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Sample records for acid exchange resins

  1. Dimerisation of isobutene on acidic ion-exchange resins

    OpenAIRE

    Honkela, Maija

    2005-01-01

    Dimerisation of isobutene produces diisobutenes that can be hydrogenated to isooctane (2,2,4-trimethyl pentane). Isooctane can be used as a high octane gasoline component. The aim of this work was to study the selective production of diisobutenes through the dimerisation of isobutene on ion-exchange resin catalysts and to construct kinetic models for the reactions in the system for reactor design purposes. High selectivities for diisobutenes were obtained in the presence of polar componen...

  2. Studies concerning the anion ex-change resins catalyzed esterification of epichlorohydrin with organic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Muresan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies the esterification of carboxylic acids with epichlorohydrin over two macroporous strong base anion exchange resins with different polymer matrix. For both resins, the influence of reaction parameters (temperature, catalyst loading, molar ratio on the reaction rate and the yields of the two isomeric esters were investigated.

  3. Enhancing ethanol fermentability of an artificial acid hydrolyzate with anion exchange resin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Gao, Jun; Ntoni, Jennifer; Begonia, Maria F T; Lee, Ken S; Hwang, Huey-Min

    2008-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of anion exchange resins (Dowex M43 and Dowex monosphere 66) in neutralization and detoxification of an acid hydrolyzate solution, a fermentation medium containing inhibitors was inoculated with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When treated with resins at a 1:1 ratio (vol:wt) for up to 20 min, 55-67% of furan and more than 95% of phenolic compounds were removed. Ethanol fermentation activity in resin-treated fermentation medium was the same as the control. There was 21-43% of the total sugar loss after one resin treatment, depending on the sugar concentration. Additional treatments increased sugar retention rate to 95%.

  4. Synthesis, characterization and applications of a new cation exchanger tamarind sulphonic acid (TSA) resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A V; Sharma, Naresh Kumar; Rathore, Abhay S

    2012-01-01

    A new composite cation exchanger, tamarind sulphonic acid (TSA) resin has been synthesized. The chemically modified TSA ion exchange resin has been used for the removal and preconcentration of Zn2+, Cd2+, Fe2+, Co2+ and Cu2+ ions in aqueous solution and effluent from the Laxmi steel plant in Jodhpur, India. This type of composite represents a new class of hybrid ion exchangers with good ion exchange capacity, stability, reproducibility and selectivity for toxic metal ions found in effluent from the steel industry. The characterization of the resin was carried out by determining the ion-exchange capacity, elemental analysis, pH titration, Fourier transform infrared spectra and thermal analysis. The distribution coefficients (K(d)) of toxic metal ions were determined in a reference aqueous solution and the steel plant effluent at different pH values; the absorbency of different metal ions on the TSA resin was studied for up to 10 cycles. The adsorption of different metal ions on TSA resin follows the order: Co2+ > Cu2+ > Zn2+ > Fe2+ > Cd2+. The ion exchange capacity of TSA resin is 2.87%.

  5. Effect of the chemical structure of anion exchange resin on the adsorption of humic acid: behavior and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuang, Chendong; Wang, Jun; Li, Haibo; Li, Aimin; Zhou, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Polystyrenic (PS) anion-exchange resin and polyacrylic (PA) anion-exchange resin were used to investigate the effect of resin chemical structure on the adsorption of humic acid (HA). Due to the rearrangement of HA to form layers that function as barricades to further HA diffusion, PS resin exhibited 12.4 times slower kinetics for the initial adsorption rate and 8.4 times for the diffusion constant in comparison to that of the PA resin. An HA layer and a spherical cluster of HA can be observed on the surface of the PS and PA resins after adsorption, respectively. The considerable difference in HA adsorption between the PS and PA resins was due to the difference in molecule shape for interaction with different resin structures, which can essentially be explained by the hydrophobicity and various interactions of the PS resin. A given amount of HA occupies more positively charged sites and hydrophobic sites on the PS resin than were occupied by the same amount of HA on the PA resin. Increased pH resulted in an increase of HA adsorption onto the PA resin but a decrease in adsorption onto PS resin, as the non-electrostatic adsorption led to electrostatic repulsion between the HA attached to the resin and the HA dissolved in solution. These results suggest higher rates of adsorption and higher regeneration efficiency for interaction of HA with more hydrophilic anion exchange materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Esterification of free fatty acids in waste cooking oils (WCO): Role of ion-exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalan Ozbay; Nuray Oktar; N. Alper Tapan [Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Chemical Engineering

    2008-08-15

    Although WCO plays a crucial role for the economical production of biodiesel, free fatty acid (FFA) level in the nature of WCO cause saponification problems during transesterification. Acidic ion-exchange resins can be used to decrease WCO free fatty acid level. In this study, activities of resins (Amberlyst-15 (A-15), Amberlyst-35 (A-35), Amberlyst-16 (A-16) and Dowex HCR-W2) in direct FFA esterification were examined in the temperature range of 50-60{sup o}C and the effect of catalyst amount (1-2 wt%) on FFA conversion was also analyzed. FFA conversion increased with increasing reaction temperature and catalyst amount. Order of catalytic activities was found as A-15 > A-35 > A-16 > Dowex HCR-W2. This was related to the size of average pore diameters and magnitude of BET surface area. 44 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Esterification of palm fatty acid distillate with epychlorohydrin using cation exchange resin catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhijanto, Budhijanto; Subagyo, Albertus F. P. H.

    2017-05-01

    Palm Fatty Acid Distillate (PFAD) is one of the wastes from the conversion of crude palm oil (CPO) into cooking oil. The PFAD is currently only utilized as the raw material for low grade soap and biofuel. To improve the economic value of PFAD, it was converted into monoglyceride by esterification process. Furthermore, the monoglyceride could be polymerized to form alkyd resin, which is a commodity of increasing importance. This study aimed to propose a kinetics model for esterification of PFAD with epichlorohydrin using cation exchange resin catalyst. The reaction was the first step from a series of reactions to produce the monoglyceride. In this study, the reaction between PFAD and epichlorohydirne was run in a stirred batch reactor. The stirrer was operated at a constant speed of 400 RPM. The reaction was carried out for 180 minutes on varied temperatures of 60°C, 70°C, 80°C, dan 90°C. Cation exchange resin was applied as solid catalysts. Analysis was conducted periodically by measuring the acid number of the samples, which was further used to calculate PFAD conversion. The data were used to determine the rate constants and the equilibrium constants of the kinetics model. The kinetics constants implied that the reaction was reversible and controlled by the intrinsic surface reaction. Despite the complication of the heterogeneous nature of the reaction, the kinetics data well fitted the elementary rate law. The effect of temperature on the equilibrium constants indicated that the reaction is exothermic.

  8. Esterification of Palmitic Acid with Methanol in the Presence of Macroporous Ion Exchange Resin as Catalyst

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    Amelia Qarina Yaakob and Subhash Bhatia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The esterification of palmitic acid with methanol was studied in a batch reactor using macro porous ion exchange resin Amberlyst 15 as a catalyst. Methyl palmitate was produced from the reaction between palmitic acid and methanol in the presence of catalyst. The effects of processing parameters, molar ratio of alcohol to acid M, (4-10, catalyst loading (0-10 g cat/liter, water inhibition (0-2 mol/liter, agitator speed (200-800 rpm and reaction temperature (343-373K were studied. The experimental kinetic data were correlated using homogenous as well as heterogeneous models (based on single as well as dual site mechanisms. The activation energy of the reaction was 11.552 kJ/mol for forward reaction whilst 5.464 kJ/mol for backward reaction. The experimental data fitted well with the simulated data obtained from the kinetic models. Keywords: Palmitic Acid, Methanol, Esterification, Ion Exchange Resin, Kinetics.

  9. Adsorption behavior of benzenesulfonic acid by novel weakly basic anion exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yue; Zuo, Peng; Luo, Junfen; Singh, Rajendra Prasad

    2017-04-01

    Two novel weakly basic anion exchange resins (SZ-1 and SZ-2) were prepared via the reaction of macroporous chloromethylated polystyrene-divinylbenzene (Cl-PS-DVB) beads with dicyclohexylamine and piperidine, respectively. The physicochemical structures of the resulting resins were characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and pore size distribution analysis. The adsorption behavior of SZ-1 and SZ-2 for benzenesulfonic acid (BA) was evaluated, and the common commercial weakly basic anion exchanger D301 was also employed for comparison purpose. Adsorption isotherms and influence of solution pH, temperature and coexisting competitive inorganic salts (Na 2 SO 4 and NaCl) on adsorption behavior were investigated and the optimum desorption agent was obtained. Adsorption isotherms of BA were found to be well represented by the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic parameters involving ΔH, ΔG and ΔS were also calculated and the results indicate that adsorption is an exothermic and spontaneous process. Enhanced selectivity of BA sorption over sulfate on the two novel resins was observed by comparison with the commercial anion exchanger D301. The fact that the tested resins loaded with BA can be efficiently regenerated by NaCl solution indicates the reversible sorption process. From a mechanistic viewpoint, this observation clearly suggests that electrostatic interaction is the predominant adsorption mechanism. Furthermore, results of column tests show that SZ-1 possesses a better adsorption property than D301, which reinforces the feasibility of SZ-1 for potential industrial application. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Ion-exchange Resin Catalyzed Esterification of Lactic Acid with Isopropanol: a Kinetic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrit P. Toor

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic behavior of esterification of lactic acid with isopropanol over an acidic cation exchange resin, Amberlyst 15, was studied under isothermal condition. Isopropyl lactate synthesized in this reaction is an important pharmaceutical intermediate. The experiments were carried out in a stirred batch reactor in the temperature range of 323.15 to 353.15 K. The effect of various parameters such as temperature, molar ratio and catalyst loading was studied. Variation in parameters on rate of reaction demonstrated that the reaction was intrinsically controlled. Kinetic modeling was performed using Eley-Rideal model which acceptably fits the experimental data. The activation energy was found to be 22.007 kJ/mol and frequency factor was 0.036809 l2 g-1 mol-1 min-1 for forward reaction. The value of entropy for the forward reaction was found to be 182.317 J K-1 mol-1 . © 2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 19th January 2011, Revised: 16th March 2011; Accepted: 16th March 2011[How to Cite: A.P. Toor, M. Sharma, S. Thakur, and R. K. Wanchoo. (2011. Ion-exchange Resin Catalyzed Esterification of Lactic Acid with Isopropanol: a Kinetic Study. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 6(1: 39-45. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.1.791.39-45][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.1.791.39-45 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/791 ] | View in  

  11. The dehydration of fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural efficiently catalyzed by acidic ion-exchange resin in ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Liu, Hui; Song, Changhua; Gu, Xiaomin; Li, Huaming; Zhu, Wenshuai; Yin, Sheng; Han, Changri

    2013-04-01

    The efficient dehydration of fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) was developed in ionic liquids (ILs) with acidic ion-exchange resins as catalyst. By screening different resins and ILs respectively, it was found that the structure of resins and ILs had a prominent effect on the dehydration of fructose. In 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]Cl), D001-cc resin showed a high activity. And then the effects of reaction temperatures, dosages of D001-cc, and different initial fructose loadings on the dehydration of fructose were studied in detail. The system of D001-cc resin and [Bmim]Cl exhibited a constant activity at 75°C for 20 min and a 86.2% yield of HMF was obtained after seven recycles. At 75°C for 20 min, a 93.0% yield of HMF from the dehydration of fructose was obtained. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. SOLVENT EFFECTS IN THE LIQUID-PHASE HYDRATION OF CYCLOHEXENE CATALYZED BY A MACROPOROUS STRONG ACID ION-EXCHANGE RESIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PANNEMAN, HJ; BEENACKERS, AACM

    1992-01-01

    The liquid-phase hydration of cyclohexene, a pseudo first order reversible reaction catalyzed by a strong acid ion exchange resin, macroporous Amberlite XE 307, was investigated in solvent mixtures of water and sulfolane. A decrease by a factor of 3 and 6 is observed in the experimentally measured

  13. Separation of aliphatic carboxylic acids and benzenecarboxylic acids by ion-exclusion chromatography with various cation-exchange resin columns and sulfuric acid as eluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Kazutoku; Ohashi, Masayoshi; Jin, Ji-Ye; Takeuchi, Toyohide; Fujimoto, Chuzo; Choi, Seong-Ho; Ryoo, Jae-Jeong; Lee, Kwang-Pill

    2003-05-16

    The application of various hydrophilic cation-exchange resins for high-performance liquid chromatography (sulfonated silica gel: TSKgel SP-2SW, carboxylated silica gel: TSKgel CM-2SW, sulfonated polymethacrylate resin: TSKgel SP-5PW, carboxylated polymethacrylate resins: TSKgel CM-5PW and TSKgel OA-Pak A) as stationary phases in ion-exclusion chromatography for C1-C7 aliphatic carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, propionic, butyric, isovaleric, valeric, isocaproic, caproic, 2-methylhexanoic and heptanoic acids) and benzenecarboxylic acids (pyromellitic, trimellitic, hemimellitic, o-phthalic, m-phthalic, p-phthalic, benzoic, salicylic acids and phenol) was carried out using diluted sulfuric acid as the eluent. Silica-based cation-exchange resins (TSKgel SP-2SW and TSKgel CM-2SW) were very suitable for the ion-exclusion chromatographic separation of these benzenecarboxylic acids. Excellent simultaneous separation of these benzenecarboxylic acids was achieved on a TSKgel SP-2SW column (150 x 6 mm I.D.) in 17 min using a 2.5 mM sulfuric acid at pH 2.4 as the eluent. Polymethacrylate-based cation-exchange resins (TSKgel SP-5PW, TSKgel CM-5PW and TSKgel OA-Pak A) acted as advanced stationary phases for the ion-exclusion chromatographic separation of these C1-C7 aliphatic carboxylic acids. Excellent simultaneous separation of these C1-C7 acids was achieved on a TSKgel CM-5PW column (150 x 6 mm I.D.) in 32 min using a 0.05 mM sulfuric acid at pH 4.0 as the eluent.

  14. Novel silica-based ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    Eichrom`s highly successful Diphonixo resin resembles a conventional ion exchange resin in its use of sulfonic acid ligands on a styrene- divinylbenzene matrix. Diphonix resin exhibits rapid exchange kinetics that allow economical operation of ion exchange systems. Unlike conventional resins, Diphonix resin contains chelating ligands that are diphosphonic acid groups that recognize and remove the targeted metals and reject the more common elements such as sodium, calcium and magnesium. This latter property makes Diphonix ideal for many industrial scale applications, including those involving waste treatment. For treatment of low-level, transuranic (TRU) and high- level radioactive wastes, Diphonix`s polystyrene backbone hinders its application due to radiolytic stability of the carbon-hydrogen bonds and lack of compatibility with expected vitrification schemes. Polystyrene-based Diphonix is approximately 60% carbon- hydrogen. In response to an identified need within the Department of Energy for a resin with the positive attributes of Diphonix that also exhibits greater radiolytic stability and final waste form compatibility, Eichrom has successfully developed a new, silica-based resin version of Diphonix. Target application for this new resin is for use in environmental restoration and waste management situations involving the processing of low-level, transuranic and high-level radioactive wastes. The resin can also be used for processing liquid mixed waste (waste that contains low level radioactivity and hazardous constituents) including mixed wastes contaminated with organic compounds. Silica-based Diphonix is only 10% carbon-hydrogen, with the bulk of the matrix silica.

  15. Ion Exchange Study of Some New Copolymer Resins Derived from 8-Hydroxyquinoline-5-sulphonic Acid, Biuret and Formaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Dhakite

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Copolymer resins (8-HQSABF were synthesized by the condensation of 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulphonic acid and biuret with formaldehyde in the presence of hydrochloric acid as catalyst, proved to be selective chelation ion exchange copolymer resins for certain metals. Chelation ion exchange properties to these polymers were studied for Cu2+, Cd2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ ions. A batch equilibrium method was employed in the study of the selectivity of the distribution of a given metal ions between the polymer sample and a solution containing the metal ion. The study was carried out over a wide pH range and in a media of various ions strengths. The polymer showed a higher selectivity for Cu2+ ions than for Cd2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ ions. Hence on the basis of above studies these copolymer may be used as semiconductors, surface coating, ion-exchangers, materials for rechargeable battery cell in various electronic industries, plastic materials, elastomers and in boiler plants

  16. Properties of the Carboxylate ion exchange resins; Karboxylatjonbytarmassans egenskaper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allard, Bert; Dario, Maarten [Oerebro Univ. (Sweden); Boren, Hans [Linkoepings Univ. (Sweden); Torstenfelt, Boerje [Swedpower, Stockholm (Sweden); Puigdomenech, Ignasi; Johansson, Claes [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-09-01

    Weakly acidic, carboxylic resin has been selected, together with strong base anion resins, for water purification at the Forsmark 1 and 2 reactors. For the strong (but not the weak) ion exchange resin the Nuclear Power Inspectorate has given permission to dispose the spent resins in the SFR 1 (the Final Repository for Radioactive Operational Waste). This report gives a review of the carboxylic resins and comes to the conclusion that the resins are very stable and that there should not exist any risks for increased leaching of radionuclides from SFR 1 if these resins are disposed (compared to the strong resins)

  17. Kinetic investigation of the immobilization of chromotropic acid derivatives onto anion exchange resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Jasmina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption kinetics of pyrazol- (РАСА and imidazol-azo-chromo-tropic acid (IACA onto Dowex 1-X8 resin, as a function of the dye concentration and temperature were investigated at pH 4.5. The pseudo-first- and second-order kinetic models and intraparticle diffusion model were used to describe the obtained kinetic data. The adsorption rate constants were found to be in the order of magnitude 10-2 min-1 for all of the used kinetics models. The adsorption capacity increases with increasing initial dye concentration. The study of adsorption kinetics at different temperatures (in the range from 5 to 25 °C reveals an increase in the rate of adsorption and adsorption capacity with increasing temperature. The activation energy (in the case of РАСА 16.6 kJ/mol, and for IACA 11.3 kJ/mol was determined using the Arrhenius dependence. Electrostatic interactions between the dye and resin beads were shown to be the adsorption mechanism.

  18. Purification of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) from fermentation of defatted rice bran extract by using ion exchange resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan Nha, Vi; Phung, Le Thi Kim; Dat, Lai Quoc

    2017-09-01

    Rice bran is one of the significant byproducts of rice processing with 10 %w/w of constitution of whole rice grain. It is rich in nutrient compounds, including glutamic acid. Thus, it could be utilized for the fermentation with Lactobateria for synthesis of GABA, a valuable bioactive for antihypertensive effects. However, the concentration and purity of GABA in fermentation broth of defatted rice bran extract is low for production of GABA drug. This research focused on the purification of GABA from the fermentation broth of defatted rice bran extract by using cation exchange resin. The results indicate that, the adsorption isotherm of GABA by Purelite C100 showed the good agreement with Freundlich model, with high adsorption capacity. The effects of pH and concentration of NaCl in eluent on the elution were also investigated. The obtained results show that, at the operating conditions of elution as follows: pH 6.5, 0.8 M of NaCl in eluent, 0.43 of bed volume; concentration of GABA in accumulative eluent, the purity and recovery yield of GABA were 743.8 ppm, 44.0% and 84.2%, respectively. Results imply that, it is feasible to apply cation exchange resin for purification of GABA from fermentation broth of defatted rice bran extract.

  19. Esterification of oleic acid in a three-phase, fixed-bed reactor packed with a cation exchange resin catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Sung Mo; Kimura, Hiroko; Kusakabe, Katsuki

    2011-01-01

    Esterification of oleic acid was performed in a three-phase fixed-bed reactor with a cation exchange resin catalyst (Amberlyst-15) at high temperature, which was varied from 80 to 120 °C. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yields in the fixed-bed reactor were increased with increases in the reaction temperature, methanol flow rate and bed height. Moreover, the FAME yields were higher than those obtained using a batch reactor due to an equilibrium shift toward the product that resulted from continuous evaporation of the produced water. In addition, there was no catalyst deactivation during the esterification of oleic acid. However, addition of sunflower oil to the oleic acid reduced the FAME yield obtained from simultaneous esterification and transesterification. The FAME yield was 97.5% at a reaction temperature of 100 °C in the fixed-bed with a height of 5 cm when the methanol and oleic acid feed rates were 8.6 and 9.0 mL/h, respectively. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. SOLVENT EFFECTS ON THE HYDRATION OF CYCLOHEXENE CATALYZED BY A STRONG ACID ION-EXCHANGE RESIN .3. EFFECT OF SULFOLANE ON THE EQUILIBRIUM CONVERSION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PANNEMAN, HJ; BEENACKERS, AACM

    The liquid-phase hydration of cyclohexene, a pseudo-first-order reversible reaction catalyzed by a strong acid ion-exchange resin, was investigated in solvent mixtures of water and sulfolane. Macroporous Amberlite XE 307 was used because of its superior catalytic activity. Chemical equilibrium

  1. High-speed simultaneous ion-exclusion/cation-exchange chromatography of anions and cations on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Masanobu; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Helaleh, Murad I H; Xu, Qun; Ikedo, Mikaru; Ogura, Yutaka; Sato, Shinji; Hu, Wenzhi; Hasebe, Kiyoshi; Haddad, Paul R

    2003-05-16

    The simultaneous ion-exclusion/cation-exchange separation column packed with a polymethacrylate-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin of 3 microm particle size was used to achieve the simultaneous high-speed separation of anions and cations (Cl(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-), Na(+), K(+), NH4(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) commonly found in environmental samples. The high-speed simultaneous separation is based on a combination of the ion-exclusion mechanism for the anions and the cation-exchange mechanism for cations. The complete separation of the anions and cations was achieved in 5 min by elution with 15 mM tartaric acid-2.5 mM 18-crown-6 at a flow-rate of 1.5 ml/min. Detection limits at S/N=3 ranged from 0.36 to 0.68 microM for anions and 0.63-0.99 microM for cations. This method has been applied to the simultaneous determination of anions and cations in several environmental waters with satisfactory results.

  2. STUDY ON ION EXCHANGE BEHAVIOR OF AUCHLITEARA9366 AND AUCHLITEA378 RESINS CHEMICALLY DEGRADED IN PERCHLORIC ACID MEDIUM

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok N. Patange*

    2017-01-01

    The resins AuchliteARA-9366 and AuchliteA-378 in chloride form were degraded by treating with 0.005 M and 0.01M HClO4 for 24 h under continuous magnetic stirring. The degraded resins in chloride form were equilibrated separately with bromide and iodide ion solutions of different concentrations in the temperature range of 30.0 - 45.0 oC for 3 h. the equilibrium constants (K) values forCl-/I- and Cl-/Br- ion exchange reactions were calculated. The results indicate that during Cl-/I- reaction ...

  3. Removal of Uranium by Exchanger Resins from Soil Washing Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Han, G. S.; Kim, G. N.; Koo, D. S.; Jeong, J. W.; Moon, J. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Uranyl ions in the acidic waste solution were sorbed on AM-resin resin with a high sorption efficiency, and desorbed from the resin by a batch-type washing with a 60 .deg. C heated 0.5 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution. However, the uranium dissolved in the sulfuric acid solution was not sorbed onto the strong anion exchanger resins. Our group has developed a decontamination process with washing and electrokinetic methods for uranium-contaminated (U-contaminated) soil. However, this process generates a large amount of waste solution containing various metal ions. If the uranium selectively removed from the waste solution, a very small amount of the 2nd waste would be generated. Thus, selective sorption of uranium by ion exchange resins was examined in this study.

  4. MODELING RESULTS FROM CESIUM ION EXCHANGE PROCESSING WITH SPHERICAL RESINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C.; Hang, T.; Aleman, S.

    2011-01-03

    Ion exchange modeling was conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory to compare the performance of two organic resins in support of Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX). In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal at Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The spherical forms of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) as well as a hypothetical spherical SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 (SL644) are evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake wastes (supernates). Both SuperLig{reg_sign} and resorcinol formaldehyde resin beds can exhibit hydraulic problems in their granular (nonspherical) forms. SRS waste is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. Using VERSE-LC Version 7.8 along with the cesium Freundlich/Langmuir isotherms to simulate the waste decontamination in ion exchange columns, spherical SL644 was found to reduce column cycling by 50% for high-potassium supernates, but sRF performed equally well for the lowest-potassium feeds. Reduced cycling results in reduction of nitric acid (resin elution) and sodium addition (resin regeneration), therefore, significantly reducing life-cycle operational costs. These findings motivate the development of a spherical form of SL644. This work demonstrates the versatility of the ion exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. The value of a resin with increased selectivity for cesium over potassium can be assessed for further development.

  5. Modified ion exchange resins - synthesis and properties. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doescher, F.; Klein, J.; Pohl, F.; Widdecke, H.

    1982-01-22

    Sulfomethylated resins are prepared by polymer analogous reactions, starting from macroporous poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) matrices. Different reaction paths are discussed and used in the synthesis. Sulfomethylation can be achieved by reaction of a chloromethylated resin with dimethyl sulfide and sodium sulfonate or alternatively by oxidation of polymer-bound thiol groups. Both methods give high conversions as shown by IR spectra and titration of the sulfonic acid groups. Poly(1-(4-hydroxysulfomethylphenyl)ethylene) (3) is obtained by reaction of poly(1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylene) (2) resin with formaldehyde/sodium sulfonate. The thermal stability, catalytic activity, and ion exchange equilibria of the sulfomethylated resin are investigated.

  6. Enrichment and low-level determination of glyphosate, aminomethylphosphonic acid and glufosinate in drinking water after cleanup by cation exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küsters, Markus; Gerhartz, Michael

    2010-04-01

    For the determination of glyphosate, aminomethylphosphonic acid and glufosinate in drinking water, different procedures of enrichment and cleanup were examined using anion exchange or SPE. In many cases interactions of, e.g. alkaline earth metal ions especially calcium could be observed during enrichment and cleanup resulting in loss of analytes. For that reason, a novel cleanup and enrichment procedure for the determination of these phosphonic acid herbicides has been developed in drinking water using cation-exchange resin. In summary, the cleanup procedure with cation-exchange resin developed in this study avoids interactions as described above and is applicable to calcium-rich drinking water samples. After derivatization with 9-fluorenylmethylchloroformate followed by LC with fluorescence detection, LOD of 12, 14 and 12 ng/L and mean recoveries from real-world drinking water samples of 98+/-9, 100+/-16 and 101+/-11% were obtained for glyphosate, aminomethylphosphonic acid and glufosinate, respectively. The low LODs and the high precision permit the analysis of these phosphonic acid herbicides according to the guidelines of the European Commission.

  7. Uranium recovery and uranium remove from acid mine waters by ion exchange resin; Remocao e recuperacao de uranio de aguas acidas de mina com resina de troca ionica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Marcos R.L. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Coordenacao do Laborarorio; Fatibello Filho, Orlando [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    1999-11-01

    Ion exchange using resins is one of few processes capable of reducing contaminants in effluents to very low levels according to environmental legislation. In this study the process was used to remove and recovery uranium from acid mine waters at Pocos de Caldas-MG Uranium Mining and Milling Plant. The presence of pyrite in the waste rock piles, resulting acid drainage with several pollutants. Including uranium ranging from 6 to 14 mg/l, as sulfate complex, that can be removed by an anionic exchanger. Studies of uranium sorption without treatment, and with lime pretreatment of water to precipitate the iron and recovery uranium as commercial product, are presented. Uranium elution was done with NaCl solutions. Saline concentration and retention time were the parameters studied. the uranium decontaminations level in the effluents from acid mine water was 94%. (author) 10 refs., 6 tabs., 3 figs.

  8. Evaluation of a new, macroporous polyvinylpyridine resin for processing plutonium using nitrate anion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, S.F.

    1989-04-01

    Anion exchange in nitric acid is the major aqueous process used to recover and purify plutonium from impure scrap materials. Most strong-base anion exchange resins incorporate a styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer. A newly available, macroporous anion exchange resin based on a copolymer of 1-methyl-4-vinylpyridine and divinylbenzene has been evaluated. Comparative data for Pu(IV) sorption kinetics and capacity are presented for this new resin and two other commonly used anion exchange resins. The new resin offers high capacity and rapid sorption kinetics for Pu(IV) from nitric acid, as well as greatly stability to chemical and radiolytic degradation. 8 refs., 14 figs.

  9. Influence of acidic eluent for retention behaviors of common anions and cations by ion-exclusion/cation-exchange chromatography on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin in the H+ -form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Masanobu; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Satori, Tatsuya; Ikedo, Mikaru; Hu, Wenzhi; Itabashi, Hideyuki

    2006-06-16

    Influence of acidic eluent on retention behaviors of common anions and cations by ion-exclusion/cation-exchange chromatography (ion-exclusion/CEC) were investigated on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin in the H(+)-form with conductivity. Sensitivities of analyte ions, especially weak acid anions (F(-) and HCOO(-)), were affected with degree of background conductivity level with pK(a1) (first dissociation constant) of acid in eluent. The retention behaviors of anions and cations were related to that of elution dip induced after eluting acid to separation column and injecting analyte sample. These results were largely dependent on the natures of acid as eluent. Through this study, succinic acid as the eluent was suitable for simultaneous separation of strong acid anions (SO(4)(2-), Cl(-), NO(3)(-) and I(-)), weak acid anions (F(-), HCOO(-) and CH(3)COO(-)), and cations (Na(+), K(+), NH(4)(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+)). The separation was achieved in 20 min under the optimum eluent condition, 20 mM succinic acid/2 mM 18-crown-6. Detection limits at S/N=3 ranged from 0.10 to 0.51 microM for strong acid anions, 0.20 to 5.04 microM for weak acid anions and 0.75 to 1.72 microM for cations. The relative standard deviations of peak areas in the repeated chromatographic runs (n=10) were in the range of 1.1-2.9% for anions and 1.8-4.5% for cations. This method was successfully applied to hot spring water containing strong acid anions, weak acid anions and cations, with satisfactory results.

  10. Conversion of ion exchange resin to various functional resins and the application in the field of pharmaceutical sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Morio

    Ion exchange resins are widely used for separating ions in the solution, desalination, removal of impurities, and etc. Giving a new function to these ion exchange resins enables the application in more various fields. Until now, we carried out the research work about the following 5 project.: (1) Conversion of ion exchange resins into selective adsorbents by using low molecular reagents, which possess capabilities of a selective reaction with target ions, ion exchange reaction with the ion exchange resin and strong physical adsorption to the ion exchange resin. (2) Synthesis of resins for ion exchange high performance liquid chromatography (IEHPLC) and the analysis of biomaterials. (3) Development of insoluble macromolecular Sn(II) complex based on the aminophosphonic acid type ion exchange resin and its application to the 99mTc labeling of proteins. (4) Development of a new 68Ge-68Ga generator using N-methylglucamine type organic polymer as the adsorbent for 68Ge and production of 68Ga for PET. (5) Preparation of an ion-exchangeable polymer bead wrapped with bilayer membrane structures. In this paper, the application of various functional resins prepared based on ion exchange resin in the field of pharmaceutical sciences has been summarized.

  11. Kinetics of soybean oil epoxidation with peracetic acid formed in situ in the presence of an ion exchange resin: Pseudo-homogeneous model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Milovan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A kinetic model was proposed for the epoxidation of vegetable oils with peracetic acid formed in situ from acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of an acidic ion exchange resin as a catalyst. The model is pseudo-homogeneous with respect to the catalyst. Besides the main reactions of peracetic acid and epoxy ring formation, the model takes into account the side reaction of epoxy ring opening with acetic acid. The partitioning of acetic acid and peracetic acid between the aqueous and organic phases and the change in the phases’ volumes during the process were considered. The temperature dependency of the apparent reaction rate coefficients is described by a reparameterized Arrhenius equation. The constants in the proposed model were estimated by fitting the experimental data obtained for the epoxidations of soybean oil conducted under defined reaction conditions. The highest epoxy yield of 87.73% was obtained at 338 K when the mole ratio of oil unsaturation:acetic acid:hydrogen peroxide was 1:0.5:1.35 and when the amount of the catalyst Amberlite IR-120H was 4.04 wt.% of oil. Compared to the other reported pseudo-homogeneous models, the model proposed in this study better correlates the change of double bond and epoxy group contents during the epoxidation process. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. III45022

  12. Micron-sized polymer particles from tanzanian cashew nut shell liquid. Part I: Preparation, functionalization with chloroacetic acid and utilization as cation exchange resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.O. Ilomo

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Micron-sized polymer particles (MSPP were prepared by formaldehyde condensation polymerization of cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL previously emulsified with sodium lauryl sulphate. The sizes of the MSPP were found to range from 0.1 to 4.4 μm. Increasing the emulsifier concentration had the effect of increasing the average particle size as well as the rate of polymerization. On the other hand, the polymerization rate decreased as the amount of the catalyst (sodium hydroxide increased. The MSPP were also found to be insoluble and stable in many organic solvents and in some inorganic reagents. The average number of surface OH groups was found to be 2.29 x 1018 per milligram of polymer particles. Micron-sized carboxylated cation exchange resins (MCCER were obtained by treating MSPP with monochloroacetic acid in an alkaline medium. The MCCER were found to exchange up to about 86 mg of calcium ion per gram of polymer at 30 ºC while the MSPP could exchange up to only about 6 mg of calcium ion per gram of polymer, at the same temperature. Compared to MSPP, the MCCER showed more than a thirteen-fold improvement in cation exchange capacity.

  13. Di-D-fructose dianhydride-enriched products by acid ion-exchange resin-promoted caramelization of D-fructose: chemical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Pereira, Elena; Rubio, Enrique M; Pilard, Serge; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; García Fernández, José M

    2010-02-10

    Caramelization commonly occurs when sugars, or products containing a high proportion of sugars, are heated either dry or in concentrated aqueous solutions, alone or in the presence of certain additives. Upon thermal treatment of sugars, dehydration and self-condensation reactions occur, giving rise to volatiles (principally 2-hydroxymethylfurfural, HMF), pigments (melanoidines) and oligosaccharidic material, among which di-D-fructose dianhydrides (DFAs) and glycosylated DFA derivatives of different degree of polymerization (DP) have been identified. This study reports a methodology to produce caramel-like products with a high content of DFAs and oligosaccharides thereof from commercial D-fructose based on the use of acid ion-exchange resins as caramelization promotors. The rate of formation of these compounds as a function of D-fructose concentration, catalyst proportion, temperature, catalyst nature and particle size has been investigated. The use of sulfonic acid resins allows conducting caramelization at remarkable low temperatures (70-90 degrees C) to reach conversions into DFA derivatives up to 70-80% in 1-2 h, with relative proportions of HMF < 2%.The relative abundance of individual DFA structures can be modulated by acting on the catalyst nature and reaction conditions, which offers a unique opportunity for nutritional studies of DFA-enriched products with well-defined compositions.

  14. Ion Exchange Resins Transforming Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shweta; Benien, Parul; Sahoo, P K

    2010-07-01

    Ion-exchange resins are light, porous, three-dimensional high molecular weight cross - linked matrix of hydrocarbon chains carrying positively or negatively charged sites that can attract an ion of opposite charge from the surrounding medium. There is stoichiometric exchange of mobile ions between the solid and the solution called as Ion-exchange which does not lead to any radical change in the properties and structure of the solid. Depending upon the type of Ionexchanged it can be either Cation-exchange or Anion-exchange. They are prepared in the form of granules, beads or sheets. As drug delivery systems they have received considerable attention after the 1950s due to their inertness, freedom from side effects, high drug loading capacity, ease of sterilization and the fact that their structure can be easily altered to achieve the desired drug release characteristics. Their use is revolutionizing all traditional delivery systems namely - oral, nasal, ophthalmic and parenteral. Ion- exchange resins have been used for the development of novel drug delivery systems (NDDSs), to modify the characteristics of the dosage form and various other biomedical applications. The present article deals with the varied applications of ion-exchange resins for taste making, as resinates (simple and microencapsulated or coated), Pennkinetic systems, in selective recovery of pharmaceuticals, in pH and ionic strength responsive systems, in gastro-retentive systems, in hollow fiber systems, as sigmoidal release systems, as site specific delivery systems and as inotophoretically assisted transdermal drug delivery systems. They also have an immense importance when used as disintegrants / superdisintegrants in formulation of orodispersible tablets, powder processing aids and in the dissolution and stabilization of drugs.

  15. Removal of CdTe in acidic media by magnetic ion-exchange resin: A potential recycling methodology for cadmium telluride photovoltaic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Teng, E-mail: zhangteng@mail.iee.ac.cn; Dong, Zebin; Qu, Fei; Ding, Fazhu; Peng, Xingyu; Wang, Hongyan; Gu, Hongwei

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • Sulfonated magnetic microsphere was prepared as one strong acid cation-exchange resin. • Cd and Te can be removed directly from the highly acidic leaching solution of CdTe. • Good chemical stability, fast adsorbing rate and quick magnetic separation in strong acidic media. • A potential path for recycling CdTe photovoltaic waste. - Abstract: Sulfonated magnetic microspheres (PSt-DVB-SNa MPs) have been successfully prepared as adsorbents via an aqueous suspension polymerization of styrene-divinylbenzene and a sulfonation reaction successively. The resulting adsorbents were confirmed by means of Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The leaching process of CdTe was optimized, and the removal efficiency of Cd and Te from the leaching solution was investigated. The adsorbents could directly remove all cations of Cd and Te from a highly acidic leaching solution of CdTe. The adsorption process for Cd and Te reached equilibrium in a few minutes and this process highly depended on the dosage of adsorbents and the affinity of sulfonate groups with cations. Because of its good adsorption capacity in strong acidic media, high adsorbing rate, and efficient magnetic separation from the solution, PSt-DVB-SNa MPs is expected to be an ideal material for the recycling of CdTe photovoltaic waste.

  16. Application of commercial ion-exchange resins to isolation and fractionation of naphthenic acids of brazilian petroleum; Aplicacao de troca ionica em resinas comerciais para isolamento e fracionamento de acidos naftenicos de petroleos nacionais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Ana Maria Rangel de Figueiredo; Lopes, Damiana Claudia Nunes [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Lab. de Pesquisas Analiticas e Tecnologicas (LAPAT)]. E-mail: anamaria @chemist.com; Teixeira, Marco Antonio Gomes [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas. Quimica]. E-mail: marcoa@cenpes.petrobras.com.br

    2003-07-01

    Commercial ion-exchange resins showed different behaviors relating naphthenic acids retention. A characteristic behavior was employed for a fractionation procedure that is related to steric factors. Thus a characterization parameter is yielded, and that allows inferences on the corrosive behavior. (author)

  17. Procedure to reduce sulphite in wine with anion-exchange resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Horák

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this experiment was to eliminate SO2 ions present in wine using the anion-exchanger resins. To compare the effectiveness, 2 following strongly basic anion-exchange resin were used. When activated, the sodium bicarbonate solution (activation solution I is used to prevent parallel reduction of sulphites, tartates and malates, so the anion-exchange resins were activated in two-step activation. In the second step, it was immersed into a mixture of malic acid and tartaric acid (1:1. After the application of anex into wine, the content of total SO2 was reduced to 97–201 mg.L−1 (depending on the amount of anex added into the wine sample. According to our expectations, the variants with anion-exchange resin activated only with bicarbonate solution, the tartrates and malates were significantly reduced. If the anion-exchange resin was activated with a two-steps activation, the tartaric acid and malic acid were reduced in the range of ± 0.13 g.L−1. This phenomenon was strongly reflected at the anion-exchanger Aqua Osmotic 02. The changes in antioxidant content were not affected by the type of anion-exchange resin, the method of activation, or an amount of used anion-exchanger. The color parameters of wine, expressed by the L * a * b *, were not significantly affected by the effects of anion-exchange resin use.

  18. Tc-99 Ion Exchange Resin Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2010-08-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by CHPRC to evaluate the release of 99Tc from spent resin used to treat water from well 299-W15-765 and stored for several years. The key questions to be answered are: 1) does 99Tc readily release from the spent ion exchange resin after being in storage for several years; 2) if hot water stripping is used to remove the co-contaminant carbon tetrachloride, will 99Tc that has been sequestered by the resin be released; and 3) can spent resin be encapsulated into a cementitious waste form; if so, how much 99Tc would be released from the weathering of the monolith waste form? The results from the long term stability leach test results confirm that the resin is not releasing a significant amount of the sequestered 99Tc, evident by the less than 0.02% of the total 99Tc loaded being identified in the solution. Furthermore, it is possible that the measured 99Tc concentration is the result of 99Tc contained in the pore spaces of the resin. In addition to these results, analyses conducted to examine the impact of hot water on the release of 99Tc suggest that only a small percentage of the total is being released. This suggest that hot water stripping to remove carbon tetrachloride will not have a significant affect on the resin’s ability to hold-on to sequestered 99Tc. Finally, encapsulation of spent resin in a cementitious material may be a viable disposal option, but additional tests are needed to examine the extent of physical degradation caused by moisture loss and the effect this degradation process can have on the release of 99Tc.

  19. [Study on the defluoridation of drinking water with model-La cation exchange resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mingyuan; Lü, Changyin

    2003-11-01

    Model-La cation exchange resin was transformed from strong acid cation exchange resin, which was used for the defluoridation of drinking water. The 001 x 7 strong acid cation exchange resin was transformed into model-La cation exchange by soaking in the La(NO3)3 solution. The F- in the water was removed by model-La cation exchange resin under the optimum condition because it was combined into fluoride with the La3+ in the model-La cation exchange resin. The used resin was regenerated with the La(NO3)3 solution and was used to defluoridate many times. The optimum conditions of transform and defluoridation and regeneration were d(rasin) = 0.315-0.600 mm, V(rasin):V(regeneration) = 1:6, t(transform) = 48 h, T = 298.16 K(25 degrees C). The defluoridation capacity was 5.60 mg/g in column test, and 4.08 mg/g in batch test. The model-La cation exchange resin could be used for defluoridation for 8 times. The results suggest that the model-La cation exchange resin is a novel material of defluoridation. This method is easy to master and the pH value of the solution doesn't need to be regenerated that the cost of defluoridation can be reduced significantly and it can be used for a long time.

  20. Procedure to reduce sulphite in wine with anion-exchange resin

    OpenAIRE

    Miroslav Horák; Pavel Híc; Eva Tománková; Josef Balík

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this experiment was to eliminate SO2 ions present in wine using the anion-exchanger resins. To compare the effectiveness, 2 following strongly basic anion-exchange resin were used. When activated, the sodium bicarbonate solution (activation solution I) is used to prevent parallel reduction of sulphites, tartates and malates, so the anion-exchange resins were activated in two-step activation. In the second step, it was immersed into a mixture of malic acid and tartaric acid (1:1). A...

  1. CITRIC ACID FERMENTATION OF SUGARS PURIFIED WITH CHELATING RESIN1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Yuichi; Johnson, Marvin J.

    1961-01-01

    Noguchi, Yuichi (University of Wisconsin, Madison), and Marvin J. Johnson. Citric acid fermentation of sugars purified with chelating resin. J. Bacteriol. 82:538–541. 1961.—A new, independently isolated strain of Aspergillus niger capable of giving high yields of citric acid in submerged culture was found to show the same behavior toward iron, zinc, and manganese as a previously studied strain. Citric acid accumulation did not occur in the presence of manganese. Best citric acid production was obtained in the presence of limited amounts of iron and zinc. Use of a chelating ion exchange resin was found to be an excellent method of removing polyvalent metals from sugars, either for analytical purposes or for fermentation. Commercial glucose, after resin treatment, gave citric acid yields of more than 80% when supplemented with iron and zinc. Unpurified glucose was converted to citric acid in good yields by mycelium grown on resin-treated glucose. PMID:14480219

  2. Removing and recovering of uranium from the acid mine waters by using ion exchange resin; Remocao e recuperacao de uranio de aguas acidas de mina por resina de troca ionica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Marcos Roberto Lopes do

    1998-07-01

    Ion exchange using resins is one of the few processes capable of reducing ionic contaminants in effluents to very low levels. In this study the process was used to remove and recovery uranium from acid mine waters at Pocos de Caldas-MG Uranium Mining and Milling Plant. The local mineralogical features, allied to the biogeochemical phenomena, owing to presence of pyrite in the rock piles, moreover another factors, resulting acid drainage with several pollutants, including uranium ranging from 6 to 14 mg/l, as sulfate complex, that can be removed by anionic exchanger. The iron interference is eliminated by lime pretreatment of water, increasing pH from 2.6 to 3.3-3.8 to precipitate this cation, without changing the uranium amount. Eight anionic resins were tested, based on the uranium loading, in sorption studies. Retention time, and pH influence was verified for the exchanger chose. With breakthrough of 1 mg U/L and 10 mg U/l in the feed solution, the uranium decontamination level was 94%. Typical values of loading resin were 20-30 g U/l and 70-90 g SO{sub 4}/l. Uranium elution was done with Na Cl solution. Retention time, saline, and acid concentration were the parameters studied. The concentrate, obtained from the eluate by ammonia precipitation, presented uranium (86,8% as U{sub 3} O{sub 8}) and impurities within commercial specifications. (author)

  3. Gold Loading on Ion Exchange Resins in Non-Ammoniacal Resin-Solution Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar Muslim

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The loading of gold using strong base anion exchange resin in non-ammoniac resin-solution (NARS systems has been studied. The loading of gold onto ion exchange resins is affected by polythionate concentration, and trithionate can be used as the baseline in the system. The results also show that resin capacity on gold loading increases due to the increase in the equilibrium thiosulfate concentration in the NARS system. Gold loading performances show the need of optimization the equilibrium concentrations of thiosulfate in the NARS system. Keywords: equilibrium, gold loading, resin capacity, thiosulfate, trithionate

  4. Recovery of tetrachloroaurate through ion exchange with Dowex 11 resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alguacil, F. J.

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available The recovery of the tetrachloroaurate complex by the anionic ion exchange resin Dowex 11 has been studied. The kinetics of gold adsorption were dependent of both gold and resin concentrations and temperature. The adsorption isotherm can be described by the expression Q = kCn. The loaded resin could be eluted by an acidic thiourea solution at 20°C. After several adsorption-elution cycles there is not any apparent loss in the adsorption properties of the resin.

    Se estudia la recuperación del ion tetracloroaurato mediante la resina aniónica Dowex 11. La extracción de oro depende tanto de las concentraciones del metal y la resina como de la temperatura. La isoterma de adsorción responde a la ecuación Q = kCn. La resina cargada con oro puede ser eluida con una disolución acida de tiourea a 20°C. Después de varios ciclos de adsorción-desorción no hay pérdida de carga por parte de la resina.

  5. Microwave-assisted and acid-catalyzed epoxidation of oleic acid in the presence of peracetic acid and cation exchange resin

    OpenAIRE

    González Muñoz, Marta

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: In recent years, the interest in developing environmentally friendly processes and replacing petroleum-derived materials has increased tremendously. For this reason, research into chemical components available in biomass is of high actuality. Biomass is a vast resource of interesting molecules that can be transformed into valuable products. Vegetable oils are renewable chemical components that can be modified chemically or enzymatically. The double bonds fatty acids can be used t...

  6. USE OF STRONG ACID RESIN PUROLITE C100E FOR REMOVING PERMANENT HARDNESS OF WATER – FACTORS AFFECTING CATIONIC EXCHANGE CAPACITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOGDAN BANDRABUR

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper experimentally investigates the performance and capacity of Purolite C100E commercial resin recommended for water softening applications in the food industry. The practical ion exchange capacity and the softening process efficiency are studied in batch mode as a function of the sorption specific process factors. Optimum operation conditions were determined as initial pH 7.1, resin dose 8 g dry resin•L-1, temperature 25 oC, contact time of 360 min, and in those conditions the retention capacity for the Ca2+ ions is 17.18 mg•g-1 that corresponds to a removal efficiency equal to 85.7%.

  7. Advanced ion exchange resins for PWR condensate polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, B. [Rohm and Haas Co. (United States); Tsuzuki, S. [Rohm and Haas Co. (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    The severe chemical and mechanical requirements of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) condensate polishing plant (CPP) present a major challenge to the design of ion exchange resins. This paper describes the development and initial operating experience of improved cation and anion exchange resins that were specifically designed to meet PWR CPP needs. Although this paper focuses specifically on the ion exchange resins and their role in plant performance, it is also recognized and acknowledged that excellent mechanical design and operation of the CPP system are equally essential to obtaining good results. (authors)

  8. Evaluation of some anionic exchange resins as potential tablet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the potential of some anionic exchange resins as tablet disintegrants. Methods: Dowex1® x2, x4 and x8 resins (crosslinked copolymers of styrene and divinylbenzene with quaternary methyl amine functionality) were evaluated as disintegrant for dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate tablets. The best ...

  9. Preparation and characterization of (St-DVB-MAA) ion exchange resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shanquan; Sun, Xiangwei; Ling, Lixing; Wang, Shumin; Wu, Wufeng; Cheng, Shihong; Hu, Yue; Zhong, Chunyan

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, used polyvinyl alcohol as dispersing agent, Benzoyl peroxide as initiator of polymerization, Divinyl benzene as cross-linking agent, Styrene and 2-Methylpropenoic acid as monomer, ion exchange resin (copolymer of St-DVB-MAA)were prepared by suspension polymerization on 80°C. The structures, components and properties of the prepared composite micro gels were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The experiment of ion exchange was conducted by resin to deal with copper ions in the solution. The result showed that performance of the ion exchange capacity was excellent, which impacted by pH.

  10. Ultrafiltration Membrane Fouling and the Effect of Ion Exchange Resins

    KAUST Repository

    Jamaly, Sanaa

    2011-12-01

    Membrane fouling is a challenging process for the ultrafiltration membrane during wastewater treatment. This research paper determines the organic character of foulants of different kinds of wastewater before and after adding some ion exchange resins. Two advanced organic characterization methods are compared in terms of concentration of dissolved organic carbons: The liquid chromatography with organic carbon (LC-OCD) and Shimadzu total organic carbon (TOC). In this study, two secondary wastewater effluents were treated using ultrafiltration membrane. To reduce fouling, pretreatment using some adsorbents were used in the study. Six ion exchange resins out of twenty were chosen to compare the effect of adsorbents on fouling membrane. Based on the percent of dissolved organic carbon’s removal, three adsorbents were determined to be the most efficient (DOWEX Marathon 11 anion exchange resin, DOWEX Optipore SD2 polymeric adsorbent, and DOWEX PSR2 anion exchange), and three other ones were determined to the least efficient (DOWEX Marathon A2 anion exchange resin, DOWEX SAR anion exchange resin, and DOWEX Optipore L493 polymeric adsorbent). Organic characterization for feed, permeate, and backwash samples were tested using LC-OCD and TOC to better understand the characteristics of foulants to prevent ultrafiltration membrane fouling. The results suggested that the polymeric ion exchange resin, DOWEX SD2, reduced fouling potential for both treated wastewaters. All the six ion exchange resins removed more humic fraction than other organic fractions in different percent, so this fraction is not the main for cause for UF membrane fouling. The fouling of colloids was tested before and after adding calcium. There is a severe fouling after adding Ca2+ to effluent colloids.

  11. The effects of ionizing radiation on Reillex trademark HPQ, a new macroporous polyvinylpyridine resin, and on four conventional polystyrene anion exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, S.F.

    1990-11-01

    This study compares the effects of ionizing radiation on Reillex{trademark} HPQ, a recently available macroporous copolymer of 1-methyl-4-vinylpyridine/divinylbenzene, and on four conventional strong-base polystyrene anion exchange resins. The polystyrene resins investigated included one gel type, Dowex{trademark} 1 {times} 4, and three macroporous resins: Dow{trademark} MSA-1, Amberlite{trademark} IRA-900, and Lewatit{trademark} MP-500-FK. Each resin, in 7 M nitric acid, was subjected to seven different levels of {sup 60}Co gamma radiation ranging from 100 to 1000 megarads. Irradiated resins were measured for changes in dry weight, wet volume, chloride and Pu(IV) exchange capacities, and thermal stability. In separate experiments, each resin was subjected to approximately 340 megarads of in situ alpha particles from sorbed plutonium. Resin damage from alpha particles was less than half that caused by gamma rays, which may be a consequence of different production rates of radiolytic nitrite and nitro radicals in the two systems. Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin provided the greatest radiation stability, whereas Lewatit{trademark} MP-500-FK was the least stable of the resins tested. Thermogravimetric analyses of dry, nitrate-form resin revealed that dry Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin offered the best thermal stability for absorbed gamma doses to 370 megarads, but the worst thermal stability after exposures of 550 megarads or more. 25 refs., 11 figs., 13 tabs.

  12. Modeling Ion-Exchange Processing With Spherical Resins For Cesium Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hang, T.; Nash, C. A.; Aleman, S. E.

    2012-09-19

    The spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde and hypothetical spherical SuperLig(r) 644 ion-exchange resins are evaluated for cesium removal from radioactive waste solutions. Modeling results show that spherical SuperLig(r) 644 reduces column cycling by 50% for high-potassium solutions. Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde performs equally well for the lowest-potassium wastes. Less cycling reduces nitric acid usage during resin elution and sodium addition during resin regeneration, therefore, significantly decreasing life-cycle operational costs. A model assessment of the mechanism behind ''cesium bleed'' is also conducted. When a resin bed is eluted, a relatively small amount of cesium remains within resin particles. Cesium can bleed into otherwise decontaminated product in the next loading cycle. The bleed mechanism is shown to be fully isotherm-controlled vs. mass transfer controlled. Knowledge of residual post-elution cesium level and resin isotherm can be utilized to predict rate of cesium bleed in a mostly non-loaded column. Overall, this work demonstrates the versatility of the ion-exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. This evaluation justifies further development of a spherical form of the SL644 resin.

  13. The effect of loading solution and dissolution media on release of Diclofenac from ion exchange resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Atyabi F

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Drugs can be loaded on ion exchange resins in order to control their release. Loading of diclofenac sodium on the resin beads not only sustain its release but also reduce its gastrointestinal mucosal injury. In this study the effect of loading solution and concentration of diclofenac in loading solution on total amount of drug loaded on the resin beads (Amberlite IRA-900 and the release characteristic of drug in different media were examined. Results showed that diclofenac resin complex did not release their drug content in simulated gastric fluid but released it in simulated intestinal fluid independent of exposure time in acidic conditions. The effect of a number of parameters such as ionic strength and pH on the release characteristic of drug - resin complexes were also examined. Results showed that although ionic strength is an important factor, drug release is more affected by the pH of the media. NO ABSTRACT

  14. Chelation Ion Exchange Properties of 2, 4-Dihydroxyacetophenone-Biuret-Formaldehyde Terpolymer Resin

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjiokumar S. Rahangdale; Anil B. Zade; Wasudeo B. Gurnule

    2009-01-01

    The terpolymer resin 2, 4-HABF has been synthesized by the condensation of 2, 4-dihydroxyacetophenone (2, 4-HA) and biuret (B) with formaldehyde (F) in 1:1:2 molar ratios in presence of 2 M hydrochloric acid as catalyst. UV-Visible, IR and proton NMR spectral studies have been carried out to elucidate the structure of the resin. A terpolymer (2, 4-HABF) proved to be a selective chelating ion exchange polymer for certain metals. Chelating ion-exchange properties of this polymer were studied fo...

  15. Use of Anion Exchange Resins for One-Step Processing of Algae from Harvest to Biofuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Poenie

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Some microalgae are particularly attractive as a renewable feedstock for biodiesel production due to their rapid growth, high content of triacylglycerols, and ability to be grown on non-arable land. Unfortunately, obtaining oil from algae is currently cost prohibitive in part due to the need to pump and process large volumes of dilute algal suspensions. In an effort to circumvent this problem, we have explored the use of anion exchange resins for simplifying the processing of algae to biofuel. Anion exchange resins can bind and accumulate the algal cells out of suspension to form a dewatered concentrate. Treatment of the resin-bound algae with sulfuric acid/methanol elutes the algae and regenerates the resin while converting algal lipids to biodiesel. Hydrophobic polymers can remove biodiesel from the sulfuric acid/methanol, allowing the transesterification reagent to be reused. We show that in situ transesterification of algal lipids can efficiently convert algal lipids to fatty acid methyl esters while allowing the resin and transesterification reagent to be recycled numerous times without loss of effectiveness.

  16. New bifunctional anion-exchange resins for nuclear waste treatment: Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, S.F.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Barr, M.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Bartsch, R.A. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    1997-06-01

    Additional bifunctional anion-exchange resins have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for their ability to take up Pu(IV) from nitric acid solutions. Bifunctionality is achieved by adding a second anion-exchange site to the pyridine nitrogen (also an anion-exchange site) of the base poly(4-vinylpyridine) resin. Previous work focused on the effect of varying the chemical properties of the added site along with the length of an alkylene spacer between the two sites. Here the authors examine four new 3- and 4-picolyl derivatives which maintain more rigidly defined geometries between the two nitrogen cationic sites. These materials, which have the two anion-exchange sites separated by three and four carbons, respectively, exhibit lower overall Pu(IV) distribution coefficients than the corresponding N-alkylenepyridium derivatives with more flexible spacers. Methylation of the second pyridium site results in a ca. 20% increase in the Pu(IV) distribution coefficients.

  17. Decontamination of spent ion-exchangers contaminated with cesium radionuclides using resorcinol-formaldehyde resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palamarchuk, Marina, E-mail: marina_p@ich.dvo.ru; Egorin, Andrey; Tokar, Eduard; Tutov, Mikhail; Marinin, Dmitry; Avramenko, Valentin

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • Cesium radionuclides not removable by regeneration are bound to silicate deposits. • Application of RFR substantially increases cesium desorption from an ion-exchanger. • The radwaste volume was reduced at least 2-fold for zeolites and 10-fold for SIER. • The distribution coefficient values for RFR were high (K{sub d} > 10{sup 4}) after 6 regenerations. • The volume of secondary waste formed after regeneration of RFR was reduced 600-fold. - Abstract: The origin of the emergence of radioactive contamination not removable in the process of acid-base regeneration of ion-exchange resins used in treatment of technological media and liquid radioactive waste streams has been determined. It has been shown that a majority of cesium radionuclides not removable by regeneration are bound to inorganic deposits on the surface and inside the ion-exchange resin beads. The nature of the above inorganic inclusions has been investigated by means of the methods of electron microscopy, IR spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. The method of decontamination of spent ion-exchange resins and zeolites contaminated with cesium radionuclides employing selective resorcinol-formaldehyde resins has been suggested. Good prospects of such an approach in deep decontamination of spent ion exchangers have been demonstrated.

  18. Vitrification of cesium-contaminated organic ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargent, Jr., Thomas N. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Vitrification has been declared by the Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) as the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Savannah River Site currently uses a sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) precipitation process to remove Cs-137 from a wastewater solution created from the processing of nuclear fuel. This process has several disadvantages such as the formation of a benzene waste stream. It has been proposed to replace the precipitation process with an ion exchange process using a new resorcinol-formaldehyde resin developed by Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC). Preliminary tests, however, showed that problems such as crust formation and a reduced final glass wasteform exist when the resin is placed in the melter environment. The newly developed stirred melter could be capable of overcoming these problems. This research explored the operational feasibility of using the stirred tank melter to vitrify an organic ion exchange resin. Preliminary tests included crucible studies to determine the reducing potential of the resin and the extent of oxygen consuming reactions and oxygen transfer tests to approximate the extent of oxygen transfer into the molten glass using an impeller and a combination of the impeller and an external oxygen transfer system. These preliminary studies were used as a basis for the final test which was using the stirred tank melter to vitrify nonradioactive cesium loaded organic ion exchange resin. Results from this test included a cesium mass balance, a characterization of the semi-volatile organic compounds present in the off gas as products of incomplete combustion (PIC), a qualitative analysis of other volatile metals, and observations relating to the effect the resin had on the final redox state of the glass.

  19. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin...

  20. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in producing...

  1. Esterification of maleic acid and butanol using cationic exchange ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dibutyl maleate is a perfumery ester used as an intermediate in the production of paints, adhesives, and copolymers. Esterification of maleic acid and butanol was studied in presence of acidic cation exchange resin as a catalyst. The objective of this work was to test the suitability and efficacy of heterogeneous catalystssuch ...

  2. Esterification of maleic acid and butanol using cationic exchange ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AARTI MULAY

    2017-11-15

    Nov 15, 2017 ... Abstract. Dibutyl maleate is a perfumery ester used as an intermediate in the production of paints, adhesives, and copolymers. Esterification of maleic acid and butanol was studied in presence of acidic cation exchange resin as a catalyst. The objective of this work was to test the suitability and efficacy of ...

  3. Adsorption of Monobutyl Phthalate from Aqueous Phase onto Two Macroporous Anion-Exchange Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwen Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As new emerging pollutants, phthalic acid monoesters (PAMs pose potential ecological and human health risks. In the present study, adsorption performance of monobutyl phthalate (MBP onto two macroporous base anion-exchange resins (D-201 and D-301 was discussed. It was found that the adsorption isotherms were best fitted by the Langmuir equation while the adsorption kinetics were well described by pseudo-first-order model. Analyses of sorption isotherms and thermodynamics proved that the adsorption mechanisms for DBP onto D-201 were ion exchange. However, the obtained enthalpy values indicate that the sorption process of MBP onto D-301 is physical adsorption. The equilibrium adsorption capacities and adsorption rates of DBP on two different resins increased with the increasing temperature of the solution. D-301 exhibited a higher adsorption capacity of MBP than D-201. These results proved that D-301, as an effective sorbent, can be used to remove phthalic acid monoesters from aqueous solution.

  4. Sorption and binary exchange of nitrate, sulfate, and uranium on an anion-exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Baohua; Ku, Yee-Kyoung; Jardine, Philip M

    2004-06-01

    Competitive ion-exchange reactions were studied on a strong-base anion-exchange resin to remove NO3- and uranium from a contaminated groundwater containing high levels of NO3- (approximately 140 mM), SO4(2-) (approximately 10 mM), and U(VI) (approximately 0.2 mM). Results indicate that although SO4(2-) carries divalent negative charges, it showed the least selectivity for sorption by the Purolite A-520E resin, which is functionalized with triethylamine exchange sites. Nitrate was the most strongly sorbed. Sorption selectivity followed the order of NO3- > Cl- > SO4(2-) under the experimental conditions. Nitrate competitively sorbed and displaced previously sorbed SO4(2-) in a column flow-through experiment and resulted in a high elution front of SO4(2-) in the effluent. Although the concentration of uranium in groundwater is orders of magnitude lower than that of NO3- or SO4(2-), it was found to be strongly sorbed by the anion-exchange resin. Because the most stable uranium species in oxic and suboxic environments is the UO2(2+) cation, its strong sorption by anion-exchange resins is hypothesized to be the result of the co-ion effect of NO3- by forming anionic UO2(NO3)3- complexes in the resin matrix. These observations point out a potential alternative remediation strategy that uses strong-base anion-exchange resins to remove uranium from this site-specific groundwater, which has a low pH and a relatively high NO3- concentration.

  5. Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-06-11

    Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.0 , which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590 PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590 PTF TEF RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

  6. Qualification of Reillex{trademark} HPQ anion exchange resin for use in SRS processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crooks, W.J. III

    2000-05-18

    The Phase 2 portion of the HB-Line facility was built in the early 1980's to process plutonium and neptunium from nitric acid solutions into oxide suitable for storage in a vault. Although the other portions of HB-Line were started up in the mid 1980's and have operated since that time, the anion exchange and precipitation processes in Phase 2 were never started up. As part of the material stabilization efforts, Phase 2 is currently being started up. A new anion exchange resin is needed because the resins that were proposed for use 10 years ago are limited by performance characteristics, disposal requirements, or are no longer commercially available. SRTC is responsible for qualifying all resins prior to their use in Nuclear Materials Stabilization and Storage (NMSS) processes. Qualification consists of both process suitability and thermal stability with nitric acid. This report describes the thermal stability qualification of Reillex{trademark} HPQ, the new resin proposed for processing plutonium and neptunium in the HB Line facility.

  7. Technological aspects of vegetable oils epoxidation in the presence of ion exchange resins: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milchert Eugeniusz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A review paper of the technology basics of vegetable oils epoxidation by means of peracetic or performic acid in the presence of acidic ion exchange resins has been presented. The influence of the following parameters: temperature, molar ratio of acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide to ethylenic unsaturation, catalyst loading, stirring intensity and the reaction time on a conversion of ethylenic unsaturation, the relative percentage conversion to oxirane and the iodine number was discussed. Optimal technological parameters, mechanism of epoxidation by carboxylic peracids and the possibilities of catalyst recycling have been also discussed. This review paper shows the application of epoxidized oils.

  8. Cation immobilization in pyrolyzed simulated spent ion exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luca, Vittorio, E-mail: vluca@cnea.gov.ar [Programa Nacional de Gestion de Residuos Radiactivos, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. General, Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bianchi, Hugo L. [Gerencia de Quimica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. General, Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); ECyT, Universidad Nacional de General San Martin, Campus Miguelete, Ed. Tornavias, Martin de Irigoyen 3100, 1650 San Martin (Argentina); Conicet, Av. Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Manzini, Alberto C. [Programa Nacional de Gestion de Residuos Radiactivos, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Del Libertador 8250, CP 1429, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-05-15

    Significant quantities of spent ion exchange resins that are contaminated by an assortment of radioactive elements are produced by the nuclear industry each year. The baseline technology for the conditioning of these spent resins is encapsulation in ordinary Portland cement which has various shortcomings none the least of which is the relatively low loading of resin in the cement and the poor immobilization of highly mobile elements such as cesium. The present study was conducted with cationic resin samples (Lewatit S100) loaded with Cs{sup +}, Sr{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} in roughly equimolar proportions at levels at or below 30% of the total cation exchange capacity. Low temperature thermal treatment of the resins was conducted in inert (Ar), or reducing (CH{sub 4}) gas atmospheres, or supercritical ethanol to convert the hydrated polymeric resin beads into carbonaceous materials that contained no water. This pyrolytic treatment resulted in at least a 50% volume reduction to give mechanically robust spherical materials. Scanning electron microscope investigations of cross-sections of the beads combined with energy dispersive analysis showed that initially all elements were uniformly distributed through the resin matrix but that at higher temperatures the distribution of Cs became inhomogeneous. Although Cs was found in the entire cross-section, a significant proportion of the Cs occurred within internal rings while a proportion migrated toward the outer surfaces to form a crustal deposit. Leaching experiments conducted in water at 25 Degree-Sign C showed that the divalent contaminant elements were very difficult to leach from the beads heated in inert atmospheres in the range 200-600 Degree-Sign C. Cumulative fractional loses of the order of 0.001 were observed for these divalent elements for temperatures below 500 Degree-Sign C. Regardless of the processing temperature, the cumulative fractional loss of Cs in water at 25 Degree-Sign C reached a plateau or

  9. Ion Exchange Column Tests Supporting Technetium Removal Resin Maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hamm, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Smith, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Morse, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2013-12-20

    The primary treatment of the tank waste at the DOE Hanford site will be done in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, currently under construction. The baseline plan for this facility is to treat the waste, splitting it into High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW). Both waste streams are then separately vitrified as glass and sealed in canisters. The LAW glass will be disposed on site. There are currently no plans to treat the waste to remove technetium, so its disposition path is the LAW glass. Due to the soluble properties of pertechnetate and long half-life of 99Tc, effective management of 99Tc is important. Options are being explored to immobilize the supplemental LAW portion of the tank waste, as well as to examine the volatility of 99Tc during the vitrification process. Removal of 99Tc, followed by off-site disposal has potential to reduce treatment and disposal costs. A conceptual flow sheets for supplemental LAW treatment and disposal that could benefit from technetium removal will specifically examine removing 99Tc from the LAW feed stream to supplemental immobilization. SuperLig® 639 is an elutable ion exchange resin. In the tank waste, 99Tc is predominantly found in the tank supernate as pertechnetate (TcO4-). Perrhenate (ReO4-) has been shown to be a good non-radioactive surrogate for pertechnetate in laboratory testing for this ion exchange resin. This report contains results of experimental ion exchange distribution coefficient and column resin maturation kinetics testing using the resin SuperLig® 639a to selectively remove perrhenate from simulated LAW. This revision includes results from testing to determine effective resin operating temperature range. Loading tests were performed at 45°C, and the computer modeling was updated to include the temperature effects. Equilibrium contact testing indicated that this batch of

  10. Ion exchange resin regenerant waste recovery and recycling via bipolar membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buszewski, C.; McArdle, J.; Mani, K.

    1995-10-12

    The present invention provides an improved process for the regeneration of ion exchange gels and resins. Exhausted regenerating solutions from either a cationic or anionic exchange column are converted into fresh regenerating solutions via one or a combination of electrodialysis units having at least one bipolar membrane. The spent regenerants may be treated in an electrodialytic water splitter, an acid or base purification unit, or any combination thereof, to reclaim as much or as little of the regenerating solution as is required by the particular process. (author)

  11. An eco-friendly synthesis, characterization, morphology and ion exchange properties of terpolymer resin derived from p-hydroxybenzaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti B. Patle

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel chelating terpolymer resin has been synthesized through the terpolymerization of p-hydroxybenzaldehyde and biuret with formaldehyde (p-HBBF in 1:1:2 mol ratio using hydrochloric acid as a reaction medium by condensation technique. The synthesized terpolymer resin was characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. On basis of the spectral studies, the structure of the terpolymer resin was proposed. The physico-chemical parameters have been evaluated for the terpolymer resin. Non-aqueous conductometric titration was used to determine the average molecular weight and polydispersity of the p-HBBF terpolymer resin and the intrinsic viscosity was also determined. The semicrystalline nature of the synthesized terpolymer was established by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Terpolymer (p-HBBF synthesized is proved to be selective chelating ion exchange terpolymer resin for certain metals. Chelating ion exchange properties of this polymer was studied for Fe3+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Zn2+, Ni2+ and Pb2+ ions. A batch equilibrium method was employed in the study of the selectivity of the distribution of a given metal ions between the polymer sample and a solution containing the metal ion. The morphology of the terpolymers was studied by scanning electron microscopy, showing amorphous nature of the resins therefore can be used as a selective ion-exchanger for certain metal ions.

  12. Determination of degradation conditions of exchange resins containing technetium; Determinacion de condiciones de degradacion de resinas de intercambio conteniendo tecnecio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera S, A.; Monroy G, F.; Quintero P, E., E-mail: aa_1190@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The quantification of Tc-99 in spent exchange resins, coming from nuclear power plants, is indispensable to define their administration. The Tc-99 is a pure beta emitter of 210000 years of half-life, volatile and of a high mobility in water and soil. For this reason, the objective of this work is to establish a digestion method of ionic exchange resins containing technetium that retains more than 95% of this radioisotope. Mineralization tests were carried out of a resin Amberlite IRN-150 by means of an oxidation heat, in acid medium, varying the resin mass, the medium volume, the media type, the temperature and the digestion time. The digested samples were analyzed by gas chromatography to estimate the grade of their degradation. The {sup 99m}Tc was used as tracer to determine the technetium percentage recovered after mineralizing the resin. The digestion process depends on the temperature and the resin mass. At higher temperature better mineralization of samples and to greater resin mass to a constant temperature, less degradation of the resin. The spectra beta of the {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 99}Tc are presented. (Author)

  13. Development of a High-Throughput Ion-Exchange Resin Characterization Workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun; Dermody, Daniel; Harris, Keith; Boomgaard, Thomas; Sweeney, Jeff; Gisch, Daryl; Goltz, Bob

    2017-06-12

    A novel high-throughout (HTR) ion-exchange (IEX) resin workflow has been developed for characterizing ion exchange equilibrium of commercial and experimental IEX resins against a range of different applications where water environment differs from site to site. Because of its much higher throughput, design of experiment (DOE) methodology can be easily applied for studying the effects of multiple factors on resin performance. Two case studies will be presented to illustrate the efficacy of the combined HTR workflow and DOE method. In case study one, a series of anion exchange resins have been screened for selective removal of NO3- and NO2- in water environments consisting of multiple other anions, varied pH, and ionic strength. The response surface model (RSM) is developed to statistically correlate the resin performance with the water composition and predict the best resin candidate. In case study two, the same HTR workflow and DOE method have been applied for screening different cation exchange resins in terms of the selective removal of Mg2+, Ca2+, and Ba2+ from high total dissolved salt (TDS) water. A master DOE model including all of the cation exchange resins is created to predict divalent cation removal by different IEX resins under specific conditions, from which the best resin candidates can be identified. The successful adoption of HTR workflow and DOE method for studying the ion exchange of IEX resins can significantly reduce the resources and time to address industry and application needs.

  14. An investigation of the applicability of the new ion exchange resin, Reillex{trademark}-HPQ, in ATW separations. Milestone 4, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, K.R.; Ball, J.; Grissom, M.; Williamson, M.; Cobb, S.; Young, D.; Wu, Yen-Yuan J.

    1993-09-07

    The investigations with the anion exchange resin Reillex{trademark}-HPQ is continuing along several different paths. The topics of current investigations that are reported here are: The sorption behavior of chromium(VI) on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ from nitric acid solutions and from sodium hydroxide/sodium nitrate solutions; sorption behavior of F{sup {minus}} on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resin in acidic sodium nitrate solution; sorption behavior of Cl{sup {minus}} on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resin in acidic sodium nitrate solution; sorption behavior of Br{sup {minus}} on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resin in acidic sodium nitrate solution; and the Honors thesis by one of the students is attached as Appendix II (on ion exchange properties of a new macroperous resin using bromide as the model ion in aqueous nitrate solutions).

  15. Separation and determination of arsenic species in water by selective exchange and hybrid resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Issa, Nureddin Ben [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, Belgrade (Serbia); Rajakovic-Ognjanovic, Vladana N. [Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Belgrade, Bulevar Kralja Aleksandra 73, Belgrade (Serbia); Marinkovic, Aleksandar D. [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, Belgrade (Serbia); Rajakovic, Ljubinka V., E-mail: ljubinka@tmf.bg.ac.rs [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2011-11-07

    Highlights: {yields} A simple and efficient method for separation and determination of arsenic species. {yields} A new hybrid resin HY-AgCl is effective for iAs and oAs analytical separation. {yields} SBAE resin was convenient for the separation of As(III) from As(V) and oAs species. {yields} HY-Fe resin was convenient for the separation of DMAs(V). - Abstract: A simple and efficient method for separation and determination of inorganic arsenic (iAs) and organic arsenic (oAs) in drinking, natural and wastewater was developed. If arsenic is present in water prevailing forms are inorganic acids of As(III) and As(V). oAs can be found in traces as monomethylarsenic acid, MMA(V), and dimethylarsenic acid, DMAs(V). Three types of resins: a strong base anion exchange (SBAE) and two hybrid (HY) resins: HY-Fe and HY-AgCl, based on the activity of hydrated iron oxides and a silver chloride were investigated. It was found that the sorption processes (ion exchange, adsorption and chemisorptions) of arsenic species on SBAE (ion exchange) and HY resins depend on pH values of water. The quantitative separation of molecular and ionic forms of iAs and oAs was achieved by SBAE and pH adjustment, the molecular form of As(III) that exists in the water at pH <8.0 was not bonded with SBAE, which was convenient for direct determination of As(III) concentration in the effluent. HY-Fe resin retained all arsenic species except DMAs(V), which makes possible direct measurements of this specie in the effluent. HY-AgCl resin retained all iAs which was convenient for direct determination of oAs species concentration in the effluent. The selective bonding of arsenic species on three types of resins makes possible the development of the procedure for measuring and calculation of all arsenic species in water. In order to determine capacity of resins the preliminary investigations were performed in batch system and fixed bed flow system. Resin capacities were calculated according to breakthrough

  16. Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-07-02

    Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.01, which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590-PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590-PTF-TEF-RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

  17. Anion exchange resin as support for invertase immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vitolo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    The invertase (EC 3.2.1.26 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was employed as a model enzyme in the evaluation of the adsorption capacity of DOWEX-1X8-50®, a basic anion exchange resin, when used as support in enzyme immobilization. By mixing 100mg of resin with 27mg of invertase (pI = 4.0 in buffer solution (pH 4.6, 25°C, stirred at 100rpm, an adsorption of 93% was achieved. The activities (1U = amount of enzyme forming 1mg reducing sugars/min of soluble and insoluble invertase were 0.084 U/mgE and 0.075 U/mgE, respectively, giving an immobilization coefficient of 90.4%. The immobilized invertase had a higher thermal stability than the soluble form. The highest activity was observed at pH 4.5 in both forms of the enzyme, whereas the pH stability ranges for soluble and insoluble invertase were 3.5-5.0 and 4.5-5.5, respectively. The kinetic constants for soluble invertase were KM = 18.3 mM and Vmax = 0.084 U/mgE, and for the insoluble form, KM = 29.1 mM and Vmax = 0.075 U/mgE. The resin tested adsorbed the invertase very well, provided the enzyme molecule had a net negative charge, i.e., the immobilization and reaction procedures had to be carried out at pH > pI. Keywords: Invertase, immobilization, adsorption, anionexchange resin.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of an N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-ethylenediaminetriacetic acid resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Yuet Fan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1977-10-01

    A chelating ion-exchange resin with N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylene-diaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) used as the ligand chemically bonded to XAD-4 by an ester linkage, HEDTA-4, was synthesized. It is stable under normal experimental conditions with the liquid chromatograph. The structure of the resin was confirmed by an infrared spectrum, and by potentiometric titrations. The capacity of the resin was also obtained by potentiometric titration and by a nitrogen analysis. The resin was used to pack a column of 5 mm internal diameter and 5 cm long. The effect of pH on the retention of different metal ions on the resin was studied. It was found that the resin was most selective for chromium(III), copper(II), lead(II), mercury(II), uranium(VI), zirconium(IV) and zinc(II) at a pH of less than 3. Furthermore, the resin proves to be functioning with a chelating mechanism rather than ion-exchange, and it can concentrate trace metal ions in the presence of a large excess of calcium and magnesium. This makes the resin potentially useful for purifying and analyzing drinking water.

  19. Leaching of Co and Cs from spent ion exchange resins in cement ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2003-08-22

    Aug 22, 2003 ... Abstract. The leaching rate of 60Co and 137Cs from the spent cation exchange resins in cement–bentonite matrix has been studied. The solidification matrix was a standard Portland cement mixed with 290–350 (kg/m3) spent cation exchange resins, with or without 2–5% of bentonite clay. The leaching ...

  20. Leaching of 60 Co and 137 Cs from spent ion exchange resins in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The leaching rate of 60Co and 137Cs from the spent cation exchange resins in cement–bentonite matrix has been studied. The solidification matrix was a standard Portland cement mixed with 290–350 (kg/m3) spent cation exchange resins, with or without 2–5% of bentonite clay. The leaching rates from the ...

  1. Local structures of ions at ion-exchange resin/solution interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Makoto; Okada, Tetsuo

    2005-08-26

    The local structures of Cl- and Br- in anion-exchange resins have been studied by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), and separation selectivity is discussed on the basis of results. When two different anion-exchange resins having trimethylammonium and dimethylammonium groups as anion-exchange groups are employed for ion-exchange experiments, slightly higher Br- selectivity has been obtained with the former. XAFS has indicated that the average hydration numbers for a given anion is not affected by the structure of the ion-exchange group, but that the extent of ion-association between the anion and the ion-exchange groups depends on the type of the ion-exchange group. Shorter interaction distance (and in turn stronger ion-association) has been confirmed for the dimethylammonium-type resin, and is consistent with lower Br- selectivity of this resin.

  2. Processing of indium (III solutions via ion exchange with Lewatit K-2621 resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López Díaz-Pavón, Adrián

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The processing of indium(III-hydrochloric acid solutions by the cationic ion exchange Lewatit K-2621 resin has been investigated. The influence of several variables such as the hydrochloric acid and metal concentrations in the aqueous solution and the variation of the amount of resin added has been studied. Moreover, a kinetic study performed in the uptake of indium(III by Lewatit K-2621, shows that either the film-diffusion and the particle-diffusion models fit the ion exchange process onto the resin, depending upon the initial metal concentration in the aqueous solution. The loaded resin could be eluted by HCl solutions at 20 °C.Se ha investigado el tratamiento de disoluciones de ácido clorhídrico conteniendo indio(III mediante la resina de cambio catiónico Lewatit K-2621. Las variables ensayadas han sido las concentraciones de ácido y de metal en la disolución acuosa y la cantidad de resina empleada en el tratamiento de dichas disoluciones. Asimismo, se ha llevado a cabo un estudio cinético del proceso de intercambio catiónico entre el indio(III y la resina Lewatit K-2621. Este estudio muestra que el proceso de intercambio responde a un mecanismo de difusión en la disolución o en la partícula de resina dependiendo de la concentración inicial del metal en el medio acuoso. El metal cargado en la resina puede ser eluido con disoluciones de ácido clorhídrico a 20 °C.

  3. Chelation Ion Exchange Properties of 2, 4-Dihydroxyacetophenone-Biuret-Formaldehyde Terpolymer Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjiokumar S. Rahangdale

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The terpolymer resin 2, 4-HABF has been synthesized by the condensation of 2, 4-dihydroxyacetophenone (2, 4-HA and biuret (B with formaldehyde (F in 1:1:2 molar ratios in presence of 2 M hydrochloric acid as catalyst. UV-Visible, IR and proton NMR spectral studies have been carried out to elucidate the structure of the resin. A terpolymer (2, 4-HABF proved to be a selective chelating ion exchange polymer for certain metals. Chelating ion-exchange properties of this polymer were studied for Fe3+, Cu2+, Ni2+, Co2+, Zn2+, Cd2+ and Pb2+ ions. A batch equilibrium method was employed in the study of the selectivity of metal ion uptake involving the measurement of the distribution of a given metal ion between the polymer sample and a solution containing the metal ion. The study was carried out over a wide pH range and in media of various ionic strengths. The polymer showed highest selectivity for Fe3+, Cu2+ ions than for Ni2+, Co2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, and Pb2+ ions. Study of distribution ratio as a formation of pH indicates that the amount of metal ion taken by resin is increases with the increasing pH of the medium.

  4. Porous metal oxide microspheres from ion exchange resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picart, S.; Parant, P.; Caisso, M.; Remy, E.; Mokhtari, H.; Jobelin, I.; Bayle, J. P.; Martin, C. L.; Blanchart, P.; Ayral, A.; Delahaye, T.

    2015-07-01

    This study is devoted to the synthesis and the characterization of porous metal oxide microsphere from metal loaded ion exchange resin. Their application concerns the fabrication of uranium-americium oxide pellets using the powder-free process called Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletization (CRMP). Those mixed oxide ceramics are one of the materials envisaged for americium transmutation in sodium fast neutron reactors. The advantage of such microsphere precursor compared to classical oxide powder is the diminution of the risk of fine dissemination which can be critical for the handling of highly radioactive powders such as americium based oxides and the improvement of flowability for the filling of compaction chamber. Those millimetric oxide microspheres incorporating uranium and americium were synthesized and characterizations showed a very porous microstructure very brittle in nature which occurred to be adapted to shaping by compaction. Studies allowed to determine an optimal heat treatment with calcination temperature comprised between 700-800 °C and temperature rate lower than 2 °C/min. Oxide Precursors were die-pressed into pellets and then sintered under air to form regular ceramic pellets of 95% of theoretical density (TD) and of homogeneous microstructure. This study validated thus the scientific feasibility of the CRMP process to prepare bearing americium target in a powder free manner.

  5. Simultaneous production of high quality biodiesel and glycerin from Jatropha oil using ion-exchange resins as catalysts and adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki-Kitakawa, Naomi; Kanagawa, Keiichi; Nakashima, Kazunori; Yonemoto, Toshikuni

    2013-08-01

    The simultaneous production of high quality biodiesel and glycerin was realized by a bench-scale process using expanded-bed reactors packed with cation- and anion-exchange resins. The mixed-solution of crude Jatropha oil and methanol at a stoichiometric molar ratio was supplied to the process. The free fatty acid as well as triglyceride was completely converted to biodiesel. All by-products were adsorbed on the resin and the effluent from the process was free from them. The effluent fully met the international biodiesel standard specifications without any downstream purification processes except for removing methanol. The glycerin adsorbed on the resin was completely recovered as a transparent methanol solution during regeneration of the resin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Kinetic studies of clavulanic acid recovery by ion exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, M; Almeida, R M; Hokka, C O

    2001-01-01

    Clavulanic acid (CA) is a beta-lactamase inhibitor produced by strains of Streptomyces clavuligerus. Nowadays, the combination of CA with amoxycillin is the most successful example of the use of a beta-lactam antibiotic sensitive to beta-lactamases together with an inhibitor of these enzymes. Clavulanic acid is purified from fermentation broth by a series of steps consisting mainly of two-phase separation processes such as liquid-liquid extraction, adsorption or ion-exchange chromatography, among others. Amberlite IRA 400, a strong anion-exchange resin, has a very high adsorption capacity for CA (Mayer et al. 1997). This resin can be pre-treated with NaCl (chloride cycle), to remove selectively only those anions, which are able to displace chloride from the resin or with NaOH (hydroxyl cycle), to remove all species of anions. In order to decide the best operating conditions for CA recovery by ion-exchange resins and then to construct a model of this separation process, batch experiments were conducted using Amberlite IRA 400 in the chloride cycle. These runs were carried out in a 200 ml stirred tank, at two different initial solution pH, 6.2 and 4.0; the temperature was maintained at 10 degrees C and 20 degrees C during adsorption and 30 degrees C during the desorption step. It was possible, on the basis of these batch results, to model the separation process, including the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium data and mass transfer limitations.

  7. Anion selective membrane. [ion exchange resins and ion exchange membrane electrolytes for electrolytic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, S. S.; Geoffroy, R. R.; Hodgdon, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental anion permselective membranes were prepared and tested for their suitability as cell separators in a chemical redox power storage system being developed at NASA-Lewis Research Center. The goals of long-term (1000 hr) oxidative and thermal stability at 80 C in FeCl3 and CrCl3 electrolytes were met by most of the weak base and strong base amino exchange groups considered in the program. Good stability is exhibited by several of the membrane substrate resins. These are 'styrene' divinylbenzene copolymer and PVC film. At least four membrane systems produce strong flexible films with electrochemical properties (resistivity, cation transfer) superior to those of the 103QZL, the most promising commercial membrane. The physical and chemical properties of the resins are listed.

  8. Separation of metal ions by anion exchange in mixtures of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faris, J.P.

    1978-12-01

    Distribution coefficients were determined for the adsorption of more than 40 elements on anion-exchange resins from mixtures of HCl (0.1 to 12M) and HF (0.1-8M). Two resins, Dowex 1 x 10, 200 to 400 mesh and Dowex 1 x 4, 100 to 200 mesh, were used. Distribution coefficients were also determined for the adsorption of many elements on both resins from 0.1 to 12M HCl and 0.1 to 12M HF. Anion exchange in the presence of HF was found useful for separating impurities from various materials for their subsequent determination, and specific procedures used in our spectrochemical laboratory for this purpose are outlined. The results of a literature search on the use of anion exchange in hydrofluoric acid and fluoride-containing media are presented in an extensive bibliography. 404 references, 9 tables.

  9. Synthesis of biodiesel from pongamia oil using heterogeneous ion-exchange resin catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaya, N; Selvan, B Karpanai; Vennison, S John

    2015-11-01

    Biodiesel is a clean-burning renewable substitute fuel for petroleum. Biodiesel could be effectively produced by transesterification reaction of triglycerides of vegetable oils with short-chain alcohols in the presence of homogeneous or heterogeneous catalysts. Conventionally, biodiesel manufacturing processes employ strong acids or bases as catalysts. But, separation of the catalyst and the by-product glycerol from the product ester is too expensive to justify the product use as an automobile fuel. Hence heterogeneous catalysts are preferred. In this study, transesterification of pongamia oil with ethanol was performed using a solid ion-exchange resin catalyst. It is a macro porous strongly basic anion exchange resin. The process parameters affecting the ethyl ester yield were investigated. The reaction conditions were optimized for the maximum yield of fatty acid ethyl ester (FAEE) of pongamia oil. The properties of FAEE were compared with accepted standards of biodiesel. Engine performance was also studied with pongamia oil diesel blend and engine emission characteristics were observed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Extraction and derivatization of chemical weapons convention relevant aminoalcohols on magnetic cation-exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Varoon; Garg, Prabhat; Chinthakindi, Sridhar; Tak, Vijay; Dubey, Devendra Kumar

    2014-02-14

    Analysis and identification of nitrogen containing aminoalcohols is an integral part of the verification analysis of chemical weapons convention (CWC). This study was aimed to develop extraction and derivatization of aminoalcohols of CWC relevance by using magnetic dispersive solid-phase extraction (MDSPE) in combination with on-resin derivatization (ORD). For this purpose, sulfonated magnetic cation-exchange resins (SMRs) were prepared using magnetite nanoparticles as core, styrene and divinylbenzene as polymer coat and sulfonic acid as acidic cation exchanger. SMRs were successfully employed as extractant for targeted basic analytes. Adsorbed analytes were derivatized with hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) on the surface of extractant. Derivatized (silylated) compounds were analyzed by GC-MS in SIM and full scan mode. The linearity of the method ranged from 5 to 200ngmL(-1). The LOD and LOQ ranged from 2 to 6ngmL(-1) and 5 to 19ngmL(-1) respectively. The relative standard deviation for intra-day repeatability and inter-day intermediate precision ranged from 5.1% to 6.6% and 0.2% to 7.6% respectively. Recoveries of analytes from spiked water samples from different sources varied from 28.4% to 89.3%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of Some Anionic Exchange Resins as Potential Tablet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . The thickness and ... synthesis of the resins via polymerization [13]. In previous studies, these resins were pharmaceutically ..... classes of superdisintegrants in promoting aspirin tablet disintegration and dissolution. AAPS. PharmSciTech ...

  12. Reducing ion exchange resins rad-wastes, experience at EDF PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fene, G. [Rohm and Haas Co. (France); Hoffman, B. [Rohm and Haas Co. (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Life time of an ion exchange resin in a Nuclear Power Station (EDF PWR). At the end of its life, an ion exchange resin which has been used to treat radioactive streams becomes a radwaste itself. Its level of radioactivity depends on the point of use and consequently on the circuit where it was used. Roughly speaking, in a Nuclear Power Station PWR we can consider two types of radwaste families: High radioactive family Ion exchange resins which come from primary circuit: reactor control and storage pools. Ion exchange resins which have worked in a decontamination circuit: waste water treatment. Low radioactive family Ion exchange resins which come from secondary circuit: Steam Generator Blowdown By understanding and carefully applying some critical properties of ion exchange resins, such as total capacity, selectivity, and physical structure, it is possible for nuclear power stations to minimize radwaste volumes, while at the same time improving plant performance. This type of improvement can be facilitated by close cooperation and communication between the resin producer and the nuclear power user. (authors)

  13. Vitrification of Cesium-Laden Organic Ion Exchange Resin in a Stirred Melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicero-Herman, C.A [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Sargent, T.N.; Overcamp, T.J.; Bickford, D.F.

    1997-07-09

    The goal of this research was a feasibility study for vitrifying the organic ion exchange resin in a stirred-tank melter. Tests were conducted to determine the fate of cesium including the feed, exit glass, and offgas streams and to assess any impact of feeding the resin on the melter or its performance.

  14. Ion-Isotopic Exchange Reaction Kinetics using Anion Exchange Resins Dowex 550A LC and Indion-930A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.U. Singare

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the characterization of ion exchange resins Dowex 550A LC and Indion-930A based on kinetics of ion-isotopic exchange reactions for which the short lived radioactive isotopes 131I and 82Br were used as a tracers. The study was performed for different concentration of ionic solution varying from 0.001 mol/L to 0.004 mol/L and temperature in the range of 30.0 °C to 45.0 °C. The results indicate that as compared to bromide ion-isotopic exchange reaction, iodide exchange reaction take place at the faster rate. For both the ion-isotopic exchange reactions, under identical experimental conditions, the values of specific reaction rate increases with increase in the ionic concentration and decreases with rise in temperature. It was observed that at 35.00C, 1.000 g of ion exchange resins and 0.002 mol/L labeled iodide ion solution for iodide ion-isotopic exchange reaction, the values of specific reaction rate (min-1, amount of ion exchanged (mmol, initial rate of ion exchange (mmol/min and log Kd were 0.270, 0.342, 0.092 and 11.8 respectively for Dowex 550A LC resin, which was higher than the respective values of 0.156, 0.241, 0.038 and 7.4 as that obtained for Indion-930A resins. From the results, it appears that Dowex 550A LC resins show superior performance over Indion-930A resins under identical experimental conditions.

  15. Ion exchange resins as catalyst for the isomerization of alpha-pinene to camphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimal-Valencia, O; Robau-Sánchez, A; Collins-Martínez, V; Aguilar-Elguézabal, A

    2004-06-01

    Camphene is an industrial intermediate compound for commercial chemicals such as isoborneol, isobornyl acetate and camphor. Industrially, the conventional process for camphene production consists of the isomerization of alpha-pinene using acidic TiO2 as catalyst. The use of this catalyst presents problems such as considerable time for preparation, reproducibility and recovery of catalyst from products after the alpha-pinene isomerization. For the first time, a commercial exchange resin was used as catalyst for this reaction. Based on the concentration of product as a function of the reaction time, the path of the alpha-pinene transformation to camphene and byproducts is proposed. Temperature and alpha-pinene/catalyst ratio were studied in order to optimize the yield to camphene production. The obtained results were comparable with those reported for acidic TiO2. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Lawps ion exchange column gravity drain of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, M. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Herman, D. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Restivo, M. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-01-28

    Experiments at several different scales were performed to understand the removal of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) ion exchange resin using a gravity drain system with a valve located above the resin screen in the ion exchange column (IXC). This is being considered as part of the design for the Low Activity Waste Pretreatment System (LAWPS) to be constructed at the DOE Hanford Site.

  17. Ion exchange system design for removal of heavy metals from acid mine drainage wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Sapkal

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the methodology used to determine the optimal ion-exchange column size to process all separate batchesof feeds from acid mine drainage wastewater.The optimal design ensures the best utilization of resin material and therefore results in a minimum amount of spent resins.Ion exchanger materials have been studied for removing heavy metals from a metal bearing wastes. For the current treatment,a facility has been designed for the removal of heavy metals from the acid mine drainage (AMD waste by the ion-exchange technology.

  18. Cement waste-form development for ion-exchange resins at the Rocky Flats Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veazey, G.W. [Los Alamos National Labs., NM (United States); Ames, R.L. [Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, CO (United States)

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the development of a cement waste form to stabilize ion-exchange resins at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). These resins have an elevated potential for ignition due to inadequate wetness and contact with nitrates. The work focused on the preparation and performance evaluation of several Portland cement/resin formulations. The performance standards were chosen to address Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and Environmental Protection Agency Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements, compatibility with Rocky Flats equipment, and throughput efficiency. The work was performed with surrogate gel-type Dowex cation- and anion-exchange resins chosen to be representative of the resin inventory at RFETS. Work was initiated with nonactinide resins to establish formulation ranges that would meet performance standards. Results were then verified and refined with actinide-containing resins. The final recommended formulation that passed all performance standards was determined to be a cement/water/resin (C/W/R) wt % ratio of 63/27/10 at a pH of 9 to 12. The recommendations include the acceptable compositional ranges for each component of the C/W/R ratio. Also included in this report are a recommended procedure, an equipment list, and observations/suggestions for implementation at RFETS. In addition, information is included that explains why denitration of the resin is unnecessary for stabilizing its ignitability potential.

  19. Simultaneous isolation of lactoferrin and lactoperoxidase from bovine colostrum by SPEC 70 SLS cation exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yafei; Wang, Xuewan; Wu, Mianbin; Zhu, Wanping

    2011-09-01

    In this work, simultaneous isolation of lactoferrin (Lf) and lactoperoxidase (Lp) from defatted bovine colostrum by one-step cation exchange chromatography with SPEC 70 SLS ion-exchange resin was investigated. A RP-HPLC method for Lf and Lp determination was developed and optimized as the following conditions: detection wavelength of 220 nm, flow rate of 1 mL/min and acetonitrile concentration from 25% to 75% within 20 min. The adsorption process of Lf on SPEC 70 SLS resin was optimized using Lf standard as substrate. The maximum static binding capacity of SPEC 70 SLS resin was of 22.0 mg/g resin at 15 °C, pH 7.0 and adsorption time 3 h. The Lf adsorption process could be well described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model, with a maximum adsorption capacity of 21.73 mg/g resin at 15 °C. In batch fractionation of defatted colostrum, the binding capacities of SPEC 70 SLS resin for adsorbing Lf and Lp simultaneously under the abovementioned conditions were 7.60 and 6.89 mg/g resin, respectively, both of which were superior to those of CM Sepharose F.F. or SP Sepharose F.F. resins under the same conditions. As a result, SPEC 70 SLS resin was considered as a successful candidate for direct and economic purification of Lf and Lp from defatted colostrum.

  20. Simultaneous Isolation of Lactoferrin and Lactoperoxidase from Bovine Colostrum by SPEC 70 SLS Cation Exchange Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mianbin Wu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, simultaneous isolation of lactoferrin (Lf and lactoperoxidase (Lp from defatted bovine colostrum by one-step cation exchange chromatography with SPEC 70 SLS ion-exchange resin was investigated. A RP-HPLC method for Lf and Lp determination was developed and optimized as the following conditions: detection wavelength of 220 nm, flow rate of 1 mL/min and acetonitrile concentration from 25% to 75% within 20 min. The adsorption process of Lf on SPEC 70 SLS resin was optimized using Lf standard as substrate. The maximum static binding capacity of SPEC 70 SLS resin was of 22.0 mg/g resin at 15 °С, pH 7.0 and adsorption time 3 h. The Lf adsorption process could be well described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model, with a maximum adsorption capacity of 21.73 mg/g resin at 15 °С. In batch fractionation of defatted colostrum, the binding capacities of SPEC 70 SLS resin for adsorbing Lf and Lp simultaneously under the abovementioned conditions were 7.60 and 6.89 mg/g resin, respectively, both of which were superior to those of CM Sepharose F.F. or SP Sepharose F.F. resins under the same conditions. As a result, SPEC 70 SLS resin was considered as a successful candidate for direct and economic purification of Lf and Lp from defatted colostrum.

  1. Preliminary flowsheet: Ion exchange for separation of cesium from Hanford tank waste using resorcinol-formaldehyde resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penwell, D.L.

    1994-12-28

    This preliminary flowsheet document describes an ion exchange process which uses resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resin to remove cesium from Hanford tank waste. The flowsheet describes one possible equipment configuration, and contains mass balances based on that configuration with feeds of Neutralized Current Acid Waste, and Double Shell Slurry Feed. The flowsheet also discusses process alternatives, unresolved issues, and development needs associated with the ion exchange process. It is expected that this flowsheet will evolve as open issues are resolved and progress is made on development needs. This is part of the Tank Waste Remediation Program at Hanford. 26 refs, 6 figs, 25 tabs.

  2. Reducing nitrogen crossover in microbial reverse-electrodialysis cells by using adjacent anion exchange membranes and anion exchange resin

    KAUST Repository

    Wallack, Maxwell J.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial reverse electrodialysis cells (MRECs) combine power generation from salinity gradient energy using reverse electrodialysis (RED), with power generation from organic matter using a microbial fuel cell. Waste heat can be used to distill ammonium bicarbonate into high (HC) and low salt concentration (LC) solutions for use in the RED stack, but nitrogen crossover into the anode chamber must be minimized to avoid ammonia loses, and foster a healthy microbial community. To reduce nitrogen crossover, an additional low concentration (LC) chamber was inserted before the anode using an additional anion exchange membrane (AEM) next to another AEM, and filled with different amounts of anion or cation ion exchange resins. Addition of the extra AEM increased the ohmic resistance of the test RED stack from 103 Ω cm2 (1 AEM) to 295 Ω cm2 (2 AEMs). However, the use of the anion exchange resin decreased the solution resistance of the LC chamber by 74% (637 Ω cm2, no resin; 166 Ω cm2 with resin). Nitrogen crossover into the anode chamber was reduced by up to 97% using 50% of the chamber filled with an anion exchange resin compared to the control (no additional chamber). The added resistance contributed by the use of the additional LC chamber could be compensated for by using additional LC and HC membrane pairs in the RED stack.

  3. Selection of anionic exchange resins for removal of natural organic matter (NOM) fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, E R; Moreau, N; Siegers, W G; Abrahamse, A J; Rietveld, L C; Grefte, A; Dignum, M; Amy, G; Wessels, L P

    2008-01-01

    Early elimination of natural organic matter (NOM) by ion exchange (IEX) in water treatment is expected to improve subsequent water treatment processes and the final drinking water quality. Nine anionic exchange resins were investigated to remove NOM and specific NOM fractions determined by liquid chromatography in combination with organic carbon detection (LC-OCD) and fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEM). Breakthrough of NOM was predicted by model calculations using Freundlich isotherms and IEX rate experiments. The time to breakthrough varied from 4 to 38 days. Removal of specific NOM fractions proved to vary considerably for the different types of IEX resins, ranging from 1% to almost 60%. The removal of NOM fractions, specifically humic substances, increased with an increase in water content of the investigated IEX resins and with a decrease in resin size. The best-performing IEX resins consisted of the smallest resins and/or those with the highest water content. The worst-performing IEX resins reflected the highest exchanging capacities and the lowest water contents.

  4. The characteristic assessment of spent ion exchange resin from PUSPATI TRIGA REACTOR (RTP) for immobilization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahida, Nurul [School of Applied Physics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia and Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Majid, Amran Ab; Irwan, M. N. [School of Applied Physics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Wahab, Mohd Abd; Marzukee, Nik; Paulus, Wilfred; Phillip, Esther; Thanaletchumy [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    In this paper, spent ion exchange resin generated from PUSPATI TRIGA reactor (RTP) in Malaysian Nuclear Agency were characterized based on the water content, radionuclide content and radionuclide leachability. The result revealed that the water content in the spent resin is 48%. Gamma spectrometry analysis indicated the presence of {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 152}Eu, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Co and {sup 65}Zn. The leachability test shows a small concentrations (<1 Bq/l) of {sup 152}Eu and {sup 134}Cs were leached out from the spent resin while {sup 60}Co activity concentrations slightly exceeded the limit generally used for industrial wastewater i.e. 1 Bq/l. Characterization of spent ion exchange resin sampled from RTP show that this characterization is important as a basis to immobilize this radioactive waste using geopolymer technology.

  5. The characteristic assessment of spent ion exchange resin from PUSPATI TRIGA REACTOR (RTP) for immobilization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahida, Nurul; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Majid, Amran Ab; Wahab, Mohd Abd; Marzukee, Nik; Paulus, Wilfred; Phillip, Esther; Thanaletchumy, Irwan, M. N.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, spent ion exchange resin generated from PUSPATI TRIGA reactor (RTP) in Malaysian Nuclear Agency were characterized based on the water content, radionuclide content and radionuclide leachability. The result revealed that the water content in the spent resin is 48%. Gamma spectrometry analysis indicated the presence of 134Cs, 137Cs, 152Eu, 54Mn, 58Co, 60Co and 65Zn. The leachability test shows a small concentrations (<1 Bq/l) of 152Eu and 134Cs were leached out from the spent resin while 60Co activity concentrations slightly exceeded the limit generally used for industrial wastewater i.e. 1 Bq/l. Characterization of spent ion exchange resin sampled from RTP show that this characterization is important as a basis to immobilize this radioactive waste using geopolymer technology.

  6. High-Capacity and Rapid Removal of Refractory NOM Using Nanoscale Anion Exchange Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Billy R; Eldred, Tim B; Nguyen, Andy T; Payne, William M; Schmidt, Emily E; Alansari, Amir Y; Amburgey, James E; Poler, Jordan C

    2016-07-20

    As human health concerns over disinfection byproducts (DBP) in drinking water increase, so does the need to develop new materials that remove them rapidly and at high capacity. Ion exchange (IEX) is an effective method for the removal of natural organic matter (NOM), especially anion exchange resins (AERs) with quaternary ammonium functional groups. However, capacity is limited in existing commercial resin materials because adsorbates can only interact with the outermost surface area, which makes these products inefficient on a mass basis. We have synthesized a novel "NanoResin" exploiting the enhanced NOM removal of the quaternary ammonium resin while utilizing the vast surface area of SWCNTs, which act as scaffolding for the resin. Our nanomaterials show increased adsorption capacity compared to commercially available adsorbents, in a fraction of the time. This NanoResin requires only about 10 s to reach ion-exchange equilibrium. Comparatively, commercial AERs only achieved partial removal after more than 30 min. High capacity adsorption of a low molecular weight (MW) surrogate has been measured. NOM removal was demonstrated in solutions of both low and high specific UV absorbance (SUVA) composition with these nanomaterials. Additionally, the NanoResin showed enhanced removal of a NOM concentrate sample taken from Myrtle Beach, SC, demonstrating NanoResin is an effective method of removal for refractory NOM in a natural aqueous environment. Synthesis and characterization of the polymers and nanomaterials are presented below. Adsorption capacity, adsorption kinetics, and the regeneration and reusability of these new materials for NOM removal are described. The open matrix microstructure precludes any intraparticle diffusion of adsorbates; thus, these nanomaterials act as a "contact resin".

  7. Design of Ion-Exchange Resins Through EDTA and DTPA Modified Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    Catechol, resorcinol, and their admixtures with EDTA and DTPA moieties were converted into polymeric resins by alkaline polycondensation with formaldehyde. The resins were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, ion-exchange capacity, and distribution coefficient (D for heavy metal and radionuclide such as Cs and Sr. 137Cs and 90Sr constitutes a major source of heat in nuclear waste streams and in regards to recent nuclear event their remediation in complex solution – sea water - represent an important issue.

  8. Combination of Na-modified zeolite and anion exchange resin for advanced treatment of a high ammonia-nitrogen content municipal effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiyun; Li, Aimin; Zhang, Wei; Shuang, Chendong

    2016-04-15

    In this study, the exchange equilibrium and kinetic experiments of ammonia-nitrogen on the Na-form zeolite were conducted. The results indicated that the presence of humic acid have a negative effect on the equilibrium exchange capacity but have limited influence on the equilibrium time except shorten the sole intra-particle diffusion control time. The exchange equilibrium data could be well fitted by Freundlich model in the absence of humic acid but Langmuir model in the presence of humic acid. While the exchange kinetic data could be well described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model in both situations. An anion exchange resin exhibited high removal efficiency to humic acid and dissolved organic matter through kinetic results and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy results. The use of the anion exchange resin prior to the Na-form zeolite improved the ammonia-nitrogen removal efficiency from 78% to 95% and increased the treatment volume of the Na-form zeolite from 51 BV (bed volume) to 76 BV. Both the resin and the Na-form zeolite could be successfully regenerated by the combination of alkaline and sodium chloride. Complete elution of ammonia-nitrogen was achieved when the mass percentage of sodium chloride and alkaline was 10% and 0.6% respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Removal of lead compounds from polyvinylchloride in electric wires and cables using cation-exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunekawa, Masami; Ito, Mayumi; Yuta, Sasaki; Tomoo, Sakai; Hiroyoshi, Naoki

    2011-07-15

    Recycling treatment of cable insulation resin generated from electric wires and cables was investigated. Conventional insulation PVC contains a lead component, tribase, as a thermal stabilizer and lead removal is necessary to recycle this PVC as insulation resin. This paper describes a solid surface adsorption method using ion exchange resin to remove the fine lead containing particles from PVC dissolved solution. Low lead concentration in the recovered PVC, complying with the requirements of RoHS, was achieved. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis of ion-exchange resin for selective thorium and uranyl ions sorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, Konstantin; Sachkov, Victor

    2017-11-01

    In this work, the method of ion-exchange resin synthesis selective to radionuclides (uranium and thorium) is presented. The method includes synthesis of polymeric styrene-divinylbenzene macroporous matrix with size of 0.1-0.2 mm, and its subsequent transformation by nitration and then reduction by tin (II) chloride. For passivation of active primary amines partially oxidation by oxygen from air is used. Obtained ion-exchange resin has ratio of sorption sum U+Th to sorption sum of other total rare-earth elements as 1:1.88 at ratio of solid to liquid phase 1:200. The proposed method of ion-exchange resin synthesis is scaled-up for laboratory reactors with volume of 5 and 50 liters.

  11. Transesterification of propylene glycol methyl ether in chromatographic reactors using anion exchange resin as a catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jungmin; Sreedhar, Balamurali; Donaldson, Megan E; Frank, Timothy C; Schultz, Alfred K; Bommarius, Andreas S; Kawajiri, Yoshiaki

    2016-09-30

    Reactive chromatography using an anion exchange resin is proposed for a transesterification reaction of propylene glycol methyl ether (DOWANOL™ PM) with ethyl acetate to produce propylene glycol methyl ether acetate (DOWANOL™ PMA). This reaction is studied in batch and chromatographic reactors catalyzed by an anion exchange resin. Several anion exchange resins are tested and compared based on the performance of resin as an adsorbent and a catalyst. A chromatographic column is packed with a selected catalyst, AMBERLITE™ IRA904, and both reaction and chromatographic elution are studied at different temperatures and feed concentrations. The resulting chromatograms are fitted to a mathematical model to obtain adsorption equilibrium and reaction kinetic parameters by the inverse method. Compared to esterification investigated in a previous study, transesterification has advantages such as a higher conversion at lower temperature and easy removal of the byproduct which may lead to higher productivity. Deactivation of anion exchange resins is observed and potential solutions are suggested. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of humic acid on ciprofloxacin removal by magnetic multifunctional resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Cheng, Jiade; Jin, Jing; Zhou, Qing; Ma, Yan; Zhao, Qingqing; Li, Aimin

    2016-07-01

    Background organic matter significantly influences the removal of emerging contaminants in natural water. In this work, the adsorption of ciprofloxacin (CPX) onto a series of magnetic multifunctional resins (GMA10-GMA90) in the presence and absence of humic acid (HA) was conducted to demonstrate the effect of HA. Both hydrophobic and ion exchange interactions contributed to CPX adsorption. Negative charge-assisted hydrogen bonds also participated in the adsorption process, resulting in the high adsorption amount of anionic CPX onto the negatively charged GMA30 under basic solutions. HA could impact CPX adsorption not only as a competitive adsorbate but also as an additional adsorbent. At pH 5.6, the additional adsorption sites provided by adsorbed HA molecules on the resins dominated and thus facilitated the adsorption process. While at pH 10, HA inhibited the adsorption of CPX by directly competing for ion exchange sites and coexisting with CPX in the solution. The ratio of the amount of CPX adsorbed by dissolved HA to that by the resin reached as high as 1.61 for GMA90. The adsorbed HA molecules onto the resins could provide additional adsorption sites for CPX as proven by the enhanced CPX adsorption in HA-preloading systems at pH 5.6.

  13. Measuring Bioavailable Copper in Estuarine Waters using an Ion Exchange Resin

    OpenAIRE

    Snyder, Jeffrey D.

    1999-01-01

    Anion exchange methods were used to measure the percent of weakly bound and strongly bound copper in estuarine waters and agricultural drainage. Copper bound to an ion exchange resin has been operationally defined as bioavailable copper, or copper that is available for uptake by aquatic organisms. Initial laboratory testing indicated that the percent of copper bound to the resin did not differ between a freshwater solution (pH 6.5 buffered with 30 mg/L as calcium carbonate) and a sali...

  14. Simultaneous Isolation of Lactoferrin and Lactoperoxidase from Bovine Colostrum by SPEC 70 SLS Cation Exchange Resin

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Yafei; Wang, Xuewan; Wu, Mianbin; Zhu, Wanping

    2011-01-01

    In this work, simultaneous isolation of lactoferrin (Lf) and lactoperoxidase (Lp) from defatted bovine colostrum by one-step cation exchange chromatography with SPEC 70 SLS ion-exchange resin was investigated. A RP-HPLC method for Lf and Lp determination was developed and optimized as the following conditions: detection wavelength of 220 nm, flow rate of 1 mL/min and acetonitrile concentration from 25% to 75% within 20 min. The adsorption process of Lf on SPEC 70 SLS resin was optimized using...

  15. Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheth, A.C.; Strevel, S.D.

    1991-12-31

    The University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) has a Department of Energy grant to further develop the Institute`s anion-exchange resin-based flue gas, desulfurization concept. The developmental program proposed includes screening of commercially available resins to select three candidate resins for further study. These three resins will undergo a series of experiments designed to test the resins` performance under different process conditions (including the use of spent MHD seed material). The best of these resins will be used in optimizing the regeneration step and in testing the effects of performance enhancers. The process schematic developed from the results will be used to estimate the related economics.

  16. Effect of cation exchange resin treatment and addition on sugar as anti-caking agent on retention of nutritional and sensory quality of lemon juice powder during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Satish K; Kaushal, B B L; Sharma, P C

    2011-06-01

    Lemon juices clarified with enzymatic treatment with and without cation exchange resin treatment were concentrated to 60(o) Brix in a vacuum evaporator and converted into powders by foam mat drying technique. Powders obtained from cation exchange resin treated juice were better in quality with respect to acidity, glucose, fructose, sugars, and ascorbic acid contents as compared to those prepared form non treated juice. Further, during 9 months storage, the powders suffered slight loss of acidity, and increase in reducing sugars i.e. glucose and fructose and considerable loss (31-55%) in vitamin C contents. Storage conditions did not bring about any significant change in the ash and hesperidin content of the product. But some losses were registered in the total phenols (23.69%) and sensory quality (from 7.72 to 7.26) of the powders. Further, the powders prepared from cation exchange resin treated juice and those pulverized with cane sugar suffered overall lesser changes in most of the quality parameters during 9 months of storage, thus indicating that, the treatment of lemon juice with cation exchange resin is beneficial for better initial product quality and pulverization of prepared powder with cane sugar is beneficial in reducing the hygroscopicity and retention of quality in a better way.

  17. 21 CFR 175.260 - Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins... COMPONENTS OF COATINGS Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.260 Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins. Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins identified in this section...

  18. New development of ion exchange resin application. Ion kokan jushi oyo no aratana tenkai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terayama, H. (Nippon Rensui Co., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-09-01

    Ion exchange resin, already widely used, was introduced particularly in recent application examples to have utilized other functions than that of ion exchange. Purposewise, demineralized water production and other water treatment use occupies about a 70% share. Though super-demineralized water production unit, functionally based on ion exchange, has come to be able to produce super-demineralized water, more than 18MOmega-cm in specific resistivity, even a small quantity of eluent matter is so problematic as to require continuation of research to materialize further high purity. Recent chromatographic separation, as large-scaled, also industrially, by the high grade separation technology of preudo-moving bed, quasi-continuation and other systems, and development of new resin, includes the separation of fruit sugar and grape super at the largest scale. Examples comprise, among many other, hard ion exchange resin, as protein-separating agent, to replace conventional dextran, ion exchange electrolysis membrane, by chelate resin, of caustic soda and separation/refining of antibiotics by synthesizing/absorbing agent. 5 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. The elution of metal cyanocomplexes from polyacrylic - and polystyrene- based ion exchange resins using nitrate and thiocyanate eluants

    OpenAIRE

    Riani,J. C.; Leão,V. A.; Silva, C.A.; Silva, A M; S. M. Bertolino; Lukey,G. C.

    2007-01-01

    Ion exchange resins can potentially be applied in cyanide recycling to address growing environmental concerns over the use of cyanide during gold extraction. In the present work the elution of copper-, iron-, and zinc-cyanocomplexes from polyacrylic- and polystyrene-based resins was studied. It was found that iron and copper cyanides are easily eluted from polyacrylic- and polystyrene-based ion exchange resins using either SCN- or NO3-. However, elution of the zinc cyanide complex from polyst...

  20. Performance testing of grout-based waste forms for the solidification of anion exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, I.L.; Bostick, W.D.

    1990-10-01

    The solidification of spent ion exchanges resins in a grout matrix as a means of disposing of spent organic resins produced in the nuclear fuel cycle has many advantages in terms of process simplicity and economy, but associated with the process is the potential for water/cement/resins to interact and degrade the integrity of the waste form solidified. Described in this paper is one possible solution to preserving the integrity of these solidified waste forms: the encapsulation of beaded anion exchange resins in grout formulations containing ground granulated blast furnace slag, Type I-II (mixed) portland cement, and additives (clays, amorphous silica, silica fume, and fly ash). The results of the study reported herein show the cured waste form tested has a low leach rate for nitrate ion from the resin (and a low leach rate is inferred for Tc-99) and acceptable durability as assessed by the water immersion and freezing/thawing test protocols. The results also suggest a tested surrogate waste form prepared in vinyl ester styrene binder performs satisfactorily against the wetting/drying criterion, and it should offer additional insight into future work on the solidification of spent organic resins. 26 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Selective Anion Exchange Resins for the Removal of Perchlorate [(CIO{sub 4}{sup -})] from Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, B.

    1999-05-20

    The primary objective of this project was to evaluate a novel bifunctional anion exchange resin for the cost-effective, in situ treatment of groundwater contaminated with perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}). Both laboratory and field studies were performed to determine the selectivity and capacity of the bifunctional synthetic resins to sorb ClO{sub 4}{sup -} from simulated or actual contaminated groundwater. A number of synthetic bifunctional resins, including two commercial versions made by Purolite International and three commercially available, mono-functional resins, were tested. Initial laboratory batch and column breakthrough studies determined the best synthetic resins and the optimal conditions for the field experiment. Laboratory results indicated that the bifunctional synthetic resins, D-3696 and RO-02-119 were highly selective toward ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and performed {approx}5 times better than the best commercial nitrate resin (Purolite{reg_sign} A-520E) and more than an order of magnitude better than some nonselective commercial resins (e.g. Amberlite{reg_sign} IRA-900). The bifunctional resins were particularly effective in removing trace quantities of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} in groundwater to below the detection limit ({approx} 3 {micro}g/L). A field trial demonstrated that the bifunctional resin (D-3696) was able to treat {approx} 110,000 bed volumes of groundwater before a 10% breakthrough of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} occurred under the column flow-through conditions (running at {approx} 2 bed volumes per minute). On the other hand, the Purolite{reg_sign} A-520E resin was able to treat {approx} 23,000 bed volumes of groundwater under the same experimental conditions. No pretreatment was needed to remove either dissolved organic matter or other competing anions (such as SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} or NO{sub 3}{sup -}) in the groundwater, and the treatment process did not alter the water quality by removing or adding secondary by-products because of the high selectivity of the

  2. Bile acid sequestrants : more than simple resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Out, Carolien; Groen, Albert K.; Brufau, Gemma

    Purpose of review Bile acid sequestrants (BAS) have been used for more than 50 years in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. The last decade, bile acids are emerging as integrated regulators of metabolism via induction of various signal transduction pathways. Consequently, BAS treatment may exert

  3. Radiotracer application for characterization of nuclear grade anion exchange resins Tulsion A-23 and Dowex SBR LC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singare, P.U. [Bhavan' s College, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    2015-12-15

    Radio isotopic tracer technique as one of the versatile nondestructive technique is employed to evaluate the performance of nuclear grade anion exchange resins Tulsion A-23 and Dowex SBR LC. The evaluation was made on the basis of ion-isotopic exchange reaction kinetics by using {sup 131}I and {sup 82}Br radioactive tracer isotopes. It was observed that for both the resins, the values of specific reaction rate (min{sup -1}), amount of ion exchanged (mmol) and initial rate of ion exchange (mmol/min) were calculated to be lower for bromide ion-isotopic exchange reaction than that for iodide ion-isotopic exchange reaction. It was observed that for iodide ion-isotopic exchange reaction under identical experimental conditions of 30.0 C, 1.000 g of ion exchange resins and 0.001 mol/L labeled iodide ion solution, the values of specific reaction rate (min{sup -1}), amount of iodide ion exchanged (mmol), initial rate of iodide ion exchange (mmol/min) and log K{sub d} were calculated as 0.377, 0.212, 0.080 and 15.5 respectively for Dowex SBR LC resin, which was higher than 0.215, 0.144, 0.031 and 14.1 respectively as that obtained for Tulsion A23 resins. Also at a constant temperature of 30.0 C, as the concentration of labeled iodide ion solution increases from 0.001 mol/L to 0.004 mol/L, the percentage of iodide ions exchanged increases from 84.75 % to 90.20 % for Dowex SBR LC resins which was higher than increases from 57.66 % to 62.38 % obtained for Tulsion A23 resins. The identical trend was observed for the two resins during bromide ion-isotopic exchange reaction. The overall results indicate superior performance of Dowex SBR LC over Tulsion A23 resins under identical experimental conditions.

  4. Synthesis, structural characterization, and performance evaluation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) ion-exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubler, T.L.; Franz, J.A.; Shaw, W.J.; Bryan, S.A.; Hallen, R.T.; Brown, G.N.; Bray, L.A.; Linehan, J.C.

    1995-08-01

    The 177 underground storage tanks at the DOE`s Hanford Site contain an estimated 180 million tons of high-level radioactive wastes. It is desirable to remove and concentrate the highly radioactive fraction of the tank wastes for vitrification. Resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resin, an organic ion-exchange resin with high selectivity and capacity for the cesium ion, which is a candidate ion-exchange material for use in remediation of tank wastes. The report includes information on the structure/function analysis of R-F resin and the synthetic factors that affect performance of the resin. CS-100, a commercially available phenol-formaldehyde (P-F) resin, and currently the baseline ion-exchanger for removal of cesium ion at Hanford, is compared with the R-F resin. The primary structural unit of the R-F resin was determined to consist of a 1,2,3,4-tetrasubstituted resorcinol ring unit while CS-100, was composed mainly of a 1,2,4-trisubstituted ring. CS-100 shows the presence of phenoxy-ether groups, and this may account for the much lower decontamination factor of CS-100 for cesium ion. Curing temperatures for the R-F resin were found to be optimal at 105--130C. At lower temperatures, insufficient curing, hence crosslinking, of the polymer resin occurs and selectivity for cesium drops. Curing at elevated temperatures leads to chemical degradation. Optimal particle size for R-F resin is in the range of 20--50 mesh-sized particles. R-F resin undergoes chemical degradation or oxidation which destroys ion-exchange sites. The ion-exchange sites (hydroxyl groups) are converted to quinones and ketones. CS-100, though it has much lower performance for cesium ion-exchange, is significantly more chemically stable than R-F resin. To gamma radiation, CS-100 is more radiolytically stable than R-F resin.

  5. The Use of Dowex-M43 Ion-exchange Resin in the Determination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concentrations of Pd and Pt were determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The results from the analysis of solutions prepared from commercial standards after ion-exchange treatment showed quantitative recoveries of both Pt (97%) and Pd (99%) from Dowex-M43 resin ...

  6. Adsorption of saponin compound in Carica papaya leaves extract using weakly basic ion exchanger resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Noraziani Zainal; Janam, Anathasia; Zubairi, Saiful Irwan

    2016-11-01

    Adsorption of saponin compound in papaya leaves juice extract using Amberlite® IRA-67 resin was not reported in previous studies. In this research, Amberlite® IRA-67 was used to determine the amount of saponin that can be adsorbed using different weights of dry resin (0.1 g and 0.5 g). Peleg model was used to determine the maximum yield of saponin (43.67 mg) and the exhaustive time (5.7 days) prior to a preliminary resin-saponin adsorption study. After adsorption process, there was no significant difference (p>0.05) in total saponin content (mg) for sample treated with 0.1 g (3.79 ± 0.55 mg) and sample treated with 0.5 g (3.43 ± 0.51 mg) dry weight resin. Long-term kinetic adsorption of resin-saponin method (>24 hours) should be conducted to obtain optimum freed saponin extract. Besides that, sample treated with 0.1 g dry weight resin had high free radical scavenging value of 50.33 ± 2.74% compared to sample treated with 0.5 g dry weight resin that had low free radical scavenging value of 24.54 ± 1.66% dry weights. Total saponin content (mg), total phenolic content (mg GAE) and free radical scavenging activity (%) was investigated to determine the interaction of those compounds with Amberlite® IRA-67. The RP-HPLC analysis using ursolic acid as standard at 203 nm showed no peak even though ursolic acid was one of the saponin components that was ubiquitous in plant kingdom. The absence of peak was due to weak solubility of ursolic acid in water and since it was only soluble in solvent with moderate polarity. The Pearson's correlation coefficient for total saponin content (mg) versus total phenolic content (mg GAE) and radical scavenging activity (%) were +0.959 and +0.807. Positive values showed that whenever there was an increase in saponin content (mg), the phenolic content (mg GAE) and radical scavenging activity (%) would also increase. However, as the resin-saponin adsorption was carried out, there was a significant decrease of radical scavenging activity

  7. Surface roughness of composite resins subjected to hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Ana Carolina Cabral; Bohner, Lauren Oliveira Lima; de Godoi, Ana Paula Terossi; Colucci, Vivian; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori; Catirse, Alma Blásida Concepción Elizaur Benitez

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of hydrochloric acid on surface roughness of composite resins subjected to brushing. Sixty samples measuring 2 mm thick x 6 mm diameter were prepared and used as experimental units. The study presented a 3x2 factorial design, in which the factors were composite resin (n=20), at 3 levels: microhybrid composite (Z100), nanofilled composite (FiltekTM Supreme), nanohybrid composite (Ice), and acid challenge (n=10) at 2 levels: absence and presence. Acid challenge was performed by immersion of specimens in hydrochloric acid (pH 1.2) for 1 min, 4 times per day for 7 days. The specimens not subjected to acid challenge were stored in 15 mL of artificial saliva at 37 oC. Afterwards, all specimens were submitted to abrasive challenge by a brushing cycle performed with a 200 g weight at a speed of 356 rpm, totaling 17.8 cycles. Surface roughness measurements (Ra) were performed and analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (p≤0.05). Surface roughness values were higher in the presence (1.07±0.24) as compared with the absence of hydrochloric acid (0.72±0.04). Surface roughness values were higher for microhybrid (1.01±0.27) compared with nanofilled (0.68 ±0.09) and nanohybrid (0.48±0.15) composites when the specimens were not subjects to acid challenge. In the presence of hydrochloric acid, microhybrid (1.26±0.28) and nanofilled (1.18±0,30) composites presents higher surface roughness values compared with nanohybrid (0.77±0.15). The hydrochloric acid affected the surface roughness of composite resin subjected to brushing.

  8. Sulfur geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. III. An anion-exchange resin technique for sampling and preservation of sulfoxyanions in natural waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ball James W

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A sampling protocol for the retention, extraction, and analysis of sulfoxyanions in hydrothermal waters has been developed in the laboratory and tested at Yellowstone National Park and Green Lake, NY. Initial laboratory testing of the anion-exchange resin Bio-Rad™ AG1-X8 indicated that the resin was well suited for the sampling, preservation, and extraction of sulfate and thiosulfate. Synthetic solutions containing sulfate and thiosulfate were passed through AG1-X8 resin columns and eluted with 1 and 3 M KCl, respectively. Recovery ranged from 89 to 100%. Comparison of results for water samples collected from five pools in Yellowstone National Park between on-site IC analysis (U.S. Geological Survey mobile lab and IC analysis of resin-stored sample at SUNY-Stony Brook indicates 96 to 100% agreement for three pools (Cinder, Cistern, and an unnamed pool near Cistern and 76 and 63% agreement for two pools (Sulfur Dust and Frying Pan. Attempts to extract polythionates from the AG1-X8 resin were made using HCl solutions, but were unsuccessful. Bio-Rad™ AG2-X8, an anion-exchange resin with weaker binding sites than the AG1-X8 resin, is better suited for polythionate extraction. Sulfate and thiosulfate extraction with this resin has been accomplished with KCl solutions of 0.1 and 0.5 M, respectively. Trithionate and tetrathionate can be extracted with 4 M KCl. Higher polythionates can be extracted with 9 M hydrochloric acid. Polythionate concentrations can then be determined directly using ion chromatographic methods, and laboratory results indicate recovery of up to 90% for synthetic polythionate solutions using AG2-X8 resin columns.

  9. Sulfur geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. III. An anion-exchange resin technique for sampling and preservation of sulfoxyanions in natural waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druschel, G.K.; Schoonen, M.A.A.; Nordstorm, D.K.; Ball, J.W.; Xu, Y.; Cohn, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    A sampling protocol for the retention, extraction, and analysis of sulfoxyanions in hydrothermal waters has been developed in the laboratory and tested at Yellowstone National Park and Green Lake, NY. Initial laboratory testing of the anion-exchange resin Bio-Rad??? AG1-X8 indicated that the resin was well suited for the sampling, preservation, and extraction of sulfate and thiosulfate. Synthetic solutions containing sulfate and thiosulfate were passed through AG1-X8 resin columns and eluted with 1 and 3 M KCl, respectively. Recovery ranged from 89 to 100%. Comparison of results for water samples collected from five pools in Yellowstone National Park between on-site IC analysis (U.S. Geological Survey mobile lab) and IC analysis of resin-stored sample at SUNY-Stony Brook indicates 96 to 100% agreement for three pools (Cinder, Cistern, and an unnamed pool near Cistern) and 76 and 63% agreement for two pools (Sulfur Dust and Frying Pan). Attempts to extract polythionates from the AG1-X8 resin were made using HCl solutions, but were unsuccessful. Bio-Rad??? AG2-X8, an anion-exchange resin with weaker binding sites than the AG1-X8 resin, is better suited for polythionate extraction. Sulfate and thiosulfate extraction with this resin has been accomplished with KCl solutions of 0.1 and 0.5 M, respectively. Trithionate and tetrathionate can be extracted with 4 M KCl. Higher polythionates can be extracted with 9 M hydrochloric acid. Polythionate concentrations can then be determined directly using ion chromatographic methods, and laboratory results indicate recovery of up to 90% for synthetic polythionate solutions using AG2-X8 resin columns. ?? The Royal Society of Chemistry and the Division of Geochemistry of the American Chemical Society 2003.

  10. Taste masking of ciprofloxacin by ion-exchange resin and sustain release at gastric-intestinal through interpenetrating polymer network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Michael Rajesh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to taste mask ciprofloxacin (CP by using ion-exchange resins (IERs followed by sustain release of CP by forming interpenetrating polymer network (IPN. IERs based on the copolymerization of acrylic acid with different cross linking agents were synthesised. Drug-resin complexes (DRCs with three different ratios of drug to IERs (1:1, 1:2, 1:4 were prepared & evaluated for taste masking by following in vivo and in vitro methods. Human volunteers graded ADC 1:4, acrylic acid-divinyl benzene (ADC-3 resin as tasteless. Characterization studies such as FTIR, SEM, DSC, P-XRD differentiated ADC 1:4, from physical mixture (PM 1:4 and confirmed the formation of complex. In vitro drug release of ADC 1:4 showed complete release of CP within 60 min at simulated gastric fluid (SGF i.e. pH 1.2. IPN beads were prepared with ADC 1:4 by using sodium alginate (AL and sodium alginate-chitosan (AL-CS for sustain release of CP at SGF pH and followed by simulated intestinal fluid (SIF i.e. pH 7.4. FTIR spectra confirmed the formation of IPN beads. The release of CP was sustain at SGF pH (75%. The kinetic model of IPN beads showed the release of CP was non-Fickian diffusion type.

  11. Ion Exchange Modeling Of Cesium Removal From Hanford Waste Using Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleman, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hamm, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Smith, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2007-06-27

    This report discusses the expected performance of spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange resin for the removal of cesium from alkaline Hanford radioactive waste. Predictions of full scale column performance in a carousel mode are made for the Hot Commissioning, Envelope B, and Subsequent Operations waste compositions under nominal operating conditions and for perturbations from the nominal. Only the loading phase of the process cycle is addressed in this report. Pertinent bench-scale column tests, kinetic experiments, and batch equilibrium experiments are used to estimate model parameters and to benchmark the ion-exchange model. The methodology and application presented in this report reflect the expected behavior of spherical RF resin manufactured at the intermediate-scale (i.e., approximately 100 gallon batch size; batch 5E-370/641). It is generally believed that scale-up to production-scale in resin manufacturing will result in similarly behaving resin batches whose chemical selectivity is unaffected while total capacity per gram of resin may vary some. As such, the full-scale facility predictions provided within this report should provide reasonable estimates of production-scale column performance.

  12. Semi-aerobic stabilized landfill leachate treatment by ion exchange resin: isotherm and kinetic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamri, Mohd Faiz Muaz Ahmad; Kamaruddin, Mohamad Anuar; Yusoff, Mohd Suffian; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Foo, Keng Yuen

    2017-05-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the treatability of ion exchange resin (Indion MB 6 SR) for the removal of chromium (VI), aluminium (III), zinc (II), copper (II), iron (II), and phosphate (PO4)3-, chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) and colour from semi-aerobic stabilized leachate by batch test. A range of ion exchange resin dosage was tested towards the removal efficiency of leachate parameters. It was observed that equilibrium data were best represented by the Langmuir model for metal ions and Freundlich was ideally fit for COD, NH3-N and colour. Intra particle diffusion model, pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order isotherm models were found ideally fit with correlation of the experimental data. The findings revealed that the models could describe the ion exchange kinetic behaviour efficiently, which further suggests comprehensive outlook for the future research in this field.

  13. Removal and recovery of vanadium from alkaline steel slag leachates with anion exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Helena I; Jones, Ashley; Rogerson, Mike; Greenway, Gillian M; Lisbona, Diego Fernandez; Burke, Ian T; Mayes, William M

    2017-02-01

    Leachable vanadium (V) from steel production residues poses a potential environmental hazard due to its mobility and toxicity under the highly alkaline pH conditions that characterise these leachates. This work aims to test the efficiency of anion exchange resins for vanadium removal and recovery from steel slag leachates at a representative average pH of 11.5. Kinetic studies were performed to understand the vanadium sorption process. The sorption kinetics were consistent with a pseudo-first order kinetic model. The isotherm data cannot differentiate between the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The maximum adsorption capacity (Langmuir value qmax) was 27 mg V g(-1) resin. In column anion exchange, breakthrough was only 14% of the influent concentration after passing 90 L of steel slag leachate with 2 mg L(-1) V through the column. When eluting the column 57-72% of vanadium was recovered from the resin with 2 M NaOH. Trials on the reuse of the anion exchange resin showed it could be reused 20 times without loss of efficacy, and on average 69% of V was recovered during regeneration. The results document for the first time the use of anion exchange resins to remove vanadium from steel slag leachate. As an environmental contaminant, removal of V from leachates may be an obligation for long-term management requirements of steel slag repositories. Vanadium removal coupled with the recovery can potentially be used to offset long-term legacy treatment costs. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Anion exchange resins for removal of reactive dyes from textile wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcher, Silke; Kornmüller, Anja; Jekel, Martin

    2002-11-01

    Sorption onto an easily regenerable sorbent in fixed bed filters would be an interesting option for removal of reactive dyes from textile wastewaters. A previous screening with model solutions (Dyes Pigm 51 (2001) 111) had shown two anion exchangers (strong basic S6328a and weak basic MP62, both Bayer) to exhibit good sorption characteristics for reactive dyes. The aim of this study was to evaluate these materials more closely. Thus filter breakthrough, the behavior with original wastewater samples, and the effect of inorganic wastewater parameters as well as regeneration were studied. Breakthrough curves for both materials are relatively unfavorable with a flat gradient, but throughput until breakthrough (100-800 bed volumes) should be sufficient for technical use. With both resins dye uptake is influenced little by competition of inorganic anions (sulfate, carbonate, phosphate) and they perform well in original wastewaters. However, the weak basic type is only efficient up to pH 8. Alkaline regeneration works well for MP62, for S6328a acid regeneration works for most dyes.

  15. REAL WASTE TESTING OF SPHERICAL RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

    2009-10-30

    This report presents data on batch contact and column testing tasks for spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin. The testing used a non-radioactive simulant of SRS Tank 2F dissolved salt, as well as an actual radioactive waste sample of similar composition, which are both notably high in sodium (6 M). The resin was Microbeads batch 5E-370/641 which had been made on the hundred gallon scale. Equilibrium batch contact work focused on cesium at a temperature of 25 C due to the lack of such data to better benchmark existing isotherm models. Two campaigns were performed with small-scale ion exchange columns, first with Tank 2F simulant, then with actual dissolved salt in the Shielded Cells. An extrapolation of the batch contact results with radioactive waste over-predicted the cesium loaded onto the IX sRF resin bed by approximately 11%. This difference is not unexpected considering uncertainties from measurement and extrapolation and because the ion exchange that occurs when waste flows through a resin bed probably cannot reach the same level of equilibrium as when waste and resin are joined in a long term batch contact. Resin was also characterized to better understand basic chemistry issues such as holdup of trace transition metals present in the waste feed streams. The column tests involved using two beds of sRF resin in series, with the first bed referred to as the Lead column and the second bed as the Lag column. The test matrix included two complete IX cycles for both the simulant and actual waste phases. A cycle involves cesium adsorption, until the resin in the Lead column reaches saturation, and then regenerating the sRF resin, which includes eluting the cesium. Both the simulated and the actual wastes were treated with two cycles of operation, and the resin beds that were used in the Lead and Lag columns of simulant test phase were regenerated and reused in the actual waste test phase. This task is the first to demonstrate the treatment of SRS waste

  16. The radiolytic and chemical degradation of organic ion exchange resins under alkaline conditions: effect on radionuclide speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loon, L. van; Hummel, W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-10-01

    The formation of water soluble organic ligands by the radiolytic and chemical degradation of several ion exchange resins was investigated under conditions close to those of the near field of a cementitious repository. The most important degradation products were characterised and their role on radionuclide speciation evaluated thoroughly. Irradiation of strong acidic cation exchange resins (Powdex PCH and Lewatite S-100) resulted in the formation of mainly sulphate and dissolved organic carbon. A small part of the carbon (10-20%) could be identified as oxalate. The identity of the remainder is unknown. Complexation studies with Cu{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} showed the presence of two ligands: oxalate and ligand X. Although ligand X could not be identified, it could be characterised by its concentration, a deprotonation constant and a complexation constant for the NiX complex. The influence of oxalate and ligand X on the speciation of radionuclides is examined in detail. For oxalate no significant influence on the speciation of radionuclides is expected. The stronger complexing ligand X may exert some influence depending on its concentration and the values of other parameters. These critical parameters are discussed and limiting values are evaluated. In absence of irradiation, no evidence for the formation of ligands was found. Irradiation of strong basic anion exchange resins (Powdex PAO and Lewatite M-500) resulted in the formation of mainly ammonia, amines and dissolved organic carbon. Up to 50% of the carbon could be identified as methyl-, dimethyl- and trimethylamine. Complexation studies with Eu{sup 3+} showed that the complexing capacity under near field conditions was negligible. The speciation of cations such as Ag, Ni, Cu and Pd can be influenced by the presence of amins. The strongest amine-complexes are formed with Pd and therefore, as an example, the aqueous Pd-ammonia system is examined in great detail. (author) 30 figs., 10 tabs., refs.

  17. Mg/Al double-metal hydroxide regeneration of anion exchange resin by electric field intensification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Li, Zhun; Li, Yansheng; Liu, Zhigang

    2017-03-01

    Fouled anion exchange resins were regenerated by electric field intensification of Mg/Al double-metal hydroxides. Regenerative experiments were performed with varying voltages (10-30 V) and dosages of Mg/Al hydroxides (0.045-0.135 mol and 0.015-0.045 mol, respectively) for 1-5 h. Optimal results were obtained under the following regenerative conditions: 20 V, 4 h, and 0.09/0.03 mol of Mg/Al hydroxides. The maximum regenerative capacity of resins was increased to 41.07%. The regenerative mechanism was presented by Fourier-transform infrared spectrum of resins and Mg/Al hydroxides, and the regenerative degree was analyzed with respect to conductivity, pH value, and electric current. Mg/Al hydroxides were also recycled after the regeneration. This method was proven to be cost-effective and environmentally friendly.

  18. Two solid-phase recycling method for basic ionic liquid [C4mim]Ac by macroporous resin and ion exchange resin from Schisandra chinensis fruits extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chun-hui; Zu, Yuan-gang; Yang, Lei; Li, Jian

    2015-01-22

    In this study, two solid-phase recycling method for basic ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C4mim]Ac) were studied through a digestion extraction system of extracting biphenyl cyclooctene lignans from Schisandra chinensis. The RP-HPLC detection method for [C4mim]Ac was established in order to investigate the recovery efficiency of IL. The recycling method of [C4mim]Ac is divided into two steps, the first step was the separation of lignans from the IL solution containing HPD 5000 macroporous resin, the recovery efficiency and purity of [C4mim]Ac achieved were 97.8% and 67.7%, respectively. This method cannot only separate the lignans from [C4mim]Ac solution, also improve the purity of lignans, the absorption rate of lignans in [C4mim]Ac solution was found to be higher (69.2%) than that in ethanol solution (57.7%). The second step was the purification of [C4mim]Ac by the SK1B strong acid ion exchange resin, an [C4mim]Ac recovery efficiency of 55.9% and the purity higher than 90% were achieved. Additionally, [C4mim]Ac as solvent extraction of lignans from S. chinensis was optimized, the hydrolysis temperature was 90°C and the hydrolysis time was 2h. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A new configuration of membrane stack for retrieval of nickel absorbed in resins*

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xue-Fen; Wu, Zu-cheng

    2005-01-01

    A new configuration integrated ion exchange effect with both electro-migration and electrochemical reaction in a single cell was developed to effectively retrieve metal ions from simulated wastewater using ion exchange resins without additive chemicals. By simply assembling cation exchange resins and anion exchange resins separated by homogeneous membranes, we found that the system will always be acidic in the concentrate compartment so that ion exchange resins could be in-situ regenerated wi...

  20. Isolation of lactoperoxidase using different cation exchange resins by batch and column procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fweja, Leonard Wt; Lewis, Michael J; Grandison, Alistair S

    2010-08-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LP) was isolated from whey protein by cation-exchange using Carboxymethyl resin (CM-25C) and Sulphopropyl Toyopearl resin (SP-650C). Both batch and column procedures were employed and the adsorption capacities and extraction efficiencies were compared. The resin bed volume to whey volume ratios were 0.96:1.0 for CM-25C and 0.64:1.0 for SP-650 indicating higher adsorption capacity of SP-650 compared with CM-25C. The effluent LP activity depended on both the enzyme activity in the whey and the amount of whey loaded on the column within the saturation limits of the resin. The percentage recovery was high below the saturation point and fell off rapidly with over-saturation. While effective recovery was achieved with column extraction procedures, the recovery was poor in batch procedures. The whey-resin contact time had little impact on the enzyme adsorption. SDS PAGE and HPLC analyses were also carried out, the purity was examined and the proteins characterised in terms of molecular weights. Reversed phase HPLC provided clear distinction of the LP and lactoferrin (LF) peaks. The enzyme purity was higher in column effluents compared with batch effluents, judged on the basis of the clarity of the gel bands and the resolved peaks in HPLC chromatograms.

  1. Retention of iron and chromium by an anion-exchange resin under decontamination conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corti, H.R. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dept. de Quimica de Reactores; Gomez, D.G. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dept. de Quimica de Reactores; De Blanco, E.K. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dept. de Quimica de Reactores; Rebagliati, R.A.J. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dept. de Quimica de Reactores; Schulman, P. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dept. de Quimica de Reactores

    1996-04-01

    The retention of iron and chromium ions on a strong base anion exchange resin (Lewatit M500 KR) in oxalic solution was studied by means of batch and column experiments. The tests performed indicate that more than 99% of the iron is uptaken by the resin, while chromium retention depends on the formation rate of the tri-oxalate complex. The experimental conditions required to improve chromium retention, such as temperature, pH, aging time, etc., were investigated and their consequences on the practical decontamination process are discussed. The available thermodynamic information for Fe(III) and Cr(III) oxalate complexes was reviewed and extended in order to determine the speciation in aqueous solutions in the range from 25 to 100 C. That information would help in searching for the optimal experimental conditions for ion exchange removal of these ions. (orig.).

  2. Ion exchange properties of humus acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoba, V. N.; Chudnenko, K. V.

    2014-08-01

    Ion exchange equilibriums in a complex of brown humic acids (HAs) and related fulvic acids (FAs) with cations (H+, K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, Cu2+, Fe3+, and Al3+) have been studied, and the activity coefficients of the acid monoionic forms have been determined. The composition of the stoichiometric cell in the system of black and brown HAs and related FAs in a leached chernozem of the Ob' region has been calculated with consideration for the earlier studies of the ion exchange properties of black HAs and related FAs. It has been shown that hydrogen, calcium, magnesium, aluminum, and iron are the major components in the exchange complex of humus acids in the leached chernozem with the other cations being of subordinate importance. In spite of some differences between the analytical and calculated compositions of the humus acids, the results of the calculations can be considered satisfactory. They indicate that calculations are feasible for such complex objects as soils, and their accuracy will improve with the expansion of the experimental studies. The physicochemical simulation of the transformation of the humus acid composition under different acid-base conditions shows that the contents of most cations decrease under alkalization, and hydroxides or carbonates become the most stable forms of these cations. Under the acidification of solutions, the binding of alkaline and alkaline-earth elements by humus acids decreases and the adsorption of iron and aluminum by humus acids increases.

  3. Use of Anion Exchange Resins for One-Step Processing of Algae from Harvest to Biofuel

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica Jones; Cheng-Han Lee; James Wang; Martin Poenie

    2012-01-01

    Some microalgae are particularly attractive as a renewable feedstock for biodiesel production due to their rapid growth, high content of triacylglycerols, and ability to be grown on non-arable land. Unfortunately, obtaining oil from algae is currently cost prohibitive in part due to the need to pump and process large volumes of dilute algal suspensions. In an effort to circumvent this problem, we have explored the use of anion exchange resins for simplifying the processing of algae to biofuel...

  4. Preliminary flowsheet: Ion exchange process for the separation of cesium from Hanford tank waste using Duolite{trademark} CS-100 resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eager, K.M.; Penwell, D.L.; Knutson, B.J.

    1994-12-01

    This preliminary flowsheet document describes an ion exchange process which uses Duolite{trademark} CS-100 resin to remove cesium from Hanford Tank waste. The flowsheet describes one possible equipment configuration, and contains mass balances based on that configuration with feeds of Neutralized Current Acid Waste, and Double Shell Slurry Feed. Process alternatives, unresolved issues, and development needs are discussed which relate to the process.

  5. LAB STUDY ON REGENERATION OF SPENT DOWEX 21K 16-20 MESH ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUNCAN, J.B.

    2007-01-24

    Currently the effort to remove chromate from groundwater in the 100K and 100H Areas uses DOWEX 21K 16-20. This report addresses the procedure and results of a laboratory study for regeneration of the spent resin by sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid, or sodium sulfate to determine if onsite regeneration by the Effluent Treatment Facility is a feasible option.

  6. Sorption of micropollutant estrone to a water treatment ion exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Peta A; Mastrup, Maibritt; Borgmann, Thomas; Schäfer, Andrea I

    2010-01-01

    Micropollutants occur in natural waters from a range of sources. Estrogenic compounds are naturally excreted by humans and hence stem predominantly from wastewater effluents. Due to their small molecular weight and concentration their effective control is a challenge. In this study magnetic ion exchange (MIEX), which was developed to remove natural organic matter (NOM) from surface water, was investigated for such a micropollutant, estrone. The interaction of estrone with the resin occurs as a side effect when NOM is removed. This interaction results in some degree of removal. However, the accumulation of those hazardous materials on the resin, which can be associated with accidental release, as well as the concentration in the regeneration brine of the process, is environmentally more significant. For this reason a thorough investigation of interaction phenomena was undertaken. Estrone and polymeric materials (such as ion exchange resins or membranes) interact through a number of mechanisms including specific and non-specific interactions. Sorption and desorption of estrone were studied as a function of pH, temperature, natural organic matter concentration, sulfate concentration and ionic strength to elucidate possible mechanisms. The results demonstrated that the resin removed around 70% estrone at high pH conditions (>10.4) when estrone was predominantly negatively charged. However, below pH 10.4, when estrone was neutral, approximately 40% of estrone still sorbed due to hydrogen bonding. The optimum temperature for estrone sorption was observed to be in the 15 to 35 degrees C range, while the presence of other anions, including natural organic matter reduced estrone removal due to competition for anion exchange sites. Desorption of estrone was most effective with 2 M NaCl regeneration brine concentration when estrone was negatively charged (98% desorption). However, when estrone was neutral there was no significant difference between 1 M and 2 M NaCl. The

  7. The impact of loading approach and biological activity on NOM removal by ion exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Joerg; Wray, Heather E; Schulz, Martin; Vortisch, Roman; Barbeau, Benoit; Bérubé, Pierre R

    2018-02-09

    The present study investigated the impact of different loading approaches and microbial activity on the Natural Organic Matter (NOM) removal efficiency and capacity of ion exchange resins. Gaining further knowledge on the impact of loading approaches is of relevance because laboratory-scale multiple loading tests (MLTs) have been introduced as a simpler and faster alternative to column tests for predicting the performance of IEX, but only anecdotal evidence exists to support their ability to forecast contaminant removal and runtime until breakthrough of IEX systems. The overall trends observed for the removal and the time to breakthrough of organic material estimated using MLTs differed from those estimated using column tests. The results nonetheless suggest that MLTs could best be used as an effective tool to screen different ion exchange resins in terms of their ability to remove various contaminants of interest from different raw waters. The microbial activity was also observed to impact the removal and time to breakthrough. In the absence of regeneration, a microbial community rapidly established itself in ion exchange columns and contributed to the removal of organic material. Biological ion exchange (BIEX) removed more organic material and enabled operation beyond the point when the resin capacity would have otherwise been exhausted using conventional (i.e. in the absence of a microbial community) ion exchange. Furthermore, significantly greater removal of organic matter could be achieved with BIEX than biological activated carbon (BAC) (i.e. 56 ± 7% vs. 15 ± 5%, respectively) when operated at similar loading rates. The results suggest that for some raw waters, BIEX could replace BAC as the technology of choice for the removal of organic material. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Adsorption Properties of Ni(II by D301R Anion Exchange Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Xiuling

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of Ni(II with D301R resin was investigated in this paper. The results showed that the saturated extent of adsorption Ni(II by the resin was 84.3 mg/g. The equilibrium data of Ni(II sorption was better described by Langmuir isotherm model (r2=0.994 while that of Ni(II sorption also fitted in Freundlich isotherm model within the experimental concentration range. The amount of the constant (q0 of Ni(II under 298 K in Langmuir model was 76.92 mg/g, which was close to the experimental results. The constant n was within 2–10 in Freundlich model; it was shown that adsorption of Ni(II by the resin was easy to take place. The uptake kinetics followed the Lagergren pseudo-first-order rate equation (r2=0.9813. The particle diffusion controlled the adsorption process of Ni(II. The coefficient of the intraparticle diffusion increased with the increase of the pH values and the concentration of Ni(II in aqueous solution. There was a drop of 20.1 cm−1 for the bending vibration frequency of N–H bond. Results showed that the adsorption of Ni(II by D301R anion exchange resin was the surface complexation through the infrared spectrum analysis.

  9. Releasing Pattern of Applied Phosphorus and Distribution Change of Phosphorus Fractions in the Acid Upland Soils with Successive Resin Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arief Hartono

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The releasing pattern of applied P in the acid upland soils and the soil properties influencing the pattern were studied. Surface horizons of six acid upland soils from Sumatra, Java and Kalimantan were used in this study. The releasing pattern of applied P (300 mg P kg-1 of these soils were studied by successive resin extraction. P fractionation was conducted to evaluate which fractions released P to the soil solution after successive resin extraction. The cumulative of resin-Pinorganic (Pi release of soils was fitted to the first order kinetic. Regression analyses using factor scores obtained from the previous principal components analyses was applied to determine soil properties influencing P releasing pattern. The results suggested that the maximum P release was significantly (P < 0.05 increased by acidity plus 1.4 nm mineral-related factor (PC2 i.e. exchangeable Al and 1.4 nm minerals (smectite and vermiculite and decreased by oxide related factor (PC1 i.e. aluminum (Al plus 1/2 iron (Fe (by ammonium oxalate, crystalline Al and Fe oxides, cation exchange capacity, and clay content. P fractionation analysis after successive resin extraction showed that both labile and less labile in the form of NaHCO3-Pi and NaOH-Pi fractions, respectively, can be transformed into resin-Pi when in the most labile resin-Pi is depleted. Most of P released in high oxides soils were from NaOH-Pi fraction while in low oxides soils were from NaHCO3-Pi. P release from the former fraction resulted in the maximum P release lower than that of the latter one. When NaHCO3-Pi was high, NaOH-Pi was relatively more stable than NaHCO3-Pi despite resin-Pi removal. NaHCO3-Pi and NaOH-Pi are very important P fractions in replenishing resin-Pi in these acid upland soils.

  10. An eco-friendly synthesis, characterization, morphology and ion exchange properties of terpolymer resin derived from p-hydroxybenzaldehyde

    OpenAIRE

    Patle, Deepti B.; Gurnule, Wasudeo B.

    2016-01-01

    A novel chelating terpolymer resin has been synthesized through the terpolymerization of p-hydroxybenzaldehyde and biuret with formaldehyde (p-HBBF) in 1:1:2 mol ratio using hydrochloric acid as a reaction medium by condensation technique. The synthesized terpolymer resin was characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. On basis of the spectral studies, the structure of the terpolymer resin was proposed. The physico-chemical parameters have been evaluated for th...

  11. The elution of metal cyanocomplexes from polyacrylic - and polystyrene- based ion exchange resins using nitrate and thiocyanate eluants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Riani

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Ion exchange resins can potentially be applied in cyanide recycling to address growing environmental concerns over the use of cyanide during gold extraction. In the present work the elution of copper-, iron-, and zinc-cyanocomplexes from polyacrylic- and polystyrene-based resins was studied. It was found that iron and copper cyanides are easily eluted from polyacrylic- and polystyrene-based ion exchange resins using either SCN- or NO3-. However, elution of the zinc cyanide complex from polystyrene-based resins was poor when using nitrate solution as eluant. Besides, an increase in elution temperature from 25 °C to 50 °C improved the elution of iron and zinc cyanides from polystyrene-based resins using a nitrate eluant; however temperature did not have any significant effect on other metal cyanocomplexes or for elution using thiocyanate. It was therefore proposed that the optimal combination of resin-eluant was site-specific, and depends on the features of the effluent, processing temperature, eluant concentration, and ion exchange resin under consideration.

  12. Effect of blastfurnace slag addition to Portland cement for cationic exchange resins encapsulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan L.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the nuclear industry, cement-based materials are extensively used to encapsulate spent ion exchange resins (IERs before their final disposal in a repository. It is well known that the cement has to be carefully selected to prevent any deleterious expansion of the solidified waste form, but the reasons for this possible expansion are not clearly established. This work aims at filling the gap. The swelling pressure of IERs is first investigated as a function of ions exchange and ionic strength. It is shown that pressures of a few tenths of MPa can be produced by decreases in the ionic strength of the bulk solution, or by ion exchanges (2Na+ instead of Ca2+, Na+ instead of K+. Then, the chemical evolution of cationic resins initially in the Na+ form is characterized in CEM I (Portland cement and CEM III (Portland cement + blastfurnace slag cements at early age and an explanation is proposed for the better stability of CEM III material.

  13. Advanced treatment of textile dyeing secondary effluent using magnetic anion exchange resin and its effect on organic fouling in subsequent RO membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng; Li, Li; Shi, Jialu; Long, Chao; Li, Aimin

    2015-03-02

    Strict regulations are forcing dyeing factory to upgrade existing waste treatment system. In this study, advanced treatment of dyeing secondary effluent by magnetic anion exchange resin (NDMP) was investigated and compared with ultrafiltration (UF); NDMP as a pre-treatment of reverse osmosis (RO) was also studied. NDMP resin (20 mL/L) gave higher removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (83.9%) and colority (94.9%) than UF with a cut-off of 10 kDa (only 48.6% and 44.1%, respectively), showing that NDMP treatment was effective to meet the stringent discharge limit of DOC and colority. Besides, NDMP resin (20 mL/L) as a pretreatment of RO increased the permeate flux by 12.5% and reduced irreversible membrane fouling by 6.6%, but UF pretreatment did not mitigate RO membrane fouling. The results of excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectra and resin fractions showed that NDMP had more efficient removal than UF for transphilic acid and hydrophilic fraction, such as protein-like organic matters and soluble microbial products, which contributed to a significant proportion of RO membrane fouling. In sum, NDMP resin treatment not only gave effective removal of DOC and colority of dyeing secondary effluent, but exhibited some improvement for RO membrane flux and irreversible fouling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Activity of some disiloxanes toward the cation exchange resin-catalyst in the siloxane equilibration reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. GOVEDARICA

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The relative activities of four disiloxanes toward the cation exchange resin, which was used as an equilibration catalyst, were determined in such a way that the equilibrium initially present in an arbitrary chosen equilibrate was disturbed by adding the respective disiloxanes to it, and then by recording the viscosity of the equilibrating mixtures as a function of reaction time. As a result, a set of different viscosity-reaction time relationships was obtained, which implies different activities of disiloxanes toward the catalyst. In this way the following decreasing order of acitivites was established: 1,3-tetramethyldisiloxane > 1,3-divinyltetramethyldisiloxane > hexamethyldisiloxane > 1,3-bis(3-carboxypropyltetramethyldisiloxane.

  15. Kinetics of transesterification of methyl acetate and n-octanol catalyzed by cation exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yong; Gao, Li; Li, Xiying; Mao, Liqun [Henan University, Kaifeng (China); Wei, Min [Henan University of Technology, Zhengzhou (China)

    2013-05-15

    The transesterification kinetics of methyl acetate with n-octanol to octyl acetate and methanol were studied using Amberlyst 15 as catalyst in a batch stirred reactor. The influence of the agitation speed, particle size, temperature, catalyst loading, and initial reactants molar ratio was investigated in detail. A pseudo-homogeneous (PH) kinetic model was applied to correlate the experimental data in the temperature range of 313.15 K to 328.15 K. The estimated kinetic parameters made the calculated results in good agreement with the experimental data. A kinetic model describing the transesterification reaction catalyzed by cation exchange resins was developed.

  16. Sanitation of old deposits of tar, acid resin and oil sludge. International exchange of experiences on projects of sanitation; Sanierung von Teer-, Saeureharz- und Oelschlamm-Altablagerungen. Internationaler Erfahrungsaustausch zu Sanierungsprojekten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruss, Ditmar; Hoger, Matthias

    2010-03-15

    The sanitation of old deposits within the range of the mineral oil industry and coal gasification still is a main problem in many countries. Apart from the financial conditions, the sanitation requires technologically developed and economic technologies. Therefore, the companies Baufeld Umwelt Engineering GmbH (Munich, Federal Republic of Germany) and MUEG Mitteldeutsche Umwelt- und Entsorgung GmbH (Braunsbedra, Federal Republic of Germany) organized an international Workshop in Chemnitz (Federal Republic of Germany) in order to exchange experiences on the basis of progresses in sanitation of projects which actually are treated.

  17. Role of metal ion incorporation in ion exchange resin on the selectivity of fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Natrayasamy [Department of Chemistry, Gandhigram Rural University, Gandhigram 624302, Tamilnadu (India)], E-mail: natrayasamy_viswanathan@rediffmail.com; Meenakshi, S. [Department of Chemistry, Gandhigram Rural University, Gandhigram 624302, Tamilnadu (India)], E-mail: drs_meena@rediffmail.com

    2009-03-15

    Indion FR 10 resin has sulphonic acid functional group (H{sup +} form) possesses appreciable defluoridation capacity (DC) and its DC has been enhanced by chemical modification into Na{sup +} and Al{sup 3+} forms by loading respective metal ions in H{sup +} form of resin. The DCs of Na{sup +} and Al{sup 3+} forms were found to be 445 and 478 mg F{sup -}/kg, respectively, whereas the DC of H{sup +} form is 265 mg F{sup (}/kg at 10 mg/L initial fluoride concentration. The nature and morphology of sorbents are characterized using FTIR and SEM analysis. The fluoride sorption was explained using the Freundlich, Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson isotherms and kinetic models. The calculated thermodynamic parameters such as {delta}G{sup o}, {delta}H{sup o}, {delta}S{sup o} and sticking probability (S{sup *}) explains the nature of sorption. Comparison was also made by the elution capacity of these resins in order to select a cost effective material. A field trial was carried out to test the suitability of the resins with fluoride water collected from a nearby fluoride-endemic area.

  18. Dissolved organic matter removal using magnetic anion exchange resin treatment on biological effluent of textile dyeing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jun; Li, Haibo; Shuang, Chendong; Li, Wentao; Li, Aimin

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the removal of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from real dyeing bio-treatment effluents (DBEs) with the use of a novel magnetic anion exchange resin (NDMP). DOMs in two typical DBEs were fractionized using DAX-8/XAD-4 resin and ultrafiltration membranes. The hydrophilic fractions and the low molecular weight (MW) (50%) of DOMs for the two effluents. The hydrophilic and low MW fractions of both effluents were the greatest contributors of specific UV254 absorbance (SUVA254), and the SUVA254 of DOM fractions decreased with hydrophobicity and MW. Two DBEs exhibited acute and chronic biotoxicities. Both acute and chronic toxicities of DOM fractions increased linearly with the increase of SUVA254 value. Kinetics of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal via NDMP treatment was performed by comparing it with that of particle active carbon (PAC). Results indicated that the removal of DOC from DBEs via NDMP was 60%, whereas DOC removals by PAC were lower than 15%. Acidic organics could be significantly removed with the use of NDMP. DOM with large MW in DBE could be removed significantly by using the same means. Removal efficiency of NDMP for DOM decreased with the decrease of MW. Compared with PAC, NDMP could significantly reduce the acute and chronic bio-toxicities of DBEs. NaCl/NaOH mixture regenerants, with selected concentrations of 10% NaCl (m/m)/1% NaOH (m/m), could improve desorption efficiency. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Preliminary Ion Exchange Modeling for Removal of Cesium from Hanford Waste Using SuperLig 644 Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamm, L.L.

    2000-08-23

    A proposed facility is being designed for the immobilization of Hanford high-level radioactive waste. One unit process in the facility is designed to remove radioactive cesium by ion-exchange from the strongly alkaline aqueous phase. A resin specifically designed with high selectivity of cesium under alkaline conditions is being investigated. The resin also is elutable under more acidic conditions. The proposed design of the facility consists of two sets of two packed columns placed in series (i.e., a lead column followed by a lag (guard) column configuration). During operation, upon reaching a specified cesium concentration criterion at the exit of the lag column, operation is switched to the second set of lead and lag columns. The cesium-loaded lead column is processed (i.e., washed and eluted) and switched to the lag position. the previous lag column is then placed in the lead position (without eluting) and the system is ready for use in the next cycle. For a well designed process, the loading and elution processes result in significant volume reductions in aqueous high-level waste.

  20. Protection of live bacteria from bile acid toxicity using bile acid adsorbing resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Alexander D; Slater, Nigel K H

    2009-06-12

    We previously demonstrated that a dry, room temperature stable formulation of a live bacterial vaccine was highly susceptible to bile, and suggested that this will lead to significant loss of viability of any live bacterial formulation released into the intestine using an enteric coating or capsule. We found that bile and acid tolerance is very rapidly recovered after rehydration with buffer or water, raising the possibility that rehydration in the absence of bile prior to release into the intestine might solve the problem of bile toxicity to dried cells. We describe here a novel formulation that combines extensively studied bile acid adsorbent resins with the dried bacteria, to temporarily adsorb bile acids and allow rehydration and recovery of bile resistance of bacteria in the intestine before release. Tablets containing the bile acid adsorbent cholestyramine release 250-fold more live bacteria when dissolved in a bile solution, compared to control tablets without cholestyramine or with a control resin that does not bind bile acids. We propose that a simple enteric coated oral dosage form containing bile acid adsorbent resins will allow improved live bacterial delivery to the intestine via the oral route, a major step towards room temperature stable, easily administered and distributed vaccine pills and other bacterial therapeutics.

  1. Removal of both N-nitrosodimethylamine and trihalomethanes precursors in a single treatment using ion exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beita-Sandí, Wilson; Karanfil, Tanju

    2017-11-01

    Drinking water utilities are relying more than ever on water sources impacted by wastewater effluents. Disinfection/oxidation of these waters during water treatment may lead to the formation of several disinfection by-products, including the probable human carcinogen N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and the regulated trihalomethanes (THMs). In this study, the potential of ion exchange resins to control both NDMA and THMs precursors in a single treatment is presented. Two ion exchange resins were examined, a cation exchange resin (Plus) to target NDMA precursors and an anion exchange resin (MIEX) for THMs precursors control. We applied the resins, individually and combined, in the treatment of surface and wastewater effluent samples. The treatment with both resins removed simultaneously NDMA (43-85%) and THMs (39-65%) precursors. However, no removal of NDMA precursors was observed in the surface water with low initial NDMA FP (14 ng/L). The removals of NDMA FP and THMs FP with Plus and MIEX resins applied alone were (49-90%) and (41-69%), respectively. These results suggest no interaction between the resins, and thus the feasibility of effectively controlling NDMA and THMs precursors concomitantly. Additionally, the effects of the wastewater impact and the natural attenuation of precursors were studied. The results showed that neither the wastewater content nor the attenuation of the precursor affected the removals of NDMA and THMs precursors. Finally, experiments using a wastewater effluent sample showed that an increase in the calcium concentration resulted in a reduction in the removal of NDMA precursors of about 50%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Improved recovery of trace amounts of gold (III), palladium (II) and platinum (IV) from large amounts of associated base metals using anion-exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, I; Takeda, Y; Ishida, K

    2000-02-01

    The adsorption and desorption behaviors of gold (III), palladium (II) and platinum (IV) were surveyed in column chromatographic systems consisting of one of the conventional anion-exchange resins of large ion-exchange capacity and dilute thiourea solutions. The noble metals were strongly adsorbed on the anion-exchange resins from dilute hydrochloric acid, while most base metals did not show any marked adsorbability. These facts made it possible to separate the noble metals from a large quantity of base metals such as Ag (I), Al (III), Co (II), Cu (II), Fe (III), Mn (II), Ni (II), Pb (II), and Zn (II). Although it used to be very difficult to desorb the noble metals from the resins used, the difficulty was easily overcome by use of dilute thiourea solutions as an eluant. In the present study, as little as 1.00 microg of the respective noble metals was quantitatively separated and recovered from as much as ca. 10 mg of a number of metals on a small column by elution with a small amount of dilute thiourea solution. The present systems should be applicable to the separation, concentration and recovery of traces of the noble metals from a number of base metals coexisting in a more extended range of amounts and ratios.

  3. Modeling Breakthrough Curves of Citric Acid Adsorption onto Anionic Resins in an Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrabali Ghorbanian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breakthrough curves for citric acid adsorption from aqueous solution onto ion-exchange resin at 20, 35, and 55°C have been investigated. To predict breakthrough curves, three mathematical models have been analyzed based on the values of the least square method parameters, Durbin-Watson test, and mean relative percent error and, finally, appropriate models have been achieved. Models are in good agreement with experimental data based on the results. To examine models reliabilities and accuracy, models have been compared by various breakthrough curve data obtained by other investigators. The results show appropriate agreement and in some cases regression errors have been reduced to less than 1.0 percent.

  4. The efficiency of macroporous polystyrene ion-exchange resins in natural organic matter removal from surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanowska, Agnieszka; Kabsch-Korbutowicz, Małgorzata

    2017-11-01

    Natural water sources used for water treatment contains various organic and inorganic compounds. Surface waters are commonly contaminated with natural organic matter (NOM). NOM removal from water is important e.g. due to lowering the risk of disinfection by-product formation during chlorination. Ion exchange with the use of synthetic ion-exchange resins is an alternative process to typical NOM removal approach (e.g. coagulation, adsorption or oxidation) as most NOM compounds have anionic character. Moreover, neutral fraction could be removed from water due to its adsorption on resin surface. In this study, applicability of two macroporous, polystyrene ion exchange resins (BD400FD and A100) in NOM removal from water was assessed including comparison of treatment efficiency in various process set-ups and conditions. Moreover, resin regeneration effectivity was determined. Obtained results shown that examined resins could be applied in NOM removal and it should be noticed that column set-up yielded better results (contrary to batch set-up). Among the examined resins A100 one possessed better properties. It was determined that increase of solution pH resulted in a slight decrease in treatment efficiency while higher temperature improved it. It was also observed that regeneration efficiency was comparable in both tested methods but batch set-up required less reagents.

  5. The efficiency of macroporous polystyrene ion-exchange resins in natural organic matter removal from surface water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbanowska Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural water sources used for water treatment contains various organic and inorganic compounds. Surface waters are commonly contaminated with natural organic matter (NOM. NOM removal from water is important e.g. due to lowering the risk of disinfection by-product formation during chlorination. Ion exchange with the use of synthetic ion-exchange resins is an alternative process to typical NOM removal approach (e.g. coagulation, adsorption or oxidation as most NOM compounds have anionic character. Moreover, neutral fraction could be removed from water due to its adsorption on resin surface. In this study, applicability of two macroporous, polystyrene ion exchange resins (BD400FD and A100 in NOM removal from water was assessed including comparison of treatment efficiency in various process set-ups and conditions. Moreover, resin regeneration effectivity was determined. Obtained results shown that examined resins could be applied in NOM removal and it should be noticed that column set-up yielded better results (contrary to batch set-up. Among the examined resins A100 one possessed better properties. It was determined that increase of solution pH resulted in a slight decrease in treatment efficiency while higher temperature improved it. It was also observed that regeneration efficiency was comparable in both tested methods but batch set-up required less reagents.

  6. Microbial desalination cells packed with ion-exchange resin to enhance water desalination rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Alexandre; Zuo, Kuichang; Xia, Xue; Wei, Jincheng; Luo, Xi; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia

    2012-08-01

    A novel configuration of microbial desalination cell (MDC) packed with ion-exchange resin (R-MDC) was proposed to enhance water desalination rate. Compared with classic MDC (C-MDC), an obvious increase in desalination rate (DR) was obtained by R-MDC. With relatively low concentration (10-2 g/L NaCl) influents, the DR values of R-MDC were about 1.5-8 times those of C-MDC. Ion-exchange resins packed in the desalination chamber worked as conductor and thus counteracted the increase in ohmic resistance during treatment of low concentration salt water. Ohmic resistances of R-MDC stabilized at 3.0-4.7 Ω. By contrast, the ohmic resistances of C-MDC ranged from 5.5 to 12.7 Ω, which were 55-272% higher than those of R-MDC. Remarkable improvement in desalination rate helped improve charge efficiency for desalination in R-MDC. The results first showed the potential of R-MDC in the desalination of water with low salinity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Throughfall Collection Method Using Mixed Bed Ion Exchange Resin Columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. Fenn

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of ionic deposition in throughfall is a widely used method for measuring deposition inputs to the forest floor. Many studies have been published, providing a large database of throughfall deposition inputs to forests. However, throughfall collection and analysis is labor intensive and expensive because of the large number of replicate collectors needed and because sample collection and chemical analyses are required on a stochastic precipitation event-based schedule. Therefore we developed and tested a throughfall collector system using a mixed bed ion exchange resin column. We anticipate that this method will typically require only one to three samplings per year. With this method, bulk deposition and bulk throughfall are collected by a funnel or snow tube and ions are retained as the solution percolates through the resin column. Ions retained by the resin are then extracted in the same column with 2N KCl and analyzed for nitrate and ammonium. Deposition values in throughfall from conventional throughfall solution collectors and colocated ion exchange samplers were not significantly different during consecutive 3- and 4-month exposure periods at a high (Camp Paivika; >35 kg N ha-1 year-1 and a low deposition (Barton Flats; 5–9 kg N ha-1 year-1 site in the San Bernardino Mountains in southern California. N deposition in throughfall under mature pine trees at Camp Paivika after 7 months of exposure was extremely high (87 and 92 kg ha-1 based on the two collector types compared to Barton Flats (11 and 13 kg ha-1. A large proportion of the N deposited in throughfall at Camp Paivika occurred as fog drip, demonstrating the importance of fog deposition as an input source of N at this site. By comparison, bulk deposition rates in open areas were 5.1 and 5.4 kg ha-1 at Camp Paivika based on the two collector types, and 1.9 and 3.0 kg ha-1 at Barton Flats.

  8. Development of a treatment process for the removal of heavy metals from raw water for drinking water supply using chelating ion exchange resins. Subproject 1. Final report; Entwicklung der Verfahrenstechnik zur Eliminierung von Schwermetallen aus Rohwaessern zur Trinkwassergewinnung mit chelatbildenden Kationenaustauscherharzen zur technischen Reife. Teilprojekt 1. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overath, H.; Stetter, D.; Doerdelmann, O.

    2002-07-01

    Chelating cation exchange resins with iminodiacetic acid group (Lewatit TP 207 and Amberlite IRC 748) were tested for the removal of heavy metals in a drinking water treatment plant. The pilot scale filtration experiments were conducted by varying the operating conditions, such as flow rate and feed concentrations. Heavy metal concentrations (nickel, lead, cadmium, zinc) in the feed were adjusted between 20 and 200 {mu}g/L. Different methods for regeneration and conditioning of the resins were developed and investigated. Finally the ion exchange resins were tested according to German health regulations for ion exchangers in drinking water treatment. (orig.)

  9. Biodiesel production from yellow horn (Xanthoceras sorbifolia Bunge.) seed oil using ion exchange resin as heterogeneous catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji; Fu, Yu-Jie; Qu, Xue-Jin; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Zhao, Chun-Jian; Zu, Yuan-Gang

    2012-03-01

    In this study, biodiesel production from yellow horn (Xanthoceras sorbifolia Bunge.) seed oil using ion exchange resin as heterogeneous catalyst was investigated. After illustration of the mechanisms of transesterification reactions catalyzed by typical ion exchange resins, the factors affecting microwave-assisted transesterification process were studied. A high conversion yield of about 96% was achieved under optimal conditions using high alkaline anion exchange resins as catalyst. Analyzing the FAMEs composition by GC-MS and main physical-chemical properties demonstrated that the biodiesel product prepared from yellow horn seed oil was of high quality. Compared with conventional alkali catalyst, the outstanding characteristics of reusability and operational stability made the resin catalyst more predominant for biodiesel production. In addition, a comprehensive kinetic model was established for analyzing the reaction. The results of present research showed that microwave-assisted transesterification process catalyzed by high alkaline anion exchange resin was a green, effective and economic technology for biodiesel industry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. REMOVAL OF CESIUM FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE WITH SPHERICAL RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN EXPERIMENTAL TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, M.; Nash, C.

    2010-03-31

    A principal goal at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is to safely dispose of the large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal. The spherical form of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) is being evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake waste at SRS, which is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. The sRF performance with SRS waste was evaluated in two phases: resin batch contacts and IX column testing with both simulated and actual dissolved salt waste. The tests, equipment, and results are discussed.

  11. Guidelines for selecting weak-base versus strong-base anion-exchange resins for the recovery of chromate from cooling tower blowdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, J.; Reed, L.W.

    1980-01-01

    Guidelines for selecting weak-base versus strong-base anion-exchange resins for the recovery of chromate from cooling tower blowdown are given, together with actual operating data on large-scale industrial systems based on strong-base anion-exchange resins, data from a similar pilot system based on weak-base anion resin, and the chemical costs for operating both systems for a cooling tower blowdown containing 2500 ppm total dissolved solids and 20 ppm chromata.

  12. Development of melamine modified urea formaldehyde resins based o nstrong acidic pH catalyzed urea formaldehyde polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung-Yun Hse

    2009-01-01

    To upgrade the performance of urea-formaldehyde (UF) resin bonded particleboards, melamine modified urea-formaldehyde (MUF) resins based on strong acidic pH catalyzed UF polymers were investigated. The study was conducted in a series of two experiments: 1) formulation of MUF resins based on a UF polymer catalyzed with strong acidic pH and 2) determination of the...

  13. Enzymatic fatty acid exchange in digalactosyldiacylglycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, M; Svensson, I; Adlercreutz, P

    2000-01-01

    Six different lipases were screened for their ability of acidolysis between digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) and heptadecanoic acid in toluene. Lipases from Geotrichum candidum, Alcaligenes sp. and Penicillium camembertii did not catalyse the acidolysis reaction. Rhizopus arrhizus and Rhizomucor miehei (Lipozyme) catalysed the acidolysis but produced a mixture of DGMG, DGDG, acyl-DGMG and acyl-DGDG. The extra acyl group is bound to the primary hydroxyl of the digalactosyl moiety. Candida antarctica also catalysed the acidolysis but the TLC analysis showed bands with higher Rf values than acyl-DGDG, these probably being different tetra and higher esters. R. arrhizus lipase was the most promising enzyme under the conditions used, with no tetra esters being formed and giving the highest reaction rate of the enzymes investigated. Low water activity (0.06 or 0.11) and high fatty acid concentration (400 mM) increased the formation of acyl-DGDG whilst higher water activities (0.33 and 0.54) increased the amount of DGMG when R. arrhizus lipase was used as catalyst. At a water activity of 0.11 and a fatty acid concentration of 400 mM a yield of 24% modified DGDG was obtained. In this product the fatty acid originally present in the sn-1 position had been exchanged by heptadecanoic acid.

  14. EPICOR-II: a field leaching test of solidified radioactively loaded ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, E.C.; Marshall, D.S.; Todd, R.A.; Craig, P.M.

    1986-08-01

    As part of an ongoing research program investigating the disposal of radioactive solid wastes in the environment' the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is participating with Argonne National Laboratory, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in a study of the leachability of solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resin under simulated disposal conditions. To simulate disposal, a group of five 2-m/sup 3/ soil lysimeters has been installed in Solid Waste Storage Area Six at ORNL, with each lysimeter containing a small sample of solidified resin at its center. Two solidification techniques are being investigated: a Portland cement and a vinyl ester-styrene treatment. During construction, soil moisture temperature cells were placed in each lysimeter, along with five porous ceramic tubes for sampling water near the waste source. A meteorological station was set up at the study site to monitor climatic conditions (primarily precipitation and air temperature), and a data acquisition system was installed to keep daily records of these meteorological parameters as well as lysimeter soil moisture and temperature conditions. This report documents the first year of the long-term field study and includes discussions of lysimeter installation, calibration of soil moisture probes, installation of the site meteorological station, and the results of the first-quarter sampling for radionuclides in lysimeter leachate. In addition, the data collection and processing system developed for this study is documented, and the results of the first three months of data collection are summarized in Appendix D.

  15. Kinetics and adsorption isotherm of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis on ion-exchange resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sala

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available C-phycocyanin is a natural blue dye extracted from Spirulina platensis, which has many applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In this paper the effect of pH and temperature on the adsorption of C-phycocyanin onto two different ion exchange resins (Streamline DEAE and Streamline Q XL for expanded bed adsorption chromatography was investigated. Moreover, the kinetics and adsorption isotherm were evaluated. The equilibrium for the Q XL matrix was reached after 60 min, while for DEAE it was only reached after 140 min. C-phycocyanin showed the highest partition coefficient at pH 7.5 for both resins at 25 ºC. The C-phycocyanin adsorption isotherm was very well represented by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Langmuir-Freundlich models, where the estimated values for Qm and Kd obtained by the Langmuir isotherm were, respectively, 33.92 mg.mL-1 and 0.123 mg.mL-1 for DEAE, and 28.12 mg.mL-1 and 0.082 mg.mL-1 for the Q XL matrix. A negative cooperativity was observed for C-phycocyanin binding when the Q XL matrix was used, while the cooperativity was purely independent using the DEAE matrix.

  16. Atmospheric deposition of inorganic nitrogen in Spanish forests of Quercus ilex measured with ion-exchange resins and conventional collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héctor García-Gomez; Sheila Izquieta-Rojano; Laura Aguillaume; Ignacio González-Fernández; Fernando Valiño; David Elustondo; Jesús M. Santamaría; Anna Àvila; Mark E. Fenn; Rocío Alonso

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition is one of the main threats for biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Measurement techniques like ion-exchange resin collectors (IECs), which are less expensive and time-consuming than conventional methods, are gaining relevance in the study of atmospheric deposition and are recommended to expand monitoring networks. In the present work...

  17. BVMO-catalysed dynamic kinetic resolution of racemic benzyl ketones in the presence of anion exchange resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, Cristina; de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Rioz-Martinez, Ana; Pazmino, Daniel E. Torres; Fraaije, Marco W.; Gotor, Vicente

    2010-01-01

    4-Hydroxyacetophenone monooxygenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens ACB was employed in the presence of a weak anion exchange resin to perform dynamic kinetic resolutions of racemic benzyl ketones with high conversions and good optical purities. Different parameters that affect to the efficiency of the

  18. Changes in the Resistance to Compression of Resin-modified Glass After Etching with Orthophosphoric Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Gil García, Stefany; Mosquera Arenas, Sara; Hoyos Arias, Luz Adriana; Domínguez Jiménez, Tatiana; Arango B., Luz Mónica; Gallego G., Clara Liliana

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Resin-modified glass ionomers are materials used as an intermediate base in some dental procedures. Our objective was to evaluate the changes that occur in resistance to compression in a light-cured resin-modified glass ionomer after etching it with 37% orthophosphoric acid. Materials and methods: We carried out an experimental study in vitro. We prepared forty thermoformed molds. The control group (cg) consisted of 20 samples to which no phosphoric acid was applied and the expe...

  19. Contact Activation of Blood Plasma and Factor XII by Ion-exchange Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Yeh, Chyi-Huey Josh; Dimachkie, Ziad O.; Golas, Avantika; Cheng, Alice; Parhi, Purnendu; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Sepharose ion-exchange particles bearing strong Lewis acid/base functional groups (sulfopropyl, carboxymethyl, quarternary ammonium, dimethyl aminoethyl, and iminodiacetic acid) exhibiting high plasma protein adsorbent capacities are shown to be more efficient activators of blood factor XII in neat-buffer solution than either hydrophilic clean-glass particles or hydrophobic octyl sepharose particles ( FXII→surfaceactivatorFXIIa; a.k.a autoactivation, where FXII is the zymogen and FXIIa is a p...

  20. Ion-exchange properties of strontium hydroxyapatite under acidic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Nishioka, Hitoshi; Moriga, Toshihiro; Hayashi, Hiromu [Univ. of Tokushima, Minamijosanjima (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Science and Technology; Moffat, J.B. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-09-01

    The ion exchange of strontium hydroxyapatite (SrHAp) with Pb{sup 2+} has been investigated under acidic conditions at 293 K. The addition of various acids to the exchanging solution enhanced the exchange capacity in the order HCl > HBr > HF > HNO{sub 3} > no acid, corresponding to the formation of halogen apatites with the former three acids or hydrogen phosphate with HNO{sub 3}. Since the ion-exchange capacity of SrHAp under nonacidic conditions is higher than that of chlorapatite, the aforementioned observations can be attributed to the participation of the protons introduced by the acids.z

  1. The mechanism of ion exchange and adsorption coexist on medium-low concentration ammonium-nitrogen removal by ion-exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunnen, Chen; Xiaoyan, Luo; Changshi, Xiong; Liming, Liang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the removal of medium-low concentration ammonium-nitrogen ([Formula: see text]) from waters and wastewaters on D113 resin was investigated with respect to pH, initial [Formula: see text] concentration, temperature and contact time. The equilibrium of [Formula: see text] on D113 resin reached in 20-30 min. The process of [Formula: see text] removal by D113 resin fitted Langmuir isotherm well. The pseudo second-order kinetic and intra-particle diffusion models were used to investigate the kinetic data of [Formula: see text] on D113 resin. The desorption solution can be returned to production after pretreatment. The mechanism of removal of [Formula: see text] by D113 resin was coexistence of adsorption and cation exchange. When the dosage of D113 resin was 5 g L(-1), pH 6, contact 30 min at room temperature, initial [Formula: see text] concentration being 116 mg L(-1) in rare earth metallurgical wastewater was reduced to 13 mg L(-1) after adsorption treatment.

  2. Treatment of Perchlorate-Contaminated Groundwater Using Highly-Selective, Regenerable Anion-Exchange Resins at Edwards Air Force Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, B.

    2003-05-30

    Selective ion exchange is one of the most effective treatment technologies for removing low levels of perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) from contaminated water because of its high efficiency without adverse impacts on the water quality caused by adding or removing any chemicals or nutrients. This report summarizes both the laboratory and a field pilot-scale studies to determine the ability and efficiency of the bifunctional synthetic resins to remove ClO{sub 4}{sup -} from the contaminated groundwater at the Edwards Air Force Base in California. Regeneration of the resins after groundwater treatment was also evaluated using the FeCl{sub 3}-HCl regeneration technique recently developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. On the basis of this study, the bifunctional resin, D-3696 was found to be highly selective toward ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and performed much better than one of the best commercial nitrate-selective resins (Purolite A-520E) and more than an order of magnitude better than the Purolite A-500 resin (with a relatively low selectivity). At an influent concentration of {approx} 450 {micro}g/L ClO{sub 4}{sup -} in groundwater, the bifunctional resin bed treated {approx} 40,000 empty bed volumes of groundwater before a significant breakthrough of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} occurred. The presence of relatively high concentrations of chloride and sulfate in site groundwater did not appear to affect the ability of the bifunctional resin to remove ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. However, the presence of high iron or iron oxyhydroxides and/or biomass in groundwater caused a significant fouling of the resin beds and greatly influenced the effectiveness in regenerating the resins sorbed with ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. Under such circumstances, a prefilter ({approx} 0.5-1 {micro}m) was found to be necessary to remove these particulates and to reduce the risk of fouling of the resin beds. Without significant fouling, the resin bed could be effectively regenerated by the FeCl{sub 3} displacement technique

  3. (Methacrylic Acid-Co-Divinylbenzene) Resin as Filler

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    divinylbenzene) resin (PMD) as a new filler-binder for direct compression tablets. Methods: Powder properties of PMD and MCC were characterized. Tablets made from PMD and MCC with and without propranolol hydrochloride were evaluated for ...

  4. (Methacrylic Acid-Co-Divinylbenzene) Resin as Filler- Binder for

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    divinylbenzene) resin (PMD) as a new filler-binder for direct compression tablets. Methods: Powder properties of PMD and MCC were characterized. Tablets made from PMD and MCC with and without propranolol hydrochloride were evaluated for ...

  5. Fabrication of gadolinium hydroxide nanoparticles using ion-exchange resin and their MRI property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kobayashi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method to fabricate gadolinium hydroxide (Gd(OH3 nanoparticles. An opaque solution was prepared by adding basic anion exchange resin (BAER to a Gd(NO33 aqueous solution at room temperature and aging the solution for 12–24 h; the solution became basic because of the exchange of H2O with OH−. The particles in the opaque solution have a needle structure, and their crystal structure was hexagonal Gd(OH3. Their longitudinal and lateral average particle sizes tend to increase in the ranges of 175.0–222.1 and 33.9–52.3 nm when the aging time increases from 12 to 24 h, respectively. The relaxivity value for T1-weighted imaging was 0.79 mM−1 s−1 for the solution that was prepared at the aging time of 18 h, which was ca. 20% of that for a commercial Gd complex contrast agent.

  6. Cleaning power and abrasivity of a new toothpaste based on ion-exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrado, Anna; Valiente, Manuel; Muñoz, Carlos A

    2004-04-01

    To compare the stain removal efficacy and enamel abrasivity of a new experimental dentifrice based on an ion-exchange resin mixture that releases calcium, fluoride, phosphate and zinc ions (named NMTD1), to four commercially available dentifrices: Crest Extra-whitening toothpaste, Crest Tartar Protection toothpaste, Crest Cavity Protection toothpaste and Colgate Fluoride Cavity Protection toothpaste. Calcium pyrophosphate was used as a control for the efficacy of the staining removal experiment. Cleaning power evaluation was made following the method developed by Stookey et al. The abrasion of the toothpastes was determined by means of a brushing machine, using 2000, 4000 and 8000 strokes and a 250g toothbrush load. Bovine specimens were prepared and abrasion was measured by a surface profilometer system. The new experimental dentifrice did not remove stains whereas Crest Extra-whitening and Crest Cavity Protection dentifrices produced statistically significant stain removal when compared with the calcium pyrophosphate control. Abrasion studies demonstrated that abrasion was linearly correlated to the number of strokes and the abrasion rates proved to be non significant for Colgate and the new experimental dentifrices, but significant for Crest Extra-whitening, Crest Tartar Protection and Crest Cavity Protection. This study demonstrated that the use of a dentifrice based on an ion-exchange mixture was not effective at removing stains and abrasion was most insignificant when compared to other commercially available toothpastes.

  7. Developing a technique to enhance durability of fibrous ion-exchange resin substrate for space greenhouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivobok, A. S.; Berkovich, Yu. A.; Shcherbakova, V. A.; Chuvilskaya, N. A.

    2018-02-01

    One way to cut consumables for space plant growth facilities (PGF) with artificial soil in the form of fibrous ion-exchange resin substrate (FIERS) is on-board regeneration of the used medium. After crop harvest the procedure includes removal of the roots from the fibrous media with preservation of the exchanger properties and capillary structure. One type of FIERS, namely BIONA-V3, has been used in Russian prototypes of space conveyors. We describe a two-stage treatment of BIONA-V3 including primary microwave heating of the used FIERS until (90 ± 5) °C in alkali-peroxide solution during 3.5 hrs. The second stage of the treatment is decomposition of root vestiges inside pores of BIONA-V3 by using thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic bacteria Clostridium thermocellum, Clostridium cellulolyticum and Cellulosilyticum lentocellum during 7-10 days at 55 °C. The two-stage procedure allows extraction of 90% dead roots from the FIERS' pores and the preservation of root zone hydro-physical properties. A posterior enrichment of the FIERS by minerals makes BIONA- V3 reusable.

  8. Radio-iodide uptake by modified poly (glycidyl methacrylate) as anion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, Sameh H. [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Nuclear Research Center; Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Second Research Reactor; Elbarbary, Ahmed M. [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Radiation Research of Polymer Chemistry Dept.; Rashad, Ghada; Fasih, T.W. [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Hot Laboratories Center

    2017-03-01

    Poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) microspheres were prepared by radiation induced polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) monomer. The factors affecting the degree of polymerization and yield (%) of PGMA such as type of solvent, monomer concentration, and irradiation dose were investigated. It was found that the PGMA yield (%) increases with increasing monomer concentration up to 50% and absorbed dose of 5 kGy. The resulting PGMA containing the epoxy group was chemically modified by hydroxyl amine to act as anion-exchange resin for uptake of {sup 131}I{sup -} ions. The modified PGMA (MPGMA) was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrophotometer, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). I-131 is produced from the fission of U-235 with low-enrichment uranium (LEU) targets in the Egyptian Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2). Separation of iodide from the radioactive solution by batchwise and column techniques was employed to determine the adsorption capacity of the MPGMA. Quality control of {sup 131}I product solution and radiochemical purity was examined by using the ascending paper chromatography method. The uptake behavior of MPGMA towards {sup 131}I{sup -} ions were studied at different experimental conditions and achieved by X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The synthesized MPGMA showed good results as anion-exchange and an effective adsorbent for uptaking {sup 131}I{sup -} ions.

  9. Conventional resin cation exchangers versus EDI for CACE measurement in power plants. Feasibility and practical field results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigrist, Manuel [Swan Systeme AG, Hinwil (Switzerland)

    2017-10-15

    The conductivity measurement after a cation exchanger in power plants with steam turbines was introduced soon after 1950 by Larson and Lane. Due to the simple measuring principle, the sensitivity to ionic contaminations and to its high reliability, the conductivity measurement after a cation exchanger (CACE) has become the most commonly used online analytical method in power plants with steam generators. Swan has investigated electro deionisation (EDI) as substitution of the conventional cation exchange resin and has developed a new conductivity instrument using this principle. This paper provides a description of the conventional method for cation conductivity measurements as well as of the new AMI CACE using EDI method.

  10. Improved performance in ionic exchange decalcifying processes using uniform resins; Mejoras de rendimiento en procesos de descalcificacion por intercambio ionico mediante el uso de resinas uniformes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano Belmonte, J. LL.

    2000-07-01

    The physical characteristics of the resins used in ionic exchange water treatment equipment have a direct bearing on the performance of the treatment facilities as well as on the quality of the water and the effluent produced during regeneration. There are now resins available on the market which have grains of a uniform size as compared to conventional resins whose grain size in more uneven. This article describes the historical evolution of such resins for use in decalcifying equipment and the reasons for the improved performance that is obtained when resins of uniform grain size are used. The results of a practical experimental in currently operating real facilities are presented. (Author)

  11. Fermentation and recovery of L-glutamic acid from cassava starch hydrolysate by ion-exchange resin column Produção de ácido L-glutâmico a partir de um hidrolisado de amido de mandioca usando resina de troca iônica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Madhavan Nampoothiri

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Investigations were carried out with the aim of producing L-glutamic acid from Brevibacterium sp. by utilizing a locally available starchy substrate, cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz. Initial studies were carried out in shake flasks, which showed that even though the yield was high with 85-90 DE (Dextrose Equivalent value, the maximum conversion yield (~34% was obtained by using only partially digested starch hydrolysate, i.e. 45-50 DE. Fermentations were carried out in batch mode in a 5 L fermenter, using suitably diluted cassava starch hydrolysate, using a 85-90 DE value hydrolysate. Media supplemented with nutrients resulted in an accumulation of 21 g/L glutamic acid with a fairly high (66.3% conversation yield of glucose to glutamic acid (based on glucose consumed and on 81.74% theoretical conversion rate. The bioreactor conditions most conducive for maximum production were pH 7.5, temperature 30°C and an agitation of 180 rpm. When fermentation was conducted in fed-batch mode by keeping the residual reducing sugar concentration at 5% w/v, 25.0 g/L of glutamate was obtained after 40 h fermentation (16% more the batch mode. Chromatographic separation by ion-exchange resin was used for the recovery and purification of glutamic acid. It was further crystallized and separated by making use of its low solubility at the isoelectric point (pH 3.2.Pesquisas foram realizadas com o objetivo de produzir ácido glutâmico a partir de Brevibacterium sp. utilizando um substrato disponível na região, a mandioca (Manihot esculenta Crantz. Estudos iniciais, desenvolvidos em shaker, demonstraram que mesmo obtendo elevado rendimento com 85-90 DE (Dextrose Equivalent value, a taxa de conversão máxima (~34% foi obtida usando um hidrolisado de amido parcialmente digerido, i.e. 45-50 DE. As fermentações foram realizadas em um fermentador de 5 L, usando um hidrolisado de amido de mandioca adequadamente diluído, preparado à partir de um valor DE de 85-90. O

  12. Resin acids as the potential growth-affecting component of pine oleoresin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Wodzicki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonvolatile fraction of the oleoresin of Pinus sihestris L. was found to contain substances which inhibit growth of wheat ceoleoptile and oat mesocotyl sections in standard bioassays. The inhibition is mainly confined to the fraction of resin acids. Among the seven authentic resin acids tested, the effects of dehydroabietic and abietic acids were most sifgnificant. Palustric, pimaric and isopimaric acids were not effective in the wheat coleoptile section straight growth test. None of the substances, in the amounts tested, except for extremely high concentration, exerted an inhibitory effect on natural or IAA-induced elongation of pine hypocotyl sections. Neither was an inhibitory effect discovered in the microbiological test with the Aspergillus niger van Tiegh. The results obtained with pine hypocotyl sections, allow the conclusion that resin acids interfering with the results of standard bioassays are probably not effective as inhibitory factors in the regulation of pine tissue growth.

  13. Simultaneous determination of NH4+, NO2(-) and NO3(-) by ion-exclusion/anion-exchange chromatography on a strongly basic anion-exchange resin with basic eluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Masanobu; Hironaga, Takahiro; Itabashi, Hideyuki; Nakatani, Nobutake; Kozaki, Daisuke; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2012-04-01

    Ion-exclusion/anion-exchange chromatography (IEC/AEC) on a combination of a strongly basic anion-exchange resin in the OH(-)-form with basic eluent has been developed. The separation mechanism is based on the ion-exclusion/penetration effect for cations and the anion-exchange effect for anions to anion-exchange resin phase. This system is useful for simultaneous separation and determination of ammonium ion (NH4+), nitrite ion (NO2(-)), and nitrate ion (NO3(-)) in water samples. The resolution of analyte ions can be manipulated by changing the concentration of base in eluent on a polystyrene-divinylbenzene based strongly basic anion-exchange resin column. In this study, several separation columns, which consisted of different particle sizes, different functional groups and different anion-exchange capacities, were compared. As the results, the separation column with the smaller anion-exchange capacity (TSKgel Super IC-Anion) showed well-resolved separation of cations and anions. In the optimization of the basic eluent, lithium hydroxide (LiOH) was used as the eluent and the optimal concentration was concluded to be 2 mmol/L, considering the resolution of analyte ions and the whole retention times. In the optimal conditions, the relative standard deviations of the peak areas and the retention times of NH4+, NO2(-), and NO3(-) ranged 1.28% - 3.57% and 0.54% - 1.55%, respectively. The limits of detection at signal-to-noise of 3 were 4.10 micromol/L for NH4+, 1.87 micromol/L for NO2(-) and 2.83 micromol/L for NO3(-).

  14. The role of lactic acid adsorption by ion exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qiang; Liu, Fabao; Zhang, Tongcun; Zhang, Jian; Jia, Shiru; Yu, Changyan; Jiang, Kunyu; Gao, Nianfa

    2010-11-11

    The polyacrylic resin Amberlite IRA-67 is a promising adsorbent for lactic acid extraction from aqueous solution, but little systematic research has been devoted to the separation efficiency of lactic acid under different operating conditions. In this paper, we investigated the effects of temperature, resin dose and lactic acid loading concentration on the adsorption of lactic acid by Amberlite IRA-67 in batch kinetic experiments. The obtained kinetic data followed the pseudo-second order model well and both the equilibrium and ultimate adsorption slightly decreased with the increase of the temperature at 293-323K and 42.5 g/liter lactic acid loading concentration. The adsorption was a chemically heterogeneous process with a mean free energy value of 12.18 kJ/mol. According to the Boyd(_)plot, the lactic acid uptake process was primarily found to be an intraparticle diffusion at a lower concentration (70 g/liter). The values of effective diffusion coefficient D(i) increased with temperature. By using our Equation (21), the negative values of ΔG° and ΔH° revealed that the adsorption process was spontaneous and exothermic. Moreover, the negative value of ΔS° reflected the decrease of solid-liquid interface randomness at the solid-liquid interface when adsorbing lactic acid on IRA-67. With the weakly basic resin IRA-67, in situ product removal of lactic acid can be accomplished especially from an open and thermophilic fermentation system without sterilization.

  15. Protein adsorption on ion exchange resins and monoclonal antibody charge variant modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guélat, Bertrand; Khalaf, Rushd; Lattuada, Marco; Costioli, Matteo; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-05-20

    A novel multicomponent adsorption equilibrium model for proteins on ion-exchange resins is developed on a statistical thermodynamic basis including surface coverage effects and protein-resin and protein-protein interactions. The resulting model exhibits a general competitive Langmuirian behavior and was applied to the study and optimization of the separation of monoclonal antibody charge variants on two strong cation exchangers. The model accounts explicitly for the effect of both pH and salt concentration, and its parameters can be determined in diluted conditions, that is, through physically sound assumptions, all model parameters can be obtained using solely experiments in diluted conditions, and be used to make predictions in overloaded conditions. The parameterization of the model and optimization of the separation is based on a two-step approach. First, gradient experiments in diluted conditions are undertaken in order to determine the model parameters. Based on these experiments and on information about the proteins of interest and the stationary phase used, all the model parameters can be estimated. Second, using the parameterized model, an initial Pareto optimization is undertaken where overloaded operating conditions are investigated. Experiments from this Pareto set are then used to refine the estimation of the model parameters. A second Pareto optimization can then be undertaken, this time with the refined parameters. This can be repeated until a satisfactory set of model parameters is found. This iterative approach is shown to be extremely efficient and to provide large amounts of knowledge based on only a few experiments. It is shown that due to the strong physical foundation of the model and the very low number of adjustable parameters, the number of iterations is expected to be at most two or three. Furthermore, the model based tool is improved as more experimental knowledge is provided, allowing for better estimations of the chromatographic

  16. Rapid fabrication of microfluidic polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell in PDMS by surface patterning of perfluorinated ion-exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yong-Ak; Han, Jongyoon [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Batista, Candy [Roxbury Community College, 1234 Columbus Ave., Roxbury Crossing, MA 02120 (United States); Sarpeshkar, Rahul [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a simple and rapid fabrication method for a microfluidic polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which has become the de facto standard material in BioMEMS. Instead of integrating a Nafion sheet film between two layers of a PDMS device in a traditional ''sandwich format,'' we pattern a perfluorinated ion-exchange resin such as a Nafion resin on a glass substrate using a reversibly bonded PDMS microchannel to generate an ion-selective membrane between the fuel-cell electrodes. After this patterning step, the assembly of the microfluidic fuel cell is accomplished by simple oxygen plasma bonding between the PDMS chip and the glass substrate. In an example implementation, the planar PEM microfluidic fuel cell generates an open circuit voltage of 600-800 mV and delivers a maximum current output of nearly 4 {mu}A. To enhance the power output of the fuel cell we utilize self-assembled colloidal arrays as a support matrix for the Nafion resin. Such arrays allow us to increase the thickness of the ion-selective membrane to 20 {mu}m and increase the current output by 166%. Our novel fabrication method enables rapid prototyping of microfluidic fuel cells to study various ion-exchange resins for the polymer electrolyte membrane. Our work will facilitate the development of miniature, implantable, on-chip power sources for biomedical applications. (author)

  17. Synthesis of hemicellulose-acrylic acid graft copolymer super water absorbent resin by ultrasonic irradiation technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang LIU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The hemicellulose super water absorbent resin is prepared by using ultrasonic irradiation technology, with the waste liquid produced during the preparation of viscose fiber which contains a large amount of hemicellulose as raw material, acrylic acid as graft monomer, N,N’-methylene bis acrylamide (NMBA as cross linking agent, and (NH42S2O8-NaHSO3 as the redox initiation system. The synthesis conditions, structure and water absorption ability of resin are discussed. The results indicate that water absorbency of the resin is 311 g/g, the tap water absorbency is 102 g/g, the normal saline absorbency is 55 g/g, and the artificial urine absorbency is 31 g/g under the optimal synthesis conditions, so the resin has great water absorption rate and water retaining capacity. The FT-IR and SEM analysis shows that the resin with honeycomb network structure is prepared. The successfully synthesized of the resin means that the hemicellulose waste liquid can be highly effectively recycled, and it provides a kind of new raw material for the synthesis of super water absorbent resin.

  18. Effect of cation exchange resin treatment and addition on sugar as anti-caking agent on retention of nutritional and sensory quality of lemon juice powder during storage

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sharma, Satish K; Kaushal, B B. L; Sharma, P C

    2011-01-01

    Lemon juices clarified with enzymatic treatment with and without cation exchange resin treatment were concentrated to 60o Brix in a vacuum evaporator and converted into powders by foam mat drying technique...

  19. Wood ants produce a potent antimicrobial agent by applying formic acid on tree-collected resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brütsch, Timothée; Jaffuel, Geoffrey; Vallat, Armelle; Turlings, Ted C J; Chapuisat, Michel

    2017-04-01

    Wood ants fight pathogens by incorporating tree resin with antimicrobial properties into their nests. They also produce large quantities of formic acid in their venom gland, which they readily spray to defend or disinfect their nest. Mixing chemicals to produce powerful antibiotics is common practice in human medicine, yet evidence for the use of such "defensive cocktails" by animals remains scant. Here, we test the hypothesis that wood ants enhance the antifungal activity of tree resin by treating it with formic acid. In a series of experiments, we document that (i) tree resin had much higher inhibitory activity against the common entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium brunneum after having been in contact with ants, while no such effect was detected for other nest materials; (ii) wood ants applied significant amounts of endogenous formic and succinic acid on resin and other nest materials; and (iii) the application of synthetic formic acid greatly increased the antifungal activity of resin, but had no such effect when applied to inert glass material. Together, these results demonstrate that wood ants obtain an effective protection against a detrimental microorganism by mixing endogenous and plant-acquired chemical defenses. In conclusion, the ability to synergistically combine antimicrobial substances of diverse origins is not restricted to humans and may play an important role in insect societies.

  20. Comparing and Optimizing Nitrate Adsorption from Aqueous Solution Using Fe/Pt Bimetallic Nanoparticles and Anion Exchange Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Daud

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research work was carried out for the removal of nitrate from raw water for a drinking water supply. Nitrate is a widespread ground water contaminant. Methodology employed in this study included adsorption on metal based nanoparticles and ion exchange using anionic resins. Fe/Pt bimetallic nanoparticles were prepared in the laboratory, by the reduction of their respective salts using sodium borohydride. Scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectrometry, and X-ray florescence techniques were utilized for characterization of bimetallic Fe/Pt nanoparticles. Optimum dose, pH, temperature, and contact time were determined for NO3- removal through batch tests, both for metal based nanoparticles and anionic exchange resin. Adsorption data fitted well the Langmuir isotherm and conformed to the pseudofirst-order kinetic model. Results indicated 97% reduction in nitrate by 0.25 mg/L of Fe/Pt nanoparticles at pH 7 and 83% reduction in nitrate was observed using 0.50 mg/L anionic exchange resins at pH 4 and contact time of one hour. Overall, Fe/Pt bimetallic nanoparticles demonstrated greater NO3- removal efficiency due to the small particle size, extremely large surface area (627 m2/g, and high adsorption capacity.

  1. Competitive migration behaviors of multiple ions and their impacts on ion-exchange resin packed microbial desalination cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Kuichang; Yuan, Lulu; Wei, Jincheng; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia

    2013-10-01

    Mixed ion-exchange resins packed microbial desalination cell (R-MDC) could stabilize the internal resistance, however, the impacts of multiple ions on R-MDC performance was unclear. This study investigated the desalination performance, multiple ions migration behaviors and their impacts on R-MDCs fed with salt solution containing multiple anions and cations. Results showed that R-MDC removed multiple anions better than multiple cations with desalination efficiency of 99% (effluent conductivity NO3(-)>Cl(-) for anions and Ca(2+)≈Mg(2+)>NH4(+)>Na(+) for cations, jointly affected by both their molar conductivity and exchange selectivity on resins. After long-term operation, the existence of higher concentration Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) caused the electric conductivity of mixed resins decrease and scaling on the surface of cation-exchange membrane adjoined with cathode chamber, suggesting that R-MDC would be more suitable for desalination of water with lower hardness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of sulfuric acid etching of polyetheretherketone on the shear bond strength to resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproesser, Oliver; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Uhrenbacher, Julia; Roos, Malgorzata; Gernet, Wolfgang; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2014-10-01

    To examine the influence of etching duration on the bond strength of PEEK substrate in combination with different resin composite cements. In total, 448 PEEK specimens were fabricated, etched with sulfuric acid for 5, 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 300 s and then luted with two conventional resin cements (RelyX ARC and Variolink II) and one self-adhesive resin cement (Clearfil SA Cement) (n = 18/subgroup). Non-etched specimens served as the control group. Specimens were stored in distilled water for 28 days at 37°C and shear bond strengths were measured. Data were analyzed nonparametrically using Kruskal-Wallis-H (p cements. The optimal etching duration varied with the type of resin composite: 60 s for RelyX ARC (15.3 ± 7.2 MPa), 90 s for Variolink II (15.2 ± 7.2 MPa), and 120 s for Clearfil SA Cement (6.4 ± 5.9 MPa). Regardless of etching duration, however, the self-etching resin composite cement showed significantly lower shear bond strength values when compared to groups luted with the conventional resin composites. Although sulfuric acid seems to be suitable and effective for PEEK surface pre-treatment, further investigations are required to examine the effect of other adhesive systems and cements.

  3. Swelling behavior of ion exchange resins incorporated in tri-calcium silicate cement matrix: I. Chemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neji, M., E-mail: mejdi.neji@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, Laboratoire d' Etude du Comportement des Bétons et des Argiles, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Polytech Lille – LML UMR, 8107 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Bary, B.; Le Bescop, P. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, Laboratoire d' Etude du Comportement des Bétons et des Argiles, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Burlion, N. [Polytech Lille – LML UMR, 8107 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents the first part of a theoretical and experimental work aiming at modeling the chemo-mechanical behavior of composites made up of ion exchange resins (IER) solidified in a tri-calcium silicate cement paste (C{sub 3}S). Because of ion exchange processes, the volume change of the IER may cause internal pressures leading to the degradation of the material. In this study, a predictive modeling is developed for describing the chemical behavior of such material. It is based on thermodynamic equilibria to determine the evolution of the ion exchange processes, and the potential precipitation of portlandite in the composite. In parallel, a phenomenological study has been set up to understand chemical phenomena related to the swelling mechanisms. The model created has been finally implemented in a finite elements software; the simulation of a laboratory test has been performed and the results compared to experimental data. - Highlights: • Ion exchange theory to model the swelling behavior of Ion exchange resin. • Experimental phenomenon analysis about Chemo-mechanical interaction between IER and cement paste matrix. • Chemo-Transport modeling on a composite material made with IER embedded into cement paste matrix.

  4. Releasing Pattern of Applied Phosphorus and Distribution Change of Phosphorus Fractions in the Acid Upland Soils with Successive Resin Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Arief Hartono

    2008-01-01

    The releasing pattern of applied P in the acid upland soils and the soil properties influencing the pattern were studied. Surface horizons of six acid upland soils from Sumatra, Java and Kalimantan were used in this study. The releasing pattern of applied P (300 mg P kg-1) of these soils were studied by successive resin extraction. P fractionation was conducted to evaluate which fractions released P to the soil solution after successive resin extraction. The cumulative of resin-Pinorganic...

  5. Crypthophilic acids A, B, and C: resin glycosides from aerial parts of Scrophularia crypthophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliş, Ihsan; Sezgin, Yükselen; Dönmez, Ali A; Rüedi, Peter; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2007-01-01

    The water-soluble part of the methanolic extract from the aerial parts of Scrophularia crypthophila, through chromatographic methods, yielded three new resin glycosides, crypthophilic acids A - C (1-3). Compounds 1-3 are tetraglycosides of (+)-3S,12S-dihydroxypalmitic acid. The structures of these and 10 known compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic and chemical means. All natural resin glycosides known so far have been obtained from Convolvulaceae plants; this is the first report of such glycosides from another, taxonomically unrelated family (Scrophulariaceae).

  6. Enrichment of boron-10 by inverse-frontal chromatography using quaternized 4-vinylpyridine-divinylbenzene anion-exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardan, A. [Pinstech, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    1997-08-01

    In order to enrich {sup 10}B, 40 meter band migration of boric acid-mannitol with hydrochloric acid solution was performed by inverse frontal chromatography on a porous, 25% crosslinked, 38% quaternized 4-vinylpyridine-divinylbenzene resin. The maximum enrichment (R{sub L}) of {sup 10}B was 94.15%. The overall process parameters, namely slope coefficient (k) and separation coefficient (e), were found to be 0.1282 cm{sup {minus}1} and 0.02967, respectively.

  7. A new configuration of membrane stack for retrieval of nickel absorbed in resins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue-fen; Wu, Zu-cheng

    2005-01-01

    A new configuration integrated ion exchange effect with both electro-migration and electrochemical reaction in a single cell was developed to effectively retrieve metal ions from simulated wastewater using ion exchange resins without additive chemicals. By simply assembling cation exchange resins and anion exchange resins separated by homogeneous membranes, we found that the system will always be acidic in the concentrate compartment so that ion exchange resins could be in-situ regenerated without hydroxide precipitation. Such a realizable design will be really suitable for wastewater purification. PMID:15909341

  8. A new configuration of membrane stack for retrieval of nickel absorbed in resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue-fen; Wu, Zu-cheng

    2005-06-01

    A new configuration integrated ion exchange effect system with both electro-migration and electrochemical reaction in a single cell was developed to effectively retrieve metal ions from simulated wastewater using ion exchange resins without additive chemicals. By simply assembling cation exchange resins and anion exchange resins separated by homogeneous membranes, we found that the system will always be acidic in the concentrate compartment so that ion exchange resins could be in-situ regenerated without hydroxide precipitation. Such a realizable design will be really suitable for wastewater purification.

  9. Chemically modified polymeric resins for separation of cations, organic acids, and small polar moleculea by high performance liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, John B. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    This thesis is divided into 4 parts: a review, ion chromatography of metal cations on carboxylic resins, separation of hydrophilic organic acids and small polar compounds on macroporous resin columns, and use of eluent modifiers for liquid chromatographic separation of carboxylic acids using conductivity detection.

  10. Measurement of gas-phase ammonia and amines in air by collection onto an ion exchange resin and analysis by ion chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, M. L.; Perraud, V.; Gomez, A.; Arquero, K. D.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-08-01

    Ammonia and amines are common trace gases in the atmosphere and have a variety of both biogenic and anthropogenic sources, with a major contribution coming from agricultural sites. In addition to their malodorous nature, both ammonia and amines have been shown to enhance particle formation from acids such as nitric, sulfuric and methanesulfonic acids, which has implications for visibility, human health and climate. A key component of quantifying the effects of these species on particle formation is accurate gas-phase measurements in both laboratory and field studies. However, these species are notoriously difficult to measure as they are readily taken up on surfaces, including onto glass surfaces from aqueous solution as established in the present studies. We describe here a novel technique for measuring gas-phase ammonia and amines that involves uptake onto a weak cation exchange resin followed by extraction and analysis using ion chromatography. Two variants - one for parts per billion concentrations in air and the second with lower (parts per trillion) detection limits - are described. The latter involves the use of a custom-designed high-pressure cartridge to hold the resin for in-line extraction. These methods avoid the use of sampling lines, which can lead to significant inlet losses of these compounds. They also have the advantages of being relatively simple and inexpensive. The applicability of this technique to ambient air is demonstrated in measurements made near a cattle farm in Chino, CA.

  11. Cation Exchange Resins and colonic perforation. What surgeons need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Luna, María Rita; Fernández-Rivera, Enrique; Guarneros-Zárate, Joaquín E.; Tueme-Izaguirre, Jorge; Hernández-Méndez, José Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Since 1961 the use of Cation Exchange Resins has been the mainstream treatment for chronic hyperkalemia. For the past 25 years different kind of complications derived from its clinical use have been recognized, being the colonic necrosis the most feared and lethal of all. Presentation of case We report a case of a 72-year-old patient with chronic kidney disease, treated with calcium polystyrene sulfonate for hyperkalemia treatment who presented in the emergency department with constipation treated with hypertonic cathartics. With clinical deterioration 48 h later progressed with colonic necrosis requiring urgent laparotomy, sigmoidectomy and open abdomen management with subsequent rectal stump perforation and dead. The histopathology finding: calcium polystyrene sulfonate embedded in the mucosa, consistent with the cause of perforation. Discussion Lillemoe reported the first case series of five uremic patients with colonic perforation associated with the use of SPS in sorbitol in 1987 and in 2009 the FDA removed from the market the SPS containing 70% of sorbitol. The pathophysiologic change of CER goes from mucosal edema, ulcers, pseudomembranes, and the most severe case transmural necrosis. Up to present day, some authors have questioned the use of CER in the setting of lowering serum potassium. Despite its worldwide use in hyperkalemia settings, multiple studies have not demonstrated a significant potassium excretion by CER. Conclusion Despite the low incidence of colonic complication and lethal colonic necrosis associated with the CER clinical use, the general surgeon needs a high index of suspicion when dealing with patients treated with CER and abdominal pain. PMID:26439420

  12. Cytotoxicity of a new toothpaste based on an ion exchange resin mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrado, Anna; Valiente, Manuel; Zhang, Wu; Li, Yiming; Muñoz, Carlos A

    2005-08-01

    To evaluate the effects for cytotoxicity of two dentifrices: a toothpaste commercially available (Crest Extra-Whitening toothpaste) and a new experimental toothpaste based on a mixture of ion-exchange resins (named NMTD) that supplies calcium, fluoride, phosphate and zinc ions. Cultures of mouse fibroblasts cells L929 were used in a MTT assay for in vitro cytotoxicity of the dentifrices. Cells were cultured in Eagle's minimal essential medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. Cultures were incubated at 37 degrees C in a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2 and collected by tripsinization (0.05% trypsin/0.5mM EDTA). A 96-well microplate method was employed for the MTT colorimetric assay. Positive control consisted of 10 microl of phenol in 5 ml of 6% media, a dose that produces zero percent cell survival. Negative control was prepared by adding 0.5 ml of HBSS to 4.5 ml of 6% media. The plates were incubated for 24 and 48 hours at 37 degrees C in a 5% CO2 atmosphere. Means and standard deviations of absorbance values for each group and percentage inhibitory dosage (%ID) for each test material were calculated. None of the dentifrices resulted in a percentage of inhibition higher than 50% and did not observe marked increases in cytotoxicity with time of incubation. The positive control gave almost zero percent cell survival, whereas the negative control gave a hundred percent cell survival. Analysis of the results indicated that test dentifrice dose had no significant effect towards the cell viability (P<0.05).

  13. Continuous biodiesel production in a fixed bed reactor packed with anion-exchange resin as heterogeneous catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yanbiao; He, Benqiao; Yan, Feng; Wang, Hong; Cheng, Yu; Lin, Ligang; Feng, Yaohui; Li, Jianxin

    2012-06-01

    A continuous biodiesel production from the transesterification of soybean oil with methanol was investigated in a fixed bed reactor packed with D261 anion-exchange resin as a heterogeneous catalyst. The conversion to biodiesel achieved 95.2% within a residence time 56 min under the conditions: reaction temperature of 323.15K, n-hexane/soybean oil weight rate of 0.5, methanol/soybean oil molar ratio of 9:1 and feed flow rate of 1.2 ml/min. The resin can be regenerated in-situ and restored to the original activity to achieve continuous production after the resin deactivation. The product obtained was mainly composed of methyl esters. No glycerol in the product was detected due to the resin adsorbing glycerol in the fixed bed, which solved the issue of glycerol separation from biodiesel. It is believed that the fixed bed reactor with D261 has a potential commercial application in the transesterification of triglyceride. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Maximum Potential Hydrogen Gas Retention in the sRF Resin Ion Exchange Column for the LAWPS Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Bottenus, Courtney LH; Schonewill, Philip P.

    2018-01-22

    The Low-Activity Waste Pretreatment System (LAWPS) is being developed to provide treated supernatant liquid from the Hanford tank farms directly to the Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vitrification Facility at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. The design and development of the LAWPS is being conducted by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC. A key process in LAWPS is the removal of radioactive Cs in ion exchange (IX) columns filled with spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin. One accident scenario being evaluated is the loss of liquid flow through the sRF resin bed after it has been loaded with radioactive Cs and hydrogen gas is being generated by radiolysis. In normal operations, the generated hydrogen is expected to remain dissolved in the liquid and be continuously removed by liquid flow. For an accident scenario with a loss of flow, hydrogen gas can be retained within the IX column both in the sRF resin and below the bottom screen that supports the resin within the column. The purpose of this report is to summarize calculations that estimate the upper-bound volume of hydrogen gas that can be retained in the column and potentially be released to the headspace of the IX column or to process equipment connected to the IX column and, thus, pose a flammability hazard.

  15. Modelling of the interaction between chemical and mechanical behaviour of ion exchange resins incorporated into a cement-based matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Bescop P.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a predictive model, based on experimental data, to determine the macroscopic mechanical behavior of a material made up of ion exchange resins solidified into a CEM III cement paste. Some observations have shown that in some cases, a significant macroscopic expansion of this composite material may be expected, due to internal pressures generated in the resin. To build the model, we made the choice to break down the problem in two scale’s studies. The first deals with the mechanical behavior of the different heterogeneities of the composite, i.e. the resin and the cement paste. The second upscales the information from the heterogeneities to the Representative Elementary Volume (REV of the composite. The heterogeneities effects are taken into account in the REV by applying a homogenization method derived from the Eshelby theory combined with an interaction coefficient drawn from the poroelasticity theory. At the first scale, from the second thermodynamic law, a formulation is developed to estimate the resin microscopic swelling. The model response is illustrated on a simple example showing the impact of the calculated internal pressure, on the macroscopic strain.

  16. The role of lactic acid adsorption by ion exchange chromatography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The polyacrylic resin Amberlite IRA-67 is a promising adsorbent for lactic acid extraction from aqueous solution, but little systematic research has been devoted to the separation efficiency of lactic acid under different operating conditions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this paper, we investigated the effects of temperature, resin dose and lactic acid loading concentration on the adsorption of lactic acid by Amberlite IRA-67 in batch kinetic experiments. The obtained kinetic data followed the pseudo-second order model well and both the equilibrium and ultimate adsorption slightly decreased with the increase of the temperature at 293-323K and 42.5 g/liter lactic acid loading concentration. The adsorption was a chemically heterogeneous process with a mean free energy value of 12.18 kJ/mol. According to the Boyd(_plot, the lactic acid uptake process was primarily found to be an intraparticle diffusion at a lower concentration (70 g/liter. The values of effective diffusion coefficient D(i increased with temperature. By using our Equation (21, the negative values of ΔG° and ΔH° revealed that the adsorption process was spontaneous and exothermic. Moreover, the negative value of ΔS° reflected the decrease of solid-liquid interface randomness at the solid-liquid interface when adsorbing lactic acid on IRA-67. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: With the weakly basic resin IRA-67, in situ product removal of lactic acid can be accomplished especially from an open and thermophilic fermentation system without sterilization.

  17. Thermoanalytical Study and Kinetics of New 8-Hydroxyquinoline 5-sulphonic Acid-Oxamide-Formaldehyde Terpolymer Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh N. Singru

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The terpolymer resins (8-HQ5-SAOF have been synthesized by the condensation of 8-hydroxyquinoline 5-sulphonic acid (8-HQ5-SA and oxamide (O with formaldehyde (F in the presence of acid catalyst and using varied molar proportion of the reacting monomers. The synthesized terpolymer resins have been characterized by different physico-chemical techniques. Thermogravimetric analysis of all terpolymer resins in present study have been carried out by non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis technique in which sample is subjected to condition of continuous increase in temperature at linear rate. Thermal study of the resins was carried out to determine their mode of decomposition and relative thermal stabilities. Thermal decomposition curves were studied carefully with minute details. The Freeman-Carroll and Sharp-Wentworth methods have been used in the present investigation to calculate thermal activation energy and different kinetic parameter of the terpolymer resins. Thermal activation energy (Ea calculated with above two mentioned methods are in close agreement. The advantage of Freeman-Carroll method is to calculate both the order of reaction (n and energy of activation in one single stage by keeping heating rate constant. By using data of thermogravimetric analysis, various thermodynamic parameters like frequency factor (Z, entropy change (Δ S, free energy change (Δ F and apparent entropy (S* have been determined using Freeman-Carroll method.

  18. Kinetics of Ethyl Acetate Synthesis Catalyzed by Acidic Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Bruno M.; Cardoso, Simao P.; Silva, Carlos M.; Portugal, Ines

    2011-01-01

    A low-cost experiment to carry out the second-order reversible reaction of acetic acid esterification with ethanol to produce ethyl acetate is presented to illustrate concepts of kinetics and reactor modeling. The reaction is performed in a batch reactor, and the acetic acid concentration is measured by acid-base titration versus time. The…

  19. Eco-friendly Crosslinking Agent for Acid Functional Acrylic Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Shah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil from J. multifida was extracted and it was first converted into N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl Jatropha fatty amide (HEJFA. HEJFA has been synthesized by reaction between Jatropha oil and diethanol amine in presence of zinc oxide as a catalyst. The reaction is relatively rapid and proceeded to high yield at 200±5 OC. The resulting HEJFA was used to formulate thermosetting coating compositions. Films were cured at ambient (air drying and elevated (stove drying temperatures using N, N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl Jatropha fatty amide (HEJFA as eco-friendly crosslinking agent for acrylic resin. The coating performance of the various compositions was tested by measurement of scratch hardness, impact strength and chemical resistance. The results show better performance of the HEJFA based compositions compared to butylated melamine formaldehyde (MF based compositions.

  20. Preparation of anion exchanger by amination of acrylic acid grafted polypropylene nonwoven fiber and its ion-exchange property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Ju; Na, Choon-Ki

    2006-09-01

    To develop the polymeric adsorbent that possess anionic exchangeable function, PP-g-AA-Am fibers were prepared by photoinduced grafting of acrylic acid (AA) onto polypropylene (PP) nonwoven fibers and subsequent conversion of carboxyl group in grafted AA to an amine (Am) group by reaction with diethylene triamine (DETA). The amination of grafted AA increased with increase in the degree of grafting, the reaction time and temperature of the chemical modification process. Catalytic effect of metal chlorides such as AlCl(3) and FeCl(3) on the amination of grafted AA was significant but not essential to lead the amination. FT-IR and solid (13)C NMR data indicate that amine group was introduced into PP-g-AA fiber through amide linkage between grafted AA and DETA. The anion exchange capacity of PP-g-AA-Am fiber increased with increase in the degree of amination, but reached maximum value at about 60% amination of 150% grafted AA. PP-g-AA-Am fiber showed much higher maximum capacity for PO(4)-P and a similar capacity for NO(3)-N compared to commercial anion resins. Furthermore, the PP-g-AA-Am fiber also has adsorption ability for cations because of unaminated residual carboxyl group.

  1. Large Scale Solid Phase Synthesis of Peptide Drugs: Use of Commercial Anion Exchange Resin as Quenching Agent for Removal of Iodine during Disulphide Bond Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Bhaskara Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The S-acetamidomethyl (Acm or trityl (Trt protecting groups are widely used in the chemical synthesis of peptides that contain one or more disulfide bonds. Treatment of peptides containing S-Acm protecting group with iodine results in simultaneous removal of the sulfhydryl protecting group and disulfide formation. However, the excess iodine needs to be quenched or adsorbed as quickly as possible after completion of the disulfide bond formation in order to minimize side reactions that are often associated with the iodination step. We report here a simple method for simultaneous quenching and removal of iodine and isolation of disulphide bridge peptides. The use of excess inexpensive anion exchange resin to the oxidized peptide from the aqueous acetic acid/methanol solution affords quantitative removal of iodine and other color impurities. This improves the resin life time of expensive chromatography media that is used in preparative HPLC column during the purification of peptide using preparative HPLC. Further, it is very useful for the conversion of TFA salt to acetate in situ. It was successfully applied commercially, to the large scale synthesis of various peptides including Desmopressin, Oxytocin, and Octreotide. This new approach offers significant advantages such as more simple utility, minimal side reactions, large scale synthesis of peptide drugs, and greater cost effectiveness.

  2. Large Scale Solid Phase Synthesis of Peptide Drugs: Use of Commercial Anion Exchange Resin as Quenching Agent for Removal of Iodine during Disulphide Bond Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K M Bhaskara; Kumari, Y Bharathi; Mallikharjunasarma, Dokka; Bulliraju, Kamana; Sreelatha, Vanjivaka; Ananda, Kuppanna

    2012-01-01

    The S-acetamidomethyl (Acm) or trityl (Trt) protecting groups are widely used in the chemical synthesis of peptides that contain one or more disulfide bonds. Treatment of peptides containing S-Acm protecting group with iodine results in simultaneous removal of the sulfhydryl protecting group and disulfide formation. However, the excess iodine needs to be quenched or adsorbed as quickly as possible after completion of the disulfide bond formation in order to minimize side reactions that are often associated with the iodination step. We report here a simple method for simultaneous quenching and removal of iodine and isolation of disulphide bridge peptides. The use of excess inexpensive anion exchange resin to the oxidized peptide from the aqueous acetic acid/methanol solution affords quantitative removal of iodine and other color impurities. This improves the resin life time of expensive chromatography media that is used in preparative HPLC column during the purification of peptide using preparative HPLC. Further, it is very useful for the conversion of TFA salt to acetate in situ. It was successfully applied commercially, to the large scale synthesis of various peptides including Desmopressin, Oxytocin, and Octreotide. This new approach offers significant advantages such as more simple utility, minimal side reactions, large scale synthesis of peptide drugs, and greater cost effectiveness.

  3. Summary of pilot-scale activities with resorcinol ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicero, C.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bickford, D.F.; Sargent, T.N.; Andrews, M.K.; Bibler, J.P.; Bibler, N.E.; Jantzen, C.M.

    1995-10-02

    The Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) of the Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating vitrification technology for treatment of low level mixed wastes (LLMW). They have chartered the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) to study vitrification of the wastes through an Office of Technology Development (OTD) Technical Task Plan (TTP). SRTC`s efforts have included crucible-scale studies and pilot scale testing on simulated LLMW sludges, resins, soils, and other solid wastes. Results from the crucible-scale studies have been used as the basis for the pilot-scale demonstrations. As part of the fiscal year (FY) 1995 activities, SRTC performed crucible-scale studies with organic resins. This waste stream was selected because of the large number of DOE sites, as well as commercial industries, that use resins for treatment of liquid wastes. Pilot-scale studies were to be completed in FY 1995, but could not be due to a reduction in funding. Instead, a compilation of pilot-scale tests with organic resins performed under the guidance of SRTC was provided in this report. The studies which will be discussed used a resorcinol- formaldehyde resin loaded with non-radioactive cesium, which was fed with simulated wastewater treatment sludge feed. The first study was performed at the SRTC in the mini-melter, 1/100th scale of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter, and also involved limited crucible-scale studies to determine the resin loading obtainable. The other study was performed at the DOE/Industrial Center for Vitrification Research (Center) and involved both crucible and pilot-scale testing in the Stir-Melter stirred-melter. Both studies were successful in vitrifying the resin in simulated radioactive sludge and glass additive feeds.

  4. Synthesis of chitosan resin possessing a phenylarsonic acid moiety for collection/concentration of uranium and its determination by ICP-AES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshita, Koji [Kibi International University, Department of International Conservation Studies for Cultural Properties, Faculty of Cultural Properties, Takahashi, Okayama (Japan); Seo, Kenji; Oshima, Mitsuko; Takayanagi, Toshio; Motomizu, Shoji [Okayama University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Okayama (Japan); Sabarudin, Akhmad [Brawijaya University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Malang, East Java (Indonesia)

    2008-04-15

    A chitosan resin possessing a phenylarsonic acid moiety (phenylarsonic acid type chitosan resin) was developed for the collection and concentration of trace uranium prior to inductively coupled plasma (ICP) atomic emission spectrometry (AES) measurement. The adsorption behavior of 52 elements was systematically examined by packing it in a minicolumn and measuring the elements in the effluent by ICP mass spectrometry. The resin could adsorb several cationic species by a chelating mechanism, and several oxo acids, such as Ti(IV), V(V), Mo(VI), and W(VI), by an anion-exchange mechanism and/or a chelating mechanism. Especially, U(VI) could be adsorbed almost 100% over a wide pH region from pH 4 to 8. Uranium adsorbed was easily eluted with 1 M nitric acid (10 mL), and the 25-fold preconcentration of uranium was achieved by using a proposed column procedure, which could be applied to the determination of trace uranium in seawater by ICP-AES. The limit of detection was 0.1 ng mL{sup -1} for measurement by ICP-AES coupled with 25-fold column preconcentration. (orig.)

  5. A proposed mechanism for nitrate and thicyanate elution of strong base ion exchange resins loaded with copper and gold cyono complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Adélia Moreira; Leão, Versiane Albis; Silva, Carlos Antônio da

    2008-01-01

    The use of ion exchange resins for the recovery of gold cyanide and other base metal cyanocomplexes has been hindered by poor elution, among other factors. To overcome this drawback, saline solutions have been proposed as an eluant for the loaded cyanocomplexes, with nitrate and thiocyanate being the most promising. In the present work, the elution of goldand copper-cyanocomplexes from polyacrylic- and polystyrene-based resins at 50 _C was studied. The results showed that copper cyanide was e...

  6. Immobilization of ion exchange radioactive resins of the TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor; Inmovilizacion de resinas de intercambio ionico radiactivas del reactor nuclear Triga Mark III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia M, H.; Emeterio H, M.; Canizal S, C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, C.P. 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    This work has the objective to develop the process and to define the agglutinating material which allows the immobilization of the ion exchange radioactive resins coming from the TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor contaminated with Ba-133, Co-60, Cs-137, Eu-152, and Mn-54 through the behavior analysis of different immobilization agents such as: bitumens, cement and polyester resin. According to the International Standardization the archetype samples were observed with the following tests: determination of free liquid, leaching, charge resistance, biodegradation, irradiation, thermal cycle, burned resistance. Generally all the tests were satisfactorily achieved, for each agent. Therefore, the polyester resin could be considered as the main immobilizing. (Author)

  7. Acid-catalysed deuterium exchange of aromatic protons. Pt. 3; Accelerated exchange by microwave irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeves, G.J. (Centre of Forensic Sciences, Toronto, ON (Canada))

    1994-03-01

    Conventional acid-catalysed [sup 2]H/[sup 1]H exchange in aromatic rings requires long reaction times, high temperatures and pressure. This paper reports that accelerated deuterium exchange can be achieved in a microwave oven. Experiments were carried out on benzodiazepines, tricyclic antidepressants and phenothiazines. The reaction time was decreased from days to minutes, the preparatory work was simpler than with conventional heating and the labelled products were cleaner. (author).

  8. Ion exchange investigation for recovery of uranium from acidic pregnant leach solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danko Bożena

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article describes studies on the separation of uranium from acid pregnant leach solutions obtained from Polish uranium ores: dictyonema shales and sandstone rocks. Ion exchange chromatography was applied for uranium sorption, using commercially available, strongly basic anion exchanger, Dowex 1. In model experiments, the influence of degree of crosslinking of Dowex 1 on the efficiency of uranium extraction was investigated. The effect of H2SO4 concentration on the breakthrough curve of uranyl ions for the Dowex 1 resins, of different crosslinking: X4, X8 and X10, was examined. Unexpectedly high increase of exchange capacity of uranium was observed in case of Dowex 1X10. This gives potential opportunity of improving the effectiveness of uranium recovery process. Applying column packed with Dowex 1X10, ‘yellow cake’ with ca. 92% yield and high purity of recovered uranium was obtained. A block diagram of the procedure for uranium and lanthanides extraction from acidic leach liquor has been proposed.

  9. Acrylic acid removal by acrylic acid utilizing bacteria from acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene resin manufactured wastewater treatment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C C; Lee, C M

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to isolate the acrylic acid utilizing bacteria from the ABS resin manufactured wastewater treatment system. The bacteria should have the ability to remove acrylic acid and tolerate the acrylonitrile and acrylamide toxicity. The aim is also to understand the performance of isolated pure strain for treating different initial acrylic acid concentrations from synthetic wastewater. The results are: twenty strains were isolated from the ABS resin manufactured wastewater treatment system and twelve of them could utilize 600 mg/l acrylic acid for growth. Seven of twelve strains could tolerate the acrylonitrile and acrylamide toxicity, when the concentration was below 300 mg/l. Bacillus thuringiensis was one of the seven strains and the optimum growth temperature was 32 degrees C. Bacillus thuringiensis could utilize acrylic acid for growth, when the initial acrylic acid concentration was below 1,690.4 mg/l. Besides this, when the initial acrylic acid concentration was below 606.8 mg/l, the acrylic acid removal efficiency exceeded 96.3%. Bacillus thuringiensis could tolerate 295.7 mg/l acrylamide and 198.4 mg/l acrylonitrile toxicity but could not tolerate 297.3 mg/l epsilon-caprolactam.

  10. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 2: Effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Asuka; Matsumoto, Mariko; Higashi, Mami; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning on resin cement bonding to CAD/CAM resin blocks. One of two resin cements, PANAVIA V5 (PV5) or PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX (PSA), were bonded to one of 24 CAD/CAM blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK). Each cement group was divided into four subgroups: no cleaning (Ctl), ultrasonic cleaning (Uc), acid cleaning (Ac) and Uc+Ac. Micro-tensile bond strengths (µTBSs) were measured immediately and 1, 3, and 6 months after water storage. Block surfaces after each treatment were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (p<0.001, F=40), 'resin cement' (p<0.001, F=696) and 'water aging' (p<0.001, F=71). The PV5 group exhibited higher µTBS values than the PSA group. Although cleaning after sandblasting was effective in removing residual alumina particles, it did not affect the long-term bonding durability with non-contaminated CAD/CAM resin blocks.

  11. Predicting the Viscosity of Low VOC Vinyl Ester and Fatty Acid-Based Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    1) (1). Epon 828 , 834, 836, 1001F, 1004F, 1007F, and 1009F (Miller- Stephenson, Danbury, CT) were used as the source of DGEBA. To determine the...Figure 1. The reaction of methacrylic acid with Epon to form vinyl-ester monomer. Pure vinyl ester was prepared via methacrylation of Epon 828 ...resins prepared. Bimodal blends of vinyl-ester monomers (BM-VE) were prepared by methacrylation of blends of Epon 828 , used as the low molecular weight

  12. Screening Analyses of Pinosylvin Stilbenes, Resin Acids and Lignans in Norwegian Conifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Fiksdahl

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The content and distribution of stilbenes and resin acids in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris and spruce (Picea abies, sampled in central Norway, have been examined. The contents of pinosylvin stilbenes in pine heartwood/living knots were 0.2-2/2-8 % (w/w. No stilbenes could be detected in spruce (Picea abies. The resin acid contents of pine sapwood/heartwood and knots were 1-4 and 5-10 % (w/w, respectively. Minor amounts of resin acids (< 0.2/< 0.04 %w/w were identified in spruce wood/knots. The lignan content in knots of Norwegian spruce was 6.5 % (w/w. Diastereomerically pure hydroxymatairesinol (HMR, 84 % of total lignans was readily isolated from this source since only minor quantities (2.6 % of total lignans of the allo-HMR diastereomer was detected. Insignificant amounts of lignans were present in the sapwood. Lignans could not be detected in the sapwood or knots of Norwegian sallow (Salix caprea, birch (Betula pendula or juniper (Juniperus communis.

  13. Screening analyses of pinosylvin stilbenes, resin acids and lignans in Norwegian conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovelstad, Hanne; Leirset, Ingebjorg; Oyaas, Karin; Fiksdahl, Anne

    2006-01-31

    The content and distribution of stilbenes and resin acids in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and spruce (Picea abies), sampled in central Norway, have been examined. The contents of pinosylvin stilbenes in pine heartwood/living knots were 0.2-2/2-8 %(w/w). No stilbenes could be detected in spruce (Picea abies). The resin acid contents of pine sapwood/heartwood and knots were 1-4 and 5-10 % (w/w), respectively. Minor amounts of resin acids (wood/knots. The lignan content in knots of Norwegian spruce was 6.5 % (w/w). Diastereomerically pure hydroxymatairesinol (HMR, 84 % of total lignans) was readily isolated from this source since only minor quantities (2.6 % of total lignans) of the allo-HMR diastereomer was detected. Insignificant amounts of lignans were present in the sapwood. Lignans could not be detected in the sapwood or knots of Norwegian sallow (Salix caprea), birch(Betula pendula) or juniper (Juniperus communis).

  14. Effect of Repeated Acid Challenges on the Color Stability of Resin-Infiltrated Enamel White Spot Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Gomez J, Lara JS, Cortes A. (2012). Infiltrating/sealing proximal caries lesions: a 3-year randomized clinical trial. Journal of Dental Research, 91...infiltration in masking white spot lesions and inhibiting caries , few studies have examined the durability of resin-infiltration against acid challenges. We...infiltration in masking white spot lesions and inhibiting caries , few studies have examined the durability of resin-infiltration against acid challenges. We

  15. Evaluation of Soil Reaction, Exchangeable Acidity and Cation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adequate application of both organic and inorganic fertilizers will improve the organic matter content which will increase the level of CEC of the soils and also liming was recommended to rise the pH of the soils for enhanced production capacity in the study area. Keywords: Exchangeable Acidity, Soil, Pedons and Fertility ...

  16. Cu-exchanged heteropoly acids as efficient and reusable catalysts ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Amidoalkyl naphthol; heteropoly acid; Cu-exchanged salts; ionic liquid; tetrabutylammo- nium bromide. 1. Introduction. Compounds bearing 1,3-amino oxygenated func- tional groups are ubiquitous to a variety of biologi- cally important natural products and potent drugs including a number of nucleoside antibiotics and. HIV ...

  17. Biogenic glutamic acid-based resin: Its synthesis and application in the removal of cobalt(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamiu, Zakariyah A.; Saleh, Tawfik A.; Ali, Shaikh A., E-mail: shaikh@kfupm.edu.sa

    2017-04-05

    Highlights: • A novel resin embedded with metal chelating glutamic acid was synthesized. • The biogenic amino acid residues imparted remarkable efficacy to remove Co(II). • The resin showed excellent ability to remove various metals from wastewater. - Abstract: Inexpensive biogenic glutamic acid has been utilized to synthesize a cross-linked dianionic polyelectrolyte (CDAP) containing metal chelating ligands. Cycloterpolymerization, using azoisobutyronitrile as an initiator, of N,N-diallylglutamic acid hydrochloride, sulfur dioxide and a cross-linker afforded a pH-responsive cross-linked polyzwitterionic acid (CPZA) which upon basification with NaOH was converted into CDAP. The new resin, characterized by a multitude of spectroscopic techniques as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analyses, was evaluated for the removal of Co(II) as a model case under different conditions. The adsorption capacity of 137 mg g{sup −1} does indeed make the resin as one of the most effective sorbents in recent times. The resin leverages its cheap natural source and ease of regeneration in combination with its high and fast uptake capacities to offer a great promise for wastewater treatment. The resin has demonstrated remarkable efficiency in removing toxic metal ions including arsenic from a wastewater sample.

  18. Pulmonary gas exchange and acid-base balance during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickland, Michael K; Lindinger, Michael I; Olfert, I Mark; Heigenhauser, George J F; Hopkins, Susan R

    2013-04-01

    As the first step in the oxygen-transport chain, the lung has a critical task: optimizing the exchange of respiratory gases to maintain delivery of oxygen and the elimination of carbon dioxide. In healthy subjects, gas exchange, as evaluated by the alveolar-to-arterial PO2 difference (A-aDO2), worsens with incremental exercise, and typically reaches an A-aDO2 of approximately 25 mmHg at peak exercise. While there is great individual variability, A-aDO2 is generally largest at peak exercise in subjects with the highest peak oxygen consumption. Inert gas data has shown that the increase in A-aDO2 is explained by decreased ventilation-perfusion matching, and the development of a diffusion limitation for oxygen. Gas exchange data does not indicate the presence of right-to-left intrapulmonary shunt developing with exercise, despite recent data suggesting that large-diameter arteriovenous shunt vessels may be recruited with exercise. At the same time, multisystem mechanisms regulate systemic acid-base balance in integrative processes that involve gas exchange between tissues and the environment and simultaneous net changes in the concentrations of strong and weak ions within, and transfer between, extracellular and intracellular fluids. The physicochemical approach to acid-base balance is used to understand the contributions from independent acid-base variables to measured acid-base disturbances within contracting skeletal muscle, erythrocytes and noncontracting tissues. In muscle, the magnitude of the disturbance is proportional to the concentrations of dissociated weak acids, the rate at which acid equivalents (strong acid) accumulate and the rate at which strong base cations are added to or removed from muscle.

  19. [Effects and mechanism on removing organics and reduction of membrane fouling using granular macro-porous anion exchange resin in drinking water treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huan; Dong, Bing-Zhi; Xu, Guang-Hong; Yan, Zhao-Hui

    2014-05-01

    A granular macro-porous anion exchange resin combined with coagulation was used as pretreatment of microfiltration membrane, and their effects and mechanism on removing organics and reduction of membrane fouling were evaluated. The results showed that resin could be effective in removing organics with medium and small molecular weight ( Mr) but ineffective in removing organics with large Mr, while couagulation could significantly remove organics with large Mr, with a limited removal for organics with medium and small Mr. Using resin alone as pretreatment could be effective in removal of organics but limited in reduction of membrane fouling. With combination of coagulation and resin as pretreatment of microfiltration, not only organics could be removed effectively, but also membrane fouling could be reduced.

  20. Characterization and disposal of ion exchange resins used in nuclear installations; Caracterizacion y disposicion de resinas de intercambio ionico utilizadas en instalaciones nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores E, R.M.; Ortiz O, H.B.; Olguin G, M.T.; Emeterio H, M.; Garcia M, H. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    To dispose of an appropriate way the used ion exchange resins so much in the pool water purification systems of the TRIGA Mark III reactor like in the JS6500 gamma irradiator, of the National Institute of Nuclear Research, were carried out a series of analytic nuclear techniques and complementary conventional to those recommended by the ASTM, with the object of to control and to manage 14 lots of worn out resins appropriately. For its were identified the radioactive isotopes, the resins type, the grade of chemical pollution and the physicochemical degradation of the same ones. The lots of resins that didn't contain radioactive isotopes its were regenerated in an usual way, as long as those that if they controlled them they selected options for its final disposition. The first selected option was the extraction method of ion radioactive isotopes, concentrating the elution product by evaporation. As second option it was carried out the resins stabilization damaged by micro-encapsulation by forged to ambient temperature, using an organic polymer. Previous to the immobilization the resins were pretreated by vacuum drying, pulverization and thermal drying, however before carrying out this last, it was carried out a thermal gravimetric analysis to determine the drying conditions of the resins avoiding its chemical decomposition. (Author)

  1. Carbon dioxide capture using resin-wafer electrodeionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, YuPo J.; Snyder, Seth W.; Trachtenberg, Michael S.; Cowan, Robert M.; Datta, Saurav

    2015-09-08

    The present invention provides a resin-wafer electrodeionization (RW-EDI) apparatus including cathode and anode electrodes separated by a plurality of porous solid ion exchange resin wafers, which when in use are filled with an aqueous fluid. The apparatus includes one or more wafers comprising a basic ion exchange medium, and preferably includes one or more wafers comprising an acidic ion exchange medium. The wafers are separated from one another by ion exchange membranes. The fluid within the acidic and/or basic ion exchange wafers preferably includes, or is in contact with, a carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme to facilitate conversion of bicarbonate ion to carbon dioxide within the acidic medium. A pH suitable for exchange of CO.sub.2 is electrochemically maintained within the basic and acidic ion exchange wafers by applying an electric potential across the cathode and anode.

  2. UREA/ammonium ion removal system for the orbiting frog otolith experiment. [ion exchange resins for water treatment during space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, J. R.; Anselmi, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of using free urease enzyme and ANGC-101 ion exchange resin to remove urea and ammonium ion for space system waste water applications was studied. Specifically examined is the prevention of urea and ammonia toxicity in a 30-day Orbiting Frog Otolith (OFO) flight experiment. It is shown that free urease enzyme used in conjunction with ANGC-101 ion-exchange resin and pH control can control urea and amonium ion concentration in unbuffered recirculating water. In addition, the resin does not adversely effect the bullfrogs by lowering the concentration of cations below critical minimum levels. Further investigations on bioburden control, frog waste excretion on an OFO diet, a trade-off analysis of methods of automating the urea/ammonium ion removal system and fabrication and test of a semiautomated breadboard were recommended as continuing efforts. Photographs of test equipment and test animals are shown.

  3. Isotopically exchangeable Al in coastal lowland acid sulfate soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yvanes-Giuliani, Yliane A.M. [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Centre Européen de Recherche et d' Enseignement des Géosciences de l' Environnement, Aix-Marseille Université, Aix en Provence (France); Fink, D. [Centre Européen de Recherche et d' Enseignement des Géosciences de l' Environnement, Aix-Marseille Université, Aix en Provence (France); Rose, J. [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Waite, T. David [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Collins, Richard N., E-mail: richard.collins@unsw.edu.au [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Periodic discharges of high concentrations of aluminium (Al) causing fish kills and other adverse effects occur worldwide in waterways affected by coastal lowland acid sulfate soils (CLASS). The exchangeability — a metal's ability to readily transfer between the soil solid- and solution-phases — of Al in these soils is therefore of particular importance as it has implications for metal transport, plant availability and toxicity to living organisms. In the present study, the concentrations of isotopically exchangeable Al (E values) were measured in 27 CLASS and compared with common salt extractions (i.e. KCl and CuCl{sub 2}) used to estimate exchangeable soil pools of Al. E values of Al were high in the soils, ranging from 357 to 3040 mg·kg{sup −1}. Exchangeable concentrations estimated using 1 M KCl were consistently lower than measured E values, although a reasonable correlation was obtained between the two values (E = 1.68 × Al{sub KCl}, r{sup 2} = 0.66, n = 25). The addition of a 0.2 M CuCl{sub 2} extraction step improved the 1:1 agreement between extractable and isotopically exchangeable Al concentrations, but lead to significant mobilisation of non-isotopically exchangeable Al in surficial ‘organic-rich’ CLASS having E values < 1000 mg·kg{sup −1}. It was concluded that currently used (i.e. 1 M KCl) methodology severely underestimates exchangeable Al and total actual acidity values in CLASS and should be corrected by a factor similar to the one determined here. - Highlights: • Isotopically exchangeable Al was compared to 1 M KCl or 0.2 M CuCl{sub 2} extractable Al. • 1 M KCl always underestimated isotopically exchangeable Al concentrations. • 0.2 M CuCl{sub 2} mobilised non-isotopically exchangeable Al • 1 M KCl values require correction of ~ 1.7 to reflect exchangeable Al concentrations.

  4. A ten liter stacked microbial desalination cell packed with mixed ion-exchange resins for secondary effluent desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Kuichang; Cai, Jiaxiang; Liang, Shuai; Wu, Shijia; Zhang, Changyong; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia

    2014-08-19

    The architecture and performance of microbial desalination cell (MDC) have been significantly improved in the past few years. However, the application of MDC is still limited in a scope of small-scale (milliliter) reactors and high-salinity-water desalination. In this study, a large-scale (>10 L) stacked MDC packed with mixed ion-exchange resins was fabricated and operated in the batch mode with a salt concentration of 0.5 g/L NaCl, a typical level of domestic wastewater. With circulation flow rate of 80 mL/min, the stacked resin-packed MDC (SR-MDC) achieved a desalination efficiency of 95.8% and a final effluent concentration of 0.02 g/L in 12 h, which is comparable with the effluent quality of reverse osmosis in terms of salinity. Moreover, the SR-MDC kept a stable desalination performance (>93%) when concentrate volume decreased from 2.4 to 0.1 L (diluate/concentrate volume ratio increased from 1:1 to 1:0.04), where only 0.875 L of nonfresh water was consumed to desalinate 1 L of saline water. In addition, the SR-MDC achieved a considerable desalination rate (95.4 mg/h), suggesting a promising application for secondary effluent desalination through deriving biochemical electricity from wastewater.

  5. Natural organic matter (NOM) and pesticides removal using a combination of ion exchange resin and powdered activated carbon (PAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, Hugues; Gallard, Hervé; Suty, Hervé; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2008-03-01

    The combination of anion exchange resins (AERs) and powdered activated carbon (PAC) was studied to remove both natural organic matter (NOM) and pesticides. Experiments were conducted with high dissolved organic carbon (DOC) surface water (about 6.0mg DOC/L) spiked with both atrazine and isoproturon. AERs, like MIEX and IRA938, showed up to 75% removal of DOC after 30min contact time. The addition of PAC after treatment with these AERs only slightly decreased the residual DOC from 1.4 to 1.2mg/L. Experiments conducted with high (200microg/L) and low (1microg/L) initial pesticide concentrations showed that simultaneous and successive combinations of AER and PAC significantly improve the removal of both pesticides compared with PAC treatment on raw water. The improvement of short-term adsorption kinetics was explained by the adsorption of pesticides on AERs (about 5%) and the removal of high molecular weight (MW) NOM structures by AERs that reduce pore blockage phenomena. For 24h contact time with PAC (adsorption isotherms), the benefit of AER treatment was lower, which indicates that the refractory DOC to AER treatment still competes through direct site competition mechanism. MIEX resin had a distinct behavior since the simultaneous treatment with PAC showed no benefit on pesticide adsorption. The presence of fine residues of MIEX was shown to interfere with PAC adsorption.

  6. Synthesis of blue-photoluminescent graphene quantum dots/polystyrenic anion-exchange resin for Fe(III) detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenjun, E-mail: wjzhang@hebut.edu.cn; Gan, Jie

    2016-05-30

    Highlights: • GQD/PS-AER was prepared as a solid fluorescent sensor with millimeter size. • The GQD/PS-AER sensor could detect Fe{sup 3+} ions selectively. • The GQD/PS-AER sensor could be reusable. • This method is simple and economical. - Abstract: A novel solid fluorescent sensor with millimeter size, based on graphene quantum dots/polystyrenic anion-exchange resin (GQDs/PS-AER) was obtained for the detection of Fe{sup 3+}. The linear response range of Fe{sup 3+} was obtained from 1 μM to 7 μM and the detection limit was as low as 0.65 μM. In addition, the sensor could be regenerated by adding complexing agent EDTA and be separated by using simple filtration.

  7. Effective and selective extraction of noble metal nanoparticles from environmental water through a noncovalent reversible reaction on an ionic exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingxiangyu; Leopold, Kerstin; Schuster, Michael

    2012-09-21

    Capable of preserving the size and shape of nanoparticles, a novel method to effectively and selectively extract noble metal nanoparticles even at the 80 ng L(-1) level from real environmental water was designed and performed using a noncovalent reversible adsorption onto an ionic exchange resin.

  8. Mineral Separation in a CELSS by Ion-exchange Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballou, E. V.; Spitze, L. A.; Wong, F. W.; Wydeven, T.; Johnson, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    Operational parameters pertinent to ion exchange chromatography separation were identified. The experiments were performed with 9 mm diameter ion exchange columns and conventional column accessories. The cation separation beds were packed with AG 50W-X2 strong acid cation exchange resin in H(+) form and 200-400 dry mesh particle size. The stripper beds used in some experiments were packed with AG 1-XB strong base cation exchange resin in OH(-) form and 200-400 dry mesh particle size.

  9. Non-destructive evaluation by terahertz spectroscopy for penetration of acid solutions into epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kusano

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Epoxy resins are used as high-performance thermosetting linings to protect substrates under corrosive environments. However, in a severe corrosive chemical solution, such protective layers may degrade with long time due to penetrations of solvent and solute molecules into resin network. In this regard, the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS is a promising tool for non-destructive evaluation of the penetrant amounts due to high transparency of such plastic materials and high sensitivity to the molecular vibrations in terahertz spectral range. In this work, the complex refractive indexes n and κ of epoxy specimens were measured after immersion into sulfuric acid solutions and compared with penetrated mass fractions of water and acid ions. It was found that n and κ depended linearly with water and sulfuric acid mass fraction in specimens, and κ of sulfuric acid immersed specimens was lager at higher frequency. While the calculated Δκ agreed well with THz-TDS measurement by THz-TDS, the calculated Δn was higher than the measurement. The difference may be attributed to the water and sulfuric states in the specimen.

  10. Study the adsorption of sulfates by high cross-linked polystyrene divinylbenzene anion-exchange resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathy, Mahmoud; Moghny, Th. Abdel; Awadallah, Ahmed E.; El-Bellihi, Abdel-Hameed A.-A.

    2017-03-01

    In response to rising concerns about the effect of sulfate on water quality, human health, and agriculture, many jurisdictions around the world are imposing tighter regulations for sulfate discharge. This is driving the need for environmental compliance in industries like mining, metal processing, pulp and paper, sewage treatment, and chemical manufacturing. The sulfate removal from synthetic water by high cross-linked polystyrene divinylbenzene resin was studied at batch experiments in this study. The effect of pH, contact time, sulfates concentration, and adsorbent dose on the sulfate sequestration was investigated. The optimum conditions were studied on Saline water as a case study. The results showed that with increasing of the absorbent amount; contact time, and pH improve the efficiency of sulfate removal. The maximum sulfates uptake was obtained in pH and contact time 3.0 and 120 min, respectively. Also, with increasing initial concentration of sulfates in water, the efficiency of sulfate removal decreased. The obtained results in this study were matched with Freundlich isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic. The maximum adsorption capacity (Qm) and constant rate were found 0.318 (mg/g) and 0.21 (mg/g.min), respectively. This study also showed that in the optimum conditions, the sulfate removal efficiency from Saline water by 0.1 mg/L sulfates was 65.64 %. Eventually, high cross-linked polystyrene divinylbenzene resin is recommended as a suitable and low cost absorbent to sulfate removal from aqueous solutions.

  11. Phosphoric acid esters cannot replace polyvinylphosphonic acid as phosphoprotein analogs in biomimetic remineralization of resin-bonded dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Sui; Kim, Young Kyung; Toledano, Manuel; Breschi, Lorenzo; Ling, Jun Qi; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2009-10-01

    Polyvinylphosphonic acid (PVPA), a biomimetic analog of phosphoproteins, is crucial for recruiting polyacrylic acid (PAA)-stabilized amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecursors during biomimetic remineralization of dentin collagen matrices. This study tested the null hypothesis that phosphoric acid esters of methacrylates in dentin adhesives cannot replace PVPA during bimimetic remineralization of resin-dentin interfaces. Human dentin specimens were bonded with: (I) XP Bond, an etch-and-rinse adhesive using moist bonding; (II) XP Bond using dry bonding; (III) Adper Prompt L-Pop, a self-etching adhesive. The control medium contained only set Portland cement and a simulated body fluid (SBF) without any biomimetic analog. Two experimental Portland cement/SBF remineralization media were evaluated: the first contained PAA as the sole biomimetic analog, the second contained PAA and PVPA as dual biomimetic analogs. No remineralization of the resin-dentin interfaces could be identified from specimens immersed in the control medium. After 2-4 months in the first experimental medium, specimens exhibited either no remineralization or large crystal formation within hybrid layers. Only specimens immersed in the second remineralization medium produced nanocrystals that accounted for intrafibrillar remineralization within hybrid layers. The null hypothesis could not be rejected; phosphoric acid esters in dentin adhesives cannot replace PVPA during biomimetic remineralization of adhesive-bonded dentin.

  12. Application of 10% Ascorbic Acid Improves Resin Shear Bond Stregth in Bleached Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamizar Kamizar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Restoration of the teeth immediately after bleaching with H2O2 35% is contraindicated due to the remnants of free radical that will stay inside dentin for 2-3 weeks which will compromise the adhesiveness of composite resin. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of 10% ascorbic acid on shear bond strength of composite placed on bleached dentin. Methods:Twenty seven samples were divided equally into three groups. Group 1: dentin was etched with 35% phosphoric acid; Group 2: dentin was bleached with 35% H2O2 followed by etching with 35% phosphoric acid; Group 3: dentin was bleached with 35% H2O2, followed by application of 10% ascorbic acid and etched with 35% phosphoric acid. All samples were then stored at 370C for 24 hours. The Universal Testing Machine was used to measure shear bond strength and the results were analyzed with Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney test. Results: After nine independent experiments, 10% ascorbic acid application on bleached dentin resulted in highest increased in bond stregth (56.04±11.06MPa compared to Group 2 (29.09±7.63MPa and Group 1 (25.55±2.22MPa and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.05. Conclusion: Application of 10% ascorbic acid to the bleached dentin improved the shear bond strength of resin composite.

  13. Technetium partitioning for the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System: anion exchange studies for partitioning technetium from synthetic DSSF and DSS simulants and actual Hanford wastes (101-SY and 103-SY) using Rellex-HPQ resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Norman C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Radzinski, Susan D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ball, Jason R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ashley, Kenneth R. [East Texas State Univ., Commerce, TX (United States); Cobb, Steven L [East Texas State Univ., Commerce, TX (United States); Cutrell, Brent [East Texas State Univ., Commerce, TX (United States); Adams, J Michael [East Texas State Univ., Commerce, TX (United States); Johnson, Coy [East Texas State Univ., Commerce, TX (United States); Whitener, Glenn D [Macalester College, St Paul, MN (United States)

    1995-12-15

    This combined annual report fufills the FY95 milestones for the TWRS technetium partitioning programs "Column Ion Exchange Test for Technetium Removal from synthetic DSSF Waste" and "Column Ion Exchange Test for Technetium Removal from Actual DSSF Waste." The report describes batch and column experiments on the sorption of technetium from DSSF-7, DSSF-5, DSS, 101-SY and 103-SY simulants by Reillex-HPQ anion exchange resin and other resins.

  14. Iodine adsorption on ion-exchange resins and activated carbons: batch testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-09-30

    Iodine sorption onto seven resins and six carbon materials was evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36 on the Hanford Site. These materials were tested using a range of solution-to-solid ratios. The test results are as follows. The efficacy of the resin and granular activated carbon materials was less than predicted based on manufacturers’ performance data. It is hypothesized that this is due to the differences in speciation previously determined for Hanford groundwater. The sorption of iodine is affected by the iodine species in the source water. Iodine loading on resins using source water ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 189.9 to 227.0 mL/g. The sorption values when the iodine is converted to iodide ranged from 2.75 to 5.90 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 536.3 to 2979.6 mL/g. It is recommended that methods to convert iodine to iodide be investigated in fiscal year (FY) 2015. The chemicals used to convert iodine to iodate adversely affected the sorption of iodine onto the carbon materials. Using as-received source water, loading and Kd values ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g and 189.8 to 226.3 mL/g respectively. After treatment, loading and Kd values could not be calculated because there was little change between the initial and final iodine concentration. It is recommended the cause of the decrease in iodine sorption be investigated in FY15. In direct support of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has evaluated samples from within the 200W pump and treat bioreactors. As part of this analysis, pictures taken within the bioreactor reveal a precipitate that, based on physical properties and known aqueous chemistry, is hypothesized to be iron pyrite or chalcopyrite, which could affect iodine adsorption. It is recommended these materials be tested at different solution-to-solid ratios in FY15 to determine their effect on iodine

  15. Characterization of Group V Dubnium Homologs on DGA Extraction Chromatography Resin from Nitric and Hydrofluoric Acid Matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Despotopulos, J D; Sudowe, R

    2012-02-21

    somewhere between Nb and Pa. Much more recent studies have examined the properties of Db from HNO{sub 3}/HF matrices, and suggest Db forms complexes similar to those of Pa. Very little experimental work into the behavior of element 114 has been performed. Thermochromatography experiments of three atoms of element 114 indicate that the element 114 is at least as volatile as Hg, At, and element 112. Lead was shown to deposit on gold at temperatures about 1000 C higher than the atoms of element 114. Results indicate a substantially increased stability of element 114. No liquid phase studies of element 114 or its homologs (Pb, Sn, Ge) or pseudo-homologs (Hg, Cd) have been performed. Theoretical predictions indicate that element 114 is should have a much more stable +2 oxidation state and neutral state than Pb, which would result in element 114 being less reactive and less metallic than Pb. The relativistic effects on the 7p{sub 1/2} electrons are predicted to cause a diagonal relationship to be introduced into the periodic table. Therefore, 114{sup 2+} is expected to behave as if it were somewhere between Hg{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Pb{sup 2+}. In this work two commercially available extraction chromatography resins are evaluated, one for the separation of Db homologs and pseudo?homologs from each other as well as from potential interfering elements such as Group IV Rf homologs and actinides, and the other for separation of element 114 homologs. One resin, Eichrom's DGA resin, contains a N,N,N',N'-tetra-n-octyldiglycolamide extractant, which separates analytes based on both size and charge characteristics of the solvated metal species, coated on an inert support. The DGA resin was examined for Db chemical systems, and shows a high degree of selectivity for tri-, tetra-, and hexavalent metal ions in multiple acid matrices with fast kinetics. The other resin, Eichrom's Pb resin, contains a di-t-butylcyclohexano 18-crown-6 extractant with isodecanol solvent

  16. Bilirubin and bile acids removal by haemoperfusion through synthetic resin "Persorb".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, K; Malý, J; Horký, J; Tlustáková, M; Kálal, J; Vrána, M

    1990-01-01

    A new type of styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer coated with polyhema was tested for biocompatibility and ability to remove bile acid, bilirubin, phenols and cholesterol in dogs with surgically induced biliary obstruction. After 4-hr hemoperfusion through a polypropylene column containing 325 g of resin, performed 7-10 days after the ligature of the cystic and common bile duct, the serum levels of bile acids, bilirubin, phenols and cholesterol decreased by 60.9 +/- 30.3% (p less than 0.001), 34.8 +/- 12.2% (p less than 0.001), 19.4 +/- 15.6% (p less than 0.001) and 15.3 +/- 4.2% (p less than 0.05), respectively. The procedure was well tolerated, no bleeding or other adverse reactions occurred. The average platelet count decreased by 19.4 +/- 15.6% (p less than 0.05). Hemoperfusion through the Czechoslovak resin coated with polyhema is safe and efficient for removal of bile acids and other protein-bound and lipid-soluble substances which accumulate in cholestatic syndromes and hepatic failure. Thus, it may play an important role in the treatment of such events as a method of artificial liver support.

  17. Thermal and Mechanical Characteristics of Polymer Composites Based on Epoxy Resin, Aluminium Nanopowders and Boric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, O. B.; Melnikova, T. V.; Visakh, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    The epoxy polymers are characterized by low thermal stability and high flammability. Nanoparticles are considered to be effective fillers of polymer composites for improving their thermal and functional properties. In this work, the epoxy composites were prepared using epoxy resin ED-20, polyethylene polyamine as a hardener, aluminum nanopowder and boric acid fine powder as flame-retardant filler. The thermal characteristics of the obtained samples were studied using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The mechanical characteristics of epoxy composites were also studied. It was found that an addition of all fillers enhances the thermal stability and mechanical characteristics of the epoxy composites. The best thermal stability showed the epoxy composite filled with boric acid. The highest flexural properties showed the epoxy composite based on the combination of boric acid and aluminum nanopowder.

  18. Biophysical study of resin acid effects on phospholipid membrane structure and properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagalski, Vivien; Barker, Robert; Topgaard, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic resin acids (RAs) are synthesized by conifer trees as part of their defense mechanisms. One of the functions of RAs in plant defense is suggested to be the perturbation of the cellular membrane. However, there is a vast diversity of chemical structures within this class of molecules...... membranes and the polar lipid extract of soybeans. The complementarity of the biophysical techniques used (NMR, DLS, NR, DSC, Cryo-TEM) allowed correlating changes at the vesicle level with changes at the molecular level and the co-localization of RAs within DPPC monolayer. Effects on DPPC membranes...

  19. Removal of Chlorinated Resin and Fatty Acids from Paper Mill wastewater through Constructed Wetland

    OpenAIRE

    Ashutosh Kumar Choudhary; Satish Kumar; Chhaya Sharma

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the performance of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland (HSSF-CW) for the removal of chlorinated resin and fatty acids (RFAs) from pulp and paper mill wastewater. The dimensions of the treatment system were 3.5 m x 1.5 m x 0.28 m with surface area of 5.25 m2, filled with fine sand and gravel. The cell was planted with an ornamental plant species Canna indica. The removal efficiency of chlorinated RFAs was in the range of 92-96% at the hydrau...

  20. Swelling behavior of ion exchange resins incorporated in tri-calcium silicate cement matrix: II. Mechanical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neji, M., E-mail: mejdi.neji@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, Laboratoire d' Etude du Comportement des Bétons et des Argiles, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Polytech Lille, LML UMR, 8107 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Bary, B.; Le Bescop, P. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, Laboratoire d' Etude du Comportement des Bétons et des Argiles, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Burlion, N. [Polytech Lille, LML UMR, 8107 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents the second part of a study aiming at modelling the mechanical behavior of composites made up of ion exchange resins (IER) solidified in a tri-calcium silicate cement paste (C{sub 3}S). Such composites may be subjected to internal pressures due to ion exchange processes between ionic species which are in IER and interstitial solution of the cement paste. The reactive transport model developed in the companion paper is coupled in this study to a multi-scale approach describing the mechanical behavior of the material. It is based on an analogy with thermomechanics for taking in account the IER internal pressures, and on Eshelby-based homogenization techniques to estimate both mechanical and coupling parameters. A laboratory test has been set up to measure the macroscopic strain caused by the swelling phenomenon. The model has been finally implemented in a finite elements software. The simulation of the laboratory tests has been performed and the results have been analyzed and compared to experimental data. - Highlights: • Experimental analysis about mechanical behavior of a composite material. • Chemo-Mechanical-Transport modeling on a composite material made up with IER embedded into cement paste matrix. • Multi-scale modeling.

  1. Ligand-exchange chromatography of aromatic amines on resin-bound cobalt ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pehlivan, E.; Vural, U.S.; Ayar, A.; Yildiz, S. [Selcuk Univ., Konya (Turkey)

    1996-06-01

    The use of cobalt metal for the selective separation of aromatic amines is completed with a chemically bonded diamine and glyoxime functional groups onto Lycopodium clavatum. Oximes and amines are excellent complexing agents for transition metal ions. Cobalt(II) metal ions can easily be immobilized on bis-diaminoethyl-glyoximated sporopollenin (bDAEG-sporopollenin). The ligand-exchange behavior of modified Lycopodium clavatum with respect to aromatic amines was investigated. This will permit the evaluation of bDAEG-sporopollenin ligand exchangers for their utilization as sorbents in the recovery, pollution control, and elimination of amines from wastewater.

  2. The influence of EI-21 redox ion-exchange resins on the secondary-coolant circuit water chemistry of vehicular nuclear power installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskvin, L. N.; Rakov, V. T.

    2015-06-01

    The results obtained from testing the secondary-coolant circuit water chemistry of full-scale land-based prototype bench models of vehicular nuclear power installations equipped with water-cooled water-moderated and liquid-metal reactor plants are presented. The influence of copper-containing redox ionexchange resins intended for chemically deoxygenating steam condensate on the working fluid circulation loop's water chemistry is determined. The influence of redox ion-exchange resins on the water chemistry is evaluated by generalizing an array of data obtained in the course of extended monitoring using the methods relating to physicochemical analysis of the quality of condensate-feedwater path media and the methods relating to metallographic analysis of the state of a faulty steam generator's tube system surfaces. The deoxygenating effectiveness of the normal state turbine condensate vacuum deaeration system is experimentally determined. The refusal from applying redox ion-exchange resins in the condensate polishing ion-exchange filters is formulated based on the obtained data on the adverse effect of copper-containing redox ionexchange resins on the condensate-feedwater path water chemistry and based on the data testifying a sufficient effect from using the normal state turbine condensate vacuum deaeration system. Data on long-term operation of the prototype bench model of a vehicular nuclear power installation without subjecting the turbine condensate to chemical deoxygenation are presented.

  3. The removal of toxic metals from liquid effluents by ion exchange resins. Part lll:Copper(ll/Sulphate/Amberlite 200

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alguacil, F. J.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Copper(II adsorption from aqueous sulphate media on Amberlite 200 was investigated. The influence of operating variables such as aqueous pH, temperature and copper concentration on the metal adsorption kinetics was measured. The copper{II uptake is best fitted to the film-diffusion controlled process. The resin has been used in minicolumns to investigate its performance under dynamics conditions. Copper(II desorption from the resin is accomplished using sulphuric acid solutions.

    Se estudia la adsorción de cobre(II, de disoluciones en medio sulfato, en la resina Amberlite 200. La cinética de adsorción del metal se ha estudiado en función de una serie de variables experimentales: pH de la fase acuosa, temperatura y concentración del metal en el medio acuoso. La adsorción de cobre(II se puede correlacionar como controlada por un proceso de difusión en capa límite. Se ha utilizado la resina en minicolumnas para estudiar su comportamiento bajo condiciones dinámicas. La desorción del cobre(II se lleva a cabo con disoluciones de ácido sulfúrico.

  4. Importance of the solvation degree of peptide-resin beads for amine groups determination by the picric acid method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cilli Eduardo M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The classic and important picric acid method used in polymers biochemical and chemical fields of polymers for amine group quantification was chosen in this work as a model for evaluating the influence of the resin bead solvation during an analytical procedure. It was observed that this method, proposed almost three decades ago, failed to quantify amine groups of peptidyl-resin containing aggregating and polar sequence. This was due to inefficient solvation of resin beads when only CH2Cl2 was used for picrate anion binding and subsequent washing steps. It was demonstrated that the use of CH2Cl2/DMF (dimethylformamide and CH2Cl2/EtOH solutions during these steps allows correct determination of peptidyl-resin amine groups. Besides the importance for the solid phase peptide synthesis methodology itself, these findings also represent the first quantitative demonstration of the relationship between solvation degree and the efficiency of a polymer-supported analytical method.

  5. Removal of Ca(II) and Mg(II) from potassium chromate solution on Amberlite IRC 748 synthetic resin by ion exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhihui; Qi, Tao; Qu, Jingkui; Wang, Lina; Chu, Jinglong

    2009-08-15

    Experimental measurements have been made on the batch ion exchange of Ca(II) and Mg(II) from potassium chromate solution using cation exchanger of Amberlite IRC 748 as K+ form. The ion exchange behavior of two alkaline-earth metals on the resin, depending on contact time, pH, temperature and resin dosage was studied. The adsorption isotherms were described by means of the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. For Ca(II) ion, the Langmuir model represented the adsorption process better than the Freundlich model. The maximum ion exchange capacity was found to be 47.21 mg g(-1) for Ca(II) and 27.70 mg g(-1) for Mg(II). The kinetic data were tested using Lagergren-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. Kinetic data correlated well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, indicating that the chemical adsorption was the rate-limiting step. Various thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy (DeltaG degrees ), enthalpy (DeltaH degrees ) and entropy (DeltaS degrees ) were also calculated. These parameters showed that the ion exchange of Ca(II) and Mg(II) from potassium chromate solution was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic process in nature. The activation energy of ion-exchange (E(a)) was determined as 12.34 kJ mol(-1) for Ca(II) and 9.865 kJ mol(-1) for Mg(II) according to the Arrhenius equation.

  6. Use of strong anion exchange resins for the removal of perfluoroalkylated substances from contaminated drinking water in batch and continuous pilot plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaggia, Alessandro; Conte, Lino; Falletti, Luigi; Fant, Massimo; Chiorboli, Andrea

    2016-03-15

    In recent years abnormally high levels of perfluoroalkylated substances (PFAS) have been detected both in surface and underground water sampled in an area covering approximately 150 square kilometers in the Veneto region (Italy) indicating the presence of a pollution point source (fluorochemicals production plant). Adsorption on granular activated carbon is an emergency measure which is poorly effective requiring frequent replacement. This work focuses on the application of three strong anion exchange resins (Purolite® A520E, A600E and A532E) for the removal of traces of PFOA, PFOS, PFBA and PFBS (concentration of hundreds of ng L(-1)) from drinking water. This technology is attractive for the possibility of reusing resins after an in-situ regeneration step. A strong relationship between the hydrophobicity of the exchange functional group of the resin and its capacity in removing PFAS exists. A600E (non hydrophobic) and A520E (fairly hydrophobic) show a reduced sorption capacity compared to A532E (highly hydrophobic). While A600E and A520E can be regenerated with solvent-less dilute solutions of non-toxic NH4Cl and NH4OH, A532E requires concentrated solutions of methanol or ethanol and 1% NH4Cl and for the sake of this work it was regarded as non-regenerable. The volume of regeneration effluents requiring incineration can be efficiently reduced by more than 96.5% by using reverse osmosis coupled with under-vacuum evaporation. Transmission electron analysis on saturated resins showed that large molecular macro-aggregates of PFAS can form in the intraparticle pores of resin indicating that ion exchange is not the only mechanism involved in PFAS removal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Production of citric acid using its extraction wastewater treated by anaerobic digestion and ion exchange in an integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Chen, Yang-Qiu; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2014-08-01

    In order to solve the problem of extraction wastewater pollution in citric acid industry, an integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process is proposed in this study. Extraction wastewater was treated by mesophilic anaerobic digestion and then used to make mash for the next batch of citric acid fermentation. The recycling process was done for seven batches. Citric acid production (82.4 g/L on average) decreased by 34.1 % in the recycling batches (2nd-7th) compared with the first batch. And the residual reducing sugar exceeded 40 g/L on average in the recycling batches. Pigment substances, acetic acid, ammonium, and metal ions in anaerobic digestion effluent (ADE) were considered to be the inhibitors, and their effects on the fermentation were studied. Results indicated that ammonium, Na(+) and K(+) in the ADE significantly inhibited citric acid fermentation. Therefore, the ADE was treated by acidic cation exchange resin prior to reuse to make mash for citric acid fermentation. The recycling process was performed for ten batches, and citric acid productions in the recycling batches were 126.6 g/L on average, increasing by 1.7 % compared with the first batch. This process could eliminate extraction wastewater discharge and reduce water resource consumption.

  8. Removal of tartrazine from aqueous solutions by strongly basic polystyrene anion exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzkiewicz, Monika; Hubicki, Zbigniew

    2009-05-30

    The removal of tartrazine from aqueous solutions onto the strongly basic polystyrene anion exchangers of type 1 (Amberlite IRA-900) and type 2 (Amberlite IRA-910) was investigated. The experimental data obtained at 100, 200, 300 and 500 mg/dm(3) initial concentrations at 20 degrees C were applied to the pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and Weber-Morris kinetic models. The calculated sorption capacities (q(e,cal)) and the rate constant of the first order adsorption (k(1)) were determined. The pseudo-second order kinetic constants (k(2)) and capacities were calculated from the plots of t/q(t) vs. t, 1/q(t) vs. 1/t, 1/t vs. 1/q(t) and q(t)/t vs. q(t) for type 1, type 2, type 3 and type 4 of the pseudo-second order expression, respectively. The influence of phase contact time, solution pH and temperature on tartrazine removal was also discussed. The FTIR spectra of pure anion exchangers and those loaded with tartrazine were recorded, too.

  9. Influence of ozone and paracetic acid disinfection on adhesion of resilient liners to acrylic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of paracetic acid (PAA) and ozone disinfection on the tensile bond strength (TBS) of silicone-based resilient liners to acrylic resins. MATERIALS AND METHODS One hundred and twenty dumbbell shaped heat-polymerized acrylic resins were prepared. From the mid segment of the specimens, 3 mm of acrylic were grinded off and separated parts were reattached by resilient liners. The specimens were divided into 2 control (control1, control7) and 4 test groups of PAA and ozone disinfection (PAA1, PAA7, ozone1 and ozone7; n=10). While control groups were immersed in distilled water for 10 min (control1) and 7 days (control7), test groups were subjected to PAA (16 g/L) or ozone rich water (4 mg/L) for 1 cycle (10 min for PAA and 60 min for ozone) per day for 7 days prior to tensile tests. Measurements of the TBS were analyzed using 3-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. RESULTS Adhesive strength of Mollosil decreased significantly by application of ozone disinfection. PAA disinfection had no negative effect on the TBS values of Mollosil and Molloplast B to acrylic resin. Single application of ozone disinfection did not have any negative effect on TBS values of Molloplast B, but prolonged exposure to ozone decreased its adhesive strength. CONCLUSION The adhesion of resilient liners to acrylic was not adversely affected by PAA disinfection. Immersion in ozonated water significantly decreased TBS of Mollosil. Prolonged exposure to ozone negatively affects adhesion of Molloplast B to denture base materials. PMID:27555898

  10. Structure/function studies of resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) and phenol-formaldehyde (P-F) copolymer ion-exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubler, T.L.; Franz, J.A.; Shaw, W.J.; Hogan, M.O.; Hallen, R.T.; Brown, G.N.; Linehan, J.C.

    1996-09-01

    he U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site was established to produce plutonium for the U.S. defense mission. Over the course of decades, hazardous, toxic, and radioactive chemical wastes were generated and disposed of in a variety of ways including storage in underground tanks. An estimated 180 million tons of high-level radioactive wastes are stored in 177 underground storage tanks. During production of fissile plutonium, large quantities of 90Sr and 137CS were produced. The high abundance and intermediate length half- lives of these fission products are the reason that effort is directed toward selective removal of these radionuclides from the bulk waste stream before final tank waste disposal is effected. Economically, it is desirable to remove the highly radioactive fraction of the tank waste for vitrification. Ion-exchange technology is being evaluated for removing cesium from Hanford Site waste tanks. This report summarizes data and analysis performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)for both resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) and phenol-formaldehyde (P-F) resins and relates their observed differences in performance and chemical stability to their structure. The experimental approach used to characterize the resins was conducted using primarily two types of data: batch distribution coefficients (Kds) and solid-state 13C NMR. Comparison of these data for a particular resin allowed correlation of resin performance to resin structure. Additional characterization techniques included solid-state 19F NMR, and elemental analyses.

  11. Toxic effects of some conifer resin acids and tea tree oil on human epithelial and fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, T A; Johansson, A; Gref, R

    1996-02-22

    The present study was undertaken to assess and compare the in vitro cytotoxic effects of three resin acid analogues: dehydrobietic acid, podocarpic acid, O-methylpodocarpic acid; an essential oil from Australia (tea tree oil); and tapped oleoresin from Thailand, on human epithelial and fibroblast cells, using a quantitative neutral red spectrophotometric assay. All of the investigated compounds except for tea tree oil exhibited a cytotoxic activity which was proportional to their concentrations and time of exposure up to 24 h, i.e. higher concentrations and longer time of exposure caused increased cell death. Dehydroabietic acid and the oleoresin were the most toxic compounds followed by O-methylpodocarpic acid, whereas podocarpic acid and tea tree oil showed a lower level of toxicity. On the basis on these findings it is concluded that an isopropyl group on the aromatic C-ring is of great importance for the cytotoxicity of the tested abietane resin acids, thus indicating that the cytotoxic activity of oleoresins most probably is caused by synergistic or additive effects of resin acids. The results from this work support the view that antibacterial activity parallels cytotoxic activity which suggests a similar mode of action, most probably exerted by membrane-associated reactions.

  12. Ion Exchange Distribution Coefficient Tests and Computer Modeling at High Ionic Strength Supporting Technetium Removal Resin Maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Charles A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hamm, L. Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Smith, Frank G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-12-19

    The primary treatment of the tank waste at the DOE Hanford site will be done in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) that is currently under construction. The baseline plan for this facility is to treat the waste, splitting it into High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW). Both waste streams are then separately vitrified as glass and poured into canisters for disposition. The LAW glass will be disposed onsite in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). There are currently no plans to treat the waste to remove technetium, so its disposition path is the LAW glass. Due to the water solubility properties of pertechnetate and long half-life of 99Tc, effective management of 99Tc is important to the overall success of the Hanford River Protection Project mission. To achieve the full target WTP throughput, additional LAW immobilization capacity is needed, and options are being explored to immobilize the supplemental LAW portion of the tank waste. Removal of 99Tc, followed by off-site disposal, would eliminate a key risk contributor for the IDF Performance Assessment (PA) for supplemental waste forms, and has potential to reduce treatment and disposal costs. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing some conceptual flow sheets for supplemental LAW treatment and disposal that could benefit from technetium removal. One of these flowsheets will specifically examine removing 99Tc from the LAW feed stream to supplemental immobilization. To enable an informed decision regarding the viability of technetium removal, further maturation of available technologies is being performed. This report contains results of experimental ion exchange distribution coefficient testing and computer modeling using the resin SuperLig® 639a to selectively remove perrhenate from high ionic strength simulated LAW. It is advantageous to operate at higher concentration in order to treat the waste

  13. Atmospheric deposition of inorganic nitrogen in Spanish forests of Quercus ilex measured with ion-exchange resins and conventional collectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gomez, Héctor; Izquieta-Rojano, Sheila; Aguillaume, Laura; González-Fernández, Ignacio; Valiño, Fernando; Elustondo, David; Santamaría, Jesús M; Àvila, Anna; Fenn, Mark E; Alonso, Rocío

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition is one of the main threats for biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Measurement techniques like ion-exchange resin collectors (IECs), which are less expensive and time-consuming than conventional methods, are gaining relevance in the study of atmospheric deposition and are recommended to expand monitoring networks. In the present work, bulk and throughfall deposition of inorganic nitrogen were monitored in three different holm oak forests in Spain during two years. The results obtained with IECs were contrasted with a conventional technique using bottle collectors and with a literature review of similar studies. The performance of IECs in comparison with the conventional method was good for measuring bulk deposition of nitrate and acceptable for ammonium and total dissolved inorganic nitrogen. Mean annual bulk deposition of inorganic nitrogen ranged 3.09-5.43 kg N ha(-1) according to IEC methodology, and 2.42-6.83 kg N ha(-1) y(-1) using the conventional method. Intra-annual variability of the net throughfall deposition of nitrogen measured with the conventional method revealed the existence of input pulses of nitrogen into the forest soil after dry periods, presumably originated from the washing of dry deposition accumulated in the canopy. Important methodological recommendations on the IEC method and discussed, compiled and summarized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Kinetics and mechanism of the sorption of some aromatic amines onto amberlite IRA-904 anion-exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaki, A.B.; El-Sheikh, M.Y.; Evans, J.; El-Safty, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of the sorption of aromatic amines such as o-aminophenol (o-AP), o-phenylenediamine (o-PDA), and p-phenylenediamine (p-PDA) onto Amberlite anion-exchange resin in chloride form was investigated in batch experiments spectrophotometrically at different temperatures. The sorption rate is zero order in all amines sorbed, increasing directly in the order: p-PDA < o-PDA < o-AP, which corresponds to the sequence of the electrostatic contributions to the sorption interactions. The attainments of sorption equilibrium of aromatic amines is seen to be similar. The diffusion coefficients (D) have been calculated by using Fick's equation from the second portions of the sorption/desorption curves; D values ranged from 0.7 to 2.8 x 10{sup {minus}9} cm{sup 2}/s. These results, reflecting the diffusion mechanism, were ascribed to intraparticle diffusion. Arrhenius parameters for the diffusion process and the thermodynamic quantities for the process of equilibrium sorption have been estimated. The effect of a chemical oxidation reaction on intraparticle diffusion was investigated by measuring the intraparticle diffusion of amines during the redox reaction.

  15. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Sorption of Some Aromatic Amines onto Amberlite IRA-904 Anion-Exchange Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki; El-Sheikh; Evans; El-Safty

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of the sorption of aromatic amines such as o-aminophenol (o-AP), o-phenylenediamine (o-PDA), and p-phenylenediamine (p-PDA) onto Amberlite anion-exchange resin in chloride form was investigated in batch experiments spectrophotometrically at different temperatures. The sorption rate is zero order in all amines sorbed, increasing directly in the order: p-PDA

  16. Novel bioactive polyester scaffolds prepared from unsaturated resins based on isosorbide and succinic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Śmiga-Matuszowicz, Monika, E-mail: monika.smiga-matuszowicz@polsl.pl [Silesian University of Technology, Department of Physical Chemistry and Technology of Polymers, M. Strzody Street 9, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Janicki, Bartosz; Jaszcz, Katarzyna; Łukaszczyk, Jan [Silesian University of Technology, Department of Physical Chemistry and Technology of Polymers, M. Strzody Street 9, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Kaczmarek, Marcin [Silesian University of Technology, Department of Biomaterials and Medical Devices Engineering, de Gaulle' a Street 66, 41-800 Zabrze (Poland); Lesiak, Marta; Sieroń, Aleksander L. [Medical University of Silesia, Department of General and Molecular Biology and Genetics, Medyków Street 18, 40-752 Katowice (Poland); Simka, Wojciech [Silesian University of Technology, Department of Chemistry, Inorganic Technology and Fuels, B. Krzywoustego Street 6, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Mierzwiński, Maciej; Kusz, Damian [Medical University of Silesia, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Ziołowa Street 45, 40-635 Katowice (Poland)

    2014-12-01

    In this study new biodegradable materials obtained by crosslinking poly(3-allyloxy-1,2-propylene succinate) (PSAGE) with oligo(isosorbide maleate) (OMIS) and small amount of methyl methacrylate were investigated. The porous scaffolds were obtained in the presence of a foaming system consisted of calcium carbonate/carboxylic acid mixture, creating in situ porous structure during crosslinking of liquid formulations. The maximum crosslinking temperature and setting time, the cured porous materials morphology as well as the effect of their porosity on mechanical properties and hydrolytic degradation process were evaluated. It was found that the kind of carboxylic acid used in the foaming system influenced compressive strength and compressive modulus of porous scaffolds. The MTS cytotoxicity assay was carried out for OMIS using hFOB1.19 cell line. OMIS resin was found to be non-toxic in wide range of concentrations. On the ground of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations and energy X-ray dispersive analysis (EDX) it was found that hydroxyapatite (HA) formation at the scaffolds surfaces within short period of soaking in phosphate buffer solution occurs. After 3 h immersion a compact layer of HA was observed at the surface of the samples. The obtained results suggest potential applicability of resulted new porous crosslinked polymeric materials as temporary bone void fillers. - Highlights: • Isosorbide-based resin was used as a component of biodegradable scaffolds. • CAC/carboxylic acid system was proven as facile method to obtain porous scaffolds. • Porous scaffolds displayed the formation of hydroxyapatite at their surfaces.

  17. The Isomerization of (-)-Menthone to (+)-Isomenthone Catalyzed by an Ion-Exchange Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, Aurora L.; Baca, Nicholas A.; Hampton, Philip D.

    2014-01-01

    A traditional organic chemistry laboratory experiment involves the acid-catalyzed isomerization of (-)-menthone to (+)-isomenthone. This experiment generates large quantities of organic and aqueous waste, and only allows the final ratio of isomers to be determined. A "green" modification has been developed that replaces the mineral acid…

  18. Adsorption of amyloglucosidase from Aspergillus niger NRRL 3122 using ion exchange resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Manera

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Amyloglucosidase enzyme was produced by Aspergillus niger NRRL 3122 from solid-state fermentation, using deffated rice bran as substrate. The effects of process parameters (pH, temperature in the equilibrium partition coefficient for the system amyloglucosidase - resin DEAE-cellulose were investigated, aiming at obtaining the optimum conditions for a subsequent purification process. The highest partition coefficients were obtained using 0.025M Tris-HCl buffer, pH 8.0 and 25ºC. The conditions that supplied the highest partition coefficient were specified, the isotherm that better described the amyloglucosidase process of adsorption obtained. It was observed that the adsorption could be well described by Langmuir equation and the values of Qm and Kd estimated at 133.0 U mL-1 and 15.4 U mL-1, respectively. From the adjustment of the kinetic curves using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm, the adsorption (k1 and desorption (k2 constants were obtained through optimization by the least square procedure, and the values calculated were 2.4x10-3 mL U-1 min-1 for k1 and 0.037 min-1 for k2 .A enzima amiloglicosidase foi produzida por Aspergillus niger NRRL 3122 através de fermentação em estado sólido, tendo como substrato farelo de arroz desengordurado. Os efeitos dos parâmetros de processo (pH e temperatura no coeficiente de partição no equilíbrio, para o sistema amiloglicosidase - resina DEAE-celulose foram investigados, com o objetivo de se obter as melhores condições para um posterior processo de purificação. Os maiores coeficientes de partição foram obtidos usando tampão Tris-HCl 0,025M pH 8,0 e 25°C. Determinadas as condições que forneceram o maior coeficiente de partição obteve-se a isoterma que melhor descrevia o processo de adsorção de amiloglicosidase. Foi verificado que adsorção pode ser bem descrita pela equação de Langmuir e os valores de Qm e Kd foram estimados em 133,0 U mL-1 e 15,4 U mL-1 respectivamente. A

  19. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  20. Reduction of aldehydes and hydrogen cyanide yields in mainstream cigarette smoke using an amine functionalised ion exchange resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duke Martin G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cigarette smoking is a well recognized cause of diseases such as lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cardiovascular disease. Of the more than 5000 identified species in cigarette smoke, at least 150 have toxicological activity. For example, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde have been assigned as Group 1 and Group 2B carcinogens by IARC, and hydrogen cyanide has been identified as a respiratory and cardiovascular toxicant. Active carbon has been shown to be an effective material for the physical adsorption of many of the smoke volatile species. However, physical adsorption of acetaldehyde, formaldehyde and also hydrogen cyanide from smoke is less effective using carbon. Alternative methods for the removal of these species from cigarette smoke are therefore of interest. A macroporous, polystyrene based ion-exchange resin (Diaion®CR20 with surface amine group functionality has been investigated for its ability to react with aldehydes and HCN in an aerosol stream, and thus selectively reduce the yields of these compounds (in particular formaldehyde in mainstream cigarette smoke. Results Resin surface chemistry was characterized using vapour sorption, XPS, TOF-SIMS and 15N NMR. Diaion®CR20 was found to have structural characteristics indicating weak physisorption properties, but sufficient surface functionalities to selectively remove aldehydes and HCN from cigarette smoke. Using 60 mg of Diaion®CR20 in a cigarette cavity filter gave reductions in smoke formaldehyde greater than 50% (estimated to be equivalent to >80% of the formaldehyde present in the smoke vapour phase independent of a range of flow rates. Substantial removal of HCN (>80% and acetaldehyde (>60% was also observed. The performance of Diaion®CR20 was found to be consistent over a test period of 6 months. The overall adsorption for the majority of smoke compounds measured appeared to follow a pseudo-first order approximation to second order

  1. Acute Hypocalcemia and Metabolic Alkalosis in Children on Cation-Exchange Resin Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aadil Kakajiwala

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Sodium polystyrene sulfonate (SPS is a chelating agent used for the treatment of hyperkalemia. SPS has a wide range of exchange capacity requiring close monitoring of serum electrolytes. We observed two patients who developed acute hypocalcemia and increased metabolic alkalosis after initiating SPS therapy. We report these cases to draw attention to the potential risk of this medication in pediatric patients. Case Diagnosis/Treatment. Two children with chronic kidney disease on dialysis were started on SPS for hyperkalemia. Within a week after initiation of the medication, both patients developed hypocalcemia on routine labs without overt clinical manifestations. The hypocalcemia was rapidly corrected with oral supplementation and discontinuation of SPS. Conclusions. Severe hypocalcemia can develop after SPS therapy. The metabolic alkalosis in these patients associated with the hypocalcemia put them at increased risk for complications. Hence, careful attention must be paid to the state of calcium metabolism in all patients receiving SPS. Often calcium supplementation is required to maintain normal calcium levels.

  2. Multi-state steric mass action model and case study on complex high loading behavior of mAb on ion exchange tentacle resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrich, Juliane; Heymann, William; Leweke, Samuel; Hunt, Stephen; Todd, Robert; Kunert, Christian; Johnson, Will; von Lieres, Eric

    2017-11-24

    Tentacle resins for IEX are increasingly applied in preparative chromatography for their higher selectivity and higher capacities in comparison to IEX resins without tentacles. However, tentacle resins are often observed to cause unusual elution behavior of monoclonal antibodies under high loading conditions. Understanding this elution behavior is important for a quality by design approach, as it is now mandated by regulatory agencies. A model-based analysis of load, wash and gradient elution is performed for a monoclonal antibody (mAb) on Fractogel SO 3 - . Four experiments with increasing loaded mass show complex peak shapes and formation of a shoulder under overloaded conditions. We hypothesize that the observed peak shapes are caused by mAbs binding in multiple states on the tentacle ion-exchange resin. A new multi-state SMA binding model is used for testing this hypothesis. A two-state binding model is found to quantitatively reproduce all four experiments. An in-depth analysis reveals that the shoulder formation under overloaded conditions can be explained by multi-state binding that particularly manifests in rapid but weak re-adsorption of eluting molecules near the column end. The introduced multi-state SMA model combines features of the so-called spreading model (multiple bound states) and of the standard SMA model (salt dependency). It is by no means limited to ion-exchange chromatography on tentacle resins, but the same concept can be applied for studying systems that are based on other physical mechanisms. The new model can potentially improve mechanistic understanding and facilitate quantitative simulation of various phenomena, such as caused by reorientation, reconformation or unfolding of bound species. Similar concepts can be applied for studying surface-induced aggregation and denaturation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A new 2-oxy-N,N-dioctylacetamide grafted resin for the separation of trivalent actinides from nitric acid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvan, B. Robert; Prathibha, T.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Antony, M.P.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.

    2015-05-01

    A novel 2-oxy-N,N-dioctylacetamide anchored on Merrifield resin was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, TG-DTA and IR spectroscopy, for the first time. The extraction behavior of Am(III) and Eu(III) from nitric acid medium in the dioctylacetamide anchored resin (R-DOA) was studied as a function of various parameters such as duration of equilibration, concentration of nitric acid and sodium nitrate etc. The distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) of Am(III) and Eu(III) in R-DOA increased with increase in concentration of nitric acid. The K{sub d} values reached a maximum at 3-4 M nitric acid concentration in both cases, followed by decrease in K{sub d} values. Rapid extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from nitric acid medium was observed in the initial stages of equilibration followed by the establishment of equilibrium occurred within 60 min. The extraction data was fitted in to the first order rate equation. The recovery of Am(III) and Eu(III) from the loaded organic phase was studied using dilute nitric acid. The results revealed that 2-oxyacetamide functionalized resin is the promising candidate for the separation of trivalent actinides and lanthanides from nitric acid medium.

  4. Method of uranium reclamation from aqueous systems by reactive ion exchange. [US DOE patent application; anion exchange resin of copolymerized divinyl-benzene and styrene having quarternary ammonium groups and bicarbonate ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, L.

    1981-11-05

    A reactive ion exchange method for separation and recovery of values of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, or americium from substantially neutral aqueous systems of said metals comprises contacting said system with an effective amount of a basic anion exchange resin of copolymerized divinyl-benzene and styrene having quarternary ammonium groups and bicarbonate ligands to achieve nearly 100% sorption of said actinyl ion onto said resin and an aqueous system practically free of said actinyl ions. The method is operational over an extensive range of concentrations from about 10/sup -6/ M to 1.0 M actinyl ion and a pH range of about 4 to 7. The method has particulr application to treatment of waste streams from Purex-type nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities and hydrometallurgical processes involving U, Np, P, or Am.

  5. Indirect UV detection-ion-exclusion/cation-exchange chromatography of common inorganic ions with sulfosalicylic acid eluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaki, Daisuke; Mori, Masanobu; Nakatani, Nobutake; Arai, Kaori; Masuno, Tomoe; Koseki, Masakazu; Itabashi, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we describe indirect UV detection-ion-exclusion/cation-exchange chromatography (IEC/CEC) on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin in the H(+)-form (TSKgel Super IC-A/C) using sulfosalicylic acid as the eluent. The goal of the study was to characterize the peaks detected by UV detector. The peak directions of analyte ions in UV at 315 nm were negative because the molar absorbance coefficients of analyte anions and cations were lower than that of the sulfosalicylic acid eluent. Good chromatographic resolution and high signal-to-noise ratios of analyte ions were obtained for the separations performed using 1.1 mM sulfosalicylic acid and 1.5 mM 18-crown-6 as the eluent. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the peak areas ranged from 0.6 to 4.9%. Lower detection limits of the analytes were achieved using indirect UV detection at 315 nm (0.23 - 0.98 μM) than those obtained with conductometric detection (CD) (0.61 - 2.1 μM) under the optimized elution conditions. The calibration curves were linear in the range from 0.01 to 1.0 mM except for Cl(-), which was from 0.02 to 2.0 mM. The present method was successfully applied to determine common inorganic ions in a pond water sample.

  6. Preparation of Superabsorbent Resin from Carboxymethyl Cellulose Grafted with Acrylic Acid by Low-temperature Plasma Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Li Jie Huang; Ying Yang; Yuan Yuan Cai; Ming Liu; Ting Xu; Guang Zai Nong; Shuang Fei Wang

    2014-01-01

    A superabsorbent resin (SAR) synthesized from carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) by grafting acrylic acid (AA) was studied using single-factor analysis. The optimum preparation conditions were as follows: plasma discharge power of 250 W, processing time of 90 s, pressure of 300 Pa, m(CMC):m(AA) ratio of 1:9, m(K2S2O8):m(CMC) ratio of 1:4, and neutralization degree of 40%. Under these conditions, the resin has a salt water absorbency of 38.5 g/g and a stable chlorine dioxide solution absorbency of ...

  7. Shear bond strength between porcelain and nano filler composite resin with or without 9% hydrofluoric acid etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Ismiyatin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reparation technique on restorations with broken or damaged porcelain which are still attached with the teeth are difficult, because it is very hard to remove the porcelain restoration without damaging it, and it needs a long time. Various ways have been developed to repair the broken porcelain, one of them is the use of composite resin as the material for the restoration of fractured porcelain. Repairing porcelain inside the mouth without removing the restoration of the damaged porcelain using light cured composite resins material seems to be an advantageous option because it is relatively simple, has low risks, good esthetically and cheap. Purpose: The objective of this study was to find out the difference of shear bond strength in porcelain reparation using nano filler composite resin with or without 9% hydrofluoric acid etching by using Autograph measuring device. Methods: Twenty pieces of the porcelain samples devided into 2 groups. Group I: etching process using 9% hydrofluoric acid, and group II : without etching process. Result: The data was analyzed using t test in a p value of 0.0001 (p≤0.05, which means there is a significant different of shear bond strength between treated group I and II. The biggest shear bond strength was in treatment group I. Conclusion: The use of 9% hydrofluoric acid on the surface of porcelain can increase the shear bond strength between porcelain and nano filler composite resin.

  8. An investigation of the applicability of the new Reillex{trademark}-HPQ anion exchange resin system for technetium/rhenium and uranium in the Hanford waste tanks. Milestone 4 final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, K.R.; Ball, J.R.; Cobb, S.L.; Adams, J.M.; Young, D.A.

    1994-09-30

    Results of the measurements of the exchange capacity and K{sub d} values for ReO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ as a function of nitric acid and hydroxide concentration, temperature, and ten months time will be reported. Results of the breakthrough volumes for UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} on Reillex-HPQ chromatography columns as a function of carbonate ion concentration in high nitrate ion concentrations and various column sizes will be reported. Individual sections of this report describe the following: the sorption behavior of ReO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} on the Reillex-HPQ between pH 2 and 12 in 1.00 M NaNO{sub 3}; results of the measurements of the K{sub d} values for ReO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} on Reillex-HPQ and on Reillex-HP as a function of nitrate and hydroxide ion concentrations; the sorption behavior of ReO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} on Reillex-HPQ resin in base with time as a variable; the results of the early attempts at determining the K{sub d} values for Na{sub 4}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} on Reillex-HPQ resin; and the breakthrough of UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} in varying nitric acid solutions on Reillex-HPQ columns.

  9. Enhanced Ionic Conductivity and Power Generation Using Ion-Exchange Resin Beads in a Reverse-Electrodialysis Stack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bopeng; Gao, Haiping; Chen, Yongsheng

    2015-12-15

    Reverse electrodialysis (RED) is a promising technique for harvesting energy by mixing seawater with river water. The energy production is usually limited by ionic conductivity in dilute compartments of a RED system. Novel tests were conducted in this research, which used ion-exchange resin beads (IERB) to replace nonconductive spacer fabrics in RED compartments with dilute NaCl solution in a modified stack containing Fumasep FKS and Fumasep FAS membranes. We compared the conductivity of an IERB packed bed with that of an inert glass-beads-packed bed as a control to confirm IERB's effectiveness. When applied in a RED system, IERB decreased the stack resistance by up to 40%. The maximum gross power density improved by 83% in the RED stack compared to that in a regular RED stack at 1.3 cm/s average linear flow velocity. IERB-filled stack resistance was modeled. The model results fit well with experimental data, thereby confirming the effectiveness of the new approach presented here. The net power density is also estimated based on the measured pressure drop and pumping energy model. Both gross and net power density was improved by over 75% at higher flow rate. A net power density of 0.44 W/m(2) was achieved at a cell thickness of 500 μm. To the best of our knowledge, this research is the first to study the impact of IERB on power generation and establishes a new approach to improving the power performance of a RED system.

  10. Atmospheric Ionic Deposition in Tropical Sites of Central Sulawesi Determined by Ion Exchange Resin Collectors and Bulk Water Collector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, S; Jungkunst, H F; Gutzler, C; Herrera, R; Gerold, G

    2012-09-01

    In the light of global change, the necessity to monitor atmospheric depositions that have relevant effects on ecosystems is ever increasing particularly for tropical sites. For this study, atmospheric ionic depositions were measured on tropical Central Sulawesi at remote sites with both a conventional bulk water collector system (BWS collector) and with a passive ion exchange resin collector system (IER collector). The principle of IER collector to fix all ionic depositions, i.e. anions and cations, has certain advantages referring to (1) post-deposition transformation processes, (2) low ionic concentrations and (3) low rainfall and associated particulate inputs, e.g. dust or sand. The ionic concentrations to be measured for BWS collectors may easily fall below detection limits under low deposition conditions which are common for tropical sites of low land use intensity. Additionally, BWS collections are not as independent from the amount of rain fallen as are IER collections. For this study, the significant differences between both collectors found for nearly all measured elements were partly correlated to the rainfall pattern, i.e. for calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium. However, the significant differences were, in most cases, not highly relevant. More relevant differences between the systems were found for aluminium and nitrate (434-484 %). Almost five times higher values for nitrate clarified the advantage of the IER system particularly for low deposition rate which is one particularity of atmospheric ionic deposition in tropical sites of extensive land use. The monthly resolution of the IER data offers new insights into the temporal distribution of annual ionic depositions. Here, it did not follow the tropical rain pattern of a drier season within generally wet conditions.

  11. Immobilization of Ion Exchange radioactive resins of the TRIGA Mark III Nuclear Reactor; Inmovilizacion de resinas de intercambio ionico radiactivas del reactor nuclear TRIGA Mark III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Martinez, H

    1999-07-01

    In the last decades many countries in the world have taken interest in the use, availability, and final disposal of dangerous wastes in the environment, within these, those dangerous wastes that contain radioactive material. That is why studies have been made on materials used as immobilization agent of radioactive waste that may guarantee its storage for long periods of time under drastic conditions of humidity, temperature change and biodegradation. In mexico, the development of different applications of radioactive material in the industry, medicine and investigation, have generated radioactive waste, sealed and open sources, whose require a special technological development for its management and final disposal. The present work has as a finality to develop the process and define the agglutinating material, bitumen, cement and polyester resin that permits immobilization of resins of Ionic Exchange contaminated by Barium 153, Cesium 137, Europium 152, Cobalt 60 and Manganese 54 generated from the nuclear reactor TRIGA Mark III. Ionic interchange contaminated resin must be immobilized and is analysed under different established tests by the Mexican Official Standard NOM-019-NUCL-1995 {sup L}ow level radioactive wastes package requirements for its near-surface final disposal. Immobilization of ionic interchange contaminated resins must count with the International Standards applicable in this process; in these standards, the following test must be taken in prototype examples: Free-standing water, leachability, compressive strength, biodegradation, radiation stability, thermal stability and burning rate. (Author)

  12. Adsorbsi Hafnium (Hf) Dalam Resin Penukar Anion Dowex-1x8 Adsorbtion of Hafnium (Hf) in Dowex - 1x8 Anion Exchange Resin

    OpenAIRE

    Susiantini, Endang; Setyadji, Moch

    2014-01-01

    Hafnium memiliki titik lebur yang tinggi dan kemampuan menyerap neutron per luas penampang 600 kali lebih besar dari Zr sehingga berpotensi untuk dimanfaatkan sebagai salah satu bahan batang pengendali reaksi fisi nuklir. Berbagai metode pemurnian Hf dari Zr telah dikembangkan salah satunya adalah dengan menggunakan resin penukar ion. Pada penelitian ini digunakan umpan berbentuk sulfat dari hafnium murni dan hafnium-zirkonium campuran hasil proses pengolahan pasir zirkon. Umpan hafnium sulfa...

  13. Initial evaluation of two organic resins and their ion exchange column performance for the recovery of cesium from Hanford alkaline wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bray, L.A.; Carson, K.J.; Elovich, R.J.; Carlson, C.D.; DesChane, J.R.; Kurath, D.E.

    1996-04-01

    The contents of Hanford`s 177 underground storage tanks include a mixture of sludge, salt cake and alkaline supernatant liquids. Most of the cesium is expected to be in the aqueous liquids and it is these solutions that are the focus of the cesium ion exchange removal process. This process is being designed with the goal of removing enough cesium so that the resulting low-level waste (LLW) will meet the NRC 10CFR61 class A limits for {sup 137}Cs (1 Ci/m{sup 3}). The overall objective of the WHC program is (1) to evaluate ion exchange materials for the recovery of cesium from alkaline wastes, (2) to determine their loading and elution capacities, (3) to determine the physical life cycle (including radiation and chemical stability) for selected ion exchangers, (4) to determine if basic ion exchange data can be applied to a broad range of tank wastes, and (5) to provide credible laboratory data for engineering-scale evaluation and ion exchange media selection. The goal will be to provide the technology to produce a Class A waste. The results presented in this document provide initial test cesium loading and elution results for ion exchange column operations for two selected ion exchange resins under a limited range of conditions. Data in this report can be found in PNL laboratory record books BNW 54705 and BNW 55026.

  14. Adhesion of resin composite to hydrofluoric acid-exposed enamel and dentin in repair protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracoglu, A; Ozcan, M; Kumbuloglu, O; Turkun, M

    2011-01-01

    Intraoral repairs of ceramic fixed-dental-prostheses (FDP) often include cervical recessions that require pretreatment of the exposed tooth surfaces either before or after the ceramic is conditioned with hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel. The sequence of repair protocol may cross-contaminate the exposed etched enamel or dentin surfaces during the application or rinsing process and thereby affect the adhesion. This study evaluated the influence of HF acid gel with two concentrations on bond strengths of composite to enamel and dentin. Human third molars (N=100, n=10 per group) with similar sizes were selected and randomly divided into 10 groups. Flat surfaces of enamel and dentin were created by wet ground finishing. Before or after the enamel (E) or dentin (D) was conditioned with phosphoric acid (P), substrate surfaces were conditioned with either 9.5% HF (HF(9.5)) or 5% HF (HF(5)). Subsequently, a bonding agent (B) was applied. The experimental groups by conditioning sequence were as follows where the first letter of the group abbreviation represents the substrate (E or D) followed by the acid type and concentration: group 1 (EPHF(9.5)), group 2 (EPHF(5)), group 3 (EHF(9.5)P), group 4 (EHF(5)P), group 5 (DPHF(9.5)), group 6 (DPHF(5)), group 7 (DHF(9.5)P), and group 8 (DHF(5)P). Group 9 (EPB) and group 10 (DPB) acted as the control groups. Repair resin was adhered incrementally onto the conditioned enamel and dentin in polyethylene molds. Each layer was photo-polymerized for 40 seconds. All specimens were thermocycled (×1000, 5°-55°C) and subjected to shear test (universal testing machine, 1 mm/min). Specimens that debonded during thermocycling were considered as 0 MPa. The bond strength data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test and failure types using the chi-square test (α=0.05). Overall, the bond results (MPa) were lower on dentin than on enamel (pdentin, the results were the lowest in group 8 (DHF(5)P: 1.5 ± 1.6), being significantly lower than those of group

  15. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange of cross-linkable α-amino acid derivatives in deuterated triflic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Murai, Yuta; Yoshida, Takuma; Okamoto, Masashi; Masuda, Katsuyoshi; Sakihama, Yasuko; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki; Hatanaka, Yasumaru; Hashimoto, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we report here a hydrogen/deuterium exchange (H/D exchange) of cross-linkable α-amino acid derivatives with deuterated trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TfOD). H/D exchange with TfOD was easily applied to o-catechol containing phenylalanine (DOPA) within an hour. A partial H/D exchange was observed for trifluoromethyldiazirinyl (TFMD) phenylalanine derivatives. N-Acetyl-protected natural aromatic α-amino acids (Tyr and Trp) were more effective in H/D exchange than unprotected ones. The N-acetylated TFMD phenylalanine derivative afforded slightly higher H/D exchange than unprotected derivatives. An effective post-deuteration method for cross-linkable α-amino acid derivatives will be useful for the analysis of biological functions of bioactive peptides and proteins by mass spectrometry.

  16. Removal of Ca(II) and Mg(II) from potassium chromate solution on Amberlite IRC 748 synthetic resin by ion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Zhihui [Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Qi Tao, E-mail: tqgreen@home.ipe.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Qu Jingkui; Wang Lina; Chu Jinglong [Key Laboratory of Green Process and Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2009-08-15

    Experimental measurements have been made on the batch ion exchange of Ca(II) and Mg(II) from potassium chromate solution using cation exchanger of Amberlite IRC 748 as K{sup +} form. The ion exchange behavior of two alkaline-earth metals on the resin, depending on contact time, pH, temperature and resin dosage was studied. The adsorption isotherms were described by means of the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. For Ca(II) ion, the Langmuir model represented the adsorption process better than the Freundlich model. The maximum ion exchange capacity was found to be 47.21 mg g{sup -1} for Ca(II) and 27.70 mg g{sup -1} for Mg(II). The kinetic data were tested using Lagergren-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. Kinetic data correlated well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, indicating that the chemical adsorption was the rate-limiting step. Various thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy ({Delta}G{sup o}), enthalpy ({Delta}H{sup o}) and entropy ({Delta}S{sup o}) were also calculated. These parameters showed that the ion exchange of Ca(II) and Mg(II) from potassium chromate solution was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic process in nature. The activation energy of ion-exchange (E{sub a}) was determined as 12.34 kJ mol{sup -1} for Ca(II) and 9.865 kJ mol{sup -1} for Mg(II) according to the Arrhenius equation.

  17. Abietic acid isolated from pine resin (Resina Pini) enhances angiogenesis in HUVECs and accelerates cutaneous wound healing in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Yeon; Lee, Yun Kyung; Lee, Dong-Soo; Yoo, Jeong-Eun; Shin, Myoung-Sook; Yamabe, Noriko; Kim, Su-Nam; Lee, Seulah; Kim, Ki Hyun; Lee, Hae-Jeung; Roh, Seok Sun; Kang, Ki Sung

    2017-05-05

    Resin known as Resina Pini is listed in the Korean and Japanese pharmacopoeias and has been used for treating skin wounds and inflammation. Resin is composed of more than 50% abietic acid and 10% neutral substances. In the present study, the wound-healing effects of abietic acid and the possible underlying mechanism of action were investigated in various in vitro and in vivo models. The effects of abietic acid on tube formation and migration were measured in human umbilical vein vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). Protein expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation was evaluated via Western blotting analysis. The wound-healing effects of abietic acid were assessed using a mouse model of cutaneous wounds. The results showed that abietic acid enhanced cell migration and tube formation in HUVECs. Abietic acid induced significant angiogenic potential, which is associated with upregulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 expression. Additionally, 0.8μM abietic acid-treated groups showed accelerated wound closure compared to the controls in a mouse model of cutaneous wounds. The current data indicate that abietic acid treatment elevated cell migration and tube formation in HUVECs by the activation of ERK and p38 MAPKs. We suggest that abietic acid can be developed as a wound-healing agent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Surface Engineering of PAMAM-SDB Chelating Resin with Diglycolamic Acid (DGA) Functional Group for Efficient Sorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) from Aqueous Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilaiyaraja, P.; Venkatraman, B., E-mail: chemila07@gmail.com [Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Deb, A.K. Singha [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Ponraju, D. [Safety Engineering Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Ali, Sk. Musharaf [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • A new DGA-PAMAM-SDB chelating resin has been synthesized for actinide sorption. • Maximum sorption capacities of resin are 682 and 544.2 mg g{sup −1}for U(VI) and Th(IV). • DGA-PAMAM-SDB chelating resin could be regenerated and reused. • DFT calculation of actinides interaction with resin corroborates the experimental. • Resin is effective for sorption of actinides from both aqueous and HNO{sub 3} medium. - Abstract: A novel chelating resin obtained via growth of PAMAM dendron on surface of styrene divinyl benzene resin beads, followed by diglycolamic acid functionalization of the dendrimer terminal. Batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of pH, nitric acid concentration, amount of adsorbent, shaking time, initial metal ion concentration and temperature on U(VI) and Th(IV) adsorption efficiency. Diglycolamic acid terminated PAMAM dendrimer functionalized styrene divinylbenzene chelating resin (DGA-PAMAM-SDB) is found to be an efficient candidate for the removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions from aqueous (pH > 4) and nitric acid media (> 3 M). The sorption equilibrium could be reached within 60 min, and the experimental data fits with pseudo-second-order model. Langmuir sorption isotherm model correlates well with sorption equilibrium data. The maximum U(VI) and Th(IV) sorption capacity onto DGA-PAMAMG{sub 5}-SDB was estimated to be about 682 and 544.2 mg g{sup −1} respectively at 25 °C. The interaction of actinides and chelating resin is reversible and hence, the resin can be regenerated and reused. DFT calculation on the interaction of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions with chelating resin validates the experimental findings.

  19. Production of large quantities of {sup 90}Y by ion-exchange chromatography using an organic resin and a chelating agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiques Castillo, Abmel, E-mail: axcastillo@yahoo.co [Centro de Isotopos (CENTIS), Ave. Monumental y Carretera La Rada Km 3 1/2, Guanabacoa, Havana (Cuba); Perez-Malo, Marylaine; Isaac-Olive, Keila [Centro de Isotopos (CENTIS), Ave. Monumental y Carretera La Rada Km 3 1/2, Guanabacoa, Havana (Cuba); Mukhallalati, Heyam [Division of Radiopharmaceuticals, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Casanova Gonzalez, Edgar; Torres Berdeguez, Mirta [Centro de Isotopos (CENTIS), Ave. Monumental y Carretera La Rada Km 3 1/2, Guanabacoa, Havana (Cuba); Cornejo Diaz, Nestor [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, AP: 6195 Habana 6, CP 10600, Havana (Cuba)

    2010-11-15

    The performance of a system composed of an organic cation exchanger (Dowex 50Wx8) and a chelating agent (EDTA) previously described for the successful production of {sup 90}Y via a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y generator is assessed under dynamic conditions. In an attempt to overcome the established limitation of ion-exchange resins for the separation of subcurie quantities of activity, {sup 90}Y is repeatedly isolated from an 11.8-GBq (320 mCi) {sup 90}Sr cow using a three-column tandem arrangement. The high recovery and radionuclidic purity obtained for {sup 90}Y and the parameters of the separation (time, eluant concentration, pH and flow rate range) strongly suggest that Ci quantities of {sup 90}Y can be handled satisfactorily by the ion-exchange method. No replacement or treatment of the cow, low waste generation and {sup 90}Sr losses less than 0.1% after each run were observed during the present study which, in combination with the low cost of this resin, may result in an attractive alternate method for the production of large quantities of {sup 90}Y.

  20. Protection of live bacteria from bile acid toxicity using bile acid adsorbing resins

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Alexander D.; Slater, Nigel K. H.

    2009-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that a dry, room temperature stable formulation of a live bacterial vaccine was highly susceptible to bile, and suggested that this will lead to significant loss of viability of any live bacterial formulation released into the intestine using an enteric coating or capsule. We found that bile and acid tolerance is very rapidly recovered after rehydration with buffer or water, raising the possibility that rehydration in the absence of bile prior to release into the in...

  1. The cytotoxic and embryotoxic effects of kaurenoic acid, a diterpene isolated from Copaifera langsdorffii oleo-resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Lotufo, L V; Cunha, G M A; Farias, P A M; Viana, G S B; Cunha, K M A; Pessoa, C; Moraes, M O; Silveira, E R; Gramosa, N V; Rao, V S N

    2002-08-01

    In this work, we studied the effects of kaurenoic acid, a diterpene isolated from the oleo-resin of Copaifera langsdorffii in developing sea urchin (Lytechinus variegatus) embryos, on tumor cell growth in microculture tetrazolium (MTT) test and on mouse and human erythrocytes in hemolysis assay. Continuous exposure of embryos to kaurenoic acid starting immediately after fertilization inhibited the first cleavage (IC(50): 84.2 microM) and progressively induced embryo destruction (IC(50): 44.7 microM and sea urchin embryos, the inhibition of tumor cell growth and the hemolysis of mouse and human erythrocytes indicate the potential cytotoxicity of kaurenoic acid.

  2. Removal of Aluminum from the Dissolved Alumina Matrix by NH{sub 4}OH Precipitation and Chelate Ion Exchange Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Jung Ki; Kim, Chang Soo; Han, Myung Sub; Lee, Hwa Shim [Korea Research Institute of Standardsand Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Many studies have been devoted to the determination of trace elements in alumina matrices using high sensitivity techniques such as inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The dissolved alumina samples contain high concentrations of aluminum (Al) and sulfuric acid. High Al concentrations can cause high background emission from 190 to 250 nm and can increase the detection limit of ICP-OES. Furthermore, reactions between the Al matrix and quartz from the quartz torch used in high temperature plasmas can result in the formation of aluminosilicate (3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–2SiO{sub 2}), which reduce the torch lifetime. High concentration of Al matrix can also form a white deposit on the skimmer and the sampler cone, and block the orifice. These problems prevent the long-term use of ICP-MS seriously. NIST SRM 699 alumina was used as a test sample for the removal of the Al and the recovery of trace metals from matrix. First, about 1 g of NIST SRM 699 alumina standard was dissolved with 40 mL of 25% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} for 65 h at 230 °C in PolytetraFluoroethylene (PTFE) vessel and diluted with deionized water to be about 100 g. For fast and simple separation of the two solid layers, 5 mL aliquots of 0.1 M NH4OH solution were added and the solutions were shaken gently; then, only the swollen resin layer was transferred to another tube. This transfer process was repeated several times.

  3. SEPARATION AND PRECONCENTRATION OF COPPER (II ION BY FATTY HYDROXAMIC ACIDS IMMOBILIZED ONTO AMBERLITE XAD – 4 RESIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedy Suhendra

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A method of copper (II ion preconcentration and separation from other ions by using a column containing fatty hydroxamic acids - loaded Amberlite XAD 4 resin (FHA-Amb is described. Several factors, which affect the separation and preconcentration efficiency such as pH, sample volume, and concentration of eluent and flow rate, have been investigated.  A quantitative recovery of copper (II ion from FHA-Amb resin column was obtained using 10% HNO3 solutions as eluent with a preconcentration factor of 60. A method for separation of Cu(II from Zn(II and Cd(II is proposed.  A rapid sample throughput, a clean separation, a high preconcentration factor and simplicity are the main advantages in these analytical procedures.   Keywords: extraction, preconcentration, fatty hydroxamic acid, copper (ii ion, amberlite XAD-4

  4. Incorporation of bactericidal poly-acrylic acid modified copper iodide particles into adhesive resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Camila; Mennito, Anthony S; Wolf, Bethany J; Pashley, David H; Renné, Walter G

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate incorporation of polyacrylic acid (PAA) coated copper iodide (CuI) nanoparticles into dental adhesives, and to evaluate for the first time, their antibacterial properties, bond strength and cytotoxicity. PAA-CuI nanoparticles were synthesized and incorporated into commercially available adhesives Optibond XTR (1.0mg/ml) and XP Bond (0.5 and 1.0mg/ml). The antibacterial properties of experimental and control specimens were evaluated (n=8), after ageing for 18h or 1 year, against Streptococcus mutans (1×10(8)cells/ml). Bond strength to human dentine of the control and experimental adhesives was evaluated by shear bond strength (n=10). For cytotoxicity evaluation, HGF cells were cultured with gingival fibroblast media and exposed to control and experimental adhesive blends (n=3). An MTT cell viability assay was used to assess cell metabolic function. A one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test was used for data analysis. Significantly greater antibacterial properties were demonstrated for PAA-CuI containing adhesives after ageing for 18h or 1 year relative to all control groups. A reduction in Streptococcus mutans viable cell count of 99.99%, 99.99% and 79.65% was shown for XP Bond - 0.5mg/ml, XP Bond - 1.0mg/ml and Optibond XTR - 1.0mg/ml PAA-CuI after ageing for 18h, and 99.99% for both XP Bond - 0.5mg/ml and XP Bond - 1.0mg/ml PAA-CuI after ageing for 1 year. No significant variations in shear bond strength or cytotoxicity were detected between the experimental resins and their corresponding controls. PAA-CuI nanoparticles are an effective additive to adhesive blends as it renders them antibacterial without adversely affecting their bond strength or cytotoxicity. The incorporation of PAA-coated copper iodide particles into adhesive resins renders the adhesive antibacterial to S. mutans for at least 1 year in vitro. This may prevent or delay bacterial invasion and the consequent development of caries lesions if the

  5. Study of the retention of radionuclides by ion-exchange resins contained in the circuits of a Pressurized Water Reactor; Etude de la retention des radionucleides dans les resines echangeuses d'ions des circuits d'une centrale nucleaire a eau sous pression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gressier, F.

    2008-11-15

    Physico-chemical quality of fluids in nuclear power plant circuits must be maintained in order to limit contamination and dose rate especially when the shutdown takes place. Nevertheless, an optimum between diminishing liquid waste and limiting solid waste production has to be reached, but at affordable costs. Ion-exchange resins of purification circuits are used to fulfill this goal. In this work, different resin types have been characterized (exchange capacity, water and electrolyte sorption) and their selectivity towards Co{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cs{sup +} and Li{sup +} cations have been studied. We have shown that the two cation-exchange resins selectivity varies according to the nature and concentrations of their counter-ions. Moreover, flow rate (and thus hydro-kinetics) impact on species retention in a column has been characterized: the more the flow rate, the more the ionic leakage (output concentration divided by input concentration) is fast and the more the output concentration front is spread. A literature revue has enabled to put in light advantages and drawbacks of the models of interest to simulate operations of ion-exchange resins. Thus, the pure end-members mixing model associated to a non-ideality description of the resin phase based on the regular solutions model has been retained for modelling ion-exchange equilibrium. Ion-exchange kinetics has been described by mass transfer coefficients. Using the experimental results to determine model parameters, these last ones have been implemented in a speciation code CHESS, coupled with a hydrodynamic code in HYTEC. On the one hand, equilibrium experiments of ion retention have been simulated and, on the other hand, column retention tests have been modelled. Finally, selectivity variations and hydro-kinetics impacts have been simulated on some test cases so as to demonstrate the importance of taking these into account when simulating ion-exchange resins operations. (author)

  6. [Effect of hydrofluoric acid etching time and resin bonding on the flexural strength of lithium disilicate glass ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Dong-feng; Luo, Xiao-ping

    2013-08-01

    To analyze the effect of hydrofluoric acid(HFA) etching time and resin bonding on the flexural strength of IPS e.max® Press glass ceramic, and evaluate the efficacy of resin cements to seal the cracks of the etched ceramic. Two hundred and twenty-five bars (25.0 mm×3.0 mm×2.0 mm) were made from IPS e.max® Press ingots using lost-wax, hot-pressed ceramic fabrication technology and randomly divided into five groups, forty-five each.In each group, the surfaces of ceramic bars were etched by 9.5% HFA gel for 0, 20, 40, 60 and 120 s respectively. Three specimens from each group were selected to observe the microstructure by the field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). Then each group were randomly subdivided into two subgroups (n = 20).One subgroup were coverd with a thin (approximately 0.1 mm) layer of resin cement (Variolink N), whereas the other subgroup remained unaltered.Half of the specimens were stored in 37°C water bath for 24 h and the other half went through thermocycle 10 000 times before 3-point bending test to determine their flexural strength.Interfaces between resin cement and etched ceramic were examined with FE-SEM. FE-SEM results showed that etching with HFA resulted in preferential dissolution of glass ceramic, and partially supported crystals within the glass matrix were lost with the increasing of etching time.FE-SEM indicated that resin cement sealed the cracks and defects and bonded tightly to etched ceramic surface. The mean flexural strength values of group 0, 20, 40, 60 and 120 s were (384 ± 33), (347 ± 43), (330 ± 53), (327 ± 67) , and (317 ± 41) MPa respectively. The mean flexural strength of each group except group 0 s increased significantly to (420 ± 31), (435 ± 50), (400 ± 39), and (412 ± 58) MPa respectively after the application of resin cement. Overtime HFA etching could have a wakening effect on IPS e.max® Press glass-ceramic. The application of dual-curing resin cement can compensate the strength loss of

  7. High Performance Fatty Acid-Based Vinyl Ester Resin for Liquid Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    novolac epoxy, and Epon 828 , a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA), were purchased from Hexion Specialty Chemicals and was used to synthesize vinyl...with Epon 160 (n=0.5) and Epon 828 (n=0.098) to produce VE 160 and VE 828 , respectively (Figure 1). The reaction was catalyzed by 1 wt% AMC-2...PROCEDURE 2.1 Materials Derakane 470HT-400 vinyl ester resin was obtained from Ashland and was used without modification. Epon Resin 160, a

  8. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation on composite resins containing ursolic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soohyeon Kim

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To evaluate the inhibitory effect of ursolic acid (UA-containing composites on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans biofilm. Materials and Methods Composite resins with five different concentrations (0.04, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 wt% of UA (U6753, Sigma Aldrich were prepared, and their flexural strengths were measured according to ISO 4049. To evaluate the effect of carbohydrate source on biofilm formation, either glucose or sucrose was used as a nutrient source, and to investigate the effect of saliva treatment, the specimen were treated with either unstimulated whole saliva or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS. For biofilm assay, composite disks were transferred to S. mutans suspension and incubated for 24 hr. Afterwards, the specimens were rinsed with PBS and sonicated. The colony forming units (CFU of the disrupted biofilm cultures were enumerated. For growth inhibition test, the composites were placed on a polystyrene well cluster, and S. mutans suspension was inoculated. The optical density at 600 nm (OD600 was recorded by Infinite F200 pro apparatus (TECAN. One-way ANOVA and two-way ANOVA followed by Bonferroni correction were used for the data analyses. Results The flexural strength values did not show significant difference at any concentration (p > 0.01. In biofilm assay, the CFU score decreased as the concentration of UA increased. The influence of saliva pretreatment was conflicting. The sucrose groups exhibited higher CFU score than glucose group (p < 0.05. In bacterial growth inhibition test, all experimental groups containing UA resulted in complete inhibition. Conclusions Within the limitations of the experiments, UA included in the composite showed inhibitory effect on S. mutans biofilm formation and growth.

  9. In vivo and in vitro evaluation of the efficacy of a peracetic acid-based disinfectant for decontamination of acrylic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassot, Ana Lúcia Campani; Poisl, Maria Inês Pereira; Samuel, Susana Maria Werner

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the antimicrobial efficacy of a peracetic acid-based disinfectant for decontamination of heat-polymerized, chemically activated and microwave-polymerized acrylic resins. Resin plates were contaminated in vivo upon intraoral use by 10 volunteers for 7 nights and slabs were contaminated in vitro by contact with Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus stearothermophilus. The contaminated acrylic resin specimens were immersed in a 0.2% peracetic acid-based disinfectant (Sterilife; Lifemed) for 5 min or 10 min and placed in a BHI culture medium. After incubation at 37 degrees C for 48 h, bacterial growth was assessed by analyzing turbidity of the medium. For all types of acrylic resin, no turbidity of the medium was observed for any of the resin specimens immersed in the peracetic acid-based disinfectant for either 5 or 10 min. On the other hand, the media with specimens that were not immersed in the disinfectant (control) showed turbidity in 100% of the cases, indicating the presence of microorganisms in both tested conditions. In conclusion, immersion for at least 5 min in a 0.2% peracetic acid-based disinfectant promoted high-level disinfection of heat-polymerized, chemically activated and microwave-polymerized acrylic resins contaminated with either human saliva or Bacillus subtilis or Bacillus stearothermophilus.

  10. Selected resin acids in effluent and receiving waters derived from a bleached and unbleached kraft pulp and paper mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, B.P.; Booth, M.M.; Delfino, J.J.; Holm, S.E.; Gross, T.S.

    2003-01-01

    Water samples were collected on three dates at 24 sites influenced by effluent from Georgia-Pacific's Palatka Pulp and Paper Mill Operation, a bleached and unbleached kraft mill near Palatka, Florida, USA. The sampling sites were located within the mill retention ponds, Rice Creek, and the St. John's River. Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for abietic, dehydroabietic, and isopimaric acids, all of which are potentially toxic by-products of pulp production. Isopimaric acid concentrations greater than 12 mg/L were measured at the mill's effluent outfall but were less than 20 ??g/L at the end of Rice Creek. This result indicates that the waters of Rice Creek provide dilution or conditions conducive for degradation or sorption of these compounds. Large differences in resin acid concentrations were observed between sampling events. In two sampling events, the maximum observed concentrations were less than 2 mg/L for each analyte. In a third sampling event, all of the compounds were detected at concentrations greater than 10 mg/L. Data from the three sample dates showed that resin acid concentrations were below 20 ??g/L before the confluence of Rice Creek and the St. John's River in all cases.

  11. The study of various parameters affecting the ion exchange of Cu2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Cd2+, and Pb2+ from aqueous solution on Dowex 50W synthetic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivan, Erol; Altun, Turkan

    2006-06-30

    A gel resin containing sulfonate groups (Dowex 50W) was investigated for its sorption properties towards copper, zinc, nickel, cadmium and lead metal ions. The use of selective ion exchange to recover metals from aqueous solution has been studied. The ion exchange behavior of five metals on Dowex 50W, depending on pH, temperature, and contact time and adsorbate amount was studied. Experimental measurements have been made on the batch sorption of toxic metals from aqueous solutions using cation exchanger Dowex 50W. The maximum recoveries (about 97%) Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Ni(2+), Cd(2+) and (about 80%) Pb(2+) were found at pH ranges 8-9. The amount of sorbed metal ion was calculated as 4.1, 4.6, 4.7, 4.8, and 4.7mequiv./gram dry resin for Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and Ni(2+), respectively. The precision of the method was examined at under optimum conditions. Selectivity increased in the series: Pb>Cd>Cu>Zn>Ni. It has been observed that, selectivity of the -SO(3)H group of the resin increases with atomic number, valance, degree of ionization of the exchanged metals. The equilibrium ion exchange capacity of resin for metal ions was measured and explored by using Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Langmuir type sorption isotherm was suitable for equilibrium studies.

  12. The study of various parameters affecting the ion exchange of Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Pb{sup 2+} from aqueous solution on Dowex 50W synthetic resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pehlivan, Erol [Department of Chemical Engineering, Selcuk University, Campus, 42031 Konya (Turkey)]. E-mail: pehlivan@selcuk.edu.tr; Altun, Turkan [Department of Chemical Engineering, Selcuk University, Campus, 42031 Konya (Turkey)

    2006-06-30

    A gel resin containing sulfonate groups (Dowex 50W) was investigated for its sorption properties towards copper, zinc, nickel, cadmium and lead metal ions. The use of selective ion exchange to recover metals from aqueous solution has been studied. The ion exchange behavior of five metals on Dowex 50W, depending on pH, temperature, and contact time and adsorbate amount was studied. Experimental measurements have been made on the batch sorption of toxic metals from aqueous solutions using cation exchanger Dowex 50W. The maximum recoveries (about 97%) Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+} and (about 80%) Pb{sup 2+} were found at pH ranges 8-9. The amount of sorbed metal ion was calculated as 4.1, 4.6, 4.7, 4.8, and 4.7 mequiv./gram dry resin for Pb{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Ni{sup 2+}, respectively. The precision of the method was examined at under optimum conditions. Selectivity increased in the series: Pb > Cd > Cu > Zn > Ni. It has been observed that, selectivity of the -SO{sub 3}H group of the resin increases with atomic number, valance, degree of ionization of the exchanged metals. The equilibrium ion exchange capacity of resin for metal ions was measured and explored by using Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Langmuir type sorption isotherm was suitable for equilibrium studies.

  13. The removal of toxic metals from liquid effluents by ion exchange resins. Part II: cadmium(II/ sulphate/Lewatit TP260

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alguacil, F. J.

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of cadmium (II, from aqueous sulphate solutions, on Lewatit TP260 resin has been investigated in batch equilibrium experiments. The influence of pH and temperature on metal adsorption capacity have also been examined. The kinetic performance of the resin has been assesed and the results have been correlated by the pore diffusion model. The resin has been used in mini-columns to study its performance under dynamics conditions. The desorption of metal ion is achieved using sulphuric acid (0.25M and 0.5M.

    Se estudia la adsorción de cadmio(II, de disoluciones en medio sulfato, sobre la resina Lewatit TP260. La adsorción del metal se ha investigado en función del pH, la temperatura y el tiempo de contacto con la resina. Los estudios cinéticos permiten correlacionar el proceso de intercambio iónico con el modelo de difusión en poro. Se ha empleado el sistema en mini columnas para evaluar el comportamiento de la resina bajo condiciones dinámicas. La desorción del metal se lleva a cabo con disoluciones de ácido sulfúrico (0,25M y 0,5M.

  14. Ion Exchange Studies for Removal of Sulfate from Hanford Tank Waste Envelope C (241-AN-107) Using SuperLig 655 Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DE Kurath; JR Bontha; DL Blanchard; SK Fiskum; BM Rapko

    2000-08-23

    BNFL Inc. is evaluating various pretreatment technologies to mitigate the impacts of sulfate on the LAW vitrification system. One pretreatment technology for separating sulfate from LAW solutions involves the use of SuperLig{reg_sign} 655 (SL-655), a proprietary ion exchange material developed and supplied by IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Fork, UT. This report describes testing of SL-655 with diluted ([Na] {approximately} 5 M) waste from Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Division. Batch contact studies were conducted from 4 to 96 hours to determine the sulfate distribution coefficient and reaction kinetics. A small-scale ion exchange column test was conducted to evaluate sulfate removal, loading, breakthrough, and elution from the SL-655. In all of these tests, an archived 241-AN-107 tank waste sample (pretreated to remove Cs, Sr, and transuranics elements) was used. The experimental details and results are described in this report. Under the test conditions, SL-655 was found to have no significant ion exchange affinity for sulfate in this matrix. The batch contact study resulted in no measurable difference in the aqueous sulfate concentration following resin contact (K{sub d} {approximately} 0). The column test also demonstrated SL-655 had no practical affinity for sulfate in the tested matrix. Within experimental error, the sulfate concentration in the column effluent was equal to the concentration in the feed after passing 3 bed volumes of sample through the columns. Furthermore, some, if not all, of the decreased sulfate concentration in these first three column volumes of effluent can be ascribed to mixing and dilution of the 241-AN-107 feed with the interstitial liquid present in the column at the start of the loading cycle. Finally, ICP-AES measurements on the eluate solutions showed the presence of barium as soon as contact with the feed solution is completed. Barium is a metal not detected in the feed solution. Should the

  15. Nanostructured gadolinium-doped ceria microsphere synthesis from ion exchange resin: Multi-scale in-situ studies of solid solution formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caisso, Marie [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Institut Européen des Membranes, UMR 5635 CNRS-ENSCM-UM2, CC047, Université Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Lebreton, Florent; Horlait, Denis [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Picart, Sébastien [CEA, DEN, DRCP/SERA/LCAR, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Martin, Philippe M.; Bès, René [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC/LLCC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Renard, Catherine; Roussel, Pascal [Unité de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide, UMR 8012 CNRS, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Lille BP 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Neuville, Daniel R. [Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris-CNRS, Géochimie and Cosmochimie, 1 rue Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Dardenne, Kathy; Rothe, Jörg [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (KIT-INE), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Delahaye, Thibaud, E-mail: thibaud.delahaye@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Ayral, André [Institut Européen des Membranes, UMR 5635 CNRS-ENSCM-UM2, CC047, Université Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2014-10-15

    In the current nano-sized material revolution, the main limitations to a large-scale deployment of nanomaterials involve health concerns related to nano-dissemination via air. Developing new chemical routes benefiting from nano-size advantages while avoiding their hazards could overcome these limitations. Addressing this need, a chemical route leading to soft nano-particle agglomerates, i.e., macroscopic precursors presenting the ability to be decomposed into nano-sized materials, was developed and applied to Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 2−δ}. Using cerium/gadolinium-loaded ion exchange resin, the Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 2−δ} solid solution formation as a function of temperature was studied in-situ through X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Temperatures corresponding to the organic skeleton decomposition and to the mixed oxide crystallization were identified. An optimal heat treatment, leading to nanostructured soft agglomerates, was established. Microsphere processing capabilities were evaluated and particle size distribution measurements were recorded. A very low fracture strength was calculated, and a nanometric particle size distribution (170 nm) was determined. - Graphical abstract: The elaboration of micro-spherical precursors leading to the formation of nano-oxide soft agglomerates was studied and approved through the use of ion exchange resin loaded with cerium and gadolinium. The formation of the solid solution was followed through in-situ measurements such as XAS, XRD, Raman, TGA and DSC. Key temperatures were identified for the formation of the mixed-oxide. Following this study, the microstructure and particle size of oxide microspheres formed highlight the formation of soft nano-arrangments. - Highlights: • Soft microspherical agglomerates able to be decomposed into nano-sized materials. • In situ study of cerium/gadolinium-loaded ion exchange resin conversion in oxide. • In situ multi-scale study

  16. Reactions of. cap alpha. -hydroxy acid chemical exchange in titanium (3) and vanadyl (2) coordination compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glebov, A.N.; Sal' nikov, Yu.I.; Zakharov, A.V.; Saprykova, Z.A.; Gogolashvili, Eh.L. (Kazanskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR))

    1983-06-01

    For the first time a study was made on the effect of chemical exchange of oxygen-containing ligands (lactic, mandelic, sulfosalicylic acids) on the relaxation period of solvent water protons. Constants of exchange rates of protonated ligand forms were evaluated. The mechanism of the observed processes are proposed.

  17. Purification of lactic acid obtained from a fermentative process of cassava syrup using ion exchange resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Quintero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se evalúo la producción de ácido láctico (AL vía fermentativa, y su posterior separación mediante un sistema de resinas de intercambio iónico. Para la biosíntesis de AL se usó la cepa Lactobacillus brevis la cual fue cultivada bajo condiciones anaeróbicas usando un medio de bajo contenido nutricional a base de hidrolizado de yuca, denominado HYl. Para una cinética de cultivo de 120 h, en un biorreactor de 7,5 L, la más alta concentración de AL encontrada fue 24,3±0,07g AL/L, con una productividad de 0,20 gIL/h, a pH 6,5 Y38°C. Para la recuperación del AL se usaron las resinas de intercambio iónico Amberlite IRA-400 e IR-l20. Inicialmente se determinó la isoterma de adsorción de AL (25°C sobre la resina Amberlite IRA-400 activada en su forma Cl, OH-y HSOt. La forma el- de la resina activada fue evaluada a pH 5, mientras que la forma OH fue evaluada a pH 3,5 Y6,3. El más alto contenido de adsorbato fue O,59±O,03g ALlg resina at pH 6,3, cuando la resina esta activada en su forma OH-. Seguidamente, se desarrollaron las curvas de ruptura en la resina Amberlite IRA-400 a pH 3 Y5, Y0,5 Y lmLl min de flujo de alimentación. La máxima concentración de AL adsorbida fue 0,109±0,005g AL/g resina a pH 3 Y0,5 mUmin Finalmente, la recuperación de AL se evaluó en un sistema de columnas en serie empacadas con las resinas Amberlite IRA-400 e IR-120; La recuperación de AL fue 77% y 73%, cuando el sistema se ajustó en 0,5mLlmin, 25°e, pH 3 Y5, respectivamente.

  18. Effects of the peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite on the colour stability and surface roughness of the denture base acrylic resins polymerised by microwave and water bath methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Flavio H C N; Orsi, Iara A; Villabona, Camilo A

    2013-03-01

    This study evaluated the surface roughness (Ra) and color stability of acrylic resin colors (Lucitone 550, QC-20 and Vipi-Wave) used for fabricating bases for complete, removable dentures, overdentures and prosthetic protocol after immersion in chemical disinfectants (1% sodium hypochlorite and 2% peracetic acid) for 30 and 60 minutes. Sixty specimens were made of each commercial brand of resin composite, and divided into 2 groups according to the chemical disinfectants. Specimens had undergone the finishing and polishing procedures, the initial color and roughness measurements were taken (t=0), and after this, ten test specimens of each commercial brand of resin composite were immersed in sodium hypochlorite and ten in peracetic acid, for 30 and 60 minutes, with measurements being taken after each immersion period. These data were submitted to statistical analysis. There was evidence of an increase in Ra after 30 minutes immersion in the disinfectants in all the resins, with QC-20 presenting the highest Ra values, and Vipi-Wave the lowest. After 60 minutes immersion in the disinfectants all the resins presented statistically significant color alteration. Disinfection with 1% sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid altered the properties of roughness and color of the resins. © 2012 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Revised Thermal Analysis of LANL Ion Exchange Column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurinat, J

    2006-04-11

    This document updates a previous calculation of the temperature distributions in a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) ion exchange column.1 LANL operates two laboratory-scale anion exchange columns, in series, to extract Pu-238 from nitric acid solutions. The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has requested an updated analysis to calculate maximum temperatures for higher resin loading capacities obtained with a new formulation of the Reillex HPQ anion exchange resin. The increased resin loading capacity will not exceed 118 g plutonium per L of resin bed. Calculations were requested for normal operation of the resin bed at the minimum allowable solution feed rate of 30 mL/min and after an interruption of flow at the end of the feed stage, when one of the columns is fully loaded. The object of the analysis is to demonstrate that the decay heat from the Pu-238 will not cause resin bed temperatures to increase to a level where the resin significantly degrades. At low temperatures, resin bed temperatures increase primarily due to decay heat. At {approx}70 C a Low Temperature Exotherm (LTE) resulting from the reaction between 8-12 M HNO{sub 3} and the resin has been observed. The LTE has been attributed to an irreversible oxidation of pendant ethyl benzene groups at the termini of the resin polymer chains by nitric acid. The ethyl benzene groups are converted to benzoic acid moities. The resin can be treated to permanently remove the LTE by heating a resin suspension in 8M HNO{sub 3} for 30-45 minutes. No degradation of the resin performance is observed after the LTE removal treatment. In fact, heating the resin in boiling ({approx}115-120 C) 12 M HNO{sub 3} for 3 hr displays thermal stability analogous to resin that has been treated to remove the LTE. The analysis is based on a previous study of the SRS Frames Waste Recovery (FWR) column, performed in support of the Pu-238 production campaign for NASA's Cassini mission. In that study, temperature transients

  20. [Development of chiral ligand exchange capillary electrophoresis for enantioseparation of D,L-amino acids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Qi, Li; Su, Yuan; Qiao, Juan; Chen, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Enantioseparation of D, L-amino acids is of great significance in life science. As one of the most useful methods, chiral ligand exchange capillary electrophoresis possesses many advantages, including high efficiency, fast speed and tunable migration order, and it has attracted great research interest. This review summarizes the development of chiral ligand exchange capillary electrophoresis for enantioseparation of D, L-amino acids in recent years.

  1. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to acid etched or Nd:Yag lased enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mridula Goswami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: In vitro evaluation of the shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to enamel which is pretreated using acid etchant or pulsed Nd:YAG. Qualitative morphological changes in enamel surfaces were observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM. Materials and Methods: 60 extracted human teeth were divided in two groups of 30 each (Groups A and B. In Group A, prepared surface of enamel was etched using 35% phosphoric acid (Scotchbond, 3M. In Group B, enamel was surface treated by a surgical Nd:YAG laser beam (Medilas 4060 Fibertom at 0.8 W, 10 Hz, for 10 s with 80 mJ/pulse power. Bonding agent (single bond dental adhesive, 3M was applied over the test areas on 20 samples of Groups A and B each, and light cured. Composite resin (Z 100, 3M was applied onto the test areas as a 3 mm diameter cylinder, and light cured. The samples were tested for shear bond strength. Remaining 10 samples from each group were observed under SEM for morphological changes. Results: The mean shear bond strength was 20.00 MPa (΁ 1.93 and 13.28 MPa (΁1.97 for Group A and B, respectively. The difference in mean values was statistically significant between Groups A and B (P<0.001. Under SEM, Group A showed typical honeycomb appearance and Group B showed bubble-like cavities. Conclusions: In enamel, acid etch technique showed higher shear bond strength.

  2. [The effect of acid etching on bond strength of different self-adhesive resin cements to dentin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Gui-hong; Wang, Hai-hua

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the effect of acid etching on bond strength (μTBS) of self-adhesive resin cements (Unicem, G-Cem, Clearfil SA Cement, BisCem) to dentin. Thirty-two human third molars without caries were used for the study. One fourth of the crowns were cut off, perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth with (Isomet) a low-speed saw, in order to expose the dentin surfaces of the sectioned sides. The sectioned dentin surfaces of the experimental groups were etched for 15 s. Subsequently, resin blocks were bonded to the dentin surfaces, with one of the four cements (Unicem, G-Cem, Clearfil SA Cement, BisCem). After being stored in water for 24 hours, all specimens were perpendicularly sectioned through the dentin-resin interfaces, prepared into beams about 1 mm×1 mm×8 mm for μTBS tests with micro-tensile tester. The micro-morphologies of the cement-dentin interfaces were assessed using scanning electron microscope. The data was analyzed using SPSS16.0 software package. Without pre-treatment of acid etching, Unicem group (12.9±3.2) MPa, G-Cem group (11.7±2.6) MPa and Clearfil SA Cement group (10.9±2.3) MPa possessed a higher bond strength than BisCem group (6.8±2.4) MPa (Padhesive cements (G-Cem, Clearfil SA CementUnicem, Unicem), but there was no significant difference in bond strength in BisCem group with or without acid etching. With pretreatment of acid etching, the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin decreases in G-Cem, Clearfil SA Cement and Unicem group, while there is no significant effect on the bond strength of BisCem group. Supported by Public Technology Applied Research Project of Science and Technology Bureau of Shaoxing City of Zhejiang Province (2012B70079).

  3. Determination of Cadmium in Brown Rice Samples by Fluorescence Spectroscopy Using a Fluoroionophore after Purification of Cadmium by Anion Exchange Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Hafuka

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Simple analytical methods are needed for determining the cadmium (Cd content of brown rice samples. In the present study, we developed a new analytical procedure consisting of the digestion of rice using HCl, Cd purification using anion exchange resin, and then determining the Cd content using fluorescence spectroscopy. Digestion with 0.1 M HCl for 10 min at room temperature was sufficient to extract Cd from the ground rice samples. The Cd in the extract was successfully purified in preference to other metals using Dowex 1X8 chloride form resin. Low concentrations of Cd in the eluate could be determined using fluorescence spectroscopy with a fluoroionophore. Overall, the actual limit of quantification value for the Cd content in rice was about 0.1 mg-Cd/kg-rice, which was sufficiently low compared with the regulatory value (0.4 mg-Cd/kg-rice given by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. We analyzed authentic brown rice samples using our new analytical procedure and the results agreed well with those determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES. Since the fluoroionophore recognized Zn2+ and Hg2+ as well as Cd2+, a sample containing high concentration of Zn2+ or Hg2+ might cause a false positive result.

  4. Immobilization of α-amylase and amyloglucosidase onto ion-exchange resin beads and hydrolysis of natural starch at high concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kapish; Jana, Asim Kumar; Kumar, Sandeep; Maiti, Mithu

    2013-11-01

    α-Amylase was immobilized on Dowex MAC-3 with 88 % yield and amyloglucosidase on Amberlite IRA-400 ion-exchange resin beads with 54 % yield by adsorption process. Immobilized enzymes were characterized to measure the kinetic parameters and optimal operational parameters. Optimum substrate concentration and temperature were higher for immobilized enzymes. The thermal stability of the enzymes enhanced after the immobilization. Immobilized enzymes were used in the hydrolysis of the natural starch at high concentration (35 % w/v). The time required for liquefaction of starch to 10 dextrose equivalent (DE) and saccharification of liquefied starch to 96 DE increased. Immobilized enzymes showed the potential for use in starch hydrolysis as done in industry.

  5. Sulfonation Process and Desalination Effect of Polystyrene/PVDF Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Network Cation Exchange Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Yin-lin Lei; Yun-jie Luo; Fei Chen; Le-he Mei

    2014-01-01

    With the classical sulfonation method of polystyrene-based strongly acidic cation exchange resins, polystyrene/polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) alloy particles were sulfonated to obtain a cation exchange resin, which was then directly thermoformed to prepare a semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) cation exchange membrane. The effects of the swelling agent, sulfonation time and temperature and the relative contents of polystyrene and divinylbenzene (DVB) in the alloy particles on the...

  6. Deuterium exchange during acid-demineralisation. [of Murchison meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerridge, John F.; Chang, Sherwood; Shipp, Ruth

    1988-01-01

    Isotopic analyses of residues prepared by demineralization of the Murchison meteorite using D-labelled reagents provide evidence for measurable exchange of H-isotopes between residue and reagents. Precise quantification of this effect is precluded by substantial inhomogeneity of the meteoritic organic matter. A conservative estimate of the degree of exchange is 3-5 percent of the H pyrolyzable as H2O. This could affect the shape of the curve defining D release as a function of temperature, but does not change conclusions previously drawn concerning the nature of the bulk D enrichment of insoluble organic matter in meteorites.

  7. Conifer Diterpene Resin Acids Disrupt Juvenile Hormone-Mediated Endocrine Regulation in the Indian Meal Moth Plodia interpunctella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun-Woo; Yun, Chan-Seok; Jeon, Jun Hyoung; Kim, Ji-Ae; Park, Doo-Sang; Ryu, Hyung Won; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Song, Hyuk-Hwan; Shin, Yunhee; Jung, Chan Sik; Shin, Sang Woon

    2017-07-03

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are important components of oleoresin and greatly contribute to the defense strategies of conifers against herbivorous insects. In the present study, we determined that DRAs function as insect juvenile hormone (JH) antagonists that interfere with the juvenile hormone-mediated binding of the JH receptor Methoprene-tolerant (Met) and steroid receptor coactivator (SRC). Using a yeast two-hybrid system transformed with Met and SRC from the Indian meal moth Plodia interpunctella, we tested the interfering activity of 3704 plant extracts against JH III-mediated Met-SRC binding. Plant extracts from conifers, especially members of the Pinaceae, exhibited strong interfering activity, and four active interfering DRAs (7α-dehydroabietic acid, 7-oxodehydroabietic acid, dehydroabietic acid, and sandaracopimaric acid) were isolated from roots of the Japanese pine Pinus densiflora. The four isolated DRAs, along with abietic acid, disrupted the juvenile hormone-mediated binding of P. interpunctella Met and SRC, although only 7-oxodehydroabietic acid disrupted larval development. These results demonstrate that DRAs may play a defensive role against herbivorous insects via insect endocrine-disrupting activity.

  8. Synthetic resin-bound truncated Candida antarctica lipase B for production of fatty acid alkyl esters by transesterification of corn and soybean oils with ethanol or butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen R; Moser, Bryan R; Robinson, Samantha; Cox, Elby J; Harmsen, Amanda J; Friesen, Jon A; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Jones, Marjorie A; Pinkelman, Rebecca; Bang, Sookie S; Tasaki, Ken; Doll, Kenneth M; Qureshi, Nasib; Liu, Siqing; Saha, Badal C; Jackson, John S; Cotta, Michael A; Rich, Joseph O; Caimi, Paolo

    2012-05-31

    A gene encoding a synthetic truncated Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) was generated via automated PCR and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Western blot analysis detected five truncated CALB variants, suggesting multiple translation starts from the six in-frame ATG codons. The longest open reading frame, which corresponds to amino acids 35-317 of the mature lipase, appeared to be expressed in the greatest amount. The truncated CALB was immobilized on Sepabeads® EC-EP resin and used to produce ethyl and butyl esters from crude corn oil and refined soybean oil. The yield of ethyl esters was 4-fold greater from corn oil than from soybean oil and was 36% and 50% higher, respectively, when compared to a commercially available lipase resin (Novozym 435) using the same substrates. A 5:1 (v/v) ratio of ethanol to corn oil produced 3.7-fold and 8.4-fold greater yields than ratios of 15:1 and 30:1, respectively. With corn oil, butyl ester production was 56% higher than ethyl ester production. Addition of an ionic catalytic resin step prior to the CALB resin increased yields of ethyl esters from corn oil by 53% compared to CALB resin followed by ionic resin. The results suggest resin-bound truncated CALB has potential application in biodiesel production using biocatalysts. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Uranium removal from contaminated groundwater by synthetic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, D H; Gu, B; Watson, D B; Parmele, C S

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic resins are shown to be effective in removing uranium from contaminated groundwater. Batch and field column tests showed that strong-base anion-exchange resins were more effective in removing uranium from both near-neutral-pH (6.5)- and high-pH (8)-low-nitrate-containing groundwaters, than metal-chelating resins, which removed more uranium from acidic-pH (5)-high-nitrate-containing groundwater from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Y-12 S-3 Ponds area in Tennessee, USA. Dowex 1-X8 and Purolite A-520E anion-exchange resins removed more uranium from high-pH (8)-low-nitrate-containing synthetic groundwater in batch tests than metal-chelating resins. The Dowex 21K anion-exchange resin achieved a cumulative loading capacity of 49.8 mg g(-1) before breakthrough in a field column test using near-neutral-pH (6.5)-low-nitrate-containing groundwater. However, in an acidic-pH (5)-high-nitrate-containing groundwater, metal-chelating resins Diphonix and Chelex-100 removed more uranium than anion-exchange resins. In 15 m L of acidic-pH (5)-high-nitrate-containing groundwater spiked with 20 mg L(-1) uranium, the uranium concentrations ranged from 0.95 mg L(-1) at 1-h equilibrium to 0.08 mg L(-1) at 24-h equilibrium for Diphonix and 0.17 mg L(-1) at 1-h equilibrium to 0.03 mg L(-1) at 24-h equilibrium for Chelex-100. Chelex-100 removed more uranium in the first 10 min in the 100mL of acidic-(pH 5)-high-nitrate-containing groundwater ( approximately 5 mg L(-1) uranium); however, after 10 min, Diphonix equaled or out-performed Chelex-100. This study presents an improved understanding of the selectivity and sorption kenetics of a range of ion-exchange resins that remove uranium from both low- and high-nitrate-containing groundwaters with varying pHs.

  10. Uranium Removal from Contaminated Groundwater by Synthetic Resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Debra H. [Queen' s University, Belfast; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Parmele, C. S. [Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), Oak Ridge, TN

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic resins are shown to be effective in removing uranium from contaminated groundwater. Batch and field column tests showed that strong-base anion-exchange resins were more effective in removing uranium from both near-neutral-pH (6.5)- and high-pH (8)-low-nitrate-containing ground waters, than metal-chelating resins, which removed more uranium from acidic-pH (5)-high-nitrate-containing groundwater from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Y-12 S-3 Ponds area in Tennessee, USA. Dowex 1-X8 and Purolite A-520E anion-exchange resins removed more uranium from high-pH (8)-low-nitrate-containing synthetic groundwater in batch tests than metal-chelating resins. The Dowex{trademark} 21K anion-exchange resin achieved a cumulative loading capacity of 49.8 mg g{sup -1} before breakthrough in a field column test using near-neutral-pH (6.5)-low-nitrate-containing groundwater. However, in an acidic-pH (5)-high-nitrate-containing groundwater, metal-chelating resins Diphonix and Chelex-100 removed more uranium than anion-exchange resins. In 15 mL of acidic-pH (5)-high-nitrate-containing groundwater spiked with 20 mg L{sup -1} uranium, the uranium concentrations ranged from 0.95 mg L{sup -1} at 1-h equilibrium to 0.08 mg L{sup -1} at 24-h equilibrium for Diphonix and 0.17 mg L{sup -1} at 1-h equilibrium to 0.03 mg L{sup -1} at 24-h equilibrium for Chelex-100. Chelex-100 removed more uranium in the first 10 min in the 100 mL of acidic-(pH 5)-high-nitrate-containing groundwater (5 mg L{sup -1} uranium); however, after 10 min, Diphonix equaled or out-performed Chelex-100. This study presents an improved understanding of the selectivity and sorption kinetics of a range of ion-exchange resins that remove uranium from both low- and high-nitrate-containing groundwaters with varying pHs.

  11. Upgrade to Ion Exchange Modeling for Removal of Technetium from Hanford Waste Using SuperLig® 639 Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamm, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Smith, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Aleman, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2013-05-16

    This report documents the development and application of computer models to describe the sorption of pertechnetate [TcO₄⁻], and its surrogate perrhenate [ReO₄⁻], on SuperLig® 639 resin. Two models have been developed: 1) A thermodynamic isotherm model, based on experimental data, that predicts [TcO₄⁻] and [ReO₄⁻] sorption as a function of solution composition and temperature and 2) A column model that uses the isotherm calculated by the first model to simulate the performance of a full-scale sorption process. The isotherm model provides a synthesis of experimental data collected from many different sources to give a best estimate prediction of the behavior of the pertechnetate-SuperLig® 639 system and an estimate of the uncertainty in this prediction. The column model provides a prediction of the expected performance of the plant process by determining the volume of waste solution that can be processed based on process design parameters such as column size, flow rate and resin physical properties.

  12. Influence of ascorbic acid on bonding of peroxide-affected dentin and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, S; Kameyama, A; Nakazawa, T; Yazaki, K; Amagai, T; Kawada, E; Oda, Y; Hirai, Y; Sato, T

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tensile bond strength (TBS) to peroxide-exposed dentin. Furthermore, the effect of ascorbic acid (AA) on the bond strength of peroxide-exposed dentin was investigated. Extracted bovine dentin was exposed to 10% carbamide peroxide, 30% hydrogen peroxide, or distilled water for 30 min, then treated with 10% AA (0, 30, 90, and 180 min), and conditioned with 10% citric acid/3% ferric chloride. The polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) rod was bonded to the treated bovine dentin with 4-META/MMA-TBB resin. A minidumbbell-shaped bonded specimen was prepared from these bonded assemblies and the TBS was tested. The fractured surfaces were also observed with a scanning electron microscope. Exposure to peroxide before bonding significantly reduced bond strength. The application of AA to the peroxide-exposed dentin increased bond strength. On the other hand, an adverse effect of AA was found in distilled water-affected dentin. Extended resin fibers were partially seen in the peroxide-exposed dentin. In conclusion, peroxide reduced the bond strength, and the stronger the oxidation, the weaker the obtained bond. Antioxidation with AA recovered the bond strength, and this effect increased the longer the AA was applied.

  13. A Robust Epoxy Resins @ Stearic Acid-Mg(OH)2 Micronanosheet Superhydrophobic Omnipotent Protective Coating for Real-Life Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Yifan; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2016-06-29

    Superhydrophobic coating has extremely high application value and practicability. However, some difficult problems such as weak mechanical strength, the need for expensive toxic reagents, and a complex preparation process are all hard to avoid, and these problems have impeded the superhydrophobic coating's real-life application for a long time. Here, we demonstrate one kind of omnipotent epoxy resins @ stearic acid-Mg(OH)2 superhydrophobic coating via a simple antideposition route and one-step superhydrophobization process. The whole preparation process is facile, and expensive toxic reagents needed. This omnipotent coating can be applied on any solid substrate with great waterproof ability, excellent mechanical stability, and chemical durability, which can be stored in a realistic environment for more than 1 month. More significantly, this superhydrophobic coating also has four protective abilities, antifouling, anticorrosion, anti-icing, and flame-retardancy, to cope with a variety of possible extreme natural environments. Therefore, this omnipotent epoxy resins @ stearic acid-Mg(OH)2 superhydrophobic coating not only satisfies real-life need but also has great application potential in many respects.

  14. Effects of gas exchange on acid-base balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindinger, Michael I; Heigenhauser, George J F

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the interactions between ventilation and acid-base balance under a variety of conditions including rest, exercise, altitude, pregnancy, and various muscle, respiratory, cardiac, and renal pathologies. We introduce the physicochemical approach to assessing acid-base status and demonstrate how this approach can be used to quantify the origins of acid-base disorders using examples from the literature. The relationships between chemoreceptor and metaboreceptor control of ventilation and acid-base balance summarized here for adults, youth, and in various pathological conditions. There is a dynamic interplay between disturbances in acid-base balance, that is, exercise, that affect ventilation as well as imposed or pathological disturbances of ventilation that affect acid-base balance. Interactions between ventilation and acid-base balance are highlighted for moderate- to high-intensity exercise, altitude, induced acidosis and alkalosis, pregnancy, obesity, and some pathological conditions. In many situations, complete acid-base data are lacking, indicating a need for further research aimed at elucidating mechanistic bases for relationships between alterations in acid-base state and the ventilatory responses. 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:2037-2061, 2012.

  15. An Engineering Evaluation of Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birdwell Jr, Joseph F [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Collins, Robert T [ORNL; Hunt, Rodney Dale [ORNL

    2010-09-01

    A small column ion exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removal of cesium from caustic, supernatant, and dissolved salt solutions stored or generated from high-level tank wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site and Savannah River Sites. In both instances, deployment of SCIX systems, either in-tank or near-tank, is a means of expediting waste pretreatment and dispositioning with minimal or no new infrastructure requirements. Conceptually, the treatment approach can utilize a range of ion exchange media. Previously, both crystalline silicotitanate (CST), an inorganic, nonelutable sorbent, and resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), an organic, elutable resin, have been considered for cesium removal from tank waste. More recently, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated use of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644, an elutable ion exchange medium, for the subject application. Results of testing indicate hydraulic limitations of the SuperLig{reg_sign} resin, specifically a high pressure drop through packed ion exchange columns. This limitation is likely the result of swelling and shrinkage of the irregularly shaped (granular) resin during repeated conversions between sodium and hydrogen forms as the resin is first loaded then eluted. It is anticipated that a similar flow limitation would exist in columns packed with conventional, granular RF resin. However, use of spherical RF resin is a likely means of mitigating processing limitations due to excessive pressure drop. Although size changes occur as the spherical resin is cycled through loading and elution operations, the geometry of the resin is expected to effectively mitigate the close packing that leads to high pressure drops across ion exchange columns. Multiple evaluations have been performed to determine the feasibility of using spherical RF resin and to obtain data necessary for design of an SCIX process. The work performed consisted of examination of radiation effects on resin performance

  16. Comparison of adsorption equilibrium models for the study of CL-, NO3- and SO4(2-) removal from aqueous solutions by an anion exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dron, Julien; Dodi, Alain

    2011-06-15

    The removal of chloride, nitrate and sulfate ions from aqueous solutions by a macroporous resin is studied through the ion exchange systems OH(-)/Cl(-), OH(-)/NO(3)(-), OH(-)/SO(4)(2-), and HCO(3)(-)/Cl(-), Cl(-)/NO(3)(-), Cl(-)/SO(4)(2-). They are investigated by means of Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevitch (D-R) and Dubinin-Astakhov (D-A) single-component adsorption isotherms. The sorption parameters and the fitting of the models are determined by nonlinear regression and discussed. The Langmuir model provides a fair estimation of the sorption capacity whatever the system under study, on the contrary to Freundlich and D-R models. The adsorption energies deduced from Dubinin and Langmuir isotherms are in good agreement, and the surface parameter of the D-A isotherm appears consistent. All models agree on the order of affinity OH(-)models provide the best fit to the experimental points, indicating that the micropore volume filling theory is the best representation of the ion exchange processes under study among other adsorption isotherms. The nonlinear regression results are also compared with linear regressions. While the parameter values are not affected, the evaluation of the best fitting model is biased by linearization. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Bio nitrate Project: a new technology for water nitrate elimination by means of ionic exchange resins; Proyecto Bionitrate: una nueva tecnologia para la eliminacion de nitratos en aguas mediante resinas de intercambio ionico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arellano Ortiz, J.

    2009-07-01

    The use of ion exchange resins for nitrate elimination from water generates a waste containing a sodium chloride mixture plus the retained nitrates. this waste must be correctly disposed. In this project, the resin ionic form is modified to be regenerated with other compounds, different from the common salt, which are interesting because of the presence of mineral nutrition. So, with Bio nitrate Project, nitrates are recovered and the regeneration waste is apt to be use as fertilizer, for agricultural uses, or as complementary contribution of nutrients in biological water treatment. (Author) 27 refs.

  18. Effect of rice-husk ash on exchange acidity, growth and yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of rice-husk ash on exchange acidity, growth and yield of groundnut ( Arachis hypogaea l.) in an acid ultisol. ... in an acid ultisol. D.O Nottidge, R.B Balogun, N.R Njoku ... Significant increases (P < 0.01) in soil P, K and Ca status relate significantly (P = 0.05) to patterns of growth and kernel yield of the crop. The 3 t ha-1 ...

  19. Enrichment of lithium isotope .sup.6./sup.Li by ion exchange resin with specific particle size

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikeš, J.; Ďurišová, Jana; Jelínek, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 312, č. 1 (2017), s. 13-18 ISSN 0236-5731 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : lithium * isotope separation * elution chromatography * ion exchange chromatography Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.282, year: 2016

  20. Novel Anion Exchange Resin-based Catalyst for Liquid-phase Methanol Synthesis at 373–393 K

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aika, Ken-ichi; Kobayashi, Hidenobu; Harada, Kenji; Inazu, Koji

    2004-01-01

    A thermo-stable anion exchange resin–Raney Cu system was found as the most effective solid catalyst for low-temperature liquid-phase methanol synthesis at 373 to 393 K under 5.0 MPa of syngas (2H2/CO). With the catalyst...

  1. Simultaneous quantification of triterpenoic acids by high performance liquid chromatography method in the extracts of gum resin of Boswellia serrata obtained by different extraction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neha; Bhardwaj, Vikram; Singh, Samar; Ali, Sheikh Abid; Gupta, D K; Paul, Satya; Satti, Naresh K; Chandra, Suresh; Verma, Mahendra K

    2016-01-01

    Boswellia serrata, also known as Indian frankincense is a commercially important medicinal plant which has been used for hundreds of years as an Ayurvedic medicine for the attempted treatment of arthritis. It contains naturally occurring triterpenoic acids, called as boswellic acids (BA's). A highly reproducible High performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet diode array detection (HPLC-UV-DAD) method was developed for the simultaneous determination and quantitative analysis of eight major triterpenoic acids in Boswellia serrata gum resin obtained by different extraction techniques. All the calibration curves exhibited good linear regression (R(2) > 0.997) within the test ranges. The established method showed good precision and overall recoveries of the boswellic acids. The eight triterpenoic acids coded as BS-1 (11-keto-beta-boswellic acid), BS-2 (3-O-acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid), BS-3 (3-keto tirucallic acid), BS-4 (3-O-acetyl-alpha-tirucallic acid), BS-5 (3-O-acetyl-beta-tirucallic acid), BS-6 (alpha-boswellic acid), BS-7 (beta-boswellic acid) and BS-8 (3-O-acetyl-beta-boswellic acid) were isolated from the processed gum resin of Boswellia serrata by column chromatography. The proposed HPLC method is simple, reliable and has been very useful for the qualitative as well as quantitative analysis of boswellic acids in the gum resin of Boswellia serrata. The proposed method allows to quantify boswellic acids in appreciable amounts by HPLC-UV (DAD) method in the extracts and the available marketed formulations.Graphical abstractIsolation & separation of eight Triterpenoic acids from Boswellia serrata.

  2. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE SHEAR BOND STRENGTH OF COMPOSITE RESIN TO DENTAL ENAMEL CONDITIONED WITH PHOSPHORIC ACID OR Nd: YAG LASER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDUARDO Carlos de Paula

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This study has been focused on a comparison between the shear bond strength of a composite resin attached to dental enamel surface, after a 35% phosphoric acid etching and after a Nd:YAG laser irradiation with 165.8 J/cm2 of energy density per pulse. After etching and attaching resin to these surfaces, the specimens were thermocycled and then underwent the shearing bond strength tests at a speed of 5 mm/min. The results achieved, after statistical analysis with Student's t-test, showed that the adhesion was significantly greater in the 35% phosphoric acid treated group than in the group treated with the Nd:YAG laser, thus demonstrating the need for developing new studies to reach the ideal parameters for an effective enamel surface conditioning as well as specific adhesives and composite resins when Nd:YAG laser is used

  3. Effect of hybridization on bond strength and adhesive interface after acid-base challenge using 4-META/MMA-TBB resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagaki, Tomohiro; Nikaido, Toru; Tsuchiya, Satoko; Ikeda, Masaomi; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2009-03-01

    The purposes of this study were twofold, namely to evaluate: (1) the effect of hybridization on microtensile bond strength (microTBS) to dentin, and (2) the ultrastructure of the dentin-adhesive interface with 4-META/MMA-TBB resin after acid-base challenge. Dentin surfaces, which received no treatment (NT), 65% phosphoric acid (PA), or 10% citric acid-3% ferric chloride (10-3), were bonded with a 4-META/MMA-TBB resin. To evaluate dentin bond strength, microTBS test was performed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. For ultrastructural evaluation of the adhesive interfaces, SEM was used to examine the interfaces of the bonded specimens after acid-base challenge. The microTBS of NT was not determined, while that of 10-3 was significantly higher than that of PA (p adhesive interface against acid-base challenge.

  4. Synergic Catalysis of PdCu Alloy Nanoparticles within a Macroreticular Basic Resin for Hydrogen Production from Formic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kohsuke; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Dojo, Masahiro; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2015-08-17

    Highly dispersed PdCu alloy nanoparticles have been successfully prepared within a macroreticular basic resin bearing N(CH3 )2 functional groups. This previously unappreciated combination of alloy is first proven to be responsible for the efficient production of high-purity H2 from formic acid (HCOOH) dehydrogenation for chemical hydrogen storage. By the addition of Cu, the electronically promoted Pd sites show significantly higher catalytic activity as well as a better tolerance towards CO poisoning as compared to their monometallic Pd counterparts. Experimental and DFT calculation studies revealed not only the synergic alloying effect but also cooperative action by the N(CH3 )2 groups within the resin play crucial roles in achieving exceptional catalytic performances. In addition to the advantages such as, facile preparation method, free of additives, recyclable without leaching of active component, and suppression of unfavorable CO formation less than 3 ppm, the present catalytic system is cost-effective because of the superior catalytic activity compared with that of well-established precious PdAg or PdAu catalysts. The present catalytic system is particularly desirable for an ideal hydrogen vector in terms of potential industrial application for fuel cells. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Demonstration of Regenerable, Large-Scale Ion Exchange System Using WBA Resin in Rialto, CA (Drinking Water Treatment - Pilot Scale)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Calcite Contactor Treated Water Figure 4. Process Configuration for Capital and O&M Cost Analyses. CO2 Filter Neutralization LiquiCel Membrane ...10,000 Equipment Quantity Unit Total Cost Ion exchange vessels 2 10 ft dia. $ 200,000 Calcite contactor 1 100 gpm $ 30,000 LiquiCel Membranes 6 3...varying the pH and using a combination of air/ membrane stripping and calcite contacting. Treated water had a Langelier Saturation Index (LSI) near zero

  6. Proton exchange between oxymethyl radical and acids and bases: semiempirical quantum-chemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Pustolaikina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The reactions with proton participation are widely represented in the analytical, technological and biological chemistry. Quantum-chemical study of the exchange processes in hydrogen bonding complexes will allow us to achieve progress in the understanding of the elementary act mechanism of proton transfer in hydrogen bonding chain as well as the essence of the acid-base interactions. Oxymethyl radical •CH2ОН is small in size and comfortable as a model particle that well transmits protolytic properties of paramagnetic acids having more complex structure. Quantum-chemical modeling of proton exchange reaction oxymethyl radical ∙CH2OH and its diamagnetic analog CH3OH with amines, carboxylic acids and water was carried out using UAM1 method with the help of Gaussian-2009 program. QST2 method was used for the search of transition state, IRC procedure was applied for the calculation of descents along the reaction coordinate. The difference in the structure of transition states of ∙CH2OH/ CH3OH with bases and acids has been shown. It has been confirmed that in the case of bases, consecutive proton exchange mechanism was fixed, and in the case of complexes with carboxylic acids parallel proton exchange mechanism was fixed. The similarity in the reaction behavior of paramagnetic and diamagnetic systems in the proton exchange has been found. It was suggested that the mechanism of proton exchange reaction is determined by the structure of the hydrogen bonding cyclic complex, which is, in turn, depends from the nature of the acid-base interactions partners.

  7. [Bonding of MMA-BPO. DMPT resin to bovine tooth coated by poly (methyl methacrylate-co-p-styrene sulfonic acid)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, T; Yamamoto, T; Nagata, K; Nakabayashi, N

    1989-11-01

    The objective of this study was to prepare a new type water-soluble bonding agent, methyl methacrylate (MMA)-p-styrene sulfonic acid copolymer (MS), and to investigate the effect of MS on bonding between resins and tooth substrates. MS is cross-linked with Ca2+ released from ground enamel and dentin and could be immobilized on their surface. A sample was prepared by bonding an acrylic rod with a BPO-amine catalyzed self-curing resin to ground enamel and dentin coated with an aqueous mixture of FeCl3 and 10 wt% MS. After immersion in water for 24 hrs, the tensile bond strength was measured. The bond strength to both enamel and dentin was only 2 MPa and adhesive failure occurred at the interface between cured MS and self-curing resin. This suggested that cured MS could adversely effect the polymerization of self-curing resins. A second treatment of cured MS on the tooth surface with metallic cations was carried out to minimize the amount of free sulfonic acids in the MS disturbing radical formation in self-curing resin. The second treatment improved the bond strength to 6 MPa.

  8. Catalytic Upgrading of bio-oil using 1-octene and 1-butanol over sulfonic acid resin catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhijun; Wang, Qingwen; Tripathi, Prabhat; Pittman, Charles U.

    2011-02-04

    Raw bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of biomass must be refined before it can be used as a transporation fuel, a petroleum refinery feed or for many other fuel uses. Raw bio-oil was upgraded with the neat model olefin, 1-octene, and with 1-octene/1-butanol mixtures over sulfonic acid resin catalysts frin 80 to 150 degrees celisus in order to simultaneously lower water content and acidity and to increase hydrophobicity and heating value. Phase separation and coke formation were key factors limiting the reaction rate during upgrading with neat 1-octene although octanols were formed by 1-octene hydration along with small amounts of octyl acetates and ethers. GC-MS analysis confirmed that olefin hydration, carboxylic acid esterification, acetal formation from aldehydes and ketones and O- and C-alkylations of phenolic compounds occurred simultaneously during upgrading with 1-octene/1-butanol mixtures. Addition of 1-butanol increased olefin conversion dramatically be reducing mass transfer restraints and serving as a cosolvent or emulsifying agent. It also reacted with carboxylic acids and aldehydes/ketones to form esters, and acetals, respectively, while also serving to stabilize bio-oil during heating. 1-Butanol addition also protected the catalysts, increasing catalyst lifetime and reducing or eliminationg coking. Upgrading sharply increased ester content and decreased the amounts of levoglucosan, polyhydric alcohols and organic acids. Upgrading lowered acidity (pH value rise from 2.5 to >3.0), removed the uppleasant ordor and increased hydrocarbon solubility. Water content decreased from 37.2% to < 7.5% dramatically and calorific value increased from 12.6 MJ kg to about 30.0 MJ kg.

  9. Study of arsenic removal with ionic exchange resins in drinking water from Zimapan, Hidalgo State, Mexico; Estudio de eliminacion de arsenico con resinas de entercambio ionico en agua potable de Zimapan, Estado de Hidalgo, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Moreno, F.; Prieto-Garcia, F.; Rojas-Hernandez, A.; Marmolejo-Santillan, Y.; Salinas-Rodriguez, E.; Patino-Cardona, F.

    2006-07-01

    Anionic exchange resins were research with respect its capacity for removal arsenic content in water. Water of well V from Zimapan Hidalgo Mexico was used to make this research, because this water have a mean concentration of 480{+-}11{mu}g-L''-1 of arsenic and it is available as drinking water. The exchange resins employed were two strong anionic, one macroreticular (IRA-900) and other gel type (IRA-400), as soon as one third anionic weak macroreticular type (IRA-96). The experiments carried with this resins showing that IRA-900 has highest efficient in the process of arsenic removal from drinking water, because, it showed a treatment capacity of 700 V{sub a}gua. V{sub r}es''-1; while that capacities of IRA-400 e IRA-96 resins were 320 and 52 V{sub a}gua .V{sub r}es''-1 respectively. The mean concentration of arsenic residue in the treatise water was 24 {mu}g.l''-1 and it is within the maximum level permissible by Mexican official norm for drinking water. (Author) 12 refs.

  10. Preparation and characterisation of tamarind 4-hydroxybenzoic acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption of heavy metal cations, Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Fe(II) from aqueous solution by newly-synthesized tamarind 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (THBA) resin was investigated. The resin was characterised on the basis of FTIR, elemental analysis, ion-exchange capacity and physico-chemical properties.

  11. Effect Of Sodium Hypochlorite And Peracetic Acid On The Surface Roughness Of Acrylic Resin Polymerized By Heated Water For Short And Long Cycles.

    OpenAIRE

    Sczepanski, Felipe; Sczepanski, Claudia Roberta Brunnquell; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Gonini-Júnior, Alcides; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the surface roughness of acrylic resin submitted to chemical disinfection via 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) or 1% peracetic acid (C2H4O3). Materials and Methods: The disc-shaped resin specimens (30 mm diameter ×4 mm height) were polymerized by heated water using two cycles (short cycle: 1 h at 74°C and 30 min at 100°C; conventional long cycle: 9 h at 74°C). The release of substances by these specimens in water solution was also quantified. Specimens were fabricated, di...

  12. Anion-exchange separation of Pt and Pd using perchloric and hydrochloric acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, R.K.; Morgan, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    On Biorad Ag-1X8 anion-exchange resin (200-400 mesh), Pd and Pt may be separated from one another by elution with 0.2M HClO4, and 5M HClO4, respectively. If present, Au may be retained by making the elutriants 0.003M in HCl. Alternatively, reduction by H2SO3 enables elution of Pt2+ with 6M HCl before recovery of Pd2+ with 0.2M HClO4??Ir4+ is reduced to Ir3+ by H2SO3 and may be eluted ahead of Pt2+ by 2M HCl. ?? 1982 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  13. Analysis of potential hazards associated with 241Am loaded resins from nitrate media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, Louis D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rubin, Jim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fife, Keith William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ricketts, Thomas Edgar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tappan, Bryce C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chavez, David E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-19

    LANL has been contacted to provide possible assistance in safe disposition of a number of 241Am-bearing materials associated with local industrial operations. Among the materials are ion exchange resins which have been in contact with 241Am and nitric acid, and which might have potential for exothermic reaction. The purpose of this paper is to analyze and define the resin forms and quantities to the extent possible from available data to allow better bounding of the potential reactivity hazard of the resin materials. An additional purpose is to recommend handling procedures to minimize the probability of an uncontrolled exothermic reaction.

  14. Acid precipitation effects on soil pH and base saturation of exchange sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. W. McFee; J. M. Kelly; R. H. Beck

    1976-01-01

    The typical values and probable ranges of acid-precipitation are evaluated in terms of their theoretical effects on pH and cation exchange equilibrium of soils characteristic of the humid temperature region. The extent of probable change in soil pH and the time required to cause such a change are calculated for a range of common soils. Hydrogen ion input by acid...

  15. B and N isolate-doped graphitic carbon nanosheets from nitrogen-containing ion-exchanged resins for enhanced oxygen reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yu, Peng; Zhao, Lu; Tian, Chungui; Zhao, Dongdong; Zhou, Wei; Yin, Jie; Wang, Ruihong; Fu, Honggang

    2014-06-01

    B,N-codoped carbon nanostructures (BNCS) can serve as alternative low-cost metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR). However, the compensation effect between the p- (B atoms) and n-type (N atoms) dopants would make the covalent boron-nitride (BN) easily formed during the synthesis of BNCS, leading to a unsatisfactory ORR activity. Therefore, it has been challenging to develop facile and rapid synthetic strategies for highly active BNCS without forming the direct covalent BN. Here, a facile method is developed to prepare B and N isolate-doped graphitic nanosheets (BNGS) by using iron species for saving N element and simultaneous doping the B element from nitrogen-containing ion-exchanged resins (NR). The resulting BNGS exhibits much more onset potential (Eonset) compared with the B-doped graphitic carbon nanosheets (BGS), N-doped graphitic carbon nanosheets (NGS), as well as B,N-codoped disorder carbon (BNC). Moreover, the BNGS shows well methanol tolerance propery and excellent stability (a minimal loss of activity after 5,000 potential cycles) compared to that of commercial Pt/C catalyst. The goog performance for BNGS towards ORR is attributed to the synergistic effect between B and N, and the well electrons transport property of graphitic carbon in BNGS.

  16. Impact of ozonation, anion exchange resin and UV/H2O2 pre-treatments to control fouling of ultrafiltration membrane for drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Biplob Kumar; Pramanik, Sagor Kumar; Sarker, Dipok Chandra; Suja, Fatihah

    2017-06-01

    The effects of ozonation, anion exchange resin (AER) and UV/H2O2 were investigated as a pre-treatment to control organic fouling (OF) of ultrafiltration membrane in the treatment of drinking water. It was found that high molecular weight (MW) organics such as protein and polysaccharide substances were majorly responsible for reversible fouling which contributed to 90% of total fouling. The decline rate increased with successive filtration cycles due to deposition of protein content over time. All pre-treatment could reduce the foulants of a Ultrafiltration membrane which contributed to the improvement in flux, and there was a greater improvement of flux by UV/H2O2 (61%) than ozonation (43%) which in turn was greater than AER (23%) treatment. This was likely due to the effective removal/breakdown of high MW organic content. AER gave greater removal of biofouling potential components (such as biodegradable dissolved organic carbon and assimilable organic carbon contents) compared to UV/H2O2 and ozonation treatment. Overall, this study demonstrated the potential of pre-treatments for reducing OF of ultrafiltration for the treatment of drinking water.

  17. Electro-Catalytic Biodiesel Production from Canola Oil in Methanolic and Ethanolic Solutions with Low-Cost Stainless Steel and Hybrid Ion-Exchange Resin Grafted Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois-Marie Allioux

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is a growing alternative to petroleum fuels and is produced by the catalyzed transesterification of fats in presence of an alcohol base. Transesterification processes using homogeneous catalysts are considered to be among the most efficient methods but rely on the feedstock quality and low water content in order to avoid undesirable saponification reactions. In this work, the electro-catalytic conversion of canola oil to biodiesel in a 1% aqueous methanolic and ethanolic reaction mixture was performed without the addition of external catalyst or cosolvent. An inexpensive stainless steel (SS electrode and a hybrid SS electrode coated with an ion-exchange resin catalyst were used as cathode materials while the anode was composed of a plain carbon paper. The cell voltages were varied from 10 to 40 V and the reaction temperature maintained at 20 or 40°C. The canola oil conversion rates were found to be superior at 40°C without saponification reactions for cell voltages below 30 V. The conversion rates were as high as 87% for the hybrid electrode and 81% for the plain SS electrode. This work could inspire new process development for the conversion of high water content feedstock for the production of second-generation biodiesel.

  18. Electro-catalytic biodiesel production from canola oil in methanolic and ethanolic solutions with low cost stainless steel and hybrid ion-exchange resin grafted electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allioux, Francois-Marie; Holland, Brendan J.; Kong, Lingxue; Dumée, Ludovic F.

    2017-07-01

    Biodiesel is a growing alternative to petroleum fuels and is produced by the catalysed transesterification of fats in presence of an alcohol base. Transesterification processes using homogeneous catalysts are considered to be amongst the most efficient methods but rely on the feedstock quality and low water content in order to avoid undesirable saponification reactions. In this work, the electro-catalytic conversion of canola oil to biodiesel in a 1% aqueous methanolic and ethanolic reaction mixture was performed without the addition of external catalyst or co-solvent. An inexpensive stainless steel electrode and a hybrid stainless steel electrode coated with an ion-exchange resin catalyst were used as cathode materials while the anode was composed of a plain carbon paper. The cell voltages were varied from 10 to 40 V and the reaction temperature maintained at 20 or 40°C. The canola oil conversion rates were found to be superior at 40°C without saponification reactions for cell voltages below 30 V. The conversion rates were as high as 87% for the hybrid electrode and 81% for the plain stainless steel electrode. This work could inspire new process development for the conversion of high water content feedstock for the production of second-generation biodiesel.

  19. Effect of experimental acid/base conditioner on microtensile bond strength of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to dentin after long-term water immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeno, Kohyoh; Taira, Yohsuke; Ito, Shuichi

    2012-01-01

    An experimental conditioner (Exp), which was an aqueous solution of 10% ascorbic acid and 5% ferric chloride, was prepared in this study. This study evaluated the effect of Exp on the microtensile bond strength between a self-curing resin and dentin after long-term water immersion. Flat human dentin surfaces were sequentially pretreated with 40% phosphoric acid, 10% sodium hypochlorite, and Exp. Surface pretreatment with an aqueous solution of 10% citric and 3% ferric chloride (10-3) was used as a control. Composite resin rods were bonded to pretreated dentin surfaces using 4-META/MMA-TBB resin. Microtensile bond strengths were evaluated after water immersion at 24 h, 12 months, 24 months, and 36 months. At each immersion period, the bond strength of Exp was significantly higher than that of 10-3. After 36 months, Exp showed no significant decrease in microtensile bond strength, but 10-3 showed significant reductions. Pretreatment with experimental acid/base conditioner markedly improved the bonding durability of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to human dentin when compared against the conventional 10-3 treatment.

  20. Biocatalytic Synthesis of Epoxy Resins from Fatty Acids as a Versatile Route for the Formation of Polymer Thermosets with Tunable Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torron, Susana; Semlitsch, Stefan; Martinelle, Mats; Johansson, Mats

    2016-12-12

    The work herein presented describes the synthesis and polymerization of series of bio-based epoxy resins prepared through lipase catalyzed transesterification. The epoxy-functional polyester resins with various architectures (linear, tri-branched, and tetra-branched) were synthesized through condensation of fatty acids derived from epoxidized soybean oil and linseed oil with three different hydroxyl cores under bulk conditions. The selectivity of the lipases toward esterification/transesterification reactions allowed the formation of macromers with up to 12 epoxides in the backbone. The high degree of functionality of the resins resulted in polymer thermosets with Tg values ranging from -25 to over 100 °C prepared through cationic polymerization. The determining parameters of the synthesis and the mechanism for the formation of the species were determined through kinetic studies by 1H NMR, SEC, and molecular modeling studies. The correlation between macromer structure and thermoset properties was studied through real-time FTIR measurements, DSC, and DMA.

  1. The removal of toxic metals from liquid effluents by ion exchange resins. Part I: Chromium(VI/Sulphate/Dowex 1x8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alguacil, F. J.

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available The removal of chromium (VI from sulphuric acid solutions using the Dowex 1x8 resin has been investigated. The influence of several variables such as the stirring speed, temperature, the sulphuric acid and metal concentrations in the aqueous phase and the variation of the amount of resin added has been studied. Various aqueous solutions were used for the elution of the metal. Although concentrated nitric acid elutes chromium, this can be best accomplished using hydrazine sulphate solutions which at the same time reduce the toxic Cr (VI to the less toxic trivalent chromium state. Results obtained from batch experiments were applied to a continuous system using vertical columns. Moreover, an analytical application of the system in the determination of Cr (VI presents in the leachate of an EAF dust was investigated by transfering the methodology to an on-line flow injection system.

    Se estudia la eliminación de cromo(VI presente en disoluciones de ácido sulfúrico mediante la resina Dowex 1x8. Las variables experimentales estudiadas fueron: velocidad de agitación, temperatura, las concentraciones de metal y ácido sulfúrico en el medio acuoso y la cantidad de resina añadida. Se utilizaron diversas disoluciones acuosas para eluir al metal. Aunque el ácido nítrico se puede utilizar como eluyente, la operación de elución parece ser más eficiente cuando se emplean disoluciones de sulfato de hidracina que, al mismo tiempo, reduce el cromo(VI a cromo(III. Los resultados obtenidos en los ensayos en discontinuo se han experimentado en sistemas en continuo, utilizando mini-columnas. Por último, se ha aplicado el sistema a la determinación analítica del cromo(VI presente en los lixiviados de un polvo de horno de arco eléctrico, transfiriendo la tecnología a un sistema on-line con inyección de flujo.

  2. Improving evolutionary models for mitochondrial protein data with site-class specific amino acid exchangeability matrices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Dunn

    Full Text Available Adequate modeling of mitochondrial sequence evolution is an essential component of mitochondrial phylogenomics (comparative mitogenomics. There is wide recognition within the field that lineage-specific aspects of mitochondrial evolution should be accommodated through lineage-specific amino-acid exchangeability matrices (e.g., mtMam for mammalian data. However, such a matrix must be applied to all sites and this implies that all sites are subject to the same, or largely similar, evolutionary constraints. This assumption is unjustified. Indeed, substantial differences are expected to arise from three-dimensional structures that impose different physiochemical environments on individual amino acid residues. The objectives of this paper are (1 to investigate the extent to which amino acid evolution varies among sites of mitochondrial proteins, and (2 to assess the potential benefits of explicitly modeling such variability. To achieve this, we developed a novel method for partitioning sites based on amino acid physiochemical properties. We apply this method to two datasets derived from complete mitochondrial genomes of mammals and fish, and use maximum likelihood to estimate amino acid exchangeabilities for the different groups of sites. Using this approach we identified large groups of sites evolving under unique physiochemical constraints. Estimates of amino acid exchangeabilities differed significantly among such groups. Moreover, we found that joint estimates of amino acid exchangeabilities do not adequately represent the natural variability in evolutionary processes among sites of mitochondrial proteins. Significant improvements in likelihood are obtained when the new matrices are employed. We also find that maximum likelihood estimates of branch lengths can be strongly impacted. We provide sets of matrices suitable for groups of sites subject to similar physiochemical constraints, and discuss how they might be used to analyze real data. We

  3. Improving Evolutionary Models for Mitochondrial Protein Data with Site-Class Specific Amino Acid Exchangeability Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Katherine A.; Jiang, Wenyi; Field, Christopher; Bielawski, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    Adequate modeling of mitochondrial sequence evolution is an essential component of mitochondrial phylogenomics (comparative mitogenomics). There is wide recognition within the field that lineage-specific aspects of mitochondrial evolution should be accommodated through lineage-specific amino-acid exchangeability matrices (e.g., mtMam for mammalian data). However, such a matrix must be applied to all sites and this implies that all sites are subject to the same, or largely similar, evolutionary constraints. This assumption is unjustified. Indeed, substantial differences are expected to arise from three-dimensional structures that impose different physiochemical environments on individual amino acid residues. The objectives of this paper are (1) to investigate the extent to which amino acid evolution varies among sites of mitochondrial proteins, and (2) to assess the potential benefits of explicitly modeling such variability. To achieve this, we developed a novel method for partitioning sites based on amino acid physiochemical properties. We apply this method to two datasets derived from complete mitochondrial genomes of mammals and fish, and use maximum likelihood to estimate amino acid exchangeabilities for the different groups of sites. Using this approach we identified large groups of sites evolving under unique physiochemical constraints. Estimates of amino acid exchangeabilities differed significantly among such groups. Moreover, we found that joint estimates of amino acid exchangeabilities do not adequately represent the natural variability in evolutionary processes among sites of mitochondrial proteins. Significant improvements in likelihood are obtained when the new matrices are employed. We also find that maximum likelihood estimates of branch lengths can be strongly impacted. We provide sets of matrices suitable for groups of sites subject to similar physiochemical constraints, and discuss how they might be used to analyze real data. We also discuss how

  4. The impact of hydrofluoric acid etching followed by unfilled resin on the biaxial strength of a glass-ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posritong, Sumana; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; Chu, Tien-Min Gabriel; Eckert, George J; Bottino, Marco A; Bottino, Marco C

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the null hypotheses that hydrofluoric (HF) acid etching time would neither decrease the biaxial flexural strength of a glass-based veneering ceramic nor enhance it after silane and unfilled resin (UR) applications. Disc-shaped IPS e.max ZirPress specimens were allocated into 12 groups: G1-control (no-etching), G2-30 s, G3-60 s, G4-90 s, G5-120 s, G6-60 s+60 s. Groups (G7-G12) were treated in the same fashion as G1-G6, but followed by silane and UR applications. Surface morphology and roughness (Ra and Rq) of the ceramics were assessed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and profilometry, respectively. Flexural strength was determined by biaxial testing. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and the Sidak test (α=0.05). Weibull statistics were estimated and finite element analysis (FEA) was carried out to verify the stress concentration end areas of fracture. The interaction (etching time vs. surface treatment) was significant for Ra (p=0.008) and Rq (0.0075). Resin-treated groups presented significantly lower Ra and Rq than non-treated groups, except for the 60s group (pceramic microstructure and that the UR was able to penetrate into the irregularities. A significant effect of etching time (p=0.029) on flexural strength was seen. G7-G12 presented higher strength than G1-G6 (pceramic flexural strength. Moreover, the flexural strength could be enhanced after UR treatment. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthesized mesoporous silica and calcium aluminate cement fillers increased the fluoride recharge and lactic acid neutralizing ability of a resin-based pit and fissure sealant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surintanasarn, Atikom; Siralertmukul, Krisana; Thamrongananskul, Niyom

    2017-11-29

    This study evaluated the effect of different types of filler in a resin-based pit and fissure sealant on fluoride release, recharge, and lactic acid neutralization. Resin-based sealant was incorporated with 5% w/w of the following fillers: calcium aluminate cement (CAC), synthesized mesoporous silica (SI), a CAC and SI mixture (CAC+SI), glass-ionomer powder (GIC), and acetic acid-treated GIC (GICA). Sealant without filler served as control. The samples were immersed in deionized water or a lactic acid solution and the concentration of fluoride in the water, before and after fluoride recharge, and the lactic acid pH change, respectively, were determined. The CAC+SI group demonstrated the highest fluoride release after being recharged with fluoride gel. The CAC+SI group also demonstrated increased lactic acid pH. These findings suggest that a resin-based sealant containing synthesized mesoporous silica and calcium aluminate cement may enhance remineralization due to fluoride release and higher pH.

  6. Effect of carbohydrate ingestion on brain exchange of amino acids during sustained exercise in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomstrand, Eva; Møller, Kirsten; Secher, Niels Henry

    2005-01-01

    occasions; either supplemented with a 6% carbohydrate solution or with flavoured water (placebo). Catheters were inserted into the right internal jugular vein and the radial artery of the non-dominant arm. The brain exchange of amino acids during exercise was calculated from the arterial-jugular venous......AIM: This study investigated the effect of prolonged exercise with and without carbohydrate intake on the brain exchange of amino acids, especially focussing on tryptophan and branched-chain amino acids (BCAA). METHODS: Five male subjects exercised for 3 h on a cycle ergometer at 200 +/- 7 W on two...... concentration difference multiplied by plasma flow. RESULTS: About 106 micromol (22 mg) of tryptophan was taken up by the brain during exercise in the placebo trial, whereas no significant uptake was observed in the carbohydrate trial. In accordance, the arterial concentration of free tryptophan increased from...

  7. The Use of Commercial Non-Hazardous Air Pollutant Monomers to Optimize the Properties of Fatty Acid-Based Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    glass, carbon, flax , etc.) are placed in a mold and the liquid monomeric resin is pulled into the mold using vacuum. Low viscosities are necessary to...polymeric melts (15, 16). For example, as the molecular weight of epoxy monomers increases, the viscosity of the melt increases because of an...Derakane 441-400 Epoxy Vinyl Ester Resin Technical Data Sheet, Columbus, OH, 2004. 5. Ashland. Ashland Derakane 411-350 Epoxy Vinyl Ester Resin Technical

  8. Microsystems for anion exchange separation of radionuclides in nitric acid media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losno, M.; Brennetot, R.; Mariet, C. [DEN/Service d' Etudes Analytiques et de Reactivite des Surfaces - SEARS, CEA, Centre de Saclay, Universite Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif sur Yvette (France); Ferrante, I.; Descroix, S. [MMBM Group, Institut Curie Research Center, CNRS UMR 168, Paris (France)

    2016-07-01

    An efficient and reproducible photo-polymerized poly(ethylene glycol methacrylate methacrylate-co- allyl methacrylate) monolith was synthesized and a photo-grafting process based on the ene-thiol click-chemistry has been performed to give anion exchange properties to the monolith. Since their introduction in the early 1990's polymethacrylate monoliths have emerged as a powerful alternative for microscale separations or sample treatment. Their relatively simple implementation in columns with small internal diameters makes them particularly attractive for the new chromatographic challenges of complex matrices analysis and on-chip separations. Despite their relatively poor ion-exchange capacity due to their highly porous structure, their use as anion exchangers is of large interest for nuclear analysis as numerous separations are based on this process. This paper presents a systematic study of the synthesis of the polymeric porous monolith and the versatile and robust functionalization method developed for the specific strong acidic media used in radiochemical procedures. The robustness of the stationary phase was tested in concentrated nitric acid. It appears that the C-S bond formed via thiol-ene chemistry is strong enough to be used to graft function of interest for separation in strong nitric acid medium. The photo-grafted anion exchanger, a quaternary ammonium, presents sufficient resistance to be used for radionuclide separation in [HNO{sub 3}]=5 mol.L{sup -1}so the next step is its integration in the cyclo olefin copolymer (COC) micro-system.

  9. Improved bonding of adhesive resin to sintered porcelain with the combination of acid etching and a two-liquid silane conditioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, H; Matsumura, H; Ide, T; Atsuta, M

    2001-01-01

    This study determined the bond strengths of adhesive resins joined to a feldspathic porcelain (VMK 68) for the purpose of developing the most durable surface preparation for the porcelain. Three porcelain surfaces-ground, air-abraded with alumina, and etched with hydrofluoric acid-were prepared. A two-liquid porcelain conditioner that contained both 4-methacryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META) and a silane coupler (Porcelain Liner M) was used as the priming agent. Each of the two liquid components of the conditioner was also used individually in order to examine the effects of the respective chemical ingredients on adhesive bonding. Two methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based resins initiated with tri-n-butylborane (TBB) either with or without 4-META (MMA-TBB and 4-META/MMA-TBB resins) were used as the luting agents. Shear bond strengths were determined both before and after thermocycling. Shear testing results indicated that thermocycling was effective for disclosing poor bonding systems, and that both mechanical and chemical retention were indispensable for bonding the porcelain. Of the combinations assessed, etching with hydrofluoric acid followed by two-liquid priming with the Porcelain Liner M material generated the most durable bond strength (33.3 MPa) for the porcelain bonded with the 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (Super-Bond C&B).

  10. KINETIC OF ESTERIFICATION OF ETHYL ALCOHOL BY ACETIC ACID ON A CATALYTIC RESIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erol İNCE

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The conversion kinetics of diluted acetic acid to ethyl acetate by ethanol esterification in a batch reactor in liquid phase with an acidic polymer catalyst (lewatit series was studied. The intrinsic rate constants have been correlated with the reaction temperature, concentration of catalyst, initial ratios of reactants and initial water concentrations. The kinetic analysis was restricted to the system at hand in which a liquid and vapor phase are at equilibrium.

  11. Chemically modified polymeric resins for solid-phase extraction and group separation prior to analysis by liquid or gas chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, L.W.

    1993-07-01

    Polystyrene divinylbenzene was modified by acetyl, sulfonic acid, and quaternary ammonium groups. A resin functionalized with an acetyl group was impregnated in a PTFE membrane and used to extract and concentrate phenolic compounds from aqueous samples. The acetyl group created a surface easily wetted, making it an efficient adsorbent for polar compounds in water. The membrane stabilized the resin bed. Partially sulfonated high surface area resins are used to extract and group separate an aqueous mixture of neutral and basic organics; the bases are adsorbed electrostatically to the sulfonic acid groups, while the neutraons are adsorbed hydrophobically. A two-step elution is then used to separate the two fractions. A partially functionalized anion exchange resin is used to separate organic acids and phenols from neutrals in a similar way. Carboxylic acids are analyzed by HPLC and phenols by GC.

  12. Amino acid ionic liquids as chiral ligands in ligand-exchange chiral separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Wu, Kangkang; Tang, Fei; Yao, Lihua; Yang, Fei; Nie, Zhou; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2009-09-28

    Recently, amino acid ionic liquids (AAILs) have attracted much research interest. In this paper, we present the first application of AAILs in chiral separation based on the chiral ligand exchange principle. By using 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium L-proline (L-Pro) as a chiral ligand coordinated with copper(II), four pairs of underivatized amino acid enantiomers-dl-phenylalanine (dl-Phe), dl-histidine (dl-His), dl-tryptophane (dl-Trp), and dl-tyrosine (dl-Tyr)-were successfully separated in two major chiral separation techniques, HPLC and capillary electrophoresis (CE), with higher enantioselectivity than conventionally used amino acid ligands (resolution (R(s))=3.26-10.81 for HPLC; R(s)=1.34-4.27 for CE). Interestingly, increasing the alkyl chain length of the AAIL cation remarkably enhanced the enantioselectivity. It was inferred that the alkylmethylimidazolium cations and L-Pro form ion pairs on the surface of the stationary phase or on the inner surface of the capillary. The ternary copper complexes with L-Pro are consequently attached to the support surface, thus inducing an ion-exchange type of retention for the dl-enantiomers. Therefore, the AAIL cation plays an essential role in the separation. This work demonstrates that AAILs are good alternatives to conventional amino acid ligands for ligand-exchange-based chiral separation. It also reveals the tremendous application potential of this new type of task-specific ILs.

  13. ION EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY AND PURIFICATION OF MATERIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, R.S.; Bailes, R.H.

    1958-04-15

    A process for the recovery of certain metallic ions from aqueous solutions by ion exchange techniques is described. It is applicable to elements such as vanadium, chromium, nnanganese, and the like, which are capable of forming lower valent cations soluble in aqueous solutions and which also form ldgher valent anions soluble in aqueous acidic solutions. For example, small amounts of vanadium occurring in phosphoric acid prepared from phosphate rock may be recovered by reducing the vanadium to a trivalent cation adsorbing; the vanadium in a cationic exchange resin, then treating the resin with a suitable oxidizing agent to convert the adsorbed vanadium to a higher valent state, and finally eluting; the vanadium as an anion from the resin by means of an aqueous acidic solution.

  14. Ion-exclusion chromatographic behavior of aliphatic carboxylic acids and benzenecarboxylic acids on a sulfonated styrene--divinylbenzene co-polymer resin column with sulfuric acid containing various alcohols as eluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Kazutoku; Towata, Atsuya; Ohashi, Masayoshi

    2003-05-16

    The addition of C1-C7 alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol, butanol, heptanol, hexanol and heptanol) to dilute sulfuric acid as eluent in ion-exclusion chromatography using a highly sulfonated styrene-divinylbenzene co-polymer resin (TSKgel SCX) in the H+ form as the stationary phase was carried out for the simultaneous separations of both (a) C1-C7 aliphatic carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, propionic, isobutyric, butyric, isovaleric, valeric, 2-methylvaleric, isocaproic, caproic, 2,2-dimethyl-n-valeric, 2-methylhexanoic, 5-methylhexanoic and heptanoic acids) and (b) benzenecarboxylic acids (pyromellitic, hemimellitic, trimellitic, o-phthalic, m-phthalic, p-phthalic, benzoic and salicylic acids and phenol). Heptanol was the most effective modifier in ion-exclusion chromatography for the improvement of peak shapes and a reduction in retention volumes for higher aliphatic carboxylic acids and benzenecarboxylic acids. Excellent simultaneous separation and relatively highly sensitive conductimetric detection for these C1-C7 aliphatic carboxylic acids were achieved on the TSKgel SCX column (150 x 6 mm I.D.) in 30 min using 0.5 mM sulfuric acid containing 0.025% heptanol as eluent. Excellent simultaneous separation and highly sensitive UV detection at 200 nm for these benzenecarboxylic acids were also achieved on the TSKgel SCX column in 30 min using 5 mM sulfuric acid containing 0.075% heptanol as eluent.

  15. Spatial patterns of atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and sulfur using ion-exchange resin collectors in Rocky Mountain National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, David W.; Roop, Heidi A.; Nanus, Leora; Fenn, Mark E.; Sexstone, Graham A.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes and streams in Class 1 wilderness areas in the western United States (U.S.) are at risk from atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S), and protection of these resources is mandated under the Federal Clean Air Act and amendments. Assessment of critical loads, which are the maximum exposure to pollution an area can receive without adverse effects on sensitive ecosystems, requires accurate deposition estimates. However, deposition is difficult and expensive to measure in high-elevation wilderness, and spatial patterns in N and S deposition in these areas remain poorly quantified. In this study, ion-exchange resin (IER) collectors were used to measure dissolved inorganic N (DIN) and S deposition during June 2006-September 2007 at approximately 20 alpine/subalpine sites spanning the Continental Divide in Rocky Mountain National Park. Results indicated good agreement between deposition estimated from IER collectors and commonly used wet + dry methods during summer, but poor agreement during winter. Snowpack sampling was found to be a more accurate way of quantifying DIN and S deposition during winter. Summer DIN deposition was significantly greater on the east side of the park than on the west side (25-50%; p ≤ 0.03), consistent with transport of pollutants to the park from urban and agricultural areas to the east. Sources of atmospheric nitrate (NO3-) were examined using N isotopes. The average δ15N of NO3- from IER collectors was 3.5‰ higher during winter than during summer (p policy makers to better protect sensitive natural resources in Class 1 Wilderness areas.

  16. Determination of {sup 55}Fe and {sup 63}Ni in spent ion-exchange resins from the IEA-R1 reactor (IPEN-CNEN/SP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taddei, Maria Helena T.; Ferreira, Marcelo T., E-mail: mhtaddei@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: ferreira@cnen.gov.b [Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (LAPOC/CNEN-MG), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Lab. of Pocos de Caldas; Vicente, Roberto; Marumo, Julio T.; Terremoto, Luis A. Albiac, E-mail: jtmarumo@ipen.b, E-mail: rvicente@ipen.b, E-mail: laaterre@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Iron and nickel are used in a wide range of metallic alloys employed in reactor core structures and their corresponding activation products are often encountered in reactor-derived solid low-level wastes and effluents. Both {sup 63} Ni and {sup 55} Fe are neutron activation products. {sup 63} Ni is produced by a neutron-gamma reaction of {sup 62} Ni and by a neutron-proton reaction of-{sup 63}Cu. Iron-55 is produced by neutron activation of two major stable iron isotopes: neutron-gamma reaction of {sup 54} Fe and neutron-to-neutron reaction of {sup 56}Fe. Nickel-63 is a pure beta emitter with maximum energy of 66.95 keV and half-life of 100.1 years, and {sup 55}Fe, with a half life of 2.7 years, decays via electron capture to stable {sup 55}Mn with the emission of Auger electrons and 5.89 keV X-rays. {sup 63} Ni is an important radionuclide in safety analysis of nuclear waste repositories and {sup 55} Fe is an important contributor to the radioactivity of nuclear waste in the first few years of storage. In this work, liquid scintillation counting was used for the determination of both radionuclides in spent ion-exchange resins taken from the water retreatment system of the IEA-R1 reactor and stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Laboratory of the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN-CNEN/SP). Since nuclear waste usually contains many beta emitters, such as {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 137}Cs, a highly efficient chemical separation method is required to isolate {sup 55}Fe and {sup 63}Ni from all other radionuclides. Hydroxide precipitation was used to separate {sup 55} Fe and {sup 63}Ni from the waste matrix and ion exchange chromatography was used to separate {sup 55}Fe and {sup 63}Ni from each other as well as from interfering radionuclides. The chemical yield was above 90% for {sup 63}Ni and above 60% for {sup 55}Fe. The results of activity measurements correlated well with the concentration of {sup 60}Co in this waste

  17. The weak acid resin process: a dustless conversion route for the synthesis of americium bearing-blanket precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picart, S.; Gauthe, A.; Parant, P.; Remy, E.; Jobelin, I.; Pomared, J.M.; Grangaud, P.; Dauby, J.; Delahaye, T. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, DEN/MAR/DRCP, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Caisso, M.; Bataille, M.; Bayle, J.P. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, DEN/MAR/DTEC, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Frost, C. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, DEN/MAR/DRCP, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Institut Europeen des Membranes, CNRS-ENSCM-UM, CC47, University of Montpellier, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Delage, C. [CEA, Centre de Cadarache, DEN/CAD/DEC, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Martin, C.L. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, SIMAP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Ayral, E. [Institut Europeen des Membranes, CNRS-ENSCM-UM, CC47, University of Montpellier, F-34095 Montpellier (France)

    2016-07-01

    Mixed uranium-americium oxides are one of the materials envisaged for Americium Bearing Blankets dedicated to transmutation in fast neutron reactors. Conversion and fabrication processes are currently developed to make those materials in the form of dense and homogeneous oxide ceramic pellets or dense granulates incorporating uranium and americium. Their development points out the need of a simplified and optimized process which could lower hazards linked to dust generation of highly contaminating and irradiating compounds and facilitate material transfer in remote handling operations. This reason motivated the development of innovative 'dustless' route such as the Weak Acid Resin route (WAR) which provides the oxide precursors in the form of sub-millimeter-sized microspheres with optimal flowability and limits dust generation during conversion and fabrication steps. This study is thus devoted to the synthesis of mixed uranium-americium oxide microspheres by the WAR process and to the characterization of such precursors. This work also deals with their application to the fabrication of dense or porous pellets and with their potential use as dense spherules to make Sphere-Pac fuel. (authors)

  18. Bile acid binding resin prevents fat accumulation through intestinal microbiota in high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumoto, Yukie; Irie, Junichiro; Iwabu, Kaho; Tagawa, Hirotsune; Itoh, Arata; Kato, Mari; Kobayashi, Nana; Tanaka, Kumiko; Kikuchi, Rieko; Fujita, Masataka; Nakajima, Yuya; Morimoto, Kohkichi; Sugizaki, Taichi; Yamada, Satoru; Kawai, Toshihide; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Oike, Yuichi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    Bile acid binding resin (BAR) absorbs intestinal bile acids, and improves obesity and metabolic disorders, but the precise mechanism remains to be clarified. Recent findings reveal that obesity is associated with skewed intestinal microbiota. Thus, we investigated the effect of BAR on intestinal microbiota and the role of microbiota in the prevention of obesity in high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice. Male Balb/c mice were fed a low-fat diet (LFD), high-fat diet (HFD), or HFD with BAR (HFD+BAR), and then metabolic parameters, caecal microbiota, and metabolites were investigated. The same interventions were conducted in germ-free and antibiotic-treated mice. The frequency of Clostridium leptum subgroup was higher in both HFD-fed and HFD+BAR-fed mice than in LFD-fed mice. The frequency of Bacteroides-Prevotella group was lower in HFD-fed mice than in LFD-fed mice, but the frequency was higher in HFD+BAR-fed mice than in HFD-fed mice. Caecal propionate was lower in HFD-fed mice than in LFD-fed mice, and higher in HFD+BAR-fed mice than in HFD-fed mice. HFD+BAR-fed mice showed lower adiposity than HFD-fed mice, and the reduction was not observed in germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice. Colonized germ-free mice showed a reduction in adiposity by BAR administration. Energy expenditure was lower in HFD-fed mice and higher in HFD+BAR-fed mice, but the increments induced by administration of BAR were not observed in antibiotic-treated mice. Modulation of intestinal microbiota by BAR could be a novel therapeutic approach for obesity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Diphonix{trademark} Resin: A review of its properties and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarizia, R.; Horwitz, E.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Alexandratos, S.D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Gula, M.J. [Eichrom Industies, Inc., Darien, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The recently developed Diphonix{trademark} resin is a new multifunctional chelating ion exchange resin containing seminally substituted diphosphonic acid ligands chemically bonded to a styrene-based polymeric matrix. Diphonix can be regarded as a dual mechanism polymer, with a sulfonic acid cation exchange group allowing for rapid access, mostly non-specific, of ions into the polymeric network, and the diphosphonic acid group responsible for specificity (recognition) for a number of metal cations. The Diphonix resin exhibits an extraordinarily strong affinity for actinides, especially in the tetra- and hexavalent oxidation states. It has potential applications in TRU and mixed waste treatment and characterization, and in the development of new procedures for rapid actinide preconcentration and separation from environmental samples. Metal uptake studies have been extended to alkaline earth cations, to transition and post transition metal species, and to metal sorption from neutral or near neutral solutions. Also the kinetic behavior of the resin has been investigated in detail. Influence of the most commonly occurring matrix constituents (Na, Ca, Al, Fe, hydrofluoric, sulfuric, oxalic and phosphoric acids) on the uptake of actinide ions has been measured. This review paper summarizes the most important results studies on the Diphonix resin and gives an overview of the applications already in existence or under development in the fields of mixed waste treatment, actinide separation procedures, treatment of radwaste from nuclear power plants, and removal of iron from copper electrowinning solutions.

  20. Analysis of equilibrium data for cesium ion exchange of Hanford CC and NCAW supernatant liquid--Status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurath, D.E.; Bray, L.A.; Brooks, K.P.; Carlson, C.D.; Kim, A.Y.

    1996-04-01

    This report contains the results of a partial analysis and correlation of a large amount of equilibrium data obtained for cesium ion exchange. Data from testing of organic resins, a phenolic- carboxylic acid resin, and a resorcinol-formaldehyde resin with NCAW and CC waste simulants were assessed. The isotherms that were considered for correlating the data include the Langmuir, the Freundlich, and a combination of the two. These correlations are being developed to provide equations that can be used with models for assessing column behavior and provide correlations that will allow prediction of the equilibrium performance of the two resins with wastes of different compositions.

  1. Large-Scale Demonstration of Perchlorate Removal Using Weak Base Anion Resin at Well No. 3 in Rialto, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    alkalinity/ stripping of CO2 from the groundwater feed can be accomplished using membrane treatment systems or stripping towers. Both methods are...pH- dependent nature of WBA resins. At low pH, WBA functional groups on the resin have a positive charge (i.e., R- NH3 +), allowing anion exchange to...R-NH2) is ionized (R- NH3 +) by protonating with acid (H+): R-NH2 + H+  R- NH3 + Protonated resin removes anions (A-) from aqueous streams: R- NH3 + + A

  2. The recovery of gold from the aqua regia leachate of electronic parts using a core–shell type anion exchange resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cyganowski

    2017-09-01

    The investigated resins revealed great selectivity towards gold. Despite the fact that the obtained solutions contained only 1.5% (CPU or 0.1% (PIN of Au, its removal reached 86% and the logarithms of partition coefficients indicate that affinity of the applied resins to gold is almost ten times greater than the very competitive nickel present in the obtained solutions. Finally, the gold-containing core–shell polymers were effectively eluted, recovering 100% of the taken from the solutions gold.

  3. Kinetic studies of nickel speciation in model solutions of a well-characterized humic acid using the competing ligand exchange method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthrie, J.W.; Mandal, R.; Salam, M.S.A.; Hassan, N.M.; Murimboh, J.; Chakrabarti, C.L.; Back, M.H.; Gregoire, D.C

    2003-03-17

    Publications on the binding characteristics of metals with humic acid (HA) are sparse. Here we investigated the release of nickel from Ni(II)-HA complexes using model solutions of three different [Ni(II)]/[HA] mole ratios at three different pH values; we also compared the results with those of [Ni(II)]/[FA] complexes from previous work in this laboratory. Ligand exchange kinetics using the competing ligand exchange method (CLEM) were studied using two different techniques: graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) with Chelex 100 resin as the competing ligand, and adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (AdCSV) with dimethylglyoxime as the competing ligand to measure the rate of dissociation of Ni(II)-HA complexes. The results of the kinetic studies showed that as the [Ni(II)]/[HA] mole ratio was decreased, the rate of dissociation of Ni(II)-HA complexes decreased, and the proportion of free Ni{sup 2+} ions plus very labile nickel complexes decreased while the proportion of the less labile kinetically distinguishable components increased. Generally, the rate of dissociation of Ni(II)-HA complexes was slower than that of Ni(II)-FA complexes. Studies on the validity of the kinetic model showed that the concentrations of chemical species varied in a reasonable way with pH and the [Ni(II)]/[HA] mole ratios, indicating that the kinetically distinguishable components have chemical significance and the kinetic model is valid.

  4. Kinetic study of the esterification of free fatty acid and ethanol in the presence of triglycerides using solid resins as catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Jorge M.

    2010-07-01

    Full text: Biodiesel production is gaining more and more relevance due to its environmental advantages as well as because of the petroleum world situation: decreases of the reserves, augmentation of the prices, etc. The kinetics of the esterification of free fatty acid (oleic acid in this case) in the presence of triglycerides and ethanol was obtained when a solid resin was employed. Using the controlling step method, several kinetic expressions have been developed and tested against the experimental data. This was done employing a non linear multi parametric routine. The kinetics expression obtained represented satisfactorily the experimental information for several operations conditions. (Author)

  5. BPPO-Based Anion Exchange Membranes for Acid Recovery via Diffusion Dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Imran Khan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To reduce the environmental impact of acids present in various industrial wastes, improved and robust anion exchange membranes (AEMs are highly desired. Moreover, they should exhibit high retention of salts, fast acid permeation and they should be able to operate with low energy input. In this work, AEMs are prepared using a facile solution-casting from brominated poly-(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide (BPPO and increasing amounts of 2-phenylimidazole (PI. Neither quaternary ammonium salts, nor ionic liquids and silica-containing compounds are involved in the synthesis. The prepared membranes showed an ion exchange capacity of 1.1–1.8 mmol/g, a water uptake of 22%–47%, a linear expansion ratio of 1%–6% and a tensile strength of 0.83–10.20 MPa. These membranes have potential for recovering waste acid via diffusion dialysis, as the acid dialysis coefficient (UH at room temperature for HCl is in the range of 0.006–0.018 m/h while the separation factor (S is in the range of 16–28, which are higher than commercial DF-120B membranes (UH = 0.004 m/h, S = 24.

  6. Spatial patterns of atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and sulfur using ion-exchange resin collectors in Rocky Mountain National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, David W.; Roop, Heidi; Nanus, Leora; Fenn, Mark; Sexstone, Graham A.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes and streams in Class 1 wilderness areas in the western United States (U.S.) are at risk from atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S), and protection of these resources is mandated under the Federal Clean Air Act and amendments. Assessment of critical loads, which are the maximum exposure to pollution an area can receive without adverse effects on sensitive ecosystems, requires accurate deposition estimates. However, deposition is difficult and expensive to measure in high-elevation wilderness, and spatial patterns in N and S deposition in these areas remain poorly quantified. In this study, ion-exchange resin (IER) collectors were used to measure dissolved inorganic N (DIN) and S deposition during June 2006–September 2007 at approximately 20 alpine/subalpine sites spanning the Continental Divide in Rocky Mountain National Park. Results indicated good agreement between deposition estimated from IER collectors and commonly used wet + dry methods during summer, but poor agreement during winter. Snowpack sampling was found to be a more accurate way of quantifying DIN and S deposition during winter. Summer DIN deposition was significantly greater on the east side of the park than on the west side (25–50%; p ≤ 0.03), consistent with transport of pollutants to the park from urban and agricultural areas to the east. Sources of atmospheric nitrate (NO3−) were examined using N isotopes. The average δ15N of NO3− from IER collectors was 3.5‰ higher during winter than during summer (p combustion and vehicular sources of atmospheric NO3−. There were no significant differences in δ15N of NO3− between east and west sides of the park during summer or winter (p = 0.83), indicating that the two areas may have similar sources of atmospheric NO3−. Results from this study indicate that a combination of IER collectors and snowpack sampling can be used to characterize spatial variability in DIN and S deposition in high-elevation wilderness

  7. The Multifunctional Fish Gill: Dominant Site of Gas Exchange, Osmoregulation, Acid-Base Regulation, and Excretion of Nitrogenous Waste

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David H. Evans; Peter M. Piermarini; Keith P. Choe

    2005-01-01

    The fish gill is a multipurpose organ that, in addition to providing for aquatic gas exchange, plays dominant roles in osmotic and ionic regulation, acid-base regulation, and excretion of nitrogenous wastes...

  8. Probing nucleic acid-ion interactions with buffer exchange-atomic emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfeld, Max; Herschlag, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The ion atmosphere of nucleic acids directly affects measured biochemical and biophysical properties. However, study of the ion atmosphere is difficult due to its diffuse and dynamic nature. Standard techniques available have significant limitations in sensitivity, specificity, and directness of the assays. Buffer exchange-atomic emission spectroscopy (BE-AES) was developed to overcome many of the limitations of previously available techniques. This technique can provide a complete accounting of all ions constituting the ionic atmosphere of a nucleic acid at thermodynamic equilibrium. Although initially developed for the study of the ion atmosphere of nucleic acids, BE-AES has also been applied to study site-bound ions in RNA and protein. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdows, Kate L.; Panitchob, Nuttanont; Crocker, Ian P.; Please, Colin P.; Hanson, Mark A.; Sibley, Colin P.; Johnstone, Edward D.; Sengers, Bram G.; Lewis, Rohan M.; Glazier, Jocelyn D.

    2015-01-01

    Uptake of system L amino acid substrates into isolated placental plasma membrane vesicles in the absence of opposing side amino acid (zero-trans uptake) is incompatible with the concept of obligatory exchange, where influx of amino acid is coupled to efflux. We therefore hypothesized that system L amino acid exchange transporters are not fully obligatory and/or that amino acids are initially present inside the vesicles. To address this, we combined computational modeling with vesicle transport assays and transporter localization studies to investigate the mechanisms mediating [14C]l-serine (a system L substrate) transport into human placental microvillous plasma membrane (MVM) vesicles. The carrier model provided a quantitative framework to test the 2 hypotheses that l-serine transport occurs by either obligate exchange or nonobligate exchange coupled with facilitated transport (mixed transport model). The computational model could only account for experimental [14C]l-serine uptake data when the transporter was not exclusively in exchange mode, best described by the mixed transport model. MVM vesicle isolates contained endogenous amino acids allowing for potential contribution to zero-trans uptake. Both L-type amino acid transporter (LAT)1 and LAT2 subtypes of system L were distributed to MVM, with l-serine transport attributed to LAT2. These findings suggest that exchange transporters do not function exclusively as obligate exchangers.—Widdows, K. L., Panitchob, N., Crocker, I. P., Please, C. P., Hanson, M. A., Sibley, C. P., Johnstone, E. D., Sengers, B. G., Lewis, R. M., Glazier, J. D. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms. PMID:25761365

  10. Topographic and surface chemical aspects of the adhesion of structural epoxy resins to phosphorus oxo acid-treated aluminum adherends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitowski, Gary Alan

    Structural adhesive bonding offers several advantages over other types of joining. These include improved stress distribution and increased design flexibility. Adhesive bonding is important in aerospace, automotive, and packaging applications. However, the full potential of the technology has not been exploited because the understanding of the basic mechanisms of adhesion and adhesion failure is incomplete. This investigation elucidates the chemical and mechanical mechanisms responsible for durable adhesion of epoxy resins to phosphorus oxo acid treated aluminum alloys. By systematically altering the adherend surface chemistry, surface topography, and adhesive formulation, combined with accelerated testing, the chemical and mechanical factors that influence the properties of adhesively bonded aluminum are isolated and assessed. It is postulated that a combination of two factors determines the strength and environmental durability of epoxy-bonded aluminum. One is the formation of hydrolytically stable, primary bonds between the adhesive and the adherend, and the second is the hydrolytic stability of the surface oxide, which is always present on the surface of aluminum and aluminum alloys. These conditions can best be met by chemical pretreatment of the oxide surface, which renders the oxide insoluble and creates, at the same time, functional surface sites. These sites can form chemical bonds with reactive components of the adhesive. Morphological and mechanical alteration of the metal surface oxide through hydroxide formation requires liquid water. Liquid water can only form by capillary condensation in interfacial gaps from molecularly diffusing water. A hydrolytically stable oxide will prevent bond failure due to mechanical weakening of the substrate surface, while a high density of hydrolytically stable surface bonding sites will minimize the occurrence of capillary gaps at the interface, thus decreasing the formation of liquid water. It is shown that highly

  11. Pistacia lentiscus resin regulates intestinal damage and inflammation in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioxari, Aristea; Kaliora, Andriana C; Papalois, Apostolos; Agrogiannis, George; Triantafillidis, John K; Andrikopoulos, Nikolaos K

    2011-11-01

    Mastic (Pistacia lentiscus) of the Anacardiaceae family has exhibited anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties in patients with Crohn's disease. This study was based on the hypothesis that mastic inhibits intestinal damage in inflammatory bowel disease, regulating inflammation and oxidative stress in intestinal epithelium. Four different dosages of P. lentiscus powder in the form of powder were administered orally to trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitic rats. Eighty-four male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to seven groups: A, control; B, colitic; C-F, colitic rats daily supplemented with P. lentiscus powder at (C) 50 mg/kg, (D) 100 mg/kg, (E) 200 mg/kg, and (F) 300 mg/kg of body weight; and G, colitic rats treated daily with cortisone (25 μg/kg of body weight). Colonic damage was assessed microscopically. The cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and IL-10 and malonaldehyde were measured in colonic specimens. Results were expressed as mean ± SE values. Histological amelioration of colitis (P≤.001) and significant differences in colonic indices occurred after 3 days of treatment. Daily administration of 100 mg of P. lentiscus powder/kg of body weight decreased all inflammatory cytokines (P≤.05), whereas 50 mg of P. lentiscus powder/kg of body weight and cortisone treatment reduced only ICAM-1 (P≤.05 and P≤.01, respectively). Malonaldehyde was significantly suppressed in all treated groups (P≤.01). IL-10 remained unchanged. Cytokines and malonaldehyde remained unaltered after 6 days of treatment. Thus P. lentiscus powder could possibly have a therapeutic role in Crohn's disease, regulating oxidant/antioxidant balance and modulating inflammation.

  12. Ion-pair, anion-exchange and ligand-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography of tenuazonic acid and 3-acetyl 5-substituted pyrrolidine-2,4-diones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, M H; Gaudemer, F; Boutar, M; Nicolas, L; Gaudemer, A

    1989-03-03

    The ion-pair, ligand-exchange and anion-exchange chromatography of the fungal metabolic tenuazonic acid (TA) and its related 3-acetyl 5-substituted pyrrolidine-2,4-diones were studied. Ion-pair chromatography was performed on a C18 column with a mobile phase composed of cetrimide, phosphate buffer in water-methanol and a metal complexant (ethylenediamine) to improve the peak sharpness. Addition of the same metal complexant to the mobile phase of the anion-exchange chromatographic system also improved its efficiency. TA and its 5-substituted analogues derived from valine and leucine were separated with the ion-pair and anion-exchange chromatographic systems. With ligand-exchange chromatography, TA could only be separated from its valine analogue. These chromatographic systems were used for the detection of TA in the culture filtrates of the fungus Pyricularia oryzae and in infected rice leaves. Deproteinated culture filtrates could be rapidly analysed for their TA content by anion-exchange chromatography. However, this system was not suitable for the detection of TA in the infected rice leaf as interfering compounds were coeluted with TA. Ion-pair and ligand-exchange chromatographic systems allowed the efficient quantification of TA in infected leaves.

  13. Exchangeable and secondary mineral reactive pools of aluminium in coastal lowland acid sulfate soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvanes-Giuliani, Yliane A M; Waite, T David; Collins, Richard N

    2014-07-01

    The use of coastal floodplain sulfidic sediments for agricultural activities has resulted in the environmental degradation of many areas worldwide. The generation of acidity and transport of aluminium (Al) and other metals to adjacent aquatic systems are the main causes of adverse effects. Here, a five-step sequential extraction procedure (SEP) was applied to 30 coastal lowland acid sulfate soils (CLASS) from north-eastern New South Wales, Australia. This enabled quantification of the proportion of aluminium present in 'water-soluble', 'exchangeable', 'organically-complexed', 'reducible iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxide/hydroxysulfate-incorporated' and 'amorphous Al mineral' fractions. The first three extractions represented an average of 5% of 'aqua regia' extractable Al and their cumulative concentrations were extremely high, reaching up to 4000 mg·kg(-1). Comparison of Al concentrations in the final two extractions indicated that 'amorphous Al minerals' are quantitatively a much more important sink for the removal of aqueous Al derived from the acidic weathering of these soils than reducible Fe(III) minerals. Correlations were observed between soil pH, dissolved and total organic carbon (DOC and TOC) and Al concentrations in organic carbon-rich CLASS soil horizons. These results suggest that complexation of Al by dissolved organic matter significantly increases soluble Al concentrations at pH values >5.0. As such, present land management practices would benefit with redefinition of an 'optimal' soil from pH ≥5.5 to ~4.8 for the preservation of aquatic environments adjacent to organic-rich CLASS where Al is the sole or principle inorganic contaminant of concern. Furthermore, it was observed that currently-accepted standard procedures (i.e. 1 M KCl extraction) to measure exchangeable Al concentrations in these types of soils severely underestimate exchangeable Al and a more accurate representation may be obtained through the use of 0.2 M CuCl2. Copyright © 2014

  14. Devices using resin wafers and applications thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, YuPo J [Naperville, IL; Henry, Michael P [Batavia, IL; Snyder, Seth W [Lincolnwood, IL; Martin, Edward [Libertyville, IL; Arora, Michelle [Woodridge, IL; de la Garza, Linda [Woodridge, IL

    2009-03-24

    Devices incorporating a thin wafer of electrically and ionically conductive porous material made by the method of introducing a mixture of a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material into a mold. The mixture is subjected to temperatures in the range of from about 60.degree. C. to about 170.degree. C. at pressures in the range of from about 0 to about 500 psig for a time in the range of from about 1 to about 240 minutes to form thin wafers. Devices include electrodeionization and separative bioreactors in the production of organic and amino acids, alcohols or esters for regenerating cofactors in enzymes and microbial cells.

  15. Adsorption of humic acid by bi-functional resin JN-10 and the effect of alkali-earth metal ions on the adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jinnan; Zhou Yang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Research Center of Organic Toxic Substance Control and Resource Reuse of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing 210038 (China); Li Aimin, E-mail: liaimin99@vip.sina.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Research Center of Organic Toxic Substance Control and Resource Reuse of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing 210038 (China); Xu Li [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Research Center of Organic Toxic Substance Control and Resource Reuse of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing 210038 (China)

    2010-04-15

    This study investigated the adsorption of humic acid (HA) by bi-functional resin JN-10, which removed the HA more effectively than the commercial resins D-301, D-201, XAD-7, and globe active carbon F-400. The difference between the FT-IR spectroscopy and {sup 13}C NMR analysis of JN-10 before and after it adsorbing the HA revealed that both hydrophobic interaction and electric attraction were the adsorption force for the HA. The related thermodynamic parameters exhibited that the adsorption of the HA by JN-10 was an endothermic process. The occurring of adsorption was due to the increase of entropy, and the electric attraction was also a main adsorption force. In order to investigate the influence of the molecule weight (MW) of the HA on its removal by JN-10, the HA with the MWs ranging from 2000 to 100,000 Da was divided into six fractions by ultra-filtration. The HA with a medium MW (6000-10,000 Da) was preferentially removed by JN-10 due to the synergistic effect of hydrophilicity, molecular size, and aromaticity of the HA. The adsorption capacity of JN-10 for the HA increased in the presence of low concentration of alkali-earth metal ions Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}, which neutralized the negative charges of the HA, but it decreased as the concentration of these ions increased because the hydrates formed by the alkali-earth metal ions occupied the adsorption sites of the resin.

  16. Adsorption kinetics, isotherm, and thermodynamics studies of acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acids (AKBA) from Boswellia serrata extract using macroporous resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niphadkar, Sonali S; Rathod, Virendra K

    2017-09-14

    An acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA) is potent anti-inflammatory agent found in Boswellia serrata oleogum resin. Adsorption characteristics of AKBA from B. serrata were studied using macroporous adsorbent resin to understand separation and adsorption mechanism of targeted molecules. Different macroporous resins were screened for adsorption and desorption of AKBA and Indion 830 was screened as it showed higher adsorption capacity. The kinetic equations were studied and results showed that the adsorption of AKBA on Indion 830 was well fitted to the pseudo first-order kinetic model. The influence of two parameters such as temperature (298, 303, and 308 K) and pH (5-8) on the adsorption process was also studied. The experimental data was further investigated using Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin isotherm models. It was observed that Langmuir isotherm model was found to be the best fit for AKBA adsorption by Indion 830 and highest adsorption capacity (50.34 mg/g) was obtained at temperature of 303 K. The values of thermodynamic parameters such as the change of Gibbs free energy (ΔG*), entropy (ΔS*), and enthalpy (ΔH*), indicated that the process of adsorption was spontaneous, favourable, and exothermic.

  17. Durability Issues of High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Acid Doped Polybenzimidazole Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    observed under continuous operation with hydrogen and air at 150-160oC, with a fuel cell performance degradation rate of 5-10 µV/h. Improvement of the membrane performance such as mechanical strength, swelling and oxidative stability has achieved by exploring the polymer chemistry, i.e. covalently......To achieve high temperature operation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), preferably under ambient pressure, phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane represents an effective approach, which in recent years has motivated extensive research activities with great progress....... As a critical concern, issues of long term durability of PBI based fuel cells are addressed in this talk, including oxidative degradation of the polymer, mechanical failures of the membrane, acid leaching out, corrosion of carbon support and sintering of catalysts particles. Excellent polymer durability has...

  18. Development of ion-exchange properties of bamboo charcoal modified with concentrated nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandaker, S.; Kuba, T.; Toyohara, Y.; Kamida, S.; Uchikawa, Y.

    2017-08-01

    The surface chemistry and the structural properties of activated carbon can be altered by the acidic modification. The objective of this study is to investigate the changes occurring in bamboo charcoal (BC) during activation with concentrated nitric acid. Low temperature (500°C) carbonized BC has been prepared and oxidized with 70% concentrated boiling nitric acid (BC-AC). The porous properties of the BC are analyzed with nitrogen adsorption isotherm at 77 K. The surface structure is observed by Field emission scanning electronic microscope (FESEM) and the surface functional groups are examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the pH of the point of zero charge (pHPZC). The results reveal that severe oxidation with HNO3 considerably decreases the surface area of BC with enhanced pore widening and FESEM observation demonstrates the erosive effect of oxidation. The FTIR analysis detects that some absorption bands are assigned for carboxyl, aldehyde and ketone groups on BC-AC. The XPS analysis also clearly shows that the ratio of oxygen and acidic functional groups has been enriched significantly on the BC-AC. The low pHPZC value of BC-AC confirms that the surface is highly acidic for the fixation of acidic functional groups on surface. In general, the existence of the abundant amount of acidic functional groups on adsorbents enhances the sorption of heavy metals ions in aqueous solution. Therefore, it is strongly expected that the modified BC, activated under the proposed conditions would be a promising ion exchanger in aqueous solution and can be applied for the adsorption of different heavy metal ions and radioactive materials from effluent.

  19. Cesium removal from liquid acidic wastes with the primary focus on ammonium molybdophosphate as an ion exchanger: A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, C.J.

    1995-03-01

    Many articles have been written concerning the selective removal of cesium from both acidic and alkaline defense wastes. The majority of the work performed for cesium removal from defense wastes involves alkaline feed solutions. Several different techniques for cesium removal from acidic solutions have been evaluated such as precipitation, solvent extraction, and ion exchange. The purpose of this paper is to briefly review various techniques for cesium removal from acidic solutions. The main focus of the review will be on ion exchange techniques, particularly those involving ammonium molybdophosphate as the exchanger. The pertinent literature sources are condensed into a single document for quick reference. The information contained in this document was used as an aid in determining techniques to evaluate cesium removal from the acidic Idaho Chemical Processing Plant waste matrices. 47 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. Separation of phenolic acids from natural plant extracts using molecularly imprinted anion-exchange polymer confined ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Wentao; Tian, Minglei; Row, Kyung Ho

    2012-04-06

    Polymer-confined ionic liquids were used for the separation of phenolic acids from natural plant extract by utilizing an anion-exchange mechanism. They were synthesized using molecular imprinting technique to reduce non-directional ion-ion interactions during anion-exchange and other interactions with interference substances that could decrease selectivity. A suitable sorbent for phenolic acid separation could be identified based on the adsorption behaviors of phenolic acids on different polymer-confined ionic liquids. Thus, the developed ionic liquid-based molecularly imprinted anion-exchange polymer (IMAP) achieved high recovery rates by solid-phase extraction of phenolic acids from Salicornia herbacea L. extract: 90.1% for protocatechuic acid, 95.5% for ferulic acid and 96.6% for caffeic acid. Moreover, the phenolic acids were separable from each other by repeated solid phase extraction cycles. The proposed method could be used to separate other phenolic acids or organic acids from complex samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Alternate Methods for Eluting Cesium from Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Johnson, Heather Lauren [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2009-02-01

    A small-column ion exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removing cesium from the supernate and dissolved salt solutions in the high-level-waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SCIX system could use either crystalline silicotitanate (CST), an inorganic, non-regenerable sorbent, or spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), a new regenerable resin, to remove cesium from the waste solutions. The baseline method for eluting the cesium from the RF resin uses 15 bed volumes (BV) of 0.5 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). The nitric acid eluate, containing the radioactive cesium, would be combined with the sludge from the waste tanks and would be converted into glass at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS. The amount of nitric acid that would be used to elute the RF resin, using the current elution protocol, exceeds the capacity of DWPF to destroy the nitrate ions and maintain the required chemical reducing environment in the glass melt. Installing a denitration evaporator at SRS is technically feasible but would add considerable cost to the project. Alternate methods for eluting the resin have been tested, including using lower concentrations of nitric acid, other acids, and changing the flow regimes. About 4 BV of 0.5 M HNO{sub 3} are required to remove the sodium (titrate the resin) and most of the cesium from the resin, so the bulk of the acid used for the baseline elution method removes a very small quantity of cesium from the resin. A summary of the elution methods that have been tested are listed.

  2. Reaction catalysts of urea-formaldehyde resin, as related to strength properties of southern pine particleboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. -Y. Hse

    1974-01-01

    Twelve resins were formulated with factorial combinations of three alkaline catalysts (i.e., somdium hydroxide, hexamethylenetetramine, and triethanolamine) and four acidic catalysts (i.e., acetic acid, hydrochloric acid, ammonium chloride, and phosphoric acid). The resins were replicated.

  3. Concentrating cesium-137 from seawater using resorcinol-formaldehyde resin for radioecological monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorin, Andrei; Tokar, Eduard; Tutov, Mikhail; Avramenko, Valentin [Institute of Chemistry FEBRAS, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Far Eastern Federal Univ., Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Palamarchuk, Marina; Marinin, Dmitry [Institute of Chemistry FEBRAS, Vladivostok (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-01

    A method of preconcentrating cesium-137 from seawater using a resorcinol-formaldehyde resin, which enables one to optimize the ecological monitoring procedure, has been suggested. Studies of sorption of cesium-137 from seawater by resorcinol-formaldehyde resin have been performed, and it has been demonstrated that the cation exchanger is characterized by high selectivity with respect to cesium-137. It was found that the selectivity depended on the temperature of resin solidification and the seawater pH value. The maximal value of the cesium-137 distribution coefficient is equal to 4.1-4.5 x 10{sup 3} cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}. Under dynamic conditions, the ion-exchange resin capacity is 310-910 bed volumes depending on the seawater pH, whereas the efficiency of cesium removal exceeds 95%. The removal of more than 95% of cesium-137 has been attained using 1-3 M solutions of nitric acid: here, the eluate volume was 8-8.4 bed volumes. Application of 3 M solution of nitric acid results in resin degradation with the release of gaseous products.

  4. Complejación de la resina de intercambio de iones: enmascaramiento del sabor amargo de cefuroxime acetil Ion-exchange resin complexation: Masking the bitter taste of cefuroxime axetil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inderbir Singh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: the purpose of this research was to formulate taste masked complexes of cefuroxime axetil and to evaluate them for taste, drug loading and characterized by FTIR, XRD. Tablets were formulated of selected batches and evaluated for drug release and physical parameters. METHODS: complexation technique is used to prepare complexes of drug where ion exchange resins such as Indion® 214, Indion® 234 and Indion® 414 were used with a drug-resin ratio of 1:0.5, 1:1, 1:2. The drug resinates were characterized by Infrared Spectroscopy, DSC and X-Ray Diffraction pattern and evaluated for drug loading and taste. Direct compression method was used to formulate tablets. In vitro dissolution was carried out using USP II apparatus. RESULT: potential taste masking increased with increasing concentration of resin. Indion® 214 resin showed better taste masking effect as compared to Indion® 234 and Indion® 414. Percent of drug loading was maximum at drug : resin ratio of 1:1, after that it decreased. Prolonged (upto 5 h and slow drug release was observed with resin 214 at higher concentration. CONCLUSIONS: out of three resins chosen, Indion® 214 at higher concentration exhibit excellent taste masking as well as sustained drug release action.OBJETIVO: el objetivo de esta investigación fue formular los complejos con sabor amargo de cefuroxime acetil y evaluarlos por sabor, carga medicamentosa y caracterización por FTIR, XRD. Las tabletas fueron formuladas a partir de lotes seleccionados y evaluados en busca de la liberación medicamentosa y parámetros físicos. MÉTODOS: la técnica de complejación se utilizó para preparar complejos farmacológicos donde las resinas de intercambio iónico como Indion® 214, Indion® 234 y el Indion® 414 se emplearon a una proporción resina-medicamento de 1:0.5, 1:1, 1:2. Los resinados medicamentosos fueron caracterizados mediante espectroscopia infrarroja, DSC y el patrón de difracción-rayos-X, y evaluados

  5. Ion exchange treatment of rinse water generated in the galvanizing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marañón, Elena; Fernández, Yolanda; Castrillón, Leonor

    2005-01-01

    A study was conducted of the viability of using the cationic exchange resins Amberlite IR-120 and Lewatit SP-112 to treat rinse water generated in the galvanizing process as well as acidic wastewater containing zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe). Solutions containing either 100 mg/L of Zn at pH 5.6 (rinse water) or Fe and Zn at concentrations of 320 and 200 mg/L at pH 1.5 (acidic water), respectively, were percolated through packed beds until the resins were exhausted. Breakthrough capacities obtained ranged between 1.1 and 1.5 meq metal/mL resin. The elution of metal and the regeneration of resins were performed with hydrochloric acid. The influence of the flowrate used during the loading stage was also studied, with 0.5 bed volumes/min (3.2 cm/min) found to be the optimum flowrate.

  6. Inter laminar shear strength behavior of acid, base and silane treated E-glass fibre epoxy resin composites on drilling process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.R. Arun prakash

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this present work siliconized e-glass fibre reinforced epoxy resin composite has been prepared and compared with acid and base treated e-glass fibre epoxy composites to know the significant advantage of silane treatment on fibre. The composites were fabricated by laying 20, 30 and 40vol% of e-glass fibre into epoxy resin matrix. The e-glass fibre woven mat was surface treated by an amine functional coupling agent 3-Aminopropyletrimethoxysilane (APTMS. The fibres were surface treated by aqueous solution method and thermo assisted to create silinol groups. Similarly for acid treatment H2SO4 and base treatment NaOH with 1N concentration was used for surface treating the fibres. Effectiveness of silane treatment on glass fibre was compared by inter laminar shear strength test according to ASTM D 2344. Drilling process with varying diameter drill bit and varying cutting speed was applied to check the composites for their delamination resistance while machining. Maximum improvement of 15%, 12.5% and 9% (20, 30 and 40vol % on ILSS was achieved for siliconized e-glass fibre reinforced epoxy composites. The scanning electron microscopy images revealed that no fibre pull out was present on fractured surfaces of composites which contains siliconized e-glass fibre. Similarly better dimensional accuracy was achieved on drilling process for composites contains siliconized e-glass fibre.

  7. Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulates Amino Acid-Mediated Autophagy in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiying Shi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Dysfunctional autophagy has been reported to be associated with aberrant intestinal metabolism. Amino acids can regulate autophagic activity in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs. Na+/H+-exchanger 3 (NHE3 has been found to participate in the absorption of amino acids in the intestine, but whether NHE3 is involved in the regulation of autophagy in IECs is unclear. Methods: In the present study, an amino acid starvation-induced autophagic model was established. Then, the effects of alanine and proline with or without the NHE inhibitor 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl amiloride (EIPA were evaluated. Autophagy was examined based on the microtubule-associated light chain 3 (LC3 levels, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, tandem GFP-mCherry-LC3 construct, sequestosome-1 (SQSTM1, P62 mRNA and protein levels, and autophagy-related gene (ATG 5, 7, and 12 expression levels. The autophagic flux was evaluated as the ratio of yellow (autophagosomes to red (autolysosomes LC3 puncta. Results: Following amino acid starvation, we found the LC3-II and ATG expression levels were enhanced in the IEC-18 cells. An increase in the number of autophagic vacuoles was concomitantly observed by TEM and confocal microscopy. Based on the results, supplementation with either alanine or proline depressed autophagy in the IEC-18 cells. Consistent with the elevated LC3-II levels, ATG expression increased upon NHE3 inhibition. Moreover, the mCherry-GFP-LC3 autophagic puncta representing both autophagosomes and autolysosomes per cell increased after EIPA treatment. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that NHE (most likely NHE3 may participate in the amino acid regulation of autophagy in IECs, which would aid in the design of better treatments for intestinal inflammation.

  8. Application of response surface methodology and artificial neural network: modeling and optimization of Cr(VI) adsorption process using Dowex 1X8 anion exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbi, Soumaya; Guesmi, Fatma; Tabassi, Dorra; Hannachi, Chiraz; Hamrouni, Bechir

    2016-01-01

    We report the adsorption efficiency of Cr(VI) on a strong anionic resin Dowex 1X8. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of this adsorbent were investigated. Response surface methodology was applied to evaluate the main effects and interactions among initial pH, initial Cr(VI) concentration, adsorbent dose and temperature. Analysis of variance depicted that resin dose and initial pH were the most significant factors. Desirability function (DF) showed that the maximum Cr(VI) removal of 95.96% was obtained at initial pH 5, initial Cr(VI) concentration of 100 mg/L, resin dose of 2 g and temperature of 283 K. Additionally, a simulated industrial wastewater containing 14.95 mg/L of Cr(VI) was treated successfully by Dowex 1X8 at optimum conditions. Same experimental design was employed to develop the artificial neural network. Both models gave a high correlation coefficient (RRSM(2) = 0.932, RANN(2) = 0.996).

  9. Competitive ligand exchange between Cu-humic acid complexes and methanobactin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, M-L; Hoffmann, M; Christl, I; Kraemer, S M; Kretzschmar, R

    2013-01-01

    Copper has been found to play a key role in the physiology of methanotrophic micro-organisms, and methane oxidation may critically depend on the availability of Cu. In natural environments, such as soils, sediments, peat bogs, and surface waters, the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) can control the bioavailability of Cu by forming strong metal complexes. To promote Cu acquisition, methanotrophs exude methanobactin, a ligand known to have a high affinity for Cu. In this study, the capability of methanobactin for Cu acquisition from NOM was investigated using humic acid (HA) as a model substance. The kinetics of ligand exchange between Cu-HA and methanobactin was observed by UV-vis spectroscopy, and the speciation of Cu bound to methanobactin was determined by size-exclusion chromatography coupled to an ICP-MS. The results showed that Cu was mobilized from HA by a fast ligand exchange reaction following a second-order rate law with first-order kinetics for both methanobactin and Cu-HA complexes. The reaction rates decreased with decreasing temperature. Equilibrium experiments indicated that methanobactin was not sorbed to HA and proved that methanobactin is competitive with HA for Cu binding by forming strong 1:1 Cu-methanobactin complexes. Consequently, our results demonstrate that methanobactin can efficiently acquire Cu in organic-rich environments. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Shear bond strength between porcelain and nano filler composite resin with or without 9% hydrofluoric acid etching

    OpenAIRE

    Kun Ismiyatin

    2009-01-01

    Background: Reparation technique on restorations with broken or damaged porcelain which are still attached with the teeth are difficult, because it is very hard to remove the porcelain restoration without damaging it, and it needs a long time. Various ways have been developed to repair the broken porcelain, one of them is the use of composite resin as the material for the restoration of fractured porcelain. Repairing porcelain inside the mouth without removing the restoration of the damaged p...

  11. Catalyst Degradation in High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Acid Doped Polybenzimidazole Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleemann, Lars Nilausen; Buazar, F.; Li, Qingfeng

    2013-01-01

    contribution of the membrane degradation to the performance losses during the potential cycling tests. As the major mechanism of the fuel cell performance degradation, the electrochemical active area of the cathodic catalysts showed a steady decrease in the cyclic voltammetric measurements, which was also...... and multi‐walled carbon nanotubes were used as supports for electrode catalysts and evaluated in accelerated durability tests under potential cycling at 150 °C. Measurements of open circuit voltage, area specific resistance and hydrogen permeation through the membrane were carried out, indicating little......Degradation of carbon supported platinum catalysts is a major failure mode for the long term durability of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells based on phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes. With Vulcan carbon black as a reference, thermally treated carbon black...

  12. Phosphoric acid doped imidazolium polysulfone membranes for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jingshuai; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2012-01-01

    A novel acid–base polymer membrane is prepared by doping of imidazolium polysulfone with phosphoric acid for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Polysulfone is first chloromethylated, followed by functionalization of the chloromethylated polysulfone with alkyl imidazoles i...... group is achieved in 85wt% H3PO4 at room temperature. The membranes exhibit a proton conductivity of 0.015–0.022Scm−1 at 130–150°C under 15mol% water vapor in air, and a tensile strength of 5–6MPa at 130°C under ambient humidity. Fuel cell tests show an open circuit voltage as high as 0.96V and a peak...

  13. Recovery of gold from ammonia-thiosulfate media with amberlite IRA-410 ionic exchange resin; Recuperacion de oro desde un medio amoniaco-tiosulfato con resina de intercambio ionico Amberlite IRA-410

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, P.; Vargas, C.; Reveco, V.; Orellana, J.

    2006-07-01

    The absorption and elution of gold in thiosulfate-ammonia media were studied at laboratory level using the Amberlite IRA-410 ionic exchange resin. Tests were carried out in a stirred reactor, maintaining constant temperature (25 degree centigree), with a volume of solution/mass of resin ratio of 833,3 ml/g and during 3 h. The variables tested were the following: pH (9-11), thio sufate concentration (0-0,5 M), ammonia concentration (0-0,5 M) and selectivity in the presence of cupric ion. The obtained results indicate that gold adsorption was quick; the presence of thiosulfate decreased strongly the adsorption; and the presence of ammonia did not affect the adsorption mostly. The copper was in a certain measure a competitor of the gold, but its biggest negative effect was that acted as catalyst of the oxidizing reaction of thiosulfate (S{sub 2}O{sub 3}''2-) to tetrathionate (S{sub 4}O{sub 6}''2), which can cause a partial elution of gold during the load stage. Also, the behavior of CLO-''-{sub 4}; SO{sub 3}''2- and CLO''- as effluents was studied in both gold and copper elution. These tests were also carried out in a stirred reactor, to constant temperature (25 degree centigree) with a volume of aqueous solution/mass of resin ratio of 200 ml/g and for 3 h. Results demonstrated that the copper was eluted more quickly that the gold in all the cases. (Author) 34 refs.

  14. Studies on the application of temperature-responsive ion exchange polymers with whey proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharjan, Pankaj; Campi, Eva M; De Silva, Kirthi; Woonton, Brad W; Jackson, W Roy; Hearn, Milton T W

    2016-03-18

    Several new types of temperature-responsive ion exchange resins of different polymer composition have been prepared by grafting the products from the co-polymerisation of N-phenylacrylamide, N-iso-propylacrylamide and acrylic acid derivatives onto cross-linked agarose. Analysis of the binding isotherms for these different resins obtained under batch adsorption conditions indicated that the resin based on N-iso-propylacrylamide containing 5% (w/w) N-phenylacrylamide and 5% (w/w) acrylic acid resulted in the highest adsorption capacity, Bmax, for the whey protein, bovine lactoferrin, e.g. 14 mg bovine lactoferrin/mL resin at 4 °C and 62 mg bovine lactoferrin/mL resin at 40 °C, respectively. Under dynamic loading conditions at 40 °C, 94% of the loaded bovine lactoferrin on a normalised mg protein per mL resin basis was adsorbed by this new temperature-responsive ion-exchanger, and 76% was eluted by a single cycle temperature shift to 4 °C without varying the composition of the 10mM sodium dihydrogen phosphate buffer, pH 6.5, or the flow rate. The binding characteristics of these different ion exchange resins with bovine lactoferrin were also compared to results obtained using other resins based on N-isopropylacrylamide but contained N-tert-butylacrylamide rather than N-phenylacrylamide, where the corresponding dynamic capture and release properties for bovine lactoferrin required different temperature conditions of 20 °C and 50 °C, respectively for optimal desorption/adsorption. The cationic protein, bovine lactoperoxidase, was also adsorbed and desorbed with these temperature-responsive resins under similar conditions of changing temperature, whereas the anionic protein, bovine β-lactoglobulin, was not adsorbed under this regime of temperature conditions but instead eluted in the flow-through. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Method for immobilizing invertase by adsorption on Dowex® anionic exchange resin Método para a imobilização da invertase por adsorção em resinas trocadoras de ânions (DOWEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Junko Tomotani

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This communication describes a method for adsorbing the invertase (EC.3.2.1.26 on DOWEX® anion exchange resin. Among the types of DOWEX® resins studied (1x8:50-400; 1x4:50-400 and 1x2:100-400, 1X4-200 was the most suitable, because it adsorbed the invertase molecules completely and the complex 1X4-200/invertase retained 100% of the catalytic activity. Moreover, no leakage of enzyme from the support was noted at the end of the sucrose hydrolysis.O presente trabalho descreve um método de adsorção da invertase (EC. 3.2.1.26 na resina de troca aniônica do tipo Dowex®. Entre os tipos de resinas Dowex® estudados (1x8:50-400; 1x4:50-400 e 1x2:100-400, 1x4-200 foi a mais apropriada devido à completa adsorção das moléculas de invertase e a sua retenção de atividade catalítica de 100% do complexo 1x4-200/invertase. Salienta-se ainda a ausência do desprendimento da enzima do suporte após o término da hidrólise da sacarose.

  16. Effect of sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid on the surface roughness of acrylic resin polymerized by heated water for short and long cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sczepanski, Felipe; Sczepanski, Claudia Roberta Brunnquell; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Gonini-Júnior, Alcides; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the surface roughness of acrylic resin submitted to chemical disinfection via 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) or 1% peracetic acid (C2H4O3). The disc-shaped resin specimens (30 mm diameter ×4 mm height) were polymerized by heated water using two cycles (short cycle: 1 h at 74°C and 30 min at 100°C; conventional long cycle: 9 h at 74°C). The release of substances by these specimens in water solution was also quantified. Specimens were fabricated, divided into four groups (n = 10) depending on the polymerization time and disinfectant. After polishing, the specimens were stored in distilled deionized water. Specimens were immersed in 1% NaClO or 1% C2H4O3 for 30 min, and then were immersed in distilled deionized water for 20 min. The release of C2H4O3 and NaClO was measured via visual colorimetric analysis. Roughness was measured before and after disinfection. Roughness data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. There was no interaction between polymerization time and disinfectant in influencing the average surface roughness (Ra, P = 0.957). Considering these factors independently, there were significant differences between short and conventional long cycles (P = 0.012), but no significant difference between the disinfectants hypochlorite and C2H4O3 (P = 0.366). Visual colorimetric analysis did not detect release of substances. It was concluded that there was the difference in surface roughness between short and conventional long cycles, and disinfection at acrylic resins polymerized by heated water using a short cycle modified the properties of roughness.

  17. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  18. Determination of 63Ni and 59Ni in spent ion-exchange resin and activated charcoal from the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, M H T; Macacini, J F; Vicente, R; Marumo, J T; Sakata, S K; Terremoto, L A A

    2013-07-01

    A radiochemical method has been adapted to determine (59)Ni and (63)Ni in samples of radioactive wastes from the water cleanup system of the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor. The process includes extraction chromatographic resin with dimethylglyoxime (DMG) as a functional group. Activity concentrations of (59)Ni and (63)Ni were measured, respectively, by X-ray spectrometry and liquid scintillation counting, whereas the chemical yield was determined by ICP-OES. The average ratio of measured activity concentrations of (63)Ni and (59)Ni agree well with theory. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Copoly(arlene ether)s containing pendant sulfonic acid groups as proton exchange membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu Seung [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Dae Sik [CANADA NRC; Robertson, Gilles [CANADA NRC; Guiver, Michael [CANADA NRC

    2008-01-01

    A copoly(arylene ether) (PAE) with high fluorine content and a copoly(arylene ether nitrile) (PAEN) with high nitrile content, each containing pendant phenyl sulfonic acids were synthesized. The P AE and PAEN were prepared from decafluorobiphenyl (DFBP) and difluorobenzonitrile (DFBN) respectively, by polycondensation with 2-phenylhydroquinone (PHQ) by conventional aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions. The sulfonic acid groups were introduced by mild post-sulfonation exclusively on the para-position of the pendant phenyl ring in PHQ. The membrane properties of the resulting sulfonated copolymers sP AE and sP AEN were compared for fuel cell applications. The copolymers sPAE and sPAEN, each having a degree of sulfonation (DS) of 1.0 had high ion exchange capacities (IEC{sub v}(wet) (volume-based, wet state)) of 1.77 and 2.55 meq./cm{sup 3}, high proton conductivities of 135.4 and 140.1 mS/cm at 80 C, and acceptable volume-based water uptake of 44.5-51.9 vol% at 80 C, respectively, compared to Nafion. The data points of these copolymer membranes are located in the area of outstanding properties in the trade-off plot of alternative hydrocarbon polyelectrolyte membranes (PEM) for the relationship between proton conductivity versus water uptake (weight based or volume based). Furthermore, the relative selectivity derived from proton conductivity and methanol permeability is higher than that of Nafion.

  20. Exposure of Atlantic salmon parr (Salmo salar) to a combination of resin acids and a water soluble fraction of diesel fuel oil: A model to investigate the chemical causes of pigmented salmon syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croce, B. [Scottish Office Agriculture, Environment, and Fisheries Dept., Aberdeen (United Kingdom). Marine Lab.]|[Scottish Environmental Protection Agency, Aberdeen (United Kingdom). North East River Purification Board; Stagg, R.M. [Scottish Office Agriculture, Environment, and Fisheries Dept., Aberdeen (United Kingdom). Marine Lab.

    1997-09-01

    Pigmented salmon syndrome is a pollutant-induced hemolytic anemia and hyperbilirubinemia. As part of an investigation of this condition, S2 Atlantic salmon parr (Salmo salar) were exposed to a diesel fuel oil, water soluble fraction (WSF) in combination with a mixture of three resin acids (isopimaric, dehydroabietic, and abietic acids) in a continuous-flow freshwater system. The total nominal concentrations of resin acids in the exposure tanks were 10, 50, and 100 {micro}g/L; the diesel WSF was generated in situ and provided a mean hydrocarbon concentration of 2.0 {+-} 0.1 mg/L (n = 12) during the 9-d exposure period. Exposure to the diesel WSF alone depressed liver bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UDPGT) activity and induced phenol UDPGT activity. Exposure to the diesel WSF in the absence or presence of resin acids induced liver cytochrome P4501A and increased the concentrations in the plasma of the enzymes lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, and glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase. The combined exposure to diesel WSF with either 50 or 100 {micro}g/L total resin acid caused significant elevations in the concentrations of bilirubin in the plasma and many of these fish had yellow pigmentation on the ventral surface and around the gill arches. The results demonstrate that exposure to combinations of two groups of contaminants can result in the manifestation of toxic effects not apparent from exposure to either of these chemicals in isolation.

  1. Utilization, at hot temperature, of an ion exchange resin column. Application to the separation of {sup 91}Y - {sup 147}Pm; Utilisation, a chaud, dune colonne de resine echangeuse d'ions. Application a la separation {sup 91} Y - {sup 147} Pm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloch, G.; Cohen, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    The fission products with long period can be separate by fractional elution, to ambient temperature, on column of an ion exchange resin. The separation of the couple {sup 91}Y + {sup 147}Pm being particularly long, we tried to improve it while using a heated column. For this study, we specified the effect of the temperature on the factor of separation: {alpha}, ratio between the Kd partition coefficients of {sup 147}Pm and {sup 91}Y: {alpha}= Kd ({sup 147}Pm) / Kd ({sup 91}Y). (M.B.) [French] Les produits de fission a periode longue peuvent etre separes par elution fractionnee, a temperature ambiante, sur colonne de resine echangeuse d'ions. La separation du couple {sup 91}Y + {sup 147}Pm etant particulerement longue, nous avons cherche a l'ameliorer en utilisant une colonne chauffee. A l'occasion de cette etude, nous avons ete amenes a preciser l'effet de la temperature sur le facteur de separation: {alpha}, rapport entre les coefficients de partage Kd de {sup 147}Pm et {sup 91}Y: {alpha} = Kd({sup 147}Pm) / Kd({sup 91}Y). (M.B.)

  2. Resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how the modulus of elasticity of resin composites influences marginal quality in restorations submitted to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. METHODS: Charisma, Filtek Supreme XTE and Grandio were selected as they were found to possess different moduli of elasticity...... of resin composite (p=0.81) on the quality of dentine margins was observed, before or after loading. Deterioration of all margins was evident after loading (p....008). CONCLUSIONS: The resin composite with the highest modulus of elasticity resulted in the highest number of gap-free enamel margins but with an increased incidence of paramarginal enamel fractures. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The results from this study suggest that the marginal quality of restorations can...

  3. Water quality monitoring system for determination of ionic nutrients by ion-exclusion chromatography with spectrophotometric detection on cation- and anion-exchange resin columns using water eluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaki, Daisuke; Nakatani, Nobutake; Mori, Masanobu; Nakagoshi, Nobukazu; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2012-07-01

    A unified ion-exclusion chromatography (IEC) system for monitoring anionic and cationic nutrients like NH4+, NO2-, NO3-, phosphate ion, silicate ion and HCO3- was developed and applied to several environmental waters. The IEC system consisted of four IEC methodologies, including the IEC with ultraviolet (UV) form connected with detection at 210 nm for determining NH4+ on anion-exchange separation column in OH anion-exchange UV-conversion column in I- form in tandem, the IEC with UV-detection at 210 nm for determining simultaneously NO3- and NO3- on cation-exchange separation column in H+ form, the IEC with UV-detection at 210 nm for determining HCO3- on cation-exchange separation column in H+ form connected with anion-exchange UV-conversion column in I- form in tandem, and the IEC with visible-detection based on molybdenum-blue reaction for determining simultaneously silicate and phosphate ions on cation-exchange separation column in H+ form. These IEC systems were combined through three manually-driven 6-port column selection valves to select each separation column to determine selectively the ionic nutrients. Using this sequential water quality monitoring system, the analytical performances such as calibration linearity, reproducibility, detection limit and recovery were also tested under the optimized chromatographic conditions. This novel water quality monitoring system has been applied successfully for the determination of the ionic eutrophication components in sub-urban river waters.

  4. Resistance to fracture of endodontically treated premolars restored with glass ionomer cement or acid etch composite resin: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Ranga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Due to the weakness of endodontically treated posterior teeth requires more strengthened restoration to withstand occlusal forces. The purpose of the present study was to determine and compare the resistance to fracture of endodontically treated maxillary 1 st premolars restored with different materials in mesio-occluso-distal (MOD cavity preparations. Materials and Methods: MOD cavity preparations in 80 endodontically treated maxillary 1 st premolars were restored using four different methods. Fiber rings were filled with stone plaster and the teeth were placed into the plaster up to the level of cemento-enamel junction. The teeth were grouped according to restorative method, mounted in an Instrom T.T. machine, and the buccal walls subjected to a slowly increasing compressive force until fracture occurred. Result: The force of fracture of the walls of each tooth was recorded and the results in the various groups compared. All teeth fractured in a similar manner irrespective of the restorative method used. Conclusion: The resistance to the fracture of the teeth was the same when they were stored with glass ionomer cement as a base over which composite resin was placed. When the entire cavities were filled with glass ionomer cement, the resistance to fracture of the teeth decreased significantly compared with the acid etch resin technique.

  5. Effect of a self-etching primer and phosphoric acid etching on the bond strength of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogawa, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Saiki, Osamu; Hiraba, Haruto; Nakamura, Mitsuo; Matsumura, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength and durability of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to human enamel. A self-etching primer that contained 4-META (Teeth Primer, TP) and 35-45% or 60-65% concentrations of phosphoric acid (K-Etchant Gel, KE, and Super Bond C&B Red Activator, RA) were used as the surface treatment agents. A methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based self-polymerizing resin (Super-Bond C&B) was used as a luting agent. The shear bond strength was determined both pre and post thermocycling. The results were statistically analyzed with a non-parametric procedure. The post-thermocycling shear bond strength of the TP group was significantly higher than that of other groups, and that of the KE group was significantly higher compared with the RA group. These results demonstrated that 4-META was effective. Furthermore, when the degree of tooth demineralization was compared, surface treatment with less demineralization using TP was the most effective treatment.

  6. Cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography: Separation of highly basic proteins using volatile acidic solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijnden-van Raaij, A.J.M. van den; Koornneef, I.; Oostwaard, Th.M.J.; Laat, S.W. de; Zoelen, E.J.J. van

    1987-01-01

    The chromatographic behavior of a number of globular proteins was studied on a Bio-Sil TSK CM-2-SW weak cation exchange HPLC column under acidic conditions. A linear gradient of O-I M NH₄Ac in I M HOAc, inducing a convex pH gradient from 2.4-4.8, resulted in an excellent separation of highly

  7. Production and first use of {sup 153}SmCl{sub 3}-ion exchange resin capsule formulation for assessing gastrointestinal motility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeong, Chai-Hong; Abdullah, Basri Johan Jeet; Ng, Kwan-Hoong [University of Malaya Research Imaging Centre, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Department of Biomedical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Chung, Lip-Yong [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Goh, Khean-Lee [Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Sarji, Sazilah Ahmad [University of Malaya Research Imaging Centre, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Department of Biomedical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Perkins, Alan Christopher, E-mail: alan.perkins@nottingham.ac.uk [Radiological and Imaging Sciences and Nottingham Digestive Diseases Biomedical Research Unit, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2UH (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    We produced an enteric-coated gelatine capsule containing neutron-activated {sup 153}Sm-labelled resin beads for use in gastrointestinal motility studies. In vitro test in simulated gastrointestinal environment and in vivo study on volunteers were performed. Scintigraphic images were acquired from ten volunteers over 24 h while blood and urine samples were collected to monitor the presence of {sup 153}Sm. All the capsules remained intact in stomach. This proved to be a safe and practical oral capsule formulation for whole gut transit scintigraphy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enteric-coated gelatin capsule containing {sup 153}Sm-labelled resin was manufactured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vitro disintegration test ensured targeted release properties of the formulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vivo volunteers study confirmed safeness and practical use of the formulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {sup 153}Sm can be used as an alternative nuclide to {sup 111}In in GI transit scintigraphy.

  8. Analytical applications of ion exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Inczédy, J

    1966-01-01

    Analytical Applications of Ion Exchangers presents the laboratory use of ion-exchange resins. This book discusses the development in the analytical application of ion exchangers. Organized into 10 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the history and significance of ion exchangers for technical purposes. This text then describes the properties of ion exchangers, which are large molecular water-insoluble polyelectrolytes having a cross-linked structure that contains ionic groups. Other chapters consider the theories concerning the operation of ion-exchange resins and investigate th

  9. Removal of fluorescent dissolved organic matter in biologically treated textile effluents by NDMP anion exchange process: efficiency and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Tao; Xu, Zi-Xiao; Shuang, Chen-Dong; Zhou, Qing; Li, Hai-Bo; Li, Ai-Min

    2016-03-01

    The efficiency and mechanism of anion exchange resin Nanda Magnetic Polymer (NDMP) for removal of fluorescent dissolved organic matter in biologically treated textile effluents were studied. The bench-scale experiments showed that as well as activated carbon, anion exchange resin could efficiently remove both aniline-like and humic-like fluorescent components, which can be up to 40 % of dissolved organic matter. The humic-like fluorescent component HS-Em460-Ex3 was more hydrophilic than HS-Em430-Ex2 and contained fewer alkyl chains but more acid groups. As a result, HS-Em460-Ex3 was eliminated more preferentially by NDMP anion exchange. However, compared with adsorption resins, the polarity of fluorescent components had a relatively small effect on the performance of anion exchange resin. The long-term pilot-scale experiments showed that the NDMP anion exchange process could remove approximately 30 % of the chemical oxygen demand and about 90 % of color from the biologically treated textile effluents. Once the issue of waste brine from resin desorption is solved, the NDMP anion exchange process could be a promising alternative for the advanced treatment of textile effluents.

  10. Assessment of plasma amino acid profile in autism using cation-exchange chromatography with postcolumn derivatization by ninhydrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Mona Mohamed; Abdel-Al, Hala; Al-Sawi, Mohamed

    2017-02-27

    Autism is a heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder. This study aimed to assess the clinical significance of amino acid profile assay in autism using cation-exchange chromatography with ninhydrin postcolumn derivatization. This study included 42 autistic children and 26 apparently healthy children. All participants were subjected to the assay of plasma amino acids (essential, nonessential, and nonstandard) using cation-exchange chromatography with postcolumn derivatization by ninhydrin. The levels of most of the essential amino acids were significantly lower in autistic children than controls. As regards nonessential amino acids, significantly lower levels for plasma cysteine, tyrosine, and serine and significantly higher levels for plasma glutamic acid were recorded in autistic children than controls. Finally, the autistic group demonstrated significantly lower levels of α-aminoadipic acid, carnosine, and β-alanine and significantly higher levels of hydroxyproline, phosphoserine, β-amino-isobutyric acid, and ammonia as compared to controls. The study revealed that autistic children exhibit distinct alterations in the plasma levels of some amino acids, which can in turn participate in the disease etiology and can be applied as a diagnostic tool for early detection of autism.

  11. Evaluation of ion exchange resins for iron control in copper electro-winning solutions; Evaluacion de resinas de intercambio ionico para el control de hierro en soluciones de electro-obtencion de cobre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parada, F.; Dreisinger, D.; Wilkomirsky, I.

    2010-07-01

    Two commercial resins were evaluated for the extraction of iron from a copper electrowinning solution. Both resins efficiently extract iron. The Mono phosphonic resin has a greater charge capacity than the Diphonix resin and the Diphonix resin shows faster kinetics. Experimental results of the interrupted test and tests with different particle size of resins have demonstrated that extraction kinetics is controlled by diffusion into the particle in both resins. A good agreement with Fick's model for diffusion inside the particles confirms the proposed mechanism. Finally, temperature favors the process kinetics and its effect on the diffusion coefficient follows Arrhenius law, obtaining a value of 4,89 kcal/mol for the Mono phosphonic resin and 4,94 kcal/mol for the Diphenox resin. The aforementioned values are close to typical values for the proposed diffusional control which are 6 to 10 kcal/mol. (Author)

  12. Sulfonation Process and Desalination Effect of Polystyrene/PVDF Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Network Cation Exchange Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-lin Lei

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available With the classical sulfonation method of polystyrene-based strongly acidic cation exchange resins, polystyrene/polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF alloy particles were sulfonated to obtain a cation exchange resin, which was then directly thermoformed to prepare a semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN cation exchange membrane. The effects of the swelling agent, sulfonation time and temperature and the relative contents of polystyrene and divinylbenzene (DVB in the alloy particles on the feasibility of the membrane formation are discussed. The results indicate that a favorable sulfonation degree above 80% and a suitable ion exchange capacity of 1.5–2.4 mmol/g can be gained, with concentrated sulfuric acid as the sulfonation agent and 1,2-dichloroethane as the swelling agent. The running electrical resistance and desalination effect of the prepared cation exchange membrane were measured in a pilot-scale electrodialyser and not only obviously exceeded a commercial heterogeneous cation exchange membrane, but was also very close to a commercial homogenous membrane. In this way, the authors have combined the classical sulfonation method of polystyrene-based cation exchange resins with the traditional thermoforming manufacturing process of heterogeneous cation exchange membranes, to successfully develop a novel, low-price, but relatively high-performance polystyrene/PVDF cation exchange membrane with the semi-IPN structure.

  13. Artifacts in the determination of the binding of americium and europium to an aquatic fulvic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lead, J.R.; Hamilton-Taylor, J.; Kelly, M. [Institute of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Lancaster University, Lancaster (United Kingdom)

    1995-11-23

    The binding of europium and americium by an aquatic fulvic acid was investigated using an equilibrium ion exchange technique (Schubert`s method). The results for europium were consistent with literature data. Americium gave anomalous results for both the D{sub o} values (partition coefficient of the metal between the resin and solution phases in the absence of the fulvic acid) and D values (partition coefficient of the metal between the resin and solution phases in the presence of the fulvic acid). The values for americium were unexpectedly low and, in the case of D values, only slightly pH dependent. The cause of the discrepancy was found to be the partial dissolution of the resin or the loss of small colloidal material from the resin. The effects on the europium results were minimal due to the use of lower resin weights and higher metal concentrations

  14. Effect of sorption conditions on the state of copper(II) ions in the phase of AN-31 ion exchange resin, according to data from ESR and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroganova, E. A.; Anufrienko, V. F.; Larina, T. V.; Vasenin, N. T.; Lebedev, Yu. A.; Parmon, V. N.

    2017-08-01

    It is found that the sorption recovery of copper ions from water solutions in the phase of AN-31 low basicity anion exchanger has a mixed character. It is established via diffuse reflectance spectroscopy that ions are stabilized through complexation with the participation of the functional groups of the sorbent with the formation of structures [Cu(NR3)2(OH)2(H2O)2], [Cu(NR3)3(OH)(H2O)2], and as a result of the physical adsorption of oxide dimers and planar-squared copper clusters. It is shown that increasing the ionic strength of a solution by introducing sodium chloride into the system greatly improves the capacity of the sorbent and leads to the uniform distribution of copper ions in the resin matrix. The similarity between the ESR spectrum parameters of copper-containing samples of the ion exchanger, obtained in a wider range of pH, is determined via ESR and testifies to the homogeneity of the stabilization positions of Cu2+ ions. The crystalline field of tetragonal-elongated octahedron is typical of all Cu2+ ions. All of the complexes have Cu(NO3)2 coordination nodes with the covalent bonding of Cu2+ ions and the amine groups of the sorbent.

  15. Photocurable bioactive bone cement based on hydroxyethyl methacrylate-poly(acrylic/maleic) acid resin and mesoporous sol gel-derived bioactive glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesaraki, S., E-mail: S-hesaraki@merc.ac.ir

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports on strong and bioactive bone cement based on ternary bioactive SiO{sub 2}-CaO-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass particles and a photocurable resin comprising hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and poly(acrylic/maleic) acid. The as-cured composite represented a compressive strength of about 95 MPa but it weakened during soaking in simulated body fluid, SBF, qua its compressive strength reached to about 20 MPa after immersing for 30 days. Biodegradability of the composite was confirmed by reducing its initial weight (~ 32%) as well as decreasing the molecular weight of early cured resin during the soaking procedure. The composite exhibited in vitro calcium phosphate precipitation in the form of nanosized carbonated hydroxyapatite, which indicates its bone bonding ability. Proliferation of calvarium-derived newborn rat osteoblasts seeded on top of the composite was observed during incubation at 37 °C, meanwhile, an adequate cell supporting ability was found. Consequently, it seems that the produced composite is an appropriate alternative for bone defect injuries, because of its good cell responses, high compressive strength and ongoing biodegradability, though more in vivo experiments are essential to confirm this assumption. - Highlights: • Light cure cement based on SiO{sub 2}-CaO-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass and polymer-like matrix was formed. • The matrix includes poly(acrylic/maleic acid) and poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate). • The cement is as strong as polymethylmethacrylate bone cement. • The cement exhibits apatite formation ability in simulated body fluid. • The cement is biodegradable and supports proliferation of osteoblastic cells.

  16. Behaviour of the pH adjustment, Ion exchange and concentrate precipitation stages in the acid leaching of uranium phosphate ores; Tratamiento de disoluciones de lixiviacion de minerales de uranio en presencia de fosfatos. Comportamiento en las etapas de ajuste de PH, cambio de ion y precipitacion de concentrados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada Aguilar, J.; Uriarte Hueda, A.

    1962-07-01

    The uranium recovery from acid leach solutions of uranium-phosphate ores has been studied. Relations have been found between the solution characteristics and the results obtained at different stages of the process. The following data can thus be predicted: solids to remove and uranium recovery in the pH adjustment stage, uranium capacity of the resin, more suitable eluating agent, elution velocity and uranium concentration in the eluate in the ion exchange stage, and composition of the concentrate produced by direct precipitation of the eluate in the concentrate precipitation stage. (Author) 8 refs.

  17. Removal and Recovery of Chromium from Solutions Simulating Tannery Wastewater by Strong Acid Cation Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulten Cetin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The process in this study was conducted on removal of chromium(III in a solution simulating a typical spent chrome tanning bath by the resin having matrix of styrene-divinylbenzene-based macroporous sulphonate, Amberjet 1200Na. The column experiments were carried out with the bed volumes of the resin as 751 mL and 1016 mL for different installation systems of the laboratory-scale pilot plant. The feeding solutions in the bed volumes of 200 and 190 were used for each installation system. The regeneration behaviour of the resin was determined by using reverse regeneration procedure with the solution of hydrogen peroxide in alkaline. The regeneration kinetics of the exhausted resin was examined with a range of the solutions having different concentration series of the alkaline hydrogen peroxide. The solutions of the basic chromium sulphate were recycled for each installation system following the regeneration cycles. The chromium ions in effluent were quantitatively eluted, and satisfactory removal of chromium(III and recovery of chromium(VI were achieved.

  18. Copoly(arylene ether)s containing pendant sulfonic acid groups as proton exchange membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dae Sik, Kim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yu Seung, Kim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gilles, Robertson [CANADA-NRC; Guiver, Michael D [CANADA-NRC

    2009-01-01

    A copoly(arylene ether) (PAE) with high fluorine content and a copoly(arylene ether nitrile) (PAEN) with high nitrile content, each containing pendant phenyl sulfonic acids were synthesized. The PAE and P AEN were prepared from decafluorobiphenyl (DFBP) and difluorobenzonitrile (DFBN) respectively, by polycondensation with 2phenylhydroquinone (PHQ) by conventional aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions. sulfonic acid groups were introduced by mild post-sulfonation exclusively on the para-position of the pendant phenyl ring in PHQ. The membrane properties of the resulting sulfonated copolymers sPAE and sPAEN were compared for fuel cell applications. The copolymers sPAE and sPAEN, each having a degree of sulfonation (OS) of 1.0 had high ion exchange capacities (IEC{sub v})(wet) (volume-based, wet state) of 1.77 and 2.55 meq./cm3, high proton conductivities of 135.4 and 140.1 mS/cm at 80 C, and acceptable volume-based water uptake of 44.5 -51.9 vol% at 80 C, respectively, compared to Nafion. The data points of these copolymer membranes are located in the upper left-hand corner in the trade-off plot of alternative hydrocarbon polyelectrolyte membranes (PEM) for the relationship between proton conductivity versus water uptake (weight based or volume based), i.e., high proton conductivity and low water uptake. Furthermore, the relative selectivity derived from proton conductivity and methanol permeability is higher than that of Nafion.

  19. A general halide-to-anion switch for imidazolium-based ionic liquids and oligocationic systems using anion exchange resins (A- form).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde, Ermitas; Dinarès, Immaculada; Ibáñez, Anna; Mesquida, Neus

    2011-03-21

    Further studies on the application of an AER (A(-) form) method broadened the anion exchange scope of representative ionic liquids and bis(imidazolium) systems. Depending on the hydrophobicity nature of the targeted imidazolium species and counteranions, different organic solvents were used to swap halides for assorted anions, proceeding in excellent to quantitative yields.

  20. Method for the purification of bis (2-ethyl-hexyl)phosphoric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, W.W.

    1974-02-19

    Foreign products including the neutral organophosphorous compounds and the iron salts normally present in commercial bis(2ethyl-hexyl) phosphoric acid(HDEHP), and the radiolytic degradation products of HDEHP on exposure of HDEHP to beta and gamma irradiation are removed from HDEHP containing one or more of such products by contacting the said foreign product containing HDEHP with a macroreticular anion exchange resin in base form whereby the DEHP- ion of HDEHP exchanges with the anion of the resin and is thus adsorbed on the resin and the said foreign products are not adsorbed and will pass through a bed of particles of the resin. The adsorbed DEHP- ion is then eluted from the resin and acidified to form and recover the purified HDEHP. (auth)

  1. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Reserpine Adsorption onto Strong Acidic Cationic Exchange Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhanjing; Liu, Xiongmin; Huang, Hongmiao

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of the adsorption process of reserpine adsorbed onto the strong acidic cationic exchange fiber (SACEF) were studied by batch adsorption experiments. The adsorption capacity strongly depended on pH values, and the optimum reserpine adsorption onto the SACEF occurred at pH = 5 of reserpine solution. With the increase of temperature and initial concentration, the adsorption capacity increased. The equilibrium was attained within 20 mins. The adsorption process could be better described by the pseudo-second-order model and the Freundlich isotherm model. The calculated activation energy Ea was 4.35 kJ/mol. And the thermodynamic parameters were: 4.97thermodynamic parameters demonstrated that the adsorption was an endothermic, spontaneous and feasible process of physisorption within the temperature range between 283 K and 323 K and the initial concentration range between 100 mg/L and 300 mg/L. All the results showed that the SACEF had a good adsorption performance for the adsorption of reserpine from alcoholic solution. PMID:26422265

  2. Lignin pyrolysis products, lignans, and resin acids as specific tracers of plant classes in emissions from biomass combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoneit, B.R.T. (Oregon State Univ., Corvaleis, OR (United States)); Rogge, W.F.; Cass, G.R. (California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)); Mazurek, M.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Standley, L.J. (Academy of Natural Sciences, Avondale, PA (United States)); Hildemann, L.M. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States))

    1993-11-01

    Biomass smoke aerosols contain thermally unaltered and partially altered biomarker compounds from major vegetation taxa. These compounds range from C[sub 8] to C[sub 31] and include phytosterols, lignans, phenolic products from lignin, and diterpenoids from resins. Certain of the higher molecular weight biomarkers are vaporized from the parent plant material and subsequently condense unaltered into the particle phase. Other compounds undergo pyrolytic alteration and possibly dimerization. In both cases it is possible to assign many of these compounds to the plant taxa of the unburned fuel. The diterpenoids are good indicators for smoke from burning of gymnosperm wood. The relative distribution of the OH/OCH[sub 3] substituent patterns on the phenolic products indicates the plant class of the biomass that was burned. Application of these relationships to the interpretation of ambient smoke aerosols may permit further evaluation of the sources that contribute to regional biomass burning. 80 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Utilization of Methacrylates and Polymer Matrices for the Synthesis of Ion Specific Resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerwinski, Kenneth [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2013-10-29

    Disposal, storage, and/or transmutation of actinides such as americium (Am) will require the development of specific separation schemes. Existing efforts focus on solvent extraction systems for achieving suitable separation of actinide from lanthanides. However, previous work has shown the feasibility of ion-imprinting polymer-based resins for use in ion-exchange-type separations with metal ion recognition. Phenolic-based resins have been shown to function well for Am-Eu separations, but these resins exhibited slow kinetics and difficulties in the imprinting process. This project addresses the need for new and innovative methods for the selective separation of actinides through novel ion-imprinted resins. The project team will explore incorporation of metals into extended frameworks, including the possibility of 3D polymerized matrices that can serve as a solid-state template for specific resin preparation. For example, an anhydrous trivalent f-element chain can be formed directly from a metal carbonate, and methacrylic acid from water. From these simple coordination complexes, molecules of discrete size or shape can be formed via the utilization of coordinating ligands or by use of an anionic multi-ligand system incorporating methacrylate. Additionally, alkyl methyl methacrylates have been used successfully to create template nanospaces, which underscores their potential utility as 3D polymerized matrices. This evidence provides a unique route for the preparation of a specific metal ion template for the basis of ion-exchange separations. Such separations may prove to be excellent discriminators of metal ions, even between f-elements. Resins were prepared and evaluated for sorption behavior, column properties, and proton exchange capacity.

  4. Biological Activities and Cytotoxicity of Eperua oleifera Ducke Oil-resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves Gomes, Fernanda Torlania; Boleti, Ana Paula de Araújo; Leandro, Lidiam M.; Squinello, Diego; Aranha, Ellen S. P.; Vasconcelos, Marne C.; Cos, Paul; Veiga-Junior, Valdir F.; Lima, Emerson Silva

    2017-01-01

    Background: The oil-resin of Eperua oleifera Ducke has been used in popular medicine similarly to the copaiba oil (Copaifera spp.). Objective: This study aimed to investigate the effects of the acid fraction of E. oleifera oil-resin (AFEOR) on cell proliferation, collagen production in human fibroblasts, inhibition of metalloproteinases, and cytotoxicity against tumor cell lines. Materials and Methods: Acid fraction of E. oleifera was fractionated in the ion exchange column chromatography. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were evaluated by Alamar Blue® and Cometa assay. The inhibition of metalloproteinases was performed by zymography and Western blotting. Results: The predominant acidic diterpenes in the AFEOR were copalic and hardwickiic acids. AFEOR caused morphology alteration and decrease of proliferation at concentrations higher than 5 μg/mL. It also caused significant collagen proliferation in fibroblasts. It showed cytotoxicity against tumoral and nontumoral cell lines, with IC50 values ranging from 13 to 50 μg/mL, and a hemolytic activity with an IC50 value of 38.29 μg/mL. AFEOR inhibited collagenase activity, with an IC50 value of 46.64 μg/mL, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 in HaCaT cells or MMP-1 expression in MRC-5 cells. AFEOR induced genotoxicity in MRC-5 cells with a DNA damage index between 40% and 60% when compared to the negative controls (0%–20%). Conclusion: For the first time, biological activities from oil-resin E. oleifera demonstrated ratifying somehow its popular use. SUMMARY Analysis of crude oil-resin and fractionation of diterpenic fraction was performance using selective ion-exchange column chromatographyCytotoxicity analysis and morphology were performed with different cell linesCollagen production in human fibroblasts, inhibition of metalloproteinases were demonstrated by zymography and Western blotting. Abbreviations used: AFEOR: Eperua oleifera oil-resin. PMID:29200711

  5. Effect of a low-viscosity adhesive resin on the adhesion of metal brackets to enamel etched with hydrochloric or phosphoric acid combined with conventional adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetkiner, Enver; Ozcan, Mutlu; Wegehaupt, Florian Just; Wiegand, Annette; Eden, Ece; Attin, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of a low-viscosity adhesive resin (Icon) applied after either hydrochloric (HCl) or phosphoric acid (H3PO4) on the adhesion of metal brackets to enamel. Failure types were analyzed. The crowns of bovine incisors (N = 20) were sectioned mesio-distally and inciso-gingivally, then randomly assigned to 4 groups according to the following protocols to receive mandibular incisor brackets: 1) H3PO4 (37%)+TransbondXT (3M UNITEK); 2) H3PO4 (37%)+Icon+TransbondXT; 3) HCl (15%)+Icon (DMG)+TransbondXT 4) HCl (15%)+Icon+Heliobond (Ivoclar Vivadent)+TransbondXT. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h and thermocycled (5000x, 5°C to 55°C). The shear bond strength (SBS) test was performed using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Failure types were classified according to the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Contact angles of adhesive resins were measured (n = 5 per adhesive) on ceramic surfaces. No significant difference in SBS was observed, implying no difference between combinations of adhesive resins and etching agents (p = 0.712; ANOVA). The Weibull distribution presented significantly lower Weibull modulus (m) of group 3 (m = 2.97) compared to other groups (m = 5.2 to 6.6) (p group 1 (45.4 ± 7.9) > group 2 (44.2 ± 10.6) > group 3 (42.6 ± 15.5). While in groups 1, 3, and 4 exclusively an ARI score of 0 (no adhesive left on tooth) was observed, in group 2, only one specimen demonstrated score 1 (less than half of adhesive left on tooth). Contact angle measurements were as follows: Icon (25.86 ± 3.81 degrees), Heliobond (31.98 ± 3.17 degrees), TransbondXT (35 ± 2.21 degrees). Icon can be safely used with the conventional adhesives tested on surfaces etched with either HCl or H3PO4.

  6. 21 CFR 177.1655 - Polysulfone resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... acetic acid in distilled water, and n-heptane, yield total extractives in each extracting solvent not to... (a) of this section may contain optional adjuvant substances required in the production of such basic resins. The optional adjuvant substances required in the production of the basic polysulfone resins may...

  7. Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochen, Robert L.; Navratil, James D.

    1997-01-21

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

  8. Conductivity Measurements of Synthesized Heteropoly Acid Membranes for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Record, K.A.; Haley, B.T.; Turner, J.

    2006-01-01

    Fuel cell technology is receiving attention due to its potential to be a pollution free method of electricity production when using renewably produced hydrogen as fuel. In a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell H2 and O2 react at separate electrodes, producing electricity, thermal energy, and water. A key component of the PEM fuel cell is the membrane that separates the electrodes. DuPont’s Nafion® is the most commonly used membrane in PEM fuel cells; however, fuel cell dehydration at temperatures near 100°C, resulting in poor conductivity, is a major hindrance to fuel cell performance. Recent studies incorporating heteropoly acids (HPAs) into membranes have shown an increase in conductivity and thus improvement in performance. HPAs are inorganic materials with known high proton conductivities. The primary objective of this work is to measure the conductivity of Nafion, X-Ionomer membranes, and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Developed Membranes that are doped with different HPAs at different concentrations. Four-point conductivity measurements using a third generation BekkTech conductivity test cell are used to determine membrane conductivity. The effect of multiple temperature and humidification levels is also examined. While the classic commercial membrane, Nafion, has a conductivity of approximately 0.10 S/cm, measurements for membranes in this study range from 0.0030 – 0.58 S/cm, depending on membrane type, structure of the HPA, and the relative humidity. In general, the X-ionomer with H6P2W21O71 HPA gave the highest conductivity and the Nafion with the 12-phosphotungstic (PW12) HPA gave the lowest. The NREL composite membranes had conductivities on the order of 0.0013 – 0.025 S/cm.

  9. Speciation analysis of Sb(III) and Sb(V) in antileishmaniotic drug using Dowex 1 x 4 resin from hydrochloric acid solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukaszczyk, L; Zyrnicki, W

    2010-09-05

    A new and simple method for the direct and simultaneous determination of Sb(III) and Sb(V) in meglumine antimoniate, the first-choice drug for leishmaniasis treatment, was developed. Speciation analysis was carried out using the quantitative separation of inorganic trivalent and pentavalent antimony on Dowex 1 x 4 resin from 1.5 mol l(-1) hydrochloric acid solution. The inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) was used for determination of antimony. The interfering effects of As, Bi, Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn were examined and only Bi was found to be a significant interferent. The liberation of Sb(V) and Sb(III) from organoantimonial compounds without changing of oxidation state was carried out by means of 1.5 mol l(-1) hydrochloric acid solution. The spike recovery values obtained for Sb(III) in pharmaceutical sample varied from 92 to 100%. The method was successfully applied for the direct determination of antimony(III) and of antimony(V) in meglumine antimoniate. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Distributed Drug Discovery, Part 2: global rehearsal of alkylating agents for the synthesis of resin-bound unnatural amino acids and virtual D(3) catalog construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, William L; Alsina, Jordi; Audu, Christopher O; Babaev, Evgenii; Cook, Linda; Dage, Jeffery L; Goodwin, Lawrence A; Martynow, Jacek G; Matosiuk, Dariusz; Royo, Miriam; Smith, Judith G; Strong, Andrew T; Wickizer, Kirk; Woerly, Eric M; Zhou, Ziniu; O'Donnell, Martin J

    2009-01-01

    Distributed Drug Discovery (D(3)) proposes solving large drug discovery problems by breaking them into smaller units for processing at multiple sites. A key component of the synthetic and computational stages of D(3) is the global rehearsal of prospective reagents and their subsequent use in the creation of virtual catalogs of molecules accessible by simple, inexpensive combinatorial chemistry. The first section of this article documents the feasibility of the synthetic component of Distributed Drug Discovery. Twenty-four alkylating agents were rehearsed in the United States, Poland, Russia, and Spain, for their utility in the synthesis of resin-bound unnatural amino acids 1, key intermediates in many combinatorial chemistry procedures. This global reagent rehearsal, coupled to virtual library generation, increases the likelihood that any member of that virtual library can be made. It facilitates the realistic integration of worldwide virtual D(3) catalog computational analysis with synthesis. The second part of this article describes the creation of the first virtual D(3) catalog. It reports the enumeration of 24,416 acylated unnatural amino acids 5, assembled from lists of either rehearsed or well-precedented alkylating and acylating reagents, and describes how the resulting catalog can be freely accessed, searched, and downloaded by the scientific community.

  11. Acid-base balance disturbances in plasma exchange depend on the replacement fluid used.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Joan; Carbassé, Gloria; Gamir, Montse; Jiménez, María; Arellano-Rodrigo, Eduardo; Lozano, Miguel

    2015-11-01

    Metabolic alkalosis occurs as a direct result of plasma exchange (PE) because of metabolism of citrate. However, we observed a decrease of serum pH and bicarbonate after PE when albumin was used as replacement fluid. The acid-base balance in 2730 PEs using different replacement fluids (albumin, fresh-frozen plasma [FFP], or both) was measured, and absolute changes (Δ) in acid-base balance were compared. The frequency of adverse effects (AEs) before and after using prophylactic administration of sodium bicarbonate was compared. A decrease of serum pH and bicarbonate was observed after PEs when albumin was used as replacement fluid (Δ pH = -0.06 ± 0.04; Δ bicarbonate = -4.03 ± 2.29 mmol/L; Δ base excess = -2.54 ± 3.82 mmol/L). An increase of serum pH and bicarbonate was observed after PEs when FFP was used as replacement fluid (Δ pH = +0.04 ± 0.05; Δ bicarbonate = +3.6 ± 3.68 mmol/L; Δ base excess = +1.62 ± 4.51 mmol/L). The prophylactic administration of sodium bicarbonate corrected partially the decrease of serum pH and bicarbonate after finishing PEs when albumin was used as replacement fluid (Δ pH = -0.04 ± 0.04; Δ bicarbonate = -3.1 ± 2.47 mmol/L; Δ base excess = -3.35 ± 3.06 mmol/L). The frequency of AEs after using prophylactic administration of sodium bicarbonate was lower in comparison with the frequency of AEs before using prophylactic administration of sodium bicarbonate (2.0% vs. 4.8%; p < 0.001). A decrease of serum pH and bicarbonate appeared in patients after PEs when albumin was used as replacement fluid; it was corrected partially with prophylactic administration of sodium bicarbonate, and it was associated with fewer AEs. © 2015 AABB.

  12. Effects of ionizing radiation on perfluorosulfonic acid ion-exchange polymer. [Nafion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balko, E.N.; Chaklos, J.T.

    1981-05-01

    The effects of ..beta.. and ..gamma.. radiation on the Nafion perfluorinated ion-exchange polymer have been examined and the radiolysis products have been identified. The polymer degrades by simple chain scission, and the rate of degradation is not affected by the state of polymer hydration or the nature of the ion which occupies an exchange site.

  13. Boric acid increases the expression levels of human anion exchanger genes SLC4A2 and SLC4A3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbas, F; Aydin, Z

    2012-04-03

    Boron is an important micronutrient in plants and animals. The role of boron in living systems includes coordinated regulation of gene expression, growth and proliferation of higher plants and animals. There are several well-defined genes associated with boron transportation and tolerance in plants and these genes show close homology with human anion exchanger genes. Mutation of these genes also characterizes some genetic disorders. We investigated the toxic effects of boric acid on HEK293 cells and mRNA expression of anion exchanger (SLC4A1, SLC4A2 and SLC4A3) genes. Cytotoxicity of boric acid at different concentrations was tested by using the methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay. Gene expression profiles were examined using quantitative real-time PCR. In the HEK293 cells, the nontoxic upper concentration of boric acid was 250 μM; more than 500 μM caused cytotoxicity. The 250 μM boric acid concentration increased gene expression level of SLC4A2 up to 8.6-fold and SLC4A3 up to 2.6-fold, after 36-h incubation. There was no significant effect of boric acid on SLC4A1 mRNA expression levels.

  14. Impaired gastric acid secretion in mice with a targeted disruption of the NHE4 Na+/H+ exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawenis, Lara R; Greeb, Jeannette M; Prasad, Vikram; Grisham, Christina; Sanford, L Philip; Doetschman, Thomas; Andringa, Anastasia; Miller, Marian L; Shull, Gary E

    2005-04-01

    The NHE4 Na+/H+ exchanger is abundantly expressed on the basolateral membrane of gastric parietal cells. To test the hypothesis that it is required for normal acid secretion, NHE4-null mutant (NHE4-/-) mice were prepared by targeted disruption of the NHE4 (Slc9a4) gene. NHE4-/- mice survived and appeared outwardly normal. Analysis of stomach contents revealed that NHE4-/- mice were hypochlorhydric. The reduction in acid secretion was similar in 18-day-old, 9-week-old, and 6-month-old mice, indicating that the hypochlorhydria phenotype did not progress over time, as was observed in mice lacking the NHE2 Na+/H+ exchanger. Histological abnormalities were observed in the gastric mucosa of 9-week-old NHE4-/- mice, including sharply reduced numbers of parietal cells, a loss of mature chief cells, increased numbers of mucous and undifferentiated cells, and an increase in the number of necrotic and apoptotic cells. NHE4-/- parietal cells exhibited limited development of canalicular membranes and a virtual absence of tubulovesicles, and some of the microvilli had centrally bundled actin. We conclude that NHE4, which may normally be coupled with the AE2 Cl-/HCO3- exchanger, is important for normal levels of gastric acid secretion, gastric epithelial cell differentiation, and development of secretory canalicular and tubulovesicular membranes.

  15. Salicylic acid confers salt tolerance in potato plants by improving water relations, gaseous exchange, antioxidant activities and osmoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faried, Hafiz Nazar; Ayyub, Chaudhary Muhammad; Amjad, Muhammad; Ahmed, Rashid; Wattoo, Fahad Masoud; Butt, Madiha; Bashir, Mohsin; Shaheen, Muhammad Rashid; Waqas, Muhammad Ahmed

    2017-04-01

    Potato is an important vegetable; however, salt stress drastically affects its growth and yield. A pot experiment was therefore conducted to assess salicylic acid efficacy in improving performance of potato cultivars, grown under salt stress (50 mmol L-1 ). Salicylic acid at 0.5 mmol L-1 was sprayed on to potato plants after 1 week of salinity application. Salt stress effects were ameliorated by salicylic acid effectively in both the studied cultivars. N-Y LARA proved more responsive to salicylic acid application than 720-110 NARC, which confirmed genetic variation between cultivars. Salicylic acid scavenged reactive oxygen species by improving antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidases) and regulating osmotic adjustment (proline, phenolic contents), which led to enhanced water relation and gaseous exchange attributes, and thereby increased potassium availability and reduced sodium content in potato leaves. Moreover, potato tuber yield showed a positive correlation with potassium content, photosynthesis and antioxidant enzyme activities. Salt tolerance efficacy of salicylic acid is authenticated in improving potato crop performance under salt stress. Salicylic acid effect was more pronounced in N-Y LARA, reflecting greater tolerance than 720-110 NARC, which was confirmed as a susceptible cultivar. Hence salicylic acid at 0.5 mmol L-1 and cultivation of N-Y LARA may be recommended in saline soil. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Photosensitive filler minimizes internal stresses in epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, J. N.

    1967-01-01

    Photosensitive filler is added to curable epoxy resins to minimize stress from internal shrinkage during curing or polymerization. Cinnamic acid resins and cinnamal ketones may be added in the amount of 1 to 3 percent by weight of the resin mixture.

  17. Effect of Mixing Urea with Humic Acid and Acid Sulphate Soil on Ammonia Loss, Exchangeable Ammonium and Available Nitrate

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd T.M. Yusuff; Osumanu H. Ahmed; Nik M.A. Majid

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: Ammonia loss due to rapid hydrolysis of urea in soil following surface application can be substantial. Ammonia loss in agriculture is estimated to be 1 to 60%. This laboratory study compared the effect of three different urea-humic acid-acid sulphate soil mixtures on NH3 loss and soil ammonium and nitrate contents, with loss from surface applied urea without additives (urea alone). Approach: Humic acid, acid sulfate soil and soil use in the incubation study was analyzed for...

  18. Paramagnetic epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Vazquez Barreiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work illustrates that macrocycles can be used as crosslinking agents for curing epoxy resins, provided that they have appropriate organic functionalities. As macrocycles can complex metal ions in their structure, this curing reaction allows for the introduction of that metal ion into the resin network. As a result, some characteristic physical properties of the metallomacrocycle could be transferred to the new material. The bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE, n = 0 and hemin (a protoporphyrin IX containing the Fe(III ion, and an additional chloride ligand have been chosen. The new material has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Fe(III remains in the high-spin state during the curing process and, consequently, the final material exhibits the magnetic characteristics of hemin. The loss of the chlorine atom ligand during the cure of the resin allows that Fe(III can act as Lewis acid, catalyzing the crosslinking reactions. At high BADGE n = 0/hemin ratios, the formation of ether and ester bonds occurs simultaneously during the process.

  19. Pu Anion Exchange Process Intensification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-08

    This project seeks to improve the efficiency of the plutonium anion-exchange process for purifying Pu through the development of alternate ion-exchange media. The objective of the project in FY15 was to develop and test a porous foam monolith material that could serve as a replacement for the current anion-exchange resin, Reillex® HPQ, used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for purifying Pu. The new material provides advantages in efficiency over the current resin by the elimination of diffusive mass transport through large granular resin beads. By replacing the large resin beads with a porous foam there is much more efficient contact between the Pu solution and the anion-exchange sites present on the material. Several samples of a polystyrene based foam grafted with poly(4-vinylpyridine) were prepared and the Pu sorption was tested in batch contact tests.

  20. Depth distribution of exchangeable aluminum in acid soils - A study from subtropical Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    High exchangeable aluminum (Al3+) requires greater attention when preparing agricultural soils. However, research examining the relationship between natural levels of soil Al3+ and pedogenetic processes receives little priority, particularly regarding the number of soil profiles investigated. To rep...

  1. Simultaneous Disulfide and Boronic Acid Ester Exchange in Dynamic Combinatorial Libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diemer, Sanna L.; Kristensen, Morten; Rasmussen, Brian

    2015-01-01

    that operate simultaneously or two reversible reactions that operate independently. Both these scenarios have advantages and disadvantages. In this contribution, we show how disulfide exchange and boronic ester transesterification can function simultaneous in dynamic combinatorial libraries under appropriate...

  2. THE USE OF CHLOROSULFONIC ACID ON SULFONATION OF cPTFE FILM GRAFTED STYRENE FOR PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohan Yohan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Sulfonation of g-ray iradiated and styrene-grafted crosslinked polytetrafluoro ethylene film (cPTFE-g-S film have been done. The aim of the research was to make hydrophyl membrane as proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Sulfonation was prepared by using chlorosulfonic acid in chloroethane under various conditions. The impact of the percentage of grafting, the concentration of chlorosulfonic acid, the reaction time,and the reaction temperature on the properties of sulfonated film were examined. The results show that sulfonation of surface-grafted films was incomplete at room temperature. Increasing concentration of chlorosulfonic acid and reaction temperature accelerate the reaction but they also favor side reactions. These lead to the decrease of the ion-exchange capacity, water uptake, and proton conductivity but the increase of the resistance to oxidation in a perhydrol solution. The resulted cPTFE-g-SS membraneis stabile in a H2O2 30% solution for 20 h.   Keywords: Chorosulfonic acid, sulfonation, PTFE film, proton excange membrane.

  3. Tree species affect cation exchange capacity (CEC) and cation binding properties of organic matter in acid forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruba, Piotr; Mulder, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) in forest soil is of major importance for cation binding and acid buffering, but its characteristics may differ among soils under different tree species. We investigated acidity, cation exchange properties and Al bonding to SOM in stands of Scots pine, pedunculate oak, Norway spruce, European beech and common hornbeam in southern Poland. The content of total carbon (Ct) was by far the major contributor to total cation exchange capacity (CECt) even in loamy soils and a strong relationship between Ct and CECt was found. The slope of the regression of CECt to Ct increased in the order hornbeam≈oakvalue in the acid pH range was smallest for hornbeam and oak, and largest for spruce and pine soils. This was supported by the apparent dissociation constant (pKapp) values of SOM, which were largest in soils under oak. The maximum values of Al saturation were similar between the stands. However, maximum Al bonding to SOM occurred at higher pH values in soils under pine and spruce than under oak. Therefore, at any value in the acid pH range, the SOM in pine soil has less Al complexed and more adsorbed H+ than SOM from oak soils. Such differences in Al and H bonding are not only important for pH buffering and metal solubility controls, but also for stabilization of SOM via saturation of functional groups by Al and H. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Preparation of poly(glycidylmethacrylate-divinylbenzene) weak acid cation exchange stationary phases with succinic anhydride, phthalic anhydride, and maleic anhydride for ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junwei; Wang, Yong; Wu, Shuchao; Zhang, Peimin; Zhu, Yan

    2016-08-01

    In this work, poly(glycidylmethacrylate-divinylbenzene) microspheres were prepared and applied for the preparation of weak acid cation exchange stationary phases. Succinic anhydride, phthalic anhydride, and maleic anhydride were selected as carboxylation reagents to prepare three weak acid cation exchangers by direct chemical derivatization reaction without solvent or catalyst. The diameters and dispersity of the microspheres were characterized by scanning electron microscopy; the amount of accessible epoxy groups and mechanical stability were also measured. The weak acid cation exchangers were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; the content of carboxyl groups was measured by traditional acid base titration method. The chromatographic properties were characterized and compared by separating alkali, alkaline earth metal ions and ammonium and polar amines. The separation properties enhanced in the order of succinic anhydride, phthalic anhydride, and maleic anhydride modified poly(glycidylmethacrylate-divinylbenzene) cation exchangers. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Preparation and characterization of molecularly-imprinted polymers for extraction of sanshool acid amide compounds followed by their separation from pepper oil resin derived from Chinese prickly ash (Zanthoxylum bungeanum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaolong; Jin, Xinkai; Li, Yao; Chen, Guangjing; Chen, Kewei; Kan, Jianquan

    2017-11-02

    Molecularly imprinted polymers were prepared using the molecular structure analogs of sanshool as template molecule, 2-vinylpyridine and β-cyclodextrin as double functional monomers, ethylene dimethacrylate as cross linker, and azobisisobutyronitrile as initiator. The structural characteristics of the polymers were determined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Dynamic adsorption and isothermal adsorption were also investigated. The molecularly imprinted polymers were used to prepare a molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction column in order to separate acid amide components from pepper oil resin derived from Chinese prickly ash (Zanthoxylum bungeanum). After eluting, the percentage of acid amide components was enhanced to 92.40 ± 1.41% compared with 23.34 ± 1.21% in the initial pepper oil resin, indicating good properties of purification of molecularly imprinted polymers and potential industrial application. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Fractionation of fulvic acid extracted from lake sediments using XAD resins and the metal complexing ability. Kosho taisekibutsuchu kara chushutsusareta furubosan no XAD jushi kyuchaku ni yoru bunkaku to sakka noryoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usui, K.; Kishino, T. (Ube Colege, Yamaguchi (Japan). laboratory of Environmental Science); Higashi, T.; Shindo, H.; Marumoto, T. (Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture)

    1993-10-10

    Fulvic acid was extracted from lake sediments, and given an adsorption treatment with Amberlite XAD-2 and XAD-8 resins. The copper complexing ability of the treated liquid was discussed using a two binding site model. As a result of deriving the condition stability constants of the treated liquid, it was learned that the fulvic acid can be divided largely into two kinds with different complexing ability by about 100 times, having log K1 = 6.33 to 7.12 and log K2 = 4.35 to 4.66. The majority was composed of fulvic acid having weak complexing ability. The resin treatment separated the fulvic acid nearly completely into an adsorption fraction and a non-adsorption fraction. The fulvic acid in the adsorption fraction showed very little complexing ability. On the other hand, the fulvic acid in the non-adsorption fraction, which is nearly colorless, exhibited a complexing ability of 33 to 45 [mu] mol/g as copper complexing capacity. Further, the amount of the non-adsorption fraction appeared to account for 52% to 69% of the total fulvic acid as judged from the TOC value. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Novel Ion-Exchange Catalysts for Reactions Involving Lipophilic Reagents: Perspectives in the Reaction of Esterifications of Fatty Acids with Methanol

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Centomo, P.; Bonato, I.; Hanková, Libuše; Holub, Ladislav; Jeřábek, Karel; Zecca, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 56, 9-10 (2013), s. 611-617 ISSN 1022-5528. [Nordic Symposium on Catalysis /15./. Mariehamn, Åland, 10.06.2012-12.06.2012] Grant - others:IMUR(IT) 2008SXASBC_004 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : sulfonated resins * acylation * lipophilic acid catalysts Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.220, year: 2013

  8. Numerical heat transfer studies of the fatty acids for different heat exchanger materials on the performance of a latent heat storage system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atul Sharma; Lee Dong Won; Jun Un Park [Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon (Korea). Solar Thermal Research Centre; Buddhi, D. [Devi Ahilya University, Indore (India). Thermal Energy Storage Laboratory

    2005-11-01

    Theoretical investigations of fatty acids as a phase change material (PCM) for energy storage system have been conducted in this study. The selected fatty acids were capric acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, palmitic acid and stearic acid. For the two-dimensional simulation model based on the enthalpy approach, calculations have been made for the melt fraction with conduction only. Glass, stainless steel, tin, aluminium mixed, aluminium and copper were used as heat exchanger materials in the numerical calculations. Theoretical results show that capric acid was found good compatibility with latent heat storage system. The large value of thermal conductivity of heat exchanger materials did not make significant contribution on the melt fraction. (author)

  9. Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Resin-modified Glass-ionomer Cement to Bleached Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Khosravanifard

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Bleaching can considerably reduce shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets bonded with composite adhesives. Application of antioxidants is a method to reverse the negative effect of bleaching on compositeto-enamel bond. However, the efficacy of antioxidants in increasing the SBS of brackets bonded using resin-modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC has not been studied, which was the aim of this study. Materials and methods. Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary first premolars were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Pola Office Bleaching, SDI. Sodium ascorbate 10% was applied to the experimental specimens (n=25. All the specimens were etched with 37% phosphoric acid (Ivoclar/Vivadent and bonded using RMGIC (Fuji Ortho LC, GC. The specimens were subjected to incubation (37°C, 24h and thermocycling (1000 cycles, 5-55°C, dwell time = 1 min. The SBS was measured at 0.5 mm/min debonding crosshead speed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI was scored under ×10 magnification. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test, one- and independent-samples t-test, and Fisher’s exact test (α=0.05. Results. The mean SBS of experimental and control groups were 11.97 ± 4.49 and 7.7 ± 3.19 MPa, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (P=0.000 by t-test. SBS of both control (P=0.014 and experimental (P=0.000 groups were significantly higher than the minimum acceptable SBS of 6 MPa, according to one-sample t-test. Conclusion. Application of ascorbic acid can guarantee a strong bond when RMGIC is to be used. However, RMGIC might tolerate the negative effect of bleaching with minimum SA treatments (or perhaps without treatments, which deserves further studies.

  10. Exchange of atmospheric formic and acetic acids with trees and crop plants under controlled chamber and purified air conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselmeier, J.; Bode, K.; Gerlach, C.; Jork, E.-M.

    We investigated the exchange of formic and acetic acids between the atmosphere and various tree species such as beech ( Fagus sylvatica L.), ash ( Fraxinus excelsior L.), spruce ( Picea abies L.) Karst, holm oak ( Quercus ilex L.), and birch ( Betula pendula L.). and some crop-plant species such as corn ( Zea mays, var. Banjo), pea ( Pisum sativum, var. Solara), barley ( Hordeum vulgare, var. Igri) and oat (Avena sativa, var. Wiesel). All experiments were done with dynamic enclosures flushed with purified oxidant-free air, containing only low or controlled amounts of the two acids. Significant and light-triggered emission of both acids from all tree species was observed. For one tree species (ash) a seasonal large increase in fall due to early leaf decomposition was found. The standard emission factors (30°C and PAR=1000 μmol m 2 s -1) given as (nmol m -2 min -1) for acetic and formic acids, respectively, were 8.1 and 29.7 (ash, autumn), 1.0 and 3.3 (ash, summer), 0.9 and 1.4 (beech), 0.7 and 1.45 (spruce), 1.9 and 2.4 (Holm oak) and 1.7 and 6.7 (birch). Rough estimation of global annual emissions range between 20 and 130 Gmol formic acid and 10 and 33 Gmol acetic acid. These numbers reflect a 15-30% contribution by forest emissions to the continental organic acid budget. As compared to the global total NMHC emissions low molecular weight organic acids are of minor importance. In contrast to the trees, none of the crop-plant species investigated showed an emission, but always a clear deposition of both acids. Both emission from trees as well as uptake by the agricultural plants could be related to transpiration rates and leaf conductances.

  11. Functionalization of Chitosan with 3,4,5-Trihydroxy Benzoic Acid Moiety for The Uptake of Chromium Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmad Sabarudin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan-based chelating resin, the cross-linked chitosan functionalized with 3,4,5-trihydroxy benzoic acid moiety (CCTS-THBA resin, was newly synthesized and its adsorption behavior toward appropriate elements was investigated. At pH 5-9, the CCTS-THBA resin showed quantitative adsorption (87-91% for Cr (VI, while only < 15% for Cr (III. The addition of cyclohexanediamine tetraacetic acid (CyDTA to the samples resulted in a considerably increase of the adsorption of both chromium species. In this condition, Cr (III is chelated with CyDTA to form anionic complexes at pH 3-5, which was then completely adsorbed on the resin by ion exchange mechanism. Similarly, the adsorption of Cr (VI reached almost 100% in pH range of 3-6. The adsorption capacity of CCTS-THBA resin for Cr (VI was 109 mg g-1.

  12. Preparation and characterization of 5-sulphosalicylic acid doped tetraethoxysilane composite ion-exchange material by sol–gel method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, Suhail-ul; Islam, Nasarul; Ahad, Sozia; Fatima, Syed Zeeshan; Pandith, Altaf Hussain, E-mail: altafpandit23@gmail.com

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Sulphosalicylic acid doped tetraethoxysilane composite is prepared by sol–gel method. •Its X-ray diffraction studies suggest that it is crystalline in nature. • This material shows selectivity for Mg(II) and Ni(II) ions in aqueous solutions. • Separation of Ni(II) from binary mixtures was successfully achieved on this material. -- Abstract: In this manuscript, we report the preparation and characterization of sulphosalicylic doped tetraethoxysilane (SATEOS), composite material by sol–gel method as a new ion exchanger for the removal of Ni(II) from aqueous solution. The fine granular material was prepared by acid catalyzed condensation polymerization through sol–gel mechanism in the presence of cationic surfactant. The material has an ion exchange capacity of 0.64 mequiv./g(dry) for sodium ions, 0.60 mequiv./g(dry) for potassium ions, 1.84 mequiv./g(dry) for magnesium ions, 1.08 mequiv./g(dry) for calcium ions and 1.36 mequiv./g(dry) for strontium ions. Its X-ray diffraction studies suggest that it is crystalline in nature. The material has been characterized by SEM, IR, TGA and DTG so as to identify the various functional groups and ion exchange sites present in this material. Quantum chemical computations at DFT/B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) level on model systems were performed to substantiate the structural conclusions based ion instrumental techniques. Investigations into the elution behaviour, ion exchange reversibility and distribution capacities of this material towards certain environmentally hazardous metal ions are also performed. The material shows good chemical stability towards acidic conditions and exhibits fast elution of exchangeable H{sup +} ions under neutral conditions. This material shows remarkable selectivity for Ni(II) and on the basis of its K{sub d} value (4 × 10{sup 2} in 0.01 M HClO{sub 4}) some binary separations of Ni(II) from other metal ions are performed.

  13. Ammonium removal from aqueous solution by ion-exchange using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ammonium removal from aqueous solution by a natural ion-exchange resin was investigated by considering the factors affecting the ammonium-exchange capacity including the zeolites' particle size, the loading flow rates and the impact of a number of regenerations upon the ion-exchange capacity. The resin column was ...

  14. Ligand Exchange Reactions of a Monomeric Zirconium Carbonate Complex with Carboxylic Acids Studied by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure, UV Absorption and Raman Spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasaki, Fumiyuki; Fujiwara, Kazuhiko; Kikuchi, Tomomi; Tanno, Takenori; Nakajima, Yasushi; Toyoda, Yasunori; Ogawa, Nobuaki

    2017-01-01

    Ligand exchange reactions of a monomeric zirconium carbonate complex with carboxylic acids were studied by means of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), UV absorption spectrophotometry and Raman spectrometry. Three carboxylic acids, gluconic acid, and L-tartaric acid and citric acid, which are mono-, di- and tri-carboxylic acids, respectively, were employed in this study. These three carboxylic acids gave different spectral signatures and concentration dependences, respectively. In the gluconic acid system, the peaks on Fourier transform of EXAFS spectrum and Raman spectrum caused by carbonate ion coordinating to zirconium atom were obviously decreased with increasing gluconic acid concentration compared to the other two carboxylic acid systems. This indicates the high association ability of gluconic acid to zirconium, which was revealed by UV spectrophotometric analysis.

  15. Arsenic Removal from Water Using Various Adsorbents: Magnetic Ion Exchange Resins, Hydrous Ion Oxide Particles, Granular Ferric Hydroxide, Activated Alumina, Sulfur Modified Iron, and Iron Oxide-Coated Microsand

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Shahnawaz

    2011-09-30

    The equilibrium and kinetic adsorption of arsenic on six different adsorbents were investigated with one synthetic and four natural types (two surface and two ground) of water. The adsorbents tested included magnetic ion exchange resins (MIEX), hydrous ion oxide particles (HIOPs), granular ferric hydroxide (GFH), activated alumina (AA), sulfur modified iron (SMI), and iron oxide-coated mic - rosand (IOC-M), which have different physicochemical properties (shape, charge, surface area, size, and metal content). The results showed that adsorption equilibriums were achieved within a contact period of 20 min. The optimal doses of adsorbents determined for a given equilibrium concentration of C eq = 10 μg/L were 500 mg/L for AA and GFH, 520–1,300 mg/L for MIEX, 1,200 mg/L for HIOPs, 2,500 mg/L for SMI, and 7,500 mg/L for IOC-M at a contact time of 60 min. At these optimal doses, the rate constants of the adsorbents were 3.9, 2.6, 2.5, 1.9, 1.8, and 1.6 1/hr for HIOPs, AA, GFH, MIEX, SMI, and IOC-M, respectively. The presence of silicate significantly reduced the arsenic removal efficiency of HIOPs, AA, and GFH, presumably due to the decrease in chemical binding affinity of arsenic in the presence of silicate. Additional experiments with natural types of water showed that, with the exception of IOC-M, the adsorbents had lower adsorption capacities in ground water than with surface and deionized water, in which the adsorption capacities decreased by approximately 60–95 % .

  16. Determination of tricarboxylic acid cycle acids and other related substances in cultured mammalian cells by gradient ion-exchange chromatography with suppressed conductivity detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Subiao; Sun, Xiangming; Shi, Chaoou; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2003-09-19

    An ion-exchange chromatography method was established for simultaneously analyzing the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle acids and other related substances in cultured mammalian cells, including citrate, cis-aconitate, isocitrate, alpha-ketoglutarate, succinate, malate, fumarate, oxaloacetate, trans-aconitate, phosphate, lactate and pyruvate. A Dionex 600 ion chromatograph with an ion suppressor and a conductivity detector, and an IonPac AS11-HC analytical column were employed. An NaOH gradient elution containing 13.5% methanol contributed to sufficient separation of target substances. The stability of carboxylic acids was investigated and oxaloacetate was found to be extremely unstable especially at pH 3. TCA cycle acids and other related substances in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were separated completely, and lactate, malate, phosphate, citrate and cis-aconitate were quantified due to their higher concentrations. In the quantification of the five substances, detection limits (S/N=3) ranged from 0.12 to 0.48 microM, the correlation coefficients from 0.9982 to 1.0000 in their linear ranges of concentration, and the recoveries from 87 to 95%. The metabolic status of CHO cells was analyzed on the basis of the intracellular concentrations of TCA cycle acids.

  17. Preparation of radioactive acetyl-l-carnitine by an enzymatic exchange reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emaus, R.; Bieber, L.L.

    1982-01-15

    A rapid method for the preparation of (1-/sup 14/C)acetyl-L-carnitine is described. The method involves exchange of (1-/sup 14/C)acetic acid into a pool of unlabeled acetyl-L-carnitine using the enzymes acetyl-CoA synthetase and carnitine acetyltransferase. After isotopic equilibrium is attained, radioactive acetylcarnitine is separated from the other reaction components by chromatography on Dowex 1 (C1/sup -/) anion exchange resin. One of the procedures used to verify the product (1-/sup 14/C)acetyl-L-carnitine can be used to synthesize (3S)-(5-/sup 14/C)citric acid.

  18. The bile acid-sequestering resin sevelamer eliminates the acute GLP-1 stimulatory effect of endogenously released bile acids in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønden, Andreas; Albér, Anders; Rohde, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    -controlled, and double-blinded cross-over study including 15 metformin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes. Four experimental study days in randomized order with administration of either sevelamer 3,200 mg or placebo in combination with intravenous infusion of cholecystokinin (CCK) (0.4 pmol sulfated CCK-8/kg......AIMS: The discovery of the specific bile acid receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and Takeda G protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) in enteroendocrine L cells has prompted research focusing on the impact of bile acids on glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion and glucose metabolism. The aim...

  19. Viricidal Capability of Resin-Triiodide Demand-Type Disinfectant †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fina, Louis R.; Hassouna, Nadia; Horacek, Gary L.; Lambert, John P.; Lambert, Jack L.

    1982-01-01

    Polyoma, Newcastle disease virus, and adenovirus, as well as two coliphages, lambda and T4, were inactivated by strong base quaternary ammonium anion-exchange resin-triiodide. Organic matter interfered with viral inactivation capability of the resin-triiodide. The viruses, as they were being inactivated by the resin disinfectant beads, were not retained or filtered by the beads. PMID:6297389

  20. Viricidal Capability of Resin-Triiodide Demand-Type Disinfectant †

    OpenAIRE

    Fina, Louis R.; Hassouna, Nadia; Horacek, Gary L.; Lambert, John P.; Lambert, Jack L.

    1982-01-01

    Polyoma, Newcastle disease virus, and adenovirus, as well as two coliphages, lambda and T4, were inactivated by strong base quaternary ammonium anion-exchange resin-triiodide. Organic matter interfered with viral inactivation capability of the resin-triiodide. The viruses, as they were being inactivated by the resin disinfectant beads, were not retained or filtered by the beads.

  1. Selective recovery of vanadium and scandium by ion exchange with D201 and solvent extraction using P507 from hydrochloric acid leaching solution of red mud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaobo; Li, Wang; Tang, Sen; Zeng, Majian; Bai, Pengyuan; Chen, Lunjian

    2017-05-01

    D201 resin and P507 extractant diluted with sulfonated kerosene were used to respectively separate vanadium and scandium, and impurity ions from hydrochloric acid leaching solution of red mud. More than 99% of vanadium was selectively adsorbed from the hydrochloric acid leaching solution under the conditions of pH value of 1.8, volume ratio of leaching solution to resin of 10, and flow rate of 3.33 mL/min. Maximum extraction and separation of scandium was observed from the acid leaching solution at an aqueous pH value of 0.2. More than 99% of scandium can be selectively extracted using 15% P507, 5% TBP at the aqueous solution/organic phase (A/O) ratio of 10:1 for 6 min. The loaded organic phase was washed with 0.3 mol/L sulfuric acid, wherein most impurities were removed. After the process of desorption or stripping, precipitation, and roasting, high-purity V2O5 and Sc2O3 were obtained. Finally, a conceptual flow sheet was established to separate and recover vanadium and scandium from red mud hydrochloric acid leaching solution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hydraulic Permeability of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    An ion exchange process using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin is the baseline process for removing cesium from the dissolved salt solution in the high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site, using large scale columns as part of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The RF resin is also being evaluated for use in the proposed small column ion exchange (SCIX) system, which is an alternative treatment option at Hanford and at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A recirculating test loop with a small ion exchange column was used to measure the effect of oxygen uptake and radiation exposure on the permeability of a packed bed of the RF resin. The lab-scale column was designed to be prototypic of the proposed Hanford columns at the WTP. Although the test equipment was designed to model the Hanford ion exchange columns, the data on changes in the hydraulic permeability of the resin will also be valuable for determining potential pressure drops through the proposed SCIX system. The superficial fluid velocity in the lab-scale test (3.4-5.7 cm/s) was much higher than is planned for the full-scale Hanford columns to generate the maximum pressure drop expected in those columns (9.7 psig). The frictional drag from this high velocity produced forces on the resin in the lab-scale tests that matched the design basis of the full-scale Hanford column. Any changes in the resin caused by the radiation exposure and oxygen uptake were monitored by measuring the pressure drop through the lab-scale column and the physical properties of the resin. Three hydraulic test runs were completed, the first using fresh RF resin at 25 C, the second using irradiated resin at 25 C, and the third using irradiated resin at 45 C. A Hanford AP-101 simulant solution was recirculated through a test column containing 500 mL of Na-form RF resin. Known amounts of oxygen were introduced into the primary recirculation loop by saturating measured volumes of the simulant solution with oxygen and reintroducing

  3. Cerebral net exchange of large neutral amino acids after lipopolysaccharide infusion in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan Mg; Taudorf, Sarah; Bailey, Damian M

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in circulating large neutral amino acids (LNAAs), leading to a decrease in the plasma ratio between branched-chain and aromatic amino acids (BCAA/AAA ratio), may be involved in sepsis-associated encephalopathy. We hypothesised that a decrease in the BCAA/AAA ratio occurs along with a ...

  4. Doping phosphoric acid in polybenzimidazole membranes for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Ronghuan; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2007-01-01

    Polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes were doped in phosphoric acid solutions of different concentrations at room temperature. The doping chemistry was studied using the Scatchard method. The energy distribution of the acid complexation in polymer membranes is heterogeneous, that is, there are two...

  5. Simultaneous Disulfide and Boronic Acid Ester Exchange in Dynamic Combinatorial Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna L. Diemer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic combinatorial chemistry has emerged as a promising tool for the discovery of complex receptors in supramolecular chemistry. At the heart of dynamic combinatorial chemistry are the reversible reactions that enable the exchange of building blocks between library members in dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCLs ensuring thermodynamic control over the system. If more than one reversible reaction operates in a single dynamic combinatorial library, the complexity of the system increases dramatically, and so does its possible applications. One can imagine two reversible reactions that operate simultaneously or two reversible reactions that operate independently. Both these scenarios have advantages and disadvantages. In this contribution, we show how disulfide exchange and boronic ester transesterification can function simultaneous in dynamic combinatorial libraries under appropriate conditions. We describe the detailed studies necessary to establish suitable reaction conditions and highlight the analytical techniques appropriate to study this type of system.

  6. A twelve-month clinical trial comparing the bracket failure rates of light-cured resin-modified glass-ionomer adhesive and acid-etch chemical-cured composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, P V

    1998-10-01

    A clinical study was undertaken to compare the failure rate over a twelve-month period of orthodontic brackets bonded with a light-cured resin-modified glass-ionomer (Fuji Ortho LC-GC International Japan) and an acid-etch chemically-cured two-paste composite (Orthodontic Concise-3M USA). Failure rates of 6.1 per cent and 5.4 per cent respectively were reported, with no statistically significant difference between the two adhesives. This finding, along with the relative ease of use and possible advantages of reduced risk of peri-bracket demineralisation, suggests that the resin-modified glass-ionomer adhesive may become more popular as a bracket adhesive.

  7. Chiral Ligand Exchange Chromatography: Separation of Enantiomeric Mixtures of Underivatized a-Amino Acids under UV Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazareth Patricia M. P.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Enantiomeric mixtures of alanine, serine, threonine, valine, methionine, leucine and norleucine were resolved in ligand exchange reversed phase HPLC (reproducibly, by using L-proline, L-hydroxyproline or N,N-dimethyl-L-phenylalanine (2 mmol L-1 and Cu(CH3COO2 (1 mmol L-1 in water or in water/methanol. The latter mobile phase greatly decreased the retention time of the more hydrophobic alpha-amino acids, preserving enantioseparation. pH must be high enough to allow the presence of free fraction three-quartersNH2 groups in order to make the complexation with Cu(II easier. The more restricted conformation of L-proline and L-hydroxyproline led to lower enantioseparations. The ligand exchange formation of pseudo-homochiral and pseudo-heterochiral complexes, thermodynamically and kinetically controlled, plays a fundamental role for the desired enantiomeric chromatographic separation. This simple and inexpensive methodology can be used routinely by any laboratory involved in alpha-amino acid synthesis.

  8. Influence of air-abrasion executed with polyacrylic acid-Bioglass 45S5 on the bonding performance of a resin-modified glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauro, Salvatore; Watson, Timothy F; Thompson, Ian; Toledano, Manuel; Nucci, Cesare; Banerjee, Avijit

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to test the microtensile bond strength (μTBS), after 6 months of storage in PBS, of a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) bonded to dentine pretreated with Bioglass 45S5 (BAG) using various etching and air-abrasion techniques. The RMGIC (GC Fuji II LC) was applied onto differently treated dentine surfaces followed by light curing for 30 s. The specimens were cut into matchsticks with cross-sectional areas of 0.9 mm(2). The μTBS of the specimens was measured after 24 h or 6 months of storage in PBS and the results were statistically analysed using two-way anova and the Student-Newman-Keuls test (α = 0.05). Further RMCGIC-bonded dentine specimens were used for interfacial characterization, micropermeability, and nanoleakage analyses by confocal microscopy. The RMGIC-dentine interface layer showed no water absorption after 6 months of storage in PBS except for the interdiffusion layer of the silicon carbide (SiC)-abraded/polyacrylic acid (PAA)-etched bonded dentine. The RMGIC applied onto dentine air-abraded with BAG/H(2)O only or with BAG/PAA-fluid followed by etching procedures (10% PAA gel) showed no statistically significant reduction in μTBS after 6 months of storage in PBS. The abrasion procedures performed using BAG in combination with PAA might be a suitable strategy to enhance the bonding durability and the healing ability of RMGIC bonded to dentine. © 2012 Eur J Oral Sci.

  9. Evolution of Conifer Diterpene Synthases: Diterpene Resin Acid Biosynthesis in Lodgepole Pine and Jack Pine Involves Monofunctional and Bifunctional Diterpene Synthases1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dawn E.; Zerbe, Philipp; Jancsik, Sharon; Quesada, Alfonso Lara; Dullat, Harpreet; Madilao, Lina L.; Yuen, Macaire; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are major components of pine (Pinus spp.) oleoresin. They play critical roles in conifer defense against insects and pathogens and as a renewable resource for industrial bioproducts. The core structures of DRAs are formed in secondary (i.e. specialized) metabolism via cycloisomerization of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) by diterpene synthases (diTPSs). Previously described gymnosperm diTPSs of DRA biosynthesis are bifunctional enzymes that catalyze the initial bicyclization of GGPP followed by rearrangement of a (+)-copalyl diphosphate intermediate at two discrete class II and class I active sites. In contrast, similar diterpenes of gibberellin primary (i.e. general) metabolism are produced by the consecutive activity of two monofunctional class II and class I diTPSs. Using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, we discovered 11 diTPS from jack pine (Pinus banksiana) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta). Three of these were orthologous to known conifer bifunctional levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthases. Surprisingly, two sets of orthologous PbdiTPSs and PcdiTPSs were monofunctional class I enzymes that lacked functional class II active sites and converted (+)-copalyl diphosphate, but not GGPP, into isopimaradiene and pimaradiene as major products. Diterpene profiles and transcriptome sequences of lodgepole pine and jack pine are consistent with roles for these diTPSs in DRA biosynthesis. The monofunctional class I diTPSs of DRA biosynthesis form a new clade within the gymnosperm-specific TPS-d3 subfamily that evolved from bifunctional diTPS rather than monofunctional enzymes (TPS-c and TPS-e) of gibberellin metabolism. Homology modeling suggested alterations in the class I active site that may have contributed to their functional specialization relative to other conifer diTPSs. PMID:23370714

  10. Ion exchange liquid chromatography method for the direct determination of small ribonucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, A Cary; Cummings, Brian S; Bartlett, Michael G

    2013-10-17

    Bioanalysis of siRNAs is challenging due to their size (5-14 kDa) and negative charge across the backbone, which complicates both sample preparation and chromatography. We present here a one step sample preparation combined with non-denaturing anion exchange chromatography with UV detection for the quantitation of siRNA and its chain shortened metabolites. The sample preparation uses a novel lysis buffer with proteinase K to effectively isolate siRNA from cells and formulated media with greater than 95% recovery. The ion exchange chromatography allows for a lower limit of quantitation of 6 ng mL(-1) in cells and media equivalent to 6 ng/200,000 cells. This method is applied to study the uptake of siRNA in prostate cancer cells and the disappearance in the media and siRNA metabolism. siRNA metabolites are identified by matching the retention time of standards to metabolite peaks. Identification is further confirmed by mass spectrometry. To our knowledge this is the first ion exchange method reported for the quantitation of siRNA from a biological matrix. It is also the first non-denaturing chromatographic method reported for siRNA quantitation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Solvent impregnated resins for the recovery of gold from gold(I)thiourea solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzpatrick, Fiona

    1997-01-01

    Solvent Impregnated Resins (SIRs) are high surface area, macroporous, polymeric