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Sample records for acid bacteria revisited

  1. The proteolytic system of lactic acid bacteria revisited : a genomic comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, M.; Bayjanov, J.; Renckens, B.A.M.; Nauta, A.; Siezen, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are a group of gram-positive, lactic acid producing Firmicutes. They have been extensively used in food fermentations, including the production of various dairy products. The proteolytic system of LAB converts proteins to peptides and then to amino acids, which

  2. The proteolytic system of lactic acid bacteria revisited: a genomic comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renckens Bernadet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are a group of gram-positive, lactic acid producing Firmicutes. They have been extensively used in food fermentations, including the production of various dairy products. The proteolytic system of LAB converts proteins to peptides and then to amino acids, which is essential for bacterial growth and also contributes significantly to flavor compounds as end-products. Recent developments in high-throughput genome sequencing and comparative genomics hybridization arrays provide us with opportunities to explore the diversity of the proteolytic system in various LAB strains. Results We performed a genome-wide comparative genomics analysis of proteolytic system components, including cell-wall bound proteinase, peptide transporters and peptidases, in 22 sequenced LAB strains. The peptidase families PepP/PepQ/PepM, PepD and PepI/PepR/PepL are described as examples of our in silico approach to refine the distinction of subfamilies with different enzymatic activities. Comparison of protein 3D structures of proline peptidases PepI/PepR/PepL and esterase A allowed identification of a conserved core structure, which was then used to improve phylogenetic analysis and functional annotation within this protein superfamily. The diversity of proteolytic system components in 39 Lactococcus lactis strains was explored using pangenome comparative genome hybridization analysis. Variations were observed in the proteinase PrtP and its maturation protein PrtM, in one of the Opp transport systems and in several peptidases between strains from different Lactococcus subspecies or from different origin. Conclusions The improved functional annotation of the proteolytic system components provides an excellent framework for future experimental validations of predicted enzymatic activities. The genome sequence data can be coupled to other "omics" data e.g. transcriptomics and metabolomics for prediction of proteolytic and flavor

  3. The mycorrhiza helper bacteria revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey-Klett, P; Garbaye, J; Tarkka, M

    2007-01-01

    In natural conditions, mycorrhizal fungi are surrounded by complex microbial communities, which modulate the mycorrhizal symbiosis. Here, the focus is on the so-called mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB). This concept is revisited, and the distinction is made between the helper bacteria, which assist mycorrhiza formation, and those that interact positively with the functioning of the symbiosis. After considering some examples of MHB from the literature, the ecological and evolutionary implications of the relationships of MHB with mycorrhizal fungi are discussed. The question of the specificity of the MHB effect is addressed, and an assessment is made of progress in understanding the mechanisms of the MHB effect, which has been made possible through the development of genomics. Finally, clear evidence is presented suggesting that some MHB promote the functioning of the mycorrhizal symbiosis. This is illustrated for three critical functions of practical significance: nutrient mobilization from soil minerals, fixation of atmospheric nitrogen, and protection of plants against root pathogens. The review concludes with discussion of future research priorities regarding the potentially very fruitful concept of MHB.

  4. Demospongic Acids Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Barnathan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The well-known fatty acids with a D5,9 unsaturation system were designated for a long period as demospongic acids, taking into account that they originally occurred in marine Demospongia sponges. However, such acids have also been observed in various marine sources with a large range of chain-lengths (C16–C32 and from some terrestrial plants with short acyl chains (C18–C19. Finally, the D5,9 fatty acids appear to be a particular type of non-methylene-interrupted fatty acids (NMA FAs. This article reviews the occurrence of these particular fatty acids in marine and terrestrial organisms and shows the biosynthetic connections between D5,9 fatty acids and other NMI FAs.

  5. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: PROBIOTIC APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    NEENA GARG

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is a heterotrophic Gram-positive bacteria which under goes lactic acid fermentations and leads to production of lactic acid as an end product. LAB includes Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Lactococcus and Streptococcus which are grouped together in the family lactobacillaceae. LAB shows numerous antimicrobial activities due to production of antibacterial and antifungal compounds such as organic acids, bacteriocins, diacetyl, hydrogen peroxide and reutrin. LA...

  6. [Teichoic acids from lactic acid bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livins'ka, O P; Harmasheva, I L; Kovalenko, N K

    2012-01-01

    The current view of the structural diversity of teichoic acids and their involvement in the biological activity of lactobacilli has been reviewed. The mechanisms of effects of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, in particular adhesive and immunostimulating functions have been described. The prospects of the use of structure data of teichoic acid in the assessment of intraspecific diversity of lactic acid bacteria have been also reflected.

  7. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: PROBIOTIC APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEENA GARG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB is a heterotrophic Gram-positive bacteria which under goes lactic acid fermentations and leads to production of lactic acid as an end product. LAB includes Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Lactococcus and Streptococcus which are grouped together in the family lactobacillaceae. LAB shows numerous antimicrobial activities due to production of antibacterial and antifungal compounds such as organic acids, bacteriocins, diacetyl, hydrogen peroxide and reutrin. LAB are used as starter culture, consortium members and bioprotective agents in food industry that improve food quality, safety and shelf life. A variety of probiotic LAB species are available including Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. bulgaricus, L. lactis, L. plantarum, L. rhamnosus, L. reuteri, L. fermentum, Bifidobacterium longum, B. breve, B. bifidum, B. esselnsis, B. lactis, B. infantis that are currently recommended for development of functional food products with health-promoting capacities.

  8. Engineering robust lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, P.A.; Bokhorst-van de Veen, van H.; Wels, M.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2011-01-01

    For centuries, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been industrially exploited as starter cultures in the fermentation of foods and feeds for their spoilage-preventing and flavor-enhancing characteristics. More recently, the health-promoting effects of LAB on the consumer have been widely acknowledged,

  9. Genetics of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagorec, Monique; Anba-Mondoloni, Jamila; Coq, Anne-Marie Crutz-Le; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine

    Many meat (or fish) products, obtained by the fermentation of meat originating from various animals by the flora that naturally contaminates it, are part of the human diet since millenaries. Historically, the use of bacteria as starters for the fermentation of meat, to produce dry sausages, was thus performed empirically through the endogenous micro-biota, then, by a volunteer addition of starters, often performed by back-slopping, without knowing precisely the microbial species involved. It is only since about 50 years that well defined bacterial cultures have been used as starters for the fermentation of dry sausages. Nowadays, the indigenous micro-biota of fermented meat products is well identified, and the literature is rich of reports on the identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) present in many traditional fermented products from various geographical origin, obtained without the addition of commercial starters (See Talon, Leroy, & Lebert, 2007, and references therein).

  10. Electron transport chains of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brooijmans, R.J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are generally considered facultative anaerobic obligate fermentative bacteria. They are unable to synthesize heme. Some lactic acid bacteria are unable to form menaquinone as well. Both these components are cofactors of respiratory (electron transport) chains of prokaryotic bact

  11. Intramolecular Amide Hydrolysis in N-Methylmaleamic Acid Revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The intramolecular amide hydrolysis of N-methylmaleamic acid have been revisited by use of density functional theory and inclusion of solvent effects. The results indicate that concerted reaction mechanism is favored over stepwise reaction mechanism. This is in agreement with the previous theoretical study. Sovlent effects have significant influence on the reaction barrier.

  12. Fatty acid composition of selected prosthecate bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, R N; Schmidt, J M

    1976-10-11

    The cellular fatty acid composition of 14 strains of Caulobacter speices and types, two species of Prosthecomicrobium, and two species of Asticcacaulis was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. In most of these bacteria, the major fatty acids were octadecenoic acid (C18:1), hexadecenoic acid (C16:1) and hexadecanoic acid (C16:0). Some cyclopropane and branched chain fatty acids were detected in addition to the straight chained acids. Hydroxytetradecanoic acid was an important component of P.enhydrum but significant amounts of hydroxy acids were not detected in other prosthecate bacteria examined.

  13. Lactic Acid Bacteria in Health and Disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reports demonstrating the health promoting effects of ... therapy. In 1908, élie Metchinkoff, proposed that the acid-producing organisms (lactic acid bacteria) ... Phage resistance aids in .... In a study conducted [29] in children aged 3 it was found.

  14. Lactic Acid Bacteria in the Gut

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolaki, M.; Vos, de W.M.; Kleerebezem, M.; Zoetendal, E.G.

    2012-01-01

    From all bacterial groups, the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are probably the group of bacteria that is most associated with human lifestyle. The term LAB mainly refers to the ability of these organisms to convert sugars to lactic acid. The LAB comprise non-sporing, aerotolerant, coccus or rod-shaped,

  15. Lactic Acid Bacteria in the Gut

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolaki, M.; Vos, de W.M.; Kleerebezem, M.; Zoetendal, E.G.

    2012-01-01

    From all bacterial groups, the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are probably the group of bacteria that is most associated with human lifestyle. The term LAB mainly refers to the ability of these organisms to convert sugars to lactic acid. The LAB comprise non-sporing, aerotolerant, coccus or rod-shaped,

  16. Energy transduction in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poolman, Bert

    In the discovery of some general principles of energy transduction, lactic acid bacteria have played an important role. In this review, the energy transducing processes of lactic acid bacteria are discussed with the emphasis on the major developments of the past 5 years. This work not only includes

  17. Quorum sensing mechanism in lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Yılmaz - Yıldıran

    2015-04-01

    and detection occurs as a consecution it is hard to understand their QS mechanism. In this review, connection between QS mechanism and some characteristics of lactic acid bacteria are evaluated such as concordance with its host, inhibition of pathogen development and colonization in gastrointestinal system, bacteriocin production, acid and bile resistance, adhesion to epithelium cells. Understanding QS mechanism of lactic acid bacteria will be useful to design metabiotics which is defined as novel probiotics.

  18. Genetics of proteinases of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerhardus

    1988-01-01

    Because it is essential for good growth with concomitant rapid acid production, and for the production of flavorous peptides and amino acids, the proteolytic ability of lactic acid bacteria is of crucial importance for reliable dairy product quality. In view of this importance, considerable research

  19. Genetics of proteinases of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerhardus

    Because it is essential for good growth with concomitant rapid acid production, and for the production of flavorous peptides and amino acids, the proteolytic ability of lactic acid bacteria is of crucial importance for reliable dairy product quality. In view of this importance, considerable research

  20. Discovering lactic acid bacteria by genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaenhammer, T.; Altermann, E.; Arigoni, F.; Bolotin, A.; Breidt, F.; Broadbent, J.; Cano, R.; Chaillou, S.; Deutscher, J.; Gasson, M.; Guchte, van de M.; Guzzo, J.; Hartke, A.; Hawkins, T.; Hols, P.; Hutkins, R.; Kleerebezem, M.; Kok, J.; Kuipers, O.; Lubbers, M.; Maguin, E.; McKay, L.; Mills, D.; Nauta, A.; Overbeek, R.; Pel, H.; Pridmore, D.; Saier, M.; Sinderen, van D.; Sorokin, A.; Steele, J.; O'Sullivan, D.; Vos, de W.; Weimer, B.; Zagorec, M.; Siezen, R.

    2002-01-01

    This review summarizes a collection of lactic acid bacteria that are now undergoing genomic sequencing and analysis. Summaries are presented on twenty different species, with each overview discussing the organisms fundamental and practical significance, nvironmental habitat, and its role in

  1. Discovering lactic acid bacteria by genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaenhammer, T; Altermann, E; Arigoni, F; Bolotin, A; Breidt, F; Broadbent, J; Cano, R; Chaillou, S; Deutscher, J; Gasson, M; van de Guchte, M; Guzzo, J; Hartke, A; Hawkins, T; Hols, P; Hutkins, R; Kleerebezem, M; Kok, J; Kuipers, O; Maguin, E; McKay, L; Mills, D; Nauta, A; Overbeek, R; Pel, H; Pridmore, D; Saier, M; van Sinderen, D; Sorokin, A; Steele, J; O'Sullivan, D; de Vos, W; Weimer, B; Zagorec, M; Siezen, R

    This review summarizes a collection of lactic acid bacteria that are now undergoing genomic sequencing and analysis. Summaries are presented on twenty different species, with each overview discussing the organisms fundamental and practical significance, environmental habitat, and its role in

  2. Lactic acid bacteria: microbiological and functional aspects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lahtinen, Sampo

    2012-01-01

    "Updated with the substantial progress made in lactic acid and bacteria research since the third edition, this fourth volume discusses improved insights in genetics and new molecular biological techniques...

  3. Comparative genomics of the lactic acid bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarova, K.; Slesarev, A.; Wolf, Y.; Sorokin, A.; Mirkin, B.; Koonin, E.; Pavlov, A.; Pavlova, N.; Karamychev, V.; Polouchine, N.; Shakhova, V.; Grigoriev, I.; Lou, Y.; Rokhsar, D.; Lucas, S.; Huang, K.; Goodstein, D. M.; Hawkins, T.; Plengvidhya, V.; Welker, D.; Hughes, J.; Goh, Y.; Benson, A.; Baldwin, K.; Lee, J. -H.; Diaz-Muniz, I.; Dosti, B.; Smeianov, V; Wechter, W.; Barabote, R.; Lorca, G.; Altermann, E.; Barrangou, R.; Ganesan, B.; Xie, Y.; Rawsthorne, H.; Tamir, D.; Parker, C.; Breidt, F.; Broadbent, J.; Hutkins, R.; O' Sullivan, D.; Steele, J.; Unlu, G.; Saier, M.; Klaenhammer, T.; Richardson, P.; Kozyavkin, S.; Weimer, B.; Mills, D.

    2006-06-01

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria are associated with various plant and animal niches and play a key role in the production of fermented foods and beverages. We report nine genome sequences representing the phylogenetic and functional diversity of these bacteria. The small genomes of lactic acid bacteria encode a broad repertoire of transporters for efficient carbon and nitrogen acquisition from the nutritionally rich environments they inhabit and reflect a limited range of biosynthetic capabilities that indicate both prototrophic and auxotrophic strains. Phylogenetic analyses, comparison of gene content across the group, and reconstruction of ancestral gene sets indicate a combination of extensive gene loss and key gene acquisitions via horizontal gene transfer during the coevolution of lactic acid bacteria with their habitats.

  4. The proteolytic system of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, B

    1993-12-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are widely used throughout the world, empirically or deliberately, in the manufacturing of several food and feed stuffs, including milk products (such as cheese, butter, yoghurt, buttermilk, etc.), fermented vegetables (pickles, olives and sauerkraut), sausages, sourdough bread and silage, due to their ability to convert sugars into lactic acid. Of these, dairy products are of outstanding economic importance. Starter cultures used in the dairy industry are mixtures of carefully selected lactic acid bacteria which are added to the milk to fulfil the desired fermentation. Dairy starter cultures must reach high densities in milk in order to produce lactic acid at the required rates for manufacturing. Under these conditions, amino acids supply becomes limitant due to their scarce concentration in milk and to the auxotrophies shown by many starter bacteria. This implies the necessity of a proteolytic system, able to degrade the most abundant protein in milk, casein, into assimilable amino acids and peptides. Casein degradation and utilization require the concerted action of proteinases, peptidases and amino acid and peptide uptake systems. This whole set of enzymes constitutes the proteolytic system. In this article an overview of the recent biochemical and genetic data on the proteolytic system of lactic acid bacteria will be presented.

  5. Whole body acid-base modeling revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Troels; Nielsen, Søren

    2017-04-01

    The textbook account of whole body acid-base balance in terms of endogenous acid production, renal net acid excretion, and gastrointestinal alkali absorption, which is the only comprehensive model around, has never been applied in clinical practice or been formally validated. To improve understanding of acid-base modeling, we managed to write up this conventional model as an expression solely on urine chemistry. Renal net acid excretion and endogenous acid production were already formulated in terms of urine chemistry, and we could from the literature also see gastrointestinal alkali absorption in terms of urine excretions. With a few assumptions it was possible to see that this expression of net acid balance was arithmetically identical to minus urine charge, whereby under the development of acidosis, urine was predicted to acquire a net negative charge. The literature already mentions unexplained negative urine charges so we scrutinized a series of seminal papers and confirmed empirically the theoretical prediction that observed urine charge did acquire negative charge as acidosis developed. Hence, we can conclude that the conventional model is problematic since it predicts what is physiologically impossible. Therefore, we need a new model for whole body acid-base balance, which does not have impossible implications. Furthermore, new experimental studies are needed to account for charge imbalance in urine under development of acidosis.

  6. Revisiting Modes of energy generation in sulfate reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joachimiak, Marcin; Chakraborty, Romy; Zhou, Aifen; Fortney, Julian; Geller, Jil; Wall, Judy; Zhou, Jizhong; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Keasling, Jay; Chhabra, Swapnil

    2010-05-17

    Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) play an important role in global sulfur and carbon cycling through their ability to completely mineralize organic matter while respiring sulfate to hydrogen sulfide. They are ubiquitous in anaerobic environments and have the ability to reduce toxic metals like Cr(VI) and U(VI). While SRB have been studied for over three decades, bioenergetic modes of this group of microbes are poorly understood. Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough (DvH) has served as a model SRB over the last decade with the accumulation of transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic data under a wide variety of stressors. To further investigate the three hypothesized modes of energy generation in this anaerobe we conducted a systematic study involving multiple electron donor and acceptor combinations for growth. DvH was grown at 37oC in a defined medium with (a) lactate + thiosulfate, (b) lactate + sulfite (c) lactate + sulfate, (d) pyruvate + sulfate, (e) H2 + acetate + sulfate, (f) formate + acetate + sulfate, g) formate + sulfate and (h) pyruvate fermentation. Cells were harvested at mid-log phase of growth for all conditions for transcriptomics, when the optical density at 600nm was in the range 0.42-0.5. Initial results indicate that cells grown on lactate do not appear to significantly differentiate their gene expression profiles when presented with different electron acceptors. These profiles however differ significantly from those observed during growth with other electron donors such as H2 and formate, as well as during fermentative growth. Together the gene expression changes in the presence of different electron donors provide insights into the ability of DvH to differentially reduce metals such as Cr(VI). Here we present revised modes of energy generation in DvH in light of this new transcriptomic evidence.

  7. Revisiting Modes of energy generation in sulfate reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joachimiak, Marcin; Chakraborty, Romy; Zhou, Aifen; Fortney, Julian; Geller, Jil; Wall, Judy; Zhou, Jizhong; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Keasling, Jay; Chhabra, Swapnil

    2010-05-17

    Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) play an important role in global sulfur and carbon cycling through their ability to completely mineralize organic matter while respiring sulfate to hydrogen sulfide. They are ubiquitous in anaerobic environments and have the ability to reduce toxic metals like Cr(VI) and U(VI). While SRB have been studied for over three decades, bioenergetic modes of this group of microbes are poorly understood. Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough (DvH) has served as a model SRB over the last decade with the accumulation of transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic data under a wide variety of stressors. To further investigate the three hypothesized modes of energy generation in this anaerobe we conducted a systematic study involving multiple electron donor and acceptor combinations for growth. DvH was grown at 37oC in a defined medium with (a) lactate + thiosulfate, (b) lactate + sulfite (c) lactate + sulfate, (d) pyruvate + sulfate, (e) H2 + acetate + sulfate, (f) formate + acetate + sulfate, g) formate + sulfate and (h) pyruvate fermentation. Cells were harvested at mid-log phase of growth for all conditions for transcriptomics, when the optical density at 600nm was in the range 0.42-0.5. Initial results indicate that cells grown on lactate do not appear to significantly differentiate their gene expression profiles when presented with different electron acceptors. These profiles however differ significantly from those observed during growth with other electron donors such as H2 and formate, as well as during fermentative growth. Together the gene expression changes in the presence of different electron donors provide insights into the ability of DvH to differentially reduce metals such as Cr(VI). Here we present revised modes of energy generation in DvH in light of this new transcriptomic evidence.

  8. [Bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilková, Andrea; Sepova, Hana Kinová; Bilka, Frantisek; Balázová, Andrea

    2011-04-01

    Lactic acid bacteria comprise several genera of gram-positive bacteria that are known for the production of structurally different antimicrobial substances. Among them, bacteriocins are nowadays in the centre of scientific interest. Bacteriocins, proteinaceous antimicrobial substances, are produced ribosomally and have usually a narrow spectrum of bacterial growth inhibition. According to their structure and the target of their activity, they are divided into four classes, although there are some suggestions for a renewed classification. The most interesting and usable class are lantibiotics. They comprise the most widely commercially used and well examined bacteriocin, nisin. The non-pathogenic character of lactic acid bacteria is advantageous for using their bacteriocins in food preservation as well as in feed supplements or in veterinary medicine.

  9. Anchoring of proteins to lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenhouts, K; Buist, Girbe; Kok, Jan

    1999-01-01

    The anchoring of proteins to the cell surface of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) using genetic techniques is an exciting and emerging research area that holds great promise for a wide variety of biotechnological applications. This paper reviews five different types of anchoring domains that have been exp

  10. Why engineering lactic acid bacteria for biobutanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Gram-positive Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are considered attractive biocatalysts for biomass to biofuels for several reasons. They have GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) status that are acceptable in food, feed, and medical applications. LAB are fermentative: selected strains are capable of f...

  11. Multidrug transporters in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazurkiewicz, P; Sakamoto, K; Poelarends, GJ; Konings, WN

    2005-01-01

    Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria possess several Multi-Drug Resistance systems (MDRs) that excrete out of the cell a wide variety of mainly cationic lipophilic cytotoxic compounds as well as many clinically relevant antibiotics. These MDRs are either proton/drug antiporters belonging to the major

  12. Proteolytic enzymes of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, J; Haandrikman, A

    The proteolytic system of lactic acid bacteria is essential for their growth in milk and contributes significantly to flavour development in fermented milk products where these microorganisms are used as starter cultures. The proteolytic system is composed of proteinases which initially cleave the

  13. Discovering lactic acid bacteria by genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaenhammer, T; Altermann, E; Arigoni, F; Bolotin, A; Breidt, F; Broadbent, J; Cano, R; Chaillou, S; Deutscher, J; Gasson, M; van de Guchte, M; Guzzo, J; Hartke, A; Hawkins, T; Hols, P; Hutkins, R; Kleerebezem, M; Kok, J; Kuipers, O; Maguin, E; McKay, L; Mills, D; Nauta, A; Overbeek, R; Pel, H; Pridmore, D; Saier, M; van Sinderen, D; Sorokin, A; Steele, J; O'Sullivan, D; de Vos, W; Weimer, B; Zagorec, M; Siezen, R

    2002-01-01

    This review summarizes a collection of lactic acid bacteria that are now undergoing genomic sequencing and analysis. Summaries are presented on twenty different species, with each overview discussing the organisms fundamental and practical significance, environmental habitat, and its role in ferment

  14. Discovering lactic acid bacteria by genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaenhammer, T.; Altermann, E.; Arigoni, F.; Bolotin, A.; Breidt, F.; Broadbent, J.; Cano, R.; Chaillou, S.; Deutscher, J.; Gasson, M.; Guchte, van de M.; Guzzo, J.; Hartke, A.; Hawkins, T.; Hols, P.; Hutkins, R.; Kleerebezem, M.; Kok, J.; Kuipers, O.; Lubbers, M.; Maguin, E.; McKay, L.; Mills, D.; Nauta, A.; Overbeek, R.; Pel, H.; Pridmore, D.; Saier, M.; Sinderen, van D.; Sorokin, A.; Steele, J.; O'Sullivan, D.; Vos, de W.; Weimer, B.; Zagorec, M.; Siezen, R.

    2002-01-01

    This review summarizes a collection of lactic acid bacteria that are now undergoing genomic sequencing and analysis. Summaries are presented on twenty different species, with each overview discussing the organisms fundamental and practical significance, nvironmental habitat, and its role in fermenta

  15. Exopolysaccharides produced by lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caggianiello, Graziano; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Spano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is able to produce capsular or extracellular polysaccharides, with various chemical compositions and properties. Polysaccharides produced by LAB alter the rheological properties of the matrix in which they are dispersed, leading to typically viscous and

  16. Multidrug transporters in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazurkiewicz, P; Sakamoto, K; Poelarends, GJ; Konings, WN

    2005-01-01

    Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria possess several Multi-Drug Resistance systems (MDRs) that excrete out of the cell a wide variety of mainly cationic lipophilic cytotoxic compounds as well as many clinically relevant antibiotics. These MDRs are either proton/drug antiporters belonging to the major

  17. The proteolytic systems of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunji, Edmund R.S.; Mierau, Igor; Hagting, Anja; Poolman, Bert; Konings, Wil N.

    1996-01-01

    Proteolysis in dairy lactic acid bacteria has been studied in great detail by genetic, biochemical and ultrastructural methods. From these studies the picture emerges that the proteolytic systems of lactococci and lactobacilli are remarkably similar in their components and mode of action. The proteo

  18. Anchoring of proteins to lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenhouts, K; Buist, Girbe; Kok, Jan

    1999-01-01

    The anchoring of proteins to the cell surface of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) using genetic techniques is an exciting and emerging research area that holds great promise for a wide variety of biotechnological applications. This paper reviews five different types of anchoring domains that have been exp

  19. Effects of culture conditions on acetic acid production by bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2015-11-30

    Nov 30, 2015 ... Keywords: Acetic acid bacteria, acetic acid production, Cocoa fermentation, culture conditions. INTRODUCTION ... assessed by acid forming colony characterized by a ... production capacity to ethanol, lactic acid, acetic acid.

  20. Precision genome engineering in lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pijkeren, Jan Peter; Britton, Robert A

    2014-08-29

    Innovative new genome engineering technologies for manipulating chromosomes have appeared in the last decade. One of these technologies, recombination mediated genetic engineering (recombineering) allows for precision DNA engineering of chromosomes and plasmids in Escherichia coli. Single-stranded DNA recombineering (SSDR) allows for the generation of subtle mutations without the need for selection and without leaving behind any foreign DNA. In this review we discuss the application of SSDR technology in lactic acid bacteria, with an emphasis on key factors that were critical to move this technology from E. coli into Lactobacillus reuteri and Lactococcus lactis. We also provide a blueprint for how to proceed if one is attempting to establish SSDR technology in a lactic acid bacterium. The emergence of CRISPR-Cas technology in genome engineering and its potential application to enhancing SSDR in lactic acid bacteria is discussed. The ability to perform precision genome engineering in medically and industrially important lactic acid bacteria will allow for the genetic improvement of strains without compromising safety.

  1. Bacteriocins From Lactic Acid Bacteria: Interest For Food Products Biopreservation

    OpenAIRE

    Dortu, C.; Thonart, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria: interest for food products biopreservation. Bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria are low molecular weight antimicrobial peptides. They have inhibitory activity against the bacteria that are closed related to the producer strains and a narrow inhibitory spectrum. Nevertheless, most of them have activity against some food-born pathogenic bacteria as Listeria monocytogenes. The application of bacteriocins or bacteriocin producing lactic acid bacteria in ...

  2. Freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Fernanda; Cenard, Stéphanie; Passot, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are of great importance for the food and biotechnology industry. They are widely used as starters for manufacturing food (e.g., yogurt, cheese, fermented meats, and vegetables) and probiotic products, as well as for green chemistry applications. Freeze-drying or lyophilization is a convenient method for preservation of bacteria. By reducing water activity to values below 0.2, it allows long-term storage and low-cost distribution at suprazero temperatures, while minimizing losses in viability and functionality. Stabilization of bacteria via freeze-drying starts with the addition of a protectant solution to the bacterial suspension. Freeze-drying includes three steps, namely, (1) freezing of the concentrated and protected cell suspension, (2) primary drying to remove ice by sublimation, and (3) secondary drying to remove unfrozen water by desorption. In this chapter we describe a method for freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria at a pilot scale, thus allowing control of the process parameters for maximal survival and functionality recovery.

  3. Bacteriocins and lactic acid bacteria - a minireview | Savadogo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Biotechnology ... Fermentation of various foods by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is one of the oldest forms of ... scientific research about lactic acid bacteria as probiotics and their bacteriocins for healthy nutrition of fermented food.

  4. Progress in engineering acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongde; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Rongqing

    2014-02-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used for the production of a variety of fermented foods, and are considered as probiotic due to their health-promoting effect. However, LAB encounter various environmental stresses both in industrial fermentation and application, among which acid stress is one of the most important survival challenges. Improving the acid stress resistance may contribute to the application and function of probiotic action to the host. Recently, the advent of genomics, functional genomics and high-throughput technologies have allowed for the understanding of acid tolerance mechanisms at a systems level, and many method to improve acid tolerance have been developed. This review describes the current progress in engineering acid stress resistance of LAB. Special emphasis is placed on engineering cellular microenvironment (engineering amino acid metabolism, introduction of exogenous biosynthetic capacity, and overproduction of stress response proteins) and maintaining cell membrane functionality. Moreover, strategies to improve acid tolerance and the related physiological mechanisms are also discussed.

  5. Lactic acid bacteria and their controversial role in fresh meat spoilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothakos, Vasileios; Devlieghere, Frank; Villani, Francesco; Björkroth, Johanna; Ercolini, Danilo

    2015-11-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) constitute a heterogeneous group that has been widely associated with fresh meat and cooked meat products. They represent a controversial cohort of microbial species that either contribute to spoilage through generation of offensive metabolites and the subsequent organoleptic downgrading of meat or serve as bioprotective agents with strains of certain species causing unperceivable or no alterations. Therefore, significant distinction among biotypes is substantiated by studies determining spoilage potential as a strain-specific trait corroborating the need to revisit the concept of spoilage.

  6. Beneficial effects of antioxidative lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisako Nakagawa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is caused by exposure to reactive oxygen intermediates. The oxidative damage of cell components such as proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids one of the important factors associated with diabetes mellitus, cancers and cardiovascular diseases. This occurs as a result of imbalance between the generations of oxygen derived radicals and the organism’s antioxidant potential. The amount of oxidative damage increases as an organism ages and is postulated to be a major causal factor of senescence. To date, many studies have focused on food sources, nutrients, and components that exert antioxidant activity in worms, flies, mice, and humans. Probiotics, live microorganisms that when administered in adequate amounts provide many beneficial effects on the human health, have been attracting growing interest for their health-promoting effects, and have often been administered in fermented milk products. In particular, lactic acid bacteria (LAB are known to conferre physiologic benefits. Many studies have indicated the antioxidative activity of LAB. Here we review that the effects of lactic acid bacteria to respond to oxidative stress, is connected to oxidative-stress related disease and aging.

  7. Exopolysaccharides from sourdough lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, Sandra; Arendt, Elke K

    2014-01-01

    The use of sourdough improves the quality and increases the shelf life of bread. The positive effects are associated with metabolites produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) during sourdough fermentation, including organic acids, exopolysaccharides (EPS), and enzymes. EPS formed during sourdough fermentation by glycansucrase activity from sucrose influence the viscoelastic properties of the dough and beneficially affect the texture and shelf life (in particular, starch retrogradation) of bread. Accordingly, EPS have the potential to replace hydrocolloids currently used as bread improvers and meet so the consumer demands for a reduced use of food additives. In this review, the current knowledge about the functional aspects of EPS formation by sourdough LAB especially in baking applications is summarized.

  8. The effect of lactic acid bacteria on cocoa bean fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2015-07-16

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao L.) are the raw material for chocolate production. Fermentation of cocoa pulp by microorganisms is crucial for developing chocolate flavor precursors. Yeasts conduct an alcoholic fermentation within the bean pulp that is essential for the production of good quality beans, giving typical chocolate characters. However, the roles of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria in contributing to the quality of cocoa bean and chocolate are not fully understood. Using controlled laboratory fermentations, this study investigated the contribution of lactic acid bacteria to cocoa bean fermentation. Cocoa beans were fermented under conditions where the growth of lactic acid bacteria was restricted by the use of nisin and lysozyme. The resultant microbial ecology, chemistry and chocolate quality of beans from these fermentations were compared with those of indigenous (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in control fermentations. In fermentations with the presence of nisin and lysozyme, the same species of yeasts and acetic acid bacteria grew but the growth of lactic acid bacteria was prevented or restricted. These beans underwent characteristic alcoholic fermentation where the utilization of sugars and the production of ethanol, organic acids and volatile compounds in the bean pulp and nibs were similar for beans fermented in the presence of lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid was produced during both fermentations but more so when lactic acid bacteria grew. Beans fermented in the presence or absence of lactic acid bacteria were fully fermented, had similar shell weights and gave acceptable chocolates with no differences

  9. Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria and Propionic Acid Bacteria using FTIR Spectroscopy and Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Nalepa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, lactic acid bacteria and propionic acid bacteria have been identified at the genus level with the use of artificial neural networks (ANNs and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Bacterial strains of the genera Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Streptococcus and Propionibacterium were analyzed since they deliver health benefits and are routinely used in the food processing industry. The correctness of bacterial identification by ANNs and FTIR was evaluated at two stages. At first stage, ANNs were tested based on the spectra of 66 reference bacterial strains. At second stage, the evaluation involved 286 spectra of bacterial strains isolated from food products, deposited in our laboratory collection, and identified by genus-specific PCR. ANNs were developed based on the spectra and their first derivatives. The most satisfactory results were reported for the probabilistic neural network, which was built using a combination of W5W4W3 spectral ranges. This network correctly identified the genus of 95 % of the lactic acid bacteria and propionic acid bacteria strains analyzed.

  10. [Regulating acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongde; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Rongqing

    2014-07-04

    As cell factories, lactic acid bacteria are widely used in food, agriculture, pharmaceutical and other industries. Acid stress is one the important survival challenges encountered by lactic acid bacteria both in fermentation process and in the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, the development of systems biology and metabolic engineering brings unprecedented opportunity for further elucidating the acid tolerance mechanisms and improving the acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria. This review addresses physiological mechanisms of lactic acid bacteria during acid stress. Moreover, strategies to improve the acid stress resistance of lactic acid were proposed.

  11. Towards lactic acid bacteria-based biorefineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoli, Roberto; Bosco, Francesca; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Bayer, Edward A; Pessione, Enrica

    2014-11-15

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have long been used in industrial applications mainly as starters for food fermentation or as biocontrol agents or as probiotics. However, LAB possess several characteristics that render them among the most promising candidates for use in future biorefineries in converting plant-derived biomass-either from dedicated crops or from municipal/industrial solid wastes-into biofuels and high value-added products. Lactic acid, their main fermentation product, is an attractive building block extensively used by the chemical industry, owing to the potential for production of polylactides as biodegradable and biocompatible plastic alternative to polymers derived from petrochemicals. LA is but one of many high-value compounds which can be produced by LAB fermentation, which also include biofuels such as ethanol and butanol, biodegradable plastic polymers, exopolysaccharides, antimicrobial agents, health-promoting substances and nutraceuticals. Furthermore, several LAB strains have ascertained probiotic properties, and their biomass can be considered a high-value product. The present contribution aims to provide an extensive overview of the main industrial applications of LAB and future perspectives concerning their utilization in biorefineries. Strategies will be described in detail for developing LAB strains with broader substrate metabolic capacity for fermentation of cheaper biomass.

  12. A computerised system for the identification of lactic acid bacteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijtzes, T.; Bruggeman, M.R.; Nout, M.J.R.; Zwietering, M.H.

    1997-01-01

    A generic computerised system for the identification of bacteria was developed. The system is equipped with a key to the identification of lactic acid bacteria. The identification is carried out in two steps. The first step distinguishes groups of bacteria by following a decision tree with general i

  13. Stress Physiology of Lactic Acid Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Alegría, Ángel; Bron, Peter A; de Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Lemos, José A; Linares, Daniel M; Ross, Paul; Stanton, Catherine; Turroni, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe; Varmanen, Pekka; Ventura, Marco; Zúñiga, Manuel; Tsakalidou, Effie; Kok, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are important starter, commensal, or pathogenic microorganisms. The stress physiology of LAB has been studied in depth for over 2 decades, fueled mostly by the technological implications of LAB robustness in the food industry. Survival of probiotic LAB in the host and the potential relatedness of LAB virulence to their stress resilience have intensified interest in the field. Thus, a wealth of information concerning stress responses exists today for strains as diverse as starter (e.g., Lactococcus lactis), probiotic (e.g., several Lactobacillus spp.), and pathogenic (e.g., Enterococcus and Streptococcus spp.) LAB. Here we present the state of the art for LAB stress behavior. We describe the multitude of stresses that LAB are confronted with, and we present the experimental context used to study the stress responses of LAB, focusing on adaptation, habituation, and cross-protection as well as on self-induced multistress resistance in stationary phase, biofilms, and dormancy. We also consider stress responses at the population and single-cell levels. Subsequently, we concentrate on the stress defense mechanisms that have been reported to date, grouping them according to their direct participation in preserving cell energy, defending macromolecules, and protecting the cell envelope. Stress-induced responses of probiotic LAB and commensal/pathogenic LAB are highlighted separately due to the complexity of the peculiar multistress conditions to which these bacteria are subjected in their hosts. Induction of prophages under environmental stresses is then discussed. Finally, we present systems-based strategies to characterize the "stressome" of LAB and to engineer new food-related and probiotic LAB with improved stress tolerance.

  14. Molecular screening of wine lactic acid bacteria degrading hydroxycinnamic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de las Rivas, Blanca; Rodríguez, Héctor; Curiel, José Antonio; Landete, José María; Muñoz, Rosario

    2009-01-28

    The potential to produce volatile phenols from hydroxycinnamic acids was investigated for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from Spanish grape must and wine. A PCR assay was developed for the detection of LAB that potentially produce volatile phenols. Synthetic degenerate oligonucleotides for the specific detection of the pdc gene encoding a phenolic acid decarboxylase were designed. The pdc PCR assay amplifies a 321 bp DNA fragment from phenolic acid decarboxylase. The pdc PCR method was applied to 85 strains belonging to the 6 main wine LAB species. Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, and Pediococcus pentosaceus strains produce a positive response in the pdc PCR assay, whereas Oenococcus oeni, Lactobacillus hilgardii, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides strains did not produce the expected PCR product. The production of vinyl and ethyl derivatives from hydroxycinnamic acids in culture media was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. A relationship was found between pdc PCR amplification and volatile phenol production, so that the LAB strains that gave a positive pdc PCR response produce volatile phenols, whereas strains that did not produce a PCR amplicon did not produce volatile phenols. The proposed method could be useful for a preliminary identification of LAB strains able to produce volatile phenols in wine.

  15. Flow cytometric assessment of viability of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunthof, C.J.; Bloemen, K.; Breeuwer, P.; Rombouts, F.M.; Abee, T.

    2001-01-01

    The viability of lactic acid bacteria is crucial for their applications as dairy starters and as probiotics. We investigated the usefulness of flow cytometry (FCM) for viability assessment of lactic acid bacteria. The esterase substrate carboxyfluorescein diacetate (cFDA) and the dye exclusion DNA b

  16. Compatible solutes in lactic acid bacteria subjected to water stress.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kets, E.P.W.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of the research project described in this thesis was to investigate the protective effect of compatible solutes on tactic acid bacteria subjected to drying. Dried preparations of lactic acid bacteria are applied as starter cultures in feed and food industries. Dried starter cultures compare

  17. Bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria : extending the family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez-Sieiro, Patricia; Montalbán-López, Manuel; Mu, Dongdong; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) constitute a heterogeneous group of microorganisms that produce lactic acid as the major product during the fermentation process. LAB are Gram-positive bacteria with great biotechnological potential in the food industry. They can produce bacteriocins, which are proteinaceo

  18. Heme and menaquinone induced electron transport in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brooijmans, R.J.W.; Smit, B.; Santos, dos F.; Riel, van J.; Vos, de W.M.; Hugenholtz, J.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: For some lactic acid bacteria higher biomass production as a result of aerobic respiration has been reported upon supplementation with heme and menaquinone. In this report, we have studied a large number of species among lactic acid bacteria for the existence of this trait. RES

  19. 9th International Symposium on Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Oscar P.; Poolman, Berend; Hugenholtz, Jeroen

    2008-01-01

    What’s new in the field of lactic acid bacteria? The 9th International Symposium on Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB9) will take place 31 August to 4 September 2008 in Egmond aan Zee, The Netherlands. Traditionally, the triannual LAB symposium focuses on the themes of genetics, physiology, and applications

  20. Lactic Acid Bacteria : embarking on 30 more years of research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jan; Johansen, Eric; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Teusink, Bas

    2014-01-01

    The 11th International Symposium on Lactic Acid Bacteria Lactic Acid Bacteria play important roles in the pro- duction of food and feed and are increasingly used as health-promoting probiotics. The incessant scientific interest in these microorganisms by academic research groups as well as by indust

  1. Bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria : extending the family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez-Sieiro, Patricia; Montalbán-López, Manuel; Mu, Dongdong; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) constitute a heterogeneous group of microorganisms that produce lactic acid as the major product during the fermentation process. LAB are Gram-positive bacteria with great biotechnological potential in the food industry. They can produce bacteriocins, which are

  2. Functional genomics of lactic acid bacteria: from food to health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douillard, F.P.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Genome analysis using next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the characterization of lactic acid bacteria and complete genomes of all major groups are now available. Comparative genomics has provided new insights into the natural and laboratory evolution of lactic acid bacteria a

  3. Functional genomics of lactic acid bacteria: from food to health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douillard, F.P.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Genome analysis using next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the characterization of lactic acid bacteria and complete genomes of all major groups are now available. Comparative genomics has provided new insights into the natural and laboratory evolution of lactic acid bacteria

  4. Bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria : extending the family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez-Sieiro, Patricia; Montalbán-López, Manuel; Mu, Dongdong; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) constitute a heterogeneous group of microorganisms that produce lactic acid as the major product during the fermentation process. LAB are Gram-positive bacteria with great biotechnological potential in the food industry. They can produce bacteriocins, which are proteinaceo

  5. Lactic Acid Bacteria : embarking on 30 more years of research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jan; Johansen, Eric; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Teusink, Bas

    2014-01-01

    The 11th International Symposium on Lactic Acid Bacteria Lactic Acid Bacteria play important roles in the pro- duction of food and feed and are increasingly used as health-promoting probiotics. The incessant scientific interest in these microorganisms by academic research groups as well as by

  6. Metabolite Profiles of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Grass Silage▿

    OpenAIRE

    Broberg, Anders; Jacobsson, Karin; Ström, Katrin; Schnürer, Johan

    2007-01-01

    The metabolite production of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on silage was investigated. The aim was to compare the production of antifungal metabolites in silage with the production in liquid cultures previously studied in our laboratory. The following metabolites were found to be present at elevated concentrations in silos inoculated with LAB strains: 3-hydroxydecanoic acid, 2-hydroxy-4-methylpentanoic acid, benzoic acid, catechol, hydrocinnamic acid, salicylic acid, 3-phenyllactic acid, 4-hydro...

  7. Zinc Binding by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna Mrvčić

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc is an essential trace element in all organisms. A common method for the prevention of zinc deficiency is pharmacological supplementation, especially in a highly available form of a metalloprotein complex. The potential of different microbes to bind essential and toxic heavy metals has recently been recognized. In this work, biosorption of zinc by lactic acid bacteria (LAB has been investigated. Specific LAB were assessed for their ability to bind zinc from a water solution. Significant amount of zinc ions was bound, and this binding was found to be LAB species-specific. Differences among the species in binding performance at a concentration range between 10–90 mg/L were evaluated with Langmuir model for biosorption. Binding of zinc was a fast process, strongly influenced by ionic strength, pH, biomass concentration, and temperature. The most effective metal-binding LAB species was Leuconostoc mesenteroides (27.10 mg of Zn2+ per gram of dry mass bound at pH=5 and 32 °C, during 24 h. FT-IR spectroscopy analysis and electron microscopy demonstrated that passive adsorption and active uptake of the zinc ions were involved.

  8. Antifungal Activity of Selected Lactic Acid Bacteria and Propionic Acid Bacteria against Dairy-Associated Spoilage Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aunsbjerg, Stina Dissing

    Bacterial cultures of lactic and propionic acid bacteria are widely used in fermented products including dairy products. Spoilage fungi may constitute a quality and safety issue in these products. The antifungal properties of some lactic and propionic acid bacteria make them potential candidates...... diacetyl and lactic acid, 6 antifungal hydroxy acids were identified. Of these, 3 have previously been reported from antifungal lactic acid bacteria, whereas the other 3 hydroxy acids have not previously been reported produced by antifungal lactic acid bacteria....... factors thereby facilitating development of new protective cultures. The aim of the current thesis was to determine and study metabolites involved in antifungal activity of protective Lactobacillus paracasei and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii. This involved development of a suitable...

  9. COMPARISON OF OCCURENCE LACTIC ACID BACTERIA IN CHOSEN YOGURTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pinterová

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The yogurt is healthy food, which contains at least 100 million cultures per gram. Probiotic bacteria have been proven to reduce the effects of some gastrointestinal problems, probiotics can greatly reduce lactose intolerance, have also been proven to prevent colon cancers, there are also a natural immune system booster. In our research we detected numbers of lactid acid bacteria in yogurts in slovak market. There were classical yogurts, yogurts with probiotics, yogurts with fat and non fat. We numbered lactid acid bacteria from and after expiration, in agars MRS and Lee´s. In examined yogurts we detected from expiration from 78.107  to 169.107  and after expiration from 59.107 to 133.107 lactic acid bacteria in 1 ml of yogurt. In agreement with Food Codex of SR (2010 of rules all these yogurts satisfy number of lactid acid bacteria. doi:10.5219/31

  10. Genetics of the proteolytic system of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jan

    1990-01-01

    The proteolytic system of lactic acid bacteria is of eminent importance for the rapid growth of these organisms in protein-rich media. The combined action of proteinases and peptidases provides the cell with small peptides and essential amino acids. The amino acids and peptides thus liberated have t

  11. Genetics of the proteolytic system of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jan

    1990-01-01

    The proteolytic system of lactic acid bacteria is of eminent importance for the rapid growth of these organisms in protein-rich media. The combined action of proteinases and peptidases provides the cell with small peptides and essential amino acids. The amino acids and peptides thus liberated have

  12. Time related total lactic acid bacteria population diversity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... diversity and dominance in cowpea-fortified fermented cereal-weaning food. ... in the spontaneous fermentation of malted cowpea fortified cereal weaning food ... those in Genbank database revealed that, the dominating lactic acid bacteria ...

  13. Technologically important properties of lactic acid bacteria isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-07-18

    Jul 18, 2007 ... strains displaying the general characteristics of lactic acid bacteria were chosen ...... Food Flavour: Generation Analysis and Process Influence. Amsterdam, The ... Farah Z, Streiff T, Bachmann M R (1990). Preparation and ...

  14. Novel applications of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) and Recombinant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Novel applications of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) and Recombinant LAB as ... through acidification, competition for essential nutrients, and / or production of inhibitory ... that allows the expression of heterologous proteins, they are being probed ...

  15. DNA fingerprinting of lactic acid bacteria in sauerkraut fermentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies using traditional biochemical methods to study the ecology of commercial sauerkraut fermentations revealed that four lactic acid bacteria species, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, and Lactobacillus brevis were the primary microorganisms in...

  16. Identification of lactic acid bacteria isolated from corn stovers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    PANG, Huili; ZHANG, Meng; QIN, Guangyong; TAN, Zhongfang; LI, Zongwei; WANG, Yanping; CAI, Yimin

    2011-01-01

    One hundred and twenty‐six strains were isolated from corn stover in Henan Province, China, of which 105 isolates were considered to be lactic acid bacteria (LAB) according to Gram‐positive, catalase...

  17. Effect of phenolic acids on glucose and organic acid metabolism by lactic acid bacteria from wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Francisco M; Figueiredo, Ana R; Hogg, Tim A; Couto, José A

    2009-06-01

    The influence of phenolic (p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic, gallic and protocatechuic) acids on glucose and organic acid metabolism by two strains of wine lactic acid bacteria (Oenococcus oeni VF and Lactobacillus hilgardii 5) was investigated. Cultures were grown in modified MRS medium supplemented with different phenolic acids. Cellular growth was monitored and metabolite concentrations were determined by HPLC-RI. Despite the strong inhibitory effect of most tested phenolic acids on the growth of O. oeni VF, the malolactic activity of this strain was not considerably affected by these compounds. While less affected in its growth, the capacity of L. hilgardii 5 to degrade malic acid was clearly diminished. Except for gallic acid, the addition of phenolic acids delayed the metabolism of glucose and citric acid in both strains tested. It was also found that the presence of hydroxycinnamic acids (p-coumaric, caffeic and ferulic) increased the yield of lactic and acetic acid production from glucose by O. oeni VF and not by L. hilgardii 5. The results show that important oenological characteristics of wine lactic acid bacteria, such as the malolactic activity and the production of volatile organic acids, may be differently affected by the presence of phenolic acids, depending on the bacterial species or strain.

  18. Metabolite Profiles of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Grass Silage▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broberg, Anders; Jacobsson, Karin; Ström, Katrin; Schnürer, Johan

    2007-01-01

    The metabolite production of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on silage was investigated. The aim was to compare the production of antifungal metabolites in silage with the production in liquid cultures previously studied in our laboratory. The following metabolites were found to be present at elevated concentrations in silos inoculated with LAB strains: 3-hydroxydecanoic acid, 2-hydroxy-4-methylpentanoic acid, benzoic acid, catechol, hydrocinnamic acid, salicylic acid, 3-phenyllactic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, (trans, trans)-3,4-dihydroxycyclohexane-1-carboxylic acid, p-hydrocoumaric acid, vanillic acid, azelaic acid, hydroferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, hydrocaffeic acid, ferulic acid, and caffeic acid. Among these metabolites, the antifungal compounds 3-phenyllactic acid and 3-hydroxydecanoic acid were previously isolated in our laboratory from liquid cultures of the same LAB strains by bioassay-guided fractionation. It was concluded that other metabolites, e.g., p-hydrocoumaric acid, hydroferulic acid, and p-coumaric acid, were released from the grass by the added LAB strains. The antifungal activities of the identified metabolites in 100 mM lactic acid were investigated. The MICs against Pichia anomala, Penicillium roqueforti, and Aspergillus fumigatus were determined, and 3-hydroxydecanoic acid showed the lowest MIC (0.1 mg ml−1 for two of the three test organisms). PMID:17616609

  19. The impact of lactic acid bacteria on sourdough fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Dragiša S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The baking of sourdough breads represents one of the oldest biotechnological processes. Despite traditionality, sourdough bread has great potential because of its benefits. Sourdough is a mixture of flour and water that is dominated by a complex microflora composed of yeasts and lactic acid bacteria that are crucial in the preparation of bread dough. Lactic acid bacteria cause acidification by producing lactic acid that increases the shelf life of bread by preventing the growth of undesirable microorganisms and affects the nutritional value of bread by increasing the availability of minerals. In addition to these advantages, the use of sourdough fermentation also improves dough machinability, breadcrumb structure and the characteristic flavour of bread. Lactic acid bacteria in sourdough fermentation are well known representing both homofermentative and heterofermentative bacteria. They may originate from selected natural contaminants in the flour or from a starter culture containing one or more known species of lactic acid bacteria. Sourdough can be cultivated in bakeries or obtained from commercial suppliers. However, many bakeries in Europe still use spontaneously fermented sourdoughs, which have been kept metabolically active for decades by the addition of flour and water at regular intervals. The impact of lactic acid bacteria on sourdough fermentation and their influence on dough and bread quality was discussed on the basis of research and literature data.

  20. Effects of Lactic Acid Bacteria Inoculated Fermentation on Pickled Cucumbers

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) fermentation on the texture and organic acid of pickled cucumbers. Texture and sensory evaluation as well as a microscopic observation were performed to study the textural differences among fresh cucumber, Spontaneous fermentation (SF) cucumber and LAB Inoculating Fermentation (LABIF) cucumber. Accumulation of seven organic acids i.e., oxalic, tartaric, malic, lactic, acetic, citric and succinic acid during cucum...

  1. Lactic Acid Bacteria Differentially Activate Natural Killer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    Background: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the non-specific immune system recognizing cancerous cells and cells altered by viral infection. Recently, it was proposed that a non-cytolytic subset of NK cells serves a regulatory role by secreting cytokines, possibly affecting both...... antigen presenting cells and T-cells. Bacteria translocating across the gastrointestinal mucosa are presumed to gain access to NK cell compartments, as consumption of certain strains of lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxic activity. On-going research in our lab aims...... at describing strain-dependent effects of lactic acid bacteria on regulatory functions of NK-cells. Here, we have investigated how human gut flora-derived non-pathogenic lactic acid bacteria affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human peripheral blood NK cells upon...

  2. Lactic acid bacteria as a cell factory for riboflavin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Kiran; Tomar, Sudhir Kumar; De, Sachinandan

    2016-07-01

    Consumers are increasingly becoming aware of their health and nutritional requirements, and in this context, vitamins produced in situ by microbes may suit their needs and expectations. B groups vitamins are essential components of cellular metabolism and among them riboflavin is one of the vital vitamins required by bacteria, plants, animals and humans. Here, we focus on the importance of microbial production of riboflavin over chemical synthesis. In addition, genetic abilities for riboflavin biosynthesis by lactic acid bacteria are discussed. Genetically modified strains by employing genetic engineering and chemical analogues have been developed to enhance riboflavin production. The present review attempts to collect the currently available information on riboflavin production by microbes in general, while placing greater emphasis on food grade lactic acid bacteria and human gut commensals. For designing riboflavin-enriched functional foods, proper selection and exploitation of riboflavin-producing lactic acid bacteria is essential. Moreover, eliminating the in situ vitamin fortification step will decrease the cost of food production.

  3. Continuous Cultivation of Photosynthetic Bacteria for Fatty Acids Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Ji-Hye; Hwang, Yuhoon

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, we introduced a novel approach for microbial fatty acids (FA) production. Photosynthetic bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides KD131, were cultivated in a continuous-flow, stirred-tank reactor (CFSTR) at various substrate (lactate) concentrations.At hydraulic retention time (HRT) 4....... sphaeroides was around 35% of dry cell weight, mainly composed of vaccenic acid (C18:1, omega-7)....

  4. Remediation of Acid Mine Drainage with Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauri, James F.; Schaider, Laurel A.

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria have been shown to be effective at treating acid mine drainage through sulfide production and subsequent precipitation of metal sulfides. In this laboratory experiment for undergraduate environmental chemistry courses, students design and implement a set of bioreactors to remediate acid mine drainage and explain observed…

  5. Making More of Milk Sugar by Engineering Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Willem M. de; Hols, Pascal; Kranenburg, Richard van; Luesink, Evert; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Oost, John van der; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Hugenholtz, Jeroen

    1998-01-01

    By exploiting their genetic and metabolic capacity, lactic acid bacteria can be used to generate a variety of products from milk sugar lactose other than the archetypical lactic acid. This review will outline the different genetic and metabolic engineering strategies that can be applied to lactic ac

  6. Remediation of Acid Mine Drainage with Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauri, James F.; Schaider, Laurel A.

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria have been shown to be effective at treating acid mine drainage through sulfide production and subsequent precipitation of metal sulfides. In this laboratory experiment for undergraduate environmental chemistry courses, students design and implement a set of bioreactors to remediate acid mine drainage and explain observed…

  7. Making More of Milk Sugar by Engineering Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Willem M. de; Hols, Pascal; Kranenburg, Richard van; Luesink, Evert; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Oost, John van der; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Hugenholtz, Jeroen

    1998-01-01

    By exploiting their genetic and metabolic capacity, lactic acid bacteria can be used to generate a variety of products from milk sugar lactose other than the archetypical lactic acid. This review will outline the different genetic and metabolic engineering strategies that can be applied to lactic

  8. Engineering metabolic highways in Lactococci and other lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de W.M.; Hugenholtz, J.

    2004-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used in industrial food fermentations and are receiving increased attention for use as cell factories for the production of food and pharmaceutical products. Glycolytic conversion of sugars into lactic acid is the main metabolic highway in these Gram-positive

  9. Engineering metabolic highways in Lactococci and other lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de W.M.; Hugenholtz, J.

    2004-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used in industrial food fermentations and are receiving increased attention for use as cell factories for the production of food and pharmaceutical products. Glycolytic conversion of sugars into lactic acid is the main metabolic highway in these Gram-positive ba

  10. Structural diversity and biological significance of lipoteichoic acid in Gram-positive bacteria: focusing on beneficial probiotic lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Yokota, Shinichi; Fukiya, Satoru; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cell surface molecules are at the forefront of host-bacterium interactions. Teichoic acids are observed only in Gram-positive bacteria, and they are one of the main cell surface components. Teichoic acids play important physiological roles and contribute to the bacterial interaction with their host. In particular, lipoteichoic acid (LTA) anchored to the cell membrane has attracted attention as a host immunomodulator. Chemical and biological characteristics of LTA from various bacteria have been described. However, most of the information concerns pathogenic bacteria, and information on beneficial bacteria, including probiotic lactic acid bacteria, is insufficient. LTA is structurally diverse. Strain-level structural diversity of LTA is suggested to underpin its immunomodulatory activities. Thus, the structural information on LTA in probiotics, in particular strain-associated diversity, is important for understanding its beneficial roles associated with the modulation of immune response. Continued accumulation of structural information is necessary to elucidate the detailed physiological roles and significance of LTA. In this review article, we summarize the current state of knowledge on LTA structure, in particular the structure of LTA from lactic acid bacteria. We also describe the significance of structural diversity and biological roles of LTA.

  11. Lactic acid bacteria found in fermented fish in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanasupawat, Somboon; Okada, Sanae; Komagata, Kazuo

    1998-06-01

    Forty-seven strains of homofermentative rod-shaped and 5 heterofermentative sphere-shaped lactic acid bacteria were isolated from 4 kinds of fermented fish (pla-ra, pla-chom, kung-chom, and hoi-dong) in Thailand. These bacteria were separated into four groups by phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, including fluorometric DNA-DNA hybridization. Five strains (Group I) contained meso-diaminopimelic acid in the cell wall. Four strains were identified as Lactobacillus pentosus, and one strain was L. plantarum. Tested strains of this group produced DL-lactic acid. The rest of the rod-shaped bacteria, 23 strains (Group II) and 19 strains (Group III), lacked meso-diaminopimelic acid in the cell wall and were identified as L. farciminis and Lactobacillus species, respectively. The tested strains of these groups produced L-lactic acid. The amount of cellular fatty acids of C16:0 and C18:1, and the DNA base compositions were significant for differentiating the strains in Groups II and III. Five strains of cocci in chains (Group IV) produced gas from glucose. The tested strains of this group produced d-lactic acid. They were identified as a Leuconostoc species. The distribution of these bacteria in fermented fish in Thailand is discussed.

  12. Functional genomics of lactic acid bacteria: from food to health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douillard, François P; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-08-29

    Genome analysis using next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the characterization of lactic acid bacteria and complete genomes of all major groups are now available. Comparative genomics has provided new insights into the natural and laboratory evolution of lactic acid bacteria and their environmental interactions. Moreover, functional genomics approaches have been used to understand the response of lactic acid bacteria to their environment. The results have been instrumental in understanding the adaptation of lactic acid bacteria in artisanal and industrial food fermentations as well as their interactions with the human host. Collectively, this has led to a detailed analysis of genes involved in colonization, persistence, interaction and signaling towards to the human host and its health. Finally, massive parallel genome re-sequencing has provided new opportunities in applied genomics, specifically in the characterization of novel non-GMO strains that have potential to be used in the food industry. Here, we provide an overview of the state of the art of these functional genomics approaches and their impact in understanding, applying and designing lactic acid bacteria for food and health.

  13. Role of inorganic carbon in lactic acid bacteria metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Arsène-Ploetze, Florence; Bringel, Françoise

    2004-01-01

    International audience; Capnophiles are bacteria stimulated by bicarbonate and CO$_2$, the two major forms of inorganic carbon (IC) in physiological neutral liquids. Capnophiles are often pathogenic heterotrophs found in IC-rich ecological niches such as human cavities. Like capnophiles, the growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) such as Lactobacillus plantarum and Enterococcus faecalis is stimulated by IC. CO$_2$ or HCO$^{-}_3$ are substrates in carbamoyl phosphate (CP) synthesis and other car...

  14. Nucleotide Metabolism and its Control in Lactic Acid Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilstrup, Mogens; Hammer, Karin; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2005-01-01

    Most metabolic reactions are connected through either their utilization of nucleotides or their utilization of nucleotides or their regulation by these metabolites. In this review the biosynthetic pathways for pyrimidine and purine metabolism in lactic acid bacteria are described including...... the interconversion pathways, the formation of deoxyribonucleotides and the salvage pathways for use of exogenous precursors. The data for the enzymatic and the genetic regulation of these pathways are reviewed, as well as the gene organizations in different lactic acid bacteria. Mutant phenotypes and methods...... for manipulation of nucleotide pools are also discussed. Our aim is to provide an overview of the physiology and genetics of nucleotide metabolism and its regulation that will facilitate the interpretation of data arising from genetics, metabolomics, proteomics, and transcriptomics in lactic acid bacteria....

  15. Acetic Acid bacteria: physiology and carbon sources oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamlouk, Dhouha; Gullo, Maria

    2013-12-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are obligately aerobic bacteria within the family Acetobacteraceae, widespread in sugary, acidic and alcoholic niches. They are known for their ability to partially oxidise a variety of carbohydrates and to release the corresponding metabolites (aldehydes, ketones and organic acids) into the media. Since a long time they are used to perform specific oxidation reactions through processes called "oxidative fermentations", especially in vinegar production. In the last decades physiology of AAB have been widely studied because of their role in food production, where they act as beneficial or spoiling organisms, and in biotechnological industry, where their oxidation machinery is exploited to produce a number of compounds such as l-ascorbic acid, dihydroxyacetone, gluconic acid and cellulose. The present review aims to provide an overview of AAB physiology focusing carbon sources oxidation and main products of their metabolism.

  16. Acid tolerance in root nodule bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, A R; Reeve, W G; Tiwari, R P; Dilworth, M J

    1999-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation, especially via the legume Rhizobium symbiosis, is important for world agriculture. The productivity of legume crops and pastures is significantly affected by soil acidity; in some cases it is the prokaryotic partner that is pH sensitive. Growth of Rhizobium is adversely affected by low pH, especially in the 'acid stress zone'. Rhizobia exhibit an adaptive acid tolerance response (ATR) that is influenced by calcium concentration. Using Tn5-mutagenesis, gusA fusions and 'proteome' analysis, we have identified a range of genes that are essential for growth at low pH (such as actA, actP, exoR, actR and actS). At least three regulatory systems exist. The two-component sensor-regulator system, actSR, is essential for induction of the adaptive ATR. Two other regulatory circuits exist that are independent of ActR. One system involves the low pH-induced regulator gene, phrR, which may control other low pH-regulated genes. The other circuit, involving a regulator that is yet unidentified, controls the expression of a pH-regulated structural gene (lpiA). We have used pH-responsive gusA fusions to identify acid-inducible genes (such as lpiA), and then attempted to identify the regulators of these genes. The emerging picture is of a relatively complex set of systems that respond to external pH.

  17. Whole-body acid-base modeling revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ring, Troels; Nielsen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    The textbook account of whole-body acid-base balance in terms of endogenous acid production, renal net acid excretion and gastrointestinal alkali absorption which is the only comprehensive model around, has never been applied in clinical practice or been formally validated. In order to improve...... understanding of acid-base modeling, we managed to write up this conventional model as an expression solely on urine chemistry. Renal net acid excretion and endogenous acid production was already formulated in terms of urine chemistry, and we could from the literature also see gastrointestinal alkali absorption...

  18. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Revisited: Structure Elucidation and Metabolic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D. John

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases’ many intricate structural and regulatory elements. In this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25360565

  19. ldentification and Mutagenesis of Lactic Acid Bacteria from Chinese Sauerkraut

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yajing CHAl; Hao SHl; Ri NA

    2015-01-01

    ln order to analyze the fermentation properties of lactic acid bacteria in Chinese sauerkraut and to improve acid production, 21 samples of Chinese sauerkraut from lnner Mongolia and Northeast China were col ected and isolated with a Man-Rogosa-Sharpe (MRS) culture. Sixteen strains of lactic acid bacteria were identified by combining both phenotype and genotype methods. After activation, the 16 strains were inoculated into the MRS medium with a concentration of 4%and then incubated at 37 ℃. The pH and the absorbance of the culture were mea-sured. The activated strains were then mutagenized in a field of 4 KV/cm mutation, with dosages administered within 20 minutes and 30 minutes, respectively. The variation curves of the pH and the absorbance of the culture were determined. The experimental results showed that the lactic acid bacteria isolated from the soup were identified as Lactobacil us and the acid production of the bacteria was signifi-cantly improved by the mutagenesis of the corona electric field.

  20. Potential of lactic acid bacteria as suppressors of wine allergies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yıldırım Hatice Kalkan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergens causes some symptoms as all asthma, allergic conjunctivitis, and allergic rhinitis. These symptoms are seen twice as many in women than in men. The major wine allergens reported in wines are endochitinase 4A and lipid-transfer protein (LTP. This review deal with possibilities of using lactic acid bacteria as suppressors of wine allergies. Phenolic compounds present in wines have not only antioxidant properties causing radical scavenging but also some special properties reported in many in vitro studies as regulating functions in inflammatory cells as mast cells. So what is the role of lactic acid bacteria in these cases? Lactic acid bacteria are used during malolactic fermentation step of wine production with purpose of malic acid reduction. During this bioconversion complex phenolic compounds could be hydrolysed by bacterial enzymes to their aglycone forms. Obtained aglycons could pass through the intestinal epithelium of human and allowed reduction of IgE antibody production by affecting Th1/ Th2 ratio. Considering different contents and quantities of phenols in different grape varieties and consequently in different wines more studies are required in order to determine which lactic acid bacteria and strains could be effective in suppressing wine allergens.

  1. Effects of Lactic Acid Bacteria Inoculated Fermentation on Pickled Cucumbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyi Ji

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effects of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB fermentation on the texture and organic acid of pickled cucumbers. Texture and sensory evaluation as well as a microscopic observation were performed to study the textural differences among fresh cucumber, Spontaneous fermentation (SF cucumber and LAB Inoculating Fermentation (LABIF cucumber. Accumulation of seven organic acids i.e., oxalic, tartaric, malic, lactic, acetic, citric and succinic acid during cucumber pickling were also studied. The disruption extent of the middle lamella in SF cucumber displayed more obviously than that in LABIF cucumber, implying that LABIF contributed to keep the cucumber original structure intact. Based on the organic acid accumulation pattern, in SF LAB and Acetic Acid Bacteria (AAB fermented simultaneously, while in LABIF LAB fermented beforehand thus being in dominant position, then AAB fermented vigorously in a acidic condition created by LAB. The acetic acid accumulaton pattern could be regarded as the distinctive feature between SF and LABIF. The orgnic acids produced in LABIF were higher than that in SF. The final score of sensory evaluation combining texture analysis demonstrated that LABIF overmatched SF. It was concluded that LABIF could obviously enhance the quality of pickled cucumber and overwhelming SF, due to LABIF more beneficial to keep the cucumber original structure intact and organic acids accumulation.

  2. Acetic acid bacteria: A group of bacteria with versatile biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saichana, Natsaran; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Adachi, Osao; Frébort, Ivo; Frebortova, Jitka

    2015-11-01

    Acetic acid bacteria are gram-negative obligate aerobic bacteria assigned to the family Acetobacteraceae of Alphaproteobacteria. They are members of the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter, Gluconacetobacter, Acidomonas, Asaia, Kozakia, Swaminathania, Saccharibacter, Neoasaia, Granulibacter, Tanticharoenia, Ameyamaea, Neokomagataea, and Komagataeibacter. Many strains of Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter have been known to possess high acetic acid fermentation ability as well as the acetic acid and ethanol resistance, which are considered to be useful features for industrial production of acetic acid and vinegar, the commercial product. On the other hand, Gluconobacter strains have the ability to perform oxidative fermentation of various sugars, sugar alcohols, and sugar acids leading to the formation of several valuable products. Thermotolerant strains of acetic acid bacteria were isolated in order to serve as the new strains of choice for industrial fermentations, in which the cooling costs for maintaining optimum growth and production temperature in the fermentation vessels could be significantly reduced. Genetic modifications by adaptation and genetic engineering were also applied to improve their properties, such as productivity and heat resistance.

  3. Quorum sensing-controlled gene expression in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Oscar P.; Ruyter, Pascalle G.G.A. de; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Vos, Willem M. de

    1998-01-01

    Quorum sensing in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) involves peptides that are directly sensed by membrane-located histidine kinases, after which the signal is transmitted to an intracellular response regulator. This regulator in turn activates transcription of target genes, that commonly include the struc

  4. Short Communication Antibacterial Activities of Lactic Acid Bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-12-20

    Dec 20, 2011 ... vegetables, studies on LAB associated with lettuce, cucumber and cabbage are limited and non-existing in. Nigeria. ... Keywords: Antagonistic effect, Bacterial cell supernatant, Lactic acid bacteria, Vegetables ... gastrointestinal tracts of animals and humans. .... that different strains of LAB possess inhibitory.

  5. Effects of lactic acid bacteria contamination on lignocellulosic ethanol fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slower fermentation rates, mixed sugar compositions, and lower sugar concentrations may make lignocellulosic fermentations more susceptible to contamination by lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which is a common and costly problem to the corn-based fuel ethanol industry. To examine the effects of LAB con...

  6. Systems solutions by lactic acid bacteria: from paradigms to practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are among the powerhouses of the food industry, colonize the surfaces of plants and animals, and contribute to our health and well-being. The genomic characterization of LAB has rocketed and presently over 100 complete or nearly complete genomes are available, many of which serv

  7. Modelling strategies for the industrial exploitation of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teusink, B.; Smid, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have a long tradition of use in the food industry, and the number and diversity of their applications has increased considerably over the years. Traditionally, process optimization for these applications involved both strain selection and trial and error. More recently, me

  8. Systems solutions by lactic acid bacteria: from paradigms to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Willem M

    2011-08-30

    Lactic acid bacteria are among the powerhouses of the food industry, colonize the surfaces of plants and animals, and contribute to our health and well-being. The genomic characterization of LAB has rocketed and presently over 100 complete or nearly complete genomes are available, many of which serve as scientific paradigms. Moreover, functional and comparative metagenomic studies are taking off and provide a wealth of insight in the activity of lactic acid bacteria used in a variety of applications, ranging from starters in complex fermentations to their marketing as probiotics. In this new era of high throughput analysis, biology has become big science. Hence, there is a need to systematically store the generated information, apply this in an intelligent way, and provide modalities for constructing self-learning systems that can be used for future improvements. This review addresses these systems solutions with a state of the art overview of the present paradigms that relate to the use of lactic acid bacteria in industrial applications. Moreover, an outlook is presented of the future developments that include the transition into practice as well as the use of lactic acid bacteria in synthetic biology and other next generation applications.

  9. Mucosal Vaccination and Therapy with Genetically Modified Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, J.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have proved to be effective mucosal delivery vehicles that overcome the problem of delivering functional proteins to the mucosal tissues. By the intranasal route, both live and killed LAB vaccine strains have been shown to elicit mucosal and systemic immune responses that

  10. Lactic acid bacteria : the bugs of the new millennium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, W.N; Kok, J.; Kuipers, O.P.; Poolman, B.

    2000-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LABs) are widely used in the manufacturing of fermented food and are among the best-studied microorganisms. Detailed knowledge of a number of physiological traits has opened new potential applications for these organisms in the food industry, while other traits might be benefic

  11. Screening of malting sorghum samples for lactic acid bacteria with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-17

    Jun 17, 2009 ... variety of foods such as milk, meat, vegetables and malted cereals. ... him to extend the shelf life of many foods (Savadogo et al., 2004). .... After solidifying, wells were cut into it using a sterile cork borer 4 mm in diameter. ..... Antimicrobial producing lactic acid bacteria from raw barley and Sorghum. J.

  12. Controlled overproduction of proteins by lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Oscar P.; Ruyter, Pascalle G.G.A. de; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Vos, Willem M. de

    1997-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are widely used in industrial food fermentations, contributing to flavour, texture and preservation of the fermented products. Here we describe recent advances in the development of controlled gene expression systems, which allow the regulated overproduction of any desirable

  13. Quorum sensing-controlled gene expression in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Oscar P.; Ruyter, Pascalle G.G.A. de; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Vos, Willem M. de

    1998-01-01

    Quorum sensing in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) involves peptides that are directly sensed by membrane-located histidine kinases, after which the signal is transmitted to an intracellular response regulator. This regulator in turn activates transcription of target genes, that commonly include the

  14. Lactic acid bacteria in a changing legislative environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feord, J.

    2002-01-01

    The benefits of using lactic acid bacteria in the food chain, both through direct consumption and production of ingredients, are increasingly recognised by the food industry and consumers alike. The regulatory environment surrounding these products is diverse, covering foods and food ingredients, pr

  15. Genetic manipulation of the peptidolytic system in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, J; Venema, G

    1995-01-01

    Due to their presumed involvenment in product flavour the peptidases of lactic acid bacteria have been subject to extensive research. A major breakthrough, was the isolation and purification of the various enzymes to homogeniety. This allowed a reevaluation of the number of different enzymes in one

  16. Systems solutions by lactic acid bacteria: from paradigms to practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are among the powerhouses of the food industry, colonize the surfaces of plants and animals, and contribute to our health and well-being. The genomic characterization of LAB has rocketed and presently over 100 complete or nearly complete genomes are available, many of which

  17. Make use of lactic acid bacteria in biomass to biofuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been widely used in dairy fermentations, nutraceuticals, and probiotic/prebiotic applications. Selected strains from the LAB could potentially be used as microbial catalysts for production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. The unique traits of lac...

  18. Mucosal Vaccination and Therapy with Genetically Modified Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, J.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have proved to be effective mucosal delivery vehicles that overcome the problem of delivering functional proteins to the mucosal tissues. By the intranasal route, both live and killed LAB vaccine strains have been shown to elicit mucosal and systemic immune responses that

  19. Heme and menaquinone induced electron transport in lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Filipe

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For some lactic acid bacteria higher biomass production as a result of aerobic respiration has been reported upon supplementation with heme and menaquinone. In this report, we have studied a large number of species among lactic acid bacteria for the existence of this trait. Results Heme- (and menaquinone stimulated aerobic growth was observed for several species and genera of lactic acid bacteria. These include Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacilllus brevis, Lactobacillus paralimentarius, Streptococcus entericus and Lactococcus garviae. The increased biomass production without further acidification, which are respiration associated traits, are suitable for high-throughput screening as demonstrated by the screening of 8000 Lactococcus lactis insertion mutants. Respiration-negative insertion-mutants were found with noxA, bd-type cytochrome and menaquinol biosynthesis gene-disruptions. Phenotypic screening and in silico genome analysis suggest that respiration can be considered characteristic for certain species. Conclusion We propose that the cyd-genes were present in the common ancestor of lactic acid bacteria, and that multiple gene-loss events best explains the observed distribution of these genes among the species.

  20. Antifungal Activity of Selected Lactic Acid Bacteria and Propionic Acid Bacteria against Dairy-Associated Spoilage Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aunsbjerg, Stina Dissing

    for prolonging shelf-life of food without the addition of specific preservatives. Increased interest in the use of these bacteria for biopreservation has led to identification of a range of potent strains, and in addition, isolation and identification of various antifungal metabolites produced by these cultures......Bacterial cultures of lactic and propionic acid bacteria are widely used in fermented products including dairy products. Spoilage fungi may constitute a quality and safety issue in these products. The antifungal properties of some lactic and propionic acid bacteria make them potential candidates...... defined interaction medium (CDIM) was developed allowing growth of protective Lb. paracasei and P. freudenreichii subsp. shermaniii as well as the spoilage fungi, Penicillium spp., Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Debaryomyces hansenii isolated from fermented dairy products. Lb. paracasei and P...

  1. Lactic acid bacteria isolated from soy sauce mash in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanasupawat, Somboon; Thongsanit, Jaruwan; Okada, Sanae; Komagata, Kazuo

    2002-08-01

    Fourteen sphere-shaped and 30 rod-shaped lactic acid bacteria were isolated from soy sauce mash of two factories in Thailand. These strains were separated into two groups, Group A and Group B, by cell shape and DNA-DNA similarity. Group A contained 14 tetrad-forming strains, and these strains were identified as Tetragenococcus halophilus by DNA similarity. Group B contained 30 rod-shaped bacteria, and they were further divided into four Subgroups, B1, B2, B3, and B4, and three ungrouped strains by phenotypic characteristics and DNA similarity. Subgroup B1 contained 16 strains, and these strains were identified as Lactobacillus acidipiscis by DNA similarity. Subgroup B2 included two strains, and the strains were identified as Lactobacillus farciminis by DNA similarity. Subgroup B3 contained five strains. The strains had meso-diaminopimelic acid in the cell wall, and were identified as Lactobacillus pentosus by DNA similarity. The strains tested produced DL-lactic acid from D-glucose. Subgroup B4 contained four strains. The strains had meso-diaminopimelic acid in the cell wall, and they were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum by DNA similarity. Two ungrouped strains were homofermentative, and one was heterofermentative. They showed a low degree of DNA similarity with the type strains tested, and were left unnamed. The distribution of lactic acid bacteria in soy sauce mash in Thailand is discussed.

  2. Isolation of lactic acid-forming bacteria from biogas plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Jelena; Yüksel-Dadak, Aytül; Dröge, Stefan; König, Helmut

    2017-02-20

    Direct molecular approaches provide hints that lactic acid bacteria play an important role in the degradation process of organic material to methanogenetic substrates in biogas plants. However, their diversity in biogas fermenter samples has not been analyzed in detail yet. For that reason, five different biogas fermenters, which were fed mainly with maize silage and manure from cattle or pigs, were examined for the occurrence of lactic acid-forming bacteria. A total of 197 lactic acid-forming bacterial strains were isolated, which we assigned to 21 species, belonging to the genera Bacillus, Clostridium, Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Streptococcus and Pseudoramibacter-related. A qualitative multiplex system and a real-time quantitative PCR could be developed for most isolates, realized by the selection of specific primers. Their role in biogas plants was discussed on the basis of the quantitative results and on physiological data of the isolates.

  3. Lactic acid bacteria as a cell factory for riboflavin production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Kiran; De, Sachinandan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Consumers are increasingly becoming aware of their health and nutritional requirements, and in this context, vitamins produced in situ by microbes may suit their needs and expectations. B groups vitamins are essential components of cellular metabolism and among them riboflavin is one of the vital vitamins required by bacteria, plants, animals and humans. Here, we focus on the importance of microbial production of riboflavin over chemical synthesis. In addition, genetic abilities for riboflavin biosynthesis by lactic acid bacteria are discussed. Genetically modified strains by employing genetic engineering and chemical analogues have been developed to enhance riboflavin production. The present review attempts to collect the currently available information on riboflavin production by microbes in general, while placing greater emphasis on food grade lactic acid bacteria and human gut commensals. For designing riboflavin‐enriched functional foods, proper selection and exploitation of riboflavin‐producing lactic acid bacteria is essential. Moreover, eliminating the in situ vitamin fortification step will decrease the cost of food production. PMID:26686515

  4. Acetic acid bacteria spoilage of bottled red wine -- a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartowsky, Eveline J; Henschke, Paul A

    2008-06-30

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are ubiquitous organisms that are well adapted to sugar and ethanol rich environments. This family of Gram-positive bacteria are well known for their ability to produce acetic acid, the main constituent in vinegar. The oxidation of ethanol through acetaldehyde to acetic acid is well understood and characterised. AAB form part of the complex natural microbial flora of grapes and wine, however their presence is less desirable than the lactic acid bacteria and yeast. Even though AAB were described by Pasteur in the 1850s, wine associated AAB are still difficult to cultivate on artificial laboratory media and until more recently, their taxonomy has not been well characterised. Wine is at most risk of spoilage during production and the presence of these strictly aerobic bacteria in grape must and during wine maturation can be controlled by eliminating, or at least limiting oxygen, an essential growth factor. However, a new risk, spoilage of wine by AAB after packaging, has only recently been reported. As wine is not always sterile filtered prior to bottling, especially red wine, it often has a small resident bacterial population (bacteria. This spoilage is evident as a distinct deposit of bacterial biofilm in the neck of the bottle at the interface of the wine and the headspace of air, and is accompanied with vinegar, sherry, bruised apple, nutty, and solvent like off-aromas, depending on the degree of spoilage. This review focuses on the wine associated AAB species, the aroma and flavour changes in wine due to AAB metabolism, discusses the importance of oxygen ingress into the bottle and presents a hypothesis for the mechanism of spoilage of bottled red wine.

  5. Revisiting the cape cod bacteria injection experiment using a stochastic modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, R.M.; Welty, C.; Harvey, R.W.

    2007-01-01

    Bromide and resting-cell bacteria tracer tests conducted in a sandy aquifer at the U.S. Geological Survey Cape Cod site in 1987 were reinterpreted using a three-dimensional stochastic approach. Bacteria transport was coupled to colloid filtration theory through functional dependence of local-scale colloid transport parameters upon hydraulic conductivity and seepage velocity in a stochastic advection - dispersion/attachment - detachment model. Geostatistical information on the hydraulic conductivity (K) field that was unavailable at the time of the original test was utilized as input. Using geostatistical parameters, a groundwater flow and particle-tracking model of conservative solute transport was calibrated to the bromide-tracer breakthrough data. An optimization routine was employed over 100 realizations to adjust the mean and variance ofthe natural-logarithm of hydraulic conductivity (InK) field to achieve best fit of a simulated, average bromide breakthrough curve. A stochastic particle-tracking model for the bacteria was run without adjustments to the local-scale colloid transport parameters. Good predictions of mean bacteria breakthrough were achieved using several approaches for modeling components of the system. Simulations incorporating the recent Tufenkji and Elimelech (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2004, 38, 529-536) correlation equation for estimating single collector efficiency were compared to those using the older Rajagopalan and Tien (AIChE J. 1976, 22, 523-533) model. Both appeared to work equally well at predicting mean bacteria breakthrough using a constant mean bacteria diameter for this set of field conditions. Simulations using a distribution of bacterial cell diameters available from original field notes yielded a slight improvement in the model and data agreement compared to simulations using an average bacterial diameter. The stochastic approach based on estimates of local-scale parameters for the bacteria-transport process reasonably captured

  6. Adaptation and tolerance of bacteria against acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trček, Janja; Mira, Nuno Pereira; Jarboe, Laura R

    2015-08-01

    Acetic acid is a weak organic acid exerting a toxic effect to most microorganisms at concentrations as low as 0.5 wt%. This toxic effect results mostly from acetic acid dissociation inside microbial cells, causing a decrease of intracellular pH and metabolic disturbance by the anion, among other deleterious effects. These microbial inhibition mechanisms enable acetic acid to be used as a preservative, although its usefulness is limited by the emergence of highly tolerant spoilage strains. Several biotechnological processes are also inhibited by the accumulation of acetic acid in the growth medium including production of bioethanol from lignocellulosics, wine making, and microbe-based production of acetic acid itself. To design better preservation strategies based on acetic acid and to improve the robustness of industrial biotechnological processes limited by this acid's toxicity, it is essential to deepen the understanding of the underlying toxicity mechanisms. In this sense, adaptive responses that improve tolerance to acetic acid have been well studied in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Strains highly tolerant to acetic acid, either isolated from natural environments or specifically engineered for this effect, represent a unique reservoir of information that could increase our understanding of acetic acid tolerance and contribute to the design of additional tolerance mechanisms. In this article, the mechanisms underlying the acetic acid tolerance exhibited by several bacterial strains are reviewed, with emphasis on the knowledge gathered in acetic acid bacteria and E. coli. A comparison of how these bacterial adaptive responses to acetic acid stress fit to those described in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is also performed. A systematic comparison of the similarities and dissimilarities of the ways by which different microbial systems surpass the deleterious effects of acetic acid toxicity has not been performed so far, although such exchange

  7. A glutamic acid-producing lactic acid bacteria isolated from Malaysian fermented foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zareian, Mohsen; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Bakar, Fatimah Abu; Mohamed, Abdul Karim Sabo; Forghani, Bita; Ab-Kadir, Mohd Safuan B; Saari, Nazamid

    2012-01-01

    l-glutamaic acid is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and an important intermediate in metabolism. In the present study, lactic acid bacteria (218) were isolated from six different fermented foods as potent sources of glutamic acid producers. The presumptive bacteria were tested for their ability to synthesize glutamic acid. Out of the 35 strains showing this capability, strain MNZ was determined as the highest glutamic-acid producer. Identification tests including 16S rRNA gene sequencing and sugar assimilation ability identified the strain MNZ as Lactobacillus plantarum. The characteristics of this microorganism related to its glutamic acid-producing ability, growth rate, glucose consumption and pH profile were studied. Results revealed that glutamic acid was formed inside the cell and excreted into the extracellular medium. Glutamic acid production was found to be growth-associated and glucose significantly enhanced glutamic acid production (1.032 mmol/L) compared to other carbon sources. A concentration of 0.7% ammonium nitrate as a nitrogen source effectively enhanced glutamic acid production. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of glutamic acid production by lactic acid bacteria. The results of this study can be further applied for developing functional foods enriched in glutamic acid and subsequently γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) as a bioactive compound.

  8. Cell wall structure and function in lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Kulakauskas, Saulius

    2014-08-29

    The cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria is a complex assemblage of glycopolymers and proteins. It consists of a thick peptidoglycan sacculus that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane and that is decorated with teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. It plays a major role in bacterial physiology since it maintains cell shape and integrity during growth and division; in addition, it acts as the interface between the bacterium and its environment. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are traditionally and widely used to ferment food, and they are also the subject of more and more research because of their potential health-related benefits. It is now recognized that understanding the composition, structure, and properties of LAB cell walls is a crucial part of developing technological and health applications using these bacteria. In this review, we examine the different components of the Gram-positive cell wall: peptidoglycan, teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. We present recent findings regarding the structure and function of these complex compounds, results that have emerged thanks to the tandem development of structural analysis and whole genome sequencing. Although general structures and biosynthesis pathways are conserved among Gram-positive bacteria, studies have revealed that LAB cell walls demonstrate unique properties; these studies have yielded some notable, fundamental, and novel findings. Given the potential of this research to contribute to future applied strategies, in our discussion of the role played by cell wall components in LAB physiology, we pay special attention to the mechanisms controlling bacterial autolysis, bacterial sensitivity to bacteriophages and the mechanisms underlying interactions between probiotic bacteria and their hosts.

  9. Revisiting the Cape Cod Bacteria Injection Experiment Using a Stochastic Modeling Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, R M; Welty, C; Harvey, R W

    2006-11-22

    Bromide and resting-cell bacteria tracer tests carried out in a sand and gravel aquifer at the USGS Cape Cod site in 1987 were reinterpreted using a three-dimensional stochastic approach and Lagrangian particle tracking numerical methods. Bacteria transport was strongly coupled to colloid filtration through functional dependence of local-scale colloid transport parameters on hydraulic conductivity and seepage velocity in a stochastic advection-dispersion/attachment-detachment model. Information on geostatistical characterization of the hydraulic conductivity (K) field from a nearby plot was utilized as input that was unavailable when the original analysis was carried out. A finite difference model for groundwater flow and a particle-tracking model of conservative solute transport was calibrated to the bromide-tracer breakthrough data using the aforementioned geostatistical parameters. An optimization routine was utilized to adjust the mean and variance of the lnK field over 100 realizations such that a best fit of a simulated, average bromide breakthrough curve is achieved. Once the optimal bromide fit was accomplished (based on adjusting the lnK statistical parameters in unconditional simulations), a stochastic particle-tracking model for the bacteria was run without adjustments to the local-scale colloid transport parameters. Good predictions of the mean bacteria breakthrough data were achieved using several approaches for modeling components of the system. Simulations incorporating the recent Tufenkji and Elimelech [1] equation for estimating single collector efficiency were compared to those using the Rajagopalan and Tien [2] model. Both appeared to work equally well at predicting mean bacteria breakthrough using a constant mean bacteria diameter for this set of field conditions, with the Rajagopalan and Tien model yielding approximately a 30% lower peak concentration and less tailing than the Tufenkji and Elimelech formulation. Simulations using a distribution

  10. Phenolic biotransformations during conversion of ferulic acid to vanillin by lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Baljinder; Chakraborty, Debkumar; Kumar, Balvir

    2013-01-01

    Vanillin is widely used as food additive and as a masking agent in various pharmaceutical formulations. Ferulic acid is an important precursor of vanillin that is available in abundance in cell walls of cereals like wheat, corn, and rice. Phenolic biotransformations can occur during growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), and their production can be made feasible using specialized LAB strains that have been reported to produce ferulic acid esterases. The present study aimed at screening a panel of LAB isolates for their ability to release phenolics from agrowaste materials like rice bran and their biotransformation to industrially important compounds such as ferulic acid, 4-ethyl phenol, vanillic acid, vanillin, and vanillyl alcohol. Bacterial isolates were evaluated using ferulic acid esterase, ferulic acid decarboxylase, and vanillin dehydrogenase assays. This work highlights the importance of lactic acid bacteria in phenolic biotransformations for the development of food grade flavours and additives.

  11. Phenolic Biotransformations during Conversion of Ferulic Acid to Vanillin by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baljinder Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vanillin is widely used as food additive and as a masking agent in various pharmaceutical formulations. Ferulic acid is an important precursor of vanillin that is available in abundance in cell walls of cereals like wheat, corn, and rice. Phenolic biotransformations can occur during growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB, and their production can be made feasible using specialized LAB strains that have been reported to produce ferulic acid esterases. The present study aimed at screening a panel of LAB isolates for their ability to release phenolics from agrowaste materials like rice bran and their biotransformation to industrially important compounds such as ferulic acid, 4-ethyl phenol, vanillic acid, vanillin, and vanillyl alcohol. Bacterial isolates were evaluated using ferulic acid esterase, ferulic acid decarboxylase, and vanillin dehydrogenase assays. This work highlights the importance of lactic acid bacteria in phenolic biotransformations for the development of food grade flavours and additives.

  12. Bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria: extending the family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Sieiro, Patricia; Montalbán-López, Manuel; Mu, Dongdong; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2016-04-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) constitute a heterogeneous group of microorganisms that produce lactic acid as the major product during the fermentation process. LAB are Gram-positive bacteria with great biotechnological potential in the food industry. They can produce bacteriocins, which are proteinaceous antimicrobial molecules with a diverse genetic origin, posttranslationally modified or not, that can help the producer organism to outcompete other bacterial species. In this review, we focus on the various types of bacteriocins that can be found in LAB and the organization and regulation of the gene clusters responsible for their production and biosynthesis, and consider the food applications of the prototype bacteriocins from LAB. Furthermore, we propose a revised classification of bacteriocins that can accommodate the increasing number of classes reported over the last years.

  13. Revisiting amino acid substitution matrices for identifying distantly related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kazunori; Tomii, Kentaro

    2014-02-01

    Although many amino acid substitution matrices have been developed, it has not been well understood which is the best for similarity searches, especially for remote homology detection. Therefore, we collected information related to existing matrices, condensed it and derived a novel matrix that can detect more remote homology than ever. Using principal component analysis with existing matrices and benchmarks, we developed a novel matrix, which we designate as MIQS. The detection performance of MIQS is validated and compared with that of existing general purpose matrices using SSEARCH with optimized gap penalties for each matrix. Results show that MIQS is able to detect more remote homology than the existing matrices on an independent dataset. In addition, the performance of our developed matrix was superior to that of CS-BLAST, which was a novel similarity search method with no amino acid matrix. We also evaluated the alignment quality of matrices and methods, which revealed that MIQS shows higher alignment sensitivity than that with the existing matrix series and CS-BLAST. Fundamentally, these results are expected to constitute good proof of the availability and/or importance of amino acid matrices in sequence analysis. Moreover, with our developed matrix, sophisticated similarity search methods such as sequence-profile and profile-profile comparison methods can be improved further. Newly developed matrices and datasets used for this study are available at http://csas.cbrc.jp/Ssearch/.

  14. Optimization of (-galactosidase production from lactic acid bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    β-galactosidase, commonly known as lactase, represents commercially important enzyme that is prevalently used for lactose hydrolysis in milk and whey. To the date, it has been isolated from various sources. In this study different strains of lactic acid bacteria were assessed for their β-galactosidase productivity, and Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 resulted with the highest production potential. Thereafter, optimal conditions for accomplishing high yi...

  15. SCREENING OF BACTERIA FOR LACTIC ACID PRODUCTION FROM WHEY WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vethakanraj Helen Shiphrah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacilli have the property of converting lactose and other sugars to lactic acid through fermentation. So whey water, the greenish translucent liquid rich in lactose, vitamins, proteins and mineral salts, obtained as a by-product after the precipitation of cheese can be used as a substrate for Lactobacilli for lactic acid production which otherwise is a serious environmental pollutant when disposed without pre-treatment. 16 isolates of Lactic acid producing bacteria isolated from various biological sources were inoculated in whey water (1% inoculum and kept at 37°C in the shaker at a speed of 150 revolutions per minute for 36 h. Lactic acid production was estimated after 36 h and the strains 4a, 12a and 15b showed lactic acid production of which 12a produced the highest concentration. The amount of Lactic acid produced by 12a was 0.62 g L-1 under unadjusted condition which is comparable to previously reported strains in enriched medium. So the lactic acid production by strain 12a was further investigated to find the effect of pH and temperature on the production efficiency. Lactic acid production was also checked in Luria-Bertani broth and whey water was found to be the medium of choice for prolonged lactic acid production.

  16. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA AND THEIR ROLE IN THE MEAT PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Kameník

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lactic acid bacteria (LAB play in meat processing a positive but also a negative role. The principal advantage of LAB in the production of dry fermented sausages lies in the fermentation of saccharides, i.e. the creation of lactic acid and the subsequent fall in pH. The role of LAB in fresh meat spoilage is still controversial. Several species are able to dominate the meat system in VP and MAP storage conditions and can release odor-impact molecules. On the other hand they can provide favorable antagonistic activity against other undesired microorganisms. LAB are important spoilage agents in cooked meat products.

  17. Tomato ABSCISIC ACID STRESS RIPENING (ASR) gene family revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Ido; Dominguez, Pia Guadalupe; Konrad, Zvia; Shkolnik-Inbar, Doron; Carrari, Fernando; Bar-Zvi, Dudy

    2014-01-01

    Tomato ABSCISIC ACID RIPENING 1 (ASR1) was the first cloned plant ASR gene. ASR orthologs were then cloned from a large number of monocot, dicot and gymnosperm plants, where they are mostly involved in response to abiotic (drought and salinity) stress and fruit ripening. The tomato genome encodes five ASR genes: ASR1, 2, 3 and 5 encode low-molecular-weight proteins (ca. 110 amino acid residues each), whereas ASR4 encodes a 297-residue polypeptide. Information on the expression of the tomato ASR gene family is scarce. We used quantitative RT-PCR to assay the expression of this gene family in plant development and in response to salt and osmotic stresses. ASR1 and ASR4 were the main expressed genes in all tested organs and conditions, whereas ASR2 and ASR3/5 expression was two to three orders of magnitude lower (with the exception of cotyledons). ASR1 is expressed in all plant tissues tested whereas ASR4 expression is limited to photosynthetic organs and stamens. Essentially, ASR1 accounted for most of ASR gene expression in roots, stems and fruits at all developmental stages, whereas ASR4 was the major gene expressed in cotyledons and young and fully developed leaves. Both ASR1 and ASR4 were expressed in flower organs, with ASR1 expression dominating in stamens and pistils, ASR4 in sepals and petals. Steady-state levels of ASR1 and ASR4 were upregulated in plant vegetative organs following exposure to salt stress, osmotic stress or the plant abiotic stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA). Tomato plants overexpressing ASR1 displayed enhanced survival rates under conditions of water stress, whereas ASR1-antisense plants displayed marginal hypersensitivity to water withholding.

  18. Tomato ABSCISIC ACID STRESS RIPENING (ASR gene family revisited.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ido Golan

    Full Text Available Tomato ABSCISIC ACID RIPENING 1 (ASR1 was the first cloned plant ASR gene. ASR orthologs were then cloned from a large number of monocot, dicot and gymnosperm plants, where they are mostly involved in response to abiotic (drought and salinity stress and fruit ripening. The tomato genome encodes five ASR genes: ASR1, 2, 3 and 5 encode low-molecular-weight proteins (ca. 110 amino acid residues each, whereas ASR4 encodes a 297-residue polypeptide. Information on the expression of the tomato ASR gene family is scarce. We used quantitative RT-PCR to assay the expression of this gene family in plant development and in response to salt and osmotic stresses. ASR1 and ASR4 were the main expressed genes in all tested organs and conditions, whereas ASR2 and ASR3/5 expression was two to three orders of magnitude lower (with the exception of cotyledons. ASR1 is expressed in all plant tissues tested whereas ASR4 expression is limited to photosynthetic organs and stamens. Essentially, ASR1 accounted for most of ASR gene expression in roots, stems and fruits at all developmental stages, whereas ASR4 was the major gene expressed in cotyledons and young and fully developed leaves. Both ASR1 and ASR4 were expressed in flower organs, with ASR1 expression dominating in stamens and pistils, ASR4 in sepals and petals. Steady-state levels of ASR1 and ASR4 were upregulated in plant vegetative organs following exposure to salt stress, osmotic stress or the plant abiotic stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA. Tomato plants overexpressing ASR1 displayed enhanced survival rates under conditions of water stress, whereas ASR1-antisense plants displayed marginal hypersensitivity to water withholding.

  19. Bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria and their applications in meat and meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woraprayote, Weerapong; Malila, Yuwares; Sorapukdee, Supaluk; Swetwiwathana, Adisorn; Benjakul, Soottawat; Visessanguan, Wonnop

    2016-10-01

    Meat and meat products have always been an important part of human diet, and contain valuable nutrients for growth and health. Nevertheless, they are perishable and susceptible to microbial contamination, leading to an increased health risk for consumers as well as to the economic loss in meat industry. The utilization of bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as a natural preservative has received a considerable attention. Inoculation of bacteriocin-producing LAB cell as starter or protective cultures is suitable for fermented meats, whilst the direct addition of bacteriocin as food additive is more preferable when live cells of LAB could not produce bacteriocin in the real meat system. The incorporation of bacteriocins in packaging is another way to improve meat safety to avoid direct addition of bacteriocin to meat. Utilization of bacteriocins can effectively contribute to food safety, especially when integrated into hurdle concepts. In this review, LAB bacteriocins and their applications in meat and meat products are revisited. The molecular structure and characteristics of bacteriocins recently discovered, as well as exemplary properties are also discussed.

  20. Sun-beams, cucumbers, and purple bacteria : Historical milestones in early studies of photosynthesis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gest, H

    1988-10-01

    Discovery of the general outlines of plant and bacterial photosyntheses required the efforts of a large number of gifted scientists over the course of two centuries. The first to suggest that sunlight might affect plants in some way other than through conversion of light to heat was Stephen Hales, in 1725, and this notion was promptly satirized by Jonathan Swift in his description of the "cucumber project" inGulliver's Travels (1726). Considerably later, in 1772, Joseph Priestley reported the first experiments showing the production of "dephlogisticated air" (oxygen gas) by plants, and the interdependence of animal and plant life mediated by gases. Priestley and others, however, had difficulty repeating these experiments, mainly because they were unaware of the requirement for light in photosynthesis. The latter was clearly demonstrated in 1779 by Jan Ingen-Housz, who also determined that leaves were the primary sites of the photosynthetic production of oxygen by plants. When purple bacteria were first studied in the late 19th century by Theodor Engelmann, light-dependent O2 formation could not be detected. Contradictory observations in this connection were reported for a number of decades, but eventually the absence of O2 production in photosynthesis by purple bacteria was conclusively established. Attempts to explain why the bacteria do not evolve O2 led Cornelis van Niel to propose a "unified, comparative biochemical" explanation of photosynthetic processes that was widely accepted. This hypothesis, however, was abandoned soon after photophosphorylation by membranes from purple bacteria and plant chloroplasts was discovered in 1954. Unexpectedly, rapid progress in molecular biological and genetic studies of the membrane-bound reaction centers of purple bacteria indicate that current investigations are on the verge of revealing the detailed mechanisms by which energy conversion occurs in the reaction centers of all photosynthetic organisms.

  1. [Lactic acid bacteria and health: are probiotics safe for human?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiszewska, Izabela; Januszewska, Milena; Rybka, Joanna; Gackowska, Lidia

    2014-11-17

    The effect of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium on human health has been examined for many years. Numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have confirmed the beneficial activity of some exogenous lactic acid bacteria in the treatment and prevention of rotaviral infection, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease and other gastrointestinal disorders. Probiotics support the action of the intestinal microflora and exhibit a favorable modulatory effect on the host's immune system. However, it should be remembered that relatively harmless lactobacilli can occasionally induce opportunistic infections. Due to reaching almost 20x10(12) probiotic doses per year which contain live cultures of bacteria, it is essential to monitor the safety aspect of their administration. In recent years, infections caused by Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium made up 0.05% to 0.4% of cases of endocarditis and bacteremia. In most cases, the infections were caused by endogenous microflora of the host or bacterial strains colonizing the host's oral cavity. According to a review of cases of infections caused by bacteria of the genus Lactobacillus from 2005 (collected by J.P. Cannot'a), 1.7% of infections have been linked directly with intensive dairy probiotic consumption by patients. Additionally, due to the lack of a precise description of most individuals' eating habits, the possible effect of probiotics on infection development definitively should not be ruled out. The present paper describes cases of diseases caused by lactic acid bacteria, a potential mechanism for the adverse action of bacteria, and the possible hazard connected with probiotic supplementation for seriously ill and hospitalized patients.

  2. Dinitraminic acid (HDN) isomerization and self-decomposition revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahm, Martin; Brinck, Tore

    2008-06-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) and the ab initio based CBS-QB3 method have been used to study possible decomposition pathways of dinitraminic acid HN(NO 2) 2 (HDN) in gas-phase. The proton transfer isomer of HDN, O 2NNN(O)OH, and its conformers can be formed and converted into each other through intra- and intermolecular proton transfer. The latter has been shown to proceed substantially faster via double proton transfer. The main mechanism for HDN decomposition is found to be initiated by a dissociation reaction, splitting of nitrogen dioxide from either HDN or the HDN isomer. This reaction has an activation enthalpy of 36.5 kcal/mol at the CBS-QB3 level, which is in good agreement with experimental estimates of the decomposition barrier.

  3. Amino acid composition of rumen bacteria and protozoa in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sok, M; Ouellet, D R; Firkins, J L; Pellerin, D; Lapierre, H

    2017-07-01

    Because microbial crude protein (MCP) constitutes more than 50% of the protein digested in cattle, its AA composition is needed to adequately estimate AA supply. Our objective was to update the AA contributions of the rumen microbial AA flowing to the duodenum using only studies from cattle, differentiating between fluid-associated bacteria (FAB), particle-associated bacteria (PAB), and protozoa, based on published literature (53, 16, and 18 treatment means were used for each type of microorganism, respectively). In addition, Cys and Met reported concentrations were retained only when an adequate protection of the sulfur groups was performed before the acid hydrolysis. The total AA (or true protein) fraction represented 82.4% of CP in bacteria. For 10 AA, including 4 essential AA, the AA composition differed between protozoa and bacteria. The most noticeable differences were a 45% lower Lys concentration and 40% higher Ala concentration in bacteria than in protozoa. Differences between FAB and PAB were less pronounced than differences between bacteria and protozoa. Assuming 33% FAB, 50% PAB, and 17% of protozoa in MCP duodenal flow, the updated concentrations of AA would decrease supply estimates of Met, Thr, and Val originating from MCP and increase those of Lys and Phe by 5 to 10% compared with those calculated using the FAB composition reported previously. Therefore, inclusion of the contribution of PAB and protozoa to the duodenal MCP flow is needed to adequately estimate AA supply from microbial origin when a factorial method is used to estimate duodenal AA flow. Furthermore, acknowledging the fact that hydrolysis of 1 kg of true microbial protein yields 1.16 kg of free AA substantially increases the estimates of AA supply from MCP. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanistic modeling of biocorrosion caused by biofilms of sulfate reducing bacteria and acid producing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dake; Li, Yingchao; Gu, Tingyue

    2016-08-01

    Biocorrosion is also known as microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Most anaerobic MIC cases can be classified into two major types. Type I MIC involves non-oxygen oxidants such as sulfate and nitrate that require biocatalysis for their reduction in the cytoplasm of microbes such as sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and nitrate reducing bacteria (NRB). This means that the extracellular electrons from the oxidation of metal such as iron must be transported across cell walls into the cytoplasm. Type II MIC involves oxidants such as protons that are secreted by microbes such as acid producing bacteria (APB). The biofilms in this case supply the locally high concentrations of oxidants that are corrosive without biocatalysis. This work describes a mechanistic model that is based on the biocatalytic cathodic sulfate reduction (BCSR) theory. The model utilizes charge transfer and mass transfer concepts to describe the SRB biocorrosion process. The model also includes a mechanism to describe APB attack based on the local acidic pH at a pit bottom. A pitting prediction software package has been created based on the mechanisms. It predicts long-term pitting rates and worst-case scenarios after calibration using SRB short-term pit depth data. Various parameters can be investigated through computer simulation.

  5. Comparative functional genomics of amino acid metabolism of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pastink, M.I.

    2009-01-01

    The amino acid metabolism of lactic acid bacteria used as starters in industrial fermentations has profound effects on the quality of the fermented foods. The work described in this PhD thesis was initiated to use genomics technologies and a comparative approach to link the gene content of some well

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM SUMBAWA MARE MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengah Sujaya

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to isolate and characterize lactic acid bacteria (LAB from the Sumbawa mares milk The Isolation of LAB was conducted in Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS agar. The isolates were characterized by standard methods, such as Gram staining, cell morphology study and fermentation activities. The ability of the isolates to inhibit some pathogenic bacteria was studied by dual culture assay. Isolates showing the widest spectrum of inhibiting pathogenic bacteria were further identified using API 50 CHL. The results showed that Sumbawa mare milk was dominated by lactobacilli and weisella/leuconostoc. As many as 26 out 36 isolates belong to homofermentative lactobacilli and another 10 isolates belong to both heterofermentative lactobacilli and weissella or leuconostoc. Twenty four isolates inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli 25922, Shigela flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus 29213. Two promising isolates with the widest spectrum of inhibiting pathogenic bacteria, Lactobacillus sp. SKG34 and Lactobacillus sp. SKG49, were identified respectively as Lactobacillus rhamnosus SKG34 and Lactobacillus ramnosus SKG49. These two isolates were specific strains of the sumbawa mare milk and are very potential to be developed as probiotic for human.

  7. Potential of lactic acid bacteria in aflatoxin risk mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlberg, Sara H; Joutsjoki, Vesa; Korhonen, Hannu J

    2015-08-17

    Aflatoxins (AF) are ubiquitous mycotoxins contaminating food and feed. Consumption of contaminated food and feed can cause a severe health risk to humans and animals. A novel biological method could reduce the health risks of aflatoxins through inhibiting mold growth and binding aflatoxins. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are commonly used in fermented food production. LAB are known to inhibit mold growth and, to some extent, to bind aflatoxins in different matrices. Reduced mold growth and aflatoxin production may be caused by competition for nutrients between bacterial cells and fungi. Most likely, binding of aflatoxins depends on environmental conditions and is strain-specific. Killed bacteria cells possess consistently better binding abilities for aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) than viable cells. Lactobacilli especially are relatively well studied and provide noticeable possibilities in binding of aflatoxin B1 and M1 in food. It seems that binding is reversible and that bound aflatoxins are released later on (Haskard et al., 2001; Peltonen et al., 2001). This literature review suggests that novel biological methods, such as lactic acid bacteria, show potential in mitigating toxic effects of aflatoxins in food and feed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Industrial production of amino acids by coryneform bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Thomas

    2003-09-04

    In the 1950s Corynebacterium glutamicum was found to be a very efficient producer of L-glutamic acid. Since this time biotechnological processes with bacteria of the species Corynebacterium developed to be among the most important in terms of tonnage and economical value. L-Glutamic acid and L-lysine are bulk products nowadays. L-Valine, L-isoleucine, L-threonine, L-aspartic acid and L-alanine are among other amino acids produced by Corynebacteria. Applications range from feed to food and pharmaceutical products. The growing market for amino acids produced with Corynebacteria led to significant improvements in bioprocess and downstream technology as well as in molecular biology. During the last decade big efforts were made to increase the productivity and to decrease the production costs. This review gives an overview of the world market for amino acids produced by Corynebacteria. Significant improvements in bioprocess technology, i.e. repeated fed batch or continuous production are summarised. Bioprocess technology itself was improved furthermore by application of more sophisticated feeding and automatisation strategies. Even though several amino acids developed towards commodities in the last decade, side aspects of the production process like sterility or detection of contaminants still have increasing relevance. Finally one focus of this review is on recent developments in downstream technology.

  9. Development of Mucosal Vaccines Based on Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G.; Innocentin, Silvia; Lefèvre, Francois; Chatel, Jean-Marc; Langella, Philippe

    Today, sufficient data are available to support the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), notably lactococci and lactobacilli, as delivery vehicles for the development of new mucosal vaccines. These non-pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria have been safely consumed by humans for centuries in fermented foods. They thus constitute an attractive alternative to the attenuated pathogens (most popular live vectors actually studied) which could recover their pathogenic potential and are thus not totally safe for use in humans. This chapter reviews the current research and advances in the use of LAB as live delivery vectors of proteins of interest for the development of new safe mucosal vaccines. The use of LAB as DNA vaccine vehicles to deliver DNA directly to antigen-presenting cells of the immune system is also discussed.

  10. Screening and characterization of novel bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendo, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are expected to be safe antimicrobial agents. While the best studied LAB bacteriocin, nisin A, is widely utilized as a food preservative, various novel ones are required to control undesirable bacteria more effectively. To discover novel bacteriocins at the early step of the screening process, we developed a rapid screening system that evaluates bacteriocins produced by newly isolated LAB based on their antibacterial spectra and molecular masses. By means of this system, various novel bacteriocins were identified, including a nisin variant, nisin Q, a two-peptide bacteriocin, lactococcin Q, a leaderless bacteriocin, lacticin Q, and a circular bacteriocin, lactocyclicin Q. Moreover, some LAB isolates were found to produce multiple bacteriocins. They were characterized as to their structures, mechanisms of action, and biosynthetic mechanisms. Novel LAB bacteriocins and their biosynthetic mechanisms are expected for applications such as food preservation and peptide engineering.

  11. Current taxonomy of phages infecting lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eMahony

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phages infecting lactic acid bacteria have been the focus of significant research attention over the past three decades. Through the isolation and characterization of hundreds of phage isolates, it has been possible to classify phages of the dairy starter and adjunct bacteria Lactococus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Leuconostoc spp. and Lactobacillus spp. Among these, phages of L. lactis have been most thoroughly scrutinized and serve as an excellent model system to address issues that arise when attempting taxonomic classification of phages infecting other LAB species. Here, we present an overview of the current taxonomy of phages infecting LAB genera of industrial significance, the methods employed in these taxonomic efforts and how these may be employed for the taxonomy of phages of currently underrepresented and emerging phage species.

  12. Analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid in Acetobacter: molecular mechanisms conferring acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Shigeru; Fukaya, Masahiro

    2008-06-30

    Acetic acid bacteria are used for industrial vinegar production because of their remarkable ability to oxidize ethanol and high resistance to acetic acid. Although several molecular machineries responsible for acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria have been reported, the entire mechanism that confers acetic acid resistance has not been completely understood. One of the promising methods to elucidate the entire mechanism is global analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Recently, two proteins whose production was greatly enhanced by acetic acid in Acetobacter aceti were identified to be aconitase and a putative ABC-transporter, respectively; furthermore, overexpression or disruption of the genes encoding these proteins affected acetic acid resistance in A. aceti, indicating that these proteins are involved in acetic acid resistance. Overexpression of each gene increased acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter, which resulted in an improvement in the productivity of acetic acid fermentation. Taken together, the results of the proteomic analysis and those of previous studies indicate that acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria is conferred by several mechanisms. These findings also provide a clue to breed a strain having high resistance to acetic acid for vinegar fermentation.

  13. Metabolic strategies of beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria in beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Andreas J; Behr, Jürgen; von Kamp, Kristina; Vogel, Rudi F

    2016-01-04

    Beer contains only limited amounts of readily fermentable carbohydrates and amino acids. Beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have to come up with metabolic strategies in order to deal with selective nutrient content, high energy demand of hop tolerance mechanisms and a low pH. The metabolism of 26 LAB strains of 6 species and varying spoilage potentialwas investigated in order to define and compare their metabolic capabilities using multivariate statistics and outline possible metabolic strategies. Metabolic capabilities of beer spoilage LAB regarding carbohydrate and amino acids did not correlate with spoilage potential, but with fermentation type (heterofermentative/homofermentative) and species. A shift to mixed acid fermentation by homofermentative (hof) Pediococcus claussenii and Lactobacillus backii was observed as a specific feature of their growth in beer. For heterofermentative (hef) LAB a mostly versatile carbohydrate metabolism could be demonstrated, supplementing the known relevance of organic acids for their growth in beer. For hef LAB a distinct amino acid metabolism, resulting in biogenic amine production, was observed, presumably contributing to energy supply and pH homeostasis.

  14. Cytokinin producing bacteria stimulate amino acid deposition by wheat roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudoyarova, Guzel R; Melentiev, Alexander I; Martynenko, Elena V; Timergalina, Leila N; Arkhipova, Tatiana N; Shendel, Galina V; Kuz'mina, Ludmila Yu; Dodd, Ian C; Veselov, Stanislav Yu

    2014-10-01

    Phytohormone production is one mechanism by which rhizobacteria can stimulate plant growth, but it is not clear whether the bacteria gain from this mechanism. The hypothesis that microbial-derived cytokinin phytohormones stimulate root exudation of amino acids was tested. The rhizosphere of wheat plants was drenched with the synthetic cytokinin trans-zeatin or inoculated with Bacillus subtilis IB-22 (which produces zeatin type cytokinins) or B. subtilis IB-21 (which failed to accumulate cytokinins). Growing plants in a split root system allowed spatial separation of zeatin application or rhizobacterial inoculation to one compartment and analyses of amino acid release from roots (rhizodeposition) into the other compartment (without either microbial inoculation or treatment with exogenous hormone). Supplying B. subtilis IB-22 or zeatin to either the whole root system or half of the roots increased concentrations of amino acids in the soil solution although the magnitude of the increase was greater when whole roots were treated. There was some similarity in amino acid concentrations induced by either bacterial or zeatin treatment. Thus B. subtilis IB-22 increased amino acid rhizodeposition, likely due to its ability to produce cytokinins. Furthermore, B. subtilis strain IB-21, which failed to accumulate cytokinins in culture media, did not significantly affect amino acid concentrations in the wheat rhizosphere. The ability of rhizobacteria to produce cytokinins and thereby stimulate rhizodeposition may be important in enhancing rhizobacterial colonization of the rhizoplane.

  15. Fermentation of aqueous plant seed extracts by lactic acid bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafner, D.W.; Beuchat, R.L.

    1986-05-01

    The effects of lactic acid bacterial fermentation on chemical and physical changes in aqueous extracts of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), peanut (Arachis hypogea), soybean (Glycine max), and sorghum (Sorghum vulgare) were studied. The bacteria investigated were Lactobacillus helveticus, L. delbrueckii, L. casei, L. bulgaricus, L. acidophilus, and Streptococcus thermophilus. Organisms were inoculated individually into all of the seed extracts; L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus were also evaluated together as inocula for fermenting the legume extracts. During fermentation, bacterial population and changes in titratable acidity, pH, viscosity, and color were measured over a 72 h period at 37 degrees C. Maximum bacterial populations, titratable acidity, pH, and viscosity varied depending upon the type of extract and bacterial strain. The maximum population of each organism was influenced by fermentable carbohydrates, which, in turn, influenced acid production and change in pH. Change in viscosity was correlated with the amount of protein and titratable acidity of products. Color was affected by pasteurization treatment and fermentation as well as the source of extract. In the extracts inoculated simultaneously with L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus, a synergistic effect resulted in increased bacterial populations, titratable acidity, and viscosity, and decreased pH in all the legume extracts when compared to the extracts fermented with either of these organisms individually. Fermented extracts offer potential as substitutes for cultured dairy products. 24 references.

  16. Preparation of lactic acid bacteria fermented wheat-yoghurt mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magala, Michal; Kohajdová, Zlatica; Karovičová, Jolana

    2013-01-01

    Tarhana, a wheat-yoghurt fermented mixture, is considered as a good source of saccharides, proteins, some vitamins and minerals. Moreover, their preparation is inexpensive and lactic acid fermentation offers benefits like product preservation, enhancement of nutritive value and sensory properties improvement. The aim of this work was to evaluate changes of some chemical parameters during fermentation of tarhana, when the level of salt and amount of yoghurt used were varied. Some functional and sensory characteristics of the fi nal product were also determined. Chemical analysis included determination of pH, titrable acidity, content of reducing saccharides, lactic, acetic and citric acid. Measured functional properties of tarhana powder were foaming capacity, foam stability, water absorption capacity, oil absorption capacity and emulsifying activity. Tarhana soups samples were evaluated for their sensory characteristics (colour, odor, taste, consistency and overall acceptability). Fermentation of tarhana by lactic acid bacteria and yeasts led to decrease in pH, content of reducing saccharides and citric acid, while titrable acidity and concentration of lactic and acetic acid increased. Determination of functional properties of tarhana powder showed, that salt absence and increased amount of yoghurt in tarhana recipe reduced foaming capacity and oil absorption capacity, whereas foam stability and water absorption capacity were improved. Sensory evaluation of tarhana soups showed that variations in tarhana recipe adversly affected sensory parameters of fi nal products. Variations in tarhana recipe (salt absence, increased proportion of yoghurt) led to changes in some chemical parameters (pH, titrable acidity, reducing saccharides, content of lactic, acetic and citric acid). Functional properties were also affected with changed tarhana recipe. Sensory characteristics determination showed, that standard tarhana fermented for 144 h had the highest overall acceptability.

  17. Preparation of lactic acid bacteria fermented wheat-yoghurt mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Magala

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tarhana, a wheat-yoghurt fermented mixture, is considered as a good source of saccharides, proteins, some vitamins and minerals. Moreover, their preparation is inexpensive and lactic acid fermentation offers benefi ts like product preservation, enhancement of nutritive value and sensory properties improvement. The aim of this work was to evaluate changes of some chemical parameters during fermentation of tarhana, when the level of salt and amount of yoghurt used were varied. Some functional and sensory characteristics of the fi nal product were also determined. Material and methods. Chemical analysis included determination of pH, titrable acidity, content of reducing saccharides, lactic, acetic and citric acid. Measured functional properties of tarhana powder were foaming capacity, foam stability, water absorption capacity, oil absorption capacity and emulsifying activity. Tarhana soups samples were evaluated for their sensory characteristics (colour, odor, taste, consistency and overall acceptability. Results. Fermentation of tarhana by lactic acid bacteria and yeasts led to decrease in pH, content of reducing saccharides and citric acid, while titrable acidity and concentration of lactic and acetic acid increased. Determination of functional properties of tarhana powder showed, that salt absence and increased amount of yoghurt in tarhana recipe reduced foaming capacity and oil absorption capacity, whereas foam stability and water absorption capacity were improved. Sensory evaluation of tarhana soups showed that variations in tarhana recipe adversly affected sensory parameters of fi nal products. Conclusion. Variations in tarhana recipe (salt absence, increased proportion of yoghurt led to changes in some chemical parameters (pH, titrable acidity, reducing saccharides, content of lactic, acetic and citric acid. Functional properties were also affected with changed tarhana recipe. Sensory characteristics determination showed, that

  18. Occurrence and role of lactic acid bacteria in seafood products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Françoise, Leroi

    2010-09-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in fish flesh has long been disregarded because the high post-mortem pH, the low percentage of sugars, the high content of low molecular weight nitrogenous molecules and the low temperature of temperate waters favor the rapid growth of pH-sensitive psychrotolerant marine Gram-negative bacteria like Pseudomonas, Shewanella and Photobacterium. In seafood packed in both vacuum (VP) and modified atmosphere (MAP) packaging commonly CO(2) enriched, the growth of the Gram-negative aerobic bacteria group (predominantly pseudomonads) is effectively inhibited and the number reached by LAB during storage is higher than that achieved in air but always several log units lower than the trimethylamine oxide (TMA-O) reducing and CO(2)-resistant organisms (Shewanella putrefaciens and Photobacterium phosphoreum). Accordingly, LAB are not of much concern in seafood neither aerobically stored nor VP and MAP. However, they may acquire great relevance in lightly preserved fish products (LPFP), including those VP or MAP. Fresh fish presents a very high water activity (aw) value (0.99). However, aw is reduced to about 0.96 when salt (typically 6% WP) is added to the product. As a result, aerobic Gram-negative bacteria are inhibited, which allows the growth of other organisms more resistant to reduced aw, i.e. LAB, and then they may acquire a central role in the microbial events occurring in the product. Changes in consumers' habits have led to an increase of convenient LPFP with a relative long shelf-life (at least 3 weeks) which, on the other hand, may constitute a serious problem from a safety perspective since Listeria monocytogenes and sometimes Clostridium botulinum (mainly type E) may able to grow. In any case the LAB function in marine products is complex, depending on species, strains, interaction with other bacteria and the food matrix. They may have no particular effect or they may be responsible for spoilage and, in certain cases, they may even exert

  19. Functional fermented whey-based beverage using lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescuma, Micaela; Hébert, Elvira María; Mozzi, Fernanda; de Valdez, Graciela Font

    2010-06-30

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) is employed as functional food ingredient because of its nutritional value and emulsifying properties. However, the major whey protein beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) is the main cause of milk allergy. The aim of this study was to formulate a fermented whey beverage using selected lactic acid bacteria and WPC35 (WPC containing 35% of proteins) to obtain a fermented product with low lactose and BLG contents and high essential amino acid concentration. Cell viability, lactose consumption, lactic acid production, proteolytic activity, amino acid release and BLG degradation by the selected strains Lactobacillus acidophilus CRL 636, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 656 and Streptococcus thermophilus CRL 804, as single or mixed (SLaB) cultures were evaluated in WPC35 (10%, w/v) incubated at 37 degrees C for 24h. Then, the fermented WPC35 was mixed with peach juice and calcium lactate (2%, w/v) and stored at 10 degrees C for 28 days. During fermentation, single cultures grew 1.7-3.1 log CFU/ml and produced 25.1-95.0 mmol/l of lactic acid as consequence of lactose consumption (14.0-41.8 mmol/l) after 12h fermentation. L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 656 was the most proteolytic strain (626 microg/ml Leu) and released the branched-chain essential amino acids Leu (16 microg/ml), Ile (27 microg/ml) and Val (43 microg/ml). All strains were able to degrade BLG in a range of 41-85% after 12h incubation. The starter culture SLaB grew 3.0 log CFU/ml, showed marked pH reduction, produced 122.0 mmol/l of lactic acid, displayed high proteolytic activity (484 microg/ml Leu) releasing Leu (13 microg/ml), Ile (18 microg/ml) and Val (35 microg/ml), and hydrolyzed 92% of BLG. The addition of calcium lactate to WPC35 maintained the drink pH stable during shelf life; no contamination was detected during this period. After 28 days, a decrease in cell viability of all strains was observed being more pronounced for L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus

  20. Lactic acid bacteria: the bugs of the new millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konings, W N; Kok, J; Kuipers, O P; Poolman, B

    2000-06-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LABs) are widely used in the manufacturing of fermented food and are among the best-studied microorganisms. Detailed knowledge of a number of physiological traits has opened new potential applications for these organisms in the food industry, while other traits might be beneficial for human health. Important new developments have been made in the research of LABs in the areas of multidrug resistance, bacteriocins and quorum sensing, osmoregulation, proteolysis, autolysins and bacteriophages. Recently, progress has been made in the construction of food-grade genetically modified LABs.

  1. Continuous Cultivation of Photosynthetic Bacteria for Fatty Acids Production

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Ji-Hye; Hwang, Yuhoon; Kang, Seoktae; Kim, Mi-Sun

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, we introduced a novel approach for microbial fatty acids (FA) production. Photosynthetic bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides KD131, were cultivated in a continuous-flow, stirred-tank reactor (CFSTR) at various substrate (lactate) concentrations.At hydraulic retention time (HRT) 4 d, cell concentration continuously increased from 0.97 g dcw/L to 2.05 g dcw/L as lactate concentration increased from 30 mM to 60 mM. At 70 mM, however, cell concentration fluctuated with incomple...

  2. Overview on mechanisms of acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-02-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are a group of gram-negative or gram-variable bacteria which possess an obligate aerobic property with oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor, meanwhile transform ethanol and sugar to corresponding aldehydes, ketones and organic acids. Since the first genus Acetobacter of AAB was established in 1898, 16 AAB genera have been recorded so far. As the main producer of a world-wide condiment, vinegar, AAB have evolved an elegant adaptive system that enables them to survive and produce a high concentration of acetic acid. Some researches and reviews focused on mechanisms of acid resistance in enteric bacteria and made the mechanisms thoroughly understood, while a few investigations did in AAB. As the related technologies with proteome, transcriptome and genome were rapidly developed and applied to AAB research, some plausible mechanisms conferring acetic acid resistance in some AAB strains have been published. In this review, the related mechanisms of AAB against acetic acid with acetic acid assimilation, transportation systems, cell morphology and membrane compositions, adaptation response, and fermentation conditions will be described. Finally, a framework for future research for anti-acid AAB will be provided.

  3. Phenolic acid degradation potential and growth behavior of lactic acid bacteria in sunflower substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Caroline; Heinrich, Veronika; Vogel, Rudi F; Toelstede, Simone

    2016-08-01

    Sunflower flour provides a high content of protein with a well-balanced amino acid composition and is therefore regarded as an attractive source for protein. The use for human nutrition is hindered by phenolic compounds, mainly chlorogenic acid, which can lead under specific circumstances to undesirable discolorations. In this study, growth behavior and degradation ability of chlorogenic acid of four lactic acid bacteria were explored. Data suggested that significant higher fermentation performances on sunflower flour as compared to sunflower protein concentrate were reached by Lactobacillus plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillus gasseri and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis. In fermentation with the latter two strains reduced amounts of chlorogenic acid were observed in sunflower flour (-11.4% and -19.8%, respectively), which were more pronounced in the protein concentrate (-50.7% and -95.6%, respectively). High tolerances against chlorogenic acid and the cleavage product quinic acid with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ≥20.48 mg/ml after 48 h were recorded for all strains except Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, which was more sensitive. The second cleavage compound, caffeic acid revealed a higher antimicrobial potential with MIC values of 0.64-5.12 mg/ml. In this proof of concept study, degradation versus inhibitory effect suggest the existence of basic mechanisms of interaction between phenolic acids in sunflower and lactic acid bacteria and a feasible way to reduce the chlorogenic acid content, which may help to avoid undesired color changes.

  4. Genome level analysis of bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neetigyata Pratap; Tiwari, Abhay; Bansal, Ankiti; Thakur, Shruti; Sharma, Garima; Gabrani, Reema

    2015-06-01

    Bacteriocins are antimicrobial peptides which are ribosomally synthesized by mainly all bacterial species. LABs (lactic acid bacteria) are a diverse group of bacteria that include around 20 genera of various species. Though LABs have a tremendous potential for production of anti-microbial peptides, this group of bacteria is still underexplored for bacteriocins. To study the diversity among bacteriocin encoding clusters and the putative bacteriocin precursors, genome mining was performed on 20 different species of LAB not reported to be bacteriocin producers. The phylogenetic tree of gyrB, rpoB, and 16S rRNA were constructed using MEGA6 software to analyze the diversity among strains. Putative bacteriocins operons identified were found to be diverse and were further characterized on the basis of physiochemical properties and the secondary structure. The presence of at least two cysteine residues in most of the observed putative bacteriocins leads to disulphide bond formation and provide stability. Our data suggests that LABs are prolific source of low molecular weight non modified peptides.

  5. Antagonism Between Osmophilic Lactic Acid Bacteria and Yeasts in Brine Fermentation of Soy Sauce

    OpenAIRE

    NODA, FUMIO; Hayashi, Kazuya; Mizunuma, Takeji

    1980-01-01

    Brine fermentation by osmophilic lactic acid bacteria and yeasts for long periods of time is essential to produce a good quality of shoyu (Japanese fermented soy sauce). It is well known that lactic acid fermentation by osmophilic lactic acid bacteria results in the depression of alcoholic fermentation by osmophilic yeasts, but the nature of the interaction between osmophilic lactic acid bacteria and yeasts in brine fermentation of shoyu has not been revealed. The inhibitory effect of osmophi...

  6. Isolation, characterization and optimization of indigenous acetic acid bacteria and evaluation of their preservation methods

    OpenAIRE

    Sharafi, SM; I Rasooli; K Beheshti-Maal

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are useful in industrial production of vinegar. The present study aims at isolation and identification of acetic acid bacteria with characterization, optimization, and evaluation of their acetic acid productivity. Materials and Methods Samples from various fruits were screened for presence of acetic acid bacteria on glucose, yeast extract, calcium carbonate (GYC) medium. Carr medium supplemented with bromocresol green was used for distingui...

  7. Hydrolytic breakdown of lactoferricin by lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Moushumi; Somkuti, George A

    2010-02-01

    Lactoferricin is a 25-amino acid antimicrobial peptide fragment that is liberated by pepsin digestion of lactoferrin present in bovine milk. Along with its antibacterial properties, lactoferricin has also been reported to have immunostimulatory, antiviral, and anticarcinogenic effects. These attributes provide lactoferricin and other natural bioactive peptides with the potential to be functional food ingredients that can be used by the food industry in a variety of applications. At present, commercial uses of these types of compounds are limited by the scarcity of information on their ability to survive food processing environments. We have monitored the degradation of lactoferricin during its incubation with two types of lactic acid bacteria used in the yogurt-making industry, Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, with the aim of assessing the stability of this milk protein-derived peptide under simulated yogurt-making conditions. Analysis of the hydrolysis products isolated from these experiments indicates degradation of this peptide near neutral pH by lactic acid bacteria-associated peptidases, the extent of which was influenced by the bacterial strain used. However, the data also showed that compared to other milk-derived bioactive peptides that undergo complete degradation under these conditions, the 25-amino acid lactoferricin is apparently more resistant, with approximately 50% of the starting material remaining after 4 h of incubation. These findings imply that lactoferricin, as a natural milk protein-derived peptide, has potential applications in the commercial production of yogurt-like fermented dairy products as a multi-functional food ingredient.

  8. Bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesković-Moračanin Slavica M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB have an essential role in the production of fermented products. With their metabolic activity, they influence the ripening processes - leading to desired sensory qualities while at the same time inhibiting the growth of undesired microorganisms. Because of their dominant role during fermentation and because of a long tradition of utilization, Lhave been designated as “safe microbiota”. Biological protection of LAB, as a naturally present and/or selected and intentionally added microflora, is realized through the production of non-specific (lactic acid, acetic acid and other volatile organic acids, hydrogen peroxide, diacetyl, etc and specific metabolites, bacteriocins. Bacteriocins are extracellularly released proteins or peptides which possess certain antibacterial activity towards certain types of microorganisms, usually related to the producing bacteria. Today, bacteriocins represent a very interesting potential for their application in the food industry. Their application can reduce the use of synthetic preservatives and/or the intensity of thermal treatment during food production consumer’s need for safe, fresh and minimally-processed food. With the intention of realizing this potential to the fullest, it is necessary to understand the nature of bacteriocins, their production mechanisms, regulations and actions, as well as the influence of external factors on the their antimicrobial activity. The composition of food, i.e. its characteristics (pH, temperature, ingredients and additives, types and quantities of epiphytic microbiota and the actual technological process used in production, can all influence the stability and activity of the added bacteriocins. The future research in this field should also aim to clarify this unknown aspect of the application of bacteriocins, to provide the necessary knowledge about the optimization of the external conditions and open up the possibility of discovering their new

  9. Decarboxylation of substituted cinnamic acids by lactic acid bacteria isolated during malt whisky fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beek, S; Priest, F G

    2000-12-01

    Seven strains of Lactobacillus isolated from malt whisky fermentations and representing Lactobacillus brevis, L. crispatus, L. fermentum, L. hilgardii, L. paracasei, L. pentosus, and L. plantarum contained genes for hydroxycinnamic acid (p-coumaric acid) decarboxylase. With the exception of L. hilgardii, these bacteria decarboxylated p-coumaric acid and/or ferulic acid, with the production of 4-vinylphenol and/or 4-vinylguaiacol, respectively, although the relative activities on the two substrates varied between strains. The addition of p-coumaric acid or ferulic acid to cultures of L. pentosus in MRS broth induced hydroxycinnamic acid decarboxylase mRNA within 5 min, and the gene was also induced by the indigenous components of malt wort. In a simulated distillery fermentation, a mixed culture of L. crispatus and L. pentosus in the presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae decarboxylated added p-coumaric acid more rapidly than the yeast alone but had little activity on added ferulic acid. Moreover, we were able to demonstrate the induction of hydroxycinnamic acid decarboxylase mRNA under these conditions. However, in fermentations with no additional hydroxycinnamic acid, the bacteria lowered the final concentration of 4-vinylphenol in the fermented wort compared to the level seen in a pure-yeast fermentation. It seems likely that the combined activities of bacteria and yeast decarboxylate p-coumaric acid and then reduce 4-vinylphenol to 4-ethylphenol more effectively than either microorganism alone in pure cultures. Although we have shown that lactobacilli participate in the metabolism of phenolic compounds during malt whisky fermentations, the net result is a reduction in the concentrations of 4-vinylphenol and 4-vinylguaiacol prior to distillation.

  10. Probiotic properties of endemic strains of lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora N. Tkhruni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB isolated from various samples of matsun, yogurt and salted cheese from natural farms of Armenia were studied. They have high antimicrobial and probiotic activities, growth rate and differ by their resistance to enzymes. Supernatants of LAB retain bactericidal activity at рН 3.0-8.0 and inhibit growth of various microflora. The application of different methods of identification and LAB genotyping (API 50 CH, 16S rRNA sequencing, GS-PCR, RAPD PCR showed that isolated LAB evidenced a 99.9% similarity with L. rhamnosus, L. plantarum and L. pentosus species and coccoid forms of Streptococcus and Enterococcus species. It can be concluded, that some strains of lactic acid bacteria, isolated from dairy products from natural farms of Armenia, can be properly used for biopreservation of some foodstuffs. On the basis of experimental data, the LAB can be used as basis for obtaining the new products of functional nutrition.

  11. The use of lactic acid bacteria to reduce mercury bioaccessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadán-Piedra, C; Alcántara, C; Monedero, V; Zúñiga, M; Vélez, D; Devesa, V

    2017-08-01

    Mercury in food is present in either inorganic [Hg(II)] or methylmercury (CH3Hg) form. Intestinal absorption of mercury is influenced by interactions with other food components. The use of dietary components to reduce mercury bioavailability has been previously proposed. The aim of this work is to explore the use of lactic acid bacteria to reduce the amount of mercury solubilized after gastrointestinal digestion and available for absorption (bioaccessibility). Ten strains were tested by addition to aqueous solutions containing Hg(II) or CH3Hg, or to food samples, and submission of the mixtures to gastrointestinal digestion. All of the strains assayed reduce the soluble fraction from standards of mercury species under gastrointestinal digestion conditions (72-98%). However their effectiveness is lower in food, and reductions in bioaccessibility are only observed with mushrooms (⩽68%). It is hypothesized that bioaccessible mercury in seafood forms part of complexes that do not interact with lactic acid bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Naturally Occurring Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Tomato Pomace Silage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing-jing; Du, Rui-ping; Gao, Min; Sui, Yao-qiang; Xiu, Lei; Wang, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Silage making has become a significant method of forage conservation worldwide. To determine how tomato pomace (TP) may be used effectively as animal feed, it was ensilaged for 90 days and microbiology counts, fermentation characteristics and chemical composition of tomato pomace silage (TPS) were evaluated at the 30th, 60th, and 90th days, respectively. In addition, 103 lactic acid bacteria were isolated from TPS. Based on the phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, 16S rDNA sequence and carbohydrate fermentation tests, the isolates were identified as 17 species namely: Lactobacillus coryniformis subsp. torquens (0.97%), Lactobacillus pontis (0.97%), Lactobacillus hilgardii (0.97%), Lactobacillus pantheris (0.97%), Lactobacillus amylovorus (1.9%), Lactobacillus panis (1.9%), Lactobacillus vaginalis (1.9%), Lactobacillus rapi (1.9%), Lactobacillus buchneri (2.9%), Lactobacillus parafarraginis (2.9%), Lactobacillus helveticus (3.9%), Lactobacillus camelliae (3.9%), Lactobacillus fermentum (5.8%), Lactobacillus manihotivorans (6.8%), Lactobacillus plantarum (10.7%), Lactobacillus harbinensis (16.5%) and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei (35.0%). This study has shown that TP can be well preserved for 90 days by ensilaging and that TPS is not only rich in essential nutrients, but that physiological and biochemical properties of the isolates could provide a platform for future design of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) inoculants aimed at improving the fermentation quality of silage. PMID:25049999

  13. Acetic acid production from food wastes using yeast and acetic acid bacteria micro-aerobic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; He, Dongwei; Niu, Dongjie; Zhao, Youcai

    2015-05-01

    In this study, yeast and acetic acid bacteria strains were adopted to enhance the ethanol-type fermentation resulting to a volatile fatty acids yield of 30.22 g/L, and improve acetic acid production to 25.88 g/L, with food wastes as substrate. In contrast, only 12.81 g/L acetic acid can be obtained in the absence of strains. The parameters such as pH, oxidation reduction potential and volatile fatty acids were tested and the microbial diversity of different strains and activity of hydrolytic ferment were investigated to reveal the mechanism. The optimum pH and oxidation reduction potential for the acetic acid production were determined to be at 3.0-3.5 and -500 mV, respectively. Yeast can convert organic matters into ethanol, which is used by acetic acid bacteria to convert the organic wastes into acetic acid. The acetic acid thus obtained from food wastes micro-aerobic fermentation liquid could be extracted by distillation to get high-pure acetic acid.

  14. [Systematic analysis and metabolic regulation of physiological functions for lactic acid bacteria--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongde; Zhang, Juan; Liu, Liming

    2012-01-01

    As cell factories, lactic acid bacteria are widely used in food, agriculture, medicine and other industries, and play a great role in industrial processes. However, lactic acid bacteria encounter various environmental stresses both in industrial processes and in the gastrointestinal tract, which impair their physiological functions and food manufacture efficiency. Recently, the development of metabolic engineering and system biology brings unprecedented opportunity for the physiological modification of lactic acid bacteria. In this review, we addresses the progress of lactic acid bacterium system biology, and based on this, the metabolic engineering strategies for manipulating and optimizing lactic acid bacteria physiological function were summarized.

  15. Insights into the evolution of sialic acid catabolism among bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almagro-Moreno Salvador

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sialic acids comprise a family of nine-carbon amino sugars that are prevalent in mucus rich environments. Sialic acids from the human host are used by a number of pathogens as an energy source. Here we explore the evolution of the genes involved in the catabolism of sialic acid. Results The cluster of genes encoding the enzymes N-acetylneuraminate lyase (NanA, epimerase (NanE, and kinase (NanK, necessary for the catabolism of sialic acid (the Nan cluster, are confined 46 bacterial species, 42 of which colonize mammals, 33 as pathogens and 9 as gut commensals. We found a putative sialic acid transporter associated with the Nan cluster in most species. We reconstructed the phylogenetic history of the NanA, NanE, and NanK proteins from the 46 species and compared them to the species tree based on 16S rRNA. Within the NanA phylogeny, Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria do not form distinct clades. NanA from Yersinia and Vibrio species was most closely related to the NanA clade from eukaryotes. To examine this further, we reconstructed the phylogeny of all NanA homologues in the databases. In this analysis of 83 NanA sequences, Bacteroidetes, a human commensal group formed a distinct clade with Verrucomicrobia, and branched with the Eukaryotes and the Yersinia/Vibrio clades. We speculate that pathogens such as V. cholerae may have acquired NanA from a commensal aiding their colonization of the human gut. Both the NanE and NanK phylogenies more closely represented the species tree but numerous incidences of incongruence are noted. We confirmed the predicted function of the sialic acid catabolism cluster in members the major intestinal pathogens Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholerae, V. vulnificus, Yersinia enterocolitica and Y. pestis. Conclusion The Nan cluster among bacteria is confined to human pathogens and commensals conferring them the ability to utilize a ubiquitous carbon source in mucus rich surfaces of the human body

  16. Recent advances in nitrogen-fixing acetic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraza, Raúl O

    2008-06-30

    Nitrogen is an essential plant nutrient, widely applied as N-fertilizer to improve yield of agriculturally important crops. An interesting alternative to avoid or reduce the use of N-fertilizers could be the exploitation of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB), capable of enhancing growth and yield of many plant species, several of agronomic and ecological significance. PGPB belong to diverse genera, including Azospirillum, Azotobacter, Herbaspirillum, Bacillus, Burkholderia, Pseudomonas, Rhizobium, and Gluconacetobacter, among others. They are capable of promoting plant growth through different mechanisms including (in some cases), the biological nitrogen fixation (BNF), the enzymatic reduction of the atmospheric dinitrogen (N(2)) to ammonia, catalyzed by nitrogenase. Aerobic bacteria able to oxidize ethanol to acetic acid in neutral or acid media are candidates of belonging to the family Acetobacteraceae. At present, this family has been divided into ten genera: Acetobacter, Gluconacetobacter, Gluconobacter, Acidomonas, Asaia, Kozakia, Saccharibacter, Swaminathania, Neoasaia, and Granulibacter. Among them, only three genera include N(2)-fixing species: Gluconacetobacter, Swaminathania and Acetobacter. The first N(2)-fixing acetic acid bacterium (AAB) was described in Brazil. It was found inside tissues of the sugarcane plant, and first named as Acetobacter diazotrophicus, but then renamed as Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus. Later, two new species within the genus Gluconacetobacter, associated to coffee plants, were described in Mexico: G. johannae and G. azotocaptans. A salt-tolerant bacterium named Swaminathania salitolerans was found associated to wild rice plants. Recently, N(2)-fixing Acetobacter peroxydans and Acetobacter nitrogenifigens, associated with rice plants and Kombucha tea, respectively, were described in India. In this paper, recent advances involving nitrogen-fixing AAB are presented. Their natural habitats, physiological and genetic aspects

  17. Purification Techniques of Bacteriocins from Lactic Acid Bacteria and Other Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Lucila; Sesma, Fernando

    The search for new antimicrobial peptides produced by lactic acid ­bacteria and other Gram-positive microorganisms has become an interesting field of research in the past decades. The fact that bacteriocins are active against numerous foodborne and human pathogens, are produced by generally regarded as safe (GRAS) microorganisms, and are readily degraded by proteolytic host systems makes them attractive candidates for biotechnological applications. However, before suggesting or choosing a new bacteriocin for future technology developments, it is necessary to elucidate its biochemical structure and its mode of action, which may be carried out once the bacteriocin is purified to homogeneity. This chapter focuses on describing the main strategies used for the purification of numerous bacteriocins.

  18. Isolation and Identification of Epiphytic Lactic Acid Bacteria from Guinea Grass (Panicum maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pasebani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Bacteria can perform a variety of beneficial functions, for example many lactic acid bacteria are responsible for fermentation of silage in the process of forage conservation. In the making of silage, epiphytic lactic acid bacteria are usually insufficient in numbers to promote efficient lactate fermentation. This study was conducted to identify the predominant indigenous bacteria, with emphasis on lactic acid bacteria, from Guinea grass (Panicum maximum. Approach: Two different condition of growth using nutrient and MRS agar were prepared for isolation of the bacteria. In total, 18 purified isolates were identified by BIOLOG identification system which comprised of 9 bacterial species. Standard plate count in the both conditions was considered. Results: Three bacterial species based on the first condition of growth were identified which were belonging to Flavimonas oryzihabitans, Enerobacter cloacae, Sphingomonas paucimobilis B. Lactic acid bacteria based on the second condition of growth were belonging to Weissella confusa, Weissella paramesenteroides, Leuconostoc mesenteroides ssp. dextranicum, Lactococcus lactis ssp. hordniae. Result of plate count showed that 8.3×103 CFU lactic acid bacteria are available per gram of fresh guinea grass. Conclusion: Three hetero-fermentative and one homo-fermentative lactic acid bacteria were identified which would be suggested to use as bacterial inoculants because of the insufficient amount of epiphytic lactic acid bacteria and the availability of pathogenic bacteria in the grass.

  19. PROBIOTIC POTENTIALS AMONG LACTIC ACID BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM CURD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruthy VV

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Curd is a commonly used fermented milk product in India since time immemorial. The scientific use of curd as a source of probiotic (good bacteria for health has not been much examined. The yougurt (curd containing probiotics is in Indian market and highly acclaimed. Therefore the status of curd as a source of probiotics is in question and requires scientific examination of its content, so the study was carried out. Probiotic potentials of two bacterial isolates from 20 different curd samples were identified as Lactobacillus spp. by the determination of morphological, cultural, physiological and biochemical characteristics, were investigated. The antibacterial potential against diarrhoegenic bacterial pathogens was also examined. The reference strain used was Lactobacillus acidophilus, MTCC 447. The percentage survivability of the strains at pH 3.5, was found to be satisfactory (>90%. Bile salt resistance (0.3% sodium thioglycollate was found to be between 80.41% and 83.2%. The pH decrease of the strains with time showed slow acidification activity. The lactic acid production of the strains ranges from 1.83 ± 0.12 to 3.93 ± 0.07 g. The strains were β-galactosidase producer and were resistant to principal antibiotics tested. But the absence of plasmids showed that they are intrinsically resistant or chromosome encoded. Strains showed maximum inhibition zone against V. cholerae O139 (13.67 ± 0.57 to 15.33 ± 0.57 mm in comparison to other diarrhoeagenic bacteria. Only 10% of the examined curd samples had probiotic bacteria. Isolated strains of Lactobacillus spp. showed satisfactory probiotic potentials in comparison with reference strains and with antibacterial activity against diarrhoeagenic pathogens and thus maybe useful in the management of diarrhoea and also in functional food industry.

  20. Antibiotic resistance of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Chinese yogurts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, N; Zhang, J X; Fan, M T; Wang, J; Guo, G; Wei, X Y

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of 43 strains of lactic acid bacteria, isolated from Chinese yogurts made in different geographical areas, to 11 antibiotics (ampicillin, penicillin G, roxithromycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, chlortetracycline, lincomycin, kanamycin, streptomycin, neomycin, and gentamycin). The 43 isolates (18 Lactobacillus bulgaricus and 25 Streptococcus thermophilus) were identified at species level and were typed by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis. Thirty-five genotypically different strains were detected and their antimicrobial resistance to 11 antibiotics was determined using the agar dilution method. Widespread resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, chlortetracycline, tetracyclines, lincomycin, streptomycin, neomycin, and gentamycin was found among the 35 strains tested. All of the Strep. thermophilus strains tested were susceptible to penicillin G and roxithromycin, whereas 23.5 and 64.7% of Lb. bulgaricus strains, respectively, were resistant. All of the Strep. thermophilus and Lb. bulgaricus strains were found to be resistant to kanamycin. The presence of the corresponding resistance genes in the resistant isolates was investigated through PCR, with the following genes detected: tet(M) in 1 Lb. bulgaricus and 2 Strep. thermophilus isolates, ant(6) in 2 Lb. bulgaricus and 2 Strep. thermophilus isolates, and aph(3')-IIIa in 5 Lb. bulgaricus and 2 Strep. thermophilus isolates. The main threat associated with these bacteria is that they may transfer resistance genes to pathogenic bacteria, which has been a major cause of concern to human and animal health. To our knowledge, the aph(3')-IIIa and ant(6) genes were found in Lb. bulgaricus and Strep. thermophilus for the first time. Further investigations are required to analyze whether the genes identified in Lb. bulgaricus and Strep. thermophilus isolates might be horizontally transferred to other species.

  1. Interactions between Cooccurring Lactic Acid Bacteria in Honey Bee Hives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokop, Z P; Horton, M A; Newton, I L G

    2015-10-01

    In contrast to the honey bee gut, which is colonized by a few characteristic bacterial clades, the hive of the honey bee is home to a diverse array of microbes, including many lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In this study, we used culture, combined with sequencing, to sample the LAB communities found across hive environments. Specifically, we sought to use network analysis to identify microbial hubs sharing nearly identical operational taxonomic units, evidence which may indicate cooccurrence of bacteria between environments. In the process, we identified interactions between noncore bacterial members (Fructobacillus and Lactobacillaceae) and honey bee-specific "core" members. Both Fructobacillus and Lactobacillaceae colonize brood cells, bee bread, and nectar and may serve the role of pioneering species, establishing an environment conducive to the inoculation by honey bee core bacteria. Coculture assays showed that these noncore bacterial members promote the growth of honey bee-specific bacterial species. Specifically, Fructobacillus by-products in spent medium supported the growth of the Firm-5 honey bee-specific clade in vitro. Metabolic characterization of Fructobacillus using carbohydrate utilization assays revealed that this strain is capable of utilizing the simple sugars fructose and glucose, as well as the complex plant carbohydrate lignin. We tested Fructobacillus for antibiotic sensitivity and found that this bacterium, which may be important for establishment of the microbiome, is sensitive to the commonly used antibiotic tetracycline. Our results point to the possible significance of "noncore" and environmental microbial community members in the modulation of honey bee microbiome dynamics and suggest that tetracycline use by beekeepers should be limited. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Characterisation of lactic acid bacteria isolated from fermented milk "laban".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chammas, Gisele I; Saliba, Rachad; Corrieu, Georges; Béal, Catherine

    2006-07-01

    The technological properties of 96 lactic acid bacteria isolated from Lebanese traditional fermented milk "laban" were characterised. They were classified by phenotypic and biochemical analyses as Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, thus indicating that laban is a fermented milk similar to yogurt. Most strains of L. bulgaricus (87.5%) exhibited a high acidification activity, whereas strains of streptococci showed low acidification ability. 33.3% of streptococci strains and 25% of lactobacilli strains displayed similar acidification performances as European strains. Results obtained for syneresis, texture and rheological parameters led us to consider that isolated strains were not low polymer-producing strains. Some of them displayed interesting characteristics such as low syneresis and high values for rheological parameters. The major flavour compounds found in pure cultures were acetaldehyde, acetone, 2-butanone, dimethyl disulfide, acetoin, 2,3-butanedione, 2,3-pentanedione, and acetic, hexanoic and butanoic acids. Acetaldehyde (7.4%) and organic acids (48.3%) were mainly produced by L. bulgaricus strains, whereas streptococci cultures contained high relative levels of 2,3-butanedione and acetoin, which represented around 82% of the total flavour compounds. Finally, strains isolated from laban samples exhibited different technological properties than those used in yogurt production, thus conferring specific characteristics to this product.

  3. Biological formation of 5-aminolevulinic acid by photosynthetic bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiu-yan; XU Xiang-yang; MA Qing-lan; WU Wei-hong

    2005-01-01

    In this study, 7 stains of Rhodopseudomonas sp. were selected from 36 photosynthetic bacteria stains storied in our laboratory.Rhodopseudomonas sp. strain 99-28 has the highest 5-aminolevulinic acid(ALA) production ability in these 7 strains. Rhodopseudomonas sp. 99-28 strain was mutated using ultraviolet radiation and a mutant strain L-1, which ALA production is higher than wild strain 99-28 about one times, was obtained. The elements affecting ALA formation of strain 99-28 and L-1 were studied. Under the optimal condition(pH 7.5,supplement of ALA dehydratase(ALAD) inhibitor, levulinic acid(LA) and precursors of ALA synthesis, glycine and succinat, 3000 Ix of light density), ALA formation of mutant L-1 was up to 22.15 mg/L. Strain L-1 was used to treat wastewater to remove CODCr and produce ALA. ALA production was 2.819 my/L, 1.531 rog/L, 2.166 mg/L, and 2.424 mg/L in monosodium glutamate wastewater(MGW),succotash wastewater(SW), brewage wastewater(BW), and citric acid wastewater(CAW) respectively. More than 90% of CODCr was removed in four kinds of wastewater. When LA, glycin and succinate were supplied, ALA production was dramatically increased,however, CODCr could hardly be removed.

  4. Bioprotective potential of lactic acid bacteria in malting and brewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Susan; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2008-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are naturally associated with many foods or their raw ingredients and are popularly used in food fermentation to enhance the sensory, aromatic, and textural properties of food. These microorganisms are well recognized for their biopreservative properties, which are achieved through the production of antimicrobial compounds such as lactic acid, diacetyl, bacteriocins, and other metabolites. The antifungal activity of certain LAB is less well characterized, but organic acids, as yet uncharacterized proteinaceous compounds, and cyclic dipeptides can inhibit the growth of some fungi. A variety of microbes are carried on raw materials used in beer brewing, rendering the process susceptible to contamination and often resulting in spoilage or inferior quality of the finished product. The application of antimicrobial-producing LAB at various points in the malting and brewing process could help to negate this problem, providing an added hurdle for spoilage organisms to overcome and leading to the production of a higher quality beer. This review outlines the bioprotective potential of LAB and its application with specific reference to the brewing industry.

  5. Olfactory attraction of Drosophila suzukii by symbiotic acetic acid bacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Mazzetto, Fabio

    2016-03-24

    Some species of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) play relevant roles in the metabolism and physiology of Drosophila spp. and in some cases convey benefits to their hosts. The pest Drosophila suzukii harbors a set of AAB similar to those of other Drosophila species. Here, we investigate the potential to exploit the ability of AAB to produce volatile substances that attract female D. suzukii. Using a two-way olfactometer bioassay, we investigate the preference of D. suzukii for strains of AAB, and using solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography–mass spectrometry we specifically characterize their volatile profiles to identify attractive and non-attractive components produced by strains from the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter, and Komagataeibacter. Flies had a preference for one strain of Komagataeibacter and two strains of Gluconobacter. Analyses of the volatile profiles from the preferred Gluconobacter isolates found that acetic acid is distinctively emitted even after 2 days of bacterial growth, confirming the relevance of this volatile in the profile of this isolate for attracting flies. Analyses of the volatile profile from the preferred Komagataeibacter isolate showed that a different volatile in its profile could be responsible for attracting D. suzukii. Moreover, variation in the concentration of butyric acid derivatives found in some strains may influence the preference of D. suzukii. Our results indicate that Gluconobacter and Komagataeibacter strains isolated from D. suzukii have the potential to provide substances that could be exploited to develop sustainable mass-trapping-based control approaches. © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

  6. Adhesion Properties of Lactic Acid Bacteria on Intestinal Mucin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Nishiyama

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are Gram-positive bacteria that are natural inhabitants of the gastrointestinal (GI tracts of mammals, including humans. Since Mechnikov first proposed that yogurt could prevent intestinal putrefaction and aging, the beneficial effects of LAB have been widely demonstrated. The region between the duodenum and the terminal of the ileum is the primary region colonized by LAB, particularly the Lactobacillus species, and this region is covered by a mucus layer composed mainly of mucin-type glycoproteins. The mucus layer plays a role in protecting the intestinal epithelial cells against damage, but is also considered to be critical for the adhesion of Lactobacillus in the GI tract. Consequently, the adhesion exhibited by lactobacilli on mucin has attracted attention as one of the critical factors contributing to the persistent beneficial effects of Lactobacillus in a constantly changing intestinal environment. Thus, understanding the interactions between Lactobacillus and mucin is crucial for elucidating the survival strategies of LAB in the GI tract. This review highlights the properties of the interactions between Lactobacillus and mucin, while concomitantly considering the structure of the GI tract from a histochemical perspective.

  7. Adhesion Properties of Lactic Acid Bacteria on Intestinal Mucin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Keita; Sugiyama, Makoto; Mukai, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are Gram-positive bacteria that are natural inhabitants of the gastrointestinal (GI) tracts of mammals, including humans. Since Mechnikov first proposed that yogurt could prevent intestinal putrefaction and aging, the beneficial effects of LAB have been widely demonstrated. The region between the duodenum and the terminal of the ileum is the primary region colonized by LAB, particularly the Lactobacillus species, and this region is covered by a mucus layer composed mainly of mucin-type glycoproteins. The mucus layer plays a role in protecting the intestinal epithelial cells against damage, but is also considered to be critical for the adhesion of Lactobacillus in the GI tract. Consequently, the adhesion exhibited by lactobacilli on mucin has attracted attention as one of the critical factors contributing to the persistent beneficial effects of Lactobacillus in a constantly changing intestinal environment. Thus, understanding the interactions between Lactobacillus and mucin is crucial for elucidating the survival strategies of LAB in the GI tract. This review highlights the properties of the interactions between Lactobacillus and mucin, while concomitantly considering the structure of the GI tract from a histochemical perspective. PMID:27681930

  8. Antibiotic susceptibility of different lactic acid bacteria strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapetkov, N; Georgieva, R; Rumyan, N; Karaivanova, E

    2011-12-01

    Five lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains belonging to species Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis and Streptococcus thermophilus were tested for their susceptibility to 27 antibiotics. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of each antimicrobial were determined using a microdilution test. Among the strains a high susceptibility was detected for most of the cell-wall synthesis inhibitors (penicillins, cefoxitin and vancomycin) and resistance toward inhibitors of DNA synthesis (trimethoprim/sulfonamides and fluoroquinolones). Generally, the Lactobacillus strains were inhibited by antibiotics such as chloramphenicol, erythromycin and tetracycline at breakpoint levels lower or equal to the levels defined by the European Food Safety Authority. Despite the very similar profile of S. thermophilus LC201 to lactobacilli, the detection of resistance toward erythromycin necessitates the performance of additional tests in order to prove the absence of transferable resistance genes.

  9. Modelling strategies for the industrial exploitation of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teusink, Bas; Smid, Eddy J

    2006-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have a long tradition of use in the food industry, and the number and diversity of their applications has increased considerably over the years. Traditionally, process optimization for these applications involved both strain selection and trial and error. More recently, metabolic engineering has emerged as a discipline that focuses on the rational improvement of industrially useful strains. In the post-genomic era, metabolic engineering increasingly benefits from systems biology, an approach that combines mathematical modelling techniques with functional-genomics data to build models for biological interpretation and--ultimately--prediction. In this review, the industrial applications of LAB are mapped onto available global, genome-scale metabolic modelling techniques to evaluate the extent to which functional genomics and systems biology can live up to their industrial promise.

  10. Antiviral potential of lactic acid bacteria and their bacteriocins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kassaa, I; Hober, D; Hamze, M; Chihib, N E; Drider, D

    2014-12-01

    Emerging resistance to antiviral agents is a growing public health concern worldwide as it was reported for respiratory, sexually transmitted and enteric viruses. Therefore, there is a growing demand for new, unconventional antiviral agents which may serve as an alternative to the currently used drugs. Meanwhile, published literature continues shedding the light on the potency of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and their bacteriocins as antiviral agents. Health-promoting LAB probiotics may exert their antiviral activity by (1) direct probiotic-virus interaction; (2) production of antiviral inhibitory metabolites; and/or (3) via stimulation of the immune system. The aim of this review was to highlight the antiviral activity of LAB and substances they produce with antiviral activity.

  11. Genomics of lactic acid bacteria: Current status and potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongde; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Rongqing

    2017-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used for the production of a variety of foods and feed raw materials where they contribute to flavor and texture of the fermented products. In addition, specific LAB strains are considered as probiotic due to their health-promoting effects in consumers. Recently, the genome sequencing of LAB is booming and the increased amount of published genomics data brings unprecedented opportunity for us to reveal the important traits of LAB. This review describes the recent progress on LAB genomics and special emphasis is placed on understanding the industry-related physiological features based on genomics analysis. Moreover, strategies to engineer metabolic capacity and stress tolerance of LAB with improved industrial performance are also discussed.

  12. Determination of peroxy radical-scavenging of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecchini, M L; Del Torre, M; Munari, M

    2001-02-28

    Responses of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to peroxy radicals generated via thermal (40 degrees C) decomposition of the diazocompound 2,2,-azo-bis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (ABAP), were studied. In general, LAB displayed survival curves with shoulders and tails indicative of 'multihit' killing by exposure to peroxy radicals. One strain, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DIP15, producing a slope of 0.0105 in the kinetic analysis when exposed to 4 mM ABAP, exhibited a measurable antioxidant capacity. The other LAB failed to show any significant antioxidant capacity. The antioxidant capacity of strain DIP15 remained constant after cells have been heat-treated, suggesting that compounds bearing free radical scavenging capacity are rather stable.

  13. Lactic acid bacteria as adjuvants for sublingual allergy vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Overtvelt, Laurence; Moussu, Helene; Horiot, Stéphane; Samson, Sandrine; Lombardi, Vincent; Mascarell, Laurent; van de Moer, Ariane; Bourdet-Sicard, Raphaëlle; Moingeon, Philippe

    2010-04-01

    We compared immunomodulatory properties of 11 strains of lactic acid bacteria as well as their capacity to enhance sublingual immunotherapy efficacy in a murine asthma model. Two types of bacterial strains were identified, including: (i) potent inducers of IL-12p70 and IL-10 in dendritic cells, supporting IFN-gamma and IL-10 production in CD4+ T cells such as Lactobacillus helveticus; (ii) pure Th1 inducers such as L. casei. Sublingual administration in ovalbumin-sensitized mice of L. helveticus, but not L. casei, reduced airways hyperresponsiveness, bronchial inflammation and proliferation of specific T cells in cervical lymph nodes. Thus, probiotics acting as a Th1/possibly Treg, but not Th1 adjuvant, potentiate tolerance induction via the sublingual route.

  14. Genotypic characterization and safety assessment of lactic acid bacteria from indigenous African fermented food products

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adimpong, David B; Nielsen, Dennis S; Sørensen, Kim I; Derkx, Patrick M F; Jespersen, Lene

    2012-01-01

    .... Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are among the predominant microbial species in African indigenous fermented food products and are used for different applications in the food and biotechnology industries...

  15. Probiotic lactic acid bacteria for applications in vegetarian food products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charernjiratrakul, W.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Total of 225 isolates of lactic acid bacteria were isolated from 152 samples of various fermented foods. The strains were investigated for their probiotic properties based on stability in bile salt (0.30% and high acidity (pH 3, growth under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, ability to grow without vitamin B12. According to the above criteria, 40 isolates were selected. Using an agar spot method, 16 isolates were able to inhibit Salmonella typhimurium, S. typhi, S. enteritidis, S. paratyphi and 4 strains of E. coli O157 : H7 as clear zone greater than 10 mm. Moreover, utilization of protein or fat or starch was also considered. Only 5 isolates were able to utilize protein and further selected for antibiotics sensitivity test. The selected isolates were susceptible to following antibiotics: ampicillin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin , kanamycin, tetracycline and vancomycin; however they were resistant to ceptazidime and norfloxacin. They all showed better growth in vegetarian medium (coconut juice medium than MRS medium both under static and shaking conditions. Five active isolates were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum LL13, LN18, LP11, LS35 and Pediococcus pentosaceus LT02 by API 50 CH system. All cultures grew well in carrot juice by reducing pH from 6.4 to below 4.0 after 24 h of fermentation at 35oC. The lactic cultures in fermented carrot juice lost their viability about 2 log cycles after 15 days of cold storage at 4oC.

  16. Bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria: production, purification, and food applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vuyst, Luc; Leroy, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    In fermented foods, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) display numerous antimicrobial activities. This is mainly due to the production of organic acids, but also of other compounds, such as bacteriocins and antifungal peptides. Several bacteriocins with industrial potential have been purified and characterized. The kinetics of bacteriocin production by LAB in relation to process factors have been studied in detail through mathematical modeling and positive predictive microbiology. Application of bacteriocin-producing starter cultures in sourdough (to increase competitiveness), in fermented sausage (anti-listerial effect), and in cheese (anti-listerial and anti-clostridial effects), have been studied during in vitro laboratory fermentations as well as on pilot-scale level. The highly promising results of these studies underline the important role that functional, bacteriocinogenic LAB strains may play in the food industry as starter cultures, co-cultures, or bioprotective cultures, to improve food quality and safety. In addition, antimicrobial production by probiotic LAB might play a role during in vivo interactions occurring in the human gastrointestinal tract, hence contributing to gut health.

  17. Continuous cultivation of photosynthetic bacteria for fatty acids production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Ji-Hye; Hwang, Yuhoon; Kang, Seoktae; Kim, Mi-Sun

    2013-11-01

    In the present work, we introduced a novel approach for microbial fatty acids (FA) production. Photosynthetic bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides KD131, were cultivated in a continuous-flow, stirred-tank reactor (CFSTR) at various substrate (lactate) concentrations. At hydraulic retention time (HRT) 4d, cell concentration continuously increased from 0.97 g dcw/L to 2.05 g dcw/L as lactate concentration increased from 30 mM to 60mM. At 70 mM, however, cell concentration fluctuated with incomplete substrate degradation. By installing a membrane unit to CFSTR, a stable performance was observed under much higher substrate loading (lactate 100mM and HRT 1.5d). A maximum cell concentration of 16.2g dcw/L, cell productivity of 1.9 g dcw/L/d, and FA productivity of 665 mg FA/L/d were attained, and these values were comparable with those achieved using microalgae. The FA content of R. sphaeroides was around 35% of dry cell weight, mainly composed of vaccenic acid (C18:1, omega-7).

  18. Identification of lactic acid bacteria isolated from corn stovers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Huili; Zhang, Meng; Qin, Guangyong; Tan, Zhongfang; Li, Zongwei; Wang, Yanping; Cai, Yimin

    2011-10-01

    One hundred and twenty-six strains were isolated from corn stover in Henan Province, China, of which 105 isolates were considered to be lactic acid bacteria (LAB) according to Gram-positive, catalase-negative and mainly metabolic lactic acid product. Analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequence of 21 representative strains was used to confirm the presence of the predominant groups and to determine the phylogenetic affiliation of isolates. The sequences from the various LAB isolates showed high degrees of similarity to those of the GenBank type strains between 99.4% and 100%. The prevalent LAB, predominantly Lactobacillus (85.6%), consisted of L. plantarum (33.3%), L. pentosus (28.6%) and L. brevis (23.7%). Other LAB species as Leuconostoc lactis (4.8%), Weissella cibaria (4.8%) and Enterococcus mundtii (4.8%) also presented in corn stover. The present study is the first to fully document corn stover-associated LAB involved in the silage fermentation. The identification results revealed LAB composition inhabiting corn stover and enabling the future design of appropriate inoculants aimed at improving the fermentation quality of silage. © 2011 The Authors. Animal Science Journal © 2011 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  19. Cd(II) Sorption on Montmorillonite-Humic acid-Bacteria Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Du, H.; Chen, W.; Cai, P.; Rong, X; Dai, K; Peacock, CL; Huang, Q.

    2016-01-01

    Soil components (e.g., clays, bacteria and humic substances) are known to produce mineral-organic composites in natural systems. Herein, batch sorption isotherms, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and Cd K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy were applied to investigate the binding characteristics of Cd on montmorillonite(Mont)-humic acid(HA)-bacteria composites. Additive sorption and non-additive Cd(II) sorption behaviour is observed for the binary Mont-bacteria and ternary Mont-HA-bacteria composi...

  20. Solution Structure and Backbone Dynamics of Human Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein: Fatty Acid Binding Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Jun; Lücke, Christian; Chen, Zhongjing; Qiao, Ye; Klimtchuk, Elena; Hamilton, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), a cytosolic protein most abundant in liver, is associated with intracellular transport of fatty acids, nuclear signaling, and regulation of intracellular lipolysis. Among the members of the intracellular lipid binding protein family, L-FABP is of particular interest as it can i), bind two fatty acid molecules simultaneously and ii), accommodate a variety of bulkier physiological ligands such as bilirubin and fatty acyl CoA. To better understand the p...

  1. Comparison of D-gluconic acid production in selected strains of acetic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainz, F; Navarro, D; Mateo, E; Torija, M J; Mas, A

    2016-04-01

    The oxidative metabolism of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) can be exploited for the production of several compounds, including D-gluconic acid. The production of D-gluconic acid in fermented beverages could be useful for the development of new products without glucose. In the present study, we analyzed nineteen strains belonging to eight different species of AAB to select those that could produce D-gluconic acid from D-glucose without consuming D-fructose. We tested their performance in three different media and analyzed the changes in the levels of D-glucose, D-fructose, D-gluconic acid and the derived gluconates. D-Glucose and D-fructose consumption and D-gluconic acid production were heavily dependent on the strain and the media. The most suitable strains for our purpose were Gluconobacter japonicus CECT 8443 and Gluconobacter oxydans Po5. The strawberry isolate Acetobacter malorum (CECT 7749) also produced D-gluconic acid; however, it further oxidized D-gluconic acid to keto-D-gluconates.

  2. Isolation and characterisation of lactic acid bacteria from donkey milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto Del Rio, Maria de Los Dolores; Andrighetto, Christian; Dalmasso, Alessandra; Lombardi, Angiolella; Civera, Tiziana; Bottero, Maria Teresa

    2016-08-01

    During the last years the interest in donkey milk has increased significantly mainly because of its compelling functional elements. Even if the composition and nutritional properties of donkey milk are known, its microbiota is less studied. This Research Communication aimed to provide a comprehensive characterisation of the lactic acid bacteria in raw donkey milk. RAPD-PCR assay combined with 16S rDNA sequencing analysis were used to describe the microbial diversity of several donkey farms in the North West part of Italy. The more frequently detected species were: Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactococcus lactis and Carnobacterium maltaromaticum. Less abundant genera were Leuconostoc, Enterococcus and Streptococcus. The yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus was also isolated. The bacterial and biotype distribution notably diverged among the farms. Several of the found species, not previously detected in donkey milk, could have an important probiotic activity and biotechnological potential. This study represents an important insight to the ample diversity of the microorganisms present in the highly selective ecosystem of raw donkey milk.

  3. Biogenic amine production by lactic acid bacteria isolated from cider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garai, G; Dueñas, M T; Irastorza, A; Moreno-Arribas, M V

    2007-11-01

    To study the occurrence of histidine, tyrosine and ornithine decarboxylase activity in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from natural ciders and to examine their potential to produce detrimental levels of biogenic amines. The presence of biogenic amines in a decarboxylase synthetic broth and in cider was determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Among the 54 LAB strains tested, six (five lactobacilli and one oenococci) were biogenic amine producers in both media. Histamine and tyramine were the amines formed by the LAB strains investigated. Lactobacillus diolivorans were the most intensive histamine producers. This species together with Lactobacillus collinoides and Oenococcus oeni also seemed to produce tyramine. No ability to form histamine, tyramine or putrescine by Pediococus parvulus was observed, although it is a known biogenic amine producer in wines and beers. This study demonstrated that LAB microbiota growing in ciders had the ability to produce biogenic amines, particularly histamine and tyramine, and suggests that this capability might be strain-dependent rather than being related to a particular bacterial species. Production of biogenic amines by food micro-organisms has continued to be the focus of intensive study because of their potential toxicity. The main goal was to identify the microbial species capable of producing these compounds in order to control their presence and metabolic activity in foods.

  4. Removal of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins by Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Vasama

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs are non-protein neurotoxins produced by saltwater dinoflagellates and freshwater cyanobacteria. The ability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains GG and LC-705 (in viable and non-viable forms to remove PSTs (saxitoxin (STX, neosaxitoxin (neoSTX, gonyautoxins 2 and 3 (GTX2/3, C-toxins 1 and 2 (C1/2 from neutral and acidic solution (pH 7.3 and 2 was examined using HPLC. Binding decreased in the order of STX ~ neoSTX > C2 > GTX3 > GTX2 > C1. Removal of STX and neoSTX (77%–97.2% was significantly greater than removal of GTX3 and C2 (33.3%–49.7%. There were no significant differences in toxin removal capacity between viable and non-viable forms of lactobacilli, which suggested that binding rather than metabolism is the mechanism of the removal of toxins. In general, binding was not affected by the presence of other organic molecules in solution. Importantly, this is the first study to demonstrate the ability of specific probiotic lactic bacteria to remove PSTs, particularly the most toxic PST-STX, from solution. Further, these results warrant thorough screening and assessment of safe and beneficial microbes for their usefulness in the seafood and water industries and their effectiveness in vivo.

  5. Use of inoculated lactic acid bacteria in fermenting sour cabbage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. PETÄJÄ

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Fermentation of sour vegetables has to date occurred through the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB naturally present in vegetables. The present article deals with preliminary studies on the effects of some LAB inocula (Lactobacillus alimentarius or Pediococcus pentosaceus on fermenting sour cabbage. The effect of LAB on yeast growth, a problem in sour vegetables, was also studied through the use of dual yeast and LAB inocula. The pH of cabbage juice decreased to levels under pH 4 during the first 10 days of fermentation, which is near the final values, pediococci decreasing the pH to the lowest values. The LAB count in inoculated cabbages increased by 0.5-2.0 log cfu (colony forming unit /g during the first 10 days of fermentation and thereafter decreased. Pediococci formed predominant part of microbial flora almost in all experimental batches. In cabbage challenged with yeasts, yeast counts rose only when the pH was < 3.5. Yeasts appeared almost regularly also in cabbages inoculated only with LAB. Pediococci fermented cabbage effectively decreasing the pH to lower levels than lactobacilli or natural LAB. However, too strong a decrease in pH may result in a decrease of LAB count which may subsequently lead to yeast growth. The yeast problem could not be solved with the LAB inocula used in our study.;

  6. Screening of oxalate degrading lactic acid bacteria of food origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Murru

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A screening for oxalate degrading abilities was initially carried on within Lactic Acid Bacteria cultures of different food origin. Seventy-nine strains were drop-inoculated onto MRS agar plates containing calcium oxalate. By comparing colonies diameters, 31 strains were used to inoculate, in parallel, MRS and MRS modified by sodium oxalate addition. Differences in the strains’ growth were assessed by colony forming unit counts. For two strains, the growth in oxalate enriched medium was significantly higher; while, for eleven strains an opposite behaviour was recorded. Two strains – probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus LbGG and Enterococcus faecalis 59 – were chosen. The first strain appeared to be able to metabolize oxalate more efficiently than the other tested cultures, while strain 59 appeared unable to gather advantage by oxalates and, indeed, appeared to be inhibited by the salt presence in the medium. Outcomes revealed that higher glucose concentrations may favour oxalates utilization. In MRS with oxalate, but without glucose, citrate was completely metabolized. Evaluation along time confirmed that the oxalate degradation is more significant in presence of glucose. Outcomes may represent a good start for the development of a safe and even probiotic culture able to lower the oxalates content of food.

  7. Optimization of β-galactosidase production from lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carević Milica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available β-galactosidase, commonly known as lactase, represents commercially important enzyme that is prevalently used for lactose hydrolysis in milk and whey. To the date, it has been isolated from various sources. In this study different strains of lactic acid bacteria were assessed for their β-galactosidase productivity, and Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 resulted with the highest production potential. Thereafter, optimal conditions for accomplishing high yields of β-galactosidase activity were determined. Maximal specific activity (1.01 IU mL-1 was accomplished after 2 days shake flask culture fermentation (150 rpm at 37ºC, with modified Man Rogosa Sharpe culture broth using lactose (2.5% as sole carbon source. Finally, in order to intensify release of intracellular β-galactosidase different mechanical and chemical methods were conducted. Nevertheless, vortexing with quartz sand (150 μm as abrasive was proven to be the most efficient method of cell disruption. The optimum temperature of obtained β-galactosidase was 45°C and the optimum range pH 6.5-7.5.

  8. Lactic acid bacteria in dried vegetables and spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säde, Elina; Lassila, Elisa; Björkroth, Johanna

    2016-02-01

    Spices and dried vegetable seasonings are potential sources of bacterial contamination for foods. However, little is known about lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in spices and dried vegetables, even though certain LAB may cause food spoilage. In this study, we enumerated LAB in 104 spices and dried vegetables products aimed for the food manufacturing industry. The products were obtained from a spice wholesaler operating in Finland, and were sampled during a one-year period. We picked isolates (n = 343) for species identification based on numerical analysis of their ribotyping patterns and comparing them with the corresponding patterns of LAB type strains. We found LAB at levels >2 log CFU/g in 68 (65%) of the samples, with the highest counts detected from dried onion products and garlic powder with counts ranging from 4.24 to 6.64 log CFU/g. The LAB identified were predominantly Weissella spp. (61%) and Pediococcus spp. (15%) with Weissella confusa, Weissella cibaria, Weissella paramesenteroides, Pediococcus acidilactici and Pediococcus pentosaceus being the species identified. Other species identified belonged to the genera of Enterococcus spp. (8%), Leuconostoc spp. (6%) and Lactobacillus spp. (2%). Among the LAB identified, Leuconostoc citreum, Leuconostoc mesenteroides and W. confusa have been associated with food spoilage. Our findings suggest that spices and dried vegetables are potential sources of LAB contamination in the food industry.

  9. A gene network engineering platform for lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Wentao; Kapuganti, Venkata S; Lu, Ting

    2016-02-29

    Recent developments in synthetic biology have positioned lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as a major class of cellular chassis for applications. To achieve the full potential of LAB, one fundamental prerequisite is the capacity for rapid engineering of complex gene networks, such as natural biosynthetic pathways and multicomponent synthetic circuits, into which cellular functions are encoded. Here, we present a synthetic biology platform for rapid construction and optimization of large-scale gene networks in LAB. The platform involves a copy-controlled shuttle for hosting target networks and two associated strategies that enable efficient genetic editing and phenotypic validation. By using a nisin biosynthesis pathway and its variants as examples, we demonstrated multiplex, continuous editing of small DNA parts, such as ribosome-binding sites, as well as efficient manipulation of large building blocks such as genes and operons. To showcase the platform, we applied it to expand the phenotypic diversity of the nisin pathway by quickly generating a library of 63 pathway variants. We further demonstrated its utility by altering the regulatory topology of the nisin pathway for constitutive bacteriocin biosynthesis. This work demonstrates the feasibility of rapid and advanced engineering of gene networks in LAB, fostering their applications in biomedicine and other areas.

  10. Bioconversion of oleuropein to hydroxytyrosol by lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M M; Piccirillo, C; Castro, P M L; Kalogerakis, N; Pintado, M E

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this work is to study the conversion of oleuropein-a polyphenol present in olives and olive oil by-products-into hydroxytyrosol, a polyphenol with antioxidant and antibacterial properties. The hydrolysis reaction is performed by lactic acid bacteria. Six bacterial strains (Lactobacillus plantarum 6907, Lactobacillus paracasei 9192, Lactobacillus casei, Bifidobacterium lactis BO, Enterococcus faecium 32, Lactobacillus LAFTI 10) were tested under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The oleuropein degradation and hydroxytyrosol formation were monitored by HPLC. Results showed that oleuropein could be successfully converted into hydroxytyrosol. The most effective strain was Lactobacillus plantarum 6907, with a reaction yield of hydroxytyrosol of about 30 %. Different reaction mechanisms were observed for different microorganisms; a different yield was observed for Lactobacillus paracasei 9192 under aerobic or anaerobic conditions and an intermediate metabolite (oleuropein aglycone) was detected for Lactobacillus paracasei 9192 and Lactobacillus plantarum 6907 only. This study could have significant applications, as this reaction can be used to increase the value of olive oil by-products and/or to improve the taste of unripe olives.

  11. Engineering strategies aimed at control of acidification rate of lactic acid bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Solem, Christian; Holm, Anders Koefoed

    2013-01-01

    The ability of lactic acid bacteria to produce lactic acid from various sugars plays an important role in food fermentations. Lactic acid is derived from pyruvate, the end product of glycolysis and thus a fast lactic acid production rate requires a high glycolytic flux. In addition to lactic acid......, alternative end products - ethanol, acetic acid and formic acid - are formed by many species. The central role of glycolysis in lactic acid bacteria has provoked numerous studies aiming at identifying potential bottleneck(s) since knowledge about flux control could be important not only for optimizing food...... fermentation processes, but also for novel applications of lactic acid bacteria, such as cell factories for the production of green fuels and chemicals. With respect to the control and regulation of the fermentation mode, some progress has been made, but the question of which component(s) control the main...

  12. Examination of Lactic Acid Bacteria to Secretion of Bacteriocins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Urazova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB have the potential to cover a very broad field of applications, including the food industry and the medical sector. In the food industry, bacteriocinogenic LAB strains can be used as starter cultures, co-cultures, and bioprotective cultures, which would be used to improve food quality and safety. In the medical sector, bacteriocins of probiotic LAB might play a role in interactions, which take place in human gastrointestinal tract, and contribute to gut health. The aim of this study was the examine the effect of LAB antimicrobial activity. Methods: LAB were isolated from different commercial and home made products, such as kazy and sour cream. To screen for bacteriocin producing LAB, we used an agar diffusion bioassay, described in a previous study by Dr. Yang, with three modifications in cell-free supernatant (CFS. First we had a clear supernatant, second we adjusted the CFS to pH 6.0 to eliminate acids antimicrobial effects, and third the CFS pH 6.0 was treated with catalase to exclude the action of H2O2 and confirm action of bacteriocin-like substances. Pathogenic S.marcescens, E. coli, S.aureus cultures were used as indicators. Results: Screening of 95 strains of LAB through deferred antagonism to six indicator cultures showed that all of the selected strains had a high value of antibacterial activity. However, CFS of only 50 strains retained their antimicrobial activity, and 10 of them lost this activity in the second modification of CFS with pH 6.0 to test culture S.marcescens, which confirmed the acidic nature of antimicrobial activity of CFS. Lb.rhamnosus (P-1, Lb.fermentum (N-6, and Lc.lactis (7M lost antibacterial activity in the presence of the catalase. All modifications of CFS of three strains: Lb.pentosus (16al, Lb.pentosus (P-2, and Pediococcusacidilactici (8 retained inhibitory activity to E.coli and S. aureus. Supernatants of only Lactococcusgarvieae (10a and

  13. Production of γ-Amino Butyric Acid in Tea Leaves wit Treatment of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yuko; Hayakawa, Kiyoshi; Ueno, Hiroshi

    Lactic acid bacteria was searched for producing termented tea that contained a lot of γ-amino butyric acid(GABA). Also examined were the growth condition, GABA production and changes in catechin contents in the tea leaves. Lactobacillus brevis L12 was found to be suitable for the production of fermented tea since it gave as much GABA as gabaron tea when tea leaves being suspended with water at 10% and incubated for 4 days at 25°C. The amount of GABA produced was more than calculated based upon the content of glutamic acid in tea leaves. It is probable to assume that glutamate derived from glutamine and theanine is converted into GABA.

  14. Occurrence of Arginine Deiminase Pathway Enzymes in Arginine Catabolism by Wine Lactic Acid Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Liu., S; Pritchard, G. G.; Hardman, M. J.; Pilone, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    l-Arginine, an amino acid found in significant quantities in grape juice and wine, is known to be catabolized by some wine lactic acid bacteria. The correlation between the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes and the ability to catabolize arginine was examined in this study. The activities of the three arginine deiminase pathway enzymes, arginine deiminase, ornithine transcarbamylase, and carbamate kinase, were measured in cell extracts of 35 strains of wine lactic acid bacteria....

  15. Who will win the race in childrens' oral cavities? Streptococcus mutans or beneficial lactic acid bacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güngör, Ö E; Kırzıoğlu, Z; Dinçer, E; Kıvanç, M

    2013-09-01

    Adhesion to oral soft and hard tissue is crucial for bacterial colonisation in the mouth. The aim of this work was to select strains of oral lactic acid bacteria that could be used as probiotics for oral health. To this end, the adhesive properties of some lactic acid bacteria were investigated. Seventeen lactic acid bacteria including two Streptococcus mutans strains were isolated from the oral cavity of healthy children, while other strains were isolated from fermented meat products. The bacterial strains were applied to teeth surfaces covered with saliva or without saliva. A significant diversity in adhesion capacity to teeth surfaces among the lactic acid bacteria was observed. Lactic acid bacteria isolated from the oral cavity adhered the best to teeth surfaces covered with saliva, whereas lactic acid bacteria isolated from fermented meat samples adhered the best to tooth surface without saliva. All strains of lactic acid bacteria were able to reduce the number of S. mutans cells, in particular on saliva-coated tooth surface. Therefore, they might have potential as probiotics for the oral cavity.

  16. Resistance to antibiotics in Lacid acid bacteria - strain Lactococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipić Brankica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are widely used in the food industry, especially in the production of fermented dairy products and meat. The most studied species among Lis Lactococcus lactis. L. lactis strains are of great importance in the production of fermented dairy products such as yogurt, butter, fresh cheese and some kind of semi-hard cheese. Although L. lactis acquired the „Generally Regarded As Safe“ (GRAS status, many investigations indicated that lactococci may act as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes, which could be transferred to other bacterial species in human gastrointestinal tract includ­ing pathogens. The genome analysis of L. lactis indicated the presence of at least 40 putative drug transporter genes, and only four multidrug resistance (MDR transporters are functionally characterized: LmrA, LmrP, LmrCD i CmbT. LmrA is the first described MDR transporter in prokaryotes. LmrCD is responsible for resistance to cholate, which is an integral part of human bile and LmrCD is important for intestinal survival of lactococci that are used as probiotics. Secondary multidrug transporter LmrP confers resistance to lincosamides, macrolides, streptogramins and tetracyclines. CmbT protein has an effect on the host cell resistance to lincomycin, sulfadiazine, streptomycin, rifampicin, puromycin and sulfametox­azole. Since the food chain is an important way of transmitting resistance genes in human and animal population, it is of great importance to study the mechanisms of resistance in lactococci and other LAB, intended for the food industry. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173019: Izučavanje gena i molekularnih mehanizama u osnovi probiotičke aktivnosti bakterija mlečne kiseline izolovanih sa područja Zapadnog Balkana

  17. Selection of Lactic Acid Bacteria as Probiotic Candidate for Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hamida

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB regarded as safe microorganisms; they can naturally live in gastrointestinal tract, so appropriately used as a probiotic for chicken. This study aimed to select six isolates of LAB (E1223, E3, E4, E5, E7, and E8 to obtain the isolates potentially as probiotic candidate for chicken. The six isolates were derived from spontaneous fermented corn obtained from Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology and Biomedical, PPSHB, Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia. LAB isolates were tested their susceptibility to antibiotics (bambermycin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline then were examined in vitro for their tolerance to gastrointestinal pH (2, 3, 4, and 7.2 and 0.5% bile salt condition, antimicrobial activity against Salmonella enteritidis and Enterococcus casseliflavus, and ability to adhere to chicken ileal cells. The results showed the isolates E5, E7, and E8 were sensitive to tetracycline and chloramphenicol, they could survive at pH 2, 3, 4, and 7.2, could survive at 0.5% bile salts, produced antimicrobial activity, and able to adhere to ileal cells (9.40±0.00 Log CFU/cm2 of E8 and were significantly (P<0.05 higher than those of control (5.30±0.14 Log CFU/cm2. In conclusion, this study showed that isolate E8 had better potential compared to isolates E5 and E7 in most in vitro assays as a probiotic candidate for chicken. E5, E7, and E8 were closely related with Pediococcus pentosaceus based on 16S rRNA gene.

  18. Hypolipidemic effects of lactic acid bacteria fermented cereal in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banjoko Immaculata

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objectives of the present study were to investigate the efficacy of the mixed culture of Lactobacillus acidophilus (DSM 20242, Bifidobacterium bifidum (DSM 20082 and Lactobacillus helveticus (CK60 in the fermentation of maize and the evaluation of the effect of the fermented meal on the lipid profile of rats. Methods Rats were randomly assigned to 3 groups and each group placed on a Diet A (high fat diet into which a maize meal fermented with a mixed culture of Lb acidophilus (DSM 20242, B bifidum (DSM 20082 and Lb helveticus (CK 60 was incorporated, B (unfermented high fat diet or C (commercial rat chow respectively after the first group of 7 rats randomly selected were sacrificed to obtain the baseline data. Thereafter 7 rats each from the experimental and control groups were sacrificed weekly for 4 weeks and the plasma, erythrocytes, lipoproteins and organs of the rats were assessed for cholesterol, triglyceride and phospholipids. Results Our results revealed that the mixed culture of Lb acidophilus (DSM 20242, B bifidum (DSM 20082 and Lb helveticus (CK 60 were able to grow and ferment maize meal into ‘ogi’ of acceptable flavour. In addition to plasma and hepatic hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia, phospholipidosis in plasma, as well as cholesterogenesis, triglyceride constipation and phospholipidosis in extra-hepatic tissues characterized the consumption of unfermented hyperlipidemic diets. However, feeding the animals with the fermented maize diet reversed the dyslipidemia. Conclusion The findings of this study indicate that consumption of mixed culture lactic acid bacteria (Lb acidophilus (DSM 20242, Bifidobacterium bifidum (DSM 20082 and Lb helveticus (CK 60 fermented food results in the inhibition of fat absorption. It also inhibits the activity of HMG CoA reductase. This inhibition may be by feedback inhibition or repression of the transcription of the gene encoding the enzyme via activation of the

  19. Bacteriocin and cellulose production by lactic acid bacteria isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-11-19

    Nov 19, 2007 ... bacteria isolated from West African soft cheese. Adetunji ... bacteriocin by agar well diffusion method using the supernatant of centrifuged test cultures. Four ... which are recalcitrant to traditional food preservation method ...

  20. Cd(II) Sorption on Montmorillonite-Humic acid-Bacteria Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Huihui; Chen, Wenli; Cai, Peng; Rong, Xingmin; Dai, Ke; Peacock, Caroline L; Huang, Qiaoyun

    2016-01-21

    Soil components (e.g., clays, bacteria and humic substances) are known to produce mineral-organic composites in natural systems. Herein, batch sorption isotherms, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and Cd K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy were applied to investigate the binding characteristics of Cd on montmorillonite(Mont)-humic acid(HA)-bacteria composites. Additive sorption and non-additive Cd(II) sorption behaviour is observed for the binary Mont-bacteria and ternary Mont-HA-bacteria composite, respectively. Specifically, in the ternary composite, the coexistence of HA and bacteria inhibits Cd adsorption, suggesting a "blocking effect" between humic acid and bacterial cells. Large positive entropies (68.1~114.4 J/mol/K), and linear combination fitting of the EXAFS spectra for Cd adsorbed onto Mont-bacteria and Mont-HA-bacteria composites, demonstrate that Cd is mostly bound to bacterial surface functional groups by forming inner-sphere complexes. All our results together support the assertion that there is a degree of site masking in the ternary clay mineral-humic acid-bacteria composite. Because of this, in the ternary composite, Cd preferentially binds to the higher affinity components-i.e., the bacteria.

  1. From physiology to systems metabolic engineering for the production of biochemicals by lactic acid bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Paula; Carvalho, Ana L.; Vinga, Susana

    2013-01-01

    The lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are a functionally related group of low-GC Gram-positive bacteria known essentially for their roles in bioprocessing of foods and animal feeds. Due to extensive industrial use and enormous economical value, LAB have been intensively studied and a large body of compr...

  2. Lactic acid bacteria differ in their ability to induce functional regulatory T cells in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roock, S. de; Elk, M. van; Dijk, M.E. van; Timmerman, H.M.; Rijkers, G.T.; Prakken, B.J.; Hoekstra, M.O.; Kleer, I.M. de

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Trials with probiotic lactic acid bacteria have yielded different results, which may be due to the strains used. Lactobacilli and bifidobacteria are known to be potent modulators of the immune system. The capacity of these bacteria used as probiotics to influence both T helper type 1

  3. Phylogenomic reconstruction of lactic acid bacteria: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are important in the food industry for the production of fermented food products and in human health as commensals in the gut. However, the phylogenetic relationships among LAB species remain under intensive debate owing to disagreements among different data sets. Results We performed a phylogenetic analysis of LAB species based on 232 genes from 28 LAB genome sequences. Regardless of the tree-building methods used, combined analyses yielded an identical, well-resolved tree topology with strong supports for all nodes. The LAB species examined were divided into two groups. Group 1 included families Enterococcaceae and Streptococcaceae. Group 2 included families Lactobacillaceae and Leuconostocaceae. Within Group 2, the LAB species were divided into two clades. One clade comprised of the acidophilus complex of genus Lactobacillus and two other species, Lb. sakei and Lb. casei. In the acidophilus complex, Lb. delbrueckii separated first, while Lb. acidophilus/Lb. helveticus and Lb. gasseri/Lb. johnsonii were clustered into a sister group. The other clade within Group 2 consisted of the salivarius subgroup, including five species, Lb. salivarius, Lb. plantarum, Lb. brevis, Lb. reuteri, Lb. fermentum, and the genera Pediococcus, Oenococcus, and Leuconostoc. In this clade, Lb. salivarius was positioned most basally, followed by two clusters, one corresponding to Lb. plantarum/Lb. brevis pair and Pediococcus, and the other including Oenococcus/Leuconostoc pair and Lb. reuteri/Lb. fermentum pair. In addition, phylogenetic utility of the 232 genes was analyzed to identify those that may be more useful than others. The genes identified as useful were related to translation and ribosomal structure and biogenesis (TRSB, and a three-gene set comprising genes encoding ultra-violet resistance protein B (uvrB, DNA polymerase III (polC and penicillin binding protein 2B (pbpB. Conclusions Our phylogenomic analyses

  4. Oral Administration of Lipopolysaccharide of Acetic Acid Bacteria Protects Pollen Allergy in a Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Satoko; Inagawa, Hiroyuki; Nakata, Yoko; Ohmori, Masaki; Kohchi, Chie; Soma, Gen-Ichiro

    2015-08-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major component of the cell wall of Gram-negative bacteria, is known to possess strong immune-regulatory activity. We have found and reported the existence of biologically-active LPS in acetic acid bacteria. The LPS shows Limulus-positive activity and activation of macrophages to produce nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor. In this study, we investigated the anti-allergic effect of an orally-administrated acetic acid bacteria extract containing LPS; the cedar pollinosis model was used. Acetic acid bacteria were isolated from various fruits by Nodai kaihen medium. Then, the anti-allergic effect of acetic acid bacteria extracts was investigated. BALB/c mice were immunized with a mixture of cedar pollen and alum into their peritoneal cavity; they also received additional immunizations of pollen to nasal cavity. After immunizing the mice with pollen into their nasal cavity to trigger an allergic reaction, the frequency of nose scratching was counted for 5 min. The bacteria were cultured and prepared and the water-extract contained about 1-10 mg/ml of Limulus positive substances. The extract of acetic acid bacteria induced higher levels of interleukin (IL)-10 and FOXP3 mRNA expression in macrophages (RAW246.7 cell), as assessed by DNA microarray analysis. Oral administration of the acetic acid bacteria extract demonstrated significantly less scratching numbers than control water group with pollen immunization. These results showed that LPS in acetic acid bacteria has the potential to protect from an allergic reaction, especially from cedar pollinosis. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular Characterization of Intrinsic and Acquired antibiotic resistance in lactic Acid bacteria and Bifidobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammor, M.S.; Flórez, A.B.; Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Reyes-Gavilan, de los C.G.; Aarts, H.J.M.; Margolles, A.; Mayo, B.

    2008-01-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 6 different antibiotics (chloramphenicol, clindamycin, erythromycin, streptomycin, tetracycline and vancomycin) were determined for 143 strains of lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria using the Etest. Different MICs were found for different species

  6. Bacillus spp. produce antibacterial activities against lactic acid bacteria that contaminate fuel ethanol plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) frequently contaminate commercial fuel ethanol fermentations, reducing yields and decreasing profitability of biofuel production. Microorganisms from environmental sources in different geographic regions of Thailand were tested for antibacterial activity against LAB. Fou...

  7. Structure-function relationships of glucansucrase and fructansucrase enzymes from lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijum, S.A.F.T. van; Kralj, S.; Ozimek, L.K.; Dijkhuizen, L.; Geel-Schutten, G.H. van

    2006-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) employ sucrase-type enzymes to convert sucrose into homopolysaccharides consisting of either glucosyl units (glucans) or fructosyl units (fructans). The enzymes involved are labeled glucansucrases (GS) and fructansucrases (FS), respectively. The available molecular, bioche

  8. Molecular Characterization of Intrinsic and Acquired antibiotic resistance in lactic Acid bacteria and Bifidobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammor, M.S.; Flórez, A.B.; Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Reyes-Gavilan, de los C.G.; Aarts, H.J.M.; Margolles, A.; Mayo, B.

    2008-01-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 6 different antibiotics (chloramphenicol, clindamycin, erythromycin, streptomycin, tetracycline and vancomycin) were determined for 143 strains of lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria using the Etest. Different MICs were found for different species

  9. Broad-spectrum antifungal-producing lactic acid bacteria and their application in fruit models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crowley, Sarah; Mahony, Jennifer; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2013-01-01

    A large-scale screen of some 7,000 presumptive lactic acid bacteria (LAB), isolated from animal, human, or plant origin, identified 1,149 isolates with inhibitory activity against the food-spoilage mould Penicillium expansum...

  10. Screening, selection and characterization of phytic acid degrading lactic acid bacteria from chicken intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavendra, Ponnala; Halami, Prakash M

    2009-07-31

    This study was undertaken to screen and select potent phytate degrading lactic acid bacteria and to evaluate their additional characteristic features. Forty lactic acid bacterial strains were isolated from different sources and screened for their ability to degrade myo-inositol hexaphosphate or IP(6) by cobalt chloride staining (plate assay) method, using calcium or sodium salt of phytic acid as substrate. All the forty isolates were able to degrade calcium phytate. However, only two Pediococcus pentosaceus strains (CFR R38 and CFR R35) were found to degrade sodium phytate. These strains showed phytase activity of 213 and 89 U at 50 degrees C, respectively and poor acid phosphatase activity. These strains were further evaluated for additional characteristic features. At pH 2, P. pentosaceus strains CFR R38 and CFR R35 showed 50.7 and 48.5 percentage survivability after 2 h of incubation respectively and they could also withstand 0.3% ox-bile. These cultures exhibited 54.6 and 44.8% of hydrophobicity to xylene, antibacterial activity against food borne pathogens and possessed beta-galactosidase activity. The resistance pattern to several antibiotics was also analyzed. The present study indicates that these strains, having phytate degrading ability and other characteristic features can be exploited as starter cultures in fermented foods to improve the mineral bioavailability.

  11. Inhibitory effect of bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria against histamine-forming bacteria isolated from Myeolchi-jeot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Seo Lim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objectives of this study were to identify the histamine-forming bacteria and bacteriocin- producing lactic acid bacteria (LAB isolated from Myeolchi-jeot according to sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene, to evaluate the inhibitory effects of the bacteriocin on the growth and histamine accumulation of histamine-forming bacteria, and to assess the physico-chemical properties of the bacteriocin. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, histamine-forming bacteria were identified as Bacillus licheniformis MCH01, Serratia marcescens MCH02, Staphylococcus xylosus MCH03, Aeromonas hydrophila MCH04, and Morganella morganii MCH05. The five LAB strains identified as Pediococcus acidilactici MCL11, Leuconostoc mesenteroides MCL12, Enterococcus faecium MCL13, Lactobacillus sakei MCL14, and Lactobacillus acidophilus MCL15 were found to produce an antibacterial compound with inhibitory activity against the tested histamine-producing bacteria. The inhibitory activity of these bacteriocins obtained from the five LAB remained stable after incubation at pH 4.0–8.0 and heating for 10 min at 80 °C; however, the bacteriocin activity was destroyed after treatment with papain, pepsin, proteinase K, α-chymotrypsin, or trypsin. Meanwhile, these bacteriocins produced by the tested LAB strains also exhibited histamine-degradation ability. Therefore, these antimicrobial substances may play a role in inhibiting histamine formation in the fermented fish products and preventing seafood-related food-borne disease caused by bacterially generated histamine.

  12. ISOLATION OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIA UNDER LOW TEMPERATURE FOR THE PREPARATION OF YOGURT

    OpenAIRE

    Javid Ahmad Bhat; Mohd Irfan Naik; R.K. Tenguria

    2014-01-01

    An investigation of isolation of Lactic acid bacteria was carried out under low temperature for the preparation of Yogurt by using various food supplements like carrot, ground-nut and tomato juices. Methods: Various samples of Cow milk, Skimmed milk were processed along with nutrients like Carrot, ground nut and tomato juices with Tryptone glucose yeast extract agar (TGYA) at different temperatures like 50C, 150C and 220C for the isolation of Lactic acid bacteria for the preparation of yogurt...

  13. ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF LACTIC ACID PRODUCING BACTERIA FROM CAMEL MILK

    OpenAIRE

    Toqeer Ahmad, Rashida Kanwal, Izhar Hussain Athar1, Najam Ayub

    2002-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from camel milk by culturing the camel milk on specific media and pure culture was obtained by sub culturing. Purification of culture was confirmed by Gram's staining and identified by different bio-chemical tests. Camel milk contains lactic acid producing bacteria including Strpptococci such as S. cremoris and S. lactis and Lactobacilli such as L. acidophilus L. acidophilus grows more rapidly in camel milk than others as its growth is supported by cam...

  14. Characterization of the spoilage lactic acid bacteria in "sliced vacuum-packed cooked ham".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalschne, Daneysa Lahis; Womer, Rute; Mattana, Ademir; Sarmento, Cleonice Mendes Pereira; Colla, Luciane Maria; Colla, Eliane

    2015-03-01

    The lactic acid bacteria are involved with food fermentation and in such cases with food spoilage. Considering the need to reduce the lactic acid bacteria growth in meat products, the aim of this work was to enumerated and investigated the lactic acid bacteria present on sliced vacuum-packed cooked ham stored at 4 °C and 8 °C for 45 days by phenotypic and molecular techniques. The quantification showed that the lactic acid bacteria were present from the first day with mean count of 1.98 log cfu/g for the four batches analyzed. The lactic acid bacteria grew rapidly on the samples, and plate counts around 7.59 log cfu/g and 8.25 log cfu/g were detected after 45 days of storage at 4 °C and 8 °C, respectively; storage temperatures studied showed significant influence on the microorganism in study growth. The predominant lactic acid bacteria associated with the spoilage samples at one day of storage includes Lactobacillus sp., the phenotypic overlap Leuconostoc / Weissella sp. and Enterococcus sp. At 45 days of storage at 4 and 8 °C the mainly specie was Lactobacillus curvatus , following by Lactobacillus sakei and Leuconostoc mesentereoides ; the Enterococcus sp. was not present in the samples.

  15. Characterization of the spoilage lactic acid bacteria in “sliced vacuum-packed cooked ham”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daneysa Lahis Kalschne

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The lactic acid bacteria are involved with food fermentation and in such cases with food spoilage. Considering the need to reduce the lactic acid bacteria growth in meat products, the aim of this work was to enumerated and investigated the lactic acid bacteria present on sliced vacuum-packed cooked ham stored at 4 °C and 8 °C for 45 days by phenotypic and molecular techniques. The quantification showed that the lactic acid bacteria were present from the first day with mean count of 1.98 log cfu/g for the four batches analyzed. The lactic acid bacteria grew rapidly on the samples, and plate counts around 7.59 log cfu/g and 8.25 log cfu/g were detected after 45 days of storage at 4 °C and 8 °C, respectively; storage temperatures studied showed significant influence on the microorganism in study growth. The predominant lactic acid bacteria associated with the spoilage samples at one day of storage includes Lactobacillus sp., the phenotypic overlap Leuconostoc/Weissella sp. and Enterococcus sp. At 45 days of storage at 4 and 8 °C the mainly specie was Lactobacillus curvatus, following by Lactobacillus sakei and Leuconostoc mesentereoides; the Enterococcus sp. was not present in the samples.

  16. Isolation, characterization and optimization of indigenous acetic acid bacteria and evaluation of their preservation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Beheshti-Maal

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Acetic acid bacteria (AAB are useful in industrial production of vinegar. The present study aims at isolation and identification of acetic acid bacteria with characterization, optimization, and evaluation of their acetic acid productivity."nMaterials and Methods: Samples from various fruits were screened for presence of acetic acid bacteria on glucose, yeast extract, calcium carbonate (GYC medium. Carr medium supplemented with bromocresol green was used for distinguishing Acetobacter from Gluconobacter. The isolates were cultured in basal medium to find the highest acetic acid producer. Biochemical tests followed by 16S rRNA and restriction analyses were employed for identification of the isolate and phylogenic tree was constructed. Bacterial growth and acid production conditions were optimized based on optimal inoculum size, pH, temperature, agitation, aeration and medium composition."nResults: Thirty-seven acetic acid bacteria from acetobacter and gluconobacter members were isolated. Acetic acid productivity yielded 4 isolates that produced higher amounts of acid. The highest producer of acid (10.03% was selected for identification. The sequencing and restriction analyses of 16S rRNA revealed a divergent strain of Acetobacter pasteurianus (Gene bank accession number # GU059865. The optimum condition for acid production was a medium composed of 2% glucose, 2% yeast extract, 3% ethanol and 3% acid acetic at inoculum size of 4% at 3L/Min aeration level in the production medium. The isolate was best preserved in GYC medium at 12oC for more than a month. Longer preservation was possible at -70oC."nConclusion: The results are suggestive of isolation of an indigenous acetic acid bacteria. Pilot plan is suggested to study applicability of the isolated strain in acetic acid production.

  17. Isolation, characterization and optimization of indigenous acetic acid bacteria and evaluation of their preservation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafi, Sm; Rasooli, I; Beheshti-Maal, K

    2010-03-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are useful in industrial production of vinegar. The present study aims at isolation and identification of acetic acid bacteria with characterization, optimization, and evaluation of their acetic acid productivity. Samples from various fruits were screened for presence of acetic acid bacteria on glucose, yeast extract, calcium carbonate (GYC) medium. Carr medium supplemented with bromocresol green was used for distinguishing Acetobacter from Gluconobacter. The isolates were cultured in basal medium to find the highest acetic acid producer. Biochemical tests followed by 16S rRNA and restriction analyses were employed for identification of the isolate and phylogenic tree was constructed. Bacterial growth and acid production conditions were optimized based on optimal inoculum size, pH, temperature, agitation, aeration and medium composition. Thirty-seven acetic acid bacteria from acetobacter and gluconobacter members were isolated. Acetic acid productivity yielded 4 isolates that produced higher amounts of acid. The highest producer of acid (10.03%) was selected for identification. The sequencing and restriction analyses of 16S rRNA revealed a divergent strain of Acetobacter pasteurianus (Gene bank accession number#GU059865). The optimum condition for acid production was a medium composed of 2% glucose, 2% yeast extract, 3% ethanol and 3% acid acetic at inoculum size of 4% at 3L/Min aeration level in the production medium. The isolate was best preserved in GYC medium at 12°C for more than a month. Longer preservation was possible at -70°C. The results are suggestive of isolation of an indigenous acetic acid bacteria. Pilot plan is suggested to study applicability of the isolated strain in acetic acid production.

  18. Antimicrobial properties of lactic acid bacteria isolated from uruguayan artisan cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Fraga Cotelo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Uruguayan artisan cheese is elaborated with raw milk and non-commercial starters. The associated native microbiota may include lactic acid bacteria and also potentially pathogenic bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from artisan cheese, raw milk, and non-commercial starter cultures, and their potential bacteriocin production was assessed. A culture collection of 509 isolates was obtained, and five isolates were bacteriocin-producers and were identified as Enterococcus durans,Lactobacillus casei, and Lactococcus lactis. No evidence of potential virulence factors were found in E. durans strains. These are promising results in terms of using these native strains for cheese manufacture and to obtain safe products.

  19. Probiotic lactic acid bacteria – the fledgling cuckoos of the gut?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Berstad

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available It is tempting to look at bacteria from our human egocentric point of view and label them as either ‘good’ or ‘bad’. However, a microbial society has its own system of government – ‘microcracy’ – and its own rules of play. Lactic acid bacteria are often referred to as representatives of the good ones, and there is little doubt that those belonging to the normal intestinal flora are beneficial for human health. But we should stop thinking of lactic acid bacteria as always being ‘friendly’ – they may instead behave like fledgling cuckoos.

  20. Acetic acid bacteria in traditional balsamic vinegar: phenotypic traits relevant for starter cultures selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullo, Maria; Giudici, Paolo

    2008-06-30

    This review focuses on acetic acid bacteria in traditional balsamic vinegar process. Although several studies are available on acetic acid bacteria ecology, metabolism and nutritional requirements, their activity as well as their technological traits in homemade vinegars as traditional balsamic vinegar is not well known. The basic technology to oxidise cooked grape must to produce traditional balsamic vinegar is performed by the so called "seed-vinegar" that is a microbiologically undefined starter culture obtained from spontaneous acetification of previous raw material. Selected starter cultures are the main technological improvement in order to innovate traditional balsamic vinegar production but until now they are rarely applied. To develop acetic acid bacteria starter cultures, selection criteria have to take in account composition of raw material, acetic acid bacteria metabolic activities, applied technology and desired characteristics of the final product. For traditional balsamic vinegar, significative phenotypical traits of acetic acid bacteria have been highlighted. Basic traits are: ethanol preferred and efficient oxidation, fast rate of acetic acid production, tolerance to high concentration of acetic acid, no overoxidation and low pH resistance. Specific traits are tolerance to high sugar concentration and to a wide temperature range. Gluconacetobacter europaeus and Acetobacter malorum strains can be evaluated to develop selected starter cultures since they show one or more suitable characters.

  1. Metabolic Induction of Lactic Acid Bacteria for Urea Removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Su-ai; BAI Yu; LI Dong-xia; CHEN Bo-li; SONG Cun-jiang; QIAO Ming-qiang; KONG De-ling; YU Yao-ting

    2009-01-01

    Objective:This study aims to induce nonpathogenic bacteria for urea removal as a potential treatment in renal failure. Methods:Lactococus lactis MG1363 was induced by repeated exposure to urea-rich culture media, the ability to remove urea from the media was evaluated. The effect of gastroenteric environment, such as low pH, bile salt and antiagonistic properties were investigated.The antimicrobial activities on pathogenic E.coli and S.aureus in the intestinal tract and the antibiotic tolerance of the induced bacteria were also studied.Results: Induced bacteria of 50 generations could decrease the urea level from 40.01 mg/dL to 32.99 mg/dL after 24 h. The bacteria could grow after treatment at pH3.0 for 2 h and in 0.1% bile salt for 6 h, and the urea removal activity was retained in such simulated gastroenteric environment. The removal of urea was significantly enhanced to 35.8% by addition of Ni2+ to the culture medium at neutral pH. It was also found that the induced bacteria could inhibit the growth of E.coli and S.aureus, and tolerate ampicillin,gentamicin,roxithromycin,tetracycline and cefradine. The safety tests were performed by feeding normal rats with either Lactococus lactis MG1363 or induced Lactococus lactis MG1363. The two materials did not cause any changes in blood cells, blood biochemical indexes and body weight. Conclusion: These results suggest that the induced Lactococus lactis MG1363 has the potential as an oral therapy for the removal of urea in patients with renal failure.

  2. Capacity of lactic acid bacteria in immunity enhancement and cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz Rajoka, Muhammad Shahid; Shi, Junling; Zhu, Jing; Shao, Dongyan; Huang, Qingsheng; Yang, Hui; Jin, Mingliang

    2017-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are associated with the human gastrointestinal tract. They are important for maintaining the balance of microflora in the human gut. An increasing number of published research reports in recent years have denoted the importance of producing interferon-gamma and IgA for treatment of disease. These agents can enhance the specific and nonspecific immune systems that are dependent on specific bacterial strains. The mechanisms of these effects were revealed in this investigation, where the cell walls of these bacteria were modulated by the cytokine pathways, while the whole bacterial cell mediated the host cell immune system and regulated the production of tumor necrosis factors and interleukins. A supplement of highly active lactic acid bacteria strains provided significant potential to enhance host's immunity, offering prevention from many diseases including some cancers. This review summarizes the current understanding of the function of lactic acid bacteria immunity enhancement and cancer prevention.

  3. Applications for biotechnology: present and future improvements in lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, L L; Baldwin, K A

    1990-09-01

    The lactic acid bacteria are involved in the manufacture of fermented foods from raw agricultural materials such as milk, meat, vegetables, and cereals. These fermented foods are a significant part of the food processing industry and are often prepared using selected strains that have the ability to produce desired products or changes efficiently. The application of genetic engineering technology to improve existing strains or develop novel strains for these fermentations is an active research area world-wide. As knowledge about the genetics and physiology of lactic acid bacteria accumulates, it becomes possible to genetically construct strains with characteristics shaped for specific purposes. Examples of present and future applications of biotechnology to lactic acid bacteria to improve product quality are described. Studies of the basic biology of these bacteria are being actively conducted and must be continued, in order for the food fermentation industry to reap the benefits of biotechnology.

  4. Antibacterial Activity of Some Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from an Algerian Dairy Product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelkader Mezaini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the antibacterial effect of 20 lactic acid bacteria isolates from a traditional cheese was investigated. 6 isolates showed antibacterial effect against Gram positive bacteria. Streptococcus thermophilus T2 strain showed the wide inhibitory spectrum against the Gram positive bacteria. Growth and bacteriocin production profiles showed that the maximal bacteriocin production, by S. thermophilus T2 cells, was measured by the end of the late-log phase (90 AU ml−1 with a bacteriocine production rate of 9.3 (AU ml−1 h−1. In addition, our findings showed that the bacteriocin, produced by S. thermophilus T2, was stable over a wide pH range (4–8; this indicates that such bacteriocin may be useful in acidic as well as nonacidic food. This preliminarily work shows the potential application of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria to improve safety of traditional fermented food.

  5. Isolation of lactic acid bacteria with potential protective culture characteristics from fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Nurul Huda; Sani, Norrakiah Abdullah

    2015-09-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are also known as beneficial microorganisms abundantly found in fermented food products. In this study, lactic acid bacteria were isolated from fresh cut fruits obtained from local markets. Throughout the isolation process from 11 samples of fruits, 225 presumptive lactic acid bacteria were isolated on MRS agar medium. After catalase and oxidase tests, 149 resulted to fit the characteristics of lactic acid bacteria. Further identification using Gram staining was conducted to identify the Gram positive bacteria. After this confirmation, the fermentation characteristics of these isolates were identified. It was found that 87 (58.4%) isolates were heterofermentative, while the rest of 62 (41.6%) are homofermentative lactic acid bacteria. Later, all these isolates were investigated for the ability to inhibit growth of Staphylococcus aureus using agar spot assay method. Seven (4.7%) isolates showed strong antagonistic capacity, while 127 (85.2%) and 8 (5.4%) isolates have medium and weak antagonistic capacity, respectively. The other 7 (4.7%) isolates indicated to have no antagonistic effect on S. aureus. Results support the potential of LAB isolated in this study which showed strong antagonistic activity against S. aureus may be manipulated to become protective cultures in food products. While the homofermentative or heterofermentative LAB can be utilized in fermentation of food and non-food products depending on the by-products required during the fermentation.

  6. Biodiversity of yeasts, lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria in the fermentation of "Shanxi aged vinegar", a traditional Chinese vinegar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jia Jia; Ma, Ying Kun; Zhang, Fen Fen; Chen, Fu Sheng

    2012-05-01

    Shanxi aged vinegar is a famous traditional Chinese vinegar made from several kinds of cereal by spontaneous solid-state fermentation techniques. In order to get a comprehensive understanding of culturable microorganism's diversity present in its fermentation, the indigenous microorganisms including 47 yeast isolates, 28 lactic acid bacteria isolates and 58 acetic acid bacteria isolates were recovered in different fermenting time and characterized based on a combination of phenotypic and genotypic approaches including inter-delta/PCR, PCR-RFLP, ERIC/PCR analysis, as well as 16S rRNA and 26S rRNA partial gene sequencing. In the alcoholic fermentation, the dominant yeast species Saccharomyces (S.) cerevisiae (96%) exhibited low phenotypic and genotypic diversity among the isolates, while Lactobacillus (Lb.) fermentum together with Lb. plantarum, Lb. buchneri, Lb. casei, Pediococcus (P.) acidilactici, P. pentosaceus and Weissella confusa were predominated in the bacterial population at the same stage. Acetobacter (A.) pasteurianus showing great variety both in genotypic and phenotypic tests was the dominant species (76%) in the acetic acid fermentation stage, while the other acetic acid bacteria species including A. senegalensis, A. indonesiensis, A. malorum and A. orientalis, as well as Gluconobacter (G.) oxydans were detected at initial point of alcoholic and acetic acid fermentation stage respectively.

  7. Lactic acid bacteria in the quality improvement and depreciation of wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonvaud-Funel, A

    1999-01-01

    The winemaking process includes two main steps: lactic acid bacteria are responsible for the malolactic fermentation which follows the alcoholic fermentation by yeasts. Both types of microorganisms are present on grapes and on cellar equipment. Yeasts are better adapted to growth in grape must than lactic acid bacteria, so the alcoholic fermentation starts quickly. In must, up to ten lactic acid bacteria species can be identified. They belong to the Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Leuconostoc and Oenococcus genera. Throughout alcoholic fermentation, a natural selection occurs and finally the dominant species is O. oeni, due to interactions between yeasts and bacteria and between bacteria themselves. After bacterial growth, when the population is over 10(6) CFU/ml, malolactic transformation is the obvious change in wine composition. However, many other substrates can be metabolized. Some like remaining sugars and citric acid are always assimilated by lactic acid bacteria, thus providing them with energy and carbon. Other substrates such as some amino acids may be used following pathways restricted to strains carrying the adequate enzymes. Some strains can also produce exopolysaccharides. All these transformations greatly influence the sensory and hygienic quality of wine. Malic acid transformation is encouraged because it induces deacidification. Diacetyl produced from citric acid is also helpful to some extent. Sensory analyses show that many other reactions change the aromas and make malolactic fermentation beneficial, but they are as yet unknown. On the contrary, an excess of acetic acid, the synthesis of glucane, biogenic amines and precursors of ethylcarbamate are undesirable. Fortunately, lactic acid bacteria normally multiply in dry wines; moreover some of these activities are not widespread. Moreover, the most striking trait of wine lactic acid bacteria is their capacity to adapt to a hostile environment. The mechanisms for this are not yet completely elucidated

  8. Preservation of acidified cucumbers with a natural preservative combination of fumaric acid and allyl isothiocyanate that target lactic acid bacteria and yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Without the addition of preservative compounds cucumbers acidified with 150 mM acetic acid with pH adjusted to 3.5 typically undergo fermentation by lactic acid bacteria. Fumaric acid (20 mM) inhibited growth of Lactobacillus plantarum and the lactic acid bacteria present on fresh cucumbers, but sp...

  9. Lactic acid bacteria as a cell factory for riboflavin production

    OpenAIRE

    Thakur, Kiran; Tomar, Sudhir Kumar; De, Sachinandan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Consumers are increasingly becoming aware of their health and nutritional requirements, and in this context, vitamins produced in situ by microbes may suit their needs and expectations. B groups vitamins are essential components of cellular metabolism and among them riboflavin is one of the vital vitamins required by bacteria, plants, animals and humans. Here, we focus on the importance of microbial production of riboflavin over chemical synthesis. In addition, genetic abilities for r...

  10. Metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria for the production of nutraceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugenholtz, J.; Sybesma, W.; Groot, M.N.; Wisselink, W.; Ladero, V.; Burgess, K.; Sinderen, van D.; Piard, J.C.; Eggink, G.; Smid, E.J.; Savoy, G.; Sesma, F.; Jansen, T.; Hols, P.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2002-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria display a relatively simple and well-described metabolism where the sugar source is converted mainly to lactic acid. Here we will shortly describe metabolic engineering strategies on the level of sugar metabolism, that lead to either the efficient re-routing of the lactococcal

  11. Extraction, isolation and purification of exopolysaccharide from lactic acid bacteria using ethanol precipitation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek K. Bajpai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria are classified ‘Generally Recognized As Safe’ (GRAS with most effective potential to divert significant amount of fermentable sugars towards the biosynthesis of functional exopolysaccharide. Exopolysaccharides from lactic acid bacteria are receiving a renewed interest due to the claims of human health benefits, such as modulation of immune response system and more importantly in food and pharma industries as a texturizer, viscosifer, emulsifier and syneresis-lowering agent. Its purification methodology involves: a Extraction of cell-free supernatant from lactic acid bacteria; b Denature of protein using trichloroacetic acid; c Ethanol precipitation; d Dialysis; and e Freeze drying. However, depending on nature of research, compounds can be further purified using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, infrared spectrum (IR; and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectral analyses.

  12. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia; Ohue, Ryuji; Nomura, Wataru; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Yu, Rina; Kitamura, Nahoko; Park, Si-Bum; Kishino, Shigenobu; Ogawa, Jun; Kawada, Teruo

    2015-04-17

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Kinetic analysis of strains of lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria in cocoa pulp simulation media toward development of a starter culture for cocoa bean fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefeber, Timothy; Janssens, Maarten; Camu, Nicholas; De Vuyst, Luc

    2010-12-01

    The composition of cocoa pulp simulation media (PSM) was optimized with species-specific strains of lactic acid bacteria (PSM-LAB) and acetic acid bacteria (PSM-AAB). Also, laboratory fermentations were carried out in PSM to investigate growth and metabolite production of strains of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum and of Acetobacter pasteurianus isolated from Ghanaian cocoa bean heap fermentations, in view of the development of a defined starter culture. In a first step, a selection of strains was made out of a pool of strains of these LAB and AAB species, obtained from previous studies, based on their fermentation kinetics in PSM. Also, various concentrations of citric acid in the presence of glucose and/or fructose (PSM-LAB) and of lactic acid in the presence of ethanol (PSM-AAB) were tested. These data could explain the competitiveness of particular cocoa-specific strains, namely, L. plantarum 80 (homolactic and acid tolerant), L. fermentum 222 (heterolactic, citric acid fermenting, mannitol producing, and less acid tolerant), and A. pasteurianus 386B (ethanol and lactic acid oxidizing, acetic acid overoxidizing, acid tolerant, and moderately heat tolerant), during the natural cocoa bean fermentation process. For instance, it turned out that the capacity to use citric acid, which was exhibited by L. fermentum 222, is of the utmost importance. Also, the formation of mannitol was dependent not only on the LAB strain but also on environmental conditions. A mixture of L. plantarum 80, L. fermentum 222, and A. pasteurianus 386B can now be considered a mixed-strain starter culture for better controlled and more reliable cocoa bean fermentation processes.

  14. Dynamics and biodiversity of populations of lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria involved in spontaneous heap fermentation of cocoa beans in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camu, Nicholas; De Winter, Tom; Verbrugghe, Kristof; Cleenwerck, Ilse; Vandamme, Peter; Takrama, Jemmy S; Vancanneyt, Marc; De Vuyst, Luc

    2007-03-01

    The Ghanaian cocoa bean heap fermentation process was studied through a multiphasic approach, encompassing both microbiological and metabolite target analyses. A culture-dependent (plating and incubation, followed by repetitive-sequence-based PCR analyses of picked-up colonies) and culture-independent (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis [DGGE] of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, PCR-DGGE) approach revealed a limited biodiversity and targeted population dynamics of both lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and acetic acid bacteria (AAB) during fermentation. Four main clusters were identified among the LAB isolated: Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus fermentum, Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, and Enterococcus casseliflavus. Other taxa encompassed, for instance, Weissella. Only four clusters were found among the AAB identified: Acetobacter pasteurianus, Acetobacter syzygii-like bacteria, and two small clusters of Acetobacter tropicalis-like bacteria. Particular strains of L. plantarum, L. fermentum, and A. pasteurianus, originating from the environment, were well adapted to the environmental conditions prevailing during Ghanaian cocoa bean heap fermentation and apparently played a significant role in the cocoa bean fermentation process. Yeasts produced ethanol from sugars, and LAB produced lactic acid, acetic acid, ethanol, and mannitol from sugars and/or citrate. Whereas L. plantarum strains were abundant in the beginning of the fermentation, L. fermentum strains converted fructose into mannitol upon prolonged fermentation. A. pasteurianus grew on ethanol, mannitol, and lactate and converted ethanol into acetic acid. A newly proposed Weissella sp., referred to as "Weissella ghanaensis," was detected through PCR-DGGE analysis in some of the fermentations and was only occasionally picked up through culture-based isolation. Two new species of Acetobacter were found as well, namely, the species tentatively named "Acetobacter senegalensis" (A. tropicalis-like) and "Acetobacter

  15. Mixed cultures of Kimchi lactic acid bacteria show increased cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ufuoma

    kimchi lactobacilli on batch fermentation increased the cell density and lactic acid production with low nutrients .... first series of fermentations were carried out using pure cultures of each ... Each number represents the mean. ± SD of three ...

  16. Repetitive sequence based polymerase chain reaction to differentiate close bacteria strains in acidic sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Ming; YIN Hua-qun; LIU Yi; LIU Jie; LIU Xue-duan

    2008-01-01

    To study the diversity of bacteria strains newly isolated from several acid mine drainage(AMD) sites in China,repetitive sequence based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR),a well established technology for diversity analysis of closely related bacteria strains,was conducted on 30 strains of bacteria Leptospirillum ferriphilium,8 strains of bacteria Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans,as well as the Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans type strain ATCC (American Type Culture Collection) 23270.The results showed that,using ERIC and BOX primer sets,rep-PCR produced highly discriminatory banding patterns.Phylogenetic analysis based on ERIC-PCR banding types was made and the results indicated that rep-PCR could be used as a rapid and highly discriminatory screening technique in studying bacterial diversity,especially in differentiating bacteria within one species in AMD.

  17. Application of molecular techniques for identification and ennumeration of acetic acid bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    González Benito, Angel

    2005-01-01

    Application of molecular techniques for identification and enumeration of acetic acid bacteria:Los principales objetivos de la tesis son el desarrollo de técnicas de biología molecular rápidas y fiables para caracterizar bacterias acéticas.Las bacterias acéticas son las principales responsables del picado de los vinos y de la producción de vinagre. Sin embargo, existe un desconocimiento importante sobre su comportamiento y evolución. Las técnicas de enumeración y de identificación basadas en ...

  18. Hydroxycinnamic acids used as external acceptors of electrons: an energetic advantage for strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filannino, Pasquale; Gobbetti, Marco; De Angelis, Maria; Di Cagno, Raffaella

    2014-12-01

    The metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids by strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria (19 strains) was investigated as a potential alternative energy route. Lactobacillus curvatus PE5 was the most tolerant to hydroxycinnamic acids, followed by strains of Weissella spp., Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides, for which the MIC values were the same. The highest sensitivity was found for Lactobacillus rossiae strains. During growth in MRS broth, lactic acid bacteria reduced caffeic, p-coumaric, and ferulic acids into dihydrocaffeic, phloretic, and dihydroferulic acids, respectively, or decarboxylated hydroxycinnamic acids into the corresponding vinyl derivatives and then reduced the latter compounds to ethyl compounds. Reductase activities mainly emerged, and the activities of selected strains were further investigated in chemically defined basal medium (CDM) under anaerobic conditions. The end products of carbon metabolism were quantified, as were the levels of intracellular ATP and the NAD(+)/NADH ratio. Electron and carbon balances and theoretical ATP/glucose yields were also estimated. When CDM was supplemented with hydroxycinnamic acids, the synthesis of ethanol decreased and the concentration of acetic acid increased. The levels of these metabolites reflected on the alcohol dehydrogenase and acetate kinase activities. Overall, some biochemical traits distinguished the common metabolism of strictly heterofermentative strains: main reductase activity toward hydroxycinnamic acids, a shift from alcohol dehydrogenase to acetate kinase activities, an increase in the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, and the accumulation of supplementary intracellular ATP. Taken together, the above-described metabolic responses suggest that strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria mainly use hydroxycinnamic acids as external acceptors of electrons.

  19. Isolation, characterization and evaluation of probiotic lactic acid bacteria for potential use in animal production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hernández, Yaneisy; Pérez-Sánchez, Tania; Boucourt, Ramón; Balcázar, José L; Nicoli, Jacques R; Moreira-Silva, João; Rodríguez, Zoraya; Fuertes, Héctor; Nuñez, Odalys; Albelo, Nereyda; Halaihel, Nabil

    2016-10-01

    In livestock production, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are the most common microorganisms used as probiotics. For such use, these bacteria must be correctly identified and characterized to ensure their safety and efficiency. In the present study, LAB were isolated from broiler excreta, where a fermentation process was used. Nine among sixteen isolates were identified by biochemical and molecular (sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene) methods as Lactobacillus crispatus (n=1), Lactobacillus pentosus (n=1), Weissella cibaria (n=1), Pediococcus pentosaceus (n=2) and Enterococcus hirae (n=4). Subsequently, these bacteria were characterized for their growth capabilities, lactic acid production, acidic pH and bile salts tolerance, cell surface hydrophobicity, antimicrobial susceptibility and antagonistic activity. Lactobacillus pentosus strain LB-31, which showed the best characteristics, was selected for further analysis. This strain was administered to broilers and showed the ability of modulating the immune response and producing beneficial effects on morpho-physiological, productive and health indicators of the animals.

  20. THE SEARCH AND PROPERTIES OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIA PERSPECTIVE FOR BIOTECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naumenko О. V.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Search of biologically active Lactobacillus strains prospective for functional milk food production was the aim of the research. The study involved the lactic acid bacteria isolated from biological material of healthy humen and non- dairy lactic products. Using modern methodological approaches, the strains of lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus casei 302, Lactobacillus acidophilus 35 and Streptococcus thermophilus 21 having high level of biological activity were selected. High biological potential of selected cultures of lactic acid bacteria, which could provide stability for the technological process of production and essential characteristics of bacterial preparations and fermented their products, was set. In vitro the experiments demonstrated that selected strains had valuable production properties, namely the ability to reduce level of cholesterol and lactose during development in milk, were resistant to virulent bacteriophages and aggressive compounds of the gastrointestinal tract, and high adhesive and antagonistic activities as well.

  1. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of lactic acid bacteria isolated from raw goat milk and effect of farming practices on the dominant species of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormo, Hélène; Ali Haimoud Lekhal, Djamila; Roques, C

    2015-10-01

    Lactic acid bacteria, in particular Lactococcus lactis, play a decisive role in the cheese making process and more particularly in lactic cheeses which are primarily produced on goat dairy farms. The objective of this study was therefore to identify the main lactic acid bacteria found in raw goats' milk from three different regions in France and evaluate if certain farming practices have an effect on the distribution of species of lactic acid bacteria in the various milk samples. Identification at genus or species level was carried out using phenotypic tests and genotypic methods including repetitive element REP-PCR, species-specific PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The distribution of the main bacterial species in the milk samples varied depending on farms and their characteristics. Out of the 146 strains identified, L. lactis was the dominant species (60% of strains), followed by Enterococcus (38%) of which Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium. Within the species L. lactis, L. lactis subsp lactis was detected more frequently than L. lactis subsp cremoris (74% vs. 26%). The predominance of L. lactis subsp cremoris was linked to geographical area studied. It appears that the animals' environment plays a role in the balance between the dominance of L. lactis and enterococci in raw goats' milk. The separation between the milking parlor and the goat shed (vs no separation) and only straw in the bedding (vs straw and hay) seems to promote L. lactis in the milk (vs enterococci).

  2. Siderophore and organic acid production in root nodule bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, K C; Holliday, S; Glenn, A R; Dilworth, M J

    1992-01-01

    Nineteen strains of root nodule bacteria were grown under various iron regimes (0.1, 1.0 and 20 microM added iron) and tested for catechol and hydroxamate siderophore production and the excretion of malate and citrate. The growth response of the strains to iron differed markedly. For 12 strains (Bradyrhizobium strains NC92B and 32H1, B. japonicum USDA110 and CB1809, B. lupini WU8, cowpea Rhizobium NGR234, Rhizobium meliloti strains U45 and CC169, Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viciae WU235 and Rhizobium leguminosarum bv trifolii strains TA1, T1 and WU95) the mean generation time showed no variation with the 200-fold increase in iron concentration. In contrast, in Bradyrhizobium strains NC921, CB756 and TAL1000, B. japonicum strain 61A76 and R. leguminosarum bv viciae MNF300 there was a 2-5 fold decrease in growth rate at low iron. R. meliloti strains WSM419 and WSM540 showed decreased growth at high iron. All strains of root nodule bacteria tested gave a positive CAS (chrome azurol S) assay for siderophore production. No catechol-type siderophores were found in any strain, and only R. leguminosarum bv trifolii T1 and bv viciae WU235 produced hydroxamate under low iron (0.1 and 1.0 microM added iron). Malate was excreted by all strains grown under all iron regimes. Citrate was excreted by B. japonicum USDA110 and B. lupini WU8 in all iron concentrations, while Bradyrhizobium TAL1000, R. leguminosarum bv viciae MNF300 and B. japonicum 61A76 only produced citrate under low iron (0.1 and/or 1.0 microM added iron) during the stationary phase of growth.

  3. Molecular identification and physiological characterization of yeasts, lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria isolated from heap and box cocoa bean fermentations in West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visintin, Simonetta; Alessandria, Valentina; Valente, Antonio; Dolci, Paola; Cocolin, Luca

    2016-01-04

    Yeast, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and acetic acid bacteria (AAB) populations, isolated from cocoa bean heap and box fermentations in West Africa, have been investigated. The fermentation dynamicswere determined by viable counts, and 106 yeasts, 105 LAB and 82 AAB isolateswere identified by means of rep-PCR grouping and sequencing of the rRNA genes. During the box fermentations, the most abundant species were Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida ethanolica, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus plantarum, Acetobacter pasteurianus and Acetobacter syzygii, while S. cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia manshurica, C. ethanolica, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Lb. fermentum, Lb. plantarum, A. pasteurianus and Acetobacter lovaniensis were identified in the heap fermentations. Furthermore, the most abundant species were molecularly characterized by analyzing the rep-PCR profiles. Strains grouped according to the type of fermentations and their progression during the transformation process were also highlighted. The yeast, LAB and AAB isolates were physiologically characterized to determine their ability to grow at different temperatures, as well as at different pH, and ethanol concentrations, tolerance to osmotic stress, and lactic acid and acetic acid inhibition. Temperatures of 45 °C, a pH of 2.5 to 3.5, 12% (v/v) ethanol and high concentrations of lactic and acetic acid have a significant influence on the growth of yeasts, LAB and AAB. Finally, the yeastswere screened for enzymatic activity, and the S. cerevisiae, H. guilliermondii, H. uvarumand C. ethanolica species were shown to possess several enzymes that may impact the quality of the final product.

  4. Spontaneous organic cocoa bean box fermentations in Brazil are characterized by a restricted species diversity of lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalexandratou, Zoi; Vrancken, Gino; De Bruyne, Katrien; Vandamme, Peter; De Vuyst, Luc

    2011-10-01

    Spontaneous organic cocoa bean box fermentations were carried out on two different farms in Brazil. Physical parameters, microbial growth, bacterial species diversity [mainly lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and acetic acid bacteria (AAB)], and metabolite kinetics were monitored, and chocolates were produced from the fermented dry cocoa beans. The main end-products of the catabolism of the pulp substrates (glucose, fructose, and citric acid) by yeasts, LAB, and AAB were ethanol, lactic acid, mannitol, and/or acetic acid. Lactobacillus fermentum and Acetobacter pasteurianus were the predominating bacterial species of the fermentations as revealed through (GTG)(5)-PCR fingerprinting of isolates and PCR-DGGE of 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicons of DNA directly extracted from fermentation samples. Fructobacillus pseudoficulneus, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Acetobacter senegalensis were among the prevailing species during the initial phase of the fermentations. Also, three novel LAB species were found. This study emphasized the possible participation of Enterobacteriaceae in the cocoa bean fermentation process. Tatumella ptyseos and Tatumella citrea were the prevailing enterobacterial species in the beginning of the fermentations as revealed by 16S rRNA gene-PCR-DGGE. Finally, it turned out that control over a restricted bacterial species diversity during fermentation through an ideal post-harvest handling of the cocoa beans will allow the production of high-quality cocoa and chocolates produced thereof, independent of the fermentation method or farm. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Inactivation of Gram-Positive Bacteria by Novel Phenolic Branched-Chain Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xuetong; Wagner, Karen; Sokorai, Kimberly J B; Ngo, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Novel phenolic branched-chain fatty acids (PBC-FAs) were evaluated for their antimicrobial properties against both gram-positive ( Listeria innocua , Bacillus subtilis , Enterococcus faecium ) and gram-negative ( Escherichia coli , Salmonella Typhimurium, and Pseudomonas tolaasii ) bacteria. In addition, PBC-FA derivatives, such as PBC-FA methyl ester mixture, methyl-branched fatty acid mixtures, and trimethylsilyl-PBC-FA methyl esters, were synthesized to study the structure activity relationship. Results showed that PBC-FAs were a potent antimicrobial against gram-positive bacteria with MICs of 1.8 to 3.6 μg/ml. The compounds were less effective against gram-negative bacteria. Derivatives of PBC-FAs and an equimolar mixture of oleic acid and phenol all had MICs above 233 μg/ml against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Comparison of antimicrobial activities of the PBC-FAs with those of the derivatives suggests that the carboxylic group in the fatty acid moiety and the hydroxyl group on the phenol moiety were responsible for the antimicrobial efficacy. Growth curves of L. innocua revealed that PBC-FAs prevented bacterial growth, while MBC-FAs only delayed the onset of rapid growth of L. innocua . Our results demonstrated that the novel PBC-FAs have potential for use as antimicrobials against gram-positive bacteria.

  6. [Comparative genomics and evolutionary analysis of CRISPR loci in acetic acid bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Xia; Xinle, Liang; Yudong, Li

    2015-12-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) is a widespread adaptive immunity system that exists in most archaea and many bacteria against foreign DNA, such as phages, viruses and plasmids. In general, CRISPR system consists of direct repeat, leader, spacer and CRISPR-associated sequences. Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) play an important role in industrial fermentation of vinegar and bioelectrochemistry. To investigate the polymorphism and evolution pattern of CRISPR loci in acetic acid bacteria, bioinformatic analyses were performed on 48 species from three main genera (Acetobacter, Gluconacetobacter and Gluconobacter) with whole genome sequences available from the NCBI database. The results showed that the CRISPR system existed in 32 species of the 48 strains studied. Most of the CRISPR-Cas system in AAB belonged to type I CRISPR-Cas system (subtype E and C), but type II CRISPR-Cas system which contain cas9 gene was only found in the genus Acetobacter and Gluconacetobacter. The repeat sequences of some CRISPR were highly conserved among species from different genera, and the leader sequences of some CRISPR possessed conservative motif, which was associated with regulated promoters. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis of cas1 demonstrated that they were suitable for classification of species. The conservation of cas1 genes was associated with that of repeat sequences among different strains, suggesting they were subjected to similar functional constraints. Moreover, the number of spacer was positively correlated with the number of prophages and insertion sequences, indicating the acetic acid bacteria were continually invaded by new foreign DNA. The comparative analysis of CRISR loci in acetic acid bacteria provided the basis for investigating the molecular mechanism of different acetic acid tolerance and genome stability in acetic acid bacteria.

  7. Modulation of folate production in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegkamp, H.B.A.

    2008-01-01

    Food fortification has proven to be very useful in reducing health problems associated with mal-intake of essential nutrients, such as the B-vitamin folate. Folate is used as one-carbon donor/acceptor in several biochemical processes like synthesis of DNA, RNA and some amino acids. Sufficient intake

  8. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: tgoto@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Research Unit for Physiological Chemistry, The Center for the Promotion of Interdisciplinary Education and Research, Kyoto University (Japan); Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Takahashi, Nobuyuki [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Research Unit for Physiological Chemistry, The Center for the Promotion of Interdisciplinary Education and Research, Kyoto University (Japan); Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Ohue, Ryuji [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Research Unit for Physiological Chemistry, The Center for the Promotion of Interdisciplinary Education and Research, Kyoto University (Japan); Nomura, Wataru [Laboratory of Molecular Function of Food, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011 (Japan); Sugawara, Tatsuya [Laboratory of Marine Bioproducts Technology, Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yu, Rina [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kitamura, Nahoko [Laboratory of Fermentation Physiology and Applied Microbiology, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); and others

    2015-04-17

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism. - Highlights: • Most LA-derived fatty acids from gut lactic acid bacteria potently activated PPARα. • Among tested fatty acids, KetoA and KetoC significantly activated PPARγ. • KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ. • KetoA enhanced adiponectin production and glucose uptake during adipogenesis.

  9. Ecophysiology of Fe-cycling bacteria in acidic sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shipeng; Gischkat, Stefan; Reiche, Marco; Akob, Denise M; Hallberg, Kevin B; Küsel, Kirsten

    2010-12-01

    Using a combination of cultivation-dependent and -independent methods, this study aimed to elucidate the diversity of microorganisms involved in iron cycling and to resolve their in situ functional links in sediments of an acidic lignite mine lake. Using six different media with pH values ranging from 2.5 to 4.3, 117 isolates were obtained that grouped into 38 different strains, including 27 putative new species with respect to the closest characterized strains. Among the isolated strains, 22 strains were able to oxidize Fe(II), 34 were able to reduce Fe(III) in schwertmannite, the dominant iron oxide in this lake, and 21 could do both. All isolates falling into the Gammaproteobacteria (an unknown Dyella-like genus and Acidithiobacillus-related strains) were obtained from the top acidic sediment zones (pH 2.8). Firmicutes strains (related to Bacillus and Alicyclobacillus) were only isolated from deep, moderately acidic sediment zones (pH 4 to 5). Of the Alphaproteobacteria, Acidocella-related strains were only isolated from acidic zones, whereas Acidiphilium-related strains were isolated from all sediment depths. Bacterial clone libraries generally supported and complemented these patterns. Geobacter-related clone sequences were only obtained from deep sediment zones, and Geobacter-specific quantitative PCR yielded 8 × 10(5) gene copy numbers. Isolates related to the Acidobacterium, Acidocella, and Alicyclobacillus genera and to the unknown Dyella-like genus showed a broad pH tolerance, ranging from 2.5 to 5.0, and preferred schwertmannite to goethite for Fe(III) reduction. This study highlighted the variety of acidophilic microorganisms that are responsible for iron cycling in acidic environments, extending the results of recent laboratory-based studies that showed this trait to be widespread among acidophiles.

  10. Plasmids from Food Lactic Acid Bacteria: Diversity, Similarity, and New Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhua Cui

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasmids are widely distributed in different sources of lactic acid bacteria (LAB as self-replicating extrachromosomal genetic materials, and have received considerable attention due to their close relationship with many important functions as well as some industrially relevant characteristics of the LAB species. They are interesting with regard to the development of food-grade cloning vectors. This review summarizes new developments in the area of lactic acid bacteria plasmids and aims to provide up to date information that can be used in related future research.

  11. Acetic Acid Bacteria and the Production and Quality of Wine Vinegar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Mas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of vinegar depends on an oxidation process that is mainly performed by acetic acid bacteria. Despite the different methods of vinegar production (more or less designated as either “fast” or “traditional”, the use of pure starter cultures remains far from being a reality. Uncontrolled mixed cultures are normally used, but this review proposes the use of controlled mixed cultures. The acetic acid bacteria species determine the quality of vinegar, although the final quality is a combined result of technological process, wood contact, and aging. This discussion centers on wine vinegar and evaluates the effects of these different processes on its chemical and sensory properties.

  12. Acetic acid bacteria and the production and quality of wine vinegar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Albert; Torija, María Jesús; García-Parrilla, María del Carmen; Troncoso, Ana María

    2014-01-01

    The production of vinegar depends on an oxidation process that is mainly performed by acetic acid bacteria. Despite the different methods of vinegar production (more or less designated as either "fast" or "traditional"), the use of pure starter cultures remains far from being a reality. Uncontrolled mixed cultures are normally used, but this review proposes the use of controlled mixed cultures. The acetic acid bacteria species determine the quality of vinegar, although the final quality is a combined result of technological process, wood contact, and aging. This discussion centers on wine vinegar and evaluates the effects of these different processes on its chemical and sensory properties.

  13. Putrescine production from different amino acid precursors by lactic acid bacteria from wine and cider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Antonella; Pietroniro, Roberta; Doria, Francesca; Pessione, Enrica; Garcia-Moruno, Emilia

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the production of biogenic amines and particularly putrescine in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) related to wine and cider. We applied an analytical protocol that involves the use of PCR and TLC techniques to determine the production of putrescine from different precursors. Moreover, we also studied the ability of the Lactobacillus and Pediococcus tested to produce histamine and tyramine. The results showed that the majority of the Lactobacillus brevis analyzed harbour both AgDI and tdc genes and are tyramine and putrescine producers. Conversely, among the other LAB tested, only one Lactobacillus hilgardii and one Pediococcus pentosaceus produced putrescine. The AgDI gene was also detected in two other LAB (Lactobacillus mali and Pediococcus parvulus), but no putrescine production was observed. Finally, hdc gene and histamine production were found in strains (L. hilgardii 5211, isolated from wine, and Lactobacillus casei 18, isolated from cider) that were not putrescine producers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Microbial Quality and Direct PCR Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria and Nonpathogenic Staphylococci from Artisanal Low-Acid Sausages

    OpenAIRE

    Aymerich, T.; B. Martín; Garriga, M.; Hugas, M

    2005-01-01

    Detection of six species of lactic acid bacteria and six species of gram-positive catalase-positive cocci from low-acid fermented sausages (fuets and chorizos) was assessed by species-specific PCR. Without enrichment, Lactobacillus sakei and Lactobacillus curvatus were detected in 11.8% of the samples, and Lactobacillus plantarum and Staphylococcus xylosus were detected in 17.6%. Enriched samples allowed the detection of L. sakei and S. xylosus in all of the samples (100%) and of Enterococcus...

  15. Growth-inhibition of hiochi bacteria in namazake (raw sake) by bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Ishiyama, Yohei; Takata, Takeomi; Nakanishi, Toshihiro; Kaneoke, Mitsuoki; Watanabe, Ken-ichi; Yanagida, Fujitoshi; Chen, Yi-sheng; Kouya, Tomoaki; Tanaka, Takaaki

    2010-06-01

    The bacteriocins produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C101910 (C101910) and NBRC 12007 (NBRC 12007) were used to prevent the growth of sake spoiling hiochi bacteria (Lactobacillus hilgardii, Lactobacillus fructivorans, and Lactobacillus paracasei) in namazake, which is raw (unpasteurized) sake. The bacteriocin concentrations required for decreasing the viable cell concentrations of L. hilgardii and L. fructivorans below the detection limit (1.0 x 10(2) cells/ml) in 24 h from the initial concentration of 4.0-9.5 x 10(5) cells/ml in the namazake at pH 4.5 and at 4 degrees C, were 18-35 U/ml and 5.6 U/ml for the bacteriocin from C101910 and NBRC 12007, respectively. To decrease the viable cell concentration of L. paracasei from the initial concentration of 7.5 x 10(5) cells/ml to below the detection limit (1.0 x 10(2) cells/ml) in 24 h, 350 U/ml bacteriocin from C101910 and 140 U/ml bacteriocin from NBRC 12007 were required. In experiments using McIlvaine buffer (pH 4.5) with 15% ethanol instead of namazake as the medium, the viable cell concentrations of L. hilgardii and L. paracasei decreased to less than 1.0 x 10(2) cells/ml, whereas those of L. fructivorans decreased to less than 1.0 x 10(3) cells/ml, when bacteriocins were added at the concentrations that had proven effective in namazake. The membrane depolarization assay using a fluorescent probe showed that the presence of ethanol stimulated the collapse of the membrane potential induced by bacteriocins. The ethanol induced collapse of the membrane potential suggests that the application of bacteriocins at the storage stage of namazake is more beneficial than when used in other stages of the sake brewing process.

  16. Lactic Acid Bateria - Friend or Foe? Lactic Acid Bacteria in the Production of Polysaccharides and Fuel Ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been widely used in the production of fermented foods and as probiotics. Alternan is a glucan with a distinctive backbone structure of alternating alpha-(1,6) and alpha-(1,3) linkages produced by the LAB Leuconostoc mesenteroides. In recent years, improved strains f...

  17. Local domestication of lactic acid bacteria via cassava beer fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colehour, Alese M; Meadow, James F; Liebert, Melissa A; Cepon-Robins, Tara J; Gildner, Theresa E; Urlacher, Samuel S; Bohannan, Brendan J M; Snodgrass, J Josh; Sugiyama, Lawrence S

    2014-01-01

    Cassava beer, or chicha, is typically consumed daily by the indigenous Shuar people of the Ecuadorian Amazon. This traditional beverage made from cassava tuber (Manihot esculenta) is thought to improve nutritional quality and flavor while extending shelf life in a tropical climate. Bacteria responsible for chicha fermentation could be a source of microbes for the human microbiome, but little is known regarding the microbiology of chicha. We investigated bacterial community composition of chicha batches using Illumina high-throughput sequencing. Fermented chicha samples were collected from seven Shuar households in two neighboring villages in the Morona-Santiago region of Ecuador, and the composition of the bacterial communities within each chicha sample was determined by sequencing a region of the 16S ribosomal gene. Members of the genus Lactobacillus dominated all samples. Significantly greater phylogenetic similarity was observed among chicha samples taken within a village than those from different villages. Community composition varied among chicha samples, even those separated by short geographic distances, suggesting that ecological and/or evolutionary processes, including human-mediated factors, may be responsible for creating locally distinct ferments. Our results add to evidence from other fermentation systems suggesting that traditional fermentation may be a form of domestication, providing endemic beneficial inocula for consumers, but additional research is needed to identify the mechanisms and extent of microbial dispersal.

  18. Local domestication of lactic acid bacteria via cassava beer fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alese M. Colehour

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cassava beer, or chicha, is typically consumed daily by the indigenous Shuar people of the Ecuadorian Amazon. This traditional beverage made from cassava tuber (Manihot esculenta is thought to improve nutritional quality and flavor while extending shelf life in a tropical climate. Bacteria responsible for chicha fermentation could be a source of microbes for the human microbiome, but little is known regarding the microbiology of chicha. We investigated bacterial community composition of chicha batches using Illumina high-throughput sequencing. Fermented chicha samples were collected from seven Shuar households in two neighboring villages in the Morona-Santiago region of Ecuador, and the composition of the bacterial communities within each chicha sample was determined by sequencing a region of the 16S ribosomal gene. Members of the genus Lactobacillus dominated all samples. Significantly greater phylogenetic similarity was observed among chicha samples taken within a village than those from different villages. Community composition varied among chicha samples, even those separated by short geographic distances, suggesting that ecological and/or evolutionary processes, including human-mediated factors, may be responsible for creating locally distinct ferments. Our results add to evidence from other fermentation systems suggesting that traditional fermentation may be a form of domestication, providing endemic beneficial inocula for consumers, but additional research is needed to identify the mechanisms and extent of microbial dispersal.

  19. Naturally fermented Jijelian black olives: microbiological characteristics and isolation of lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karam, Nour-Eddine

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A study of the microflora of traditionally fermented black olives in Eastern Algeria is presented. A count of the following microbial groups was carried out: mesophilic bacteria, enterobacteria, lactic acid bacteria (LAB, staphylococci and yeast. In a second phase, the identification and assessment of the technological traits of LAB was performed. Seventeen lactic acid bacteria were isolated and identified. These isolates were represented by two genera: Lactobacillus and Leuconostoc. The results showed that Lactobacillus plantarum was the predominant species in this traditional product.Un estudio sobre la microflora de aceitunas negras fermentada por métodos tradicionales en el Este de Argelia es presentado. Se realizo el siguiente recuento de grupos de microorganismos: bacterias mesófilas, enterobacterias, bacterias ácido lácticas (LAB, staphylococcus y levaduras. En una segunda fase, la identificación y evaluación de aspectos tecnológicos de LAB fue realizada. Setenta bacterias ácido lácticas fueron aisladas e identificadas. Estos aislados contenían principalmente dos géneros: Lactobacillus y Leuconostoc. Los resultados mostraron que Lactobacillus plantarum fue la especie predominante en este producto tradicional.

  20. Acid production in dental plaque after exposure to probiotic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller Mette K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing interest in probiotic lactobacilli in health maintenance has raised the question of potential risks. One possible side effect could be an increased acidogenicity in dental plaque. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of probiotic lactobacilli on plaque lactic acid (LA production in vitro and in vivo. Methods In the first part (A, suspensions of two lactobacilli strains (L. reuteri DSM 17938, L. plantarum 299v were added to suspensions of supragingival dental plaque collected from healthy young adults (n=25. LA production after fermentation with either xylitol or fructose was analyzed. In the second part (B, subjects (n=18 were given lozenges with probiotic lactobacilli (L. reuteri DSM 17938 and ATCC PTA 5289 or placebo for two weeks in a double-blinded, randomized cross-over trial. The concentration of LA in supragingival plaque samples was determined at baseline and after 2 weeks. Salivary counts of mutans streptococci (MS and lactobacilli were estimated with chair-side methods. Results Plaque suspensions with L. reuteri DSM 17938 produced significantly less LA compared with L. plantarum 299v or controls (p Conclusion Lactic acid production in suspensions of plaque and probiotic lactobacilli was strain-dependant and the present study provides no evidence of an increase in plaque acidity by the supply of selected probiotic lactobacilli when challenged by fructose or xylitol. The study protocol was approved by The Danish National Committee on Biomedical Research Ethics (protocol no H-2-2010-112. Trial registration NCT01700712

  1. Lactic acid bacteria in dairy food: surface characterization and interactions with food matrix components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgain, J; Scher, J; Francius, G; Borges, F; Corgneau, M; Revol-Junelles, A M; Cailliez-Grimal, C; Gaiani, C

    2014-11-01

    This review gives an overview of the importance of interactions occurring in dairy matrices between Lactic Acid Bacteria and milk components. Dairy products are important sources of biological active compounds of particular relevance to human health. These compounds include immunoglobulins, whey proteins and peptides, polar lipids, and lactic acid bacteria including probiotics. A better understanding of interactions between bioactive components and their delivery matrix may successfully improve their transport to their target site of action. Pioneering research on probiotic lactic acid bacteria has mainly focused on their host effects. However, very little is known about their interaction with dairy ingredients. Such knowledge could contribute to designing new and more efficient dairy food, and to better understand relationships between milk constituents. The purpose of this review is first to provide an overview of the current knowledge about the biomolecules produced on bacterial surface and the composition of the dairy matter. In order to understand how bacteria interact with dairy molecules, adhesion mechanisms are subsequently reviewed with a special focus on the environmental conditions affecting bacterial adhesion. Methods dedicated to investigate the bacterial surface and to decipher interactions between bacteria and abiotic dairy components are also detailed. Finally, relevant industrial implications of these interactions are presented and discussed.

  2. Production and transformation of dissolved neutral sugars and amino acids by bacteria in seawater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Linda; Lechtenfeld, O.J.; Benner, R.

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the ocean consists of a heterogeneous mixture of molecules, most of which are of unknown origin. Neutral sugars and amino acids are among the few recognizable biomolecules in DOM, and the molecular composition of these biomolecules is shaped primarily by biological...... production and degradation processes. This study provides insight into the bioavailability of biomolecules as well as the chemical composition of DOM produced by bacteria. The molecular compositions of combined neutral sugars and amino acids were investigated in DOM produced by bacteria and in DOM remaining...... degradation was characterized by a high galactose content (33 mol %), followed by glucose (22 mol %) and the remaining neutral sugars (7–11 mol %). The ratio of D-amino acids to L-amino acids increased during the experiments as a response to bacterial degradation, and after 32 days, the D/L ratios of aspartic...

  3. Mechanisms of acid tolerance in bacteria and prospects in biotechnology and bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuping; Tang, Hongzhi; Lin, Zhanglin; Xu, Ping

    2015-11-15

    Acidogenic and aciduric bacteria have developed several survival systems in various acidic environments to prevent cell damage due to acid stress such as that on the human gastric surface and in the fermentation medium used for industrial production of acidic products. Common mechanisms for acid resistance in bacteria are proton pumping by F1-F0-ATPase, the glutamate decarboxylase system, formation of a protective cloud of ammonia, high cytoplasmic urease activity, repair or protection of macromolecules, and biofilm formation. The field of synthetic biology has rapidly advanced and generated an ever-increasing assortment of genetic devices and biological modules for applications in biofuel and novel biomaterial productions. Better understanding of aspects such as overproduction of general shock proteins, molecular mechanisms, and responses to cell density adopted by microorganisms for survival in low pH conditions will prove useful in synthetic biology for potential industrial and environmental applications.

  4. Identification and Characteristics of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Sour Dough Sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, S; Ishikawa, M; Yoshida, I; Uchimura, T; Ohara, N; Kozaki, M

    1992-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria in four samples of sour dough sponges were studied quantitatively and qualitatively. In each sponge, there were one or two species of the genus Lactobacillus: L. reuteri and L. curvatus in San Francisco sour dough sponge, L. brevis and L. hilgardii in panettone sour dough sponge produced in Italy, L. sanfrancisco from a rye sour dough sponge produced in Germany, and L. casei and L. curvatus from a rye sour dough sponge produced in Switzerland. For all isolates except the L. reuteri strains oleic acid, a component of the Tween 80 added to the medium, was essential for growth. It was of interest that lactobacilli requiring oleic acid were the predominant flora of lactic acid bacteria in the microbial environment of sour dough sponges.

  5. Production and transformation of dissolved neutral sugars and amino acids by bacteria in seawater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Linda; Lechtenfeld, O.J.; Benner, R.

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the ocean consists of a heterogeneous mixture of molecules, most of which are of unknown origin. Neutral sugars and amino acids are among the few recognizable biomolecules in DOM, and the molecular composition of these biomolecules is shaped primarily by biological...... production and degradation processes. This study provides insight into the bioavailability of biomolecules as well as the chemical composition of DOM produced by bacteria. The molecular compositions of combined neutral sugars and amino acids were investigated in DOM produced by bacteria and in DOM remaining...... degradation was characterized by a high galactose content (33 mol %), followed by glucose (22 mol %) and the remaining neutral sugars (7–11 mol %). The ratio of D-amino acids to L-amino acids increased during the experiments as a response to bacterial degradation, and after 32 days, the D/L ratios of aspartic...

  6. Heterologous surface display on lactic acid bacteria: non-GMO alternative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadravec, Petra; Štrukelj, Borut; Berlec, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are food-grade hosts for surface display with potential applications in food and therapy. Alternative approaches to surface display on LAB would avoid the use of recombinant DNA technology and genetically-modified organism (GMO)-related regulatory requirements. Non-covalent surface display of proteins can be achieved by fusing them to various cell-wall binding domains, of which the Lysine motif domain (LysM) is particularly well studied. Fusion proteins have been isolated from recombinant bacteria or from their growth medium and displayed on unmodified bacteria, enabling heterologous surface display. This was demonstrated on non-viable cells devoid of protein content, termed bacteria-like particles, and on various species of genus Lactobacillus. Of the latter, Lactobacillus salivarius ATCC 11741 was recently shown to be particularly amenable for LysM-mediated display. Possible regulatory implications of heterologous surface display are discussed, particularly those relevant for the European Union.

  7. Genetically modified lactic acid bacteria: applications to food or health and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Pierre

    2002-11-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have a long history of use in fermented food products. Progress in gene technology allows their modification by introducing new genes or by modifying their metabolic functions. These modifications may lead to improvements in food technology (bacteria better fitted to technological processes, leading to improved organoleptic properties em leader ), or to new applications including bacteria producing therapeutic molecules that could be delivered by mouth. Examples in these two fields will be discussed, at the same time evaluating their potential benefit to society and the possible risks associated with their use. Risk assessment and expected benefits will determine the future use of modified bacteria in the domains of food technology and health.

  8. Characterization of sulfur oxidizing bacteria related to biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion in sludge digesters

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Bettina;Herzog, Bastian;Drewes, Jörg E.;Koch, Konrad;Müller, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Background Biogenic sulfuric acid (BSA) corrosion damages sewerage and wastewater treatment facilities but is not well investigated in sludge digesters. Sulfur/sulfide oxidizing bacteria (SOB) oxidize sulfur compounds to sulfuric acid, inducing BSA corrosion. To obtain more information on BSA corrosion in sludge digesters, microbial communities from six different, BSA-damaged, digesters were analyzed using culture dependent methods and subsequent polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient ...

  9. Comparison of the Morphology and Deoxyribonucleic Acid Composition of 27 Strains of Nitrifying Bacteria1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Stanley W.; Mandel, Manley

    1971-01-01

    The gross morphology, fine structure, and per cent guanine plus cytosine (GC) composition of deoxyribonucleic acid of 27 strains of nitrifying bacteria were compared. Based on morphological differences, the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were separated into four genera. Nitrosomonas species and Nitrosocystis species formed one homogenous group, and Nitrosolobus species and Nitrosospira species formed a second homogenous group in respect to their deoxyribonucleic acid GC compositions. Similarly, the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria were separated into three genera based on their morphology. The members of two of these nitrite-oxidizing genera, Nitrobacter and Nitrococcus, had similar GC compositions, but Nitrospina gracilis had a significantly lower GC composition than the members of the other two genera. Images PMID:4939767

  10. Comparison of the morphology and deoxyribonucleic acid composition of 27 strains of nitrifying bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, S W; Mandel, M

    1971-08-01

    The gross morphology, fine structure, and per cent guanine plus cytosine (GC) composition of deoxyribonucleic acid of 27 strains of nitrifying bacteria were compared. Based on morphological differences, the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were separated into four genera. Nitrosomonas species and Nitrosocystis species formed one homogenous group, and Nitrosolobus species and Nitrosospira species formed a second homogenous group in respect to their deoxyribonucleic acid GC compositions. Similarly, the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria were separated into three genera based on their morphology. The members of two of these nitrite-oxidizing genera, Nitrobacter and Nitrococcus, had similar GC compositions, but Nitrospina gracilis had a significantly lower GC composition than the members of the other two genera.

  11. Ammonia production by human faecal bacteria, and the enumeration, isolation and characterization of bacteria capable of growth on peptides and amino acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The products of protein breakdown in the human colon are considered to be detrimental to gut health. Amino acid catabolism leads to the formation of sulfides, phenolic compounds and amines, which are inflammatory and/or precursors to the formation of carcinogens, including N-nitroso compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate the kinetics of protein breakdown and the bacterial species involved. Results Casein, pancreatic casein hydrolysate (mainly short-chain peptides or amino acids were incubated in vitro with suspensions of faecal bacteria from 3 omnivorous and 3 vegetarian human donors. Results from the two donor groups were similar. Ammonia production was highest from peptides, followed by casein and amino acids, which were similar. The amino acids metabolized most extensively were Asp, Ser, Lys and Glu. Monensin inhibited the rate of ammonia production from amino acids by 60% (P = 0.001, indicating the involvement of Gram-positive bacteria. Enrichment cultures were carried out to investigate if, by analogy with the rumen, there was a significant population of asaccharolytic, obligately amino acid-fermenting bacteria (‘hyper-ammonia-producing’ bacteria; HAP in the colon. Numbers of bacteria capable of growth on peptides or amino acids alone averaged 3.5% of the total viable count, somewhat higher than the rumen. None of these were HAP, however. The species enriched included Clostridium spp., one of which was C. perfringens, Enterococcus, Shigella and Escherichia coli. Conclusions Protein fermentation by human faecal bacteria in the absence of sugars not only leads to the formation of hazardous metabolic products, but also to the possible proliferation of harmful bacteria. The kinetics of protein metabolism were similar to the rumen, but HAP bacteria were not found.

  12. Competitive selection of lactic acid bacteria that persist in the human oral cavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, J.; Marco, M.L.; Kingma, F.; Noordman, W.M.; Rademaker, J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) might offer opportunities as oral probiotics provided candidate strains persist in the mouth. After intake of a mixture of 69 LAB, strains of Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus salivarius were especially recovered. Coaggregation with other microbes is likely not a p

  13. Mutational and selective pressures on codon and amino acid usage in Buchnera, endosymbiotic bacteria of aphids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rispe, C.; Delmotte, F.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.; Moya, A.

    2004-01-01

    We have explored compositional variation at synonymous (codon usage) and nonsynonymous (amino acid usage) positions in three complete genomes of Buchnera, endosymbiotic bacteria of aphids, and also in their orthologs in Escherichia coli, a close free-living relative. We sought to discriminate genes

  14. Perspectives on the contribution of lactic acid bacteria to cheese flavor development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steele, James; Broadbent, Jeffery; Kok, Jan

    It has been known since the 1960s that lactic acid bacteria are essential for the development of cheese flavor. In the ensuing 50 years significant research has been directed at understanding the microbiology, genetics and biochemistry of this process. This review briefly covers the current status

  15. Survival and growth of probiotic lactic acid bacteria in refrigerated pickle products

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined 10 lactic acid bacteria that have been previously characterized for commercial use as probiotic cultures, mostly for dairy products, including 1 Pediococcus and 9 Lactobacilli. Our objectives were to develop a rapid procedure for determining the long-term survivability of these cultures ...

  16. Glucansucrases from lactic acid bacteria which produce water-insoluble polysaccharides from sucrose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dextrans and related glucans produced from sucrose by lactic acid bacteria have been studied for many years and are used in numerous commercial applications and products. Most of these glucans are water-soluble, except for a few notable exceptions from cariogenic Streptococcus spp. and a very small ...

  17. Distinct gut-derived lactic acid bacteria elicit divergent dendritic cell-mediated NK cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Zeuthen, Louise Hjerrild; Christensen, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are abundant in the gastrointestinal tract where they continuously regulate the immune system. NK cells are potently activated by dendritic cells (DCs) matured by inflammatory stimuli, and NK cells are present in the gut epithelium and in mesenteric lymph nodes...

  18. Drivers for the establishment and composition of the sourdough lactic acid bacteria biota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbetti, Marco; Minervini, Fabio; Pontonio, Erica; Di Cagno, Raffaella; De Angelis, Maria

    2016-12-19

    The drivers for the establishment and composition of the sourdough microbiota, with particular emphasis on lactic acid bacteria, are reviewed and discussed. More than 60 different species of lactobacilli were identified from sourdoughs, showing the main overlapping between sourdough and human intestine ecosystems. The microbial kinetics during sourdough preparation was described by several studies using various methodological approaches, including culture-dependent and -independent (e.g., high throughput sequencing), and metabolite and meta-transcriptome analyses. Although the abundant microbial diversity harbored by flours, a succession of dominating and sub-dominating populations of lactic acid bacteria suddenly occurred during sourdough propagation, leading to the progressive assembly of the bacterial community. The contribution of all the potential sources (house microbiota, flour, types of flours and additional ingredients) for contaminating lactic acid bacteria was compared with the aim to find overlapping or specific routes that affect the sourdough microbiota. Once established and mature, pros and cons regarding the stability of the sourdough lactic acid bacteria biota were also reviewed, showing contradictory results, which were mainly dependent on the species/strains. Probably, the future research efforts should be dedicated to decrease the sources/drivers of noticeable variation rather than to full standardization of the process for sourdough preparation and use.

  19. Minimizing the level of butyric acid bacteria spores in farm tank milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, M.M.M.; Driehuis, F.; Giffel, M.C.T.; Jong, de P.; Lankveld, J.M.G.

    2007-01-01

    A year-long survey of 24 dairy farms was conducted to determine the effects of farm management on the concentrations of butyric acid bacteria (BAB) spores in farm tank milk (FTM). The results were used to validate a control strategy derived from model simulations. The BAB spore concentrations were m

  20. Inducible gene expression and environmentally regulated genes in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jan

    1996-01-01

    Relatively recently, a number of genes and operons have been identified in lactic acid bacteria that are inducible and respond to environmental factors. Some of these genes/operons had been isolated and analysed because of their importance in the fermentation industry and, consequently, their transc

  1. TECHNOLOGICAL AND FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: THE IMPORTANCE OF THESE MICROORGANISMS FOR FOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda de Souza Motta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Eacters of coccus or rods Gram-positive, catalase negative, non-sporulating, which produce lactic acid as the major end product during the fermentation of carbohydrates. When applied on food, provides beneficial effects to consumers through its functional and technological properties. With this the present review article, explore the potential application of lactic acid bacteria in food. The following genera are considered the principal lactic acid bacteria: Aerococcus, Carnobacterium, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Oenococcus, Pediococcus, Streptococcus, Tetragenococcus, Vagococcus and Weissella. These cultures have been used as starter or adjunct cultures for the fermentation of foods and beverages due to their contributions to the sensorial characteristics of these products and by microbiological stability. Their probiotic properties have also been investigated. More recent studies by indigenous cultures have received increased attention in light of the search for isolated cultures of a given raw material and a certain region. These microorganisms are being investigated for its functional and technological potential that may be applied in product development with its own characteristics and designation of origin. Those properties will be discussed in the present review in order to highlight the performance of these bacteria and the high degree of control over the fermentation process and standardization of the final product. The use of autochthonous cultures will be considered due the increase of studies of new cultures of lactic acid bacteria isolated of milk and meat of distinct products.

  2. Diversity, vitality and activities of intestinal lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria assessed by molecular approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaughan, E.E.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Ben-Amor, K.; Vos, de W.M.

    2005-01-01

    While lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria have been scientifically important for over a century, many of these are marketed today as probiotics and have become a valuable and rapidly expanding sector of the food market that is leading functional foods in many countries. The human

  3. Multiple Genome Sequences of Important Beer-Spoiling Lactic Acid Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Geissler, Andreas J.; Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2016-01-01

    Seven strains of important beer-spoiling lactic acid bacteria were sequenced using single-molecule real-time sequencing. Complete genomes were obtained for strains of Lactobacillus paracollinoides, Lactobacillus lindneri, and Pediococcus claussenii. The analysis of these genomes emphasizes the role of plasmids as the genomic foundation of beer-spoiling ability.

  4. Identification of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Tarkhineh, a traditional Iranian fermented food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faride Tabatabaee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tarkhineh is a traditional Iranian fermented product produced from a mixture of doogh and wheat grout. The purposes of the present study were identifying of lactic acid bacteria (LAB isolated and Changes of lactic acid bacteria flora throughout spontaneous fermentation of Tarkhineh. Results have shown a total of ten strains of LAB were isolated from Tarkhineh on the 3th day of fermentation using MRS agar plates and identified on the basis of morphological, biochemical, and physiological characteristics. The isolates were identified as L.nagelii(67%, L.bifermentans(21.3%, Leu.cermoris(6%, L.fructosus(1.45%, L.fermentum(1%, L.intestinalis(0.9%, L.agilis(0.9% L.acidipiscis(0.9% was reported, and approximately %1 of isolated samples remained unknown. The naturally occurring lactic acid bacteria load was found to vary between 1.97×105 and 4.3×105 cfu/gr. The main source of lactic acid bacteria was found to be the doogh.

  5. Pediocin PA-1, a wide-spectrum bacteriocin from lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, JM; Martinez, MI; Kok, J

    2002-01-01

    Pediocin PA-1 is a broad-spectrum lactic acid bacteria bacteriocin that shows a particularly strong activity against Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne pathogen of special concern among the food industries. This antimicrobial peptide is the most extensively studied class IIa (or pediocin family)

  6. Concentrations of butyric acid bacteria spores in silage and relationships with aerobic deterioration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, M.M.M.; Driehuis, F.; Giffel, M.C.T.; Jong, de P.; Lankveld, J.M.G.

    2007-01-01

    Germination and growth of spores of butyric acid bacteria ( BAB) may cause severe defects in semihard cheeses. Silage is the main source of BAB spores in cheese milk. The objectives of the study were to determine the significance of grass silages and corn silages as sources of BAB spores and to inve

  7. Improving farm management by modeling the contamination of farm tank milk with butyric acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, M.M.M.; Driehuis, F.; Giffel, te M.C.; Jong, de P.; Lankveld, J.M.G.

    2006-01-01

    Control of contamination of farm tank milk (FTM) with the spore-forming butyric acid bacteria (BAB) is important to prevent the late-blowing defect in semi-hard cheeses. The risk of late blowing can be decreased via control of the contamination level of FTM with BAB. A modeling approach was applied

  8. Improving farm management by modeling the contamination of farm tank milk with butyric acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, M.M.M.; Driehuis, F.; Giffel, te M.C.; Jong, de P.; Lankveld, J.M.G.

    2006-01-01

    Control of contamination of farm tank milk (FTM) with the spore-forming butyric acid bacteria (BAB) is important to prevent the late-blowing defect in semi-hard cheeses. The risk of late blowing can be decreased via control of the contamination level of FTM with BAB. A modeling approach was applied

  9. Systems biology and metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria for improved fermented foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flahaut, N.A.L.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have long been used in industrial dairy and other food fermentations that make use of their metabolic activities leading to products with specific organoleptic properties. Metabolic engineering is a rational approach to steer fermentations toward the production of desired compou

  10. Comparison of phenotypic and molecular tests to identify lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Mendonça Moraes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-nine lactic acid bacteria (LAB isolates were submitted for identification using Biolog, API50CHL, 16S rDNA sequencing, and species-specific PCR reactions. The identification results were compared, and it was concluded that a polyphasic approach is necessary for proper LAB identification, being the molecular analyzes the most reliable.

  11. Perspectives on the contribution of lactic acid bacteria to cheese flavor development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steele, James; Broadbent, Jeffery; Kok, Jan

    2013-01-01

    It has been known since the 1960s that lactic acid bacteria are essential for the development of cheese flavor. In the ensuing 50 years significant research has been directed at understanding the microbiology, genetics and biochemistry of this process. This review briefly covers the current status o

  12. Use of the alr gene as a food-grade selection marker in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, P.A.; Benchimol, M.G.; Lambert, J.; Palumbo, E.; Deghorain, M.; Delcour, J.; Vos, de W.M.; Kleerebezem, M.; Hols, P.

    2002-01-01

    Both Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum contain a single alr gene, encoding an alanine racemase (EC 5.1.1.1), which catalyzes the interconversion of D-alanine and L-alanine. The alr genes of these lactic acid bacteria were investigated for their application as food-grade selection marker

  13. Pediocin PA-1, a wide-spectrum bacteriocin from lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, JM; Martinez, MI; Kok, J

    2002-01-01

    Pediocin PA-1 is a broad-spectrum lactic acid bacteria bacteriocin that shows a particularly strong activity against Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne pathogen of special concern among the food industries. This antimicrobial peptide is the most extensively studied class IIa (or pediocin family) ba

  14. Characterization of anti-listerial lactic acid bacteria isolated from Thai fermented fish products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Anya; Embarek, Peter Karim Ben; Wedell-Neergaard, C.

    1998-01-01

    further characterized and 43 strains were inhibitory against Listeria monocytogenes. The strains were inhibitory to other Gram- positive (lactic acid) bacteria probably because of production of bacteriocins. All 44 strains inhibited both Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus and 37 were inhibitory...

  15. Multiple Genome Sequences of Important Beer-Spoiling Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Andreas J.; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2016-01-01

    Seven strains of important beer-spoiling lactic acid bacteria were sequenced using single-molecule real-time sequencing. Complete genomes were obtained for strains of Lactobacillus paracollinoides, Lactobacillus lindneri, and Pediococcus claussenii. The analysis of these genomes emphasizes the role of plasmids as the genomic foundation of beer-spoiling ability. PMID:27795248

  16. Towards metagenome-scale models for industrial applications-the case of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Branco Dos Santos, F.; Vos, de W.M.; Teusink, B.

    2013-01-01

    We review the uses and limitations of modelling approaches that are in use in the field of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB). We describe recent developments in model construction and computational methods, starting from application of such models to monocultures. However, since most applications in food b

  17. Fluorescent protein vectors for promoter analysis in lactic acid bacteria and Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Cayuela, T.; Cadiñanos, de L.P.; Mohedano, M.L.; Palencia, de P.F.; Boden, D.; Wells, J.; Peláez, C.; López, P.; Requena, T.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent reporter genes are valuable tools for real-time monitoring of gene expression in living cells. In this study we describe the construction of novel promoter-probe vectors containing a synthetic mCherry fluorescent protein gene, codon-optimized for lactic acid bacteria, divergently linked,

  18. Genome data mining of lactic acid bacteria: the impact of bioinformatics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siezen, R.J.; Enckevort, F.H.J. van; Kleerebezem, M.; Teusink, B.

    2004-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been widely used in food fermentations and, more recently, as probiotics in health-promoting food products. Genome sequencing and functional genomics studies of a variety of LAB are now rapidly providing insights into their diversity and evolution and revealing the mo

  19. Pediocin PA-1, a wide-spectrum bacteriocin from lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, JM; Martinez, MI; Kok, J

    2002-01-01

    Pediocin PA-1 is a broad-spectrum lactic acid bacteria bacteriocin that shows a particularly strong activity against Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne pathogen of special concern among the food industries. This antimicrobial peptide is the most extensively studied class IIa (or pediocin family) ba

  20. Lactic acid bacteria active during the fermentation of wheat silage in small scale silos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, N.J.; Parker, J.A.; Moon, L.C.; Ely, L.O.

    1981-01-01

    Wheat was ensiled and periodically analyzed for lactic acid bacteria present. Initially Lactobacillus plantarum, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus cellobiosus and Streptococcus lactis predominated. After two to four days enterococci including S. faecium and S. bovis were present in high populations as well as Lactobacillus plantarum. It was concluded that mixed populations of enterococci and L. plantarum are active in the successful fermentation of wheat silage.

  1. Antioxidant activity of probiotic lactic acid bacteria isolated from Mongolian airag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Uugantsetseg

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to determine the antioxidant activity of probiotic lactic acid bacteria isolated from airag. In this study, 42 lactic acid bacteria were isolated from Mongolian airag. All isolates were identified by using morphological, biochemical and physiological methods. The isolated bacteria were studied for antagonistic effects on Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, 22 strains showed antibacterial activity. When we examined their probiotic properties such as bile acid tolerance and gastric acid tolerance, it is shown that only 6 bacterial strains can survive up to 3  hours in a pH 3.0 acid environment  and up to 8 hours in  0.3% bile acid environment. Selected probiotic strains were further identified to species by API 50CHL system. Antioxidant activity of  probiotic  strains were determined by 1,1-diphenyl-2 picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assay. While the antioxidant activity in cell free supernatant fluctuated between the range of 26.1-38.4%,  the antioxidant activity after 72 hours of fermentation in the whey fraction was between 17.23-55.12%. DOI: http://doi.dx.org/10.5564/mjc.v15i0.327 Mongolian Journal of Chemistry 15 (41, 2014, p73-78

  2. Characterization and application of lactic acid bacteria for tropical silage preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pholsen, Suradej; Khota, Waroon; Pang, Huili; Higgs, David; Cai, Yimin

    2016-10-01

    Strains TH 14, TH 21 and TH 64 were isolated from tropical silages, namely corn stover, sugar cane top and rice straw, respectively, prepared in Thailand. These strains were selected by low pH growth range and high lactic acid-producing ability, similar to some commercial inoculants. Based on the analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence and DNA-DNA relatedness, strain TH 14 was identified as Lactobacillus casei, and strains TH 21 and TH 64 were identified as L. plantarum. Strains TH 14, TH 21, TH 64 and two commercial inoculants, CH (L. plantarum) and SN (L. rhamnosus), were used as additives to fresh and wilted purple Guinea and sorghum silages prepared using a small-scale fermentation method. The number of epiphytic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in the forages before ensilage was relatively low but the numbers of coliform and aerobic bacteria were higher. Sorghum silages at 30 days of fermentation were all well preserved with low pH (3.56) and high lactic acid production (72.86 g/kg dry matter). Purple Guinea silage inoculated with LAB exhibited reduced count levels of aerobic and coliform bacteria, lower pH, butyric acid and ammonia nitrogen and increased lactic acid concentration, compared with the control. Strain TH 14 more effectively improved lactic acid production compared with inoculants and other strains. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  3. Isolation of alkaliphilic bacteria for production of high optically pure L-(+)-lactic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokaryo, Hiroto; Tokiwa, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria that grow under alkaline conditions (pH 10) were isolated from various sources in Okinawa (Japan). These alkali-tolerant and alkaliphilic bacteria were classified as follows: Microbacterium sp. (1 strain), Enterococcus spp. (9 strains), Alkalibacterium spp. (3 strains), Exiguobacterium spp. (5 strains), Oceanobacillus spp. (3 strains) and Bacillus spp. (7 strains) by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. By fermentation, many strains were able to convert glucose into mainly L-(+)-lactic acid of high optical purity in alkaline broth. This result indicated that valuable L-(+)-lactic acid-producing bacteria could be isolated efficiently by screening under alkaline conditions. Six strains were selected and their ability to produce lactic acid at different initial pH was compared. Enterococcus casseliflavus strain 79w3 gave the highest lactic acid concentration. Lactic acid concentration and productivity were 103 g L(-1) (optical purity of 99.5% as L-isomer) and 2.2 g L(-1) h(-1), respectively when 129 g L(-1) of glucose was used by batch fermentation.

  4. Genome-wide Studies of Mycolic Acid Bacteria: Computational Identification and Analysis of a Minimal Genome

    KAUST Repository

    Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua

    2012-12-01

    The mycolic acid bacteria are a distinct suprageneric group of asporogenous Grampositive, high GC-content bacteria, distinguished by the presence of mycolic acids in their cell envelope. They exhibit great diversity in their cell and morphology; although primarily non-pathogens, this group contains three major pathogens Mycobacterium leprae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, and Corynebacterium diphtheria. Although the mycolic acid bacteria are a clearly defined group of bacteria, the taxonomic relationships between its constituent genera and species are less well defined. Two approaches were tested for their suitability in describing the taxonomy of the group. First, a Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) experiment was assessed and found to be superior to monophyletic (16S small ribosomal subunit) in delineating a total of 52 mycolic acid bacterial species. Phylogenetic inference was performed using the neighbor-joining method. To further refine phylogenetic analysis and to take advantage of the widespread availability of bacterial genome data, a computational framework that simulates DNA-DNA hybridisation was developed and validated using multiscale bootstrap resampling. The tool classifies microbial genomes based on whole genome DNA, and was deployed as a web-application using PHP and Javascript. It is accessible online at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dna_hybridization/ A third study was a computational and statistical methods in the identification and analysis of a putative minimal mycolic acid bacterial genome so as to better understand (1) the genomic requirements to encode a mycolic acid bacterial cell and (2) the role and type of genes and genetic elements that lead to the massive increase in genome size in environmental mycolic acid bacteria. Using a reciprocal comparison approach, a total of 690 orthologous gene clusters forming a putative minimal genome were identified across 24 mycolic acid bacterial species. In order to identify new potential drug

  5. Phytic acid degrading lactic acid bacteria in tef-injera fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Maren M; Egli, Ines M; Aeberli, Isabelle; Hurrell, Richard F; Meile, Leo

    2014-11-03

    Ethiopian injera, a soft pancake, baked from fermented batter, is preferentially prepared from tef (Eragrostis tef) flour. The phytic acid (PA) content of tef is high and is only partly degraded during the fermentation step. PA chelates with iron and zinc in the human digestive tract and strongly inhibits their absorption. With the aim to formulate a starter culture that would substantially degrade PA during injera preparation, we assessed the potential of microorganisms isolated from Ethiopian household-tef fermentations to degrade PA. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were found to be among the dominating microorganisms. Seventy-six isolates from thirteen different tef fermentations were analyzed for phytase activity and thirteen different isolates of seven different species were detected to be positive in a phytase screening assay. In 20-mL model tef fermentations, out of these thirteen isolates, the use of Lactobacillus (L.) buchneri strain MF58 and Pediococcus pentosaceus strain MF35 resulted in lowest PA contents in the fermented tef of 41% and 42%, respectively of its initial content. In comparison 59% of PA remained when spontaneously fermented. Full scale tef fermentation (0.6L) and injera production using L. buchneri MF58 as culture additive decreased PA in cooked injera from 1.05 to 0.34±0.02 g/100 g, representing a degradation of 68% compared to 42% in injera from non-inoculated traditional fermentation. The visual appearance of the pancakes was similar. The final molar ratios of PA to iron of 4 and to zinc of 12 achieved with L. buchneri MF58 were decreased by ca. 50% compared to the traditional fermentation. In conclusion, selected LAB strains in tef fermentations can degrade PA, with L. buchneri MF58 displaying the highest PA degrading potential. The 68% PA degradation achieved by the application of L. buchneri MF58 would be expected to improve human zinc absorption from tef-injera, but further PA degradation is probably necessary if iron absorption has to

  6. Isolation of lactic acid bacteria for its possible use in the fermentation of green algerian olives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour-Eddine, Karam

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken with the aim of obtaining lactic acid bacteria with the ability to ferment olives for possible use as starter cultures. For this reason, 32 isolates of lactic acid bacteria isolated from the spontaneous fermentation of green olives were characterized and identified on the basis of morphological and biochemical criteria. 14 of them were identified as Lactococcus lactis, 11 isolates as Lactobacillus plantarum and 7 isolates as Enterococcus sp. Of the 18 isolates examined for antagonistic activity, 3 isolates of Lactobacillus plantarum and one isolate of Enterococcus sp. were able to give distinct zones of inhibition against 5 indicator strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated in this study. Cell free supernatant of Lactobacillus plantarum OL9 was active against Gram-positive bacteria (Lactobacillus, Enterococcus and Propionibacterium and also against one Gram-negative bacteria strain of spoilage significance (Erwinia.Este estudio se emprendió con el objetivo de obtener bacterias del ácido láctico con capacidad para utilizarse como cultivo iniciador en la fermentación de aceitunas. Por esta razón, 32 cepas de bacterias del ácido láctico procedentes de fermentaciones espontáneas de aceitunas verdes se caracterizaron e identificaron en función de criterios morfológicos y bioquímicos. Catorce cepas se identificaron como Lactococcus lactis, 11 cepas como Lactobacillus plantarum y 7 cepas como Enterococcus sp. De las 18 cepas que se examinaron para detectar actividades antagónicas, se encontró que 3 cepas de Lactobacillus plantarum y una de Enterococcus sp. mostraban zonas de inhibición contra 5 cepas indicadoras de bacterias del ácido láctico aisladas en este estudio. El sobrenadante libre de células Lactobacillus plantarum OL9 fue activo contra diversas bacterias Gram-positivas (Lactobacillus, Enterococcus y Propionibacterium y contra una cepa de bacteria Gram-negativa relacionada con alteraciones (Erwinia.

  7. Antibacterial activity of hen egg white lysozyme modified by heat and enzymatic treatments against oenological lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, W; García-Ruiz, A; Recio, I; Moreno-Arribas, M V

    2014-10-01

    The antimicrobial activity of heat-denatured and hydrolyzed hen egg white lysozyme against oenological lactic acid and acetic acid bacteria was investigated. The lysozyme was denatured by heating, and native and heat-denatured lysozymes were hydrolyzed by pepsin. The lytic activity against Micrococcus lysodeikticus of heat-denatured lysozyme decreased with the temperature of the heat treatment, whereas the hydrolyzed lysozyme had no enzymatic activity. Heat-denatured and hydrolyzed lysozyme preparations showed antimicrobial activity against acetic acid bacteria. Lysozyme heated at 90°C exerted potent activity against Acetobacter aceti CIAL-106 and Gluconobacter oxydans CIAL-107 with concentrations required to obtain 50% inhibition of growth (IC50) of 0.089 and 0.013 mg/ml, respectively. This preparation also demonstrated activity against Lactobacillus casei CIAL-52 and Oenococcus oeni CIAL-91 (IC50, 1.37 and 0.45 mg/ml, respectively). The two hydrolysates from native and heat-denatured lysozyme were active against O. oeni CIAL-96 (IC50, 2.77 and 0.3 mg/ml, respectively). The results obtained suggest that thermal and enzymatic treatments increase the antibacterial spectrum of hen egg white lysozyme in relation to oenological microorganisms.

  8. Organism-adapted specificity of the allosteric regulation of pyruvate kinase in lactic acid bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Veith

    Full Text Available Pyruvate kinase (PYK is a critical allosterically regulated enzyme that links glycolysis, the primary energy metabolism, to cellular metabolism. Lactic acid bacteria rely almost exclusively on glycolysis for their energy production under anaerobic conditions, which reinforces the key role of PYK in their metabolism. These organisms are closely related, but have adapted to a huge variety of native environments. They include food-fermenting organisms, important symbionts in the human gut, and antibiotic-resistant pathogens. In contrast to the rather conserved inhibition of PYK by inorganic phosphate, the activation of PYK shows high variability in the type of activating compound between different lactic acid bacteria. System-wide comparative studies of the metabolism of lactic acid bacteria are required to understand the reasons for the diversity of these closely related microorganisms. These require knowledge of the identities of the enzyme modifiers. Here, we predict potential allosteric activators of PYKs from three lactic acid bacteria which are adapted to different native environments. We used protein structure-based molecular modeling and enzyme kinetic modeling to predict and validate potential activators of PYK. Specifically, we compared the electrostatic potential and the binding of phosphate moieties at the allosteric binding sites, and predicted potential allosteric activators by docking. We then made a kinetic model of Lactococcus lactis PYK to relate the activator predictions to the intracellular sugar-phosphate conditions in lactic acid bacteria. This strategy enabled us to predict fructose 1,6-bisphosphate as the sole activator of the Enterococcus faecalis PYK, and to predict that the PYKs from Streptococcus pyogenes and Lactobacillus plantarum show weaker specificity for their allosteric activators, while still having fructose 1,6-bisphosphate play the main activator role in vivo. These differences in the specificity of allosteric

  9. Screening, Isolation and Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria From a Traditional Dairy Product of Sabzevar, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Rashid

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are a major group of probiotics. Isolation of these bacteria is difficult, because they have a complex ecosystem in fermented dairy products. Objectives: The aim of this study was to detect Lactobacillus and Lactococcus in a conventional dairy product (Khameh and study their probiotic characteristics. Materials and Methods: To isolateLAB, samples were collected from four different villages. Afterwards, screening was performed in pH = 2.5. The selected strains were examined for their tolerance to acidic pH (3 and 0.3% bile salt. Moreover, the antimicrobial activity of the isolated strains against two pathogenic bacteria, Salmonella typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus, was assessed using the disc plate method. Finally, the selected strains were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR screening and sequencing. Results: Among the isolated samples, two strains (Lactobacillus and Lactococcus were highly resistant to unfavorable conditions and the L1 strain showed the highest antimicrobial activity. Conclusions: This study showed that the conventional dairy product (Khameh contained probiotic bacteria, which are capable of fighting against pathogenic bacteria and living in the digestive tract.

  10. Channel-mediated lactic acid transport: a novel function for aquaglyceroporins in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Gerd P; Desguin, Benoît; Chaumont, François; Hols, Pascal

    2013-09-15

    MIPs (major intrinsic proteins), also known as aquaporins, are membrane proteins that channel water and/or uncharged solutes across membranes in all kingdoms of life. Considering the enormous number of different bacteria on earth, functional information on bacterial MIPs is scarce. In the present study, six MIPs [glpF1 (glycerol facilitator 1)-glpF6] were identified in the genome of the Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum. Heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed that GlpF2, GlpF3 and GlpF4 each facilitated the transmembrane diffusion of water, dihydroxyacetone and glycerol. As several lactic acid bacteria have GlpFs in their lactate racemization operon (GlpF1/F4 phylogenetic group), their ability to transport this organic acid was tested. Both GlpF1 and GlpF4 facilitated the diffusion of D/L-lactic acid. Deletion of glpF1 and/or glpF4 in Lb. plantarum showed that both genes were involved in the racemization of lactic acid and, in addition, the double glpF1 glpF4 mutant showed a growth delay under conditions of mild lactic acid stress. This provides further evidence that GlpFs contribute to lactic acid metabolism in this species. This lactic acid transport capacity was shown to be conserved in the GlpF1/F4 group of Lactobacillales. In conclusion, we have functionally analysed the largest set of bacterial MIPs and demonstrated that the lactic acid membrane permeability of bacteria can be regulated by aquaglyceroporins.

  11. Mycolic Acid-Containing Bacteria Induce Natural-Product Biosynthesis in Streptomyces Species▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaka, Hiroyasu; Mori, Yukiko; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Furumai, Tamotsu

    2011-01-01

    Natural products produced by microorganisms are important starting compounds for drug discovery. Secondary metabolites, including antibiotics, have been isolated from different Streptomyces species. The production of these metabolites depends on the culture conditions. Therefore, the development of a new culture method can facilitate the discovery of new natural products. Here, we show that mycolic acid-containing bacteria can influence the biosynthesis of cryptic natural products in Streptomyces species. The production of red pigment by Streptomyces lividans TK23 was induced by coculture with Tsukamurella pulmonis TP-B0596, which is a mycolic acid-containing bacterium. Only living cells induced this pigment production, which was not mediated by any substances. T. pulmonis could induce natural-product synthesis in other Streptomyces strains too: it altered natural-product biosynthesis in 88.4% of the Streptomyces strains isolated from soil. The other mycolic acid-containing bacteria, Rhodococcus erythropolis and Corynebacterium glutamicum, altered biosynthesis in 87.5 and 90.2% of the Streptomyces strains, respectively. The coculture broth of T. pulmonis and Streptomyces endus S-522 contained a novel antibiotic, which we named alchivemycin A. We concluded that the mycolic acid localized in the outer cell layer of the inducer bacterium influences secondary metabolism in Streptomyces, and this activity is a result of the direct interaction between the mycolic acid-containing bacteria and Streptomyces. We used these results to develop a new coculture method, called the combined-culture method, which facilitates the screening of natural products. PMID:21097597

  12. Use of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria starters to ferment mango juice for promoting its probiotic roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xue-Yi; Guo, Li-Qiong; Ye, Zhi-Wei; Qiu, Ling-Yan; Gu, Feng-Wei; Lin, Jun-Fang

    2016-05-18

    Strains of Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Pediococcus pentosaceus, and Lactobacillus brevis were identified from mango fruits by partial 16S rDNA gene sequence. Based on the ability of producing mannitol and diacetyl, Leuconostoc mesenteroides MPL18 and MPL39 were selected within the lactic acid bacteria isolates, and used as mixed starters to ferment mango juice (MJ). Both the autochthonous strains grew well in fermented mango juice (FMJ) and remained viable at 9.81 log cfu mL(-1) during 30 days of storage at 4°C. The content of total sugar of FMJ was lower than that of MJ, while the concentration of mannitol was higher than that of MJ, and the concentration of diacetyl was 3.29 ± 0.12 mg L(-1). Among detected organic acids including citric acid, gallic acid, lactic acid, and acetic acid, only citric acid and gallic acid were found in MJ, while all detected organic acids were found in FMJ. The concentration of lactic acid of FMJ was the highest (78.62 ± 13.66 mM) among all detected organic acids. The DPPH radical scavenging capacity of FMJ was higher than that of MJ. Total phenolic compounds were better preserved in FMJ. The acidity and sweetness had a noticeable impact on the overall acceptance of the treated sample.

  13. Genomewide expression analysis in amino acid-producing bacteria using DNA microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polen, Tino; Wendisch, Volker F

    2004-01-01

    DNA microarray technology has become an important research tool for biotechnology and microbiology. It is now possible to characterize genetic diversity and gene expression in a genomewide manner. DNA microarrays have been applied extensively to study the biology of many bacteria including Escherichia coli, but only recently have they been developed for the Gram-positive Corynebacterium glutamicum. Both bacteria are widely used for biotechnological amino acid production. In this article, in addition to the design and generation of microarrays as well as their use in hybridization experiments and subsequent data analysis, we describe recent applications of DNA microarray technology regarding amino acid production in C. glutamicum and E. coli. We also discuss the impact of functional genomics studies on fundamental as well as applied aspects of amino acid production with C. glutamicum and E. coli.

  14. Fermentation of Prefermented and Extruded Rice Flour by Lactic Acid Bacteria from Sikhae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, C. H.; Min, K. C.; Souane, M.

    1992-01-01

    digestion. The amount of sugar consumption during lactic fermentation varied with the type of bacteria. Leuconostoc mesenteroides(sikhae) and Lactobacillus plantarum(sikhae) increased up to 6 times of original cell number by 24 hrs of fermentation in rice + soymilk substrate, but Lactococcus lactis...... decreased in the same substrates. The final pH of the cereal lactic beverage was in the range of 3.4 - 4.1, L. mesenteroides(sikhae) had relatively higher pH compared to other lactic acid bacteria. L. mesenteroides(sikhae) produced apple juice-like flavor, while L. plantarum, L. casei and L. lactis yielded...... objectionable off-flavor. The HPLC analysis shoved that the lactic ferment of L. mesenteroides(sikhae) contained relatively small amount of lactic acid and malic acid which vas not detected in other microorganisms tested....

  15. [The microflora of sourdough. XVIII. The protein degrading capabilities of lactic acid bacteria in sourdough].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicher, G; Nierle, W

    1984-05-01

    Acidification of the dough by the use of sourdough or acidifiers is necessary not only for good baking quality of rye flour but it is also very important for development of the typical sensory characteristics of rye bread. We confirmed that the lactic acid bacteria of sour dough are proteolytic. Proteolytic effects are observed in the increase of the amino acid content during fermentation. A marked increase was found in the content of leucine, alanine, valine, isoleucine, glutamic acid, glutamine, arginine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, tyrosine and serine. Lactobacillus plantarum showed a higher proteolytic activity than L. brevis ssp. lindneri or L. fructivorans.

  16. Isolation and identification of indigenous lactic acid bacteria from North Sumatra river buffalo milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heni Rizqiati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Buffalo milk is a source of various lactic acid bacteria (LAB which is potential as culture starter as well as the probiotic. This study was conducted to isolate and identify LAB from indigenous North Sumatra river buffalo milk. Lactic acid bacteria was isolated and grown in medium De Man Rogosa Sharpe Agar (MRSA. The isolation was conducted to obtain pure isolate. The identification of LAB was studied in terms of morphology, physiology, biochemistry and survival on low pH. Morphology tests were conducted by Gram staining and cell forming; physiology tests were conducted for growing viability at pH 4.5 and temperature at 45oC; whereas biochemistry tests were conducted for CO2, dextran and NH3 productions. Determination of LAB species was conducted using Analytical Profile Index (API test CHL 50. Results of identification showed that 41 isolates were identified as LAB with Gram-positive, catalase-negative, rod and round shaped characteristics. Resistance test done to low pH (pH 2 for the lactic acid bacteria showed decrease of bacteria viability up to1.24±0.68 log cfu/ml. The resistant isolates at low pH were L12, L16, L17, L19, L20, M10, P8, S3, S19 and S20. Identification with API test CHL 50 for 10 isolates showed that four isolates were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum, L. brevis, L. pentosus and Lactococuslactis.

  17. Inducible gene expression and environmentally regulated genes in lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, J

    1996-10-01

    Relatively recently, a number of genes and operons have been identified in lactic acid bacteria that are inducible and respond to environmental factors. Some of these genes/operons had been isolated and analysed because of their importance in the fermentation industry and, consequently, their transcription was studied and found to be regulatable. Examples are the lactose operon, the operon for nisin production, and genes in the proteolytic pathway of Lactococcus lactis, as well as xylose metabolism in Lactobacillus pentosus. Some other operons were specifically targetted with the aim to compare their mode of regulation with known regulatory mechanisms in other well-studied bacteria. These studies, dealing with the biosynthesis of histidine, tryptophan, and of the branched chain amino acids in L. lactis, have given new insights in gene regulation and in the occurrence of auxotrophy in these bacteria. Also, nucleotide sequence analyses of a number of lactococcal bacteriophages was recently initiated to, among other things, specifically learn more about regulation of the phage life cycle. Yet another approach in the analysis of regulated genes is the 'random' selection of genetic elements that respond to environmental stimuli and the first of such sequences from lactic acid bacteria have been identified and characterized. The potential of these regulatory elements in fundamental research and practical (industrial) applications will be discussed.

  18. Inhibition of hydrogen fermentation of organic wastes by lactic acid bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noike, Tatsuya; Takabatake, Hiroo [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Saitama (Japan). CREST; Mizuno, Osama [Ataka Construction and Engineering Co., Osaka (Japan); Ohba, Mika [Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Saitama (Japan). CREST

    2002-12-01

    The effects of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on hydrogen fermentation of organic waste were investigated. For this three hydrogen producing strains of Clostridium were cultured with two lactic acid bacteria, i.e. Lactobacillus paracasei and Enterococcus durans, which were isolated from the wastes generated in the bean curd manufacturing. The decrease or cessation of hydrogen production by Clostridium was caused by the addition of LAB. The supernatants of L. paracasei and E. durans suspensions also inhibited hydrogen production by Clostridium. This inhibition was partially destroyed in the presence of trypsin, which is a protease inactivating a bacteriocin. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of lactic acid bacteria on hydrogen production was caused by bacteriocins excreted from LAB which have a deleterious effect on other bacteria. To suppress any effect by LAB, heat treatment of this waste was investigated as a possible pretreatment step. The inhibition of hydrogen production was reduced by heat treatment for 30 min at temperatures ranging from 50{sup o}C to 90{sup o}C. This means that a temperature of 50{sup o}C is already adequate to prevent growth of LAB. (Author)

  19. Development of radiation sterilized dip slides for enumerating lactic acid bacteria and total count in foodstuffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, E.; Padova, R.; Kirsch, E.; Weissman, Sh.; Hirshfeld, T.; Shenfeld, A.

    APT agar (APT) used for enumeration of lactic acid bacteria and Plate Count agar (PCA) applied for total count were sterilized by gamma radiation using radiation dose of 10-15 kGy. Radiosterilized PCA and APT modified by adding catalase prior to irradiation, or APT with increased content of yeast extract performed, as well as, the heat sterilized commercial media. Growth performance was evaluated on several strains of microorganisms, as well as, by enumeration of bacteria in food products. Radiosterilization of culture media in final packaging, can be applied to produce dip slide kits containing PCA or APT.

  20. Understanding the industrial application potential of lactic acid bacteria through genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin

    2009-06-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are a heterogeneous group of bacteria contributing to various industrial applications, ranging from food and beverage fermentation, bulk and fine chemicals production to pharmaceuticals manufacturing. Genome sequencing is booming; hitherto, 25 genomes of LAB have been published and many more are in progress. Based on genomic content of LAB, this review highlights some findings related to applications revealed by genomics and functional genomics analyses. Finally, this review summarizes mathematical modeling strategies of LAB in the context of genomics, to further our understanding of industrial related features.

  1. Characterization of anti-listerial lactic acid bacteria isolated from Thai fermented fish products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Anya; Embarek, Peter Karim Ben; Wedell-Neergaard, C.

    1998-01-01

    further characterized and 43 strains were inhibitory against Listeria monocytogenes. The strains were inhibitory to other Gram- positive (lactic acid) bacteria probably because of production of bacteriocins. All 44 strains inhibited both Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus and 37 were inhibitory...... in laboratory media whereas pH decreased only very slowly in fish juice supplemented with 4% glucose and 3.5% NaCl or in a rice-fish mixture. Only four of 44 isolates could degrade and ferment complex carbohydrates such as rice, potatoes and maize starch. This indicates that other types of bacteria may...

  2. Enhanced fatty acid production in engineered chemolithoautotrophic bacteria using reduced sulfur compounds as energy sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beller, Harry R.; Zhou, Peng; Jewell, Talia N.M.

    2016-01-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic bacteria that oxidize reduced sulfur compounds, such as H2S, while fixing CO2 are an untapped source of renewable bioproducts from sulfide-laden waste, such as municipal wastewater. In this study, we report engineering of the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus...... strength of the two native promoters as assessed by fatty acid production in engineered strains was very similar to that assessed by expression of the cognate genes in the wild-type strain. This proof-of-principle study suggests that engineering sulfide-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophic bacteria...

  3. Isolation of acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria from biogas plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibis, Katharina Gabriela; Gneipel, Armin; König, Helmut

    2016-02-20

    In this study, acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria were isolated from thermophilic and mesophilic biogas plants (BGP) located in Germany. The fermenters were fed with maize silage and cattle or swine manure. Furthermore, pressurized laboratory fermenters digesting maize silage were sampled. Enrichment cultures for the isolation of acid-forming bacteria were grown in minimal medium supplemented with one of the following carbon sources: Na(+)-dl-lactate, succinate, ethanol, glycerol, glucose or a mixture of amino acids. These substrates could be converted by the isolates to acetic, propionic or butyric acid. In total, 49 isolates were obtained, which belonged to the phyla Firmicutes, Tenericutes or Thermotogae. According to 16S rRNA gene sequences, most isolates were related to Clostridium sporosphaeroides, Defluviitoga tunisiensis and Dendrosporobacter quercicolus. Acetic, propionic or butyric acid were produced in cultures of isolates affiliated to Bacillus thermoamylovorans, Clostridium aminovalericum, Clostridium cochlearium/Clostridium tetani, C. sporosphaeroides, D. quercicolus, Proteiniborus ethanoligenes, Selenomonas bovis and Tepidanaerobacter sp. Isolates related to Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum produced acetic, butyric and lactic acid, and isolates related to D. tunisiensis formed acetic acid. Specific primer sets targeting 16S rRNA gene sequences were designed and used for real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The isolates were physiologically characterized and their role in BGP discussed.

  4. Dynamics and species diversity of communities of lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria during spontaneous cocoa bean fermentation in vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefeber, Timothy; Gobert, William; Vrancken, Gino; Camu, Nicholas; De Vuyst, Luc

    2011-05-01

    To speed up research on the usefulness and selection of bacterial starter cultures for cocoa bean fermentation, a benchmark cocoa bean fermentation process under natural fermentation conditions was developed successfully. Therefore, spontaneous fermentations of cocoa pulp-bean mass in vessels on a 20 kg scale were tried out in triplicate. The community dynamics and kinetics of these fermentations were studied through a multiphasic approach. Microbiological analysis revealed a limited bacterial species diversity and targeted community dynamics of both lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and acetic acid bacteria (AAB) during fermentation, as was the case during cocoa bean fermentations processes carried out in the field. LAB isolates belonged to two main (GTG)(5)-PCR clusters, namely Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum, with Fructobacillus pseudofilculneus occurring occasionally; one main (GTG)(5)-PCR cluster, composed of Acetobacter pasteurianus, was found among the AAB isolates, besides minor clusters of Acetobacter ghanensis and Acetobacter senegalensis. 16S rRNA-PCR-DGGE revealed that L. plantarum and L. fermentum dominated the fermentations from day two until the end and Acetobacter was the only AAB species present at the end of the fermentations. Also, species of Tatumella and Pantoea were detected culture-independently at the beginning of the fermentations. Further, it was shown through metabolite target analyses that similar substrate consumption and metabolite production kinetics occurred in the vessels compared to spontaneous cocoa bean fermentation processes. Current drawbacks of the vessel fermentations encompassed an insufficient mixing of the cocoa pulp-bean mass and retarded yeast growth.

  5. Role in Cheese Flavour Formation of Heterofermentative Lactic Acid Bacteria from Mesophilic Starter Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Bæk

    -starters including strains from our culture collection were used throughout the project. Initially selected strains were screened for enzyme activities involved in cheese flavour formation after growth in a cheese based medium (CBM) and in a nutrient rich growth medium (MRS). The Leuconostoc strains had low...... the heterofermentative bacteria grew and were established well. The biodiversity of heterofermentative bacteria in DL-starters was examined using pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and the strains were characterized with 16s rRNA sequencing and carbohydrate fermentation. The sugar fermentation results indicated...... with plant isolates, the ability to ferment citrate and lacked several genes involved in the fermentation of complex carbohydrates. The presented research in this thesis has gained insight in to the role of heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria in cheese flavour formation. The traditional DL...

  6. Lactic acid bacteria convert glucosinolates to nitriles efficiently yet differently from enterobacteriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, Jane A; Kelly, William J; McGhie, Tony K; Ansell, Juliet; Heyes, Julian A

    2013-03-27

    Glucosinolates from the genus Brassica can be converted into bioactive compounds known to induce phase II enzymes, which may decrease the risk of cancers. Conversion via hydrolysis is usually by the brassica enzyme myrosinase, which can be inactivated by cooking or storage. We examined the potential of three beneficial bacteria, Lactobacillus plantarum KW30, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis KF147, and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917, and known myrosinase-producer Enterobacter cloacae to catalyze the conversion of glucosinolates in broccoli extract. Enterobacteriaceae consumed on average 65% glucoiberin and 78% glucoraphanin, transforming them into glucoiberverin and glucoerucin, respectively, and small amounts of iberverin nitrile and erucin nitrile. The lactic acid bacteria did not accumulate reduced glucosinolates, consuming all at 30-33% and transforming these into iberverin nitrile, erucin nitrile, sulforaphane nitrile, and further unidentified metabolites. Adding beneficial bacteria to a glucosinolate-rich diet may increase glucosinolate transformation, thereby increasing host exposure to bioactives.

  7. Natural Killer Cells Are Activated by Lactic Acid Bacteria-Matured Dendritic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    Natural killer (NK) cells are cells of the non-specific immune system lysing altered self-cells. A non-cytolytic subset of NK cells may serve a regulatory role by secreting cytokines. Bacteria translocating across the gastrointestinal mucosa are presumed to gain access to NK cells, as consumption...... of certain lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxicity. Here, we investigated how human gut flora-derived lactobacilli affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human NK cells upon bacterial stimulation. Human peripheral blood NK cells were...... incubated with 10 microg/ml UV-inactivated bacteria or 10 microg/ml phytohemagglutinin (PHA) for four days. Proliferation was assessed by incorporation of radioactive thymidine into NK cell DNA. The IFN-gamma concentration was measured by ELISA. Incubation of NK cells with a Lactobacillus acidophilus strain...

  8. Impact of gluconic fermentation of strawberry using acetic acid bacteria on amino acids and biogenic amines profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordóñez, J L; Sainz, F; Callejón, R M; Troncoso, A M; Torija, M J; García-Parrilla, M C

    2015-07-01

    This paper studies the amino acid profile of beverages obtained through the fermentation of strawberry purée by a surface culture using three strains belonging to different acetic acid bacteria species (one of Gluconobacter japonicus, one of Gluconobacter oxydans and one of Acetobacter malorum). An HPLC-UV method involving diethyl ethoxymethylenemalonate (DEEMM) was adapted and validated. From the entire set of 21 amino acids, multiple linear regressions showed that glutamine, alanine, arginine, tryptophan, GABA and proline were significantly related to the fermentation process. Furthermore, linear discriminant analysis classified 100% of the samples correctly in accordance with the microorganism involved. G. japonicus consumed glucose most quickly and achieved the greatest decrease in amino acid concentration. None of the 8 biogenic amines were detected in the final products, which could serve as a safety guarantee for these strawberry gluconic fermentation beverages, in this regard.

  9. Composition of lactic acid bacteria in dairy products and their effect on tourism development of inner Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the development of dairy industry in Inner Mongolia has accelerated its economic growth, and its grassland culture has become appealing to the public. As an important support industry for the economic development in tourism area of Inner Mongolia, dairy industry can create economic value for the development of tourism. In view of the importance of dairy products-the habitat of lactic acid bacteria, this study aims to reveal the composition of lactic acid bacteria in dairy products and isolate lactic acid bacteria resources. Firstly, we selected 60 traditional dairy product samples (from the pasture in scenic area of Inner Mongolia as the research objects. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, lactic acid bacteria in the samples were isolated and identified; Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR technology was applied to the comparative analysis on the population of dominant bacteria in samples. It was found that there were significant differences in the numbers of dominant bacteria in different dairy products. With the advantages of improving nutritional value and extending storage time of dairy products, lactic acid bacteria is contributive to the development of dairy industry, which further promotes the prosperity of economy and tourism. Therefore, it is of great importance to study the composition of lactic acid bacteria in dairy products.

  10. Application of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) in freshness keeping of tilapia fillets as sashimi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Rong; Liu, Qi; Chen, Shengjun; Yang, Xianqing; Li, Laihao

    2015-08-01

    Aquatic products are extremely perishable food commodities. Developing methods to keep the freshness of fish represents a major task of the fishery processing industry. Application of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) as food preservative is a novel approach. In the present study, the possibility of using lactic acid bacteria in freshness keeping of tilapia fillets as sashimi was examined. Fish fillets were dipped in Lactobacillus plantarum 1.19 (obtained from China General Microbiological Culture Collection Center) suspension as LAB-treated group. Changes in K-value, APC, sensory properties and microbial flora were analyzed. Results showed that LAB treatment slowed the increase of K-value and APC in the earlier storage, and caused a smooth decrease in sensory score. Gram-negative bacteria dominated during refrigerated storage, with Pseudomonas and Aeromonas being relatively abundant. Lactobacillus plantarum 1.19 had no obvious inhibitory effect against these Gram-negatives. However, Lactobacillus plantarum 1.19 changed the composition of Gram-positive bacteria. No Micrococcus were detected and the proportion of Staphylococcus decreased in the spoiled LAB-treated samples. The period that tilapia fillets could be used as sashimi material extended from 24 h to 48 h after LAB treatment. The potential of using LAB in sashimi processing was confirmed.

  11. Modelling of the acid base properties of two thermophilic bacteria at different growth times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Hannah T. M.; Bremer, Phil J.; McQuillan, A. James; Daughney, Christopher J.

    2008-09-01

    Acid-base titrations and electrophoretic mobility measurements were conducted on the thermophilic bacteria Anoxybacillus flavithermus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus at two different growth times corresponding to exponential and stationary/death phase. The data showed significant differences between the two investigated growth times for both bacterial species. In stationary/death phase samples, cells were disrupted and their buffering capacity was lower than that of exponential phase cells. For G. stearothermophilus the electrophoretic mobility profiles changed dramatically. Chemical equilibrium models were developed to simultaneously describe the data from the titrations and the electrophoretic mobility measurements. A simple approach was developed to determine confidence intervals for the overall variance between the model and the experimental data, in order to identify statistically significant changes in model fit and thereby select the simplest model that was able to adequately describe each data set. Exponential phase cells of the investigated thermophiles had a higher total site concentration than the average found for mesophilic bacteria (based on a previously published generalised model for the acid-base behaviour of mesophiles), whereas the opposite was true for cells in stationary/death phase. The results of this study indicate that growth phase is an important parameter that can affect ion binding by bacteria, that growth phase should be considered when developing or employing chemical models for bacteria-bearing systems.

  12. Commensal bacteria and essential amino acids control food choice behavior and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão-Gonçalves, Ricardo; Carvalho-Santos, Zita; Francisco, Ana Patrícia; Fioreze, Gabriela Tondolo; Anjos, Margarida; Baltazar, Célia; Elias, Ana Paula; Itskov, Pavel M; Piper, Matthew D W; Ribeiro, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Choosing the right nutrients to consume is essential to health and wellbeing across species. However, the factors that influence these decisions are poorly understood. This is particularly true for dietary proteins, which are important determinants of lifespan and reproduction. We show that in Drosophila melanogaster, essential amino acids (eAAs) and the concerted action of the commensal bacteria Acetobacter pomorum and Lactobacilli are critical modulators of food choice. Using a chemically defined diet, we show that the absence of any single eAA from the diet is sufficient to elicit specific appetites for amino acid (AA)-rich food. Furthermore, commensal bacteria buffer the animal from the lack of dietary eAAs: both increased yeast appetite and decreased reproduction induced by eAA deprivation are rescued by the presence of commensals. Surprisingly, these effects do not seem to be due to changes in AA titers, suggesting that gut bacteria act through a different mechanism to change behavior and reproduction. Thus, eAAs and commensal bacteria are potent modulators of feeding decisions and reproductive output. This demonstrates how the interaction of specific nutrients with the microbiome can shape behavioral decisions and life history traits.

  13. Dual-coated lactic acid bacteria: an emerging innovative technology in the field of probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Calatayud, Guillermo; Margolles, Abelardo

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are living micro-organisms that do not naturally have shelf life, and normally are weakly protected against the digestive action of the GI tract. A new dual coating technology has been developed in an effort to maximize survival, that is, to be able to reach the intestine alive and in sufficient numbers to confer the beneficial health effects on the host. Dual-coating of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is the result of fourth-generation coating technology for the protection of these bacteria at least 100-fold or greater than the uncoated LAB. This innovative technique involves a first pH-dependent protein layer that protects bacteria from gastric acid and bile salt, and a second polysaccharide matrix that protects bacteria from external factors, such as humidity, temperature and pressure, as well as the digestive action during the passage through the GI tract. Dual-coated probiotic formulation is applicable to different therapeutic areas, including irritable bowel syndrome, atopic dermatitis, acute diarrhea, chronic constipation, Helicobacter pylori eradication, and prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. An updated review of the efficacy of doubly coated probiotic strains for improving bacterial survival in the intestinal tract and its consequent clinical benefits in humans is here presented.

  14. Novel Simplified and Rapid Method for Screening and Isolation of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Producing Marine Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Tilay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial production of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs is a potential biotechnological approach for production of valuable nutraceuticals. Reliable method for screening of number of strains within short period of time is great need. Here, we report a novel simplified method for screening and isolation of PUFA-producing bacteria by direct visualization using the H2O2-plate assay. The oxidative stability of PUFAs in growing bacteria towards added H2O2 is a distinguishing characteristic between the PUFAs producers (no zone of inhibition and non-PUFAs producers (zone of inhibition by direct visualization. The confirmation of assay results was performed by injecting fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs produced by selected marine bacteria to Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GCMS. To date, this assay is the most effective, inexpensive, and specific method for bacteria producing PUFAs and shows drastically reduction in the number of samples thus saves the time, effort, and cost of screening and isolating strains of bacterial PUFAs producers.

  15. Molecular Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria Producing Antimicrobial Agents from Bakasang, An Indonesian Traditional Fermented Fish Product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Joan Lawalata

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractTwenty seven strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB were isolated from bakasang, Indonesian traditional fermented fish product. In general, LAB have inhibitory activity againts pathogenic bacteria and spoilage bacteria. Screening for antimicrobia activity of isolates were performed with well-diffusion method. One isolate that was designed as Pediococcus BksC24 was the strongest against bacteria pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. This strain was further identified by 16S rRNA gen sequence comparison. Isolates LAB producing antimicrobial agents from bakasang were identified as Pediococcus acidilactici.Keywords : Bakasang, LAB, antimicrobial, phenotypic characteristics, 16S rRNA gene

  16. Development of growth rate measuring method for intracellular, parasitic acid-fast bacteria using radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Noboru; Fukutomi, Yasuo [National Inst. of Infectious Deseases, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    To prevent and treat infections diseases caused by pathogenic acid-fast bacteria such as Mycobacterium leprae, Tubercle bacillus, it is important to elucidate the mechanisms of intracellular proliferations of these bacteria. This research project was started to make DNA library using a new constructed shuttle vector. Development of in vitro evaluation method for intracellular proliferation of mycobacterium and its transformed cells was attempted on the basis of Buddemeyer method. This method was able to precisely determine the metabolic activities as low as those in leprae and its modified method using {sup 14}C-palmitic acid was highly sensitive and the results were obtainable in a shorter period. The generated CO{sub 2} was satisfactorily absorbed into scintillator without using a filter paper. A new culture medium from which arginine, a NO-producing compound was eliminated was used to repress the sterilizing effects of NO, but the metabolic activities of leprae was not enhanced. (M.N.)

  17. The influence of gene transfer on the lactic acid bacteria evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Višnja Bačun-Družina

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the case of preparing various dairy products, the exploitation of lactic acid bacteria has been essential in the course of past millennia in all known nations. Numerous comparative analyses of gene and genome sequences reveal that the exchange of genetic material within and between bacterial species is far more general and frequent than has previously been thought. Consequently, the horizontal gene transfer between distant species or within the same species is an important factor in the Lactobacillales evolution. Knowledge about the exchange of lactobacillus genetic information through horizontal gene transfer, mobile genetic elements, and its evolution is very important due to characterizations and stability maintenance of autochthonous as well as industrial lactic acid bacteria strains in dairy products that benefit human health.

  18. Effect of oxidoreduction potential on aroma biosynthesis by lactic acid bacteria in nonfat yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, F; Cachon, R; Pernin, K; De Coninck, J; Gervais, P; Guichard, E; Cayot, N

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of oxidoreduction potential (Eh) on the biosynthesis of aroma compounds by lactic acid bacteria in non-fat yogurt. The study was done with yogurts fermented by Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. The Eh was modified by the application of different gaseous conditions (air, nitrogen, and nitrogen/hydrogen). Acetaldehyde, dimethyl sulfide, diacetyl, and pentane-2,3-dione, as the major endogenous odorant compounds of yogurt, were chosen as tracers for the biosynthesis of aroma compounds by lactic acid bacteria. Oxidative conditions favored the production of acetaldehyde, dimethyl sulfide, and diketones (diacetyl and pentane-2,3-dione). The Eh of the medium influences aroma production in yogurt by modifying the metabolic pathways of Lb. bulgaricus and Strep. thermophilus. The use of Eh as a control parameter during yogurt production could permit the control of aroma formation.

  19. Production and transformation of dissolved neutral sugars and amino acids by bacteria in seawater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Linda; Lechtenfeld, O.J.; Benner, R.;

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the ocean consists of a heterogeneous mixture of molecules, most of which are of unknown origin. Neutral sugars and amino acids are among the few recognizable biomolecules in DOM, and the molecular composition of these biomolecules is shaped primarily by biological...... production and degradation processes. This study provides insight into the bioavailability of biomolecules as well as the chemical composition of DOM produced by bacteria. The molecular compositions of combined neutral sugars and amino acids were investigated in DOM produced by bacteria and in DOM remaining...... after 32 days of bacterial degradation. Results from bioassay incubations with natural seawater (sampled from water masses originating from the surface waters of the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic Ocean) and artificial seawater indicate that the molecular compositions following bacterial...

  20. Biopreservation of refrigerated and vacuum-packed Dicentrarchus labrax by lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bassi, Leila; Hassouna, Mnasser; Shinzato, Naoya; Matsui, Toru

    2009-08-01

    Two lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were selected from 100 LAB isolated from various sea products to examine their use in Dicentrarchus labrax preservation. The isolates, tentatively named strain nr 3 and 7, were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum and L. pentosus, respectively. They showed antagonistic activity against psychrotroph, pathogenic, and coliform bacteria. The antagonistic activity of strain 3 was suggested to be by bacteriocins since activity was abolished by protease treatment, while that of strain 7 was due to the effect of pH decrease caused by the produced organic acids. Their use prevented total volatile basic nitrogen contents (TVB-N) and trimethylamine (TMA) to some extent, suggesting that inoculation could extend the period of storage.

  1. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA FLORA OF KONYA KUFLU CHEESE: A TRADITIONAL CHEESE FROM KONYA PROVINCE IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziba Guley

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the lactic acid bacteria flora of mature Konya Kuflu cheese. Konya Kuflu cheese is a traditional blue cheese which is produced from raw milk without starter culture addition and mould growth occurs in uncontrolled conditions during its ripening. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB isolated from 9 mature Konya Kuflu cheese samples were investigated using a combination of conventional biochemical tests, API test kits, and molecular approaches. For some isolates, different results were obtained according to the identification technique. The overall LAB profile of Konya Kuflu cheese samples revealed that Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus paracasei/Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus plantarum, Enterococcus faecium, and Enterococcus faecalis are the predominant species. In addition, 1 Pediococcus parvulus and 1 Enterococcus durans were also identified.

  2. Structure of an Extracellular Polysaccharide from a Strain of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾笑梅; 马桂荣; 吴厚铭

    2003-01-01

    A new extracellular polysaccharide (EPS-I) isolated and purified from Z222, a strain of Lactic acid bacteria has been investigated. Sugar composition analysis, methylation analysis and 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy reveal that the EPS-I is composed of a pentasaccharide repeating unit. The sequence of sugar residue was determined by using two-dlmensional NMR spectroscopy, including heteronudear multiple-bond correlation(HMBC) and nuclear overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY).

  3. Perspectives on the probiotic potential of lactic acid bacteria from African traditional fermented foods and beverages

    OpenAIRE

    Mokoena, Mduduzi Paulos; Mutanda, Taurai; Olaniran, Ademola O.

    2016-01-01

    Diverse African traditional fermented foods and beverages, produced using different types of fermentation, have been used since antiquity because of their numerous nutritional values. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from these products have emerged as a welcome source of antimicrobials and therapeutics, and are accepted as probiotics. Probiotics are defined as live microbial food supplements which beneficially affect the host by improving the intestinal microbial balance. Currently, popul...

  4. Heterologous surface display on lactic acid bacteria: non-GMO alternative?

    OpenAIRE

    Zadravec, Petra; Štrukelj, Borut; Berlec, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are food-grade hosts for surface display with potential applications in food and therapy. Alternative approaches to surface display on LAB would avoid the use of recombinant DNA technology and genetically-modified organism (GMO)-related regulatory requirements. Non-covalent surface display of proteins can be achieved by fusing them to various cell-wall binding domains, of which the Lysine motif domain (LysM) is particularly well studied. Fusion proteins have been is...

  5. Molecular characterization of lactic acid bacteria isolated from industrially fermented Greek table olives

    OpenAIRE

    Doulgeraki, Agapi; Pramateftaki, Paraskevi; Argyri, Anthoula; Nychas, George John; Tassou, Chrysoula; Panagou, Efstathios

    2012-01-01

    A total of 145 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolates have been recovered from fermented table olives and brine and characterized at strain level with molecular tools. Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) of ApaI macrorestriction fragments was applied for strain differentiation. Species differentiation was based either on Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) (black olives) or on restriction analysis of the amplified 16S rRNA gene (PCR-ARDRA) (brine and green olives). Species ide...

  6. Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase enhances the growth of Leuconostoc mesenteroides lactic acid bacteria at low temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Goto, Seitaro; Kawamoto, Jun; Sato, Satoshi B; Iki, Takashi; WATANABE, Itaru; Kudo, Kazuyuki; Esaki, Nobuyoshi; Kurihara, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can cause deterioration of food quality even at low temperatures. In this study, we investigated the cold-adaptation mechanism of a novel food spoilage LAB, Leuconostoc mesenteroides NH04 (NH04). L. mesenteroides was isolated from several spoiled cooked meat products at a high frequency in our factories. NH04 grew rapidly at low temperatures within the shelf-life period and resulted in heavy financial losses. NH04 grew more rapidly than related strains such as Leuco...

  7. Bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria: purification, properties and use as biopreservatives

    OpenAIRE

    José Luis Parada; Carolina Ricoy Caron; Medeiros,Adriane Bianchi P.; Carlos Ricardo Soccol

    2007-01-01

    Biopreservation systems in foods are of increasing interest for industry and consumers. Bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria and/or their isolated bacteriocins are considered safe additives (GRAS), useful to control the frequent development of pathogens and spoiling microorganisms in foods and feed. The spreading of bacterial antibiotic resistance and the demand for products with fewer chemicals create the necessity of exploring new alternatives, in order to reduce the abusive use of therap...

  8. A review: Health promoting lactic acid bacteria in traditional Indonesian fermented foods

    OpenAIRE

    Lilis Nuraida

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Indonesian fermented foods can be used as potential sources of probiotics as they commonly contain lactic acid bacteria (LAB), including species of Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Enterococcus, Weisella and Leuconostoc. The occurrence of LAB in Indonesian fermented foods is not only limited to lactic fermented foods but is also present in foods with molds as the main starter culture. This review aims to describe the significance of Indonesian fermented foods as potential sources of pr...

  9. Efficacy of microencapsulated lactic acid bacteria in Helicobater pylori eradication therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Maha A Khalil; El-Sheekh, Mostafa M.; El-Adawi, Hala I.; EL-Deeb, Nehal M.; Hussein, Mohamed Z.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Probiotic delivery systems are widely used nutraceutical products for the supplementation of natural intestinal flora. These delivery systems vary greatly in the effectiveness to exert health benefits for a patient. This study focuses on providing probiotic living cells with a physical barrier against adverse environmental conditions. Materials and Methods: Microencapsulation of the selected lactic acid bacteria (LAB) using chitosan and alginate was performed. Physical examination...

  10. Fighting Off Wound Pathogens in Horses with Honeybee Lactic Acid Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Olofsson, Tobias C.; Butler, Éile; Lindholm, Christina; Nilson, Bo; Michanek, Per; Vásquez, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    In the global perspective of antibiotic resistance, it is urgent to find potent topical antibiotics for the use in human and animal infection. Healing of equine wounds, particularly in the limbs, is difficult due to hydrostatic factors and exposure to environmental contaminants, which can lead to heavy bio-burden/biofilm formation and sometimes to infection. Therefore, antibiotics are often prescribed. Recent studies have shown that honeybee-specific lactic acid bacteria (LAB), involved in ho...

  11. Lactic acid bacteria active during the fermentation of wheat silage in small scale silos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, N.J.; Moon, L.C.; Ely, L.O.; Parker, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Wheat was ensiled and periodically analyzed for lactic acid bacteria present. Initially Lactobacillus plantarum, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus cellobiosus and Streptococcus lactis predominated. After two to four days enterococci including S. faecium and S. bovis were present in high populations as well as Lactobacillus plantarum. It was concluded that mixed populations of enterococci and L. plantarum are active in the successful fermentation of wheat silage. (Refs. 5).

  12. Sugar fatty acid esters inhibit biofilm formation by food-borne pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Soichi; Akiyoshi, Yuko; O’Toole, George A.; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2010-01-01

    Effects of food additives on biofilm formation by food-borne pathogenic bacteria were investigated. Thirty-three potential food additives and 3 related compounds were added to the culture medium at concentrations from 0.001 to 0.1% (w/w), followed by inoculation and cultivation of five biofilm-forming bacterial strains for the evaluation of biofilm formation. Among the tested food additives, 21 showed inhibitory effects of biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, and in particular, sugar fatty acid esters showed significant anti-biofilm activity. Sugar fatty acid esters with long chain fatty acid residues (C14-16) exerted their inhibitory effect at the concentration of 0.001%(w/w), but bacterial growth was not affected at this low concentration. Activities of the sugar fatty acid esters positively correlated with the increase of the chain length of the fatty acid residues. Sugar fatty acid esters inhibited the initial attachment of the Staphylococcus aureus cells to the abiotic surface. Sugar fatty acid esters with long chain fatty acid residues (C14-16) also inhibited biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans and Listeria monocytogenes at 0.01%(w/w), while the inhibition of biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa required the addition of a far higher concentration (0.1%(w/w)) of the sugar fatty acid esters. PMID:20089325

  13. Sugar fatty acid esters inhibit biofilm formation by food-borne pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Soichi; Akiyoshi, Yuko; O'Toole, George A; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2010-03-31

    Effects of food additives on biofilm formation by food-borne pathogenic bacteria were investigated. Thirty-three potential food additives and 3 related compounds were added to the culture medium at concentrations from 0.001 to 0.1% (w/w), followed by inoculation and cultivation of five biofilm-forming bacterial strains for the evaluation of biofilm formation. Among the tested food additives, 21 showed inhibitory effects of biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, and in particular, sugar fatty acid esters showed significant anti-biofilm activity. Sugar fatty acid esters with long chain fatty acid residues (C14-16) exerted their inhibitory effect at the concentration of 0.001% (w/w), but bacterial growth was not affected at this low concentration. Activities of the sugar fatty acid esters positively correlated with the increase of the chain length of the fatty acid residues. Sugar fatty acid esters inhibited the initial attachment of the S. aureus cells to the abiotic surface. Sugar fatty acid esters with long chain fatty acid residues (C14-16) also inhibited biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans and Listeria monocytogenes at 0.01% (w/w), while the inhibition of biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa required the addition of a far higher concentration (0.1% (w/w)) of the sugar fatty acid esters.

  14. Bacteriocin-Producing Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Traditional Fermented Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormin, Salasiah; Rusul, Gulam; Radu, Son; Ling, Foo Hooi

    2001-01-01

    Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) isolated from several traditional fermented foods such as “tempeh”, “tempoyak” and “tapai” were screened for the production of bacteriocin. One strain isolated from “tempeh” gives an inhibitory activity against several LAB. The strain was later identified as Lactobacillus plantarum BS2. Study shows that the inhibitory activity was not caused by hydrogen peroxide, organic acids or bacteriophage. The bacteriocin production was maximum after 10 hours of incubation with an activity of 200 AU/ml. The bacteriocin was found to be sensitive towards trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, β-chymotrypsin, α-amylase and lysozyme. PMID:22973159

  15. Non-starter lactic acid bacteria used to improve cheese quality and provide health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settanni, Luca; Moschetti, Giancarlo

    2010-09-01

    Non-starter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) dominate cheese microbiota during ripening. They tolerate the hostile environment well and strongly influence the biochemistry of curd maturation, contributing to the development of the final characteristics of cheese. Several NSLAB are selected on the basis of their health benefits (enhancement of intestinal probiosis, production of bioactive peptides, generation of gamma-aminobutyric acid and inactivation of antigenotoxins) and are employed in cheese-making. This review describes the ecology of NSLAB, and focuses on their application as adjunct cultures, in order to drive the ripening process and promote health advantages. The scopes of future directions of research are summarised.

  16. Distribution of D-amino acids in vinegars and involvement of lactic acid bacteria in the production of D-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutaguchi, Yuta; Ohmori, Taketo; Akano, Hirofumi; Doi, Katsumi; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2013-01-01

    Levels of free D-amino acids were compared in 11 vinegars produced from different sources or through different manufacturing processes. To analyze the D- and L-amino acids, the enantiomers were initially converted into diastereomers using pre-column derivatization with o-phthaldialdehyde plus N-acethyl-L-cysteine or N-tert-butyloxycarbonyl-L-cysteine. This was followed by separation of the resultant fluorescent isoindol derivatives on an octadecylsilyl stationary phase using ultra-performance liquid chromatography. The analyses showed that the total D-amino acid level in lactic fermented tomato vinegar was very high. Furthermore, analysis of the amino acids in tomato juice samples collected after alcoholic, lactic and acetic fermentation during the production of lactic fermented tomato vinegar showed clearly that lactic fermentation is responsible for the D-amino acids production; marked increases in D-amino acids were seen during lactic fermentation, but not during alcoholic or acetic fermentation. This suggests lactic acid bacteria have a greater ability to produce D-amino acids than yeast or acetic acid bacteria.

  17. Key volatile aroma compounds of lactic acid fermented malt based beverages - impact of lactic acid bacteria strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsogning Dongmo, Sorelle; Sacher, Bertram; Kollmannsberger, Hubert; Becker, Thomas

    2017-08-15

    This study aims to define the aroma composition and key aroma compounds of barley malt wort beverages produced from fermentation using six lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry-olfactometry and flame ionization detection was employed; key aroma compounds were determined by means of aroma extract dilution analysis. Fifty-six detected volatile compounds were similar among beverages. However, significant differences were observed in the concentration of individual compounds. Key aroma compounds (flavor dilution (FD) factors ≥16) were β-damascenone, furaneol, phenylacetic acid, 2-phenylethanol, 4-vinylguaiacol, sotolon, methional, vanillin, acetic acid, nor-furaneol, guaiacol and ethyl 2-methylbutanoate. Furthermore, acetaldehyde had the greatest odor activity value of up to 4266. Sensory analyses revealed large differences in the flavor profile. Beverage from L. plantarum Lp. 758 showed the highest FD factors in key aroma compounds and was correlated to fruity flavors. Therefore, we suggest that suitable LAB strain selection may improve the flavor of malt based beverages.

  18. Identification and quantification of antifungal compounds produced by lactic acid bacteria and propionibacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Lay, Céline; Coton, Emmanuel; Le Blay, Gwenaëlle; Chobert, Jean-Marc; Haertlé, Thomas; Choiset, Yvan; Van Long, Nicolas Nguyen; Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Mounier, Jérôme

    2016-12-19

    Fungal growth in bakery products represents the most frequent cause of spoilage and leads to economic losses for industrials and consumers. Bacteria, such as lactic acid bacteria and propionibacteria, are commonly known to play an active role in preservation of fermented food, producing a large range of antifungal metabolites. In a previous study (Le Lay et al., 2016), an extensive screening performed both in vitro and in situ allowed for the selection of bacteria exhibiting an antifungal activity. In the present study, active supernatants against Penicillium corylophilum and Aspergillus niger were analyzed to identify and quantify the antifungal compounds associated with the observed activity. Supernatant treatments (pH neutralization, heating and addition of proteinase K) suggested that organic acids played the most important role in the antifungal activity of each tested supernatant. Different methods (HPLC, mass spectrometry, colorimetric and enzymatic assays) were then applied to analyze the supernatants and it was shown that the main antifungal compounds corresponded to lactic, acetic and propionic acids, ethanol and hydrogen peroxide, as well as other compounds present at low levels such as phenyllactic, hydroxyphenyllactic, azelaic and caproic acids. Based on these results, various combinations of the identified compounds were used to evaluate their effect on conidial germination and fungal growth of P. corylophilum and Eurotium repens. Some combinations presented the same activity than the bacterial culture supernatant thus confirming the involvement of the identified molecules in the antifungal activity. The obtained results suggested that acetic acid was mainly responsible for the antifungal activity against P. corylophilum and played an important role in E. repens inhibition.

  19. Antimicrobial Potentials of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated From a Nigerian Menstruating Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funmilola Abidemi Ayeni

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Racial differences affect the composition of lactic acid bacteria (LAB in women’s vagina. However, the bacteria present in women’s vagina exert protective effect against invading uropathogens through production of several inhibitory compounds. The LAB composition of the vagina of a menstruating Nigerian woman was examined to detect any difference between the subject’s vaginal LAB flora and reported cases of women from western world and to investigate the antimicrobial activities of these lactic acid bacteria against potential uropathogens and enteropathogens with analysis of possible compounds that may be responsible for inhibition. Methods: Informed consent was obtained from the subject. LAB were identified by partially sequencing the 16S rRNA gene. The organic acids were detected through High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC while the volatile compounds were detected by gas chromatography. The hydrogen peroxide production was assayed through enzymatic reactions. Results: Enterococcus faecalis FAA025 and Streptococcus equines FAA026 were the only bacterial strains isolated. The two LAB strains inhibited the growth of all tested uropathogens and enteropathogens to remarkable degree. Both strains produced high quantities of lactic acid while high quantities of hydrogen peroxide, acetic acid and ethanol were only observed in Streptococcus equines FAA026. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that in spite of absence of lactobacilli during menstruation in the subject, other LAB present (Enterococcus faecalis FAA025 and Streptococcus equines FAA026 can exert protective effects against invading uropathogens. Also, the LAB composition of the Nigerian woman is similar to her counterparts in the West. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2013; 12(3.000: 283-290

  20. Isolation and identification of lactid acid bacteria originated from king grass (Pennisetum purpureophoides) as candidate of probiotic for livestock

    OpenAIRE

    Santoso B; Maunatin A; Hariadi BT; Abubakar H

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted to isolate and identify strain of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from king grass, and to determine their potential as candidate of probiotic for livestock. The LAB was isolated by culturing king grass extract in De Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS) medium. The pure culture LAB was used to identify strain of bacteria using Analytical Profile Index (API) 50 CH kit. The result showed that the strain bacteria was identified as Lactobacillus plantarum. L. plantarum was able t...

  1. Study of Lactic Acid Bacteria Community From Raw Milk of Iranian One Humped Camel and Evaluation of Their Probiotic Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Davati, Nafiseh; Tabatabaee Yazdi, Farideh; Zibaee, Saeed; Shahidi, Fakhri; Edalatian, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Camel milk is amongst valuable food sources in Iran. On the other hand, due to the presence of probiotic bacteria and bacteriocin producers in camel milk, probiotic bacteria can be isolated and identified from this food product. Objectives: The objectives of the present research were the isolation and molecular identification of lactic acid bacteria from camel milk and evaluation of their probiotic properties. Materials and Methods: A total of ten samples of camel milk were collec...

  2. Effects of lactic acid bacteria silage inoculation on methane emission and productivity of Holstein Friesian dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellis, J.L.; Hindrichsen, I.K.; Klop, G.; Kinley, R.D.; Milora, N.; Bannink, A.; Dijkstra, J.

    2016-01-01

    Inoculants of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are used to improve silage quality and prevent spoilage via increased production of lactic acid and other organic acids and a rapid decline in silage pH. The addition of LAB inoculants to silage has been associated with increases in silage digestibility, d

  3. Important impacts of intestinal bacteria on utilization of dietary amino acids in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Xiang; Dai, Zhao-Lai; Zhu, Wei-Yun

    2014-11-01

    Bacteria in pig intestine can actively metabolize amino acids (AA). However, little research has focused on the variation in AA metabolism by bacteria from different niches. This study compared the metabolism of AA by microorganisms derived from the lumen and epithelial wall of the pig small intestine, aiming to test the hypothesis that the metabolic profile of AA by gut microbes was niche specific. Samples from the digesta, gut wall washes and gut wall of the jejunum and ileum were used as inocula. Anaerobic media containing single AA were used and cultured for 24 h. The 24-h culture served as inocula for the subsequent 30 times of subcultures. Results showed that for the luminal bacteria, all AA concentrations except phenylalanine in the ileum decreased during the 24-h in vitro incubation with a increase of ammonia concentration, while 4 AA (glutamate, glutamine, arginine and lysine) in the jejunum decreased, with the disappearance rate at 60-95 %. For tightly attached bacteria, all AA concentrations were generally increased during the first 12 h and then decreased coupled with first a decrease and then an increase of ammonia concentration, suggesting a synthesis first and then a catabolism pattern. Among them, glutamate in both segments, histidine in the jejunum and lysine in the ileum increased significantly during the first 12 h and then decreased at 24 h. The concentrations of glutamine and arginine did not change during the first 12 h, but significantly decreased at 24 h. Jejunal lysine and ileal threonine were increased for the first 6 or 12 h. For the loosely attached bacteria, there was no clear pattern for the entire AA metabolism. However, glutamate, methionine and lysine in the jejunum decreased after 24 h of cultivation, while glutamine and threonine in the jejunum and glutamine and lysine in the ileum increased in the first 12 h. During subculture, AA metabolism, either utilization or synthesis, was generally decreased with disappearance

  4. Biotransformations of Bile Acids with Bacteria from Cayambe Slaughterhouse (Ecuador): Synthesis of Bendigoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Stefania; Maldonado Rodriguez, Maria Elena; Rugiero, Irene; De Bastiani, Morena; Medici, Alessandro; Tamburini, Elena; Pedrini, Paola

    2016-08-01

    The biotransformations of cholic acid (1a), deoxycholic acid (1b), and hyodeoxycholic acid (1c) to bendigoles and other metabolites with bacteria isolated from the rural slaughterhouse of Cayambe (Pichincha Province, Ecuador) were reported. The more active strains were characterized, and belong to the genera Pseudomonas and Rhodococcus. Various biotransformation products were obtained depending on bacteria and substrates. Cholic acid (1a) afforded the 3-oxo and 3-oxo-4-ene derivatives 2a and 3a (45% and 45%, resp.) with P. mendocina ECS10, 3,12-dioxo-4-ene derivative 4a (60%) with Rh. erythropolis ECS25, and 9,10-secosteroid 6 (15%) with Rh. erythropolis ECS12. Bendigole F (5a) was obtained in 20% with P. fragi ECS22. Deoxycholic acid (1b) gave 3-oxo derivative 2b with P. prosekii ECS1 and Rh. erythropolis ECS25 (20% and 61%, resp.), while 3-oxo-4-ene derivative 3b was obtained with P. prosekii ECS1 and P. mendocina ECS10 (22% and 95%, resp.). Moreover, P. fragi ECS9 afforded bendigole A (8b; 80%). Finally, P. mendocina ECS10 biotransformed hyodeoxycholic acid (1c) to 3-oxo derivative 2c (50%) and Rh. erythropolis ECS12 to 6α-hydroxy-3-oxo-23,24-dinor-5β-cholan-22-oic acid (9c, 66%). Bendigole G (5c; 13%) with P. prosekii ECS1 and bendigole H (8c) with P. prosekii ECS1 and Rh. erythropolis ECS12 (20% and 16%, resp.) were obtained.

  5. Antifungal sourdough lactic acid bacteria as biopreservation tool in quinoa and rice bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axel, Claudia; Brosnan, Brid; Zannini, Emanuele; Furey, Ambrose; Coffey, Aidan; Arendt, Elke K

    2016-12-19

    The use of sourdough fermented with specific strains of antifungal lactic acid bacteria can reduce chemical preservatives in bakery products. The main objective of this study was to investigate the production of antifungal carboxylic acids after sourdough fermentation of quinoa and rice flour using the antifungal strains Lactobacillus reuteri R29 and Lactobacillus brevis R2Δ as bioprotective cultures and the non-antifungal L. brevis L1105 as a negative control strain. The impact of the fermentation substrate was evaluated in terms of metabolic activity, acidification pattern and quantity of antifungal carboxylic acids. These in situ produced compounds (n=20) were extracted from the sourdough using a QuEChERS method and detected by a new UHPLC-MS/MS chromatography. Furthermore, the sourdough was applied in situ using durability tests against environmental moulds to investigate the biopreservative potential to prolong the shelf life of bread. Organic acid production and TTA values were lowest in rice sourdough. The sourdough fermentation of the different flour substrates generated a complex and significantly different profile of carboxylic acids. Extracted quinoa sourdough detected the greatest number of carboxylic acids (n=11) at a much higher concentration than what was detected from rice sourdough (n=9). Comparing the lactic acid bacteria strains, L. reuteri R29 fermented sourdoughs contained generally higher concentrations of acetic and lactic acid but also the carboxylic acids. Among them, 3-phenyllactic acid and 2-hydroxyisocaproic acid were present at a significant concentration. This was correlated with the superior protein content of quinoa flour and its high protease activity. With the addition of L. reuteri R29 inoculated sourdough, the shelf life was extended by 2 days for quinoa (+100%) and rice bread (+67%) when compared to the non-acidified controls. The L. brevis R2Δ fermented sourdough bread reached a shelf life of 4 days for quinoa (+100%) and

  6. Compositional characteristics of commercial yoghurt based on quantitative determination of viable lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niketić Gordana B.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Yoghurt quality is particularly difficult to standardize because of the many forms, varieties, manufacturing methods, ingredients and consumer preferences that exist. Since these factors will always play an important role, it is unlikely that a uniform yoghurt quality concept will ever emerge, such as has been developed for other dairy products. There are a number of common denominators, however that have bearing on yoghurt quality. Since a number of producers are recognized within the broad category entitled yoghurt. This situation makes yoghurt an interesting, challenging, but also a confusing area to work in. The present investigation was undertaken to isolate from commercial yoghurt the strains involved in its manufacture and determine the characteristics of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp.bulgaricus. This study is concerned with the lactic acid bacteria (L.delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus growth in yoghurt from involving different procedures and with the determination of the number of lactic acid bacteria in dependence of the temperature and acidity in the period of storage. Predominant samples of yoghurt were with 11-107/ml lactic acid lactococci (44.28%.

  7. Population dynamics of mixed cultures of yeast and lactic acid bacteria in cider conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Roseli Dierings

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the malolactic bioconversion in low acidity cider, according Brazilian conditions. The apple must was inoculated with Saccharomyces cerevisiae or S. cerevisiae with Oenococcus oeni. The control contained the indigenous microorganisms. Fermentation assays were carried out with clarified apple must from the Gala variety. At the beginning of fermentation, there was a fast growth of the non-Saccharomyces yeast population. Competitive inhibition occurred in all the assays, either with inoculated or indigenous populations of the yeast. The lactic acid bacteria count was ca. 1.41·10²CFU/mL at the beginning and 10(6CFU/mL after yeast cells autolysis. The lactic bacteria O. oeni reached the highest population (10(7CFU/mL when added to the apple must after the decline of the yeast. The malic acid was totally consumed during the alcoholic fermentation period (80.0 to 95.5 % and lactic acid was still synthesized during the 35 days of malolactic fermentation. These results could be important in order to achieve a high quality brut, or sec cider obtained from the dessert apple must.

  8. Growth inhibitory effect of grape phenolics against wine spoilage yeasts and acetic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorkova, E; Zakova, T; Landa, P; Novakova, J; Vadlejch, J; Kokoska, L

    2013-02-15

    This paper investigates the in vitro antimicrobial potential of 15 grape phenolic compounds of various chemical classes (phenolic acids, stilbenes and flavonoids) using the broth microdilution method against yeasts and acetic acid bacteria frequently occurring in deteriorated wine. Pterostilbene (MICs=32-128 μg/mL), resveratrol (MICs=256-512 μg/mL) and luteolin (MICs=256-512 μg/mL) are among six active compounds that possessed the strongest inhibitory effects against all microorganisms tested. In the case of phenolic acids, myricetin, p-coumaric and ferulic acids exhibited selective antimicrobial activity (MICs=256-512 μg/mL), depending upon yeasts and bacteria tested. In comparison with potassium metabisulphite, all microorganisms tested were more susceptible to the phenolics. The results revealed the antibacterial and antiyeast effects against wine spoilage microorganisms of several highly potent phenolics naturally occurring in grapes. These findings also provide arguments for further investigation of stilbenes as prospective compounds reducing the need for the use of sulphites in winemaking.

  9. Antimicrobial resistance of coagulase-negative staphylococci and lactic acid bacteria from industrially produced dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevijo Zdolec

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the susceptibility to clindamycin, tetracycline, amikacin, amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, enrofloxacine, vancomycin, trimethoprim + sulphametoxazol, tobramycin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, penicillin and trimethoprim was tested in coagulase-negative staphylococci (n=78 and lactic acid bacteria (n=30 by means of disk diffusion test and E-test. The isolates were collected from soft and hard cheeses, butter and brine. All isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci were susceptible to clindamycin, amikacin, amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, enrofloxacine, vancomycin, chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin according to CLSI breakpoints. A total of 30 staphylococci isolates (38.46 % were resistant to erythromycin, 18 to penicillin (23.07 %, 4 to tetracycline (5.12 %, and one isolate to trimethoprim, tobramicin and trimethoprim + sulphametoxazol (1.28 %. Among 78 tested staphylococci, 35 of them were resistant to at least one antimicrobial substance (44.87 %. The rate of resistant isolates of different soft cheese types ranged from 22 to 70 %, while resistant staphylococci were absent in hard cheese and brine. The growth of lactic acid bacteria was not influenced by trimethoprim + sulphametoxazol (n=29, vancomycin (n=29, trimethoprim (n=28, amikacin (n=10 and tobramycin (n=10. The results show that significant part of apathogenic microbiota in different dairy products is phenotypically resistant to antimicrobial agents.

  10. Influence of levan-producing acetic acid bacteria on buckwheat-sourdough breads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ua-Arak, Tharalinee; Jakob, Frank; Vogel, Rudi F

    2017-08-01

    Buckwheat sourdoughs supplemented with molasses as natural sucrose source were fermented with levan-producing Gluconobacter (G.) albidus TMW 2.1191 and Kozakia (K.) baliensis NBRC 16680. Cell growth, concomitant levan and low-molecular-weight metabolite production were monitored. Sourdough breads were prepared with different sourdoughs from both strains (24, 30 and 48 h fermentation, respectively) and analyzed with respect to bread volume, crumb hardness and sensory characteristics. During fermentation, levan, acetic and gluconic acids were increasingly produced, while spontaneously co-growing lactic acid bacteria additionally formed acetic and lactic acids. Sourdoughs from both strains obtained upon 24 h of fermentation significantly improved the bread sensory and quality, including higher specific volume as well as lower crumb hardness. Buckwheat doughs containing isolated levan, with similar molecular size and mass compared to in situ produced levan in the sourdough at 48 h, verified the positive effect of levan on bread quality. However, the positive effects of levan were masked to a certain extent by the impact from the natural acidification during fermentations. While levan-producing acetic acid bacteria are a promising alternative for the development of clean-label gluten-free breads without the need of additives, an appropriate balance between acidification and levan production (amount and structure) must be reached. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Population dynamics of acetic acid bacteria during traditional wine vinegar production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegas, Carlos; Mateo, Estibaliz; González, Angel; Jara, Carla; Guillamón, José Manuel; Poblet, Montse; Torija, Ma Jesús; Mas, Albert

    2010-03-31

    The population dynamics of acetic acid bacteria in traditional vinegar production was determined in two independent vinegar plants at both the species and strain level. The effect of barrels made of four different woods upon the population dynamics was also determined. Acetic acid bacteria were isolated on solid media and the species were identified by RFLP-PCR of 16S rRNA genes and confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, while strains were typed by ERIC-PCR and (GTG)(5)-rep-PCR. The most widely isolated species was Acetobacter pasteurianus, which accounted for 100% of all the isolates during most of the acetification. Gluconacetobacter europaeus only appeared at any notable level at the end of the process in oak barrels from one vinegar plant. The various A. pasteurianus strains showed a clear succession as the concentration of acetic acid increased. In both vinegar plants the relative dominance of different strains was modified as the concentrations of acetic acid increased, and strain diversity tended to reduce at the end of the process.

  12. ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF LACTIC ACID PRODUCING BACTERIA FROM CAMEL MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toqeer Ahmad, Rashida Kanwal, Izhar Hussain Athar1, Najam Ayub

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB were isolated from camel milk by culturing the camel milk on specific media and pure culture was obtained by sub culturing. Purification of culture was confirmed by Gram's staining and identified by different bio-chemical tests. Camel milk contains lactic acid producing bacteria including Strpptococci such as S. cremoris and S. lactis and Lactobacilli such as L. acidophilus L. acidophilus grows more rapidly in camel milk than others as its growth is supported by camel milk. A variety of food can be preserved by lactic acid fermentation, so starter culture was prepared from strains which were isolated from camel milk. Camel and buffalo's milk cheese was prepared by using starter culture. The strains isolated from camel milk were best for acid production and can coagulate the milk in less lime. Camel milk cheese was prepared and compared with buffalo's milk cheese. It is concluded that cheese can be prepared successfully from camel milk and better results can be obtained by coagulating milk with starter culture.

  13. Current status and emerging role of glutathione in food grade lactic acid bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have taken centre stage in perspectives of modern fermented food industry and probiotic based therapeutics. These bacteria encounter various stress conditions during industrial processing or in the gastrointestinal environment. Such conditions are overcome by complex molecular assemblies capable of synthesizing and/or metabolizing molecules that play a specific role in stress adaptation. Thiols are important class of molecules which contribute towards stress management in cell. Glutathione, a low molecular weight thiol antioxidant distributed widely in eukaryotes and Gram negative organisms, is present sporadically in Gram positive bacteria. However, new insights on its occurrence and role in the latter group are coming to light. Some LAB and closely related Gram positive organisms are proposed to possess glutathione synthesis and/or utilization machinery. Also, supplementation of glutathione in food grade LAB is gaining attention for its role in stress protection and as a nutrient and sulfur source. Owing to the immense benefits of glutathione, its release by probiotic bacteria could also find important applications in health improvement. This review presents our current understanding about the status of glutathione and its role as an exogenously added molecule in food grade LAB and closely related organisms. PMID:22920585

  14. The Occurrence of Beer Spoilage Lactic Acid Bacteria in Craft Beer Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Cristiana; Osimani, Andrea; Milanović, Vesna; Taccari, Manuela; Aquilanti, Lucia; Clementi, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    Beer is one of the world's most ancient and widely consumed fermented alcoholic beverages produced with water, malted cereal grains (generally barley and wheat), hops, and yeast. Beer is considered an unfavorable substrate of growth for many microorganisms, however, there are a limited number of bacteria and yeasts, which are capable of growth and may spoil beer especially if it is not pasteurized or sterile-filtered as craft beer. The aim of this research study was to track beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria (LAB) inside a brewery and during the craft beer production process. To that end, indoor air and work surface samples, collected in the brewery under study, together with commercial active dry yeasts, exhausted yeasts, yeast pellet (obtained after mature beer centrifugation), and spoiled beers were analyzed through culture-dependent methods and PCR-DGGE in order to identify the contaminant LAB species and the source of contamination. Lactobacillus brevis was detected in a spoiled beer and in a commercial active dry yeast. Other LAB species and bacteria ascribed to Staphylococcus sp., Enterobaceriaceae, and Acetobacter sp. were found in the brewery. In conclusion, the PCR-DGGE technique coupled with the culture-dependent method was found to be a useful tool for identifying the beer spoilage bacteria and the source of contamination. The analyses carried out on raw materials, by-products, final products, and the brewery were useful for implementing a sanitization plan to be adopted in the production plant.

  15. Interactions of the cell-wall glycopolymers of lactic acid bacteria with their bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pierre eChapot-Chartier

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are Gram positive bacteria widely used in the production of fermented food in particular cheese and yoghurts. Bacteriophage infections during fermentation processes have been for many years a major industrial concern and have stimulated numerous research efforts. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of bacteriophage interactions with their host bacteria is required for the development of efficient strategies to fight against infections. The bacterial cell wall plays key roles in these interactions. First, bacteriophages must adsorb at the bacterial surface through specific interactions with receptors that are cell wall components. At next step, phages must overcome the barrier constituted by cell wall peptidoglycan to inject DNA inside bacterial cell. Also at the end of the infection cycle, phages synthesize endolysins able to hydrolyze peptidoglycan and lyse bacterial cells to release phage progeny. In the last decade, concomitant development of genomics and structural analysis of cell wall components allowed considerable advances in the knowledge of their structure and function in several model LAB. Here, we describe the present knowledge on the structure of the cell wall glycopolymers of the best characterized LAB emphasizing their structural variations and we present the available data regarding their role in bacteria-phage specific interactions at the different steps of the infection cycle.

  16. Current status and emerging role of glutathione in food grade lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pophaly Sarang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lactic acid bacteria (LAB have taken centre stage in perspectives of modern fermented food industry and probiotic based therapeutics. These bacteria encounter various stress conditions during industrial processing or in the gastrointestinal environment. Such conditions are overcome by complex molecular assemblies capable of synthesizing and/or metabolizing molecules that play a specific role in stress adaptation. Thiols are important class of molecules which contribute towards stress management in cell. Glutathione, a low molecular weight thiol antioxidant distributed widely in eukaryotes and Gram negative organisms, is present sporadically in Gram positive bacteria. However, new insights on its occurrence and role in the latter group are coming to light. Some LAB and closely related Gram positive organisms are proposed to possess glutathione synthesis and/or utilization machinery. Also, supplementation of glutathione in food grade LAB is gaining attention for its role in stress protection and as a nutrient and sulfur source. Owing to the immense benefits of glutathione, its release by probiotic bacteria could also find important applications in health improvement. This review presents our current understanding about the status of glutathione and its role as an exogenously added molecule in food grade LAB and closely related organisms.

  17. Current status and emerging role of glutathione in food grade lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pophaly, Sarang Dilip; Singh, Rameshwar; Pophaly, Saurabh Dilip; Kaushik, Jai K; Tomar, Sudhir Kumar

    2012-08-25

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have taken centre stage in perspectives of modern fermented food industry and probiotic based therapeutics. These bacteria encounter various stress conditions during industrial processing or in the gastrointestinal environment. Such conditions are overcome by complex molecular assemblies capable of synthesizing and/or metabolizing molecules that play a specific role in stress adaptation. Thiols are important class of molecules which contribute towards stress management in cell. Glutathione, a low molecular weight thiol antioxidant distributed widely in eukaryotes and Gram negative organisms, is present sporadically in Gram positive bacteria. However, new insights on its occurrence and role in the latter group are coming to light. Some LAB and closely related Gram positive organisms are proposed to possess glutathione synthesis and/or utilization machinery. Also, supplementation of glutathione in food grade LAB is gaining attention for its role in stress protection and as a nutrient and sulfur source. Owing to the immense benefits of glutathione, its release by probiotic bacteria could also find important applications in health improvement. This review presents our current understanding about the status of glutathione and its role as an exogenously added molecule in food grade LAB and closely related organisms.

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of antimicrobial lactic acid bacteria from farmed seabass Dicentrarchus labrax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourouni, Ouissal Chahad; El Bour, Monia; Calo-Mata, Pilar; Mraouna, Radhia; Abedellatif, Boudabous; Barros-Velàzquez, Jorge

    2012-04-01

    The use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in the prevention or reduction of fish diseases is receiving increasing attention. In the present study, 47 LAB strains were isolated from farmed seabass ( Dicentrarchus labrax ) and were phenotypically and phylogenetically analysed by 16S rDNA and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA - polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR). Their antimicrobial effect was tested in vitro against a wide variety of pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. Most of the strains isolated were enterococci belonging to the following species: Enterococcus faecium (59%), Enterococcus faecalis (21%), Enterococcus sanguinicola (4 strains), Enterococcus mundtii (1 strain), Enterococcus pseudoavium (1 strain), and Lactococcus lactis (1 strain). An Aerococcus viridans strain was also isolated. The survey of their antimicrobial susceptibility showed that all isolates were sensitive to vancomycin and exhibited resistance to between 4 and 10 other antibiotics relevant for therapy in human and animal medicine. Different patterns of resistance were noted for skin and intestines isolates. More than 69% (32 strains) of the isolates inhibited the growth of the majority of pathogenic and spoilage bacteria tested, including Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Aeromonas salmonicida, Vibrio anguillarum, and Carnobacterium sp. To our knowledge, this is the first report of bioactive enterococcal species isolated from seabass that could potentially inhibit the undesirable bacteria found in food systems.

  19. Incidence of Bacteriocins Produced by Food-Related Lactic Acid Bacteria Active towards Oral Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Papadimitriou

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigated the incidence of bacteriocins produced by 236 lactic acid bacteria (LAB food isolates against pathogenic or opportunistic pathogenic oral bacteria. This set of LAB contained several strains (≥17% producing bacteriocins active against food-related bacteria. Interestingly only Streptococcus macedonicus ACA-DC 198 was able to inhibit the growth of Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus gordonii, while Lactobacillus fermentum ACA-DC 179 and Lactobacillus plantarun ACA-DC 269 produced bacteriocins solely against Streptococcus oralis. Thus, the percentage of strains that were found to produce bacteriocins against oral bacteria was ~1.3%. The rarity of bacteriocins active against oral LAB pathogens produced by food-related LAB was unexpected given their close phylogenetic relationship. Nevertheless, when tested in inhibition assays, the potency of the bacteriocin(s of S. macedonicus ACA-DC 198 against the three oral streptococci was high. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy combined with principal component analysis revealed that exposure of the target cells to the antimicrobial compounds caused major alterations of key cellular constituents. Our findings indicate that bacteriocins produced by food-related LAB against oral LAB may be rare, but deserve further investigation since, when discovered, they can be effective antimicrobials.

  20. Tomato ABSCISIC ACID STRESS RIPENING (ASR) Gene Family Revisited: e107117

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ido Golan; Pia Guadalupe Dominguez; Zvia Konrad; Doron Shkolnik-Inbar; Fernando Carrari; Dudy Bar-Zvi

    2014-01-01

      Tomato ABSCISIC ACID RIPENING 1 (ASR1) was the first cloned plant ASR gene. ASR orthologs were then cloned from a large number of monocot, dicot and gymnosperm plants, where they are mostly involved in response to abiotic...

  1. Characterisation and biochemical properties of predominant lactic acid bacteria from fermenting cassava for selection as starter cultures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kostinek, M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A total of 375 lactic acid bacteria were isolated from fermenting cassava in South Africa, Benin, Kenya and Germany, and were characterised by phenotypic and genotypic tests. These could be divided into five main groups comprising strains...

  2. Modelling the effect of lactic acid bacteria from starter- and aroma culture on growth of Listeria monocytogenes in cottage cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Eklöw, Annelie; Dalgaard, Paw

    2014-01-01

    Four mathematical models were developed and validated for simultaneous growth of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria from added cultures and Listeria monocytogenes, during chilled storage of cottage cheese with freshor cultured cream dressing. The mathematical models include the effect of temperature...... cheese to improvemodel performance. The inhibiting effect of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria from added cultures on growth of L. monocytogenes was efficiently modelled using the Jameson approach. The new models appropriately predicted the maximum population density of L. monocytogenes in cottage cheese....... The developed models were successfully validated by using 25 growth rates for L. monocytogenes, 17 growth rates for lactic acid bacteria and a total of 26 growth curves for simultaneous growth of L. monocytogenes and lactic acid bacteria in cottage cheese. These data were used in combination with bias...

  3. Screening of lactic acid bacteria from Indonesia reveals glucansucrase and fructansucrase genes in two different Weissella confusa strains from soya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malik, Amarila; Radji, Maksum; Kralj, Slavko; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2009-01-01

    Homopolysaccharide (glucan and fructan) synthesis from sucrose by sucrase enzymes in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) has been well studied in the genera Leuconostoc, Streptococcus and Lactobacillus. This study aimed to identify and characterize genes encoding glucansucrase/glucosyltransferase (GTF) and

  4. The aflatoxin B1 isolating potential of two lactic acid bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adel Hamidi; Reza Mirnejad; Emad Yahaghi; Vahid Behnod; Ali Mirhosseini; Sajad Amani; Sara Sattari; Ebrahim Khodaverdi Darian

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To determine lactic acid bacteria’s capability to enhance the process of binding and isolating aflatoxin B1 and to utilize such lactic acid bacteria as a food supplement or probiotic products for preventing absorption of aflatoxin B1 in human and animal bodies. Methods: In the present research, the bacteria were isolated from five different sources. For surveying the capability of the bacteria in isolating aflatoxin B1, ELISA method was implemented, and for identifying the resultant strains through 16S rRNA sequencing method, universal primers were applied. Results: Among the strains which were isolated, two strains of Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus beveris exhibited the capability of absorbing and isolating aflatoxin B1 by respectively absorbing and discharging 17.4%and 34.7%of the aforementioned toxin existing in the experiment solution. Conclusions:Strains of Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus beveris were isolated from human feces and local milk samples, respectively. And both strains has the ability to isolate or bind with aflatoxin B1.

  5. Coexistence of Lactic Acid Bacteria and Potential Spoilage Microbiota in a Dairy Processing Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellato, Giuseppina; De Filippis, Francesca; La Storia, Antonietta; Ercolini, Danilo

    2015-11-01

    Microbial contamination in food processing plants can play a fundamental role in food quality and safety. In this study, the microbiota in a dairy plant was studied by both 16S rRNA- and 26S rRNA-based culture-independent high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Environmental samples from surfaces and tools were studied along with the different types of cheese produced in the same plant. The microbiota of environmental swabs was very complex, including more than 200 operational taxonomic units with extremely variable relative abundances (0.01 to 99%) depending on the species and sample. A core microbiota shared by 70% of the samples indicated a coexistence of lactic acid bacteria with a remarkable level of Streptococcus thermophilus and possible spoilage-associated bacteria, including Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and Psychrobacter, with a relative abundance above 50%. The most abundant yeasts were Kluyveromyces marxianus, Yamadazyma triangularis, Trichosporon faecale, and Debaryomyces hansenii. Beta-diversity analyses showed a clear separation of environmental and cheese samples based on both yeast and bacterial community structure. In addition, predicted metagenomes also indicated differential distribution of metabolic pathways between the two categories of samples. Cooccurrence and coexclusion pattern analyses indicated that the occurrence of potential spoilers was excluded by lactic acid bacteria. In addition, their persistence in the environment can be helpful to counter the development of potential spoilers that may contaminate the cheeses, with possible negative effects on their microbiological quality.

  6. Influence of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on the Transport and Deposition Behaviors of Bacteria in Quartz Sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Tong, Meiping; Kim, Hyunjung

    2016-03-01

    The significance of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) on the transport and deposition behaviors of bacteria (Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis) in quartz sand is examined in both NaCl and CaCl2 solutions at pH 5.6 by comparing both breakthrough curves and retained profiles with PFOA in solutions versus those without PFOA. All test conditions are found to be highly unfavorable for cell deposition regardless of the presence of PFOA; however, 7%-46% cell deposition is observed depending on the conditions. The cell deposition may be attributed to micro- or nanoscale roughness and/or to chemical heterogeneity of the sand surface. The results show that, under all examined conditions, PFOA in suspensions increases cell transport and decreases cell deposition in porous media regardless of cell type, presence or absence of extracellular polymeric substances, ionic strength, and ion valence. We find that the additional repulsion between bacteria and quartz sand caused by both acid-base interaction and steric repulsion as well as the competition for deposition sites on quartz sand surfaces by PFOA are responsible for the enhanced transport and decreased deposition of bacteria with PFOA in solutions.

  7. Screening of species-specific lactic acid bacteria for veal calves multi-strain probiotic adjuncts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, Barbara; Agazzi, Alessandro; Bersani, Carla; De Dea, Paola; Pecorini, Chiara; Pirani, Silvia; Rebucci, Raffaella; Savoini, Giovanni; Stella, Simone; Stenico, Alberta; Tirloni, Erica; Domeneghini, Cinzia

    2011-06-01

    The selection of promising specific species of lactic acid bacteria with potential probiotic characteristics is of particular interest in producing multi species-specific probiotic adjuncts in veal calves rearing. The aim of the present work was to select and evaluate in vitro the functional activity of lactic acid bacteria, Bifidobacterium longum and Bacillus coagulans strains isolated from veal calves in order to assess their potential use as multi species-specific probiotics for veal calves. For this purpose, bacterial strains isolated from faeces collected from 40 healthy 50-day-calves, were identified by RiboPrinter and 16s rRNA gene sequence. The most frequent strains belonged to the species B. longum, Streptococcus bovis, Lactobacillus animalis and Streptococcus macedonicus. Among these, 7 strains were chosen for testing their probiotic characteristics in vitro. Three strains, namely L. animalis SB310, Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei SB137 and B. coagulans SB117 showed varying individual but promising capabilities to survive in the gastrointestinal tract, to adhere, to produce antimicrobial compounds. These three selected species-specific bacteria demonstrated in vitro, both singularly and mixed, the functional properties needed for their use as potential probiotics in veal calves.

  8. Fermentation profile and identification of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts of rehydrated corn kernel silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, B F; Ávila, C L S; Bernardes, T F; Pereira, M N; Santos, C; Schwan, R F

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemical and microbiological characteristics and to identify the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeasts involved in rehydrated corn kernel silage. Four replicates for each fermentation time: 5, 15, 30, 60, 90, 150, 210 and 280 days were prepared. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and PCR-based identification were utilized to identify LAB and yeasts. Eighteen bacteria and four yeast species were identified. The bacteria population reached maximum growth after 15 days and moulds were detected up to this time. The highest dry matter (DM) loss was 7·6% after 280 days. The low concentration of water-soluble carbohydrates (20 g kg(-1) of DM) was not limiting for fermentation, although the reduction in pH and acid production occurred slowly. Storage of the rehydrated corn kernel silage increased digestibility up to day 280. This silage was dominated by LAB but showed a slow decrease in pH values. This technique of corn storage on farms increased the DM digestibility. This study was the first to evaluate the rehydrated corn kernel silage fermentation dynamics and our findings are relevant to optimization of this silage fermentation. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. ISOLATION OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIA UNDER LOW TEMPERATURE FOR THE PREPARATION OF YOGURT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javid Ahmad Bhat

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of isolation of Lactic acid bacteria was carried out under low temperature for the preparation of Yogurt by using various food supplements like carrot, ground-nut and tomato juices. Methods: Various samples of Cow milk, Skimmed milk were processed along with nutrients like Carrot, ground nut and tomato juices with Tryptone glucose yeast extract agar (TGYA at different temperatures like 50C, 150C and 220C for the isolation of Lactic acid bacteria for the preparation of yogurt. The characteristic isolates were identified by using various biochemical tests and direct microscopy. Results: Lactic acid bacteria (LAB dominated the microbial population of Yogurt, and were identified according to their morphological and physiological characteristics. Among these lactobacilli were frequently occurring organisms. The most abundant species were Lactobacillus delbrueckii subspecies Bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. The Lactic Streptococci was subjected to bio-chemical tests to identify the species. Based on the biochemical reactions the species was identified as Lactococcus Lactis, sub species di-acetylactis. Isolated culture of lactic Streptococci was found to grow at low temperature. When this was used as an inoculum to prepare yogurt at 50C, 150C and 220C curdling took place in 3days time. In order to reduce the setting time, nutrients in the form of carrot, ground-nut and tomato juices were added. The yogurt was found to set at 50C in 30hrs which is considered useful. Acidity of yogurt was found to be 0.53%- 0.55%. The yogurt was found to contain di-acetyl and quality of yogurt was good.

  10. THE EFFECTS OF INOCULANT LACTIC ACID BACTERIA ON THE FERMENTATION AND AEROBIC STABILITY OF SUNFLOWER SILAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fisun Koc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the effects of actic acid bacterial inoculant on the fermentation and aerobic stability of sunflower silages. Sunflower was harvested at the milk stage. Inoculant-1174 (Pioneer®,USA was used as homofermentative lactic acid bacterial inoculant. Inoculant was applied 6.00 log10 cfu/g silage levels. Silages with no additive served as controls. After treatment, the chopped sunflower was ensiled in the PVC type laboratory silos. Three silos for each group were sampled for chemical and microbiological analysis on days 2, 4, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 56 after ensiling. At the end of the ensiling period, all silages were subjected to an aerobic stability test for 14 days. Neither inoculant improved the fermentation parameters of sunflower silages. At the end of the ensiling period, inoculant increased lactic acid bacteria (LAB and decreased yeast and mould numbers of silages. Inoculant treatment did not affect aerobic stability of silages.

  11. Sample to answer: a fully integrated nucleic acid identification system for bacteria monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungkyu; Elsnab, John; Johnson, Michael; Gale, Bruce K.

    2010-02-01

    A fully integrated microfluidic system was developed and incorporates an EC-MWCNT (electrochemical multiwalled carbon nanotube) sensor for the detection of bacteria. Sample metering, reagent metering and delivery was implemented with microvalves and pumps embedded inside the microfluidic system. The nucleic acid extraction was performed using microchannels controlled using automated platforms and a disposable microfluidic silica cartridge. The target samples were flowed and hybridized with probe ssDNA (single strand DNA) across the MWCNT-EC sensor (built on a silicon chip), which was embedded in a microfluidic cell. The 9-pad sensor was scanned before and after hybridization to measure the quantity of RNA (Ribonucleic acid) bound to the array surface. A rapid and accurate sample-in answer-out nucleic acid system was realized with automated volume metering, microfluidic sample preparation, and integrated nano-biosensors.

  12. Fermentation of Prefermented and Extruded Rice Flour by Lactic Acid Bacteria from Sikhae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, C. H.; Min, K. C.; Souane, M.

    1992-01-01

    The acid- and flavor-forming properties of Lactobacillus plantarum and Leuconostoc mesenteroides isolated from Sikhae, a Korean traditional lactic acid fermented fish product, were examined and compared to those of Lactobacillus casei and Lactococcus lactis subsp. diacetylactis DRC3. The effects...... of prefermentation of rice flour in solid-state with Bacillus laevolacticus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, extrusion cooking and addition of soymilk as the substrate of lactic acid fermentation were tested. Extrusion cooking and prefermentation of rice increased the soluble solid and sugar contents before malt...... digestion. The amount of sugar consumption during lactic fermentation varied with the type of bacteria. Leuconostoc mesenteroides(sikhae) and Lactobacillus plantarum(sikhae) increased up to 6 times of original cell number by 24 hrs of fermentation in rice + soymilk substrate, but Lactococcus lactis...

  13. BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF LACTIC ACID PRODUCING BACTERIA AND PREPARATION OF CAMEL MILK CHEESE BY USING STARTER CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    T. Ahmed and R. Kanwal

    2004-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from camel milk by culturing the milk on specific media and pure culture was obtained by sub-culturing. Purification of culture was confirmed by Gram’s staining and identified by different biochemical tests. Camel milk contained lactic acid producing bacteria like Streptococci such as S. cremoris and S. lactis and Lactobacilli such as L. acidophilus. L. acidophilus grew more rapidly in camel milk than others as its growth was supported by camel milk...

  14. Fermentation by amylolytic lactic acid bacteria and consequences for starch digestibility of plantain, breadfruit, and sweet potato flours

    OpenAIRE

    Haydersah, J.; Chevallier, I.; Rochette, Isabelle; Mouquet Rivier, Claire; Picq, Christian; Marianne Pépin, T.; Icard-Vernière, Christèle; Guyot, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The potential of tropical starchy plants such as plantain (Musa paradisiaca), breadfruit (Artocarpus communis), and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) for the development of new fermented foods was investigated by exploiting the capacity of some lactic acid bacteria to hydrolyze starch. The amylolytic lactic acid bacteria (ALAB) Lactobacillus plantarum A6 and Lactobacillus fermentum Ogi E1 were able to change the consistency of thick sticky gelatinized slurries of these starchy fruits and tubers ...

  15. Effect of Goji Berries and Honey on Lactic Acid Bacteria Viability and Shelf Life Stability of Yoghurt

    OpenAIRE

    Ancuţa M. Rotar; Dan Cristian VODNAR; Florina BUNGHEZ; Giorgiana Mihaela CĂTUNESCU; Carmen R. POP; Mirela JIMBOREAN; Semeniuc, Cristina A.

    2015-01-01

    The probiotic properties and the viability of lactic acid bacteria of fermented dairy products can be improved by addition of bioactive compounds originating from natural sources (e.g. goji berries). This study aimed to evaluate how goji berries and honey affect the sensorial quality of yoghurt, the chemical properties, the viability of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and the concurrent microflora development. Two types of yoghurts (yoghurt with goji berries and yoghurt with honey and goji berries...

  16. Characteristics of lactic acid bacteria isolates and their effect on silage fermentation of fruit residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinsong; Tan, Haisheng; Cai, Yimin

    2016-07-01

    The natural lactic acid bacteria (LAB) population, chemical composition, and silage fermentation of fruit residues were studied. Eighty-two strains of LAB were isolated from fruit residues such as banana leaf and stem, pineapple peel, and papaya peel. All strains were gram-positive and catalase-negative bacteria, and they were divided into 7 groups (A-G) according to morphological and biochemical characters. Strains in groups A to F were rods, and group G was cocci. Group F produced gas from glucose; other groups did not. Groups A to C and F formed dl-lactic acid, whereas groups D, E, and G formed l-lactic acid. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence and DNA-DNA hybridization analysis, groups A to G strains were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum (54.9% of the total isolates), Lactobacillus paraplantarum (3.6%), Lactobacillus nagelii (8.5%), Lactobacillus perolens (4.9%), Lactobacillus casei (11.0%), Lactobacillus fermentum (9.8%), and Enterococcus gallinarum (7.3%), respectively. Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus casei are the most frequently isolated from fruit residues as a dominant species, and they could grow at a lower pH conditions and produce more lactic acid than other isolates. Pineapple and papaya peels contained higher crude protein (11.5-13.8%) and water-soluble carbohydrate (16.8-22.4%), but lower acid detergent fiber contents (21.2 to 26.4%) than banana stems and leaves (8.2% crude protein, 42.8% acid detergent fiber, and 5.1% water-soluble carbohydrate). Compared with banana stem and leaf silages, the pineapple and papaya peel silages were well preserved with a lower pH and higher lactate content. The study suggests that the fruit residues contain excellent LAB species and abundant feed nutrients, and that they can be preserved as silage to be potential food resources for livestock.

  17. Effects of Lactic Acid Bacteria Fermentation on the Quality of Little Yellow Croaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Wu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This research was to study the effects of lactic acid bacteria fermentation on the quality of little yellow croaker. The effects of the LAB starter composed of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus acidophilus on the quality of little yellow croaker were studied through a 72 h fermentation process in this study. During 72 h fermentation at 30°C, little yellow croaker inoculated with the LAB starter not only resulted in a rapid pH decrease and suppression of spoilage bacteria, but also receded chemical changes such as total volatile base nitrogen and biogenic amines, its texture profile and whiteness also satisfying. Besides, Scanning Electron Micrograph (SEM images indicated some microstructure changes in LAB fermentation. The results demonstrated that the LAB starter could be developed as bio-preservatives to improve the quality of little yellow croaker in storage.

  18. Interaction of lactic acid bacteria with metal ions: opportunities for improving food safety and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrvčić, Jasna; Stanzer, Damir; Solić, Ema; Stehlik-Tomas, Vesna

    2012-09-01

    Certain species of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), as well as other microorganisms, can bind metal ions to their cells surface or transport and store them inside the cell. Due to this fact, over the past few years interactions of metal ions with LAB have been intensively investigated in order to develop the usage of these bacteria in new biotechnology processes in addition to their health and probiotic aspects. Preliminary studies in model aqueous solutions yielded LAB with high absorption potential for toxic and essential metal ions, which can be used for improving food safety and quality. This paper provides an overview of results obtained by LAB application in toxic metal ions removing from drinking water, food and human body, as well as production of functional foods and nutraceutics. The biosorption abilities of LAB towards metal ions are emphasized. The binding mechanisms, as well as the parameters influencing the passive and active uptake are analyzed.

  19. Biotechnology and pasta-making: lactic Acid bacteria as a new driver of innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozzi, Vittorio; Russo, Pasquale; Fragasso, Mariagiovanna; De Vita, Pasquale; Fiocco, Daniela; Spano, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Cereals-derived foods represent a key constituent in the diet of many populations. In particular, pasta is consumed in large quantities throughout the world in reason of its nutritive importance, containing significant amounts of complex carbohydrates, proteins, B-vitamins, and iron. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are a heterogeneous group of bacteria that play a key role in the production of fermented foods and beverages with high relevance for human and animal health. A wide literature testifies the multifaceted importance of LAB biotechnological applications in cereal-based products. Several studies focused on LAB isolation and characterization in durum wheat environment, in some cases with preliminary experimental applications of LAB in pasta-making. In this paper, using sourdough as a model, we focus on the relevant state-of-art to introduce a LAB-based biotechnological step in industrial pasta-making, a potential world driver of innovation that might represent a cutting-edge advancement in pasta production.

  20. Novel bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria (LAB): various structures and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Rodney H; Zendo, Takeshi; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2014-08-29

    Bacteriocins are heat-stable ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides produced by various bacteria, including food-grade lactic acid bacteria (LAB). These antimicrobial peptides have huge potential as both food preservatives, and as next-generation antibiotics targeting the multiple-drug resistant pathogens. The increasing number of reports of new bacteriocins with unique properties indicates that there is still a lot to learn about this family of peptide antibiotics. In this review, we highlight our system of fast tracking the discovery of novel bacteriocins, belonging to different classes, and isolated from various sources. This system employs molecular mass analysis of supernatant from the candidate strain, coupled with a statistical analysis of their antimicrobial spectra that can even discriminate novel variants of known bacteriocins. This review also discusses current updates regarding the structural characterization, mode of antimicrobial action, and biosynthetic mechanisms of various novel bacteriocins. Future perspectives and potential applications of these novel bacteriocins are also discussed.

  1. Development of specific fluorescent oligonucleotide probes for in situ identification of wine lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Lucía; Ferrer, Sergi; Pardo, Isabel

    2003-08-08

    A rapid method for the identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from wine has been developed. This method is based on fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), using fluorescent oligonucleotide probes, homologous to 16S rDNA of those species of LAB commonly found in wines. The protocol for the specific detection of these bacteria was established through the hybridisation of 36 reference strains. The specificity of the probes was evaluated by using pure cultures. Probes were used to identify species in different wines, making it evident that direct identification and quantification from natural samples without culturing is also possible. The results show that FISH is a promising technique for the rapid identification of LAB, allowing positive identification in a few hours (4-16 h).

  2. Biotechnological and in situ food production of polyols by lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Maria Eugenia; Bleckwedel, Juliana; Raya, Raúl R; Mozzi, Fernanda

    2013-06-01

    Polyols such as mannitol, erythritol, sorbitol, and xylitol are naturally found in fruits and vegetables and are produced by certain bacteria, fungi, yeasts, and algae. These sugar alcohols are widely used in food and pharmaceutical industries and in medicine because of their interesting physicochemical properties. In the food industry, polyols are employed as natural sweeteners applicable in light and diabetic food products. In the last decade, biotechnological production of polyols by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) has been investigated as an alternative to their current industrial production. While heterofermentative LAB may naturally produce mannitol and erythritol under certain culture conditions, sorbitol and xylitol have been only synthesized through metabolic engineering processes. This review deals with the spontaneous formation of mannitol and erythritol in fermented foods and their biotechnological production by heterofermentative LAB and briefly presented the metabolic engineering processes applied for polyol formation.

  3. Role of specific components from commercial inactive dry yeast winemaking preparations on the growth of wine lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andújar-Ortiz, Inmaculada; Pozo-Bayón, Maria Angeles; García-Ruiz, Almudena; Moreno-Arribas, M Victoria

    2010-07-28

    The role of specific components from inactive dry yeast preparations widely used in winemaking on the growth of three representative wine lactic acid bacteria (Oenococcus oeni, Lactobacillus hilgardii and Pediococcus pentosaceus) has been studied. A pressure liquid extraction technique using solvents of different polarity was employed to obtain extracts with different chemical composition from the inactive dry yeast preparations. Each of the extracts was assayed against the three lactic acid bacteria. Important differences in the effect of the extracts on the growth of the bacteria were observed, which depended on the solvent employed during the extraction, on the type of commercial preparations and on the lactic acid bacteria species. The extracts that exhibited the most different activity were chemically characterized in amino acids, free monosaccharides, monosaccharides from polysaccharides, fatty acids and volatile compounds. In general, specific amino acids and monosaccharides were related to a stimulating effect whereas fatty acid composition and likely some volatile compounds seemed to show an inhibitory effect on the growth of the lactic acid bacteria. These results may provide novel and useful information in trying to obtain better and more specific formulations of winemaking inactive dry yeast preparations.

  4. Phenotypic and technological diversity of lactic acid bacteria and staphylococci isolated from traditionally fermented sausages in southern Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosinos, Eleftherios H; Paramithiotis, Spiros; Kolovos, George; Tsikouras, Ioannis; Metaxopoulos, Ioannis

    2007-05-01

    The physicochemical and microbiological characteristics of spontaneously fermented sausages made by two medium-sized enterprises (MSE) located in southern Greece have been studied. A total of 300 lactic acid bacteria and 300 staphylococcal strains have been isolated and identified by their physiological characteristics. Lactobacillus plantarum strains were found to dominate the lactic acid bacteria microbiota in most of the cases with L. sakei strains prevailing in some of them and L. rhamnosus strains occasionally accompanying the dominant lactic acid bacteria microbiota. On the other hand, S. saprophyticus strains were found to dominate the staphylococcal microbiota in all spontaneously fermented sausages with of S. simulans, S. xylosus, S. gallinarum and S. cohnii cohnii strains being sporadically present. Following the identification, an evaluation of their technological properties, namely proteolytic and lipolytic capacities as well as production of biogenic amines and antimicrobial compounds, took place. None of the lactic acid bacteria and staphylococci was found to possess lipolytic activity whereas a total of 6 lactic acid bacteria and 51 staphylococci strains were found to be able to hydrolyse either the sarcoplasic, myofibrillar or both protein fractions. Furthermore, only one L. sakei strain and 185 staphylococci strains were found to possess decarboxylase activity against lysine, tyrosine, ornithine or histidine. Finally none of the staphylococcal microbiota and 3 lactic acid bacteria strains were found to be able to produce antimicrobial compounds of proteinaceous nature against Listeria monocytogenes.

  5. Antigenotoxic activity of lactic acid bacteria, prebiotics, and products of their fermentation against selected mutagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Adriana; Śliżewska, Katarzyna; Otlewska, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Dietary components such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and prebiotics can modulate the intestinal microbiota and are thought to be involved in the reduction of colorectal cancer risk. The presented study measured, using the comet assay, the antigenotoxic activity of both probiotic and non-probiotic LAB, as well as some prebiotics and the end-products of their fermentation, against fecal water (FW). The production of short chain fatty acids by the bacteria was quantified using HPLC. Seven out of the ten tested viable strains significantly decreased DNA damage induced by FW. The most effective of them were Lactobacillus mucosae 0988 and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bb-12, leading to a 76% and 80% decrease in genotoxicity, respectively. The end-products of fermentation of seven prebiotics by Lactobacillus casei DN 114-001 exhibited the strongest antigenotoxic activity against FW, with fermented inulin reducing genotoxicity by 75%. Among the tested bacteria, this strain produced the highest amounts of butyrate in the process of prebiotic fermentation, and especially from resistant dextrin (4.09 μM/mL). Fermented resistant dextrin improved DNA repair by 78% in cells pre-treated with 6.8 μM methylnitronitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Fermented inulin induced stronger DNA repair in cells pre-treated with mutagens (FW, 25 μM hydrogen peroxide, or MNNG) than non-fermented inulin, and the efficiency of DNA repair after 120 min of incubation decreased by 71%, 50% and 70%, respectively. The different degrees of genotoxicity inhibition observed for the various combinations of bacteria and prebiotics suggest that this effect may be attributable to carbohydrate type, SCFA yield, and the ratio of the end-products of prebiotic fermentation.

  6. Nitrogen Deposition Via N+ Implantation:Implications for Primordial Amino Acids Synthesis Revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; SHI Huaibin; WANG Xiangqin; YU Zengliang

    2007-01-01

    In this paper amino acids synthesis in aqueous solution induced by ion implantation,which was possibly ubiquitous on primitive Earth,is investigated.As a discharge using a graphite rod as the anode under a nitrogen atmosphere was performed against ammonia water,it was found that three kinds of amino acids were produced.They were glycine,serine and alanine.By introducing ion implantation into the carboxylate solution,ammonia and amino acids were also formed via nitrogen deposition/fixation.Another isotopic experiment showed that both OH and H radicals played a crucial role in the arc-discharge-promoted reactions in aqueous solution Therefore,we believe that the impact of ions in the original atmospheric conditions might have functioned as a promoter in the chemical origin and evolution of life.

  7. Recent investigations and updated criteria for the assessment of antibiotic resistance in food lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Francesca; Aquilanti, Lucia

    2011-12-01

    The worldwide use, and misuse, of antibiotics for about sixty years in the so-called antibiotic era, has been estimated in some one to ten million tons, a relevant part of which destined for non-therapeutic purposes such as growth promoting treatments for livestock or crop protection. As highly adaptable organisms, bacteria have reacted to this dramatic change in their environment by developing several well-known mechanisms of antibiotic resistance and are becoming increasingly resistant to conventional antibiotics. In recent years, commensal bacteria have become a cause of concern since they may act as reservoirs for the antibiotic resistance genes found in human pathogens. In particular, the food chain has been considered the main route for the introduction of animal and environment associated antibiotic resistant bacteria into the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) where these genes may be transferred to pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria. As fundamental microbial communities in a large variety of fermented foods and feed, the anaerobe facultative, aerotolerant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are likely to play a pivotal role in the resistance gene exchange occurring in the environment, food, feed and animal and human GIT. Therefore their antibiotic resistance features and their genetic basis have recently received increasing attention. The present article summarises the results of the latest studies on the most typical genera belonging to the low G + C branch of LAB. The evolution of the criteria established by European regulatory bodies to ensure a safe use of microorganisms in food and feed, including the assessment of their antibiotic resistance is also reviewed.

  8. Efficacy of microencapsulated lactic acid bacteria in Helicobater pylori eradication therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha A Khalil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Probiotic delivery systems are widely used nutraceutical products for the supplementation of natural intestinal flora. These delivery systems vary greatly in the effectiveness to exert health benefits for a patient. This study focuses on providing probiotic living cells with a physical barrier against adverse environmental conditions. Materials and Methods: Microencapsulation of the selected lactic acid bacteria (LAB using chitosan and alginate was performed. Physical examination of the formulated LAB microcapsules was observed using phase contrast inverted microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM. Finally, the survival of microencapsulated and noncapsulated bacteria was cheeked in the simulated human gastric tract (GT. The potential antimicrobial activity of the most potent microencapsulated LAB strain was in vivo evaluated in rabbit models. Results: Microencapsulated L. plantarum, L. acidophilus, and L. bulgaricus DSMZ 20080 were loaded with 1.03 × 10 10 CFU viable bacteria/g, 1.9 × 10 10 CFU viable bacteria/g, and 5.5 × 10 9 CFU viable bacteria/g, respectively. The survival of microencapsulated cells was significantly higher than that of the free cells after exposure to simulated gastric juice (SGJ at pH 2. Additionally, in simulated small intestine juice (SSJ, larger amounts of the selected LAB cells were found, whereas in simulated colon juice (SCJ, the released LAB reached the maximum counts. In vivo results pointed out that an 8-week supplementation with a triple therapy of a microencapsulated L. plantarum, L. acidophilus, and L. bulgaricus DSMZ 20080 might be able to reduce H. pylori. Conclusion: Microencapsulated probiotics could possibly compete with and downregulate H. pylori infection in humans.

  9. Biofilm-forming bacteria with varying tolerance to peracetic acid from a paper machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasimus, Stiina; Kolari, Marko; Rita, Hannu; Hoornstra, Douwe; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja

    2011-09-01

    Biofilms cause runnability problems in paper machines and are therefore controlled with biocides. Peracetic acid is usually effective in preventing bulky biofilms. This study investigated the microbiological status of a paper machine where low concentrations (≤ 15 ppm active ingredient) of peracetic acid had been used for several years. The paper machine contained a low amount of biofilms. Biofilm-forming bacteria from this environment were isolated and characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, whole-cell fatty acid analysis, biochemical tests, and DNA fingerprinting. Seventy-five percent of the isolates were identified as members of the subclades Sphingomonas trueperi and S. aquatilis, and the others as species of the genera Burkholderia (B. cepacia complex), Methylobacterium, and Rhizobium. Although the isolation media were suitable for the common paper machine biofoulers Deinococcus, Meiothermus, and Pseudoxanthomonas, none of these were found, indicating that peracetic acid had prevented their growth. Spontaneous, irreversible loss of the ability to form biofilm was observed during subculturing of certain isolates of the subclade S. trueperi. The Sphingomonas isolates formed monoculture biofilms that tolerated peracetic acid at concentrations (10 ppm active ingredient) used for antifouling in paper machines. High pH and low conductivity of the process waters favored the peracetic acid tolerance of Sphingomonas sp. biofilms. This appears to be the first report on sphingomonads as biofilm formers in warm water using industries.

  10. Oxalic acid: a signal molecule for fungus-feeding bacteria of the genus Collimonas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, M B; van Veen, J A; de Boer, W

    2015-10-01

    Mycophagous (=fungus feeding) soil bacteria of the genus Collimonas have been shown to colonize and grow on hyphae of different fungal hosts as the only source of energy and carbon. The ability to exploit fungal nutrient resources might require a strategy for collimonads to sense fungi in the soil matrix. Oxalic acid is ubiquitously secreted by soil fungi, serving different purposes. In this study, we investigated the possibility that collimonads might use oxalic acid secretion to localize a fungal host and move towards it. We first confirmed earlier indications that collimonads have a very limited ability to use oxalic acid as growth substrate. In a second step, with using different assays, we show that oxalic acid triggers bacterial movement in such a way that accumulation of cells can be expected at micro-sites with high free oxalic acid concentrations. Based on these observations we propose that oxalic acid functions as a signal molecule to guide collimonads to hyphal tips, the mycelial zones that are most sensitive for mycophagous bacterial attack.

  11. Characteristic of cow milk dadih using starter of probiotic of lactic acid bacteria

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    Sri Usmiati

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Dadih is an original dairy product from West Sumatera processed traditionally. It is a spontaneous fermentation of buffalo milk at room temperature for 48 hours in a bamboo tube, has no standard of processing and quality. Dadih is potentially to be develop into probiotic products (functional food that can be enjoyed by the public widely. Development of cow's milk dadih is necessary since buffalo milk is available only in certain area. Product and characteristic information of cow milk dadih using probiotic of lactic acid bacteria starter has not been known. The research objective was to determine the characteristics of cow milk dadih that used starter of probiotic lactic acid bacteria during storage at room temperature (27oC and cold temperature (4oC. The study was designed using a factorial randomized block design pattern 12x3 at room temperature and 12X4 at cold temperatures, with the number of repeatation of 3 times. Treatment consisted of: (i starter formula (A using a single bacterium or a combination of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium longum, and (ii storage time (B. Observed parameters included pH value, titrable acidity, the total plate count, and in-vitro probiotic testing (bacterial resistance to bile salts and low pH of cow milk dadih. The results showed that L. acidophilus early exponential phase was at the hour 3rd, L. casei at the hour 4th and B. longum on the 3rd of which is used as the optimum time of mixing two or more bacteria in the manufacture of cow milk dadih. The volume of starter used was 3% with time fermentation of 48 hours at room temperature (27-30oC. Cow milk dadih that was stored for 7 days at room temperature (27-30oC and for 21 days at cold temperatures (4-10oC was able to maintain viability of bacteria to bile salts and low pH at 1010-1012 cfu/ml with percentage resistance varied. The cow milk dadih using a combination starter of B. longum with other probiotics on the

  12. [Studies on rapid detection of food-borne pathogenic bacteria by nucleic acid testing and related technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei; Wang, Mingzhong; Wang, Xiaoying; Liu, Xiumei

    2008-03-01

    The traditional methods of bacteria isolation, cultivation and identification are time-consuming, which can't meet the needs of the control and prevention of food-borne diseases. Recently, various kinds of rapid methods for food-borne pathogenic bacteria detection have emerged with the prompt development of nucleic acid testing technology. The application studies on polymerase chain reaction and the techniques derived from it, nucleic acid isothermal amplification, oligonucleotide microarray, immunomagnetic separation and DNA biosensing on food-borne pathogenic bacteria including Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterohemorrhagic Escherchia coli, etc. were reviewed.

  13. Antibiotic Resistance of Probiotic Strains of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Marketed Foods and Drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG LIU; ZHUO-YANG ZHANG; KE DONG; JIAN-PING YUAN; XIAO-KUI GUO

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify the antimicrobial resistance of commercial lactic acid bacteria present in microbial foods and drug additives by analyzing their isolated strains used for fermentation and probioties. Methods Antimicrobial susceptibility of 41 screened isolates was tested with disc diffusion and E-test methods after species-level identification. Resistant strains were selected and examined for the presence of resistance genes by PCR. Results Distribution of resistance was found in different species. All isolates were susceptible to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cephalothin, and imipenem. In addition, isolates resistant to vancomycin, rifampicin, streptomycin, bacitracin, and erythromycin were detected, although the incidence of resistance to these antibiotics was relatively low. In contrast, most strains were resistant to ciprofloxacin, amikacin, trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole, and gentamycin. The genes msrC, vanX, and dfrA were detected in strains of Enterococcus faecium, Lactobacillus plantarum, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Lactococcus lactis. Conclusion Antibiotic resistance is present in different species of probiotic strains, which poses a threat to food safety. Evaluation of the safety of lactic acid bacteria for human consumption should be guided by established criteria, guidelines and regulations.

  14. Caciotta della Garfagnana cheese: selection and evaluation of autochthonous mesophilic lactic acid bacteria as starter cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Cerri

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to isolate, identify and select, with respect to acidification and proteolytic activities, the autochthonous mesophilic lactic acid bacteria (LAB present in milk and Caciotta della Garfagnana, a cheese produced either with raw or thermised cow’s milk in small dairies and family plants of Garfagnana (Tuscany, to obtain LAB strains with attributes suitable to be employed as starter cultures in this type of cheese, particularly when thermised milk is used to control spoilage microflora. Samples of raw milk, curd and cheese were collected from three representative farmers of the production area and used to isolate autochthonous LAB. Phenotypic and genotypic (species-specific PCR assay identification of isolated LAB was done. Twenty-eight strains of LAB isolated from milk, curd and cheese were screened for acidifying and proteolytic activities. LAB strains with the better attributes were used as mesophilic starter cultures in technological trials: experimental cheeses manufactured with the addition of autochthonous LAB and control cheeses were compared for LAB and pH evolution. Experimental cheeses presented a significant increase in the mesophilic lactic acid microflora up to 14 days of ripening and significantly lower pH values up to seven days of ripening. The use of wild selected mesophilic lactic acid bacteria, together with thermisation of milk, for the Caciotta della Garfagnana looks very promising and could help to both standardise the production and improve quality and traditional characteristics of this type of cheese.

  15. Caciotta della Garfagnana cheese: selection and evaluation of autochthonous mesophilic lactic acid bacteria as starter cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Turchi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available he aim of this study was to isolate, identify and select, with respect to acidification and proteolytic activities, the autochthonous mesophilic lactic acid bacteria (LAB present in milk and Caciotta della Garfagnana, a cheese produced either with raw or thermised cow’s milk in small dairies and family plants of Garfagnana (Tuscany, to obtain LAB strains with attributes suitable to be employed as starter cultures in this type of cheese, particularly when thermised milk is used to control spoilage microflora. Samples of raw milk, curd and cheese were collected from three representative farmers of the production area and used to isolate autochthonous LAB. Phenotypic and genotypic (species-specific PCR assay identification of isolated LAB was done. Twenty-eight strains of LAB isolated from milk, curd and cheese were screened for acidifying and proteolytic activities. LAB strains with the better attributes were used as mesophilic starter cultures in technological trials: experimental cheeses manufactured with the addition of autochthonous LAB and control cheeses were compared for LAB and pH evolution. Experimental cheeses presented a significant increase in the mesophilic lactic acid microflora up to 14 days of ripening and significantly lower pH values up to seven days of ripening. The use of wild selected mesophilic lactic acid bacteria, together with thermisation of milk, for the Caciotta della Garfagnana looks very promising and could help to both standardise the production and improve quality and traditional characteristics of this type of cheese.

  16. Fast identification of wine related lactic acid bacteria by multiplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, A; Pfannebecker, J; Fröhlich, J; König, H

    2013-02-01

    The microflora of must and wine consists of yeasts, acetic acid bacteria and lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The latter group plays an important role for wine quality. The malolactic fermentation carried out by LAB leads to deacidification and stabilisation of wines. Nevertheless, LAB are often associated with wine spoilage. They are mainly responsible for the formation of biogenic amines. Furthermore, some strains produce exopolysaccharide slimes, acetic acid, diacetyl and other off-flavours. In this context a better monitoring of the vinification process is crucial to improve wine quality. Moreover, a lot of biodiversity studies would also profit from a fast and reliable identification method. In this study, we propose a species-specific multiplex PCR system for a rapid and simultaneous detection of 13 LAB species, frequently occurring in must or wine: Lactobacillus brevis, Lb. buchneri, Lb. curvatus, Lb. hilgardii, Lb. plantarum, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Oenococcus oeni, Pediococcus acidilactici, P. damnosus, P. inopinatus, P. parvulus, P. pentosaceus and Weissella paramesenteroides.

  17. The Effects of Lactic Acid Bacteria+Enzyme Mixture Silage Inoculant on Wheat Silage

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    C. Polat

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the effects of a commercial lactic acid bacteria+enzyme inoculants used as silage additive on the fermentation, crude nutritient contents, cell wall fractions and in vitro dry and organic matter digestibilities wheat (Triticum aestivum L. harvested and ensiled at milk and dough stages of maturity. Sil-All (Altech, UK containing water soluble Pediococcus acidilactici, Lactobacillus plantarum and Streptococcus faecium bacteria with cellulase, hemicellulase, pentosonase and amylase was used as bacterial inoculants. The inoculant was applied to the silages at 6.0 log10 cfu/g levels. Wheats were ensiled in 2 liter glass jars and stored at 25 ±2 C in the laboratory. Three jars from each group were sampled for pH, ammonia nitrogen, water soluble carbohydrates, organic acids (acetic, butyric and lactic, crude nutritients, cell wall fractions and microbiological analyses following the 75-day ensiling period. In additions in vitro dry and organic matters digestibility of the silages were determined with enzymatic methods. The inoculant improved fermentation characteristics, decreased neutral and acid detergent fiber contents of wheat silages. However, the in vitro dry and organic matter digestibilities of the silages were not affected by the treatments.

  18. Improving the antioxidant properties of quinoa flour through fermentation with selected autochthonous lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe; Lorusso, Anna; Russo, Vito; Pinto, Daniela; Marzani, Barbara; Gobbetti, Marco

    2017-01-16

    Lactic acid bacteria strains, previously isolated from the same matrix, were used to ferment quinoa flour aiming at exploiting the antioxidant potential. As in vitro determined on DPPH and ABTS radicals, the scavenging activity of water/salt-soluble extracts (WSE) from fermented doughs was significantly (Pquinoa dough fermented with Lactobacillus plantarum T0A10. The corresponding WSE was subjected to Reverse Phase Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography, and 32 fractions were collected and subjected to in vitro assays. The most active fraction was resistant to further hydrolysis by digestive enzymes. Five peptides, having sizes from 5 to 9 amino acid residues, were identified by nano-Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionisation-Mass Spectra/Mass Spectra. The sequences shared compositional features which are typical of antioxidant peptides. As shown by determining cell viability and radical scavenging activity (MTT and DCFH-DA assays, respectively), the purified fraction showed antioxidant activity on human keratinocytes NCTC 2544 artificially subjected to oxidative stress. This study demonstrated the capacity of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria to release peptides with antioxidant activity through proteolysis of native quinoa proteins. Fermentation of the quinoa flour with a selected starter might be considered suitable for novel applications as functional food ingredient, dietary supplement or pharmaceutical preparations.

  19. Screening of probiotic lactic acid bacteria from Thai fermented foods for human.

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    Kantachote, D.

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Total of 327 strains of lactic acid bacteria were isolated from 179 samples of various Thai fermented foods. The strains were investigated for their probiotic properties based on stability in bile salt (0.15% and high acidity (pH 2, 3 and 4. Moreover, utilization of protein or fat or starch, growth in the absence of vitamin B12 and growth under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions with no significant difference were also considered. According to the above criteria, 67 strains were selected for antibiotics sensitivity test. The selected strains were susceptible to following antibiotics: ampicillin, cephalothin, cefoperazone, tetracycline andchloramphenicol; however the strains were resistant to vancomycin, kanamycin, streptomycin, norfloxacin and polymyxin B. Using agar spot method, only 5 strains were able to inhibit 13 strains of manifest by a bacteria indicator as clear zone greater than 10 mm. A further investigation using co-culture technique showed inhibition of the tested organisms was between 80 and 100 percent. The strains grew under media of MRS and SPY2 (no materials from animal over 36 hours with no significant difference. The strains were investigated for survival in condition of high acidity within 3 hours. It was found that at pH 4 almost 100% were maintained but at pH 2 and 3 the survival reduced approximately 1 log cycle. The strain LA71 which showed the highest survival was identified as Lactobacillus plantarum.

  20. Screening and characterization of ethanol-tolerant and thermotolerant acetic acid bacteria from Chinese vinegar Pei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Bai, Ye; Li, Dongsheng; Wang, Chao; Xu, Ning; Hu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are important microorganisms in the vinegar industry. However, AAB have to tolerate the presence of ethanol and high temperatures, especially in submerged fermentation (SF), which inhibits AAB growth and acid yield. In this study, seven AAB that are tolerant to temperatures above 40 °C and ethanol concentrations above 10% (v/v) were isolated from Chinese vinegar Pei. All the isolated AAB belong to Acetobacter pasteurianus according to 16S rDNA analysis. Among all AAB, AAB4 produced the highest acid yield under high temperature and ethanol test conditions. At 4% ethanol and 30-40 °C temperatures, AAB4 maintained an alcohol-acid transform ratio of more than 90.5 %. High alcohol-acid transform ratio was still maintained even at higher temperatures, namely, 87.2, 77.1, 14.5 and 2.9% at 41, 42, 43 and 44 °C, respectively. At 30 °C and different initial ethanol concentrations (4-10%), the acid yield by AAB4 increased gradually, although the alcohol-acid transform ratio decreased to some extent. However, 46.5, 8.7 and 0.9% ratios were retained at ethanol concentrations of 11, 12 and 13%, respectively. When compared with AS1.41 (an AAB widely used in China) using a 10 L fermentor, AAB4 produced 42.0 g/L acetic acid at 37 °C with 10% ethanol, whereas AS1.41 almost stopped producing acetic acid. In conclusion, these traits suggest that AAB4 is a valuable strain for vinegar production in SF.

  1. Ethanol production by selected intestinal microorganisms and lactic acid bacteria growing under different nutritional conditions

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    Fouad M.F. Elshaghabee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To gain some specific insight into the roles microorganisms might play in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, some intestinal and lactic acid bacteria and one yeast (Anaerostipes caccae, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bifidobacterium longum, Enterococcus fecalis, Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus plantarum, Weissella confusa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae were characterized by high performance liquid chromatography for production of ethanol when grown on different carbohydrates: hexoses (glucose and fructose, pentoses (arabinose and ribose, disaccharides (lactose and lactulose, and inulin. Highest amounts of ethanol were produced by S. cerevisiae, L. fermentum and W. confusa on glucose and by S. cerevisiae and W. confusa on fructose. Due to mannitol-dehydrogenase expressed in L. fermentum, ethanol production on fructose was significantly (P < 0.05 reduced. Pyruvate and citrate, two potential electron acceptors for regeneration of NAD+/NADP+, drastically reduced ethanol production with acetate produced instead in L. fermentum grown on glucose and W. confusa grown on glucose and fructose, respectively. In fecal slurries prepared from feces of four overweight volunteers, ethanol was found to be produced upon addition of fructose. Addition of A. caccae, L. acidophilus, L. fermentum, as well as citrate and pyruvate, respectively, abolished ethanol production. However, addition of W. confusa resulted in significantly (P < 0.05 increased production of ethanol. These results indicate that microorganisms like W. confusa, a hetero-fermentative, mannitol-dehydrogenase negative lactic acid bacterium, may promote NAFLD through ethanol produced from sugar fermentation, while other intestinal bacteria and homo- and hetero-fermentative but mannitol-dehydrogenase positive lactic acid bacteria may not promote NAFLD. Also, our studies indicate that dietary factors interfering with gastrointestinal microbiota and

  2. Lactic acid bacteria protect human intestinal epithelial cells from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affhan, S; Dachang, W; Xin, Y; Shang, D

    2015-12-16

    Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic pathogens that cause nosocomial and food-borne infections. They promote intestinal diseases. Gastrointestinal colonization by S. aureus and P. aeruginosa has rarely been researched. These organisms spread to extra gastrointestinal niches, resulting in increasingly progressive infections. Lactic acid bacteria are Gram-positive bacteria that produce lactic acid as the major end-product of carbohydrate fermentation. These bacteria inhibit pathogen colonization and modulate the host immune response. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus rhamnosus on enteric infections caused by the paradigmatic human pathogens S. aureus ATCC25923 and P. aeruginosa ATCC27853. The effect of whole cells and neutralized cell-free supernatant (CFS) of the lactobacilli on LoVo human carcinoma enterocyte (ATCC CCL-229) infection was analyzed by co-exposure, pre-exposure, and post-exposure studies. Simultaneous application of whole cells and CFS of the lactobacilli significantly eradicated enterocyte infection (P cells and CFS were added after or prior to the infection (P > 0.05). This result could be attributed to interference by extracellular polymeric substances and cell surface hydrophobicity, which resulted in the development of a pathogen that did not form colonies. Furthermore, results of the plate count and LIVE/ DEAD BacLight bacterial viability staining attributed this inhibition to a non-bacteriocin-like substance, which acted independently of organic acid and H2O2 production. Based on these results, the cell-free supernatant derived from lactobacilli was concluded to restrain the development of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa enteric infections.

  3. Effect of citric acid and bacteria on metal uptake in reeds grown in a synthetic acid mine drainage solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lin; Cutright, Teresa J

    2015-03-01

    The effect of citric acid (CA), rhizosphere acidophilic heterotrophs and/or Fe(II) oxidizing bacteria (Fe(II)OB) on plaque formation and metal accumulation in Phragmites australis L. (common reed) from acid mine drainage (AMD) solution were investigated. Reeds were grown in different hydroponic solutions that contained AMD, CA and/or rhizosphere bacteria for three months. Triplicate experiments were conducted for each experimental condition. Fe(II)OB enhanced the formation of Fe plaque which decreased Fe and Mn uptake in reeds, while it had no significant influence on Al accumulation. CA inhibited the growth of Fe(II)OB, decreased the formation of metal plaque and increased Fe and Mn accumulation in reeds. Acidophilic heterotrophs consumed CA and made the environment more suitable for the growth of Fe(II)OB. Reeds are a good candidate for phytoextraction while CA is a useful chelator to enhance metal uptake in plants. More research may be needed to investigate the influence of CA on microbial community. Further investigations are required to study the effect of CA on phytoremediation of AMD contaminated fields. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biodiversity and γ-aminobutyric acid production by lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional alpine raw cow's milk cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciosi, Elena; Carafa, Ilaria; Nardin, Tiziana; Schiavon, Silvia; Poznanski, Elisa; Cavazza, Agostino; Larcher, Roberto; Tuohy, Kieran M

    2015-01-01

    "Nostrano-cheeses" are traditional alpine cheeses made from raw cow's milk in Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy. This study identified lactic acid bacteria (LAB) developing during maturation of "Nostrano-cheeses" and evaluated their potential to produce γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an immunologically active compound and neurotransmitter. Cheese samples were collected on six cheese-making days, in three dairy factories located in different areas of Trentino and at different stages of cheese ripening (24 h, 15 days, and 1, 2, 3, 6, and 8 months). A total of 1,059 LAB isolates were screened using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA-PCR (RAPD-PCR) and differentiated into 583 clusters. LAB strains from dominant clusters (n = 97) were genetically identified to species level by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. LAB species most frequently isolated were Lactobacillus paracasei, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. The 97 dominant clusters were also characterized for their ability in producing GABA by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). About 71% of the dominant bacteria clusters evolving during cheeses ripening were able to produce GABA. Most GABA producers were Lactobacillus paracasei but other GABA producing species included Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Pediococcus pentosaceus, and Streptococcus thermophilus. No Enterococcus faecalis or Sc. macedonicus isolates produced GABA. The isolate producing the highest amount of GABA (80.0±2.7 mg/kg) was a Sc. thermophilus.

  5. Selection of oleuropein-degrading lactic acid bacteria strains isolated from fermenting Moroccan green olives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghabbour, N.; Lamzira, Z.; Thonart, P.; Cidalia, P.; Markaouid, M.; Asehraoua, A.

    2011-07-01

    A total of 177 strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from early-stage Moroccan Picholine green olive fermentation, including Lactobacillus plantarum (44.63%), Lactobacillus pentosus (25.99%), Lactobacillus brevis (9.61%) and Pediococcus pentosaceus (19.77%). All the isolates were screened for their tolerance to olive leaf extract and oleuropein. Most of the isolates (85.3%) were found able to degrade oleuropein, when evaluated by either oleuropein or 5-Bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl {beta}-D-glucuronide (X-Gluc) as substrates. The biodegradation capacity of the selected strains of each species was confirmed by HPLC analysis. (Author).

  6. Tyramine and phenylethylamine production among lactic acid bacteria isolated from wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landete, José María; Pardo, Isabel; Ferrer, Sergi

    2007-04-20

    The ability of wine lactic acid bacteria to produce tyramine and phenylethylamine was investigated by biochemical and genetic methods. An easy and accurate plate medium was developed to detect tyramine-producer strains, and a specific PCR assay that detects the presence of tdc gene was employed. All strains possessing the tdc gene were shown to produce tyramine and phenylethylamine. Wines containing high quantities of tyramine and phenylethylamine were found to contain Lactobacillus brevis or Lactobacillus hilgardii. The main tyramine producer was L. brevis. The ability to produce tyramine was absent or infrequent in the rest of the analysed wine species.

  7. Developing Lactic Acid Bacteria for the conversion of brown macroalgae into green chemicals and fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosma, Elleke Fenna; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard

    or sea weed, which do not contain lignin, do not require fresh water, are not a major food source, and contain a higher sugar fraction. The main sugars are mannitol, laminarin (glucose) and alginate (guluronate and mannuronate). We will use metabolic engineering and laboratory evolution of Lactic Acid...... Bacteria (LAB) for the conversion of brown macroalgae into green chemicals and fuels. To select the best-suited production platform, we are screening Lactobacillus and Pediococcus strains for traits like genetic accessibility, substrate utilization and several stress tolerances. Most microorganisms...

  8. Lactic acid bacteria: inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Anders; Rattray, Fergal; Nilsson, Dan

    2003-01-01

    A total of 26 strains of wild-type lactic acid bacteria, mainly belonging to Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus helveticus , were assayed in vitro for their ability to produce a milk fermentate with inhibitory activity towards angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). It was clear that the test...... were pre-fed with milks fermented using two strains of Lactobacillus helveticus . An increased response to bradykinin (10 μg/kg, intravenously injected) was observed using one of these fermented milks. It is concluded that Lactobacillus helveticus produces substances which in vivo can give rise...

  9. Revisiting the Kinetics and Mechanism of the Tetrathionate-Hypochlorous Acid Reaction in Nearly Neutral Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Dénes; Horváth, Attila K.

    2009-11-01

    The tetrathionate-hypochlorous acid reaction has been investigated in nearly neutral medium at I = 0.5 M ionic strength and T = 25.0 ± 0.1 °C in dihydrogen-phosphate-hydrogen-phosphate buffer by UV-vis spectrophotometry. In excess of hypochlorous acid, the stoichiometry was found to be S4O62- + 7HOCl + 3H2O → 4SO42- + 7Cl- + 13H+, but in excess of tetrathionate colloidal sulfur precipitates. On the basis of the simultaneous evaluation of the kinetic curves, a nine-step kinetic model with four fitted and five fixed rate coefficients is proposed. Analogous oxidation reactions of tetrathionate are also compared and discussed.

  10. Regulation of acid adaptation in Lactic acid bacteria%乳酸菌的适酸性调节

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔磊; 崔艳华; 曲晓军

    2011-01-01

    The understanding of acid adaptation mechanisms of LAB will benefit screening the acid-tolerance bacteria, the optimization of procedures in the ferment progress and optimization of culture. This will greatly improve the quality of fermented foods. The acid adaptation mechanisms were discussed, including proton pump, the production of alkali, the changes of membrane, protection or repair of macro-molecules and the regulation of acid tolerance.%探讨了乳酸菌适酸机制有助于抗酸菌株的筛选、发酵过程中工序的优化以及培养基的优化等,进而大大提升发酵产品品质.对质子泵、产碱、细胞膜变化、大分子保护修复以及耐酸调节在内的适酸性调节机制进行了一一阐述.

  11. Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase enhances the growth of Leuconostoc mesenteroides lactic acid bacteria at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Seitaro; Kawamoto, Jun; Sato, Satoshi B; Iki, Takashi; Watanabe, Itaru; Kudo, Kazuyuki; Esaki, Nobuyoshi; Kurihara, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can cause deterioration of food quality even at low temperatures. In this study, we investigated the cold-adaptation mechanism of a novel food spoilage LAB, Leuconostoc mesenteroides NH04 (NH04). L. mesenteroides was isolated from several spoiled cooked meat products at a high frequency in our factories. NH04 grew rapidly at low temperatures within the shelf-life period and resulted in heavy financial losses. NH04 grew more rapidly than related strains such as Leuconostoc mesenteroides NBRC3832 (NBRC3832) at 10°C. Proteome analysis of NH04 demonstrated that this strain produces a homolog of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase--AhpC--the expression of which can be induced at low temperatures. The expression level of AhpC in NH04 was approximately 6-fold higher than that in NBRC3832, which was grown under the same conditions. Although AhpC is known to have an anti-oxidative role in various bacteria by catalyzing the reduction of alkyl hydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide, the involvement of AhpC in cold adaptation of food spoilage bacteria was unclear. We introduced an expression plasmid containing ahpC into NBRC3832, which grows slower than NH04 at 10°C, and found that expression of AhpC enhanced growth. These results demonstrated that AhpC, which likely increases anti-oxidative capacity of LAB, plays an important role in their rapid growth at low temperatures.

  12. Characterization of some bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria isolated from fermented foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosu-Tudor, Silvia-Simona; Stancu, Mihaela-Marilena; Pelinescu, Diana; Zamfir, Medana

    2014-09-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from different sources (dairy products, fruits, fresh and fermented vegetables, fermented cereals) were screened for antimicrobial activity against other bacteria, including potential pathogens and food spoiling bacteria. Six strains have been shown to produce bacteriocins: Lactococcus lactis 19.3, Lactobacillus plantarum 26.1, Enterococcus durans 41.2, isolated from dairy products and Lactobacillus amylolyticus P40 and P50, and Lactobacillus oris P49, isolated from bors. Among the six bacteriocins, there were both heat stable, low molecular mass polypeptides, with a broad inhibitory spectrum, probably belonging to class II bacteriocins, and heat labile, high molecular mass proteins, with a very narrow inhibitory spectrum, most probably belonging to class III bacteriocins. A synergistic effect of some bacteriocins mixtures was observed. We can conclude that fermented foods are still important sources of new functional LAB. Among the six characterized bacteriocins, there might be some novel compounds with interesting features. Moreover, the bacteriocin-producing strains isolated in our study may find applications as protective cultures.

  13. Physiological Role of Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems in Food-Associated Lactic Acid Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monedero, Vicente; Revilla-Guarinos, Ainhoa; Zúñiga, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are widespread signal transduction pathways mainly found in bacteria where they play a major role in adaptation to changing environmental conditions. TCSs generally consist of sensor histidine kinases that autophosphorylate in response to a specific stimulus and subsequently transfer the phosphate group to their cognate response regulators thus modulating their activity, usually as transcriptional regulators. In this review we present the current knowledge on the physiological role of TCSs in species of the families Lactobacillaceae and Leuconostocaceae of the group of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). LAB are microorganisms of great relevance for health and food production as the group spans from starter organisms to pathogens. Whereas the role of TCSs in pathogenic LAB (most of them belonging to the family Streptococcaceae) has focused the attention, the roles of TCSs in commensal LAB, such as most species of Lactobacillaceae and Leuconostocaceae, have been somewhat neglected. However, evidence available indicates that TCSs are key players in the regulation of the physiology of these bacteria. The first studies in food-associated LAB showed the involvement of some TCSs in quorum sensing and production of bacteriocins, but subsequent studies have shown that TCSs participate in other physiological processes, such as stress response, regulation of nitrogen metabolism, regulation of malate metabolism, and resistance to antimicrobial peptides, among others. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Enzyme responsive hyaluronic acid nanocapsules containing polyhexanide and their exposure to bacteria to prevent infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Grit; Cavallaro, Alex; Vasilev, Krasimir; Mailänder, Volker; Musyanovych, Anna; Landfester, Katharina

    2013-04-08

    Antibacterial nanodevices could bring coatings of plastic materials and wound dressings a big step forward if the release of the antibacterial agents could be triggered by the presence of the bacteria themselves. Here, we show that novel hyaluronic acid (HA)-based nanocapsules containing the antimicrobial agent polyhexanide are specifically cleaved in the presence of hyaluronidase, a factor of pathogenicity and invasion for bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. This resulted in an efficient killing of the pathogenic bacteria by the antimicrobial agent. The formation of different polymeric nanocapsules was achieved through a polyaddition reaction in inverse miniemulsion. After the synthesis, the nanocapsules were transferred to an aqueous medium and investigated in terms of size, size distribution, functionality, and morphology using dynamic light scattering, zeta potential measurements and scanning electron microscopy. The enzyme triggered release of a model dye and the antimicrobial polyhexanide was monitored using fluorescence and UV spectroscopy. The stability of the nanocapsules in several biological media was tested and the interaction of nanocapsules with human serum protein was studied using isothermal titration calorimetry. The antibacterial effectiveness is demonstrated by determination of the antibacterial activity and determination of the minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC).

  15. Inhibition Effect of Lactic Acid Bacteria against Food Born Pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouha Kasra-Kermanshahi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Disease caused by consuming microbial contaminated food has increased significantly in recent years due to changes in the livelihoods and eating habits of the human populations. Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica are three of the most important foodborne bacterial pathogens and can lead to foodborne diseases. Increased use of antibiotics, has led to development of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Therefore, there is growing interest in the development of new types of effective and nontoxic antimicrobial compounds. Nowadays, the most extensive research and commercial practices are based on probiotic bacteria. Probiotics, specifically lactic acid bacteria are widely used in the food industry for fermentation but have gained attention from health professionals because of their potential beneficial effects. Now probiotic therapy is thought to be an effective way to improve the gut health and an alternative to antibiotic treatments. They contribute to food safety by their ability to inhibit the growth of several other bacteria. LAB can be used as protective cultures to compete with potential pathogens and other undesired organisms, thereby increasing the safety of the food product.

  16. In vitro screening of probiotic lactic acid bacteria and prebiotic glucooligosaccharides to select effective synbiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimoud, Julien; Durand, Henri; Courtin, Céline; Monsan, Pierre; Ouarné, Françoise; Theodorou, Vassilia; Roques, Christine

    2010-10-01

    Probiotics and prebiotics have been demonstrated to positively modulate the intestinal microflora and could promote host health. Although some studies have been performed on combinations of probiotics and prebiotics, constituting synbiotics, results on the synergistic effects tend to be discordant in the published works. The first aim of our study was to screen some lactic acid bacteria on the basis of probiotic characteristics (resistance to intestinal conditions, inhibition of pathogenic strains). Bifidobacterium was the most resistant genus whereas Lactobacillus farciminis was strongly inhibited. The inhibitory effect on pathogen growth was strain dependent but lactobacilli were the most effective, especially L. farciminis. The second aim of the work was to select glucooligosaccharides for their ability to support the growth of the probiotics tested. We demonstrated the selective fermentability of oligodextran and oligoalternan by probiotic bacteria, especially the bifidobacteria, for shorter degrees of polymerisation and absence of metabolism by pathogenic bacteria. Thus, the observed characteristics confer potential prebiotic properties on these glucooligosaccharides, to be further confirmed in vivo, and suggest some possible applications in synbiotic combinations with the selected probiotics. Furthermore, the distinctive patterns of the different genera suggest a combination of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria with complementary probiotic effects in addition to the prebiotic ones. These associations should be further evaluated for their synbiotic effects through in vitro and in vivo models.

  17. In vitro testing of commercial and potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Hanne; Grimmer, Stine; Naterstad, Kristine; Axelsson, Lars

    2012-02-01

    Probiotics are defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The objective of this study was to investigate the diversity of selected commercial and potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria using common in vitro screening assays such as transit tolerance in the upper human gastrointestinal tract, adhesion capacity to human intestinal cell lines and effect on epithelial barrier function. The selected bacteria include strains of Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus, Lactobacillus farciminis, Lactobacillus sakei, Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus reuteri and Pediococcus pentosaceus. Viable counts after simulated gastric transit tolerance showed that L. reuteri strains and P. pentosaceus tolerate gastric juice well, with no reduction of viability, whereas L. pentosus, L. farciminis and L. sakei strains lost viability over 180min. All strains tested tolerate the simulated small intestinal juice well. The bacterial adhesion capacity to human intestinal cells revealed major species and strain differences. Overall, L. plantarum MF1298 and three L. reuteri strains had a significant higher adhesion capacity compared to the other strains tested. All strains, both living and UV-inactivated, had little effect on the epithelial barrier function. However, living L. reuteri strains revealed a tendency to increase the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) from 6 to 24h. This work demonstrates the diversity of 18 potential probiotic bacteria, with major species and strain specific effects in the in vitro screening assays applied. Overall, L. reuteri strains reveal some interesting characteristics compared to the other strains investigated.

  18. Process for inhibiting the growth of a culture of lactic acid bacteria, and optionally lysing the bacterial cells, and uses of the resulting lysed culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, Arjen; Venema, Gerard; Kok, Jan; Ledeboer, Aat M.

    1995-01-01

    The invention provides a process for inhibiting the growth of a culture of lactic acid bacteria, or a product containing such culture e.g. a cheese product, in which in the cells of the lactic acid bacteria a holin obtainable from bacteriophages of Gram-positive bacteria, esp. from bacteriophages of

  19. Selection of tropical lactic acid bacteria for enhancing the quality of maize silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A O; Ávila, C L S; Schwan, R F

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to select lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains isolated from silage and assess their effect on the quality of maize silage. The LAB strains were inoculated into aqueous extract obtained from maize to evaluate their production of metabolites and pH reduction. The ability to inhibit the pathogenic and silage-spoilage microorganisms' growth was evaluated. Nine LAB strains that showed the best results were assessed in polyvinyl chloride experimental silos. The inoculation of the LAB strains influenced the concentration of lactic and acetic acids and the diversity of Listeria. The inoculation of silages with Lactobacillus buchneri (UFLA SLM11 and UFLA SLM103 strains) resulted in silages with greater LAB populations and improvements after aerobic exposure. The UFLA SLM11 and SLM103 strains identified as L. buchneri showed to be promising in the treatment of maize silage.

  20. OBTAINING OF PROTEIC BIOMASS BY CULTIVATION OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIA ON GRAPE MARC DIFFUSION SOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian BUTU

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article are presented the researches made in order to obtain protein biomass with the aid of lactic bacteria grown on an economically medium, achieved by using secondary products from the winery: marc and wine yeast. Therefore, there were cultivated two strains of Lactobacillus sp. on five different growth medium. The protein biosynthesis and evolution of lactic fermentation were monitored by determining the optical density (OD of the culture at a wavelength λ = 600 nm and by counting the colony forming units (CFU by serial dilutions and seeding on plates and by determination of lactic acid obtained. The results showed that the fermentation medium represented by diffusion solution of the marc, enriched with peptone is economically profitable compared to other culture media containing peptone, yeast extract, glucose, minerals, amino acids and vitamins presented in the literature.

  1. Evaluation of the probiotic characteristics of newly isolated lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswathy, Ravindran Girija; Ismail, Bindhumol; John, Rojan Pappy; Nampoothiri, Kesavan Madhavan

    2008-12-01

    Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from fermented vegetables, sour dough, milk products, sheep and human excreta. The newly isolated cultures were evaluated for a number of probiotic characteristics like bile salt resistance, salt tolerance in general, survival in low pH, hydrophobicity of the cell surface, resistance to low phenol concentration, antimicrobial activity and susceptibility pattern against vancomycin and erythromycin. The selected cultures were further screened for their ability to produce the nutraceticals such as folic acid and exopolysaccharide (EPS). Two potent isolates, CB2 (from cabbage) and SD2 (from sour dough) were found to produce both extracellular and intracellular folate. One of the isolates from yogurt (MC-1) and the one from whey (W3) produced significant amount of EPS with a maximum production of 8.79 +/- 0.05 g/l by MC-1.

  2. Proteolytic Activity in Reduced-Fat Cheddar Cheese Made with Lactic Acid Bacteria and Camel Chymosin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Mette Winther

    be the need of an extended ripening period to reach a similar cheese structure as in cheeses produced with BC. The aim of this project was to compensate for the lower proteolytic activity in cheese produced with CC compared to BC. Selection of dairy lactic acid bacteria (LAB) for cheese production with high...... for their ability to influence proteolysis and structure during cheese ripening. In an attempt to improve the screening methods and contribute to the development of a new classification system of Latcococcus lactic strains, the peptide profile formed by selected strains after growth in milk was analyzed...... mediated an increase in the total amount of amino acids as well as a shorter structure. A model system, used to study the retention of chymosin in a curd, showed that the retention of CC was less dependent on pH compared to BC, and the retention of CC was higher than BC in the pH interval 6...

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM A TRADITIONAL PASTA FILATA CHEESE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.P.L De Santis

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are reported the results of the characterization of the lactic acid microflora isolated from Sardinian “provoletta”, a traditional pasta filata cheese obtained from cow’s milk. Cheese samples from two batches were taken in triplicate from three dairy plants after 7 and 21 days of ripening. Each sample was analyzed for mesophilic and thermophilic lactic acid bacteria (LAB. From plates, 118 isolates were identified by Rep- PCR GTG5, species-specific PCR and DNA sequencing. The identified LAB belonged to 7 different species: Lb. paracasei, Lb. rhamnosus, Lb. delbrueckii, Lb. fermentum, E. faecalis, E. faecium e Lc. Lactis. Enterococci were the most common isolates, they were recovered from all the dairy plants and from all the products analysed at 7 and at 20 days of ripening. Although with some differences within the various producers, the technology used aids mesophilic LAB growth, guaranteeing a large biodiversity protection.

  4. Hydroxylamine hydrochloride-acetic acid-soluble and -insoluble fractions of pelagic sediment: Readsorption revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, D.Z.; Wandless, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    The extraction of the rare earth elements (REE) from deep-ocean pelagic sediment, using hydroxylamine hydrochloride-acetic acid, leads to the separation of approximately 70% of the bulk REE content into the soluble fraction and 30% into the insoluble fraction. The REE pattern of the soluble fraction, i.e., the content of REE normalized to average shale on an element-by-element basis and plotted against atomic number, resembles the pattern for seawater, whereas the pattern, as well as the absolute concentrations, in the insoluble fraction resembles the North American shale composite. These results preclude significant readsorption of the REE by the insoluble phases during the leaching procedure.

  5. 6-Aminopenicillanic acid revisited: A combined solid state NMR and in silico refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Daniel Lima Marques de; San Gil, Rosane Aguiar da Silva; Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca de; Souza, Eugenio Furtado de; Borré, Leandro Bandeira; Vaiss, Viviane da Silva; Leitão, Alexandre Amaral

    2016-09-01

    13C/15N (experimental and ab initio) solid-state NMR was used to achieve an affordable way to improve hydrogen refinement of 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA) structure. The lattice effect on the isotropic chemical shifts was probed by using two different magnetic shielding calculations: isolated molecules and periodic crystal structure. The electron density difference maps of optimized and non-optimized structures were calculated in order to investigate the interactions inside the 6-APA unit cell. The 13C and 15N chemical shifts assignments were unambiguously stablished. In addition, some of the literature 13C resonances ambiguities could be properly solved.

  6. Isolation of Lactic Acid Bacteria Showing Antioxidative and Probiotic Activities from Kimchi and Infant Feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Keunho; Jang, Na Young; Kim, Young Tae

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate lactic acid bacteria with antioxidative and probiotic activities isolated from Korean healthy infant feces and kimchi. Isolates A1, A2, S1, S2, and S3 were assigned to Lactobacillus sp. and isolates A3, A4, E1, E2, E3, and E4 were assigned to Leuconostoc sp. on the basis of their physiological properties and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis. Most strains were confirmed as safe bioresources through nonhemolytic activities and non-production of harmful enzymes such as β-glucosidase, β- glucuronidase and tryptophanase. The 11 isolates showed different resistance to acid and bile acids. In addition, they exhibited antibacterial activity against foodborne bacteria, especially Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli. Furthermore, all strains showed significantly high levels of hydrophobicity. The antioxidant effects of culture filtrates of the 11 strains included 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity, 2.2'- azino-bis (2-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical cation scavenging activity, and superoxide dismutase activity. The results revealed that most of the culture filtrates have effective scavenging activity for DPPH and ABTS radicals. All strains appeared to have effective superoxide dismutase activity. In conclusion, the isolated strains A1, A3, S1, and S3 have significant probiotic activities applicable to the development of functional foods and health-related products. These strains might also contribute to preventing and controlling several diseases associated with oxidative stress, when used as probiotics.

  7. Phytate degrading activities of lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional fermented food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damayanti, Ema; Ratisiwi, Febiyani Ndaru; Istiqomah, Lusty; Sembiring, Langkah; Febrisiantosa, Andi

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the potential of LAB with phytate degrading activity from fermented traditional food grain-based and legume-based. Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from different sources of traditional fermented food from Gunungkidul Yogyakarta Indonesia such as gembus tempeh (tofu waste), soybean tempeh, lamtoro tempeh (Leucaena bean) and kara tempeh. Isolation of LAB was performed using Total Plate Count (TPC) on de Man Rogosa Sharpe Agar (MRSA) medium supplemented with CaCO3. They were screened for their ability to degrade myo-inositol hexaphosphate or IP6 by using qualitative streak platemethod with modified de Man Rogosa-MorpholinoPropanesulfonic Acid Sharpe (MRS-MOPS) medium contained sodium salt of phytic acid as substrate and cobalt chloride staining (plate assay) method. The selected isolates were further assayed for phytase activities using quantitative method with spectrophotometer and the two selected isolates growth were optimized. Furthermore, thhe isolates that shown the highest phytase activity was characterized and identified using API 50 CH kitand 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The results showed that there were 18 LAB isolates obtained from samplesand 13 isolates were able to degrade sodium phytate based on qualitative screening. According to quantitative assay, the highest phytate degrading activities were found in TG-2(23.562 U/mL) and TG-1 (19.641 U/mL) isolated from gembus tempeh. The phytate activity of TG-2 was optimum at 37 °C with agitation, while the phytate activity of TG-1 was optimum at 45 °C without agitation. Characterization and identification of TG-2 isolate with the highest phytate degrading activity using API 50 CH and 16S rRNA showed that TG-2had homology with Lactobacillus fermentum. It could be concluded that LAB from from fermented traditional food grain-based and legume-based produced the extracellular phytase. Keywords: lactic acid bacteria, tempeh, phytatedegrading activity

  8. Effect of methionine and lactic acid bacteria as aflatoxin binder on broiler performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istiqomah, Lusty; Damayanti, Ema; Julendra, Hardi; Suryani, Ade Erma; Sakti, Awistaros Angger; Anggraeni, Ayu Septi

    2017-06-01

    The use of aflatoxin binder product based amino acids, lacic acid bacteria, and natural product gived the opportunity to be an alternative biological decontamination of aflatoxins. A study was conducted to determine the efficacy of aflatoxin binder administration (amino acid methionine and lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum G7)) as feed additive on broiler performance. In this study, 75 Lohmann unsexed day old chicks were distributed randomly into 5 units of cages, each filled with 15 broilers. Five cages were assigned into 5 treatments groups and fed with feed contained aflatoxin. The treatments as follow: P1 (aflatoxin feed without aflatoxin binder), P3 (aflatoxin feed + 0.8% of methionine + 1% of LAB), P4 (aflatoxin feed + 1.2% of methionine + 1% of LAB), P5 (aflatoxin feed + 1% of LAB), and K0 (commercial feed). The measurement of aflatoxin content in feed was performed by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay method using AgraQuant® Total Aflatoxin Assay Romer Labs procedure. The experimental period was 35 days with feeding and drinking ad libitum. LAB was administered into drinking water, while methionine into feed. Vaccination program of Newcastle Disease (ND) was using active vaccine at 4 and 18 day old, while Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD) was given at 8 day old. Parameter of body weight was observed weekly, while feed consumption noted daily. The result showed that aflatoxin in feed for 35 days period did not significantly affect the body weight gain and feed conversion. The lowest percentage of organ damage at 21 day old was found in P5 treatment (55%), while at 35day old was found in P4 treatment (64%). It could be concluded that technological process of detoxifying aflatoxin could be applied in an attempt to reduce the effect on the toxicity of aflatoxin in poultry feed.

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of Gluconobacter cerinus CECT 9110 and Gluconobacter japonicus CECT 8443, Acetic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Grape Must

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainz, Florencia

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of Gluconobacter cerinus strain CECT9110 and Gluconobacter japonicus CECT8443, acetic acid bacteria isolated from grape must. Gluconobacter species are well known for their ability to oxidize sugar alcohols into the corresponding acids. Our objective was to select strains to oxidize effectively d-glucose. PMID:27365351

  10. Peptidoglycan Hydrolases of Local Lactic Acid Bacteria from Kazakh Traditional Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serik Shaikhin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Peptidoglycan (PG is a major component of the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria and is essential for maintaining the integrity of the bacterial cell and its shape. The bacteria synthesize PG hydrolases, which are capable of cleaving the covalent bonds of PG. They also play an important role in modeling PG, which is required for bacterial growth and division. In an era of increasing antibiotic-resistant pathogens, PG hydrolases that destroy these important structures of the cell wall act as a potential source of new antimicrobials. The aim of this study is to identify the main PG hydrolases of local lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional foods that enhance probiotic activity of a biological preparation. Methods. Lactococcus lactis 17А and Lactococcus garvieae 19А were isolated from the traditional sausage-like meat product called kazy. They were isolated according to standards methods of microbiology. Genetic identification of the isolates were tested by determining the nucleotide sequences of 16S rDNA. The Republican collection of microorganisms took strains of Lactobacillus casei subsp. Rhamnosus 13-P, L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis CG-1 B-RKM 0044 from cheese, Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei B-RKM 0202 from homemade butter. They used the standard technique of renaturating polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to detect PG hydrolases activity. Results. According to the profiles of PG hydrolase activity on zymograms, the enzymes of Lactococci 17A and 19A in kazy are similar in electrophoretic mobility to major autolysin AcmA, while the lactobacilli of industrial and home-made dairy products have enzymes similar to extracellular proteins p40 and p75, which have probiotic activity. Conclusions. Use of peptidoglycan hydrolases seems to be an interesting approach in the fight against multi-drug resistant strains of bacteria and could be a valuable tool for the treatment of diseases caused by these microorganisms in Kazakhstan.

  11. Isolation and identification of microorganisms including lactic acid bacteria and their use in microbial deacidification of wines from domestic vineyards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdz, Iwona; Makarewicz, Malgorzata; Tuszyński, Tadeusz

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify various bacteria isolated from grapes and their wines. Additionally we investigated the capacity of lactic acid bacteria for microbiological deacidification of wines produced in Poland. We have identified Oenococcus oeni, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii. During the microbial deacidification process, we observed decreases of total acidity and increases of volatile acidity, with statistically significant changes noted for O. oeni in Marechal Foch and Seyval Blanc, and for Lb. acidophilus in Frontenac. On the other hand, a statistically significant increase in pH was observed in Marechal Foch and Seyval Blanc following deacidification by O. oeni.

  12. Of mice, rats and men: Revisiting the quinolinic acid hypothesis of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarcz, Robert; Guidetti, Paolo; Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V; Muchowski, Paul J

    2010-02-09

    The neurodegenerative disease Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) tract in the protein huntingtin (htt). Although the gene encoding htt was identified and cloned more than 15 years ago, and in spite of impressive efforts to unravel the mechanism(s) by which mutant htt induces nerve cell death, these studies have so far not led to a good understanding of pathophysiology or an effective therapy. Set against a historical background, we review data supporting the idea that metabolites of the kynurenine pathway (KP) of tryptophan degradation provide a critical link between mutant htt and the pathophysiology of HD. New studies in HD brain and genetic model organisms suggest that the disease may in fact be causally related to early abnormalities in KP metabolism, favoring the formation of two neurotoxic metabolites, 3-hydroxykynurenine and quinolinic acid, over the related neuroprotective agent kynurenic acid. These findings not only link the excitotoxic hypothesis of HD pathology to an impairment of the KP but also define new drug targets and therefore have direct therapeutic implications. Thus, pharmacological normalization of the imbalance in brain KP metabolism may provide clinical benefits, which could be especially effective in early stages of the disease.

  13. Preparation of metal-resistant immobilized sulfate reducing bacteria beads for acid mine drainage treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingliang; Wang, Haixia; Han, Xuemei

    2016-07-01

    Novel immobilized sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) beads were prepared for the treatment of synthetic acid mine drainage (AMD) containing high concentrations of Fe, Cu, Cd and Zn using up-flow anaerobic packed-bed bioreactor. The tolerance of immobilized SRB beads to heavy metals was significantly enhanced compared with that of suspended SRB. High removal efficiencies of sulfate (61-88%) and heavy metals (>99.9%) as well as slightly alkaline effluent pH (7.3-7.8) were achieved when the bioreactor was fed with acidic influent (pH 2.7) containing high concentrations of multiple metals (Fe 469 mg/L, Cu 88 mg/L, Cd 92 mg/L and Zn 128 mg/L), which showed that the bioreactor filled with immobilized SRB beads had tolerance to AMD containing high concentrations of heavy metals. Partially decomposed maize straw was a carbon source and stabilizing agent in the initial phase of bioreactor operation but later had to be supplemented by a soluble carbon source such as sodium lactate. The microbial community in the bioreactor was characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of partial 16S rDNA genes. Synergistic interaction between SRB (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans) and co-existing fermentative bacteria could be the key factor for the utilization of complex organic substrate (maize straw) as carbon and nutrients source for sulfate reduction.

  14. Isolation, enumeration, molecular identification and probiotic potential evaluation of lactic acid bacteria isolated from sheep milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.B. Acurcio

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria species were molecularly identified in milk from Lacaune, Santa Inês and crossbred sheep breeds and their in vitro probiotic potential was evaluated. The species identified were Enterococcus faecium (56.25%, E. durans (31.25% and E. casseliflavus (12.5%. No other lactic acid bacteria species, such as lactobacilli, was identified. Most of the isolated enterococci were resistant to gastric pH (2.0 and to 0.3% oxgall. All tested enterococci were resistant to ceftazidime, oxacillin and streptomycin and sensible to clindamycin, erythromycin and penicillin. The resistance to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, tetracycline and vancomycin varied among tested species. All tested enterococci strongly inhibited (P<0.05 Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes, moderately inhibited E. faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus and did not inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica var. Typhimurium and also one E. durans sample isolated from sheep milk. Four samples of E. faecium, one of E. durans and one of E. casseliflavus presented the best probiotic potential.

  15. Effect of lactic acid bacteria isolated from fermented mustard on immunopotentiating activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen-Kai; Chang; Shu-Chen; Wang; Chih-Kwang; Chiu; Shih-Ying; Chen; Zong-Tsi; Chen; Pin-Der; Duh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of lactic acid bacteria isolated from fermented mustard on immunopotentiating activity Methods: One hundred and fifty nine strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional Taiwan fermented mustard were evaluated for their immunopotentiating activity on a murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7.Results: Of the strains, pronounced increases in the levels of nitric oxide(NO), tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 were observed in strains B0040, B0110 and B0145. Among them,strain B0145 had the highest NO and tumor necrosis factor-α generation in RAW 264.7 cells;strains B0040 and B0110 were also superior to that of Lactobacillus casei. These results demonstrated that NO and cytokines were effectively induced when the bacterial stimulants were treated with macrophages. In addition, strains B0040 and B0110 were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum, and B0145 as Weissella cibaria using 16 S rDNA analysis.Conclusions: The results implicated selected strains may be regarded as a biological response modifier and had a broad application prospects in exploiting new functional food or as a feed additive.

  16. Sugar-coated: exopolysaccharide producing lactic acid bacteria for food and human health applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, P M; Ross, R P; Fitzgerald, G F; Caplice, N M; Stanton, C

    2015-03-01

    The human enteric microbiome represents a veritable organ relied upon by the host for a range of metabolic and homeostatic functions. Through the production of metabolites such as short chain fatty acids (SCFA), folate, vitamins B and K, lactic acid, bacteriocins, peroxides and exopolysaccharides, the bacteria of the gut microbiome provide nutritional components for colonocytes, liver and muscle cells, competitively exclude potential pathogenic organisms and modulate the hosts immune system. Due to the extensive variation in structure, size and composition, microbial exopolysaccharides represent a useful set of versatile natural ingredients for the food industrial sector, both in terms of their rheological properties and in many cases, their associated health benefits. The exopolysaccharide-producing bacteria that fall within the 35 Lactobacillus and five Bifidobacterium species which have achieved qualified presumption of safety (QPS) and generally recognised as safe (GRAS) status are of particular interest, as their inclusion in food products can avoid considerable scrutiny. In addition, additives commonly utilised by the food industry are becoming unattractive to the consumer, due to the demand for a more 'natural' and 'clean labelled' diet. In situ production of exopolysaccharides by food-grade cultures in many cases confers similar rheological and sensory properties in fermented dairy products, as traditional additives, such as hydrocolloids, collagen and alginate. This review will focus on microbial synthesis of exopolysaccharides, the human health benefits of dietary exopolysaccharides and the technofunctional applications of exopolysaccharide-synthesising microbes in the food industry.

  17. Experimental evolution and the adjustment of metabolic strategies in lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Herwig; Molenaar, Douwe; Branco Dos Santos, Filipe; Teusink, Bas

    2017-08-01

    Experimental evolution of microbes has gained lots of interest in recent years, mainly due to the ease of strain characterisation through next-generation sequencing. While evolutionary and systems biologists use experimental evolution to address fundamental questions in their respective fields, studies with lactic acid bacteria are often more directed by applied questions. Insight into population and genome dynamics are valuable for experimental design and data interpretation, and it is becoming increasingly apparent how different constraints limit and govern the outcome of microbial adaptation to a selective environment. Examples for such constraints are the finite membrane and cellular space which can lead to trade-offs between cellular strategies. A powerful perspective is that of resource allocation, which allows cells to maximise fitness. This impacts on metabolic strategies that have different protein/resource demands. This review focuses on parameters and forces that shape cellular optimisation processes and that are determining for the outcome of laboratory evolution experiments. Phenotypic changes of experimentally evolved lactic acid bacteria will be discussed in the light of the selection conditions and the prevailing constraints. © FEMS 2017.

  18. Comparative Antifungal Effect of Lactic Acid Bacteria Strains on Penicillium digitatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Matei

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are natural alternative to chemical preservatives for fruits. The aim of the research was to select LAB strains with high antifungal activity against Penicillium digitatum for the biopreservation of fruits. The antifungal activity of eight lactic acid bacteria strains has been evaluated against Penicilliuum digitatum isolated from orange, by overlay assay method and by optical microscope examination. The reversion of inhibition zone after 96 h was recorded as a fungistatic effect while those with inhibition zone for at least 7 days were recorded as fungicidal. The antifungal effect of efficient LAB strains was assessed by comparing inhibition of fungal biofilm formation in liquid media. The strains Lpl, Lpa, LAB 13, LAB 15, LAB 43 and LAB 58 presented intense antifungal activity with clear inhibition zones diameter over 20 mm. The microscopy evidenced atypical hyphae and delaying of conidial chain formation. The strains Lpa, LAB 13, LAB 15 fully inhibited the mycelia growth, strains LAB 43 and LAB 58 partly with delaying of biofilm formation on the surface of culture medium. The results of comparative antifungal activity of LAB strains evidenced the highest inhibition of fungal biofilm formation and structural damages of hyphae and spores caused by the strains Lpa, LAB 13 and LAB 15. These strains could be efficient biocontrol agents of Penicillium digitatum in fruits.

  19. Isolation and identification of lactic acid bacteria from fermented red dragon fruit juices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Yien Yien; Tan, Wen Siang; Rosfarizan, Mohamad; Chan, Eng Seng; Tey, Beng Ti

    2012-10-01

    Red dragon fruit or red pitaya is rich in potassium, fiber, and antioxidants. Its nutritional properties and unique flesh color have made it an attractive raw material of various types of food products and beverages including fermented beverages or enzyme drinks. In this study, phenotypic and genotypic methods were used to confirm the identity of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) appeared in fermented red dragon fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus) beverages. A total of 21 isolates of LAB were isolated and characterized. They belonged to the genus of Enterococcus based on their biochemical characteristics. The isolates can be clustered into two groups by using the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA method. Nucleotide sequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism of the 16S rRNA region suggested that they were either Enterococcus faecalis or Enterococcus durans. Current research revealed the use of biochemical analyses and molecular approaches to identify the microbial population particularly lactic acid bacteria from fermented red dragon fruit juices. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Lactic acid bacteria producing B-group vitamins: a great potential for functional cereals products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozzi, Vittorio; Russo, Pasquale; Dueñas, María Teresa; López, Paloma; Spano, Giuseppe

    2012-12-01

    Wheat contains various essential nutrients including the B group of vitamins. However, B group vitamins, normally present in cereals-derived products, are easily removed or destroyed during milling, food processing or cooking. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used as starter cultures for the fermentation of a large variety of foods and can improve the safety, shelf life, nutritional value, flavor and overall quality of the fermented products. In this regard, the identification and application of strains delivering health-promoting compounds is a fascinating field. Besides their key role in food fermentations, several LAB found in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals are commercially used as probiotics and possess generally recognized as safe status. LAB are usually auxotrophic for several vitamins although certain strains of LAB have the capability to synthesize water-soluble vitamins such as those included in the B group. In recent years, a number of biotechnological processes have been explored to perform a more economical and sustainable vitamin production than that obtained via chemical synthesis. This review article will briefly report the current knowledge on lactic acid bacteria synthesis of vitamins B2, B11 and B12 and the potential strategies to increase B-group vitamin content in cereals-based products, where vitamins-producing LAB have been leading to the elaboration of novel fermented functional foods. In addition, the use of genetic strategies to increase vitamin production or to create novel vitamin-producing strains will be also discussed.

  1. Sourdough lactic acid bacteria: exploration of non-wheat cereal-based fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coda, Rossana; Cagno, Raffaella Di; Gobbetti, Marco; Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe

    2014-02-01

    Cereal-based foods represent a very important source of biological as well as of cultural diversity, as testified by the wide range of derived fermented products. A trend that is increasingly attracting bakery industries as well as consumers is the use of non-conventional flours for the production of novel products, characterised by peculiar flavour and better nutritional value. Lactic acid bacteria microbiota of several non-wheat cereals and pseudo-cereals has been recently deeply investigated with the aim of studying the biodiversity and finding starter cultures for sourdough fermentation. Currently, the use of ancient or ethnic grains is mainly limited to traditional typical foods and the bread making process is not well standardised with consequent negative effects on the final properties. The challenge in fermenting such grains is represented by the necessity to combine good technology and sensory properties with nutritional/health benefits. The choice of the starter cultures has a critical impact on the final quality of cereal-based products, and strains that dominate and outcompete contaminants should be applied for specific sourdough fermentations. In this sense, screening and characterisation of the lactic acid bacteria microbiota is very useful in the improvement of a peculiar flour, from both a nutritional and technological point of view.

  2. Chemotactic behavior of deep subsurface bacteria toward carbohydrates, amino acids and a chlorinated alkene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez de Victoria, G. (Puerto Rico Univ., Rio Piedras (Puerto Rico). Dept. of Biology)

    1989-02-01

    The chemotactic behavior of deep terrestrial subsurface bacteria toward amino acids, carbohydrates and trichloroethylene was assayed using a modification of the capillary method and bacterial enumeration by acridine orange direct counts. Eleven isolates of bacteria isolated from six different geological formations were investigated. A bimodal response rather than an absolute positive or negative response was observed in most assays. Most of the isolates were positively chemotactic to low concentrations of substrates and were repelled by high concentrations of the same substrate. However, this was not the case for trichloroethylene (TCE) which was mostly an attractant and elicited the highest responses in all the isolates when compared with amino acids and carbohydrates. The movement rates of these isolates in aseptic subsurface sediments in the absence and presence of TCE were also determined using a laboratory model. All of the isolates showed distinct response range, peak, and threshold concentrations when exposed to the same substrates suggesting that they are possibly different species as has been inferred from DNA homology studies. 101 refs., 4 figs., 57 tabs.

  3. Aflatoxin M1 in raw milk and binding of aflatoxin by lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aflatoxin M1 in raw milk and binding of aflatoxin by lactic acid bacteria

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1 is potential human carcinogen. Its presence in milk and dairy products represents risk for human health. Therefore, this study was carried out in order to determine thedegree of microbiological contamination by mold, and the potential presence of aflatoxin M1 in 60 raw milk samples, randomly taken from individual producers from different regions of the continental Croatia. The most common genera isolated fungi were Geotrichum (78.3 %, Aspergillus (32.4 % and Penicillium (27.0 %. From total of 60 studied milk samples, 86.66 % were positive for the presence of aflatoxin M1, and 6.66 % of samples were above the prescribed limits. Lactic acid bacteria used in fermented dairy products as a starter culture may play a role in reduction of aflatoxin in foods and nutrients. In this paper the ability of lactic acid bacteria: Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (ATCC 53103, Lactobacillus delbrueckii S1 and Lactobacillus plantarum A1 to bind aflatoxin M1 was investigated. Standard strain L. rhamnosus GG (ATCC 53103 and L. delbrueckii S1 can significantly (P50 % compared to L. plantarum A1, which binds AFM1 between 18.7 to 28.7 %.

  4. Fermentative profile and bacterial diversity of corn silages inoculated with new tropical lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A O; Ávila, C L S; Pinto, J C; Carvalho, B F; Dias, D R; Schwan, R F

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of inoculation of strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from sugarcane grown in a Brazil on the quality of corn silage. Three strains of Lactobacillus buchneri (UFLA SLM11, UFLA SLM103 and UFLA SLM108), five strains of Lactobacillus plantarum (UFLA SLM08, UFLA SLM41, UFLA SLM45, UFLA SLM46 and UFLA SLM105), and one strain of Leuconostoc mesenteroides (UFLA SLM06) were evaluated at 0, 10, 30, 60 and 90 day after inoculating corn forage. The inoculation of the LAB strains did not influence the chemical composition of the silage, but pH, acetic acid and 1,2-propanediol were affected by treatment. The silages inoculated with UFLA SLM11 and SLM108 contained the lowest yeast and filamentous fungi counts during fermentation. Bacteria belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae family, Clostridium genus were detected in the silages inoculated with Lact. buchneri UFLA SLM 11, 103 and 108, as shown by DGGE analysis. Silages inoculated with Lact. buchneri UFLA SLM 11 showed higher aerobic stability. The Lact. buchneri UFLA SLM11 strain was considered promising as a starter culture or inoculant for corn silages. The selection of microbial inoculants for each crop promotes improvement of silage quality. Studies on the chemical and microbiological characteristics of silage provide useful information for improving ensiling techniques. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Honeybees and beehives are rich sources for fructophilic lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Akihito; Salminen, Seppo

    2013-09-01

    Fructophilic lactic acid bacteria (FLAB) are a specific group of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) characterized and described only recently. They prefer fructose as growth substrate and inhabit only fructose-rich niches. Honeybees are high-fructose-consuming insects and important pollinators in nature, but reported to be decreasing in the wild. In the present study, we analyzed FLAB microbiota in honeybees, larvae, fresh honey and bee pollen. A total of 66 strains of LAB were isolated from samples using a selective isolation technique for FLAB. Surprisingly, all strains showed fructophilic characteristics. The 66 strains and ten FLAB strains isolated from flowers in a separate study were genotypically separated into six groups, four of which being identified as Lactobacillus kunkeei and two as Fructobacillus fructosus. One of the L. kunkeei isolates showed antibacterial activity against Melissococcus plutonius, a causative pathogen of European foulbrood, this protection being attributable to production of an antibacterial peptide or protein. Culture-independent analysis suggested that bee products and larvae contained simple Lactobacillus-group microbiota, dominated by L. kunkeei, although adult bees carried a more complex microbiota. The findings clearly demonstrate that honeybees and their products are rich sources of FLAB, and FLAB are potential candidates for future bee probiotics.

  6. Technological and functional applications of low-calorie sweeteners from lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, F; Tomar, S K; Arora, S

    2009-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been extensively used for centuries as starter cultures to carry out food fermentations and are looked upon as burgeoning "cell factories" for production of host of functional biomolecules and food ingredients. Low-calorie sugars have been a recent addition and have attracted a great deal of interest of researchers, manufacturers, and consumers for varied reasons. These sweeteners also getting popularized as low-carb sugars have been granted generally recommended as safe (GRAS) status by the U.S. Federal Drug Administration (USFDA) and include both sugars and sugar alcohols (polyols) which in addition to their technological attributes (sugar replacer, bulking agent, texturiser, humectant, cryoprotectant) have been observed to exert a number of health benefits (low calories, low glycemic index, anticariogenic, osmotic diuretics, obesity control, prebiotic). Some of these sweeteners successfully produced by lactic acid bacteria include mannitol, sorbitol, tagatose, and trehalose and there is a potential to further enhance their production with the help of metabolic engineering. These safe sweeteners can be exploited as vital food ingredients for development of low-calorie foods with added functional values especially for children, diabetic patients, and weight watchers.

  7. Isolation and characterization of lactic acid bacteria strains with ornithine producing capacity from natural sea salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jin-Ju; Oh, Suk-Heung

    2010-08-01

    Two lactic acid bacteria (LAB) having ornithine-producing capacity were isolated from Korean natural sea salt. They were Gram-positive, short rod-type bacteria, and able to grow anaerobically with CO(2) production. The isolates grew well on MRS broth at 30-37 degrees C and a pH of 6.5-8.0. The optimum temperature and pH for growth are 37 degrees C and pH 7.0. The isolates fermented D-ribose, D-galactose, D-lactose, D-maltose, Dcellobiose, D-tagatose, D-trehalose, sucrose, D-melezitose, gentiobiose, D-glucose but not D-melibiose, inositol, and L-sorbose. The 16S rDNA sequences of the two isolates showed 99.5% and 99.6% homology with the Weissella koreensis S5623 16S rDNA (Access no. AY035891). They were accordingly identified and named as Weissella koreensis MS1-3 and Weissella koreensis MS1-14, and produced intracellular ornithine at levels of 72 mg/100 g cell F.W. and 105 mg/100 g cell F.W. and extracellular ornithine at levels of 4.5 mg/100 ml and 4.6 mg/100 ml medium, respectively, by culturing in MRS broth supplemented with 1% arginine. High cell growth was maintained in MRS broth with a NaCl concentration of 0-6%. These results show for the first time that Korean natural sea salts contain lactic acid bacteria Weissella koreensis strains having ornithine producing capacity.

  8. Whey fermentation by thermophilic lactic acid bacteria: evolution of carbohydrates and protein content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescuma, Micaela; Hébert, Elvira María; Mozzi, Fernanda; Font de Valdez, Graciela

    2008-05-01

    Whey, a by-product of the cheese industry usually disposed as waste, is a source of biological and functional valuable proteins. The aim of this work was to evaluate the potentiality of three lactic acid bacteria strains to design a starter culture for developing functional whey-based drinks. Fermentations were performed at 37 and 42 degrees C for 24h in reconstituted whey powder (RW). Carbohydrates, organic acids and amino acids concentrations during fermentation were evaluated by RP-HPLC. Proteolytic activity was measured by the o-phthaldialdehyde test and hydrolysis of whey proteins was analyzed by Tricine SDS-PAGE. The studied strains grew well (2-3log cfu/ml) independently of the temperature used. Streptococcus thermophilus CRL 804 consumed 12% of the initial lactose concentration and produced the highest amount of lactic acid (45 mmol/l) at 24h. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 454 was the most proteolytic (91 microg Leu/ml) strain and released the branched chain amino acids Leu and Val. In contrast, Lactobacillus acidophilus CRL 636 and S. thermophilus CRL 804 consumed most of the amino acids present in whey. The studied strains were able to degrade the major whey proteins, alpha-lactalbumin being degraded in a greater extent (2.2-3.4-fold) than beta-lactoglobulin. Two starter cultures were evaluated for their metabolic and proteolytic activities in RW. Both cultures acidified and reduced the lactose content in whey in a greater extent than the strains alone. The amino acid release was higher (86 microg/ml) for the starter SLb (strains CRL 804+CRL 454) than for SLa (strains CRL 804+CRL 636, 37 microg/ml). Regarding alpha-lactalbumin and beta-lactoglobulin degradation, no differences were observed as compared to the values obtained with the single cultures. The starter culture SLb showed high potential to be used for developing fermented whey-based beverages.

  9. Stochastic modelling of Listeria monocytogenes single cell growth in cottage cheese with mesophilic lactic acid bacteria from aroma producing cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Dalgaard, Paw

    2015-01-01

    for pH, lactic acid concentration and initial concentration of lactic acid bacteria. These data and bootstrap sampling were used to represent product variability in the stochastic model. Lag time data were estimated from observed growth data (lactic acid bacteria) and from literature on L. monocytogenes...... single cells. These lag time data were expressed as relative lag times and included in growth models. A stochastic model was developed from an existing deterministic growth model including the effect of five environmental factors and inter-bacterial interaction [Østergaard, N.B, Eklöw, A and Dalgaard, P....... 2014. Modelling the effect of lactic acid bacteria from starter- and aroma culture on growth of Listeria monocytogenes in cottage cheese. International Journal of Food Microbiology. 188, 15-25]. Growth of L. monocytogenes single cells, using lag time distributions corresponding to three different...

  10. Acid resistance of methanogenic bacteria in a two-stage anaerobic process treating high concentration methanol Wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xuefei; REN Nanqi

    2007-01-01

    In this study,the two-stage upflow anaerobic sludge blanket(UASB)system and batch experiments were employed to evaluate the performance of anaerobic digestion for the treatment of high concentration methanol wastewater.The acid resistance of granular sludge and methanogenic bacteria and their metabolizing activity were investigated.The results show that the pH of the first UASB changed from 4.9 to 5.8 and 5.5 to 6.2 for the second reactor.Apparently,these were not the advisable pH levels that common metha nogenic bacteria could accept.The methanogenic bacteria of the system,viz.Methanosarcina barkeri,had some acid resistance and could still degrade methanol at pH 5.0.If the methanogenic bacteria were trained further,their acid resistance would be improved somewhat.Granular sludge of the system could protect the methanogenic bacteria within its body against the impact of the acidic environment and make them degrade methanol at pH 4.5.The performance of granular sludge was attributed to its structure,bacteria species,and the distribution of bacterium inside the granule.

  11. The phylogeny of the aromatic amino acid hydroxylases revisited by characterizing phenylalanine hydroxylase from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica; Steen, Ida Helene; Svebak, Randi M; Martinez, Aurora

    2008-12-31

    The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum contains only one aromatic amino acid hydroxylase (AAAH) gene compared to at least three in metazoans. As shown in this work this gene codes for a phenylalanine hydroxylase (DictyoPAH) and phylogenetic analysis places this enzyme close to the precursor AAAHs, aiding to define the evolutionary history of the AAAH family. DictyoPAH shows significant similarities to other eukaryote PAH, but it exhibits higher activity with tetrahydrodictyopterin (DH4) than with tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) as cofactor. DH4 is an abundant tetrahydropterin in D. discoideum while BH4 is the natural cofactor of the AAAHs in mammals. Moreover, DictyoPAH is devoid of the characteristic regulatory mechanisms of mammalian PAH such as positive cooperativity for L-Phe and activation by preincubation with the substrate. Analysis of the few active site substitutions between DictyoPAH and mammalian PAH, including mutant expression analysis, reveals potential structural determinants for allosteric regulation.

  12. Unified theory of bacterial sialometabolism: how and why bacteria metabolize host sialic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimr, Eric R

    2013-01-01

    Sialic acids are structurally diverse nine-carbon ketosugars found mostly in humans and other animals as the terminal units on carbohydrate chains linked to proteins or lipids. The sialic acids function in cell-cell and cell-molecule interactions necessary for organismic development and homeostasis. They not only pose a barrier to microorganisms inhabiting or invading an animal mucosal surface, but also present a source of potential carbon, nitrogen, and cell wall metabolites necessary for bacterial colonization, persistence, growth, and, occasionally, disease. The explosion of microbial genomic sequencing projects reveals remarkable diversity in bacterial sialic acid metabolic potential. How bacteria exploit host sialic acids includes a surprisingly complex array of metabolic and regulatory capabilities that is just now entering a mature research stage. This paper attempts to describe the variety of bacterial sialometabolic systems by focusing on recent advances at the molecular and host-microbe-interaction levels. The hope is that this focus will provide a framework for further research that holds promise for better understanding of the metabolic interplay between bacterial growth and the host environment. An ability to modify or block this interplay has already yielded important new insights into potentially new therapeutic approaches for modifying or blocking bacterial colonization or infection.

  13. [Effects of a lactic acid bacteria community SFC-2 treated on rice straw].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li-Juan; Wang, Xiao-Fen; Yang, Hong-Yan; Gao, Xiu-Zhi; Lü, Yu-Cai; Cui, Zong-Jun

    2007-06-01

    Aimed to utilize rice straw and lessen the pressure of environment, the rice straw was used as the fermentation material, and a lactic acid bacteria community SFC-2 from my laboratory was inoculated into the rice straw to investigate the inoculation effects. After 30 days fermentation, the inoculated fermented straw smelt acid-fragrant, and the pH value was 3.8, which was lower than the control of 4.1. Furthermore, lactic acid concentration was more than that in the control. Especially L-lactic acid concentration was two times more than in the control, and the crude protein content was 10.16% higher than that in the control, and the crude fiber content was 3.2% lower than that in the control. From the patterns of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus paracasei rapidly became the advantageous species in the inoculated straws. However, Enterobacter sakazakii, Pantoea agglomerans, Enterobacter endosymbiont, Pantoea ananatis, whichwere predominate in the controls, were not detected in the inoculated straws, and the fermented quality was improved significantly.

  14. Culture-independent analysis of lactic acid bacteria diversity associated with mezcal fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narváez-Zapata, J A; Rojas-Herrera, R A; Rodríguez-Luna, I C; Larralde-Corona, C P

    2010-11-01

    Mezcal is an alcoholic beverage obtained from the distillation of fermented juices of cooked Agave spp. plant stalks (agave must), and each region in Mexico with denomination of origin uses defined Agave species to prepare mezcal with unique organoleptic characteristics. During fermentation to produce mezcal in the state of Tamaulipas, not only alcohol-producing yeasts are involved, but also a lactic acid bacterial community that has not been characterized yet. In order to address this lack of knowledge on this traditional Mexican beverage, we performed a DGGE-16S rRNA analysis of the lactic acid bacterial diversity and metabolite accumulation during the fermentation of a typical agave must that is rustically produced in San Carlos County (Tamaulipas, Mexico). The analysis of metabolite production indicated a short but important malolactic fermentation stage not previously described for mezcal. The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of the 16S rRNA genes showed a distinctive lactic acid bacterial community composed mainly of Pediococcus parvulus, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus composti, Lactobacillus parabuchneri, and Lactobacillus plantarum. Some atypical genera such as Weissella and Bacillus were also found in the residual must. Our results suggest that the lactic acid bacteria could strongly be implicated in the organoleptic attributes of this traditional Mexican distilled beverage.

  15. [Composition diversity of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) community Al2 used for alfalfa silage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Fen; Gao, Li-Juan; Yang, Hong-Yan; Wang, Wei-Dong; Cui, Zong-Jun

    2006-10-01

    Alfalfa is the most important forage grass that is difficult to ensile for good quality. Using silage inoculants are the important way for preservation of alfalfa silage. Through continuous restricted subcultivation, a lactic acid bacteria (LAB) community Al2 was selected from well-fermented alfalfa silage. Plate isolation and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE), construction of 16S rDNA clone library were used to identify the composition diversity of Al2 community, with 7 strains detected, and they were all belonged to Lactobacillus. The composition ratios of the 7 strains were 55.21%, 19.79%, 14.58%, 3.13%, 3.13%, 3.13%, 1.03% according to 16S rDNA clone library. Al2-1i, Al2-2i, Al2-3i, corresponding to L. plantarum (99.9%), L. kimchii (99.4%), L. farciminis (100%) were detected by plate isolation. Among 3 isolates, Al2-1i had the highest ability of dropping pH and producing lactic acid, and the amount of lactic acid was reach to 18g/L at 24h cultivated in MRS media. The ability of dropping pH and producing lactic acid of Al2-3i was the lowest. From DGGE profiles, the dominant strains in Al2 community were L. plantarum and L. kimchii. L. plantarum was detected during the whole process, and L. kimchii was detected in the later phase.

  16. A prebiotic role of Ecklonia cava improves the mortality of Edwardsiella tarda-infected zebrafish models via regulating the growth of lactic acid bacteria and pathogen bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, WonWoo; Oh, Jae Young; Kim, Eun-A; Kang, Nalae; Kim, Kil-Nam; Ahn, Ginnae; Jeon, You-Jin

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the beneficial prebiotic roles of Ecklonia cava (E. cava, EC) were evaluated on the growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and pathogen bacteria and the mortality of pathogen-bacteria infected zebrafish model. The result showed that the original E. cava (EC) led to the highest growth effects on three LABs (Lactobacillus brevis, L. brevis; Lactobacillus pentosus, L. pentosus; Lactobacillus plantarum; L. plantarum) and it was dose-dependent manners. Also, EC, its Celluclast enzymatic (ECC) and 100% ethanol extracts (ECE) showed the anti-bacterial activities on the fish pathogenic bacteria such as (Edwardsiella tarda; E. tarda, Streptococcus iniae; S. iniae, and Vibrio harveyi; V. harveyi). Interestingly, EC induced the higher production of the secondary metabolites from L. plantarum in MRS medium. The secondary metabolites produced by EC significantly inhibited the growth of pathogen bacteria. In further in vivo study, the co-treatment of EC and L. plantarum improved the growth and mortality of E. tarda-infected zebrafish as regulating the expression of inflammatory molecules such as iNOS and COX2. Taken together, our present study suggests that the EC plays an important role as a potential prebiotic and has a protective effect against the infection caused by E. tarda injection in zebrafish. Also, our conclusion from this evidence is that EC can be used and applied as a useful prebiotic.

  17. Lack of inhibitory effects of Lactic acid bacteria on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon tumors in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Li; Chong-Bi Li

    2003-01-01

    AIM: A myriad of healthful effects has been attributed to the probiotic lactic acid bacteria, perhaps the most controversial issue remains that of anticancer activity. This study was aimed at investigating the putative anti-cancer effects of lactic acid bacteria strains on the progression of colon tumor in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-treated animals.METHODS: The strain of lactic acid bacteria used in this study was lactic acid bacteria NZ9000 that conformed to the characteristics of plasmid free. Sixty male Wistar rats were given subcutaneous injections of DMH at a dose of 40 mg/kg body wt or saline once a week for 10 weeks. The rats were divided into 6 experimental groups. After the last DMH injection,animals in groups 1 and 4 were gavaged with 1 mi of lactic acid bacteria at a dose of 5×109 per day or vehide until sacrifice at the end of week 22 or week 52. Animals in groups 1-3 were killed at the end of week 22 for histopathological examination.The whole period of experimental observation was 52 weeks.RESULTS: By the end of 22nd week, final average body weights of the rats treated with DMH alone and all animals receiving lactic acid bacteria were significantly decreased compared with the vehicle control (P<0.05). No differences in tumor inridence, multiplicity, dimensions and stage in the colonic mucosa were observed among the groups. At week 52, the survival rate of the rats administered lactic acid bacteria was lower than that of the rats treated with DMH that were fed on control fluids of non-lactococcus lactis. The mean survival time of lactic acid bacteria-treated animals was 39 weeks.CONCLUSION: These results indicate that lactic acid bacteria lacks inhibitory effects on the progression of colon tumor in DMH-treated animals, and does not support the hypothesis that alteration of colonic flora may exert an influence on the progression of colon tumor.

  18. Identification of lactic acid bacteria constituting the predominating microflora in an acid-fermented condiment (tempoyak) popular in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisner, J J; Vancanneyt, M; Rusul, G; Pot, B; Lefebvre, K; Fresi, A; Tee, L K

    2001-01-22

    Tempoyak is a traditional Malaysian fermented condiment made from the pulp of the durian fruit (Durio zibethinus). Salt is sometime added to proceed fermentation at ambient temperature. In various samples obtained from night markets, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were the predominant microorganisms, ranging from log 8.4 to log 9.2 cfu g(-1). No other microorganisms were present to such a level. These samples contained reduced amount of saccharose, glucose and fructose but increased amount of D- and L-lactic acid and acetic acid compared with samples of non-fermented durian fruit. Sixty-four isolates of LAB were divided into five groups by use of a few phenotypic tests. A total of 38 strains of LAB were selected for comparison by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of their whole cell protein patterns with a SDS-PAGE database of LAB. These strains were also examined for their carbohydrate fermentation patterns by use of API 50 CH. Isolates belonging to the Lactobacillus plantarum group were shown to be the predominant members of the LAB flora. In addition, isolates belonging to the Lactobacillus brevis group, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus mali, Lactobacilus fermentum and an unidentified Lactobacillus sp. were also observed. A high degree of diversity among isolates belonging to the Lb. plantarum group was demonstrated by analysis of their plasmid profiles.

  19. Viability of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Kombucha Tea Against Low pH and Bile Salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Nyoman Puspawati

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Kombucha tea is a functional drink fermented by various types of microbes. Kombucha tea is also a source of lactic acid bacteria that can maintain the balance of the microflora of the digestive tract which can improve the health of the human body. Lactic acid bacteria can act as a probiotic if it is able to survive to the human gastrointestinal tract, where in order to reach the digestive tract, lactic acid bacteria has to be resistant to the low pH in the stomach and bile salts. The purpose of this study was to determine the level of resistance of lactic acid bacteria in kombucha tea against low pH and bile salts. This study uses 20 isolates, each of these isolates were tested to the resistance of low pH 2.0 and 0.5 % bile salts with incubation time of 4 hours. The results indicated that from 20 isolates of lactic acid bacteria that were obtained from kombucha tea, 15 isolates were resistant to low pH and 13 isolates were resistant to bile salts. The isolates have a huge potential to be developed as a probiotic candidate that can contribute greatly to the health of the digestive tract.

  20. Investigation of antibacterial activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria isolated from traditional kordish cheese in comparison with commercial strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Tofangsazan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The health benefits of lactic acid bacteria in human, especially their anti-pathogenic properties has been the focus of recent interests. The objective of this study was to investigate the antibacterial activity of lactic acid bacteria (LAB isolated from traditional Kurdish cheese against a few bacterial pathogens. Materials and Methods: The cell free culture supernatant of LAB isolated from Kurdish cheese which was treated with heat and NaOH were tested for their antibacterial activity by Agar Disk Diffusion method. Moreover, Minimum Inhibition Concentration and Co-aggregation of LAB against pathogens were determined. Each test was repeated for three times. Results: The LAB isolates, in comparison with commercial lactic acid bacteria, showed suitable antibacterial activity. Heating the bacterial supernatant eliminated its anti-bacterial property; however, alkali treatment did not have any effect. The Minimum Inhibition Concentration did not show significant differences between native and commercial lactic acid bacteria; however, the native LAB showed suitable co-aggregation with pathogens. Conclusion: Traditional lactic acid bacteria and their metabolites can inhibit growth of pathogens. This shows the positive role of LAB in human health which necessitates their increase usage as natural antimicrobial agent.