WorldWideScience

Sample records for achromatic nulling interferometry

  1. Study and development of an achromatic phase shifter for nulling interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachet, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The Darwin mission is a project of the European Space Agency that should allow around 2015 the search for extra-solar planets and a spectral analysis of their atmospheres to detect gases and particularly tracers of life. The basic concept of the instrument is a Bracewell nulling interferometer. It allows the high angular resolution and high dynamic range necessary to cancel the light coming from the star to keep the planetary one. The Darwin mission technological key-points require preliminary laboratory experiments to validate each element before any space application. Among these, the π achromatic phase shifter included in the interferometer to cancel the starlight has to be achromatic in the whole Darwin spectral band from 6 to 18 μm. There are many solutions to create this phase shift. This work presents the study and development of one of these techniques based on dispersive prisms and tested on the polychromatic test bench SYNAPSE. After an introduction of Darwin stakes, both from an exo-planetological and exobiological point of view, we introduce different achromatic phase shifter techniques. The concept based on prismatic dispersive plates is then detailed, along with the development of the SYNAPSE test bench working in near infrared. We finally show that this bench allowed to maintain rejection ratio better than 4 000 (corresponding to a 2,5.10 -4 stellar leaks level) in the whole K band (from 2 to 2,5 μm) during several minutes. These results also show that more than the absolute rejection ratio needed in the whole Darwin spectral band, their stability will be the real stake during observations. (author) [fr

  2. High-contrast Nulling Interferometry Techniques Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — "We are developing rotating-baseline nulling-interferometry techniques and algorithms on the single-aperture Hale and Keck telescopes at near-infrared wavelengths,...

  3. Approaches for achieving broadband achromatic phase shifts for visible nulling coronagraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Lyon, Richard G.

    2012-07-01

    Visible nulling coronagraphy is one of the few approaches to the direct detection and characterization of Jovian and Terrestrial exoplanets that works with segmented aperture telescopes. Jovian and Terrestrial planets require at least 10-9 and 10-10 image plane contrasts, respectively, within the spectral bandpass and thus require a nearly achromatic π-phase difference between the arms of the interferometer. An achromatic π-phase shift can be achieved by several techniques, including sequential angled thick glass plates of varying dispersive materials, distributed thin-film multilayer coatings, or techniques that leverage the polarization-dependent phase shift of total-internal reflections. Herein we describe two implementations of such techniques: sequential thick glass plates and Fresnel rhomb prisms. A viable technique must achieve the achromatic phase shift while simultaneously minimizing the intensity difference, chromatic beam spread and polarization variation between the interferometer arms. In this paper we describe the above implementations and report on the trades associated with each technique that will lead to an implementation of the most promising one in Goddard's Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC).

  4. Development of IR single mode optical fibers for DARWIN-nulling interferometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chakkalakkal Abdulla, S.M.; Cheng, L.K.; Bosch, B. van den; Dijkhuizen, N.; Nieuwland, R.A.; Gielesen, W.L.M.; Lucas, J.; Boussard-Plédel, C.; Conseil, C.; Bureau, B.; Carmo, J.P. do

    2014-01-01

    The DARWIN mission aims to detect weak infra-red emission lines from distant orbiting earth-like planets using nulling interferometry. This requires filtering of wavefront errors using single mode waveguides operating at a wavelength range of 6.5-20 μm. This article describes the optical design of

  5. Potential of balloon payloads for in flight validation of direct and nulling interferometry concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demangeon, Olivier; Ollivier, Marc; Le Duigou, Jean-Michel; Cassaing, Frédéric; Coudé du Foresto, Vincent; Mourard, Denis; Kern, Pierre; Lam Trong, Tien; Evrard, Jean; Absil, Olivier; Defrere, Denis; Lopez, Bruno

    2010-07-01

    While the question of low cost / low science precursors is raised to validate the concepts of direct and nulling interferometry space missions, balloon payloads offer a real opportunity thanks to their relatively low cost and reduced development plan. Taking into account the flight capabilities of various balloon types, we propose in this paper, several concepts of payloads associated to their flight plan. We also discuss the pros and cons of each concepts in terms of technological and science demonstration power.

  6. Nulling interferometry for the darwin mission: laboratory demonstration experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollivier, Marc; Léger, Alain; Sekulic, Predrag; Labèque, Alain; Michel, Guy

    2017-11-01

    The DARWIN mission is a project of the European Space Agency that should allow around 2012 the search for extrasolar planets and a spectral analysis of their potential atmosphere in order to evidence gases and particularly tracers of life. The principle of the instrument is based on the Bracewell nulling interferometer. It allows high angular resolution and high dynamic range. However, this concept, proposed more than 20 years ago, has never been experimentally demonstrated in the thermal infrared with high levels of extinction. We present here a laboratory monochromatic experiment dedicated to this goal. A theoretical and numerical approach of the question highlights a strong difficulty: the need for very clean and homogeneous wavefronts, in terms of intensity, phase and polarisation distribution. A classical interferometric approach appears to be insufficient to reach our goals. We have shown theoretically then numerically that this difficulty can be surpassed if we perform an optical filtering of the interfering beams. This technique allows us to decrease strongly the optical requirements and to view very high interferometric contrast measurements with commercial optical pieces. We present here a laboratory interferometer working at 10,6 microns, and implementing several techniques of optical filtering (pinholes and single-mode waveguides), its realisation, and its first promising results. We particularly present measurements that exhibit stable visibility levels better than 99,9% that is to say extinction levels better than 1000.

  7. Simple Fourier optics formalism for high-angular-resolution systems and nulling interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénault, François

    2010-03-01

    Reviewed are various designs of advanced, multiaperture optical systems dedicated to high-angular-resolution imaging or to the detection of exoplanets by nulling interferometry. A simple Fourier optics formalism applicable to both imaging arrays and nulling interferometers is presented, allowing their basic theoretical relationships to be derived as convolution or cross-correlation products suitable for fast and accurate computation. Several unusual designs, such as a "superresolving telescope" utilizing a mosaicking observation procedure or a free-flying, axially recombined interferometer are examined, and their performance in terms of imaging and nulling capacity are assessed. In all considered cases, it is found that the limiting parameter is the diameter of the individual telescopes. A final section devoted to nulling interferometry shows an apparent superiority of axial versus multiaxial recombining schemes. The entire study is valid only in the framework of first-order geometrical optics and scalar diffraction theory. Furthermore, it is assumed that all entrance subapertures are optically conjugated with their associated exit pupils.

  8. Partial null astigmatism-compensated interferometry for a concave freeform Zernike mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Yimeng; Yuan, Qun; Gao, Zhishan; Yin, Huimin; Chen, Lu; Yao, Yanxia; Cheng, Jinlong

    2018-06-01

    Partial null interferometry without using any null optics is proposed to measure a concave freeform Zernike mirror. Oblique incidence on the freeform mirror is used to compensate for astigmatism as the main component in its figure, and to constrain the divergence of the test beam as well. The phase demodulated from the partial nulled interferograms is divided into low-frequency phase and high-frequency phase by Zernike polynomial fitting. The low-frequency surface figure error of the freeform mirror represented by the coefficients of Zernike polynomials is reconstructed from the low-frequency phase, applying the reverse optimization reconstruction technology in the accurate model of the interferometric system. The high-frequency surface figure error of the freeform mirror is retrieved from the high-frequency phase adopting back propagating technology, according to the updated model in which the low-frequency surface figure error has been superimposed on the sag of the freeform mirror. Simulations verified that this method is capable of testing a wide variety of astigmatism-dominated freeform mirrors due to the high dynamic range. The experimental result using our proposed method for a concave freeform Zernike mirror is consistent with the null test result employing the computer-generated hologram.

  9. Stitching interferometry of high numerical aperture cylindrical optics without using a fringe-nulling routine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Junzheng; Wang, Qingquan; Peng, Xiang; Yu, Yingjie

    2015-11-01

    Stitching interferometry is a common method for measuring the figure error of high numerical aperture optics. However, subaperture measurement usually requires a fringe-nulling routine, thus making the stitching procedure complex and time-consuming. The challenge when measuring a surface without a fringe-nulling routine is that the rays no longer perpendicularly hit the surface. This violation of the null-test condition can lead to high fringe density and introduce high-order misalignment aberrations into the measurement result. This paper demonstrates that the high-order misalignment aberrations can be characterized by low-order misalignment aberrations; then, an efficient method is proposed to separate the high-order misalignment aberrations from subaperture data. With the proposed method, the fringe-nulling routine is not required. Instead, the subaperture data is measured under a nonzero fringe pattern. Then, all possible misalignment aberrations are removed with the proposed method. Finally, the full aperture map is acquired by connecting all subaperture data together. Experimental results showing the feasibility of the proposed procedure are presented.

  10. Integrated optics for nulling interferometry in the thermal infrared: progress and recent achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillot, M.; Barthelemy, E.; Bastard, L.; Broquin, J.-E.; Hawkins, G.; Kirschner, V.; Ménard, S.; Parent, G.; Poinsot, C.; Pradel, A.; Vigreux, C.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X.

    2017-11-01

    The search for Earth-like exoplanets, orbiting in the habitable zone of stars other than our Sun and showing biological activity, is one of the most exciting and challenging quests of the present time. Nulling interferometry from space, in the thermal infrared, appears as a promising candidate technique for the task of directly observing extra-solar planets. It has been studied for about 10 years by ESA and NASA in the framework of the Darwin and TPF-I missions respectively [1]. Nevertheless, nulling interferometry in the thermal infrared remains a technological challenge at several levels. Among them, the development of the "modal filter" function is mandatory for the filtering of the wavefronts in adequacy with the objective of rejecting the central star flux to an efficiency of about 105. Modal filtering [2] takes benefit of the capability of single-mode waveguides to transmit a single amplitude function, to eliminate virtually any perturbation of the interfering wavefronts, thus making very high rejection ratios possible. The modal filter may either be based on single-mode Integrated Optics (IO) and/or Fiber Optics. In this paper, we focus on IO, and more specifically on the progress of the on-going "Integrated Optics" activity of the European Space Agency.

  11. Nulling interferometry: impact of exozodiacal clouds on the performance of future life-finding space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrère, D.; Absil, O.; den Hartog, R.; Hanot, C.; Stark, C.

    2010-01-01

    Context. Earth-sized planets around nearby stars are being detected for the first time by ground-based radial velocity and space-based transit surveys. This milestone is opening the path toward the definition of instruments able to directly detect the light from these planets, with the identification of bio-signatures as one of the main objectives. In that respect, both the European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have identified nulling interferometry as one of the most promising techniques. The ability to study distant planets will however depend on the amount of exozodiacal dust in the habitable zone of the target stars. Aims: We assess the impact of exozodiacal clouds on the performance of an infrared nulling interferometer in the Emma X-array configuration. The first part of the study is dedicated to the effect of the disc brightness on the number of targets that can be surveyed and studied by spectroscopy during the mission lifetime. In the second part, we address the impact of asymmetric structures in the discs such as clumps and offset which can potentially mimic the planetary signal. Methods: We use the DarwinSIM software which was designed and validated to study the performance of space-based nulling interferometers. The software has been adapted to handle images of exozodiacal discs and to compute the corresponding demodulated signal. Results: For the nominal mission architecture with 2-m aperture telescopes, centrally symmetric exozodiacal dust discs about 100 times denser than the solar zodiacal cloud can be tolerated in order to survey at least 150 targets during the mission lifetime. Considering modeled resonant structures created by an Earth-like planet orbiting at 1 AU around a Sun-like star, we show that this tolerable dust density goes down to about 15 times the solar zodiacal density for face-on systems and decreases with the disc inclination. Conclusions: Whereas the disc brightness only affects

  12. Characterization of the Stabilized Test Bench of Nulling Interferometry PERSÉE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozi, Julien; Ollivier, M.; Cassaing, F.; Le Duigou, J.; CNES; Onera/Dota/HRA; IAS; LESIA; OCA; TAS

    2013-01-01

    There are two problems with the observation of exoplanets: the contrast between the planet and the star and their very low separation. One technique solving these problems is nulling interferometry: two pupils are recombined to make a destructive interference on the star, and their base is adjusted to create a constructive interference on the planet. However, to ensure a sufficient extinction of the star, the optical path difference between the beams must be around the nanometer, and the pointing must be better than one hundredth of Airy disk, despite the external disturbances.To validate the critical points of such a space mission, a laboratory demonstrator, PERSÉE, was defined by a consortium led by the french space agency CNES, including IAS, LESIA, ONERA, OCA and Thales Alenia Space and integrated in Paris Observatory. This bench simulates the entire space mission (interferometer and nanometric cophasing system). Its goal is to deliver and maintain an extinction of 10^-4 stable at better than 10^-5 over a few hours in the presence of typical injected disturbances.My thesis work consisted in integrating the bench in successive stages and to develop calibration procedures. This helped me to characterize the critical elements separately before grouping them. After having implemented the control loops of the cophasing system, their precise analysis helped me to reduce down to 0.3 nm rms the residual OPD, and 0.4 % of the Airy disk the residual tip/tilt, despite disturbances of tens of nanometers, consisting of several tens of vibrational frequencies between 1 and 100 Hz. This has been achieved by the implementation of a linear quadratic Gaussian controller, parameterized by the preliminary measurement of the disturbance to minimize. Thanks to these excellent results, I obtained on the band [1.65 - 2.45] µm a record null rate of 8.8x10^-6 stabilized at 9x10^-7 over a few hours, a decade better than the original specifications. An extrapolation of these results to

  13. Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totzeck, Michael

    The intention of this chapter is to provide a fast and comprehensive overview of the principles of interferometry and the various types of interferometer, including interferogram evaluation and applications. Due to the age and the importance of the subject, you can find a number of monographs [16.1,2,3,4] and book chapters [16.5] in the literature. The number of original papers on optical interferometry is far too large to even attempt complete coverage in this chapter. Whenever possible, review papers are cited. Original papers are cited according to their aptness as starting points into the subject. This, however, reflects my personal judgment. Even if you do not share my opinion, you should find the references therein useful.

  14. Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Stephen; Wilson, Robert W.; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Bender, Peter; Burke, Bernard F.; Cornwell, Tim; Drever, Ronald; Dyck, H. Melvin; Johnston, Kenneth J.; Kibblewhite, Edward

    1991-01-01

    The following recommended programs are reviewed: (1) infrared and optical interferometry (a ground-based and space programs); (2) compensation for the atmosphere with adaptive optics (a program for development and implementation of adaptive optics); and (3) gravitational waves (high frequency gravitational wave sources (LIGO), low frequency gravitational wave sources (LAGOS), a gravitational wave observatory program, laser gravitational wave observatory in space, and technology development during the 1990's). Prospects for international collaboration and related issues are also discussed.

  15. High Contrast Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) Contrast, Performance and Null Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Mallik, Udayan; Madison, Timothy; Bolcar, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Herein we report on our Visible Nulling Coronagraph high-contrast result of 109 contrast averaged over a focal planeregion extending from 14 D with the Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) in a vibration isolated vacuum chamber. TheVNC is a hybrid interferometriccoronagraphic approach for exoplanet science. It operates with high Lyot stopefficiency for filled, segmented and sparse or diluted-aperture telescopes, thereby spanning the range of potential futureNASA flight telescopes. NASAGoddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has a well-established effort to develop the VNCand its technologies, and has developed an incremental sequence of VNC testbeds to advance this approach and itsenabling technologies. These testbeds have enabled advancement of high-contrast, visible light, nulling interferometry tounprecedented levels. The VNC is based on a modified Mach-Zehnder nulling interferometer, with a W configurationto accommodate a hex-packed MEMS based deformable mirror, a coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters.We give an overview of the VNT and discuss the high-contrast laboratory results, the optical configuration, criticaltechnologies and null sensing and control.

  16. High contrast vacuum nuller testbed (VNT) contrast, performance, and null control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Mallik, Udayan; Madison, Timothy; Bolcar, Matthew R.

    2012-09-01

    Herein we report on our Visible Nulling Coronagraph high-contrast result of 109 contrast averaged over a focal plane region extending from 1 - 4 λ/D with the Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) in a vibration isolated vacuum chamber. The VNC is a hybrid interferometric/coronagraphic approach for exoplanet science. It operates with high Lyot stop efficiency for filled, segmented and sparse or diluted-aperture telescopes, thereby spanning the range of potential future NASA flight telescopes. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has a well-established effort to develop the VNC and its technologies, and has developed an incremental sequence of VNC testbeds to advance this approach and its enabling technologies. These testbeds have enabled advancement of high-contrast, visible light, nulling interferometry to unprecedented levels. The VNC is based on a modified Mach-Zehnder nulling interferometer, with a “W” configuration to accommodate a hex-packed MEMS based deformable mirror, a coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. We give an overview of the VNT and discuss the high-contrast laboratory results, the optical configuration, critical technologies and null sensing and control.

  17. Achromatic X-ray lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umbach, Marion

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents first results on the development of achromatic refractive X-ray lenses which can be used for scientific experiments at synchrotron sources. First of all the different requirements for achromatic X-ray lenses have been worked out. There are different types of lenses, one type can be used for monochromatized sources when the energy is scanned while the spot size should be constant. The other type can be used at beamlines providing a broad energy band. By a combination of focusing and defocusing elements we have developed a lens system that strongly reduces the chromatic aberration of a refractive lens in a given energy range. The great challenge in the X-ray case - in contrast to the visible range - the complex refractive index, which is very similar for the possible materials in the X-ray spectrum. For precise studies a numerical code has been developed, which calculates the different rays on their way through the lenses to the detector plane via raytracing. In this numerical code the intensity distribution in the detector plane has been analyzed for a chromatic and the corresponding achromatic system. By optimization routines for the two different fields of applications specific parameter combinations were found. For the experimental verification an achromatic system has been developed, consisting of biconcave SU-8 lenses and biconvex Nickel Fresnel lenses. Their fabrication was based on the LIGA-process, including a further innovative development, namely the fabrication of two different materials on one wafer. In the experiment at the synchrotron source ANKA the energy was varied in a specific energy range in steps of 0.1 keV. The intensity distribution for the different energies was detected at a certain focal length. For the achromatic system a reduction of the chromatic aberration could be clearly shown. Achromatic refractive X-ray lenses, especially for the use at synchrotron sources, have not been developed so far. As a consequence of the

  18. Phenomenal transparency in achromatic checkerboards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masin, S C

    1999-04-01

    The study explored the luminance relations that determine the occurrence of achromatic transparency in phenomenal surfaces on complex backgrounds. Let the luminances of the left and right parts of a transparent surface on a bipartite background and those of the left and right parts of the bipartite background be p and q and m and n, respectively. Metelli proposed that this surface looks transparent when the rule p q if m > n) is satisfied, and Masin and Fukuda that it looks transparent when the inclusion rule is satisfied, that is, when p epsilon (m, q) or q epsilon (p, n). These rules also apply to achromatic checkerboards formed by one checkerboard enclosed in another checkerboard. This study shows that only the inclusion rule correctly predicted the occurrence of transparency in these checkerboards.

  19. Newborns' Discrimination of Chromatic from Achromatic Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Russell J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Two experiments assessed the extent of newborns' ability to discriminate color. Results imply that newborns have some, albeit limited, capacity to discriminate chromatic from achromatic stimuli, and hence, are at least dichromats. (Author/DR)

  20. Improved averaging for non-null interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleig, Jon F.; Murphy, Paul E.

    2013-09-01

    Arithmetic averaging of interferometric phase measurements is a well-established method for reducing the effects of time varying disturbances, such as air turbulence and vibration. Calculating a map of the standard deviation for each pixel in the average map can provide a useful estimate of its variability. However, phase maps of complex and/or high density fringe fields frequently contain defects that severely impair the effectiveness of simple phase averaging and bias the variability estimate. These defects include large or small-area phase unwrapping artifacts, large alignment components, and voids that change in number, location, or size. Inclusion of a single phase map with a large area defect into the average is usually sufficient to spoil the entire result. Small-area phase unwrapping and void defects may not render the average map metrologically useless, but they pessimistically bias the variance estimate for the overwhelming majority of the data. We present an algorithm that obtains phase average and variance estimates that are robust against both large and small-area phase defects. It identifies and rejects phase maps containing large area voids or unwrapping artifacts. It also identifies and prunes the unreliable areas of otherwise useful phase maps, and removes the effect of alignment drift from the variance estimate. The algorithm has several run-time adjustable parameters to adjust the rejection criteria for bad data. However, a single nominal setting has been effective over a wide range of conditions. This enhanced averaging algorithm can be efficiently integrated with the phase map acquisition process to minimize the number of phase samples required to approach the practical noise floor of the metrology environment.

  1. Visible nulling coronagraph testbed results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Woodruff, Robert A.; Vasudevan, Gopal; Thompson, Patrick; Petrone, Peter; Madison, Timothy; Rizzo, Maxime; Melnick, Gary; Tolls, Volker

    2009-08-01

    We report on our recent laboratory results with the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) testbed. We have experimentally achieved focal plane contrasts of 1 x 108 and approaching 109 at inner working angles of 2 * wavelength/D and 4 * wavelength/D respectively where D is the aperture diameter. The result was obtained using a broadband source with a narrowband spectral filter of width 10 nm centered on 630 nm. To date this is the deepest nulling result with a visible nulling coronagraph yet obtained. Developed also is a Null Control Breadboard (NCB) to assess and quantify MEMS based segmented deformable mirror technology and develop and assess closed-loop null sensing and control algorithm performance from both the pupil and focal planes. We have demonstrated closed-loop control at 27 Hz in the laboratory environment. Efforts are underway to first bring the contrast to > 109 necessary for the direct detection and characterization of jovian (Jupiter-like) and then to > 1010 necessary for terrestrial (Earth-like) exosolar planets. Short term advancements are expected to both broaden the spectral passband from 10 nm to 100 nm and to increase both the long-term stability to > 2 hours and the extent of the null out to a ~ 10 * wavelength / D via the use of MEMS based segmented deformable mirror technology, a coherent fiber bundle, achromatic phase shifters, all in a vacuum chamber at the GSFC VNC facility. Additionally an extreme stability textbook sized compact VNC is under development.

  2. Minimum emittance of three-bend achromats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoyu; Xu Gang

    2012-01-01

    The calculation of the minimum emittance of three-bend achromats (TBAs) made by Mathematical software can ignore the actual magnets lattice in the matching condition of dispersion function in phase space. The minimum scaling factors of two kinds of widely used TBA lattices are obtained. Then the relationship between the lengths and the radii of the three dipoles in TBA is obtained and so is the minimum scaling factor, when the TBA lattice achieves its minimum emittance. The procedure of analysis and the results can be widely used in achromats lattices, because the calculation is not restricted by the actual lattice. (authors)

  3. Design of a fifth-order achromat

    CERN Document Server

    Wan, W

    1999-01-01

    A repetitive system free of all aberrations up to the fifth order was designed based on a recently developed analytical theory that, in principle, allows the design of such achromats to an arbitrary order (Wan and Berz, Phys. Rev. E, 54 (1996) 2870; Wan, Ph.D. Thesis, Michigan State University, 1995). It serves as an example to show that complete correction of aberrations is possible beyond order three, which is the highest order achieved before (Dragt, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 258 (1987) 339; F. Neri, in: Berz, McIntyre (Eds.), Proc. Workshop on High Order Effects). Instead of repetition of identical cells, which is widely used in achromat design based on normal form theory, we utilize cells which are obtained from the original ones through mirror imaging about the x-y plane, which corresponds to a reversion. In our design, the second half of the ring is the reversion of the first one, and two turns make a fifth-order achromat. A possible application of repetitive high-order achromats being time-of-flight sp...

  4. Design of a fifth-order achromat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Weishi; Berz, Martin

    1999-01-01

    A repetitive system free of all aberrations up to the fifth order was designed based on a recently developed analytical theory that, in principle, allows the design of such achromats to an arbitrary order (Wan and Berz, Phys. Rev. E, 54 (1996) 2870; Wan, Ph.D. Thesis, Michigan State University, 1995). It serves as an example to show that complete correction of aberrations is possible beyond order three, which is the highest order achieved before (Dragt, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 258 (1987) 339; F. Neri, in: Berz, McIntyre (Eds.), Proc. Workshop on High Order Effects). Instead of repetition of identical cells, which is widely used in achromat design based on normal form theory, we utilize cells which are obtained from the original ones through mirror imaging about the x-y plane, which corresponds to a reversion. In our design, the second half of the ring is the reversion of the first one, and two turns make a fifth-order achromat. A possible application of repetitive high-order achromats being time-of-flight spectroscopy, the resulting ring was analyzed with respect to dynamic aperture and energy resolution using maps of orders nine and higher

  5. Kaon interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roldao, C.G.; Padula, S.S.

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary results of the χ 2 analysis where data on kaon interferometry, obtained from the E859 Collaboration of the AGS/Brookhaven Nat.Lab., are compared with results of a hadronic resonance production model are presented. The main goal is to test the resolution power of the method here discussed when applied to the two-dimensional kaon interferometry

  6. Achromatic hues matching in graphic printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinia Ira Glogar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Some problems in process of dark achromatic hues reproduction and matching in graphic industry, where requests on colour matching are very high, are discussed. When achromatic hues is concerned, in terms of high requests on colour parameter matching, right on time production, quick response and high quality standards requests, the production and moreover the reproduction is subject to many variables and represent the manufacturing process of high complexity. The aim is to achieve a graphic reproduction with defined colour parameters and remission characteristics as close as possible to a standard. In this paper, black and grey hues characterized with average lightness value L*≤ 20, were analysed. Subjective as well as objective colour evaluation have been performed and results of colour differences obtained by two colour difference formulae, CIELAB and CMC(l:c have been compared.

  7. Achromatic lattice comparison for light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, S.L.; Crosbie, E.A.; Cho, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The next generation of synchrotron light sources are being designed to support a large number of undulators and require long dispersion-free insertion regions. With less demand for radiation from the dipole magnets, the storage ring cost per undulator beam can be reduced by decreasing the number of dipole magnets and increasing the number of dispersion free straight sections. The two simplest achromatic lattices are the Chasman-Green or double-bend achromatic (DBA) and the three-bend achromat (TBA). The DBA in its simplest form consists of a single horizontally-focussing quadrupole between the two dipole magnets. Since this quadrupole strength is fixed by the achromatic condition, the natural emittance (/var epsilon//sub n/) may vary as the beta functions in the insertion region (IR) are varied. The expanded Chasman-Green (also DBA) uses multiple quadrupoles in the dispersive section to provide emittance control independent of the beta functions in the IR. Although this provides flexibility in the ID beta functions, the horizontal phase advance is constrained to /phi/ /approx equal/ 180/degree/ between approximately the centers of the dipole magnets. If small /var epsilon//sub n/ is required, the horizontal phase advance between the dipoles will be near one and the lattice properties will be dominated by this systematic resonance. The TBA lattice places a third dipole between the DBA dipoles, eliminating the 180/degree/ horizontal phase advance constraint. However, the requirement of small /var epsilon//sub n/ limits the range of tune, since /mu//sub x/ /approx equal/ 1.29 in the dipoles alone for /var epsilon//sub n/ near its minimum value. The minimum emittance is five times smaller for the TBA than for the DBA with the same number of periods and, therefore, its phase advance can be relaxed more than the DBA for the same natural emittance. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  8. Achromatic lattice comparison for light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, S.L.; Crosbie, E.A.; Cho, Y.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on the next generation of synchrotron light sources designed to support a large number of undulators and require long dispersion-free insertion regions. With less demand for radiation from the dipole magnets, the storage ring cost per undulator beam can be reduced by decreasing the number of dipole magnets and increasing the number of dispersion-free straight sections. The two simplest achromatic lattices are the Chasman-Green or double-bend achromatic (DBA) and the three-bend achromat (TBA). The DBA in its simplest form consists of a single horizontally-focussing quadrupole between the two dipole magnets. Since this quadrupole strength is fixed by the achromatic condition, the natural emittance (σ n ) may vary as the beta functions in the insertion region (IR) are varied. The expanded Chasman-Green (also DBA) uses multiple quadrupoles in the dispersive section to provide emittance control independent of the beta functions in the IR. Although this provides flexibility in the ID beta functions, the horizontal phase advance is constrained to φ ≅ 180 degrees between approximately the centers of the dipole magnets. If small σ n is required, the horizontal phase advance between the dipoles will be near one and the lattice properties will be dominated by this systematic resonance. The TBA lattice places a third dipole between the DBA dipoles, eliminating the 180 degrees horizontal phase advance constraint. However, the requirement of small σ n limits the range of tune, since μ x ≅ 1.29 in the dipoles alone for σ n near its minimum value. The minimum emittance is five times smaller for the TBA than for the DBA with the same number of periods and, therefore, its phase advance can be relaxed more than the DBA for the same natural emittance

  9. Notes on lie algebraic analysis of achromats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chunxi; Chao, A.

    1995-01-01

    Normal form technique is a powerful method to analyze the achromat problem. Assume the one cell map M cell = ARe :h 3 : e :h 4 : A -1 , where h 3 ,h 4 are the normal forms of the generators of the unit cell map, and A is the nonlinear transformation that brings M cell into its normal form; then the map of the whole system is M N = M cell N = AR N A -1 = I, provided that we can set e :h 3 :, e :h 4 , and R N to the identity (or only δ dependent) maps. Therefore, the conditions to form an achromat are h 3 and h 4 equal to zero (or δ dependent only) and the total linear map is identity. In this report, we will apply these conditions to a FODO array (a simple model system) to make it an achromat. We will start from Hamiltonians and work all the way up to obtain the analytical expressions of the required sextupole and octupole strengths

  10. The multi-bend achromat storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Mikael [MAX IV Laboratory Ole Römers v. 1 22100 Lund Sweden (Sweden)

    2016-07-27

    Not very long ago, the 3{sup rd} generation storage ring technology was judged as mature. Most of the 3{sup rd} generation storage rings used the Double-Bend Achromat (DBA) or Triple-Bend Achromat (TBA) concepts. It was however a well-known fact that increasing the number of magnet cells in the rings is a powerful way of decreasing the electron beam emittance and thus the source brilliance, but at the penalty of increasing the size and cost of the rings. Preserving the Dynamic Aperture (DA) in the rings became also an issue when increasing the number of magnet cells. The Multi-Bend Achromat (MBA) concept, including a miniaturization of the ring elements, has now drastically changed the picture. The MBA rings, now in construction or being planned, offer orders of magnitudes higher brilliance than rings of conventional designs. Several light sources around the world are now implementing or planning to implement this MBA concept. This article touches on the science drivers for higher brilliance. We will then describe the MBA concept with its advantages as well as its challenges. A short survey of the MBA activity around the world will also be presented. The author apologies for focusing on the MAX IV project regarding technical solutions. This is motivated by that MAX IV is the facility he knows best and it might be regarded as a fore-runner for the MBA concept.

  11. The multi-bend achromat storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Not very long ago, the 3"r"d generation storage ring technology was judged as mature. Most of the 3"r"d generation storage rings used the Double-Bend Achromat (DBA) or Triple-Bend Achromat (TBA) concepts. It was however a well-known fact that increasing the number of magnet cells in the rings is a powerful way of decreasing the electron beam emittance and thus the source brilliance, but at the penalty of increasing the size and cost of the rings. Preserving the Dynamic Aperture (DA) in the rings became also an issue when increasing the number of magnet cells. The Multi-Bend Achromat (MBA) concept, including a miniaturization of the ring elements, has now drastically changed the picture. The MBA rings, now in construction or being planned, offer orders of magnitudes higher brilliance than rings of conventional designs. Several light sources around the world are now implementing or planning to implement this MBA concept. This article touches on the science drivers for higher brilliance. We will then describe the MBA concept with its advantages as well as its challenges. A short survey of the MBA activity around the world will also be presented. The author apologies for focusing on the MAX IV project regarding technical solutions. This is motivated by that MAX IV is the facility he knows best and it might be regarded as a fore-runner for the MBA concept.

  12. Fine art of computing nulling interferometer maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénault, F.

    2008-07-01

    Spaceborne nulling interferometers are often characterized by means of their nulling ratio, which is defined as the deepest possible extinction of one target star supposed to harbor an extra-solar system. Herein is shown that another parameter, which is the transmitting efficiency of nearby bright fringes, is also of prime importance. More generally, "nulling maps" formed by the whole destructive and constructive fringe pattern projected on-sky, are found to be very sensitive on the design of some subsystems constituting the interferometer. In particular, we consider Spatial Filtering (SF) and Achromatic Phase Shifter (APS) devices, both required achieving planet detection and characterization. Consequences of the SF choice (pinhole or single-mode optical fiber) and APS properties (with or without induced pupil-flip) are discussed, for both monochromatic and polychromatic cases. Examples of numerical simulations are provided for single Bracewell interferometer, Angel cross and X-array configurations, demonstrating noticeable differences in the aspect of resulting nulling maps. It is concluded that both FS and APS designs exhibit variable capacities for serendipitous planet discovery.

  13. Achromatic beam transport of High Current Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.

    2016-01-01

    The high current injector (HCI) provides intense ion beams of high charge state using a high temperature superconducting ECR ion source. The ion beam is accelerated upto a final energy of 1.8 MeV/u due to an electrostatic potential, a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a drift tube linac (DTL). The ion beam has to be transported to superconducting LINAC which is around 50 m away from DTL. This section is termed as high energy beam transport section (HEBT) and is used to match the beam both in transverse and longitudinal phase space to the entrance of LINAC. The HEBT section is made up of four 90 deg. achromatic bends and interconnecting magnetic quadrupole triplets. Two RF bunchers have been used for longitudinal phase matching to the LINAC. The ion optical design of HEBT section has been simulated using different beam dynamics codes like TRACEWIN, GICOSY and TRACE 3D. The field computation code OPERA 3D has been utilized for hardware design of all the magnets. All the dipole and quadrupole magnets have been field mapped and their test results such as edge angles measurements, homogeneity and harmonic analysis etc. are reported. The whole design of HEBT section has been performed such that the most of the beam optical components share same hardware design and there is ample space for beam diagnostics as per geometry of the building. Many combination of achromatic bends have been simulated to transport the beam in HEBT section but finally the four 90 deg. achromatic bend configuration is found to be the best satisfying all the geometrical constraints with simplified beam tuning process in real time

  14. An achromatic multipassage magnetic mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulanger, P.; Baril, M.

    1999-01-01

    A design providing achromatic correction to a multipassage magnetic mass spectrometer previously described by the author is presented. The energy spatial dispersion caused by repeated passages in the magnetic prism is corrected by three supplementary mirrors placed in a reinjection loop. From this study one can see that we simultaneously eliminate the energy dispersion term C ΔE/E and the opening angle aberration term C α 2 and we may also eliminate the coupled aberration term C αΔE/E

  15. On threshold mechanisms for achromatic and chromatic vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, M.A.; Walraven, P.L.

    1972-01-01

    On the basis of measurements of the achromatic zone for red light in the fovea and for green light in the periphery, a discussion is given on the possible difference in threshold mechanisms for the achromatic (scotopic) and chromatic (photopic) retinal systems. A specific suggestion for this

  16. An analytical study of double bend achromat lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhri, Ali Akbar, E-mail: fakhri@rrcat.gov.in; Kant, Pradeep; Singh, Gurnam; Ghodke, A. D. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013 (India)

    2015-03-15

    In a double bend achromat, Chasman-Green (CG) lattice represents the basic structure for low emittance synchrotron radiation sources. In the basic structure of CG lattice single focussing quadrupole (QF) magnet is used to form an achromat. In this paper, this CG lattice is discussed and an analytical relation is presented, showing the limitation of basic CG lattice to provide the theoretical minimum beam emittance in achromatic condition. To satisfy theoretical minimum beam emittance parameters, achromat having two, three, and four quadrupole structures is presented. In this structure, different arrangements of QF and defocusing quadruple (QD) are used. An analytical approach assuming quadrupoles as thin lenses has been followed for studying these structures. A study of Indus-2 lattice in which QF-QD-QF configuration in the achromat part has been adopted is also presented.

  17. An analytical study of double bend achromat lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Ali Akbar; Kant, Pradeep; Singh, Gurnam; Ghodke, A D

    2015-03-01

    In a double bend achromat, Chasman-Green (CG) lattice represents the basic structure for low emittance synchrotron radiation sources. In the basic structure of CG lattice single focussing quadrupole (QF) magnet is used to form an achromat. In this paper, this CG lattice is discussed and an analytical relation is presented, showing the limitation of basic CG lattice to provide the theoretical minimum beam emittance in achromatic condition. To satisfy theoretical minimum beam emittance parameters, achromat having two, three, and four quadrupole structures is presented. In this structure, different arrangements of QF and defocusing quadruple (QD) are used. An analytical approach assuming quadrupoles as thin lenses has been followed for studying these structures. A study of Indus-2 lattice in which QF-QD-QF configuration in the achromat part has been adopted is also presented.

  18. An analytical study of double bend achromat lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhri, Ali Akbar; Kant, Pradeep; Singh, Gurnam; Ghodke, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    In a double bend achromat, Chasman-Green (CG) lattice represents the basic structure for low emittance synchrotron radiation sources. In the basic structure of CG lattice single focussing quadrupole (QF) magnet is used to form an achromat. In this paper, this CG lattice is discussed and an analytical relation is presented, showing the limitation of basic CG lattice to provide the theoretical minimum beam emittance in achromatic condition. To satisfy theoretical minimum beam emittance parameters, achromat having two, three, and four quadrupole structures is presented. In this structure, different arrangements of QF and defocusing quadruple (QD) are used. An analytical approach assuming quadrupoles as thin lenses has been followed for studying these structures. A study of Indus-2 lattice in which QF-QD-QF configuration in the achromat part has been adopted is also presented

  19. First multi-bend achromat lattice consideration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einfeld, Dieter, E-mail: dieter.einfeld@maxlab.lu.se [Lund University, PO Box 118, Lund SE-221 00 (Sweden); Plesko, Mark [COSYLAB, Teslova ulica 30, Ljubljana SI-1000 (Slovakia); Schaper, Joachim [HAWK University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Hohnsen 4, D-31134 Hildesheim (Germany)

    2014-08-27

    The first proposed lattice for a ‘diffraction-limited light source’ is reported. This approach has now more or less been used for the MAX IV project. By the beginning of 1990, three third-generation synchrotron light sources had been successfully commissioned in Grenoble, Berkeley and Trieste (ESRF, ALS and ELETTRA). Each of these new machines reached their target specifications without any significant problems. In parallel, already at that time discussions were underway regarding the next generation, the ‘diffraction-limited light source (DLSR)’, which featured sub-nm rad electron beam emittance, photon beam brilliance exceeding 10{sup 22} and the potential to emit coherent radiation. Also, at about that time, a first design for a 3 GeV DLSR was developed, based on a modified multiple-bend achromat (MBA) design leading to a lattice with normalized emittance of ∊{sub x} = 0.5 nm rad. The novel feature of the MBA lattice was the use of seven vertically focusing bend magnets with different bending angles throughout the achromat cell to keep the radiation integrals and resulting beam emittance low. The baseline design called for a 400 m ring circumference with 12 straight sections of 6 m length. The dynamic aperture behaviour of the DLSR lattice was estimated to produce > 5 h beam lifetime at 100 mA stored beam current.

  20. An adjustable electron achromat for cathode lens microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tromp, R.M., E-mail: rtromp@us.ibm.com [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Leiden Institute of Physics, Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Niels Bohrweg 2, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-12-15

    Chromatic aberration correction in light optics began with the invention of a two-color-corrected achromatic crown/flint lens doublet by Chester Moore Hall in 1730. Such color correction is necessary because any single glass shows dispersion (i.e. its index of refraction changes with wavelength), which can be counteracted by combining different glasses with different dispersions. In cathode lens microscopes (such as Photo Electron Emission Microscopy – PEEM) we encounter a similar situation, where the chromatic aberration coefficient of the cathode lens shows strong dispersion, i.e. depends (non-linearly) on the energy with which the electrons leave the sample. Here I show how a cathode lens in combination with an electron mirror can be configured as an adjustable electron achromat. The lens/mirror combination can be corrected at two electron energies by balancing the settings of the electron mirror against the settings of the cathode lens. The achromat can be adjusted to deliver optimum performance, depending on the requirements of a specific experiment. Going beyond the achromat, an apochromat would improve resolution and transmission by a very significant margin. I discuss the requirements and outlook for such a system, which for now remains a wish waiting for fulfilment. - Highlights: • The properties of cathode objective lens plus electron mirror are discussed. • In analogy with light-optical achromats, cathode lens plus mirror can be configured as an electron achromat. • Unlike light optics, the electron achromat can be adjusted to best fulfill experimental requirements.

  1. Null Lens Assembly for X-Ray Mirror Segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David W.

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a null lens assembly that allows laser interferometry of 60 deg. slumped glass mirror segments used in x-ray mirrors. The assembly consists of four lenses in precise alignment to each other, with incorporated piezoelectric nanometer stepping actuators to position the lenses in six degrees of freedom for positioning relative to each other.

  2. Atomic interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudon, J.; Robert, J.

    2004-01-01

    Since the theoretical works of L. De Broglie (1924) and the famous experiment of Davisson and Germer (1927), we know that a wave is linked with any particle of mass m by the relation λ = h/(mv), where λ is the wavelength, v the particle velocity and h is the Planck constant. The basic principle of the interferometry of any material particle, atom, molecule or aggregate is simple: using a simple incident wave, several mutually consistent waves (with well-defined relative phases) are generated and controllable phase-shifts are introduced between them in order to generate a wave which is the sum of the previous waves. An interference figure is obtained which consists in a succession of dark and bright fringes. The atomic interferometry is based on the same principle but involves different techniques, different wave equations, but also different beams, sources and correlations which are described in this book. Because of the small possible wavelengths and the wide range of possible atomic interactions, atomic interferometers can be used in many domains from the sub-micron lithography to the construction of sensors like: inertial sensors, gravity-meters, accelerometers, gyro-meters etc. The first chapter is a preliminary study of the space and time diffraction of atoms. The next chapters is devoted to the description of slit, light separation and polarization interferometers, and the last chapter treats of the properties of Bose-Einstein condensates which are interesting in atomic interferometry. (J.S.)

  3. Lightness dependence of achromatic loci in color-appearance coordinates

    OpenAIRE

    Kuriki, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Shifts in the appearance of color under different illuminant chromaticity are known to be incomplete, and fit nicely with a simple linear transformation of cone responses that aligns the achromatic points under two illuminants. Most chromaticity-transfer functions with von-Kries-like transformations use only one set of values to fit the color shifts from one illuminant to another. However, an achromatic point shifts its chromaticity depending on the lightness of the test stimulus. This lightn...

  4. Speckle interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, Rajpal S.

    2002-03-01

    Illumination of a rough surface by a coherent monochromatic wave creates a grainy structure in space termed a speckle pattern. It was considered a special kind of noise and was the bane of holographers. However, its information-carrying property was soon discovered and the phenomenon was used for metrological applications. The realization that a speckle pattern carried information led to a new measurement technique known as speckle interferometry (SI). Although the speckle phenomenon in itself is a consequence of interference among numerous randomly dephased waves, a reference wave is required in SI. Further, it employs an imaging geometry. Initially SI was performed mostly by using silver emulsions as the recording media. The double-exposure specklegram was filtered to extract the desired information. Since SI can be configured so as to be sensitive to the in-plane displacement component, the out-of-plane displacement component or their derivatives, the interferograms corresponding to these were extracted from the specklegram for further analysis. Since the speckle size can be controlled by the F number of the imaging lens, it was soon realized that SI could be performed with electronic detection, thereby increasing its accuracy and speed of measurement. Furthermore, a phase-shifting technique can also be incorporated. This technique came to be known as electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI). It employed the same experimental configurations as SI. ESPI found many industrial applications as it supplements holographic interferometry. We present three examples covering diverse areas. In one application it has been used to measure residual stress in a blank recordable compact disk. In another application, microscopic ESPI has been used to study the influence of relative humidity on paint-coated figurines and also the effect of a conservation agent applied on top of this. The final application is to find the defects in pipes. These diverse applications

  5. Recent developments with the visible nulling coronagraph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Brian A.; Lyon, Richard G.; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Helmbrecht, Michael A.; Howard, Joseph M.; Miller, Ian J.

    2016-08-01

    A wide array of general astrophysics studies including detecting and characterizing habitable exoplanets could be enabled by a future large segmented telescope with sensitivity in the UV, optical, and infrared bands. When paired with a starshade or coronagraph, such an observatory could enable direct imaging and detailed spectroscopic observations of nearby Earth-like habitable zone planets. Over the past several years, a laboratory-based Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) has evolved to reach requisite contrasts over a 1 nm bandwidth at narrow source angle separation using a segmented deformable mirror in one arm of a Mach-Zehnder layout. More recent efforts targeted broadband performance following the addition of two sets of half-wave Fresnel rhomb achromatic phase shifters (APS) with the goal of reaching 10-9 contrast, at a separation of 2λ/D, using a 40 nm (6%) bandwidth single mode fiber source. Here we present updates on the VNC broadband nulling effort, including approaches to addressing system contrast limitations.

  6. Enhanced Interferometry with Programmable Spatial Light Modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    Interferometry, Spatial Light Modulator, Surface Accuracy, Optics, Mirror, Zernike , Freeform Optics, Null Testing, Hartman, Wavefront 16. SECURITY...S L M P ix e l- c a m Tilted Flat Mirror L a s e r PV. ± 3.4 λ -Tilt by the flat mirror, ~7 waves ~ 14 fringes Interferogram 3D view (Various...Interferogram ( 3D view) x- profile y- profile (Various waveplates and telescopes not shown) SLM can compensate tilted wavefronts with an accuracy of

  7. Speckle Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, F. P.; Jin, F.; Wang, Q.; Zhu, N.

    Before the milestone work of Leedertz in 1970 coherent speckles generated from a laser illuminated object are considered noise to be eliminated or minimized. Leedertz shows that coherent speckles are actually information carriers. Since then the speckle technique has found many applications to fields of mechanics, metrology, nondestructive evaluation and material sciences. Speckles need not be coherent. Artificially created socalled white light speckles can also be used as information carriers. In this paper we present two recent developments of speckle technique with applications to micromechanics problems using SIEM (Speckle Interferometry with Electron Microscopy), to nondestructive evaluation of crevice corrosion and composite disbond and vibration of large structures using TADS (Time-Average Digital Specklegraphy).

  8. Lightness dependence of achromatic loci in color-appearance coordinates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro eKuriki

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Shifts in the appearance of color under different illuminant chromaticity are known to be incomplete, and fit nicely with a simple linear transformation of cone responses that aligns the achromatic points under two illuminants. Most chromaticity-transfer functions with von-Kries-like transformations use only one set of values to fit the color shifts from one illuminant to another. However, an achromatic point shifts its chromaticity depending on the lightness of the test stimulus. This lightness dependence of the achromatic-point locus is qualitatively similar to a phenomenon known as the Helson-Judd effect. The present study suggests that the lightness dependency of achromatic points appears to be a general trend, which is supported by the results from deriving the optimal von-Kries coefficients for different lightness levels that best fit the color shifts under different illuminant chromaticities. Further, we report that such a lightness dependence of the achromatic-point loci can be represented simply as a straight line in coordinates defined using color-appearance models such as CIECAM when normalized for daylight.

  9. Visible nulling coronagraphy testbed development for exoplanet detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Woodruff, Robert A.; Vasudevan, Gopal; Thompson, Patrick; Chen, Andrew; Petrone, Peter; Booth, Andrew; Madison, Timothy; Bolcar, Matthew; Noecker, M. Charley; Kendrick, Stephen; Melnick, Gary; Tolls, Volker

    2010-07-01

    Three of the recently completed NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept (ASMC) studies addressed the feasibility of using a Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) as the prime instrument for exoplanet science. The VNC approach is one of the few approaches that works with filled, segmented and sparse or diluted aperture telescope systems and thus spans the space of potential ASMC exoplanet missions. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has a well-established effort to develop VNC technologies and has developed an incremental sequence of VNC testbeds to advance the this approach and the technologies associated with it. Herein we report on the continued development of the vacuum Visible Nulling Coronagraph testbed (VNT). The VNT is an ultra-stable vibration isolated testbed that operates under high bandwidth closed-loop control within a vacuum chamber. It will be used to achieve an incremental sequence of three visible light nulling milestones of sequentially higher contrasts of 108, 109 and 1010 at an inner working angle of 2*λ/D and ultimately culminate in spectrally broadband (>20%) high contrast imaging. Each of the milestones, one per year, is traceable to one or more of the ASMC studies. The VNT uses a modified Mach-Zehnder nulling interferometer, modified with a modified "W" configuration to accommodate a hex-packed MEMS based deformable mirror, a coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. Discussed will be the optical configuration laboratory results, critical technologies and the null sensing and control approach.

  10. OPTIMIZING THE DYNAMIC APERTURE FOR TRIPLE BEND ACHROMATIC LATTICES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KRAMER, S.L.; BENGTSSON, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Triple Bend Achromatic (TBA) lattice has the potential for lower natural emittance per period than the Double Bend Achromatic (DBA) lattice for high brightness light sources. However, the DBA has been chosen for 3rd generation light sources more often due to the higher number of undulator straight section available for a comparable emittance. The TBA has considerable flexibility in linear optics tuning while maintaining this emittance advantage. We have used the tune and chromaticity flexibility of a TBA lattice to minimize the lowest order nonlinearities to implement a 3rd order achromatic tune, while maintaining a constant emittance. This frees the geometric sextupoles to counter the higher order nonlinearities. This procedure is being used to improve the nonlinear dynamics of the TBA as a proposed lattice for NSLS-II facility. The flexibility of the TBA lattice will also provide for future upgrade capabilities of the beam parameters

  11. Achromatic-chromatic colorimetric sensors for on-off type detection of analytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jun Hyuk; Cho, Hui Hun; Lee, Jin Woong; Lee, Jung Heon

    2014-12-21

    We report the development of achromatic colorimetric sensors; sensors changing their colors from achromatic black to other chromatic colors. An achromatic colorimetric sensor was prepared by mixing a general colorimetric indicator, whose color changes between chromatic colors, and a complementary colored dye with no reaction to the targeted analyte. As the color of an achromatic colorimetric sensor changes from black to a chromatic color, the color change could be much easily recognized than general colorimetric sensors with naked eyes. More importantly, the achromatic colorimetric sensors enable on-off type recognition of the presence of analytes, which have not been achieved from most colorimetric sensors. In addition, the color changes from some achromatic colorimetric sensors (achromatic Eriochrome Black T and achromatic Benedict's solution) could be recognized with naked eyes at much lower concentration ranges than normal chromatic colorimetric sensors. These results provide new opportunities in the use of colorimetric sensors for diverse applications, such as harsh industrial, environmental, and biological detection.

  12. Nonimaging achromatic shaped Fresnel lenses for ultrahigh solar concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Languy, Fabian; Habraken, Serge

    2013-05-15

    The maximum concentration ratio achievable with a solar concentrator made of a single refractive primary optics is much more limited by the chromatic aberration than by any other aberration. Therefore achromatic doublets made with poly(methyl methacrylate) and polycarbonate are of great interest to enhance the concentration ratio and to achieve a spectrally uniform flux on the receiver. In this Letter, shaped achromatic Fresnel lenses are investigated. One lossless design is of high interest since it provides spectrally and spatially uniform flux without being affected by soiling problems. With this design an optical concentration ratio of about 8500× can be achieved.

  13. A near-infrared zero-order achromatic retarder

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present investigation deals with a technique to design and study the characteristics of an achromatic combination of birefringent plates in 800–2000 nm range. The retarder has been designed using calcite, crystalline quartz and ADP. The thicknesses of the plates are 19.38 μm,. 446.14 μm and 12.57 μm respectively.

  14. Effects of visual attention on chromatic and achromatic detection sensitivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikawa, Keiji; Sato, Masayuki; Kuwamura, Keiko

    2014-05-01

    Visual attention has a significant effect on various visual functions, such as response time, detection and discrimination sensitivity, and color appearance. It has been suggested that visual attention may affect visual functions in the early visual pathways. In this study we examined selective effects of visual attention on sensitivities of the chromatic and achromatic pathways to clarify whether visual attention modifies responses in the early visual system. We used a dual task paradigm in which the observer detected a peripheral test stimulus presented at 4 deg eccentricities while the observer concurrently carried out an attention task in the central visual field. In experiment 1, it was confirmed that peripheral spectral sensitivities were reduced more for short and long wavelengths than for middle wavelengths with the central attention task so that the spectral sensitivity function changed its shape by visual attention. This indicated that visual attention affected the chromatic response more strongly than the achromatic response. In experiment 2 it was obtained that the detection thresholds increased in greater degrees in the red-green and yellow-blue chromatic directions than in the white-black achromatic direction in the dual task condition. In experiment 3 we showed that the peripheral threshold elevations depended on the combination of color-directions of the central and peripheral stimuli. Since the chromatic and achromatic responses were separately processed in the early visual pathways, the present results provided additional evidence that visual attention affects responses in the early visual pathways.

  15. Visible Nulling Coronagraphy for Exo-Planetary Detection and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Woodruff, Robert; Vasudevan, Gopal; Shao, Mike; Levine, Martin; Melnick, Gary; Tolls, Volker; Petrone, Peter; Dogoda, Peter; Duval, Julia; Ge, Jian

    Visible Nulling Coronagraphy (VNC) is the proposed method of detecting and characterizing exo-solar Jovian planets (null depth 10-9) for the proposed NASA's Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) Clampin & Lyon 2004 and is an approach under evaluation for NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission. The VNC approach uses a single unobscured filled-aperture telescope and splits, via a 50:50 beamsplitter, its re-imaged pupil into two paths within a Mach-Zender interferometer. An achromatic PI phase shift is imposed onto one beam path and the two paths are laterally sheared with respect to each other. The two beams are recombined at a second 50:50 beamsplitter. The net effect is that the on axis (stellar) light is transmitted out of the bright interferometer arm while the off-axis (planetary) light is transmitted out of the nulled interferometer arm. The bright output is used for fine pointing control and coarse wavefront control. The nulled output is relayed to the science camera for science imagery and fine wavefront control. The actual transmission pattern, projected on the sky, follows a θ^2 pattern for a single shear, θ^4 for a double shear, with the spacing of the successive maxima proportional to the inverse of the relative lateral shear. Combinations of shears and spacecraft rolls build up the spatial frequency content of the sky transmission pattern in the same manner as imaging interferometer builds up the spatial frequency content of the image.

  16. Chromatic and achromatic monocular deprivation produce separable changes of eye dominance in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiawei; Reynaud, Alexandre; Kim, Yeon Jin; Mullen, Kathy T; Hess, Robert F

    2017-11-29

    Temporarily depriving one eye of its input, in whole or in part, results in a transient shift in eye dominance in human adults, with the patched eye becoming stronger and the unpatched eye weaker. However, little is known about the role of colour contrast in these behavioural changes. Here, we first show that the changes in eye dominance and contrast sensitivity induced by monocular eye patching affect colour and achromatic contrast sensitivity equally. We next use dichoptic movies, customized and filtered to stimulate the two eyes differentially. We show that a strong imbalance in achromatic contrast between the eyes, with no colour content, also produces similar, unselective shifts in eye dominance for both colour and achromatic contrast sensitivity. Interestingly, if this achromatic imbalance is paired with similar colour contrast in both eyes, the shift in eye dominance is selective, affecting achromatic but not chromatic contrast sensitivity and revealing a dissociation in eye dominance for colour and achromatic image content. On the other hand, a strong imbalance in chromatic contrast between the eyes, with no achromatic content, produces small, unselective changes in eye dominance, but if paired with similar achromatic contrast in both eyes, no changes occur. We conclude that perceptual changes in eye dominance are strongly driven by interocular imbalances in achromatic contrast, with colour contrast having a significant counter balancing effect. In the short term, eyes can have different dominances for achromatic and chromatic contrast, suggesting separate pathways at the site of these neuroplastic changes. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. The diffractive achromat full spectrum computational imaging with diffractive optics

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Yifan

    2016-07-11

    Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) have recently drawn great attention in computational imaging because they can drastically reduce the size and weight of imaging devices compared to their refractive counterparts. However, the inherent strong dispersion is a tremendous obstacle that limits the use of DOEs in full spectrum imaging, causing unacceptable loss of color fidelity in the images. In particular, metamerism introduces a data dependency in the image blur, which has been neglected in computational imaging methods so far. We introduce both a diffractive achromat based on computational optimization, as well as a corresponding algorithm for correction of residual aberrations. Using this approach, we demonstrate high fidelity color diffractive-only imaging over the full visible spectrum. In the optical design, the height profile of a diffractive lens is optimized to balance the focusing contributions of different wavelengths for a specific focal length. The spectral point spread functions (PSFs) become nearly identical to each other, creating approximately spectrally invariant blur kernels. This property guarantees good color preservation in the captured image and facilitates the correction of residual aberrations in our fast two-step deconvolution without additional color priors. We demonstrate our design of diffractive achromat on a 0.5mm ultrathin substrate by photolithography techniques. Experimental results show that our achromatic diffractive lens produces high color fidelity and better image quality in the full visible spectrum. © 2016 ACM.

  18. Interferometry with polarised neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badurek, G.

    1978-01-01

    This paper aimed to give an outline of what might be expected from an extension of polarized beam techniques in neutron interferometry and how it could be achieved properly and what is the present state of this special field of interferometry

  19. PERSEE: a nulling interferometer with dynamic correction of external perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquinod, S.; Houairi, K.; Le Duigou, J.-M.; Barillot, M.; Cassaing, F.; Réess, J.-M.; Hénault, F.; Sorrente, B.; Morinaud, G.; Amans, J.-P.; Coudé du Foresto, V.; Ollivier, M.

    2017-11-01

    Nulling interferometry is one of the direct detection methods assessed to find and characterize extrasolar planets and particularly telluric ones. Several projects such as Darwin [1;2], TPF-I [3;4], PEGASE [5;6] or FKSI [7], are currently considered. One of the main issues is the feasibility of a stable polychromatic null despite the presence of significant disturbances, induced by vibrations, atmospheric turbulence on the ground or satellite drift. Satisfying all these requirements is a great challenge and a key issue of these missions. In the context of the PEGASE mission, it was decided (in 2006), to build a laboratory demonstrator named PERSEE. It is the first laboratory setup which couples deep nulling interferometry with a free flying GNC simulator [8]. It is developed by a consortium composed of CNES, IAS, LESIA, OCA, ONERA, and TAS. In this paper, we detail the main objectives, the set-up and the function of the bench. We describe all the subsystems and we focus particularly on two key points of PERSEE: the beam combiner and the Fringe tracker.

  20. Improved achromatization of phase mask coronagraphs using colored apodization

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'diaye, M.; Dohlen, K.; Cuevas, S.; Soummer, R.; Sánchez-Pérez, C.; Zamkotsian, F.

    2012-02-01

    Context. For direct imaging of exoplanets, a stellar coronagraph helps to remove the image of an observed bright star by attenuating the diffraction effects caused by the telescope aperture of diameter D. The dual zone phase mask (DZPM) coronagraph constitutes a promising concept since it theoretically offers a small inner working angle (IWA ~ λ0/D where λ0 denotes the central wavelength of the spectral range Δλ), good achromaticity, and high starlight rejection, typically reaching a 106 contrast at 5 λ0/D from the star over a spectral bandwidth Δλ/λ0 of 25% (similar to H-band). This last value proves to be encouraging for broadband imaging of young and warm Jupiter-like planets. Aims: Contrast levels higher than 106 are, however, required for observing older and/or less massive companions over a finite spectral bandwidth. An achromatization improvement of the DZPM coronagraph is therefore mandatory to reach such good performance. Methods: In its design, the DZPM coronagraph uses a gray (or achromatic) apodization. We replaced it by a colored apodization to increase the performance of this coronagraphic system over a wide spectral range. This innovative concept, called colored apodizer phase mask (CAPM) coronagraph, is defined to reach the highest contrast in the exoplanet search area. Once this has been done, we study the performance of the CAPM coronagraph in the presence of different errors to evaluate the sensitivity of our concept. Results: A 2.5 contrast gain is estimated from the performance provided by the CAPM coronagraph with respect to that of the DZPM coronagraph. A 2.2 × 10-8 intensity level at 5 λ0/D separation is then theoretically achieved with the CAPM coronagraph in the presence of a clear circular aperture and a 25% bandwidth. In addition, our studies show that our concept is less sensitive to low than to high-order aberrations for a given value of rms wavefront errors.

  1. Multiplexing schemes for an achromatic programmable diffractive lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millan, M S; Perez-Cabre, E; Oton, J [Technical University of Catalonia, Dep. Optics and Optometry, Terrassa-Barcelona, 08222 (Spain)], E-mail: millan@oo.upc.edu

    2008-11-01

    A multiplexed programmable diffractive lens, displayed on a pixelated liquid crystal device under broadband illumination, is proposed to compensate for the severe chromatic aberration that affects diffractive elements. The proposed lens is based on multiplexing a set of sublenses with a common focal length for different wavelengths. We consider different types of integration of the optical information (spatial only, temporal only and hybrid spatial-temporal) combined with a proper selection of the spectral bandwidth. The properties and limits of the achromatic programmable multiplexed lens are described. Experimental results are presented and discussed.

  2. Multiplexing schemes for an achromatic programmable diffractive lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millan, M S; Perez-Cabre, E; Oton, J

    2008-01-01

    A multiplexed programmable diffractive lens, displayed on a pixelated liquid crystal device under broadband illumination, is proposed to compensate for the severe chromatic aberration that affects diffractive elements. The proposed lens is based on multiplexing a set of sublenses with a common focal length for different wavelengths. We consider different types of integration of the optical information (spatial only, temporal only and hybrid spatial-temporal) combined with a proper selection of the spectral bandwidth. The properties and limits of the achromatic programmable multiplexed lens are described. Experimental results are presented and discussed.

  3. Quadrupole singlet focusing for achromatic parallel-to-parallel devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    A first order achromatic magnetic deflection system for use in conjunction with a charged particle accelerator is realized from a stepped gap magnet wherein charged particles propagating through the system are subject to at least two adjacent homogeneous magnetic fields in adjacent regions in traversing one-half of a symmetric trajectory through the system. A quadrupole singlet element Q of adjustable focal length disposed substantially at the entrance plane of such a symmetric system makes possible the coincidence of the waists of the beam in both the vertical (transverse) and (radial) bending planes. (author)

  4. Optical interferometry in astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnier, John D

    2003-01-01

    Here I review the current state of the field of optical stellar interferometry, concentrating on ground-based work although a brief report of space interferometry missions is included. We pause both to reflect on decades of immense progress in the field as well as to prepare for a new generation of large interferometers just now being commissioned (most notably, the CHARA, Keck and VLT Interferometers). First, this review summarizes the basic principles behind stellar interferometry needed by the lay-physicist and general astronomer to understand the scientific potential as well as technical challenges of interferometry. Next, the basic design principles of practical interferometers are discussed, using the experience of past and existing facilities to illustrate important points. Here there is significant discussion of current trends in the field, including the new facilities under construction and advanced technologies being debuted. This decade has seen the influence of stellar interferometry extend beyond classical regimes of stellar diameters and binary orbits to new areas such as mapping the accretion discs around young stars, novel calibration of the cepheid period-luminosity relation, and imaging of stellar surfaces. The third section is devoted to the major scientific results from interferometry, grouped into natural categories reflecting these current developments. Lastly, I consider the future of interferometry, highlighting the kinds of new science promised by the interferometers coming on-line in the next few years. I also discuss the longer-term future of optical interferometry, including the prospects for space interferometry and the possibilities of large-scale ground-based projects. Critical technological developments are still needed to make these projects attractive and affordable

  5. Null cone superspace supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downes-Martin, S.G.

    1980-03-01

    The null cone formalism is used to derive a 2(N-1) parameter family of constraints for O(N) extended superspace supergravity. The invariance groups of these constraints is analysed and is found to be [subgroup U submanifold] contains GL(4,R) for N = 1, the submanifold being eliminated for N > 1. The invariance group defines non-Weyl rotations on the superbein which combine to form Weyl transformations on the supertangent space metric. The invariance of the supergravity Lagrangian under these transformations is discussed. (Auth.)

  6. Relationship of field components and the matched dispersion function in Arc achromats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieguth, T.; Kheifets, S.; Murray, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    The general integral condition connecting the field, its derivative and the resulting eta function derived for any lattice is applied to the achromats of the SLC Arcs. This condition can be combined with the non-dispersive condition to give a simple parameterization of second-order achromats constructed of combined function magnets

  7. Design of achromatic bending systems in the presence of space charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jason, A.J.; Svaton, E.M.; Blind, B.; Heighway, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    The usual conditions for achromaticity of a dispersive system are shown to be inadequate when space-charge effects are included. Using a matrix formulation describing linear space-charge forces, we give generalized criteria necessary for a system to be achromatic. Additionally, these conditions are necessary for conservation of transverse emittances. An example of such a system is given

  8. Design of achromatic bending systems in the presence of space charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jason, A.J.; Svaton, E.M.; Blind, B.; Heighway, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    The usual conditions for achromaticity of a dispersive system are shown to be inadequate when space-charge effects are included. Using a matrix formulation describing linear space-charge forces, the authors give generalized criteria necessary for a system to be achromatic. Additionally, these conditions are necessary for conservation of transverse emittances. An example of such a system is given

  9. Geometric phase modulation for stellar interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, M.; Boschung, B.; Tango, W.J.; Davis, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In a long baseline optical interferometer, the fringe visibility is normally measured by modulation of the optical path difference between the two arms of the instruments. To obtain accurate measurements, the spectral bandwidth must be narrow, limiting the sensitivity of the technique. The application of geometric phase modulation technique to stellar interferometry has been proposed by Tango and Davis. Modulation of the geometric phase has the potential for improving the sensitivity of optical interferometers, and specially the Sydney University Stellar Interferometer (SUSI), by allowing broad band modulation of the light signals. This is because a modulator that changes the geometric phase of the signal is, in principle, achromatic. Another advantage of using such a phase modulator is that it can be placed in the common path traversed by the two orthogonally polarized beams emerging from the beam combiner in a stellar interferometer. Thus the optical components of the modulator do not have to be interferometric quality and could be relatively easily introduced into SUSI. We have investigated the proposed application in a laboratory-based experiment using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with white-light source. This can be seen as a small model of an amplitude stellar interferometer where the light source takes the place of the distant star and two corner mirrors replaces the entrance pupils of the stellar interferometer

  10. Multiwavelength interferometry system for the Orion laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, S; Gumbrell, E T; Robinson, T S; Lowe, H F; Giltrap, S; Price, C J; Stuart, N H; Kemshall, P; Fyrth, J; Luis, J; Skidmore, J W; Smith, R A

    2015-12-20

    We report on the design and testing of a multiwavelength interferometry system for the Orion laser facility based upon the use of self-path matching Wollaston prisms. The use of UV corrected achromatic optics allows for both easy alignment with an eye-safe light source and small (∼ millimeter) offsets to the focal lengths between different operational wavelengths. Interferograms are demonstrated at wavelengths corresponding to first, second, and fourth harmonics of a 1054 nm Nd:glass probe beam. Example data confirms the broadband achromatic capability of the imaging system with operation from the UV (263 nm) to visible (527 nm) and demonstrates that features as small as 5 μm can be resolved for object sizes of 15 by 10 mm. Results are also shown for an off-harmonic wavelength that will underpin a future capability. The primary optics package is accommodated inside the footprint of a ten-inch manipulator to allow the system to be deployed from a multitude of viewing angles inside the 4 m diameter Orion target chamber.

  11. Full-field parallel interferometry coherence probe microscope for high-speed optical metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safrani, A; Abdulhalim, I

    2015-06-01

    Parallel detection of several achromatic phase-shifted images is used to obtain a high-speed, high-resolution, full-field, optical coherence probe tomography system based on polarization interferometry. The high enface imaging speed, short coherence gate, and high lateral resolution provided by the system are exploited to determine microbump height uniformity in an integrated semiconductor chip at 50 frames per second. The technique is demonstrated using the Linnik microscope, although it can be implemented on any polarization-based interference microscopy system.

  12. Principles of Stellar Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Glindemann, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, stellar interferometry has developed from a specialist tool to a mainstream observing technique, attracting scientists whose research benefits from milliarcsecond angular resolution. Stellar interferometry has become part of the astronomer’s toolbox, complementing single-telescope observations by providing unique capabilities that will advance astronomical research. This carefully written book is intended to provide a solid understanding of the principles of stellar interferometry to students starting an astronomical research project in this field or to develop instruments and to astronomers using interferometry but who are not interferometrists per se. Illustrated by excellent drawings and calculated graphs the imaging process in stellar interferometers is explained starting from first principles on light propagation and diffraction wave propagation through turbulence is described in detail using Kolmogorov statistics the impact of turbulence on the imaging process is discussed both f...

  13. Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) Performance, Characterization and Null Control: Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Mallik, Udayan; Madison, Timothy; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Noecker, M. Charley; Kendrick, Stephen; Helmbrecht, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Herein we report on the development. sensing and control and our first results with the Vacuum Nuller Testbed to realize a Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) for exoplanet coronagraphy. The VNC is one of the few approaches that works with filled. segmented and sparse or diluted-aperture telescope systems. It thus spans a range of potential future NASA telescopes and could be Hown as a separate instrument on such a future mission. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has a well-established effort to develop VNC technologies. and has developed an incremental sequence of VNC testbeds to advance this approach and the enabling technologies associated with it. We discuss the continued development of the vacuum Visible Nulling Coronagraph testbed (VNT). Tbe VNT is an ultra-stable vibration isolated testbed that operates under closed-loop control within a vacuum chamber. It will be used to achieve an incremental sequence of three visible-light nulling milestones with sequentially higher contrasts of 10(sup 8), 10(sup 9) and ideally 10(sup 10) at an inner working angle of 2*lambda/D. The VNT is based on a modified Mach-Zehnder nulling interferometer, with a "W" configuration to accommodate a hex-packed MEMS based deformable mirror, a coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. We discuss the initial laboratory results, the optical configuration, critical technologies and the null sensing and control approach.

  14. Vacuum nuller testbed (VNT) performance, characterization and null control: progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Mallik, Udayan; Madison, Timothy; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Noecker, M. Charley; Kendrick, Stephen; Helmbrecht, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Herein we report on the development, sensing and control and our first results with the Vacuum Nuller Testbed to realize a Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) for exoplanet coronagraphy. The VNC is one of the few approaches that works with filled, segmented and sparse or diluted-aperture telescope systems. It thus spans a range of potential future NASA telescopes and could be flown as a separate instrument on such a future mission. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has a well-established effort to develop VNC technologies, and has developed an incremental sequence of VNC testbeds to advance this approach and the enabling technologies associated with it. We discuss the continued development of the vacuum Visible Nulling Coronagraph testbed (VNT). The VNT is an ultra-stable vibration isolated testbed that operates under closed-loop control within a vacuum chamber. It will be used to achieve an incremental sequence of three visible-light nulling milestones with sequentially higher contrasts of 108, 109, and ideally 1010 at an inner working angle of 2*λ/D. The VNT is based on a modified Mach-Zehnder nulling interferometer, with a "W" configuration to accommodate a hex-packed MEMS based deformable mirror, a coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. We discuss the initial laboratory results, the optical configuration, critical technologies and the null sensing and control approach.

  15. Achromatic wave plates for the mid-infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, J. Donald; Marlowe, Philip D.

    2012-06-01

    Achromatic wave plates are useful in various mid-IR applications, such as analyzing or controlling the spectrum available from CO2 and other lasers, and for the study of IR spectra from distant stars. Their production relies upon the technical skills of those who grow the required high quality crystals and upon those who fabricate the optical parts to the needed precision. Two materials are described - one useful for light in the spectral range of the visible through the near IR and another that functions well in mid-IR applications from 2.5 μm to 11.5 μm. Some limitations imposed by inherent material properties will also be discussed.

  16. Qualification of a Null Lens Using Image-Based Phase Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Aronstein, David L.; Hill, Peter C.; Smith, J. Scott; Zielinski, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    In measuring the figure error of an aspheric optic using a null lens, the wavefront contribution from the null lens must be independently and accurately characterized in order to isolate the optical performance of the aspheric optic alone. Various techniques can be used to characterize such a null lens, including interferometry, profilometry and image-based methods. Only image-based methods, such as phase retrieval, can measure the null-lens wavefront in situ - in single-pass, and at the same conjugates and in the same alignment state in which the null lens will ultimately be used - with no additional optical components. Due to the intended purpose of a Dull lens (e.g., to null a large aspheric wavefront with a near-equal-but-opposite spherical wavefront), characterizing a null-lens wavefront presents several challenges to image-based phase retrieval: Large wavefront slopes and high-dynamic-range data decrease the capture range of phase-retrieval algorithms, increase the requirements on the fidelity of the forward model of the optical system, and make it difficult to extract diagnostic information (e.g., the system F/#) from the image data. In this paper, we present a study of these effects on phase-retrieval algorithms in the context of a null lens used in component development for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission. Approaches for mitigation are also discussed.

  17. Vacuum Nuller Testbed Performance, Characterization and Null Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, R. G.; Clampin, M.; Petrone, P.; Mallik, U.; Madison, T.; Bolcar, M.; Noecker, C.; Kendrick, S.; Helmbrecht, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) can detect and characterize exoplanets with filled, segmented and sparse aperture telescopes, thereby spanning the choice of future internal coronagraph exoplanet missions. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has developed a Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) to advance this approach, and assess and advance technologies needed to realize a VNC as a flight instrument. The VNT is an ultra-stable testbed operating at 15 Hz in vacuum. It consists of a MachZehnder nulling interferometer; modified with a "W" configuration to accommodate a hexpacked MEMS based deformable mirror (DM), coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. The 2-output channels are imaged with a vacuum photon counting camera and conventional camera. Error-sensing and feedback to DM and delay line with control algorithms are implemented in a real-time architecture. The inherent advantage of the VNC is that it is its own interferometer and directly controls its errors by exploiting images from bright and dark channels simultaneously. Conservation of energy requires the sum total of the photon counts be conserved independent of the VNC state. Thus sensing and control bandwidth is limited by the target stars throughput, with the net effect that the higher bandwidth offloads stressing stability tolerances within the telescope. We report our recent progress with the VNT towards achieving an incremental sequence of contrast milestones of 10(exp 8) , 10(exp 9) and 10(exp 10) respectively at inner working angles approaching 2A/D. Discussed will be the optics, lab results, technologies, and null control. Shown will be evidence that the milestones have been achieved.

  18. Two-harmonic complex spectral-domain optical coherence tomography using achromatic sinusoidal phase modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sheng-Hua; Huang, Siang-Ru; Chou, Che-Chung

    2018-03-01

    We resolve the complex conjugate ambiguity in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) by using achromatic two-harmonic method. Unlike previous researches, the optical phase of the fiber interferometer is modulated by an achromatic phase shifter based on an optical delay line. The achromatic phase modulation leads to a wavelength-independent scaling coefficient for the two harmonics. Dividing the mean absolute value of the first harmonic by that of the second harmonic in a B-scan interferogram directly gives the scaling coefficient. It greatly simplifies the determination of the magnitude ratio between the two harmonics without the need of third harmonic and cumbersome iterative calculations. The inverse fast Fourier transform of the complex-valued interferogram constructed with the scaling coefficient, first and second harmonics yields a full-range OCT image. Experimental results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed achromatic two-harmonic technique for suppressing the mirror artifacts in SD-OCT images.

  19. Visible Nulling Coronagraph Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, R. G.; Clampin, M.; Woodruff, R. A.; Vasudevan, G.; Thompson, P.; Petrone, P.; Madison, T.; Rizzo, M.; Melnick, G.; Tolls, V.

    2010-10-01

    We report on recent laboratory results with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) testbed. We have achieved focal plane contrasts of 108 and approaching 109 at inner working angles of 2 λ/D and 4 λ/D, respectively. Results were obtained with a broadband source and 40 nm filter centered on 630 nm. A null control breadboard (NCB) was also developed to assess and quantify MEMS based deformable mirror technology (DM), and to develop and assess closed-loop null control algorithms. We have demonstrated closed-loop performance at 27 Hz.

  20. Null lifts and projective dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cariglia, Marco, E-mail: marco@iceb.ufop.br

    2015-11-15

    We describe natural Hamiltonian systems using projective geometry. The null lift procedure endows the tangent bundle with a projective structure where the null Hamiltonian is identified with a projective conic and induces a Weyl geometry. Projective transformations generate a set of known and new dualities between Hamiltonian systems, as for example the phenomenon of coupling-constant metamorphosis. We conclude outlining how this construction can be extended to the quantum case for Eisenhart–Duval lifts.

  1. Achromatic Focal Plane Mask for Exoplanet Imaging Coronagraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Kevin Edward; Belikov, Ruslan; Guyon, Olivier; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Wilson, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in coronagraph technologies for exoplanet imaging have achieved contrasts close to 1e10 at 4 lambda/D and 1e-9 at 2 lambda/D in monochromatic light. A remaining technological challenge is to achieve high contrast in broadband light; a challenge that is largely limited by chromaticity of the focal plane mask. The size of a star image scales linearly with wavelength. Focal plane masks are typically the same size at all wavelengths, and must be sized for the longest wavelength in the observational band to avoid starlight leakage. However, this oversized mask blocks useful discovery space from the shorter wavelengths. We present here the design, development, and testing of an achromatic focal plane mask based on the concept of optical filtering by a diffractive optical element (DOE). The mask consists of an array of DOE cells, the combination of which functions as a wavelength filter with any desired amplitude and phase transmission. The effective size of the mask scales nearly linearly with wavelength, and allows significant improvement in the inner working angle of the coronagraph at shorter wavelengths. The design is applicable to almost any coronagraph configuration, and enables operation in a wider band of wavelengths than would otherwise be possible. We include initial results from a laboratory demonstration of the mask with the Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization coronagraph.

  2. Iterative supervirtual refraction interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Hagan, Ola

    2014-05-02

    In refraction tomography, the low signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) can be a major obstacle in picking the first-break arrivals at the far-offset receivers. To increase the S/N, we evaluated iterative supervirtual refraction interferometry (ISVI), which is an extension of the supervirtual refraction interferometry method. In this method, supervirtual traces are computed and then iteratively reused to generate supervirtual traces with a higher S/N. Our empirical results with both synthetic and field data revealed that ISVI can significantly boost up the S/N of far-offset traces. The drawback is that using refraction events from more than one refractor can introduce unacceptable artifacts into the final traveltime versus offset curve. This problem can be avoided by careful windowing of refraction events.

  3. Parsimonious Surface Wave Interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2017-10-24

    To decrease the recording time of a 2D seismic survey from a few days to one hour or less, we present a parsimonious surface-wave interferometry method. Interferometry allows for the creation of a large number of virtual shot gathers from just two reciprocal shot gathers by crosscoherence of trace pairs, where the virtual surface waves can be inverted for the S-wave velocity model by wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD). Synthetic and field data tests suggest that parsimonious wave-equation dispersion inversion (PWD) gives S-velocity tomograms that are comparable to those obtained from a full survey with a shot at each receiver. The limitation of PWD is that the virtual data lose some information so that the resolution of the S-velocity tomogram can be modestly lower than that of the S-velocity tomogram inverted from a conventional survey.

  4. Parsimonious Surface Wave Interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing; Hanafy, Sherif; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2017-01-01

    To decrease the recording time of a 2D seismic survey from a few days to one hour or less, we present a parsimonious surface-wave interferometry method. Interferometry allows for the creation of a large number of virtual shot gathers from just two reciprocal shot gathers by crosscoherence of trace pairs, where the virtual surface waves can be inverted for the S-wave velocity model by wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD). Synthetic and field data tests suggest that parsimonious wave-equation dispersion inversion (PWD) gives S-velocity tomograms that are comparable to those obtained from a full survey with a shot at each receiver. The limitation of PWD is that the virtual data lose some information so that the resolution of the S-velocity tomogram can be modestly lower than that of the S-velocity tomogram inverted from a conventional survey.

  5. Vibration insensitive interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millerd, James; Brock, Neal; Hayes, John; Kimbrough, Brad; North-Morris, Michael; Wyant, James C.

    2017-11-01

    The largest limitation of phase-shifting interferometry for optical testing is the sensitivity to the environment, both vibration and air turbulence. An interferometer using temporal phase-shifting is very sensitive to vibration because the various phase shifted frames of interferometric data are taken at different times and vibration causes the phase shifts between the data frames to be different from what is desired. Vibration effects can be reduced by taking all the phase shifted frames simultaneously and turbulence effects can be reduced by averaging many measurements. There are several techniques for simultaneously obtaining several phase-shifted interferograms and this paper will discuss two such techniques: 1) Simultaneous phase-shifting interferometry on a single detector array (PhaseCam) and 2) Micropolarizer phase-shifting array. The application of these techniques for the testing of large optical components, measurement of vibrational modes, the phasing of segmented optical components, and the measurement of deformations of large diffuse structures is described.

  6. Iterative supervirtual refraction interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Hagan, Ola; Hanafy, Sherif M.; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2014-01-01

    In refraction tomography, the low signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) can be a major obstacle in picking the first-break arrivals at the far-offset receivers. To increase the S/N, we evaluated iterative supervirtual refraction interferometry (ISVI), which is an extension of the supervirtual refraction interferometry method. In this method, supervirtual traces are computed and then iteratively reused to generate supervirtual traces with a higher S/N. Our empirical results with both synthetic and field data revealed that ISVI can significantly boost up the S/N of far-offset traces. The drawback is that using refraction events from more than one refractor can introduce unacceptable artifacts into the final traveltime versus offset curve. This problem can be avoided by careful windowing of refraction events.

  7. Scope of neutron interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauch, H.

    1978-01-01

    This paper deals with the interferometry of well separated coherent beams, where the phase of the beams can be manipulated individually. The basic equation of the dynamical neutron diffraction theory are recalled. The various contributions to the interaction of as low neutron with its surroundings are discussed: the various terms denote the nuclear, magnetic, electromagnetic, intrinsic, gravitational, and weak interaction respectively. Applications to nuclear physics, fundamental physics and solid state physics are successively envisaged

  8. Space Interferometry Science Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Stephen T.

    1992-12-01

    Decisions taken by the astronomy and astrophysics survey committee and the interferometry panel which lead to the formation of the Space Interferometry Science Working Group (SISWG) are outlined. The SISWG was formed by the NASA astrophysics division to provide scientific and technical input from the community in planning for space interferometry and in support of an Astrometric Interferometry Mission (AIM). The AIM program hopes to measure the positions of astronomical objects with a precision of a few millionths of an arcsecond. The SISWG science and technical teams are described and the outcomes of its first meeting are given.

  9. Bare Quantum Null Energy Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zicao; Marolf, Donald

    2018-02-16

    The quantum null energy condition (QNEC) is a conjectured relation between a null version of quantum field theory energy and derivatives of quantum field theory von Neumann entropy. In some cases, divergences cancel between these two terms and the QNEC is intrinsically finite. We study the more general case here where they do not and argue that a QNEC can still hold for bare (unrenormalized) quantities. While the original QNEC applied only to locally stationary null congruences in backgrounds that solve semiclassical theories of quantum gravity, at least in the formal perturbation theory at a small Planck length, the quantum focusing conjecture can be viewed as the special case of our bare QNEC for which the metric is on shell.

  10. Chromatic-achromatic perimetry in four clinic cases: Glaucoma and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezos, Inmaculada; Luque, Maria Jos; de Fez, Dolores; Moncho, Vicenta; Camps, Vicente

    2015-02-01

    Some diseases that affect the visual system may show loss of chromatic-achromatic sensitivity before obvious physical signs appear in the usual examination of the eye's posterior segment. A perimetric study has been conducted with four typical patients with glaucoma and diabetes, at different stages of the disease. In addition to the standard white-on-white (standard automated perimetry [SAP]), a test battery has been used to study patient's contrast sensitivity, using stimuli with different chromatic, spatial, and temporal content (multichannel perimetry). The choice of stimuli tries to maximize the response of different visual mechanisms: Achromatic (parvocellular and magnocellular origin); chromatic red-green (parvocellular origin); and chromatic blue-yellow (koniocellular origin). The results seem to indicate losses in the achromatic-parvocellular perimetry and both chromatic perimetry tests, undetected by conventional SAP. Our results illustrate that our patients without visible retinal alterations show signs of suspicion in multichannel perimetry.

  11. Study of double triple bend achromat (DTBA) lattice for a 3GeV light source

    CERN Document Server

    Alekou, Androula; Carmignani, Nicola; Liuzzo, Simone Maria; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Pulampong, Thapakron; Walker, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Starting from the concepts of the Hybrid Multi Bend Achromat (HMBA) lattice developed at ESRF and of the Double-Double Bend Achromat(DDBA) lattice developed at Diamond, we present a new cell tha tincludes all the advantages of the two designs. The resulting Double Triple Bend Achromat(DTBA) cel lallows for a natural horizontal emittance of less than 100pm with a large dynamic aperture and lifetime. It includes two straight sections, for insertion devices, five and three meters long. The lattice is consistent with the engineering design developed for the ESRF-EBS lattice and the layout and user requirements of Diamond. The characteristics of the cell are presented together with the results of the optimisation process.

  12. Antihydrogen Experiment Gravity Interferometry Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Trezzi, D; Dassa, L; Rienacker, B; Khalidova, O; Ferrari, G; Krasnicky, D; Perini, D; Cerchiari, G; Belov, A; Boscolo, I; Sacerdoti, M G; Ferragut, R O; Nedelec, P; Hinterberger, A; Al-qaradawi, I; Malbrunot, C L S; Brusa, R S; Prelz, F; Manuzio, G; Riccardi, C; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Haider, S; Haug, F; Turbabin, A; Castelli, F; Testera, G; Lagomarsino, V E; Doser, M; Penasa, L; Gninenko, S; Cataneo, F; Zenoni, A; Cabaret, L; Comparat, D P; Zmeskal, J; Scampoli, P; Nesteruk, K P; Dudarev, A; Kellerbauer, A G; Mariazzi, S; Carraro, C; Zavatarelli, S M

    The AEGIS experiment (Antihydrogen Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) has the aim of carrying out the first measurement of the gravitational interaction of antimatter to a precision of 1%, by applying techniques from atomic physics, laser spectroscopy and interferometry to a beam of antihydrogen atoms. A further goal of the experiment is to carry out spectroscopy of the antihydrogen atoms in flight.

  13. A Normative Data Set for the Clinical Assessment of Achromatic and Chromatic Contrast Sensitivity Using a qCSF Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Jin; Reynaud, Alexandre; Hess, Robert F; Mullen, Kathy T

    2017-07-01

    The measurement of achromatic sensitivity has been an important tool for monitoring subtle changes in vision as the result of disease or response to therapy. In this study, we aimed to provide a normative data set for achromatic and chromatic contrast sensitivity functions within a common cone contrast space using an abbreviated measurement approach suitable for clinical practice. In addition, we aimed to provide comparisons of achromatic and chromatic binocular summation across spatial frequency. We estimated monocular cone contrast sensitivity functions (CCSFs) using a quick Contrast Sensitivity Function (qCSF) approach for achromatic as well as isoluminant, L/M cone opponent, and S cone opponent stimuli in a healthy population of 51 subjects. We determined the binocular CCSFs for achromatic and chromatic vision to evaluate the degree of binocular summation across spatial frequency for these three different mechanisms in a subset of 20 subjects. Each data set shows consistent contrast sensitivity across the population. They highlight the extremely high cone contrast sensitivity of L/M cone opponency compared with the S-cone and achromatic responses. We also find that the two chromatic sensitivities are correlated across the healthy population. In addition, binocular summation for all mechanisms depends strongly on stimulus spatial frequency. This study, using an approach well suited to the clinic, is the first to provide a comparative normative data set for the chromatic and achromatic contrast sensitivity functions, yielding quantitative comparisons of achromatic, L/M cone opponent, and S cone opponent chromatic sensitivities as a function of spatial frequency.

  14. Basics of interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Hariharan, P

    1992-01-01

    This book is for those who have some knowledge of optics, but little or no previous experience in interferometry. Accordingly, the carefully designed presentation helps readers easily find and assimilate the interferometric techniques they need for precision measurements. Mathematics is held to a minimum, and the topics covered are also summarized in capsule overviews at the beginning and end of each chapter. Each chapter also contains a set of worked problems that give a feel for numbers.The first five chapters present a clear tutorial review of fundamentals. Chapters six and seven discus

  15. Interferometry with atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmcke, J.; Riehle, F.; Witte, A.; Kisters, T.

    1992-01-01

    Physics and experimental results of atom interferometry are reviewed and several realizations of atom interferometers are summarized. As a typical example of an atom interferometer utilizing the internal degrees of freedom of the atom, we discuss the separated field excitation of a calcium atomic beam using four traveling laser fields and demonstrate the Sagnac effect in a rotating interferometer. The sensitivity of this interferometer can be largely increased by use of slow atoms with narrow velocity distribution. We therefore furthermore report on the preparation of a laser cooled and deflected calcium atomic beam. (orig.)

  16. Achromatic triplet and athermalized lens assembly for both midwave and longwave infrared spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chih-Wei

    2014-02-01

    Analytic solutions for finding the achromatic triplet in the midwave and longwave infrared spectra simultaneously are explored. The relationship between the combination of promising refractive materials and the system's optical power is also formulated. The principles for stabilizing the effective focal length of an air-spaced lens group with respect to temperature are explored, and the thermal properties of the optical component and mechanical elements mutually counterbalanced. An optical design based on these achromatic and athermal theories is demonstrated, and the image quality of the lens assembly seems to approach the diffractive limitation.

  17. Demonstrating Broadband Billion-to-One Contrast with the Visible Nulling Coronagraph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Brian A.; Lyon, Richard G.; Petrone, Peter, III; Miller, Ian J.; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Clampin, Mark; Helmbrecht, Michael A.; Mallik, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    The key to broadband operation of the Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) is achieving a condition of quasi- achromatic destructive interference between combined beams. Here we present efforts towards meeting this goal using Fresnel rhombs in each interferometric arm as orthogonally aligned half wave phase retarders. The milestone goal of the demonstration is to achieve 1 × 10-9 contrast at 2/D over a 40 nm bandpass centered at 633 nm. Rhombs have been designed and fabricated, and a multi-step approach to alignment using coarse positioners for each rhomb and pair has been developed to get within range of piezo stages used for fine positioning. The previously demonstrated narrowband VNC sensing and control approach that uses a segmented deformable mirror is being adapted to broadband to include fine positioning of the piezo-mounted rhombs, all demonstrated in a low-pressure environment.

  18. Demonstrating broadband billion-to-one contrast with the Visible Nulling Coronagraph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Brian A.; Lyon, Richard G.; Petrone, Peter; Miller, Ian J.; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Clampin, Mark; Helmbrecht, Michael A.; Mallik, Udayan

    2015-09-01

    The key to broadband operation of the Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) is achieving a condition of quasi-achromatic destructive interference between combined beams. Here we present efforts towards meeting this goal using Fresnel rhombs in each interferometric arm as orthogonally aligned half wave phase retarders. The milestone goal of the demonstration is to achieve 1 × 10-9 contrast at 2λ/D over a 40 nm bandpass centered at 633 nm. Rhombs have been designed and fabricated, and a multi-step approach to alignment using coarse positioners for each rhomb and pair has been developed to get within range of piezo stages used for fine positioning. The previously demonstrated narrowband VNC sensing and control approach that uses a segmented deformable mirror is being adapted to broadband to include fine positioning of the piezo-mounted rhombs, all demonstrated in a low-pressure environment.

  19. Beam shaping optics to enhance performance of interferometry techniques in grating manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2018-02-01

    Improving of industrial holographic and interferometry techniques is of great importance in interference lithography, computer-generated holography, holographic data storage, interferometry recording of Bragg gratings as well as gratings of various types in semiconductor industry. Performance of mentioned techniques is essentially enhanced by providing a light beam with flat phase front and flat-top irradiance distribution. Therefore, transformation of Gaussian distribution of a TEM00 laser to flat-top (top hat, uniform) distribution is an important optical task. There are different refractive and diffractive beam shaping approaches used in laser industrial and scientific applications, but only few of them are capable to fulfil the optimum conditions for beam quality demanding holography and interferometry. As a solution it is suggested to apply refractive field mapping beam shaping optics πShaper, which operational principle presumes almost lossless transformation of Gaussian to flat-top beam with flatness of output wavefront, conserving of beam consistency, providing collimated low divergent output beam, high transmittance, extended depth of field, negligible wave aberration, and achromatic design provides capability to work with several lasers with different wavelengths simultaneously. High optical quality of resulting flat-top beam allows applying additional optical components to build various imaging optical systems for variation of beam size and shape to fulfil requirements of a particular application. This paper will describe design basics of refractive beam shapers and optical layouts of their applying in holography and laser interference lithography. Examples of real implementations and experimental results will be presented as well.

  20. Speckle interferometry of asteroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drummond, J.

    1988-01-01

    By studying the image two-dimensional power spectra or autocorrelations projected by an asteroid as it rotates, it is possible to locate its rotational pole and derive its three axes dimensions through speckle interferometry under certain assumptions of uniform, geometric scattering, and triaxial ellipsoid shape. However, in cases where images can be reconstructed, the need for making the assumptions is obviated. Furthermore, the ultimate goal for speckle interferometry of image reconstruction will lead to mapping albedo features (if they exist) as impact areas or geological units. The first glimpses of the surface of an asteroid were obtained from images of 4 Vesta reconstructed from speckle interferometric observations. These images reveal that Vesta is quite Moon-like in having large hemispheric-scale albedo features. All of its lightcurves can be produced from a simple model developed from the images. Although undoubtedly more intricate than the model, Vesta's lightcurves can be matched by a model with three dark and four bright spots. The dark areas so dominate one hemisphere that a lightcurve minimum occurs when the maximum cross-section area is visible. The triaxial ellipsoid shape derived for Vesta is not consistent with the notion that the asteroid has an equilibrium shape in spite of its having apparently been differentiated

  1. Time-Delay Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Tinto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Equal-arm detectors of gravitational radiation allow phase measurements many orders of magnitude below the intrinsic phase stability of the laser injecting light into their arms. This is because the noise in the laser light is common to both arms, experiencing exactly the same delay, and thus cancels when it is differenced at the photo detector. In this situation, much lower level secondary noises then set the overall performance. If, however, the two arms have different lengths (as will necessarily be the case with space-borne interferometers, the laser noise experiences different delays in the two arms and will hence not directly cancel at the detector. In order to solve this problem, a technique involving heterodyne interferometry with unequal arm lengths and independent phase-difference readouts has been proposed. It relies on properly time-shifting and linearly combining independent Doppler measurements, and for this reason it has been called time-delay interferometry (TDI. This article provides an overview of the theory, mathematical foundations, and experimental aspects associated with the implementation of TDI. Although emphasis on the application of TDI to the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA mission appears throughout this article, TDI can be incorporated into the design of any future space-based mission aiming to search for gravitational waves via interferometric measurements. We have purposely left out all theoretical aspects that data analysts will need to account for when analyzing the TDI data combinations.

  2. Standard and Null Weak Values

    OpenAIRE

    Zilberberg, Oded; Romito, Alessandro; Gefen, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    Weak value (WV) is a quantum mechanical measurement protocol, proposed by Aharonov, Albert, and Vaidman. It consists of a weak measurement, which is weighed in, conditional on the outcome of a later, strong measurement. Here we define another two-step measurement protocol, null weak value (NVW), and point out its advantages as compared to WV. We present two alternative derivations of NWVs and compare them to the corresponding derivations of WVs.

  3. Precision measurement with atom interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jin

    2015-01-01

    Development of atom interferometry and its application in precision measurement are reviewed in this paper. The principle, features and the implementation of atom interferometers are introduced, the recent progress of precision measurement with atom interferometry, including determination of gravitational constant and fine structure constant, measurement of gravity, gravity gradient and rotation, test of weak equivalence principle, proposal of gravitational wave detection, and measurement of quadratic Zeeman shift are reviewed in detail. Determination of gravitational redshift, new definition of kilogram, and measurement of weak force with atom interferometry are also briefly introduced. (topical review)

  4. Neurochemical responses to chromatic and achromatic stimuli in the human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednařík, Petr; Tkáč, Ivan; Giove, Federico; Eberly, Lynn E; Deelchand, Dinesh K; Barreto, Felipe R; Mangia, Silvia

    2018-02-01

    In the present study, we aimed at determining the metabolic responses of the human visual cortex during the presentation of chromatic and achromatic stimuli, known to preferentially activate two separate clusters of neuronal populations (called "blobs" and "interblobs") with distinct sensitivity to color or luminance features. Since blobs and interblobs have different cytochrome-oxidase (COX) content and micro-vascularization level (i.e., different capacities for glucose oxidation), different functional metabolic responses during chromatic vs. achromatic stimuli may be expected. The stimuli were optimized to evoke a similar load of neuronal activation as measured by the bold oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast. Metabolic responses were assessed using functional 1 H MRS at 7 T in 12 subjects. During both chromatic and achromatic stimuli, we observed the typical increases in glutamate and lactate concentration, and decreases in aspartate and glucose concentration, that are indicative of increased glucose oxidation. However, within the detection sensitivity limits, we did not observe any difference between metabolic responses elicited by chromatic and achromatic stimuli. We conclude that the higher energy demands of activated blobs and interblobs are supported by similar increases in oxidative metabolism despite the different capacities of these neuronal populations.

  5. GRB060206 and the quandary of achromatic breaks in afterglow light curves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curran, P.A.; van der Horst, A.J.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Starling, R.L.C.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Fynbo, J.P.U.; Gorosabel, J.; Järvinen, A.S.; Malesani, D.; Rol, E.; Tanvir, N.R.; Wiersema, K.; Burleigh, M.R.; Casewell, S.L.; Dobbie, P.D.; Guziy, S.; Jakobsson, P.; Jelínek, M.; Laursen, P.; Levan, A.J.; Mundell, C.G.; Näränen, J.; Piranomonte, S.

    2007-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst afterglow observations in the Swift era have a perceived lack of achromatic jet breaks compared with the BeppoSAX era. We present our multi-wavelength analysis of GRB060206 as an illustrative example of how inferences of jet breaks from optical and X-ray data might differ. The

  6. Characterization methods of integrated optics for mid-infrared interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labadie, Lucas; Kern, Pierre Y.; Schanen-Duport, Isabelle; Broquin, Jean-Emmanuel

    2004-10-01

    his article deals with one of the important instrumentation challenges of the stellar interferometry mission IRSI-Darwin of the European Space Agency: the necessity to have a reliable and performant system for beam combination has enlightened the advantages of an integrated optics solution, which is already in use for ground-base interferometry in the near infrared. Integrated optics provides also interesting features in terms of filtering, which is a main issue for the deep null to be reached by Darwin. However, Darwin will operate in the mid infrared range from 4 microns to 20 microns where no integrated optics functions are available on-the-shelf. This requires extending the integrated optics concept and the undergoing technology in this spectral range. This work has started with the IODA project (Integrated Optics for Darwin) under ESA contract and aims to provide a first component for interferometry. In this paper are presented the guidelines of the characterization work that is implemented to test and validate the performances of a component at each step of the development phase. We present also an example of characterization experiment used within the frame of this work, is theoretical approach and some results.

  7. Parsimonious refraction interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif

    2016-09-06

    We present parsimonious refraction interferometry where a densely populated refraction data set can be obtained from just two shot gathers. The assumptions are that the first arrivals are comprised of head waves and direct waves, and a pair of reciprocal shot gathers is recorded over the line of interest. The refraction traveltimes from these reciprocal shot gathers can be picked and decomposed into O(N2) refraction traveltimes generated by N virtual sources, where N is the number of geophones in the 2D survey. This enormous increase in the number of virtual traveltime picks and associated rays, compared to the 2N traveltimes from the two reciprocal shot gathers, allows for increased model resolution and better condition numbers in the normal equations. Also, a reciprocal survey is far less time consuming than a standard refraction survey with a dense distribution of sources.

  8. Interferometry with Vortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Senthilkumaran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interference of optical beams with optical vortices is often encountered in singular optics. Since interferometry makes the phase observable by intensity measurement, it brings out a host of applications and helps to understand the optical vortex. In this article we present an optical vortex interferometer that can be used in optical testing and has the potential to increase the accuracy of measurements. In an optical vortex interferometer (OVI, a lattice of vortices is formed, and the movement of the cores of these vortices is tracked when one of the interfering beams is deformed. Instead of multiple vortices in an OVI, an isolated single vortex also finds applications in optical testing. Finally, singularity in scalar and vector fields is presented, and the relation between them is illustrated by the superposition of these beams.

  9. Parsimonious refraction interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2016-01-01

    We present parsimonious refraction interferometry where a densely populated refraction data set can be obtained from just two shot gathers. The assumptions are that the first arrivals are comprised of head waves and direct waves, and a pair of reciprocal shot gathers is recorded over the line of interest. The refraction traveltimes from these reciprocal shot gathers can be picked and decomposed into O(N2) refraction traveltimes generated by N virtual sources, where N is the number of geophones in the 2D survey. This enormous increase in the number of virtual traveltime picks and associated rays, compared to the 2N traveltimes from the two reciprocal shot gathers, allows for increased model resolution and better condition numbers in the normal equations. Also, a reciprocal survey is far less time consuming than a standard refraction survey with a dense distribution of sources.

  10. Interferometry using undulator sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beguiristain, R.; Goldberg, K.A.; Tejnil, E.; Bokor, J.; Medecki, H.; Attwood, D.T.; Jackson, K.

    1996-01-01

    Optical systems for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography need to use optical components with subnanometer surface figure error tolerances to achieve diffraction-limited performance [M.D. Himel, in Soft X-Ray Projection Lithography, A.M. Hawryluk and R.H. Stulen, eds. (OSA, Washington, D.C., 1993), 18, 1089, and D. Attwood et al., Appl. Opt. 32, 7022 (1993)]. Also, multilayer-coated optics require at-wavelength wavefront measurement to characterize phase effects that cannot be measured by conventional optical interferometry. Furthermore, EUV optical systems will additionally require final testing and alignment at the operational wavelength for adjustment and reduction of the cumulative optical surface errors. Therefore, at-wavelength interferometric measurement of EUV optics will be the necessary metrology tool for the successful development of optics for EUV lithography. An EUV point diffraction interferometer (PDI) has been developed at the Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO) and has been already in operation for a year [K. Goldberg et al., in Extreme Ultra Lithography, D.T. Attwood and F. Zernike, eds. (OSA, Washington, D.C., 1994), K. Goldberg et al., Proc. SPIE 2437, to be published, and K. Goldberg et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 13, 2923 (1995)] using an undulator radiation source and coherent optics beamline at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. An overview of the PDI interferometer and some EUV wavefront measurements obtained with this instrument will be presented. In addition, future developments planned for EUV interferometry at CXRO towards the measurement of actual EUV lithography optics will be shown. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  11. Parsimonious Refraction Interferometry and Tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2017-01-01

    We present parsimonious refraction interferometry and tomography where a densely populated refraction data set can be obtained from two reciprocal and several infill shot gathers. The assumptions are that the refraction arrivals are head waves

  12. Phase Referencing in Optical Interferometry

    OpenAIRE

    Filho, Mercedes E.; Garcia, Paulo; Duvert, Gilles; Duchene, Gaspard; Thiebaut, Eric; Young, John; Absil, Olivier; Berger, Jean-Phillipe; Beckert, Thomas; Hoenig, Sebastian; Schertl, Dieter; Weigelt, Gerd; Testi, Leonardo; Tatuli, Eric; Borkowski, Virginie

    2008-01-01

    One of the aims of next generation optical interferometric instrumentation is to be able to make use of information contained in the visibility phase to construct high dynamic range images. Radio and optical interferometry are at the two extremes of phase corruption by the atmosphere. While in radio it is possible to obtain calibrated phases for the science objects, in the optical this is currently not possible. Instead, optical interferometry has relied on closure phase techniques to produce...

  13. IMPROVING INTERFEROMETRIC NULL DEPTH MEASUREMENTS USING STATISTICAL DISTRIBUTIONS: THEORY AND FIRST RESULTS WITH THE PALOMAR FIBER NULLER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanot, C.; Riaud, P.; Absil, O.; Mennesson, B.; Martin, S.; Liewer, K.; Loya, F.; Mawet, D.; Serabyn, E.

    2011-01-01

    A new 'self-calibrated' statistical analysis method has been developed for the reduction of nulling interferometry data. The idea is to use the statistical distributions of the fluctuating null depth and beam intensities to retrieve the astrophysical null depth (or equivalently the object's visibility) in the presence of fast atmospheric fluctuations. The approach yields an accuracy much better (about an order of magnitude) than is presently possible with standard data reduction methods, because the astrophysical null depth accuracy is no longer limited by the magnitude of the instrumental phase and intensity errors but by uncertainties on their probability distributions. This approach was tested on the sky with the two-aperture fiber nulling instrument mounted on the Palomar Hale telescope. Using our new data analysis approach alone-and no observations of calibrators-we find that error bars on the astrophysical null depth as low as a few 10 -4 can be obtained in the near-infrared, which means that null depths lower than 10 -3 can be reliably measured. This statistical analysis is not specific to our instrument and may be applicable to other interferometers.

  14. Extreme ultraviolet interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Kenneth A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-12-01

    EUV lithography is a promising and viable candidate for circuit fabrication with 0.1-micron critical dimension and smaller. In order to achieve diffraction-limited performance, all-reflective multilayer-coated lithographic imaging systems operating near 13-nm wavelength and 0.1 NA have system wavefront tolerances of 0.27 nm, or 0.02 waves RMS. Owing to the highly-sensitive resonant reflective properties of multilayer mirrors and extraordinarily tight tolerances set forth for their fabrication, EUV optical systems require at-wavelength EUV interferometry for final alignment and qualification. This dissertation discusses the development and successful implementation of high-accuracy EUV interferometric techniques. Proof-of-principle experiments with a prototype EUV point-diffraction interferometer for the measurement of Fresnel zoneplate lenses first demonstrated sub-wavelength EUV interferometric capability. These experiments spurred the development of the superior phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI), which has been implemented for the testing of an all-reflective lithographic-quality EUV optical system. Both systems rely on pinhole diffraction to produce spherical reference wavefronts in a common-path geometry. Extensive experiments demonstrate EUV wavefront-measuring precision beyond 0.02 waves RMS. EUV imaging experiments provide verification of the high-accuracy of the point-diffraction principle, and demonstrate the utility of the measurements in successfully predicting imaging performance. Complementary to the experimental research, several areas of theoretical investigation related to the novel PS/PDI system are presented. First-principles electromagnetic field simulations of pinhole diffraction are conducted to ascertain the upper limits of measurement accuracy and to guide selection of the pinhole diameter. Investigations of the relative merits of different PS/PDI configurations accompany a general study of the most significant sources

  15. Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevchenko, S.N., E-mail: sshevchenko@ilt.kharkov.u [B.Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering, Kharkov (Ukraine); RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako-shi, Saitama (Japan); Ashhab, S.; Nori, Franco [RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako-shi, Saitama (Japan); Department of Physics, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2010-07-15

    A transition between energy levels at an avoided crossing is known as a Landau-Zener transition. When a two-level system (TLS) is subject to periodic driving with sufficiently large amplitude, a sequence of transitions occurs. The phase accumulated between transitions (commonly known as the Stueckelberg phase) may result in constructive or destructive interference. Accordingly, the physical observables of the system exhibit periodic dependence on the various system parameters. This phenomenon is often referred to as Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg (LZS) interferometry. Phenomena related to LZS interferometry occur in a variety of physical systems. In particular, recent experiments on LZS interferometry in superconducting TLSs (qubits) have demonstrated the potential for using this kind of interferometry as an effective tool for obtaining the parameters characterizing the TLS as well as its interaction with the control fields and with the environment. Furthermore, strong driving could allow for fast and reliable control of the quantum system. Here we review recent experimental results on LZS interferometry, and we present related theory.

  16. Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevchenko, S.N.; Ashhab, S.; Nori, Franco

    2010-01-01

    A transition between energy levels at an avoided crossing is known as a Landau-Zener transition. When a two-level system (TLS) is subject to periodic driving with sufficiently large amplitude, a sequence of transitions occurs. The phase accumulated between transitions (commonly known as the Stueckelberg phase) may result in constructive or destructive interference. Accordingly, the physical observables of the system exhibit periodic dependence on the various system parameters. This phenomenon is often referred to as Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg (LZS) interferometry. Phenomena related to LZS interferometry occur in a variety of physical systems. In particular, recent experiments on LZS interferometry in superconducting TLSs (qubits) have demonstrated the potential for using this kind of interferometry as an effective tool for obtaining the parameters characterizing the TLS as well as its interaction with the control fields and with the environment. Furthermore, strong driving could allow for fast and reliable control of the quantum system. Here we review recent experimental results on LZS interferometry, and we present related theory.

  17. Design and delivery of the diamond double double bend achromat project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, J.; Hammond, N. P.; Thomson, A.

    2016-01-01

    A major project is underway at Diamond Light Source to remove one of the 24 Double Bend Achromat (DBA) Storage Ring cells and replace it with a Double Double Bend Achromat (DDBA). In this way a new Insertion Device (ID) straight can be created and so ID light can be produced and delivered to a beamline previously only capable of receiving Bending Magnet (BM) radiation. This project is in support of the micro-focus Protein Crystallography (MX) beamline VMX-m which is scheduled to take users towards the end of 2017. This paper describes the Engineering Design of the DDBA project in more detail and gives the current status of the project.

  18. The momentum-loss achromat - a new method for the isotopical separation of relativistic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, K.H.; Geissel, H.; Muenzenberg, G.; Dufour, J.P.; Hanelt, E.

    1987-03-01

    The application of the slowing-down process of relativistic heavy ions in a layer of matter in ion-optical devices is theoretically investigated. The modifications of the phase space of the ion beam due to the dissipative forces and the straggling phenomena are discussed. Methods are developed to study the properties of the momentum-loss achromat, an isotope separator consisting of an achromatic magnetic system with an energy degrader located in the intermediate dispersive focal plane. This device separates projectile fragments with respect to A and Z up to uranium over a wide energy range with an efficiency in the order of 50% and with separation times of several hundred nanoseconds. (orig.)

  19. Psychophysical Evaluation of Achromatic and Chromatic Vision of Workers Chronically Exposed to Organic Solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, E.M.D.B.; Lima, M.G.; Silveira, L.C.D.S.; Rodrigues, A.R.; Teixeira, C.E.C.; De Lima, L.J.B.; Silveira, L.C.D.S.; Ventura, D.F.; Ventura, D.F.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to evaluate achromatic and chromatic vision of workers chronically exposed to organic solvents through psychophysical methods. Thirty-one gas station workers (31.5 ± 8.4 years old) were evaluated. Psychophysical tests were achromatic tests (Snellen chart, spatial and temporal contrast sensitivity, and visual perimetry) and chromatic tests (Ishihara's test, color discrimination ellipses, and Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test FM100). Spatial contrast sensitivities of exposed workers were lower than the control at spatial frequencies of 20 and 30 cpd whilst the temporal contrast sensitivity was preserved. Visual field losses were found in 10-30 degrees of eccentricity in the solvent exposed workers. The exposed workers group had higher error values of FM100 and wider color discrimination ellipses area compared to the controls. Workers occupationally exposed to organic solvents had abnormal visual functions, mainly color vision losses and visual field constriction

  20. Differences in Brain Hemodynamics in Response to Achromatic and Chromatic Cards of the Rorschach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. In order to investigate the effects of color stimuli of the Rorschach inkblot method (RIM), the cerebral activity of 40 participants with no history of neurological or psychiatric illness was scanned while they engaged in the Rorschach task. A scanned image of the ten RIM inkblots was projected onto a screen in the MRI scanner. Cerebral activation in response to five achromatic color cards and five chromatic cards were compared. As a result, a significant increase in brain activity was observed in bilateral visual areas V2 and V3, parietooccipital junctions, pulvinars, right superior temporal gyrus, and left premotor cortex for achromatic color cards (p chromatic color, significant increase in brain activity was observed in left visual area V4 and left orbitofrontal cortex (p < .001). Furthermore, a conjoint analysis revealed various regions were activated in responding to the RIM. The neuropsychological underpinnings of the response process, as described by Acklin and Wu-Holt (1996), were largely confirmed. PMID:28239255

  1. Visible-Frequency Dielectric Metasurfaces for Multiwavelength Achromatic and Highly Dispersive Holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Dong, Fengliang; Li, Qi-Tong; Yang, Dong; Sun, Chengwei; Chen, Jianjun; Song, Zhiwei; Xu, Lihua; Chu, Weiguo; Xiao, Yun-Feng; Gong, Qihuang; Li, Yan

    2016-08-10

    Dielectric metasurfaces built up with nanostructures of high refractive index represent a powerful platform for highly efficient flat optical devices due to their easy-tuning electromagnetic scattering properties and relatively high transmission efficiencies. Here we show visible-frequency silicon metasurfaces formed by three kinds of nanoblocks multiplexed in a subwavelength unit to constitute a metamolecule, which are capable of wavefront manipulation for red, green, and blue light simultaneously. Full phase control is achieved for each wavelength by independently changing the in-plane orientations of the corresponding nanoblocks to induce the required geometric phases. Achromatic and highly dispersive meta-holograms are fabricated to demonstrate the wavefront manipulation with high resolution. This technique could be viable for various practical holographic applications and flat achromatic devices.

  2. Design and delivery of the diamond double double bend achromat project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, J., E-mail: jim.kay@diamond.ac.uk; Hammond, N. P.; Thomson, A. [Diamond Light Source, Didcot, Oxfordshire, UK, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-27

    A major project is underway at Diamond Light Source to remove one of the 24 Double Bend Achromat (DBA) Storage Ring cells and replace it with a Double Double Bend Achromat (DDBA). In this way a new Insertion Device (ID) straight can be created and so ID light can be produced and delivered to a beamline previously only capable of receiving Bending Magnet (BM) radiation. This project is in support of the micro-focus Protein Crystallography (MX) beamline VMX-m which is scheduled to take users towards the end of 2017. This paper describes the Engineering Design of the DDBA project in more detail and gives the current status of the project.

  3. Measurements of emittance growth through the achromatic bend at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.J.; Kehne, D.

    1997-07-01

    Measurements of emittance growth in a high peak current beam as it passes through an achromatic double bend are summarized. Experiments were performed using the ATF at Brookhaven National Laboratory by X.J. Wang and D. Kehne as a collaboration resulting from the proposal attached at the end of the document. The ATF consists off an RF gun (1 MeV), two sections of linac (40-75 MeV), a diagnostic section immediately following the linac, a 20 degree bend magnet, a variable aperture slit at a high dispersion point, 5 quadrupoles, then another 20 degree bend followed by another diagnostic section. The TRANSPORT deck describing the region from the end of the linac to the end of the diagnostic line following the achromatic bends is attached to the end of this document. Printouts of the control screens are also attached

  4. Modular organization of mechanisms of achromatic vision in human and animals

    OpenAIRE

    Chernorizov, Aleksander; Shekhter, Evgenija

    2011-01-01

    Psychophysiological research into achromatic vision in humans and vertebrates displays that light intensity is coded by a two-dimensional excitation vector. The components of that vector are responses of brightness and darkness neurons (or, according to another classifi cation, onand off -neurons). It means that a current sensation of brightness is determined by a corresponding interrelation between activities of those two systems responding in opponent way to light onset and off set. The pre...

  5. Applications of the second-order achromat concept to the design of particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.L.; Servranckx, R.V.

    1985-05-01

    A property of the second-order achromat, whereby dipole and sextupole families may be inserted into a lattice for chromatic corrections without introducing second-order geometrical (on momentum) optical distortions, has been incorporated in several new particle accelerator designs. These include the SLC at SLAC, LEP at CERN, the EROS pulse stretcher ring at Saskatoon, the CEBAF ring at SURA, and the MIT ring

  6. The effect of contrast intensity and polarity in the achromatic watercolor effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bo; Yazdanbakhsh, Arash; Mingolla, Ennio

    2011-03-24

    The watercolor effect (WCE) is a filling-in phenomenon in a region demarcated by two thin abutting lines. The perceived chromaticity of the region is similar to that of the interior line. We develop a series of achromatic WCE stimuli to induce lightness changes analogous to the induced chromaticity in the chromatic version of the WCE. We use a variation of the paired-comparison paradigm to quantify the induced lightness of the filled-in regions to regions with real luminance variations. The luminance of the inner line is fixed, while the luminance of the outer line varies across stimuli. Data from seven subjects (five naive) confirm that an achromatic WCE exists. Moreover, outer lines with both high and low luminances can generate a WCE with an inner line of a moderate luminance. All subjects show a single peak of the effect strength for both polarity conditions, which is never at the extreme luminance levels. Most subjects show an inverted U curve for effect strength as a function of the contrast of the outer lines against the background. Results suggest that the contrast difference between the outer line and the inner line affects the existence and the strength of the achromatic WCE in a nonlinear way.

  7. Chromatic-achromatic perimetry in four clinic cases: Glaucoma and diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Cabezos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some diseases that affect the visual system may show loss of chromatic-achromatic sensitivity before obvious physical signs appear in the usual examination of the eye′s posterior segment. A perimetric study has been conducted with four typical patients with glaucoma and diabetes, at different stages of the disease. Materials and Methods: In addition to the standard white-on-white (standard automated perimetry [SAP], a test battery has been used to study patient′s contrast sensitivity, using stimuli with different chromatic, spatial, and temporal content (multichannel perimetry. The choice of stimuli tries to maximize the response of different visual mechanisms: Achromatic (parvocellular and magnocellular origin; chromatic red-green (parvocellular origin; and chromatic blue-yellow (koniocellular origin. Results: The results seem to indicate losses in the achromatic-parvocellular perimetry and both chromatic perimetry tests, undetected by conventional SAP. Conclusions: Our results illustrate that our patients without visible retinal alterations show signs of suspicion in multichannel perimetry.

  8. Chromatic and Achromatic Spatial Resolution of Local Field Potentials in Awake Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Michael; Li, Xiaobing; Lashgari, Reza; Kremkow, Jens; Bereshpolova, Yulia; Swadlow, Harvey A; Zaidi, Qasim; Alonso, Jose-Manuel

    2015-10-01

    Local field potentials (LFPs) have become an important measure of neuronal population activity in the brain and could provide robust signals to guide the implant of visual cortical prosthesis in the future. However, it remains unclear whether LFPs can detect weak cortical responses (e.g., cortical responses to equiluminant color) and whether they have enough visual spatial resolution to distinguish different chromatic and achromatic stimulus patterns. By recording from awake behaving macaques in primary visual cortex, here we demonstrate that LFPs respond robustly to pure chromatic stimuli and exhibit ∼2.5 times lower spatial resolution for chromatic than achromatic stimulus patterns, a value that resembles the ratio of achromatic/chromatic resolution measured with psychophysical experiments in humans. We also show that, although the spatial resolution of LFP decays with visual eccentricity as is also the case for single neurons, LFPs have higher spatial resolution and show weaker response suppression to low spatial frequencies than spiking multiunit activity. These results indicate that LFP recordings are an excellent approach to measure spatial resolution from local populations of neurons in visual cortex including those responsive to color. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. Performance of an Achromatic Focal Plane Mask for Exoplanet Imaging Coronagraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Kevin; Belikov, Ruslan; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Wilson, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Coronagraph technology combined with wavefront control is close to achieving the contrast and inner working angle requirements in the lab necessary to observe the faint signal of an Earth-like exoplanet in monochromatic light. An important remaining technological challenge is to achieve high contrast in broadband light. Coronagraph bandwidth is largely limited by chromaticity of the focal plane mask, which is responsible for blocking the stellar PSF. The size of a stellar PSF scales linearly with wavelength; ideally, the size of the focal plane mask would also scale with wavelength. A conventional hard-edge focal plane mask has a fixed size, normally sized for the longest wavelength in the observational band to avoid starlight leakage. The conventional mask is oversized for shorter wavelengths and blocks useful discovery space. Recently we presented a solution to the size chromaticity challenge with a focal plane mask designed to scale its effective size with wavelength. In this paper, we analyze performance of the achromatic size-scaling focal plane mask within a Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph. We present results from wavefront control around the achromatic focal plane mask, and demonstrate the size-scaling effect of the mask with wavelength. The edge of the dark zone, and therefore the inner working angle of the coronagraph, scale with wavelength. The achromatic mask enables operation in a wider band of wavelengths compared with a conventional hard-edge occulter.

  10. Direct design of achromatic lens for Lambertian sources in collimating illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Peng; Xu, Xiping; Jiang, Zhaoguo; Wang, Hongshu

    2017-10-01

    Illumination design used to redistribute the spatial energy distribution of light source is a key technique in lighting applications. However, there is still no effective illumination design method for the removing of the chromatic dispersion. What we present here is an achromatic lens design to enhance the efficiency and uniform illumination of white light-emitting diode (LED) with diffractive optical element (DOE). We employ the chromatic aberration value (deg) to measure the degree of chromatic dispersion in illumination systems. Monte Carlo ray tracing simulation results indicate that the chromatic dispersion of the modified achromatic collimator significantly decreases from 0.5 to 0.1 with LED chip size of 1.0mm×1.0mm and simulation efficiency of 90.73%, compared with the traditional collimator. Moreover, with different corrected wavelengths we compared different chromatic aberration values that followed with the changing pupil percent. The achromatic collimator provided an effective way to achieve white LED with low chromatic dispersion at high efficiency and uniform illumination.

  11. Kaon interferometry; Interferometria de kaons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roldao, C.G.; Padula, S.S. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1994-06-01

    Preliminary results of the {chi}{sup 2} analysis where data on kaon interferometry, obtained from the E859 Collaboration of the AGS/Brookhaven Nat.Lab., are compared with results of a hadronic resonance production model are presented. The main goal is to test the resolution power of the method here discussed when applied to the two-dimensional kaon interferometry. 11 refs., 2 figs.; e-mail: roldao at axp.ift.unesp.br; padula at axp.ift.unesp.br.

  12. Phase estimation in optical interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Rastogi, Pramod

    2014-01-01

    Phase Estimation in Optical Interferometry covers the essentials of phase-stepping algorithms used in interferometry and pseudointerferometric techniques. It presents the basic concepts and mathematics needed for understanding the phase estimation methods in use today. The first four chapters focus on phase retrieval from image transforms using a single frame. The next several chapters examine the local environment of a fringe pattern, give a broad picture of the phase estimation approach based on local polynomial phase modeling, cover temporal high-resolution phase evaluation methods, and pre

  13. The Importance of Proving the Null

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallistel, C. R.

    2009-01-01

    Null hypotheses are simple, precise, and theoretically important. Conventional statistical analysis cannot support them; Bayesian analysis can. The challenge in a Bayesian analysis is to formulate a suitably vague alternative, because the vaguer the alternative is (the more it spreads out the unit mass of prior probability), the more the null is…

  14. Complete positivity and neutron interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benatti, F.; Floreanini, R.

    1999-01-01

    We analyze the dynamics of neutron beams in interferometry experiments using quantum dynamical semigroups. We show that these experiments could provide stringent limits on the non-standard, dissipative terms appearing in the extended evolution equations. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  15. Conformal symmetry inheritance in null fluid spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tupper, B O J; Keane, A J; Hall, G S; Coley, A A; Carot, J

    2003-01-01

    We define inheriting conformal Killing vectors for null fluid spacetimes and find the maximum dimension of the associated inheriting Lie algebra. We show that for non-conformally flat null fluid spacetimes, the maximum dimension of the inheriting algebra is seven and for conformally flat null fluid spacetimes the maximum dimension is eight. In addition, it is shown that there are two distinct classes of non-conformally flat generalized plane wave spacetimes which possess the maximum dimension, and one class in the conformally flat case

  16. Null solution of the Yang-Mills equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tafel, J.

    1986-05-01

    We investigate the correspondence between null solutions of the Yang-Mills equations and shearfree geodesic null congruences. We give an example of a non-Abelian null solution with twisting rays. (orig.)

  17. Magnifying Lenses with Weak Achromatic Bends for High-Energy Electron Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walstrom, Peter Lowell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-27

    This memo briefly describes bremsstrahlung background effects in GeV-range electron radiography systems and the use of weak bending magnets to deflect the image to the side of the forward bremsstrahlung spot to reduce background. The image deflection introduces first-order chromatic image blur due to dispersion. Two approaches to eliminating the dispersion effect to first order by use of magnifying lens with achromatic bends are described. Also, higher-order image blur terms caused by weak bends are also discussed, and shown to be negligibly small in most cases of interest.

  18. Achromatic elemental mapping beyond the nanoscale in the transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, K W; Mayer, J; Jinschek, J R; Neish, M J; Lugg, N R; Allen, L J

    2013-05-03

    Newly developed achromatic electron optics allows the use of wide energy windows and makes feasible energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) at atomic resolution. In this Letter we present EFTEM images formed using electrons that have undergone a silicon L(2,3) core-shell energy loss, exhibiting a resolution in EFTEM of 1.35 Å. This permits elemental mapping beyond the nanoscale provided that quantum mechanical calculations from first principles are done in tandem with the experiment to understand the physical information encoded in the images.

  19. Achromatic and isochronous electron beam transport for tunable free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, J.; Kim, K.J.

    1991-09-01

    We have continued the study of a suitable electron beam transport line, which is both isochronous and achromatic, for the free electron laser being designed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A refined version of the beam transport optics is discussed that accommodates two different modes of FEL wavelength tuning. For the fine tuning involving a small change of the electron beam energy, sextupoles are added to cancel the leading nonlinear dispersion. For the main tuning involving the change of the undulator gap, a practical solution of maintaining the beam matching condition is presented. Calculation of the higher order aberrations is facilitated by a newly developed code. 11 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  20. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS CHALLENGES IN THE DESIGN OF MULTI-BEND-ACHROMAT-BASED STORAGE RINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borland, M.; Hettel, R.; Leemann, S. C.; Robin, D. S.

    2017-06-01

    With the recent success in commissioning of MAX IV, the multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattice has begun to deliver on its promise to usher in a new generation of higher-brightness synchrotron light sources. In this paper, we begin by reviewing the challenges, recent success, and lessons learned of the MAX-IV project. Drawing on these lessons, we then describe the physics challenges in even more ambitious rings and how these can be met. In addition, we touch on engineering issues and choices that are tightly linked with the physics design.

  1. Null-strut calculus. II. Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheyfets, A.; LaFave, N.J.; Miller, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, we continue from the preceding paper to develop a fully functional Regge calculus geometrodynamic algorithm from the null-strut-calculus construction. The developments discussed include (a) the identification of the Regge calculus analogue of the constraint and evolution equations on the null-strut lattice, (b) a description of the Minkowski solid geometry for the simplicial blocks of the null-strut lattice, (c) a description of the evolution algorithm for the geometrodynamic scheme and an analysis of its consistency, and (d) a presentation of the dynamical degrees of freedom for a simplicial hypersurface and the description of an initial-value prescription. To demonstrate qualitatively this new approach to geometrodynamics, we present the most simple application of null-strut calculus that we know of---the Friedmann cosmology using the three-boundary of a 600-cell simplicial polytope to model the simplicial hypersurface

  2. Null structure groups in eleven dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cariglia, Marco; Mac Conamhna, Oisin A. P.

    2006-01-01

    We classify all the structure groups which arise as subgroups of the isotropy group (Spin(7)xR 8 )xR, of a single null Killing spinor in 11 dimensions. We construct the spaces of spinors fixed by these groups. We determine the conditions under which structure subgroups of the maximal null structure group (Spin(7)xR 8 )xR may also be embedded in SU(5), and hence the conditions under which a supersymmetric spacetime admits only null, or both timelike and null, Killing spinors. We discuss how this purely algebraic material will facilitate the direct analysis of the Killing spinor equation of 11 dimensional supergravity, and the classification of supersymmetric spacetimes therein

  3. On smoothness-asymmetric null infinities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiente Kroon, Juan Antonio

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the existence of asymptotically Euclidean initial data sets for the vacuum Einstein field equations which would give rise (modulo an existence result for the evolution equations near spatial infinity) to developments with a past and a future null infinity of different smoothness. For simplicity, the analysis is restricted to the class of conformally flat, axially symmetric initial data sets. It is shown how the free parameters in the second fundamental form of the data can be used to satisfy certain obstructions to the smoothness of null infinity. The resulting initial data sets could be interpreted as those of some sort of (nonlinearly) distorted Schwarzschild black hole. Their developments would be that they admit a peeling future null infinity, but at the same time have a polyhomogeneous (non-peeling) past null infinity

  4. Null-plane quantization of fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustaki, D.

    1990-01-01

    Massive Dirac fermions are canonically quantized on the null plane using the Dirac-Bergmann algorithm. The procedure is carried out in the framework of quantum electrodynamics as an illustration of a rigorous treatment of interacting fermion fields

  5. On the Penrose inequality along null hypersurfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mars, Marc; Soria, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The null Penrose inequality, i.e. the Penrose inequality in terms of the Bondi energy, is studied by introducing a functional on surfaces and studying its properties along a null hypersurface Ω extending to past null infinity. We prove a general Penrose-type inequality which involves the limit at infinity of the Hawking energy along a specific class of geodesic foliations called Geodesic Asymptotically Bondi (GAB), which are shown to always exist. Whenever this foliation approaches large spheres, this inequality becomes the null Penrose inequality and we recover the results of Ludvigsen–Vickers (1983 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 16 3349–53) and Bergqvist (1997 Class. Quantum Grav. 14 2577–83). By exploiting further properties of the functional along general geodesic foliations, we introduce an approach to the null Penrose inequality called the Renormalized Area Method and find a set of two conditions which imply the validity of the null Penrose inequality. One of the conditions involves a limit at infinity and the other a restriction on the spacetime curvature along the flow. We investigate their range of applicability in two particular but interesting cases, namely the shear-free and vacuum case, where the null Penrose inequality is known to hold from the results by Sauter (2008 PhD Thesis Zürich ETH ), and the case of null shells propagating in the Minkowski spacetime. Finally, a general inequality bounding the area of the quasi-local black hole in terms of an asymptotic quantity intrinsic of Ω is derived. (paper)

  6. Latex allergy and filaggrin null mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Berit C; Meldgaard, Michael; Hamann, Dathan

    2011-01-01

    to aeroallergens and it is possible that filaggrin null mutations also increase the risk of latex allergy. The aim of this paper was to examine the association between filaggrin null mutations and type I latex allergy. Methods Twenty latex allergic and 24 non-latex allergic dentists and dental assistants...... in the cases in this study may not have occurred through direct skin contact but through the respiratory organs via latex proteins that are absorbed in glove powder and aerosolized...

  7. Precision Geodesy via Radio Interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinteregger, H F; Shapiro, I I; Robertson, D S; Knight, C A; Ergas, R A; Whitney, A R; Rogers, A E; Moran, J M; Clark, T A; Burke, B F

    1972-10-27

    Very-long-baseline interferometry experiments, involving observations of extragalactic radio sources, were performed in 1969 to determine the vector separations between antenna sites in Massachusetts and West Virginia. The 845.130-kilometer baseline was estimated from two separate experiments. The results agreed with each other to within 2 meters in all three components and with a special geodetic survey to within 2 meters in length; the differences in baseline direction as determined by the survey and by interferometry corresponded to discrepancies of about 5 meters. The experiments also yielded positions for nine extragalactic radio sources, most to within 1 arc second, and allowed the hydrogen maser clocks at the two sites to be synchronized a posteriori with an uncertainty of only a few nanoseconds.

  8. Holographic interferometry in construction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartikainen, T.

    1995-12-31

    In this work techniques for visualizing phase and opaque objects by ruby laser interferometry are introduced. A leakage flow as a phase object is studied by holographic interferometry and the intensity distribution of the interferograms presenting the leakage flow are computer-simulated. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of the leakage flow is made. The analysis is based on the experimental and theoretical results presented in this work. The holographic setup and the double pass method for visualizing leakage flow are explained. A vibrating iron plate is the opaque object. Transient impact waves are generated by a pistol bullet on the iron plate and visualized by holographic interferometry. An apparatus with the capability of detecting and calculating the delays necessary for laser triggering is introduced. A time series of interferograms presenting elastic wave formation in an iron plate is shown. A computer-simulation of the intensity distributions of these interferograms is made. An analysis based on the computer-simulation and the experimental data of the transient elastic wave is carried out and the results are presented. (author)

  9. Holographic interferometry of high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIlwain, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements in turbulent flows have been historically performed using various types of probes and optical diagnostic methods. In general, probes suffer from plasma perturbation effects and are single point determination methods. Optical methods appear to be better suited to determinations in turbulent flows, however interpretation of the resulting data can often be complex. Methods such as laser Doppler anemometry, which relies on entrained particles, suffers from the fact that particles small enough to be swept along by the plasma are usually melted or sublimed in the plasma. Light refraction or diffraction methods such as shadow photography, interferometry, and holography have also been used to observe plasma flows. These methods typically suffer from the difficulty of interpreting line of sight images and obtaining quantitative data. A new method based on multi-pass holographic interferometry will be discussed. This method has certain advantages which can significantly simplify the complexity of line of sight interferometry image deconvolution. When the method employs high speed cinematography, time resolved images of the plasma flow can be obtained. This method has been applied to both transferred and non-transferred arcs and various types of DC-plasma torch produced jets. These studies and conclusions as to the usefulness of the technique are presented

  10. Coherence holography by achromatic 3-D field correlation of generic thermal light with an imaging Sagnac shearing interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Dinesh N; Ezawa, Takahiro; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Miyamoto, Yoko; Takeda, Mitsuo

    2012-08-27

    We propose a new technique for achromatic 3-D field correlation that makes use of the characteristics of both axial and lateral magnifications of imaging through a common-path Sagnac shearing interferometer. With this technique, we experimentally demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, 3-D image reconstruction of coherence holography with generic thermal light. By virtue of the achromatic axial shearing implemented by the difference in axial magnifications in imaging, the technique enables coherence holography to reconstruct a 3-D object with an axial depth beyond the short coherence length of the thermal light.

  11. Defective chromatic and achromatic visual pathways in developmental dyslexia: Cues for an integrated intervention programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfiglio, Luca; Bocci, Tommaso; Minichilli, Fabrizio; Crecchi, Alessandra; Barloscio, Davide; Spina, Donata Maria; Rossi, Bruno; Sartucci, Ferdinando

    2017-01-01

    As well as obtaining confirmation of the magnocellular system involvement in developmental dyslexia (DD); the aim was primarily to search for a possible involvement of the parvocellular system; and, furthermore, to complete the assessment of the visual chromatic axis by also analysing the koniocellular system. Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in response to achromatic stimuli with low luminance contrast and low spatial frequency, and isoluminant red/green and blue/yellow stimuli with high spatial frequency were recorded in 10 dyslexic children and 10 age- and sex-matched, healthy subjects. Dyslexic children showed delayed VEPs to both achromatic stimuli (magnocellular-dorsal stream) and isoluminant red/green and blue/yellow stimuli (parvocellular-ventral and koniocellular streams). To our knowledge, this is the first time that a dysfunction of colour vision has been brought to light in an objective way (i.e., by means of electrophysiological methods) in children with DD. These results give rise to speculation concerning the need for a putative approach for promoting both learning how to read and/or improving existing reading skills of children with or at risk of DD. The working hypothesis would be to combine two integrated interventions in a single programme aimed at fostering the function of both the magnocellular and the parvocellular streams.

  12. Suppression of the emittance growth induced by coherent synchrotron radiation in triple-bend achromats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xiyang; Jiao Yi; Xu Gang; Cui Xiaohao

    2015-01-01

    The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effect in a bending path plays an important role in transverse emittance dilution in high-brightness light sources and linear colliders, where the electron beams are of short bunch length and high peak current. Suppression of the emittance growth induced by CSR is critical to preserve the beam quality and help improve the machine performance. It has been shown that the CSR effect in a double-bend achromat (DBA) can be analyzed with the two-dimensional point-kick analysis method. In this paper, this method is applied to analyze the CSR effect in a triple-bend achromat (TBA) with symmetric layout, which is commonly used in the optics designs of energy recovery linacs (ERLs). A condition of cancelling the CSR linear effect in such a TBA is obtained, and is verified through numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that emittance preservation can be achieved with this condition, and to a large extent, has a high tolerance to the fluctuation of the initial transverse phase space distribution of the beam. (authors)

  13. Modular Organization of Mechanisms of Achromatic Vision in Human and Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander M. Chernorizov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychophysiological research into achromatic vision in humans and vertebrates displays that light intensity is coded by a two-dimensional "excitation vector". The components of that vector are responses of brightness and darkness neurons (or, according to another classification, on- and o/f-neurons. It means that a current sensation of brightness is determined by a corresponding interrelation between activities of those two systems responding in opponent way to set. The present research is devoted to testing of a hypothesis asserting that two-module organization of achromatic vision is a universal principle of brightness coding in a wide raw of animals including invertebrates. The paper represents certain results of registration and analysis of electroretinogram and total activity of the optical nerve in snail Helix lucorum to diffuse light flashes of different intensities. The obtained experimental data, along with the already existing reference data, allow us to assume that on- and off-systems may constitute the neural basis for brightness coding in the invertebrates. The peculiarity of on- and o/f-systems in vertebrates is that they are formed already at the photoreceptor level.

  14. Ion beam transport and focus for LMF using an achromatic solenoidal lens system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, C.L.

    1990-01-01

    The light ion LMF (Laboratory Microfusion Facility) requires an ion beam transport length for bunching and standoff to be about four meters from the diode to the target. The baseline LMF transport scheme uses an achromatic two lens system consisting of the diode (a self-field lens) and a solenoidal lens. Charge and current neutralization are provided by a background gas. A detailed analysis of this system is presented here. The effects of additional magnetic fields are examined, including those produced by non-zero net currents, applied B effects near the diode, and diamagnetic effects in the solenoidal lens. Instabilities are analyzed including the filamentation instability, the two-stream instability (beam ions, plasma electrons), the plasma two-stream instability (plasma electrons, plasma ions), and the ion acoustic instability. Scattering in the foil and gas are shown to be negligible. Gas breakdown processes are analyzed in detail, including ion impact ionization, electron avalanching, and ohmic heating. Special diode requirements are examined, including voltage accuracy, energy spread, and aiming tolerances. The neutral gas and gas pressure are chosen to satisfy several constraints, one being that the net current must be small, and another being that the filamentation instability should be avoided. With the present choice of 1 Torr He, it is concluded that the complete achromatic lens system appears to be viable, simple, and efficient transport and focusing system for LMF

  15. Null Subjects in European and Brazilian Portuguese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Barbosa

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The goals of this paper are twofold: a to provide a structural account of the effects of the informal ‘Avoid Pronoun Principle’, proposed in Chomsky (1981: 65 for the Null Subject Languages (NSLs, and b to compare, in European and Brazilian Portuguese (EP and BP, the distribution of the third person pronouns in its full and null forms, to check whether in written corpora BP incorporates signs of the ongoing loss of the null subject, largely attested in its contemporary spoken language. The strong theoretical claim is that in the Romance non-NSLs the pre-verbal subject is sitting in Spec of IP, while in the Romance NSLs it is Clitic Left-Dislocated (or is extracted by A-bar movement if it belongs to a restricted set of non-referential quantified expressions. The paper provides quantitative evidence that BP is losing the properties associated with the Null Subject Parameter. In its qualitative analysis, it shows that the contrasts between EP and BP are easily accounted for if the two derivations are assumed and if the null subjects in the two varieties are considered to be of a different nature: a pronoun in EP and a pronominal anaphor in BP.

  16. Supersymmetric null-like holographic cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Fengli; Wen Wenyu

    2006-01-01

    We construct a new class of 1/4-BPS time dependent domain-wall solutions with null-like metric and dilaton in type II supergravities, which admit a null-like big bang singularity. Based on the domain-wall/QFT correspondence, these solutions are dual to 1/4-supersymmetric quantum field theories living on a boundary cosmological background with time dependent coupling constant and UV cutoff. In particular we evaluate the holographic c function for the 2-dimensional dual field theory living on the corresponding null-like cosmology. We find that this c function runs in accordance with the c-theorem as the boundary universe evolves, this means that the number of degrees of freedom is divergent at big bang and suggests the possible resolution of big bang singularity

  17. Null-strut calculus. I. Kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheyfets, A.; LaFave, N.J.; Miller, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the kinematics of null-strut calculus---a 3+1 Regge calculus approach to general relativity. We show how to model the geometry of spacetime with simplicial spacelike three-geometries (TET's) linked to ''earlier'' and ''later'' momentumlike lattice surfaces (TET * ) entirely by light rays or ''null struts.'' These three-layered lattice spacetime geometries are defined and analyzed using combinatorial formulas for the structure of polytopes. The following paper in this series describes how these three-layered spacetime lattices are used to model spacetimes in full conformity with Einstein's theory of gravity

  18. Multi-Segment Radius Measurement Using an Absolute Distance Meter Through a Null Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Cormic; Wick, Eric; Hayden, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This system was one of the test methods considered for measuring the radius of curvature of one or more of the 18 segmented mirrors that form the 6.5 m diameter primary mirror (PM) of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The assembled telescope will be tested at cryogenic temperatures in a 17-m diameter by 27-m high vacuum chamber at the Johnson Space Center. This system uses a Leica Absolute Distance Meter (ADM), at a wavelength of 780 nm, combined with beam-steering and beam-shaping optics to make a differential distance measurement between a ring mirror on the reflective null assembly and individual PM segments. The ADM is located inside the same Pressure-Tight Enclosure (PTE) that houses the test interferometer. The PTE maintains the ADM and interferometer at ambient temperature and pressure so that they are not directly exposed to the telescope s harsh cryogenic and vacuum environment. This system takes advantage of the existing achromatic objective and reflective null assembly used by the test interferometer to direct four ADM beamlets to four PM segments through an optical path that is coincident with the interferometer beam. A mask, positioned on a linear slide, contains an array of 1.25 mm diameter circular subapertures that map to each of the 18 PM segments as well as six positions around the ring mirror. A down-collimated 4 mm ADM beam simultaneously covers 4 adjacent PM segment beamlets and one ring mirror beamlet. The radius, or spacing, of all 18 segments can be measured with the addition of two orthogonally-oriented scanning pentaprisms used to steer the ADM beam to any one of six different sub-aperture configurations at the plane of the ring mirror. The interferometer beam, at a wavelength of 687 nm, and the ADM beamlets, at a wavelength of 780 nm, pass through the objective and null so that the rays are normally incident on the parabolic PM surface. After reflecting off the PM, both the ADM and interferometer beams return to their respective

  19. Objective assessment of chromatic and achromatic pattern adaptation reveals the temporal response properties of different visual pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Anthony G; Kulikowski, Janus J

    2012-11-01

    The aim was to investigate the temporal response properties of magnocellular, parvocellular, and koniocellular visual pathways using increment/decrement changes in contrast to elicit visual evoked potentials (VEPs). Static achromatic and isoluminant chromatic gratings were generated on a monitor. Chromatic gratings were modulated along red/green (R/G) or subject-specific tritanopic confusion axes, established using a minimum distinct border criterion. Isoluminance was determined using minimum flicker photometry. Achromatic and chromatic VEPs were recorded to contrast increments and decrements of 0.1 or 0.2 superimposed on the static gratings (masking contrast 0-0.6). Achromatic increment/decrement changes in contrast evoked a percept of apparent motion when the spatial frequency was low; VEPs to such stimuli were positive in polarity and largely unaffected by high levels of static contrast, consistent with transient response mechanisms. VEPs to finer achromatic gratings showed marked attenuation as static contrast was increased. Chromatic VEPs to R/G or tritan chromatic contrast increments were of negative polarity and showed progressive attenuation as static contrast was increased, in keeping with increasing desensitization of the sustained responses of the color-opponent visual pathways. Chromatic contrast decrement VEPs were of positive polarity and less sensitive to pattern adaptation. The relative contribution of sustained/transient mechanisms to achromatic processing is spatial frequency dependent. Chromatic contrast increment VEPs reflect the sustained temporal response properties of parvocellular and koniocellular pathways. Cortical VEPs can provide an objective measure of pattern adaptation and can be used to probe the temporal response characteristics of different visual pathways.

  20. Optimal Design of an Achromatic Angle-Insensitive Phase Retarder Used in MWIR Imaging Polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo-Guo, Kang; Qiao-Feng, Tan; Guo-Fan, Jin

    2009-01-01

    Dielectric gratings with period in the range from λ/10 to λ/4 with λ being the illumination wavelength not only exclude higher order diffractions but also exhibit strong dispersion of effective indices which are proportional to the wavelength. Moreover, they are insensitive to the incident angle of the illumination wave. With these features, we can design a true zero-order achromatic and angle-insensitive phase retarder which can be used as the polarization state analyzer in middle wave infrared (MWIR) imaging polarimetry. A design method using effective medium theory is described, and the performance of the designed phase retarder is evaluated by rigorous coupled wave analysis theory. The calculation results demonstrate that the retardance deviates from 45° by < ±1.6° within a field of view ±10° over the MWIR bandwidth (3–5 μm). (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  1. Achromatic half-wave plate for submillimeter instruments in cosmic microwave background astronomy: modeling and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savini, Giorgio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Ade, Peter A R

    2006-12-10

    We adopted an existing formalism and modified it to simulate, with high precision, the transmission, reflection, and absorption of multiple-plate birefringent devices as a function of frequency. To validate the model, we use it to compare the measured properties of an achromatic five-plate device with a broadband antireflection coating to expectations derived from the material optical constants and its geometric configuration. The half-wave plate presented here is observed to perform well with a phase shift variation of < 2 degrees from the ideal 180 degrees over a bandwidth of Deltav/v approximately 1 at millimeter wavelengths. This formalism represents a powerful design tool for birefringent polarization modulators and enables its optical properties to be specified with high accuracy.

  2. Achromatic half-wave plate for submillimeter instruments in cosmic microwave background astronomy: experimental characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, Giampaolo; Savini, Giorgio; Ade, Peter A R; Haynes, Vic; Gear, Walter K

    2006-09-20

    An achromatic half-wave plate (HWP) to be used in millimeter cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiments has been designed, manufactured, and tested. The design is based on the 5-plates Pancharatnam recipe and it works in the frequency range 85-185 GHz. A model has been used to predict the transmission, reflection, absorption, and phase shift as a function of frequency. The HWP has been tested by using coherent radiation from a back-wave oscillator to investigate its modulation efficiency and with incoherent radiation from a polarizing Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) to explore its frequency behavior. The FTS measurements have been fitted with an optical performance model which is in excellent agreement with the data. A detailed analysis of the data also allows a precise determination of the HWP fast and slow axes in the frequency band of operation. A list of the HWP performance characteristics is reported including estimates of its cross polarization.

  3. Achromatic nested Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror optics for hard X-ray nanofocusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wenjun; Ice, Gene E.; Assoufid, Lahsen; Liu, Chian; Shi, Bing; Khachatryan, Ruben; Qian, Jun; Zschack, Paul; Tischler, Jonathan Z.; Choi, J.-Y.

    2011-01-01

    A nested Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror pair has been designed, fabricated and tested for achromatic nanofocusing synchrotron hard X-rays. The prototype system achieved a FWHM focal spot of about 150 nm in both horizontal and vertical directions. The first test of nanoscale-focusing Kirkpatrick–Baez (KB) mirrors in the nested (or Montel) configuration used at a hard X-ray synchrotron beamline is reported. The two mirrors are both 40 mm long and coated with Pt to produce a focal length of 60 mm at 3 mrad incident angle, and collect up to a 120 µm by 120 µm incident X-ray beam with maximum angular acceptance of 2 mrad and a broad bandwidth of energies up to 30 keV. In an initial test a focal spot of about 150 nm in both horizontal and vertical directions was achieved with either polychromatic or monochromatic beam. The nested mirror geometry, with two mirrors mounted side-by-side and perpendicular to each other, is significantly more compact and provides higher demagnification than the traditional sequential KB mirror arrangement. Ultimately, nested mirrors can focus larger divergence to improve the diffraction limit of achromatic optics. A major challenge with the fabrication of the required mirrors is the need for near-perfect mirror surfaces near the edge of at least one of the mirrors. Special polishing procedures and surface profile coating were used to preserve the mirror surface quality at the reflecting edge. Further developments aimed at achieving diffraction-limited focusing below 50 nm are underway

  4. Attosecond electron wave packet interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remetter, T.; Ruchon, T.; Johnsson, P.; Varju, K.; Gustafsson, E.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. The well controlled generation and characterization of attosecond XUV light pulses provide an unprecedented tool to study electron wave packets (EWPs). Here a train of attosecond pulses is used to create and study the phase of an EWP in momentum space. There is a clear analogy between electronic wave functions and optical fields. In optics, methods like SPIDER or wave front shearing interferometry, allow to measure the spectral or spatial phase of a light wave. These two methods are based on the same principle: an interferogram is produced when recombining two sheared replica of a light pulse, spectrally (SPIDER) or spatially (wave front shearing interferometry). This enables the comparison of two neighbouring different spectral or spatial slices of the original wave packet. In the experiment, a train of attosecond pulses is focused in an Argon atomic gas jet. EWPs are produced from the single XUV photon ionization of Argon atoms. If an IR beam is synchronized to the EWPs, it is possible to introduce a shear in momentum space between two consecutive s wave packets. A Velocity Map Imaging Spectrometer (VMIS) enables us to detect the interference pattern. An analysis of the interferograms will be presented leading to a conclusion about the symmetry of the studied wave packet.

  5. Matter sources for a null big bang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronnikov, K A; Zaslavskii, O B

    2008-01-01

    We consider the properties of stress-energy tensors compatible with a null big bang, i.e., cosmological evolution starting from a Killing horizon rather than a singularity. For Kantowski-Sachs cosmologies, it is shown that if matter satisfies the null energy condition, then (i) regular cosmological evolution can only start from a Killing horizon, (ii) matter is absent at the horizon and (iii) matter can only appear in the cosmological region due to interaction with vacuum. The latter is understood phenomenologically as a fluid whose stress tensor is insensitive to boosts in a particular direction. We also argue that matter is absent in a static region beyond the horizon. All this generalizes the observations recently obtained for a mixture of dust and a vacuum fluid. If, however, we admit the existence of phantom matter, its certain special kinds (with the parameter w ≤ -3) are consistent with a null big bang without interaction with vacuum (or without vacuum fluid at all). Then in the static region there is matter with w ≥ -1/3. Alternatively, the evolution can begin from a horizon in an infinitely remote past, leading to a scenario combining the features of a null big bang and an emergent universe

  6. Instabilities and the null energy condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buniy, Roman V.; Hsu, Stephen D.H.

    2006-01-01

    We show that violation of the null energy condition implies instability in a broad class of models, including gauge theories with scalar and fermionic matter as well as any perfect fluid. When applied to the dark energy, our results imply that w=p/ρ is unlikely to be less than -1. than -1

  7. Covariant quantum mechanics on a null plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leutwyler, H.; Stern, J.

    1977-03-01

    Lorentz invariance implies that the null plane wave functions factorize into a kinematical part describing the motion of the system as a whole and an inner wave function that involves the specific dynamical properties of the system - in complete correspondence with the non-relativistic situation. Covariance is equivalent to an angular condition which admits non-trivial solutions

  8. Null vectors in superconformal quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Chaoshang

    1993-01-01

    The superspace formulation of the N=1 superconformal field theory and superconformal Ward identities are used to give a precise definition of fusion. Using the fusion procedure, superconformally covariant differential equations are derived and consequently a complete and straightforward algorithm for finding null vectors in Verma modules of the Neveu-Schwarz algebra is given. (orig.)

  9. Gravitational collapse of a cylindrical null shell in vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khakshournia

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available   Barrabès-Israel null shell formalism is used to study the gravitational collapse of a thin cylindrical null shell in vacuum. In general the lightlike matter shell whose history coincides with a null hypersurface is characterized by a surface energy density. In addition, a gravitational impulsive wave is present on this null hypersurface whose generators admit both the shear and expansion. In the case of imposing the cylindrical flatness the surface energy-momentum tensor of the matter shell on the null hypersurface vanishes and the null hyper- surface is just the history of the gravitational wave .

  10. Quantitative phase imaging using quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometry. Application to X-ray domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzi, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Since Roentgen discovered X-rays, X-ray imaging systems are based on absorption contrast. This technique is inefficient for weakly absorbing objects. As a result, X-ray standard radiography can detect bones lesions, but cannot detect ligament lesions. However, phase contrast imaging can overcome this limitation. Since the years 2000, relying on former works of opticians, X-ray scientists are developing phase sensitive devices compatible with industrial applications such as medical imaging or non destructive control. Standard architectures for interferometry are challenging to implement in the X-ray domain. This is the reason why grating based interferometers became the most promising devices to envision industrial applications. They provided the first x-ray phase contrast images of living human samples. Nevertheless, actual grating based architectures require the use of at least two gratings, and are challenging to adapt on an industrial product. So, the aim of my thesis was to develop a single phase grating interferometer. I demonstrated that such a device can provide achromatic and propagation invariant interference patterns. I used this interferometer to perform quantitative phase contrast imaging of a biological fossil sample and x-ray at mirror metrology. (author)

  11. Space Interferometry Mission Instrument Mechanical Layout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, K.; Stubbs, D.; Kroening, K.

    2000-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission, planned for launch in 2006, will measure the positions of celestial objects to an unprecedented accuracy of 4x10 to the power of negative six arc (about 1 billionth of a degree).

  12. Some applications of holographic interferometry in biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbeni, Jean P. L.

    1992-03-01

    Holographic interferometry is well adapted for the determination of 2D strain fields in osseous structures. The knowledge of those strain fields is important for the understanding of structure behavior such as arthrosis.

  13. Interferometry of high energy nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padula, S.S.

    1990-01-01

    The interferometry is used for determining large space time dimensions of the Quark Gluon Plasma formed in high energy nuclear collisions or in high multiplicity fluctuations in p-barp collisions. (M.C.K.)

  14. Analytic approximations for inside-outside interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padula, S.S.; Gyulassy, M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA). Nuclear Science Div.)

    1990-07-30

    Analytical expressions for pion interferometry are derived illustrating the competing effects of various non-ideal aspects of inside-outside cascade dynamics at energies {proportional to}200 AGeV. (orig.).

  15. Fundamental physics research and neutron interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ioffe, A. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany)

    1996-08-01

    The possibility of the use of an extremely sensitive neutron interferometry technique for the study of electromagnetic structure of the neutron and the parity non-conservative effects in neutron spin rotation is discussed. (author)

  16. Novel Polarimetric SAR Interferometry Algorithms, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Polarimetric radar interferometry (PolInSAR) is a new SAR imaging mode that is rapidly becoming an important technique for bare earth topographic mapping, tree...

  17. Nulling tomography with weak gravitational lensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huterer, Dragan; White, Martin

    2005-01-01

    We explore several strategies of eliminating (or nulling) the small-scale information in weak lensing convergence power spectrum measurements in order to protect against undesirable effects, for example, the effects of baryonic cooling and pressure forces on the distribution of large-scale structures. We selectively throw out the small-scale information in the convergence power spectrum that is most sensitive to the unwanted bias, while trying to retain most of the sensitivity to cosmological parameters. The strategies are effective in the difficult but realistic situations when we are able to guess the form of the contaminating effect only approximately. However, we also find that the simplest scheme of simply not using information from the largest multipoles works about as well as the proposed techniques in most, although not all, realistic cases. We advocate further exploration of nulling techniques and believe that they will find important applications in the weak lensing data mining

  18. Collapse and bounce of null fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Creelman, Bradley; Booth, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Exact solutions describing the spherical collapse of null fluids can contain regions which violate the energy conditions. Physically the violations occur when the infalling matter continues to move inwards even when non-gravitational repulsive forces become stronger than gravity. In 1991 Ori proposed a resolution for these violations: spacetime surgery should be used to replace the energy condition violating region with an outgoing solution. The matter bounces. We revisit and implement this p...

  19. Null balance type electrostatic generating voltmeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahant, A.K.; Sidhu, N.P.S.; Gupta, U.C.

    1977-01-01

    A description is given of a null balance type generating voltmeter for measuring high D.C. voltage upto about 400 kV. The paper discusses the principle of operation, design, calibration and performance of the instrument. Main advantages of the device are: (1) it does not load the high voltage source, (2) no physical connection is required with the H.T. terminal and (3) calibration is independent of the rotor's frequency and amplifier's gain. (author)

  20. Differences in Brain Hemodynamics in Response to Achromatic and Chromatic Cards of the Rorschach: A fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Masahiro; Uchiumi, Chigusa; Jung, Minyoung; Aizawa, Naoki; Makita, Kiyoshi; Nakamura, Yugo; Saito, Daisuke N

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of color stimuli of the Rorschach inkblot method (RIM), the cerebral activity of 40 participants with no history of neurological or psychiatric illness was scanned while they engaged in the Rorschach task. A scanned image of the ten RIM inkblots was projected onto a screen in the MRI scanner. Cerebral activation in response to five achromatic color cards and five chromatic cards were compared. As a result, a significant increase in brain activity was observed in bilateral visual areas V2 and V3, parietooccipital junctions, pulvinars, right superior temporal gyrus, and left premotor cortex for achromatic color cards ( p chromatic color, significant increase in brain activity was observed in left visual area V4 and left orbitofrontal cortex ( p < .001). Furthermore, a conjoint analysis revealed various regions were activated in responding to the RIM. The neuropsychological underpinnings of the response process, as described by Acklin and Wu-Holt (1996), were largely confirmed.

  1. Null controllability of the viscous Camassa–Holm equation with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we study the null controllability of the viscous Camassa–. Holm equation on the one-dimensional torus. By using a moving distributed control, we obtain that the system is null controllable for a given data with certain regularity. Keywords. Viscous Camassa–Holm equation; null controllability; moving control;.

  2. 2. Interferometry and polarimetry. 2.1. Principle of interferometry and polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahata, Kazuo; Okajima, Shigeki

    2000-01-01

    Laser interferometry and polarimetry are useful diagnostics for measuring electron density and the internal magnetic field distribution in the plasma. In this section, principles of interferometry and polarimetry and their applications to plasma diagnostics on LHD (section 2.2) and JT-60 (section 2.3) are descried. (author)

  3. Theory of supervirtual refraction interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Bharadwaj, Pawan; Schuster, Gerard T.; Mallinson, Ian; Dai, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Inverting for the subsurface velocity distribution by refraction traveltime tomography is a well-accepted imaging method by both the exploration and earthquake seismology communities. A significant drawback, however, is that the recorded traces become noisier with increasing offset from the source position, and so accurate picking of traveltimes in far-offset traces is often prevented. To enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the far-offset traces, we present the theory of supervirtual refraction interferometry where the SNR of far-offset head-wave arrivals can be theoretically increased by a factor proportional to; here, N is the number of receiver or source positions associated with the recording and generation of the head-wave arrival. There are two steps to this methodology: correlation and summation of the data to generate traces with virtual head-wave arrivals, followed by the convolution of the data with the virtual traces to create traces with supervirtual head-wave arrivals. This method is valid for any medium that generates head-wave arrivals recorded by the geophones. Results with both synthetic traces and field data demonstrate the feasibility of this method. There are at least four significant benefits of supervirtual interferometry: (1) an enhanced SNR of far-offset traces so the first-arrival traveltimes of the noisy far-offset traces can be more reliably picked to extend the useful aperture of the data, (2) the SNR of head waves in a trace that arrive later than the first arrival can be enhanced for accurate traveltime picking and subsequent inversion by later-arrival traveltime tomography, (3) common receiver-pair gathers can be analysed to detect the presence of diving waves in the first arrivals, which can be used to assess the nature of the refracting boundary, and (4) the source statics term is eliminated in the correlation operations so that the timing of the virtual traces is independent of the source excitation time. This suggests the

  4. Longitudinal transport measurements in an energy recovery accelerator with triple bend achromat arcs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Jackson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal properties of electron bunches (energy spread and bunch length and their manipulation are of importance in free electron lasers (FELs, where magnetic bunch length compression is a common feature of beam transport. Recirculating accelerators and energy recovery linac accelerators (ERLs have been used as FEL drivers for several decades and control of longitudinal beam transport is particularly important in their magnet lattices. We report on measurements of longitudinal transport properties in an ERL-FEL, the ALICE (Accelerators and Lasers in Combined Experiments accelerator at Daresbury Laboratory. ALICE is an energy recovery research accelerator that drives an infrared free electron laser. By measuring the time of arrival of electron bunches, the canonical longitudinal transport quantities were measured in the beam transport and bunch compression sections of the lattice. ALICE includes a four-dipole bunch compression chicane providing fixed longitudinal transport, and triple bend achromat arcs including sextupole magnets where the first and second order longitudinal transport can be adjusted. The longitudinal transport properties in these lattice sections were measured and compared with the theoretical model of the lattice. A reasonable level of agreement has been found. The effect of sextupoles in second order, as well as first order, longitudinal correction is considered, with the measurements indicating the level of alignment of the beam to the center of the sextupole.

  5. Experimental validation of the Achromatic Telescopic Squeezing (ATS) scheme at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fartoukh, S.; Bruce, R.; Carlier, F.; Coello De Portugal, J.; Garcia-Tabares, A.; Maclean, E.; Malina, L.; Mereghetti, A.; Mirarchi, D.; Persson, T.; Pojer, M.; Ponce, L.; Redaelli, S.; Salvachua, B.; Skowronski, P.; Solfaroli, M.; Tomas, R.; Valuch, D.; Wegscheider, A.; Wenninger, J.

    2017-07-01

    The Achromatic Telescopic Squeezing scheme offers new techniques to deliver unprecedentedly small beam spot size at the interaction points of the ATLAS and CMS experiments of the LHC, while perfectly controlling the chromatic properties of the corresponding optics (linear and non-linear chromaticities, off-momentum beta-beating, spurious dispersion induced by the crossing bumps). The first series of beam tests with ATS optics were achieved during the LHC Run I (2011/2012) for a first validation of the basics of the scheme at small intensity. In 2016, a new generation of more performing ATS optics was developed and more extensively tested in the machine, still with probe beams for optics measurement and correction at β* = 10 cm, but also with a few nominal bunches to establish first collisions at nominal β* (40 cm) and beyond (33 cm), and to analysis the robustness of these optics in terms of collimation and machine protection. The paper will highlight the most relevant and conclusive results which were obtained during this second series of ATS tests.

  6. Designing of the Low Energy Beam Lines with Achromatic Condition in the RAON Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jeon, Dong-O [Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    The RAON accelerator has been built to create and accelerate stable heavy-ion beams and rare isotope beams. The stable heavy-ion beams are generated by the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source and accelerated by the low energy superconducting linac SCL1. The beams accelerated by the SCL1 are re-accelerated by the high energy superconducting linac SCL2 for the generation of rare isotope beams by using the in-flight fragmentation system or are put to use in the low energy experimental halls, which include the neutron science facility and the Korea Broad acceptance Recoil spectrometer and Apparatus after having passed through the low energy beam lines which have long deflecting sections. At the end of each beam line in the low energy experimental halls, the beams should meet the targets of the two facilities with the specific requirements satisfied. Namely, if the beam is to be sent safely and accurately to the targets and simultaneously, satisfy the requirements, an achromatic lattice design needs to be applied in each beam line. In this paper, we will present the lattice design of the low energy beam lines and describe the results of the beam dynamics simulations. In addition, the correction of the beam orbit, which is distorted by machine imperfections, will be discussed.

  7. First demonstration with beam of the achromatic telescoping squeezing (ATS) scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fartoukh, S.

    2012-01-01

    The Achromatic Telescopic Squeezing (ATS) scheme is a novel squeezing mechanism which is (almost fully) compatible with the existing hardware of the LHC, and enables both the production and the chromatic correction of very low β*. The basic principles of the ATS scheme will be reviewed together with its basic motivation which is to deliver a very ambitious β* of 10-15 cm in view of the even more ambitious performance commitments taken by the HL-LHC project. In this context, a few dedicated beam experiments were meticulously prepared and took place at the LHC in 2011. The results obtained will be highlighted, demonstrating already the viability of the scheme. The plans for 2012 will be discussed, with a few optics considerations which could already justify the implementation of the ATS scheme in the nominal machine, depending on which β* limits will be met first, and that the ATS can solve (e.g. optics compatibility, chromatic aberrations) and obviously cannot: the aperture of the existing triplet. (author)

  8. Digital halftoning methods for selectively partitioning error into achromatic and chromatic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey B.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for reducing the visibility of artifacts arising in the display of quantized color images on CRT displays. The method is based on the differential spatial sensitivity of the human visual system to chromatic and achromatic modulations. Because the visual system has the highest spatial and temporal acuity for the luminance component of an image, a technique which will reduce luminance artifacts at the expense of introducing high-frequency chromatic errors is sought. A method based on controlling the correlations between the quantization errors in the individual phosphor images is explored. The luminance component is greatest when the phosphor errors are positively correlated, and is minimized when the phosphor errors are negatively correlated. The greatest effect of the correlation is obtained when the intensity quantization step sizes of the individual phosphors have equal luminances. For the ordered dither algorithm, a version of the method can be implemented by simply inverting the matrix of thresholds for one of the color components.

  9. Avoidance of achromatic colours by bees provides a private niche for hummingbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunau, Klaus; Papiorek, Sarah; Eltz, Thomas; Sazima, Marlies

    2011-05-01

    That hummingbird-pollinated plants predominantly have red flowers has been known for decades, but well-investigated research studies are still rare. Preference tests have shown that hummingbirds do not have an innate preference for red colours. In addition, hummingbirds do not depend solely upon red flowers, because white-flowered hummingbird-pollinated plants are also common and temporarily abundant. Here we show that both white and red hummingbird-pollinated flowers differ from bee-pollinated flowers in their reflection properties for ultraviolet (UV) light. Hummingbird-pollinated red flowers are on average less UV reflective, and white hummingbird-pollinated flowers are more UV reflective than the same coloured bee-pollinated ones. In preference tests with artificial flowers, neotropical orchid bees prefer red UV-reflecting artificial flowers and white UV-nonreflecting flowers over red and white flowers with the opposite UV properties. By contrast, hummingbirds showed no preference for any colour in the same tests. Plotting floral colours and test stimuli into the honeybees' perceptual colour space suggests that the less attractive colours are achromatic for bees and therefore more difficult to detect against the background. This underlying colour preference in bees might provide hummingbirds with a private niche that is not attractive to bees.

  10. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential. PMID:27649932

  11. Parsimonious Refraction Interferometry and Tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif

    2017-02-04

    We present parsimonious refraction interferometry and tomography where a densely populated refraction data set can be obtained from two reciprocal and several infill shot gathers. The assumptions are that the refraction arrivals are head waves, and a pair of reciprocal shot gathers and several infill shot gathers are recorded over the line of interest. Refraction traveltimes from these shot gathers are picked and spawned into O(N2) virtual refraction traveltimes generated by N virtual sources, where N is the number of geophones in the 2D survey. The virtual traveltimes can be inverted to give the velocity tomogram. This enormous increase in the number of traveltime picks and associated rays, compared to the many fewer traveltimes from the reciprocal and infill shot gathers, allows for increased model resolution and a better condition number with the system of normal equations. A significant benefit is that the parsimonious survey and the associated traveltime picking is far less time consuming than that for a standard refraction survey with a dense distribution of sources.

  12. Clausius entropy for arbitrary bifurcate null surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baccetti, Valentina; Visser, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Jacobson’s thermodynamic derivation of the Einstein equations was originally applied only to local Rindler horizons. But at least some parts of that construction can usefully be extended to give meaningful results for arbitrary bifurcate null surfaces. As presaged in Jacobson’s original article, this more general construction sharply brings into focus the questions: is entropy objectively ‘real’? Or is entropy in some sense subjective and observer-dependent? These innocent questions open a Pandora’s box of often inconclusive debate. A consensus opinion, though certainly not universally held, seems to be that Clausius entropy (thermodynamic entropy, defined via a Clausius relation dS=đQ/T) should be objectively real, but that the ontological status of statistical entropy (Shannon or von Neumann entropy) is much more ambiguous, and much more likely to be observer-dependent. This question is particularly pressing when it comes to understanding Bekenstein entropy (black hole entropy). To perhaps further add to the confusion, we shall argue that even the Clausius entropy can often be observer-dependent. In the current article we shall conclusively demonstrate that one can meaningfully assign a notion of Clausius entropy to arbitrary bifurcate null surfaces—effectively defining a ‘virtual Clausius entropy’ for arbitrary ‘virtual (local) causal horizons’. As an application, we see that we can implement a version of the generalized second law (GSL) for this virtual Clausius entropy. This version of GSL can be related to certain (nonstandard) integral variants of the null energy condition. Because the concepts involved are rather subtle, we take some effort in being careful and explicit in developing our framework. In future work we will apply this construction to generalize Jacobson’s derivation of the Einstein equations. (paper)

  13. Generalized frame of reference with null congruence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrarese, G.; Antonelli, R.

    2000-01-01

    The paper derives the main properties of a generalized frame of reference with a null congruence (light flux), by means of adapted non-holonomic techniques; then it studies the geometry of the space-time in terms of non-orthogonal projection: longitudinal and transverse covariant derivatives and corresponding commutation formulae, decomposition of the Riemann and gravitational tensors, lie derivatives of the Ricci rotation coefficients, transverse Bianchi identity. Application to the (absolute and relative) light flux: kinematical characteristics and screen, Sachs theorems etc. are also given

  14. Dall-Null tester for spaceborne applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingler, R. L.

    1984-12-01

    This is a study to design a self correcting primary mirror system for a space telescope. The design is centered around a Dall-Null tester (a Foucault knife-edge tester with compensating lens). An indepth study of the theory of the Foucault test from Foucault's original publications to current work is presented. Also short comings of the diffraction approach are shown. The findings of a simple experiment showed the way to the correct explanation as to the workings of the test. Based on this new explanation, a computer program to find the error in the surface of the mirror from the irradiance pattern provided by the Dall-Null tester was developed. The computer program with a sample run is included in the appendixes A and B. The basic design of an adaptive optic system for a spaceborne application is also presented in the paper. This design has the desired quality of being able to correct the mirror while the telescope is in use. The equations being independent of wavelength allows for the design to be applied to systems working outside of the visible spectrum as well as the systems working in the visible.

  15. Averaged null energy condition from causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Thomas; Kundu, Sandipan; Tajdini, Amirhossein

    2017-07-01

    Unitary, Lorentz-invariant quantum field theories in flat spacetime obey mi-crocausality: commutators vanish at spacelike separation. For interacting theories in more than two dimensions, we show that this implies that the averaged null energy, ∫ duT uu , must be non-negative. This non-local operator appears in the operator product expansion of local operators in the lightcone limit, and therefore contributes to n-point functions. We derive a sum rule that isolates this contribution and is manifestly positive. The argument also applies to certain higher spin operators other than the stress tensor, generating an infinite family of new constraints of the form ∫ duX uuu··· u ≥ 0. These lead to new inequalities for the coupling constants of spinning operators in conformal field theory, which include as special cases (but are generally stronger than) the existing constraints from the lightcone bootstrap, deep inelastic scattering, conformal collider methods, and relative entropy. We also comment on the relation to the recent derivation of the averaged null energy condition from relative entropy, and suggest a more general connection between causality and information-theoretic inequalities in QFT.

  16. Singular Null Hypersurfaces in General Relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dray, T

    2006-01-01

    Null hypersurfaces are a mathematical consequence of the Lorentzian signature of general relativity; singularities in mathematical models usually indicate where the interesting physics takes place. This book discusses what happens when you combine these ideas. Right from the preface, this is a no-nonsense book. There are two principal approaches to singular shells, one distributional and the other 'cut and paste'; both are treated in detail. A working knowledge of GR is assumed, including familiarity with null tetrads, differential forms, and 3 + 1 decompositions. Despite my own reasonably extensive, closely related knowledge, there was material unfamiliar to me already in chapter 3, although I was reunited with some old friends in later chapters. The exposition is crisp, with a minimum of transition from chapter to chapter. In fact, my main criticism is that there is no clear statement of the organization of the book, nor is there an index. Everything is here, and the story is compelling if you know what to look for, although it is less easy to follow the story if you are not already familiar with it. But this is really a book for experts, and the authors certainly qualify, having played a significant role in developing and extending the results they describe. It is also entirely appropriate that the book is dedicated to Werner Israel, who pioneered the thin-shell approach to (non-null) singular surfaces and later championed the use of similar methods for analysing null shells. After an introductory chapter on impulsive signals, the authors show how the Bianchi identities can be used to classify spacetimes with singular null hypersurfaces. This approach, due to the authors, generalizes the framework originally proposed by Penrose. While astrophysical applications are discussed only briefly, the authors point out that detailed physical characteristics of signals from isolated sources can be determined in this manner. In particular, they describe the behaviour of

  17. The Lindley paradox in optical interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauri, Camillo; Paris, Matteo G.A.

    2016-01-01

    The so-called Lindley paradox is a counterintuitive statistical effect where the Bayesian and frequentist approaches to hypothesis testing give radically different answers, depending on the choice of the prior distribution. In this paper we address the occurrence of the Lindley paradox in optical interferometry and discuss its implications for high-precision measurements. In particular, we focus on phase estimation by Mach–Zehnder interferometers and show how to mitigate the conflict between the two approaches by using suitable priors. - Highlights: • We address the occurence of Lindley paradox in interferometry and discuss its implications for high-precision measurements. • We show how to mitigate the conflict between Bayesian and frequentist approach to interferometry using suitable priors. • Our results apply to calibration of homodyne detectors for quantum tomography.

  18. A system for airborne SAR interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Nørvang; Skou, Niels; Granholm, Johan

    1996-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) systems have already demonstrated that elevation maps can be generated rapidly with single pass airborne across-track interferometry systems (XTT), and satellite repeat track interferometry (RTT) techniques have been used to map both elevation...... and perturbations of the surface of the Earth. The Danish Center for Remote Sensing (DCRS) has experimented with airborne INSAR since 1993. Multiple track data are collected in a special mode in which the radar directly steers the aircraft which allows for very precise control of the flight path. Such data sets......) the status of the airborne interferometry activities at DCRS, including the present system configuration, recent results, and some scientific applications of the system....

  19. Samuel A. Werner Pioneer of Neutron Interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In 1975, Sam Werner and his collaborators on the staff of the Scientific Laboratory of the Ford Motor Company carried out one of the pioneering experiments in neutron interferometry at the 2MW University of Michigan research reactor. It was the famous COW Experiment on gravitationally induced quantum interference. Shortly thereafter he moved to the University of Missouri in Columbia, to set up a program of neutron scattering research, including neutron interferometry. In the 25 years until his retirement a large number of beautiful experiments have been performed by Sam, with his group, his numerous students and many international collaborators. The Interferometry and Coherence session at this conference has been organized in his honour and the collected papers presented by his friends, collaborators and former students form his Festschrift. (author)

  20. Soft x-ray interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the soft x-ray interferometry workshop held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory was to discuss with the scientific community the proposed technical design of the soft x-ray Fourier-transform spectrometer being developed at the ALS. Different design strategies for the instrument's components were discussed, as well as detection methods, signal processing issues, and how to meet the manufacturing tolerances that are necessary for the instrument to achieve the desired levels of performance. Workshop participants were encouraged to report on their experiences in the field of Fourier transform spectroscopy. The ALS is developing a Fourier transform spectrometer that is intended to operate up to 100 eV. The motivation is solely improved resolution and not the throughput (Jaquinot) or multiplex (Fellgett) advantage, neither of which apply for the sources and detectors used in this spectral range. The proposed implementation of this is via a Mach-Zehnder geometry that has been (1) distorted from a square to a rhombus to get grazing incidence of a suitable angle for 100 eV and (2) provided with a mirror-motion system to make the path difference between the interfering beams tunable. The experiment consists of measuring the emergent light intensity (I(x)) as a function of the path difference (x). The resolving power of the system is limited by the amount of path difference obtainable that is 1 cm (one million half-waves at 200 angstrom wavelength) in the design thus allowing a resolving power of one million. The free spectral range of the system is limited by the closeness with which the function I(x) is sampled. It is proposed to illuminate a helium absorption cell with roughly 1%-band-width light from a monochromator thus allowing one hundred aliases without spectral overlap even for sampling of I(x) at one hundredth of the Nyquist frequency

  1. Design of an achromatic and uncoupled medical gantry for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoupas, N.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.; MacKay, W.W.

    2011-01-01

    We are presenting the layout and the optics of a beam line to be used as a medical gantry in radiation therapy. The optical properties of the gantry's beam line are such as to make the beam line achromatic and uncoupled. These two properties make the beam spot size, which is delivered and focused by the gantry, on the tumor of the patient, independent of the angular orientation of the gantry. In this paper we present the layout of the magnetic elements of the gantry, and also present the theoretical basis for the optics design of such a gantry. A medical gantry, as it is used in the radiation treatment of cancer patients, is the last part of the beam optical system, of the accelerator complex, which delivers and focuses the beam on the tumor. The curved line shown in figure 1 is a schematic diagram of a gantry which can rotate about a horizontal axis. The particle beam (green arrow in fig. 1) enters the gantry, and is guided by the gantry on the tumor (red spot in fig. 1). As the gantry rotates about the axis shown in figure 1, the beam exiting the gantry always lies on a plane normal to the rotation axis at the point of the icocenter. Thus the gantry facilitates the ability of the beam delivery system, to deliver the beam at the tumor, which is placed at the icocenter, from any angle on this vertical plane, which is normal to the rotation angle of the gantry as stated earlier. The gantry consists of dipoles and quadrupoles elements whose median symmetry plane lies on a plane which contains the rotation axis of the gantry. In this paper we define this plane as the 'plane of the gantry'. As the beam is transported along the axis of rotation of the gantry and before it enters the gantry, it is focused by 'normal' quadrupoles and experiences no linear beam coupling. Subsequently the beam enters the gantry, and is transported by the gantry to the delivery point which is the tumor. The transported beam at the tumor is still linearly uncoupled as long as the plane of the

  2. Elemental mapping in achromatic atomic-resolution energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, B.D. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Houben, L. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Mayer, J. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, RWTH Aachen University, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Dunin-Borkowski, R.E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Allen, L.J., E-mail: lja@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    We present atomic-resolution energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) images obtained with the chromatic-aberration-corrected FEI Titan PICO at the Ernst-Ruska Centre, Jülich, Germany. We find qualitative agreement between experiment and simulation for the background-subtracted EFTEM images of the Ti–L{sub 2,3} and O–K edges for a specimen of SrTiO{sub 3} oriented down the [110] zone axis. The simulations utilize the transition potential formulation for inelastic scattering, which permits a detailed investigation of contributions to the EFTEM image. We find that energy-filtered images of the Ti–L{sub 2,3} and O–K edges are lattice images and that the background-subtracted core-loss maps may not be directly interpretable as elemental maps. Simulations show that this is a result of preservation of elastic contrast, whereby the qualitative details of the image are determined primarily by elastic, coherent scattering. We show that this effect places a constraint on the range of specimen thicknesses which could theoretically yield directly useful elemental maps. In general, interpretation of EFTEM images is ideally accompanied by detailed simulations. - Highlights: • Achromatic atomic-resolution EFTEM images were obtained for STO 〈110〉. • Simulations were in qualitative agreement with Ti–L{sub 2,3} and O–K edge maps. • The experimental EFTEM maps are not directly interpretable as elemental maps. • Image intensities are strongly determined by preservation of elastic contrast. • Interpretation of EFTEM images is ideally accompanied by detailed simulations.

  3. Global astrometry with the space interferometry mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, A.; Unwin, S.; Shao, M.

    1997-01-01

    The prospects for global astrometric measurements with the space interferometry mission (SIM) are discussed. The SIM mission will perform four microarcsec astrometric measurements on objects as faint as 20 mag using the optical interferometry technique with a 10 m baseline. The SIM satellite will perform narrow angle astrometry and global astrometry by means of an astrometric grid. The sensitivities of the SIM global astrometric performance and the grid accuracy versus instrumental parameters and sky coverage schemes are reported on. The problems in finding suitable astrometric grid objects to support microarcsec astrometry, and related ground-based observation programs are discussed.

  4. On the null origin of the ambitwistor string

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casali, Eduardo [Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford,Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG (United Kingdom); Tourkine, Piotr [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics,Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-07

    In this paper we present the null string origin of the ambitwistor string. Classically, the null string is the tensionless limit of string theory, and so too is the ambitwistor string. Both have as constraint algebra the Galilean Conformal Algebra in two dimensions. But something interesting happens in the quantum theory since there is an ambiguity in quantizing the null string. We show that, given a particular choice of quantization scheme and a particular gauge, the null string coincides with the ambitwistor string both classically and quantum mechanically. We also show that the same holds for the spinning versions of the null string and ambitwistor string. With these results we clarify the relationship between the ambitwistor string, the null string, the usual string and the Hohm-Siegel-Zwiebach theory.

  5. Cold neutron interferometry and its application. 2. Coherency and cold neutron spin interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achiwa, Norio; Ebisawa, Toru

    1998-03-01

    The second workshop entitled 'Interference studies and cold neutron spin interferometry' was held on 10 and 11 March 1998 at KUR (Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Kumatori). Cold neutron spin interferometry is a new field. So it is very important for its development to learn the studies of X-ray and neutron optics which are rapidly developing with long history. In the workshop, the issues related to interference were reviewed such as experimental studies on cold neutron spin interferometry, theoretical and experimental approach on tunneling time, interference experiments by neutrons and its application, interference studies using synchrotron radiation, topics on silicon interferometry and quantum measurement problem and cold neutron interference experiment related to quantum measurement problem. The 8 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  6. Response saturation of monochromatic increments on intense achromatic backgrounds: implications for color-opponent organization in human vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drum, Bruce; Sternheim, Charles E.

    2005-10-01

    We present evidence that steady achromatic adapting fields can produce response saturation in color-opponent pathways. We measured tvi (log increment threshold illuminance versus log background illuminance) functions at four test wavelengths (430, 490, 575, and 660 nm) and nine background illuminances from 4.0 to 5.6 log Td. Foveal, 2° diameter, 1 s duration test stimuli were presented on a concentric, perceptually white (5128°K color temperature), 7° diameter, steady background. Thresholds were obtained by the method of adjustment, after which the test stimulus illuminances were increased 0.6 log unit and the subject estimated percentages of red, yellow, green, blue, and white. Average tvi slopes for two subjects were 2.06 for 430 nm, 1.6 for 490 nm, 1.11 for 575 nm and 1.34 for 660 nm, consistent with the estimated ratios of chromatic to achromatic sensitivity at the same wavelengths. Also, the percentage of white seen in the suprathreshold increments increased with increasing background illuminance despite increases in excitation purity. These findings imply that steady, intense, achromatic backgrounds can produce response saturation in color-opponent mechanisms at wavelengths across the visible spectrum. The saturation was more extreme at short wavelengths than at middle or long wavelengths, producing a tritanopic condition at the highest background illuminances. The tritanopia reduced color space to a predominately red-blue dichromacy, in agreement with previous findings. The results support a multistage opponent-color model in which precortical koniocellular and parvocellular opponent pathways interact to produce the observed red-green and yellow-blue color-opponent channels at a cortical level.

  7. Technology Advancement of the Visible Nulling Coronagraph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Thompson, Patrick; Bolcar, Matt; Madison, Timothy; Woodruff, Robert; Noecker, Charley; Kendrick, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The critical high contrast imaging technology for the Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) mission concept is the visible nulling coronagraph (VNC). EPIC would be capable of imaging jovian planets, dust/debris disks, and potentially super-Earths and contribute to answering how bright the debris disks are for candidate stars. The contrast requirement for EPIC is 10(exp 9) contrast at 125 milli-arseconds inner working angle. To advance the VNC technology NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, in collaboration with Lockheed-Martin, previously developed a vacuum VNC testbed, and achieved narrowband and broadband suppression of the core of the Airy disk. Recently our group was awarded a NASA Technology Development for Exoplanet Missions to achieve two milestones: (i) 10(exp 8) contrast in narrowband light, and, (ii) 10(ecp 9) contrast in broader band light; one milestone per year, and both at 2 Lambda/D inner working angle. These will be achieved with our 2nd generation testbed known as the visible nulling testbed (VNT). It contains a MEMS based hex-packed segmented deformable mirror known as the multiple mirror array (MMA) and coherent fiber bundle, i.e. a spatial filter array (SFA). The MMA is in one interferometric arm and works to set the wavefront differences between the arms to zero. Each of the MMA segments is optically mapped to a single mode fiber of the SFA, and the SFA passively cleans the sub-aperture wavefront error leaving only piston, tip and tilt error to be controlled. The piston degree of freedom on each segment is used to correct the wavefront errors, while the tip/tilt is used to simultaneously correct the amplitude errors. Thus the VNT controls both amplitude and wavefront errors with a single MMA in closed-loop in a vacuum tank at approx.20 Hz. Herein we will discuss our ongoing progress with the VNT.

  8. [Dilemma of null hypothesis in ecological hypothesis's experiment test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji

    2016-06-01

    Experimental test is one of the major test methods of ecological hypothesis, though there are many arguments due to null hypothesis. Quinn and Dunham (1983) analyzed the hypothesis deduction model from Platt (1964) and thus stated that there is no null hypothesis in ecology that can be strictly tested by experiments. Fisher's falsificationism and Neyman-Pearson (N-P)'s non-decisivity inhibit statistical null hypothesis from being strictly tested. Moreover, since the null hypothesis H 0 (α=1, β=0) and alternative hypothesis H 1 '(α'=1, β'=0) in ecological progresses are diffe-rent from classic physics, the ecological null hypothesis can neither be strictly tested experimentally. These dilemmas of null hypothesis could be relieved via the reduction of P value, careful selection of null hypothesis, non-centralization of non-null hypothesis, and two-tailed test. However, the statistical null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) should not to be equivalent to the causality logistical test in ecological hypothesis. Hence, the findings and conclusions about methodological studies and experimental tests based on NHST are not always logically reliable.

  9. Broadband Active Segmented Aperture and Radial Shear Nulling

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) is a starlight suppression system for enabling exoplanet detectionand atmospheric measurement. Conceptual space telescope...

  10. [Sensitivity and specificity of flicker perimetry with Pulsar. Comparison with achromatic (white-on-white) perimetry in glaucoma patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbel, K; Erb, C

    2013-02-01

    The early detection of functional glaucoma damage plays an increasingly more central role in the diagnosis and treatment of glaucoma disease. Using selective perimetry detection of early glaucomatous defects is more likely and one of these methods is flicker perimetry with Pulsar. Flicker perimetry is used to analyze the temporal visual function in combination with spatial resolution and contrast sensitivity as opposed to standard automated perimetry which measures the differential light sensitivity with a non-specific stimulus. This study showed a higher sensitivity and specificity of Pulsar perimetry in comparison to achromatic perimetry in glaucoma patients.

  11. Precision measurements with atom interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Schlippert, Dennis; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M.

    2017-04-01

    Interferometry with matter waves enables precise measurements of rotations, accelerations, and differential accelerations [1-5]. This is exploited for determining fundamental constants [2], in fundamental science as e.g. testing the universality of free fall [3], and is applied for gravimetry [4], and gravity gradiometry [2,5]. At the Institut für Quantenoptik in Hannover, different approaches are pursued. A large scale device is designed and currently being set up to investigate the gain in precision for gravimetry, gradiometry, and fundamental tests on large baselines [6]. For field applications, a compact and transportable device is being developed. Its key feature is an atom chip source providing a collimated high flux of atoms which is expected to mitigate systematic uncertainties [7,8]. The atom chip technology and miniaturization benefits from microgravity experiments in the drop tower in Bremen and sounding rocket experiments [8,9] which act as pathfinders for space borne operation [10]. This contribution will report about our recent results. The presented work is supported by the CRC 1227 DQ-mat, the CRC 1128 geo-Q, the RTG 1729, the QUEST-LFS, and by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under Grant No. DLR 50WM1552-1557. [1] P. Berg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 114, 063002, 2015; I. Dutta et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 116, 183003, 2016. [2] J. B. Fixler et al., Science 315, 74 (2007); G. Rosi et al., Nature 510, 518, 2014. [3] D. Schlippert et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 112, 203002, 2014. [4] A. Peters et al., Nature 400, 849, 1999; A. Louchet-Chauvet et al., New J. Phys. 13, 065026, 2011; C. Freier et al., J. of Phys.: Conf. Series 723, 012050, 2016. [5] J. M. McGuirk et al., Phys. Rev. A 65, 033608, 2002; P. Asenbaum et al., arXiv:1610.03832. [6] J. Hartwig et al., New J. Phys. 17, 035011, 2015. [7] H. Ahlers et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 173601

  12. Green's function representations for seismic interferometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wapenaar, C.P.A.; Fokkema, J.T.

    2006-01-01

    The term seismic interferometry refers to the principle of generating new seismic responses by crosscorrelating seismic observations at different receiver locations. The first version of this principle was derived by Claerbout (1968), who showed that the reflection response of a horizontally layered

  13. Basic radio interferometry for future lunar missions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aminaei, Amin; Klein Wolt, Marc; Chen, Linjie; Bronzwaer, Thomas; Pourshaghaghi, Hamid Reza; Bentum, Marinus Jan; Falcke, Heino

    2014-01-01

    In light of presently considered lunar missions, we investigate the feasibility of the basic radio interferometry (RIF) for lunar missions. We discuss the deployment of two-element radio interferometer on the Moon surface. With the first antenna element is envisaged to be placed on the lunar lander,

  14. Monitoring civil infrastructure using satellite radar interferometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, L.

    2015-01-01

    Satellite radar interferometry (InSAR) is a precise and efficient technique to monitor deformation on Earth with millimeter precision. Most InSAR applications focus on geophysical phenomena, such as earthquakes, volcanoes, or subsidence. Monitoring civil infrastructure with InSAR is relatively new,

  15. 3D super-virtual refraction interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Kai; AlTheyab, Abdullah; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2014-01-01

    Super-virtual refraction interferometry enhances the signal-to-noise ratio of far-offset refractions. However, when applied to 3D cases, traditional 2D SVI suffers because the stationary positions of the source-receiver pairs might be any place

  16. Photopolymer for Optical Holography and Holographic Interferometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Květoň, M.; Lédl, Vít; Havránek, A.; Fiala, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 295, č. 1 (2010), s. 107-113 ISSN 1022-1360 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : holographic interferometry * holography * photopolymerization * recording material * refractive index Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/masy.200900093/pdf

  17. MAGNETIC NULL POINTS IN KINETIC SIMULATIONS OF SPACE PLASMAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni; Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We present a systematic attempt to study magnetic null points and the associated magnetic energy conversion in kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of various plasma configurations. We address three-dimensional simulations performed with the semi-implicit kinetic electromagnetic code iPic3D in different setups: variations of a Harris current sheet, dipolar and quadrupolar magnetospheres interacting with the solar wind, and a relaxing turbulent configuration with multiple null points. Spiral nulls are more likely created in space plasmas: in all our simulations except lunar magnetic anomaly (LMA) and quadrupolar mini-magnetosphere the number of spiral nulls prevails over the number of radial nulls by a factor of 3–9. We show that often magnetic nulls do not indicate the regions of intensive energy dissipation. Energy dissipation events caused by topological bifurcations at radial nulls are rather rare and short-lived. The so-called X-lines formed by the radial nulls in the Harris current sheet and LMA simulations are rather stable and do not exhibit any energy dissipation. Energy dissipation is more powerful in the vicinity of spiral nulls enclosed by magnetic flux ropes with strong currents at their axes (their cross sections resemble 2D magnetic islands). These null lines reminiscent of Z-pinches efficiently dissipate magnetic energy due to secondary instabilities such as the two-stream or kinking instability, accompanied by changes in magnetic topology. Current enhancements accompanied by spiral nulls may signal magnetic energy conversion sites in the observational data

  18. Modification of the code BEAMCORR, and some simulation results of the magnet and achromat misalignments for the SLC South Arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoaee, H.; Kheifets, S.

    1984-01-01

    An important decision has been made regarding the correction scheme for the arcs leading to the adoption of the so called scheme I. In this scheme the beam position data are collected from single-plane x and y Beam Position Monitors (BPMs), which are placed in the drift spaces adjacent to the downstream D- and F-magnets correspondingly. Similarly, single-plane x and y correctors are used for moving the upstream end of the corresponding magnets. In the present simulation this scheme is used exclusively. The first order calculations performed by means of TRANSPORT appear to be unsatisfactory from the point of view of the beam spotsize at the interaction point (IP). In this note we describe the modification to our program BEAMCORR which employs second order calculations by means of the program TURTLE. We also present the results of the following simulations: (a) study of the effects of two different levels of magnet misalignment on the beam spotsize at IP, and comparison of the results with those obtained by means of the program DINGBAT; (b) study of disjoints between achromats (both the displacement of the adjacent ends and angular discontinuity between achromats)

  19. Future Looks Bright for Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    First Light for the PRIMA instrument The PRIMA instrument [1] of the ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) recently saw "first light" at its new home atop Cerro Paranal in Chile. When fully operational, PRIMA will boost the capabilities of the VLTI to see sources much fainter than any previous interferometers, and enable astrometric precision unmatched by any other existing astronomical facility. PRIMA will be a unique tool for the detection of exoplanets. First Light of the PRIMA Instrument ESO PR Photo 29a/08 Preparing for PRIMA "PRIMA is specifically designed to see if one star 'wobbles' to and fro because it is has unseen planetary companions", says instrument scientist Gerard van Belle. "This allows us to not only detect exoplanets, but to measure their mass." PRIMA's expected astrometric precision of tens of micro-arcseconds is unmatched by any other existing astronomical facility, whether on the ground or in orbit [2]. In addition to taking astrometric measurements PRIMA will be the key to the imaging of faint sources with the VLTI using the science instruments AMBER and MIDI. Interferometry combines the light received by two or more telescopes, concentrating on tiny differences between the signals to measure angles with exquisite precision. Using this technique PRIMA can pick out details as sharply as a single telescope with a diameter equivalent to the largest distance between the telescopes. For the VLTI, the distance between the two telescope elements is about 200 metres. The PRIMA instrument is unique amongst the VLTI instruments, in that it is effectively two interferometers in one. PRIMA will take data from two sources on the sky simultaneously: the brighter source can be used for tracking, allowing the interferometer to "stare" at the fainter source for longer than is now possible with conventional interferometers. Although there have been earlier pathfinder experiments to test this technique, PRIMA represents the first facility

  20. Visual and Plastic Arts in Teaching Literacy: Null Curricula?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeland, Robin Gay

    2010-01-01

    Visual and plastic arts in contemporary literacy instruction equal null curricula. Studies show that painting and sculpture facilitate teaching reading and writing (literacy), yet such pedagogy has not been formally adopted into USA curriculum. An example of null curriculum can be found in late 19th - early 20th century education the USA…

  1. Euclidean null controllability of nonlinear infinite delay systems with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sufficient conditions for the Euclidean null controllability of non-linear delay systems with time varying multiple delays in the control and implicit derivative are derived. If the uncontrolled system is uniformly asymptotically stable and if the control system is controllable, then the non-linear infinite delay system is Euclidean null ...

  2. Null infinity and extremal horizons in AdS-CFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickling, Andrew; Wiseman, Toby; Lucietti, James

    2015-01-01

    We consider AdS gravity duals to CFT on background spacetimes with a null infinity. Null infinity on the conformal boundary may extend to an extremal horizon in the bulk. For example it does so for Poincaré–AdS, although does not for planar Schwarzschild–AdS. If null infinity does extend into an extremal horizon in the bulk, we show that the bulk near-horizon geometry is determined by the geometry of the boundary null infinity. Hence the ‘infra-red’ geometry of the bulk is fixed by the large scale behaviour of the CFT spacetime. In addition the boundary stress tensor must have a particular decay at null infinity. As an application, we argue that for CFT on asymptotically flat backgrounds, any static bulk dual containing an extremal horizon extending from the boundary null infinity, must have the near-horizon geometry of Poincaré–AdS. We also discuss a class of boundary null infinity that cannot extend to a bulk extremal horizon, although we give evidence that they can extend to an analogous null surface in the bulk which possesses an associated scale-invariant ‘near-geometry’. (paper)

  3. Logarithmic corrections to gravitational entropy and the null energy condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parikh, Maulik, E-mail: maulik.parikh@asu.edu; Svesko, Andrew

    2016-10-10

    Using a relation between the thermodynamics of local horizons and the null energy condition, we consider the effects of quantum corrections to the gravitational entropy. In particular, we find that the geometric form of the null energy condition is not affected by the inclusion of logarithmic corrections to the Bekenstein–Hawking entropy.

  4. Logarithmic corrections to gravitational entropy and the null energy condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maulik Parikh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Using a relation between the thermodynamics of local horizons and the null energy condition, we consider the effects of quantum corrections to the gravitational entropy. In particular, we find that the geometric form of the null energy condition is not affected by the inclusion of logarithmic corrections to the Bekenstein–Hawking entropy.

  5. A new dynamic null model for phylogenetic community structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pigot, Alex L; Etienne, Rampal S

    Phylogenies are increasingly applied to identify the mechanisms structuring ecological communities but progress has been hindered by a reliance on statistical null models that ignore the historical process of community assembly. Here, we address this, and develop a dynamic null model of assembly by

  6. ENERGY DISSIPATION IN MAGNETIC NULL POINTS AT KINETIC SCALES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Lapenta, Giovanni; Divin, Andrey; Eriksson, Elin; Markidis, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    We use kinetic particle-in-cell and MHD simulations supported by an observational data set to investigate magnetic reconnection in clusters of null points in space plasma. The magnetic configuration under investigation is driven by fast adiabatic flux rope compression that dissipates almost half of the initial magnetic field energy. In this phase powerful currents are excited producing secondary instabilities, and the system is brought into a state of “intermittent turbulence” within a few ion gyro-periods. Reconnection events are distributed all over the simulation domain and energy dissipation is rather volume-filling. Numerous spiral null points interconnected via their spines form null lines embedded into magnetic flux ropes; null point pairs demonstrate the signatures of torsional spine reconnection. However, energy dissipation mainly happens in the shear layers formed by adjacent flux ropes with oppositely directed currents. In these regions radial null pairs are spontaneously emerging and vanishing, associated with electron streams and small-scale current sheets. The number of spiral nulls in the simulation outweighs the number of radial nulls by a factor of 5–10, in accordance with Cluster observations in the Earth's magnetosheath. Twisted magnetic fields with embedded spiral null points might indicate the regions of major energy dissipation for future space missions such as the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

  7. On the Robinson theorem and shearfree geodesic null congruences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tafel, J.

    1985-01-01

    Null electromagnetic fields and shearfree geodesic null congruences in curved and flat spacetimes are studied. We point out some mathematical problems connected with the validity of the Robinson theorem. The problem of finding nonanalytic twisting congruences in the Minkowski space is reduced to the construction of holomorphic functions with specific boundary conditions. (orig.)

  8. An omnibus test for the global null hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futschik, Andreas; Taus, Thomas; Zehetmayer, Sonja

    2018-01-01

    Global hypothesis tests are a useful tool in the context of clinical trials, genetic studies, or meta-analyses, when researchers are not interested in testing individual hypotheses, but in testing whether none of the hypotheses is false. There are several possibilities how to test the global null hypothesis when the individual null hypotheses are independent. If it is assumed that many of the individual null hypotheses are false, combination tests have been recommended to maximize power. If, however, it is assumed that only one or a few null hypotheses are false, global tests based on individual test statistics are more powerful (e.g. Bonferroni or Simes test). However, usually there is no a priori knowledge on the number of false individual null hypotheses. We therefore propose an omnibus test based on cumulative sums of the transformed p-values. We show that this test yields an impressive overall performance. The proposed method is implemented in an R-package called omnibus.

  9. The Visible Nulling Coronagraph--Architecture Definition and Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Michael; Levine, B. Martin; Wallace, J. Kent; Liu, Duncan T.; Schmidtlin, Edouard; Serabyn, Eugene; Mennesson, Bertrand; Green, Joseph J.; Aguayo, Francisco; Fregoso, S. Felipe; hide

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the advantages of visible direct detection and spectroscopy of Earth-like extrasolar planets using a nulling coronagraph instrument behind a moderately sized single aperture space telescope. Our concept synthesizes a nulling interferometer by shearing the telescope pupil, with the resultant producing a deep null. We describe nulling configurations that also include methods to mitigate stellar leakage, such as spatial filtering by a coherent array of single mode fibers, and post-starlight suppression wavefront sensing and control. With diffraction limited telescope optics and similar quality components in the optical train (lambda/20), suppression of the starlight to 1e-10 is readily achievable. We describe key features of the architecture and analysis, present latest results of laboratory measurements demonstrating achievable null depth and component development, and discuss future key technical milestones.

  10. Wormholes minimally violating the null energy condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhmadi-López, Mariam [Departamento de Física, Universidade da Beira Interior, 6200 Covilhã (Portugal); Lobo, Francisco S N; Martín-Moruno, Prado, E-mail: mariam.bouhmadi@ehu.es, E-mail: fslobo@fc.ul.pt, E-mail: pmmoruno@fc.ul.pt [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofísica da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Edifício C8, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-11-01

    We consider novel wormhole solutions supported by a matter content that minimally violates the null energy condition. More specifically, we consider an equation of state in which the sum of the energy density and radial pressure is proportional to a constant with a value smaller than that of the inverse area characterising the system, i.e., the area of the wormhole mouth. This approach is motivated by a recently proposed cosmological event, denoted {sup t}he little sibling of the big rip{sup ,} where the Hubble rate and the scale factor blow up but the cosmic derivative of the Hubble rate does not [1]. By using the cut-and-paste approach, we match interior spherically symmetric wormhole solutions to an exterior Schwarzschild geometry, and analyse the stability of the thin-shell to linearized spherically symmetric perturbations around static solutions, by choosing suitable properties for the exotic material residing on the junction interface radius. Furthermore, we also consider an inhomogeneous generalization of the equation of state considered above and analyse the respective stability regions. In particular, we obtain a specific wormhole solution with an asymptotic behaviour corresponding to a global monopole.

  11. Bodyweight Assessment of Enamelin Null Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert H.-L. Chan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Enam null mice appear to be smaller than wild-type mice, which prompted the hypothesis that enamel defects negatively influence nutritional intake and bodyweight gain (BWG. We compared the BWG of Enam−/− and wild-type mice from birth (D0 to Day 42 (D42. Wild-type (WT and Enam−/− (N mice were given either hard chow (HC or soft chow (SC. Four experimental groups were studied: WTHC, WTSC, NHC, and NSC. The mother’s bodyweight (DBW and the average litter bodyweight (ALBW were obtained from D0 to D21. After D21, the pups were separated from the mother and provided the same type of food. Litter bodyweights were measured until D42. ALBW was compared at 7-day intervals using one-way ANOVA, while the influence of DBW on ALBW was analyzed by mixed-model analyses. The ALBW of Enam−/− mice maintained on hard chow (NHC was significantly lower than the two WT groups at D21 and the differences persisted into young adulthood. The ALBW of Enam−/− mice maintained on soft chow (NSC trended lower, but was not significantly different than that of the WT groups. We conclude that genotype, which affects enamel integrity, and food hardness influence bodyweight gain in postnatal and young adult mice.

  12. Kinetic Titration Series with Biolayer Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Daniel; Willbold, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Biolayer interferometry is a method to analyze protein interactions in real-time. In this study, we illustrate the usefulness to quantitatively analyze high affinity protein ligand interactions employing a kinetic titration series for characterizing the interactions between two pairs of interaction patterns, in particular immunoglobulin G and protein G B1 as well as scFv IC16 and amyloid beta (1–42). Kinetic titration series are commonly used in surface plasmon resonance and involve sequential injections of analyte over a desired concentration range on a single ligand coated sensor chip without waiting for complete dissociation between the injections. We show that applying this method to biolayer interferometry is straightforward and i) circumvents problems in data evaluation caused by unavoidable sensor differences, ii) saves resources and iii) increases throughput if screening a multitude of different analyte/ligand combinations. PMID:25229647

  13. Optical interferometry for biology and medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Nolte, David D

    2012-01-01

    This book presents the fundamental physics of optical interferometry as applied to biophysical, biological and medical research. Interference is at the core of many types of optical detection and is a powerful probe of cellular and tissue structure in interfererence microscopy and in optical coherence tomography. It is also the root cause of speckle and other imaging artefacts that limit range and resolution. For biosensor applications, the inherent sensitivity of interferometry enables ultrasensitive detection of molecules in biological samples for medical diagnostics. In this book, emphasis is placed on the physics of light scattering, beginning with the molecular origins of refraction as light propagates through matter, and then treating the stochastic nature of random fields that ultimately dominate optical imaging in cells and tissue. The physics of partial coherence plays a central role in the text, with a focus on coherence detection techniques that allow information to be selectively detected out of ...

  14. Permafrost Active Layer Seismic Interferometry Experiment (PALSIE).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Knox, Hunter Anne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); James, Stephanie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lee, Rebekah [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cole, Chris [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We present findings from a novel field experiment conducted at Poker Flat Research Range in Fairbanks, Alaska that was designed to monitor changes in active layer thickness in real time. Results are derived primarily from seismic data streaming from seven Nanometric Trillium Posthole seismometers directly buried in the upper section of the permafrost. The data were evaluated using two analysis methods: Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and ambient noise seismic interferometry. Results from the HVSR conclusively illustrated the method's effectiveness at determining the active layer's thickness with a single station. Investigations with the multi-station method (ambient noise seismic interferometry) are continuing at the University of Florida and have not yet conclusively determined active layer thickness changes. Further work continues with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine if the ground based measurements can constrain satellite imagery, which provide measurements on a much larger spatial scale.

  15. Laser interferometry for the Big Bang Observer

    OpenAIRE

    Harry, Gregory M.; Fritschel, Peter; Shaddock, Daniel A.; Folkner, William; Phinney, E. Sterl

    2006-01-01

    The Big Bang Observer is a proposed space-based gravitational-wave detector intended as a follow on mission to the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). It is designed to detect the stochastic background of gravitational waves from the early universe. We discuss how the interferometry can be arranged between three spacecraft for this mission and what research and development on key technologies are necessary to realize this scheme.

  16. Laser interferometry for the Big Bang Observer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harry, Gregory M [LIGO Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, NW17-161, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Fritschel, Peter [LIGO Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, NW17-161, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Shaddock, Daniel A [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Folkner, William [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Phinney, E Sterl [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2006-08-07

    The Big Bang Observer is a proposed space-based gravitational-wave detector intended as a follow on mission to the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). It is designed to detect the stochastic background of gravitational waves from the early universe. We discuss how the interferometry can be arranged between three spacecraft for this mission and what research and development on key technologies are necessary to realize this scheme.

  17. Interferometry and synthesis in radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, A Richard; Swenson Jr , George W

    2017-01-01

    This book is open access under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license. The third edition of this indispensable book in radio interferometry provides extensive updates to the second edition, including results and technical advances from the past decade; discussion of arrays that now span the full range of the radio part of the electromagnetic spectrum observable from the ground, 10 MHz to 1 THz; an analysis of factors that affect array speed; and an expanded discussion of digital signal-processing techniques and of scintillation phenomena and the effects of atmospheric water vapor on image distortion, among many other topics. With its comprehensiveness and detailed exposition of all aspects of the theory and practice of radio interferometry and synthesis imaging, this book has established itself as a standard reference in the field. It begins with an overview of the basic principles of radio astronomy, a short history of the development of radio interferometry, and an elementary discussion of the operation of an interferomete...

  18. Development of Speckle Interferometry Algorithm and System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamsir, A. A. M.; Jafri, M. Z. M.; Lim, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    Electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) method is a wholefield, non destructive measurement method widely used in the industries such as detection of defects on metal bodies, detection of defects in intergrated circuits in digital electronics components and in the preservation of priceless artwork. In this research field, this method is widely used to develop algorithms and to develop a new laboratory setup for implementing the speckle pattern interferometry. In speckle interferometry, an optically rough test surface is illuminated with an expanded laser beam creating a laser speckle pattern in the space surrounding the illuminated region. The speckle pattern is optically mixed with a second coherent light field that is either another speckle pattern or a smooth light field. This produces an interferometric speckle pattern that will be detected by sensor to count the change of the speckle pattern due to force given. In this project, an experimental setup of ESPI is proposed to analyze a stainless steel plate using 632.8 nm (red) wavelength of lights.

  19. Comparing Laser Interferometry and Atom Interferometry Approaches to Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John; Thorpe, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Thoroughly studied classic space-based gravitational-wave missions concepts such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) are based on laser-interferometry techniques. Ongoing developments in atom-interferometry techniques have spurred recently proposed alternative mission concepts. These different approaches can be understood on a common footing. We present an comparative analysis of how each type of instrument responds to some of the noise sources which may limiting gravitational-wave mission concepts. Sensitivity to laser frequency instability is essentially the same for either approach. Spacecraft acceleration reference stability sensitivities are different, allowing smaller spacecraft separations in the atom interferometry approach, but acceleration noise requirements are nonetheless similar. Each approach has distinct additional measurement noise issues.

  20. Tensionless branes and the null string critical dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozhilov, P.

    1998-01-01

    BRST quantization is carried out for a model of p-branes with second class constraints. After extension of the phase space the constraint algebra coincides with the one of null string when p=1. It is shown that in this case one can or cannot obtain critical dimension for the null string, depending on the choice of the operator ordering and corresponding vacuum states. When p>1, operator orderings leading to critical dimension in the p=1 case are not allowed. Admissible orderings give no restrictions on the dimension of the embedding space-time. Finally, a generalization to supersymmetric null branes is proposed

  1. Generic conditions for suppressing the coherent synchrotron radiation induced emittance growth in a two-dipole achromat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yi; Cui, Xiaohao; Huang, Xiyang; Xu, Gang

    2014-06-01

    The effect of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) becomes evident, and leads to increased beam energy spread and transverse emittance dilution, as both the emittance and bunch length of the electron beams are continuously pushed down in present and forthcoming high-brightness light sources and linear colliders. Suppressing this effect is important to preserve the expected machine performance. Methods of the R-matrix analysis and the Courant-Snyder formalism analysis have been proposed to evaluate and to suppress the emittance growth due to CSR in achromatic cells. In this paper a few important modifications are made on these two methods, which enable us to prove that these two methods are equivalent to each other. With the modified analysis, we obtain explicit and generic conditions of cancelling the CSR-driven emittance excitation in a single achromat consisting of two dipoles of arbitrary bending angles. In spite of the fact that the analysis constrains itself in a linear regime, based on the assumption that CSR-induced particle energy deviation is proportional to both θ and ρ1/3, with θ being the bending angle and ρ the bending radius, it is demonstrated through ELEGANT simulations that the conditions derived from this analysis are still effective in suppressing the emittance growth when a more detailed one-dimensional CSR model is considered. In addition, it illustrates that the emittance growth can be reduced to a lower level with the proposed conditions than with the other two approaches, such as matching the beam envelope to the CSR kick and setting the cell-to-cell betatron phase advance to an appropriate value.

  2. Emission and null coordinates: geometrical properties and physical construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coll, Bartolome; Ferrando, Joan J; Morales-Lladosa, Juan A

    2011-01-01

    A Relativistic Positioning System is defined by four clocks (emitters) broadcasting their proper time. Then, every event reached by the signals is naturally labeled by these four times which are the emission coordinates of this event. The coordinate hypersurfaces of the emission coordinates are the future light cones based on the emitter trajectories. For this reason the emission coordinates have been also named null coordinates or light coordinates. Nevertheless, other coordinate systems used in different relativistic contexts have the own right to be named null or light coordinates. Here we analyze when one can say that a coordinate is a null coordinate and when one can say that a coordinate system is null. Moreover, we examine the physical construction and the geometrical properties of several n ull coordinate systems : the emission and the reception coordinates, the radar coordinates, and the Bondi-Sachs coordinates, among others.

  3. Relative null controllability of linear systems with multiple delays in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    varying multiple delays in state and control are developed. If the uncontrolled system is uniformly asymptotically stable, and if the linear system is controllable, then the linear system is null controllable. Journal of the Nigerian Association of ...

  4. Null canonical formalism 1, Maxwell field. [Poisson brackets, boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wodkiewicz, K [Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. Fizyki Teoretycznej

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to formulate the canonical formalism on null hypersurfaces for the Maxwell electrodynamics. The set of the Poisson brackets relations for null variables of the Maxwell field is obtained. The asymptotic properties of the theory are investigated. The Poisson bracket relations for the news-functions of the Maxwell field are computed. The Hamiltonian form of the asymptotic Maxwell equations in terms of these news-functions is obtained.

  5. Null controllability of a cascade system of Schrodinger equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Lopez-Garcia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a control problem for a cascade system of two linear N-dimensional Schrodinger equations. We address the problem of null controllability by means of a control supported in a region not satisfying the classical geometrical control condition. The proof is based on the application of a Carleman estimate with degenerate weights to each one of the equations and a careful analysis of the system in order to prove null controllability with only one control force.

  6. Sequential weak continuity of null Lagrangians at the boundary

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalamajska, A.; Kraemer, S.; Kružík, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 49, 3/4 (2014), s. 1263-1278 ISSN 0944-2669 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP201/10/0357 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : null Lagrangians * nonhomogeneous nonlinear mappings * sequential weak/in measure continuity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.518, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/MTR/kruzik-sequential weak continuity of null lagrangians at the boundary.pdf

  7. On the geometry of null congruences in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahsan, Zafar; Malik, N.P.

    1977-01-01

    Some theorems for the null congruences within the framework of general theory of relativity are given. These theorems are important in themselves as they illustrate the geometric meaning of the spin coefficients. The newly developed Geroch-Held-Penrose (GHP) formalism has been used throughout the investigations. The salient features of GHP formalism that are necessary for the present work are given and these techniques are applied to a pair of null congruences C(l) and C(n). (author)

  8. A parameter set for a double-null DEMO reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, P.I.H.

    1987-01-01

    The present study is aimed at commenting on the reactor-relevance of the design principles and technology being proposed for NET. The authors propose that a double-null device serve as a basis for a NET-based demonstration reactor. Calculations are carried out to determine the parameter set for reactors based on the double-null NET design, and the results are presented in tabular form. (U.K.)

  9. Vortical null orbits, repulsive barriers, energy confinement in Kerr metric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvani, M [Padua Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Astronomia; De Felice, F

    1978-10-01

    The complete analytical description of the null trajectories in the field of a Kerr naked singularity is given. Two peculiar phenomena are described: the existence of repulsive barriers in the r < O world and the existence of null circular bound orbits which surround the singularity in 'shells'. They distribute around the surface at r = m, which is the position of the horizon in the extreme black-hole case; this suggests that a naked singularity 'remembers' the position of the last horizon.

  10. Ambitwistor strings at null infinity and (subleading) soft limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyer, Yvonne; Lipstein, Arthur E; Mason, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between BMS symmetries at null infinity and Weinberg's soft theorems for gravitons and photons together with their subleading extensions are developed using ambitwistor string theory. Ambitwistor space is the phase space of complex null geodesics in complexified space-time. We show how it can be canonically identified with the cotangent bundle of complexified null infinity. BMS symmetries of null infinity lift to give a Hamiltonian action on ambitwistor space, both in general dimension and in its twistorial four-dimensional representation. General vertex operators arise from Hamiltonians generating diffeomorphisms of ambitwistor space that determine the scattering from past to future null infinity. When a momentum eigenstate goes soft, the diffeomorphism defined by its leading and its subleading part are extended BMS generators realized in the world sheet conformal field theory of the ambitwistor string. More generally, this gives an explicit perturbative correspondence between the scattering of null geodesics and that of the gravitational field via ambitwistor string theory. (paper)

  11. Phase-shift interferometry with a digital photocamera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Trivi, Marcelo; Molesini, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    A phase-shift interferometry experiment is proposed, working on a Twyman-Green optical configuration with additional polarization components. A guideline is provided to modern phase-shift interferometry, using concepts and laboratory equipment at the level of undergraduate optics courses

  12. Atom Interferometry for Fundamental Physics and Gravity Measurements in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohel, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-cooled atoms are used as freefall test masses. The gravitational acceleration on atoms is measured by atom-wave interferometry. The fundamental concept behind atom interferometry is the quantum mechanical particle-wave duality. One can exploit the wave-like nature of atoms to construct an atom interferometer based on matter waves analogous to laser interferometers.

  13. Probing dark energy with atom interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrage, Clare; Copeland, Edmund J.; Hinds, E.A.

    2015-01-01

    Theories of dark energy require a screening mechanism to explain why the associated scalar fields do not mediate observable long range fifth forces. The archetype of this is the chameleon field. Here we show that individual atoms are too small to screen the chameleon field inside a large high-vacuum chamber, and therefore can detect the field with high sensitivity. We derive new limits on the chameleon parameters from existing experiments, and show that most of the remaining chameleon parameter space is readily accessible using atom interferometry

  14. Probing dark energy with atom interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrage, Clare; Copeland, Edmund J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Hinds, E.A., E-mail: Clare.Burrage@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: Edmund.Copeland@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: Ed.Hinds@imperial.ac.uk [Centre for Cold Matter, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    Theories of dark energy require a screening mechanism to explain why the associated scalar fields do not mediate observable long range fifth forces. The archetype of this is the chameleon field. Here we show that individual atoms are too small to screen the chameleon field inside a large high-vacuum chamber, and therefore can detect the field with high sensitivity. We derive new limits on the chameleon parameters from existing experiments, and show that most of the remaining chameleon parameter space is readily accessible using atom interferometry.

  15. Baseline-dependent averaging in radio interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnholds, S. J.; Willis, A. G.; Salvini, S.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a detailed analysis of the applicability and benefits of baseline-dependent averaging (BDA) in modern radio interferometers and in particular the Square Kilometre Array. We demonstrate that BDA does not affect the information content of the data other than a well-defined decorrelation loss for which closed form expressions are readily available. We verify these theoretical findings using simulations. We therefore conclude that BDA can be used reliably in modern radio interferometry allowing a reduction of visibility data volume (and hence processing costs for handling visibility data) by more than 80 per cent.

  16. Frequency scanning interferometry for CLIC component fiducialisation

    CERN Document Server

    Kamugasa, Solomon William; Mainaud Durand, Helene; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    We present a strategy for the fiducialisation of CLIC’s Main Beam Quadrupole (MBQ) magnets using Frequency Scanning Interferometry (FSI). We have developed complementary device for a commercial FSI system to enable coordinate determination via multilateration. Using spherical high index glass retroreflectors with a wide acceptance angle, we optimise the geometry of measurement stations with respect to fiducials -- thus improving the precision of coordinates. We demonstrate through simulations that the 10 μm uncertainty required in the vertical and lateral axes for the fiducialisation of the MBQ can be attained using FSI multilateration.

  17. Balanced detection for self-mixing interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Cavedo, Federico; Pesatori, Alessandro; Zhao, Changming; Norgia, Michele

    2017-01-15

    We propose a new detection scheme for self-mixing interferometry using two photodiodes for implementing a differential acquisition. The method is based on the phase opposition of the self-mixing signal measured between the two laser diode facet outputs. The subtraction of the two outputs implements a sort of balanced detection that improves the signal quality, and allows canceling of unwanted signals due to laser modulation and disturbances on laser supply and transimpedance amplifier. Experimental results demonstrate the benefits of differential acquisition in a system for both absolute distance and displacement-vibration measurement. This Letter provides guidance for the design of self-mixing interferometers using balanced detection.

  18. Spin dynamics in polarized neutron interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchelt, R.J.

    2000-05-01

    Since its first implementation in 1974, perfect crystal neutron interferometry has become an extremely successful method applicable to a variety of research fields. Moreover, it proved as an illustrative and didactically valuable experiment for the demonstration of the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics, the neutron being an almost ideal probe for the detection of various effects, as it interacts by all four forces of nature. For instance, the first experimental verification of the 4-pi-periodicity of spinor wave functions was performed with perfect crystal neutron interferometry, and it remains the only method known which demonstrates the quantum mechanical wave-particle-duality of massive particles at a macroscopic separation of the coherent matter waves of several centimeters. A particular position is taken herein by polarized neutron interferometry, which as a collective term comprises all techniques and experiments which not only aim at the coherent splitting and macroscopic separation of neutron beams in the interferometer with the purpose of their separate treatment, but which aim to do so with explicit employment of the spin-magnetic properties of the neutron as a fermion. Remarkable aspects may arise, for example, if nuclear and magnetic potentials are concurrently applied to a partial beam of the interferometer: among other results, it is found that - in perfect agreement to the theoretical predictions - the neutron beam leaving the interferometer features non-zero polarization, even if the incident neutron beam, and hence either of the partial beams, is unpolarized. The main emphasis of the present work lies on the development of an appropriate formalism that describes the effect of simultaneous occurrence of nuclear and magnetic interaction on the emerging intensity and polarization for an arbitrary number of sequential magnetic regions, so-called domains. The confrontation with subtle theoretical problems was inevitable during the experimental

  19. Sources of Artefacts in Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becek, K.; Borkowski, A.

    2012-07-01

    In recent years, much attention has been devoted to digital elevation models (DEMs) produced using Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR). This has been triggered by the relative novelty of the InSAR method and its world-famous product—the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) DEM. However, much less attention, if at all, has been paid to sources of artefacts in SRTM. In this work, we focus not on the missing pixels (null pixels) due to shadows or the layover effect, but rather on outliers that were undetected by the SRTM validation process. The aim of this study is to identify some of the causes of the elevation outliers in SRTM. Such knowledge may be helpful to mitigate similar problems in future InSAR DEMs, notably the ones currently being developed from data acquired by the TanDEM-X mission. We analysed many cross-sections derived from SRTM. These cross-sections were extracted over the elevation test areas, which are available from the Global Elevation Data Testing Facility (GEDTF) whose database contains about 8,500 runways with known vertical profiles. Whenever a significant discrepancy between the known runway profile and the SRTM cross-section was detected, a visual interpretation of the high-resolution satellite image was carried out to identify the objects causing the irregularities. A distance and a bearing from the outlier to the object were recorded. Moreover, we considered the SRTM look direction parameter. A comprehensive analysis of the acquired data allows us to establish that large metallic structures, such as hangars or car parking lots, are causing the outliers. Water areas or plain wet terrains may also cause an InSAR outlier. The look direction and the depression angle of the InSAR system in relation to the suspected objects influence the magnitude of the outliers. We hope that these findings will be helpful in designing the error detection routines of future InSAR or, in fact, any microwave aerial- or space-based survey. The

  20. SOURCES OF ARTEFACTS IN SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR INTERFEROMETRY DATA SETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Becek

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, much attention has been devoted to digital elevation models (DEMs produced using Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR. This has been triggered by the relative novelty of the InSAR method and its world-famous product—the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM DEM. However, much less attention, if at all, has been paid to sources of artefacts in SRTM. In this work, we focus not on the missing pixels (null pixels due to shadows or the layover effect, but rather on outliers that were undetected by the SRTM validation process. The aim of this study is to identify some of the causes of the elevation outliers in SRTM. Such knowledge may be helpful to mitigate similar problems in future InSAR DEMs, notably the ones currently being developed from data acquired by the TanDEM-X mission. We analysed many cross-sections derived from SRTM. These cross-sections were extracted over the elevation test areas, which are available from the Global Elevation Data Testing Facility (GEDTF whose database contains about 8,500 runways with known vertical profiles. Whenever a significant discrepancy between the known runway profile and the SRTM cross-section was detected, a visual interpretation of the high-resolution satellite image was carried out to identify the objects causing the irregularities. A distance and a bearing from the outlier to the object were recorded. Moreover, we considered the SRTM look direction parameter. A comprehensive analysis of the acquired data allows us to establish that large metallic structures, such as hangars or car parking lots, are causing the outliers. Water areas or plain wet terrains may also cause an InSAR outlier. The look direction and the depression angle of the InSAR system in relation to the suspected objects influence the magnitude of the outliers. We hope that these findings will be helpful in designing the error detection routines of future InSAR or, in fact, any microwave aerial- or space

  1. Persistent Scatterer Interferometry using Sentinel-1 Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monserrat, Oriol; Crosetto, Michele; Devanthery, Nuria; Cuevas-Gonzalez, Maria; Qihuan, Huang; Barra, Anna; Crippa, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    This work will be focused on the deformation measurement and monitoring using SAR imagery from the C-band Sentinel-1, a space mission funded by the European Union and carried out by the European Space Agency (ESA) within the Copernicus Programme. The work will firstly address the data processing and analysis procedure implemented by the authors. This includes both Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) tools to analyse large stacks of SAR images (say, typically more than 20 images), and Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) tools to analyse short SAR image stacks. The work will discuss the characteristics of the main products derived by using Sentinel-1 DInSAR and PSI: deformation maps, deformation velocity maps, deformation time series, residual topographic error, etc. The analysis will be carried out over different types of land use area, e.g. urban, peri-urban and rural areas. The deformation monitoring based on Sentinel-1 data will be compared with the monitoring based on data from pre-existing missions, e.g. C-band ERS and Envisat, X-band TerraSAR-X and CosmoSkyMed, etc. The comparison will concern different study areas, mainly located in Italy and Spain.

  2. Astronomical optical interferometry, II: Astrophysical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankov S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical interferometry is entering a new age with several ground- based long-baseline observatories now making observations of unprecedented spatial resolution. Based on a great leap forward in the quality and quantity of interferometric data, the astrophysical applications are not limited anymore to classical subjects, such as determination of fundamental properties of stars; namely, their effective temperatures, radii, luminosities and masses, but the present rapid development in this field allowed to move to a situation where optical interferometry is a general tool in studies of many astrophysical phenomena. Particularly, the advent of long-baseline interferometers making use of very large pupils has opened the way to faint objects science and first results on extragalactic objects have made it a reality. The first decade of XXI century is also remarkable for aperture synthesis in the visual and near-infrared wavelength regimes, which provided image reconstructions from stellar surfaces to Active Galactic Nuclei. Here I review the numerous astrophysical results obtained up to date, except for binary and multiple stars milliarcsecond astrometry, which should be a subject of an independent detailed review, taking into account its importance and expected results at microarcsecond precision level. To the results obtained with currently available interferometers, I associate the adopted instrumental settings in order to provide a guide for potential users concerning the appropriate instruments which can be used to obtain the desired astrophysical information.

  3. Observations of binary stars by speckle interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, B.L.; Beckmann, G.K.; Scaddan, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    This is the second paper in a series describing observations of binary stars using the technique of speckle interferometry. Observations were made using the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope and the 1-m telescope of the Royal Greenwich Observatory and the 1.9-m telescope of the South African Astronomical Observatory. The classical Rayleigh diffraction limits are 0.050 arcsec for the 2.5-m telescope, 0.065 arcsec for the 1.9-m telescope and 0.125 arcsec for the 1-m telescope, at a wavelength of 500 nm. The results of 29 measurements of 26 objects are presented. The objects include long period spectroscopic binaries from the 6th Catalogue of Batten, close visual binary systems from the 3rd Catalogue of Finsen and Worley and variable stars. Nine of the objects have not been previously resolved by speckle interferometry. New members are detected in the systems β Cep, p Vel and iota UMa. (author)

  4. GLINT. Gravitational-wave laser INterferometry triangle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aria, Shafa; Azevedo, Rui; Burow, Rick; Cahill, Fiachra; Ducheckova, Lada; Holroyd, Alexa; Huarcaya, Victor; Järvelä, Emilia; Koßagk, Martin; Moeckel, Chris; Rodriguez, Ana; Royer, Fabien; Sypniewski, Richard; Vittori, Edoardo; Yttergren, Madeleine

    2017-11-01

    When the universe was roughly one billion years old, supermassive black holes (103-106 solar masses) already existed. The occurrence of supermassive black holes on such short time scales are poorly understood in terms of their physical or evolutionary processes. Our current understanding is limited by the lack of observational data due the limits of electromagnetic radiation. Gravitational waves as predicted by the theory of general relativity have provided us with the means to probe deeper into the history of the universe. During the ESA Alpach Summer School of 2015, a group of science and engineering students devised GLINT (Gravitational-wave Laser INterferometry Triangle), a space mission concept capable of measuring gravitational waves emitted by black holes that have formed at the early periods after the big bang. Morespecifically at redshifts of 15 big bang) in the frequency range 0.01 - 1 Hz. GLINT design strain sensitivity of 5× 10^{-24} 1/√ { {Hz}} will theoretically allow the study of early black holes formations as well as merging events and collapses. The laser interferometry, the technology used for measuring gravitational waves, monitors the separation of test masses in free-fall, where a change of separation indicates the passage of a gravitational wave. The test masses will be shielded from disturbing forces in a constellation of three geocentric orbiting satellites.

  5. Spaceborne intensity interferometry via spacecraft formation flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribak, Erez N.; Gurfil, Pini; Moreno, Coral

    2012-07-01

    Interferometry in space has marked advantages: long integration times and observation in spectral bands where the atmosphere is opaque. When installed on separate spacecraft, it also has extended and flexible baselines for better filling of the uv plane. Intensity interferometry has an additional advantage, being insensitive to telescope and path errors, but is unfortunately much less light-sensitive. In planning towards such a mission, we are experimenting with some fundamental research issues. Towards this end, we constructed a system of three vehicles floating on an air table in formation flight, with an autonomous orbit control. Each such device holds its own light collector, detector, and transmitter, to broadcast its intensity signal towards a central receiving station. At this station we implement parallel radio receivers, analogue to digital converters, and a digital three-way correlator. Current technology limits us to ~1GHz transmission frequency, which corresponds to a comfortable 0.3m accuracy in light-bucket shape and in its relative position. Naïve calculations place our limiting magnitude at ~7 in the blue and ultraviolet, where amplitude interferometers are limited. The correlation signal rides on top of this huge signal with its own Poisson noise, requiring a very large dynamic range, which needs to be transmitted in full. We are looking at open questions such as deployable optical collectors and radio antennae of similar size of a few meters, and how they might influence our data transmission and thus set our flux limit.

  6. Resistivity at the field null of the FRC plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerwin, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    In the absence of the major destructive instabilities, the configuration time is ultimately determined by particle and flux containment. If the profiles are ''gentle,'' then the anomalous flux-loss rate depends essentially on the anomalous resistivity at the field null. Conventional electrostatic quasi-linear models of anomalous cross-field resistive diffusivity are based upon the use of rvec E x rvec B drift velocities, and hence break down at the magnetic field null. In this paper, an electromagnetic treatment valid at the field null is developed, based upon the presence of flute-parity perturbations. An expression for anomalous resistivity at the field null in the quasi-linear approximation is derived by averaging in the ignorable direction over the random phases of the perturbations. The expression is valid for arbitrary (non-local) radial shapes of the perturbing modes (for example, the eigenfunctions need not be centered at the field null), and for an arbitrary ratio of real frequency to growth rate. The effective resistivity due to flute perturbations of the MHD type will be considered. 1 ref

  7. Evaluation of null-point detection methods on simulation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Fu, Huishan; Vaivads, Andris; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Lapenta, Giovanni; Markidis, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    We model the measurements of artificial spacecraft that resemble the configuration of CLUSTER propagating in the particle-in-cell simulation of turbulent magnetic reconnection. The simulation domain contains multiple isolated X-type null-points, but the majority are O-type null-points. Simulations show that current pinches surrounded by twisted fields, analogous to laboratory pinches, are formed along the sequences of O-type nulls. In the simulation, the magnetic reconnection is mainly driven by the kinking of the pinches, at spatial scales of several ion inertial lentghs. We compute the locations of magnetic null-points and detect their type. When the satellites are separated by the fractions of ion inertial length, as it is for CLUSTER, they are able to locate both the isolated null-points, and the pinches. We apply the method to the real CLUSTER data and speculate how common are pinches in the magnetosphere, and whether they play a dominant role in the dissipation of magnetic energy.

  8. Tolerance analysis of null lenses using an end-use system performance criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, J. Michael

    2000-07-01

    An effective method of assigning tolerances to a null lens is to determine the effects of null-lens fabrication and alignment errors on the end-use system itself, not simply the null lens. This paper describes a method to assign null- lens tolerances based on their effect on any performance parameter of the end-use system.

  9. Null but not void: considerations for hypothesis testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Pamela A; Proschan, Michael A

    2013-01-30

    Standard statistical theory teaches us that once the null and alternative hypotheses have been defined for a parameter, the choice of the statistical test is clear. Standard theory does not teach us how to choose the null or alternative hypothesis appropriate to the scientific question of interest. Neither does it tell us that in some cases, depending on which alternatives are realistic, we may want to define our null hypothesis differently. Problems in statistical practice are frequently not as pristinely summarized as the classic theory in our textbooks. In this article, we present examples in statistical hypothesis testing in which seemingly simple choices are in fact rich with nuance that, when given full consideration, make the choice of the right hypothesis test much less straightforward. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. sirt1-null mice develop an autoimmune-like condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequeira, Jedon; Boily, Gino; Bazinet, Stephanie; Saliba, Sarah; He Xiaohong; Jardine, Karen; Kennedy, Christopher; Staines, William; Rousseaux, Colin; Mueller, Rudi; McBurney, Michael W.

    2008-01-01

    The sirt1 gene encodes a protein deacetylase with a broad spectrum of reported substrates. Mice carrying null alleles for sirt1 are viable on outbred genetic backgrounds so we have examined them in detail to identify the biological processes that are dependent on SIRT1. Sera from adult sirt1-null mice contain antibodies that react with nuclear antigens and immune complexes become deposited in the livers and kidneys of these animals. Some of the sirt1-null animals develop a disease resembling diabetes insipidus when they approach 2 years of age although the relationship to the autoimmunity remains unclear. We interpret these observations as consistent with a role for SIRT1 in sustaining normal immune function and in this way delaying the onset of autoimmune disease

  11. Unicorns do exist: a tutorial on "proving" the null hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streiner, David L

    2003-12-01

    Introductory statistics classes teach us that we can never prove the null hypothesis; all we can do is reject or fail to reject it. However, there are times when it is necessary to try to prove the nonexistence of a difference between groups. This most often happens within the context of comparing a new treatment against an established one and showing that the new intervention is not inferior to the standard. This article first outlines the logic of "noninferiority" testing by differentiating between the null hypothesis (that which we are trying to nullify) and the "nill" hypothesis (there is no difference), reversing the role of the null and alternate hypotheses, and defining an interval within which groups are said to be equivalent. We then work through an example and show how to calculate sample sizes for noninferiority studies.

  12. ISCO and Principal Null Congruences in Extremal Kerr Spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2012-01-01

    The effective potential in universal like coordinates(U, V, θ, φ), which are smooth across the event horizon is derived and investigated the ISCO(Innermost Stable Circular Orbits) explicitly in these coordinates for extremal Kerr spacetime. Extremization of the effective potential for timelike circular orbit shows that the existence of a stable circular geodesics in the extremal spacetime for direct orbit, precisely on the event horizon in terms of the radial coordinate which coincides with the principal null geodesic congruences of the event horizon. These null geodesic congruences mold themselves to the spacetime curvature in such a way that Weyl conformal tensor and its dual are vanished, that is why they are in-fact doubly degenerate principal null congruences.

  13. Phase-space lagrangians for null spinning strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcelos-Neto, J.; Ruiz-Altaba, M.; Ramirez, C.

    1990-01-01

    The striking fact that normal-ordered null strings have the same critical dimension as their usual non-zero tension siblings can be understood from the observation that one must, in the tensionless case, keep all the conjugate momenta as independent dynamical variables, thus doubling the number of physical degrees of freedom. The fermionic momenta give rise to a second-class constraint which cannot be solved covariantly, but can be successfully incorporated into the first-class constraint algebra after gauge-fixing. The ghost contributions to the anomaly consist of two b-c (and also two β-γ systems in the supersymmetric case), of the single Virasoro sub(super)algebra for the closed null (spinning) string. In the appropriate gauge, the null (super)string is (super)chiral. (orig.)

  14. Isotope Analysis of Uranium by Interferometry; Analyse isotopique de l'uranium par interferometrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leicknam, J P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique. Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1962-07-01

    Among the optical methods which may be used to make isotopic measurements of {sup 235}U interferometry gives promising results. An apparatus is described which has a photomultiplier as receiver; the source must therefore have characteristics (intensity, stability, fineness of emitted rays) which have led to the use of electrode-less discharge tubes whose methods of production and excitation are given. An example of calibration is given. (author) [French] Parmi les methodes optiques permettant le dosage isotopique de l'uranium 235, l'interferometrie est une technique qui donne des resultats prometteurs. On decrit ici un appareil ayant un photo-multiplicateur comme recepteur; la source doit donc avoir des caracteristiques (intensite, stabilite, finesse des raies emises) qui ont conduit a utiliser des tubes a decharge sans electrode dont on indique la fabrication et le mode d'excitation. Un exemple d'etalonnage est enfin donne. (auteur)

  15. Resolving power test of 2-D K+ K+ interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padula, Sandra S.; Roldao, Christiane G.

    1999-01-01

    Adopting a procedure previously proposed to quantitatively study pion interferometry 1 , an equivalent 2-D X 2 analysis was performed to test the resolving power of that method when applied to less favorable conditions, when no significant contribution from long lived resonances is expected, as in kaon interferometry. For that purpose, use is made of the preliminary E859 K + K + interferometry data from Si+Au collisions at 14.6 A GeV/c. Less sensitivity is achieved in the present case, although it is shown that it is still possible to distinguish two distinct decoupling geometries. (author)

  16. Generalized interferometry - I: theory for interstation correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Andreas; Stehly, Laurent; Ermert, Laura; Boehm, Christian

    2017-02-01

    We develop a general theory for interferometry by correlation that (i) properly accounts for heterogeneously distributed sources of continuous or transient nature, (ii) fully incorporates any type of linear and nonlinear processing, such as one-bit normalization, spectral whitening and phase-weighted stacking, (iii) operates for any type of medium, including 3-D elastic, heterogeneous and attenuating media, (iv) enables the exploitation of complete correlation waveforms, including seemingly unphysical arrivals, and (v) unifies the earthquake-based two-station method and ambient noise correlations. Our central theme is not to equate interferometry with Green function retrieval, and to extract information directly from processed interstation correlations, regardless of their relation to the Green function. We demonstrate that processing transforms the actual wavefield sources and actual wave propagation physics into effective sources and effective wave propagation. This transformation is uniquely determined by the processing applied to the observed data, and can be easily computed. The effective forward model, that links effective sources and propagation to synthetic interstation correlations, may not be perfect. A forward modelling error, induced by processing, describes the extent to which processed correlations can actually be interpreted as proper correlations, that is, as resulting from some effective source and some effective wave propagation. The magnitude of the forward modelling error is controlled by the processing scheme and the temporal variability of the sources. Applying adjoint techniques to the effective forward model, we derive finite-frequency Fréchet kernels for the sources of the wavefield and Earth structure, that should be inverted jointly. The structure kernels depend on the sources of the wavefield and the processing scheme applied to the raw data. Therefore, both must be taken into account correctly in order to make accurate inferences on

  17. Plasmonic color-graded nanosystems with achromatic sub-wavelength architectures for light filtering and advanced SERS detection

    KAUST Repository

    Proietti Zaccaria, Remo

    2016-03-09

    Plasmonic colour-graded systems are devices featuring a spatially variable plasmonic response over their surface. They are widely used as nanoscale colour filters; their typical size is small enough to allow integration with miniaturized electronic circuits paving the way to realize novel nanophotonic devices. Currently, most plasmonic colour-graded systems are intrinsically discrete, as their chromatic response exploits the tailored plasmon resonance of micro-architectures characterized by different size and/or geometry for each target colour. Here we report the realization of multifunctional plasmon-graded devices where continuously-graded chromatic response is achieved by smoothly tuning the composition of the resonator material while simultaneously maintaining an achromatic nanoscale geometry. The result is a new class of versatile materials: we show their application as plasmonic filters with a potential pixel size smaller than half of the exciting wavelength, but also as multiplexed surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates. Many more implementations, like photovoltaic efficiency boosters or colour routers await, and will benefit from the low fabrication cost and intrinsic plasmonic flexibility of the presented systems.

  18. Plasmonic color-graded nanosystems with achromatic sub-wavelength architectures for light filtering and advanced SERS detection

    KAUST Repository

    Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; Bisio, Francesco; Das, Gobind; Maidecchi, Giulia; Caminale, Michael; Vu, Chinh Duc; De Angelis, Francesco; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Toma, Andrea; Canepa, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic colour-graded systems are devices featuring a spatially variable plasmonic response over their surface. They are widely used as nanoscale colour filters; their typical size is small enough to allow integration with miniaturized electronic circuits paving the way to realize novel nanophotonic devices. Currently, most plasmonic colour-graded systems are intrinsically discrete, as their chromatic response exploits the tailored plasmon resonance of micro-architectures characterized by different size and/or geometry for each target colour. Here we report the realization of multifunctional plasmon-graded devices where continuously-graded chromatic response is achieved by smoothly tuning the composition of the resonator material while simultaneously maintaining an achromatic nanoscale geometry. The result is a new class of versatile materials: we show their application as plasmonic filters with a potential pixel size smaller than half of the exciting wavelength, but also as multiplexed surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates. Many more implementations, like photovoltaic efficiency boosters or colour routers await, and will benefit from the low fabrication cost and intrinsic plasmonic flexibility of the presented systems.

  19. Multi-Axis Heterodyne Interferometry (MAHI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, James

    The detection and measurement of gravitational waves represents humanity’s next, and final, opportunity to open an entirely new spectrum with which to view the universe. The first steps of this process will likely take place later this decade when the second-generation ground-based instruments such as Advanced LIGO approach design sensitivity. While these events will be historic, it will take a space-based detector to access the milliHertz gravitational wave frequency band, a band that is rich in both number and variety of sources. The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) concept has been developed over the past two decades in the US and Europe to provide access to this band. The European Space Agency recently selected The Gravitational Universe as the science theme for the 3rd Large-class mission in the Cosmic Visions Programme, with the assumption that a LISA-like instrument would be implemented for launch in 2034. NASA has expressed interest in partnering on this effort and the US community has made its own judgment on the scientific potential of a space-based gravitational wave observatory through the selection of LISA as the 3rd flagship mission in the 2010 Decadal Survey. Much of the effort has been in retiring risk for the unique technologies that comprise a gravitational wave detector. A prime focus of this effort is LISA Pathfinder (LPF), a dedicated technology demonstrator mission led by ESA with contributions from NASA and several member states. LPF’s primary objective is to validate drag-free flight as an approach to realizing an inertial reference mass. Along the way, several important technologies will be demonstrated, including picometer-level heterodyne interferometry. However, there are several important differences between the interferometry design for LISA and that for LPF. These mostly result from the fact that LISA interferometry involves multiple lasers on separate spacecraft whereas LPF can use a single laser on a single spacecraft

  20. Atom-surface potentials and atom interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babb, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Long-range atom-surface potentials characterize the physics of many actual systems and are now measurable spectroscopically in deflection of atomic beams in cavities or in reflection of atoms in atomic fountains. For a ground state, spherically symmetric atom the potential varies as -1/R 3 near the wall, where R is the atom-surface distance. For asymptotically large distances the potential is weaker and goes as -1/R 4 due to retardation arising from the finite speed of light. This diminished interaction can also be interpreted as a Casimir effect. The possibility of measuring atom-surface potentials using atomic interferometry is explored. The particular cases studied are the interactions of a ground-state alkali-metal atom and a dielectric or a conducting wall. Accurate descriptions of atom-surface potentials in theories of evanescent-wave atomic mirrors and evanescent wave-guided atoms are also discussed. (author)

  1. Real time processor for array speckle interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, G.; Florez, J.; Borelli, R.; Fong, W.; Miko, J.; Trujillo, C.

    1989-01-01

    With the construction of several new large aperture telescopes and the development of large format array detectors in the near IR, the ability to obtain diffraction limited seeing via IR array speckle interferometry offers a powerful tool. We are constructing a real-time processor to acquire image frames, perform array flat-fielding, execute a 64 x 64 element 2D complex FFT, and to average the power spectrum all within the 25 msec coherence time for speckles at near IR wavelength. The processor is a compact unit controlled by a PC with real time display and data storage capability. It provides the ability to optimize observations and obtain results on the telescope rather than waiting several weeks before the data can be analyzed and viewed with off-line methods

  2. Unification of nonclassicality measures in interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiao; Zhou, Hongyi; Gu, Mile; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2018-01-01

    From an operational perspective, nonclassicality characterizes the exotic behavior in a physical process which cannot be explained with Newtonian physics. There are several widely used measures of nonclassicality, including coherence, discord, and entanglement, each proven to be essential resources in particular situations. There exists evidence of fundamental connections among the three measures. However, the sources of nonclassicality are still regarded differently and such connections are yet to be elucidated. Here, we introduce a general framework of defining a unified nonclassicality with an operational motivation founded on the capability of interferometry. Nonclassicality appears differently as coherence, discord, and entanglement in different scenarios with local measurement, weak basis-independent measurement, and strong basis-independent measurement, respectively. Our results elaborate how these three measures are related and how they can be transformed from each other. Experimental schemes are proposed to test the results.

  3. Compressed-sensing wavenumber-scanning interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yulei; Zhou, Yanzhou; He, Zhaoshui; Ye, Shuangli; Dong, Bo; Xie, Shengli

    2018-01-01

    The Fourier transform (FT), the nonlinear least-squares algorithm (NLSA), and eigenvalue decomposition algorithm (EDA) are used to evaluate the phase field in depth-resolved wavenumber-scanning interferometry (DRWSI). However, because the wavenumber series of the laser's output is usually accompanied by nonlinearity and mode-hop, FT, NLSA, and EDA, which are only suitable for equidistant interference data, often lead to non-negligible phase errors. In this work, a compressed-sensing method for DRWSI (CS-DRWSI) is proposed to resolve this problem. By using the randomly spaced inverse Fourier matrix and solving the underdetermined equation in the wavenumber domain, CS-DRWSI determines the nonuniform sampling and spectral leakage of the interference spectrum. Furthermore, it can evaluate interference data without prior knowledge of the object. The experimental results show that CS-DRWSI improves the depth resolution and suppresses sidelobes. It can replace the FT as a standard algorithm for DRWSI.

  4. Edge effects in composites by moire interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnek, R.; Post, D.; Herakovich, C.

    1983-01-01

    The very high sensitivity of moire interferometry has permitted the present edge effect experiments to be conducted at a low average stress and strain level, assuring linear and elastic behavior in the composite material samples tested. Sensitivity corresponding to 2450 line/mm moire was achieved with a 0.408 micron/fringe. Simultaneous observations of the specimen face and edge displacement fields showed good fringe definition despite the 1-mm thickness of the specimens and the high gradients, and it is noted that the use of a carrier pattern and optical filtering was effective in even these conditions. Edge effects and dramatic displacement gradients were confirmed in angle-ply composite laminates.

  5. The digital holographic interferometry in resonant acoustic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GAPONOV, V.E.; AZAMATOV, Z.T.; REDKORECHEV, V.I.; ISAEV, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The opportunities of application of digital holographic interferometry method for studies of shapes of resonant modes in resonant acoustic spectroscopy are shown. The results of experimental measurements and analytical calculations are submitted. (authors)

  6. Investigation of surface deformations by double exposure holographic interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecevit, F.N.; Guven, H.; Aydin, R.

    1990-01-01

    Surface deformations of rigid bodies produced by thermal as well as mechanical strains have been investigated using double-exposure holographic interferometry. The recorded interference fringes have been discussed qualitatively. (author). 9 refs, 4 figs

  7. Two-dimensional χ2 analysis in kaon interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roldao, C.G.; Padula, S.S.

    1997-01-01

    This work presents preliminary results obtained from the χ 2 analysis performed on the E 859 Joint Work data. The work objective is to quantify the resolution power of the kaon two-dimension interferometry

  8. Observational Model for Precision Astrometry with the Space Interferometry Mission

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Turyshev, Slava G; Milman, Mark H

    2000-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) is a space-based 10-m baseline Michelson optical interferometer operating in the visible waveband that is designed to achieve astrometric accuracy in the single digits of the microarcsecond domain...

  9. Testing the null hypothesis: the forgotten legacy of Karl Popper?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Mick

    2013-01-01

    Testing of the null hypothesis is a fundamental aspect of the scientific method and has its basis in the falsification theory of Karl Popper. Null hypothesis testing makes use of deductive reasoning to ensure that the truth of conclusions is irrefutable. In contrast, attempting to demonstrate the new facts on the basis of testing the experimental or research hypothesis makes use of inductive reasoning and is prone to the problem of the Uniformity of Nature assumption described by David Hume in the eighteenth century. Despite this issue and the well documented solution provided by Popper's falsification theory, the majority of publications are still written such that they suggest the research hypothesis is being tested. This is contrary to accepted scientific convention and possibly highlights a poor understanding of the application of conventional significance-based data analysis approaches. Our work should remain driven by conjecture and attempted falsification such that it is always the null hypothesis that is tested. The write up of our studies should make it clear that we are indeed testing the null hypothesis and conforming to the established and accepted philosophical conventions of the scientific method.

  10. Euclidean null controllability of perturbed infinite delay systems with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Euclidean null controllability of perturbed infinite delay systems with limited control. ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... The results are established by placing conditions on the perturbation function which guarantee that, if the linear control base system is completely Euclidean controllable, then the perturbed system ...

  11. Euclidean null controllability of linear systems with delays in state ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sufficient conditions are developed for the Euclidean controllability of linear systems with delay in state and in control. Namely, if the uncontrolled system is uniformly asymptotically stable and the control equation proper, then the control system is Euclidean null controllable. Journal of the Nigerian Association of ...

  12. Future null infinity of Robertson-Walker spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreschi, O.M.

    1988-08-01

    The future null infinity for all non-contracting Robertson-Walker space time is studied systematically. A theorem is proved which establishes the expected relation between the nature of J + and the appearance or absence of cosmic event horizons. (author). 7 refs, 1 tab

  13. The Many Null Distributions of Person Fit Indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Ivo W.; Hoijtink, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    Statistical properties of person fit indices are reviewed as indicators of the extent to which a person's score pattern is in agreement with a measurement model. Distribution of a fit index and ability-free fit evaluation are discussed. The null distribution was simulated for a test of 20 items. (SLD)

  14. Spatial and null infinity via advanced and retarded conformal factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, Sean A.

    2003-01-01

    A new approach to space-time asymptotics is presented, refining Penrose's idea of conformal transformations with infinity represented by the conformal boundary of space-time. It is proposed that the Penrose conformal factor be a product of advanced and retarded conformal factors, which asymptotically relate physical and conformal null coordinates and vanish at future and past null infinity respectively. A refined definition of asymptotic flatness at both spatial and null infinity is given, including that the conformal boundary is locally a light cone, with spatial infinity as the vertex. It is shown how to choose the conformal factors so that this asymptotic light cone is locally a metric light cone. The theory is implemented in the spin-coefficient (or null-tetrad) formalism by a joint transformation of the spin-metric and spin-basis (or metric and tetrad). Asymptotic regularity conditions are proposed, based on the conformal boundary locally being a smoothly embedded metric light cone. These conditions ensure that the Bondi-Sachs energy-flux integrals of ingoing and outgoing gravitational radiation decay at spatial infinity such that the total radiated energy is finite, and that the Bondi-Sachs energy-momentum has a unique limit at spatial infinity, coinciding with the uniquely rendered ADM energy-momentum

  15. Red hair is the null phenotype of MC1R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Kimberley A; Shekar, Sri N; Cook, Anthony L; Duffy, David L; Sturm, Richard A

    2008-08-01

    The Melanocortin-1 Receptor (MC1R) is a G-protein coupled receptor, which is responsible for production of the darker eumelanin pigment and the tanning response. The MC1R gene has many polymorphisms, some of which have been linked to variation in pigmentation phenotypes within human populations. In particular, the p.D84E, p.R151C, p.R160W and p.D294 H alleles have been strongly associated with red hair, fair skin and increased skin cancer risk. These red hair colour (RHC) variants are relatively well described and are thought to result in altered receptor function, while still retaining varying levels of signaling ability in vitro. The mouse Mc1r null phenotype is yellow fur colour, the p.R151C, p.R160W and p.D294 H alleles were able to partially rescue this phenotype, leading to the question of what the true null phenotype of MC1R would be in humans. Due to the rarity of MC1R null alleles in human populations, they have only been found in the heterozygous state until now. We report here the first case of a homozygous MC1R null individual, phenotypic analysis indicates that red hair and fair skin is found in the absence of MC1R function.

  16. On the null distribution of Bayes factors in linear regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    We show that under the null, the 2 log (Bayes factor) is asymptotically distributed as a weighted sum of chi-squared random variables with a shifted mean. This claim holds for Bayesian multi-linear regression with a family of conjugate priors, namely, the normal-inverse-gamma prior, the g-prior, and...

  17. Magnetic Reconnection at a Three-dimensional Solar Null Point

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Jacob Trier; Baumann, Gisela; Galsgaard, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Using a specific solar null point reconnection case studied by Masson et al (2009; ApJ 700, 559) we investigate the dependence of the reconnection rate on boundary driving speed, numerical resolution, type of resistivity (constant or numerical), and assumed stratification (constant density or sol...

  18. Null point of discrimination in crustacean polarisation vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Martin J; Christy, John; Roberts, Nicholas W; Marshall, N Justin

    2014-07-15

    The polarisation of light is used by many species of cephalopods and crustaceans to discriminate objects or to communicate. Most visual systems with this ability, such as that of the fiddler crab, include receptors with photopigments that are oriented horizontally and vertically relative to the outside world. Photoreceptors in such an orthogonal array are maximally sensitive to polarised light with the same fixed e-vector orientation. Using opponent neural connections, this two-channel system may produce a single value of polarisation contrast and, consequently, it may suffer from null points of discrimination. Stomatopod crustaceans use a different system for polarisation vision, comprising at least four types of polarisation-sensitive photoreceptor arranged at 0, 45, 90 and 135 deg relative to each other, in conjunction with extensive rotational eye movements. This anatomical arrangement should not suffer from equivalent null points of discrimination. To test whether these two systems were vulnerable to null points, we presented the fiddler crab Uca heteropleura and the stomatopod Haptosquilla trispinosa with polarised looming stimuli on a modified LCD monitor. The fiddler crab was less sensitive to differences in the degree of polarised light when the e-vector was at -45 deg than when the e-vector was horizontal. In comparison, stomatopods showed no difference in sensitivity between the two stimulus types. The results suggest that fiddler crabs suffer from a null point of sensitivity, while stomatopods do not. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Self-Nulling Beam Combiner Using No External Phase Inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemhof, Eric E.

    2010-01-01

    A self-nulling beam combiner is proposed that completely eliminates the phase inversion subsystem from the nulling interferometer, and instead uses the intrinsic phase shifts in the beam splitters. Simplifying the flight instrument in this way will be a valuable enhancement of mission reliability. The tighter tolerances on R = T (R being reflection and T being transmission coefficients) required by the self-nulling configuration actually impose no new constraints on the architecture, as two adaptive nullers must be situated between beam splitters to correct small errors in the coatings. The new feature is exploiting the natural phase shifts in beam combiners to achieve the 180 phase inversion necessary for nulling. The advantage over prior art is that an entire subsystem, the field-flipping optics, can be eliminated. For ultimate simplicity in the flight instrument, one might fabricate coatings to very high tolerances and dispense with the adaptive nullers altogether, with all their moving parts, along with the field flipper subsystem. A single adaptive nuller upstream of the beam combiner may be required to correct beam train errors (systematic noise), but in some circumstances phase chopping reduces these errors substantially, and there may be ways to further reduce the chop residuals. Though such coatings are beyond the current state of the art, the mechanical simplicity and robustness of a flight system without field flipper or adaptive nullers would perhaps justify considerable effort on coating fabrication.

  20. Shaping Up the Practice of Null Hypothesis Significance Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainer, Howard; Robinson, Daniel H.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses criticisms of null hypothesis significance testing (NHST), suggesting that historical use of NHST was reasonable, and current users should read Sir Ronald Fisher's applied work. Notes that modifications to NHST and interpretations of its outcomes might better suit the needs of modern science. Concludes that NHST is most often useful as…

  1. Relative controllability and null controllability of linear delay systems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Necessary and sufficient conditions are established for the relative, absolute controllability and null controllability of the generalized linear delay system and its discrete prototype. The paper presents illuminating examples on previous controllability results by Manitius and Olbrot [7] and carries over the results of Onwuatu [8] ...

  2. A model for electron currents near a field null

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, R.A.; Miley, G.H.

    1987-01-01

    The fluid approximation is invalid near a field null, since the local electron orbit size and the magnetic scale length are comparable. To model the electron currents in this region we propose a single equation of motion describing the bulk electron dynamics. The equation applies to the plasma within one thermal orbit size of the null. The region is treated as unmagnetized; electrons are accelerated by the inductive electric field and drag on ions; damping is provided by viscosity due to electrons and collisions with ions. Through variational calculations and a particle tracking code for electrons, the size of the terms in the equation of motion have been estimated. The resulting equation of motion combines with Faraday's Law to produce a governing equation which implicitly contains the self inductive field of the electrons. This governing equation predicts that viscosity prevents complete cancellation of the ion current density by the electrons in the null region. Thus electron dynamics near the field null should not prevent the formation and deepening of field reversal using neutral-beam injection

  3. A comment on the null geodesic equations in Schwarzschild geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, M.A.F.; Rodrigues Junior, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    An integration of the null geodesic equations in the Schwarzschild geometry, which is valid to first order in GM/Rc 2 is presented. The solution is compared with others published in the literature and their range of validity is analysed. Some misunderstandings are also clarified. (Author) [pt

  4. Maxwell fields and shear-free null geodesic congruences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Ezra T

    2004-01-01

    We study and report on the class of vacuum Maxwell fields in Minkowski space that possess a non-degenerate, diverging, principal null vector field (null eigenvector field of the Maxwell tensor) that is tangent to a shear-free null geodesics congruence. These congruences can be either surface forming (the tangent vectors being proportional to gradients) or not, i.e., the twisting congruences. In the non-twisting case, the associated Maxwell fields are precisely the Lienard-Wiechert fields, i.e., those Maxwell fields arising from an electric monopole moving on an arbitrary worldline. The null geodesic congruence is given by the generators of the light-cones with apex on the worldline. The twisting case is much richer, more interesting and far more complicated. In a twisting subcase, where our main interests lie, the following strange interpretation can be given. If we allow the real Minkowski space to be complexified so that the real Minkowski coordinates x a take complex values, i.e., x a → z a = x a + iy a with complex metric g η ab dz a dz b , the real vacuum Maxwell equations can be extended into the complex space and rewritten as curl W=i W radical, div W=0 with W=E+iB. This subcase of Maxwell fields can then be extended into the complex space so as to have as source, a complex analytic worldline, i.e., to now become complex Lienard-Wiechart fields. When viewed as real fields on the real Minkowski space (z a = x a ), they possess a real principal null vector that is shear-free but twisting and diverging. The twist is a measure of how far the complex worldline is from the real 'slice'. Most Maxwell fields in this subcase are asymptotically flat with a time-varying set of electric and magnetic moments, all depending on the complex displacements and the complex velocities

  5. A Comparison of Plasma Performance Between Single-Null and Double-Null Configurations During Elming H-Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrie, T.W.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Allen, S.L.; Carlstrom, T.N.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R.J.; Greenfield, C.M.; Hyatt, A.W.; Lasnier, C.J.; La Haye, R.J.; Leonard, A.W.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Osborne, T.H.; Porter, G.D.; Rhodes, T.L.; Thomas, D.M.; Watkins, J.G.; West, W.P.; Wolf, N.S.

    1999-01-01

    Tokamak plasma performance generally improves with increased shaping of the plasma cross section, such as higher elongation and higher triangularity. The stronger shaping, especially higher triangularity, leads to changes in the magnetic topology of the divertor. Because there are engineering and divertor physics issues associated with changes in the details of the divertor flux geometry, especially as the configuration transitions from a single-null (SN) divertor to a marginally balanced double-null (DN) divertor, we have undertaken a systematic evaluation of the plasma characteristics as the magnetic geometry is varied, particularly with respect to (1) energy confinement, (2) the response of the plasma to deuterium gas fueling, (3) the operational density range for the ELMing H-mode, and (4) heat flux sharing by the diverters. To quantify the degree of divertor imbalance (or equivalently, to what degree the shape is double-null or single-null), we define a parameter DRSEP. DRSEP is taken as the radial distance between the upper divertor separatrix and the lower divertor separatrix, as determined at the outboard midplane. For example, if DRSEP=O, the configuration is a magnetically balanced DN; if DRSEP = +1.0 cm, the divertor configuration is biased toward the upper divertor. Three examples are shown in Fig. 1. In the following discussions, VB drift is directed toward the lower divertor

  6. LISA time-delay interferometry zero-signal solution: Geometrical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinto, Massimo; Larson, Shane L.

    2004-01-01

    Time-delay interferometry (TDI) is the data processing technique needed for generating interferometric combinations of data measured by the multiple Doppler readouts available onboard the three Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) spacecraft. Within the space of all possible interferometric combinations TDI can generate, we have derived a specific combination that has zero response to the gravitational wave signal, and called it the zero-signal solution (ZSS). This is a two-parameter family of linear combinations of the generators of the TDI space, and its response to a gravitational wave becomes null when these two parameters coincide with the values of the angles of the source location in the sky. Remarkably, the ZSS does not rely on any assumptions about the gravitational waveform, and in fact it works for waveforms of any kind. Our approach is analogous to the data analysis method introduced by Guersel and Tinto in the context of networks of Earth-based, wideband, interferometric gravitational wave detectors observing in coincidence a gravitational wave burst. The ZSS should be regarded as an application of the Guersel and Tinto method to the LISA data

  7. Extended averaging phase-shift schemes for Fizeau interferometry on high-numerical-aperture spherical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Jan

    2010-08-01

    Phase-shifting Fizeau interferometry on spherical surfaces is impaired by phase-shift errors increasing with the numerical aperture, unless a custom optical set-up or wavelength shifting is used. This poses a problem especially for larger numerical apertures, and requires good error tolerance of the phase-shift method used; but it also constitutes a useful testing facility for phase-shift formulae, because a vast range of phase-shift intervals can be tested in a single measurement. In this paper I show how the "characteristic polynomials" method can be used to generate a phase-shifting method for the actual numerical aperture, and analyse residual cyclical phase errors by comparing a phase map from an interferogram with a few fringes to a phase mpa from a nulled fringe. Unrelated to the phase-shift miscalibration, thirdharmonic error fringes are found. These can be dealt with by changing the nominal phase shift from 90°/step to 60°/step and re-tailoring the evaluation formula for third-harmonic rejection. The residual error has the same frequency as the phase-shift signal itself, and can be removed by averaging measurements. Some interesting features of the characteristic polynomials for the averaged formulae emerge, which also shed some light on the mechanism that generates cyclical phase errors.

  8. Detection of long nulls in PSR B1706-16, a pulsar with large timing irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Arun; Joshi, Bhal Chandra; Manoharan, P. K.; Krishnakumar, M. A.

    2018-04-01

    Single pulse observations, characterizing in detail, the nulling behaviour of PSR B1706-16 are being reported for the first time in this paper. Our regular long duration monitoring of this pulsar reveals long nulls of 2-5 h with an overall nulling fraction of 31 ± 2 per cent. The pulsar shows two distinct phases of emission. It is usually in an active phase, characterized by pulsations interspersed with shorter nulls, with a nulling fraction of about 15 per cent, but it also rarely switches to an inactive phase, consisting of long nulls. The nulls in this pulsar are concurrent between 326.5 and 610 MHz. Profile mode changes accompanied by changes in fluctuation properties are seen in this pulsar, which switches from mode A before a null to mode B after the null. The distribution of null durations in this pulsar is bimodal. With its occasional long nulls, PSR B1706-16 joins the small group of intermediate nullers, which lie between the classical nullers and the intermittent pulsars. Similar to other intermediate nullers, PSR B1706-16 shows high timing noise, which could be due to its rare long nulls if one assumes that the slowdown rate during such nulls is different from that during the bursts.

  9. Using Seismic Interferometry to Investigate Seismic Swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzel, E.; Morency, C.; Templeton, D. C.

    2017-12-01

    Seismicity provides a direct means of measuring the physical characteristics of active tectonic features such as fault zones. Hundreds of small earthquakes often occur along a fault during a seismic swarm. This seismicity helps define the tectonically active region. When processed using novel geophysical techniques, we can isolate the energy sensitive to the fault, itself. Here we focus on two methods of seismic interferometry, ambient noise correlation (ANC) and the virtual seismometer method (VSM). ANC is based on the observation that the Earth's background noise includes coherent energy, which can be recovered by observing over long time periods and allowing the incoherent energy to cancel out. The cross correlation of ambient noise between a pair of stations results in a waveform that is identical to the seismogram that would result if an impulsive source located at one of the stations was recorded at the other, the Green function (GF). The calculation of the GF is often stable after a few weeks of continuous data correlation, any perturbations to the GF after that point are directly related to changes in the subsurface and can be used for 4D monitoring.VSM is a style of seismic interferometry that provides fast, precise, high frequency estimates of the Green's function (GF) between earthquakes. VSM illuminates the subsurface precisely where the pressures are changing and has the potential to image the evolution of seismicity over time, including changes in the style of faulting. With hundreds of earthquakes, we can calculate thousands of waveforms. At the same time, VSM collapses the computational domain, often by 2-3 orders of magnitude. This allows us to do high frequency 3D modeling in the fault region. Using data from a swarm of earthquakes near the Salton Sea, we demonstrate the power of these techniques, illustrating our ability to scale from the far field, where sources are well separated, to the near field where their locations fall within each other

  10. Nonparametric Regression Estimation for Multivariate Null Recurrent Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biqing Cai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses nonparametric kernel regression with the regressor being a \\(d\\-dimensional \\(\\beta\\-null recurrent process in presence of conditional heteroscedasticity. We show that the mean function estimator is consistent with convergence rate \\(\\sqrt{n(Th^{d}}\\, where \\(n(T\\ is the number of regenerations for a \\(\\beta\\-null recurrent process and the limiting distribution (with proper normalization is normal. Furthermore, we show that the two-step estimator for the volatility function is consistent. The finite sample performance of the estimate is quite reasonable when the leave-one-out cross validation method is used for bandwidth selection. We apply the proposed method to study the relationship of Federal funds rate with 3-month and 5-year T-bill rates and discover the existence of nonlinearity of the relationship. Furthermore, the in-sample and out-of-sample performance of the nonparametric model is far better than the linear model.

  11. Pair of null gravitating shells: III. Algebra of Dirac's observables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouletsis, I; Hajicek, P

    2002-01-01

    The study of the two-shell system started in 'pair of null gravitating shells I and II' is continued. The pull back of the Liouville form to the constraint surface, which contains complete information about the Poisson brackets of Dirac observables, is computed in the singular double-null Eddington-Finkelstein (DNEF) gauge. The resulting formula shows that the variables conjugate to the Schwarzschild masses of the intershell spacetimes are simple combinations of the values of the DNEF coordinates on these spacetimes at the shells. The formula is valid for any number of in- and outgoing shells. After applying it to the two-shell system, the symplectic form is calculated for each component of the physical phase space; regular coordinates are found, defining it as a symplectic manifold. The symplectic transformation between the initial and final values of observables for the shell-crossing case is given

  12. Local modular Hamiltonians from the quantum null energy condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeller, Jason; Leichenauer, Stefan; Levine, Adam; Shahbazi-Moghaddam, Arvin

    2018-03-01

    The vacuum modular Hamiltonian K of the Rindler wedge in any relativistic quantum field theory is given by the boost generator. Here we investigate the modular Hamiltonian for more general half-spaces which are bounded by an arbitrary smooth cut of a null plane. We derive a formula for the second derivative of the modular Hamiltonian with respect to the coordinates of the cut which schematically reads K''=Tv v . This formula can be integrated twice to obtain a simple expression for the modular Hamiltonian. The result naturally generalizes the standard expression for the Rindler modular Hamiltonian to this larger class of regions. Our primary assumptions are the quantum null energy condition—an inequality between the second derivative of the von Neumann entropy of a region and the stress tensor—and its saturation in the vacuum for these regions. We discuss the validity of these assumptions in free theories and holographic theories to all orders in 1 /N .

  13. Segmented Aperture Interferometric Nulling Testbed (SAINT) II: component systems update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Brian A.; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Helmbrecht, Michael A.; Petrone, Peter; Burke, Elliot; Corsetti, James; Dillon, Thomas; Lea, Andrew; Pellicori, Samuel; Sheets, Teresa; Shiri, Ron; Agolli, Jack; DeVries, John; Eberhardt, Andrew; McCabe, Tyler

    2017-09-01

    This work presents updates to the coronagraph and telescope components of the Segmented Aperture Interferometric Nulling Testbed (SAINT). The project pairs an actively-controlled macro-scale segmented mirror with the Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) towards demonstrating capabilities for the future space observatories needed to directly detect and characterize a significant sample of Earth-sized worlds around nearby stars in the quest for identifying those which may be habitable and possibly harbor life. Efforts to improve the VNC wavefront control optics and mechanisms towards repeating narrowband results are described. A narrative is provided for the design of new optical components aimed at enabling broadband performance. Initial work with the hardware and software interface for controlling the segmented telescope mirror is also presented.

  14. Lovelock vacua with a recurrent null vector field

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ortaggio, Marcello

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 4 (2018), č. článku 044051. ISSN 2470-0010 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-10042S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Lovelock gravity * recurrent null vector field Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics Impact factor: 4.568, year: 2016 https://journals.aps.org/prd/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevD.97.044051

  15. Spherical null geodesics of rotating Kerr black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2013-01-01

    The non-equatorial spherical null geodesics of rotating Kerr black holes are studied analytically. Unlike the extensively studied equatorial circular orbits whose radii are known analytically, no closed-form formula exists in the literature for the radii of generic (non-equatorial) spherical geodesics. We provide here an approximate formula for the radii r ph (a/M;cosi) of these spherical null geodesics, where a/M is the dimensionless angular momentum of the black hole and cos i is an effective inclination angle (with respect to the black-hole equatorial plane) of the orbit. It is well-known that the equatorial circular geodesics of the Kerr spacetime (the prograde and the retrograde orbits with cosi=±1) are characterized by a monotonic dependence of their radii r ph (a/M;cosi=±1) on the dimensionless spin-parameter a/M of the black hole. We use here our novel analytical formula to reveal that this well-known property of the equatorial circular geodesics is actually not a generic property of the Kerr spacetime. In particular, we find that counter-rotating spherical null orbits in the range (3√(3)−√(59))/4≲cosi ph (a/M;cosi=const) on the dimensionless rotation-parameter a/M of the black hole. Furthermore, it is shown that spherical photon orbits of rapidly-rotating black holes are characterized by a critical inclination angle, cosi=√(4/7), above which the coordinate radii of the orbits approach the black-hole radius in the extremal limit. We prove that this critical inclination angle signals a transition in the physical properties of the spherical null geodesics: in particular, it separates orbits which are characterized by finite proper distances to the black-hole horizon from orbits which are characterized by infinite proper distances to the horizon.

  16. The quantum null energy condition in curved space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zicao; Koeller, Jason; Marolf, Donald

    2017-11-01

    The quantum null energy condition (QNEC) is a conjectured bound on components (Tkk = Tab ka k^b) of the stress tensor along a null vector k a at a point p in terms of a second k-derivative of the von Neumann entropy S on one side of a null congruence N through p generated by k a . The conjecture has been established for super-renormalizeable field theories at points p that lie on a bifurcate Killing horizon with null tangent k a and for large-N holographic theories on flat space. While the Koeller-Leichenauer holographic argument clearly yields an inequality for general ( p, k^a) , more conditions are generally required for this inequality to be a useful QNEC. For d≤slant 3 , for arbitrary backgroud metric we show that the QNEC is naturally finite and independent of renormalization scheme when the expansion θ of N at the point p vanishes. This is consistent with the original QNEC conjecture which required θ and the shear σab to satisfy θ \\vert _p= \\dotθ\\vert p =0 , σab\\vert _p=0 . But for d=4, 5 more conditions than even these are required. In particular, we also require the vanishing of additional derivatives and a dominant energy condition. In the above cases the holographic argument does indeed yield a finite QNEC, though for d≥slant6 we argue these properties to fail even for weakly isolated horizons (where all derivatives of θ, σab vanish) that also satisfy a dominant energy condition. On the positive side, a corrollary to our work is that, when coupled to Einstein-Hilbert gravity, d ≤slant 3 holographic theories at large N satisfy the generalized second law (GSL) of thermodynamics at leading order in Newton’s constant G. This is the first GSL proof which does not require the quantum fields to be perturbations to a Killing horizon.

  17. Null half-supersymmetric solutions in five-dimensional supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, Jai; Gutowski, Jan B.; Sabra, Wafic

    2008-01-01

    We classify half-supersymmetric solutions of gauged N = 2, D = 5 supergravity coupled to an arbitrary number of abelian vector multiplets for which all of the Killing spinors generate null Killing vectors. We show that there are four classes of solutions, and in each class we find the metric, scalars and gauge field strengths. When the scalar manifold is symmetric, the solutions correspond to a class of local near horizon geometries recently found by Kunduri and Lucietti.

  18. Yang-Mills theory in null path space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kent, S.L.

    1982-01-01

    A reformulation of classical GL(n,c) Yang-Mills theory is presented. The reformulation is in terms of a single matrix-valued function G on a six-dimensional subspace of the space of paths in Minkowski space, M. This subspace is defined as the null paths beginning at each point, (X/sup a/), of M and ending at future null infinity. A convenient parametrization of these paths is to give the Minkowski coordinates x/sup a/ of the starting point and the (complex) stereographic coordinates (xi, antixi) on S 2 which label the light cone generators of x/sup a/. A path is thus labeled by (x/sup a/,xi, antixi). The function G(x/sup a/,xi, antixi) is defined by the parallel propagation (with a given connection) of n linearly independent fiber vectors from x/sup a/ to null infinity along the (xi, antixi) generator. From knowledge of G(x/sup a/,xi, antixi) the connection one-form γ/sub a/ at the point x/sup a/ can be obtained is shown. Furthermore how the vacuum Yang-Mills equations can be imposed on the G is shown. This results in a rather complicated integro-differential equation for G which involves the characteristic initial data (essentially the radiation field) acting as the driving term. Two simple special cases are immediately obtainable; in the case of self-dual (or anti-self dual) fields the author obtains a simple derivation of the Sparling equation, namely delta G = -GA, while for Abelian (Maxwell) theories obtained the equation delta anti delta log G = -anti delta A-anti delta A, where A and its conjugate anti A are the characteristic free data given on null infinity. The latter equation is equivalent to the vacuum Maxwell equations

  19. Shearfree congruences of null geodesics and Killing tensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, W.; Ruediger, R.

    1980-01-01

    In this communication, the mutual connections between quantities that are generalizations of the notion of a a Killing vector field are investigated. A classification of these quantities in terms of a complex vector field αsub(a) is given. A common feature of all these quantities is that they imply the existence of a pair of shearfree geodetic null congruences. There are no explicit restrictions posed on the Ricci tensor. (author)

  20. Lovelock vacua with a recurrent null vector field

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ortaggio, Marcello

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 4 (2018), č. článku 044051. ISSN 2470-0010 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-10042S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Lovelock gravity * recurrent null vector field Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics Impact factor: 4.568, year: 2016 https://journals. aps .org/prd/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevD.97.044051

  1. In Search of the Null: The NCSA 2003 Presidential Address

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Davison

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Sociologists usually publish articles where the results show statistically significant differences between two groups of people. Results which show the opposite are generally called 'negative findings,' and are not considered publishable. Davison argues that we really ought to be looking for and encouraging the null finding, especially when social inequality and poverty are the issue. In addition, society as a whole should be working to eliminate poverty and inequality

  2. Zero emission city. Preliminary study; Null-Emissions-Stadt. Sondierungsstudie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diefenbach, N; Enseling, A; Werner, P; Flade, A; Greiff, R; Hennings, D; Muehlich, E; Wullkopf, U; Sturm, P; Kieslich, W; Born, R; Grossklos, M; Hatteh, R; Mueller, K; Ratschow, A; Valouch-Fornoff, C

    2002-10-01

    The idea of a 'zero emission city' is investigated by the Institut Wohnen und Umwelt on behalf of the Federal Minister of Education and Research. After describing the current situation and defining the key parameters of a 'zero emission city', settlement structures, power supply, production processes and transportation are analyzed and linked with the communal action level to obtain a framework for research, activities and actions. The study ends with recommendations for a research programme 'zero emission city'. (orig.) [German] Die von den Staedten der Industrielaender ausgehenden Emissionen stellen im Hinblick auf die globalen Belastungen wie z.B. Treibhauseffekt, Ozonabbau und Versauerung das Hauptproblem dar. Aus diesem Grunde bietet es sich an, den Gedanken der 'Null-Emissions-Stadt', der Vision einer moeglichst emissionsfreien Stadt, aufzugreifen und auf seine Tragfaehigkeit fuer innovative Handlungsmodelle forschungsstrategisch zu ueberpruefen. Das Bundesministerium fuer Bildung und Forschung hat das Institut Wohnen und Umwelt beauftragt, in einer Sondierungsstudie dieser Fragestellung nachzugehen. Nach der Festlegung der Ausgangsbedingungen und Eckpunkte der Vision 'Null-Emissions-Stadt' und der Analyse der vier Handlungsfelder Siedlungsstrukturen, Energieversorgung, Produktionsprozesse (Kreislaufwirtschaft) und Verkehr werden diese aufgegriffen und mit der kommunalen Handlungsebene verknuepft und zu einem Forschungs-, Handlungs- und moeglichen Aktionsrahmen zusammengefuegt. Die Studie schliesst mit Hinweisen fuer die Gestaltung eines Forschungsprogramms 'Null-Emissions-Stadt'. (orig.)

  3. The Quantum Focussing Conjecture and Quantum Null Energy Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeller, Jason

    Evidence has been gathering over the decades that spacetime and gravity are best understood as emergent phenomenon, especially in the context of a unified description of quantum mechanics and gravity. The Quantum Focussing Conjecture (QFC) and Quantum Null Energy Condition (QNEC) are two recently-proposed relationships between entropy and geometry, and energy and entropy, respectively, which further strengthen this idea. In this thesis, we study the QFC and the QNEC. We prove the QNEC in a variety of contexts, including free field theories on Killing horizons, holographic theories on Killing horizons, and in more general curved spacetimes. We also consider the implications of the QFC and QNEC in asymptotically flat space, where they constrain the information content of gravitational radiation arriving at null infinity, and in AdS/CFT, where they are related to other semiclassical inequalities and properties of boundary-anchored extremal area surfaces. It is shown that the assumption of validity and vacuum-state saturation of the QNEC for regions of flat space defined by smooth cuts of null planes implies a local formula for the modular Hamiltonian of these regions. We also demonstrate that the QFC as originally conjectured can be violated in generic theories in d ≥ 5, which led the way to an improved formulation subsequently suggested by Stefan Leichenauer.

  4. Zero emission city. Preliminary study; Null-Emissions-Stadt. Sondierungsstudie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diefenbach, N.; Enseling, A.; Werner, P.; Flade, A.; Greiff, R.; Hennings, D.; Muehlich, E.; Wullkopf, U.; Sturm, P.; Kieslich, W.; Born, R.; Grossklos, M.; Hatteh, R.; Mueller, K.; Ratschow, A.; Valouch-Fornoff, C.

    2002-10-01

    The idea of a 'zero emission city' is investigated by the Institut Wohnen und Umwelt on behalf of the Federal Minister of Education and Research. After describing the current situation and defining the key parameters of a 'zero emission city', settlement structures, power supply, production processes and transportation are analyzed and linked with the communal action level to obtain a framework for research, activities and actions. The study ends with recommendations for a research programme 'zero emission city'. (orig.) [German] Die von den Staedten der Industrielaender ausgehenden Emissionen stellen im Hinblick auf die globalen Belastungen wie z.B. Treibhauseffekt, Ozonabbau und Versauerung das Hauptproblem dar. Aus diesem Grunde bietet es sich an, den Gedanken der 'Null-Emissions-Stadt', der Vision einer moeglichst emissionsfreien Stadt, aufzugreifen und auf seine Tragfaehigkeit fuer innovative Handlungsmodelle forschungsstrategisch zu ueberpruefen. Das Bundesministerium fuer Bildung und Forschung hat das Institut Wohnen und Umwelt beauftragt, in einer Sondierungsstudie dieser Fragestellung nachzugehen. Nach der Festlegung der Ausgangsbedingungen und Eckpunkte der Vision 'Null-Emissions-Stadt' und der Analyse der vier Handlungsfelder Siedlungsstrukturen, Energieversorgung, Produktionsprozesse (Kreislaufwirtschaft) und Verkehr werden diese aufgegriffen und mit der kommunalen Handlungsebene verknuepft und zu einem Forschungs-, Handlungs- und moeglichen Aktionsrahmen zusammengefuegt. Die Studie schliesst mit Hinweisen fuer die Gestaltung eines Forschungsprogramms 'Null-Emissions-Stadt'. (orig.)

  5. Kastor-Traschen black holes, null geodesics and conformal circles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Kastor-Traschen metric is a time-dependent solution of the Einstein-Maxwell equations with positive cosmological constant Λ which can be used to describe an arbitrary number of charged dynamical black holes. In this paper, we consider the null geodesic structure of this solution, in particular, focusing on the projection to the space of orbits of the timelike conformal retraction. It is found that these projected light rays arise as integral curves of a system of third-order ordinary differential equations. This system is not uniquely defined, however, and we use the inherent freedom to construct a new system whose integral curves coincide with the projection of distinguished null curves of Kastor-Traschen arising from a magnetic flow. We discuss our results in the one-centre case and demonstrate a link to conformal circles in the limit Λ → 0. We also show how to construct analytic expressions for the projected null geodesics of this metric by exploiting a well-known diffeomorphism between the K-T metric and extremal Reissner-Nordstrom-de Sitter. We make some remarks about the two-centre solution and demonstrate a link with the one-centre case. (paper)

  6. "Time sweet time": circadian characterization of galectin-1 null mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabinovich Gabriel A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence suggests a two-way interaction between the immune and circadian systems. Circadian control of immune factors, as well as the effect of immunological variables on circadian rhythms, might be key elements in both physiological and pathological responses to the environment. Among these relevant factors, galectin-1 is a member of a family of evolutionarily-conserved glycan-binding proteins with both extracellular and intracellular effects, playing important roles in immune cell processes and inflammatory responses. Many of these actions have been studied through the use of mice with a null mutation in the galectin-1 (Lgals1 gene. To further analyze the role of endogenous galectin-1 in vivo, we aimed to characterize the circadian behavior of galectin-1 null (Lgals1-/- mice. Methods We analyzed wheel-running activity in light-dark conditions, constant darkness, phase responses to light pulses (LP at circadian time 15, and reentrainment to 6 hour shifts in light-dark schedule in wild-type (WT and Lgals1-/- mice. Results We found significant differences in free-running period, which was longer in mutant than in WT mice (24.02 vs 23.57 h, p alpha (14.88 vs. 12.35 circadian h, p Conclusions Given the effect of a null mutation on circadian period and entrainment, we indicate that galectin-1 could be involved in the regulation of murine circadian rhythmicity. This is the first study implicating galectin-1 in the mammalian circadian system.

  7. Principles and methods of neutron interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonse, U.

    1978-01-01

    The merits of Angstrom range interferometry with neutrons are briefly outlined. The energy (wavelength) range which is accessible with the triple Laue case (LLL) crystal interferometer is estimated, assuming a neutron source with flux characteristics similar to that of the HFR at Grenoble. It appears that a range in E from roughly 2.3 meV to 8.2eV (lambda approximatly equal to 6A to 0.1A) can be covered with LLL interferometers manufactured with presently available perfect crystals of silicon. Within this range there exists a number of scattering resonances that it seems worth while to investigate interferometrically. The attainable resolution ΔE/E is estimated to be at least 10 -3 for E -2 above. The essentials of zero absorption Bragg diffraction optics of the neutron LLL interferometer are described. Virtues and weaknesses of different LLL geometries are discussed. The influence of geometrical abberrations, strain and position instabilities are surveyed. Aspects of coherent scattering length measurements and of neutron phase topography are discussed

  8. 3D super-virtual refraction interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Kai

    2014-08-05

    Super-virtual refraction interferometry enhances the signal-to-noise ratio of far-offset refractions. However, when applied to 3D cases, traditional 2D SVI suffers because the stationary positions of the source-receiver pairs might be any place along the recording plane, not just along a receiver line. Moreover, the effect of enhancing the SNR can be limited because of the limitations in the number of survey lines, irregular line geometries, and azimuthal range of arrivals. We have developed a 3D SVI method to overcome these problems. By integrating along the source or receiver lines, the cross-correlation or the convolution result of a trace pair with the source or receiver at the stationary position can be calculated without the requirement of knowing the stationary locations. In addition, the amplitudes of the cross-correlation and convolution results are largely strengthened by integration, which is helpful to further enhance the SNR. In this paper, both synthetic and field data examples are presented, demonstrating that the super-virtual refractions generated by our method have accurate traveltimes and much improved SNR.

  9. On marginally resolved objects in optical interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachaume, R.

    2003-03-01

    With the present and soon-to-be breakthrough of optical interferometry, countless objects shall be within reach of interferometers; yet, most of them are expected to remain only marginally resolved with hectometric baselines. In this paper, we tackle the problem of deriving the properties of a marginally resolved object from its optical visibilities. We show that they depend on the moments of flux distribution of the object: centre, mean angular size, asymmetry, and curtosis. We also point out that the visibility amplitude is a second-order phenomenon, whereas the phase is a combination of a first-order term, giving the location of the photocentre, and a third-order term, more difficult to detect than the visibility amplitude, giving an asymmetry coefficient of the object. We then demonstrate that optical visibilities are not a good model constraint while the object stays marginally resolved, unless observations are carried out at different wavelengths. Finally, we show an application of this formalism to circumstellar discs.

  10. High-Speed Interferometry Under Impacting Drops

    KAUST Repository

    Langley, Kenneth R.; Li, Erqiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade the rapid advances in high-speed video technology, have opened up to study many multi-phase fluid phenomena, which tend to occur most rapidly on the smallest length-scales. One of these is the entrapment of a small bubble under a drop impacting onto a solid surface. Here we have gone from simply observing the presence of the bubble to detailed imaging of the formation of a lubricating air-disc under the drop center and its subsequent contraction into the bubble. Imaging the full shape-evolution of the air-disc has required μm and sub-μs space and time resolutions. Time-resolved 200 ns interferometry with monochromatic light, has allowed us to follow individual fringes to obtain absolute air-layer thicknesses, based on the eventual contact with the solid. We can follow the evolution of the dimple shape as well as the compression of the gas. The improved imaging has also revealed new levels of detail, like the nature of the first contact which produces a ring of micro-bubbles, highlighting the influence of nanometric surface roughness. Finally, for impacts of ultra-viscous drops we see gliding on ~100 nm thick rarified gas layers, followed by extreme wetting at numerous random spots.

  11. Time delay interferometry with moving spacecraft arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinto, Massimo; Estabrook, F.B.; Armstrong, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Space-borne interferometric gravitational wave detectors, sensitive in the low-frequency (millihertz) band, will fly in the next decade. In these detectors the spacecraft-to-spacecraft light-travel-times will necessarily be unequal, time varying, and (due to aberration) have different time delays on up and down links. The reduction of data from moving interferometric laser arrays in solar orbit will in fact encounter nonsymmetric up- and down-link light time differences that are about 100 times larger than has previously been recognized. The time-delay interferometry (TDI) technique uses knowledge of these delays to cancel the otherwise dominant laser phase noise and yields a variety of data combinations sensitive to gravitational waves. Under the assumption that the (different) up- and down-link time delays are constant, we derive the TDI expressions for those combinations that rely only on four interspacecraft phase measurements. We then turn to the general problem that encompasses time dependence of the light-travel times along the laser links. By introducing a set of noncommuting time-delay operators, we show that there exists a quite general procedure for deriving generalized TDI combinations that account for the effects of time dependence of the arms. By applying our approach we are able to re-derive the 'flex-free' expression for the unequal-arm Michelson combinations X 1 , and obtain the generalized expressions for the TDI combinations called relay, beacon, monitor, and symmetric Sagnac

  12. High-Speed Interferometry Under Impacting Drops

    KAUST Repository

    Langley, Kenneth R.

    2017-08-31

    Over the last decade the rapid advances in high-speed video technology, have opened up to study many multi-phase fluid phenomena, which tend to occur most rapidly on the smallest length-scales. One of these is the entrapment of a small bubble under a drop impacting onto a solid surface. Here we have gone from simply observing the presence of the bubble to detailed imaging of the formation of a lubricating air-disc under the drop center and its subsequent contraction into the bubble. Imaging the full shape-evolution of the air-disc has required μm and sub-μs space and time resolutions. Time-resolved 200 ns interferometry with monochromatic light, has allowed us to follow individual fringes to obtain absolute air-layer thicknesses, based on the eventual contact with the solid. We can follow the evolution of the dimple shape as well as the compression of the gas. The improved imaging has also revealed new levels of detail, like the nature of the first contact which produces a ring of micro-bubbles, highlighting the influence of nanometric surface roughness. Finally, for impacts of ultra-viscous drops we see gliding on ~100 nm thick rarified gas layers, followed by extreme wetting at numerous random spots.

  13. Bounding the Higgs boson width through interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Lance J; Li, Ye

    2013-09-13

    We study the change in the diphoton-invariant-mass distribution for Higgs boson decays to two photons, due to interference between the Higgs resonance in gluon fusion and the continuum background amplitude for gg→γγ. Previously, the apparent Higgs mass was found to shift by around 100 MeV in the standard model in the leading-order approximation, which may potentially be experimentally observable. We compute the next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to the apparent mass shift, which reduce it by about 40%. The apparent mass shift may provide a way to measure, or at least bound, the Higgs boson width at the Large Hadron Collider through "interferometry." We investigate how the shift depends on the Higgs width, in a model that maintains constant Higgs boson signal yields. At Higgs widths above 30 MeV, the mass shift is over 200 MeV and increases with the square root of the width. The apparent mass shift could be measured by comparing with the ZZ* channel, where the shift is much smaller. It might be possible to measure the shift more accurately by exploiting its strong dependence on the Higgs transverse momentum.

  14. Experimental demonstration of deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isleif, Katharina-Sophie; Gerberding, Oliver; Schwarze, Thomas S; Mehmet, Moritz; Heinzel, Gerhard; Cervantes, Felipe Guzmán

    2016-01-25

    Experiments for space and ground-based gravitational wave detectors often require a large dynamic range interferometric position readout of test masses with 1 pm/√Hz precision over long time scales. Heterodyne interferometer schemes that achieve such precisions are available, but they require complex optical set-ups, limiting their scalability for multiple channels. This article presents the first experimental results on deep frequency modulation interferometry, a new technique that combines sinusoidal laser frequency modulation in unequal arm length interferometers with a non-linear fit algorithm. We have tested the technique in a Michelson and a Mach-Zehnder Interferometer topology, respectively, demonstrated continuous phase tracking of a moving mirror and achieved a performance equivalent to a displacement sensitivity of 250 pm/Hz at 1 mHz between the phase measurements of two photodetectors monitoring the same optical signal. By performing time series fitting of the extracted interference signals, we measured that the linearity of the laser frequency modulation is on the order of 2% for the laser source used.

  15. Quasar Astrophysics with the Space Interferometry Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Stephen; Wehrle, Ann; Meier, David; Jones, Dayton; Piner, Glenn

    2007-01-01

    Optical astrometry of quasars and active galaxies can provide key information on the spatial distribution and variability of emission in compact nuclei. The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM PlanetQuest) will have the sensitivity to measure a significant number of quasar positions at the microarcsecond level. SIM will be very sensitive to astrometric shifts for objects as faint as V = 19. A variety of AGN phenomena are expected to be visible to SIM on these scales, including time and spectral dependence in position offsets between accretion disk and jet emission. These represent unique data on the spatial distribution and time dependence of quasar emission. It will also probe the use of quasar nuclei as fundamental astrometric references. Comparisons between the time-dependent optical photocenter position and VLBI radio images will provide further insight into the jet emission mechanism. Observations will be tailored to each specific target and science question. SIM will be able to distinguish spatially between jet and accretion disk emission; and it can observe the cores of galaxies potentially harboring binary supermassive black holes resulting from mergers.

  16. Achromatic shearing phase sensor for generating images indicative of measure(s) of alignment between segments of a segmented telescope's mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip (Inventor); Walker, Chanda Bartlett (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An achromatic shearing phase sensor generates an image indicative of at least one measure of alignment between two segments of a segmented telescope's mirrors. An optical grating receives at least a portion of irradiance originating at the segmented telescope in the form of a collimated beam and the collimated beam into a plurality of diffraction orders. Focusing optics separate and focus the diffraction orders. Filtering optics then filter the diffraction orders to generate a resultant set of diffraction orders that are modified. Imaging optics combine portions of the resultant set of diffraction orders to generate an interference pattern that is ultimately imaged by an imager.

  17. From master slave interferometry to complex master slave interferometry: theoretical work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivet, Sylvain; Bradu, Adrian; Maria, Michael; Feuchter, Thomas; Leick, Lasse; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2018-03-01

    A general theoretical framework is described to obtain the advantages and the drawbacks of two novel Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) methods denoted as Master/Slave Interferometry (MSI) and its extension denoted as Complex Master/Slave Interferometry (CMSI). Instead of linearizing the digital data representing the channeled spectrum before a Fourier transform can be applied to it (as in OCT standard methods), channeled spectrum is decomposed on the basis of local oscillations. This replaces the need for linearization, generally time consuming, before any calculation of the depth profile in the range of interest. In this model two functions, g and h, are introduced. The function g describes the modulation chirp of the channeled spectrum signal due to nonlinearities in the decoding process from wavenumber to time. The function h describes the dispersion in the interferometer. The utilization of these two functions brings two major improvements to previous implementations of the MSI method. The paper details the steps to obtain the functions g and h, and represents the CMSI in a matrix formulation that enables to implement easily this method in LabVIEW by using parallel programming with multi-cores.

  18. Digital Double-Pulse Holographic Interferometry for Vibration Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.J. Tiziani

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Different arrangements for double-pulsed holographic and speckle interferometry for vibration analysis will be described. Experimental results obtained with films (classical holographic interferometry and CCD cameras (digital holographic interferometry as storage materials are presented. In digital holography, two separate holograms of an object under test are recorded within a few microseconds using a CCD camera and are stored in a frame grabber. The phases of the two reconstructed wave fields are calculated from the complex amplitudes. The deformation is obtained from the phase difference. In the case of electronic speckle pattern interferometry (or image plane hologram, the phase can be calculated by using the sinusoid-fitting method. In the case of digital holographic interferometry, the phase is obtained by digital reconstruction of the complex amplitudes of the wave fronts. Using three directions of illumination and one direction of observation, all the information necessary for the reconstruction of the 3-dimensional deformation vector can be recorded at the same time. Applications of the method for measuring rotating objects are discussed where a derotator needs to be used.

  19. Variational principle for gravity with null and non-null boundaries: a unified boundary counter-term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parattu, Krishnamohan; Chakraborty, Sumanta; Padmanabhan, T. [IUCAA, Post Bag 4, Pune (India)

    2016-03-15

    It is common knowledge that the Einstein-Hilbert action does not furnish a well-posed variational principle. The usual solution to this problem is to add an extra boundary term to the action, called a counter-term, so that the variational principle becomes well-posed. When the boundary is spacelike or timelike, the Gibbons-Hawking-York counter-term is the most widely used. For null boundaries, we had proposed a counter-term in a previous paper. In this paper, we extend the previous analysis and propose a counter-term that can be used to eliminate variations of the ''off-the-surface'' derivatives of the metric on any boundary, regardless of its spacelike, timelike or null nature. (orig.)

  20. Left cardiac isomerism in the Sonic hedgehog null mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, Victoria; Webb, Sandra; Chaudhry, Bill; Peat, Jonathan D; Phillips, Helen M; Brown, Nigel; Anderson, Robert H; Henderson, Deborah J

    2009-06-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is a secreted morphogen necessary for the production of sidedness in the developing embryo. In this study, we describe the morphology of the atrial chambers and atrioventricular junctions of the Shh null mouse heart. We demonstrate that the essential phenotypic feature is isomerism of the left atrial appendages, in combination with an atrioventricular septal defect and a common atrioventricular junction. These malformations are known to be frequent in humans with left isomerism. To confirm the presence of left isomerism, we show that Pitx2c, a recognized determinant of morphological leftness, is expressed in the Shh null mutants on both the right and left sides of the inflow region, and on both sides of the solitary arterial trunk exiting from the heart. It has been established that derivatives of the second heart field expressing Isl1 are asymmetrically distributed in the developing normal heart. We now show that this population is reduced in the hearts from the Shh null mutants, likely contributing to the defects. To distinguish the consequences of reduced contributions from the second heart field from those of left-right patterning disturbance, we disrupted the movement of second heart field cells into the heart by expressing dominant-negative Rho kinase in the population of cells expressing Isl1. This resulted in absence of the vestibular spine, and presence of atrioventricular septal defects closely resembling those seen in the hearts from the Shh null mutants. The primary atrial septum, however, was well formed, and there was no evidence of isomerism of the atrial appendages, suggesting that these features do not relate to disruption of the contributions made by the second heart field. We demonstrate, therefore, that the Shh null mouse is a model of isomerism of the left atrial appendages, and show that the recognized associated malformations found at the venous pole of the heart in the setting of left isomerism are likely to arise from

  1. Absolute marine gravimetry with matter-wave interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidel, Y; Zahzam, N; Blanchard, C; Bonnin, A; Cadoret, M; Bresson, A; Rouxel, D; Lequentrec-Lalancette, M F

    2018-02-12

    Measuring gravity from an aircraft or a ship is essential in geodesy, geophysics, mineral and hydrocarbon exploration, and navigation. Today, only relative sensors are available for onboard gravimetry. This is a major drawback because of the calibration and drift estimation procedures which lead to important operational constraints. Atom interferometry is a promising technology to obtain onboard absolute gravimeter. But, despite high performances obtained in static condition, no precise measurements were reported in dynamic. Here, we present absolute gravity measurements from a ship with a sensor based on atom interferometry. Despite rough sea conditions, we obtained precision below 10 -5  m s -2 . The atom gravimeter was also compared with a commercial spring gravimeter and showed better performances. This demonstration opens the way to the next generation of inertial sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope) based on atom interferometry which should provide high-precision absolute measurements from a moving platform.

  2. Threshold secret sharing scheme based on phase-shifting interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaopeng; Shi, Zhengang; Wen, Wei

    2016-11-01

    We propose a new method for secret image sharing with the (3,N) threshold scheme based on phase-shifting interferometry. The secret image, which is multiplied with an encryption key in advance, is first encrypted by using Fourier transformation. Then, the encoded image is shared into N shadow images based on the recording principle of phase-shifting interferometry. Based on the reconstruction principle of phase-shifting interferometry, any three or more shadow images can retrieve the secret image, while any two or fewer shadow images cannot obtain any information of the secret image. Thus, a (3,N) threshold secret sharing scheme can be implemented. Compared with our previously reported method, the algorithm of this paper is suited for not only a binary image but also a gray-scale image. Moreover, the proposed algorithm can obtain a larger threshold value t. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  3. A publication database for optical long baseline interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malbet, Fabien; Mella, Guillaume; Lawson, Peter; Taillifet, Esther; Lafrasse, Sylvain

    2010-07-01

    Optical long baseline interferometry is a technique that has generated almost 850 refereed papers to date. The targets span a large variety of objects from planetary systems to extragalactic studies and all branches of stellar physics. We have created a database hosted by the JMMC and connected to the Optical Long Baseline Interferometry Newsletter (OLBIN) web site using MySQL and a collection of XML or PHP scripts in order to store and classify these publications. Each entry is defined by its ADS bibcode, includes basic ADS informations and metadata. The metadata are specified by tags sorted in categories: interferometric facilities, instrumentation, wavelength of operation, spectral resolution, type of measurement, target type, and paper category, for example. The whole OLBIN publication list has been processed and we present how the database is organized and can be accessed. We use this tool to generate statistical plots of interest for the community in optical long baseline interferometry.

  4. Pipeline monitoring with interferometry in non-arid regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCardle, Adrian; Rabus, Bernhard; Ghuman, Parwant [MacDonald Dettwiler, Richmond, BC (Canada); Freymueller, Jeff T. [University of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Interferometry has become a proven technique for accurately measuring ground movements caused by subsidence, landslides, earthquakes and volcanoes. Using space borne sensors such as the ERS, ENVISAT and RADARSAT satellites, ground deformation can be monitored on a millimeter level. Traditionally interferometry has been limited to arid areas however new technology has allowed for successful monitoring in vegetated regions and areas of changing land-cover. Analysis of ground movement of the Trans-Alaskan pipeline demonstrates how these techniques can offer pipeline engineers a new tool for observing potential dangers to pipeline integrity. Results from Interferometric Point Target Analysis were compared with GPS measurements and speckle tracking interferometry was demonstrated to measure a major earthquake. (author)

  5. Practical optical interferometry imaging at visible and infrared wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Buscher, David F

    2015-01-01

    Optical interferometry is a powerful technique to make images on angular scales hundreds of times smaller than is possible with the largest telescopes. This concise guide provides an introduction to the technique for graduate students and researchers who want to make interferometric observations and acts as a reference for technologists building new instruments. Starting from the principles of interference, the author covers the core concepts of interferometry, showing how the effects of the Earth's atmosphere can be overcome using closure phase, and the complete process of making an observation, from planning to image reconstruction. This rigorous approach emphasizes the use of rules-of-thumb for important parameters such as the signal-to-noise ratios, requirements for sampling the Fourier plane and predicting image quality. The handbook is supported by web resources, including the Python source code used to make many of the graphs, as well as an interferometry simulation framework, available at www.cambridg...

  6. Deghosting, Demultiple, and Deblurring in Controlled-Source Seismic Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost van der Neut

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With controlled-source seismic interferometry we aim to redatum sources to downhole receiver locations without requiring a velocity model. Interferometry is generally based on a source integral over cross-correlation (CC pairs of full, perturbed (time-gated, or decomposed wavefields. We provide an overview of ghosts, multiples, and spatial blurring effects that can occur for different types of interferometry. We show that replacing cross-correlation by multidimensional deconvolution (MDD can deghost, demultiple, and deblur retrieved data. We derive and analyze MDD for perturbed and decomposed wavefields. An interferometric point spread function (PSF is introduced that can be obtained directly from downhole data. Ghosts, multiples, and blurring effects that may populate the retrieved gathers can be locally diagnosed with the PSF. MDD of perturbed fields can remove ghosts and deblur retrieved data, but it leaves particular multiples in place. To remove all overburden-related effects, MDD of decomposed fields should be applied.

  7. Progress in electron- and ion-interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselbach, Franz [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik der Universitaet Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 10, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)], E-mail: franz.hasselbach@uni-tuebingen.de

    2010-01-15

    In the 1970s the prominent goal was to overcome the limitations of electron microscopy caused by aberrations of electron lenses by the development of electron holography. In the meantime this problem has been solved, not only in the roundabout way of holography, but directly by correcting the aberrations of the lenses. Nevertheless, many quantitative electron microscopical measurement methods-e.g. mapping and visualization of electric and magnetic fields-were developed within the context of holography and have become fields of their own. In this review we focus on less popular electron interferometric experiments which complement the field of electron holography. The paper is organized as follows. After a short sketch of the development of electron biprism interferometry after its invention in 1954, recent advances in technology are discussed that made electron biprism interferometry an indispensable tool for solving fundamental and applied questions in physics: the development and preparation of conventional and single-atom field electron and field ion sources with their extraordinary properties. Single- and few-atom sources exhibit spectacular features: their brightness at 100 keV exceeds that of conventional field emitters by two orders in magnitude. Due to the extremely small aberrations of diode field emitter extraction optics, the virtual source size of single-atom tips is on the order of 0.2 nm. As a consequence it illuminates an area 7 cm in diameter on a screen at a distance of 15 cm coherently. Projection electron micrographs taken with these sources reach spatial resolutions of atomic dimensions and in-line holograms are-due to the absence of lenses with their aberrations-not blurred. Their reconstruction is straightforward. By addition of a carbon nanotube biprism into the beam path of a projection microscope a lensless electron interferometer has been realized. In extremely ultrahigh vacuum systems flicker noise is practically absent in the new sources

  8. Progress in electron- and ion-interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasselbach, Franz

    2010-01-01

    In the 1970s the prominent goal was to overcome the limitations of electron microscopy caused by aberrations of electron lenses by the development of electron holography. In the meantime this problem has been solved, not only in the roundabout way of holography, but directly by correcting the aberrations of the lenses. Nevertheless, many quantitative electron microscopical measurement methods-e.g. mapping and visualization of electric and magnetic fields-were developed within the context of holography and have become fields of their own. In this review we focus on less popular electron interferometric experiments which complement the field of electron holography. The paper is organized as follows. After a short sketch of the development of electron biprism interferometry after its invention in 1954, recent advances in technology are discussed that made electron biprism interferometry an indispensable tool for solving fundamental and applied questions in physics: the development and preparation of conventional and single-atom field electron and field ion sources with their extraordinary properties. Single- and few-atom sources exhibit spectacular features: their brightness at 100 keV exceeds that of conventional field emitters by two orders in magnitude. Due to the extremely small aberrations of diode field emitter extraction optics, the virtual source size of single-atom tips is on the order of 0.2 nm. As a consequence it illuminates an area 7 cm in diameter on a screen at a distance of 15 cm coherently. Projection electron micrographs taken with these sources reach spatial resolutions of atomic dimensions and in-line holograms are-due to the absence of lenses with their aberrations-not blurred. Their reconstruction is straightforward. By addition of a carbon nanotube biprism into the beam path of a projection microscope a lensless electron interferometer has been realized. In extremely ultrahigh vacuum systems flicker noise is practically absent in the new sources

  9. Atmospheric Phase Delay in Sentinel SAR Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, V.; Monserrat, O.; Crosetto, M.; Crippa, B.

    2018-04-01

    The repeat-pass Synthetic Aperture Radio Detection and Ranging (RADAR) Interferometry (InSAR) has been a widely used geodetic technique for observing the Earth's surface, especially for mapping the Earth's topography and deformations. However, InSAR measurements are prone to atmospheric errors. RADAR waves traverse the Earth's atmosphere twice and experience a delay due to atmospheric refraction. The two major layers of the atmosphere (troposphere and ionosphere) are mainly responsible for this delay in the propagating RADAR wave. Previous studies have shown that water vapour and clouds present in the troposphere and the Total Electron Content (TEC) of the ionosphere are responsible for the additional path delay in the RADAR wave. The tropospheric refractivity is mainly dependent on pressure, temperature and partial pressure of water vapour. The tropospheric refractivity leads to an increase in the observed range. These induced propagation delays affect the quality of phase measurement and introduce errors in the topography and deformation fields. The effect of this delay was studied on a differential interferogram (DInSAR). To calculate the amount of tropospheric delay occurred, the meteorological data collected from the Spanish Agencia Estatal de Meteorología (AEMET) and MODIS were used. The interferograms generated from Sentinel-1 carrying C-band Synthetic Aperture RADAR Single Look Complex (SLC) images acquired on the study area are used. The study area consists of different types of scatterers exhibiting different coherence. The existing Saastamoinen model was used to perform a quantitative evaluation of the phase changes caused by pressure, temperature and humidity of the troposphere during the study. Unless the phase values due to atmospheric disturbances are not corrected, it is difficult to obtain accurate measurements. Thus, the atmospheric error correction is essential for all practical applications of DInSAR to avoid inaccurate height and deformation

  10. ATMOSPHERIC PHASE DELAY IN SENTINEL SAR INTERFEROMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Krishnakumar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The repeat-pass Synthetic Aperture Radio Detection and Ranging (RADAR Interferometry (InSAR has been a widely used geodetic technique for observing the Earth’s surface, especially for mapping the Earth’s topography and deformations. However, InSAR measurements are prone to atmospheric errors. RADAR waves traverse the Earth’s atmosphere twice and experience a delay due to atmospheric refraction. The two major layers of the atmosphere (troposphere and ionosphere are mainly responsible for this delay in the propagating RADAR wave. Previous studies have shown that water vapour and clouds present in the troposphere and the Total Electron Content (TEC of the ionosphere are responsible for the additional path delay in the RADAR wave. The tropospheric refractivity is mainly dependent on pressure, temperature and partial pressure of water vapour. The tropospheric refractivity leads to an increase in the observed range. These induced propagation delays affect the quality of phase measurement and introduce errors in the topography and deformation fields. The effect of this delay was studied on a differential interferogram (DInSAR. To calculate the amount of tropospheric delay occurred, the meteorological data collected from the Spanish Agencia Estatal de Meteorología (AEMET and MODIS were used. The interferograms generated from Sentinel-1 carrying C-band Synthetic Aperture RADAR Single Look Complex (SLC images acquired on the study area are used. The study area consists of different types of scatterers exhibiting different coherence. The existing Saastamoinen model was used to perform a quantitative evaluation of the phase changes caused by pressure, temperature and humidity of the troposphere during the study. Unless the phase values due to atmospheric disturbances are not corrected, it is difficult to obtain accurate measurements. Thus, the atmospheric error correction is essential for all practical applications of DInSAR to avoid inaccurate

  11. Monitoring Unstable Glaciers with Seismic Noise Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiswerk, L. E.; Walter, F.

    2016-12-01

    Gravity-driven glacier instabilities are a threat to human infrastructure in alpine terrain, and this hazard is likely to increase with future changes in climate. Seismometers have been used previously on hazardous glaciers to monitor the natural englacial seismicity. In some situations, an increase in "icequake" activity may indicate fracture growth and thus an imminent major break-off. However, without independent constraints on unstable volumes, such mere event counting is of little use. A promising new approach to monitor unstable masses in Alpine terrain is coda wave interferometry of ambient noise. While already established in the solid earth, application to glaciers is not straightforward, because the lack of inhomogeneities typically suppresses seismic coda waves in glacier ice. Only glaciers with pervasive crevasses provide enough scattering to generate long codas. This is requirement is likely met for highly dynamic unstable glaciers. Here, we report preliminary results from a temporary 5-station on-ice array of seismometers (corner frequencies: 1 Hz, array aperture: 500m) on Bisgletscher (Switzerland). The seismometers were deployed in shallow boreholes, directly above the unstable tongue of the glacier. In the frequency band 4-12 Hz, we find stable noise cross-correlations, which in principle allows monitoring on a subdaily scale. The origin and the source processes of the ambient noise in these frequencies are however uncertain. As a first step, we evaluate the stability of the sources in order to separate effects of changing source parameters from changes of englacial properties. Since icequakes occurring every few seconds may dominate the noise field, we compare their temporal and spatial occurrences with the cross-correlation functions (stability over time, the asymmetry between causal and acausal parts of the cross-correlation functions) as well as with results from beamforming to assess the influence of these transient events on the noise field.

  12. Super-virtual refraction interferometry: Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Bharadwaj, Pawan

    2011-01-01

    Inverting for the subsurface velocity distribution by refraction traveltime tomography is a well-accepted imaging method by both the exploration and earthquake seismology communities. A significant drawback, however, is that the recorded traces become noisier with increasing offset from the source position, and so prevents accurate picking of traveltimes in far-offset traces. To enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the far-offset traces, we present the theory of super-virtual refraction interferometry where the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of far-offset head-wave arrivals can be theoretically increased by a factor proportional to N; here, N is the number of receiver and source positions associated with the recording and generation of the head-wave arrival. There are two steps to this methodology: correlation and summation of the data to generate traces with virtual head-wave arrivals, followed by the convolution of the data with the virtual traces to create traces with super-virtual head-wave arrivals. This method is valid for any medium that generates head-wave arrivals. There are at least three significant benefits to this methodology: 1). enhanced SNR of far-offset traces so the first-arrival traveltimes of the noisy far-offset traces can be more reliably picked to extend the useful aperture of data, 2). the SNR of head waves in a trace that arrive after the first arrival can be enhanced for accurate traveltime picking and subsequent inversion by traveltime tomography, and 3). common receiver-pair gathers can be analyzed to detect the presence of diving waves in the first arrivals, which can be used to assess the nature of the refracting boundary. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  13. Photon exchange and decoherence in neutron interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulyok, G.

    2011-01-01

    The general subject of the present work concerns the action of time-dependent, spatially restricted magnetic fields on the wave function of a neutron. Special focus lies on their application in neutron interferometry. For arbitrary time-periodic fields, the corresponding Schroedinger equation is solved analytically. It is then shown, how the occurring exchange of energy quanta between the neutron and the modes of the magnetic field appears in the temporal modulation of the interference pattern between the original wavefunction and the wavefunction altered by the magnetic field. By Fourier analysis of the time-resolved interference pattern, the transition probabilities for all possible energy transfers are deducible. Experimental results for fields consisting of up to five modes are presented. Extending the theoretical approach by quantizing the magnetic field allows deeper insights on the underlying physical processes. For a coherent field state with a high mean photon number, the results of the calculation with classical fields is reproduced. By increasing the number of field modes whose relative phases are randomly distributed, one approaches the noise regime which offers the possibility of modelling decoherence in the neutron interferometer. Options and limitations of this modelling procedure are investigated in detail both theoretically and experimentally. Noise sources are applied in one or both interferometer path, and their strength, frequency bandwidth and position to each other is varied. In addition, the influence of increasing spatial separation of the neutron wave packet is examined, since the resulting Schroedinger cat-like states play an important role in decoherence theory. (author) [de

  14. Interferometry correlations in central p+Pb collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bożek, Piotr; Bysiak, Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    We present results on interferometry correlations for pions emitted in central p+Pb collisions at √{s_{NN}}=5.02 TeV in a 3+1-dimensional viscous hydrodynamic model with initial conditions from the Glauber Monte Carlo model. The correlation function is calculated as a function of the pion pair rapidity. The extracted interferometry radii show a weak rapidity dependence, reflecting the lack of boost invariance of the pion distribution. A cross term between the out and long directions is found to be nonzero. The results obtained in the hydrodynamic model are in fair agreement with recent data of the ATLAS Collaboration.

  15. Modulated Source Interferometry with Combined Amplitude and Frequency Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An improved interferometer is produced by modifying a conventional interferometer to include amplitude and/or frequency modulation of a coherent light source at radio or higher frequencies. The phase of the modulation signal can be detected in an interfering beam from an interferometer and can be used to determine the actual optical phase of the beam. As such, this improvement can be adapted to virtually any two-beam interferometer, including: Michelson, Mach-Zehnder, and Sagnac interferometers. The use of an amplitude modulated coherent tight source results in an interferometer that combines the wide range advantages of coherent interferometry with the precise distance measurement advantages of white light interferometry.

  16. Interferometry correlations in central p+Pb collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozek, Piotr; Bysiak, Sebastian [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland)

    2018-01-15

    We present results on interferometry correlations for pions emitted in central p+Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN}) = 5.02 TeV in a 3 + 1-dimensional viscous hydrodynamic model with initial conditions from the Glauber Monte Carlo model. The correlation function is calculated as a function of the pion pair rapidity. The extracted interferometry radii show a weak rapidity dependence, reflecting the lack of boost invariance of the pion distribution. A cross term between the out and long directions is found to be nonzero. The results obtained in the hydrodynamic model are in fair agreement with recent data of the ATLAS Collaboration. (orig.)

  17. The compact and inexpensive arrowhead setup for holographic interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladera, Celso L; Donoso, Guillermo, E-mail: clladera@usb.v [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Simon BolIvar, Apdo. 89000, Caracas 1086 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    Hologram recording and holographic interferometry are intrinsically sensitive to phase changes, and therefore both are easily perturbed by minuscule optical path perturbations. It is therefore very convenient to bank on holographic setups with a reduced number of optical components. Here we present a compact off-axis holographic setup that requires neither a collimator nor a beam-splitter, and whose layout is reminiscent of an arrowhead. We show that this inexpensive setup is a good alternative for the study and applications of scientific holography by measuring small displacements and deformations of a body. The arrowhead setup will be found particularly useful for holography and holographic interferometry experiments and projects in teaching laboratories.

  18. Apoptosis in spermatogonia irradiated P53 null mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streit-Bianchi, M.; Hendry, J.H.; Roberts, S.A.; Morris, J.D.; Durgaryan, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The exposure of germ cells to ionizing radiations is of concern both from high-dose therapeutic exposures and from low doses causing deleterious trans-generational mutations. P53 protein plays an important role in cellular damage and is expressed in the testis normally during meiosis, its expression being localised to the preleptotene and early/mid pachytene spermatocytes. P53 null mice, heterozygotes possessing a 129 Sv/C57BL6 genetic background and B6D2F1 mice have been irradiated to 1 and 2 Gy single doses. Fractionated exposures of 1+1 Gy at 4 hours interval were also carried out. Apoptosis induction, spermatogonia and spermatocytes survival were assessed by microscope analysis of histological samples at 4 to 96 hours after irradiation in time-course experiments. The same end-points were also assessed at 72 and 96 hours after irradiation to single doses in the region between 20cGy to 2Gy. A dose dependent level of p53 expression was observed at 4 hours after irradiation to 1 and 2 Gy which returned to normal level by 24 hours. Our data support a two process mode of apoptosis with a first wave around 12 hours followed by a second wave at 2-3 days. The first wave apoptosis is substantially reduced in p53 null mice whereas the second wave is reduced in B6D2F1 mice. The initial increase in apoptosis was delayed in some stages of the of germ cells development which were identified by the spermatids shape. Clear correlation exists between apoptosis and survival assessed in stage XI-XII Tubules 72 hours after irradiation. The data are in agreement with other data in literature indicating that irradiated spermatogonia die through apoptosis. The lack of apoptosis observed in p53 null mice results in a very high survival rate of daughter cells assessed later. Theses spermatocytes and the following progenitor cells are likely to carry mutations as most will not die in the smaller second wave of apoptosis observed 3 days after

  19. A visualization of null geodesics for the bonnor massive dipole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Andree Oliva Mercado

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work we simulate null geodesics for the Bonnor massive dipole metric by implementing a symbolic-numerical algorithm in Sage and Python. This program is also capable of visualizing in 3D, in principle, the geodesics for any given metric. Geodesics are launched from a common point, collectively forming a cone of light beams, simulating a solid-angle section of a point source in front of a massive object with a magnetic field. Parallel light beams also were considered, and their bending due to the curvature of the space-time was simulated.

  20. Do electromagnetic waves always propagate along null geodesics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asenjo, Felipe A; Hojman, Sergio A

    2017-01-01

    We find exact solutions to Maxwell equations written in terms of four-vector potentials in non–rotating, as well as in Gödel and Kerr spacetimes. We show that Maxwell equations can be reduced to two uncoupled second-order differential equations for combinations of the components of the four-vector potential. Exact electromagnetic waves solutions are written on given gravitational field backgrounds where they evolve. We find that in non–rotating spherical symmetric spacetimes, electromagnetic waves travel along null geodesics. However, electromagnetic waves on Gödel and Kerr spacetimes do not exhibit that behavior. (paper)

  1. Two-loop string theory on null compactifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cove, Henry C.D.; Szabo, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    We compute the two-loop contributions to the free energy in the null compactification of perturbative string theory at finite temperature. The cases of bosonic, type II and heterotic strings are all treated. The calculation exploits an explicit reductive parametrization of the moduli space of infinite-momentum frame string worldsheets in terms of branched cover instantons. Various arithmetic and physical properties of the instanton sums are described. Applications to symmetric product orbifold conformal field theories and to the matrix string theory conjecture are also briefly discussed

  2. Twisting null geodesic congruences and the Einstein-Maxwell equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Ezra T; Silva-Ortigoza, Gilberto

    2006-01-01

    In a recent article, we returned to the study of asymptotically flat solutions of the vacuum Einstein equations with a rather unconventional point of view. The essential observation in that work was that from a given asymptotically flat vacuum spacetime with a given Bondi shear, one can find a class of asymptotically shear-free (but, in general, twisting) null geodesic congruences where the class was uniquely given up to the arbitrary choice of a complex analytic 'worldline' in a four-dimensional complex space. By imitating certain terms in the Weyl tensor that are found in the algebraically special type II metrics, this complex worldline could be made unique and given-or assigned-the physical meaning as the complex centre of mass. Equations of motion for this case were found. The purpose of the present work is to extend those results to asymptotically flat solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations. Once again, in this case, we get a class of asymptotically shear-free null geodesic congruences depending on a complex worldline in the same four-dimensional complex space. However in this case there will be, in general, two distinct but uniquely chosen worldlines, one of which can be assigned as the complex centre of charge while the other could be called the complex centre of mass. Rather than investigating the situation where there are two distinct complex worldlines, we study instead the special degenerate case where the two worldlines coincide, i.e., where there is a single unique worldline. This mimics the case of algebraically special Einstein-Maxwell fields where the degenerate principle null vector of the Weyl tensor coincides with a Maxwell principle null vector. Again we obtain equations of motion for this worldline-but explicitly found here only in an approximation. Though there are ambiguities in assigning physical meaning to different terms it appears as if reliance on the Kerr and charged Kerr metrics and classical electromagnetic radiation theory helps

  3. The null-event method in computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, S.L.

    1978-01-01

    The simulation of collisions of ions moving under the influence of an external field through a neutral gas to non-zero temperatures is discussed as an example of computer models of processes in which a probe particle undergoes a series of interactions with an ensemble of other particles, such that the frequency and outcome of the events depends on internal properties of the second particles. The introduction of null events removes the need for much complicated algebra, leads to a more efficient simulation and reduces the likelihood of logical error. (Auth.)

  4. Null geodesic deviation II. Conformally flat space--times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, P.C.

    1975-01-01

    The equation of geodesic deviation is solved in conformally flat space--time in a covariant manner. The solution is given as an integral equation for general geodesics. The solution is then used to evaluate second derivatives of the world function and derivatives of the parallel propagator, which need to be known in order to find the Green's function for wave equations in curved space--time. A method of null geodesic limits of two-point functions is discussed, and used to find the scalar Green's function as an iterative series

  5. Mechanical Strain Measurement from Coda Wave Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzola, J.; Schmittbuhl, J.; Zigone, D.; Masson, F.; Magnenet, V.

    2017-12-01

    Coda Wave Interferometry (CWI) aims at tracking small changes in solid materials like rocks where elastic waves are diffusing. They are intensively sampling the medium, making the technique much more sensitive than those relying on direct wave arrivals. Application of CWI to ambient seismic noise has found a large range of applications over the past years like for multiscale imaging but also for monitoring complex structures such as regional faults or reservoirs (Lehujeur et al., 2015). Physically, observed changes are typically interpreted as small variations of seismic velocities. However, this interpretation remains questionable. Here, a specific focus is put on the influence of the elastic deformation of the medium on CWI measurements. The goal of the present work is to show from a direct numerical and experimental modeling that deformation signal also exists in CWI measurements which might provide new outcomes for the technique.For this purpose, we model seismic wave propagation within a diffusive medium using a spectral element approach (SPECFEM2D) during an elastic deformation of the medium. The mechanical behavior is obtained from a finite element approach (Code ASTER) keeping the mesh grid of the sample constant during the whole procedure to limit numerical artifacts. The CWI of the late wave arrivals in the synthetic seismograms is performed using both a stretching technique in the time domain and a frequency cross-correlation method. Both show that the elastic deformation of the scatters is fully correlated with time shifts of the CWI differently from an acoustoelastic effect. As an illustration, the modeled sample is chosen as an effective medium aiming to mechanically and acoustically reproduce a typical granitic reservoir rock.Our numerical approach is compared to experimental results where multi-scattering of an acoustic wave through a perforated loaded Au4G (Dural) plate is performed at laboratory scale. Experimental and numerical results of the

  6. Time-delay interferometry for LISA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinto, Massimo; Estabrook, F.B.; Armstrong, J.W.

    2002-01-01

    LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) is a mission to detect and study low-frequency cosmic gravitational radiation through its influence on the phases or frequencies of laser beams exchanged between three remote spacecraft. We previously showed how, with lasers of identical frequencies on stationary spacecraft, the measurement of twelve time series of Doppler shifts could be combined to cancel exactly the phase noise of the lasers and the Doppler fluctuations due to noninertial motions of the six optical benches, while preserving gravitational wave signals. Here we generalize those results on gravitational wave detection with time-delay interferometry to the expected LISA instrument. The six lasers have different center frequencies (in the nominal LISA configuration these center frequencies may well differ by several hundred megahertz) and the distances between spacecraft pairs will change with time (these slowly varying orbital Doppler shifts are expected to be up to tens of megahertz). We develop time-delay data combinations which, as previously, preserve gravitational waves and exactly cancel the leading noise source (phase fluctuations of the six lasers); these data combinations then imply transfer functions for the remaining system noises. Using these, we plot frequency and phase power spectra for modeled system noises in the unequal Michelson combination X and the symmetric Sagnac combination ζ. Although optical bench noise can no longer be cancelled exactly, with the current LISA specifications it is suppressed to negligible levels. It is known that the presently anticipated laser center frequency differences and the orbital Doppler drifts introduce another source of phase noise, arising from the onboard oscillators required to track the photodetector fringes. For the presently planned mission, our analysis indeed demonstrates that noise from current-generation ultrastable oscillators would, if uncorrected, dominate the LISA noise budget. To meet the

  7. Laser interferometry of radiation driven gas jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Kyle James; Ivanov, Vladimir; Mancini, Roberto; Mayes, Daniel C.

    2017-06-01

    In a series of experiments performed at the 1MA Zebra pulsed power accelerator of the Nevada Terawatt Facility nitrogen gas jets were driven with the broadband x-ray flux produced during the collapse of a wire-array z-pinch implosion. The wire arrays were comprised of 4 and 8, 10μm-thick gold wires and 17μm-thick nickel wires, 2cm and 3cm tall, and 0.3cm in diameter. They radiated 12kJ to 16kJ of x-ray energy, most of it in soft x-ray photons of less than 1keV of energy, in a time interval of 30ns. This x-ray flux was used to drive a nitrogen gas jet located at 0.8cm from the axis of the z-pinch radiation source and produced with a supersonic nozzle. The x-ray flux ionizes the nitrogen gas thus turning it into a photoionized plasma. We used laser interferometry to probe the ionization of the plasma. To this end, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer at the wavelength of 266 nm was set up to extract the atom number density profile of the gas jet just before the Zebra shot, and air-wedge interferometers at 266 and 532 nm were used to determine the electron number density of the plasma right during the Zebra shot. The ratio of electron to atom number densities gives the distribution of average ionization state of the plasma. A python code was developed to perform the image data processing, extract phase shift spatial maps, and obtain the atom and electron number densities via Abel inversion. Preliminary results from the experiment are promising and do show that a plasma has been created in the gas jet driven by the x-ray flux, thus demonstrating the feasibility of a new experimental platform to study photoionized plasmas in the laboratory. These plasmas are found in astrophysical scenarios including x-ray binaries, active galactic nuclei, and the accretion disks surrounding black holes1. This work was sponsored in part by DOE Office of Science Grant DE-SC0014451.1R. C. Mancini et al, Phys. Plasmas 16, 041001 (2009)

  8. The new null testing method for the special optical window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Changchun

    2009-07-01

    The high speed, high precision and wide range specifications are requirement for the modern aircraft, which the traditional hemispherical dome can't achieve now, and the novel conformal window instead can enhance the aerodynamic performance of the aircraft obviously. To reduce the aerodynamic drag and radar cross-section, the window geometry is generally aspheric in shape. As a result, the involved fabrication and testing processes are much more challenging than that of conventional optics and must be mastered before these windows and systems can be implemented at an acceptable cost and risk. Metrology is one of the critical areas required to advance the conformal window technology. But as the surface of these conformal windows is not the traditional sphere lens, the measurement method for it is infeasible with the conventional optics measurement processes. This paper we express the development of testing technology for the special conformal windows in brief, and emphatically introduces one available novel testing method- a new null testing, and here based on the theory of compensation methods, The principle of Offner's refractive null lens has been extended to test the transmission wavefront through conformal window optics and provide feedback during surface fabrication. a compensator system for the was designed for the conformal window is given which parameters are 100mm for its aperture and two parabolic surface as conformal window, the final residual wavefront error(RMS) of which is less than 1/20λ(λ=632.8nm).

  9. Pituitary null cell adenoma in a domestic llama (Lama glama).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkley, M D; Kiupel, M; Draper, A C E

    2014-07-01

    Pituitary gland neoplasia has been reported rarely in camelids. A 12-year-old neutered male llama (Lama glama) presented with lethargy, inappetence and neurological signs. On physical examination, the llama was mentally dull and exhibited compulsive pacing and circling to the left. Complete blood count and serum biochemistry revealed haemoconcentration, mild hypophosphataemia, hyperglycaemia, hypercreatininaemia and hyperalbuminaemia. Humane destruction was elected due to rapid clinical deterioration and poor prognosis. Post-mortem examination revealed a pituitary macroadenoma and bilateral internal hydrocephalus. Microscopically, the pituitary tumour was composed of neoplastic chromophobic pituitary cells. Ultrastructural studies revealed similar neoplastic cells to those previously described in human null cell adenomas. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells were strongly immunoreactive for neuroendocrine markers (synaptophysin and chromogranin A), but did not exhibit immunoreactivity for epithelial, mesenchymal, neuronal and all major pituitary hormone markers (adrenocorticotropic hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, growth hormone, luteinizing hormone, melanocyte-stimulating hormone, prolactin and thyroid stimulating hormone), consistent with the diagnosis of a pituitary null cell adenoma. This is the first report of pituitary neoplasia in a llama. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Randomizing growing networks with a time-respecting null model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhuo-Ming; Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Medo, Matúš

    2018-05-01

    Complex networks are often used to represent systems that are not static but grow with time: People make new friendships, new papers are published and refer to the existing ones, and so forth. To assess the statistical significance of measurements made on such networks, we propose a randomization methodology—a time-respecting null model—that preserves both the network's degree sequence and the time evolution of individual nodes' degree values. By preserving the temporal linking patterns of the analyzed system, the proposed model is able to factor out the effect of the system's temporal patterns on its structure. We apply the model to the citation network of Physical Review scholarly papers and the citation network of US movies. The model reveals that the two data sets are strikingly different with respect to their degree-degree correlations, and we discuss the important implications of this finding on the information provided by paradigmatic node centrality metrics such as indegree and Google's PageRank. The randomization methodology proposed here can be used to assess the significance of any structural property in growing networks, which could bring new insights into the problems where null models play a critical role, such as the detection of communities and network motifs.

  11. Geometry of extended null supersymmetry in M theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conamhna, Oisin A.P. Mac

    2006-01-01

    For supersymmetric spacetimes in 11 dimensions admitting a null Killing spinor, a set of explicit necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of any number of arbitrary additional Killing spinors is derived. The necessary and sufficient conditions are comprised of algebraic relationships, linear in the spinorial components, between the spinorial components and their first derivatives, and the components of the spin connection and four-form. The integrability conditions for the Killing spinor equation are also analyzed in detail, to determine which components of the field equations are implied by arbitrary additional supersymmetries and the four-form Bianchi identity. This provides a complete formalism for the systematic and exhaustive investigation of all spacetimes with extended null supersymmetry in 11 dimensions. The formalism is employed to show that the general bosonic solution of 11 dimensional supergravity admitting a G 2 structure defined by four Killing spinors is either locally the direct product of R 1,3 with a seven-manifold of G 2 holonomy, or locally the Freund-Rubin direct product of AdS 4 with a seven-manifold of weak G 2 holonomy. In addition, all supersymmetric spacetimes admitting a (G 2 xR 7 )xR 2 structure are classified

  12. Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC): visible nulling cornagraph testbed results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Melnick, Gary; Tolls, Volker; Woodruff, Robert; Vasudevan, Gopal

    2008-07-01

    The Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) is a NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept under study for the upcoming Exoplanet Probe. EPIC's mission would be to image and characterize extrasolar giant planets, and potential super-Earths, in orbits with semi-major axes between 2 and 10 AU. EPIC will provide insights into the physical nature of a variety of planets in other solar systems complimenting radial velocity (RV) and astrometric planet searches. It will detect and characterize the atmospheres of planets identified by radial velocity surveys and potentially some transits, determine orbital inclinations and masses, characterize the atmospheres of gas giants around A and F stars, observed the inner spatial structure and colors of inner Spitzer selected debris disks. EPIC would be launched into a heliocentric Earth trailing drift-away orbit, with a 3-year mission lifetime (5 year goal) and will revisit planets at least three times. The starlight suppression approach consists of a visible nulling coronagraph (VNC) that enables high order starlight suppression in broadband light. To demonstrate the VNC approach and advance it's technology readiness the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and Lockheed-Martin have developed a laboratory VNC and have demonstrated white light nulling. We will discuss our ongoing VNC work and show the latest results from the VNC testbed.

  13. Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph: Visible Nulling Coronagraph Testbed Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    The Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) is a proposed NASA Discovery mission to image and characterize extrasolar giant planets in orbits with semi-major axes between 2 and 10 AU. EPIC will provide insights into the physical nature of a variety of planets in other solar systems complimenting radial velocity (RV) and astrometric planet searches. It will detect and characterize the atmospheres of planets identified by radial velocity surveys, determine orbital inclinations and masses, characterize the atmospheres around A and F stars, observed the inner spatial structure and colors of inner Spitzer selected debris disks. EPIC would be launched to heliocentric Earth trailing drift-away orbit, with a 3-year mission lifetime ( 5 year goal) and will revisit planets at least three times at intervals of 9 months. The starlight suppression approach consists of a visible nulling coronagraph (VNC) that enables high order starlight suppression in broadband light. To demonstrate the VNC approach and advance it's technology readiness the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and Lockheed-Martin have developed a laboratory VNC and have demonstrated white light nulling. We will discuss our ongoing VNC work and show the latest results from the VNC testbed,

  14. Non-dissipative electromagnetic media with two Lorentz null cones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, Matias F.

    2013-01-01

    We study Maxwell’s equations on a 4-manifold where the electromagnetic medium is modeled by an antisymmetric (2/2 )-tensor with 21 real coefficients. In this setting the Fresnel surface is a fourth-order polynomial surface that describes the dynamical response of the medium in the geometric optics limit. For example, in an isotropic medium the Fresnel surface is a Lorentz null cone. The contribution of this paper is the pointwise description of all electromagnetic medium tensors κ with real coefficients that satisfy the following three conditions: (i)medium κ is invertible, (ii)medium κ is skewon-free, or non-dissipative, (iii)the Fresnel surface of κ is the union of two distinct Lorentz null cones. We show that there are only three classes of media with these properties and give explicit expressions in local coordinates for each class. - Highlights: ► We find two new electromagnetic media classes for which the Fresnel surface decomposes into two light cones. ► In a suitable setting we classify all electromagnetic media where this is the case. ► We find an electromagnetic medium tensor with three different signal speeds in one direction. ► The work is related to [5], which classifies all media with one light cone (in a suitable setting).

  15. Plate with a hole obeys the averaged null energy condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, Noah; Olum, Ken D.

    2005-01-01

    The negative energy density of Casimir systems appears to violate general relativity energy conditions. However, one cannot test the averaged null energy condition (ANEC) using standard calculations for perfectly reflecting plates, because the null geodesic would have to pass through the plates, where the calculation breaks down. To avoid this problem, we compute the contribution to ANEC for a geodesic that passes through a hole in a single plate. We consider both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in two and three space dimensions. We use a Babinet's principle argument to reduce the problem to a complementary finite disk correction to the perfect mirror result, which we then compute using scattering theory in elliptical and spheroidal coordinates. In the Dirichlet case, we find that the positive correction due to the hole overwhelms the negative contribution of the infinite plate. In the Neumann case, where the infinite plate gives a positive contribution, the hole contribution is smaller in magnitude, so again ANEC is obeyed. These results can be extended to the case of two plates in the limits of large and small hole radii. This system thus provides another example of a situation where ANEC turns out to be obeyed when one might expect it to be violated

  16. Theoretical trends in interferometry of ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padula, S.S.

    1990-01-01

    A review is made of the main concepts of interferometry, since its discovery in the mid 50's as the HBT effect, until recently, where some new approaches to the field were suggested. A few modifications on the correlation function in the case of high energy collisions are discussed and illustrated. (author)

  17. A new polarized neutron interferometry facility at the NCNR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahi, C.B. [Physics and Engineering Physics Department, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70188 (United States); Arif, M. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Cory, D.G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1Z8 (Canada); Mineeva, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1Z8 (Canada); Nsofini, J.; Sarenac, D. [Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Williams, C.J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Huber, M.G., E-mail: michael.huber@nist.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Pushin, D.A., E-mail: dmitry.pushin@uwaterloo.ca [Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2016-03-21

    A new monochromatic beamline and facility has been installed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) devoted to neutron interferometry in the research areas of spin control, spin manipulation, quantum mechanics, quantum information science, spintronics, and material science. This facility is possible in part because of advances in decoherence free subspace interferometer designs that have demonstrated consistent contrast in the presence of vibrational noise; a major environmental constraint that has prevented neutron interferometry from being applied at other neutron facilities. Neutron interferometry measures the phase difference between a neutron wave function propagating along two spatially separated paths. It is a practical example of self interference and due to its modest path separation of a few centimeters allows the insertion of samples and macroscopic neutron spin rotators. Phase shifts can be caused by gravitational, magnetic and nuclear interactions as well as purely quantum mechanical effects making interferometer a robust tool in neutron research. This new facility is located in the guide hall of the NCNR upstream of the existing Neutron Interferometry and Optics Facility (NIOF) and has several advantages over the NIOF including higher incident flux, better neutron polarization, and increased accessibility. The long term goal for the new facility is to be a user supported beamline and makes neutron interferometer more generally available to the scientific community. This paper addresses both the capabilities and characteristics of the new facility.

  18. Matter wave interferometry in the light of Schroedinger's wave mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This is a pre-conference abstracts collection for 67 oral presentations and posters, 62 of them are in INIS scope and are treated individually. The subject matters are interferometers (mainly neutron), interferometry experiments and the related interpretation - and epistemological problems of quantum theory. (qui)

  19. Deformation measurement of a pressure vessel flange by holographic interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves Junior, Armando A.; Schneider, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    An automatic metodology used for the measurement of displacement through the holographic interferometry is presented. In order to shown its performance and potentiality, the displacement field from a pipe's and flange, when submited to an internal pressure, is experimentally found. Holography's results are compared with other technique's results. (Author) [pt

  20. Time-lapse controlled-source electromagnetics using interferometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunziker, J.W.; Slob, E.C.; Wapenaar, C.P.A.

    In time-lapse controlled-source electromagnetics, it is crucial that the source and the receivers are positioned at exactly the same location at all times of measurement. We use interferometry by multidimensional deconvolution (MDD) to overcome problems in repeatability of the source location.

  1. Generation of Bell, NOON and W states via atom interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Rameez-ul; Saif, Farhan [Department of Electronics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Khosa, Ashfaq H [Centre for Quantum Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2008-02-14

    We propose atom interferometric techniques for the generation of Bell, NOON and W states of an electromagnetic field in high-Q cavities. The fundamental constituent of these techniques is off-resonant Bragg diffraction of atomic de Broglie waves. We show good success probabilities for these schemes under the currently available experimental environment of atom interferometry.

  2. Radio astronomical interferometry and x-ray's computerized tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, L F [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City. Inst. de Astronomia

    1982-01-01

    Radio astronomical interferometry and computerized tomography are techniques of great importance for astronomy and medicine, respectively. In this paper we emphasize that both techniques are based on the same mathematical principles, and present them as an example of interaction between basic and applied science.

  3. Michelson wide-field stellar interferometry : Principles and experimental verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montilla, I.; Pereira, S.F.; Braat, J.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    A new interferometric technique for Michelson wide-field interferometry is presented that consists of a Michelson pupil-plane combination scheme in which a wide field of view can be achieved in one shot. This technique uses a stair-shaped mirror in the intermediate image plane of each telescope in

  4. Back scattering interferometry revisited – A theoretical and experimental investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Jepsen, S. T.; Sørensen, Henrik Schiøtt

    2015-01-01

    A refractive index based detector based on so called back scattering interferometry (BSI) has been described in the literature as a unique optical method for measuring biomolecular binding interactions in solution. In this paper, we take a detailed look at the optical principle underlying this te...

  5. Global-scale seismic interferometry : Theory and numerical examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, E.N.; Draganov, D.S.; Wapenaar, K.

    2008-01-01

    Progress in the imaging of the mantle and core is partially limited by the sparse distribution of natural sources; the earthquake hypocenters are mainly along the active lithospheric plate boundaries. This problem can be approached with seismic interferometry. In recent years, there has been

  6. Pion interferometry theory for the hydrodynamic stage of multiple processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhlin, A.N.; Sinyukov, Yu.M.

    1986-01-01

    The double pion inclusive cross section for identical particles is described in hydrodynamical theory of multiparticle production. The pion interferometry theory is developed for the case when secondary particles are generated against the background of internal relativistic motion of radiative hadron matter. The connection between correlation functions in various schemes of experiment is found within the framework of relativistic Wigner functions formalism

  7. Meterwavelength Single-pulse Polarimetric Emission Survey. III. The Phenomenon of Nulling in Pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Rahul; Mitra, Dipanjan; Melikidze, George I., E-mail: rahulbasu.astro@gmail.com [Janusz Gil Institute of Astronomy, University of Zielona Góra, ul. Szafrana 2, 65–516 Zielona Góra (Poland)

    2017-09-10

    A detailed analysis of nulling was conducted for the pulsars studied in the Meterwavelength Single-pulse Polarimetric Emission Survey. We characterized nulling in 36 pulsars including 17 pulsars where the phenomenon was reported for the first time. The most dominant nulls lasted for a short duration, less than five periods. Longer duration nulls extending to hundreds of periods were also seen in some cases. A careful analysis showed the presence of periodicities in the transition from the null to the burst states in 11 pulsars. In our earlier work, fluctuation spectrum analysis showed multiple periodicities in 6 of these 11 pulsars. We demonstrate that the longer periodicity in each case was associated with nulling. The shorter periodicities usually originate from subpulse drifting. The nulling periodicities were more aligned with the periodic amplitude modulation, indicating a possible common origin for both. The most prevalent nulls last for a single period and can be potentially explained using random variations affecting the plasma processes in the pulsar magnetosphere. On the other hand, longer-duration nulls require changes in the pair-production processes, which need an external triggering mechanism for the changes. The presence of periodic nulling puts an added constraint on the triggering mechanism, which also needs to be periodic.

  8. Mice null for the deubiquitinase USP18 spontaneously develop leiomyosarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinyengetere, Fadzai; Sekula, David J.; Lu, Yun; Giustini, Andrew J.; Sanglikar, Aarti; Kawakami, Masanori; Ma, Tian; Burkett, Sandra S.; Eisenberg, Burton L.; Wells, Wendy A.; Hoopes, Paul J.; Demicco, Elizabeth G.; Lazar, Alexander J; Torres, Keila E.; Memoli, Vincent; Freemantle, Sarah J.; Dmitrovsky, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    USP18 (ubiquitin-specific protease 18) removes ubiquitin-like modifier interferon stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) from conjugated proteins. USP18 null mice in a FVB/N background develop tumors as early as 2 months of age. These tumors are leiomyosarcomas and thus represent a new murine model for this disease. Heterozygous USP18 +/− FVB/N mice were bred to generate wild-type, heterozygous and homozygous cohorts. Tumors were characterized immunohistochemically and two cell lines were derived from independent tumors. Cell lines were karyotyped and their responses to restoration of USP18 activity assessed. Drug testing and tumorigenic assays were also performed. USP18 immunohistochemical staining in a large series of human leiomyosacomas was examined. USP18 −/− FVB/N mice spontaneously develop tumors predominantly on the back of the neck with most tumors evident between 6–12 months (80 % penetrance). Immunohistochemical characterization of the tumors confirmed they were leiomyosarcomas, which originate from smooth muscle. Restoration of USP18 activity in sarcoma-derived cell lines did not reduce anchorage dependent or independent growth or xenograft tumor formation demonstrating that these cells no longer require USP18 suppression for tumorigenesis. Karyotyping revealed that both tumor-derived cell lines were aneuploid with extra copies of chromosomes 3 and 15. Chromosome 15 contains the Myc locus and MYC is also amplified in human leiomyosarcomas. MYC protein levels were elevated in both murine leiomyosarcoma cell lines. Stabilized P53 protein was detected in a subset of these murine tumors, another feature of human leiomyosarcomas. Immunohistochemical analyses of USP18 in human leiomyosarcomas revealed a range of staining intensities with the highest USP18 expression in normal vascular smooth muscle. USP18 tissue array analysis of primary leiomyosarcomas from 89 patients with a clinical database revealed cases with reduced USP18 levels had a significantly

  9. Radiation Hardened NULL Convention Logic Asynchronous Circuit Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhou

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a radiation hardened NULL Convention Logic (NCL architecture that can recover from a single event latchup (SEL or single event upset (SEU fault without deadlock or any data loss. The proposed architecture is analytically proved to be SEL resistant, and by extension, proved to be SEU resistant. The SEL/SEU resistant version of a 3-stage full-word pipelined NCL 4 × 4 unsigned multiplier was implemented using the IBM cmrf8sf 130 nm 1.2 V process at the transistor level and simulated exhaustively with SEL fault injection to validate the proposed architectures. Compared with the original version, the SEL/SEU resilient version has 1.31× speed overhead, 2.74× area overhead, and 2.79× energy per operation overhead.

  10. The simple map for a single-null divertor tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punjabi, A.; Verma, A.; Boozer, A.

    1996-01-01

    We present the simple map for a single-null divertor tokamak. The simple map is an area-preserving map based on the idea that magnetic field lines are a single-degree-of-freedom time-dependent Hamiltonian system, and that the basic features of such systems near the X-point are generic. We obtain the properties of this map and the resulting footprints of field lines on the divertor plate. These include the width of the stochastic layer, the edge safety factor, the area of the footprint and the amount of magnetic flux diverted. We give the safety factor profile, the average and median values of strike angles, lengths and the Liapunov exponents. We describe how the effects of magnetic perturbations can be included in the simple map. We show how the map can be applied to the problem of the determination of heat flux on the divertor plate in tokamaks. (Author)

  11. Status of the Visible Nulling Coronagraph Technology Demonstration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clampin, M.; Lyon, R.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the development, sensing and control of the Vacuum Nuller Testbed to realize a Visible Nulling Coronagraphy (VNC) for exoplanet detection and characterization. The VNC is one of the few approaches that works with filled, segmented and sparse or diluted-aperture telescope systems. It thus spans a range of potential future NASA telescopes and could be flown as a separate instrument on such a future mission. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center has an established effort to develop VNC technologies, and an incremental sequence of testbeds to advance this approach and its critical technologies. We will highlight results demonstrating the achievement of our TDEM contrast milestones, and highlight the performance of our wavefront sensing and control concept.

  12. Horizons in Matter:. Black Hole Hair Versus Null Big Bang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Zaslavskii, Oleg B.

    It is shown that only particular kinds of matter (in terms of the "radial" pressure-to-density ratio w) can coexist with Killing horizons in black hole or cosmological space-times. Thus, for arbitrary (not necessarily spherically symmetric) static black holes, admissible are vacuum matter (w = -1, i.e. the cosmological constant or its generalization with the same value of w) and matter with certain values of w between 0 and -1, in particular a gas of disordered cosmic strings (w = -1/3). If the cosmological evolution starts from a horizon (the so-called null big bang scenarios), this horizon can coexist with vacuum matter and certain kinds of phantom matter with w ≤ -3. It is concluded that normal matter in such scenarios is entirely created from vacuum.

  13. Cadmium modulates adipocyte functions in metallothionein-null mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, Takashige; Nishiyama, Kaori; Kadota, Yoshito; Sato, Masao; Inoue, Masahisa; Suzuki, Shinya, E-mail: suzukis@ph.bunri-u.ac.jp

    2013-11-01

    Our previous study has demonstrated that exposure to cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal, causes a reduction of adipocyte size and the modulation of adipokine expression. To further investigate the significance of the Cd action, we studied the effect of Cd on the white adipose tissue (WAT) of metallothionein null (MT{sup −/−}) mice, which cannot form atoxic Cd–MT complexes and are used for evaluating Cd as free ions, and wild type (MT{sup +/+}) mice. Cd administration more significantly reduced the adipocyte size of MT{sup −/−} mice than that of MT{sup +/+} mice. Cd exposure also induced macrophage recruitment to WAT with an increase in the expression level of Ccl2 (MCP-1) in the MT{sup −/−} mice. The in vitro exposure of Cd to adipocytes induce triglyceride release into culture medium, decrease in the expression levels of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis and lipid hydrolysis at 24 h, and at 48 h increase in phosphorylation of the lipid-droplet-associated protein perilipin, which facilitates the degradation of stored lipids in adipocytes. Therefore, the reduction in adipocyte size by Cd may arise from an imbalance between lipid synthesis and lipolysis. In addition, the expression levels of leptin, adiponectin and resistin decreased in adipocytes. Taken together, exposure to Cd may induce unusually small adipocytes and modulate the expression of adipokines differently from the case of physiologically small adipocytes, and may accelerate the risk of developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. - Highlights: • Cd causes a marked reduction in adipocyte size in MT-null mice. • Cd enhances macrophage migration into adipose tissue and disrupt adipokine secretion. • MT gene alleviates Cd-induced adipocyte dysfunctions. • Cd enhances the degradation of stored lipids in adipocytes, mediated by perilipin. • Cd induces unusually small adipocytes and the abnormal expression of adipokines.

  14. Dinucleotide controlled null models for comparative RNA gene prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesell Tanja

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative prediction of RNA structures can be used to identify functional noncoding RNAs in genomic screens. It was shown recently by Babak et al. [BMC Bioinformatics. 8:33] that RNA gene prediction programs can be biased by the genomic dinucleotide content, in particular those programs using a thermodynamic folding model including stacking energies. As a consequence, there is need for dinucleotide-preserving control strategies to assess the significance of such predictions. While there have been randomization algorithms for single sequences for many years, the problem has remained challenging for multiple alignments and there is currently no algorithm available. Results We present a program called SISSIz that simulates multiple alignments of a given average dinucleotide content. Meeting additional requirements of an accurate null model, the randomized alignments are on average of the same sequence diversity and preserve local conservation and gap patterns. We make use of a phylogenetic substitution model that includes overlapping dependencies and site-specific rates. Using fast heuristics and a distance based approach, a tree is estimated under this model which is used to guide the simulations. The new algorithm is tested on vertebrate genomic alignments and the effect on RNA structure predictions is studied. In addition, we directly combined the new null model with the RNAalifold consensus folding algorithm giving a new variant of a thermodynamic structure based RNA gene finding program that is not biased by the dinucleotide content. Conclusion SISSIz implements an efficient algorithm to randomize multiple alignments preserving dinucleotide content. It can be used to get more accurate estimates of false positive rates of existing programs, to produce negative controls for the training of machine learning based programs, or as standalone RNA gene finding program. Other applications in comparative genomics that require

  15. Dinucleotide controlled null models for comparative RNA gene prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesell, Tanja; Washietl, Stefan

    2008-05-27

    Comparative prediction of RNA structures can be used to identify functional noncoding RNAs in genomic screens. It was shown recently by Babak et al. [BMC Bioinformatics. 8:33] that RNA gene prediction programs can be biased by the genomic dinucleotide content, in particular those programs using a thermodynamic folding model including stacking energies. As a consequence, there is need for dinucleotide-preserving control strategies to assess the significance of such predictions. While there have been randomization algorithms for single sequences for many years, the problem has remained challenging for multiple alignments and there is currently no algorithm available. We present a program called SISSIz that simulates multiple alignments of a given average dinucleotide content. Meeting additional requirements of an accurate null model, the randomized alignments are on average of the same sequence diversity and preserve local conservation and gap patterns. We make use of a phylogenetic substitution model that includes overlapping dependencies and site-specific rates. Using fast heuristics and a distance based approach, a tree is estimated under this model which is used to guide the simulations. The new algorithm is tested on vertebrate genomic alignments and the effect on RNA structure predictions is studied. In addition, we directly combined the new null model with the RNAalifold consensus folding algorithm giving a new variant of a thermodynamic structure based RNA gene finding program that is not biased by the dinucleotide content. SISSIz implements an efficient algorithm to randomize multiple alignments preserving dinucleotide content. It can be used to get more accurate estimates of false positive rates of existing programs, to produce negative controls for the training of machine learning based programs, or as standalone RNA gene finding program. Other applications in comparative genomics that require randomization of multiple alignments can be considered. SISSIz

  16. Does horizon entropy satisfy a quantum null energy conjecture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zicao; Marolf, Donald

    2016-12-01

    A modern version of the idea that the area of event horizons gives 4G times an entropy is the Hubeny-Rangamani causal holographic information (CHI) proposal for holographic field theories. Given a region R of a holographic QFTs, CHI computes A/4G on a certain cut of an event horizon in the gravitational dual. The result is naturally interpreted as a coarse-grained entropy for the QFT. CHI is known to be finitely greater than the fine-grained Hubeny-Rangamani-Takayanagi (HRT) entropy when \\partial R lies on a Killing horizon of the QFT spacetime, and in this context satisfies other non-trivial properties expected of an entropy. Here we present evidence that it also satisfies the quantum null energy condition (QNEC), which bounds the second derivative of the entropy of a quantum field theory on one side of a non-expanding null surface by the flux of stress-energy across the surface. In particular, we show CHI to satisfy the QNEC in 1  +  1 holographic CFTs when evaluated in states dual to conical defects in AdS3. This surprising result further supports the idea that CHI defines a useful notion of coarse-grained holographic entropy, and suggests unprecedented bounds on the rate at which bulk horizon generators emerge from a caustic. To supplement our motivation, we include an appendix deriving a corresponding coarse-grained generalized second law for 1  +  1 holographic CFTs perturbatively coupled to dilaton gravity.

  17. 3D Solar Null Point Reconnection MHD Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, G.; Galsgaard, K.; Nordlund, Å.

    2013-06-01

    Numerical MHD simulations of 3D reconnection events in the solar corona have improved enormously over the last few years, not only in resolution, but also in their complexity, enabling more and more realistic modeling. Various ways to obtain the initial magnetic field, different forms of solar atmospheric models as well as diverse driving speeds and patterns have been employed. This study considers differences between simulations with stratified and non-stratified solar atmospheres, addresses the influence of the driving speed on the plasma flow and energetics, and provides quantitative formulas for mapping electric fields and dissipation levels obtained in numerical simulations to the corresponding solar quantities. The simulations start out from a potential magnetic field containing a null-point, obtained from a Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) magnetogram magnetogram extrapolation approximately 8 hours before a C-class flare was observed. The magnetic field is stressed with a boundary motion pattern similar to - although simpler than - horizontal motions observed by SOHO during the period preceding the flare. The general behavior is nearly independent of the driving speed, and is also very similar in stratified and non-stratified models, provided only that the boundary motions are slow enough. The boundary motions cause a build-up of current sheets, mainly in the fan-plane of the magnetic null-point, but do not result in a flare-like energy release. The additional free energy required for the flare could have been partly present in non-potential form at the initial state, with subsequent additions from magnetic flux emergence or from components of the boundary motion that were not represented by the idealized driving pattern.

  18. Molecular bass for a malic enzyme null mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.L.; Wise, L.S.; Rubin, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    Many tissues from normal (wt) mice have cytosolic malic enzyme (ME) activity and express two mRNAs (2 and 3.1 kb) that code for a single ME polypeptide. Mod-1 null (M-n) mice lack cytosolic ME activity, but express 2.5 and 3.6 kb mRNAs that hybridize with wt ME cDNAs. To investigate the basis for the ME deficiency cDNAs corresponding to M-n ME RNA were cloned. A λgt11 library was prepared using M-n liver mRNA as a template. Wt ME cDNA probes hybridized with several recombinant phages and a 2kb insert with an atypical (non-wt) restriction pattern was subcloned in pGEM 1 and sequenced. The M-n ME cDNA contains an internal directly repeated sequence that corresponds to nts 1109-1617 in the coding region of wt ME cDNA. A restriction fragment from M-n ME cDNA that includes the first 204 bp of repeated sequence and 306 bp of contiguous 5' sequence was subcloned into pGEM 1 and used as a template for synthesizing 32 P-labeled anti-sense RNA. After hybridization with M-n liver RNA the 510 nt transcript was resistant to RNA digestion; after hybridization with wt RNA only fragments corresponding to the normally non-contiguous 204 bp and 306 bp segments of the insert were protected. Thus the partial duplication of coding sequence in M-n ME mRNA is confirmed. Analyses of intron-exon organization in the relevant regions of the wt and M-n ME genes will provide further insights into the mechanism underlying the ME null mutation

  19. Surprising structures hiding in Penrose’s future null infinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Ezra T.

    2017-07-01

    Since the late1950s, almost all discussions of asymptotically flat (Einstein-Maxwell) space-times have taken place in the context of Penrose’s null infinity, I+. In addition, almost all calculations have used the Bondi coordinate and tetrad systems. Beginning with a known asymptotically flat solution to the Einstein-Maxwell equations, we show first, that there are other natural coordinate systems, near I+, (analogous to light-cones in flat-space) that are based on (asymptotically) shear-free null geodesic congruences (analogous to the flat-space case). Using these new coordinates and their associated tetrad, we define the complex dipole moment, (the mass dipole plus i times angular momentum), from the l  =  1 harmonic coefficient of a component of the asymptotic Weyl tensor. Second, from this definition, from the Bianchi identities and from the Bondi-Sachs mass and linear momentum, we show that there exists a large number of results—identifications and dynamics—identical to those of classical mechanics and electrodynamics. They include, among many others, {P}=M{v}+..., {L}= {r} × {P} , spin, Newton’s second law with the rocket force term (\\dotM v) and radiation reaction, angular momentum conservation and others. All these relations take place in the rather mysterious H-space rather than in space-time. This leads to the enigma: ‘why do these well known relations of classical mechanics take place in H-space?’ and ‘What is the physical meaning of H-space?’

  20. Is PMI the Hypothesis or the Null Hypothesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarone, Aaron M; Sanford, Michelle R

    2017-09-01

    Over the past several decades, there have been several strident exchanges regarding whether forensic entomologists estimate the postmortem interval (PMI), minimum PMI, or something else. During that time, there has been a proliferation of terminology reflecting this concern regarding "what we do." This has been a frustrating conversation for some in the community because much of this debate appears to be centered on what assumptions are acknowledged directly and which are embedded within a list of assumptions (or ignored altogether) in the literature and in case reports. An additional component of the conversation centers on a concern that moving away from the use of certain terminology like PMI acknowledges limitations and problems that would make the application of entomology appear less useful in court-a problem for lawyers, but one that should not be problematic for scientists in the forensic entomology community, as uncertainty is part of science that should and can be presented effectively in the courtroom (e.g., population genetic concepts in forensics). Unfortunately, a consequence of the way this conversation is conducted is that even as all involved in the debate acknowledge the concerns of their colleagues, parties continue to talk past one another advocating their preferred terminology. Progress will not be made until the community recognizes that all of the terms under consideration take the form of null hypothesis statements and that thinking about "what we do" as a null hypothesis has useful legal and scientific ramifications that transcend arguments over the usage of preferred terminology. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Observation of a 3D Magnetic Null Point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, P.; Falco, M. [INAF—Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Guglielmino, S. L.; Murabito, M., E-mail: prom@oact.inaf.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia—Sezione Astrofisica, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2017-03-10

    We describe high-resolution observations of a GOES B-class flare characterized by a circular ribbon at the chromospheric level, corresponding to the network at the photospheric level. We interpret the flare as a consequence of a magnetic reconnection event that occurred at a three-dimensional (3D) coronal null point located above the supergranular cell. The potential field extrapolation of the photospheric magnetic field indicates that the circular chromospheric ribbon is cospatial with the fan footpoints, while the ribbons of the inner and outer spines look like compact kernels. We found new interesting observational aspects that need to be explained by models: (1) a loop corresponding to the outer spine became brighter a few minutes before the onset of the flare; (2) the circular ribbon was formed by several adjacent compact kernels characterized by a size of 1″–2″; (3) the kernels with a stronger intensity emission were located at the outer footpoint of the darker filaments, departing radially from the center of the supergranular cell; (4) these kernels started to brighten sequentially in clockwise direction; and (5) the site of the 3D null point and the shape of the outer spine were detected by RHESSI in the low-energy channel between 6.0 and 12.0 keV. Taking into account all these features and the length scales of the magnetic systems involved in the event, we argue that the low intensity of the flare may be ascribed to the low amount of magnetic flux and to its symmetric configuration.

  2. Verification of time-delay interferometry techniques using the University of Florida LISA interferometry simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitryk, Shawn J; Wand, Vinzenz; Mueller, Guido, E-mail: smitryk@phys.ufl.ed, E-mail: mueller@phys.ufl.ed [Department of Physics, University of Florida, PO Box 118440, Gainesville, FL 32611-8440 (United States)

    2010-04-21

    Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a cooperative NASA/ESA mission proposed to directly measure gravitational waves (GW) in the frequency range from 30 muHz to 1 Hz with an optimal strain sensitivity of 10{sup -21}/sq root(Hz) at 3 mHz. LISA will utilize a modified Michelson interferometer to measure length changes of 40 pm/sq root(Hz) between drag-free proof masses located on three separate spacecraft (SC) separated by a distance of 5 Gm. The University of Florida has developed a hardware-in-the-loop simulator of the LISA constellation to verify the laser noise cancellation technique known as time-delay interferometry (TDI). We replicate the frequency stabilization of the laser on the local SC and the phase-locking of the lasers on the far SC. The laser photodetector beatnotes are electronically delayed, Doppler shifted and applied with a mock GW signal to simulate the laser link between the SC. The beatnotes are also measured with a LISA-like phasemeter and the data are used to extract the laser phase and residual phase-lock loop noise in post-processing through TDI. This uncovers the GW modulation signal buried under the laser noise. The results are then compared to the requirements defined by the LISA science collaboration.

  3. A novel plasmonic interferometry and the potential applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, J.; Pornsuwancharoen, N.; Youplao, P.; Aziz, M. S.; Chiangga, S.; Jaglan, J.; Amiri, I. S.; Yupapin, P.

    2018-03-01

    In this article, we have proposed the plasmonic interferometry concept and analytical details given. By using the conventional optical interferometry, which can be simply calculated by using the relationship between the electric field and electron mobility, the interference mobility visibility (fringe visibility) can be observed. The surface plasmons in the sensing arm of the Michelson interferometer is constructed by the stacked layers of the silicon-graphene-gold, allows to characterize the spatial resolution of light beams in terms of the electron mobility down to 100-nm scales, with measured coherence lengths as low as ∼100 nm for an incident wavelength of 1550 nm. We have demonstrated a compact plasmonic interferometer that can apply to the electron mean free paths measurement, from which the precise determination can be used for the high-resolution mean free path measurement and sensing applications. This system provides the practical simulation device parameters that can be fabricated and tested by the experimental platform.

  4. A recent history of science cases for optical interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrère, Denis; Aerts, Conny; Kishimoto, Makoto; Léna, Pierre

    2018-04-01

    Optical long-baseline interferometry is a unique and powerful technique for astronomical research. Since the 1980's (with I2T, GI2T, Mark I to III, SUSI, ...), optical interferometers have produced an increasing number of scientific papers covering various fields of astrophysics. As current interferometric facilities are reaching their maturity, we take the opportunity in this paper to summarize the conclusions of a few key meetings, workshops, and conferences dedicated to interferometry. We present the most persistent recommendations related to science cases and discuss some key technological developments required to address them. In the era of extremely large telescopes, optical long-baseline interferometers will remain crucial to probe the smallest spatial scales and make breakthrough discoveries.

  5. Phase and fringe order determination in wavelength scanning interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschetti, Giuseppe; Forbes, Alistair; Leach, Richard K; Jiang, Xiang; O'Connor, Daniel

    2016-04-18

    A method to obtain unambiguous surface height measurements using wavelength scanning interferometry with an improved repeatability, comparable to that obtainable using phase shifting interferometry, is reported. Rather than determining the conventional fringe frequency-derived z height directly, the method uses the frequency to resolve the fringe order ambiguity, and combine this information with the more accurate and repeatable fringe phase derived z height. A theoretical model to evaluate the method's performance in the presence of additive noise is derived and shown to be in good agreement with experiments. The measurement repeatability is improved by a factor of ten over that achieved when using frequency information alone, reaching the sub-nanometre range. Moreover, the z-axis non-linearity (bleed-through or ripple error) is reduced by a factor of ten. These order of magnitude improvements in measurement performance are demonstrated through a number of practical measurement examples.

  6. X-ray Talbot interferometry with capillary plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momose, Atsushi; Kawamoto, Shinya

    2006-01-01

    An X-ray Talbot interferometer consisting of two capillary plates, which were used as X-ray amplitude gratings, was evaluated for X-ray phase imaging. A theoretical aspect of capillary X-ray Talbot interferometry is presented with a preliminary operation result using synchrotron radiation. A two-dimensional X-ray Talbot effect, or self-imaging effect, which was the basis of Talbot interferometry, was observed with the capillary plate, and moire images formed by the X-ray Talbot interferometer exhibited contrasts corresponding to the differential phase shift caused by phase objects placed in front of the interferometer. Finally, the possibility of quantitative phase measurement with a fringe scanning technique is discussed. (author)

  7. MAGIA - using atom interferometry to determine the Newtonian gravitational constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuhler, J; Fattori, M; Petelski, T; Tino, G M

    2003-01-01

    We describe our experiment MAGIA (misura accurata di G mediante interferometria atomica), in which we will use atom interferometry to perform a high precision measurement of the Newtonian gravitational constant G. Free-falling laser-cooled atoms in a vertical atomic fountain will be accelerated due to the gravitational potential of nearby source masses (SMs). Detecting this acceleration with techniques of Raman atom interferometry will enable us to assign a value to G. To suppress systematic effects we will implement a double-differential measurement. This includes launching two atom clouds in a gradiometer configuration and moving the SMs to different vertical positions. We briefly summarize the general idea of the MAGIA experiment and put it in the context of other high precision G-measurements. We present the current status of the experiment and report on analyses of the expected measurement accuracy

  8. Polarimetric SAR interferometry applied to land ice: modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Papathanassiou, Konstantinos; Skriver, Henning

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces a few simple scattering models intended for the application of polarimetric SAR interfer-ometry to land ice. The principal aim is to eliminate the penetration bias hampering ice sheet elevation maps generated with single-channel SAR interferometry. The polarimetric coherent...... scattering models are similar to the oriented-volume model and the random-volume-over-ground model used in vegetation studies, but the ice models are adapted to the different geometry of land ice. Also, due to compaction, land ice is not uniform; a fact that must be taken into account for large penetration...... depths. The validity of the scattering models is examined using L-band polarimetric interferometric SAR data acquired with the EMISAR system over an ice cap located in the percolation zone of the Greenland ice sheet. Radar reflectors were deployed on the ice surface prior to the data acquisition in order...

  9. Demystifying back scatter interferometry: a sensitive refractive index detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Søren Terpager; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Trydal, Torleif

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Back Scatter Interferometry (BSI) is a sensitive method for detecting changes of the refractive index (RI) in small capillaries. The method was originally developed as an off-axial column detector for use in Liquid Chromatography or Capillary Electrophoresis systems, but it has been...... acting like a common-path interferometer. METHODS: A HeNe laser is directed at a glass capillary with inner diameter of 1.4 mm and reflected light from air/glass and liquid/glass interfaces interfere to form an RI dependent intensity fringe pattern at a CCD detector. The fringe shift relative...... a common-path interferometer. The sensitivity of the BSI system is given by twice the inner diameter of the capillary times the wavenumber of the light source. Our results suggest that Back Scatter Interferometry does not provide a unique measurement principle for sensing biochemical bindings compared...

  10. Neutron interferometry: The pioneering contributions of Samuel A. Werner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    In 1975, Sam Werner, while on the staff of the Scientific Laboratory of the Ford Motor Company, and his collaborators from Purdue University, Roberto Colella and Albert Overhauser, carried out one of the pioneering experiments in neutron interferometry at the 2 MW University of Michigan research reactor. It was the famous COW Experiment [Colella et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 34 (1975) 1472] on gravitationally induced quantum interference. Shortly thereafter he moved to University of Missouri in Columbia, to set up a program of neutron scattering research, including neutron interferometry. In the 25 years until his retirement a large number of beautiful experiments have been performed by Sam, with his group, his numerous students and many international collaborators. This work and its history are briefly reviewed in this paper

  11. Holodiagram: elliptic visualizing interferometry, relativity, and light-in-flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Nils H

    2014-04-10

    In holographic interferometry, there is usually a static distance separating the point of illumination and the point of observation. In Special Relativity, this separation is dynamic and is caused by the velocity of the observer. The corrections needed to compensate for these separations are similar in the two fields. We use the ellipsoids of the holodiagram for measurement and in a graphic way to explain and evaluate optical resolution, gated viewing, radar, holography, three-dimensional interferometry, Special Relativity, and light-in-flight recordings. Lorentz contraction together with time dilation is explained as the result of the eccentricity of the measuring ellipsoid, caused by its velocity. The extremely thin ellipsoid of the very first light appears as a beam aimed directly at the observer, which might explain the wave or ray duality of light and entanglement. Finally, we introduce the concept of ellipsoids of observation.

  12. Application of synchrotron radiation to X-ray interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, M [King' s Coll., London (UK). Wheatstone Physics Lab.

    1980-05-01

    X-ray interferometry has been attempted with synchrotron radiation at Hamburg and at Orsay. Experiments will start this year at the Storage Ring Source at Daresbury. This review covers work which has already been completed and outlines the likely trends in phase sensitive X-ray polarimetry, high resolution spectroscopy (including real and imaginary-part EXAFS) and novel experiments with many-beam-case interferometers.

  13. Heterodyne Angle Deviation Interferometry in Vibration and Bubble Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Ming-Hung Chiu; Jia-Ze Shen; Jian-Ming Huang

    2016-01-01

    We proposed heterodyne angle deviation interferometry (HADI) for angle deviation measurements. The phase shift of an angular sensor (which can be a metal film or a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) prism) is proportional to the deviation angle of the test beam. The method has been demonstrated in bubble and speaker’s vibration measurements in this paper. In the speaker’s vibration measurement, the voltage from the phase channel of a lock-in amplifier includes the vibration level and frequency. ...

  14. Using Atom Interferometry to Search for New Forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wacker, Jay G.

    2009-01-01

    Atom interferometry is a rapidly advancing field and this Letter proposes an experiment based on existing technology that can search for new short distance forces. With current technology it is possible to improve the sensitivity by up to a factor of 10 2 and near-future advances will be able to rewrite the limits for forces with ranges from 100 (micro)m to 1km.

  15. Pion interferometry of ultra-relativistic hadronic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolehmainen, K.

    1986-05-01

    Pion interferometry of ultra-relativistic hadronic collisions is described in the context of the inside-outside cascade model using a current ensemble method capable of describing an arbitrary distribution of pion sources with an arbitrary velocity distribution. The results are quite distinct from the usual Gaussian and Kopylov parameterizations. Extraction of the temperature parameter, effective source lifetime, and transverse size requires a full three-dimensional analysis of the correlation function in terms of the momentum difference. 7 refs., 4 figs

  16. Using atom interferometry to search for new forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wacker, Jay G.

    2010-01-01

    Atom interferometry is a rapidly advancing field and this Letter proposes an experiment based on existing technology that can search for new short distance forces. With current technology it is possible to improve the sensitivity by up to a factor of 10 2 and near-future advances may be able to rewrite the limits for forces with ranges from 1 mm to 100 m.

  17. Atomic Interferometry with Detuned Counter-Propagating Electromagnetic Pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, Ming -Yee [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-05

    Atomic fountain interferometry uses atoms cooled with optical molasses to 1 μK, which are then launched in a fountain mode. The interferometer relies on the nonlinear Raman interaction of counter-propagating visible light pulses. We present models of these key transitions through a series of Hamiltonians. Our models, which have been verified against special cases with known solutions, allow us to incorporate the effects of non-ideal pulse shapes and realistic laser frequency or wavevector jitter.

  18. HBT interferometry and the parton-hadron phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soff, S.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss predictions for the pion and kaon interferometry measurements in relativistic heavy ion collisions at SPS and RHIC energies. In particular, we confront relativistic transport model calculations that include explicitly a first-order phase transition from a thermalized quark-gluon plasma to a hadron gas with recent data from the RHIC experiments. We critically examine the HBT puzzle both from the theoretical as well as from the experimental point of view. Alternative scenarios are briefly explained. (orig.)

  19. Pion interferometry and resonances in pp and AA collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padula, S.S. (UNESP, Inst. de Fisica Teorica, Sao Paulo (Brazil)); Gyulassy, M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., Nuclear Science Div., CA (United States))

    1992-07-20

    We study the sensitivity of pion interferometry in pp and anti pp collisions at ISR energies to the resonance abundance. We show that those data are not compatible with the full resonance fractions predicted by the Lund model. The preliminary S+S and O+Au data at 200 A GeV are, however, not incompatible with the Lund predictions, although their sensitivity to resonances is significantly weaker than in the pp/anti pp case. (orig.).

  20. Pion interferometry and resonances in pp and AA collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padula, S.S.; Gyulassy, M.

    1992-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of pion interferometry in pp and anti pp collisions at ISR energies to the resonance abundance. We show that those data are not compatible with the full resonance fractions predicted by the Lund model. The preliminary S+S and O+Au data at 200 A GeV are, however, not incompatible with the Lund predictions, although their sensitivity to resonances is significantly weaker than in the pp/anti pp case. (orig.)

  1. Pion interferometry and resonances in pp and AA collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padula, S.S.

    1991-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of pion interferometry in bar pp and bar pp collisions at ISR energies to the resonance abundance. We show that those data are not compatible with the full resonance fractions predicted by the Lund model. The preliminary S+S and O+Au data at 200 GeV are, however, not incompatible with the Lund predictions, although their sensitivity to resonances is significantly weaker than in the pp/bar pp case

  2. Deformation Measurement Of Lumbar Vertebra By Holographic Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Toshiro; Kojima, Arata; Ogawa, Ryoukei; Iwata, Koichi; Nagata, Ryo

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of normal lumbar vertebra and one with the interarticular part cut off to simulate hemi-spondylolysis were measured by the double exposure holographic interferometry. In the normal lumbar vertebra, displacement due to the load applied to the inferior articular process was greater than that of superior articular process under the same load. The interarticular part was subjected to the high stress. From these points, one of the valuable data to consider the cause of spondylolysis was obtained.

  3. Special topics in infrared interferometry. [Michelson interferometer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanel, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Topics in IR interferometry related to the development of a Michelson interferometer are treated. The selection and reading of the signal from the detector to the analog to digital converter is explained. The requirements for the Michelson interferometer advance speed are deduced. The effects of intensity modulation on the interferogram are discussed. Wavelength and intensity calibration of the interferometer are explained. Noise sources (Nyquist or Johnson noise, phonon noise), definitions of measuring methods of noise, and noise measurements are presented.

  4. Real-time laser holographic interferometry for aerodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, G.

    1987-01-01

    Recent developments in thermoplastic recording holograms and advancements in automated image digitalization and analysis make real-time laser holographic interferometry feasible for two-dimensional flows such as airfoil flows. Typical airfoil measurements would include airfoil pressure distributions, wake and boundary layer profiles, and flow field density contours. This paper addresses some of the problems and requirements of a real-time laser holographic interferometer. 13 references

  5. Use of the shearing interferometry for dense inhomogeneous plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharenkov, Yu.A.; Sklizkov, G.V.; Shikanov, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    Investigated is a possibility of applying the shearing interferometry for diagnostics of a dense inhomogeneous laser plasma which makes it possible to measure the electron density without losses in accuracy near the critical surface. A shearing interferogram is formed upon interference of two identical images of the object under study shifted at some fixed distance. The value of the interference band deflection inside phase inhomogeneity depends on the gradient of the index of refraction in the direction of shift. It has been found that for studying the inner region of the laser plasma a small shift should be used, and for the external one - a large one. The version of a radial shift interferometry is shown to be optimum. For the inner region of the interferogram the error of the electron density restoration does not exceed 10%, and for the external one the error is comparable with that for the version of standard interferometry. A systematic analysis of the optimum type interferometers shows advantages of shearing interferometers. The maximum electron density recorded in experiments makes up approximately equal to 10 20 cm -3 , which is 3-5 times higher than the corresponding value obtained by a standard double-slit type interferometer at equal limiting parameters of the optical system applied

  6. PNO-apparatus and its test use for neutron interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomimitsu, Hiroshi; Aizawa, Kazuya; Hasegawa, Yuji; Kikuta, Seishi.

    1993-01-01

    Special apparatus 'PNO' of multiutility in the so-called precise neutron optics, such as double or triple crystal diffractometry, interferometry, etc., including neutron diffraction topography, was settled at 3G beam hole in the JRR-3M. In the symposium, several applications of the PNO apparatus are presented as 1) very small angle neutron scattering tool with double crystal arrangement, 2) the characterization of the quality of artificial multilayer lattices made of Ti-Ni by a triple crystal arrangement, 3) the characterization of Ni-base superalloy single crystals by the diffraction topography, which are presented in individual sessions. Preliminary test of the neutron interferometry was also tried with the PNO apparatus. Usual monolithic Si LLL- type interferometer was used with an Al phase shifter in the neutron beam paths. The periodicity of the measured intensity curve was well corresponded to the expected one. The best contrast of the intensity curve was measured as high as 43%. The utility of the PNO-apparatus for neutron interferometry was, thus, approved. (author)

  7. Neutron Interferometry at the National Institute of Standards and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, M. G.; Sarenac, D.; Nsofini, J.; Pushin, D. A.; Arif, M.; Wood, C. J.; Cory, D. G.; Shahi, C. B.

    2015-01-01

    Neutron interferometry has proved to be a very precise technique for measuring the quantum mechanical phase of a neutron caused by a potential energy difference between two spatially separated neutron paths inside interferometer. The path length inside the interferometer can be many centimeters (and many centimeters apart) making it very practical to study a variety of samples, fields, potentials, and other macroscopic medium and quantum effects. The precision of neutron interferometry comes at a cost; neutron interferometers are very susceptible to environmental noise that is typically mitigated with large, active isolated enclosures. With recent advances in quantum information processing especially quantum error correction (QEC) codes we were able to demonstrate a neutron interferometer that is insensitive to vibrational noise. A facility at NIST’s Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) has just been commissioned with higher neutron flux than the NCNR’s older interferometer setup. This new facility is based on QEC neutron interferometer, thus improving the accessibility of neutron interferometry to the greater scientific community and expanding its applications to quantum computing, gravity, and material research

  8. Analysis of surface absorbed dose in X-ray grating interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhili, E-mail: wangnsrl@ustc.edu.cn [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Wu, Zhao; Gao, Kun; Wang, Dajiang; Chen, Heng; Wang, Shenghao [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Wu, Ziyu, E-mail: wuzy@ustc.edu.cn [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Theoretical framework for dose estimation in X-ray grating interferometry. • Potential dose reduction of X-ray grating interferometry compared to conventional radiography. • Guidelines for optimization of X-ray grating interferometry for dose-sensitive applications. • Measure to compare various existing X-ray phase contrast imaging techniques. - Abstract: X-ray phase contrast imaging using grating interferometry has shown increased contrast over conventional absorption imaging, and therefore the great potential of dose reduction. The extent of the dose reduction depends on the geometry of grating interferometry, the photon energy, the properties of the sample under investigation and the utilized detector. These factors also determine the capability of grating interferometry to distinguish between different tissues with a specified statistical certainty in a single raw image. In this contribution, the required photon number for imaging and the resulting surface absorbed dose are determined in X-ray grating interferometry, using a two-component imaging object model. The presented results confirm that compared to conventional radiography, phase contrast imaging using grating interferometry indeed has the potential of dose reduction. And the extent of dose reduction is strongly dependent on the imaging conditions. Those results provide a theoretical framework for dose estimation under given imaging conditions before experimental trials, and general guidelines for optimization of grating interferometry for those dose-sensitive applications.

  9. Analysis of surface absorbed dose in X-ray grating interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhili; Wu, Zhao; Gao, Kun; Wang, Dajiang; Chen, Heng; Wang, Shenghao; Wu, Ziyu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Theoretical framework for dose estimation in X-ray grating interferometry. • Potential dose reduction of X-ray grating interferometry compared to conventional radiography. • Guidelines for optimization of X-ray grating interferometry for dose-sensitive applications. • Measure to compare various existing X-ray phase contrast imaging techniques. - Abstract: X-ray phase contrast imaging using grating interferometry has shown increased contrast over conventional absorption imaging, and therefore the great potential of dose reduction. The extent of the dose reduction depends on the geometry of grating interferometry, the photon energy, the properties of the sample under investigation and the utilized detector. These factors also determine the capability of grating interferometry to distinguish between different tissues with a specified statistical certainty in a single raw image. In this contribution, the required photon number for imaging and the resulting surface absorbed dose are determined in X-ray grating interferometry, using a two-component imaging object model. The presented results confirm that compared to conventional radiography, phase contrast imaging using grating interferometry indeed has the potential of dose reduction. And the extent of dose reduction is strongly dependent on the imaging conditions. Those results provide a theoretical framework for dose estimation under given imaging conditions before experimental trials, and general guidelines for optimization of grating interferometry for those dose-sensitive applications

  10. The D18 diffractometer for neutron interferometry at the I.L.L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauspiess, W.

    1978-01-01

    Three things are needed for neutron interferometry: an interferometer (a crystal in the case of Bragg diffraction interferometry), a neutron source, and a device to select and handle the neutrons that shall be used. It is this last technical aspect of neutron interferometry which is discussed in the paper, using as an example the new diffractometer for neutron interferometry that is being built at the I.L.L. Results of performance tests are not presently available but its characteristics are visible from the design. The experimental figures given in the paper refer to experiments performed with the prototype machine, or are extrapolated from said experiments

  11. An equation satisfied by the tangent to a shear-free, geodesic, null congruence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, P.A.; Dublin Inst. for Advanced Studies

    1987-01-01

    A tensorial equation satisfied by the tangent to a shear-free geodesic, null congruence is presented. If the congruence is neither twist-free nor expansion-free then the equation defines a second, unique, null direction previously obtained, using the spinor formalism, by Somers. Some further properties of the equation are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Causal null hypotheses of sustained treatment strategies: What can be tested with an instrumental variable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Sonja A; Labrecque, Jeremy; Hernán, Miguel A

    2018-05-02

    Sometimes instrumental variable methods are used to test whether a causal effect is null rather than to estimate the magnitude of a causal effect. However, when instrumental variable methods are applied to time-varying exposures, as in many Mendelian randomization studies, it is unclear what causal null hypothesis is tested. Here, we consider different versions of causal null hypotheses for time-varying exposures, show that the instrumental variable conditions alone are insufficient to test some of them, and describe additional assumptions that can be made to test a wider range of causal null hypotheses, including both sharp and average causal null hypotheses. Implications for interpretation and reporting of instrumental variable results are discussed.

  13. Continuous development of current sheets near and away from magnetic nulls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Bhattacharyya, R.

    2016-01-01

    The presented computations compare the strength of current sheets which develop near and away from the magnetic nulls. To ensure the spontaneous generation of current sheets, the computations are performed congruently with Parker's magnetostatic theorem. The simulations evince current sheets near two dimensional and three dimensional magnetic nulls as well as away from them. An important finding of this work is in the demonstration of comparative scaling of peak current density with numerical resolution, for these different types of current sheets. The results document current sheets near two dimensional magnetic nulls to have larger strength while exhibiting a stronger scaling than the current sheets close to three dimensional magnetic nulls or away from any magnetic null. The comparative scaling points to a scenario where the magnetic topology near a developing current sheet is important for energetics of the subsequent reconnection.

  14. Constrained Null Space Component Analysis for Semiblind Source Separation Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wen-Liang; Lu, Keng-Shih; Ho, Jinn

    2018-02-01

    The blind source separation (BSS) problem extracts unknown sources from observations of their unknown mixtures. A current trend in BSS is the semiblind approach, which incorporates prior information on sources or how the sources are mixed. The constrained independent component analysis (ICA) approach has been studied to impose constraints on the famous ICA framework. We introduced an alternative approach based on the null space component (NCA) framework and referred to the approach as the c-NCA approach. We also presented the c-NCA algorithm that uses signal-dependent semidefinite operators, which is a bilinear mapping, as signatures for operator design in the c-NCA approach. Theoretically, we showed that the source estimation of the c-NCA algorithm converges with a convergence rate dependent on the decay of the sequence, obtained by applying the estimated operators on corresponding sources. The c-NCA can be formulated as a deterministic constrained optimization method, and thus, it can take advantage of solvers developed in optimization society for solving the BSS problem. As examples, we demonstrated electroencephalogram interference rejection problems can be solved by the c-NCA with proximal splitting algorithms by incorporating a sparsity-enforcing separation model and considering the case when reference signals are available.

  15. A null relationship between media multitasking and well-being.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shui-I Shih

    Full Text Available There is a rapidly increasing trend in media-media multitasking or MMM (using two or more media concurrently. In a recent conference, scholars from diverse disciplines expressed concerns that indulgence in MMM may compromise well-being and/or cognitive abilities. However, research on MMM's impacts is too sparse to inform the general public and policy makers whether MMM should be encouraged, managed, or minimized. The primary purpose of the present study was to develop an innovative computerized instrument--the Survey of the Previous Day (SPD--to quantify MMM as well as media-nonmedia and nonmedia-nonmedia multitasking and sole-tasking. The secondary purpose was to examine whether these indices could predict a sample of well-being related, psychosocial measures. In the SPD, participants first recalled (typed what they did during each hour of the previous day. In later parts of the SPD, participants analysed activities and their timing and duration for each hour of the previous day, while relevant recall was on display. Participants also completed the Media Use Questionnaire. The results showed non-significant relationship between tasking measures and well-being related measures. Given how little is known about the associations between MMM and well-being, the null results may offer some general reassurance to those who are apprehensive about negative impacts of MMM.

  16. A Null Relationship between Media Multitasking and Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Shui-I

    2013-01-01

    There is a rapidly increasing trend in media-media multitasking or MMM (using two or more media concurrently). In a recent conference, scholars from diverse disciplines expressed concerns that indulgence in MMM may compromise well-being and/or cognitive abilities. However, research on MMM's impacts is too sparse to inform the general public and policy makers whether MMM should be encouraged, managed, or minimized. The primary purpose of the present study was to develop an innovative computerized instrument – the Survey of the Previous Day (SPD) – to quantify MMM as well as media-nonmedia and nonmedia-nonmedia multitasking and sole-tasking. The secondary purpose was to examine whether these indices could predict a sample of well-being related, psychosocial measures. In the SPD, participants first recalled (typed) what they did during each hour of the previous day. In later parts of the SPD, participants analysed activities and their timing and duration for each hour of the previous day, while relevant recall was on display. Participants also completed the Media Use Questionnaire. The results showed non-significant relationship between tasking measures and well-being related measures. Given how little is known about the associations between MMM and well-being, the null results may offer some general reassurance to those who are apprehensive about negative impacts of MMM. PMID:23691236

  17. Conical twist fields and null polygonal Wilson loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Alvaredo, Olalla A.; Doyon, Benjamin; Fioravanti, Davide

    2018-06-01

    Using an extension of the concept of twist field in QFT to space-time (external) symmetries, we study conical twist fields in two-dimensional integrable QFT. These create conical singularities of arbitrary excess angle. We show that, upon appropriate identification between the excess angle and the number of sheets, they have the same conformal dimension as branch-point twist fields commonly used to represent partition functions on Riemann surfaces, and that both fields have closely related form factors. However, we show that conical twist fields are truly different from branch-point twist fields. They generate different operator product expansions (short distance expansions) and form factor expansions (large distance expansions). In fact, we verify in free field theories, by re-summing form factors, that the conical twist fields operator product expansions are correctly reproduced. We propose that conical twist fields are the correct fields in order to understand null polygonal Wilson loops/gluon scattering amplitudes of planar maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.

  18. Lovelock vacua with a recurrent null vector field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortaggio, Marcello

    2018-02-01

    Vacuum solutions of Lovelock gravity in the presence of a recurrent null vector field (a subset of Kundt spacetimes) are studied. We first discuss the general field equations, which constrain both the base space and the profile functions. While choosing a "generic" base space puts stronger constraints on the profile, in special cases there also exist solutions containing arbitrary functions (at least for certain values of the coupling constants). These and other properties (such as the p p - waves subclass and the overlap with VSI, CSI and universal spacetimes) are subsequently analyzed in more detail in lower dimensions n =5 , 6 as well as for particular choices of the base manifold. The obtained solutions describe various classes of nonexpanding gravitational waves propagating, e.g., in Nariai-like backgrounds M2×Σn -2. An Appendix contains some results about general (i.e., not necessarily Kundt) Lovelock vacua of Riemann type III/N and of Weyl and traceless-Ricci type III/N. For example, it is pointed out that for theories admitting a triply degenerate maximally symmetric vacuum, all the (reduced) field equations are satisfied identically, giving rise to large classes of exact solutions.

  19. A review of recent work in sub-nanometre displacement measurement using optical and X-ray interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peggs, G N; Yacoot, A

    2002-05-15

    This paper reviews recent work in the field of displacement measurement using optical and X-ray interferometry at the sub-nanometre level of accuracy. The major sources of uncertainty in optical interferometry are discussed and a selection of recent designs of ultra-precise, optical-interferometer-based, displacement measuring transducers presented. The use of X-ray interferometry and its combination with optical interferometry is discussed.

  20. Measurement of high-departure aspheres using subaperture stitching with the Variable Optical Null (VON)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulawiec, Andrew; Murphy, Paul; DeMarco, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Aspheric surfaces are proven to provide significant benefits to a wide variety of optical systems, but the ability to produce high-precision aspheric surfaces has historically been limited by the ability (or lack thereof) to measure them. Traditionally, aspheric measurements have required dedicated null optics, but the cost, lead time, and calibration difficulty of using null optics has made the use of aspheres more challenging and less attractive. In the past three years, QED has developed the Subaperture Stitching Interferometer for Aspheres (SSI-A®) to help address this limitation, providing flexible aspheric measurement capability of up to 200 waves of aspheric departure from best-fit sphere. Some aspheres, however, have thousands of waves of departure. We have recently developed Variable Optical Null (VON) technology that can null much of the aspheric departure in a subaperture. The VON is automatically configurable and is adjusted to nearly null each specific subaperture of an asphere. This ability to nearly null a local subaperture of an asphere provides a significant boost in aspheric measurement capability, enabling aspheres with up to 1000 waves of departure to be measured, without the use of dedicated null optics. We outline the basic principles of subaperture stitching and VON technology, demonstrate the extended capability provided by the VON, and present measurement results from the new Aspheric Stitching Interferometer (ASI®).

  1. Shocks and currents in stratified atmospheres with a magnetic null point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarr, Lucas A.; Linton, Mark

    2017-08-01

    We use the resistive MHD code LARE (Arber et al 2001) to inject a compressive MHD wavepacket into a stratified atmosphere that has a single magnetic null point, as recently described in Tarr et al 2017. The 2.5D simulation represents a slice through a small ephemeral region or area of plage. The strong gradients in field strength and connectivity related to the presence of the null produce substantially different dynamics compared to the more slowly varying fields typically used in simple sunspot models. The wave-null interaction produces a fast mode shock that collapses the null into a current sheet and generates a set of outward propagating (from the null) slow mode shocks confined to field lines near each separatrix. A combination of oscillatory reconnection and shock dissipation ultimately raise the plasma's internal energy at the null and along each separatrix by 25-50% above the background. The resulting pressure gradients must be balanced by Lorentz forces, so that the final state has contact discontinuities along each separatrix and a persistent current at the null. The simulation demonstrates that fast and slow mode waves localize currents to the topologically important locations of the field, just as their Alfvenic counterparts do, and also illustrates the necessity of treating waves and reconnection as coupled phenomena.

  2. Modular Hamiltonians on the null plane and the Markov property of the vacuum state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, Horacio; Testé, Eduardo; Torroba, Gonzalo

    2017-09-01

    We compute the modular Hamiltonians of regions having the future horizon lying on a null plane. For a CFT this is equivalent to regions with a boundary of arbitrary shape lying on the null cone. These Hamiltonians have a local expression on the horizon formed by integrals of the stress tensor. We prove this result in two different ways, and show that the modular Hamiltonians of these regions form an infinite dimensional Lie algebra. The corresponding group of unitary transformations moves the fields on the null surface locally along the null generators with arbitrary null line dependent velocities, but act non-locally outside the null plane. We regain this result in greater generality using more abstract tools on the algebraic quantum field theory. Finally, we show that modular Hamiltonians on the null surface satisfy a Markov property that leads to the saturation of the strong sub-additive inequality for the entropies and to the strong super-additivity of the relative entropy.

  3. Mechanical Forces Exacerbate Periodontal Defects in Bsp-null Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soenjaya, Y.; Foster, B.L.; Nociti, F.H.; Ao, M.; Holdsworth, D.W.; Hunter, G.K.; Somerman, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an acidic phosphoprotein with collagen-binding, cell attachment, and hydroxyapatite-nucleating properties. BSP expression in mineralized tissues is upregulated at onset of mineralization. Bsp-null (Bsp-/-) mice exhibit reductions in bone mineral density, bone turnover, osteoclast activation, and impaired bone healing. Furthermore, Bsp-/- mice have marked periodontal tissue breakdown, with a lack of acellular cementum leading to periodontal ligament detachment, extensive alveolar bone and tooth root resorption, and incisor malocclusion. We hypothesized that altered mechanical stress from mastication contributes to periodontal destruction observed in Bsp-/- mice. This hypothesis was tested by comparing Bsp-/- and wild-type mice fed with standard hard pellet diet or soft powder diet. Dentoalveolar tissues were analyzed using histology and micro–computed tomography. By 8 wk of age, Bsp-/- mice exhibited molar and incisor malocclusion regardless of diet. Bsp-/- mice with hard pellet diet exhibited high incidence (30%) of severe incisor malocclusion, 10% lower body weight, 3% reduced femur length, and 30% elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity compared to wild type. Soft powder diet reduced severe incisor malocclusion incidence to 3% in Bsp-/- mice, supporting the hypothesis that occlusal loading contributed to the malocclusion phenotype. Furthermore, Bsp-/- mice in the soft powder diet group featured normal body weight, long bone length, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity, suggesting that tooth dysfunction and malnutrition contribute to growth and skeletal defects reported in Bsp-/- mice. Bsp-/- incisors also erupt at a slower rate, which likely leads to the observed thickened dentin and enhanced mineralization of dentin and enamel toward the apical end. We propose that the decrease in eruption rate is due to a lack of acellular cementum and associated defective periodontal attachment. These data demonstrate the importance of BSP

  4. Magnetoacoustic Waves in a Stratified Atmosphere with a Magnetic Null Point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarr, Lucas A.; Linton, Mark; Leake, James, E-mail: lucas.tarr.ctr@nrl.navy.mil [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    We perform nonlinear MHD simulations to study the propagation of magnetoacoustic waves from the photosphere to the low corona. We focus on a 2D system with a gravitationally stratified atmosphere and three photospheric concentrations of magnetic flux that produce a magnetic null point with a magnetic dome topology. We find that a single wavepacket introduced at the lower boundary splits into multiple secondary wavepackets. A portion of the packet refracts toward the null owing to the varying Alfvén speed. Waves incident on the equipartition contour surrounding the null, where the sound and Alfvén speeds coincide, partially transmit, reflect, and mode-convert between branches of the local dispersion relation. Approximately 15.5% of the wavepacket’s initial energy ( E {sub input}) converges on the null, mostly as a fast magnetoacoustic wave. Conversion is very efficient: 70% of the energy incident on the null is converted to slow modes propagating away from the null, 7% leaves as a fast wave, and the remaining 23% (0.036 E {sub input}) is locally dissipated. The acoustic energy leaving the null is strongly concentrated along field lines near each of the null’s four separatrices. The portion of the wavepacket that refracts toward the null, and the amount of current accumulation, depends on the vertical and horizontal wavenumbers and the centroid position of the wavepacket as it crosses the photosphere. Regions that refract toward or away from the null do not simply coincide with regions of open versus closed magnetic field or regions of particular field orientation. We also model wavepacket propagation using a WKB method and find that it agrees qualitatively, though not quantitatively, with the results of the numerical simulation.

  5. An improved null model for assessing the net effects of multiple stressors on communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Patrick L; MacLennan, Megan M; Vinebrooke, Rolf D

    2018-01-01

    Ecological stressors (i.e., environmental factors outside their normal range of variation) can mediate each other through their interactions, leading to unexpected combined effects on communities. Determining whether the net effect of stressors is ecologically surprising requires comparing their cumulative impact to a null model that represents the linear combination of their individual effects (i.e., an additive expectation). However, we show that standard additive and multiplicative null models that base their predictions on the effects of single stressors on community properties (e.g., species richness or biomass) do not provide this linear expectation, leading to incorrect interpretations of antagonistic and synergistic responses by communities. We present an alternative, the compositional null model, which instead bases its predictions on the effects of stressors on individual species, and then aggregates them to the community level. Simulations demonstrate the improved ability of the compositional null model to accurately provide a linear expectation of the net effect of stressors. We simulate the response of communities to paired stressors that affect species in a purely additive fashion and compare the relative abilities of the compositional null model and two standard community property null models (additive and multiplicative) to predict these linear changes in species richness and community biomass across different combinations (both positive, negative, or opposite) and intensities of stressors. The compositional model predicts the linear effects of multiple stressors under almost all scenarios, allowing for proper classification of net effects, whereas the standard null models do not. Our findings suggest that current estimates of the prevalence of ecological surprises on communities based on community property null models are unreliable, and should be improved by integrating the responses of individual species to the community level as does our

  6. OBSERVATION OF MAGNETIC RECONNECTION AT A 3D NULL POINT ASSOCIATED WITH A SOLAR ERUPTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, J. Q.; Yang, K.; Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic null has long been recognized as a special structure serving as a preferential site for magnetic reconnection (MR). However, the direct observational study of MR at null-points is largely lacking. Here, we show the observations of MR around a magnetic null associated with an eruption that resulted in an M1.7 flare and a coronal mass ejection. The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites X-ray profile of the flare exhibited two peaks at ∼02:23 UT and ∼02:40 UT on 2012 November 8, respectively. Based on the imaging observations, we find that the first and also primary X-ray peak was originated from MR in the current sheet (CS) underneath the erupting magnetic flux rope (MFR). On the other hand, the second and also weaker X-ray peak was caused by MR around a null point located above the pre-eruption MFR. The interaction of the null point and the erupting MFR can be described as a two-step process. During the first step, the erupting and fast expanding MFR passed through the null point, resulting in a significant displacement of the magnetic field surrounding the null. During the second step, the displaced magnetic field started to move back, resulting in a converging inflow and subsequently the MR around the null. The null-point reconnection is a different process from the current sheet reconnection in this flare; the latter is the cause of the main peak of the flare, while the former is the cause of the secondary peak of the flare and the conspicuous high-lying cusp structure.

  7. Electromagnetic interferometry in wavenumber and space domains in a layered earth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunziker, J.W.; Slob, E.C.; Fan, Y.; Snieder, R.; Wapenaar, C.P.A.

    2013-01-01

    With interferometry applied to controlled-source electromagnetic data, the direct field and the airwave and all other effects related to the air-water interface can be suppressed in a data-driven way. Interferometry allows for retreival of the scattered field Green’s function of the subsurface or,

  8. Visualization and direct comparison of large displacements using difference holographic interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Necati Ecevit, F.; Aydin, R.

    1994-01-01

    The difference holographic interferometry provides the possibility of direct comparison of large displacements and deformations of two similar but different objects by application of a special kind of illumination. In this work, the principles of the difference holographic interferometry and the experimental results obtained by applying the single beam technique to large displacements is presented. (author). 10 refs, 4 figs

  9. New developments in NDT through electronic speckle pattern interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, S.; Murugesan, P; Mas, R.H.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Optical holography and speckle interferometry are the emerging optical techniques that can be used for the measurements of microscopic parameters such as displacement, strain, stress and slope. These techniques are applied in various fields such as surface studies, non destructive testing, speckle metrology and steller interferometry. Even though many new NDT methods are available, the suitability for a specific application is based on the material property, nature of defects and sensitivity of detection. Difficulty in radiographic technique is that it fails in detecting tight cracks, planar defects and debonds. Microwave techniques has limited sensitivity for the defect detection and it is not suitable for the objects with metallic cases since the metals are perfect reflectors for the microwaves. Low modulus material attenuates the acoustic energy completely, making ultrasonic testing techniques not feasible. The recently evolved optoelectronic technique namely Electronic Speckle Pattern interferometry (ESPI) is a fast developing optical technique widely used for measuring displacement components, their derivatives, surface roughness, surface contours, shape and others. Due to non contact nature and high sensitivity, this technique has been used as a powerful on line inspection tool for non destructive pattern of materials in industrial environment. The salient feature of ESPI is its capability to display the correlation fringes in a real time on a monitor without the need of photographic processing or optical filtering. ESPI is an alternate non destructive technique suitable for propellant grains and other low modulus materials used in space vehicle systems. The optoelectronic technique can be used to detect cracks, voids and residual stresses etc.., in the components in the industrial environment. In the present investigation, speckle non destructive testing has been carried out on some selected low modulus materials used in space vehicles. The

  10. Application of Phase Shifted, Laser Feedback Interferometry to Fluid Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovryn, Ben; Eppell, Steven J.; Andrews, James H.; Khaydarov, John

    1996-01-01

    We have combined the principles of phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) and laser-feedback interferometry (LFI) to produce a new instrument that can measure both optical path length (OPL) changes and discern sample reflectivity variations. In LFI, coherent feedback of the incident light either reflected directly from a surface or reflected after transmission through a region of interest will modulate the output intensity of the laser. LFI can yield a high signal-to-noise ratio even for low reflectivity samples. By combining PSI and LFI, we have produced a robust instrument, based upon a HeNe laser, with high dynamic range that can be used to measure either static (dc) or oscillatory changes along the optical path. As with other forms of interferometry, large changes in OPL require phase unwrapping. Conversely, small phase changes are limited by the fraction of a fringe that can be measured. We introduce the phase shifts with an electro-optic modulator (EOM) and use either the Carre or Hariharan algorithms to determine the phase and visibility. We have determined the accuracy and precision of our technique by measuring both the bending of a cantilevered piezoelectric bimorph and linear ramps to the EOM. Using PSI, sub-nanometer displacements can be measured. We have combined our interferometer with a commercial microscope and scanning piezoelectric stage and have measured the variation in OPL and visibility for drops of PDMS (silicone oil) on coated single crystal silicon. Our measurement of the static contact angle agrees with the value of 68 deg stated in the literature.

  11. Optical polarimetry for noninvasive glucose sensing enabled by Sagnac interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Amy M; Bonnema, Garret T; Barton, Jennifer K

    2011-06-10

    Optical polarimetry is used in pharmaceutical drug testing and quality control for saccharide-containing products (juice, honey). More recently, it has been proposed as a method for noninvasive glucose sensing for diabetic patients. Sagnac interferometry is commonly used in optical gyroscopes, measuring minute Doppler shifts resulting from mechanical rotation. In this work, we demonstrate that Sagnac interferometers are also sensitive to optical rotation, or the rotation of linearly polarized light, and are therefore useful in optical polarimetry. Results from simulation and experiment show that Sagnac interferometers are advantageous in optical polarimetry as they are insensitive to net linear birefringence and alignment of polarization components.

  12. IMAP: Interferometry for Material Property Measurement in MEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, B.D.; Miller, S.L.; de Boer, M.P.

    1999-03-10

    An interferometric technique has been developed for non-destructive, high-confidence, in-situ determination of material properties in MEMS. By using interferometry to measure the full deflection curves of beams pulled toward the substrate under electrostatic loads, the actual behavior of the beams has been modeled. No other method for determining material properties allows such detailed knowledge of device behavior to be gathered. Values for material properties and non-idealities (such as support post compliance) have then been extracted which minimize the error between the measured and modeled deflections. High accuracy and resolution have been demonstrated, allowing the measurements to be used to enhance process control.

  13. Sandwich Hologram Interferometry For Determination Of Sacroiliac Joint Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukicevic, S.; Vinter, I.; Vukicevic, D.

    1983-12-01

    Investigations were carried out on embalmed and fresh specimens of human pelvisis with preserved lumbar spines, hip joints and all the ligaments. Specimens were tested under static vertical loading by pulsed laser interferometry. The deformations and behaviour of particular pelvic parts were interpreted by providing computer interferogram models. Results indicate rotation and tilting of the sacrum in the dorso-ventral direction and small but significant movements in the cranio-caudal direction. Sandwich holography proved to be the only applicable method when there is a combination of translation and tilt in the range of 200 μm to 1.5 mm.

  14. Precision Gravity Tests with Atom Interferometry in Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tino, G.M.; Sorrentino, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and LENS, Università di Firenze, INFN Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Aguilera, D. [Institute of Space Systems, German Aerospace Center, Robert-Hooke-Strasse 7, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Battelier, B.; Bertoldi, A. [Laboratoire Photonique, Numérique et Nanosciences, LP2N - UMR5298 - IOGS - CNRS Université Bordeaux 1, Bâtiment A30 351 cours de la Libération F-33405 TALENCE Cedex France (France); Bodart, Q. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and LENS, Università di Firenze, INFN Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Bongs, K. [Midlands Ultracold Atom Research Centre School of Physics and Astronomy University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Bouyer, P. [Laboratoire Photonique, Numérique et Nanosciences, LP2N - UMR5298 - IOGS - CNRS Université Bordeaux 1, Bâtiment A30 351 cours de la Libération F-33405 TALENCE Cedex France (France); Braxmaier, C. [Institute of Space Systems, German Aerospace Center, Robert-Hooke-Strasse 7, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Cacciapuoti, L. [European Space Agency, Research and Scientific Support Department, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); Gaaloul, N. [Institute of Quantum Optics, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Welfengarten 1, D 30167 Hannover (Germany); Gürlebeck, N. [University of Bremen, Centre of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM), Am Fallturm, D - 29359 Bremen (Germany); Hauth, M. [Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); and others

    2013-10-15

    Atom interferometry provides extremely sensitive and accurate tools for the measurement of inertial forces. Operation of atom interferometers in microgravity is expected to enhance the performance of such sensors. This paper presents two possible implementations of a dual {sup 85}Rb-{sup 87}Rb atom interferometer to perform differential gravity measurements in space, with the primary goal to test the Weak Equivalence Principle. The proposed scheme is in the framework of two projects of the European Space Agency, namely Q-WEP and STE-QUEST. The paper describes the baseline experimental configuration, and discusses the technology readiness, noise and error budget for the two proposed experiments.

  15. Weld evaluation on spherical pressure vessels using holographic interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, D.M.; Wilcox, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    Waist welds on spherical experimental pressure vessels have been evaluated under pressure using holographic interferometry. A coincident viewing and illumination optical configuration coupled with a parabolic mirror was used so that the entire weld region could be examined with a single hologram. Positioning the pressure vessel at the focal point of the parabolic mirror provides a relatively undistorted 360 degree view of the waist weld. Double exposure and real time holography were used to obtain displacement information on the weld region. Results are compared with radiographic and ultrasonic inspections

  16. Holographic interferometry using a digital photo-camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekanina, H.; Hledik, S.

    2001-01-01

    The possibilities of running digital holographic interferometry using commonly available compact digital zoom photo-cameras are studied. The recently developed holographic setup, suitable especially for digital photo-cameras equipped with an un detachable object lens, is used. The method described enables a simple and straightforward way of both recording and reconstructing of a digital holographic interferograms. The feasibility of the new method is verified by digital reconstruction of the interferograms acquired, using a numerical code based on the fast Fourier transform. Experimental results obtained are presented and discussed. (authors)

  17. Mapping small elevation changes over large areas - Differential radar interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Andrew K.; Goldstein, Richard M.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is described, based on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry, which uses SAR images for measuring very small (1 cm or less) surface motions with good resolution (10 m) over swaths of up to 50 km. The method was applied to a Seasat data set of an imaging site in Imperial Valley, California, where motion effects were observed that were identified with movements due to the expansion of water-absorbing clays. The technique can be used for accurate measurements of many geophysical phenomena, including swelling and buckling in fault zones, residual displacements from seismic events, and prevolcanic swelling.

  18. Modelling of a holographic interferometry based calorimeter for radiation dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigzadeh, A. M.; Vaziri, M. R. Rashidian; Ziaie, F.

    2017-08-01

    In this research work, a model for predicting the behaviour of holographic interferometry based calorimeters for radiation dosimetry is introduced. Using this technique for radiation dosimetry via measuring the variations of refractive index due to energy deposition of radiation has several considerable advantages such as extreme sensitivity and ability of working without normally used temperature sensors that disturb the radiation field. We have shown that the results of our model are in good agreement with the experiments performed by other researchers under the same conditions. This model also reveals that these types of calorimeters have the additional and considerable merits of transforming the dose distribution to a set of discernible interference fringes.

  19. Model-based multi-fringe interferometry using Zernike polynomials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wei; Song, Weihong; Wu, Gaofeng; Quan, Haiyang; Wu, Yongqian; Zhao, Wenchuan

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, a general phase retrieval method is proposed, which is based on one single interferogram with a small amount of fringes (either tilt or power). Zernike polynomials are used to characterize the phase to be measured; the phase distribution is reconstructed by a non-linear least squares method. Experiments show that the proposed method can obtain satisfactory results compared to the standard phase-shifting interferometry technique. Additionally, the retrace errors of proposed method can be neglected because of the few fringes; it does not need any auxiliary phase shifting facilities (low cost) and it is easy to implement without the process of phase unwrapping.

  20. Self-calibration in optical/infrared interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millour, Florentin; Dalla Vedova, Gaetan

    2015-08-01

    Optical interferometry produces nowadays images of the observed stars. However, the image quality of the current facilities (VLTI, CHARA) is impaired by the lack of phases measurements. We will describe here a method used to improve the image reconstruction that takes profit of a badly used observable: the wavelength differential phase. This phase shares some properties with the interferometric phase. That method is parent to the self-calibration which was developed in the 80's for radio astronomy to get rid of calibratioon artifacts, and produces a significant improvement on image quality over the current available methods.

  1. Theory of decoherence in Bose-Einstein condensate interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, B J [ARC Centre for Quantum-Atom Optics and Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2007-05-15

    A full treatment of decoherence and dephasing effects in BEC interferometry has been developed based on using quantum correlation functions for treating interferometric effects. The BEC is described via a phase space distribution functional of the Wigner type for the condensate modes and the positive P type for the non-condensate modes. Ito equations for stochastic condensate and non-condensate field functions replace the functional Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution functional and stochastic averages of field function products determine the quantum correlation functions.

  2. Rapid prototyping of versatile atom chips for atom interferometry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasch, Brian; Squires, Matthew; Olson, Spencer; Kroese, Bethany; Imhof, Eric; Kohn, Rudolph; Stuhl, Benjamin; Schramm, Stacy; Stickney, James

    2016-05-01

    We present recent advances in the manipulation of ultracold atoms with ex-vacuo atom chips (i.e. atom chips that are not inside to the UHV chamber). Details will be presented of an experimental system that allows direct bonded copper (DBC) atom chips to be removed and replaced in minutes, requiring minimal re-optimization of parameters. This system has been used to create Bose-Einstein condensates, as well as magnetic waveguides with precisely tunable axial parameters, allowing double wells, pure harmonic confinement, and modified harmonic traps. We investigate the effects of higher order magnetic field contributions to the waveguide, and the implications for confined atom interferometry.

  3. Spherical grating based x-ray Talbot interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cong, Wenxiang, E-mail: congw@rpi.edu, E-mail: xiy2@rpi.edu, E-mail: wangg6@rpi.edu; Xi, Yan, E-mail: congw@rpi.edu, E-mail: xiy2@rpi.edu, E-mail: wangg6@rpi.edu; Wang, Ge, E-mail: congw@rpi.edu, E-mail: xiy2@rpi.edu, E-mail: wangg6@rpi.edu [Biomedical Imaging Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Grating interferometry is a state-of-the-art x-ray imaging approach, which can acquire information on x-ray attenuation, phase shift, and small-angle scattering simultaneously. Phase-contrast imaging and dark-field imaging are very sensitive to microstructural variation and offers superior contrast resolution for biological soft tissues. However, a common x-ray tube is a point-like source. As a result, the popular planar grating imaging configuration seriously restricts the flux of photons and decreases the visibility of signals, yielding a limited field of view. The purpose of this study is to extend the planar x-ray grating imaging theory and methods to a spherical grating scheme for a wider range of preclinical and clinical applications. Methods: A spherical grating matches the wave front of a point x-ray source very well, allowing the perpendicular incidence of x-rays on the grating to achieve a higher visibility over a larger field of view than the planer grating counterpart. A theoretical analysis of the Talbot effect for spherical grating imaging is proposed to establish a basic foundation for x-ray spherical gratings interferometry. An efficient method of spherical grating imaging is also presented to extract attenuation, differential phase, and dark-field images in the x-ray spherical grating interferometer. Results: Talbot self-imaging with spherical gratings is analyzed based on the Rayleigh–Sommerfeld diffraction formula, featuring a periodic angular distribution in a polar coordinate system. The Talbot distance is derived to reveal the Talbot self-imaging pattern. Numerical simulation results show the self-imaging phenomenon of a spherical grating interferometer, which is in agreement with the theoretical prediction. Conclusions: X-ray Talbot interferometry with spherical gratings has a significant practical promise. Relative to planar grating imaging, spherical grating based x-ray Talbot interferometry has a larger field of view and

  4. From linear optical quantum computing to Heisenberg-limited interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hwang; Kok, Pieter; Williams, Colin P; Dowling, Jonathan P

    2004-01-01

    The working principles of linear optical quantum computing are based on photodetection, namely, projective measurements. The use of photodetection can provide efficient nonlinear interactions between photons at the single-photon level, which is technically problematic otherwise. We report an application of such a technique to prepare quantum correlations as an important resource for Heisenberg-limited optical interferometry, where the sensitivity of phase measurements can be improved beyond the usual shot-noise limit. Furthermore, using such nonlinearities, optical quantum non-demolition measurements can now be carried out easily at the single-photon level

  5. Speckle Interferometry with the OCA Kuhn 22" Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, Rick

    2018-04-01

    Speckle interferometry measurements of double stars were made in 2015 and 2016, using the Kuhn 22-inch classical Cassegrain telescope of the Orange County Astronomers, a Point Grey Blackfly CMOS camera, and three interference filters. 272 observations are reported for 177 systems, with separations ranging from 0.29" to 2.9". Data reduction was by means of the REDUC and Speckle Tool Box programs. Equipment, observing procedures, calibration, data reduction, and analysis are described, and unusual results for 11 stars are discussed in detail.

  6. Spherical grating based x-ray Talbot interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cong, Wenxiang; Xi, Yan; Wang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Grating interferometry is a state-of-the-art x-ray imaging approach, which can acquire information on x-ray attenuation, phase shift, and small-angle scattering simultaneously. Phase-contrast imaging and dark-field imaging are very sensitive to microstructural variation and offers superior contrast resolution for biological soft tissues. However, a common x-ray tube is a point-like source. As a result, the popular planar grating imaging configuration seriously restricts the flux of photons and decreases the visibility of signals, yielding a limited field of view. The purpose of this study is to extend the planar x-ray grating imaging theory and methods to a spherical grating scheme for a wider range of preclinical and clinical applications. Methods: A spherical grating matches the wave front of a point x-ray source very well, allowing the perpendicular incidence of x-rays on the grating to achieve a higher visibility over a larger field of view than the planer grating counterpart. A theoretical analysis of the Talbot effect for spherical grating imaging is proposed to establish a basic foundation for x-ray spherical gratings interferometry. An efficient method of spherical grating imaging is also presented to extract attenuation, differential phase, and dark-field images in the x-ray spherical grating interferometer. Results: Talbot self-imaging with spherical gratings is analyzed based on the Rayleigh–Sommerfeld diffraction formula, featuring a periodic angular distribution in a polar coordinate system. The Talbot distance is derived to reveal the Talbot self-imaging pattern. Numerical simulation results show the self-imaging phenomenon of a spherical grating interferometer, which is in agreement with the theoretical prediction. Conclusions: X-ray Talbot interferometry with spherical gratings has a significant practical promise. Relative to planar grating imaging, spherical grating based x-ray Talbot interferometry has a larger field of view and

  7. North and northeast Greenland ice discharge from satellite radar interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rignot, E.J.; Gogineni, S.P.; Krabill, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    Ice discharge from north and northeast Greenland calculated from satellite radar interferometry data of 14 outlet glaciers is 3.5 times that estimated from iceberg production. The satellite estimates, obtained at the grounding line of the outlet glaciers, differ from those obtained at the glacier...... front, because basal melting is extensive at the underside of the floating glacier sections. The results suggest that the north and northeast parts of the Greenland ice sheet may be thinning and contributing positively to sea-level rise....

  8. Frequency Noise Properties of Lasers for Interferometry in Nanometrology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrabina, Jan; Lazar, Josef; Holá, Miroslava; Číp, Ondřej

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 2 (2013), s. 2206-2219 ISSN 1424-8220 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP102/11/P820; GA ČR GA102/09/1276; GA AV ČR KAN311610701; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06007 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : nanometrology * laser noise * interferometry * nanopositioning * AFM Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.048, year: 2013

  9. Meson interferometry and the quest for quark-gluon matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soff, Sven

    2001-01-01

    We point out what we may learn from the investigation of identical two-particle interferometry in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions if we assume a particular model scenario by the formation of a thermalized quark-gluon plasma hadronizing via a first-order phase transition to an interacting hadron gas. The bulk properties of the two-pion correlation functions are dominated by these late and soft resonance gas rescattering processes. However, we show that kaons at large transverse momenta have several advantages and a bigger sensitivity to the QCD phase transition parameters

  10. Design and construction of a novel compact doubly achromatic asymmetric 2700 magnet system for 25 MeV therapy electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutcheon, R.M.; Hodge, S.B.

    1980-09-01

    A modern cancer therapy electron accelerator unit must satisfy many design constraints, one of which is the isocentric height above floor level. Usually 130 cm is considered the maximum height at which a nurse can work with a patient. The advent of higher energy machines has increasingly made this more difficult to achieve, as higher magnetic fields are required in the magnet that directs the beam onto the patient. A new 270 degree doubly-achromatic magnet configuration has been developed which minimizes the isocentre height for a given maximum energy and maximum magnetic field. The system is an asymmetric two-magnet configuration, with zero field index, equal fields and a bend of greater than 180 degrees in the first magnet. It is compact, easy to manufacture and relatively insensitive to assembly tolerances. Energy defining slits are easily incorporated in the design and can readily be radiation shielded. Input and output beam matching and steering is easily accomplished with a compact input quadrupole doublet and small steering windings. This report details the design and bench testing of a head magnet for a 25 MeV electron accelerator with +- 10 percent energy acceptance. The output beam requirement is < 3 mm diameter with < +- 17 mrad angular divergence. (auth)

  11. Argonaute-2-null embryonic stem cells are retarded in self-renewal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Present address: Institute of Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, Bangalore, India ... [Chandra Shekar P, Naim A, Partha Sarathi D and Kumar S 2011 Argonaute-2-null embryonic stem cells are retarded in self-renewal ..... Research, India.

  12. Possible Solution to Publication Bias Through Bayesian Statistics, Including Proper Null Hypothesis Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konijn, Elly A.; van de Schoot, Rens; Winter, Sonja D.; Ferguson, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper argues that an important cause of publication bias resides in traditional frequentist statistics forcing binary decisions. An alternative approach through Bayesian statistics provides various degrees of support for any hypothesis allowing balanced decisions and proper null

  13. Vacuum non-expanding horizons and shear-free null geodesic congruences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamo, T M; Newman, E T

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the geometry of a particular class of null surfaces in spacetime called vacuum non-expanding horizons (NEHs). Using the spin-coefficient equation, we provide a complete description of the horizon geometry, as well as fixing a canonical choice of null tetrad and coordinates on a NEH. By looking for particular classes of null geodesic congruences which live exterior to NEHs but have the special property that their shear vanishes at the intersection with the horizon, a good cut formalism for NEHs is developed which closely mirrors asymptotic theory. In particular, we show that such null geodesic congruences are generated by arbitrary choice of a complex worldline in a complex four-dimensional space, each such choice induces a CR structure on the horizon, and a particular worldline (and hence CR structure) may be chosen by transforming to a privileged tetrad frame.

  14. ON THE NATURE OF RECONNECTION AT A SOLAR CORONAL NULL POINT ABOVE A SEPARATRIX DOME

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontin, D. I.; Priest, E. R.; Galsgaard, K.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional magnetic null points are ubiquitous in the solar corona and in any generic mixed-polarity magnetic field. We consider magnetic reconnection at an isolated coronal null point whose fan field lines form a dome structure. Using analytical and computational models, we demonstrate several features of spine-fan reconnection at such a null, including the fact that substantial magnetic flux transfer from one region of field line connectivity to another can occur. The flux transfer occurs across the current sheet that forms around the null point during spine-fan reconnection, and there is no separator present. Also, flipping of magnetic field lines takes place in a manner similar to that observed in the quasi-separatrix layer or slip-running reconnection

  15. Are eikonal quasinormal modes linked to the unstable circular null geodesics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Konoplya

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In Cardoso et al. [6] it was claimed that quasinormal modes which any stationary, spherically symmetric and asymptotically flat black hole emits in the eikonal regime are determined by the parameters of the circular null geodesic: the real and imaginary parts of the quasinormal mode are multiples of the frequency and instability timescale of the circular null geodesics respectively. We shall consider asymptotically flat black hole in the Einstein–Lovelock theory, find analytical expressions for gravitational quasinormal modes in the eikonal regime and analyze the null geodesics. Comparison of the both phenomena shows that the expected link between the null geodesics and quasinormal modes is violated in the Einstein–Lovelock theory. Nevertheless, the correspondence exists for a number of other cases and here we formulate its actual limits.

  16. Are eikonal quasinormal modes linked to the unstable circular null geodesics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konoplya, R. A.; Stuchlík, Z.

    2017-08-01

    In Cardoso et al. [6] it was claimed that quasinormal modes which any stationary, spherically symmetric and asymptotically flat black hole emits in the eikonal regime are determined by the parameters of the circular null geodesic: the real and imaginary parts of the quasinormal mode are multiples of the frequency and instability timescale of the circular null geodesics respectively. We shall consider asymptotically flat black hole in the Einstein-Lovelock theory, find analytical expressions for gravitational quasinormal modes in the eikonal regime and analyze the null geodesics. Comparison of the both phenomena shows that the expected link between the null geodesics and quasinormal modes is violated in the Einstein-Lovelock theory. Nevertheless, the correspondence exists for a number of other cases and here we formulate its actual limits.

  17. Vlasov Fluid stability of a 2-D plasma with a linear magnetic field null

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Vlasov Fluid stability of a 2-dimensional plasma near an O type magnetic null is investigated. Specifically, an elongated Z-pinch is considered, and applied to Field Reversed Configurations at Los Alamos National Laboratory by making a cylindrical approximation of the compact torus. The orbits near an elliptical O type null are found to be very complicated; the orbits are large and some are stochastic. The kinetic corrections to magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are investigated by evaluating the expectation values of the growth rates of a Vlasov Fluid dispersion functional by using a set of trial functions based on ideal MHD. The dispersion functional involves fluid parts and orbit dependent parts. The latter involves phase integral of two time correlations. The phase integral is replaced by the time integral both for the regular and for the stochastic orbits. Two trial functions are used; one has a large displacement near the null and the other away from the null

  18. Hypersensitivities for acetaldehyde and other agents among cancer cells null for clinically relevant Fanconi anemia genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soma; Sur, Surojit; Yerram, Sashidhar R; Rago, Carlo; Bhunia, Anil K; Hossain, M Zulfiquer; Paun, Bogdan C; Ren, Yunzhao R; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Azad, Nilofer A; Kern, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    Large-magnitude numerical distinctions (>10-fold) among drug responses of genetically contrasting cancers were crucial for guiding the development of some targeted therapies. Similar strategies brought epidemiological clues and prevention goals for genetic diseases. Such numerical guides, however, were incomplete or low magnitude for Fanconi anemia pathway (FANC) gene mutations relevant to cancer in FANC-mutation carriers (heterozygotes). We generated a four-gene FANC-null cancer panel, including the engineering of new PALB2/FANCN-null cancer cells by homologous recombination. A characteristic matching of FANCC-null, FANCG-null, BRCA2/FANCD1-null, and PALB2/FANCN-null phenotypes was confirmed by uniform tumor regression on single-dose cross-linker therapy in mice and by shared chemical hypersensitivities to various inter-strand cross-linking agents and γ-radiation in vitro. Some compounds, however, had contrasting magnitudes of sensitivity; a strikingly high (19- to 22-fold) hypersensitivity was seen among PALB2-null and BRCA2-null cells for the ethanol metabolite, acetaldehyde, associated with widespread chromosomal breakage at a concentration not producing breaks in parental cells. Because FANC-defective cancer cells can share or differ in their chemical sensitivities, patterns of selective hypersensitivity hold implications for the evolutionary understanding of this pathway. Clinical decisions for cancer-relevant prevention and management of FANC-mutation carriers could be modified by expanded studies of high-magnitude sensitivities. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Null geodesics and embedding diagrams of the interior Schwarzschild--de Sitter spacetimes with uniform density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuchlik, Zdenek; Hledik, Stanislav; Soltes, Jiri; Ostgaard, Erlend

    2001-01-01

    Null geodesics and embedding diagrams of central planes in the ordinary space geometry and the optical reference geometry of the interior Schwarzschild--de Sitter spacetimes with uniform density are studied. For completeness, both positive and negative values of the cosmological constant are considered. The null geodesics are restricted to the central planes of these spacetimes, and their properties can be reflected by an 'effective potential.' If the interior spacetime is extremely compact, the effective potential has a local maximum corresponding to a stable circular null geodesic around which bound null geodesics are concentrated. The upper limit on the size of the interior spacetimes containing bound null geodesics is R=3M, independently of the value of the cosmological constant. The embedding diagrams of the central planes of the ordinary geometry into three-dimensional Euclidean space are well defined for the complete interior of all spacetimes with a repulsive cosmological constant, but the planes cannot be embedded into the Euclidean space in the case of spacetimes with subcritical values of an attractive cosmological constant. On the other hand, the embedding diagrams of the optical geometry are well defined for all of the spacetimes, and the turning points of these diagrams correspond to the radii of the circular null geodesics. All the embedding diagrams, for both the ordinary and optical geometry, are smoothly matched to the corresponding embedding diagrams of the external vacuum Schwarzschild--de Sitter spacetimes

  20. pyNSMC: A Python Module for Null-Space Monte Carlo Uncertainty Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J.; Brakefield, L. K.

    2015-12-01

    The null-space monte carlo technique is a non-linear uncertainty analyses technique that is well-suited to high-dimensional inverse problems. While the technique is powerful, the existing workflow for completing null-space monte carlo is cumbersome, requiring the use of multiple commandline utilities, several sets of intermediate files and even a text editor. pyNSMC is an open-source python module that automates the workflow of null-space monte carlo uncertainty analyses. The module is fully compatible with the PEST and PEST++ software suites and leverages existing functionality of pyEMU, a python framework for linear-based uncertainty analyses. pyNSMC greatly simplifies the existing workflow for null-space monte carlo by taking advantage of object oriented design facilities in python. The core of pyNSMC is the ensemble class, which draws and stores realized random vectors and also provides functionality for exporting and visualizing results. By relieving users of the tedium associated with file handling and command line utility execution, pyNSMC instead focuses the user on the important steps and assumptions of null-space monte carlo analysis. Furthermore, pyNSMC facilitates learning through flow charts and results visualization, which are available at many points in the algorithm. The ease-of-use of the pyNSMC workflow is compared to the existing workflow for null-space monte carlo for a synthetic groundwater model with hundreds of estimable parameters.

  1. The data-driven null models for information dissemination tree in social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Wang, Zhenyu

    2017-10-01

    For the purpose of detecting relatedness and co-occurrence between users, as well as the distribution features of nodes in spreading path of a social network, this paper explores topological characteristics of information dissemination trees (IDT) that can be employed indirectly to probe the information dissemination laws within social networks. Hence, three different null models of IDT are presented in this article, including the statistical-constrained 0-order IDT null model, the random-rewire-broken-edge 0-order IDT null model and the random-rewire-broken-edge 2-order IDT null model. These null models firstly generate the corresponding randomized copy of an actual IDT; then the extended significance profile, which is developed by adding the cascade ratio of information dissemination path, is exploited not only to evaluate degree correlation of two nodes associated with an edge, but also to assess the cascade ratio of different length of information dissemination paths. The experimental correspondences of the empirical analysis for several SinaWeibo IDTs and Twitter IDTs indicate that the IDT null models presented in this paper perform well in terms of degree correlation of nodes and dissemination path cascade ratio, which can be better to reveal the features of information dissemination and to fit the situation of real social networks.

  2. Losses at magnetic nulls in pulsed-power transmission line systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, C.W. Jr.; Pointon, T.D.; Savage, M.E.; Seidel, D.B.; Magne, I.; Vezinet, R.

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed-power systems operating in the terawatt regime must deal with large electron flows in vacuum transmission lines. In most parts of these transmission lines the electrons are constrained by the self-magnetic field to flow parallel to the conductors. In very low impedance systems, such as those used to drive Z-pinch radiation sources, the currents from multiple transmission lines are added together. This addition necessarily involves magnetic nulls that connect the positive and negative electrodes. The resultant local loss of magnetic insulation results in electron losses at the anode in the vicinity of the nulls. The lost current due to the magnetic null might or might not be appreciable. In some cases the lost current due to the null is not large, but is spatially localized, and may create a gas and plasma release from the anode that can lead to an excessive loss, and possibly to catastrophic damage to the hardware. In this paper we describe an analytic model that uses one geometric parameter (aside from straightforward hardware size measurements) that determines the loss to the anode, and the extent of the loss region when the driving source and load are known. The parameter can be calculated in terms of the magnetic field in the region of the null calculated when no electron flow is present. The model is compared to some experimental data, and to simulations of several different hardware geometries, including some cases with multiple nulls, and unbalanced feeds

  3. Premeiotic germ cell defect in seminiferous tubules of Atm-null testis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takubo, Keiyo; Hirao, Atsushi; Ohmura, Masako; Azuma, Masaki; Arai, Fumio; Nagamatsu, Go; Suda, Toshio

    2006-01-01

    Lifelong spermatogenesis is maintained by coordinated sequential processes including self-renewal of stem cells, proliferation of spermatogonial cells, meiotic division, and spermiogenesis. It has been shown that ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) is required for meiotic division of the seminiferous tubules. Here, we show that, in addition to its role in meiosis, ATM has a pivotal role in premeiotic germ cell maintenance. ATM is activated in premeiotic spermatogonial cells and the Atm-null testis shows progressive degeneration. In Atm-null testicular cells, differing from bone marrow cells of Atm-null mice, reactive oxygen species-mediated p16 Ink4a activation does not occur in Atm-null premeiotic germ cells, which suggests the involvement of different signaling pathways from bone marrow defects. Although Atm-null bone marrow undergoes p16 Ink4a -mediated cellular senescence program, Atm-null premeiotic germ cells exhibited cell cycle arrest and apoptotic elimination of premeiotic germ cells, which is different from p16 Ink4a -mediated senescence

  4. Vibration Analysis Of Automotive Structures Using Holographic Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G. M.; Wales, R. R.

    1983-10-01

    Since 1979, Ford Motor Company has been developing holographic interferometry to supplement more conventional test methods to measure vehicle component vibrations. An Apollo PHK-1 Double Pulse Holographic Laser System was employed to visualize a variety of complex vibration modes, primarily on current production and prototype powertrain components. Design improvements to reduce powertrain response to problem excitations have been deter-mined through pulsed laser holography, and have, in several cases, been put into production in Ford vehicles. Whole-field definition of vibration related deflections provide continuity of information missed by accelerometer/modal analysis techniaues. Certain opera-tional problems, common among pulsed ruby holographic lasers, have reauired ongoing hardware and electronics improvements to minimize system downtime. Real-time, time-averaged and stroboscopic C. W. laser holographic techniques are being developed at Ford to complement the double pulse capabilities and provide rapid identification of modal frequencies and nodal lines for analysis of powertrain structures. Methods for mounting and exciting powertrains to minimize rigid body motions are discussed. Work at Ford will continue toward development of C. W. holographic techniques to provide refined test methodology dedicated to noise and vibration diagnostics with particular emphasis on semi-automated methods for quantifying displacement and relative phase using high resolution digitized video and computers. Continued use of refined pulsed and CW laser holographic interferometry for the analysis of complex structure vibrations seems assured.

  5. Electron density interferometry measurement in laser-matter interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovics-Chenais, C.

    1981-05-01

    This work is concerned with the laser-interferometry measurement of the electronic density in the corona and the conduction zone external part. Particularly, it is aimed at showing up density gradients and at their space-time localization. The first chapter recalls the density profile influence on the absorption principal mechanisms and the laser energy transport. In chapter two, the numerical and analytical hydrodynamic models describing the density profile are analysed. The influence on the density profile of the ponderomotive force associated to high oscillating electric fields is studied, together with the limited thermal conduction and suprathermal electron population. The mechanism action, in our measurement conditions, is numerically simulated. Calculations are made with experimental parameters. The measurement interaction conditions, together with the diagnostic method by high resolution laser interferometry are detailed. The results are analysed with the help of numerical simulation which is the experiment modeling. An overview of the mechanisms shown up by interferometric measurements and their correlation with other diagnostics is the conclusion of this work [fr

  6. Algorithms and Array Design Criteria for Robust Imaging in Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Binoy George

    Optical interferometry is a technique for obtaining high-resolution imagery of a distant target by interfering light from multiple telescopes. Image restoration from interferometric measurements poses a unique set of challenges. The first challenge is that the measurement set provides only a sparse-sampling of the object's Fourier Transform and hence image formation from these measurements is an inherently ill-posed inverse problem. Secondly, atmospheric turbulence causes severe distortion of the phase of the Fourier samples. We develop array design conditions for unique Fourier phase recovery, as well as a comprehensive algorithmic framework based on the notion of redundant-spaced-calibration (RSC), which together achieve reliable image reconstruction in spite of these challenges. Within this framework, we see that classical interferometric observables such as the bispectrum and closure phase can limit sensitivity, and that generalized notions of these observables can improve both theoretical and empirical performance. Our framework leverages techniques from lattice theory to resolve integer phase ambiguities in the interferometric phase measurements, and from graph theory, to select a reliable set of generalized observables. We analyze the expected shot-noise-limited performance of our algorithm for both pairwise and Fizeau interferometric architectures and corroborate this analysis with simulation results. We apply techniques from the field of compressed sensing to perform image reconstruction from the estimates of the object's Fourier coefficients. The end result is a comprehensive strategy to achieve well-posed and easily-predictable reconstruction performance in optical interferometry.

  7. Atomic interactions in precision interferometry using Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamison, Alan O.; Gupta, Subhadeep; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2011-01-01

    We present theoretical tools for predicting and reducing the effects of atomic interactions in Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) interferometry experiments. To address mean-field shifts during free propagation, we derive a robust scaling solution that reduces the three-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation to a set of three simple differential equations valid for any interaction strength. To model the other common components of a BEC interferometer--condensate splitting, manipulation, and recombination--we generalize the slowly varying envelope reduction, providing both analytic handles and dramatically improved simulations. Applying these tools to a BEC interferometer to measure the fine structure constant, α[S. Gupta, K. Dieckmann, Z. Hadzibabic, and D. E. Pritchard, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 140401 (2002)], we find agreement with the results of the original experiment and demonstrate that atomic interactions do not preclude measurement to better than part-per-billion accuracy, even for atomic species with relatively large scattering lengths. These tools help make BEC interferometry a viable choice for a broad class of precision measurements.

  8. A novel plasmonic interferometry and the potential applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ali

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we have proposed the plasmonic interferometry concept and analytical details given. By using the conventional optical interferometry, which can be simply calculated by using the relationship between the electric field and electron mobility, the interference mobility visibility (fringe visibility can be observed. The surface plasmons in the sensing arm of the Michelson interferometer is constructed by the stacked layers of the silicon-graphene-gold, allows to characterize the spatial resolution of light beams in terms of the electron mobility down to 100-nm scales, with measured coherence lengths as low as ∼100 nm for an incident wavelength of 1550 nm. We have demonstrated a compact plasmonic interferometer that can apply to the electron mean free paths measurement, from which the precise determination can be used for the high-resolution mean free path measurement and sensing applications. This system provides the practical simulation device parameters that can be fabricated and tested by the experimental platform.

  9. High speed digital holographic interferometry for hypersonic flow visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, G. M.; Jagdeesh, G.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2013-06-01

    Optical imaging techniques have played a major role in understanding the flow dynamics of varieties of fluid flows, particularly in the study of hypersonic flows. Schlieren and shadowgraph techniques have been the flow diagnostic tools for the investigation of compressible flows since more than a century. However these techniques provide only the qualitative information about the flow field. Other optical techniques such as holographic interferometry and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) have been used extensively for extracting quantitative information about the high speed flows. In this paper we present the application of digital holographic interferometry (DHI) technique integrated with short duration hypersonic shock tunnel facility having 1 ms test time, for quantitative flow visualization. Dynamics of the flow fields in hypersonic/supersonic speeds around different test models is visualized with DHI using a high-speed digital camera (0.2 million fps). These visualization results are compared with schlieren visualization and CFD simulation results. Fringe analysis is carried out to estimate the density of the flow field.

  10. Multi-link laser interferometry architecture for interspacecraft displacement metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Samuel P.; Lam, Timothy T.-Y.; McClelland, David E.; Shaddock, Daniel A.

    2018-03-01

    Targeting a future Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission, we present a new laser interferometry architecture that can be used to recover the displacement between two spacecraft from multiple interspacecraft measurements. We show it is possible to recover the displacement between the spacecraft centers of mass in post-processing by forming linear combinations of multiple, spatially offset, interspacecraft measurements. By canceling measurement error due to angular misalignment of the spacecraft, we remove the need for precise placement or alignment of the interferometer, potentially simplifying spacecraft integration. To realize this multi-link architecture, we propose an all-fiber interferometer, removing the need for any ultrastable optical components such as the GRACE Follow-On mission's triple mirror assembly. Using digitally enhanced heterodyne interferometry, the number of links is readily scalable, adding redundancy to our measurement. We present the concept, an example multi-link implementation and the signal processing required to recover the center of mass displacement from multiple link measurements. Finally, in a simulation, we analyze the limiting noise sources in a 9 link interferometer and ultimately show we can recover the 80 {nm}/√{ {Hz}} displacement sensitivity required by the GRACE Follow-On laser ranging interferometer.

  11. Controlled-source seismic interferometry with one way wave fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Neut, J.; Wapenaar, K.; Thorbecke, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    In Seismic Interferometry we generally cross-correlate registrations at two receiver locations and sum over an array of sources to retrieve a Green's function as if one of the receiver locations hosts a (virtual) source and the other receiver location hosts an actual receiver. One application of this concept is to redatum an area of surface sources to a downhole receiver location, without requiring information about the medium between the sources and receivers, thus providing an effective tool for imaging below complex overburden, which is also known as the Virtual Source method. We demonstrate how elastic wavefield decomposition can be effectively combined with controlled-source Seismic Interferometry to generate virtual sources in a downhole receiver array that radiate only down- or upgoing P- or S-waves with receivers sensing only down- or upgoing P- or S- waves. For this purpose we derive exact Green's matrix representations from a reciprocity theorem for decomposed wavefields. Required is the deployment of multi-component sources at the surface and multi- component receivers in a horizontal borehole. The theory is supported with a synthetic elastic model, where redatumed traces are compared with those of a directly modeled reflection response, generated by placing active sources at the virtual source locations and applying elastic wavefield decomposition on both source and receiver side.

  12. Real-time trichromatic holographic interferometry: preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albe, Felix; Bastide, Myriam; Desse, Jean-Michel; Tribillon, Jean-Louis H.

    1998-08-01

    In this paper we relate our preliminary experiments on real- time trichromatic holographic interferometry. For this purpose a CW `white' laser (argon and krypton of Coherent- Radiation, Spectrum model 70) is used. This laser produces about 10 wavelengths. A system consisting of birefringent plates and polarizers allows to select a trichromatic TEM00 triplet: blue line ((lambda) equals 476 nm, 100 mW), green line ((lambda) equals 514 nm, 100 mW) and red line ((lambda) equals 647 nm, 100 mW). In a first stage we recorded a trichromatic reflection hologram with a separate reference beam on a single-layer silver-halide panchromatic plate (PFG 03C). After processing, the hologram is put back into the original recording set-up, as in classical experiments on real-time monochromatic holographic interferometry. So we observe interference fringes between the 3 reconstructed waves and the 3 actual waves. The interference fringes of the phenomenon are observed on a screen and recorded by a video camera at 25 frames per second. A color video film of about 3 minutes of duration is presented. Some examples related to phase objects are presented (hot airflow from a candle, airflow from a hand). The actual results show the possibility of using this technique to study, in real time, aerodynamic wakes and mechanical deformation.

  13. Interferometry in the era of time-domain astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Gail H.; Cassan, Arnaud; Gallenne, Alexandre; Roettenbacher, Rachael M.; Schneider, Jean

    2018-04-01

    The physical nature of time variable objects is often inferred from photometric light-curves and spectroscopic variations. Long-baseline optical interferometry has the power to resolve the spatial structure of time variable sources directly in order to measure their physical properties and test the physics of the underlying models. Recent interferometric studies of variable objects include measuring the angular expansion and spatial structure during the early stages of novae outbursts, studying the transits and tidal distortions of the components in eclipsing and interacting binaries, measuring the radial pulsations in Cepheid variables, monitoring changes in the circumstellar discs around rapidly rotating massive stars, and imaging starspots. Future applications include measuring the image size and centroid displacements in gravitational microlensing events, and imaging the transits of exoplanets. Ongoing and upcoming photometric surveys will dramatically increase the number of time-variable objects detected each year, providing many potential targets to observe interferometrically. For short-lived transient events, it is critical for interferometric arrays to have the flexibility to respond rapidly to targets of opportunity and optimize the selection of baselines and beam combiners to provide the necessary resolution and sensitivity to resolve the source as its brightness and size change. We discuss the science opportunities made possible by resolving variable sources using long baseline optical interferometry.

  14. Resolving power test of 2-D K{sup +} K{sup +} interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padula, Sandra S.; Roldao, Christiane G. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1999-07-01

    Adopting a procedure previously proposed to quantitatively study pion interferometry {sup 1} , an equivalent 2-D X{sup 2} analysis was performed to test the resolving power of that method when applied to less favorable conditions, when no significant contribution from long lived resonances is expected, as in kaon interferometry. For that purpose, use is made of the preliminary E859 K{sup +}K{sup +} interferometry data from Si+Au collisions at 14.6 A GeV/c. Less sensitivity is achieved in the present case, although it is shown that it is still possible to distinguish two distinct decoupling geometries. (author)

  15. Influence of choice of null network on small-world parameters of structural correlation networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M Hadi Hosseini

    Full Text Available In recent years, coordinated variations in brain morphology (e.g., volume, thickness have been employed as a measure of structural association between brain regions to infer large-scale structural correlation networks. Recent evidence suggests that brain networks constructed in this manner are inherently more clustered than random networks of the same size and degree. Thus, null networks constructed by randomizing topology are not a good choice for benchmarking small-world parameters of these networks. In the present report, we investigated the influence of choice of null networks on small-world parameters of gray matter correlation networks in healthy individuals and survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Three types of null networks were studied: 1 networks constructed by topology randomization (TOP, 2 networks matched to the distributional properties of the observed covariance matrix (HQS, and 3 networks generated from correlation of randomized input data (COR. The results revealed that the choice of null network not only influences the estimated small-world parameters, it also influences the results of between-group differences in small-world parameters. In addition, at higher network densities, the choice of null network influences the direction of group differences in network measures. Our data suggest that the choice of null network is quite crucial for interpretation of group differences in small-world parameters of structural correlation networks. We argue that none of the available null models is perfect for estimation of small-world parameters for correlation networks and the relative strengths and weaknesses of the selected model should be carefully considered with respect to obtained network measures.

  16. Influence of Choice of Null Network on Small-World Parameters of Structural Correlation Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S. M. Hadi; Kesler, Shelli R.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, coordinated variations in brain morphology (e.g., volume, thickness) have been employed as a measure of structural association between brain regions to infer large-scale structural correlation networks. Recent evidence suggests that brain networks constructed in this manner are inherently more clustered than random networks of the same size and degree. Thus, null networks constructed by randomizing topology are not a good choice for benchmarking small-world parameters of these networks. In the present report, we investigated the influence of choice of null networks on small-world parameters of gray matter correlation networks in healthy individuals and survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Three types of null networks were studied: 1) networks constructed by topology randomization (TOP), 2) networks matched to the distributional properties of the observed covariance matrix (HQS), and 3) networks generated from correlation of randomized input data (COR). The results revealed that the choice of null network not only influences the estimated small-world parameters, it also influences the results of between-group differences in small-world parameters. In addition, at higher network densities, the choice of null network influences the direction of group differences in network measures. Our data suggest that the choice of null network is quite crucial for interpretation of group differences in small-world parameters of structural correlation networks. We argue that none of the available null models is perfect for estimation of small-world parameters for correlation networks and the relative strengths and weaknesses of the selected model should be carefully considered with respect to obtained network measures. PMID:23840672

  17. Abnormal Activation of BMP Signaling Causes Myopathy in Fbn2 Null Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Sengle

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fibrillins are large extracellular macromolecules that polymerize to form the backbone structure of connective tissue microfibrils. Mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1 cause the Marfan syndrome, while mutations in the gene for fibrillin-2 cause Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly. Both are autosomal dominant disorders, and both disorders affect musculoskeletal tissues. Here we show that Fbn2 null mice (on a 129/Sv background are born with reduced muscle mass, abnormal muscle histology, and signs of activated BMP signaling in skeletal muscle. A delay in Myosin Heavy Chain 8, a perinatal myosin, was found in Fbn2 null forelimb muscle tissue, consistent with the notion that muscle defects underlie forelimb contractures in these mice. In addition, white fat accumulated in the forelimbs during the early postnatal period. Adult Fbn2 null mice are already known to demonstrate persistent muscle weakness. Here we measured elevated creatine kinase levels in adult Fbn2 null mice, indicating ongoing cycles of muscle injury. On a C57Bl/6 background, Fbn2 null mice showed severe defects in musculature, leading to neonatal death from respiratory failure. These new findings demonstrate that loss of fibrillin-2 results in phenotypes similar to those found in congenital muscular dystrophies and that FBN2 should be considered as a candidate gene for recessive congenital muscular dystrophy. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence associated muscle abnormalities and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice with abnormally activated BMP signaling. Genetic rescue of reduced muscle mass and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice was accomplished by deleting a single allele of Bmp7. In contrast to other reports that activated BMP signaling leads to muscle hypertrophy, our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of BMP signaling to the fibrillin-2 extracellular environment during early postnatal muscle development. New evidence presented here suggests that

  18. Averaged null energy condition and difference inequalities in quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurtsever, U.

    1995-01-01

    For a large class of quantum states, all local (pointwise) energy conditions widely used in relativity are violated by the renormalized stress-energy tensor of a quantum field. In contrast, certain nonlocal positivity constraints on the quantum stress-energy tensor might hold quite generally, and this possibility has received considerable attention in recent years. In particular, it is now known that the averaged null energy condition, the condition that the null-null component of the stress-energy tensor integrated along a complete null geodesic is non-negative for all states, holds quite generally in a wide class of spacetimes for a minimally coupled scalar field. Apart from the specific class of spacetimes considered (mainly two-dimensional spacetimes and four-dimensional Minkowski space), the most significant restriction on this result is that the null geodesic over which the average is taken must be achronal. Recently, Ford and Roman have explored this restriction in two-dimensional flat spacetime, and discovered that in a flat cylindrical space, although the stress energy tensor itself fails to satisfy the averaged null energy condition (ANEC) along the (nonachronal) null geodesics, when the ''Casimir-vacuum'' contribution is subtracted from the stress-energy the resulting tensor does satisfy the ANEC inequality. Ford and Roman name this class of constraints on the quantum stress-energy tensor ''difference inequalities.'' Here I give a proof of the difference inequality for a minimally coupled massless scalar field in an arbitrary (globally hyperbolic) two-dimensional spacetime, using the same techniques as those we relied on to prove the ANEC in an earlier paper with Wald. I begin with an overview of averaged energy conditions in quantum field theory

  19. Investigating Spatial Patterns of Persistent Scatterer Interferometry Point Targets and Landslide Occurrences in the Arno River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Lu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI has been widely used for landslide studies in recent years. This paper investigated the spatial patterns of PSI point targets and landslide occurrences in the Arno River basin in Central Italy. The main purpose is to analyze whether spatial patterns of Persistent Scatterers (PS can be recognized as indicators of landslide occurrences throughout the whole basin. The bivariate K-function was employed to assess spatial relationships between PS and landslides. The PSI point targets were acquired from almost 4 years (from March 2003 to January 2007 of RADARSAT-1 images. The landslide inventory was collected from 15 years (from 1992–2007 of surveying and mapping data, mainly including remote sensing data, topographic maps and field investigations. The proposed approach is able to assess spatial patterns between a variety of PS and landslides, in particular, to understand if PSI point targets are spatially clustered (spatial attraction or randomly distributed (spatial independency on various types of landslides across the basin. Additionally, the degree and scale distances of PS clustering on a variety of landslides can be characterized. The results rejected the null hypothesis that PSI point targets appear to cluster similarly on four types of landslides (slides, flows, falls and creeps in the Arno River basin. Significant influence of PS velocities and acquisition orbits can be noticed on detecting landslides with different states of activities. Despite that the assessment may be influenced by the quality of landslide inventory and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images, the proposed approach is expected to provide guidelines for studies trying to detect and investigate landslide occurrences at a regional scale through spatial statistical analysis of PS, for which an advanced understanding of the impact of scale distances on landslide clustering is fundamentally needed.

  20. Imaging and Measuring Electron Beam Dose Distributions Using Holographic Interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Holographic interferometry was used to image and measure ionizing radiation depth-dose and isodose distributions in transparent liquids. Both broad and narrowly collimated electron beams from accelerators (2–10 MeV) provided short irradiation times of 30 ns to 0.6 s. Holographic images...... and measurements of absorbed dose distributions were achieved in liquids of various densities and thermal properties and in water layers thinner than the electron range and with backings of materials of various densities and atomic numbers. The lowest detectable dose in some liquids was of the order of a few k......Rad. The precision limits of the measurement of dose were found to be ±4%. The procedure was simple and the holographic equipment stable and compact, thus allowing experimentation under routine laboratory conditions and limited space....