (LASY)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Indira Padmalayam; Sumera Hasham; Uday Saxena; Sivaram Pillarisetti

    2009-01-01

    Lipoic Acid Synthase (LASY) A Novel Role in Inflammation, Mitochondrial Function, and Insulin Resistance Indira Padmalayam 1 , Sumera Hasham 2 , Uday Saxena 1 and Sivaram Pillarisetti 1 1 Discovery Research, ReddyUS...

  5. Synthesis of aminoaldonic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christel Thea

    of 2,5-anhydrides and not the expected 2-acetamido-2-deoxy aldose phenylhydrazones. The acetylated phenylhydrazones were found to eliminate acetic acid when heated in aqueous ethanol and 1-phenylazoalkenes could be isolated by crystallisation. By this method the 17, 20, 23 and 25 were prepared from....... The aziridino amides 43 and 51 were reductively cleaved with hydrazine to give 3-amino-2,3-dideoxyhexonhydrazides 83 and 85, which were easily converted into the corresponding lactone 84 and acid 86. The aziridine ring of 43 and 51 was also opened with acetic acid to give the 3-amino-3-deoxyhexonic acids 79....... These compounds did not react with 2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethyl amine 105. Instead the commercially available unsubstituted 4-carboxyl tetronolactone 108 was converted into the 2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethyl amides 110 and 111 in two steps. These amides were cyclised by the Bischler-Napieralski cyclisation to give...

  6. Amino Acids and Chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  7. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands, and generally do so more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands while exhibiting increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a...... a group consisting of naturally-occurring nucleobases and non-naturally-occurring nucleobases, including 2,6-diaminopurine, attached to a polyamide backbone, and contain alkyl amine side chains....

  8. Folic acid in pregnancy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paul, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    ... it was isolated from spinach in 1941, hence being named ‘folic acid’ (from the Latin word folium for leaf ). By the mid‐1940s a team of biochemists, ‘the folic acid boys’, working at the Lederle Laboratory in Pearl River, New York, USA were able to synthesise folic acid in a pure crystalline form, allowing more detailed evaluation of its properties. I...

  9. Influence of Chondroitin Sulfate and Hyaluronic Acid on Structure, Mechanical Properties, and Glioma Invasion of Collagen I Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-li; Sun, Charles; Wilhelm, Matthew E.; Fox, Laura J.; Zhu, Jieling

    2011-01-01

    To mimic the extracellular matrix surrounding high grade gliomas, composite matrices composed of either acid-solubilized (AS) or pepsin-treated (PT) collagen and the glycosaminoglycans chondroitin sulfate (CS) and hyaluronic acid (HA) are prepared and characterized. The structure and mechanical properties of collagen/CS and collagen/HA gels are studied via confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) and rheology. CRM reveals that CS induces fibril bundling and increased mesh size in AS collagen but not PT collagen networks. The presence of CS also induces more substantial changes in the storage and loss moduli of AS gels than of PT gels, in accordance with expectation based on network structural parameters. The presence of HA significantly reduces mesh size in AS collagen but has a smaller effect on PT collagen networks. However, both AS and PT collagen network viscoelasticity is strongly affected by the presence of HA. The effects of CS and HA on glioma invasion is then studied in collagen/GAG matrices with network structure both similar to (PT collagen-based gels) and disparate from (AS collagen-based gels) those of the corresponding pure collagen matrices. It is shown that CS inhibits and HA has no significant effect on glioma invasion in 1.0 mg/ml collagen matrices over 3 days. The inhibitory effect of CS on glioma invasion is more apparent in AS than in PT collagen gels, suggesting invasive behavior in these environments is affected by both biochemical and network morphological changes induced by GAGs. This study is among the few efforts to differentiate structural, mechanical and biochemical effects of changes to matrix composition on cell motility in 3D. PMID:21820735

  10. Poly(γ-Glutamic Acid) as an Exogenous Promoter of Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Joana C; Tsaryk, Roman; Gonçalves, Raquel M; Pereira, Catarina Leite; Landes, Constantin; Brochhausen, Christoph; Ghanaati, Shahram; Barbosa, Mário A; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2015-06-01

    Cartilage damage and/or aging effects can cause constant pain, which limits the patient's quality of life. Although different strategies have been proposed to enhance the limited regenerative capacity of cartilage tissue, the full production of native and functional cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM) has not yet been achieved. Poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA), a naturally occurring polyamino acid, biodegradable into glutamate residues, has been explored for tissue regeneration. In this work, γ-PGA's ability to support the production of cartilaginous ECM by human bone marrow mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) and nasal chondrocytes (NCs) was investigated. MSC and NC pellets were cultured in basal medium (BM), chondrogenic medium (CM), and CM-γ-PGA-supplemented medium (CM+γ-PGA) over a period of 21 days. Pellet size/shape was monitored with time. At 14 and 21 days of culture, the presence of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs), type II collagen (Col II), Sox-9, aggrecan, type XI collagen (Col XI), type X collagen (Col X), calcium deposits, and type I collagen (Col I) was analyzed. After excluding γ-PGA's cytotoxicity, earlier cell condensation, higher sGAG content, Col II, Sox-9 (day 14), aggrecan, and Col X (day 14) production was observed in γ-PGA-supplemented MSC cultures, with no signs of mineralization or Col I. These effects were not evident with NCs. However, Sox-9 (at day 14) and Col X (at days 14 and 21) were increased, decreased, or absent, respectively. Overall, γ-PGA improved chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, increasing ECM production earlier in culture. It is proposed that γ-PGA incorporation in novel biomaterials has a beneficial impact on future approaches for cartilage regeneration.

  11. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis IX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carey, E. M.; Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Dils, R.

    1972-01-01

    # 1. I. [I-14C]Acetate was covalently bound to rabbit mammary gland fatty acid synthetase by enzymic transacylation from [I-14C]acetyl-CoA. Per mole of enzyme 2 moles of acetate were bound to thiol groups and up to I mole of acetate was bound to non-thiol groups. # 2. 2. The acetyl-fatty acid...... synthetase complex was isolated free from acetyl-CoA. It was rapidly hydrolysed at 30°C, but hydrolysis was greatly diminished at o°C and triacetic lactone synthesis occurred. In the presence of malonyl-CoA and NADPH, all the acetate bound to fatty acid synthetase was incorporated into long-chain fatty acids....... Hydrolysis of bound acetate and incorporation of bound acetate into fatty acids were inhibited to the same extent by guanidine hydrochloride. # 3. 3. Acetate was also covalently bound to fatty acid synthetase by chemical acetylation with [I-14C]acetic anhydride in the absence of CoASH. A total of 60 moles...

  12. Acidification and Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, S. A.; Veselã½, J.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution by acids has been known as a problem for centuries (Ducros, 1845; Smith, 1872; Camuffo, 1992; Brimblecombe, 1992). Only in the mid-1900s did it become clear that it was a problem for more than just industrially developed areas, and that precipitation quality can affect aquatic resources ( Gorham, 1955). The last three decades of the twentieth century saw tremendous progress in the documentation of the chemistry of the atmosphere, precipitation, and the systems impacted by acid atmospheric deposition. Chronic acidification of ecosystems results in chemical changes to soil and to surface waters and groundwater as a result of reduction of base cation supply or an increase in acid (H+) supply, or both. The most fundamental changes during chronic acidification are an increase in exchangeable H+ or Al3+ (aluminum) in soils, an increase in H+ activity (˜concentration) in water in contact with soil, and a decrease in alkalinity in waters draining watersheds. Water draining from the soil is acidified and has a lower pH (=-log [H+]). As systems acidify, their biotic community changes.Acidic surface waters occur in many parts of the world as a consequence of natural processes and also due to atmospheric deposition of strong acid (e.g., Canada, Jeffries et al. (1986); the United Kingdom, Evans and Monteith (2001); Sweden, Swedish Environmental Protection Board (1986); Finland, Forsius et al. (1990); Norway, Henriksen et al. (1988a); and the United States (USA), Brakke et al. (1988)). Concern over acidification in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere has been driven by the potential for accelerating natural acidification by pollution of the atmosphere with acidic or acidifying compounds. Atmospheric pollution ( Figure 1) has resulted in an increased flux of acid to and through ecosystems. Depending on the ability of an ecosystem to neutralize the increased flux of acidity, acidification may increase only imperceptibly or be accelerated at a rate that

  13. Differential activation of pregnane X receptor by carnosic acid, carnosol, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Chun Ling; Lau, Aik Jiang

    2017-06-01

    Pregnane X receptor (PXR) regulates the expression of many genes, including those involved in drug metabolism and transport, and has been linked to various diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease. In the present study, we determined whether carnosic acid and other chemicals in rosemary extract (carnosol, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid) are PXR activators. As assessed in dual-luciferase reporter gene assays, carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, activated human PXR (hPXR) and mouse PXR (mPXR), whereas carnosol and ursolic acid, but not carnosic acid or rosmarinic acid, activated rat PXR (rPXR). Dose-response experiments indicated that carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid activated hPXR with EC50 values of 0.79, 2.22, and 10.77μM, respectively. Carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, transactivated the ligand-binding domain of hPXR and recruited steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1), SRC-2, and SRC-3 to the ligand-binding domain of hPXR. Carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, increased hPXR target gene expression, as shown by an increase in CYP3A4, UGT1A3, and ABCB1 mRNA expression in LS180 human colon adenocarcinoma cells. Rosmarinic acid did not attenuate the extent of hPXR activation by rifampicin, suggesting it is not an antagonist of hPXR. Overall, carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, are hPXR agonists, and carnosic acid shows species-dependent activation of hPXR and mPXR, but not rPXR. The findings provide new mechanistic insight on the effects of carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid on PXR-mediated biological effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cytotoxic effect of betulinic acid and betulinic acid acetate isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-20

    Sep 20, 2010 ... Key words: Betulinic acid, HL 60, cytotoxicity, MTT assay, DNA laddering, Cell cycle PI. INTRODUCTION. Betulinic acid ... Chemical structure of betulinic acid and its derivatives. (Fulda et al., 1999) and leukemia cells ... feature makes betulinic acid unique in comparison to compounds that are currently used ...

  15. [Lipid synthesis by an acidic acid tolerant Rhodotorula glutinis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhangnan; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jian'an; Wang, Gehua

    2016-03-01

    Acetic acid, as a main by-product generated in the pretreatment process of lignocellulose hydrolysis, significantly affects cell growth and lipid synthesis of oleaginous microorganisms. Therefore, we studied the tolerance of Rhodotorula glutinis to acetic acid and its lipid synthesis from substrate containing acetic acid. In the mixed sugar medium containing 6 g/L glucose and 44 g/L xylose, and supplemented with acetic acid, the cell growth was not:inhibited when the acetic acid concentration was below 10 g/L. Compared with the control, the biomass, lipid concentration and lipid content of R. glutinis increased 21.5%, 171% and 122% respectively when acetic acid concentration was 10 g/L. Furthermore, R. glutinis could accumulate lipid with acetate as the sole carbon source. Lipid concentration and lipid yield reached 3.20 g/L and 13% respectively with the initial acetic acid concentration of 25 g/L. The lipid composition was analyzed by gas chromatograph. The main composition of lipid produced with acetic acid was palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, including 40.9% saturated fatty acids and 59.1% unsaturated fatty acids. The lipid composition was similar to that of plant oil, indicating that lipid from oleaginous yeast R. glutinis had potential as the feedstock of biodiesel production. These results demonstrated that a certain concentration of acetic acid need not to be removed in the detoxification process when using lignocelluloses hydrolysate to produce microbial lipid by R. glutinis.

  16. Synthesis and anticonvulsant activity of novel bicyclic acidic amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conti, Paola; De Amici, Marco; Joppolo Di Ventimiglia, Samuele

    2003-01-01

    Bicyclic acidic amino acids (+/-)-6 and (+/-)-7, which are conformationally constrained homologues of glutamic acid, were prepared via a strategy based on a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The new amino acids were tested toward ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes; both of them...

  17. Amino acids in the sedimentary humic and fulvic acids

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.

    Humic and fulvic acids isolated from a few sediment samples from Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal were analysed for total hydrolysable amino acids concentration and their composition. The amono acids content of fulvic acids was higher than in the humic...

  18. Effects of hesperidin loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffolds on growth behavior of costal cartilage cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sun Ah; Cha, Se Rom; Park, Sang Mi; Kim, Kyoung Hee; Lee, Hyun Gu; Kim, Eun Young; Lee, Dongwon; Khang, Gilson

    2014-01-01

    It has been widely accepted that costal cartilage cells (CCs) have more excellent initial proliferation capacity than articular cartilage cells. Biodegradable synthetic polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) was approved by Food and Drug Administration. Hesperidin has antifungal, antiviral, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic properties. Hesperidin loaded (0, 3, 5, and 10 wt.%) PLGA scaffolds were prepared and in vitro and in vivo properties were characterized. Scaffolds were seeded with CCs isolated from rabbit, which were kept in culture to harvest for histological analysis. Hesperidin/PLGA scaffolds were also implanted in nude mice for 7 and 28 days. Assays of 2-(2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfo-phenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, monosodium salt (WST), and scanning electron microscope were carried out to evaluate attachment and proliferation of CCs in hesperidin/PLGA scaffolds. Glycosaminoglycan assay was performed to confirm the effects of hesperidin on extracellular matrix formation. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was carried out to confirm the expression of the specific genes for CCs. In these results, we demonstrated that cell attachment and proliferation on hesperidin/PLGA scaffolds were more excellent compared with on PLGA scaffold. Specially, 5 wt.% hesperidin/PLGA scaffold represented the best results among other scaffolds. Thus, 5 wt.% hesperidin/PLGA scaffold will be applicable to tissue engineering cartilage.

  19. Amino-acid contamination of aqueous hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolman, Y.; Miller, S. L.

    1971-01-01

    Considerable amino-acid contamination in commercially available analytical grade hydrochloric acid (37% HCl) was found. One bottle contained 8,300 nmol of amino-acids per liter. A bottle from another supplier contained 6,700 nmol per liter. The contaminants were mostly protein amino-acids and several unknowns. Data on the volatility of the amino-acids during HCl distillation were also obtained.

  20. Analysis of Bile Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjövall, Jan; Griffiths, William J.; Setchell, Kenneth D. R.; Mano, Nariyasu; Goto, Junichi

    Bile acids constitute a large family of steroids in vertebrates, normally formed from cholesterol and carrying a carboxyl group in a side-chain of variable length. Bile alcohols, also formed from cholesterol, have similar structures as bile acids, except for the absence of a carboxyl group in the steroid skeleton. The conversion of cholesterol to bile acids and/or bile alcohols is of major importance for maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis, both from quantitative and regulatory points of view (Chiang, 2004; Kalaany and Mangelsdorf, 2006; Moore, Kato, Xie, et al., 2006; Scotti, Gilardi, Godio, et al., 2007). Appropriately conjugated bile acids and bile alcohols (also referred to as bile salts) are secreted in bile and serve vital functions in the absorption of lipids and lipid-soluble compounds (Hofmann, 2007). Reliable analytical methods are required for studies of the functions and pathophysiological importance of the variety of bile acids and bile alcohols present in living organisms. When combined with genetic and proteomic studies, analysis of these small molecules (in today's terminology: metabolomics, steroidomics, sterolomics, cholanoidomics, etc.) will lead to a deeper understanding of the integrated metabolic processes in lipid metabolism.

  1. Ursodeoxycholic acid, 7-ketolithocholic acid, and chenodeoxycholic acid are primary bile acids of the nutria (Myocastor coypus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tint, G S; Bullock, J; Batta, A K; Shefer, S; Salen, G

    1986-03-01

    Because ursodeoxycholic and chenodeoxycholic acids are interconverted in humans via 7-ketolithocholic acid, bile acid metabolism was studied in the nutria (Myocastor coypus), the bile of which is known to contain these three bile acids. Relative concentrations of ursodeoxycholic (37% +/- 20%), 7-ketolithocholic (33% +/- 17%), and chenodeoxycholic (17% +/- 9%) acids in gallbladder bile were unchanged by 5-20 h of complete biliary diversion (n = 7). Injection of either [14C]cholesterol, [14C]ursodeoxycholic, [14C]7-ketolithocholic acid, or a mixture of [7 beta-3H]chenodeoxycholic acid and [14C]chenodeoxycholic acid into bile fistula nutria demonstrated that all three bile acids can be synthesized hepatically from cholesterol, that they are interconverted sparingly (2%-5%) by the liver, but that 7-ketolithocholic acid is an intermediate in the hepatic transformation of chenodeoxycholic acid to ursodeoxycholic acid. An animal that had been fed antibiotics showed an unusually elevated concentration of ursodeoxycholic acid in gallbladder and hepatic bile, suggesting that bacterial transformation of ursodeoxycholic acid in the intestine may be a source of some biliary chenodeoxycholic acid and 7-ketolithocholic acid.

  2. acetyl amino acids and dipeptides

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemistry. 2-(2'-Isopropyl-5'-methylphenoxy)acetic acid (1) was prepared by phenoxylation of thymol by using chloroacetic acid in alkaline conditions. Dipeptides Boc-Gly-Gly-OMe, Boc-Pro-Pro-. OMe and Boc-Ala-Leu-OMe were prepared from the corresponding amino acid methyl esters and Boc-amino acids using DCC ...

  3. Acid rain in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Neeloo; Streets, David G.; Foell, Wesley K.

    1992-07-01

    Acid rain has been an issue of great concern in North America and Europe during the past several decades. However, due to the passage of a number of recent regulations, most notably the Clean Air Act in the United States in 1990, there is an emerging perception that the problem in these Western nations is nearing solution. The situation in the developing world, particularly in Asia, is much bleaker. Given the policies of many Asian nations to achieve levels of development comparable with the industrialized world—which necessitate a significant expansion of energy consumption (most derived from indigenous coal reserves)—the potential for the formation of, and damage from, acid deposition in these developing countries is very high. This article delineates and assesses the emissions patterns, meteorology, physical geology, and biological and cultural resources present in various Asian nations. Based on this analysis and the risk factors to acidification, it is concluded that a number of areas in Asia are currently vulnerable to acid rain. These regions include Japan, North and South Korea, southern China, and the mountainous portions of Southeast Asia and southwestern India. Furthermore, with accelerated development (and its attendant increase in energy use and production of emissions of acid deposition precursors) in many nations of Asia, it is likely that other regions will also be affected by acidification in the near future. Based on the results of this overview, it is clear that acid deposition has significant potential to impact the Asian region. However, empirical evidence is urgently needed to confirm this and to provide early warning of increases in the magnitude and spread of acid deposition and its effects throughout this part of the world.

  4. Whither Acid Rain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Brimblecombe

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Acid rain, the environmental cause célèbre of the 1980s seems to have vanished from popular conscience. By contrast, scientific research, despite funding difficulties, has continued to produce hundreds of research papers each year. Studies of acid rain taught much about precipitation chemistry, the behaviour of snow packs, long-range transport of pollutants and new issues in the biology of fish and forested ecosystems. There is now evidence of a shift away from research in precipitation and sulfur chemistry, but an impressive theoretical base remains as a legacy.

  5. 2-arylureidobenzoic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valgeirsson, Jon; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Peters, Dan

    2003-01-01

    A series of 2-arylureidobenzoic acids (AUBAs) was prepared by a short and effective synthesis, and the pharmacological activity at glutamate receptors was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The compounds showed noncompetitive antagonistic activity at the kainate receptor subtype GluR5. The most potent...... on the benzoic acid moiety (ring A), whereas ring B tolerated a variety of substituents, but with a preference for lipophilic substituents. The most potent compounds had a 4-chloro substituent on ring A and 3-chlorobenzene (6b), 2-naphthalene (8h), or 2-indole (8k) as ring B and had IC(50) values of 1.3, 1...

  6. Alterações histoquímicas das glicosaminoglicanas na cérvice uterina no final da prenhez da rata albina após ministração local de hialuronidase Histochemical changes of the glycosaminoglycans in the uterine cervix of pregnant rats after local injection of hyaluronidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Almeida de Alcântara Lopes

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: estudar as alterações histoquímicas relacionadas às glicosaminoglicanas da cérvice uterina da rata albina, após ministração local de hialuronidase no final da prenhez. MÉTODOS: dez ratas com teste de prenhez positivo foram distribuídas aleatoriamente em dois grupos, numericamente iguais. O Grupo Controle (Gc foi constituído pelas ratas que receberam 1 mL de água destilada, dose única, no 18º dia da prenhez, sob anestesia, ministrado na cérvice uterina. O Grupo Experimental (Gex constou de ratas que receberam, sob as mesmas condições do Gc, 0,02 mL de hialuronidase, diluído em 0,98 mL de água destilada (total de 1 mL. No 20º dia de prenhez, as ratas foram novamente anestesiadas e submetidas à dissecção, preparando-se a cérvice uterina para estudo histoquímico com coloração de alcian blue e seus bloqueios (pH=0,5, pH=2,5, metilação e saponificação. RESULTADOS: verificou-se na lâmina própria no Gc, reação fortemente positiva (+3 e, no Gex, reação negativa, na coloração de alcian blue no pH=0,5. Em pH=2,5 a coloração também se apresentou fortemente positiva (+4 no Gc e fracamente positiva (+1 no Gex. Após metilação, tanto o Gc quanto o Gex mostraram reação negativa após coloração de alcian blue no pH=2,5. Com a reação de metilação seguida de saponificação e na digestão enzimática em lâmina, a coloração da lâmina própria se mostrou negativa em ambos os grupos. CONCLUSÕES: há uma nítida predominância de glicosaminoglicanas sulfatadas no Gc em relação ao Gex e uma tênue quantidade de glicosaminoglicanas carboxiladas identificadas no Gex. As modificações evidenciadas na matriz extracelular sugerem que a hialuronidase injetada localmente na cérvix uterina promoveu alterações bioquímicas compatíveis com maturação cervical.PURPOSE: to study the histochemical changes related to the uterine cervix glycosaminoglycan of the albino female rat, after local ministration of

  7. The Acid-Base Titration of a Very Weak Acid: Boric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celeste, M.; Azevedo, C.; Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment based on the titration of boric acid with strong base in the presence of d-mannitol is described. Boric acid is a very weak acid and direct titration with NaOH is not possible. An auxiliary reagent that contributes to the release of protons in a known stoichiometry facilitates the acid-base titration. Students obtain the…

  8. Catalytic acetoxylation of lactic acid to 2-acetoxypropionic acid, en route to acrylic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerthuis, R.; Granollers, M.; Brown, D.R.; Salavagione, H.J.; Rothenberg, G.; Shiju, N.R.

    2015-01-01

    We present an alternative synthetic route to acrylic acid, starting from the platform chemical lactic acid and using heterogeneous catalysis. To improve selectivity, we designed an indirect dehydration reaction that proceeds via acetoxylation of lactic acid to 2-acetoxypropionic acid. This

  9. Oxalic acid excretion after intravenous ascorbic acid administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robitaille, Line; Mamer, Orval A.; Miller, Wilson H.; Levine, Mark; Assouline, Sarit; Melnychuk, David; Rousseau, Caroline; Hoffer, L. John

    2012-01-01

    Ascorbic acid is frequently administered intravenously by alternative health practitioners and, occasionally, by mainstream physicians. Intravenous administration can greatly increase the amount of ascorbic acid that reaches the circulation, potentially increasing the risk of oxalate crystallization in the urinary space. To investigate this possibility, we developed gas chromatography mass spectrometry methodology and sampling and storage procedures for oxalic acid analysis without interference from ascorbic acid and measured urinary oxalic acid excretion in people administered intravenous ascorbic acid in doses ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 g/kg body weight. In vitro oxidation of ascorbic acid to oxalic acid did not occur when urine samples were brought immediately to pH less than 2 and stored at –30°C within 6 hours. Even very high ascorbic acid concentrations did not interfere with the analysis when oxalic acid extraction was carried out at pH 1. As measured during and over the 6 hours after ascorbic acid infusions, urinary oxalic acid excretion increased with increasing doses, reaching approximately 80 mg at a dose of approximately 100 g. We conclude that, when studied using correct procedures for sample handling, storage, and analysis, less than 0.5% of a very large intravenous dose of ascorbic acid is recovered as urinary oxalic acid in people with normal renal function. PMID:19154961

  10. [Studies on interaction of acid-treated nanotube titanic acid and amino acids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huqin; Chen, Xuemei; Jin, Zhensheng; Liao, Guangxi; Wu, Xiaoming; Du, Jianqiang; Cao, Xiang

    2010-06-01

    Nanotube titanic acid (NTA) has distinct optical and electrical character, and has photocatalysis character. In accordance with these qualities, NTA was treated with acid so as to enhance its surface activity. Surface structures and surface groups of acid-treated NTA were characterized and analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FT-IR). The interaction between acid-treated NTA and amino acids was investigated. Analysis results showed that the lengths of acid-treated NTA became obviously shorter. The diameters of nanotube bundles did not change obviously with acid-treating. Meanwhile, the surface of acid-treated NTA was cross-linked with carboxyl or esterfunction. In addition, acid-treated NTA can catch amino acid residues easily, and then form close combination.

  11. Determination of Sialic Acids by Acidic Ninhydrin Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Yao,Kenzabroh; Ubuka,Toshihiko

    1987-01-01

    A new acidic ninhydrin method for determining free sialic acids is described. The method is based on the reaction of sialic acids with Gaitonde's acid ninhydrin reagent 2 which yields a stable color with an absorption maximum at 470 nm. The standard curve is linear in the range of 5 to 500 nmol of N-acetylneuraminic acid per 0.9 ml of reaction mixture. The reaction was specific only for sialic acids among the various sugars and sugar derivatives examined. Some interference of this method by c...

  12. octadecenoic acid in tomato

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    ,12,13-. THODA. It has recently been shown that the enzyme peroxygenase is involved in the synthe- sis of 9,12,13-THODA in tomato fruits and that this trihydroxy fatty acid was probably further broken down or converted into other metabo-.

  13. Multifunctional Cinnamic Acid Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Peperidou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Our research to discover potential new multitarget agents led to the synthesis of 10 novel derivatives of cinnamic acids and propranolol, atenolol, 1-adamantanol, naphth-1-ol, and (benzylamino ethan-1-ol. The synthesized molecules were evaluated as trypsin, lipoxygenase and lipid peroxidation inhibitors and for their cytotoxicity. Compound 2b derived from phenoxyphenyl cinnamic acid and propranolol showed the highest lipoxygenase (LOX inhibition (IC50 = 6 μΜ and antiproteolytic activity (IC50 = 0.425 μΜ. The conjugate 1a of simple cinnamic acid with propranolol showed the higher antiproteolytic activity (IC50 = 0.315 μΜ and good LOX inhibitory activity (IC50 = 66 μΜ. Compounds 3a and 3b, derived from methoxylated caffeic acid present a promising combination of in vitro inhibitory and antioxidative activities. The S isomer of 2b also presented an interesting multitarget biological profile in vitro. Molecular docking studies point to the fact that the theoretical results for LOX-inhibitor binding are identical to those from preliminary in vitro study.

  14. Fenofibric acid for hyperlipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurav, Alok; Kaushik, Manu; Mohiuddin, Syed M

    2012-04-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (i.e., statins) are the mainstay of therapy for hyperlipidemia, as per the current National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) recommendation. However, the role of other agents, such as the fibrates, is continually being debated in the context of incremental risk reduction, especially in the setting of mixed dyslipidemia. Results from the ACCORD Trial have further added to the confusion. Fibrates also have a role to play in familial hyperlipidemias and in hypertriglyceridemia. Fenofibric acid is one of the newly approved forms of fenofibrate with enhanced bioavailability and was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administation (FDA) for the treatment of various types of hyperlipidemia, in conjunction with statins. This article reviews the role of fenofibric acid in the context of results from recent randomized trials on fenofibrate, including the ACCORD Trial. It discusses the current status of fenofibric acid in the management of dyslipidemia, especially in combination with statins, and also addresses the comparative efficacy and safety profile of this new molecule against other agents in its class. Fenofibric acid in combination with low- to moderate-dose statins is an effective and safe option in the treatment of mixed dyslipidemia, although the long-term effects on cardiovascular risk reduction need to be explored further.

  15. Hyaluronic Acid Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itenov, Theis S; Kirkby, Nikolai S; Bestle, Morten H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUD: Hyaluronic acid (HA) is proposed as a marker of functional liver capacity. The aim of the present study was to compare a new turbidimetric assay for measuring HA with the current standard method. METHODS: HA was measured by a particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and enzyme...

  16. Phenylpyruvic acid in urine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulemans, O.; Vergeer, E.G.

    The method of The, Fleury And Vink for the determination of phenylpyruvic acid (PPA) in urine is modified by measuring the extinction after the green colour with ferric chloride has faded, and subtracting this extinction from that found initially. More accurate values are obtained and low PPA values

  17. Pantothenic acid and biotin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Function Pantothenic acid and biotin are needed for growth. They help the body break down and use ... pregnancy Lactation: 7 mg/day *Adequate Intake (AI) Dietary Reference Intakes ... best way to get the daily requirement of essential vitamins is to eat a balanced ...

  18. furfural and acetic acid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigating the effects of two lignocellulose degradation by-products (furfural and acetic acid) on ethanol fermentations by six ethanologenic yeast strains. ... Among the tested yeast strains, 1300 exhibited the highest growth rate, thus can be a promising candidate for mass production of bioethanol. Three important ...

  19. Nanoclusters of Cyanuric Acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydrogen bonding; molecular clusters; cyanuric acid; self-assembly; symmetry. ... Chemical Laboratory, CSIR-Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600 020, India; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA; Indian Institute of Science Education and ...

  20. Koetjapic acid chloroform hemisolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. D. Nassar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C30H46O4·0.5CHCl3, consists of one koetjapic acid [systematic name: (3R,4aR,4bS,7S,8S,10bS,12aS-7-(2-carboxyethyl-3,4b,7,10b,12a-pentamethyl-8-(prop-1-en-2-yl-1,2,3,4,4a,4b,5,6,7,8,9,10,10b,11,12,12a-hexadecahydrochrysene-3-carboxylic acid] molecule and one half-molecule of chloroform solvent, which is disordered about a twofold rotation axis. The symmetry-independent component is further disordered over two sites, with occupancies of 0.30 and 0.20. The koetjapic acid contains a fused four-ring system, A/B/C/D. The A/B, B/C and C/D junctions adopt E/trans/cis configurations, respectively. The conformation of ring A is intermediate between envelope and half-chair and ring B adopts an envelope conformation whereas rings C and D adopt chair conformations. A weak intramolecular C—H...O hydrogen bond is observed. The koetjapic acid molecules are linked into dimers by two pairs of intermolecular O—H...O hydrogen bonds. The dimers are stacked along the c axis.

  1. A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arceo, Elena; Ellman, Jonathan; Bergman, Robert

    2010-05-03

    An alternative biomass-based route to benzoic acid from the renewable starting materials quinic acid and shikimic acid is described. Benzoic acid is obtained selectively using a highly efficient, one-step formic acid-mediated deoxygenation method.

  2. Fatty acid-producing hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleger, Brian F; Lennen, Rebecca M

    2013-12-31

    Described are hosts for overproducing a fatty acid product such as a fatty acid. The hosts include an exogenous nucleic acid encoding a thioesterase and, optionally, an exogenous nucleic acid encoding an acetyl-CoA carboxylase, wherein an acyl-CoA synthetase in the hosts are functionally delected. The hosts prefereably include the nucleic acid encoding the thioesterase at an intermediate copy number. The hosts are preferably recominantly stable and growth-competent at 37.degree. C. Methods of producing a fatty acid product comprising culturing such hosts at 37.degree. C. are also described.

  3. How salicylic acid takes transcriptional control over jasmonic acid signaling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Caarls, Lotte|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371746213; Pieterse, Corné M J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113115113; van Wees, Saskia C M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/185445373

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is a central process in plant immunity. The induction or repression of defense genes is orchestrated by signaling networks that are directed by plant hormones of which salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA...

  4. Progress in engineering acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongde; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Rongqing

    2014-02-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used for the production of a variety of fermented foods, and are considered as probiotic due to their health-promoting effect. However, LAB encounter various environmental stresses both in industrial fermentation and application, among which acid stress is one of the most important survival challenges. Improving the acid stress resistance may contribute to the application and function of probiotic action to the host. Recently, the advent of genomics, functional genomics and high-throughput technologies have allowed for the understanding of acid tolerance mechanisms at a systems level, and many method to improve acid tolerance have been developed. This review describes the current progress in engineering acid stress resistance of LAB. Special emphasis is placed on engineering cellular microenvironment (engineering amino acid metabolism, introduction of exogenous biosynthetic capacity, and overproduction of stress response proteins) and maintaining cell membrane functionality. Moreover, strategies to improve acid tolerance and the related physiological mechanisms are also discussed.

  5. Animosity towards Acid Attacks - Critical Study on Acid Victimization

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrashekar, S.V; Eldo Johny

    2017-01-01

    Animosity to acid attacks is deliberated as foulest acts, a form of gender terrorism within the feminist read. It’s a form of vicious violence outlined as acid throwing or Vitriolage. In India, there are component varied incident were reported, as most precarious victimization of individuals by deforming their body. The condition of victims of acid attacks is unit in serious frustrating their entire life. Acid victimization has deliberated globally and even several countries area unit sensiti...

  6. Effect of phenolic acids on glucose and organic acid metabolism by lactic acid bacteria from wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Francisco M; Figueiredo, Ana R; Hogg, Tim A; Couto, José A

    2009-06-01

    The influence of phenolic (p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic, gallic and protocatechuic) acids on glucose and organic acid metabolism by two strains of wine lactic acid bacteria (Oenococcus oeni VF and Lactobacillus hilgardii 5) was investigated. Cultures were grown in modified MRS medium supplemented with different phenolic acids. Cellular growth was monitored and metabolite concentrations were determined by HPLC-RI. Despite the strong inhibitory effect of most tested phenolic acids on the growth of O. oeni VF, the malolactic activity of this strain was not considerably affected by these compounds. While less affected in its growth, the capacity of L. hilgardii 5 to degrade malic acid was clearly diminished. Except for gallic acid, the addition of phenolic acids delayed the metabolism of glucose and citric acid in both strains tested. It was also found that the presence of hydroxycinnamic acids (p-coumaric, caffeic and ferulic) increased the yield of lactic and acetic acid production from glucose by O. oeni VF and not by L. hilgardii 5. The results show that important oenological characteristics of wine lactic acid bacteria, such as the malolactic activity and the production of volatile organic acids, may be differently affected by the presence of phenolic acids, depending on the bacterial species or strain.

  7. Kinetics of oxidation of acidic amino acids by sodium N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Keywords. Acidic amino acids; bromamine-B; oxidation kinetics, acid medium. 1. Introduction. The chemistry of aromatic sulphonyl haloamines has evoked considerable interest, as they are sources of halonium cations, hypohalite species, and N-anions which act both as bases and nucleophiles. The prominent members of ...

  8. Acetic acid extraction from aqueous solutions using fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJmker, H.M.; Gramblicka, M.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; van der Ham, Aloysius G.J.; Schuur, Boelo

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge for production of acetic acid via bio-based routes is cost-effective concentration and purification of the acetic acid from the aqueous solutions, for which liquid–liquid extraction is a possible method. A main challenge in extraction of acetic acid from dilute aqueous solutions is

  9. Effect of hydrofluoric acid on acid decomposition mixtures for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of hydrofluoric acid on acid decomposition mixtures for determining iron and other metallic elements in green vegetables. ... Therefore, the inclusion of HF in the acid decomposition mixtures would ensure total and precise estimation of Fe in plant materials, but not critical for analysis of Mn, Mg, Cu, Zn and Ca.

  10. Selective hydrodeoxygenation of tartaric acid to succinic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Jiayi [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; University of Delaware; Newark; USA; Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation; Vasiliadou, Efterpi S. [Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation; University of Delaware; Newark; USA; Goulas, Konstantinos A. [Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation; University of Delaware; Newark; USA; Saha, Basudeb [Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation; University of Delaware; Newark; USA; Vlachos, Dionisios G. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; University of Delaware; Newark; USA; Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation

    2017-01-01

    A novel one-step process for the selective production of succinic acid from tartaric acid is developed. High succinic yield is achieved in an efficient catalytic system comprised of MoOx/BC, HBr and acetic acid under hydrogen atmosphere.

  11. Amino acids analysis during lactic acid fermentation by single strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-09

    Jul 9, 2014 ... of the three LAB strains to utilize amino acids for growth and lactic acid production were employed to ... Lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which are used for the .... broth. These findings confirm that L. salivarius released alanine and glycine, which are non-essential for the growth of this bacterium. P. acidilactici ...

  12. Kinetics of oxidation of acidic amino acids by sodium N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 113; Issue 4. Kinetics of oxidation of acidic amino acids by sodium N-bromobenzenesulphonamide in acid medium: A mechanistic approach ... Department of Post-Graduate Studies in Chemistry, Central College, Bangalore University, Bangalore 560 001, India ...

  13. Industrial ecotoxicology "acid rain".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astolfi, E; Gotelli, C; Higa, J

    1986-01-01

    The acid rain phenomenon was studied in the province of Cordoba, Argentina. This study, based on a previously outlined framework, determined the anthropogenic origin of the low pH due to the presence of industrial hydrochloric acid wastage. This industrial ecotoxicological phenomenon seriously affected the forest wealth, causing a great defoliation of trees and shrubs, with a lower effect on crops. A survey on its effects on human beings has not been carried out, but considering the corrosion caused to different metals and its denouncing biocide effect on plants and animals, we should expect to find some kind of harm to the health of the workers involved or others engaged in farming, and even to those who are far away from the polluting agent.

  14. Halogenated fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Sundin, Peter; Wesén, Clas

    1997-01-01

    and separation method. This review covers separation by solid phase chromatography, gel permeation chromatography, and liquid-liquid extraction, followed by halogen determination. All studies performed according to this outline have indicated that the major organohalogen compounds are chlorinated fatty acids...... bound in different lipids. For the detection and identification of individual, halogenated fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) liberated from the lipids, gas chromatography (GC) has been employed together with detection methods such as electron capture detection, electrolytic conductivity detection (ELCD......), atomic emission spectrometry, and mass spectrometry. For most environmental samples, chlorinated FAMEs must be enriched prior to GC. ELCD is a useful detection method for indicating halogenated FAMEs in the chromatograms, and tentative identification of the halogenated species can be obtained...

  15. N-(3-Chlorophenylmaleamic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Thimme Gowda

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C10H8ClNO3, the molecular conformation is stabilized by two intramolecular hydrogen bonds. The first is a short O—H...O hydrogen bond within the maleamic acid unit and the second is a C—H...O hydrogen bond which connects the amide group with the phenyl ring. The maleamic acid unit is essentially planar, with an r.m.s. deviation of 0.044 Å, and makes a dihedral angle of 15.2 (1° with the phenyl ring. In the crystal, intermolecular N—H...O hydrogen bonds link the molecules into C(7 chains running [010].

  16. N-(3-Methylphenylsuccinamic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Thimme Gowda

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In the crystal structure of the title compound, C11H13NO3, the conformations of the N—H and C=O bonds in the amide segment are anti to each other, and that of the amide H atom is anti to the meta-methyl group in the benzene ring. Furthermore, the conformations of the amide oxygen and the carbonyl O atom of the acid segment are also anti to the adjacent –CH2 groups. The C=O and O—H bonds of the acid group are syn to each other. In the crystal, the molecules are packed into infinite chains through intermolecular N—H...O and O—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  17. Radioimmunoassay for jasmonic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoefel, H.D.; Brueckner, C.; Kramell, R.; Sembdner, G.; Schreiber, K. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Halle/Saale. Inst. fuer Biochemie der Pflanzen)

    1984-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the natural plant growth regulator jasmonic acid (JA) was developed. The antiserum was raised in rabbits against (+-)-JA linked to bovine serum albumin. As tracer tritium labelled (+-)-JA (spec. act. 7.4 x 10/sup 9/ Bq x mmol/sup -1/) was used. Cross-reactivity studies with compounds structurally related to JA demonstrated the antiserum to be specific for JA, abscisic acid normally present in the same extract does not interfer. The RIA has a detection limit of 2 ng (-)-JA methylester, a measuring range 2-200 ng, and no extensive purification is required prior to estimation. Therefore, in JA analysis the RIA described is superior to GC, HPLC, and bioassay. This new method has been employed for studies on the distribution of JA in different plant organs of the broad bean, Vicia faba L.

  18. (Radioiodinated free fatty acids)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, Jr., F. F.

    1987-12-11

    The traveler participated in the Second International Workshop on Radioiodinated Free Fatty Acids in Amsterdam, The Netherlands where he presented an invited paper describing the pioneering work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving the design, development and testing of new radioiodinated methyl-branched fatty acids for evaluation of heart disease. He also chaired a technical session on the testing of new agents in various in vitro and in vivo systems. He also visited the Institute for Clinical and Experimental Nuclear Medicine in Bonn, West Germany, to review, discuss, plan and coordinate collaborative investigations with that institution. In addition, he visited the Cyclotron Research Center in Liege, Belgium, to discuss continuing collaborative studies with the Osmium-191/Iridium-191m radionuclide generator system, and to complete manuscripts and plan future studies.

  19. USEFULNESS OF METACHROMATIC REAGENTS IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... epithelial from connective tissue mucopolysaccharides. Hexamine silver, Acridine orage and blocking of reactive groups by methyl esteriflcation, and saponification are technically inferior and not useful for demonstration of mucopolysaccharides. Keywords: Metachromatic dyes, Mucopolysaccharides, Tissue processing.

  20. Humic acid protein complexation

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, W.F.; Koopal, L.K.; Weng, L.P.; Riemsdijk, van, J.F.; Norde, W.

    2008-01-01

    Interactions of purified Aldrich humic acid (PAHA) with lysozyme (LSZ) are investigated. In solution LSZ is moderately positively and PAHA negatively charged at the investigated pH values. The proton binding of PAHA and of LSZ is determined by potentiometric proton titrations at various KCl concentrations. It is also measured for two mixtures of PAHA¿LSZ and compared with theoretically calculated proton binding assuming no mutual interaction. The charge adaptation due to PAHA¿LSZ interaction ...

  1. octadecenoic acid in tomato

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    The MMS medium was a mixture of 2.15 g of Murashige and Skoog me- dium, 0.97g of 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulphonic acid and 10 g of saccharose in. 500 ml of distilled water. The pH of the MMS medium was adjusted to 5.6 with 1 M KOH solution. Plant material and treatments. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. cv ...

  2. PEPTIC ACID DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Buriticá, Jorge Eduardo; Jorge Eduardo Buriticá: Cirujano General U. de Caldas, Profesor de Cirugía U. de Manizales. Profesor pregrado y postgrado U. de Caldas.; Becerra, Luis Fernando; Luis Fernando Becerra : Cirujano general CES Medellín, Docente U de Manizales, U de Caldas.; Salazar Osorio, Alejandro; Alejandro Salazar Osorio: Médico General U. de Manizales.

    2006-01-01

      Acid peptic disease (PAD) constitutes one of the most frequent queries in general medical practice, both in the emergency department and outpatient external; for this reason it is essential for good general practitioner, snagging a concrete and firm knowledge about this subject. Moreover, not only about this specific pathology but from its complications such as the digestive bleeding, although this would be a different item for which we are concerned in this review. There are areas of predo...

  3. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Predicts Compositional and Mechanical Properties of Hyaluronic Acid-Based Engineered Cartilage Constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Farzad; Kim, Minwook; Nahri, Syeda Yusra; Mauck, Robert L; Pleshko, Nancy

    2018-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) has been widely used for cartilage tissue engineering applications. However, the optimal time point to harvest HA-based engineered constructs for cartilage repair is still under investigation. In this study, we investigated the ability of a nondestructive modality, near-infrared spectroscopic (NIR) analysis, to predict compositional and mechanical properties of HA-based engineered cartilage constructs. NIR spectral data were collected from control, unseeded constructs, and twice per week by fiber optic from constructs seeded with chondrocytes during their development over an 8-week period. Constructs were harvested at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks, collagen and sulfated glycosaminoglycan content measured using biochemical assays, and the mechanical properties of the constructs evaluated using unconfined compression tests. NIR absorbances associated with the scaffold material, water, and engineered cartilage matrix, were identified. The NIR-determined matrix absorbance plateaued after 4 weeks of culture, which was in agreement with the biochemical assay results. Similarly, the mechanical properties of the constructs also plateaued at 4 weeks. A multivariate partial least square model based on NIR spectral input was developed to predict the moduli of the constructs, which resulted in a prediction error of 10% and R value of 0.88 for predicted versus actual values of dynamic modulus. Furthermore, the maximum increase in moduli was calculated from the first derivative of the curve fit of NIR-predicted and actual moduli values over time, and both occurred at ∼2 weeks. Collectively, these data suggest that NIR spectral data analysis could be an alternative to destructive biochemical and mechanical methods for evaluation of HA-based engineered cartilage construct properties.

  4. Intermolecular G-quadruplex induces Hyaluronic Acid-DNA superpolymers causing cancer cell swelling, blebbing and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beals, Nathan; Model, Michael; Worden, Matt; Hegmann, Torsten; Basu, Soumitra

    2018-02-05

    Over the past decade, nanomedicine has gained considerable traction through its relevance, for example in "smart" delivery, thus creating platforms for novel treatments. Here we report a natural polymer-DNA conjugate that undergoes self-assembly in a K+ dependent fashion to form a G-quadruplex (GQ) and generate superpolymeric structures. We derivatized the naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan polymer hyaluronic acid (HA) with short G-rich DNA (HASH-DNA) that can form intermolecular non-canonical GQ structure. Gel mobility shift assay and Circular Dichroism measurements confirmed HASH conjugation to DNA and K+ dependent GQ formation respectively. TEM and SEM results indicated that the addition of K+ to the HASH-DNA conjugate led to the formation of micron range structures, while control samples remained unordered and as nebulous globular form. Confocal microscopy of a fluorescently labeled form of the superpolymer verified increased cellular uptake. The HASH-DNA conjugates showed toxicity in HeLa cells while a scrambled DNA (Mut) conjugate HASH-Mut showed no cytotoxicity, presumably due to non-formation of the superpolymeric structure. To understand the mechanism of cell death and if the superpolymeric structure is responsible for it, we monitored the cell size and observed an average of 23% increase in size compared to 4.5% in control cells at 4.5 hours. We believe that cellular stress is generated presumably by the intracellular assembly of this large superpolymeric nanostructures causing cell blebbing with no exit option. This approach provides a new strategy of cellular delivery of a targeted naturally occurring polymer and a novel way to induce superpolymeric structure formation that acts as a therapeutic.

  5. Resveratrol and N-acetylcysteine influence redox balance in equine articular chondrocytes under acidic and very low oxygen conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, John A; Moots, Robert J; Clegg, Peter D; Milner, Peter I

    2015-09-01

    Mature articular cartilage is an avascular tissue characterized by a low oxygen environment. In joint disease, acidosis and further reductions in oxygen levels occur, compromising cartilage integrity.This study investigated how acidosis and very low oxygen levels affect components of the cellular redox system in equine articular chondrocytesand whether the antioxidants resveratrol and N-acetylcysteine could modulate this system. We used articular chondrocytes isolated from nondiseased equine joints and cultured them in a 3-D alginate bead system for 48h in pH 7.2 or 6.2 in the absence or presence of the proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β (10ng/ml).In addition, chondrocytes were cultured with resveratrol (10µM) or N-acetylcysteine (NAC) (2mM).Cell viability, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) release, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), reactive oxygen species (ROS), GSH:GSSG ratio, and SOD1 and SOD2 protein expression were measured. Very low levels of oxygen (pH 6.2), and exposure to IL-1β led to reductions in cell viability, increased GAG release, alterations in ΔΨm and ROS levels, and reduced GSH:GSSG ratio. In addition, SOD1 and SOD2 protein expressions were reduced. Both resveratrol and NAC partially restored ΔΨm and ROS levels and prevented GAG release and cell loss and normalized SOD1 and SOD2 protein expression. In particular NAC was highly effective at restoring the GSH:GSSG ratio.These results show that the antioxidants resveratrol and N-acetylcysteine can counteract the redox imbalance in articular chondrocytes induced by low oxygen and acidic conditions. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2007-01-01

    Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness.......Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness....

  7. Biological properties of lipoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bilska

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Lipoic acid is a prostetic group of H-protein of the glycine cleavage system and the dihydrolipoamide acyltransferases (E2 of the pyruvate, alpha-ketoglutarate and branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complexes. Lipoic acid and its reduced form, dihydrolipoic acid, reacts with oxygen reactive species. This paper reviews the beneficial effects in oxidative stress models or clinical conditions.

  8. Acids and bases solvent effects on acid-base strenght

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Brian G

    2013-01-01

    Acids and bases are ubiquitous in chemistry. Our understanding of them, however, is dominated by their behaviour in water. Transfer to non-aqueous solvents leads to profound changes in acid-base strengths and to the rates and equilibria of many processes: for example, synthetic reactions involving acids, bases and nucleophiles; isolation of pharmaceutical actives through salt formation; formation of zwitter- ions in amino acids; and chromatographic separation of substrates. This book seeks to enhance our understanding of acids and bases by reviewing and analysing their behaviour in non-aqueous solvents. The behaviour is related where possible to that in water, but correlations and contrasts between solvents are also presented.

  9. Fumaric acid production by fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roa Engel, C.A.; Straathof, A.J.J.; Zijlmans, T.W.; Van Gulik, W.M.; Van der Wielen, L.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The potential of fumaric acid as a raw material in the polymer industry and the increment of cost of petroleum-based fumaric acid raises interest in fermentation processes for production of this compound from renewable resources. Although the chemical process yields 112% w/w fumaric acid

  10. [Total synthesis of nordihydroguaiaretic acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, A X; Zhao, Y R; Chen, N; Pan, X F

    1997-04-01

    beta-Keto ester(5) was obtained from vanilin through etherification, oxidation and condensation with acetoacetic ester, (5) on oxidative coupling reaction by NaOEt/I2 produced dimer (6) in high yield. Acid catalyzed cyclodehydration of (6) gave the furan derivative(7), and by a series of selective hydrogenation nordihydroguaiaretic acid, furoguaiacin dimethyl ether and dihydroguaiaretic acid dimethyl ether were synthesized.

  11. Excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Ebert, B

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that (RS)-2-amino-2-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)acetic acid (ATAA) is an antagonist at N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. We have now resolved ATAA via diastereomeric salt formation...

  12. Acid precipitation and forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. O. Tamm

    1976-01-01

    Many soil processes and properties may be affected by a change in chemical climate such as that caused by acidification of precipitation. The effect of additions of acid precipitation depends at first on the extent to which this acid is really absorbed by the soil and on the changes in substances with actual or potential acidity leaving the soil. There is for instance...

  13. Hyaluronic Acid in Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Mohammad Abid

    2017-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a major component of the extracellular matrix of the skin and plays an important role in the metabolism of the dermis. It has a key position in wound healing and tissue repair processes owing to its ability to maintain a humid environment favorable to healing and the stimulation of growth factors, cellular constituents, and the migration of various cells essential for healing. This review aims to describe briefly the physical, chemical, and biologic properties of HA, together with some details of the dermatologic indications of this unique molecule.

  14. Crassulacean acid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas David Geydan

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A review of Crassulacean acid metabolism is presented, characterized by showing the occurrence, activity and plasticity of these complex mechanism at the physiological, biochemical and molecular level, framed by the presence of the denominated four phases in CAM and its repercussion and expression due to different stresses in an ecological context. The basic enzymes, and metabolites necessary for the optional functioning of CAM are presented as well as their mode of action and cellular control. Finally, it is shown how environmental conditions and molecular signalling mediate the phenotypic plasticity.

  15. Protonation study of peroxynitric acid and peroxynitrous acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiano, Randy L.; Francisco, Joseph S.

    2004-11-01

    The equilibrium structures and harmonic vibrational frequencies of peroxynitric acid (HOONO2) and seven structures of protonated peroxynitric acid, along with peroxynitrous acid (HOONO) and its 12 protonated peroxynitrous acid structures, have been investigated using several ab initio and density functional methods. The ab initio methods include second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, quadratic configuration interaction, including single and double excitations theory (QCISD), and the QCISD(T) methods, which incorporate a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitation. The Becke three-parameter hybrid functional combined with Lee, Yang, and Parr correlation function is the density functional method used. The lowest energy form of protonated peroxynitric acid is a complex between H2O2 and NO+ rather than between H2O and NO2+. For peroxynitrous acid, a complex between H2O2 and NO2+ is found to be the lowest energy structure. The ab initio proton affinity (PA) of HOONO and HOONO2 is predicted to be 182.1 and 175.1 kcal mol-1, respectively, at the QCISD(T)/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory. The results are contrasted with an earlier study on nitrous acid, and is shown that peroxynitric acid and peroxynitrous acid have a smaller PA than nitrous acid.

  16. Adsorption of humic acid on acid-activated Greek bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulia, Danae; Leodopoulos, Ch; Gimouhopoulos, K; Rigas, F

    2009-12-15

    The adsorption of humic acid on bentonite from Milos Island (Greece) acid-treated with dilute H(2)SO(4) solutions over a concentration range between 0.25 and 13M has been studied. Bentonite activated with 3M sulfuric acid (AAS) showed a higher efficiency in removing humic acid from aqueous solutions and was selected for further investigation. The specific surface area of acid-activated bentonite was estimated using the methylene blue adsorption method. The morphology of untreated, activated, and HA-sorbed bentonite was studied under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The effects of contact time, adsorbate concentration, adsorbent dose, and temperature on the adsorption of humic acid onto bentonite activated with 3M H(2)SO(4) were studied using a batch adsorption technique. Acidic pH and high ionic strength proved to be favorable for the adsorption efficiency. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion models were used to describe the kinetic data and the rate constants were evaluated. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin equations and the isotherm constants were determined. Thermodynamic parameters (DeltaH(o), DeltaS(o), and DeltaG(o)) of adsorption of humic acid onto acid-activated bentonite with 3M sulfuric acid were also evaluated.

  17. New Acid Combination for a Successful Sandstone Acidizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, M. U.; Mahmud, H. K. B.; Rezaee, R.

    2017-05-01

    With the development of new enhanced oil recovery techniques, sandstone acidizing has been introduced and played a pivotal role in the petroleum industry. Different acid combinations have been applied, which react with the formation, dissolve the soluble particles; thus increase the production of hydrocarbons. To solve the problems which occurred using current preflush sandstone acidizing technology (hydrochloric acid); a new acid combination has been developed. Core flooding experiments on sandstone core samples with dimensions 1.5 in. × 3 in. were conducted at a flow rate of 2 cm3/min. A series of hydrochloric-acetic acid mixtures with different ratios were tested under 150°F temperature. The core flooding experiments performed are aimed to dissolve carbonate, sodium, potassium and calcium particles from the core samples. These experiments are followed by few important tests which include, porosity-permeability, pH value, Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) analysis and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR measurements). All the results are compared with the results of conventional hydrochloric acid technology. NMR and porosity analysis concluded that the new acid combination is more effective in creating fresh pore spaces and thus increasing the reservoir permeability. It can be seen from the pore distribution before and after the acidizing. Prior applying acid; the large size of pores appears most frequently in the pore distribution while with the applied acid, it was found that the small pore size is most the predominant of the pore distribution. These results are validated using ICP analysis which shows the effective removal of calcium and other positive ions from the core sample. This study concludes that the combination of acetic-hydrochloric acid can be a potential candidate for the preflush stage of sandstone acidizing at high temperature reservoirs.

  18. Simultaneous liquid-chromatographic quantitation of salicylic acid, salicyluric acid, and gentisic acid in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cham, B E; Bochner, F; Imhoff, D M; Johns, D; Rowland, M

    1980-01-01

    We have developed a specific and sensitive method for the determination of salicylic acid, salicyluric acid, and gentisic acid in urine. Any proteins present are precipitated with methyl cyanide. After centrifugation, an aliquot of the supernate is directly injected into an octadecyl silane reversed-phase chromatographic column, then eluted with a mixture of water, butanol, acetic acid, and sodium sulfate, and quantitated at 313 nm by ultraviolet detection according to peak-height ratios (with internal standard, o-methoxybenzoic acid) or peak heights (no internal standard). The method allows estimates within 25 min. Sensitivity was 0.2 mg/L for gentisic acid, and 0.5 mg/L for both salicyluric and salicylic acid (20-micro L injection volume); response was linear with concentration to at least 2.000 g/L for salicylic acid and metabolites. Analytical recovery of salicylic acid and metabolites from urine is complete. Intra-assay precision (coefficient of variation) is 5.52% at 7.5 mg/L for salicylic acid, 5.01% at 9.33 mg/L for salicyluric acid, and 3.07% at 7.96 mg/L for gentisic acid. Interassay precision is 7.32% at 7.51 mg/L for salicylic acid, 5.52% at 8.58 mg/L for salicyluric acid, and 3.97% at 8.32 mg/L for gentisic acid. We saw no significant interference in urine from patients being treated with various drugs other than aspirin.

  19. Cryoprotection from lipoteichoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Charles V.; Middaugh, Amy; Wickham, Jason R.; Friedline, Anthony; Thomas, Kieth J.; Johnson, Karen; Zachariah, Malcolm; Garimella, Ravindranth

    2012-10-01

    Numerous chemical additives lower the freezing point of water, but life at sub-zero temperatures is sustained by a limited number of biological cryoprotectants. Antifreeze proteins in fish, plants, and insects provide protection to a few degrees below freezing. Microbes have been found to survive at even lower temperatures, and with a few exceptions, antifreeze proteins are missing. Survival has been attributed to external factors, such as the high salt concentration of brine veins and adhesion to particulates or ice crystal defects. We have discovered an endogenous cryoprotectant in the cell wall of bacteria, lipoteichoic acid biopolymers. Adding 1% LTA to bacteria cultures immediately prior to freezing provides 50% survival rate, similar to the results obtained with 1% glycerol. In the absence of an additive, bacterial survival is negligible as measured with the resazurin cell viability assay. The mode of action for LTA cryoprotection is unknown. With a molecular weight of 3-5 kDa, it is unlikely to enter the cell cytoplasm. Our observations suggest that teichoic acids could provide a shell of liquid water around biofilms and planktonic bacteria, removing the need for brine veins to prevent bacterial freezing.

  20. Bile Acid Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ciaula, Agostino; Garruti, Gabriella; Baccetto, Raquel Lunardi; Molina-Molina, Emilio; Bonfrate, Leonilde; Wang, David Q-H; Portincasa, Piero

    2017-10-28

    The primary bile acids (BAs) are synthetized from colesterol in the liver, conjugated to glycine or taurine to increase their solubility, secreted into bile, concentrated in the gallbladder during fasting, and expelled in the intestine in response to dietary fat, as well as bio-transformed in the colon to the secondary BAs by the gut microbiota, reabsorbed in the ileum and colon back to the liver, and minimally lost in the feces. BAs in the intestine not only regulate the digestion and absorption of cholesterol, triglycerides, and fat-soluble vitamins, but also play a key role as signaling molecules in modulating epithelial cell proliferation, gene expression, and lipid and glucose metabolism by activating farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor-1 (GPBAR-1, also known as TGR5) in the liver, intestine, muscle and brown adipose tissue. Recent studies have revealed the metabolic pathways of FXR and GPBAR-1 involved in the biosynthesis and enterohepatic circulation of BAs and their functions as signaling molecules on lipid and glucose metabolism.

  1. CELL PENETRATION BY ACIDS : VI. THE CHLOROACETIC ACIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, W J

    1922-09-20

    Measurements of the penetration of tissue from Chromodoris zebra are believed to show that a determining factor in penetration involves the establishment of a critical pH (near 3.5) in relation to superficial cell proteins. The rapidity with which this state is produced depends upon acid strength, and upon some property of the acid influencing the speed of absorption; hence it is necessary to compare acids within groups of chemical relationship. The actual speed of penetration observed with any acid is dependent upon two influences: preliminary chemical combination with the outer protoplasm, followed by diffusion. The variation of the temperature coefficient of penetration velocity with the concentration of acid, and the effect of size (age) of individual providing the tissue sample agree in demonstrating the significant part played by diffusion. In comparing different acids, however, their mode of chemical union with the protoplasm determines the general order of penetrating ability.

  2. Solid acid catalysis from fundamentals to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hattori, Hideshi

    2014-01-01

    IntroductionTypes of solid acid catalystsAdvantages of solid acid catalysts Historical overviews of solid acid catalystsFuture outlookSolid Acids CatalysisDefinition of acid and base -Brnsted acid and Lewis acid-Acid sites on surfacesAcid strengthRole of acid sites in catalysisBifunctional catalysisPore size effect on catalysis -shape selectivity-Characterization of Solid Acid Catalysts Indicator methodTemperature programmed desorption (TPD) of ammoniaCalorimetry of adsorption of basic moleculesInfrare

  3. Citric acid production patent review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassiadis, Savas; Morgunov, Igor G; Kamzolova, Svetlana V; Finogenova, Tatiana V

    2008-01-01

    Current Review article summarizes the developments in citric acid production technologies in East and West last 100 years. Citric acid is commercially produced by large scale fermentation mostly using selected fungal or yeast strains in aerobe bioreactors and still remains one of the runners in industrial production of biotechnological bulk metabolites obtained by microbial fermentation since about 100 years, reflecting the historical development of modern biotechnology and fermentation process technology in East and West. Citric acid fermentation was first found as a fungal product in cultures of Penicillium glaucum on sugar medium by Wehmer in 1893. Citric acid is an important multifunctional organic acid with a broad range of versatile uses in household and industrial applications that has been produced industrially since the beginning of 20(th) century. There is a great worldwide demand for citric acid consumption due to its low toxicity, mainly being used as acidulant in pharmaceutical and food industries. Global citric acid production has reached 1.4 million tones, increasing annually at 3.5-4.0% in demand and consumption. Citric acid production by fungal submerged fermentation is still dominating, however new perspectives like solid-state processes or continuous yeast processes can be attractive for producers to stand in today's strong competition in industry. Further perspectives aiming in the improvement of citric acid production are the improvement of citric acid producing strains by classical and modern mutagenesis and selection as well as downstream processes. Many inexpensive by-products and residues of the agro-industry (e.g. molasses, glycerin etc.) can be economically utilized as substrates in the production of citric acid, especially in solid-state fermentation, enormously reducing production costs and minimizing environmental problems. Alternatively, continuous processes utilizing yeasts which reach 200-250 g/l citric acid can stand in today

  4. Microbial production of tenuazonic acid analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatenbeck, S; Sierankiewicz, J

    1973-02-01

    The fungus Alternaria tenuis normally produces tenuazonic acid (3-acetyl-5-secbutyltetramic acid). On supplementation of the culture substrate with l-valine and l-leucine, the organism formed two new tetramic acids, 3-acetyl-5-isopropyltetramic acid and 3-acetyl-5-isobutyltetramic acid, respectively. l-Phenylalanine was not utilized by the organism as a tetramic acid precursor.

  5. 49 CFR 173.158 - Nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nitric acid. 173.158 Section 173.158... Nitric acid. (a) Nitric acid exceeding 40 percent concentration may not be packaged with any other material. (b) Nitric acid in any concentration which does not contain sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as...

  6. Fatty acids and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecerf, Jean-Michel

    2009-05-01

    Fatty acids have been classified into "good" or "bad" groups according to their degree of unsaturation or whether they are "animal fat" or "vegetable fat". Today, it appears that the effects of fatty acids are complex and vary greatly according to the dose and the nature of the molecule. Monounsaturated fatty acids are still considered as having a "neutral" status, but any benefits may be related to the chemical environment of the source food or the associated overall food pattern. Controversy surrounds omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, because even though they lower LDL cholesterol levels, excessive intakes do not appear to be correlated with cardiovascular benefit. The omega-3 fatty acids are known to exert cardiovascular protective effects. Dairy fat and its cardiovascular impact are being evaluated. This review examines the existing literature on the relationships between the different fatty acids and cardiovascular disease.

  7. Acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigham, Jerry M.; Cravotta, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) consists of metal-laden solutions produced by the oxidative dissolution of iron sulfide minerals exposed to air, moisture, and acidophilic microbes during the mining of coal and metal deposits. The pH of AMD is usually in the range of 2–6, but mine-impacted waters at circumneutral pH (5–8) are also common. Mine drainage usually contains elevated concentrations of sulfate, iron, aluminum, and other potentially toxic metals leached from rock that hydrolyze and coprecipitate to form rust-colored encrustations or sediments. When AMD is discharged into surface waters or groundwaters, degradation of water quality, injury to aquatic life, and corrosion or encrustation of engineered structures can occur for substantial distances. Prevention and remediation strategies should consider the biogeochemical complexity of the system, the longevity of AMD pollution, the predictive power of geochemical modeling, and the full range of available field technologies for problem mitigation.

  8. Hyaluronic acid based hydrogel system for soft tissue regeneration and drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Amit Kumar

    We have developed hyaluronic acid (HA)-based, biomimetic hydrogel matrices that are hierarchically structured, mechanically robust and biologically active. Specifically, HA-based hydrogel particles (HGPs) with controlled sizes, defined porosity, and improved stability were synthesized using different inverse emulsion systems and crosslinking chemistries. The resultant particles either contained residual functional groups or were rendered reactive by subsequent chemical modifications. HA-based doubly crosslinked networks (DXNs) were synthesized via covalent crosslinking of HA HGPs with soluble HA macromers carrying mutually reactive functional groups. These hybrid matrices are hierarchical in nature, consisting of densely crosslinked HGPs integrated in a loosely connected secondary matrix. Their mechanical properties and degradation kinetics can be readily tuned by varying the particle size, functional group density, intra- and interparticle crosslinking. To improve the biological functions of HA HGPs, perlecan domain I (PlnDI), a basement membrane proteoglycan that has strong affinity for various heparin binding growth factors (HBGFs), was successfully conjugated to the particles through the core protein via a flexible poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) linker. The immobilized PlnDI maintains its ability to bind bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP-2) and modulates its in vitro release. A similar, sustained release of BMP-2 was achieved by encapsulating BMP-2-loaded HGPs within a photocrosslinked HA matrix. When encapsulated in HA DXNs, primary bovine chondrocytes were able to maintain their phenotype, proliferate readily and produce abundant glycosaminoglycan. Finally, cell-adhesive HA DXNs were fabricated by encapsulating gelatin-decorated HA HGPs in a secondary HA matrix. Human MSCs were shown to adhere to the composite matrix through the focal adhesion sites clustered on particle surface. The cell-adhesive composite matrices supported hMSC proliferation and migration into

  9. In vitro evaluation of antiviral and virucidal activity of a high molecular weight hyaluronic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blasi Elisabetta

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background hyaluronic acid (HA, a non-sulphated glycosaminoglycan, is present in synovial fluid, vitreous humour serum and many connective tissues. Pharmaceutical preparations of HA are used in clinical practice for wound healing, joint pain, kerato-conjunctivitis, asthma, mouth care, oesophageal-reflux, and gastritis. Moreover, it is used as a filler to counteract ageing and facial lipoatrophy. Our study aims at investigating the in vitro antiviral activity of a high molecular weight HA. Methods the MTT test was used to rule out the potential toxic effects of HA on the different cell lines used in the antiviral assays. The antiviral activity of HA against Coxsackievirus B5, Herpes Simplex Virus-1, Mumps Virus, Adenovirus-5, Influenza Virus A/H1N1, Human Herpesvirus-6, Porcine Parvovirus, Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus was assessed by virus yield assays. Results the most effective inhibition was observed against Coxsackievirus B5, with 3Log reduction of the virus yield at 4 mg/ml, and a reduction of 3.5Log and 2Log, at 2 mg/ml and 1 mg/ml, respectively: the selectivity index was 16. Mumps virus was highly inhibited too showing a reduction of 1.7Log at 1 mg/ml and 1Log at 4 mg/ml and 2 mg/ml (selectivity index = 12. The selectivity index for Influenza Virus was 12 with the highest inhibition (1Log observed at 4 mg/ml. Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and Porcine Parvovirus were mildly inhibited, whereas no antiviral activity was observed with respect to Adenovirus-5, Human Herpesvirus-6, Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus. No HA virucidal activity was ever observed against any of the viruses tested. Kinetic experiments showed that both Coxsackievirus B5 and Herpes simplex virus-1 replication were consistently inhibited, not influenced by the time of HA addition, during the virus replication cycle. Conclusions the spectrum of the antiviral activity exhibited by HA against both RNA and DNA viruses, known to have

  10. Generation of Vascular Graft Biomaterials via the Modification of Polyurethane with Hyaluronic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Amaliris

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the United States, necessitating surgical interventions such as small diameter (I.D. <6 mm) bypass grafting. Although the use of autologous veins as small diameter grafts produces favorable results, their limited availability provides a significant obstacle. Meanwhile, several synthetic materials have demonstrated success as large-diameter vascular grafts, but exhibit poor patency and high failure rates in small-diameter applications. Based on these limitations and the clinical issues associated with them, it is clear that there is a significant need to develop new materials for cardiovascular and blood-contacting applications that could be used to fabricate small-diameter vascular grafts. Thus, in this thesis we have designed and characterized a new polymer that is composed of both synthetic and natural elements with the goal of generating a material that is appropriate for use in cardiovascular applications. Specifically, we describe the modification of polyurethane (PU), a synthetic polymer with many favorable physical characteristics, with hyaluronic acid (HA), a native glycosaminoglycan that possesses anti-thrombotic properties as well as the ability to modulate endothelial cell proliferation in a molecular weight-dependent manner. The goal of the present work was to assess in detail the impact of 1) HA molecular weight, 2) HA quantity, and 3) the method of HA incorporation (bulk vs. surface-grafted) on the vascular-specific performance of polyurethane-HA (PU-HA) materials, under static conditions and upon exposure to physiological shear stresses. The initial findings presented in this thesis indicate that these PU-HA materials possess many of the physical and biological properties that are necessary for implementation in vascular applications. These materials were able to simultaneously address the three major design criteria in vascular graft fabrication: hemocompatibility, endothelialization, and

  11. Intestinal metabolism of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enser, M

    1965-08-01

    1. The effect of concentration on the oxidation and incorporation into lipids of lauric acid and linoleic acid by rings of rat small intestine has been studied in vitro. 2. In the absence of glucose, the oxidation of lauric acid in the range 0.01-5.0mm showed a maximum at 0.1mm. In the presence of glucose the maximum was at 0.5mm. The oxidation of linoleic acid in the presence of glucose increased throughout the concentration range 0.01-5.0mm. 3. The incorporation of lauric acid into lipids was maximal at 0.5-0.6mm in the presence of glucose, but at 10mm in the absence of glucose. At 0.8mm-lauric acid, in the presence of glucose, over 75% of the incorporated lauric acid was in triglycerides, but at 10mm they only contained 30%. The incorporation of glucose carbon into glycerides paralleled the incorporation of lauric acid. 4. In the range 0.01-2.5mm-linoleic acid the quantity incorporated into lipids increased. In the range 0.01-0.4mm linoleic acid was incorporated predominantly into triglycerides, but between 0.4 and 1.0mm most was in diglycerides, and between 2.5 and 5.0mm most was in monoglycerides. 5. The relationship of fatty acid concentration to the mechanism of absorption is discussed, together with the correlation between the distribution of the absorbed fatty acids within the tissue lipids and the lipase activity of intestinal mucosa.

  12. [Glycosaminoglycans in the pathogenesis and diagnostics of Graves's ophthalmopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daroszewski, Jacek; Rybka, Jacek; Gamian, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    Graves's ophthalmopathy is an extrathyroidal tissue-specific symptom of Graves's disease characterized by inflammatory infiltration of orbital tissues. In several percent of patients the course of disease is severe, leading to serious ocular complications and affecting quality of life. Progress made in understanding the pathogenesis of GO has not been followed by better outcome of treatment and it is still one of the most complex problems of clinical endocrinology. In this respect, qualification for immunosuppressive treatment based on an assessment of the disease activity is a matter of great importance. Glycosaminogycans are linear, unbranched heteropolysaccharides built of repeating disaccharide sequences. These compounds are essential for the organization and function of connective tissue. Moreover, they also take part in the initiation and regulation of immune reactions. In this paper, glycosaminogycans are described with regard to their structure, metabolism, and function, with special emphasis on the tissue specificity of the orbit. Data concerning GAG useful in the management of patients with GO are highlighted.

  13. Free energy calculations of glycosaminoglycan-protein interactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gandhi, Neha S; Mancera, Ricardo L

    2009-01-01

    .... We report the first use of molecular dynamics (MD) free energy calculations using the MM PBSA method to investigate the binding of GAGs to protein molecules, namely the platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) and annexin A2...

  14. Progress in structural analysis of glycosaminoglycans and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recent research data on GAGs have suggested that they have many new biological functions such as anti-atherogenesis, anticoagulation, prevention and cure of arthritis, morphogenesis and cell division. They are widely applied in functional food, clinical medicine, cosmetics and biomaterial. Especially, in the biomaterials ...

  15. Not all lubricin isoforms are substituted with a glycosaminoglycan chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lord, Megan S; Estrella, Ruby P; Chuang, Christine Y

    2012-01-01

    digestion using a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay approach. Aggrecan was not found to form complexes with lubricin in synovial fluid which confirmed that the MAb 3-B-3 CS and MAb 5-D-4 KS structures decorated lubricin. These data demonstrate that lubricin present in human synovial fluid...... in human synovial fluid to provide insight into its biological role. Lubricin was detected as a major band at approximately 360 kDa which co-migrated in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a chondroitin sulfate (CS)-containing proteoglycan that was detected by both monoclonal...

  16. Impact of mechanical ventilation and fluid load on pulmonary glycosaminoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriondo, Andrea; Marcozzi, Cristiana; Bianchin, Francesca; Reguzzoni, Marcella; Severgnini, Paolo; Protasoni, Marina; Raspanti, Mario; Passi, Alberto; Pelosi, Paolo; Negrini, Daniela

    2012-05-31

    The combined effect of mechanical ventilation and fluid load on pulmonary glycasaminoglycans (GAGs) was studied in anaesthetized rats ((BW 290±21.8 (SE)g) mechanically ventilated for 4h: (a) at low (∼7.5mlkg(-1)) or high (∼23mlkg(-1)) tidal volume (V(T)) and zero alveolar pressure; (b) at low or high V(T) at 5cmH(2)O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP); (c) with or without 7mlkg(-1)h(-1) intravenous infusion of Phosphate Buffer Solution (PBS). Compared to spontaneous breathing, GAGs extractability decreased by 52.1±1.5% and 42.2±7.3% in not-infused lungs mechanically ventilated at low V(T) or at high V(T) and PEEP, respectively. In contrast, in infused lungs, GAGs extractability increased by 56.1±4.0% in spontaneous ventilation and PEEP and up to 81.1% in all mechanically ventilated lungs, except at low V(T) without PEEP. In the absence of an inflammatory process, these results suggest that PEEP was protective at low but not at high V(T) when alveolar structures experience exceedingly high stresses. When combined to mechanical ventilation, fluid load might exacerbate edema development and lung injury. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Targeting Human Cancer by a Glycosaminoglycan Binding Malaria Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salanti, Ali; Clausen, Thomas M.; Agerbæk, Mette Ø.

    2015-01-01

    be specifically targeted by recombinant VAR2CSA (rVAR2). In tumors, placental-like CS chains are linked to a limited repertoire of cancer-associated proteoglycans including CD44 and CSPG4. The rVAR2 protein localizes to tumors in vivo and rVAR2 fused to diphtheria toxin or conjugated to hemiasterlin compounds...

  18. Mapping by monoclonal antibody detection of glycosaminoglycans in connective tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Caterson, B; Christner, J E

    1984-01-01

    Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans are widespread connective tissue components and chemical analysis of cartilage and other proteoglycans has demonstrated molecular speciation involving the degree and position of sulphation of the carbohydrate chains. This may, in turn, affect the properties...... organizations on the GAG molecule endowed by the sulphate groups. So far, it has not been possible to identify and map chondroitins of differing sulphation in tissues, but we have now raised three monoclonal antibodies which specifically recognize unsulphated, 4-sulphated and 6-sulphated chondroitin...... and dermatan sulphate. These provide novel opportunities to study the in vivo distribution of chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans. We demonstrate that chondroitin sulphates exhibit remarkable connective tissue specificity and furthermore provide evidence that some proteoglycans may predominantly carry only one...

  19. Dielectric behavior of gelatine-glycosaminoglycans blends: an impedance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanungo, Ivy; Fathima, Nishter Nishad; Rao, Jonnalagadda Raghava

    2013-05-01

    The dielectric behavior of the gelatine-GAGs based blend systems has been studied to understand the dynamic behavior of the water at the protein-GAGs interfaces which are relevant for tissue engineering application. Impedance (Z) and phase have been measured as a function of frequencies from 0.01 Hz to 100 kHz. GAGs tunes the ionic charge drift which initiates polarization mechanisms through charge accumulation at structural interfaces and creates conduction currents. The admittance results showed that at high frequency, the conductivity increases with increasing GAGs concentration indicating changes in hydration shell of the gelatine by the GAGs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Biotechnological production of citric acid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Max, Belén; Salgado, José Manuel; Rodríguez, Noelia; Cortés, Sandra; Converti, Attilio; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    This work provides a review about the biotechnological production of citric acid starting from the physicochemical properties and industrial applications, mainly in the food and pharmaceutical sectors...

  1. Preparation and characterization Al3+-bentonite Turen Malang for esterification fatty acid (palmitic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulloh, Abdulloh; Aminah, Nanik Siti; Triyono, Mudasir, Trisunaryanti, Wega

    2016-03-01

    Catalyst preparation and characterization of Al3+-bentonite for esterification of palmitic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid has been done. Al3+-bentonite catalyst was prepared from natural bentonite of Turen Malang through cation exchange reaction using AlCl3 solution. The catalysts obtained were characterized by XRD, XRF, pyridine-FTIR and surface area analyser using the BET method. Catalyst activity test of Al3+-bentonite for esterification reaction was done at 65°C using molar ratio of metanol-fatty acid of 30:1 and 0.25 g of Al3+-bentonite catalyst for the period of ½, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 hours. Based on the characterization results, the Al3+-bentonite Turen Malang catalyst has a d-spacing of 15.63 Ǻ, acid sites of Brönsted and Lewis respectively of 230.79 µmol/g and 99.39 µmol/g, surface area of 507.3 m2/g and the average of radius pore of 20.09 Å. GC-MS analysis results of the oil phase after esterification reaction showed the formation of biodiesel (FAME: Fatty acid methyl ester), namely methyl palmitate, methyl oleate and methyl linoleate. The number of conversions resulted in esterification reaction using Al3+-bentonite Turen Malang catalyst was 74.61%, 37.75%, and 20, 93% for the esterification of palmitic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid respectively.

  2. Amino acids and gut function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W W; Qiao, S Y; Li, D F

    2009-05-01

    The intestine is not only critical for the absorption of nutrients, but also interacts with a complex external milieu. Most foreign antigens enter the body through the digestive tract. Dietary amino acids are major fuels for the small intestinal mucosa, as well as important substrates for syntheses of intestinal proteins, nitric oxide, polyamines, and other products with enormous biological importance. Recent studies support potential therapeutic roles for specific amino acids (including glutamine, glutamate, arginine, glycine, lysine, threonine, and sulfur-containing amino acids) in gut-related diseases. Results of these new lines of work indicate trophic and cytoprotective effects of amino acids on gut integrity, growth, and health in animals and humans.

  3. Antibiofilm Properties of Acetic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Morten; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2014-01-01

    of the infected implant, tissue, or organ and thereby the biofilm. Acetic acid is known for its antimicrobial effect on bacteria in general, but has never been thoroughly tested for its efficacy against bacterial biofilms. In this article, we describe complete eradication of both Gram-positive and Gram......-negative biofilms using acetic acid both as a liquid and as a dry salt. In addition, we present our clinical experience of acetic acid treatment of chronic wounds. In conclusion, we here present the first comprehensive in vitro and in vivo testing of acetic acid against bacterial biofilms....

  4. ACETIC ACID AND A BUFFER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition comprising : a) 0.01-20% wt/wt acetic acid and b) a physiologically tolerable buffer capable of maintaining acetic acid at a pH in the range of 2-7; and use of such a composition as an antimicrobial agent.......The present invention relates to a composition comprising : a) 0.01-20% wt/wt acetic acid and b) a physiologically tolerable buffer capable of maintaining acetic acid at a pH in the range of 2-7; and use of such a composition as an antimicrobial agent....

  5. Lipoic acid and diabetes: Effect of dihydrolipoic acid administration ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Relative α-lipoic acid content of diabetic livers was considerably less than that of normal livers as determined by gas chromatography. It was not possible to detect any dihydrolipoic acid in the livers. Biochemical abnormalities such as hyperglycaemia, ketonemia, reduction in liver glycogen and impaired incorporation of ...

  6. Molecular Interaction of Pinic Acid with Sulfuric Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elm, Jonas; Kurten, Theo; Bilde, Merete

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the molecular interactions between the semivolatile α-pinene oxidation product pinic acid and sulfuric acid using computational methods. The stepwise Gibbs free energies of formation have been calculated utilizing the M06-2X functional, and the stability of the clusters is evaluated...

  7. Biobased methacrylic acid via selective catalytic decarboxylation of itaconic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report a bio-based route to methacrylic acid via selective decarboxylation of itaconic acid utilizing catalytic ruthenium carbonyl propionate in an aqueous solvent system. High selectivity (>90%) was achieved at low catalyst loading (0.1 mol %) with high substrate concentration (5.5 M) at low tem...

  8. Composition of amino acids, fatty acids and dietary fibre monomers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is increasing demand for sources of energy and non-meat protein with balanced amino acid profiles worldwide. Nuts are rich in protein and essential amino acids, and have a high energy value due to their high fat content. Kernels from two wild fruits in Mozambique, Adansonia digitata and Sclerocarya birrea, were ...

  9. Amino acids analysis during lactic acid fermentation by single strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-09

    Jul 9, 2014 ... Amino acids analysis during lactic acid fermentation by single strain cultures of lactobacilli and mixed culture starter made from them. KiBeom Lee1*, Ho-Jin Kim1 and Sang-Kyu Park2. 1Bio Center Technopark, 7-50 Songdo, Yeonsu-Gu, Incheon 406-840, Republic of Korea. 2Nambu University, Chumdan ...

  10. How salicylic acid takes transcriptional control over jasmonic acid signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caarls, Lotte; Pieterse, Corné M J; van Wees, Saskia C M

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is a central process in plant immunity. The induction or repression of defense genes is orchestrated by signaling networks that are directed by plant hormones of which salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) are the major players. Extensive cross-communication between

  11. [The role of biliary dyskinesia in the mechanism of the damage to the protective properties of the mucosal barrier in peptic ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oparin, A G; Demerchian, T I; Korenovskiĭ, I P; Chonka, V Iu; Iakovenko, E L; Pandeĭ, I

    1993-01-01

    Mucous barrier resistance was studied in 232 duodenal ulcer patients with signs of exacerbation as shown by PAS-positive substances and acid mucopolysaccharides in antral mucosa of the stomach and duodenum as well as by gastric juice levels of gastromucoproteins, fucose and sialic acids. In addition, measurements were performed of biliary motility. The tests indicated that half of the ulcer patients developed biliary dyskinesia manifesting as hyperkinesia or hypokinesia. The resultant decrease in gastric mucins requires individual correction.

  12. Fatty Acid Esterification with Polyols over Acidic Montmorillonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaari, Asma; Neji, Soumaya Bouguerra; Frikha, Mouhamed Hedi

    2017-05-01

    The production of fatty acid esters from stearic, oleic, and palmitic acids and polyols (ethylene glycol and glycerol) was investigated in this work. A series of montmorillonite-based clays catalysts (KSF, KSF/0, KP10, and K10), having different physicochemical properties, were used as acidic catalysts. The influence of the specific surface area and the acidity of the catalysts on the esterification rate were explored. The best catalytic activities were obtained with KSF catalyst. The optimization of various factors on the reaction was also studied, including catalyst concentration, reaction temperature and molar ratio (polyol / fatty acid). The yield rate reached 94% under the optimum conditions and the recovery rate maintained more than 96% after 5 batches.

  13. Acid-base balance in lake water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosset, C.

    1980-02-01

    As expected, the acid-base content of lake water is composed of strong base or acid, weak acids (mainly fulvic acid) and carbonic acid. All of these may be determined by using a simple titration method. The concentration of undissociated carbonic acid sometimes appears not to be in equilibrium with the CO/sub 2/-concentration in air. Observed supersaturation seems to be connected to the concentration of fulvic acid.

  14. New look at sandstone acidizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidley, J.L.

    1973-10-01

    The acid mutual solvent (AMS) technique is a 3-step process which involves a preflush, a mixed HF-HCl stage, and an afterflush employing the mutual solvent. The preflush is normally regular hydrochloric acid (15% HCl). This step is designed to serve as a buffer between formation water and hydrofluoric acid. Normally an adequate preflush is 50 gal of regular acid per ft of perforated interval. The mud-acid stage commonly consists of a mixture 3% HF and 12% HCl, although other concentrations may be used. Unfortunately this acid formulation is capable of producing by-products which as insoluble residues, reduce formation permeability or alter wettability in a way that lower relative permeability to oil. Effective treatments are sometimes conducted with as little as 10 to 20 gal of mud acid per ft of perforated interval. Third treatment stage, the afterflush, is composed of diesel oil containing 10% or more of a mutual solvent. A solvent of particular interest is ethylene glycol monobutyl ether (EGMBE). The EGMBE appears to improve cleanup to such an extent that an appreciable increase in well productivity is noticed. Tabular data show comparisons of multiple field treatments employing mud acid with and without the mutual solvent in the afterflush.

  15. Omega-3 fatty acids (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are a form of polyunsaturated fat that the body derives from food. Omega-3s (and omega- ... fish including tuna, salmon, and mackerel. Other important omega 3 fatty acids are found in dark green leafy vegetables, flaxseed ...

  16. Acid rain: a background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glustrom, L.; Stolzenberg, J.

    1982-07-08

    This Staff Brief was prepared for the Wisconsin Legislative Council's Special Committee on Acid Rain to provide an introduction to the issue of acid rain. It is divided into four parts. Part I provides an overview on the controversies surrounding the measurement, formation and effects of acid rain. As described in Part I, the term acid rain is used to describe the deposition of acidic components through both wet deposition (e.g., rain or snow) and dry deposition (e.g., direct contact between atmospheric constituents and the land, water or vegetation of the earth). Part II presents background information on state agency activities relating to acid rain in Wisconsin, describes what is known about the occurrence of, susceptibility to and effects of acid rain in Wisconsin, and provides information related to man-made sources of sulfur and nitrogen oxides in Wisconsin. Part III describes major policies and regulations relating to acid rain which have been or are being developed jointly by the United States and Canadian governments, by the United States government and by the State of Wisconsin. Part IV briefly discusses possible areas for Committee action.

  17. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness.......The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness....

  18. [Phylogenetic vision of bile acids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, H

    1994-08-01

    Bile acids are the most important solutes of bile: they are essential in cholesterol degradation, solubilization and excretion; they are determinants of bile flow and secretion; and their role is crucial in the intestinal absorption of lipids and lipid soluble vitamins. In amphibia and in cartilaginous fish, the 27C cholestane molecule is hydroxylated to alcohols. In birds, the terminal 27C-OH group is oxydated to cholestanoic acids. In vertebrates of a more recent evolutionary origin, the lateral chain is shortened to 24C and oxydated to cholestanoic acids. Further transformations include chemical changes in the cholestane skeleton and in the lateral chain (hydroxylations, dehydroxylations, epimerization, etc). In the intestinal lumen, the saprophytic flora provides enzymes catalysing new changes that originate "secondary" bile acids. During entero-hepatic circulation, another variety of bile acids appear, commonly termed "tertiary" bile acids. A recent study of Lee R Hagey characterized bile acid composition of over 600 species of vertebrates, showing that bile acid composition of bile has been the subject of an interesting evolutionary phenomenon and that it is a chemical marker of biodiversity in vertebrates.

  19. Acid Precipitation: Causes and Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babich, Harvey; And Others

    1980-01-01

    This article is the first of three articles in a series on the acid rain problem in recent years. Discussed are the causes of acid precipitation and its consequences for the abiotic and biotic components of the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and for man-made materials. (Author/SA)

  20. utilisation of synthetic amino acids

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    student

    Crystalline amino acids are used increasingly to meet the lysine, methionine and threonine requirements of poultry. Initially this was on economic grounds but their use is now being encouraged by concerns over N-pollution (Fisher, 2000). When modelling the amino acid requirements of broiler breeder hens, a question that ...

  1. Preparation of fulvic acid and low-molecular organic acids by oxidation of weathered coal humic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinozuka, T.; Ito, A.; Sasaki, O.; Yazawa, Y.; Yamaguchi, T. [Chiba Institute of Technolgy, Chiba (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry

    2002-07-01

    Weathered coal contains much humic acid and a little fulvic acid. Therefore, the production of fulvic acid, the most valuable humic substance because of its water-solubility, was examined by ozone and hydrogen peroxide oxidation of humic acid extracted form Xinjiang (China) weathered coal. The resulting products of the oxidation were water soluble fulvic acid and organic acids, mainly formic acid and oxalic acid. The product yield of fulvic acid was 20 (C%) and that of organic acids were 39 (C%) for formic and acid 13 (C%) for oxalic acid. The formed fulvic acid showed a higher content of oxygen and carboxyl groups, than those of the extracted one from the original weathered coal.

  2. N-(3-Nitrophenylmaleamic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Thimme Gowda

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C10H8N2O5, the molecule is slightly distorted from planarity. The molecular structure is stabilized by two intramolecular hydrogen bonds. The first is a short O—H...O hydrogen bond (H...O distance = 1.57 Å within the maleamic acid unit and the second is a C—H...O hydrogen bond (H...O distance = 2.24 Å which connects the amide group with the benzene ring. The nitro group is twisted by 6.2 (2° out of the plane of the benzene ring. The crystal structure manifests a variety of hydrogen bonding. The packing is dominated by a strong intermolecular N—H...O interaction which links the molecules into chains running along the b axis. The chains within a plane are further assembled by three additional types of intermolecular C—H...O hydrogen bonds to form a sheet parallel to the (overline{1}01 plane.

  3. Fumaric acid esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami Yazdi, Martin; Mrowietz, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Several clinical studies have shown that systemic therapy with fumaric acid esters (FAEs) in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis is effective and has a good long-term safety profile. For therapeutic use, tablets with a defined mixture of FAEs (dimethylfumarate [DMF] and three different salts of monoethylfumarate) are registered in Germany. There is evidence that DMF is the most essential component in this formulation with an antipsoriatic effect. Currently, there are few data on the pharmacokinetics of fumarates in human beings. DMF seems to act as a prodrug for its main metabolite: monomethylfumarate. This hypothesis was supported by the observation that only monomethylfumarate was detected in the plasma of human beings after the oral administration of FAEs. FAEs have been tested in different biological assays, and effects such as inhibition of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway or induction of apoptosis by DMF have been described. For these data, the role of DMF as a modulator of intracellular glutathione plays an important role.

  4. Antioxidants based on fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalk Christian

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoxidation is the cause for deterioration of organic materials. Many commercial products react with atmospheric oxygen under loss of quality. To retard unwanted oxidative damage and to prolong the useful life of the substrates, antioxidants are used to protect the organic matter. We linked phenolic compounds with fatty acids to obtain fatty acid conjugates with antioxidative action. The conjugates have a similar constitution like hindered phenols e.g. tert.-butyl-hydroxy-anisole (BHA and show good antioxidative action in the Rancimat-test. Ascorbic acid is an antioxidant and a strong reducing agent. Its action is based on a ketoene-diol structure. We were able to insert an analogous structure into a fatty acid chain. The products we obtained have similar oxidation potentials as ascorbic acid

  5. Glycosaminoglycan loss from cartilage after anterior cruciate ligament rupture: influence of time since rupture and chondral injury Perda de glicosaminoglicanas da cartilagem após ruptura do ligamento cruzado anterior: influência do tempo de ruptura e da lesão condral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SMG Mattiello-Rosa

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To quantify the concentration of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs concentration in the synovial fluid (SF of knees with chronic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL rupture and to identify possible associations between GAG concentration in SF and the time elapsed since rupture and degree of chondral injury. METHOD: Fourteen adult male subjects with total unilateral ACL rupture, which had occurred between 5 and 144 months earlier, were assessed. All subjects underwent joint aspiration; it was possible to collect SF from ten individuals. The samples were quantified to determine the GAG concentration using dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB staining. The degree of chondral injury was macroscopically evaluated using the modified Mankin histological scale. Spearman correlation test (OBJETIVO: Quantificar a concentração de glicosaminoglicanas sulfatadas (GAGs no líquido sinovial (LS de joelhos com ruptura crônica do ligamento cruzado anterior (LCA e identificar uma possível correlação entre a concentração de GAGs no LS e o tempo pós-ruptura e grau de lesão condral. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 14 indivíduos adultos do sexo masculino com ruptura total unilateral do LCA, ocorrida entre cinco a 144 meses. Todos os sujeitos foram puncionados, sendo possível a coleta de LS em dez indivíduos. As amostras foram quantificadas para determinar a concentração de GAGs usando a coloração azul de dimetilmetileno, método descrito por Farndale21. O grau de lesão condral foi macroscopicamente avaliado pela escala histológica de Mankin modificada por Messner14. As correlações entre concentração de GAGs e lesão condral foram feitas pelo teste de correlação de Sperman (p< 0,05 e a concentração de GAGs e tempo pós-ruptura pelo teste de correlação de Pearson (p< 0,05. RESULTADOS: Concentração de GAGs no LS apresentou variação média de 73,84 ± 40,75µg/mL, sendo o tempo médio pós-ruptura de 40,4 + 40,3 meses. Não houve correla

  6. Reactive extraction and recovery of levulinic acid, formic acid and furfural from aqueous solutions containing sulphuric acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Thomas; Blahusiak, Marek; Babic, Katarina; Schuur, Boelo

    2017-01-01

    Levulinic acid (LA) can be produced from lignocellulosic materials via hydroxylation followed by an acid-catalyzed conversion of hexoses. Inorganic homogeneous catalysts are mostly used, in particular sulphuric acid, yielding a mixture of LA with sulphuric acid, formic acid (FA) and furfural.

  7. Kinetics of aluminum-fulvic acid complexation in acidic waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plankey, B.J.; Patterson, H.H.

    1987-06-01

    A fluorescence technique has been used to study the complex formation kinetics of aluminum with a single metal-free fulvic acid isolated from an Adirondack Mountain forest soil. In the pH range of 3.0-4.5, two kinetically distinguishable components of the fulvic acid mixture have been identified, which define two types of average aluminum binding sites. Both fulvic acid average sites conform to a bidentate chelating binding site kinetic analysis, from which rate and equilibrium parameters have been obtained. From comparison of rate and equilibrium constants of aluminum-salicyclic acid complexation, the authors conclude that the faster reacting component of fulvic acid probably contains salicyclic acid type aluminum binding sites. Results are also compared with those of an aluminum-fluoride kinetic study. Fulvic acid and fluoride react with aluminum by the same mechanism and therefore have the same pH dependence. The dependence of the rate on temperature is, however, quite different for the two reactions. The environmental implications of these findings are discussed. 45 references, 5 figures, 6 tables.

  8. Isolation and characterization of aquatic humic acid and fulvic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, D.S. [Kangwon National University, Chunchon (Korea)

    2002-02-01

    The dissolved organic carbon extracted from groundwater is separated into humic acid and fulvic acid. They are characterized for their chemical composition, spectroscopic characteristics using UV/VIS, IR and solid state {sup 13}C-NMR spectroscopy, proton exchange capacity and molecular size distribution. The results are comparable with the literature data. The study explains that the aquatic humic and fulvic acid in this experiment are site-specipic and polydisperse natural organic matter with considerable proton exchange capacity. (author). 16 refs., 5 tabs., 4 figs.

  9. Bioactive phenolic acids from Scorzonera radiata Fisch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Tsevegsuren

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromatographic separation of the crude extract obtained from the aerial parts of the Mongolian medicinal plant Scorzonera radiata yielded five new dihydrostilbenes [4], two new flavonoids, one new quinic acid derivative, as well as twenty known compounds including eight quinic acid derivatives, four flavonoids, two coumarins, five simple benzoic acids, and one monoterpene glycoside. We present here results on isolation and structural identification some active phenolic compounds from the Scorzonera radiata - eight quinic acid derivatives (quinic acid, 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 4,5-dicaffeoyl-epi-quinic acid, 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 3,5-dicaffeoyl-epi-quinic acid, chlorogenic acid, 5-p-coumaroylquinic acid (trans, 5-p-coumaroylquinic acid (cis. Quinic acid derivatives exhibited antioxidative activity.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5564/mjc.v12i0.177 Mongolian Journal of Chemistry Vol.12 2011: 78-84

  10. Synthesis of Trishomocubane Amino Acid Derivatives | Govender ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The acid fluoride is required for activation of the cage amino acid in SPPS. Esterification of the sterically hindered trishomocubane amino acid is also reported, indicating sufficient reactivity of the acid function for potential use in SPPS. Keywords: Trishomocubane amino acid, hydantoin, Fmoc protection, t-Boc protection, ...

  11. Phytic acid in green leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi Alkarawi, H; Zotz, G

    2014-07-01

    Phytic acid or phytate, the free-acid form of myo-inositolhexakiphosphate, is abundant in many seeds and fruits, where it represents the major storage form of phosphorus. Although also known from other plant tissues, available reports on the occurrence of phytic acid, e.g. in leaves, have never been compiled, nor have they been critically reviewed. We found 45 published studies with information on phytic acid content in leaves. Phytic acid was almost always detected when studies specifically tried to detect it, and accounted for up to 98% of total P. However, we argue that such extreme values, which rival findings from storage organs, are dubious and probably result from measurement errors. Excluding these high values from further quantitative analysis, foliar phytic acid-P averaged 2.3 mg·g(-1) , and represented, on average, 7.6% of total P. Remarkably, the ratio of phytic acid-P to total P did not increase with total P, we even detected a negative correlation of the two variables within one species, Manihot esculenta. This enigmatic finding warrants further attention. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  12. Insect acid-base physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J F

    2001-01-01

    Acid-base status influences many aspects of insect biology, including insect distributions in aquatic systems, insect-plant and insect-pathogen interactions, membrane transport phenomena, and the mode of action of pesticides. Acid-base status in the hemolymph and gut lumen of insects is generally well regulated but varies somewhat within individuals owing to effects of temperature, activity, discontinuous ventilation, and diet. The pH of the midgut lumen varies with the phylogeny and feeding ecology. Insect fluids have buffer values similar to those of vertebrates. The respiratory system participates in acid-base homeostasis primarily by regulating the internal carbon dioxide (partial) pressure via changes in spiracular opening and convective ventilation. The epithelia of the renal system and gut participate in hemolymph acid-base regulation by varying acid-base transport in response to organismal acid-base status. Evidence to date suggests that the dominant mechanisms for control of renal acid-base excretion involve hormonal regulation of H+-V-ATPase activity.

  13. Ascorbic acid induced atrazine degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaojing; Huang, Xiaopeng; Ai, Zhihui; Zhao, Jincai; Zhang, Lizhi

    2017-04-05

    In this study, we systematically investigated the degradation efficiency and the degradation mechanism of atrazine in the presence of ascorbic acid at different pH values. Although atrazine could be degraded by ascorbic acid in a wide pH range from 4 to 12, its degradation under either acidic (pH≤4) or alkaline (pH≥12) condition was more efficient than under neutral condition (pH=7). This pH dependent atrazine degradation was related to the reactive characteristic of atrazine and the reductive activity of ascorbic acid. The ascorbic acid induced atrazine degradation pathways at different pH were investigated by comparing the atrazine degradation intermediates with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography and ion chromatography. It was found that more products were detected in presence of ascorbic acid at alkaline condition. The appearance of chloride ions confirmed the dechlorination of atrazine by ascorbic acid in the absence of molecular oxygen, while its dechlorination efficiency reached highest at pH 12. These results can shed light on the application of AA for the organic pollutant remediation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Safety and tolerability of intra-articular hyaluronic acid (Sinovial®/GELSYN-3tm) injections in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, M; Salini, V

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressively degenerative joint disease, with a very high prevalence rate that is expected to increase worldwide with the ageing of the population. Considering that OA requires long-term treatment, therapies with minimal side effects and which can be repeated as needed are warranted. Hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural glycosaminoglycan with viscoelastic properties, is a major component of synovial fluid and the extracellular matrix of the joint cartilage, and plays key roles in maintaining synovial fluid viscosity and the bio-mechanical integrity of healthy cartilage. Intra-articular administration of exogenous HA has therefore been used to successfully improve the viscoelastic properties of the joint to improve lubrication, modulate inflammation and modify the catabolic micro-environment. Sinovial®/GELSYN-3TM is a sterile, non-pyrogenic formulation of highly purified, chemically unmodified HA of bio-fermentative origin, which has been introduced in several different concentrations in clinical use within the European market. This expert opinion reports on the published data regarding the efficacy and tolerability of first and multiple injection series of Sinovial®-based product formulations. The data regarding the tolerability of Sinovial® in patients with knee osteoarthritis were analyzed, showing that this formulation, beside favourable therapeutic effects, has a very good tolerability profile, with only mild, transient, and easily managed, local injection-site reactions and absence of systemic reactions. In particular, repetitive cycles of HA have been shown to yield positive results in terms of both efficacy and safety and therefore should be offered to patients who had undergone a successful first course of therapy when their symptoms reoccur.

  15. Hyaluronic acid in the tail and limb of amphibians and lizards recreates permissive embryonic conditions for regeneration due to its hygroscopic and immunosuppressive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2017-12-01

    The present review focuses on the role of hyaluronate (hyaluronic acid; HA) during limb and tail regeneration in amphibians and lizards mainly in relation to cells of the immune system. This non-sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) increases in early stages of wound healing and blastema formation, like during limb or tail embryogenesis, when the immune system is still immature. The formation of a regenerating blastema occurs by the accumulation of mesenchymal cells displaying embryonic-like antigens and HA. This GAG adsorbs large amount of water and generates a soft tissue over 80% hydrated where mesenchymal and epithelial cells can move and interact, an obligatory passage for organ regeneration. GAGs and HA in particular rise to a high amount and coat plasma membranes of blastema cells forming a shield that likely impedes to the circulating immune cells to elicit an immune reaction against the embryonic-like antigens present on blastema cells. The evolution of limb-tail regeneration in amphibians dates back to the Devonian-Carboniferous, while tail regeneration in lizards is a more recent evolution process, possibly occurred since the Jurassic, which is unique among amniotes. Both processes are associated with the reactivation of proliferating embryonic programs that involve the upregulation of genes for Wnt, non-coding RNAs, and HA synthesis in an immune-suppress organ, the regenerative blastema. Failure of maintaining a lasting HA synthesis for the formation of a highly hydrated blastema leads to scarring, the common healing process of amniotes equipped with an efficient immune system. The study of amphibian and lizard regeneration indicates that attempts to stimulate organ regeneration in other vertebrates require the induction of a highly hydrated and immune-depressed, HA-rich environment, similar to the extracellular environment present during development. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Controlled Release of Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist from Hyaluronic Acid-Chitosan Microspheres Attenuates Interleukin-1β-Induced Inflammation and Apoptosis in Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the protective effect of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra released from hyaluronic acid chitosan (HA-CS microspheres in a controlled manner on IL-1β-induced inflammation and apoptosis in chondrocytes. The IL-1Ra release kinetics was characterized by an initial burst release, which was reduced to a linear release over eight days. Chondrocytes were stimulated with 10 ng/ml IL-1β and subsequently incubated with HA-CS-IL-1Ra microspheres. The cell viability was decreased by IL-1β, which was attenuated by HA-CS-IL-1Ra microspheres as indicated by an MTT assay. ELISA showed that HA-CS-IL-1Ra microspheres inhibited IL-1β-induced inflammation by attenuating increases in NO2- and prostaglandin E2 levels as well as increase in glycosaminoglycan release. A terminal deoxyribonucleotide transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling assay revealed that the IL-1β-induced chondrocyte apoptosis was decreased by HA-CS-IL-1Ra microspheres. Moreover, HA-CS-IL-1Ra microspheres blocked IL-1β-induced chondrocyte apoptosis by increasing B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 and decreasing Bcl-2-associated X protein and caspase-3 expressions at mRNA and protein levels, as indicated by reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. The results of the present study indicated that HA-CS-IL-1Ra microspheres as a controlled release system of IL-1Ra possess potential anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic properties in rat chondrocytes due to their ability to regulate inflammatory factors and apoptosis associated genes.

  17. C-11 Acid and the Stereochemistry of Abietic Acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    carboxycyclohexylacetic acid. ... developed by Barton (1969 Chemistry Nobel Prize) to the solution of an important configurational problem, ... organic chemistry' and of the theoretical treatment of the chemical bond, essential to an understanding of ...

  18. Renal handling of terephthalic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremaine, L.M.; Quebbemann, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    By use of the Sperber in vivo chicken preparation method, infusion of radiolabeled terephthalic acid ((/sup 14/C)TPA) into the renal portal circulation revealed a first-pass excretion of the unchanged compound into the urine. This model was utilized further to characterize the excretory transport of (/sup 14/C)TPA and provide information on the structural specificity in the secretion of dicarboxylic acids. At an infusion rate of 0.4 nmol/min. 60% of the (/sup 14/C)TPA which reached the kidney was directly excreted. An infusion rate of 3 or 6 mumol/min resulted in complete removal of (/sup 14/C)TPA by the kidney. These results indicate that TPA is both actively secreted and actively reabsorbed when infused at 0.4 nmol/min and that active reabsorption is saturated with the infusion of TPA at higher concentrations. The secretory process was saturated with the infusion of TPA at 40 mumol/mn. The excretory transport of TPA was inhibited by the infusion of probenecid, salicylate, and m-hydroxybenzoic acid, indicating that these organic acids share the same organic anion excretory transport process. m-Hydroxybenzoic acid did not alter the simultaneously measured excretory transport of p-aminohippuric acid (PAH), suggesting that there are different systems involved in the secretion of TPA and PAH. The structural specificity for renal secretion of dicarboxylic acids was revealed by the use of o-phthalic acid and m-phthalic acid as possible inhibitors of TPA secretion.

  19. Rosmarinic acid potentiates carnosic acid induced apoptosis in lung fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Bahri, Sana; Mies, Fr?d?rique; Ben Ali, Ridha; Mlika, Mona; Jameleddine, Saloua; Mc Entee, Kathleen; Shlyonsky, Vadim

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by over-population and excessive activation of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts disrupting normal lung structure and functioning. Rosemary extract rich in carnosic acid (CA) and rosmarinic acid (RA) was reported to cure bleomycin-(BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis. We demonstrate that CA decreased human lung fibroblast (HLF) viability with IC50 value of 17.13?1.06 ?M, while RA had no cytotoxic effect. In the presence of 50 ?M of RA, dose-response for CA shifted...

  20. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Amino Acid Side Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a group consisting of nat...... of naturally-occurring nucleobases and non-naturally-occurring nucleobases attached to a polyamide backbone, and contain alkylamine side chains....