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Sample records for acid bacterium lactococcus

  1. Genome Sequence and Transcriptome Analysis of Meat-Spoilage-Associated Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus piscium MKFS47

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andreevskaya, Margarita; Johansson, Per; Laine, Pia; Smolander, Olli-Pekka; Sonck, Matti; Rahkila, Riitta; Jääskeläinen, Elina; Paulin, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Björkroth, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus piscium is a psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium and is known to be one of the predominant species within spoilage microbial communities in cold-stored packaged foods, particularly in meat products...

  2. Lactococcus lactis - a diploid bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Ole; Hansen, Flemming G.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    In contrast to higher eukaryotes, bacteria are haploid, i.e. they store their genetic information in a single chromosome, which is then duplicated during the cell cycle. If the growth rate is sufficiently low, the bacterium is born with only a single copy of the chromosome, which gets duplicated...... before the bacterium divides. Fast-growing bacteria have overlapping rounds of replication, and can contain DNA corresponding to more than four genome equivalents. However, the terminus region of the chromosome is still present in just one copy after division, and is not duplicated until right before...... the next division. Thus, the regions of the chromosome that are the last to be replicated are haploid even in fast-growing bacteria. In contrast to this general rule for bacteria, we found that Lactococcus lactis, a bacterium which has been exploited for thousands of years for the production of fermented...

  3. Lactococcus piscium: a psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium with bioprotective or spoilage activity in food-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraoui, T; Leroi, F; Björkroth, J; Pilet, M F

    2016-10-01

    The genus Lactococcus comprises 12 species, some known for decades and others more recently described. Lactococcus piscium, isolated in 1990 from rainbow trout, is a psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium, probably disregarded because most of the strains are unable to grow at 30°C. During the last 10 years, this species has been isolated from a large variety of food: meat, seafood and vegetables, mostly packed under vacuum (VP) or modified atmosphere (MAP) and stored at chilled temperature. Recently, culture-independent techniques used for characterization of microbial ecosystems have highlighted the importance of Lc. piscium in food. Its role in food spoilage varies according to the strain and the food matrix. However, most studies have indicated that Lc. piscium spoils meat, whereas it does not degrade the sensory properties of seafood. Lactococcus piscium strains have a large antimicrobial spectrum, including Gram-positive and negative bacteria. In various seafoods, some strains have a protective effect against spoilage and can extend the sensory shelf-life of the products. They can also inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes, by a cell-to-cell contact-dependent. This article reviews the physiological and genomic characteristics of Lc. piscium and discusses its spoilage or protective activities in food.

  4. Complete genome sequence of the prototype lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp cremoris MG1363

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegmann, Udo; O'Connell-Motherwy, Mary; Zomer, Aldert; Buist, Girbe; Shearman, Claire; Canchaya, Carlos; Ventura, Marco; Goesmann, Alexander; Gasson, Michael J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; van Sinderen, Douwe; Kok, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is of great importance for the nutrition of hundreds of millions of people worldwide. This paper describes the genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363, the lactococcal strain most intensively studied throughout the world. The 2,529,478-bp genome contains 81 ps

  5. Genome Sequence and Transcriptome Analysis of Meat-Spoilage-Associated Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus piscium MKFS47.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreevskaya, Margarita; Johansson, Per; Laine, Pia; Smolander, Olli-Pekka; Sonck, Matti; Rahkila, Riitta; Jääskeläinen, Elina; Paulin, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Björkroth, Johanna

    2015-06-01

    Lactococcus piscium is a psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium and is known to be one of the predominant species within spoilage microbial communities in cold-stored packaged foods, particularly in meat products. Its presence in such products has been associated with the formation of buttery and sour off-odors. Nevertheless, the spoilage potential of L. piscium varies dramatically depending on the strain and growth conditions. Additional knowledge about the genome is required to explain such variation, understand its phylogeny, and study gene functions. Here, we present the complete and annotated genomic sequence of L. piscium MKFS47, combined with a time course analysis of the glucose catabolism-based transcriptome. In addition, a comparative analysis of gene contents was done for L. piscium MKFS47 and 29 other lactococci, revealing three distinct clades within the genus. The genome of L. piscium MKFS47 consists of one chromosome, carrying 2,289 genes, and two plasmids. A wide range of carbohydrates was predicted to be fermented, and growth on glycerol was observed. Both carbohydrate and glycerol catabolic pathways were significantly upregulated in the course of time as a result of glucose exhaustion. At the same time, differential expression of the pyruvate utilization pathways, implicated in the formation of spoilage substances, switched the metabolism toward a heterofermentative mode. In agreement with data from previous inoculation studies, L. piscium MKFS47 was identified as an efficient producer of buttery-odor compounds under aerobic conditions. Finally, genes and pathways that may contribute to increased survival in meat environments were considered. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Transcriptional regulation of central amino acid metabolism in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the functional characterisation of the transcriptional regulators GlnR, ArgR and AhrC of Lactococcus lactis, which are responsible for the control of genes involved in the metabolism of the amino acids glutamine, glutamate and arginine. A chromosomal glnR deletion mutant was ma

  7. Physiological adaptation of the bacterium Lactococcus lactis in response to the production of human CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Anton; Wiederhold, Elena; Gandhi, Tejas; Breitling, Rainer; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2011-07-01

    Biochemical and biophysical characterization of CFTR (the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) is thwarted by difficulties to obtain sufficient quantities of correctly folded and functional protein. Here we have produced human CFTR in the prokaryotic expression host Lactococcus lactis. The full-length protein was detected in the membrane of the bacterium, but the yields were too low (proteins) for in vitro functional and structural characterization, and induction of the expression of CFTR resulted in growth arrest. We used isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantitation based quantitative proteomics to find out why production of CFTR in L. lactis was problematic. Protein abundances in membrane and soluble fractions were monitored as a function of induction time, both in CFTR expression cells and in control cells that did not express CFTR. Eight hundred and forty six proteins were identified and quantified (35% of the predicted proteome), including 163 integral membrane proteins. Expression of CFTR resulted in an increase in abundance of stress-related proteins (e.g. heat-shock and cell envelope stress), indicating the presence of misfolded proteins in the membrane. In contrast to the reported consequences of membrane protein overexpression in Escherichia coli, there were no indications that the membrane protein insertion machinery (Sec) became overloaded upon CFTR production in L. lactis. Nutrients and ATP became limiting in the control cells as the culture entered the late exponential and stationary growth phases but this did not happen in the CFTR expressing cells, which had stopped growing upon induction. The different stress responses elicited in E. coli and L. lactis upon membrane protein production indicate that different strategies are needed to overcome low expression yields and toxicity.

  8. Physiological Adaptation of the Bacterium Lactococcus lactis in Response to the Production of Human CFTR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, Anton; Wiederhold, Elena; Gandhi, Tejas; Breitling, Rainer; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2011-01-01

    Biochemical and biophysical characterization of CFTR (the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) is thwarted by difficulties to obtain sufficient quantities of correctly folded and functional protein. Here we have produced human CFTR in the prokaryotic expression host Lactococcus lacti

  9. Heterologous Protein Expression by Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villatoro-Hernández, J.; Kuipers, O.P.; Saucedo-Cárdenas, O.; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, R.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of Lactococcus lactis as a safe and efficient cell factory to produce heterologous proteins of medical interest. The relevance of the use of this lactic acid bacterium (LAB) is that it is a noncolonizing, nonpathogenic microorganism that can be delivered in vivo at a m

  10. Engineering of sugar metabolism in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, Weia Arianne

    2008-01-01

    Short English Summary Lactococcus lactis is a lactic acid bacterium used in the dairy industry. This thesis decribes the genetic engineering performed on the sugar metabolism of L. lactis. Besides our fundamental interest for sugar metabolism and its regulation in L. lactis, this project had the int

  11. Environmental stress responses in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, JW; Venema, G; Kok, J

    1999-01-01

    Bacteria can encounter a variety of physical conditions during their life, Bacterial cells are able to survive these (often adverse) conditions by the induction of specific or general protection mechanisms. The lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis is widely used for the production of cheese. Bef

  12. Environmental stress responses in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, JW; Venema, G; Kok, J

    Bacteria can encounter a variety of physical conditions during their life, Bacterial cells are able to survive these (often adverse) conditions by the induction of specific or general protection mechanisms. The lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis is widely used for the production of cheese.

  13. Resistance to antibiotics in Lacid acid bacteria - strain Lactococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipić Brankica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are widely used in the food industry, especially in the production of fermented dairy products and meat. The most studied species among Lis Lactococcus lactis. L. lactis strains are of great importance in the production of fermented dairy products such as yogurt, butter, fresh cheese and some kind of semi-hard cheese. Although L. lactis acquired the „Generally Regarded As Safe“ (GRAS status, many investigations indicated that lactococci may act as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes, which could be transferred to other bacterial species in human gastrointestinal tract includ­ing pathogens. The genome analysis of L. lactis indicated the presence of at least 40 putative drug transporter genes, and only four multidrug resistance (MDR transporters are functionally characterized: LmrA, LmrP, LmrCD i CmbT. LmrA is the first described MDR transporter in prokaryotes. LmrCD is responsible for resistance to cholate, which is an integral part of human bile and LmrCD is important for intestinal survival of lactococci that are used as probiotics. Secondary multidrug transporter LmrP confers resistance to lincosamides, macrolides, streptogramins and tetracyclines. CmbT protein has an effect on the host cell resistance to lincomycin, sulfadiazine, streptomycin, rifampicin, puromycin and sulfametox­azole. Since the food chain is an important way of transmitting resistance genes in human and animal population, it is of great importance to study the mechanisms of resistance in lactococci and other LAB, intended for the food industry. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173019: Izučavanje gena i molekularnih mehanizama u osnovi probiotičke aktivnosti bakterija mlečne kiseline izolovanih sa područja Zapadnog Balkana

  14. Cyclopropanation of membrane unsaturated fatty acids is not essential to the acid stress response of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Thi Mai Huong; Grandvalet, Cosette; Tourdot-Maréchal, Raphaëlle

    2011-05-01

    Cyclopropane fatty acids (CFAs) are synthetized in situ by the transfer of a methylene group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to a double bond of unsaturated fatty acid chains of membrane phospholipids. This conversion, catalyzed by the Cfa synthase enzyme, occurs in many bacteria and is recognized to play a key role in the adaptation of bacteria in response to a drastic perturbation of the environment. The role of CFAs in the acid tolerance response was investigated in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis MG1363. A mutant of the cfa gene was constructed by allelic exchange. The cfa gene encoding the Cfa synthase was cloned and introduced into the mutant to obtain the complemented strain for homologous system studies. Data obtained by gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) validated that the mutant could not produce CFA. The CFA levels in both the wild-type and complemented strains increased upon their entry to stationary phase, especially with acid-adapted cells or, more surprisingly, with ethanol-adapted cells. The results obtained by performing quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) experiments showed that transcription of the cfa gene was highly induced by acidity (by 10-fold with cells grown at pH 5.0) and by ethanol (by 9-fold with cells grown with 6% ethanol) in comparison with that in stationary phase. Cell viability experiments were performed after an acidic shock on the mutant strain, the wild-type strain, and the complemented strain, as a control. The higher viability level of the acid-adapted cells of the three strains after 3 h of shock proved that the cyclopropanation of unsaturated fatty acids is not essential for L. lactis subsp. cremoris survival under acidic conditions. Moreover, fluorescence anisotropy data showed that CFA itself could not maintain the membrane fluidity level, particularly with ethanol-grown cells.

  15. Reconstitution of the Leucine Transport System of Lactococcus lactis into Liposomes Composed of Membrane-Spanning Lipids from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    in t Veld, Geertruida; Elferink, Maria; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Konings, Wilhelmus

    1992-01-01

    The effect of bipolar tetraether lipids, extracted from the thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, on the branched-chain amino acid transport system of the mesophilic bacterium Lactococcus lactis was investigated. Liposomes were prepared from mixtures of monolayer lipids and the

  16. Cooperation between Lactococcus lactis and nonstarter lactobacilli in the formation of cheese aroma from amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieronczyk, Agnieszka; Skeie, Siv; Langsrud, Thor; Yvon, Mireille

    2003-02-01

    In Gouda and Cheddar type cheeses the amino acid conversion to aroma compounds, which is a major process for aroma formation, is essentially due to lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In order to evaluate the respective role of starter and nonstarter LAB and their interactions in cheese flavor formation, we compared the catabolism of phenylalanine, leucine, and methionine by single strains and strain mixtures of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris NCDO763 and three mesophilic lactobacilli. Amino acid catabolism was studied in vitro at pH 5.5, by using radiolabeled amino acids as tracers. In the presence of alpha-ketoglutarate, which is essential for amino acid transamination, the lactobacillus strains degraded less amino acids than L. lactis subsp. cremoris NCDO763, and produced mainly nonaromatic metabolites. L. lactis subsp. cremoris NCDO763 produced mainly the carboxylic acids, which are important compounds for cheese aroma. However, in the reaction mixture containing glutamate, only two lactobacillus strains degraded amino acids significantly. This was due to their glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity, which produced alpha-ketoglutarate from glutamate. The combination of each of the GDH-positive lactobacilli with L. lactis subsp. cremoris NCDO763 had a beneficial effect on the aroma formation. Lactobacilli initiated the conversion of amino acids by transforming them mainly to keto and hydroxy acids, which subsequently were converted to carboxylic acids by the Lactococcus strain. Therefore, we think that such cooperation between starter L. lactis and GDH-positive lactobacilli can stimulate flavor development in cheese.

  17. Physiological and molecular adaptations of Lactococcus lactis to near-zero growth conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ercan, O.

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is an important lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species that is used for the manufacture of dairy products, such as cheese, buttermilk, and other fermented products. The predominant function of this bacterium in dairy fermentation is the production of lactic acid, as its major fermenta

  18. Development, molecular characterization and exploitation of the nisin controlled expression system in Lactococcus lactis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruyter, de P.G.G.A.

    1998-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are gram-positive bacteria that are widely used in a variety of dairy fermentation processes. Notably, strains of the lactic acid starter bacterium Lactococcus lactis are of great economic importance because of their world-wide use in cheese making. The characteristic aroma, fla

  19. Development, molecular characterisation and exploitation of the nisin controlled expression system in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruyter, de P.G.G.A.

    1998-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are gram-positive bacteria that are widely used in a variety of dairy fermentation processes. Notably, strains of the lactic acid starter bacterium Lactococcus lactis are of great economic importance because of their world-wide use in cheese making.

  20. Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 2118, a GABA-Producing Strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Letícia C; Saraiva, Tessália D L; Soares, Siomar C

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 2118 is a nondairy lactic acid bacterium, a xylose fermenter, and a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) producer isolated from frozen peas. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of L. lactis NCDO 2118, a strain with probiotic potential activity....

  1. Characterization of the Lactococcus lactis lactose genes and regulation of their expression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijen, van R.J.

    1993-01-01

    An important trait of the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis , that is used in industrial dairy fermentations, is the conversion of lactose into lactic acid. The enzymatic steps involved in the breakdown of lactose, that is transported into the cell via a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent lactose

  2. Antimicrobial activity against Xanthomonas albilineans and fermentation kinetics of a lactic acid bacterium isolated from the sugar cane crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Serna-Cock

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Xanthomonas albilineans is a pathogen that causes leaf scald disease in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L. This disease causes the death of seedlings and consequently results in economic losses for sugarcane growers. The objective of this work was to isolate a lactic acid bacterium with antimicrobial activity against X. albilineans from sugarcane crops and to evaluate its antimicrobial activity and its lactic acid production kinetics, biomass yield, and substrate consumption in three different fermentation substrates. To isolate the lactic acid bacterium, samples were collected from different parts of infected and non-infected sugarcane plants of var. CC85-92. Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis was isolated from the leaves of healthy crops, and showed in vitro antimicrobial activity against the pathogen. Batch fermentations of this isolate (at 32 °C, agitation of 100 rpm, and pH 6 were performed using a commercial substrate (MRS, a commercial substrate supplemented with glucose (MRSG, and a substrate produced from agricultural crop residues (ACR. The highest antimicrobial activity was 5.83 mm in the ACR substrate after 6 h of fermentation. The maximum biomass production of 3.37 g L-1 and the maximum lactic acid production of 12.1 g L-1 were obtained in the MRSG substrate. The lactic acid production did not show any significant differences between the substrates. This lactic acid bacterium showed antimicrobial activity against X. albilineans and is thus a biological alternative for the control of leaf scald disease in sugarcane.

  3. Controlled Gene Expression Systems for Lactic Acid Bacteria : Transferable Nisin-Inducible Expression Cassettes for Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, and Lactobacillus spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleerebezem, Michiel; Beerthuyzen, Marke M.; Vaughan, Elaine E.; Vos, Willem M. de; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    1997-01-01

    A transferable dual-plasmid inducible gene expression system for use in lactic acid bacteria that is based on the autoregulatory properties of the antimicrobial peptide nisin produced by Lactococcus lactis was developed. Introduction of the two plasmids allowed nisin-inducible gene expression in Lac

  4. Targeting diseases with genetically engineered Lactococcus lactis and its course towards medical translation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villatoro-Hernandez, Julio; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, Roberto; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2011-01-01

    The use of the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis, primarily used in food fermentations, as therapeutic agent is no longer speculative but an imminent reality. After the successful completion of Phase I and II clinical trials in humans for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, an ongoin

  5. Construction of a food-grade multiple-copy integration system for Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenhouts, K.; Bolhuis, A.; Venema, G.; Kok, J.

    A food-grade vector system was developed that allows stable integration of multiple plasmid copies in the chromosome of Lactococcus lactis. The vector consists of the plus origin of replication (Ori(+)) of the lactococcal plasmid pWV01, the sucrose genes of the lactic acid bacterium Pediococcus

  6. Sec-mediated secretion of bacteriocin enterocin P by Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herranz, C; Driessen, AJM

    2005-01-01

    Most lactic acid bacterium bacteriocins utilize specific leader peptides and dedicated machineries for secretion. In contrast, the enterococcal bacteriocin enterocin P (EntP) contains a typical signal peptide that directs its secretion when heterologously expressed in Lactococcus lactis. Signal pept

  7. Relationships between MDR proteins, bacteriocin production and proteolysis in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gajic, Olivera

    2003-01-01

    The Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis can harbour a wide variety of circular extrachromosomal DNA molecules, so-called plasmids. Many of the traits that make them useful for manufacturing of fermented food products (e.g. bacteriophage resistance, bacteriocin and proteinase produ

  8. Changes in Glycolytic Activity of Lactococcus lactis Induced by Low Temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Jeroen A.; Kamphuis, Henrike H.; Hugenholtz, Jeroen; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Vos, Willem M. de; Abee, Tjakko

    2000-01-01

    The effects of low-temperature stress on the glycolytic activity of the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis were studied. The maximal glycolytic activity measured at 30°C increased approximately 2.5-fold following a shift from 30 to 10°C for 4 h in a process that required protein synthesis.

  9. Changes in glycolytic activity of Lactococcus lactis induced by low temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, J.A.; Kamphuis, H.H.; Hugenholtz, J.; Kuipers, O.P.; Vos, de W.M.; Abee, T.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of low-temperature stress on the glycolytic activity of the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis were studied. The maximal glycolytic activity measured at 30°C increased approximately 2.5-fold following a shift from 30 to 10°C for 4 h in a process that required protein synthesis.

  10. Microbial domestication signatures of Lactococcus lactis can be reproduced by experimental evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bachmann, H.; Starrenburg, M.J.C.; Molenaar, D.; Kleerebezem, M.; Hylckama Vlieg, van J.E.T.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental evolution is a powerful approach to unravel how selective forces shape microbial genotypes and phenotypes. To this date, the available examples focus on the adaptation to conditions specific to the laboratory. The lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis naturally occurs on plants and i

  11. Enhance nisin yield via improving acid-tolerant capability of Lactococcus lactis F44

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Caiyin, Qinggele; Feng, Wenjing; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Bin; Zhao, Guangrong; Qiao, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, nisin was produced industrially by using Lactococcus lactis in the neutral fermentation process. However, nisin showed higher activity in the acidic environment. How to balance the pH value for bacterial normal growth and nisin activity might be the key problem. In this study, 17 acid-tolerant genes and 6 lactic acid synthetic genes were introduced in L. lactis F44, respectively. Comparing to the 2810 IU/mL nisin yield of the original strain F44, the nisin titer of the engineered strains over-expressing hdeAB, ldh and murG, increased to 3850, 3979 and 4377 IU/mL, respectively. These engineered strains showed more stable intracellular pH value during the fermentation process. Improvement of lactate production could partly provide the extra energy for the expression of acid tolerance genes during growth. Co-overexpression of hdeAB, murG, and ldh(Z) in strain F44 resulted in the nisin titer of 4913 IU/mL. The engineered strain (ABGL) could grow on plates with pH 4.2, comparing to the surviving pH 4.6 of strain F44. The fed-batch fermentation showed nisin titer of the co-expression L. lactis strain could reach 5563 IU/mL with lower pH condition and longer cultivation time. This work provides a novel strategy of constructing robust strains for use in industry process. PMID:27306587

  12. Identification of a novel operon in Lactococcus lactis encoding three enzymes for lactic acid synthesis: phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llanos, R M; Harris, C J; Hillier, A J; Davidson, B E

    1993-01-01

    The discovery of a novel multicistronic operon that encodes phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis is reported. The three genes in the operon, designated pfk, pyk, and ldh, contain 340, 502, and 325 codons, respectively. The intergenic distances are 87 bp between pfk and pyk and 117 bp between pyk and ldh. Plasmids containing pfk and pyk conferred phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase activity, respectively, on their host. The identity of ldh was established previously by the same approach (R. M. Llanos, A. J. Hillier, and B. E. Davidson, J. Bacteriol. 174:6956-6964, 1992). Each of the genes is preceded by a potential ribosome binding site. The operon is expressed in a 4.1-kb transcript. The 5' end of the transcript was determined to be a G nucleotide positioned 81 bp upstream from the pfk start codon. The pattern of codon usage within the operon is highly biased, with 11 unused amino acid codons. This degree of bias suggests that the operon is highly expressed. The three proteins encoded on the operon are key enzymes in the Embden-Meyerhoff pathway, the central pathway of energy production and lactic acid synthesis in L. lactis. For this reason, we have called the operon the las (lactic acid synthesis) operon. Images PMID:8478320

  13. Use of Lactococcus lactis to enrich sourdough bread with γ-aminobutyric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanwar, Seema; Bamnia, Meenakshi; Ghosh, Moushumi; Ganguli, Abhijit

    2013-02-01

    Fried sourdough bread (bhatura) with an elevated amount of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was produced using lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The LAB starter was screened and isolated from pickled yam showing highest GABA content and was identified as Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. The maximum GABA production in de Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) media supplemented with monosodium glutamate (MSG) was 110 mg/100 ml at pH 5, and 1-3% NaCl did not change the production of GABA significantly (p>0.05). When MSG was replaced with Vigna mungo in sourdough, the amount of GABA for bhatura was 226.22 mg/100 g representing about 10-fold increase. A sensory evaluation resulted as the overall general acceptability of bhatura to be 4.91 ± 0.03 on a five-point hedonic scale. Thus, the results indicated the potential of L. lactis as a LAB starter for the production of GABA-enriched bhatura. Although other physiological effects can be expected in the product, animal and clinical studies are mandatory prior to application of this food.

  14. Spoilage potential of psychrotrophic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species: Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum and Lactococcus piscium, on sweet bell pepper (SBP) simulation medium under different gas compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothakos, Vasileios; Nyambi, Clarice; Zhang, Bao-Yu; Papastergiadis, Antonios; De Meulenaer, Bruno; Devlieghere, Frank

    2014-05-16

    Sweet bell peppers are a significant constituent of retail, chilled-stored and packaged food products like fresh salads, marinades and ready-to-eat (RTE) meals. Previously, through general screening of the Belgian market and by means of source tracking analysis in a plant manufacturing minimally processed, vegetable salads the susceptibility of fresh-cut sweet bell peppers to lactic acid bacterium (LAB) contamination was substantiated. The determination of the metabolic profiles of Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum and Lactococcus piscium, two major psychrotrophic, spoilage-related LAB species, on sweet bell pepper (SBP) simulation medium under different packaging conditions - 1.) vacuum: 100% N2, 2.) air: 21% O2, 79% N2, 3.) MAP1: 30% CO2, 70% N2 and 4.) MAP2: 50% O2, 50% CO2 - facilitated a better understanding of the spoilage potential of these microbes as well as the presumptive contribution of O2 in the spectrum of produced volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with poor organoleptic properties of food products. Generally, none of the applied gas compositions inhibited the growth of the 4 L. gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum isolates, however the presence of O2 resulted in buttery off-odors by inducing primarily the accumulation of diacetyl and pungent "vinegar" smell due to acetic acid. The 3 tested isolates of L. piscium varied greatly among their growth dynamics and inhibition at MAP2. They exhibited either weak spoilage profile or very offensive metabolism confirming significant intraspecies diversity.

  15. Reconstitution of the Leucine Transport System of Lactococcus lactis into Liposomes Composed of Membrane-Spanning Lipids from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    in t Veld, Geertruida; Elferink, Maria; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Konings, Wilhelmus

    1992-01-01

    The effect of bipolar tetraether lipids, extracted from the thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, on the branched-chain amino acid transport system of the mesophilic bacterium Lactococcus lactis was investigated. Liposomes were prepared from mixtures of monolayer lipids and the bil

  16. The riboflavin transporter RibU in Lactococcus lactis : Molecular characterization of gene expression and the transport mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgess, CM; Slotboom, DJ; Geertsma, ER; Duurkens, Hinderika; Poolman, B; van Sinderen, D

    2006-01-01

    This study describes the characterization of the riboflavin transport protein RibU in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris NZ9000. RibU is predicted to contain five membrane-spanning segments and is a member of a novel transport protein family, not described in the Transport

  17. Salt-inducible promoter derivable from a lactic acid bacterium, and its use in a lactic acid bacterium for production of a desired protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Jan Willem; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerard; Ledeboer, Adrianus Marinus

    1998-01-01

    The invention provides a salt-inducible promoter present in SEQ ID NO: 10 and derivable from a lactic acid bacterium in isolation from the coding sequence normally controlled by said promoter in a wild-type lactic acid bacterium, with modifications and important parts thereof. Also provided are a

  18. Salt-inducible promoter derivable from a lactic acid bacterium, and its use in a lactic acid bacterium for production of a desired protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Jan Willem; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerard; Ledeboer, Adrianus Marinus

    1998-01-01

    The invention provides a salt-inducible promoter present in SEQ ID NO: 10 and derivable from a lactic acid bacterium in isolation from the coding sequence normally controlled by said promoter in a wild-type lactic acid bacterium, with modifications and important parts thereof. Also provided are a re

  19. Development, molecular characterization and exploitation of the nisin controlled expression system in Lactococcus lactis.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruyter, de, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are gram-positive bacteria that are widely used in a variety of dairy fermentation processes. Notably, strains of the lactic acid starter bacterium Lactococcus lactis are of great economic importance because of their world-wide use in cheese making. The characteristic aroma, flavor and texture of cheese develops during ripening of the cheese curd through the action of numerous enzymes derived from the cheese milk, the coagulant, and the starter and non-starter bacteria. R...

  20. Characterization of the Lactococcus lactis lactose genes and regulation of their expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Rooijen, van, J.

    1993-01-01

    An important trait of the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis , that is used in industrial dairy fermentations, is the conversion of lactose into lactic acid. The enzymatic steps involved in the breakdown of lactose, that is transported into the cell via a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent lactose phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS lac), have been well established (Fig. 1). However, except for the molecular cloning and characterization of the plasmid-located phospho-B-galactosidase gene (Boi...

  1. Development, molecular characterisation and exploitation of the nisin controlled expression system in Lactococcus lactis

    OpenAIRE

    Ruyter, de, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are gram-positive bacteria that are widely used in a variety of dairy fermentation processes. Notably, strains of the lactic acid starter bacterium Lactococcus lactis are of great economic importance because of their world-wide use in cheese making. The characteristic aroma, flavor and texture of cheese develops during ripening of the cheese curd through the action of numerous enzymes derived from the cheese milk, the coagulant, and the start...

  2. Determination of the phosphorylated sugars of the Embden-Meyerhoff-Parnas Pathway in Lactococcus lactis using a fast sampling technique and solid phase extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels B.s.; Jokumsen, Kirsten Væver; Villadsen, John

    1999-01-01

    An experimental procedure for the determination of intracellular concentrations of the phosphorylated sugars in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis is presented. The first step of the procedure is a rapid sampling of a small volume of the growth medium into 60% (v/v) methanol precooled...

  3. Use of non-growing Lactococcus lactis cell suspensions for production of volatile metabolites with direct relevance for flavour formation during dairy fermentations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunt, van de B.; Bron, P.A.; Sijtsma, L.; Vos, de W.M.; Hugenholtz, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Lactococcus lactis is a lactic acid bacterium that has been used for centuries in the production of a variety of cheeses, as these bacteria rapidly acidify milk and greatly contribute to the flavour of the fermentation end-products. After a short growth phase during cheese ripening L. lac

  4. Identification and functional characterization of the Lactococcus lactis CodY-regulated branched-chain amino acid permease BcaP (CtrA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hengst, CD; Groeneveld, M; Kuipers, OP; Kok, J; Hengst, Chris D. den

    2006-01-01

    Transcriptome analyses have previously revealed that a gene encoding the putative amino acid transporter CtrA (YhdG) is one of the major targets of the pleiotropic regulator CodY in Lactococcus lactis and Bacillus subtilis. The role of ctrA in L. lactis was further investigated with respect to both

  5. Design of aqueous two-phase systems for purification of hyaluronic acid produced by metabolically engineered Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Vivek; Puvendran, Kirubhakaran; Guru, Bharath Raja; Jayaraman, Guhan

    2016-02-01

    Hyaluronic acid has a wide range of biomedical applications and its commercial value is highly dependent on its purity and molecular weight. This study highlights the utility of aqueous two-phase separation as a primary recovery step for hyaluronic acid and for removal of major protein impurities from fermentation broths. Metabolically engineered cultures of a lactate dehydrogenase mutant strain of Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis NZ9020) were used to produce high-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid. The cell-free fermentation broth was partially purified using a polyethylene glycol/potassium phosphate system, resulting in nearly 100% recovery of hyaluronic acid in the salt-rich bottom phase in all the aqueous two-phase separation experiments. These experiments were optimized for maximum removal of protein impurities in the polyethylene glycol rich top phase. The removal of protein impurities resulted in substantial reduction of membrane fouling in the subsequent diafiltration process, carried out with a 300 kDa polyether sulfone membrane. This step resulted in considerable purification of hyaluronic acid, without any loss in recovery and molecular weight. Diafiltration was followed by an adsorption step to remove minor impurities and achieve nearly 100% purity. The final hyaluronic acid product was characterized by Fourier-transform IR and NMR spectroscopy, confirming its purity.

  6. The simultaneous biosynthesis and uptake of amino acids by Lactococcus lactis studied by C-13-labeling experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, N.B.S.; Christensen, B.; Nielsen, Jette

    2002-01-01

    Uniformly C-13 labeled glucose was fed to a lactic acid bacterium growing on a defined medium supplemented with all proteinogenic amino acids except glutamate. Aspartate stemming from the protein pool and from the extracellular medium was enriched with C-13 disclosing a substantial de novo...... biosynthesis of this amino acid simultaneous to its uptake from the growth medium and a rapid exchange flux of aspartate over the cellular membrane. Phenylalanine, alanine, and threonine were also synthesized de novo in spite of their presence in the growth medium....

  7. L+-lactic acid production from starch by a novel amylolytic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis B84.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Kaloyan; Urshev, Zoltan; Petrova, Penka

    2008-06-01

    A new Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis B84, capable of utilizing starch as a sole carbon source and producing L(+)-lactate, was isolated from spontaneously fermented rye sourdough. Aiming at maximum lactic acid productivity, the components of the media and the cultivation conditions were varied. In MRS-starch medium (with absence of yeast and meat extracts), at 33 degrees C, agitation 200 rpm and pH 6.0 for 6 days complete starch hydrolysis occurred and 5.5 gl(-1) lactic acid were produced from 18 gl(-1) starch. The identification of strain B84 was based on genetic criteria. Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA), PCR with species-specific primers and sequencing of the 16S rDNA proved its species affiliation. Four genes for enzymes, involved in starch degradation were detected in B84 genome: amyL, amyY, glgP and apu, coding cytoplasmic and extracellular alpha-amylases, glycogen phosphorylase and amylopullulanase, respectively. Reverse transcription PCR experiments showed that both genes, encoding alpha-amylases (amyL and amyY) were expressed into mRNAs, whereas apu and glgP were not. Amylase activity assay was performed at different pH and temperatures. The cell-bond amylase proved to be the key enzyme, involved in the starch hydrolysis with maximum activity at 45 degrees C and pH 5.4.

  8. Increased biomass yield of Lactococcus lactis by reduced overconsumption of amino acids and increased catalytic activities of enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaarel Adamberg

    Full Text Available Steady state cultivation and multidimensional data analysis (metabolic fluxes, absolute proteome, and transcriptome are used to identify parameters that control the increase in biomass yield of Lactococcus lactis from 0.10 to 0.12 C-mol C-mol(-1 with an increase in specific growth rate by 5 times from 0.1 to 0.5 h(-1. Reorganization of amino acid consumption was expressed by the inactivation of the arginine deiminase pathway at a specific growth rate of 0.35 h(-1 followed by reduced over-consumption of pyruvate directed amino acids (asparagine, serine, threonine, alanine and cysteine until almost all consumed amino acids were used only for protein synthesis at maximal specific growth rate. This balanced growth was characterized by a high glycolytic flux carrying up to 87% of the carbon flow and only amino acids that relate to nucleotide synthesis (glutamine, serine and asparagine were consumed in higher amounts than required for cellular protein synthesis. Changes in the proteome were minor (mainly increase in the translation apparatus. Instead, the apparent catalytic activities of enzymes and ribosomes increased by 3.5 times (0.1 vs 0.5 h(-1. The apparent catalytic activities of glycolytic enzymes and ribosomal proteins were seen to follow this regulation pattern while those of enzymes involved in nucleotide metabolism increased more than the specific growth rate (over 5.5 times. Nucleotide synthesis formed the most abundant biomonomer synthetic pathway in the cells with an expenditure of 6% from the total ATP required for biosynthesis. Due to the increase in apparent catalytic activity, ribosome translation was more efficient at higher growth rates as evidenced by a decrease of protein to mRNA ratios. All these effects resulted in a 30% decrease of calculated ATP spilling (0.1 vs 0.5 h(-1. Our results show that bioprocesses can be made more efficient (using a balanced metabolism by varying the growth conditions.

  9. Producción de ácido láctico por una mezcla de Lactococcus lactis y Streptococcus salivarius en fermentaciones en discontinuo Lactic acid production from a mixture of cultures of Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus salivarius using batch fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez de Stouvenel Aida

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió la producción de ácido láctico (AL, la conversión de sustrato (CG, y el rendimiento(Yp/s de Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus salivarius y una mezcla 1:1 de ambas cepas en sustrato glucosado. Lactococcus lactis se seleccionó de 20 cepas homofermentativas aisladas de cultivos de caña de azúcar variedad CC85-92 y Streptococcus salivarius se aisló de un fermento láctico comercial. En fermentaciones llevadas a cabo con la mezcla microbiana, a 32 °C con 60 gL-1 de glucosa y pH 6,0 se obtuvo un máximo de 47,63 gL-1 de ácido láctico, conversión de glucosa de 95,4% y rendimiento en producto de 0,83 gg-1. Palabras clave: caña de azúcar, Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus salivarius, mezcla de cepas.Production of lactic acid (LA, yield (Yp/s and substrate conversion (SC from Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus salivarius and their mixtures were tested. Lactococcus lactis was selected from 20 homofermentative strains isolated from a sugar cane crop (variety CC85-92 and Streptococcus salivarius was isolated from a commercial lactic ferment. Batch fermentation experiments at 32 C with a glucose concentration of 60 gL-1 and a pH of 6,0 were carried out. A maximum of 47,63 gL-1 of lactic acid concentration, 95,4% of substrate conversion and 83 gg-1 were obtained from the mixture of strains after a fermentation of 48 h. Key words: sugar cane, Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus salivarius, mixture of strains.

  10. 13C based proteinogenic amino acid (PAA and metabolic flux ratio analysis of Lactococcus lactis reveals changes in pentose phosphate (PP pathway in response to agitation and temperature related stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalrul Azlan Azizan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 is an important starter culture for dairy fermentation. During industrial fermentations, L. lactis is constantly exposed to stresses that affect the growth and performance of the bacterium. Although the response of L. lactis to several stresses has been described, the adaptation mechanisms at the level of in vivo fluxes have seldom been described. To gain insights into cellular metabolism, 13C metabolic flux analysis and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS were used to measure the flux ratios of active pathways in the central metabolism of L. lactis when subjected to three conditions varying in temperature (30°C, 37°C and agitation (with and without agitation at 150 rpm. Collectively, the concentrations of proteinogenic amino acids (PAAs and free fatty acids (FAAs were compared, and Pearson correlation analysis (r was calculated to measure the pairwise relationship between PAAs. Branched chain and aromatic amino acids, threonine, serine, lysine and histidine were correlated strongly, suggesting changes in flux regulation in glycolysis, the pentose phosphate (PP pathway, malic enzyme and anaplerotic reaction catalysed by pyruvate carboxylase (pycA. Flux ratio analysis revealed that glucose was mainly converted by glycolysis, highlighting the stability of L. lactis’ central carbon metabolism despite different conditions. Higher flux ratios through oxaloacetate (OAA from pyruvate (PYR reaction in all conditions suggested the activation of pyruvate carboxylate (pycA in L. lactis, in response to acid stress during exponential phase. Subsequently, more significant flux ratio differences were seen through the oxidative and non-oxidative pentose phosphate (PP pathways, malic enzyme, and serine and C1 metabolism, suggesting NADPH requirements in response to environmental stimuli. These reactions could play an important role in optimization strategies for metabolic engineering in L. lactis. Overall

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer-ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi-cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome squence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Mun Su [University of Florida, Gainesville; Moritz, Brelan E. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Patel, Milind [University of Florida, Gainesville; Ou, Mark [University of Florida, Gainesville; Harbrucker, Roberta [University of Florida, Gainesville; Ingram, Lonnie O. [University of Florida; Shanmugam, Keelnathan T. [University of Florida

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer- ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this spo- rogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attrac- tive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi- cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome se- quence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  13. Effect of alginic acid decomposing bacterium on the growth of Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyceae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG You; TANG Xue-xi; YANG Zhen; YU Zhi-ming

    2006-01-01

    We collected the diseased blades of Laminaria japonica from Yantai Sea Farm from October to December 2002, and the alginic acid decomposing bacterium on the diseased blade was isolated and purified, and was identified as Alteromonas espejiana. This bacterium was applied as the causative pathogen to infect the blades of L. japonica under laboratory conditions. The aim of the present study was to identify the effects of the bacterium on the growth of L. japonica, and to find the possibly effective mechanism. Results showed that: (1)The blades of L.japonica exhibited symptoms of lesion,bleaching and deterioration when infected by the bacterium,and their growth and photosynthesis were dramatically suppressed. At the same time, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation enhanced obviously, and the relative membrane permeability increased significantly. The contents of malonaldehyde (MDA) and free fatty acid in the microsomol membrane greatly elevated, but the phospholipid content decreased. Result suggested an obvious peroxidation and deesterrification in the blades of L. japonica when infected by the bacterium. (2) The simultaneous assay on the antioxidant enzyme activities demonstrated that superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) increased greatly when infected by the bacterium, but glutathione peroxidase (Gpx) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) did not exhibit active responses to the bacterium throughout the experiment. (3) The histomorphological observations gave a distinctive evidence of the severity of the lesions as well as the relative abundance in the bacterial population on the blades after infection. The bacterium firstly invaded into the endodermis of L. japonica and gathered around there, and then resulted in the membrane damage, cells corruption and ultimately, the death of L.japonica.

  14. Two New Cholic Acid Derivatives from the Marine Ascidian-Associated Bacterium Hasllibacter halocynthiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Hun Kim

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of secondary metabolites in liquid cultures of a recently discovered marine bacterium, Hasllibacter halocynthiae strain KME 002T, led to the isolation of two new cholic acid derivatives. The structures of these compounds were determined to be 3,3,12-trihydroxy-7-ketocholanic acid (1 and 3,3,12-trihydroxy-7-deoxycholanic acid (2 through HRFABMS and NMR data analyses.

  15. Endohyphal bacterium enhances production of indole-3-acetic acid by a foliar fungal endophyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Michele T; Gunatilaka, Malkanthi K; Wijeratne, Kithsiri; Gunatilaka, Leslie; Arnold, A Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Numerous plant pathogens, rhizosphere symbionts, and endophytic bacteria and yeasts produce the important phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), often with profound effects on host plants. However, to date IAA production has not been documented among foliar endophytes -- the diverse guild of primarily filamentous Ascomycota that live within healthy, above-ground tissues of all plant species studied thus far. Recently bacteria that live within hyphae of endophytes (endohyphal bacteria) have been detected, but their effects have not been studied previously. Here we show not only that IAA is produced in vitro by a foliar endophyte (here identified as Pestalotiopsis aff. neglecta, Xylariales), but that IAA production is enhanced significantly when the endophyte hosts an endohyphal bacterium (here identified as Luteibacter sp., Xanthomonadales). Both the endophyte and the endophyte/bacterium complex appear to rely on an L-tryptophan dependent pathway for IAA synthesis. The bacterium can be isolated from the fungus when the symbiotic complex is cultivated at 36°C. In pure culture the bacterium does not produce IAA. Culture filtrate from the endophyte-bacterium complex significantly enhances growth of tomato in vitro relative to controls and to filtrate from the endophyte alone. Together these results speak to a facultative symbiosis between an endophyte and endohyphal bacterium that strongly influences IAA production, providing a new framework in which to explore endophyte-plant interactions.

  16. The level of pyruvate-formate lyase controls the shift from homolactic to mixed-acid product formation in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melchiorsen, C.R.; Jokumsen, K.V.; Villadsen, John

    2002-01-01

    promoters in L. lactis MG1363 and in the PFL-deficient strain CRM40. Strains with five different PFL levels were obtained. Variation in the PFL level markedly affected the resulting end-product formation in these strains. During growth on galactose, the flux towards mixed-acid products was to a great extent......Regulation of pyruvate-formate lyase (PFL) activity in vivo plays a central role in the shift from homolactic to mixed-acid product formation observed during the growth of Lactococcus lactis on glucose and galactose, respectively. Characterisation of L lactis MG1363 in anaerobic batch cultures...... controlled by the PFL level. This demonstrates that a regulated PFL level plays a predominant role in the regulation of the metabolic shift from homolactic to mixed-acid product formation in L lactis....

  17. Catalytic activity of tripeptidase from Lactococcus lactis to which amino acid substitution was introduced according to natural mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Sumiko; Kaneko, Satoshi; Kasumi, Takafumi

    2004-05-01

    Four mutations observed between tripeptidases from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and subsp. cremoris were introduced one by one to the corresponding points in wild-type tripeptidase from L. lactis subsp. lactis. The k(cat) values of four resultant mutants were analyzed and discussed in stereographical terms. Change in catalytic activity appeared to be related to the sequential and steric location of mutation point within the enzyme protein, even though no drastic change was observed with one point mutation.

  18. Mesophilic Lactic Acid Bacteria Diversity Encountered in Brazilian Farms Producing Milk with Particular Interest in Lactococcus lactis Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiz, L M P; Chuat, V; Madec, M N; Araújo, E A; de Carvalho, A F; Valence, F

    2016-10-01

    The milk produced in regions with different traditions in Brazil is used for artisanal product production, which is characterized by different sensorial characteristics. This study aimed to identify the bacterial ecosystem of farms located in a traditional dairy region in the state of Minas Gerais and to characterize Lactococcus lactis strains, the species of interest in this study, using a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) protocol and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) technique. Samples were collected from raw milk and dairy environment from six farms. A total of 50 isolates were analyzed using 16S rRNA sequencing and species-specific PCR. Five genera were identified: Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Lactococcus, Enterococcus, and Staphylococcus, from ten different species. MLST (with six housekeeping genes) and PFGE (with SmaI endonuclease) were used for the characterization of 20 isolates of Lactococcus lactis from a dairy collection in this study. Both methods revealed a high clonal diversity of strains with a higher discriminatory level for PFGE (15 pulsotypes), compared to MLST (12 ST). This study contributes to the preservation of the Brazilian dairy heritage and provides insights into a part of the LAB population found in raw milk and dairy environment.

  19. An oleaginous bacterium that intrinsically accumulates long-chain free Fatty acids in its cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Taiki; Kanno, Manabu; Morita, Naoki; Hori, Tomoyuki; Narihiro, Takashi; Mitani, Yasuo; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2014-02-01

    Medium- and long-chain fatty acids are present in organisms in esterified forms that serve as cell membrane constituents and storage compounds. A large number of organisms are known to accumulate lipophilic materials as a source of energy and carbon. We found a bacterium, designated GK12, that intrinsically accumulates free fatty acids (FFAs) as intracellular droplets without exhibiting cytotoxicity. GK12 is an obligatory anaerobic, mesophilic lactic acid bacterium that was isolated from a methanogenic reactor. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that GK12 is affiliated with the family Erysipelotrichaceae in the phylum Firmicutes but is distantly related to type species in this family (less than 92% similarity in 16S rRNA gene sequence). Saturated fatty acids with carbon chain lengths of 14, 16, 18, and 20 were produced from glucose under stress conditions, including higher-than-optimum temperatures and the presence of organic solvents that affect cell membrane integrity. FFAs were produced at levels corresponding to up to 25% (wt/wt) of the dry cell mass. Our data suggest that FFA accumulation is a result of an imbalance between excess membrane fatty acid biosynthesis due to homeoviscous adaptation and limited β-oxidation activity due to anaerobic growth involving lactic acid fermentation. FFA droplets were not further utilized as an energy and carbon source, even under conditions of starvation. A naturally occurring bacterium that accumulates significant amounts of long-chain FFAs with noncytotoxicity would provide useful strategies for microbial biodiesel production.

  20. Uncoupling effect of fatty acids in halo- and alkalotolerant bacterium Bacillus pseudofirmus FTU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, I V; Bodrova, M E; Mokhova, E N; Muntyan, M S

    2004-10-01

    Natural uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation, long-chain non-esterified fatty acids, cause uncoupling in the alkalo- and halotolerant bacterium Bacillus pseudofirmus FTU. The uncoupling effect in the bacterial cells was manifested as decrease of membrane potential and increase of respiratory activity. The membrane potential decrease was detected only in bacterial cells exhausted by their endogenous substrates. In proteoliposomes containing reconstituted bacterial cytochrome c oxidase, fatty acids caused a "mild" uncoupling effect by reducing membrane potential only at low rate of membrane potential generation. "Free respiration" induced by the "mild" uncouplers, the fatty acids, can be considered as possible mechanism responsible for adaptation of the bacteria to a constantly changed environment.

  1. Increased production of folate by metabolic engineering of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sybesma, W.F.H.; Starrenburg, M.; Kleerebezem, M.; Mierau, I.; Vos, de W.M.; Hugenholtz, J.

    2003-01-01

    The dairy starter bacterium Lactococcus lactis is able to synthesize folate and accumulates large amounts of folate, predominantly in the polyglutamyl form. Only small amounts of the produced folate are released in the extracellular medium. Five genes involved in folate biosynthesis were identified

  2. Multidrug transporters and antibiotic resistance in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelarends, GJ; Mazurkiewicz, P; Konings, WN

    2002-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis produces two distinct multidrug transporters, designated LmrA and LmrP, that both confer resistance to a wide variety of cationic lipophilic cytotoxic compounds as well as to many clinically relevant antibiotics. While LmrP is a proton/drug antiporter

  3. Multidrug transporters and antibiotic resistance in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelarends, GJ; Mazurkiewicz, P; Konings, WN

    2002-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis produces two distinct multidrug transporters, designated LmrA and LmrP, that both confer resistance to a wide variety of cationic lipophilic cytotoxic compounds as well as to many clinically relevant antibiotics. While LmrP is a proton/drug antiporter t

  4. Programmed cell death in Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyta) tissues infected with alginic acid decomposing bacterium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gaoge; LIN Wei; ZHANG Lijing; YAN Xiaojun; DUAN Delin

    2004-01-01

    TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) is a sensitive and valid method for detecting DNA cleavage in programmed cell death (PCD). Using this method, DNA cleavage was observed in Laminaria japonica sporophytic tissues, which were infected with alginic acid decomposing bacterium. It was found that DNA cleavage occurred 5 min after the infection, the fragments with 3′-OH groups of cleaved nuclear DNA increased with time of infection and spread from the infection site. Although no typical DNA ladder (200 bp/180 bp) was detected by routine agarose gel electrophoresis, the cleavage of nuclear DNA fragments of 97~48.5 kb could be detected by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). By using CaspGLOWTM fluorescein active caspase-3 staining method, caspase-3 activity has been detected in response to the infection of alginic acid decomposing bacterium. Our results are similar to the observations in hypersensitive response (HR) of higher plant, suggesting that the rapid cell death of L. Japonica infected by alginic acid decomposing bacterium might be involved in PCD, and indicating that the occurrence of PCD is an active defense process against the pathogen's infection.

  5. EXPRESSION OF A CHITINASE GENE FROM SERRATIA-MARCESCENS IN LACTOCOCCUS-LACTIS AND LACTOBACILLUS-PLANTARUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRURBERG, MB; HAANDRIKMAN, AJ; LEENHOUTS, KJ; VENEMA, G; NES, IF

    1994-01-01

    A chitinase gene from the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens BJL200 was cloned in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MG1363 and in the silage inoculum strain Lactobacillus plantarum E19b. The chitinase gene was expressed as an active enzyme at a low level in Lactococcus lactis, when cloned in

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF LACTOCOCCUS STRAINS AND THEIR USING IN DAIRY TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Greif

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis species is one of the most important groups of lactic acid bacteria that are used in the dairy industry. Lactococci are generally found on plants and the skins of animals. Special interest is placed on the study of Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis and Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, as they are the strains used as starter cultures in industrial dairy fermentation. The major functions of this species in dairy fermentation are the production of lactic acid, formation of flavour and aroma compounds, development of ripened cheese texture and antimicrobial activity against spoilage bacteria and moulds.doi:10.5219/162

  7. Heterologous production of human papillomavirus type-16 L1 protein by a lactic acid bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bermúdez-Humarán Luis G

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of vaccine antigens in lactic acid bacteria (LAB is a safe and cost-effective alternative to traditional expression systems. In this study, we investigated i the expression of Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16 L1 major capsid protein in the model LAB Lactococcus lactis and ii the ability of the resulting recombinant strain to produce either capsomer-or virus-like particles (VLPs. Results and conclusion HPV-16 L1 gene was cloned into two vectors, pCYT and pSEC, designed for controlled intra- or extracellular heterologous expression in L. lactis, respectively. The capacity of L. lactis harboring either pCYT:L1 or pSEC:L1 plasmid to accumulate L1 in the cytoplasm and supernatant samples was confirmed by Western blot assays. Electron microscopy analysis suggests that, L1 protein produced by recombinant lactococci can self-assemble into structures morphologically similar to VLPs intracellularly. The presence of conformational epitopes on the L. lactis-derived VLPs was confirmed by ELISA using an anti-HPV16 L1 capsid antigen antibody. Our results support the feasibility of using recombinant food-grade LAB, such as L. lactis, for the production of L1-based VLPs and open the possibility for the development of a new safe mucosal vector for HPV-16 prophylactic vaccination.

  8. [Stearic acid methyl ether: a new extracellular metabolite of the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylophilus quaylei].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terekhova, E A; Stepicheva, N A; Pshenichnikova, A B; Shvets, V I

    2010-01-01

    Methyl esters of fatty acids, free fatty acids, and hydrocarbons were found in the culture liquid and in the cellular lipids of the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylophilus quaylei under optimal growth conditions and osmotic stress. The main extracellular hydrophobic metabolite was methyl stearate. Exogenous free fatty acids C16-C18 and their methyl esters stimulated the M. quaylei growth and survivability, as well as production of exopolysaccharide under osmotic and oxidative stress, playing the role of growth factors and adaptogens. The order of hydrophobic supplements according to the ability to stimulate bacterial growth is C18 : 1 > C18 : 0 > C16 : 0 > methyl oleate > methyl stearate > no supplements > C14: 0 > C12 : 0. The mechanism underlying the protective action of fatty acids and their methyl esters is discussed.

  9. Multi-omics approach to study the growth efficiency and amino acid metabolism in Lactococcus lactis at various specific growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahtvee, Petri-Jaan; Adamberg, Kaarel; Arike, Liisa; Nahku, Ranno; Aller, Kadri; Vilu, Raivo

    2011-02-24

    Lactococcus lactis is recognised as a safe (GRAS) microorganism and has hence gained interest in numerous biotechnological approaches. As it is fastidious for several amino acids, optimization of processes which involve this organism requires a thorough understanding of its metabolic regulations during multisubstrate growth. Using glucose limited continuous cultivations, specific growth rate dependent metabolism of L. lactis including utilization of amino acids was studied based on extracellular metabolome, global transcriptome and proteome analysis. A new growth medium was designed with reduced amino acid concentrations to increase precision of measurements of consumption of amino acids. Consumption patterns were calculated for all 20 amino acids and measured carbon balance showed good fit of the data at all growth rates studied. It was observed that metabolism of L. lactis became more efficient with rising specific growth rate in the range 0.10-0.60 h(-1), indicated by 30% increase in biomass yield based on glucose consumption, 50% increase in efficiency of nitrogen use for biomass synthesis, and 40% reduction in energy spilling. The latter was realized by decrease in the overall product formation and higher efficiency of incorporation of amino acids into biomass. L. lactis global transcriptome and proteome profiles showed good correlation supporting the general idea of transcription level control of bacterial metabolism, but the data indicated that substrate transport systems together with lower part of glycolysis in L. lactis were presumably under allosteric control. The current study demonstrates advantages of the usage of strictly controlled continuous cultivation methods combined with multi-omics approach for quantitative understanding of amino acid and energy metabolism of L. lactis which is a valuable new knowledge for development of balanced growth media, gene manipulations for desired product formation etc. Moreover, collected dataset is an excellent

  10. Multi-omics approach to study the growth efficiency and amino acid metabolism in Lactococcus lactis at various specific growth rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arike Liisa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactococcus lactis is recognised as a safe (GRAS microorganism and has hence gained interest in numerous biotechnological approaches. As it is fastidious for several amino acids, optimization of processes which involve this organism requires a thorough understanding of its metabolic regulations during multisubstrate growth. Results Using glucose limited continuous cultivations, specific growth rate dependent metabolism of L. lactis including utilization of amino acids was studied based on extracellular metabolome, global transcriptome and proteome analysis. A new growth medium was designed with reduced amino acid concentrations to increase precision of measurements of consumption of amino acids. Consumption patterns were calculated for all 20 amino acids and measured carbon balance showed good fit of the data at all growth rates studied. It was observed that metabolism of L. lactis became more efficient with rising specific growth rate in the range 0.10 - 0.60 h-1, indicated by 30% increase in biomass yield based on glucose consumption, 50% increase in efficiency of nitrogen use for biomass synthesis, and 40% reduction in energy spilling. The latter was realized by decrease in the overall product formation and higher efficiency of incorporation of amino acids into biomass. L. lactis global transcriptome and proteome profiles showed good correlation supporting the general idea of transcription level control of bacterial metabolism, but the data indicated that substrate transport systems together with lower part of glycolysis in L. lactis were presumably under allosteric control. Conclusions The current study demonstrates advantages of the usage of strictly controlled continuous cultivation methods combined with multi-omics approach for quantitative understanding of amino acid and energy metabolism of L. lactis which is a valuable new knowledge for development of balanced growth media, gene manipulations for desired product

  11. Promoting acid resistance and nisin yield of Lactococcus lactis F44 by genetically increasing D-Asp amidation level inside cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Panlong; Liang, Dongmei; Cao, Lijie; Qiao, Bin; Wu, Hao; Caiyin, Qinggele; Zhu, Hongji; Qiao, Jianjun

    2017-08-01

    Nisin fermentation by Lactococcus lactis requires a low pH to maintain a relatively higher nisin activity. However, the acidic environment will result in cell arrest, and eventually decrease the relative nisin production. Hence, constructing an acid-resistant L. lactis is crucial for nisin harvest in acidic nisin fermentation. In this paper, the first discovery of the relationship between D-Asp amidation-associated gene (asnH) and acid resistance was reported. Overexpression of asnH in L. lactis F44 (F44A) resulted in a sevenfold increase in survival capacity during acid shift (pH 3) and enhanced nisin desorption capacity compared to F44 (wild type), which subsequently contributed to higher nisin production, reaching 5346 IU/mL, 57.0% more than that of F44 in the fed-batch fermentation. Furthermore, the engineered F44A showed a moderate increase in D-Asp amidation level (from 82 to 92%) compared to F44. The concomitant decrease of the negative charge inside the cell wall was detected by a newly developed method based on the nisin adsorption amount onto cell surface. Meanwhile, peptidoglycan cross-linkage increased from 36.8% (F44) to 41.9% (F44A), and intracellular pH can be better maintained by blocking extracellular H(+) due to the maintenance of peptidoglycan integrity, which probably resulted from the action of inhibiting hydrolases activity. The inference was further supported by the acmC-overexpression strain F44C, which was characterized by uncontrolled peptidoglycan hydrolase activity. Our results provided a novel strategy for enhancing nisin yield through cell wall remodeling, which contributed to both continuous nisin synthesis and less nisin adsorption in acidic fermentation (dual enhancement).

  12. Niizalactams A-C, Multicyclic Macrolactams Isolated from Combined Culture of Streptomyces with Mycolic Acid-Containing Bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Shotaro; Okada, Masahiro; Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Zhang, Huiping; Hayashi, Fumiaki; Onaka, Hiroyasu; Abe, Ikuro

    2015-12-24

    A terrestrial bacterium, Streptomyces sp. NZ-6, produced niizalactams A-C (1-3), unprecedented di- and tricyclic macrolactams, by coculturing with the mycolic acid-containing bacterium Tsukamurella pulmonis TP-B0596. Their complete structures, including absolute configurations, were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data and chemical derivatization. Their unique skeletons are proposed to be biosynthesized from a common 26-membered macrolactam intermediate by SN2 cyclization or an intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction.

  13. UvrA expression of Lactococcus lactis NZ9000 improve multiple stresses tolerance and fermentation of lactic acid against salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Taher Khakpour; Zhang, Juan; Du, Guocheng

    2017-03-01

    Lactococcus lactis is subjected to several stressful conditions during industrial fermentation including oxidation, heating and cooling, acid, high osmolarity/dehydration and starvation. DNA lesion is a major cause of genetic instability in L. lactis that usually occurs at a low frequency, but it is greatly enhanced by environmental stresses. DNA damages produced by these environmental stresses are thought to induce DNA double-strand breaks, leading to illegitimate recombination. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) protein UvrA suppresses multiple stresses-induced illegitimate recombination. UvrA protein can survive a coincident condition of environmental harsh conditions, multiple stress factors supposedly encountered in the host and inducing UvrA in L. lactis. In this study the expression of UvrA and growth performance and viability of control strain L. lactisVector and recombinant strain L. lactisUvrA under multiple stress conditions were determined. The recombinants strain had 30.70 and 52.67% higher growth performances when subjected to acidic and osmotic stresses conditions. In addition, the L. lactisUvrA strain showed 1.85-, 1.65-, and 2.40-fold higher biomass, lactate production, and lactate productivity, compared with the corresponding values for L. lactisVector strain during the osmotic stress. Results demonstrated NER system is involved in adaptation to various stress conditions and suggested that cells with a compromised UvrA as DNA repair system have an enhanced protection behavior in L. lactis NZ9000 against DNA damage.

  14. Influence of yeast and lactic acid bacterium on the constituent profile of soy sauce during fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Risa; Yuzuki, Masanobu; Ito, Kotaro; Shiga, Kazuki; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2017-02-01

    Soy sauce is a Japanese traditional seasoning composed of various constituents that are produced by various microbes during a long-term fermentation process. Due to the complexity of the process, the investigation of the constituent profile during fermentation is difficult. Metabolomics, the comprehensive study of low molecular weight compounds in biological samples, is thought to be a promising strategy for deep understanding of the constituent contribution to food flavor characteristics. Therefore, metabolomics is suitable for the analysis of soy sauce fermentation. Unfortunately, only few and unrefined studies of soy sauce fermentation using metabolomics approach have been reported. Therefore, we investigated changes in low molecular weight hydrophilic and volatile compounds of soy sauce using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS)-based non-targeted metabolic profiling. The data were analyzed by statistical analysis to evaluate influences of yeast and lactic acid bacterium on the constituent profile. Consequently, our results suggested a novel finding that lactic acid bacterium affected the production of several constituents such as cyclotene, furfural, furfuryl alcohol and methional in the soy sauce fermentation process. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Sequencing of the tyrosine decarboxylase cluster of Lactococcus lactis IPLA 655 and the development of a PCR method for detecting tyrosine decarboxylating lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, María; Linares, Daniel M; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2004-11-01

    The enzymatic decarboxylation of tyrosine produces tyramine, the most abundant biogenic amine in dairy products-especially in cheeses. The screening of lactic acid bacteria isolated from different artisanal cheeses and a number of microbial collections identified 22 tyramine-producing strains belonging to different genera. The Lactococcus lactis strain IPLA 655 was selected, and the genes encoding a putative tyrosyl tRNA synthetase, a tyrosine decarboxylase (tdcA), and a tyrosine-tyramine antiporter, found together as a cluster, were sequenced. The disruption of tdcA yielded a strain unable to produce tyramine. Comparison of the L. lactis IPLA 655 tdcA gene with database tdcA sequences led to the design of two primers for use in a PCR method that identified potential tyramine-producing strains. The proposed method can use purified DNA, isolated colonies, milk, curd, and even cheese as a template. Molecular tools for the rapid detection of tyramine-producing bacteria at any time during the fermentation process could help prevent tyramine accumulation in fermented foods. The proposed technique could be of great use to the food industry.

  16. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Wang

    Full Text Available Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals.

  17. Quantitative analysis of growth and volatile fatty acid production by the anaerobic ruminal bacterium Megasphaera elsdenii T81

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megaspheara elsdenii T81 grew on either DL-lactate or D-glucose at similar rates (0.85 per h), but displayed major differences in the fermentation of these substrates. Lactate was fermented at up to 210-mM concentration to yield acetic, propionic, butyric, and valeric acids. The bacterium was able t...

  18. Microbacter margulisiae gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel propionigenic bacterium isolated from sediments of an acid rock drainage pond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez Andrea, I.; Luis Sanz, J.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    A novel anaerobic propionigenic bacterium, strain ADRIT, was isolated from sediment of an acid rock drainage environment (Tinto River, Spain). Cells were small (0.4-0.6 x 1-1.7 µm), non-motile and non-spore forming rods. Cells possessed a Gram-negative cell wall structure and were vancomycin resista

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CFL1, a Lactic Acid Bacterium Isolated from French Handcrafted Fermented Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghel, Julie; Dugat-Bony, Eric; Irlinger, Françoise; Loux, Valentin; Vidal, Marie; Passot, Stéphanie; Béal, Catherine; Layec, Séverine; Fonseca, Fernanda

    2016-03-03

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) is a lactic acid bacterium widely used for the production of yogurt and cheeses. Here, we report the genome sequence of L. bulgaricus CFL1 to improve our knowledge on its stress-induced damages following production and end-use processes.

  20. Production of recombinant peanut allergen Ara h 2 using Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenting, J.; Poulsen, Lars K.; Kato, K.;

    2007-01-01

    Background: Natural allergen sources can supply large quantities of authentic allergen mixtures for use as immunotherapeutics. However, such extracts are complex, difficult to define, vary from batch to batch, which may lead to unpredictable efficacy and/ or unacceptable levels of side effects....... The use of recombinant expression systems for allergen production can alleviate some of these issues. Several allergens have been tested in high- level expression systems and in most cases show immunereactivity comparable to their natural counterparts. The gram positive lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus...... of the major allergens in peanut have been described. However, for therapeutic usage more information about the individual allergenic components is needed. In this paper we report recombinant production of the Ara h 2 peanut allergen using L. lactis. Results: A synthetic ara h 2 gene was cloned into an L...

  1. Lactobacillus formosensis sp. nov., a lactic acid bacterium isolated from fermented soybean meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-huan; Chen, Yi-sheng; Lee, Tzu-tai; Chang, Yu-chung; Yu, Bi

    2015-01-01

    A Gram-reaction-positive, catalase-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped lactic acid bacterium, designated strain S215(T), was isolated from fermented soybean meal. The organism produced d-lactic acid from glucose without gas formation. 16S rRNA gene sequencing results showed that strain S215(T) had 98.74-99.60 % sequence similarity to the type strains of three species of the genus Lactobacillus (Lactobacillus farciminis BCRC 14043(T), Lactobacillus futsaii BCRC 80278(T) and Lactobacillus crustorum JCM 15951(T)). A comparison of two housekeeping genes, rpoA and pheS, revealed that strain S215(T) was well separated from the reference strains of species of the genus Lactobacillus. DNA-DNA hybridization results indicated that strain S215(T) had DNA related to the three type strains of species of the genus Lactobacillus (33-66 % relatedness). The DNA G+C content of strain S215(T) was 36.2 mol%. The cell walls contained peptidoglycan of the d-meso-diaminopimelic acid type and the major fatty acids were C18 : 1ω9c, C16 : 0 and C19 : 0 cyclo ω10c/C19 : 1ω6c. Phenotypic and genotypic features demonstrated that the isolate represents a novel species of the genus Lactobacillus, for which the name Lactobacillus formosensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S215(T) ( = NBRC 109509(T) = BCRC 80582(T)).

  2. Structural characterization of an acidic exoheteropolysaccharide produced by the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Burkholderia tropica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrato, Rodrigo V; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Gorin, Philip A J; Cruz, Leonardo M; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Choudhury, Biswa; Carlson, Russell W; Iacomini, Marcello

    2008-09-05

    An acidic exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by the diazotrophic bacterium Burkholderia tropica, strain Ppe8, was isolated from the culture supernatant of bacteria grown in a synthetic liquid medium containing mannitol and glutamate. Monosaccharide composition showed Rha, Glc and GlcA in a 2.0:2.0:1.0 molar ratio, respectively. Further structural characterization was performed by a combination of NMR, mass spectrometry and chemical methods. Partial acid hydrolysis of EPS provided a mixture of acidic oligosaccharides that were characterized by ESI-MS, giving rise to ions with m/z 193 (GlcA-H)(-), 339 (GlcA,Rha-H)(-), 501 (GlcA,Rha,Glc-H)(-), 647 (GlcA,Rha2,Glc,-H)(-), 809 (GlcA,Rha2,Glc2,-H)(-) and 851 (GlcA,Rha2,Glc2,OAc-H)(-). Carboxyreduced EPS (EPS-CR) had Glc and Rha in a 3:2 ratio, present as d- and l-enantiomers, respectively. Methylation and NMR analysis of EPS and EPS-CR showed a main chain containing 2,4-di-O-Rhap, 3-O-Rhap and 4-O-Glcp. A GlcA side chain unit was found in the acidic EPS, substituting O-4 of α-l-Rhap units. This was observed as a non-reducing end unit of glucopyranose in the EPS-CR. Acetyl esters occured at O-2 of β-l-Rhap units. From the combined results herein, we determined the structure of the exocellular polysaccharide produced by B. tropica, Ppe8, as being a pentasaccharide repeating unit as shown.

  3. Fermentation products of solvent tolerant marine bacterium Moraxella spp. MB1 and its biotechnological applications in salicylic acid bioconversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solimabi Wahidullah

    Full Text Available As part of a proactive approach to environmental protection, emerging issues with potential impact on the environment is the subject of ongoing investigation. One emerging area of environmental research concerns pharmaceuticals like salicylic acid, which is the main metabolite of various analgesics including aspirin. It is a common component of sewage effluent and also an intermediate in the degradation pathway of various aromatic compounds which are introduced in the marine environment as pollutants. In this study, biotransformation products of salicylic acid by seaweed, Bryopsis plumosa, associated marine bacterium, Moraxella spp. MB1, have been investigated. Phenol, conjugates of phenol and hydroxy cinnamic acid derivatives (coumaroyl, caffeoyl, feruloyl and trihydroxy cinnamyl with salicylic acid (3-8 were identified as the bioconversion products by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. These results show that the microorganism do not degrade phenolic acid but catalyses oxygen dependent transformations without ring cleavage. The degradation of salicylic acid is known to proceed either via gentisic acid pathway or catechol pathway but this is the first report of biotransformation of salicylic acid into cinnamates, without ring cleavage. Besides cinnamic acid derivatives (9-12, metabolites produced by the bacterium include antimicrobial indole (13 and β-carbolines, norharman (14, harman (15 and methyl derivative (16, which are beneficial to the host and the environment.

  4. Fermentation products of solvent tolerant marine bacterium Moraxella spp. MB1 and its biotechnological applications in salicylic acid bioconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahidullah, Solimabi; Naik, Deepak N; Devi, Prabha

    2013-01-01

    As part of a proactive approach to environmental protection, emerging issues with potential impact on the environment is the subject of ongoing investigation. One emerging area of environmental research concerns pharmaceuticals like salicylic acid, which is the main metabolite of various analgesics including aspirin. It is a common component of sewage effluent and also an intermediate in the degradation pathway of various aromatic compounds which are introduced in the marine environment as pollutants. In this study, biotransformation products of salicylic acid by seaweed, Bryopsis plumosa, associated marine bacterium, Moraxella spp. MB1, have been investigated. Phenol, conjugates of phenol and hydroxy cinnamic acid derivatives (coumaroyl, caffeoyl, feruloyl and trihydroxy cinnamyl) with salicylic acid (3-8) were identified as the bioconversion products by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. These results show that the microorganism do not degrade phenolic acid but catalyses oxygen dependent transformations without ring cleavage. The degradation of salicylic acid is known to proceed either via gentisic acid pathway or catechol pathway but this is the first report of biotransformation of salicylic acid into cinnamates, without ring cleavage. Besides cinnamic acid derivatives (9-12), metabolites produced by the bacterium include antimicrobial indole (13) and β-carbolines, norharman (14), harman (15) and methyl derivative (16), which are beneficial to the host and the environment.

  5. Minimal requirements for exponential growth of Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Hammer, Karin

    1993-01-01

    A minimal growth medium containing glucose, acetate, vitamins, and eight amino acids allowed for growth of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, with a specific growth rate in batch culture of mu = 0.3 h-1. With 19 amino acids added, the growth rate increased to mu = 0.7 h-1 and the exponential growth...

  6. Rhizobium hidalgonense sp. nov., a nodule endophytic bacterium of Phaseolus vulgaris in acid soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jun; Yan, Hui; Liu, Li Xue; Chen, Wen Feng; Zhang, Xiao Xia; Verástegui-Valdés, Myrthala M; Wang, En Tao; Han, Xiao Zeng

    2017-01-01

    One Gram-negative, aerobic, motile, rod-shaped bacterium, designated as FH14(T), was isolated from nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris grown in Hidalgo State of Mexico. Results based upon 16S rRNA gene (≥99.8 % similarities to known species), concatenated sequence (recA, atpD and glnII) analysis of three housekeeping genes (≤93.4 % similarities to known species) and average nucleotide identity (ANI) values of genome sequence (ranged from 87.6 to 90.0 % to related species) indicated the distinct position of strain FH14(T) within the genus Rhizobium. In analyses of symbiotic genes, only nitrogen fixation gene nifH was amplified that had nucleotide sequence identical to those of the bean-nodulating strains in R. phaseoli and R. vallis, while nodulation gene nodC gene was not amplified. The failure of nodulation to its original host P. vulgaris and other legumes evidenced the loss of its nodulation capability. Strain FH14(T) contained summed feature 8 (C18:1 ω6c/C18:1 ω7c, 59.96 %), C16:0 (10.6 %) and summed feature 2 (C12:0 aldehyde/unknown 10.928, 10.24 %) as the major components of cellular fatty acids. Failure to utilize alaninamide, and utilizing L-alanine, L-asparagine and γ-amino butyric acid as carbon source, distinguished the strain FH14(T) from the type strains for the related species. The genome size and DNA G+C content of FH14(T) were 6.94 Mbp and 60.8 mol %, respectively. Based on those results, a novel specie in Rhizobium, named Rhizobium hidalgonense sp. nov., was proposed, with FH14(T) (=HAMBI 3636(T) = LMG 29288(T)) as the type strain.

  7. Immunogenicity of a malaria parasite antigen displayed by Lactococcus lactis in oral immunisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramasamy, R; Yasawardena, S; Zomer, A; Venema, G; Kok, J; Leenhouts, K

    2006-01-01

    A putative protective protein from Plasmodium falciparum merozoites, MSA2, was expressed in two different ways on the cell surface of the Gram-positive food-grade bacterium, Lactococcus lactis. The first display format exploits an LPXTG-type anchoring motif of the lactococcal proteinase PrtP to cova

  8. Adaptation of Lactococcus lactis to high growth temperature leads to a dramatic increase in acidification rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jun; Shen, Jing; Hellgren, Lars;

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is essential for most cheese making, and this mesophilic bacterium has its growth optimum around 30 °C. We have, through adaptive evolution, isolated a mutant TM29 that grows well up to 39 °C, and continuous growth at 40 °C is possible if pre-incubated at a slightly lower...

  9. Influence of phenolic compounds on the growth and arginine deiminase system in a wine lactic acid bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto, María R.; Manca de Nadra,María C.; Arena, Mario E.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of seven phenolic compounds, normally present in wine, on the growth and arginine deiminase system (ADI) of Lactobacillus hilgardii X1B, a wine lactic acid bacterium, was established. This system provides energy for bacterial growth and produces citrulline that reacts with ethanol forming the carcinogen ethyl carbamate (EC), found in some wines. The influence of phenolic compounds on bacterial growth was compound dependent. Growth and final pH values increased in presence of arg...

  10. Recycling of carbon dioxide and acetate as lactic acid by the hydrogen-producing bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Ippolito, Giuliana; Dipasquale, Laura; Fontana, Angelo

    2014-09-01

    The heterotrophic bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana produces hydrogen by fermentation of sugars. Under capnophilic (carbon dioxide requiring) conditions, the process is preferentially associated with the production of lactic acid, which, as shown herein, is synthesized by reductive carboxylation of acetyl coenzyme A. The enzymatic coupling is dependent on the carbon dioxide stimulated activity of heterotetrameric pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Under the same culture conditions, T. neapolitana also operates the unfavorable synthesis of lactic acid from an exogenous acetate supply. This process, which requires carbon dioxide (or carbonate) and an unknown electron donor, allows for the conversion of carbon dioxide into added-value chemicals without biomass deconstruction.

  11. Desulfurella amilsii sp. nov., a novel acidotolerant sulfur-respiring bacterium isolated from acidic river sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florentino, Anna P; Brienza, Claudio; Stams, Alfons J M; Sánchez-Andrea, Irene

    2016-03-01

    A novel acidotolerant and moderately thermophilic sulfur-reducing bacterium was isolated from sediments of the Tinto River (Spain), an extremely acidic environment. Strain TR1T stained Gram-negative, and was obligately anaerobic, non-spore-forming and motile. Cells were short rods (1.5-2 × 0.5-0.7 μm), appearing singly or in pairs. Strain TR1T was catalase-negative and slightly oxidase-positive. Urease activity and indole formation were absent, but gelatin hydrolysis was present. Growth was observed at 20-52 °C with an optimum close to 50 °C, and a pH range of 3-7 with optimum between pH 6 and 6.5. Yeast extract was essential for growth, but extra vitamins were not required. In the presence of sulfur, strain TR1T grew with acetate, formate, lactate, pyruvate, stearate, arginine and H2/CO2. All substrates were completely oxidized and H2S and CO2 were the only metabolic products detected. Besides elemental sulfur, thiosulfate was used as an electron acceptor. The isolate also grew by disproportionation of elemental sulfur. The predominant cellular fatty acids were saturated components: C16 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0 and C18 : 0. The only quinone component detected was menaquinone MK-7(H2). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 34 mol%. The isolate is affiliated to the genus Desulfurella of the class Deltaproteobacteria, sharing 97 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with the four species described in the genus Desulfurella. Considering the distinct physiological and phylogenetic characteristics, strain TR1T represents a novel species within the genus Desulfurella, for which the name Desulfurella amilsii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is TR1T ( = DSM 29984T = JCM 30680T).

  12. 重组乳酸乳球菌表达外源产物在养猪生产中的潜在应用%Potential Application of Expression of Exogenous Products by Recombinant Lactococcus lactis in Pig Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张攀; 许蒙蒙; 林燕; 方正锋; 车炼强; 吴德; 徐盛玉

    2015-01-01

    乳酸乳球菌是乳酸菌中的典型代表,随着乳酸乳球菌分子生物学研究的不断深入,重组乳酸乳球菌因具有益生作用和表达外源功能蛋白的双重功能被用做载体菌在畜牧兽医学领域广泛研究,同时在养猪产业中也显示出良好的应用潜力,可为养猪业的健康发展提供新的思路. 本文主要对重组乳酸乳球菌表达表皮生长因子、乳铁蛋白等外源产物来提高猪生产性能以及作为疫苗呈递载体用于猪疾病防治的应用做一综述.%Lactococcus lactis is a typical representative bacterium of lactic acid bacteria. With the deepening re-search in molecular biology of Lactococcus lactis, recombinant Lactococcus lactis is extensively researched as a bacterial carrier in the field of animal husbandry and veterinary due to having prebiotic effects and using expres-sion of exogenous functional proteins. Meanwhile, Lactococcus lactis also showed good potential in pig indus-try, which could provide a new way for the healthy development of pig industry. This paper reviewed the ex-pression of exogenous products of recombinant Lactococcus lactis ( epidermal growth factor, lactoferrin, etc. ) for improving pig performance as well as a vaccine carrier for prevention and treatment of swine diseases.

  13. Amino Acid and Peptide Utilization Profiles of the Fluoroacetate-Degrading Bacterium Synergistetes Strain MFA1 Under Varying Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Lex E X; Denman, Stuart E; Hugenholtz, Philip; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2016-02-01

    Synergistetes strain MFA1 is an asaccharolytic ruminal bacterium isolated based on its ability to degrade fluoroacetate, a plant toxin. The amino acid and peptide requirements of the bacterium were investigated under different culturing conditions. The growth of strain MFA1 and its fluoroacetate degradation rate were enhanced by peptide-rich protein hydrolysates (tryptone and yeast extract) compared to casamino acid, an amino acid-rich protein hydrolysate. Complete utilization and preference for arginine, asparagine, glutamate, glycine, and histidine as free amino acids from yeast extract were observed, while the utilization of serine, threonine, and lysine in free form and peptide-bound glutamate was stimulated during growth on fluoroacetate. A predominant peptide in yeast extract preferentially utilized by strain MFA1 was partially characterized by high-liquid performance chromatography-mass spectrometry as a hepta-glutamate oligopeptide. Similar utilization profiles of amino acids were observed between the co-culture of strain MFA1 with Methanobrevibacter smithii without fluoroacetate and pure strain MFA1 culture with fluoroacetate. This suggests that growth of strain MFA1 could be enhanced by a reduction of hydrogen partial pressure as a result of hydrogen removal by a methanogen or reduction of fluoroacetate.

  14. The putrescine biosynthesis pathway in Lactococcus lactis is transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression, mediated by CcpA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Daniel M; del Río, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Martín, María Cruz; Fernández, María; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2013-07-01

    Lactococcus lactis is the lactic acid bacterium most widely used by the dairy industry as a starter for the manufacture of fermented products such as cheese and buttermilk. However, some strains produce putrescine from agmatine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. The proteins involved in this pathway, including those necessary for agmatine uptake and conversion into putrescine, are encoded by the aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC genes, which together form an operon. This paper reports the mechanism of regulation of putrescine biosynthesis in L. lactis. It is shown that the aguBDAC operon, which contains a cre site at the promoter of aguB (the first gene of the operon), is transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) mediated by the catabolite control protein CcpA.

  15. Amino Acid Transport by Membrane Vesicles of an Obligate Anaerobic Bacterium, Clostridium acetobutylicum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Ubbink-Kok, Trees; Konings, Wilhelmus

    Membrane vesicles were isolated from the obligate anaerobic bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum. Beef heart mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase was inserted in these membrane vesicles by membrane fusion by using the freeze-thaw sonication technique to accommodate them with a functional proton motive

  16. Value-added lipid production from brown seaweed biomass by two-stage fermentation using acetic acid bacterium and thraustochytrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafiles, Kim Hazel V; Iwasaka, Hiroaki; Eramoto, Yuri; Okamura, Yoshiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Aki, Tsunehiro

    2014-11-01

    Thraustochytrid production of polyunsaturated fatty acids and xanthophylls have been generally sourced from crop-derived substrates, making the exploration of alternative feedstocks attractive since they promise increased sustainability and lower production costs. In this study, a distinct two-stage fermentation system was conceptualized for the first time, using the brown seaweed sugar mannitol as substrate for the intermediary biocatalyst Gluconobacter oxydans, an acetic acid bacterium, along with the marine thraustochytrid Aurantiochytrium sp. to produce the value-added lipids and xanthophylls. Jar fermenter culture resulted in seaweed mannitol conversion to fructose with an efficiency of 83 % by G. oxydans and, after bacteriostasis with sea salts, production of astaxanthin and docosahexaenoic acid by Aurantiochytrium sp. KH105. Astaxanthin productivity was high at 3.60 mg/L/day. This new system, therefore, widens possibilities of obtaining more varieties of industrially valuable products including foods, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and biofuel precursor lipids from seaweed fermentation upon the use of suitable thraustochytrid strains.

  17. Influence of phenolic compounds on the growth and arginine deiminase system in a wine lactic acid bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberto, María R; de Nadra, María C Manca; Arena, Mario E

    2012-01-01

    The influence of seven phenolic compounds, normally present in wine, on the growth and arginine deiminase system (ADI) of Lactobacillus hilgardii X1B, a wine lactic acid bacterium, was established. This system provides energy for bacterial growth and produces citrulline that reacts with ethanol forming the carcinogen ethyl carbamate (EC), found in some wines. The influence of phenolic compounds on bacterial growth was compound dependent. Growth and final pH values increased in presence of arginine. Arginine consumption decreased in presence of protocatechuic and gallic acids (31 and 17%, respectively) and increased in presence of quercetin, rutin, catechin and the caffeic and vanillic phenolic acids (between 10 and 13%, respectively). ADI enzyme activities varied in presence of phenolic compounds. Rutin, quercetin and caffeic and vanillic acids stimulated the enzyme arginine deiminase about 37-40%. Amounts of 200 mg/L gallic and protocatechuic acids inhibited the arginine deiminase enzyme between 53 and 100%, respectively. Ornithine transcarbamylase activity was not modified at all concentrations of phenolic compounds. As gallic and protocatechuic acids inhibited the arginine deiminase enzyme that produces citrulline, precursor of EC, these results are important considering the formation of toxic compounds.

  18. Influence of phenolic compounds on the growth and arginine deiminase system in a wine lactic acid bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María R. Alberto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of seven phenolic compounds, normally present in wine, on the growth and arginine deiminase system (ADI of Lactobacillus hilgardii X1B, a wine lactic acid bacterium, was established. This system provides energy for bacterial growth and produces citrulline that reacts with ethanol forming the carcinogen ethyl carbamate (EC, found in some wines. The influence of phenolic compounds on bacterial growth was compound dependent. Growth and final pH values increased in presence of arginine. Arginine consumption decreased in presence of protocatechuic and gallic acids (31 and 17%, respectively and increased in presence of quercetin, rutin, catechin and the caffeic and vanillic phenolic acids (between 10 and 13%, respectively. ADI enzyme activities varied in presence of phenolic compounds. Rutin, quercetin and caffeic and vanillic acids stimulated the enzyme arginine deiminase about 37-40%. Amounts of 200 mg/L gallic and protocatechuic acids inhibited the arginine deiminase enzyme between 53 and 100%, respectively. Ornithine transcarbamylase activity was not modified at all concentrations of phenolic compounds. As gallic and protocatechuic acids inhibited the arginine deiminase enzyme that produces citrulline, precursor of EC, these results are important considering the formation of toxic compounds.

  19. Versatile vector suite for the extracytoplasmic production and purification of heterologous His-tagged proteins in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neef, Jolanda; Milder, Fin J.; Koedijk, Danny G. A. M.; Klaassens, Marindy; Heezius, Erik C.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.; Otto, Andreas; Becher, Doerte; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Buist, Girbe

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis can be exploited for the expression of heterologous proteins; however, a versatile set of vectors suitable for inducible extracellular protein production and subsequent purification of the expressed proteins by immobilized

  20. Recombinant invasive Lactococcus lactis can transfer DNA vaccines either directly to dendritic cells or across an epithelial cell monolayer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azevedo, de Marcela; Meijerink, Marjolein; Taverne, Nico; Pereira, Vanessa Bastos; LeBlanc, Jean Guy; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson; Langella, Philippe; Wells, J.M.; Chatel, Jean Marc

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis), a generally regarded as safe (GRAS) bacterium has recently been investigated as a mucosal delivery vehicle for DNA vaccines. Because of its GRAS status, L. lactis represents an attractive alternative to attenuated pathogens. Previous studies showed that eukaryotic

  1. Ability of Lactococcus lactis to export viral capsid antigens: a crucial step for development of live vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieye, Y.; Hoekman, A.J.W.; Clier, F.; Juillard, V.; Boot, H.J.; Piard, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Thefood grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis is a potential vehicle for protein delivery in the gastrointestinal tract. As a model, we constructed lactococcal strains producing antigens of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). IBDV infects chickens and causes depletion of B-lymphoid cells in the bur

  2. Lysozyme expression in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guchte, Maarten van de; Wal, Fimme Jan van der; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerhardus

    1992-01-01

    Three lysozyme-encoding genes, one of eukaryotic and two of prokaryotic origin, were expressed in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. Hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) could be detected in L. lactis lysates by Western blotting. No lysozyme activity was observed, however, presumably because of the absence o

  3. Hydrophobic membrane thickness and lipid-protein interactions of the leucine transport system of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    in t Veld, Gerda; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Kamp, Jos A.F. op den; Konings, Wil N.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of the phospholipid acyl chain carbon number on the activity of the branched-chain amino acid transport system of Lactococcus lactis has been investigated. Major fatty acids identified in a total lipid extract of L. lactis membranes are palmitic acid (16:0), oleic acid (18:1) and the cycl

  4. LANTIBIOTIC NISIN: NATURAL PRESERVATIVE FROM LACTOCOCCUS LACTIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suganthi.V

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for high quality safe foods that are not extensively processed has created a niche for natural food preservative. Studies confirm that food allergies due to chemical preservatives affect as much as 2.5% of the population. Recent research had suggested bacteriocins (Nisin are the ideal biological food preservative. Nisin was proteinaceous antibacterial substances produced by Lactococcus lactis, a homofermentative bacterium. Naturally nisin occurs in two different forms nisin A and nisin Z. Nisin has wide range of inhibitory mode of action on Gram negative bacteria and food borne pathogens. Food preservation is a continuous war against the microorganisms spoiling the food or making it unsafe. So, nisin is actually the only lantibiotic bacteriocins used as a food preservative. This review paper will discuss about the Lactococcal strain used for the production of nisin, different forms of nisin, the mode of action of nisin, the cost reductive methods for the production and purification of nisin. So that it can be used in large scale industry for the high yield of nisin and the wide application of nisin in food industries.

  5. Effect of cell immobilization on the treatment of olive mill wastewater by a total phenols, acetic acid and formic acid degrading bacterium strain

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    Errami, Mohamed

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Olive mill wastewater (OMW is a pure vegetative by-product, containing a high organic and polyphenol content and is resistant to biodegradation. Its disposal lead to major environmental pollution problems in the Mediterranean basin. An aerobic bacterium was isolated from OMW. During three consecutive diluted and supplemented OMW treatment cycles, significant abatement of its phytotoxic substances was observed. In fact, total phenols, acetic and formic acids were reduced between 33 and 64 % when cells of the isolated bacterium were grown free; and between 62 and 78 % when cells of the same isolated bacterium were grown immobilized in a polyurethane sponge. These results suggest that the bacterium culture of the new isolate would decrease the OMW phytotoxicity. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA showed that all the related sequences are members of the Enterobacteriaceae family and revealed that the isolated bacterium was characterized as a Klebsiella oxytoca strain.El alpechín (OMW es un residuo puro de la extracción del aceite de oliva, que contiene una elevada carga orgánica y de polifenoles por lo que es resistente a la degradación. Su descarga produce graves problemas de contaminación medioambiental en toda el área mediterránea. Se ha aislado una bacteria anaerobia del OMW, que , durante tres ciclos consecutivos de tratamiento del OMW diluido y suplementado, produjo una disminución significativa de las sustancias fitotóxicas del residuo. De hecho, la concentración en fenoles totales, ácido acético y ácido fórmico se redujeron entre 33 y 64 % cuando las células no estaban inmovilizadas y entre el 62 y 78 % cuando las células bacterianas se inmovilizaron en una esponja de poliuretano. Estos resultados indican que el cultivo de la nueva bacteria aislada puede disminuir la fototoxicidad del alpechín. Análisis filogenético del ribosoma 16S de DNA demostró que todas las secuencias eran miembros de la familia

  6. Culture conditions for the production of an acidic exopolysaccharide by the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Burkholderia tropica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrato, Rodrigo V; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Cruz, Leonardo M; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Gorin, Philip A J; Iacomini, Marcello

    2006-05-01

    The endophytic diazotrophic bacterium Burkholderia tropica, strain Ppe8, produced copious amounts of exopolysaccharide (EPS) on batch growth in liquid synthetic media containing mannitol and glutamate as carbon and nitrogen sources. The effect of various aeration regimes and carbon source concentrations on EPS production was determined, as well as the effects of temperature and time of growth. The degree of aeration had a great influence on the yield of EPS, in contrast with the C:N ratio of the medium. Growth temperature also affected the EPS yield after the first 24 h of culture but seemed to be irrelevant after that. After isolation and purification, the EPS was analyzed by high-performance size exclusion chromatography and multiangle laser light scattering (HPSEC-MALLS), revealing a molecular mass of 300 kDa. The acid hydrolyzate of EPS was examined by HPLC and found to contain Glc, Rha, GlcA, and an aldobiouronic acid. The latter was found to have a GlcA and a Rha unit. Carboxy-reduced EPS contained Glc and Rha (3:2). The monosaccharide composition of the native acidic EPS was calculated as GlcA, Glc, and Rha in a molar ratio of 1:2:2.

  7. Chorioamnionitis due to Lactococcus lactis cremoris: A case report

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    F. Azouzi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis cremoris is rarely involved in human pathology. A thirty two-year old pregnant woman with premature rupture of membrane history presented with chorioamnionitis due to L. lactis cremoris. She underwent an emergency caesarian section and was treated with antibiotics including the association of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. She was completely recovered. This is the first case to our knowledge of chorioamnionitis due to this organism.

  8. Chorioamnionitis due to Lactococcus lactis cremoris: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    F. Azouzi; C. Chahed; Marzouk, M.; A. Ferjani; N. Hannechi; M. Fekih; Y. Ben Salem; J. Boukadida

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis cremoris is rarely involved in human pathology. A thirty two-year old pregnant woman with premature rupture of membrane history presented with chorioamnionitis due to L. lactis cremoris. She underwent an emergency caesarian section and was treated with antibiotics including the association of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. She was completely recovered. This is the first case to our knowledge of chorioamnionitis due to this organism.

  9. Lactococcus garvieae carries a chromosomally encoded pentapeptide repeat protein that confers reduced susceptibility to quinolones in Escherichia coli producing a cytotoxic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibello, Alicia; Díaz de Alba, Paula; Blanco, M Mar; Machuca, Jesus; Cutuli, M Teresa; Rodríguez-Martínez, José Manuel

    2014-09-01

    This study characterises a chromosomal gene of Lactococcus garvieae encoding a pentapeptide repeat protein designated as LgaQnr. This gene has been implicated in reduced susceptibility to quinolones in this bacterium, which is of relevance to both veterinary and human medicine. All of the L. garvieae isolates analysed were positive for the lgaqnr gene. The expression of lgaqnr in Escherichia coli reduced the susceptibility to quinolones, producing an adverse effect. The reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was 16-fold in E. coli ATCC 25922 and 32-fold in E. coli DH10B, compared to the control strains. The minimum inhibitory concentration of nalidixic acid was also increased 4 or 5-fold. The effect of the expression of lgaqnr in E. coli was investigated by electron microscopy and was observed to affect the structure of the cell and the inner membrane of the recombinant cells.

  10. Probiotic Lactococcus lactis: A Review

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    Priti Khemariya

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis plays a critical role in food, dairy and health sectors. In food and dairy industries, it is found in production processes of various fermented products such as sausages, pickled vegetables, beverages such as beer and wine, breads, soymilk kefir, sour milk, butter, cream, fresh cheese and different types of cheeses, like Cheddar, Colby, Cottage cheese, Camembert, cream cheese, Roquefort and Brie. Additionally, there is an increasing interest towards the possible health benefits of the probiotic activity of this organism which generally is species and strain specific and depends upon the survival in gastrointestinal tract with sufficient number. Certain strains have the ability to produce antimicrobial peptide called nisin which exhibits preservative potential. Therefore, application of bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis in food and dairy sectors to preserve foods as a natural way and contributing health promoting attributes due to probiotic activity would definitely fulfil today’s consumer demands. This paper aimed to review the adaptation, antibiotic resistance, therapeutic and preservation potential of bacteriocinogenic and probiotic Lactococcus lactis.

  11. Tryptophan, thiamine and indole-3-acetic acid exchange between Chlorella sorokiniana and the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Oskar A; Gomez-Anduro, Gracia; Bashan, Yoav; de-Bashan, Luz E

    2016-06-01

    During synthetic mutualistic interactions between the microalga Chlorella sorokiniana and the plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Azospirillum brasilense, mutual exchange of resources involved in producing and releasing the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) by the bacterium, using tryptophan and thiamine released by the microalga, were measured. Although increased activities of tryptophan synthase in C. sorokiniana and indole pyruvate decarboxylase (IPDC) in A. brasilense were observed, we could not detect tryptophan or IAA in the culture medium when both organisms were co-immobilized. This indicates that no extra tryptophan or IAA is produced, apart from the quantities required to sustain the interaction. Over-expression of the ipdC gene occurs at different incubation times: after 48 h, when A. brasilense was immobilized alone and grown in exudates of C. sorokiniana and at 96 h, when A. brasilense was co-immobilized with the microalga. When A. brasilense was cultured in exudates of C. sorokiniana, increased expression of the ipdC gene, corresponding increase in activity of IPDC encoded by the ipdC gene, and increase in IAA production were measured during the first 48 h of incubation. IAA production and release by A. brasilense was found only when tryptophan and thiamine were present in a synthetic growth medium (SGM). The absence of thiamine in SGM yielded no detectable IAA. In summary, this study demonstrates that C. sorokiniana can exude sufficient tryptophan and thiamine to allow IAA production by a PGPB during their interaction. Thiamine is essential for IAA production by A. brasilense and these three metabolites are part of a communication between the two microorganisms.

  12. Cell wall anchoring of the Campylobacter antigens to Lactococcus lactis

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    Patrycja Anna Kobierecka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of human food-borne gastroenteritis and chicken meat is the main source of infection. Recent studies showed that broiler chicken immunization against Campylobacter should be the most efficient way to lower the number of human infections by this pathogen. Induction of the mucosal immune system after oral antigen administration should provide protective immunity to chickens. In this work we tested the usefulness of Lactococcus lactis, the most extensively studied lactic acid bacterium, as a delivery vector for Campylobacter antigens. First we constructed hybrid protein – CjaA antigen presenting CjaD peptide epitopes on its surface. We showed that specific rabbit anti-rCjaAD serum reacted strongly with both CjaA and CjaD produced by a wild type Campylobacter jejuni strain. Next, rCjaAD and CjaA were fused to the C-terminus of the L. lactis YndF containing the LPTXG motif. The genes expressing these proteins were transcribed under control of the L. lactis Usp45 promoter and their products contain the Usp45 signal sequences. This strategy ensures a cell surface location of both analysed proteins, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. In order to evaluate the impact of antigen location on vaccine prototype efficacy, a L. lactis strain producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD was also generated. Animal experiments showed a decrease of Campylobacter cecal load in vaccinated birds as compared with the control group and showed that the L. lactis harboring the surface-exposed rCjaAD antigen afforded greater protection than the L. lactis producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to employ LAB (Lactic Acid Bacteria strains as a mucosal delivery vehicle for chicken immunization. Although the observed reduction of chicken colonization by Campylobacter resulting from vaccination was rather moderate, the experiments showed that LAB strains can be considered

  13. A plant pathogenic bacterium exploits the tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolic pathway of its insect vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killiny, Nabil; Nehela, Yasser; Hijaz, Faraj; Vincent, Christopher I

    2017-06-08

    Huanglongbing in citrus is caused by a phloem-limited, uncultivable, gram-negative α-proteobacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas). CLas is transmitted by the phloem-sucking insect, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae), in a persistent, circulative, and propagative manner. In this study, we investigated the metabolomic and respiration rates changes in D. citri upon infection with CLas using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas exchange analysis. The level of glycine, L-serine, L-threonine, and gamma-amino butyric acid were higher in CLas-infected D. citri, while L-proline, L-aspartic acid, and L-pyroglutamic acid were lower in CLas-infected D. citri compared with the control. Citric acid was increased in CLas-infected D. citri, whereas malic and succinic acids were reduced. Interestingly, most of the reduced metabolites such as malate, succinate, aspartate, and L-proline are required for the growth of CLas. The increase in citric acid, serine, and glycine indicated that CLas induced glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) in its vector. In agreement with the GC-MS results, the gene expression results also indicated that glycolysis and TCA were induced in CLas-infected D. citri and this was accompanied with an increases in respiration rate. Phosphoric acid and most of the sugar alcohols were higher in CLas-infected D. citri, indicating a response to the biotic stress or cell damage. Only slight increases in the levels of few sugars were observed in CLas-infected D. citri, which indicated that sugars are tightly regulated by D. citri. Our results indicated that CLas induces nutrient and energetic stress in its host insect. This study may provide some insights into the mechanism of colonization of CLas in its vector.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Enterococcus mundtii QU 25, an efficient L-(+)-lactic acid-producing bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiwa, Yuh; Yanase, Hiroaki; Hirose, Yuu; Satomi, Shohei; Araya-Kojima, Tomoko; Watanabe, Satoru; Zendo, Takeshi; Chibazakura, Taku; Shimizu-Kadota, Mariko; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2014-08-01

    Enterococcus mundtii QU 25, a non-dairy bacterial strain of ovine faecal origin, can ferment both cellobiose and xylose to produce l-lactic acid. The use of this strain is highly desirable for economical l-lactate production from renewable biomass substrates. Genome sequence determination is necessary for the genetic improvement of this strain. We report the complete genome sequence of strain QU 25, primarily determined using Pacific Biosciences sequencing technology. The E. mundtii QU 25 genome comprises a 3 022 186-bp single circular chromosome (GC content, 38.6%) and five circular plasmids: pQY182, pQY082, pQY039, pQY024, and pQY003. In all, 2900 protein-coding sequences, 63 tRNA genes, and 6 rRNA operons were predicted in the QU 25 chromosome. Plasmid pQY024 harbours genes for mundticin production. We found that strain QU 25 produces a bacteriocin, suggesting that mundticin-encoded genes on plasmid pQY024 were functional. For lactic acid fermentation, two gene clusters were identified-one involved in the initial metabolism of xylose and uptake of pentose and the second containing genes for the pentose phosphate pathway and uptake of related sugars. This is the first complete genome sequence of an E. mundtii strain. The data provide insights into lactate production in this bacterium and its evolution among enterococci.

  15. The lactic acid bacterium Pediococcus acidilactici suppresses autoimmune encephalomyelitis by inducing IL-10-producing regulatory T cells.

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    Kazushiro Takata

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Certain intestinal microflora are thought to regulate the systemic immune response. Lactic acid bacteria are one of the most studied bacteria in terms of their beneficial effects on health and autoimmune diseases; one of which is Multiple sclerosis (MS which affects the central nervous system. We investigated whether the lactic acid bacterium Pediococcus acidilactici, which comprises human commensal bacteria, has beneficial effects on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of MS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: P. acidilactici R037 was orally administered to EAE mice to investigate the effects of R037. R037 treatment suppressed clinical EAE severity as prophylaxis and therapy. The antigen-specific production of inflammatory cytokines was inhibited in R037-treated mice. A significant increase in the number of CD4(+ Interleukin (IL-10-producing cells was observed in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs and spleens isolated from R037-treated naive mice, while no increase was observed in the number of these cells in the lamina propria. Because only a slight increase in the CD4(+Foxp3(+ cells was observed in MLNs, R037 may primarily induce Foxp3(- IL10-producing T regulatory type 1 (Tr1 cells in MLNs, which contribute to the beneficial effect of R037 on EAE. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: An orally administered single strain of P. acidilactici R037 ameliorates EAE by inducing IL10-producing Tr1 cells. Our findings indicate the therapeutic potential of the oral administration of R037 for treating multiple sclerosis.

  16. Characterization and Antibacterial Potential of Lactic Acid Bacterium Pediococcus pentosaceus 4I1 Isolated from Freshwater Fish Zacco koreanus

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    Vivek K. Bajpai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to characterize a lactic acid bacterium 4I1, isolated from the freshwater fish, Zacco koreanus. Morphological, biochemical and molecular characterization of 4I1 revealed it to be Pediococcus pentosaceus 4I1. The cell free supernatant (CFS of P. pentosaceus 4I1 exhibited significant (p<0.05 antibacterial effects (inhibition zone diameters: 16.5–20.4 mm against tested foodborne pathogenic bacteria with MIC and MBC values of 250-500 and 500-1,000 µg/mL, respectively. Further, antibacterial action of CFS of P. pentosaceus 4I1 against two selected bacteria Staphylococcus aureus KCTC-1621 and Escherichia coli O157:H7 was determined in subsequent assays. The CFS of P. pentosaceus 4I1 revealed its antibacterial action against S. aureus KCTC-1621 and E. coli O157:H7 on membrane integrity as confirmed by a reduction in cell viability, increased potassium ion release (900 and 800 mmol/L, reduced absorption at 260-nm (3.99 and 3.77 OD, and increased relative electrical conductivity (9.9 and 9.7%, respectively. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS analysis of the CFS of P. pentosaceus 4I1 resulted in the identification of seven major compounds, which included amino acids, fatty acids and organic acids. SEM-based morphological analysis further confirmed the antibacterial effect of CFS of P. pentosaceus 4I1 against S. aureus KCTC-1621 and E. coli O157:H7. In addition, the CFS of P. Pentosaceus 4I1 displayed potent inhibitory effects on biofilms formation by S. aureus KCTC-1621 and E. coli O157:H7. The study indicates the CFS of P. pentosaceus 4I1 offers an alternative means of controlling foodborne pathogens.

  17. Transcriptome and proteome exploration to model translation efficiency and protein stability in Lactococcus lactis.

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    Clémentine Dressaire

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This genome-scale study analysed the various parameters influencing protein levels in cells. To achieve this goal, the model bacterium Lactococcus lactis was grown at steady state in continuous cultures at different growth rates, and proteomic and transcriptomic data were thoroughly compared. Ratios of mRNA to protein were highly variable among proteins but also, for a given gene, between the different growth conditions. The modeling of cellular processes combined with a data fitting modeling approach allowed both translation efficiencies and degradation rates to be estimated for each protein in each growth condition. Estimated translational efficiencies and degradation rates strongly differed between proteins and were tested for their biological significance through statistical correlations with relevant parameters such as codon or amino acid bias. These efficiencies and degradation rates were not constant in all growth conditions and were inversely proportional to the growth rate, indicating a more efficient translation at low growth rate but an antagonistic higher rate of protein degradation. Estimated protein median half-lives ranged from 23 to 224 min, underlying the importance of protein degradation notably at low growth rates. The regulation of intracellular protein level was analysed through regulatory coefficient calculations, revealing a complex control depending on protein and growth conditions. The modeling approach enabled translational efficiencies and protein degradation rates to be estimated, two biological parameters extremely difficult to determine experimentally and generally lacking in bacteria. This method is generic and can now be extended to other environments and/or other micro-organisms.

  18. Antiviral Effects of Lactococcus lactis on Feline Calicivirus, A Human Norovirus Surrogate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboubakr, Hamada A; El-Banna, Amr A; Youssef, Mohammed M; Al-Sohaimy, Sobhy A A; Goyal, Sagar M

    2014-12-01

    Foodborne viruses, particularly human norovirus (NV) and hepatitis virus type A, are a cause of concern for public health making it necessary to explore novel and effective techniques for prevention of foodborne viral contamination, especially in minimally processed and ready-to-eat foods. This study aimed to determine the antiviral activity of a probiotic lactic acid bacterium (LAB) against feline calicivirus (FCV), a surrogate of human NV. Bacterial growth medium filtrate (BGMF) of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis LM0230 and its bacterial cell suspension (BCS) were evaluated separately for their antiviral activity against FCV grown in Crandell-Reese feline kidney (CRFK) cells. No significant antiviral effect was seen when CRFK cells were pre-treated with either BGMF (raw or pH 7-adjusted BGMF) or BCS. However, pre-treatment of FCV with BGMF and BCS resulted in a reduction in virus titers of 1.3 log10 tissue culture infectious dose (TCID)50 and 1.8 log10 TCID50, respectively. The highest reductions in FCV infectivity were obtained when CRFK cells were co-treated with FCV and pH 7-adjusted BGMF or with FCV and BCS (7.5 log10 TCID50 and 6.0 log10 TCID50, respectively). These preliminary results are encouraging and indicate the need for continued studies on the role of probiotics and LAB on inactivation of viruses in various types of foods.

  19. Simultaneous saccharification and high titer lactic acid fermentation of corn stover using a newly isolated lactic acid bacterium Pediococcus acidilactici DQ2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kai; Qiao, Qingan; Chu, Deqiang; Gu, Hanqi; Dao, Thai Ha; Zhang, Jian; Bao, Jie

    2013-05-01

    A lactic acid bacterium with high tolerance of temperature and lignocellulose derived inhibitor was isolated and characterized as Pediococcus acidilactici DQ2. The strain used in the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) for high titer lactic acid production at the high solids loading of corn stover. Corn stover was pretreated using the dry sulphuric acid pretreatment, followed by a biological detoxification to remove the inhibitors produced in the pretreatment. The bioreactor with a novel helical impeller was used to the SSF operation of the pretreated and biodetoxified corn stover. The results show that a typical SSF operation at 48 °C, pH 5.5, and near 30% (w/w) solids loading in both 5 and 50 L bioreactors was demonstrated. The lactic acid titer, yield, and productivity reached 101.9 g/L, 77.2%, and 1.06 g/L/h, respectively. The result provided a practical process option for cellulosic lactic acid production using virgin agriculture lignocellulose residues.

  20. Desulfosporosinus acididurans sp. nov.: an acidophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from acidic sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez Andrea, I.; Stams, A.J.M.; Hedrich, S.; Nancucheo, I.; Johnson, D.B.

    2015-01-01

    Three strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria (M1T, D, and E) were isolated from acidic sediments (White river and Tinto river) and characterized phylogenetically and physiologically. All three strains were obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, spore-forming straight rods, stained Gram-negative and

  1. Clostridium acetireducens sp nov, a novel amino acid-oxidizing, acetate-reducing anaerobic bacterium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlygsson, J; Krooneman, J; Collins, Matthew D.; Pascual, C; Gottschall, JC

    1996-01-01

    Strain 30A(T) (T = type strain), which was isolated from an anaerobic bioreactor fed on waste from a potato starch factory in De Krim, The Netherlands, is a nonmotile, gram-positive, anaerobic, rod-shaped organism that is able to degrade various amino acids, including alanine, leucine, isoleucine, v

  2. Gluconic acid production and phosphate solubilization by the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Hilda; Gonzalez, Tania; Goire, Isabel; Bashan, Yoav

    2004-11-01

    In vitro gluconic acid formation and phosphate solubilization from sparingly soluble phosphorus sources by two strains of the plant growth-promoting bacteria A. brasilense (Cd and 8-I) and one strain of A. lipoferum JA4 were studied. Strains of A. brasilense were capable of producing gluconic acid when grown in sparingly soluble calcium phosphate medium when their usual fructose carbon source is amended with glucose. At the same time, there is a reduction in pH of the medium and release of soluble phosphate. To a greater extent, gluconic acid production and pH reduction were observed for A. lipoferum JA4. For the three strains, clearing halos were detected on solid medium plates with calcium phosphate. This is the first report of in vitro gluconic acid production and direct phosphate solubilization by A. brasilense and the first report of P solubilization by A. lipoferum. This adds to the very broad spectrum of plant growth-promoting abilities of this genus.

  3. Gluconacetobacter kakiaceti sp. nov., an acetic acid bacterium isolated from a traditional Japanese fruit vinegar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, Takao; Suzuki, Rei; Tanaka, Naoto; Kosako, Yoshimasa; Ohkuma, Moriya; Komagata, Kazuo; Uchimura, Tai

    2012-07-01

    Two novel acetic acid bacteria, strains G5-1(T) and I5-1, were isolated from traditional kaki vinegar (produced from fruits of kaki, Diospyros kaki Thunb.), collected in Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strains G5-1(T) and I5-1 formed a distinct subline in the genus Gluconacetobacter and were closely related to Gluconacetobacter swingsii DST GL01(T) (99.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). The isolates showed 96-100% DNA-DNA relatedness with each other, but <53% DNA-DNA relatedness with closely related members of the genus Gluconacetobacter. The isolates could be distinguished from closely related members of the genus Gluconacetobacter by not producing 2- and 5-ketogluconic acids from glucose, producing cellulose, growing without acetic acid and with 30% (w/v) d-glucose, and producing acid from sugars and alcohols. Furthermore, the genomic DNA G+C contents of strains G5-1(T) and I5-1 were a little higher than those of their closest phylogenetic neighbours. On the basis of the phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic position, strains G5-1(T) and I5-1 are assigned to a novel species, for which the name Gluconacetobacter kakiaceti sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is G5-1(T) (=JCM 25156(T)=NRIC 0798(T)=LMG 26206(T)).

  4. Gluconacetobacter maltaceti sp. nov., a novel vinegar producing acetic acid bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slapšak, Nina; Cleenwerck, Ilse; De Vos, Paul; Trček, Janja

    2013-02-01

    Comparison of HaeIII- and HpaII-restriction profiles of PCR-amplified 16S-23S rDNA ITS regions of Gluconacetobacter sp. LMG 1529(T) and SKU 1109 with restriction profiles of reference strains of acetic acid bacteria described by Trček and Teuber [34] revealed the same but unique restriction profiles for LMG 1529(T) and SKU 1109. Further analyses of nearly complete 16S rRNA gene sequences, nearly complete 16S-23S rDNA ITS sequences, as well as concatenated partial sequences of the housekeeping genes dnaK, groEL and rpoB, allocated both strains to a single phylogenetic cluster well separated from the other species of the genus Gluconacetobacter. DNA-DNA hybridizations confirmed their novel species identity by 73% DNA-DNA relatedness between both strains, and values below the species level (<70%) between SKU 1109 and the type strains of the closest phylogenetic neighbors. The classification of strains LMG 1529(T) and SKU 1109 into a single novel species was confirmed also by AFLP and (GTG)(5)-PCR DNA fingerprinting data, as well as by phenotypic data. Strains LMG 1529(T) and SKU 1109 can be differentiated from their closely related Gluconacetobacter species, Gluconacetobacter entanii and Gluconacetobacter hansenii, by their ability to form 2-keto-d-gluconic acid from d-glucose, their ability to use d-mannitol, d-gluconate and glycerol as carbon source and form acid from d-fructose, and their ability to grow without acetic acid. The major fatty acid of LMG 1529(T) and SKU 1109 is C(18:1ω7c) (60.2-64.8%). The DNA G+C content of LMG 1529(T) and SKU 1109 is 62.5 and 63.3mol% respectively. The name Gluconacetobacter maltaceti sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LMG 1529(T) (=NBRC 14815(T)=NCIMB 8752(T)).

  5. Endohyphal Bacterium Enhances Production of Indole-3-Acetic Acid by a Foliar Fungal Endophyte

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, Michele T.; Gunatilaka, Malkanthi K.; Kithsiri Wijeratne; Leslie Gunatilaka; A Elizabeth Arnold

    2013-01-01

    Numerous plant pathogens, rhizosphere symbionts, and endophytic bacteria and yeasts produce the important phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), often with profound effects on host plants. However, to date IAA production has not been documented among foliar endophytes -- the diverse guild of primarily filamentous Ascomycota that live within healthy, above-ground tissues of all plant species studied thus far. Recently bacteria that live within hyphae of endophytes (endohyphal bacteria) have ...

  6. Diversity of Heteropolysaccharide-Producing Lactic Acid Bacterium Strains and Their Biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozzi, Fernanda; Vaningelgem, Frederik; Hébert, Elvira María; Van der Meulen, Roel; Foulquié Moreno, María Remedios; Font de Valdez, Graciela; De Vuyst, Luc

    2006-01-01

    Thirty-one lactic acid bacterial strains from different species were evaluated for exopolysaccharide (EPS) production in milk. Thermophilic strains produced more EPS than mesophilic ones, but EPS yields were generally low. Ropiness or capsular polysaccharide formation was strain dependent. Six strains produced high-molecular-mass EPS. Polymers were classified into nine groups on the basis of their monomer composition. EPS from Enterococcus strains were isolated and characterized. PMID:16751563

  7. Lactobacillus ghanensis sp. nov., a motile lactic acid bacterium isolated from Ghanaian cocoa fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Dennis S; Schillinger, Ulrich; Franz, Charles M A P; Bresciani, José; Amoa-Awua, Wisdom; Holzapfel, Wilhelm H; Jakobsen, Mogens

    2007-07-01

    Three Gram-positive, catalase-negative, motile, rod-shaped strains, designated L486, L489(T) and L499, were isolated from fermenting cocoa. These organisms produced DL-lactic acid from glucose without gas formation. Ammonia was not produced from arginine. Acid was produced from amygdalin, D-cellobiose, aesculin, D-fructose, D-glucose, D-galactose, D-mannitol, D-mannose, N-acetylglucosamine, L-rhamnose, sucrose, salicin and D-trehalose. The cell walls contained peptidoglycan of the d-meso-diaminopimelic acid type. A 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the isolates belong phylogenetically to the genus Lactobacillus and are closely related to Lactobacillus nagelii, Lactobacillus vini and Lactobacillus satsumensis. Low DNA-DNA reassociation values were obtained between the isolates and the phylogenetically closest neighbours. On the basis of the genetic and phenotypic results, the isolates are considered to represent a novel species, for which the name Lactobacillus ghanensis is proposed. The type strain is L489(T) (=DSM 18630(T)=CCUG 53453(T)).

  8. Lactic acid bacterium and yeast microbiotas of sixteen French traditional sourdoughs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhomme, Emilie; Lattanzi, Anna; Dousset, Xavier; Minervini, Fabio; De Angelis, Maria; Lacaze, Guylaine; Onno, Bernard; Gobbetti, Marco

    2015-12-23

    Sixteen sourdoughs (FS1-FS16) used for the manufacture of traditional French breads were characterized by strongly acid conditions (median value of pH 3.5). The concentration of free amino acids (FAA) was highly variable, due to different proteolytic activity of flour used for back slopping and of dominant microorganisms. Median value of cell density of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) was 9.2 log CFU/g. The ratio between LAB and yeasts ranged from 10,000:1 to 10:1. According to the culture-dependent method and 16S metagenetics, Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis was the dominant species in French sourdoughs. FS5 and FS15, propagated according to protocols including one back slopping step at 14 °C, were the only exceptions. High positive correlations were found between L. sanfranciscensis, temperature of back slopping and FAA. The results of this study highlighted the broad adaptability of L. sanfranciscensis to very acid sourdough. Besides species frequently encountered (e.g., Lactobacillus parabrevis/Lactobacillus hammesii, Lactobacillus plantarum and Leuconostoc mesenteroides), first Lactobacillus xiangfangensis (FS5) and Lactobacillus diolivorans (FS15) were found in sourdough. As determined by RAPD-PCR analyses, the sourdough samples showed a different number of strains, ranging from 5 (FS9, FS11 and FS15) to 12 (FS1 and FS13), meaning a highly variable bacterial diversity. Cluster analysis showed that different sourdoughs, especially when propagated in the same bakery, may harbor similar strains. Except for L. plantarum (FS5) and Ln. mesenteroides (FS3), all the dominant species were detected by both 16S metagenetics and culture-dependent method. Yeast diversity was lower than LAB. Except for FS4 (solely dominated by Kazachstania servazzii), yeast microbiota of French sourdoughs was dominated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Strains isolated in this study could be a useful base for developing new basic researches on physiology, metabolism, and intraspecific diversity of L

  9. Inoculation of sugarcane with Pantoea sp. increases amino acid contents in shoot tissues; serine, alanine, glutamine and asparagine permit concomitantly ammonium excretion and nitrogenase activity of the bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiret, F G; Grimm, B; Hajirezaei, M R; Kleiner, D; Ortega, E

    2009-07-15

    Pantoea sp. is an endophytic nitrogen-fixing bacterium isolated from sugarcane tissues. The aim of the present study was to determine the contents of amino acids in sugarcane as a result of inoculation of nodes and nodal roots with Pantoea sp. strain 9C and to evaluate the effects of amino acids on growth, nitrogenase activity and ammonium excretion of the bacterium. Content of almost all amino acids increased in 30-day-old plantlets by root inoculation. The most abundant amino acids in shoot tissues were asparagine and proline, and those in nodal roots were asparagine, proline, aspartic acid, glutamic acid and serine. The bacterium was able to grow on all tested amino acids except histidine, isoleucine and leucine. Nitrogenase Pantoea sp. was partially inhibited by 1, 2 or 5mmolL(-1) and completely inhibited by 10mmolL(-1) of NH(4)(+) in the media. Pantoea sp. showed nitrogenase activity in 5mmolL(-1) of serine, asparagine, threonine, alanine, proline, tyrosine, valine, methionine, lysine, phenylalanine, cysteine, tryptophan, citrulline and ornithine. Pantoea sp. did not excrete ammonium when it grew in vivo conditions favoring nitrogen fixation; however, ammonium was detected in the supernatant when 5mmolL(-1) asparagine, aspartic acid, alanine, serine or glutamine was added to the medium. The highest ammonium concentration in the supernatant was detected, when Pantoea grew on serine. Ammonium in the supernatant and nitrogenase activity were only detectable concomitantly when the medium was supplemented with serine, alanine, glutamine or asparagine. We discuss roles of amino acids on plant-bacteria interaction during the colonization of sugarcane plants.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of the Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactobacillus Rhamnosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samat Kozhakhmetov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lactobacilli are a bacteria commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract. Some species of this genus have probiotic properties. The most common of these is Lactobacillus rhamnosus, a microoganism, generally regarded as safe (GRAS. It is also a homofermentative L-(+-lactic acid producer. The genus Lactobacillus is characterized by an extraordinary degree of the phenotypic and genotypic diversity. However, the studies of the genus were conducted mostly with the unequally distributed, non-random choice of species for sequencing; thus, there is only one representative genome from the Lactobacillus rhamnosus clade available to date. The aim of this study was to characterize the genome sequencing of selected strains of Lactobacilli. Methods: 109 samples were isolated from national domestic dairy products in the laboratory of Center for life sciences. After screaning isolates for probiotic properties, a highly active Lactobacillus spp strain was chosen. Genomic DNA was extracted according to the manufacturing protocol (Wizard® Genomic DNA Purification Kit. The Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain was identified as the highly active Lactobacillus strain accoridng to its morphological, cultural, physiological, and biochemical properties, and a genotypic analysis. Results: The genome of Lactobacillus rhamnosus was sequenced using the Roche 454 GS FLX (454 GS FLX platforms. The initial draft assembly was prepared from 14 large contigs (20 all contigs by the Newbler gsAssembler 2.3 (454 Life Sciences, Branford, CT. Conclusion: A full genome-sequencing of selected strains of lactic acid bacteria was made during the study.

  11. Microbacter margulisiae gen. nov., sp. nov., a propionigenic bacterium isolated from sediments of an acid rock drainage pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Andrea, Irene; Sanz, Jose Luis; Stams, Alfons J M

    2014-12-01

    A novel anaerobic propionigenic bacterium, strain ADRI(T), was isolated from sediment of an acid rock drainage environment (Tinto River, Spain). Cells were small (0.4-0.6×1-1.7 µm), non-motile and non-spore-forming rods. Cells possessed a Gram-negative cell-wall structure and were vancomycin-resistant. Strain ADRI(T) utilized yeast extract and various sugars as substrates and formed propionate, lactate and acetate as major fermentation products. The optimum growth temperature was 30 °C and the optimum pH for growth was pH 6.5, but strain ADRI(T) was able to grow at a pH as low as 3.0. Oxidase, indole formation, and urease and catalase activities were negative. Aesculin and gelatin were hydrolysed. The predominant cellular fatty acids of strain ADRI(T) were anteiso-C15 : 0 (30.3 %), iso-C15 : 0 (29.2 %) and iso-C17 : 0 3-OH (14.9 %). Major menaquinones were MK-8 (52 %) and MK-9 (48 %). The genomic DNA G+C content was 39.9 mol%. Phylogenetically, strain ADRI(T) was affiliated to the family Porphyromonadaceae of the phylum Bacteroidetes. The most closely related cultured species were Paludibacter propionicigenes with 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 87.5 % and several species of the genus Dysgonomonas (similarities of 83.5-85.4 % to the type strains). Based on the distinctive ecological, phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics of strain ADRI(T), a novel genus and species, Microbacter margulisiae gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is ADRI(T) ( = JCM 19374(T) = DSM 27471(T)).

  12. Production of L-lactic Acid from Biomass Wastes Using Scallop Crude Enzymes and Novel Lactic Acid Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Mitsunori; Nakamura, Kanami; Nakasaki, Kiyohiko

    In the present study, biomass waste raw materials including paper mill sludge, bamboo, sea lettuce, and shochu residue (from a distiller) and crude enzymes derived from inedible and discarded scallop parts were used to produce L-lactic acid for the raw material of biodegradable plastic poly-lactic acid. The activities of cellulase and amylase in the crude enzymes were 22 and 170units/L, respectively, and L-lactic acid was produced from every of the above mentioned biomass wastes, by the method of liquid-state simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) . The L-lactic acid concentrations produced from sea lettuce and shochu residue, which contain high concentration of starch were 3.6 and 9.3g/L, respectively, and corresponded to greater than 25% of the conversion of glucans contained in these biomass wastes. Furthermore, using the solid state SSF method, concentrations as high as 13g/L of L-lactic acid were obtained from sea lettuce and 26g/L were obtained from shochu residue.

  13. Enterococcus bulliens sp. nov., a novel lactic acid bacterium isolated from camel milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Zaina; Spitaels, Freek; Cnockaert, Margo; Praet, Jessy; El Farricha, Omar; Swings, Jean; Vandamme, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Four lactic acid bacteria isolates obtained from fresh dromedary camel milk produced in Dakhla, a city in southern Morocco, were characterised in order to determine their taxonomic position. The four isolates had highly similar MALDI-TOF MS and RAPD fingerprints and identical 16S rRNA gene sequences. Comparative sequence analysis revealed that the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the four isolates was most similar to that of Enterococcus sulfureus ATCC 49903(T) and Enterococcus italicus DSM 15952(T) (99.33 and 98.59% similarity, respectively). However, sequence analysis of the phenylalanyl-tRNA synthase (pheS), RNA polymerase (rpoA) and ATP synthase (atpA) genes revealed that the taxon represented by strain LMG 28766(T) was well separated from E. sulfureus LMG 13084(T) and E. italicus LMG 22039(T), which was further confirmed by DNA-DNA hybridization values that were clearly below the species demarcation threshold. The novel taxon was easily differentiated from its nearest neighbour species through sequence analysis of protein encoding genes, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and multiple biochemical tests, but had a similar percentage G+C content of about 39%. We therefore propose to formally classify these isolates as Enterococcus bulliens sp. nov., with LMG 28766(T) (=CCMM B1177(T)) as the type strain.

  14. Asaia krungthepensis sp. nov., an acetic acid bacterium in the alpha-Proteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukphan, Pattaraporn; Potacharoen, Wanchern; Tanasupawat, Somboon; Tanticharoen, Morakot; Yamada, Yuzo

    2004-03-01

    Three bacterial strains were isolated from flowers collected in Bangkok, Thailand, by an enrichment-culture approach for acetic acid bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolates were located in the lineage of the genus Asaia but constituted a cluster separate from the type strains of Asaia bogorensis and Asaia siamensis. The DNA base composition of the isolates was 60.2-60.5 mol% G+C, with a range of 0.3 mol%. The isolates constituted a taxon separate from Asaia bogorensis and Asaia siamensis on the basis of DNA-DNA relatedness. The isolates had morphological, physiological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic characteristics similar to those of the type strains of Asaia bogorensis and Asaia siamensis, but the isolates grew on maltose. The major ubiquinone was Q(10). On the basis of the results obtained, the name Asaia krungthepensis sp. nov. is proposed for the isolates. The type strain is isolate AA08(T) (=BCC 12978(T)=TISTR 1524(T)=NBRC 100057(T)=NRIC 0535(T)), which had a DNA G+C content of 60.3 mol% and was isolated from a heliconia flower ('paksaasawan' in Thai; Heliconia sp.) collected in Bangkok, Thailand.

  15. Lactobacillus vini sp. nov., a wine lactic acid bacterium homofermentative for pentoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodas, Ana María; Chenoll, Empar; Macián, M Carmen; Ferrer, Sergi; Pardo, Isabel; Aznar, Rosa

    2006-03-01

    Six strains with more than 99.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, identical internal spacer region profiles and restriction analysis of the amplified 16S rRNA gene patterns were isolated from fermenting grape musts during independent studies carried out in France and Spain many years apart. Strains are Gram-positive, motile, facultatively anaerobic rods that do not exhibit catalase activity and have the ability to utilize pentose sugars (ribose and/or l-arabinose), although they are homofermentative bacteria. Strains ferment pentoses exclusively yielding lactic acid as the end product. A broad set of molecular techniques has been applied to characterize these strains and the results show a high degree of genotypical congruence, sharing identical profiles with 16S rRNA-based techniques. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed these strains within the genus Lactobacillus, closely related to Lactobacillus mali, Lactobacillus nagelii and Lactobacillus satsumensis (with approximately 95 % sequence similarity). DNA-DNA hybridization experiments confirmed the independent status at the species level of these fermenting grape-musts strains. Phenotypically they can be distinguished from the closest relatives by several traits such as growth temperatures and fermentation of carbohydrates. The name Lactobacillus vini sp. nov. is proposed, with strain Mont 4T (= DSM 20605T = CECT 5924T) as the type strain.

  16. Features of a Clostridium, strain CV-AA1, an obligatory anaerobic bacterium producing acetic acid from methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamse, A D; Velzeboer, C T

    1982-01-01

    Isolation and characterization of a new, obligatory, anaerobic, methylotrophic, homoacetogenic bacterium is described. This bacterium is a mesophilic, motile, slightly curved rod that demonstrated a negative Gram reaction, formed spherical, (sub)terminal spores and performed a homoacetic fermentation with methanol, a CO2-2H2-gas mixture, glucose or fructose, respectively, as the substrate. The methanol fermentation proceeded only when a suitable amount of NaHCO3 was available in the nutrient solution supplied.

  17. Multilocus sequence typing of Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum, a Psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium causing spoilage of packaged perishable foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahkila, Riitta; Johansson, Per; Säde, Elina; Paulin, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Björkroth, Johanna

    2015-04-01

    Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum is a psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium (LAB) that causes spoilage of a variety of modified-atmosphere-packaged (MAP) cold-stored food products. During the past 10 years, this spoilage organism has been increasingly reported in MAP meat and vegetable products in northern Europe. In the present study, the population structure within 252 L. gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum strains was determined based on a novel multilocus sequence-typing (MLST) scheme employing seven housekeeping genes. These strains had been isolated from meat and vegetable sources over a time span of 15 years, and all 68 previously detected pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) genotypes were represented. A total of 46 sequence types (STs) were identified, with a majority of the strains (>60%) belonging to three major STs, which were grouped into three clonal complexes (CCs) and 17 singletons by Global Optimal eBURST (goeBURST). The results by Bayesian analysis of population structure (BAPS) mostly correlated with the grouping by goeBURST. Admixture analysis by BAPS indicated a very low level of exchange of genetic material between the subpopulations. Niche specificity was observed within the subpopulations: CC1 and BAPS cluster 1 consisted mostly of strains from a variety of MAP meats, whereas vegetable strains grouped together with strains from MAP poultry within CC2 and BAPS cluster 2. The MLST scheme presented in this study provides a shareable and continuously growing sequence database enabling global comparison of strains associated with spoilage cases. This will further advance our understanding of the microbial ecology of this industrially important LAB. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Alterations in membrane phospholipid fatty acids of Gram-positive piezotolerant bacterium Sporosarcina sp. DSK25 in response to growth pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiani; Li, Jiangtao; Dasgupta, Shamik; Zhang, Li; Golovko, Mikhail Y; Golovko, Svetlana A; Fang, Jiasong

    2014-04-01

    Pressure is an important thermodynamic property of the ocean and the deep biosphere that affects microbial physiology and biochemistry. Here, we report on our investigation of the response of Gram-positive piezotolerant bacterium Sporosarcina sp. DSK25 to hydrostatic pressure. Strain DSK25 responded in an adaptive manner to upshifts of growth pressure and showed systematic changes in phospholipid fatty acids. As the pressure increased from 0.1 to 10 MPa (Megapascal), unsaturated fatty acids in DSK25 increased from 21.7 to 31.1% of total fatty acids, while the level of iso- and anteiso-branched fatty acids remained unchanged. At higher pressures (30, 50, and 60 MPa), the amount of unsaturated fatty acids decreased, and that of anteiso-branched fatty acids increased from 34.4 to 49.9% at the expense of iso-branched fatty acids. For the first time, two polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), 18:2n-6 and 18:2n-x, with the latter having much higher abundance than the former, were identified in DSK25. The concentration of the PUFA increased with growth pressure. These results indicate the involvement of unsaturated and methyl-branched fatty acids in the modulation of bacteria membrane fluidity and function over environmentally relevant parameter (pressure). Piezotolerant bacterium Sporosarcina sp. DSK25 appears to utilize two regulatory mechanisms for adaptation to high pressure, a rapid-responding mechanism on transient scale, expressed as increased biosynthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids, and a long-term adaptation mechanism in increased synthesis of anteiso-branched and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Our results further suggest that Gram-positive piezophilic bacteria respond differently than Gram-negative bacteria in adaptation to high pressure.

  19. The level of pyruvate-formate lyase controls the shift from homolactic to mixed-acid product formation in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melchiorsen, C.R.; Jokumsen, K.V.; Villadsen, John

    2002-01-01

    promoters in L. lactis MG1363 and in the PFL-deficient strain CRM40. Strains with five different PFL levels were obtained. Variation in the PFL level markedly affected the resulting end-product formation in these strains. During growth on galactose, the flux towards mixed-acid products was to a great extent...

  20. Leuconostoc gelidum and Leuconostoc gasicomitatum strains dominated the lactic acid bacterium population associated with strong slime formation in an acetic-acid herring preserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyhs, Ulrike; Koort, Joanna M K; Lundström, Hanna-Saara; Björkroth, K Johanna

    2004-01-15

    Spoilage characterised by strong slime and gas formation affected some manufacture lots of an acetic-acid Baltic herring (Culpea haerengus membras) preserve after few weeks of storage at 0-6 degrees C. The product consisted of herring filets in acetic acid marinade containing sugar, salt, allspice and carrot slices. Microbiological analyses of the spoiled product showed high lactic acid bacterium (LAB) levels ranging from 4.5x10(8) to 2.4x10(9) CFU/g. Yeasts were not detected in any of the herring samples. Since LAB contaminants are seldom associated with fresh fish, LAB populations associated with marinade ingredients (carrots, allspice) were also analyzed. The highest LAB levels exceeding 10(7) CFU/g were detected in equilibrium modified atmosphere packaged baby carrots whereas the levels detected in the allspice samples did not exceed 4.3x10(5). A total of 176 randomly selected LAB isolates originating from herring, carrot and allspice samples were further identified to species level using a 16 and 23S rRNA gene RFLP (ribotyping) database. Leuconostoc gelidum and Leuconostoc gasicomitatum strains dominated both in the spoiled herring and carrot samples. These species are heterofermentative-producing CO(2) from glucose and they also produce dextran from sucrose. Inoculation of some commercial-herring products with spoilage-associated L. gelidum and L. gasicomitatum strains verified that these strains have the capability of producing slime and gas in herring preserves although slime formation was not as strong as in the original samples. Since L. gelidum and L. gasicomitatum strains were commonly detected in carrots, carrot slices used for the fish marinade were considered to be the probable source of these specific spoilage organisms.

  1. Acid Production Characteristics of Luminescent Lactococcus Lactis Transformed with Lux Genes%转lux基因发光乳球菌产酸特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭善广; 蒋爱民; 杨公明; 王海峰; Mansel W. Griffiths

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Effect of lux genes, generations, erythromycin, and incubating time on the acid producing characteristics of the luminescent L lactis transformed with lux genes was studied in this paper in order to apply its luminescent phenotype in test field. Method: The selected luminescent L. lactis transformed with luxCDABE and luxAB were activated and then cultured in liquid medium at 30℃. The capacity of acid producing of the microorganisms was determined. Result: Gene and generation did not obviously affect the production capacity of the luminescent L. lactis transformed with lux genes (P>0.05). It suggested that the transformed genes make no difference to the capability of producing acid. Erythromycin slowed down the rate of acid production of the luminescent L. lactis transformed with lux genes, but did not influence the biggest capacity of acid production. Conclusion; The selected luminescent L. lactis transformed with lux genes had a stable heritable property of acid production.%目的:为使转lux基因发光乳球菌应用于检测领域,研究lux基因、世代、红霉素和培养时间等因素对转lux基因发光乳球菌产酸特性的影响.方法:将筛选的转luxCDA BE基因发光乳球菌、转luxAB基因发光乳球菌菌株活化后接入液体培养基中,30℃培养,测定其产酸能力.结果:基因、世代对转lux基因发光乳球菌的产酸能力无显著影响(P>0.05),表明转入的lux基因大小对lux基因发光乳球菌的产酸性能无影响.红霉素可明显降低转lux基因发光乳球菌产酸速率,但对其最大产酸能力无显著影响.结论:筛选的转lux基因发光乳球菌的产酸性能具有稳定的遗传特性.

  2. CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF THE CYTOPLASMIC PH IN LACTOCOCCUS-LACTIS WITH A FLUORESCENT PH INDICATOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOLENAAR, D; ABEE, T; KONINGS, WN

    1991-01-01

    The cytoplasmic pH of Lactococcus lactis was studied with the fluorescent pH indicator 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5 (and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). A novel method was applied for loading bacterial cells with BCECF, which consists of briefly treating a dense cell suspension with acid in the prese

  3. CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF THE CYTOPLASMIC PH IN LACTOCOCCUS-LACTIS WITH A FLUORESCENT PH INDICATOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOLENAAR, D; ABEE, T; KONINGS, WN

    1991-01-01

    The cytoplasmic pH of Lactococcus lactis was studied with the fluorescent pH indicator 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5 (and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). A novel method was applied for loading bacterial cells with BCECF, which consists of briefly treating a dense cell suspension with acid in the

  4. On the binding mechanism of the peptide receptor of the oligopeptide transport system of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanfermeijer, Frank C.; Detmers, Frank J.M.; Konings, Wil N.; Poolman, Bert

    2000-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis degrades exogenous proteins such as β-casein to peptides of 4–30 amino acids, and uses these as nitrogen sources. The binding protein or receptor (OppALl) of the oligopeptide transport system (Opp) of L.lactis has the unique capacity to bind peptides from five up to at least 20

  5. An ABC-type multidrug transporter of Lactococcus lactis possesses an exceptionally broad substrate specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelarends, GJ; Mazurkiewicz, P; Putman, M; Cool, RH; van Veen, HW; Konings, WN

    2000-01-01

    LmrA is a 590-amino acid membrane protein which confers multidrug resistance on Lactococcus lactis cells by extruding amphiphilic compounds from the inner leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Its structural and functional characteristics place it in the

  6. Properties of Nisin Z and Distribution of Its Gene, nisZ, in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Willem M. de; Mulders, John W.M.; Siezen, Roland J.; Hugenholtz, Jeroen; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    1993-01-01

    Two natural variants of the lantibiotic nisin that are produced by Lactococcus lactis are known. They have a similar structure but differ in a single amino acid residue at position 27: histidine in nisin A and asparagine in nisin Z. The nisin variants were purified to apparent homogeneity, and their

  7. Topology of a type I secretion system for bacteriocins of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, Christian Marc

    1998-01-01

    This thesis describes the analysis of a number of aspects of the secretion and muturation machinery of the bacteriocin lactococcin A (LcnA) from Lactococcus lactis, whick is initially synthesized as a precursor protein (preLcnA), containing an N-terminal extension of 20 amino acids (the leader)....

  8. Genome Sequences of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 (Revised) and NZ9000 and Comparative Physiological Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linares, D.M.; Kok, J.; Poolman, B.

    2010-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis NZ9000 and its parent MG1363 are the most commonly used lactic acid bacteria for expression and physiological studies. We noted unexpected but significant differences in the growth behaviors of both strains. We sequenced the entire genomes of the original NZ9000 and MG1363 strains

  9. Stress Response in Lactococcus lactis : Cloning, Expression Analysis, and Mutation of the Lactococcal Superoxide Dismutase Gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Jan Willem; Leenhouts, Kees J.; Haandrikman, Alfred J.; Venema, Gerard; Kok, Jan

    In an analysis of the stress response of Lactococcus lactis, three proteins that were induced under low pH culture conditions were detected. One of these was identified as the lactococcal superoxide dismutase (SodA) by N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis. The gene encoding this protein,

  10. CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF THE CYTOPLASMIC PH IN LACTOCOCCUS-LACTIS WITH A FLUORESCENT PH INDICATOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOLENAAR, D; ABEE, T; KONINGS, WN

    1991-01-01

    The cytoplasmic pH of Lactococcus lactis was studied with the fluorescent pH indicator 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5 (and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). A novel method was applied for loading bacterial cells with BCECF, which consists of briefly treating a dense cell suspension with acid in the prese

  11. Growth Phase-Dependent Proteomes of the Malaysian Isolated Lactococcus lactis Dairy Strain M4 Using Label-Free Qualitative Shotgun Proteomics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Wan Chen Yap

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis is the most studied mesophilic fermentative lactic acid bacterium. It is used extensively in the food industry and plays a pivotal role as a cell factory and also as vaccine delivery platforms. The proteome of the Malaysian isolated L. lactis M4 dairy strain, obtained from the milk of locally bred cows, was studied to elucidate the physiological changes occurring between the growth phases of this bacterium. In this study, ultraperformance liquid chromatography nanoflow electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC- nano-ESI-MSE approach was used for qualitative proteomic analysis. A total of 100 and 121 proteins were identified from the midexponential and early stationary growth phases, respectively, of the L. lactis strain M4. During the exponential phase, the most important reaction was the generation of sufficient energy, whereas, in the early stationary phase, the metabolic energy pathways decreased and the biosynthesis of proteins became more important. Thus, the metabolism of the cells shifted from energy production in the exponential phase to the synthesis of macromolecules in the stationary phase. The resultant proteomes are essential in providing an improved view of the cellular machinery of L. lactis during the transition of growth phases and hence provide insight into various biotechnological applications.

  12. [Isolation, identification and oxidizing characterization of an iron-sulfur oxidizing bacterium LY01 from acid mine drainage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-jiao; Yang, Xin-ping; Wang, Shi-mei; Liang, Yin

    2013-05-01

    An acidophilic iron-sulfur oxidizing bacterium LY01 was isolated from acid mine drainage of coal in Guizhou Province, China. Strain LY01 was identified as Acidithiobacillusferrooxidans by morphological and physiological characteristics, and phylogenetic analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence. Strain LY01 was able to grow using ferrous ion (Fe2+), elemental sulfur (S0) and pyrite as sole energy source, respectively, but significant differences in oxidation efficiency and bacterial growth were observed when different energy source was used. When strain LY01 was cultured in 9K medium with 44.2 g x L(-1) FeSO4.7H2O as the substrate, the oxidation efficiency of Fe2+ was 100% in 30 h and the cell number of strain LY01 reached to 4.2 x 10(7) cell x mL(-1). When LY01 was cultured in 9K medium with 10 g x L(-1) S0 as the substrate, 6.7% S0 oxidation efficiency, 2001 mg x L(-1) SO4(2-) concentration and 8.9 x 10(7) cell x mL(-1) cell number were observed in 21 d respectively. When LY01 was cultured with 30 g x L(-1) pyrite as the substrate, the oxidation efficiency of pyrite, SO4(2-) concentration and cell number reached 10%, 4443 mg x L(-1) and 3.4 x 10(8) cell x mL(-1) respectively in 20 d. The effects of different heavy metals (Ni2+, Pb2+) on oxidation activity of strain LY01 cultured with pyrite were investigated. Results showed that the oxidation activity of strain LY01 was inhibited to a certain extent with the addition of Ni2+ at 10-100 mg x L(-1) to the medium, but the addition of 10-100 mg x L(-1) Pb2+ had no effect on LY01 activity.

  13. Thermosyntropha lipolytica gen. nov., sp. nov., a lipolytic, anaerobic, alkalitolerant, thermophilic bacterium utilizing short- and long-chain fatty acids in syntrophic coculture with a methanogenic archaeum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlitshnyi, V; Rainey, F; Wiegel, J

    1996-10-01

    Three strains of an anaerobic thermophilic organoheterotrophic lipolytic alkalitolerant bacterium, Thermosyntropha lipolytica gen. nov., sp. nov. (type strain JW/VS-265T; DSM 11003), were isolated from alkaline hot springs of Lake Bogoria (Kenya). The cells were nonmotile, non-spore forming, straight or slightly curved rods. At 60 degrees C the pH range for growth determined at 25 degrees C [pH25 degrees C] was 7.15 to 9.5, with an optimum between 8.1 and 8.9 (pH60 degrees C of 7.6 and 8.1). At a pH25 degrees C of 8.5 the temperature range for growth was from 52 to 70 degrees C, with an optimum between 60 and 66 degrees C. The shortest doubling time was around 1 h. In pure culture the bacterium grew in a mineral base medium supplemented with yeast extract, tryptone, Casamino Acids, betaine, and crotonate as carbon sources, producing acetate as a major product and constitutively a lipase. During growth in the presence of olive oil, free long-chain fatty acids were accumulated in the medium but the pure culture could not utilize olive oil, triacylglycerols, short- and long-chain fatty acids, and glycerol for growth. In syntrophic coculture (Methanobacterium strain JW/VS-M29) the lipolytic bacteria grew on triacylglycerols and linear saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with 4 to 18 carbon atoms, but glycerol was not utilized. Fatty acids with even numbers of carbon atoms were degraded to acetate and methane, while from odd-numbered fatty acids 1 mol of propionate per mol of fatty acid was additionally formed. 16S rDNA sequence analysis identified Syntrophospora and Syntrophomonas spp. as closest phylogenetic neighbors.

  14. Cloning and Expression of the Lactococcus lactis purDEK Genes, Required for Growth in Milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Dan; Kilstrup, Mogens

    1998-01-01

    An operon containing the genes purD and purE and part of the purK gene was cloned from the facultative anaerobic gram positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis by complementation of the purD mutation in Escherichia coli SO609. The genes encode enzymes in the de novo pathway of purine nucleotides....... The expression of the genes was regulated approximately 35-fold at the transcription level by the availability of purines in the growth medium. Deletion analysis of the nucleotide region upstream of purD indicated that a region of 145 bp is enough to give regulated expression of the reporter lacLM genes, which...

  15. Thermosyntropha lipolytica gen. nov., sp. nov., a lipolytic, anaerobic, alkalitolerant, thermophilic bacterium utilizing short- and long-chain fatty acids in syntrophic coculture with a methanogenic archaeum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svetlitshnyi, V.; Wiegel, J. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Rainey, F. [German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures, Braunschweig (Germany)

    1996-10-01

    Three strains of an anaerobic thermophilic organoheterotrophic lipolytic alkalitolerant bacterium, Thermosyntropha lipolytica gen. nov., sp. nov. (type strain JW/VS-264{sup T}; DSM 11003) were isolated from alkaline hot springs of Lake Bogoria (Kenya). The cells were nonmotile, non-spore forming, straight or slightly curved rods. At 60{degrees}C, the pH range for growth determined at 25{degrees}C [pH{sup 25{degrees}C}] was 7.15 to 9.5, with an optimum between 8.1 and 8.9 (pH{sup 60{degrees}C} of 7.6 and 8.1). At a pH{sup 25{degrees}C} of 8.5 temperature range for growth was from 52 to 70{degrees}C, with an optimum between 60 and 66{degrees}C. The shortest doubling time was around 1 h. In pure culture the bacterium grew in a mineral base medium supplemented with yeast extract, tryptone, Casamino Acids, betaine, and crotonate as carbon sources, producing acetate as a major product and constitutively a lipase. During growth in the presence of olive oil, free long-chain fatty acids were accumulated in the medium but the pure culture syntrophic coculture (Methanobacterium strain JW/VS-M29) the lipolytic bacteria grew on triacylglycerols and linear saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with 4 to 18 carbon atoms, but glycerol was not utilized. Fatty acids with even numbers of carbon atoms were degraded to acetate and methane, while from odd-numbered fatty acids 1 mol of propionate per mol of fatty acid was additionally formed. 16S rDNA sequence analysis identified Syntrophospora and Syntrophomonas spp. as closest phylogenetic neighbors.

  16. The Lactococcus lactis Thioredoxin System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efler, Petr

    -dependent thioredoxin reductase (NTR) in order to complete its catalytic cycle. Glutathione-dependent glutaredoxin complements Trx in many organisms. This thesis focuses on disulfide reduction pathways in Lactococcus lactis, an important industrial microorganism used traditionally for cheese and buttermilk production...... ribonucleotide reductase (NrdEF). Physiological functions of LlTrxA and LlTrxD were studied using ΔtrxA, ΔtrxD and ΔtrxAΔtrxD mutant strains of L. lactis ssp. cremoris MG1363 exposed to various stress conditions and comparing them to the wild type (wt) strain. These experiments revealed that the ΔtrxA genotype...... with a previous study showing that NTR in L. lactis is not essential. Therefore, the presence of an additional thiol redox system is hypothesized. Biochemical studies demonstrated that recombinant LlTrxA, LlTrxD and LlNrdH are substrates for LlNTR, while only LlTrxA and LlNrdH are efficiently reduced by E. coli...

  17. Over-expressed CmbT multidrug resistance transporter improves the fitness of Lactococcus lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipić Brankica

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the over-expression of CmbT multidrug resistance transporter on the growth rate of Lactococcus lactis NZ9000 was studied. L. lactis is a lactic acid bacteria (LAB widely used as a starter culture in dairy industry. Recently characterized CmbT MDR transporter in L. lactis confers resistance to a wide variety of toxic compounds as well as to some clinically relevant antibiotics. In this study, the cmbT gene was over-expressed in the strain L. lactis NZ9000 in the presence of nisin inducer. Over-expression of the cmbT gene in L. lactis NZ9000 was followed by RT-PCR. The obtained results showed that the cmbT gene was successfully over-expressed by addition of sub-inhibitory amounts of nisin. Growth curves of L. lactis NZ9000/pCT50 over-expressing the cmbT gene and L. lactis NZ9000 control strain were followed in the rich medium as well as in the chemically defined medium in the presence solely of methionine (0.084 mM or mix of methionine and cysteine (8.4 mM and 8.2 mM, respectively. Resulting doubling times revealed that L. lactis NZ9000/pCT50 had higher growth rate comparing to the control strain. This could be a consequence of the CmbT efflux activity, which improves the fitness of the host bacterium through the elimination of toxic compounds from the cell.

  18. PpiA, a surface PPIase of the cyclophilin family in Lactococcus lactis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Trémillon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein folding in the envelope is a crucial limiting step of protein export and secretion. In order to better understand this process in Lactococcus lactis, a lactic acid bacterium, genes encoding putative exported folding factors like Peptidyl Prolyl Isomerases (PPIases were searched for in lactococcal genomes. RESULTS: In L. lactis, a new putative membrane PPIase of the cyclophilin subfamily, PpiA, was identified and characterized. ppiA gene was found to be constitutively expressed under normal and stress (heat shock, H(2O(2 conditions. Under normal conditions, PpiA protein was synthesized and released from intact cells by an exogenously added protease, showing that it was exposed at the cell surface. No obvious phenotype could be associated to a ppiA mutant strain under several laboratory conditions including stress conditions, except a very low sensitivity to H(2O(2. Induction of a ppiA copy provided in trans had no effect i on the thermosensitivity of an mutant strain deficient for the lactococcal surface protease HtrA and ii on the secretion and stability on four exported proteins (a highly degraded hybrid protein and three heterologous secreted proteins in an otherwise wild-type strain background. However, a recombinant soluble form of PpiA that had been produced and secreted in L. lactis and purified from a culture supernatant displayed both PPIase and chaperone activities. CONCLUSIONS: Although L. lactis PpiA, a protein produced and exposed at the cell surface under normal conditions, displayed a very moderate role in vivo, it was found, as a recombinant soluble form, to be endowed with folding activities in vitro.

  19. Monte-Carlo modeling of the central carbon metabolism of Lactococcus lactis: insights into metabolic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murabito, Ettore; Verma, Malkhey; Bekker, Martijn; Bellomo, Domenico; Westerhoff, Hans V; Teusink, Bas; Steuer, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic pathways are complex dynamic systems whose response to perturbations and environmental challenges are governed by multiple interdependencies between enzyme properties, reactions rates, and substrate levels. Understanding the dynamics arising from such a network can be greatly enhanced by the construction of a computational model that embodies the properties of the respective system. Such models aim to incorporate mechanistic details of cellular interactions to mimic the temporal behavior of the biochemical reaction system and usually require substantial knowledge of kinetic parameters to allow meaningful conclusions. Several approaches have been suggested to overcome the severe data requirements of kinetic modeling, including the use of approximative kinetics and Monte-Carlo sampling of reaction parameters. In this work, we employ a probabilistic approach to study the response of a complex metabolic system, the central metabolism of the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis, subject to perturbations and brief periods of starvation. Supplementing existing methodologies, we show that it is possible to acquire a detailed understanding of the control properties of a corresponding metabolic pathway model that is directly based on experimental observations. In particular, we delineate the role of enzymatic regulation to maintain metabolic stability and metabolic recovery after periods of starvation. It is shown that the feedforward activation of the pyruvate kinase by fructose-1,6-bisphosphate qualitatively alters the bifurcation structure of the corresponding pathway model, indicating a crucial role of enzymatic regulation to prevent metabolic collapse for low external concentrations of glucose. We argue that similar probabilistic methodologies will help our understanding of dynamic properties of small-, medium- and large-scale metabolic networks models.

  20. Identification of Lactococcus-Specific Bacteriocins Produced by Lactococcal Isolates, and the Discovery of a Novel Bacteriocin, Lactococcin Z.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Naoki; Seto, Hiromi; Koga, Shoko; Zendo, Takeshi; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2015-09-01

    Lactic acid bacteria that produce Lactococcus-specific bacteriocins were isolated and identified as Lactococcus lactis from fresh corn or lettuce. Among them, four isolates were identified as lactococcin Q producers. Seven isolates showed antimicrobial activity against a lactococcin Q producer, L. lactis QU 4, as well as against nisin Z and lacticin Q producers belonging to L. lactis. Strain QU 7 was selected as a standard strain and showed no cross-immunity to lactococcin Q or other lactococcal bacteriocins. The bacteriocin produced by strain QU 7 was purified in three chromatographic steps, and its molecular mass was determined to be 5041.35 Da. The amino acid sequence analysis revealed that it is a novel class IId bacteriocin, referred to as lactococcin Z. It consisted of 45 amino acid residues. The lczA gene encoding the prepeptide of lactococcin Z showed homology to lactococcins A, B, and M. Thus, this report demonstrates a new example of Lactococcus-specific bacteriocins.

  1. Fermentation products of solvent tolerant marine bacterium Moraxella spp. MB1 and its biotechnological applications in salicylic acid bioconversion

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wahidullah, S.; Naik, D.N.; PrabhaDevi

    -tuberculosis properties [42] but is also known to inhibit the growth of several bacteria [43] in particular Escherichia coli O157:H7 [44]. It is also an active compound in medicinal plants with anti- Helicobacter pylori [45]. The bacterium of the present investigation... the prairie medicinal plant Ipomoea leptophylla. J Nat Prod 66: 1457–1462. 43. Burt S (2004) Essential oils: their antibacterial properties and potential applications in foods- a review. Int J Food Microbiol 94: 223–253. 44. Wells JE, Berry ED, Varel VH (2005...

  2. Regulation of carbon catabolism in Lactococcus lactis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleksandrzak, T; Kowalczyk, M; Kok, J; Bardowski, J; Bielecki, S; Tramper, J; Polak, J

    2000-01-01

    The Lactococcus lactis IL1403 is a lactose negative, plasmid free strain. Nevertheless, it is able to hydrolyze lactose in the presence of cellobiose. In this work we describe identification of a gene involved in this process. The gene was found to be homologous to the sugar catabolism regulator, cc

  3. Functionality of Sortase A in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieye, Yakhya; Oxaran, Virginie; Ledue-Clier, Florence; Alkhalaf, Walid; Buist, Girbe; Juillard, Vincent; Lee, Chang Won; Piard, Jean-Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis IL1403 harbors a putative sortase A (SrtA) and 11 putative sortase substrates that carry the canonical LPXTG signature of such substrates. We report here on the functionality of SrtA to anchor five LPXTG substrates to the cell wall, thus suggesting that SrtA is the housekeeping so

  4. Glutathione protects Lactococcus lactis against oxidative stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Hugenholtz, J.; Abee, T.; Molenaar, D.

    2003-01-01

    Glutathione was found in several dairy Lactococcus lactis strains grown in M17 medium. None of these strains was able to synthesize glutathione. In chemically defined medium, L. lactis subsp. cremoris strain SK11 was able to accumulate up to similar to60 mM glutathione when this compound was added t

  5. Regulation of carbon catabolism in Lactococcus lactis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleksandrzak, T; Kowalczyk, M; Kok, J; Bardowski, J; Bielecki, S; Tramper, J; Polak, J

    2000-01-01

    The Lactococcus lactis IL1403 is a lactose negative, plasmid free strain. Nevertheless, it is able to hydrolyze lactose in the presence of cellobiose. In this work we describe identification of a gene involved in this process. The gene was found to be homologous to the sugar catabolism regulator,

  6. Protein export elements from Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez-Martinez, Gaspar; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerhardus; Dijl, Jan Maarten van; Smith, Hilda; Bron, Sierd

    1992-01-01

    Broad-host-range plasmids carrying α-amylase or β-lactamase reporter genes lacking a signal sequence were used to select export elements from Lactococcus lactis chromosomal DNA that could function as signal sequences. Fragments containing such elements were identified by their ability to direct the

  7. Protein export elements from Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez-Martinez, Gaspar; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerhardus; Dijl, Jan Maarten van; Smith, Hilda; Bron, Sierd

    Broad-host-range plasmids carrying α-amylase or β-lactamase reporter genes lacking a signal sequence were used to select export elements from Lactococcus lactis chromosomal DNA that could function as signal sequences. Fragments containing such elements were identified by their ability to direct the

  8. Functional Expression of an Orchid Fragrance Gene in Lactococcus lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelene Ai Lian Song

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Vanda Mimi Palmer (VMP, an orchid hybrid of Vanda tesselata and Vanda Tan Chay Yan is a highly scented tropical orchid which blooms all year round. Previous studies revealed that VMP produces a variety of isoprenoid volatiles during daylight. Isoprenoids are well known to contribute significantly to the scent of most fragrant plants. They are a large group of secondary metabolites which may possess valuable characteristics such as flavor, fragrance and toxicity and are produced via two pathways, the mevalonate (MVA pathway or/and the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP pathway. In this study, a sesquiterpene synthase gene denoted VMPSTS, previously isolated from a floral cDNA library of VMP was cloned and expressed in Lactococcus lactis to characterize the functionality of the protein. L. lactis, a food grade bacterium which utilizes the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid production was found to be a suitable host for the characterization of plant terpene synthases. Through recombinant expression of VMPSTS, it was revealed that VMPSTS produced multiple sesquiterpenes and germacrene D dominates its profile.

  9. Expression of biologically active murine interleukin-18 in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizollahzadeh, Sadegh; Khanahmad, Hossein; Rahimmanesh, Ilnaz; Ganjalikhani-Hakemi, Mazdak; Andalib, Alireza; Sanei, Mohammad Hossein; Rezaei, Abbas

    2016-11-01

    The food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis is increasingly used for heterologous protein expression in therapeutic and industrial applications. The ability of L. lactis to secrete biologically active cytokines may be used for the generation of therapeutic cytokines. Interleukin (IL)-18 enhances the immune response, especially on mucosal surfaces, emphasizing its therapeutic potential. However, it is produced as an inactive precursor and has to be enzymatically cleaved for maturation. We genetically manipulated L. lactis to secrete murine IL-18. The mature murine IL-18 gene was inserted downstream of a nisin promoter in pNZ8149 plasmid and the construct was used to transform L. lactis NZ3900. The transformants were selected on Elliker agar and confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion and sequencing. The expression and secretion of IL-18 protein was verified by SDS-PAGE, western blotting and ELISA. The biological activity of recombinant IL-18 was determined by its ability to induce interferon (IFN)-γ production in L. lactis co-cultured with murine splenic T cells. The amounts of IL-18 in bacterial lysates and supernatants were 3-4 μg mL(-1) and 0.6-0.7 ng mL(-1), respectively. The successfully generated L. lactis strain that expressed biologically active murine IL-18 can be used to evaluate the possible therapeutic effects of IL-18 on mucosal surfaces.

  10. Carboxydothermus pertinax sp. nov., a thermophilic, hydrogenogenic, Fe(III)-reducing, sulfur-reducing carboxydotrophic bacterium from an acidic hot spring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoneda, Yasuko; Yoshida, Takashi; Kawaichi, Satoshi;

    2012-01-01

    growth on CO, H(2) and CO(2) were produced. Growth occurred on molecular hydrogen as an energy source and carbon dioxide as a sole carbon source. Growth was observed on various organic compounds under an N(2) atmosphere with the reduction of ferric iron. The temperature range for carboxydotrophic growth......A novel anaerobic, Fe(III)-reducing, hydrogenogenic, carboxydotrophic bacterium, designated strain Ug1(T), was isolated from a volcanic acidic hot spring in southern Kyushu Island, Japan. Cells of the isolate were rod-shaped (1.0-3.0 µm long) and motile due to peritrichous flagella. Strain Ug1(T...... oxidation. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis and unique physiological features, the isolate represents a novel species of the genus Carboxydothermus for which the name Carboxydothermus pertinax sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain of the novel species is Ug1(T) (=DSM 23698(T)=NBRC 107576(T))....

  11. The Plasmid Complement of the Cheese Isolate Lactococcus garvieae IPLA 31405 Revealed Adaptation to the Dairy Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flórez, Ana Belén; Mayo, Baltasar

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus garvieae is a lactic acid bacterium found in raw-milk dairy products as well as a range of aquatic and terrestrial environments. The plasmids in L. garvieae have received little attention compared to those of dairy Lactococcus lactis, in which the genes carried by these extrachromosomal elements are considered of adaptive value. The present work reports the sequencing and analysis of the plasmid complement of L. garvieae IPLA 31405, a strain isolated from a traditional, Spanish, starter-free cheese made from raw-milk. It consists of pLG9 and pLG42, of 9,124 and 42,240 nucleotides, respectively. Based on sequence and structural homology in the putative origin of replication (ori) region, pLG9 and pLG42 are predicted to replicate via a theta mechanism. Real-time, quantitative PCR showed the number of copies per chromosome equivalent of pLG9 and pLG42 to be around two and five, respectively. Sequence analysis identified eight complete open reading frames (orfs) in pLG9 and 36 in pLG42; these were organized into functional modules or cassettes containing different numbers of genes. These modules were flanked by complete or interrupted insertion sequence (IS)-like elements. Among the modules of pLG42 was a gene cluster encoding specific components of a phosphoenolpyruvate-phosphotransferase (PEP-PTS) system, including a phospho-β-galacosidase. The cluster showed a complete nucleotide identity respect to that in plasmids of L. lactis. Loss of pLG42 showed this to be involved in lactose assimilation. In the same plasmid, an operon encoding a type I restriction/modification (R/M) system was also identified. The specificity of this R/M system might be broadened by different R/M specificity subunits detected in pLG9 and in the bacterial chromosome. However, challenges of L. garvieae IPLA 31405 against L. lactis phages proved that the R/M system was not involved in phage resistance. Together, these results support the hypothesis that, as in L. lactis, pLG42

  12. Construction and Expression of β-galactosidase Genetically Engineered Lactococcus lactis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕晓英; 张朝武; 裴晓方; 刘祥; 余倩; 刘衡川

    2004-01-01

    Our objective is to solve the lactose malabsorption and intolerance of human beings by combining mlcro-ecology path with genetic engineering technique. Plasmid pMG36e was used to clone and express a β-galactosidase gene from L.delbrueckii bulgaricus strain 1. 1480 in the Lactococcus lactis subsp, cremoris MG1363 and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL1403. The recombinant plasmid was preserved and proliferated in Escherichia coli ( E. coli) JM109, and transformed into MG1363 and 1L1403 by electroporation. The protein expression was studied. (1) The bifidobacterium culture medium (BBL) was suitable for the growth of the strain 1. 1480. (2) With 13 amino acids at the N-terminus from the vector, β-galactosidase fusion protein (which retained the enzyme activity) could be successfully expressed in E. coli JM109, MG1363 and IL1403, but the expression quantity was larger in the former than in the latter two. (3) The SD sequence designed could be successfully recognized by both the E. coli and the Lactococcus lactis, but the expression level of the non-fusion β-galac-tosidase protein was lower than that of the fusion protein in the same host. The β-galactosidase genetically engineered E.coli JM109 is a useful tool to produce this enzyme in vitro. The signal peptide of the usp45 protein from the Lactococcus lactis can be added before the promoter sequence to promote β-galactosidase secretion from Lactococcus lactis. The potential application of the β-galactosidase genetically engineered MG1363 and IL1403 to cure the lactose malabsorption and lactose intolerance in both health food and medicine is promising。

  13. Purification and partial characterization of bacteriocin produced by Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis LL171.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Archana; Akkoç, Nefise; Akçelik, Mustafa

    2012-04-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are possessing ability to synthesize antimicrobial compounds (like bacteriocin) during their growth. In this regard, novel bacteriocin compound secreting capability of LAB isolated from Tulum Cheese in Turkey was demonstrated. The synthesized bacteriocin was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation, dialysis and gel filtration. The molecular weight (≈3.4 kDa) of obtained bacteriocin was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, which revealed single peptide band. Molecular identification of LAB strain isolated from Tulum Cheese was conducted using 16S rDNA gene sequencing as Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis LL171. The amino acid sequences (KKIDTRTGKTMEKTEKKIELSLKNMKTAT) of the bacteriocin from Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis LL171 was found unique and novel than reported bacteriocins. Further, the bacteriocin was possessed the thermostable property and active at wide range of pH values from 1 to 11. Thus, bacteriocin reported in this study has the potential applications property as food preservative agent.

  14. Control of Brochothrix thermosphacta in pork meat using Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis I23 isolated from beef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusegun A Olaoye

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the antimicrobial activities of two lactic acid bacteria (LAB Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis I23 and L. lactis subsp. hordinae E91 against Brochothrix thermosphacta in pork during storage at ambient temperature (30oC over 7 days. Both the LAB strains and spoilage organism were inoculated on fresh pork samples at 1x106cfu/g. About 3 log reduction in the spoilage organism was obtained in LAB treated samples after 48 h of storage. The spoilage organism was confirmed to be sensitive to the bacteriocin nisin produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis I23. There were reductions in the counts of Salmonella typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcus in the treated samples. Conclusively, growth of B. thermosphacta could be effectively controlled by nisin producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis I23 in fresh pork during storage, thereby enhancing shelf life of the product.

  15. Nutritional requirements and media development for Lactococcus lactis IL1403.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Kadri; Adamberg, Kaarel; Timarova, Veronica; Seiman, Andrus; Feštšenko, Darja; Vilu, Raivo

    2014-07-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are extensively used in food technology and for the production of various compounds, but they are fastidious in nutrient requirements. In order to elucidate the role of each component precisely, defined multicomponent media are required. This study focuses on determining nutrient auxotrophies and minimizing media components (amino acids, vitamins, metal ions, buffers and additional compounds) for the cultivation of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL1403, using microtitre plates and test tubes. It was shown that glutamine and asparagine were the most important media components for achieving higher biomass yields while the branched-chain amino acids were necessary to increase specific growth rate. The amino acid and glucose ratio was reduced to achieve minimal residual concentration of amino acids in the medium after the growth of cells, whereas the specific growth rate and biomass yield of cells were not considerably affected. As the percentage of each consumed amino acid compared to initial amount is larger than measurement error, these optimized media are important for achieving more precise data about amino acid utilization and metabolism.

  16. Fructose metabolism of the purple non-sulfur bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum: effect of carbon dioxide on growth, and production of bacteriochlorophyll and organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Christiane; Grammel, Hartmut

    2012-04-05

    During fermentative metabolism, carbon dioxide fixation plays a key role in many bacteria regarding growth and production of organic acids. The present contribution, dealing with the facultative photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum, reveals not only the strong influence of ambient carbon dioxide on the fermentative break-down of fructose but also a high impact on aerobic growth with fructose as sole carbon source. Both growth rates and biomass yield increased with increasing carbon dioxide supply in chemoheterotrophic aerobic cultures. Furthermore, intracellular metabolite concentration measurements showed almost negligible concentrations of the tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates succinate, fumarate and malate under aerobic growth, in contrast to several metabolites of the glycolysis. In addition, we present a dual phase fed-batch process, where an aerobic growth phase is followed by an anaerobic production phase. The biosynthesis of bacteriochlorophyll and the secretion of organic acids were both affected by the carbon dioxide supply, the pH value and by the cell density at the time of switching from aerobic to anaerobic conditions. The formation of pigmented photosynthetic membranes and the amount of bacteriochlorophyll were inversely correlated to the secretion of succinate. Accounting the high biotechnological potential of R. rubrum, optimization of carbon dioxide supply is important because of the favored application of fructose-containing fermentable feedstock solutions in bio-industrial processes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Syntrophus aciditrophicus sp. nov., a new anaerobic bacterium that degrades fatty acids and benzoate in syntrophic association with hydrogen-using microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, B. E.; Bhupathiraju, V. K.; Tanner, R. S.; Woese, C. R.; McInerney, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Strain SBT is a new, strictly anaerobic, gram-negative, nonmotile, non-sporeforming, rod-shaped bacterium that degrades benzoate and certain fatty acids in syntrophic association with hydrogen/formate-using microorganisms. Strain SBT produced approximately 3 mol of acetate and 0.6 mol of methane per mol of benzoate in coculture with Methanospirillum hungatei strain JF1. Saturated fatty acids, some unsaturated fatty acids, and methyl esters of butyrate and hexanoate also supported growth of strain SBT in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G11. Strain SBT grew in pure culture with crotonate, producing acetate, butyrate, caproate, and hydrogen. The molar growth yield was 17 +/- 1 g cell dry mass per mol of crotonate. Strain SBT did not grow with fumarate, iron(III), polysulfide, or oxyanions of sulfur or nitrogen as electron acceptors with benzoate as the electron donor. The DNA base composition of strain SBT was 43.1 mol% G+C. Analysis of the 16 S rRNA gene sequence placed strain SBT in the delta-subdivision of the Proteobacteria, with sulfate-reducing bacteria. Strain SBT was most closely related to members of the genus Syntrophus. The clear phenotypic and genotypic differences between strain SBT and the two described species in the genus Syntrophus justify the formation of a new species, Syntrophus aciditrophicus.

  18. Milk fermentation by Lactococcus lactis with modified proteolytic systems to accumulate potentially bio-active peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Algaron, Florence; Miranda, Guy; Le Bars, Dominique; Monnet, Véronique

    2004-01-01

    International audience; The proteolytic system of lactic acid bacteria has been characterised in detail and numerous modified strains with null or increased specific proteolytic activities have been constructed or identified among natural strains. Based on this knowledge, our objective was to ferment milk with modified strains and produce mixtures of peptides with specific features corresponding to potential bio-activities. We used a collection of Lactococcus lactis negative mutants for pepti...

  19. In vivo imaging of Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum and Escherichiacoli expressing infrared fluorescent protein in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Berlec, Aleš; Štrukelj, Borut; Završnik, Janja; Turk, Boris; Butinar, Miha

    2016-01-01

    Background In vivo imaging of orally administered lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and commensal bacteria in mice is shown to provide information on the spatial and temporal distribution of bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. The bacteria can be detected and monitored using bioluminescence or near-infrared fluorescence. Results Fluorescence imaging of bacteria was established by expressing the infrared fluorescent protein IRFP713 in Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum and Escherichia co...

  20. Suitability of Lactococcus lactis subsp lactis ATCC 11454 as a protective culture for lightly preserved fish products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessels, Stephen Wallace; Huss, Hans Henrik

    1996-01-01

    This study is part of strategy to control the human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in lightly preserved fish products by using food-grade lactic acid bacteria. When the nisin-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp lactis ATCC 11454 was cultured in the same vessel as L-monocytogenes Scott A in brain...

  1. STRESS-RESPONSE IN LACTOCOCCUS-LACTIS - CLONING, EXPRESSION ANALYSIS, AND MUTATION OF THE LACTOCOCCAL SUPEROXIDE-DISMUTASE GENE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SANDERS, JW; LEENHOUTS, KJ; HAANDRIKMAN, AJ; VENEMA, G; KOK, J

    1995-01-01

    In an analysis of the stress response of Lactococcus lactis, three proteins that were induced under low pH culture conditions were detected. One of these was identified as the lactococcal superoxide dismutase (SodA) by N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis. The gene encoding this protein, designat

  2. Transcriptome landscape of Lactococcus lactis reveals many novel RNAs including a small regulatory RNA involved in carbon uptake and metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meulen, Sjoerd B; de Jong, Anne; Kok, Jan

    2016-01-01

    RNA sequencing has revolutionized genome-wide transcriptome analyses, and the identification of non-coding regulatory RNAs in bacteria has thus increased concurrently. Here we reveal the transcriptome map of the lactic acid bacterial paradigm Lactococcus lactis MG1363 by employing differential RNA s

  3. Influence of long-term consumption of a Lactococcus lactis strain on the intestinal immunity and intestinal flora of the senescence-accelerated mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto-Nira, Hiromi; Mizumachi, Koko; Okamoto, Takashi; Sasaki, Keisuke; Kurisaki, Jun-Ichi

    2009-07-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse develops normally until 5-6 months of age and then displays rapid and irreversible advancement of senescence manifesting as clinical signs and gross lesions. To clarify the effect of lactic acid bacteria on the physiological changes with increasing age, heat-killed Lactococcus lactis G50 was administered to 1-month-old senescence-accelerated-prone mouse (SAMP)6 mice for 11 months, a senescence-accelerated mouse strain that develops senile osteoporosis. Mice fed G50 gained more weight than the control mice (not fed G50) during the feeding experiment. Faecal IgA levels in the mice fed G50 at 3 months were higher than those of the control mice but decreased to control levels with increasing age. The numbers of viable cells of Bacteroides sp., Lactobacillus sp., Staphylococcus sp., Enterococcus/Streptococcus sp. and Enterobacteriaceae sp. in faeces were similar for mice fed the G50 and control diets at any age, but strain G50 suppressed the intestinal growth of H2S-producing bacteria. Bone density of the thigh bone did not differ between aged G50 and control mice. Strain G50 would be a beneficial bacterium for the enhancement of intestinal immunity during youth and to suppress the growth of harmful intestinal bacteria. The applicability of strain G50 for the food and animal industries has been proposed in the present study.

  4. Utilization of CO2 fixating bacterium Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z for simultaneous biogas upgrading and bio-succinic acid production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Ingólfur Bragi; Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-01-01

    acid using the bacterial strain Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z, and simultaneously producing high purity CH4 (>95%). Results showed that when pressure during fermentation was increased from 101.325 to 140 kPa, higher CO2 solubility was achieved, thereby positively affecting final succinic acid yield...... and titre, CO2 consumption rate and CH4 purity. When using biogas as the only CO2 source at 140 kPa, the CO2 consumption rate corresponded to 2.59 L CO2 L-1 d-1 with a final succinic acid titre of 14.4 g L-1. Under this pressure condition the highest succinic acid yield and biogas quality reached...... corresponded to 0.635 g g-1 and 95.4% (v v-1) CH4 content respectively after 24 hours fermentation. This work represents the first successful attempt to develop a system capable of upgrading biogas to vehicle fuel/gas grid quality and simultaneously produce bio-succinic acid, a valuable building block...

  5. Utilization of CO2 fixating bacterium Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z for simultaneous biogas upgrading and biosuccinic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, Ingólfur B; Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-10-21

    Biogas is an attractive renewable energy carrier. However, it contains CO2 which limits its use for certain applications. Here we report a novel approach for removing CO2 from biogas and capturing it as a biochemical through a biological process. This approach entails converting CO2 into biosuccinic acid using the bacterial strain Actinobacillus succinogenes 130 Z, and simultaneously producing high-purity CH4 (> 95%). Results showed that when pressure during fermentation was increased from 101.325 to 140 kPa, higher CO2 solubility was achieved, thereby positively affecting final succinic acid yield and titer, CO2 consumption rate, and CH4 purity. When using biogas as the only CO2 source at 140 kPa, the CO2 consumption rate corresponded to 2.59 L CO2 L(-1) d(-1) with a final succinic acid titer of 14.4 g L(-1). Under this pressure condition, the highest succinic acid yield and biogas quality reached corresponded to 0.635 g g(-1) and 95.4% (v v(-1)) CH4 content, respectively, after 24 h fermentation. This work represents the first successful attempt to develop a system capable of upgrading biogas to vehicle fuel/gas grid quality and simultaneously produce biosuccinic acid, a valuable building block with large market potential in the near term.

  6. Optimization of acetic acid production from synthesis gas by chemolithotrophic bacterium--Clostridium aceticum using statistical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Jia Huey; Kamaruddin, Azlina Harun

    2008-05-01

    Efforts in optimizing reducing agents, cysteine-HCl.H2O and sodium sulfide in order to attain satisfactory responses during acetic acid fermentation have been carried out in this study. Cysteine-HCl.H2O each with five concentrations (0.00-0.50 g/L) was optimized one at a time and followed by sodium sulfide component (0.00-0.50 g/L). Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to determine the optimum concentrations of cysteine-HCl.H2O and sodium sulfide. The statistical analysis showed that the amount of cells produced and efficiency in CO conversion were not affected by sodium sulfide concentration. However, sodium sulfide is required as it does influence the acetic acid production. The optimum reducing agents for acetic acid fermentation was at 0.30 g/L cysteine-HCl.H2O and sodium sulfide respectively and when operated for 60 h cultivation time resulted in 1.28 g/L acetic acid production and 100% CO conversion.

  7. Immunization against Leishmania major infection using LACK- and IL-12-expressing Lactococcus lactis induces delay in footpad swelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Hugentobler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leishmania is a mammalian parasite affecting over 12 million individuals worldwide. Current treatments are expensive, cause severe side effects, and emerging drug resistance has been reported. Vaccination is the most cost-effective means to control infectious disease but currently there is no vaccine available against Leishmaniasis. Lactococcus lactis is a non-pathogenic, non-colonizing Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium commonly used in the dairy industry. Recently, L. lactis was used to express biologically active molecules including vaccine antigens and cytokines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the generation of L. lactis strains expressing the protective Leishmania antigen, LACK, in the cytoplasm, secreted or anchored to the bacterial cell wall. L. lactis was also engineered to secrete biologically active single chain mouse IL-12. Subcutaneous immunization with live L. lactis expressing LACK anchored to the cell wall and L. lactis secreting IL-12 significantly delayed footpad swelling in Leishmania major infected BALB/c mice. The delay in footpad swelling correlated with a significant reduction of parasite burden in immunized animals compared to control groups. Immunization with these two L. lactis strains induced antigen-specific multifunctional T(H1 CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells and a systemic LACK-specific T(H1 immune response. Further, protection in immunized animals correlated with a Leishmania-specific T(H1 immune response post-challenge. L. lactis secreting mouse IL-12 was essential for directing immune responses to LACK towards a protective T(H1 response. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This report demonstrates the use of L. lactis as a live vaccine against L. major infection in BALB/c mice. The strains generated in this study provide the basis for the development of an inexpensive and safe vaccine against the human parasite Leishmania.

  8. Immunization against Leishmania major infection using LACK- and IL-12-expressing Lactococcus lactis induces delay in footpad swelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugentobler, Felix; Yam, Karen K; Gillard, Joshua; Mahbuba, Raya; Olivier, Martin; Cousineau, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania is a mammalian parasite affecting over 12 million individuals worldwide. Current treatments are expensive, cause severe side effects, and emerging drug resistance has been reported. Vaccination is the most cost-effective means to control infectious disease but currently there is no vaccine available against Leishmaniasis. Lactococcus lactis is a non-pathogenic, non-colonizing Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium commonly used in the dairy industry. Recently, L. lactis was used to express biologically active molecules including vaccine antigens and cytokines. We report the generation of L. lactis strains expressing the protective Leishmania antigen, LACK, in the cytoplasm, secreted or anchored to the bacterial cell wall. L. lactis was also engineered to secrete biologically active single chain mouse IL-12. Subcutaneous immunization with live L. lactis expressing LACK anchored to the cell wall and L. lactis secreting IL-12 significantly delayed footpad swelling in Leishmania major infected BALB/c mice. The delay in footpad swelling correlated with a significant reduction of parasite burden in immunized animals compared to control groups. Immunization with these two L. lactis strains induced antigen-specific multifunctional T(H)1 CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and a systemic LACK-specific T(H)1 immune response. Further, protection in immunized animals correlated with a Leishmania-specific T(H)1 immune response post-challenge. L. lactis secreting mouse IL-12 was essential for directing immune responses to LACK towards a protective T(H)1 response. This report demonstrates the use of L. lactis as a live vaccine against L. major infection in BALB/c mice. The strains generated in this study provide the basis for the development of an inexpensive and safe vaccine against the human parasite Leishmania.

  9. Biological degradation of 4-chlorobenzoic acid by a PCB-metabolizing bacterium through a pathway not involving (chloro)catechol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebusoye, Sunday A

    2017-02-01

    Cupriavidus sp. strain SK-3, previously isolated on polychlorinated biphenyl mixtures, was found to aerobically utilize a wide spectrum of substituted aromatic compounds including 4-fluoro-, 4-chloro- and 4-bromobenzoic acids as a sole carbon and energy source. Other chlorobenzoic acid (CBA) congeners such as 2-, 3-, 2,3-, 2,5-, 3,4- and 3,5-CBA were all rapidly transformed to respective chlorocatechols (CCs). Under aerobic conditions, strain SK-3 grew readily on 4-CBA to a maximum concentration of 5 mM above which growth became impaired and yielded no biomass. Growth lagged significantly at concentrations above 3 mM, however chloride elimination was stoichiometric and generally mirrored growth and substrate consumption in all incubations. Experiments with resting cells, cell-free extracts and analysis of metabolite pools suggest that 4-CBA was metabolized in a reaction exclusively involving an initial hydrolytic dehalogenation yielding 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, which was then hydroxylated to protocatechuic acid (PCA) and subsequently metabolized via the β-ketoadipate pathway. When strain SK-3 was grown on 4-CBA, there was gratuitous induction of the catechol-1,2-dioxygenase and gentisate-1,2-dioxygenase pathways, even if both were not involved in the metabolism of the acid. While activities of the modified ortho- and meta-cleavage pathways were not detectable in all extracts, activity of PCA-3,4-dioxygenase was over ten-times higher than those of catechol-1,2- and gentisate-1,2-dioxygenases. Therefore, the only reason other congeners were not utilized for growth was the accumulation of CCs, suggesting a narrow spectrum of the activity of enzymes downstream of benzoate-1,2-dioxygenase, which exhibited affinity for a number of substituted analogs, and that the metabolic bottlenecks are either CCs or catabolites of the modified ortho-cleavage metabolic route.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of the Unclassified Iron-Oxidizing, Chemolithoautotrophic Burkholderiales Bacterium GJ-E10, Isolated from an Acidic River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Jun; Tojo, Fuyumi; Asano, Ryoki; Kobayashi, Yayoi; Shimura, Yoichiro; Okano, Kunihiro; Miyata, Naoyuki

    2015-02-05

    Burkholderiales bacterium GJ-E10, isolated from the Tamagawa River in Akita Prefecture, Japan, is an unclassified, iron-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophic bacterium. Its single circular genome, consisting of 3,276,549 bp, was sequenced by using three types of next-generation sequencers and the sequences were then confirmed by PCR-based Sanger sequencing.

  11. High efficiency electrotransformation of Lactococcus lactis spp. lactis cells pretreated with lithium acetate and dithiothreitol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filioussis George

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A goal for the food industry has always been to improve strains of Lactococcus lactis and stabilize beneficial traits. Genetic engineering is used extensively for manipulating this lactic acid bacterium, while electropolation is the most widely used technique for introducing foreign DNA into cells. The efficiency of electrotransformation depends on the level of electropermealization and pretreatment with chemicals which alter cell wall permeability, resulting in improved transformation efficiencies is rather common practice in bacteria as in yeasts and fungi. In the present study, treatment with lithium acetate (LiAc and dithiothreitol (DTT in various combinations was applied to L. lactis spp. lactis cells of the early-log phase prior to electroporation with plasmid pTRKH3 (a 7.8 kb shuttle vector, suitable for cloning into L. lactis. Two strains of L. lactis spp. lactis were used, L. lactis spp. lactis LM0230 and ATCC 11454. To the best of our knowledge these agents have never been used before with L. lactis or other bacteria. Results Electrotransformation efficiencies of up to 105 transformants per μg DNA have been reported in the literature for L. lactis spp.lactis LM0230. We report here that treatment with LiAc and DDT before electroporation increased transformation efficiency to 225 ± 52.5 × 107 transformants per μg DNA, while with untreated cells or treated with LiAc alone transformation efficiency approximated 1.2 ± 0.5 × 105 transformants per μg DNA. Results of the same trend were obtained with L. lactis ATCC 11454, although transformation efficiency of this strain was significantly lower. No difference was found in the survival rate of pretreated cells after electroporation. Transformation efficiency was found to vary directly with cell density and that of 1010 cells/ml resulted in the highest efficiencies. Following electrotransformation of pretreated cells with LiAc and DDT, pTRKH3 stability was examined

  12. Production of Recombinant Peanut Allergen Ara h 2 using Lactococcus lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frøkiær Hanne

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural allergen sources can supply large quantities of authentic allergen mixtures for use as immunotherapeutics. However, such extracts are complex, difficult to define, vary from batch to batch, which may lead to unpredictable efficacy and/or unacceptable levels of side effects. The use of recombinant expression systems for allergen production can alleviate some of these issues. Several allergens have been tested in high-level expression systems and in most cases show immunereactivity comparable to their natural counterparts. The gram positive lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis is an attractive microorganism for use in the production of protein therapeutics. L. lactis is considered food grade, free of endotoxins, and is able to secrete the heterologous product together with few other native proteins. Hypersensitivity to peanut represents a serious allergic problem. Some of the major allergens in peanut have been described. However, for therapeutic usage more information about the individual allergenic components is needed. In this paper we report recombinant production of the Ara h 2 peanut allergen using L. lactis. Results A synthetic ara h 2 gene was cloned into an L. lactis expression plasmid containing the P170 promoter and the SP310mut2 signal sequence. Flask cultures grown overnight showed secretion of the 17 kDa Ara h 2 protein. A batch fermentation resulted in 40 mg/L recombinant Ara h 2. Purification of Ara h 2 from the culture supernatant was done by hydrophobic exclusion and size separation. Mass spectrometry and N-terminal analysis showed a recombinant Ara h 2 of full length and correctly processed by the signal peptidase. The immunological activity of recombinant Ara h 2 was analysed by ELISA using antibodies specific for native Ara h 2. The recombinant Ara h 2 showed comparable immunereactivity to that of native Ara h 2. Conclusion Recombinant production of Ara h 2 using L. lactis can offer high yields

  13. Genes but not genomes reveal bacterial domestication of Lactococcus lactis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Passerini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The population structure and diversity of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, a major industrial bacterium involved in milk fermentation, was determined at both gene and genome level. Seventy-six lactococcal isolates of various origins were studied by different genotyping methods and thirty-six strains displaying unique macrorestriction fingerprints were analyzed by a new multilocus sequence typing (MLST scheme. This gene-based analysis was compared to genomic characteristics determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The MLST analysis revealed that L. lactis subsp. lactis is essentially clonal with infrequent intra- and intergenic recombination; also, despite its taxonomical classification as a subspecies, it displays a genetic diversity as substantial as that within several other bacterial species. Genome-based analysis revealed a genome size variability of 20%, a value typical of bacteria inhabiting different ecological niches, and that suggests a large pan-genome for this subspecies. However, the genomic characteristics (macrorestriction pattern, genome or chromosome size, plasmid content did not correlate to the MLST-based phylogeny, with strains from the same sequence type (ST differing by up to 230 kb in genome size. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The gene-based phylogeny was not fully consistent with the traditional classification into dairy and non-dairy strains but supported a new classification based on ecological separation between "environmental" strains, the main contributors to the genetic diversity within the subspecies, and "domesticated" strains, subject to recent genetic bottlenecks. Comparison between gene- and genome-based analyses revealed little relationship between core and dispensable genome phylogenies, indicating that clonal diversification and phenotypic variability of the "domesticated" strains essentially arose through substantial genomic flux within the dispensable

  14. Antimicrobial Activities of Five Strains Of Lactococcus Isolated from Beef Against Indicator Organisms of Public Health Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusegun Ayodele Olaoye

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Five strains of Lactococcus, including L. garviae K2, L. piscium SU4, L. lactis subsp. cremoris E22, L. plantarum L7 and L. lactis subsp. hordinae E91 were screened for production of antimicrobial agents. The strains were also analysed for antimicrobial activities against spoilage and pathogenic organisms, including Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas fluorescens. Result revealed that L. piscium SU4, L. plantarum L7 and L. lactis subsp. cremoris E22 had lactic acid production (g/107 colony forming units, CFU of 7.23, 7.20 and 7.19. The value of 6.83 recorded as lactic acid produced by L. garviae K2 was significantly different from those obtained for others. The highest acetic acid production (3.55 g/107 CFU was recorded for L. garviae K2 while L. piscium SU4 had the lowest (2.99 g/107 CFU. L. lactis subsp. hordinae E91 had diacetyl production of 71.99 (µg/107 CFU, which was higher than those recorded for other Lactococcus strains. Test for antimicrobial activities showed that Escherichia coli NCTC 86, Yersinia enterocolitica NCTC 10460, Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCIMB 10848, Bacillus cereus NCTC 21113 and Pseudomonas flourescens recorded higher susceptibilities to the antimicrobial action of the Lactococcus strains than others; zones of inhibition of 5 mm and above were recorded for the indicator organisms compared to lower values (<5 mm obtained for others. Listeria monocytogenes also showed medium susceptibility (zones of inhibition <5 mm to the antimicrobial activities of the Lactococcus strains. It was concluded that the Lactococcus strains could be effective in the control of spoilage and pathogenic organisms; their antagonism recorded against Listeria monocytogenes, E. coli, Salmonella Typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus may be of public health significance.

  15. High genetic diversity among strains of the unindustrialized lactic acid bacterium Carnobacterium maltaromaticum in dairy products as revealed by multilocus sequence typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Abdur; Cailliez-Grimal, Catherine; Bontemps, Cyril; Payot, Sophie; Chaillou, Stéphane; Revol-Junelles, Anne-Marie; Borges, Frédéric

    2014-07-01

    Dairy products are colonized with three main classes of lactic acid bacteria (LAB): opportunistic bacteria, traditional starters, and industrial starters. Most of the population structure studies were previously performed with LAB species belonging to these three classes and give interesting knowledge about the population structure of LAB at the stage where they are already industrialized. However, these studies give little information about the population structure of LAB prior their use as an industrial starter. Carnobacterium maltaromaticum is a LAB colonizing diverse environments, including dairy products. Since this bacterium was discovered relatively recently, it is not yet commercialized as an industrial starter, which makes C. maltaromaticum an interesting model for the study of unindustrialized LAB population structure in dairy products. A multilocus sequence typing scheme based on an analysis of fragments of the genes dapE, ddlA, glpQ, ilvE, pyc, pyrE, and leuS was applied to a collection of 47 strains, including 28 strains isolated from dairy products. The scheme allowed detecting 36 sequence types with a discriminatory index of 0.98. The whole population was clustered in four deeply branched lineages, in which the dairy strains were spread. Moreover, the dairy strains could exhibit a high diversity within these lineages, leading to an overall dairy population with a diversity level as high as that of the nondairy population. These results are in agreement with the hypothesis according to which the industrialization of LAB leads to a diversity reduction in dairy products.

  16. Identification of a 4-Deoxy-l-erythro-5-hexoseulose Uronic Acid Reductase, FlRed, in an Alginolytic Bacterium Flavobacterium sp. Strain UMI-01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Inoue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In alginate-assimilating bacteria, alginate is depolymerized to unsaturated monosaccharide by the actions of endolytic and exolytic alginate lyases (EC 4.2.2.3 and EC 4.2.2.11. The monosaccharide is non-enzymatically converted to 4-deoxy-l-ery thro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid (DEH, then reduced to 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate (KDG by a specific reductase, and metabolized through the Entner–Doudoroff pathway. Recently, the NADPH-dependent reductase A1-R that belongs to short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR superfamily was identified as the DEH-reductase in Sphingomonas sp. A1. We have subsequently noticed that an SDR-like enzyme gene, flred, occurred in the genome of an alginolytic bacterium Flavobacterium sp. strain UMI-01. In the present study, we report on the deduced amino-acid sequence of flred and DEH-reducing activity of recombinant FlRed. The deduced amino-acid sequence of flred comprised 254 residues and showed 34% amino-acid identities to that of A1-R from Sphingomonas sp. A1 and 80%–88% to those of SDR-like enzymes from several alginolytic bacteria. Common sequence motifs of SDR-superfamily enzymes, e.g., the catalytic tetrad Asn-Lys-Tyr-Ser and the cofactor-binding sequence Thr-Gly-x-x-x-Gly-x-Gly in Rossmann fold, were completely conserved in FlRed. On the other hand, an Arg residue that determined the NADPH-specificity of Sphingomonas A1-R was replaced by Glu in FlRed. Thus, we investigated cofactor-preference of FlRed using a recombinant enzyme. As a result, the recombinant FlRed (recFlRed was found to show high specificity to NADH. recFlRed exhibited practically no activity toward variety of aldehyde, ketone, keto ester, keto acid and aldose substrates except for DEH. On the basis of these results, we conclude that FlRed is the NADH-dependent DEH-specific SDR of Flavobacterium sp. strain UMI-01.

  17. Aureispira marina gen. nov., sp. nov., a gliding, arachidonic acid-containing bacterium isolated from the southern coastline of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Shoichi; Arunpairojana, Vullapa; Suwannachart, Chatrudee; Kanjana-Opas, Akkharawit; Yokota, Akira

    2006-12-01

    Three strains of gliding bacteria, 24(T), 62 and 71, isolated from a marine sponge and algae from the southern coastline of Thailand, were studied using a polyphasic approach to clarify their taxonomic positions. A phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the three isolates formed a distinct lineage within the family 'Saprospiraceae' of the phylum Bacteroidetes and were related to members of the genus Saprospira. The G+C contents of the isolates were in the range 38-39 mol%. The major respiratory quinone was MK-7. The predominant cellular fatty acids were 20 : 4omega6c (arachidonic acid), 16 : 0 and iso-17 : 0. On the basis of morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics, together with DNA-DNA hybridization data and 16S rRNA gene sequences, the isolates represent a novel species of a novel genus, for which the name Aureispira marina gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Aureispira marina is 24(T) (=IAM 15389(T)=TISTR 1719(T)).

  18. Carnobacterium iners sp. nov., a psychrophilic, lactic acid-producing bacterium from the littoral zone of an Antarctic pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snauwaert, Isabel; Hoste, Bart; De Bruyne, Katrien; Peeters, Karolien; De Vuyst, Luc; Willems, Anne; Vandamme, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Two lactic acid-producing, Gram-stain-positive rods were isolated from a microbial mat actively growing in the littoral zone of an Antarctic lake (Forlidas Pond) in the Pensacola mountains and studied using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The isolates were examined by phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene, multilocus sequence analysis of pheS, rpoA and atpA, and biochemical and genotypic characteristics. One strain, designated LMG 26641, belonged to Carnobacterium alterfunditum and the other strain, designated LMG 26642(T), could be assigned to a novel species, with Carnobacterium funditum DSM 5970(T) as its closest phylogenetic neighbour (99.2 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). Carnobacterium iners sp. nov. could be distinguished biochemically from other members of the genus Carnobacterium by the lack of acid production from carbohydrates. DNA-DNA relatedness confirmed that strain LMG 26642(T) represented a novel species, for which we propose the name Carnobacterium iners sp. nov. (type strain is LMG 26642(T)  = CCUG 62000(T)).

  19. The Biosynthesis of Deuterium Labeled Amino Acids Using a Strain of Facultative Methylotrophic Bacterium Вrevibacterium Methylicum 5662 With RuMP Cycle of Carbon Assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Mosin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We used Gram-positive aerobic facultative methylotrophic bacterium, Brevibacterium methylicum, L-phenylalanine producer with ribulose-5-monophosphate (RuMP cycle for carbon assimilation for microbiological preparation of [2H]phenylalanine via conversion of low molecular weight substrates ([U-2H]MeOH and 2H2O. For this purpose, the cells of the methylotroph with improved growth characteristics were used on minimal salt media M9 supplemented with 2 % (v/v [U-2H]MeOH and increasing gradient of 2Н2O concentration from 0; 24,5; 49,0; 73,5 up to 98 % (v/v 2Н2O. L-phenylalanine was isolated from the growth medium after adding 5 M 2HCl (in 2Н2О, pH = 2,0 by extraction with isopropanol and subsequent crystallization in ethanol (output 0,65 g/l. Alanine, valine, and leucine/isoleucine were produced and accumulated exogenously in amounts of 5–6 mol in addition to the main product of biosynthesis. The method allows to obtain [2Н]amino acids with different levels of deuterium enrichment, depending on 2Н2O concentration in growth media, from 17 atom% 2Н (2 deuterium atoms (on the growth medium with 24,5 % (v/v 2Н2О up to 75 atom% 2Н (6 deuterium atoms (on the growth medium with 98 % (v/v 2Н2О with introduction of deuterium to benzyl С6Н5СН2-fragment of molecule that is confirmed with the data of electron impact (EI mass spectrometry analysis of methyl ethers of N-5-dimethylamino(naphthalene-1-sulfochloride [2H]amino acids after the separation by reverse-phase HPLC.

  20. Flexibility of the metabolism of Corynebacterium glutamicum 2262, a glutamic acid-producing bacterium, in response to temperature upshocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunay, S; Lapujade, P; Engasser, J M; Goergen, J L

    2002-06-01

    In order to test the temperature sensitivity of glutamate production metabolism, several temperature shifts, from 33 to 37, 38, 39, 40 or 41 degrees C, were applied to the temperature-sensitive strain, Corynebacterium glutamicum 2262, cultivated in a 24-h fed-batch process. Whereas glucose was entirely dedicated to biomass synthesis when cells were grown at 33 degrees C, applying temperature upshocks, whatever their range, triggered a redistribution of the carbon utilisation between glutamate, biomass and lactate production. Although increasing the culture temperature from 33 to 37, 38, 39 or 40 degrees C resulted in final glutamate titers superior to 80 g/l, temperatures resulting in the best chanelling of the carbon flow towards glutamic acid synthesis were 39 and 40 degrees C. Moreover, this study showed that the higher the temperature, the slower the growth rate and the higher the lactate accumulation.

  1. Vinegar production from post-distillation slurry deriving from rice shochu production with the addition of caproic acid-producing bacteria consortium and lactic acid bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hua-Wei; Tan, Li; Chen, Hao; Sun, Zhao-Yong; Tang, Yue-Qin; Kida, Kenji

    2017-07-22

    To establish a zero emission process, the post-distillation slurry of a new type of rice shochu (NTRS) was used for the production of health promoting vinegar. Since the NTRS post-distillation slurry contained caproic acid and lactic acid, the effect of these two organic acids on acetic acid fermentation was first evaluated. Based on these results, Acetobacter aceti CICC 21684 was selected as a suitable strain for subsequent production of vinegar. At the laboratory scale, acetic acid fermentation of the NTRS post-distillation slurry in batch mode resulted in an acetic acid concentration of 41.9 g/L, with an initial ethanol concentration of 40 g/L, and the acetic acid concentration was improved to 44.5 g/L in fed-batch mode. Compared to the NTRS post-distillation slurry, the vinegar product had higher concentrations of free amino acids and inhibition of angiotensin I converting enzyme activity. By controlling the volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient to be similar to that of the laboratory scale production, 45 g/L of acetic acid was obtained at the pilot scale, using a 75-L fermentor with a working volume of 40 L, indicating that vinegar production can be successfully scaled up. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Antagonisme entre les bactéries mésophiles et les bactéries lactiques du genre Lactococcus isolées du lait de jument et recherche des bactériocine

    OpenAIRE

    BELABBES, Souad

    2015-01-01

    This work is revealed the existence of antagonistic effect betweèiic c swaiu «fit& gmm Ladococcus sp mares milk and pathogenic species by i1ifiï dise ïnhditory factors produced by these bacteria, which can be irganiv hages, bydrogen peroxide or bacteriocins. Ail pathogens were inhibited by lactic strains tested secrete organic acids, hydrogen peroxide and bacteriocins but flot lodge phages. Ail strains belonging to lactic Lactococcus lactis and Lactococcus diacetylactis o...

  3. Genes involved in protein metabolism of the probiotic lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus delbrueckii UFV H2b20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Carmo, A P; da Silva, D F; De Oliveira, M N V; Borges, A C; De Carvalho, A F; De Moraes, C A

    2011-09-01

    A basic requirement for the prediction of the potential use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in the dairy industry is the identification of specific genes involved in flavour-forming pathways. The probiotic Lactobacillus delbrueckii UFV H2b20 was submitted to a genetic characterisation and phylogenetic analysis of genes involved in protein catabolism. Eight genes belonging to this system were identified, which possess a closely phylogenetic relationship to NCFM strains representative, as it was demonstrated for oppC and oppBII, encoding oligopeptide transport system components. PepC, PepN, and PepX might be essential for growth of LAB, probiotic or not, since the correspondent genes are always present, including in L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20 genome. For pepX gene, a probable link between carbohydrate catabolism and PepX expression may exists, where it is regulated by PepR1/CcpA-like, a common feature between Lactobacillus strains and also in L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20. The well conserved evolutionary history of the ilvE gene is evidence that the pathways leading to branched-chain amino acid degradation, such as isoleucine and valine, are similar among L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains and L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20. Thus, the involvement of succinate in flavour formation can be attributed to IlvE activity. The presence of aminopeptidase G in L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20 genome, which is absent in several strains, might improve the proteolytic activity and effectiveness. The nucleotide sequence encoding PepG revealed that it is a cysteine endopeptidase, belonging to Peptidase C1 superfamily; sequence analysis showed 99% identity with L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus ATCC 11842 pepG, whereas protein sequence analysis revealed 100% similarity with PepG from the same organism. The present study proposes a schematic model to explain how the proteolytic system of the probiotic L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20 works, based on the components identified so far.

  4. Hematite Reduction Buffers Acid Generation and Enhances Nutrient Uptake by a Fermentative Iron Reducing Bacterium, Orenia metallireducens Strain Z6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yiran; Sanford, Robert A; Chang, Yun-Juan; McInerney, Michael J; Fouke, Bruce W

    2017-01-03

    Fermentative iron-reducing organisms have been identified in a variety of environments. Instead of coupling iron reduction to respiration, they have been consistently observed to use ferric iron minerals as an electron sink for fermentation. In the present study, a fermentative iron reducer, Orenia metallireducens strain Z6, was shown to use iron reduction to enhance fermentation not only by consuming electron equivalents, but also by generating alkalinity that effectively buffers the pH. Fermentation of glucose by this organism in the presence of a ferric oxide mineral, hematite (Fe2O3), resulted in enhanced glucose decomposition compared with fermentation in the absence of an iron source. Parallel evidence (i.e., genomic reconstruction, metabolomics, thermodynamic analyses, and calculation of electron transfer) suggested hematite reduction as a proton-consuming reaction effectively consumed acid produced by fermentation. The buffering effect of hematite was further supported by a greater extent of glucose utilization by strain Z6 in media with increasing buffer capacity. Such maintenance of a stable pH through hematite reduction for enhanced glucose fermentation complements the thermodynamic interpretation of interactions between microbial iron reduction and other biogeochemical processes. This newly discovered feature of iron reducer metabolism also has significant implications for groundwater management and contaminant remediation by providing microbially mediated buffering systems for the associated microbial and/or chemical reactions.

  5. Specialized adaptation of a lactic acid bacterium to the milk environment: the comparative genomics of Streptococcus thermophilus LMD-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    overexpressed genes involved in amino acid transport and metabolism as well as DNA replication. Conclusions The genome of S. thermophilus LMD-9 is shaped by its domestication in the dairy environment, with gene features that conferred rapid growth in milk, stress response mechanisms and host defense systems that are relevant to its industrial applications. The presence of a unique exopolysaccharide gene cluster and cell surface protein orthologs commonly associated with probiotic functionality revealed potential probiotic applications of LMD-9. PMID:21995282

  6. Two Lactococcus lactis thioredoxin paralogues play different roles in responses to arsenate and oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efler, Petr; Kilstrup, Mogens; Johnsen, Stig

    2015-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) maintains intracellular thiol groups in a reduced state and is involved in a wide range of cellular processes, including ribonucleotide reduction, sulphur assimilation, oxidative stress responses and arsenate detoxification. The industrially important lactic acid bacterium...

  7. Screening and Identification of a Lactic Acid Bacterium from Sichuan Bran Vinegar Brewing Mass%四川麸醋醋醅中一株乳酸菌的筛选及鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭明烨; 刘军; 王洋; 郇阿梅; 韩志双

    2016-01-01

    从四川传统固态酿造工艺麸醋的醋醅中筛选出15株疑似乳酸菌菌株。通过对其抑菌性、产双乙酰能力、产酸速率和对不同酸度、培养温度、初始酒精度的耐受性能等指标的考察,最终得到了一株产乳酸多,并且具有抑菌性的乳酸菌E9。经微生物细胞和菌落形态、生理生化特征和分子生物学鉴定,确定此株乳酸菌E9为发酵乳杆菌(Lactobacillus fermentum)。%Select 1 5 strains of suspected lactic acid bacteria from Sichuan bran vinegar brewing mass by traditional solid-state brewing process. By investigation of their antimicrobial activity, diacetyl production ability,acid production rates and the tolerance to different acidity,culture temperature, initial alcoho,finally,a strain of lactic acid bacterium E9 producing more lactic acid and with antimicrobial acitivity is gotten. By microbial cells and colony morphology, physiological and biochemical characteristics and molecular biology identification,this strain of lactic acid bacterium E9 is determined as Lactobacillus fermentum.

  8. Effects of acid pH and urea on the spectral properties of the LHII antenna complex from the photosynthetic bacterium Ectothiorhodospira sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buche, A; Ramirez, J M; Picorel, R

    2000-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the spectral modifications of the LHII antenna complex from the purple bacterium Ectothiorhodospira sp. upon acid pH titration both in the presence and absence of urea. A blue shift specifically and reversibly affected the B850 band around pH 5.5-6.0 suggesting that a histidine residue most probably participated in the in vivo absorption red shifting mechanism. This transition was observed in the presence and absence of urea. Under strong chaotropic conditions, a second transition occurred around pH 2.0, affecting the B800 band irreversibly and the B850 reversibly. Under these conditions a blue shift from 856 to 842 nm occurred and a new and strong circular dichroism signal from the new 842 nm band was observed. Reverting to the original experimental conditions induced a red shift of the B850 band up to 856 nm but the circular dichroism signal remained mostly unaffected. Under the same experimental conditions, i.e. pH 2.1 in the presence of urea, part of the B800 band was irreversibly destroyed with concomitant appearance of a band around 770 nm due to monomeric bacteriochlorophyll from the disrupted B800. Furthermore, Gaussian deconvolution and second derivative of the reverted spectra at pH 8.0 after strong-acid treatment indicated that the new B850 band was actually composed of two bands centered at 843 and 858 nm. We ascribed the 858 nm band to bacteriochlorophylls that underwent reversible spectral shift and the 843 nm band to oligomeric bacteriopheophytin formed from a part of the B850 bacteriochlorophyll. This new oligomer would be responsible for the observed strong and mostly conservative circular dichroism signal. The presence of bacteriopheophytin in the reverted samples was definitively demonstrated by HPLC pigment analysis. The pheophytinization process progressed as the pH decreased below 2.1, and at a certain point (i.e. pH 1.5) all bacteriochlorophylls, including those from the B800 band, became converted to

  9. Glutathione attenuates uranyl toxicity in Lactococcus lactis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahmy, Karim; Oertel, Jana [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biophysics; Obeid, M. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Solioz, M. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland)

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the role of intracellular glutathione (GSH), which in a large number of taxa plays a role in the protection against the toxicity of heavy metals. Anaerobically grown Lactococcus lactis containing an inducible GSH synthesis pathway was used as a model organism allowing the study of GSH-dependent uranyl detoxification without interference from additional reactive oxygen species. Microcalorimetric measurements of the metabolic heat showed that intracellular GSH attenuates the toxicity of uranium at a concentration in the range of 10-150 μM. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed the endothermic binding of U(VI) to the carboxyl group(s) of GSH. The data indicate that the primary detoxifying mechanism is the intracellular sequestration of carboxyl-coordinated U(VI) into an insoluble complex with GSH.

  10. Características da bacteriocina produzida por Lactococcus lactis ssp. hordniae CTC 484 e seu efeito sobre Listeria monocytogenes em carne bovina Characterisation of the bacteriocin produced by Lactococcus lactis ssp. hordniae CTC 484 and the effect of this compound on Listeria monocytogenes in beef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Bromberg

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available O isolamento de linhagens de bactérias lácticas produtoras de bacteriocinas em carnes e seus produtos derivados resultou na detecção de Lactococcus lactis ssp. hordniae CTC 484, proveniente de frango. A bacteriocina inibiu não apenas uma outra bactéria láctica (Lactobacillus helveticus, mas também microorganismos patogênicos (Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, Clostridium perfringens e Enterococcus faecalis. Ela foi inativada por causa de enzimas como: alfa-quimotripsina, tripsina, pronase E, ficina, pepsina, papaína e lipase. Além disso, a bacteriocina mostrou-se termoestável, mesmo a temperaturas de autoclavagem (121°C/10 min e foi produzida em condições de armazenamento sob refrigeração. A bacteriocina mostrou-se ativa dentro de uma ampla faixa de valores de pH (2-10, porém a maior atividade ocorreu em valores menores de pH. A eficiência da linhagem CTC 484, assim como a de sua bacteriocina na redução e inibição do crescimento de Listeria monocytogenes em carne bovina estéril, foram avaliadas. Os resultados indicaram que o tratamento da carne por meio da inoculação desta bactéria contribuiu para o aumento da segurança e extensão da vida útil deste alimento.Screening for the bacteriocin production of strains of lactic acid bacteria from various meat and meat products resulted in the detection of a bacteriocin-producing Lactococcus lactis ssp. hordniae CTC 484, isolated from chicken. The bacteriocin inhibited not only closely related lactic acid bacterium (Lactobacillus helveticus, but also pathogenic microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, Clostridium perfringens, and Enterococcus faecalis. This compound was inactivated by alpha-chymotrypsin, trypsin, pronase E, ficin, pepsin, papain, and also by lipase. It was heat stable even at autoclaving temperature (121°C/10 min and was produced under refrigerated storage. It was also active over a wide

  11. Modeling Lactococcus lactis using a genome-scale flux model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Jens

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-scale flux models are useful tools to represent and analyze microbial metabolism. In this work we reconstructed the metabolic network of the lactic acid bacteria Lactococcus lactis and developed a genome-scale flux model able to simulate and analyze network capabilities and whole-cell function under aerobic and anaerobic continuous cultures. Flux balance analysis (FBA and minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA were used as modeling frameworks. Results The metabolic network was reconstructed using the annotated genome sequence from L. lactis ssp. lactis IL1403 together with physiological and biochemical information. The established network comprised a total of 621 reactions and 509 metabolites, representing the overall metabolism of L. lactis. Experimental data reported in the literature was used to fit the model to phenotypic observations. Regulatory constraints had to be included to simulate certain metabolic features, such as the shift from homo to heterolactic fermentation. A minimal medium for in silico growth was identified, indicating the requirement of four amino acids in addition to a sugar. Remarkably, de novo biosynthesis of four other amino acids was observed even when all amino acids were supplied, which is in good agreement with experimental observations. Additionally, enhanced metabolic engineering strategies for improved diacetyl producing strains were designed. Conclusion The L. lactis metabolic network can now be used for a better understanding of lactococcal metabolic capabilities and potential, for the design of enhanced metabolic engineering strategies and for integration with other types of 'omic' data, to assist in finding new information on cellular organization and function.

  12. Effects of the organic acids produced by a lactic acid bacterium in Apis mellifera colony development, Nosema ceranae control and fumagillin efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Matías; Negri, Pedro; Plischuk, Santiago; Szawarski, Nicolás; De Piano, Fiorella; De Feudis, Leonardo; Eguaras, Martín; Audisio, Carina

    2013-12-27

    The European honey bee Apis mellifera is known to be affected by many parasites and pathogens that have great impact over the insect development. Among parasites affecting bee health, Nosema ceranae is one of the main biotic factors affecting colony populations. As honey bee populations decline, interest in pathogenic and mutualistic relationships between bees and microorganisms has increased. The main goal of the current study was to assess the effect of the oral administration of the metabolites produced by Lactobacillus johnsonii CRL1647 (mainly organic acids) supplemented in syrup, on: (I) N. ceranae sporulation dynamics before and after fumagillin application, and (II) performance of A. mellifera colonies. Different experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of these bacterial metabolites on bees: in vitro administration revealed no toxic effects against bees. Colonies fed with the lactic acids incremented their beehive population and also the amount of fat bodies per bee. Finally, the organic acids reduced the intensity of the pathogen after the second application of treatment as well as enhanced the fumagillin efficiency. This study provides important information for the development of new control substances against nosemosis.

  13. A review on Lactococcus lactis: from food to factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Adelene Ai-Lian; In, Lionel L A; Lim, Swee Hua Erin; Rahim, Raha Abdul

    2017-04-04

    Lactococcus lactis has progressed a long way since its discovery and initial use in dairy product fermentation, to its present biotechnological applications in genetic engineering for the production of various recombinant proteins and metabolites that transcends the heterologous species barrier. Key desirable features of this gram-positive lactic acid non-colonizing gut bacteria include its generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status, probiotic properties, the absence of inclusion bodies and endotoxins, surface display and extracellular secretion technology, and a diverse selection of cloning and inducible expression vectors. This have made L. lactis a desirable and promising host on par with other well established model bacterial or yeast systems such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella cerevisiae and Bacillus subtilis. In this article, we review recent technological advancements, challenges, future prospects and current diversified examples on the use of L. lactis as a microbial cell factory. Additionally, we will also highlight latest medical-based applications involving whole-cell L. lactis as a live delivery vector for the administration of therapeutics against both communicable and non-communicable diseases.

  14. Recombinant expression of Laceyella sacchari thermitase in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Casper M; Madsen, Søren M; Vrang, Astrid; Hansen, Ole C; Johnsen, Mads G

    2013-12-01

    Thermitase (EC 3.4.21.66) is a thermostable endo-protease with the ability to convert various food relevant substrates into low-molecular weight peptides. A thermitase produced by Laceyella sacchari strain DSM43353 was found to have a mature amino acid sequence nearly identical to that of the original thermitase isolated from Thermoactinomyces vulgaris. The DSM43353 thermitase gene sequence contains a pro-peptide including parts of an I9 inhibitor motif. Expression of the thermitase gene in the Lactococcus lactis P170 expression system allowed secretion of stable thermitase in an auto-induced fermentation setup at 30°C. Thermitase accumulated in the culture supernatant during batch fermentations and was easily activated at 50°C or by prolonged dialysis. The activation step resulted in an almost complete degradation of endogenous L. lactis host proteins present in the supernatant. Mature activated product was stable at 50°C and functional at pH values between pH 6 and pH 11, suggesting that substrate hydrolysis can be performed over a broad range of pH values. The L. lactis based P170 expression system is a simple and safe system for obtaining food compatible thermitase in the range of 100 mg/L.

  15. Phosphoglycerate Mutase Is a Highly Efficient Enzyme without Flux Control in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solem, Christian; Petranovic, D.; Købmann, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase (PGM), which catalyzes the conversion of 3-phosphoglycerate to 2-phosphoglycerate, was examined in Lactococcus lactis with respect to its function, kinetics and glycolytic flux control. A library of strains with PGM activities ranging between 15......-465% of the wild-type level was constructed by replacing the native promoter of pgm with synthetic promoters of varying strengths. The specific growth rate and glucose flux were found to be maximal at the wild-type level at which PGM had no flux control. Low flux control of PGM was found on mixed acid fluxes...

  16. Complete genome sequence and description of Lactococcus garvieae M14 isolated from Algerian fermented milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Moumene

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe using a polyphasic approach that combines proteomic by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF analysis, genomic data and phenotypic characterization the features of Lactococcus garvieae strain M14 newly isolated from the fermented milk (known as raib of an Algerian cow. The 2 188 835 bp containing genome sequence displays a metabolic capacity to form acid fermentation that is very useful for industrial applications and encodes for two bacteriocins responsible for its eventual bioprotective properties.

  17. Transport of β-Casein-derived Peptides by the Oligopeptide Transport System Is a Crucial Step in the Proteolytic Pathway of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunji, E.R S; Hagting, A; de Vries, C.J.; Juillard, V.; Haandrikman, A.J; Poolman, B.; Konings, W.N

    1995-01-01

    In the proteolytic pathway of Lactococcus lactis, milk proteins (caseins) are hydrolyzed extracellularly to oligopeptides by the proteinase (PrtP). The fate of these peptides, i.e. extracellular hydrolysis followed by amino acid uptake or transport followed by intracellular hydrolysis, has been addr

  18. 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)- and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T)-degrading gene cluster in the soybean root-nodulating bacterium Bradyrhizobium elkanii USDA94.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shohei; Sano, Tomoki; Suyama, Kousuke; Itoh, Kazuhito

    2016-01-01

    Herbicides 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)- and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T)-degrading Bradyrhizobium strains possess tfdAα and/or cadABC as degrading genes. It has been reported that root-nodulating bacteria belonging to Bradyrhizobium elkanii also have tfdAα and cadA like genes but lack the ability to degrade these herbicides and that the cadA genes in 2,4-D-degrading and non-degrading Bradyrhizobium are phylogenetically different. In this study, we identified cadRABCK in the genome of a type strain of soybean root-nodulating B. elkanii USDA94 and demonstrated that the strain could degrade the herbicides when cadABCK was forcibly expressed. cadABCK-cloned Escherichia coli also showed the degrading ability. Because co-spiked phenoxyacetic acid (PAA) could induce the degradation of 2,4-D in B. elkanii USDA94, the lack of degrading ability in this strain was supposed to be due to the low inducing potential of the herbicides for the degrading gene cluster. On the other hand, tfdAα from B. elkanii USDA94 showed little potential to degrade the herbicides, but it did for 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and PAA. The 2,4-D-degrading ability of the cad cluster and the inducing ability of PAA were confirmed by preparing cadA deletion mutant. This is the first study to demonstrate that the cad cluster in the typical root-nodulating bacterium indeed have the potential to degrade the herbicides, suggesting that degrading genes for anthropogenic compounds could be found in ordinary non-degrading bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Bacterium-like Particles for efficient immune stimulation of existing vaccines and new subunit vaccines in mucosal applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalija eVan Braeckel-Budimir

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The successful development of a mucosal vaccine critically depends on the use of a safe and effective immunostimulant and/or carrier system. This review describes the effectiveness and mode of action of an immunostimulating particle derived from bacteria in mucosal subunit vaccines. The non-living particles, designated Bacterium-like Particles (BLPs are based on the food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis. The focus of the overview is on the development of intranasal BLP-based vaccines to prevent diseases caused by influenza and respiratory syncytial virus, and includes a selection of Phase I clinical data for the intranasal FluGEM vaccine.

  20. Antifungal and sprout regulatory bioactivities of phenylacetic acid, indole-3-acetic acid, and tyrosol isolated from the potato dry rot suppressive bacterium Enterobacter cloacae S11:T:07.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slininger, P J; Burkhead, K D; Schisler, D A

    2004-12-01

    Enterobacter cloacae S11: T:07 (NRRL B-21050) is a promising biological control agent that has significantly reduced both fungal dry rot disease and sprouting in laboratory and pilot potato storages. The metabolites phenylacetic acid (PAA), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and tyrosol (TSL) were isolated from S11:T:07 liquid cultures provided with three different growth media. The bioactivities of these metabolites were investigated via thin-layer chromatography bioautography of antifungal activity, wounded potato assays of dry rot suppressiveness, and cored potato eye assays of sprout inhibition. Relative accumulations of PAA, IAA, and TSL in cultures were nutrient dependent. For the first time, IAA, TSL, and PAA were shown to have antifungal activity against the dry rot causative pathogen Gibberella pulicaris, and to suppress dry rot infection of wounded potatoes. Disease suppression was optimal when all three metabolites were applied in combination. Dosages of IAA that resulted in disease suppression also resulted in sprout inhibition. These results suggest the potential for designing culture production and formulation conditions to achieve a dual purpose biological control agent able to suppress both dry rot and sprouting of stored potatoes.

  1. Evaluation of lactic acid bacterium fermentation products and food-grade chemicals to control Listeria monocytogenes in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnan, A J; Kaspar, C W; Otwell, W S; Tamplin, M L; Luchansky, J B

    1994-01-01

    Fresh blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) meat was obtained from retail markets in Florida and sampled for viable Listeria monocytogenes. The pathogen was found in crabmeat in three of four different lots tested by enrichment and at levels of 75 CFU/g in one of the same four lots by direct plating. Next, crabmeat was steam sterilized, inoculated with a three-strain mixture of L. monocytogenes (ca. 5.5 log10 CFU/g), washed with various lactic acid bacterium fermentation products (2,000 to 20,000 arbitrary units [AU]/ml of wash) or food-grade chemicals (0.25 to 4 M), and stored at 4 degrees C. Counts of the pathogen remained relatively constant in control samples during storage for 6 days, whereas in crabmeat washed with Perlac 1911 or MicroGard (10,000 to 20,000 AU), numbers initially decreased (0.5 to 1.0 log10 unit/g) but recovered to original levels within 6 days. Numbers of L. monocytogenes cells decreased 1.5 to 2.7 log10 units/g of crabmeat within 0.04 day when washed with 10,000 to 20,000 AU of Alta 2341, enterocin 1083, or Nisin per ml. Thereafter, counts increased 0.5 to 1.6 log10 units within 6 days. After washing with food-grade chemicals, modest reductions (0.4 to 0.8 log10 unit/g) were observed with sodium acetate (4 M), sodium diacetate (0.5 or 1 M), sodium lactate (1 M), or sodium nitrite (1.5 M). However, Listeria counts in crabmeat washed with 2 M sodium diacetate decreased 2.6 log10 units/g within 6 days. In addition, trisodium phosphate reduced L. monocytogenes counts from 1.7 (0.25 M) to > 4.6 (1 M) log10 units/g within 6 days.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7944362

  2. Characterization of Lactococcus lactis response to ampicillin and ciprofloxacin using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Panxue; Pang, Shintaro; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Mingtao; He, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Decades of antibiotic use or misuse has resulted in antibiotic resistance in lactic acid bacteria, a group of common culture starters and probiotic microorganisms. This has urged researchers to study how lactic acid bacteria respond to antibiotics, so as to have a better strategy to identify and predict the antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This study aimed to characterize the biochemical profiles of Lactococcus lactis responding to antibiotics using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Lactococcus lactis exposed to antibiotics was mixed with 50-nm gold nanoparticles for subsequent SERS measurements. The SERS spectra analyzed by principal component analysis showed no significant change after 30 min of antibiotic treatment, whereas distinct changes were clearly observed after 60 and 90 min of antibiotic treatment. Different antibiotics induced different spectral changes, and these changes revealed the detailed biochemical information of cellular responses. This study demonstrates that the SERS method developed not only senses the changes in the bacterial cell wall, but also reveals details of the biochemical profiles, which help us to understand how lactic acid bacteria respond to antibiotics, as well as to set a base for the detection of antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria by SERS.

  3. Nisin inducible production of listeriolysin O in Lactococcus lactis NZ9000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffin Brendan T

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Listeria monocytogenes is a well-characterized food-borne pathogen that infects pregnant women and immunocompromised individuals. Listeriolysin O (LLO is the major virulence factor of the pathogen and is often used as a diagnostic marker for detection of L. monocytogenes. In addition, LLO represents a potent antigen driving T cell-mediated immunity during infection. In the present work, Lactococcus lactis NZ9000 was used as an expression host to hyper-produce LLO under inducible conditions using the NICE (NIsin Controlled Expression system. We created a modified pNZ8048 vector encoding a six-His-tagged LLO downstream of the strong inducible PnisA promoter. Results The constructed vector (pNZPnisA:CYTO-LLO was expressed in L. lactis NZ9000 and was best induced at mid-log phase with 0.2% v/v nisin for 4 h statically at 30°C. Purification of the His-tagged LLO was accomplished by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and functionality was confirmed through haemolytic assays. Total LLO yield (measured as total protein content was 4.43–5.9 mg per litre culture and the haemolytic activity was still detectable after 8 months of storage at 4°C. Conclusion The LLO production method described in this work provides an approach to efficient LLO production in the Gram-positive Lactococcus bacterium to yield a significant source of the protein for research and diagnostic applications. Expression of LLO in L. lactis has a number of benefits over E. coli which may facilitate both in vivo and in vitro applications of this system.

  4. POTENTIAL OF Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MTCC 3041 AS A BIOPRESERVATIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Sharma

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria especially in developing countries can be exploited against frequently occurring spoilage organisms of fresh fruits and vegetables in addition to pathogens. Keeping in views this antagonism imparted by bacteria Lactococci, the present study was taken and effectiveness of bacteriocin of Lactococci was also studied in preservatives and enzymes. Lactic acid bacteria Lactococcus lactis subs. Lactis MTCC 3041 was used as bacteriocin producer strain. Isolation of most frequently occurring spoilage organisms from spoiled Mango and Kinnow was done by microbiological procedures and were identified by microscopic studies as Isolate 1 and Isolate 2. It has limited use in processed salted food as no zone of inhibition was observed at and above 5% NaCl (w/v.0.3% (w/v is the minimum concentration of KMS that provides stress to the microorganism for the production of bacteriocin. It is not suitable for food having sodium benzoate as preservative as with increase in concentration growth of Lactococcus lactis decreases. Presence of bacteriocin hinders the growth of the isolate 1 as fresh weight of the mycelium in test sample is 7.09% less than the control. Being non-pathogenic this organism can be safely used against spoilage organisms in addition to food borne pathogens.

  5. Isolation and identification of Lactococcus lactis and Weissella%乳酸乳球菌和魏斯氏菌的分离及鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    商婷婷; 张日俊

    2013-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to isolate and identify Lactococcus lactis and Weissel-la. According to the morphological character and microscopic examination, six lactic acid coc-cus strains were isolated and identified from samples of raw milk, pickle, silage and commercial cheese. By physiological and biochemical reaction, salt tolerance and heat resistance reaction and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, four strains belong to Lactococcus lactis, ST2 is lactococcus lactis subsp. Cremoris and ST7 is Lactococcus lactis subsp. Lactis; two strains were identified as Weissella, one of them is Weissella cibaria. These results indicated that raw milk and pickle are the excellent habitats of Lactococcus lactis and Weissella correspondingly, with the incorpo-ration of traditional methods and molecular biology techniques, strains could be isolated and identified more accurately and rapidly.%试验以生牛奶、自制泡菜水、青贮料、市售奶酪为样品,进行乳酸乳球菌和魏斯氏菌的筛选与鉴定。通过培养基中菌落形态观察和镜检细胞形态观察,共筛得6株疑似乳酸球菌(分别命名为ST1、ST2、ST6、ST7、ST8、ST9)。经生理生化、耐盐性、耐热性试验以及16S rD-NA序列分析鉴定,这6株菌分属两个属:ST1、ST2、ST7、ST9为乳酸乳球菌(Lactococcus lac-tis),其中ST2为乳酸乳球菌乳脂亚种(Lactococcus lactis subsp. Cremoris),ST7为乳酸乳球菌乳酸亚种(Lactococcus lactis subsp. Lactis );ST6、ST8属于魏斯氏菌属(Weissella),其中ST6为食窦魏斯氏菌(Weissella cibaria)。研究表明,生牛奶和泡菜水分别是乳酸乳球菌和魏斯氏菌的优良生活环境,传统方法与分子生物技术相结合可更准确快速地分离及鉴定菌株。

  6. Butanol is cytotoxic to Lactococcus lactis while ethanol and hexanol are cytostatic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Anne-Mette Meisner; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2017-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria currently used extensively by the dairy industry have a superior tolerance towards small chain alcohols, which makes them interesting targets for use in future bio-refineries. The mechanism underlying the alcohol tolerance of lactic acid bacteria has so far received little...... resistant lactic acid bacteria. Combined results from alcohol survival rate, live/dead staining, and a novel usage of the beta-galactosidase assay, revealed that while high concentrations of ethanol and hexanol were cytostatic to L. lactis, high concentrations of butanol were cytotoxic, causing irreparable...... attention. In the present study the physiological alcohol stress response of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 towards the primary, even-chain alcohols; ethanol, butanol, and hexanol was characterized. The alcohol tolerance of L. lactis was found comparable to those reported for highly alcohol...

  7. Lactic Acid Bacteria in Durum Wheat Flour Are Endophytic Components of the Plant during Its Entire Life Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minervini, Fabio; Celano, Giuseppe; Lattanzi, Anna; Tedone, Luigi; De Mastro, Giuseppe; Gobbetti, Marco; De Angelis, Maria

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed at assessing the dynamics of lactic acid bacteria and other Firmicutes associated with durum wheat organs and processed products. 16S rRNA gene-based high-throughput sequencing showed that Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Enterococcus, and Lactococcus were the main epiphytic and endophytic genera among lactic acid bacteria. Bacillus, Exiguobacterium, Paenibacillus, and Staphylococcus completed the picture of the core genus microbiome. The relative abundance of each lactic acid bacterium genus was affected by cultivars, phenological stages, other Firmicutes genera, environmental temperature, and water activity (aw) of plant organs. Lactobacilli, showing the highest sensitivity to aw, markedly decreased during milk development (Odisseo) and physiological maturity (Saragolla). At these stages, Lactobacillus was mainly replaced by Streptococcus, Lactococcus, and Enterococcus. However, a key sourdough species, Lactobacillus plantarum, was associated with plant organs during the life cycle of Odisseo and Saragolla wheat. The composition of the sourdough microbiota and the overall quality of leavened baked goods are also determined throughout the phenological stages of wheat cultivation, with variations depending on environmental and agronomic factors.

  8. The zoonotic potential of Lactococcus garvieae: An overview on microbiology, epidemiology, virulence factors and relationship with its presence in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibello, Alicia; Galán-Sánchez, Fátima; Blanco, M Mar; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel; Domínguez, Lucas; Fernández-Garayzábal, José F

    2016-12-01

    Lactococcus garvieae is a relevant worldwide fish pathogen affecting various farmed and wild marine and freshwater species. It has also been isolated from other animals, such as ruminants with subclinical mastitis and pigs with pneumonia. From the early 90s, L. garvieae has been associated with different human infections, mainly endocarditis. During the last five years, human infections by this bacterium appear to be increasing, likely due to the improvement in microbiological methods for bacterial identification and the alertness of this bacterium by physicians. Human L. garvieae infections have been associated with the consumption or the handling of contaminated raw fish or seafood, and recently, a genetic study showed that meat, raw milk and dairy products may also be food sources of human L. garvieae infections. However, the status of L. garvieae as a potential zoonotic bacterium is still controversial to date. In this work, we describe four new human infections by L. garvieae in elderly and inmunocompromised patients, and we show an overview on L. garvieae microbiology, epidemiology, virulence factors and relationship with its presence in foods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mobile CRISPR/Cas-mediated bacteriophage resistance in Lactococcus lactis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Millen

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis is a biotechnological workhorse for food fermentations and potentially therapeutic products and is therefore widely consumed by humans. It is predominantly used as a starter microbe for fermented dairy products, and specialized strains have adapted from a plant environment through reductive evolution and horizontal gene transfer as evidenced by the association of adventitious traits with mobile elements. Specifically, L. lactis has armed itself with a myriad of plasmid-encoded bacteriophage defensive systems to protect against viral predation. This known arsenal had not included CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins, which forms a remarkable microbial immunity system against invading DNA. Although CRISPR/Cas systems are common in the genomes of closely related lactic acid bacteria (LAB, none was identified within the eight published lactococcal genomes. Furthermore, a PCR-based search of the common LAB CRISPR/Cas systems (Types I and II in 383 industrial L. lactis strains proved unsuccessful. Here we describe a novel, Type III, self-transmissible, plasmid-encoded, phage-interfering CRISPR/Cas discovered in L. lactis. The native CRISPR spacers confer resistance based on sequence identity to corresponding lactococcal phage. The interference is directed at phages problematic to the dairy industry, indicative of a responsive system. Moreover, targeting could be modified by engineering the spacer content. The 62.8-kb plasmid was shown to be conjugally transferrable to various strains. Its mobility should facilitate dissemination within microbial communities and provide a readily applicable system to naturally introduce CRISPR/Cas to industrially relevant strains for enhanced phage resistance and prevention against acquisition of undesirable genes.

  10. Detection and viability of Lactococcus lactis throughout cheese ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggirello, Marianna; Dolci, Paola; Cocolin, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidences highlighted the presence of Lactococcus lactis during late cheese ripening. For this reason, the role of this microorganism, well known as dairy starter, should be reconsidered throughout cheese manufacturing and ripening. Thus, the main objective of this study was to develop a RT-qPCR protocol for the detection, quantification and determination of the viability of L. lactis in ripened cheese samples by direct analysis of microbial nucleic acids. Standard curves were constructed for the specific quantification of L. lactis in cheese matrices and good results in terms of selectivity, correlation coefficient and efficiency were obtained. Thirty-three ripened cheeses were analyzed and, on the basis of RNA analysis, twelve samples showed 106 to 108 CFU of L. lactis per gram of product, thirteen from 103 to 105 CFU/g, and in eight cheeses, L. lactis was not detected. Traditional plating on M17 medium led to loads ranging from 105 to 109 CFU/g, including the cheese samples where no L. lactis was found by RT-qPCR. From these cheeses, none of the colonies isolated on M17 medium was identified as L. lactis species. These data could be interpreted as a lack of selectivity of M17 medium where colony growth is not always related to lactococcal species. At the same time, the absence or low abundance of L. lactis isolates on M17 medium from cheese where L. lactis was detected by RT-qPCR support the hypothesis that L. lactis starter populations are mainly present in viable but not culturable state during ripening and, for this reason, culture-dependent methods have to be supplemented with direct analysis of cheese.

  11. Detection and viability of Lactococcus lactis throughout cheese ripening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Ruggirello

    Full Text Available Recent evidences highlighted the presence of Lactococcus lactis during late cheese ripening. For this reason, the role of this microorganism, well known as dairy starter, should be reconsidered throughout cheese manufacturing and ripening. Thus, the main objective of this study was to develop a RT-qPCR protocol for the detection, quantification and determination of the viability of L. lactis in ripened cheese samples by direct analysis of microbial nucleic acids. Standard curves were constructed for the specific quantification of L. lactis in cheese matrices and good results in terms of selectivity, correlation coefficient and efficiency were obtained. Thirty-three ripened cheeses were analyzed and, on the basis of RNA analysis, twelve samples showed 106 to 108 CFU of L. lactis per gram of product, thirteen from 103 to 105 CFU/g, and in eight cheeses, L. lactis was not detected. Traditional plating on M17 medium led to loads ranging from 105 to 109 CFU/g, including the cheese samples where no L. lactis was found by RT-qPCR. From these cheeses, none of the colonies isolated on M17 medium was identified as L. lactis species. These data could be interpreted as a lack of selectivity of M17 medium where colony growth is not always related to lactococcal species. At the same time, the absence or low abundance of L. lactis isolates on M17 medium from cheese where L. lactis was detected by RT-qPCR support the hypothesis that L. lactis starter populations are mainly present in viable but not culturable state during ripening and, for this reason, culture-dependent methods have to be supplemented with direct analysis of cheese.

  12. La réponse au stress osmotique des bactéries lactiques Lactococcus lactis et Lactobacillus plantarum (mini-revue)

    OpenAIRE

    Romeo, Yves; Bouvier, Jean; Gutierrez, Claude

    2001-01-01

    International audience; Osmotic stress response of lactic acid bacteria Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum. In order to survive in a wide variety of environments, bacteria have evolved systems that protect themselves against environmental stress. Lactic acid bacteria grow in media where osmolarity is high and varies frequently and they must adjust their intracellular osmolarity in order to maintain the turgor pressure necessary for cell elongation. An osmotic upshock stops their g...

  13. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: evaluation of the probiotic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Danielle N; Todorov, Svetoslav D; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T; Franco, Bernadette D G M

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria capable of producing bacteriocins and presenting probiotic potential open innovative technological applications in the dairy industry. In this study, a bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi) was isolated from goat milk, and studied for its probiotic potential. Lc. lactis DF4Mi was resistant to acidic pH and oxbile, presented co-aggregation with Listeria monocytogenes, and was not affected by several drugs from different generic groups, being sensitive to most tested antibiotics. These properties indicate that this Lc. lactis strain can be used for enhancement of dairy foods safety and quality, in combination with potential probiotic properties.

  14. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp: lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: Evaluation of the probiotic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle N. Furtado

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria capable of producing bacteriocins and presenting probiotic potential open innovative technological applications in the dairy industry. In this study, a bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi was isolated from goat milk, and studied for its probiotic potential. Lc. lactis DF4Mi was resistant to acidic pH and oxbile, presented co-aggregation with Listeria monocytogenes, and was not affected by several drugs from different generic groups, being sensitive to most tested antibiotics. These properties indicate that this Lc. lactis strain can be used for enhancement of dairy foods safety and quality, in combination with potential probiotic properties.

  15. Induction of heat shock proteins DnaK, GroEL, and GroES by salt stress in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilstrup, Mogens; Jacobsen, Susanne; Hammer, Karin;

    1997-01-01

    The bacterium Lactococcus lactis has become a model organism in studies of growth physiology and membrane transport, as a result of its simple fermentative metabolism. It is also used as a model for studying the importance of specific genes and functions during lie in excess nutrients, by compari......The bacterium Lactococcus lactis has become a model organism in studies of growth physiology and membrane transport, as a result of its simple fermentative metabolism. It is also used as a model for studying the importance of specific genes and functions during lie in excess nutrients......, by comparison of prototrophic wild-type strains and auxotrophic domesticated (daily) strains. In a study of the capacity of domesticated strains to perform directed responses toward various stress conditions, we have analyzed the heat and salt stress response in the established L,. lactis subsp. cremoris...... laboratory strain MG1363, which was originally derived from a dairy strain, After two-dimensional separation of proteins, the DnaK, GroEL, and GroES heat shock proteins, the HrcA (Orf1) heat shack repressor, and the glycolytic enzymes pyruvate kinase, glyceral-dehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase...

  16. Structure-function analysis of multidrug transporters in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, HW; Putman, M; Margolles, A; Sakamoto, K; Konings, WN

    1999-01-01

    The active extrusion of cytotoxic compounds from the cell by multidrug transporters is one of the major causes of failure of chemotherapeutic treatment of tumor cells and of infections by pathogenic microorganisms. A multidrug transporter in Lactococcus lactis, LmrA, is a member of the ATP-binding c

  17. Regulatory phenotyping reveals important diversity within the species Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bachmann, H.; Starrenburg, M.; Dijkstra, A.; Molenaar, D.; Kleerebezem, M.; Rademaker, J.L.W.; Hylckama Vlieg, van J.E.T.

    2009-01-01

    The diversity in regulatory phenotypes among a collection of 84 Lactococcus lactis strains isolated from dairy and nondairy origin was explored. The specific activities of five enzymes were assessed in cell extracts of all strains grown in two different media, a nutritionally rich broth and a relati

  18. Lactococcus lactis as host for overproduction of functional membrane proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunji, ERS; Slotboom, DJ; Poolman, B

    2003-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis has many properties that are ideal for enhanced expression of membrane proteins. The organism is easy and inexpensive to culture, has a single membrane and relatively mild proteolytic activity. Methods for genetic manipulation are fully established and a tightly controlled

  19. Nisin-Producing Lactococcus lactis Strains Isolated from Human Milk

    OpenAIRE

    Beasley, Shea S.; Saris, Per E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Characterization by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing, ribotyping, and green fluorescent protein-based nisin bioassay revealed that 6 of 20 human milk samples contained nisin-producing Lactococcus lactis bacteria. This suggests that the history of humans consuming nisin is older than the tradition of consuming fermented milk products.

  20. Alternative lactose catabolic pathway in Lactococcus lactis IL1403

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleksandrzak-Piekarczyk, T; Kok, J; Renault, P; Bardowski, J

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we present a glimpse of the diversity of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL1403 beta-galactosidase phenotype-negative mutants isolated by negative selection on solid media containing cellobiose or lactose and X-Gal (5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside), and we identif

  1. Autoregulation of Nisin Biosynthesis in Lactococcus lactis by Signal Transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Oscar P.; Beerthuyzen, Marke M.; Ruyter, Pascalle G.G.A. de; Luesink, Evert J.; Vos, Willem M. de

    1995-01-01

    The post-translationally modified, antimicrobial peptide nisin is secreted by strains of Lactococcus lactis that contain the chromosomally located nisin biosynthetic gene cluster nisABTCIPRKFEG. When a 4-base pair deletion is introduced into the structural nisA gene (ΔnisA), transcription of ΔnisA

  2. Nucleotide metabolism in Lactococcus lactis: Salvage pathways of exogenous pyrimidines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Hammer, Karin

    1994-01-01

    By measuring enzyme activities in crude extracts and studying the effect of toxic analogs (5-fluoropyrimidines) on cell growth, the metabolism of pyrimidines in Lactococcus lactis was analyzed. Pathways by which uracil, uridine, deoxyuridine, cytidine, and deoxycytidine are metabolized in L. lact...

  3. Luciferase detection during stationary phase in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bachmann, H.; Santos, dos F.; Kleerebezem, M.; Hylckama Vlieg, van J.E.T.

    2007-01-01

    The luminescence signal of luxAB-encoded bacterial luciferase strongly depends on the metabolic state of the host cell, which restricts the use of this reporter system to metabolically active bacteria. Here we show that in stationary-phase cells of Lactococcus lactis, detection of luciferase is sign

  4. Lactococcus lactis as host for overproduction of functional membrane proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunji, ERS; Slotboom, DJ; Poolman, B

    2003-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis has many properties that are ideal for enhanced expression of membrane proteins. The organism is easy and inexpensive to culture, has a single membrane and relatively mild proteolytic activity. Methods for genetic manipulation are fully established and a tightly controlled promote

  5. Rock Phosphate Solubilization Mechanisms of One Fungus and One Bacterium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Qi-mei; ZHAO Xiao-rong; ZHAO Zi-juan; LI Bao-guo

    2002-01-01

    Many microorganisms can dissolve the insoluble phosphates like apatite. However, the mechanisms are still not clear. This study was an attempt to investigate the mechanisms of rock phosphate solubilization by an Aspergillus 2TCiF2 and an Arthrobacter1TCRi7. The results indicated that the fungus produced a large amount of organic acids, mainly oxalic acid. The total quantity of the organic acids produced by the fungus was 550 times higher than that by the bacterium. Different organic acids had completely different capacities to solubilize the rock. Oxalic acid and citric acid had stronger capacity to dissolve the rock than malic acid, tartaric acid, lactic acid, acetic acid, malonic acid and succinic acid. The fungus solubilized the rock through excreting both proton and organic acids. The rock solubilization of the bacterium depended on only proton.

  6. Protective effect of clove oil-supplemented fish diets on experimental Lactococcus garvieae infection in tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanachaikunsopon, Pongsak; Phumkhachorn, Parichat

    2009-09-01

    The essential oils extracted from the four herbs, cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum), clove (Syzygium aromaticum), ginger (Zingiber officinale) and holy basil (Ocimum sanctum), were investigated for their antimicrobial activity and mode of action against Lactococcus garvieae, a fish pathogenic bacteria causing lactococcosis. Of all the tested oils, clove oil had the strongest inhibitory effect and exhibited a bactericidal mode of action against the pathogenic bacterium. When an intraperitoneal infection of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) with L. garvieae was performed, the median lethal dose (LD(50)) was determined to be 1.78x10(2) CFU/fish. For an in vivo trial, no mortality was apparent in fish fed on the fish diets supplemented with 3% (w/w) of clove oil and with 0.5% (w/w) of oxytetracycline 5 d prior to the infection with L. garvieae. These results indicate that clove oil had a protective effect on experimental L. garvieae infection in tilapia and the potential to replace antibiotics for controlling the disease.

  7. Precision genome engineering in lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pijkeren, Jan Peter; Britton, Robert A

    2014-08-29

    Innovative new genome engineering technologies for manipulating chromosomes have appeared in the last decade. One of these technologies, recombination mediated genetic engineering (recombineering) allows for precision DNA engineering of chromosomes and plasmids in Escherichia coli. Single-stranded DNA recombineering (SSDR) allows for the generation of subtle mutations without the need for selection and without leaving behind any foreign DNA. In this review we discuss the application of SSDR technology in lactic acid bacteria, with an emphasis on key factors that were critical to move this technology from E. coli into Lactobacillus reuteri and Lactococcus lactis. We also provide a blueprint for how to proceed if one is attempting to establish SSDR technology in a lactic acid bacterium. The emergence of CRISPR-Cas technology in genome engineering and its potential application to enhancing SSDR in lactic acid bacteria is discussed. The ability to perform precision genome engineering in medically and industrially important lactic acid bacteria will allow for the genetic improvement of strains without compromising safety.

  8. Partial characterization of an rpoD-like gene of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis ML3 with a polymerase chain reaction-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gansel, X; Dutreix, M; Hartke, A; Boutibonnes, P; Auffray, Y

    1993-11-01

    With degenerated oligonucleotide primers for conserved regions of bacterial sigma factor proteins, a 117-bp internal DNA fragment of an rpoD-like gene of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis ML3 was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The DNA sequence of this PCR product was determined by cycle sequencing, and the deduced amino acid sequence of this internal fragment showed an extensive homology with the known sigma factor sequences from six other microorganisms and present a 13-amino acid region corresponding to the typical "RpoD box" of primary sigma factors. This PCR product was used as a probe to specifically detect sigma homologs in Pediococcus acidilactici, Leuconostoc lactis, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris. These data are consistent with the existence of a high similarity between the primary sigma factors from diverse Gram-positive microorganisms.

  9. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: characterization of the bacteriocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Danielle N; Todorov, Svetoslav D; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T; Franco, Bernadette D G M

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria capable of producing bacteriocins and presenting probiotic potential open innovative technological applications in the dairy industry. In this study, a bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi) was isolated from goat milk, and studied for its antimicrobial activity. The bacteriocin presented a broad spectrum of activity, was sensitive to proteolytic enzymes, resistant to heat and pH extremes, and not affected by the presence of SDS, Tween 20, Tween 80, EDTA or NaCl. Bacteriocin production was dependent on the components of the culture media, especially nitrogen source and salts. When tested by PCR, the bacteriocin gene presented 100% homology to nisin Z gene. These properties indicate that this L. lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi can be used for enhancement of dairy foods safety and quality.

  10. An exoproteome approach to monitor safety of a cheese-isolated Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genovese, Federica; Coïsson, Jean Daniel; Majumder, Avishek

    2013-01-01

    The safety of the cheese-isolated and potential starter Lactococcus lactis 11D was explored by means of an extracellular proteomic study. A preliminary analysis showed good caseification/proteolytic behavior of the strain, absence of production of biogenic amines and good survival at acidic p...... isomerase were abundant in the L. lactis 11D exoproteome. These proteins play a role in bacterial aggregation and in bacteria–fungi interactions, therefore their presence may indicate a good competition potential of the strain against other microorganisms in both food and the gastrointestinal habitat....... This is to our knowledge the first extracellular proteomic mapping of L. lactis with relevance for bacterial strain-typing in food safety....

  11. Encapsulated Lactococcus lactis with enhanced gastrointestinal survival for the development of folate enriched functional foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, Jayakumar Beena; Nampoothiri, Kesavan Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    Two lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from cow's milk were identified as Lactococcus lactis strains and designated as L. lactis CM22 and L. lactis CM28. They were immobilised by co-encapsulation using alginate and mannitol and by hybrid entrapment with skim milk, glycerol, CaCO3 and alginate. The encapsulated cells survived better in simulated gastrointestinal conditions compared to the free cells. The percentage survival of probiotics encapsulated by hybrid entrapment method was 62.74% for L. lactis CM22 and 68% for L. lactis CM28. Studies to check their efficacy in fermentative fortification of skim milk and ice cream revealed an enhancement in folate level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: characterization of the bacteriocin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle N. Furtado

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria capable of producing bacteriocins and presenting probiotic potential open innovative technological applications in the dairy industry. In this study, a bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi was isolated from goat milk, and studied for its antimicrobial activity. The bacteriocin presented a broad spectrum of activity, was sensitive to proteolytic enzymes, resistant to heat and pH extremes, and not affected by the presence of SDS, Tween 20, Tween 80, EDTA or NaCl. Bacteriocin production was dependent on the components of the culture media, especially nitrogen source and salts. When tested by PCR, the bacteriocin gene presented 100% homology to nisin Z gene. These properties indicate that this L. lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi can be used for enhancement of dairy foods safety and quality.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis CRL264, a Citrate-Fermenting Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuljan, Federico; Espariz, Martín; Blancato, Victor S.; Esteban, Luis; Alarcón, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis CRL264, a natural strain isolated from artisanal cheese from northwest Argentina. L. lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis is one of the most important microorganisms used as starter culture around the world. The CRL264 strain constitutes a model microorganism in the studies on the generation of aroma compounds (diacetyl, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol) by lactic acid bacteria. Our genome analysis shows similar genetic organization to other available genomes of L. lactis bv. diacetylactis strains. PMID:26847906

  14. Plasma mutation breeding of Lactococcus lactis in producing Nisin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuanli ZHANG

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available With Nisin-producing Lactococcus lactis as the starting strain, the strain with tolerance to 10 000 IU/mL Nisin is selected on high-concentration Nisin medium. The Nisin titer of the strain is up to 1 680 IU/mL. As the starting strain, the strain is further treated by atmospheric and room temperature plasmas(ARTP and mutant strain for high yield of Nisin is quickly selected with 24 well culture plate. At a survival rate of 3%, the positive mutation rate of the Lactococcus lactis is 273% compared with the starting strain. The results of shake flask culture further confirmed that one positive mutant strains could produce 6 120 IU/mL Nisin.

  15. Lactococcus garvieae Endocarditis on a Prosthetic Biological Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsur, A; Slutzki, T; Flusser, D

    2015-09-01

    Lactococcus garvieae (LG) endocarditis is a rare disease in humans. There are only about 16 reported cases in the world. We report a 76-year-old male patient with LG endocarditis. In depth interview with the patient revealed that 2 weeks prior to admission, he had eaten sushi containing raw fish. Unlike many of the other infections reported, which were on a native mitral valve, our patient's vegetation was on a prosthetic aortic valve.

  16. Evaluation of continuous ethanol fermentation of dilute-acid corn stover hydrolysate using thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva, Tania I.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2007-01-01

    Dilute sulfuric acid pretreated corn stover is potential feedstock of industrial interest for second generation fuel ethanol production. However, the toxicity of corn stover hydrolysate (PCS) has been a challenge for fermentation by recombinant xylose fermenting organisms. In this work...

  17. Fluorescence assessment of Lactococcus lactis viability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunthof, C.J.; Braak, van den S.; Breeuwer, P.; Rombouts, F.M.; Abee, T.

    2000-01-01

    The reproduction and activity of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are essential in their applications in the dairy industry and other fermentations. Traditionally used methods like plate counting and acidification tests require long incubation times and provide limited information. Fluorescence techniques

  18. Influence of triethyl phosphate on phosphatase activity in shooting range soil: Isolation of a zinc-resistant bacterium with an acid phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Sandra; Brigmon, Robin L

    2017-03-01

    Phosphatase-mediated hydrolysis of organic phosphate may be a viable means of stabilizing heavy metals via precipitation as a metal phosphate in bioremediation applications. We investigated the effect of triethyl phosphate (TEP) on soil microbial-phosphatase activity in a heavy-metal contaminated soil. Gaseous TEP has been used at subsurface sites for bioremediation of organic contaminants but not applied in heavy-metal contaminated areas. Little is known about how TEP affects microbial activity in soils and it is postulated that TEP can serve as a phosphate source in nutrient-poor groundwater and soil/sediments. Over a 3-week period, TEP amendment to microcosms containing heavy-metal contaminated soil resulted in increased activity of soil acid-phosphatase and repression of alkaline phosphatase, indicating a stimulatory effect on the microbial population. A soil-free enrichment of microorganisms adapted to heavy-metal and acidic conditions was derived from the TEP-amended soil microcosms using TEP as the sole phosphate source and the selected microbial consortium maintained a high acid-phosphatase activity with repression of alkaline phosphatase. Addition of 5mM zinc to soil-free microcosms had little effect on acid phosphatase but inhibited alkaline phosphatase. One bacterial member from the consortium, identified as Burkholderia cepacia sp., expressed an acid-phosphatase activity uninhibited by high concentrations of zinc and produced a soluble, indigo pigment under phosphate limitation. The pigment was produced in a phosphate-free medium and was not produced in the presence of TEP or phosphate ion, indicative of purple acid-phosphatase types that are pressed by bioavailable phosphate. These results demonstrate that TEP amendment was bioavailable and increased overall phosphatase activity in both soil and soil-free microcosms supporting the possibility of positive outcomes in bioremediation applications.

  19. Characterization and evaluation of the spoilage potential of Lactococcus piscium isolates from modified atmosphere packaged meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahkila, Riitta; Nieminen, Timo; Johansson, Per; Säde, Elina; Björkroth, Johanna

    2012-05-01

    A total of 222 psychrotrophic lactococci isolated from use-by day, modified atmosphere packaged (MAP) meat were identified to the species level by numerical analyses of EcoRI and ClaI ribopatterns and phylogenetic sequence analyses of 16S, rpoA and pheS genes. In addition, their meat spoilage potential was studied. The majority of the isolates (n=215) were identified as Lactococcus piscium, while seven isolates belonged to Lactococcus raffinolactis. L. piscium was shown to be adapted to growing in a variety of MAP meat products including broiler, turkey, pork, and minced meat from beef and pork, where they belonged to the predominating microbiota at the end of the storage. Numerical analyses of EcoRI and ClaI ribopatterns, and phylogenetic sequence analyses of rpoA and pheS genes were shown to be reliable tools in species level identification of meat lactococci. The spoilage potential of L. piscium was evaluated by inoculating representative isolates to MAP pork stored at 6 °C for 22 days. Development of spoilage population was monitored using a culture-independent T-RFLP approach. The sensory shelf life of pork inoculated with L. piscium was shortened compared to the uninoculated control. Alongside with the inoculated L. piscium isolates, Leuconostoc spp. present as initial contaminants in the samples thrived. This shows that even though lactococci were inoculated at higher levels compared to the natural microbiota, they did not occupy the niche and prevent the growth of other lactic acid bacteria. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus saerimneri 30a (Formerly Lactobacillus sp. Strain 30a), a Reference Lactic Acid Bacterium Strain Producing Biogenic Amines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romano, Andrea; Trip, Hein; Campbell-Sills, Hugo; Bouchez, Olivier; Sherman, David; Lolkema, Juke S.; Lucas, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus sp. strain 30a (Lactobacillus saerimneri) produces the biogenic amines histamine, putrescine, and cadaverine by decarboxylating their amino acid precursors. We report its draft genome sequence (1,634,278 bases, 42.6% G+C content) and the principal findings from its annotation, which

  1. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus saerimneri 30a (Formerly Lactobacillus sp. Strain 30a), a Reference Lactic Acid Bacterium Strain Producing Biogenic Amines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romano, Andrea; Trip, Hein; Campbell-Sills, Hugo; Bouchez, Olivier; Sherman, David; Lolkema, Juke S.; Lucas, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus sp. strain 30a (Lactobacillus saerimneri) produces the biogenic amines histamine, putrescine, and cadaverine by decarboxylating their amino acid precursors. We report its draft genome sequence (1,634,278 bases, 42.6% G+C content) and the principal findings from its annotation, which mi

  2. Transcription profiling of interactions between Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris SK11 and Lactobacillus paracasei ATCC 334 during Cheddar cheese simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desfossés-Foucault, Émilie; LaPointe, Gisèle; Roy, Denis

    2014-05-16

    The starter cultures (Lactococcus sp.) and non-starter lactic acid bacteria (mostly Lactobacillus spp.) are essential to flavor development of Cheddar cheese. The aim of this study was to elucidate the transcriptional interaction between Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris SK11 and Lactobacillus paracasei ATCC 334 in mixed cultures during simulated Cheddar cheese manufacture (Pearce activity test) and ripening (slurry). Reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to quantify the expression of 34 genes common to both bacteria and for eight genes specific to either L. lactis subsp. cremoris SK11 or L. paracasei ATCC 334. The multifactorial analysis (MFA) performed on fold change results for each gene revealed that the genes linked to stress, protein and peptide degradation as well as carbohydrate metabolism of L. paracasei ATCC 334 were especially overexpressed in mixed culture with L. lactis subsp. cremoris SK11 during the ripening simulation. For L. lactis subsp. cremoris SK11, genes coding for amino acid metabolism were more expressed during the cheese manufacture simulation, especially in single culture. These results show how complementary functions of starter and NSLAB contribute to activities useful for flavor development.

  3. Taxonomic characterization of the cellulose-degrading bacterium NCIB 10462

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dees, C.; Ringleberg, D.; Scott, T.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Phelps, T. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The gram negative cellulase-producing bacterium NCIB 10462 has been previously named Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. or var. cellulosa. Since there is renewed interest in cellulose-degrading bacteria for use in bioconversion of cellulose to chemical feed stocks and fuels, we re-examined the characteristics of this microorganism to determine its proper taxonomic characterization and to further define it`s true metabolic potential. Metabolic and physical characterization of NCIB 10462 revealed that this was an alkalophilic, non-fermentative, gram negative, oxidase positive, motile, cellulose-degrading bacterium. The aerobic substrate utilization profile of this bacterium was found to have few characteristics consistent with a classification of P. fluorescens with a very low probability match with the genus Sphingomonas. Total lipid analysis did not reveal that any sphingolipid bases are produced by this bacterium. NCIB 10462 was found to grow best aerobically but also grows well in complex media under reducing conditions. NCIB 10462 grew slowly under full anaerobic conditions on complex media but growth on cellulosic media was found only under aerobic conditions. Total fatty acid analysis (MIDI) of NCIB 10462 failed to group this bacterium with a known pseudomonas species. However, fatty acid analysis of the bacteria when grown at temperatures below 37{degrees}C suggest that the organism is a pseudomonad. Since a predominant characteristic of this bacterium is it`s ability to degrade cellulose, we suggest it be called Pseudomonas cellulosa.

  4. A Computational Study of Amensalistic Control of Listeria monocytogenes by Lactococcus lactis under Nutrient Rich Conditions in a Chemostat Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Khassehkhan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We study a previously introduced mathematical model of amensalistic control of the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes by the generally regarded as safe lactic acid bacteria Lactococcus lactis in a chemostat setting under nutrient rich growth conditions. The control agent produces lactic acids and thus affects pH in the environment such that it becomes detrimental to the pathogen while it is much more tolerant to these self-inflicted environmental changes itself. The mathematical model consists of five nonlinear ordinary differential equations for both bacterial species, the concentration of lactic acids, the pH and malate. The model is algebraically too involved to allow a comprehensive, rigorous qualitative analysis. Therefore, we conduct a computational study. Our results imply that depending on the growth characteristics of the medium in which the bacteria are cultured, the pathogen can survive in an intermediate flow regime but will be eradicated for slower flow rates and washed out for higher flow rates.

  5. Dethiosulfatibacter aminovorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel thiosulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from coastal marine sediment via sulfate-reducing enrichment with Casamino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takii, Susumu; Hanada, Satoshi; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Ueno, Yutaka; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Ibe, Akihiro; Matsuura, Katsumi

    2007-10-01

    A sulfate-reducing enrichment culture originating from coastal marine sediment of the eutrophic Tokyo Bay, Japan, was successfully established with Casamino acids as a substrate. A thiosulfate reducer, strain C/G2(T), was isolated from the enrichment culture after further enrichment with glutamate. Cells of strain C/G2(T) were non-motile rods (0.6-0.8 microm x 2.2-4.8 microm) and were found singly or in pairs and sometimes in short chains. Spores were not formed. Cells of strain C/G2(T) stained Gram-negatively, despite possessing Gram-positive cell walls. The optimum temperature for growth was 28-30 degrees C, the optimum pH was around 7.8 and the optimum salt concentration was 20-30 g l(-1). Lactate, pyruvate, serine, cysteine, threonine, glutamate, histidine, lysine, arginine, Casamino acids, peptone and yeast extract were fermented as single substrates and no sugar was used as a fermentative substrate. A Stickland reaction was observed with some pairs of amino acids. Fumarate, alanine, proline, phenylalanine, tryptophan, glutamine and aspartate were utilized only in the presence of thiosulfate. Strain C/G2(T) fermented glutamate to H2, CO2, acetate and propionate. Thiosulfate and elemental sulfur were reduced to sulfide. Sulfate, sulfite and nitrate were not utilized as electron acceptors. The growth of strain C/G2(T) on Casamino acids or glutamate was enhanced by co-culturing with Desulfovibrio sp. isolated from the original mixed culture enriched with Casamino acids. The DNA G+C content of strain C/G2(T) was 41.0 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain C/G2(T) formed a distinct cluster with species of the genus Sedimentibacter. The closest relative was Sedimentibacter hydroxybenzoicus (with a gene sequence similarity of 91 %). On the basis of its phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, strain C/G2(T) (=JCM 13356(T)=NBRC 101112(T)=DSM 17477(T)) is proposed as representing a new genus and novel species, Dethiosulfatibacter

  6. Transcriptome and membrane fatty acid analyses reveal different strategies for responding to permeating and non-permeating solutes in the bacterium Sphingomonas wittichii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson David R

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sphingomonas wittichii strain RW1 can completely oxidize dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, which are persistent contaminants of soils and sediments. For successful application in soil bioremediation systems, strain RW1 must cope with fluctuations in water availability, or water potential. Thus far, however, little is known about the adaptive strategies used by Sphingomonas bacteria to respond to changes in water potential. To improve our understanding, strain RW1 was perturbed with either the cell-permeating solute sodium chloride or the non-permeating solute polyethylene glycol with a molecular weight of 8000 (PEG8000. These solutes are assumed to simulate the solute and matric components of the total water potential, respectively. The responses to these perturbations were then assessed and compared using a combination of growth assays, transcriptome profiling, and membrane fatty acid analyses. Results Under conditions producing a similar decrease in water potential but without effect on growth rate, there was only a limited shared response to perturbation with sodium chloride or PEG8000. This shared response included the increased expression of genes involved with trehalose and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the reduced expression of genes involved with flagella biosynthesis. Mostly, the responses to perturbation with sodium chloride or PEG8000 were very different. Only sodium chloride triggered the increased expression of two ECF-type RNA polymerase sigma factors and the differential expression of many genes involved with outer membrane and amino acid metabolism. In contrast, only PEG8000 triggered the increased expression of a heat shock-type RNA polymerase sigma factor along with many genes involved with protein turnover and repair. Membrane fatty acid analyses further corroborated these differences. The degree of saturation of membrane fatty acids increased after perturbation with sodium chloride but had the

  7. Expanding the molecular toolbox for Lactococcus lactis: construction of an inducible thioredoxin gene fusion expression system

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Douillard, Francois P

    2011-08-09

    Abstract Background The development of the Nisin Inducible Controlled Expression (NICE) system in the food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris represents a cornerstone in the use of Gram-positive bacterial expression systems for biotechnological purposes. However, proteins that are subjected to such over-expression in L. lactis may suffer from improper folding, inclusion body formation and\\/or protein degradation, thereby significantly reducing the yield of soluble target protein. Although such drawbacks are not specific to L. lactis, no molecular tools have been developed to prevent or circumvent these recurrent problems of protein expression in L. lactis. Results Mimicking thioredoxin gene fusion systems available for E. coli, two nisin-inducible expression vectors were constructed to over-produce various proteins in L. lactis as thioredoxin fusion proteins. In this study, we demonstrate that our novel L. lactis fusion partner expression vectors allow high-level expression of soluble heterologous proteins Tuc2009 ORF40, Bbr_0140 and Tuc2009 BppU\\/BppL that were previously insoluble or not expressed using existing L. lactis expression vectors. Over-expressed proteins were subsequently purified by Ni-TED affinity chromatography. Intact heterologous proteins were detected by immunoblotting analyses. We also show that the thioredoxin moiety of the purified fusion protein was specifically and efficiently cleaved off by enterokinase treatment. Conclusions This study is the first description of a thioredoxin gene fusion expression system, purposely developed to circumvent problems associated with protein over-expression in L. lactis. It was shown to prevent protein insolubility and degradation, allowing sufficient production of soluble proteins for further structural and functional characterization.

  8. Pilus biogenesis in Lactococcus lactis: molecular characterization and role in aggregation and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Oxaran

    Full Text Available The genome of Lactococcus lactis strain IL1403 harbors a putative pilus biogenesis cluster consisting of a sortase C gene flanked by 3 LPxTG protein encoding genes (yhgD, yhgE, and yhhB, called here pil. However, pili were not detected under standard growth conditions. Over-expression of the pil operon resulted in production and display of pili on the surface of lactococci. Functional analysis of the pilus biogenesis machinery indicated that the pilus shaft is formed by oligomers of the YhgE pilin, that the pilus cap is formed by the YhgD pilin and that YhhB is the basal pilin allowing the tethering of the pilus fibers to the cell wall. Oligomerization of pilin subunits was catalyzed by sortase C while anchoring of pili to the cell wall was mediated by sortase A. Piliated L. lactis cells exhibited an auto-aggregation phenotype in liquid cultures, which was attributed to the polymerization of major pilin, YhgE. The piliated lactococci formed thicker, more aerial biofilms compared to those produced by non-piliated bacteria. This phenotype was attributed to oligomers of YhgE. This study provides the first dissection of the pilus biogenesis machinery in a non-pathogenic Gram-positive bacterium. Analysis of natural lactococci isolates from clinical and vegetal environments showed pili production under standard growth conditions. The identification of functional pili in lactococci suggests that the changes they promote in aggregation and biofilm formation may be important for the natural lifestyle as well as for applications in which these bacteria are used.

  9. A Novel Uncultured Bacterium of the Family Gallionellaceae: Description and Genome Reconstruction Based on the Metagenomic Analysis of Microbial Community in Acid Mine Drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadnikov, V V; Ivasenko, D A; Beletsky, A V; Mardanov, A V; Danilova, E V; Pimenov, N V; Karnachuk, O V; Ravin, N V

    2016-07-01

    Drainage waters at the metal mining areas often have low pH and high content of dissolved metals due to oxidation of sulfide minerals. Extreme conditions limit microbial diversity in- such ecosystems. A drainage water microbial community (6.5'C, pH 2.65) in an open pit at the Sherlovaya Gora polymetallic open-cast mine (Transbaikal region, Eastern Siberia, Russia) was studied using metagenomic techniques. Metagenome sequencing provided information for taxonomic and functional characterization of the micro- bial community. The majority of microorganisms belonged to a single uncultured lineage representing a new Betaproteobacteria species of the genus Gallionella. While no.acidophiles are known among the cultured members of the family Gallionellaceae, similar 16S rRNA gene sequences were detected in acid mine drain- ages. Bacteria ofthe genera Thiobacillus, Acidobacterium, Acidisphaera, and Acidithiobacillus,-which are com- mon in acid mine drainage environments, were the minor components of the community. Metagenomic data were -used to determine the almost complete (-3.4 Mb) composite genome of the new bacterial. lineage desig- nated Candidatus Gallionella acididurans ShG14-8. Genome analysis revealed that Fe(II) oxidation probably involved the cytochromes localized on the outer membrane of the cell. The electron transport chain included NADH dehydrogenase, a cytochrome bc1 complex, an alternative complex III, and cytochrome oxidases of the bd, cbb3, and bo3 types. Oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds probably involved the Sox system, sul- fide-quinone oxidoreductase, adenyl sulfate reductase, and sulfate adenyltransferase. The genes required for autotrophic carbon assimilation via the Calvin cycle were present, while no pathway for nitrogen fixation was revealed. High numbers of RND metal transporters and P type ATPases were probably responsible for resis- tance to heavy metals. The new microorganism was an aerobic chemolithoautotroph of the group of

  10. Production of secreted guar α-galactosidase by Lactococcus lactis

    OpenAIRE

    Leenhouts, K J; Bolhuis, A; Ledeboer, A.; Venema, G; Kok, J

    1995-01-01

    A plant α-galactosidase gene was inserted in the expression vector pGKV259. The resulting plasmid pGAL2 consisted of the replication functions of the broad-host-range lactococcal plasmid pWV01, the lactococcal promoter P59, and the DNA sequences encoding the α-amylase signal sequence from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and the mature part of the α-galactosidase from Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (guar). Lactococcus cells of strain MG1363 harbouring this vector produced the plant α-galactosidase and sec...

  11. Ribosomal dimerization factor YfiA is the major protein synthesized after abrupt glucose depletion in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breuner, Anne; Frees, Dorte; Varmanen, Pekka;

    2016-01-01

    We analysed the response of the model bacterium Lactococcus lactis to abrupt depletion of glucose after several generations of exponential growth. Glucose depletion resulted in a drastic drop in the energy charge accompanied by an extremely low GTP level and an almost total arrest of protein synt...... that YfiA-mediated ribosomal dimerization is important for keeping long-term starved cells viable and competent for growth initiation....... levels of the yfiA transcript. Severe up-regulation of genes in the FruR, CcpA, ArgR and AhrC regulons were consistent with a downshift in carbon and energy source. Based upon the results, we suggest that transcription proceeded long enough to record the transcriptome changes from activation of the Fru...

  12. Effect of dissolved oxygen on redox potential and milk acidification by lactic acid bacteria isolated from a DL-starter culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nadja; Werner, Birgit Brøsted; Vogensen, Finn Kvist

    2015-01-01

    was to investigate the effect of dissolved oxygen on acidification kinetics and redox potential during milk fermentation by lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Fermentations were conducted by single strains isolated from mixed DL-starter culture, including Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis, Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris...

  13. Modeling the acid-base properties of bacterial surfaces: A combined spectroscopic and potentiometric study of the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Laura; Ferri, Diego; Manfredi, Carla; Persson, Per; Shchukarev, Andrei; Sjöberg, Staffan; Loring, John

    2007-09-15

    In this study, macroscopic and spectroscopic data were combined to develop a surface complexation model that describes the acid-base properties of Bacillus subtilis. The bacteria were freeze-dried and then resuspended in 0.1 M NaCl ionic medium. Macroscopic measurements included potentiometric acid-base titrations and electrophoretic mobility measurements. In addition, ATR-FTIR spectra of wet pastes from suspensions of Bacillus subtilis at different pH values were collected. The least-squares program MAGPIE was used to generate a surface complexation model that takes into account the presence of three acid-base sites on the surface: tripple bond COOH, tripple bond NH+, and tripple bond PO-, which were identified previously by XPS measurements. Both potentiometric titration data and ATR-FTIR spectra were used quantitatively, and electrostatic effects at the charged bacterial surface were accounted for using the constant capacitance model. The model was calculated using two different approaches: in the first one XPS data were used to constrain the ratio of the total concentrations of all three surface sites. The capacitance of the double layer, the total buffer capacity, and the deprotonation constants of the tripple bond NH+, tripple bond POH, and tripple bond COOH species were determined in the fit. A second approach is presented in which the ratio determined by XPS of the total concentrations of tripple bond NH+ to tripple bond PO- sites is relaxed. The total concentration of tripple bond PO- sites was determined in the fit, while the deprotonation constant for tripple bond POH was manually varied until the minimization led to a model which predicted an isoelectric point that resulted in consistency with electrophoretic mobility data. The model explains well the buffering capacity of Bacillus subtilis suspensions in a wide pH range (between pH=3 and pH=9) which is of considerable environmental interest. In particular, a similar quantitative use of the IR data

  14. Extracellular secretion of a maltogenic amylase from Lactobacillus gasseri ATCC33323 in Lactococcus lactis MG1363 and its application on the production of branched maltooligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Mee-Hyun; Park, Sang-Eun; Lee, Myung-Hun; Ha, Suk-Jin; Kim, Hae-Yeong; Kim, Myo-Jeong; Lee, Sung-Joon; Madsen, Søren M; Park, Cheon-Seok

    2007-09-01

    A maltogenic amylase gene from Lactobacillus gasseri ATCC33323 (LGMA) was expressed in Lactococcus lactis MG1363 using the P170 expression system. The successful production of recombinant LGMA (rLGMA) was confirmed by the catalytic activity of the enzyme in liquid and solid media. The N-terminal amino acid sequencing analysis of the rLGMA showed that it was Met-Gln-Leu-Ala-Ala-Leu-, which was the same as that of genuine protein, meaning the signal peptide was efficiently cleaved during secretion to the extracellular milieu. The optimal reaction temperature and pH of rLGMA (55 degrees C and pH 5, respectively) and enzymatic hydrolysis patterns on various substrates (beta-cyclodextrin, starch, and pullulan) supported that rLGMA was not only efficiently secreted from the Lactococcus lactis MG1363 but was also functionally active. Finally, the branched maltooligosaccharides were effectively produced from liquefied corn starch, by using rLGMA secreted from Lactococcus lactis, with a yield of 53.1%.

  15. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity in Lactococcus chungangensis: application in cream cheese to moderate alcohol uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkit, Maytiya; Choi, Woo Jin; Kim, Wonyong

    2015-09-01

    Many human gastrointestinal facultative anaerobic and aerobic bacteria possess alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity and are therefore capable of oxidizing ethanol to acetaldehyde. However, the ADH activity of Lactococcus spp., except Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis, has not been widely determined, though they play an important role as the starter for most cheesemaking technologies. Cheese is a functional food recognized as an aid to digestion. In the current study, the ADH activity of Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T) and 11 reference strains from the genus Lactococcus was determined. Only 5 strains, 3 of dairy origin, L. lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T), L. lactis ssp. cremoris KCCM 40699(T), and Lactococcus raffinolactis DSM 20443(T), and 2 of nondairy origin, Lactococcus fujiensis NJ317(T) and Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T) KCTC 13185(T), showed ADH activity and possessed the ADH gene. All these strains were capable of making cheese, but the highest level of ADH activity was found in L. chungangensis, with 45.9nmol/min per gram in tryptic soy broth and 65.8nmol/min per gram in cream cheese. The extent that consumption of cheese, following imbibing alcohol, reduced alcohol uptake was observed by following the level of alcohol in the serum of mice. The results show a potential novel benefit of cheese as a dairy functional food. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Acid-base titrations of functional groups on the surface of the thermophilic bacterium Anoxybacillus flavithermus: comparing a chemical equilibrium model with ATR-IR spectroscopic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Hannah T M; Bremer, Phil J; Daughney, Christopher J; McQuillan, A James

    2007-02-27

    Acid-base functional groups at the surface of Anoxybacillus flavithermus (AF) were assigned from the modeling of batch titration data of bacterial suspensions and compared with those determined from in situ infrared spectroscopic titration analysis. The computer program FITMOD was used to generate a two-site Donnan model (site 1: pKa = 3.26, wet concn = 2.46 x 10(-4) mol g(-1); site 2: pKa = 6.12, wet concn = 6.55 x 10(-5) mol g(-1)), which was able to describe data for whole exponential phase cells from both batch acid-base titrations at 0.01 M ionic strength and electrophoretic mobility measurements over a range of different pH values and ionic strengths. In agreement with information on the composition of bacterial cell walls and a considerable body of modeling literature, site 1 of the model was assigned to carboxyl groups, and site 2 was assigned to amino groups. pH difference IR spectra acquired by in situ attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy confirmed the presence of carboxyl groups. The spectra appear to show a carboxyl pKa in the 3.3-4.0 range. Further peaks were assigned to phosphodiester groups, which deprotonated at slightly lower pH. The presence of amino groups could not be confirmed or discounted by IR spectroscopy, but a positively charged group corresponding to site 2 was implicated by electrophoretic mobility data. Carboxyl group speciation over a pH range of 2.3-10.3 at two different ionic strengths was further compared to modeling predictions. While model predictions were strongly influenced by the ionic strength change, pH difference IR data showed no significant change. This meant that modeling predictions agreed reasonably well with the IR data for 0.5 M ionic strength but not for 0.01 M ionic strength.

  17. Identification and characterization of the alpha-acetolactate synthase gene from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marugg, J D; Goelling, D; Stahl, U; Ledeboer, A M; Toonen, M Y; Verhue, W M; Verrips, C T

    1994-01-01

    The conversion of 3-13C-labelled pyruvate in an acetoin-producing clone from a Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis strain DSM 20384 plasmid bank in Escherichia coli was studied by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. The results showed that alpha-acetolactate was the first metabolic product formed from pyruvate, whereas acetoin appeared at a much slower rate and reached only low concentrations. This alpha-acetolactate production shows that the cells express the gene for alpha-acetolactate synthase (als). Nucleotide sequence analysis identified an open reading frame encoding a protein of 554 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibits extensive similarities to those of known alpha-acetolactate synthases from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The als gene is expressed on a monocistronic transcriptional unit, which is transcribed from a promoter located just upstream of the coding region. Images PMID:8017926

  18. Lactate dehydrogenase has no control on lactate production but has a strong negative control on formate production in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.W.; Pedersen, M.B.; Hammer, Karin

    2001-01-01

    A series of mutant strains of Lactococcus lactis were constructed with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities ranging from below 1% to 133% of the wild-type activity level. The mutants with 59% to 133% of lactate dehydrogenase activity had growth rates similar to the wild-type and showed...... a homolactic pattern of fermentation. Only after lactate dehydrogenase activity was reduced ninefold compared to the wild-type was the growth rate significantly affected, and the ldh mutants started to produce mixed-acid products (formate, acetate, and ethanol in addition to lactate). Flux control coefficients...... were determined and it was found that lactate dehydrogenase exerted virtually no control on the glycolytic flux at the wild-type enzyme level and also not on the flux catalyzed by the enzyme itself, i.e. on the lactate production. As expected, the flux towards the mixed-acid products was strongly...

  19. Pre-cold stress increases acid stress resistance and induces amino ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and the viability of Lactococcus lactis during acid fermentation. Methods: Bacterial strains ... bacterial growth and viability, cell recovery after exposure to various types ... statically at 30°C without aeration in M17 broth. (Oxoid, Basingstoke, UK) ...

  20. Potential aquaculture probiont Lactococcus lactis TW34 produces nisin Z and inhibits the fish pathogen Lactococcus garvieae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeiros, Cynthia; Garcés, Marisa E; Vallejo, Marisol; Marguet, Emilio R; Olivera, Nelda L

    2015-04-01

    Bacteriocin-producing Lactococcus lactis TW34 was isolated from marine fish. TW34 bacteriocin inhibited the growth of the fish pathogen Lactococcus garvieae at 5 AU/ml (minimum inhibitory concentration), whereas the minimum bactericidal concentration was 10 AU/ml. Addition of TW34 bacteriocin to L. garvieae cultures resulted in a decrease of six orders of magnitude of viable cells counts demonstrating a bactericidal mode of action. The direct detection of the bacteriocin activity by Tricine-SDS-PAGE showed an active peptide with a molecular mass ca. 4.5 kDa. The analysis by MALDI-TOF-MS detected a strong signal at m/z 2,351.2 that corresponded to the nisin leader peptide mass without the initiating methionine, whose sequence STKDFNLDLVSVSKKDSGASPR was confirmed by MS/MS. Sequence analysis of nisin structural gene confirmed that L. lactis TW34 was a nisin Z producer. This nisin Z-producing strain with probiotic properties might be considered as an alternative in the prevention of lactococcosis, a global disease in aquaculture systems.

  1. Dual role of alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goupil-Feuillerat, N; Cocaign-Bousquet, M; Godon, J J; Ehrlich, S D; Renault, P

    1997-10-01

    The alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase gene aldB is clustered with the genes for the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. It can be transcribed with BCAA genes under isoleucine regulation or independently of BCAA synthesis under the control of its own promoter. The product of aldB is responsible for leucine sensibility under valine starvation. In the presence of more than 10 microM leucine, the alpha-acetolactate produced by the biosynthetic acetohydroxy acid synthase IlvBN is transformed to acetoin by AldB and, consequently, is not available for valine synthesis. AldB is also involved in acetoin formation in the 2,3-butanediol pathway, initiated by the catabolic acetolactate synthase, AlsS. The differences in the genetic organization, the expression, and the kinetics parameters of these enzymes between L. lactis and Klebsiella terrigena, Bacillus subtilis, or Leuconostoc oenos suggest that this pathway plays a different role in the metabolism in these bacteria. Thus, the alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase from L. lactis plays a dual role in the cell: (i) as key regulator of valine and leucine biosynthesis, by controlling the acetolactate flux by a shift to catabolism; and (ii) as an enzyme catalyzing the second step of the 2,3-butanediol pathway.

  2. Heterologous expression of the Bacillus subtilis (natto) alanine dehydrogenase in Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wei; Huo, Guicheng; Chen, Junliang; Liu, Fei; Yin, Jingyuan; Yang, Lijie; Ma, Xiaolong

    2010-05-30

    The major objective of the present study is to change the alanine production of Lactic acid bacteria by expression of Bacillus subtilis (natto) alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH), the gene that is not present in Lactic acid. B. subtilis AlaDH gene (ald) was cloned into a pGEX6p-1 and expressed in E. coli JM109. Its enzyme activity was 48.3U/mg at 30 degrees C and 45.2U/mg at 42 degrees C. This ald gene was then cloned into a vector pNZ8148 to generate a vector pNZ8148/ald. The same ald gene was placed downstream of the ldh promoter from Streptococcus thermophilus to generate pNZ273/ldhp/ald. The pNZ8148/ald and pNZ273/ldhp/ald were introduced separately in Lactococcus lactis NZ9000. As a result of over-expressed ald, the production of alanine detected by HPLC in L. lactis NZ9000 carrying pNZ273/ldhp/ald reached 52mug/ml, an approximately 26-fold increase compared to the parent strain L. lactis NZ9000, but not in L. lactis NZ9000 carrying pNZ8148/ald. This study would help strain improvement to be used in dairy fermentation for developing healthy yogurts with sweet taste or other fermented dairy foods. Copyright 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Mode of action of lactococcin R produced by Lactococcus lactis R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Zeliha; Yildirim, Metin; Johnson, Michael G

    2004-04-01

    We investigated the mode of action and factors affecting adsorption of lactoccocin R produced by Lactococcus lactis R. It was found that lactococcin R adsorbed to all Gram-positive but not to the Gram-negative bacteria tested and its adsorption was dependent on pH. It was observed that the binding of lactococcin R was prevented by anions of several salts (Cl-, PO4(-3)) and lipoteichoic acid. Pretreatments of sensitive cells and cell walls with detergents, organic solvents or enzymes did not reduce subsequent binding of lactococcin R. However, treatment of cell wall preparations with methanol:chloroform and hot 20% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) caused such walls to lose their ability to adsorb lactococcin R. Sensitive cells treated with lactococcin R lost high amounts of intracellular K+ ions, UV-absorbing materials and became more permeable to o-nitrophenol-beta-D-glactopyranoside (ONPG). In addition, different lactococcin R concentrations (0-2560 AU/mL) decreased the colony counts of Listeria monocytogenes by 99% and also a reduction in the absorbance values. These results show that the mode of action of lactococcin R is bactericidal rather than bacteriostatic.

  4. Arginine metabolism in sugar deprived Lactococcus lactis enhances survival and cellular activity, while supporting flavour production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandsma, J B; van de Kraats, I; Abee, T; Zwietering, M H; Meijer, W C

    2012-02-01

    Flavour development in cheese is affected by the integrity of Lactococcus lactis cells. Disintegrated cells enhance for instance the enzymatic degradation of casein to free amino acids, while integer cells are needed to produce specific flavour compounds from amino acids. The impact of the cellular activity of these integer cells on flavour production remains to be elucidated. In this study we investigated whether lactose-deprived L. lactis cells that use arginine as an alternative energy source can extend cellular activity and produce more specific flavours. In cheese experiments we demonstrated that arginine metabolising cells survived about 3 times longer than non-arginine metabolising cells, which suggests prolonged cellular activity. Cellular activity and flavour production of L. lactis was further studied in vitro to enable controlled arginine supplementation. Comparable with the results found in cheese, the survival rates of in vitro incubated cells improved when arginine was metabolised. Furthermore, elongated cellular activity was reflected in 3-4-fold increased activity of flavour generating enzymes. The observed prolonged cellular activity resulted in about 2-fold higher concentrations of typical Gouda cheese flavours. These findings provide new leads for composing starter cultures that will produce specific flavour compounds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hydrogen production by co-cultures of Lactobacillus and a photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asada, Yasuo; Ishimi, Katsuhiro [Department of General Education, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, Narashinodai, Chiba 274-8501 (Japan); Tokumoto, Masaru; Aihara, Yasuyuki; Oku, Masayo; Kohno, Hideki [Department of Applied Molecular Chemistry, College of Industrial Technology, Nihon University, Izumi-cho, Chiba 275-8575 (Japan); Wakayama, Tatsuki; Miyake, Jun [Research Institute for Cell Engineering, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Nakoji, Amagasaki, Hyogo 661-0974 (Japan); Tomiyama, Masamitsu [Genetic Diversity Department, National Institute of Agrobiological Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan)

    2006-09-15

    Hydrogen production with glucose by using co-immobilized cultures of a lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus delbrueckii NBRC13953, and a photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV, in agar gels was studied. Glucose was converted to hydrogen gas in a yield of 7.1mol of hydrogen per mole of glucose at a maximum under illuminated conditions. (author)

  6. Aii20J, a wide-spectrum thermostable N-acylhomoserine lactonase from the marine bacterium Tenacibaculum sp. 20J, can quench AHL-mediated acid resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, C; Romero, M; Muras, A; Otero, A

    2015-11-01

    Acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) are produced by many Gram-negative bacteria to coordinate gene expression in cellular density dependent mechanisms known as quorum sensing (QS). Since the disruption of the communication systems significantly reduces virulence, the inhibition of quorumsensing processes or quorum quenching (QQ) represents an interesting anti-pathogenic strategy to control bacterial infections. Escherichia coli does not produce AHLs but possesses an orphan AHL receptor, SdiA, which is thought to be able to sense the QS signals produced by other bacteria and controls important traits as the expression of glutamate-dependent acid resistance mechanism, therefore constituting a putative target for QQ. A novel AHL-lactonase, named Aii20J, has been identified, cloned and over expressed from the marine bacterium Tenacibaculum sp. strain 20 J presenting a wide-spectrum QQ activity. The enzyme, belonging to the metallo-β-lactamase family, shares less than 31 % identity with the lactonase AiiA from Bacillus spp. Aii20J presents a much higher specific activity than the Bacillus enzyme, maintains its activity after incubation at 100 ºC for 10 minutes, is resistant to protease K and α-chymotrypsin, and is unaffected by wide ranges of pH. The addition of Aii20J (20 μg/mL) to cultures of E. coli K-12 to which OC6-HSL was added resulted in a significant reduction in cell viability in comparison with the acidresistant cultures derived from the presence of the signal. Results confirm the interaction between AHLs and SdiA in E. coli for the expression of virulence-related genes and reveal the potential use of Aii20J as anti-virulence strategy against important bacterial pathogens and in other biotechnological applications.

  7. Use of rRNA gene restriction patterns to evaluate lactic acid bacterium contamination of vacuum-packaged sliced cooked whole-meat product in a meat processing plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkroth, K J; Korkeala, H J

    1997-02-01

    Molecular typing was applied to an in-plant lactic acid bacterium (LAB) contamination analysis of a vacuum-packaged sliced cooked whole-meat product. A total of 982 LAB isolates from the raw mass, product, and the environment at different production stages were screened by restriction endonuclease (EcoRI and HindIII) analysis. rRNA gene restriction patterns were further determined for different strains obtained from each source. These patterns were used for recognizing the spoilage-causing LAB strains from the product on the sell-by day and tracing the sources and sites of spoilage LAB contamination during the manufacture. LAB typing resulted in 71 different ribotypes, of which 27 were associated with contamination routes. Raw material was distinguished as the source of the major spoilage strains. Contamination of the product surfaces after cooking was shown to be airborne. The removal of the product from the cooking forms was localized as a major site of airborne LAB contamination. Food handlers and some surfaces in contact with the product during the manufacture were also contaminated with the spoilage strains. Some LAB strains were also able to resist cooking in the core of the product bar. These strains may have an effect on the product shelf life by contaminating the slicing machine. The air in the slicing department and adjacent cold room contained very few LAB. Surface-mediated contamination was detected during the slicing and packaging stages. Food handlers also carried strains later found in the packaged product. Molecular typing provided useful information revealing the LAB contamination sources and sites of this product. The production line will be reorganized in accordance with these results to reduce spoilage LAB contamination.

  8. Comparison of antigenic proteins from Lactococcus garvieae KG- and KG+ strains that are recognized by olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Gee-Wook; Nho, Seong-Won; Park, Seong-Bin; Jang, Ho-Bin; Cha, In-Seok; Ha, Mi-Ae; Kim, Young-Rim; Dalvi, Rishikesh S; Joh, Seong-Joon; Jung, Tae-Sung

    2009-10-20

    Lactococcus garvieae is an important etiological agent of lactococcosis in various fish species including olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus). In this study, proteomic and immunoproteomic analyses were employed to compare the antigenic profiles of strains KG9408, MS93003, and NSS9310 strains of L. garvieae. Proteomic analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) revealed differences in five protein spots among the different L. garvieae strains. In immunoproteomic analysis, there was a significant difference in the 2-DE immunoblot profiles of the L. garvieae strains using sera collected from fish surviving infection with either L. garvieae strains KG9408 or NSS9310. These sera reacted with 8 and 7 unique antigenic protein spots, respectively. Heat shock protein (HSP) 70 and DNA-directed RNA polymerase were among the specific antigens recognized by the anti-NSS9310 serum. In addition, the anti-NSS9310 and anti-KG9408 olive flounder sera reacted with 25 common antigenic protein spots of all the L. garvieae strains, which included elongation factor (EF)-Tu, arginine deiminase (AD), inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPD), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), phosphomannomutase (PMM), L-lactate dehydrogenase (L-LDH), 6-phosphofructokinase and UDP-galactose 4-epimerase (UDP-galactose). Based on the present results, the 8 antigens recognized by the anti-KG9408 serum and the 25 common antigens recognized by both sera may serve as potential markers for developing an effective vaccine against this bacterium.

  9. Engineering of carbon distribution between glycolysis and sugar nucleobiosynthesis in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boels, I.C.; Kleerebezem, M.; Vos, de W.M.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the effects of modulating the activities of glucokinase, phosphofructokinase, and phosphoglucomutase on the branching point between sugar degradation and the biosynthesis of sugar nucleotides involved in the production of exopolysaccharide biosynthesis by Lactococcus lactis. This was

  10. Localization and accessibility of antigenic sites of the extracellular serine proteinase of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, Harm; Kok, Jan; Haandrikman, Alfred J.; Venema, Gerhardus; Konings, Wilhelmus

    1992-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis strains produce an extracellular subtilisin-related serine proteinase in which immunologically different components can be distinguished. Monoclonal antibodies specific for the different proteinase components have been raised and their epitopes were identified. By Western-blot ana

  11. Physicochemical and functional characterization of a biosurfactant produced by Lactococcus lactis 53

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, LR; Teixeira, JA; van der Mei, HC; Oliveira, R

    2006-01-01

    Isolation and identification of key components of the crude biosurfactant produced by Lactococcus lactis 53 was studied. Fractionation was achieved by hydrophobic interaction chromatography which allowed the isolation of a fraction rich in glycoproteins. Molecular (by Fourier transform infrared

  12. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: PROBIOTIC APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    NEENA GARG

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is a heterotrophic Gram-positive bacteria which under goes lactic acid fermentations and leads to production of lactic acid as an end product. LAB includes Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Lactococcus and Streptococcus which are grouped together in the family lactobacillaceae. LAB shows numerous antimicrobial activities due to production of antibacterial and antifungal compounds such as organic acids, bacteriocins, diacetyl, hydrogen peroxide and reutrin. LA...

  13. The physiology of the filamentous bacterium Microthrix parvicella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slijkhuis, H.

    1983-01-01

    A study has been made of the physiology of Microthrix parvicella. This filamentous bacterium often causes poor settleability of activated sludge in oxidation ditches supplied with domestic sewage. The organism was found to utilize only long chain fatty acids (preferably in esterified form) as carbon

  14. The physiology of the filamentous bacterium Microthrix parvicella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slijkhuis, H.

    1983-01-01

    A study has been made of the physiology of Microthrix parvicella. This filamentous bacterium often causes poor settleability of activated sludge in oxidation ditches supplied with domestic sewage. The organism was found to utilize only long chain fatty acids (preferably in

  15. Infective endocarditis with Lactococcus garvieae in Japan: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isonuma Hiroshi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Lactococcus garvieae is a well-recognized fish pathogen, and it is considered a rare pathogen with low virulence in human infection. We describe the 11th case of L. garvieae infective endocarditis reported in the literature, and the first reported case in Japan. Case presentation We report a case of a 55-year-old Japanese woman who had native valve endocarditis with L. garvieae. The case was complicated by renal infarction, cerebral infarction, and mycotic aneurysms. After anti-microbial treatment, she was discharged from the hospital and is now well while being monitored in the out-patient clinic. Conclusion We encountered a case of L. garvieae endocarditis that occurred in a native valve of a healthy woman. The 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing was useful for the identification of this pathogen. Although infective endocarditis with L. garvieae is uncommon, it is possible to treat high virulence clinically.

  16. Biodegradation of heavy oils by halophilic bacterium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruixia Hao; Anhuai Lu

    2009-01-01

    A halophilic bacterial strain TM-1 was isolated from the reservoir of the Shengli oil field in East China. Strain TM-1, which was found to be able to degrade crude oils, is a gram-positive non-motile bacterium with a coccus shape that can grow at temperatures of up to 58 ℃ and in 18% NaCl solution. Depending on the culture conditions, the organism may occur in tetrads. In addition, strain TM-1 pro-duced acid from glucose without gas formation and was catalase-negative. Furthermore, strain TM-I was found to be a facultative aer-obe capable of growth under anaerobic conditions. Moreover, it produced butylated hydroxytoluene, 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid-bis ester and dibutyl phthalate and could use different organic substrates. Laboratory studies indicated that strain TM-1 affected different heavy oils by degrading various components and by changing the chemical properties of the oils. In addition, growth of the bacterium in heavy oils resulted in the loss of aromatic hydrocarbons, resins and asphaltenes, and enrichment with light hydrocarbons and an overall redistribution of these hydrocarbons.

  17. Lactococcus lactis productor de bacteriocina utilizable como cultivo iniciador para acelerar la maduración de queso

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Cuesta, M. Carmen; Requena, Teresa; Peláez, Carmen

    2003-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis productor de bacteriocina utilizable como cultivo iniciador para acelerar la maduración de queso. La presente invención describe un procedimiento de producción de transconjugantes de Lactococcus lactis (se describe en detalle el Lactococcus lactis CECT5367) productores de bacteriocina y por tanto inmune a ella. Este microorganismo y otros similares pueden utilizarse como cultivos iniciadores para la elaboración de queso semiduro produciendo quesos de buena calidad organolép...

  18. Insights into new bacteriophages of Lactococcus garvieae belonging to the family Podoviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Seyed Mahdi; Bouzari, Majid; Shaykh Baygloo, Nima; Chang, Hyo-Ihl

    2014-11-01

    Lactococcus garvieae is an emerging pathogen responsible for lactococcosis, a serious disease in trout aquaculture. The identification of new bacteriophages against L. garvieae strains may be an effective way to fight this disease and to study the pathogen's biology. Three L. garvieae phages, termed WP-1, WWP-2 and SP-2, were isolated from different environments, and their morphological features, genome restriction profiles and structural protein patterns were studied. Random cloning of HindIII-cut fragments was performed, and the fragments were partially sequenced for each phage. Although slight differences were observed by transmission electron microscopy, all of the phages had hexagonal heads and short non-contractile tails and were classified as members of the family Podoviridae. Restriction digestion analysis of the nucleic acids of the different phages revealed that the HindIII and AseI digests produced similar DNA fragment patterns. Additionally, SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the isolated phages have similar structural proteins. The sequence BLAST results did not show any significant similarity with other previously identified phages. To the best of our knowledge, this study provides the first molecular characterization of L. garvieae phages.

  19. Antigenicity and Immunogenicity of Rotavirus VP6 Protein Expressed on the Surface of Lactococcus lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Group A rotaviruses are the major etiologic agents of acute gastroenteritis worldwide in children and young animals. Among its structural proteins, VP6 is the most immunogenic and is highly conserved within this group. Lactococcus lactis is a food-grade, Gram-positive, and nonpathogenic lactic acid bacteria that has already been explored as a mucosal delivery system of heterologous antigens. In this work, the nisin-controlled expression system was used to display the VP6 protein at the cell surface of L. lactis. Conditions for optimal gene expression were established by testing different nisin concentrations, cell density at induction, and incubation times after induction. Cytoplasmic and cell wall protein extracts were analyzed by Western blot and surface expression was confirmed by flow cytometry. Both analysis provided evidence that VP6 was efficiently expressed and displayed on the cell surface of L. lactis. Furthermore, the humoral response of mice immunized with recombinant L. lactis was evaluated and the displayed recombinant VP6 protein proved to be immunogenic. In conclusion, this is the first report of displaying VP6 protein on the surface of L. lactis to induce a specific immune response against rotavirus. These results provide the basis for further evaluation of this VP6-displaying L. lactis as a mucosal delivery vector in a mouse model of rotavirus infection.

  20. Lactose-mediated carbon catabolite repression of putrescine production in dairy Lactococcus lactis is strain dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rio, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Linares, Daniel M; Fernández, Maria; Martín, Maria Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-06-01

    Lactococcus lactis is the lactic acid bacterial (LAB) species most widely used as a primary starter in the dairy industry. However, several strains of L. lactis produce the biogenic amine putrescine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. We previously reported the putrescine biosynthesis pathway in L. lactis subsp. cremoris GE2-14 to be regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) via glucose but not lactose (Linares et al., 2013). The present study shows that both these sugars repress putrescine biosynthesis in L. lactis subsp. lactis T3/33, a strain isolated from a Spanish artisanal cheese. Furthermore, we demonstrated that both glucose and lactose repressed the transcriptional activity of the aguBDAC catabolic genes of the AGDI route. Finally, a screening performed in putrescine-producing dairy L. lactis strains determined that putrescine biosynthesis was repressed by lactose in all the L. lactis subsp. lactis strains tested, but in only one L. lactis subsp. cremoris strain. Given the obvious importance of the lactose-repression in cheese putrescine accumulation, it is advisable to consider the diversity of L. lactis in this sense and characterize consequently the starter cultures to select the safest strains.

  1. Heterologous protein secretion in Lactococcus lactis: a novel antigen delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langella P.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are Gram-positive bacteria and are generally regarded as safe (GRAS organisms. Therefore, LAB could be used for heterologous protein secretion and they are good potential candidates as antigen delivery vehicles. To develop such live vaccines, a better control of protein secretion is required. We developed an efficient secretion system in the model LAB, Lactococcus lactis. Staphylococcal nuclease (Nuc was used as the reporter protein. We first observed that the quantity of secreted Nuc correlated with the copy number of the cloning vector. The nuc gene was cloned on a high-copy number cloning vector and no perturbation of the metabolism of the secreting strain was observed. Replacement of nuc native promoter by a strong lactococcal one led to a significant increase of nuc expression. Secretion efficiency (SE of Nuc in L. lactis was low, i.e., only 60% of the synthesized Nuc was secreted. Insertion of a synthetic propeptide between the signal peptide and the mature moiety of Nuc increased the SE of Nuc. On the basis of these results, we developed a secretion system and we applied it to the construction of an L. lactis strain which secretes a bovine coronavirus (BCV epitope-protein fusion (BCV-Nuc. BCV-Nuc was recognized by both anti-BCV and anti-Nuc antibodies. Secretion of this antigenic fusion is the first step towards the development of a novel antigen delivery system based on LAB-secreting strains.

  2. Cloning and DNA sequence analysis of a Lactococcus bacteriophage lysin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearman, C; Underwood, H; Jury, K; Gasson, M

    1989-08-01

    A gene for the lysin of Lactococcus lactis bacteriphage phi vML3 was cloned using an Escherichia coli/bacteriophage lambda host-vector system. The gene was detected by its expression of antimicrobial activity against L. lactis cells in a bioassay. The cloned fragment was analysed by sub-cloning on to E. coli plasmid vectors and by restriction endonuclease and deletion mapping. Its entire DNA sequence was determined and an open reading frame for the lysin structural gene was identified. The sequenced lysin gene would express a protein of 187 amino acids with a molecular weight of 21,090, which is in good agreement with that of a protein detected after in vitro transcription and translation of DNA encoding the gene. Expression of the lysin gene in E. coli and B. subtilis from an adjacent bacteriophage promoter was readily detected but in L. lactis expression of lysin was found to be lethal. The bacteriophage phi vML3 lysin had sequence homology with protein 15 of B. subtilis bacteriophage PZA. This protein is involved in DNA packaging during bacteriophage maturation rather than in host cell lysis. The cloning and analysis of the phi vML3 lysin gene is of importance in further understanding lactic streptococcal bacteriophages, for the development of positive selection vectors and for biotechnological applications of relevance to the dairy industry.

  3. Lactococcus lactis LMG2081 Produces Two Bacteriocins, a Nonlantibiotic and a Novel Lantibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkovic, Nemanja; Polovic, Natalija; Vukotic, Goran; Jovcic, Branko; Miljkovic, Marija; Radulovic, Zorica; Diep, Dzung B; Kojic, Milan

    2016-04-01

    Bacteriocin producers normally possess dedicated immunity systems to protect themselves from their own bacteriocins.Lactococcus lactis strains LMG2081 and BGBM50 are known as lactococcin G producers. However, BGBM50 was sensitive to LMG2081, which indicated that LMG2081 might produce additional bacteriocins that are not present in BGBM50. Therefore, whole-genome sequencing of the two strains was performed, and a lantibiotic operon (called lctLMG) was identified in LMG2081 but not in BGBM50. The lctLMG operon contains six open reading frames; the first three genes,lmgA ,lmgM, and lmgT, are involved in the biosynthesis and export of bacteriocin, while the other three genes,lmgF,lmgE, and lmgG, are involved in lantibiotic immunity. Mutational analysis confirmed that the lctLMG operon is responsible for the additional antimicrobial activity. Specifically, site-directed mutation within this operon rendered LMG2081 inactive toward BGBM50. Subsequent purification and electrospray ionization-time of flight mass spectrometric analysis confirmed that the lantibiotic bacteriocin called lacticin LMG is exported as a 25-amino-acid peptide. Lacticin LMG is highly similar to the lacticin 481 group. It is interesting that a bacteriocin producer produces two different classes of bacteriocins, whose operons are located in the chromosome and a plasmid.

  4. [Characteristics and identification of bacteriocins produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 194-K].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustiugova, E A; Timofeeva, A V; Stoianova, L G; Netrusov, A I; Katrukha, G S

    2012-01-01

    The Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 194-K strain has been established to be able to produce two bacteriocins, one of which was identified as the known lantibiotic nisin A, and the other 194-D bacteriocin represents a polypeptide with a 2589-Da molecular mass and comprises 20 amino acid residues. Both bacteriocins were produced in varying proportions in all of the studied nutrient media, which support the growth of the producer. Depending on the cultivation medium, the nisin A content was 380- to 1123-fold lower in the 194-K stain culture fluid than that of the 194-D peptide. In comparision to to nisin A Bacteriocin 194-D possessed a wide range of antibacterial activity and suppressed the growth of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. An optimal medium for 194-D bacteriocin synthesis was shown to be a fermentation medium which contained yeast extract, casein hydrolysate, and potassium phosphate. The biosynthesis ofbacteriocin 194-D by the 194-K strain in these media occurred parallel to producer growth, and its maximal accumulation in the culture fluid was observed at 14-20 h of the strain's growth.

  5. Sequencing and transcriptional analysis of the biosynthesis gene cluster of putrescine-producing Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladero, Victor; Rattray, Fergal P; Mayo, Baltasar; Martín, María Cruz; Fernández, María; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2011-09-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a prokaryotic microorganism with great importance as a culture starter and has become the model species among the lactic acid bacteria. The long and safe history of use of L. lactis in dairy fermentations has resulted in the classification of this species as GRAS (General Regarded As Safe) or QPS (Qualified Presumption of Safety). However, our group has identified several strains of L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris that are able to produce putrescine from agmatine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. Putrescine is a biogenic amine that confers undesirable flavor characteristics and may even have toxic effects. The AGDI cluster of L. lactis is composed of a putative regulatory gene, aguR, followed by the genes (aguB, aguD, aguA, and aguC) encoding the catabolic enzymes. These genes are transcribed as an operon that is induced in the presence of agmatine. In some strains, an insertion (IS) element interrupts the transcription of the cluster, which results in a non-putrescine-producing phenotype. Based on this knowledge, a PCR-based test was developed in order to differentiate nonproducing L. lactis strains from those with a functional AGDI cluster. The analysis of the AGDI cluster and their flanking regions revealed that the capacity to produce putrescine via the AGDI pathway could be a specific characteristic that was lost during the adaptation to the milk environment by a process of reductive genome evolution.

  6. Analysis of T-2 Toxin Removal Factors in a Lactococcus Fermentation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lang-Hua; Wang, Ya-Ling; Qiu, Mei; Shi, Qi; Sun, Li-Jun; Liao, Jian-Meng; Xu, De-Feng; Liu, Ying; Fang, Zhi-Jia; Gooneratne, Ravi

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the bacterial strains and factors that most efficiently degrade T-2 toxin in foods or animal feed. To determine the most efficient strain and optimal incubation times for degradation of T-2, the rate of T-2 removal by three lactic acid bacteria strains was quantified by liquid chromatography plus tandem mass spectrometry after incubation in de Man Rogosa Sharpe broth with 50 ng mL(-1) T-2 at 37°C for 96 h. Various components of the most efficient degradation strain fermentation systems were extracted, and the ability to remove T-2 was assayed. Lactococcus lactis CAMT22361 was the most efficient degradation strain for removing T-2. Yeast extract powder interfered with L. lactis CAMT22361 in the degradation process. T-2 toxin was removed by various components of the L. lactis CAMT22361 cells in the following order: nonprotein material of the extracellular fraction > protein in the extracellular fraction > whole cell ≈ cell wall > cell intracellular matrix fluid. T-2 removal rates were 54.08% ± 0.79%, 43.65% ± 0.84%, 43.09% ± 0.87%, 41.98% ± 0.8%, and 23.45% ± 0.66%, respectively. The nonprotein fraction in the extracellular fluid was most likely the key component in L. lactis CAMT22361 and hence would be the most desirable cellular component to be used to remove T-2 from food or feed.

  7. Molecular Characterization of a Recombinant Manganese Superoxide Dismutase from Lactococcus lactis M4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boon Hooi Tan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A superoxide dismutase (SOD gene of Lactococcus lactis M4 was cloned and expressed in a prokaryotic system. Sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 621 bp which codes for 206 amino acid residues. Expression of sodA under T7 promoter exhibited a specific activity of 4967 U/mg when induced with 1 mM of isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside. The recombinant SOD was purified to homogeneity by immobilised metal affinity chromatography and Superose 12 gel filtration chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and western blot analyses of the recombinant SOD detected a molecular mass of approximately 27 kDa. However, the SOD was in dimer form as revealed by gel filtration chromatography. The purified recombinant enzyme had a pI of 4.5 and exhibited maximal activity at 25°C and pH 7.2. It was stable up to 45°C. The insensitivity of this lactococcal SOD to cyanide and hydrogen peroxide established that it was a MnSOD. Although it has 98% homology to SOD of L. lactis IL1403, this is the first elucidated structure of lactococcal SOD revealing active sites containing the catalytic manganese coordinated by four ligands (H-27, H-82, D-168, and H-172.

  8. Expression of mptC of Listeria monocytogenes induces sensitivity to class IIa bacteriocins in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnath, Manilduth; Arous, Safia; Gravesen, Anne; Hastings, John W; Héchard, Yann

    2004-08-01

    Sensitivity to class IIa bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria was recently associated with the mannose phosphotransferase system (PTS) permease, in Listeria monocytogenes. To assess the involvement of this protein complex in class IIa bacteriocin activity, the mptACD operon, encoding, was heterologously expressed in an insensitive species, namely Lactococcus lactis, using the NICE double plasmid system. Upon induction of the cloned operon, the recombinant Lc. lactis became sensitive to leucocin A. Pediocin PA-1 and enterocin A also showed inhibitory activity against Lc. lactis cultures expressing mptACD. Furthermore, the role of the three genes of the mptACD operon was investigated. Derivative plasmids containing various combinations of these three genes were made from the parental mptACD plasmid by divergent PCR. The results showed that expression of mptC alone is sufficient to confer sensitivity to class IIa bacteriocins in Lc. lactis.

  9. Isolation and Characterisation of Bacteriocin and Aggregation-Promoting Factor Production in Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis BGBM50 Strain

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    Nemanja Mirkovic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis BGBM50, a producer of lactococcin G and aggregation-promoting factor, was isolated from selected lactic acid bacteria taken from semi-hard cheese traditionally produced in the village Žanjic, Montenegro. Strain BGBM50 harbours a number of plasmids of diff erent sizes. Plasmid curing experiments showed that genes for bacteriocin production are located on pBM140, a plasmid 140 kb in length. PCR analysis with primers specifi c for lactococcin Q and G genes gave fragment of the expected size. In addition, after plasmid curing of strain BGBM50, different derivatives with altered phenotypes were obtained, among them BGBM50-34 strain, which retained bacteriocin synthesis but had enhanced aggregation ability.

  10. Single Bacterium Detection Using Sers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Baikova, T. V.; Alushin, M. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Minaeva, S. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Saraeva, I. N.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of a single Staphylococcus aureus bacterium detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonant Raman spectroscopy (RS). It was shown that SERS allows increasing sensitivity of predominantly low frequency lines connected with the vibrations of Amide, Proteins and DNA. At the same time the lines of carotenoids inherent to this kind of bacterium are well-detected due to the resonance Raman scattering mechanism. The reproducibility and stability of Raman spectra strongly depend on the characteristics of nanostructured substrate, and molecular structure and size of the tested biological object.

  11. Enhancement of nisin production by Lactococcus lactis in periodically re-alkalized cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Nelson Pérez; Castro, Lorenzo Pastrana

    2003-10-01

    Synthesis of nisin as well as biomass production by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CECT (Colección Española de Cultivos Tipo) 539 on both hydrolysed mussel-processing waste and whey medium were followed in three fixed volume fed-batch fermentations, with re-alkalization cycles. The two cultures on mussel-processing waste (MPW) were fed with a 240 g/l concentrated glucose and with a concentrated MPW (about 100 g of glucose/l). The culture on whey was fed with a mixture of concentrated whey (48 g of total sugars/l) and a 400 g/l concentrated lactose. The three cultures were mainly characterized with higher nisin titres [49.7, 109.6 and 124.7 bacteriocin activity units (AU)/ml respectively] compared with the batch process on de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe [(1960) J. Appl. Bacteriol. 23, 130-135] medium (49.6 AU/ml), MPW (9.5 AU/ml) and whey (22.5 AU/ml) [1 AU/ml is the amount of antibacterial compound needed to obtain 50% growth inhibition (LD50) compared with control tubes]. In the three fed-batch cultures a shift from homolactic to mixed-acid fermentation was observed, and other products (acetic acid, butane-2,3-diol or ethanol) in addition to lactic acid were detectable in the medium. However, their contributions to the total antibacterial activity of the post-incubates (the cell-free culture supernatant obtained at the end of the fermentation process) of L. lactis CECT 539 against Carnobacterium piscicola CECT 4020 were very low.

  12. Fine tuning of the lactate and diacetyl production through promoter engineering in Lactococcus lactis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Guo

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis is a well-studied bacterium widely used in dairy fermentation and capable of producing metabolites with organoleptic and nutritional characteristics. For fine tuning of the distribution of glycolytic flux at the pyruvate branch from lactate to diacetyl and balancing the production of the two metabolites under aerobic conditions, a constitutive promoter library was constructed by randomizing the promoter sequence of the H(2O-forming NADH oxidase gene in L. lactis. The library consisted of 30 promoters covering a wide range of activities from 7,000 to 380,000 relative fluorescence units using a green fluorescent protein as reporter. Eleven typical promoters of the library were selected for the constitutive expression of the H(2O-forming NADH oxidase gene in L. lactis, and the NADH oxidase activity increased from 9.43 to 58.17-fold of the wild-type strain in small steps of activity change under aerobic conditions. Meanwhile, the lactate yield decreased from 21.15 ± 0.08 mM to 9.94 ± 0.07 mM, and the corresponding diacetyl production increased from 1.07 ± 0.03 mM to 4.16 ± 0.06 mM with the intracellular NADH/NAD(+ ratios varying from 0.711 ± 0.005 to 0.383 ± 0.003. The results indicated that the reduced pyruvate to lactate flux was rerouted to the diacetyl with an almost linear flux variation via altered NADH/NAD(+ ratios. Therefore, we provided a novel strategy to precisely control the pyruvate distribution for fine tuning of the lactate and diacetyl production through promoter engineering in L. lactis. Interestingly, the increased H(2O-forming NADH oxidase activity led to 76.95% lower H(2O(2 concentration in the recombinant strain than that of the wild-type strain after 24 h of aerated cultivation. The viable cells were significantly elevated by four orders of magnitude within 28 days of storage at 4°C, suggesting that the increased enzyme activity could eliminate H(2O(2 accumulation and prolong cell survival.

  13. Engineering the cell surface display of cohesins for assembly of cellulosome-inspired enzyme complexes on Lactococcus lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieczorek Andrew S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The assembly and spatial organization of enzymes in naturally occurring multi-protein complexes is of paramount importance for the efficient degradation of complex polymers and biosynthesis of valuable products. The degradation of cellulose into fermentable sugars by Clostridium thermocellum is achieved by means of a multi-protein "cellulosome" complex. Assembled via dockerin-cohesin interactions, the cellulosome is associated with the cell surface during cellulose hydrolysis, forming ternary cellulose-enzyme-microbe complexes for enhanced activity and synergy. The assembly of recombinant cell surface displayed cellulosome-inspired complexes in surrogate microbes is highly desirable. The model organism Lactococcus lactis is of particular interest as it has been metabolically engineered to produce a variety of commodity chemicals including lactic acid and bioactive compounds, and can efficiently secrete an array of recombinant proteins and enzymes of varying sizes. Results Fragments of the scaffoldin protein CipA were functionally displayed on the cell surface of Lactococcus lactis. Scaffolds were engineered to contain a single cohesin module, two cohesin modules, one cohesin and a cellulose-binding module, or only a cellulose-binding module. Cell toxicity from over-expression of the proteins was circumvented by use of the nisA inducible promoter, and incorporation of the C-terminal anchor motif of the streptococcal M6 protein resulted in the successful surface-display of the scaffolds. The facilitated detection of successfully secreted scaffolds was achieved by fusion with the export-specific reporter staphylococcal nuclease (NucA. Scaffolds retained their ability to associate in vivo with an engineered hybrid reporter enzyme, E. coli β-glucuronidase fused to the type 1 dockerin motif of the cellulosomal enzyme CelS. Surface-anchored complexes exhibited dual enzyme activities (nuclease and β-glucuronidase, and were

  14. 3-PBA降解菌BA3的降解特性及基因工程菌构建%Characteristics of a 3-Phenoxybenzoic Acid Degrading-Dacterium and the Construction of a Engineering Bacterium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段晓芹; 郑金伟; 张隽; 杭宝建; 何健; 李顺鹏

    2011-01-01

    从石油污染土壤中分离到1株能以3-苯氧基苯甲酸(3-PBA)为唯一碳源生长的细菌,命名为BA3.根据其生理生化特征和16S rDNA序列相似性分析,将该菌鉴定为鞘脂菌属(Sphingobium sp.).该菌株在60 h内对100 mg·L-1的3-苯氧基苯甲酸的降解率达到99%.降解3-苯氧基苯甲酸的最适温度为30℃,pH值为7.0,降解速率与初始接种量呈正相关.拟除虫菊酯类杀虫剂水解酶基因pytH为本实验室克隆到的一个新的菊酯水解酶基因,通过PCR从菊酯降解菌株JZ-2总DNA扩增了pytH,将pytH定向克隆到pBBRMCS-5载体上,构建重组质粒pPYTH,在辅助质粒pBK600的帮助下,通过三亲接合将pPYTH转移到3-PBA降解菌株Sphingobium sp.BA3中,获得工程菌Sphingobium sp.BA3-pytH;甲氰菊酯的降解实验表明,菌株JZ-2在48 h内对50 mg·L-1的甲氰菊酯降解率仅为60%左右,工程菌BA3一pytH相同条件下对50 mg·L-1的甲氰菊酯降解率达到95%以上,同时对甲氰菊酯的降解中间产物3-PBA也能较快降解,不会对菊酯的降解产生反馈抑制.工程菌BA3-pytH因其对甲氰菊酯和其降解中间产物3-PBA的快速降解能力,比原始菌株JZ-2在菊酯污染土壤生物修复应用中更具有优势.%A bacterium capable of utilizing 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-FBA) as sole carbon source was isolated trom petroleumcontaminated soil. This bacterium, designated as BA3, was identified as Sphingobium sp. according to its physiological & biochemical characteristic and the similarity analysis of its 16S rDNA sequence. Strain BA3 was able to degrade 99% of 100 mg· L-1 3-phenoxybenzoic acid within 60 h. The optimal pH and temperature for the degradation were 7.0 and 30℃, respectively. The degradation efficiency was related positively to initial inoculum size. The pyrethroid hydrolase gene(pytH) gene was amplified from the genomic DNA of Sphingobium sp. JZ-2 by PCR. Recombinant plasmids pPYTH was constructed by ligating pytH gene into the broad

  15. Food Safety: Secretome of Lactococcus lactis and Listeria monocytogenes in competition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Alloggio

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes (LM is a foodborne pathogen responsible of listeriosis. In the spreading of this pathology, milk and dairy products are key reservoir for this pathogen1. Food processing represents one of the major steps that could be linked to LM growth. Inhibition of LM growth through competition of Lactococcus lactis (LAC could represent a solution to this problem. Exoproteome of LM and two different strains of Lactic Acid Bacteria in co-culture have been studied in order to highlight mechanisms of bacterial competition useful to improve food safety. Two different strains of LAC and one strain of LM were cultivated in appropriate medium cultures (BHI, also in competition. Filtrated cultures (SECRETOME were lyophilized and resuspended for proteomics analysis. Shotgun analysis on each secretome was performed on nano UPLC-MS system. Obtained data reveal, during competition, the higher production by LM of moonlighting protein Enolase and Glucose 6 Phosphate isomerase, of Septation ring formation regulator EzrA, involved into cell replication and the lower secretion of Endopeptidase P60. In parallel, L. lactis produced higher amounts of Secreted 45 kDa protein and switched from lantibiotic Nisin A production to Nisin Z production. In competition with LM, LAC strain investigated produce higher amounts of Secreted 45 kDa protein with peptidoglycan lytic activity and the selective secretion of Nisin Z probably to improve lantibiotic solubility in less acidic environment. Next step will be validation of obtained results in dairy products. These results are of interesting to design new strategies of fighting LM as contaminant in food from animal origin.Work supported by Ministry of Health-CCM “Milano EXPO 2015 Project: Garantire la sicurezza alimentare- Valorizzare le produzioni”

  16. Immunomodulatory Activity of Lactococcus lactis A17 from Taiwan Fermented Cabbage in OVA-Sensitized BALB/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ching Mei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available From fermented Taiwan foods, we have isolated numerous lactic acid bacteria (LAB of plant origin and investigated their biological activities. This study aimed to investigate the immunomodulatory effect and mechanism of Lactococcus lactis A17 (A17, isolated from Taiwan fermented cabbage, on ovalbumin (OVA-sensitized mice. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used to verify immune responses of A17 by IFN-γ production. Live (A17-A and heat-killed A17 (A17-H were orally administered to OVA-sensitized BALB/c mice to investigate their effects on immunoglobulin (Ig and cytokine production. The mRNA expression of Toll-like receptors (TLR and nucleotide binding oligomerization domain (NOD-like protein receptors in spleen cells was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. Both live and heat-killed A17 modulate OVA-induced allergic effects. B-cell response was modulated by diminishing IgE production and raising OVA-specific IgG2a production, while T-cell response was modulated by increasing IFN-γ production and decreasing IL-4 production. The mRNA expression of NOD-1, NOD-2, and TLR-4 was down-regulated by A17 as well. This is the first report to describe a naïve Lactococcus lactis A17 strain as a promising candidate for prophylactic and therapeutic treatments of allergic diseases via oral administration. Our results suggest the ameliorative effects of A17 may be caused by modulating NOD-1 NOD-2, and TLR-4 expression.

  17. CTP limitation increases expression of CTP synthase in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, C.M.; Hammer, Karin; Martinussen, Jan

    2003-01-01

    on the CTP concentration through an attenuator mechanism. At normal CTP concentrations a terminator is preferentially formed in the pyrG leader, thereby reducing expression of CTP synthase. At low CTP concentrations the RNA polymerase pauses at a stretch of C residues in the pyrG leader, thereby allowing......CTP synthase is encoded by the pyrG gene and catalyzes the conversion of UTP to CTP. A Lactococcus lactis pyrG mutant with a cytidine requirement was constructed, in which beta-galactosidase activity in a pyrG-lacLM transcriptional fusion was used to monitor gene expression of pyrG. A 10-fold...... decrease in the CTP pool induced by cytidine limitation was found to immediately increase expression of the L. lactis pyrG gene. The final level of expression of pyrG is 37-fold higher than the uninduced level. CTP limitation has pronounced effects on central cellular metabolism, and both RNA and protein...

  18. Evolution of Lactococcus lactis phages within a cheese factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Geneviève M; Moineau, Sylvain

    2009-08-01

    We have sequenced the double-stranded DNA genomes of six lactococcal phages (SL4, CB13, CB14, CB19, CB20, and GR7) from the 936 group that were isolated over a 9-year period from whey samples obtained from a Canadian cheese factory. These six phages infected the same two industrial Lactococcus lactis strains out of 30 tested. The CB14 and GR7 genomes were found to be 100% identical even though they were isolated 14 months apart, indicating that a phage can survive in a cheese plant for more than a year. The other four genomes were related but notably different. The length of the genomes varied from 28,144 to 32,182 bp, and they coded for 51 to 55 open reading frames. All five genomes possessed a 3' overhang cos site that was 11 nucleotides long. Several structural proteins were also identified by nano-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, confirming bioinformatic analyses. Comparative analyses suggested that the most recently isolated phages (CB19 and CB20) were derived, in part, from older phage isolates (CB13 and CB14/GR7). The organization of the five distinct genomes was similar to the previously sequenced lactococcal phage genomes of the 936 group, and from these sequences, a core genome was determined for lactococcal phages of the 936 group.

  19. Therapeutic drug delivery by genetically modified Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steidler, Lothar; Rottiers, Pieter

    2006-08-01

    Food-grade bacteria have been consumed throughout history without associated pathologies and are, therefore, absolutely safe to ingest. Unexpectedly, Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis), known from cheese production, can be genetically engineered to constantly secrete satisfactory amounts of bioactive cytokines. Both of these features enabled the development of a new kind of topical delivery system: topical and active delivery of therapeutic proteins by genetically modified micro-organisms. The host organism's record inspired the development of applications that target intestinal diseases. In a variety of mouse models, chronic colon inflammation can be successfully treated with (interleukin) IL-10-secreting L. lactis. Trefoil factor (TFF) producer strains have also been shown to be very effective in the treatment of acute colitis. Such novel therapeutic strains are textbook examples of genetically modified (GM) organisms. There are legitimate concerns with regard to the deliberate release of GM micro-organisms. On development of these applications, therefore, we have engineered these bacteria in such a way that biological containment is guaranteed. The essential gene thyA, encoding thymidylate synthase, has been exchanged for IL-10. This makes the GM strain critically dependent on thymidine. Lack of thymidine, for example, resulting from thymidine consumption by thyA-deficient strains-will irreversibly lead to induced "thymidine-less death." This accomplishment has created the possibility of using this strategy for application in human medicine.

  20. Enhancement of Nisin Production by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussault, Dominic; Vu, Khanh Dang; Lacroix, Monique

    2016-09-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp lactis BSA (L. lactis BSA) was isolated from a commercial fermented product (BSA Food Ingredients, Montreal, Canada) containing mixed bacteria that are used as starter for food fermentation. In order to increase the bacteriocin production by L. lactis BSA, different fermentation conditions were conducted. They included different volumetric combinations of two culture media (the Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS) broth and skim milk), agitation level (0 and 100 rpm) and concentration of commercial nisin (0, 0.15, and 0.30 µg/ml) added into culture media as stimulant agent for nisin production. During fermentation, samples were collected and used for antibacterial evaluation against Lactobacillus sakei using agar diffusion assay. Results showed that medium containing 50 % MRS broth and 50 % skim milk gave better antibacterial activity as compared to other medium formulations. Agitation (100 rpm) did not improve nisin production by L. lactis BSA. Adding 0.15 µg/ml of nisin into the medium-containing 50 % MRS broth and 50 % skim milk caused the highest nisin activity of 18,820 AU/ml as compared to other medium formulations. This activity was 4 and ~3 times higher than medium containing 100 % MRS broth without added nisin (~4700 AU/ml) and 100 % MRS broth with 0.15 µg/ml of added nisin (~6650 AU/ml), respectively.

  1. New Antifungal Bacteriocin-Synthesizing Strains of Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis as the Perspective Biopreservatives for Protection of Raw Smoked Sausages

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    L. G. Stoyanova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Screening for the effective bacteriocin-synthesizing strains of Lactococcus lactis as the perspective biopreservatives was performed. We used a raw milk and dairy products from different climatic regions as well as from powerful drinks of mixed lactic acid and alcoholic fermentation: kurunga, kumiss and Iranian Dough, that were widely used by local population to prevent diseases. Approach: The special interest was paid to isolates of lactococci with antagonistic activity. According to their morphological, cultural, physiological, biochemical properties and sequence of 16S rRNA gene they were identified as Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis. Only nine from the selected 94 strains expressed a broad spectrum of activity against Gram-positive and Gramnegative bacteria including pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris, Salmonella gallinarum, moulds (Aspergillus, Fusarium, Penicillium genera, as well as yeasts (Rhodotorula, Candida. Results: It reveals the unique biological properties for isolated natural strains of Lactococcus lactis species. Most effective new bacteriocin-synthesizing strains 194 and K-205 were isolated from raw cow milk and kurunga from Buryatia. These strains had high antibiotic activity up to 3600 and 2700 IU mL-1 as compared to nisin and up to 2500-1700 IU mL-1 as compared to fungicidal antibiotic nistatin. In our experiments we used raw smoked sausages that were infected with fungi. The identification of this infection showed the presence of Eurotium repens de Bary on the sausages. Treatment of the raw smoked sausages with cultural broth of L.lactis ssp. lactis 194 and K-205 inhibited growth of these microorganisms. After treatment the sausages had longer shelf-life and was in accordance with basal production data (Russian State Standard Specification 16131-86. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that the treatment with

  2. Endocardite por lactococcus garvieae: primeiro relato de caso da América Latina

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    Tatiana Franco Hirakawa

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus garvieae, patógeno zoonótico emergente, é responsável por mastite em ruminantes e septicemia em peixes. Embora seja considerado oportunista e raramente causar infecções em humanos, sua incidência deve estar subestimada devido à dificuldade do diagnóstico. Há pouquíssimos relatos de osteomielite, abscesso hepático e peritonite, e apenas nove casos descritos na literatura mundial de endocardite. Relatamos o primeiro caso de endocardite por Lactococcus garvieae da América Latina em paciente portadora de prótese valvar metálica, com quadro de febre diária, calafrios, nodos de Osler e seis hemoculturas positivas para Lactococcus garvieae, que preenchiam os critérios de Duke para o diagnóstico de "endocardite infecciosa definitiva"

  3. 乳酸菌Enterococcuse faecalis TN-9低温蛋白酶的提纯及性质%Purification and Properties of Cold-Adapted Protease from Lactic Acid Bacterium Enterococcus faecalis TN-9

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁清珠; 林笃志; 北村良久; 岛田贵志

    2009-01-01

    对产自乳酸菌Enterococcuse faecalis TN-9的蛋白酶,进行了硫酸铵沉淀,DEAE-Sephadex A-25以及DEAE Cellulofine A-500离子交换层析的3步纯化和特性研究.纯化酶Native PAGE显示1条蛋白带.SDS-PAGE和凝胶层析分子量分别为30 ku及69 ku.纯化酶最适作用温度为30℃,最适作用pH为7.5~8.0,在pH 6.0~9.5和45℃以下条件下稳定,在0℃下显示了6.1%的相对活性,60℃以上热处理完全失去酶活.该酶被EDTA-2Na,Hg~(2+)、Cu~(2+)、Ni~(2+)、Ag~(2+)、Co~(2+)及Pepstatin A不完全抑制.Zn~(2+)对蛋白酶具有明显的激活作用.纯化酶作用于偶氮酪蛋白的K_m和V_max分别为0.098%和72 mg/(h·mg).该酶为N末端VGSEVTLKNS的明胶酶(Gelatinase)的一种,性质属于低温蛋白酶.%Protease from lactic acid bacterium Enterococcus faecalis TN-9 was purified with three steps, ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE-Sephadex A-25, and DEAE Cellnlofine A-500 ion exchange chromatography and studied its properties. Native PAGE analysis of the purified enzyme showed a single protein band. The molecular weight was 30 ku by SDS-PAGE analysis and 69 ku by gel chromatography analysis respectively. The optimal reaction temperature and pH of the enzyme were at 30 ℃ and 7.5 ~ 8.0 respeetively. It was stable at pH 6.0 ~ 9.5 and 45 ℃. Under 0 ℃ it showed 6.1% of relative activity. Heat treatment above 60 ℃ it totally lost its activity. The enzyme was ineomplete-ly inhibited by EDTA-2Na, Hg~(2+) , Cu~(2+) ,Ni~(2+) , Ag~(2+) , Co~(2+) , and Pepstatin. Zn~(2+) had obvious activation to the pro-tease. K_m and V_(max) of the purified enzyme were 0.098% and 72 mg/(h·mg) respectively. The enzyme was one of gelatinase with N-terminal sequence of VGSEVTLKNS. Its property belonged to cold-adapted protease.

  4. Evolution of Lactococcus strains during ripening in Brie cheese using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Lefier, Dominique; Lamprell, Helen; Mazerolles, Gérard

    2000-01-01

    International audience; The diversity of the Lactococcus flora during maturation of soft cheese, produced using one of 2 different starter cultures (S$_{\\rm A}$ and S$_{\\rm B}$), was determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Identification of Lactococcus sp. was achieved using a model composed of the 6 strains of Lc. lactis ssp. lactis and the 2 strains of Lc. lactis ssp. cremoris, present in the starter cultures S$_{\\rm A}$ and S$_{\\rm B}$, as well as a reference strai...

  5. Lactococcus bacteriophages isolated from whey and their effects on commercial lactic starters

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    Maria Raquel de Godoy Oriani

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of phages of lactic acid bacteria in milk industry and their effects on acidification ability of commercial lactic acid starters were studied. Cheese whey samples (33 samples were collected from 17 factories. A total of 16 bacteriophages were isolated (12 specific for Lactococcus lactis, 3 for L. diacetylactis and one capable of lysing both species. The results showed that 10% reduction in acidification tests was not good indication of phage in the sample. The majority of samples showed reduction higher than 10%, although only 65% were phage positive. The isolated phages were quite stable and showed no reduction in infectivity even after 20 daily replications. A pool of bacteriophages was prepared from isolates and inoculated in 12 commercial lactic starters. After 8 hours of incubation, only 2 showed reduced acidification. Bacterial strains isolated from commercial starters were tested regarding the phage resistance. Considerable difference in phage sensitivity was observed among different starters (BD, D, O and L. diacetylactis. Five bacteriophages showed no infectivity on any isolates but one was infective for most of isolates.Para ampliar conhecimentos sobre a incidência de bacteriófagos de bactérias lácticas na indústria de leite do Estado de São Paulo e a sua influência sobre a capacidade acidificante de fermentos lácticos disponíveis em nosso mercado, o presente trabalho foi conduzido com o intuito de esclarecer a real situação dos laticínios no Estado. Foram coletadas 33 amostras de soro de queijo em 17 laticínios. Foram isolados 16 bacteriófagos, 12 específicos para Lactococcus lactis, 3 para L. diacetylactis e um capaz de lisar ambos os microrganismos. Os experimentos mostraram que, uma diminuição de 10% na acidez em presença de soro suspeito, ao contrário do estabelecido na literatura, não reflete a veracidade da presença de bacteriófagos na amostra, uma vez que a maioria apresentou redução acima

  6. Growth of a Strictly Anaerobic Bacterium on Furfural (2-Furaldehyde)

    OpenAIRE

    Brune, Gerhard; Schoberth, Siegfried M.; Sahm, Hermann

    1983-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterium was isolated from a continuous fermentor culture which converted the organic constituents of sulfite evaporator condensate to methane and carbon dioxide. Furfural is one of the major components of this condensate. This furfural isolate could degrade furfural as the sole source of carbon and energy in a defined mineral-vitamin-sulfate medium. Acetic acid was the major fermentation product. This organism could also use ethanol, lactate, pyruvate, or fumarate and c...

  7. Structural basis for the transcriptional regulation of heme homeostasis in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawai, Hitomi; Yamanaka, Masaru; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Aono, Shigetoshi

    2012-08-31

    Although heme is a crucial element for many biological processes including respiration, heme homeostasis should be regulated strictly due to the cytotoxicity of free heme molecules. Numerous lactic acid bacteria, including Lactococcus lactis, acquire heme molecules exogenously to establish an aerobic respiratory chain. A heme efflux system plays an important role for heme homeostasis to avoid cytotoxicity of acquired free heme, but its regulatory mechanism is not clear. Here, we report that the transcriptional regulator heme-regulated transporter regulator (HrtR) senses and binds a heme molecule as its physiological effector to regulate the expression of the heme-efflux system responsible for heme homeostasis in L. lactis. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of how HrtR senses a heme molecule and regulates gene expression for the heme efflux system, we determined the crystal structures of the apo-HrtR·DNA complex, apo-HrtR, and holo-HrtR at a resolution of 2.0, 3.1, and 1.9 Å, respectively. These structures revealed that HrtR is a member of the TetR family of transcriptional regulators. The residue pair Arg-46 and Tyr-50 plays a crucial role for specific DNA binding through hydrogen bonding and a CH-π interaction with the DNA bases. HrtR adopts a unique mechanism for its functional regulation upon heme sensing. Heme binding to HrtR causes a coil-to-helix transition of the α4 helix in the heme-sensing domain, which triggers a structural change of HrtR, causing it to dissociate from the target DNA for derepression of the genes encoding the heme efflux system. HrtR uses a unique heme-sensing motif with bis-His (His-72 and His-149) ligation to the heme, which is essential for the coil-to-helix transition of the α4 helix upon heme sensing.

  8. Fate of Lactococcus lactis starter cultures during late ripening in cheese models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggirello, Marianna; Cocolin, Luca; Dolci, Paola

    2016-10-01

    The presence of Lactococcus lactis, commonly employed as starter culture, was, recently, highlighted and investigated during late cheese ripening. Thus, the main goal of the present study was to assess the persistence and viability of this microorganism throughout manufacturing and ripening of model cheeses. Eight commercial starters, constituted of L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris, were inoculated in pasteurized milk in order to manufacture miniature cheeses, ripened for six months. Samples were analysed at different steps (milk after inoculum, curd after cutting, curd after pressing and draining, cheese immediately after salting and cheese at 7, 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 days of ripening) and submitted to both culture-dependent (traditional plating on M17) and -independent analysis (reverse transcription-quantitative PCR). On the basis of direct RNA analysis, L. lactis populations were detected in all miniature cheeses up to the sixth month of ripening, confirming the presence of viable cells during the whole ripening process, including late stages. Noteworthy, L. lactis was detected by RT-qPCR in cheese samples also when traditional plating failed to indicate its presence. This discrepancy could be explain with the fact that lactococci, during ripening process, enter in a stressed physiological state (viable not culturable, VNC), which might cause their inability to grow on synthetic medium despite their viability in cheese matrix. Preliminary results obtained by "resuscitation" assays corroborated this hypothesis and 2.5% glucose enrichment was effective to recover L. lactis cells in VNC state. The capability of L. lactis to persist in late ripening, and the presence of VNC cells which are known to shift their catabolism to peptides and amino acids consumption, suggests a possible technological role of this microorganism in cheese ripening with a possible impact on flavour formation.

  9. Characterization of plasmids in a human clinical strain of Lactococcus garvieae.

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    Mónica Aguado-Urda

    Full Text Available The present work describes the molecular characterization of five circular plasmids found in the human clinical strain Lactococcus garvieae 21881. The plasmids were designated pGL1-pGL5, with molecular sizes of 4,536 bp, 4,572 bp, 12,948 bp, 14,006 bp and 68,798 bp, respectively. Based on detailed sequence analysis, some of these plasmids appear to be mosaics composed of DNA obtained by modular exchange between different species of lactic acid bacteria. Based on sequence data and the derived presence of certain genes and proteins, the plasmid pGL2 appears to replicate via a rolling-circle mechanism, while the other four plasmids appear to belong to the group of lactococcal theta-type replicons. The plasmids pGL1, pGL2 and pGL5 encode putative proteins related with bacteriocin synthesis and bacteriocin secretion and immunity. The plasmid pGL5 harbors genes (txn, orf5 and orf25 encoding proteins that could be considered putative virulence factors. The gene txn encodes a protein with an enzymatic domain corresponding to the family actin-ADP-ribosyltransferases toxins, which are known to play a key role in pathogenesis of a variety of bacterial pathogens. The genes orf5 and orf25 encode two putative surface proteins containing the cell wall-sorting motif LPXTG, with mucin-binding and collagen-binding protein domains, respectively. These proteins could be involved in the adherence of L. garvieae to mucus from the intestine, facilitating further interaction with intestinal epithelial cells and to collagenous tissues such as the collagen-rich heart valves. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the characterization of plasmids in a human clinical strain of this pathogen.

  10. Lactococcus lactis metabolism and gene expression during growth on plant tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golomb, Benjamin L; Marco, Maria L

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have been isolated from living, harvested, and fermented plant materials; however, the adaptations these bacteria possess for growth on plant tissues are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated plant habitat-specific traits of Lactococcus lactis during growth in an Arabidopsis thaliana leaf tissue lysate (ATL). L. lactis KF147, a strain originally isolated from plants, exhibited a higher growth rate and reached 7.9-fold-greater cell densities during growth in ATL than the dairy-associated strain L. lactis IL1403. Transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq) of KF147 identified 853 induced and 264 repressed genes during growth in ATL compared to that in GM17 laboratory culture medium. Genes induced in ATL included those involved in the arginine deiminase pathway and a total of 140 carbohydrate transport and metabolism genes, many of which are involved in xylose, arabinose, cellobiose, and hemicellulose metabolism. The induction of those genes corresponded with L. lactis KF147 nutrient consumption and production of metabolic end products in ATL as measured by gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS) untargeted metabolomic profiling. To assess the importance of specific plant-inducible genes for L. lactis growth in ATL, xylose metabolism was targeted for gene knockout mutagenesis. Wild-type L. lactis strain KF147 but not an xylA deletion mutant was able to grow using xylose as the sole carbon source. However, both strains grew to similarly high levels in ATL, indicating redundancy in L. lactis carbohydrate metabolism on plant tissues. These findings show that certain strains of L. lactis are well adapted for growth on plants and possess specific traits relevant for plant-based food, fuel, and feed fermentations.

  11. Physiological function of the maltose operon regulator, MalR, in Lactococcus lactis

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    Rådström Peter

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maltose metabolism is initiated by an ATP-dependent permease system in Lactococcus lactis. The subsequent degradation of intracellular maltose is performed by the concerted action of Pi-dependent maltose phosphorylase and β-phosphoglucomutase. In some Gram-positive bacteria, maltose metabolism is regulated by a maltose operon regulator (MalR, belonging to the LacI-GalR family of transcriptional regulators. A gene presumed to encode MalR has been found directly downstream the maltose phosphorylase-encoding gene, malP in L. lactis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological role of the MalR protein in maltose metabolism in L. lactis. Results A L. lactis ssp. lactis mutant, TMB5004, deficient in the putative MalR protein, was physiologically characterised. The mutant was not able to ferment maltose, while its capability to grow on glucose as well as trehalose was not affected. The activity of maltose phosphorylase and β-phosphoglucomutase was not affected in the mutant. However, the specific maltose uptake rate in the wild type was, at its lowest, five times higher than in the mutant. This difference in maltose uptake increased as the maltose concentration in the assay was increased. Conclusion According to amino acid sequence similarities, the presumed MalR is a member of the LacI-GalR family of transcriptional regulators. Due to the suggested activating effect on maltose transport and absence of effect on the activities of maltose phosphorylase and β-phosphoglucomutase, MalR of L. lactis is considered rather as an activator than a repressor.

  12. Detection and characterization of bacteriocin-producing Lactococcus lactis strains Detecção e caracterização de Lactococcus lactis produtores de bacteriocinas

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    Izildinha Moreno

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available One hundred sixty seven strains of Lactococcus lactis were screened for bacteriocin production by well diffusion assay of GM17 agar. Fourteen (8.4% produced antimicrobial activity other than organic acids, bacteriophages or hydrogen peroxide. The frequency of bacteriocin production ranged from 2% in L. lactis subsp. cremoris up to 12% in L. lactis subsp. lactis. Antimicrobial activities were not observed in any strain of L. lactis subsp. lactis var. diacetylactis. Among thirteen bacteriocin-producing strains and two nisin-producing strains (L. lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454 and L. lactis subsp. lactis CNRZ 150, eight (53% were characterized as lactose-positive (Lac+ and proteinase-negative (Prt-. The bacteriocin-producing cultures were also characterized on the basis of plasmid content. All strains had 2 to 7 plasmids with molecular weights varying from 0.5 to 28.1 Mdal. Four strains (ITAL 435, ITAL 436, ITAL 437 and ITAL 438 showed identical profiles and the other were quite distinct.Um total de 167 linhagens de L. lactis foi selecionado para os testes de produção de bacteriocinas pelo método de difusão em poços em agar GM17. Desse total, 14 (8.4% produziram substâncias inibidoras que não foram associadas com ácidos orgânicos, peróxido de hidrogênio e bacteriófagos. A frequência de produção de bacteriocinas variou de 2% em L. lactis subsp. cremoris a 12% em L. lactis subsp. lactis. Nenhuma das linhagens de L. lactis subsp. lactis var. diacetylactis produziu substâncias inibidoras. De 13 linhagens produtoras de bacteriocinas e duas de nisina (L. lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454 e L. lactis subsp. lactis CNRZ 150, 8 (53% foram caracterizadas como lactose-positivas (Lac+ e proteinase-negativas (Prt-. As linhagens produtoras de bacteriocinas também foram caracterizadas no seu conteúdo de plasmídios. Elas apresentaram de 2 a 7 plasmídios, com pesos moleculares aproximados de 0.5 a 28.1 Mdal. Quatro linhagens (ITAL 435, ITAL 436

  13. Strain-Dependent Transcriptome Signatures for Robustness in Lactococcus lactis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Annereinou R.; Alkema, Wynand; Starrenburg, Marjo J. C.; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Bron, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that fermentation conditions have a strong impact on subsequent survival of Lactococcus lactis strain MG1363 during heat and oxidative stress, two important parameters during spray drying. Moreover, employment of a transcriptome-phenotype matching approach revealed groups of genes associated with robustness towards heat and/or oxidative stress. To investigate if other strains have similar or distinct transcriptome signatures for robustness, we applied an identical transcriptome-robustness phenotype matching approach on the L. lactis strains IL1403, KF147 and SK11, which have previously been demonstrated to display highly diverse robustness phenotypes. These strains were subjected to an identical fermentation regime as was performed earlier for strain MG1363 and consisted of twelve conditions, varying in the level of salt and/or oxygen, as well as fermentation temperature and pH. In the exponential phase of growth, cells were harvested for transcriptome analysis and assessment of heat and oxidative stress survival phenotypes. The variation in fermentation conditions resulted in differences in heat and oxidative stress survival of up to five 10-log units. Effects of the fermentation conditions on stress survival of the L. lactis strains were typically strain-dependent, although the fermentation conditions had mainly similar effects on the growth characteristics of the different strains. By association of the transcriptomes and robustness phenotypes highly strain-specific transcriptome signatures for robustness towards heat and oxidative stress were identified, indicating that multiple mechanisms exist to increase robustness and, as a consequence, robustness of each strain requires individual optimization. However, a relatively small overlap in the transcriptome responses of the strains was also identified and this generic transcriptome signature included genes previously associated with stress (ctsR and lplL) and novel genes, including nan

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibilities and random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR fingerprint characterization of Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis and Lactococcus garvieae isolated from bovine intramammary infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumed-Ferrer, C; Barberio, A; Franklin-Guild, R; Werner, B; McDonough, P; Bennett, J; Gioia, G; Rota, N; Welcome, F; Nydam, D V; Moroni, P

    2015-09-01

    In total, 181 streptococci-like bacteria isolated from intramammary infections (IMI) were submitted by a veterinary clinic to Quality Milk Production Services (QMPS, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY). The isolates were characterized by sequence analysis, and 46 Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis and 47 Lactococcus garvieae were tested for susceptibility to 17 antibiotics. No resistant strains were found for β-lactam antibiotics widely used in clinical practice (penicillin, ampicillin, and amoxicillin), and all minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were far from the resistance breakpoints. Eight strains had MIC intermediate to cefazolin. The random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR fingerprint patterns showed a slightly higher heterogeneity for Lc. lactis ssp. lactis isolates than for Lc. garvieae isolates.

  15. Comparative genome analysis of Lactococcus garvieae using a suppression subtractive hybridization library: discovery of novel DNA signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wonyong; Park, Hee Kuk; Thanh, Hien Dang; Lee, Bo-Young; Shin, Jong Wook; Shin, Hyoung-Shik

    2011-12-01

    Lactococcus garvieae, the pathogenic species in the genus Lactococcus, is recognized as an emerging pathogen in fish, animals, and humans. Despite the widespread distribution and emerging clinical significance of L. garvieae, little is known about the genomic content of this microorganism. Suppression subtractive hybridization was performed to identify the genomic differences between L. garvieae and Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis, its closest phylogenetic neighbor, and the type species of the genus Lactococcus. Twenty-seven clones were specific to L. garvieae and were highly different from Lactococcus lactis in their nucleotide and protein sequences. Lactococcus garvieae primer sets were subsequently designed for two of these clones corresponding to a pyrH gene and a novel DNA signature for application in the specific detection of L. garvieae. The primer specificities were evaluated relative to three previously described 16S rRNA gene-targeted methods using 32 Lactococcus and closely related strains. Both newly designed primer sets were highly specific to L. garvieae and performed better than did the existing primers. Our findings may be useful for developing more stable and accurate tools for the discrimination of L. garvieae from other closely related species.

  16. Expression of avian influenza haemagglutinin (H5) and chicken interleukin 2 (chIL-2) under control of the ptcB promoter in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatraj, Katarzyna; Szczepankowska, Agnieszka K; Sączyńska, Violetta; Florys, Katarzyna; Gromadzka, Beata; Łepek, Krzysztof; Płucienniczak, Grażyna; Szewczyk, Bogusław; Zagórski-Ostoja, Włodzimierz; Bardowski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Gram-positive and nonpathogenic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are considered to be promising candidates for the development of new, safe systems of heterologous protein expression. Recombinant LAB has been shown to induce specific local and systemic immune response against selected pathogens, and could be a good alternative to classical attenuated carriers. The main goal of our study was to express the avian influenza haemagglutinin (H5) and chicken interleukin 2 (chIL-2) in Lactococcus lactis. Results of this study were anticipated to lead to construction of lactococcal strain(s) with potential vaccine properties against the avian influenza A (H5N1) virus. Expression of the cloned H5 gene, its His-tagged variant and chIL-2 gene, under the control of the ptcB gene promoter was attested by RT-PCR on transcriptional level and Western or dot blot analysis on translational level, demonstrating that system can be an attractive solution for production of heterologous proteins. The results of the preliminary animal trial conducted in mice are a promising step toward development of a vaccine against avian bird flu using Lactococcus lactis cells as antigen carriers.

  17. Recombinant Lactococcus lactis Expressing Haemagglutinin from a Polish Avian H5N1 Isolate and Its Immunological Effect in Preliminary Animal Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepankowska, Agnieszka K; Szatraj, Katarzyna; Sałański, Przemysław; Rózga, Agnieszka; Górecki, Roman K; Bardowski, Jacek K

    2017-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are Gram-positive, nonpathogenic microorganisms that are gaining much interest as antigen producers for development of live vaccine vectors. Heterologous proteins of different origin have been successfully expressed in various LAB species, including Lactococcus lactis. Recombinant L. lactis strains have been shown to induce specific local and systemic immune responses against various antigens. Our study aimed at constructing a L. lactis strain expressing haemagglutinin of a Polish avian H5H1 influenza isolate and examining its effect on animals. Expression of the cloned H5 gene was achieved using the nisin-controlled gene expression system. Detection of the intracellular H5 antigen produced in L. lactis was performed by Western blot analysis and confirmed using mass spectrometry. The potential of L. lactis recombinant cells to induce an immune response was examined by setting up preliminary immunization trials on chickens and mice. Obtained sera were tested for specific antibodies by ELISA assays. The results of these studies are a promising step toward developing a vaccine against the bird flu using Lactococcus lactis cells as bioreactors for efficient antigen production and delivery to the mucosal surface.

  18. Recombinant Lactococcus lactis Expressing Haemagglutinin from a Polish Avian H5N1 Isolate and Its Immunological Effect in Preliminary Animal Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka K. Szczepankowska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are Gram-positive, nonpathogenic microorganisms that are gaining much interest as antigen producers for development of live vaccine vectors. Heterologous proteins of different origin have been successfully expressed in various LAB species, including Lactococcus lactis. Recombinant L. lactis strains have been shown to induce specific local and systemic immune responses against various antigens. Our study aimed at constructing a L. lactis strain expressing haemagglutinin of a Polish avian H5H1 influenza isolate and examining its effect on animals. Expression of the cloned H5 gene was achieved using the nisin-controlled gene expression system. Detection of the intracellular H5 antigen produced in L. lactis was performed by Western blot analysis and confirmed using mass spectrometry. The potential of L. lactis recombinant cells to induce an immune response was examined by setting up preliminary immunization trials on chickens and mice. Obtained sera were tested for specific antibodies by ELISA assays. The results of these studies are a promising step toward developing a vaccine against the bird flu using Lactococcus lactis cells as bioreactors for efficient antigen production and delivery to the mucosal surface.

  19. Recombinant Lactococcus lactis Expressing Haemagglutinin from a Polish Avian H5N1 Isolate and Its Immunological Effect in Preliminary Animal Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatraj, Katarzyna; Sałański, Przemysław; Rózga, Agnieszka; Górecki, Roman K.; Bardowski, Jacek K.

    2017-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are Gram-positive, nonpathogenic microorganisms that are gaining much interest as antigen producers for development of live vaccine vectors. Heterologous proteins of different origin have been successfully expressed in various LAB species, including Lactococcus lactis. Recombinant L. lactis strains have been shown to induce specific local and systemic immune responses against various antigens. Our study aimed at constructing a L. lactis strain expressing haemagglutinin of a Polish avian H5H1 influenza isolate and examining its effect on animals. Expression of the cloned H5 gene was achieved using the nisin-controlled gene expression system. Detection of the intracellular H5 antigen produced in L. lactis was performed by Western blot analysis and confirmed using mass spectrometry. The potential of L. lactis recombinant cells to induce an immune response was examined by setting up preliminary immunization trials on chickens and mice. Obtained sera were tested for specific antibodies by ELISA assays. The results of these studies are a promising step toward developing a vaccine against the bird flu using Lactococcus lactis cells as bioreactors for efficient antigen production and delivery to the mucosal surface. PMID:28321412

  20. Physiological responses of Lactococcus lactis ML3 to alternating conditions of growth and starvation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunji, E.R.S.; Ubbink, T.; Matin, A.; Poolman, B.; Konings, W.N.

    1993-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis species can survive periods of carbohydrate starvation for relatively long periods of time. In the first hours of starvation, however, the maximal glycolytic and arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway activities decline rapidly. The rate of decrease of the pathway activities diminishes

  1. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Responses to Carbon Starvation in Nongrowing Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ercan,O.; Wels, M.; Smid. E.J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the transcriptional adaptations of nongrowing, retentostat cultures of Lactococcus lactis to starvation. Near-zero-growth cultures (μ = 0.0001 h−1) obtained by extended retentostat cultivation were exposed to starvation by termination of the medium supply for 24 h, followed by a

  2. Quantitative physiology of Lactococcus lactis at extreme low-growth rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ercan, O.; Smid, E.J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the metabolic adaptation of Lactococcus lactis during the transition from a growing to a non-growing state using retentostat cultivation. Under retentostat cultivation, the specific growth rate decreased from 0.025 h-1 to 0.0001 h-1 in 42 days, while doubling time increased to m

  3. Effect of X-Prolyl Dipeptidyl Aminopeptidase Deficiency on Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mayo, Baltasar; Kok, Jan; Bockelmann, Wilhelm; Haandrikman, Alfred; Leenhouts, Kees J.; Venema, Gerhardus

    1993-01-01

    The genetic determinant (pepXP) of an X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidase (PepXP) has recently been cloned and sequenced from both Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris (B. Mayo, J. Kok, K. Venema, W. Bockelmann, M. Teuber, H. Reinke, and G. Venema, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:38-44, 1991) and L. lacti

  4. Genome-wide transcriptional responses to carbon starvation in nongrowing Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ercan, O.; Wels, M.; Smid, E.J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the transcriptional adaptations of nongrowing, retentostat cultures of Lactococcus lactis to starvation. Near-zero-growth cultures (µ = 0.0001 h-1) obtained by extended retentostat cultivation were exposed to starvation by termination of the medium supply for 24 h, followed by a

  5. Insertion-Sequence-Mediated Mutations Isolated During Adaptation to Growth and Starvation in Lactococcus lactis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, de J.A.G.M.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Hoekstra, R.F.; Vos, de W.M.

    2004-01-01

    We studied the activity of three multicopy insertion sequence (IS) elements in 12 populations of Lactococcus lactis IL1403 that evolved in the laboratory for 1000 generations under various environmental conditions (growth or starvation and shaken or stationary). Using RFLP analysis of single-clone r

  6. Systematic identification of tRNAome and its dynamics in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puri, Pranav; Wetzel, Collin; Saffert, Paul; Gaston, Kirk W.; Russel, Susan P.; Cordero Varela, Juan A.; van der Vlies, Pieter; Zhang, Gong; Limbach, Patrick A.; Ignatova, Zoya; Poolman, Bert

    2014-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) through their abundance and modification pattern significantly influence protein translation. Here, we present a systematic analysis of the tRNAome of Lactococcus lactis. Using the next-generation sequencing approach, we identified 40 tRNAs which carry 16 different post-transcr

  7. Comparative analyses of prophage-like elements present in two Lactococcus lactis strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ventura, Marco; Zomer, Aldert; Canchaya, Carlos; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; Kuipers, Oscar; Turroni, Francesca; Ribbera, Angela; Foroni, Elena; Buist, Girbe; Wegmann, Udo; Shearman, Claire; Gasson, Michael J.; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Kok, Jan; van Sinderen, Douwe; O’Connell-Motherway, Mary

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we describe the genetic organizations of six and five apparent prophage-like elements present in the genomes of the Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains MG1363 and SK11, respectively. Phylogenetic investigation as well bioinformatic analyses indicates that all 11 prophages belon

  8. Time-resolved genetic responses of Lactococcus lactis to a dairy environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bachmann, H.; Wilt, de L.; Kleerebezem, M.; Hylckama Vlieg, van J.E.T.

    2010-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is one of main bacterial species found in mixed dairy starter cultures for the production of semi-hard cheese. Despite the appreciation that mixed cultures are essential for the eventual properties of the manufactured cheese the vast majority of studies on L. lactis were carried o

  9. Heterologous expression and characterization of recombinant Lactococcus lactis neutral endopeptidase (Neprilysin)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lian, W; Wu, D; Konings, W.N; Mierau, I; Hersh, L.B

    1996-01-01

    A neutral endopeptidase (NEP) from Lactococcus lactis has recently been cloned and shown to contain high sequence homology with the human neutral endopeptidase, endopeptidase 24.11 (I. Mierau et al., J. Bacteriol. 175, 2087-2096, 1993). The gene for the neutral endopeptidase from L. lactis was clone

  10. Molecular analysis of the replication origin of the Lactococcus lactis plasmid pCI305

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foley, S; Bron, S; Venema, G; Daly, C; Fitzgerald, GF

    1996-01-01

    The replication origin region, ori, of the Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis plasmid pCI305 contains three-and-one-half directly repeated 22-bp sequences and two inverted repeat sequences, IR1 and IR2. These inverted repeat sequences overlap the promoter of the repB gene, which encodes a protein (Rep

  11. A possible contribution of mRNA secondary structure to translation initiation efficiency in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guchte, Maarten van de; Lende, Ted van der; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerard

    1991-01-01

    Gene expression signals derived from Lactococcus lactis were linked to lacZ-fused genes with different 5'-nucleotide sequences. Computer predictions of mRNA secondary structure were combined with lacZ expression studies to direct base-substitutions that could possibly influence gene expression. Muta

  12. Functional Analysis of Promoters in the Nisin Gene Cluster of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruyter, Pascalle G.G.A. de; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Beerthuyzen, Marke M.; Alen-Boerrigter, Ingrid van; Vos, Willem M. de

    1996-01-01

    The promoters in the nisin gene cluster nisABTCIPRKFEG of Lactococcus lactis were characterized by primer extension and transcriptional fusions to the Escherichia coli promoterless β-glucuronidase gene (gusA). Three promoters preceding the nisA, nisR, and nisF genes, which all give rise to gusA expr

  13. Rerouting Citrate Metabolism in Lactococcus lactis to Citrate-Driven Transamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pudlik, Agata M.; Lolkema, Juke S.

    2012-01-01

    Oxaloacetate is an intermediate of the citrate fermentation pathway that accumulates in the cytoplasm of Lactococcus lactis ILCitM(pFL3) at a high concentration due to the inactivation of oxaloacetate decarboxylase. An excess of toxic oxaloacetate is excreted into the medium in exchange for citrate

  14. Lactococcus lactis Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase A Mutants Reveal Important Facets of the Enzymatic Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørager, Sofie Charlotte; Arent, S; Björnberg, Olof

    2003-01-01

    and 1B, and class 2. This division corresponds to differences in cellular location and the nature of the electron acceptor. Herein we report a study of Lactococcus lactis DHODA, a representative of the class 1A enzymes. Based on the DHODA structure we selected seven residues that are highly conserved...

  15. Characteristics and Osmoregulatory Roles of Uptake Systems for Proline and Glycine Betaine in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, Douwe; Hagting, Anja; Alkema, Harmen; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Konings, Wilhelmus

    1993-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lacti ML3 contains high pools of proline or betaine when grown under conditions of high osmotic strength. These pools are created by specific transport systems. A high-affinity uptake system for glycine betaine (betaine) with a Km of 1.5 µM is expressed constitutively. The

  16. A System To Generate Chromosomal Mutations in Lactococcus lactis Which Allows Fast Analysis of Targeted Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, Jean; Buist, Girbe; Haandrikman, Alfred; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerhardus; Leenhouts, Kees

    1995-01-01

    A system for generating chromosomal insertions in lactococci is described. It is based on the conditional replication of lactococcal pWV01-derived Ori+ RepA- vector pORI19, containing lacZα and the multiple cloning site of pUC19. Chromosomal AluI fragments of Lactococcus lactis were cloned in pORI19

  17. Supplementation with engineered Lactococcus lactis improves the folate status in deficient rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LeBlanc, J.G.; Sybesma, W.F.H.; Starrenburg, M.; Sesma, F.; Vos, de W.M.; Giori, de G.S.; Hugenholtz, J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to establish the bioavailability of different folates produced by engineered Lactococcus lactis strains using a rodent depletion-repletion bioassay. Methods: Rats were fed a folate-deficient diet, which produces a reversible subclinical folate deficiency,

  18. Lactococcus lactis YfiA is necessary and sufficient for ribosome dimerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puri, Pranav; Eckhardt, Thomas H; Franken, Linda E; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Stuart, Marc C A; Boekema, Egbert J; Kuipers, Oscar P; Kok, Jan; Poolman, Berend

    2014-01-01

    Dimerization and inactivation of ribosomes in Escherichia coli is a two-step process that involves the binding of ribosome modulation factor (RMF) and hibernation promotion factor (HPF). Lactococcus lactisMG1363 expresses a protein, YfiA(Ll), which associates with ribosomes in the stationary phase o

  19. Genotype-phenotype matching analysis of 38 Lactococcus lactis strains using random forest methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayjanov, J.; Starrenburg, M.J.; Sijde, M.R. van der; Siezen, R.J.; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lactococcus lactis is used in dairy food fermentation and for the efficient production of industrially relevant enzymes. The genome content and different phenotypes have been determined for multiple L. lactis strains in order to understand intra-species genotype and phenotype diversity a

  20. Topology of LcnD, a protein implicated in the transport of bacteriocins from Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, Christian M.; Leenhouts, Kees J.; Haandrikman, Alfred J.; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerard; Venema, Koen

    1996-01-01

    Four in-frame translational fusions to both the reporter proteins beta-galactosidase and alkaline phosphatase support a topological model of LcnD, a protein implicated in the transport of several bacteriocins from Lactococcus lactis, in which the N-terminal part is located intracellularly and one tr

  1. Cholate resistance in Lactococcus lactis is mediated by an ATP-dependent multispecific organic anion transporter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yokota, A; Veenstra, M; Kurdi, P; van Veen, HW; Konings, WN

    The cholate-resistant Lactococcus lactis strain C41-2, derived from mild-type L. lactis MG1363 through selection for growth on cholate-containing medium, displayed a reduced accumulation of cholate due to an enhanced active efflux, However, L. lactis C41-2 was not cross resistant to deoxycholate or

  2. Lactococcus lactis Uses MscL as Its Principal Mechanosensitive Channel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folgering, Joost H.A.; Moe, Paul C.; Schuurman-Wolters, Gea K.; Blount, Paul; Poolman, Bert

    2005-01-01

    The functions of the mechanosensitive channels from Lactococcus lactis were determined by biochemical, physiological, and electrophysiological methods. Patchclamp studies showed that the genes yncB and mscL encode MscS and MscL-like channels, respectively, when expressed in Escherichia coli or if th

  3. Characteristics and Osmoregulatory Roles of Uptake Systems for Proline and Glycine Betaine in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, Douwe; Hagting, Anja; Alkema, Harmen; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Konings, Wilhelmus

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lacti ML3 contains high pools of proline or betaine when grown under conditions of high osmotic strength. These pools are created by specific transport systems. A high-affinity uptake system for glycine betaine (betaine) with a Km of 1.5 µM is expressed constitutively. The

  4. Morphology, genome sequence, and structural proteome of type phage P335 from Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labrie, Simon J.; Josephsen, Jytte; Neve, Horst;

    2008-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis phage P335 is a virulent type phage for the species that bears its name and belongs phage P335 is a virulent type phage for the species that bears its name and belongs to the Siphoviridae family. Morphologically, P335 resembled the L. lactis phages TP901-1 and Tuc2009, except...

  5. Complete genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis S0, an efficient producer of nisin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fangyuan; Ma, Hongchu; Lu, Ying; Teng, Kunling; Kang, Xusheng; Wang, Fangfang; Yang, Xiaopan; Zhong, Jin

    2015-03-20

    Lactococcus lactis S0 is a nisin Z-producing strain isolated from milk, and the nisin production of the strain can reach 4000 IU/ml under fermenting condition. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of L. lactis S0 which includes a single circular chromosome.

  6. Topology of LcnD, a protein implicated in the transport of bacteriocins from Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, Christian M.; Leenhouts, Kees J.; Haandrikman, Alfred J.; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerard; Venema, Koen

    Four in-frame translational fusions to both the reporter proteins beta-galactosidase and alkaline phosphatase support a topological model of LcnD, a protein implicated in the transport of several bacteriocins from Lactococcus lactis, in which the N-terminal part is located intracellularly and one

  7. Transcriptomic profile of aguR deletion mutant of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Del Rio, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel M; Redruello, Begoña; Martin, Maria Cruz; Fernandez, Maria; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Ladero, Victor; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 (formerly GE2-14) is a dairy strain that catabolizes agmatine (a decarboxylated derivative of arginine) into the biogenic amine putrescine by the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway [1]. The AGDI cluster of L. lactis is composed by five genes aguR, aguB, ag

  8. A Case of Infective Endocarditis and Pulmonary Septic Emboli Caused by Lactococcus lactis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Adib; Asli, Nazih; Geffen, Yuval; Miron, Dan; Elias, Nael

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a rare condition in children with normal hearts. We present here a case of previously healthy eleven-year-old girl with infective endocarditis and pulmonary septic emboli caused by a very rare bacterial etiology (Lactococcus lactis). Identification of this pathogen was only made by polymerase chain reaction.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Nonagglutinating Lactococcus garvieae Strain 122061 Isolated from Yellowtail in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiki, Issei; Oinaka, Daisaku; Iwasaki, Yuki; Yasuike, Motoshige; Nakamura, Yoji; Yoshida, Terutoyo; Nagai, Satoshi; Katoh, Masaya; Kobayashi, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    Nonagglutinating Lactococcus garvieae has been isolated from diseased farmed yellowtail in Japan since 2012. In this study, the complete genome and plasmid sequence of nonagglutinating L. garvieae strain 122061 was determined, to our knowledge, for the first time. PMID:27389264

  10. Transcriptome analysis of the Lactococcus lactis ArgR and AhrC regulons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Martinussen, Jan;

    2008-01-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that direct protein-protein. interaction between the two regulators ArgR and AhrC in Lactococcus lactis is required for arginine-dependent repression of the biosynthetic argC promoter and the activation of the catabolic arcA promoter. Here, we establish the global...

  11. Diversity in robustness of Lactococcus lactis strains during heat stress, oxidative stress, and spray drying stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, A.R.; Setyawati, M.C.; Bayjanov, J.R.; Alkema, W.; van Hijum, S.A.F.T.; Bron, P.A.; Hugenholtz, J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we tested 39 Lactococcus lactis strains isolated from diverse habitats for their robustness under heat and oxidative stress, demonstrating high diversity in survival (up to 4 log units). Strains with an L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype generally displayed more-robust phenotypes than s

  12. Overproduction of heterologous mannitol 1-phosphatase : a key factor for engineering mannitol production by Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.W.; Moers, A.P.H.A.; Mars, A.E.; Hoefnagel, M.H.N.; Vos, de W.M.; Hugenholtz, J.

    2005-01-01

    To achieve high mannitol production by Lactococcus lactis, the mannitol 1-phosphatase gene of Eimeria tenella and the mannitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase gene mtlD of Lactobacillus plantarum were cloned in the nisin-dependent L. lactis NICE overexpression system. As predicted by a kinetic L. lactis

  13. Lacticin LC14, a new bacteriocin produced by Lactococcus lactis BMG6.14: isolation, purification and partial characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasta, Samar; Ouzari, Hadda; Andreotti, Nicolas; Fajloun, Ziad; Mansuelle, Pascal; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Sampieri, Francois; Sabatier, Jean Marc

    2012-08-01

    A new bacteriocin, lacticin LC14, produced by Lactococcus lactis BMG6.14, was isolated and characterized. It was purified to homogeneity from overnight broth culture by ammonium sulfate precipitation, Sep-Pak chromatography, and two steps of reversed-phase HPLC. Lacticin LC14 showed bactericidal-type antimicrobial activity against several lactic acid bacteria and pathogenic strains including Listeria monocytogenes. It was inactivated by proteinase K and pronase E, but was resistant to papain, lysozyme, lipase and catalase. Lacticin LC14 was heat resistant, stable over a wide range of pH (2-10) and after treatment by solvents and detergents. Its N-terminal end was found unreactive towards Edman sequencing. Based on MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, its molecular mass was 3333.7 Da. LC14 amino acid composition revealed a high proportion of hydrophobic residues, but no modified ones. LC14 may be able to challenge other well known other bacteriocins in probiotic and therapeutic applications.

  14. Influence of cofermentation by amylolytic Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactococcus lactis strains on the fermentation process and rheology of sorghum porridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukisa, Ivan M; Byaruhanga, Yusuf B; Muyanja, Charles M B K; Aijuka, Matthew; Schüller, Reidar B; Sahlstrøm, Stefan; Langsrud, Thor; Narvhus, Judith A

    2012-08-01

    Amylolytic lactic acid bacteria (ALAB) can potentially replace malt in reducing the viscosity of starchy porridges. However, the drawback of using ALAB is their low and delayed amylolytic activity. This necessitates searching for efficient ALAB and strategies to improve their amylolytic activity. Two ALAB, Lactobacillus plantarum MNC 21 and Lactococcus lactis MNC 24, isolated from Obushera, were used to ferment starches in MRS broth: sorghum, millet, sweet potato, and commercial soluble starch. The amylolytic activity of MNC 21 was comparable to that of the ALAB collection strain Lb. plantarum A6, while that of MNC 24 was extremely low. MNC 21, MNC 24, and their coculture were compared to A6 and sorghum malt for ability to ferment and reduce the viscosity of sorghum porridge (11.6% dry matter). ALAB and the coculture lowered the pH from 6.2 to porridge than the monocultures. The coculture initiated changes in the rheological parameters storage modulus (G'), loss modulus (G″), phase angle (δ), and complex viscosity (η*) earlier than its constituent monocultures. The shear viscosity of sorghum porridge was reduced significantly (P < 0.05) from 1950 cP to 110 cP (malt), 281 cP (coculture), 382 cP (MNC 21), 713 cP (MNC 24), and 722 cP (A6). Coculturing strong ALAB with weak ALAB or non-ALAB can be exploited for preparation of nutrient-dense weaning foods and increasing lactic acid yield from starchy materials.

  15. Cloning and Expression of Plantaricin W Produced by Lactobacillus plantarum U10 Isolate from "Tempoyak" Indonesian Fermented Food as Immunity Protein in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lages, Aksar Chair; Mustopa, Apon Zaenal; Sukmarini, Linda; Suharsono

    2015-10-01

    Plantaricins, one of bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus plantarum, are already known to have activities against several pathogenic bacterium. L. plantarum U10 isolated from "tempoyak," an Indonesian fermented food, produced one kind of plantaricin designated as plantaricin W (plnW). The plnW is suggested as a putative membrane location of protein and has similar conserved motif which is important as immunity to bacteriocin itself. Thus, due to study about this plantaricin, several constructs have been cloned and protein was analyzed in Lactococcus lactis. In this study, plnW gene was successfully cloned into vector NICE system pNZ8148 and created the transformant named L. lactis NZ3900 pNZ8148-WU10. PlnW protein was 25.3 kDa in size. The concentration of expressed protein was significantly increased by 10 ng/mL nisin induction. Furthermore, PlnW exhibited protease activity with value of 2.22 ± 0.05 U/mL and specific activity about 1.65 ± 0.03 U/mg protein with 50 ng/mL nisin induction. Immunity study showed that the PlnW had immunity activity especially against plantaricin and rendered L. lactis recombinant an immunity broadly to other bacteriocins such as pediocin, fermentcin, and acidocin.

  16. AguR, a Transmembrane Transcription Activator of the Putrescine Biosynthesis Operon in Lactococcus lactis, Acts in Response to the Agmatine Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Daniel M; Del Rio, Beatriz; Redruello, Begoña; Ladero, Victor; Martin, M Cruz; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Fernandez, Maria; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-09-01

    Dairy industry fermentative processes mostly use Lactococcus lactis as a starter. However, some dairy L. lactis strains produce putrescine, a biogenic amine that raises food safety and spoilage concerns, via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. The enzymatic activities responsible for putrescine biosynthesis in this bacterium are encoded by the AGDI gene cluster. The role of the catabolic genes aguB, aguD, aguA, and aguC has been studied, but knowledge regarding the role of aguR (the first gene in the cluster) remains limited. In the present work, aguR was found to be a very low level constitutively expressed gene that is essential for putrescine biosynthesis and is transcribed independently of the polycistronic mRNA encoding the catabolic genes (aguBDAC). In response to agmatine, AguR acts as a transcriptional activator of the aguB promoter (PaguB), which drives the transcription of the aguBDAC operon. Inverted sequences required for PaguB activity were identified by deletion analysis. Further work indicated that AguR is a transmembrane protein which might function as a one-component signal transduction system that senses the agmatine concentration of the medium and, accordingly, regulates the transcription of the aguBDAC operon through a C-terminal cytoplasmic DNA-binding domain typically found in LuxR-like proteins.

  17. The lipopolysaccharide of a chloridazon-degrading bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisshaar, R; Lingens, F

    1983-12-01

    Lipopolysaccharide of a chloridazon-degrading bacterium was obtained by a two-stage extraction procedure with phenol/EDTA in a yield of 0.3% of dried bacteria. The carbohydrate moiety consisted of heptose, 3-deoxyoctulosonic acid and D-glucose in a molar ratio of 1:2:2 X 3. Lipid A was composed of 1 mol 2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxy-D-glucose, 2 mol amide-bound and 2.6 mol ester-bound fatty acids/mol. Amide-bound fatty acids were 3-hydroxydodecanoic acid and 3-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid; dodecanoic acid and R-(-)-3-hydroxydodec-5-cis-enoic acid were found to be present in ester linkage. Under conditions of acidic hydrolysis, the latter was converted into the cis and trans isomers of 5-hexyltetrahydrofuran-2-acetic acid. Dodecanoic acid was demonstrated to be linked with the hydroxy groups of the amide-bound fatty acids. The taxonomic significance of these results, especially the demonstration of 2,3-diamino-2, 3-dideoxy-D-glucose, is discussed.

  18. Sequence and stress-response analyses of the DNA mismatch repair gene hexA in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, J; Park, J H; Dunn, N W; Kim, W S

    2001-10-01

    The DNA mismatch repair gene hexA was identified in Lactococcus lactis by PCR amplification by using a pair of primers homologous to the DNA-binding Dps protein. The gene in its entirety, including the regulatory regions, was sequenced, by using a strategy of chromosomal walking based on two PCR protocols. The open reading frame of 2526 bp was preceded by a strong ribosome-binding site (AGGAAG) and was followed by a potential transcription terminator (hairpin loop structure). The 5' terminus of the hexA mRNA was located 135 bp upstream of the start codon, and putative -10 and -35 regions were identified. The deduced amino acid sequence revealed two motifs, the ATP/GTP-binding site (P-loop) and the "MutS family signature". The hexA promoter was cloned into pMU1327, which contained a promoter-less CAT reporter gene, and the promoter activity was examined under oxidative-stress conditions. It appears that the promoter activity is down-shifted by H2O2 at 4 mM.

  19. Occurrence of nisin Z production in Lactococcus lactis BFE 1500 isolated from wara, a traditional Nigerian cheese product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olasupo, N A; Schillinger, U; Narbad, A; Dodd, H; Holzapfel, W H

    1999-12-15

    Screening for bacteriocin production of 500 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from various African fermented foods resulted in the detection of a bacteriocin producing Lactococcus lactis (BFE 1500) isolated from a dairy product called wara. The bacteriocin inhibited not only the closely related LAB, but also strains of Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria innocua, Clostridium butyricum, Clostridium perfringens, Bacillis cereus and Staphylococcus aureus. It was heat stable even at autoclaving temperature (121 degrees C for 15 min) and was active over a wide pH range (2-10), but highest activity was observed in the lower pH range. The bacteriocin was inactivated by alpha-chymotrypsin and proteinase K, but not by other proteases. Growth kinetic assay indicated stronger growth inhibition by the bacteriocin produced by Lc. lactis BFE 1500 on L. monocytogenes WS 2250 and B. cereus DSM 2301 than with the nisin A producing strain DSM 20729. Polymerase chain reaction indicated the presence of the nisin operon in strain BFE 1500 and sequencing of its structural gene showed that Lc. lactis BFE 1500 produced the natural nisin variant, nisin Z, as indicated by the substitution of asparagine residue instead of histidine at position 27. The genetic determinants for bacteriocin production in strain BFE 1500 are located on a conjugative transposon. The ability of the bacteriocin produced by Lc. lactis BFE 1500 to inhibit a wide range of food-borne pathogens is of special interest for food safety, especially in the African environment with perennial problems of poor food hygiene.

  20. Structure-guided engineering of Lactococcus lactis alcohol dehydrogenase LlAdhA for improved conversion of isobutyraldehyde to isobutanol

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xiang

    2013-03-01

    We have determined the X-ray crystal structures of the NADH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase LlAdhA from Lactococcus lactis and its laboratory-evolved variant LlAdhA(RE1) at 1.9Å and 2.5Å resolution, respectively. LlAdhA(RE1), which contains three amino acid mutations (Y50F, I212T, and L264V), was engineered to increase the microbial production of isobutanol (2-methylpropan-1-ol) from isobutyraldehyde (2-methylpropanal). Structural comparison of LlAdhA and LlAdhA(RE1) indicates that the enhanced activity on isobutyraldehyde stems from increases in the protein\\'s active site size, hydrophobicity, and substrate access. Further structure-guided mutagenesis generated a quadruple mutant (Y50F/N110S/I212T/L264V), whose KM for isobutyraldehyde is ∼17-fold lower and catalytic efficiency (kcat/KM) is ∼160-fold higher than wild-type LlAdhA. Combining detailed structural information and directed evolution, we have achieved significant improvements in non-native alcohol dehydrogenase activity that will facilitate the production of next-generation fuels such as isobutanol from renewable resources.

  1. Biogenic amine production by Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains in the model system of Dutch-type cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasarová, Radka; Pachlová, Vendula; Buňková, Leona; Menšíková, Anna; Georgová, Nikola; Dráb, Vladimír; Buňka, František

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the biogenic amine production of two starter strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris (strains from the Culture Collection of Dairy Microorganisms - CCDM 824 and CCDM 946) with decarboxylase positive activity in a model system of Dutch-type cheese during a 90-day ripening period at 10°C. During ripening, biogenic amine and free amino acid content, microbiological characteristics and proximate chemical properties were observed. By the end of the ripening period, the putrescine content in both samples with the addition of the biogenic amine producing strain almost evened out and the concentration of putrescine was >800mg/kg. The amount of tyramine in the cheeses with the addition of the strain of CCDM 824 approached the limit of 400mg/kg by the end of ripening. In the cheeses with the addition of the strain of CCDM 946 it even exceeded 500mg/kg. In the control samples, the amount of biogenic amines was insignificant.

  2. Interaction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactococcus lactis in the fermentation and quality of artisanal cachaça

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Paula Carvalho

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in co-culture were evaluated during sugar cane fermentantion for cachaça production. The inocula containing L. lactis UFLA CA 312 and S. cerevisiae UFLA CA 11 were used in the population of approximately 105 CFU mL-1 and 108 CFU mL-1,  respectively. The sugar cane medium plus 1% of yeast extract (SCM was efficient for growth of L. lactis UFLA CA 312 and S. cerevisiae UFLA CA 11 (letter b -Tukey test. In flasks and vats fermentation the growth of UFLA CA 11 was not negatively influenced by L. lactis UFLA CA 312. However, after 19 h of fermentation, bacterial population showed a slight decrease. Considering parameters higher alcohols and aldehydes, cachaça produced by pure culture of S. cerevisiae was similar to cachaça produced by mixed culture. Cachaça produced by mixed culture showed high values of volatile acidity (letter b -Scott-Knott test being characterized by this parameters in the principal component analysis. High percentage of acceptance (81.10% for the attribute aroma was observed in samples from cachaça produced by mixed culture.

  3. ClaR--a novel key regulator of cellobiose and lactose metabolism in Lactococcus lactis IL1403.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrzak-Piekarczyk, Tamara; Stasiak-Różańska, Lidia; Cieśla, Jarosław; Bardowski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    In a number of previous studies, our group has discovered an alternative pathway for lactose utilization in Lactococcus lactis that, in addition to a sugar-hydrolyzing enzyme with both P-β-glucosidase and P-β-galactosidase activity (BglS), engages chromosomally encoded components of cellobiose-specific PTS (PTS(Cel-Lac)), including PtcA, PtcB, and CelB. In this report, we show that this system undergoes regulation via ClaR, a novel activator protein from the RpiR family of transcriptional regulators. Although RpiR proteins are widely distributed among lactic acid bacteria, their roles have yet to be confirmed by functional assays. Here, we show that ClaR activity depends on intracellular cellobiose-6-phosphate availability, while other sugars such as glucose or galactose have no influence on it. We also show that ClaR is crucial for activation of the bglS and celB expression in the presence of cellobiose, with some limited effects on ptcA and ptcB activation. Among 190 of carbon sources tested, the deletion of claR reduces L. lactis growth only in lactose- and/or cellobiose-containing media, suggesting a narrow specificity of this regulator within the context of sugar metabolism.

  4. Bacteriocins produced by wild Lactococcus lactis strains isolated from traditional, starter-free cheeses made of raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegría, Angel; Delgado, Susana; Roces, Clara; López, Belén; Mayo, Baltasar

    2010-09-30

    Sixty bacterial strains were encountered by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) typing in a series of 306 Lactococcus lactis isolates collected during the manufacturing and ripening stages of five traditional, starter-free cheeses made from raw milk. Among the 60 strains, 17 were shown to produce bacteriocin-like compounds in both solid and liquid media. At a genotypic level, 16 of the strains were identified by molecular methods as belonging to L. lactis subsp. lactis and one to L. lactis subsp. cremoris. Among the L. lactis subsp. lactis strains, phenotypic and genetic data determined that eleven produced either nisin A (nine strains) or nisin Z (two strains), and that five produced lactococcin 972. Variable levels of the two bacteriocins were produced by different strains. In addition, nisin was shown to be produced in inexpensive, dairy- and meat-based media, which will allow the practical application of its producing strains in industrial processes. Specific PCR and nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence analysis identified the inhibitor produced by the single L. lactis subsp. cremoris isolate as a lactococcin G-like bacteriocin. Beyond the use of bacteriocins as functional ingredients for the biopreservation of foods, the newly identified bacteriocin-producing L. lactis strains from traditional cheeses may also be useful for designing starter cultures with protective properties and/or adjunct cultures for accelerating cheese ripening.

  5. CINÉTICA, PRUEBA DE CRECIMIENTO Y EFECTO DE INHIBICIÓN DE Lactococcus lactis SOBRE Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HENRY JURADO GÁMEZ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria have demonstrated a high ability to inhibit pathogenic microorganisms, which improve knowledge of such microorganisms is important, for this, the kinetics was determined, growth and the inhibition effect of Lactococcus lactis on Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. The research was conducted at the University of Nariño, by susceptibility testing in all strains; in vitro inhibition of Lc. lactis and supernatant on bacterial pathogen; gastrointestinal lactic strain testing (gas production and catalase, bile, bile salts and 2 temperatures, growth kinetics and HPLC determination of peptides in the supernatant. dicloxacillin resistance was found in both strains. Lactic strain and the supernatant inhibited Y. pseudotuberculosis. growths and 3,9x1010 3x1011 CFU/150 uL to 3 to 5% bile salts, 3x1011 5x1012 and CFU/150 uL 1 and 2% bovine 3x1013 and 3x1012 bile and CFU/150 uL was found 38 and 45°C. The logarithmic phase of Lc. lactis was found at 3 hours with values 6,4x1012 CFU/150 uL. The VAL-TIR-VAL peptide was found in the supernatant. It is concluded that Lc lactis shows probiotic characteristics in in vitro conditions.

  6. Molecular and functional analyses of the metC gene of Lactococcus lactis, encoding cystathionine beta-lyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, M; van Doesburg, W; Rutten, G A; Marugg, J D; Alting, A C; van Kranenburg, R; Kuipers, O P

    2000-01-01

    The enzymatic degradation of amino acids in cheese is believed to generate aroma compounds and therefore to be essential for flavor development. Cystathionine beta-lyase (CBL) can convert cystathionine to homocysteine but is also able to catalyze an alpha, gamma elimination. With methionine as a substrate, it produces volatile sulfur compounds which are important for flavor formation in Gouda cheese. The metC gene, which encodes CBL, was cloned from the Lactococcus lactis model strain MG1363 and from strain B78, isolated from a cheese starter culture and known to have a high capacity to produce volatile compounds. The metC gene was found to be cotranscribed with a downstream cysK gene, which encodes a putative cysteine synthase. The MetC proteins of both strains were overproduced in strain MG1363 with the NICE (nisin-controlled expression) system, resulting in a >25-fold increase in cystathionine lyase activity. A disruption of the metC gene was achieved in strain MG1363. Determination of enzymatic activities in the overproducing and knockout strains revealed that MetC is essential for the degradation of cystathionine but that at least one lyase other than CBL contributes to methionine degradation via alpha, gamma elimination to form volatile aroma compounds.

  7. Chemical synthesis and characterization of J46 peptide, an atypical class IIa bacteriocin from Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris J46 Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasta, Samar; Fajloun, Ziad; Darbon, Hervé; Mansuelle, Pascal; Andreotti, Nicolas; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Sampieri, François

    2008-02-01

    Bacteriocin J46 is a 27-residue polypeptide produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris J46 in fermented milk. The natural form of J46 (nJ46) exhibits a broad antimicrobial spectrum. Herein, we produced the synthetic form of J46 (sJ46) by solid-phase chemical synthesis. The biochemical and physico-chemical properties of sJ46, as well as its antimicrobial activity, were found to be identical to those of its natural counterpart nJ46. It showed a potent antimicrobial activity against both lactic acid bacteria and other Gram-positive microorganisms. (1)H-NMR conformational analysis of sJ46 indicates that it adopts a flexible random coil structure.

  8. Differential expression of proteins and genes in the lag phase of Lactococcus lactis subsp lactis grown in synthetic medium and reconstituted skim milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, N.; Boye, Mette; Jakobsen, Marianne

    2006-01-01

    metabolism, glycolysis, stress response, translation, transcription, cell division, amino acid metabolism, and coenzyme synthesis., were identified. Among the identified proteins, > 2-fold induction and down-regulation in the lag phase were determined for 12 proteins in respect to the exponential phase......We investigated protein and gene expression in the lag phase of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CNRZ 157 and compared it to the exponential and stationary phases. By means of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, 28 highly expressed lag-phase proteins, implicated in nucleotide...... and for 18 proteins in respect to the stationary phase. Transcriptional changes of the lag-phase proteins in L. lactis were studied by oligonucleotide microarrays. Good correlation between protein and gene expression studies was demonstrated for several differentially expressed proteins, including nucleotide...

  9. PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NISIN PRODUCED BY LACTOCOCCUS LACTIS ISOLATED FROM INDIAN CURD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba A. Mahdy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis isolated from traditional dairy Indian curd. Strains were preliminarily identified by PCR analysis and partial 16S rRNA confirmed that N5 were 100% identical to Lactococcus. lactis sp. lactis. The results revealed that only the bacteriocin produced from strain N5 was shown as being active against mostly gram positive bacteria The bacteriocin produced purified by precipitation followed by loading with gel chromatography. The partially purified bacteriocin was found to be stable over a wide range of pH, temperature and enzymes. The molecular weight of the peptide was judged to be 3.5 kDa by SDSpolyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.and conform to the result of mass spectrometry by maldi-tof test which calculated the mass of 3354.07 Da for nisin.These results indicate that bacteriocin produced by L. lactis sp. lactis N5 is a nisin.

  10. Biosorption of silver cations onto Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus casei isolated from dairy products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanowski, Maciej; Pomastowski, Paweł; Railean-Plugaru, Viorica; Rafińska, Katarzyna; Ligor, Tomasz; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2017-01-01

    The current work deals with the phenomenon of silver cations uptake by two kinds of bacteria isolated from dairy products. The mechanism of sorption of silver cations by Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus casei bacteria was investigated. Inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for determination of silver concentration sorbed by bacteria. Analysis of charge distribution was conducted by diffraction light scattering method. Changes in the ultrastructure of Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus casei cells after treatment with silver cations were investigated using transmission electron microscopy observation. Molecular spectroscopy methods, namely Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) were employed for description of the sorption mechanism. Moreover, an analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) extracted from bacterial cells was performed. PMID:28362838

  11. Generation of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV-Inhibiting Peptides from β-Lactoglobulin Secreted by Lactococcus lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suguru Shigemori

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies showed that hydrolysates of β-lactoglobulin (BLG prepared using gastrointestinal proteases strongly inhibit dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV activity in vitro. In this study, we developed a BLG-secreting Lactococcus lactis strain as a delivery vehicle and in situ expression system. Interestingly, trypsin-digested recombinant BLG from L. lactis inhibited DPP-IV activity, suggesting that BLG-secreting L. lactis may be useful in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  12. Physiological and regulatory effects of controlled overproduction of five cold shock proteins of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, J.A.; Mailhes, M.; Rombouts, F.M.; Vos, de W.M.; Kuipers, O.P.; Abee, T.

    2000-01-01

    The physiological and regulatory effects of overproduction of five cold shock proteins (CSPs) of Lactococcus lactis were studied. CspB, CspD, and CspE could be overproduced at high levels (up to 19␘f the total protein), whereas for CspA and CspC limited overproduction (0.3 to 0.5␘f the total protein

  13. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 Alleviates Food Allergic Manifestations in Sensitized Mice by Reducing IL-13 Expression Specifically in the Ileum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian W. Zuercher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Utilizing a food allergy murine model, we have investigated the intrinsic antiallergic potential of the Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 strain. Methods. BALB/c mice were sensitized at weekly intervals with ovalbumin (OVA plus cholera toxin (CT by the oral route for 7 weeks. In this model, an oral challenge with a high dose of OVA at the end of the sensitization period leads to clinical symptoms. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 was given to mice via the drinking water during sensitization (prevention phase or after sensitization (management phase. Results. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 administration to sensitized mice strikingly reduced allergic manifestations in the management phase upon challenge, when compared to control mice. No preventive effect was observed with the strain. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 significantly decreased relative expression levels of the Th-2 cytokine, IL-13, and associated chemokines CCL11 (eotaxin-1 and CCL17 (TARC in the ileum. No effect was observed in the jejunum. Conclusion/Significance. These results taken together designate Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 as a candidate probiotic strain appropriate in the management of allergic symptoms.

  14. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 Alleviates Food Allergic Manifestations in Sensitized Mice by Reducing IL-13 Expression Specifically in the Ileum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuercher, Adrian W.; Weiss, Marietta; Holvoet, Sébastien; Moser, Mireille; Moussu, Hélène; van Overtvelt, Laurence; Horiot, Stéphane; Moingeon, Philippe; Nutten, Sophie; Prioult, Guénolée; Singh, Anurag; Mercenier, Annick

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Utilizing a food allergy murine model, we have investigated the intrinsic antiallergic potential of the Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 strain. Methods. BALB/c mice were sensitized at weekly intervals with ovalbumin (OVA) plus cholera toxin (CT) by the oral route for 7 weeks. In this model, an oral challenge with a high dose of OVA at the end of the sensitization period leads to clinical symptoms. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 was given to mice via the drinking water during sensitization (prevention phase) or after sensitization (management phase). Results. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 administration to sensitized mice strikingly reduced allergic manifestations in the management phase upon challenge, when compared to control mice. No preventive effect was observed with the strain. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 significantly decreased relative expression levels of the Th-2 cytokine, IL-13, and associated chemokines CCL11 (eotaxin-1) and CCL17 (TARC) in the ileum. No effect was observed in the jejunum. Conclusion/Significance. These results taken together designate Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 as a candidate probiotic strain appropriate in the management of allergic symptoms. PMID:21961022

  15. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 alleviates food allergic manifestations in sensitized mice by reducing IL-13 expression specifically in the ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuercher, Adrian W; Weiss, Marietta; Holvoet, Sébastien; Moser, Mireille; Moussu, Hélène; van Overtvelt, Laurence; Horiot, Stéphane; Moingeon, Philippe; Nutten, Sophie; Prioult, Guénolée; Singh, Anurag; Mercenier, Annick

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing a food allergy murine model, we have investigated the intrinsic antiallergic potential of the Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 strain. BALB/c mice were sensitized at weekly intervals with ovalbumin (OVA) plus cholera toxin (CT) by the oral route for 7 weeks. In this model, an oral challenge with a high dose of OVA at the end of the sensitization period leads to clinical symptoms. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 was given to mice via the drinking water during sensitization (prevention phase) or after sensitization (management phase). Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 administration to sensitized mice strikingly reduced allergic manifestations in the management phase upon challenge, when compared to control mice. No preventive effect was observed with the strain. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 significantly decreased relative expression levels of the Th-2 cytokine, IL-13, and associated chemokines CCL11 (eotaxin-1) and CCL17 (TARC) in the ileum. No effect was observed in the jejunum. These results taken together designate Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 as a candidate probiotic strain appropriate in the management of allergic symptoms.

  16. Diversity analysis of dairy and nondairy Lactococcus lactis isolates, using a novel multilocus sequence analysis scheme and (GTG)5-PCR fingerprinting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rademaker, J.L.W.; Herbet, H.; Starrenburg, M.J.C.; Naser, S.M.; Gevers, D.; Kelly, W.J.; Hugenholtz, J.; Swings, J.; van Hylckama Vlieg, J.E.T.

    2007-01-01

    The diversity of a collection of 102 lactococcus isolates including 91 Lactococcus lactis isolates of dairy and nondairy origin was explored using partial small subunit rRNA gene sequence analysis and limited phenotypic analyses. A subset of 89 strains of L. lactis subsp. cremoris and L. lactis subs

  17. Genome-scale metabolic model for Lactococcus lactis MG1363 and its application to the analysis of flavor formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flahaut, Nicolas A L; Wiersma, Anne; van de Bunt, Bert; Martens, Dirk E; Schaap, Peter J; Sijtsma, Lolke; Dos Santos, Vitor A Martins; de Vos, Willem M

    2013-10-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 is a paradigm strain for lactococci used in industrial dairy fermentations. However, despite of its importance for process development, no genome-scale metabolic model has been reported thus far. Moreover, current models for other lactococci only focus on growth and sugar degradation. A metabolic model that includes nitrogen metabolism and flavor-forming pathways is instrumental for the understanding and designing new industrial applications of these lactic acid bacteria. A genome-scale, constraint-based model of the metabolism and transport in L. lactis MG1363, accounting for 518 genes, 754 reactions, and 650 metabolites, was developed and experimentally validated. Fifty-nine reactions are directly or indirectly involved in flavor formation. Flux Balance Analysis and Flux Variability Analysis were used to investigate flux distributions within the whole metabolic network. Anaerobic carbon-limited continuous cultures were used for estimating the energetic parameters. A thorough model-driven analysis showing a highly flexible nitrogen metabolism, e.g., branched-chain amino acid catabolism which coupled with the redox balance, is pivotal for the prediction of the formation of different flavor compounds. Furthermore, the model predicted the formation of volatile sulfur compounds as a result of the fermentation. These products were subsequently identified in the experimental fermentations carried out. Thus, the genome-scale metabolic model couples the carbon and nitrogen metabolism in L. lactis MG1363 with complete known catabolic pathways leading to flavor formation. The model provided valuable insights into the metabolic networks underlying flavor formation and has the potential to contribute to new developments in dairy industries and cheese-flavor research.

  18. Microbiology of Cheddar cheese made with different fat contents using a Lactococcus lactis single-strain starter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, J R; Brighton, C; McMahon, D J; Farkye, N Y; Johnson, M E; Steele, J L

    2013-07-01

    Flavor development in low-fat Cheddar cheese is typified by delayed or muted evolution of desirable flavor and aroma, and a propensity to acquire undesirable meaty-brothy or burnt-brothy off-flavor notes early in ripening. The biochemical basis for these flavor deficiencies is unclear, but flavor production in bacterial-ripened cheese is known to rely on microorganisms and enzymes present in the cheese matrix. Lipid removal fundamentally alters cheese composition, which can modify the cheese microenvironment in ways that may affect growth and enzymatic activity of starter or nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB). Additionally, manufacture of low-fat cheeses often involves changes to processing protocols that may substantially alter cheese redox potential, salt-in-moisture content, acid content, water activity, or pH. However, the consequences of these changes on microbial ecology and metabolism remain obscure. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of fat content on population dynamics of starter bacteria and NSLAB over 9 mo of aging. Duplicate vats of full fat, 50% reduced-fat, and low-fat (containing cheeses were manufactured at 3 different locations with a single-strain Lactococcus lactis starter culture using standardized procedures. Cheeses were ripened at 8°C and sampled periodically for microbiological attributes. Microbiological counts indicated that initial populations of nonstarter bacteria were much lower in full-fat compared with low-fat cheeses made at all 3 sites, and starter viability also declined at a more rapid rate during ripening in full-fat compared with 50% reduced-fat and low-fat cheeses. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of cheese bacteria showed that the NSLAB fraction of all cheeses was dominated by Lactobacillus curvatus, but a few other species of bacteria were sporadically detected. Thus, changes in fat level were correlated with populations of different bacteria, but did not appear to alter the

  19. Production of Fibronectin Binding Protein A at the surface of Lactococcus lactis increases plasmid transfer in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Pontes

    Full Text Available Lactococci are noninvasive lactic acid bacteria frequently used as protein delivery vectors and, more recently, as DNA delivery vehicles. We previously showed that Lactococcus lactis (LL expressing the Fibronectin-Binding Protein A of Staphylococcus aureus (LL-FnBPA+ showed higher internalization rates in vitro in Caco-2 cells than the native (wt lactococci and were able to deliver a eukaryotic Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP expression plasmid in 1% of human Caco-2 cells. Here, using the bovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG, one of the major cow's milk allergen, and GFP we characterized the potential of LL-FnBPA+ as an in vivo DNA vaccine delivery vehicle. We first showed that the invasive strain LL-FnBPA+ carrying the plasmid pValac:BLG (LL-FnBPA+ BLG was more invasive than LL-BLG and showed the same invasivity as LL-FnBPA+. Then we demonstrated that the Caco-2 cells, co-incubated with LL-FnBPA+ BLG produced up to 30 times more BLG than the Caco-2 cells co-incubated with the non invasive LL-BLG. Using two different gene reporters, BLG and GFP, and two different methods of detection, EIA and fluorescence microscopy, we showed in vivo that: i in order to be effective, LL-FnBPA+ required a pre-coating with Fetal Calf Serum before oral administration; ii plasmid transfer occurred in enterocytes without regard to the strains used (invasive or not; iii the use of LL-FnBPA+ increased the number of mice producing BLG, but not the level of BLG produced. We thus confirmed the good potential of invasive recombinant lactic acid bacteria as DNA delivery vector in vivo.

  20. Complete genome of Nitrosospira briensis C-128, an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium from agricultural soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rice, Marlen C.; Norton, Jeanette M.; Valois, Frederica; Bollmann, Annette; Bottomley, Peter J.; Klotz, Martin G.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.; Suwa, Yuichi; Stein, Lisa Y.; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis; Woyke, Tanja; Shapiro, Nicole; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Kyrpides, Nikos; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Nitrosospira briensis C-128 is an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium isolated from an acid agricultural soil. N. briensis C-128 was sequenced with PacBio RS technologies at the DOE-Joint Genome Institute through their Community Science Program (2010). The high-quality finished genome contains one chromosom

  1. Metabolic Engineering of Exopolysaccharide Production in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boels, I.C.

    2002-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by lactic acid bacteria are important structural components in fermented foods. In addition, they may confer health benefits to the consumer, as mouse model studies have indicated that EPS may have immunostimulatory, anti-tumoral,

  2. Structural characterisation and enzymic modification of exopolysaccharides from Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casteren, van W.

    2000-01-01

    Since ancient times, lactic acid bacteria have been used for the preservation of food. Some of these bacteria are able to produce exopolysaccharides (EPSs), which may contribute to the peculiar rheology and texture of, for example, milk-derived products. Insight into the relationship betwee

  3. Exopolysaccharide biosynthesis in Lactococcus lactis : a molecular characterisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, van R.

    1999-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are Gram-positive bacteria which are used for industrial food fermentation processes. Some have the ability to form exopolysaccharides (EPSs) and these bacteria or the produced EPSs can be used to enhance the structural properties of food products. Furthermore, these EPSs are cl

  4. IDENTIFICATION OF THE BACTERIUM TOMATO STEM CANKER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goner A. Shaker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseased tomato samples were collected from green house was evaluated for isolation, pathogenicity and biochemical tests. The symptoms of the infected tomato plants were as sudden wilting after curled on leaves and necrotic streak regions developed at the crown and base of the stem and the cavities deepen and expand up and down, brown discoloration and necrosis occurring on xylem and phloem vasculer. All of ages of tomato plant were susceptible to bacteria when the weather condition favorable and immediately, seen collapse symptom on tomato plant at once fail and die. The bacterium was isolated from diseased plant in all regions on nutrient Agar; a yellow bacterium was isolated from infected tomato plant in green houses and fields in Abu-Ghraib, Rashiedia and Qanat Al-Geiaysh nurseries in Baghdad provinces of Iraq. The bacterium was found gram positive, rod-shaped, non-motile and capable an aerobic growth and based on the morphological and biochemical characteristics revealed that this bacterium belongs to: Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. (smith pathogenicity and hypersensitivity of the bacterium Cmm showed the disease index were 18.33, 6.66, 16.66, 5, 0% for tomato seedlings were inoculated treatments as the wounding roots, without wounding roots, crown of the stem, petiole and control respectively.

  5. The domestication of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Matthew J; Jolley, Keith A; Bray, James E; Aerts, Maarten; Vandamme, Peter; Maiden, Martin C J; Marchesi, Julian R; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2014-11-26

    Lactobacillus acidophilus is a Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium that has had widespread historical use in the dairy industry and more recently as a probiotic. Although L. acidophilus has been designated as safe for human consumption, increasing commercial regulation and clinical demands for probiotic validation has resulted in a need to understand its genetic diversity. By drawing on large, well-characterised collections of lactic acid bacteria, we examined L. acidophilus isolates spanning 92 years and including multiple strains in current commercial use. Analysis of the whole genome sequence data set (34 isolate genomes) demonstrated L. acidophilus was a low diversity, monophyletic species with commercial isolates essentially identical at the sequence level. Our results indicate that commercial use has domesticated L. acidophilus with genetically stable, invariant strains being consumed globally by the human population.

  6. A bacterium that degrades and assimilates poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shosuke; Hiraga, Kazumi; Takehana, Toshihiko; Taniguchi, Ikuo; Yamaji, Hironao; Maeda, Yasuhito; Toyohara, Kiyotsuna; Miyamoto, Kenji; Kimura, Yoshiharu; Oda, Kohei

    2016-03-11

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is used extensively worldwide in plastic products, and its accumulation in the environment has become a global concern. Because the ability to enzymatically degrade PET has been thought to be limited to a few fungal species, biodegradation is not yet a viable remediation or recycling strategy. By screening natural microbial communities exposed to PET in the environment, we isolated a novel bacterium, Ideonella sakaiensis 201-F6, that is able to use PET as its major energy and carbon source. When grown on PET, this strain produces two enzymes capable of hydrolyzing PET and the reaction intermediate, mono(2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalic acid. Both enzymes are required to enzymatically convert PET efficiently into its two environmentally benign monomers, terephthalic acid and ethylene glycol. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Elucidating Flux Regulation of the Fermentation Modes of Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Siu Hung Joshua

    an important subject for basic research in cellular metabolism because L. lactis exhibits an interesting metabolic shift. Under anaerobic conditions, on fast fermentable sugars, L. lactis produces lactate as the primary product, known as homolactic fermentation but on slowly fermentable sugars, significant...... amounts of formate, acetate and ethanol are formed, known as mixed-acid fermentation. This shift is termed the mixedacid shift. This type of shift between a low-yield and a high-yield metabolism has drawn a lot of research focus and has similarly been observed in other bacteria, yeast and even tumor cells...... the expression level of certain genes in glycolysis and fermentation pathways, the levels of the cofactors NADH, NAD+, ATP and ADP, the balance between catabolism and anabolism, etc. In this project, we studied the mixed-acid fermentation of L. lactis by (i) examining the roles of the enzymes in the mixed...

  8. Characterization of bacteriocins produced by Lactococcus lactis strains Caracterização de bacteriocinas produzidas por linhagens de Lactococcus lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izildinha Moreno

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriocins produced by fifteen strains of Lactococcus lactis (14 L. lactis subsp. lactis and one L. lactis subsp. cremoris were heat resistant, sensitive to several proteolytic enzymes and active over a wide range of pH. Their resistance to the heating was greatly influenced by the pH. Only the strain L. lactis subsp. lactis ITAL 383 produced a bacteriocin with a wide activity spectrum, similar to nisin of L. lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454. This bacteriocin inhibited closely related species and other Gram-positive microorganisms including Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus, but it was not active against the Gram-negative bacteria tested. The identification of partially purified antimicrobial compounds by SDS-PAGE showed that bacteriocin produced by strain ITAL 383 had the same molecular weight of nisin produced by L. lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454.Bacteriocinas resistentes ao aquecimento produzidas por quinze linhagens de Lactococcus lactis (14 L. lactis subsp. lactis e 1 L. lactis subsp. cremoris foram sensíveis à enzimas proteolíticas e ativas em uma ampla faixa de pH. A resistência dessas bacteriocinas ao aquecimento foi fortemente influenciada pelo pH do meio. Somente a linhagem L. lactis subsp. lactis ITAL 383 produziu uma bacteriocina com um amplo espectro de atividade, semelhante ao da nisina de L. lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454. Esta bacteriocina inibiu as espécies relacionadas e outros microorganismos gram-positivos, inclusive Listeria monocytogenes e Staphylococcus aureus, mas não as bactérias Gram-negativas examinadas. A identificação do composto antimicrobiano parcialmente purificado por SDS-PAGE revelou um peso molecular similar entre a bacteriocina ITAL 383 e a nisina de L. lactis subsp lactis ATCC 11454.

  9. Atopobacter phocae gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel bacterium isolated from common seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, P A; Foster, G; Falsen, E; Ohlén, M; Collins, M D

    2000-09-01

    Two strains of a Gram-positive, catalase-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium isolated from common seals were characterized using phenotypic and molecular taxonomic methods. The two strains closely resembled each other based on their biochemical characteristics, and PAGE analysis of whole-cell protein patterns confirmed their close phenotypic affinity. 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that the two strains were genetically highly related (99.8% sequence similarity) and that they constitute a new line of descent within the lactic acid group of bacteria. The nearest phylogenetic neighbours of the unknown bacterium were Granulicatella spp., with related taxa such as enterococci, carnobacteria, Desemzia incerta, Lactosphaera pasteurii, Melissococcus plutonius, tetragenococci and vagococci more distantly related. Based on phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence it is proposed that the unknown bacterium from seals be classified in a new genus as Atopobacter phocae gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Atopobacter phocae is CCUG 42358T (= CIP 106392T).

  10. Non-Fusion and Fusion Expression of β-Galactosidase from Lactobacillus bulgaricus in Lactococcus lactis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHUAN WANG; CHAO-WU ZHANG; HENG-CHUAN LIU; QIAN YU; XIAO-FANG PEI

    2008-01-01

    Objective To construct four recombinant Lactococcus lactis strains exhibiting high β-galactosidase activity in fusion or non-fusion ways, and to study the influence factors for their protein expression and secretion. Methods The gene fragments encoding β-galactosidase from two strains of Lactobacillus bulgaricus, wch9901 isolated from yogurt and 1.1480 purchased from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, were amplified and inserted into lactococcal expression vector pMG36e. For fusion expression, the open reading frame of the β-galactosidase gene was amplified, while for non-fusion expression, the open reading frame of the β-galactosidase gene was amplified with its native Shine-Dalgarno sequence upstream. The start codon of the β-galactosidase gene partially overlapped with the stop codon of vector origin open reading frame. Then, the recombinant plasmids were transformed into Escherichia coli DH5α and Lactococcus lactis subsp, lactis MG1363 and confirmed by determining β-galactosidase activities. Results The non-fusion expression plasmids showed a significantly higher β-galactosidase activity in transformed strains than the fusion expression plasmids. The highest enzyme activity was observed in Lactococcus lactis transformed with the non-fusion expression plasmids which were inserted into the β-galactosidase gene from Lactobacillus bulgaricus wch9901. The β-galactosidase activity was 2.75 times as high as that of the native counterpart. In addition, β-galactosidase expressed by recombinant plasmids in Lactococcus lactis could be secreted into the culture medium. The highest secretion rate (27.1%) was observed when the culture medium contained 20 g/L of lactose. Conclusion Different properties of the native bacteria may have some effects on the protein expression of recombinant plasmids. Non-fusion expression shows a higher enzyme activity in host bacteria. There may be a ost-related weak secretion signal peptide gene within the structure gene of Lb

  11. Mechanism of flavin reduction in the class 1A dihydroorotate dehydrogenase from Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagan, Rebecca L; Jensen, Kaj Frank; Björnberg, Olof;

    2007-01-01

    is concerted or stepwise was addressed for the class 1A enzyme from Lactococcus lactis by determining kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) on flavin reduction in anaerobic stopped-flow experiments. Isotope effects were determined at two pH values. At pH 7.0, KIEs were approximately 2-fold for DHO labeled singly...... mutants was extremely slow compared to that of the wild type; the rate of reduction increased with pH, showing no sign of a plateau. Interestingly, double-deuterium isotope effects on the Cys130Ser mutant also showed a concerted mechanism for flavin reduction....

  12. Lactococcus lactis-based vaccines from laboratory bench to human use: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahey-El-Din, Mohammed

    2012-01-17

    Developing effective vaccines is an important weapon in the battle against potential pathogens and their evolving antibiotic resistance trends. Several vaccine delivery vectors have been investigated among which the generally regarded as safe (GRAS) Lactococcus lactis has a distinguished position. In this review, different factors affecting the efficacy of L. lactis-based vaccines are discussed. In addition, the issues of biological containment and pharmaceutical quality assurance of L. lactis vaccines are highlighted. These issues are critical for the success of medical translation of L. lactis-based vaccines from research laboratories to clinical use by ensuring consistent manufacturing of safe and efficacious vaccines.

  13. Cloning and Characterization of upp, a Gene Encoding Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase from Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Hammer, Karin

    1994-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase catalyzes the key reaction in the salvage of uracil in many microorganisms. The gene encoding uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (upp) was cloned from Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 by complementation of an Escherichia coli mutant. The gene was sequenced...... construction of an internal deletion, a upp mutant was constructed by a double-crossover event. This implicated the utilization of a plasmid with a thermosensitive origin of replication and a new and easy way to screen for double crossover events in both gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains...

  14. Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae YZUSK-4, a Bacterium Proposed as a Starter Culture for Fermented Meat Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hai; Yin, Yongqi; Xu, Lin; Yan, Ming; Fang, Weiming; Ge, Qingfeng

    2015-07-23

    Klebsiella pneumoniae strain YZUSK-4, isolated from Chinese RuGao ham, is an efficient branched-chain aminotransferase-producing bacterium that can be used widely in fermented meat products to enhance flavor. The draft genome sequence of strain YZUSK-4 may provide useful genetic information on branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase production and branched-chain amino acid metabolism.

  15. In Vitro Assessment of the Probiotic Potential of Lactococcus lactis LMG 7930 against Ruminant Mastitis-Causing Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Federica; Camperio, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Mastitis in dairy ruminants is considered to be the most expensive disease to farmers worldwide. Recently, the intramammary infusion of lactic acid bacteria has emerged as a potential new alternative to antibiotics for preventing and treating bovine mastitis. In this study we have investigated in vitro the probiotic potential of Lactococcus lactis LMG 7930, a food-grade and nisin-producing strain, against mastitis-causing pathogens. We have characterized its carbohydrate fermentation and antibiotic susceptibility profiles, cell surface properties and antimicrobial activity, as well as its capabilities to adhere to and inhibit the invasion of pathogens into the bovine mammary epithelial cell line BME-UV1d. We found that L. lactis LMG 7930 was sensitive to tested drugs, according to the EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP), and showed an improved carbohydrate fermentation capacity compared to starter strains. Moreover, the strain exhibited antagonistic properties towards many of the pathogens tested. It presented medium surface hydrophobicity, a low basic property and no electron acceptor capability. It showed low auto-aggregation and no co-aggregation abilities towards any of the tested pathogens. The strain was one of the most adhesive to bovine mammary epithelial cells among tested bacteria, but its internalisation was low. The strain did not affect significantly pathogen invasion; however, a trend to decrease internalization of some pathogens tested was observed. In conclusion, our results suggest that this strain might be a promising candidate for the development of new strategies of mastitis control in ruminants. Future investigations are needed to evaluate its safety and efficacy under field conditions. PMID:28068371

  16. Genetically engineered Lactococcus lactis protect against house dust mite allergy in a BALB/c mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunqing Ai

    Full Text Available Mucosal vaccine based on lactic acid bacteria is an attractive concept for the prevention and treatment of allergic diseases, but their mechanisms of action in vivo are poorly understood. Therefore, we sought to investigate how recombinant major dust mite allergen Der p2-expressing Lactococcus lactis as a mucosal vaccine induced the immune tolerance against house dust mite allergy in a mouse model.Three strains of recombinant L. lactis producing Der p2 in different cell components (extracellular, intracellular and cell wall were firstly constructed. Their prophylactic potential was evaluated in a Der p2-sensitised mouse model, and immunomodulation properties at the cellular level were determined by measuring cytokine production in vitro.Der p2 expressed in the different recombinant L. lactis strains was recognized by a polyclonal anti-Der p2 antibody. Oral treatment with the recombinant L. lactis prior sensitization significantly prevented the development of airway inflammation in the Der p2-sensitized mice, as determined by the attenuation of inflammatory cells infiltration in the lung tissues and decrease of Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage. In addition, the serum allergen-specific IgE levels were significantly reduced, and the levels of IL-4 in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes cell cultures were also markedly decreased upon allergen stimulation in the mice fed with the recombinant L. lactis strains. These protective effects correlated with a significant up-regulation of regulatory T cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes.Oral pretreatment with live recombinant L. lactis prevented the development of allergen-induced airway inflammation primarily by the induction of specific mucosal immune tolerance.

  17. In Vitro Assessment of the Probiotic Potential of Lactococcus lactis LMG 7930 against Ruminant Mastitis-Causing Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Federica; Camperio, Cristina; Marianelli, Cinzia

    2017-01-01

    Mastitis in dairy ruminants is considered to be the most expensive disease to farmers worldwide. Recently, the intramammary infusion of lactic acid bacteria has emerged as a potential new alternative to antibiotics for preventing and treating bovine mastitis. In this study we have investigated in vitro the probiotic potential of Lactococcus lactis LMG 7930, a food-grade and nisin-producing strain, against mastitis-causing pathogens. We have characterized its carbohydrate fermentation and antibiotic susceptibility profiles, cell surface properties and antimicrobial activity, as well as its capabilities to adhere to and inhibit the invasion of pathogens into the bovine mammary epithelial cell line BME-UV1d. We found that L. lactis LMG 7930 was sensitive to tested drugs, according to the EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP), and showed an improved carbohydrate fermentation capacity compared to starter strains. Moreover, the strain exhibited antagonistic properties towards many of the pathogens tested. It presented medium surface hydrophobicity, a low basic property and no electron acceptor capability. It showed low auto-aggregation and no co-aggregation abilities towards any of the tested pathogens. The strain was one of the most adhesive to bovine mammary epithelial cells among tested bacteria, but its internalisation was low. The strain did not affect significantly pathogen invasion; however, a trend to decrease internalization of some pathogens tested was observed. In conclusion, our results suggest that this strain might be a promising candidate for the development of new strategies of mastitis control in ruminants. Future investigations are needed to evaluate its safety and efficacy under field conditions.

  18. Secretion of an immunoreactive single-chain variable fragment antibody against mouse interleukin 6 by Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemori, Suguru; Ihara, Masaki; Sato, Takashi; Yamamoto, Yoshinari; Nigar, Shireen; Ogita, Tasuku; Shimosato, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is an important pathogenic factor in development of various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and cancer. Blocking antibodies against molecules associated with IL-6/IL-6 receptor signaling are an attractive candidate for the prevention or therapy of these diseases. In this study, we developed a genetically modified strain of Lactococcus lactis secreting a single-chain variable fragment antibody against mouse IL-6 (IL6scFv). An IL6scFv-secretion vector was constructed by cloning an IL6scFv gene fragment into a lactococcal secretion plasmid and was electroporated into L. lactis NZ9000 (NZ-IL6scFv). Secretion of recombinant IL6scFv (rIL6scFv) by nisin-induced NZ-IL6scFv was confirmed by western blotting and was optimized by tuning culture conditions. We found that rIL6scFv could bind to commercial recombinant mouse IL-6. This result clearly demonstrated the immunoreactivity of rIL6scFv. This is the first study to engineer a genetically modified strain of lactic acid bacteria (gmLAB) that produces a functional anti-cytokine scFv. Numerous previous studies suggested that mucosal delivery of biomedical proteins using gmLAB is an effective and low-cost way to treat various disorders. Therefore, NZ-IL6scFv may be an attractive tool for the research and development of new IL-6 targeting agents for various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases as well as for cancer.

  19. Description of Gluconacetobacter sacchari sp. nov., a new species of acetic acid bacterium isolated from the leaf sheath of sugar cane and from the pink sugar-cane mealy bug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, I H; Fegan, M; Hayward, C; Leonard, G; Stackebrandt, E; Sly, L I

    1999-10-01

    A new species of the genus Gluconacetobacter, for which the name Gluconacetobacter sacchari sp. nov. is proposed, was isolated from the leaf sheath of sugar cane and from the pink sugar-cane mealy bug, Saccharicoccus sacchari, found on sugar cane growing in Queensland and northern New South Wales, Australia. The nearest phylogenetic relatives in the alpha-subclass of the Proteobacteria are Gluconacetobacter liquefaciens and Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, which have 98.8-99.3% and 97.9-98.5% 16S rDNA sequence similarity, respectively, to members of Gluconacetobacter sacchari. On the basis of the phylogenetic positioning of the strains, DNA reassociation studies, phenotypic tests and the presence of the Q10 ubiquinone, this new species was assigned to the genus Gluconacetobacter. No single phenotypic characteristic is unique to the species, but the species can be differentiated phenotypically from closely related members of the acetic acid bacteria by growth in the presence of 0.01% malachite green, growth on 30% glucose, an inability to fix nitrogen and an inability to grow with the L-amino acids asparagine, glycine, glutamine, threonine and tryptophan when D-mannitol was supplied as the sole carbon and energy source. The type strain of this species is strain SRI 1794T (= DSM 12717T).

  20. Phage-host interaction in Lactococcus and Leuconostoc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kot, Witold Piotr

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are economically important group of microbes used as starter cultures in the dairy industry. Bacteriophages attacking LAB are the main factor responsible for fermentations failures, thus creating significant economical losses worldwide. In the first part of this study, ....... The study was mainly focused on the interaction between the host cell wall polysaccharides (CWPS) and the phage RBP. The results of the study suggest that both CWPS types and RBP determinants could be classified in groups, which correlated with each other.......Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are economically important group of microbes used as starter cultures in the dairy industry. Bacteriophages attacking LAB are the main factor responsible for fermentations failures, thus creating significant economical losses worldwide. In the first part of this study......, bacteriophages infecting Leuconostoc species were characterized. A large group of Leuconostoc phages was characterized regarding the morphology, host range variation and genetic relatedness. A classification system for dairy Leuconostoc phages was proposed. dditionally, a PCR test for the dairy Leuconostoc...

  1. Zymomonas mobilis: a bacterium for ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baratti, J.C.; Bu' Lock, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis is a facultative anaerobic gram negative bacterium first isolated in tropical countries from alcoholic beverages like the African palm wine, the Mexican pulque and also as a contaminant of cider (cider sickness) or beer in the European countries. It is one of the few facultative anaerobic bacteria degrading glucose by the Entner-Doudoroff pathway usually found in strictly aerobic microorganisms. Some work was devoted to this bacterium in the 50s and 60s and was reviewed by Swings and De Ley in their classical paper published in 1977. During the 70s there was very little work on the bacterium until 1979 and the first report by the Australian group of P.L. Rogers on the great potentialities of Z. mobilis for ethanol production. At that time the petroleum crisis had led the developed countries to search for alternative fuel from renewable resources. The Australian group clearly demonstrated the advantages of the bacterium compared to the yeasts traditionally used for the alcoholic fermentation. As a result, there was a considerable burst in the Zymomonas literature which started from nearly zero in the late 70s to attain 70 papers published in the field in 1984. In this article, papers published from 1982 to 1986 are reviewed.

  2. Pathogenesis of helicobacter pylori infection: Bacterium and host relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić-Milutinović Aleksandra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of a half of the mankind. Duodenal ulcer is found in 15-25%, t gastric ulcer in 13%, while gastric adenocarcinoma develops in 1% of all infected individuals. Pathogenesis of H. pylori infection is related to the virulence factors of the bacterium, environmental (dietary habits, hygiene, stress and host factors (age, sex, blood type. Colonization of the gastric mucosa is related to the motility of the bacterium, presence of lipopolysacharide (LPS and various bacterial enzymes. Gastric mucosal injury is the result of H. pylori LPS, vacuolization cytotoxin (vacA, cytotoxin associated protein (cagA, heat shock proteins and factors responsible for neutrophil chemotaxis and activity. H. pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa and zones of ectopic gastric epithelium. H. pylori infection is transmitted via oral-oral, fecal-oral and iatrogenic way (during endoscopy. Higher prevalence of the infection is associated with lower socioeconomic level, lack of drinking water, and living in a community. Acute H. pylori gastritis is superficial pangastritis progressing into the chronic phase after 7-10 days. Gastric mucosal atrophy and intestinal metaplasia can develop during the course of H. pylori infection. Clearly defined factors that influence the outcome of H. pylori infection include bacterial strain, distribution of gastritis, acid secretion and gastric mucosal atrophy.

  3. Antibacterial effects of medicinal plant extracts against Lactococcus garvieae, the etiological agent of rainbow trout lactococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saeid Fereidouni

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Eight medicinal plants were assessed for antimicrobial activity against Lactococcus garvieae isolate obtained from diseased Oncorhynchus mykiss collected from rainbow trout fish farms in Iran. Lactococcus garvieae is among the major pathogens of a large number of fish species cultured in fresh and marine recirculating and net pen production systems. The antibacterial activity of the medicinal plants against L. garvieae was evaluated using disc diffusion, well diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration. Results showed that the extracts and essential oils had a relatively high antibacterial activity against L. garvieae. Of the plants studied, the most active extracts were those from the methanol extract of Peganum harmala, the essential oil of Satureja bachtiarica, the ethanol extract of Juglans regia and Trachyspermum copticum with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of 105, 126, 510 and 453 μg/ml, respectively. Conversly, some of the extracts such as Quercus branti Lindley and Glycyrrhiza glabra L. had lower activity against L. garvieae with MIC values of 978 and 920 μg/ml respectively. Plant extracts as natural and environment- friendly compounds can be an important source of antibacterial agents against L. garvieae. They may be used for disinfection of instruments and rainbow trout raceways or treatment of the fish.

  4. Enhancing bile tolerance improves survival and persistence of Bifidobacterium and Lactococcus in the murine gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Colin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of commensal gastrointestinal bacteria used as probiotics are highly adapted to the specialised environment of the large bowel. However, unlike pathogenic bacteria; they are often inadequately equipped to endure the physicochemical stresses of gastrointestinal (GI delivery in the host. Herein we outline a patho-biotechnology strategy to improve gastric delivery and host adaptation of a probiotic strain Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 and the generally regarded as safe (GRAS organism Lactococcus lactis NZ9000. Results In vitro bile tolerance of both strains was significantly enhanced (P Listeria monocytogenes bile resistance mechanism BilE. Strains harbouring bilE were also recovered at significantly higher levels (P n = 5, following oral inoculation. Furthermore, a B. breve strain expressing bilE demonstrated increased efficacy relative to the wild-type strain in reducing oral L. monocytogenes infection in mice. Conclusion Collectively the data indicates that bile tolerance can be enhanced in Bifidobacterium and Lactococcus species through rational genetic manipulation and that this can significantly improve delivery to and colonisation of the GI tract.

  5. First Case Report of a Late Onset Knee Periprosthetic Joint Infection Caused by Lactococcus garvieae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.-I. Neagoe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus garvieae is known as a Gram-positive, catalase-negative, and facultatively anaerobic fish pathogen. The association between Lactococcus spp. and human infectious diseases is described as being mainly associated with lumbar osteomyelitis, hepatic abscess, and infective endocarditis. In the literature of orthopedic post-prosthetic infections, L. garvieae was associated with a case of hip prosthetic infection in a fishmonger woman. We present the case of a 79-year-old male patient with multiple comorbidities, who is admitted to our center with a 5-day history of pain, swelling, and motility disorder of the right knee by the presence of a bicondylar knee replacement surgery, which was performed due to gonarthrosis 17 years ago. The radiographies of the right knee revealed no signs of displacement or loosening of the prothesis. After multiple radical debridements including VAC therapy and targeted antibiotic therapy we have managed to defeat the infection without exchange arthroplasty. Although we could not demonstrate the source of infection, we can only presume that in our case the source of infection was represented by the ingestion of possibly contaminated food. The patient had a habit of eating Nile perch fish (Lates niloticus every 4 weeks. We illustrated once more the possibility of a late onset L. garvieae related orthopedic periprosthetic joint infection by multiple comorbidities.

  6. Analysis of the genome content of Lactococcus garvieae by genomic interspecies microarray hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibello Alicia

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactococcus garvieae is a bacterial pathogen that affects different animal species in addition to humans. Despite the widespread distribution and emerging clinical significance of L. garvieae in both veterinary and human medicine, there is almost a complete lack of knowledge about the genetic content of this microorganism. In the present study, the genomic content of L. garvieae CECT 4531 was analysed using bioinformatics tools and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH experiments. Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL1403 and Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4 were used as reference microorganisms. Results The combination and integration of in silico analyses and in vitro CGH experiments, performed in comparison with the reference microorganisms, allowed establishment of an inter-species hybridization framework with a detection threshold based on a sequence similarity of ≥ 70%. With this threshold value, 267 genes were identified as having an analogue in L. garvieae, most of which (n = 258 have been documented for the first time in this pathogen. Most of the genes are related to ribosomal, sugar metabolism or energy conversion systems. Some of the identified genes, such as als and mycA, could be involved in the pathogenesis of L. garvieae infections. Conclusions In this study, we identified 267 genes that were potentially present in L. garvieae CECT 4531. Some of the identified genes could be involved in the pathogenesis of L. garvieae infections. These results provide the first insight into the genome content of L. garvieae.

  7. Tulum Peynirlerinden izole Edilen Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis YBML9 ve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasin TUNCER

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Bu çalısmanın amacı tulum peynirlerinden izole edilen Lactococcus lactis suslarının fenotipik tanısı ve bu suslar tarafından üretilen bakteriyosinlerin kısmi karakterizasyonlarıdır. Bu amaçla Türkiye'nin sekiz farklı ilinden (Ankara, Antalya, Burdur, Denizli, Erzincan, Isparta, İstanbul ve İzmir yöresel pazarlardan toplanan 60 adet tulum peyniri örneginden 40 adet Lactococcus lactis susu (31 adet L. lactis subsp. lactis ve 9 adet L. lactis subsp. cremoris izole edildi. 40 adet L. lactis susu içerisinden, 2 adet L. lactis subsp. lactis (YBML9 ve YBML21 susu bakteriyosin üretme yeteneginde bulundu. L. lactis subsp. lactis YBML9 ve YBML21 susları tarafından üretilen bakteriyosinler, farklı enzim, pH ve sıcaklık uygulamaları sonucu; sırasıyla nisin ve laktisin 481 olarak tanımlandı.

  8. Isolation, screening and characterization of bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional fermented food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shafei, H A; Abd-El-Sabour, H; Ibrahim, N; Mostafa, Y A

    2000-03-01

    100 lactic acid bacterial strains isolated from traditional fermented foods (yoghurt, milk cream, sour dough and milk) were screened for bacteriocin production. Twenty six strains producing a nisin-like bacteriocin were selected. Most of these isolates gave only a narrow inhibitory spectrum, although one showed a broad inhibitory spectrum against the indicator strains tested, this strain was determined as Lactococcus lactis. The influence of several parameters on the fermentative production of nisin by Lactococcus lactis was studied. Production of nisin was optimal at 30 degrees C and in the pH range 5.5-6.3. The effect of different sulphur and nitrogen sources on Lactococcus lactis growth and nisin production was studied. Magnesium sulfate and manganese sulfate were found to be the best sulphur sources while triammonium citrate was the best inorganic nitrogen source and meat extract, peptone and yeast extract were the best organic nitrogen source for nisin production.

  9. Characterization of three lactic acid bacteria and their isogenic ldh deletion mutants shows optimization for Y(ATP) (cell mass produced per mole of ATP) at their physiological pHs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiedler, T.; Bekker, M.; Jonsson, M.; Mehmeti, I.; Pritzschke, A.; Siemens, N.; Nes, I.; Hugenholtz, J.; Kreikemeyer, B.

    2011-01-01

    Several lactic acid bacteria use homolactic acid fermentation for generation of ATP. Here we studied the role of the lactate dehydrogenase enzyme on the general physiology of the three homolactic acid bacteria Lactococcus lactis, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus pyogenes. Of note, deletion o

  10. Characterization of three lactic acid bacteria and their isogenic ldh deletion mutants shows optimization for Y(ATP) (cell mass produced per mole of ATP) at their physiological pHs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiedler, T.; Bekker, M.; Jonsson, M.; Mehmeti, I.; Pritzschke, A.; Siemens, N.; Nes, I.; Hugenholtz, J.; Kreikemeyer, B.

    2011-01-01

    Several lactic acid bacteria use homolactic acid fermentation for generation of ATP. Here we studied the role of the lactate dehydrogenase enzyme on the general physiology of the three homolactic acid bacteria Lactococcus lactis, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus pyogenes. Of note, deletion

  11. Metabolic Engineering of Mannitol Production in Lactococcus lactis: Influence of Overexpression of Mannitol 1-Phosphate Dehydrogenase in Different Genetic Backgrounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.W.; Mars, A.E.; Meer, van der P.; Eggink, G.; Hugenholtz, J.

    2004-01-01

    To obtain a mannitol-producing Lactococcus lactis strain, the mannitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (mtlD) from Lactobacillus plantarum was overexpressed in a wild-type strain, a lactate dehydrogenase(LDH)-deficient strain, and a strain with reduced phosphofructokinase activity. High-performance l

  12. Lytic Infection of Lactococcus lactis by Bacteriophages Tuc2009 and c2 Triggers Alternative Transcriptional Host Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ainsworth, S.; Zomer, A.L.; Mahony, J.; Sinderen, D. van

    2013-01-01

    Here we present an entire temporal transcriptional profile of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris UC509.9 undergoing lytic infection with two distinct bacteriophages, Tuc2009 and c2. Furthermore, corresponding high-resolution whole-phage genome tiling arrays of both bacteriophages were performed thro

  13. Functional analysis of glycosyltransferase genes from Lactococcus lactis and other gram-positive cocci: complementation,expression, and diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, van R.; Vos, H.R.; Swam, van I.I.; Kleerebezem, M.; Vos, de W.M.

    1999-01-01

    Sixteen exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing Lactococcus lactis strains were analyzed for the chemical compositions of their EPSS and the locations, sequences, and organization of the eps genes involved in EPS biosynthesis. This allowed the grouping of these strains into three major groups, representat

  14. The anaerobic (Class III) ribonucleotide reductase from Lactococcus lactis : Catalytic properties and allosteric regulation of the pure enzyme system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrents, Eduard; Buist, Girbe; Liu, Aimin; Eliasson, Rolf; Kok, Jan; Gibert, Isidre; Gräslund, Astrid; Reichard, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis contains an operon with the genes (nrdD and nrdG) for a class III ribonucleotide reductase, Strict anaerobic growth depends on the activity of these genes. Both were sequenced, cloned, and overproduced in Escherichia coli, The corresponding proteins, NrdD and NrdG, were purified c

  15. Expression of genes encoding F-1-ATPase results in uncoupling of glycolysis from biomass production in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købmann, Brian Jensen; Solem, Christian; Pedersen, M.B.

    2002-01-01

    We studied how the introduction of an additional ATP-consuming reaction affects the metabolic fluxes in Lactococcus lactis. Genes encoding the hydrolytic part of the F-1 domain of the membrane-bound (F1F0) H+-ATPase were expressed from a range of synthetic constitutive promoters. Expression...

  16. A POSSIBLE CONTRIBUTION OF MESSENGER-RNA SECONDARY STRUCTURE TO TRANSLATION INITIATION EFFICIENCY IN LACTOCOCCUS-LACTIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDEGUCHTE, M; VANDERLENDE, T; KOK, J; VENEMA, G

    1991-01-01

    Gene expression signals derived from Lactococcus lactis were linked to lacZ-fused genes with different 5'-nucleotide sequences. Computer predictions of mRNA secondary structure were combined with lacZ expression studies to direct base-substitutions that could possibly influence gene expression. Muta

  17. Heterologous Gene Expression in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis : Synthesis, Secretion, and Processing of the Bacillus subtilis Neutral Protease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guchte, Maarten van de; Kodde, Jan; Vossen, Jos M.B.M. van der; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerard

    1990-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis nprE gene lacking its own promoter sequence was inserted in the lactococcal expression vector pMG36e. Upon introduction of the recombinant plasmid into Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain MG1363, neutral protease activity could be visualized by the appearance of large clear

  18. Enhanced production of pediocin PA-1 in wild nisin- and non-nisin-producing Lactococcus lactis strains of dairy origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reviriego, C.; Fernandez, L.; Kuipers, O. P.; Kok, J.; Rodriguez, J. M.

    In this work, heterologous production of pediocin PA-1 in Lactococcus lactis ESI 153 and ESI 515 (Nis+), two strains selected because of their technological properties for cheesemaking, was achieved after transformation with plasmids pMC117, pRK119 and pCNC1, which contain the complete pediocin

  19. Classification of Lactococcus lactis cell envelope proteinase based on gene sequencing, peptides formed after hydrolysis of milk, and computer modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Mette Winther; Qvist, K.B.; Brockmann, E.

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis strains depend on a proteolytic system for growth in milk to release essential AA from casein. The cleavage specificities of the cell envelope proteinase (CEP) can vary between strains and environments and whether the enzyme is released or bound to the cell wall. Thirty-eight L...

  20. Lytic Infection of Lactococcus lactis by Bacteriophages Tuc2009 and c2 Triggers Alternative Transcriptional Host Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ainsworth, S.; Zomer, A.L.; Mahony, J.; Sinderen, D. van

    2013-01-01

    Here we present an entire temporal transcriptional profile of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris UC509.9 undergoing lytic infection with two distinct bacteriophages, Tuc2009 and c2. Furthermore, corresponding high-resolution whole-phage genome tiling arrays of both bacteriophages were performed

  1. Proton Motive Force-Driven and ATP-Dependent Drug Extrusion Systems in Multidrug-Resistant Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOLHUIS, H; MOLENAAR, D; POELARENDS, G; VANVEEN, HW; POOLMAN, B; DRIESSEN, AJM; KONINGS, WN

    1994-01-01

    Three mutants of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MG1363, termed Eth(R), Dau(R), and Rho(R), were selected for resistance to high concentrations of ethidium bromide, daunomycin, and rhodamine 6G, respectively. These mutants were found to be cross resistant to a number of structurally and

  2. Expression of the pyrG gene determines the pool sizes of CTP and dCTP in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, C.M.; Hammer, Karin; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal;

    2004-01-01

    The pyrG gene from Lactococcus lactis encodes CTP synthase (EC 6.4.3.2), an enzyme converting UTP to CTP. A series of strains were constructed with different levels of pyrG expression by insertion of synthetic constitutive promoters with different strengths in front of pyrG. These strains expressed...

  3. Physiological and Regulatory Effects of Controlled Overproduction of Five Cold Shock Proteins of Lactococcus lactis MG1363

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Jeroen A.; Mailhes, Marielle; Rombouts, Frank M.; Vos, Willem M. de; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Abee, Tjakko

    2000-01-01

    The physiological and regulatory effects of overproduction of five cold shock proteins (CSPs) of Lactococcus lactis were studied. CspB, CspD, and CspE could be overproduced at high levels (up to 19% of the total protein), whereas for CspA and CspC limited overproduction (0.3 to 0.5% of the total pro

  4. Two nucleoside uptake systems in Lactococcus lactis: Competition between purine nucleosides and cytidine allows for modulation of intracellular nucleotide pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Wadskov-Hansen, Steen Lyders Lerche; Hammer, Karin

    2003-01-01

    in Lactococcus lactis were investigated by measuring the uptake of radioactively labeled nucleosides. The K. for for inosine, cytidine, and uridine was determined to be in the micromolar range. Furthermore, it was found that cytidine and inosine are competitive inhibitors of each other, whereas no competition...

  5. Interaction between ArgR and AhrC controls regulation of arginine metabolism in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, R; Kok, J; Kuipers, OP

    2005-01-01

    The expression of arginine metabolism in Lactococcus lactis is controlled by the two homologous transcriptional regulators ArgR and AhrC. Genome sequence analyses have shown that the occurrence of multiple homologues of the ArgR family of transcriptional regulators is a common feature of many low-G

  6. The Lcn972 Bacteriocin-Encoding Plasmid pBL1 Impairs Cellobiose Metabolism in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campelo, Ana B.; Gaspar, Paula; Roces, Clara; Rodriguez, Ana; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Neves, Ana Rute; Martinez, Beatriz

    2011-01-01

    pBL1 is a Lactococcus lactis theta-replicating 10.9-kbp plasmid that encodes the synthetic machinery of the bacteriocin Lcn972. In this work, the transcriptomes of exponentially growing L. lactis strains with and without pBL1 were compared. A discrete response was observed, with a total of 10 genes

  7. Fermentation-induced variation in heat and oxidative stress phenotypes of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 reveals transcriptome signatures for robustness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Dijkstra; W. Alkema; M.J.C. Starrenburg; J. Hugenholtz; S.A.F.T. van Hijum; P.A. Bron

    2014-01-01

    Background: Lactococcus lactis is industrially employed to manufacture various fermented dairy products. The most cost-effective method for the preservation of L. lactis starter cultures is spray drying, but during this process cultures encounter heat and oxidative stress, typically resulting in low

  8. Metabolic Engineering of Mannitol Production in Lactococcus lactis: Influence of Overexpression of Mannitol 1-Phosphate Dehydrogenase in Different Genetic Backgrounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.W.; Mars, A.E.; Meer, van der P.; Eggink, G.; Hugenholtz, J.

    2004-01-01

    To obtain a mannitol-producing Lactococcus lactis strain, the mannitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (mtlD) from Lactobacillus plantarum was overexpressed in a wild-type strain, a lactate dehydrogenase(LDH)-deficient strain, and a strain with reduced phosphofructokinase activity. High-performance

  9. Twofold reduction of phosphofructokinase activity in Lactococcus lactis results in strong decreases in growth rate and in glycolytic flux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Heidi Winterberg; Solem, Christian; Hammer, Karin;

    2001-01-01

    Two mutant strains of Lactococcus lactis in which the promoter of the las operon, harboring pfk, pyk, and ldh, were replaced by synthetic promoters were constructed. These las mutants had an approximately twofold decrease in the activity of phosphofructokinase, whereas the activities of pyruvate...

  10. Effects of gene disruptions in the nisin gene cluster of Lactococcus lactis on nisin production and producer immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ra, Runar; Beerthuyzen, Marke M.; Vos, Willem M. de; Saris, Per E.J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    1999-01-01

    The lantibiotic nisin is produced by several strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. The chromosomally located gene cluster nisABTCIPRKFEG is required for biosynthesis, development of immunity, and regulation of gene expression. In-frame deletions in the nisB and nisT genes, and disruption of

  11. Antagonistic Activity and Mode of Action of Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid, Produced by Marine Bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA31x, Against Vibrio anguillarum In vitro and in a Zebrafish In vivo Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linlin; Tian, Xueying; Kuang, Shan; Liu, Ge; Zhang, Chengsheng; Sun, Chaomin

    2017-01-01

    Phenazine and its derivatives are very important secondary metabolites produced from Pseudomonas spp. and have exhibited broad-spectrum antifungal and antibacterial activities. However, till date, there are few reports about marine derived Pseudomonas and its production of phenazine metabolites. In this study, we isolated a marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA31x which produced natural product inhibiting the growth of Vibrio anguillarum C312, one of the most serious bacterial pathogens in marine aquaculture. Combining high-resolution electro-spray-ionization mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyses, the functional compound against V. anguillarum was demonstrated to be phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), an important phenazine derivative. Molecular studies indicated that the production of PCA by P. aeruginosa PA31x was determined by gene clusters phz1 and phz2 in its genome. Electron microscopic results showed that treatment of V. anguillarum with PCA developed complete lysis of bacterial cells with fragmented cytoplasm being released to the surrounding environment. Additional evidence indicated that reactive oxygen species generation preceded PCA-induced microbe and cancer cell death. Notably, treatment with PCA gave highly significant protective activities against the development of V. anguillarum C312 on zebrafish. Additionally, the marine derived PCA was further found to effectively inhibit the growth of agricultural pathogens, Acidovorax citrulli NP1 and Phytophthora nicotianae JM1. Taken together, this study reveals that marine Pseudomonas derived PCA carries antagonistic activities against both aquacultural and agricultural pathogens, which broadens the application fields of PCA. PMID:28289406

  12. 高盐辣椒坯中一株耐盐乳杆菌的分离及鉴定%Isolation and identification of salt-tolerance lactic acid bacterium from high-salt chili

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梓铭; 谢靓; 蒋立文; 李云倩

    2014-01-01

    Objective To isolate some salt-tolerance strains with different colony morphologies from Hunan characteristic fermented chilli samples using selected MRS medium. Methods One isolated strain which could grow on an 18%NaCl salt tolerant bacteria medium was identified base on the physiological and biochemical experiments with 16S rDNA sequencing and phylogenetic tree analyses. Results This strain had a good ability of producing lactic acid and high tolerance to salt. Conclusion This strain was identified as Lactobacillus plantarum through 16S rDNA sequence analysis.%目的:采用选择性的 MRS培养基,从湖南地区特色的盐坯辣椒中分离筛选出耐盐优势菌。方法得到一株能在18%NaCl培养基中生长的耐盐菌进行了生理生化实验,通过菌落PCR扩增其16S rDNA基因序列并测序,经过序列比对构建系统发育树。结果这株菌有较好的产乳酸、耐盐的能力,经过形态观察和生理生化试验验证,属于乳酸杆菌。结论经过16S rDNA进一步鉴定为植物乳杆菌。

  13. Amino acid accumulation limits the overexpression of proteins in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marreddy, Ravi K. R.; Geertsma, Eric R.; Permentier, Hjalmar P.; Coelho Pinto, Joao; Kok, Jan; Poolman, Bert

    2010-01-01

    Background: Understanding the biogenesis pathways for the functional expression of recombinant proteins, in particular membrane proteins and complex multidomain assemblies, is a fundamental issue in cell biology and of high importance for future progress in structural genomics. In this study, we emp

  14. Update on antibiotic resistance in foodborne Lactobacillus and Lactococcus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara eDevirgiliis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacilli represent a major Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB component within the complex microbiota of fermented foods obtained from meat, dairy and vegetable sources. Lactococci, on the other hand, are typical of milk and fermented dairy products, which in turn represent the vast majority of fermented products. As is the case for all species originating from the environment, foodborne lactobacilli and lactococci consist of natural, uncharacterized strains, whose biodiversity depends on geographical origin, seasonality, animal feeding/plant growth conditions. Although a few species of opportunistic pathogens have been described in lactobacilli and lactococci, they are mostly non-pathogenic, Gram-positive bacteria displaying probiotic features. Since antibiotic resistant (AR strains do not constitute an immediate threat to human health, scientific interest for detailed studies on AR genes in these species has been greatly hindered. However, increasing evidence points at a crucial role for foodborne LAB as reservoir of potentially transmissible AR genes, underlining the need for further, more detailed studies aimed at identifying possible strategies to avoid AR spread to pathogens through fermented food consumption. The availability of a growing number of sequenced bacterial genomes has been very helpful in identifying the presence/distribution of mobile elements associated with AR genes, but open questions and knowledge gaps still need to be filled, underlining the need for systematic and datasharing approaches to implement both surveillance and mechanistic studies on transferability of AR genes. In the present review we report an update of the recent literature on AR in lactobacilli and lactococci following the 2006 EU-wide ban of the use of antibiotics as feed additives in animal farming, and we discuss the limits of the present knowledge in evaluating possible risks for human health.

  15. Use of the alr gene as a food-grade selection marker in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, P.A.; Benchimol, M.G.; Lambert, J.; Palumbo, E.; Deghorain, M.; Delcour, J.; Vos, de W.M.; Kleerebezem, M.; Hols, P.

    2002-01-01

    Both Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum contain a single alr gene, encoding an alanine racemase (EC 5.1.1.1), which catalyzes the interconversion of D-alanine and L-alanine. The alr genes of these lactic acid bacteria were investigated for their application as food-grade selection marker

  16. Isolation and characterization of a nisin-like bacteriocin produced by a Lactococcus lactis strain isolated from charqui, a Brazilian fermented, salted and dried meat product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscola, V; Todorov, S D; Capuano, V S C; Abriouel, H; Gálvez, A; Franco, B D G M

    2013-03-01

    A Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain (L. lactis 69) capable to produce a heat-stable bacteriocin was isolated from charqui, a Brazilian fermented, salted and sun-dried meat product. The bacteriocin inhibited, in vitro, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, several lactic acid bacteria isolated from foods and spoilage halotolerant bacteria isolated from charqui. The activity of the bacteriocin was not affected by pH (2.0-10.0), heating (100 °C), and chemical agents (1% w/v). Treatment of growing cells of L. monocytogenes ScottA with the cell-free supernatant of L. lactis 69 resulted in complete cell inactivation. L. lactis 69 harbored the gene for the production of a nisin-like bacteriocin, and the amino acid sequence of the active peptide was identical to sequences previously described for nisin Z. However, differences were observed regarding the leader peptide. Besides, the isolate was able to survive and produce bacteriocins in culture medium with NaCl content up to 20%, evidencing a potential application as an additional hurdle in the preservation of charqui. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of a potential probiotics Lactococcus garvieae B301 on the growth performance, immune parameters and caecum microflora of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T; Xie, J; Zhang, M; Fu, N; Zhang, Y

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a novel Lactococcus garvieae B301 was isolated from the intestinal tract of a healthy piglet. L. garvieae B301 was tolerant to acid pH, simulated gastric and small intestinal transit juices, indicating that it was capable of surviving in the gastrointestinal tract. L. garvieae B301 was safe and beneficial to broilers, as broiler chickens supplemented with L. garvieae B301 had lower diarrhoea incidence and mortality than the Control. Moreover, supplementation of broiler diets with L. garvieae B301 resulted in an increase in body weight and the number of caecum lactic acid bacteria and Bifidobacterium spp., and decrease in feed-to-gain ratio and the number of caecum coliforms. It also had a positive effect on the thymus index and bursa of Fabricius index and enhanced serum levels of immune globulins. All these results showed that L. garvieae B301 could enhance the growth performance of broiler chickens and improve their health. Thus, L. garvieae B301 could be a promising feed additive for broiler chickens. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. The effect of lactose, NaCl and an aero/anaerobic environment on the tyrosine decarboxylase activity of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buňková, Leona; Buňka, František; Pollaková, Eva; Podešvová, Tereza; Dráb, Vladimír

    2011-05-27

    The aim of this work was to study, under model conditions, combined effects of the concentration of lactose (0-1% w/v), NaCl (0-2% w/v) and aero/anaerobiosis on the growth and tyramine production in 3 strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and 2 strains of L. lactis subsp. cremoris. The levels of the factors tested were chosen with respect to the conditions which can occur during the real process of natural cheese production, including the culture temperature (10 ± 1°C). In all strains tested, tyrosine decarboxylation was most influenced by NaCl concentration; the highest production of tyramine was obtained within the culture with the highest (2% w/v) salt concentration applied. Two of the strains L. lactis subsp. lactis produced tyramine only in broth with the highest NaCl concentration tested. In the remaining 3 strains of L. lactis, tyramine was detected under all conditions applied. The tested concentration of lactose and aero/anaerobiosis had a less significant effect on tyramine decarboxylation. However, it was also found that at the same concentrations of NaCl and lactose, a higher amount of tyramine was detected under anaerobic conditions. In all strains tested, tyramine decarboxylation started during the active growth phase of the cells.

  19. A fragile metabolic network adapted for cooperation in the symbiotic bacterium Buchnera aphidicola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goryanin Igor

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In silico analyses provide valuable insight into the biology of obligately intracellular pathogens and symbionts with small genomes. There is a particular opportunity to apply systems-level tools developed for the model bacterium Escherichia coli to study the evolution and function of symbiotic bacteria which are metabolically specialised to overproduce specific nutrients for their host and, remarkably, have a gene complement that is a subset of the E. coli genome. Results We have reconstructed and analysed the metabolic network of the γ-proteobacterium Buchnera aphidicola (symbiont of the pea aphid as a model for using systems-level approaches to discover key traits of symbionts with small genomes. The metabolic network is extremely fragile with > 90% of the reactions essential for viability in silico; and it is structured so that the bacterium cannot grow without producing the essential amino acid, histidine, which is released to the insect host. Further, the amount of essential amino acid produced by the bacterium in silico can be controlled by host supply of carbon and nitrogen substrates. Conclusion This systems-level analysis predicts that the fragility of the bacterial metabolic network renders the symbiotic bacterium intolerant of drastic environmental fluctuations, whilst the coupling of histidine production to growth prevents the bacterium from exploiting host nutrients without reciprocating. These metabolic traits underpin the sustained nutritional contribution of B. aphidicola to the host and, together with the impact of host-derived substrates on the profile of nutrients released from the bacteria, point to a dominant role of the host in controlling the symbiosis.

  20. Physiochemical parameters optimization for enhanced nisin production by Lactococcus lactis (MTCC 440

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puspadhwaja Mall

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The influence of various physiochemical parameters on the growth of Lactococcus lactis sub sp. lactis MTCC 440 was studied at shake flask level for 20 h. Media optimization (MRS broth was studied to achieve enhanced growth of the organism and also nisin production. Bioassay of nisin was done with agar diffusion method using Streptococcus agalactae NCIM 2401 as indicator strain. MRS broth (6%, w/v with 0.15μg/ml of nisin supplemented with 0.5% (v/v skimmed milk was found to be the best for nisin production as well as for growth of L lactis. The production of nisin was strongly influenced by the presence of skimmed milk and nisin in MRS broth. The production of nisin was affected by the physical parameters and maximum nisin production was at 30(0C while the optimal temperature for biomass production was 37(0C.

  1. Interaction of benzoate pyrimidine analogues with class 1A dihydroorotate dehydrogenase from Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolfe, Abigail E; Thymark, Majbritt; Gattis, Samuel G

    2007-01-01

    -specific inhibitor directed against this site are poor. Nonetheless, two compounds that bind specifically to the Class 1A DHOD from Lactococcus lactis, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (3,4-diOHB) and 3,5-dihydroxybenzoate (3,5-diOHB), have been identified [Palfey et al. (2001) J. Med. Chem. 44, 2861-2864]. The mechanism...... determined, showing that 3,5-diOHB binds in the same orientation as orotate. In contrast, 3,4-diOHB binds in a twisted orientation, enabling one of its phenolic oxygens to form a very strong hydrogen bond to an asparagine, thus stabilizing the phenolate and causing charge-transfer interactions with the pi-system...... of the flavin, resulting in a green color....

  2. Analysis of heat shock gene expression in Lactococcus lactis MG1363

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnau, José; Sørensen, Kim; Appel, Karen Fuglede

    1996-01-01

    The induction of the heat shock response in Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strain MG1363 was analysed at the RNA level using a novel RNA isolation procedure to prevent degradation. Cloning of the dnaJ and groEL homologous was carried out. Nothern blot analysis showed a similar induction pattern......, although maximum induction was observed earlier for orf1 and grpE. Novel transcript sizes were detected in heat-shocked cells. The induction kinetics observed for ftsH suggested a different regulation for this gene. Experimental evidence for a prenounced transcriptional regulation being involved...... in the heat shock response in L. lactis MG1363 is presented. A gene located downstream of the dnaK operon in strain MG1363, named orf4, was shown not to be regulated by heat shock....

  3. Increased biomass yield of Lactococcus lactis during energetically limited growth and respiratory conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købmann, Brian Jensen; Blank, Lars Mathias; Solem, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is known to be capable of respiration under aerobic conditions in the presence of haemin. In the present study the effect of respiration on ATP production during growth on different sugars was examined. With glucose as the sole carbon source, respiratory conditions in L. lactis...... MG1363 resulted in only a minor increase, 21%, in biomass yield. Since ATP production through substrate-level phosphorylation was essentially identical with and without respiration, the increased biomass yield was a result of energy-saving under respiratory conditions estimated to be 0.4 mol of ATP....../mol of glucose. With maltose as the energy source, the increase in biomass yield amounted to 51% compared with an aerobic culture that lacked haemin. This higher ATP yield was obtained by redirecting pyruvate metabolism from lactate to acetate production, and from savings through respiration. However, even after...

  4. Control analysis as a tool to understand the formation of the las operon in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købmann, Brian Jensen; Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2005-01-01

    In Lactococcus lactis the enzymes phosphofructokinase (PFK), pyruvate kinase (PK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) are uniquely encoded in the las operon and we here apply Metabolic Control Analysis to study the role of this organisation. Earlier work showed that LDH at wildtype level has zero...... control on glycolysis and growth rate but high negative control on formate production. We find that PFK and PK have zero control on glycolysis and growth rate at the wildtype enzyme level but both enzymes exert strong positive control on the glycolytic flux at reduced activities. PK has high positive...... control on formate and acetate production, whereas PFK has no control on these fluxes. Decreased expression of the entire las operon resulted in a strong decrease in growth rate and the glycolytic flux; at 53% expression of the las operon the glycolytic flux was reduced to 44% and the flux control...

  5. Control analysis as a tool to understand the formation of the las operon in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købmann, Brian Jensen; Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2005-01-01

    In Lactococcus lactis the enzymes phosphofructokinase (PFK), pyruvate kinase (PK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) are uniquely encoded in the las operon and we here apply Metabolic Control Analysis to study the role of this organisation. Earlier work showed that LDH at wildtype level has zero...... control on glycolysis and growth rate but high negative control on formate production. We find that PFK and PK have zero control on glycolysis and growth rate at the wildtype enzyme level but both enzymes exert strong positive control on the glycolytic flux at reduced activities. PK has high positive...... control on formate and acetate production, whereas PFK has no control on these fluxes. Decreased expression of the entire las operon resulted in a strong decrease in growth rate and the glycolytic flux; at 53% expression of the las operon the glycolytic flux was reduced to 44% and the flux control...

  6. Biocidal Inactivation of Lactococcus lactis Bacteriophages: Efficacy and Targets of Commonly Used Sanitizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Stephen; Murphy, James; Mahony, Jennifer; Lugli, Gabriele A.; Ventura, Marco; Noben, Jean-Paul; Franz, Charles M. A. P.; Neve, Horst; Nauta, Arjen; Van Sinderen, Douwe

    2017-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis strains, being intensely used in the dairy industry, are particularly vulnerable to members of the so-called 936 group of phages. Sanitization and disinfection using purpose-made biocidal solutions is a critical step in controlling phage contamination in such dairy processing plants. The susceptibility of 36 936 group phages to biocidal treatments was examined using 14 biocides and commercially available sanitizers. The targets of a number of these biocides were investigated by means of electron microscopic and proteomic analyses. The results from this study highlight significant variations in phage resistance to biocides among 936 phages. Furthermore, rather than possessing resistance to specific biocides or biocide types, biocide-resistant phages tend to possess a broad tolerance to multiple classes of antimicrobial compounds. PMID:28210242

  7. The pyrimidine operon pyrRPB-carA from Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Schallert, J.; Andersen, Birgit;

    2001-01-01

    The four genes pyrR, pyrP, pyrB, and carA were found to constitute an operon in Lactococcus lactis subsp, lactis MG1363. The functions of the different genes were established by mutational analysis. The first gene in the operon is the pyrimidine regulatory gene, pyrR, which is responsible...... for the regulation of the expression of the pyrimidine biosynthetic genes leading to UMP formation. The second gene encodes a membrane-bound high-affinity uracil permease, required for utilization of exogenous uracil. The last two genes in the operon, pyrB and carA, encode pyrimidine biosynthetic enzymes; aspartate....... The expression of the pyrimidine biosynthetic genes including the pyrRPB-carA operon is subject to control at the transcriptional level, most probably by an attenuator mechanism in which PyrR acts as the regulatory protein....

  8. Microbiota of Minas cheese as influenced by the nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perin, Luana Martins; Dal Bello, Barbara; Belviso, Simona; Zeppa, Giuseppe; de Carvalho, Antônio Fernandes; Cocolin, Luca; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2015-12-01

    Minas cheese is a popular dairy product in Brazil that is traditionally produced using raw or pasteurized cow milk. This study proposed an alternative production of Minas cheese using raw goat milk added of a nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. An in situ investigation was carried on to evaluate the interactions between the L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 and the autochthonous microbiota of a Minas cheese during the ripening; production of biogenic amines (BAs) was assessed as a safety aspect. Minas cheese was produced in two treatments (A, by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05, and B, without adding this strain), in three independent repetitions (R1, R2, and R3). Culture dependent (direct plating) and independent (rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE) methods were employed to characterize the microbiota and to assess the possible interferences caused by L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. BA amounts were measured using HPLC. A significant decrease in coagulase-positive cocci was observed in the cheeses produced by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 (cheese A). The rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE highlighted the differences in the microbiota of both cheeses, separating them into two different clusters. Lactococcus sp. was found as the main microorganism in both cheeses, and the microbiota of cheese A presented a higher number of species. High concentrations of tyramine were found in both cheeses and, at specific ripening times, the BA amounts in cheese B were significantly higher than in cheese A (pnisin producer L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 was demonstrated in situ, by demonstration of its influence in the complex microbiota naturally present in a raw goat milk cheese and by controlling the growth of coagulase-positive cocci. L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 influenced also the production of BA determining that their amounts in the cheeses were maintained at acceptable levels for human consumption.

  9. Transcriptome analysis of the rhizosphere bacterium Azospirillum brasilense reveals an extensive auxin response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Puyvelde, Sandra; Cloots, Lore; Engelen, Kristof; Das, Frederik; Marchal, Kathleen; Vanderleyden, Jos; Spaepen, Stijn

    2011-05-01

    The rhizosphere bacterium Azospirillum brasilense produces the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) through the indole-3-pyruvate pathway. As we previously demonstrated that transcription of the indole-3-pyruvate decarboxylase (ipdC) gene is positively regulated by IAA, produced by A. brasilense itself or added exogenously, we performed a microarray analysis to study the overall effects of IAA on the transcriptome of A. brasilense. The transcriptomes of A. brasilense wild-type and the ipdC knockout mutant, both cultured in the absence and presence of exogenously added IAA, were compared.Interfering with the IAA biosynthesis/homeostasis in A. brasilense through inactivation of the ipdC gene or IAA addition results in much broader transcriptional changes than anticipated. Based on the multitude of changes observed by comparing the different transcriptomes, we can conclude that IAA is a signaling molecule in A. brasilense. It appears that the bacterium, when exposed to IAA, adapts itself to the plant rhizosphere, by changing its arsenal of transport proteins and cell surface proteins. A striking example of adaptation to IAA exposure, as happens in the rhizosphere, is the upregulation of a type VI secretion system (T6SS) in the presence of IAA. The T6SS is described as specifically involved in bacterium-eukaryotic host interactions. Additionally, many transcription factors show an altered regulation as well, indicating that the regulatory machinery of the bacterium is changing.

  10. Role of phosphate in the central metabolism of two lactic acid bacteria-a comparative systems biology approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levering, J.; Musters, M.W.J.M.; Bekker, M.; Bellomo, D.; Fiedler, T.; Vos, de W.M.; Hugenholtz, F.; Kreikemeyer, B.; Kummer, U.; Teusink, B.

    2012-01-01

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria survive in distinct environments, but show common metabolic characteristics. Here we studied the dynamic interactions of the central metabolism in Lactococcus lactis, extensively used as a starter culture in the dairy industry, and Streptococcus pyogenes, a human patho

  11. Effects of dietary supplementation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus or/and Lactococcus lactis on the growth, gut microbiota and immune responses of red sea bream, Pagrus major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, Mahmoud A O; Koshio, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Manabu; Yokoyama, Saichiro; El Basuini, Mohammed F; Hossain, Md Sakhawat; Nhu, Truong H; Dossou, Serge; Moss, Amina S

    2016-02-01

    Pagrus major fingerlings (3·29 ± 0·02 g) were fed with basal diet (control) supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LR), Lactococcus lactis (LL), and L. rhamnosus + L. lactis (LR + LL) at 10(6) cell g(-1) feed for 56 days. Feeding a mixture of LR and LL significantly increased feed utilization (FER and PER), intestine lactic acid bacteria (LAB) count, plasma total protein, alternative complement pathway (ACP), peroxidase, and mucus secretion compared with the other groups (P growth performance (Fn wt, WG, and SGR) and protein digestibility than the groups fed an individual LR or the control diet. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) significantly increased in LR and LR + LL groups when compared with the other groups. Moreover, the fish fed LR or LL had better improvement (P growth, feed utilization, body protein and lipid contents, digestibility coefficients (dry matter, protein, and lipid), protease activity, total intestine and LAB counts, hematocrit, total plasma protein, biological antioxidant potential, ACP, serum and mucus LZY and bactericidal activities, peroxidase, SOD, and mucus secretion than the control group. Interestingly, fish fed diets with LR + LL showed significantly lower total cholesterol and triglycerides when compared with the other groups (P < 0.05). These data strongly suggest that a mixture of LR and LL probiotics may serve as a healthy immunostimulating feed additive in red sea bream aquaculture.

  12. AcmA of Lactococcus lactis is an N-acetylglucosaminidase with an optimal number of LysM domains for proper functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Anton; Buist, Girbe; Horsburgh, Gavin J; Venema, Gerard; Kuipers, Oscar P; Foster, Simon J; Kok, Jan

    2005-06-01

    AcmA, the major autolysin of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 is a modular protein consisting of an N-terminal active site domain and a C-terminal peptidoglycan-binding domain. The active site domain is homologous to that of muramidase-2 of Enterococcus hirae, however, RP-HPLC analysis of muropeptides released from Bacillus subtilis peptidoglycan, after digestion with AcmA, shows that AcmA is an N-acetylglucosaminidase. In the C-terminus of AcmA three highly similar repeated regions of 45 amino acid residues are present, which are separated by short nonhomologous sequences. The repeats of AcmA, which belong to the lysine motif (LysM) domain family, were consecutively deleted, removed, or, alternatively, one additional repeat was added, without destroying the cell wall-hydrolyzing activity of the enzyme in vitro, although AcmA activity was reduced in all cases. In vivo, proteins containing no or only one repeat did not give rise to autolysis of lactococcal cells, whereas separation of the producer cells from the chains was incomplete. Exogenously added AcmA deletion derivatives carrying two repeats or four repeats bound to lactococcal cells, whereas the derivative with no or one repeat did not. In conclusion, these results show that AcmA needs three LysM domains for optimal peptidoglycan binding and biological functioning.

  13. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: Application in the control of Listeria monocytogenes in fresh Minas-type goat cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle N. Furtado

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogen frequently found in dairy products. Its control in fresh cheeses is difficult, due to the psychrotrophic properties and salt tolerance. Bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (LAB with proven in vitro antilisterial activity can be an innovative technological approach but their application needs to be evaluated by means of in situ tests. In this study, a novel bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis strain (Lc. lactis DF4Mi, isolated from raw goat milk, was tested for control of growth of L. monocytogenes in artificially contaminated fresh Minas type goat cheese during storage under refrigeration. A bacteriostatic effect was achieved, and counts after 10 days were 3 log lower than in control cheeses with no added LAB. However, this effect did not differ significantly from that obtained with a non-bacteriocinogenic Lc. lactis strain. Addition of nisin (12.5 mg/kg caused a rapid decrease in the number of viable L. monocytogenes in the cheeses, suggesting that further studies with the purified bacteriocin DF4Mi may open new possibilities for this strain as biopreservative in dairy products.

  14. Isolation of a bacteriocin-producing lactococcus lactis and application of its bacteriocin to manage spoilage bacteria in high-value marine fish under different storage temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarika, A R; Lipton, A P; Aishwarya, M S; Dhivya, R S

    2012-07-01

    The bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria have considerable potential for biopreservation. The Lactococcus lactis strain PSY2 (GenBank account no. JF703669) isolated from the surface of marine perch Perca flavescens produced antibacterial activity against pathogenic and spoilage-causing Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria viz. Arthrobacter sp., Acinetobacter sp., Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus and possessed broad inhibitory spectrum. The biopreservative efficacy of the bacteriocin PSY2 was evaluated using fillets of reef cod, Epinephelus diacanthus. The fillets (10 g) were sprayed with 2.0 ml of 1,600 AU/ml bacteriocin, wrapped and kept under different storage temperatures viz., 4, 0 and -18 °C. The biopreservative extended the shelf-life of fillets stored at 4 °C to >21 days as against bacteriocin-treated samples stored for 21 days at 4 °C while the untreated samples became unacceptable by the 14th day. The biopreservative gave no significant effect at -18 °C. Thus, the bacteriocin derived from L. lactis PSY2 gave increased protection against spoilage bacteria and offers an alternative for the preservation of high-value sea foods.

  15. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: Application in the control of Listeria monocytogenes in fresh Minas-type goat cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Danielle N; Todorov, Svetoslav D; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T; Franco, Bernadette D G M

    2015-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogen frequently found in dairy products. Its control in fresh cheeses is difficult, due to the psychrotrophic properties and salt tolerance. Bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with proven in vitro antilisterial activity can be an innovative technological approach but their application needs to be evaluated by means of in situ tests. In this study, a novel bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis strain ( Lc . lactis DF4Mi), isolated from raw goat milk, was tested for control of growth of L. monocytogenes in artificially contaminated fresh Minas type goat cheese during storage under refrigeration. A bacteriostatic effect was achieved, and counts after 10 days were 3 log lower than in control cheeses with no added LAB. However, this effect did not differ significantly from that obtained with a non-bacteriocinogenic Lc. lactis strain. Addition of nisin (12.5 mg/kg) caused a rapid decrease in the number of viable L. monocytogenes in the cheeses, suggesting that further studies with the purified bacteriocin DF4Mi may open new possibilities for this strain as biopreservative in dairy products.

  16. On Lactococcus lactis UL719 competitivity and nisin (Nisaplin® capacity to inhibit Clostridium difficile in a model of human colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe eLe Lay

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is the most frequently identified enteric pathogen in patients with nocosocomially acquired, antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. Although metronidazole and vancomycin were effective, an increasing number of treatment failures and recurrence of C. difficile infection are being reported. Use of probiotics, particularly metabolically active lactic acid bacteria, was recently proposed as an alternative for the medical community. The aim of this study was to assess a probiotic candidate, nisin Z-producer Lactococcus lactis UL719, competitivity and nisin (Nisaplin® capacity to inhibit C. difficile in a model of human colon. Bacterial populations was enumerated by qPCR coupled to PMA treatment. L. lactis UL719 was able to survive and proliferate under simulated human colon, did not alter microbiota composition, but failed to inhibit C. difficile. While a single dose of 19 µmol/L (5× the MIC was not sufficient to inhibit C. difficile, nisin at 76 µmol/L (20× the MIC was effective at killing the pathogen. Nisin (at 76 µmol/L caused some temporary changes in the microbiota with Gram-positive bacteria being the mostly affected. These results highlight the capacity of L. lactis UL719 to survive under simulated human colon and the efficacy of nisin as an alternative in the treatment of C. difficile infections.

  17. Psychrotrophic members of Leuconostoc gasicomitatum, Leuconostoc gelidum and Lactococcus piscium dominate at the end of shelf-life in packaged and chilled-stored food products in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothakos, Vasileios; Snauwaert, Cindy; De Vos, Paul; Huys, Geert; Devlieghere, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Previously, a considerable underestimation (+0.5-3.2 log CFU/g) on the contamination levels of psychrotrophic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) was observed for 33 retail, packaged food products stored at chilling temperature when the mesophilic enumeration technique was implemented as reference shelf-life parameter. In the present study, the microbial diversity of the dominant psychrotrophic LAB recovered after incubation of plates at 22 °C for 5 days was determined using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. A total of 212 LAB isolates were identified using a combination of rep-PCR fingerprinting, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis and pheS gene sequencing. Leuconostoc gasicomitatum, Leuconostoc gelidum, Leuconostoc spp., Lactococcus piscium and Lactobacillus algidus proved to be the most competent and predominant species that may go undetected by the widely applied mesophilic enumeration protocols (ISO 4833:2003 and ISO 15214:1998). This study has assessed the interspecific variation among potential spoilage LAB, and highlights the significance of implementing a reference shelf-life parameter based on the enumeration of the total psychrotrophic bacterial load for industrial microbiological routine analyses.

  18. The C-terminus of nisin is important for the ABC transporter NisFEG to confer immunity in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlKhatib, Zainab; Lagedroste, Marcel; Zaschke, Julia; Wagner, Manuel; Abts, André; Fey, Iris; Kleinschrodt, Diana; Smits, Sander H J

    2014-10-01

    The lantibiotic nisin is a small 3.4 kDa antimicrobial peptide, which acts against Gram-positive bacteria in the nmol/L range. Nisin is produced and secreted by several Lactococcus lactis strains to ensure advantages against other bacteria in their habitat. Nisin contains five specific lanthionine rings of which the first two are important for Lipid II binding and the last two are crucial for the pore formation in the membrane. To gain immunity against nisin, the producing strain is expressing an ABC transporter called NisFEG, which expels nisin from the membrane. As a result six to eightfold more nisin is needed to affect the cells. The hydrolysis of ATP by NisFEG is required for this immunity as shown by a mutant, where the ATP hydrolysis is disrupted (NisFH181A EG). Furthermore, NisFEG recognizes the C-terminus of nisin, since deletion of the last six amino acids as well as of the last ring lowered the fold of immunity displayed by NisFEG.

  19. Purification and Characterization of Cystathionine (beta)-Lyase from Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris B78 and Its Possible Role in Flavor Development in Cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alting, A C; Engels, W; van Schalkwijk, S; Exterkate, F A

    1995-11-01

    An enzyme that degrades sulfur-containing amino acids was purified from Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris B78; this strain was isolated from a mixed-strain, mesophilic starter culture used for the production of Gouda cheese. The enzyme has features of a cystathionine (beta)-lyase (EC 4.4.1.8), a pyridoxal-5(prm1)-phosphate-dependent enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of methionine and catalyzing an (alpha),(beta)-elimination reaction. It is able to catalyze an (alpha),(gamma)-elimination reaction as well, which in the case of methionine, results in the production of methanethiol, a putative precursor of important flavor compounds in cheese. The native enzyme has a molecular mass of approximately 130 to 165 kDa and consists of four identical subunits of 35 to 40 kDa. The enzyme is relatively thermostable and has a pH optimum for activity around 8.0; it is still active under cheese-ripening conditions, viz., pH 5.2 to 5.4 and 4% (wt/vol) NaCl. A possible essential role of the enzyme in flavor development in cheese is suggested.

  20. Comparison of the local immune response against Giardia lamblia cyst wall protein 2 induced by recombinant Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus gordonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peter; Abdul-Wahid, Aws; Faubert, Gaétan M

    2009-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus gordonii are lactic acid bacteria (LAB) currently being advocated for use as live antigen delivery vehicles to mucosal sites. Since both vehicles differ in their capability to persist within the small intestine and in their mode of antigen delivery, we sought to compare them to determine which one was superior. In this study, we compared the efficacy of recombinant L. lactis and S. gordonii to stimulate intestinal immune responses against Giardia lamblia cyst wall protein-2 in BALB/c mice. Oral administration of either vector significantly increased the number of CD4(+) T helper and B-cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and Peyer's patches (PP) of immunized animals. Delivery of recombinant CWP2 (rCWP2) by L. lactis stimulated a balanced IFN-gamma/IL-4 response (MLN and PP cells) and a CWP2-specific intestinal IgA antibody response. Alternatively, delivery of rCWP2 by S. gordonii stimulated a higher frequency of IFN-gamma secreting MLN and PP cells, as well as doubling the amount of CWP2-specific intestinal IgA. In challenge studies, L. lactis and S. gordonii reduced cyst output by 71 and 90%, respectively. When compared to each other, S. gordonii-immunized animals shed 65% fewer cysts than their L. lactis-immunized counterparts. Based on these findings, we concluded that S. gordonii was superior to L. lactis as an intestinal vaccine delivery vehicle.

  1. Desulfurella amilsii sp. nov., a novel acidotolerant sulfur-respiring bacterium isolated from sediments of the Tinto River

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florentino de Souza Silva, Anna; Brienza, C.; Stams, A.J.M.; Sanchez Andrea, I.

    2016-01-01

    A novel acidotolerant and moderately thermophilic sulfur-reducing bacterium was isolated from sediments of the Tinto River (Spain), an extremely acidic environment. Strain TR1T stains Gram-negative, is obligately anaerobic, non-spore forming and motile. Cells are short rods (1.5-2 by 0.5-0.7 µm),app

  2. Lactobacillus diolivorans sp nov., a 1,2-propanediol-degrading bacterium isolated from aerobically stable maize silage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krooneman, J; Faber, F; Alderkamp, AC; Elferink, SJHWO; Driehuis, F; Cleenwerck, [No Value; Swings, J; Gottschal, JC; Vancanneyt, M

    2002-01-01

    Inoculation of maize silage with Lactobacillus buchneri (5 x 10(5) c.f.u. g(-1) of maize silage) prior to ensiling results in the formation of aerobically stable silage. After 9 months, lactic acid bacterium counts are approximately 10(10) c.f.u. g(-1) in these treated silages. An important subpopul

  3. Lactobacillus diolivorans sp nov., a 1,2-propanediol-degrading bacterium isolated from aerobically stable maize silage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krooneman, J; Faber, F; Alderkamp, AC; Elferink, SJHWO; Driehuis, F; Cleenwerck, [No Value; Swings, J; Gottschal, JC; Vancanneyt, M

    Inoculation of maize silage with Lactobacillus buchneri (5 x 10(5) c.f.u. g(-1) of maize silage) prior to ensiling results in the formation of aerobically stable silage. After 9 months, lactic acid bacterium counts are approximately 10(10) c.f.u. g(-1) in these treated silages. An important

  4. Optimization of Fermentation Conditions for Nisin Production by Lactococcus lactis N302%Nisin生产菌株Lactococcus lactis N302的发酵优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑞青; 轩辕铮铮; 姜德洲; 苏俊杰; 徐海津; 张秀明; 乔明强

    2011-01-01

    对一株Nisin生产菌株Lactococcus lactis N302现有培养基进行了氮源替代,并采用Plackett-Burman(PB)法和中心复合设计(Central Composite Design)对影响其发酵生产Nisin的6个培养条件进行筛选优化.PB实验表明,蔗糖、初始pH值和酵母粉是影响Nisin效价的三个关键因素.对三因素进行中心复合设计,经响应面法优化分析(RSM)确定了L.Lactis N302发酵生产Nisin的最优条件为:蔗糖13.7g.L-1,初始pH值7.74,酵母粉25.7g.L-1,大豆蛋白胨10.0g.L-1,K2HPO410.0g.L-1,接种量3%.优化后Nisin效价较优化前提高了7.2%.小试(10 L)研究表明,分批发酵18h、补碱分批发酵16h菌株L.lactis N302单位Nisin效价最高,分别为4 597.03 IU.mL-1和8 773.34 IU.mL-1.%Nisin is a bacteriocin widely used in food industry as an effective food preservative. High nisin production was aimed by optimizing the fermentation conditions of Lactococcus lactis N302. First, soybean peptone was used the main nitrogen source of the culture medium instead of peptone. Then, the Plackett-Burman design (PB) and the path of steepest ascent method were applied to investigate the main factors that affect the yield of nisin, and to find the optimum region of the response. The results indicated that sucrose, initial pH value and yeast extract were the significant factors for nisin production. Central composite experimental design and response surface methodology (RSM) were further adopted to derive a statistical model for optimizing the fermentation conditions. The optimum fermentation conditions were found to be sucrose 13. 7 g · L-1, initial pH value 7. 74, yeast extract 25. 7 g · L-1, soybean peptone 10 g · L-1, K2HPO410 g · L-1, inoculum size 3%. The nisin yield increased by 7. 2% compared to the no-optimized conditions. Finally, 10 liter batch and pH fed-batch fermentation with the optimized conditions were carried out. The maximum nisin yield was achieved at 18 h for batch fermentation and 16 h for fed

  5. Swimming Efficiency of Bacterium Escherichia Coli

    CERN Document Server

    Chattopadhyay, S; Wu, X L; Yeung, C; Chattopadhyay, Suddhashil; Moldovan, Radu; Yeung, Chuck

    2005-01-01

    We use in vivo measurements of swimming bacteria in an optical trap to determine fundamental properties of bacterial propulsion. In particular, we determine the propulsion matrix, which relates the angular velocity of the flagellum to the torques and forces propelling the bacterium. From the propulsion matrix dynamical properties such as forces, torques, swimming speed and power can be obtained from measurements of the angular velocity of the motor. We find significant heterogeneities among different individuals even though all bacteria started from a single colony. The propulsive efficiency, defined as the ratio of the propulsive power output to the rotary power input provided by the motors, is found to be 0.2%.

  6. Isolation of a Bacterium Strain Degraded Agar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    One in 58 strains of bacteria isolated from the compost showed clear colonies after a few days of growth on the plates containing medium made of only agar and water.Water suspension contained only agar (2 and 8g·L -1 ) with two controls (normal saline,LB medium) was inoculated with the bacterium BR5-1 to see whether there was an increasement of the alive bacteria concentration after 48 h of the growth.The results showed that there was a significant rising of the alive bacteria concentration in the agar susp...

  7. Clustered organization and transcriptional analysis of a family of five csp genes of Lactococcus lactis MG1363

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Jeroen A.; Sanders, Jan-Willem; Kok, Jan; Vos, Willem M. de; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Abee, Tjakko; Wouters, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    A family of genes encoding cold-shock proteins, named cspA, cspB, cspC, cspD and cspE, was cloned and sequenced from Lactococcus lactis MG1363. The genes cspA and cspB and the genes cspC and cspD are located in tandem repeats, an organization of csp genes that has never been encountered before. The

  8. Dual-Color Bioluminescence Imaging for Simultaneous Monitoring of the Intestinal Persistence of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactococcus lactis in Living Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Catherine; Poiret, Sabine; Dennin, Véronique; Boutillier, Denise; Lacorre, Delphine Armelle; Foligné, Benoit; Pot, Bruno

    2015-08-15

    Lactic acid bacteria are found in the gastrointestinal tract of mammals and have received tremendous attention due to their health-promoting properties. We report the development of two dual-color luciferase-producing Lactobacillus (Lb.) plantarum and Lactococcus (Lc.) lactis strains for noninvasive simultaneous tracking in the mouse gastrointestinal tract. We previously described the functional expression of the red luciferase mutant (CBRluc) from Pyrophorus plagiophthalamus in Lb. plantarum NCIMB8826 and Lc. lactis MG1363 (C. Daniel, S. Poiret, V. Dennin, D. Boutillier, and B. Pot, Appl Environ Microbiol 79:1086-1094, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.03221-12). In this study, we determined that CBRluc is a better-performing luciferase for in vivo localization of both lactic acid bacteria after oral administration than the green click beetle luciferase mutant construct developed in this study. We further established the possibility to simultaneously detect red- and green-emitting lactic acid bacteria by dual-wavelength bioluminescence imaging in combination with spectral unmixing. The difference in spectra of light emission by the red and green click beetle luciferase mutants and dual bioluminescence detection allowed in vitro and in vivo quantification of the red and green emitted signals; thus, it allowed us to monitor the dynamics and fate of the two bacterial populations simultaneously. Persistence and viability of both strains simultaneously administered to mice in different ratios was studied in vivo in anesthetized mice and ex vivo in mouse feces. The application of dual-luciferase-labeled bacteria has considerable potential to simultaneously study the interactions and potential competitions of different targeted bacteria and their hosts.

  9. Metabolic and Transcriptional Analysis of Acid Stress in Lactococcus lactis, with a Focus on the Kinetics of Lactic Acid Pools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, Ana Lucia; Turner, David L.; Fonseca, Luis L.; Solopova, Ana; Catarino, Teresa; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Voit, Eberhard O.; Neves, Ana Rute; Santos, Helena

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pH on the glucose metabolism of non-growing cells of L. lactis MG1363 was studied by in vivo NMR in the range 4.8 to 6.5. Immediate pH effects on glucose transporters and/or enzyme activities were distinguished from transcriptional/translational effects by using cells grown at the opti

  10. A bacterium that can grow by using arsenic instead of phosphorus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe-Simon, F; Blum, J S; Kulp, T R; Gordon, G W; Hoeft, S E; Pett-Ridge, J; Stolz, J F; Webb, S M; Weber, P K; Davies, P W; Anbar, A D; Oremland, R S

    2010-11-01

    Life is mostly composed of the elements carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur and phosphorus. Although these six elements make up nucleic acids, proteins and lipids and thus the bulk of living matter, it is theoretically possible that some other elements in the periodic table could serve the same functions. Here we describe a bacterium, strain GFAJ-1 of the Halomonadaceae, isolated from Mono Lake, CA, which substitutes arsenic for phosphorus to sustain its growth. Our data show evidence for arsenate in macromolecules that normally contain phosphate, most notably nucleic acids and proteins. Exchange of one of the major bio-elements may have profound evolutionary and geochemical significance.

  11. A bacterium that can grow by using arsenic instead of phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe-Simon, Felisa; Switzer Blum, Jodi; Kulp, Thomas R; Gordon, Gwyneth W; Hoeft, Shelley E; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Stolz, John F; Webb, Samuel M; Weber, Peter K; Davies, Paul C W; Anbar, Ariel D; Oremland, Ronald S

    2011-06-03

    Life is mostly composed of the elements carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and phosphorus. Although these six elements make up nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids and thus the bulk of living matter, it is theoretically possible that some other elements in the periodic table could serve the same functions. Here, we describe a bacterium, strain GFAJ-1 of the Halomonadaceae, isolated from Mono Lake, California, that is able to substitute arsenic for phosphorus to sustain its growth. Our data show evidence for arsenate in macromolecules that normally contain phosphate, most notably nucleic acids and proteins. Exchange of one of the major bio-elements may have profound evolutionary and geochemical importance.

  12. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: PROBIOTIC APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEENA GARG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB is a heterotrophic Gram-positive bacteria which under goes lactic acid fermentations and leads to production of lactic acid as an end product. LAB includes Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Lactococcus and Streptococcus which are grouped together in the family lactobacillaceae. LAB shows numerous antimicrobial activities due to production of antibacterial and antifungal compounds such as organic acids, bacteriocins, diacetyl, hydrogen peroxide and reutrin. LAB are used as starter culture, consortium members and bioprotective agents in food industry that improve food quality, safety and shelf life. A variety of probiotic LAB species are available including Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. bulgaricus, L. lactis, L. plantarum, L. rhamnosus, L. reuteri, L. fermentum, Bifidobacterium longum, B. breve, B. bifidum, B. esselnsis, B. lactis, B. infantis that are currently recommended for development of functional food products with health-promoting capacities.

  13. Isolation and identification of berberine and berberrubine metabolites by berberine-utilizing bacterium Rhodococcus sp. strain BD7100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kazuki; Takeda, Hisashi; Wakana, Daigo; Sato, Fumihiko; Hosoe, Tomoo

    2016-05-01

    Based on the finding of a novel berberine (BBR)-utilizing bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. strain BD7100, we investigated the degradation of BBR and its analog berberrubine (BRU). Resting cells of BD7100 demethylenated BBR and BRU, yielding benzeneacetic acid analogs. Isolation of benzeneacetic acid analogs suggested that BD7100 degraded the isoquinoline ring of the protoberberine skeleton. This work represents the first report of cleavage of protoberberine skeleton by a microorganism.

  14. Lactic acid bacteria from Sheep's Dhan, a traditional butter from sheep's milk: Isolation, identification and major technological traits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idoui, T.; Boudjerda, J.; Leghouchi, E.; Karam, N. E.

    2009-07-01

    Twenty six lactic acid bacteria were isolated from sheep's Dhan, a traditional butter made from sheep's milk in Jijel (East of Algeria). These strains belong to three genera: Lactococcus, Leuconostoc and Lactobacillus. The results showed that Lactococcus lactic ssp diacetylactis was the predominant species in this traditional butter. The results of the assessment of the technological aptitude indicate that a major strain has a good acidification aptitude, some of them show good proteolytic activity and only Leuconostoc mesenteroides ssp. dextranicum isolates were able to produce exo polysaccharide. (Author) 42 refs.

  15. Ferredoxin-NADP reductase from the thermophilic hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium, Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Takeshi; Nakamura, Miyuki; Arai, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2009-08-01

    The thermophilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium, Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6, assimilates carbon dioxide via the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. Small iron-sulfur proteins, ferredoxins, play a central role as low-potential electron donors for this cycle. The fpr gene of this bacterium, encoding a putative ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR, EC 1.18.1.2), was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant protein was purified to homogeneity. Unexpectedly, the monomeric Fpr protein contained one molecule of FMN as a prosthetic group, although FNRs from other organisms are known to contain FAD. The FMN-containing Fpr was shown to be a bona fide FNR that catalyzes a reversible redox reaction between NADP(+)/NADPH and ferredoxins.

  16. Fluctuation-Enhanced Sensing of Bacterium Odors

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Hung-Chih; King, Maria D; Kwan, Chiman

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore the possibility to detect and identify bacteria by sensing their odor via fluctuation-enhanced sensing with commercial Taguchi sensors. The fluctuations of the electrical resistance during exposure to different bacterial odors, Escherichia coli and anthrax-surrogate Bacillus subtilis, have been measured and analyzed. In the present study, the simplest method, the measurement and analysis of power density spectra was used. The sensors were run in the normal heated and the sampling-and-hold working modes, respectively. The results indicate that Taguchi sensors used in these fluctuation-enhanced modes are effective tools of bacterium detection and identification even when they are utilizing only the power density spectrum of the stochastic sensor signal.

  17. Diffusion of magnetotactic bacterium in rotating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebers, A., E-mail: aceb@tesla.sal.l [Department of Physics, University of Latvia, Zellu 8, Ri-bar ga, LV-1002 (Latvia)

    2011-02-15

    Swimming trajectory of a magnetotactic bacterium in a rotating magnetic field is a circle. Random reversals of the direction of the bacterium motion induces a random walk of the curvature center of the trajectory. In assumption of the distribution of the switching events according to the Poisson process the diffusion coefficient is calculated in dependence on the frequency of the rotating field and the characteristic time between the switching events. It is confirmed by the numerical simulation of the random walk of the bacterium in the rotating magnetic field. - Research highlights: Random switching of the flagella leads to diffusion of a bacterium in the field. Mean square displacement of the curvature center is proportional to time. Diffusion coefficient depends on the period of a rotating field. At zero frequency diffusion coefficient is the same as for a tumbling bacterium.

  18. Influence of extracellular pH on growth, viability, cell size, acidification activity, and intracellular pH of Lactococcus lactis in batch fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Gunda; Johansen, Claus Lindvald; Marten, Gunvor; Wilmes, Jacqueline; Jespersen, Lene; Arneborg, Nils

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of three extracellular pH (pHex) values (i.e., 5.5, 6.5, and 7.5) on the growth, viability, cell size, acidification activity in milk, and intracellular pH (pHi) of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DGCC1212 during pH-controlled batch fermentations. A universal parameter (e.g., linked to pHi) for the description or prediction of viability, specific acidification activity, or growth behavior at a given pHex was not identified. We found viability as determined by flow cytometry to remain high during all growth phases and irrespectively of the pH set point. Furthermore, regardless of the pHex, the acidification activity per cell decreased over time which seemed to be linked to cell shrinkage. Flow cytometric pHi determination demonstrated an increase of the averaged pHi level for higher pH set points, while the pH gradient (pHi-pHex) and the extent of pHi heterogeneity decreased. Cells maintained positive pH gradients at a low pHex of 5.5 and even during substrate limitation at the more widely used pHex 6.5. Moreover, the strain proved able to grow despite small negative or even absent pH gradients at a high pHex of 7.5. The larger pHi heterogeneity at pHex 5.5 and 6.5 was associated with more stressful conditions resulting, e.g., from higher concentrations of non-dissociated lactic acid, while the low pHi heterogeneity at pHex 7.5 most probably corresponded to lower concentrations of non-dissociated lactic acid which facilitated the cells to reach the highest maximum active cell counts of the three pH set points.

  19. The chemical formula of a magnetotactic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh, Mohit; Das, Sayoni; Mishra, Prashant; Mittal, Aditya

    2012-05-01

    Elucidation of the chemical logic of life is one of the grand challenges in biology, and essential to the progress of the upcoming field of synthetic biology. Treatment of microbial cells explicitly as a "chemical" species in controlled reaction (growth) environments has allowed fascinating discoveries of elemental formulae of a few species that have guided the modern views on compositions of a living cell. Application of mass and energy balances on living cells has proved to be useful in modeling of bioengineering systems, particularly in deriving optimized media compositions for growing microorganisms to maximize yields of desired bio-derived products by regulating intra-cellular metabolic networks. In this work, application of elemental mass balance during growth of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense in bioreactors has resulted in the discovery of the chemical formula of the magnetotactic bacterium. By developing a stoichiometric equation characterizing the formation of a magnetotactic bacterial cell, coupled with rigorous experimental measurements and robust calculations, we report the elemental formula of M. gryphiswaldense cell as CH(2.06)O(0.13)N(0.28)Fe(1.74×10(-3)). Remarkably, we find that iron metabolism during growth of this magnetotactic bacterium is much more correlated individually with carbon and nitrogen, compared to carbon and nitrogen with each other, indicating that iron serves more as a nutrient during bacterial growth rather than just a mineral. Magnetotactic bacteria have not only invoked some interest in the field of astrobiology for the last two decades, but are also prokaryotes having the unique ability of synthesizing membrane bound intracellular organelles. Our findings on these unique prokaryotes are a strong addition to the limited repertoire, of elemental compositions of living cells, aimed at exploring the chemical logic of life.

  20. Characterization of lactic acid bacteria isolated from a Thai low-salt fermented fish product and the role of garlic as substrate for fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paludan-Müller, Christine; Huss, Hans Henrik; Gram, Lone

    1999-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from raw materials (fish, rice, garlic and banana leaves) and processed som-fak (a Thai low-salt fermented fish product) were characterized by API 50- CH and other phenotypic criteria. Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and Leuconostoc citreum were specifically...