WorldWideScience

Sample records for acid combustion rate

  1. Long-chain fatty acid combustion rate is associated with unique metabolite profiles in skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin L Seifert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIM: Incomplete or limited long-chain fatty acid (LCFA combustion in skeletal muscle has been associated with insulin resistance. Signals that are responsive to shifts in LCFA beta-oxidation rate or degree of intramitochondrial catabolism are hypothesized to regulate second messenger systems downstream of the insulin receptor. Recent evidence supports a causal link between mitochondrial LCFA combustion in skeletal muscle and insulin resistance. We have used unbiased metabolite profiling of mouse muscle mitochondria with the aim of identifying candidate metabolites within or effluxed from mitochondria and that are shifted with LCFA combustion rate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Large-scale unbiased metabolomics analysis was performed using GC/TOF-MS on buffer and mitochondrial matrix fractions obtained prior to and after 20 min of palmitate catabolism (n = 7 mice/condition. Three palmitate concentrations (2, 9 and 19 microM; corresponding to low, intermediate and high oxidation rates and 9 microM palmitate plus tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle and electron transport chain inhibitors were each tested and compared to zero palmitate control incubations. Paired comparisons of the 0 and 20 min samples were made by Student's t-test. False discovery rate were estimated and Type I error rates assigned. Major metabolite groups were organic acids, amines and amino acids, free fatty acids and sugar phosphates. Palmitate oxidation was associated with unique profiles of metabolites, a subset of which correlated to palmitate oxidation rate. In particular, palmitate oxidation rate was associated with distinct changes in the levels of TCA cycle intermediates within and effluxed from mitochondria. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This proof-of-principle study establishes that large-scale metabolomics methods can be applied to organelle-level models to discover metabolite patterns reflective of LCFA combustion, which may lead to identification of molecules

  2. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    1987-01-01

    Combustion, Second Edition focuses on the underlying principles of combustion and covers topics ranging from chemical thermodynamics and flame temperatures to chemical kinetics, detonation, ignition, and oxidation characteristics of fuels. Diffusion flames, flame phenomena in premixed combustible gases, and combustion of nonvolatile fuels are also discussed. This book consists of nine chapters and begins by introducing the reader to heats of reaction and formation, free energy and the equilibrium constants, and flame temperature calculations. The next chapter explores the rates of reactio

  3. Hybrid rocket fuel combustion and regression rate study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, L. D.; Ray, R. L.; Anderson, F. A.; Cohen, N. S.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to develop hybrid fuels (1) with higher regression rates and reduced dependence on fuel grain geometry and (2) that maximize potential specific impulse using low-cost materials. A hybrid slab window motor system was developed to screen candidate fuels - their combustion behavior and regression rate. Combustion behavior diagnostics consisted of video and high speed motion pictures coverage. The mean fuel regression rates were determined by before and after measurements of the fuel slabs. The fuel for this initial investigation consisted of hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene binder with coal and aluminum fillers. At low oxidizer flux levels (and corresponding fuel regression rates) the filled-binder fuels burn in a layered fashion, forming an aluminum containing binder/coal surface melt that, in turn, forms into filigrees or flakes that are stripped off by the crossflow. This melt process appears to diminish with increasing oxidizer flux level. Heat transfer by radiation is a significant contributor, producing the desired increase in magnitude and reduction in flow dependency (power law exponent) of the fuel regression rate.

  4. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON PREMIX COMBUSTION AT ISOSCELES TRIANGLE TYPE RATE OF HEAT RELEASE FOR SQUISH TYPE COMBUSTION CHAMBER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a theory on premix fuel combustion at nearisosceles triangle type rate of heat release,describes the measures taken for the combustion system,points out its many theoretical advantages,and that it can solve effectively the problems of rough running,fuel consumption and exhaust emission.Two squish lip type combustion chambers are designed to match separately with multiple holes injector and conical spray type injector in order to achieve premix combustion at near isosceles triangle type rate of heat release.Experimental studies on two single cylinder diesel engines showed that premix combustion at isosceles triangle type rate of heat release resulted in longer ignition delay period,larger amount of fuel injected into cylinder during the ignition delay period,lower maximum pressure,better fuel economy,and better exhaust emission.

  5. Effect of oxygen enrichment in air on acid gas combustion under Claus conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Ibrahim, Salisu

    2013-09-01

    Results are presented to examine the combustion of acid gas (H2S and CO2) in hydrogen-fueled flames using a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen under Claus conditions (Φ = 3). Specifically the effect of oxygen enrichment in the above flames is examined. The compositions of acid gas examined are100% H2S and 50% H2S/50% CO2 with different percentages of oxygen enrichment (0%, 19.3% and 69.3%) in the oxygen/nitrogen mixtures. The results revealed that combustion of acid gas formed SO2 wherein the mole fraction of SO2 increased to an asymptotic value at all the oxygen concentrations examined. In addition, increase in oxygen enrichment of the air resulted in increased amounts of SO2 rather than the formation of more desirable elemental sulfur. In case of 50% H2S/50% CO2 acid gas, carbon monoxide mole fraction increased with oxygen enrichment which is an indicator to the availability of additional amounts of oxygen into the reaction pool. This gas mixture resulted in the formation of other sulfurous–carbonaceous compounds (COS and CS2) due to the presence of carbon monoxide. The results showed that the rate of COS formation increased with oxygen enrichment due to the availability of higher amounts of CO while that of CS2 reduced. The global reactions responsible for this observed phenomenon are presented.

  6. for the inference of Furan combustion reaction rate

    KAUST Repository

    Long, Quan

    2016-01-06

    We carry out the design of experiments for the identification of the reaction parameters in Furan combustion. The lacks of information on the true value of the control parameters, specifically, the initial temperature and the initial TBHP concentration, are considered in the design procedure by errors-invariables models. We use two types of observables. The first is a scaler observable, i.e., half decay time of the [TBHP]. The second is the time history of the concentration.

  7. Application of neural network in the study of combustion rate of natural gas/diesel dual fuel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhao-Da; Zhou, Chong-Guang; Su, Shi-Chuan; Liu, Zhen-Tao; Wang, Xi-Zhen

    2003-01-01

    In order to predict and improve the performance of natural gas/diesel dual fuel engine (DFE), a combustion rate model based on forward neural network was built to study the combustion process of the DFE. The effect of the operating parameters on combustion rate was also studied by means of this model. The study showed that the predicted results were good agreement with the experimental data. It was proved that the developed combustion rate model could be used to successfully predict and optimize the combustion process of dual fuel engine.

  8. Application of neural network in the study of combustion rate of natural gas/diesel dual fuel engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严兆大; 周重光; 苏石川; 刘震涛; 王希珍

    2003-01-01

    In order to predict and improve the performance of natural gas/diesel dual fuel engine (DFE), a combustion rate model based on forward neural network was built to study the combustion process of the DFE. The effect of the operating parameters on combustion rate was also studied by means of this model. The study showed that the predicted results were good agreement with the experimental data. It was proved that the developed combustion rate model could be used to successfully predict and optimize the combustion process of dual fuel engine.

  9. Application of neural network in the study of combustion rate of natural gas/diesel dual fuel engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严兆大; 周重光; 苏石川; 刘震涛; 王希珍

    2003-01-01

    In order to predict and improve the performance of matural gas/diesel dual fuel engine(DFE),a combustion rate model based on forward meural network was built to study the combustion process of the DFE.The effect of the operating parameters on combustion rate was also studied by means of this model.The study showed that the predicted results were good agreement with the experimental data.It was proved that the de-veloped combustion rate model could be used to successfully predict and optimize the combustion process of dual fuel engine.

  10. The Combustion of HMX. [burning rate at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, T. L.; Price, C. F.; Atwood, A. I.; Zurn, D. E.; Eisel, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The burn rate of HMX was measured at high pressures (p more than 1000 psi). The self deflagration rate of HMX was determined from 1 atmosphere to 50,000 psi. The burning rate shows no significant slope breaks.

  11. Effect of Chamber Pressurization Rate on Combustion and Propagation of Solid Propellant Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wei-Lan; Wei, Shen; Yuan, Shu-Shen

    2002-01-01

    area of the propellant grain satisfies the designed value. But cracks in propellant grain can be generated during manufacture, storage, handing and so on. The cracks can provide additional surface area for combustion. The additional combustion may significantly deviate the performance of the rocket motor from the designed conditions, even lead to explosive catastrophe. Therefore a thorough study on the combustion, propagation and fracture of solid propellant cracks must be conducted. This paper takes an isolated propellant crack as the object and studies the effect of chamber pressurization rate on the combustion, propagation and fracture of the crack by experiment and theoretical calculation. deformable, the burning inside a solid propellant crack is a coupling of solid mechanics and combustion dynamics. In this paper, a theoretical model describing the combustion, propagation and fracture of the crack was formulated and solved numerically. The interaction of structural deformation and combustion process was included in the theoretical model. The conservation equations for compressible fluid flow, the equation of state for perfect gas, the heat conducting equation for the solid-phase, constitutive equation for propellant, J-integral fracture criterion and so on are used in the model. The convective burning inside the crack and the propagation and fracture of the crack were numerically studied by solving the set of nonlinear, inhomogeneous gas-phase governing equations and solid-phase equations. On the other hand, the combustion experiments for propellant specimens with a precut crack were conducted by RTR system. Predicted results are in good agreement with experimental data, which validates the reasonableness of the theoretical model. Both theoretical and experimental results indicate that the chamber pressurization rate has strong effects on the convective burning in the crack, crack fracture initiation and fracture pattern.

  12. Modeling of scalar dissipation rates in flamelet models for low temperature combustion engine simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Saurabh; Pal, Pinaki; Im, Hong G

    2014-01-01

    The flamelet approach offers a viable framework for combustion modeling of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines under stratified mixture conditions. Scalar dissipation rate acts as a key parameter in flamelet-based combustion models which connects the physical mixing space to the reactive space. The aim of this paper is to gain fundamental insights into turbulent mixing in low temperature combustion (LTC) engines and investigate the modeling of scalar dissipation rate. Three direct numerical simulation (DNS) test cases of two-dimensional turbulent auto-ignition of a hydrogen-air mixture with different correlations of temperature and mixture fraction are considered, which are representative of different ignition regimes. The existing models of mean and conditional scalar dissipation rates, and probability density functions (PDFs) of mixture fraction and total enthalpy are a priori validated against the DNS data.

  13. Methane combustion kinetic rate constants determination: an ill-posed inverse problem analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara D. L. Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methane combustion was studied by the Westbrook and Dryer model. This well-established simplified mechanism is very useful in combustion science, for computational effort can be notably reduced. In the inversion procedure to be studied, rate constants are obtained from [CO] concentration data. However, when inherent experimental errors in chemical concentrations are considered, an ill-conditioned inverse problem must be solved for which appropriate mathematical algorithms are needed. A recurrent neural network was chosen due to its numerical stability and robustness. The proposed methodology was compared against Simplex and Levenberg-Marquardt, the most used methods for optimization problems.

  14. THE ASYMPTOTIC LIMIT FOR A COMBUSTION MODEL IN REGARD TO INFINITE REACTION RATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Longan

    2008-01-01

    The Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring model and the Chapman-Jouguet model for a simplified combustion model-Majda's model is studied. The author proves a uniform maximum norm estimate, then proves that as the rate of chemical reaction tends to infinity the solutions to the Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring model tend to that of the Chapman-Jouguet model. The type of combustion waves is studied. This result is compared with the result of the projection and finite difference method for the same model.

  15. Factors affecting the corrosion rates of ceramics in coal combustion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, J.P. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The concentrations of approximately a dozen elements in the products of coal combustion affect the corrosion rates of ceramics used to construct the combustion system. The elements, including H, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, and Fe, affect corrosion rates in three ways: as primary corrodants of the materials, as secondary corrodants that affect the activities of the primary corrodants, and by affecting the mass transport rate of the primary corrodants. A full factorial study of corrosion rates performed by varying the concentrations of these elements would involve X{sup n} tests, where X is the number of variations of each element and n is the number of different elements. For three variations (low, medium, and high concentrations) of each of 12 elements, the number of tests is 531,441 for a single temperature and pressure condition. The numbers can be reduced with the use of a fractional factorial test matrix, but the most effective way to perform corrosion tests is to base them on realistic system conditions. In this paper, the effects of the composition and physical state of the products of coal combustion on ceramic corrosion rates are given along with suggestions of appropriate test conditions for specific system components.

  16. Improved multiple-shot gun for use as a combustion stability rating device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop and experimentally evaluate an improved version of a modified machine gun for use as a device for rating the relative combustion stability of various rocket combustors. Following the results of a previous study involving a caliber .30 machine gun, a caliber .50 machine gun was modified in order to extend the charge-size range of the device. Nitrocellulose charge sizes ranging from 1.004 to 9.720 grams were fired at rates up to four shots per second. Shock pressures up to 25,512 kN/sq m were measured near the end of a shortened gun barrel. A minimal resistance type of check valve permitted the gun to fire into pressurized regions; back pressures up to 3448 kN/sq m abs were tested. The final modified assembly was evaluated during combustion stability tests on rocket combustors burning a FLOX-methane propellant combination.

  17. Ignition delays, heats of combustion, and reaction rates of aluminum alkyl derivatives used as ignition and combustion enhancers for supersonic combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Thomas W., III; Schwab, S. T.; Harlowe, W. W.

    1992-01-01

    The subject of this paper is the design of supersonic combustors which will be required in order to achieve the needed reaction rates in a reasonable sized combustor. A fuel additive approach, which is the focus of this research, is the use of pyrophorics to shorten the ignition delay time and to increase the energy density of the fuel. Pyrophoric organometallic compounds may also provide an ignition source and flame stabilization mechanism within the combustor, thus permitting use of hydrocarbon fuels in supersonic combustion systems. Triethylaluminum (TEA) and trimethylaluminum (TMA) were suggested for this application due to their high energy density and reactivity. The objective here is to provide comparative data for the ignition quality, the energy content, and the reaction rates of several different adducts of both TEA and TMA. The results of the experiments indicate the aluminum alkyls and their more stable derivatives reduce the ignition delay and total reaction time to JP-10 jet fuel. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of ignition delay and total reaction time of the blends of the adducts are significantly lower than in neat JP-10.

  18. Electroremediation of straw and co-combustion ash under acidic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lima, Ana T.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.

    2009-01-01

    Biomass, such as wood and straw, is currently used in EU as a renewable energy source for energy production and this application is expected to rise in coming years. Combined heat and power installations produce fly ash, which is considered hazardous waste. The fly ash management issue should...... be addressed before biomass combustion is considered a truly sustainable technology. The electrodialytic process is a remediation technique able to assist the management of fly ash. For this work, straw and co-combustion of wood ash are briefly characterized and their electrodialytic treatment is carried out...... similarities with wood ash alone. However, further characterization should be carried out before any comparison regarding applicable legislation. Under acidic conditions, the electrodialytic treatment was not effective for the co-combustion wood ash. The heavy metals appeared in the least soluble fraction...

  19. Calculation of the Rate of Combustion of a Metallized Composite Solid Propellant with Allowance for the Size Distribution of Agglomerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poryazov, V. A.; Krainov, A. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    A physicomathematical model of combustion of a metallized composite solid propellant based on ammonium perchlorate has been presented. The model takes account of the thermal effect of decomposition of a condensed phase (c phase), convection, diffusion, the exothermal chemical reaction in a gas phase, the heating and combustion of aluminum particles in the gas flow, and the velocity lag of the particles behind the gas. The influence of the granulometric composition of aluminum particles escaping from the combustion surface on the linear rate of combustion has been investigated. It has been shown that information not only on the kinetics of chemical reactions in the gas phase, but also on the granulometric composition of aluminum particles escaping from the surface of the c phase into the gas, is of importance for determination of the linear rate of combustion.

  20. Modified Regression Rate Formula of PMMA Combustion by a Single Plane Impinging Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuneyoshi Matsuoka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified regression rate formula for the uppermost stage of CAMUI-type hybrid rocket motor is proposed in this study. Assuming a quasi-steady, one-dimensional, an energy balance against a control volume near the fuel surface is considered. Accordingly, the regression rate formula which can calculate the local regression rate by the quenching distance between the flame and the regression surface is derived. An experimental setup which simulates the combustion phenomenon involved in the uppermost stage of a CAMUI-type hybrid rocket motor was constructed and the burning tests with various flow velocities and impinging distances were performed. A PMMA slab of 20 mm height, 60 mm width, and 20 mm thickness was chosen as a sample specimen and pure oxygen and O2/N2 mixture (50/50 vol.% were employed as the oxidizers. The time-averaged regression rate along the fuel surface was measured by a laser displacement sensor. The quenching distance during the combustion event was also identified from the observation. The comparison between the purely experimental and calculated values showed good agreement, although a large systematic error was expected due to the difficulty in accurately identifying the quenching distance.

  1. Combustion of Bimodal Nano/Micro Aluminum Suspension with New Reaction Rate Model

    OpenAIRE

    M. Bidabadi; N. Moallemi; I. Shafieenejad; M. Jadidi

    2008-01-01

    In this study a mathematical model for combustion of bimodal particle in lean flow was developed. The difference between structure of flame in this work and previous ones was that, in those flame was divided by five zones and reaction rate was considered to be constant in reaction zones and also zero in post flame zone. In reality it was obvious with respect to shape and size of different particles in dust, reaction didn't end suddenly. In the present research the heat loss term, which was as...

  2. Combustion of Bimodal Nano/Micro Aluminum Suspension with New Reaction Rate Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bidabadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study a mathematical model for combustion of bimodal particle in lean flow was developed. The difference between structure of flame in this work and previous ones was that, in those flame was divided by five zones and reaction rate was considered to be constant in reaction zones and also zero in post flame zone. In reality it was obvious with respect to shape and size of different particles in dust, reaction didn't end suddenly. In the present research the heat loss term, which was assumed to be linearly proportional to temperature difference, was added to the energy conservation equation and reaction rate was considered proportional to available amount of fuel, leading to exponentially decreasing of reaction rate. The flame speed and temperature distribution were obtained by solving the energy equation in each zone and matching the temperature and heat flux at the interfacial boundaries. Calculated values of flame speed were in good agreement with experimental data.

  3. Influence of lead Inorganic Compounds on Combustion Rate of Double Base Rocket Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Pillai

    1982-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of lead nitrate, red lead, lead chromate, lead floride and lead carbonate on the combustion behaviour of double base propellants in the pressure range-35-140kg/cm /sup 2/ was studied. While all these compounds increased burning rates in lower pressure range (35-60 kg/cm/sup 2/ and higher pressure range (120-140 kg/cm/sup 2/, only lead chromate and lead fluoride were effective in the intermediate pressure range of 60-105 kg/cm/sup 2/. None of these compounds were effective as platonizer, except lead fluoride, which lowered n value to 0.34 in the lower pressure range. Addition of carbon black along with lead compounds raised burning rates further and reduced n values significantly in the higher pressure regins. A probable mechanism on the role of lead compounds studied has been suggested based on burning rate and DTA results.

  4. Combustion Rate of Solid Carbon in the Axisymmetric Stagnation Flowfield Established over a Sphere and/or a Flat Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Makino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon combustion in the forward stagnation flowfield has been examined through experimental comparisons, by conducting aerothermochemical analyses, with the surface C-O2 and C-CO2 reactions and the gas-phase CO-O2 reaction taken into account. By virtue of the generalized species-enthalpy coupling functions, close coupling of those reactions has been elucidated. Explicit combustion-rate expressions by use of the transfer number in terms of the natural logarithmic term, just like that for droplet combustion, have further been obtained for the combustion response in the limiting situations. It has been confirmed that before the establishment of CO flame, the combustion rate can fairly be represented by the expression in the frozen mode, that after its establishment by the expression in the flame-attached or flame-detached modes, and that the critical condition derived by the asymptotics can fairly predict the surface temperature for its establishment. The formulation has further been extended to include the surface C-H2O and gas-phase H2-O2 reactions additionally, so as to evaluate the combustion rate in humid airflow. Since those expressions are explicit and have fair accuracy, they are anticipated to make various contributions not only for qualitative/quantitative studies, but also for various aerospace applications, including propulsion with high-energy-density fuels.

  5. Circulating fluidized bed combustion product addition to acid soil: alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) composition and environmental quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liming; Dick, Warren A; Kost, David

    2006-06-28

    To reduce S emissions, petroleum coke with a high concentration of S was combusted with limestone in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler. The combustion process creates a bed product that has potential for agricultural uses. This CFB product is often alkaline and enriched in S and other essential plant nutrients, but also contains high concentrations of Ni and V. Agricultural land application of CFB product is encouraged, but little information is available related to plant responses and environmental impacts. CFB product and agricultural lime (ag-lime) were applied at rates of 0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 times the soil's lime requirement (LR) to an acidic soil (Wooster silt loam). The 2.0x LR application rate of CFB product was equivalent to 67.2 Mg ha(-1). Alfalfa yield was increased 4.6 times by CFB product and 3.8 times by ag-lime compared to untreated control. Application of CFB product increased the concentration of V in soil and alfalfa tissue, but not in soil water, and increased the concentration of Ni in soil and soil water, but not in alfalfa tissue. However, these concentrations did not reach levels that might cause environmental problems.

  6. Emission control for precursors causing acid rain(V):Improvement of acid soil with the bio-briquette combustion ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Xu-hui; SAKAMOTO Kazuhiko; WANG Wei; GAO Shi-dong; ISOBE Yugo

    2004-01-01

    The bio-briquette technique which mixes coal, biomass and sulfur fixation agent and bio-briquettes under 3-5 t/cm2 line pressure has aroused people's attention in view of controlling the air pollution and the acid rain. In this paper, the physicochemical properties of bio-briquette and its ash were investigated. And the acid soil was improved by the bio-briquette combustion ash, which contained nutritive substances such as P, N, K and had the acid-neutralizing capacity(ANC). The pH, EC, effective nutrient elements(Ca, Mg, K, P and N), heavy metal elements(Al, Cu, Cd, Cr, Zn and Mn) and acid-neutralizing capacity change of ash-added soils within the range of 0%-10%, were also studied. Specially, when 5% bio-briquette combustion ash was added to the tested soil, the content of the effective elements such as Ca, Mg and K rose by 100 times, 7 times and twice, respectively. The total nitrogen also increased by about twice. The results showed the oxyanions such as that of Al, Cu, Cd, Cr, Zn and Mn were not potentially dangerous, because they were about the same as the averages of them in Chinese soil. It is shown that the ANC became stronger, though the ANC hardly increases in the ash-added soil. On the basis of the evaluation indices, it is concluded that the best mixture ratio is to add 2.5%-8% of the bio-briquette combustion ash to the tested soil.

  7. Ignition delays, heats of combustion, and reaction rates of aluminum alkyl derivatives used as ignition and combustion enhancers for supersonic combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, T. W., III; Harlowe, W. W.; Schwab, S.

    1992-01-01

    The work was based on adapting an apparatus and procedure developed at Southwest Research Institute for rating the ignition quality of fuels for diesel engines. Aluminum alkyls and various Lewis-base adducts of these materials, both neat and mixed 50/50 with pure JP-10 hydrocarbon, were injected into the combustion bomb using a high-pressure injection system. The bomb was pre-charged with air that was set at various initial temperatures and pressures for constant oxygen density. The ignition delay times were determined for the test materials at these different initial conditions. The data are presented in absolute terms as well as comparisons with the parent alkyls. The relative heats of reaction of the various test materials were estimated based on a computation of the heat release, using the pressure data recorded during combustion in the bomb. In addition, the global reaction rates for each material were compared at a selected tmperature and pressure.

  8. Study on drying and combustion process in 8rate-CFB incinerator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI QingHai; ZHANG YanGuo; CHEN MeiQian; MENG AiHong; CHEN ChangHe

    2009-01-01

    The drying and combustion process in the combined grate and circulating fiuidized bed (grate-CFB)municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator was investigated experimentally and mathematically. The drying grate bed was simulated by a muffle furnace, which could be controlled at a constant tempera-ture level. The kind of wastes, thickness of waste layer fed and temperature were chosen as the ad-justable parameters to study their effect on the drying process. The experimental results indicated that the hydrophilic wastes were more difficult to be dried than the hydrophobic wastes. The higher the temperature is the easier the waste is to be dried. The thinner waste layer is favorable to drying the waste. The pyrolysis experiment in the furnace showed that the higher temperature level could reduce the conversion rate of carbon to carbon monoxide. The semi-empirical mathematical model that in-cluded the bed material distribution subrnodel, volatile matter release submodel, carbon particle combustion submodel and so on was proposed. A 260 t/d grate-CFB incinerator was modeled and the model predicted bulk density agreed with the measured value from industrial field test. The predicted flue gas (e.g. CO2, CO) concentration deviated slightly from the industrial test data. The parameters and variables used in the model were determined by the experiments or practical field test. This model can be used to design the grate-CFB incinerator and guide its operation.

  9. Acid mine drainage potential of raw, retorted, and combusted Eastern oil shale: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, P.J.; Yelton, J.L.; Reddy, K.J.

    1987-09-01

    In order to manage the oxidation of pyritic materials effectively, it is necessary to understand the chemistry of both the waste and its disposal environment. The objective of this two-year study was to characterize the acid production of Eastern oil shale waste products as a function of process conditions, waste properties, and disposal practice. Two Eastern oil shales were selected, a high pyrite shale (unweathered 4.6% pyrite) and a low pyrite shale (weathered 1.5% pyrite). Each shale was retorted and combusted to produce waste products representative of potential mining and energy conversion processes. By using the standard EPA leaching tests (TCLP), each waste was characterized by determining (1) mineralogy, (2) trace element residency, and (3) acid-base account. Characterizing the acid producing potential of each waste and potential trace element hazards was completed with laboratory weathering studies. 32 refs., 21 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. The effect of CO{sub 2} on the corrosion rate in simulated combustion atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekipaeae, Martti [VTT Processes, P.O. Box 1601, FIN-02044 VTT, Espoo (Finland); Sroda, Szymon [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2004-07-01

    The aim of the study is to improve the understanding of the corrosion mechanism in biomass and waste combustion processes. Laboratory, pilot and full scale testing of materials are performed. The obtained results are discussed, e.g., with reference to thermodynamic modelling calculations. The laboratory experiments in JRC Plant Simulation Test Laboratory are focused mainly on common ferritic and austenitic steels (X10, X20, 2.25Cr1Mo, AC66, Sanicro28, Esshette 1250 etc), which are used as superheater steel tube materials in such applications. The main aim of this part of the project is to understand the effect of deposition as well as the CO{sub 2} or/and CO/CO{sub 2} content in combustion atmospheres on corrosion rate and mechanism of studied materials. Laboratory tests include the thermogravimetric studies using Cahn thermo-balances and long exposure tests in horizontal/autoclave multi-sample furnaces. Post experimental analyses are made using SEM/EDS + XRD techniques and optical microscopy. The experiments are carried out at isothermal temperature - 535 deg. C in various simulated combustion atmospheres (22%H{sub 2}O + 5%O{sub 2} + xCO{sub 2} + N{sub 2}) with different CO{sub 2} content vary from 0 to 25 vol. % for the samples without deposit and with filter/cyclone ash deposition (long exposure tests). In this stage, following conclusions can be made: - Corrosion rate, for the alloys with and without the deposit, increase with increasing CO{sub 2} content, especially for the ferritic steels; - Corrosion rate for samples with the deposit increase significantly and in this case the internal oxidation of the studied samples was observed; - Thermodynamic model calculations performed resulted, a.o., to the following propositions still of preliminary nature; - Various carbides of metallic alloying elements become less stable at oxide scale-metallic alloy phase boundary with increasing partial pressure of carbon dioxide; - Carbides and oxides of various alloying

  11. Regulation of the arachidonic acid mobilization in macrophages by combustion-derived particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiss Carsten

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute exposure to elevated levels of environmental particulate matter (PM is associated with increasing morbidity and mortality rates. These adverse health effects, e.g. culminating in respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, have been demonstrated by a multitude of epidemiological studies. However, the underlying mechanisms relevant for toxicity are not completely understood. Especially the role of particle-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses is of particular interest. In this in vitro study we examined the influence of particle-generated ROS on signalling pathways leading to activation of the arachidonic acid (AA cascade. Incinerator fly ash particles (MAF02 were used as a model for real-life combustion-derived particulate matter. As macrophages, besides epithelial cells, are the major targets of particle actions in the lung murine RAW264.7 macrophages and primary human macrophages were investigated. Results The interaction of fly ash particles with macrophages induced both the generation of ROS and as part of the cellular inflammatory responses a dose- and time-dependent increase of free AA, prostaglandin E2/thromboxane B2 (PGE2/TXB2, and 8-isoprostane, a non-enzymatically formed oxidation product of AA. Additionally, increased phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK JNK1/2, p38 and ERK1/2 was observed, the latter of which was shown to be involved in MAF02-generated AA mobilization and phosphorylation of the cytosolic phospolipase A2. Using specific inhibitors for the different phospolipase A2 isoforms the MAF02-induced AA liberation was shown to be dependent on the cytosolic phospholipase A2, but not on the secretory and calcium-independent phospholipase A2. The initiation of the AA pathway due to MAF02 particle exposure was demonstrated to depend on the formation of ROS since the presence of the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC prevented the MAF02

  12. A numerical study of the effects of injection rate shape on combustion and emission of diesel engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Zhixia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The spray characteristics including spray droplet sizes, droplet distribution, spray tip penetration length and spray diffusion angle directly affects the mixture process of fuel and oxygen and then plays an important role for the improvement of combustion and emission performance of diesel engines. Different injection rate shapes may induce different spray characteristics and then further affect the subsequent combustion and emission performance of diesel engines. In this paper, the spray and combustion processes based on four different injection rate shapes with constant injection duration and injected fuel mass were simulated in the software of AVL FIRE. The numerical models were validated through comparing the results from the simulation with those from experiment. It was found that the dynamic of diesel engines with the new proposed hump shape of injection rate and the original saddle shape is better than that with the injection rate of rectangle and triangle shape, but the emission of NOX is higher. And the soot emission is lowest during the late injection period for the new hump-shape injection rate because of a higher oxidation rate with a better mixture between fuel and air under the high injection pressure.

  13. Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium Theory Applied to the Expansion of Combustion Products in the Power Stroke of an Internal Combustion Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hameed Metghalchi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Rate-controlled constrained-equilibrium method, firmly based on the second law of thermodynamics, is applied to the expansion of combustion products of methane during the power stroke of an internal combustion engine. The constraints used in this study are the elemental oxygen, hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen together with other four dynamic constraints of total number of moles, moles of DCO (CO+HCO, moles of free valence and moles of free oxygen. Since at chemical equilibrium, the mixture composition is dominated by H/O, CO/CO2, and a few other carbon-containing species, almost independent of the fuel molecule, the set results in accurate predictions of the kinetic effects observed in all H/O and CO/CO2 compounds and temperature history. It is shown that the constrained-equilibrium predictions of all the species composed of the specified atomic elements can be obtained independent of a kinetic path, provided their Gibbs free energies are known.

  14. Mineral acquisition by maize grown in acidic soil amended with coal combustion products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, R.B.; Zeto, S.K.; Ritchey, K.D.; Baligar, V.C. [USDA ARS, Beaver, WV (United States). Appalachian Farming Systems Research Center

    2001-07-01

    Large amounts of coal combustion products (CCPs) are produced when coal is burned for generation of electricity. Some of these CCPs could potentially be used as soil amendments. Glasshouse experiments were conducted to test the effects of different levels of 15 CCPs and chemical grade CaCO{sub 3}, CaSO{sub 4}, and CaSO{sub 3} added to acidic soil (Umbric Dystrochrept) on shoot calcium (Ca), sulfur (S), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), and aluminum (Al) concentrations of maize (Zea mays L.). The CCPs consisted of two fly ashes, one CaO material, three fluidized bed combustion products (FBCs), three 'non-stabilized' flue gas desulfurization products (FGDs), three 'stabilized' FGDs, and three 'oxidized' (FGD gypsum) FGDs. Level of CCP added to soil ranged from beneficial to detrimental effects on plants. Differences in shoot mineral element concentrations were related to kind and amount of CCP added and soil pH. Plants grown in unamended (pH 4) soil had symptoms of P and Mg deficiencies and A1 toxicity. High concentrations of Ca, S, Mg, and Mn accumulated when plants were grown with sonic CCPs, but most mineral nutrients were at concentrations considered normal for maize. Shoot concentrations of P, K, Zn, Mn, Fe, and A1 decreased when soil pH became high ({gt}7). Even though detrimental mineral element acquisition effects were imposed on plants at high levels of CCP application, shoot element concentrations were usually normal when applied at levels near those commonly used as soil amendments.

  15. Nanostructured aluminium oxide powders obtained by aspartic acid-nitrate gel-combustion routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardey Merino, Maria Celeste, E-mail: mcgardey@frm.utn.edu.a [Laboratorio de Investigaciones y Servicios Ambientales Mendoza (LISAMEN) - CCT - CONICET, Avda. Ruiz Leal s/n, Parque Gral. San Martin, (M5502IRA) Ciudad de Mendoza, Prov. de Mendoza (Argentina); Grupo CLIOPE, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional - Facultad Regional Mendoza, Rodriguez 273, (M5502AJE) Ciudad de Mendoza, Prov. de Mendoza (Argentina); Lascalea, Gustavo E. [Laboratorio de Investigaciones y Servicios Ambientales Mendoza (LISAMEN) - CCT - CONICET, Avda. Ruiz Leal s/n, Parque Gral. San Martin, (M5502IRA) Ciudad de Mendoza, Prov. de Mendoza (Argentina); Sanchez, Laura M. [CINSO (Centro de Investigaciones en Solidos), CITEFA - CONICET, J.B. de La Salle 4397, (B1603ALO) Villa Martelli, Prov. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Vazquez, Patricia G. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas ' Dr. Jorge J. Ronco' (CINDECA), CONICET, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Calle 47 nro. 257, (B1900AJK) La Plata, Prov. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cabanillas, Edgardo D. [CONICET and Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Gral. Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Prov. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Lamas, Diego G. [CINSO (Centro de Investigaciones en Solidos), CITEFA - CONICET, J.B. de La Salle 4397, (B1603ALO) Villa Martelli, Prov. de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-04-16

    In this work, two new gel-combustion routes for the synthesis of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanopowders with aspartic acid as fuel are presented. The first route is a conventional stoichiometric process, while the second one is a non-stoichiometric, pH-controlled process. These routes were compared with similar synthesis procedures using glycine as fuel, which are well-known in the literature. The samples were calcined in air at different temperatures, in a range of 600-1200 {sup o}C. They were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and BET specific surface area. Different phases were obtained depending on the calcination temperature: amorphous, {gamma} (metastable) or {alpha} (stable). The amorphous-to-{gamma} transition was found for calcination temperatures in the range of 700-900 {sup o}C, while the {gamma}-to-{alpha} one was observed for calcination temperatures of 1100-1200 {sup o}C. The retention of the metastable {gamma} phase is probably due to a crystallite size effect. It transforms to the {alpha} phase after the crystallite size increases over a critical size during the calcination process at 1200 {sup o}C. The highest BET specific surface areas were obtained for both nitrate-aspartic acid routes proposed in this work, reaching values of about 50 m{sup 2}/g.

  16. Effects of heat release rate on NOx time history in diesel combustion; Diesel nensho ni okeru netsu hasseiritsu keika ga NOx nodo rireki ni oyobosu eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiyama, T.; Miwa, K.; Higashida, M. [Tokushima Univ., Tokushima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Watanabe, S. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1996-06-25

    For determining the optimum combination of combustion control techniques to reduce NOx emission from diesel engines, it is important to clarify the effects of each technique not only on the NOx emission but also on its time history during combustion. In this paper, NOx concentration in the combustion chamber of a rapid compression machine has been measured by using a total gas sampling method. In order to elucidate the relation between NOx history and heat release rate, air temperatures nozzle hole size and air motion are varied to control the heat release process. The results show that NOx emission is not solely dependent upon initial combustion. Air utilization in the main diffusive combustion phase has great influence on NOx formation and its decay. NOx formation is accelerated by activation of the initial stage of the main combustion when using a nozzle with small holes. 9 refs., 13 figs.

  17. Evaluation of the reaction rate constants for the gas-phase Al-CH4-air combustion chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharipov, A. S.; Titova, N. S.; Starik, A. M.

    2012-10-01

    The most likely reaction pathways and reaction products in the Al-CH4-O2-N2 system are investigated using density functional theory and ab initio calculations. The B3LYP functional with extended 6-311+G(3df,2p) basis set as well as the CBS-QB3 composite method are mainly utilised. Theoretical analysis of corresponding reaction rate constants is also performed with the use of simple theoretical models. A critical overview of current knowledge on combustion-relevant reactions with aluminium compounds is given. On the basis of critical comparison of available experimental kinetic data with theoretical calculations, the approximations for rate constants for 44 reversible elementary reactions involving Al-containing species are recommended for use in combustion issues.

  18. Evaluation of economic and technical efficiency of diesel engines operation on the basis of volume combustion rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    І. О. Берестовой

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with a new approach to evaluation of complex efficiency of diesel engines. Traditionally, cylinder’s capacity, rotation frequency, average efficient pressure inside cylinder, piston’s stroke, average piston’s velocity, fuel specific consumption and other indices are used as generalizing criteria, characterizing diesel engine’s efficiency, but they do not reflect interrelation between engine’s complex efficiency and a set of economic, mass-dimensional, operational and ecological efficiency. The approach applied in the article makes it possible to reveal the existing and modify the existing methods of solving the problem of improving diesel engine’s efficiency with due regard to interrelation of the parameters, characterizing efficiency of their operation. Statistic analyses were carried out, on the basis of which an assumption regarding the existence of interrelation between specific fuel consumption and the analyzed engine’s parameters was made. Processing of statistical data for various analyzed functions of diesel engines helped offer a function, illustrating the link between volume combustion rate, piston’s area and nominal theoretical specific fuel consumption. Interrelation between volume combustion rate, nominal parameters of diesel operation and efficiency indices, obtained by processing statistical data of more than 500 models of diesels of different series was evaluated, the main feature of it being a mathematical trend. The analysis of the obtained function makes it possible to establish an interrelation between economic efficiency of a diesel, its main index being specific fuel consumption and volume combustion rate and design peculiarities

  19. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by polycarboxylic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.R.

    2001-01-01

    Calcite crystal growth rates measured in the presence of several polycarboxyclic acids show that tetrahydrofurantetracarboxylic acid (THFTCA) and cyclopentanetetracarboxylic acid (CPTCA) are effective growth rate inhibitors at low solution concentrations (0.01 to 1 mg/L). In contrast, linear polycarbocylic acids (citric acid and tricarballylic acid) had no inhibiting effect on calcite growth rates at concentrations up to 10 mg/L. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by cyclic polycarboxyclic acids appears to involve blockage of crystal growth sites on the mineral surface by several carboxylate groups. Growth morphology varied for growth in the absence and in the presence of both THFTCA and CPTCA. More effective growth rate reduction by CPTCA relative to THFTCA suggests that inhibitor carboxylate stereochemical orientation controls calcite surface interaction with carboxylate inhibitors. ?? 20O1 Academic Press.

  20. Oxalic acid-assisted combustion synthesized LiVO3 cathode material for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, X. M.; Wenren, H. Q.; Huang, S.; Shi, S. J.; Wang, X. L.; Gu, C. D.; Tu, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    LiVO3 materials are synthesized by combustion method with oxalic acid as fuel. Owing to its relatively low crystallization and small particle size, the LiVO3 calcined at 450 °C for 2 h displays optimal electrochemical performances, delivering a high discharge capacity of 298.4 mAh g-1 and 262.5 mAh g-1 between 1.0 and 3.5 V at a current density of 50 mA g-1 and 500 mA g-1 respectively, and exhibiting good cyclic stability. In this work, the chemical diffusion coefficient of Li+ (DLi+) in the LiVO3 electrode is determined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT). The value calculated by EIS is in the range of 10-9-10-8 cm2 s-1, while it calculated by GITT is 10-9.5-10-8 cm2 s-1.

  1. Precipitating amino acid solvents for CO2 capture: opportunities to reduce costs in post combustion capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez Fernandez, E.; Heffernan, K.; Ham, L.V. van der; Linders, M.J.G.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Vlugt, T.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Post-combustion CO2 capture based on absorption and thermal desorption is considered a suitable technology for carbon abatement in fossil fuelled power plants. The economic viability of post-combustion capture has been widely studied. The major drawbacks of this technology are the efficiency penalti

  2. Precipitating amino acid solvents for CO2 capture: Opportunities to reduce costs in post combustion capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Fernandez, E.; Heffernan, K.; Van der Ham, L.; Linders, M.J.G.; Goetheer, E.; Vlugt, T.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Post-combustion CO2 capture based on absorption and thermal desorption is considered a suitable technology for carbon abatement in fossil fuelled power plants. The economic viability of post-combustion capture has been widely studied. The major drawbacks of this technology are the efficiency penalti

  3. Feasibility demonstration of a variable frequency driver-microwave transient regression rate measurement system. [for solid propellant combustion response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, L. D.; Mcnamara, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of a system capable of rapidly and directly measuring the low-frequency (motor characteristics length bulk mode) combustion response characteristics of solid propellants has been investigated. The system consists of a variable frequency oscillatory driver device coupled with an improved version of the JPL microwave propellant regression rate measurement system. The ratio of the normalized regression rate and pressure amplitudes and their relative phase are measured as a function of varying pressure level and frequency. Test results with a well-characterized PBAN-AP propellant formulation were found to compare favorably with the results of more conventional stability measurement techniques.

  4. Sensitivity of PCDD/F formation to hazardous waste. Firing rate and combustion quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gullet, B.; Touati, A.

    2002-07-01

    Industrial boilers that cofire hazardous waste will be receiving attention from the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as part of an effort to consider revising PCDD/F emission standards for hazardous waste combustors. Recent combustor work has shown that combustion deposits became a sink and source for polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and di benzofurans (PCDDs/Fs) and their precursors, respectively, and that byproduct emissions have species-specific response times that result in varying pollutant concentrations long after fuel/waste or combustion conditions change. It is important to understand the PCDD/F emissions from hazardous-waste cofiring boilers as well as the impact of operating changes on emissions, such that accurate causality can be determined as well as appropriate conditions under which sampling can characterize emissions. (Author) 9 refs.

  5. Biofuels combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Charles K

    2013-01-01

    This review describes major features of current research in renewable fuels derived from plants and from fatty acids. Recent and ongoing fundamental studies of biofuel molecular structure, oxidation reactions, and biofuel chemical properties are reviewed, in addition to combustion applications of biofuels in the major types of engines in which biofuels are used. Biofuels and their combustion are compared with combustion features of conventional petroleum-based fuels. Two main classes of biofuels are described, those consisting of small, primarily alcohol, fuels (particularly ethanol, n-butanol, and iso-pentanol) that are used primarily to replace or supplement gasoline and those derived from fatty acids and used primarily to replace or supplement conventional diesel fuels. Research efforts on so-called second- and third-generation biofuels are discussed briefly.

  6. Dry sorbent injection of trona to control acid gases from a pilot-scale coal-fired combustion facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany L. B. Yelverton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available  Gaseous and particulate emissions from the combustion of coal have been associated with adverse effects on human and environmental health, and have for that reason been subject to regulation by federal and state governments. Recent regulations by the United States Environmental Protection Agency have further restricted the emissions of acid gases from electricity generating facilities and other industrial facilities, and upcoming deadlines are forcing industry to consider both pre- and post-combustion controls to maintain compliance. As a result of these recent regulations, dry sorbent injection of trona to remove acid gas emissions (e.g. HCl, SO2, and NOx from coal combustion, specifically 90% removal of HCl, was the focus of the current investigation. Along with the measurement of HCl, SO2, and NOx, measurements of particulate matter (PM, elemental (EC, and organic carbon (OC were also accomplished on a pilot-scale coal-fired combustion facility. Gaseous and particulate emissions from a coal-fired combustor burning bituminous coal and using dry sorbent injection were the focus of the current study. From this investigation it was shown that high levels of trona were needed to achieve the goal of 90% HCl removal, but with this increased level of trona injection the ESP and BH were still able to achieve greater than 95% fine PM control. In addition to emissions reported, measurement of acid gases by standard EPA methods were compared to those of an infrared multi-component gas analyzer. This comparison revealed good correlation for emissions of HCl and SO2, but poor correlation in the measurement of NOx emissions.

  7. Impact of heating rate and solvent on Ni-based catalysts prepared by solution combustion method for syngas methanation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Yan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ni-Al2O3 catalysts prepared by solution combustion method for syngas methanation were enhanced by employing various heating rate and different solvent. The catalytic properties were tested in syngas methanation. The result indicates that both of heating rate and solvent remarkably affect Ni particle size, which is a key factor to the catalytic activity of Ni-Al2O3 catalysts for syngas methanation. Moreover, the relationship between Ni particle size and the production rate of methane per unit mass was correlated. The optimal Ni-Al2O3 catalyst prepared in ethanol at 2°C/min, achieves a maximum production rate of methane at the mean size of 20.8 nm.

  8. Combustion physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. R.

    1985-11-01

    Over 90% of our energy comes from combustion. By the year 2000 the figure will still be 80%, even allowing for nuclear and alternative energy sources. There are many familiar examples of combustion use, both domestic and industrial. These range from the Bunsen burner to large flares, from small combustion chambers, such as those in car engines, to industrial furnaces for steel manufacture or the generation of megawatts of electricity. There are also fires and explosions. The bountiful energy release from combustion, however, brings its problems, prominent among which are diminishing fuel resources and pollution. Combustion science is directed towards finding ways of improving efficiency and reducing pollution. One may ask, since combustion is a chemical reaction, why physics is involved: the answer is in three parts. First, chemicals cannot react unless they come together. In most flames the fuel and air are initially separate. The chemical reaction in the gas phase is very fast compared with the rate of mixing. Thus, once the fuel and air are mixed the reaction can be considered to occur instantaneously and fluid mechanics limits the rate of burning. Secondly, thermodynamics and heat transfer determine the thermal properties of the combustion products. Heat transfer also plays a role by preheating the reactants and is essential to extracting useful work. Fluid mechanics is relevant if work is to be performed directly, as in a turbine. Finally, physical methods, including electric probes, acoustics, optics, spectroscopy and pyrometry, are used to examine flames. The article is concerned mainly with how physics is used to improve the efficiency of combustion.

  9. THE USE OF COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS FOR IN SITU TREATMENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoffrey A. Canty; Jess W. Everett

    2004-09-30

    In 1994 a demonstration project was undertaken to investigate the effectiveness of using CCBs for the in situ treatment of acidic mine water. Actual injection of alkaline material was performed in 1997 with initial positive results; however, the amount of alkalinity added to the system was limited and resulted in short duration treatment. In 1999, a CBRC grant was awarded to further investigate the effectiveness of alkaline injection technology (AIT). Funds were released in fall 2001. In December 2001, 2500 tons of fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash were injected into the wells used in the 1997 injection project. Post injection monitoring continued for 24 months. During this period the mine chemistry had gone through a series of chemical changes that manifested as stages or ''treatment phases.'' The mine system appeared to be in the midst of reestablishing equilibrium with the partial pressure of mine headspace. Alkalinity and pH appeared to be gradually increasing during this transition. As of December 2003, the pH and alkalinity were roughly 7.3 and 65 ppm, respectively. Metal concentrations were significantly lower than pre-injection levels, but iron and manganese concentrations appeared to be gradually increasing (roughly 30 ppm and 1.25 ppm, respectively). Aluminum, nickel, and zinc were less than pre-injection concentrations and did not appear to be increasing (roughly

  10. Structure properties and sintering densification of Gd2Zr2O7 nanoparticles prepared via different acid combustion methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马雷; 马伟民; 孙旭东; 刘佳男; 纪连永; 宋晗

    2015-01-01

    Gadolinium zirconate (Gd2Zr2O7) nanocrystals were prepared via two different combustion methods:citric acid combus-tion (CAC) and stearic acid combustion (SAC). The effects of the different preparation methods on the phase composition, micro-topography, and sintering densification of the resulting Gd2Zr2O7 nanopowders were investigated by thermal-gravimetric and differ-ential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission elec-tron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The results indicated that both methods could produce Gd2Zr2O7 nanopowders with an excellent defective fluorite structure. The reaction time was reduced by the SAC method, compared with the CAC method. The nanopowders synthesized by the two methods were different in grain size distribution. The resulting nanoparticle diameter was about 50 nm for CAC and 10 nm for SAC. After vacuum sintering, the sintered bodies also had a different relative density of about 93%and 98%, respectively. Thus the preparation of Gd2Zr2O7 nanopowders by SAC was the first choice to achieve the desired sintering densifi-cation.

  11. Correlation between air flow rate and pollutant concentrations during two-stage oak log combustion in a 25 KW residential boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juszczak Marek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available It can be expected that there is a considerable correlation between combustion air flow rate and the concentrations of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxide in the flue gas. The influence of temperature and oxygen concentration in the combustion zone on the concentrations of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxide in the flue gas, for high and low combustion air flow, was analysed. Oxygen concentration for which the concentration of carbon monoxide is the lowest was determined, as well as the mutual relation between carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide concentration.

  12. Studies on the Effects of Interphase Heat Exchange during Thermal Explosion in a Combustible Dusty Gas with General Arrhenius Reaction-Rate Laws

    OpenAIRE

    K. S. Adegbie; F. I. Alao

    2012-01-01

    A mathematical model for thermal explosion in a combustible dusty gas containing fuel droplets with general Arrhenius reaction-rate laws, convective and radiative heat losses, and interphase heat exchange between gas and inert solid particles is investigated. The objective of the study is to examine the effects of interphase heat exchange between the gas and solid particles on (i) ignition of reacting gas, (ii) accumulation of heat by the solid particles during combustion process (iii) evapor...

  13. Analysis of potential combustion source impacts on acid deposition using an independently derived inventory. Volume II, appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-12-01

    This document contains 2 appendices. The first documents the methodologies used to calculate production, unit energy consumption, fuel type and emission estimates for 16 industries and 35 types of facilities utilizing direct-fired industrial combustion processes, located in 26 states (and the District of Columbia) east of the Mississippi River. As discussed in the text of this report, a U.S. total of 16 industries and 45 types of facilities utilizing direct-fired combustion processes were identified by an elimination type method that was developed based on evaluation of fuel use in industrial SIC codes 20-39 to identify pollutant sources contributing to acid rain. The final population included only plants that have direct-fired fuel consumption greater than or equal to 100 x 10/sup 9/ Btu/yr of equivalent energy consumption. The goal for this analysis was to provide at least a 1980 base year for the data. This was achieved for all of the industries and in fact, 1981 data were used for a number of the industries evaluated. The second contains an analysis of all consumption of major fossil fuels to: (1) identify all fuel usage categories, and (2) identify the kinds of combustion equipment used within each category. This analysis provides a frame of reference for the balance of the study and permits using an energy accounting methodology to quantify the degree to which the inventoried sources in individual consuming sectors are complete and representative of the total population for the sector.

  14. New concept of combustion technology in small DI diesel engines. 4th Report. Effects of fuel injection rates on MK combustion; Kogata chokufun diesel kikan no shinnensho concept. 4. Funsharitsu no MK nensho eno eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, S.; Matsui, Y.; Kamihara, T. [Nissan Motor Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    A previous paper showed that EGR cooling and a low compression ratio which prolongs the ignition delay can expand the area of the new combustion concept. Experimental investigations were conducted in this research to examine the effects of the fuel injection rates, the injection pressure and the injection duration, on the exhaust emissions of an engine incorporating the MK concept The results showed that a higher injection pressure was effective in reducing NOx and particulate matter (PM) under MK combustion conditions. 10 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Sulfur Recovery from Acid Gas Using the Claus Process and High Temperature Air Combustion (HiTAC Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Sassi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur-bearing compounds are very detrimental to the environment and to industrial process equipment. They are often obtained or formed as a by-product of separation and thermal processing of fuels containing sulfur, such as coal, crude oil and natural gas. The two sulfur compounds, which need special attention, are: hydrogen sulfide (H2S and sulfur dioxide (SO2. H2S is a highly corrosive gas with a foul smell. SO2 is a toxic gas responsible for acid rain formation and equipment corrosion. Various methods of reducing pollutants containing sulfur are described in this paper, with a focus on the modified Claus process, enhanced by the use of High Temperature Air Combustion (HiTAC technology in the Claus furnace. The Claus process has been known and used in the industry for over 100 years. It involves thermal oxidation of hydrogen sulfide and its reaction with sulfur dioxide to form sulfur and water vapor. This process is equilibrium-limited and usually achieves efficiencies in the range of 94-97%, which have been regarded as acceptable in the past years. Nowadays strict air pollution regulations regarding hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide emissions call for nearly 100% efficiency, which can only be achieved with process modifications. High temperature air combustion technology or otherwise called flameless (or colorless combustion is proposed here for application in Claus furnaces, especially those employing lean acid gas streams, which cannot be burned without the use of auxiliary fuel or oxygen enrichment under standard conditions. With the use of HiTAC it has been shown, however, that fuel-lean, Low Calorific Value (LCV fuels can be burned with very uniform thermal fields without the need for fuel enrichment or oxygen addition. The uniform temperature distribution favors clean and efficient burning with an additional advantage of significant reduction of NOx, CO and hydrocarbon emission.

  16. Electrical and magnetic properties of spherical SmFeO{sub 3} synthesized by aspartic acid assisted combustion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuvaraj, Subramanian [Solid State Ionics and Energy Devices Laboratory, Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046 (India); Layek, Samar [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India); Vidyavathy, S. Manisha [Department of Ceramic Technology, Anna University, Chennai 600 025 (India); Yuvaraj, Selvaraj [Solid State Ionics and Energy Devices Laboratory, Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046 (India); Meyrick, Danielle [School of Engineering and Information Technology, Murdoch University, South St. Murdoch, WA 6150 (Australia); Selvan, R. Kalai, E-mail: selvankram@buc.edu.in [Solid State Ionics and Energy Devices Laboratory, Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046 (India)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • SmFeO{sub 3} is synthesized by simple combustion method using aspartic acid as the fuel. • The particles are spherical in shape with the size ranges between 150 and 300 nm. • Cole–Cole plot infers the bulk conduction mechanism. • Room temperature VSM analysis reveal the weak ferromagnetic behaviour of SmFeO{sub 3}. • Mössbauer analysis elucidates the +3 oxidation state of Fe atoms. - Abstract: Samarium orthoferrite (SmFeO{sub 3}) is synthesized by a simple combustion method using aspartic acid as fuel. Phase purity and functional groups are analyzed via X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis, which confirms the single phase formation of orthorhombic SmFeO{sub 3}. Approximately spherical particles with size range 150–300 nm is revealed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The conductivity of the material is identified by the single semicircle obtained in the solid state impedance spectra at elevated temperatures. The calculated electrical conductivity increases with increasing temperature, inferring the semiconducting nature of SmFeO{sub 3}. A magnetic study at room temperature revealed weak ferromagnetic behaviour in SmFeO{sub 3} due to Dzyaloshinsky–Moriya antisymmetric exchange interaction mechanism. Mössbauer analysis confirmed the +3 oxidation state of iron and magnetic ordering of the sample at room temperature.

  17. Effect of CO Combustion Promoters on Combustion Air Partition in FCC under Nearly Complete Combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王锐; 罗雄麟; 许锋

    2014-01-01

    With CO combustion promoters, the role of combustion air flow rate for concerns of economics and control is important. The combustion air is conceptually divided to three parts:the air consumed by coke burning, the air consumed by CO combustion and the air unreacted. A mathematical model of a fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) unit, which includes a quantitative correlation of CO heterogeneous combustion and the amount of CO combustion promoters, is introduced to investigate the effects of promoters on the three parts of combustion air. The results show that the air consumed by coke burning is almost linear to combustion air flow rate, while the air consumed by CO combustion promoters tends to saturate as combustion air flow rate increases, indicating that higher air flow rate can only be used as a manipulated variable to control the oxygen content for an economic concern.

  18. COMBUSTION HEAT RELEASE RATE ANALYSIS OF C.I. ENGINE WITH SECONDARY CO-INJECTION OF DEE-H2O SOLUTION - A VIBRATIONAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. V. SATYANARAYANA MURTHY

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the combustion propensity of single cylinder direct injection engine fueled with palm kernel methyl ester (PKME, which is non- edible oil and a secondary co-injection of saturated Diethyl ether (DEE with water. DEE along with water is fumigated through a high pressure nozzle fitted to the inlet manifold of the engine and the flow rate of the secondary injection was electronically controlled. DEE is known to improve the cold starting problem in engines when used in straight diesel fuel. However, its application in emulsion form is little known. Experimental results show that for 5% DEE- H2O solution injection, occurrence of maximum net heat release rate is delayed due to controlled premixed combustion, which normally helped in better torque conversion when the piston is in accelerated mode. Vibration measurements in the frequency range of 900Hz to 1300Hz revealed that a new mode of combustion has taken place with different excitation frequencies.

  19. Turbulent combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  20. Deuterium Isotope Effects During HMX Combustion: Chemical Kinetic Burn Rate Control Mechanism Verified

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    propellant contain- controls the I-IMX burn rate in the pressure range cited. The ing a chemically modified double base ( CMDB ) high oxygen 1.41 KDIE...controlling the observed overall or global burn rate of the could expect from the deuterium labeled HMX methylene HMX/ CMDB composite propellant. It is...measured in the HMX/ CMDB system. A graphic representa- densed phase KDIE investigation of thermochemical decom- non of one cornposic HMX binder

  1. Agglomeration rate and action forces between atomized particles of agglomerator and inhaled-particles from coal combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Feng; ZHANG Jun-ying; ZHENG Chu-guang

    2005-01-01

    In order to remove efficiently haled-particles emissions from coal combustions, a new way was used to put forward the process of agglomeration and the atomization was produced by the nozzle and then sprayed into the flue before precipitation devices of power station boiler in order to make inhaled-particles agglomerate into bigger particles, which can be easily removed but not change existing running conditions of boiler. According to this idea, a model is set up to study agglomeration rate and effect forces between fly ash inhaledparticles and atomized agglomerator particles. The developed agglomeration rate was expressed by relative particle number decreasing speed per unit volume. The result showed that viscosity force and flow resistance force give main influences on agglomeration effect of inhaled particles, while springiness force and gravity have little effect on agglomeration effect of theirs. Factors influencing the agglomeration rate and effect forces are studied, including agglomerator concentration, agglomerator flux and agglomerator density,atomized-particles diameters and inhaled-particles diameter and so on.

  2. Carbonic anhydrase promotes the absorption rate of CO2 in post-combustion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinoba, Mari; Bhagiyalakshmi, Margandan; Grace, Andrews Nirmala; Kim, Dae Hoon; Yoon, Yeoil; Nam, Sung Chan; Baek, Il Hyun; Jeong, Soon Kwan

    2013-05-09

    The rate of carbon dioxide (CO2) absorption by monoethanol amine (MEA), diethanol amine (DEA), N-methyl-2,2'-iminodiethanol (MDEA), and 2-amino-2-methyl 1-propanol (AMP) solutions was found to be enhanced by the addition of bovine carbonic anhydrase (CA), has been investigated using a vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) device. The enthalpy (-ΔHabs) of CO2 absorption and the absorption capacities of aqueous amines were measured in the presence and/or absence of CA enzyme via differential reaction calorimeter (DRC). The reaction temperature (ΔT) under adiabatic conditions was determined based on the DRC analysis. Bicarbonate and carbamate species formation mechanisms were elucidated by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectral analysis. The overall CO2 absorption rate (flux) and rate constant (kapp) followed the order MEA > DEA > AMP > MDEA in the absence or presence of CA. Hydration of CO2 by MDEA in the presence of CA directly produced bicarbonate, whereas AMP produced unstable carbamate intermediate, then underwent hydrolytic reaction and converted to bicarbonate. The MDEA > AMP > DEA > MEA reverse ordering of the enhanced CO2 flux and kapp in the presence of CA was due to bicarbonate formation by the tertiary and sterically hindered amines. Thus, CA increased the rate of CO2 absorption by MDEA by a factor of 3 relative to the rate of absorption by MDEA alone. The thermal effects suggested that CA yielded a higher activity at 40 °C.

  3. Lanthanum-doped mesostructured strontium titanates synthesized via sol–gel combustion route using citric acid as complexing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukpanish, Polthep [Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Center of Excellence on Petrochemical and Materials Technology (PETROMAT), Chulalongkorn University, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Lertpanyapornchai, Boontawee [Program in Petrochemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Yokoi, Toshiyuki [Division of Catalytic Chemistry, Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Ngamcharussrivichai, Chawalit, E-mail: Chawalit.Ng@chula.ac.th [Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Center of Excellence on Petrochemical and Materials Technology (PETROMAT), Chulalongkorn University, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2016-09-15

    In the present work, a series of lanthanum-doped mesostructured strontium titanate (LMST) materials with different La/Sr ratios were synthesized via a sol–gel combustion method in the presence of citric acid as a complexing agent and Pluronic P123 as a templating agent. The effects of the amount of doped La and calcination temperature on the physicochemical properties of the LMSTs were examined using various techniques. Powder X-ray diffraction confirmed the substitution of La{sup 3+} into the SrTiO{sub 3} lattice, generating cubic perovskite La{sub x}Sr{sub 1−x}TiO{sub 3}, for the LMST materials calcined at 600 °C. The purity and crystallinity of the desired perovskite phase were enhanced by citric acid addition. The solubility limit of La{sup 3+} substitution at an La/Sr ratio of 0.43 was determined by structural and morphological studies. Increasing the La doping amount decreased the crystallinity and compositional homogeneity, because an La-rich amorphous phase segregated on the surface, but improved the mesoporosity. N{sub 2} physisorption measurements indicated that the LMSTs had a bimodal pore size distribution, of which the larger one was characterized by the crystallite size of mixed oxides, and the specific surface area of 24.9–37.3 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. The formation of mesopores in the LMST materials synthesized via sol–gel combustion was explained based on a combination of soft- and hard-templating chemistries. - Highlights: • La-doped mesoporous SrTiO{sub 3} (LMST) was prepared first time via sol-gel combustion. • Pluronic P123 triblock copolymer was used as a cheap templating agent. • Citric acid as a complexing agent enhanced the purity and crystallinity of SrTiO{sub 3}. • The textural properties of LMST were improved by increasing the La doping amount. • Mesopore formation was explained by a combined soft- and hard-templating route.

  4. Claus recycle with double combustion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Bishtawi, Ribhi; Haimour, No' man [University of Jordan, Amman 11942 (Jordan)

    2004-12-15

    A new modification is developed on conventional Claus process to increase the overall sulfur recovery as well as to decrease the costs. The modification combines both oxygen enrichment and recycling. The process is simulated and studied for various N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} ratios with and without using SURE double combustion technique. The predictions show that using pure oxygen in combustion, condensing water vapor in a condenser following the first sulfur condenser and recycling the effluent gas to combine it with fresh acid gas feed leads to large savings in the production cost and to a clean environment. However, it leads to a high adiabatic flame temperature which exceeds the maximum allowable temperature of the furnace material of construction as well as its refractory. To avoid these effects, it is necessary to use SURE double combustion technique. The oxygen flow rate to the first combustion stage should not exceed 78% O{sub 2}.

  5. Elevated trace element concentrations and standard metabolic rate in banded water snakes (Nerodia fasciata) exposed to coal combustion wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, W.A.; Rowe, C.L.; Congdon, J.D. [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Trace element concentrations in banded water snakes, Nerodia fasciata, and representative prey items from a site polluted by coal combustion wastes were compared with concentrations in conspecifics from a nearby reference site. Water snakes accumulated high concentrations of trace elements, especially arsenic (As) and selenium (Se), in the polluted habitat. In addition to being exposed to contaminants in water and sediments, snakes in the polluted site are exposed to contaminants by ingesting prey items that have elevated whole-body concentrations of trace elements, including As, cadmium (Cd), and Se. Snakes from the polluted site exhibited mean standard metabolic rates (SMR) 32% higher than snakes from the reference site. As a result, snakes from the polluted site appear to have elevated allocation of energy to maintenance and theoretically should have less energy available for growth, reproduction, and storage. It is hypothesized that long-term exposure to coal ash-derived trace elements and the resultant accumulation of some elements are responsible for observed increases in SMR.

  6. Reduction Rates for Higher Americium Oxidation States in Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Travis Shane [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mincher, Bruce Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schmitt, Nicholas C [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The stability of hexavalent americium was measured using multiple americium concentrations and nitric acid concentrations after contact with the strong oxidant sodium bismuthate. Contrary to our hypotheses Am(VI) was not reduced faster at higher americium concentrations, and the reduction was only zero-order at short time scales. Attempts to model the reduction kinetics using zero order kinetic models showed Am(VI) reduction in nitric acid is more complex than the autoreduction processes reported by others in perchloric acid. The classical zero-order reduction of Am(VI) was found here only for short times on the order of a few hours. We did show that the rate of Am(V) production was less than the rate of Am(VI) reduction, indicating that some Am(VI) undergoes two electron-reduction to Am(IV). We also monitored the Am(VI) reduction in contact with the organic diluent dodecane. A direct comparison of these results with those in the absence of the organic diluent showed the reduction rates for Am(VI) were not statistically different for both systems. Additional americium oxidations conducted in the presence of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) ions showed that Am(VI) is reduced without the typical growth of Am(V) observed in the systems sans Ce ion. This was an interesting result which suggests a potential new reduction/oxidation pathway for Am in the presence of Ce; however, these results were very preliminary, and will require additional experiments to understand the mechanism by which this occurs. Overall, these studies have shown that hexavalent americium is fundamentally stable enough in nitric acid to run a separations process. However, the complicated nature of the reduction pathways based on the system components is far from being rigorously understood.

  7. A practical approach to estimate emission rates of indoor air pollutants due to the use of personal combustible products based on small-chamber studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulejko, Jan E; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    As emission rates of airborne pollutants are commonly measured from combusting substances placed inside small chambers, those values need to be re-evaluated for the possible significance under practical conditions. Here, a simple numerical procedure is investigated to extrapolate the chamber-based emission rates of formaldehyde that can be released from various combustible sources including e-cigarettes, conventional cigarettes, or scented candles to their concentration levels in a small room with relatively poor ventilation. This simple procedure relies on a mass balance approach by considering the masses of pollutants emitted from source and lost through ventilation under the assumption that mixing occurs instantaneously in the room without chemical reactions or surface sorption. The results of our study provide valuable insights into re-evaluation procedure of chamber data to allow comparison between extrapolated and recommended values to judge the safe use of various combustible products in confined spaces. If two scented candles with a formaldehyde emission rate of 310 µg h(-1) each were lit for 4 h in a small 20 m(3) room with an air change rate of 0.5 h(-1), then the 4-h (candle lit) and 8-h (up to 8 h after candle lighting) TWA [FA] were determined to be 28.5 and 23.5 ppb, respectively. This is clearly above the 8-h NIOSH recommended exposure limit (REL) time weighted average of 16 ppb.

  8. Stretch rate effects and flame surface densities in premixed turbulent combustion up to 1.25 MPa

    KAUST Repository

    Bagdanavicius, Audrius

    2015-11-01

    Independent research at two centres using a burner and an explosion bomb has revealed important aspects of turbulent premixed flame structure. Measurements at pressures and temperatures up to 1.25MPa and 673K in the two rigs were aimed at quantifying the influences of flame stretch rate and strain rate Markstein number, Masr , on both turbulent burning velocity and flame surface density. That on burning velocity is expressed through the stretch rate factor, Io , or probability of burning, Pb 0.5. These depend on Masr , but they grow in importance as the Karlovitz stretch factor, K, increases, and are evaluated from the associated burning velocity data. Planar laser tomography was employed to identify contours of reaction progress variable in both rigs. These enabled both an appropriate flame front for the measurement of the turbulent burning velocity to be identified, and flame surface densities, with the associated factors, to be evaluated. In the explosion measurements, these parameters were derived also from the flame surface area, the derived Pb 0.5 factor and the measured turbulent burning velocities. In the burner measurement they were calculated directly from the flame surface density, which was derived from the flame contours.A new overall correlation is derived for the Pb 0.5 factor, in terms of Masr at different K and this is discussed in the light of previous theoretical studies. The wrinkled flame surface area normalised by the area associated with the turbulent burning velocity measurement, and the ratio of turbulent to laminar burning velocity, ut /ul , are also evaluated. The higher the value of Pb0.5, the more effective is an increased flame wrinkling in increasing ut /ul A correlation of the product of k and the laminar flame thickness with Karlovitz stretch factor and Markstein number is explored using the present data and those

  9. Experimental particle formation rates spanning tropospheric sulfuric acid and ammonia abundances, ion production rates, and temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Kürten, Andreas; Almeida, Joao; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Dunne, Eimear M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Williamson, Christina; Barmet, Peter; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Gordon, Hamish; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Ickes, Luisa; Jokinen, Tuija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Onnela, Antti; Ortega, Ismael K.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Smith, James N.; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Wagner, Paul E.; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Ken; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Binary nucleation of sulfuric acid and water as well as ternary nucleation involving ammonia arethought to be the dominant processes responsible for new particle formation (NPF) in the cold temperaturesof the middle and upper troposphere. Ions are also thought to be important for particle nucleation inthese regions. However, global models presently lack experimentally measured NPF rates under controlledlaboratory conditions and so at present must rely on theoretical or empirical parameterizations. Here withdata obtained in the European Organization for Nuclear Research CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets)chamber, we present the first experimental survey of NPF rates spanning free tropospheric conditions. Theconditions during nucleation cover a temperature range from 208 to 298 K, sulfuric acid concentrationsbet ween 5 × 105and 1 × 109cm3, and ammonia mixing ratios from zero added ammonia, i.e., nominally purebinary, to a maximum of ~1400 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). We performed nucleation s...

  10. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Heart Rate Variability

    OpenAIRE

    Jeppe Hagstrup Christensen

    2011-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) may modulate autonomic control of the heart because omega-3 PUFA is abundant in the brain and other nervous tissue as well as in cardiac tissue. This might partly explain why omega-3 PUFA offer some protection against sudden cardiac death (SCD). The autonomic nervous system is involved in the pathogenesis of SCD. Heart rate variability (HRV) can be used as a non-invasive marker of cardiac autonomic control and a low HRV is a predictor for SCD and arr...

  11. Lectures on combustion theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burstein, S.Z.; Lax, P.D.; Sod, G.A. (eds.)

    1978-09-01

    Eleven lectures are presented on mathematical aspects of combustion: fluid dynamics, deflagrations and detonations, chemical kinetics, gas flows, combustion instability, flame spread above solids, spark ignition engines, burning rate of coal particles and hydrocarbon oxidation. Separate abstracts were prepared for three of the lectures. (DLC)

  12. Utilizing maleic acid as a novel fuel for synthesis of PbFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanoceramics via sol–gel auto-combustion route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansari, Fatemeh; Soofivand, Faezeh; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud, E-mail: salavati@kashanu.ac.ir

    2015-05-15

    PbFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanostructures were prepared in an aqueous solution by the sol–gel auto-combustion method using Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} as starting materials and various carboxylic acids, including oxalic acid, malonic acid, succinic acid and maleic acid as fuel and reducing and capping agents. The as-synthesized products were characterized by X- ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. The effect of carboxylic acid type, Pb{sup +} {sup 2} to carboxylic acid molar ratio, and calcination temperature was investigated on the morphology of the products and several experiments were carried out to obtain the optimal reaction conditions. It was found that the phase and the morphology of the products are influenced by the investigated parameters. Furthermore, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) was used to study the magnetic properties of PbFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} samples. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • PbFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanoceramics were synthesized from Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} via the sol–gel auto combustion method. • The maleic acid can be instead of common capping agent and fuel in auto-combustion sol–gel. • The synthesized PbFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} is a hard magnetic material. • The specific saturation magnetization and coercivity are 27 emu/g and 1900 Oe, respectively.

  13. Morphology and luminescence characteristics of combustion synthesized Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}: (Eu, Dy, Tb) nanoparticles with various amino-acid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, S.; Sudarsan, V. [Chemistry Division Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sastry, P.U.; Patra, A.K. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Tyagi, A.K., E-mail: aktyagi@barc.gov.in [Chemistry Division Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2014-01-15

    Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles doped with Dy{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} together were prepared by the gel combustion method using a variety of amino acids namely, glycine, phenyl alanine, arginine, glutamic and aspartic acids. Number of carboxylate groups present in the amino acids used for combustion reaction was found to have strong influence on powder characteristics as well as luminescence from the samples. Based on small angle X-ray scattering studies, it is inferred that the nanoparticles prepared by using glycine and arginine as the fuels have smooth surface compared to those prepared using other amino acids. For the nanoparticles prepared using glutamic and aspartic acids, there exist a diffused pore-grain interface due to the lesser extent of heat generated in the reaction which leads to smaller particle size, poor crystallinity and improper burning of the organic materials. Lower surface area and smooth surface of the nanoparticles prepared using glycine leads to their improved luminescence properties. -- Highlights: • Surface smoothness of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Dy, Eu, Tb) nanoparticles vary with amino acids. • Optimum luminescence intensity is observed when glycine is used as the fuel. • Diffused pore grain interface when glutamic and aspartic acids are used as fuels.

  14. Combusting vegetable oils in diesel engines: the impact of unsaturated fatty acids on particle emissions and mutagenic effects of the exhaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünger, Jürgen; Bünger, Jörn F; Krahl, Jürgen; Munack, Axel; Schröder, Olaf; Brüning, Thomas; Hallier, Ernst; Westphal, Götz A

    2016-06-01

    High particle emissions and strong mutagenic effects were observed after combustion of vegetable oil in diesel engines. This study tested the hypothesis that these results are affected by the amount of unsaturated or polyunsaturated fatty acids of vegetable oils. Four different vegetable oils (coconut oil, CO; linseed oil, LO; palm tree oil, PO; and rapeseed oil, RO) and common diesel fuel (DF) were combusted in a heavy-duty diesel engine. The exhausts were investigated for particle emissions and mutagenic effects in direct comparison with emissions of DF. The engine was operated using the European Stationary Cycle. Particle masses were measured gravimetrically while mutagenicity was determined using the bacterial reverse mutation assay with tester strains TA98 and TA100. Combustion of LO caused the largest amount of total particulate matter (TPM). In comparison with DF, it particularly raised the soluble organic fraction (SOF). RO presented second highest TPM and SOF, followed by CO and PO, which were scarcely above DF. RO revealed the highest number of mutations of the vegetable oils closely followed by LO. PO was less mutagenic, but still induced stronger effects than DF. While TPM and SOF were strongly correlated with the content of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the vegetable oils, mutagenicity had a significant correlation with the amount of total unsaturated fatty acids. This study supports the hypothesis that numbers of double bounds in unsaturated fatty acids of vegetable oils combusted in diesel engines influence the amount of emitted particles and the mutagenicity of the exhaust. Further investigations have to elucidate the causal relationship.

  15. Studies on the Effects of Interphase Heat Exchange during Thermal Explosion in a Combustible Dusty Gas with General Arrhenius Reaction-Rate Laws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Adegbie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model for thermal explosion in a combustible dusty gas containing fuel droplets with general Arrhenius reaction-rate laws, convective and radiative heat losses, and interphase heat exchange between gas and inert solid particles is investigated. The objective of the study is to examine the effects of interphase heat exchange between the gas and solid particles on (i ignition of reacting gas, (ii accumulation of heat by the solid particles during combustion process (iii evaporation of the liquid fuel droplets, and (iv consumption of reacting gas concentration. The equations governing the physical model with realistic assumptions are stated and nondimensionalised leading to an intractable system of first-order coupled nonlinear differential equations, which is not amenable to exact methods of solution. Therefore, we present numerical solutions as well as different qualitative effects of varying interphase heat exchange parameter. Graphs and Table feature prominently to explain the results obtained.

  16. CHLORINATION OF AMINO ACIDS: REACTION PATHWAYS AND REACTION RATES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Zuo Tong; Linge, Kathryn; Busetti, Francesco; Joll, Cynthia A

    2017-03-15

    Chlorination of amino acids can result in the formation of organic monochloramines or organic dichloramines, depending on the chlorine to amino acid ratio (Cl:AA). After formation, organic chloramines degrade into aldehydes, nitriles and N-chloraldimines. In this paper, the formation of organic chloramines from chlorination of lysine, tyrosine and valine were investigated. Chlorination of tyrosine and lysine demonstrated that the presence of a reactive secondary group can increase the Cl:AA ratio required for the formation of N,N-dichloramines, and potentially alter the reaction pathways between chlorine and amino acids, resulting in the formation of unexpected by-products. In a detailed investigation, we report rate constants for all reactions in the chlorination of valine, for the first time, using experimental results and modelling. At Cl:AA = 2.8, the chlorine was found to first react quickly with valine (5.4x104 M-1 s-1) to form N-monochlorovaline, with a slower subsequent reaction with N-monochlorovaline to form N,N-dichlorovaline (4.9x102 M-1 s-1), although some N-monochlorovaline degraded into isobutyraldehyde (1.0x10-4 s-1). The N,N-dichlorovaline then competitively degraded into isobutyronitrile (1.3x10-4 s-1) and N-chloroisobutyraldimine (1.2x10-4 s-1). In conventional drinking water disinfection, N-chloroisobutyraldimine can potentially be formed in concentrations higher than its odour threshold concentration, resulting in aesthetic challenges and an unknown health risk.

  17. Role of temperature and hydrochloric acid on the formation of chlorinated hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during combustion of paraffin powder, polymers, and newspaper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasuga, Takumi; Umetsu, Norihito; Makino, Tetsuya; Tsubota, Katsuya; Sajwan, Kenneth S; Kumar, Kurunthachalam Senthil

    2007-07-01

    Formation of chlorinated hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined using a laboratory-scale incinerator when combusting materials at different temperatures, different concentrations of hydrochloric acid (HCl), and when combusting various types of polymers/newspaper. Polychlorobenzenes (PCBz), polychlorophenols (PCPhs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs) and their toxic equivalency (TEQ) and PAHs were highlighted and reported. Our results imply maximum formation of chlorinated hydrocarbons at 400 degrees C in the following order; PCBz>or=PCPhs>PCDFs>PCDDs>TEQ on a parts-per-billion level. Similarly, a maximum concentration of chlorinated hydrocarbons was noticed with an HCl concentration at 1000 ppm with the presence of paraffin powder in the following order; PAHs>PCBz>or=PCPhs>PCDFs>PCDDs>TEQ an a parts-per-billion level. PAHs were not measured at different temperatures. Elevated PAHs were noticed with different HCl concentrations and paraffin powder combustion (range: 27-32 microg/g). While, different polymers and newspaper combusted, nylon and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) produced the maximum hydrogen cyanide (HCN) concentration, concentrations of PCDD/FS, dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (DL-PCBs), and TEQ were in a decreasing order: polyvinylchloride (PVC)newspapernewspapernewspaper newspapernewspaper

  18. Coal Combustion Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardesty, D.R. (ed.); Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.; Baxter, L.L. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States))

    1991-08-01

    The objective of this activity is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This activity consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency Coal Combustion Science Project. Specific tasks for this activity include: (1) coal devolatilization - the objective of this risk is to characterize the physical and chemical processes that constitute the early devolatilization phase of coal combustion as a function of coal type, heating rate, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxidizer concentration; (2) coal char combustion -the objective of this task is to characterize the physical and chemical processes involved during coal char combustion as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxygen concentration; (3) fate of mineral matter during coal combustion - the objective of this task is to establish a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and rates of transformation, fragmentation, and deposition of mineral matter in coal combustion environments as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, the initial forms and distribution of mineral species in the unreacted coal, and the local gas temperature and composition.

  19. Factorial design for the evaluation of the interaction effect between particle size and heating rate in the kinetic energy of coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, Ivonete; Silva, Eugenio A.G.; Mortari, Daniela A.; Crnkovic, Paula M.; Milioli, Fernando E. [University of Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Engineering School. Group of Thermal and Fluids Engineering], Emails: iavila@sc.usp.br, eugenio.silva@usp.br, paulam@sc.usp.br, milioli@sc.usp.br

    2010-07-01

    This paper evaluates the behavior of kinetic energy for different heating rates ({alpha}) and particle sizes of the material in the study of the coal combustion process. It aims to obtain a response surface in a large range of particle size, using heating rates between the minimum and maximum values allowed by the equipment. Therefore it searches for a model to evaluate the interaction effect between particle size and the heating rate and to predict the activation energy of the process studied. The activation energy of the process was determined using the isoconversional model Model Free Kinetics. In this model, the activation energy (E{sub {alpha}}) is obtained as a function of the reaction extent ({alpha}). The subscript in E{sub {alpha}} designates the values related to a given value of conversion ({alpha}). All experiments were conducted in thermogravimetric balance using samples of a Brazilian coal (EC4500) witch average particle size between 163 to 650 {mu}m and heating rates between 10 and 40 deg C min{sup -1} in dynamic atmosphere of air. A central rotatable composite design was applied for the 2{sup 2} factorial design including 4 tests under the axial conditions and 3 repetitions in the central point. As expected, the results show that both the particle size and the heating rate affected significantly the values of activation energy of the coal combustion process obtained by the model used. (author)

  20. Modelling diesel combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Lakshminarayanan, P A; Shi, Yu; Reitz, Rolf D

    2010-01-01

    The underlying principles of combustion phenomena are presented here, providing the basis for quantitative evaluation. These phenomena - ignition delay, fuel air mixing, rate of release, etc. - are then modelled for greater understanding and applicability.

  1. Application of a Genetic Algorithm to the Optimization of Rate Constants in Chemical Kinetic Models for Combustion Simulation of HCCI Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Kyu; Ito, Kazuma; Yoshihara, Daisuke; Wakisaka, Tomoyuki

    For numerically predicting the combustion processes in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines, practical chemical kinetic models have been explored. A genetic algorithm (GA) has been applied to the optimization of the rate constants in detailed chemical kinetic models, and a detailed kinetic model (592 reactions) for gasoline reference fuels with arbitrary octane number between 60 and 100 has been obtained from the detailed reaction schemes for iso-octane and n-heptane proposed by Golovitchev. The ignition timing in a gasoline HCCI engine has been predicted reasonably well by zero-dimensional simulation using the CHEMKIN code with this detailed kinetic model. An original reduced reaction scheme (45 reactions) for dimethyl ether (DME) has been derived from Curran’s detailed scheme, and the combustion process in a DME HCCI engine has been predicted reasonably well in a practical computation time by three-dimensional simulation using the authors’ GTT code, which has been linked to the CHEMKIN subroutines with the proposed reaction scheme and also has adopted a modified eddy dissipation combustion model.

  2. Influence of fuel moisture, charge size, feeding rate and air ventilation conditions on the emissions of PM, OC, EC, parent PAHs, and their derivatives from residential wood combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guofeng Shen; Miao Xue; Siye Wei; Yuanchen Chen; Qiuyue Zhao; Bing Li; Haisuo Wu

    2013-01-01

    Controlled combustion experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of fuel charge size,moisture,air ventilation and feeding rate on the emission factors (EFs) of carbonaceous particulate matter,parent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (pPAHs) and their derivatives from residential wood combustion in a typical brick cooking stove.Measured EFs were found to be independent of fuel charge size,but increased with increasing fuel moisture.Pollution emissions from the normal burning under an adequate air supply condition were the lowest for most pollutants,while more pollutants were emitted when an oxygen deficient atmosphere was formed in the stove chamber during fast burning.The impacts of these factors on the size distribution of emitted particles was also studied.Modified combustion efficiency and the four investigated factors explained 68%,72%,and 64% of total variations in EFs of PM,organic carbon,and oxygenated PAHs,respectively,but only 36%,38% and 42% of the total variations in EFs of elemental carbon,pPAHs and nitro-PAHs,respectively.

  3. delta 13C analyses of vegetable oil fatty acid components, determined by gas chromatography--combustion--isotope ratio mass spectrometry, after saponification or regiospecific hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbury, S E; Evershed, R P; Rossell, J B

    1998-05-01

    The delta 13C values of the major fatty acids of several different commercially important vegetable oils were measured by gas chromatography--combustion--isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The delta 13C values obtained were found to fall into two distinct groups, representing the C3 and C4 plants classes from which the oils were derived. The delta 13C values of the oils were measured by continuous flow elemental isotope ratio mass spectrometry and were found to be similar to their fatty acids, with slight differences between individual fatty acids. Investigations were then made into the influence on the delta 13C values of fatty acids of the position occupied on the glycerol backbone. Pancreatic lipase was employed to selectively hydrolyse fatty acids from the 1- and 3-positions with the progress of the reaction being followed by high-temperature gas chromatography in order to determine the optimum incubation time. The 2-monoacylglycerols were then isolated by thin-layer chromatography and fatty acid methyl esters prepared. The delta 13C values obtained indicate that fatty acids from any position on the glycerol backbone are isotopically identical. Thus, whilst quantification of fatty acid composition at the 2-position and measurement of delta 13C values of oils and their major fatty acids are useful criteria in edible oil purity assessment, measurement of delta 13C values of fatty acids from the 2-position does not assist with oil purity assignments.

  4. A Simulation of the Effects of Varying Repetition Rate and Pulse Width of Nanosecond Discharges on Premixed Lean Methane-Air Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Soo Bak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional kinetic simulation has been carried out to investigate the effects of repetition rate and pulse width of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges on stabilizing premixed lean methane-air combustion. The repetition rate and pulse width are varied from 10 kHz to 50 kHz and from 9 ns to 2 ns while the total power is kept constant. The lower repetition rates provide larger amounts of radicals such as O, H, and OH. However, the effect on stabilization is found to be the same for all of the tested repetition rates. The shorter pulse width is found to favor the production of species in higher electronic states, but the varying effects on stabilization are also found to be small. Our results indicate that the total deposited power is the critical element that determines the extent of stabilization over this range of discharge properties studied.

  5. Effect of starting solution acidity on the characteristics of CoFe2O4 powders prepared by solution combustion synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourgolmohammad, B.; Masoudpanah, S. M.; Aboutalebi, M. R.

    2017-02-01

    Cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles were synthesized at the different pH values of starting solution, adjusted by NH4OH, using solution combustion method. Theoretical calculations and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis were carried out for determination and controlling the chelated species in solution. The phase evolution, surface area, morphology and magnetic properties of the combusted CoFe2O4 powders have been investigated by thermal analysis, X-ray diffractometry, electron microscopy, adsorption-desorption and vibrating sample magnetometer. The combustion rate mainly depends on pH which affects the phase and crystallite size. Furthermore, the specific surface area of the porous CoFe2O4 powders decreases from 66.25 to 27.09 m2/g by the increase of pH from 2 to 10. The combusted CoFe2O4 powders exhibit ferromagnetic properties which the highest saturation magnetization of 63.7 emu/g was achieved at pH of 2. Furthermore, the coercivity increases from 1112 to 1225 Oe by the increase of pH due to the decreasing of crystallite size.

  6. Design and Testing of Lab-scale Red Fuming Nitric Acid/Hydroxyl-terminated Polybutadiene Hybrid Rocket Motor for Studying Regression Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankaran Venugopal

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a hybrid rocket motor and the experiments carried out for investigation of hybrid combustion and regression rates for a combination of liquid oxidiser red fuming nitric acid with solid fuel hydroxyl-terminated Polybutadiene. The regression rate is enhanced with the addition of small quantity of solid oxidiser ammonium perchlorate in the fuel. The characteristics of the combustion products were calculated using the NASA CEA Code and were used in a ballistic code developed for predicting the performance of the hybrid rocket motor. A lab-scale motor was designed and the oxidiser mass flow requirements of the hybrid motor for the above combination of fuel and oxidiser have been calculated using the developed ballistic code. A static rocket motor testing facility has been realised for conducting the hybrid experiments. A series of tests were conducted and proper ignition with stable combustion in the hybrid mode has been established. The regression rate correlations were obtained as a function of the oxidiser mass flux and chamber pressure from the experiments for the various combinations.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(6, pp.515-522, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.873

  7. Single particle aerosol mass spectrometry of coal combustion particles associated with high lung cancer rates in Xuanwei and Fuyuan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Senlin; Tan, Zhengying; Liu, Pinwei; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Dingyu; Yu, Shang; Cheng, Ping; Win, Myat Sandar; Hu, Jiwen; Tian, Linwei; Wu, Minghong; Yonemochi, Shinich; Wang, Qingyue

    2017-11-01

    Coal combustion particles (CCPs) are linked to the high incidence of lung cancer in Xuanwei and in Fuyuan, China, but studies on the chemical composition of the CCPs are still limited. Single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) was recently developed to measure the chemical composition and size of single particles in real-time. In this study, SPAMS was used to measure individual combustion particles emitted from Xuanwei and Fuyuan coal samples and the results were compared with those by ICP-MS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The total of 38,372 particles mass-analyzed by SPAMS can be divided into 9 groups based on their chemical composition and their number percentages: carbonaceous, Na-rich, K-rich, Al-rich, Fe-rich, Si-rich, Ca-rich, heavy metal-bearing, and PAH-bearing particles. The carbonaceous and PAH-bearing particles are enriched in the size range below 0.56 μm, Fe-bearing particles range from 0.56 to 1.0 μm in size, and heavy metals such as Ti, V, Cr, Cu, Zn, and Pb have diameters below 1 μm. The TEM results show that the particles from Xuanwei and Fuyuan coal combustion can be classified into soot aggregates, Fe-rich particles, heavy metal containing particles, and mineral particles. Non-volatile particles detected by SPAMS could also be observed with TEM. The number percentages by SPAMS also correlate with the mass concentrations measured by ICP-MS. Our results could provide valuable insight for understanding high lung cancer incidence in the area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Heart Rate Variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeppe Hagstrup Christensen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA may modulate autonomic control of the heart because omega-3 PUFA is abundant in the brain and other nervous tissue as well as in cardiac tissue. This might partly explain why omega-3 PUFA offer some protection against sudden cardiac death (SCD. The autonomic nervous system is involved in the pathogenesis of SCD. Heart rate variability (HRV can be used as a non-invasive marker of cardiac autonomic control and a low HRV is a predictor for SCD and arrhythmic events. Studies on HRV and omega-3 PUFA have been performed in several populations such as patients with ischemic heart disease, patients with diabetes mellitus, patients with chronic renal failure, and in healthy subjects as well as in children.. The studies have demonstrated a positive association between cellular content of omega-3 PUFA and HRV and supplementation with omega-3 PUFA seems to increase HRV which could be a possible explanation for decreased risk of arrhythmic events and SCD sometimes observed after omega-3 PUFA supplementation. However, the results are not consistent and further research is needed

  9. Combustion chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  10. Low Phytic Acid Barley Responses to Phosphorus Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low phytic acid (LPA) barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivars partition phosphorus in seed tissue differently than conventional barley cultivars through a reduction in seed phytic acid (myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexkisphosphate) coupled with an increase in inorganic phosphorus. The response of the LPA...

  11. Computational Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C K; Mizobuchi, Y; Poinsot, T J; Smith, P J; Warnatz, J

    2004-08-26

    Progress in the field of computational combustion over the past 50 years is reviewed. Particular attention is given to those classes of models that are common to most system modeling efforts, including fluid dynamics, chemical kinetics, liquid sprays, and turbulent flame models. The developments in combustion modeling are placed into the time-dependent context of the accompanying exponential growth in computer capabilities and Moore's Law. Superimposed on this steady growth, the occasional sudden advances in modeling capabilities are identified and their impacts are discussed. Integration of submodels into system models for spark ignition, diesel and homogeneous charge, compression ignition engines, surface and catalytic combustion, pulse combustion, and detonations are described. Finally, the current state of combustion modeling is illustrated by descriptions of a very large jet lifted 3D turbulent hydrogen flame with direct numerical simulation and 3D large eddy simulations of practical gas burner combustion devices.

  12. Examining flow-flame interaction and the characteristic stretch rate in vortex-driven combustion dynamics using PIV and numerical simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Seunghyuck

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we experimentally investigate the combustion dynamics in lean premixed flames in a laboratory scale backward-facing step combustor in which flame-vortex driven dynamics are observed. A series of tests was conducted using propane/hydrogen/air mixtures for various mixture compositions at the inlet temperature ranging from 300K to 500K and at atmospheric pressure. Pressure measurements and high speed particle image velocimetry (PIV) are used to generate pressure response curves and phase-averaged vorticity and streamlines as well as the instantaneous flame front, respectively, which describe unsteady flame and flow dynamics in each operating regime. This work was motivated in part by our earlier study where we showed that the strained flame consumption speed Sc can be used to collapse the pressure response curves over a wide range of operating conditions. In previous studies, the stretch rate at which Sc was computed was determined by trial and error. In this study, flame stretch is estimated using the instantaneous flame front and velocity field from the PIV measurement. Independently, we also use computed strained flame speed and the experimental data to determine the characteristic values of stretch rate near the mode transition points at which the flame configuration changes. We show that a common value of the characteristic stretch rate exists across all the flame configurations. The consumption speed computed at the characteristic stretch rate captures the impact of different operating parameters on the combustor dynamics. These results suggest that the unsteady interactions between the turbulent flow and the flame dynamics can be encapsulated in the characteristic stretch rate, which governs the critical flame speed at the mode transitions and thereby plays an important role in determining the stability characteristics of the combustor. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  13. Control of combustion rates: A decisive step towards a further optimization of CO{sub 2}, emissions and NVH; Verbrennungsratenregelung. Ein entscheidender Schritt zur weiteren Optimierung von CO{sub 2}, Emissionen und NVH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremer, Florian; Schaub, Joschka; Pischinger, Stefan [RWTH Aachen (DE) Lehrstuhl fuer Verbrennungskraftmaschinen (VKA); Hinkelbein, Jan; Koerfer, Thomas; Kolbeck, Andreas; Lamping, Matthias [FEV Motorentechnik GmbH, Aachen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Both, the constant increase in emission legislation as well as the striving for lower greenhouse gas emissions strongly affects the automobile industry and its development processes and strategies. In this context, especially the engine optimization is being considered as a means of choice to sustainably lower the relevant emissions. From the big variety of possible methods to do so the combustion development stands out by still allowing high optimization yields at comparably low costs and effort. As an example, the evolution of the injection technology over the last years has lead to a noticeable emission reduction of the internal combustion engine. Besides the injection system the closed-loop combustion control (CLCC) offers a number of concepts to further optimize the combustion process. Based on the cylinder pressure information obtained with piezoelectric pressure sensors, a highly accurate analysis of the combustion becomes possible. As a direct result of this analysis, the injection scheme (timing, quantity, rate) can be adjusted in order to meet predefined target values. This combination of pressure data processing and injection adjustment can be considered as the main idea of close-loop combustion control. For the realization of this concept, rate-shaping injectors, featuring functionalities for an individual modification of the injection rate, offer the largest degree of freedom to design the combustion. In the present publication, the potential of combustion rate shaping to lower fuel consumption, exhaust gas and noise emissions is assessed. The combustion rate shaping is realized in two different ways: The first approach is based on rate-shaping injection technology using a unique pressure-modulated prototype diesel injector. In the second part, a novel control algorithm is presented, that enables the realization of predefined pressure traces by multiple injection strategies using a conventional piezo-driven common-rail injector. With these methods an

  14. Dry sorbent injection of trona to control acid gases from a pilot-scale coal-fired combustion facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaseous and particulate emissions from the combustion of coal have been associated with adverse effects on human and environmental health, and have for that reason been subject to regulation by federal and state governments. Recent regulations by the United States Environmental ...

  15. Synthesis of magnetic ZnO/ZnFe2O4 by a microwave combustion method, and its high rate of adsorption of methylene blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jing; Wang, Yuting; Zou, Linyi; Li, Bowen; He, Xiaofeng; Ren, Yueming; Lv, Yanzhuo; Fan, Zhuangjun

    2015-01-15

    The magnetic ZnO/ZnFe2O4 particles have been synthesized by a microwave combustion method using NaAc as fuel. The as-obtained ZnO/ZnFe2O4 was characterized and applied for the removal of methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution in the batch system. The ZnO/ZnFe2O4 particles display larger S(BET) and smaller size with increase of NaAc dosage. Because a certain amount of gas is generated during NaAc decomposing and the gas prevent the particles from growing larger. More interestingly, even at neutral pH value, the ZnO/ZnFe2O4 obtained with 24 mL NaAc shows high-rate adsorption properties with the MB removal efficiency up to 90% in 0.5 min and a maximum adsorption capacity of 37.27 mg/g.

  16. Laminar Burning Velocities of Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE) Gasoline and Gasoline Surrogates with and without Ethanol Blending Associated with Octane Rating

    KAUST Repository

    Mannaa, Ossama A.

    2016-05-04

    Laminar burning velocities of fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE) C gasoline and of several blends of surrogate toluene reference fuels (TRFs) (n-heptane, iso-octane, and toluene mixtures) of the same research octane number are presented. Effects of ethanol addition on laminar flame speed of FACE-C and its surrogate are addressed. Measurements were conducted using a constant volume spherical combustion vessel in the constant pressure, stable flame regime at an initial temperature of 358 K and initial pressures up to 0.6 MPa with the equivalence ratios ranging from 0.8 to 1.6. Comparable values in the laminar burning velocities were measured for the FACE-C gasoline and the proposed surrogate fuel (17.60% n-heptane + 77.40% iso-octane + 5% toluene) over the range of experimental conditions. Sensitivity of flame propagation to total stretch rate effects and thermo-diffusive instability was quantified by determining Markstein length. Two percentages of an oxygenated fuel of ethanol as an additive, namely, 60 vol% and 85 vol% were investigated. The addition of ethanol to FACE-C and its surrogate TRF-1 (17.60% n-heptane + 77.40% iso-octane + 5% toluene) resulted in a relatively similar increase in the laminar burning velocities. The high-pressure measured values of Markstein length for the studied fuels blended with ethanol showed minimal influence of ethanol addition on the flame’s response to stretch rate and thermo-diffusive instability. © 2016 Taylor & Francis.

  17. The effect of linoleic acid on the whole body synthesis rates of polyunsaturated fatty acids from α-linolenic acid and linoleic acid in free-living rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenichiello, Anthony F; Kitson, Alex P; Chen, Chuck T; Trépanier, Marc-Olivier; Stavro, P Mark; Bazinet, Richard P

    2016-04-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is thought to be important for brain function. The main dietary source of DHA is fish, however, DHA can also be synthesized from precursor omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA), the most abundantly consumed being α-linolenic acid (ALA). The enzymes required to synthesize DHA from ALA are also used to synthesize longer chain omega-6 (n-6) PUFA from linoleic acid (LNA). The large increase in LNA consumption that has occurred over the last century has led to concern that LNA and other n-6 PUFA outcompete n-3 PUFA for enzymes involved in DHA synthesis, and therefore, decrease overall DHA synthesis. To assess this, rats were fed diets containing LNA at 53 (high LNA diet), 11 (medium LNA diet) or 1.5% (low LNA diet) of the fatty acids with ALA being constant across all diets (approximately 4% of the fatty acids). Rats were maintained on these diets from weaning for 8 weeks, at which point they were subjected to a steady-state infusion of labeled ALA and LNA to measure DHA and arachidonic acid (ARA) synthesis rates. DHA and ARA synthesis rates were generally highest in rats fed the medium and high LNA diets, while the plasma half-life of DHA was longer in rats fed the low LNA diet. Therefore, increasing dietary LNA, in rats, did not impair DHA synthesis; however, low dietary LNA led to a decrease in DHA synthesis with tissue concentrations of DHA possibly being maintained by a longer DHA half-life.

  18. Measurement of the rates of oxindole-3-acetic acid turnover, and indole-3-acetic acid oxidation in Zea mays seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonhebel, H. M.; Bandurski, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    Oxindole-3-acetic acid is the principal catabolite of indole-3-acetic acid in Zea mays seedlings. In this paper measurements of the turnover of oxindole-3-acetic acid are presented and used to calculate the rate of indole-3-acetic acid oxidation. [3H]Oxindole-3-acetic acid was applied to the endosperm of Zea mays seedlings and allowed to equilibrate for 24 h before the start of the experiment. The subsequent decrease in its specific activity was used to calculate the turnover rate. The average half-life of oxindole-3-acetic acid in the shoots was found to be 30 h while that in the kernels had an average half-life of 35h. Using previously published values of the pool sizes of oxindole-3-acetic acid in shoots and kernels from seedlings of the same age and variety, and grown under the same conditions, the rate of indole-3-acetic acid oxidation was calculated to be 1.1 pmol plant-1 h-1 in the shoots and 7.1 pmol plant-1 h-1 in the kernels.

  19. Non-linear direct effects of acid rain on leaf photosynthetic rate of terrestrial plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dan; Du, Enzai; Sun, Zhengzhong; Zeng, Xuetong; de Vries, Wim

    2017-09-12

    Anthropogenic emissions of acid precursors have enhanced global occurrence of acid rain, especially in East Asia. Acid rain directly suppresses leaf function by eroding surface waxes and cuticle and leaching base cations from mesophyll cells, while the simultaneous foliar uptake of nitrates in rainwater may directly benefit leaf photosynthesis and plant growth, suggesting a non-linear direct effect of acid rain. By synthesizing data from literature on acid rain exposure experiments, we assessed the direct effects of acid rain on leaf photosynthesis across 49 terrestrial plants in China. Our results show a non-linear direct effect of acid rain on leaf photosynthetic rate, including a neutral to positive effect above pH 5.0 and a negative effect below that pH level. The acid rain sensitivity of leaf photosynthesis showed no significant difference between herbs and woody species below pH 5.0, but the impacts above that pH level were strongly different, resulting in a significant increase in leaf photosynthetic rate of woody species and an insignificant effect on herbs. Our analysis also indicates a positive effect of the molar ratio of nitric versus sulfuric acid in the acid solution on leaf photosynthetic rate. These findings imply that rainwater acidity and the composition of acids both affect the response of leaf photosynthesis and therefore result in a non-linear direct effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Acidic ribosomal proteins and histone H3 from Leishmania present a high rate of divergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ysabel Montoya

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Another additional peculiarity in Leishmania will be discussed about of the amino acid divergence rate of three structural proteins: acidic ribosomal P1 and P2b proteins, and histone H3 by using multiple sequence alignment and dendrograms. These structural proteins present a high rate of divergence regarding to their homologous protein in Trypanosoma cruzi. At this regard, L. (V. peruviana P1 and T. cruzi P1 showed 57.4% of divergence rate. Likewise, L. (V. braziliensis histone H3 and acidic ribosomal P2 protein exhibited 31.8% and 41.7% respectively of rate of divergence in comparison with their homologous in T. cruzi.

  1. Engineering strategies aimed at control of acidification rate of lactic acid bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Solem, Christian; Holm, Anders Koefoed

    2013-01-01

    The ability of lactic acid bacteria to produce lactic acid from various sugars plays an important role in food fermentations. Lactic acid is derived from pyruvate, the end product of glycolysis and thus a fast lactic acid production rate requires a high glycolytic flux. In addition to lactic acid......, alternative end products - ethanol, acetic acid and formic acid - are formed by many species. The central role of glycolysis in lactic acid bacteria has provoked numerous studies aiming at identifying potential bottleneck(s) since knowledge about flux control could be important not only for optimizing food...... fermentation processes, but also for novel applications of lactic acid bacteria, such as cell factories for the production of green fuels and chemicals. With respect to the control and regulation of the fermentation mode, some progress has been made, but the question of which component(s) control the main...

  2. The mechanism of lead catalysis of double-base rocket propellant combustion: Super-rate burning and the plateau/mesa phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, W.H.; Neidert, J.B. (Thiokol Corp., Huntsville, AL (United States))

    1993-10-01

    Although double-base propellants contain a fairly complex mixture of ingredients, the most unstable compounds present are the nitrate esters, nitrocellulose and nitrate ester plasticizers, which represent the majority of most formulations; usually the ballistic additives, a lead compound and often carbon, represent from 1% to 5% of the total propellant. Energetic additives such as RDX and HMX are often present, but these nitramines are less responsive to lead catalysis which is characterized by a region of super-rate burning at lower pressures followed by a plateau region at higher pressure as the catalytic effectiveness appears to decrease and often a mesa region as the burn rate actually decreases with pressure. To explain both the super-rate burning and the plateau/mesa phenomena, one should logically examine the chemistry of decomposition of the nitrate esters to explain both lead catalysis and the apparent loss of catalysis; fortunately, examination of the reported chemistry of nitrate esters and several more recent investigations, which used sophisticated experimental techniques to examine double-base propellant combustion, provide support for a comprehensive mechanism to explain both.

  3. Applied combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    From the title, the reader is led to expect a broad practical treatise on combustion and combustion devices. Remarkably, for a book of modest dimension, the author is able to deliver. The text is organized into 12 Chapters, broadly treating three major areas: combustion fundamentals -- introduction (Ch. 1), thermodynamics (Ch. 2), fluid mechanics (Ch. 7), and kinetics (Ch. 8); fuels -- coal, municipal solid waste, and other solid fuels (Ch. 4), liquid (Ch. 5) and gaseous (Ch. 6) fuels; and combustion devices -- fuel cells (Ch. 3), boilers (Ch. 4), Otto (Ch. 10), diesel (Ch. 11), and Wankel (Ch. 10) engines and gas turbines (Ch. 12). Although each topic could warrant a complete text on its own, the author addresses each of these major themes with reasonable thoroughness. Also, the book is well documented with a bibliography, references, a good index, and many helpful tables and appendices. In short, Applied Combustion does admirably fulfill the author`s goal for a wide engineering science introduction to the general subject of combustion.

  4. Simplified Two-Time Step Method for Calculating Combustion Rates and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions for Hydrogen/Air and Hydorgen/Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Melissa; Marek, C. John

    2005-01-01

    A simplified single rate expression for hydrogen combustion and nitrogen oxide production was developed. Detailed kinetics are predicted for the chemical kinetic times using the complete chemical mechanism over the entire operating space. These times are then correlated to the reactor conditions using an exponential fit. Simple first order reaction expressions are then used to find the conversion in the reactor. The method uses a two-time step kinetic scheme. The first time averaged step is used at the initial times with smaller water concentrations. This gives the average chemical kinetic time as a function of initial overall fuel air ratio, temperature, and pressure. The second instantaneous step is used at higher water concentrations (> 1 x 10(exp -20) moles/cc) in the mixture which gives the chemical kinetic time as a function of the instantaneous fuel and water mole concentrations, pressure and temperature (T4). The simple correlations are then compared to the turbulent mixing times to determine the limiting properties of the reaction. The NASA Glenn GLSENS kinetics code calculates the reaction rates and rate constants for each species in a kinetic scheme for finite kinetic rates. These reaction rates are used to calculate the necessary chemical kinetic times. This time is regressed over the complete initial conditions using the Excel regression routine. Chemical kinetic time equations for H2 and NOx are obtained for H2/air fuel and for the H2/O2. A similar correlation is also developed using data from NASA s Chemical Equilibrium Applications (CEA) code to determine the equilibrium temperature (T4) as a function of overall fuel/air ratio, pressure and initial temperature (T3). High values of the regression coefficient R2 are obtained.

  5. Summary of Simplified Two Time Step Method for Calculating Combustion Rates and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions for Hydrogen/Air and Hydrogen/Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, C. John; Molnar, Melissa

    2005-01-01

    A simplified single rate expression for hydrogen combustion and nitrogen oxide production was developed. Detailed kinetics are predicted for the chemical kinetic times using the complete chemical mechanism over the entire operating space. These times are then correlated to the reactor conditions using an exponential fit. Simple first order reaction expressions are then used to find the conversion in the reactor. The method uses a two time step kinetic scheme. The first time averaged step is used at the initial times with smaller water concentrations. This gives the average chemical kinetic time as a function of initial overall fuel air ratio, temperature, and pressure. The second instantaneous step is used at higher water concentrations (greater than l x 10(exp -20)) moles per cc) in the mixture which gives the chemical kinetic time as a function of the instantaneous fuel and water mole concentrations, pressure and temperature (T(sub 4)). The simple correlations are then compared to the turbulent mixing times to determine the limiting properties of the reaction. The NASA Glenn GLSENS kinetics code calculates the reaction rates and rate constants for each species in a kinetic scheme for finite kinetic rates. These reaction rates are used to calculate the necessary chemical kinetic times. This time is regressed over the complete initial conditions using the Excel regression routine. Chemical kinetic time equations for H2 and NOx are obtained for H2/Air fuel and for H2/O2. A similar correlation is also developed using data from NASA's Chemical Equilibrium Applications (CEA) code to determine the equilibrium temperature (T(sub 4)) as a function of overall fuel/air ratio, pressure and initial temperature (T(sub 3)). High values of the regression coefficient R squared are obtained.

  6. Determination of low isotopic enrichment of L-[1-C-13]valine by gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry : a robust method for measuring protein fractional synthetic rates in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijngoud, DJ; Hellstern, G; Elzinga, H; de Sain-van der Velden, MG; Okken, A; Stellaard, F

    1998-01-01

    A method was developed for measuring protein fractional synthetic rates using the N-methoxycarbonylmethyl ester (MCM) derivative of L-[1-C-13]valine and on-line gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). The derivatization procedure can be performed rapidly and GC sep

  7. Determination of low isotopic enrichment of L-[1-C-13]valine by gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry : a robust method for measuring protein fractional synthetic rates in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijngoud, DJ; Hellstern, G; Elzinga, H; de Sain-van der Velden, MG; Okken, A; Stellaard, F

    A method was developed for measuring protein fractional synthetic rates using the N-methoxycarbonylmethyl ester (MCM) derivative of L-[1-C-13]valine and on-line gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). The derivatization procedure can be performed rapidly and GC

  8. Comparison of gas-phase acidities of some carbon acids with their rates of hydron exchange in methanolic methoxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeTuri, V.F.; Koch, H.F.; Koch, J.G.; Lodder, G.; Mishima, M.; Zuilhof, H.; Abrams, N.M.; Anders, C.E.; Biffinger, J.C.; Han, P.; Kurland, A.R.; Nichols, J.M.; Ruminski, A.M.; Smith, P.R.; Vasey, K.D.J.

    2006-01-01

    Hydron exchange reaction rates, k(exch)M(-1) s(-1), using methanolic sodium methoxide are compared with gas-phase acidities, Delta G(Acid)(0) kcal/mol, for four 9-YPhenylfluorenes-9-H-i, seven (YC6H4CH)-H-i(CF3)(2), seven YC6H4-(CHClCF3)-H-i, and (C6F5H)-H-i. Fourteen of the fluorinated benzylic com

  9. Reliability of Urinary Excretion Rate Adjustment in Measurements of Hippuric Acid in Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Nicolli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The urinary excretion rate is calculated based on short-term, defined time sample collections with a known sample mass, and this measurement can be used to remove the variability in urine concentrations due to urine dilution. Adjustment to the urinary excretion rate of hippuric acid was evaluated in 31 healthy volunteers (14 males and 17 females. Urine was collected as short-term or spot samples and tested for specific gravity, creatinine and hippuric acid. Hippuric acid values were unadjusted or adjusted to measurements of specific gravity, creatinine or urinary excretion rate. Hippuric acid levels were partially independent of urinary volume and urinary flow rate, in contrast to specific gravity and creatinine, which were both highly dependent on the hippuric acid level. Accordingly, hippuric acid was independent on urinary specific gravity and creatinine excretion. Unadjusted and adjusted values for specific gravity or creatinine were generally closely correlated, especially in spot samples. Values adjusted to the urinary excretion rate appeared well correlated to those unadjusted and adjusted to specific gravity or creatinine values. Thus, adjustment of crude hippuric acid values to the urinary excretion rate is a valid procedure but is difficult to apply in the field of occupational medicine and does not improve the information derived from values determined in spot urine samples, either unadjusted or adjusted to specific gravity and creatinine.

  10. Correlating dynamic amino acid properties with success rate of crystallization of proteins from Bacteroides vulgatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Shaomin [State Key Laboratory of Non-food Biomass Enzyme Technology, National Engineering Research Center for Non-food Biorefinery, Guangxi Key Laboratory of Biorefinery, Guangxi Academy of Sciences, 98 Daling Road, Nanning, Guangxi, 530007 (China); Wu, Guang [State Key Laboratory of Non-food Biomass Enzyme Technology, National Engineering Research Center for Non-food Biorefinery, Guangxi Key Laboratory of Biorefinery, Guangxi Academy of Sciences, 98 Daling Road, Nanning, Guangxi, 530007 (China); DreamSciTech Consulting, 301, Building 12, Nanyou A-zone, Jiannan Road, Shenzhen, Guangdong, 518054 (China)

    2012-05-15

    To enhance the success rate of protein crystallization, many studies were conducted to determine the relationship between amino acid properties and the success rate of protein crystallization. Although those were successful, new efforts should be made to search for the new factors, which affect protein crystallization. In this study, two dynamic amino acid properties were used to correlate with the success rate of crystallization of proteins from Bacteroides vulgatus, because the amino acid properties used in previous studies were steady. As previously done, logistic regression and neural network were used to model that relationship, and the results were compared against those obtained from each of 532 amino acid properties, which severed as benchmark. The results demonstrated that dynamic amino acid properties should be taken into consideration of protein crystallization. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Protodeboronation of Heteroaromatic, Vinyl, and Cyclopropyl Boronic Acids: pH-Rate Profiles, Autocatalysis, and Disproportionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Paul A; Leach, Andrew G; Campbell, Andrew D; Lloyd-Jones, Guy C

    2016-07-27

    pH-rate profiles for aqueous-organic protodeboronation of 18 boronic acids, many widely viewed as unstable, have been studied by NMR and DFT. Rates were pH-dependent, and varied substantially between the boronic acids, with rate maxima that varied over 6 orders of magnitude. A mechanistic model containing five general pathways (k1-k5) has been developed, and together with input of [B]tot, KW, Ka, and KaH, the protodeboronation kinetics can be correlated as a function of pH (1-13) for all 18 species. Cyclopropyl and vinyl boronic acids undergo very slow protodeboronation, as do 3- and 4-pyridyl boronic acids (t0.5 > 1 week, pH 12, 70 °C). In contrast, 2-pyridyl and 5-thiazolyl boronic acids undergo rapid protodeboronation (t0.5 ≈ 25-50 s, pH 7, 70 °C), via fragmentation of zwitterionic intermediates. Lewis acid additives (e.g., Cu, Zn salts) can attenuate (2-pyridyl) or accelerate (5-thiazolyl and 5-pyrazolyl) fragmentation. Two additional processes compete when the boronic acid and the boronate are present in sufficient proportions (pH = pKa ± 1.6): (i) self-/autocatalysis and (ii) sequential disproportionations of boronic acid to borinic acid and borane.

  12. Combustible Cartridge Case Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    University (NYU) has resulted in the selection of two cross-linked melamine / formaldehyde acrylic styrene resin systems that can be used in the beater additive... melamine resin Akaradit II stabilizer 20. ABSTRACT (con) Test coupons of combustible cartridge case material were fabricated using these recommended...and agitated for 30 min before the pH was slowly lowered to 3 with p-toluene sulfonic acid. In order to maintain this pH in the felting tank, it was

  13. A comprehensive fractal char combustion model☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuting Liu; Rong He

    2016-01-01

    The char combustion mechanisms were analyzed and a comprehensive fractal char combustion model was developed to give a better understanding and better predictions of the char combustion characteristics. Most of the complex factors affecting the char combustion were included, such as the coupling effects between the pore diffusion and the chemical reactions, the evolution of the char pore structures and the variation of the apparent reaction order during combustion, the CO/CO2 ratio in the combustion products and the correction for oxy-char combustion. Eleven different chars were then combusted in two drop tube furnaces with the conversions of the partly burned char samples measured by thermogravimetric analysis. The combustion processes of these chars were simulated with the predicted char conversions matching very well with the measured data which shows that this char combustion model has good accuracy. The apparent reaction order of the char combustion decreases, stabilizes and then increases during the combustion process. The combustion rates in the oxy-mode are general y slower than in the air-mode and the effect of the char-CO2 gasification reac-tion becomes obvious only when the temperature is relatively high and the O2 concentration is relatively low.

  14. Combustion of boron containing compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, Y.; Pivkina, A. [Institute of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31

    Boron is one of the most energetic components for explosives, propellants and for heterogeneous condensed systems in common. The combustion process of mixtures of boron with different oxidizers was studied. The burning rate, concentration combustion limits, the agglomeration and dispersion processes during reaction wave propagation were analysed in the respect of the percolation theory. The linear dependence of the burning rate on the contact surface value was demonstrated. The percolative model for the experimental results explanation is proposed. (authors) 5 refs.

  15. Disposal of fluidized bed combustion ash in an underground mine to control acid mine drainage and subsidence. Quarterly report, December 1, 1996--February 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This project will evaluate the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of filling abandoned underground mine voids with alkaline, advanced coal combustion wastes (Fluidized Bed Combustion-FBC ash). Success will be measured in terms of technical feasibility of the approach (i.e. % void filling), cost, environmental benefits (acid mine drainage and subsidence control) and environmental impacts (noxious ion release). During Phase 3 the majority of the activity involves completing two full scale demonstration projects. The eleven acre Longridge mine in Preston County will be filled with 53,000 cubic yards of grout during the summer of 1997 and monitored for the following year. The second demonstration involves stowing 2,000 tons of ash into an abandoned mine to demonstrate the newly redesigned Burnett Ejector. This demonstration is anticipated to take place during Summer 1997, as well. This document will report on progress made during Phase 3. The report will be divided into four major sections. The first will be the Hydraulic Injection component. This section of the report will report on progress and milestones associated with the grouting activities of the project. The Phase 3 tasks of Economic Analysis and Regulatory Analysis is covered under this section. The second component is Pneumatic Injection. This section reports on progress made towards completing the demonstration project. The Water Quality component involves background monitoring of water quality and precipitation at the Phase 3 (Longridge) mine site. The last component involves evaluating the migration of contaminants through the grouted mine. A computer model has been developed in earlier phases and will model the flow of water in and around the grouted Longridge mine. The Gantt Chart on the following page details progress by task.

  16. Disposal of fluidized bed combustion ash in an underground mine to control acid mine drainage and subsidence. Quarterly report, December 1, 1996--February 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This project will evaluate the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of filling abandoned underground mine voids with alkaline, advanced coal combustion wastes (Fluidized Bed Combustion -- FBC ash). Success will be measured in terms of technical feasibility of the approach (i.e. % void filling), cost, environmental benefits (acid mine drainage and subsidence control) and environmental impacts (noxious ion release). During Phase 3 the majority of the activity involves completing two full scale demonstration projects. The eleven acre Longridge mine in Preston County will be filled with 53,000 cubic yards of grout during the summer of 1997 and monitored for the following year. The second demonstration involves stowing 2,000 tons of ash into an abandoned mine to demonstrate the newly redesigned Burnett Ejector. This demonstration is anticipated to take place during Summer 1997, as well. This document will report on progress made during Phase 3. The report will be divided into four major sections. The first will be the Hydraulic Injection component. This section of the report will report on progress and milestones associated with the grouting activities of the project. The Phase 3 tasks of Economic Analysis and Regulatory Analysis will be covered under this section. The second component is Pneumatic Injection. This section reports on progress made towards completing the demonstration project. The Water Quality component involves background monitoring of water quality and precipitation at the Phase 3 (Longridge) mine site. The last component involves evaluating the migration of contaminants through the grouted mine. A computer model has been developed in earlier phases and will model the flow of water in and around the grouted Longridge mine.

  17. Carbon isotopic ratio analysis by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the detection of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) administration to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saudan, Christophe; Augsburger, Marc; Mangin, Patrice; Saugy, Martial

    2007-01-01

    Since GHB (gamma-hydroxybutyric acid) is naturally produced in the human body, clinical and forensic toxicologists must be able to discriminate between endogenous levels and a concentration resulting from exposure. To suggest an alternative to the use of interpretative concentration cut-offs, the detection of exogenous GHB in urine specimens was investigated by means of gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). GHB was isolated from urinary matrix by successive purification on Oasis MCX and Bond Elute SAX solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges prior to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractioning using an Atlantis dC18 column eluted with a mixture of formic acid and methanol. Subsequent intramolecular esterification of GHB leading to the formation of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) was carried out to avoid introduction of additional carbon atoms for carbon isotopic ratio analysis. A precision of 0.3 per thousand was determined using this IRMS method for samples at GHB concentrations of 10 mg/L. The (13)C/(12)C ratios of GHB in samples of subjects exposed to the drug ranged from -32.1 to -42.1 per thousand, whereas the results obtained for samples containing GHB of endogenous origin at concentration levels less than 10 mg/L were in the range -23.5 to -27.0 per thousand. Therefore, these preliminary results show that a possible discrimination between endogenous and exogenous GHB can be made using carbon isotopic ratio analyses.

  18. Simplified Two-Time Step Method for Calculating Combustion and Emission Rates of Jet-A and Methane Fuel With and Without Water Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Melissa; Marek, C. John

    2005-01-01

    A simplified kinetic scheme for Jet-A, and methane fuels with water injection was developed to be used in numerical combustion codes, such as the National Combustor Code (NCC) or even simple FORTRAN codes. The two time step method is either an initial time averaged value (step one) or an instantaneous value (step two). The switch is based on the water concentration in moles/cc of 1x10(exp -20). The results presented here results in a correlation that gives the chemical kinetic time as two separate functions. This two time step method is used as opposed to a one step time averaged method previously developed to determine the chemical kinetic time with increased accuracy. The first time averaged step is used at the initial times for smaller water concentrations. This gives the average chemical kinetic time as a function of initial overall fuel air ratio, initial water to fuel mass ratio, temperature, and pressure. The second instantaneous step, to be used with higher water concentrations, gives the chemical kinetic time as a function of instantaneous fuel and water mole concentration, pressure and temperature (T4). The simple correlations would then be compared to the turbulent mixing times to determine the limiting rates of the reaction. The NASA Glenn GLSENS kinetics code calculates the reaction rates and rate constants for each species in a kinetic scheme for finite kinetic rates. These reaction rates are used to calculate the necessary chemical kinetic times. Chemical kinetic time equations for fuel, carbon monoxide and NOx are obtained for Jet-A fuel and methane with and without water injection to water mass loadings of 2/1 water to fuel. A similar correlation was also developed using data from NASA's Chemical Equilibrium Applications (CEA) code to determine the equilibrium concentrations of carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide as functions of overall equivalence ratio, water to fuel mass ratio, pressure and temperature (T3). The temperature of the gas entering

  19. Formation rates, stability and reactivity of sulfuric acid - amine clusters predicted by computational chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtén, Theo; Ortega, Ismael; Kupiainen, Oona; Olenius, Tinja; Loukonen, Ville; Reiman, Heidi; McGrath, Matthew; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-04-01

    Despite the importance of atmospheric particle formation for both climate and air quality, both experiments and non-empirical models using e.g. sulfuric acid, ammonia and water as condensing vapors have so far been unable to reproduce atmospheric observations using realistic trace gas concentrations. Recent experimental and theoretical evidence has shown that this mystery is likely resolved by amines. Combining first-principles evaporation rates for sulfuric acid - dimethylamine clusters with cluster kinetic modeling, we show that even sub-ppt concentrations of amines, together with atmospherically realistic concentrations of sulfuric acid, result in formation rates close to those observed in the atmosphere. Our simulated cluster formation rates are also close to, though somewhat larger than, those measured at the CLOUD experiment in CERN for both sulfuric acid - ammonia and sulfuric acid - dimethylamine systems. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the remaining discrepancy for the sulfuric acid - amine particle formation rates is likely caused by steric hindrances to cluster formation (due to alkyl groups of the amine molecules) rather than by significant errors in the evaporation rates. First-principles molecular dynamic and reaction kinetic modeling shed further light on the microscopic physics and chemistry of sulfuric acid - amine clusters. For example, while the number and type of hydrogen bonds in the clusters typically reach their equilibrium values on a picosecond timescale, and the overall bonding patterns predicted by traditional "static" quantum chemical calculations seem to be stable, the individual atoms participating in the hydrogen bonds continuously change at atmospherically realistic temperatures. From a chemical reactivity perspective, we have also discovered a surprising phenomenon: clustering with sulfuric acid molecules slightly increases the activation energy required for the abstraction of alkyl hydrogens from amine molecules. This implies

  20. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS. II. ACID AND GENERAL BASE CATALYZED HYDROLYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate acid and neutral hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition states of a ...

  1. Combustion diagnostic for active engine feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jr., Johney Boyd; Daw, Charles Stuart; Wagner, Robert Milton

    2007-10-02

    This invention detects the crank angle location where combustion switches from premixed to diffusion, referred to as the transition index, and uses that location to define integration limits that measure the portions of heat released during the combustion process that occur during the premixed and diffusion phases. Those integrated premixed and diffusion values are used to develop a metric referred to as the combustion index. The combustion index is defined as the integrated diffusion contribution divided by the integrated premixed contribution. As the EGR rate is increased enough to enter the low temperature combustion regime, PM emissions decrease because more of the combustion process is occurring over the premixed portion of the heat release rate profile and the diffusion portion has been significantly reduced. This information is used to detect when the engine is or is not operating in a low temperature combustion mode and provides that feedback to an engine control algorithm.

  2. Combustion Stratification for Naphtha from CI Combustion to PPC

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.

    2017-03-28

    This study demonstrates the combustion stratification from conventional compression ignition (CI) combustion to partially premixed combustion (PPC). Experiments are performed in an optical CI engine at a speed of 1200 rpm for diesel and naphtha (RON = 46). The motored pressure at TDC is maintained at 35 bar and fuelMEP is kept constant at 5.1 bar to account for the difference in fuel properties between naphtha and diesel. Single injection strategy is employed and the fuel is injected at a pressure of 800 bar. Photron FASTCAM SA4 that captures in-cylinder combustion at the rate of 10000 frames per second is employed. The captured high speed video is processed to study the combustion homogeneity based on an algorithm reported in previous studies. Starting from late fuel injection timings, combustion stratification is investigated by advancing the fuel injection timings. For late start of injection (SOI), a direct link between SOI and combustion phasing is noticed. At early SOI, combustion phasing depends on both intake air temperature and SOI. In order to match the combustion phasing (CA50) of diesel, the intake air temperature is increased to 90°C for naphtha. The combustion stratification from CI to PPC is also investigated for various level of dilution by displacing oxygen with nitrogen in the intake. The start of combustion (SOC) was delayed with the increase in dilution and to compensate for this, the intake air temperature is increased. The mixture homogeneity is enhanced for higher dilution due to longer ignition delay. The results show that high speed image is initially blue and then turned yellow, indicating soot formation and oxidation. The luminosity of combustion images decreases with early SOI and increased dilution. The images are processed to generate the level of stratification based on the image intensity. The level of stratification is same for diesel and naphtha at various SOI. When O concentration in the intake is decreased to 17.7% and 14

  3. New Reduced Two-Time Step Method for Calculating Combustion and Emission Rates of Jet-A and Methane Fuel With and Without Water Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Melissa; Marek, C. John

    2004-01-01

    A simplified kinetic scheme for Jet-A, and methane fuels with water injection was developed to be used in numerical combustion codes, such as the National Combustor Code (NCC) or even simple FORTRAN codes that are being developed at Glenn. The two time step method is either an initial time averaged value (step one) or an instantaneous value (step two). The switch is based on the water concentration in moles/cc of 1x10(exp -20). The results presented here results in a correlation that gives the chemical kinetic time as two separate functions. This two step method is used as opposed to a one step time averaged method previously developed to determine the chemical kinetic time with increased accuracy. The first time averaged step is used at the initial times for smaller water concentrations. This gives the average chemical kinetic time as a function of initial overall fuel air ratio, initial water to fuel mass ratio, temperature, and pressure. The second instantaneous step, to be used with higher water concentrations, gives the chemical kinetic time as a function of instantaneous fuel and water mole concentration, pressure and temperature (T4). The simple correlations would then be compared to the turbulent mixing times to determine the limiting properties of the reaction. The NASA Glenn GLSENS kinetics code calculates the reaction rates and rate constants for each species in a kinetic scheme for finite kinetic rates. These reaction rates were then used to calculate the necessary chemical kinetic times. Chemical kinetic time equations for fuel, carbon monoxide and NOx were obtained for Jet-A fuel and methane with and without water injection to water mass loadings of 2/1 water to fuel. A similar correlation was also developed using data from NASA's Chemical Equilibrium Applications (CEA) code to determine the equilibrium concentrations of carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide as functions of overall equivalence ratio, water to fuel mass ratio, pressure and temperature (T3

  4. EFFECT OF SODIUM DODECYLBENZENESULFONIC ACID (SDBS ON THE GROWTH RATE AND MORPHOLOGY OF BORAX CRYSTAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suharso Suharso

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of the effect of sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (SDBS on both growth rate and morphology of borax crystal has been carried out.  This experiment was carried out at temperature of 25 °C and relative supersaturation of 0.21 and 0.74 under in situ cell optical microscopy method.  The result shows that SDBS inhibits the growth rate and changes the morphology of borax crystal.   Keywords: Borax; growth rate; crystallization, SDBS

  5. EFFECT OF SODIUM DODECYLBENZENESULFONIC ACID (SDBS) ON THE GROWTH RATE AND MORPHOLOGY OF BORAX CRYSTAL

    OpenAIRE

    Suharso, Suharso

    2010-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (SDBS) on both growth rate and morphology of borax crystal has been carried out.  This experiment was carried out at temperature of 25 °C and relative supersaturation of 0.21 and 0.74 under in situ cell optical microscopy method.  The result shows that SDBS inhibits the growth rate and changes the morphology of borax crystal.   Keywords: Borax; growth rate; crystallization, SDBS

  6. Influence of polyunsaturated fatty acids on blood pressure, resting heart rate and heart rate variability among French Polynesians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera, Beatriz; Suhas, Edouard; Counil, Emilie; Poirier, Paul; Dewailly, Eric

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the associations between marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and blood pressure (BP), resting heart rate (HR), and heart rate variability (HRV) in a population highly exposed to methylmercury through the diet. Concentrations of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in erythrocytes membranes were measured in 180 French Polynesian adults (≥18 years) residing in Tubuai, which is a community with a traditional lifestyle, or Papeete, which has a modern lifestyle. HRV was measured using a 2-hour ambulatory electrocardiogram (Holter). Resting HR and BP were measured using standardized protocols and pulse pressure (PP) was calculated as systolic BP - diastolic BP. The associations between n-3 PUFAs and the dependent variables were studied using simple and multiple linear regressions. Increasing DHA concentration was associated with lower resting HR (β = -2.57, p = 0.005) and diastolic BP (β = -1.96, p = 0.05) and higher HRV in multivariable models. Specifically, DHA was associated with high frequency (HF; β = 0.19, p = 0.02) and the square root of the mean squared differences of successive R-R intervals (difference between two consecutive R waves; rMSSD; β = 0.08, p = 0.03), which are specific indices of the parasympathetic activity of the autonomic nervous system. DHA was associated with lower BP and resting HR and higher HRV among French Polynesians who are also exposed to high methylmercury levels.

  7. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) produced in the combustion of fatty acid alkyl esters from different feedstocks: Quantification, statistical analysis and mechanisms of formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamas, Alberto; Al-Lal, Ana-María; García-Martínez, María-Jesús; Ortega, Marcelo F; Llamas, Juan F; Lapuerta, Magín; Canoira, Laureano

    2017-05-15

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants of concern due to their carcinogenic and mutagenic activity. Their emissions are mainly related with the combustion or pyrolysis of the organic matter, such as in fossil fuels combustion. It is important to characterize PAHs in the combustions of biofuels due to their increasing importance in the actual energetic setting. There is a lot of research focused in PAHs emission due to the combustion in diesel engines; but only few of them have analyzed the effect of raw material and type of alcohol used in the transesterification process. Different raw materials (i.e. animal fat, palm, rapeseed, linseed, peanut, coconut, and soybean oils) have been used for obtaining FAME and FAEE. A method for measuring PAHs generated during combustion in a bomb calorimeter has been developed. Combustion was made at different oxygen pressures and the samples were taken from the bomb after each combustion. Samples were extracted and the PAHs amounts formed during combustion were analyzed by GC-MS. This research shows the statistical relationships among the 16 PAHs of concern, biodiesel composition and oxygen pressure during combustion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Advanced Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  9. Determining Heats of Combustion of Gaseous Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jag J.; Sprinkle, Danny R.; Puster, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    Enrichment-oxygen flow rate-ratio related to heat of combustion. Technique developed for determining heats of combustion of natural-gas samples. Based on measuring ratio m/n, where m is (volmetric) flow rate of oxygen required to enrich carrier air in which test gas flowing at rate n is burned, such that mole fraction of oxygen in combustion-product gases equals that in carrier air. The m/n ratio directly related to heats of combustion of saturated hydrocarbons present in natural gas.

  10. Flameless Combustion for Gas Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Li, Guoqiang; Overman, Nick; Cornwell, Michael; Stankovic, Dragan; Fuchs, Laszlo; Milosavljevic, Vladimir

    2006-11-01

    An experimental study of a novel flameless combustor for gas turbine engines is presented. Flameless combustion is characterized by distributed flame and even temperature distribution for high preheat air temperature and large amount of recirculating low oxygen exhaust gases. Extremely low emissions of NOx, CO, and UHC are reported. Measurements of the flame chemiluminescence, CO and NOx emissions, acoustic pressure, temperature and velocity fields as a function of the preheat temperature, inlet air mass flow rate, exhaust nozzle contraction ratio, and combustor chamber diameter are described. The data indicate that larger pressure drop promotes flameless combustion and low NOx emissions at the same flame temperature. High preheated temperature and flow rates also help in forming stable combustion and therefore are favorable for flameless combustion.

  11. Interactions of acetylcholinesterase with salvianolic acid B and rosmarinic acid from Salvia miltiorhiza water extract investigated by NMR relaxation rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Wei Yin; Yi Ming Li; Wei Wei; Shan Hao Jiang; Da Yuan Zhu; Wei Hong Du

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand whether the ameliorating effect on old ages memory disorder by the root of Salvia miltiorhiza is related to the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, two main ingredients, salvianolic acid B (1) and rosmarinic acid (2), which were isolated from S. Miltiorhiza water extract, were investigated in vitro by NMR relaxation rate in this work. The results showed that the proton selective relaxation rates and the molecular rotational correlation time of proton pairs for compounds 1 and 2 increased significantly by adding of AChE in mixing solution. The study reveals that the two compounds might bind to the enzyme and have AChE inhibitory effect, which could contribute to the ameliorating effect at some extent on old ages memory disorder.

  12. Size dependent electrical and magnetic properties of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles synthesized by the combustion method: Comparison between aspartic acid and glycine as fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugavani, A.; Kalai Selvan, R.; Layek, Samar; Sanjeeviraja, C.

    2014-03-01

    Using two different fuels such as aspartic acid and glycine, the spinel zinc ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by the combustion method at different pH values. The thermochemical calculations for both the fuel assisted materials and its adiabatic flame temperature were calculated. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern revealed the formation of single phase ZnFe2O4 with high crystallinity. The characteristic functional groups of Fe3O and Zn3O were identified through FTIR analysis. Uniform size distribution of spherical particle in the average size range of 35-100 nm was inferred from SEM images. The room temperature DC conductivities of ZnFe2O4 particles prepared by using aspartic and glycine are in the order of 10-7 and 10-8 respectively. The dielectric spectral analysis inferred that the obtained dielectric constant is high at low frequency and decreases with increase in frequency. This dielectric behavior is in accordance with the Maxwell-Wagner interfacial polarization. VSM and Mössbauer analysis revealed that the prepared material exhibits paramagnetic behavior and Fe3+ state of iron content in ZnFe2O4 at room temperature.

  13. Investigation of aerosol based emission of MEA due to sulphuric acid aerosol and soot in a post combustion CO2 capture process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khakharia, P.M.; Brachert, L.; Mertens, J.; Huizinga, A.; Schallert, B.; Schaber, K.; Vlugt, T.J.H.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2013-01-01

    The prevention of emissions of amine species is of high importance for the overall sustainability and performance of Post Combustion CO2 Capture facilities. There is a clear understanding of amine emissions based on volatility in the treated flue gas. Emission via aerosols from Post Combustion CO2 C

  14. Fluidized-bed combustion of gasification residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudjoi, A.; Heinolainen, A.; Hippinen, I.; Lu, Y. [Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo (Finland). Lab. of Energy Economics and Power Plant Engineering

    1998-12-31

    Hybrid combined cycle processes have been presented as possibilities for power generation in the future. In the processes based on partial gasification of coal, the solid materials removed from a gasifier (i.e. fly ash and bed char) contain unburned fuel, which is burned either in an atmospheric or a pressurised fluidised-bed. Pressurised fluidised-bed (PFB) combustion of gasification residues were studied experimentally by Helsinki University of Technology. The gasification residues, i.e. cyclone fines and bed chars, came from pilot scale PFB gasification tests of bituminous coals. The combustion efficiency was high in cyclone fines combustion. The calcium sulphide oxidised effectively to calcium sulphate in the combustion of cyclone fines. In bed char combustion the residual sulphide contents in solids after combustion were still relatively high. In general, sulphur dioxide emissions in residue combustion were low. The recarbonation of calcium oxide was observed in bed char combustion. Fuel-N conversion to NO{sub x} during bed char combustion and in most of the test runs with cyclone fines was higher than in bituminous coal combustion. In bed char combustion the conversion was significantly higher than in cyclone fines combustion. NO{sub x} emissions increased with increasing excess air for both residues, as was expected. In bed char combustion the highest NO{sub x} emissions were measured at higher pressure. Calculated mass reactivity values of equal particle size of all bed chars studied had similar trends with burnout. The biggest particles had the lowest reactivity values throughout the combustion, while reactivity for finer particles was at considerably higher level and sharply increases with burnout. In the constant combustion conditions used in the tests, no significant differences were observed in rate-controlling mechanisms for bed char fractions studied. 25 refs., 13 figs., 15 tab.

  15. Reduction of birth prevalence rates of neural tube defects after folic acid fortification in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Camelo, Jorge S; Orioli, Iêda M; da Graça Dutra, Maria; Nazer-Herrera, Julio; Rivera, Nelson; Ojeda, María Elena; Canessa, Aurora; Wettig, Elisabeth; Fontannaz, Ana María; Mellado, Cecília; Castilla, Eduardo E

    2005-06-01

    To verify whether the decreasing neural tube defects birth prevalence rates in Chile are due to folic acid fortification or to pre-existing decreasing trends, we performed a population survey using a network of Estudio Colaborativo Latino Americano de Malformaciones Congenitas (ECLAMC, Latin American Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations) maternity hospitals in Chile, between the years 1982 and 2002. Within each maternity hospital, birth prevalence rates of spina bifida and anencephaly were calculated from two pre-fortification periods (1982-1989 and 1990-2000), and from one fortified period (2001-2002). There was no historical trend for spina bifida birth prevalence rates before folic acid fortification, and there was a 51% (minimum 27%, maximum 66%) decrease in the birth prevalence rates of this anomaly in the fortified period. The relative risks of spina bifida were homogeneous among hospitals in the two period comparisons. There was no historical trend for the birth prevalence of anencephaly comparing the two pre-fortified periods, but the relative risks were heterogeneous among hospitals in this comparison. There was a 42% (minimum 10%, maximum 63%) decrease in the birth prevalence rate of anencephaly in the fortified period as compared with the immediately pre-fortified period, with homogeneous relative risks among hospitals. Within the methodological constraints of this study we conclude that the birth prevalence rates for both spina bifida and anencephaly decreased as a result of folic acid fortification, without interference of decreasing secular trends.

  16. Sandia Combustion Research Program: Annual report, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    This report presents research results of the past year, divided thematically into some ten categories. Publications and presentations arising from this work are included in the appendix. Our highlighted accomplishment of the year is the announcement of the discovery and demonstration of the RAPRENOx process. This new mechanism for the elimination of nitrogen oxides from essentially all kinds of combustion exhausts shows promise for commercialization, and may eventually make a significant contribution to our nation's ability to control smog and acid rain. The sections of this volume describe the facility's laser and computer system, laser diagnostics of flames, combustion chemistry, reacting flows, liquid and solid propellant combustion, mathematical models of combustion, high-temperature material interfaces, studies of engine/furnace combustion, coal combustion, and the means of encouraging technology transfer. 182 refs., 170 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. How the folding rates of two- and multistate proteins depend on the amino acid properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jitao T; Huang, Wei; Huang, Shanran R; Li, Xin

    2014-10-01

    Proteins fold by either two-state or multistate kinetic mechanism. We observe that amino acids play different roles in different mechanism. Many residues that are easy to form regular secondary structures (α helices, β sheets and turns) can promote the two-state folding reactions of small proteins. Most of hydrophilic residues can speed up the multistate folding reactions of large proteins. Folding rates of large proteins are equally responsive to the flexibility of partial amino acids. Other properties of amino acids (including volume, polarity, accessible surface, exposure degree, isoelectric point, and phase transfer energy) have contributed little to folding kinetics of the proteins. Cysteine is a special residue, it triggers two-state folding reaction and but inhibits multistate folding reaction. These findings not only provide a new insight into protein structure prediction, but also could be used to direct the point mutations that can change folding rate.

  18. The relation between starch digestion rate and amino acid level for broiler chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weurding, R.E.; Enting, H.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2003-01-01

    Digestion coefficients of nutrients give information about the amount of nutrients available to the animal but not about the rate or site of absorption. Gradual digestion of starch may have an amino acid sparing effect and therefore enhance growth efficiency of broiler chickens. A growth trial was

  19. Factors influencing the rate of non-enzymatic activation of carboxylic and amino acids by ATP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The nonenzymatic formation of adenylate anhydrides of carboxylic and amino acids is discussed as a necessary step in the origin of the genetic code and protein biosynthesis. Results of studies are presented which have shown the rate of activation to depend on the pKa of the carboxyl group, the pH of the medium, temperature, the divalent metal ion catalyst, salt concentration, and the nature of the amino acid. In particular, it was found that of the various amino acids investigated, phenylalanine had the greatest affinity for the adenine derivatives adenosine and ATP. Results thus indicate that selective affinities between amino acids and nucleotides were important during prebiotic chemical evolution, and may have played a major role in the origin of protein synthesis and genetic coding.

  20. Straw combustion on slow-moving grates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2005-01-01

    Combustion of straw in grate-based boilers is often associated with high emission levels and relatively poor fuel burnout. A numerical grate combustion model was developed to assist in improving the combustion performance of these boilers. The model is based on a one-dimensional ‘‘walking......-column’’ approach and includes the energy equations for both the fuel and the gas accounting for heat transfer between the two phases. The model gives important insight into the combustion process and provides inlet conditions for a computational fluid dynamics analysis of the freeboard. The model predictions...... indicate the existence of two distinct combustion modes. Combustion air temperature and mass flow-rate are the two parameters determining the mode. There is a significant difference in reaction rates (ignition velocity) and temperature levels between the two modes. Model predictions were compared...

  1. Combustion Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Combustion Research Laboratory facilitates the development of new combustion systems or improves the operation of existing systems to meet the Army's mission for...

  2. High Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility in Morgantown, WV, researchers can investigate new high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen turbine combustion...

  3. Effect of defatting on acid hydrolysis rate of maize starch with different amylose contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Benxi; Hu, Xiuting; Zhang, Bao; Li, Hongyan; Xu, Xueming; Jin, Zhengyu; Tian, Yaoqi

    2013-11-01

    The effect of defatting on the physiochemical properties and the acid hydrolysis rate of maize starch with different amylose contents was evaluated in this study. The increase in the number of pores and the stripping of starch surface layers were observed after defatting by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction spectrum showed that the peaks attributing to the amylose-lipid complex disappeared. The relative crystallinity increased by 19% for high-amylose maize starch (HMS) on defatting, while the other tested starches virtually unchanged. Differential scanning calorimetry study indicated an increase in the thermal stability for the defatted starches. Compared with native waxy maize starch, the acid hydrolysis rate of the defatted one increased by 6% after 10 days. For normal maize starch (NMS) and HMS, the higher rate of hydrolysis was observed during the first 5 days. Thereafter, the hydrolysis rate was lower than that of their native counterpart. The increase in susceptibility to acid hydrolysis (in the first 5 days) was mainly attributed to the defective and porous structures formed during defatting process, while the decrease of hydrolysis rate for NMS and HMS samples (after the first 5 days) probably resulted from the increase in the relative crystallinity.

  4. New parameterization of sulfuric acid-ammonia-water ternary nucleation rates at tropospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merikanto, J.; Napari, I.; VehkamäKi, H.; Anttila, T.; Kulmala, M.

    2007-08-01

    Recently, the classical theory of sulfuric acid-ammonia-water (H2SO4-NH3-H2O) nucleation was reinvestigated by including the effect of stable ammonium bisulfate formation into calculations. The predicted nucleation rates lowered by many orders of magnitude, bringing them close to agreement with the available experiments on H2SO4-NH3-H2O nucleation. However, because of complex thermodynamics involved, the theoretical calculations of nucleation rates are computationally demanding, and sometimes the theory breaks down at specific concentrations and temperatures. Here we present parameterized equations of ternary H2SO4-NH3-H2O nucleation rates, critical cluster sizes, and critical cluster compositions. Our parameterizations reduce the computing time of these values by a factor of 105 compared with the calculations with the full thermodynamic model. Also, our parameterizations provide reliable estimates for ternary nucleation rates in cases when the full theory fails in isolated points of the parameter space. The parameterized nucleation rates are accurate to one order of magnitude in nucleation rate. Because of their computational efficiency, our parameterizations are particularly suitable for large-scale models of atmosphere. They are valid for temperatures above 235 K, sulfuric acid concentrations 5 · 104-109 cm-3, ammonia mixing ratios 0.1-1000 ppt, relative humidities 5%-95%, and nucleation rates over 10-5 cm-3 s-1. At these conditions, no significant nucleation occurs above 295 K.

  5. Effects of fluidized bed combustion residue on pecan seedling growth and nutrient content. [Carya illinoensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, J.H.; White, A.W. Jr.; Bennett, O.L.

    1985-01-01

    Fluidized bed combustion residue from a calcitic limestone source (FBCRC), a by-product of scrubbing SO/sub 2/ from fossil fuel fired boilers using the FBC technique was evaluated as a source of calcium for pecan (Carya illinoensis (Wang.) K. Koch) seedlings. Fluidized bed combustion residue produced following injection of calcitic limestone into the combustion chamber was more effective in neutralizing soil acidity and increasing extractable soil Ca levels than agricultural calcitic limestone. The Ca concentration in the pecan leaves was increased linearly by Ca rates for both 12- and 24-week growth periods, but stem and petiole Ca concentration was increased linearly for the second 12-week growth period. Macronutrient concentrations were affected by Ca rates for both 12- and 24-week growth periods, but no effect was observed with Ca source. The primary difference was between the control and all other Ca rates.

  6. Thermochemical and trace element behavior of coal gangue, agricultural biomass and their blends during co-combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuncai; Liu, Guijian; Cheng, Siwei; Fang, Ting; Lam, Paul Kwan Sing

    2014-08-01

    The thermal decomposition behavior of coal gangue, peanut shell, wheat straw and their blends during combustion were determined via thermogravimetric analysis. The coal gangue/agricultural biomass blends were prepared in four weight ratios and oxidized under dynamic conditions from room temperature to 1000 °C by various heating rates. Kinetic models were carried out to evaluate the thermal reactivity. The overall mass balance was performed to assess the partition behavior of coal gangue, peanut shell and their blends during combustion in a fixed bed reactor. The decomposition processes of agricultural biomass included evaporation, release of volatile matter and combustion as well as char oxidation. The thermal reactivity of coal gangue could be improved through the addition of agricultural biomass in suitable proportion and subsequent appropriate heating rate during combustion. In combination with the heating value and base/acid ratio limitations, a blending ratio of 30% agricultural biomass is conservatively selected as optimum blending.

  7. Influence of Lime and Phosphorus Application Rates on Growth of Maize in an Acid Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Asbon Opala

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactive effects of lime and phosphorus on maize growth in an acid soil were investigated in a greenhouse experiment. A completely randomized design with 12 treatments consisting of four lime levels, 0, 2, 10, and 20 t ha−1, in a factorial combination with three phosphorus rates, 0, 30, and 100 kg ha−1, was used. Maize was grown in pots for six weeks and its heights and dry matter yield were determined and soils were analyzed for available P and exchangeable acidity. Liming significantly reduced the exchangeable acidity in the soils. The effect of lime on available P was not significant but available P increased with increasing P rates. There was a significant effect of lime, P, and P by lime interactions on plant heights and dry matter. Without lime application, dry matter increased with increasing P rates but, with lime, dry mattes increased from 0 to 30 kg P ha−1 but declined from 30 to 100 kg P ha−1. The highest dry matter yield (13.8 g pot−1 was obtained with a combined 2 t ha−1 of lime with 30 kg P ha−1 suggesting that lime application at low rates combined with moderate amounts of P would be appropriate in this soil.

  8. Internal combustion piston engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segaser, C.L.

    1977-07-01

    Current worldwide production of internal combustion piston engines includes many diversified types of designs and a very broad range of sizes. Engine sizes range from a few horsepower in small mobile units to over 40,000 brake horsepower in large stationary and marine units. The key characteristics of internal combustion piston engines considered appropriate for use as prime movers in Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES) are evaluated. The categories of engines considered include spark-ignition gas engines, compression-ignition oil (diesel) engines, and dual-fuel engines. The engines are evaluated with respect to full-load and part-load performance characteristics, reliability, environmental concerns, estimated 1976 cost data, and current and future status of development. The largest internal combustion piston engines manufactured in the United States range up to 13,540 rated brake horsepower. Future development efforts are anticipated to result in a 20 to 25% increase in brake horsepower without increase in or loss of weight, economy, reliability, or life expectancy, predicated on a simple extension of current development trends.

  9. Smoldering Combustion Experiments in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, David C.; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; Urban, David L.

    1997-01-01

    The Microgravity Smoldering Combustion (MSC) experiment is part of a study of the smolder characteristics of porous combustible materials in a microgravity environment. Smoldering is a non-flaming form of combustion that takes place in the interior of porous materials and takes place in a number of processes ranging from smoldering of porous insulation materials to high temperature synthesis of metals. The objective of the study is to provide a better understanding of the controlling mechanisms of smolder, both in microgravity and normal-gravity. As with many forms of combustion, gravity affects the availability of oxidizer and transport of heat, and therefore the rate of combustion. Microgravity smolder experiments, in both a quiescent oxidizing environment, and in a forced oxidizing flow have been conducted aboard the NASA Space Shuttle (STS-69 and STS-77 missions) to determine the effect of the ambient oxygen concentration and oxidizer forced flow velocity on smolder combustion in microgravity. The experimental apparatus is contained within the NASA Get Away Special Canister (GAS-CAN) Payload. These two sets of experiments investigate the propagation of smolder along the polyurethane foam sample under both diffusion driven and forced flow driven smoldering. The results of the microgravity experiments are compared with identical ones carried out in normal gravity, and are used to verify present theories of smolder combustion. The results of this study will provide new insights into the smoldering combustion process. Thermocouple histories show that the microgravity smolder reaction temperatures (Ts) and propagation velocities (Us) lie between those of identical normal-gravity upward and downward tests. These observations indicate the effect of buoyancy on the transport of oxidizer to the reaction front.

  10. Control of NOx during stationary combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James T. Yeh; Wei-Yin Chen

    2004-11-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) and sulfur oxides (SOx) emissions are primary contributors to acid rain, which is associated with a number of effects including acidification of lakes and streams, accelerated corrosion of buildings, and visibility impairment. Among the various nitrogen oxides emitted from stationary combustion; nitrogen oxide (NO), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) are stable, and NO predominates (over 90%). In health effects, NO{sub 2} can irritate the lungs and lower resistance to respiratory infection. In the area of ozone nonattainment, NOx and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) react in the atmosphere to form ozone, a photochemical oxidant and a major component of smog. Atmospheric ozone can cause respiratory problems by damaging lung tissue and reducing lung function. It is generally believed that over 80% of the total NOx emitted to the atmosphere originate at sources where fossil fuels and industrial wastes are burned. About one-half of the emissions are produced during combustion of fossil fuels in the utility industries. The rate of NOx formation is affected by fuel nitrogen content and by combustor design parameters. Higher firing temperature and combustor pressure increase NOx emissions. Nitric acid plants also produce large amounts of NOx as waste gas, but in much higher concentration than emissions from utility boiler flue gas.

  11. Cellulose acetate layer effect toward aluminium corrosion rate in hydrochloric acid media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andarany, K. S.; Sagir, A.; Ahmad, A.; Deni, S. K.; Gunawan, W.

    2017-09-01

    Corrosion occurs due to the oxidation and reduction reactions between the material and its environment. The oxidation reaction defined as reactions that produce electrons and reduction is between two elements that bind the electrons. Corrosion cannot be inevitable in life both within the industry and household. Corrosion cannot eliminate but can be control. According to the voltaic table, Aluminum is a metal that easily corroded. This study attempts to characterize the type of corrosion by using a strong acid media (HCl). Experiment using a strong acid (HCl), at a low concentration that occurs is pitting corrosion, whereas at high concentrations that occurs is corrosion erosion. One of prevention method is by using a coating method. An efforts are made to slow the rate of corrosion is by coating the metal with “cellulose acetate” (CA). cellulose acetate consisted of cellulose powder dissolved in 99% acetic acid, and then applied to the aluminum metal. Soaking experiments using hydrochloric acid, cellulose acetate is able to slow down the corrosion rate of 47 479%.

  12. Investigating co-combustion characteristics of bamboo and wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fang; Wang, Ruijuan; Jiang, Changle; Yang, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Tao; Hu, Wanhe; Mi, Bingbing; Liu, Zhijia

    2017-07-04

    To investigate co-combustion characteristics of bamboo and wood, moso bamboo and masson pine were torrefied and mixed with different blend ratios. The combustion process was examined by thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The results showed the combustion process of samples included volatile emission and oxidation combustion as well as char combustion. The main mass loss of biomass blends occurred at volatile emission and oxidation combustion stage, while that of torrefied biomass occurred at char combustion stage. With the increase of bamboo content, characteristic temperatures decreased. Compared with untreated biomass, torrefied biomass had a higher initial and burnout temperature. With the increase of heating rates, combustion process of samples shifted to higher temperatures. Compared with non-isothermal models, activation energy obtained from isothermal model was lower. The result is helpful to promote development of co-combustion of bamboo and masson pine wastes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Oxygen-enhanced combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Baukal, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    Combustion technology has traditionally been dominated by air/fuel combustion. However, two developments have increased the significance of oxygen-enhanced combustion-new technologies that produce oxygen less expensively and the increased importance of environmental regulations. Advantages of oxygen-enhanced combustion include less pollutant emissions as well as increased energy efficiency and productivity. Oxygen-Enhanced Combustion, Second Edition compiles information about using oxygen to enhance industrial heating and melting processes. It integrates fundamental principles, applications, a

  14. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK CLEANING: CORROSION RATE FOR ONE VERSUS EIGHT PERCENT OXALIC ACID SOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2011-01-20

    Until recently, the use of oxalic acid for chemically cleaning the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste tanks focused on using concentrated 4 and 8-wt% solutions. Recent testing and research on applicable dissolution mechanisms have concluded that under appropriate conditions, dilute solutions of oxalic acid (i.e., 1-wt%) may be more effective. Based on the need to maximize cleaning effectiveness, coupled with the need to minimize downstream impacts, SRS is now developing plans for using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution. A technology gap associated with using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution was a dearth of suitable corrosion data. Assuming oxalic acid's passivation of carbon steel was proportional to the free oxalate concentration, the general corrosion rate (CR) from a 1-wt% solution may not be bound by those from 8-wt%. Therefore, after developing the test strategy and plan, the corrosion testing was performed. Starting with the envisioned process specific baseline solvent, a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution, with sludge (limited to Purex type sludge-simulant for this initial effort) at 75 C and agitated, the corrosion rate (CR) was determined from the measured weight loss of the exposed coupon. Environmental variations tested were: (a) Inclusion of sludge in the test vessel or assuming a pure oxalic acid solution; (b) acid solution temperature maintained at 75 or 45 C; and (c) agitation of the acid solution or stagnant. Application of select electrochemical testing (EC) explored the impact of each variation on the passivation mechanisms and confirmed the CR. The 1-wt% results were then compared to those from the 8-wt%. The immersion coupons showed that the maximum time averaged CR for a 1-wt% solution with sludge was less than 25-mils/yr for all conditions. For an agitated 8-wt% solution with sludge, the maximum time averaged CR was about 30-mils/yr at 50 C, and 86-mils/yr at 75 C. Both the 1-wt% and the 8-wt% testing demonstrated that if the sludge was removed

  15. Comparison of gas chromatography-combustion-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-flame ionization detector for the determination of fatty acid methyl esters in biodiesel without specific standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrado, Laura Alonso; Freije-Carrelo, Laura; Moldovan, Mariella; Encinar, Jorge Ruiz; Alonso, J Ignacio García

    2016-07-29

    GC-FID has been effectively used as a universal quantification technique for volatile organic compounds for a long time. In most cases, the use of the ECN allows for quantification by GC-FID without external calibration using only the response of a single internal standard. In this paper we compare the performance characteristics of GC-FID with those of post-column (13)C Isotope Dilution GC-Combustion-MS for the absolute quantification of organic compounds without the need for individual standards. For this comparison we have selected the quantification of FAMEs in biodiesel. The selection of the right internal standard was critical for GC-FID even when ECN were considered. On the other hand, the nature of the internal standard was not relevant when GC-Combustion-MS was employed. The proposed method was validated with the analysis of the certified reference material SRM 2772 and comparative data was obtained on real biodiesel samples. The analysis of the SRM 2772 biodiesel provided recoveries in the range 100.6-103.5% and 96.4-103.6% for GC-combustion-MS and GC-FID, respectively. The detection limit for GC-combustion-MS was found to be 4.2ng compound/g of injected sample. In conclusion, the quantitative performance of GC-Combustion-MS compared satisfactorily with that of GC-FID constituting a viable alternative for the quantification of organic compounds without the need for individual standards.

  16. Investigation of the effects of renewable diesel fuels on engine performance, combustion, and emissions

    KAUST Repository

    Ogunkoya, Dolanimi

    2015-01-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate renewable fuels in a compression-ignition internal combustion engine. The focus of this study was the effect of newly developed renewable fuels on engine performance, combustion, and emissions. Eight fuels were investigated, and they include diesel, jet fuel, a traditional biodiesel (fatty acid methyl ester: FAME), and five next generation biofuels. These five fuels were derived using a two-step process: hydrolysis of the oil into fatty acids (if necessary) and then a thermo-catalytic process to remove the oxygen via a decarboxylation reaction. The fuels included a fed batch deoxygenation of canola derived fatty acids (DCFA), a fed batch deoxygenation of canola derived fatty acids with varying amounts of H2 used during the deoxygenation process (DCFAH), a continuous deoxygenation of canola derived fatty acids (CDCFA), fed batch deoxygenation of lauric acid (DLA), and a third reaction to isomerize the products of the deoxygenated canola derived fatty acid alkanes (IPCF). Diesel, jet fuel, and biodiesel (FAME) have been used as benchmarks for comparing with the newer renewable fuels. The results of the experiments show slightly lower mechanical efficiency but better brake specific fuel consumption for the new renewable fuels. Results from combustion show shorter ignition delays for most of the renewable (deoxygenated) fuels with the exception of fed batch deoxygenation of lauric acid. Combustion results also show lower peak in-cylinder pressures, reduced rate of increase in cylinder pressure, and lower heat release rates for the renewable fuels. Emission results show an increase in hydrocarbon emissions for renewable deoxygenated fuels, but a general decrease in all other emissions including NOx, greenhouse gases, and soot. Results also demonstrate that isomers of the alkanes resulting from the deoxygenation of the canola derived fatty acids could be a potential replacement to conventional fossil diesel and biodiesel based on the

  17. Torrefaction of empty fruit bunches under biomass combustion gas atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Yoshimitsu; Sellappah, Varsheta; Trinh, Thanh Hoai; Hassan, Suhaimi; Tanoue, Ken-Ichiro

    2017-06-13

    Torrefaction of oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) under combustion gas atmosphere was conducted in a batch reactor at 473, 523 and 573K in order to investigate the effect of real combustion gas on torrefaction behavior. The solid mass yield of torrefaction in combustion gas was smaller than that of torrefaction in nitrogen. This may be attributed to the decomposition enhancement effect by oxygen and carbon dioxide in combustion gas. Under combustion gas atmosphere, the solid yield for torrefaction of EFB became smaller as the temperature increased. The representative products of combustion gas torrefaction were carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide (gas phase) and water, phenol and acetic acid (liquid phase). By comparing torrefaction in combustion gas with torrefaction in nitrogen gas, it was found that combustion gas can be utilized as torrefaction gas to save energy and inert gas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Heart Rate is Associated with Red Blood Cell Fatty Acid Concentration: the GOCADAN Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbesson, Sven O.E.; Devereux, Richard B.; Cole, Shelley; Ebbesson, Lars O.E.; Fabsitz, Richard R.; Haack, Karin; Harris, William S.; Howard, Wm. James; Laston, Sandra; Lopez-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos; MacCluer, Jean W.; Okin, Peter M.; Tejero, M. Elizabeth; Voruganti, V. Saroja; Wenger, Charlotte R.; Howard, Barbara V.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Consumption of omega-3 fatty acids (FAs) is associated with a reduction in deaths from coronary heart disease, arrhythmia, and sudden death. Although these FAs were originally thought to be anti-atherosclerotic, recent evidence suggests that their benefits are related to reducing risk for ventricular arrhythmia, and that this may be mediated by a slowed heart rate (HR). Methods The study was conducted in Alaskan Eskimos participating in the Genetics of Coronary Artery Disease in Alaska Natives (GOCADAN) Study, a population experiencing a dietary shift from unsaturated to saturated fats. We compared HR with red blood cell (RBC) FA content in 316 men and 391 women ages 35–74 years. Results Multivariate linear regression analyses of individual FAs with HR as the dependent variable and specific FAs as covariates revealed negative associations between HR and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3; p= 0.004) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3; p=0.009) and positive associations between HR and palmitoleic acid (16:1n-7; p=0.021), eicosenoic acid (20:1n9; p=0.007), and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA; 20:3n-6; p=0.021). Factor analysis revealed that the omega-3 FAs were negatively associated with HR (p=0.003), while a cluster of other, non-omega-3 unsaturated FAs (16:1, 20:1, and 20:3) was positively associated. Conclusions Marine omega 3 FAs are associated with lower HR, whereas palmitoleic and DGLA, previously identified as associated with saturated FA consumption and directly related to cardiovascular mortality, are associated with higher HR. These relations may at least partially explain the relations between omega-3 FAs, ventricular arrhythmia, and sudden death. PMID:20569715

  19. Acid suppression increases rates of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal injury in the presence of duodenal reflux.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: The contribution of gastric acid to the toxicity of alkaline duodenal refluxate on the esophageal mucosa is unclear. This study compared the effect of duodenal refluxate when acid was present, decreased by proton pump inhibitors (PPI), or absent. METHODS: We randomized 136 Sprague-Dawley rats into 4 groups: group 1 (n = 33) were controls; group 2 (n = 34) underwent esophagoduodenostomy promoting "combined reflux"; group 3 (n = 34) underwent esophagoduodenostomy and PPI treatment to decrease acid reflux; and group 4, the \\'gastrectomy\\' group (n = 35) underwent esophagoduodenostomy and total gastrectomy to eliminate acid in the refluxate. Esophaguses were examined for inflammatory, Barrett\\'s, and other histologic changes, and expression of proliferative markers Ki-67, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). RESULTS: In all reflux groups, the incidence of Barrett\\'s mucosa was greater when acid was suppressed (group C, 62%; group D, 71%) than when not suppressed (group B, 27%; P = 0.004 and P < .001). Erosions were more frequent in the PPI and gastrectomy groups than in the combined reflux group. Edema (wet weight) and ulceration was more frequent in the gastrectomy than in the combined reflux group. Acute inflammatory changes were infrequent in the PPI group (8%) compared with the combined reflux (94%) or gastrectomy (100%) groups, but chronic inflammation persisted in 100% of the PPI group. EGFR levels were greater in the PPI compared with the combined reflux group (P = .04). Ki-67, PCNA, and combined marker scores were greater in the gastrectomy compared with the combined reflux group (P = .006, P = .14, and P < .001). CONCLUSION: Gastric acid suppression in the presence of duodenal refluxate caused increased rates of inflammatory changes, intestinal metaplasia, and molecular proliferative activity. PPIs suppressed acute inflammatory changes only, whereas chronic inflammatory changes persisted.

  20. Temperature effects on protein depolymerization and amino acid immobilization rates in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Lisa; Hu, Yuntao; Zhang, Shasha; Zheng, Qing; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    Increasing N deposition, land use change, elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations and global warming have altered soil nitrogen (N) cycling during the last decades. Those changes affected ecosystem services, such as C and N sequestration in soils, which calls for a better understanding of soil N transformation processes. The cleavage of macromolecular organic N by extracellular enzymes maintains an ongoing flow of new bioavailable organic N into biotic systems and is considered to be the bottle neck of terrestrial N cycling in litter and soils. Recent studies showed that protein depolymerization is susceptible to changes in C and N availabilities. Based on general biological observations the temperature sensitivity of soil organic N processes is expected to depend on whether they are rather enzyme limited (i.e. Q10=2) or diffusion limited (i.e. Q10= 1.0 - 1.3). However, temperature sensitivities of protein depolymerization and amino acid immobilization are still unknown. We therefore here report short-term temperature effects on organic N transformation rates in soils differing in physicochemical parameters but not in climate. Soil samples were collected from two geologically distinct sites close to the LFZ Raumberg-Gumpenstein, Styria, Austria, each from three different management types (arable land, grassland, forest). Four replicates of mineral soil were taken from every site and management type. The area provides a unique opportunity to study geological and management controls in soils without confounding effects of climate and elevation. The soils differ in several soil chemical parameters, such as soil pH, base saturation, soil C: N ratio and SOM content as well as in soil physical parameters, such as soil texture, bulk density and water holding capacity. Soils were pre-incubated at 5, 15 and 25˚ C for one day. Protein depolymerization rates and amino acid immobilization rates were assessed by an isotope pool dilution assay with 15N labeled amino acids at

  1. Numerical modeling of straw combustion in a fixed bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Haosheng; Jensen, Anker; Glarborg, Peter

    2005-01-01

    . The straw combustion processes include moisture evaporation, straw pyrolysis, gas combustion, and char combustion. The model provides detailed information of the structure of the ignition flame front. Simulated gas species concentrations at the bed surface, ignition flame front rate, and bed temperature...

  2. Combustion 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Levasseur; S. Goodstine; J. Ruby; M. Nawaz; C. Senior; F. Robson; S. Lehman; W. Blecher; W. Fugard; A. Rao; A. Sarofim; P. Smith; D. Pershing; E. Eddings; M. Cremer; J. Hurley; G. Weber; M. Jones; M. Collings; D. Hajicek; A. Henderson; P. Klevan; D. Seery; B. Knight; R. Lessard; J. Sangiovanni; A. Dennis; C. Bird; W. Sutton; N. Bornstein; F. Cogswell; C. Randino; S. Gale; Mike Heap

    2001-06-30

    . To achieve these objectives requires a change from complete reliance of coal-fired systems on steam turbines (Rankine cycles) and moving forward to a combined cycle utilizing gas turbines (Brayton cycles) which offer the possibility of significantly greater efficiency. This is because gas turbine cycles operate at temperatures well beyond current steam cycles, allowing the working fluid (air) temperature to more closely approach that of the major energy source, the combustion of coal. In fact, a good figure of merit for a HIPPS design is just how much of the enthalpy from coal combustion is used by the gas turbine. The efficiency of a power cycle varies directly with the temperature of the working fluid and for contemporary gas turbines the optimal turbine inlet temperature is in the range of 2300-2500 F (1260-1371 C). These temperatures are beyond the working range of currently available alloys and are also in the range of the ash fusion temperature of most coals. These two sets of physical properties combine to produce the major engineering challenges for a HIPPS design. The UTRC team developed a design hierarchy to impose more rigor in our approach. Once the size of the plant had been determined by the choice of gas turbine and the matching steam turbine, the design process of the High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF) moved ineluctably to a down-fired, slagging configuration. This design was based on two air heaters: one a high temperature slagging Radiative Air Heater (RAH) and a lower temperature, dry ash Convective Air Heater (CAH). The specific details of the air heaters are arrived at by an iterative sequence in the following order:-Starting from the overall Cycle requirements which set the limits for the combustion and heat transfer analysis-The available enthalpy determined the range of materials, ceramics or alloys, which could tolerate the temperatures-Structural Analysis of the designs proved to be the major limitation-Finally the commercialization

  3. Combustion 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Levasseur; S. Goodstine; J. Ruby; M. Nawaz; C. Senior; F. Robson; S. Lehman; W. Blecher; W. Fugard; A. Rao; A. Sarofim; P. Smith; D. Pershing; E. Eddings; M. Cremer; J. Hurley; G. Weber; M. Jones; M. Collings; D. Hajicek; A. Henderson; P. Klevan; D. Seery; B. Knight; R. Lessard; J. Sangiovanni; A. Dennis; C. Bird; W. Sutton; N. Bornstein; F. Cogswell; C. Randino; S. Gale; Mike Heap

    2001-06-30

    . To achieve these objectives requires a change from complete reliance of coal-fired systems on steam turbines (Rankine cycles) and moving forward to a combined cycle utilizing gas turbines (Brayton cycles) which offer the possibility of significantly greater efficiency. This is because gas turbine cycles operate at temperatures well beyond current steam cycles, allowing the working fluid (air) temperature to more closely approach that of the major energy source, the combustion of coal. In fact, a good figure of merit for a HIPPS design is just how much of the enthalpy from coal combustion is used by the gas turbine. The efficiency of a power cycle varies directly with the temperature of the working fluid and for contemporary gas turbines the optimal turbine inlet temperature is in the range of 2300-2500 F (1260-1371 C). These temperatures are beyond the working range of currently available alloys and are also in the range of the ash fusion temperature of most coals. These two sets of physical properties combine to produce the major engineering challenges for a HIPPS design. The UTRC team developed a design hierarchy to impose more rigor in our approach. Once the size of the plant had been determined by the choice of gas turbine and the matching steam turbine, the design process of the High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF) moved ineluctably to a down-fired, slagging configuration. This design was based on two air heaters: one a high temperature slagging Radiative Air Heater (RAH) and a lower temperature, dry ash Convective Air Heater (CAH). The specific details of the air heaters are arrived at by an iterative sequence in the following order:-Starting from the overall Cycle requirements which set the limits for the combustion and heat transfer analysis-The available enthalpy determined the range of materials, ceramics or alloys, which could tolerate the temperatures-Structural Analysis of the designs proved to be the major limitation-Finally the commercialization

  4. Improving arachidonic acid fermentation by Mortierella alpina through multistage temperature and aeration rate control in bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Min-Jie; Wang, Cheng; Zheng, Zhi-Yong; Zhu, Li; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Lin, Chi-Chung

    2016-05-18

    Effective production of arachidonic acid (ARA) using Mortierella alpina was conducted in a 30-L airlift bioreactor. Varying the aeration rate and temperature significantly influenced cell morphology, cell growth, and ARA production, while the optimal aeration rate and temperature for cell growth and product formation were quite different. As a result, a two-stage aeration rate control strategy was constructed based on monitoring of cell morphology and ARA production under various aeration rate control levels (0.6-1.8 vvm). Using this strategy, ARA yield reached 4.7 g/L, an increase of 38.2% compared with the control (constant aeration rate control at 1.0 vvm). Dynamic temperature-control strategy was implemented based on the fermentation performance at various temperatures (13-28°C), with ARA level in total cellular lipid increased by 37.1% comparing to a constant-temperature control (25°C). On that basis, the combinatorial fermentation strategy of two-stage aeration rate control and dynamic temperature control was applied and ARA production achieved the highest level of 5.8 g/L.

  5. Fuel gas combustion research at METC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, T.S.

    1995-06-01

    The in-house combustion research program at METC is an integral part of many METC activities, providing support to METC product teams, project managers, and external industrial and university partners. While the majority of in-house combustion research in recent years has been focussed on the lean premixed combustion of natural gas fuel for Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) applications, increasing emphasis is being placed on issues of syngas combustion, as the time approaches when the ATS and coal-fired power systems programs will reach convergence. When the METC syngas generator is built in 1996, METC will have the unique combination of mid-scale pressurized experimental facilities, a continuous syngas supply with variable ammonia loading, and a team of people with expertise in low-emissions combustion, chemical kinetics, combustion modeling, combustion diagnostics, and the control of combustion instabilities. These will enable us to investigate such issues as the effects of pressure, temperature, and fuel gas composition on the rate of conversion of fuel nitrogen to NOx, and on combustion instabilities in a variety of combustor designs.

  6. Homogeneous nucleation rates of nitric acid dihydrate (NAD at simulated stratospheric conditions – Part II: Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Möhler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation energies ΔGact for the nucleation of nitric acid dihydrate (NAD in supercooled binary HNO3/H2O solution droplets were calculated from volume-based nucleation rate measurements using the AIDA (Aerosol, Interactions, and Dynamics in the Atmosphere aerosol chamber of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The experimental conditions covered temperatures T between 192 and 197 K, NAD saturation ratios SNAD between 7 and 10, and nitric acid molar fractions of the nucleating sub-micron sized droplets between 0.26 and 0.28. Based on classical nucleation theory, a new parameterisation for ΔGact=A×(T ln SNAD−2+B is fitted to the experimental data with A=2.5×106 kcal K2 mol−1 and B=11.2−0.1(T−192 kcal mol−1. A and B were chosen to also achieve good agreement with literature data of ΔGact. The parameter A implies, for the temperature and composition range of our analysis, a mean interface tension σsl=51 cal mol−1 cm−2 between the growing NAD germ and the supercooled solution. A slight temperature dependence of the diffusion activation energy is represented by the parameter B. Investigations with a detailed microphysical process model showed that literature formulations of volume-based (Salcedo et al., 2001 and surface-based (Tabazadeh et al., 2002 nucleation rates significantly overestimate NAD formation rates when applied to the conditions of our experiments.

  7. Field rates for natural attenuation of arsenic in Tinto Santa Rosa acid mine drainage (SW Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asta, Maria P; Ayora, Carlos; Acero, Patricia; Cama, Jordi

    2010-05-15

    Reactive transport modelling of the main processes related to the arsenic natural attenuation observed in the acid mine drainage (AMD) impacted stream of Tinto Santa Rosa (SW Spain) was performed. Despite the simplicity of the kinetic expressions used to deal with arsenic attenuation processes, the model reproduced successfully the major chemical trends observed along the acid discharge. Results indicated that the rate of ferrous iron oxidation was similar to the one obtained in earlier field studies in which microbial catalysis is reported to occur. With regard to the scaled arsenic oxidation rate, it is one order of magnitude faster than the values obtained under laboratory conditions suggesting the existence of a catalytic agent in the natural system. Schwertmannite precipitation rate, which was represented by a simple kinetic expression relying on Fe(III) and pH, was in the range calculated for other AMD impacted sites. Finally, the obtained distribution coefficients used for representing arsenic sorption onto Fe(III) precipitates were lower than those deduced from reported laboratory data. This discrepancy is attributed to a decrease in the schwertmannite arsenate sorption capacity as sulphate increases in the solution.

  8. Chemical kinetics and combustion modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to gain qualitative insight into how pollutants are formed in combustion systems and to develop quantitative mathematical models to predict their formation rates. The approach is an integrated one, combining low-pressure flame experiments, chemical kinetics modeling, theory, and kinetics experiments to gain as clear a picture as possible of the process in question. These efforts are focused on problems involved with the nitrogen chemistry of combustion systems and on the formation of soot and PAH in flames.

  9. Suppression of Growth Rate of Colony-Associated Fungi by High Fructose Corn Syrup Feeding Supplement, Formic Acid, and Oxalic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Select colony-associated fungi (bee isolates). Absidia sp., Ascosphaera apis, Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium sp., Penicillium glabrum, Mucor sp., showed a 40% reduction in radial growth rate with formic acid, a 28% reduction with oxalic acid, and a 15% reduction with fructose and high fructose corn sy...

  10. Evolution of humic acid-like and core-humic acid-like during high-rate composting of pig faeces amended with wheat straw

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genevini, P.; Adani, F.; Veeken, A.H.M.

    2002-01-01

    The changes in the absolute amounts and in the composition of humic acid-like (RA-like) and core-humic acid-like (core-RA-like) were monitored for the high-rate composting process (4 weeks) of wheat straw-amended pig faeces. Absolute amounts of HA-like and core-HA-like were obtained by extraction of

  11. On-line measurement of heat of combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, S. K.; Chegini, H.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental method for an on-line measurement of heat of combustion of a gaseous hydrocarbon fuel mixture of unknown composition is developed. It involves combustion of a test gas with a known quantity of air to achieve a predetermined oxygen concentration level in the combustion products. This is accomplished by a feedback controller which maintains the gas volumetric flow rate at a level consistent with the desired oxygen concentration in the products. The heat of combustion is determined from a known correlation with the gas volumetric flow rate. An on-line microcomputer accesses the gas volumetric flow data, and displays the heat of combustion values at desired time intervals.

  12. Development of a carbonate absorption-based process for post-combustion CO2 capture: The role of biocatalyst to promote CO2 absorption rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y.; Ye, X.; Zhang, Z.; Khodayari, A.; Djukadi, T.

    2011-01-01

    An Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process (IVCAP) for post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture is described. IVCAP employs potassium carbonate (PC) as a solvent, uses waste or low quality steam from the power plant for CO2 stripping, and employs a biocatalyst, carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme, for promoting the CO2 absorption into PC solution. A series of experiments were performed to evaluate the activity of CA enzyme mixed in PC solutions in a stirred tank reactor system under various temperatures, CA dosages, CO2 loadings, CO2 partial pressures, and the presence of major flue gas contaminants. It was demonstrated that CA enzyme is an effective biocatalyst for CO2 absorption under IVCAP conditions. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. How and why electrostatic charge of combustible nanoparticles can radically change the mechanism and rate of their oxidation in humid atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Meshcheryakov, Oleg

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatically charged aerosol nanoparticles strongly attract surrounding polar gas molecules due to a charge-dipole interaction. In humid air, the substantial electrostatic attraction and acceleration of surrounding water vapour molecules towards charged combustible nanoparticles cause intense electrostatic hydration and preferential oxidation of these nanoparticles by accelerated water vapor molecules rather than non-polar oxygen molecules. In particular, electrostatic acceleration, acquired by surrounding water vapour molecules at a distance of their mean free path from the minimally charged iron metal nanoparticle can increase an oxidative activity of these polar molecules with respect to the nanoparticle by a factor of one million. Intense electrostatic hydration of charged metal nanoparticles converts the nanoparticle's oxide based shells into the hydroxide based electrolyte shells, transforming these nanoparticles into metal/air core-shell nanobatteries, periodically short-circuited by intra-particl...

  14. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada, USA, The Suwannee River, Georgia, USA and by polycarboxylic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Michael M.; Leenheer, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Calcite crystallization rates are characterized using a constant solution composition at 25°C, pH=8.5, and calcite supersaturation (Ω) of 4.5 in the absence and presence of fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada (BSLFA), and a fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia (SRFA). Rates are also measured in the presence and absence of low-molar mass, aliphatic-alicyclic polycarboxylic acids (PCA). BSLFA inhibits calcite crystal-growth rates with increasing BSLFA concentration, suggesting that BSLFA adsorbs at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. Calcite growth morphology in the presence of BSLFA differed from growth in its absence, supporting an adsorption mechanism of calcite-growth inhibition by BSLFA. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by BSLFA is consistent with a model indicating that polycarboxylic acid molecules present in BSLFA adsorb at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. In contrast to published results for an unfractionated SRFA, there is dramatic calcite growth inhibition (at a concentration of 1 mg/L) by a SRFA fraction eluted by pH 5 solution from XAD-8 resin, indicating that calcite growth-rate inhibition is related to specific SRFA component fractions. A cyclic PCA, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6-cyclohexane hexacarboxylic acid (CHXHCA) is a strong calcite growth-rate inhibitor at concentrations less than 0.1 mg/L. Two other cyclic PCAs, 1, 1 cyclopentanedicarboxylic acid (CPDCA) and 1, 1 cyclobutanedicarboxylic acid (CBDCA) with the carboxylic acid groups attached to the same ring carbon atom, have no effect on calcite growth rates up to concentrations of 10 mg/L. Organic matter ad-sorbed from the air onto the seed crystals has no effect on the measured calcite crystal-growth rates.

  15. On supersonic combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁生学

    1999-01-01

    Some basic concepts and features of supersonic combustion are explained from the view point of macroscopic aerodynamics. Two kinds of interpretations of supersonic combustion are proposed. The difference between supersonic combustion and subsonic combustion is discussed, and the mechanism of supersonic combustion propagation and the limitation of heat addition in supersonic flow are pointed out. The results of the calculation of deflagration in supersonic flow show that the entropy increment and the total pressure loss of the combustion products may decrease with the increase of combustion velocity. It is also demonstrated that the oblique detonation wave angle may not be controlled by the wedge angle under weak underdriven solution conditions and be determined only by combustion velocity. Therefore, the weak underdriven solution may become self-sustaining oblique detonation waves with a constant wave angle.

  16. Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — For more than 30 years The Combustion Research Facility (CRF) has served as a national and international leader in combustion science and technology. The need for a...

  17. Thermogravimetric investigation of hydrochar-lignite co-combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengang; Quek, Augustine; Kent Hoekman, S; Srinivasan, M P; Balasubramanian, R

    2012-11-01

    Co-combustion of hydrochar with lignite was investigated by means of thermogravimetric analysis. Hydrochars were produced from coconut fibers and eucalyptus leaves under hydrothermal conditions at 250°C. The hydrochar was added in varying amounts to lignite for combustion. The results indicated that hydrothermal treatment decreased the volatile matter content and increased the fixed carbon content of the biomaterials. The elevated energy density and decreased ash content of the hydrochar improved its combustion behavior when co-fired with lignite for energy production. The hydrochars derived from coconut fiber and eucalyptus leaves had similar chemical compositions and showed similar influences on lignite combustion. Hydrochar addition increased the burnout and shortened the combustion range of the hydrochar-lignite blends. High combustion efficiency was observed due to the synergistic interactions between hydrochar and lignite during the co-combustion process. A kinetic study showed that the combustion process of hydrochar-lignite blends followed first-order reaction rates.

  18. Production rates of bacterial tetraether lipids and fatty acids in peatland under varying oxygen concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Arnaud; Meador, Travis B.; Laggoun-Défarge, Fatima; Könneke, Martin; Wu, Weichao; Derenne, Sylvie; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2017-04-01

    Interpretations of the abundance and distribution of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (brGDGT) lipids have been increasingly applied to infer changes in paleoenvironment and to estimate terrigenous organic matter inputs into estuarine and marine sediments. However, only preliminary information is known regarding the ecology and physiology of the source organisms of these biomarkers. We assessed the production rates of brGDGTs under different redox conditions in peat, where these lipids are found in high concentrations, particularly at greater depths below the fluctuating water table. The incorporation of hydrogen relative to carbon into lipids observed in our dual stable isotope probing assay indicates that brGDGTs were produced by heterotrophic bacteria. Unexpectedly, incubations with stable isotope tracers of the surface horizon (5-20 cm) initiated under oxic conditions before turning suboxic and eventually anoxic exhibited up to one order of magnitude higher rates of brGDGT production (16-87 ng cm-3 y-1) relative to the deeper, anoxic zone (20-35 cm; ca. 7 ng cm-3 y-1), and anoxic incubations of the surface horizon (cell membrane in comparison to fatty acids, despite the typically high brGDGT concentrations observed in peat. Multivariate analysis identified two branched fatty acids that shared a similar production pattern as brGDGTs among the experimental treatments and may be associated with brGDGT biosynthesis.

  19. Domain-confined catalytic soot combustion over Co3O4 anchored on a TiO2 nanotube array catalyst prepared by mercaptoacetic acid induced surface-grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiale; Yu, Yifu; Dai, Fangfang; Meng, Ming; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Lirong; Hu, Tiandou

    2013-11-01

    Herein, we introduce a specially designed domain-confined macroporous catalyst, namely, the Co3O4 nanocrystals anchored on a TiO2 nanotube array catalyst, which was synthesized by using the mercaptoacetic acid induced surface-grafting method. This catalyst exhibits much better performance for catalytic soot combustion than the conventional TiO2 powder supported one in gravitational contact mode (GMC).Herein, we introduce a specially designed domain-confined macroporous catalyst, namely, the Co3O4 nanocrystals anchored on a TiO2 nanotube array catalyst, which was synthesized by using the mercaptoacetic acid induced surface-grafting method. This catalyst exhibits much better performance for catalytic soot combustion than the conventional TiO2 powder supported one in gravitational contact mode (GMC). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The images of XRD, UV-vis, EDX and soot-TPR. The table providing information on Co/Ti-NA catalysts. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03757f

  20. Glycyrrhizic Acid Reduces Heart Rate and Blood Pressure by a Dual Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kailash; Zaw, Aung Moe; Sekar, Revathi; Palak, Ahuja; Allam, Ahmed A; Ajarem, Jamaan; Chow, Billy K C

    2016-09-27

    Beta adrenergic receptors are crucial for their role in rhythmic contraction of heart along with their role in the pathological conditions such as tachycardia and high risk of heart failure. Studies report that the levels of beta-1 adrenergic receptor tend to decrease by 50%, whereas, the levels of beta-2 adrenergic receptor remains constant during the risk of heart failure. Beta blockers-the antagonistic molecules for beta-adrenergic receptors, function by slowing the heart rate, which thereby allows the left ventricle to fill completely during tachycardia incidents and hence helps in blood pumping capacity of heart and reducing the risk of heart failure. In the present study, we investigate the potential of glycyrrhizic acid (GA) as a possible principal drug molecule for cardiac arrhythmias owing to its ability to induce reduction in the heart rate and blood pressure. We use in vitro and in silico approach to study GA's effect on beta adrenergic receptor along with an in vivo study to examine its effect on heart rate and blood pressure. Additionally, we explore GA's proficiency in eliciting an increase in the plasma levels of vasoactive intestinal peptide, which by dilating the blood vessel consequently, can be a crucial aid during the occurrence of a potential heart attack. Therefore, we propose GA as a potential principal drug molecule via its potential in modulating heart rate and blood pressure.

  1. The effects of temperature and growth rate on the proportion of unsaturated fatty acids in bacterial lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, C O; Suisted, J R

    1978-01-01

    The effects of temperature and growth rate on the fatty acid composition of the extractable lipids of four mesophilic and three psychotrophic bacteria were examined. Two of the mesophiles (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) increased the proportion of unsaturated fatty acids in their lipids with decreasing temperature over their whole growth temperature range. The other mesophiles (Enterobacter aerogenes and Lactobacillus casei) increased the proportion of unsaturated fatty acids with decreasing temperature only over the lower half of their growth temperature ranges. The psychrotrophs Pseudomonas fluorescens and Enterobacter sp. had a constant proportion of unsaturated acids over the lower half of their growth temperature range, while the psychotrophic Lactobacillus sp. showed no consistent change in its unsaturated fatty acid composition with temperature. All species showed some variation of unsaturated fatty acid composition with growth rate at the highest and lowest growth temperatures, although such variations were small in some species (Ent. aerogenes and Lactobacillus sp.).

  2. Influence of liquid and gas flow rates on sulfuric acid mist removal from air by packed bed tower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari Mohammad Javad

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The possible emission of sulfuric acid mists from a laboratory scale, counter-current packed bed tower operated with a caustic scrubbing solution was studied. Acid mists were applied through a local exhaust hood. The emissions from the packed bed tower were monitored in three different categories of gas flow rate as well as three liquid flow rates, while other influencing parameters were kept almost constant. Air sampling and sulfuric acid measurement were carried out iso-kinetically using USEPA method 8. The acid mists were measured by the barium-thorin titration method. According to the results when the gas flow rate increased from 10 L/s to 30 L/s, the average removal efficiency increased significantly (p 3, respectively. L/G of 2–3 was recommended for designing purposes of a packed tower for sulfuric acid mists and vapors removal from contaminated air stream.

  3. Some characteristics of fine beryllium particle combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, D. A.; Kholopova, O. V.; Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-08-01

    Beryllium dust will be produced under plasma interaction with beryllium armor of the first wall in ITER. Exothermal reaction of this dust with water steam or air, which can leak into the reactor vacuum chamber in some accidents, gives concern in respect to reactor safety. Results of studies devoted to combustion of fine beryllium particles are reviewed in the paper. A chemically active medium and elevated temperature are prerequisite to the combustion of beryllium particles. Their ignition is hampered by oxide films, which form a diffusion barrier on the particle surface as a result of pre-flame oxidation. The temperature to initiate combustion of particles depends on flame temperature, particle size, composition of combustible mixture, heating rate and other factors. In mixtures enriched with combustible, the flame temperature necessary to ignite individual particles approaches the beryllium boiling temperature.

  4. Relationship of lipogenic enzyme activities to the rate of rat liver fatty acid synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, G.; Kelley, D.; Schmidt, P.; Virk, S.; Serrato, C.

    1986-05-01

    The mechanism by which diet regulates liver lipogenesis is unclear. Here the authors report how dietary alterations effect the activities of key enzymes of fatty acid (FA) synthesis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats, 400-500 g, were fasted for 48h and then refed a fat-free, high carbohydrate (HC) diet (75% cal. from sucrose) for 0,3,9,24 and 48h, or refed a HC diet for 48h, then fed a high-fat (HF) diet (44% cal. from corn oil) for 3,9,24 and 48h. The FA synthesis rate and the activities of acetyl CoA carboxylase (AC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), ATP citrate lyase (CL), and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) were determined in the livers. FA synthesis was assayed with /sup 3/H/sub 2/O, enzyme activities were measured spectrophotometrically except for AC which was assayed with /sup 14/C-bicarbonate. There was no change in the activity of AC during fasting or on the HC diet. Fasting decreased the rate of FA synthesis by 25% and the activities of FAS and CL by 50%; refeeding the HC diet induced parallel changes in FA synthesis and the activities of FAS, CL, and G6PDH. After 9h on the HF diet, FA synthesis had decreased sharply, AC activity increased significantly while no changes were detected in the other activities. Subsequently FA synthesis did not change while the activities of the enzymes decreased slowly. These enzymes did not appear to regulate FA synthesis during inhibition of lipogenesis, but FAS, CL or G6PDH may be rate limiting in the induction phase. Other key factors may regulate FA synthesis during dietary alterations.

  5. Determination of phosphine: comparison of rates of desorption by purge-and-trap method and by sulfuric acid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, T; Abu-Tabanja, R

    1985-01-01

    Two methods were compared for quantitative determination of phosphine present on fumigated food and materials. The rate of desorption of PH3 by using a purge-and-trap method was shown to be much slower when compared with sulfuric acid treatment and was also simpler. Application of the modified sulfuric acid treatment for real samples is described.

  6. Nitrogen release during coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, L.L.; Mitchell, R.E.; Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.

    1995-02-01

    Experiments in entrained flow reactors at combustion temperatures are performed to resolve the rank dependence of nitrogen release on an elemental basis for a suite of 15 U.S. coals ranging from lignite to low-volatile bituminous. Data were obtained as a function of particle conversion, with overall mass loss up to 99% on a dry, ash-free basis. Nitrogen release rates are presented relative to both carbon loss and overall mass loss. During devolatilization, fractional nitrogen release from low-rank coals is much slower than fractional mass release and noticeably slower than fractional carbon release. As coal rank increases, fractional nitrogen release rate relative to that of carbon and mass increases, with fractional nitrogen release rates exceeding fractional mass and fractional carbon release rates during devolatilization for high-rank (low-volatile bituminous) coals. At the onset of combustion, nitrogen release rates increase significantly. For all coals investigated, cumulative fractional nitrogen loss rates relative to those of mass and carbon passes through a maximum during the earliest stages of oxidation. The mechanism for generating this maximum is postulated to involve nascent thermal rupture of nitrogen-containing compounds and possible preferential oxidation of nitrogen sites. During later stages of oxidation, the cumulative fractional loss of nitrogen approaches that of carbon for all coals. Changes in the relative release rates of nitrogen compared to those of both overall mass and carbon during all stages of combustion are attributed to a combination of the chemical structure of coals, temperature histories during combustion, and char chemistry.

  7. Specific Growth Rate Determines the Sensitivity of Escherichia coli to Lactic Acid Stress: Implications for Predictive Microbiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Lindqvist

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study tested the hypothesis that sensitivity of Escherichia coli to lactic acid at concentrations relevant for fermented sausages (pH 4.6, 150 mM lactic acid, aw=0.92, temperature = 20 or 27°C increases with increasing growth rate. For E. coli strain 683 cultured in TSB in chemostat or batch, subsequent inactivation rates when exposed to lactic acid stress increased with increasing growth rate at harvest. A linear relationship between growth rate at harvest and inactivation rate was found to describe both batch and chemostat cultures. The maximum difference in T90, the estimated times for a one-log reduction, was 10 hours between bacteria harvested during the first 3 hours of batch culture, that is, at different growth rates. A 10-hour difference in T90 would correspond to measuring inactivation at 33°C or 45°C instead of 37°C based on relationships between temperature and inactivation. At similar harvest growth rates, inactivation rates were lower for bacteria cultured at 37°C than at 15–20°C. As demonstrated for E. coli 683, culture conditions leading to variable growth rates may contribute to variable lactic acid inactivation rates. Findings emphasize the use and reporting of standardised culture conditions and can have implications for the interpretation of data when developing inactivation models.

  8. Radioactive chromium-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid for determination of glomerular filtration rate in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tvedegaard, E.; Kamstrup, O.

    1981-12-01

    Simultaneous determination of the glomerular filtration rate was made by the insulin clearance technique and by analysis of the plasma disappearance curve of radioactive chromium-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (/sup 51/Cr-EDTA) following an intravenous injection in 28 anaesthetized rabbits. In some rabbits, the renal function was reduced by previous surgery. The insulin clearances ranged from 2.7 to 17 ml/minute. By a double-exponential analysis of the plasma disappearance curve, the total plasma clearance of /sup 51/Cr-EDTA was found to exceed the inulin clearance by 12%. By the simpler slope-intercept analysis requiring only two blood samples, this value was 32%. The renal clearance of /sup 51/Cr-EDTA was 97% of inulin clearance. In nephrectomized rabbits, plasma clearance of /sup 51/Cr-EDTA was 0.7 ml/minute. At all levels of renal function, measurement of the plasma clearance rate of /sup 51/Cr-EDTA by the single injection technique allowed a fairly reliable estimate of the glomerular filtration rate.

  9. Real time identification of the internal combustion engine combustion parameters based on the vibration velocity signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiuliang; Cheng, Yong; Wang, Limei; Ji, Shaobo

    2017-03-01

    Accurate combustion parameters are the foundations of effective closed-loop control of engine combustion process. Some combustion parameters, including the start of combustion, the location of peak pressure, the maximum pressure rise rate and its location, can be identified from the engine block vibration signals. These signals often include non-combustion related contributions, which limit the prompt acquisition of the combustion parameters computationally. The main component in these non-combustion related contributions is considered to be caused by the reciprocating inertia force excitation (RIFE) of engine crank train. A mathematical model is established to describe the response of the RIFE. The parameters of the model are recognized with a pattern recognition algorithm, and the response of the RIFE is predicted and then the related contributions are removed from the measured vibration velocity signals. The combustion parameters are extracted from the feature points of the renovated vibration velocity signals. There are angle deviations between the feature points in the vibration velocity signals and those in the cylinder pressure signals. For the start of combustion, a system bias is adopted to correct the deviation and the error bound of the predicted parameters is within 1.1°. To predict the location of the maximum pressure rise rate and the location of the peak pressure, algorithms based on the proportion of high frequency components in the vibration velocity signals are introduced. Tests results show that the two parameters are able to be predicted within 0.7° and 0.8° error bound respectively. The increase from the knee point preceding the peak value point to the peak value in the vibration velocity signals is used to predict the value of the maximum pressure rise rate. Finally, a monitoring frame work is inferred to realize the combustion parameters prediction. Satisfactory prediction for combustion parameters in successive cycles is achieved, which

  10. Breakdown kinetics of C-hydroxymethyl beta-dicarbonyl derivatives of carbon acids: implications in the bioconversion rate of C-phosphoryloxymethyl prodrugs of carbon acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhareshwar, Sundeep S; Stella, Valentino J

    2009-05-01

    The kinetics of conversion of C-hydroxymethyl derivatives of pharmaceutically relevant beta-dicarbonyl carbon acids of two series, pyrazolidin-3,5-diones and inden-1,3-diones, and a model carbon acid back to the respective carbon acids were studied as a function of pH at 25 degrees C and an ionic strength of 0.15 M. This is a somewhat surprising reaction since it involves the facile breakdown of a carbon-carbon bond. The slopes of the pH-rate profiles for the dehydroxymethylation were approximately unity, which along with the lack of buffer catalysis, indicates a specific-base mechanism involving spontaneous breakdown of the oxymethyl anion. This breakdown generates the conjugate base of the respective carbon acids. Thus within a series, there exists a correlation between the second-order rate constant for dehydroxymethylation and the pK(a) of the corresponding carbon acid with a shorter conversion/dehydroxymethylation half-life (at all given pH values) with decreasing pK(a) of the parent carbon acid. The increasing acidity of the carbon acid affords an increase in the leaving group ability of the carbanion, and therefore facilitation of the rate-determining unimolecular carbon-carbon bond cleavage. Since the hydroxymethyl derivative is an intermediate in the bioconversion of C-phosphoryloxymethyl prodrugs of carbon acids, also under study, the relationship allows one to reasonably predict how facile the dehydroxymethylation would be for any new beta-dicarbonyl carbon acid.

  11. Fatty acids from high rate algal pond's microalgal biomass and osmotic stress effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drira, Neila; Dhouibi, Nedra; Hammami, Saoussen; Piras, Alessandra; Rosa, Antonella; Porcedda, Silvia; Dhaouadi, Hatem

    2017-11-01

    The extraction of oil from a wild microalgae biomass collected from a domestic wastewater treatment facility's high rate algal pond (HRAP) was investigated. An experiment plan was used to determine the most efficient extraction method, the optimal temperature, time and solvent system based on total lipids yield. Microwave-assisted extraction was the most efficient method whether in n-hexane or in a mixture of chloroform/methanol compared to Soxhlet, homogenization, and ultrasounds assisted extractions. This same wild biomass was cultivated in a photobioreactor (PBR) and the effect of osmotic stress was studied. The lipids extraction yield after 3days of stress increased by more than four folds without any significant loss of biomass, however, the quality of extracted total lipids in terms of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids was not affected by salinity change in the culture medium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Size dependent electrical and magnetic properties of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles synthesized by the combustion method: Comparison between aspartic acid and glycine as fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugavani, A. [Solid State Ionics and Energy Devices Laboratory, Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India); Kalai Selvan, R., E-mail: selvankram@buc.edu.in [Solid State Ionics and Energy Devices Laboratory, Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India); Layek, Samar [Department of Physics, Indian institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India); Sanjeeviraja, C. [Department of Physics, Alagappa Chettiar College of Engineering and Technology, Karaikudi- 630 004, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2014-03-15

    Using two different fuels such as aspartic acid and glycine, the spinel zinc ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by the combustion method at different pH values. The thermochemical calculations for both the fuel assisted materials and its adiabatic flame temperature were calculated. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern revealed the formation of single phase ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} with high crystallinity. The characteristic functional groups of Fe3O and Zn3O were identified through FTIR analysis. Uniform size distribution of spherical particle in the average size range of 35–100 nm was inferred from SEM images. The room temperature DC conductivities of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles prepared by using aspartic and glycine are in the order of 10{sup −7} and 10{sup −8} respectively. The dielectric spectral analysis inferred that the obtained dielectric constant is high at low frequency and decreases with increase in frequency. This dielectric behavior is in accordance with the Maxwell–Wagner interfacial polarization. VSM and Mössbauer analysis revealed that the prepared material exhibits paramagnetic behavior and Fe{sup 3+} state of iron content in ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} at room temperature. - Highlights: • For the first time aspartic acid is used as a fuel to synthesize ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. • Theoretical adiabatic flame temperature for the formation of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is calculated. • Individual spherical shape particles are achieved by combustion synthesis. • Enhanced room temperature conductivity for aspartic acid assisted particles are revealed. • Size dependent electrical and magnetic properties are demonstrated.

  13. A Simulation on Effect of Start-of-injection and Swirl Rate on Low Temperature Combustion%喷油定时和涡流比对低温燃烧影响的模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志强; 赵福全; 李理光; 吴志军

    2013-01-01

    基于计算流体动力学(CFD)软件和耦合自行编写的程序,对一台柴油机进行低温燃烧模拟研究,对比分析不同废气再循环(EGR)率、喷油定时和涡流比对燃烧和排放的影响.结果表明,随着EGR率增大,燃烧放热过程滞后,缸内压力、温度和放热率峰值和累计放热量降低,壁面油膜生成增加,氮氧化物(NOx)排放大幅降低的同时,碳烟(soot)、未燃碳氢化物(UHC)和CO排放增加;固定EGR率为40%的同时将喷油定时曲轴转角从353°提前至345°,可使燃烧放热过程适当提前,并有利于提高热效率和改善燃油经济性;保持EGR率为40%,喷油定时曲轴转角为345°时,随着涡流比的增大,soot和UHC排放减少,而CO排放出现先减少后增大的趋势,涡流比为3.0时,综合效果较好.%Based on the CFD simulation software and coupled with the written codes,a study on the effect of the exhaust gas recirculation(EGR),start of injection and swirl rate on the low temperature combustion is conducted.The results show that the combustion and heat release lag,the cylinder pressure,temperature,peak of heat release rate and the accumulated heat release decrease,nevertheless the wall-film increase with the increased EGR rate.Besides,NOx emissions decrease drastically with the increased EGR rate,meanwhile soot,unburned hydro carbons (UHC) and CO emissions increase.When the EGR rate is kept constant at 40%,and the start of injection is advanced from 353 ℃A to 345 ℃A,the combustion and heat release are advanced,the efficiency and fuel economy are improved.When the EGR rate and start of injection are kept constant at 40% and 345° CA,with the increased swirl rate,the soot and UHC emissions is decreased,meanwhile CO emissions has a trend that first decreased than increased.There is the better effect when the swirl rate is 3.0.

  14. Combustive management of oil spills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Extensive experiments with in situ incineration were performed on a desert site at the University of Arizona with very striking results. The largest incinerator, 6 feet in diameter with a 30 foot chimney, developed combustion temperatures of 3000, F, and attendant soot production approximately 1000 times less than that produced by conventional in situ burning. This soot production, in fact, is approximately 30 times less than current allowable EPA standards for incinerators and internal combustion engines. Furthermore, as a consequence of the high temperature combustion, the bum rate was established at a very high 3400 gallons per hour for this particular 6 foot diameter structure. The rudimentary design studies we have carried out relative to a seagoing 8 foot diameter incinerator have predicted that a continuous burn rate of 7000 gallons per hour is realistic. This structure was taken as a basis for operational design because it is compatible with C130 flyability, and will be inexpensive enough ($120,000 per copy) to be stored at those seaside depots throughout the US coast line in which the requisite ancillary equipments (booms, service tugs, etc.) are already deployed. The LOX experiments verified our expectations with respect to combustion of debris and various highly weathered or emulsified oils. We have concluded, however, that the use of liquid oxygen in actual beach clean up is not promising because the very high temperatures associated with this combustion are almost certain to produce environmentally deleterious effects on the beach surface and its immediately sublying structures. However, the use of liquid oxygen augmentation for shore based and flyable incinerators may still play an important role in handing the problem of accumulated debris.

  15. Boiler using combustible fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, H.; Meier, J.G.

    1974-07-03

    A fluid fuel boiler is described comprising a combustion chamber, a cover on the combustion chamber having an opening for introducing a combustion-supporting gaseous fluid through said openings, means to impart rotation to the gaseous fluid about an axis of the combustion chamber, a burner for introducing a fluid fuel into the chamber mixed with the gaseous fluid for combustion thereof, the cover having a generally frustro-conical configuration diverging from the opening toward the interior of the chamber at an angle of between 15/sup 0/ and 55/sup 0/; means defining said combustion chamber having means defining a plurality of axial hot gas flow paths from a downstream portion of the combustion chamber to flow hot gases into an upstream portion of the combustion chamber, and means for diverting some of the hot gas flow along paths in a direction circumferentially of the combustion chamber, with the latter paths being immersed in the water flow path thereby to improve heat transfer and terminating in a gas outlet, the combustion chamber comprising at least one modular element, joined axially to the frustro-conical cover and coaxial therewith. The modular element comprises an inner ring and means of defining the circumferential, radial, and spiral flow paths of the hot gases.

  16. Influence of solution volume on the dissolution rate of silicon dioxide in hydrofluoric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartsev, Boris; Gelman, Danny; Komissarov, Ilia; Epshtein, Alon; Starosvetsky, David; Ein-Eli, Yair

    2015-02-01

    Experimental data and modeling of the dissolution of various Si/SiO2 thermal coatings in different volumes of hydrofluoric acid (HF) are reported. The rates of SiO2 -film dissolution, measured by means of various electrochemical techniques, and alteration in HF activity depend on the thickness of the film coating. Despite the small volumes (0.6-1.2 mL) of the HF solution, an effect of SiO2 -coating thickness on the dissolution rate was detected. To explain alterations detected in HF activity after SiO2 dissolution, spectroscopic analyses (NMR and FTIR) of the chemical composition of the solutions were conducted. This is associated with a modification in the chemical composition of the HF solution, which results in either the formation of an oxidized species in solution or the precipitation of dissolution products. HF2 (-) accumulation in the HF solution, owing to SiO2 dissolution was identified as the source of the chemical alteration.

  17. Rates of synthesis and degradation of ribosomal ribonucleic acid during differentiation of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, G; Altruda, F; Lodish, H F

    1981-01-01

    Synthesis of ribosomes and ribosomal ribonucleic acid (RNA) continued during differentiation of Dictyostelium discoideum concurrently with extensive turnover of ribosomes synthesized during both growth and developmental stages. We show here that the rate of synthesis of 26S and 17S ribosomal RNA during differentiation was less than 15% of that in growing cells, and by the time of sorocarp formation only about 25% of the cellular ribosomes had been synthesized during differentiation. Ribosomes synthesized during growth and differentiation were utilized in messenger RNA translation to the same extent; about 50% of each class were on polyribosomes. Ribosome degradation is apparently an all-or-nothing process, since virtually all 80S monosomes present in developing cells could be incorporated into polysomes when growth conditions were restored. By several criteria, ribosomes synthesized during growth and differentiation were functionally indistinguishable. Our data, together with previously published information on changes in the messenger RNA population during differentiation, indicate that synthesis of new ribosomes is not necessary for translation of developmentally regulated messenger RNA. We also establish that the overall rate of messenger RNA synthesis during differentiation is less than 15% of that in growing cells.

  18. Environment variations into the combustion control. A control system mixtures the air rate in the environmental characteristics. Influencia de las condiciones ambientales en el control de combustion. Un sistema de control que corrige el indice de exceso de aire en funcion de las caracteristicas ambientales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreiro Garcia, R.; Gonzalez Marco, P.P. (Universidad de la Corua. Dpto. Electronica y Sistemas (Spain))

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a combustion control application for a fired drum type boiler system. The contribution is based in the compensation of disturbances by means of feed forward and feedback methods, which enters the combustion system from the environment variations as it is the case of moisture and ambient temperature in the combustion air. With the proposed strategy, efficiency is achieved at economic cost because of the simplicity of the system to correct automatically the stoichiometric combustion air flow even under large modelling errors design, which makes the control system robust and efficient under a wide range of operating conditions. (Author) 4 ref.

  19. [Effects of simulated acid rain on respiration rate of cropland system with different soil pH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xue-zhu; Zhang, Gao-chuan; Li, Hui

    2009-10-15

    To evaluate the effects of acid rain on the respiration rate of cropland system, an outdoor pot experiment was conducted with paddy soils of pH 5.48 (S1), pH 6.70 (S1) and pH 8.18 (S3) during the 2005-2007 wheat-growing seasons. The cropland system was exposed to acid rain by spraying the wheat foliage and irrigating the soil with simulated rainwater of T1 (pH 6.0), T2 (pH 6.0, ionic concentration was twice as rainwater T1), and T3 (pH 4.4, ionic concentration was twice as rainwater T1), respectively. The static opaque chamber-gas chromatograph method was used to measure CO2 fluxes from cropland system. The results showed that acid rain affected the respiration rate of cropland system through crop plant, and the cropland system could adapt to acid rain. Acid rainwater significantly increased the average respiration rate in alkaline soil (S3) cropland system, while it had no significant effects on the average respiration rate in neutral soil (S2) and acidic soil (S1) cropland systems. During 2005-2006, after the alkaline soil cropland system was treated with rainwater T3, the average respiration rate was 23.6% and 27.6% higher than that of alkaline soil cropland system treated with rainwater T1 and T2, respectively. During March to April, the respiration rate was enhanced with the increase of rainwater ionic concentration, while it was dropped with the decrease of rainwater pH value in acidic soil cropland system. It was demonstrated that soil pH and crop plant played important roles on the respiration rate of cropland system.

  20. Combustion characteristics of aluminium-iron oxidein SHS-gravitational process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In order to get high quality of products, the combustion of aluminium-iron oxide thermite in SHS-gravitational process must be under control. The effects of thermite filling density, hole in thermite and inclined angle of pipe on combustion rate were studied. It shows that the combustion rate decreases with the decrease of filling density. The thermite combusts downwards the pipe much more quickly if there are holes in the thermite. And the combustion rate increases with the increase of the inclined angle of pipe. The experiment results show that the combustion of thermite is predominantly controlled by gas phasereaction, which is attributed to the high temperature of the thermitecombustion.

  1. 气相色谱-燃烧-同位素比值质谱法测定单体氨基酸的碳稳定同位素组成%Analysis of Stable Carbon Isotope Composition of Individual N-Trifluoroacetyl-Isopropyl Amino Acid Esters by Gas Chromatography-Combustion-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡德陵; 刘金钟; 刘海珍

    2004-01-01

    A combined gas chromatography combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry method(GC-C IRMS) for stable carbon isotope analysis of amino acids is presented. Unlike hydrocarbons, amino acids require derivatization prior to GC-C-IRMS analysis. Replicate carbon isotope analyses of trifluoroacetyl isopropyl ester derivatives of 17 amino acids by IRMS revealed that the derivatization process is reproducible. Due to a reproducible isotopic fractionation an empirical correction factor for each individual amino acid is derived separately for derivatives and the original δ13C value of the underivatized amino acid is calculated.

  2. Measuring Combustion Advance in Solid Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L. C.

    1986-01-01

    Set of gauges on solid-propellant rocket motor with electrically insulating case measures advance of combustion front and local erosion rates of propellant and insulation. Data furnished by gauges aid in motor design, failure analysis, and performance prediction. Technique useful in determining propellant uniformity and electrical properties of exhaust plum. Gauges used both in flight and on ground. Foilgauge technique also useful in basic research on pulsed plasmas or combustion of solids.

  3. [Evaluation on contribution rate of each component total salvianolic acids and characterization of apparent oil/water partition coefficient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hong-mei; Chen, Xiao-yun; Xia, Hai-jian; Liu, Dan; Jia, Xiao-bin; Zhang, Zhen-hai

    2015-02-01

    The difference between three representative components of total salvianolic acids in pharmacodynamic activity were compared by three different pharmacological experiments: HUVECs oxidative damage experiment, 4 items of blood coagulation in vitro experiment in rabbits and experimental myocardial ischemia in rats. And the effects of contribution rate of each component were calculated by multi index comprehensive evaluation method based on CRITIC weights. The contribution rates of salvianolic acid B, rosmarinic acid and Danshensu were 28.85%, 30.11%, 41.04%. Apparent oil/water partition coefficient of each representative components of total salvianolic acids in n-octyl alcohol-buffer was tested and the total salvianolic acid components were characterized based on a combination of the approach of self-defined weighting coefficient with effects of contribution rate. Apparent oil/water partition coefficient of total salvianolic acids was 0.32, 1.06, 0.89, 0.98, 0.90, 0.13, 0.02, 0.20, 0.56 when in octanol-water/pH 1.2 dilute hydrochloric acid solution/ pH 2.0, 2.5, 5.0, 5.8, 6.8, 7.4, 7.8 phosphate buffer solution. It provides a certain reference for the characterization of components.

  4. Characteristics of particulate carbon emissions from real-world Chinese coal combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanxun; Schauer, James Jay; Zhang, Yuanhang; Zeng, Limin; Wei, Yongjie; Liu, Yuan; Shao, Min

    2008-07-15

    Particulate matter emissions from a series of different Chinese coal combustion systems were collected and analyzed for elemental and organic carbon (EC, OC), and molecular markers. Emissions from both industrial boilers and residential stoves were investigated. The coal used in this study included anthracite, bituminite, and brown coal, as well as commonly used coal briquettes produced in China for residential coal combustion. Results show significant differences in the contribution of carbonaceous species to particulate mass emissions. Industrial boilers had much higher burn out of carbon yielding particulate matter emissions with much lower levels of OC, EC, and speciated organic compounds, while residential stoves had significantly higher emissions of carbonaceous particulate matter with emission rates of approximately 100 times higher than that of industrial boilers. Quantified organic compounds emitted from industrial boilers were dominated by oxygenated compounds, of which 46-68% were organic acids, whereas the dominate species quantified in the emissions from residential stoves were PAHs (38%) and n-alkanes (20%). An important observation was the fact that emission factors of PAHs and the distribution of hopanoids were different among the emissions from industrial and residential coal combustion even using the same coal for combustion. Although particulate matter emissions from industrial and residential combustion were different in many regards, picene was detected in all samples with detectable OC mass concentrations, which supports the use of this organic tracer for OC from all types of coal combustion. 17alpha(H),21beta(H)-29-norhopane was the predominant hopanoid in coal combustion emissions, which is different from mobile source emissions and may be used to distinguish emissions from these different fossil fuel sources.

  5. Experimental and CFD investigation of gas phase freeboard combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jimmy

    Reliable and accurate modeling capabilities for combustion systems are valuable tools for optimization of the combustion process. This work concerns primary precautions for reducing NO emissions, thereby abating the detrimental effects known as “acid rain”, and minimizing cost for flue gas...

  6. Coal combustion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyoncu, R.S.; Olson, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    Coal-burning powerplants, which supply more than half of U.S. electricity, also generate coal combustion products, which can be both a resource and a disposal problem. The U.S. Geological Survey collaborates with the American Coal Ash Association in preparing its annual report on coal combustion products. This Fact Sheet answers questions about present and potential uses of coal combustion products.

  7. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acid and magnesium ion—Possible influence on biogenic calcite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Michael M.

    2012-08-01

    Increases in ocean surface water dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations retard biocalcification by reducing calcite supersaturation (Ωc). Reduced calcification rates may influence growth-rate dependent magnesium ion (Mg) incorporation into biogenic calcite modifying the use of calcifying organisms as paleoclimate proxies. Fulvic acid (FA) at biocalcification sites may further reduce calcification rates. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by FA and Mg, two common constituents of seawater and soil water involved in the formation of biogenic calcite, was measured separately and in combination under identical, highly reproducible experimental conditions. Calcite growth rates (pH=8.5 and Ωc=4.5) are reduced by FA (0.5 mg/L) to 47% and by Mg (10-4 M) to 38%, compared to control experiments containing no added growth-rate inhibitor. Humic acid (HA) is twice as effective a calcite growth-rate inhibitor as FA. Calcite growth rate in the presence of both FA (0.5 mg/L) and Mg (10-4 M) is reduced to 5% of the control rate. Mg inhibits calcite growth rates by substitution for calcium ion at the growth site. In contrast, FA inhibits calcite growth rates by binding multiple carboxylate groups on the calcite surface. FA and Mg together have an increased affinity for the calcite growth sites reducing calcite growth rates.

  8. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acid and magnesium ion—Possible influence on biogenic calcite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Increases in ocean surface water dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations retard biocalcification by reducing calcite supersaturation (Ωc). Reduced calcification rates may influence growth-rate dependent magnesium ion (Mg) incorporation into biogenic calcite modifying the use of calcifying organisms as paleoclimate proxies. Fulvic acid (FA) at biocalcification sites may further reduce calcification rates. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by FA and Mg, two common constituents of seawater and soil water involved in the formation of biogenic calcite, was measured separately and in combination under identical, highly reproducible experimental conditions. Calcite growth rates (pH=8.5 and Ωc=4.5) are reduced by FA (0.5 mg/L) to 47% and by Mg (10−4 M) to 38%, compared to control experiments containing no added growth-rate inhibitor. Humic acid (HA) is twice as effective a calcite growth-rate inhibitor as FA. Calcite growth rate in the presence of both FA (0.5 mg/L) and Mg (10−4 M) is reduced to 5% of the control rate. Mg inhibits calcite growth rates by substitution for calcium ion at the growth site. In contrast, FA inhibits calcite growth rates by binding multiple carboxylate groups on the calcite surface. FA and Mg together have an increased affinity for the calcite growth sites reducing calcite growth rates.

  9. Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) develops aerospace propulsion technology by performing tests on propulsion components and materials. Altitudes up to 137,000...

  10. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Ashlines: To promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing.

  11. Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) develops aerospace propulsion technology by performing tests on propulsion components and materials. Altitudes up to 137,000...

  12. Evaluation the rate of trans fatty acids isomers in ghee and tail sheep consumption in Lorestan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshanak Hedayatifar

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Ghee and tail sheep contains high percentage of saturated fatty acids including trans and saturated fatty acids. Therefore, people who consume these foods may put themselves at elevated risk of cardiovascular disease.

  13. Non-linear direct effects of acid rain on leaf photosynthetic rate of terrestrial plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dong, Dan; Du, Enzai; Sun, Zhengzhong; Zeng, Xuetong; Vries, de Wim

    2017-01-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of acid precursors have enhanced global occurrence of acid rain, especially in East Asia. Acid rain directly suppresses leaf function by eroding surface waxes and cuticle and leaching base cations from mesophyll cells, while the simultaneous foliar uptake of nitrates in

  14. Effect of flaxseed supplementation rate and processing on the production, fatty acid profile, and texture of milk, butter, and cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeffner, S P; Qu, Y; Just, J; Quezada, N; Ramsing, E; Keller, M; Cherian, G; Goddick, L; Bobe, G

    2013-02-01

    Health and nutrition professionals advise consumers to limit consumption of saturated fatty acids and increase the consumption of foods rich in n-3 fatty acids. Researchers have previously reported that feeding extruded flaxseed, which is high in C18:3n-3, improves the fatty acid profile of milk and dairy products to less saturated fatty acids and to more C18:3n-3. Fat concentrations in milk and butter decreased when cows were fed higher concentrations of extruded flaxseed. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal rate of flaxseed supplementation for improving the fatty acid profile without decreasing production characteristics of milk and dairy products. By using a double 5 × 5 Latin square design, 10 mid- to late-lactation Holstein cows were fed extruded (0, 0.91, 1.81, and 2.72 kg/d) and ground (1.81 kg/d) flaxseed as a top dressing for 2-wk periods each. At the end of each 2-wk treatment period, milk and serum samples were taken. Milk was subsequently manufactured into butter and fresh Mozzarella cheese. Increasing supplementation rates of extruded flaxseed improved the fatty acid profile of milk, butter, and cheese gradually to less saturated and atherogenic fatty acids and to more C18:3n-3 by increasing concentrations of C18:3n-3 in serum. The less saturated fatty acid profile was associated with decreased hardness and adhesiveness of refrigerated butter, which likely cause improved spreadability. Supplementation rates of extruded flaxseed did not affect dry matter intake of the total mixed ration, milk composition, and production of milk, butter, or cheese. Flaxseed processing did not affect production, fatty acid profile of milk, or texture of butter and cheese. Feeding up to 2.72 kg/d of extruded flaxseed to mid- to late-lactation Holstein cows may improve nutritional and functional properties of milk fat without compromising production parameters.

  15. Association between serum uric acid and different states of glucose metabolism and glomerular filtration rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xiao-ling; HAN Xue-yao; JI Li-nong

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently, it has been suggested that the serum uric acid (SUA) level decreased in diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to explore the association between SUA level and different state of glucose metabolism and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) reflected by the simplified Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation and to test the hypothesis that high MDRD is one of the determinants of SUA level.Methods This cross-sectional study included 2373 subjects in Beijing who underwent a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) for screening of diabetes. According to the states of glucose metabolism, they were divided into normal glucose tolerance, impaired glucose regulation and diabetes.Results Multiple stepwise linear regression analysis showed that adjusted by gender, SUA was positively correlated with body mass index (BMI), waist/hippo ratio, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and triglyceride, meanwhile negatively correlated with age, hemoglobin A1c, fasting insulin and MDRD. There was an increasing trend in SUA concentration and a decreasing trend in MDRD when the levels of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) increased from low to high up to the FPG level of 8.0 mmol/L; thereafter, the SUA concentration started to decrease with further increases in FPG levels, and the MDRD started to increase with further increases in FPG levels.Conclusion This study confirmed the previous finding that SUA decreased in diabetes and provided the supporting evidence that the increased MDRD might contribute to the fall of SUA.

  16. Structural calibration of the rates of amino acid evolution in a search for Darwin in drifting biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toft, Christina; Fares, Mario A

    2010-10-01

    In the last two decades, many reports of proteins under positive selection have brought the neutral theory into question. However, the methods used to detect selection have ignored the evolvability of amino acids within proteins, which is fundamental to distinguishing positive selection from the relaxed constraints caused by genetic drift. Disentangling these two counterbalancing forces is essential to test the neutral theory. Here, we calibrate rates of amino acid divergence by using structural information from the full set of crystallized proteins in bacteria. In agreement with previous reports, we show that rates of amino acid evolution correlate negatively with the number of per-amino acid atomic interactions. Calibration of the rates of evolution allows identifying signatures of selection in biological systems that evolve under strong genetic drift, such as endosymbiotic bacteria. Application of this method identifies different rates and dynamics of evolution for highly connected amino acids in the structure compared with sparsely connected ones. We also unearth patterns of Darwinian selection in fundamental cellular proteins in endosymbiotic bacteria including the cochaperonin GroES, ribosomal proteins, proteins involved in cell cycle control, DNA-binding proteins, and proteins involved in DNA replication and repair. This is, to our knowledge, the first attempt to distinguish adaptive evolution from relaxed constraints in biological systems under genetic drift.

  17. Trends in modeling of porous media combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujeebu, M. Abdul; Abdullah, M. Zulkifly [Porous Media Combustion Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Engineering Campus, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Mohamad, A.A. [College of Engineering, Alfaisal University, Riyadh 11533, P.O. Box 50927 (Saudi Arabia); Bakar, M.Z. Abu [School of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Engineering Campus, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2010-12-15

    Porous media combustion (PMC) has interesting advantages compared with free flame combustion due to higher burning rates, increased power dynamic range, extension of the lean flammability limits, and low emissions of pollutants. Extensive experimental and numerical works were carried out and are still underway, to explore the feasibility of this interesting technology for practical applications. For this purpose, numerical modeling plays a crucial role in the design and development of promising PMC systems. This article provides an exhaustive review of the fundamental aspects and emerging trends in numerical modeling of gas combustion in porous media. The modeling works published to date are reviewed, classified according to their objectives and presented with general conclusions. Numerical modeling of liquid fuel combustion in porous media is excluded. (author)

  18. Strobes: An oscillatory combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.; Lingen, J.N.J. van; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    Strobe compositions belong to the class of solid combustions. They are mixtures of powdered ingredients. When ignited, the combustion front evolves in an oscillatory fashion, and flashes of light are produced by intermittence. They have fascinated many scientists since their discovery at the beginni

  19. Strobes: An Oscillatory Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.; van Lingen, J.N.J.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    Strobe compositions belong to the class of solid combustions. They are mixtures of powdered ingredients. When ignited, the combustion front evolves in an oscillatory fashion, and flashes of light are produced by intermittence. They have fascinated many scientists since their discovery at the beginni

  20. Fifteenth combustion research conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-06-01

    The BES research efforts cover chemical reaction theory, experimental dynamics and spectroscopy, thermodynamics of combustion intermediates, chemical kinetics, reaction mechanisms, combustion diagnostics, and fluid dynamics and chemically reacting flows. 98 papers and abstracts are included. Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers.

  1. Combustion of coffee husks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenger, M.; Hartge, E.-U.; Werther, J. [Technical Univ. Hamburg-Harburg, Chemical Engineering 1, Hamburg (Germany); Ogada, T.; Siagi, Z. [Moi Univ., Dept. of Production Engineering, Eldoret (Kenya)

    2001-05-01

    Combustion mechanisms of two types of coffee husks have been studied using single particle combustion techniques as well as combustion in a pilot-scale fluidized bed facility (FBC), 150 mm in diameter and 9 m high. Through measurements of weight-loss and particle temperatures, the processes of drying, devolatilization and combustion of coffee husks were studied. Axial temperature profiles in the FBC were also measured during stationary combustion conditions to analyse the location of volatile release and combustion as a function of fuel feeding mode. Finally the problems of ash sintering were analysed. The results showed that devolatilization of coffee husks (65-72% volatile matter, raw mass) starts at a low temperature range of 170-200degC and takes place rapidly. During fuel feeding using a non water-cooled system, pyrolysis of the husks took place in the feeder tube leading to blockage and non-uniform fuel flow. Measurements of axial temperature profiles showed that during under-bed feeding, the bed and freeboard temperatures were more or less the same, whereas for over-bed feeding, freeboard temperatures were much higher, indicating significant combustion of the volatiles in the freeboard. A major problem observed during the combustion of coffee husks was ash sintering and bed agglomeration. This is due to the low melting temperature of the ash, which is attributed to the high contents of K{sub 2}O (36-38%) of the coffee husks. (Author)

  2. Combustion char characterisation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, P.; Ingermann Petersen, H.; Sund Soerensen, H.; Thomsen, E.; Guvad, C.

    1996-06-01

    The aim was to correlate reactivity measures of raw coals and the maceral concentrates of the coals obtained in a previous project with the morphology of the produced chars by using a wire grid devolatilization method. Work involved determination of morphology, macroporosity and a detailed study by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Systematic variations in the texture of chars produced in different temperature domains and heating rates were demonstrated by using incident light microscopy on polished blocks and by SEM studies directly on the surfaces of untreated particles. Results suggest that work in the field of char reactivity estimates and correlations between char morphology and coal petrography can be accomplished only on chars produced under heating rates and temperatures comparable to those for the intended use of coal. A general correlation between the coals` petrography and the the morphology of high temperature chars was found. The SEM study of the chars revealed that during the devolatilization period the particles fuse and the macroporosity and thus the morphotypes are formed. After devolatilization ceases, secondary micropores are formed. These develop in number and size throughout the medium combustion interval. At the end of the combustion interval the macrostructure breaks down, caused by coalescence of the increased number of microspores. This can be observed as a change in the morphology and the macroporosity of the chars. Results indicate that char reactivity is a function of the macroporosity and thus the morphology of combustion chars. (AB) 34 refs.

  3. COMBUSTION PROPERTIES OF EUCALYPTUS WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalçın ÖRS

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the combustion properties of some impregnation materials (abiotic and biotic factors used for eucalyptus wood in interior or exterior environments were investigated. The experimental samples were prepared from Eucalyptus wood based on ASTM-D-1413-76 Tanalith-CBC, boric acid, borax, vacsol-WR, immersol-WR, polyethylen glycole-400 and ammonium sulphate were used as an impregnation material. The results indicated that, vacuum treatment on Eucalyptus gave the lowest retention value of salts. Compounds containing boron+salt increased fire resistance however water repellents decreased the wood flammability.

  4. Spontaneously Combustible Solids -- A Literature Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-01

    the increasing acidity of the clay surface. Treatment of the clays with volatile organic’ bases or basic substances such as urea or...Stearic kcid heats spontaneously Straw of Flax, Maize , Oats, Rice, subject to spontaneous heating and Rye, Wheat, etc. combustion 22 NSWC/WOL/TR 75-159

  5. Steady state HNG combustion modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louwers, J.; Gadiot, G.M.H.J.L. [TNO Prins Maurits Lab., Rijswijk (Netherlands); Brewster, M.Q. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Son, S.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Parr, T.; Hanson-Parr, D. [Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Two simplified modeling approaches are used to model the combustion of Hydrazinium Nitroformate (HNF, N{sub 2}H{sub 5}-C(NO{sub 2}){sub 3}). The condensed phase is treated by high activation energy asymptotics. The gas phase is treated by two limit cases: the classical high activation energy, and the recently introduced low activation energy approach. This results in simplification of the gas phase energy equation, making an (approximate) analytical solution possible. The results of both models are compared with experimental results of HNF combustion. It is shown that the low activation energy approach yields better agreement with experimental observations (e.g. regression rate and temperature sensitivity), than the high activation energy approach.

  6. Internal combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmich, M.J.; Hoagland, M.C.; Hubbard, R.L.; Schaub, F.S.

    1981-12-22

    A method of combusting natural gas fuel in a two cycle, turbocharged internal combustion engine substantially reduces the production of nitrogen-oxygen emissions. An improved turbocharger design provides increased air charging pressure, produces a controlled lean air/fuel mixture and lowers peak combustion temperatures. A jet cell ignition device ensures uniform, reliable ignition of the lean air/fuel mixture under all operating conditions and the lean air/fuel mixture in turn encourages complete fuel combustion and provides excellent combustion characteristics with methane, ethane and heavier paraffinic hydrocarbon fuels. These structural modifications and adjustment of other operating parameters combine to reduce nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) emissions by as much as 75% while effecting only a negligible increase in fuel consumption.

  7. Fuels and Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Johansson, Bengt

    2016-08-17

    This chapter discusses the combustion processes and the link to the fuel properties that are suitable for them. It describes the basic three concepts, including spark ignition (SI) and compression ignition (CI), and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The fuel used in a CI engine is vastly different from that in an SI engine. In an SI engine, the fuel should sustain high pressure and temperature without autoignition. Apart from the dominating SI and CI engines, it is also possible to operate with a type of combustion: autoignition. With HCCI, the fuel and air are fully premixed before combustion as in the SI engine, but combustion is started by the increased pressure and temperature during the compression stroke. Apart from the three combustion processes, there are also a few combined or intermediate concepts, such as Spark-Assisted Compression Ignition (SACI). Those concepts are discussed in terms of the requirements of fuel properties.

  8. Effect of rate of pyrolysis on the textural properties of naturally-templated porous carbons from alginic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Andrew S; Hunt, Andrew J; Bergström, Ed; Thomas-Oates, Jane; Clark, James H

    2016-09-01

    The effect of pyrolysis rate on the properties of alginic acid-derived carbonaceous materials, termed Starbon(®), was investigated. Thermal Gravimetry-IR was used to prepare porous carbons up to 800 °C at several rates and highlighted increased CO2 production at higher pyrolysis rates. N2 porosimetry of the resultant carbons shows how pyrolysis rate affects both the mesopore structure and thus surface area and surface energy. Surface capacity of these carbons was analysed by methylene blue dye adsorption. In general, as the rate of pyrolysis increased, the mesopore content and adsorbent capacity decreased. It is considered here that the rapid production of volatiles at these higher rates causes structural collapse of the non-templated pore network. The work here demonstrates that pyrolysis rate is a key variable which needs to be controlled to maximise the textural properties of Starbon(®) required for adsorption applications.

  9. Dynamic Combustion Stability Rating of LOX/LH2 Rocket Engine%氢氧火箭发动机动态燃烧稳定性评定技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁兆波; 许晓勇; 乔桂玉; 陶瑞峰

    2013-01-01

      为了实现氢氧发动机的动态燃烧稳定性试验评定,基于国内外液体火箭发动机动态稳定性评定的相关经验,并结合 CPIA655关于稳定性评定的准则,进行了氢氧发动机动态稳定性评定的方案探讨。分析表明,氢氧发动机有必要在全系统热试车状态下进行动态稳定性评定试验。所选定的扰动装置和传感器在喷注器面安装的方案可实现性最好,结构变动最小,可保持试验在原型燃烧室状态下进行,同时扰动效果较好,传感器敏感性较好。%In order to carry out dynamic combustion stability rating of a LOX/LH2 rocket engine, the schemes of stability rating for the LOX/LH2 rocket engine are investigated based on the stability rating datum of some rocket engines and the basic criteria of CPIA655, including the evaluation standard, testing method, disturbance method, dynamic pressure testing and structure design. Compared to other schemes, the selected scheme that disturbance device and high frequency pressure sensors install on injector surface has better feasibility and less structural changes, which could ensure the rating test to be carried in a prototype engine, thereby leading to better disturbance efficiency and measure sensitivity.

  10. Kinetic investigation for slow combustion of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykiri-Acma, H.; Yaman, S. [Istanbul Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    The renewed interest in biomass as a renewable, clean, and inexpensive fuel was discussed. Many different mechanisms take place simultaneously during biomass combustion and also during other thermal processes such as gasification, pyrolysis or carbonization. These mechanisms have a pronounced influence on the design and operation of thermal conversion processes. In addition, product yields and product distributions from the thermal processes are sensitive to the kinetic properties of biomass. In order to evaluate the combustion mechanisms and the combustion kinetics of biomass, the behavior of these constituents under combustion conditions were properly evaluated. In this study, combustion of biomass samples was carried out in a thermogravimetric analyzer by heating them from ambient to 1173 K with heating rates of 5 K/min and 10 K/min under dynamic dry air atmosphere of 40 mL/min. The biomass samples included olive refuse, sunflower seed shell, rapeseed, grape seed, and hybrid poplar. The purpose of the study was to examine the kinetic properties of biomass during slow combustion for the overall combustion process as well as for some definite temperature intervals at which different combustion mechanisms are present according to the type and complexity of biomass used. Derivative thermogravimetric analysis (DTG) curves were derived, and data obtained from these curves were used to compute the kinetic parameters such as activation energy, pre-exponential factor, and governing mechanisms for the combustion processes. The governing mechanisms for individual temperature intervals were examined along with the overall combustion process. The study showed that at lower temperature intervals, the combustion process was controlled primarily by the chemical reaction. At least 3 sequential mechanisms may occur at different temperature intervals during combustion of biomass. Activation energy and pre-exponential factors were determined for each temperature interval

  11. Correlating multidimensional fetal heart rate variability analysis with acid-base balance at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasch, Martin G; Xu, Yawen; Stampalija, Tamara; Durosier, Lucien D; Herry, Christophe; Wang, Xiaogang; Casati, Daniela; Seely, Andrew Je; Alfirevic, Zarko; Gao, Xin; Ferrazzi, Enrico

    2014-12-01

    Fetal monitoring during labour currently fails to accurately detect acidemia. We developed a method to assess the multidimensional properties of fetal heart rate variability (fHRV) from trans-abdominal fetal electrocardiogram (fECG) during labour. We aimed to assess this novel bioinformatics approach for correlation between fHRV and neonatal pH or base excess (BE) at birth.We enrolled a prospective pilot cohort of uncomplicated singleton pregnancies at 38-42 weeks' gestation in Milan, Italy, and Liverpool, UK. Fetal monitoring was performed by standard cardiotocography. Simultaneously, with fECG (high sampling frequency) was recorded. To ensure clinician blinding, fECG information was not displayed. Data from the last 60 min preceding onset of second-stage labour were analyzed using clinically validated continuous individualized multiorgan variability analysis (CIMVA) software in 5 min overlapping windows. CIMVA allows simultaneous calculation of 101 fHRV measures across five fHRV signal analysis domains. We validated our mathematical prediction model internally with 80:20 cross-validation split, comparing results to cord pH and BE at birth.The cohort consisted of 60 women with neonatal pH values at birth ranging from 7.44 to 6.99 and BE from -0.3 to -18.7 mmol L(-1). Our model predicted pH from 30 fHRV measures (R(2) = 0.90, P birth. Further refinement and validation in larger cohorts are needed. These new measurements of fHRV might offer a new opportunity to predict fetal acid-base balance at birth.

  12. Acetic acid modulates spike rate and spike latency to salt in peripheral gustatory neurons of rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breza, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Sour and salt taste interactions are not well understood in the peripheral gustatory system. Therefore, we investigated the interaction of acetic acid and NaCl on taste processing by rat chorda tympani neurons. We recorded multi-unit responses from the severed chorda tympani nerve (CT) and single-cell responses from intact narrowly tuned and broadly tuned salt-sensitive neurons in the geniculate ganglion simultaneously with stimulus-evoked summated potentials to signal when the stimulus contacted the lingual epithelium. Artificial saliva served as the rinse and solvent for all stimuli [0.3 M NH4Cl, 0.5 M sucrose, 0.1 M NaCl, 0.01 M citric acid, 0.02 M quinine hydrochloride (QHCl), 0.1 M KCl, 0.003–0.1 M acetic acid, and 0.003–0.1 M acetic acid mixed with 0.1 M NaCl]. We used benzamil to assess NaCl responses mediated by the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). The CT nerve responses to acetic acid/NaCl mixtures were less than those predicted by summing the component responses. Single-unit analyses revealed that acetic acid activated acid-generalist neurons exclusively in a concentration-dependent manner: increasing acid concentration increased response frequency and decreased response latency in a parallel fashion. Acetic acid suppressed NaCl responses in ENaC-dependent NaCl-specialist neurons, whereas acetic acid-NaCl mixtures were additive in acid-generalist neurons. These data suggest that acetic acid attenuates sodium responses in ENaC-expressing-taste cells in contact with NaCl-specialist neurons, whereas acetic acid-NaCl mixtures activate distinct receptor/cellular mechanisms on taste cells in contact with acid-generalist neurons. We speculate that NaCl-specialist neurons are in contact with type I cells, whereas acid-generalist neurons are in contact with type III cells in fungiform taste buds. PMID:22896718

  13. Effect of application rate and persistence of boric acid sugar baits applied to plants for control of Aedes albopictus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Rui-De; Müller, Günter C; Kline, Daniel L; Barnard, Donald R

    2011-03-01

    The use of toxic bait to kill adult Aedes albopictus is a safe and potentially effective alternative to the use of synthetic chemical insecticides. This study was carried out to determine effective concentrations of boric acid needed in sugar bait solutions applied to plant surfaces, and to determine its residual effect in reducing adult mosquito densities. In outdoor tests in 1,100-m3 screened enclosures, landing rates of Ae. albopictus on a human subject and the number of female mosquitoes in mechanical traps were significantly reduced by a 1% boric acid bait compared with the other tested concentrations (0.25%, 0.50%, and 0.75%) and untreated control. Studies of the duration of boric acid activity on plant surfaces were made in 1.4-m3 cages in the laboratory and outdoors in 78-m3 screened enclosures. In the laboratory tests, 1% boric acid bait resulted in >96% mortality in male and female Ae. albopictus for 14 days, whereas in outdoor tests, mosquito landing rates in the treated enclosures were significantly lower than in the control enclosures for 7 days. Also, mosquito mortality responses to boric acid baits between plants with flowers and nonflowers (1.4-m3 cages in the laboratory) were not significantly different. The results of this study suggest that boric acid baits applied to plant surfaces may provide specific data related to the development of an effective point-source-based adjunct/alternative to the use of conventional adulticides for mosquito control.

  14. Regional trends in soil acidification and exchangeable metal concentrations in relation to acid deposition rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Carly J; Dise, Nancy B; Gowing, David J

    2009-01-01

    The deposition of high levels of reactive nitrogen (N) and sulphur (S), or the legacy of that deposition, remain among the world's most important environmental problems. Although regional impacts of acid deposition in aquatic ecosystems have been well documented, quantitative evidence of wide-scale impacts on terrestrial ecosystems is not common. In this study we analysed surface and subsoil chemistry of 68 acid grassland sites across the UK along a gradient of acid deposition, and statistically related the concentrations of exchangeable soil metals (1 M KCl extraction) to a range of potential drivers. The deposition of N, S or acid deposition was the primary correlate for 8 of 13 exchangeable metals measured in the topsoil and 5 of 14 exchangeable metals in the subsoil. In particular, exchangeable aluminium and lead both show increased levels above a soil pH threshold of about 4.5, strongly related to the deposition flux of acid compounds.

  15. Protein and lipid deposition rates in male broiler chickens : separate responses to amino acids and protein-free energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eits, R.M.; Kwakkel, R.P.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Stoutjesdijk, P.; Greef, de K.H.

    2002-01-01

    Two experiments of similar design were conducted with male broiler chickens over two body weight ranges, 200 to 800 g in Experiment 1 and 800 to 1,600 g in Experiment 2. The data were used to test the hypothesis that protein deposition rate increases (linearly) with increasing amino acid intake, unt

  16. Effect of application rate and persistence of boric acid sugar baits applied to plants control of Aedes albopictus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of toxic baits to kill adult Aedes albopictus (Skuse) mosquitoes is a safe and potentially effective alternative to the use of synthetic chemical insecticides. This study was made to identify effective application rates for boric acid-sugar solution baits sprayed onto plant surfaces and to ...

  17. Contents of nucleic and amino acids and rate of protein synthesis in developing flight muscles of Locusta migratoria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marrewijk, W.J.A. van; Schrikker, A.E.M.; Beenakkers, A.M.Th.

    1980-01-01

    1. 1. Changes in the contents of DNA, RNA, free amino acids (FAA) and protein as well as in the rate of protein synthesis in vivo were measured in the developing flight muscles of Locustamigratoria. 2. 2. The DNA concentration rises temporarily at the end of the last larval instar, possibly in rela

  18. Effect of substrate and cation requirement on anaerobic volatile fatty acid conversion rates at elevated biogas pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, R.E.F.; Ferrer, I.; Weijma, J.; Lier, van J.B.

    2013-01-01

    This work studied the anaerobic conversion of neutralized volatile fatty acids (VFA) into biogas under Autogenerative High Pressure Digestion (AHPD) conditions. The effects of the operating conditions on the biogas quality, and the substrate utilisation rates were evaluated using 3 AHPD reactors (0.

  19. Essential fatty acids influence metabolic rate and tolerance of hypoxia in Dover sole ( Solea solea ) larvae and juveniles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKenzie, David; Lund, Ivar; Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg

    2008-01-01

    Dover sole (Solea solea, Linneaus 1758) were raised from first feeding on brine shrimp (Artemia sp.) with different contents and compositions of the essential fatty acids (EFA) arachidonic acid (ARA, 20:4n - 6); eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n - 3), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n - 3......), and their metabolic rate and tolerance to hypoxia measured prior to and following metamorphosis and settlement. Four dietary Artemia preparations were compared: (1) un-enriched; (2) enriched with a commercial EFA mixture (Easy DHA SELCO Emulsion); (3) enriched with a marine fish oil combination (VEVODAR and Incromega......-crit, but juveniles fed on un-enriched Artemia still exhibited higher P-crit and agitation thresholds than the other groups. Sole fed un-enriched Artemia had significantly lower contents of EFA in their tissues, both before and after settlement. Thus, enriching live feeds with EFA has significant effects...

  20. Progressive combustion in SI-Engines—Experimental investigation on influence of combustion related parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Harish Kumar; A J Antony

    2008-12-01

    The fuel heat release rate which virtually controls the combustion process is dependent on the ‘Mass-Fraction-Burnt (MFB)’. In the present research work, a ‘logistic model with conditional variability in MFB’, has been developed for precise simulation of combustion in SI engines as the model has built in routines to take into account such factors as location of spark plug, single/dual spark plugs, intake generated swirl, combustion chamber geometry (associated with Bore/Stroke ratio), etc. A major contribution of this paper is that new and improved models for the ‘overall combustion duration’, and ‘ignition delay/flame development angle’, taking into account primarily the influence of compression ratio on the overall combustion process in SI engine have been developed. Taylor’s original equation for estimating the overall combustion duration has been modified by including a logistic equation for the error term and incorporating it in the original equation. Ignition delay as proposed by Keck et al has been modified by incorporating a polynomial of 3rd order into the original equation. The empirical correlations that have been proposed in this paper may serve to be the starting point for simulation of ‘photodetonation concept’ to simulate HCCI combustion which is presently the hot research work in the area of pre-mixed combustion. A program in Turbo-C++ has been developed for the complete simulation of SI engine combustion, taking into account the conditional variability effect, variable specific heats of burnt gases, dissociation of gases at high temperatures, progressive combustion phenomena, heat transfer (based on Woschni‘s equation), gas exchange process based on 1D-steady gas flow equation employing Taylor’s mach index of 0·6 for valve design.

  1. Real-Time Combustion Controls and Diagnostics Sensors (CCADS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, J.D.; Richard, G.A.; Dodrill, K.A.; Nutter, R.S. Jr; Straub, D.

    2005-05-03

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus for the monitoring of the combustion process within a combustion system. The apparatus comprises; a combustion system, a means for supplying fuel and an oxidizer, a device for igniting the fuel and oxidizer in order to initiate combustion, and a sensor for determining the current conducted by the combustion process. The combustion system comprises a fuel nozzle and an outer shell attached to the combustion nozzle. The outer shell defines a combustion chamber. Preferably the nozzle is a lean premix fuel nozzle (LPN). Fuel and an oxidizer are provided to the fuel nozzle at separate rates. The fuel and oxidizer are ignited. A sensor positioned within the combustion system comprising at least two electrodes in spaced-apart relationship from one another. At least a portion of the combustion process or flame is between the first and second electrodes. A voltage is applied between the first and second electrodes and the magnitude of resulting current between the first and second electrodes is determined.

  2. Experimental validation of calculated capture rate for nucleus involved in fuel cycle; Validation experimentale du calcul du taux de capture des noyaux intervenant dans le cycle du combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benslimane-Bouland, A

    1997-09-01

    The framework of this study was the evaluation of the nuclear data requirements for Actinides and Fission Products applied to current nuclear reactors as well as future applications. This last item includes extended irradiation campaigns, 100 % Mixed Oxide fuel, transmutation or even incineration. The first part of this study presents different types of integral measurements which are available for capture rate measurements, as well as the methods used for reactor core calculation route design and nuclear data library validation. The second section concerns the analysis of three specific irradiation experiments. The results have shown the extent of the current knowledge on nuclear data as well as the associated uncertainties. The third and last section shows both the coherency between all the results, and the statistical method applied for nuclear data library adjustment. A relevant application of this method has demonstrated that only specifically chosen integral experiments can be of use for the validation of nuclear data libraries. The conclusion is reached that even if co-ordinated efforts between reactor and nuclear physicists have made possible a huge improvement in the knowledge of capture cross sections of the main nuclei such as uranium and plutonium, some improvements are currently necessary for the minor actinides (Np, Am and Cm). Both integral and differential measurements are recommended to improve the knowledge of minor actinide cross sections. As far as integral experiments are concerned, a set of criteria to be followed during the experimental conception have been defined in order to both reduce the number of required calculation approximations, and to increase as much as possible the maximum amount of extracted information. (author)

  3. Modeling the internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, F. J.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A flexible and computationally economical model of the internal combustion engine was developed for use on large digital computer systems. It is based on a system of ordinary differential equations for cylinder-averaged properties. The computer program is capable of multicycle calculations, with some parameters varying from cycle to cycle, and has restart capabilities. It can accommodate a broad spectrum of reactants, permits changes in physical properties, and offers a wide selection of alternative modeling functions without any reprogramming. It readily adapts to the amount of information available in a particular case because the model is in fact a hierarchy of five models. The models range from a simple model requiring only thermodynamic properties to a complex model demanding full combustion kinetics, transport properties, and poppet valve flow characteristics. Among its many features the model includes heat transfer, valve timing, supercharging, motoring, finite burning rates, cycle-to-cycle variations in air-fuel ratio, humid air, residual and recirculated exhaust gas, and full combustion kinetics.

  4. Aspartic acid racemization rate in narwhal (Monodon monoceros) eye lens nuclei estimated by counting of growth layers in tusks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Eva; Heide-Jørgensen, Mads Peter; Ditlevsen, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Ages of marine mammals have traditionally been estimated by counting dentinal growth layers in teeth. However, this method is difficult to use on narwhals (Monodon monoceros) because of their special tooth structures. Alternative methods are therefore needed. The aspartic acid racemization (AAR......) technique has been used in age estimation studies of cetaceans, including narwhals. The purpose of this study was to estimate a species-specific racemization rate for narwhals by regressing aspartic acid D/L ratios in eye lens nuclei against growth layer groups in tusks (n=9). Two racemization rates were...... rate and (D/L)0 value be used in future AAR age estimation studies of narwhals, but also recommend the collection of tusks and eyes of narwhals for further improving the (D/L)0 and 2kAsp estimates obtained in this study....

  5. Sandia Combustion Research: Technical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This report contains reports from research programs conducted at the Sandia Combustion Research Facility. Research is presented under the following topics: laser based diagnostics; combustion chemistry; reacting flow; combustion in engines and commercial burners; coal combustion; and industrial processing. Individual projects were processed separately for entry onto the DOE databases.

  6. Effect of oxydesulphurization on the combustion characteristics of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Technical University of Istanbul, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-06-01

    Desulphurization of a Turkish lignite by oxydesulphurization using dilute alkaline solutions, obtained by the extraction of fly ash with water, was carried out under 0-1.5 MPa partial pressure of oxygen at temperatures between 403 and 498 K for 30-90 min time intervals. The combustion characteristics of original and desulphurized lignite samples are compared using TGA. DTG curves were derived and the effects of desulphurization conditions such as temperature, partial pressure of oxygen and time on coal reactivity were studied. Ignition temperature, maximum combustion rate, combustion period, and the end temperature of combustion were considered. Relations between coal reactivity and removals of sulphur and ash contents were also studied.

  7. Fluidized bed combustion of high ash Singareni coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, M.K.; Biswas, R.R.; Mukherjee, S.K.; Talapatra, P.C.; Roy, R.U.; Rao, S.K.; Sen, M.M.

    1986-04-01

    Fluid bed combustion is comparatively a new technology for efficient combustion of high ash coals, which constitute the bulk of Indian coal resources. A 2-tonne equivalent steam per hour fluid bed combustion boiler was installed at the CPRI for experimentation with Indian coals and this paper discusses the salient features of tests conducted in the unit with minus 6 mm high ash Singareni coal of Andhra Pradesh. Data on combustion, heat transfer and heat utilization characteristics of the boiler under varying operating conditions show that high ash Singareni coal slacks can be burnt efficiently with high thermal efficiency, combustion efficiency and heat transfer rates from bed to surface in direct contact in a fluid bed combustion boiler. 3 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Oxy-combustion of biomass in a circulating fluidized bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosowska-Golachowska, Monika; Kijo-Kleczkowska, Agnieszka; Luckos, Adam; Wolski, Krzysztof; Musiał, Tomasz

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate combustion characteristics of biomass (willow, Salix viminalis) burnt in air and O2/CO2 mixtures in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB). Air and oxy-combustion characteristics of wooden biomass in CFB were supplemented by the thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses (TGA/DTA). The results of conducted CFB and TGA tests show that the composition of the oxidizing atmosphere strongly influences the combustion process of biomass fuels. Replacing N2 in the combustion environment by CO2 caused slight delay (higher ignition temperature and lower maximum mass loss rate) in the combustion of wooden biomass. The combustion process in O2/CO2 mixtures at 30% and 40% O2 is faster and shorter than that at lower O2 concentrations.

  9. Oxy-combustion of biomass in a circulating fluidized bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosowska-Golachowska Monika

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate combustion characteristics of biomass (willow, Salix viminalis burnt in air and O2/CO2 mixtures in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB. Air and oxy-combustion characteristics of wooden biomass in CFB were supplemented by the thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses (TGA/DTA. The results of conducted CFB and TGA tests show that the composition of the oxidizing atmosphere strongly influences the combustion process of biomass fuels. Replacing N2 in the combustion environment by CO2 caused slight delay (higher ignition temperature and lower maximum mass loss rate in the combustion of wooden biomass. The combustion process in O2/CO2 mixtures at 30% and 40% O2 is faster and shorter than that at lower O2 concentrations.

  10. Numerical models for the phenomenological study of flameless combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Argemiro Herrera Múnera

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Flameless combustion is a technique which offers environmental advantages such as lower than 100 ppm NOx and CO emis- sions due to below 200 K temperature gradients. Flameless combustion also supplies higher than 70% energy efficiency. Knowledge of the phenomena in this combustion regime has been facilitated by using numerical simulation. This paper reviewed the specialised literature about the most commonly used turbulence, combustion, heat transfer and NOx formation models in modelling flameless combustion with CFD codes. The review concluded that the k-ε standard model is the most used for turbu- lence. Finite rate/eddy dissipation with modified constants and eddy dissipation concept models are suitable for combustion reac- tions, discrete ordinates and weighted sum gray gas (WSGG models are used for radiation and thermal, prompt and N2O inter- mediate models are used for NOx.

  11. Fine particle emissions from residential wood combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tissari, J.

    2008-07-01

    Residential wood combustion (RWC) appliances have the high probability of incomplete combustion, producing e.g. fine particles and hazardous organic compounds. In this thesis, the fine particle number and mass emissions, particle composition and morphology, and gas emissions were investigated from the modern (MMH) and conventional masonry heaters (CMH), sauna stoves (SS) and pellet burner. The investigation was based on laboratory and field experiments applying extensive and unique particle sampling methods. The appliance type, fuel and operational practices were found to affect clearly the fine particle emissions. In good combustion conditions (e.g. in pellet combustion), the fine particle mass (PM{sub 1}) emission factors were low, typically below 0.3 g kg-1, and over 90% of the PM{sub 1} consisted of inorganic compounds (i.e fine ash). From the CMH the typical PM{sub 1} values were 1.6-1.8 g kg-1, and from the SS 2.7-5.0 g kg-1, but were strongly dependent on operational practices. The smouldering combustion in CMH increased PM{sub 1} emission up to 10 g kg-1. The good secondary combustion in the MMH reduced the particle organic matter (POM) and gaseous emissions, but not substantially the elemental carbon (EC, i.e. soot) emission, and the typical PM{sub 1} values were 0.7-0.8 g kg-1. The particle number emissions were high, and did not correspond with the completition of combustion. The particle number distributions were mainly dominated by ultrafine (<100 nm) particles, but varied dependent on combustion conditions. The electronmicroscopy analyses showed that ultrafine particles were composed mainly of K, S and Zn. From the smouldering combustion, particles were composed mainly of carbon compounds and they had a closed sinteredlike structure, due to organic matter on the particles. Controlling the gasification rate via the primary air supply, log and batch size, as well as fuel moisture content, is important for the reduction of emissions in batch combustion

  12. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Biofuel Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarathy, Subram Maniam

    Bioalcohols, such as bioethanol and biobutanol, are suitable replacements for gasoline, while biodiesel can replace petroleum diesel. Improving biofuel engine performance requires understanding its fundamental combustion properties and the pathways of combustion. This study's contribution is experimentally validated chemical kinetic combustion mechanisms for biobutanol and biodiesel. Fundamental combustion data and chemical kinetic mechanisms are presented and discussed to improve our understanding of biofuel combustion. The net environmental impact of biobutanol (i.e., n-butanol) has not been studied extensively, so this study first assesses the sustainability of n-butanol derived from corn. The results indicate that technical advances in fuel production are required before commercializing biobutanol. The primary contribution of this research is new experimental data and a novel chemical kinetic mechanism for n-butanol combustion. The results indicate that under the given experimental conditions, n-butanol is consumed primarily via abstraction of hydrogen atoms to produce fuel radical molecules, which subsequently decompose to smaller hydrocarbon and oxygenated species. The hydroxyl moiety in n-butanol results in the direct production of the oxygenated species such as butanal, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde. The formation of these compounds sequesters carbon from forming soot precursors, but they may introduce other adverse environmental and health effects. Biodiesel is a mixture of long chain fatty acid methyl esters derived from fats and oils. This research study presents high quality experimental data for one large fatty acid methyl ester, methyl decanoate, and models its combustion using an improved skeletal mechanism. The results indicate that methyl decanoate is consumed via abstraction of hydrogen atoms to produce fuel radicals, which ultimately lead to the production of alkenes. The ester moiety in methyl decanoate leads to the formation of low molecular

  13. Combustion of thermochemically torrefied sugar cane bagasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valix, M; Katyal, S; Cheung, W H

    2017-01-01

    This study compared the upgrading of sugar bagasse by thermochemical and dry torrefaction methods and their corresponding combustion behavior relative to raw bagasse. The combustion reactivities were examined by non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis. Thermochemical torrefaction was carried out by chemical pre-treatment of bagasse with acid followed by heating at 160-300°C in nitrogen environment, while dry torrefaction followed the same heating treatment without the chemical pretreatment. The results showed thermochemical torrefaction generated chars with combustion properties that are closer to various ranks of coal, thus making it more suitable for co-firing applications. Thermochemical torrefaction also induced greater densification of bagasse with a 335% rise in bulk density to 340kg/m(3), increased HHVmass and HHVvolume, greater charring and aromatization and storage stability. These features demonstrate the potential of thermochemical torrefaction in addressing the practical challenges in using biomass such as bagasse as fuel.

  14. Coal combustion science. Quarterly progress report, April 1993--June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardesty, D.R. [ed.

    1994-05-01

    This document is a quarterly status report of the Coal Combustion Science Project that is being conducted at the Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories. The information reported is for Apr-Jun 1993. The objective of this work is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This project consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the PETC Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency Coal Combustion Science Project. The objective of the kinetics and mechanisms of pulverized coal char combustion task is to characterize the combustion behavior of selected US coals under conditions relevant to industrial pulverized coal-fired furnaces. Work is being done in four areas: kinetics of heterogeneous fuel particle populations; char combustion kinetics at high carbon conversion; the role of particle structure and the char formation process in combustion and; unification of the Sandia char combustion data base. This data base on the high temperature reactivities of chars from strategic US coals will permit identification of important fuel-specific trends and development of predictive capabilities for advanced coal combustion systems. The objective of the fate of inorganic material during coal combustion task is the establish a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and rates of transformation, fragmentation, and deposition of inorganic material during coal combustion as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, the initial forms and distribution of inorganic species in the unreacted coal, and the local gas temperature and composition. In addition, optical diagnostic capabilities are being developed for in situ, real-time detection of inorganic vapor species and surface species during ash deposition. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  15. Establishment of Combustion Model for Isooctane HCCI Marine Diesel Engine and Research on the Combustion Characteristic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Biao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI combustion mode applied in marine diesel engine is expected to be one of alternative technologies to decrease nitrogen oxide (NOX emission and improve energy utilization rate. Applying the chemical-looping combustion (CLC mechanism inside the cylinder, a numerical study on the HCCI combustion process is performed taking a marine diesel engine as application object. The characteristic feature of combustion process is displayed. On this basis, the formation and emission of NOX are analyzed and discussed. The results indicate that the HCCI combustion mode always exhibit two combustion releasing heats: low-temperature reaction and high-temperature reaction. The combustion phase is divided into low-temperature reaction zone, high-temperature reaction zone and negative temperature coefficient (NTC zone. The operating conditions of the high compression ratio, high intake air temperature, low inlet pressure and small excess air coefficient would cause the high in-cylinder pressure which often leads engine detonation. The low compression ratio, low intake air temperature and big excess air coefficient would cause the low combustor temperature which is conducive to reduce NOX emissions. These technological means and operating conditions are expected to meet the NOX emissions limits in MARPOL73/78 Convention-Annex VI Amendment.

  16. Improving combustion efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulsari, A.; Wemberg, A.; Multas, A. [Nonlinear Solutions Oy (Finland)

    2009-06-15

    The paper describes how nonlinear models are used to improve the efficiency of coal combustion while keeping NOx and other emissions under desired limits in the Naantali 2 boiler of Fortum Power and Heat Oy. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Fluidized coal combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, P. I.; Young, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Fluidized-bed coal combustion process, in which pulverized coal and limestone are burned in presence of forced air, may lead to efficient, reliable boilers with low sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide emissions.

  18. TENORM: Coal Combustion Residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burning coal in boilers to create steam for power generation and industrial applications produces a number of combustion residuals. Naturally radioactive materials that were in the coal mostly end up in fly ash, bottom ash and boiler slag.

  19. Fatty Acid Composition and Hedonic Ratings of Meat from Light Lambs of Leccese Breed in Relation to Slaughter Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Gabriella D’Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty lambs from Leccese local breed were used to investigate the effect of two slaughter ages (45 vs 60 d on fatty acid composition and hedonic ratings of meat. The lambs, born as singles in spring, were subdivided into two groups (n. 10 corresponding to the slaughter ages of 45 and 60 d. The animals received their mother’s milk and a supplementation of hay and concentrate from 30 d to slaughter. The increase to 60 d of slaughter age resulted in higher proportion of lauric acid (C12:0; P<0.05, pentadecanoic acid (C15:0; P<0.01 and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA; P<0.05, and lower proportion of stearic acid (C18:0; P<0.05 and linoleic acid (C20:3 n-6; P<0.05. Using a none-point hedonic scale, consumer test showed that meat from lambs slaughtered at 60 d received a higher hedonic scores (P < 0.01 as well as higher scores for tenderness (P < 0.05, flavour (P < 0.05, and juiciness (P < 0.001 than meat from lambs slaughtered at 45 d. These findings might be useful to characterise lamb meat of local origin in relation to its nutritional traits and market perspectives connected to consumer acceptability.

  20. Free-radicals aided combustion with scramjet applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongsheng; Kumar, Ramohalli

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations aimed at altering 'nature-prescribed' combustion rates in hydrogen/hydrocarbon reactions with (enriched) air are presented. The intent is to anchor flame zones in supersonic streams, and to ensure proper and controllable complete combustion in scramjets. The diagnostics are nonintrusive through IR thermograms and acoustic emissions in the control and free-radicals altered flame zones.

  1. Using Demonstrations Involving Combustion and Acid-Base Chemistry to Show Hydration of Carbon Dioxide, Sulfur Dioxide, and Magnesium Oxide and Their Relevance for Environmental Climate Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, C. Frank, III; Webb, James W.; Rothenberger, Otis

    2016-01-01

    The nature of acidic and basic (alkaline) oxides can be easily illustrated via a series of three straightforward classroom demonstrations for high school and general chemistry courses. Properties of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and magnesium oxide are revealed inexpensively and safely. Additionally, the very different kinetics of hydration of…

  2. Using Demonstrations Involving Combustion and Acid-Base Chemistry to Show Hydration of Carbon Dioxide, Sulfur Dioxide, and Magnesium Oxide and Their Relevance for Environmental Climate Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, C. Frank, III; Webb, James W.; Rothenberger, Otis

    2016-01-01

    The nature of acidic and basic (alkaline) oxides can be easily illustrated via a series of three straightforward classroom demonstrations for high school and general chemistry courses. Properties of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and magnesium oxide are revealed inexpensively and safely. Additionally, the very different kinetics of hydration of…

  3. Scramjet Combustion Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    plan for these flights is as follows: Scramjet Combustion Processes RTO-EN-AVT-185 11 - 21 HyShot 5 – A Free-Flying Hypersonic Glider HyShot...5 will be a hypersonic glider designed to fly at Mach 8. It will separate from its rocket booster in space and perform controlled manoeuvres as it...RTO-EN-AVT-185 11 - 1 Scramjet Combustion Processes Michael Smart and Ray Stalker Centre for Hypersonics The University of Queensland

  4. Technical Report: Rayleigh Scattering Combustion Diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Wyatt [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hecht, Ethan [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-29

    A laser Rayleigh scattering (LRS) temperature diagnostic was developed over 8 weeks with the goal of studying oxy-combustion of pulverized coal char in high temperature reaction environments with high concentrations of carbon dioxide. Algorithms were developed to analyze data collected from the optical diagnostic system and convert the information to temperature measurements. When completed, the diagnostic will allow for the kinetic gasification rates of the oxy-combustion reaction to be obtained, which was previously not possible since the high concentrations of high temperature CO2 consumed thermocouples that were used to measure flame temperatures inside the flow reactor where the combustion and gasification reactions occur. These kinetic rates are important for studying oxycombustion processes suitable for application as sustainable energy solutions.

  5. Combustion Behaviour of Advanced Solid Propellants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Asthana

    1993-07-01

    Full Text Available The study reports the effect of incorporation of Al and ammonium perchlorate (AP individually and in combination with each other on combustion pattern and specific impulse (Isp of minimum signature propellants. Incorporation of Al obviates the combustion instability problems; however, it has marginal effect on burning rates. The composition containing AP and zirconium silicate combination gives superior performance; however, its Isp is considerably lower than the composition incorporating 9 per cent AP. A combination of 6 per cent Al gave 20 per cent enhancement in burning rate and 12 s increase in Isp as compared to purely nitramine-based composition, cal-val results also reveal increase in energy output on incorporating AP and Al. Hot stage microscopic and propellant combustion studies indicate occurrence of intense decomposition reaction in case of AP-based compositions.

  6. Sandia Combustion Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, S.C.; Palmer, R.E.; Montana, C.A. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    During the late 1970s, in response to a national energy crisis, Sandia proposed to the US Department of Energy (DOE) a new, ambitious program in combustion research. Shortly thereafter, the Combustion Research Facility (CRF) was established at Sandia's Livermore location. Designated a ''user facility,'' the charter of the CRF was to develop and maintain special-purpose resources to support a nationwide initiative-involving US inventories, industry, and national laboratories--to improve our understanding and control of combustion. This report includes descriptions several research projects which have been simulated by working groups and involve the on-site participation of industry scientists. DOE's Industry Technology Fellowship program, supported through the Office of Energy Research, has been instrumental in the success of some of these joint efforts. The remainder of this report presents results of calendar year 1988, separated thematically into eleven categories. Referred journal articles appearing in print during 1988 and selected other publications are included at the end of Section 11. Our traditional'' research activities--combustion chemistry, reacting flows, diagnostics, engine and coal combustion--have been supplemented by a new effort aimed at understanding combustion-related issues in the management of toxic and hazardous materials.

  7. METC Combustion Research Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halow, J.S.; Maloney, D.J.; Richards, G.A.

    1993-11-01

    The objective of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) high pressure combustion facility is to provide a mid-scale facility for combustion and cleanup research to support DOE`s advanced gas turbine, pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion, and hot gas cleanup programs. The facility is intended to fill a gap between lab scale facilities typical of universities and large scale combustion/turbine test facilities typical of turbine manufacturers. The facility is now available to industry and university partners through cooperative programs with METC. High pressure combustion research is also important to other DOE programs. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems and second-generation, pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) systems use gas turbines/electric generators as primary power generators. The turbine combustors play an important role in achieving high efficiency and low emissions in these novel systems. These systems use a coal-derived fuel gas as fuel for the turbine combustor. The METC facility is designed to support coal fuel gas-fired combustors as well as the natural gas fired combustor used in the advanced turbine program.

  8. Metabolism of Nonessential N15-Labeled Amino Acids and the Measurement of Human Whole-Body Protein Synthesis Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. P.; Settle, R. G.; Albina, J. A.; Dempsey, D. T.; Melnick, G.

    1991-01-01

    Eight N-15 labeled nonessential amino acids plus (15)NH4Cl were administered over a 10 h period to four healthy adult males using a primed-constant dosage regimen. The amount of N-15 excreted in the urine and the urinary ammonia, hippuric acid, and plasma alanine N-15 enrichments were measured. There was a high degree of consistency across subjects in the ordering of the nine compounds based on the fraction of N-15 excreted (Kendall coefficient of concordance W = 0.83, P is less than 0.01). Protein synthesis rates were calculated from the urinary ammonia plateau enrichment and the cumulative excretion of N-15. Glycine was one of the few amino acids that gave similar values by both methods.

  9. Organic compounds in PM 2.5 emitted from fireplace and woodstove combustion of typical Portuguese wood species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Cátia; Alves, Célia; Fernandes, Ana Patrícia; Monteiro, Cristina; Tarelho, Luís; Evtyugina, Margarita; Pio, Casimiro

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study is the further characterisation of PM 2.5 emissions from the residential wood combustion of common woods grown in Portugal. This new research extends to eight the number of biomass fuels studied and tries to understand the differences that the burning appliance (fireplace versus woodstove) and the combustion temperature (cold and hot start) have on emissions. Pinus pinaster (Maritime pine), Eucalyptus globulus (eucalypt), Quercus suber (cork oak), Acacia longifolia (Golden wattle), Quercus faginea (Portuguese oak), Olea europea (Olive), Quercus ilex rotundifolia (Holm oak) and briquettes produced from forest biomass waste were used in the combustion tests. Determinations included fine particle emission factors, carbonaceous content (OC and EC) by a thermal-optical transmission technique and detailed identification and quantification of organic compounds by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Fine particle emission factors from the woodstove were lower than those from the fireplace. For both combustion appliances, the OC/EC ratio was higher in "cold start" tests (1.56 ± 0.95 for woodstove and 2.03 ± 1.34 for fireplace). These "cold start" OC/EC values were, respectively, for the woodstove and the fireplace, 51% and 69% higher than those obtained in "hot start" experiments. The chromatographically resolved organics included n-alkanes, n-alkenes, PAHs, n-alkanals, ketones, n-alkanols, terpenoids, triterpenoids, phenolic compounds, phytosterols, alcohols, n-alkanoic acids, n-di-acids, unsaturated acids and alkyl esters of acids. The smoke emission rate and composition varied widely depending on fuel type, burning appliance and combustion temperature.

  10. High rate treatment of terephthalic acid production wastewater in a two-stage anaerobic bioreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleerebezem, R.; Beckers, J.; Pol, L.W.H.; Lettinga, G.

    2005-01-01

    The feasibility was studied of anaerobic treatment of wastewater generated during purified terephthalic acid (PTA) production in two-stage upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor system. The artificial influent of the system contained the main organic substrates of PTA-wastewater: acetate, be

  11. Vitamin E supplementation in elderly lowers the oxidation rate of linoleic acid in LDL.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waart, de F.; Moser, U.; Kok, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    .Oxidation of LDL–linoleic acid (LDL–LA), a major substrate for lipid peroxidation, may be counteracted by the antioxidant vitamin E. In a 3-month randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial in 83 apparently healthy Dutch elderly, aged 67–85 years, the direct protective effect of 100 IU vitamin

  12. Comparison on Response and Dissolution Rates Between Ursodeoxycholic Acid Alone or in Combination With Chenodeoxycholic Acid for Gallstone Dissolution According to Stone Density on CT Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Min; Hyun, Jong Jin; Choi, In Young; Yeom, Suk Keu; Kim, Seung Young; Jung, Sung Woo; Jung, Young Kul; Koo, Ja Seol; Yim, Hyung Joon; Lee, Hong Sik; Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Chang Duck

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Medical dissolution of gallstone is usually performed on radiolucent gallstones in a functioning gallbladder. However, absence of visible gallstone on plain abdominal x-ray does not always preclude calcification. This study aims to compare the response and dissolution rates between ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) alone or in combination with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) according to stone density on computed tomography (CT) scan. A total of 126 patients underwent dissolution therapy with either UDCA alone or combination of CDCA and UDCA (CNU) from December 2010 to March 2014 at Korea University Ansan Hospital. In the end, 81 patients (CNU group = 44, UDCA group = 37) completed dissolution therapy for 6 months. Dissolution rate (percentage reduction in the gallstone volume) and response to therapy (complete dissolution or partial dissolution defined as reduction in stone volume of >50%) were compared between the 2 groups. Dissolution and response rates of sludge was also compared between the 2 groups. The overall response rate was 50.6% (CNU group 43.2% vs UDCA group 59.5%, P = 0.14), and the overall dissolution rate was 48.34% (CNU group 41.5% vs UDCA group 56.5%, P = 0.13). When analyzed according to stone density, response rate was 33.3%, 87.1%, 30.0%, and 6.2% for hypodense, isodense, hyperdense, and calcified stones, respectively. Response rate (85.7% vs 88.2%, P = 0.83) and dissolution rate (81.01% vs 85.38%, P = 0.17) of isodense stones were similar between CNU and UDCA group. When only sludge was considered, the overall response rate was 87.5% (CNU group 71.4% vs UDCA group 94.1%, P = 0.19), and the overall dissolution rate was 85.42% (CNU group 67.9% vs UDCA group 92.7%, P = 0.23). Patients with isodense gallstones and sludge showed much better response to dissolution therapy with CNU and UDCA showing comparable efficacy. Therefore, CT scan should be performed before medication therapy if stone dissolution is intended

  13. Numerical analysis of combustion characteristics of hybrid rocket motor with multi-section swirl injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengen; Cai, Guobiao; Tian, Hui

    2016-06-01

    This paper is aimed to analyse the combustion characteristics of hybrid rocket motor with multi-section swirl injection by simulating the combustion flow field. Numerical combustion flow field and combustion performance parameters are obtained through three-dimensional numerical simulations based on a steady numerical model proposed in this paper. The hybrid rocket motor adopts 98% hydrogen peroxide and polyethylene as the propellants. Multiple injection sections are set along the axis of the solid fuel grain, and the oxidizer enters the combustion chamber by means of tangential injection via the injector ports in the injection sections. Simulation results indicate that the combustion flow field structure of the hybrid rocket motor could be improved by multi-section swirl injection method. The transformation of the combustion flow field can greatly increase the fuel regression rate and the combustion efficiency. The average fuel regression rate of the motor with multi-section swirl injection is improved by 8.37 times compared with that of the motor with conventional head-end irrotational injection. The combustion efficiency is increased to 95.73%. Besides, the simulation results also indicate that (1) the additional injection sections can increase the fuel regression rate and the combustion efficiency; (2) the upstream offset of the injection sections reduces the combustion efficiency; and (3) the fuel regression rate and the combustion efficiency decrease with the reduction of the number of injector ports in each injection section.

  14. 3D Polyaniline Architecture by Concurrent Inorganic and Organic Acid Doping for Superior and Robust High Rate Supercapacitor Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawli, Yogesh; Banerjee, Abhik; Dhakras, Dipti; Deo, Meenal; Bulani, Dinesh; Wadgaonkar, Prakash; Shelke, Manjusha; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2016-02-12

    A good high rate supercapacitor performance requires a fine control of morphological (surface area and pore size distribution) and electrical properties of the electrode materials. Polyaniline (PANI) is an interesting material in supercapacitor context because it stores energy Faradaically. However in conventional inorganic (e.g. HCl) acid doping, the conductivity is high but the morphological features are undesirable. On the other hand, in weak organic acid (e.g. phytic acid) doping, interesting and desirable 3D connected morphological features are attained but the conductivity is poorer. Here the synergy of the positive quality factors of these two acid doping approaches is realized by concurrent and optimized strong-inorganic (HCl) and weak-organic (phytic) acid doping, resulting in a molecular composite material that renders impressive and robust supercapacitor performance. Thus, a nearly constant high specific capacitance of 350 F g(-1) is realized for the optimised case of binary doping over the entire range of 1 A g(-1) to 40 A g(-1) with stability of 500 cycles at 40 A g(-1). Frequency dependant conductivity measurements show that the optimized co-doped case is more metallic than separately doped materials. This transport property emanates from the unique 3D single molecular character of such system.

  15. 3D Polyaniline Architecture by Concurrent Inorganic and Organic Acid Doping for Superior and Robust High Rate Supercapacitor Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawli, Yogesh; Banerjee, Abhik; Dhakras, Dipti; Deo, Meenal; Bulani, Dinesh; Wadgaonkar, Prakash; Shelke, Manjusha; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2016-02-01

    A good high rate supercapacitor performance requires a fine control of morphological (surface area and pore size distribution) and electrical properties of the electrode materials. Polyaniline (PANI) is an interesting material in supercapacitor context because it stores energy Faradaically. However in conventional inorganic (e.g. HCl) acid doping, the conductivity is high but the morphological features are undesirable. On the other hand, in weak organic acid (e.g. phytic acid) doping, interesting and desirable 3D connected morphological features are attained but the conductivity is poorer. Here the synergy of the positive quality factors of these two acid doping approaches is realized by concurrent and optimized strong-inorganic (HCl) and weak-organic (phytic) acid doping, resulting in a molecular composite material that renders impressive and robust supercapacitor performance. Thus, a nearly constant high specific capacitance of 350 F g‑1 is realized for the optimised case of binary doping over the entire range of 1 A g‑1 to 40 A g‑1 with stability of 500 cycles at 40 A g‑1. Frequency dependant conductivity measurements show that the optimized co-doped case is more metallic than separately doped materials. This transport property emanates from the unique 3D single molecular character of such system.

  16. Internal combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G.J.

    1986-06-03

    A variable power internal combustion engine is described which consists of: a separate air compressor for receiving and compressing a flow of air to a given pressure, the compressor having an inlet valve introducing a flow of air into the compressor and an outlet valve for exhausting compressed air out of the compressor into a compressed air storage means, at least one expander having a cylinder, a cylinder head closing an end of the cylinder, a piston reciprocally mounted in the cylinder for movement away from the cylinder head in a power stroke from an initial position defining a combustion chamber within the cylinder between the cylinder head and the piston, the compressed air storage means receiving the pressurized flow of air from the compressor and being of a volume adequate to provide compressed air in the combustion chamber essentially at the given pressure essentially over the power output of the engine, means for introducing an amount of combustible fuel in the compressed charge to be present with compressed air in the combustion chamber and providing combustion of the amount of fuel in the cylinder with the inlet and exhaust valves closed, cam shaft means in contact with the piston for absorbing and storing the energy of the power stroke of the piston and controlling movement of the piston within the cylinder during the exhaust stroke; the means for varying the volume of the combustion chamber being controlled in accordance with power requirements to provide variable power output and improved efficiency of the engine at power outputs reduced relative to a given design power output of the engine by providing a variable expansion ratio of a minimum of at least about 30 to 1 at the given design power output and higher with reduced power output.

  17. Reaction mechanism of the acidic hydrolysis of highly twisted amides: Rate acceleration caused by the twist of the amide bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujika, Jon I; Formoso, Elena; Mercero, Jose M; Lopez, Xabier

    2006-08-03

    We present an ab initio study of the acid hydrolysis of a highly twisted amide and a planar amide analogue. The aim of these studies is to investigate the effect that the twist of the amide bond has on the reaction barriers and mechanism of acid hydrolysis. Concerted and stepwise mechanisms were investigated using density functional theory and polarizable continuum model calculations. Remarkable differences were observed between the mechanism of twisted and planar amide, due mainly to the preference for N-protonation of the former and O-protonation of the latter. In addition, we were also able to determine that the hydrolytic mechanism of the twisted amide will be pH dependent. Thus, there is a preference for a stepwise mechanism with formation of an intermediate in the acid hydrolysis, whereas the neutral hydrolysis undergoes a concerted-type mechanism. There is a nice agreement between the characterized intermediate and available X-ray data and a good agreement with the kinetically estimated rate acceleration of hydrolysis with respect to analogous undistorted amide compounds. This work, along with previous ab initio calculations, describes a complex and rich chemistry for the hydrolysis of highly twisted amides as a function of pH. The theoretical data provided will allow for a better understanding of the available kinetic data of the rate acceleration of amides upon twisting and the relation of the observed rate acceleration with intrinsic differential reactivity upon loss of amide bond resonance.

  18. Nitrogen Chemistry in Fluidized Bed Combustion of Coal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anker Degn

    plant were used for model verification. The simulations of the NO emission during staged combustion and NH3 injection for NO reduction were in qualitative agreement with the experimental data. A parametric study of the influence of operating conditions on the conversion of fuel-N to NO showed...... are subjected to some uncertainty, and a sensitivity analysis of the predicted NO emission was carried out. The analysis showed that the predicted NO emission is sensitive to both hydrodynamic and combustion-related parameters. The most important hydrodynamic parameters were the minimum fluidization velocity......, the gas interchange coefficient, the bubble size and the bubble rise velocity. The most important combustion parameters were the rate of CO and CH4 combustion and the fraction of CO produced from char combustion. By using a rate of production analysis, the important reactions in the NO model were...

  19. Development of growth rate measuring method for intracellular, parasitic acid-fast bacteria using radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Noboru; Fukutomi, Yasuo [National Inst. of Infectious Deseases, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    To prevent and treat infections diseases caused by pathogenic acid-fast bacteria such as Mycobacterium leprae, Tubercle bacillus, it is important to elucidate the mechanisms of intracellular proliferations of these bacteria. This research project was started to make DNA library using a new constructed shuttle vector. Development of in vitro evaluation method for intracellular proliferation of mycobacterium and its transformed cells was attempted on the basis of Buddemeyer method. This method was able to precisely determine the metabolic activities as low as those in leprae and its modified method using {sup 14}C-palmitic acid was highly sensitive and the results were obtainable in a shorter period. The generated CO{sub 2} was satisfactorily absorbed into scintillator without using a filter paper. A new culture medium from which arginine, a NO-producing compound was eliminated was used to repress the sterilizing effects of NO, but the metabolic activities of leprae was not enhanced. (M.N.)

  20. The PDF method for turbulent combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, S. B.

    1991-01-01

    Probability Density Function (PDF) methods provide a means of calculating the properties of turbulent reacting flows. They have been successfully applied to many turbulent flames, including some with finite rate kinetic effects. Here the methods are reviewed with an emphasis on computational issues and their application to turbulent combustion.

  1. Disposal of fluidized bed combustion ash in an underground mine to control acid mine drainage and subsidence - phase II - small scale field demonstration. Topical report, December 1, 1996--February 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemkiewicz, P.F.; Head, W.J.; Gray, D.D.; Siriwardane, H.J.; Sack, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    It has been proposed that a mix made from fly and bottom ash from atmospheric pressure fluidized bed coal combusters (FBC ash), water, and stabilizers be injected from the surface into abandoned room and pillar coal mines through boreholes. Besides ash disposal, this process would prevent subsidence and acid mine drainage. Such a mix (called `grout`) needs to be an adequately stable and flowable suspension for it to spread and cover large areas in the mine. This is necessary as the drilling of the boreholes will be an expensive operation and the number such holes should be minimized. Addition of bentonite was found to be needed for this purpose. A suitable grout mix was tested rheologically to determine its fluid flow properties. Finding little published information on such materials, tests were performed using a commercial rotational viscometer with a T-bar rotor and a stand which produced a helical rotor path. Existing mixer viscometer test methods were modified and adapted to convert the measurements of torque vs. angular speed to the material properties appearing in several non-Newtonian constitutive equations. Yield stress was measured by an independent test called the vane method. The rheological behavior was a close fit to the Bingham fluid model. Bleed tests were conducted to ascertain the stability of the mixtures. Spread tests were conducted to compare the flowability of various mixes. Using the flow parameters determined in the laboratory, numerical simulations of grout flow were performed and compared with the results of scale model and field tests. A field injection of this grout was performed at the Fairfax mines in Preston county, W.V.. The observations there proved that this FBC ash grout flows as desired, is a very economical way of disposing the environmentally menacing ash, while also preventing the subsidence and acid mine drainage of the mines.

  2. Aspartic acid concentrations in coral skeletons as recorders of past disturbances of metabolic rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Lallan P.; Suzuki, Atsushi; Kawahata, Hodaka

    2006-11-01

    The composition of total hydrolysable amino acids (THAAs) in a skeleton of the coral Porites australiensis, collected from Ishigaki Island, Japan, was examined in order to determine whether amino acids (AA) can be used as biomarkers of past changes in coral physiology (metabolism). Micro-samples, corresponding to a time resolution of 1 month, were collected along the growth axis of the coral. Of the 20 AAs analyzed, aspartic acid (Asp) was the most abundant, and its mole concentration relative to the sum of all other AAs (mole%Asp) showed a clear seasonal pattern of low content during winters and high during summers. A growth disturbance in the coral skeleton during 1988 1990, shown by X-ray scans and oxygen and carbon stable isotope data, was marked by a high mole%Asp ratio. Variability in carbon isotope data has often been attributed to metabolic effects, or changes in the isotopic composition of seawater, or both. The changes in mole%Asp shown here suggest that metabolic effects are mainly responsible for sharp changes in carbon isotope profiles during periods of growth disturbance.

  3. Comparison of Catabolic Rates of sn-1, sn-2, and sn-3 Fatty Acids in Triacylglycerols Using (13)CO2 Breath Test in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beppu, Fumiaki; Kawamatsu, Takashi; Yamatani, Yoshio; Nagai, Toshiharu; Yoshinaga, Kazuaki; Mizobe, Hoyo; Yoshida, Akihiko; Kubo, Atsushi; Kanda, Jota; Gotoh, Naohiro

    2017-01-01

    Fatty acids in triacylglycerols (TAGs) are catabolized after digestion. However, the catabolic rates of the fatty acids at the sn-1, sn-2, and sn-3 positions of TAGs have not been compared. To elucidate the differences, we studied the catabolic rates of (13)C-labeled palmitic acid, oleic acid, and capric acid at the sn-1, sn-2, or sn-3 position of TAGs using isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. Specifically, we measured the (13)C-to-(12)C ratio in CO2 (Δ(13)C (‰)) exhaled by mice. For all analyzed fatty acids, we observed significant differences between sn-2 and other binding positions. In contrast, no significant difference was detected between the sn-1 and sn-3 positions. These results indicated that the catabolic rates of fatty acids are strongly influenced by their positions in TAGs.

  4. THE COMBUSTION CHARACTERISTICS OF LIGNITE BLENDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Jun; Zhou Junhu; Cao Xinyu; Cen Kefa

    2000-01-01

    The combustion characteristics of lignite blends were studied with a thermogravimetric analyzer (t.g.a.), at constant heating rate.The characteristic temperatures were determined from the burning profiles.It was found that the characteristic times of combustion reaction moved forward, the ignition temperature dropped and the burnout efficiency slightly changed when blending lignites.The characteristic parameters of blends could not be predicted as a linear function of the average values of the individual lignites.when blending with less reactive coal, the ignition and burnout characteristics of lignite turned worse.

  5. Kinetic data base for combustion modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, W.; Herron, J.T. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a set of evaluated rate constants for use in the simulation of hydrocarbon combustion. The approach has been to begin with the small molecules and then introduce larger species with the various structural elements that can be found in all hydrocarbon fuels and decomposition products. Currently, the data base contains most of the species present in combustion systems with up to four carbon atoms. Thus, practically all the structural grouping found in aliphatic compounds have now been captured. The direction of future work is the addition of aromatic compounds to the data base.

  6. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of 2-Methylhexane Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Mohamed, Samah Y.

    2015-03-30

    Accurate chemical kinetic combustion models of lightly branched alkanes (e.g., 2-methylalkanes) are important for investigating the combustion behavior of diesel, gasoline, and aviation fuels. Improving the fidelity of existing kinetic models is a necessity, as new experiments and advanced theories show inaccuracy in certain portions of the models. This study focuses on updating thermodynamic data and kinetic model for a gasoline surrogate fuel, 2-methylhexane, with recently published group values and rate rules. These update provides a better agreement with rapid compression machine measurements of ignition delay time, while also strengthening the fundamental basis of the model.

  7. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D; Swank, William D.

    2011-08-30

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  8. Combustion and regulation; Combustion et reglementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This conference was organized after the publication of the French by-law no 2010 relative to combustion installations and to the abatement of atmospheric pollution. Five topics were discussed during the conference: the new regulations, their content, innovations and modalities of application; the means of energy suppliers to face the new provisions and their schedule; the manufacturers proposals for existing installations and the new equipments; the administration control; and the impact of the new measures on exploitation and engineering. Twenty papers and 2 journal articles are reported in these proceedings. (J.S.)

  9. Combustion modeling in a model combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.Y.Jiang; I.Campbell; K.Su

    2007-01-01

    The flow-field of a propane-air diffusion flame combustor with interior and exterior conjugate heat transfers was numerically studied.Results obtained from four combustion models,combined with the re-normalization group (RNG) k-ε turbulence model,discrete ordinates radiation model and enhanced wall treatment are presented and discussed.The results are compared with a comprehensive database obtained from a series of experimental measurements.The flow patterns and the recirculation zone length in the combustion chamber are accurately predicted,and the mean axial velocities are in fairly good agreement with the experimental data,particularly at downstream sections for all four combustion models.The mean temperature profiles are captured fairly well by the eddy dissipation (EDS),probability density function (PDF),and laminar flamelet combustion models.However,the EDS-finite-rate combustion model fails to provide an acceptable temperature field.In general,the flamelet model illustrates little superiority over the PDF model,and to some extent the PDF model shows better performance than the EDS model.

  10. Studies on Selection of Combustion-supporting Agent in the Combustion Heat Test of Boron Powder%硼粉燃烧热测试中助燃剂选取的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张勤林; 袁红春; 楼旭俊; 王春红; 王英红

    2012-01-01

    为了提高助燃法测试硼粉燃烧热值的准确性,探寻助燃剂选取的规律原则,分别选用含硼推进剂研制领域常见的苯甲酸、90方片药、镁粉、某火箭推进剂测试标准药四种物质作为助燃剂,采用于法和湿法两种混合方式,在GR3500氧弹量热计中测试了95级无定形硼粉的燃烧热,进行对比实验研究.结果显示:不加助燃剂,直接测试硼粉燃烧热,点火失败;采用不同的助燃剂,硼粉的燃烧效率不同.分析认为选择的助燃剂应具有易引燃、高热值、高燃温、低成气率的特点,同时燃速应和硼粉相匹配,化学性质应和硼粉具有良好的相容性.另外,混合试样中,助燃剂和硼粉结合地越紧密,混合地越均匀,越能发挥助燃作用.相比于干法混合,温法混合制作固态药条试样测试硼粉燃烧热值时,硼粉燃烧效率更高.%In order to improve the accuracy of the test of combustion heat value of boron powder using combustion-supporting agent and to explore the principles of combustion-supporting agent selection, four substances commonly used in the field of developing boron-containing propellant, such as benzoic acid, 90 square tablet, magnesium powder, and a standard drug in rocket propellant test were selected to be combustion-supporting agents respectively, two methods namely dry mixing and wet mixing were used, the combustion heat value of amorphous boron powder with 95 grade was tested in GR3500 oxygen bomb calorimeter, and comparative experimental study was then studied. The results show that the ignition failed when directly testing the combustion heat value of boron powder without combustion-supporting agent, and the combustion efficiency of the boron powder is different when using different combustion-supporting agent. The conclusions are that the selected combustion-supporting agent should be easy to ignite, having high heat value, high ignition temperature, and low gas rates, burning rate of which

  11. Butyrate and other short-chain fatty acids increase the rate of lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Rumberger

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We determined the effect of butyrate and other short-chain fatty acids (SCFA on rates of lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Prolonged treatment with butyrate (5 mM increased the rate of lipolysis approximately 2–3-fold. Aminobutyric acid and acetate had little or no effect on lipolysis, however propionate stimulated lipolysis, suggesting that butyrate and propionate act through their shared activity as histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors. Consistent with this, the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (1 µM also stimulated lipolysis to a similar extent as did butyrate. Western blot data suggested that neither mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK activation nor perilipin down-regulation are necessary for SCFA-induced lipolysis. Stimulation of lipolysis with butyrate and trichostatin A was glucose-dependent. Changes in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK phosphorylation mediated by glucose were independent of changes in rates of lipolysis. The glycolytic inhibitor iodoacetate prevented both butyrate- and tumor necrosis factor-alpha-(TNF-α mediated increases in rates of lipolysis indicating glucose metabolism is required. However, unlike TNF-α– , butyrate-stimulated lipolysis was not associated with increased lactate release or inhibited by activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH with dichloroacetate. These data demonstrate an important relationship between lipolytic activity and reported HDAC inhibitory activity of butyrate, other short-chain fatty acids and trichostatin A. Given that HDAC inhibitors are presently being evaluated for the treatment of diabetes and other disorders, more work will be essential to determine if these effects on lipolysis are due to inhibition of HDAC.

  12. Altered Preconception Fatty Acid Intake Is Associated with Improved Pregnancy Rates in Overweight and Obese Women Undertaking in Vitro Fertilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa J. Moran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maternal preconception diet is proposed to affect fertility. Prior research assessing the effect of altering the fatty acid profile on female fertility is conflicting. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of preconception maternal diet, specifically fatty acid profile, on pregnancies and live births following in vitro fertilisation (IVF. Forty-six overweight and obese women undergoing IVF were randomised to a diet and physical activity intervention (intervention or standard care (control. Outcome measures included pregnancy, live birth and pre-study dietary intake from food frequency questionnaire. Twenty pregnancies (n = 12/18 vs. n = 8/20, p = 0.12 and 12 live births (n = 7/18 vs. n = 5/20, p = 0.48 occurred following the intervention with no differences between the treatment groups. On analysis adjusted for BMI and smoking status, women who became pregnant had higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA intake (p = 0.03, specifically omega-6 PUFA and linoleic acid (LA (p = 0.045 with a trend for an elevated intake of omega-3 PUFA (p = 0.06. There were no dietary differences for women who did or did not have a live birth. Maternal preconception PUFA, and specifically omega-6 and LA intake, are associated with improved pregnancy rates in overweight and obese women undergoing IVF. This has implications for optimising fertility through preconception nutrition.

  13. Modeled dosage-response relationship on the net photosynthetic rate for the sensitivity to acid rain of 21 plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shihuai; Gou, Shuzhen; Sun, Baiye; Lv, Wenlin; Li, Yuanwei; Peng, Hong; Xiao, Hong; Yang, Gang; Wang, Yingjun

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the sensitivity of plant species to acid rain based on the modeled dosage-response relationship on the net photosynthetic rate (P (N)) of 21 types of plant species, subjected to the exposure of simulated acid rain (SAR) for 5 times during a period of 50 days. Variable responses of P (N) to SAR occurred depending on the type of plant. A majority (13 species) of the dosage-response relationship could be described by an S-shaped curve and be fitted with the Boltzmann model. Model fitting allowed quantitative evaluation of the dosage-response relationship and an accurate estimation of the EC(10), termed as the pH of the acid rain resulting in a P (N) 10 % lower than the reference value. The top 9 species (Camellia sasanqua, Cinnamomum camphora, etc. EC(10) ≤ 3.0) are highly endurable to very acid rain. The rare, relict plant Metasequoia glyptostroboides was the most sensitive species (EC(10) = 5.1) recommended for protection.

  14. Studies in combustion dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koszykowski, M.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop a fundamental understanding and a quantitative predictive capability in combustion modeling. A large part of the understanding of the chemistry of combustion processes comes from {open_quotes}chemical kinetic modeling.{close_quotes} However, successful modeling is not an isolated activity. It necessarily involves the integration of methods and results from several diverse disciplines and activities including theoretical chemistry, elementary reaction kinetics, fluid mechanics and computational science. Recently the authors have developed and utilized new tools for parallel processing to implement the first numerical model of a turbulent diffusion flame including a {open_quotes}full{close_quotes} chemical mechanism.

  15. Alcohol combustion chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2014-10-01

    Alternative transportation fuels, preferably from renewable sources, include alcohols with up to five or even more carbon atoms. They are considered promising because they can be derived from biological matter via established and new processes. In addition, many of their physical-chemical properties are compatible with the requirements of modern engines, which make them attractive either as replacements for fossil fuels or as fuel additives. Indeed, alcohol fuels have been used since the early years of automobile production, particularly in Brazil, where ethanol has a long history of use as an automobile fuel. Recently, increasing attention has been paid to the use of non-petroleum-based fuels made from biological sources, including alcohols (predominantly ethanol), as important liquid biofuels. Today, the ethanol fuel that is offered in the market is mainly made from sugar cane or corn. Its production as a first-generation biofuel, especially in North America, has been associated with publicly discussed drawbacks, such as reduction in the food supply, need for fertilization, extensive water usage, and other ecological concerns. More environmentally friendly processes are being considered to produce alcohols from inedible plants or plant parts on wasteland. While biofuel production and its use (especially ethanol and biodiesel) in internal combustion engines have been the focus of several recent reviews, a dedicated overview and summary of research on alcohol combustion chemistry is still lacking. Besides ethanol, many linear and branched members of the alcohol family, from methanol to hexanols, have been studied, with a particular emphasis on butanols. These fuels and their combustion properties, including their ignition, flame propagation, and extinction characteristics, their pyrolysis and oxidation reactions, and their potential to produce pollutant emissions have been intensively investigated in dedicated experiments on the laboratory and the engine scale

  16. Radiative Augmented Combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-12

    86-0085 In 00I to RADIATIVE AUGMENTED COMBUSTION MOSHE LAVID M.L. ENERGIA , INC. P.O. BOX 1468 1 PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08542 AUGUST 1985 *.. plo...Combustion conducted at M.L. ENERGIA . It is funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Contract No. F49620-83-C-0133, with Dr. J.M...reported. It covers the second year of the contract, from July 15, 1984 through July 14, 1985. The work was performed at ENERGIA , Princeton, New Jersey

  17. Transition nozzle combustion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won-Wook; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Maldonado, Jaime Javier

    2016-11-29

    The present application provides a combustion system for use with a cooling flow. The combustion system may include a head end, an aft end, a transition nozzle extending from the head end to the aft end, and an impingement sleeve surrounding the transition nozzle. The impingement sleeve may define a first cavity in communication with the head end for a first portion of the cooling flow and a second cavity in communication with the aft end for a second portion of the cooling flow. The transition nozzle may include a number of cooling holes thereon in communication with the second portion of the cooling flow.

  18. Toxicology of Biodiesel Combustion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. Introduction The toxicology of combusted biodiesel is an emerging field. Much of the current knowledge about biological responses and health effects stems from studies of exposures to other fuel sources (typically petroleum diesel, gasoline, and wood) incompletely combusted. ...

  19. Kinetics and Product Channels in Combustion Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershberger, John F. [North Dakota State Univ., Fargo, ND (United States)

    2017-02-28

    We report study of the chemical kinetics and/or photochemistry of several chemical reactions of potential interest in understanding the gas phase combustion chemistry of nitrogen-containing molecules. Studies completed during the final grant period include determination of quantum yields of the photolysis of HCNO, fulminic acid, a kinetics and product channel study of the reaction of CN radicals with methyl bromide, and study of the products of the reaction of hydroxymethyl radical with nitric oxide.

  20. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-11-01

    In order to verify the technical feasibility of the MTCI Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor technology, a laboratory-scale system was designed, built and tested. Important aspects of the operational and performance parameters of the system were established experimentally. A considerable amount of the effort was invested in the initial task of constructing an AFBC that would represent a reasonable baseline against which the performance of the PAFBC could be compared. A summary comparison of the performance and emissions data from the MTCI 2 ft {times} 2 ft facility (AFBC and PAFBC modes) with those from conventional BFBC (taller freeboard and recycle operation) and circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) units is given in Table ES-1. The comparison is for typical high-volatile bituminous coals and sorbents of average reactivity. The values indicated for BFBC and CFBC were based on published information. The AFBC unit that was designed to act as a baseline for the comparison was indeed representative of the larger units even at the smaller scale for which it was designed. The PAFBC mode exhibited superior performance in relation to the AFBC mode. The higher combustion efficiency translates into reduced coal consumption and lower system operating cost; the improvement in sulfur capture implies less sorbent requirement and waste generation and in turn lower operating cost; lower NO{sub x} and CO emissions mean ease of site permitting; and greater steam-generation rate translates into less heat exchange surface area and reduced capital cost. Also, the PAFBC performance generally surpasses those of conventional BFBC, is comparable to CFBC in combustion and NO{sub x} emissions, and is better than CFBC in sulfur capture and CO emissions even at the scaled-down size used for the experimental feasibility tests.

  1. Continuous dissolution of irradiated nuclear fuels; Dissolution continue des combustibles nucleaires irradies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, P.; Talmont, X.; Tarnerq, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    In the case of the continuous dissolution of nuclear fuels, the equations for the calculation of the fuel concentration of the solution flowing out of a pot dissolver have been written. Nitric acid feed flow rates have been calculated in order to obtain an adjusted solution when starting or stopping a dissolution, or when changing the number of rods introduced per hour. Then some transient states brought on by perturbations, have been studied: a) sudden change in nitric acid flow rate; b) continuous drift of the latter; c) sudden change in nitric acid feed concentration; d) transition from a fuel concentration to another by changing the flow rate of nitric acid feed. It has been shown that some transient states cannot be solved with general equations. Computer calculation programs would be probably more useful. (authors) [French] L'etude se rapporte a la dissolution dans l'acide nitrique des combustibles nucleaires irradies, en vue de la recuperation de la matiere fissile qu'ils contiennent. On a etabli, dans le cas de la dissolution continue, les differentes equations permettant le calcul de la concentration en combustible a la sortie d'un dissolveur du type 'marmite'. On a etudie les regimes du debit d'alimentation en acide nitrique a imposer lors du demarrage, de l'arret d'une dissolution, ou lors d'un changement de cadence d'introduction des barreaux, de facon a obtenir une solution ajustee. On a etudie ensuite differents regimes transitoires consecutifs a des perturbations: changement brusque du debit d'acide d'alimentation, derive continue de ce debit, changement brusque de la concentration de l'acide d'alimentation, passage d'une concentration en combustible a une autre par changement du debit d'acide d'alimentation. On a pu montrer que certains regimes transitoires ne peuvent se traiter par des equations generales, et necessiteraient plustot l'etablissement d

  2. Corrosion rate of construction materials in hot phosphoric acid with the contribution of anodic polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kouril, M.; Christensen, Erik; Eriksen, S.;

    2011-01-01

    ). Several grades of stainless steels were tested as well as tantalum, niobium, titanium, nickel alloys and silicon carbide. The corrosion rate was evaluated by means of mass loss at free corrosion potential as well as under various levels of polarization. The only corrosion resistant material in 85...

  3. High Acetic Acid Production Rate Obtained by Microbial Electrosynthesis from Carbon Dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jourdin, Ludovic; Grieger, Timothy; Monetti, Juliette; Flexer, Victoria; Freguia, Stefano; Lu, Yang; Chen, Jun; Romano, Mark; Wallace, Gordon G.; Keller, Jurg

    2015-01-01

    High product specificity and production rate are regarded as key success parameters for large-scale applicability of a (bio)chemical reaction technology. Here, we report a significant performance enhancement in acetate formation from CO2, reaching comparable productivity levels as in i

  4. Saliva secretion rate and acidity in a group of physically disabled older care home residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, G.J. van der; Brand, H.S.; De Visschere, L.M.; Schols, J.M.; Baat, C. de

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of older people have teeth, which are vulnerable to oral diseases. To maintain good oral health, an adequate amount of saliva should be secreted and the saliva should possess adequate buffer capacity. The study aim was to investigate the associations of saliva secretion rate and

  5. Saliva secretion rate and acidity in a group of physically disabled older care home residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Putten, G.J.; Brand, H.S.; Visschere, L.M.J.; Schols, J.M.G.A.; de Baat, C.

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of older people have teeth, which are vulnerable to oral diseases. To maintain good oral health, an adequate amount of saliva should be secreted and the saliva should possess adequate buffer capacity. The study aim was to investigate the associations of saliva secretion rate and aci

  6. High-intensity interval training increases intrinsic rates of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation in rat red and white skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Daisuke; Yoshida, Yuko; Kitaoka, Yu; Hatta, Hideo; Bonen, Arend

    2013-03-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) can increase mitochondrial volume in skeletal muscle. However, it is unclear whether HIIT alters the intrinsic capacity of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, or whether such changes are associated with changes in mitochondrial FAT/CD36, a regulator of fatty acid oxidation, or with reciprocal changes in the nuclear receptor coactivator (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1α)) and the corepressor (receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP140)). We examined whether HIIT alters fatty acid oxidation rates in the isolated subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria of red and white skeletal muscle and (or) induces changes in muscle PGC-1α and RIP140 proteins and mitochondrial FAT/CD36 protein content. Rats were divided into untrained or HIIT-trained groups. HIIT animals performed 10 bouts of 1-min high-intensity treadmill running (30-55 m·min(-1)), separated by 2 min of rest, for 5 days a week for 4 weeks. As expected, after the training period, HIIT increased mitochondrial enzymes (citrate synthase, COXIV, and β-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase) in red and white muscle, indicating that muscle mitochondrial volume had increased. HIIT also increased the rates of palmitate oxidation in mitochondria of red (37% for SS and 19% for IMF) and white (36% for SS and 12% for IMF) muscle. No changes occurred in SS and IMF mitochondrial FAT/CD36 proteins, despite increasing FAT/CD36 at the whole-muscle level (27% for red and 22% for white). Concurrently, muscle PGC-1α protein was increased in red (22%) and white (16%) muscle, but RIP140 was not altered. These results indicate that increases in SS and IMF mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation induced by HIIT are accompanied by an increase in PGC-1α, but not RIP140 or FAT/CD36.

  7. Prediction and measurement of multi-metal electrodeposition rates and efficiencies in aqueous acidic chloride media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilone, D. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Kelsall, G.H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: g.kelsall@imperial.ac.uk

    2006-05-05

    A novel process is being developed for metal recovery from waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) and involving a leach reactor coupled to an electrochemical reactor. Metals such as Ag, Au, Cu, Pb, Pd, Sn, etc. are dissolved from shredded WEEE in an acidic aqueous chloride electrolyte by oxidizing them with aqueous dissolved chlorine species. In the electrochemical reactor: (i) chlorine is generated at the anode for use as the oxidant in the leach reactor, and, simultaneously (ii) at the cathode, the dissolved metals are electrodeposited from the leach solution. The Butler-Volmer equation was used to provide predictions of the electrode potential dependences of partial current densities, and hence total current densities, current efficiencies and alloy compositions, for acidic aqueous chloride electrolytes containing Ag(I), Au(III), Cu(II), Fe(III), Pb(II), Pd(IV) and Sn(IV) species, together with dissolved chlorine. With judicious choice of kinetic parameters, the predicted total current density-electrode potential behaviour of such solutions was in good agreement with experimental data for a rotating Pt disc electrode. Reduction of dissolved chlorine at a Pt rotating disc electrode exhibited mass transport controlled behaviour, in agreement with Levich's equation over the potential range 0.3-0.9 V (SHE). This could form the basis of a linear sensor, possibly using a microelectrode for measurement and control of the dissolved chlorine concentration in the efflux of leach reactors and inlet to cathodes of the electrowinning reactors, in the envisaged process.

  8. Lipotoxic Palmitate Impairs the Rate of β-Oxidation and Citric Acid Cycle Flux in Rat Neonatal Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffar, Taha; Akoumi, Ali; Bousette, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic hearts exhibit intracellular lipid accumulation. This suggests that the degree of fatty acid oxidation (FAO) in these hearts is insufficient to handle the elevated lipid uptake. We previously showed that palmitate impaired the rate of FAO in primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Here we were interested in characterizing the site of FAO impairment induced by palmitate since it may shed light on the metabolic dysfunction that leads to lipid accumulation in diabetic hearts. We measured fatty acid oxidation, acetyl-CoA oxidation, and carnitine palmitoyl transferase (Cpt1b) activity. We measured both forward and reverse aconitase activity, as well as NAD+ dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity. We also measured reactive oxygen species using the 2', 7'-Dichlorofluorescin Diacetate (DCFDA) assay. Finally we used thin layer chromatography to assess diacylglycerol (DAG) levels. We found that palmitate significantly impaired mitochondrial β-oxidation as well as citric acid cycle flux, but not Cpt1b activity. Palmitate negatively affected net aconitase activity and isocitrate dehydrogenase activity. The impaired enzyme activities were not due to oxidative stress but may be due to DAG mediated PKC activation. This work demonstrates that palmitate, a highly abundant fatty acid in human diets, causes impaired β-oxidation and citric acid cycle flux in primary neonatal cardiomyocytes. This metabolic defect occurs prior to cell death suggesting that it is a cause, rather than a consequence of palmitate mediated lipotoxicity. This impaired mitochondrial metabolism can have important implications for metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Lipotoxic Palmitate Impairs the Rate of β-Oxidation and Citric Acid Cycle Flux in Rat Neonatal Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Haffar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Diabetic hearts exhibit intracellular lipid accumulation. This suggests that the degree of fatty acid oxidation (FAO in these hearts is insufficient to handle the elevated lipid uptake. We previously showed that palmitate impaired the rate of FAO in primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Here we were interested in characterizing the site of FAO impairment induced by palmitate since it may shed light on the metabolic dysfunction that leads to lipid accumulation in diabetic hearts. Methods: We measured fatty acid oxidation, acetyl-CoA oxidation, and carnitine palmitoyl transferase (Cpt1b activity. We measured both forward and reverse aconitase activity, as well as NAD+ dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity. We also measured reactive oxygen species using the 2', 7'-Dichlorofluorescin Diacetate (DCFDA assay. Finally we used thin layer chromatography to assess diacylglycerol (DAG levels. Results: We found that palmitate significantly impaired mitochondrial β-oxidation as well as citric acid cycle flux, but not Cpt1b activity. Palmitate negatively affected net aconitase activity and isocitrate dehydrogenase activity. The impaired enzyme activities were not due to oxidative stress but may be due to DAG mediated PKC activation. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that palmitate, a highly abundant fatty acid in human diets, causes impaired β-oxidation and citric acid cycle flux in primary neonatal cardiomyocytes. This metabolic defect occurs prior to cell death suggesting that it is a cause, rather than a consequence of palmitate mediated lipotoxicity. This impaired mitochondrial metabolism can have important implications for metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity.

  10. Absolute rate constants for the reaction of hypochlorous acid with protein side chains and peptide bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pattison, D I; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    , absolute second-order rate constants for the reactions of HOCl with protein side chains, model compounds, and backbone amide (peptide) bonds have been determined at physiological pH values. The reactivity of HOCl with potential reactive sites in proteins is summarized by the series: Met (3.8 x 10(7) M(-1......) x s(-1)) > backbone amides (10-10(-3) M(-1) x s(-1)) > Gln(0.03 M(-1) x s(-1)) approximately Asn (0.03 M(-1) x s(-1)). The rate constants for reaction of HOCl with backbone amides (peptide bonds) vary by 4 orders of magnitude with uncharged peptide bonds reacting more readily with HOCl than those...

  11. Glycyrrhizic Acid Reduces Heart Rate and Blood Pressure by a Dual Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Kailash Singh; Aung Moe Zaw; Revathi Sekar; Ahuja Palak; Allam, Ahmed A.; Jamaan Ajarem; Chow, Billy K. C.

    2016-01-01

    Beta adrenergic receptors are crucial for their role in rhythmic contraction of heart along with their role in the pathological conditions such as tachycardia and high risk of heart failure. Studies report that the levels of beta-1 adrenergic receptor tend to decrease by 50%, whereas, the levels of beta-2 adrenergic receptor remains constant during the risk of heart failure. Beta blockers—the antagonistic molecules for beta-adrenergic receptors, function by slowing the heart rate, which there...

  12. Experimental combustion an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, D P

    2014-01-01

    ""… other books available in this area do not cover the detailed topics covered here. Energy and combustion is a hot issue. It is expected to be even hotter with more demand in this area as we search for cleaner methods of energy conversion from chemical to thermal energy.""-Ashwani K. Gupta, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, USA

  13. Coal combustion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daw, C.S.

    1996-06-01

    This section describes research and development related to coal combustion being performed for the Fossil Energy Program under the direction of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The key activity involves the application of chaos theory for the diagnosis and control of fossil energy processes.

  14. Optical Tomography in Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evseev, Vadim

    . JQSRT 113 (2012) 2222, 10.1016/j.jqsrt.2012.07.015] included in the PhD thesis as an attachment. The knowledge and experience gained in the PhD project is the first important step towards introducing the advanced optical tomography methods of combustion diagnostics developed in the project to future...

  15. Combustion Models in Finance

    CERN Document Server

    Tannous, C

    2001-01-01

    Combustion reaction kinetics models are used for the description of a special class of bursty Financial Time Series. The small number of parameters they depend upon enable financial analysts to predict the time as well as the magnitude of the jump of the value of the portfolio. Several Financial Time Series are analysed within this framework and applications are given.

  16. Flameless Combustion Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-20

    operating hours, to produce low emission levels of NOx, CO and UHC . Gas turbine combustion stability has increasingly become a crucial design issue as...achieved proved: "* Safe and reliable operation ofgas turbine combustors "* Low emissions of NO., CO and UHC These results have clear economically

  17. Effects of folic acid and vitamin B12 supplementation on culling rate, diseases, and reproduction in commercial dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplessis, M; Girard, C L; Santschi, D E; Laforest, J-P; Durocher, J; Pellerin, D

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the effect of a combined folic acid and vitamin B12 supplement given in early lactation on culling rate, metabolic disorders and other diseases, and reproduction in commercial dairy herds. A total of 805 cows (271 primiparous and 534 multiparous cows) in 15 commercial dairy herds were involved. Every 2mo from February to December 2010 and within each herd, cows were assigned according to parity, previous 305-d milk production, and calving interval to 5mL of either (1) saline 0.9% NaCl (control group) or (2) 320mg of folic acid + 10mg of vitamin B12 (vitamin group). Treatments were administered weekly by intramuscular injections starting 3wk before the expected calving date until 8wk after parturition. A total of 221 cows were culled before the next dry period. Culling rate was not affected by treatment and was 27.5%; culling rate was greater for multiparous (32.2%) than for primiparous cows (18.8%). Within the first 60d in milk (DIM), 47 cows were culled, representing 21.3% of total culling, and no treatment effect was noted. Ketosis incidence based on a threshold ≥100µmol/L of β-hydroxybutyrate in milk was 38.3±2.9% for the vitamin group and 41.8±3.0% for the control group and was not affected by treatment. The combined supplement of folic acid and vitamin B12 did not decrease incidence of retained placenta, displaced abomasum, milk fever, metritis, or mastitis. However, the incidence of dystocia decreased by 50% in multiparous cows receiving the vitamin supplement, although no effect was observed in primiparous cows. The first breeding postpartum for multiparous cows occurred 3.8d earlier with the vitamin supplement compared with controls, whereas no treatment effect was seen for primiparous cows. Days open, first- and second-breeding conception rates, number of breedings per conception, and percentage of cows pregnant at 150 DIM were not affected by treatment. The reduced percentage of dystocia combined with the

  18. Application of spectral analysis to renal uptake rate measurement with {sup 99m}Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murase, Kenya; Tanada, Shuji; Ikezoe, Junpei [Ehime University, Shigenobu (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-06-01

    In our previous paper, we demonstrated a new method for renal uptake rate measurement with {sup 99m}Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) which required no background and kidney depth corrections and only 20 min for examination. In this study, we applied spectral analysis to renal uptake rate measurement with DMSA. The net uptake rate of DMSA by tubular cells (K) calculated using spectral analysis correlated well with the renal uptake rates measured two hours after DMSA administration (r=0.918 for the 3-parameter model and r=0.924 for the 4-parameter model), and agreed well with the K values obtained using the nonlinear least-squares method (r=0.997 for the 3-parameter model and r=0.998 for the 4-parameter model). These results indicate that spectral analysis is applicable and useful for quantification of renal uptake rate of DMSA and it can be an alternative approach to our previous method. We believe that this method will facilitate even more widespread utilization of the quantitative assessment of DMSA uptake by planar scintigraphy, because it is much simpler for practical use as compared to the previous method. (author)

  19. Hydrogen Internal Combustion Stirling Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Sanyo; Morita, Hiroyuki; Kurata, Osamu; Yamashita, Iwao

    The hydrogen combustion Stirling engine utilizes internal combustion of a stoichiometric H2 and O2 mixture injected into the working gas as thermal input, and the cyclic operation is completed with the removal of water from the engine after condensation at the cooler. In the prototype engine, a catalytic combustor is substituted for the conventional heater, and the H2-O2 mixture is injected at a constant flow rate from the boundary between the regenerator and the cooler. The engine internal heating characteristics were compared to those on external heating to clarify the internal heating effect on the engine performance. The internal heating performance showed almost the same characteristics as those of external heating, except for the increase of expansion work due to the direct thermal input. The increase of expansion work improved the engine performance, particularly in the region of high engine speed. Furthermore, it was found that the steady injection method was able to suppress the mixture strength to a relatively low level.

  20. Burning characteristics of microcellular combustible objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-tao Yang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microcellular combustible objects for application of combustible case, caseless ammunition or combustible detonator-holding tubes are fabricated through one-step foaming process, in which supercritical CO2 is used as foaming agent. The formulations consist of inert polymer binder and ultra fine RDX. For the inner porous structures of microcellular combustible objects, the cell sizes present a unimodal or bimodal distribution by adjusting the foaming conditions. Closed bomb test is to investigate the influence of both porous structure style and RDX content on burning behavior. The sample with bimodal distribution of cell sizes burns faster than that with unimodal distribution, and the concentration of RDX can influence the burning characteristics in a positive manner. In addition, the translation of laminar burning to convective burning is determined by burning rate versus pressure curves of samples at two different loading densities, and the resulting transition pressure is 30 MPa. Moreover, the samples with bigger sample size present higher burning rate, resulting in providing deeper convective depth. Dynamic vivacity of samples is also studied. The results show that the vivacity increases with RDX content and varies with inner structure.

  1. Combustion calorimetry experimental chemical thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sunner, Stig

    1979-01-01

    Combustion Calorimetry deals with expertise knowledge concerning the calorimetry of combustion reactions of an element or compound. After defining the use of units and physical constants, the book discusses the basic principles of combustion calorimetry and the various instruments and calorimeters used in the experiments to measure operations concerning temperatures and its time variations. One paper discusses the theory and design criteria of combustion calorimeter calibration. Another paper discusses the results obtained from a combustion calorimeter after it has measured the energy or entha

  2. Modelling of CWS combustion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybenko, I. A.; Ermakova, L. A.

    2016-10-01

    The paper considers the combustion process of coal water slurry (CWS) drops. The physico-chemical process scheme consisting of several independent parallel-sequential stages is offered. This scheme of drops combustion process is proved by the particle size distribution test and research stereomicroscopic analysis of combustion products. The results of mathematical modelling and optimization of stationary regimes of CWS combustion are provided. During modeling the problem of defining possible equilibrium composition of products, which can be obtained as a result of CWS combustion processes at different temperatures, is solved.

  3. Effect of substrate and cation requirement on anaerobic volatile fatty acid conversion rates at elevated biogas pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeboom, Ralph E F; Ferrer, Ivet; Weijma, Jan; van Lier, Jules B

    2013-12-01

    This work studied the anaerobic conversion of neutralized volatile fatty acids (VFA) into biogas under Autogenerative High Pressure Digestion (AHPD) conditions. The effects of the operating conditions on the biogas quality, and the substrate utilisation rates were evaluated using 3 AHPD reactors (0.6 L); feeding a concentration of acetate and VFA (1-10 g COD/L) corresponding to an expected pressure increase of 1-20 bar. The biogas composition improved with pressure up to 4.5 bar (>93% CH4), and stabilized at 10 and 20 bar. Both, acetotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity was observed. Substrate utilisation rates of 0.2, 0.1 and 0.1 g CODCH4/g VSS/d for acetate, propionate and butyrate were found to decrease by up to 50% with increasing final pressure. Most likely increased Na(+)-requirement to achieve CO2 sequestration at higher pressure rather than end-product inhibition was responsible.

  4. Nitrate, ascorbic acid, mineral and antioxidant activities of Cosmos caudatus in response to organic and mineral-based fertilizer rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Siti Aishah; Mijin, Salumiah; Yusoff, Umi Kalsom; Ding, Phebe; Wahab, Puteri Edaroyati Megat

    2012-06-28

    The source and quantity of nutrients available to plants can affect the quality of leafy herbs. A study was conducted to compare quality of Cosmos caudatus in response to rates of organic and mineral-based fertilizers. Organic based fertilizer GOBI (8% N:8% P₂O₅:8% K₂O) and inorganic fertilizer (15% N, 15% P₂O₅, 15% K₂O) were evaluated based on N element rates at 0, 30, 60, 90, 120 kg h⁻¹. Application of organic based fertilizer reduced nitrate, improved vitamin C, antioxidant activity as well as nitrogen and calcium nutrients content. Antioxidant activity and chlorophyll content were significantly higher with increased fertilizer application. Fertilization appeared to enhance vitamin C content, however for the maximum ascorbic acid content, regardless of fertilizer sources, plants did not require high amounts of fertilizer.

  5. Aspartic acid racemization rate in narwhal (Monodon monoceros eye lens nuclei estimated by counting of growth layers in tusks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Garde

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Ages of marine mammals have traditionally been estimated by counting dentinal growth layers in teeth. However, this method is difficult to use on narwhals (Monodon monoceros because of their special tooth structures. Alternative methods are therefore needed. The aspartic acid racemization (AAR technique has been used in age estimation studies of cetaceans, including narwhals. The purpose of this study was to estimate a species-specific racemization rate for narwhals by regressing aspartic acid d/l ratios in eye lens nuclei against growth layer groups in tusks (n=9. Two racemization rates were estimated: one by linear regression (r2=0.98 based on the assumption that age was known without error, and one based on a bootstrap study, taking into account the uncertainty in the age estimation (r2 between 0.88 and 0.98. The two estimated 2kAsp values were identical up to two significant figures. The 2k Asp value from the bootstrap study was found to be 0.00229±0.000089 SE, which corresponds to a racemization rate of 0.00114−yr±0.000044 SE. The intercept of 0.0580±0.00185 SE corresponds to twice the (d/l0 value, which is then 0.0290±0.00093 SE. We propose that this species-specific racemization rate and (d/l0 value be used in future AAR age estimation studies of narwhals, but also recommend the collection of tusks and eyes of narwhals for further improving the (d/l0 and 2kAsp estimates obtained in this study.

  6. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase activity and whole muscle oxidation rates vary with fatty acid substrate in avian flight muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Edwin R; Staples, James F; Milligan, C Louise; Guglielmo, Christopher G

    2011-05-01

    Birds primarily fuel migratory flights with fat, and the composition of that fat has the potential to affect overall lipid oxidation rates. We measured the whole muscle lipid oxidation rates in extensor digitorum communis muscles from white-throated sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis Gmelin) incubated for 20 min at 20°C with radiolabeled stearate (18:0), oleate (18:1ω9), or linoleate (18:2ω6). Lipid oxidation rates were ~40% higher with linoleate than oleate (oleate: 36 ± 8.54 μmol CO(2) g(-1) h(-1)), and ~75% lower with stearate compared with oleate, indicating that maximal lipid oxidation rates can indeed be affected by the type of fatty acid supplied to the muscle. Additionally, we investigated the activity of the mitochondrial fatty acid transport-associated enzyme carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT) in pectoralis muscles of 5 bird species (Zonotrichia albicollis, Philomachus pugnax, Sturnus vulgaris, Taeniopygia guttata, Passer domesticus). Activity was measured in homogenized samples using various fatty acyl-CoA substrates (16:0, 16:1, 18:0, 18:1ω9, 18:2ω6, 18:3ω3, 18:3ω6, 20:0, 20:4ω6, 22:6ω3) in a spectrophotometric assay. CPT activity increased with the degree of unsaturation and decreased with chain length. CPT activity did not differ between ω3 and ω6 isomers of 18:3, nor was the pattern of CPT substrate preference different between captive white-throated sparrows in a migratory (i.e., displaying Zugunruhe) or non-migratory state. These findings can explain previously observed differences in peak performance induced by dietary fat composition and suggest that lipid supply is limiting to maximal exercise performance in birds.

  7. CuO-ZnO-ZrO2的柠檬酸燃烧法制备及其催化CO2加氢合成甲醇的性能%Preparation of CuO-ZnO-ZrO2 by Citric Acid Combustion Method and Its Catalytic Property for Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭晓明; 毛东森; 卢冠忠; 王嵩

    2012-01-01

    采用柠檬酸燃烧法制备了CuO-ZnO-ZrO2 (CZZ)催化剂,并将其用于CO2加氢合成甲醇反应.按推进剂化学原理对燃烧反应进行了分析,并采用热重-差热分析(TG-DTA)技术记录了其燃烧行为.采用X射线衍射(XRD)、氮吸附、程序升温还原(TPR)及氧化亚氮(N2O)反应吸附技术对制得的催化剂进行了表征.结果表明:柠檬酸燃烧法的燃烧过程比较温和,燃料用量对催化剂物化和催化性能的影响不大,并结合燃烧反应的特点进行了解释.此外,还对三种燃料(柠檬酸、尿素和甘氨酸)的用量与CZZ性能之间的关系进行了比较,表明柠檬酸作燃料具有更好的工艺可控性.柠檬酸燃烧法是一种简单、快速且有效的制备CZZ催化剂的方法.%CuO-ZnO-ZrO2 (CZZ) catalysts for methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation were prepared by a citric acid combustion method. The combustion reactions were analyzed in terms of propellant chemistry and the combustion behavior was recorded by thermo-gravimetric/differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA). The as-prepared CZZ powders were investigated with X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and reactive N2O adsorption techniques and the catalytic activities were evaluated for methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation. The results show that the influence of citric acid quantity on the physicochemical and catalytic properties of CZZ is subtle, and the reason is related to the characteristics of the combustion reaction. Furthermore, the relationship between the quantity of fuel (citric acid, urea, and glycine) and the properties of the catalysts was determined. The citric acid combustion method exhibits better controllability and it is a simple, fast, and valuable route for the preparation of the CZZ catalyst for methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation.

  8. On-Line Measurement of Heat of Combustion of Gaseous Hydrocarbon Fuel Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinkle, Danny R.; Chaturvedi, Sushil K.; Kheireddine, Ali

    1996-01-01

    A method for the on-line measurement of the heat of combustion of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel mixtures has been developed and tested. The method involves combustion of a test gas with a measured quantity of air to achieve a preset concentration of oxygen in the combustion products. This method involves using a controller which maintains the fuel (gas) volumetric flow rate at a level consistent with the desired oxygen concentration in the combustion products. The heat of combustion is determined form a known correlation with the fuel flow rate. An on-line computer accesses the fuel flow data and displays the heat of combustion measurement at desired time intervals. This technique appears to be especially applicable for measuring heats of combustion of hydrocarbon mixtures of unknown composition such as natural gas.

  9. Assessing glomerular filtration rate in healthy adult potential kidney donors in Bangladesh: a comparison of various prediction equations with measured glomerular filtration rate by diethylentriamine pentaacetic acid renogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahan, F; Chowdhury, M N U; Mahbub, T; Arafat, S M; Jahan, S; Hossain, M; Khan, M F

    2013-08-01

    To ensure that potential kidney donors in Bangladesh have no renal impairment, it is extremely important to have accurate methods for evaluating the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). We evaluated the performance of serum creatinine based GFR in healthy adult potential kidney donors in Bangladesh to compare GFR determined by DTPA with that determined by various prediction equations. In this study GFR in 61 healthy adult potential kidney donors were measured with 99mTc-diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) renogram. We also estimated GFR using a four variable equation modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD), Cockcroft-Gault creatinine clearance (CGCrCl), Cockcroft-Gault glomerular filtration rate (CG-GFR). The mean age of study population was 34.31 +/- 9.46 years and out of them 65.6% was male. In this study mean mGFR was 85.4 +/- 14.8. Correlation of estimated GFR calculated by CG-CrCl, CG-GFR and MDRD were done with measured GFR DTPA using quartile. Kappa values were also estimated which was found to be 0.104 for (p = 0.151), 0.336 for (p = 0.001) and 0.125 for (p = 0.091) respectively. This indicates there is no association between estimated GFR calculated by CG-CrCl, CG-GFR, MDRD with measured GFR DTPA. These results show poor performance of these equations in evaluation of renal function among healthy population and also raise question regarding validity of these equations for assessment of renal function in chronic kidney disease in our population.

  10. Effect of hydrion evolution by polylactic-co-glycolic acid coating on degradation rate of pure iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingyao; Lu, Xi; Tan, Lili; Zhang, Bingchun; Yang, Ke

    2013-10-01

    For biodegradable iron coronary stents, the major problem is the low degradation rate in body environment. In this study, a new strategy was proposed to increase the degradation rate of iron in vitro. The hydrion evolution was intended to be introduced into the degradation system to increase the degradation rate. To realize this strategy, polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) was coated onto the surface of pure iron. The degradation process and mechanism of pure iron coated with PLGA were investigated. The results showed that iron coated with PLGA exhibited higher degradation rate in the static immersion test all along. With the degradation of PLGA, the oligomers of PLGA could release abundant H(+) which could dissolve the ferrous oxide to make the electrolyte and oxygen to reach the surface of iron again and simultaneity trigger the hydrion evolution at the middle stage of the degradation. The study also revealed that the solution ions failed to permeate the PLGA coating and the deposition of calcium and phosphorus in the degradation layer was inhibited which further enhanced the degradation.

  11. Oxy-Combustion Boiler Material Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Gagliano; Andrew Seltzer; Hans Agarwal; Archie Robertson; Lun Wang

    2012-01-31

    Under U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NT0005262 Foster Wheeler North America Corp conducted a laboratory test program to determine the effect of oxy-combustion on boiler tube corrosion. In this program, CFD modeling was used to predict the gas compositions that will exist throughout and along the walls of air-fired and oxy-fired boilers operating with low to high sulfur coals. Test coupons of boiler tube materials were coated with deposits representative of those coals and exposed to the CFD predicted flue gases for up to 1000 hours. The tests were conducted in electric tube furnaces using oxy-combustion and air-fired flue gases synthesized from pressurized cylinders. Following exposure, the test coupons were evaluated to determine the total metal wastage experienced under air and oxy-combustions conditions and materials recommendations were made. Similar to air-fired operation, oxy-combustion corrosion rates were found to vary with the boiler material, test temperature, deposit composition, and gas composition. Despite this, comparison of air-fired and oxy-fired corrosion rates showed that oxy-firing rates were, for the most part, similar to, if not lower than those of air-firing; this finding applied to the seven furnace waterwall materials (wrought and weld overlay) and the ten superheater/reheater materials (wrought and weld overlay) that were tested. The results of the laboratory oxy-combustion tests, which are based on a maximum bulk flue gas SO{sub 2} level of 3200 ppmv (wet) / 4050 ppmv (dry), suggest that, from a corrosion standpoint, the materials used in conventional subcritical and supercritical, air-fired boilers should also be suitable for oxy-combustion retrofits. Although the laboratory test results are encouraging, they are only the first step of a material evaluation process and it is recommended that follow-on corrosion tests be conducted in coal-fired boilers operating under oxy-combustion to provide longer term (one to

  12. Oxy-Combustion Boiler Material Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagliano, Michael; Seltzer, Andrew; Agarwal, Hans; Robertson, Archie; Wang, Lun

    2012-01-31

    Under U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NT0005262 Foster Wheeler North America Corp conducted a laboratory test program to determine the effect of oxy-combustion on boiler tube corrosion. In this program, CFD modeling was used to predict the gas compositions that will exist throughout and along the walls of air-fired and oxy-fired boilers operating with low to high sulfur coals. Test coupons of boiler tube materials were coated with deposits representative of those coals and exposed to the CFD predicted flue gases for up to 1000 hours. The tests were conducted in electric tube furnaces using oxy-combustion and air-fired flue gases synthesized from pressurized cylinders. Following exposure, the test coupons were evaluated to determine the total metal wastage experienced under air and oxy-combustions conditions and materials recommendations were made. Similar to air-fired operation, oxy-combustion corrosion rates were found to vary with the boiler material, test temperature, deposit composition, and gas composition. Despite this, comparison of air-fired and oxy-fired corrosion rates showed that oxy-firing rates were, for the most part, similar to, if not lower than those of air-firing; this finding applied to the seven furnace waterwall materials (wrought and weld overlay) and the ten superheater/reheater materials (wrought and weld overlay) that were tested. The results of the laboratory oxy-combustion tests, which are based on a maximum bulk flue gas SO2 level of 3200 ppmv (wet) / 4050 ppmv (dry), suggest that, from a corrosion standpoint, the materials used in conventional subcritical and supercritical, air-fired boilers should also be suitable for oxy-combustion retrofits. Although the laboratory test results are encouraging, they are only the first step of a material evaluation process and it is recommended that follow-on corrosion tests be conducted in coal-fired boilers operating under oxy-combustion to provide longer term (one to two year

  13. Time Resolved FTIR Analysis of Combustion of Ethanol and Gasoline Combustion in AN Internal Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Allen R.; Sakai, Stephen; Devasher, Rebecca B.

    2011-06-01

    In order to pursue In Situ measurements in an internal combustion engine, a MegaTech Mark III transparent spark ignition engine was modified with a sapphire combustion chamber. This modification will allow the transmission of infrared radiation for time-resolved spectroscopic measurements by an infrared spectrometer. By using a Step-scan equipped Fourier transform spectrometer, temporally resolved infrared spectral data were acquired and compared for combustion in the modified Mark III engine. Measurements performed with the FTIR system provide insight into the energy transfer vectors that precede combustion and also provides an in situ measurement of the progress of combustion. Measurements were performed using ethanol and gasoline.

  14. Experimental chemical thermodynamics. Volume I. Combustion calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunner, S.; Mansson, M. (eds.)

    1979-01-01

    This book contains 18 chapters. The information included is: units and physical constants; basic principles of combustion calorimetry; calibration of combustion calorimeters; test and auxiliary substances in combustion calorimetry; strategies in the calculation of standard-state energies of combustion from the experimentally determined quantities; assignments of uncertainties; presentation of combustion calorimetric data in the primary literature; general techniques for combustion of liquid/solid organic compounds by oxygen bomb calorimetry; combustion of liquid/solid organic compounds with non-metallic hetero-atoms; combustion calorimetry of metals and simple metallic compounds; combustion calorimetry of organometallic compounds; combustion in fluorine and other halogens; bomb combustion of gaseous compounds in oxygen; oxygen flame calorimetry; fluorine flame calorimetry; combustion calorimetry as a technological service; trends in combustion calorimetry; and from the history of combustion calorimetry. (DP)

  15. Turnover rates of fatty acid and amino acid in the coelomic fluid of the sea star Asterias rubens: Implications for the route of nutrient translocation during vitellogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, P.A.; Beijnink, F.B.; Sluis, I. van der

    1984-01-01

    1. 1. The turnover of fatty acid and amino acid in the coelomic fluid of the sea star Asterias rubens was quantified by intra-coelomic injection of radiolabelled oleic acid and L-leucine which had half times of 2 and 10 min, respectively. 2. 2. The molar composition of the amino acids of the cell-f

  16. Turnover rates of fatty acid and amino acid in the coelomic fluid of the sea star Asterias rubens: Implications for the route of nutrient translocation during vitellogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, P.A.; Beijnink, F.B.; Sluis, I. van der

    1984-01-01

    1. 1. The turnover of fatty acid and amino acid in the coelomic fluid of the sea star Asterias rubens was quantified by intra-coelomic injection of radiolabelled oleic acid and L-leucine which had half times of 2 and 10 min, respectively. 2. 2. The molar composition of the amino acids of the cell-f

  17. Combustion Ratio of Waste Tire Particle, PC and Mixture at Blast Temperature of BF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-liang; REN Shan; SU Bu-xin; LIN Yin-he; LONG Shi-gang

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the combustion characteristics of waste tire particle (WTP), pulverized coal (PC) and their mixture, the contents of CO, CO2 and O2 of off-gas during the combustion of WTP, PC and mixture under the condition of rich oxygen by 0--4% in blast and at 1 250℃ were measured simultaneously using synthetically infrared analyzer, and then the corresponding combustion ratio was calculated and compared. The results showed that the burning rate of WTP reached approximately 57%, which is much higher than that of PC (only about 18%) in the in- itial 650 s in fresh air, and then the increase of combustion rate of PC is faster than that of WTP; the combustion rate of PC improved remarkably with the addition of WTP. Meanwhile, the combustion rates of all these materials improved with the increase of oxygen content.

  18. Heart rate is associated with markers of fatty acid desaturation: the GOCADAN study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven O.E. Ebbesson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine if heart rate (HR is associated with desaturation indexes as HR is associated with arrhythmia and sudden death. Study design: A community based cross-sectional study of 1214 Alaskan Inuit. Methods: Data of FA concentrations from plasma and red blood cell membranes from those ≥35 years of age (n = 819 were compared to basal HR at the time of examination. Multiple linear regression with backward stepwise selection was employed to analyze the effect of the desaturase indexes on HR, after adjustment for relevant covariates. Results: The Δ5 desaturase index (Δ5-DI measured in serum has recently been associated with a protective role for cardiovascular disease. This index measured here in plasma and red blood cells showed a negative correlation with HR. The plasma stearoyl-CoA-desaturase (SCD index, previously determined to be related to cardiovascular disease (CVD mortality, on the other hand, was positively associated with HR, while the Δ6 desaturase index (Δ6-DI had no significant effect on HR. Conclusion: Endogenous FA desaturation is associated with HR and thereby, in the case of SCD, possibly with arrhythmia and sudden death, which would at least partially explain the previously observed association between cardiovascular mortality and desaturase activity.

  19. Aerosols from biomass combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nussbaumer, T.

    2001-07-01

    This report is the proceedings of a seminar on biomass combustion and aerosol production organised jointly by the International Energy Agency's (IEA) Task 32 on bio energy and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE). This collection of 16 papers discusses the production of aerosols and fine particles by the burning of biomass and their effects. Expert knowledge on the environmental impact of aerosols, formation mechanisms, measurement technologies, methods of analysis and measures to be taken to reduce such emissions is presented. The seminar, visited by 50 participants from 11 countries, shows, according to the authors, that the reduction of aerosol emissions resulting from biomass combustion will remain a challenge for the future.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Paul

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Computational fluid dynamics has reached a stage where flow field in practical situation can be predicted to aid the design and to probe into the fundamental flow physics to understand and resolve the issues in fundamental fluid mechanics. The study examines the computation of reacting flows. After exploring the conservation equations for species and energy, the methods of closing the reaction rate terms in turbulent flow have been examined briefly. Two cases of computation, where combustion-flow interaction plays important role, have been discussed to illustrate the computational aspects and the physical insight that can be gained by the reacting flow computation.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(6, pp.577-582, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.600

  1. Premixed combustion of coconut oil in a hele-shaw cell

    OpenAIRE

    Hadi Saroso; I. N. G. Wardana; Rudy Soenoko; Nurkholis Hamidi

    2014-01-01

    Coconut oil combustion characteristic is observed experimentally by evaporating oil in the boiler then mix it with air before being burned at various equivalence ratios in the Hele-shaw cell. The result shows that, coconut oil tends to break into glycerol and fatty acid due to hydrolysis reaction producing the flame propagation, where the fatty acid flame propagates first then glycerol flame. Micro-explosion occurs when moisture from fatty acid combustion is absorbed by glycerol and higher he...

  2. An Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of Methyl Decanoate Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarathy, S M; Thomson, M J; Pitz, W J; Lu, T

    2010-02-19

    Biodiesel is typically a mixture of long chain fatty acid methyl esters for use in compression ignition engines. Improving biofuel engine performance requires understanding its fundamental combustion properties and the pathways of combustion. This research study presents new combustion data for methyl decanoate in an opposed-flow diffusion flame. An improved detailed chemical kinetic model for methyl decanoate combustion is developed, which serves as the basis for deriving a skeletal mechanism via the direct relation graph method. The novel skeletal mechanism consists of 648 species and 2998 reactions. This mechanism well predicts the methyl decanoate opposed-flow diffusion flame data. The results from the flame simulations indicate that methyl decanoate is consumed via abstraction of hydrogen atoms to produce fuel radicals, which lead to the production of alkenes. The ester moiety in methyl decanoate leads to the formation of low molecular weight oxygenated compounds such as carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and ketene.

  3. ESTIMATION OF HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS OF CARBOXYLIC ACID ESTER AND PHOSPHATE ESTER COMPOUNDS IN AQUEOUS SYSTEMS FROM MOLECULAR STRUCTURE BY SPARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate hydrolysis rate constants for carboxylic acid ester and phosphate ester compounds in aqueous non- aqueous and systems strictly from molecular structure. The energy diffe...

  4. Maslinic acid added to the diet increases growth and protein-turnover rates in the white muscle of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Navarro, Mónica; Peragón, Juan; Amores, Victoria; De La Higuera, Manuel; Lupiáñez, José Antonio

    2008-03-01

    Maslinic acid (2-alpha, 3-beta-dihydroxiolean-12-en-28-oic acid) is a triterpenoid compound present in fruit and leaves of Olea europaea that can be used as an additive in the diet of trout. The present work investigates the effects of maslinic acid on growth, protein-turnover rates and nucleic acid concentration in trout white muscle. Five groups of 180 trout of a mean body mass of 20 g were fed for 225 days with diets containing 0, 1, 5, 25 and 250 mg of maslinic acid per kg of diet. At the end of the experiment, white-muscle weight and protein-accumulation rate of trout fed with maslinic acid were higher than in control. The total content of DNA, RNA, and protein in trout fed with 25 and 250 mg of maslinic acid kg(-1) were significantly higher than in control. The protein:DNA ratio was also slightly higher than control. In the same groups of trout, fractional (K(S)) and absolute (A(S)) protein-synthesis rates increased to more than 80% over the control values while no differences were found in the fractional protein-degradation rate (K(D)). These results, similar to previous findings in liver, show that maslinic acid can act as a growth factor when added to a standard trout diet.

  5. Near-Critical Behavior of Aminoacyl-tRNA Pools in E. coli at Rate-Limiting Supply of Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elf, Johan; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2005-01-01

    The rates of consumption of different amino acids in protein synthesis are in general stoichiometrically coupled with coefficients determined by codon usage frequencies on translating ribosomes. We show that when the rates of synthesis of two or more amino acids are limiting for protein synthesis and exactly matching their coupled rates of consumption on translating ribosomes, the pools of aminoacyl-tRNAs in ternary complex with elongation factor Tu and GTP are hypersensitive to a variation in the rate of amino acid supply. This high sensitivity makes a macroscopic analysis inconclusive, because it is accompanied by almost free and anticorrelated diffusion in copy numbers of ternary complexes. This near-critical behavior is relevant for balanced growth of Escherichia coli cells in media that lack amino acids and for adaptation of E. coli cells after downshifts from amino-acid-containing to amino-acid-lacking growth media. The theoretical results are used to discuss transcriptional control of amino acid synthesis during multiple amino acid limitation, the recovery of E. coli cells after nutritional downshifts and to propose a robust mechanism for the regulation of RelA-dependent synthesis of the global effector molecule ppGpp. PMID:15501947

  6. Combustion science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Annamalai, Kalyan

    2006-01-01

    Introduction and Review of Thermodynamics Introduction Combustion Terminology Matter and Its Properties Microscopic Overview of Thermodynamics Conservation of Mass and Energy and the First Law of Thermodynamics The Second Law of Thermodynamics Summary Stoichiometry and Thermochemistry of Reacting Systems Introduction Overall Reactions Gas Analyses Global Conservation Equations for Reacting Systems Thermochemistry Summary Appendix Reaction Direction and Equilibrium Introduction Reaction Direction and Chemical Equilibrium Chemical Equilibrium Relations Vant Hoff Equation Adi

  7. Combustion Characteristics of Sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-01

    regarded by implication or otherwise, or in any way licensing the holder or any other person or corporation, or conveying any rights or permission to...00 _’N 1. TI TLE inctuat Security CZaaafication5 Combustion Characteristics of Sprays 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Sohrab, Siavash H. 13& TYPE OF REPORT...to ?!HF of rich butane/air 3unsen flames. .lso, the rotacion speed and :he oerodic temDeracure fluc:uations of rotacfng ?HF are examined. :’!naily

  8. High Gravity (g) Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    required thrust-to-weight ratio goals. Shorter residence times in the combustion chamber may reduce the NOx emissions, but the CO and UHC emissions then...Emissions analyzing equipment is available to detect CO, CO2, NOx, O2, and total unburned hydrocarbons ( UHC ) at the combustor exit plane. Emissions... UHC ) emissions along with the CO data, as seen in Fig. 24, shows that Configuration 1 had much higher UHC levels. The reactions from hydrocarbons to

  9. Combustive management of oil spills. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    Extensive experiments with in situ incineration were performed on a desert site at the University of Arizona with very striking results. The largest incinerator, 6 feet in diameter with a 30 foot chimney, developed combustion temperatures of 3000, F, and attendant soot production approximately 1000 times less than that produced by conventional in situ burning. This soot production, in fact, is approximately 30 times less than current allowable EPA standards for incinerators and internal combustion engines. Furthermore, as a consequence of the high temperature combustion, the bum rate was established at a very high 3400 gallons per hour for this particular 6 foot diameter structure. The rudimentary design studies we have carried out relative to a seagoing 8 foot diameter incinerator have predicted that a continuous burn rate of 7000 gallons per hour is realistic. This structure was taken as a basis for operational design because it is compatible with C130 flyability, and will be inexpensive enough ($120,000 per copy) to be stored at those seaside depots throughout the US coast line in which the requisite ancillary equipments (booms, service tugs, etc.) are already deployed. The LOX experiments verified our expectations with respect to combustion of debris and various highly weathered or emulsified oils. We have concluded, however, that the use of liquid oxygen in actual beach clean up is not promising because the very high temperatures associated with this combustion are almost certain to produce environmentally deleterious effects on the beach surface and its immediately sublying structures. However, the use of liquid oxygen augmentation for shore based and flyable incinerators may still play an important role in handing the problem of accumulated debris.

  10. Internal combustion engine using premixed combustion of stratified charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Craig D.; Reitz, Rolf D. (Madison, WI

    2003-12-30

    During a combustion cycle, a first stoichiometrically lean fuel charge is injected well prior to top dead center, preferably during the intake stroke. This first fuel charge is substantially mixed with the combustion chamber air during subsequent motion of the piston towards top dead center. A subsequent fuel charge is then injected prior to top dead center to create a stratified, locally richer mixture (but still leaner than stoichiometric) within the combustion chamber. The locally rich region within the combustion chamber has sufficient fuel density to autoignite, and its self-ignition serves to activate ignition for the lean mixture existing within the remainder of the combustion chamber. Because the mixture within the combustion chamber is overall premixed and relatively lean, NO.sub.x and soot production are significantly diminished.

  11. The Diesel Combustion Collaboratory: Combustion Researchers Collaborating over the Internet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. M. Pancerella; L. A. Rahn; C. Yang

    2000-02-01

    The Diesel Combustion Collaborator (DCC) is a pilot project to develop and deploy collaborative technologies to combustion researchers distributed throughout the DOE national laboratories, academia, and industry. The result is a problem-solving environment for combustion research. Researchers collaborate over the Internet using DCC tools, which include: a distributed execution management system for running combustion models on widely distributed computers, including supercomputers; web-accessible data archiving capabilities for sharing graphical experimental or modeling data; electronic notebooks and shared workspaces for facilitating collaboration; visualization of combustion data; and video-conferencing and data-conferencing among researchers at remote sites. Security is a key aspect of the collaborative tools. In many cases, the authors have integrated these tools to allow data, including large combustion data sets, to flow seamlessly, for example, from modeling tools to data archives. In this paper the authors describe the work of a larger collaborative effort to design, implement and deploy the DCC.

  12. Issues in waste combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsson, Lennart; Robertson, Kerstin; Tullin, Claes [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden); Sundquist, Lena; Wrangensten, Lars [AaF-Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Blom, Elisabet [AaF-Processdesign AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-05-01

    The main purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art on research and development issues related to waste combustion with relevance for Swedish conditions. The review focuses on co-combustion in grate and fluidised bed furnaces. It is primarily literature searches in relevant databases of scientific publications with to material published after 1995. As a complement, findings published in different report series, have also been included. Since the area covered by this report is very wide, we do not claim to cover the issues included completely and it has not been possitile to evaluate the referred studies in depth. Basic knowledge about combustion issues is not included since such information can be found elsewhere in the literature. Rather, this review should be viewed as an overview of research and development in the waste-to-energy area and as such we hope that it will inspire scientists and others to further work in relevant areas.

  13. Synthesis of functional materials in combustion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravlev, V. D., E-mail: zhvd@ihim.uran.ru; Bamburov, V. G.; Ermakova, L. V.; Lobachevskaya, N. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The conditions for obtaining oxide compounds in combustion reactions of nitrates of metals with organic chelating–reducing agents such as amino acids, urea, and polyvinyl alcohol are reviewed. Changing the nature of internal fuels and the reducing agent-to-oxidizing agent ratio makes possible to modify the thermal regime of the process, fractal dimensionality, morphology, and dispersion of synthesized functional materials. This method can be used to synthesize simple and complex oxides, composites, and metal powders, as well as ceramics and coatings. The possibilities of synthesis in combustion reactions are illustrated by examples of αand γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, YSZ composites, uranium oxides, nickel powder, NiO and NiO: YSZ composite, TiO{sub 2}, and manganites, cobaltites, and aluminates of rare earth elements.

  14. Synthesis of functional materials in combustion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, V. D.; Bamburov, V. G.; Ermakova, L. V.; Lobachevskaya, N. I.

    2015-12-01

    The conditions for obtaining oxide compounds in combustion reactions of nitrates of metals with organic chelating-reducing agents such as amino acids, urea, and polyvinyl alcohol are reviewed. Changing the nature of internal fuels and the reducing agent-to-oxidizing agent ratio makes possible to modify the thermal regime of the process, fractal dimensionality, morphology, and dispersion of synthesized functional materials. This method can be used to synthesize simple and complex oxides, composites, and metal powders, as well as ceramics and coatings. The possibilities of synthesis in combustion reactions are illustrated by examples of αand γ-Al2O3, YSZ composites, uranium oxides, nickel powder, NiO and NiO: YSZ composite, TiO2, and manganites, cobaltites, and aluminates of rare earth elements.

  15. Computer simulation of combustion of mine fires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余明高; 张和平; 范维澄; 王清安

    2002-01-01

    According to control theories, mine fires can be considered as an unsteady process after the normal ventilation system is disturbed. Applied the principal of physical chemistry and thermal fluid mechanics, the parameters models of the unsteady state system have been given, such as fuel combustion rate, heat of combustion, concentration, temperature, heat losses, heat resistance, work of expansion and heat pressure difference. The results of the calculation agree approximately with the results of the test. By the computer simulation, it is shown that the main factor of producing the throttling effect is the fire rate, second is the heat resistance and the heat pressure difference. The rate of heat flow that passes through the airway wall is the maximum on the surface, and decrease with time. The heat transfer progresses only within the range of 0.5 m away from theairway wall during combustion for 2 hours. Its variable for the mass flux rate and the percentage concentration of the gas along the airway of the downstream. When the delayed time is very small, the variation can be neglected. Viscosity resistance is the main part of the heat resistance, second is the expansion resistance that is less than tens Pascal when Mach number is very small. Work of expansion is principally turned into heat losses, only a very small part is consumed by the work of the heat resistance and the inertia acceleration.

  16. Coal flotation optimization using modified flotation parameters and combustible recovery in a Jameson cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vapur, Hueseyin; Bayat, Oktay [Cukurova University, Mining Engineering Department, Balcali, 01330 Adana (Turkey); Ucurum, Metin [Nigde University, Mining Engineering Department, 51100 Nigde (Turkey)

    2010-10-15

    This study discusses a new coal flotation optimization approach. It is conducted using modified flotation parameters and combustible recovery. The experimental work was evaluated in two stages. In the first stage, recoveries (1, 2, 3, 5 and 8 min of flotation times) of Jameson flotation operating parameters were fitted to first-order kinetic model, R = R{sub {infinity}} [1 - exp (-kt)] where R was recovery at t time, R{sub {infinity}} was ultimate recovery and k was the first-order rate constant to draw the time recovery curves in the experimental study. Two parameters, the ultimate recovery (R{sub {infinity}}) and first-order rate constant (k), were then obtained from the model to fit an experimental time recovery curve. A modified flotation rate constant (K{sub m}) defined as product of R{sub {infinity}} and k, i.e., K{sub m} = R{sub {infinity}}{sup *} k, and selectivity index (SI) defined as the ratio of the modified rate constant of coal to the modified rate constant of ash ((SI)=K{sub m} of Coal/K{sub m} of Ash), which could be collectively called ''modified flotation parameters''. It was used to determine of the sub and upper values of operation variables. In the second one, combustible recovery (%) and ash content (%) were used to optimization of the Jameson flotation variables and it was found that d{sub 80} = 0.250 mm particle size, 1/1 vegetable oil acids/kerosene ratio, 20% solids pulp density, 0.600 L/min wash water rate and 40 cm downcomer immersion dept could be used to separate efficiently coal from ash. Final concentrate was obtained with 94.83% combustible recovery and 17.86% ash content at optimum conditions after 8 min flotation time. (author)

  17. Development of flameless combustion; Desarrollo de la combustion sin flama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores Sauceda, M. Leonardo; Cervantes de Gortari, Jaime Gonzalo [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: 8344afc@prodigy.net.mx; jgonzalo@servidor.unam.mx

    2010-11-15

    The paper intends contribute to global warming mitigation joint effort that develops technologies to capture the CO{sub 2} produced by fossil fuels combustion and to reduce emission of other greenhouse gases like the NO{sub x}. After reviewing existing combustion bibliography is pointed out that (a) touches only partial aspects of the collective system composed by Combustion-Heat transfer process-Environment, whose interactions are our primary interest and (b) most specialists think there is not yet a clearly winning technology for CO{sub 2} capture and storage. In this paper the study of combustion is focused as integrated in the aforementioned collective system where application of flameless combustion, using oxidant preheated in heat regenerators and fluent gas recirculation into combustion chamber plus appropriated heat and mass balances, simultaneously results in energy saving and environmental impact reduction. [Spanish] El trabajo pretende contribuir al esfuerzo conjunto de mitigacion del calentamiento global que aporta tecnologias para capturar el CO{sub 2} producido por la combustion de combustibles fosiles y para disminuir la emision de otros gases invernadero como NOx. De revision bibliografica sobre combustion se concluye que (a) trata aspectos parciales del sistema compuesto por combustion-proceso de trasferencia de calor-ambiente, cuyas interacciones son nuestro principal interes (b) la mayoria de especialistas considera no hay todavia una tecnologia claramente superior a las demas para captura y almacenaje de CO{sub 2}. Se estudia la combustion como parte integrante del mencionado sistema conjunto, donde la aplicacion de combustion sin flama, empleando oxidante precalentado mediante regeneradores de calor y recirculacion de gases efluentes ademas de los balances de masa y energia adecuados, permite tener simultaneamente ahorros energeticos e impacto ambiental reducido.

  18. NOx Emission Reduction by Oscillating Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John C. Wagner

    2004-03-31

    High-temperature, natural gas-fired furnaces, especially those fired with preheated air, produce large quantities of NO{sub x} per ton of material processed. Regulations on emissions from industrial furnaces are becoming increasingly more stringent. In addition, competition is forcing operators to make their furnaces more productive and/or efficient. Switching from preheated air to industrial oxygen can increase efficiency and reduce NO{sub x}, but oxygen is significantly more costly than air and may not be compatible with the material being heated. What was needed, and what was developed during this project, is a technology that reduces NO{sub x} emissions while increasing furnace efficiency for both air- and oxy-fired furnaces. Oscillating combustion is a retrofit technology that involves the forced oscillation of the fuel flow rate to a furnace. These oscillations create successive, fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones within the furnace. Heat transfer from the flame to the load increases due to the more luminous fuel-rich zones, a longer overall flame length, and the breakup of the thermal boundary layer. The increased heat transfer shortens heat up times, thereby increasing furnace productivity, and reduces the heat going up the stack, thereby increasing efficiency. The fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones also produce substantially less NO{sub x} than firing at a constant excess air level. The longer flames and higher heat transfer rate reduces overall peak flame temperature and thus reduces additional NO{sub x} formation from the eventual mixing of the zones and burnout of combustibles from the rich zones. This project involved the development of hardware to implement oscillating combustion on an industrial scale, the laboratory testing of oscillating combustion on various types of industrial burners, and the field testing of oscillating combustion on several types of industrial furnace. Before laboratory testing began, a market study was conducted, based on the

  19. NOx Emission Reduction by Oscillating combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Institute of Gas Technology

    2004-01-30

    High-temperature, natural gas-fired furnaces, especially those fired with preheated air, produce large quantities of NO{sub x} per ton of material processed. Regulations on emissions from industrial furnaces are becoming increasingly more stringent. In addition, competition is forcing operators to make their furnaces more productive and/or efficient. Switching from preheated air to industrial oxygen can increase efficiency and reduce NO{sub x}, but oxygen is significantly more costly than air and may not be compatible with the material being heated. What was needed, and what was developed during this project, is a technology that reduces NO{sub x} emissions while increasing furnace efficiency for both air- and oxy-fired furnaces. Oscillating combustion is a retrofit technology that involves the forced oscillation of the fuel flow rate to a furnace. These oscillations create successive, fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones within the furnace. Heat transfer from the flame to the load increases due to the more luminous fuel-rich zones, a longer overall flame length, and the breakup of the thermal boundary layer. The increased heat transfer shortens heat up times, thereby increasing furnace productivity, and reduces the heat going up the stack, thereby increasing efficiency. The fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones also produce substantially less NO{sub x} than firing at a constant excess air level. The longer flames and higher heat transfer rate reduces overall peak flame temperature and thus reduces additional NO{sub x} formation from the eventual mixing of the zones and burnout of combustibles from the rich zones. This project involved the development of hardware to implement oscillating combustion on an industrial scale, the laboratory testing of oscillating combustion on various types of industrial burners, and the field testing of oscillating combustion on several types of industrial furnace. Before laboratory testing began, a market study was conducted, based on the

  20. NO Reduction over Biomass and Coal Char during Simultaneous Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Ke; Glarborg, Peter; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2013-01-01

    . The straw and bark chars showed higher reactivity, about a factor of 4–5, than bituminous char at 850 °C. The difference in reactivity between biomass char and bituminous char decreased with increasing reaction temperature. The reaction rate expressions for NO reduction during simultaneous combustion......This paper reports an experimental study of NO reduction over chars of straw, bark, bituminous coal, and lignite. The experiments were performed in a fixed bed reactor in the temperature range 850–1150 °C. The chars were generated by in situ pyrolysis at the reaction temperature to minimize further...... thermal deactivation. The rates of NO reduction over char were studied by char combustion experiments and O2-free experiments respectively. Two simple models were applied to interpret the data from the char combustion experiments. One model assumed that combustion and NO release take place uniformly...

  1. Dimensionality reduction, and function approximation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid micro- and nanoparticle dissolution rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojha VK

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Varun Kumar Ojha,1,2 Konrad Jackowski,3 Ajith Abraham,1,4 Václav Snášel1,2 1IT4Innovations, VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava, Ostrava, Czech Republic; 2Department of Computer Science, VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava, Ostrava, Czech Republic; 3Department of Systems and Computer Networks, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wroclaw, Poland; 4Machine Intelligence Research Labs, Auburn, WA, USA Abstract: Prediction of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA micro- and nanoparticles’ dissolution rates plays a significant role in pharmaceutical and medical industries. The prediction of PLGA dissolution rate is crucial for drug manufacturing. Therefore, a model that predicts the PLGA dissolution rate could be beneficial. PLGA dissolution is influenced by numerous factors (features, and counting the known features leads to a dataset with 300 features. This large number of features and high redundancy within the dataset makes the prediction task very difficult and inaccurate. In this study, dimensionality reduction techniques were applied in order to simplify the task and eliminate irrelevant and redundant features. A heterogeneous pool of several regression algorithms were independently tested and evaluated. In addition, several ensemble methods were tested in order to improve the accuracy of prediction. The empirical results revealed that the proposed evolutionary weighted ensemble method offered the lowest margin of error and significantly outperformed the individual algorithms and the other ensemble techniques. Keywords: feature selection, regression models, ensemble, protein dissolution

  2. Relation between relative growth rate, endogenous gibberellins, and the response to applied gibberellic acid for Plantago major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, P; Reegen, H; Kuiper, P J

    1990-08-01

    Relationships between relative growth rate (RGR), endogenous gibberellin (GA) concentration and the response to application of gibberellic acid (GA(3) ) were studied for two inbred lines of Plantago major L., which differed in RGR. A4, the fast-growing inbred line, had a higher free GA concentration than the slow-growing W9, as analyzed by enzyme immunoassay. GA(3) application increased total plant weight and RGR(3) particularly for the slow-growing line. Chlorophyll a content and photosynthetic activity per unit leaf area were decreased, while transpiration rate was unaffected by GA(3) application. The increase in RGR by GA(3) application was associated with an increased leaf weight ratio; specific leaf area and percentage of dry matter in the leaves were only temporarily affected. Root respiration rate per unit dry weight was unaffected. The correlation between low RGR, low GA concentration and high responsiveness to applied GA(3) supports the contention that gibberellins are involved in the regulation of RGR. However, the transient influence of GA(3) application on some growth components suggests the involvement of other regulatory factors in addition to GA.

  3. ReplacementMatrix: a web server for maximum-likelihood estimation of amino acid replacement rate matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Cuong Cao; Lefort, Vincent; Le, Vinh Sy; Le, Quang Si; Gascuel, Olivier

    2011-10-01

    Amino acid replacement rate matrices are an essential basis of protein studies (e.g. in phylogenetics and alignment). A number of general purpose matrices have been proposed (e.g. JTT, WAG, LG) since the seminal work of Margaret Dayhoff and co-workers. However, it has been shown that matrices specific to certain protein groups (e.g. mitochondrial) or life domains (e.g. viruses) differ significantly from general average matrices, and thus perform better when applied to the data to which they are dedicated. This Web server implements the maximum-likelihood estimation procedure that was used to estimate LG, and provides a number of tools and facilities. Users upload a set of multiple protein alignments from their domain of interest and receive the resulting matrix by email, along with statistics and comparisons with other matrices. A non-parametric bootstrap is performed optionally to assess the variability of replacement rate estimates. Maximum-likelihood trees, inferred using the estimated rate matrix, are also computed optionally for each input alignment. Finely tuned procedures and up-to-date ML software (PhyML 3.0, XRATE) are combined to perform all these heavy calculations on our clusters. http://www.atgc-montpellier.fr/ReplacementMatrix/ olivier.gascuel@lirmm.fr Supplementary data are available at http://www.atgc-montpellier.fr/ReplacementMatrix/

  4. Consequences of sludge composition on combustion performance derived from thermogravimetry analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Meiyan; Xiao, Benyi; Wang, Xu; Liu, Junxin, E-mail: jxliu@rcees.ac.cn

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Volatiles, particularly proteins, play a key role in sludge combustion. • Sludge combustion performance varies with different sludge organic concentrations. • Carbohydrates significantly affect the combustion rate in the second stage. • Combustion performance of digested sludge is more negative compared with others. - Abstract: Wastewater treatment plants produce millions of tons of sewage sludge. Sewage sludge is recognized as a promising feedstock for power generation via combustion and can be used for energy crisis adaption. We aimed to investigate the quantitative effects of various sludge characteristics on the overall sludge combustion process performance. Different types of sewage sludge were derived from numerous wastewater treatment plants in Beijing for further thermogravimetric analysis. Thermogravimetric–differential thermogravimetric curves were used to compare the performance of the studied samples. Proximate analytical data, organic compositions, elementary composition, and calorific value of the samples were determined. The relationship between combustion performance and sludge composition was also investigated. Results showed that the performance of sludge combustion was significantly affected by the concentration of protein, which is the main component of volatiles. Carbohydrates and lipids were not correlated with combustion performance, unlike protein. Overall, combustion performance varied with different sludge organic composition. The combustion rate of carbohydrates was higher than those of protein and lipid, and carbohydrate weight loss mainly occurred during the second stage (175–300 °C). Carbohydrates have a substantial effect on the rate of system combustion during the second stage considering the specific combustion feature. Additionally, the combustion performance of digested sewage sludge is more negative than the others.

  5. The Effect of Varying Magnetic Field Gradient on Combustion Dynamic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzdalenko, Vera; Zake, Maija; Barmina, Inesa; Gedrovics, Martins

    2011-01-01

    The focus of the recent experimental research is to provide control of the combustion dynamics and complex measurements (flame temperature, heat production rate, and composition of polluting emissions) for pelletized wood biomass using a non-uniform magnetic field that produces magnetic force interacting with magnetic moment of paramagnetic oxygen. The experimental results have shown that a gradient magnetic field provides enhanced mixing of the flame compounds by increasing combustion efficiency and enhancing the burnout of volatiles.

  6. High Impact Technology Compact Combustion (HITCC) Compact Core Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    the CO and CO2 net reaction rates from the FGM. This, in turn, provides another benefit . That is, the source term in YC is not just now dependent on...AFRL-RQ-WP-TR-2016-0010 HIGH IMPACT TECHNOLOGY COMPACT COMBUSTION (HITCC) COMPACT CORE TECHNOLOGIES Andrew W. Caswell Combustion...information exchange, and its publication does not constitute the Government’s approval or disapproval of its ideas or findings. *Disseminated

  7. Propellant combustion response to oscillatory radiant heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, L. D.; Schwartz, K.; Burns, S. P.

    1987-01-01

    An introductory progress report is given on a research project to use the microwave Doppler velocimeter technique to measure the combustion response to an oscillating thermal radiation source (laser). The objective is to relate the measured burning rate response to the thermal radiation to an equivalent oscillation in pressure using existing thermal combustion theory. The test system is described, and the results of an initial test series on the composite propellant A-13 are presented.

  8. Diamond films from combustion of methyl acetylene and propadiene

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Stephen J.; Shin, Ho Seon; Goodwin, David G.

    1995-01-01

    To date diamond films grown with the combustion technique have used either acetylene or, rarely, ethylene as the fuel. However, there are barriers to large scale commercialization of the combustion technique using either fuel. For example, acetylene is relatively expensive and difficult to handle, while the use of ethylene gives relatively low growth rates. In this letter we propose replacing acetylene with MAPPTM gas, a commercial mixture of methyl acetylene and propadiene in liquefied petro...

  9. Renal uptake of dimercaptosuccinic acid and glomerular filtration rate in chronic nephropathy at angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A L; Thomsen, H S; Nielsen, S L;

    1990-01-01

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal uptake of dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) were measured in 31 patients with progressive chronic nephropathy before and immediately after the start of treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor in order to control adverse effects on kidney...... function. Scintigrams of the kidneys showed an unaltered distribution of DMSA during treatment. GFR estimated by 51Cr-EDTA plasma clearance fell by 14% (P less than 0.01), but renal uptake of 99mTc-DMSA increased by 10% (P less than 0.01). It is concluded that DMSA in chronic renal failure is mainly taken...... up by the tubular cells from the peritubular capillaries since the uptake was unaffected by the acute decrease in GFR....

  10. Numerical simulation of fuel sprays and combustion in a premixed lean diesel engine; Kihaku yokongo diesel kikan ni okeru nenryo funmu to nensho no suchi simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, T.; Harada, A.; Sasaki, S.; Shimazaki, N.; Hashizume, T.; Akagawa, H.; Tsujimura, K.

    1997-10-01

    Fuel sprays and combustion in a direct injection Premixed lean Diesel Combustion (PREDIC) engine, which can make smokeless combustion with little NOx emission, is studied numerically. Numerical simulation was carried out by means of KIVA II based computer code with a combustion submodel. The combustion submodel describes the formation of combustible fuel vapor by turbulent mixing and four-step chemical reaction which includes low temperature oxidation. Comparison between computation and experiment shows qualitatively good agreement in terms of heat release rate and NO emission. Computational results indicate that the combustion is significantly influenced by fuel spray characteristics and injection timing to vary NO emission. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Development and improvement of measuring method for growth rate of intracellular symbiotic acid-fast bacteria using radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Noboru; Fukutomi, Yasuo [National Inst. for Leprosy Research, Higashimurayama, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    The aim of this research group was to investigate the factors which might mediate the growth of mycobacterium lepra and relate to its affinity to the nerve tissue. In this year, constructions of a mycobacterium smegmatis mutant having a high transform ability and a shuttle vector between E. coli and acid-fast bacteria was attempted. From the wild type of m. smegmatis, a highly transformable mutant was obtained and the rate of transformation of the mutant was ca. 10{sup 5} times higher than the parent. And two shuttle vectors for E. coli/acid-fast bacteria; pALKMZErO (6.2 kb) and pHSGM59 (5.4 kb) were constructed. Since the former was unstable in M. smegmatis, the latter vector was used for the following experiments. Expression of `cat` gene cloned by pHSGM59 was identified in M. smegmatis. Further, DNA library of M. leprae was prepared by the use of the vector. Approximately, 1 x 10{sup 4} transformed clones were obtained. The analysis of the plasmids recovered from the clones is under way. (M.N.)

  12. Calculated Third Order Rate Constants for Interpreting the Mechanisms of Hydrolyses of Chloroformates, Carboxylic Acid Halides, Sulfonyl Chlorides and Phosphorochloridates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. William Bentley

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrolyses of acid derivatives (e.g., carboxylic acid chlorides and fluorides, fluoro- and chloroformates, sulfonyl chlorides, phosphorochloridates, anhydrides exhibit pseudo-first order kinetics. Reaction mechanisms vary from those involving a cationic intermediate (SN1 to concerted SN2 processes, and further to third order reactions, in which one solvent molecule acts as the attacking nucleophile and a second molecule acts as a general base catalyst. A unified framework is discussed, in which there are two reaction channels—an SN1-SN2 spectrum and an SN2-SN3 spectrum. Third order rate constants (k3 are calculated for solvolytic reactions in a wide range of compositions of acetone-water mixtures, and are shown to be either approximately constant or correlated with the Grunwald-Winstein Y parameter. These data and kinetic solvent isotope effects, provide the experimental evidence for the SN2-SN3 spectrum (e.g., for chloro- and fluoroformates, chloroacetyl chloride, p-nitrobenzoyl p-toluenesulfonate, sulfonyl chlorides. Deviations from linearity lead to U- or V-shaped plots, which assist in the identification of the point at which the reaction channel changes from SN2-SN3 to SN1-SN2 (e.g., for benzoyl chloride.

  13. Effects of auricular acupuncture on heart rate, oxygen consumption and blood lactic acid for elite basketball athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zen-Pin; Chen, Yi-Hung; Fan, Chia; Wu, Huey-June; Lan, Lawrence W; Lin, Jaung-Geng

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of auricular acupuncture on athletes' recovery abilities after exercise. Subjects were selected from twenty-four male elite university basketball players, randomly divided into two groups: auricular acupuncture group (AAG), and normal control group (NCG), each group containing twelve subjects. Auricular acupuncture was experimented to each AAG athlete while no auricular acupuncture was conducted to each NCG athlete. Each subject in both groups performed a ride on the stationary bike until exhausted. The data of heart rate (HR(max)), oxygen consumption (VO(2 max)), and blood lactic acid were measured at four points of time: during the rest period after warm-ups and at the 5th, 30th and 60th minutes post-exercise, respectively. One-way ANOVA and repeated Scheffé methods were used to test the differences of the data between these two groups. The results showed that both HR(max) and blood lactic acid in AAG were significantly lower than those in NCG at the 30th and 60th minutes post-exercise. This suggests that auricular acupuncture can enhance athletes' recovery abilities after aggressive exercise.

  14. Post combustion in converter steelmaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oghbasilasie, H.; Holappa, L.

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this work is to study the fundamentals of post combustion and the effect of different process parameters on the post combustion ratio (PCR) and heat transfer efficiency (HTE) in converter steelmaking process. The PCR and HTE have been determined under normal operating conditions. Trials assessed the effect of lance height, vessel volume, foaming slag and pellet additions on PCR and HTE. Based on enthalpy considerations, post combustion of CO gas is regarded as one of the most effective means of increasing the heat supply to the BOP. The thermodynamic study of gas-metal-slag reactions gives the limiting conditions for post combustion inside the converter reactor. Different process parameters influencing both thermodynamic equilibria and kinetic conditions can greatly affect the post combustion ratio. Different features of converter processes as well smelting reduction processes utilizing post combustion have been reviewed. (orig.) SULA 2 Research Programme; 26 refs.

  15. Combustion synthesis of tungsten powder from sodium tungstate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Guojian, E-mail: guojianjiang@sit.edu.cn [Shanghai Institute of Technology, 120 Caobao Road, Shanghai 200235 (China); Xu Jiayue [Shanghai Institute of Technology, 120 Caobao Road, Shanghai 200235 (China); Zhuang Hanrui; Li Wenlan [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2011-08-25

    Highlights: > Phase compositions of the combustion products synthesized at different mole ratios of Mg/Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}. > Phase compositions of combustion products synthesized at different relative densities. > Phase compositions of combustion product after the acid enrichment and distilled water washing. > Morphology of the combustion product after the acid enrichment and distilled water washing. - Abstract: Tungsten powders were prepared by Self-propagating High-temperature Synthesis (SHS) method directly from hitherto unreported system: sodium tungstate (Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}) and magnesium (Mg). The adiabatic temperatures of self-propagating combustion reactions with different amount of Mg in Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} + Mg system were calculated. The influences of different starting conditions (molar ratios of Mg/Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} and relative densities of samples) on the compositions and microstructure of reaction products were investigated. It shown that, the complete reduction of WO{sub 3} required a 60% excess of magnesium over the stoichiometric molar ratio Mg/Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} of 3. The amount of the impurities is minimal at appropriate relative density. At last, tungsten powders can be obtained after the acid enrichment and distilled water washing.

  16. Novel approaches in advanced combustion characterization of fuels for advanced pressurized combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, M.; Haemaelaeinen, J. [VTT Energy (Finland); Joutsenoja, T. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    This project is a part of the EU Joule 2 (extension) programme. The objective of the research of Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) is to produce experimental results of the effects of pressure and other important parameters on the combustion of pulverized coals and their char derivates. The results can be utilized in modelling of pressurized combustion and in planning pilot-scale reactors. The coals to be studied are Polish hvb coal, French lignite (Gardanne), German anthracite (Niederberg) and German (Goettelbom) hvb coal. The samples are combusted in an electrically heated, pressurized entrained flow reactor (PEFR), where the experimental conditions are controlled with a high precision. The particle size of the fuel can vary between 100 and 300 {mu}m. The studied things are combustion rates, temperatures and sizes of burning single coal and char particles. The latter measurements are performed with a method developed by Tampere University of Technology, Finland. In some of the experiments, mass loss and elemental composition of the char residue are studied in more details as the function of time to find out the combustion mechanism. Combustion rate of pulverized (140-180 {mu}m) Gardanne lignite and Niederberg anthracite were measured and compared with the data obtained earlier with Polish hvb coal at various pressures, gas temperatures, oxygen partial pressures and partial pressures of carbon dioxide in the second working period. In addition, particle temperatures were measured with anthracite. The experimental results were treated with multivariable partial least squares (PLS) method to find regression equation between the measured things and the experimental variables. (author)

  17. Raman Spectra and Nucleation Rates of Sulfuric Acid and Ammonium Sulfate Aerosols Supercooled with Respect to Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, D. A.; Koop, T.; Weers, U. G.; Krieger, U. K.; Peter, T.

    2001-12-01

    Sulfuric acid and ammonium sulfate aerosol particles can serve as ice condensation nuclei for the formation of upper tropospheric cirrus clouds. These clouds influence the global radiation budget by scattering of short wavelength (solar) radiation as well as by absorbing long wavelength (terrestrial) radiation. Knowledge of the thermodynamics and the nucleation rates of aerosols is fundamental for the understanding of formation processes of cirrus clouds. Here, we present a new investigation tool to observe phase transitions of aerosols supercooled with respect to ice. Confocal Raman microscopy is used to determine the phase changes and the morphology of the particles. Raman spectroscopy is employed to distinguish and to characterize the different phases inside the frozen particles. Single droplets with a diameter of typically 20-120 μ m are deposited on a hydrophobically coated Herasil-plate that is covered by a spacer and another plate. Since the gas phase volume of the cell is small compared to the liquid droplet volume the composition of the droplets remains fixed during temperature changes. The temperature of the droplets can be varied between 150-350~K. We present the first Raman spectra of aqueous H2SO4/H2O and (NH4)2SO4/H2O droplets for several concentrations and temperatures to the homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The analysis of the speciation of the components inside the droplets (e.g. sulfate vs. bisulfate ions) is compared to results from thermodynamic models. Evaluation of the freezing data gives upper limits for ice nucleation rates of droplets as a function of sulfuric acid or ammonium sulfate concentration.

  18. Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase 3 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, M.F.; Ryan, H.M.

    2000-05-31

    Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) burners have been successfully installed and operated in the reheat furnace at Auburn Steel Co., Inc., Auburn, NY, under Phase 3 of the Dilute Oxygen Combustion project. Two new preheat zones were created employing a total of eight 6.5 MMBtu/hr capacity burners. The preheat zones provide a 30 percent increase in maximum furnace production rate, from 75 tph to 100 tph. The fuel rate is essentially unchanged, with the fuel savings expected from oxy-fuel combustion being offset by higher flue gas temperatures. When allowance is made for the high nitrogen level and high gas phase temperature in the furnace, measured NOx emissions are in line with laboratory data on DOC burners developed in Phase 1 of the project. Burner performance has been good and there have been no operating or maintenance problems. The DOC system continues to be used as part of Auburn Steel?s standard reheat furnace practice. High gas phase temperature is a result of the high firing density needed to achieve high production rates, and little opportunity exists for improvement in that area. However, fuel and NOx performance can be improved by further conversion of furnace zones to DOC burners, which will lower furnace nitrogen levels. Major obstacles are cost and concern about increased formation of oxide scale on the steel. Oxide scale formation may be enhanced by exposure of the steel to higher concentrations of oxidizing gas components (primarily products of combustion) in the higher temperature zones of the furnace. Phase 4 of the DOC project will examine the rate of oxide scale formation in these higher temperature zones and develop countermeasures that will allow DOC burners to be used successfully in these furnace zones.

  19. Dilute Oxygen Combustion - Phase 3 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Michael F.

    2000-05-31

    Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) burners have been successfully installed and operated in the reheat furnace at Auburn Steel Co., Inc., Auburn, NY, under Phase 3 of the Dilute Oxygen Combustion project. Two new preheat zones were created employing a total of eight 6.5 MMBtu/hr capacity burners. The preheat zones provide a 30 percent increase in maximum furnace production rate, from 75 tph to 100 tph. The fuel rate is essentially unchanged, with the fuel savings expected from oxy-fuel combustion being offset by higher flue gas temperatures. When allowance is made for the high nitrogen level and high gas phase temperature in the furnace, measured NOx emissions are in line with laboratory data on DOC burners developed in Phase 1 of the project. Burner performance has been good, and there have been no operating or maintenance problems. The DOC system continues to be used as part of Auburn Steel's standard reheat furnace practice. High gas phase temperature is a result of the high firing density needed to achieve high production rates, and little opportunity exists for improvement in that area. However, fuel and NOx performance can be improved by further conversion on furnace zones to DOC burners, which will lower furnace nitrogen levels. Major obstacles are cost and concern about increased formation of oxide scale on the steel. Oxide scale formation may be enhanced by exposure of the steel to higher concentrations of oxidizing gas components (primarily products of combustion) in the higher temperature zones of the furnace. Phase 4 of the DOC project will examine the rate of oxide scale formation in these higher temperature zones and develop countermeasures that will allow DOC burners to be used successfully in these furnace zones.

  20. Combustion synthesis of radioactive waste immobilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ruizhu; GUO Zhimeng; LU Xin; JIA Chengchang; LIN Tao

    2005-01-01

    Using chromium oxide (CrO3) as an oxidant, the immobilization of simulating radioactive waste in perovskite (CaTiO3) structure by a combustion synthesis (CS) method was tested. The products were characterized by Archimedes liquid displacement technique, microhardness technique, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The leaching rate was measured by the method of MCC-1 or MCC-2.The primary results show that the CS method can be used to solidify the immobilizate waste effectively.

  1. Bile acid sequestration reduces plasma glucose levels in db/db mice by increasing its metabolic clearance rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxi Meissner

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Bile acid sequestrants (BAS reduce plasma glucose levels in type II diabetics and in murine models of diabetes but the mechanism herein is unknown. We hypothesized that sequestrant-induced changes in hepatic glucose metabolism would underlie reduced plasma glucose levels. Therefore, in vivo glucose metabolism was assessed in db/db mice on and off BAS using tracer methodology. METHODS: Lean and diabetic db/db mice were treated with 2% (wt/wt in diet Colesevelam HCl (BAS for 2 weeks. Parameters of in vivo glucose metabolism were assessed by infusing [U-(13C]-glucose, [2-(13C]-glycerol, [1-(2H]-galactose and paracetamol for 6 hours, followed by mass isotopologue distribution analysis, and related to metabolic parameters as well as gene expression patterns. RESULTS: Compared to lean mice, db/db mice displayed an almost 3-fold lower metabolic clearance rate of glucose (p = 0.0001, a ∼300% increased glucokinase flux (p = 0.001 and a ∼200% increased total hepatic glucose production rate (p = 0.0002. BAS treatment increased glucose metabolic clearance rate by ∼37% but had no effects on glucokinase flux nor total hepatic or endogenous glucose production. Strikingly, BAS-treated db/db mice displayed reduced long-chain acylcarnitine content in skeletal muscle (p = 0.0317 but not in liver (p = 0.189. Unexpectedly, BAS treatment increased hepatic FGF21 mRNA expression 2-fold in lean mice (p = 0.030 and 3-fold in db/db mice (p = 0.002. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: BAS induced plasma glucose lowering in db/db mice by increasing metabolic clearance rate of glucose in peripheral tissues, which coincided with decreased skeletal muscle long-chain acylcarnitine content.

  2. Sulfur Chemistry in Combustion I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Glarborg, Peter

    2000-01-01

    of the sulphur compounds in fossil fuels and the possibilities to remove them will be given. Then the combustion of sulphur species and their influence on the combustion chemistry and especially on the CO oxidation and the NOx formation will be described. Finally the in-situ removal of sulphur in the combustion...... process by reaction between SO2 and calcium containing sorbents and the influence on the NOx chemistry will be treated....

  3. Effect of milk replacer feeding rate and functional fatty acids on dairy calf performance and digestion of nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T M; Quigley, J D; Suarez-Mena, F X; Bateman, H G; Schlotterbeck, R L

    2016-08-01

    Calves fed large amounts of milk replacer (MR) gain more body weight preweaning than calves fed less MR; however, postweaning growth may be reduced because of impaired digestion of nutrients. This was explored in the current research, as was the inclusion of functional fatty acids (NT) that could ameliorate some poor growth and digestion issues in calves fed large amounts of MR. Two MR rates [moderate (MOD) or aggressive (AGG)] with and without NT were compared using 48 male Holstein calves initially 3d old (43±1.5kg of body weight) randomly assigned to treatments. The MOD rate was fed at 0.66kg of dry matter (DM) for 49d. The AGG rate was fed for 4d at 0.66kg of DM, 4d at 0.96kg of DM, then 34d at 1.31kg of DM, followed by 0.66kg of DM for the last 7d. Calves were completely weaned at 49d. The MR contained 27% crude protein and 17% fat. The textured starter was 20% crude protein. Starter and water were fed free-choice for the first 56d when calves were housed in individual pens. From 56 to 112d, calves were grouped (4 calves/pen), maintaining the same MR rate and NT treatments, and fed starter blended with 5% chopped grass hay free-choice with free-choice water. Digestibility was estimated from fecal collections made on d 19 to 23, 40 to 44, and 52 to 56. Data were analyzed as a completely randomized design with a factorial arrangement of MR rate and NT using repeated measures with a mixed procedure. Fiber and starch digestion increased with age and was lower for AGG versus MOD. Calf average daily gain and hip width change were greater before approximately 6wk of age for AGG versus MOD, but this was reversed from approximately 6 to 16wk. Calves fed AGG had lower average daily gain per unit intake of DM, crude protein, and metabolizable energy from 8 to 16wk than calves fed MOD. Preweaning starter intake was less for calves fed AGG versus MOD. Calves fed AGG had greater body weight gain than MOD over 112d, but hip width change did not differ. Feeding NT improved

  4. Effects of pyrite on the spontaneous combustion of coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Deng; Xiaofeng Ma; Yutao Zhang; Yaqing Li; Wenwen Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Pyrite has a significant effect on the spontaneous combustion of coal. The presence of pyrite can change the propensity of coal towards spontaneous combustion. The influences of various pyrite contents on the parameters of spontaneous combustion, such as index gases, temperature and released heat etc., were investigated in this study. Coal samples with different pyrite contents (0%, 3%, 5%, 7%and 9%) were made by mixing coal and pyrite. The oxidation experiments under temperature-programmed condition were carried out to test the release rate of gaseous oxidation products at different temperatures. Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) was employed to measure the intensity of heat release during coal oxidation for various pyrite contents. The results indicate that pyrite can nonlinearly accelerate the process of spontaneous combustion. The coal sample with a pyrite content of 5% has the largest CO release rate and oxygen adsorption as well. However, the coal sample with a pyrite content of 7% has the largest rate of heat flow according to the results from the DSC tests. Pyrite contents of 5%–7% in coal has the most significant effects on spontaneous combustion within the range of this study. The conclusions are conducive to the evaluation and control for the spontaneous combustion of coal.

  5. Pulsating combustion - Combustion characteristics and reduction of emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindholm, Annika

    1999-11-01

    In the search for high efficiency combustion systems pulsating combustion has been identified as one of the technologies that potentially can meet the objectives of clean combustion and good fuel economy. Pulsating combustion offers low emissions of pollutants, high heat transfer and efficient combustion. Although it is an old technology, the interest in pulsating combustion has been renewed in recent years, due to its unique features. Various applications of pulsating combustion can be found, mainly as drying and heating devices, of which the latter also have had commercial success. It is, however, in the design process of a pulse combustor, difficult to predict the operating frequency, the heat release etc., due to the lack of a well founded theory of the phenomenon. Research concerning control over the combustion process is essential for developing high efficiency pulse combustors with low emissions. Natural gas fired Helmholtz type pulse combustors have been the experimental objects of this study. In order to investigate the interaction between the fluid dynamics and the chemistry in pulse combustors, laser based measuring techniques as well as other conventional measuring techniques have been used. The experimental results shows the possibilities to control the combustion characteristics of pulsating combustion. It is shown that the time scales in the large vortices created at the inlet to the combustion chamber are very important for the operation of the pulse combustor. By increasing/decreasing the time scale for the large scale mixing the timing of the heat release is changed and the operating characteristics of the pulse combustor changes. Three different means for NO{sub x} reduction in Helmholtz type pulse combustors have been investigated. These include exhaust gas recirculation, alteration of air/fuel ratio and changed inlet geometry in the combustion chamber. All used methods achieved less than 10 ppm NO{sub x} emitted (referred to stoichiometric

  6. The modes of gaseous combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Rubtsov, Nickolai M

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an analysis of contemporary problems in combustion science, namely flame propagation, detonation and heterophaseous combustion based on the works of the author. The current problems in the area of gas combustion, as well as the methods allowing to calculate and estimate limiting conditions of ignition, and flame propagation on the basis of experimental results are considered. The book focuses on the virtually inaccessible works of Russian authors and will be useful for experienced students and qualified scientists in the area of experimental studies of combustion processes.

  7. Combustion from basics to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lackner, Maximilian; Winter, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Combustion, the process of burning, is defined as a chemical reaction between a combustible reactant (the fuel) and an oxidizing agent (such as air) in order to produce heat and in most cases light while new chemical species (e.g., flue gas components) are formed. This book covers a gap on the market by providing a concise introduction to combustion. Most of the other books currently available are targeted towards the experienced users and contain too many details and/or contain knowledge at a fairly high level. This book provides a brief and clear overview of the combustion basics, suitable f

  8. Mathematical Modeling in Combustion Science

    CERN Document Server

    Takeno, Tadao

    1988-01-01

    An important new area of current research in combustion science is reviewed in the contributions to this volume. The complicated phenomena of combustion, such as chemical reactions, heat and mass transfer, and gaseous flows, have so far been studied predominantly by experiment and by phenomenological approaches. But asymptotic analysis and other recent developments are rapidly changing this situation. The contributions in this volume are devoted to mathematical modeling in three areas: high Mach number combustion, complex chemistry and physics, and flame modeling in small scale turbulent flow combustion.

  9. Active Combustion Control Valve Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Over the past decade, research into active combustion control has yielded impressive results in suppressing thermoacoustic instabilities and widening the...

  10. Active Combustion Control Valve Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Over the past decade, research into active combustion control has yielded impressive results in suppressing thermoacoustic instabilities and widening the operational...

  11. Basic Aerodynamics of Combustion Chambers,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-20

    8217, tie imnrulse foree eyuilibr-um c’ the bomd’~ leye - is 173 pv-:irJ p~76vJbK 2sO) IL !-. = Zn pT -- a , bV T. z -,,r y.re C era 3oia * ~~I" onc art-=e...heat by combustion all have very large influences on the capabilities of a combustion chamber. A yellow- colored flame represents diffusion combustion in...the wakes of fuel droplets. Blue- colored flames represent gaseous combustion of evaporated vapors which have already left the fuel droplets. The

  12. Combustion, emission and engine performance characteristics of used cooking oil biodiesel - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enweremadu, C.C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Vaal University of Technology, Private Bag X021, Vanderbijlpark 1900 (South Africa); Rutto, H.L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Vaal University of Technology, Private Bag X021, Vanderbijlpark 1900 (South Africa)

    2010-12-15

    As the environment degrades at an alarming rate, there have been steady calls by most governments following international energy policies for the use of biofuels. One of the biofuels whose use is rapidly expanding is biodiesel. One of the economical sources for biodiesel production which doubles in the reduction of liquid waste and the subsequent burden of sewage treatment is used cooking oil (UCO). However, the products formed during frying, such as free fatty acid and some polymerized triglycerides, can affect the transesterification reaction and the biodiesel properties. This paper attempts to collect and analyze published works mainly in scientific journals about the engine performance, combustion and emissions characteristics of UCO biodiesel on diesel engine. Overall, the engine performance of the UCO biodiesel and its blends was only marginally poorer compared to diesel. From the standpoint of emissions, NOx emissions were slightly higher while un-burnt hydrocarbon (UBHC) emissions were lower for UCO biodiesel when compares to diesel fuel. There were no noticeable differences between UCO biodiesel and fresh oil biodiesel as their engine performances, combustion and emissions characteristics bear a close resemblance. This is probably more closely related to the oxygenated nature of biodiesel which is almost constant for every biodiesel (biodiesel has some level of oxygen bound to its chemical structure) and also to its higher viscosity and lower calorific value, which have a major bearing on spray formation and initial combustion. (author)

  13. Time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huot, Alexandrine; Gagnon, Marc-André; Jahjah, Karl-Alexandre; Tremblay, Pierre; Savary, Simon; Farley, Vincent; Lagueux, Philippe; Guyot, Éric; Chamberland, Martin; Marcotte, Fréderick

    2015-05-01

    Thermal infrared imaging is a field of science that evolves rapidly. Scientists have used for years the simplest tool: thermal broadband cameras. This allows to perform target characterization in both the longwave (LWIR) and midwave (MWIR) infrared spectral range. Infrared thermal imaging is used for a wide range of applications, especially in the combustion domain. For example, it can be used to follow combustion reactions, in order to characterize the injection and the ignition in a combustion chamber or even to observe gases produced by a flare or smokestack. Most combustion gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2) selectively absorb/emit infrared radiation at discrete energies, i.e. over a very narrow spectral range. Therefore, temperatures derived from broadband imaging are not reliable without prior knowledge about spectral emissivity. This information is not directly available from broadband images. However, spectral information is available using spectral filters. In this work, combustion analysis was carried out using Telops MS-IR MW camera which allows multispectral imaging at a high frame rate. A motorized filter wheel allowing synchronized acquisitions on eight (8) different channels was used to provide time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion products of a candle in which black powder has been burnt to create a burst. It was then possible to estimate the temperature by modeling spectral profile derived from information obtained with the different spectral filters. Comparison with temperatures obtained using conventional broadband imaging illustrates the benefits of time-resolved multispectral imaging for the characterization of combustion processes.

  14. Time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huot, Alexandrine; Gagnon, Marc-André; Jahjah, Karl-Alexandre; Tremblay, Pierre; Savary, Simon; Farley, Vincent; Lagueux, Philippe; Guyot, Éric; Chamberland, Martin; Marcotte, Frédérick

    2015-10-01

    Thermal infrared imaging is a field of science that evolves rapidly. Scientists have used for years the simplest tool: thermal broadband cameras. These allow to perform target characterization in both the longwave (LWIR) and midwave (MWIR) infrared spectral range. Infrared thermal imaging is used for a wide range of applications, especially in the combustion domain. For example, it can be used to follow combustion reactions, in order to characterize the injection and the ignition in a combustion chamber or even to observe gases produced by a flare or smokestack. Most combustion gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), selectively absorb/emit infrared radiation at discrete energies, i.e. over a very narrow spectral range. Therefore, temperatures derived from broadband imaging are not reliable without prior knowledge of spectral emissivity. This information is not directly available from broadband images. However, spectral information is available using spectral filters. In this work, combustion analysis was carried out using a Telops MS-IR MW camera, which allows multispectral imaging at a high frame rate. A motorized filter wheel allowing synchronized acquisitions on eight (8) different channels was used to provide time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion products of a candle in which black powder has been burnt to create a burst. It was then possible to estimate the temperature by modeling spectral profiles derived from information obtained with the different spectral filters. Comparison with temperatures obtained using conventional broadband imaging illustrates the benefits of time-resolved multispectral imaging for the characterization of combustion processes.

  15. Analysis of combustion efficiency in CFB coal combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afsin Gungor [Nigde University, Nigde (Turkey). Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture

    2008-06-15

    Fluidized bed technology is well known for its high combustion efficiency and is widely used in coal combustion. In this study, the combustor efficiency has been defined and investigated for CFB coal combustor based on the losses using a dynamic 2D model. The model is shown to agree well with the published data. The effect of operating parameters such as excess air ratio, bed operational velocity, coal particle diameter and combustor load and the effect of design variables such as bed height and bed diameter on the mean bed temperature, the overall CO emission and the combustion efficiency are analyzed for the small-scale of CFBC in the presently developed model. As a result of this analysis, it is observed that the combustion efficiency decreases with increasing excess air value. The combustion efficiency increases with the bed operational velocity. Increasing coal particle size results in higher combustion efficiency values. The coal feed rate has negative effect on the combustion efficiency. The combustor efficiency considerably increases with increasing combustor height and diameter if other parameters are kept unchanged. 46 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. The Heat of Combustion of Tobacco and Carbon Oxide Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman AB

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies demonstrated a relationship between mass burn rates of straight-grade cigarettes and heats of combustion of the tobacco materials. In the present work, relationships between measured heats of combustion and elemental composition of the tobacco materials were further analyzed. Heats of combustion measured in oxygen were directly correlated with the carbon and hydrogen content of the tobacco materials tested. Ash content of the materials was inversely related to the heats of combustion. The water insoluble residues from exhaustively extracted tobacco materials showed higher heats of combustion and higher carbon content than the non-extracted materials, confirming a direct relationship between carbon content and heat of combustion. A value for the heat of formation of tobacco was estimated (1175 cal/g from the heat of combustion data and elemental analysis results. The estimated value for heat of formation of tobacco appears to be constant regardless of the material type. Heat values measured in air were uniformly lower than the combustion heats in oxygen, suggesting formation of CO and other reaction products. Gases produced during bomb calorimetry experiments with five tobacco materials were analyzed for CO and CO2 content. When the materials were burned in oxygen, no CO was found in the gases produced. Measured heats of combustion matched estimates based on CO2 found in the gas and conversion of the sample hydrogen content to water. Materials burned in air produced CO2 (56% to 77% of the sample carbon content and appreciable amounts of CO (7% to 16% of the sample carbon content. Unburned residue containing carbon and hydrogen was found in the air combustion experiments. Estimated heat values based on amounts of CO and CO2 found in the gas and water formed from the hydrogen lost during combustion in air were higher than the measured values. These observations indicate formation of products containing hydrogen when the materials

  17. Fuel Chemistry And Combustion Distribution Effects On Rocket Engine Combustion Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-19

    model, the D 2 law rate constant for ideal combustion, k0, of a droplet is dependent on the thermal properties of the fuel and oxidizer and is...remaining increase in the D 2 law regression rate constant is caused by the non- ideal conditions of the experiment. Natural convection is present, as...is the gap-averaged pressure. Considering incompressible gas flow (ρ is constant ), two governing equations can be solved for the pressure in the gap

  18. Effects of Docosahexaenoic Acid Supplementation on Blood Pressure, Heart Rate, and Serum Lipids in Scottish Men with Hypertension and Hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Sagara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of daily supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA on coronary heart disease risks in 38 middle-aged men with hypertension and/or hypercholesterolemia in Scotland, a five-week double-blind placebo-controlled dietary supplementation with either 2 g of DHA or active placebo (1 g of olive oil was conducted. Percent composition of DHA in plasma phospholipids increased significantly in DHA group. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate decreased significantly in DHA group, but not in placebo group. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C increased significantly, and total cholesterol (TC/HDL-C and non-HDL-C/HDL-C ratios decreased significantly in both groups. There was no change in TC and non-HDL-C. We conclude that 2 g/day of DHA supplementation reduced coronary heart disease risk factor level improving blood pressure, heart rate, and lipid profiles in hypertensive, hypercholesterolemic Scottish men who do not eat fish on a regular basis.

  19. Reduced rates of non-union with modified periacetabular osteotomy using peracetic-acid sterilized cancellous allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassilew, Georgi I; Janz, Viktor; Renner, Lisa; Perka, Carsten; Pruss, Axel

    2016-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to analyze the clinical and radiological results of periacetabular osteotomies (PAO) using Kirschner wire fixation and an allogeneic cancellous bone graft. This retrospective cohort study included 73 patients (85 PAOs). The allografts were processed from distal femur of cadaveric donors, defatted, sterilized with a peracetic-acid ethanol solution and freeze-dried. The clinical outcome, as measured by the Harris Hip Scores (HHS), the complication rate and the acetabular correction, as measured by radiological parameters, were compared. The postoperative femoral head coverage and HSS were significantly improved. Major complications occurred in five cases (6 %), but in no case did we observe a non-union or a graft-associated adverse effect. Fixation of the acetabular fragment with Kirschner wires in combination with an allogeneic cancellous bone graft is a safe method, with a low complication rate, no loss of correction and can prevent the occurrence of non-union with a high degree of probability.

  20. Amniotic Fluid or Its Fatty Acids Produce Actions Similar to Diazepam on Lateral Septal Neurons Firing Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana G. Gutiérrez-García

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human amniotic fluid (AF contains eight fatty acids (FATs, and both produce anxiolytic-like effects in adult rats and appetitive responses in human newborns. The medial amygdala and lateral septal nucleus function are related to social behavior, but the action of AF or its FATs in this circuit is known. We obtained 267 single-unit extracellular recordings in Wistar rats treated with vehicle (1 mL, s.c.; n=12, human AF (1 mL, s.c.; n=12, a FAT mixture (1 mL, s.c.; n=13, diazepam (1 mg/kg, i.p.; n=11, and fluoxetine (1 mg/kg, p.o.; n=12. Compared with the vehicle group, the spontaneous septal firing rate in the AF, FAT mixture, and diazepam groups was the lowest and in the fluoxetine group the highest. Cumulative peristimulus histograms indicated that the significant change in septal firing occurred only in the AF and FAT mixture groups and exclusively in those neurons that increased their firing rate during amygdala stimulation. We conclude that human AF and its FATs produce actions comparable to anxiolytic drugs and are able to modify the responsivity of a circuit involved in social behavior, suggesting facilitation of social recognition processes by maternal-fetal fluids.

  1. Combustion Branch Website Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The NASA combustion branch is a leader in developing and applying combustion science to focused aerospace propulsion systems concepts. It is widely recognized for unique facilities, analytical tools, and personnel. In order to better communicate the outstanding research being done in this Branch to the public and other research organization, a more substantial website was desired. The objective of this project was to build an up-to-date site that reflects current research in a usable and attractive manner. In order to accomplish this, information was requested from all researchers in the Combustion branch, on their professional skills and on the current projects. This information was used to fill in the Personnel and Research sections of the website. A digital camera was used to photograph all personnel and these photographs were included in the personnel section as well. The design of the site was implemented using the latest web standards: xhtml and external css stylesheets. This implementation conforms to the guidelines recommended by the w3c. It also helps to ensure that the web site is accessible by disabled users, and complies with Section 508 Federal legislation (which mandates that all Federal websites be accessible). Graphics for the new site were generated using the gimp (www.gimp.org) an open-source graphics program similar to Adobe Photoshop. Also, all graphics on the site were of a reasonable size (less than 20k, most less than 2k) so that the page would load quickly. Technologies such as Macromedia Flash and Javascript were avoided, as these only function on some clients which have the proper software installed or enabled. The website was tested on different platforms with many different browsers to ensure there were no compatibility issues. The website was tested on windows with MS IE 6, MSIE 5 , Netscape 7, Mozilla and Opera. On a Mac, the site was tested with MS IE 5 , Netscape 7 and Safari.

  2. Alternate fuels; Combustibles alternos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero Paredes R, Hernando; Ambriz G, Juan Jose [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana. Iztapalapa (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In the definition and description of alternate fuels we must center ourselves in those technological alternatives that allow to obtain compounds that differ from the traditional ones, in their forms to be obtained. In this article it is tried to give an overview of alternate fuels to the conventional derivatives of petroleum and that allow to have a clear idea on the tendencies of modern investigation and the technological developments that can be implemented in the short term. It is not pretended to include all the tendencies and developments of the present world, but those that can hit in a relatively short term, in accordance with agreed with the average life of conventional fuels. Nevertheless, most of the conversion principles are applicable to the spectrum of carbonaceous or cellulosic materials which are in nature, are cultivated or wastes of organic origin. Thus one will approach them in a successive way, the physical, chemical and biological conversions that can take place in a production process of an alternate fuel or the same direct use of the fuel such as burning the sweepings derived from the forests. [Spanish] En la definicion y descripcion de combustibles alternos nos debemos centrar en aquellas alternativas tecnologicas que permitan obtener compuestos que difieren de los tradicionales, al menos en sus formas de ser obtenidos. En este articulo se pretende dar un panorama de los combustibles alternos a los convencionales derivados del petroleo y que permita tener una idea clara sobre las tendencias de la investigacion moderna y los desarrollos tecnologicos que puedan ser implementados en el corto plazo. No se pretende abarcar todas las tendencias y desarrollos del mundo actual, sino aquellas que pueden impactar en un plazo relativamente corto, acordes con la vida media de los combustibles convencionales. Sin embargo, la mayor parte de los principios de conversion son aplicables al espectro de materiales carbonaceos o celulosicos los cuales se

  3. Development of High Efficiency and Low Emission Low Temperature Combustion Diesel Engine with Direct EGR Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, R. J.; Kumaran, P.; Yusoff, M. Z.

    2016-03-01

    Focus on energy and environmental sustainability policy has put automotive research & development directed to developing high efficiency and low pollutant power train. Diffused flame controlled diesel combustion has reach its limitation and has driven R&D to explore other modes of combustions. Known effective mode of combustion to reduce emission are Low temperature combustion (LTC) and homogeneous charge combustion ignition by suppressing Nitrogen Oxide(NOx) and Particulate Matter (PM) formation. The key control to meet this requirement are chemical composition and distribution of fuel and gas during a combustion process. Most research to accomplish this goal is done by manipulating injected mass flow rate and varying indirect EGR through intake manifold. This research paper shows viable alternative direct combustion control via co-axial direct EGR injection with fuel injection process. A simulation study with OpenFOAM is conducted by varying EGR injection velocity and direct EGR injector diameter performed with under two conditions with non-combustion and combustion. n-heptane (C7H16) is used as surrogate fuel together with 57 species 290 semi-detailed chemical kinetic model developed by Chalmers University is used for combustion simulation. Simulation result indicates viability of co-axial EGR injection as a method for low temperature combustion control.

  4. AIR EMISSIONS FROM SCRAP TIRE COMBUSTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses air emissions from two types of scrap tire combustion: uncontrolled and controlled. Uncontrolled sources are open tire fires, which produce many unhealthful products of incomplete combustion and release them directly into the atmosphere. Controlled combustion...

  5. Path planning during combustion mode switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Ravi, Nikhil

    2015-12-29

    Systems and methods are provided for transitioning between a first combustion mode and a second combustion mode in an internal combustion engine. A current operating point of the engine is identified and a target operating point for the internal combustion engine in the second combustion mode is also determined. A predefined optimized transition operating point is selected from memory. While operating in the first combustion mode, one or more engine actuator settings are adjusted to cause the operating point of the internal combustion engine to approach the selected optimized transition operating point. When the engine is operating at the selected optimized transition operating point, the combustion mode is switched from the first combustion mode to the second combustion mode. While operating in the second combustion mode, one or more engine actuator settings are adjusted to cause the operating point of the internal combustion to approach the target operating point.

  6. Investigation on thermal and trace element characteristics during co-combustion biomass with coal gangue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuncai; Liu, Guijian; Fang, Ting; Lam, Paul Kwan Sing

    2015-01-01

    The thermochemical behaviors during co-combustion of coal gangue (CG), soybean stalk (SS), sawdust (SD) and their blends prepared at different ratios have been determined via thermogravimetric analysis. The simulate experiments in a fixed bed reactor were performed to investigate the partition behaviors of trace elements during co-combustion. The combustion profiles of biomass was more complicated than that of coal gangue. Ignition property and thermal reactivity of coal gangue could be enhanced by the addition of biomass. No interactions were observed between coal gangue and biomass during co-combustion. The volatilization ratios of trace elements decrease with the increasing proportions of biomass in the blends during co-combustion. Based on the results of heating value, activation energy, base/acid ratio and gaseous pollutant emissions, the blending ratio of 20-30% biomass content is regarded as optimum composition for blending and could be applied directly at current combustion application with few modifications.

  7. Oxygen isotopic signature of CO2 from combustion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Brand

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available For a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope (13C and 18O abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the δ18O signature of CO2 from combustion processes, which are widely present both naturally (wild fires, and human induced (fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning in the carbon cycle. All these combustion processes use atmospheric oxygen, of which the isotopic signature is assumed to be constant with time throughout the whole atmosphere. The combustion is generally presumed to take place at high temperatures, thus minimizing isotopic fractionation. Therefore it is generally supposed that the 18O signature of the produced CO2 is equal to that of the atmospheric oxygen. This study, however, reveals that the situation is much more complicated and that important fractionation effects do occur. From laboratory studies fractionation effects on the order of up to 26%permil; became obvious in the derived CO2 from combustion of different kinds of material, a clear differentiation of about 7‰ was also found in car exhausts which were sampled directly under ambient atmospheric conditions. We investigated a wide range of materials (both different raw materials and similar materials with different inherent 18O signature, sample geometries (e.g. texture and surface-volume ratios and combustion circumstances. We found that the main factor influencing the specific isotopic signatures of the combustion-derived CO2 and of the concomitantly released oxygen-containing side products, is the case-specific rate of combustion. This points firmly into the direction of (diffusive transport of oxygen to the reaction zone as the cause of the isotope fractionation. The original total 18O signature of the material appeared to have little influence, however, a contribution of specific bio

  8. Pre-Combustion Carbondioxide Capture in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zeki YILMAZOĞLU

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermal power plants have a significant place big proportion in the production of electric energy. Thermal power plants are the systems which converts heat energy to mechanical energy and also mechanical energy to electrical energy. Heat energy is obtained from combustion process and as a result of this, some harmful emissions, like CO2, which are the reason for global warming, are released to atmosphere. The contribution of carbondioxide to global warming has been exposed by the previous researchs. Due to this fact, clean energy technologies are growing rapidly all around the world. Coal is generally used in power plants and when compared to other fossil energy sources unit electricity production cost is less than others. When reserve rate is taken into account, coal may be converted to energy in a more efficient and cleaner way. The aim for using the clean coal technologies are to eradicate the harmful emissions of coal and to store the carbondioxide, orginated from combustion, in different forms. In line with this aim, carbondioxide may be captured by either pre-combustion, by O2/CO2 recycling combustion systems or by post combustion. The integrated gasification combined cycles (IGCC are available in pre-combustion capture systems, whereas in O2/CO2 recycling combustion systems there are ultrasuper critical boiler technologies and finally flue gas washing systems by amines exists in post combustion systems. In this study, a pre-combustion CO2 capture process via oxygen blown gasifiers is compared with a conventional power plant in terms of CO2 emissions. Captured carbondioxide quantity has been presented as a result of the calculations made throughout the study.

  9. Effect of inoculation rate of selected strains of lactic acid bacteria on fermentation and in vitro digestibility of grass-legume forage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J H; Soderlund, S D; Loney, K A

    1989-09-01

    Grass-legume forage was used to evaluate the effect of inoculation rate of selected strains of lactic acid bacteria on fermentation and in vitro digestibility during 57 d of ensiling. Chopped forage (DM = 28%) was ensiled in 4 to 6-kg quantities and treated as: 1) control, 10(3) epiphytic lactic acid bacteria; 2) 10(5) added lactic acid bacteria; and 3) 10(6) added lactic bacteria/g of wet forage. Samples were obtained for analyses on d 0, 1, 2, 3, 6, 10, 14, 29, and 57 of fermentation. Treated silages were observed to have: 1) greater quantities of lactic acid bacteria, 2) a greater proportion of homofermentative lactic acid bacteria, and 3) lactic acid bacteria with greater biological activity. Addition of each amount of lactic acid bacteria: 1) increased the rate of utilization of water-soluble carbohydrate and decline in pH, 2) limited the formation of NH3 N, and 3) increased the in vitro digestibility of DM and ADF. No differences were observed in the lactic acid content of the silages after 57 d of fermentation.

  10. Caffeic Acid Reduces the Viability and Migration Rate of Oral Carcinoma Cells (SCC-25 Exposed to Low Concentrations of Ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Dziedzic

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol increases the risk of carcinoma originated from oral epithelium, but the biological effects of ultra-low doses of ethanol on existing carcinoma cells in combination with natural substances are still unclear. A role for ethanol (EtOH, taken in small amounts as an ingredient of some beverages or mouthwashes to change the growth behavior of established squamous cell carcinoma, has still not been examined sufficiently. We designed an in vitro study to determine the effect of caffeic acid (CFA on viability and migration ability of malignant oral epithelial keratinocytes, exposed to ultra-low concentrations (maximum 100 mmol/L EtOH. MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-dimethyltetrazolium bromide and LDH (lactate dehydrogenase assays were used to assess the cytotoxic effect of EtOH/CFA and the viability of squamous carcinoma SCC-25 cells (ATCC CRL-1628, mobile part of the tongue. Tested EtOH concentrations were: 2.5, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 mmol/L, along with an equal CFA concentration of 50 μmol/L. Carcinoma cells’ migration was investigated by monolayer “wound” healing assay. We demonstrated that very low concentrations of EtOH ranging between 2.5 and 10 mmol/L may induce the viability of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells, while the results following addition of CFA reveal an antagonistic effect, attenuating pro-proliferative EtOH activity. The migration rate of oral squamous carcinoma cells can be significantly inhibited by the biological activity of caffeic acid.

  11. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON HORIZONTAL COMBUSTION TECHNIQUE FOR BITUMINOUS COAL BRIQUET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路春美; 程世庆; 邵延玲; 张晔

    1997-01-01

    Through a lot of experiments, a new kind of stove using horizontal combustion technique for bituminous coal briquet has been developed. Making use of this stove, studies have been made on burning process of bituminous coal briquet, distribution of temperature field in the stove, the regularities of evolution and combustion of volatile matter, the burning rate and efficiency of bituminous coal briquet, characteristics of fire-sealing and sulfur-retention. The results show that, with the technique, some achievements can be obtained in combustion of bituminous coal briquet, such as lower pollution that the flue gas black degree is below 0.5R and dust concentration is below 90mg/m3 . The stove's combustion efficiency reaches 90%, sulfur fixing efficiency is 60%, and CO concentration is decreased by 40% compared with other traditional stoves. With so many advantages, the stove can be used extensively in civil stoves and smaller industrial boilers.

  12. Coal Combustion Products Extension Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarunjit S. Butalia; William E. Wolfe

    2006-01-11

    This final project report presents the activities and accomplishments of the ''Coal Combustion Products Extension Program'' conducted at The Ohio State University from August 1, 2000 to June 30, 2005 to advance the beneficial uses of coal combustion products (CCPs) in highway and construction, mine reclamation, agricultural, and manufacturing sectors. The objective of this technology transfer/research program at The Ohio State University was to promote the increased use of Ohio CCPs (fly ash, FGD material, bottom ash, and boiler slag) in applications that are technically sound, environmentally benign, and commercially competitive. The project objective was accomplished by housing the CCP Extension Program within The Ohio State University College of Engineering with support from the university Extension Service and The Ohio State University Research Foundation. Dr. Tarunjit S. Butalia, an internationally reputed CCP expert and registered professional engineer, was the program coordinator. The program coordinator acted as liaison among CCP stakeholders in the state, produced information sheets, provided expertise in the field to those who desired it, sponsored and co-sponsored seminars, meetings, and speaking at these events, and generally worked to promote knowledge about the productive and proper application of CCPs as useful raw materials. The major accomplishments of the program were: (1) Increase in FGD material utilization rate from 8% in 1997 to more than 20% in 2005, and an increase in overall CCP utilization rate of 21% in 1997 to just under 30% in 2005 for the State of Ohio. (2) Recognition as a ''voice of trust'' among Ohio and national CCP stakeholders (particularly regulatory agencies). (3) Establishment of a national and international reputation, especially for the use of FGD materials and fly ash in construction applications. It is recommended that to increase Ohio's CCP utilization rate from 30% in 2005 to

  13. Model analysis for combustion characteristics of RDF pellet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Fundamental studies of the combustion characteristics and the de-HCl behavior of a single refuse-derived fuel(RDF) pellet were carried out to explain the de-HCl phenomena of RDF during fluidized bed combustion and to provide data for the development of high efficiency power generation technology using RDF previously. For further interpreting the devolatilization and the char combustion processes of RDF quantitatively, an unsteady combustion model for single RDF pellet, involving reaction rates, heat transfer and oxygen diffusion in the RDF pellet, was developed. Comparisons of simulation results with experimental data for mass loss of the RDF samples made from municipal solid waste, wood chips and poly-propylene when they were heated at 10K/min or put into the furnace under 1073K show the verifiability of the model. Using this model, the distributions of the temperature and the reaction ratio along the radius of RDF pellet during the devolatilization process and the char combustion process were presented, and discussion about the inference of heating rate on the combustion characteristics were performed.

  14. Modelling of fuel spray and combustion in diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huttunen, M.T.; Kaario, O.T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    Fuel spray and air motion characteristics and combustion in direct injection (DI) diesel engines was studied using computational models of the commercial CFD-code FIRE. Physical subprocesses modelled included Lagrangian spray droplet movement and behaviour (atomisation, evaporation and interaction of spray droplets) and combustion of evaporated liquid spray in the gas phase. Fuel vapour combustion rate was described by the model of Magnussen and Hjertager. The standard k,{epsilon}-model was used for turbulence. In order to be able to predict combustion accurately, the fuel spray penetration should be predicted with reasonable accuracy. In this study, the standard drag coefficient had to be reduced in order to match the computed penetration to the measured one. In addition, the constants in the submodel describing droplet breakup also needed to be adjusted for closer agreement with the measurements. The characteristic time scale of fuel consumption rate k/C{sub R} {epsilon} strongly influenced the heat release and in-cylinder pressure. With a value around 2.0 to 5.0 for C{sub R}, the computed in-cylinder pressure during the compression stroke agreed quite well with the measurements. On the other hand, the in-cylinder pressure was underpredicted during the expansion stroke. This is partly due to the fact that hydrocarbon fuel combustion was modelled as a one-step reaction reading to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O and inadequate description of the mixing of reactants and combustion products. (author) 16 refs.

  15. The combustion behavior of large scale lithium titanate battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peifeng; Wang, Qingsong; Li, Ke; Ping, Ping; Sun, Jinhua

    2015-01-01

    Safety problem is always a big obstacle for lithium battery marching to large scale application. However, the knowledge on the battery combustion behavior is limited. To investigate the combustion behavior of large scale lithium battery, three 50 Ah Li(NixCoyMnz)O2/Li4Ti5O12 batteries under different state of charge (SOC) were heated to fire. The flame size variation is depicted to analyze the combustion behavior directly. The mass loss rate, temperature and heat release rate are used to analyze the combustion behavior in reaction way deeply. Based on the phenomenon, the combustion process is divided into three basic stages, even more complicated at higher SOC with sudden smoke flow ejected. The reason is that a phase change occurs in Li(NixCoyMnz)O2 material from layer structure to spinel structure. The critical temperatures of ignition are at 112–121°C on anode tab and 139 to 147°C on upper surface for all cells. But the heating time and combustion time become shorter with the ascending of SOC. The results indicate that the battery fire hazard increases with the SOC. It is analyzed that the internal short and the Li+ distribution are the main causes that lead to the difference. PMID:25586064

  16. Manifold methods for methane combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, B.; Pope, S.B. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Great progresses have been made in combustion research, especially, the computation of laminar flames and the probability density function (PDF) method in turbulent combustion. For one-dimensional laminar flames, by considering the transport mechanism, the detailed chemical kinetic mechanism and the interactions between these two basic processes, today it is a routine matter to calculate flame velocities, extinction, ignition, temperature, and species distributions from the governing equations. Results are in good agreement with those obtained for experiments. However, for turbulent combustion, because of the complexities of turbulent flow, chemical reactions, and the interaction between them, in the foreseeable future, it is impossible to calculate the combustion flow field by directly integrating the basic governing equations. So averaging and modeling are necessary in turbulent combustion studies. Averaging, on one hand, simplifies turbulent combustion calculations, on the other hand, it introduces the infamous closure problems, especially the closure problem with chemical reaction terms. Since in PDF calculations of turbulent combustion, the averages of the chemical reaction terms can be calculated, PDF methods overcome the closure problem with the reaction terms. It has been shown that the PDF method is a most promising method to calculate turbulent combustion. PDF methods have been successfully employed to calculate laboratory turbulent flames: they can predict phenomena such as super equilibrium radical levels, and local extinction. Because of these advantages, PDF methods are becoming used increasingly in industry combustor codes.

  17. Effect of ash content on the combustion process of simulated MSW in the fixed bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui; Ismail, Tamer M; Ren, Xiaohan; Abd El-Salam, M

    2016-02-01

    This paper experimentally and numerically investigates the effects of ash content on the combustion process of simulated Municipal Solid Waste (MSW). A fixed-bed experimental reactor was utilized to reveal the combustion characteristics. Temperature distributions, ignition front velocity, and the characteristics of gas species' release were measured and simulated during the combustion process. In the present work, the two-dimensional unsteady mathematical heterogeneous model was developed to simulate the combustion process in the bed, including the process rate model as well as NOx production model. The simulation results in the bed are accordant with the experimental results. The results show that as ash content increases, the lower burning rate of fuel results in char particles leaving the grate without being fully burned, causing a loss of combustible material in the MSW in a fixed bed and therefore reducing the combustion efficiency and increasing the burning time of the MSW. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Combustion & Laser Diagnostics Research Complex (CLDRC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Combustion and Laser Diagnostics Research Complex (CLRDC) supports the experimental and computational study of fundamental combustion phenomena to...

  19. Combustion of bulk titanium in oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A. F.; Moulder, J. C.; Runyan, C. C.

    1975-01-01

    The combustion of bulk titanium in one atmosphere oxygen is studied using laser ignition and several analytical techniques. These were high-speed color cinematography, time and space resolved spectra in the visible region, metallography (including SEM) of specimens quenched in argon gas, X-ray and chemical product analyses, and a new optical technique, the Hilbert transform method. The cinematographic application of this technique for visualizing phase objects in the combustion zone is described. The results indicate an initial vapor phase reaction immediately adjacent to the molten surface but as the oxygen uptake progresses the evaporation approaches the point of congruency and a much reduced evaporation rate. This and the accumulation of the various soluble oxides soon drive the reaction zone below the surface where gas formation causes boiling and ejection of particles. The buildup of rutile cuts off the oxygen supply and the reaction ceases.

  20. Oxy-Fuel Combustion of Coal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Jacob

    This Ph.D. thesis describes an experimental and modeling investigation of the thermal conversion of coal and an experimental investigation of the emission of NO from char combustion in O2/N2 and O2/CO2 atmospheres. The motivation for the work has been the prospective use of the technology “Oxy...... the experiments. Devolatilization experiments showed that the volatile weight loss was not affected by the change from N2 to CO2. Analysis by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of sampled char did not reveal differences between the two atmospheres either. Char...... gasification though using only EFR-char devolatilized at 1273 K, 1473 K and 1573 K due to a lack of samples. Interestingly, it was found that devolatilization temperature did not affect the gasification rate constant. A detailed COal COmbustion MOdel (COCOMO) encompassing among others the three char...

  1. Supercritical droplet combustion and related transport phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Vigor; Hsieh, K. C.; Shuen, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of recent advances in theoretical analyses of supercritical droplet vaporization and combustion is conducted. Both hydrocarbon and cryogenic liquid droplets over a wide range of thermodynamic states are considered. Various important high-pressure effects on droplet behavior, such as thermodynamic non-ideality, transport anomaly, and property variation, are reviewed. Results indicate that the ambient gas pressure exerts significant control of droplet gasification and burning processes through its influence on fluid transport, gas-liquid interfacial thermodynamics, and chemical reactions. The droplet gasification rate increases progressively with pressure. However, the data for the overall burnout time exhibit a considerable change in the combustion mechanism at the criticl pressure, mainly as a result of reduced mass diffusivity and latent heat of vaporization with increased pressure. The influence of droplet size on the burning characteristics is also noted.

  2. Studying the specific features pertinent to combustion of chars obtained from coals having different degrees of metamorphism and biomass chars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestsennyi, I. V.; Shchudlo, T. S.; Dunaevskaya, N. I.; Topal, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    Better conditions for igniting low-reaction coal (anthracite) can be obtained, higher fuel burnout ratio can be achieved, and the problem of shortage of a certain grade of coal can be solved by firing coal mixtures and by combusting coal jointly with solid biomass in coal-fired boilers. Results from studying the synergetic effect that had been revealed previously during the combustion of coal mixtures in flames are presented. A similar effect was also obtained during joint combustion of coal and wood in a flame. The kinetics pertinent to combustion of char mixtures obtained from coals characterized by different degrees of metamorphism and the kinetics pertinent to combustion of wood chars were studied on the RSK-1D laboratory setup. It was found from the experiments that the combustion rate of char mixtures obtained from coals having close degrees of metamorphism is equal to the value determined as a weighted mean rate with respect to the content of carbon. The combustion rate of char mixtures obtained from coals having essentially different degrees of metamorphism is close to the combustion rate of more reactive coal initially in the process and to the combustion rate of less reactive coal at the end of the process. A dependence of the specific burnout rate of carbon contained in the char of two wood fractions on reciprocal temperature in the range 663—833 K is obtained. The combustion mode of an experimental sample is determined together with the reaction rate constant and activation energy.

  3. FastMG: a simple, fast, and accurate maximum likelihood procedure to estimate amino acid replacement rate matrices from large data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Cuong Cao; Le, Vinh Sy; Gascuel, Olivier; Hazes, Bart; Le, Quang Si

    2014-10-24

    Amino acid replacement rate matrices are a crucial component of many protein analysis systems such as sequence similarity search, sequence alignment, and phylogenetic inference. Ideally, the rate matrix reflects the mutational behavior of the actual data under study; however, estimating amino acid replacement rate matrices requires large protein alignments and is computationally expensive and complex. As a compromise, sub-optimal pre-calculated generic matrices are typically used for protein-based phylogeny. Sequence availability has now grown to a point where problem-specific rate matrices can often be calculated if the computational cost can be controlled. The most time consuming step in estimating rate matrices by maximum likelihood is building maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees from protein alignments. We propose a new procedure, called FastMG, to overcome this obstacle. The key innovation is the alignment-splitting algorithm that splits alignments with many sequences into non-overlapping sub-alignments prior to estimating amino acid replacement rates. Experiments with different large data sets showed that the FastMG procedure was an order of magnitude faster than without splitting. Importantly, there was no apparent loss in matrix quality if an appropriate splitting procedure is used. FastMG is a simple, fast and accurate procedure to estimate amino acid replacement rate matrices from large data sets. It enables researchers to study the evolutionary relationships for specific groups of proteins or taxa with optimized, data-specific amino acid replacement rate matrices. The programs, data sets, and the new mammalian mitochondrial protein rate matrix are available at http://fastmg.codeplex.com.

  4. Mission Success for Combustion Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Karen J.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation describes how mission success for combustion experiments has been obtained in previous spaceflight experiments and how it will be obtained for future International Space Station (ISS) experiments. The fluids and combustion facility is a payload planned for the ISS. It is composed of two racks: the fluids Integrated rack and the Combustion INtegrated Rack (CIR). Requirements for the CIR were obtained from a set of combustion basis experiments that served as surrogates for later experiments. The process for experiments that fly on the ISS includes proposal selection, requirements and success criteria definition, science and engineering reviews, mission operations, and postflight operations. By following this process, the microgravity combustion science program has attained success in 41 out of 42 experiments.

  5. Effect of Arachidonic Acid on the Rate of Oxygen Consumption in Isolated Cardiomyocytes from Intact Rats and Animals with Ischemic or Diabetic Injury to the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, M V; Kutsykova, T V; Afanas'ev, S A; Popov, S V

    2015-12-01

    We studied the rate of oxygen consumption by isolated cardiomyocytes from intact rats and animals with experimental myocardial infarction or streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus. The measurements were performed in standard incubation medium under various conditions of oxygenation and after addition of arachidonic acid (20 μmol/liter). Under normoxic conditions, arachidonic acid improves respiration of cardiomyocytes from intact animals, but reduces this parameter in cells isolated from animals with pathologies. The intensity of O2 consumption by cardiomyocytes from intact rats and animals with pathologies was shown to decrease during hypoxia. Addition of arachidonic acid aggravated inhibition of respiration for cardiomyocytes from intact rats and specimens with myocardial infarction, but had no effect in diabetes mellitus. The effect of arachidonic acid on oxygen consumption rate is probably mediated by a nonspecific mechanism realized at the mitochondrial level.

  6. Effects of intake air temperature on homogenous charge compression ignition combustion and emissions with gasoline and n-heptane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jianyong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In a port fuel injection engine, Optimized kinetic process (OKP technology is implemented to realize HCCI combustion with dual-fuel injection. The effects of intake air temperature on HCCI combustion and emissions are investigated. The results show that dual-fuel control prolongs HCCI combustion duration and improves combustion stability. Dual-fuel HCCI combustion needs lower intake air temperature than gasoline HCCI combustion, which reduces the requirements on heat management system. As intake air temperature decreases, air charge increases and maximum pressure rising rate decreases. When intake air temperature is about 55ºC, HCCI combustion becomes worse and misfire happens. In fixed dual fuel content condition, HC and CO emission decreases as intake air temperature increases. The combination of dual-fuel injection and intake air temperature control can expand operation range of HCCI combustion.

  7. Influence of citric acid content on magnetic properties of BaFe12O19 powder prepared by sol-gel auto-combustion method%柠檬酸含量对溶胶凝胶自燃烧法制备的钡铁氧体磁性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟敏建; 徐国庆; 马洪良; 周炯; 岳中岳; 何正明

    2007-01-01

    BaFe12O19 powders with nanocrystalline sizes were produced by sol-gel auto-combustion method.The precursors were prepared under the molar ratios of citric acid to the metal nitrate of 0.5.1.0 and 1.5.Appropriate ethylene diamine C2HsN2)was added in order to adjust pH of 7.The ions distribution of citric acid at different pH explains the effect of citric acid in the starting solution.The XRD patterns of the as-burnt powders and annealing powders show different phases for different citric acid content.In addition,the lattice constants(a,c)derived from X-ray diffraction pattern were changed from 0.58881 nm to 0.58997 nm and 2.32057 nin to 2.32296 nm respectively.The data from VSM indicated that the powder with high citric acid content took on good magnetic properties.Pure single BaFe12O19 of the specific maximum magnetization M(1 T)≈49.73 Am2/kg,the specific remanent magnetization Mr≈30.77 Am2/kg and the coercive force Hc≈467 kA/m Was produced when the molar ratios of citric acid to the metal nitrate was 1.5.

  8. Turbulence, combustion, efficiency and emission measurements on a supercharged natural gas SI engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einewall, P.; Olsson, Magnus

    1996-08-01

    LDV was used to measure turbulence in six different combustion chambers for a natural gas operated TD102 Volvo truck engine. The efficiency and emissions were measured during supercharged lean operation. The combustion chambers were altered by using pistons with different crown geometries. Some of the load cases require supercharged operation of the engine. The cooling of the cylinder-head was therefore improved. Turbulence, combustion rate, emissions and efficiency was measured for four different piston design. 8 refs, figs

  9. A comparison of three pH control methods for revealing effects of undissociated butyric acid on specific butanol production rate in batch fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    pH control has been essential for butanol production with Clostridium acetobutylicum. However, it is not very clear at what pH level the acid crash will occur, at what pH level butanol production will be dominant, and at what pH level butyric acid production will be prevailing. Furthermore, contradictory results have been reported about required acidic conditions for initiation of solventogenesis. In this study, with the aim of further understanding the role of undissociated butyric acid in butanol production, we investigated the correlation between undissociated butyric acid concentration and specific butanol production rate in batch fermentation of Clostridium acetobutylicum by comparing three pH control approaches: NaOH neutralization (at 12, 24 or 36 h), CaCO3 supplementation (2, 5, or 8 g/l) and NaOAc buffering (pH 4.6, 5.0 or 5.6). By neutralizing the fermentation pH to ~5.0 at different time, we observed that neutralization should take place at the beginning of exponential phase (12 h), and otherwise resulting in lower concentrations of undissociated butyric acid, cell biomass and final butanol. CaCO3 supplementation extended cell growth to 36 h and resulted in higher butyrate yield under 8 g/L of CaCO3. In the NaOAc buffering, the highest specific butanol rate (0.58 h−1) was associated with the highest undissociated butyric acid (1.92 g/L). The linear correlation of the undissociated butyric acid with the specific butanol production rates suggested the undissociated butyric acid could be the major driving force for butanol production. PMID:23294525

  10. An experiment study of homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion and emission in a gasoline engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jianyong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI technology has exhibited high potential to reduce fuel consumption and NOx emissions over normal spark ignition engines significantly. Optimized kinetic process (OKP technology is implemented to realize HCCI combustion in a port fuel injection gasoline engine. The combustion and emission characteristics are investigated with variation of intake air temperature, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR rate and intake air pressure. The results show that intake air temperature has great influence on HCCI combustion characteristic. Increased intake air temperature results in advance combustion phase, shorten combustion duration, and lower indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP. Increased EGR rate retards combustion start phase and prolongs combustion duration, while maximum pressure rising rate and NOx emission are reduced with increase of EGR rate. In the condition with constant fuel flow quantity, increased air pressure leads to retarded combustion phase and lower pressure rising rate, which will reduce the engine knocking tendency. In the condition with constant air fuel ratio condition, fuel injection quantity increases as intake air pressure increases, which lead to high heat release rate and high emission level. The optimal intake air temperature varies in different operating area, which can be tuned from ambient temperature to 220℃ by heat management system. The combination of EGR and air boost technology could expand operating area of HCCI engine, which improve indicated mean effective pressure from maximum 510kPa to 720kPa.

  11. Correlation of film density and wet etch rate in hydrofluoric acid of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provine, J.; Schindler, Peter; Kim, Yongmin; Walch, Steve P.; Kim, Hyo Jin; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2016-06-01

    The continued scaling in transistors and memory elements has necessitated the development of atomic layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride (SiNx), particularly for use a low k dielectric spacer. One of the key material properties needed for SiNx films is a low wet etch rate (WER) in hydrofluoric (HF) acid. In this work, we report on the evaluation of multiple precursors for plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of SiNx and evaluate the film's WER in 100:1 dilutions of HF in H2O. The remote plasma capability available in PEALD, enabled controlling the density of the SiNx film. Namely, prolonged plasma exposure made films denser which corresponded to lower WER in a systematic fashion. We determined that there is a strong correlation between WER and the density of the film that extends across multiple precursors, PEALD reactors, and a variety of process conditions. Limiting all steps in the deposition to a maximum temperature of 350 °C, it was shown to be possible to achieve a WER in PEALD SiNx of 6.1 Å/min, which is similar to WER of SiNx from LPCVD reactions at 850 °C.

  12. Volatile fatty acids production from food waste: effects of pH, temperature, and organic loading rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianguo; Zhang, Yujing; Li, Kaimin; Wang, Quan; Gong, Changxiu; Li, Menglu

    2013-09-01

    The effects of pH, temperature, and organic loading rate (OLR) on the acidogenesis of food waste have been determined. The present study investigated their effects on soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), volatile fatty acids (VFAs), volatile solids (VS), and ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)-N). Both the concentration and yield of VFAs were highest at pH 6.0, acetate and butyrate accounted for 77% of total VFAs. VFAs concentration and the VFA/SCOD ratio were highest, and VS levels were lowest, at 45 °C, but the differences compared to the values at 35 °C were slight. The concentrations of VFAs, SCOD, and NH4(+)-N increased as OLR increased, whereas the yield of VFAs decreased from 0.504 at 5 g/Ld to 0.306 at 16 g/Ld. Acetate and butyrate accounted for 60% of total VFAs. The percentage of acetate and valerate increased as OLR increased, whereas a high OLR produced a lower percentage of propionate and butyrate.

  13. Correlation of film density and wet etch rate in hydrofluoric acid of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provine, J., E-mail: jprovine@stanford.edu; Schindler, Peter; Kim, Yongmin; Walch, Steve P.; Kim, Hyo Jin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Kim, Ki-Hyun [Manufacturing Technology Center, Samsung Electronics, Suwon, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea, Republic of); Prinz, Fritz B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The continued scaling in transistors and memory elements has necessitated the development of atomic layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}), particularly for use a low k dielectric spacer. One of the key material properties needed for SiN{sub x} films is a low wet etch rate (WER) in hydrofluoric (HF) acid. In this work, we report on the evaluation of multiple precursors for plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of SiN{sub x} and evaluate the film’s WER in 100:1 dilutions of HF in H{sub 2}O. The remote plasma capability available in PEALD, enabled controlling the density of the SiN{sub x} film. Namely, prolonged plasma exposure made films denser which corresponded to lower WER in a systematic fashion. We determined that there is a strong correlation between WER and the density of the film that extends across multiple precursors, PEALD reactors, and a variety of process conditions. Limiting all steps in the deposition to a maximum temperature of 350 °C, it was shown to be possible to achieve a WER in PEALD SiN{sub x} of 6.1 Å/min, which is similar to WER of SiN{sub x} from LPCVD reactions at 850 °C.

  14. Chloride, gluconate, sulfate, and short-chain fatty acids affect calcium flux rates across the sheep forestomach epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhard-Marek, S; Becker, G; Breves, G; Schröder, B

    2007-03-01

    In ruminants, more than 50% of overall gastrointestinal Ca absorption can occur preintestinally, and the anions of orally applied Ca salts are thought to play an important role in stimulating ruminal Ca absorption. This assumption is based mainly on ion-exchange studies that have used gluconate as the control anion, which may bind Ca2+ ions and interfere with treatment effects. In the present study, we investigated the distinct effects of different anions on Ca absorption across the sheep rumen and on the concentration of free Ca2+ ions ([Ca2+]ion). We showed that gluconate, sulfate, and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) remarkably reduced [Ca2+]ion in buffer solutions. Nevertheless, increasing the Cl or SCFA concentration by 60 mM stimulated net ruminal Ca absorption 5- to 7-fold, but these effects could be antagonized by gluconate. Therefore, ion-exchange experiments must be (re)evaluated very carefully, because changes in [Ca2+]ion in the presence of gluconate, sulfate, or SCFA not only might entail an underestimation of Ca flux rates, but also might have effects on other cellular pathways that are Ca2+ dependent. Concerning the optimal Ca supply for dairy cows, the present study suggests that CaCl2 formulations and Ca salts of the SCFA stimulate Ca absorption across the rumen wall and are beneficial in preventing or correcting a Ca deficiency.

  15. Correlation of film density and wet etch rate in hydrofluoric acid of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited silicon nitride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Provine

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The continued scaling in transistors and memory elements has necessitated the development of atomic layer deposition (ALD of silicon nitride (SiNx, particularly for use a low k dielectric spacer. One of the key material properties needed for SiNx films is a low wet etch rate (WER in hydrofluoric (HF acid. In this work, we report on the evaluation of multiple precursors for plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD of SiNx and evaluate the film’s WER in 100:1 dilutions of HF in H2O. The remote plasma capability available in PEALD, enabled controlling the density of the SiNx film. Namely, prolonged plasma exposure made films denser which corresponded to lower WER in a systematic fashion. We determined that there is a strong correlation between WER and the density of the film that extends across multiple precursors, PEALD reactors, and a variety of process conditions. Limiting all steps in the deposition to a maximum temperature of 350 °C, it was shown to be possible to achieve a WER in PEALD SiNx of 6.1 Å/min, which is similar to WER of SiNx from LPCVD reactions at 850 °C.

  16. Ameliorer les performances environnementales des centrales a charbon pulverise via la co-combustion de combustible derive de dechets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekemans, Odile Geraldine

    Coal supplies around 28% of the world's energy needs and produces some 40% of the world's electricity. In the United States, close to 650 coal power plants currently produce electricity from coal, the majority of witch are equipped with pulverized coal boilers build in the 80's. Due to coal's intrinsic content in nitrogen and sulfur, its combustion is associated with high levels of NOx and SO2 emissions, that are responsible, among other thing, for acid rains. In order to help reduce SO2 emissions of coal power plant, this thesis focuses on the behaviour of a novel feedstock called ReEF(TM) or ReEngineered Feedstock(TM), developed by the company Accordant Energy LLCRTM, that combines non recyclable waste and alkaline sorbent. Since waste have a high calorific value and do not contain sulfur, and since alkaline sorbents (such as limestone) are able to react with SO2 and capture it in solid state, co-combustion of ReEF(TM) and coal could reduce SO2 emissions inside the furnace chamber itself. This technology easy to implement, as it requires a limited initial investment and limited additional space, could help avoid the construction of costly flue gas treatment unit downstream from the furnace. However, careless combustion of this engineered fuel could have disastrous consequences for the coal power plant owners. This thesis, then, deliver one among the first experimental study of co-combustion of coal and ReEF(TM) in conditions characteristic of pulverized coal boilers. As a first step, in order to get familiarize with the feedstock under study, the thermal degradation of a ReEF(TM) without sorbent and of its components is analyzed by thermogravimetry. With the analysis of more than 70 samples at heating rates ranging from 5°C/min to 400°C/min we are able to conclude that ReEF(TM) thermal degradation can be seen as the independent thermal degradation of its components, as long as heat transfer limitations are taken into account. Thus, no substantial chemical

  17. Evaluation of biohydrogenation rate of canola vs. soya bean seeds as unsaturated fatty acids sources for ruminants in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashaei, S; Ghoorchi, T; Yamchi, A

    2016-04-01

    An experiment was conducted to study disappearance of C14 to C18 fatty acids, lag times and biohydrogenation (BH) rates of C18 fatty acids of ground soya bean and canola seeds in situ. Three ruminally fistulated Dallagh sheep were used to determine ruminal BH of unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs). Differences in the disappearance of fatty acids through the bags and lag times were observed between the oilseeds. We saw that the longer the incubation time of the oilseeds in the rumen, the lower the content of C18:2 and C18:3. Significantly higher lag times for both C18:2 and C18:3 were observed in ground canola compared to ground soya bean. BH rates of C18:2 and C18:3 fatty acids in soya bean were three times higher than those of canola. These results suggest that the fatty acid profile of fat source can affect the BH of UFAs by rumen micro-organisms. So that UFAs of canola had higher ability to escape from ruminal BH. It seems that fatty acid profile of ruminant products is more affected by canola seed compared to soya bean seed. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Novel approaches in advanced combustion characterization of fuels for advanced pressurized combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, M.; Haemaelaeinen, J.; Joutsenoja, T. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    The objective of the research was to produce results of the effects of pressure and other parameters on the combustion of pulverized coals using both experimental and theoretical methods. The results can be utilized to model pressurized combustion and to plan pilot-scale reactors. The studied coals were Polish hvb coal, French lignite (Gardanne), German anthracite (Niederberg) and German (Gottelborn) hvb coal. Anthracite was selected, because the theoretical studies predicted maximum pressure effect to be found for anthracite-type coals (with low reactivity and low content of volatiles). The pulverized coal samples were combusted in an electrically heated, pressurized entrained flow reactor (PEFR), experimental conditions were controlled with high precision. The studied particle size fractions were 100-125 {mu}m and 140-180{mu}m for anthracite and 140-180{mu}m for the other coals. Combustion rates and temperatures of burning particles were studied. A pyrometric method measured particle sizes. Experimental planning was done and the results were handled with multivariable partial least squares (PLS) method. Gas temperature varied from 1073 K to 1473 K and pressure from 0.2 MPa to 0.8 Mpa. The other variables were PO{sub 2} and PCO{sub 2}. Some of the experiments were carried out at conditions prevailing during flue gas recirculation. Experimental and theoretical studies showed that increasing gas pressure at constant gas composition most strongly increases the combustion rate of less reactive coals, which are difficult to burn in atmospheric pulverized boilers. The effect of pressure increase was greatest near 0.1 MPa and less at higher pressure. The limit value of P after which increase in pressure has no effect varies between different coals. With small particles, the effect of P is stronger and can be seen at higher pressure than with larger particles of the same coal. 4 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Pyrolysis and combustion behaviour of coal-MBM blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skodras, G; Grammelis, P; Basinas, P

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, thermogravimetric analysis was employed in order to investigate the behaviour of MBM and their blends with Greek brown coal, under pyrolysis and combustion conditions. MBM presented enhanced pyrolysis rates reflecting its high volatile and low ash contents compared to Greek brown coal. Increased conversion rates were observed when MBM was added in the brown coal sample. Significant interactions were detected between the two fuel blend components leading to significant deviations from the expected behaviour. The catalytic effect of mineral matter on the pyrolysis of MBM resulted in reaction rate decrease and DTG curve shift to lower temperatures for the demineralised MBM. Alterations in the combustion process due to the mineral matter were minimal when testing the blends. Interactions maintained during combustion and lower reactivity of MBM was achieved due to the reduced oxygen content.

  20. Pyrolysis and combustion behaviour of coal-MBM blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skodras, G.; Grammelis, P.; Basinas, P. [Center for Research & Technology Hellas, Ptolemais (Greece)

    2007-01-15

    In the present work, thermogravimetric analysis was employed in order to investigate the behaviour of MBM (meat and bone meal) and their blends with Greek brown coal, under pyrolysis and combustion conditions. MBM presented enhanced pyrolysis rates reflecting its high volatile and low ash contents compared to Greek brown coal. Increased conversion rates were observed when MBM was added in the brown coal sample. Significant interactions were detected between the two fuel blend components leading to significant deviations from the expected behaviour. The catalytic effect of mineral matter on the pyrolysis of MBM resulted in reaction rate decrease and DTG curve shift to lower temperatures for the demineralised MBM. Alterations in the combustion process due to the mineral matter were minimal when testing the blends. Interactions maintained during combustion and lower reactivity of MBM was achieved due to the reduced oxygen content.

  1. The first turbulent combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H

    2005-01-01

    The first turbulent combustion arises in a hot big bang cosmological model Gibson (2004) where nonlinear exothermic turbulence permitted by quantum mechanics, general relativity, multidimensional superstring theory, and fluid mechanics cascades from Planck to strong force freeze out scales with gravity balancing turbulent inertial-vortex forces. Interactions between Planck scale spinning and non-spinning black holes produce high Reynolds number turbulence and temperature mixing with huge Reynolds stresses driving the rapid inflation of space. Kolmogorovian turbulent temperature patterns are fossilized as strong-force exponential inflation stretches them beyond the scale of causal connection ct where c is light speed and t is time. Fossil temperature turbulence patterns seed nucleosynthesis, and then hydro-gravitational structure formation in the plasma epoch, Gibson (1996, 2000). Evidence about formation mechanisms is preserved by cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies. CMB spectra indicate hydr...

  2. Absolute in vivo translation rates of individual codons in Escherichia coli: The two glutamic acid codons GAA and GAG are translated with a threefold difference in rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M.A.; Pedersen, Steen

    1991-01-01

    We have determined the absolute translation rates for four individual codons in Escherichia coli. We used our previously described system for direct measurements of in vivo translation rates using small, in-frame inserts in the lacZ gene. The inserts consisted of multiple synthetic 30 base-pair D...

  3. Filtration combustion: Smoldering and SHS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matkowsky, Bernard J.

    1995-01-01

    Smolder waves and SHS (self-propagating high-temperature synthesis) waves are both examples of combustion waves propagating in porous media. When delivery of reactants through the pores to the reaction site is an important aspect of the process, it is referred to as filtration combustion. The two types of filtration combustion have a similar mathematical formulation, describing the ignition, propagation and extinction of combustion waves in porous media. The goal in each case, however, is different. In smoldering the desired goal is to prevent propagation, whereas in SHS the goal is to insure propagation of the combustion wave, leading to the synthesis of desired products. In addition, the scales in the two areas of application may well differ. For example, smoldering generally occurs at a relatively low temperature and with a smaller propagation velocity than SHS filtration combustion waves. Nevertheless, the two areas of application have much in common, so that mechanisms learned about in one application can be used to advantage in the other. In this paper we discuss recent results in the areas of filtration combustion.

  4. Combustion Properties of Straw Briquettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Qing-ling

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The low bulk density of straw is one of the major barriers, which blocks the collection, handling, transportation and storage. Densification of biomass into briquettes/pellets is a suitable method of increasing the bulk density of biomass. Yet in the process, a tremendous amount of air is ejected from biomass grind, which brings substantial specific variation including combustion property. Among them, combustion property is critical for proper design and operation of burning facilities. Therefore, a series of tests about combustion properties of 75mm diameter corn briquettes were done. First, the combustion process (ignition, full flaming and glowing phases., precipitation of tar were investigated by a heating stove, then, Some ash sample from the muffle burner was subjected to an ash melting characteristic test. The results show the combustion of briquettes takes more time than that of raw straw from ignition to complete combustion; in order to meet complete combustion in a short time, the raw straw needs more supply air volume than briquettes under the same α value; the temperature of furnace chamber should been controlled under 900°C, which help to reduce the dark smoke, tar and slag.

  5. N sub 2 O formation in combustion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1989-08-01

    The objective of this project is to characterize N{sub 2}O emissions from combustion sources emphasizing N{sub 2}O emissions from post-combustion selective gas phase NO{sub x} reduction processes and reburning. The processes to be evaluated include ammonia, cyanuric acid, urea injection and reburning. The project includes pilot-scale testing at two facilities supported by chemical kinetic modeling. Testing will be performed on both a gas-fired plug flow combustor and a pulverized-coal fired combustor. Work performed has included the performance of preliminary chemical kinetics calculations. 10 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Heart rate variability and n-3 fatty acids in patients with chronic renal failure--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, J H; Aarøe, J; Knudsen, N; Dideriksen, K; Kornerup, H J; Dyerberg, J; Schmidt, E B

    1998-02-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) often have autonomic cardiac dysfunction, which can be assessed by measuring heart rate variability (HRV). This dysfunction prediposes the patients to sudden cardiac death. This study describes 24-hour HRV in patients with CRF compared to HRV in patients with a previous myocardial infarction (MI). Furthermore, associations between HRV in patients with CRF and the content of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in cell membranes were examined, because n-3 PUFA may improve HRV. Twenty-nine patients with CRF treated with dialysis were enrolled. A 24-hour Holter recording was obtained at baseline and the HRV variables, RR (= mean of all normal RR intervals during the 24-hour recording) and SDNN (= standard deviation of all normal RR intervals in the entire 24-hour recording) were analyzed. Also, granulocyte fatty acid composition was determined. The patients were allocated to dietary supplementation with either 5.2 g of n-3 PUFA or a placebo oil (olive oil) daily for 12 weeks in a double-blind design. At the end of the supplementation period the Holter recording and blood sampling were repeated. At baseline the CRF patients' mean SDNN ws 86 ms compared to 118 ms (p < 0.01) in patients with a previous MI. After supplementation with either n-3 PUFA or placebo a highly significant correlation was observed between the content of n-3 PUFA in cell membranes and HRV (r = 0.71, p < 0.01). Furthermore, when the patients were dichotomized according to their mean SDNN, it was found, that those with the highest SDNN had a higher content of n-3 PUFA in cell membranes compared to those with the lowest SDNN (7.8% vs 4.2%, p < 0.05). In conclusion, HRV was decreased in CRF patients indicating a cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. The positive correlation between the n-3 PUFA content in cell membranes and HRV suggests that the effects of an increased intake of n-3 PUFA in CRF patients should be further studied.

  7. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  8. Computational Study of Stratified Combustion in an Optical Diesel Engine

    KAUST Repository

    Jaasim, Mohammed

    2017-03-28

    Full cycle simulations of KAUST optical diesel engine were conducted in order to provide insights into the details of fuel spray, mixing, and combustion characteristics at different start of injection (SOI) conditions. Although optical diagnostics provide valuable information, the high fidelity simulations with matched parametric conditions improve fundamental understanding of relevant physical and chemical processes by accessing additional observables such as the local mixture distribution, intermediate species concentrations, and detailed chemical reaction rates. Commercial software, CONVERGE™, was used as the main simulation tool, with the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence model and the multi-zone (SAGE) combustion model to compute the chemical reaction terms. SOI is varied from late compression ignition (CI) to early partially premixed combustion (PPC) conditions. The simulation results revealed a stronger correlation between fuel injection timing and combustion phasing for late SOI conditions, whereas the combustion phasing starts to decouple from SOI for early SOI cases. The predictions are consistent with the experimental observations, in terms of the overall trends in combustion and emission characteristics, while the high fidelity simulations provided further insights into the effects of mixture stratifications resulting from different SOI conditions.

  9. Numerical Analysis on Combustion Characteristic of Leaf Spring Rotary Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to investigate combustion characteristics for rotary engine via numerical studies. A 3D numerical model was developed to study the influence of several operative parameters on combustion characteristics. A novel rotary engine called, “Leaf Spring Rotary Engine”, was used to illustrate the structure and principle of the engine. The aims are to (1 improve the understanding of combustion process, and (2 quantify the influence of rotational speed, excess air ratio, initial pressure and temperature on combustion characteristics. The chamber space changed with crankshaft rotation. Due to the complexity of chamber volume, an equivalent modeling method was presented to simulate the chamber space variation. The numerical simulations were performed by solving the incompressible, multiphase Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes Equations via the commercial code FLUENT using a transport equation-based combustion model; a realizable  turbulence model and finite-rate/eddy-dissipation model were used to account for the effect of local factors on the combustion characteristics.

  10. Internal and Surface Phenomena in Heterogenous Metal Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreizin, Edward L.

    1997-01-01

    The phenomenon of gas dissolution in burning metals was observed in recent metal combustion studies, but it could not be adequately explained by the traditional metal combustion models. The research reported here addresses heterogeneous metal combustion with emphasis on the processes of oxygen penetration inside burning metal and its influence on the metal combustion rate, temperature history, and disruptive burning. The unique feature of this work is the combination of the microgravity environment with a novel micro-arc generator of monodispersed metal droplets, ensuring repeatable formation and ignition of uniform metal droplets with a controllable initial temperature and velocity. Burning droplet temperature is measured in real time with a three wavelength pyrometer. In addition, particles are rapidly quenched at different combustion times, cross-sectioned, and examined using SEM-based techniques to retrieve the internal composition history of burning metal particles. When the initial velocity of a spherical particle is nearly zero, the microgravity environment makes it possible to study the flame structure, the development of flame nonsymmetry, and correlation of the flame shape with the heterogeneous combustion processes.

  11. On Lean Turbulent Combustion Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin LEVENTIU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a lean methane-air flame with different chemical reaction mechanisms, for laminar and turbulent combustion, approached as one and bi-dimensional problem. The numerical results obtained with Cantera and Ansys Fluent software are compared with experimental data obtained at CORIA Institute, France. First, for laminar combustion, the burn temperature is very well approximated for all chemical mechanisms, however major differences appear in the evaluation of the flame front thickness. Next, the analysis of turbulence-combustion interaction shows that the numerical predictions are suficiently accurate for small and moderate turbulence intensity.

  12. Regulation possibilities of biomass combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzdalenko, Vera; Gedrovics, Martins; Zake, Maija; Barmina, Inesa

    2012-11-01

    The focus of the recent experimental research is to analyze the regulation possibilities of biomass combustion. Three possibilities were chosen as part of this research: a) biomass cofiring with propane, b) swirling flow with re-circulation zone, and c) use of a permanent magnet. The aim of the research is to provide stable, controllable and effective biomass combustion with minimum emissions. The special pilot device was created where biomass can be combusted separately and co-fired with propane. Wood pellets were used during the experiments.

  13. Combustion-gas recirculation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean

    2007-10-09

    A combustion-gas recirculation system has a mixing chamber with a mixing-chamber inlet and a mixing-chamber outlet. The combustion-gas recirculation system may further include a duct connected to the mixing-chamber inlet. Additionally, the combustion-gas recirculation system may include an open inlet channel with a solid outer wall. The open inlet channel may extend into the mixing chamber such that an end of the open inlet channel is disposed between the mixing-chamber inlet and the mixing-chamber outlet. Furthermore, air within the open inlet channel may be at a pressure near or below atmospheric pressure.

  14. Higher baseline serum uric acid is associated with poorer cognition but not rates of cognitive decline in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannorsdall, Tracy D; Kueider, Alexandra M; Carlson, Michelle C; Schretlen, David J

    2014-12-01

    Serum uric acid is a powerful antioxidant that may have neuroprotective properties. While some studies have found that greater serum uric acid is associated with better cognition in older adults, it is also associated with numerous vascular risk factors that increase risk for dementia. Women may also be particularly vulnerable to the vascular effects of elevated uric acid. We previously found that mildly elevated serum uric acid is a biomarker of cognitive dysfunction in older adults, and that this likely is mediated by cerebral ischemic burden. Here we examine both cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between serum uric acid and declines in cognition and functioning in 423 cognitively healthy community-dwelling older women in the Women's Health and Aging Study (WHAS II). We hypothesized that higher serum uric acid would be associated with poorer concurrent functioning and greater declines over 9 years. In linear regression analyses, higher baseline serum uric acid was associated with poorer working memory, with a trend toward slower manual speed and dexterity before and after adjusting for baseline serum uric acid, demographic and health/cardiovascular variables. However, there were no associations for global cognitive functioning, learning/memory, sequencing, verbal fluency, or visuoconstruction. Mixed effects models also revealed no association with subsequent cognitive declines. Future research should examine changes in serum uric acid at earlier periods in the lifespan and their relationships with later cognitive declines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. THE COMBUSTION ACTION VERIFICATION AND ESTIMATE OF COMBUSTION EFFICIENCY IN AVIATION GAS#TURBINE ENGINE COMBUSTION CHAMBERS

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Verification results of combustion action simulating and estimate of calculation combustion efficiency that was given by simulating were shown. Mathematical model and its assumption are described. Execution calculations method was shown. Results of simulating are shown; their comparative analyses with results of experiment were executed. Accuracy of combustion action mathematical modeling by combustion efficiency in model with oneand two-stage reactions of combustion was estimated. The infere...

  16. Measures for a quality combustion (combustion chamber exit and downstream); Mesures pour une combustion de qualite (sortie de chambre de combustion et en aval)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epinat, G. [APAVE Lyonnaise, 69 (France)

    1996-12-31

    After a review of the different pollutants related to the various types of stationary and mobile combustion processes (stoichiometric, reducing and oxidizing combustion), measures and analyses than may be used to ensure the quality and efficiency of combustion processes are reviewed: opacimeters, UV analyzers, etc. The regulation and control equipment for combustion systems are then listed, according to the generator capacity level

  17. Computational Modeling of Turbulent Spray Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, L.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the research presented in this thesis is development and validation of predictive models or modeling approaches of liquid fuel combustion (spray combustion) in hot-diluted environments, known as flameless combustion or MILD combustion. The goal is to combine good physical insight,

  18. Computational Modeling of Turbulent Spray Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, L.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the research presented in this thesis is development and validation of predictive models or modeling approaches of liquid fuel combustion (spray combustion) in hot-diluted environments, known as flameless combustion or MILD combustion. The goal is to combine good physical insight, a

  19. Engine emissions and combustion analysis of biodiesel from East African countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Maina

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Environmental, availability and financial problems associated with fossil fuels encourage the manufacture and use of biodiesel. In this study, vegetable oil was extracted from Jatropha curcas seeds sourced from Kenya and Tanzania. A two-step acid base catalytic transesterification process was used to produce biodiesel because of the amount of free fatty acids present in the oil. The test rig used in the experiments was an Audi, 1.9-litre, turbocharged direct injection, compression ignition engine. Emissions were measured using an Horiba emission analyser system while combustion data was collected by a data acquisition system, from which cylinder pressure and rate of heat release of the test engine in every crank angle were calculated. The two biodiesels showed better emission characteristics than the fossil diesel included in the tests for comparison purposes. Cylinder pressure and heat release of the biodiesel were also within acceptable ranges. However, the emission and combustion characteristics differed between the two biodiesels a result likely related to their different origins. These findings prove that the source of biodiesel is an important factor to consider.

  20. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  1. Combustible and incombustible speciation of Cl and S in various components of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Yamamoto, Osamu; Sakai, Mamoru; Fukuyama, Johji

    2004-01-01

    Chlorine (Cl) and sulfur (S) in municipal solid waste (MSW) are important reactive elements during combustion. They generate the acidic pollutants HCl and SOx, and, furthermore, produce and suppress organic chlorinated compounds. Nevertheless, few practical reports about Cl and S content in MSW have been published. In combustion and recycling processes, both combustible Cl and S, and incombustible Cl and S species are equally important. This paper presents the results of a comprehensive study about combustible and incombustible Cl and S in MSW components, including kitchen garbage, paper, textiles, wood and leaves, plastics and small chips. By integrating this collected data with data about MSW composition, not only the overall content of Cl and S in MSW, but also the origins of both combustible and incombustible Cl and S were estimated. The average Cl content in bulk MSW was 3.7 g/kg of raw MSW, of which 2.7 and 1.0 g/kg were combustible and incombustible, respectively. The Cl contribution from plastics was 76% and 27% with respect to combustible and incombustible states. The average S content in bulk MSW was 0.81 g/kg of raw MSW, of which 0.46 g/kg was combustible and 0.35 g/kg was incombustible. Combustible S was mainly due to synthetic textiles, while incombustible S was primarily from paper.

  2. Evolution of Submicrometer Organic Aerosols during a Complete Residential Coal Combustion Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Jiang, Jingkun; Duan, Lei; Hao, Jiming

    2016-07-19

    In the absence of particulate matter (PM) control devices, residential coal combustion contributes significantly to ambient PM pollution. Characterizing PM emissions from residential coal combustion with high time resolution is beneficial for developing control policies and evaluating the environmental impact of PM. This study reports the evolution of submicrometer organic aerosols (OA) during a complete residential coal combustion process, that is, from fire start to fire extinction. Three commonly used coal types (bituminous, anthracite, and semicoke coals) were evaluated in a typical residential stove in China. For all three types of coal, the OA emission exhibited distinct characteristics in the four stages, that is, ignition, fierce combustion, relatively stable combustion, and ember combustion. OA emissions during the ignition stage accounted for 58.2-85.4% of the total OA emission of a complete combustion process. The OA concentration decreased rapidly during the fierce combustion stage and remained low during the relatively stable combustion stage. During these two stages, a significant ion peak of m/z 73 from organic acids were observed. The degree of oxidation of the OA increased from the first stage to the last stage. Implications for ambient OA source-apportionment and residential PM emission characterization and control are discussed.

  3. Effects of Coal Combustion Additives on the Forms and Recovery of Uranium in Coal Bottom Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ye; Li, Yilian

    2017-04-01

    Recovering uranium from uranium-rich coal ash is an important way to utilize unconventional uranium resource. Although it might be expected that the uranium in residual form would prevent uranium recovery from coal ash, raising the recovery rate in way of controlling residual uranium has not yet been studied. In this study, three different kinds of combustion promoting additives were investigated by coal combustion experiments, in order to decrease the proportion of residual-form uranium in ash and increase the acid leaching rate. Analytical procedures included Tessier sequential extraction, acidleaching, and characterization(ICP-MS, XRF, BET and SEM-EDS). It was showed that the effects of additives in reducing residual uranium were as the following order: alkaline earth metal compounds > transition metal compounds> alkali metal compounds. Adding alkali metal additives(KCl, NaCl, K2CO3, Na2CO3) raised the percentage of residual uranium largely. Additionally, one transition metal additive(Fe2O3) reached a decreasing amplitude of 5.15%, while the other two additives(MnO2 and Fe3O4)made the rates increased. However, coal combustion with alkaline earth metal compounds mixed had target effects. Among this kind of additives(Ca(OH)2, CaCO3, CaO, CaCl2), CaCO3displayed the best effect on restricting the rising proportion of residual uranium by 18%. Moreover, the leaching recovery research indicated that CaCO3 could raise the recovery rate by 10.8%. The XRF profiles supported that the CaCO3 could lower the concentration of SiO2 in the bottom ash from 79.76% to 49.69%. Besides, The BET and SEM revealed that the decomposition of CaCO3 brought about a variation of surface structures and area, which promoted the contact between the leaching agent and bottom ash. The uranium content increase was determined by ICP-MS and EDS. These findings suggest that CaCO3 could be a favorable additive for the controlling of residual uranium and improvement of uranium recovery rates. Key words

  4. Relative Humidity of 40% Inhibiting the Increase of Pulse Rate, Body Temperature, and Blood Lactic Acid During Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengah Sandi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Excessive sweating of the body is a reaction to decrease the heat caused by prolonged exercise at high relative humidity (RH. This situation may cause an increase in pulse rate (PR, body temperature (BT, and blood lactic acid (BLA workout. Objective: This study aimed to prove that a RH of 40% better than a RH of 50% and 60% RH in inhibiting the increase of PR, BT, and BLA during exercise. Methods: The study was conducted on 54 samples randomly selected from the IKIP PGRI Bali students. The samples were divided into three groups, and each group was given cycling exercise with a load of 80 Watt for 2 x 30 minutes with rest between sets for five minutes. Group-1 of cycling at 40% of RH, Group-2 at a RH of 50%, and the Group-3 at a RH of 60%. Data PR, BT, and BLA taken before and during exercise. The mean difference between groups before and during exercise were analyzed by One-way Anova and a further test used Least Significant Difference (LSD. Significance used was α = 0.05. Results: The mean of PR during exercise was significantly different between groups with p = 0.045, the mean of BT during exercises was significantly different between groups with p = 0.006, and the mean of BLA during exercises was significantly different between groups with p = 0.005 (p <0.05. Also found that PR, BT, and BLA during exercise at 40% RH was lower than 50% RH and 60% RH (p <0.05. Conclusion: Thus, the RH of 40% was better than RH of 50% and 60 % in inhibiting the increase of PR, BT, and BLA during exercise. Therefore, when practiced in a closed room is expected at 40% relative humidity.

  5. Effects of diet type and ingredient composition on rate of passage and apparent ileal amino acid digestibility in broiler chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochell, S J; Applegate, T J; Kim, E J; Dozier, W A

    2012-07-01

    This experiment evaluated rate of passage (ROP) and apparent ileal amino acid digestibility (AIAAD) of 4 diets varying in ingredient composition fed to broilers from 14 to 22 d of age. Two hundred and 88 Ross × Ross 708 chicks (12 birds per cage; 0.45 m(2) per bird) were randomly assigned to 24 cages (6 replicate cages per treatment) at 1 d of age. Experimental diets were 1) corn-soybean meal-based (CSM) diet containing porcine meat and bone meal (MBM; 5% inclusion), 2) CSM diet containing distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS; 5% inclusion), 3) semipurified (SP) diet containing MBM (38% inclusion), and 4) SP diet containing DDGS (76% inclusion). Diets were formulated to contain 20% CP and were adequate for vitamins and minerals. Experimental diets were provided from d 14 to 22. On d 18, a total excreta collection was conducted every hour for 12 h from 0800 to 1900 h to determine ROP, and AIAAD was determined on d 22. Time of 1% TiO(2) excretion (T1), 50% TiO(2) excretion (T50), and mean retention time (MRT) were used to express ROP. The SP-MBM diet reached T1 (P MBM, CSM-MBM, and CSM-DDGS diets, which resulted in values of 5.48, 5.62, and 5.58 h, respectively. In general, the AIAAD values were higher (P MBM. Based on T50 and MRT, SP diets containing DDGS had a faster ROP in broilers than CSM diets or SP diets containing MBM.

  6. Comparison of isotope-labeled amino acid incorporation rates (CILAIR) provides a quantitative method to study tissue secretomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofsen, Han; Dijkstra, Martijn; Weening, Desiree; de Vries, Marcel P; Hoek, Annemieke; Vonk, Roel J

    2009-02-01

    Adipose tissue is an endocrine organ involved in regulation of whole-body energy metabolism via storage of lipids and secretion of various peptide hormones (adipokines). We previously characterized the adipose tissue secretome and showed that [(13)C]lysine incorporation into secreted proteins can be used to determine the origin of identified proteins. In the present study we determined the effect of insulin on the secretome by comparing incorporation rates of (13)C-labeled lysine in the presence and absence of insulin. Human visceral adipose tissue from one patient was divided over six dishes. After subsequent washes to remove serum proteins, [(13)C]lysine-containing medium was added. Three dishes also received 60 nm insulin. The other three were controls. After 72 h of culture, media were collected and processed separately, involving concentration by ultrafiltration and fractionation by SDS-PAGE followed by in-gel digestion of excised bands and LC-MS/MS analyses. The obtained spectra were used for database searching and calculation of heavy/light ratios. The three control data sets shared 342 proteins of which 156 were potentially secreted and contained label. The three insulin-derived data sets shared 361 proteins of which 141 were potentially secreted and contained label. After discarding secreted proteins with very low label incorporation, 121 and 113 proteins remained for control and insulin data sets, respectively. The average coefficient of variation for control triplicates was 10.0% and for insulin triplicates was 18.3%. By comparing heavy/light ratios in the absence and presence of insulin we found 24 up-regulated proteins and four down-regulated proteins, and 58 proteins showed no change. Proteins involved in the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and in extracellular matrix remodeling were up-regulated by insulin. In conclusion, comparison of isotope-labeled amino acid incorporation rates (CILAIR) allows quantitative assessment of changes in protein

  7. Multidimensional modeling of Dimethyl Ether(DME) spray combustion in DI diesel engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Hua; LIU Yong-chang; WEI Ming-rui; ZHANG Yu-sheng

    2005-01-01

    In the present study a modified CFD code KIVA3V was used to simulate the spray combustion in a small DI diesel engine fueled with DME. The improved spray models consider more spray phenomena such as cavitation flow in nozzle hole, jet atomization, droplet second breakup and spray wall interaction. Otherwise, a reduced DME reaction mechanism is implemented in the combustion model, and a new turbulent combustion model-Partial Stirred Reactor (PaSR) model is selected to simulate the spray combustion process, the effects of turbulent mixing on the reaction rate are considered. The results of engine modeling based on those models agreed well with the experimental measurements. Study of temperature fields variation and particle traces in the combustion chamber revealed that the engine combustion system originally used for diesel fuel must be optimized for DME.

  8. Evaluation and Optimization of Amino Acids Retention Rate of Japanese Scallop Powder with Different Food Additives in Spray-drying Process by Response Surface Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spray-drying process for Japanese scallop powder can cause damage because of its heat-sensitive components such as amino acids. Therefore it is important for amino acids to be embedded with the appropriate food additives in spray-drying process. In this study, with Japanese scallop as the raw, Response Surface Method (RSM with three variables (the addition level of &beta-cyclodextrin, modified starch and CMC was used to investigate the effect of food additives on the amino acids retention rate in Japanese scallop powder in spray drying. The equation model to predict amino acids retention rate was reported. The results showed that the optimal addition level of &beta-cyclodextrin, modified starch and CMC were 25.55, 24.55 and 2.96%, respectively. And the amino acids retention rate was 56.75±0.64%. This model was testified to fit the actual situation preferably, therefore it can provide theoretical and practical basis for industrial production of Japanese scallop powder.

  9. CORROSION RESISTANCE OF PEARLITIC AND BAINITIC CAST IRON IN A SYNTHETIC SOLUTION OF CONDENSED GAS FROM COMBUSTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Matos Cordeiro Costa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion of engine components of the combustion chamber is usually related to the formation of acids such as sulfuric and nitric. These acids are generated by the condensation of combustion gases that usually occur in vehicle exhaust systems. However, with the development of new technologies to reduce emissions, condensation is also being promoted in vehicle combustion chambers. This fact is associated with high exhaust gas recirculation rates, known as EGR (English term for Exhaust Gas Recirculation. Consequently, corrosion problems in the engine components are increasing, especially in cylinder liners alloy manufactured using cast iron. In this study, the corrosion resistance of two cast iron alloys, one with a pearlitic microstructure and the other with a bainite microstructure in a solution simulating the composition of the condensate obtained from the combustion gases. It was found that the microstructure of the cast iron is an important factor affecting the corrosion behavior. The results showed that none of the two materials investigated is resistant to corrosion in the test medium, and the small difference observed between the behavior of the two cast iron was related to its microstructure, which are dependent on their chemical compositions. The cast iron with a pearlitic microstructure showed less formation of corrosion products than the bainitic cast iron. This result is related to the presence of steadite phase, highly stable and resistant to corrosion in pearlitic microstructure. This phase (steadite anchors the corrosion products formed on the surface and act as a partial barrier slowing the progress of the corrosion process, that was more pronounced in the bainitic cast iron.

  10. Materials Combustion Testing and Combustion Product Sensor Evaluations in FY12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Marit Elisabeth; Mudgett, Paul D.; Hornung, Steven D.; McClure, Mark B.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bryg, Victoria; Makel, Darby; Ruff, Gary A.; Hunter, Gary

    2013-01-01

    NASA Centers continue to collaborate to characterize the chemical species and smoke particles generated by the combustion of current space-rated non-metallic materials including fluoropolymers. This paper describes the results of tests conducted February through September 2012 to identify optimal chemical markers both for augmenting particle-based fire detection methods and for monitoring the post-fire cleanup phase in human spacecraft. These studies follow up on testing conducted in August 2010 and reported at ICES 2011. The tests were conducted at the NASA White Sands Test Facility in a custom glove box designed for burning fractional gram quantities of materials under varying heating profiles. The 623 L chamber was heavily instrumented to quantify organics (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry), inorganics by water extraction followed by ion chromatography, and select species by various individual commercially-available sensors. Evaluating new technologies for measuring carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide, hydrogen fluoride, hydrogen chloride and other species of interest was a key objective of the test. Some of these sensors were located inside the glovebox near the fire source to avoid losses through the sampling lines; the rest were located just outside the glovebox. Instruments for smoke particle characterization included a Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance Personal Dust Monitor (TEOM PDM) and a TSI Dust Trak DRX to measure particle mass concentration, a TSI PTrak for number concentration and a thermal precipitator for collection of particles for microscopic analysis. Materials studied included Nomex®, M22759 wire insulation, granulated circuit board, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), Kapton®, and mixtures of PTFE and Kapton®. Furnace temperatures ranged from 340o to 640o C, focusing on the smoldering regime. Of particular interest in these tests was confirming burn repeatability and production of acid gases with different

  11. Materials Combustion Testing and Combustion Product Sensor Evaluations in FY12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Marit E.; Hunter, Gary; Ruff, Gary; Mudgett, Paul D.; Hornung, Steven D.; McClure, Mark B.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bryg, Victoria; Makel, Darby

    2013-01-01

    NASA Centers continue to collaborate to characterize the chemical species and smoke particles generated by the combustion of current space-rated non-metallic materials including fluoropolymers. This paper describes the results of tests conducted February through September 2012 to identify optimal chemical markers both for augmenting particle-based fire detection methods and for monitoring the post-fire cleanup phase in human spacecraft. These studies follow up on testing conducted in August 2010 and reported at ICES 2011. The tests were conducted at the NASA White Sands Test Facility in a custom glove box designed for burning fractional gram quantities of materials under varying heating profiles. The 623 L chamber was heavily instrumented to quantify organics (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry), inorganics by water extraction followed by ion chromatography, and select species by various individual commercially-available sensors. Evaluating new technologies for measuring carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide, hydrogen fluoride, hydrogen chloride and other species of interest was a key objective of the test. Some of these sensors were located inside the glovebox near the fire source to avoid losses through the sampling lines; the rest were located just outside the glovebox. Instruments for smoke particle characterization included a Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance Personal Dust Monitor (TEOM PDM) and a TSI Dust Trak DRX to measure particle mass concentration, a TSI PTrak for number concentration and a thermal precipitator for collection of particles for microscopic analysis. Materials studied included Nomex(R), M22759 wire insulation, granulated circuit board, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), Kapton(R), and mixtures of PTFE and Kapton(R). Furnace temperatures ranged from 340 to 640 C, focusing on the smoldering regime. Of particular interest in these tests was confirming burn repeatability and production of acid gases with different

  12. Ignition and combustion characteristics of molded amorphous boron under different oxygen pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Daolun; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhou, Yunan; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2017-09-01

    Ignition and combustion characteristics of amorphous boron (B) have received much attention from researchers in recent decades. A pressurized concentrated ignition experimental system was designed to evaluate the ignition and combustion characteristics of molded B samples. The ignition experiments were carried out under different oxygen pressures (1-9 atm). The condensed combustion products were then analyzed using a scanning electron microscope, an X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer, and an X-ray diffractometer. Furthermore, the complete oxidation rates of the samples were detected by inductively coupled plasma chromatography. As the oxygen pressure increased, the combustion intensity of the samples steadily increased, and the ignition delay time and combustion time both decreased. Under the oxygen pressure of 9 atm, the average ignition delay time and combustion time were 2640 ms and 2596 ms, respectively, and the highest combustion temperature reached 1561.5 °C. The initial diffusion flame on the sample surface was green and the brightest, which was produced by an intermediate combustion product, BO2 (corresponding molecular emission spectrum wavelength, 547.3 nm). Emission spectra of another intermediate product, BO (431.9 nm) was also detected. Two different types of structures were found in the condensed combustion products of the samples. The first type was the flaky B2O3 structure, and the second type was the flocculent structure of incomplete combustion products. The B2O3 content in the condensed combustion products increased with the oxygen pressure during combustion. The complete oxidation ratio of the samples also increased with the oxygen pressure, and reached the maximum value of 68.71% under 9 atm. Overall, the samples showed better ignition and combustion characteristics under higher oxygen pressure.

  13. Research on combustion characteristics of bio-oil from sewage sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui LI; Baosheng JIN; Xiangru JIA; Zhaoping ZHONG; Gang XIAO; Xufeng FU

    2009-01-01

    Combustion characteristics of bio-oil from sewage sludge were investigated using thermograviMetry (TG) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques. The combustion process could be divided into two weight loss stages. Light compounds volatilized and were oxidized in the first stage and the heterogeneous combustion between oxygen and heavy compounds happened in the second stage, which were confirmed by FT-IR technique. Most weight loss occurred in the first stage. The effect of heating rate was also studied and higher heating rates were found to facilitate the combustion process. The kinetic parameters of the two stages were calculated and the change of activation energy indicated higher heating rates benefited combustion.

  14. Combustion Process Modelling and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Maduda

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with realization of combustion control system on programmable logic controllers. Control system design is based on analysis of the current state of combustion control systems in technological device of raw material processing area. Control system design is composed of two subsystems. First subsystem is represented by software system for measured data processing and for data processing from simulation of the combustion mathematical model. Outputs are parameters for setting of controller algorithms. Second subsystem consists from programme modules. The programme module is presented by specific control algorithm, for example proportional regulation, programmed proportional regulation, proportional regulation with correction on the oxygen in waste gas, and so on. According to the specific combustion control requirements it is possible built-up concrete control system by programme modules. The programme modules were programmed by Automation studio that is used for development, debugging and testing software for B&R controllers.

  15. Putting combustion optimization to work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spring, N.

    2009-05-15

    New plants and plants that are retrofitting can benefit from combustion optimization. Boiler tuning and optimization can complement each other. The continuous emissions monitoring system CEMS, and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy TDLAS can be used for optimisation. NeuCO's CombustionOpt neural network software can determine optimal fuel and air set points. Babcock and Wilcox Power Generation Group Inc's Flame Doctor can be used in conjunction with other systems to diagnose and correct coal-fired burner performance. The four units of the Colstrip power plant in Colstrips, Montana were recently fitted with combustion optimization systems based on advanced model predictive multi variable controls (MPCs), ABB's Predict & Control tool. Unit 4 of Tampa Electric's Big Bend plant in Florida is fitted with Emerson's SmartProcess fuzzy neural model based combustion optimisation system. 1 photo.

  16. A Review of Recruitment, Adherence and Drop-Out Rates in Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Supplementation Trials in Children and Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wurff, Inge; Meyer, Barbara; De Groot, Renate

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The influence of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFA) supplementation on health outcomes has been studied extensively with randomized controlled trials (RCT). In many research fields, difficulties with recruitment, adherence and high drop-out rates have been

  17. Impact of low-dose acetylsalicylic acid on kidney function in type 2 diabetic patients with elevated urinary albumin excretion rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaede, Peter; Hansen, Henrik Post; Parving, Hans-Henrik

    2003-01-01

    Low-dose treatment with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is widely recommended to type 2 diabetic patients as primary prevention against cardiovascular disease. High-dose treatment with cyclooxygenase inhibitors reduces urinary albumin excretion rate (AER) in type 1 diabetic patients with micro...

  18. Propagated fixed-bed mixed-acid fermentation: Part I: Effect of volatile solid loading rate and agitation at high pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Kristina W; Forrest, Andrea K; Mercy, Kevin L; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2011-11-01

    Countercurrent fermentation is a high performing process design for mixed-acid fermentation. However, there are high operating costs associated with moving solids, which is an integral component of this configuration. This study investigated the effect of volatile solid loading rate (VSLR) and agitation in propagated fixed-bed fermentation, a configuration which may be more commercially viable. To evaluate the role of agitation on fixed-bed configuration performance, continuous mixing was compared with periodic mixing. VSLR was also varied and not found to affect acid yields. However, increased VSLR and liquid retention time did result in higher conversions, productivity, acid concentrations, but lower selectivities. Agitation was demonstrated to be important for this fermentor configuration, the periodically-mixed fermentation had the lowest conversion and yields. Operating at a high pH (∼9) contributed to the high selectivity to acetic acid, which might be industrially desirable but at the cost of lower yield compared to a neutral pH.

  19. Digital signal processing of cylinder pressure data for combustion diagnostics of HCCI engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Maurya, Rakesh; Pal, Dev Datt; Kumar Agarwal, Avinash

    2013-03-01

    Diagnosis of combustion is necessary for the estimation of the combustion quality, and control of combustion timing in advanced combustion concepts like HCCI. Combustion diagnostics is often performed using digital processing of pressure signals measured using piezoelectric sensor installed in the combustion chamber of the engine. Four-step pressure signal processing consisting of (i) absolute pressure correction, (ii) phasing w.r.t. crank angle, (iii) cycle averaging and (iv) smoothening is used to get cylinder pressure data from the engine experiments, which is further analyzed to get information about combustion characteristics. This study focuses on various aspect of signal processing (cycle averaging and smoothing) of in-cylinder pressure signal from a HCCI engine acquired using a piezoelectric pressure sensor. Experimental investigations are conducted on a HCCI combustion engine operating at different engine speed/load/air-fuel ratio conditions. The cylinder pressure history of 3000 consecutive engine cycles is acquired for analysis using piezoelectric pressure sensor. This study determines the optimum number of engine cycles to be acquired for reasonably good pressure signals based on standard deviation of in-cylinder pressure, rate of pressure rise and rate of heat release signals. Different signal smoothening methods (using various digital filters) are also analyzed and their results are compared. This study also presents effect of signal processing methods on pressure, pressure rise rate and rate of heat release curves at different engine operating conditions.

  20. Asymptotic approximation of long-time solution for low-temperature filtration combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chapiro, G.; Mallybaev, A.A.; De Souza, A.J.; Marchesin, D.; Bruining, J.

    2012-01-01

    There is a renewed interest in using combustion for the recovery of medium viscosity oil. We consider the combustion process when air is injected into the porous medium containing some fuel and inert gas. Commonly the reaction rate is negligible at low temperatures, hence the possibility of oxygen b

  1. Multi-omics approach to study the growth efficiency and amino acid metabolism in Lactococcus lactis at various specific growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahtvee, Petri-Jaan; Adamberg, Kaarel; Arike, Liisa; Nahku, Ranno; Aller, Kadri; Vilu, Raivo

    2011-02-24

    Lactococcus lactis is recognised as a safe (GRAS) microorganism and has hence gained interest in numerous biotechnological approaches. As it is fastidious for several amino acids, optimization of processes which involve this organism requires a thorough understanding of its metabolic regulations during multisubstrate growth. Using glucose limited continuous cultivations, specific growth rate dependent metabolism of L. lactis including utilization of amino acids was studied based on extracellular metabolome, global transcriptome and proteome analysis. A new growth medium was designed with reduced amino acid concentrations to increase precision of measurements of consumption of amino acids. Consumption patterns were calculated for all 20 amino acids and measured carbon balance showed good fit of the data at all growth rates studied. It was observed that metabolism of L. lactis became more efficient with rising specific growth rate in the range 0.10-0.60 h(-1), indicated by 30% increase in biomass yield based on glucose consumption, 50% increase in efficiency of nitrogen use for biomass synthesis, and 40% reduction in energy spilling. The latter was realized by decrease in the overall product formation and higher efficiency of incorporation of amino acids into biomass. L. lactis global transcriptome and proteome profiles showed good correlation supporting the general idea of transcription level control of bacterial metabolism, but the data indicated that substrate transport systems together with lower part of glycolysis in L. lactis were presumably under allosteric control. The current study demonstrates advantages of the usage of strictly controlled continuous cultivation methods combined with multi-omics approach for quantitative understanding of amino acid and energy metabolism of L. lactis which is a valuable new knowledge for development of balanced growth media, gene manipulations for desired product formation etc. Moreover, collected dataset is an excellent

  2. Multi-omics approach to study the growth efficiency and amino acid metabolism in Lactococcus lactis at various specific growth rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arike Liisa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactococcus lactis is recognised as a safe (GRAS microorganism and has hence gained interest in numerous biotechnological approaches. As it is fastidious for several amino acids, optimization of processes which involve this organism requires a thorough understanding of its metabolic regulations during multisubstrate growth. Results Using glucose limited continuous cultivations, specific growth rate dependent metabolism of L. lactis including utilization of amino acids was studied based on extracellular metabolome, global transcriptome and proteome analysis. A new growth medium was designed with reduced amino acid concentrations to increase precision of measurements of consumption of amino acids. Consumption patterns were calculated for all 20 amino acids and measured carbon balance showed good fit of the data at all growth rates studied. It was observed that metabolism of L. lactis became more efficient with rising specific growth rate in the range 0.10 - 0.60 h-1, indicated by 30% increase in biomass yield based on glucose consumption, 50% increase in efficiency of nitrogen use for biomass synthesis, and 40% reduction in energy spilling. The latter was realized by decrease in the overall product formation and higher efficiency of incorporation of amino acids into biomass. L. lactis global transcriptome and proteome profiles showed good correlation supporting the general idea of transcription level control of bacterial metabolism, but the data indicated that substrate transport systems together with lower part of glycolysis in L. lactis were presumably under allosteric control. Conclusions The current study demonstrates advantages of the usage of strictly controlled continuous cultivation methods combined with multi-omics approach for quantitative understanding of amino acid and energy metabolism of L. lactis which is a valuable new knowledge for development of balanced growth media, gene manipulations for desired product

  3. Effect of pressure on combustion of char in fluidised beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnbull, E.; Blackshaw, H.W.; Davidson, J.F.; Goodyer, P.T.Y.; Hopes, R.B.; Kossakowski, E.R.

    1984-07-01

    Measurements of burn-out time are reported, for 0.25-1.7 mm carbon particles in an air-fluidised 100 mm dia bed of sand at pressures up to 17 bar absolute and bed temperatures of 1023-1173 K. A variety of carbons was used including (i) coke (ii) chars formed from coals of different ranks: thus the carbons had various porosities and surface areas. The effect of increased pressure is to increase the combustion rate, because of the higher oxygen concentration which accelerates the chemical reactions of combustion. On the other hand, pressure has virtually no influence on diffusion of oxygen towards a burning particle, because the higher oxygen concentration is offset by a proportionately lower diffusion coefficient. The overall effect is that as pressure increases, the chemical rate controlling steps become less important, so at very high pressure, combustion is diffusion controlled.

  4. Use of the graphical analytic methods of studying the combustion processes in the internal combustion engine combustion chamber on the basis of similarity criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Krasheninnikov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The task of improving the economic and ecological parameters of the internal combustion engines remains topical within the frameworks of the modern engine-building technology. Since a combustion engine is a complex system combining such units as an intake manifold, combustion chamber, exhaust manifold, one of directions of the engine development is adjustment of the joint operation of its units. The specified adjustment should better be performed with the use of the so-called integral characteristics. The author means under an integral characteristic the rating plate of a unit (engine containing information about all the possible modes and conditions of its use, specifies the optimal operating range and indicates all the basic values of efficiency – reliability – environmental friendliness at each point of its field. As a rule, integral characteristics are multi-parametric. It is common practice to coordinate the field of such characteristic by similarity criteria determining the unit or engine behavior in whole.

  5. Study of Second Generation Biofuels in Internal Combustion Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan, Dhandapani

    2012-07-01

    fuel, vis-a-vis neat diesel fuel (DF). The CO, THC, smoke and TPM emissions were reduced significantly, while NOx emissions were somewhat higher with BD blended fuels compared to neat FT fuel. The reductions in CO, THC, smoke and TPM emissions with BD blends were mainly due to the oxygen content in the BD blended fuel, while the increases in NOx emissions with BD fuels were due to advances in injection timing, higher percentages of fatty acids with double bonds in the carbon chain and higher heat release in the pre-mixed combustion. Secondly, a four-stroke, single-cylinder, naturally-aspirated (NA), direct-injection (DI) diesel engine with 8 BHP at 1500 rpm coupled with water-cooled, eddy current dynamometer was used for the experiments. Ethanol (5% by volume) was injected into the intake manifold by the port injection method with the assistance of a mechanical fuel injection pump. Therefore, the volumetric blending percentages of ethanol, BD and diesel fuels (E:D:JME) are (0:100:0), (5:95:0), (5:75:20), (5:55:40), (5:35:60), (5:15:80) (5:0:95) and (0:0:100) respectively. Ethanol pre-mixed with intake air, assisted in improving combustion in both diesel and the JME blends. The addition of ethanol to high-viscosity Jatropha methyl ester (JME) through port injection is investigated in order to determine its effect on the fuels viscosity and thereby on the diesel engine performance. In addition to viscosity alteration, the impact of ethanol addition on combustion characteristics such as combustion duration, ignition delay and emissions levels from diesel engines fuelled with blends of ethanol, diesel and JME was studied in particular. It was found that blending of oxygenated fuels with diesel modifies the chemical structure and physical properties which in turn, alter the engines operating conditions, combustion parameters and emissions levels. However, the injection of only 5% ethanol through port injection allows for up to 25% blending of diesel with biofuels, while

  6. Rotary internal combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witkowski, J.

    1989-12-05

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine assembly. It includes: a central rotor means formed with at least one peripheral fuel cavity. The cavity having a first surface defining a thrust surface and a second surface defining a contoured surface; a housing means enclosing the rotor and having an internal wall encircling the rotor. The internal wall being intercepted by at least two recesses defining cylinder means. The housing means and the rotor means being relatively rotatable; piston means individual to each the cylinder means and reciprocable therein; each piton means having a working face complementary to aid contoured surface; and power means for urging the working face into intimate areal contact with the contoured surface to create a first seal means. The housing means having at lest one fuel inlet port, at least one fuel ignition means and at least one exhaust port whereby during the course of a revolution of the rotor means relative to the housing means, the first seal means, the power means, the respective ports, the ignition means and the fuel cavity cooperate to develop fuel compression, fuel ignition and exhaust functions.

  7. Internal combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskaris, M.A.; Broitman, K.; Natale, S.E.

    1991-08-27

    This patent describes improvement in a two-stroke internal combustion engine adapted to run on a diesel or a kerosene type of fuel, and including a piston connected to the crankshaft of the engine to move within a cylinder through a first stroke from a top dead center position to a bottom dead center position and through a second stroke from the bottom dead center position back to the top dead center position. The improvement comprises: means providing a cylinder head at the top end of the engine cylinder in the shape of an open bowl having a generally cup-shaped configuration including a sidewall portion, a spark plug positioned centrally within the bowl at the top end of the cylinder, and means for injecting fuel into the top end of the engine cylinder at a location between the spark plug and the sidewall portion, the fuel injecting means including an injection nozzle having a plurality of nozzle openings therein, the nozzle openings being constructed and arranged to discharge a plurality of plume-like sprays into the top end of the cylinder at a location within the bowl, two of the sprays being directed from the nozzle to diverge and pass along opposite sides of the spark plug, and additional sprays being directed from the nozzle against the sidewall portion or the cylinder head to be deflected therefrom back toward the piston and the spark plug to thereby form a cloud of fuel over the spark plug for good ignition.

  8. Combustion instability mitigation by magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jocher, Agnes; Pitsch, Heinz; Gomez, Thomas; Bonnety, Jérôme; Legros, Guillaume

    2017-06-01

    The present interdisciplinary study combines electromagnetics and combustion to unveil an original and basic experiment displaying a spontaneous flame instability that is mitigated as the non-premixed sooting flame experiences a magnetic perturbation. This magnetic instability mitigation is reproduced by direct numerical simulations to be further elucidated by a flow stability analysis. A key role in the stabilization process is attributed to the momentum and thermochemistry coupling that the magnetic force, acting mainly on paramagnetic oxygen, contributes to sustain. The spatial local stability analysis based on the numerical simulations shows that the magnetic field tends to reduce the growth rates of small flame perturbations.

  9. Geochemical Rate/RNA Integration Study (GRIST): A Pilot Field Experiment for Inter-Calibration of Biogeochemistry and Nucleic Acid Measurements Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronk, Deborah

    2007-01-08

    The Geochemical Rate/RNA Integration Study (GRIST) project sought to correlate biogeochemical flux rates with measurements of gene expression and mRNA abundance to demonstrate the application of molecular approaches to estimate the presence and magnitude of a suite of biogeochemical processes. The study was headed by Lee Kerkhoff of Rutgers University. In this component of the GRIST study, we characterized ambient nutrient concentrations and measured uptake rates for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, ammonium, nitrate and nitrite) and dissolved organic nitrogen (urea and dissolved free amino acids) during two diel studies at the Long-Term Ecosystem Observatory (LEO-15) on the New Jersey continental shelf.

  10. Measurements of fuel-N release during solid fuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Di Nola; H. Spliethoff; S. Leiser; W. van de Kamp [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands). Thermal Power Engineering Section

    2003-07-01

    A South American high volatile bituminous coal and two fuel blends obtained by adding 10% cocoa shells and 10% wood, respectively, were selected to investigate the release of fuel nitrogen during devolatilisation and the char burnout behavior. The chars were produced at atmospheric pressure in heated wire mesh (HWM) and isothermal plug flow (IPFR) reactors and subsequently compared for their fuel-N content. Char burnout behavior was investigated comparing data from IPFR with outputs of a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). Results showed that the volatile release yield was more affected by the final temperature and the residence time rather than by the heating rate. Fuel nitrogen release occurred to be particularly influenced by the residence time, showing higher total yields in the HWM with longer hold times at peak temperature. The comparison of char combustion rates in the IPFR and TGA showed that the data gained using a TGA is quantitatively not representative for combustion rates found in an industrial boiler. Combustion rates determined with the TGA are approximately three orders of magnitude lower than those determined with the IPFR. However, it was shown that differences in the combustion rates of the different fuels are reproducible qualitatively with both approaches. 27 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Investigation of poly(γ-glutamic acid) production via online determination of viscosity and oxygen transfer rate in shake flasks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lena Regestein nee Meissner; Julia Arndt; Thomas G Palmen; Tim Jestel; Hitoshi Mitsunaga; Eiichiro Fukusaki; Jochen Buchs

    2017-01-01

    Background Poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) is a biopolymer with many useful properties making it applicable for instance in food and skin care industries, in wastewater treatment, in biodegradable plastics or in the pharmaceutical industry. γ...

  12. Metabolism of nonessential N-15-labeled amino acids and the measurement of human whole-body protein synthesis rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. P.; Settle, R. G.; Albina, J. A.; Melnick, G.; Dempsey, D. T.

    1991-01-01

    Eight N-15-labeled nonessential amino acids plus (N-15)H4Cl were administered over a 10-h period to four healthy adult males using a primed-constant dosage regimen. The amount of N-15 excreted in the urine and the urinary ammonia, hippuric acid, and plasma alanine N-15 enrichments were measured. There was a high degree of consistency across subjects in the ordering of the nine compounds based on the fraction of N-15 excreted.

  13. Metabolism of nonessential N-15-labeled amino acids and the measurement of human whole-body protein synthesis rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. P.; Settle, R. G.; Albina, J. A.; Melnick, G.; Dempsey, D. T.

    1991-01-01

    Eight N-15-labeled nonessential amino acids plus (N-15)H4Cl were administered over a 10-h period to four healthy adult males using a primed-constant dosage regimen. The amount of N-15 excreted in the urine and the urinary ammonia, hippuric acid, and plasma alanine N-15 enrichments were measured. There was a high degree of consistency across subjects in the ordering of the nine compounds based on the fraction of N-15 excreted.

  14. Radical scavenging ability of gallic acid toward OH and OOH radicals. Reaction mechanism and rate constants from the density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Tiziana; Galano, Annia; Russo, Nino

    2014-09-04

    Gallic acid is a ubiquitous compound, widely distributed in the vegetal kingdom and frequently found in the human diet. In the present work, its primary antioxidant activity has been investigated using the density functional theory (DFT), and the quantum mechanics-based test for overall free radical scavenging activity (QM-ORSA) protocol. It was found that gallic acid is a better antioxidant than the reference compound, Trolox, regardless of the polarity of the environment. In addition, gallic acid is predicted to be among the best peroxyl radical scavengers identified so far in nonpolar (lipid) media. This compound is capable of scavenging hydroxyl radicals at diffusion-limited rates, and hydroperoxyl radicals with rate constants in the order of 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). The deprotonation of gallic acid, in aqueous solution, is predicted to increase the protective action of this compound against oxidative stress. Gallic acid was also identified as a versatile scavenger, capable of rapidly deactivating a wide variety of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) via electron transfer at physiological pH.

  15. Twenty-second symposium (international) on combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The following research areas were discussed at the symposium: coal combustion: carbon burnout, pyrolysis, furnaces, laboratory-scale combustion, and fluidized bed combustion; combustion-generated particulates: soot inception, growth, and soot formation in diffusion flames; engine combustion; turbulent combustion: flames in vortices, fractals and cellular automations, nonpremixed flames, premixed flames, premixed flame structure, and lifted flames; reaction kinetics: hydrocarbon oxidation, free radical chemistry, unsaturated species, aromatics, and nitrogen compounds/pollutant formation; combustion generated NO/sub x/ and SO/sub x/; fires: flame spread, radiation, characterization, and unsteady flames; Laminar flames: structure, opposed-flow combustion, shape, propagation/extinction, and inhibition, oscillations, microgravity; ignition; detonations; dusts; propellants; diagnostics; combustion of drops, sprays, and dispersions, and slurries. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  16. Combustion behaviours of tobacco stem in a thermogravimetric analyser and a pilot-scale fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zixu; Zhang, Shihong; Liu, Lei; Li, Xiangpeng; Chen, Hanping; Yang, Haiping; Wang, Xianhua

    2012-04-01

    Despite its abundant supply, tobacco stem has not been exploited as an energy source in large scale. This study investigates the combustion behaviours of tobacco stem in a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA) and a pilot-scale fluidized bed (FB). Combustion characteristics, including ignition and burnout index, and combustion reaction kinetics were studied. Experiments in the FB investigated the effects of different operating conditions, such as primary air flow, secondary air flow and feeding rates, on the bed temperature profiles and combustion efficiency. Two kinds of bed materials cinder and silica sand were used in FB and the effect of bed materials on agglomeration was studied. The results indicated that tobacco stem combustion worked well in the FB. When operation condition was properly set, the tobacco stem combustion efficiency reached 94%. In addition, compared to silica sand, cinder could inhibit agglomeration during combustion because of its high aluminium content.

  17. Combustion iron distribution and deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chao; Mahowald, N.; Bond, T.; Chuang, P. Y.; Artaxo, P.; Siefert, R.; Chen, Y.; Schauer, J.

    2008-03-01

    Iron is hypothesized to be an important micronutrient for ocean biota, thus modulating carbon dioxide uptake by the ocean biological pump. Studies have assumed that atmospheric deposition of iron to the open ocean is predominantly from mineral aerosols. For the first time we model the source, transport, and deposition of iron from combustion sources. Iron is produced in small quantities during fossil fuel burning, incinerator use, and biomass burning. The sources of combustion iron are concentrated in the industrialized regions and biomass burning regions, largely in the tropics. Model results suggest that combustion iron can represent up to 50% of the total iron deposited, but over open ocean regions it is usually less than 5% of the total iron, with the highest values (ocean biogeochemistry the bioavailability of the iron is important, and this is often estimated by the fraction which is soluble (Fe(II)). Previous studies have argued that atmospheric processing of the relatively insoluble Fe(III) occurs to make it more soluble (Fe(II)). Modeled estimates of soluble iron amounts based solely on atmospheric processing as simulated here cannot match the variability in daily averaged in situ concentration measurements in Korea, which is located close to both combustion and dust sources. The best match to the observations is that there are substantial direct emissions of soluble iron from combustion processes. If we assume observed soluble Fe/black carbon ratios in Korea are representative of the whole globe, we obtain the result that deposition of soluble iron from combustion contributes 20-100% of the soluble iron deposition over many ocean regions. This implies that more work should be done refining the emissions and deposition of combustion sources of soluble iron globally.

  18. Effects of solids concentration, pH and carbon addition on the production rate and composition of volatile fatty acids in prefermenters using primary sewage sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Raymond Jianxiong; Yuan, Z.; Keller, J.

    2006-01-01

    in prefermenters. In this study, a series of controlled batch experiments were conducted with sludge from a full-scale prefermenter to determine the impact of solids concentration, pH and addition of molasses on prefermentation processes. It was found that an increase in solids concentration enhanced total VFA...... production with an increased propionic acid fraction. The optimal pH for prefermentation was in the range of 6-7 with significant productivity loss when pH was below 5.5. Molasses addition significantly increased the production of VFAs particularly the propionic acid. However, the fermentation rate...

  19. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F

  20. Metabolic rate and membrane fatty acid composition in birds: a comparison between long-living parrots and short-living fowl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Magdalene K; Hulbert, A J; Buttemer, William A

    2012-01-01

    Both basal metabolic rate (BMR) and maximum lifespan potential (MLSP) vary with body size in mammals and birds and it has been suggested that these are mediated through size-related variation in membrane fatty acid composition. Whereas the physical properties of membrane fatty acids affect the activity of membrane proteins and, indirectly, an animal's BMR, it is the susceptibility of those fatty acids to peroxidation which influence MLSP. Although there is a correlation between body size and MLSP, there is considerable MLSP variation independent of body size. For example, among bird families, Galliformes (fowl) are relatively short-living and Psittaciformes (parrots) are unusually long-living, with some parrot species reaching maximum lifespans of more than 100 years. We determined BMR and tissue phospholipid fatty acid composition in seven tissues from three species of parrots with an average MLSP of 27 years and from two species of quails with an average MLSP of 5.5 years. We also characterised mitochondrial phospholipids in two of these tissues. Neither BMR nor membrane susceptibility to peroxidation corresponded with differences in MLSP among the birds we measured. We did find that (1) all birds had lower n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid content in mitochondrial membranes compared to those of the corresponding tissue, and that (2) irrespective of reliance on flight for locomotion, both pectoral and leg muscle had an almost identical membrane fatty acid composition in all birds.