WorldWideScience

Sample records for achilles tendon

  1. Achilles tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles tendon rupture-surgery; Percutaneous Achilles tendon rupture repair ... To fix your torn Achilles tendon, the surgeon will: Make a cut down the back of your heel Make several small cuts rather than one large cut ...

  2. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles tendon rupture Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Achilles (uh-KILL-eez) tendon rupture is an injury that affects the back ... but it can happen to anyone. The Achilles tendon is a strong fibrous cord that connects the ...

  3. Percutaneous Achilles Tendon Lengthening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Site Content AOFAS / FootCareMD / Treatments Percutaneous Achilles Tendon Lengthening Page Content ​ Pre-operative incision markings along ... What is the goal of a percutaneous Achilles tendon lengthening? The goal of this procedure is to ...

  4. Achilles tendon rupture - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heel cord tear; Calcaneal tendon rupture ... MRI scan to see what type of Achilles tendon tear you have. An MRI is a type ... partial tear means at least some of the tendon is still OK. A full tear means your ...

  5. Achilles tendon disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinfeld, Steven B

    2014-03-01

    Achilles tendon disorders include tendinosis, paratenonitis, insertional tendinitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, and frank rupture. Patients present with pain and swelling in the posterior aspect of the ankle. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound are helpful in confirming the diagnosis and guiding treatment. Nonsurgical management of Achilles tendon disorders includes nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, bracing, and footwear modification. Surgical treatment includes debridement of the diseased area of the tendon with direct repair. Tendon transfer may be necessary to augment the strength of the Achilles tendon. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Achilles tendon: US examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornage, B.D.

    1986-06-01

    Real-time ultrasonography (US) using linear-array probes and a stand-off pad as a ''waterpath'' was performed to evaluate the Achilles tendon in 67 patients (including 24 athletes) believed to have acute or chronic traumatic or inflammatory pathologic conditions. Tendons in 23 patients appeared normal on US scans. The 44 abnormal tendons comprised five complete and four partial ruptures, seven instances of postoperative change, and 28 cases of tendonitis. US depiction of the inner structure of the tendon resulted in the diagnosis of focal abnormalities, including partial ruptures, nodules, and calcifications. Tendonitis was characterized by enlargement and decreased echogenicity of the tendon. The normal US appearance of the Achilles tendon is described.

  7. Complete Achilles tendon ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landvater, S J; Renström, P A

    1992-10-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures can be treated nonsurgically in the nonathletic or low-end recreational athletic patient, particularly those more than 50 years of age, provided the treating physician does not delay in the diagnosis and treatment (preferably less than 48 hrs and possibly less than 1 week). The patient should be advised of the higher incidence of re-rupture of the tendon when treated nonsurgically. Surgical treatment is recommended for patients who are young and athletic. This is particularly true because the major criticism of surgical treatment has been the complication rate, which has decreased to a low level and to a mild degree, usually not significantly affecting the repair over time. Surgical treatment in these individuals seems to be superior not only in regard to re-rupture but also in assuring the correct apposition of the tendon ends and in placing the necessary tension on the tendon to secure appropriate orientation of the collagen fibers. This in turn allows them to regain full strength, power, endurance, and an early return to sports. Surgery is also recommended for late diagnosed ruptures where there is significant lengthening of the tendon. Surgical technique should involve a medial incision to avoid the sural nerve, absorbable suture, and augmentation with fascia or tendon where there is a gap or late rupture. Postoperatively, the immobilization should be 7 to 10 days in a splint. A walking boot with early motion in plantar flexion or a short leg cast with the tendon under slight tension should thereafter be used for 4 to 5 weeks. An early and well-supervised rehabilitation program should be initiated to restore the patient to the preinjury activity level.

  8. MRI of the Achilles tendon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naegele, M.; Lienemann, A.; Hahn, D.; Lissner, J.; Boehm, P.

    1987-06-01

    The Achilles tendon and preachillar space of 30 patients was studied by MRI. A surface coil (Helmholtz' principle) was applied and all patients were examined with a superconducting magnet operating at 1.0 Tesla field strength. The purpose of the study was to illustrate pathological changes of the tendon and the surrounding soft tissue. In 3 cases MRI diagnosed a total rupture of the Achilles tendon. Furthermore, the strain of the tendon and side effects of an inflammatory process could be demonstrated. The use of a surface coil yields a high resolution of the normal anatomy of the region and of the pathological changes of the tendon and the surrounding soft tissue structures. The advantages of MRI for Achilles tendon diagnostics against competitive modalities are 1) excellent soft tissue contrast, 2) multiplanar imaging, 3) as well as exact delineation and visualisation of the lesion.

  9. Achilles tendon rupture; assessment of nonoperative treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner

    2014-01-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture is a frequent and potentially disabling injury. Over the past decade a change in treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture away from operative towards non-operative treatment has taken place...

  10. Demonstration of Achilles tendon on CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, M.; Rupp, N.; Lehner, K.; Paar, O.; Gradinger, R.; Karpf, P.M.

    1985-08-01

    Ligaments and tendons, including the Achilles tendon, show the highest density among normal soft tissue structures in the body. Traumatic and degenerative changes of the Achilles tendon are often associated with marked thickening and reduction in density associated with increased opacity of the space in front of the Achilles tendon. These changes are easily demonstrated by CT, whereas conventional radiological techniques only show non-specific changes. Twenty-five patients were examined, including nine with pain, seven following rupture of the Achilles tendon and nine post-operative controls; it was found that CT can add information important for the diagnosis and treatment planning of abnormalities of the Achilles tendon.

  11. Achilles tendon lesions in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J G

    1993-09-01

    Achillodynia (Achilles tendon pain) is a significant source of disability to many people taking part in sports. Papers in the English language published since 1986 are reviewed here, grouped into specific subject areas including biomechanics, pathology, general clinical presentations, experimental treatments, steroids, podiatry and surgery. While there has been no dramatic breakthrough in the field, there have been various interesting advances with particular reference to imaging and conservative management, which will hopefully stimulate further studies. Many problems of Achilles tendon lesions in athletes remain unsolved, however, and much is yet to be done to provide adequate and generally effective methods of prevention and conservative treatment.

  12. Midportion Achilles tendinosis and the plantaris tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfredson, Håkan

    2011-10-01

    When re-operating patients with midportion Achilles tendinosis, having had a poor effect of ultrasound (US) and Doppler-guided scraping, the author found the involvement of the plantaris tendon to be a likely reason for the poor result. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of a plantaris tendon in close relation to the Achilles tendon in consecutive patients with midportion Achilles tendinosis undergoing treatment with US and Doppler-guided scraping. This study includes 73 consecutive tendons with chronic painful midportion Achilles tendinosis, where US+Doppler examination showed thickening, irregular tendon structure, hypo-echoic regions, and localised high blood flow outside and inside the ventral Achilles midportion. The tendons were treated with US+Doppler-guided scraping, via a medial incision. If there was a plantaris tendon located in close relation to the medial Achilles, it was extirpated. An invaginated, or 'close by located', enlarged plantaris tendon was found in 58 of 73 (80%) tendons. Preliminary clinical results of the combined procedure, US + Doppler-guided surgical scraping and extirpation of the plantaris tendon, are very promising. A thickened plantaris tendon located in close relation to the medial Achilles seems common in patients with chronic painful midportion tendinosis. The role of the plantaris tendon in midportion Achilles tendinosis needs to be further evaluated and should be kept in mind when treating this condition.

  13. The roentgenographic findings of achilles tendon rupture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seouk, Kang Hyo; Keun, Rho Yong [Shilla General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of a lateral view of the ankles in Achilles tendon rupture. We performed a retrospective analysis of the roentgenographic findings of 15 patients with surgically proven Achilles tendon rupture. Four groups of 15 patients(normal, ankle sprain, medial lateral malleolar fracture, and calcaneal fracture) were analysed as reference groups. Plain radiographs were reviewed with regard to Kager's triangle, Arner's sign, Toygar's angle, ill defined radiolucent shadow through the Achilles tendon, sharpness of the anterior margin of Achilles tendon, and meniscoid smooth margin of the posterior skin surface of the ankle. Kager's triangle was deformed and disappeared after rupture of the Achilles tendon in nine patients(60%) with operative verification of the rupture, six patients(40%) had a positive Arner's sign, while none had a diminished Toygars angle. In 13 patients(87%) with a ruptured Achilles tendon, the thickness of this was nonuniform compared with the reference group. The anterior margin of the Achilles tendon became serrated and indistinct in 14 patients(93%) in whom this was ruptured. An abnormal ill defined radiolucent shadow through the Achilles tendon was noted in nine patient(60%), and nonparallelism between the anterior margin of the Achilles tendon and posterior skin surface of the ankle was detected in 11 patients(73%). The posterior skin surface of the ankle had a nodular surface margin in 13 patients(87%). A deformed Kager's triangle and Achilles tendon, and an abnormal ill defined radiolucent shadow through the Achilles tendon in a lateral view of the ankles are important findings for the diagnesis of in diagnosing achilles tendon rupture.

  14. Achilles tendon rupture; assessment of nonoperative treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute Achilles tendon rupture is a frequent and potentially disabling injury. Over the past decade a change in treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture away from operative towards non-operative treatment has taken place. However, the optimal non-operative treatment protocol remains...... and Sweden. Immediate weight-bearing was found to be safe and recommendable in non-operative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. The novel ultrasound measurement showed excellent reliability and acceptable validity and agreement....

  15. Achilles tendon rupture; assessment of nonoperative treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Troelsen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute Achilles tendon rupture is a frequent and potentially disabling injury. Over the past decade a change in treatment ofacute Achilles tendon rupture away from operative towards non-operative treatment has taken place. However, the optimal non-operative treatment protocol remains...... and Sweden. Immediate weight-bearing was found to be safe and recommendable in non-operative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. The novel ultrasound measurement showed excellent reliability and acceptable validity and agreement....

  16. Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy accelerates Achilles tendon repair by promoting neurite regeneration☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Aibai, Minawa; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Shawutali, Nuerai; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Nuerduola, Yeermike; Satewalede, Turde; Buranbai, Darehan; Hunapia, Beicen; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Bai, Jingping; Kizaibek, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy facilitates the functional recovery of a ruptured Achilles tendon. However, protein expression during the healing process remains a controversial issue. New Zealand rabbits, aged 14 weeks, underwent tenotomy followed immediately by Achilles tendon microsurgery to repair the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was then immobilized or subjected to postoperative early motion treatment (kinesitherapy). Mass spectrography results showed that after 14 days of motion treatment, 18 protein spots were differentially expressed, among which, 12 were up-regulated, consisting of gelsolin isoform b and neurite growth-related protein collapsing response mediator protein 2. Western blot analysis showed that gelsolin isoform b was up-regulated at days 7–21 of motion treatment. These findings suggest that active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy promotes the neurite regeneration of a ruptured Achilles tendon and gelsolin isoform b can be used as a biomarker for Achilles tendon healing after kinesitherapy. PMID:25317130

  17. Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy accelerates Achilles tendon repair by promoting neurite regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiasharete Jielile; Beicen Hunapia; Ayidaer Jialihasi; Jingping Bai; Murat Kizaibek; Minawa Aibai; Gulnur Sabirhazi; Nuerai Shawutali; Wulanbai Tangkejie; Aynaz Badelhan; Yeermike Nuerduola; Turde Satewalede; Darehan Buranbai

    2012-01-01

    Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy facilitates the functional recovery of a ruptured Achilles tendon. However, protein expression during the healing process remains a controversial issue. New Zealand rabbits, aged 14 weeks, underwent tenotomy followed immediately by Achilles tendon microsurgery to repair the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was then immobilized or subjected to postoperative early motion treatment (kinesitherapy). Mass spectrography results showed that after 14 days of motion treatment, 18 protein spots were differentially expressed, among which, 12 were up-regulated, consisting of gelsolin isoform b and neurite growth-related protein collapsing response mediator protein 2. Western blot analysis showed that gelsolin isoform b was up-regulated at days 7–21 of motion treatment. These findings suggest that active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy promotes the neurite regeneration of a ruptured Achilles tendon and gelsolin isoform b can be used as a biomarker for Achilles tendon healing after kinesitherapy.

  18. MRI of normal achilles tendon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollandi, G.A. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Bertolotto, M. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Perrone, R. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Garlaschi, G. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Derchi, L.E. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy)

    1995-12-01

    To investigate the normal internal structure of tendons 11 volunteers without clinical evidence of tendinopathy were examined using conventional spin-echo T1-, T2- and proton-density weighted sequences. The Achilles tendon was chosen because of its high frequency of injury in athletic activity, large size, superficial position and because it is oriented nearly parallel to the static magnetic field, therefore minimizing the ``magic angle phenomenon``. The tendons exhibited areas of slighly increased signal in four T1-weighted and in all but one proton-density-weighted scans. No intratendinous signal was detected in T2-weighted images. The possible origin of these findings is discussed. We conclude that the knowledge of these normal signals may be useful to avoid incorrectly diagnosing as pathological. (orig.). With 2 figs.

  19. Motor responses to experimental Achilles tendon pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Aaboe, Jens; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    of the exercise are affected by Achilles tendon pain. Objective The authors aimed to determine the effects of experimental Achilles tendon pain on motor function during one-legged weight bearing ankle plantar and dorsal flexion exercises. Methods In a crossover study, with 16 healthy subjects tested on two...... before, during and after either experimental Achilles tendon pain or a non-painful control condition. Pain was induced by intratendinous injections of hypertonic saline with isotonic saline injections as control. Joint kinematics, ground reaction force frequency contents and average EMG amplitudes were...... calculated. Results Compared with the control condition experimental Achilles tendon pain reduced the EMG activity in agonistic, synergistic and antagonistic muscles, and increased the ground reaction force frequency content around 10 Hz, during both eccentric and concentric movement phases. Conclusions...

  20. Achilles tendon: US diagnosis of pathologic conditions. Work in progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blei, C.L.; Nirschl, R.P.; Grant, E.G.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-three patients were prospectively examined with ultra-sound (US) for acute or recurrent Achilles tendon symptoms. Three types of pathologic conditions of the Achilles tendon were found: tendinitis/tenosynovitis, acute tendon trauma, and postoperative changes. US appears to enable differentiation of these conditions and to contribute to the diagnosis of a broad range of Achilles tendon disorders.

  1. Endoscopic adhesiolysis for extensive tibialis posterior tendon and Achilles tendon adhesions following compound tendon rupture

    OpenAIRE

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2013-01-01

    Tendon adhesion is one of the most common causes of disability following tendon surgery. A case of extensive peritendinous adhesions of the Achilles tendon and tibialis posterior tendon after compound rupture of the tendons was reported. This was managed by endoscopic adhesiolysis of both tendons. The endoscopic approach allows early postoperative mobilisation which can relieve the tendon adhesion.

  2. Endoscopic adhesiolysis for extensive tibialis posterior tendon and Achilles tendon adhesions following compound tendon rupture

    OpenAIRE

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2013-01-01

    Tendon adhesion is one of the most common causes of disability following tendon surgery. A case of extensive peritendinous adhesions of the Achilles tendon and tibialis posterior tendon after compound rupture of the tendons was reported. This was managed by endoscopic adhesiolysis of both tendons. The endoscopic approach allows early postoperative mobilisation which can relieve the tendon adhesion.

  3. Endoscopic adhesiolysis for extensive tibialis posterior tendon and Achilles tendon adhesions following compound tendon rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2013-01-01

    Tendon adhesion is one of the most common causes of disability following tendon surgery. A case of extensive peritendinous adhesions of the Achilles tendon and tibialis posterior tendon after compound rupture of the tendons was reported. This was managed by endoscopic adhesiolysis of both tendons. The endoscopic approach allows early postoperative mobilisation which can relieve the tendon adhesion. PMID:24045762

  4. [Damage to large tendons: Achilles, patellar and quadriceps tendons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amlang, M H; Zwipp, H

    2006-07-01

    The etiology and mechanisms of Achilles, patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures are very similar. Age dependent changes in tendon structure and disorders such gout, diabetes, rheumatic diseases and chronic renal failure are associated causes. The main mechanism of rupture is indirect trauma. Although clinical diagnosis is easy, ruptures are still frequently missed. Sonography is the main standard diagnostic tool. MRI is indicated only in special cases. Open operative repair is the most common treatment for quadriceps and patellar tendon ruptures. Treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures is moving towards an individualized choice of therapy. Percutaneous and other "minimally invasive" techniques will play an increasingly important role.

  5. Rupture of Achilles Tendon : Usefulness of Ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nam Hyeon; Ki, Won Woo; Yoon, Kwon Ha; Kim, Song Mun; Shin, Myeong Jin [Ulsan Medical College, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Soon Tae [Chungnam University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-15

    To differentiate a complete rupture of Achilles tendon from an incomplete one which is important because its treatment is quite different. And it is necessary to know the exact site of the rupture preoperatively. Fifteen cases of fourteen patients which were diagnosed as Achilles tendon rupture by ultrasonography and surgery were reviewed. We compared sonographic rupture site with surgical findings. Ultrasonographic criteria for differentiation of complete and incomplete rupture was defined as follows : the discreteness, which means the proximal intervening hypoechogenicity to the interface echogenicity of distal margin of ruptured tendon : the slant sign, which represents the interface of ruptured distal margin which was seen over the 3/4 of the thickness of the tendon without intervening low echogeneicity : the invagination sign, which means the echogenic invagination from Kager triangle into posterior aspect of Achilles tendon over the half thickness of the tendon. The sites of complete tendon rupture were exactly corresponded to surgical finding in four cases of ten complete ruptures. And the discrepancy between sonographic and surgical findings in the site of complete rupture was 1.2 {+-} 0.4 cm in six cases. Three of ten complete ruptures showed the discreteness sign, all of ten showed the slant sign and two of ten showed the invagination sign. It is helpful to differentiate a complete from incomplete rupture of the Achilles tendon and to localize the site of the complete rupture with the ultrasonographic evaluation

  6. TREATMENT OF OLD ACHILLES TENDON RUPTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Koryshkov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available From 1998 to 2010 32 patients (14 men, 18 women, aged 15-65 years, underwent surgical treatment for old Achilles tendon rupture. In all cases correct diagnosis was made not earlier than 1 month after injury. The importance of clinical Thompson test and sonographic examination for diagnosis of Achilles tendon rupture is underlined. For the restoration of Achilles tendon V-Y plasty was used. Surgery was performed in a period of 1 to 13 months in patients with subcutaneous Achilles tendon ruptures. Follow-up results of patients in the postoperative period ranged from 6 months to 10 years (mean follow-up 1 year 7 months. Date of observation in the postoperative period ranged from 6 months to 19 years. Marginal necrosis wound occurred in 3 (10% patients, re-rupture of the Achilles tendon to tendon suture zone - in one patient, even in one patient on day 14 became infected. Violations of the foot innervation were no detected.

  7. Achilles tendon rupture; assessment of nonoperative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner

    2014-04-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture is a frequent and potentially disabling injury. Over the past decade a change in treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture away from operative towards non-operative treatment has taken place. However, the optimal non-operative treatment protocol remains to be clarified, particularly the role of weight-bearing during early rehabilitation. Also, there is a need for a clinically applicable and accurate measurement to detect patients in risk of developing Achilles tendon elongation. The aim of this PhD thesis was to evaluate non-operative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. In study I, a cross-sectional survey was performed investigating the chosen treatment protocols across Scandinavia. In study II, the effect of immediate weight-bearing on patient reported and functional outcomes was investigated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). In study III, the effect of immediate weight-bearing on the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex was investigated in an RCT. In study IV, validity, reliability and agreement of a novel ultrasound measurement of Achilles tendon length and elongation was tested. Study I found surgery to be the preferred treatment in 83% of departments in Denmark, 92% in Norway, 65% in Sweden, and 30% in Finland (p tendon complex. Study IV showed excellent intra-rater reliability (ICC 0.96, SEM 3.7 mm and MDC 10.3 mm), inter-rater reliability (ICC 0.97, SEM 3.3 mm and MDC 9.3 mm) and validity (measurement error 2%). Treatment algorithms across Scandinavia showed considerable variation, though operative treatment and controlled early weight-bearing was the preferred treatment in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Immediate weight-bearing was found to be safe and recommendable in non-operative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. The novel ultrasound measurement showed excellent reliability and acceptable validity and agreement.

  8. Achilles tendon rupture in atypical patient populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon is a significant injury, and the likelihood of a good recovery is directly associated with early diagnosis and appropriate referral. Such injuries are commonly assessed and identified by practitioners working in 'minors' areas of emergency departments or urgent care settings. The literature frequently describes rupture of the Achilles tendon as 'typically sport-related' affecting 'middle-aged weekend warriors', but this aetiology accounts for only about 70% of such injuries. Factors such as the natural ageing process, obesity and use of some commonly prescribed medications, can increase the risk of developing a tendinopathy and subsequent rupture, often from a seemingly insignificant incident. However, research suggests that injuries in this patient population are more likely be missed on first examination. This article describes risk factors that should alert clinicians to the possibility of Achilles tendon rupture in 'atypical' patient populations.

  9. Micromechanical properties and collagen composition of ruptured human achilles tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Philip; Kovanen, Vuokko; Hölmich, Per

    2013-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is one of the strongest tendons in the human body, and yet it frequently ruptures, which is a substantial clinical problem. However, the cause of ruptures remains elusive.......The Achilles tendon is one of the strongest tendons in the human body, and yet it frequently ruptures, which is a substantial clinical problem. However, the cause of ruptures remains elusive....

  10. Finite Element Analysis of the Achilles Tendon While Running

    OpenAIRE

    Anițaș Răzvan; Lucaciu Do

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The Achilles tendon is the most frequent recipient of traumatic injuries. The aim of this study is to identify and describe the varying load at ankle level and especially at the Achilles tendon’s insertion on the calcaneus.

  11. Chronic Achilles Tendon Rupture Reconstructed With Achilles Tendon Allograft and Xenograft Combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollawell, Shane; Baione, William

    2015-01-01

    More than 20% of acute Achilles tendon injuries are misdiagnosed, leading to chronic or neglected ruptures. Some controversy exists regarding how to best manage an acute Achilles tendon rupture. However, a general consensus has been reached that chronic rupture with ≥3 cm of separation is associated with functional morbidity and, therefore, should be managed operatively. It has been demonstrated that the functional outcomes of surgically treated Achilles ruptures are superior to the nonoperative outcomes in a chronic setting. In the present report, we reviewed 4 patients with chronic Achilles tendon ruptures that were successfully treated with an Achilles tendon interposition allograft and simultaneous augmentation with a xenograft. The median duration of rupture was 11 (range 8 to 16) weeks, the median gap between the proximal and distal segments of the tendon was 4.75 (range 3.5 to 6) cm, and the patients were able to return pain-free to all preinjury activities at a median of 14.5 (range 13.8 to 15.5) weeks, without the need for tendon transfer, lengthening, or additional intervention. The median duration of follow up was 37.25 (range 15.25 to 51.5) months, at which point the mean Foot and Ankle Outcomes Instrument core scale score was 97 ± 1 (mean normative score 53 ± 1), and the Foot and Ankle Outcomes Instrument shoe comfort core scale score was 100 ± 0 (mean normative score 59 ± 0). The combined Achilles allograft plus xenograft augmentation technique appears to be a reasonable option for the surgical treatment of chronic Achilles tendon rupture. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Conservative functional treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüfner, T; Gaulke, R; Imrecke, J; Krettek, C; Stübig, T

    2010-09-01

    The conservative functional treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures has developed further over the last 20 years and is basically possible for 60-80% of patients. The treatment leads to success if the indications obtained by dynamic sonography are correctly interpreted (adaptation of the tendon ends up to 20 degrees plantar flexion), if the patient presents sufficient compliance and the physiotherapy is increasingly intensified depending on tendon healing. Modern ortheses allow an increased equinus position and therefore improved protection of the healing tendon. If these factors are present a relatively low re-rupture rate of only 7% can be achieved. The decisive advantage of conservative functional therapy is the avoidance of specific operative risks, such as infection and injury to the sural nerve. After removal of the orthesis the tendon should continue to be modeled using shoe insoles and raised heels.

  13. MR imaging in chronic Achilles tendon disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Movin, T.; Rolf, C. [Section for Sports Medicine, Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Huddinge Univ. Hospital (Sweden); Kristoffersen-Wiberg, M.; Aspelin, P. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Karolinska Inst., Huddinge Univ. Hospital (Sweden)

    1998-03-01

    Objectives: The primary objective was to compare 4 imaging sequences (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, proton density, and T1-weighted with gadolinium contrast agent enhancement) with regard to intratendinous signal abnormality in patients with achillodynia. The secondary objective was to relate the images to the clinical symptoms and histopathological findings. Material and Methods: Twenty patients (16 men, 4 women, median age 40 years) with chronic achillodynia participated in the study. The symptoms prohibited activity and clinical examination revealed swelling and tenderness 1.5-6 cm proximal to the Achilles tendon insertion. Of the 20 patients: 5 had bilateral achillodynia, 4 had had previous contralateral Achilles tendon disorder, and 11 had never had symptoms in the contralateral tendon region. These 11 tendons served as controls for comparison. MR imaging was performed on a superconductive 1.5 T unit. Both Achilles tendons were examined (n=40) at the same time, and multiple sagittal and transversal images were obtained. The corresponding sections on these images were visually graded according to both extension and level of MR signal intensity. Tissue was obtained for microscopic examination from the most symptomatic side in all patients (n=20). Results: T1-weighted images following gadolinium contrast medium enhancement proved to be the best method by which to visualize intratendinous signal abnormality. This sequence revealed signal abnormality in 24/25 symptomatic tendons and in 1/11 control tendons. Histopathological examination showed an increased noncollagenous extracellular matrix and altered fiber structure in the lesions corresponding to the contrast-enhanced areas. (orig./MG).

  14. Achilles Tendon Repair, A Modified Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Keyhani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available   Background: Wound complications following open repair for acute Achilles tendon ruptures (AATR remain the subject of significant debate. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of covering repaired AATR using well-nourished connective tissues (paratenon and deep fascia to avoid complications after open repair.   Methods: In this case series study, open repair was performed for 32 active young patients with AATR. After the tendon was repaired, the deep fascia and paratenon was used to cover the Achilles tendon. Patients were followed for two years and any wound complication was recorded. During the last visit, the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS ankle-hind foot score was completed for all patients. Calf circumference and ankle range of motion were measured and compared with the contralateral side. Patients were asked about returning to previous sports activities and limitations with footwear. Results: Only, one patient developed deep wound infection (3%. None of the patients had any discomfort around the operation area, limitation with footwear, sural nerve injury, re-rupture, and skin adhesion. The AOFAS score averaged 92.5±6. Two patients (7% were unable to return to previous sports activities because of moderate pain in heavy physical exercises. The calf circumference and ankle ROM were similar between healthy and operated sides. Conclusion: The present study showed that fascial envelope for full covering of the repaired Achilles tendon may help to prevent the occurrence of wound complications.

  15. Achilles Tendon Repair, A Modified Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Keyhani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wound complications following open repair for acute Achilles tendon ruptures (AATR remain the subject of significant debate. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of covering repaired AATR using well-nourished connective tissues (paratenon and deep fascia to avoid complications after open repair.   Methods: In this case series study, open repair was performed for 32 active young patients with AATR. After the tendon was repaired, the deep fascia and paratenon was used to cover the Achilles tendon. Patients were followed for two years and any wound complication was recorded. During the last visit, the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS ankle-hind foot score was completed for all patients. Calf circumference and ankle range of motion were measured and compared with the contralateral side. Patients were asked about returning to previous sports activities and limitations with footwear. Results: Only, one patient developed deep wound infection (3%. None of the patients had any discomfort around the operation area, limitation with footwear, sural nerve injury, re-rupture, and skin adhesion. The AOFAS score averaged 92.5±6. Two patients (7% were unable to return to previous sports activities because of moderate pain in heavy physical exercises. The calf circumference and ankle ROM were similar between healthy and operated sides. Conclusion: The present study showed that fascial envelope for full covering of the repaired Achilles tendon may help to prevent the occurrence of wound complications.

  16. Lubricin in human achilles tendon: The evidence of intratendinous sliding motion and shear force in achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-Long; Wei, Zhuang; Zhao, Chunfeng; Jay, Gregory D; Schmid, Thomas M; Amadio, Peter C; An, Kai-Nan

    2015-06-01

    Achilles tendon is one of the most commonly injured tendons. Mechanical force is regarded as a major causative factor. However, the biomechanics of Achilles tendon and mechanical mechanism of the injuries are unclear. Lubricin expresses at regions exposed to sliding motion and shear force in a number of tissues. This study investigated the distribution and concentration of lubricin in human Achilles tendons for better understanding the biomechanics of Achilles tendon. Achilles tendons were harvested from nine cadavers. Lubricin was extracted from various locations proximal to the calcaneal insertion and quantified with ELISA. The distribution of lubricin was investigated with immunohistochemistry. Lubricin was mainly identified at the interfaces of tendon fascicles, especially in the mid-portion of the tendon. The concentration of lubricin in Achilles tendons varied by individual and the distance from its calcaneal insertion. The distal portion of the tendon had a higher concentration of lubricin than the proximal regions of the tendon. This study suggests the presence of intratendinous sliding motion of fascicles and shear force at interfaces of fascicles in human Achilles tendon. Shear force could be an important mechanical factor for the development of Achilles tendinopathy and rupture.

  17. Percutaneous & Mini Invasive Achilles tendon repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmont Michael R

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rupture of the Achilles tendon is a considerable cause of morbidity with reduced function following injury. Recent studies have shown little difference in outcome between the techniques of open and non-operative treatment using an early active rehabilitation programme. Meta-analyses have shown that non-operative management has increased risk of re-rupture whereas surgical intervention has risks of complications related to the wound and iatrogenic nerve injury. Minimally invasive surgery has been adopted as a way of reducing infections rates and wound breakdown however avoiding iatrogenic nerve injury must be considered. We discuss the techniques and outcomes of percutaneous and minimally invasive repairs of the Achilles tendon.

  18. Motor responses to experimental Achilles tendon pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Aaboe, Jens; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    calculated. Results Compared with the control condition experimental Achilles tendon pain reduced the EMG activity in agonistic, synergistic and antagonistic muscles, and increased the ground reaction force frequency content around 10 Hz, during both eccentric and concentric movement phases. Conclusions...... different days separated by 1 week, three-dimensional ground reaction forces, ankle joint kinematics and surface electromyography (EMG) of the lower leg muscles were recorded during one-legged full weight-bearing ankle plantar (concentric) and dorsal (eccentric) flexion exercises. Measurements were done...... before, during and after either experimental Achilles tendon pain or a non-painful control condition. Pain was induced by intratendinous injections of hypertonic saline with isotonic saline injections as control. Joint kinematics, ground reaction force frequency contents and average EMG amplitudes were...

  19. ACHILLES TENDON RUPTURE AND PLATELET RICH PLASMA

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    Pietro Zedde

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Achilles tendon rupture is currently one of the most frequent injuries in athletes. Such rupture may be caused by a sudden dorsiflexion of the ankle, pushing off with the weight bearing forefoot while extending the knee or violent dorsiflexion of a plantar flexed foot. The treatment goal consists of restoring the normal tendon length and tension, as well as the function and strength of the gastrocnemius-soleus complex. The biological repair process can be enhanced in all stages of recovery with the use of PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma without any side effects.

  20. Chronic Achilles tendon rupture reconstructed using hamstring tendon autograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Philip; Mason, Lyndon William; Molloy, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Chronic rupture of the Achilles tendon (delayed diagnosis of more than 4 weeks) can result in retraction of the tendon and inadequate healing. Direct repair may not be possible and augmentation methods are challenging when the defect exceeds 5-6 cm, especially if the distal stump is grossly tendinopathic. We describe our method of Achilles tendon reconstruction with ipsilateral semitendinosis autograft and interference screw fixation in a patient with chronic rupture, a 9 cm defect and gross distal tendinopathy. Patient reported outcome measures consistently demonstrated improved health status at 12 months post surgery: MOXFQ-Index 38-25, EQ5D-5L 18-9, EQ VAS 70-90 and VISA-A 1-64. The patient was back to full daily function, could single leg heel raise and was gradually returning to sport. No complications or adverse events were recorded. Reconstruction of chronic tears of the Achilles tendon with large defects and gross tendinopathy using an ipsilateral semitendinosis autograft and interference screw fixation can achieve satisfactory improvements in patient reported outcomes up to 1 year post-surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Achilles tendon: fundamental properties and mechanisms governing healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Benjamin R.; Gordon, Joshua A.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review highlights recent research on Achilles tendon healing, and comments on the current clinical controversy surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of injury. The processes of Achilles tendon healing, as demonstrated through changes in its structure, composition, and biomechanics, are reviewed. Finally, a review of tendon developmental biology and mechano transductive pathways is completed to recognize recent efforts to augment injured Achilles tendons, and to suggest potential future strategies for therapeutic intervention and functional tissue engineering. Despite an abundance of clinical evidence suggesting that current treatments and rehabilitation strategies for Achilles tendon ruptures are equivocal, significant questions remain to fully elucidate the basic science mechanisms governing Achilles tendon injury, healing, treatment, and rehabilitation. PMID:25332943

  2. Validation of a novel ultrasound measurement of achilles tendon length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Riecke, Anja Falk; Boesen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: A clinically applicable and accurate method for measuring Achilles tendon length is needed to investigate the influence of elongation of the Achilles tendon after acute rupture. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an ultrasonographic (US) length measurement...... of the Achilles tendon-aponeurosis complex. METHODS: Both legs of 19 non-injured subjects were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and US. The length from calcaneus to the medial head of m. Gastrocnemius was measured by three independent US examiners. Repeated US measurements were performed and compared...... to be further assessed in the setting of acute Achilles tendon rupture. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This new ultrasound measurement might allow for length measurement of ruptured Achilles tendons in the acute and chronic state after rupture. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: II....

  3. Use of fluroquinolone and risk of Achilles tendon rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Jacob; Obel, Niels; Hallas, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Several case-control studies have reported that the use of fluoroquinolone increases the risk of rupture of the Achilles tendon. Our aim was to estimate this risk by means of a population-based cohort approach. SETTING: Data on Achilles tendon ruptures and fluoroquinolone use were...... retrieved from three population-based databases that include information on residents of Funen County (population: 470,000) in primary and secondary care during the period 1991-1999. A study cohort of all 28,262 first-time users of fluoroquinolone and all incident cases of Achilles tendon ruptures were...... identified. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The incidence rate of Achilles tendon ruptures among users and non-users of fluoroquinolones and the standardised incidence rate ratio associating fluoroquinolon use with Achilles tendon rupture were the main outcome measures. RESULTS: Between 1991 and 2002 the incidence...

  4. Ipsilateral free semitendinosus tendon graft transfer for reconstruction of chronic tears of the Achilles tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gougoulias Nikolaos

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many techniques have been developed for the reconstruction of the Achilles tendon in chronic tears. In presence of a large gap (greater than 6 centimetres, tendon augmentation is required. Methods We present our method of minimally invasive semitendinosus reconstruction for the Achilles tendon using one para-midline and one midline incision. Results The first incision is a 5 cm longitudinal incision, made 2 cm proximal and just medial to the palpable end of the residual tendon. The second incision is 3 cm long and is also longitudinal but is 2 cm distal and in the midline to the distal end of the tendon rupture. The distal and proximal Achilles tendon stumps are mobilised. After trying to reduce the gap of the ruptured Achilles tendon, if the gap produced is greater than 6 cm despite maximal plantar flexion of the ankle and traction on the Achilles tendon stumps, the ipsilateral semitendinosus tendon is harvested. The semitendinosus tendon is passed through small incisions in the substance of the proximal stump of the Achilles tendon, and it is sutured to the Achilles tendon. It is then passed beneath the intact skin bridge into the distal incision, and passed from medial to lateral through a transverse tenotomy in the distal stump. With the ankle in maximal plantar flexion, the semitendinosus tendon is sutured to the Achilles tendon at each entry and exit point Conclusion This minimally invasive technique allows reconstruction of the Achilles tendon using the tendon of semitendinosus preserving skin integrity over the site most prone to wound breakdown, and can be especially used to reconstruct the Achilles tendon in the presence of large gap (greater than 6 centimetres.

  5. [Fluoroquinolone-induced Achilles tendon rupture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurin, N

    2008-02-01

    A 72-year-old female dialysis patient with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus who was under long-term medication with oral prednisolone due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was given levofloxacin for one week to treat an acute bronchitis (one 500 mg dose on the first day, 125 mg/day orally from second day onwards). One day after the end of levofloxacin treatment, the patient complained about a constant dragging pain above the right heel that receded under local application of diclofenac ointment and inactivity of the right foot. Twelve days after ending administration of levofloxacin, strong pains in the right calf were suddenly felt during normal walking, and active plantar flexion was lost. Palpation showed the right calf to be soft; a distinct gap was found in the middle third of the Achilles tendon. The Thompson test was positive, and the patient was unable to stand on her right toes. Ultrasonography showed a discontinuity of the right Achilles tendon. A spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture after taking fluoroquinolone was diagnosed. Conservative treatment was applied due to the reduced general condition. Initial treatment involved a below-knee plaster cast in equinus position; the cast was replaced on the fourth day by a pneumatic walker, which was also worn during mobilisation by physiotherapy. A typical feature of fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathy (FIT) is a considerable latency period in some cases between the commencement of treatment with a fluoroquinolone and the onset of FIT symptoms. In addition to fluoroquinolone intake, there are three other predisposing risk factors for tendinopathy: age over 60 years, long-term treatment with systemic glucocorticoids, and chronic kidney disease. The patient showed a combination of all the aforementioned risk factors. In patients with these risk factors, especially among people with a combination of said risk factors - which is frequently the case with nephrologic and dialysis patients, especially

  6. Validity and Reliability of the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganestam, Ann; Barfod, Kristoffer; Klit, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    The best treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture remains debated. Patient-reported outcome measures have become cornerstones in treatment evaluations. The Achilles tendon total rupture score (ATRS) has been developed for this purpose but requires additional validation. The purpose of the present...... study was to validate a Danish translation of the ATRS. The ATRS was translated into Danish according to internationally adopted standards. Of 142 patients, 90 with previous rupture of the Achilles tendon participated in the validity study and 52 in the reliability study. The ATRS showed moderately...

  7. The role of tendon microcirculation in Achilles and patellar tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Karsten

    2008-04-30

    Tendinopathy is of distinct interest as it describes a painful tendon disease with local tenderness, swelling and pain associated with sonographic features such as hypoechogenic texture and diameter enlargement. Recent research elucidated microcirculatory changes in tendinopathy using laser Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry such as at the Achilles tendon, the patellar tendon as well as at the elbow and the wrist level. Tendon capillary blood flow is increased at the point of pain. Tendon oxygen saturation as well as tendon postcapillary venous filling pressures, determined non-invasively using combined Laser Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry, can quantify, in real-time, how tendon microcirculation changes over with pathology or in response to a given therapy. Tendon oxygen saturation can be increased by repetitive, intermittent short-term ice applications in Achilles tendons; this corresponds to 'ischemic preconditioning', a method used to train tissue to sustain ischemic damage. On the other hand, decreasing tendon oxygenation may reflect local acidosis and deteriorating tendon metabolism. Painful eccentric training, a common therapy for Achilles, patellar, supraspinatus and wrist tendinopathy decreases abnormal capillary tendon flow without compromising local tendon oxygenation. Combining an Achilles pneumatic wrap with eccentric training changes tendon microcirculation in a different way than does eccentric training alone; both approaches reduce pain in Achilles tendinopathy. The microcirculatory effects of measures such as extracorporeal shock wave therapy as well as topical nitroglycerine application are to be studied in tendinopathy as well as the critical question of dosage and maintenance. Interestingly it seems that injection therapy using color Doppler for targeting the area of neovascularisation yields to good clinical results with polidocanol sclerosing therapy, but also with a combination of epinephrine and lidocaine.

  8. Finite Element Analysis of the Achilles Tendon While Running

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    Anițaș Răzvan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Achilles tendon is the most frequent recipient of traumatic injuries. The aim of this study is to identify and describe the varying load at ankle level and especially at the Achilles tendon’s insertion on the calcaneus.

  9. Surgical Strategy for the Chronic Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yangjing; Yang, Liu; Yin, Li; Duan, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic Achilles tendon rupture is usually misdiagnosed and treated improperly. This study aims to better understand the treatment of chronic Achilles tendon rupture. Methods. Patients who were not able to perform a single-limb heel rise were chosen. Pre- and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were conducted. By evaluating the presence or absence of Achilles tendon stumps and the gap length of rupture, V-Y advancement, gastrocnemius fascial turndown flap, or flexor halluces longus tendon transfer were selected for tendon repair. The function of ankle and foot was assessed by American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scores and Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS). Results. Twenty-nine patients were followed up. One patient had superficial incision infection, which was healed after debridement and oral antibiotics. Three months postoperatively, MRI showed some signs of inflammation, which disappeared at one or two years postoperatively. All patients were able to perform a single-limb heel rise. Mean AOFAS scores and ATRS scores were increased at the latest follow-up. Conclusion. Surgical options can be determined by evaluating the presence of the Achilles tendon stumps and the gap length, which can avoid using the nearby tendon and yield satisfactory functional results.

  10. Surgical Strategy for the Chronic Achilles Tendon Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangjing Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic Achilles tendon rupture is usually misdiagnosed and treated improperly. This study aims to better understand the treatment of chronic Achilles tendon rupture. Methods. Patients who were not able to perform a single-limb heel rise were chosen. Pre- and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were conducted. By evaluating the presence or absence of Achilles tendon stumps and the gap length of rupture, V-Y advancement, gastrocnemius fascial turndown flap, or flexor halluces longus tendon transfer were selected for tendon repair. The function of ankle and foot was assessed by American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS ankle-hindfoot scores and Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS. Results. Twenty-nine patients were followed up. One patient had superficial incision infection, which was healed after debridement and oral antibiotics. Three months postoperatively, MRI showed some signs of inflammation, which disappeared at one or two years postoperatively. All patients were able to perform a single-limb heel rise. Mean AOFAS scores and ATRS scores were increased at the latest follow-up. Conclusion. Surgical options can be determined by evaluating the presence of the Achilles tendon stumps and the gap length, which can avoid using the nearby tendon and yield satisfactory functional results.

  11. Quadriceps tendon allografts as an alternative to Achilles tendon allografts: a biomechanical comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabe, Isaac; Hunter, Shawn

    2014-12-01

    Quadriceps tendon with a patellar bone block may be a viable alternative to Achilles tendon for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) if it is, at a minimum, a biomechanically equivalent graft. The objective of this study was to directly compare the biomechanical properties of quadriceps tendon and Achilles tendon allografts. Quadriceps and Achilles tendon pairs from nine research-consented donors were tested. All specimens were processed to reduce bioburden and terminally sterilized by gamma irradiation. Specimens were subjected to a three phase uniaxial tension test performed in a custom environmental chamber to maintain the specimens at a physiologic temperature (37 ± 2 °C) and misted with a 0.9 % NaCl solution. There were no statistical differences in seven of eight structural and mechanical between the two tendon types. Quadriceps tendons exhibited a significantly higher displacement at maximum load and significantly lower stiffness than Achilles tendons. The results of this study indicated a biomechanical equivalence of aseptically processed, terminally sterilized quadriceps tendon grafts with bone block to Achilles tendon grafts with bone block. The significantly higher displacement at maximum load, and lower stiffness observed for quadriceps tendons may be related to the failure mode. Achilles tendons had a higher bone avulsion rate than quadriceps tendons (86 % compared to 12 %, respectively). This was likely due to observed differences in bone block density between the two tendon types. This research supports the use of quadriceps tendon allografts in lieu of Achilles tendon allografts for ACL-R.

  12. Rocker shoes reduce Achilles tendon load in running and walking in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobhani, Sobhan; Zwerver, Johannes; van den Heuvel, Edwin; Postema, Klaas; Dekker, Rienk; Hijmans, Juha M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Relative rest and pain relief play an important role in the management of Achilles tendinopathy, and might be achieved by reducing the load on the Achilles tendon. Previous studies have provided evidence that rocker shoes are able to decrease the ankle internal plantar flexion moment in

  13. Quantification of cell density in rat Achilles tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couppé, Christian; Svensson, René B; Heinemeier, Katja M

    2017-01-01

    Increased tendon cell nuclei density (TCND) has been proposed to induce tendon mechanical adaptations. However, it is unknown whether TCND is increased in tendon tissue after mechanical loading and whether such an increase can be quantified in a reliable manner. The aim of this study was to develop...... a reliable method for quantification of TCND and to investigate potential changes in TCND in rat Achilles tendons in response to 12 weeks of running. Eight adult male Sprague-Dawley rats ran (RUN) on a treadmill with 10° incline, 1 h/day, 5 days/wk (17-20 m/min) for 12 weeks (which improved tendon mechanical...... properties) and were compared with 11 control rats (SED). Tissue-Tek-embedded cryosections (10 µm) from the mid region of the Achilles tendon were cut longitudinally on a cryostat. Sections were stained with alcian blue and picrosirius red. One blinded investigator counted the number of tendon cell nuclei 2...

  14. Structural integrity is decreased in both Achilles tendons in people with unilateral Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docking, Sean I; Rosengarten, Samuel D; Daffy, John; Cook, Jill

    2015-07-01

    A high proportion of Achilles tendinopathy patients develop bilateral symptoms with human and animal studies showing bilateral histological changes associated with overuse/pathology in one tendon. The current study examined changes in tendon structure, assessed semi-quantitatively using ultrasound tissue characterisation, in both the symptomatic and asymptomatic tendon in unilateral Achilles tendinopathy patients in comparison to individuals with no history of tendinopathy. Cross-sectional case-control study. Participants with Achilles tendinopathy (n=21), with varying severity and length of clinical symptoms, and six participants with no history of tendinopathy were recruited. Tendons were scanned using ultrasound tissue characterisation, which captures contiguous transverse ultrasound images every 0.2mm and renders a 3-dimensional image. Ultrasound tissue characterisation quantifies tendon structure by measuring the stability of echopattern over contiguous transverse images. Four echo-types were discriminated and expressed as a percentage. Antero-posterior diameter of all tendons was measured. Significant differences were observed in the proportion of normal tendon structure between all three groups (ptendon containing the least amount of normal tendon structure (symptomatic - 79.5%, asymptomatic - 81.8%, control - 86.4%). The asymptomatic tendon contained significantly less normal tendon in comparison to the control tendon (p=0.008), suggesting the asymptomatic tendon is structurally compromised despite the absence of symptoms. Both Achilles tendons are structurally compromised in patients with unilateral Achilles tendinopathy. Future studies need to investigate whether these changes increase the risk of developing symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. New finding in the radiographic diagnosis of Achilles tendon rupture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newmark, H.; Mellon, W.S. Jr.; Malhotra, A.K.; Olken, S.M.; Halls, J.

    1982-06-01

    The authors describe a new radiographic sign of rupture of the Achilles tendon system. It is a fracture, with separation through an osteophyte at the insertion of this tendon. Previously reported signs are also discussed as well as the present case report.

  16. Human Achilles tendon glycation and function in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couppé, Christian; Svensson, Rene Brüggebusch; Madsen, Mads Kongsgaard

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic patients have an increased risk of foot ulcers, and glycation of collagen may increase tissue stiffness. We hypothesized that the level of glycemic control (glycation) may affect Achilles tendon stiffness, which can influence gait pattern. We therefore investigated the relationship between...... collagen glycation, Achilles tendon stiffness parameters and plantar pressure in poorly (n = 22) and well (n = 22) controlled diabetic patients, including healthy age matched (45-70 yrs) controls (n = 11). There were no differences in any of outcome parameters (collagen cross-linking or tendon stiffness...... concentrations (55%, P pressure (PPP)-ratio (33%, P

  17. Compensatory muscle activation caused by tendon lengthening post-Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suydam, Stephen M; Buchanan, Thomas S; Manal, Kurt; Silbernagel, Karin Gravare

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a relationship between the lengthening of the Achilles tendon post-rupture and surgical repair to muscle activation patterns during walking in order to serve as a reference for post-surgical assessment. The Achilles tendon lengths were collected from 4 patients with an Achilles tendon rupture 6 and 12 months post-surgery along with 5 healthy controls via ultrasound. EMG was collected from the triceps surae muscles and tibialis anterior during overground walking. Achilles lengths at 6 and 12 months post-surgery were significantly longer (p Achilles tendon rupture; no side-to-side difference was found in the healthy controls. The triceps surae muscles' activations were fair to moderately correlated to the Achilles lengths (0.38 Achilles tendon length and iEMG from the triceps surae muscles indicate that loss of function is primarily caused by anatomical changes in the tendon and the appearance of muscle weakness is due to a lack of force transmission capability. This study indicates that when aiming for full return of function and strength, an important treatment goal appears to be to minimize tendon elongation.

  18. Compensatory muscle activation caused by tendon lengthening post Achilles tendon rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suydam, Stephen M.; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Manal, Kurt; Silbernagel, Karin Gravare

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to establish a relationship between the lengthening of the Achilles tendon post rupture and surgical repair to muscle activation patterns during walking in order to serve as a reference for post-surgical assessment. Method The Achilles tendon lengths were collected from 4 patients with an Achilles tendon rupture 6 and 12 month post-surgery along with 5 healthy controls via ultrasound. EMG was collected from the triceps surae muscles and tibialis anterior during over-ground walking. Results Achilles lengths at 6 and 12 months post-surgery were significantly longer (p Achilles tendon rupture; no side to side difference was found in the healthy controls. The triceps surae muscles’ activations were fair to moderately correlated to the Achilles lengths (0.38 Achilles tendon length and iEMG from the triceps surae muscles indicate that loss of function is primarily caused by anatomical changes in the tendon and the appearance of muscle weakness is due to a lack of force transmission capability. This study indicates that when aiming for full return of function and strength an important treatment goal appears to be to minimize tendon elongation. Level of evidence Prognostic prospective case series. Level IV. PMID:23609529

  19. Treatment of Chronic Achilles Tendon Ruptures With Large Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Jamal; Jones, Kennis; Raikin, Steven M

    2016-10-01

    Background When Achilles tendon ruptures become chronic, a defect often forms at the rupture site. There is scant literature regarding the treatment of chronic Achilles ruptures with defects of 6 cm or larger. We examined outcomes from combining a turndown of the proximal, central Achilles with a flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon transfer to treat this condition. Materials Between September 2002 and December 2013, 32 patients presented with a chronic Achilles rupture and a defect of 6 cm or more. Twenty patients were male and 12 were female. Patient age was between 20 and 74 years, with a mean of 53.3 years. Eighteen and 14 patients had their right and left Achilles tendon affected, respectively. The number of days between injury and surgery ranged from 30 to 315 days, with a mean of 102 days. Reconstruction of the Achilles involved a turndown of the proximal, central tendon and FHL augmentation. Final patient follow-up ranged from 18 to 150 months, with a mean of 62.3 months. At surgery, the gap between the ruptured ends of the Achilles ranged from 6 to 12 cm, with a mean gap of 7.5 cm. Full healing was achieved in all 32 patients (100%) by 5 months postoperatively. Mean Foot and Ankle Ability Measures scores increased from 36.3% to 90.2% between initial and latest follow-up (P Achilles ruptures with large defects are scant within the orthopaedic literature. Our method of Achilles reconstruction results in a high rate of improved function and pain relief. Therapeutic, Level IV: Case series. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Ultrasonic evaluations of Achilles tendon mechanical properties poststroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Heng; Ren, Yupeng; Wu, Yi-Ning; Liu, Shu Q; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2009-03-01

    Spasticity, contracture, and muscle weakness are commonly observed poststroke in muscles crossing the ankle. However, it is not clear how biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon change poststroke, which may affect functions of the impaired muscles directly. Biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon, including the length and cross-sectional area, in the impaired and unimpaired sides of 10 hemiparetic stroke survivors were evaluated using ultrasonography. Elongation of the Achilles tendon during controlled isometric ramp-and-hold and ramping up then down contractions was determined using a block-matching method. Biomechanical changes in stiffness, Young's modulus, and hysteresis of the Achilles tendon poststroke were investigated by comparing the impaired and unimpaired sides of the 10 patients. The impaired side showed increased tendon length (6%; P = 0.04), decreased stiffness (43%; P Young's modulus (38%; P = 0.005), and increased mechanical hysteresis (1.9 times higher; P muscle spasticity, contracture, and/or disuse poststroke. In vivo quantitative characterizations of the tendon biomechanical properties may help us better understand changes of the calf muscle-tendon unit as a whole and facilitate development of more effective treatments.

  1. [Surgical treatment for chronic achilles tendon rupture and severe scarring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chuan-Xiu; He, Sheng-Wei; Fang, Xu; Mi, Li-Dong; Du, Guang-Yu; Sun, Xue-Gang

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of autologous semitendinosus and gracilis tendon grafting with anchor repair for the treatment of chronic achilles tendon rupture and severe scarring. From April 2010 to October 2012,26 patients with chronic achilles tendon rupture(with Myerson type III ) and severe scarring were treated with autologous semitendinosus and gracilis tendon grafting with anchor repair. There were 19 males and 7 females,with an average age of 32 years old (ranged, 22 to 47 years). The time from injury to surgery was from 3 to 12 months (7 months on average). The plantar flexion strength of all injuried feet attenuated and single heel rise test were positive in 26 cases before operation. Plaster immobilization and routine rehabilitation therapy were performed after operation. Clinical effects were evaluated by Arner-lindholm criterion and complications were observed after operation. All the patients were followed up from 12 to 24 months with a mean of 16 months. No complications such as achilles tendon re-rupture, wound infection, etc were found during follow-up period. According to the Arner-Lindholm standard, 15 cases got excellent results and 11 good. Using autologous semitendinosus and gracilis tendon grafts with anchor repair to treat chronic achilles tendon rupture and severe scarring is a perfect surgical procedure.

  2. Minimally invasive surgery for Achilles tendon pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Maffulli

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicola Maffulli1, Umile Giuseppe Longo2, Filippo Spiezia2, Vincenzo Denaro21Centre for Sports and Exercise Medicine, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, England; 2Department of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Minimally invasive trauma and orthopedic surgery is increasingly common, though technically demanding. Its use for pathologies of the Achilles tendon (AT hold the promise to allow faster recovery times, shorter hospital stays, and improved functional outcomes when compared to traditional open procedures, which can lead to difficulty with wound healing because of the tenuous blood supply and increased chance of wound breakdown and infection. We present the recent advances in the field of minimally invasive AT surgery for tendinopathy, acute ruptures, chronic tears, and chronic avulsions of the AT. In our hands, minimally invasive surgery has provided similar results to those obtained with open surgery, with decreased perioperative morbidity, decreased duration of hospital stay, and reduced costs. So far, the studies on minimally invasive orthopedic techniques are of moderate scientific quality with short follow-up periods. Multicenter studies with longer follow-up are needed to justify the long-term advantages of these techniques over traditional ones.Keywords: tendinopathy, rupture, percutanous repair, less invasive

  3. Nonoperative, dynamic treatment of acute achilles tendon rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Bencke, Jesper; Lauridsen, Hanne Bloch

    2015-01-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture alters the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex that can affect functional performance and the risk of repeat injury. The purpose of the present study was to compare the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon...... complex in patients randomized to early weightbearing or non-weightbearing in the nonoperative treatment of Achilles tendon rupture. A total of 60 patients were randomized to full weightbearing from day 1 of treatment or non-weightbearing for 6 weeks. After 6 and 12 months, the peak passive torque at 20......° dorsiflexion, the stiffness during slow stretching, and the maximal strength were measured in both limbs. The stiffness of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex in the terminal part of dorsiflexion was significantly increased (p = .024) in the non-weightbearing group at 12 months. The peak passive torque...

  4. Ossification of the Achilles tendon: imaging abnormalities in 12 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, J.S. [Dept. of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Witte, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Resnick, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Pogue, W. [Dept. of Radiology, AMI Valley Medical Center, El Cajon, CA (United States)

    1994-02-01

    Ossification of the Achilles tendon is a rare clinical entity that is characterized by the presence of an ossific mass contained within the fibrocartilaginous substance of the tendon. Because the radiographic features of this condition have not been documented entirely and the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings have not been determined, a review of 16 affected tendons in 12 patients was performed in an attempt to characterize the imaging abnormalities associated with this process. MR imaging was performed in three Achilles tendons which demonstrated thickening of the tendons at the level of the ossifications and a lack of intratendinous signal abnormalities compatible with acute tendinitis. Signal intensity similar to that of bone marrow was present in the ossifications. (orig.)

  5. Functional rehabilitation of patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark-Christensen, Troels; Troelsen, Anders; Kallemose, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The optimal treatment for acute Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) is continuously debated. Recent studies have proposed that the choice of either operative or non-operative treatment may not be as important as rehabilitation, suggesting that functional rehabilitation should be preferred over......, CINAHL, Cochrane Library and PEDro using the search terms: "Achilles tendon," "rupture," "mobilization" and "immobilization". Seven RCTs involving 427 participants were eligible for inclusion, with a total of 211 participants treated with functional rehabilitation and 216 treated with immobilization....... CONCLUSION: Functional rehabilitation after acute Achilles tendon rupture does not increase the rate of re-rupture or other complications. A trend toward earlier return to work and sport, and increased patient satisfaction was found when functional rehabilitation was used. The present literature is of low...

  6. Nonoperative dynamic treatment of acute achilles tendon rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Bencke, Jesper; Bloch Lauridsen, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dynamic rehabilitation has been suggested to be an important part of nonoperative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture that results in functional outcome and rerupture rates comparable with those of operative treatment. However, the optimal role of weight-bearing during early...... rehabilitation remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare immediate weight-bearing with non-weight-bearing in a nonoperative dynamic treatment protocol for Achilles tendon rupture. METHODS: The study was conducted as a blinded, randomized, controlled, parallel superiority trial. Patients eighteen...... to sixty years of age were eligible for inclusion. Both groups were treated nonoperatively with controlled early motion. The intervention group was allowed full weight-bearing from day one, and the control group was non-weight-bearing for six weeks. The primary outcome was the Achilles tendon Total Rupture...

  7. Botulinum toxin improves reduced dorsiflexion after Achilles tendon surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Iris; Lorbach, Olaf; Mehnert, Sabine; Kaps, Manfred; Engelhardt, Martin

    2010-02-01

    Generally, outcome after surgical repair of complete Achilles tendon rupture is good. However, some patients have ongoing problems with dorsiflexion of the ankle joint. We report on eight patients, who did not achieve heel contact because of reduced ankle dorsiflexion 5 months after surgical repair of complete Achilles tendon rupture. All patients received at least three cycles of injections with 200-300 units of Botulinum toxin A (BOTOX) into the gastrocnemius and soleus muscle. Weakening of the triceps surae by Botulinum toxin allowed patients to perform the required exercises and to tolerate casting at night. Thus, all patients were able to tolerate plantigrade foot position 9 months after beginning of Botulinum toxin treatment. At final follow-up after 2 years, pain had significantly improved, and a mean dorsiflexion of 21 degrees was reached. In conclusion, treatment of the calf muscles with BOTOX is a safe and effective method to improve restricted dorsiflexion in patients after Achilles tendon repair.

  8. Could Ossification of the Achilles Tendon Have a Hereditary Component?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chawki Cortbaoui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ossification of the Achilles tendon (OTA is an unusual clinical condition. It is characterized by the presence of an ossified mass within the fibrocartilaginous substance of the Achilles tendon. The etiology of the ossification of the Achilles tendon is unknown. Review of the literature suggests that its etiology is multifactorial. The major contributing factors are trauma and surgery with other minor causes such as systemic diseases, metabolic conditions, and infections. To our knowledge, no previous reports suggest any genetic/hereditary predisposition in OAT. We report 3 siblings who have OAT with no history of any of the aforementioned predisposing factors. Could OAT have a hereditary component as one of its etiologies?

  9. Missed Medial Malleolar Fracture Associated With Achilles Tendon Rupture: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Koji; Taketomi, Shuji; Inui, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kensuke; Sanada, Takaki; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    A 45-year-old man sustained an Achilles tendon rupture while playing futsal. A concomitant medial malleolar fracture was not diagnosed until the patient underwent an operation for Achilles tendon repair. A routine postoperative radiograph showed a minimally displaced medial malleolar fracture. Conservative treatment was chosen for the fracture. The function of the Achilles tendon recovered well, and the fracture was united. A medial malleolar fracture can be missed when an Achilles tendon rupture occurs simultaneously. Thus, surgeons should consider the possibility of medial malleolar fracture associated with an Achilles tendon rupture. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures using Lynn method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Tolunay

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Efficiency assessment of Lynn method onopen primary repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures.Methods: Data were evaluated from 19 patients whotreated with the Lynne method due to acute Achilles tendonrupture. Average follow-up length was 12.3 months(range 8-15 months. Dominant side was the right sideby all patients and all patients were males. Plantaris tendonaugmentation was applied after end-to-end repair bymodified Kessler suture technique.Results: The mean postoperative AOFAS score (TheAmerican Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfootclinical outcome scores was 93.5 (range 82-100. Theaverage of Achilles tendon postoperative assessmentscore, as developed by Thermann and colleagues, was93.3. Both assessment scores were between 90-100 andwere evaluated as very good. None of the patients developedpost-operative wound infection. The Thompson testwas negative on all patients and bilateral motor strengthwas 5/5.Conclusion: Lynn method, especially in young and activepatients with acute Achilles tendon rupture is a methodthat should be considered in treatment protocols.Key words: Achilles tendon, Lynn method, AOFAS score

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed radiography in Achilles tendon rupture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenaga, Tateo; Hachiya, Junichi; Miyasaka, Yasuo and others

    1988-11-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computed Radiography (CR) were performed in 15 patients with complete Achilles tendon rupture who were treated conservatively without surgery. MRI was obtained using Toshiba MRT 50 A superconductive machine, operaing at 0.5 Tesla. CR was performed by CR-101, Fuji Medical System. In fresh cases, ruptured tendons showed intermediate signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high intensity on T2-weighted images. Thickening of the tendon was observed in all cases except in very acute stage. Configuration of thickend tendons tends to be dumbbell shape in subacute stage and fusiform in chronic stage of more than six months after the initial trauma. In cases which showed high signal intensity at the ruptured area both on T1 and T2 weighted images, migration of fat into the sapces between the ruptured tendons was considered to be the major source of increased signal intensity. Computed radiography showed thickening of the tendon, blurring of anterior margin of the tendon, and decreased translucency of pre-Achilles fat pad. However, MRI better demonstrated the details of ruptured tendons when compared to CR, and thought to be an usefull way of following up the healing process of the ruptured tendon to facilitate more reasonable judgement of the time of removing plaster casts and stating exercise.

  12. Management of acute Achilles tendon rupture with tendon-bundle technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Guang; Li, Bing; Yang, Yun-Feng

    2017-02-01

    Objective * These authors contributed equally to this work. To explore tendon-bundle technique for treating Achilles tendon rupture with no defects. Methods Patients with full unilateral Achilles tendon rupture with no defects were included. The Achilles tendon medial edge surgical repair approach was used, revealing horsetail-like rupture bundles. Tendon bundles were anatomically realigned and repaired end-to-end using 5-0 sutures. Patients were followed-up for 1 year, and assessed for differences between the repaired versus healthy limb. Results Out of 24 patients (18 male, 6 female; aged 19-56 years) at 1 year following surgery, mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 92.4 ± 5.9; mean differences between the surgically repaired versus contralateral side in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion angle were 3.5 ± 2.3° and 5.6 ± 3.2°, respectively; mean difference in calf circumference between the two sides was 0.9 ± 0.5 cm; and mean increase in Achilles tendon width versus the healthy side was 0.8 ± 0.2 cm. By 1 year post-surgery, there were no significant between-side differences in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion angle, or calf circumference. Conclusions Tendon-bundle surgery resulted in good ankle function restoration and low complication rates. Tendon-bundle surgery may reduce blood supply destruction and maximally preserve Achilles tendon length, and may be effective for treating Achilles tendon rupture with no defects.

  13. A mathematical model characterising Achilles tendon dynamics in flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzistefani, N; Chappell, M J; Hutchinson, C; Kletzenbauer, S; Evans, N D

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to acquire mechanistic knowledge of the gastrocnemius muscle-Achilles tendon complex behaviour during specific movements in humans through mathematical modelling. Analysis of this muscle-tendon complex was performed to see if already existing muscle-tendon models of other parts of the body could be applied to the leg muscles, especially the gastrocnemius muscle-Achilles tendon complex, and whether they could adequately characterise its behaviour. Five healthy volunteers were asked to take part in experiments where dorsiflexion and plantar flexion of the foot were studied. A model of the Achilles tendon-gastrocnemius muscle was developed, incorporating assumptions regarding the mechanical properties of the muscle fibres and the tendinous tissue in series. Ultrasound images of the volunteers, direct measurements and additional mathematical calculations were used to parameterise the model. Ground reaction forces, forces on specific joints and moments and angles for the ankle were obtained from a Vicon 3D motion capture system. Model validation was performed from the experimental data captured for each volunteer and from reconstruction of the movements of specific trajectories of the joints, muscles and tendons involved in those movements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Surgical treatment of the neglected achilles tendon rupture with Hyalonect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esenyel, Cem Zeki; Tekin, Cagri; Cakar, Murat; Bayraktar, Kursat; Saygili, Selcuk; Esenyel, Meltem; Tekin, Zeynep N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the management and outcomes of ten patients with chronic Achilles tendon rupture treated with a turndown gastrocnemius-soleus fascial flap wrapped with a surgical mesh (Hyalonect). Ten men with neglected Achilles tendon rupture were treated with a centrally based turndown gastrocnemius fascial flap wrapped with Hyalonect. Hyalonect is a knitted mesh composed of HYAFF, a benzyl ester of hyaluronic acid. The Achilles tendon ruptures were diagnosed more than 1 month after injury. The mean patient age was 41 years. All of the patients had weakness of active plantarflexion. The mean preoperative American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 64.8. The functional outcome was excellent. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 97.8 at the latest follow-up. There were significant differences between the preoperative and postoperative scores. Ankle range of motion was similar in both ankles. Neither rerupture nor major complication, particularly of wound healing, was observed. For patients with chronic Achilles tendon rupture with a rupture gap of at least 5 cm, surgical repair using a single turndown fascial flap covered with Hyalonect achieved excellent outcomes.

  15. Catastrophic Failure of an Infected Achilles Tendon Rupture Repair Managed with Combined Flexor Hallucis Longus and Peroneus Brevis Tendon Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Devin C; Elliott, Andrew D; Roukis, Thomas S

    2016-01-01

    Deep infection is one of the most devastating complications following repair of an Achilles tendon rupture. Treatment requires not only culture-driven antibiotic therapy, but more importantly, appropriate débridement of some or even all of the Achilles tendon. This may necessitate delayed reconstruction of the Achilles tendon. The authors present a successful case of reconstruction of a chronically infected Achilles tendon in an otherwise healthy 43-year-old man via a multistaged approach using the flexor hallucis longus and peroneus brevis tendons. We also provide a brief review of the literature regarding local tendon transfer used in the reconstruction of Achilles tendon rupture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The structural and mechanical properties of the Achilles tendon 2 years after surgical repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geremia, Jeam Marcel; Bobbert, Maarten Frank; Casa Nova, Mayra; Ott, Rafael Duvelius; Lemos, Fernando de Aguiar; Lupion, Raquel de Oliveira; Frasson, Viviane Bortoluzzi; Vaz, Marco Aurélio

    2015-06-01

    Acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon affect the tendon's structural and mechanical properties. The long-term effects of surgical repair on these properties remain unclear. To evaluate effects of early mobilization versus traditional immobilization rehabilitation programs 2 years after surgical Achilles tendon repair, by comparing force-elongation and stress-strain relationships of the injured tendon to those of the uninjured tendon. A group of males with previous Achilles tendon rupture (n=18) and a group of healthy male controls (n=9) participated. Achilles tendon rupture group consisted of patients that had received early mobilization (n=9) and patients that had received traditional immobilization with a plaster cast (n=9). Comparisons of tendon structural and mechanical properties were made between Achilles tendon rupture and healthy control groups, and between the uninjured and injured sides of the two rehabilitation groups in Achilles tendon rupture group. Ultrasound was used to determine bilaterally tendon cross-sectional area, tendon resting length, and tendon elongation as a function of torque during maximal voluntary plantar flexion. From these data, Achilles tendon force-elongation and stress-strain relationships were determined. The Achilles tendon rupture group uninjured side was not different from healthy control group. Structural and mechanical parameters of the injured side were not different between the Achilles tendon rupture early mobilization and the immobilization groups. Compared to the uninjured side, the injured side showed a reduction in stress at maximal voluntary force, in Young's modulus and in stiffness. Two years post-surgical repair, the Achilles tendon mechanical properties had not returned to the uninjured contralateral tendon values. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Heel pain and Achilles tendonitis -- aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... walking or standing on your foot References Achilles Tendinitis. In: Safran MR, Zachazewski J, Stone DA, eds. ... Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heel Injuries and Disorders Tendinitis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  18. The Achilles tendon resting angle as an indirect measure of Achilles tendon length following rupture, repair, and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Carmont

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: The ATRA increases following injury, is reduced by surgery, and then increases again during initial rehabilitation. The angle also correlates with patient-reported symptoms early in the rehabilitation phase and with heel-rise height after 1 year. The ATRA might be considered a simple and effective means to evaluate Achilles tendon function 1 year after the rupture.

  19. [Treatment of traumatic sections of the Achilles tendon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfanu, N

    1977-01-01

    The author maintains that the atrophy of the sural triceps muscle, the retraction of the Achille tendon and the osteoporosis of the calcaneum and of the tarsian bones, occurring after the traumatic sectioning of the Achille tendon, are the results of an inadequate treatment. The cause of these sequellae is the immobilization of the foot in an equinus position, which relaxes the sural triceps and as a result of the lack of mechanical traction factor, leads to local circulatory disturbances followed by a modification in the structure of the bone and of the muscle. On the basis of this pathophysiological concept the author has excluded post-operative immobilization in the equinus position, and in fact any type of immobilization, recommending in contrast a mobilization of the foot from the very first days after the suture of the tendon. The clinical results obtained confirm the value of the hypothesis.

  20. Chronic Achilles Tendon Disorders: Tendinopathy and Chronic Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffulli, Nicola; Via, Alessio Giai; Oliva, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon involves clinical conditions in and around the tendon and it is the result of a failure of a chronic healing response. Although several conservative therapeutic options have been proposed, few of them are supported by randomized controlled trials. The management is primarily conservative and many patients respond well to conservative measures. If clinical conditions do not improve after 6 months of conservative management, surgery is recommended. The management of chronic ruptures is different from that of acute ruptures. The optimal surgical procedure is still debated. In this article chronic Achilles tendon disorders are debated and evidence-based medicine treatment strategies are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization and Surgical Management of Achilles Tendon Sleeve Avulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jeannie; Easley, Mark E; Nunley, James A

    2016-06-01

    An Achilles sleeve avulsion occurs when the tendon ruptures distally from its calcaneal insertion as a continuous "sleeve." This relatively rare injury pattern may not be appreciated until the time of surgery and can be challenging to treat because, unlike a midsubstance rupture, insufficient tendon remains on the calcaneus to allow for end-to-end repair, and unlike a tuberosity avulsion fracture, any bony element avulsed with the tendon is inadequate for internal fixation. This study aimed to highlight the characteristics of Achilles sleeve avulsions and present the outcomes of operative repair using suture anchor fixation. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 11 consecutive Achilles tendon sleeve avulsions (10 males, 1 female; mean age 44 years) that underwent operative repair between 2008 and 2014. Patient demographics, injury presentation, and operative details were reviewed. Postoperative outcomes were collected at a mean follow-up of 38.4 (range, 12-83.5) months, including the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot score, visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, plantarflexion strength, patient satisfaction, and complications. Eight patients (72.7%) had preexisting symptoms of insertional Achilles disease. Ten of 11 (90.9%) injuries were sustained during recreational athletic activity. An Achilles sleeve avulsion was recognized preoperatively in 7 of 11 (64%) cases, where lateral ankle radiographs demonstrated a small radiodensity several centimeters proximal to the calcaneal insertion. Intraoperatively, 90.9% of sleeve avulsions had a concomitant Haglund deformity and macroscopic evidence of insertional tendinopathy. All patients healed after suture anchor repair. The average AOFAS score was 92.8 and VAS score was 0.9. Ten patients (90.9%) were completely satisfied. One complication occurred, consisting of delayed wound healing. Achilles tendon sleeve avulsions predominantly occurred in middle-aged men with preexisting insertional

  2. Achilles tendon rupture following surgical management for tendinopathy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maffulli Nicola

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Achilles tendinopathy is understood to be a failed healing response. Operative management is utilised following the failure of non-operative methods. Case Presentation We present a case of Achilles tendon rupture, sustained whilst isometrically loading the Achilles tendon during an eccentric loading exercise programme. Conclusion: Bilateral surgical exploration and debridement had previously been performed after conservative management of bilateral Achilles tendinopathy had been unsuccessful.

  3. Direct Repair of Chronic Achilles Tendon Ruptures Using Scar Tissue Located Between the Tendon Stumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Toshito; Shima, Hiroaki; Mori, Katsunori; Kizawa, Momoko; Neo, Masashi

    2016-07-20

    Several surgical procedures for chronically ruptured Achilles tendons have been reported. Resection of the interposed scar tissue located between the tendon stumps and reconstruction using normal autologous tissue have been well described. We developed a direct repair procedure that uses scar tissue, which obviates the need to use normal autologous tissue. Thirty consecutive patients with Achilles tendon ruptures with a delay in diagnosis of >4 weeks underwent removal of a section of scar and healing tissue with direct primary suture of the ends of the tendon without the use of allograft or autograft. Patients were followed for a mean time of 33 months. Preoperative and postoperative clinical outcomes were measured with the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) and the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score. In addition, the patients underwent preoperative and postoperative functional measurements and magnetic resonance imaging. Lastly, we evaluated the histology of the interposed healing tissue. The mean AOFAS scores were 82.8 points preoperatively and 98.1 points postoperatively. The mean postoperative ATRS was 92.0 points. At the time of the latest follow-up, none of the patients had experienced tendon reruptures or difficulties in walking or climbing stairs, and all except 2 patients could perform a single-limb heel rise. All athletes had returned to their pre-injury level of sports participation. Preoperative T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed that 22 Achilles tendons were thickened with diffuse intratendinous high-signal alterations, and 8 Achilles tendons were thinned. Postoperative T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings included fusiform-shaped tendon thickening and homogeneous low-signal alterations of the tendons in all patients. Histologically, the interposed scar tissue consisted of dense collagen fibers. Shortening of the tissue between the 2 tendon ends that included healing scar and direct

  4. MRI of the Achilles tendon: A comprehensive review of the anatomy, biomechanics, and imaging of overuse tendinopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierre-Jerome, Claude; Moncayo, Valeria; Terk, Michael R. (Dept. of Radiology, Emory Univ. Orthopedics and Spine Center, Atlanta, GA (United States)), e-mail: cpierr3@emory.edu

    2010-05-15

    The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the body; it plays an important role in the biomechanics of the lower extremity. It can withstand great forces, especially during sporting exercises and pivoting. The pathologies related to the Achilles tendon are diverse and many carry undesirable consequences. We retrospectively analyzed the images of patients who underwent examinations of the ankle/foot region to review the anatomy of the Achilles tendon and its surroundings and to search for pathologies consistent with overuse injuries. The anatomy of the tendon is described from origin to insertion. The imaging characteristics of the Achilles tendon including pitfalls are reviewed. We also describe the Achilles overuse injuries: paratenonitis, tendinosis, tendon tear, atypical tear, tendon re-tear, retrocalcaneal bursitis, retro-Achilles bursitis, Haglund's deformity, and tendon calcification. We present other entities like tendon ossification and failed transplanted Achilles tendon, with emphasis on MRI

  5. Treatment of A Case of Spontaneous Rupture of Achille's Tendon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张世筠

    2003-01-01

    @@ Mr. Guo, 51 years old, paid his first visit on November 7, 2001. The patient felt sudden pain in the right Achille's tendon in June 1999 with no apparent predisposing factors. Several months later he palpated a small pitting in the middle of the right Achille's tendon, which expanded gradually in size. In June 2000, two thirds of the tendon was diagnosed to be ruptured in a local hospital. Ten days later the tendon was ruptured completely when he felt sudden severe pain, numbness and distention, and he was unable to raise the heel. The lesion was healed three months later after being treated with a plaster model, but it was partially ruptured again 6 months later. Though the ruptured tendon was healed again with the help of a plaster model, he still suffered from local swelling and pain, which was aggravated during movement and made him difficult in walking, squatting down and standing up. During the examination, the right heel was found hyperemic and swollen with ecchymosis and tenderness. The tongue proper was dark red and the pulse thready and rapid. The condition was due to depletion and deficiency of liver-qi, stagnant blood with dampheat obstructing the collaterals. The principle of nourishing the liver and soothing the tendon was adopted, assisted by invigorating blood circulation and removing blood stasis, clearing heat and transforming dampness.

  6. Long-term functional outcome of bilateral spontaneous and simultaneous Achilles tendon ruptures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ellanti, Prasad

    2012-10-01

    Bilateral simultaneous ruptures are rare comprising less than 1% of all Achilles tendon ruptures. Risk factors for bilateral ruptures include chronic diseases and medications such as corticosteroids and fluoroquinolones. There is little in the literature on the long-term functional outcome of bilateral Achilles tendon ruptures. This article present a series of 3 cases of simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral Achilles tendon ruptures with a minimum of 5-year follow up suggesting a good functional outcome.

  7. Bone Reduction Clamp to Gain Length in Repairing Chronic Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Patrick S; Pedowitz, David I

    2016-11-01

    Chronic Achilles tendon ruptures occur after an unrecognized, untreated, or misdiagnosed acute Achilles tendon rupture and present a potentially debilitating injury for the patient. Various techniques have been described to reconstruct the Achilles tendon after chronic ruptures. The technique chosen depends on the length of tendon defect that is present after debridement. If the tendon gap is greater than 3 cm, additional techniques are generally used, as direct repair is often not possible. The authors present a novel intraoperative technique using pointed reduction clamps to gain and maintain length of the Achilles tendon to decrease the gap between ends of the Achilles tendon and allow for end-to-end repair when it may have otherwise not been possible. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1223-e1225.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Open re-rupture of the Achilles tendon after surgical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuru Hanada

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The rate of re-rupture of Achilles tendon after surgical treatment were reported to 1.7-5.6% previously. Re-rupture of Achilles tendon generally occurs subcutaneously. We experienced two rare cases of the open re-ruptures of Achilles tendon with a transverse wound perpendicular to the primary surgical incision. Re-rupture occurred 4 and 13 weeks after surgical treatment. We suggest that open re-rupture correlates more closely with skin scaring and shortening. Another factor may be adhesion between the subcutaneous scar and the suture of the paratenon and Achilles tendon with post-operative immobilization.

  9. Treatment of Achilles tendon rupture using different methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grubor Predrag

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Today there are controversies about searching for the ideal surgical method (conservatively with plaster cast, with open and percutaneous tenorrhaphy for repairing a ruptured Achilles tendon. The aim of this study study was to examine the results of treating Achilles tendon ruptures in patients by using the following methods: percutaneous suturing, open surgery technique and non-surgical treatment by plaster cast immobilisation. Methods. Forty two patients treated at our facility in the period August 2003 - September 2010 for Achilles tendon ruptures were included in the study. They were operated on by using different orthopedic procedures (percutaneous reconstruction of the Achilles tendon, open surgery, plaster cast only and two anaesthesia technique (spinal aneasthesia and local infiltrational anaesthesia. The following parameters were monitored after interventions performed and compared: duration of hospital stay, postsurgical complications, incidence of the reruptures of the Achilles tendon and time for full leg functionality. Results. The patients sustained their respective injuries in the following manner: 8 of them while pursuing sports activities, 24 while pursuing recreational activities, 4 at workplace, 4 while performing everyday activities, and 2 of the patients did not know how they had sustained their injuries. The average age of the patients was 40.5, with 37 (88% men and 5 (12% women. Surgeries were performed under spinal anaesthesia in 29 (69% patients, and in 5 (12% patients tenorrhaphy was performed under local anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was not used in 8 (19% patients treated with plaster cast. We performed percutaneous reconstruction of the Achilles tendon in 19 (45% patients. A total of 14 (33% patients were treated under spinal anaesthesia, and 5 (11.9% under local infiltrational anaesthesia with 2% xylocain. We treated 15 (36% patients with open surgery. The patients treated conservatively stayed in

  10. Biomechanical characteristics of the eccentric Achilles tendon exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Aaboe, Jens; Bliddal, Henning

    2009-01-01

    muscles were recorded. Joint kinematics, GRF frequency contents, average EMG amplitudes, and Achilles tendon loads were calculated. FINDINGS: The eccentric movement phase was characterized by a higher GRF frequency content in the 8-12 Hz range, and reduced EMG activity in the lower leg muscles...... into the biomechanics of the exercise may improve our understanding. METHODS: Sixteen healthy subjects performed one-legged full weight bearing ankle plantar and dorsiflexion exercises during which three-dimensional ground reaction forces (GRF), ankle joint kinematics and surface electromyography (EMG) of the lower leg....... No differences in Achilles tendon loads were found. INTERPRETATION: This descriptive study demonstrates differences in the movement biomechanics between the eccentric and concentric phases of one-legged full weight bearing ankle dorsal and plantar flexion exercises. In particular, the findings imply...

  11. Effect of taurine on rat Achilles tendon healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdemir, Ovunc; Lineaweaver, William C; Cavusoglu, Turker; Binboga, Erdal; Uyanikgil, Yigit; Zhang, Feng; Pekedis, Mahmut; Yagci, Tugay

    2015-01-01

    Taurine has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant characteristics. We have introduced taurine into a tendon-healing model to evaluate its effects on tendon healing and adhesion formation. Two groups of 16 rats underwent diversion and repair of the Achilles tendon. One group received a taurine injection (200 mg/ml) at the repair site, while the other group received 1 ml of saline. Specimens were harvested at 6 weeks and underwent biomechanical and histological evaluation. No tendon ruptured. Average maximum load was significantly greater in the taurine-applied group compared with the control group (p taurine-applied group compared with the control group (p  0.05). After histological assessment, we found that fibroblast proliferation, edema, and inflammation statistically decreased in the treatment group (p taurine may have an effect on adhesion formation.

  12. Endoscopic-assisted achilles tendon reconstruction with free hamstring tendon autograft for chronic rupture of achilles tendon: clinical and isokinetic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Shazly, Ossama; Abou El Soud, Maged M; El Mikkawy, Dalia M E; El Ganzoury, Ibrahim; Ibrahim, Ayman Mohamed

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical and functional outcome of endoscopic-assisted reconstruction of chronic ruptures of the Achilles tendon using free hamstring tendon autograft. We present a case series of 15 patients who had chronic ruptures of the Achilles tendon (>6 weeks earlier) and underwent endoscopic-assisted reconstruction with a free hamstring autograft. The graft loop was passed through and fixed to the proximal stump of the tendon. The graft was then passed through suture to the distal stump and finally inserted into a tunnel in the anterior calcaneus to the Achilles tendon insertion and fixed with an bioabsorbable interference screw. The mean follow-up period was 27 months (SD, 3 months; range, 24 to 33 months). All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and at follow-up 2 years postoperatively. All patients were functionally evaluated with the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) score for the hindfoot preoperatively and postoperatively. Calf muscle power was evaluated by isokinetic strength testing at 2 years' follow-up. The mean size of the gap on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging was 49 mm (SD, 9 mm). The mean preoperative AOFAS score was 32.6 (SD, 7.5). There was a statistically significant improvement in the postoperative AOFAS score after 2 years to 90.8 (SD, 3.54) (P Achilles tendon reconstruction with free hamstring tendon autograft for chronic ruptures of the Achilles tendon showed good to excellent results in all patients. Isokinetic testing showed a nonsignificant deficit between the involved and uninvolved sides at 2 years' follow-up. Level IV, therapeutic cases series. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Variation in the human Achilles tendon moment arm during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasske, Kristen; Thelen, Darryl G; Franz, Jason R

    2017-02-01

    The Achilles tendon (AT) moment arm is an important determinant of ankle moment and power generation during locomotion. Load and depth-dependent variations in the AT moment arm are generally not considered, but may be relevant given the complex triceps surae architecture. We coupled motion analysis and ultrasound imaging to characterize AT moment arms during walking in 10 subjects. Muscle loading during push-off amplified the AT moment arm by 10% relative to heel strike. AT moment arms also varied by 14% over the tendon thickness. In walking, AT moment arms are not strictly dependent on kinematics, but exhibit important load and spatial dependencies.

  14. The effect of dry needling and treadmill running on inducing pathological changes in rat Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bom Soo; Joo, Young Chae; Choi, Byung Hyune; Kim, Kil Hwan; Kang, Joon Soon; Park, So Ra

    2015-11-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a common degenerative condition without a definitive treatment. An adequate chronic animal model of Achilles tendinopathy has not yet been developed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual and combined effects of dry needling and treadmill running on the Achilles tendon of rats. Percutaneous dry needling, designed to physically replicate microrupture of collagen fibers in overloaded tendons, was performed on the right Achilles tendon of 80 Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were randomly divided into two groups: a treadmill group, which included rats that underwent daily uphill treadmill running (n = 40), and a cage group, which included rats that could move freely within their cages (n = 40). At the end of weeks 1 and 4, 20 rats from each group were sacrificed, and bilateral Achilles tendons were collected. The harvested tendons were subjected to mechanical testing and histological analysis. Dry needling induced histological and mechanical changes in the Achilles tendons at week 1, and the changes persisted at week 4. The needled Achilles tendons of the treadmill group tended to show more severe histological and mechanical changes than those of the cage group, although these differences were not statistically significant. Dry needling combined with free cage activity or treadmill running produced tendinopathy-like changes in rat Achilles tendons up to 4 weeks after injury. Dry needling is an easy procedure with a short induction period and a high success rate, suggesting it may have relevance in the design of an Achilles tendinopathy model.

  15. The Risk of Achilles Tendon Rupture in the Patients with Achilles Tendinopathy: Healthcare Database Analysis in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youichi Yasui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Disorders of the Achilles tendon can be broadly classified into acute and chronic entities. Few studies have established chronic Achilles tendinopathy as a precursor to acute Achilles ruptures. In this study, we assessed the relationship between Achilles tendinopathy and rupture, clarifying the incidence of rupture in the setting of underlying tendinopathy. Methods. The United Healthcare Orthopedic Dataset from the PearlDiver Patient Record Database was used to identify patients with ICD-9 codes for Achilles rupture and/or Achilles tendinopathy. The number of patients with acute rupture, chronic tendinopathy, and rupture following a prior diagnosis of tendinopathy was assessed. Results. Four percent of patients with an underlying diagnosis of Achilles tendinopathy went on to sustain a rupture (7,232 patients. Older patients with tendinopathy were most vulnerable to subsequent rupture. Conclusions. The current study demonstrates that 4.0% of patients who were previously diagnosed with Achilles tendinopathy sustained an Achilles tendon rupture. Additionally, older patients with Achilles tendinopathy were most vulnerable. These findings are important as they can help clinicians more objectively council patients with Achilles tendinopathy.

  16. The Risk of Achilles Tendon Rupture in the Patients with Achilles Tendinopathy: Healthcare Database Analysis in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimozono, Yoshiharu; Kawano, Hirotaka

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Disorders of the Achilles tendon can be broadly classified into acute and chronic entities. Few studies have established chronic Achilles tendinopathy as a precursor to acute Achilles ruptures. In this study, we assessed the relationship between Achilles tendinopathy and rupture, clarifying the incidence of rupture in the setting of underlying tendinopathy. Methods. The United Healthcare Orthopedic Dataset from the PearlDiver Patient Record Database was used to identify patients with ICD-9 codes for Achilles rupture and/or Achilles tendinopathy. The number of patients with acute rupture, chronic tendinopathy, and rupture following a prior diagnosis of tendinopathy was assessed. Results. Four percent of patients with an underlying diagnosis of Achilles tendinopathy went on to sustain a rupture (7,232 patients). Older patients with tendinopathy were most vulnerable to subsequent rupture. Conclusions. The current study demonstrates that 4.0% of patients who were previously diagnosed with Achilles tendinopathy sustained an Achilles tendon rupture. Additionally, older patients with Achilles tendinopathy were most vulnerable. These findings are important as they can help clinicians more objectively council patients with Achilles tendinopathy. PMID:28540301

  17. Achilles Tendon Rupture: Avoiding Tendon Lengthening during Surgical Repair and Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Achilles tendon rupture is a serious injury for which the best treatment is still controversial. Its primary goal should be to restore normal length and tension, thus obtaining an optimal function. Tendon elongation correlates significantly with clinical outcome; lengthening is an important cause of morbidity and may produce permanent functional impairment. In this article, we review all factors that may influence the repair, including the type of surgical technique, suture material, and rehabilitation program, among many others. PMID:21966048

  18. Blood flow in the peritendinous space of the human Achilles tendon during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langberg, Henning; Bülow, J; Kjaer, M

    1998-01-01

    This study evaluated blood flow in the peritendinous space of the human Achilles tendon during rest and 40-min dynamical contraction of m. triceps surae. In 10 healthy volunteers 133Xe was injected in to the peritendinous space just ventrally to the Achilles tendon 2 and 5 cm proximal...... to the calcaneal insertion of the tendon, respectively. Blood flow 5 cm proximal to the Achilles tendon insertion was found to increase 4-fold from rest to exercise whereas the exercise induced increase in blood flow was less pronounced, only 2.5-fold, when measured 2 cm proximal to the Achilles tendon insertion....... Lymph drainage from the area was found to be negligible both during rest and exercise. We conclude that dynamical calf muscle contractions result in increased peritendinous blood flow at the Achilles tendon in humans....

  19. [Achilles tendon rupture--early functional and surgical options with special emphasis on rehabilitation issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, K; Thermann, H; Hüfner, T

    2007-03-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are one end of a continuum starting with the healthy Achilles tendon via the thickened and painful tendinopathic Achilles tendon with neovascularisation to the complete tendon rupture. Often times chinolone antibiotics, cortisone therapy and valgus foot axis are associated risk factors. Incidence of Achilles tendon ruptures is estimated to be 10/100 000 per year with a mean age of 35-40 years. Physical activity is encountered in 75 % cases of Achilles tendon ruptures. Running is associated with Achilles tendinopathy as the predominant overuse injury in an analysis among 291 athletes with 10 million kilometers exposure. The Achilles tendinopathic rate was 0.016/1000 km differentiated in 0.008/1000 km mid-portion tendinopathy and 0.005/1000 km insertional tendinopathy. Achilles tendinopathy in running overuse injuries is followed by runner's knee (0.013/1000 km), shin splint (0.0104/1000 km) and plantar fasciitis (0.0054/1000 km). Dynamic ultrasound in 20 degrees plantar flexion is of utmost importance for therapeutic decision making. With an adaptation rate of 75 % or more of the ruptured tendon in 20 degrees plantar flexion and a high patient's compliance we perform an early functional conservative treatment regimen in Achilles tendon ruptures. In almost all other cases the percutaneous Achilles tendon repair is indicated, where nervus suralis lesions have to be appreciated. The vulnerable zone is 10-12 cm proximal to the calcaneus at the lateral border of the Achilles tendon with the sural nerve in close proximity with the tendon. Early functional rehabilitation is not associated with a higher risk of rerupture but with improved subjective assessments and should therefore be advocated.

  20. [Percutaneus Suture of Achilles Tendon Rupture--Operation for Beginners?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, A; Dolezych, R; Chmielnicki, M

    2016-02-01

    Acute rupture of the Achilles tendon is the most common tendon injury, with an incidence of 30/100,000 population. With the Dresden instruments, operative tendon suture can be standardised and is safe, quick and minimally invasive. With post-operative functional therapy in a walking boot, very good clinical results can be achieved. Is this operation suitable as an educational procedure and is its performance still economic? Between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2013, 212 patients with acute rupture of the Achilles tendon were operated using the Dresden instruments. There were 167 males and 45 females, with an average age of 46 years. 99 operations were performed by trainees, 46 by attending surgical staff, and 57 by a senior surgeon. With the trainees, the mean duration of the operation was 29:53 minutes, and with the attending staff 29:10 minutes (n. s., p > 0.1). The rate of complications (re-rupture, infection, and sural nerve damage) was 5/99 (5 %) for the trainees, 4/46 (8.7 %) for the attending staff, and 3/57 (5.3 %) for the senior surgeon. A total cost analysis yielded a total operative cost of 445.76 € for outpatient surgery. With a billed sum of 490.11 €, net income of 44.35 € per case is generated. In patients with reasonable indications for 2-day short inpatient treatment, total treatment cost was 3232.70 €. Percutaneous suture of the Achilles tendon with the Dresden instruments is a standardised and cost-effective surgical procedure. It is suitable as a "beginner's" procedure that can be performed quickly, safely, and cost-effectively. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. [MR imaging of the Achilles tendon: evaluation of criteria for the differentiation of asymptomatic and symptomatic tendons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, C; Wedegärtner, U; Maas, L C; Buchert, R; Adam, G; Maas, R

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop quantitative and qualitative MRI criteria to differentiate between healthy and pathological Achilles tendons. 364 Achilles tendons were examined on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. 264 patients had Achilles tendon complaints, 100 asymptomatic Achilles tendons served as a control. T 1-weighted, T 2-weighted and a STIR sequence were performed in sagittal and axial orientation. Images were evaluated in consensus by two radiologists. Quantitative and qualitative criteria were assessed. A Mann-Whitney-U-Test and a regression analysis were used for statistical analysis. There were statistically significant differences between the patients with disorders and the control group concerning the depth (12.0 mm and 6.3 mm, p tendon, the area of the tendon cross section (1.60 mm (2) and 061 mm (2), p tendon depth (A4), length of bursa (A5) and area of tendon (F). The measurement of the Achilles tendon and the binary-logistic regression analysis allow differentiation between normal and pathological Achilles tendons. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Simultaneous reconstruction of quadriceps tendon rupture after TKA and neglected Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Seuk; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Han, Kyeong-Jin; Cho, Jae Ho; Han, Seung Hwan; Lee, Doo-Hyung; Oh, Kyung Soo

    2010-05-12

    We report a case of simultaneous reconstruction of a quadriceps tendon rupture after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and neglected Achilles tendon rupture, which occurred before TKA with an ipsilateral hamstring autograft. A 64-year-old woman presented with persistent right knee pain. She also had right heel pain and had received multiple steroid injections at the knee joint and heel. On examination, she showed osteoarthritis in the medial and lateral compartments of the knee joint and an Achilles tendon rupture in the ipsilateral limb. There was skin dimpling and the proximal portion of tendon was migrated. We performed TKA, and the postoperative course was satisfactory. She returned 3 months postoperatively, however, with skin dimpling around the suprapatellar area and weakness of knee extension. Her ankle symptoms were also aggravated because she could not use the knee joint freely. We performed simultaneous reconstruction of the quadriceps tendon and the Achilles tendon using an ipsilateral hamstring autograft.Hamstring autograft offers a good alternative treatment option for rupture repair, particularly with concommitant ruptures of multiple sites when primary repair is not possible or the viability of repaired tissue is poor.

  3. Teknik Rekonstruksi Turndown Flap Tendon Achilles dan Flap Fasiokutan Sural pada Ruptur Tendon Achilles yang Disertai Kerusakan Masif Jaringan Lunak: Laporan Kasus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermawan Nagar Rasyid

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Achilles tendon rupture is the most common ruptur of tendon in the lower limb despite being one of the toughest tendons. This rupture presents a complex problem to the treating surgeon especially if it is associated with tendon and soft tissue loss. The case in this study is one patient (male, age 30-year old with a spectrum of acute and infected open tendon-achilles rupture that includes loss of tendon of up to 5 cm, tendon defect with no distal attachment, and partial loss of the calcaneum. The skin defect measured after debridement ranged from 8 x 5 cm to 15 x 10 cm. The ruptured tendon was sutured using gastrocnemius-soleus turn down flap technic to calcaneus bone. A reverse sural artery was used to provide soft tissue cover. The flap survived. The patient had normal gait, were able to stand on tip toes, had active plantar flexion, and had returned to his original occupation 2 months after reconstruction. He had full range of movement at the ankle. Augmented repair of Achilles tendon rupture with large soft tissue defect using gastrocnemius- soleus turn down flap and sural artery flap are stable enough to allow early weight-bearing with favorable clinical result for this patient. Conclusions is single stage tendon reconstruction and reverse flow sural artery flap give good functional outcome in complex Achilles tendon rupture with tendon and soft tissue loss.

  4. Muscle-tendon glucose uptake in Achilles tendon rupture and tendinopathy before and after eccentric rehabilitation: Comparative case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Tahir; Kalliokoski, Kari; Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Finni, Taija

    2016-09-01

    Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) is the most common tendon rupture injury. The consequences of ATR on metabolic activity of the Achilles tendon and ankle plantarflexors are unknown. Furthermore, the effects of eccentric rehabilitation on metabolic activity patterns of Achilles tendon and ankle plantarflexors in ATR patients have not been reported thus far. We present a case study demonstrating glucose uptake (GU) in the Achilles tendon, the triceps surae, and the flexor hallucis longus of a post-surgical ATR patient before and after a 5-month eccentric rehabilitation. At baseline, three months post-surgery, all muscles and Achilles tendon displayed much higher GU in the ATR patient compared to a healthy individual despite lower plantarflexion force. After the rehabilitation, plantarflexion force increased in the operated leg while muscle GU was considerably reduced. The triceps surae muscles showed similar values to the healthy control. When compared to the healthy or a matched patient with Achilles tendon pain after 12 weeks of rehabilitation, Achilles tendon GU levels of ATR patient remained greater after the rehabilitation. Past studies have shown a shift in the metabolic fuel utilization towards glycolysis due to immobilization. Further research, combined with immuno-histological investigation, is needed to fully understand the mechanism behind excessive glucose uptake in ATR cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of the human Achilles tendon enthesis organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, H M; Vázquez, Osorio T; McGonagle, D; Bydder, G; Santer, R M; Benjamin, M

    2008-12-01

    The attachment of the Achilles tendon is part of an 'enthesis organ' that reduces stress concentration at the hard-soft tissue interface. The organ also includes opposing sesamoid and periosteal fibrocartilages, a bursa and Kager's fat pad. In addition, the deep crural and plantar fasciae contribute to Achilles stress dissipation and could also be regarded as components. Here we describe the sequence in which these various tissues differentiate. Serial sections of feet from spontaneously aborted foetuses (crown rump lengths 22-322 mm) were examined. All slides formed part of an existing collection of histologically sectioned embryological material, obtained under Spanish law and housed in the Universidad Complutense, Madrid. From the earliest stages, it was evident that the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia had a mutual attachment to the calcaneal perichondrium. The first components of the enthesis organ to appear (in the 45-mm foetus) were the retrocalcaneal bursa and the crural fascia. The former developed by cavitation within the mesenchyme that later gave rise to Kager's fat pad. The tip of the putative fat pad protruded into the developing bursa in the 110-mm foetus and fully differentiated adipocytes were apparent in the 17-mm foetus. All three fibrocartilages were first recognisable in the 332-mm foetus--at which time adipogenesis had commenced in the heel fat pad. The sequence in which the various elements became apparent suggests that bursal formation and the appearance of the crural fascia may be necessary to facilitate the foot movements that subsequently lead to fibrocartilage differentiation. The later commencement of adipogenesis in the heel than in Kager's pad probably reflects the non-weight environment in utero. The direct continuity between plantar fascia and Achilles tendon that is characteristic of the adult reflects the initial attachment of both structures to the calcaneal perichondrium rather than to the skeletal anlagen itself.

  6. Ruptured human Achilles tendon has elevated metabolic activity up to 1 year after repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasson, Pernilla; Couppé, Christian; Lonsdale, Markus

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Following Achilles tendon rupture, running is often allowed after 6 months. However, tendon healing is slow and the metabolic status of the tendon at this point is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate tendon metabolism (glucose uptake) and vascularization at 3, 6 and 12...... months after Achilles tendon rupture as measured using PET and power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS). METHODS: The study group comprised 23 patients with surgically repaired Achilles tendon rupture who were investigated at 3 months (n = 7), 6 months (n = 7) and 12 months (n = 9) after surgery. The triceps...... surae complex was loaded over 20 min of slow treadmill walking while a radioactive tracer ((18)F-FDG) was administered prior to PET. Vascularization was measured in terms of PDUS flow activity, and patient-reported outcomes were scored using the Achilles tendon rupture score (ATRS) and sports assessment...

  7. Z-APPROACH USAGE IN SURGICAL TREATMENT OF ACHILLES TENDON RUPTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Gritsyuk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors worked out and checked out rational Z-approach to the Achilles tendon with taking into consideration anatomical, physiological and biomechanical features of this region. Entrance allowed trustworthy reduce frequency and area of postoperative wound rim necrosis, and allowed statistic trustworthy reduce number of complications after surgical treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures.

  8. Elastographic Findings of Achilles Tendons in Asymptomatic Professional Male Volleyball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Mehtap; Idilman, Ilkay S; Ipek, Ali; Ikiz, Sinem Sigit; Bektaser, Bulent; Gumus, Mehmet

    2016-12-01

    Elastography is a new sonographic technique that evaluates the elasticity of different tissues such as the Achilles tendon. In this study, we aimed to investigate the elastographic findings of Achilles tendons in professional athletes in comparison with healthy volunteers. Twenty-one professional male volleyball players with no history of Achilles trauma were included in this study. Twenty-one healthy male volunteers with similar ages and body mass indices were selected as control participants. All participants underwent sonographic and elastographic evaluations of the Achilles tendons to evaluate Achilles tendon thickness and stiffness. We observed thickening in many of the thirds of the Achilles tendons (right proximal, right middle, left middle, and left distal thirds) of athletes in comparison with healthy volunteers. We did not detect any abnormalities according to the sonographic evaluations in both athletes and healthy volunteers. In the elastographic evaluations, we observed softening in the middle thirds of the Achilles tendons of athletes according to the main types (P < .001) and subtypes (P < .001 for right; and P = .002 for left middle third). There was no difference observed in the elastographic evaluations of the proximal and distal thirds. On sonography and elastography, we observed thickening and softening in Achilles tendons of athletes in comparison with healthy volunteers who had similar ages and body mass indices. These changes could be associated with early tendon degeneration. Further longitudinal studies may support this consideration. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  9. Treatment of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture in Scandinavia Does Not Adhere to Evidence-based Guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer W; Nielsen, Fredrik; Helander, Katarina N;

    2013-01-01

    and that adherence to evidence-based recommendations would not be as good as desired. The purpose of the present study was to investigate how acute Achilles tendon rupture is treated in Scandinavia. A questionnaire was distributed to all orthopedic departments treating acute Achilles tendon ruptures in Denmark...

  10. Shear wave elastographic characterization of normal and torn achilles tendons: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang-Mei; Cui, Li-Gang; He, Ping; Shen, Wei-Wei; Qian, Ya-Jun; Wang, Jin-Rui

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using quantitative shear wave elastography for assessing the functional integrity of the Achilles tendon and to summarize the changes in elasticity of ruptured Achilles tendons in comparison with normal controls. Thirty-six normal and 14 ruptured Achilles tendons were examined with shear wave elastography coupled with a linear array transducer (4-15 MHz). The elasticity value of each Achilles tendon in a longitudinal view was measured. The mean elasticity value ± SD for the normal Achilles tendons was 291.91 ± 4.38 kPa (note that there are saturated measurement phenomena for the normal Achilles tendon, so the actual value will be >300 kPa), whereas the ruptured Achilles tendons had an elasticity value of 56.48 ± 68.59 kPa. A statistically significant difference was found in relation to the findings in healthy volunteers (P = .006). Our results suggest that shear wave elastography is a valuable tool that can provide complementary biomechanical information for evaluating the function of the Achilles tendon.

  11. Augmented Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture Using an Allograft Tendon Weaving Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaowei; Huang, Gan; Ji, Ying; Ao, Rong guang; Yu, Baoqing; Zhu, Ya Long

    2015-01-01

    Achilles tendon rupture is a common injury, especially in those who are physically active. Although open surgery is a widely used option for the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture, the optimal treatment is still disputed. In our study, 59 patients with unilateral, closed, acute rupture of the Achilles tendon were treated by open surgery using an allograft weave to augment the repair. All the surgeries were performed within 1 to 4 days after injury. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was recorded as 91.20 (range 88 to 95), 95.34 (range 92 to 98), and 98.27 (range 97 to 99) at the 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up visit, respectively. At the final follow-up visit, the mean difference between the mid-calf circumference of the injured and uninjured legs was 0.19 (range -0.03 to 1.50) cm (p = .43). At the final follow-up visit, the mean difference between the vertical distances from the plantar surface of the heel to the ground for the injured and uninjured lower extremities was 0.44 (range -0.03 to 0.5) cm (p = .17). Augmented repair using the allograft tendon weaving technique provided satisfactory tendon strength and functional outcomes and a timely return to the patients' activities. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Percutaneous Repair Technique for Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture with Assistance of Kirschner Wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ze-yang; Chai, Ming-xiang; Liu, Yue-ju; Zhang, Xiao-ran; Zhang, Tao; Song, Lian-xin; Ren, Zhi-xin; Wu, Xi-rui

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to introduce a self-designed, minimally invasive technique for repairing an acute Achilles tendon rupture percutaneously. Comparing with the traditional open repair, the new technique provides obvious advantages of minimized operation-related lesions, fewer wound complications as well as a higher healing rate. However, a percutaneous technique without direct vision may be criticized by its insufficient anastomosis of Achilles tendon and may also lead to the lengthening of the Achilles tendon and a reduction in the strength of the gastrocnemius. To address the potential problems, we have improved our technique using a percutaneous Kirschner wire leverage process before suturing, which can effectively recover the length of the Achilles tendon and ensure the broken ends are in tight contact. With this improvement in technique, we have great confidence that it will become the treatment of choice for acute Achilles tendon ruptures. © 2015 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Stretching for prevention of Achilles tendon injuries: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Don Young; Chou, Loretta

    2006-12-01

    Professional and recreational athletes commonly perform pre-exercise stretching to prevent musculoskeletal injuries. Little definitive evidence exists that clearly demonstrates the efficacy of stretching in reducing injury. Achilles tendon injuries are among the most common injuries affecting active individuals in the United States today. Clinicians commonly recommend stretching the Achilles tendon without concrete scientific evidence to support such a claim. Few studies have addressed the effect of stretching in Achilles tendon injuries, and it is unclear if the conclusions made for musculoskeletal injuries can be applied to the Achilles tendon. Biomechanical studies of the Achilles tendon and measurements of the tendon's reflex activity have demonstrated possible mechanisms for the potential benefit of stretching, including load-induced hypertrophy and increased tendon tensile strength. Recent prospective studies have contended that reductions in plantarflexor strength and increases in ankle dorsiflexion range of motion from stretching the Achilles tendon may increase the risk of injury. Studies examining stretching in injury prevention, the biomechanical properties of injuries to the Achilles tendon were compiled and reviewed. Although many theories have been published regarding the potential benefits and limitations of stretching, few studies have been able to definitively demonstrate its utility in injury prevention.

  14. Realtime Achilles Ultrasound Thompson (RAUT) Test for the Evaluation and Diagnosis of Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Matthew J; Olson, Kirstina; Heckmann, Nathanael; Charlton, Timothy P

    2017-01-01

    Acute complete Achilles tendon ruptures are commonly missed injuries. We propose the Realtime Achilles Ultrasound Thompson (RAUT) test, a Thompson test under ultrasound visualization, to aid in the diagnosis of these injuries. We hypothesized that RAUT testing would provide improved diagnostic characteristics compared with static ultrasound. Twenty-two consecutive patients with operatively confirmed acute Achilles tendon ruptures were prospectively evaluated with RAUT testing and static ultrasonography. RAUT video recordings and static ultrasound images from both ruptured and uninjured sides were randomized and graded by a group of novice reviewers and a group of expert attendings. From these observations, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for RAUT and static ultrasound were calculated. In addition, κ interobserver coefficients were computed. Forty-seven novice reviewers and 11 foot and ankle attendings made a total of 4136 and 528 observations, respectively. For static ultrasound, sensitivity and specificity were 76.8% and 74.8% for the novice reviewers and 79.6% and 86.4% for the attendings, respectively. For RAUT testing, sensitivity and specificity were 87.2% and 81.1% for the novice group and 86.4% and 91.7% for the attending group, respectively. The κ coefficient was 0.62 and 0.27 for novice and attending RAUT reviewers, indicating substantial and fair agreement, respectively, but only 0.46 and 0.12 for static ultrasonography, representing moderate and slight agreement, respectively. RAUT testing was a sensitive and specific test, providing a cost-effective adjunct to the clinical examination when diagnosing acute Achilles tendon ruptures. This test can be used by surgeons with minimal training in ultrasonography. Level II, diagnostic study.

  15. A Case of Heel Cord Pain After Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: Treated by Endoscopic Adhesiolysis of the Achilles Tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-10-01

    The causes of heel cord pain after repair of acute rupture of the Achilles tendon are unclear. The proposed etiologies include nonabsorbable suture granuloma formation, alteration of the pain receptors threshold in the tendon, and distension of the paratenon by the hypertrophied tendon, underlying tendinopathy, postrepair neovascularization, and peritendinous fibrous adhesion. We present an endoscopic technique of adhesiolysis of the Achilles tendon to deal with the various possible causes of postrepair heel cord pain. Therapeutic, Level 4: Case report. © 2015 The Author(s).

  16. Marked innervation but also signs of nerve degeneration in between the Achilles and plantaris tendons and presence of innervation within the plantaris tendon in midportion Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spang, C; Harandi, V M; Alfredson, H; Forsgren, S

    2015-06-01

    The plantaris tendon is increasingly recognised as an important factor in midportion Achilles tendinopathy. Its innervation pattern is completely unknown. Plantaris tendons (n=56) and associated peritendinous tissue from 46 patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy and where the plantaris tendon was closely related to the Achilles tendon were evaluated. Morphological evaluations and stainings for nerve markers [general (PGP9.5), sensory (CGRP), sympathetic (TH)], glutamate NMDA receptor and Schwann cells (S-100β) were made. A marked innervation, as evidenced by evaluation for PGP9.5 reactions, occurred in the peritendinous tissue located between the plantaris and Achilles tendons. It contained sensory and to some extent sympathetic and NMDAR1-positive axons. There was also an innervation in the zones of connective tissue within the plantaris tendons. Interestingly, some of the nerve fascicles showed a partial lack of axonal reactions. New information on the innervation patterns for the plantaris tendon in situations with midportion Achilles tendinopathy has here been obtained. The peritendinous tissue was found to be markedly innervated and there was also innervation within the plantaris tendon. Furthermore, axonal degeneration is likely to occur. Both features should be further taken into account when considering the relationship between the nervous system and tendinopathy.

  17. Type 1 Achilles tendon rupture caused by grooming trauma in a young dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Isaka

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Achilles tendon rupture is uncommon in small animal practice. A 9-month-old, female, mixed breed dog (weighing 2.2kg was referred to our hospital with a primary complaint of right hind limb lameness. Complete right Achilles tendon rupture was diagnosed by physical examination and radiography. The tendon was surgically repaired the next day by using a three-loop and single near-far-far-near suture methods. Complete healing was achieved by 97 days post-surgery. This report describes the surgical technique used for complete Achilles tendon rupture repair in a young dog.

  18. Subcutaneous Achilles tendon rupture in an eighty-year-old female with an absence of risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoki Sonohata

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Achilles tendon ruptures rarely occur in patients over 80 years of age. However, it is unclear what treatment, surgical or conservative, is suitable for such an Achilles tendon rupture in the elderly. In addition, the clinical results of an Achilles tendon rupture in the elderly are disappointing. We report here the case of a subcutaneous Achilles tendon rupture in an eighty-year-old, healthy female, who returned to her previous level of activity following surgical treatment. Additional case reports of other instances of successful treatment are needed to help establish the optimal treatment protocol for an Achilles tendon rupture in the elderly.

  19. Percutaneous suturing of the ruptured Achilles tendon with endoscopic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doral, Mahmut Nedim; Bozkurt, Murat; Turhan, Egemen; Ayvaz, Mehmet; Atay, Ozgür Ahmet; Uzümcügil, Akin; Leblebicioğlu, Gürsel; Kaya, Defne; Aydoğ, Tolga

    2009-08-01

    A prospective study of modified percutaneous Achilles tendon repair performed between 1999 and 2005 under local infiltration anesthesia is presented; the study evaluated the results of percutaneous repair technique by visualization of the synovia under endoscopic control, followed by early functional postoperative treatment for surgical intervention of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. Sixty-two patients (58 males, 4 females, mean age 32) were treated by percutaneous suturing with modified Bunnel technique under endoscopic control within 10 days after acute total rupture. Physiotherapy was initiated immediately after the operation and patients were encouraged to weight-bearing ambulation with a walking brace-moon boot as tolerated. Full weight-bearing was allowed minimum after 3 weeks postoperatively without brace. The procedure was tolerated in all patients. There were no significant ROM limitation was observed. Two patients experienced transient hypoesthesia in the region of sural nerve that spontaneously resolved in 6 months. Fifty-nine patients (95%) including professional athletes returned to their previous sportive activities, while 18 of them (29%) had some minor complaints. The interval from injury to return to regular work and rehabilitation training was 11.7 weeks (10-13 weeks). At the latest follow-up (mean: 46 months; range: 12-78 months), all the patients had satisfactory results with a mean American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society's ankle-hindfoot score of 94.6. No re-ruptures, deep venous thrombosis or wound problems occurred. The proposed method offers a reasonable treatment option for acute total Achilles tendon rupture with a low number of complications. The rerupture rate and return to preinjury activities are comparable to open and percutaneous without endoscopic control procedures.

  20. Surgical repair of acute Achilles tendon rupture with an end-to-end tendon suture and tendon flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradino, B; Di Lorenzo, S; Calamia, C; Moschella, F

    2015-08-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are becoming more common. Complications after open or minimally invasive surgery are: recurrent rupture (2-8%), wound breakdown, deep infections, granuloma, and fistulas. The authors expose their experience with a personal technique. In 8 patients with acute rupture of Achilles tendon the surgery was performed at least 25 days after trauma. Clinical exam and MR demonstrated in all case a total lesion of tendon. After a posterolateral skin incision the tendon stumps were debrided and suture in end-to-end fashion. A tendon flap was harvested from the proximal part of the tendon, in order to protect and reinforce the suture itself. A plaster cast was applied for 3 weeks and the patients started the rehabilitation protocol. After 4 months all patients returned to pre-injury daily activities. The mean follow up was 13 months (ranged between 6 and 24 months). No major complications occurred. The posterolateral skin incision, not above the tendon, preserves the vascularity of the soft tissues, allows identifying and not accidentally injuring the sural nerve, and prevents the cutaneous scar is overlapped the tendon. In this way is favoured physiological tendon sliding. The preparation of the flap tendon does not weaken the overall strength of the tendon and protects the tendon suture. The tension on sutured stumps is less than being spread over a larger area. In our sample of 8 patients the absence of short-and long-term complications and the rapid functional recovery after surgery suggest that the technique used is safe and effective. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Tendon Graft and Platelet Concentrate for Chronic Achilles Tendon Rupture. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yovanny Ferrer Lozano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Achilles tendon is third most common tendon torn, following the rotator cuff and the quadriceps extensor mechanism. Ruptures can be partial or complete and their etiology is multifactorial. We present the case of a 63-year-old woman who attended the Orthopedics service because of discomfort when walking that had been present for several months and persistent pain in his right heel related to an acetonide triamcinolone injection into the back of the calcaneus. The gap in the tendon (hatchet strike defect and a Thompson test confirmed the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was repaired using a peroneus brevis tendon graft and the repair was reinforced with gastrocnemius aponeurosis. The skin flap necrosis led to conservative debridement, graft exposure, and daily application of a platelet lysate, which was subsequently alternated due to the successful formation of the scar tissue. Epithelialization was reached in the fourth postoperative week. Twelve weeks after surgery, the patient began to resume her normal life. The use of platelet concentrates as adjuvant therapy is rare in these patients. For this reason, we decided to publish this case.

  2. A Rare Case of Simultaneous Acute Bilateral Quadriceps Tendon Rupture and Unilateral Achilles Tendon Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yee Leong

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There have been multiple reported cases of bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures (QTR in the literature. These injuries frequently associated with delayed diagnosis, which results in delayed surgical treatment. In very unusual cases, bilateral QTRs can be associated with other simultaneous tendon ruptures. Case Report: We present a rare case of bilateral QTR with a simultaneous Achilles Tendon Rupture involving a 31 years old Caucasian man who is a semi-professional body builder taking anabolic steroids. To date bilateral QTR with additional TA rupture has only been reported once in the literature and to our knowledge this is the first reported case of bilateral QTR and simultaneous TA rupture in a young, fit and healthy individual. Conclusion: The diagnosis of bilateral QTR alone can sometimes be challenging and the possibility of even further tendon injuries should be carefully assessed. A delay in diagnosis could result in delay in treatment and potentially worse outcome for the patient. Keywords: Quadriceps tendon rupture; Achilles tendon rupture; Bilateral.

  3. Achilles tendon and sports; Die Achillessehne im Sport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulreich, N.; Kainberger, F. [Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik Wien (Austria); Huber, W.; Nehrer, S. [Univ.-Klinik fuer Orthopaedie Wien (Austria)

    2002-10-01

    Because of the rising popularity of recreational sports activities achillodynia is an often associated symptom with running, soccer and athletics. Therefore radiologist are frequently asked to image this tendon. The origin of the damage of the Achilles tendon is explained by numerous hypothesis, mainly a decreased perfusion and a mechanical irritation that lead to degeneration of the tendon. High-resolution technics such as sonography and magnetic resonance imaging show alterations in the structure of the tendon which can be graduated and classified. Manifestations like tendinosis, achillobursitis, rupture and Haglunds disease can summarized as the tendon overuse syndrom. A rupture of a tendon is mostly the result of a degeneration of the collagenfibres. The task of the radiologist is to acquire the intrinsic factors for a potential rupture. (orig.) [German] Aufgrund des starken Anstiegs des Freizeitsportes sind Achillodynien ein besonders mit Laufsport, Fussball und Leichtathletik assoziiertes Symptom und die Indikation zur radiologischen Abklaerung wird oft gestellt. Die Entstehung von Sehnenschaeden wird durch eine Reihe von Hypothesen erklaert, wobei eine gestoerte Gewebeperfusion und eine mechanische Irritation als Hauptursachen angesehen werden, die zur Degeneration des Sehnengewebes und des umgebenden Gleitlagers fuehren. Sie koennen aufgrund sonographischer und MR-tomographischer Zeichen meist klar klassifiziert und graduiert werden, wobei hochaufloesende Techniken eine wesentliche Voraussetzung fuer die subtile Analyse der Sehnenstruktur darstellen. Die einzelnen klinischen Erscheinungsformen wie Tendinose, Achillobursitis, Haglund-Ferse und Sehnenruptur koennen unter dem Begriff des ''Sehnenueberlastungssyndroms'' (Tendon overuse syndrome) subsummiert werden. Rupturen der Achillessehne treten so gut wie immer bei bereits vorgeschaedigtem Kollagenfasergewebe auf, und der radiologischen Diagnostik kommt wesentliche Bedeutung dabei zu

  4. Diagnosing Achilles tendon injuries in the emergency department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gibbons, Lynda

    2013-09-01

    Achilles tendon (AT) injury is an overuse injury often seen in professional and recreational athletes. It tends to affect men, particularly those in their thirties and forties, more than women, and is typically seen in people who are intermittently active. To ensure AT ruptures are identified and treated effectively, early intervention in emergency departments (EDs) is crucial. This article discusses how advanced nurse practitioners can use their comprehensive problem-solving, clinical decision-making and clinical judgement skills to manage patients who present with suspected AT injury. It also describes the anatomy of tendon rupture, the aetiology and mechanism of injuries, and the importance of assessment and diagnostic tools, therapeutic techniques and management strategies. Finally, it considers the psychological effect this injury can have on patients, while in the ED and after discharge. A case study is included as an example of ED management.

  5. Assessment of Postoperative Tendon Quality in Patients With Achilles Tendon Rupture Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Tendon Fiber Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarman, Hakan; Atmaca, Halil; Cakir, Ozgur; Muezzinoglu, Umit Sefa; Anik, Yonca; Memisoglu, Kaya; Baran, Tuncay; Isik, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    Although pre- and postoperative imaging of Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) has been well documented, radiographic evaluations of postoperative intratendinous healing and microstructure are still lacking. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an innovative technique that offers a noninvasive method for describing the microstructure characteristics and organization of tissues. DTI was used in the present study for quantitative assessment of fiber continuity postoperatively in patients with acute ATR. The data from 16 patients with ATR from 2005 to 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. The microstructure of ART was evaluated using tendon fiber tracking, tendon continuity, fractional anisotropy, and apparent diffusion coefficient values by way of DTI. The distal and proximal portions were measured separately in both the ruptured and the healthy extremities of each patient. The mean patient age was 41.56 ± 8.49 (range 26 to 56) years. The median duration of follow-up was 21 (range 6 to 80) months. The tendon fractional anisotropy values of the ruptured Achilles tendon were significantly lower statistically than those of the normal side (p = .001). However, none of the differences between the 2 groups with respect to the distal and proximal apparent diffusion coefficient were statistically significant (p = .358 and p = .899, respectively). In addition, the fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient measurements were not significantly different in the proximal and distal regions of the ruptured tendons compared with the healthy tendons. The present study used DTI and fiber tracking to demonstrate the radiologic properties of postoperative Achilles tendons with respect to trajectory and tendinous fiber continuity. Quantifying DTI and fiber tractography offers an innovative and effective tool that might be able to detect microstructural abnormalities not appreciable using conventional radiologic techniques. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle

  6. [Flexor hallucis tendon transfer combined with an interference screw reconstruction for chronic Achilles tendon rupture of Kuwada IV].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jun-feng; Zhu, Yang-yi

    2015-05-01

    To explore the clinical effect of interference screw and flexor hallucis longus tendon as augmentation material in repair of chronic Achilles tendon rupture. From September 2010 to June 2012,26 patients with chronic Achilles tendon rupture were treated, including 18 males and 8 females with an average age of 44.2 years old (20 to 66 years old). All patients were unilateral damage. MRI showed the Achilles tendon.ends' distance was 6.0 to 9.0 cm. The postoperative complications were observed. The curative effect was assessed by American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society and Leppilahti score. All the 26 patients were followed up for 18 to 68 months (means 30.4 months). No neurological injury and infection of incision occurred, all patients were stage I incision healing. The shape and function of the ankle were recovered well. The average AOFAS score increased from 52.27±12.30 preoperatively to 90.92±6.36 postoperatively. Leppilahti Achilles Tendon Repair score increased from 34.23±12.86 preoperatively to 90.00±5.10 postoperatively. The flexor hallucis tendon transfer with an interference screw technique for repairing the chronic Achilles tendon rupture of type IV of Kuwada had advantages of simple operation, quick recovery, firm tendon fixation, and less complications.

  7. Effect of Calendula officinalis cream on achilles tendon healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aro, A A; Perez, M O; Vieira, C P; Esquisatto, M A M; Rodrigues, R A F; Gomes, L; Pimentel, E R

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, the scientific community has undertaken research on plant extracts, searching for compounds with pharmacological activities that can be used in diverse fields of medicine. Calendula officinalis L. is known to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and wound healing properties when used to treat skin burns. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of C. officinalis on the initial phase of Achilles tendon healing. Wistar rats were separated in three groups: Calendula (Cal)-rats with a transected tendon were treated with topical applications of C. officinalis cream and then euthanized 7 days after injury; Control (C)-rats were treated with only vehicle after transection; and Normal (N)-rats without tenotomy. Higher concentrations of hydroxyproline (an indicator of total collagen) and non-collagenous proteins were observed in the Cal group in relation to the C group. Zymography showed no difference in the amount of the isoforms of metalloproteinase-2 and of metalloproteinase-9, between C and Cal groups. Polarization microscopy images analysis showed that the Cal group presented a slightly higher birefringence compared with the C group. In sections of tendons stained with toluidine blue, the transected groups presented higher metachromasy as compared with the N group. Immunocytochemistry analysis for chondroitin-6-sulfate showed no difference between the C and Cal groups. In conclusion, the topical application of C. officinalis after tendon transection increases the concentrations of collagen and non-collagenous proteins, as well as the collagen organization in the initial phase of healing.

  8. An in-vivo experimental evaluation of He-Ne laser photostimulation in healing Achilles tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwakil, Tarek F

    2007-03-01

    There is no method of treatment that has been proven to accelerate the rate of tendon healing or to improve the quality of the regenerating tendon. Low level laser photostimulation has gained a considerable attention for enhancing tissue repair in a wide spectrum of applications. However, there is controversy regarding the effectiveness of laser photostimulation for improvement of the healing process of surgically repaired tendons. Accordingly, the present study was conducted to evaluate the role of helium-neon (He-Ne) laser photostimulation on the process of healing of surgically repaired Achilles tendons. Thirty unilateral Achilles tendons of 30 Raex rabbits were transected and immediately repaired. Operated Achilles tendons were randomly divided into two equal groups. Tendons at group A were subjected to He-Ne laser (632.8 nm) photostimulation, while tendons at group B served as a control group. Two weeks later, the repaired Achilles tendons were histopathologically and biomechanically evaluated. The histopathological findings suggest the favorable qualitative pattern of the newly synthesized collagen of the regenerating tendons after He-Ne laser photostimulation. The biomechanical results support the same favorable findings from the functional point of view as denoted by the better biomechanical properties of the regenerating tendons after He-Ne laser photostimulation with statistical significance (p repair of ruptured and injured tendons for a better functional outcome. It could be applied safely and effectively in humans, especially with respect to the proposed long-term clinical outcome.

  9. An Alternative Bundle-to-Bundle Suturing Technique for Repairing Fresh Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingjing; Yu, Bin; Xie, Ming; Huang, Ruokun; Xiao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The main concern about conventional Achilles tendon repair surgical techniques is how to maintain the initial strength of the ruptured Achilles tendon through complicated suturing methods. The primary surgical problem lies in the properties of the soft tissue; the deterioration of the Achilles tendon, especially in its elasticity; and the surface lubricity of the local tissues. In the present study, we describe an innovative bundle-to-bundle suturing method that addresses these potential problems. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Subcutaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon and ipsilateral fracture of the medial malleolus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards Paula J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although ankle fractures and an Achilles tendon rupture are relatively frequent in isolation, their association in the same injury is uncommon. Case presentation A 38 year old male tree surgeon fell six meters from a tree, sustaining a subcutaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon and an ipsilateral closed fracture of the medial malleolus. The injuries were diagnosed following clinical examination and imaging. Conclusion This injury combination is infrequent, and management of the Achilles tendon rupture should take into account the necessity not to secondarily displace the fracture of the medial malleollus.

  11. Nerve distributions in insertional Achilles tendinopathy - a comparison of bone, bursae and tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Gustav; Backman, Ludvig J; Christensen, Jens; Alfredson, Håkan

    2017-03-01

    In a condition of pain in the Achilles tendon insertion there are multiple structures involved, such as the Achilles tendon itself, the retrocalcaneal bursa and a bony protrusion at the calcaneal tuberosity called Haglund's deformity. The innervation patterns of these structures are scarcely described, and the subcutaneous calcaneal bursa is traditionally not considered to be involved in the pathology. This study aimed at describing the innervation patterns of the four structures described above to provide a better understanding of possible origins of pain at the Achilles tendon insertion. Biopsies were taken from 10 patients with insertional Achilles tendinopathy, which had pathological changes in the subcutaneous and retrocalcaneal bursae, a Haglund deformity and Achilles tendon tendinopathy as verified by ultrasound. The biopsies were stained using immunohistochemistry in order to delineate the innervation patterns in the structures involved in insertional Achilles tendinopathy. Immunohistochemical examinations found that the subcutaneous bursa scored the highest using a semi-quantitative evaluation of the degree of innervation when compared to the retrocalcaneal bursa, the Achilles tendon, and the calcaneal bone. These findings suggest that the subcutaneous bursa, which is traditionally not included in surgical treatment, may be a clinically important factor in insertional Achilles tendinopathy.

  12. Evaluation of normal and pathological Achilles tendon by real-time shear wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Pompiliu HoraŢiu; Izvernariu, Dragoş Andrei; Iancu, Cătălina; Dinu, Gabriel Ovidiu; Crişan, Dan; Popescu, Simona Alina; Şirli, Roxana Lucia Denisa; Nistor, Bogdan Mihai; RăuŢia, Ion Călin; Lăzureanu, Dorela CodruŢa; Dema, Sorin; Prejbeanu, Ion Radu; Sporea, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    Tendinopathy covers a range of several tendon conditions, mostly caused by overuse but at least in Achilles tendon pathology, favored by obesity, diabetes, inflammatory and autoimmune conditions. Subclinical tendon pathology is difficult to diagnose, as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations are sometimes inconclusive and not cost-effective. Elastography is an ultrasound examination method that uses mechanical impulses to produce shear waves in the tissue of interest, then measures the tissue displacement and calculates the shear wave speed or the elastic modulus of the examined tissue. We have used B-mode ultrasonography and shear wave elastography on 80 Achilles tendons from healthy volunteers with or without tendon pathology history, and correlated the data obtained with the clinical parameters of the volunteers, such as age, body mass index (BMI) and sports practice. We have shown that there is no significant correlation between the elastic modulus of the Achilles tendon and age, sports practice and body mass index with the exception of the correlation between the elastic modulus of the right Achilles tendon in men and age. Shear wave elastography has proved to be cost-effective for the evaluation of the Achilles tendon in healthy volunteers and was able to monitor the evolution of one patient with old tendon rupture treated by surgery. It can complete MRI investigation and it can replace B-mode ultrasonography particularly in monitoring the post-surgery evolution.

  13. Histopathological and biomechanical evaluation of tenocyte seeded allografts on rat Achilles tendon regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güngörmüş, Cansın; Kolankaya, Dürdane; Aydin, Erkin

    2015-05-01

    Tendon injuries in humans as well as in animals' veterinary medicine are problematic because tendon has poor regenerative capacity and complete regeneration of the ruptured tendon is never achieved. In the last decade there has been an increasing need of treatment methods with different approaches. The aim of the current study was to improve the regeneration process of rat Achilles tendon with tenocyte seeded decellularized tendon matrices. For this purpose, Achilles tendons were harvested, decellularized and seeded as a mixture of three consecutive passages of tenocytes at a density of 1 × 10(6) cells/ml. Specifically, cells with different passage numbers were compared with respect to growth characteristics, cellular senescence and collagen/tenocyte marker production before seeding process. The viability of reseeded tendon constructs was followed postoperatively up to 6 months in rat Achilles tendon by histopathological and biomechanical analysis. Our results suggests that tenocyte seeded decellularized tendon matrix can significantly improve the histological and biomechanical properties of tendon repair tissue without causing adverse immune reactions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first long-term study in the literature which was accomplished to prove the use of decellularized matrix in a clinically relevant model of rat Achilles tendon and the method suggested herein might have important implications for translation into the clinic.

  14. Effectiveness comparison of channel-assisted mini-incision and open Achilles shortening for treatment of healed Achilles tendon rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-zhe QI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To compare the clinical effectiveness between the channel-assisted mini-invasion and open Achilles shortening for treatment of the elongated Achilles tendon following previous rupture. Methods The clinical data of 19 patients admitted from Dec. 2013 to Dec. 2015 and met the inclusion criteria were analyzed retrospectively. Eight patients were treated with shortening operation by channel-assisted minimally invasive repair system, while 11 patients received dissection of Krackow Achilles tendon shortening. There was no significant difference between the two groups in gender, age, injury to operation time, preoperative calf circumference and preoperative AOFAS (American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society score (P>0.05. Results The operation time, incision length and postoperative hospital days were significantly less in min-invasion group than in incision group (P0.05. Conclusion Channel-assisted minimally invasive Achilles tendon shortening operation has not only similar effectiveness to the incision shorting operation for the treatment of elongated Achilles tendon following previous rupture, but also has the advantages of shortening operation time and stay in hospital and avoidance of sural nerve injury. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.07.12

  15. Acute Achilles tendon rupture - Minimally invasive surgery versus nonoperative treatment with immediate full weightbearing - Randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, Roderick; Verleisdonk, Egbert-Jan M. M.; van der Heijden, Geert J. -M. -G.; Clevers, Geert-Jan; Hammacher, Erik R.; Verhofstad, Michiel H. J.; van der Werken, Christiaan

    2008-01-01

    Background: Surgical repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures is considered superior to nonoperative treatment, but complications other than rerupture range up to 34%. Nonoperative treatment by functional bracing seems a promising alternative. Hypothesis: Nonoperative treatment of acute Achilles ten

  16. Degenerative Achilles tendon disease; Assessment by magnetic resonance and ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuhold, A.; Stiskal, M. (Rudolfinerhaus, Vienna (Austria). Department of Diagnostic Imaging); Kainberger, F.; Schwaighofer, B. (Vienna Univ. (Austria). 2. Medizinische Klinik)

    As Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging and Ultrasound (US) allow the evaluation of soft-tissue structures not previously possible with other imaging techniques, a clinical study has been undertaken to determine the value of these 2 modalities in the detection of lesions in the Achilles tendon (AT), other than acute total rupture. Seven healthy subjects and 28 symptomatic patients with Achillodynia and/or signs of thickening of the AT were investigated with MR and US; all results were compared with the clinical features. Surgical findings were available in 14 patients. Patients were divided into 3 groups; those with tendon thickening, incomplete and complete ruptures. Thickening of the AT was easily detected with both methods. MR was superior in the detection of incomplete tendon rupture and in the evaluation of various stages of chronic degenerative changes. It is concluded that only if US remains unclear, an additional MR study should be performed and together with the clinical diagnosis indication for surgery can be made more efficient. (author). 24 refs.; 4 figs.

  17. Fatal Pulmonary Embolism following Achilles Tendon Repair: A Case Report and a Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim M. Makhdom

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep venous thrombosis (DVT is a significant source of morbidity in orthopaedic surgery. It can progress to a pulmonary embolism, a significant source of mortality. Up to date, patients with Achilles tendon rupture routinely do not receive DVT chemical prophylaxis. We are presenting a case of fatal pulmonary embolism after a surgically treated Achilles tendon rupture in a forty-two-year-old male healthy patient. In the current body of the literature, the reported incidence of DVT after Achilles tendon rupture is highly variable ranging from less than 1% to 34%, and there is a disagreement in the international guidelines regarding the need of chemical DVT prophylaxis with this type of injury. Further research needs to be conducted to investigate the risks and benefits of chemical DVT prophylaxis following Achilles tendon rupture. For low-risk patients, the use of milder forms of prophylaxis such as aspirin should also be explored.

  18. Dual Fixation of Calcaneal Tuberosity Avulsion with Concomitant Achilles Tendon Rupture: A Novel Hybrid Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautham Prabhakar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fracture of the calcaneal tuberosity with a concomitant Achilles tendon rupture presents a difficult challenge for the treating surgeon. The ultimate goal of treatment is to restore function of both the gastrocnemius-soleus complex and the Achilles tendon. This particular subset of fractures occurs often in diabetics and elderly patients with osteoporosis making fixation of the displaced fragment rather complex. If the Achilles tendon disruption is only discovered later once the fracture is healed, subsequent management is difficult with surgical treatment being more morbid. While this is a rare injury, the consequences of a missed chronic Achilles tendon disruption are severe with significant dysfunction. It is therefore important to have a high index of suspicion for concomitant injury and to be prepared for dual fixation. We present a novel hybrid surgical fixation technique, which may be used in this instance.

  19. Comparison of Achilles Tendon Loading Between Male and Female Recreational Runners

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greenhalgh Andrew; Sinclair Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    ... information to better understand why this is the case. The aim of the current investigation was to determine whether gender differences in the Achilles tendon load exist in recreational runners. Fifteen male (age 26.74...

  20. Combined flexor hallucis longus tendon transfer and gastrocnemius recession for reconstruction of gapped chronic achilles tendon ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgohary, Hatem Elsayed Ahmed; Elmoghazy, Nabil A; Abd Ellatif, Mohammed Serry

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the functional outcomes after a combined FHL transfer and a gastrocnemius recession for treatment of chronic ruptures of Achilles tendon with a gap and to investigate the patient's satisfaction about the great toe function after transfer. 19 patients with chronic rupture of the Achilles tendon with a gap were treated with a flexor halluces longus tendon transfer combined with a gastrocnemius recession, Clinical diagnosis depends on the presence of gap in the tendon on examination, inability of tip toe walking on the affected side and positive calf-squeeze test, MRI was used to confirm the clinical diagnosis. American Orthopedic Foot & Ankle Society hind foot score was used for assessment of the results. The AOFAS score improved significantly from a mean of 65 preoperatively to 94 at the last follow up (ptendon weaved through the stump of the Achilles tendon and those with trans osseous tunnels, the mean AOFAS score at the last follow up was 94.2, 93.8 respectively, no patient complained of big toe dysfunction. Management of chronic rupture of the Achilles tendon with a gap with flexor halluces longus tendon transfer combined with a gastrocnemius recession is a safe and reliable method with a significantly improved functional outcome, muscle advancement through gastrocnemius recession decreases the length of the gap without affecting the muscle function, flexor halluces longus tendon transfer doesn't harm the big toe function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. ggstThe role of tendon microcirculation in Achilles and patellar tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knobloch Karsten

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tendinopathy is of distinct interest as it describes a painful tendon disease with local tenderness, swelling and pain associated with sonographic features such as hypoechogenic texture and diameter enlargement. Recent research elucidated microcirculatory changes in tendinopathy using laser Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry such as at the Achilles tendon, the patellar tendon as well as at the elbow and the wrist level. Tendon capillary blood flow is increased at the point of pain. Tendon oxygen saturation as well as tendon postcapillary venous filling pressures, determined non-invasively using combined Laser Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry, can quantify, in real-time, how tendon microcirculation changes over with pathology or in response to a given therapy. Tendon oxygen saturation can be increased by repetitive, intermittent short-term ice applications in Achilles tendons; this corresponds to 'ischemic preconditioning', a method used to train tissue to sustain ischemic damage. On the other hand, decreasing tendon oxygenation may reflect local acidosis and deteriorating tendon metabolism. Painful eccentric training, a common therapy for Achilles, patellar, supraspinatus and wrist tendinopathy decreases abnormal capillary tendon flow without compromising local tendon oxygenation. Combining an Achilles pneumatic wrap with eccentric training changes tendon microcirculation in a different way than does eccentric training alone; both approaches reduce pain in Achilles tendinopathy. The microcirculatory effects of measures such as extracorporeal shock wave therapy as well as topical nitroglycerine application are to be studied in tendinopathy as well as the critical question of dosage and maintenance. Interestingly it seems that injection therapy using color Doppler for targeting the area of neovascularisation yields to good clinical results with polidocanol sclerosing therapy, but also with a combination of epinephrine and

  2. Tendon mineralization is accelerated bilaterally and creep of contralateral tendons is increased after unilateral needle injury of murine achilles tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Etienne John Ogilvy; Shrive, Nigel G; Rosvold, Joshua M; Thornton, Gail M; Frank, Cyril B; Hart, David A

    2013-10-01

    Heterotopic mineralization may result in tendon weakness, but effects on other biomechanical responses have not been reported. We used a needle injury, which accelerates spontaneous mineralization of murine Achilles tendons, to test two hypotheses: that injured tendons would demonstrate altered biomechanical responses; and that unilateral injury would accelerate mineralization bilaterally. Mice underwent left hind (LH) injury (I; n = 11) and were euthanized after 20 weeks along with non-injured controls (C; n = 9). All hind limbs were examined by micro computed tomography followed by biomechanical testing (I = 7 and C = 6). No differences were found in the biomechanical responses of injured tendons compared with controls. However, the right hind (RH) tendons contralateral to the LH injury exhibited greater static creep strain and total creep strain compared with those LH tendons (p ≤ 0.045) and RH tendons from controls (p ≤ 0.043). RH limb lesions of injured mice were three times larger compared with controls (p = 0.030). Therefore, despite extensive mineralization, changes to the responses we measured were limited or absent 20 weeks postinjury. These results also suggest that bilateral occurrence should be considered where tendon mineralization is identified clinically. This experimental system may be useful to study the mechanisms of bilateral new bone formation in tendinopathy and other conditions. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  3. Concurrent deficits of soleus and gastrocnemius muscle fascicles and Achilles tendon post stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Heng; Ren, Yupeng; Roth, Elliot J; Harvey, Richard L; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2015-04-01

    Calf muscles and Achilles tendon play important roles in functional activities. However, it is not clear how biomechanical properties of the uniarticular soleus (SOL) and biarticular gastrocnemius muscle and Achilles tendon, including the fascicle length, pennation angle, and stiffness, change concurrently post stroke. Biomechanical properties of the medial gastrocnemius (GM) and soleus muscles were evaluated bilaterally in 10 hemiparetic stroke survivors using combined ultrasonography-biomechanical measurements. Biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon including the length, cross-sectional area (CSA), stiffness, and Young's modulus were evaluated, together with calf muscle biomechanical properties. Gastrocnemius and SOL contributions were separated using flexed and extended knee positions. The impaired side showed decreased fascicle length (GM: 6%, P = 0.002 and SOL: 9%, P = 0.03, at full knee extension and 0° ankle dorsiflexion) and increased fascicular stiffness (GM: 64%, P = 0.005 and SOL: 19%, P = 0.012, at a common 50 N force level). In contrast, Achilles tendon on the impaired side showed changes in the opposite direction as the muscle fascicles with increased tendon length (5%, P Young's modulus (30%, P muscle fascicles and Achilles tendon biomechanical properties help us better understand concurrent changes of fascicles and tendon as part of the calf muscle-tendon unit and facilitate development of more effective treatments. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Comparison of Achilles Tendon Loading Between Male and Female Recreational Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Greenhalgh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recreational running is an activity with multiple reported health benefits for both sexes, however, chronic injuries caused by excessive and/or repetitive loading of the Achilles tendon are common. Males have been identified as being at an increased risk of suffering an injury to the Achilles tendon and as such, knowledge of differences in loading between the sexes may provide further information to better understand why this is the case. The aim of the current investigation was to determine whether gender differences in the Achilles tendon load exist in recreational runners. Fifteen male (age 26.74 ± 5.52 years, body height 1.80 ± 0.11 m and body mass 74.22 ± 7.27 kg and fifteen female (age 25.13 ± 6.39 years, body height 1.68 ± 0.12 m and body mass 67.12 ± 9.11 kg recreational runners volunteered to take part in the current investigation. Participants completed 10 trials running at 4.0 m·s-1 ±5% striking a force platform (1000 Hz with their right foot. Ankle joint kinematics were synchronously recorded (250 Hz using an optoelectric motion capture system. Ankle joint kinetics were computed using Newton-Euler inverse-dynamics. Net external ankle joint moments were then calculated. To estimate Achilles tendon kinetics the plantarflexion moment calculated was divided by an estimated Achilles tendon moment arm of 0.05 m. Differences in Achilles tendon kinetics were examined using independent sample t-tests (p<0.05. The results indicate that males were associated with significantly (p<0.05 greater Achilles tendon loads than females. The findings from this study support the notion that male recreational runners may be at greater risk of Achilles tendon pathology.

  5. Clinical Outcomes and Complications of Percutaneous Achilles Repair System Versus Open Technique for Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Andrew R; Jones, Carroll P; Cohen, Bruce E; Davis, W Hodges; Ellington, J Kent; Anderson, Robert B

    2015-11-01

    Limited incision techniques for acute Achilles tendon ruptures have been developed in recent years to improve recovery and reduce postoperative complications compared with traditional open repair. The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to analyze the clinical outcomes and postoperative complications between acute Achilles tendon ruptures treated using a percutaneous Achilles repair system (PARS [Arthrex, Inc, Naples, FL]) versus open repair and evaluate the overall outcomes for operatively treated Achilles ruptures. Between 2005 and 2014, 270 consecutive cases of operatively treated acute Achilles tendon ruptures were reviewed (101 PARS, 169 open). Patients with Achilles tendinopathy, insertional ruptures, chronic tears, or less than 3-month follow-up were excluded. Operative treatment consisted of a percutaneous technique (PARS) using a 2-cm transverse incision with FiberWire (Arthrex, Inc, Naples, FL) sutures or open repair using a 5- to 8-cm posteromedial incision with FiberWire in a Krackow fashion reinforced with absorbable sutures. Patient demographics were recorded along with medical comorbidities, activity at injury, time from injury to surgery, length of follow-up, return to baseline activities by 5 months, and postoperative complications. The most common activity during injury for both groups was basketball (PARS: 39%, open: 47%). A greater number of patients treated with PARS were able to return to baseline physical activities by 5 months compared with the open group (PARS: 98%, open: 82%; P = .0001). There were no significant differences (P > .05) between groups in rates of rerupture (P = 1.0), sural neuritis (P = .16), wound dehiscence (P = .74), superficial (P = .29) and/or deep infection (P = .29), or reoperation (P = .13). There were no deep vein thromboses (DVTs) or reruptures in either group. In the PARS group, there were no cases of sural neuritis, 3 cases (3%) of superficial wound dehiscence, and 2 reoperations (2%) for superficial

  6. Changes in Achilles tendon mechanical properties following eccentric heel drop exercise are specific to the free tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obst, S J; Newsham-West, R; Barrett, R S

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical loading of the Achilles tendon during isolated eccentric contractions could induce immediate and region-dependent changes in mechanical properties. Three-dimensional ultrasound was used to examine the immediate effect of isolated eccentric exercise on the mechanical properties of the distal (free tendon) and proximal (gastrocnemii) regions of the Achilles tendon. Participants (n = 14) underwent two testing sessions in which tendon measurements were made at rest and during a 30% and 70% isometric plantar flexion contractions immediately before and after either: (a) 3 × 15 eccentric heel drops or (b) 10-min rest. There was a significant time-by-session interaction for free tendon length and strain for all loading conditions (P eccentric exercise (P exercise compared with the gastrocnemii aponeurosis or tendon. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Achilles tendon reattachment after surgical treatment of insertional tendinosis using the suture bridge technique: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Bryan L; Hyer, Christopher F

    2012-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a clinical diagnosis characterized as a triad of symptoms including pain, swelling, and impaired performance of the diseased tendon. Achilles tendinopathy is divided into Achilles tendonitis and tendinosis based on histopathological examination. Achilles tendinosis is viewed microscopically as disorganized collagen, abnormal neovascularization, necrosis, and mucoid degeneration. Insertional Achilles tendinosis is a degenerative process of the tendon at the junction of the tendon and calcaneus. This disease is initially treated conservatively with activity modification, custom orthotic devices, heel lifts, and immobilization. After 3 to 6 months of conservative therapy has failed to alleviate symptoms, surgical management is indicated. Surgical management of insertional Achilles tendinosis includes Achilles tendon debridement, calcaneal exostosis ostectomy, and retrocalcaneal bursa excision. In this case series, we present 4 patients who underwent surgical management of insertional Achilles tendinosis with complete tendon detachment. All patients underwent reattachment of the Achilles tendon with the suture bridge technique. The Arthrex SutureBridge(®) (Arthrex, Inc., Naples, FL) device uses a series of 4 suture anchors and FiberWire(®) (Arthrex Inc.) to reattach the Achilles tendon to its calcaneal insertion. This hourglass pattern of FiberWire(®) provides a greater area of tendon compression, consequently allowing greater stability and possible earlier return to weightbearing activities. The patients were followed up for approximately 2 years' duration. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. At final follow-up there was no evidence of Achilles tendon ruptures or device failures. All patients were able to return to their activities of daily living without the use of assistive devices. The patients' average visual analog pain scale was 1 (range 0 to 4), and their average foot functional index score was 3.41 (range 0

  8. Modeling the tensile behavior of human Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, G; Shaw, K M

    1997-01-01

    Uniaxial quasi-static tensile stress, sigma versus strain, epsilon, data were obtained from 29 cadaveric Achilles tendons (donor ages: 36 to 100 years), at a strain rate of either 10 or 100%/s. These results were then used in modeling the elastic component of the tensile deformational behavior of this tissue. Two approaches were taken. In the first, it was shown that the following constitutive relation provided an excellent fit to the elastic section of the sigma-epsilon curve, sigma = C epsilon exp[D epsilon + F epsilon 2], with C, D and F being material constants, whose values for the present dataset were found to be C = 2.00 +/- 0.99, D = 0.089 +/- 0.087 and F = -0.0047 +/- 0.0095. The values of these coefficients were not statistically significantly affected by either donor age or test strain rate. In the second approach, the value of the modulus of elasticity of a filamentary polymer matrix composite material was computed as a function of various combinations of values of the modulus of elasticity of the fiber, the modulus of elasticity of the matrix, and angle of orientation of the principal material axes with respect to the reference coordinate axes (theta) for a fiber volume fraction of 0.6 and a material Poisson's ratio of 0.4. By comparing these results with the experimentally-obtained values of the tangent modulus of elasticity of the tendons (defined as the slope of the linear section of the post-toe zone in the sigma-epsilon plot), and assuming that the tendon may be idealized as a filamentary polymer matrix composite material, the suggestion is made that the winding angle of the fibers (collagen fibrils) in the tendon (taken to be equal to theta) is about 6 degrees.

  9. Evaluation of Elastic Stiffness in Healing Achilles Tendon After Surgical Repair of a Tendon Rupture Using In Vivo Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-ning; Wan, Wen-bo; Wang, Yue-xiang; Jiao, Zi-yu; Zhang, Li-hai; Luo, Yu-kun; Tang, Pei-fu

    2016-04-09

    BACKGROUND There has been no published report assessing the mechanical properties of a repaired Achilles tendon after surgery using shear wave elastography (SWE). The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in mechanical properties of the healing Achilles tendon after surgical repair of a tendon rupture using ultrasound SWE and how these changes correlate with tendon function. MATERIAL AND METHODS Twenty-six patients who underwent surgical repair for Achilles tendon rupture were examined with ultrasound SWE coupled with a linear array transducer (4-15 MHz). The elasticity values of the repaired Achilles tendon in a longitudinal view were measured at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively. Functional outcomes were assessed with the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) rating system at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively. General linear regression analysis and correlation coefficients were used to analyze the relationship between elasticity and the AOFAS score. RESULTS There were significant differences with respect to the mean elasticity values and functional scores of the repaired Achilles tendon at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively (all PTendon function was positively correlated with the elasticity of the repaired Achilles tendon (P=0.0003). CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that SWE can provide biomechanical information for evaluating the mechanical properties of healing Achilles tendon and predict Achilles tendon function.

  10. Lack of tissue renewal in human adult Achilles tendon is revealed by nuclear bomb (14)C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Schjerling, Peter; Heinemeier, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Tendons are often injured and heal poorly. Whether this is caused by a slow tissue turnover is unknown, since existing data provide diverging estimates of tendon protein half-life that range from 2 mo to 200 yr. With the purpose of determining life-long turnover of human tendon tissue, we used...... turnover. Our observation provides a fundamental premise for understanding tendon function and pathology, and likely explains the poor regenerative capacity of tendon tissue.-Heinemeier, K. M., Schjerling, P., Heinemeier, J., Magnusson, S. P., Kjaer, M. Lack of tissue renewal in human adult Achilles tendon...... (donor birth years 1945-1983) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and compared to known atmospheric levels to estimate tissue turnover. We found that Achilles tendon tissue retained levels of 14C corresponding to atmospheric levels several decades before tissue sampling, demonstrating a very limited...

  11. Macroscopic Anomalies and Pathological Findings in and Around the Achilles Tendon: Observations From 1661 Operations During a 40-Year Period

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johansson, Kristian; Lempainen, Lasse; Sarimo, Janne; Laitala-Leinonen, Tiina; Orava, Sakari

    2014-01-01

    ...; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: The main macroscopic pathologies of 1661 chronic Achilles tendon overuse injuries, which were diagnosed and surgically treated by a single surgeon, were reviewed...

  12. Cross cultural adaptation of the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score with reliability, validity and responsiveness evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmont, Michael R; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Nilsson-Helander, Katarina; Mei-Dan, Omer; Karlsson, Jon; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-06-01

    The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) was developed because of the need for a reliable, valid and sensitive instrument to evaluate symptoms and their effects on physical activity in patients following either conservative or surgical management of an Achilles tendon rupture. Prior to using the score in larger randomized trial in an English-speaking population, we decided to perform reliability, validity and responsiveness evaluations of the English version of the ATRS. Even though the score was published in English, the actual English version has not be validated and compared to the results of the Swedish version. From 2009 to 2010, all patients who received treatment for Achilles tendon rupture were followed up using the English version of the ATRS. Patients were asked to complete the score at 3, 6 and 12 months following treatment for Achilles tendon rupture. The ATRS was completed on arrival in the outpatient clinic and again following consultation. The outcomes of 49 (13 female and 36 male) patients were assessed. The mean (SD) age was 49 (12) years, and 27 patients had treatment for a left-sided rupture, 22 the right. All patients received treatment for ruptured Achilles tendons: 38 acute percutaneous repair, 1 open repair, 5 an Achilles tendon reconstruction using a Peroneus Brevis tendon transfer for delayed presentation, 1 gracilis augmented repair for re-rupture and 4 non-operative treatment for mid-portion rupture. The English version of ATRS was shown to have overall excellent reliability (ICC = 0.986). There was no significant difference between the results with the English version and the Swedish version when compared at the 6-month- or 12-month (n.s.) follow-up appointments. The effect size was 0.93. The minimal detectable change was 6.75 points. The ATRS was culturally adapted to English and shown to be a reliable, valid and responsive method of testing functional outcome following an Achilles tendon rupture.

  13. Achilles tendon of wistar rats treated with laser therapy and eccentric exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Verônica de Souza

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIntroduction:Both laser therapy and eccentric exercises are used in tendon injuries. However, the association of these physiotherapeutic modalities is yet little investigated.Objective:To evaluate the effect of low-level laser therapy associated to eccentric exercise (downhill walking on Achilles tendinopathy of Wistar rats.Method:Eighteen Achilles tendon from 15 adult male Wistar rats were used. Tendons were distributed in six groups (laser, eccentric exercise, laser and eccentric exercise, rest, contralateral tendon, and healthy tendon. Unilateral tendinopathy was surgically induced by transversal compression followed by scarification of tendon fibers. The treatments laser therapy (904 nm, 3J/cm² and/or eccentric exercise (downhill walking; 12 m/min; 50 min/day; 15o inclination treadmill began 24 hours after surgery and remained for 20 days. Clinical and biomechanical analyzes were conducted. Achilles tendon was macroscopically evaluated and the transversal diameter measured. Euthanasia was performed 21 days after lesion induction. Tendons of both limbs were collected and frozen at -20°C until biomechanical analysis, on which the characteristic of maximum load (N, stress at ultimate (MPa and maximum extension (mm were analyzed.Results:Swelling was observed within 72 hours postoperative. No fibrous adhesions were observed nor increase in transversal diameter of tendons. Animals with the exercised tendons, but not treated with laser therapy, presented lower (p=0.0000 locomotor capacity. No difference occurred be-tween groups for the biomechanical characteristics maximum load (p=0.4379, stress at ultimate (p=0.4605 and maximum extension (p=0.3820 evaluated, even considering healthy and contralateral tendons.Conclusion:The concomitant use of low-level laser and the eccentric exercise of downhill walking, starting 24 hours after surgically induced tendinopathy, do not result in a tendon with the same biomechanical resistance or elasticity

  14. Augmented Repair of an Achilles Tendon Rupture Using the Flexor Digitorum Lateralis Tendon in a Toy Poodle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Masaaki

    2016-11-01

    To report appositional augmentation of Achilles tendon rupture in a toy breed dog with an intact flexor digitorum lateralis (FDL) muscle tendon. Clinical case report. Two-year-old spayed female Toy Poodle with Achilles tendon rupture. The Achilles tendon was accidentally ruptured by hair clippers during grooming. The dog demonstrated a plantigrade stance without digital flexion of the right hind limb. The ruptured gastrocnemius and superficial digital flexor tendons were sutured to their respective cut ends using a simple locking loop pattern under a surgical microscope. The repair site was appositionally augmented by the caudally retracted intact FDL. An aluminum splint was applied on the plantar aspect to immobilize the tarsal joint for the first 2 weeks, after which a soft bandage was applied for another 2 weeks. At the 7 month follow-up no lameness was detected during walking and no complications associated with decreased FDL function such as digital contracture were observed. The range of motion of the tarsal joint had improved and could be flexed to ∼60° and extended fully. Use of the FDL is feasible for augmenting Achilles tendon repair in toy breed dogs. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  15. Spontaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon in a patient with gout.

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    A 49-year-old man with long-standing gout suffered a spontaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon. Surgical repair was performed, and gouty tophi were found in the severed end of the tendon. The possible causes of this spontaneous rupture are discussed.

  16. Achilles tendon and plantar fascia in recently diagnosed type II diabetes: role of body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Michele; Schiavone, Cosima; Di Carlo, Luigi; Salini, Vincenzo

    2012-07-01

    Previous research has shown that plantar fascia and Achilles tendon thickness is increased in diabetes. The aims of present study were to assess whether tendon changes can occur in the early stages of the disease and to evaluate the extent of the influence of body mass index (BMI). The study population included 51 recent-onset type II diabetic subjects, who were free from diabetic complications, divided according to BMI into three groups (normal weight, overweight, and obese). Eighteen non-diabetic, normal-weight subjects served as controls. Plantar fascia and Achilles tendon thickness was measured by means of sonography. The groups were well balanced for age and sex. In all the diabetic subjects, plantar fascia and Achilles tendon thickness was increased compared to the controls (p fascia thickness and BMI values (r = 0.749, p fascia and Achilles tendon thickness is increased in the early stages of type II diabetes and that BMI is related more to plantar fascia than Achilles tendon thickness. Further longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate whether these early changes can overload the metatarsal heads and increase the stress transmitted to plantar soft tissues, thus representing an additional risk factor for foot ulcer development.

  17. Application of internal fixation of steel-wire limited loop in early Achilles tendon rupture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhe Chen; Jia-Sen Wei; Zhao-Yang Hou; Jiong Hu; Yan-Guang Cao; Qi-Xin Chen

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To explore the clinical effect and safety of internal fixation of steel-wire limited loop in earlyAchilles tendon rupture.Methods:Seventy-six patients respectively with early transected and avulsed types ofAchilles tendon rupture were selected and treated with internal fixation of steel-wire limited loop.The patients began to take exercise for their lower limbs through continous passive motion as early as possible after surgical repair, and the loops were removed after3-5 months.Six months later, the condition of complications includingAchilles tendon re-rupture, wound fistula, wound infection and skin necrosis, cutaneous sensation in sural nerve dominance region, time back to preinjury work or learning as well as time to physical activities were observed.One year later, the therapeutic effect was evaluated, and the maximum circumferences of bilateral legs and ruptured plane circumferences ofAchilles tendon were measured.Results:The wound of all patients healed well, no complications likeAchilles tendon re-rupture, wound fistula, wound infection and skin necrosis occured, and the cutaneous sensation in sural nerve dominance region was normal.The mean time back to preinjury workor learning as well as to pysical activities of all patients were respectively10 and22 weeks.Seventy out of76 patients(92.1%) achieved an excellent effect, and6(7.9%) good effect.The excellent and good rate came up to100%.The maximum circumference in the affected leg decreased to 2 mm averagely compared with the offside, while the ruptured plane circumferences ofAchilles tendon in the affected side increased to2.2 mm compared with the offside.Conclusions:For earlyAchilles tendon rupture, internal fixation of steel-wire limited loop can recover the ankle function better, return to the preinjury state in the shortest time, and has few complications.

  18. Prospective randomized clinical trial of aggressive rehabilitation after acute Achilles tendon ruptures repaired with Dresden technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente, Carlos; Peña y Lillo, Roberto; Carreño, Gabriel; Marambio, Hugo

    2016-03-01

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon is a common injury during working years. Aggressive rehabilitation may provide better outcomes, but also a greater chance of re-rupture. To determine if aggressive rehabilitation has better clinical outcomes for Achilles tendon function, Triceps surae function, one-leg heel rise capacity and lower complication rate during twelve weeks after percutaneous Achilles tendon repair compared to conventional rehabilitation. Randomized controlled trial. Thirty-nine patients were prospectively randomized. The aggressive group (n=20, 41.4 ± 8.3 years) received rehabilitation from the first day after surgery. The conventional group (n=19, 41.7 ± 10.7 years) rested for 28 days, before rehabilitation started. The statistical parameters were the Achilles tendon rupture score (ATRS), verbal pain scale, time to return to work, pain medication consumption, Achilles tendon strength, dorsiflexion range of motion (RoM), injured-leg calf circumference, calf circumference difference, one-leg heel rise repetition and difference, re-rupture rate, strength deficit rate, and other complication rates. Mixed-ANOVA and Bonferroni's post hoc test were performed for multiple comparisons. Student's t-test was performed for parameters measured on the 12th week. The aggressive group with respect to the conventional group had a higher ATRS; lower verbal pain score; lower pain medication consumption; early return to work; higher Achilles tendon strength; higher one-leg heel rise repetitions; and lower one-leg heel rise difference. The re-rupture rate was 5% and 5%, the strength deficit rate was 42% and 5%, and other complications rate was 11% and 15% in the conventional and aggressive group, respectively. Patients with Dresden repair and aggressive rehabilitation have better clinical outcomes, Achilles tendon function and one-leg heel rise capacity without increasing the postoperative complications rate after 12 weeks compared to rehabilitation with immobilization and

  19. Application of internal fixation of steel-wire limited loop in early Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Wei, Jia-Sen; Hou, Zhao-Yang; Hu, Jiong; Cao, Yan-Guang; Chen, Qi-Xin

    2013-11-01

    To explore the clinical effect and safety of internal fixation of steel-wire limited loop in early Achilles tendon rupture. Seventy-six patients respectively with early transected and avulsed types of Achilles tendon rupture were selected and treated with internal fixation of steel-wire limited loop. The patients began to take exercise for their lower limbs through continous passive motion as early as possible after surgical repair, and the loops were removed after 3-5 months. Six months later, the condition of complications including Achilles tendon re-rupture, wound fistula, wound infection and skin necrosis, cutaneous sensation in sural nerve dominance region, time back to preinjury work or learning as well as time to physical activities were observed. One year later, the therapeutic effect was evaluated, and the maximum circumferences of bilateral legs and ruptured plane circumferences of Achilles tendon were measured. The wound of all patients healed well, no complications like Achilles tendon re-rupture, wound fistula, wound infection and skin necrosis occured, and the cutaneous sensation in sural nerve dominance region was normal. The mean time back to preinjury work or learning as well as to pysical activities of all patients were respectively 10 and 22 weeks. Seventy out of 76 patients (92.1%) achieved an excellent effect, and 6 (7.9%) good effect. The excellent and good rate came up to 100%. The maximum circumference in the affected leg decreased to 2 mm averagely compared with the offside, while the ruptured plane circumferences of Achilles tendon in the affected side increased to 2.2 mm compared with the offside. For early Achilles tendon rupture, internal fixation of steel-wire limited loop can recover the ankle function better, return to the preinjury state in the shortest time, and has few complications. Copyright © 2013 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical results of percutaneous repair of ruptured Achilles tendon with MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Noritaka; Hamanishi, Hirotsugu (Fujiwara Hospital, Kyoto (Japan))

    1993-11-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed to evaluate the usefulness of percutaneous repair according to the modified method of Bunnell for Achilles tendon rupture. The subjects were four men and 4 women, whose ages ranged from 22 to 62 years with a mean of 38.6. No surgical complications, including recurrent rupture, neurological damage and infections, were encountered. Three months after surgery, dorsiflexion of foot was recovered to the degree of the healthy foot. Jogging became possible 5 or 6 months later. The healthy Achilles tendon was seen as low signal intensity, and the ruptured site was seen as high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Postoperative MR images showed tightness of the Achilles tendon. Signals in the repair site were shifted from isointensity to hypointensity with recovery. The tendon, mainly surrounding the reptured site, was thickened. In conclusion, MR imaging was useful in confirming the ruptured site and evaluating the condition of repair. (N.K.).

  1. A minimally invasive "overwrapping" technique for repairing neglected ruptures of the Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-01-01

    About 10% to 25% of acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon go undiagnosed for some time beyond what would be optimal for repair and a return to optimal function. Managing these chronic or neglected ruptures is a surgical challenge, because the tendon ends retract and atrophy and could develop a short, fibrous distal stump. In the present report, a patient with a ruptured right Achilles tendon, neglected for approximately 10 years, is described. The chronically injured tendon was successfully treated by overwrapping the interposed scar at the rupture site. This minimally invasive technique restored tension to the tendon, a prerequisite for which was the presence of functional triceps surae, confirmed by identification of gross contraction of the muscle during tiptoeing. The procedure is contraindicated when the scar tissue is not intact and does not have sufficient laxity to allow adequate dorsiflexion of the ankle after overwrapping the tendon or when the triceps surae are nonfunctional.

  2. Minimally invasive flexor hallucis longus transfer in management of acute achilles tendon rupture associated with tendinosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2012-04-01

    Chronic tendinopathy is characterized by pain in the tendon, generally at the start and completion of exercise. However, tendinosis may lead to decreased blood flow, increased stiffness of the tendon and reduced tensile strength, and predispose to rupture. Operative treatment is indicated to restore the function of the Achilles tendon and alleviate the prerupture heel cord pain. A case of acute Achilles tendon rupture with extensive tendinosis that was successfully treated with minimally invasive flexor hallucis longus transfer is reported.

  3. Increased unilateral tendon stiffness and its effect on gait 2-6 years after Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agres, A N; Duda, G N; Gehlen, T J; Arampatzis, A; Taylor, W R; Manegold, S

    2015-12-01

    Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) alters tissue composition, which may affect long-term tendon mechanics and ankle function during movement. However, a relationship between Achilles tendon (AT) properties and ankle joint function during gait remains unclear. The primary hypotheses were that (a) post-ATR tendon stiffness and length differ from the noninjured contralateral side and that (b) intra-patient asymmetries in AT properties correlate to ankle function asymmetries during gait, determined by ankle angles and moments. Ultrasonography and dynamometry were used to assess AT tendon stiffness, strain, elongation, and rest length in both limbs of 20 ATR patients 2-6 years after repair. Three-dimensional ankle angles and moments were determined using gait analysis. Injured tendons exhibited increased stiffness, rest length, and altered kinematics, with higher dorsiflexion and eversion, and lower plantarflexion and inversion. Intra-patient tendon stiffness and tendon length ratios were negatively correlated to intra-patient ratios of the maximum plantarflexion moment and maximum dorsiflexion angle, respectively. These results suggest that after surgical ATR repair, higher AT stiffness, but not a longer AT, may contribute to deficits in plantarflexion moment generation. These data further support the claim that post-ATR tendon regeneration results in the production of a tissue that is functionally different than noninjured tendon. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Early Ankle Mobilization Promotes Healing in a Rabbit Model of Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Asilehan, Batiza; Wupuer, Aikeremu; Qianman, Bayixiati; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Maimaitiaili, Abudouheilil; Shawutali, Nuerai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Niyazebieke, Hadelebieke; Aizezi, Adili; Aisaiding, Amuding; Bakyt, Yerzat; Aibek, Rakimbaiev; Wuerliebieke, Jianati

    2016-01-01

    The use of early mobilization of the ankle joint without orthosis in the treatment of Achilles tendon rupture has been advocated as the optimal management. The goal of this study was to compare outcomes in a postoperative rabbit model of Achilles tendon rupture between early mobilization and immobilized animals using a differential proteomics approach. In total, 135 rabbits were randomized into the control group (n=15), the postoperative cast immobilization (PCI) group (n=60), and the early mobilization (EM) group (n=60). A rupture of the Achilles tendon was created in each animal model and repaired microsurgically, and tendon samples were removed at 3, 7, 14, and 21 days postoperatively. Proteins were separated using 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified using peptide mass fingerprinting, tandem mass spectrometry, NCBI database searches, and bioinformatics analyses. A series of differentially expressed proteins were identified between groups, some of which may play an important role in Achilles tendon healing. Notable candidate proteins that were upregulated in the EM group were identified, such as CRMP-2, galactokinase 1, tropomyosin-4, and transthyretin. The healing of ruptured Achilles tendons appears to be affected at the level of protein expression with the use of early mobilization. The classic postoperative treatment of Achilles tendon rupture with an orthosis ignored the self-protecting instinct of humans. With a novel operative technique, the repaired tendon can persist the load that comes from traction in knee and ankle joint functional movement. In addition, kinesitherapy provided an excellent experimental outcome via a mechanobiological mechanism. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. A Fibre-Reinforced Poroviscoelastic Model Accurately Describes the Biomechanical Behaviour of the Rat Achilles Tendon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuijerjans, Ashley; Matikainen, Marko K.; Julkunen, Petro; Eliasson, Pernilla; Aspenberg, Per; Isaksson, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Background Computational models of Achilles tendons can help understanding how healthy tendons are affected by repetitive loading and how the different tissue constituents contribute to the tendon’s biomechanical response. However, available models of Achilles tendon are limited in their description of the hierarchical multi-structural composition of the tissue. This study hypothesised that a poroviscoelastic fibre-reinforced model, previously successful in capturing cartilage biomechanical behaviour, can depict the biomechanical behaviour of the rat Achilles tendon found experimentally. Materials and Methods We developed a new material model of the Achilles tendon, which considers the tendon’s main constituents namely: water, proteoglycan matrix and collagen fibres. A hyperelastic formulation of the proteoglycan matrix enabled computations of large deformations of the tendon, and collagen fibres were modelled as viscoelastic. Specimen-specific finite element models were created of 9 rat Achilles tendons from an animal experiment and simulations were carried out following a repetitive tensile loading protocol. The material model parameters were calibrated against data from the rats by minimising the root mean squared error (RMS) between experimental force data and model output. Results and Conclusions All specimen models were successfully fitted to experimental data with high accuracy (RMS 0.42-1.02). Additional simulations predicted more compliant and soft tendon behaviour at reduced strain-rates compared to higher strain-rates that produce a stiff and brittle tendon response. Stress-relaxation simulations exhibited strain-dependent stress-relaxation behaviour where larger strains produced slower relaxation rates compared to smaller strain levels. Our simulations showed that the collagen fibres in the Achilles tendon are the main load-bearing component during tensile loading, where the orientation of the collagen fibres plays an important role for the tendon

  6. Reconstruction of Kuwada grade IV chronic achilles tendon rupture by minimally invasive technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xudong; Wu, Yongping; Tao, Huimin; Yang, Disheng; Huang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transfer of a flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon can not only reconstruct the Achilles tendon but also provide ischemic tendinous tissues with a rich blood supply to enhance wound healing. This retrospective study aims to investigate clinical outcomes in patients who underwent repair of Kuwada grade IV chronic Achilles tendon rupture with long hallucis longus tendons harvested using a minimally invasive technique. Materials and Methods: 35 patients who were treated for Kuwada grade IV Achilles tendon injuries from July 2006 to June 2011 were included in this retrospective study. The age ranged between 23 and 71 years. The duration from primary injury to surgery ranged from 29 days to 34 months (mean value, 137.6 days). All 35 patients had difficulties in lifting their calves. Thirty two were followed up for a mean 32.2 months (range 18–72 months), whereas three were lost to followup. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed that the tendon rupture gap ranged from 6.0 to 9.2 cm. During surgery, a 2.0 cm minor incision was made vertically in the medial plantar side of the midfoot, and a 1.5 cm minor transverse incision was made in the plantar side of the interphalangeal articulation of the great toe to harvest the FHL tendon, and the tendon was fixed to the calcaneus with suture anchors. Postoperative appearance and function were evaluated by physiotherapists based American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society-ankle and hindfoot score (AOFAS-AH), and Leppilahti Achilles tendon ratings. Results: Results were assessed in 32 patients. Except for one patient who suffered complications because of wound disruption 10 days after the operation, all other patients had primary wound healing, with 28 of 32 able to go up on their toes at last followup. The AOFAS-AH score was increased from preoperative (51.92 ± 7.08) points to (92.56 ± 6.71) points; Leppilahti Achilles tendon score was increased from preoperative (72.56 ± 7.43) to (92.58 ± 5.1). There were

  7. The Achilles tendon total rupture score: a study of responsiveness, internal consistency and convergent validity on patients with acute Achilles tendon ruptures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kearney Rebecca S

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score was developed by a research group in 2007 in response to the need for a patient reported outcome measure for this patient population. Beyond this original development paper, no further validation studies have been published. Consequently the purpose of this study was to evaluate internal consistency, convergent validity and responsiveness of this newly developed patient reported outcome measure within patients who have sustained an isolated acute Achilles tendon rupture. Methods Sixty-four eligible patients with an acute rupture of their Achilles tendon completed the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score alongside two further patient reported outcome measures (Disability Rating Index and EQ 5D. These were completed at baseline, six weeks, three months, six months and nine months post injury. The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score was evaluated for internal consistency, using Cronbach's alpha, convergent validity, through correlation analysis and responsiveness, by analysing floor and ceiling effects and calculating its relative efficiency in comparison to the Disability Rating Index and EQ 5D scores. Results The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbachs alpha > 0.8 and correlated significantly (p Conclusions A universally accepted outcome measure is imperative to allow comparisons to be made across practice. This is the first study to evaluate aspects of validity of this newly developed outcome measure, outside of the developing centre. The ATRS demonstrated high internal consistency and responsiveness, with limited convergent validity. This research provides further support for the use of this outcome measure, however further research is required to advocate its universal use in patients with acute Achilles tendon ruptures. Such areas include inter-rater reliability and research to determine the minimally clinically important difference

  8. The Achilles tendon total rupture score: a study of responsiveness, internal consistency and convergent validity on patients with acute Achilles tendon ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Rebecca S; Achten, Juul; Lamb, Sarah E; Parsons, Nicholas; Costa, Matthew L

    2012-02-29

    The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score was developed by a research group in 2007 in response to the need for a patient reported outcome measure for this patient population. Beyond this original development paper, no further validation studies have been published.Consequently the purpose of this study was to evaluate internal consistency, convergent validity and responsiveness of this newly developed patient reported outcome measure within patients who have sustained an isolated acute Achilles tendon rupture. Sixty-four eligible patients with an acute rupture of their Achilles tendon completed the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score alongside two further patient reported outcome measures (Disability Rating Index and EQ 5D). These were completed at baseline, six weeks, three months, six months and nine months post injury. The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score was evaluated for internal consistency, using Cronbach's alpha, convergent validity, through correlation analysis and responsiveness, by analysing floor and ceiling effects and calculating its relative efficiency in comparison to the Disability Rating Index and EQ 5D scores. The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbachs alpha > 0.8) and correlated significantly (p measure is imperative to allow comparisons to be made across practice. This is the first study to evaluate aspects of validity of this newly developed outcome measure, outside of the developing centre. The ATRS demonstrated high internal consistency and responsiveness, with limited convergent validity. This research provides further support for the use of this outcome measure, however further research is required to advocate its universal use in patients with acute Achilles tendon ruptures. Such areas include inter-rater reliability and research to determine the minimally clinically important difference between scores.All authors have read and concur with the content of this manuscript. The material

  9. Radial forearm flap plus Flexor Carpi Radialis tendon in Achilles tendon reconstruction: Surgical technique, functional results, and gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, Marco; Tani, Massimiliano; Carulli, Christian; Ghezzi, Serena; Raspanti, Andrea; Menichini, Giulio

    2015-11-01

    Wound dehiscence, infection, and necrosis of tendon and overlying skin are severe complications after open repairs of Achilles tendon. A simultaneous reconstruction should be provided in a single stage operation. We evaluated the outcomes of one of the possible options: the radial forearm free flap with Flexor Carpi Radialis (FCR) tendon. Between 2006 and 2014, six patients affected by infection and necrosis after Achilles tendon open repair underwent multi-tissutal reconstruction by a composite radial forearm free flap including a vascularized FCR tendon. The mean skin and tendon defect was respectively 9.8 cm × 4.7 cm and 6.5 cm. After reconstruction, patients underwent clinical examination, including the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) questionnaire, DASH score, MRI study, and a computer-assisted gait analysis. All flaps survived and no complications were recorded. Full weightbearing was allowed within 2 months after surgery. The mean follow-up was 36.2 months (range 12-96). MRI showed an optimal reconstruction of the tendon. Range of motion was minimally reduced if compared to the contralateral side. Gait analysis showed the recovery of a nearly symmetrical stance phase, time to heel off, and step length of the gate. ATRS and DASH score improved to a mean value of 85.2 (range 83-88) and 8.0 (range 3-15) respectively. This procedure provided an anatomical reconstruction of the Achilles tendon and skin achieving good and objective functional results; donor site morbidity was limited to the sacrifice of the radial artery, which, in our opinion, is a minor drawback if compared to the quality of the results. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. In-vitro tensile testing machine for vibration study of fresh rabbit Achilles tendon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revel, Gian M.; Scalise, Alessandro; Scalise, Lorenzo; Pianosi, Antonella

    2001-10-01

    A lot of people, overall athletic one suffer from tendinitis or complete rupture of the Achilles tendon. This structure becomes inflamed and damaged mainly from a variety of mechanical forces and sometimes due to metabolic problems, such as diabetes or arthritis. Over the past three decades extensive studies have been performed on the structural and mechanical properties of Achilles tendon trying to explain the constitutive equations to describe and foresee tendon behavior. Among the various mechanical parameters, the vibrational behavior is also of interest. Several investigations are performed in order to study how the Achilles tendon vibrations influence the response of the muscle proprioception and human posture. The present article describes how in vitro tensile experiments can be performed, taking into account the need to simulate physiological condition of Achilles tendon and thus approaching some opened problems in the design of the experimental set-up. A new system for evaluating tendon vibrations by non contact techniques is proposed. Preliminary simple elongation tests are made extracting the main mechanical parameters: stress and strain at different fixed stretches, in order to characterize the tissue. Finally, a vibration study is made at each pretensioned tendon level evaluating the oscillating curves caused by a small hammer.

  11. Functional outcomes of conservatively managed acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J E; Nasr, P; Fountain, D M; Berman, L; Robinson, A H N

    2017-01-01

    This prospective cohort study aims to determine if the size of the tendon gap following acute rupture of the Achilles tendon shows an association with the functional outcome following non-operative treatment. All patients presenting within two weeks of an acute unilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon between July 2012 and July 2015 were considered for the study. In total, 38 patients (nine female, 29 male, mean age 52 years; 29 to 78) completed the study. Dynamic ultrasound examination was performed to confirm the diagnosis and measure the gap between ruptured tendon ends. Outcome was assessed using dynamometric testing of plantarflexion and the Achilles tendon Total Rupture score (ATRS) six months after the completion of a rehabilitation programme. Patients with a gap ≥ 10 mm with the ankle in the neutral position had significantly greater peak torque deficit than those with gaps tendon gap and functional outcome in acute rupture of the Achilles tendon. We have identified 10 mm as a gap size at which deficits in plantarflexion strength become significantly greater, however, the precise relationship between gap size and plantarflexion strength remains unclear. Large, multicentre studies will be needed to clarify this relationship and identify population subgroups in whom deficits in peak torque are reflected in patient-reported outcome measures. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:87-93. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  12. Patellofemoral Joint and Achilles Tendon Loads During Overground and Treadmill Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willy, Richard W; Halsey, Lisa; Hayek, Andrew; Johnson, Holly; Willson, John D

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Level 4, controlled laboratory study. Background Little is known regarding how the potential differences between treadmill and overground running may affect patellofemoral joint and Achilles tendon loading characteristics. Objectives To compare measures of loading of the patellofemoral joint and Achilles tendon across treadmill and overground running in healthy, uninjured runners. Methods Eighteen healthy runners ran at their self-selected speed on an instrumented treadmill and overground, while 3-D running mechanics were sampled. A musculoskeletal model derived peak load, rate of loading, and estimated cumulative load per 1 km of continuous running for the patellofemoral joint and Achilles tendon for each condition. Data were analyzed via paired t tests and Pearson correlations to detect differences and assess relationships, respectively, between the 2 running mediums. Results No differences (P>.05) were found between treadmill and overground running for peak load, rate of loading, or estimated cumulative patellofemoral joint stress per 1 km of continuous running. However, treadmill running resulted in 12.5% greater peak Achilles tendon force (P0.70) and moderate agreements (r>0.50) for most patellofemoral joint and Achilles measures, respectively, between treadmill and overground running. Conclusion No differences were observed in loading characteristics to the patellofemoral joint between running mediums; however, treadmill running resulted in greater Achilles tendon loading compared with overground running. Future investigations should examine whether sudden bouts of treadmill running may increase the risk of mechanical overload of the Achilles tendon in runners who habitually train overground. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):664-672. Epub 12 May 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6494.

  13. Percutaneous repair followed by accelerated rehabilitation for acute Achilles tendon ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mouazzen, Louay; Rajakulendran, Karthig; Najefi, Ali; Ahad, Nurul

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the outcome after percutaneous repair followed by accelerated rehabilitation for acute Achilles tendon ruptures. 21 men and 9 women (mean age, 41 years) underwent percutaneous repair by a single senior surgeon for acute Achilles tendon ruptures, followed by early weight bearing and accelerated rehabilitation. Outcome measures included the Achilles tendon re-rupture rate, the Achilles tendon total rupture score (ATRS) at 3 and 6 months, the incidence of sural nerve injury, wound infection, wound dehiscence, patient satisfaction, and the time to return to pre-rupture activity. The mean follow-up period was 12.5 months. The mean ATRS score improved from 57.65 at 3 months to 86.95 at 6 months (ptendon re-rupture, sural nerve injury, wound dehiscence, or deep infection. Two patients developed a superficial wound infection, which was resolved with oral flucloxacillin. Two patients had a mass at the transverse incision, but neither had any symptoms or functional restriction. All patients were able to bear full weight comfortably without the walker boot at 8 weeks, and return to their work by 3 months. The mean time to return to pre-rupture activity, including sports, was 10.4 months. The mean satisfaction rate was 87% at 6 months. Percutaneous repair of the Achilles tendon followed by early weight bearing and accelerated rehabilitation achieves good functional outcome.

  14. Enhancement of Achilles tendon repair mediated by matrix metalloproteinase inhibition via systemic administration of doxycycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Michael W; Barr, Jerome; Greenwald, Robert; Lane, Lewis B; Dines, Joshua S; Dines, David M; Drakos, Mark C; Grande, Daniel A; Chahine, Nadeen O

    2014-04-01

    Collagenases or matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been shown to play an important role in the matrix degradation cascade associated with Achilles tendon rupture and disease. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of daily administration of doxycycline (Doxy) through oral gavage on MMP activity and on the repair quality of Achilles tendons in vivo. Our findings indicate that Achilles tendon transection resulted in increasing MMP-8 activity from 2 to 6 weeks post-injury, with peak increases in activity occurring at 4 weeks post-injury. Doxy adiministration at clinically relevant serum concentrations was found to significantly inhibit MMP activity after continuous treatment for 4 weeks, but not for continuous administration for shorter durations (96 h or 2 weeks). Extended doxy administration was also associated with improved collagen fibril organization, and enhanced biomechanical properties (stiffness, ultimate tensile strength, maximum load to failure, and elastic toughness). Our findings indicate that a temporal delay exists between Achilles tendon transection and associated increases in MMP-8 activity in situ. Our findings suggest that inhibition of MMP-8 at its peak activity levels ameliorates fibrosis development and improves biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Plantarflexor muscle function in healthy and chronic Achilles tendon pain subjects evaluated by the use of EMG and PET imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masood, Tahir; Kalliokoski, Kari; Bojsen-Møller, Jens

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Achilles tendon pathologies may alter the coordinative strategies of synergistic calf muscles. We hypothesized that both surface electromyography and positron emission tomography would reveal differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic legs in Achilles tendinopathy patients...... and between healthy controls. METHODS: Eleven subjects with unilateral chronic Achilles tendon pain (28 years) and eleven matched controls (28 years) were studied for triceps surae and flexor hallucis longus muscle activity in response to repetitive isometric plantarflexion tasks performed at 30% of maximal...... voluntary contraction using surface electromyography and glucose uptake using positron emission tomography. Additionally, Achilles tendon glucose uptake was quantified. FINDINGS: Normalized myoelectric activity of soleus was higher (P

  16. Effect of Complications After Minimally Invasive Surgical Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures Report on 211 Cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, Roderik; van der Heijden, Geert J. M. G.; Verleisdonk, Egbert-Jan M. M.; Kolfschoten, Nicky; Verhofstad, Michiel H. J.; van der Werken, Christiaan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Complications of acute Achilles tendon rupture treatment are considered to negatively influence outcome, but the relevance of these effects is largely unknown. Purpose: The Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) was used to determine level of disability in patients with minimally inv

  17. Biomechanical properties of isolated fascicles of the Iliopsoas and Achilles tendons in African American and Caucasian men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, P; Aagaard, P; Magnusson, S P

    2012-01-01

    To investigate biomechanical properties of the Iliopsoas and Achilles tendons in young African American (AA) and Caucasian (CC) men, and attempt to clarify whether the difference in Achilles tendon ruptures between AA and CC can be explained by differences in material properties....

  18. Effect of Complications After Minimally Invasive Surgical Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures Report on 211 Cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, Roderik; van der Heijden, Geert J. M. G.; Verleisdonk, Egbert-Jan M. M.; Kolfschoten, Nicky; Verhofstad, Michiel H. J.; van der Werken, Christiaan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Complications of acute Achilles tendon rupture treatment are considered to negatively influence outcome, but the relevance of these effects is largely unknown. Purpose: The Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) was used to determine level of disability in patients with minimally inv

  19. The management of chronic rupture of the Achilles tendon: minimally invasive peroneus brevis tendon transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffulli, N; Oliva, F; Costa, V; Del Buono, A

    2015-03-01

    We hypothesised that a minimally invasive peroneus brevis tendon transfer would be effective for the management of a chronic rupture of the Achilles tendon. In 17 patients (three women, 14 men) who underwent minimally invasive transfer and tenodesis of the peroneus brevis to the calcaneum, at a mean follow-up of 4.6 years (2 to 7) the modified Achilles tendon total rupture score (ATRS) was recorded and the maximum circumference of the calf of the operated and contralateral limbs was measured. The strength of isometric plantar flexion of the gastrocsoleus complex and of eversion of the ankle were measured bilaterally. Functional outcomes were classified according to the four-point Boyden scale. At the latest review, the mean maximum circumference of the calf of the operated limb was not significantly different from the pre-operative mean value, (41.4 cm, 32 to 50 vs 40.6 cm, 33 to 46; p = 0.45), and not significantly less than that of the contralateral limb (43.1 cm, 35 to 52; p = 0.16). The mean peak torque (244.6 N, 125 to 367) and the strength of eversion of the operated ankle (149.1 N, 65 to 240) were significantly lower (p < 0.01) than those of the contralateral limb (mean peak torque 289, 145 to 419; strength of eversion: 175.2, 71 to 280). The mean ATRS significantly improved from 58 pre-operatively (35 to 68) to 91 (75 to 97; 95% confidence interval 85.3 to 93.2) at the time of final review. Of 13 patients who practised sport at the time of injury, ten still undertook recreational activities. This procedure may be safely performed, is minimally invasive, and allows most patients to return to pre-injury sport and daily activities. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  20. Outcomes of acute Achilles tendon rupture repair with bone marrow aspirate concentrate augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Benjamin E; Stroh, David Alex; Schon, Lew C

    2015-05-01

    Optimal treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures remains controversial. Positive results using stem-cell-bearing concentrates have been reported with other soft-tissue repairs, but no studies exist on outcomes of bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) augmentation in primary Achilles tendon repair. We reviewed patients with sport-related Achilles tendon ruptures treated via open repair augmented with BMAC injection from 2009 to 2011. Data on operative complications, strength, range of motion, rerupture, calf circumference and functional improvement through progressive return to sport and the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) were analysed. A total of 27 patients (28 tendons) treated with open repair and BMAC injection were identified (mean age 38.3 ± 9.6 years). At mean follow-up of 29.7 ± 6.1 months, there were no reruptures. Walking without a boot was at 1.8 ± 0.7 months, participation in light activity was at 3.4 ± 1.8 months and 92% (25 of 27) of patients returned to their sport at 5.9 ± 1.8 months. Mean ATRS at final follow-up was 91 (range 72-100) points. One case of superficial wound dehiscence healed with local wound care. No soft-tissue masses, bone formation or tumors were observed in the operative extremity. Excellent results, including no re-ruptures and early mobilisation, were observed in this small cohort with open Achilles tendon repair augmented by BMAC. No adverse outcomes of biologic treatment were observed with this protocol. The efficacy of BMAC in the operative repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures warrants further study. IV - Therapeutic.

  1. The effect of foot overpronation on Achilles tendon blood supply in healthy male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karzis, K; Kalogeris, M; Mandalidis, D; Geladas, N; Karteroliotis, K; Athanasopoulos, S

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate Achilles tendon blood flow in individuals with overpronated feet during non-weight- and weight-bearing positions. Achilles tendon blood flow was measured by means of the pulsatility index (PI) and the resistance index (RI) in 15 male individuals with overpronated feet and 15 counterparts with normal feet, using power Doppler ultrasonography (PDI). Achilles tendon ultrasonographic (US) assessment was performed at its musculo-tendinous junction (MTJ), mid-tendon (MT), and osseotendinous junction (OTJ) at a non-weight-bearing relaxed position (RP) and during two-leg stance (TLS) and one-leg upright stance (OLS). PI and RI indices were significantly greater in individuals with overpronated feet compared to individuals with normal feet at the OTJ in OLS position (P MTJ in all positions (P MTJ (P < 0.001). The findings of the present study suggest that foot overpronation may affect Achilles tendon blood flow, particularly at mid-tendon, thus enhancing the possibility for injury. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Postoperative MR imaging and ultrasonography of surgically repaired Achilles tendon ruptures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karjalainen, P.T. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology; Ahovuo, J. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology; Pihlajamaeki, H.K. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Orthopaedics and Traumatology; Soila, K. [Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, FL (United States). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Aronen, H.J. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare MR and US findings in an unselected group of patients with 1-3 year-old surgically repaired complete ruptures of the Achilles tendon. Material and Methods: Thirteen patients with complete Achilles tendon rupture underwent clinical, MR and US examinations. The average time interval from rupture to postoperative imaging was 18 months. Results: The cross-sectional area of a postoperative tendon was 4.2 times that of the unaffected side. The shape of the operated tendon was more rounded than the unaffected side and it had irregular margins both in MR imaging and in US examination. In 4 of 13 cases an intratendinous area of intermediate to high signal intensity on proton density- and T2-weighted images was seen on MR. The size of this area varied from 4 to 18% of the cross-sectional tendon area. Two patients with the largest intratendinous area had poor clinical outcome. On US the tendon had mixed echogenicity in all cases and the tendon bands were thinner and shorter than normal. Comparison of dimension between MR and US revealed that in a.p. dimension the correlation was good (r=0.87, p=0.001), but in transversal width there was no significant correlation (r=0.58, p=0.06). Conclusion: The increased size and round irregular area of the operated Achilles tendon rupture was well detected by both MR and US, but intratendinous lesions were seen only by MR. (orig.).

  3. Human hamstring tenocytes survive when seeded into a decellularized porcine Achilles tendon extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohan, Anke; Stoll, Christiane; Albrecht, Marit; Denner, Andreas; John, Thilo; Krüger, Kay; Ertel, Wolfgang; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2013-01-01

    Tendon ruptures and defects remain major orthopaedic challenges. Tendon healing is a time-consuming process, which results in scar tissue with an altered biomechanical competence. Using a xenogeneic tendon extracellular matrix (ECM) as a natural scaffold, which can be reseeded with autologous human tenocytes, might be a promising approach to reconstruct damaged tendons. For this purpose, the porcine Achilles (AS) tendons serving as a scaffold were histologically characterized in comparison to human cell donor tendons. AS tendons were decellularized and then reseeded with primary human hamstring tenocytes using cell centrifuging, rotating culture and cell injection techniques. Vitality testing, histology and glycosaminoglycan/DNA quantifications were performed to document the success of tendon reseeding. Porcine AS tendons were characterized by a higher cell and sulfated glycosaminoglycan content than human cell donor tendons. Complete decellularization could be achieved, but led to a wash out of sulfated glycosaminoglycans. Nevertheless, porcine tendon could be recellularized with vital human tenocytes. The recellularization led to a slight increase in cell number compared to the native tendon and some glycosaminoglycan recovery. This study indicates that porcine tendon can be de- and recellularized using adult human tenocytes. Future work should optimize cell distribution within the recellularized tendon ECM and consider tendon- and donor species-dependent differences.

  4. Early changes in Achilles tendon behaviour in vivo following downhill backwards walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, C W; Bradshaw, E J; Furness, T P; Kemp, J; Clark, R A

    2016-01-01

    Downhill backwards walking causes repeated, cyclical loading of the muscle-tendon unit. The effect this type of repeated loading has on the mechanical behaviour of the Achilles tendon is presently unknown. This study aimed to investigate the biomechanical response of the Achilles tendon aponeurosis complex following a downhill backwards walking protocol. Twenty active males (age: 22.3 ± 3.0 years; mass: 74.7 ± 5.6 kg; height: 1.8 ± 0.7 m) performed 60 min of downhill (8.5°), backwards walking on a treadmill at -0.67 m · s(-1). Data were collected before, immediately post, and 24-, 48- and 168-h post-downhill backwards walking. Achilles tendon aponeurosis elongation, strain and stiffness were measured using ultrasonography. Muscle force decreased immediately post-downhill backward walking (P = 0.019). There were increases in Achilles tendon aponeurosis stiffness at 24-h post-downhill backward walking (307 ± 179.6 N · mm(-1), P = 0.004), and decreases in Achilles tendon aponeurosis strain during maximum voluntary contraction at 24 (3.8 ± 1.7%, P = 0.008) and 48 h (3.9 ± 1.8%, P = 0.002) post. Repeated cyclical loading of downhill backwards walking affects the behaviour of the muscle-tendon unit, most likely by altering muscle compliance, and these changes result in tendon stiffness increases.

  5. Bilateral spontaneous non-traumatic rupture of the Achilles tendon: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widdowson David

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present an interesting case of spontaneous non-traumatic bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendons, which is a rare condition. Delayed or missed diagnosis of Achilles tendon ruptures by primary treating physicians is relatively common. Case report A 78-year-old Caucasian woman presented with spontaneous non-traumatic bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendons. Her symptoms started two days after she took ciprofloxacin 500 mg twice daily for a urinary tract infection and prednisolone 30 mg once daily for chronic obstructive airway disease. Conclusion This case report aims to increase the awareness of this rare condition, which should be borne in mind with regard to patients who are on steroid therapy and are concurrently started on fluoroquinolones.

  6. METHOD OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH RECURRENT ACHILLES TENDON RUPTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Rodomanova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to justify a new method of surgical treatment of patients with recurrent and chronic Achilles tendon ruptures conducted applied topographic-anatomic study of 12 fixed and 8 fixed preparations of the lower extremities was performed. In the developed technique were carried out operations in 18 patients aged from 30 to 72 years with repeated ruptures Achilles tendon. The results of treatment were followed-up in all 18 patients in the period from 6 months to 3 years. Repeated tears of Achilles tendon were not observed. The range of motions in ankle joint reconstructed almost in its entirety. Performed topographic and anatomical studies and accumulated clinical experience allow us to recommend the proposed method for a wider clinical use.

  7. Physical rehabilitation after achilles tendon ruptures: a review of modern approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ra’ad Abdul Hadi Mohammad Alalwan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to conduct review methodological approaches to physical rehabilitation after Achilles tendon ruptures. Material & Methods: analysis and synthesis of the foreign and domestic special scientific and methodical literature on physical rehabilitation after surgical treatment of Achilles tendon rupture. Results: restore function lower limb and gait parameters is a long, complex and difficult process. Qualitative rehabilitation process should be accompanied by adequate motor mode and its extension, axial load and special exercise. The most significant differences are observed in the approach concerning types of immobilization, its term and necessity at all, timing axial load. Among the options of immobilization allocated gypsuming, a variety of cast, orthosis, splints and braces. In the later stages of rehabilitation recommendations are somewhat different of terms of basic loads such as the rise of the fingers, walking without assistive devices. Conclusion: problem of design protocol of physical rehabilitation after achilles tendon ruptures is not completely solved.

  8. Comparison between tenocutaneous suture and Kessler suture techniques in treating acute closed Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wen-Ge; Li, Huan; Zhu, Ya-Ping; Liu, Zhi-wei

    2014-06-01

    To compare the effectiveness of tenocutaneous suture and conventional Kessler suture techniques in treating acute closed Achilles tendon rupture. A total of 33 patients with acute closed Achilles tendon rupture who were admitted to our hospital from February 1998 to December 2008 underwent repair with either a tenocutaneous suture or Kessler suture technique. All patients were followed up for 1-5 years (mean, 3 years). According to the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scale, the excellence rate was 91% in the Kessler suture group and 98% in the tenocutaneous suture group, with a significant difference between groups. Our tenocutaneous suture technique is an effective method for treating Achilles tendon rupture. It has certain advantages compared with the conventional incision method and is worthy of wide clinical application. Copyright © 2014 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Does achilles tendon cross sectional area differ after downhill, level and uphill running in trained runners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Katy Andrews; Johnson, A Wayne; Hunter, Iain; Myrer, J William

    2014-12-01

    In this study we examined how hill running affects the Achilles tendon, a common location for injuries in runners. Twenty females ran for 10 min on each of three randomly ordered grades (-6%, 0 and +6%) at speeds selected to match the metabolic rates. Achilles tendon (AT) cross-sectional area (CSA) was imaged using Doppler ultrasound and peak vertical forces were analyzed using an instrumented treadmill. A metabolic cart and gas analyzer ensured a similar metabolic cost across grades. Data were analyzed using a forward selection regression. Results showed similar decreases in AT CSA from pre- to post-run for all three conditions of ~5 to 7% (p = 0.0001). Active peak vertical forces were different across grades (p = 0.0001) with the largest occurring during downhill running and smallest during uphill running. Since changes in AT CSA were not different between grades, each form of running appears equal and acceptable in regards to how the Achilles tendon reacts. That is, the results suggest that the Achilles tendon is affected by downhill, level, and uphill running and a decrease in CSA appears to be a normal response. Key PointsDownhill (- 6%), level and uphill (+ 6%) running at different speeds each caused a statistically significant decrease in the Achilles tendon cross-sectional area in healthy, trained runners.The magnitude of change in Achilles tendon cross-sectional area did not differ between grades when metabolic cost of running was matched.Downhill running resulted in the largest peak vertical force, while uphill running resulted in the smallest.

  10. Long-term Results of Chronic Achilles Tendon Ruptures Repaired With V-Y Tendon Plasty and Fascia Turndown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guclu, Berk; Basat, H Cagdas; Yildirim, Tugrul; Bozduman, Omer; Us, Ali Kemal

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the long-term follow-up results of V-Y tendon plasty with fascia turndown, for repairing chronic Achilles tendon ruptures. Seventeen patients (12 males, 5 females), who were diagnosed with chronic Achilles tendon rupture and met the inclusion criteria, were included in the study. These patients received treatment by means of V-Y tendon plasty with fascia turndown from January 1995 to December 2001. Clinical outcomes of the patients were assessed by using isokinetic strength testing, questioning the patient regarding residual discomfort, pain, or swelling and having the ability to perform heel rises and using American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society's (AOFAS's) Ankle-Hind Foot Scale score. Mean follow-up duration was 16 years (13-18 years). Mean time from the injury to operative treatment was 7 months. Mean operative defect of Achilles tendon in neutral position after debridement was 6 cm. During the follow-up, the mean calf atrophy was 3.4 cm. The mean 30 degrees/s plantarflex and 120 degrees/s plantarflex peak torques were 89 and 45 Nm, respectively. The mean 30 degrees/s plantarflex peak torque deficiency was 16%. The mean 120 degrees/s plantarflex peak torque deficiency was 17%. The average peak torque deficiency was 17%. The pre- and postoperative mean AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot Scale scores were 64 and 95, respectively. No patient had a rerupture. Superficial wound infection was treated with oral antibiotic therapy in 2 patients (11%). The V-Y tendon plasty with fascia turndown for repairing chronic Achilles tendon ruptures yielded results comparable with the literature regarding clinical outcomes. This method did not require synthetic materials for augmentation and was an economic alternative compared to other repair methods. Level III, retrospective comparative study. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Age-related differences in Achilles tendon properties and triceps surae muscle architecture in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenroth, Lauri; Peltonen, Jussi; Cronin, Neil J; Sipilä, Sarianna; Finni, Taija

    2012-11-01

    This study examined the concurrent age-related differences in muscle and tendon structure and properties. Achilles tendon morphology and mechanical properties and triceps surae muscle architecture were measured from 100 subjects [33 young (24 ± 2 yr) and 67 old (75 ± 3 yr)]. Motion analysis-assisted ultrasonography was used to determine tendon stiffness, Young's modulus, and hysteresis during isometric ramp contractions. Ultrasonography was used to measure muscle architectural features and size and tendon cross-sectional area. Older participants had 17% lower (P Triceps surae muscle size was smaller (P < 0.05) and gastrocnemius medialis muscle fascicle length shorter (P < 0.05) in old compared with young. Maximal plantarflexion force was associated with tendon stiffness and Young's modulus (r = 0.580, P < 0.001 and r = 0.561, P < 0.001, respectively). Comparison between old and young subjects with similar strengths did not reveal a difference in tendon stiffness. The results suggest that regardless of age, Achilles tendon mechanical properties adapt to match the level of muscle performance. Old people may compensate for lower tendon material properties by increasing tendon cross-sectional area. Lower tendon stiffness in older subjects might be beneficial for movement economy in low-intensity locomotion and thus optimized for their daily activities.

  12. [Impingement lesion of the distal anterior Achilles tendon in sub-Achilles bursitis and Haglund-pseudoexostosis-a therapeutic challenge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrer, H; Arentz, S

    2003-12-01

    Retrocalcaneal bursitis in athletes is frequently misdiagnosed. Results of conservative treatment are not very promising. This investigation evaluates the results of 39 consecutive cases in 38 patients surgically treated due to chronic retrokalkaneal bursitis in a sport specific population. Preoperative MRI and ultrasound investigation showed corresponding lesions (focal degeneration, partial rupture) of the anterior Achilles tendon. This is possibly the result of a previously undescribed impingement lesion produced by the Haglund's bone and the chronically inflamed retrocalcaneal bursa. During operation this lesion was additionally addressed in 85% of the cases. Follow up was done after 32 months. Success rate was 54%. VISA-A Score at follow up was 80.6 points. Training and competition activities were started at 16 weeks and 9 months respectively. Unsatisfying results were analysed. In two cases Haglund's bone resection was incomplete and had to be removed in a reoperation. Additionally one deep wound infection had to be revised. Due to the distal Achilles tendon fiber extensions around the medial and lateral calcaneal bone, an unintended Achilles tendon lesion, induced by the edge of the osteotome seems to be possible. Two calcanear stress fractures complicated the postoperative rehabilitation.

  13. Evaluation of absorbable and nonabsorbable sutures for repair of achilles tendon rupture with a suture-guiding device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaoglu, Baris; Ulku, Tekin Kerem; Gereli, Arel; Karahan, Mustafa; Turkmen, Metin

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the functional and clinical results of Achilles tendon repairs with an Achilles tendon suture-guiding device using nonabsorbable versus absorbable sutures. We hypothesized that the absorbable suture would have clinical results comparable to those of the nonabsorbable suture for Achilles tendon repair with an Achilles tendon suture-guiding system. From January 2010 to September 2013, 48 consecutive patients who had sustained a spontaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon underwent operative repair with an Achilles tendon suture-guiding device using 2 different suture types. All ruptures were acute. The patients were divided equally into 2 groups according to suture type. In the nonabsorbable suture group, No. 2 braided nonabsorbable polyethylene terephthalate sutures were used, and in the absorbable suture group, braided absorbable polyglactin sutures were used. The average age of the patients was 38 years (range, 28-50 years). Functional outcome scores and complications were evaluated. All patients had an intact Achilles repair after surgery. The American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot clinical outcome scores were 98 (range, 90-100) in the nonabsorbable suture group and 96.8 (range, 87-100) in the absorbable suture group. All patients returned to their previous work. The absorbable suture group had fewer postoperative complications (0%) than the nonabsorbable suture group (12.5%) (P Achilles tendon repair by an Achilles tendon suture-guiding system was associated with a lower incidence of suture reaction; however, functionally the results were not notably different from those using a traditional nonabsorbable suture. We conclude that repair with absorbable sutures is appropriate for Achilles tendon ruptures. Level II, prospective comparative study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Collagen fibril size and crimp morphology in ruptured and intact Achilles tendons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, S P; Qvortrup, K; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2002-01-01

    The present study examined the hypothesis that collagen fibril diameter and crimp angle in ruptured human Achilles tendons differed from that of intact ones. Tissue samples were obtained from the central core (distal core) and the posterior periphery (distal superficial) at the rupture site, and ...... tendon rupture site. Moreover, the lack of symptoms prior to the rupture suggests that clinical tendinopathy is not an etiological factor in complete tendon ruptures.......The present study examined the hypothesis that collagen fibril diameter and crimp angle in ruptured human Achilles tendons differed from that of intact ones. Tissue samples were obtained from the central core (distal core) and the posterior periphery (distal superficial) at the rupture site......, and the proximally intact (proximal superficial) part of the tendon in 10 subjects (38+/-8 years) with a complete tendon rupture. For comparisons corresponding tissue samples were procured from age (38+/-7 years) and gender matched intact Achilles tendons during routine forensic autopsy. The cross-sectional area...

  15. The Effects of Irreversible Electroporation on the Achilles Tendon: An Experimental Study in a Rabbit Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Song

    Full Text Available To evaluate the potential effects of irreversible electroporation ablation on the Achilles tendon in a rabbit model and to compare the histopathological and biomechanical changes between specimens following electroporation ablation and radiofrequency ablation.A total of 140 six-month-old male New Zealand rabbits were used. The animals were randomly divided into two groups, 70 in the radiofrequency ablation group and 70 in the electroporation group. In situ ablations were applied directly to the Achilles tendons of rabbits using typical electroporation (1800 V/cm, 90 pulses and radiofrequency ablation (power control mode protocols. Histopathological and biomechanical evaluations were performed to examine the effects of electroporation ablation and radiofrequency ablation over time.Both electroporation and radiofrequency ablation produced complete cell ablation in the target region. Thermal damage resulted in tendon rupture 3 days post radiofrequency ablation. In contrast, electroporation-ablated Achilles tendons preserved their biomechanical properties and showed no detectable rupture at this time point. The electroporation-ablated tendons exhibited signs of recovery, including tenoblast regeneration and angiogenesis within 2 weeks, and the restoration of their integral structure was evident within 12 weeks.When applying electroporation to ablate solid tumors, major advantage could be that collateral damage to adjacent tendons or ligaments is minimized due to the unique ability of electroporation ablation to target the cell membrane. This advantage could have a significant impact on the field of tumor ablation near vital tendons or ligaments.

  16. Repair of Achilles tendon rupture using autologous semitendinosus graft in a kidney transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Ryohei; Natsuume, Takashi; Yoneda, Kenji; Fuji, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Insertional Achilles tendon injuries can be difficult to treat when minimal tendon tissue remains for anastomosis. Moreover, in the chronic case with tendon shortening, operative repair can be more difficult than acute rupture. It is particularly desirable to reinforce the tendons, in addition to performing primary repair, in patients with renal or systemic diseases because of the accelerated collagen degeneration. Many techniques have been described for the surgical management of Achilles tendon rupture; however, none has shown clear superiority. We report the case of a 50-year-old renal transplant patient with a spontaneous distal Achilles tendon injury that we repaired using the pull-out technique reinforced with an autologous semitendinosus graft. At 2 years postoperatively, the ankle-hindfoot scale score was 92 points, and the postoperative course was without complication. We believe that the free hamstring tendon autograft is advantageous for this repair, because it is easy to handle, has limited donor site morbidity, and preserves the structures around the ankle. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fluoroquinolone-induced bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon: clinical and sonographic findings

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    P. Busilacchi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The fluoroquinolones are antibiotics widely used in the clinical practice. The concomitant use of corticosteroids and fluoroquinolones in elderly patients is recognised as a risk factor for developing clinically relevant tendon lesions. Fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathy is underreported in the literature. Clinical case. A 67-year-old man, came to our observation complaining of 5 days history of bilateral heel pain. The patient had a medical history of sarcoidosis and was treated with a daily dose of 5 mg of prednisone. He was initially given oral levofloxacin (500 mg/die for 10 days, because of an acute respiratory infection. Two days before the end of the antibiotic therapy, he developed bilateral heel pain. He denied any history of trauma. Physical examination revealed swelling and marked tenderness with mild palpation of the Achilles tendons at the calcaneal insertion. The ultrasound evaluation of the Achilles tendons revealed the following main abnormalities: diffuse thickening, loss of the “fibrillar” echotexture, blurred margins, and bilateral partial tendon tears. Discussion. Bilateral Achilles tendon pain and rupture has been described as a rare adverse effect of fluoroquinolone treatment. Most of the fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathies of the Achilles tendon are due to ciprofloxacin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of bilateral Achilles tendon rupture due to levofloxacin. The risk/benefit ratio of the fluoroquinolones should be carefully considered and these drugs should be prescribed cautiously in elderly patients treated with corticosteroids. This case can be regarded as a representative example of the potential clinical efficacy of sonography in daily rheumatological practise.

  18. Ultrasonographic Classification of Achilles Tendon Ruptures as a Rationale for Individual Treatment Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amlang, Michael H.; Zwipp, Hans; Friedrich, Adina; Peaden, Adam; Bunk, Alfred; Rammelt, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. This work introduces a distinct sonographic classification of Achilles tendon ruptures which has proven itself to be a reliable instrument for an individualized and differentiated therapy selection for patients who have suffered an Achilles tendon rupture. Materials and Methods. From January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2005, 273 patients who suffered from a complete subcutaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon (ASR) were clinically and sonographically evaluated. The sonographic classification was organized according to the location of the rupture, the contact of the tendon ends, and the structure of the interposition between the tendon ends. Results. In 266 of 273 (97.4%) patients the sonographic classification of the rupture of the Achilles tendon was recorded. Type 1 was detected in 54 patients (19.8%), type 2a in 68 (24.9%), type 2b in 33 (12.1%), type 3a in 20 (7.3%), type 3b in 61 (22.3%), type 4 in 20 (7.3%), and type 5 in 10 (3.7%). Of the patients with type 1 and fresh ASR, 96% (n = 47) were treated nonoperative-functionally, and 4% (n = 2) were treated by percutaneous suture with the Dresden instrument (pDI suture). Of the patients classified as type 2a with fresh ASR, 31 patients (48%) were treated nonoperatively-functionally and 33 patients (52%) with percutaneous suture with the Dresden instrument (pDI suture). Of the patients with type 3b and fresh ASR, 94% (n = 34) were treated by pDI suture and 6% (n = 2) by open suture according to Kirchmayr and Kessler. Conclusion. Unlike the clinical classification of the Achilles tendon rupture, the sonographic classification is a guide for deriving a graded and differentiated therapy from a broad spectrum of treatments. PMID:24977069

  19. Percutaneous, Minimally Invasive Repair of Traumatic and Simultaneous Rupture of Both Achilles Tendons: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietek, Pawel; Karaczun, Maciej; Kruk, Bartosz; Szczypior, Karina

    2016-01-01

    Achilles injury is a common musculoskeletal disorder. Bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon, however, is much less common and usually occurs spontaneously. Complete, traumatic, and bilateral ruptures are rare and typically require long periods of immobilization before the patient can return to full weightbearing. A 52-year-old male was hospitalized for bilateral traumatic rupture to both Achilles tendons. No risk factors for tendon rupture were found. Blood samples revealed no peripheral blood pathologic features. Both tendons were repaired with percutaneous, minimally invasive surgery using the Achillon(®) tendon suture system. Rehabilitation was begun 4 weeks later. An ankle-foot orthosis was prescribed to provide ankle support with an adjustable range of movement, and active plantar flexion was set at 0° to 30°. The patient remained non-weightbearing with the ankle-foot orthosis device and performed active range-of-motion exercises. At 8 weeks after surgery, we recommended that he begin walking with partial weightbearing using a foot-tibial orthosis with the range of motion set to 45° plantar flexion and 15° dorsiflexion. At 10 weeks postoperatively, he was encouraged to return to full weightbearing on both feet. Beginning rehabilitation as soon as possible after minimally invasive surgery, compared with 6 weeks of immobilization after surgery, provided a rapid resumption to full weightbearing. We emphasize the clinical importance of a safe, simple treatment program that can be followed for a patient with damage to the Achilles tendons. To our knowledge, ours is the first report of minimally invasive repair of bilateral simultaneous traumatic rupture of the Achilles tendon. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Real-time sonoelastography as novel follow-up method in Achilles tendon surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busilacchi, A; Olivieri, M; Ulisse, S; Gesuita, R; Skrami, E; Lording, T; Fusini, F; Gigante, A

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the sonoelastographic features of Achilles tendon healing after percutaneous treatment using real-time sonoelastography, a new tool able to quantify deformation in biological tissues. Patients with atraumatic Achilles tendon ruptures, treated with a percutaneous technique, were assessed. Sonoelastographic evaluations were performed at the myotendinous junction, tendon body/lesion site and osteotendinous junction, both for the operated and contralateral side, at 40 days, 6 months and 1 year after surgery. Using standard regions of interest, the "strain index" (SI) was calculated as an indicator of tendon elasticity. Clinical outcomes were assessed by the ATRS questionnaire at 6 months and 1 year post-operatively and correlated with sonoelastographic findings. Sixty healthy tendons from 30 volunteers were used to provide a healthy control range. Twenty-five patients were recruited for this study. The SI in treated tendons showed progressive stiffening over time, especially at myotendinous junction and at the site of the sutured lesion, resulting in significantly higher stiffness than both the contralateral tendon and healthy volunteers. Peak thickness of treated tendons occurred at 6 months, with a tendency to reduce at 1 year, while never achieving a normal physiological state. Greatest remodelling was seen at the lesion site. The contralateral tendon showed significant thickening at the myotendinous and osteotendinous junctions. The SI of the contralateral tendon was found to be stiffer than physiological values found in the control group. ATRS score improved significantly between 6 months and 1 year, being negatively correlated with the SI (p Achilles tendons become progressively stiffer during follow-up, while the ATRS score improved. From a biomechanical point of view, at 1 year after surgery Achilles tendons did not show a "restitutio ad integrum". Real-time sonoelastography provides more qualitative and quantitative details in the

  1. Effects of Cigarette Smoking on Elastographic Strain Ratio Measurements of Patellar and Achilles Tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ağladıoğlu, Kadir; Akkaya, Nuray; Güngör, Harun R; Akkaya, Semih; Ök, Nusret; Özçakar, Levent

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the sonographic and elastographic properties of patellar and Achilles tendons in smoking and nonsmoking otherwise healthy adults. We conducted a level 3 case-control analytical study. Smoking and nonsmoking volunteers (>18 years) without musculoskeletal system disorders were included in the study. Demographic characteristics and smoking habits (pack-years) were recorded. Proximal, middle, and distal third thicknesses of the patellar and Achilles tendons were measured by B-mode sonography. Strain ratio measurements of the same regions were measured by real-time ultrasound elastography. A total of 69 participants (57 male and 12 female; mean age ± SD, 35.5 ± 7.8 years) were evaluated in the study. Smoking (n = 35) and nonsmoking (n = 34) groups had no significant differences in terms of age, body mass index, sex, and activity level (all P > .05). Proximal, middle, and distal thirds of the patellar and Achilles tendons were significantly thinner in the smoking group (all P smoking group (all Psmoking amount (all P < .05). Thickness and strain ratio measurements of patellar and Achilles tendons were reduced (thinner and harder tendons) in smokers. Clinical implications of these morphologic and elastographic changes should be investigated in future studies. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  2. Management of Neglected Achilles Tendon Division: Assessment of Two Novel and Innovative Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Jain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Repair of injured Achilles tendon in neglected cases is one of the difficult and challenging procedures for surgeon. Here, we share our experience with the use of two innovative techniques for repair of chronic rupture of Achilles tendon. Design. Prospective Study. Setting. Tertiary care hospital. Patients. Twelve patients with chronic Tendo Achilles rupture were followed up over a period of three to five years. Intervention. Patients were divided in two groups, A and B. In Group A, the repair was done with Gastroc-soleus turndown flap and weaving with Plantaris tendon graft and in Group B, with modified Kessler’s technique strengthened with the free plantaris tendon graft. Outcome Assessment. Clinically and by Modified Rupp Scoring system. Results. At an average follow-up of 4 years (Group A, 3.7 and Group B, 4.4 years, the majority of the patients had excellent to good results as assessed with Modified Rupp Scoring with few minor complications in both the groups. There was no significant difference in the baseline variables such as age and gender and also in the Rupp’s score between the two groups. Conclusion. The two techniques are novel and simple and have been found to be useful for repair of chronically ruptured Achilles tendon.

  3. [Anchors and peroneous brevis tendon augmentation and plantaris muscle tendon covering for the reconstruction of achilles tendon rupture caused by corticosteroids injection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Ning

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the clinical therapeutic effects of anchors, peroneus brevis tendon augmentation and plantaris muscle tendon covering on the reconstruction of achilles tendon rupture caused by corticosteroids injection. From March 2005 to April 2010, the clinical data of 10 patients with acute achilles tendon rupture repaired with suture anchors, peroneus brevis tendon augmentation and plantaris muscle tendon covering were retrospectively analyzed. The achilles tendon rupture was caused by corticosteroids injection. There were 8 males and 2 females with a mean age of (46.80 +/- 2.83) years old(ranged from 21 to 68 years). Postoperative complications, the range of movement of affected foot, number of consecutive heel raises and single leg jumpings were recorded. Functional recovery of achilles tendon were assessed according to ankle and hindfoot scores of the American Orthopedic Foot Ankle Society (AOFAS). All patients were followed up for 12 to 18 months with an average of 13.5 months. No wound infection, re-rupture and rejection reaction were found. At the last follow-up, there was no significant difference in the range of movement between affected foot (54.5 +/- 6.3) degrees and unaffected foot (56.8 +/- 3.8) degrees (t = 0.989, P = 0.336). The affected foot could raise heel and do single-leg hops for 10 times continuosly. There was significant difference in AOFAS between preoperative score (67.3 +/- 7.6) and postoperative score (95.5 +/- 7.6) (t = 8.297, P = 0.000);and there was no significant difference between affected foot scores (95.5 +/- 7.6)and unaffected foot scores (98.5 +/- 6.3) (t = 0.961, P = 0.349). Function recovery of achilles tendon: 9 cases were good, 1 case was fine. Anchors, peroneus brevis tendon augmentation and plantaris muscle tendon covering for the reconstruction of achilles tendon rupture caused by corticosteroids injection is a reliable and effective method, with advantage of simple operation, dependable fixation and less complications.

  4. Rehabilitation of Achilles tendon ruptures: is early functional rehabilitation daily routine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankewycz, B; Krutsch, W; Weber, J; Ernstberger, A; Nerlich, M; Pfeifer, Christian G

    2017-03-01

    Ruptures of the Achilles tendon are the most common tendon injuries of the lower extremities. Besides the initial operative or non-operative treatment, rehabilitation of patients plays a crucial role for tendon healing and long-term outcome. As only limited evidence is available for optimized rehabilitation regimen and guidelines for the initial (e.g., first 6 weeks) rehabilitation are limited, this study investigated the current rehabilitation concepts after Achilles tendon rupture. We analyzed 213 written rehabilitation protocols that are provided by orthopedic and trauma surgery institutions throughout Germany in terms of recommendations for weight-bearing, range of motion (ROM), physiotherapy, and choice of orthosis. All protocols for operatively and non-operatively treated Achilles tendon ruptures were included. Descriptive analysis was carried out and statistical analysis applied where appropriate. Of 213 institutions, 204 offered rehabilitation protocols for Achilles tendon rupture and, therefore, 243 protocols for operative and non-operative treatment could be analyzed. While the majority of protocols allowed increased weight-bearing over time, significant differences were found for durations of fixed plantar flexion between operative (o) and non-operative (n) treatments [fixed 30° (or 20)° to 15° (or 10)°: 3.6 weeks (±0.1; o) vs 4.7 weeks (±0.3; n) (p ≤ 0.0001) and fixed 15° (or 10)° to 0°: 5.8 weeks (±0.1; o) vs 6.6 weeks (±0.2; n) (p ≤ 0.001)]. The mean time of the recommended start of physiotherapy is at 2.9 weeks (±0.2; o) vs 3.3 weeks (±0.4; n), respectively. Our study shows that a huge variability in rehabilitation after Achilles tendon rupture exists. This study shows different strategies in rehabilitation of Achilles tendon ruptures using a convertible vacuum brace system. To improve patient care, further clinical as well as biomechanical studies need to be conducted. This study might serve as basis for prospective

  5. Expression, content, and localization of insulin-like growth factor I in human achilles tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jens L; Heinemeier, Katja M; Langberg, Henning;

    2006-01-01

    by immunoflourometric assay, real-time PCR, and immunohistochemistry used to localize and determine expression of IGF-I and IGFBP-4 in 6 postmortem human Achilles tendons. Tendon tissue concentrations of IGF-I were found to be 0.53 +/- 0.10 ng/g. Furthermore, we demonstrated that IGF-I and IGFBP-4 are localized around......In animals insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) stimulates collagen production by fibroblasts and is expressed in tendons together with its binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4). However, the presence of IGF-I and IGFBP-4 in human tendon tissue is not described. Tissue IGF-I content was examined...... the tendon fibroblasts and that mRNA for IGF-I and IGFBP-4 can be determined in human tendon tissue. The present study adds support for the roles of IGF-I and IGFBP-4 in the regulation of tendon adaptive responses to mechanical loading....

  6. [Atypical Achilles tendon rupture in Haglund exostosis--a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porsch, M; Hackenbroch, M H; König, D P

    1998-01-01

    We report about an unusual case of a rupture of the Achilles tendon in a patient with Haglund's exostosis and long term achillodynia. Intraoperatively, we found a fresh superficial typically located tendon-rupture and an old deep round shaped rupture which was located directly over the cranial edge of the calcaneous bone spur. We presume that the sharp edge of Haglund's deformity was the cause of the deep tendon rupture, because the location of the round shaped rupture was near the exostosis. The additional superficial rupture, caused by an inadequate trauma, induced operative revision consisting of double layer transosseous suturing. In conclusion early operative resection of Haglund's deformity in cases of repeated irritations of the Achilles tendon should be performed to avoid mechanical damage, including the risk of rupture by the hypomochlion-like effect of the exostosis.

  7. Effects of tendon viscoelasticity in Achilles tendinosis on explosive performance and clinical severity in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H-K; Lin, K-H; Su, S-C; Shih, T T-F; Huang, Y-C

    2012-12-01

    The aim was to compare viscoelastic properties of Achilles tendons between legs in elite athletes with unilateral tendinosis, and to investigate relationships between the properties and explosive performance and clinical severity. Seventeen male athletes (mean ± standard deviation age, 27.3 ± 2.0 years) who had unilateral, chronic middle-portion tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon were assessed by the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment questionnaire, measurements of tendon viscoelastic properties, voluntary electromechanical delay (EMD), normalized rate of force development (RFD), and one-leg hopping distance. Compared with the non-injured leg, the tendinopathic leg showed reduced tendon stiffness (-19.2%. P tendinosis affect explosive performance in athletes. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Lack of tissue renewal in human adult Achilles tendon is revealed by nuclear bomb (14)C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Schjerling, Peter; Heinemeier, Jan; Magnusson, Stig Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Tendons are often injured and heal poorly. Whether this is caused by a slow tissue turnover is unknown, since existing data provide diverging estimates of tendon protein half-life that range from 2 mo to 200 yr. With the purpose of determining life-long turnover of human tendon tissue, we used the (14)C bomb-pulse method. This method takes advantage of the dramatic increase in atmospheric levels of (14)C, produced by nuclear bomb tests in 1955-1963, which is reflected in all living organisms. Levels of (14)C were measured in 28 forensic samples of Achilles tendon core and 4 skeletal muscle samples (donor birth years 1945-1983) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and compared to known atmospheric levels to estimate tissue turnover. We found that Achilles tendon tissue retained levels of (14)C corresponding to atmospheric levels several decades before tissue sampling, demonstrating a very limited tissue turnover. The tendon concentrations of (14)C approximately reflected the atmospheric levels present during the first 17 yr of life, indicating that the tendon core is formed during height growth and is essentially not renewed thereafter. In contrast, (14)C levels in muscle indicated continuous turnover. Our observation provides a fundamental premise for understanding tendon function and pathology, and likely explains the poor regenerative capacity of tendon tissue.

  9. Therapeutic Effects of Doxycycline on the Quality of Repaired and Unrepaired Achilles Tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quynhhoa T; Norelli, Jolanta B; Graver, Adam; Ekstein, Charles; Schwartz, Johnathan; Chowdhury, Farzana; Drakos, Mark C; Grande, Daniel A; Chahine, Nadeen O

    2017-07-01

    Achilles tendon tears are devastating injuries, especially to athletes. Elevated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity after a tendon injury has been associated with deterioration of the collagen network and can be inhibited with doxycycline (Doxy). Daily oral administration of Doxy will enhance the histological, molecular, and biomechanical quality of transected Achilles tendons. Additionally, suture repair will further enhance the quality of repaired tendons. Controlled laboratory study. Randomized unilateral Achilles tendon transection was performed in 288 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The injured tendons were either unrepaired (groups 1 and 2) or surgically repaired (groups 3 and 4). Animals from groups 2 and 4 received Doxy daily through oral gavage, and animals from groups 1 and 3 served as controls (no Doxy). Tendons were harvested at 1.5, 3, 6, and 9 weeks after the injury (n = 18 per group and time point). The quality of tendon repair was evaluated based on the histological grading score, collagen fiber orientation, gene expression, and biomechanical properties. In surgically repaired samples, Doxy enhanced the quality of tendon repair compared with no Doxy ( P = .0014). Doxy had a significant effect on collagen fiber dispersion, but not principal fiber angle. There was a significant effect of time on the gene expression of MMP-3, MMP-9 and TIMP1, and Doxy significantly decreased MMP-3 expression at 9 weeks. Doxy treatment with surgical repair increased the dynamic modulus at 6 weeks but not at 9 weeks after the injury ( P Doxy also increased the equilibrium modulus and decreased creep strain irrespective of the repair group. Doxy did not have a significant effect on the histology or biomechanics of unrepaired tendons. The findings indicate that daily oral administration of Doxy accelerated matrix remodeling and the dynamic and equilibrium biomechanics of surgically repaired Achilles tendons, although such enhancements were most evident at the 3- to 6

  10. Preinjury and postinjury running analysis along with measurements of strength and tendon length in a patient with a surgically repaired Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Willy, Richard; Davis, Irene

    2012-06-01

    Case report. The Achilles tendon is the most frequently ruptured tendon, and the incidence of Achilles tendon rupture has increased in the last decade. The rupture generally occurs without any preceding warning signs, and therefore preinjury data are seldom available. This case represents a unique opportunity to compare preinjury running mechanics with postinjury evaluation in a patient with an Achilles tendon rupture. A 23-year-old female sustained a right complete Achilles tendon rupture while playing soccer. Running mechanics data were collected preinjury, as she was a healthy participant in a study on running analysis. In addition, patient-reported symptoms, physical activity level, strength, ankle range of motion, heel-rise ability, Achilles tendon length, and running kinetics were evaluated 1 year after surgical repair. During running, greater ankle dorsiflexion and eversion and rearfoot abduction were noted on the involved side postinjury when compared to preinjury data. In addition, postinjury, the magnitude of all kinetics data was lower on the involved limb when compared to the uninvolved limb. The involved side displayed differences in strength, ankle range of motion, heel rise, and tendon length when compared to the uninvolved side 1 year after injury. Despite a return to normal running routine and reports of only minor limitations with running, considerable changes were noted in running biomechanics 1 year after injury. Calf muscle weakness and Achilles tendon elongation were also found when comparing the involved and uninvolved sides.

  11. Ruptured human Achilles tendon has elevated metabolic activity up to 1 year after repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, Pernilla; Couppé, Christian; Lonsdale, Markus; Svensson, René B; Neergaard, Christian; Kjær, Michael; Friberg, Lars; Magnusson, S Peter

    2016-09-01

    Following Achilles tendon rupture, running is often allowed after 6 months. However, tendon healing is slow and the metabolic status of the tendon at this point is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate tendon metabolism (glucose uptake) and vascularization at 3, 6 and 12 months after Achilles tendon rupture as measured using PET and power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS). The study group comprised 23 patients with surgically repaired Achilles tendon rupture who were investigated at 3 months (n = 7), 6 months (n = 7) and 12 months (n = 9) after surgery. The triceps surae complex was loaded over 20 min of slow treadmill walking while a radioactive tracer ((18)F-FDG) was administered prior to PET. Vascularization was measured in terms of PDUS flow activity, and patient-reported outcomes were scored using the Achilles tendon rupture score (ATRS) and sports assessment (VISA-A) questionnaire. Relative glucose uptake ((18)F-FDG) was higher in repaired tendons than in intact tendons at all time-points (6, 3 and 1.6 times higher at 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively; P ≤ 0.001), and was also higher in the tendon core than in the periphery at 3 and 6 months (P ≤ 0.02), but lower at 12 months (P = 0.06). Relative glucose uptake was negatively related to ATRS at 6 months after repair (r = -0.89, P ≤ 0.01). PDUS flow activity was higher in repaired tendons than in intact tendons at 3 and 6 months (P tendon. Indeed, metabolic activity remained elevated for more than 1 year after injury despite normalized vascularization. The robust negative correlation between tendon metabolism and patient-reported outcome suggests that a high metabolic activity 6 months after the injury may be related to a poor clinical healing outcome.

  12. New technical procedure involving Achilles tendon rupture treatment through transcutaneous suture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TarniŢă, DănuŢ Nicolae; TarniŢă, Daniela; Grecu, Dan Cristian; Calafeteanu, Dan Marian; Căpitănescu, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the widest tendon of the human body. Achilles tendon belongs to the extrasynovial tendons group and this allows it a faster recovery, thanks to local hematoma from the peritenon, necessary for the scarification. We concluded that in Achilles tendon rupture treatment it is essential to maintain the tendon covering skin integrity, the peritendinous integrity, to maintain the local hematoma formed during and after tendon rupture, reattaching the ruptured tendon heads and maintain them in this position by suturing them and by relaxing the sural triceps muscle. The percutaneous suture requires five pairs of mirror micro-incisions (5 mm) on one side and the other of the tendon. It is necessary for one of the pairs to be placed to the rupture level. With a surgical needle, we arm the proximal and distal heads of the tendon by different threads. By traction and muscular relaxation, we bring in contact the two ruptured heads and then we knot together the arming threads. The inferior member was cast immobilized in relaxing position for the sural triceps muscle for a 45 days period. Using this technique, we have operated 15 cases in our Clinic. In all the cases, we obtained a healing by first intention of the tegument micro-incisions. After the cast immobilization suppression, during 30 days the patients were in a recovery program. At the end of this program, they have recovered completely the dorsal and plantar flexion and the walking. In four months after the surgery, the esthetic of the area is completely restored, this technique being the only surgical technique that realizes this recovery.

  13. Magic angle imaging of the achilles tendon in patients with chronic tendonopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oatridge, A.; Herlihy, A.; Thomas, R.W.; Wallace, A.L.; Puri, B.K.; Larkman, D.J.; Bydder, G.M. E-mail: graeme.bydder@csc.mrc.ac.uk

    2003-05-01

    AIMS: To assess the Achilles tendon in patients with chronic tendonopathy using magnetic resonance (MR) magic angle imaging, and to compare the appearances and uptake of contrast medium in abnormal tendons with those in normal tendons. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eight patients with chronic Achilles tendonopathy and five normal controls were examined with the long axis of the tendon placed at 55 deg. and at 0 deg. to the main magnetic field. Conventional two-dimensional (2D) multi-slice images were obtained and T1 values were calculated before, and for up to 1 h after the administration of intravenous gadodiamide. Both the unenhanced appearance and the pattern of enhancement in the tendon were compared. RESULTS: In the patients with tendonopathy, high signal intensity areas were evident on the short T1 inversion recovery (STIR) images obtained at 55 deg. in all tendons. Contrast medium enhancement was seen in six tendons and was most obvious on the images obtained at the magic angle. This was initially focal and then spread more diffusely within the tendon. After contrast medium administration, T1 values were significantly reduced in the tendonopathy group compared with normal controls (p<0.01). On the late post-contrast medium images obtained at 55 deg., enhancement was evident in most of the tendon and correlated well with high signal intensity seen on STIR images. CONCLUSION: The use of magic angle MR imaging improved the demonstration of signal changes in the Achilles tendon in chronic tendonopathy. The STIR images obtained at the magic angle showed more obvious signal change than those obtained at 0 deg. The changes due to enhancement were much more evident on images obtained at 55 deg. than at 0 deg. The uptake of contrast medium was greater in the patients than in normal controls.

  14. Partial achilles tendon rupture presenting with giant hematoma; MRI findings of 4 year follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarsilmaz, Aysegul; Varer, Makbule; Coskun, Gulten; Apaydın, Melda; Oyar, Orhan

    2011-12-01

    In the young population, spontaneous rupture of Achilles tendon is very rare. The big hematoma is also rare finding of the Achilles tendon partial rupture. It is usually seen with complete rupture. We presented imaging findings of 4 years follow up of the spontaneous partial rupture of Achilles tendon presenting with giant expanding hematoma and mimicking complete rupture radiologically. We discussed the alterations of tendon signal intensity and result of conservative therapy after partial rupture with big hematoma in the long term. A 29 year-old man, applied with pain and swelling in the retrocalcaneal region of left ankle. He did not have chronic metabolic disease. He was not active in physical activities. X-ray radiograms were normal. At magnetic resonance images (MRI), there was an intratendinous big hematoma, subcutanous fat planes were edematous around tendon. The diagnosis was partial rupture and giant hematoma. Hematoma was drained. The conservative treatment was applied and his complaints disappeared. After treatment, approximately 4 years later, control MRI showed thickened and hypointense tendon in all images. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A composite medial plantar flap for the repair of an achilles' tendon defect: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, C E; Kessler, J

    2001-12-01

    The surgical management of infected necrosis of the Achilles' tendon and overlying skin is very demanding, and reconstruction with vascularized tendon and skin flaps is considered the benchmark procedure. The authors report a 65-year-old man who sustained a chronic wound after operative repair of a chronic rupture of the Achilles' tendon. A pedicled medial plantar flap including the surrounding vascularized plantar aponeurosis was elevated. The plantar aponeurosis was split and used to bridge the 4-cm-long tendon defect. The flap donor site was covered with a thin skin graft. The flap survived completely without recurrence of the infection. At the 7-month follow-up, the reconstructed Achilles' tendon showed a good functional result and a normal range of dorsi- and plantar flexion of the foot. This technique is of great interest in comparison with free flaps because it does not require vascular anastomosis in a septic environment or a secondary debulking operation, yet it still provides both vascularized tendon and skin graft.

  16. Death following bilateral complete Achilles tendon rupture in a patient on fluoroquinolone therapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottschalk Andrew W

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Risk of tendon rupture, especially of the Achilles tendon, is one of the many potential side-effects of fluoroquinolone therapy. Achilles tendon rupture may be painful, debilitating or, as seen in our patient, devastating. While fluoroquinolone-induced tendon rupture typically accompanies other comorbidities (for example renal impairment or concurrent steroid therapy, our case represents a medical 'first' in that there were no such comorbidities and no steroid therapy. Furthermore, our case is remarkable in that tendon rupture was bilateral, complete, and resulted in a devastating outcome. Case presentation A healthy 91-year-old Caucasian man was placed on fluoroquinolone (levofloxacin therapy for a presumed bacterial pneumonitis. Subsequently, he developed bilateral heel pain, edema, and ecchymoses leading to a diagnosis of bilateral complete Achilles tendon rupture. This drug's side-effect was directly responsible for his subsequent physical and psychologic decline and unfortunate death. Conclusion Fluoroquinolones are a powerful and potent tool in the fight against bacterial infection. As a class, they are employed by primary care physicians as well as by subspecialty physicians in all areas of medical practice. However, as this case illustrates, the use of these drugs is not without risk. Attention must be paid to potential side-effects when prescribing any medication, and close follow-up with patients is a medical necessity to evaluate for these adverse reactions, especially with fluoroquinolones.

  17. Biomechanical properties of Achilles tendon repair augmented with a bioadhesive-coated scaffold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, Michael; Vollenweider, Laura; Murphy, John L; Xu Fangmin; Lyman, Arinne; Lew, William D; Lee, Bruce P, E-mail: b-lee@nerites.com [Nerites Corporation, 505 S. Rosa Road, Suite 123, Madison, WI 53719 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    The Achilles tendon is the most frequently ruptured tendon. Both acute and chronic (neglected) tendon ruptures can dramatically affect a patient's quality of life, and require a prolonged period of recovery before return to pre-injury activity levels. This paper describes the use of an adhesive-coated biologic scaffold to augment primary suture repair of transected Achilles tendons. The adhesive portion consisted of a synthetic mimic of mussel adhesive proteins that can adhere to various surfaces in a wet environment, including biologic tissues. When combined with biologic scaffolds such as bovine pericardium or porcine dermal tissues, these adhesive constructs demonstrated lap shear adhesive strengths significantly greater than that of fibrin glue, while reaching up to 60% of the strength of a cyanoacrylate-based adhesive. These adhesive constructs were wrapped around transected cadaveric porcine Achilles tendons repaired with a combination of parallel and three-loop suture patterns. Tensile mechanical testing of the augmented repairs exhibited significantly higher stiffness (22-34%), failure load (24-44%), and energy to failure (27-63%) when compared to control tendons with suture repair alone. Potential clinical implications of this novel adhesive biomaterial are discussed.

  18. Tendon Mineralization Is Progressive and Associated with Deterioration of Tendon Biomechanical Properties, and Requires BMP-Smad Signaling in the Mouse Achilles Tendon Injury Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kairui; Asai, Shuji; Hast, Michael W.; Liu, Min; Usami, Yu; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Soslowsky, Louis J.; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic tendon mineralization can develop following tendon rupture or trauma surgery. The pathogenesis of ectopic tendon mineralization and its clinical impact have not been fully elucidated yet. In this study, we utilized a mouse Achilles tendon injury model to determine whether ectopic tendon mineralization alters the biomechanical properties of the tendon and whether BMP signaling is involved in this condition. A complete transverse incision was made at the midpoint of the right Achilles tendon in 8-week-old CD1 mice and the gap was left open. Ectopic cartilaginous mass formation was found in the injured tendon by 4 weeks post-surgery and ectopic mineralization was detected at 8–10 weeks post-surgery. Ectopic mineralization grew over time and volume of the mineralized materials of 25-weeks samples was about 2.5 fold bigger than that of 10-weeks samples, indicating that injury-induced ectopic tendon mineralization is progressive. In vitro mechanical testing showed that max force, max stress and mid-substance modulus in the 25-weeks samples were significantly lower than the 10-weeks samples. We observed substantial increases in expression of bone morphogenetic protein family genes in injured tendons 1 week post-surgery. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that phosphorylation of both Smad1 and Smad3 were highly increased in injured tendons as early as 1 week post-injury and remained high in ectopic chondrogenic lesions 4 weeks post-injury. Treatment with the BMP receptor kinase inhibitor (LDN193189) significantly inhibited injury-induced tendon mineralization. These findings indicate that injury-induced ectopic tendon mineralization is progressive, involves BMP signaling and associated with deterioration of tendon biomechanical properties. PMID:26825318

  19. A review on animal models and treatments for the reconstruction of Achilles and flexor tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottagisio, Marta; Lovati, Arianna B

    2017-03-01

    Tendon is a connective tissue mainly composed of collagen fibers with peculiar mechanical properties essential to functional movements. The increasing incidence of tendon traumatic injuries and ruptures-associated or not with the loss of tissue-falls on the growing interest in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The use of animal models is mandatory to deepen the knowledge of the tendon healing response to severe damages or acute transections. Thus, the selection of preclinical models is crucial to ensure a successful translation of effective and safe innovative treatments to the clinical practice. The current review is focused on animal models of tendon ruptures and lacerations or defective injuries with large tissue loss that require surgical approaches or grafting procedures. Data published between 2000 and 2016 were examined. The analyzed articles were compiled from Pub Med-NCBI using search terms, including animal model(s) AND tendon augmentation OR tendon substitute(s) OR tendon substitution OR tendon replacement OR tendon graft(s) OR tendon defect(s) OR tendon rupture(s). This article presents the existing preclinical models - considering their advantages and disadvantages-in which translational progresses have been made by using bioactive sutures or tissue engineering that combines biomaterials with cells and growth factors to efficiently treat transections or large defects of Achilles and flexor tendons.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells from a hypoxic culture improve and engraft Achilles tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tung-Fu; Yew, Tu-Lai; Chiang, En-Rung; Ma, Hsiao-Li; Hsu, Chih-Yuan; Hsu, Shan-Hui; Hsu, Yuan-Tong; Hung, Shih-Chieh

    2013-05-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from humans cultured under hypoxic conditions increase bone healing capacity. Rat MSCs cultured under hypoxic conditions increase the tendon healing potential after transplantation into injured Achilles tendons. Controlled laboratory study. Biomechanical testing, histological analysis, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling/collagen immunohistochemistry were performed to demonstrate that augmentation of an Achilles tendon rupture site with hypoxic MSCs increases healing capacity compared with normoxic MSCs and controls. Fifty Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the experiments, with 2 rats as the source of bone marrow MSCs. The cut Achilles tendons in the rats were equally divided into 3 groups: hypoxic MSC, normoxic MSC, and nontreated (vehicle control). The uncut tendons served as normal uncut controls. Outcome measures included mechanical testing in 24 rats, histological analysis, and BrdU labeling/collagen immunohistochemistry in another 24 rats. The ultimate failure load in the hypoxic MSC group was significantly greater than that in the nontreated or normoxic MSC group at 2 weeks after incision (2.1 N/mm(2) vs 1.1 N/mm(2) or 1.9 N/mm(2), respectively) and at 4 weeks after incision (5.5 N/mm(2) vs 1.7 N/mm(2) or 2.7 N/mm(2), respectively). The ultimate failure load in the hypoxic MSC group at 4 weeks after incision (5.5 N/mm(2)) was close to but still significantly less than that of the uncut tendon (7.2 N/mm(2)). Histological analysis as determined by the semiquantitative Bonar histopathological grading scale revealed that the hypoxic MSC group underwent a significant improvement in Achilles tendon healing both at 2 and 4 weeks when compared with the nontreated or normoxic MSC group via statistical analysis. Immunohistochemistry further demonstrated that the hypoxic and normoxic MSC groups had stronger immunostaining for type I and type III collagen than did the nontreated group both at 2 and 4 weeks after

  1. The influence of physical activity during youth on structural and functional properties of the Achilles tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenskjold, A; Kongsgaard, M; Larsen, J O

    2015-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a highly prevalent sports injury. Animal studies show a growth response in tendons in response to loading in the immature phase but not after puberty maturation. The aim of this investigation was to examine the structural and material properties in long distance runners w...

  2. The Effectiveness of Open Repair Versus Percutaneous Repair for an Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Heidi; David, Shannon

    2016-12-01

    Clinical Scenario: There are 2 approaches available for surgical repair of the Achilles tendon: open or percutaneous. However, there is controversy over which repair is superior. Focused Clinical Question: Which type of surgery is better in providing the best overall patient outcome, open or percutaneous repair, in physically active men and women with acute Achilles tendon ruptures? Summary of Search, "Best Evidence" Appraised, and Key Findings: The literature was searched for studies of level 3 evidence or higher that investigated the effectiveness of open repair versus percutaneous repair on acute Achilles tendon ruptures in physically active men and women. The literature search resulted in 3 studies for possible inclusion. All 3 good-quality studies were included. Clinical Bottom Line: There is supporting evidence to indicate that percutaneous repair is the best option for Achilles tendon surgery when it comes to the physically active population. Percutaneous repair has faster surgery times, less risk of complications, and faster recovery times over having an open repair, although it is acknowledged that every patient has a different situation and best individual option may vary patient to patient.

  3. Unrecognised Acute Rupture of the Achilles Tendon in Severe Ankle Sprain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Wai Lam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Inversion ankle sprain is a common sport injury. It commonly refers to the injury of lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle. Failure to detect the concomitant injuries would lead to inappropriate treatment and suboptimal result. A case of unrecognised rupture of the Achilles tendon in a patient with severe inversion ankle sprain is reported.

  4. [No influence of physiotherapy on outcome after open repair of achilles tendon ruptures?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateschrang, A; Gratzer, C; Rolauffs, B; Glatzle, J; Weise, K; Braun, A

    2008-12-01

    Many studies have been performed to analyse the influence of surgical techniques and the postoperative aftercare after Achilles tendon ruptures on the outcome. However, there is no study investigating the influence of physiotherapy on outcome after surgical repair and standardised early functional rehabilitation of Achilles tendon rupture, so that this was the objective of the present study. In this retrospective study, 104 patients with Achilles tendon ruptures, all treated by open repair followed by a standardised early rehabilitation, were evaluated by the Thermann score. The average age was 42 years. We could identify 3 patient groups. Group I (n=23) did not receive any physiotherapy. Group II (n=41) received physiotherapy for 3-6 weeks, and group III (n=40) received more than 6 weeks of physiotherapy. Physiotherapy consisted of 3 units per week. Each unit lasted for 30 min. All groups were compared statistically via variance analysis. Group I scored on average 88.8 points, group II 88.6 and group III 87.0 points. There were no statistically significant differences between the three groups (p=0.50). The age of patients had also no relevant influence on the outcome (p=0.48). Physiotherapy and age of the patients involved were not found to influence the outcome after open augmented repair of Achilles tendon ruptures followed by a standardised early rehabilitation. These results should be confirmed by a prospective randomised trial. Also elderly patients participating in demanding sport activities should receive a surgical repair.

  5. Does Achilles Tendon Cross Sectional Area Differ after Downhill, Level and Uphill Running in Trained Runners?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katy Andrews Neves, A. Wayne Johnson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examined how hill running affects the Achilles tendon, a common location for injuries in runners. Twenty females ran for 10 min on each of three randomly ordered grades (-6%, 0 and +6% at speeds selected to match the metabolic rates. Achilles tendon (AT cross-sectional area (CSA was imaged using Doppler ultrasound and peak vertical forces were analyzed using an instrumented treadmill. A metabolic cart and gas analyzer ensured a similar metabolic cost across grades. Data were analyzed using a forward selection regression. Results showed similar decreases in AT CSA from pre- to post-run for all three conditions of ~5 to 7% (p = 0.0001. Active peak vertical forces were different across grades (p = 0.0001 with the largest occurring during downhill running and smallest during uphill running. Since changes in AT CSA were not different between grades, each form of running appears equal and acceptable in regards to how the Achilles tendon reacts. That is, the results suggest that the Achilles tendon is affected by downhill, level, and uphill running and a decrease in CSA appears to be a normal response.

  6. The amplitude of the Achilles tendon reflex in infants is related to body position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, Janneke L. M.; Bos, Arend F.; vd Hoeven, Johannes H.; Brouwer, Oebele F.; Sollie, Krystyna M.; Sival, Deborah A.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether the Achilles tendon reflex (ATR) in healthy infants is modulated by changes in body position (prone vs. supine). The amplitude of the ATR was compared at postnatal day 1, months 2, 3 and 6, while infants were placed in prone and supine position. The ATR was con

  7. Sonographic measurements of the achilles tendon, plantar fascia, and heel fat pad are reliable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Finn E; Jensen, Signe; Stallknecht, Sandra E

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine intra- and interobserver reliability and precision of sonographic (US) scanning in measuring thickness of the Achilles tendon, plantar fascia, and heel fat pad in patients with heel pain. METHODS: Seventeen consecutive patients referred with heel pain were included. Two...

  8. Effect of cyclic training model on terminal structure of rabbit Achilles tendon: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-lin HUANG

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To observe the effect of cyclic training on histomorphology of the terminal structure of rabbit Achilles tendon, and explore its preventive effect on training-based enthesiopathy. Methods  Seventy-two Japanese white rabbits were randomly assigned to four groups: control group, jumping group, running group and cyclic training group, 18 for each. Three rabbits of each group were sacrificed at the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 6th, 8th and 10th week. The terminal insertion tissues of bilateral Achilles tendons were harvested from these rabbits for observing the pathomorphological changes under light microscope, and pathological scoring and statistical analysis were carried out. Results  Light microscopy showed that the tendon fibers and fibrocartilage in the Achilles tendon insertion region were severely damaged in the jumping group, and though the tendon fibers were damaged severely, the injury to the fibrocartilage was comparatively less serious in the running group. The injuries to the tendon fibers and fibrocartilage were milder in the cyclic training group than in the jumping group and running group. In the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 6th and 8th week, the histopathology score of insertion of Achilles tendon was 1.17±0.12, 2.19±0.15, 3.23±0.20, 4.66±0.16, 4.71±0.18, 4.63±0.13 respectively in the jumping group, and 1.16±0.13, 1.15±0.14, 2.18±0.12, 2.99±0.15, 3.98±0.16, 4.01±0.12 respectively in the running group. Increase in pathological score appeared earlier in the jumping group than in the running group, and a significant increase began at the 3rd week. The difference in pathological score between the two groups originated mainly from the changes in the tidemark. In the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 6th, 8th and 10th week, the pathological score of Achilles tendon insertion was 1.13±0.14, 1.16±0.17, 1.15±0.13, 2.18±0.13, 2.17±0.12, 2.92±0.11 respectively in the cyclic training group, and they showed no significant changes as compared with control

  9. [Successive ruptures of patellar and Achilles tendons. Anabolic steroids in competitive sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, J; Prokop, A; Skouras, E

    2008-01-01

    Derivatives of testosterone or of 19-nor-testosterone are used as anabolics for the purpose of improving performance although the effect of anabolics is known still to be under discussion. The use of anabolic steroids continues among competitive athletes despite increased controls and increasingly frequent dramatic incidents connected with them. Whereas metabolic dysfunction during anabolic use is well documented, ruptures of the large tendons are rarely reported. Within 18 months, a 29-year-old professional footballer needed surgery for rupture of the patellar tendon and of both Achilles tendons. Carefully directed questioning elicited confirmation that he had taken different anabolic steroids regularly for 3 years with the intention of improving his strength. After each operation anabolic steroids were taken again at a high dosage during early convalescence and training. Minimally invasive surgery and open suturing techniques led to complete union of the Achilles tendons in good time. Training and anabolic use (metenolon 300 mg per week) started early after suturing of the patellar tendon including bone tunnels culminated in histologically confirmed rerupture after 8 weeks. After a ligament reconstruction with a semitendinosus tendon graft with subsequent infection, the tendon and reserve traction apparatus were lost. Repeated warnings of impaired healing if anabolic use was continued had been given without success. In view of the high number of unrecorded cases in competitive and athletic sports, we can assume that the use of anabolic steroids is also of quantitative relevance in the operative treatment of tendon ruptures.

  10. Comparison of structural anisotropic soft tissue models for simulating Achilles tendon tensile behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayyeri, Hanifeh; Longo, Giacomo; Gustafsson, Anna; Isaksson, Hanna

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of tendon injury (tendinopathy) has increased over the past decades due to greater participation in sports and recreational activities. But little is known about the aetiology of tendon injuries because of our limited knowledge in the complex structure-function relationship in tendons. Computer models can capture the biomechanical behaviour of tendons and its structural components, which is essential for understanding the underlying mechanisms of tendon injuries. This study compares three structural constitutive material models for the Achilles tendon and discusses their application on different biomechanical simulations. The models have been previously used to describe cardiovascular tissue and articular cartilage, and one model is novel to this study. All three constitutive models captured the tensile behaviour of rat Achilles tendon (root mean square errors between models and experimental data are 0.50-0.64). They further showed that collagen fibres are the main load-bearing component and that the non-collagenous matrix plays a minor role in tension. By introducing anisotropic behaviour also in the non-fibrillar matrix, the new biphasic structural model was also able to capture fluid exudation during tension and high values of Poisson׳s ratio that is reported in tendon experiments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of muscle contraction levels on the force-length relationship of the human Achilles tendon during lengthening of the triceps surae muscle-tendon unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugisaki, Norihide; Kawakami, Yasuo; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2011-07-28

    Findings from animal experiments are sometimes contradictory to the idea that the tendon structure is a simple elastic spring in series with muscle fibers, and suggest influence of muscle contraction on the tendon mechanical properties. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of muscle contraction levels on the force-length relationship of the human Achilles tendon during lengthening of the triceps surae muscle-tendon unit. For seven subjects, ankle dorsiflexion was performed without (passive condition) and with contraction of plantar flexor muscles (eccentric conditions, at 3 contraction levels) on an isokinetic dynamometer. Deformation of the Achilles tendon during each trial was measured using ultrasonography. The Achilles tendon force corresponding to the tendon elongation of 10mm in the passive condition was significantly smaller than those in the eccentric conditions (p<0.05 or p<0.01). Within the eccentric conditions, the Achilles tendon force corresponding to the tendon elongation of 10mm was significantly greater in the maximal contraction level than those in submaximal eccentric conditions (p<0.05 or p<0.01). In addition, the tendon stiffness was greater in higher contraction levels (p<0.05 or p<0.01). Present results suggest that the human tendon structure is not a simple elastic spring in series with muscle fibers.

  12. Augmented Versus Nonaugmented Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Quan; Lin, Xiang-Jin

    2017-04-01

    Although simple end-to-end repair of the Achilles tendon is common, many augmented repair protocols have been implemented for acute Achilles tendon rupture. However, whether augmented repair is better than nonaugmented repair of an acute Achilles tendon rupture is still unknown. To conduct a meta-analysis to determine whether augmented surgical repair of an acute Achilles tendon rupture improved subjective patient satisfaction without an increase in rerupture rates. Secondary outcomes assessed included infections, ankle range of motion, calf muscle strength, and minor complications. Meta-analysis. A systematic literature search of peer-reviewed articles was conducted to identify all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing augmented repair and nonaugmented repair for acute Achilles tendon rupture from January 1980 to August 2016 in the electronic databases of PubMed, Web of Science (SCI-E/SSCI/A&HCI), and EMBASE. The keywords (Achilles tendon rupture) AND (surg* OR operat* OR repair* OR augment* OR non-augment* OR end-to-end OR sutur*) were combined, and results were limited to human RCTs and controlled clinical trials published in the English language. Four RCTs involving 169 participants were eligible for inclusion; 83 participants were treated with augmented repair and 86 were treated with nonaugmented repair. Augmented repair led to similar responses when compared with nonaugmented repair for acute Achilles tendon rupture (93% vs 90%, respectively; P = .53). The rerupture rates showed no significant difference for augmented versus nonaugmented repair (7.2% vs 9.3%, respectively; P = .69). No differences in superficial and deep infections occurred in augmented (7 infections) and nonaugmented (8 infections) repair groups during postoperative follow-up ( P = .89). The average incisional infection rate was 8.4% with augmented repair and 9.3% with nonaugmented repair. No significant differences in other complications were found between augmented (7.2%) and

  13. Experimental diabetes induces structural, inflammatory and vascular changes of Achilles tendons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo R de Oliveira

    Full Text Available This study aims to demonstrate how the state of chronic hyperglycemia from experimental Diabetes Mellitus can influence the homeostatic imbalance of tendons and, consequently, lead to the characteristics of tendinopathy. Twenty animals were randomly divided into two experimental groups: control group, consisting of healthy rats and diabetic group constituted by rats induced to Diabetes Mellitus I. After twenty-four days of the induction of Diabetes type I, the Achilles tendon were removed for morphological evaluation, cellularity, number and cross-sectional area of blood vessel, immunohistochemistry for Collagen type I, VEGF and NF-κB nuclear localization sequence (NLS and nitrate and nitrite level. The Achilles tendon thickness (µm/100g of diabetic animals was significantly increased and, similarly, an increase was observed in the density of fibrocytes and mast cells in the tendons of the diabetic group. The average number of blood vessels per field, in peritendinous tissue, was statistically higher in the diabetic group 3.39 (2.98 vessels/field when compared to the control group 0.89 (1.68 vessels/field p = 0.001 and in the intratendinous region, it was observed that blood vessels were extremely rare in the control group 0.035 (0.18 vessels/field and were often present in the tendons of the diabetic group 0.89 (0.99 vessels/field. The immunohistochemistry analysis identified higher density of type 1 collagen and increased expression of VEGF as well as increased immunostaining for NFκB p50 NLS in the nucleus in Achilles tendon of the diabetic group when compared to the control group. Higher levels of nitrite/nitrate were observed in the experimental group induced to diabetes. We conclude that experimental DM induces notable structural, inflammatory and vascular changes in the Achilles tendon which are compatible with the process of chronic tendinopathy.

  14. The Effect of Phospholipids (Surfactant) on Adhesion and Biomechanical Properties of Tendon: A Rat Achilles Tendon Repair Model.

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    Dabak, T Kursat; Sertkaya, Omer; Acar, Nuray; Donmez, B Ozgur; Ustunel, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion of the tendon is a major challenge for the orthopedic surgeon during tendon repair. Manipulation of biological environment is one of the concepts to prevent adhesion. Lots of biochemicals have been studied for this purpose. We aimed to determine the effect of phospholipids on adhesion and biomechanical properties of tendon in an animal tendon repair model. Seventy-two Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups. Achilles tendons of rats were cut and repaired. Phospholipids were applied at two different dosages. Tendon adhesion was determined histopathologically and biomechanical test was performed. At macroscopic evaluation of adhesion, there are statistically significant differences between multiple-dose phospholipid injection group and Control group and also hyaluronic acid group and Control group (p 0.008). Ultimate strength was highest at hyaluronic acid injection group and lowest at multiple-dose phospholipid injection group. Single-dose phospholipids (surfactant) application may have a beneficial effect on the tendon adhesion. Although multiple applications of phospholipids seem the most effective regime to reduce the tendon adhesion among groups, it deteriorated the biomechanical properties of tendon.

  15. Treatment of ruptured Achilles tendon: Operative or non-operative procedure?

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    Cukelj, Fabijan; Bandalovic, Ante; Knezevic, Josip; Pavic, Arsen; Pivalica, Bozen; Bakota, Bore

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of non-operative and surgical procedures in the treatment of ruptured Achilles tendon in athletes (professional and amateur). Ninety professional or amateur athletes with rupture of the Achilles tendon were included in the study between 1998 and 2013. The athletes were aged between 25 and 40 years (mean 34.83±4.65). A total of 30 athletes underwent an open procedure, 30 were treated with a percutaneous method and 30 were treated non-operatively. All operated patients were tested one year after the surgical procedure. An isokinetic dynamometer was used to compare the open and percutaneous methods. The results for the patients who were treated using the percutaneous method were 15% better than those for the patients who underwent the open procedure; the results for the group treated conservatively were 20% better than those for the group treated percutaneously. The percutaneous method was easier technically than the open method. Time spent in hospital was 14.5 times shorter with the percutaneous procedure compared with the open procedure (percutaneous procedure: range 0.5-2 days, mean 0.79±0.36; open procedure: range 10-24 days, mean 11.46±2.70; pAchilles tendon in the group treated with the percutaneous procedure. One patient in the group treated with the open procedure had postoperative infection (4.2%). In the non-surgical (conservatively treated) group, there were three reruptures of the Achilles tendon within one year, and one patient developed adhesions that resulted in loss of function and had to undergo an operation. The percutaneous method is the best method of surgical treatment for Achilles tendon rupture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The chinese version of achilles tendon total rupture score: cross-cultural adaptation, reliability and validity.

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    Cui, Jin; Jia, Zhenyu; Zhi, Xin; Li, Xiaoqun; Zhai, Xiao; Cao, Liehu; Weng, Weizong; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Lin; Chen, Xiao; Su, Jiacan

    2017-01-05

    The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS), which is originally developed in 2007 in Swedish, is the only patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) for specific outcome assessment of an Achilles tendon rupture.Purpose of this study is to translate and cross-culturally adapt Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) into simplified Chinese, and primarily evaluate the responsiveness, reliability and validity. International recognized guideline which was designed by Beaton was followed to make the translation of ATRS from English into simplified Chinese version (CH-ATRS). A prospective cohort study was carried out for the cross-cultural adaptation. There were 112 participants included into the study. Psychometric properties including floor and ceiling effects, Cronbach's alpha, intraclass correlation coefficient, effect size, standard response mean, and construct validity were tested. The mean scores of CH-ATRS are 57.42 ± 13.70. No sign of floor or ceiling effect was found of CH-ATRS. High level of internal consistency was supported by the value of Cronbach's alpha (0.893). ICC (0.979, 95%CI: 0.984-0.993) was high to indicate the high test-retest reliability. Great responsive ness was proved with the high absolute value of ES and SRM (0.84 and 8.98, respectively). The total CH-ATRS score had very good correlation with physical function and body pain subscales of SF-36 (r = -0.758 and r = -0.694, respectively, p Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (CH-ATRS) can be used as a reliable and valid instrument for Achilles tendon rupture assessing in Chinese-speaking population. Level of evidence II.

  17. Professional Athletes' Return to Play and Performance After Operative Repair of an Achilles Tendon Rupture.

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    Trofa, David P; Miller, J Chance; Jang, Eugene S; Woode, Denzel R; Greisberg, Justin K; Vosseller, J Turner

    2017-06-01

    Most Achilles tendon ruptures are sports related. However, few studies have examined and compared the effect of surgical repair for complete ruptures on return to play (RTP), play time, and performance across multiple sports. To examine RTP and performance among professional athletes after Achilles tendon repair and compare pre- versus postoperative functional outcomes of professional athletes from different major leagues in the United States. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. National Basketball Association (NBA), National Football League (NFL), Major League Baseball (MLB), and National Hockey League (NHL) athletes who sustained a primary complete Achilles tendon rupture treated surgically between 1989 and 2013 were identified via public injury reports and press releases. Demographic information and performance-related statistics were recorded for 2 seasons before and after surgery and compared with matched controls. Statistical analyses were used to assess differences in recorded metrics. Of 86 athletes screened, 62 met inclusion criteria including 25 NBA, 32 NFL, and 5 MLB players. Nineteen (30.6%) professional athletes with an isolated Achilles tendon rupture treated surgically were unable to return to play. Among athletes who successfully returned to play, game participation averaged 75.4% ( P .05). When individual sports were compared, NBA players were most significantly affected, experiencing significant decreases in games played, play time, and performance. An Achilles tendon rupture is a devastating injury that prevents RTP for 30.6% of professional players. Athletes who do return play in fewer games, have less play time, and perform at a lower level than their preinjury status. However, these functional deficits are seen only at 1 year after surgery compared with matched controls, such that players who return to play can expect to perform at a level commensurate with uninjured controls 2 years postoperatively.

  18. Extended field of view ultrasound imaging to evaluate Achilles tendon length and thickness: a reliability and validity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbernagel, Karin Gravare; Shelley, Kristen; Powell, Stephen; Varrecchia, Shaun

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Achilles tendon structural changes are common after injury and correlate with recovery of function. Having simple, inexpensive, yet valid and reliable measures of Achilles tendon structure are useful both in research and clinical. The purpose of this study was to perform reliability and validity measures of extended field of view (EFOV) ultrasound (US) imaging of the Achilles tendon. Methods eight cadavers (16 tendons) were used for the validation study to compare Achilles tendon length measurements from US images with actual measured length from dissected tendons. Nine healthy subjects (18 tendons) were included in the test-retest evaluation. Results the correlation between the US images and cadaveric measurements was excellent (ICC=0.895) for the length between calcaneus and the gastrocnemius and good (ICC=0.744) for the length between the calcaneus and the soleus. The between-limb reliability was excellent (ICC 0.886–0.940) for the tendon length measurements with standard error of measurements (SEM) of 0.64 cm for calcaneus to soleus and 0.67 cm for calcaneus to gastrocnemius. Between-day test-retest reliability was also excellent (ICC=0.898–0.944). Conclusion this study supports the use of EFOV US imaging as a reliable and valid method to determine Achilles tendon length and thickness, and using the uninjured limb for comparison. PMID:27331037

  19. Achilles tendon rupture: physiotherapy and endoscopy-assisted surgical treatment of a common sports injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doral, Mahmut Nedim; Bozkurt, Murat; Turhan, Egemen; Dönmez, Gürhan; Demirel, Murat; Kaya, Defne; Ateşok, Kıvanç; Atay, Ozgür Ahmet; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-12-13

    Although the Achilles tendon (AT) is the strongest tendon in the human body, rupture of this tendon is one of the most common sports injuries in the athletic population. Despite numerous nonoperative and operative methods that have been described, there is no universal agreement about the optimal management strategy of acute total AT ruptures. The management of AT ruptures should aim to minimize the morbidity of the injury, optimize rapid return to full function, and prevent complications. Since endoscopy-assisted percutaneous AT repair allows direct visualization of the synovia and protects the paratenon that is important in biological healing of the AT, this technique becomes a reasonable treatment option in AT ruptures. Furthermore, Achilles tendoscopy technique may decrease the complications about the sural nerve. Also, early functional postoperative physiotherapy following surgery may improve the surgical outcomes.

  20. Division Tenorrhaphy: A Novel Technique for Chronic or Failed Nonoperatively Treated Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Jesse; Katsuura, Yoshihiro; Richardson, Nicholas

    2017-06-01

    Here we describe a modified open technique for the repair of a ruptured Achilles tendon using multiple looped sutures with the creation of interdigitating tendon stumps maximizing surface area for suture application as well as allowing for significant tissue overlay. This technique produces a high strength repair that is useful in cases of extensive degeneration or poor-quality tissue. Degenerative tissue may be encountered with chronic ruptures or failed nonoperative treatment, as well as those ruptures that occur at the proximal myotendinous junction. We present 2 cases in which the technique was utilized: one of a failed nonoperatively treated rupture and another of a chronic rupture. The technique was found to be successful for both patients with improvement in visual analogue scale, Achilles tendon total rupture score, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Score, and Foot and Ankle Disability Index. Level IV.

  1. Xenograft scaffold full-wrap reinforcement of Krackow achilles tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisbeck, Jacob M; Parks, Brent G; Schon, Lew C

    2012-03-07

    Standard 4-strand repair of Achilles tendon tears is effective, but additional strength may be desirable in patients who are compromised or those with reruptures. Use of a xenograft scaffold has not been investigated biomechanically in Achilles tendon repair. This study compared stiffness, gap formation, and ultimate load to failure with Krackow repair vs Krackow repair augmented with xenograft scaffold in 6 matched pairs of fresh-frozen human lower extremities. The Achilles tendon was transected 4 cm above the calcaneal insertion. Specimens were randomized to receive standard Krackow repair or Krackow repair augmented with a porcine xenograft scaffold. The graft was wrapped around the repaired tendon, sutured to itself with 2-0 FiberWire (Arthrex, Naples, Florida), and attached to the tendon distally and proximally and then medially and laterally. Specimens were loaded for 200 cycles between 5 and 30 N. Load to 5-mm gapping and load to ultimate failure were measured. Xenograft scaffold augmentation of standard Krakow Achilles tendon repair was significantly stronger and stiffer than standard Krackow repair in a biomechanical model immediately after repair (39.0±8.8 vs 24.4±4.6 N/mm; P=.01). The augmented repair group had significantly higher load to ultimate failure than did the Krackow group (862.7±174.0 vs 479.5±65.5 N; P<.01). Biological factors remain to be investigated, but this augmentation method could provide additional strength in patients who are compromised or those with reruptures.

  2. Experimental Diabetes Alters the Morphology and Nano-Structure of the Achilles Tendon

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rodrigo Ribeiro; Medina de Mattos, Rômulo; Magalhães Rebelo, Luciana; Guimarães Meireles Ferreira, Fernanda; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Eurico Nasciutti, Luiz; de Castro Brito, Gerly Anne

    2017-01-01

    Although of several studies that associate chronic hyperglycemia with tendinopathy, the connection between morphometric changes as witnessed by magnetic resonance (MR) images, nanostructural changes, and inflammatory markers have not yet been fully established. Therefore, the present study has as a hypothesis that the Achilles tendons of rats with diabetes mellitus (DM) exhibit structural changes. The animals were randomly divided into two experimental groups: Control Group (n = 06) injected with a vehicle (sodium citrate buffer solution) and Diabetic Group (n = 06) consisting of rats submitted to intraperitoneal administration of streptozotocin. MR was performed 24 days after the induction of diabetes and images were used for morphometry using ImageJ software. Morphology of the collagen fibers within tendons was examined using Atomic Force microscopy (AFM). An increase in the dimension of the coronal plane area was observed in the diabetic group (8.583 ± 0.646 mm2/100g) when compared to the control group (4.823 ± 0.267 mm2/100g) resulting in a significant difference (p = 0.003) upon evaluating the Achilles tendons. Similarly, our analysis found an increase in the size of the transverse section area in the diabetic group (1.328 ± 0.103 mm2/100g) in comparison to the control group (0.940 ± 0.01 mm2/100g) p = 0.021. The tendons of the diabetic group showed great irregularity in fiber bundles, including modified grain direction and jagged junctions and deformities in the form of collagen fibrils bulges. Despite the morphological changes observed in the Achilles tendon of diabetic animals, IL1 and TNF-α did not change. Our results suggest that DM promotes changes to the Achilles tendon with important structural modifications as seen by MR and AFM, excluding major inflammatory changes. PMID:28095484

  3. Recurrent patellar tendon rupture in a patient after intramedullary nailing of the tibia: reconstruction using an Achilles tendon allograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagow, Devin M; Garcia, Branden J; Yacoubian, Stephan V; Yacoubian, Shahan V

    2015-05-01

    Various complications after intramedullary (IM) nailing of the tibia have been reported, the most common of which are anterior knee pain and symptoms similar to patella tendonitis. Complete rupture of the patellar tendon after IM nailing of the tibia has been reported on 2 occasions, in conjunction with predisposing patient factors, such as systemic disease or a proud tibial nail. Patellar tendon ruptures are disabling injuries that can be technically difficult to repair because of the poor quality of remaining tendon tissue, quadriceps muscle atrophy and/or contracture, and scar-tissue formation. Many methods have described the surgical reconstruction of the knee extensor mechanism, which is most commonly performed after total knee arthroplasty. We report the successful surgical and clinical outcome of patellar tendon reconstruction using an Achilles tendon allograft in a patient subject to late and recurrent ruptures after IM nailing of the tibia through a mid-patellar tendon-splitting approach. Seven months after tendon reconstruction, the patient exhibited full knee flexion, an extension lag of 10º, 4/5 quadriceps strength, and return to her baseline ambulatory status.

  4. Subject-specific finite element analysis to characterize the influence of geometry and material properties in Achilles tendon rupture.

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    Shim, Vickie B; Fernandez, Justin W; Gamage, Prasad B; Regnery, Camille; Smith, David W; Gardiner, Bruce S; Lloyd, David G; Besier, Thor F

    2014-11-28

    Achilles tendon injuries including rupture are one of the most frequent musculoskeletal injuries, but the mechanisms for these injuries are still not fully understood. Previous in vivo and experimental studies suggest that tendon rupture mainly occurs in the tendon mid-section and predominantly more in men than women due to reasons yet to be identified. Therefore we aimed to investigate possible mechanisms for tendon rupture using finite element (FE) analysis. Specifically, we have developed a framework for generating subject-specific FE models of human Achilles tendon. A total of ten 3D FE models of human Achilles tendon were generated. Subject-specific geometries were obtained using ultrasound images and a mesh morphing technique called Free Form Deformation. Tendon material properties were obtained by performing material optimization that compared and minimized difference in uniaxial tension experimental results with model predictions. Our results showed that both tendon geometry and material properties are highly subject-specific. This subject-specificity was also evident in our rupture predictions as the locations and loads of tendon ruptures were different in all specimens tested. A parametric study was performed to characterize the influence of geometries and material properties on tendon rupture. Our results showed that tendon rupture locations were dependent largely on geometry while rupture loads were more influenced by tendon material properties. Future work will investigate the role of microstructural properties of the tissue on tendon rupture and degeneration by using advanced material descriptions.

  5. Achilles Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  6. Genome-wide association screens for Achilles tendon and ACL tears and tendinopathy

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    Roos, Thomas R.; Roos, Andrew K.; Kleimeyer, John P.; Ahmed, Marwa A.; Goodlin, Gabrielle T.; Fredericson, Michael; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Avins, Andrew L.; Dragoo, Jason L.

    2017-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy or rupture and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture are substantial injuries affecting athletes, associated with delayed recovery or inability to return to competition. To identify genetic markers that might be used to predict risk for these injuries, we performed genome-wide association screens for these injuries using data from the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort consisting of 102,979 individuals. We did not find any single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with either of these injuries with a p-value that was genome-wide significant (pAchilles tendon injury and ACL rupture, respectively. We then tested SNPs previously reported to be associated with either Achilles tendon injury or ACL rupture. None showed an association in our cohort with a false discovery rate of less than 5%. We obtained, however, moderate to weak evidence for replication in one case; specifically, rs4919510 in MIR608 had a p-value of 5.1x10-3 for association with Achilles tendon injury, corresponding to a 7% chance of false replication. Finally, we tested 2855 SNPs in 90 candidate genes for musculoskeletal injury, but did not find any that showed a significant association below a false discovery rate of 5%. We provide data containing summary statistics for the entire genome, which will be useful for future genetic studies on these injuries. PMID:28358823

  7. Healing of Achilles tendon partial tear following focused shockwave: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu YC

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Chun Hsu,1,* Wei-Ting Wu,2,* Ke-Vin Chang,2–4 Der-Sheng Han,2–4 Li-Wei Chou5–7 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Community and Geriatric Research Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Bei-Hu Branch, 3National Taiwan University College of Medicine, 4Community and Geriatric Research Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Bei-Hu Branch, Taipei, 5Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, China Medical University Hospital, 6Graduate Institute of Acupuncture Science, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, 7Department of Rehabilitation, Asia University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Achilles tendinopathy is a common cause of posterior heel pain and can progress to partial tendon tear without adequate treatment. Effects of traditional treatments vary, and many recent reports focus on the use of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT for Achilles tendinopathy but not for Achilles tendon partial tear. Here, we report the case of a 64-year-old female suffering from severe left heel pain for half a year. All treatment and rehabilitation were less effective until ESWT was applied. Each course of focused shockwave therapy included 2500 shots with energy flux density from 0.142 mJ/mm2 to 0.341 mJ/mm2. The visual analog scale decreased from nine to one degree. High-resolution musculoskeletal ultrasonography was performed before and 1 month after the treatment, which revealed healing of the torn region and decrease in inflammation. ESWT had shown to be an alternative treatment for Achilles tendon partial tear under safety procedure and ultrasound observation. Keywords: focused shockwave, Achilles tendon, partial tear, ultrasonography

  8. Surgical Correction of the Achilles Tendon for Diabetic Foot Ulcerations and Charcot Neuroarthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Zgonis, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Achilles tendon pathologic conditions are implicated in contributing to the development of many diabetic foot complications including diabetic foot ulceration and Charcot neuroarthropathy. Surgical correction of the diabetic equinus deformity has been studied as an isolated or adjunctive treatment when dealing with difficult-to-close diabetic foot ulcerations or when surgically addressing the diabetic Charcot neuroarthropathy foot or ankle. This article reviews the most common indications, complications, and surgical procedures for equinus correction by either a tendo-Achilles lengthening or gastrocnemius recession for the management of diabetic foot conditions.

  9. High voltage pulsed current in collagen realignment, synthesis, and angiogenesis after Achilles tendon partial rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érika P. Rampazo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To verify the efficacy of high voltage pulsed current in collagen realignment and synthesis and in angiogenesis after the partial rupturing of the Achilles tendon in rats. Method Forty male Wistar rats were randomized into four groups of 10 animals each: sham, cathodic stimulation, anodic stimulation, and alternating stimulation. Their Achilles tendons were submitted to direct trauma by a free-falling metal bar. Then, the treatment was administered for six consecutive days after the injury. In the simulation group, the electrodes were positioned on the animal, but the device remained off for 30 minutes. The other groups used a frequency of 120 pps, sensory threshold, and the corresponding polarity. On the seventh day, the tendons were removed and sent for histological slide preparation for birefringence and Picrosirius Red analysis and for blood vessel quantification. Results No significant difference was observed among the groups regarding collagen realignment (types I or III collagen or quantity of blood vessels. Conclusion High voltage pulsed current for six consecutive days was not effective in collagen realignment, synthesis, or angiogenesis after the partial rupturing of the Achilles tendon in rats.

  10. High voltage pulsed current in collagen realignment, synthesis, and angiogenesis after Achilles tendon partial rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampazo, Érika P.; Liebano, Richard E.; Pinfildi, Carlos Eduardo; Folha, Roberta A. C.; Ferreira, Lydia M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To verify the efficacy of high voltage pulsed current in collagen realignment and synthesis and in angiogenesis after the partial rupturing of the Achilles tendon in rats. Method Forty male Wistar rats were randomized into four groups of 10 animals each: sham, cathodic stimulation, anodic stimulation, and alternating stimulation. Their Achilles tendons were submitted to direct trauma by a free-falling metal bar. Then, the treatment was administered for six consecutive days after the injury. In the simulation group, the electrodes were positioned on the animal, but the device remained off for 30 minutes. The other groups used a frequency of 120 pps, sensory threshold, and the corresponding polarity. On the seventh day, the tendons were removed and sent for histological slide preparation for birefringence and Picrosirius Red analysis and for blood vessel quantification. Results No significant difference was observed among the groups regarding collagen realignment (types I or III collagen) or quantity of blood vessels. Conclusion High voltage pulsed current for six consecutive days was not effective in collagen realignment, synthesis, or angiogenesis after the partial rupturing of the Achilles tendon in rats. PMID:27556387

  11. Strenuous Treadmill Running Induces a Chondrocyte Phenotype in Rat Achilles Tendons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shao-Yong; Li, Shu-Fen; Ni, Guo-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background Although tendinopathy is common, its underlying pathogenesis is poorly understood. This study aimed to investigate the possible pathogenesis of tendinopathy. Material/Methods In this study, a total of 24 rats were randomly and evenly divided into a control (CON) group and a strenuous treadmill running (STR) group. Animals in the STR group were subjected to a 12-week treadmill running protocol. Subsequently, all Achilles tendons were harvested to perform histological observation or biochemical analyses. Results Histologically, hypercellularity and round cells, as well as disorganized collagen fibrils, were presented in rat Achilles tendon sections from the STR group. Furthermore, our results showed that the expression of aggrecan, collagen type II (Col II), and Sex-Determining Region Y Box 9 (Sox 9) were markedly increased in the STR group compared with that in the CON group. Additionally, the mRNA expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and biglycan was significantly up-regulated in the STR group in contrast to that in CON group. Conclusions These results suggest that a 12-week strenuous treadmill running regimen can induce chondrocyte phenotype in rat Achilles tendons through chondrogenic differentiation of tendon stem cells (TSCs) by BMP-2 signaling. PMID:27742920

  12. Biomechanical evaluation of varying the number of loops in a repair of a physiological model of Achilles tendon rupture.

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    Grieco, Preston W; Frumberg, David B; Weinberg, Maxwell; Pivec, Robert; Naziri, Qais; Uribe, Jaime A

    2015-04-01

    Numerous suturing techniques have been described to treat Achilles tendon ruptures. No prior studies have evaluated frayed tendon ends on construct strength and whether this allows for less extensile exposure. Forty bovine Achilles tendons were divided into groups: 1 control and 4 experimental. Experimental groups were sectioned with ends frayed longitudinally in 2 mm intervals for 2 cm with no fraying for the control group. Four-stand Krackow sutures were used for repairs with 3 loops in the control group, 2 loops in frayed section for experimental groups, and varying numbers of loops (1-4) in healthy tendon. Samples were tested in loading cells at 100 N and 190 N for 1000 cycles. Gap width and maximum load failure were measured. Gapping was tendon (10.9-13.9 mm). Most early catastrophic failures (5/8) occurred in groups with 1-2 loops in healthy tendon. Two failures at 100 N occurred in 1-loop healthy tendons. The least failures occurred in controls (2/8), at 190 N. Suture loops incorporated into frayed tendon portions predisposed repairs to significantly greater gapping and lower maximal failure forces than 4-strand Krackow repairs in unfrayed tendons. We cannot recommend attempting more limited exposures with sutures in frayed tendon as this may lead to early repair failure. We provided a physiologic model utilizing frayed tendon ends that resembles in vivo Achilles tendon rupture. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. [PART-KESSLER TECHNIQUE WITH SUTURE ANCHOR IN REPAIR OF SPONTANEOUS Achilles TENDON RUPTURE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jie; Duan, Liang; Li, Weiwei; Wei, Wenbo

    2016-02-01

    To summarize the application and experience of repairing spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture by part-Kessler technique with suture anchor. Between January 2011 and December 2013, 31 patients with spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture were treated by part-Kessler technique with suture anchor. Of 31 cases, 23 were male and 8 were female, aged 16-53 years (mean, 38 years). The left side was involved in 15 cases and the right side in 16 cases. The causes of injury included sudden heel pain and walking weakness during sports in 22 cases; no surefooted down-stairs, slip, and carrying heavy loads in 9 cases. The distance from broken site to the calcaneus adhension of Achilles tendon was 3-6 cm (mean, 4.2 cm). The time from injury to operation was 7 hours to 4 days (mean, 36.8 hours). All incisions healed by first intention without nerve injury or adhering with skin. The patients were followed up 6-24 months (mean, 15 months). All patients could complete 25 times heel raising without difficulty at 6 months after operation. No Achilles tendon rupture occurred again during follow-up. At 6 months after operation, the range of motion of the ankle joint in dorsiflexion and plantar flexion showed no significant difference between normal and affected sides (t=0.648, P=0.525; t=0.524, P=0.605). The circumference of the affected leg was significantly smaller than that of normal leg at 6 months after operation (t=2.074, P=0.041), but no significant difference was found between affected and normal sides at 12 months after operation (t=0.905, P=0.426). The American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scores at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after operation were significantly higher than preoperative score (P0.05). Repairing spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture by part-Kessler technique with suture anchor can supply strong strain and decrease the shear forces of suture. So part-Kessler technique with suture anchor is successful in repairing spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture.

  14. Can platelet-rich plasma have a role in Achilles tendon surgical repair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carli, Angelo; Lanzetti, Riccardo Maria; Ciompi, Alessandro; Lupariello, Domenico; Vadalà, Antonio; Argento, Giuseppe; Ferretti, Andrea; Vulpiani, M C; Vetrano, M

    2016-07-01

    Our hypothesis was that the Achilles tendon healing process after surgical treatment would be promoted by PRP with a faster return to sports activities. Thirty patients with Achilles tendon rupture and surgically treated with a combined mini-open and percutaneous technique were prospectively enroled in the study. Patients were alternately case-by-case assigned to Group A (control group; 15 patients) or Group B (study group; 15 patients). In Group B, PRP was locally infiltrated both during surgery and 14 days after surgery. Patients in both groups were followed up at 1, 3, 6 and 24 months post-operatively via physical examination, VAS, FAOS and VISA-A scales; ultrasonography (US) and MRI were also conducted at one and 6 months; at the 6-month follow-up, isokinetic and jumping capacity tests were also performed. The VAS, FAOS and VISA-A scale showed no difference between the two groups at 1, 3, 6 and 24 months post-operatively. Isokinetic evaluation showed no differences at both angular speeds. Jumping evaluation showed no difference at 6 months. Also US evaluation showed no differences. MRI data analysis before administration of gadolinium did not reveal significant differences between the two groups. Moreover, after intravenous injection of gadolinium, patients in Group B showed signal enhancement in 30 % of patients compared to 80 % in Group A at 6 months, as indirect evidence of better tendon remodelling (P Achilles tendon ruptures surgically treated with and without addition of PRP is shown by present study. Clinical results, morphological features and jumping capability were similar in both groups. The addition of PRP to the surgical treatment of Achilles tendon rupture does not appear to offer superior clinical and functional results. IV.

  15. The plantaris tendon in association with mid-portion Achilles tendinosis: tendinosis-like morphological features and presence of a non-neuronal cholinergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spang, Christoph; Alfredson, Håkan; Ferguson, Mark; Roos, Beverley; Bagge, Johan; Forsgren, Sture

    2013-05-01

    The plantaris tendon is often neglected in morphological/clinical studies on the lower extremity. There is, however, clinical evidence that the plantaris tendon is involved in cases with Achilles midportion tendinopathy/tendinosis. It is nevertheless unclear if the plantaris tendon exhibits tendinosis-like features in this situation. We therefore investigated the plantaris tendon of patients with midportion Achilles tendinosis when the plantaris tendon was found to be located very close to or invaginated into the Achilles tendon, a situation which very often has been found to be the case. There was a very large number of tenocytes in the tendon tissue and the tenocytes showed abnormal and irregular appearances, exhibiting widened/rounded and wavy appearances, and were frequently lined up in rows. These features are characteristic features in Achilles tendinosis tendons. The tendon cells showed a distinct immunoreaction for the acetylcholine (ACh) -producing enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Frequent fibroblasts were found in the loose connective tissue and these cells also showed a marked ChAT immunoreaction. The study shows that the plantaris tendon is morphologically affected in a similar way to the Achilles tendon in cases with midportion Achilles tendinosis and medial pain. The plantaris tendon may accordingly be a co-factor in these cases. The results also favour that there is a local ACh production both within the tendon tissue of the plantaris tendon and in the loose connective tissue. In conclusion, it is evident that plantaris tendons lying invaginated into or very close to the Achilles tendon in cases with midportion Achilles tendinosis show similar tendinosis features, as previously shown for the Achilles tendon itself in these cases.

  16. Collagen membrane alleviates peritendinous adhesion in the rat Achilles tendon injury model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Huan; GUAN Hong-geng; GU Jun; LUO Zong-ping; ZHANG Wen; CHEN Bing; GU Qiao-li

    2013-01-01

    Background Tendon adhesion is one of the most common causes of disability following tendon surgery.Therefore,prevention of peritendinous adhesion after surgical repair of tendon is a major challenge.The aim of this study was to explore the possible application of a collagen membrane for the prevention or attenuation of peritendinous adhesions.Methods Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat Achilles tendon was cut and sutured by a modified Kessler's technique with or without the collagen membrane wrapped.Macroscopic,morphological and biomechanical evaluations were applied to examine the recovery of the injured tendon at 4 and 8 weeks after surgery.Results The surgery group wrapped by collagen membranes had a better outcome than the group with surgery repair only.In the collagen membrane-treated group,less adhesion appeared,stronger tensile strength was detected,and more tendon fibers and collagen I expression were observed morphologically.Conclusion Wrapping the tendon with a collagen membrane may be an efficient approach for tendon repair and preventing tendon adhesion after its ruptures.

  17. Characterization and comparison of post-natal rat Achilles tendon-derived stem cells at different development stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jialin; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Zeyu; Zhu, Ting; Shen, Weiliang; Ran, Jisheng; Tang, Qiaomei; Gong, Xiaonan; Backman, Ludvig J; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Xiaowen; Wen, Feiqiu; Ouyang, Hongwei

    2016-03-14

    Tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSPCs) are a potential cell source for tendon tissue engineering. The striking morphological and structural changes of tendon tissue during development indicate the complexity of TSPCs at different stages. This study aims to characterize and compare post-natal rat Achilles tendon tissue and TSPCs at different stages of development. The tendon tissue showed distinct differences during development: the tissue structure became denser and more regular, the nuclei became spindle-shaped and the cell number decreased with time. TSPCs derived from 7 day Achilles tendon tissue showed the highest self-renewal ability, cell proliferation, and differentiation potential towards mesenchymal lineage, compared to TSPCs derived from 1 day and 56 day tissue. Microarray data showed up-regulation of several groups of genes in TSPCs derived from 7 day Achilles tendon tissue, which may account for the unique cell characteristics during this specific stage of development. Our results indicate that TSPCs derived from 7 day Achilles tendon tissue is a superior cell source as compared to TSPCs derived from 1 day and 56 day tissue, demonstrating the importance of choosing a suitable stem cell source for effective tendon tissue engineering and regeneration.

  18. Uphill running improves rat Achilles tendon tissue mechanical properties and alters gene expression without inducing pathological changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, K M; Skovgaard, D; Bayer, M L

    2012-01-01

    Overuse Achilles tendinopathy is a common and challenging problem in sports medicine. Little is known about the etiology of this disorder, and the development of a good animal model for overuse tendinopathy is essential for advancing insight into the disease mechanisms. Our aim was to test...... a previously proposed rat model for Achilles tendon overuse. Ten adult male Sprague-Dawley rats ran on a treadmill with 10° incline, 1 h/day, 5 days/wk (17-20 m/min) for 12 wk and were compared with 12 control rats. Histological, mechanical, and gene-expression changes were measured on the Achilles tendons...

  19. Tendinosis-like histologic and molecular changes of the Achilles tendon to repetitive stress: a pilot study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam Soon; Hwang, Ji Hye; Lee, Yong Taek; Chae, Seoung Wan

    2011-11-01

    Tendinopathy (pain and tendon degeneration) is associated with repetitive use and mechanical overload. However, the etiology of tendinopathy remains unclear. Clarification of histologic and molecular changes of tendon to repetitive stress could provide better understanding of Achilles tendon disorders related to repetitive stress. We asked whether repetitive stress simulating overuse of the Achilles tendon induced (1) histologic changes in rats similar to tendinosis (increased cellularity of fibrocytes, increased disorganization of collagen fiber, and increased roundness of the nucleus of the fibrocyte), (2) increased collagen Type III occurrence, and (3) increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. We used an exercise protocol simulating repetitive, jerky, eccentric contraction of the triceps surae in 15 rats. We conducted the exercise for 2 hours per day, three times per week using the right rear legs only and the left legs as internal controls. We harvested Achilles tendons after either 2, 4, or 6 weeks of exercise, and evaluated changes in tendon thickness, fibrocyte count, collagen fiber arrangement, collagen fiber type, and occurrence of iNOS. Exercised Achilles tendons showed increased cellularity of fibrocytes at 4 and 6 weeks of exercise, and disorganized collagen fiber arrangement at 6 weeks of exercise. There was a trend for Type III collagen occurrence being greater in experimental groups. Expression of iNOS increased after 2 and 4 weeks of exercise when compared with that of the controls, but decreased after 6 weeks. These observations suggest repetitive, synchronized, passive, and jerky exercise induced by electrical stimulation can lead to the tendinosis-like changes in the Achilles tendons in rats with imbalance between synthesis and degeneration after 4 weeks of exercise. This newly designed exercise protocol may be used to design an animal model of Achilles tendon overuse. With this model, therapeutic interventions of tendinopathy

  20. Neglected Achilles Tendon Rupture Treated with Flexor Hallucis Longus transfer with two turndown gastrocnemius fascia flap and reinforced with plantaris tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Haijiao; Shi, Zengyuan; Xu, Dachuan; Liu, Zhenxin

    2015-09-01

    Neglected Achilles Tendon Ruptures are commonly seen by orthopaedic surgeons. In cases resistant to conservative treatment, a variety of surgical procedures have been utilized in the past. The senior -surgeon at our institution has utilized a technique -employing two turndown fascia flaps fashioned from the proximal Achilles tendon augmented by a tenomyodesis of the flexor hallucis longus and plantaris tendon. The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical outcome of all patients who underwent this procedure. The medical records of 10 cases that underwent this procedure were retrospectively reviewed. We completed data collection sets using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hind foot scores, isokinetic evaluation, and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1 year of follow-up. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hind foot scores improved from 64.4±3.54. Isokinetic testing at 30º/sec and 120º/sec revealed an mean deficits of 24.5%, respectively, in the plantar flexion peak torque of the involved ankle than non-involved ankle. The flexor hallucis longus tendon, gastrocnemius fascia flap and plantaris were well -integrated into the Achilles tendon forming a homogenous tendon, which was confirmed in MRI. Our subjective and objective data indicate that the reconstructive technique using flexor hallucis longus transfer with two turndown gastrocnemius fascia flaps and plantaris tendon is a good option for repairing large gap defect of Achilles tendon.

  1. The treatment of a rupture of the Achilles tendon using a dedicated management programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, A M; Topliss, C; Beard, D; Evans, R M; Williams, P

    2015-04-01

    The Swansea Morriston Achilles Rupture Treatment (SMART) programme was introduced in 2008. This paper summarises the outcome of this programme. Patients with a rupture of the Achilles tendon treated in our unit follow a comprehensive management protocol that includes a dedicated Achilles clinic, ultrasound examination, the use of functional orthoses, early weight-bearing, an accelerated exercise regime and guidelines for return to work and sport. The choice of conservative or surgical treatment was based on ultrasound findings. The rate of re-rupture, the outcome using the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) and the Achilles Tendon Repair Score, (AS), and the complications were recorded. An elementary cost analysis was also performed. Between 2008 and 2014 a total of 273 patients presented with an acute rupture 211 of whom were managed conservatively and 62 had surgical repair. There were three re-ruptures (1.1%). There were 215 men and 58 women with a mean age of 46.5 years (20 to 86). Functional outcome was satisfactory. Mean ATRS and AS at four months was 53.0 (sd 14), 64.9 (sd 15) (n = 135), six months 67.8 (sd 16), 73.8 (sd 15) (n = 103) and nine months (72.4; sd 14) 72.3 (sd 13) (n = 43). The programme realised estimated cost savings exceeding £91,000 per annum. The SMART programme resulted in a low rate of re-rupture, a satisfactory outcome, a reduced rate of surgical intervention and a reduction in healthcare costs. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the Achilles tendon using ultrashort TE (UTE) pulse sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robson, M.D.; Benjamin, M.; Gishen, P.; Bydder, G.M. E-mail: gbydder@ucsd.edu

    2004-08-01

    AIM: To assess the potential value of imaging the Achilles tendon with ultrashort echo time (UTE) pulse sequences. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four normal controls and four patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy were examined in the sagittal and transverse planes. Three of the patients were examined before and after intravenous gadodiamide. RESULTS: The fascicular pattern was clearly demonstrated within the tendon and detail of the three distinct fibrocartilaginous components of an 'enthesis organ' was well seen. T2* measurements showed two short T2* components. Increase in long T2 components with reduction in short T2 components was seen in tendinopathy. Contrast enhancement was much more extensive than with conventional sequences in two cases of tendinopathy but in a third case, there was a region of reduced enhancement. CONCLUSION: UTE pulse sequences provide anatomical detail not apparent with conventional sequences, demonstrate differences in T2* and show patterns of both increased and decreased enhancement in tendinopathy.

  3. Evidence of accumulated stress in Achilles and anterior knee tendons in elite badminton players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Anders Ploug; Boesen, Morten Ilum; Koenig, Merete Juhl

    2011-01-01

    Tendon-related injuries are a major problem, but the aetiology of tendinopathies is unknown. In tendinopathies as well as during unaccustomed loading, intra-tendinous flow can be detected indicating that extensive loading can provoke intra-tendinous flow. The aim of present study is to evaluate......- and tuberositas region. Intra-tendinous flow was measured using both a semi-quantitative grading system (CD grading) and a quantitative scoring system (CF) on colour Doppler. Intra-tendinous flow in the Achilles and anterior knee tendons was examined in fourteen single players before tournament and after 1st...... and 2nd match, respectively on both the dominant and non-dominant side. All players had abnormal intra-tendinous flow (Colour Doppler = grade 2) in at least one tendon in at least one scan during the tournament. At baseline, only two of the 14 players had normal flow in all the tendons examined. After 1...

  4. The Neglected Achilles Tendon Rupture Repaired With Allograft: A Review of 14 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofili, Kene P; Pollard, Jason D; Schuberth, John M

    Various surgical techniques have been reported for the repair of neglected Achilles tendon ruptures, including V-Y advancements, synthetic augmentations, and collagen implants. The use of an Achilles tendon allograft allows bridging of large defects without donor site morbidity, with a relative ease of technique and adequate graft availability. The present retrospective report focused on the outcomes of a series of 14 patients with neglected ruptures treated with an Achilles tendon allograft. Patients were included in the present series if they had ≥12 months of postoperative follow-up data available and the allograft had been used without any adjunctive procedures. Of the 14 patients, 6 were female (43%) and 8 were male (57%), with a mean follow-up period of 16.1 ± 3 (range 12 to 27) months. The mean interval from the initial injury to surgery was 6.9 ± 5 (range 1 to 28) months. The mean intraoperative defect size was 7.0 ± 3 (range 4 to 15) cm. A calcaneal block was used in 2 patients (14%). All patients were able to perform a single heel rise at a mean of 27 ± 11 (range 12 to 37) weeks postoperatively. Weightbearing in normal shoe gear was achieved at a mean of 13.5 ± 3 (range 12 to 17) weeks. Complications included 1 delayed union (7%) of the calcaneal bone block. Repair of the neglected Achilles tendon rupture with an allograft appears to be an acceptable approach, with good overall outcomes and low risk. These results suggest that this method of repair compares favorably with established alternatives. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Effect of early versus late rehabilitation in patients with Achilles tendon tenorrhaphy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Mena, R; Burgos-Elías, V M; Pérez-González, C S

    2013-01-01

    Achilles tendon tear is a prevalent condition in our setting. There is no consensus in the literature regarding the ideal treatment modality or the right immobilization period before starting physiatrics. The harmful effect of prolonged immobilization is widely known, so the functional results of early versus late physical therapy are compared in patients subjected to surgery for Achilles tendon tear. Ambispective, longitudinal, comparative study in patients over 16 years of age with Achilles tendon rupture treated surgically and referred to rehabilitation; they followed the management protocol established at the service. Retrospective record review was performed for discharged patients and patients admitted after the study initiation date were followed-up prospectively. The evaluation continued by means of a phone interview; results were recorded according to the Achilles Tendon Rupture Score. A total of 115 patients were included; they were classified into two groups according to the time elapsed between the surgery and the onset of physical therapy, as follows: 31 patients in group A, with onset between postoperative days 0 and 21; and 84 patients in group B, with onset after postoperative day 21. Two infectious complications were reported and no re-ruptures. Functional results were 6.52 for group A and 8.18 for group B. The duration of rehabilitation was similar in all patients, regardless of the protocol. The time elapsed between surgery and discharge was shortest in patients who underwent early physical therapy. The functional score is independent from the onset of physical therapy. Surgery followed by early mobilization is a safe practice that does not increase complications and shortens the total time the patients need to resume their daily activities.

  6. Performance outcomes after repair of complete achilles tendon ruptures in national basketball association players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Nirav H; Old, Andrew B; Tabb, Loni P; Garg, Rohit; Toossi, Nader; Cerynik, Douglas L

    2013-08-01

    A complete rupture of the Achilles tendon is a devastating injury. Variables affecting return to competition and performance changes for National Basketball Association (NBA) players are not readily evident. Players in the NBA who ruptured their Achilles tendons and who underwent surgical repair would have more experience in the league, and the performance of those who were able to return to competition would be decreased when compared with their performance before injury and with their control-matched peers. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Data for 18 basketball players with Achilles tendon repair over a 23-year period (1988-2011) were obtained from injury reports, press releases, and player profiles. Variables included age, body mass index (BMI), player position, and number of years playing in the league. Individual season statistics were obtained, and the NBA player efficiency rating (PER) was calculated for 2 seasons before and after injury. Controls were matched by playing position, number of seasons played, and performance statistics. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the effect of each factor. At the time of injury, the average age was 29.7 years, average BMI was 25.6, and average playing experience was 7.6 years. Seven players never returned to play an NBA game, whereas 11 players returned to play 1 season, with 8 of those players returning for ≥2 seasons. Players who returned missed an average of 55.9 games. The PER was reduced by 4.57 (P = .003) in the first season and by 4.38 (P = .010) in the second season. When compared with controls, players demonstrated a significant decline in the PER the first season (P = .038) and second season (P = .081) after their return. The NBA players who returned to play after repair of complete Achilles tendon ruptures showed a significant decrease in playing time and performance. Thirty-nine percent of players never returned to play.

  7. Functional rehabilitation of patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture: a meta-analysis of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark-Christensen, Troels; Troelsen, Anders; Kallemose, Thomas; Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner

    2016-06-01

    The optimal treatment for acute Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) is continuously debated. Recent studies have proposed that the choice of either operative or non-operative treatment may not be as important as rehabilitation, suggesting that functional rehabilitation should be preferred over traditional immobilization. The purpose of this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was to compare functional rehabilitation to immobilization in the treatment of ATR. This meta-analysis was conducted using the databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine Source, AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Library and PEDro using the search terms: "Achilles tendon," "rupture," "mobilization" and "immobilization". Seven RCTs involving 427 participants were eligible for inclusion, with a total of 211 participants treated with functional rehabilitation and 216 treated with immobilization. Re-rupture rate, other complications, strength, range of motion, duration of sick leave, return to sport and patient satisfaction were examined. There were no statistically significant differences between groups. A trend favoring functional rehabilitation was seen regarding the examined outcomes. Functional rehabilitation after acute Achilles tendon rupture does not increase the rate of re-rupture or other complications. A trend toward earlier return to work and sport, and increased patient satisfaction was found when functional rehabilitation was used. The present literature is of low-to-average quality, and the basic constructs of the examined treatment and study protocols vary considerably. Larger, randomized controlled trials using validated outcome measures are needed to confirm the findings. II.

  8. Recovery of calf muscle endurance 3 months after an Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorsson, A; Olsson, N; Nilsson-Helander, K; Karlsson, J; Eriksson, B I; Silbernagel, K G

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate calf muscle endurance in a seated position 3 months after an Achilles tendon rupture and to evaluate how the ability to perform standardized seated heel-rises correlated to the single-leg standing heel-rise test and to patient-reported symptoms evaluated with the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) 3 and 6 months after the injury. Ninety-three patients were included from a cohort of 101 patients participating in a prospective, randomized controlled trial comparing surgical and nonsurgical treatment after Achilles tendon rupture. Forty-seven patients were treated surgically and 46 nonsurgically. Ninety-one patients out of 93 (98%) could perform the standardized seated heel-rises. At the 3-month follow-up, there was a significant difference (P < 0.001) between the injured and the healthy side performing standardized seated heel-rises. There were also significant correlations (r = 0.29-0.37, P = < 0.05) between the standardized seated heel-rises and ATRS 3 and 6 months after injury in the group who could not perform single-leg standing heel-rises. There were no significant differences between the surgical and nonsurgical treatment groups. The evaluation of standardized seated heel-rises appears to be a useful tool to quantify progress and predict future functional performance and patient-reported symptoms. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Application of Computed Tomography Processed by Picture Archiving and Communication Systems in the Diagnosis of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Peng Xue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The applications of CT examination in the diagnosis of the acute Achilles tendon rupture (AATR were investigated. A total of 36 patients with suspected acute Achilles tendon rupture were tested using physical examination, ultrasound, and 3DCT scanning, respectively. Then, surgery was performed for the patients who showed positive result in at least two of the three tests for AATR. 3DVR, MPR, and the other CT scan image processing and diagnosis were conducted in PACS (picture archiving and communication system. PACS was also used to measure the length of distal broken ends of the Achilles tendon (AT to tendon calcaneal insertion. Our study indicated that CT has the highest accuracy in diagnosis of acute Achilles tendon complete rupture. The length measurement is matched between PACS and those actually measured in operation. CT not only demonstrates more details directly in three dimensions especially with the rupture involved calcaneal insertion flap but also locates the rupture region for percutaneous suture by measuring the length of distal stump in PACS without the effect of the position of ankle. The accuracy of CT diagnosis for Achilles tendon partial rupture is yet to be studied.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Signal, Rather Than Tendon Volume, Correlates to Pain and Functional Impairment in Chronic Achilles Tendinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaerdin, A.; Bruno, J.; Movin, T.; Kristoffersen-Wiberg, M.; Shalabi, A. [Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Depts. of Radiology and Orthopedics

    2006-09-15

    Purpose: To depict abnormal tendon matrix composition using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in chronic Achilles tendinopathy, and correlate intratendinous signal alterations to pain and functional impairment. Material and Methods: MRI of the Achilles tendon was performed on 25 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy (median age 50, range 37-71 years). All patients suffered from pain in the mid-portion of the Achilles tendon. Intratendinous signal was calculated from five different sagittal sequences, using a computerized 3D seed-growing technique. Pain and functional impairment were evaluated using a questionnaire completed by patients. Results: Severity of pain and functional impairment correlated to increased mean intratendinous signal in the painful tendon in all MR sequences (P 0.05). Difference in mean intratendinous signal between symptomatic and contralateral asymptomatic tendons was highly significant in all sequences (P <0.05) except on T2-weighted images (P = 0.6). Conclusion: Severity of pain and disability correlated to increased MR signal rather than to tendon volume in patients with unilateral mid-portion chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

  11. Application of Computed Tomography Processed by Picture Archiving and Communication Systems in the Diagnosis of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Hai-Peng; Liu, Xin-Wei; Tian, Jing; Xie, Bing; Yang, Chao; Zhang, Hao; Zhou, Da-Peng

    2016-01-01

    The applications of CT examination in the diagnosis of the acute Achilles tendon rupture (AATR) were investigated. A total of 36 patients with suspected acute Achilles tendon rupture were tested using physical examination, ultrasound, and 3DCT scanning, respectively. Then, surgery was performed for the patients who showed positive result in at least two of the three tests for AATR. 3DVR, MPR, and the other CT scan image processing and diagnosis were conducted in PACS (picture archiving and communication system). PACS was also used to measure the length of distal broken ends of the Achilles tendon (AT) to tendon calcaneal insertion. Our study indicated that CT has the highest accuracy in diagnosis of acute Achilles tendon complete rupture. The length measurement is matched between PACS and those actually measured in operation. CT not only demonstrates more details directly in three dimensions especially with the rupture involved calcaneal insertion flap but also locates the rupture region for percutaneous suture by measuring the length of distal stump in PACS without the effect of the position of ankle. The accuracy of CT diagnosis for Achilles tendon partial rupture is yet to be studied.

  12. Quantitative US Elastography Can Be Used to Quantify Mechanical and Histologic Tendon Healing in a Rabbit Model of Achilles Tendon Transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yohei; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Sasho, Takahisa; Fukawa, Taisuke; Akatsu, Yorikazu; Akagi, Ryuichiro; Yamaguchi, Tadashi; Takahashi, Kenji; Nagashima, Kengo; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2017-05-01

    Purpose To determine the time-dependent change in strain ratios (SRs) at the healing site of an Achilles tendon rupture in a rabbit model of tendon transection and to assess the correlation between SRs and the mechanical and histologic properties of the healing tissue. Materials and Methods Experimental methods were approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. The Achilles tendons of 24 New Zealand white rabbits (48 limbs) were surgically transected. The SRs of Achilles tendons were calculated by using compression-based quantitative ultrasonographic elastography measurements obtained 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after transection. After in vivo elastography, the left Achilles tendon was harvested for mechanical testing of ultimate load, ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and linear stiffness, and the right tendons were harvested for tissue histologic analysis with the Bonar scale. Time-dependent changes in SRs, mechanical parameters, and Bonar scale scores were evaluated by using repeated-measures analysis of variance. The correlation between SRs and each measured variable was evaluated by using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results Mean SRs and Bonar scale values decreased as a function of time after transection, whereas mechanical parameters increased (P tendon. (©) RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  13. Can transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation improve achilles tendon healing in rats?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta A. C. Folha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tendon injury is one of the most frequent injuries in sports activities. TENS is a physical agent used in the treatment of pain but its influence on the tendon's healing process is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of TENS on the healing of partial rupture of the Achilles tendon in rats. METHOD: Sixty Wistar rats were submitted to a partial rupture of the Achilles tendon by direct trauma and randomized into six groups (TENS or Sham stimulation and the time of evaluation (7, 14, and 21 days post-injury. Burst TENS was applied for 30 minutes, 6 days, 100 Hz frequency, 2 Hz burst frequency, 200 µs pulse duration, and 300 ms pulse train duration. Microscopic analyses were performed to quantify the blood vessels and mast cells, birefringence to quantify collagen fiber alignment, and immunohistochemistry to quantify types I and III collagen fibers. RESULTS: A significant interaction was observed for collagen type I (p=0.020 where the TENS group presented lower percentage in 14 days after the lesion (p=0.33. The main group effect showed that the TENS group presented worse collagen fiber alignment (p=0.001 and lower percentage of collagen III (p=0.001 and the main time effect (p=0.001 showed decreased percentage of collagen III at 7 days (p=0.001 and 14 days (p=0.001 after lesion when compared to 21 days. CONCLUSIONS: Burst TENS inhibited collagen I and III production and impaired its alignment during healing of partial rupture of the Achilles tendon in rats.

  14. Can transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation improve achilles tendon healing in rats?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folha, Roberta A. C.; Pinfildi, Carlos E.; Liebano, Richard E.; Rampazo, Érika P.; Pereira, Raphael N.; Ferreira, Lydia M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tendon injury is one of the most frequent injuries in sports activities. TENS is a physical agent used in the treatment of pain but its influence on the tendon's healing process is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of TENS on the healing of partial rupture of the Achilles tendon in rats. METHOD: Sixty Wistar rats were submitted to a partial rupture of the Achilles tendon by direct trauma and randomized into six groups (TENS or Sham stimulation) and the time of evaluation (7, 14, and 21 days post-injury). Burst TENS was applied for 30 minutes, 6 days, 100 Hz frequency, 2 Hz burst frequency, 200 µs pulse duration, and 300 ms pulse train duration. Microscopic analyses were performed to quantify the blood vessels and mast cells, birefringence to quantify collagen fiber alignment, and immunohistochemistry to quantify types I and III collagen fibers. RESULTS: A significant interaction was observed for collagen type I (p=0.020) where the TENS group presented lower percentage in 14 days after the lesion (p=0.33). The main group effect showed that the TENS group presented worse collagen fiber alignment (p=0.001) and lower percentage of collagen III (p=0.001) and the main time effect (p=0.001) showed decreased percentage of collagen III at 7 days (p=0.001) and 14 days (p=0.001) after lesion when compared to 21 days. CONCLUSIONS: Burst TENS inhibited collagen I and III production and impaired its alignment during healing of partial rupture of the Achilles tendon in rats. PMID:26647744

  15. Effect of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor on Achilles Tendon Healing in Rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafbeygi, Arash; Fatemi, Mohammad Javad; Lebaschi, Amir Hussein; Mousavi, Seyed Jaber; Husseini, Seyed Abouzar; Niazi, Mitra

    2017-01-01

    Tendon injuries are common and it takes a long time for an injured tendon to heal. Adverse phenomena such as adhesion and rupture are associated with these injuries. Finding a method to reduce the time required for healing which improves the final outcome, will lead to decreased frequency and intensity of adverse consequences. This study was designed to investigate the effects of basic fibroblast growth factor on the healing of the Achilles tendon in rabbits. In 10 New Zealand white rabbits, Achilles tendon was cut at the intersection of the distal and middle thirds on both hind legs. One microgram of recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) was injected in the proximal and distal stumps of the cut tendon on the right side (study group). Normal saline of equal volume was injected on the left side in the same way (control group). Then the tendons were repaired with 5/0 nylon using modified Kessler technique. A cast was made to immobilize each leg. On day 42, rabbits were euthanized and both hind legs were amputated. Tensometry and histopathologic examination were done on specimens. In tensometric studies, more force was required to rupture the repair site in study group. In histopathologic examination, collagen fibers had significantly better orientation and organization in the study group. No difference was noted regarding number of fibroblast and fibrocytes, and degree of angiogenesis in the two groups. Application of basic fibroblast growth factor at tendon repair site improves the healing process through improvement of collagen fiber orientation and increase in biomechanical resistance.

  16. Physical activity modulates nerve plasticity and stimulates repair after Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bring, Daniel K-I; Kreicbergs, Andris; Renstrom, Per A F H; Ackermann, Paul W

    2007-02-01

    In a rat model of tendon rupture using semiquantitative methodology, healing was assessed according to the diameter of newly organized collagen and the occurrence of the sensory neuropeptides (SP, CGRP) in relation to different levels of physical activity. Normally, innervation of the Achilles tendon is confined to the paratenon. After rupture new nerve fibers grow into the tendon proper, but disappear after healing. In a first experiment to establish peak tissue and nerve regeneration after rupture, tendon tissues from freely moving rats were collected consecutively over 16 weeks. A peak increase in organized collagen and nerve ingrowth was observed between week 2 to 4 post rupture. Therefore, in a second experiment week 4 was chosen to assess the effect of physical activity on tendon healing in three groups of rats, that is, wheel running, plaster treated, and freely moving (controls). In the wheel-running group, the diameter of newly organized collagen was 94% ( p = 0.001) greater than that in the plaster-treated group and 48% ( p = 0.02) greater than that in the controls. Inversely, the neuronal occurrence of CGRP in the tendon proper was 57% ( p = 0.02) lower in the wheel-running group than that in the plaster-treated group and 53% ( p = 0.02) lower than that in the controls, suggesting an earlier neuronal in-growth and disappearance in the more active group. Physical activity speeds up tendon healing, which may prove to be linked to accelerated neuronal plasticity.

  17. Biomechanical properties of isolated fascicles of the Iliopsoas and Achilles tendons in African American and Caucasian men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, P; Aagaard, P; Magnusson, S P

    2012-09-01

    To investigate biomechanical properties of the Iliopsoas and Achilles tendons in young African American (AA) and Caucasian (CC) men, and attempt to clarify whether the difference in Achilles tendon ruptures between AA and CC can be explained by differences in material properties. Tissue from 12 young males (AA, n=6; CC, n=6) was obtained from routine forensic autopsies. Iliopsoas and Achilles tendon samples were obtained from cadavers that were age, height and weight matched. Tendon collagen fascicles were tested micromechanically in a Deben mechanical testing rig. Peak failure stress in Iliopsoas tendon fascicles was considerably higher (pYoung's modulus was greater (p0.1) in AA (21.9 ± 9.9MPa) and CC (28.1 ± 9.8MPa), and peak strain did not differ (p>0.1) between AA (16.3 ± 3.5%) and CC (13.8 ± 4.4%). Young's modulus was slightly greater in CC (316.8 ± 110MPa) than AA (222.8 ± 84.6MPa), yet not significantly (p>0.1). These findings indicate that Iliopsoas tendon fascicles are stronger in young AA compared to CC males, which is suggested to reflect differences in muscle mass and force generating capacity. This could not be confirmed in Achilles tendon fascicles. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  18. Plantar fascia anatomy and its relationship with Achilles tendon and paratenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecco, Carla; Corradin, Marco; Macchi, Veronica; Morra, Aldo; Porzionato, Andrea; Biz, Carlo; De Caro, Raffaele

    2013-12-01

    Although the plantar fascia (PF) has been studied quite well from a biomechanical viewpoint, its microscopic properties have been overlooked: nothing is known about its content of elastic fibers, the features of the extracellular matrix or the extent of innervation. From a functional and clinical standpoint, the PF is often correlated with the triceps surae muscle, but the anatomical grounds for this link are not clear. The aim of this work was to focus on the PF macroscopic and microscopic properties and study how Achilles tendon diseases might affect it. Twelve feet from unembalmed human cadavers were dissected to isolate the PF. Specimens from each PF were tested with various histological and immunohistochemical stains. In a second stage, 52 magnetic resonance images (MRI) obtained from patients complaining of aspecific ankle or foot pain were analyzed, dividing the cases into two groups based on the presence or absence of signs of degeneration and/or inflammation of the Achilles tendon. The thickness of PF and paratenon was assessed in the two groups and statistical analyses were conducted. The PF is a tissue firmly joined to plantar muscles and skin. Analyzing its possible connections to the sural structures showed that this fascia is more closely connected to the paratenon of Achilles tendon than to the Achilles tendon, through the periosteum of the heel. The PF extended medially and laterally, continuing into the deep fasciae enveloping the abductor hallucis and abductor digiti minimi muscles, respectively. The PF was rich in hyaluronan, probably produced by fibroblastic-like cells described as 'fasciacytes'. Nerve endings and Pacini and Ruffini corpuscles were present, particularly in the medial and lateral portions, and on the surface of the muscles, suggesting a role for the PF in the proprioception of foot. In the radiological study, 27 of the 52 MRI showed signs of Achilles tendon inflammation and/or degeneration, and the PF was 3.43 ± 0.48 mm thick

  19. Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Transfer for Calcific Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Michael A; Catanzariti, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Calcific insertional Achilles tendinopathy can result in significant pain and disability. Although some patients respond to nonoperative therapy, many patients are at risk for long-term morbidity and unpredictable clinical outcomes. There is no evidence-based data to support the timing of operative invention, choice of procedures, or whether equinus requires treatment. This article suggests the need for a classification system based on physical examination and imaging to help guide treatment. There is an obvious need for evidence-based studies evaluating outcomes and for properly conducted scientific research to establish appropriate treatment protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 陈旧性跟腱断裂的治疗体会%Treatment of Old Achilles Tendon Rupture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾显荣

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the surgical effectiveness of old achilles tendon rupture. Methods 18 cases of old a-chilles tendon rupture were treated by operation, Bosworh method repaired achilles tendon, plaster external fixation after opera-tion, systematic functional exercise, evaluated function recovery. Results 18 cases in this group of patients, according to the Ar-ner-Lindholm score standard, excellent in 13 cases, good in 3 cases, poor in 2 cases, the excellent and good rate was 88. 8%. Conclusion Early diagnosis of achilles tendon rupture, early treatment is necessary, using Bosworh method to repair Achilles tendon have definite therapeutic effect.%目的 探讨陈旧性跟腱断裂的手术治疗效果. 方法 18例陈旧性跟腱断裂病例进行手术治疗,采用Bos-worh法修复跟腱,术后石膏固定,系统进行功能练习,评价功能恢复情况. 结果 本组18例患者,按Arner-Lindholm评分标准,优13例,良3例,差2例,优良率为88. 8%. 结论 跟腱断裂早期诊断,早期治疗十分必要,采用Bosworh法修复跟腱,疗效确切.

  1. A preliminary study on the effect of ultrasound therapy on the healing of surgically severed achilles tendons in five dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, N S; Roy, K S; Bansal, P S; Singh, B; Simran, P S

    2002-08-01

    This study was conducted on the left Achilles tendon in five clinically normal dogs. The Achilles tendon was surgically exposed and severed 3-4 cm proximal to the point of its insertion. Tenorrhaphy was undertaken by the application of three sutures on the various tendon units of the Achilles tendon using single locking-loop sutures with polyamide no. 1-0. The superficial digital flexor tendon was sutured with catgut using two horizontal mattress sutures. No ultrasound therapy was used in the animals of group I (control). Ultrasound therapy was given to the animals of group II (treated) starting from the third day post-operatively at 0.5 W/cm2 for 10 min daily for 10 days. A cortical screw was used for immobilization of the tibiotarsal joint which was removed 4 weeks after tenorrhaphy. Post-operatively, healing of the Achilles tendon was monitored using clinical observations, ultrasonography, gross and histomorphological observations at various intervals up to 120 days in both groups. Clinically, the dogs showed significant lameness for the first 4-5 days, which disappeared earlier in the ultrasound-treated (group II) animals than the controls (group I). Extension and flexion of the hock joint were found to be near normal at 6 weeks after the repair of the Achilles tendon. Ultrasonography showed anechoic to hypo-echoic echo-texture on days 3 and 7 after repair. By day 40, the echo-texture started to improve to hypo-echoic in group II, but in group I anechoic areas were still observed. However, the tendon showed near normal mottled hypo- to hyper-echoic texture in both groups by day 120. Gross observations suggested that the Achilles tendon in group II showed comparatively fewer adhesions than in group I animals. Histologically, in group II (treated), on day 40, the union was comparatively better without any inflammatory reaction. Bundle formation had begun in the ultrasound-treated animals which was not observed in the control animals. By day 90, more compact

  2. Surgical versus conservative treatment following acute rupture of the Achilles tendon: is there a pedobarographic difference?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaaslan F

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fatih Karaaslan,1 Musa Uğur Mermerkaya,1 Alper Çıraklı,2 Sinan Karaoğlu,3 Fuat Duygulu21Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, Bozok University, Yozgat, Turkey; 2Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Kayseri Training Hospital, Kayseri, Turkey; 3Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Memorial Kayseri Hospital, Kayseri, TurkeyIntroduction: Controversy remains regarding the optimal treatment method and postoperative rehabilitation of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. In this study, pedobarographic assessments of surgical and conservative treatments were compared.Material and methods: A prospective assessment was made of 16 patients (eight surgical, eight conservative and eight healthy controls using a plantar pressure measurement system. Biomechanical gait parameters were obtained using the Footscan dynamic gait analysis system. Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U-tests were used for the evaluation of data.Results: Nineteen males and five females were assessed, with an average age of 42.0±11.9 years. Follow-up was completed in 16 patients. No statistically significant difference was determined between the two treatment groups with regard to the gait analysis, but a difference was observed with the control group (P<0.001. All patients were able to resume their prior activities after 6 months and regained normal ranges of motion, with a high rate of satisfaction. Most of the patients (75% were able to return to their pre-injury level of activities.Conclusion: Satisfactory results were obtained through conservative treatment of acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon. No significant differences or complications were observed in the group managed conservatively versus the group treated surgically. Further studies including 3D gait analyses and tendon biomechanical research are required to further investigate this issue.Keywords: Achilles tendon, acute rupture, pedobarographic analysis

  3. Achilles tendon rupture: physiotherapy and endoscopy-assisted surgical treatment of a common sports injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Nedim Doral

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Mahmut Nedim Doral1,2, Murat Bozkurt3, Egemen Turhan4, Gürhan Dönmez2, Murat Demirel5, Defne Kaya2, Kivanç Atesok7, Özgür Ahmet Atay1, Nicola Maffulli61Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, 2Department of Sports Medicine, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Sihhiye, Ankara, Turkey; 3Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Ankara Etlik Ihtisas Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey; 4Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University School of Medicine, Zonguldak, Turkey; 5Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Ankara Bayindir Medical Center, Ankara, Turkey; 6Centre for Sports and Exercise Medicine, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK; 7St. Michael's Hospital Division of Orthopaedics Musculoskeletal Research Lab, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Although the Achilles tendon (AT is the strongest tendon in the human body, rupture of this tendon is one of the most common sports injuries in the athletic population. Despite numerous nonoperative and operative methods that have been described, there is no universal agreement about the optimal management strategy of acute total AT ruptures. The management of AT ruptures should aim to minimize the morbidity of the injury, optimize rapid return to full function, and prevent complications. Since endoscopy-assisted percutaneous AT repair allows direct visualization of the synovia and protects the paratenon that is important in biological healing of the AT, this technique becomes a reasonable treatment option in AT ruptures. Furthermore, Achilles tendoscopy technique may decrease the complications about the sural nerve. Also, early functional postoperative physiotherapy following surgery may improve the surgical outcomes.Keywords: Achilles tendon rupture, percutaneous repair, endoscopic control, growth factors

  4. Concurrent arthroscopic bicruciate ligament reconstruction using Achilles tendon-bone allografts: experience with 15 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi De-hai; CAI Dao-zhang; WANG Kun; RONG Li-min; XU Yi-chun

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical outcome of arthroscopically assisted combined anterior and posterior cruciate ligament (ACL/PCL) reconstructions using Achil-les tendon-bone allografts. Methods: Associated meniscus injuries were treated according to established methods prior to ligament recon-structions during arthroscopic surgery. Thirty Achilles ten-don-bone allografts were used to reconstruct torn ACL and PCL in 15 knees. At postoperative follow-up, all knees were graded using the modified IKDC and the Lysholm scoring systems just as done preoperatively. Results were analyzed compared with the contralateral healthy knees. Results: Eleven men and 4 women with a minimum of 3-year follow-up (mean 38 months) were included in the study. Preoperatively, the group ratings by the modified IKDC standards were all severely abnormal. Twelve bicruciate reconstructions were performed in subacute or chronic stage (>3-8 weeks), 3 for acute ligamentous deficien-cies (≤ 3 weeks). The noticeable early complication was transitory local fever combined with joint effusion in one case. At postoperative follow-up, 9 knees were normal, 5 nearly normal and 1 abnormal. On Lysholm score the differ-ence was statistically significant (t- test, P<0.001) before and after operation. Conclusions: Achilles tendon-bone allograft offers an alternative for simultaneous arthroscopic ACL/PCL reconstructions. However, further investigation is needed to eradicate its potential immunogenicity for better use.

  5. Sonography of the Achilles Tendon After Complete Rupture Repair: What the Radiologist Should Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitto, Salvatore; Draghi, Anna Guja; Bortolotto, Chandra; Draghi, Ferdinando

    2016-12-01

    This review aims to provide the radiologist with simple and systematic guidelines for evaluation of the Achilles tendon after complete rupture repair. Currently, there is a plethora of nonsurgical and surgical treatments, but sonographic examination has shown no significant differences between them. A systematic analysis of several parameters (morphologic characteristics, structure, color Doppler vascularization, and mobility) should be undertaken. Morphologically, the repaired tendon is larger, wider, or both. The loss of the fibrillary structure, inhomogeneity, and the surgical material in the context of the tendon are "normal" aspects after a repaired rupture. The presence of fluid collections when affecting greater than 50% of the surface of the tendon and extensive calcifications should be considered pathologic aspects. In the immediate postoperative period, there is the absence of vascularization detectable by color Doppler imaging. During the first 3 months, there is an increase in intratendinous vascularization with hypervascularization. From 3 to 6 months, stabilization and regression of the vascularization occur. Beyond the first 6 months, the hypervascularization is pathologic. The pattern of motion is, generally, reduced considerably more often in surgically treated tendons than in non-surgically treated ones. Elastography generally shows a hard appearance, with only a relatively heterogeneous pattern. In conclusion, a treated tendon will never regain a normal sonographic appearance, and the operator must distinguish between normal posttreatment changes and real pathologic characteristics. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  6. A Prospective Study of Platelet-Rich Plasma as Biological Augmentation for Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute Achilles tendon rupture is one of the most common tendon injuries in adults. We hypothesized that Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP can be used as biological augmentation for surgical treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. Our study is a prospective randomized controlled trial. Patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture undergoing surgical repair were randomly assigned into either control group or PRP group. End-to-end modified Krackow suture was performed in both groups. In the PRP group, PRP was injected into the paratenon sheath and around the ruptured tissue after the tendon was repaired. Postoperatively we evaluated isokinetic muscle strength at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. In addition, ankle ROM, calf circumference, Leppilahti score, and the SF-36 score were evaluated at 6, 12, and 24 months after operation. At 3 months, the PRP group had better isokinetic muscle. The PRP group also achieved higher SF-36 and Leppilahti scores at 6 and 12 months. At 24 months, the PRP group had an improved ankle range of motion compared to the control group. Our study results suggest that PRP can serve as a biological augmentation to acute Achilles tendon rupture repair and improves both short and midterm functional outcomes.

  7. A Prospective Study of Platelet-Rich Plasma as Biological Augmentation for Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jian; Mo, Xiaolian; Shi, Zhongmin; Li, Tanzhu; Xue, Jianfeng; Mei, Guohua; Li, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture is one of the most common tendon injuries in adults. We hypothesized that Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) can be used as biological augmentation for surgical treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. Our study is a prospective randomized controlled trial. Patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture undergoing surgical repair were randomly assigned into either control group or PRP group. End-to-end modified Krackow suture was performed in both groups. In the PRP group, PRP was injected into the paratenon sheath and around the ruptured tissue after the tendon was repaired. Postoperatively we evaluated isokinetic muscle strength at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. In addition, ankle ROM, calf circumference, Leppilahti score, and the SF-36 score were evaluated at 6, 12, and 24 months after operation. At 3 months, the PRP group had better isokinetic muscle. The PRP group also achieved higher SF-36 and Leppilahti scores at 6 and 12 months. At 24 months, the PRP group had an improved ankle range of motion compared to the control group. Our study results suggest that PRP can serve as a biological augmentation to acute Achilles tendon rupture repair and improves both short and midterm functional outcomes.

  8. Low-Magnitude, High-Frequency Vibration Fails to Accelerate Ligament Healing but Stimulates Collagen Synthesis in the Achilles Tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, William R; Keller, Benjamin V; Davis, Matthew L; Dahners, Laurence E; Weinhold, Paul S

    2015-05-01

    Low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration accelerates fracture and wound healing and prevents disuse atrophy in musculoskeletal tissues. To investigate the role of low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration as a treatment to accelerate healing of an acute ligament injury and to examine gene expression in the intact Achilles tendon of the injured limb after low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration. Controlled laboratory study. Complete surgical transection of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) was performed in 32 Sprague-Dawley rats, divided into control and low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration groups. Low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration started on postoperative day 2, and rats received vibration for 30 minutes a day for 12 days. All rats were sacrificed 2 weeks after the operation, and their intact and injured MCLs were biomechanically tested or used for histological analysis. Intact Achilles tendons from the injured limb were evaluated for differences in gene expression. Mechanical testing revealed no differences in the ultimate tensile load or the structural stiffness between the control and vibration groups for either the injured or intact MCL. Vibration exposure increased gene expression of collagen 1 alpha (3-fold), interleukin 6 (7-fold), cyclooxygenase 2 (5-fold), and bone morphogenetic protein 12 (4-fold) in the intact Achilles tendon when compared with control tendons (P high-frequency vibration treatment, significant enhancements in gene expression were observed in the intact Achilles tendon. These included collagen, several inflammatory cytokines, and growth factors critical for tendons. As low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration had no negative effects on ligament healing, vibration therapy may be a useful tool to accelerate healing of other tissues (bone) in multitrauma injuries without inhibiting ligament healing. Additionally, the enhanced gene expression in response to low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration in the intact Achilles tendon suggests

  9. [Achilles tendon plasty in inveterate lesions. Pérez Teuffer modified technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Estrada, J G; Martinez, E F

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to convey our experience with the technique used to treat chronic Achilles tendon lesions at ISSSTE "1 de Octubre" Regional Hospital. A prospective study with descriptive longitudinal follow-up was conducted in 30 patients with Achilles tendon rupture that occurred more than 10 days earlier. They were treated with the modified Perez-Teuffer technique at the Orthopedics and Trauma Service from March 2004 to March 2008. Plasty with transposition of the lateral peroneus brevis to the tendon stump was performed. The right side was affected in 70% of patients, mean age was 31.1 years, and males were predominant and accounted for 90%. Time elapsed since the lesion was 10-62 days with a mean of 26 days. We obtained excellent results in 90%, and good results in 10% of patients. One case had skin necrosis and limited mobility and two had pain. They were not considered as poor results as this did not interfere with the final functional results.

  10. Analysis of the effect of phototherapy in model with traumatic Achilles tendon injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalechi, Heliodora Leão; de Farias Marques, Anna Cristina; da Silva, Evela Aparecida Pereira; Aimbire, Flávio; Marcos, Rodrigo Labat; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo A B; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camilo; Albertini, Regiane

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of low-intensity laser (LILT) infrared (830 nm) therapy in tendon inflammation, tendinitis induced by mechanical trauma in rat Achilles tendon. For this, we used 65 young male Wistar rats, weighing ± 300 g divided into different groups: C = control (n = 5) and experimental (n = 10/group), with two different times of sacrifice such as treated with L = laser, D = treated with diclofenac, and T = untreated injured. The tendon inflammation was induced by controlled contusion in the medial region of the Achilles tendon of the animals. The treated groups received some kind of intervention every 24 h, all groups were sacrificed on the 7th or 14th day after the trauma. The tendons were dissected, extracted, and sent for analysis. Histological analysis of the L group showed a decrease in the number of inflammatory cells in relation to other groups in both periods studied. The comparative results between the number of inflammatory cells in the control and treated groups at 7 and 14 days showed statistically significant differences. Qualitative analysis findings obtained by the picrosirius red technique under polarized light showed that in 7 days, the T group presented collagen types I and III in the same proportion; group D presented a predominance of type III fibers, while in group L, type I collagen predominated. The 14-day group D showed collagen types I and III in the same proportion, while in group L, there was a predominance of type I fibers. Biomechanical analysis showed that 7-day groups L and C showed similar stiffness and increased breaking strength. The 14-day groups L and C showed greater rupturing strength as well as increased stiffness angle. Group D showed a decrease of maximum traction strength and degree of rigidity. It was concluded that treatment with LIL in the parameters used and the times studied reduces migration of inflammatory cells and improves the quality of repair while reducing the functional

  11. Statins induce biochemical changes in the Achilles tendon after chronic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Letícia Prado; Vieira, Cristiano Pedrozo; Da Ré Guerra, Flávia; de Almeida, Marcos dos Santos; Pimentel, Edson Rosa

    2013-09-15

    Statins have been widely prescribed as lipid-lowering drugs and are associated with tendon rupture. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the possible biochemical changes in the Achilles tendon of rats after chronic treatment with statins. Dosages of statins were calculated using allometric scaling with reference to the 80mg/day and 20mg/day, doses recommended for humans. The rats were divided into the following groups: treated with simvastatin (S-20 and S-80), treated with atorvastatin (A-20 and A-80), and the control group that received no treatment (C). Measurements of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in the plasma were performed. The levels of non-collagenous proteins, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and hydroxyproline were quantified. Western blotting for collagen I was performed, and the presence of metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2 and -9 was investigated through zymography. The concentration of non-collagenous proteins in S-20 was less than the C group. There was a significant increase in pro-MMP-2 activity in A-80 group and in active MMP-2 in S-20 group compared to the C group. A significant increase in latent MMP-9 activity was observed in both the A-80 and S-20 groups when compared to C group. In the A-20 group, there was a lower amount of collagen I in relation to C group. In addition, a higher concentration of hydroxyproline was found in the S-20 group than the C group. The analysis of GAGs showed a significant increase in the A-20 group when compared to C group. The treatment induced remarkable alterations in the Achilles tendon and the response of the tissue seems to depend of the used statin dosage. The presence of MMP-2 and MMP-9 is evidence of the degradation and remodeling processes in the extracellular matrix of the tendons. Our results show that statins induce imbalance of extracellular matrix components and possibly induce microdamage in tendons.

  12. In vivo evaluation of the elastic anisotropy of the human Achilles tendon using shear wave dispersion analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brum, J.; Bernal, M.; Gennisson, J. L.; Tanter, M.

    2014-02-01

    Non-invasive evaluation of the Achilles tendon elastic properties may enhance diagnosis of tendon injury and the assessment of recovery treatments. Shear wave elastography has shown to be a powerful tool to estimate tissue mechanical properties. However, its applicability to quantitatively evaluate tendon stiffness is limited by the understanding of the physics on the shear wave propagation in such a complex medium. First, tendon tissue is transverse isotropic. Second, tendons are characterized by a marked stiffness in the 400 to 1300 kPa range (i.e. fast shear waves). Hence, the shear wavelengths are greater than the tendon thickness leading to guided wave propagation. Thus, to better understand shear wave propagation in tendons and consequently to properly estimate its mechanical properties, a dispersion analysis is required. In this study, shear wave velocity dispersion was measured in vivo in ten Achilles tendons parallel and perpendicular to the tendon fibre orientation. By modelling the tendon as a transverse isotropic viscoelastic plate immersed in fluid it was possible to fully describe the experimental data (deviation<1.4%). We show that parallel to fibres the shear wave velocity dispersion is not influenced by viscosity, while it is perpendicularly to fibres. Elasticity (found to be in the range from 473 to 1537 kPa) and viscosity (found to be in the range from 1.7 to 4 Pa.s) values were retrieved from the model in good agreement with reported results.

  13. ADVANTAGES OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF ACHILLES TENDON RUPTURE BY PERCUTANEOUS SUTURE AS OPPOSED TO NONSURGICAL TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Vidić

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The Achilles tendon is the strongest tendon in the body, and its rupture appears to be the most common injury of the tendomuscular apparatus. This type of injury is more frequent in sportsmen, especially those who play tennis, gymnastics, skiing, handball, football, basketball and athletics. Also, the ruptures are common in people who engage in sports activities for recreation. They appear more often in males, in proportion of 3:1. It appears reciprocally in 25- 30% of the cases. The rupture is easily diagnosed by means of clinical examination (Thompson's test and ultrasonography.The aim of the analysis was to point to the advantages of surgical treatment of a fresh Achilles tendon rupture as opposed to non-surgical treatment by plaster immobilization.The examination was performed on 35 patients, of which 16 (45,71% were treated operatively and 19 (54,29% were treated nonoperatively. The average age of the patients was 38.8 years, that is 37.1 for those treated operatively and 40.2 for those treated nonoperatively. Among the examinees, there were 29(82,86% men and 6 (17,14% women. The operative treatment method consisted of percutaneous suturing, whereas the nonoperative treatment involved the circular above the knee plaster immobilization. All operatively treated patients underwent the surgical treatment in the first 48 hours from the time when the injury had occured. Anesthesia was local and infiltrative.The obtained results showed that there were no unhealed ruptures or re-ruptures. In the group of patients who did not undergo the surgery, there was 1 re-rupture and 1 unhealed rupture, after which the surgical treatment had to be performed in both cases. In the group of operated patients there were no infections, however, 1 thromboembolism occured. Recovery of muscular strenght of the tendon and the realization of the full range of movement required less time in the operated patients. The ultrasonographic findings in the operated patients

  14. Quantitative ultrasound method for assessing stress-strain properties and the cross-sectional area of Achilles tendon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yung-Fu; Li, Chien-Ming; Lin, Chia-Hung; Yang, Chia-En; Wu, Jian-Xing; Chen, Tainsong

    2013-12-01

    The Achilles tendon is one of the most commonly observed tendons injured with a variety of causes, such as trauma, overuse and degeneration, in the human body. Rupture and tendinosis are relatively common for this strong tendon. Stress-strain properties and shape change are important biomechanical properties of the tendon to assess surgical repair or healing progress. Currently, there are rather limited non-invasive methods available for precisely quantifying the in vivo biomechanical properties of the tendons. The aim of this study was to apply quantitative ultrasound (QUS) methods, including ultrasonic attenuation and speed of sound (SOS), to investigate porcine tendons in different stress-strain conditions. In order to find a reliable method to evaluate the change of tendon shape, ultrasound measurement was also utilized for measuring tendon thickness and compared with the change in tendon cross-sectional area under different stress. A total of 15 porcine tendons of hind trotters were examined. The test results show that the attenuation and broadband ultrasound attenuation decreased and the SOS increased by a smaller magnitude as the uniaxial loading of the stress-strain upon tendons increased. Furthermore, the tendon thickness measured with the ultrasound method was significantly correlated with tendon cross-sectional area (Pearson coefficient = 0.86). These results also indicate that attenuation of QUS and ultrasonic thickness measurement are reliable and potential parameters for assessing biomechanical properties of tendons. Further investigations are needed to warrant the application of the proposed method in a clinical setting.

  15. Severe Functional Debilitations After Complications Associated With Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture With 9 Years of Follow-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Sveen, Thor Magnus; Ganestam, Ann

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the long-term effect of deep infection, sural nerve injury, and repeat rupture in the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. A total of 324 patients had made a claim to the Danish Patient Insurance Association from 1992 to 2010 for a compli......The purpose of the present study was to investigate the long-term effect of deep infection, sural nerve injury, and repeat rupture in the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. A total of 324 patients had made a claim to the Danish Patient Insurance Association from 1992 to 2010...

  16. Ipsi- and contralateral H-reflexes and V-waves after unilateral chronic Achilles tendon vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapole, Thomas; Canon, Francis; Pérot, Chantal

    2013-09-01

    Chronic Achilles tendon vibration has previously shown its effectiveness in improving plantar flexor's strength and activation capacities. The present study investigated the related neural mechanisms by analyzing H-reflexes and V-waves of the soleus (SOL) and gastrocnemii (GM gastrocnemius medialis; GL gastrocnemius lateralis) muscles under maximal isometric plantar flexion. Moreover, recordings were conducted bilaterally to address potential crossed effects. 11 subjects were engaged in this study. Maximal voluntary contraction and superimposed H-reflexes and V-waves were quantified in both legs at baseline (PRE) and 2 weeks later to verify repeatability of data (CON). Then, subjects were retested after 14 days of daily unilateral Achilles tendon vibration (VIB; 1 h per day; frequency: 50 Hz). No changes were reported between PRE and CON data. In the VIB condition, there was an increase in MVC for both the vibrated (+9.1 %; p = 0.016) and non-vibrated (+10.2 %; p = 0.009) legs. The H-reflex increased by a mean 25 % in the vibrated SOL (p wave also increased in the vibrated limb (+43.3 %; p vibrated one (+41.9 %; p = 0.006). Furthermore, the GM V-wave increased by 37.8 % (p = 0.081) in the vibrated side and by 39.4 % (p = 0.03) in the non-vibrated side. However, no changes were reported for the GL muscles. While the present study confirmed the strength gains induced by chronic Achilles tendon vibration, the results indicated a cross-education phenomenon with differences in neural adaptations between the vibrated leg and non-vibrated leg.

  17. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of Persian Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Naghdi, Soofia; Hasanvand, Sahar; Fakhari, Zahra; Kordi, Ramin; Nilsson-Helander, Katarina

    2016-04-01

    To cross-culturally adapt the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) to Persian language and to preliminary evaluate the reliability and validity of a Persian ATRS. A cross-sectional and prospective cohort study was conducted to translate and cross-culturally adapt the ATRS to Persian language (ATRS-Persian) following steps described in guidelines. Thirty patients with total Achilles tendon rupture and 30 healthy subjects participated in this study. Psychometric properties of floor/ceiling effects (responsiveness), internal consistency reliability, test-retest reliability, standard error of measurement (SEM), smallest detectable change (SDC), construct validity, and discriminant validity were tested. Factor analysis was performed to determine the ATRS-Persian structure. There were no floor or ceiling effects that indicate the content and responsiveness of ATRS-Persian. Internal consistency was high (Cronbach's α 0.95). Item-total correlations exceeded acceptable standard of 0.3 for the all items (0.58-0.95). The test-retest reliability was excellent [(ICC)agreement 0.98]. SEM and SDC were 3.57 and 9.9, respectively. Construct validity was supported by a significant correlation between the ATRS-Persian total score and the Persian Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (PFAOS) total score and PFAOS subscales (r = 0.55-0.83). The ATRS-Persian significantly discriminated between patients and healthy subjects. Explanatory factor analysis revealed 1 component. The ATRS was cross-culturally adapted to Persian and demonstrated to be a reliable and valid instrument to measure functional outcomes in Persian patients with Achilles tendon rupture. II.

  18. Endoscopy-Assisted Achilles Tendon Reconstruction With a Central Turndown Flap and Semitendinosus Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedam, Prashant N; Rushnaiwala, Faizaan M

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to report the results of a new minimally invasive Achilles reconstruction technique and to assess the perioperative morbidity, medium- to long-term outcomes, and functional results. Our series was comprised 14 patients (11 men and 3 women), with a mean age of 45.6 years at surgery. Each patient had a chronic Achilles tendon rupture. The mean interval from rupture to surgery was 5.5 months (range, 2-10). The mean total follow-up was 30.1 months (range, 12-78). All patients were operated with a central turndown flap augmented with free semitendinosus tendon graft and percutaneous sutures in a minimally invasive approach assisted by endoscopy. The patients underwent retrospective assessment by clinical examination, the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle and hindfoot score, and the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS). Paired t tests were used to assess the preoperative and postoperative AOFAS scores, ATRS scores, and ankle range of motion. The length of the defect ranged from 3 to 8 cm (mean, 5.1), while the length of the turndown flap ranged from 8 to 13 cm (mean, 10.1). The mean AOFAS score improved from 64.5 points preoperatively to 96.9 points at last follow-up. The mean ATRS score improved from 49.4 preoperatively to 91.4 points at last follow-up. None of the patients developed a wound complication. No patient had a rerupture or sural nerve damage. All patients in our study had a favorable outcome with no complications. We believe that with this triple-repair technique, one can achieve a strong and robust repair such as in open surgery while at the same time reducing the incidence of complications. Level III, retrospective comparative study. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. A systematic review of early rehabilitation methods following a rupture of the Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Rebecca S; McGuinness, Katie R; Achten, Juul; Costa, Matthew L

    2012-03-01

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon is a debilitating injury. Advances have led to the development of immediate weight bearing rehabilitation. A range of early rehabilitation methods exist, but further research is required into this new area. The first stage in the investigation of a complex intervention is to identify its defining components. The aim of this review was to systemically identify and summarise, from clinical studies, the individual components that define immediate weight bearing rehabilitation protocols for the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture's. The electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED and the register of current controlled trials were searched up to March 2010. All study designs and languages were included. Two independent reviewers used pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria to identify all eligible articles. Eligible articles were summarised and critically reviewed, using the extension of the CONSORT statement for non-pharmacological interventions. Two hundred and fifteen articles were screened, nine were included. These studies, presented the results of 424 patients; 236 who had surgery and 188 who were managed non-operatively. There were a range of rehabilitation protocols that were defined by four components. These components consisted of the degree of maintained plantarflexion, whether daily range of movement exercises were permitted, the type of orthotic and for how long it was worn. The efficacy of different immediate weight bearing rehabilitation protocols following an acute rupture of the Achilles tendon remains unclear. Further research is required to evaluate the identified components to optimise rehabilitation. Copyright © 2011 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Sport-Specific Capacity to Use Elastic Energy in the Patellar and Achilles Tendons of Elite Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesinger, Hans-Peter; Rieder, Florian; Kösters, Alexander; Müller, Erich; Seynnes, Olivier R

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: During running and jumping activities, elastic energy is utilized to enhance muscle mechanical output and efficiency. However, training-induced variations in tendon spring-like properties remain under-investigated. The present work extends earlier findings on sport-specific profiles of tendon stiffness and cross-sectional area to examine whether years of distinct loading patterns are reflected by tendons' ability to store and return energy. Methods:Ultrasound scans were performed to examine the morphological features of knee extensor and plantar flexor muscle-tendon units in elite ski jumpers, distance runners, water polo players, and sedentary controls. Tendon strain energy and hysteresis were measured with combined motion capture, ultrasonography, and dynamometry. Results: Apart from the fractional muscle-to-tendon cross-sectional area ratio being lower in the knee extensors of ski jumpers (-31%) and runners (-33%) than in water polo players, no difference in the considered muscle-tendon unit morphological features was observed between groups. Similarly, no significant difference in tendon energy storage or energy return was detected between groups. In contrast, hysteresis was lower in the patellar tendon of ski jumpers (-33%) and runners (-30%) compared to controls, with a similar trend for the Achilles tendon (significant interaction effect and large effect sizes η(2) = 0.2). Normalized to body mass, the recovered strain energy of the patellar tendon was ~50% higher in ski jumpers than in water polo players and controls. For the Achilles tendon, recovered strain energy was ~40% higher in ski jumpers and runners than in controls. Discussion: Advantageous mechanical properties related to tendon spring-like function are observed in elite athletes whose sport require effective utilization of elastic energy. However, the mechanisms underpinning the better tendon capacity of some athletes to retain elastic energy could not be ascribed to intrinsic or

  1. Sport-Specific Capacity to Use Elastic Energy in the Patellar and Achilles Tendons of Elite Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesinger, Hans-Peter; Rieder, Florian; Kösters, Alexander; Müller, Erich; Seynnes, Olivier R.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: During running and jumping activities, elastic energy is utilized to enhance muscle mechanical output and efficiency. However, training-induced variations in tendon spring-like properties remain under-investigated. The present work extends earlier findings on sport-specific profiles of tendon stiffness and cross-sectional area to examine whether years of distinct loading patterns are reflected by tendons' ability to store and return energy. Methods:Ultrasound scans were performed to examine the morphological features of knee extensor and plantar flexor muscle-tendon units in elite ski jumpers, distance runners, water polo players, and sedentary controls. Tendon strain energy and hysteresis were measured with combined motion capture, ultrasonography, and dynamometry. Results: Apart from the fractional muscle-to-tendon cross-sectional area ratio being lower in the knee extensors of ski jumpers (−31%) and runners (−33%) than in water polo players, no difference in the considered muscle-tendon unit morphological features was observed between groups. Similarly, no significant difference in tendon energy storage or energy return was detected between groups. In contrast, hysteresis was lower in the patellar tendon of ski jumpers (−33%) and runners (−30%) compared to controls, with a similar trend for the Achilles tendon (significant interaction effect and large effect sizes η2 = 0.2). Normalized to body mass, the recovered strain energy of the patellar tendon was ~50% higher in ski jumpers than in water polo players and controls. For the Achilles tendon, recovered strain energy was ~40% higher in ski jumpers and runners than in controls. Discussion: Advantageous mechanical properties related to tendon spring-like function are observed in elite athletes whose sport require effective utilization of elastic energy. However, the mechanisms underpinning the better tendon capacity of some athletes to retain elastic energy could not be ascribed to

  2. FROM ACUTE ACHILLES TENDON RUPTURE TO RETURN TO PLAY – A CASE REPORT EVALUATING RECOVERY OF TENDON STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, CLINICAL AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellers, Jennifer A.; Cortes, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Achilles tendon rupture results in significant functional deficits regardless of treatment strategy (surgical versus non-surgical intervention). Recovery post-rupture is highly variable, making comprehensive patient assessment critical. Assessment tools may change along the course of recovery as the patient progresses – for instance, moving from a seated heel-rise to standing heel-rise to jump testing. However, tools that serve as biomarkers for early recovery may be particularly useful in informing clinical decision-making. The purpose of this case report was to describe the progress of a young, athletic individual following Achilles tendon rupture managed non-surgically, using patient reported and functional performance outcome measures and comprehensively evaluating Achilles tendon structure and function incorporating a novel imaging technique (cSWE). Subject Description The subject is a 26 year-old, female basketball coach who sustained an Achilles tendon rupture and was managed non-surgically. Outcome The subject was able to steadily progress using a gradual tendon loading treatment approach well-supported by the literature. Multiple evaluative techniques including the addition of diagnostic ultrasound imaging and continuous shear wave elastography (cSWE) to standard clinical tests and measures were used to assess patient-reported symptoms, tendon structure, and tendon functional performance. Five assessments were performed over the course of 2-14 months post-rupture. By the 14-month follow-up, the subject had achieved full self-reported function. Tendon structural and mechanical properties showed similar shear modulus by 14 months, however, viscosity continued to be lower and tendon length longer on the ruptured side. Functional performance, evidenced by the heel-rise test and jump tests, also showed a positive trajectory, however, deficits of 12-28% remained between ruptured and non-ruptured sides at 14 months. Discussion This case report

  3. Oedema and fatty degeneration of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles on MR images in patients with achilles tendon abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Adrienne [University Hospital Balgrist Zuerich, Radiology Department, Zuerich (Switzerland); Hirslanden Klinik Aarau, Radiology Department, Aarau (Switzerland); Mamisch, Nadja; Buck, Florian M.; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Zanetti, Marco [University Hospital Balgrist Zuerich, Radiology Department, Zuerich (Switzerland); Espinosa, Norman [University Hospital Balgrist Zuerich, Orthopedic Surgery Department, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2011-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of oedema and fatty degeneration of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles in patients with Achilles tendon abnormalities. Forty-five consecutive patients (mean 51 years; range 14-84 years) with achillodynia were examined with magnetic resonance (MR) images of the calf. The frequency of oedema and fatty degeneration in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles was determined in patients with normal tendons, tendinopathy and in patients with a partial tear or a complete tear of the Achilles tendon. Oedema was encountered in 35% (7/20) of the patients with tendinopathy (n = 20; range 13-81 years), and in 47% (9/19) of the patients with partial tears or complete tears (n = 19; 28-78 years). Fatty degeneration was encountered in 10% (2/20) of the patients with tendinopathy, and in 32% (6/19) of the patients with tears. The prevalence of fatty degeneration was significantly more common in patients with a partial or complete tear compared with the patients with a normal Achilles tendon (p = 0.032 and p = 0.021, respectively). Oedema and fatty degeneration of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles are common in patients with Achilles tendon abnormalities. (orig.)

  4. [Application of a new design of cryo-jaw and its biomechanical evaluation in rat achilles tendon in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Erfu; Sun, Yanjun; Peng, Yongjin; Xu, Wei; Wang, Yequan; Xu, Kang; Mohanad, Khalid Ahmed; Lu, Yonggang; Yang, Li

    2014-06-01

    This study was aimed to design a new, accurate and easy-to-use water bath cryo-jaw, and try to solve the problems met in small animals achilles tendon mechanical testing. The muscle-tendon-bony units were fixed in the clamps. SD rats achilles tendon were randomly divided into group A and B. Group A was tested by the newly designed water bath cryo-jaw, while group B was treated by non-water bath cryo-jaw. The mechanical tests revealed that non of the samples of the newly-designed water bath cryo-jaw in group A slipped and fell off, and the achilles tendons were in a physiologically active state, but one of the group B samples slipped and fell off, and the others had the frozen phenomenon obviously. The maximum stress, fracture displacement and Young's modulus of the rats in group A were significantly different compared to those in group B (P jaw has more advantages than traditional ones. It exhibits a good simulation in vivo in the environmental conditions for testing the mechanical properties of the achilles tendon.

  5. Low recurrence rate after mini surgery outside the tendon combined with short rehabilitation in patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredson H

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Håkan Alfredson1,2 1Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; 2Institute of Sport, Exercise and Health, University College London Hospitals, London, UKBackground: There is a general opinion that a structured and specific rehabilitation is needed after treatment of midportion Achilles tendinopathy to minimize recurrence of the condition. There is sparse knowledge about the recurrence rates in large patient materials after specific treatments for midportion Achilles tendinopathy.Aim: This study aimed to investigate the recurrence rates in a large number of patients with chronic painful midportion Achilles tendinopathy that had been surgically treated with the ultrasound (US and Doppler (DP-guided mini-surgical scraping technique. Postoperatively, a relatively simple rehabilitation protocol, including a range of movement exercises and gradually increased walking and biking before allowing free activity, was used.Materials and methods: From a database, information about the recurrence rates after US + DP-guided mini-surgical scraping, performed by a single surgeon on 519 tendons with US + DP-verified chronic painful midportion Achilles tendinopathy, was obtained.Results: Recurrence of painful midportion Achilles tendinopathy was found in 26 of 519 (5% operated tendons, 13 from women and 13 from men. In 13 tendons, a close by located plantaris tendon was extirpated during the reoperation.Conclusion: In this large material on patients treated with US + DP-guided mini-surgical scraping for midportion Achilles tendinopathy, there were few recurrences, although only a simple and nonspecific rehabilitation protocol was used.Keywords: Achilles midportion, ultrasound, Doppler, mini-surgical scraping technique

  6. MR imaging of the achilles tendon. Evaluation of criteria for the differentiation of asymptomatic and symptomatic tendons; MR-Tomografie der Achillessehne. Evaluation von Kriterien zur Differenzierung von asymptomatischen und symptomatischen Sehnen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, C.; Wedegaertner, U.; Maas, L.C.; Adam, G. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Buchert, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Maas, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Privatpraxis fuer Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop quantitative and qualitative MRI criteria to differentiate between healthy and pathological Achilles tendons. Materials and Methods: 364 Achilles tendons were examined on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. 264 patients had Achilles tendon complaints, 100 asymptomatic Achilles tendons served as a control. T1-weighted, T2-weighted and a STIR sequence were performed in sagittal and axial orientation. Images were evaluated in consensus by two radiologists. Quantitative and qualitative criteria were assessed. A Mann-Whitney-U-Test and a regression analysis were used for statistical analysis. Results: There were statistically significant differences between the patients with disorders and the control group concerning the depth (12.0 mm and 6.3 mm, p < 0.001) and length (83.2 mm and 45.9 mm, p < 0.001) of the tendon, the area of the tendon cross section (1.60 mm{sup 2} and 061 mm{sup 2}, p < 0.001), as well as the length of the bursa retrocalcanea (8.3 mm and 5.3 mm, p < 0.001). There was a sensitivity of 97 % and a specificity of 91 % using a formula including the 3 criteria: tendon depth (A4), length of bursa (A5) and area of tendon (F). Conclusion: The measurement of the Achilles tendon and the binary-logistic regression analysis allow differentiation between normal and pathological Achilles tendons. (orig.)

  7. Adverse reactions of Achilles tendon xanthomas in three hypercholesterolemic patients after treatment intensification with niacin and bile acid sequestrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakey, Wanda C; Greyshock, Nicole; Guyton, John R

    2013-01-01

    Multiple cholesterol-reducing therapies have been shown to induce the regression of tendon xanthoma in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia. We present 3 cases of adverse reactions in Achilles tendon xanthomas after the addition of niacin and bile acid sequestrants to ongoing statin therapy. Reduction in tendon dimensions and marked softening of xanthomas were interpreted as cholesterol removal from heavily infiltrated tissue sites. In 2 cases, changes in the xanthomas occurred despite only minor lipoprotein improvements, raising the possibility of direct drug effects in cholesterol-infiltrated tissue. Intriguingly, recent studies have described niacin receptor-mediated effects in macrophages. In summary, although adverse reactions in Achilles tendon xanthomas appear to be infrequent, clinicians should be aware of this phenomenon in their patients after intensifying lipid treatments, especially with the use of niacin in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia. Xanthoma responses may provide clues to new pharmacologic effects in cholesterol-infiltrated tissues.

  8. Stereological quantification of immune-competent cells in baseline biopsy specimens from achilles tendons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragsnaes, Maja Skov; Fredberg, Ulrich; Stribolt, Katrine

    2014-01-01

    immunohistochemically by quantifying the presence of macrophages (CD68-PGM1(+), CD68-KP1(+)), hemosiderophages (Perls blue), T lymphocytes (CD2(+), CD3(+), CD4(+), CD7(+), CD8(+)), B lymphocytes (CD20(+)), natural killer cells (CD56(+)), mast cells (NaSDCl(+)), Schwann cells (S100(+)), and endothelial cells (CD34......(+)) using a stereological technique. A follow-up examination was conducted more than 4 years (range, 4-9 years) after the biopsy procedure to evaluate the long-term presence of Achilles tendon symptoms. RESULTS: Macrophages, T lymphocytes, mast cells, and natural killer cells were observed in the majority......BACKGROUND: Limited data exist on the presence and function of immune-competent cells in chronic tendinopathic tendons and their potential role in inflammation and tissue healing as well as in predicting long-term outcome. PURPOSE: To quantify subtypes of immune-competent cells in biopsy specimens...

  9. Treatment of open achilles tendon ruptures by Achillon minimally invasive achilles tendon suture system in cases%Achillon微创跟腱吻合器治疗开放性跟腱断裂23例疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄崧; 陈翔宇; 任小宝; 郭国宁; 任鸿

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical effect of Achillon minimal invasive achilles tendon suture system on repairing of acute open achilles tendon ruptures. Methods Twenty three patients with acute open achilles tendon ruptures were treated by Achillon minimal invasive achilles tendon suture system and the follow-up was conducted. This minimal invasive treatment was performed after the debride-ment. In all cases Achilles tendons were successfully explored through the original wounds. Achillon minimal invasive achilles tendon suture system was put in to hold the rupture end of achilles tendon. Then suture threads were introduced to both proximal and distal ends. The ankle was casted with gypsum for six weeks after the surgery. Results Twenty three cases were successfully followed up for 8 to 14 months ( 10 months in average ). Accoring to Arner-Lindholm score,the clinical effect was excellent in 21 cases ( 91. 3% ),good in 2 cases ( 8. 7% ). No case of infection, Achilles tendon mal-union,sural nerve damage,recurrent achillies tendon ruptures or suture rejection was found. Conclusion Repairing acute open Achilles tendon ruptures by Achillon minimal invasive achilles tendon suture system is reliable, minimal invasive , with fast recovery of the ankle function.%目的 探讨应用Achillon微创跟腱吻合器治疗新鲜开放性跟腱断裂的临床效果.方法 采用Achillon跟腱缝合器治疗23例急性开放性跟腱断裂患者并随访.在急诊清创后,采用原创口显露跟腱断端、清理残端后,置入Achillon吻合器夹持跟腱近侧断端,引入缝线;同法在跟腱断裂远端置入缝线,拉出缝线打结,术后石膏托外固定6周.结果 23例获得随访,时间8~14个月,平均10个月,按Arner-Lindholm疗效评定标准,优21例(91.3%),良2例(8.7%),无伤口感染、跟腱愈合不良、腓肠神经损伤、复发跟腱断裂或缝线排异.结论 开放性跟腱断裂在急诊清创后,采用原创口清理显露跟腱断端,

  10. Effects of boric acid on the healing of Achilles tendons of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaymaz, Burak; Gölge, Umut Hatay; Ozyalvaclı, Gulzade; Kömürcü, Erkam; Goksel, Ferdi; Mermerkaya, Musa Ugur; Doral, Mahmut Nedim

    2016-12-01

    Tendinous lesions are among the most frequent pathologies encountered in sportsmen. The objectives of new treatments are to improve the healing process and reduce the recovery time. Boron plays an important role in the wound repair process by increasing components of extracellular matrix and angiogenesis. This animal study aimed to investigate the effect of boric acid on healing of the Achilles tendon. The right Achilles tendons of 40 rats were completely sectioned, and the rats were randomly divided into five groups. Each group consisted of eight rats. Groups 1 and 2 were oral boric acid groups with the doses of 4 and 8 mg/kg/day boric acid, respectively. Group 3 was the local boric acid group (8 mg/kg boric acid intratendinous injection). Group 4 was administered both oral and local boric acid (8 mg/kg/day orally and 8 mg/kg boric acid intratendinous injection), and group 5 was the control group with no boric acid application. At the end of the fourth week, all the rats were killed and histopathological examination of the Achilles tendon repair site was made. Histopathological examination of the tissue sections revealed more properly oriented collagen fibres, more normal cellular distribution of tenocytes and more properly organized vascular bundles in group 1 and group 2, which were the groups administered oral boric acid. Pathological sum scores of groups 1 and 2 were less than those of the other groups, and the differences between the oral boric acid groups (group 1 and group 2) and the other three groups (groups 3, 4 and 5) were statistically significant (p = 0.001). As boric acid is safe and toxicity even after very high doses is unusual, oral boric acid may be used as an agent to improve the healing process of tendon injuries. However, biomechanical tests should also be performed to show the effect of boric acid on strength and endurance of the tendon before it can be used in clinical practice.

  11. 腓骨肌腱修复跟腱断裂24例的临床分析%Peroneal tendon repair achilles tendon rupture of 24 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄春吉

    2009-01-01

    目的 分析腓骨长肌腱用于修复跟腱断裂的手术方法 和经验.方法 将腓骨长肌腱在远端处切断,经皮下隧道移位修复跟腱断裂24例.结果根据Arner-Lindholm评定标准,24例中优14例,良10例.未发生跟腱再次断裂.2例出现伤口感染,1例出现皮肤与跟腱粘连.结论 对疑有跟腱断裂的患者未进行认真的体检是导致跟腱断裂误诊的重要原因.避免误诊、尽早手术及循序渐进的术后康复锻炼是提高疗效的有效措施.用腓骨长肌腱重建陈旧性和某些急性跟腱断裂是一种安全可行、疗效满意的手术方法 .%Objective To conclude the method and experience of reconstruction of achilles tendon rupture with peroneus longus tendon transfer.Methods In 24 cases,reconstruction the achilles tendon ruptured by cutting the peroneus longus tendon at the distal end and transferred through subcutaneous tunnel.Results According to ArnerLindholm critera,14 cases were graded as excellent,10 cases as good.No rerupture of Achilles tendon occurred.There were 2 cases occurred wound infection and 1 conglutination.Conclusions The suspected Achilles tendon rupture in patients with a serious medical examination did not lead to an achilles tendon rupture is the major cause of misdiagnosis.Avoid misdiagnosis,as soon as possible after surgery and gradual rehabilitation exercise is to improve the efficacy of effective measures.The peroneus longus tendon transfer is a safe and satisfied way to reconstructing the old and certain fresh rupture of the Achilles tendon.

  12. Imaging and simulation of Achilles tendon dynamics: Implications for walking performance in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Jason R; Thelen, Darryl G

    2016-06-14

    The Achilles tendon (AT) is a complex structure, consisting of distinct fascicle bundles arising from each triceps surae muscle that may act as mechanically independent structures. Advances in tissue imaging are rapidly accelerating our understanding of the complexities of functional Achilles tendon behavior, with potentially important implications for musculoskeletal injury and performance. In this overview of our recent contributions to these efforts, we present the results of complementary experimental and computational approaches to investigate AT behavior during walking and its potential relevance to reduced triceps surae mechanical performance due to aging. Our experimental evidence reveals that older tendons exhibit smaller differences in tissue deformations than young adults between regions of the AT presumed to arise from the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. These observations are consistent with a reduced capacity for inter-fascicle sliding within the AT, which could have implications for the mechanical independence of the triceps surae muscles. More uniform AT deformations are also correlated with hallmark biomechanical features of elderly gait - namely, a loss of net ankle moment, power, and positive work during push-off. Simulating age-related reductions in the capacity for inter-fascicle sliding in the AT during walking predicts detriments in gastrocnemius muscle-tendon mechanical performance coupled with underlying shifts in fascicle kinematics during push-off. AT compliance, also suspected to vary due to age, systematically modulates those effects. By integrating in vivo imaging with computational modeling, we have gained theoretical insight into multi-scale biomechanical changes due to aging, hypotheses regarding their functional effects, and opportunities for experiments that validate or invalidate these assertions.

  13. Percutaneous Tenolig(®) repair under intra-operative ultrasonography guidance in acute Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, S; Féron, J M; Cherrier, B

    2014-12-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture can be treated conservatively or surgically. Open surgery restores tendon continuity but carries a risk of skin complications. Tenolig(®) is a device designed for the percutaneous biological treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. Earlier studies found high rates of recurrent tears and nerve injury after Tenolig(®) repair. We hypothesised that intra-operative ultrasonography during Tenolig(®) repair would decrease the post-operative complication rate and improve functional outcomes. We studied 75 consecutive patients with a mean age of 39.9 years. The injury was sports-related in 82.8% of cases. Mean distance from the calcaneal tendon attachment to the tear was 5cm and mean time from injury to repair was 4.2 days. All patients underwent Tenolig(®) repair under ultrasound guidance followed by early rehabilitation therapy with partial weight bearing started after 3 weeks. Mean follow-up was 20.7 months and no patient was lost to follow-up. A single patient (1.3%) experienced rerupture and none had permanent sural nerve damage. Mean time to sports resumption was 8.6 months, with two-thirds of patients returning to their previous level of sporting activities. The mean AOFAS functional score was 95 and the mean ATRS score was 91.3. Our experience suggests that intra-operative ultrasonography, a non-invasive, widely available, and accurate tool, provided improved control of Tenolig(®) suture position. Ultrasonography provided valuable guidance during this demanding procedure and allowed the very early initiation of rehabilitation therapy. Another crucial factor is patient education about the physical therapy programme. Attention to this point allowed us to obtain robust and reliable functional outcomes in a population predominantly composed of athletes. Level IV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Neuromechanical Modulation of the Achilles Tendon During Bilateral Hopping in Patients with Unilateral Achilles Tendon Rupture, Over 1 Year After Surgical Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Hiroyuki; Sano, Kanae; Kunimasa, Yoko; Komi, Paavo V; Ishikawa, Masaki

    2017-06-01

    Patients who have had an Achilles tendon (AT) rupture repaired are potentially at higher risk for re-rupture than those without previous rupture. Little attention has been given to the neuromechanical modulation of muscle-tendon interaction and muscle activation profiles during human dynamic movements after AT rupture repair. The purpose of this study was to examine muscle-tendon behavior and muscle activation during bilateral hopping. We enrolled nine subjects who had undergone surgical repair of unilateral AT rupture within the past 1-2 years. Subjects performed bilateral hopping while we took ultrasound, kinematic, and electromyogram recordings and measurements. AT behaviors were also recorded. We then compared responses between values obtained from the ruptured AT leg (LEGATR) and non-ruptured AT leg (LEGNOR). During hopping, the AT stretching amplitudes were greater in the LEGATR than in the LEGNOR, although the peak AT force and stiffness were smaller in the LEGATR than in the LEGNOR. The AT negative mechanical work did not show any significant differences between both legs. However, positive works were significantly lower in the LEGATR than in the LEGNOR. Electromyogram patterns in both soleus and tibialis anterior muscles clearly differed after ground contact for the LEGATR and the LEGNOR. These results suggest that the repaired ruptured AT can be compliant and have insufficient Young's modulus, which can influence mechanical responses in muscle activities. The modulation of agonist-antagonist muscle activities corresponding to the different levels of stiffness between the LEGATR and the LEGNOR may not be fully functioning during the pre-activation phase.

  15. Comparison of Semi-Invasive "Internal Splinting" and Open Suturing Techniques in Achilles Tendon Rupture Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarman, Hakan; Muezzinoglu, Umit Sefa; Memisoglu, Kaya; Aydin, Adem; Atmaca, Halil; Baran, Tuncay; Odabas Ozgur, Bahar; Ozgur, Turgay; Kantar, Cengizhan

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the semi-invasive "internal splinting" (SIIS) method for repair of Achilles tendon rupture relative to open repair with Krakow sutures. Efficacy was evaluated based on the clinical and functional outcomes, postoperative magnetic resonance imaging measurements, isokinetic results, and surgical complication rates. Functional measurements included the Thermann and American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle scores, bilateral ankle dorsiflexion, and plantar flexion measurements. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to compare the bilateral length and thickness of each Achilles tendon. The isokinetic outcomes were evaluated using a Biodex System 3 dynamometer. Of the 45 patients meeting the inclusion criteria, 24 were treated by SIIS and 21 by the open Krackow suture technique. The mean follow-up time for all patients was 43.7 (range 6 to 116) months. In the SIIS group, patients returned to normal daily activities after 7.2 (range 6 to 8) weeks compared with 14.3 (range 12 to 15) weeks in the open surgery group. The AOFAS ankle scores were 93.5 (range 82 to 100) points in the open repair group and 96.2 (range 86 to 100) points in the SIIS group. The Thermann scores were 80.4 (range 53 to 91) points for the open repair group and 87.9 (range 81 to 100) points for the SIIS method. The mean Achilles length on the operated side measured using magnetic resonance imaging was 175.06 (range 110 to 224) mm and 177.76 (range 149 to 214) mm for the open surgery and SIIS groups, respectively. Sensory impairment in the territory of the sural nerve was identified in 1 patient immediately after SIIS surgery, although this defect had completely resolved within 12 months. SIIS yielded better outcomes relative to the open surgery group according to the isokinetic measurements. Taken together, these data indicate the SIIS method for Achilles tendon ruptures performed better in terms of both functional and objective outcomes

  16. Cyclic mechanical stimulation rescues achilles tendon from degeneration in a bioreactor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Lin, Zhen; Ni, Ming; Thien, Christine; Day, Robert E; Gardiner, Bruce; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B; Smith, David W; Wang, Allan; Lloyd, David G; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Qiujian; Zheng, Ming H

    2015-12-01

    Physiotherapy is one of the effective treatments for tendinopathy, whereby symptoms are relieved by changing the biomechanical environment of the pathological tendon. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we first established a model of progressive tendinopathy-like degeneration in the rabbit Achilles. Following ex vivo loading deprivation culture in a bioreactor system for 6 and 12 days, tendons exhibited progressive degenerative changes, abnormal collagen type III production, increased cell apoptosis, and weakened mechanical properties. When intervention was applied at day 7 for another 6 days by using cyclic tensile mechanical stimulation (6% strain, 0.25 Hz, 8 h/day) in a bioreactor, the pathological changes and mechanical properties were almost restored to levels seen in healthy tendon. Our results indicated that a proper biomechanical environment was able to rescue early-stage pathological changes by increased collagen type I production, decreased collagen degradation and cell apoptosis. The ex vivo model developed in this study allows systematic study on the effect of mechanical stimulation on tendon biology.

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with Achilles tendon allografts in revisions and in patients older than 30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafe, Michael W; Kurzweil, Peter R

    2008-06-01

    We evaluated the results of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using an Achilles tendon allograft in revisions and in patients older than 30. Results from 23 consecutive patients (mean age, 43 years) who underwent ACL reconstruction with fresh-frozen, irradiated (22/23) Achilles allografts were retrospectively reviewed. Seven cases were revisions. Patients were evaluated with physical examination, questionnaires, and x-rays. Twenty of the 23 patients were evaluated a mean of 28 months after surgery. There were 5 failures (21%); 3 acute failures were not evaluated at follow-up. One patient had an infection that required graft removal, 2 patients had mechanical failure of the grafts, and 2 had displacements of more than 5.5 mm as measured with a KT-1000 arthrometer. The 18 clinically successful cases had full motion, no thigh atrophy, and no effusion. Pivot shift scores were 55% A and 45% B on the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scale. Lachman scores were 40% A, 55% B, and 5% C on the IKDC scale. The KT-1000 difference was a mean of 2.9 mm at final follow-up. However, knees loosened a mean of 4.5 mm from the immediate postoperative measurements (Preconstructions with Achilles tendon allografts failed. Grafts deemed successful still had significant loosening at final follow-up. Allografts from donors older than 40 may have played a role in these failures. From the data in this study, it appears that surgeons should scrutinize the source of the allograft tissue and the age of the donor.

  18. Ageing, deep vein thrombosis and male gender predict poor outcome after acute Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arverud, E Domeij-; Anundsson, P; Hardell, E; Barreng, G; Edman, G; Latifi, A; Labruto, F; Ackermann, P W

    2016-12-01

    Patients with an acute Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) take a long time to heal, have a high incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and widely variable functional outcomes. This variation in outcome may be explained by a lack of knowledge of adverse factors, and a subsequent shortage of appropriate interventions. A total of 111 patients (95 men, 16 women; mean age 40.3, standard deviation 8.4) with an acute total ATR were prospectively assessed. At one year post-operatively a uniform outcome score, Achilles Combined Outcome Score (ACOS), was obtained by combining three validated, independent, outcome measures: Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score, heel-rise height test, and limb symmetry heel-rise height. Predictors of ACOS included treatment; gender; age; smoking; body mass index; time to surgery; physical activity level pre- and post-injury; symptoms; quality of life and incidence of DVT. There were three independent variables that correlated significantly with the dichotomised outcome score (ACOS), while there was no correlation with other factors. An age of less than 40 years old was the strongest independent predictor of a good outcome one year after ATR (odds ratio (OR) 0.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08 to 0.51), followed by female gender (OR) 4.18, 95% CI 1.01 to 17.24). Notably, patients who did not have a DVT while immobilised post-operatively had a better outcome (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.80). Over the age of 40 years, male gender and having a DVT while immobilised are independent negative predictors of outcome in patients with an acute ATR. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:1635-41. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  19. Orthotic Heel Wedges Do Not Alter Hindfoot Kinematics and Achilles Tendon Force During Level and Inclined Walking in Healthy Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinert-Aplin, Robert A; Bull, Anthony M J; McGregor, Alison H

    2016-04-01

    Conservative treatments such as in-shoe orthotic heel wedges to treat musculoskeletal injuries are not new. However, weak evidence supporting their use in the management of Achilles tendonitis suggests the mechanism by which these heel wedges works remains poorly understood. It was the aim of this study to test the underlying hypothesis that heel wedges can reduce Achilles tendon load. A musculoskeletal modeling approach was used to quantify changes in lower limb mechanics when walking due to the introduction of 12-mm orthotic heel wedges. Nineteen healthy volunteers walked on an inclinable walkway while optical motion, force plate, and plantar pressure data were recorded. Walking with heel wedges increased ankle dorsiflexion moments and reduced plantar flexion moments; this resulted in increased peak ankle dorsiflexor muscle forces during early stance and reduced tibialis posterior and toe flexor muscle forces during late stance. Heel wedges did not reduce overall Achilles tendon force during any walking condition, but did redistribute load from the medial to lateral triceps surae during inclined walking. These results add to the body of clinical evidence confirming that heel wedges do not reduce Achilles tendon load and our findings provide an explanation as to why this may be the case.

  20. Increasing incidence of acute Achilles tendon rupture and a noticeable decline in surgical treatment from 1994 to 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganestam, Ann; Kallemose, Thomas; Troelsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to investigate the incidence of acute Achilles tendon rupture in Denmark from 1994 to 2013 with focus on sex, age, geographical areas, seasonal variation and choice of treatment. METHODS: The National Patient Registry was retrospectively searched to find the ...

  1. Central tendon splitting combined with SutureBridge double-row technique as a surgical treatment for insertional Achilles tendinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Yuan; WANG Zhi-wei; ZHANG Bo; PAN Jiang; QU Tie-bing; HAI Yong

    2013-01-01

    Background Surgical treatment of insertional Achilles tendinopathy should be considered when a variety of conservative measures fail.To achieve a satisfactory outcome,thorough debridement of the Achilles tendon is critical,besides excision of the bursitis and the calcaneal exostosis.Central tendon-splitting provides straightforward access to the calcified or degenerative tissue within the Achilles tendon.For Achilles tendon reconstruction if detachment is present,several surgical techniques have been reported.Controversy surrounds the technique can provide maximum security for reattachment of the Achilles tendon.The SutureBridge double-row construct,initially used in rotator cuff repair,is probably a good choice.Methods Ten consecutive patients with insertional Achilles tendinopathy underwent tendon reattachment using the SutureBridge technique through a central tendon-splitting approach.We retrospectively evaluated the surgical outcomes,which included pre-and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS),postoperative Maryland Foot Score (MFS),postoperative range of motion of the affected ankle,and related complications.Follow-up was performed in the outpatient department.Results One patient was lost to follow-up.Nine patients (two male and seven female; 12 feet) were reviewed with a minimum follow-up of six months (range 6-30 months).The postoperative VAS pain scores were markedly lower than the preoperative scores.Postoperative MFS was 92.1±8.0 (range 74-100).No intra-or postoperative complications were found,except for one case of delayed healing incision.At last follow-up,all affected ankles achieved their normal range of motion,and patients were able to resume daily activities without any assistive device.Conclusions Although a randomized control trial with a larger sample may be necessary to compare the central tendonsplitting combined with the SutureBridge technique with other techniques,our results confirmed that it was a promising alternative for treatment of

  2. Uphill running improves rat Achilles tendon tissue mechanical properties and alters gene expression without inducing pathological changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemeier, K M; Skovgaard, D; Bayer, M L; Qvortrup, K; Kjaer, A; Kjaer, M; Magnusson, S P; Kongsgaard, M

    2012-09-01

    Overuse Achilles tendinopathy is a common and challenging problem in sports medicine. Little is known about the etiology of this disorder, and the development of a good animal model for overuse tendinopathy is essential for advancing insight into the disease mechanisms. Our aim was to test a previously proposed rat model for Achilles tendon overuse. Ten adult male Sprague-Dawley rats ran on a treadmill with 10° incline, 1 h/day, 5 days/wk (17-20 m/min) for 12 wk and were compared with 12 control rats. Histological, mechanical, and gene-expression changes were measured on the Achilles tendons after the intervention, and local tendon glucose-uptake was measured before and after the intervention with positron emission tomography. No differences were detected between runners and controls in tissue histology or in glucose uptake, indicating that tendon pathology was not induced. Greater tendon tissue modulus (P < 0.005) and failure stress/body weight (P < 0.02) in runners compared with controls further supported that tendons successfully adapted to uphill running. Several genes of interest were regulated after 12 wk of running. Expression of collagen III and insulin-like growth factor I was increased, while collagen I was unchanged, and decreases were seen in noncollagen matrix components (fibromodulin and biglycan), matrix degrading enzymes, transforming growth factor-β1, and connective tissue growth factor. In conclusion, the tested model could not be validated as a model for Achilles tendinopathy, as the rats were able to adapt to 12 wk of uphill running without any signs of tendinopathy. Improved mechanical properties were observed, as well as changes in gene-expression that were distinctly different from what is seen in tendinopathy and in response to short-term tendon loading.

  3. Overload and neovascularization of Achilles tendons in young artistic and rhythmic gymnasts compared with controls: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarnicola, A; Maccagnano, G; Di Leo, M; Tafuri, S; Moretti, B

    2014-08-01

    The incidence of Achilles tendinopathy is very high in young female gymnasts (17.5 %). According to literature, ecography screenings show the tendons thickening, but at the same time it does not reveal a direct link to the clinical picture. The neovessels are involved in the pathophysiological process of Achilles tendinopathy. For this reason, we wanted to verify there between perfusion tendon values and the type of sport activity. We performed a clinical observational study monitoring the oximetry of the Achilles tendon and the epidemiological data of 52 elite female (artistic and rhythmic) gymnasts versus 21 age-matched controls. Analyzing the main limb, we revealed statistically higher oximetry values in the artistic gymnasts group (69.5 %) compared to the rhythmic gymnasts group (67.1 %) (t = 2.13; p = 0.01) and the sedentary group (66.2 %) (t = 2.70; p = 0.004), but we did not find any differences between rhythmic gymnasts group and the sedentary group (t = 0.68; p = 0.24). The multiple logistic regression model highlighted that the oximetry value of the main limb is not influenced by age, knowledge of the main limb, years of general and gymnastic sports activity (p > 0.05). We discovered an increase of Achilles tendon perfusion in the main limb in the artistic gymnast group. We hypothesize that specific figures of artistic sports activity are responsible for muscle overload and gastrocnemius-soleus group and, at the same time, these figures cause hyperperfusion of the tendon. Prospective longitudinal studies could explain if this could become a predictive sign of the next Achilles tendinopathy onset.

  4. Effects of repeated Achilles tendon vibration on triceps surae stiffness and reflex excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapole, Thomas; Pérot, Chantal

    2011-02-01

    Clinical studies frequently report an increase in stiffness and a loss of range of motion at joints placed in disuse or immobilization. This is notably the case for subjects maintained in bed for a long period, whilst their joints are not affected. Recently we documented on healthy subjects the benefit in terms of force and activation capacities of the triceps surae offered by vibrations applied to the Achilles tendon. Knowing that stiffness changes may contribute to force changes, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of tendon vibration on the triceps surae stiffness of healthy subjects. The vibration program consisted in 14 days of 1h daily Achilles tendon vibration applied at rest. Nineteen healthy students were involved in this study. Before and at the end of the vibration program, musculo-tendinous stiffness in active conditions was determined by use of a quick-release test. Passive stiffness was also analyzed by a flexibility test: passive torque-angle relationships were established from maximal plantar-flexion to maximal dorsiflexion. Passive stiffness indexes at 10°, 15° and 20° dorsiflexion were defined as the slope of the relationships at the corresponding angle. Tendinous reflex, influenced by stiffness values, was also investigated as well as the H reflex to obtain an index of the central reflex excitability. After the program, musculo-tendinous stiffness was significantly decreased (p=.01). At the same time, maximal passive dorsiflexion was increased (p=.005) and passive stiffness indexes at 10°, 15° and 20° dorsiflexion decreased (ptriceps surae parameters are diminished after the vibration program, it could be beneficial to immobilized persons as hypo-activity is known to increase muscular stiffness.

  5. 陈旧性跟腱断裂11例治疗分析%Clinical analysis for 11 cases of chronic achilles tendon rupture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王锐

    2012-01-01

      目的探讨陈旧性跟腱断裂的治疗方法与疗效.方法11例陈旧性跟腱断裂患者根据跟腱缺损长度选择相应的手术治疗方法.结果所有病例均得到随访,根据Amer-Lindholm疗效评定标准评估,优6例,良4例,差1例,优良率为90.9%.结论陈旧性跟腱断裂应根据跟腱缺损长度选择不同的治疗方法,腓肠肌腱瓣翻转法适用于跟腱缺损>6 cm的患者.%  Objective To investigate the treatment for Chronic Achilles tendon rupture. Methods 11 cases of rupture of Achilles tendon with Achilles tendon defect length was selected according to the corresponding operation treatment method. Results All cases were followed up, according to the Amer-Lindholm criteria for the evaluation of curative effect evaluation, excellent in 6 cases, good in 4 cases, and poor in 1 cases, the excellent and good rate was 90.9%. Conclusion The rupture of Achilles tendon Achilles tendon defect length according to different therapeutic methods, gastrocnemius tendon flap method is applied to the Achilles tendon defect with>6 cm.

  6. Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture Treated by Double Side-Locking Loop Suture Technique With Early Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Wataru; Imade, Shinji; Innami, Ken; Kawano, Hirotaka; Takao, Masato

    2017-02-01

    Although early accelerated rehabilitation is recommended for the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture, most traditional rehabilitation techniques require some type of brace. We retrospectively analyzed 44 feet of 44 patients (25 male and 19 female) with a mean age of 31.8 years who had an acute Achilles tendon rupture related to athletic activity. Patients had been treated by a double side-locking loop suture (SLLS) technique using double antislip knots between stumps and had undergone early accelerated rehabilitation, including active and passive range of motion exercises on the day following the operation and full weight-bearing at 4 weeks. No brace was applied postoperatively. The evaluation criteria included the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot Scale (AOFAS) score; active plantar flexion and dorsiflexion angles; and the intervals between surgery and the time when patients could walk normally without any support, perform double-leg heel raises, and perform 20 continuous single-leg heel raises of the operated foot. Despite postoperative early accelerated rehabilitation, the AOFAS score and active dorsiflexion angles improved over time (6, 12, and 24 weeks and 2 years). A mean of 4.3 ± 0.6 weeks was required for patients to be able to walk normally without any support. The mean period to perform double-leg heel raises and 20 continuous single-leg heel raises of the injured foot was 8.0 ± 1.3 weeks and 10.9 ± 2.1 weeks, respectively. All patients, except one who was engaged in classical ballet, could return to their preinjury level of athletic activities, and the interval between operation and return to athletic activities was 17.1 ± 3.7 weeks. The double SLLS technique with double antislip knots between stumps adjusted the tension of the sutured Achilles tendon at the ideal ankle position and provided good clinical outcomes following accelerated rehabilitation after surgery without the use of a brace. Level IV, retrospective case

  7. Functional Outcomes of Achilles Tendon Minimally Invasive Repair Using 4- and 6-Strand Nonabsorbable Suture: A Cohort Comparison Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmont, Michael R.; Zellers, Jennifer A.; Brorsson, Annelie; Olsson, Nicklas; Nilsson-Helander, Katarina; Karlsson, Jon; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of management of Achilles tendon rupture is to reduce tendon lengthening and maximize function while reducing the rerupture rate and minimizing other complications. Purpose: To determine changes in Achilles tendon resting angle (ATRA), heel-rise height, patient-reported outcomes, return to play, and occurrence of complications after minimally invasive repair of Achilles tendon ruptures using nonabsorbable sutures. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Between March 2013 and August 2015, a total of 70 patients (58 males, 12 females) with a mean age of 42 ± 8 years were included and evaluated at 6 weeks and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after repair of an Achilles tendon rupture. Surgical repair was performed using either 4-strand or 6-strand nonabsorbable sutures. After surgery, patients were mobilized, fully weightbearing using a functional brace. Early active movement was permitted starting at 2 weeks. Results: There were no significant differences in the ATRA, Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS), and Heel-Rise Height Index (HRHI) between the 4- and 6-strand repairs. The mean (SD) relative ATRA was –13.1° (6.6°) (dorsiflexion) following injury; this was reduced to 7.6° (4.8°) (plantar flexion) directly after surgery. During initial rehabilitation at 6 weeks, the relative ATRA was 0.6° (7.4°) (neutral) and –7.0° (5.3°) (dorsiflexion) at 3 months, after which ATRA improved significantly with time to 12 months (P = .005). At 12 months, the median ATRS was 93 (range, 35-100), and the mean (SD) HRHI and Heel-Rise Repetition Index were 81% (0.22%) and 82.9% (0.17%), respectively. The relative ATRA at 3 and 12 months correlated with HRHI (r = 0.617, P Achilles tendon repair. The use of a nonabsorbable suture during minimally invasive repair when used together with accelerated rehabilitation did not prevent the development of an increased relative ATRA. The ATRA at 3 months after surgery correlated with heel

  8. Three-Dimensional Gait Analysis Following Achilles Tendon Rupture With Nonsurgical Treatment Reveals Long-Term Deficiencies in Muscle Strength and Function

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tengman, Tine; Riad, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Precise long-term assessment of movement and physical function following Achilles tendon rupture is required for the development and evaluation of treatment, including different regimens of physical therapy...

  9. A DELPHI STUDY OF RISK FACTORS FOR ACHILLES TENDINOPATHY- OPINIONS OF WORLD TENDON EXPERTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Paul J.; Barry, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Achilles tendinopathy can be a debilitating chronic condition for both active and inactive individuals. The identification of risk facors is important both in preventing but also treating tendinopathy, many factors have been proposed but there is a lack of primary epidemiological data. The purpose of this study was to develop a statement of expert consensus on risk factors for Achilles tendinopathy in active and sedentary patient populations to inform a primary epidemiological study. Study design Delphi study Methods and Measures An online Delphi study was completed inviting participation from world tendon experts. The consensus was developed using three rounds of the Delphi technique. The first round developed a complete list of potential risk factors, the second round refined this list but also separated the factors into two population groups – active/athletic and inactive/sedentary. The third round ranked this list in order of perceived importance. Results Forty-four experts were invited to participate, 16 participated in the first round (response rate 40%) and two dropped out in the second round (resulting in a response rate of 35%). A total of 27 intrinsic and eight extrinsic risk factors were identified during round one. During round two only 12 intrinsic and five extrinsic risk factors were identified as important in active/athletic tendinopathy while 14 intrinsic and three extrinsic factors were identified as important for inactive/sedentary tendinopathy. Conclusions Risk factors for Achilles tendinopathy were identified based on expert consensus, and these factors provide a basis for primary epidemiological studies. Plantarflexor strength was identified as the primary modifiable factor in the active/athletic group while systemic factors were identified as important in the inactive/sedentary group, many of the potential factors suggested for either group were non-modifiable. Non-modifiable factors include: previous tendinopathy

  10. Frequency characteristics of human muscle and cortical responses evoked by noisy Achilles tendon vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildren, Robyn Lynne; Peters, Ryan M; Hill, Aimee J; Blouin, Jean-Sebastien; Carpenter, Mark Gregory; Inglis, J Timothy

    2017-02-16

    Noisy stimuli, along with linear systems analysis, have proven to be effective for mapping functional neural connections. We explored the use of noisy (10-115 Hz) Achilles tendon vibration to examine proprioceptive reflexes in the triceps surae muscles in standing healthy young adults (n = 8). We also examined the association between noisy vibration and electrical activity recorded over the sensorimotor cortex using electroencephalography. We applied two-minutes of vibration and recorded ongoing muscle activity of the soleus and gastrocnemii using surface electromyography (EMG). Vibration amplitude was varied to characterize reflex scaling and to examine how different stimulus levels affected postural sway. Muscle activity from the soleus and gastrocnemii were significantly correlated with the tendon vibration across a broad frequency range (~10-80 Hz), with a peak located at ~40 Hz. Vibration-EMG coherence positively scaled with stimulus amplitude in all three muscles, with soleus displaying the strongest coupling and steepest scaling. EMG responses lagged the vibration by ~38 ms, a delay that paralleled observed response latencies to tendon taps. Vibration-evoked cortical oscillations were observed at frequencies ~40-70 Hz (peak ~54 Hz) in most subjects, a finding in line with previous reports of sensory evoked γ-band oscillations. Further examination of the method revealed a) accurate reflex estimates could be obtained with <60 s of low-level (RMS=10 m/s(2)) vibration, b) responses did not habituate over two-minutes of exposure, and importantly c) noisy vibration had a minimal influence on standing balance. Our findings suggest noisy tendon vibration is an effective novel approach to characterize proprioceptive reflexes.

  11. Reconstruction of neglected achilles tendon ruptures with gastrocnemius flaps: excellent results in long-term follow-up.

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    Seker, Ali; Kara, Adnan; Armagan, Raffi; Oc, Yunus; Varol, Ali; Sezer, Hasan Basri

    2016-10-01

    Repair of the neglected achilles tendon ruptures can be challenging due to retraction of tendon stumps. Different repair and augmentation techniques were described. This study aims to investigate long-term results of neglected achilles tendon rupture repair with gastrocnemius flaps. Between 1995 and 2005, 21 neglected achilles tendon rupture reconstructions were performed with using gastrocnemius fascial flaps. Mean age was 32.1 years. Mean period between rupture and operation was 8.4 weeks. Ankle range of motion, calf circumference, heel raise test, Visual Analog Scale (VAS), American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot and Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI) scores were checked. The average gap length was 6.4 cm. Mean follow-up was 145.3 months. Median dorsiflexion/plantar flexion values for operated and uneffected sides were 18°/30° and 19°/30°, respectively. The mean values for AOFAS and FADI scores were 98.5 points and 98.9 %, respectively. VAS score was 0 point for all patients. With the numbers available, no significant difference could be detected in terms of ankle range of motion, calf circumference measures and dynamometric analysis. Mean time for return to daily activities was 11.1 (8-16) weeks after surgery. Prerupture activity level was achieved 14.1 months postoperatively. All patients were able to perform heel raise test. Repair of neglected achilles tendon ruptures with gastrocnemius flaps has satisfactory long-term results.

  12. Accelerated rehabilitation following Achilles tendon repair after acute rupture - Development of an evidence-based treatment protocol.

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    Brumann, Mareen; Baumbach, Sebastian F; Mutschler, Wolf; Polzer, Hans

    2014-11-01

    The acute rupture of the Achilles tendon is a protracted injury. Surgery is only the beginning of a long rehabilitation period. Therefore, the rehabilitation protocol is an integral aspect to restore the pre-injury activity level. Despite several trials available comparing different treatment regimes, there is still no consensus regarding the optimal protocol. Consequently, the aim of our study was to systematically search the evidence available and define a precise rehabilitation programme after operative repair of acute Achilles tendon rupture based on the trials with the highest level of evidence. We performed a systematic literature search in Medline, Embase and Cochrane library. We identified twelve randomized controlled trials comparing different treatment regimes after operative repair of the Achilles tendon. Five trials compared full to non weight bearing, all applying immobilization in equinus. Immediate full weight bearing led to significant higher patient satisfaction, earlier ambulation and return to pre-injury activity. Four trials compared early ankle mobilization to immobilization. All trials found mobilization to be superior as it shortens time to return to work and sports significantly. Three trials compared the combination of full weight bearing and early ankle mobilization to immobilization. This combination was most beneficial. Patients showed significantly higher satisfaction, less use of rehabilitation resources, earlier return to pre-injury activities and further demonstrated significantly increased calf muscle strength, reduced atrophy and tendon elongation. No study found an increased rerupture rate for the more progressive treatment. In conclusion, the rehabilitation protocol after Achilles tendon repair should allow immediate full weight bearing. After the second postoperative week controlled ankle mobilization by free plantar flexion and limited dorsiflexion at 0° should be applied. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Achilles Tendonitis

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    ... Safety Tips: Basketball Safety Tips: Running Repetitive Stress Injuries Sports and Exercise Safety Dealing With Sports Injuries Stress Fractures Sports Center Plantar Fasciitis Contact Us Print Resources Send ...

  14. Declining incidence of surgery for Achilles tendon rupture follows publication of major RCTs: evidence-influenced change evident using the Finnish registry study.

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    Mattila, Ville M; Huttunen, Tuomas T; Haapasalo, Heidi; Sillanpää, Petri; Malmivaara, Antti; Pihlajamäki, Harri

    2015-08-01

    Acute Achilles tendon ruptures are common among highly active people. Recently published studies have provided increasing evidence to support non-surgical treatment. This study aimed to assess the incidence trends of surgically treated, acute Achilles tendon ruptures. Our hypothesis, based on the recent literature showing no difference in functional results between surgical and non-surgical treatment, was that the incidence of surgery would be declining. We conducted a nationwide hospital register-based study. All patients 18 years of age or older with a diagnosis of acute Achilles tendon injury, and treated with Achilles tendon repair from 1987 to 2011 in Finland were included in the study. During the 25-year study period in Finland, a total of 15,252 patients received surgical treatment for an acute Achilles tendon rupture. The incidence of surgical treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture in men was 11.1/100,000 person-years in 1987 and 20.5/100,000 person-years in 2011. The corresponding figures in women were 2.5/100,000 person-years in 1987 and 4.2/100,000 person-years in 2011. The highest rates occurred in 2008 in men and 2007 in women, and since then the decrease has been 42% in men and 55% in women. During the past few years, the rate of surgically treated acute Achilles tendon ruptures has declined remarkably. The findings of the present study indicate that orthopaedic surgeons have chosen more often non-surgical treatment option for acute Achilles ruptures. This can be considered as an example, how high-quality scientific evidence can lead to a rapid change in clinical practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. An Investigation of the Immediate Effect of Static Stretching on the Morphology and Stiffness of Achilles Tendon in Dominant and Non-Dominant Legs.

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    Tsz-Chun Roxy Chiu

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to investigate the immediate effect of static stretching on normal Achilles tendon morphology and stiffness, and the different effect on dominant and non-dominant legs; and to evaluate inter-operator and intra-operator reliability of using shear-wave elastography in measuring Achilles tendon stiffness.20 healthy subjects (13 males, 7 females were included in the study. Thickness, cross-sectional area and stiffness of Achilles tendons in both legs were measured before and after 5-min static stretching using grey-scale ultrasound and shear-wave elastography. Inter-operator and intra-operator reliability of tendon stiffness measurements of six operators were evaluated.Result showed that there was no significant change in the thickness and cross-sectional area of Achilles tendon after static stretching in both dominant and non-dominant legs (p > 0.05. Tendon stiffness showed a significant increase in non-dominant leg (p 0.05. The inter-operator reliability of shear-wave elastography measurements was 0.749 and the intra-operator reliability ranged from 0.751 to 0.941.Shear-wave elastography is a useful and non-invasive imaging tool to assess the immediate stiffness change of Achilles tendon in response to static stretching with high intra-operator and inter-operator reliability.

  16. Mechanical properties during healing of Achilles tendon ruptures to predict final outcome: A pilot Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis in 10 patients

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    Aspenberg Per

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are presently few methods described for in vivo monitoring of the mechanics of healing human tendon ruptures, and no methods for prediction of clinical outcome. We tested if Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA can be used to follow the restoration of mechanical properties during healing of ruptured Achilles tendons, and if early measurements can predict clinical results. Methods Achilles tendon repair was studied with RSA in 10 patients with a total rupture. Tantalum beads were implanted in conjunction with surgical repair. The patients were evaluated at 6, 12 and 18 weeks, and after 1 year. RSA was performed with two different mechanical loadings, and the strain induced by increasing load was measured. The transverse area was determined by ultrasound. CT scan at 12 weeks confirmed that the tantalum beads were located within the tendons. Functional testing was done after 1 year. A heel raise index was chosen as primary clinical outcome variable. Results The strain was median 0.90, 0.32 and 0.14 percent per 100 N tendon force at 6 weeks, 18 weeks and one year respectively. The error of measurement was 0.04 percent units at 18 weeks. There was a large variation between patients, which appears to reflect biological variation. From 6 to 18 weeks, there was a negative correlation between increase in transverse area and increase in material properties, suggesting that healing is regulated at the organ level, to maximize stiffness. Modulus of elasticity during this time correlated with a heel raise index at one year (Rho = 0.76; p = 0.02. Conclusion We conclude that the RSA method might have potential for comparing different treatments of Achilles tendon ruptures.

  17. Relationship between Achilles tendon length and running performance in well-trained male endurance runners.

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    Ueno, Hiromasa; Suga, Tadashi; Takao, Kenji; Tanaka, Takahiro; Misaki, Jun; Miyake, Yuto; Nagano, Akinori; Isaka, Tadao

    2017-06-28

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between Achilles tendon (AT) length and running performance, including running economy, in well-trained endurance runners. We also examined the reasonable portion of the AT related to running performance among AT lengths measured in three different portions. The AT lengths at three portions and cross-sectional area (CSA) of 30 endurance runners were measured using magnetic resonance imaging. Each AT length was calculated as the distance from the calcaneal tuberosity to the muscle-tendon junction of the soleus, gastrocnemius medialis (GMAT ), and gastrocnemius lateralis, respectively. These AT lengths were normalized with shank length. The AT CSA was calculated as the average of 10, 20, and 30 mm above the distal insertion of the AT and normalized with body mass. Running economy was evaluated by measuring energy cost during three 4-minutes submaximal treadmill running trials at 14, 16, and 18 km/h, respectively. Among three AT lengths, only a GMAT correlated significantly with personal best 5000-m race time (r=-.376, P=.046). Furthermore, GMAT correlated significantly with energy cost during submaximal treadmill running trials at 14 km/h and 18 km/h (r=-.446 and -.429, respectively, PGMAT , may be advantageous to achieve superior running performance, with better running economy, in endurance runners. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. SURGICAL PERCUTANEOUS TREATMENT OF AN ACUTE RUPTURE OF ACHILLES TENDON IN ATHLETES

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    Zarko Dasic

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We have registered that with growing interest of the middle-aged in sport activities in our country the incidence of Achilles tendon ruptures has increased. It was usually preceded by its degenerative changes. Our aim was to examine the results of Achiles tendon rupture treatment in the group treated with our modified percutaneous technique with double - crossed suture.We compared these results with those obtained by the treatment with the nonsurgical method.Our study included 139 patients who gained injuries during their sports activities. They were active professionals or ex-active who continued training sports for recreation, and finally, amateurs who trained sports for the sake of recreation. We also analyzed differences in the results of those three groups after the treatment and checked them statistically.The results have showed superiority of this percutaneous operative treatment because of its simple operative technique, possibility of doing it in the local anaesthesia, continuous ultrasonographic following of the rupture during the process of healing up and shorter immobilisation time, practically without hospitalization and rare complications.

  19. Running biomechanics in a long-term monitored recreational athlete with a history of Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandacka, Daniel; Zahradnik, David; Foldyna, Karel; Hamill, Joseph

    2013-01-28

    This study represented a unique opportunity to understand changes in the human motion biomechanics during basic locomotion within a time interval of 4 years, when the monitored individual regained his original aerobic fitness, running performance and body mass index as prior to the injury. The participant visited the laboratory a month prior to the injury and during 4 years after the surgery. The surgery, subsequent rehabilitation and a 4-year running training programme in the studied recreational athlete did not completely eliminate the consequences of the Achilles tendon rupture. The function muscle deficit is namely manifested by a lower net plantar flexion moment and a lower net-generated ankle joint power during the take-off in the stance phase. The greater dorsal flexion in the affected ankle joint at the first contact with the ground and consequently higher peaks of ground reaction forces during running are consequences of the longer Achilles tendon in the affected lower extremity and weakened calf muscles.

  20. In vivo quantification of the shear modulus of the human Achilles tendon during passive loading using shear wave dispersion analysis

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    Helfenstein-Didier, C.; Andrade, R. J.; Brum, J.; Hug, F.; Tanter, M.; Nordez, A.; Gennisson, J.-L.

    2016-03-01

    The shear wave velocity dispersion was analyzed in the Achilles tendon (AT) during passive dorsiflexion using a phase velocity method in order to obtain the tendon shear modulus (C 55). Based on this analysis, the aims of the present study were (i) to assess the reproducibility of the shear modulus for different ankle angles, (ii) to assess the effect of the probe locations, and (iii) to compare results with elasticity values obtained with the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) technique. The AT shear modulus (C 55) consistently increased with the ankle dorsiflexion (N  =  10, p  tendon mechanical properties across populations. Future studies should determine the clinical relevance of the shear wave dispersion analysis, for instance in the case of tendinopathy or tendon tear.

  1. [Comparative study on animal model of acute Achilles tendon rupture with surgical treatment using platelet-rich plasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Martínez, J C; Vásquez, C R; Ceja, C B; Fuentes, C C E; Sesma, J F; Benítez, A G

    2012-01-01

    To compare the functional and histologicalal course of two animal model groups with acute Achilles tendon tears using platelet rich plasma. An open clinical trial was conducted with dogs donated by the animal facility of the Autonomous University of Puebla (BUAP, for its acronym in Spanish). Dogs were divided into 2 groups: a control group and a problem group. Intentional surgical Achilles tendon tear was performed to them. The Krackow technique was used to repair the tendon and the control group received platelet rich plasma (PRP) as a clot; the other group did not receive PRP. The dogs were seen at 4 weeks to check functionality using the Farell and Schwarz scale to assess the degree of limping. They were sacrificed at week 5; the tendons were removed and sent to the histopathology lab. Functionality results according to the Farell and Schwarz scale showed grades I and II in the problem group, and grades IV and V in the control group. Histologically, the problem group showed moderate vascular proliferation and abundant fibroblastic proliferation. The control group had mild to moderate vascular proliferation and moderate fibroblastic proliferation. PRP improves tendon healing and this has repercussions on functional recovery.

  2. Surgical Versus Conservative Intervention for Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: A PRISMA-Compliant Systematic Review of Overlapping Meta-Analyses.

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    Zhang, Hao; Tang, Hao; He, Qianyun; Wei, Qiang; Tong, Dake; Wang, Chuangfeng; Wu, Dajiang; Wang, Guangchao; Zhang, Xin; Ding, Wenbin; Li, Di; Ding, Chen; Liu, Kang; Ji, Fang

    2015-11-01

    Although many meta-analyses comparing surgical intervention with conservative treatment have been conducted for acute Achilles tendon rupture, discordant conclusions are shown. This study systematically reviewed the overlapping meta-analyses relating to surgical versus conservative intervention of acute Achilles tendon rupture to assist decision makers select among conflicting meta-analyses, and to offer intervention recommendations based on the currently best evidence.Multiple databases were comprehensively searched for meta-analyses comparing surgical with conservative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. Meta-analyses only comprising randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. Two authors independently evaluated the meta-analysis quality and extracted data. The Jadad decision algorithm was applied to ascertain which meta-analysis offered the best evidence.A total of 9 meta-analyses were included. Only RCTs were determined as Level-II evidence. The scores of Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) ranged from 5 to 10 (median 7). A high-quality meta-analysis with more RCTs was selected according to the Jadad decision algorithm. This study found that when functional rehabilitation was used, conservative intervention was equal to surgical treatment regarding the incidence of rerupture, range of motion, calf circumference, and functional outcomes, while reducing the incidence of other complications. Where functional rehabilitation was not performed, conservative intervention could significantly increase rerupture rate.Conservative intervention may be preferred for acute Achilles tendon rupture at centers offering functional rehabilitation, because it shows a similar rerupture rate with a lower risk of other complications when compared with surgical treatment. However, surgical treatment should be considered at centers without functional rehabilitation as this can reduce the incidence of rerupture.

  3. Minimally invasive versus open surgery for acute Achilles tendon rupture: a systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingbo; Wang, Chuanying; Huo, Yanqing; Jia, Zhiwei; Wang, Xiqian

    2016-06-06

    A number of meta-analyses have been carried out to evaluate the effects of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) versus open surgery (OS) for acute Achilles tendon rupture. However, discordant findings were seen in these meta-analyses. The present study, performing a systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses regarding MIS versus OS of acute Achilles tendon rupture, aimed to assist decision-makers interpret and choose among conflicting meta-analyses, as well as to offer treatment recommendations based on current best evidence. The literature search was performed to identify systematic reviews comparing MIS with OS for Achilles tendon rupture. Meta-analyses only comprising randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. Two authors individually evaluated the quality of meta-analysis and extracted data. The Jadad decision algorithm was conducted to ascertain which meta-analysis offered the best evidence. A total of four meta-analyses was included. All these meta-analyses comprised RCTs or quasi-RCTs and were determined as Level-II evidence. The scores of the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) ranged from 7 to 10 (median 9.5). The Jadad algorithm indicated that the best meta-analysis should be chosen according to the search strategies and application of selection. A high-quality meta-analysis with more RCTs was chosen, which suggested that there was no statistically significant difference between MIS and OS regarding rerupture rate, tissue adhesion, sural nerve injury, deep infection, and deep vein thrombosis. However, MIS could decrease superficial infection rate, and had a better patient satisfaction for good to excellent outcomes in comparison to OS. Based on the best available evidence, MIS may be superior to OS for treating acute Achilles tendon rupture. However, due to some limitations, this should be cautiously interpreted, and further high-quality studies are needed.

  4. Influence of different training patterns on the biomechanical performance of the terminal region of the Achilles tendon in rabbits

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    Zhen-hai GUO

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the effects of the different training patterns on the biomechanical performance of the terminal region of the Achilles tendon for providing a scientific basis for improving the ability of anti-stress and preventing injury in military physical training. Methods  Fifty Japanese white rabbits were randomly assigned to four groups: control (n=5, running (running training on the running table, n=15, jump (jump training by electric shock, n=15, and cycle training (run and jump cycle, n=15. The animals in the control group were sacrificed at the start of the experiment. For the other training groups, three rabbits were sacrificed randomly in the second, third, fourth, sixth, and eighth week, respectively. The terminal regions of the Achilles tendons in both sides were identified to determine the biomechanics. Results  At the sixth week, the limit stress and the elastic modulus reached the highest in the running group, and then reduced with the increase in training time. Meanwhile, in the jump group, the limit stress and elastic modulus reached the peak at the fourth week, and then decreased gradually. In the eighth week, no significant difference was observed when the groups were compared with the control group. In the cycle group, the limit stress and elastic modulus increased gradually with the increase in training time, reaching the peak value in the eighth week, and no decline was recorded during the training period. Conclusions  Running training can slowly improve the biomechanical performance of the tissues in the terminal region of the Achilles tendon, whereas jump training can rapidly increase it, although long-term excessive training will reduce the anti-injury ability. Meanwhile, cycle training can improve the biomechanical performance of the tissues in the terminal region of the Achilles tendon, enabling it to withstand more stress and thus its anti-injury ability is enhanced.

  5. Effect of chronic unloading and rehabilitation on human Achilles tendon properties: a velocity-encoded phase-contrast MRI study.

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    Shin, Dongsuk; Finni, Taija; Ahn, Sinyeob; Hodgson, John A; Lee, Hae-Dong; Edgerton, V Reggie; Sinha, Shantanu

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to measure and monitor changes in Achilles tendon mechanical properties and force production capability of triceps surae muscles after 4 wk of limb suspension and 6 wk of physical rehabilitation. Five healthy volunteers underwent unilateral lower limb suspension followed by weekly physiotherapy. A velocity-encoded, phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (VE-PC-MRI) technique was used to estimate the tendon strain as a function of force produced during the submaximal isometric contractions. After limb suspension, triceps surae muscle strength decreased to 53.2 +/- 15.6% (mean +/- SD) of the presuspension level (P Young's modulus, estimated from the slope of the tendon stress-strain relationship, decreased by 17.1% (from 140.50 +/- 29.33 to 119.95 +/- 36.07 MPa, P Muscle strength, tendon stiffness, and transition point recovered to presuspension levels by the end of 6 wk of rehabilitation. Calcaneus movement was significant during the "isometric" contraction, accounting for 52.13 +/- 7.63% of the tendon displacement. Tendon cross-sectional area determined from anatomic magnetic resonance axial images remained unchanged, suggesting that the altered tendon elastic modulus and transition point were largely due to material deterioration. The increase in the transition point following chronic unloading as measured by the VE-PC-MRI technique has not been previously reported and offers new insights into the biomechanical changes that may occur in the tendon crimp structure.

  6. Reconstruction of defects involving the Achilles tendon and local soft tissues: a quick solution for a lingering problem.

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    Soons, J; Rakhorst, H A; Ruettermann, M; Luijsterburg, A J M; Bos, P K; Zöphel, O T

    2015-02-01

    A total of seven patients (six men and one woman) with a defect in the Achilles tendon and overlying soft tissue underwent reconstruction using either a composite radial forearm flap (n = 3) or an anterolateral thigh flap (n = 4). The Achilles tendons were reconstructed using chimeric palmaris longus (n = 2) or tensor fascia lata (n = 2) flaps or transfer of the flexor hallucis longus tendon (n = 3). Surgical parameters such as the rate of complications and the time between the initial repair and flap surgery were analysed. Function was measured objectively by recording the circumference of the calf, the isometric strength of the plantar flexors and the range of movement of the ankle. The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) questionnaire was used as a patient-reported outcome measure. Most patients had undergone several previous operations to the Achilles tendon prior to flap surgery. The mean time to flap surgery was 14.3 months (2.1 to 40.7). At a mean follow-up of 32.3 months (12.1 to 59.6) the circumference of the calf on the operated lower limb was reduced by a mean of 1.9 cm (sd 0.74) compared with the contralateral limb (p = 0.042). The mean strength of the plantar flexors on the operated lower limb was reduced to 88.9% of that of the contralateral limb (p = 0.043). There was no significant difference in the range of movement between the two sides (p = 0.317). The mean ATRS score was 72 points (sd 20.0). One patient who had an initial successful reconstruction developed a skin defect of the composite flap 12 months after free flap surgery and this resulted in recurrent infections, culminating in transtibial amputation 44 months after reconstruction. These otherwise indicate that reconstruction of the Achilles tendon combined with flap cover results in a successful and functional reconstruction. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  7. Comparison of the early period effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma on the Achilles tendon ruptures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Serdar; Guleç, M Akif; Gultekin, M Zeki; Adanır, Oktay; Caglar, Aysel; Beytemur, Ozan; Onur Küçükyıldırım, B; Avcı, Ali; Subaşı, Cansu; İnci, Çiğdem; Karaoz, Erdal

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to histopathologically, biomechanically, and immunohistochemically compare the fourth-week efficiencies of local platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (rBM-MSC) treatments of the Achilles tendon ruptures created surgically in rats. The study included 35 12-month-old male Sprague Dawley rats, with an average weight of 400-500 g. Five rats were used as donors for MSC and PRP, and 30 rats were separated into MSC, PRP, and control groups (n = 10). The Achilles tendons of the rats were cut transversely, the MSC from bone marrow was administered to the MSC group, the PRP group received PRP, and the control group received physiological saline to create the same surgical effect. In previous studies, it was shown that this physiological saline does not have any effect on tendon recovery. Thirty days after the treatment, the rats were sacrificed and their Achilles tendons were examined histopathologically, immunohistochemically, and biomechanically. The use of rBM-MSC and PRP in the Achilles tendon ruptures when the tendon is in its weakest phase positively affected the recovery of the tendon in histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and biomechanical manners compared to the control group (p tendon recovery, such as IL2, VEGF, transforming growth factor-beta, and HGF, were significantly higher in the MSC group than those of the PRP and control groups (p tendon and increase its structural strength. The use of PRP and MSC provides hope for the treatment of the Achilles tendon ruptures that limit human beings' functionalities and quality of life, particularly for athletes. It is thought that the use of MSC can be more effective for tendon healing; hence, more extensive and advanced studies are needed on this topic.

  8. Asymptomatic Achilles tendon pathology is associated with a central fat distribution in men and a peripheral fat distribution in women: a cross sectional study of 298 individuals

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    Bass Shona L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adiposity is a modifiable factor that has been implicated in tendinopathy. As tendon pain reduces physical activity levels and can lead to weight gain, associations between tendon pathology and adiposity must be studied in individuals without tendon pain. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether fat distribution was associated with asymptomatic Achilles tendon pathology. Methods The Achilles tendons of 298 individuals were categorised as normal or pathological using diagnostic ultrasound. Fat distribution was determined using anthropometry (waist circumference, waist hip ratio [WHR] and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Results Asymptomatic Achilles tendon pathology was more evident in men (13% than women (5% (p = 0.007. Men with tendon pathology were older (50.9 ± 10.4, 36.3 ± 11.3, p 83 cm had the greatest prevalence of tendon pathology (33%. Women with tendon pathology were older (47.4 ± 10.0, 36.0 ± 10.3, p = 0.008, had less total fat (17196 ± 3173 g, 21626 ± 7882 g, p = 0.009, trunk fat (7367 ± 1662 g, 10087 ± 4152 g, p = 0.003 and android fat (1117 ± 324 g, 1616 ± 811 g, p = 0.005. They had lower central/peripheral fat mass ratios (0.711 ± 0.321 g, 0.922 ± 0.194 g, p = 0.004 than women with normal tendons. Women with tendon pathology were more often menopausal (63%, 13%, p = 0.002. Conclusions Men with Achilles tendon pathology were older and had a central fat distribution. Women with tendon pathology were older and had a peripheral fat distribution. An interaction between age and waist circumference was observed among men.

  9. Regional molecular and cellular differences in the female rabbit Achilles tendon complex: potential implications for understanding responses to loading.

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    Huisman, Elise S; Andersson, Gustav; Scott, Alexander; Reno, Carol R; Hart, David A; Thornton, Gail M

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was: (i) to analyze the morphology and expression of extracellular matrix genes in six different regions of the Achilles tendon complex of intact normal rabbits; and (ii) to assess the effect of ovariohysterectomy (OVH) on the regional expression of these genes. Female New Zealand White rabbits were separated into two groups: (i) intact normal rabbits (n = 4); and (ii) OVH rabbits (n = 8). For each rabbit, the Achilles tendon complex was dissected into six regions: distal gastrocnemius (DG); distal flexor digitorum superficialis; proximal lateral gastrocnemius (PLG); proximal medial gastrocnemius; proximal flexor digitorum superficialis; and paratenon. For each of the regions, hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed for histological evaluation of intact normal rabbit tissues and mRNA levels for proteoglycans, collagens and genes associated with collagen regulation were assessed by real-time reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction for both the intact normal and OVH rabbit tissues. The distal regions displayed a more fibrocartilaginous phenotype. For intact normal rabbits, aggrecan mRNA expression was higher in the distal regions of the Achilles tendon complex compared with the proximal regions. Collagen Type I and matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression levels were increased in the PLG compared to the DG in the intact normal rabbit tissues. The tendons from OVH rabbits had lower gene expressions for the proteoglycans aggrecan, biglycan, decorin and versican compared with the intact normal rabbits, although the regional differences of increased aggrecan expression in distal regions compared with proximal regions persisted. The tensile and compressive forces experienced in the examined regions may be related to the regional differences found in gene expression. The lower mRNA expression of the genes examined in the OVH group confirms a potential effect of systemic estrogen on tendon.

  10. Achilles Tendinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people who play sports, such as tennis or basketball, only on the weekends. Most cases of Achilles ... soft tissues such as tendons, they may help rule out other conditions that can cause similar symptoms. ...

  11. Elevated Knee Joint Kinetics and Reduced Ankle Kinetics Are Present During Jogging and Hopping After Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willy, Richard W; Brorsson, Annelie; Powell, Hayley C; Willson, John D; Tranberg, Roy; Grävare Silbernagel, Karin

    2017-04-01

    Deficits in plantarflexor function are common after an Achilles tendon rupture. These deficits may result in an altered distribution of joint loads during lower extremity tasks. We hypothesized that, regardless of treatment, the Achilles tendon-ruptured limb would exhibit deficits in ankle kinematics and joint power while exhibiting elevated knee joint power and patellofemoral joint loads during walking, jogging, and hopping. We further hypothesized that this loading pattern would be most evident during jogging and hopping. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty-four participants (17 participants treated surgically, 17 treated nonsurgically) were tested at a mean 6.1 ± 2.0 years after an Achilles tendon rupture. Lower extremity kinematics and kinetics were assessed while participants completed walking, jogging, and single-legged hopping trials. Patellofemoral joint stress was calculated via a musculoskeletal model. Data were analyzed via mixed-model repeated analyses of variance (α = .05) and the limb symmetry index (LSI). No differences ( P ≥ .05) were found between the surgical and nonsurgical groups. In both groups, large side-to-side deficits in the plantarflexion angle at toeoff (LSI: 53.5%-73.9%) were noted during walking, jogging, and hopping in the involved limb. Side-to-side deficits in the angular velocity were only present during jogging (LSI: 93.5%) and hopping (LSI: 92.5%). This pattern was accompanied by large deficits in eccentric (LSI: 80.8%-94.7%) and concentric (LSI: 82.2%-84.7%) ankle joint powers in the involved limb during all tasks. Interestingly, only jogging and hopping demonstrated greater knee joint loads when compared with the uninvolved limb. Concentric knee power was greater during jogging (LSI: 117.2%) and hopping (LSI: 115.9%) compared with the uninvolved limb. Similarly, peak patellofemoral joint stress was greater in the involved limb during jogging (LSI: 107.5%) and hopping (LSI: 107.1%), while only hopping had a greater loading

  12. Operative Treatment of Haglund Syndrome With Central Achilles Tendon-Splitting Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae Hoon; Ahn, Chi-Young; Byun, Chu-Hwan; Kim, Yoon-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Haglund syndrome is characterized by chronic posterior heel pain associated with a posterosuperior calcaneal prominence. We assessed the clinical and radiologic outcomes after operative treatment of Haglund syndrome using the central tendon-splitting approach. Fifteen feet in 15 patients were investigated retrospectively after surgery. Of the 15 patients, 14 were males (93.3%) and 1 was female (6.7%). Their mean age was 33.1 ± 8.2 (range 20 to 50) years. The mean follow-up duration was 3.5 ± 1.5 years (range 24 to 90 months). The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot Scale and Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles scores were investigated to assess the clinical outcomes. Patient satisfaction was assessed at the latest follow-up visit. The lateral talo-first metatarsal angle, calcaneal pitch angle, Fowler-Philip angle, and parallel pitch line were measured to assess the foot shape and radiographic outcomes. Clinically, the mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scale score increased from 62.1 ± 7.5 preoperatively to 92.5 ± 3.5 at the latest follow-up visit. The mean Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles score increased from 53.2 ± 7.4 to 89.6 ± 3.4. All patients were satisfied with the operative results. Radiographically, all patients had cavus feet with an increased lateral talo-first metatarsal angle (mean +5.9° ± 5.0°) and calcaneal pitch angle (mean 26.0° ± 3.8°). The mean Fowler-Philip angle decreased from 58.9° ± 15.0° to 32.5° ± 7.2° postoperatively, and the positive parallel pitch line had changed to a negative value in all cases. Operative treatment with the central tendon-splitting approach appears to be safe and satisfactory for intractable Haglund syndrome.

  13. Is the Dresden technique a mechanical design of choice suitable for the repair of middle third Achilles tendon ruptures? A biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, C; Carreño-Zillmann, G; Marambio, H; Henríquez, H

    2016-01-01

    To compare the mechanical failure of the Dresden technique for Achilles tendon repair with the double modified Kessler technique controlled repair technique. The maximum resistance of the two repair techniques are also compared. A total of 30 Achilles tendon ruptures in bovine specimens were repaired with an Ethibond(®) suture to 4.5cm from the calcaneal insertion. Each rupture was randomly distributed into one of two surgical groups. After repair, each specimen was subjected to a maximum traction test. The mechanical failure (tendon, suture, or knot) rates (proportions) were compared using the exact Fisher test (α=.05), and the maximum resistances using the Student t test (α=.05). There was a difference in the proportions of mechanical failures, with the most frequent being a tendon tear in the Dresden technique, and a rupture of the suture in the Kessler technique. The repair using the Dresden technique performed in the open mode, compared to the Kessler technique, has a more suitable mechanical design for the repair of middle third Achilles tendon ruptures on developing a higher tensile resistance in 58.7%. However, its most common mechanical failure was a tendon tear, which due to inappropriate loads could lead to lengthening of the Achilles tendon. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Substance P accelerates hypercellularity and angiogenesis in tendon tissue and enhances paratendinitis in response to Achilles tendon overuse in a tendinopathy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Gustav; Backman, Ludvig J; Scott, Alexander; Lorentzon, Ronny; Forsgren, Sture; Danielson, Patrik

    2011-10-01

    Tenocytes produce substance P (SP), and its receptor (neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R)) is expressed throughout the tendon tissue, especially in patients with tendinopathy and tissue changes (tendinosis) including hypercellularity and vascular proliferation. Considering the known effects of SP, one might ask whether SP contributes to these changes. To test whether development of tendinosis-like changes (hypercellularity and angiogenesis) is accelerated during a 1-week course of exercise with local administration of SP in an established Achilles tendinopathy model. Rabbits were subjected to a protocol of Achilles tendon overuse for 1 week, in conjunction with SP injections in the paratenon. Exercised control animals received NaCl injections or no injections, and unexercised, uninjected controls were also used. Tenocyte number and vascular density, as well as paratendinous inflammation, were evaluated. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation to detect NK-1R were conducted. Results There was a significant increase in tenocyte number in the SP-injected and NaCl-injected groups compared with both unexercised and exercised, uninjected controls. Tendon blood vessels increased in number in the SP-injected group compared with unexercised controls, a finding not seen in NaCl-injected controls or in uninjected, exercised animals. Paratendinous inflammation was more pronounced in the SP-injected group than in the NaCl controls. NK-1R was detected in blood vessel walls, nerves, inflammatory cells and tenocytes. SP accelerated the development of tendinosis-like changes in the rabbit Achilles tendon, which supports theories of a potential role of SP in tendinosis development; a fact of clinical interest since SP effects can be effectively blocked. The angiogenic response to SP injections seems related to paratendinitis.

  15. The medial gastrocnemius muscle with an achilles tendon sheath extension flap as a versatile myo-tendon sheath flap for coverage of the upper two-thirds of the tibia and pre-tibial area: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elghamry, Ashraf Hussein

    2014-02-01

    The idea of using the leg tendon sheath as a pedicled fascial flap was first described by the author in April 2003. To extend this new idea, the author studied the blood supply and gross features of the outer layer of the Achilles tendon sheath. The findings of that study supported the feasibility of using the medial gastrocnemius muscle with an Achilles tendon sheath extension flap to cover defects over the upper two-thirds of the tibia. Six flaps of the Achilles tendon sheath survived, and the split skin grafts over the tibia took; but, in one flap, the distal 1 cm was lost. The length of follow-up was 3 years for all cases. The results demonstrated safe elevation of up to 8 cm of distal extension.

  16. UTE-T2(⁎) Analysis of Diseased and Healthy Achilles Tendons and Correlation with Clinical Score: An In Vivo Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yang; Tao, Hong-Yue; Ma, Kui; Wu, Zi-Ying; Qu, Jian-Xun; Chen, Shuang

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To compare T2(⁎) value of healthy and diseased Achilles tendons (AT) with a recently introduced three-dimensional ultrashort echo time (3D-UTE) sequence and analyze the correlation between T2(⁎) value and clinical scores. Methods. Ten patients with symptomatic Achilles tendon and ten healthy volunteers were investigated with 3D-UTE sequence on a 3T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. T2(⁎) values of four regions in Achilles tendons were calculated. The clinical outcomes of patients were evaluated according to the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score and Achilles Tendon Rupture Score (ATRS). An independent sample t-test was used to compare the differences of T2(⁎) value and clinical scores between two groups. The Pearson correlation coefficient between clinical scores and T2(⁎) values was assessed. Results. The T2(⁎) values of Achilles tendon were statistically significantly different between patients and volunteers. The Pearson correlation coefficients between T2(⁎) and AOFAS or ATRS scores of patients were r = -0.733 and r = -0.634, respectively. Conclusion. The variability of T2(⁎) in healthy and pathologic AT can be quantified by UTE-T2(⁎). T2(⁎) may be a promising marker to detect and diagnose AT tendinopathy. UTE-T2(⁎) could give a precise guidance to clinical outcome.

  17. UTE-T2⁎ Analysis of Diseased and Healthy Achilles Tendons and Correlation with Clinical Score: An In Vivo Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Qiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare T2⁎ value of healthy and diseased Achilles tendons (AT with a recently introduced three-dimensional ultrashort echo time (3D-UTE sequence and analyze the correlation between T2⁎ value and clinical scores. Methods. Ten patients with symptomatic Achilles tendon and ten healthy volunteers were investigated with 3D-UTE sequence on a 3T magnetic resonance (MR scanner. T2⁎ values of four regions in Achilles tendons were calculated. The clinical outcomes of patients were evaluated according to the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS score and Achilles Tendon Rupture Score (ATRS. An independent sample t-test was used to compare the differences of T2⁎ value and clinical scores between two groups. The Pearson correlation coefficient between clinical scores and T2⁎ values was assessed. Results. The T2⁎ values of Achilles tendon were statistically significantly different between patients and volunteers. The Pearson correlation coefficients between T2⁎ and AOFAS or ATRS scores of patients were r=-0.733 and r=-0.634, respectively. Conclusion. The variability of T2⁎ in healthy and pathologic AT can be quantified by UTE-T2⁎. T2⁎ may be a promising marker to detect and diagnose AT tendinopathy. UTE-T2⁎ could give a precise guidance to clinical outcome.

  18. Endogenous substance P production in the Achilles tendon increases with loading in an in vivo model of tendinopathy-peptidergic elevation preceding tendinosis-like tissue changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backman, L J; Andersson, G; Wennstig, G; Forsgren, S; Danielson, P

    2011-06-01

    To quantify the intratendinous levels of substance P (SP) at different stages of overload in an established model for Achilles tendinopathy (rabbit). Also, to study the distribution of the SP-receptor, the NK-1R, and the source of SP, in the tendon. Animals were subjected to the overuse protocol for 1, 3 or 6 weeks. One additional group served as unexercised controls. Immunoassay (EIA), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and in situ hybridisation (ISH) were performed. EIA revealed increased SP-levels in the Achilles tendon of the exercised limb in all the experimental groups as compared to in the controls (statistically significant; p=0.01). A similar trend in the unexercised Achilles tendon was observed but was not statistically significant (p=0.14). IHC and in ISH illustrated reactions of both SP and NK-1R mainly in blood vessel walls, but the receptor was also found on tenocytes. Achilles tendon SP-levels are elevated already after 1 week of loading. This shows that increased SP-production precedes tendinosis, as tendinosis-like changes occur only after a minimum of 3 weeks of exercise, as shown in a recent study using this model. We propose that central neuronal mechanism may be involved as similar trends were observed in the contralateral Achilles tendon.

  19. Diagnostic failure of ciprofloxacin-induced spontaneous bilateral Achilles tendon rupture: case-report and medical-legal considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantalone, A; Abate, M; D'Ovidio, C; Carnevale, A; Salini, V

    2011-01-01

    Rare side-effects of fluoroquinolone therapy are tendinitis and tendon rupture. Many reports have demonstrated that the concomitant use of corticosteroids, in patients aged 60 years or older, increase the risk substantially. We present a case of spontaneous bilateral Achilles tendon rupture induced by ciprofloxacin and methylprednisolone. A 61-year-old woman was diagnosed with Bronchiolitis Obliterans with Organizing Pneumonia (BOOP) and was started on oral ciprofloxacin 500 mg twice daily for 3 weeks and on oral methylprednisolone 16 mg twice daily for 2 weeks. The diagnosis was made after doctors, rather than stop drug therapy and advise complete rest, had mistakenly prescribed for the woman to undergo physiotherapy and local NSAIDs, thus favoring the onset of tendon ruptures and resulting in surgical and legal implications. Inspired by this case, we also submit a brief review on professional liability in Orthopaedics.

  20. Nonsurgical treatment and early return to activity leads to improved Achilles tendon fatigue mechanics and functional outcomes during early healing in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Benjamin R; Gordon, Joshua A; Bhatt, Pankti R; Pardes, Adam M; Thomas, Stephen J; Sarver, Joseph J; Riggin, Corinne N; Tucker, Jennica J; Williams, Alexis W; Zanes, Robert C; Hast, Michael W; Farber, Daniel C; Silbernagel, Karin G; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2016-12-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are common and devastating injuries; however, an optimized treatment and rehabilitation protocol has yet to be defined. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the effects of surgical repair and return to activity on joint function and Achilles tendon properties after 3 weeks of healing. Sprague-Dawley rats (N = 100) received unilateral blunt transection of their Achilles tendon. Animals were then randomized into repaired or non-repaired treatments, and further randomized into groups that returned to activity after 1 week (RTA1) or after 3 weeks (RTA3) of limb casting in plantarflexion. Limb function, passive joint mechanics, and tendon properties (mechanical, organizational using high frequency ultrasound, histological, and compositional) were evaluated. Results showed that both treatment and return to activity collectively affected limb function, passive joint mechanics, and tendon properties. Functionally, RTA1 animals had increased dorsiflexion ROM and weight bearing of the injured limb compared to RTA3 animals 3-weeks post-injury. Such functional improvements in RTA1 tendons were evidenced in their mechanical fatigue properties and increased cross sectional area compared to RTA3 tendons. When RTA1 was coupled with nonsurgical treatment, superior fatigue properties were achieved compared to repaired tendons. No differences in cell shape, cellularity, GAG, collagen type I, or TGF-β staining were identified between groups, but collagen type III was elevated in RTA3 repaired tendons. The larger tissue area and increased fatigue resistance created in RTA1 tendons may prove critical for optimized outcomes in early Achilles tendon healing following complete rupture. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:2172-2180, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Low-level laser therapy in IL-1β, COX-2, and PGE2 modulation in partially injured Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Julio Fernandes; Spadacci-Morena, Diva Denelle; dos Anjos Rabelo, Nayra Deise; Pinfildi, Carlos Eduardo; Fukuda, Thiago Yukio; Plapler, Helio

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated IL-1β, COX-2, and PGE2 modulation in partially injured Achilles tendons treated with low-level laser therapy (LLLT). Sixty-five male Wistar rats were used. Sixty were submitted to a direct injury on Achilles tendon and then distributed into six groups: LASER 1 (a single LLLT application), LASER 3 (three LLLT applications), and LASER 7 (seven LLLT applications) and Sham 1, 3, and 7 (the same injury but LLLT applications were simulated). The five remaining animals were allocated at control group (no procedure performed). LLLT (780 nm) was applied with 70 mW of mean power and 17.5 J/cm(2) of fluency for 10 s, once a day. The tendons were surgically removed and assessed immunohistochemically for IL-1β, COX-2, and PGE2. In comparisons with control (IL-1β: 100.5 ± 92.5 / COX-2: 180.1 ± 97.1 / PGE2: 187.8 ± 128.8) IL-1β exhibited (mean ± SD) near-normal level (p > 0.05) at LASER 3 (142.0 ± 162.4). COX-2 and PGE2 exhibited near-normal levels (p > 0.05) at LASER 3 (COX-2: 176.9 ± 75.4 / PGE2: 297.2 ± 259.6) and LASER 7 (COX-2: 259.2 ± 190.4 / PGE2: 587.1 ± 409.7). LLLT decreased Achilles tendon's inflammatory process.

  2. Three-Dimensional Gait Analysis Following Achilles Tendon Rupture With Nonsurgical Treatment Reveals Long-Term Deficiencies in Muscle Strength and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengman, Tine; Riad, Jacques

    2013-09-01

    Precise long-term assessment of movement and physical function following Achilles tendon rupture is required for the development and evaluation of treatment, including different regimens of physical therapy. To assess intermediate-term (physical function following Achilles tendon rupture treated nonsurgically and to compare these with self-reported measures of physical function. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Two to 5 years after Achilles tendon rupture, 9 women and 43 men (mean age, 49.2 years; range, 26-68 years) were assessed by physical examination, performance of 1-legged jumps, and 3-dimensional gait analysis (including calculation of muscle work). Self-reported scores for foot function (Achilles tendon rupture score) and level of physical activity were collected. Twenty age- and sex-matched controls were assessed in the same manner. Physical examination of patients with the knee extended revealed 11.1° of dorsiflexion on the injured side and 9.2° on the uninjured side (P = .020), indicating gastrocnemius muscle lengthening. The 1-legged jump distance was shorter on the injured side (89.5 vs 96.2 cm; P physical activity were lower in patients than in healthy controls (mean Achilles tendon rupture score, 78.6 and 99.8, respectively). Nonsurgically treated patients with Achilles tendon rupture showed signs of both anatomic and functional lengthening of the tendon. Attenuated muscle strength and function were present during walking as long as 2 to 5 years after rupture, as determined by 3-dimensional gait analysis. More extensive future studies involving patients having both surgical and nonsurgical treatment could provide additional valuable information.

  3. Percutaneous repair of Achilles tendon ruptures with Tenolig: quantitative analysis of postural control and gait pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzarobba, S; Bortolato, S; Giacomazzi, A; Fancellu, G; Marcovich, R; Valentini, R

    2012-12-01

    Surgical approach in Achilles tendon's rupture involved during the last years has becoming safer and less invasive as possible. Lots of study investigate the outcomes of the mini-invasive technique with Tenolig proving its good results, but never in the long-term. Our study want to emphasize the effectiveness of this treatment exploring the postural and gait patterns in a 24-month follow up. Patients did self-training exercises without specific supervision, instead of a particular postoperative rehabilitation protocol. We compared 21 patients to a control group of 19 health subjects using a clinical examination, a podobarometric and an optokinetic analysis. Data shows no differences in time-distance parameters, despite a reduction of propulsion phase data, confirmed also by kinetic analysis. Podobarometric results show only a decrease in the anterior pressure of the injured limb (p=0.09). In standing an increase of anterior-posterior oscillation of the COP (center of pressure) (p=0.03). The results underline the long-term outcome effectiveness of the technique but some functional alterations remain. This could be the reason of the weakness, which always affected the patients. Reduction of the triceps elongation and restoration of strength during the propulsion phase should be the key points in postoperative physiotherapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [The echographic and clinical follow-up of patients operated on for subcutaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinotti, A; Massari, L; Traina, G C; Mannella, P

    1996-01-01

    Thanks to its good long-term results, surgery is the method of choice to treat subcutaneous ruptures of the Achilles tendon. Reconstructed tendons present typical morphological and functional US patterns which depend partly on the kind of surgical reconstruction and partly on the time passed since surgery. The authors report the results of the clinical and US follow-up of a series of 62 surgical patients treated in 7 years for the subcutaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon. The patients were 55 men and 7 women, whose mean age was 36 years (range: 25-65 years). The left-hand side was affected in 38 patients and the right-hand side in 24 patients. All patients were operated on using an end-to-end suture and reinforcement plastic surgery pulling down a gastrocnemius tendon flap. To homogenize the results, all the US exams were performed by the same operator, in the presence of the orthopedic specialist and under the same conditions: both the involved and the contralateral Achilles tendons were studied, longitudinal and transverse scans were performed with the foot in max. plantar and dorsal flexion and, whenever possible, dynamic scans were also performed making the sural triceps contract against resistance. The following parameters were studied clinically: pain (which was absent in 39 patients, occasional in 11, after stress in 9 and on walking in 3 patients), skin scar trophism (which was eutrophic in 53.23% of patients, keloid in 27.42% and hypertrophic in 19.35% of patients), ankle joint excursion (plantar flexion was impaired in 32.3% and dorsal flexion in 36% of patients), walking on tiptoe (in all, 22.6% of patients complained of difficulties walking on tiptoe) and, finally, work activity resumption (which all patients achieved). US depicted the surgical tendons as much bigger than the contralateral ones (3-4 times on the average), which increase in volume lasted throughout the follow-up. In 75% of patients the echo structure of the surgical tendons was

  5. In-depth imaging and quantification of degenerative changes associated with Achilles ruptured tendons by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnaninchi, P. O.; Yang, Y.; Bonesi, M.; Maffulli, G.; Phelan, C.; Meglinski, I.; El Haj, A.; Maffulli, N.

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a method based on polarization-sensitive optical coherent tomography (PSOCT) for the imaging and quantification of degenerative changes associated with Achilles tendon rupture. Ex vivo PSOCT examinations were performed in 24 patients. The study involved samples from 14 ruptured Achilles tendons, 4 tendinopathic Achilles tendons and 6 patellar tendons (collected during total knee replacement) as non-ruptured controls. The samples were imaged in both intensity and phase retardation modes within 24 h after surgery, and birefringence was quantified. The samples were fixed and processed for histology immediately after imaging. Slides were assessed twice in a blind manner to provide a semi-quantitative histological score of degeneration. In-depth micro structural imaging was demonstrated. Collagen disorganization and high cellularity were observable by PSOCT as the main markers associated with pathological features. Quantitative assessment of birefringence and penetration depth found significant differences between non-ruptured and ruptured tendons. Microstructure abnormalities were observed in the microstructure of two out of four tendinopathic samples. PSOCT has the potential to explore in situ and in-depth pathological change associated with Achilles tendon rupture, and could help to delineate abnormalities in tendinopathic samples in vivo.

  6. In-depth imaging and quantification of degenerative changes associated with Achilles ruptured tendons by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagnaninchi, P O; Yang, Y; Maffulli, G; El Haj, A; Maffulli, N [Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University, Thornburrow Drive, Hartshill, Stoke-on-Trent ST4 7QB (United Kingdom); Bonesi, M; Meglinski, I [Cranfield Health, Cranfield University, Cranfield MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Phelan, C, E-mail: pierre.bagnaninchi@ed.ac.u [Department of Pathology, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, Stoke-on-Trent ST4 7QB (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-07

    The objective of this study was to develop a method based on polarization-sensitive optical coherent tomography (PSOCT) for the imaging and quantification of degenerative changes associated with Achilles tendon rupture. Ex vivo PSOCT examinations were performed in 24 patients. The study involved samples from 14 ruptured Achilles tendons, 4 tendinopathic Achilles tendons and 6 patellar tendons (collected during total knee replacement) as non-ruptured controls. The samples were imaged in both intensity and phase retardation modes within 24 h after surgery, and birefringence was quantified. The samples were fixed and processed for histology immediately after imaging. Slides were assessed twice in a blind manner to provide a semi-quantitative histological score of degeneration. In-depth micro structural imaging was demonstrated. Collagen disorganization and high cellularity were observable by PSOCT as the main markers associated with pathological features. Quantitative assessment of birefringence and penetration depth found significant differences between non-ruptured and ruptured tendons. Microstructure abnormalities were observed in the microstructure of two out of four tendinopathic samples. PSOCT has the potential to explore in situ and in-depth pathological change associated with Achilles tendon rupture, and could help to delineate abnormalities in tendinopathic samples in vivo.

  7. The microvascular volume of the achilles tendon is increased in patients with tendinopathy at rest and after a 1-hour treadmill run

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Harrison, Adrian; Simonsen, Lene

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Achilles tendinopathy (AT) is initiated asymptomatically and is therefore often discovered at a very late stage. PURPOSE:To elucidate whether the microvascular volume (MV) of the Achilles tendon is elevated in patients with AT compared with healthy controls during pre-exercise rest...... of tendinopathy. CLINICAL RELEVANCE:This study underlines that tendon flexibility is altered in patients with AT and that CEU is a promising tool to establish the early diagnosis of this condition......., after acute exercise, and 24 hours after exercise. Additionally, this study investigated the muscle activation pattern of the gastrocnemius muscle and the relative elasticity of the Achilles tendon during a 1-hour treadmill run in healthy patients and in patients with AT. STUDY DESIGN...

  8. Gait analysis before and after achilles tendon surgical suture in a single-subject study: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolin, Giuseppe; Buriani, Alessandro; Balasso, Alberto; Villaminar, Renato; Petrone, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Achilles tendon rupture is a disabling injury that requires a long recovery time. We describe a unique case of a 46-year-old male who had undergone gait analysis as part of a personal physical examination and who, 16 months later, ruptured his left Achilles tendon while running. With gait kinematic and kinetic data available both before and after his injury, we determined the residual gait asymmetries on his uninjured side and compared the pre- and postinjury measurements. We analyzed his gait at 1, 4, and 7 weeks after his return to full weightbearing. Compared with the preinjury values, at 7 weeks he had almost complete range of motion in his left ankle (-2%) and a slight increase in gait velocity (+6%) and cadence (+3%). The peak power of his injured ankle was 90% of its preinjury value. In contrast, the unaffected ankle was at 118%. These observations suggest that measuring the asymmetries of the gait cycle, especially at the beginning of rehabilitation, can be used to improve treatment. We had the patient strengthen his ankle using a stationary bicycle before he returned to running. Kinetics also appears to be more powerful than kinematics in detecting functional asymmetries associated with reduced calf strength, even 15 weeks after surgery. Gait analysis could be used to predict the effectiveness of rehabilitation protocols and help calibrate and monitor the return to sports participation while preventing overloading muscle and tendon syndromes.

  9. Evaluation of the stiffnesses of the Achilles tendon and soleus from the apparent stiffness of the triceps surae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    París-García, Federico; Barroso, Alberto; Doblaré, Manuel; Cañas, José; París, Federico

    2015-01-01

    The triceps surae plays an important role in the performance of many sports. Although the apparent average mechanical properties of the triceps surae may be a satisfactory parameter for estimating the training level of an athlete, a knowledge of the mechanical properties of the individual constituents of the triceps surae (in particular the Achilles tendon and soleus) permits a more detailed and in-depth control of the effects of training from more physically based parameters. The objective of this work is therefore the estimation of the individual viscoelastic properties (stiffness and viscosity) of soleus and Achilles tendon from the apparent properties of the triceps surae obtained by free vibration techniques. Different procedures have been developed and discussed, showing a high degree of robustness in the predictions. The results obtained for a non-oriented set of subjects present a high level of variability, depending on the training conditions and anthropometric features, although the corresponding average values compare well with data previously reported in the literature, particularly those associated with the tendon stiffness.

  10. Knotless Repair of Achilles Tendon Rupture in an Elite Athlete: Return to Competition in 18 Weeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Paul A; Hopper, Graeme P; Wilson, William T; Mackay, Gordon M

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon is an increasingly common injury, particularly in physically active males, and current evidence favors minimally invasive surgical repair. We describe the case of a 36-year-old male elite bobsled athlete with complete rupture of the Achilles tendon. He was treated with surgical repair of the ruptured tendon using an innovative, minimally invasive procedure based on an internal bracing concept and was able to undergo early mobilization and aggressive physiotherapy rehabilitation. His recovery was such that he returned to training at 13 weeks postoperatively and participated in an international competition at 18 weeks, winning a World Cup silver medal. He subsequently raced at the 2014 Winter Olympic Games at 29 weeks after surgery. At >2 years since his injury, he has experienced no complications or reinjury. This represents an exceptional recovery that far exceeds the standard expected for such injuries. The use of this technique for athletes could enable accelerated return to sporting activity and attainment of their preinjury activity levels.

  11. Comparison of Achilles tendon repair techniques in a sheep model using a cross-linked acellular porcine dermal patch and platelet-rich plasma fibrin matrix for augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrafian, Tiffany L; Wang, Hali; Hackett, Eileen S; Yao, Jian Q; Shih, Mei-Shu; Ramsay, Heather L; Turner, A Simon

    2010-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to evaluate a cross-linked acellular porcine dermal patch (APD), as well as platelet-rich plasma fibrin matrix (PRPFM), for repair of acute Achilles tendon rupture in a sheep model. The 2 surgically transected tendon ends were reapproximated in groups 1 and 2, whereas a gap was left between the tendon ends in group 3. APD was used to reinforce the repair in group 2, and autologous PRPFM was used to fill the gap, which was also reinforced with APD, in group 3. All sheep were humanely euthanized at 24 weeks after the repair, and biomechanical and histological testing were performed. Tensile strength testing showed a statistically significant difference in elongation between the operated limb and the unoperated contralateral limb in groups 1 and 3, but not in group 2. All operated tendons appeared healed with no apparent fibrosis under light and polarized microscopy. In group 1, all surgical separation sites were identifiable, and healing occurred via increasing tendon thickness. In group 2, healing occurred with new tendon fibers across the separation, without increasing tendon thickness in 2 out of 6 animals. Group 3 showed complete bridging of the gap, with no change in tendon thickness in 2 out of 6 animals. In groups 2 and 3, peripheral integration of the APD to tendon fibers was observed. These findings support the use of APD, alone or with PRPFM, to augment Achilles tendon repair in a sheep model.

  12. Achillodynia. Radiological imaging of acute and chronic overuse injuries of the Achilles tendon; Achillodynie. Radiologische Bildgebung bei akuten und chronischen Ueberlastungsschaeden der Achillessehne

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    Syha, R.; Springer, F.; Grosse, U. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Section on Experimental Radiology; Ketelsen, D.; Kramer, U.; Horger, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Ipach, I. [University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany). Orthopaedic Surgery; Schick, F. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Section on Experimental Radiology

    2013-11-15

    In the past decades the incidence of acute and chronic disorders of the Achilles tendon associated with sport-induced overuse has steadily increased. Besides acute complete or partial ruptures, achillodynia (Achilles tendon pain syndrome), which is often associated with tendon degeneration, represents the most challenging entity regarding clinical diagnostics and therapy. Therefore, the use of imaging techniques to differentiate tendon disorders and even characterize structure alterations is of growing interest. This review article discusses the potential of different imaging techniques with respect to the diagnosis of acute and chronic tendon disorders. In this context, the most commonly used imaging techniques are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), B-mode ultrasound, and color-coded Doppler ultrasound (US). These modalities allow the detection of acute tendon ruptures and advanced chronic tendon disorders. However, the main disadvantages are still the low capabilities in the detection of early-stage degeneration and difficulties in the assessment of treatment responses during follow-up examinations. Furthermore, differentiation between chronic partial ruptures and degeneration remains challenging. The automatic contour detection and texture analysis may allow a more objective and quantitative interpretation, which might be helpful in the monitoring of tendon diseases during follow-up examinations. Other techniques to quantify tendon-specific MR properties, e.g. based on ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequences, also seem to have great potential with respect to the precise detection of degenerative tendon disorders and their differentiation at a very early stage. (orig.)

  13. Power Doppler ultrasonography of painful Achilles tendons and entheses in patients with and without spondyloarthropathy-a comparison with clinical examination and contrast-enhanced MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiell, Charlotte; Szkudlarek, Marcin; Hasselquist, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings at painful Achilles tendons and entheses in patients with and without spondyloarthropathy (SpA and non-SpA) and healthy control persons (CTRLs). Particularly, we aimed to investigate....../or enthesis due to sports-related causes and 10 CTRLs were examined at the Achilles tendons and entheses with US, MRI and clinical assessment. Intratendinous changes, entheseal changes, bursitis and peritendonitis were assessed. An US interobserver substudy was performed in nine persons. US findings showed...

  14. Nucleostemin- and Oct 3/4-positive stem/progenitor cells exhibit disparate anatomical and temporal expression during rat Achilles tendon healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runesson, Eva; Ackermann, Paul; Karlsson, Jón; Eriksson, Bengt I

    2015-08-20

    The recent discovery of residing tendon stem/progenitor cells has triggered a growing interest in stem cells as a useful tool in tendon repair. Our knowledge of their involvement in naturally healing tendons is, however, sparse. The aim of this study was to identify and determine stem/progenitor cells in relation to different healing phases and regions in a rat model of Achilles tendon rupture. Surgery was performed to create a mid-tendon rupture on the right Achilles tendon of 24 rats, whereas the left tendon was used as a control. Tendons were harvested at one, two, eight and 17 weeks post-rupture and stained with antibodies specific to stem/progenitor cells (Octamer-binding transcription factor 3/4 (Oct 3/4) and nucleostemin), migrating cells (Dynamin 2 (Dyn 2)) and leukocytes (CD45). A histological examination was performed on sections stained with Alcian blue. At one and two weeks post-rupture, a large number of stem/progenitor cells were discovered throughout the tendon. Most of these cells were nucleostemin positive, whereas only a few Oct 3/4-positive cells were found, mainly situated inside the injury region (I region). At eight and 17 weeks, the increment in stem/progenitor cells had diminished to equal that in the control tendons. At all time points, Oct 3/4-positive cells were also found in the connective tissue surrounding the tendon and at the muscle-tendon junction in both ruptured and control tendons and were often seen at the same location as the migration marker, Dyn 2. The whole length of the Achilles tendon is infiltrated by stem/progenitor cells at early time points after a mid-tendon rupture. However, different stem/progenitor cell populations exhibit varying anatomical and temporal expressions during Achilles tendon healing, suggesting distinct reparative implications. Oct 3/4 may thus act as a more local, migrating stem/progenitor cell involved in injury-site-specific regenerative effects, as compared to the more general proliferative role

  15. Shewanella algae infection after surgical treatment of Haglund's heel and rupture of the Achilles tendon.] [Article in Danish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Malene

    2014-01-01

    of the Achilles tendon, which was treated surgically as well. The post-operative healing process proved to be protracted with a number of surgical wound revisions being necessary. A microbiology culture showed the presence of S. algae and after proper antibiotic treatment the patient recovered quickly.......This is a case report of soft tissue infection with the marine bacterium Shewanella algae that is rare in Denmark. The patient was a 43-year-old male and he was treated surgically for Haglund's heel, a bony protrusion at the calcaneus. After clinical healing the patient suffered a rupture...

  16. Tendon Derived Stem Cells Promote Platelet-Rich Plasma Healing in Collagenase-Induced Rat Achilles Tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Tendon injuries are common, difficult to cure and usually healed with fibrosis and scar tissue. The aim of this study was to evaluate tendon derived stem cells (TDSCs and platelet rich plasma (PRP in the treatment of collagenase induced Achilles tendinopathy in rat. Methods: Four and 8 weeks (n=18 after TDSCs, PRP, PRP with TDSC or PBS (control injection into collagenase or saline (sham injected rat Achilles tendon, tendon tissue was harvested and tendon quality was evaluated by histology and biomechanical testing. TDSCs were cultured and treated by 10% PRP, and the FAK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway and tenocyte-related genes were detected by western blot analysis. Results: Compared to the control, PRP treatment resulted in better healing of injured tendons with improved histological outcomes and biomechanical functions. The addition of TDSCs to PRP treatment significantly enhanced the effects of PRP treatment alone. TDSC injection alone had little effect on tendon healing. PRP and PRP with TDSC treatments of collagenase induced tendon injuries also increased the mRNA and protein expression of tenocyte-related genes (type I collagen, SCX, Tenascin C and activated the focal adhesion kinase (FAK and extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2 signaling pathways. Treatment of TDSCs in vitro with 10% PRP significantly increased the phosphorylation levels of FAK and ERK1/2 and the protein levels of tenocyte-related genes (Col I, SCX and Tenascin C. Inhibition of the FAK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways abolished the effect of PRP. Conclusion: This study concludes that PRP combined with TDSCs is potentially effective for the treatment of tendinopathy. The PRP induced, FAK and ERK1/2 dependent activation of tenocyte related genes in TDSCs in vitro suggests that the beneficial healing effect of the PRP with TDSC combination might occur by means of an improved TDSC differentiation toward the tenocyte lineage. Thus, a PRP with TDSC combination

  17. Clinical and biomechanical outcome of minimal invasive and open repair of the Achilles tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Alexander

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction With evolutions in surgical techniques, minimally invasive surgical (MIS repair with Achillon applicator has been introduced. However, there is still a lack of literature to investigate into the clinical merits of MIS over open surgery. This study aims to investigate the correlation between clinical outcome, gait analysis and biomechanical properties comparing both surgical methods. Materials and methods A single centre retrospective review on all the consecutive operated patients between January 2004 and December 2008 was performed. Twenty-six patients (19 male and 7 female; age 40.4 ± 9.2 years had experienced a complete Achilles tendon rupture with operative repair. Nineteen of the patients, 10 MIS versus 9 open repairs (13 men with a mean age of 40.54 ± 10.43 (range 23-62 yrs and 6 women with a mean age of 45.33 ± 7.71 (range 35-57 yrs were further invited to attend a thorough clinical assessment using Holz's scale and biomechanical evaluation at a mean of 25.3 months after operation. This study utilized the Cybex II isokinetic dynamometer to assess the isokinetic peak force of plantar-flexion and dorsiflexion of both ankles. The patients were also invited to return to our Gait Laboratory for analysis. The eight-infrared camera motion capture system (VICON, UK was utilized for the acquisition of kinematic variables. Their anthropometric data was measured according to the Davis and coworkers' standard. Results The mean operative time and length of hospital stay were shorter in the MIS group. The operative time was 54.55 ± 15.15 minutes versus 68.80 ± 18.23 minutes of the MIS group and Open group respectively (p = 0.045, whereas length of stay was 3.36 ± 1.21 days versus 6.40 ± 3.70 days respectively (p = 0.039. There is statistically significant decrease (p = 0.005 in incision length in MIS group than the open surgery group, 3.23 ± 1.10 cm versus 9.64 ± 2.55 cm respectively. Both groups attained similar Holz

  18. Histomorphometric analysis of the Achilles tendon of Wistar rats treated with laser therapy and eccentric exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V. de Souza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Low-level laser therapy is recommended for the treatment of tendinopathies despite the contradictory results related to the ideal dose of energy, wavelength and time of application. This study aimed to assess the effects of laser therapy and eccentric exercise on tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon of Wistar rats. Forty-eight adult male rats were randomly distributed into four groups (L= laser; E= eccentric exercise; LE = laser and eccentric exercise; and R= rest. Laser therapy (904nm/3J/cm2 and/or eccentric exercise (downhill walking; 15o incline treadmill; 12m/min; 50min/day was started 24h after induction of unilateral tendinopathy and remained for 20 days. At 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after lesion induction, three rats from each group were euthanized and the tendons were collected for histological and morphometric analyses. There was no difference among groups or among times for the characteristics hemorrhage (p=0.4154, fibrinous adhesion formation (p=0.0712, and organization of collagen fibers (p=0.2583 and of the connective tissue (p=0.1046. For these groups, regardless of the time, eccentric exercise led to epitenon thickening (p=0.0204, which was lower in the group treated with laser therapy. Histological analysis revealed differences (p=0.0032 in the number of inflammatory cells over time. They were more numerous in the group that only exercised. This result was confirmed by morphometric analysis, which showed a significant interaction (groups x time for this characteristic. Eccentric exercise increased (p=0.0014 the inflammatory infiltrate over time (3 and 21 days. However, association with laser therapy reduced inflammatory reaction. On the other hand, the combination of the treatments increased angiogenesis in morphometric (p=0.0000 and histological (p=0.0006 analyses compared with the other groups, while the isolated application of low-level laser reduced this characteristic over time. Animals maintained at rest presented the

  19. Achilles tendon stress is more sensitive to subject-specific geometry than subject-specific material properties: A finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Wencke; Shim, Vickie B; Obst, Steven; Lloyd, David G; Newsham-West, Richard; Barrett, Rod S

    2017-05-03

    This study used subject-specific measures of three-dimensional (3D) free Achilles tendon geometry in conjunction with a finite element method to investigate the effect of variation in subject-specific geometry and subject-specific material properties on tendon stress during submaximal isometric loading. Achilles tendons of eight participants (Aged 25-35years) were scanned with freehand 3D ultrasound at rest and during a 70% maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Ultrasound images were segmented, volume rendered and transformed into subject-specific 3D finite element meshes. The mean (±SD) lengths, volumes and cross-sectional areas of the tendons at rest were 62±13mm, 3617±984mm(3) and 58±11mm(2) respectively. The measured tendon strain at 70% MVIC was 5.9±1.3%. Subject-specific material properties were obtained using an optimisation approach that minimised the difference between measured and modelled longitudinal free tendon strain. Generic geometry was represented by the average mesh and generic material properties were taken from the literature. Local stresses were subsequently computed for combinations of subject-specific and generic geometry and material properties. For a given geometry, changing from generic to subject-specific material properties had little effect on the stress distribution in the tendon. In contrast, changing from generic to subject-specific geometry had a 26-fold greater effect on tendon stress distribution. Overall, these findings indicate that the stress distribution experienced by the living free Achilles tendon of a young and healthy population during voluntary loading are more sensitive to variation in tendon geometry than variation in tendon material properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Utility of Clinical Measures for the Diagnosis of Achilles Tendon Injuries: A Systematic Review With Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, Michael; Burgi, Ciara; Strube, Eileen; Prue, Kevin; Ray, Keaton; Elliott, Amanda; Goode, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To summarize and evaluate the current diagnostic accuracy of clinical measures used to diagnose Achilles tendon injuries. Data Sources: A literature search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, and EMBASE databases was conducted with key words related to diagnostic accuracy and Achilles tendon injuries. Study Selection: Original research articles investigating Achilles tendon injuries against an acceptable reference standard were included. Data Extraction: Three studies met the inclusion criteria. Quality assessment was conducted using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 tool. DerSimonian-Laird random-effects models were used to pool sensitivity (SN), specificity (SP), and diagnostic odds ratios with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Data Synthesis: The SN and negative likelihood ratio (−LR) values for Achilles tendon rupture measures ranged from 0.73 (95% CI = 0.65, 0.81) and 0.30 (95% CI = 0.23, 0.40) to 0.96 (95% CI = 0.93, 0.99) and 0.04 (95% CI = 0.02, 0.10), respectively, whereas SP and positive likelihood ratio (+LR) values ranged from 0.85 (95% CI = 0.72, 0.98) and 6.29 (95% CI = 2.33, 19.96) to 0.93 (95% CI = 0.84, 1.00) and 13.71 (95% CI = 3.54, 51.24), respectively, with the highest SN and SP both reported in the calf-squeeze test. The SN and −LR values for Achilles tendinopathy measures ranged from 0.03 (95% CI = 0.00, 0.08) and 0.97 (95% CI = not reported) to 0.89 (95% CI = 0.75, 0.98) and 0.19 (95% CI = not reported), whereas SP and +LR values ranged from 0.58 (95% CI = 0.38, 0.77) and 2.12 (95% CI = not reported) to 1.00 (95% CI = 1.00, 1.00) and infinity, respectively, with the highest SN and SP reported for morning stiffness and palpation for crepitus. Pooled analyses demonstrated similar diagnostic properties in all 3 clinical measures (arc sign, palpation, and Royal London Hospital test), with SN and −LR ranging from 0.42 (95% CI = 0.23, 0.62) and 0.68 (95% CI = 0.50, 0.93), respectively, for the arc sign, to 0.64 (95% CI

  1. Intradiurnal fluctuations of off-resonance saturation effects in healthy human achilles tendons assessed with a 3D ultrashort echo time MRI sequence at 3 tesla

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    Grosse, U.; Syha, R.; Kessler, D.E.; Bongers, M.; Seith, F.; Nikolaou, K.; Springer, F. [University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Partovi, S.; Robbin, M. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Schick, F. [University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany). Section on Experimental Radiology

    2015-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether gravitational interstitial fluid accumulation in healthy subjects has an impact on off-resonance saturation ratios (OSR) or the volume of the Achilles tendon after a prolonged time of reduced levels of physical activity. 7 healthy volunteers were repeatedly investigated on 3 consecutive days on a 3 T whole body MR scanner using an ultrashort echo time (UTE) imaging sequence with a Gaussian off-resonance saturation pulse at a frequency offset of 2000 Hz to calculate OSR values. For accurate volumetric quantification of the Achilles tendon, a newly developed contour detection snake algorithm was applied on high-resolution isotropic T2-weighted SPACE sequence datasets. Single-measure intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated to estimate test-retest reliability. For OSR and tendon volume measurements on three consecutive days, excellent reproducibility could be achieved with ICC values above 0.96 and 0.97, respectively. Comparing the results of all three days, a statistically significant mean individual percentage decrease (-4.1 ± 1.5 %; p=0.001) of calculated tendon OSR values was found for the evening measurements. No statistically significant difference between tendon volumes in the morning and the evening could be detected (p=0.589). The results of this in-vivo study demonstrate a significant influence of gravitational interstitial fluid accumulation after reduced physical activity on OSR values in the Achilles tendon, but not on tendon volume. Taken together with the demonstrated excellent reproducibility, these findings are important for future studies investigating temporal changes of the Achilles tendon microstructure.

  2. A novel repair method for the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture with minimally invasive approach using button implant: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huri, Gazi; Biçer, Ömer Sunkar; Ozgözen, Levent; Uçar, Yurdanur; Garbis, Nickolas G; Hyun, Yoon Suk

    2013-12-01

    Minimally invasive Q3 repair has been proposed for acute Achilles tendon rupture with low rate of complications. However there are still controversies about optimal technique. In this study we aimed to describe Endobutton-assisted modified Bunnell configuration as a new Achilles tendon repair technique and evaluate its biomechanical properties comparing with native tendon and Krackow technique. 27 ovine Achilles tendons were obtained and randomly placed into 3 groups with 9 specimens ineach. The Achilles tendons were repaired with Endobutton-assisted modified Bunnell technique in group 1, Krackow suture technique in group 2 and group 3 was defined as the control group including native tendons. Unidirectional tensile loading to failure was performed at 25mm/min. Biomechanicalproperties such as peak force to failure (N), stress at peak (MPa), elongation at failure, and Young'smodulus (GPa) was measured for each group. All groups were compared with each other using one-wayANOVA followed by the Tukey HSD multiple comparison test (a=0.05). The average peak force (N) to failure of group 1 and group 2 and control group was 415.6±57.6, 268.1±65.2 and 704.5±85.8, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between native tendon and group 1 for the amount elongation at failure (p>0.05). Regarding the results, we concluded that Endobutton-assisted modified Bunnell technique provides stronger fixation than conventional techniques. It may allow early range of motion and can be easily applied in minimally invasive and percutaneous methods particularly for cases with poor quality tendon at the distal part of rupture. Level II, Biomechanical research study. Copyright © 2013 European Foot and Ankle Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Mini-invasive surgical repair of the Achilles tendon--does it reduce post-operative morbidity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Mayukh; Gerber, Bruno

    2009-02-01

    The surgical benefit of minimally invasive tendo Achilles repair (n = 25) with early weight-bearing mobilisation after rupture of the tendo Achilles was compared with operative treatment using an open technique (n = 34) with full weight-bearing after 8 weeks of surgical repair. The minimally invasive technique provided no evidence of wound problems and a functional benefit from early weight-bearing mobilisation. However, we noted that increased post-operative morbidity in terms of wound infection (n = 7) leading to delayed wound healing and wound pain requiring opiate-based analgesia post-operatively in the open repair group may have an additional impact on the patients and health care providers. This study showed that the mini-invasive open surgical repair of the Achilles tendon with the Achillon instrument and early weight-bearing mobilisation in an orthosis for the accelerated rehabilitation may offer cost-effectiveness and less financial burden on the health care provider in terms of associated nursing and physiotherapy costs.

  4. Subcutaneous Achilles tendon rupture: A comparison between open technique and mini-invasive tenorrhaphy with Achillon(®) suture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghino, W; Enrietti, E; Sprio, A E; di Prun, N Barbasetti; Berta, G N; Massè, A

    2016-11-01

    Surgical management of Achilles tendon rupture is still controversial: open techniques have a higher rate of soft tissue complications but a lower incidence of re-rupture than percutaneous tenorrhaphies. The aim of our retrospective study was to analyze and compare clinical and functional results in patients treated with either the conventional open or minimally invasive suture treatment with the Achillon(®) system. A retrospective review of 140 patients was performed; 72 were treated with open tenorrhaphy, 68 with the minimally invasive Achillon(®) suture system. With a comparable re-rupture rate, there was a statistically significant reduction in surgical time, incidence of minor complications, time required to return to sport activities and return to work in the minimally invasive group. Achillon(®) mini-invasive suture system is a reliable tool for the Achilles tendon ruptures, able to reduce the incidence of soft tissues complications if compared to the classic open tenorrhaphy, while maintaining strength of the suture and leading to superimposed functional outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. AUGMENTATION VS NONAUGMENTATION TECHNIQUES FOR OPEN REPAIRS OF ACHILLES TENDON RUPTURES WITH EARLY FUNCTIONAL TREATMENT: A PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gündüz Tezeren

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A prospective randomized study was conducted in order to compare augmentation technique versus nonaugmentation technique, followed by early functional postoperative treatment, for operative repair of Achilles tendon ruptures. Twenty-four consecutive patients were assigned to two groups. Group I included 12 patients treated with Lindholm augmentation technique, whereas group II included 12 patients treated with modified Kessler end-to-end repair. Thereafter, these patients had postoperative management with a below-knee-cast for three weeks. The physioteraphy was initiated immediately after the cast was removed. Full weight bearing was allowed after five weeks postoperatively in the both groups. Two patients had reruptures in group II, whereas group I had prolonged operative time significantly. The patients with reruptures underwent reoperations and at the most final follow-up, it was observed that they could not resume to sporting activities. The other objective and subjective results were similar between two groups. Because of quite high rerupture rate in the group of patients treated with nonaugmentation technique, we favor functional postoperative treatment with early ankle movement in the patients treated with augmentation technique for the management of acute rupture of the Achilles tendon

  6. Radial shock waves effectively introduced NF-kappa B decoy into rat achilles tendon cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugioka, Kaori; Nakagawa, Koichi; Murata, Ryo; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Sasho, Takahisa; Arai, Momoko; Tsuruoka, Hiroaki; Ohtori, Seiji; Saisu, Takashi; Gemba, Takefumi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to test if radial shock waves could enhance the introduction of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) decoy oligodeoxynucleotides, which is reported to markedly inhibit NF-kappaB activation and suppress pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression, using rat Achilles tendon cells. In the presence of NF-kappaB decoy labeled with or without fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) in culture media, radial shock waves were applied to the tendon cells in variable conditions and cultivated for 24 h. The transfection rate was assessed by counting FITC-positive cells, and IL-1-induced NF-kappaB activation in the cells was assessed. Radial shock waves significantly enhanced introduction of NF-kappaB decoy-FITC into the tendon cells. IL-1-induced NF-kappaB activation was significantly inhibited by pretreatment of the cells with NF-kappaB decoy combined with radial shock wave exposure. The present study demonstrated the effectiveness of radial shock waves on introduction of NF-kappaB decoy into tendon cells. Radial shock wave treatment combined with local NF-kappaB decoy administration could be a novel therapeutic strategy for chronic tendinopathy.

  7. Efficacy of early controlled motion of the ankle compared with no motion after non-operative treatment of an acute Achilles tendon rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Hansen, Maria Swennergren; Holmich, Per;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early controlled ankle motion is widely used in the non-operative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture, though its safety and efficacy have never been investigated in a randomized setup. The objectives of this study are to investigate if early controlled motion of the ankle affe...

  8. Operative versus nonoperative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture: An analysis of 12,570 patients in a large healthcare database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dean; Sandlin, M Isiah; Cohen, Jeremiah R; Lord, Elizabeth L; Petrigliano, Frank A; SooHoo, Nelson F

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the latest patient demographics and rerupture rates of operative versus nonoperative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture in the United States. Patients undergoing treatment of an acute Achilles tendon rupture from 2007 to 2011 were identified by cross-referencing ICD-9-CM and CPT codes through the PearlDiver Patient Record Database. In total, 12,570 patients were treated for an acute Achilles tendon rupture. The ratio of operative to nonoperative treatment increased from 1.41 to 1.65. Males were more likely to undergo surgery than females. There were no significant differences in short-term rerupture rate for operative (2.1%) versus nonoperative (2.4%) treatment. The proportion of patients who received operative treatment for an acute Achilles tendon rupture increased slightly during the 5 year period, suggesting that surgeons in the United States have been slower to adopt nonoperative treatment than their European counterparts. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Outcome of a one-stage tensile stress surgical technique and early postoperative rehabilitation in the treatment of neglected achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badalihan, Ayinazi; Aihemaiti, Amina; Shawutali, Nuerai; Jielile, Jiasharete; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Nuerdoula, Yeermike; Satewalede, Turde; Hunapiya, Beisen; Niyazebieke, Hadelebieke; Hezibieke, Hayilat; Zhao, Qin; Bahetijiang, Ahezhuoli; Kelamu, Mailamuguli; Qianman, Bayixiati

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of single-stage internal traction combined with early postoperative active rehabilitation and the yurt bone suture method, a new surgical technique, on the clinical outcomes after surgical repair of Achilles tendon. A total of 51 patients with neglected Achilles tendon rupture who underwent the yurt bone suture treatment also participated in an accelerated postoperative rehabilitation program. The clinical outcome was evaluated for 18 weeks using the Leppilahti scoring system, bilateral ultrasound examination, and computed tomography examination. The ultrasound and computed tomography examinations revealed that Achilles tendon elongation and adhesion occurred in none of the patients. All the patients could perform the single leg heel raise exercise for a mean of 30 ± 7.6 seconds at 12 weeks postoperatively. In addition, the patients could participate in sport exercises and heavy physical activities by around 13 weeks postoperatively. The mean Leppilahti score was 85.8 ± 3.7 at 8 weeks postoperatively, and it had increased to 96.1 ± 3.2 and 100.0 ± 0.0 at 12 and 18 weeks, respectively, after the operation. The 1-stage internal traction technique, combined with early postoperative active rehabilitation and the yurt bone surgical technique, resulted in good clinical outcomes for the treatment of neglected Achilles tendon rupture. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Increasing incidence of acute Achilles tendon rupture and a noticeable decline in surgical treatment from 1994 to 2013. A nationwide registry study of 33,160 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganestam, Ann; Kallemose, Thomas; Troelsen, Anders; Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the incidence of acute Achilles tendon rupture in Denmark from 1994 to 2013 with focus on sex, age, geographical areas, seasonal variation and choice of treatment. The National Patient Registry was retrospectively searched to find the number of acute Achilles tendon rupture in Denmark during the time period of 1994-2013. Regional population data were retrieved from the services of Statistics Denmark. During the 20-year period, 33,160 ruptures occurred revealing a statistically significant increase in the incidence (p Achilles tendon rupture increased from 1994 to 2013 based on increasing incidence in the older population. There was no difference in incidence of acute Achilles tendon rupture in the rural compared with urban geographical areas. A steady decline in surgical treatment was found over the whole period, with a noticeable decline from 2009 to 2013, possibly reflecting a rapid change in clinical practice following a range of high-quality randomized clinical trials (RCT). IV.

  11. The effect of running, strength, and vibration strength training on the mechanical, morphological, and biochemical properties of the Achilles tendon in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legerlotz, Kirsten; Schjerling, Peter; Langberg, Henning

    2007-01-01

    on the mechanical, morphological, and biochemical properties of the Achilles tendon. Sixty-four female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups: nonactive age-matched control (AMC; n = 20), voluntary wheel running (RT; n = 20), vibration strength-trained (LVST; n = 12), high-vibration strength...

  12. Clinical outcome of exercise therapy and early post-operative rehabilitation for treatment of neglected Achilles tendon rupture: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Badalihan, Ayinazi; Qianman, Bayixiati; Satewalede, Tuerde; Wuerliebieke, Jianati; Kelamu, Mailamuguli; Jialihasi, Ayidaer

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of neglected Achilles tendon rupture is very challenging. This randomized study aimed to compare the clinical outcome of early post-operative rehabilitation (EPR) with post-operative cast immobilization (PCI). Fifty-seven patients with neglected Achilles tendon rupture were randomized to receive EPR (n = 26) or PCI (n = 31) management following surgery. Clinical outcome was monitored by follow-up at weeks 8, 12, 18 and 26 and year 2. The significance of intergroup differences from the Leppilahti scoring system (LSS), ultrasonography, multislice spiral computerized tomography (MSCT) and electromyography was assessed. Ultrasonography and MSCT revealed no occurrence of tendon elongation or adhesion. Four patients could perform sustained single-leg heel-raise exercise for 60 s at post-operative day 40. The PCI group also showed increased post-operative LSS score, but recovery was slower. Post-operative complications, such as ankle joint ankylosis and osteoporosis, only occurred in the PCI group. Compared with cast immobilization, early post-operative rehabilitation results in better clinical outcome and faster overall tendon regeneration of neglected Achilles tendon rupture. II.

  13. 腓骨长肌腱移位修复陈旧性跟腱断裂%Long fibular muscle tendon transposition in repair of old Achilles tendon rupture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张胜强

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of peroneus longus tendon for treatment of old Achilles tendon rupture. Methods The peroneus longus tendon was cut near the ending point, and transposed via subcutaneous tunnel for repair of Achilles tendon rupture. Results 15 cases were followed up for 18 ~24 months. 2 cases got delayed wound healing. After rehabilitation, patients were allowed full weight-bearing on the 10th postoperative week. No recurrence of Achilles tendon rupture was found. According to Arner-Lindholm efficacy evaluation, the results were excellent in 10 cases, and good in 5 cases. Conclusions Long fibular muscle tendon transposition for repair of old rupture of Achilles tendon is effective for fast rehabilitation, and good effect.%目的 探讨腓骨长肌腱治疗陈旧性跟腱断裂的疗效.方法 腓骨长肌腱近止点处切断,经皮下隧道移位修复跟腱断裂.结果 15例均获随访,时间18~24 个月.2例出现伤口延迟愈合.经康复锻炼,患者均在术后10周左右弃拐完全负重行走,未发生跟腱断裂.疗效按Arner-Lindholm标准评定:优10 例,良5 例.结论 腓骨长肌腱移位修复陈旧性跟腱断裂,康复较快,疗效满意.

  14. Depth-dependent variations in Achilles tendon deformations with age are associated with reduced plantarflexor performance during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Jason R; Thelen, Darryl G

    2015-08-01

    The anatomical arrangement of the Achilles tendon (AT), with distinct fascicle bundles arising from the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, may facilitate relatively independent behavior of the triceps surae muscles. A reduced capacity for sliding between adjacent tendon fascicles with age may couple gastrocnemius and soleus muscle behavior, thereby potentially contributing to diminished plantarflexor performance commonly observed in old adults. Nine healthy young (mean age, 23.9 yr) and eight healthy old (69.9 yr) adults walked at three speeds (0.75, 1.00, and 1.25 m/s) on a force-sensing treadmill. We coupled dynamic ultrasound imaging of the free AT with motion capture and inverse dynamic analyses to compute, in part: 1) depth-dependent variations in AT tissue displacements and elongations and 2) net ankle joint kinetics during push-off. The difference in displacements between superficial and deep AT regions, and in their corresponding elongations, did not differ between old and young adults at the slower two walking speeds (P > 0.61). However, old adults walked with 41% smaller depth-dependent variations in free AT displacements and elongations at 1.25 m/s (P = 0.02). These more uniform tendon deformations in old adults most strongly correlated with reduced peak ankle moment (R(2) = 0.40), but also significantly correlated with reduced peak power generation (R(2) = 0.15) and positive ankle work during push-off (R(2) = 0.19) (P > 0.01). Our findings: 1) demonstrate a potential role for nonuniform AT deformations in governing gastrocnemius and soleus muscle-tendon function and 2) allude to altered tendon behavior that may contribute to the age-related reduction in plantarflexor performance during walking.

  15. Differential strain patterns of the human Achilles tendon determined in vivo with freehand three-dimensional ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Dominic James; Trewartha, Grant; McGuigan, M Polly; Lichtwark, Glen A

    2013-02-15

    The human Achilles tendon (AT) has often been considered to act as a single elastic structure in series with the muscles of the triceps surae. As such it has been commonly modelled as a Hookean spring of uniform stiffness. However, the free AT and the proximal AT have distinctly different structures that lend themselves to different elastic properties. This study aimed to use three-dimensional freehand ultrasound imaging to determine whether the proximal AT and the free AT exhibit different elastic behaviour during sub-maximal, fixed-end contractions of the triceps surae. Six male and five female participants (mean ± s.d. age=27 ± 5 years) performed fixed position contractions of the plantar-flexors on an isokinetic dynamometer at 50% of their maximum voluntary contraction in this position. Freehand three-dimensional ultrasound imaging was used to reconstruct the free-tendon and proximal AT at rest and during contraction. The free-tendon exhibited significantly (P=0.03) greater longitudinal strain (5.2 ± 1.7%) than the proximal AT (2.6 ± 2.0%). The lesser longitudinal strain of the proximal AT was linked to the fact that it exhibited considerable transverse (orthogonal to the longitudinal direction) strains (5.0 ± 4%). The transverse strain of the proximal AT is likely due to the triceps surae muscles bulging upon contraction, and thus the level of bulging may influence the elastic behaviour of the proximal AT. This might have implications for the understanding of triceps surae muscle-tendon interaction during locomotion, tendon injury mechanics and previous measurements of AT elastic properties.

  16. Long-Term Results of Mini-Open Repair Technique in the Treatment of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşatan, Ersin; Emre, Tuluhan Yunus; Demircioğlu, Demet Tekdöş; Demiralp, Bahtiyar; Kırdemir, Vecihi

    2016-01-01

    An ideal surgical treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture includes restoring the original length of the tendon, minimizing possible adhesions with the surrounding tissues, minimizing the risk of repeat rupture, alleviating wound problems, and providing an acceptable cosmetic outcome. In the mini-open repair technique, unlike the percutaneous repair technique, the quality of the tenodesis can be visualized without disturbing the healing potential of the surrounding tissues, thus minimizing wound problems. The purpose of the present study was to assess the long-term results of the mini-open repair technique in patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture. A total of 20 consecutive patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture, admitted to our inpatient clinic from October 2003 to March 2008, were included in the present study. The patients underwent Achilles tenodesis with the mini-open repair technique, and each patient was followed up for 5 years. The study was completed in April 2013. The surgical procedure was performed with the assistance of a device designed in our orthosis laboratories, similarly to that defined by Assal et al. Of the 20 patients, 18 were male and 2 were female. Their mean age was 39.3 (range 21 to 55) years. The Achilles tendon rupture was located on the left side in 15 patients (75%) and on the right side in 5 patients (25%). The mean follow-up duration was 58.5 (range 18 to 60) months and no complications occurred during the follow-up period, including repeat rupture, wound site infection, and sural nerve injury. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society scale score for the patients was 99.2 (range 94 to 100) points at the final follow-up visit. All our patients were able to return to work and sporting activities. According to the Trillat scores, the outcome was excellent in 19 patients and good in 1 patient at the 18th postoperative month. No complaint, such as pain or loss of function, that might have a negative effect on the

  17. New imaging methods for non-invasive assessment of mechanical, structural and biochemical properties of Human Achilles tendon: a mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fouré

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of tendon play a fundamental role to passively transmit forces from muscle to bone, withstand sudden stretches and act as a mechanical buffer allowing the muscle to work more efficiently. The use of non-invasive imaging methods for the assessment of human tendon’s mechanical, structural and biochemical properties in vivo is relatively young in sports medicine, clinical practice and basic science. Non-invasive assessment of the tendon properties may enhance the diagnosis of tendon injury and the characterization of recovery treatments. While ultrasonographic imaging is the most popular tool to assess the tendon’s structural and, indirectly, mechanical properties, ultrasonographic elastography and ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (UHF MRI have recently emerged as potentially powerful techniques to explore tendon tissues. This paper highlights some methodological cautions associated with conventional ultrasonography and perspectives for in vivo human Achilles tendon assessment using ultrasonographic elastography and UHF MRI.

  18. 微创跟腱延长术联合系统康复治疗跟腱挛缩畸形%Treatment of contracture of achilles tendon with minimally invasive achilles tendon lengthening and system rehabilitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭程; 孙大川; 黄淮; 胡春林

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the safety and efficacy of minimally invasive achilles tendon lengthening and system rehabilitation for the treatment of contracture of achilles tendon. Methods: From January 2002 to December 2010,27 patients (31 feet) with contracture of achilles tendon were treated with minimally invasive achilles tendon lengthening and system rehabilitation. There were 11 males and 16 females with an average age of 35.5 years (ranged 3 to 65 years). Right foot was in 13 cases, left foot was in 10 cases, both feet were in 4 cases. Course of disease was from 1 to 5 years with an average of 2.3 years. The cause of contracture included postoperative complication of tibia fractures treated with intramedullary nailing in 7 feet, sequelae of lower leg compartment syndrome in 11 feet,congenital talipes equinovarus in 13 feet (both feet in 4). Before operation , all the patients walked with limping, plantar flexion anomaly was from 15° to 50°with an average of 35.5°. The strength of quadriceps muscle of thigh was grade V in 27 feet, grade IV in 4 feet, the strength of musculus triceps surae was grade V in 24 feet,grade Ivin 7 feet. Results:All the patients were followed-up for 6-24 months with an average of 11.3 months. According to standard of Arner-Lindholm to evaluate function of ankle joint, 29 feet obtained excellent results and 2 feet good. No infection, re-rupture or re-contracture was found. Conclusion:Minimally invasive achilles tendon lengthening and system rehabilitation in treating contracture of achilles tendon has advantage such as simple operation,less complication,lower recurrence rate,which is favourable for thoroughly rehabilitation of patients. But,the case in which the strength of quadriceps muscle of thigh or musculus triceps surae still less than grade IE after preoperative rehabilitation care should not choose the method.%目的:分析微创跟腱延长术联合系统康复治疗跟腱挛缩患者的疗效和可行性.方法:2002年1

  19. 跟腱Haglund病的手术治疗%Surgical Treatment of Haglund's Syndrome of the Achilles Tendon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦晨; 郭秦炜; 陶昊; 陈临新; 谢兴; 杨渝平; 胡跃林

    2013-01-01

    目的:研究跟腱Haglund病的手术治疗效果.方法:21例跟腱Haglund病患者保守治疗无效后采用切开或关节镜手术治疗.术前测量Fowler-Phillip角和斜平行线,术前术后分别进行VAS评分、Tegner评分和VISA-A评分.结果:术后平均随访(47.5±16.7)个月(23 ~72个月),与术前相比,VAS评分显著降低,Tegner评分和VISA-A评分显著提高,优良率95.2%.结论:跟腱Haglund病手术治疗可获得良好的临床效果,但需根据跟腱的病变情况确定采取关节镜或切开手术.%Objective To study the surgical effect of Haglund's syndrome of the Achilles tendon. Methods Twenty-one cases underwent open or arthroscopic surgical treatment. The Fowler-Phillip angle and parallel pitch line were measured preoperatively. The visual analog scale (VAS),Tegner score and VISA-A score for Achilles tendinopathy were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively. Patients were followed up for average (47.5±16.7) months (23~72 months). Results VAS,Tegner score and VISA-A score improved significantly. 95.2% of patients presented excellent or good results. Conclusion Surgical treatment for Haglund's syndrome can reach satisfactory result. It depends on the Achilles tendinopathy to choose arthroscopic or open surgery.

  20. Differentially expressed proteins on postoperative 3 days healing in rabbit Achilles tendon rupture model after early kinesitherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ainuer Jialili; Haxiaobieke Kasimu; Jiasharete Jielile; Shajidan Abudoureyimu; Gulnur Sabirhazi; Darebai Redati; Bai Jingping; Bin Liang; Sailike Duisabai; Jiangaguli Aishan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Surgical repair of Achilles tendon (AT) rupture should immediately be followed by active tendon mobilization. The optimal time as to when the mobilization should begin is important yet controversial.Early kinesitherapy leads to reduced rehabilitation period.However, an insight into the detailed mechanism of this process has not been gained. Proteomic technique can be used to separate and purify the proteins by differential expression profile which is related to the function of different proteins, but research in the area ofproteomic analysis of AT 3 days after repair has not been studied so far.Methods: Forty-seven New Zealand white rabbits were randomized into 3 groups. Group A (immobilization group,n=16) received postoperative cast immobilization; Group B (early motion group, n= 16) received early active motion treatments immediately following the repair of AT rupture from tenotomy. Another 15 rabbits served as control group (Group C). The AT samples were prepared 3 days following the microsurgery. The proteins were separated employing twodimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE).PDQuest software version 8.0 was used to identify differentially expressed proteins, followed by peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) and tandem mass spectrum analysis, using the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) protein database retrieval and then for bioinformatics analysis.Results: Amean of 446.33,436.33 and 462.67 protein spots on Achilles tendon samples of 13 rabbits in Group A,14 rabbits in Group B and 13 rabbits in Group C were successfully detected in the 2D-PAGE. There were 40, 36 and 79unique proteins in Groups A, B and C respectively. Some differentially expressed proteins were enzyme with the gel,matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). We successfully identified 9 and 11 different proteins in Groups A and B,such as GAPDH, phosphoglycerate kinase 1, pro-alpha-1type 1 collagen

  1. Nonoperative, dynamic treatment of acute achilles tendon rupture: influence of early weightbearing on biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex-a blinded, randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Bencke, Jesper; Lauridsen, Hanne Bloch; Dippmann, Christian; Ebskov, Lars; Troelsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture alters the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex that can affect functional performance and the risk of repeat injury. The purpose of the present study was to compare the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex in patients randomized to early weightbearing or non-weightbearing in the nonoperative treatment of Achilles tendon rupture. A total of 60 patients were randomized to full weightbearing from day 1 of treatment or non-weightbearing for 6 weeks. After 6 and 12 months, the peak passive torque at 20° dorsiflexion, the stiffness during slow stretching, and the maximal strength were measured in both limbs. The stiffness of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex in the terminal part of dorsiflexion was significantly increased (p = .024) in the non-weightbearing group at 12 months. The peak passive torque was significantly lower for the affected limb at 6 months (91%; p = .01), and the stiffness was significantly lower for the affected limb during the early part of dorsiflexion at 6 (67%; p tendon complex in the terminal part of dorsiflexion was found in the non-weightbearing group. The altered stiffness and strength in the affected limb could affect the coordination of gait and running. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score at 3 months can predict patients' ability to return to sport 1 year after injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria Swennergren; Christensen, Marianne; Budolfsen, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate how the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) at 3 months and 1 year after injury is associated with a patient's ability to return to work and sports as well as to investigate whether sex and age influence ATRS after 3 months and 1 year. METHOD: This is a retrospective...... study analysing the data from the Danish Achilles tendon Database. A total of 366 patients were included. Logistic regression was conducted to describe the effect of ATRS on return to work and sports. The effect of age and sex on ATRS was analysed by linear regression. RESULTS: Three months after injury...... patients had a significantly increased chance of return to sport after 1 year with an increased ATRS (OR 1.06, p = 0.001) but a non-significant effect on return to work. After 1 year, patients had a significantly increased probability of having returned to sport (OR 1.11, p

  3. Bilateral Achilles Tendon Ruptures Associated With Ciprofloxacin Use in the Setting of Minimal Change Disease: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawtharani, Firas; Masrouha, Karim Z; Afeiche, Nadim

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are widely used antibiotics; however, numerous side effects have been reported in published studies, including a spectrum of tendinopathies, affecting numerous anatomic sites. Several risk factors have been identified, including advanced age (>60 years), corticosteroid use, renal failure or dialysis, female sex, and nonobesity. We present the case of an elderly male with minimal change disease treated with glucocorticoids and acute kidney injury, who sustained spontaneous nontraumatic bilateral Achilles tendon tears 4 days after initiating ciprofloxacin.

  4. Age-related greater Achilles tendon compliance is not associated with larger plantar flexor muscle fascicle strains in senior women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csapo, R; Malis, V; Hodgson, J; Sinha, S

    2014-04-15

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the age-associated decrease of tendon stiffness would necessitate greater muscle fascicle strains to produce similar levels of force during isometric contraction. Greater fascicle strains could force sarcomeres to operate in less advantageous regions of their force-length and force-velocity relationships, thus impairing the capacity to generate strong and explosive contractions. To test this hypothesis, sagittal-plane dynamic velocity-encoded phase-contrast magnetic resonance images of the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle and Achilles tendon (AT) were acquired in six young (YW; 26.1 ± 2.3 yr) and six senior (SW; 76.7 ± 8.3 yr) women during submaximal isometric contraction (35% maximum voluntary isometric contraction) of the plantar flexor muscles. Multiple GM fascicle lengths were continuously determined by automatically tracking regions of interest coinciding with the end points of muscle fascicles evenly distributed along the muscle's proximo-distal length. AT stiffness and Young's modulus were measured as the slopes of the tendon's force-elongation and stress-strain curves, respectively. Despite significantly lower AT stiffness at older age (YW: 120.2 ± 52.3 N/mm vs. SW: 53.9 ± 44.4 N/mm, P = 0.040), contraction-induced changes in GM fascicle lengths were similar in both age groups at equal levels of absolute muscular force (4-5% fascicle shortening in both groups), and even significantly larger in YW (YW: 11-12% vs. SW: 6-8% fascicle shortening) at equal percentage of maximum voluntary contraction. These results suggest that factors other than AT stiffness, such as age-associated changes in muscle composition or fascicle slack, might serve as compensatory adaptations, limiting the degree of fascicle strains upon contraction.

  5. 阔筋膜移植修复跟腱缺损的临床疗效%The clinical research of fascia graft to repair achilles tendon defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯涛; 孙中建; 吴敬红; 李宏磊; 徐鹏

    2015-01-01

    Objective To discuss the clinical effect of fascia graft to repair Achilles tendon defect. Methods Adopt the method of broad fascia graft to repair Achilles tendon defect treatment of the patients (19 cases), rehabilitation plan and follow-up visit. Results 1 case in 19 patients lost follow-up, the rest of the 18 cases were followed up for 8 months to 5 years postoperatively, 3 years on average, according to standard Arner - Lindhobm evaluation decision, 8 cases were excellent, 10 cases were good. Conclusion The broad fascia graft to repair Achilles tendon defect, can obtain good clinical effect.%目的:探讨应用阔筋膜移植修复跟腱缺损的临床疗效。方法2002年5月-2010年9月,采用阔筋膜移植修复跟腱缺损19例,术后制定康复计划并随访疗效。结果19例中1例失访,其余18例术后随访8个月~5年,平均3年,按Arner-Lindhobm评定标准判定,优8例,良10例。结论采用阔筋膜移植修复跟腱缺损,可获得良好的临床效果。

  6. Acute Achilles tendon rupture: minimally invasive surgery versus non operative treatment, with immediate full weight bearing. Design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verleisdonk Egbert-Jan MM

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present the design of an open randomized multi-centre study on surgical versus conservative treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. The study is designed to evaluate the effectiveness of conservative treatment in reducing complications when treating acute Achilles tendon rupture. Methods/Design At least 72 patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture will be randomized to minimally invasive surgical repair followed by functional rehabilitation using tape bandage or conservative treatment followed by functional rehabilitation with use of a functional bracing system. Both treatment arms use a 7 weeks post-rupture rehabilitation protocol. Four hospitals in the Netherlands will participate. Primary end-point will be reduction in complications other than re-rupture. Secondary end-point will be re-rupturing, time off work, sporting activity post rupture, functional outcome by Leppilahti score and patient satisfaction. Patient follow-up will be 12 month. Discussion By making this design study we wish to contribute to more profound research on AT rupture treatment and prevent publication bias for this open-labelled randomized trial. Trial registration ISRCTN50141196

  7. Bi-pedicled V-Y gastrocnemius myocutaneous flap for repairing Achilles tendon and overlying skin defect: the anatomic basis and clinical application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yong-qing; ZHU Yue-liang; YANG Jun; LI Jun; DING Jing; LU Sheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the anatomic basis of the bi-pedicled V-Y gastrocnemius myocutaneous flap for repairing the composite Achilles tendon defect. Methods: The pedicle anatomy of the bi-pedicled V-Y gastrocnemius myocutaneous flap was examined on 30 cadaver specimens. The sliding distances of the flap were measured at different knee flexion degrees. The bi-pedicled V-Y gastrocnemius myocutaneous flap was applied in 12 cases of Achilles tendon defect with simultaneous skin and soft tissue defect. Results: The sural arteries could be classified into four types. After cutting off the gastrocnemius origin with a "Z-shaped" incision, the sliding distance of the flap reached (3.7±0.5)cm when the knee flexed 0°,(4.9±0.7)cm when the knee flexed 30°,(6.7±0.7)cm when the knee flexed 60°and (9.2±0.9)cm when the knee flexed 90°. All the defects healed. The patients recovered ambulation with satisfactory knee and ankle function.The follow-up was 4 months -12 years. Conclusions: Different sural artery types should be noticed during the harvest of the bi-pedicled V-Y gastrocnemius myocutaneous flap. With 90°knee flexion,this flap is suitable for one-stage repair of composite Achilles tendon defect within 9.2 cm±0.9 cm.

  8. Application of different biomaterials in Achilles tendon repair%不同生物材料修复跟腱损伤的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李敏; 李广杰

    2011-01-01

    背景:构建组织工程化肌腱的关键是寻找适于肌腱细胞黏附、生长及功能分化的支架材料.目的:评价不同生物材料在跟腱损伤修复中的效果.方法:以"生物材料,跟腱,修复" 为关键词在万方数据库中检索1985-01/2011-01关于生物材料治疗跟腱缺损的文章.结果与结论:陈旧性跟腱断裂难以自行愈合及修复,易遗留疼痛及功能障碍.长期以来,不少学者对跟腱缺损的治疗进行了较多的研究,从自体肌腱移植、同种异体肌腱移植到人工肌腱移植、组织工程肌腱移植等,实践证明这些方法手段都存在一定的优点和缺点.虽然肌腱组织工程中支架材料的研究与应用已经取得了一些成功,但是目前应用的材料或存在生物相容性问题、降解性问题或存在力学性能差、难加工成型等缺陷,与理想的支架材料还存在很大差距.%BACKGROUND: The key to construct tissue engineered tendon is to look for appropriate scaffold materials for tendon cell adhesion, growth and functional differentiation.OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of different biomaterials on Achilles tendon injury.METHODS: “Biomaterial, Achilles tendon, repair” were used as keywords to retrieve articles about biomaterials for treatment of Achilles tendon injuries published 1985-01/2011-01 in Wanfang database.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Self-healing and repair of old Achilles tendon rupture is difficult, and pain and dysfunction easily occur. Over the years, there are many studies about treatment of Achilles tendon injuries from autologous tendon graft and tendon allograft to artificial tendon and tissue-engineered tendon. The above-mentioned methods have their own advantages and disadvantages. Although studies on scaffold materials for tissue-engineered tendon have achieved some results, the poor biocompatibility, degradation or mechanical properties as well as difficulty to molding lead to a great difference from ideal scaffold

  9. Structural and biomechanical changes in the Achilles tendon after chronic treatment with statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, L P; Vieira, C P; Guerra, F D; Almeida, M S; Pimentel, E R

    2015-03-01

    Cases of tendinopathy and tendon ruptures have been reported as side effects associated with statin therapy. This work assessed possible changes in the structural and biomechanical properties of the tendons after chronic treatment with statins. Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: treated with atorvastatin (A-20 and A-80), simvastatin (S-20 and S-80) and the group that received no treatment (C). The doses of statins were calculated using allometric scaling, based on the doses of 80 mg/day and 20 mg/day recommended for humans. The morphological aspect of the tendons in A-20, S-20 and S-80 presented signals consistent with degeneration. Both the groups A-80 and S-80 showed a less pronounced metachromasia in the compression region of the tendons. Measurements of birefringence showed that A-20, A-80 and S-80 groups had a lower degree of organization of the collagen fibers. In all of the groups treated with statins, the thickness of the epitenon was thinner when compared to the C group. In the biomechanical tests the tendons of the groups A-20, A-80 and S-20 were less resistant to rupture. Therefore, statins affected the organization of the collagen fibers and decreased the biomechanical strength of the tendons, making them more predisposed to ruptures.

  10. Hypotrophy of the soleus muscle in man after achilles tendon rupture. Discussion of findings obtained by computed tomography and morphologic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggmark, T; Eriksson, E

    1979-01-01

    Seven athletes (age range, 35 to 43 years), who sustained total subcutaneous ruptures of the Achilles tendon 2 to 5 cm above its distal insertion, were treated surgically with suturing of the tendon, immobilization of the leg and foot for 6 weeks, and cast changes so as to increase the dorsiflexion of the foot. Needle biopsies were obtained several times from the soleus muscles of both the injured and uninjured legs at a depth of about 5 cm. The cross-sectional area was measured by computed tomography at the same level the tissue was obtained by biopsy. Results of morphologic studies revealed a selective Type I fiber atrophy of the soleus muscle. Computed tomography revealed a 23% decrease in the area of the calf muscles and a 11% total reduction in the cross-sectional area of the calf (about the middle, where the gastrocnemius muscle is transformed into a tendon and where the soleus lies superficially). Mere measurement of the circumference of the calf is judged to be a poor criterion of muscle atrophy when compared with these other means of evaluation of atrophy. The evidence compiled during this study suggests that prompt surgical treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures, with cast changes several times during the period of immobilization and with tension maintained on the muscle, is the most effective treatment regimen we have found for this injury.

  11. Effect of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB-coated sutures on Achilles tendon healing in a rat model: A histological and biomechanical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen H Cummings

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Repairing tendon injuries with recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB has potential for improving surgical outcomes. Augmentation of sutures, a critical component of surgical tendon repair, by coating with growth factors may provide a clinically useful therapeutic device for improving tendon repair. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to (a coat Vicryl sutures with a defined dose of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB without additional coating excipients (e.g. gelatin, (b quantify the recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB released from the suture, and (c use the recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB-coated sutures to enhance tendon repair in a rat Achilles tendon transection model. Methods: Vicryl sutures were coated with 0, 0.3, 1.0, and 10.0 mg/mL concentrations of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB using a dip-coating process. In vitro release was quantified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Acutely transected rat Achilles tendons were repaired using one of the four suture groups (n = 12 per group. Four weeks following repair, the tensile biomechanical and histological (i.e. collagen organization and angiogenesis properties were determined. Results: A dose-dependent bolus release of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB occurred within the first hour in vitro, followed by a gradual release over 48 h. There was a significant increase in ultimate tensile strength (p < 0.01 in the two highest recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB dose groups (1.9 ± 0.5 and 2.1 ± 0.5 MPa relative to controls (1.0 ± 0.2 MPa. The modulus significantly increased (p = 0.031 with the highest recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB dose group (7.2 ± 3.8 MPa relative to all other groups (control: 3.5 ± 0.9 MPa. No significant differences were identified for the maximum load or stiffness. The histological collagen and angiogenesis

  12. Regular physical activity reduces the effects of Achilles tendon vibration on postural control for older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitre, J; Serres, I; Lhuisset, L; Bois, J; Gasnier, Y; Paillard, T

    2015-02-01

    The aim was to determine in what extent physical activity influences postural control when visual, vestibular, and/or proprioceptive systems are disrupted. Two groups of healthy older women: an active group (74.0 ± 3.8 years) who practiced physical activities and a sedentary group (74.7 ± 6.3 years) who did not, underwent 12 postural conditions consisted in altering information emanating from sensory systems by means of sensory manipulations (i.e., eyes closed, cervical collar, tendon vibration, electromyostimulation, galvanic vestibular stimulation, foam surface). The center of foot pressure velocity was recorded on a force platform. Results indicate that the sensory manipulations altered postural control. The sedentary group was more disturbed than the active group by the use of tendon vibration. There was no clear difference between the two groups in the other conditions. This study suggests that the practice of physical activities is beneficial as a means of limiting the effects of tendon vibration on postural control through a better use of the not manipulated sensory systems and/or a more efficient reweighting to proprioceptive information from regions unaffected by the tendon vibration.

  13. Microtrauma stimulates rat Achilles tendon healing via an early gene expression pattern similar to mechanical loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerman, Malin; Aspenberg, Per; Eliasson, Pernilla

    2014-01-01

    . Sixteen of the 19 genes were regulated after 3 h, in the same way as after loading. In conclusion, needling increased strength, and there was a striking similarity between the gene expression response to needling and mechanical loading. This suggests that the response to loading in early tendon healing...

  14. Evaluating the effect of low-level laser therapy on healing of tentomized Achilles tendon in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by light microscopical and gene expression examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliodoust, Morteza; Bayat, Mohammad; Jalili, Mohammad Reza; Sharifian, Zainalabedin; Dadpay, Masoomeh; Akbari, Mohammad; Bayat, Mehrnoush; Khoshvaghti, Amir; Bayat, Homa

    2014-07-01

    Tendon healing is impaired in individuals diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (DM). According to research, there is considerable improvement in the healing of surgically tenotomized Achilles tendons following low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in non-diabetic, healthy animals. This study uses light microscopic (LM) and semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analyses to evaluate the ability of LLLT in healing Achilles tendons from streptozotocin-induced diabetic (STZ-D) rats. A total of 88 rats were randomly divided into two groups, non-diabetic and diabetic. DM was induced in the rats by injections of STZ. The right Achilles tendons of all rats were tenotomized 1 month after administration of STZ. Laser-treated rats were treated with a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser that had a 632.8-nm wavelength and 7.2-mW average power. Experimental group rats received a daily dose of 0.014 J (energy density, 2.9 J/cm(2)). Control rats did not receive LLLT. Animals were sacrificed on days 5, 10, and 15 post-operatively for semi-quantitative LM and semi-quantitative RT-PCR examinations of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) gene expression. The chi-square test showed that LLLT significantly reduced inflammation in non-diabetic rats compared with their non-diabetic controls (p = 0.02). LLLT significantly decreased inflammation in diabetic rats on days 5 (p = 0.03) and 10 (p = 0.02) compared to the corresponding control diabetic rats. According to the student's t test, LLLT significantly increased TGF-β1 gene expression in healthy (p = 0.000) and diabetic (p = 0.000) rats compared to their relevant controls. The He-Ne laser was effective in altering the inflammatory reaction and increasing TGF-β1 gene production.

  15. Magnetization transfer in human achilles tendon assessed by a 3D ultrashort echo time sequence. Quantitative examinations in healthy volunteers at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syha, R.; Grosse, U.; Springer, F. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Section on Experimental Radiology; Martirosian, P.; Schick, F. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Section on Experimental Radiology; Ketelsen, D.; Claussen, C.D. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2011-11-15

    Magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) imaging provides insight into interactions between free and bounded water. Newly developed ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequences implemented on whole-body magnetic resonance (MR) scanners allow MTC imaging in tissues with extremely fast signal decay such as tendons. The aim of this study was to develop a technique for the quantification of the MT effect in healthy Achilles tendons in-vivo at 3 Tesla. 16 normal tendons of volunteers with no history of tendinopathy were examined using a 3D-UTE sequence with a rectangular on-resonant excitation pulse and a Fermi-shaped off-resonant MT preparation pulse. The frequency of the MT pulse was varied from 1 to 5 kHz. MT effects were calculated in terms of the MT ratio (MTR) between measurements without and with MT preparation. Direct saturation effects of MT preparation on the signal intensity were evaluated using numerical simulation of Bloch equations. One patient with tendinopathy was examined to exemplarily show changes of MTR under pathologic conditions. Calculation of MTR data was feasible in all examined tendons and showed a decrease from 0.53 {+-} 0.05 to 0.25 {+-} 0.03 (1 kHz to 5 kHz) for healthy volunteers. Evaluation of variation with gender and dominance of ankle revealed no significant differences (p > 0.05). In contrast, the patient with confirmed tendinopathy showed MTR values between 0.36 (1 kHz) and 0.19 (5 kHz). MT effects in human Achilles tendons can be reliably assessed in-vivo using a 3D UTE sequence at 3 T. All healthy tendons showed similar MTR values (coefficient of variation 10.0 {+-} 1.2 %). The examined patient showed a clearly different MT effect revealing a changed microstructure in the case of tendinopathy. (orig.)

  16. Rabbit Achilles tendon full transection model – wound healing, adhesion formation and biomechanics at 3, 6 and 12 weeks post-surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Meier Bürgisser

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available After tendon rupture repair, two main problems may occur: re-rupture and adhesion formation. Suitable non-murine animal models are needed to study the healing tendon in terms of biomechanical properties and extent of adhesion formation. In this study 24 New Zealand White rabbits received a full transection of the Achilles tendon 2 cm above the calcaneus, sutured with a 4-strand Becker suture. Post-surgical analysis was performed at 3, 6 and 12 weeks. In the 6-week group, animals received a cast either in a 180 deg stretched position during 6 weeks (adhesion provoking immobilization, or were re-casted with a 150 deg position after 3 weeks (adhesion inhibiting immobilization, while in the other groups (3 and 12 weeks a 180 deg position cast was applied for 3 weeks. Adhesion extent was analyzed by histology and ultrasound. Histopathological scoring was performed according to a method by Stoll et al. (2011, and the main biomechanical properties were assessed. Histopathological scores increased as a function of time, but did not reach values of healthy tendons after 12 weeks (only around 15 out of 20 points. Adhesion provoking immobilization led to an adhesion extent of 82.7±9.7%, while adhesion inhibiting immobilization led to 31.9±9.8% after 6 weeks. Biomechanical properties increased over time, however, they did not reach full strength nor elastic modulus at 12 weeks post-operation. Furthermore, the rabbit Achilles tendon model can be modulated in terms of adhesion formation to the surrounding tissue. It clearly shows the different healing stages in terms of histopathology and offers a suitable model regarding biomechanics because it exhibits similar biomechanics as the human flexor tendons of the hand.

  17. Rabbit Achilles tendon full transection model – wound healing, adhesion formation and biomechanics at 3, 6 and 12 weeks post-surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier Bürgisser, Gabriella; Calcagni, Maurizio; Bachmann, Elias; Fessel, Gion; Snedeker, Jess G.; Giovanoli, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT After tendon rupture repair, two main problems may occur: re-rupture and adhesion formation. Suitable non-murine animal models are needed to study the healing tendon in terms of biomechanical properties and extent of adhesion formation. In this study 24 New Zealand White rabbits received a full transection of the Achilles tendon 2 cm above the calcaneus, sutured with a 4-strand Becker suture. Post-surgical analysis was performed at 3, 6 and 12 weeks. In the 6-week group, animals received a cast either in a 180 deg stretched position during 6 weeks (adhesion provoking immobilization), or were re-casted with a 150 deg position after 3 weeks (adhesion inhibiting immobilization), while in the other groups (3 and 12 weeks) a 180 deg position cast was applied for 3 weeks. Adhesion extent was analyzed by histology and ultrasound. Histopathological scoring was performed according to a method by Stoll et al. (2011), and the main biomechanical properties were assessed. Histopathological scores increased as a function of time, but did not reach values of healthy tendons after 12 weeks (only around 15 out of 20 points). Adhesion provoking immobilization led to an adhesion extent of 82.7±9.7%, while adhesion inhibiting immobilization led to 31.9±9.8% after 6 weeks. Biomechanical properties increased over time, however, they did not reach full strength nor elastic modulus at 12 weeks post-operation. Furthermore, the rabbit Achilles tendon model can be modulated in terms of adhesion formation to the surrounding tissue. It clearly shows the different healing stages in terms of histopathology and offers a suitable model regarding biomechanics because it exhibits similar biomechanics as the human flexor tendons of the hand. PMID:27635037

  18. Achilles Tendon Ruptures: Comparison between the Clinical Results of Classical Versus Mini-Invasive or Percutaneous Surgical Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Obada

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to evaluate the surgical treatment comparing the results obtained with different techniques. We revised 68 cases with acute Achilles tendon rupture who underwent surgical correction between 2004 and 2011, with a 40 month average follow-up. 34 of these were submitted to a classical open repair using the Kessler or Krakow technique, 25 to a mini-invasive technique (Achilon and 9 to a percutaneous technique (Tenolig. We report a 29% rate of complications when using the classical technique: the major complications were one re-rupture, two surgical wound dehiscences, one infection and one sural nerve injury. In the mini-invasive/percutaneous techniques, two re-ruptures occurred (5.9% total, one in each technique and one fistula at the needle insertion location. In regards to the percutaneous and mini-invasive techniques, the functional results and degree of satisfaction were higher, with fewer complications, reflecting a trend that has been expressed in the international literature.

  19. Sonographic evaluation of the immediate effects of eccentric heel drop exercise on Achilles tendon and gastrocnemius muscle stiffness using shear wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Wilson K C; Chu, K L; Lai, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical loading is crucial for muscle and tendon tissue remodeling. Eccentric heel drop exercise has been proven to be effective in the management of Achilles tendinopathy, yet its induced change in the mechanical property (i.e., stiffness) of the Achilles tendon (AT), medial and lateral gastrocnemius muscles (MG and LG) was unknown. Given that shear wave elastography has emerged as a powerful tool in assessing soft tissue stiffness with promising intra- and inter-operator reliability, the objective of this study was hence to characterize the stiffness of the AT, MG and LG in response to an acute bout of eccentric heel drop exercise. Forty-five healthy young adults (36 males and nine females) performed 10 sets of 15-repetition heel drop exercise on their dominant leg with fully-extended knee, during which the AT and gastrocnemius muscles, but not soleus, were highly stretched. Before and immediately after the heel drop exercise, elastic moduli of the AT, MG and LG were measured by shear wave elastography. After the heel drop exercise, the stiffness of AT increased significantly by 41.8 + 33.5% (P eccentric heel drop exercise. The findings from this pilot study shed some light on how and to what extent the AT and gastrocnemius muscles mechanically responds to an isolated set of heel drop exercise. Taken together, appropriate eccentric load might potentially benefit mechanical adaptations of the AT and gastrocnemius muscles in the rehabilitation of patients with Achilles tendinopathy.

  20. Direct Radiofrequency Application Improves Pain and Gait in Collagenase-Induced Acute Achilles Tendon Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Pu Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency (RF is often used as a supplementary and alternative method to alleviate pain for chronic tendinopathy. Whether or how it would work for acute tendon injury is not addressed in the literatures. Through detailed pain and gait monitoring, we hypothesized that collagenase-induce acute tendinopathy model may be able to answer these questions. Gait parameters, including time, distance, and range of motion, were recorded and analyzed using a walking track equipped with a video-based system. Expression of substance P (SP, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP, and galanin were used as pain markers. Beta-III tubulin and Masson trichrome staining were used as to evaluate nerve sprouting, matrix tension, and degeneration in the tendon. Of fourteen analyzed parameters, RF significantly improved stance phase, step length, preswing, and intermediary toe-spread of gait. Improved gait related to the expression of substance P, CGRP, and reduced nerve fiber sprouting and matrix tension, but not galanin. The study indicates that direct RF application may be a valuable approach to improve gait and pain in acute tendon injury. Altered gait parameters may be used as references to evaluate therapeutic outcomes of RF or other treatment plan for tendinopathy.

  1. Imaging of the Achilles tendon in spondyloarthritis: a comparison of ultrasound and conventional, short and ultrashort echo time MRI with and without intravenous contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, R.J.; Emery, P. [University of Leeds, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Centre, Leeds (United Kingdom); Grainger, A.J.; O' Connor, P.J.; Evans, R. [Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Centre, Leeds (United Kingdom); Coates, L.; Marzo-Ortega, H.; Helliwell, P.; McGonagle, D. [University of Leeds, Leeds Institute for Molecular Medicine, Leeds (United Kingdom); Robson, M.D. [University of Oxford, Oxford Centre for Clinical Magnetic Resonance Research, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-15

    To compare conventional MRI, ultrashort echo time MRI and ultrasound for assessing the extent of tendon abnormalities in spondyloarthritis. 25 patients with spondyloarthritis and Achilles symptoms were studied with MRI and ultrasound. MR images of the Achilles tendon were acquired using T1-weighted spin echo, gradient echo and ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequences with echo times (TE) between 0.07 and 16 ms, before and after intravenous contrast medium. Greyscale and power Doppler ultrasound were also performed. The craniocaudal extent of imaging abnormalities measured by a consultant musculoskeletal radiologist was compared between the different techniques. Abnormalities were most extensive on spoiled gradient echo images with TE=2 ms. Contrast enhancement after intravenous gadolinium was greatest on the UTE images (TE=0.07 ms). Fewer abnormalities were demonstrated using unenhanced UTE. Abnormalities were more extensive on MRI than ultrasound. Contrast enhancement was more extensive than power Doppler signal. 3D spoiled gradient echo images with an echo time of 2 ms demonstrate more extensive tendon abnormalities than the other techniques in spondyloarthritis. Abnormalities of vascularity are best demonstrated on enhanced ultrashort echo time images. (orig.)

  2. Achilles Tendon Penetration for Continuous 810 nm and Superpulsed 904 nm Lasers Before and After Ice Application: An In Situ Study on Healthy Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslerud, Sturla; Naterstad, Ingvill Fjell; Bjordal, Jan Magnus; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro Brandão; Magnussen, Liv Heide; Leonardo, Patrícia Sardinha; Marques, Ricardo Henrique; Joensen, Jon

    2017-10-01

    There is a lack of knowledge about the influence tissue temperature may have on laser light penetration and tendon structure. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether penetration of laser energy in human Achilles tendons differed before and after ice pack application. The Achilles tendons (n = 54) from 27 healthy young adults were irradiated with two class 3B lasers (810 nm 200 mW continuous mode laser and a 904 nm 60 mW superpulsed mode laser). The optical energy penetrating the Achilles area was measured before and after 20 min of ice application. Measurements were obtained after 30, 60, and 120 sec irradiation with the 904 nm laser and after 30 and 60 sec irradiation with the 810 nm laser. Achilles tendon thickness was measured with ultrasonography. Optical energy penetration increased significantly (p lasers and at all time points from 0.34% to 0.39% of energy before ice application to 0.43-0.52% of energy after ice application for the 904 nm laser and from 0.24% to 0.25% of energy before ice application to 0.30-0.31% of energy after ice application for the 810 nm laser. The energy loss per centimeter of irradiated tissue was significantly higher (p laser light increased significantly through healthy Achilles tendons subjected to 20 min of cooling. These findings occurred in the presence of a significant reduction in skin temperature and Achilles tendon thickness.

  3. Applications of CT spectral imaging and MRI in Achilles tendon rupture%CT能谱成像和MRI在跟腱撕裂诊断中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李伟; 王新怡; 李爱银; 邓凯; 张成琪

    2012-01-01

    目的 初步探讨CT能谱成像和MRI在诊断跟腱撕裂中的影像特点,比较两种方法的应用价值.方法 跟腱区疼痛病史患者35例,通过手术确诊跟腱撕裂患者30例,分为完全性撕裂、不完全性撕裂和慢性局限性撕裂3种类型,根据跟腱形态、连续性、密度、信号改变,由影像科专家独立阅片,分析CT能谱成像和MRI影像特点,并对跟腱撕裂的CT能谱成像和MRI检出对照作统计学处理,P<0.05为差异具有统计学意义.结果 CT能谱成像主要表现为跟腱增粗、断端迂曲、密度减低.MRI表现为断端高信号,挛缩.对完全性或不完全性撕裂的诊断,CT能谱成像和MRI比较差异无统计学意义(x2=0,P>0.05),对慢性艰腱局限性撕裂的诊断,两种检查方法差异有统计学意义(x2=4.17,P <0.05).结论 CT能谱成像对跟腱完全或不完全性撕裂有较高的应用价值,而MRI 在显示慢性跟腱局限性撕裂方面较CT能谱成像有优势.%Objective To investigate the imaging features of CT spectral imaging and MRI in Achilles tendon rupture, and to compare the application value of the two methods. Methods CT spectral imaging and MRI were both performed in 35 cases with pain and limitation of motion in the Achilles tendon. 30 cases with rupture of the Achilles tendon were confirmed by operation and the patients were divided into complete rupture, incomplete rupture and chronic limitations rupture. Imaging features of the CT spectral imaging and MRI were independently compared and analyzed on the basis of shape, continuity, density, and signal changes of the Achilles tendon by two image experts. The CT spectral imaging and MRI images of the Achilles tendon were compared for statistical analysis. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results CT spectral imaging signs of Achilles tendon rupture were thickening, circuity and density diminution. MRI signs were hyper-intensity and contracture of broken ends. CT spectral

  4. Immunological characteristics of allogeneic tendon and achilles tendon after transplantation%异体肌腱及跟腱移植后移植物的免疫学特点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李敏; 王丽霞; 张瑞存

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Immune rejection of allogeneic transplantation is the most important issue for the successful transplantation.OBJECTIVE: To summarize the I mmunological characteristics of allogeneic tendon and achilles tendon transplantation for thetreatment of achilles tendon defects and cruciate ligament, respectively.METHODS: A computer-based research was conducted on the PubMed database and Wanfang database for the articles onallogeneic ahilles tendon transplantation or achilles tendon reconstruction published from January 1990 to January 2012. The keywords were “allograft, tendon, immunity, transplantation” in Chinese and English. A total of 83 articles were obtained.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The immune rejection of allogeneic tendon transplantation increased the risk of failure; however,the present studies have showed that deep-frozen processed allogeneic tendon is an ideal alternative material for the repair ofhuman tendon defects. It has the advantages of no normal tissue structure sacrifice and free from the individual constraints. Itcould ensure the success of the tendon transplantation and provide a reliable guarantee for the repair of achilles tendonre-rupture defects with the advantages of simple operation, small incision, less damage and reliable effects.%背景:异体移植的免疫排斥问题是移植能否成功的首要问题.目的:总结异体肌腱移植治疗跟腱缺损或异体跟腱移植治疗交叉韧带的免疫学特点.方法:应用计算机检索1990-01/2012-01 PubMed数据库及万方数据库有关异体跟腱移植或跟腱重建的相关文献.英文检索词"allograft,tendon,immunity,transplatation",中文检索词"异体,跟腱,移植,免疫".检索文献量总计83篇.结果与结论:腱组织的异体移植重建免疫排斥问题给手术增加了失败的危险性,但从目前研究来看经深低温冷冻处理的异体肌腱,是人体肌腱缺损修复的理想替代材料.它不以牺牲正常组织结构为代价,不受

  5. Acute Achilles tendon rupture: Mini-incision repair with double-Tsuge loop suture vs. open repair with modified Kessler suture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chongyang; Qu, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Achilles tendon rupture is a common injury of the foot and ankle. However, the optimal treatment strategy for Achilles tendon rupture is still not established. This study was conducted to compare the efficacy and complications of mini-incision repair with double-Tsuge loop sutures and open repair with modified Kessler sutures. We evaluated data from 60 patients with acute closed Achilles tendon ruptures who underwent mini-incision repair with double-Tsuge loop sutures (n = 30) or open repair with modified Kessler sutures (n = 30) from 2006 to 2010 in an ongoing prospective study conducted by us and have finished at least 18-month follow-up or finished the study. The AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot score, ATRS, maximal ankle range of motion and the time to achieve 20 continuous single heel raises after operation were recorded to compare the efficacy. The complications were also evaluated. During a mean follow-up of 25 months after surgery, the time to achieve 20 continuous single heel raises after operation of patients in Group Mini was significantly shorter than patients in Group Open. Moreover, the mini-incision with double-Tsuge repair was associated with a significantly shorter operating time, smaller incision length, and lower rate of complications. The mini-incision with double-Tsuge suture method in our study was shown to provide earlier strength recovery, as well as shorter operation time, less complications and improved cosmetic appearance. Copyright © 2014 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Is surgical intervention more effective than non-surgical treatment for acute Achilles tendon rupture? A systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yaohong; Lin, Linghan; Li, Hao; Zhao, Yachao; Liu, Longgang; Jia, Zhiwei; Wang, Deli; He, Qing; Ruan, Dike

    2016-12-01

    There is discordance in the results from meta-analyses on surgical versus non-surgical treatment for acute Achilles tendon rupture. We systematically reviewed the overlapping meta-analyses on this topic to provide information that will be helpful to decision makers when selecting treatments based on the current best available evidence. We comprehensively searched multiple databases for systematic reviews that compared surgical and non-surgical treatments for acute Achilles tendon rupture. We only included meta-analyses that comprised randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The methodological quality and extracted data were assessed. The meta-analysis that offered the best evidence was ascertained with the Jadad decision algorithm. Nine meta-analyses were included in our study and all of them included RCTs with Level-II evidence. Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) scores ranged from 5 to 10 (median 7). The Jadad decision algorithm was used to select a high-quality meta-analysis with more RCTs. The results from this study showed that when functional rehabilitation was used, non-surgical intervention was similar to surgical treatment regarding the incidence of range of motion, rerupture, calf circumference and functional outcomes, and the incidence of other complications was reduced. Non-surgical intervention significantly increased the rerupture rate if functional rehabilitation was not considered. The findings of meta-analyses regarding surgical versus non-surgical treatment for acute Achilles tendon rupture are inconsistent. According to this systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses, the current best available evidence suggests that centers offering functional rehabilitation may prefer non-surgical intervention. Surgical treatment may be preferred at centers that do not have functional rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Achilles tendon rupture in an elite athlete following multiple injection therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Bruce; Remedios, Denis; Loosemore, Mike; Maffulli, Nicola

    2008-11-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is common, and its management continues to be challenging, especially in elite athletes. Despite a wide range of novel management options, none guarantees a rapid return to high level sporting activity. Eccentric exercise has been shown to reduce symptoms and normalise imaging abnormalities, but time constraints on professional athletes often make this an unrewarding isolated management strategy. Eccentric exercises concurrent with ongoing training may not be as successful as eccentric training alone, reducing one's confidence in this modality for the "in-season" tendinopathy in the elite athlete. When a professional athlete is faced with a tendinopathy recalcitrant to eccentric exercise, manual therapy and orthotics, a more invasive approach is often attempted to expedite a return to unencumbered training. Numerous injection therapies are described, ranging from homeopathic products to glucocorticosteroids. The robustness of the literature surrounding these techniques is variable, but when an athlete is desperate to return to full training, clinicians working with elite athletes are often tempted to utilise more empirical management options. We present a patient who illustrates the potential dangers of injection therapy in the elite athlete, in particular sequential injection therapy involving vascular sclerosants, which to our knowledge has not previously been described. Written consent for the presentation of this case was obtained from the athlete concerned.

  8. Medial Gastrocnemius Myotendinous Junction Displacement and Plantar-Flexion Strength in Patients Treated With Immediate Rehabilitation After Achilles Tendon Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente, Carlos I; Lillo, Roberto Peña Y; Ramirez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Ortega-Auriol, Pablo; Delgado, Mauricio; Alvarez-Ruf, Joel; Carreño, Gabriel

    2016-12-01

    Pathologic plantar flexion frequently occurs after operative repair of the Achilles tendon (AT) because of immobilization and non-weight bearing in the first weeks of traditional rehabilitation. Novel rehabilitation strategies that apply mobilization and weight bearing have been proposed, but their effects on medial gastrocnemius myotendinous junction displacement (MJD) and isometric plantar-flexion strength (PFS) are unknown. To compare the effects of 12 weeks of immediate versus traditional rehabilitation on MJD and PFS in patients with percutaneous AT repair and to compare AT rupture scores (ATRSs) during follow-up. Controlled laboratory study. Human performance laboratory. A total of 26 amateur soccer players (age = 42.3 ± 9.7 years, body mass index = 29.5 ± 3.9 kg/m(2)) with percutaneous AT repair. Athletes were randomly divided into 2 groups: an immediate group, given physical therapy from day 1 to day 84, and a traditional group, given physical therapy from day 29 to day 84. We used repeated-measures analysis of variance to compare the data. We measured MJD and PFS at days 28 (fourth week), 56 (eighth week), and 84 (12th week) after AT repair. After 12 weeks of rehabilitation, we observed a large clinically meaningful effect and statistical difference between groups. At day 28, the immediate group showed higher values for PFS (P = .002), MJD (P = .02), and ATRS (P = .002) than the traditional group. At day 56, the immediate group presented higher values for MJD (P = .02) and ATRS (P = .009). At day 84, the immediate group registered more MJD (P = .001). Compared with traditional rehabilitation, 12 weeks of immediate rehabilitation after percutaneous AT repair resulted in better MJD, PFS, and ATRS after 4 weeks; better MJD and ATRS after 8 weeks; and better MJD after 12 weeks.

  9. Green tea and glycine aid in the recovery of tendinitis of the Achilles tendon of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, C P; Guerra, F Da Ré; de Oliveira, L P; Almeida, M S; Marcondes, Maria Cristina Cintra; Pimentell, E R

    2015-02-01

    Green tea (GT) is widely used due to its anti-inflammatory properties. Previous studies have shown beneficial effects of a glycine diet on the remodeling process in inflamed tendons. Tendinitis is commonly observed in athletes and is of concern to surgeons due to the slowness of the recovery process. Our hypothesis is that GT + a glycine diet may improve tendinitis. To analyze the effect of GT and/or glycine in the diet on tendinitis. Wistar rats were divided into seven groups (G): control group (C); G1 and G4, tendinitis; G2 and G5, tendinitis supplied with GT; and G3 and G6, tendinitis supplied with GT and a glycine diet for 7 or 21 days, respectively. We performed zymography for metalloproteinase, biochemical, morphological and biomechanics tests. G2, G3 and G5 showed high levels of hydroxyproline in relation to G1, while G4 showed high levels of glycosaminoglycans. High activity of metalloproteinase-2 was detected in G3. The organization of collagen bundles was better in G2 and G3. G5 showed similar birefringence measurements compared with C. G5 withstood a larger load compared with G4. The presence of metalloproteinase-2 indicates that a tissue is undergoing a remodeling process. High birefringence suggests a better organization of collagen bundles. After 21 days, G5 sustained a high load before rupture, unlike G4. The results suggest that GT + a glycine diet has beneficial effects that aid in the recovery process of the tendon after tendinitis.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute tendon ruptures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daffner, R.H.; Lupetin, A.R.; Dash, N.; Riemer, B.L.

    1986-11-01

    The diagnosis of acute tendon ruptures of the extensor mechanism of the knee or the Achilles tendon of the ankle may usually be made by clinical means. Massive soft tissue swelling accompanying these injuries often obscures the findings, however. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can rapidly demonstrate these tendon ruptures. Examples of the use of MRI for quadriceps tendon, and Achilles tendon rupture are presented.

  11. Hoffmann reflex is increased after 14 days of daily repeated Achilles tendon vibration for the soleus but not for the gastrocnemii muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapole, Thomas; Pérot, Chantal

    2012-02-01

    In a previous study, Achilles tendon vibrations were enough to improve the triceps surae (TS) activation capacities and also to slightly increase TS Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex) obtained by summing up soleus (Sol) and gastrocnemii (GM and GL) EMGs. The purpose of the present study was to analyze separately Sol and GM or GL reflexes to account for different effects of the vibrations on the reflex excitability of the slow soleus and of the gastrocnemii muscles. A control group (n = 13) and a vibration group (n = 16) were tested in pre-test and post-test conditions. The Achilles tendon vibration program consisted of 1 h of daily vibration (frequency: 50 Hz) applied during 14 days. Maximal Sol, GM and GL H-reflexes, and M-waves were recorded, and their H(max)/M(max) ratios gave the index of reflex excitability. After the vibration protocol, only Sol H(max)/M(max) was enhanced (p vibration is in favor of a decrease in the pre-synaptic inhibition due to the repeated vibrations and the high solicitation of the reflex pathway. Those results of a short period of vibration applied at rest may be limited to the soleus because of its high density in muscle spindles and slow motor units, both structures being very sensitive to vibrations.

  12. The influence of stretching and warm-up exercises on Achilles tendon reflex activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, D; Hennig, E M

    1995-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of prior exercise (warm-up and stretching) on the electromyographic and force output of mechanically elicited triceps surae reflexes. Fifty male subjects performed eight reflex experiments under each of three successive conditions in one session: (1) no prior exercise, (2) after static stretching of the passive triceps surae (3 min) and (3) after a 10-min warm-up run on a treadmill. Tendon tap reflex force was elicited in the triceps surae of the right leg by means of a standardized reflex hammer and measured in a custom-built fixture. Electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded with surface electrodes over the medial head of the gastrocnemius (G) and the soleus (S). Low coefficients of variation within subjects contrasted with high between-subject variations, indicating highly individual reflex characteristics. After stretching, reductions in the peak force (-5%; P running, the peak force reached the values obtained without prior exercise (-2%; N.S.), the force rise rate and half relaxation rate increased by 8 and 12%, respectively (P run had a more pronounced influence with regard to improved force development and a decreased EMG activity, which can be viewed as a performance-enhancing effect.

  13. 改良膝降动脉为蒂大收肌腱骨皮瓣修跟复合组织缺损%Repair of Achilles tendon composite defect using osteocutaneous flap of adductor magnus tendon pedicled with

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海文; 顾荣; 江新明; 曾德庆; 江吉勇

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨改良膝降动脉为蒂的大收肌腱骨皮瓣修复跟区跟腱复合组织缺损方法及效果.方法对3例外伤致足跟区跟腱止点伴跟骨及皮肤软组织缺损的患者,采用以膝降动脉为蒂的隐动脉穿支皮瓣修复跟区皮肤缺损,以膝降动脉关节支为蒂的大收肌腱骨瓣移植修复跟区复合组织缺损.其中跟区皮肤缺损面积为7 cm×9 cm~5 cm×7 cm,跟腱缺损长度为6~8 cm,切取皮瓣面积为8 cm×10cm~6 cm×8cm,大收肌腱切取长度为7~9cm.结果 3例复合组织瓣全部顺利成活,术后随访6~12个月,皮瓣感觉恢复S3-4,双足提踵试验及单足提踵试验均阴性,步态恢复均正常.结论应用隐动脉穿支设计皮瓣,皮瓣设计于大腿内侧,改良了隐动脉皮瓣设计于小腿内侧,造成切口过大,分离血管蒂较长等缺点,疗效可靠,是目前较理想修复方法.%Objective To evaluate clinical effects of osteocutaneous flap of adductor magnus tendon pedicled with descending genicular artery on repair of Achilles tendon composite defect. Methods Osteocutaneous flap of adductor magnus tendon pedicied with descending genicular artery were individually designed and surgically used on 3 Cases with traumatic Achilles tendon defects, combined with soft tissue and Calcaneal bone damage. The area of skin defect was ranged from 7 cmx9 cm to 5 Cm x7 cm, and the length of Achilles tendon defect was 6 - 8 cm. During the operation , the flaps was designed as ScmxlOcm to 6cmx 8cm, with the cutting length of the adductor magnus tendon 7~ 9 cm . Results: All 3 cases were followed-up for 6 to 12 months. The transplanted tissue flap survived well. The texture, appearance and function of the flap were excellent. Conclusions It is a ideal way to repair of Achilles tendon composite defect, using osteocutaneous flap of adductor magnus tendon pedicled with descending genicular artery, which avoiding the severe surgical trauma and the extended isolation of vessels.

  14. Optimization image of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2 fast spin echo (FSE) with variation echo train length (ETL) on the rupture tendon achilles case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzamil, Akhmad; Haries Firmansyah, Achmad

    2017-05-01

    The research was done the optimization image of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) T2 Fast Spin Echo (FSE) with variation Echo Train Length (ETL) on the Rupture Tendon Achilles case. This study aims to find the variations Echo Train Length (ETL) from the results of ankle’s MRI image and find out how the value of Echo Train Length (ETL) works on the MRI ankle to produce optimal image. In this research, the used ETL variations were 12 and 20 with the interval 2 on weighting T2 FSE sagittal. The study obtained the influence of Echo Train Length (ETL) on the quality of ankle MRI image sagittal using T2 FSE weighting and analyzed in 25 images of five patients. The data analysis has done quantitatively with the Region of Interest (ROI) directly on computer MRI image planes which conducted statistical tests Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and Contras to Noise Ratio (CNR). The Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) was the highest finding on fat tissue, while the Contras to Noise Ratio (CNR) on the Tendon-Fat tissue with ETL 12 found in two patients. The statistics test showed the significant SNR value of the 0.007 (pTendon tissue, 0.364 (p>0.05) of the Fat, 0.912 (p>0.05) of the Fibula, and 0.436 (p>0.05) of the Heel Bone. For the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of the Tendon-FAT tissue was about 0.041 (p>0.05). The results of the study showed that ETL variation with T2 FSE sagittal weighting had difference at Tendon tissue and Tendon-Fat tissue for MRI imaging quality. SNR and CNR were an important aspect on imaging optimization process to give the diagnose information.

  15. Outcomes and complications of percutaneous versus open repair of acute Achilles tendon rupture: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Liu, Yang; Kan, Shunli; Zhang, Di; Xu, Hong; Liu, Feifei; Ning, Guangzhi; Feng, Shiqing

    2017-04-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture (AATR) is a frequent injury occurring dominantly in young to middle-aged males. Outcomes and complications between percutaneous and open repair are still controversial. Thus, the purpose of this meta-analysis is to evaluate the outcomes and complications of these two operative methods. We searched multiple databases: PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library up to October 2016. Two reviewers independently screened the studies for eligibility, evaluated the quality and extracted data from eligible studies, with confirmation by cross-checking. The major results and conclusions were concluded, and the different complication rates and functional outcomes were compared. Meta-analysis was processed by Rev Man 5.3 software. Five randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and seven retrospective cohort studies involving 815 patients met the inclusion criteria. The sural nerve injury rate in the percutaneous group was significantly higher (RR = 3.52, 95%CI 1.45 to 8.57, P = 0.006). However, deep infection rate in the open group was higher (RR = 0.33, 95%CI 0.11 to 0.96, P = 0.04) and subgroup analysis of five RCTs showed no significant difference (RR = 0.42, 95%CI 0.09 to 2.10, P = 0.29). No significant difference was seen regarding the rate of re-rupture. The time of operation in the percutaneous group was shorter (RR = -1.99, 95%CI -3.81 to -0.80, P = 0.001). American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score showed statistically different in the two groups. Other functional outcomes were similar in the two groups. Percutaneous repair has the advantages of operation time, deep infection and AOFAS score. The functional outcomes were similar in two treatment groups except AOFAS score. Despite the higher incidence of sural nerve injury, we still believe that percutaneous repair is superior to open repair for treating AATR. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Can Achilles tendon be used as a new distal landmark for coronal tibial component alignment in total knee replacement surgery? An observational MRI study