WorldWideScience

Sample records for achieving continuous improvement

  1. Methods and Conditions for Achieving Continuous Improvement of Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Florica BADEA; Catalina RADU; Ana-Maria GRIGORE

    2010-01-01

    In the early twentieth century, the Taylor model improved, in a spectacular maner the efficiency of the production processes. This allowed obtaining high productivity by low-skilled workers, but used in large number in the execution of production. Currently this model is questioned by experts and was replaced by the concept of "continuous improvement". The first signs of change date from the '80s, with the apparition of quality circles and groups of operators on quality issues, principles whi...

  2. Role of continual environmental performance improvement in achieving sustainability in uranium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarrell, J.P.; Chad, G.M.S.

    2002-01-01

    Although the term sustainable development is commonly used today, there is not yet a commonly accepted definition. Various ways of measuring sustainability have been proposed. To show how these issues are being effectively addressed in modern uranium developments, we will review some methods of defining the environmental component of sustainable development in the mining and mineral-processing sector. Environmental impacts associated with uranium extraction and processing in modern facilities are modest. Air and water emissions are well controlled. Waste materials are subject to comprehensive management programmes. The size of the impacted area is smaller than in other energy sectors, providing good opportunity to minimize land impact. Experience over the past three decades facilitated gradual, persistent, but cumulatively significant environmental improvements in the uranium production sector. Cameco's uranium mining and processing facilities exemplify these improvements. These improvements can be expected to continue, supporting our argument of Cameco's environmental sustainability. (author)

  3. Achieving continuous improvement in reductions in foodborne listeriosis: A risk-based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone

    2005-01-01

    likely due to consumption of contaminated soft cheeses such as queso fresco and queso blanco. The International Life Sciences Institute Risk Science Institute Expert Panel concluded that certain foods pose a high risk for causing listeriosis. High-risk foods have all of the following properties: (1) have...... the potential for contamination with L. monocytogenes; (2) support the growth of L. monocytogenes to high numbers; (3) are ready to eat; (4) require refrigeration; and (5) are stored for an extended period of time. Control strategies are needed in the food chain from preharvest through consumption to minimize...... the likelihood that food will become contaminated by L. monocytogenes and to prevent the growth of the organism to high numbers. The Expert Panel identified three main strategies for ensuring continuous improvement in reducing foodborne listeriosis: (1) preventing contamination of foods with L. monocytogenes; (2...

  4. Continuous quality improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourne, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the various statistical tools used at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory to achieve continuous quality improvement in the development of Breeder Reactor Technology and in reactor operations. The role of the quality assurance professionals in this process, including quantifiable measurements using actual examples, is provided. The commitment to quality improvement through top management involvement is dramatically illustrated

  5. Continual improvement plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    NASA's approach to continual improvement (CI) is a systems-oriented, agency-wide approach that builds on the past accomplishments of NASA Headquarters and its field installations and helps achieve NASA's vision, mission, and values. The NASA of the future will fully use the principles of continual improvement in every aspect of its operations. This NASA CI plan defines a systematic approach and a model for continual improvement throughout NASA, stressing systems integration and optimization. It demonstrates NASA's constancy of purpose for improvement - a consistent vision of NASA as a worldwide leader in top-quality science, technology, and management practices. The CI plan provides the rationale, structures, methods, and steps, and it defines NASA's short term (1-year) objectives for improvement. The CI plan presents the deployment strategies necessary for cascading the goals and objectives throughout the agency. It also provides guidance on implementing continual improvement with participation from top leadership and all levels of employees.

  6. Continuous Personal Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emiliani, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    Suggests that continuous improvement tools used in the workplace can be applied to self-improvement. Explains the use of such techniques as one-piece flow, kanban, visual controls, and total productive maintenance. Points out misapplications of these tools and describes the use of fishbone diagrams to diagnose problems. (SK)

  7. Continuous quality improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohlin, Madeleine; Schaub, Rob M.H.; Holbrook, Peter; Leibur, Edvitar; Lévy, Gérard; Roubalikova, Lenka; Nilner, Maria; Roger-Leroi, Valerie; Danner, Gunter; Iseri, Haluk; Feldman, Cecile

    2002-01-01

    Versch. in: Eur J Dent Educ; 6 (Suppl. 3): 67–77 Continuous quality improvement (CQI) can be envisaged as a circular process of goal-setting, followed by external and internal evaluations resulting in improvements that can serve as goals for a next cycle. The need for CQI is apparent, because of

  8. KAIZEN CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Yenque D., Julio; García P., Manuel; Raez G., Luis

    2014-01-01

    Many times we ask the question why Japanese companies are competitive?, Surely many of the answers to this mystery have support in the Kaizen. And the Kaizen is not a simple concept, it is a whole way of life that involves both managers and workers in the pursuit of progressive improvement of enterprises. In his book Kaizen, The Key to Japanese Competitive Advantage, Masaaki Imai explains in simple terms what is the essence of this philosophy: Kaizen means improvement means further progressiv...

  9. Partnership for Continuous Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The proceedings are presented of the sixth annual conference on quality control between NASA and its contractors. The emphasis is placed on a commitment to quality and excellence that guarantees mission success. A forum is provided for representatives from government, industry, and academia to exchange ideas and experiences, encouraging total quality performance that results in high quality products and services. Key points are highlighted from the presentations and activities are described that have resulted in a broad range of improvements in products and services from government, industry, and academia. Long term commitment to quality is an essential requirement that ensures future success. That commitment reinterates the dedication to excellence in space exploration and to national quality and productivity improvement.

  10. Continuous improvement of software quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivertsen, Terje

    1999-04-01

    The present report is the first Halden Work Report delivered from the OECD Halden Reactor Project's research activity on formal methods and software quality. Of particular concern in this activity is to reach a consensus between regulators, licensees and the nuclear industry on questions related to the effective, industrial use of formal methods. The report gives considerable attention to the importance of continuous improvement as a characteristic of a living software quality system, and to the need of providing a basis for software process/product quality integration. In particular, the report discusses these aspects from the perspectives of defect prevention, formal methods, Total Quality Management (TQM), and Bayesian Belief Nets. Another concern is to promote controlled experiments on the use of new methods, techniques, and tools. This is achieved partly by reviewing suggestions on the collection and experimental use of data, and by surveying a number of metrics believed to have some potential for comparison studies (author) (ml)

  11. Perspectives: The Continuous Improvement Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Accrediting agencies, legislators, pundits, and even higher educational professionals have become enamored with applying the language of continuous improvement to learning outcomes. The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges specifically uses the term "continuing improvement" in Core Standard 2.5, one of its…

  12. An improved characterization method for international accountancy measurements of fresh and irradiated mixed oxide (MOX) fuel: helping achieve continual monitoring and safeguards through the fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Louise G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, S. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, H. O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schear, M. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Worrall, Andrew [U.K. NNL

    2011-01-13

    Nuclear fuel accountancy measurements are conducted at several points through the nuclear fuel cycle to ensure continuity of knowledge (CofK) of special nuclear material (SNM). Non-destructive assay (NDA) measurements are performed on fresh fuel (prior to irradiation in a reactor) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) post-irradiation. We have developed a fuel assembly characterization system, based on the novel concept of 'neutron fingerprinting' with multiplicity signatures to ensure detailed CofK of nuclear fuel through the entire fuel cycle. The neutron fingerprint in this case is determined by the measurement of the various correlated neutron signatures, specific to fuel isotopic composition, and therefore offers greater sensitivity to variations in fissile content among fuel assemblies than other techniques such as gross neutron counting. This neutron fingerprint could be measured at the point of fuel dispatch (e.g. from a fuel fabrication plant prior to irradiation, or from a reactor site post-irradiation), monitored during transportation of the fuel assembly, and measured at a subsequent receiving site (e.g. at the reactor site prior to irradiation, or reprocessing facility post-irradiation); this would confirm that no unexpected changes to the fuel composition or amount have taken place during transportation and/ or reactor operations. Changes may indicate an attempt to divert material for example. Here, we present the current state of the practice of fuel measurements for both fresh mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and SNF (both MOX and uranium dioxide). This is presented in the framework of international safeguards perspectives from the US and UK. We also postulate as to how the neutron fingerprinting concept could lead to improved fuel characterization (both fresh MOX and SNF) resulting in: (a) assured CofK of fuel across the nuclear fuel cycle, (b) improved detection of SNM diversion, and (c) greater confidence in safeguards of SNF transportation.

  13. Baseline budgeting for continuous improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilty, G L

    1999-05-01

    This article is designed to introduce the techniques used to convert traditionally maintained department budgets to baseline budgets. This entails identifying key activities, evaluating for value-added, and implementing continuous improvement opportunities. Baseline Budgeting for Continuous Improvement was created as a result of a newly named company president's request to implement zero-based budgeting. The president was frustrated with the mind-set of the organization, namely, "Next year's budget should be 10 to 15 percent more than this year's spending." Zero-based budgeting was not the answer, but combining the principles of activity-based costing and the Just-in-Time philosophy of eliminating waste and continuous improvement did provide a solution to the problem.

  14. Developing a Continuous Improvement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-16

    disagree that continuous improvement is critical to an organization’s suc-cess, since conducting business using a status quo philosophy will not work...for implementing one of these processes include: better operational efficiency, increased customer satisfaction, improved employee morale ...when a problem in reliability or maintenance may become the greatest opportunity. As described in the January-February 2011 issue of Defense AT&L

  15. Improved continuity of reduced graphene oxide on polyester fabric by use of polypyrrole to achieve a highly electro-conductive and flexible substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berendjchi, Amirhosein; Khajavi, Ramin; Yousefi, Ali Akbar; Yazdanshenas, Mohammad Esmail

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Discontinuity of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) coated polyester fabric (PET) substrate was overcome by filling the gaps by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of polypyrrole (PPy). • The RGO–PPy coated samples exhibited 53% and 263% lower surface resistivity values (5 Ω/sq) than samples coated only with PPy (12 Ω/sq) and RGO (1300 Ω/sq), respectively. • The RGO–PPy coated fabric displayed other properties, such as excellent UV blocking (UPF = 73), antibacterial activity, improved electrochemical behavior and thermal stability which make it a multifunctional fabric. - Abstract: A flexible and highly conductive fabric can be applied for wearable electronics and as a pliable counter electrode for photovoltaics. Methods such as surface coating of fabrics with conductive polymers and materials have been developed, but the roughness of fabric is a challenge because it creates discontinuity in the coated layer. The present study first coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fabric with reduced graphene oxide sheets; RGO and then filled the gaps with polypyrrole (PPy). The samples were first dipped in graphene oxide (GO) and then reduced to RGO. They were next coated with PPy by in situ polymerization. The results showed that the presence of oxidative agent during synthesis of PPy oxidized the RGO to some extent on the previously RGO-coated samples. PPy was more uniform on samples pre-coated with RGO in comparison those coated with raw PET. The RGO–PPy coated samples exhibited 53% and 263% lower surface resistivity values than samples coated only with PPy and RGO, respectively. There was no significant difference between the tenacity of samples but the bending rigidity of samples increased. The RGO–PPy coated fabric displayed properties, such as excellent UV blocking (UPF = 73), antibacterial activity, improved electrochemical behavior and thermal stability which make it a multifunctional fabric.

  16. Improved continuity of reduced graphene oxide on polyester fabric by use of polypyrrole to achieve a highly electro-conductive and flexible substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berendjchi, Amirhosein [Department of Textile Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khajavi, Ramin, E-mail: khajavi@azad.ac.ir [Nano Technology Research Center, South Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yousefi, Ali Akbar [Faculty of Polymer Processing, Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yazdanshenas, Mohammad Esmail [Department of Textile Engineering, Yazd Branch, Islamic Azad University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Discontinuity of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) coated polyester fabric (PET) substrate was overcome by filling the gaps by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of polypyrrole (PPy). • The RGO–PPy coated samples exhibited 53% and 263% lower surface resistivity values (5 Ω/sq) than samples coated only with PPy (12 Ω/sq) and RGO (1300 Ω/sq), respectively. • The RGO–PPy coated fabric displayed other properties, such as excellent UV blocking (UPF = 73), antibacterial activity, improved electrochemical behavior and thermal stability which make it a multifunctional fabric. - Abstract: A flexible and highly conductive fabric can be applied for wearable electronics and as a pliable counter electrode for photovoltaics. Methods such as surface coating of fabrics with conductive polymers and materials have been developed, but the roughness of fabric is a challenge because it creates discontinuity in the coated layer. The present study first coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fabric with reduced graphene oxide sheets; RGO and then filled the gaps with polypyrrole (PPy). The samples were first dipped in graphene oxide (GO) and then reduced to RGO. They were next coated with PPy by in situ polymerization. The results showed that the presence of oxidative agent during synthesis of PPy oxidized the RGO to some extent on the previously RGO-coated samples. PPy was more uniform on samples pre-coated with RGO in comparison those coated with raw PET. The RGO–PPy coated samples exhibited 53% and 263% lower surface resistivity values than samples coated only with PPy and RGO, respectively. There was no significant difference between the tenacity of samples but the bending rigidity of samples increased. The RGO–PPy coated fabric displayed properties, such as excellent UV blocking (UPF = 73), antibacterial activity, improved electrochemical behavior and thermal stability which make it a multifunctional fabric.

  17. Continuous improvement of pump seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, W.; Eyvindson, A.; Rhodes, D.B.

    2003-01-01

    Pump seal reliability continues to be an area needing improvement and ongoing vigilance. Methods have been developed for identifying and assessing factors relating to seal performance, selecting the most relevant ones for a specific station, and then focusing on the most significant aspects and how to improve. Discussion invariably addresses maintenance practices, seal design, monitoring capabilities, operating conditions, transients, and pump and motor design. Success in reliability improvement requires ongoing dialogue among the station operators, pump manufacturers and seal designers. AECL CAN-seals lead the nuclear industry in reliability and seal life. They effectively save operators millions of dollars in outage time and person-rem. This paper describes some of the significant developments in AECL's ongoing program in seal R and D, as well as recent new installations following the most demanding seal qualification programs to date. (author)

  18. Soybean improvement: Achievements and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burton Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean is a major source of vegetable protein and oil in the world. Worldwide demand continues to be high and production has more than doubled in the past 20 years to a total of 264.2 million metric tons in 2011 (National Agricultural Statistics Service 2012. Much of this increase has been due to increased planting in Argentina and Brazil. But, there have been genetic gains as well. We now have powerful genetic tools and these will be useful in gene discovery and in developing selectable markers for those genes. But for traits that are quantitative and multigenic, marker assisted selection may not be practical. We are facing unprecedented changes in our climate which will require resourceful use of the new genetic tools along with standard plant breeding methodology to maintain soybean productivity and quality.

  19. Sustaining motivation for continuous improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; Kofoed, Lise Busk

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this article is to explore possibilities for improving motivation for participation in Continuous Improvement (CI). Due to a number of issues, for example, challenges with measuring outcomes of CI activities on performance, the inherent slower, incremental rather than big bang...... activities is an important issue for managers. The paper begins with a short description of CI, with an emphasis on barriers to successful implementation cited in the literature. Thereafter, a number of widely-acknowledged-albeit perhaps somewhat dated-theories of motivation are explored in relation...... to the elements of CI in practice. Based on their own experiences with CI implementation in numerous action-research based studies, the authors propose a scenario for motivating CI participation through emphasis on factors common to the presented motivational theories. The paper ends with insights into future...

  20. [A Case of HPN, In Which QOL Improvement Was Achieved by Combining Continuous Infusion with Once-Weekly Intermittent Infusion - Contribution of Pharmacists to Health Promotion among Home Patients Receiving Infusion Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Namihiro; Hamana, Tomoko; Oka, Toyoka; Hirohara, Masayoshi; Kushida, Kazuki

    2016-12-01

    Patients receiving parenteral nutrition at home have the following two options: 24-h continuous or intermittent infusion. To date, for patients with impaired glucose tolerance and/or other metabolic disorders or for those with decreased cardiac/ pulmonary/renal function, it is desirable to opt for continuous infusion to minimize the variance in the body's metabolic rate as much as possible. Furthermore, it should be noted that continuous infusion evokes a stronger feeling among patients of being constrained because it restricts their everyday activities. This case witnesses collaborations among the patient's doctor, dispensary's pharmacy, and patient's family. Because ofthe use ofintermittent infusion more or less once per week in addition to continuous infusion, significant improvement in quality of life was achieved, and the patient was able to enjoy taking a short trip. To assist a home patient receiving infusion therapy, it is essential that the pharmacist be equipped with skills to manage risks associated with infusion therapy and have knowledge about insurance to cover incidents concerning infusion fluids or medical materials. It will certainly depend on the degree ofindependence ofpatients and the level ofcare their families can provide; however, should we manage to use a similar medical procedure in at least a few cases in the future, we may be able to contribute to "joie de vivre" in home patients receiving infusion therapy.

  1. Quick and continuous improvement through kaizen blitz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNichols, T; Hassinger, R; Bapst, G W

    1999-05-01

    It is our objective to provide you with a step-by-step approach to conducting a kaizen blitz within two days and describe how to achieve dramatic performance improvement with employee buy-in through this process. Kaizen blitz has been used dozens of times by the authors, and in some instances the same area has been blitzed as many as four times, with significant improvements each and every time. Employees have even taken it on themselves to conduct informal blitzes as a continuing improvement effort after a formal blitz has been conducted in their area. Blitzes can succeed in a variety of environments. The morning after the employees of one company attended this presentation, they self initiated a mini-blitz and discovered opportunities for improvement that they enthusiastically presented to management.

  2. Continuous Improvement in Schools: Understanding the Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Stephen; Kumari, Roshni

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates conceptually and practically what it means for schools to engage in the practice of continuous improvement. The analysis draws upon prior research and discussion to predict core elements of the practice of continuous improvement in schools. The predictions are then applied to a case study of continuous improvement efforts…

  3. Teamwork, Leadership, and Continuous Improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijser, Wouter Alexander; Glaudemans, Andor; Medema, Jitze; Dierckx, Rudi; Ahaus, Kees

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe the enhanced TeamSTEPPS® curriculum as fundament to creating a “culture of continuous improvement” in nuclear medicine. This evidence-based and modular teamwork system is deployed in concordance with a novel medical leadership development program. It provides a

  4. Achieving Improvement Through Nursing Home Quality Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Yael; Clauser, Steven B.

    2002-01-01

    CMS has initiated the Nursing Home Quality Initiative (NHQI) to improve the quality of nursing home care. Central to the NHQI is the public reporting of nursing home quality measures that serve as the basis for the Initiative's communication and quality improvement program. This article provides an overview of the NHQI, focusing on the role of nursing home quality measures in achieving improvements in nursing home care. We also describe the evolution of quality measurement in nursing homes, a...

  5. CTE's Focus on Continuous Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, John; Kelley, Patricia; Pritz, Sandy; Hodes, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Just one of the ways career and technical education (CTE) is revamping its image is through increased attention to data-driven instructional techniques as a means of improving and focusing instruction on what matters most. Accountability and data have increasingly become a core focus of research, news, and commentary about education in recent…

  6. Continuous Improvement and Collaborative Improvement: Similarities and Differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Middel, Rick; Boer, Harry; Fisscher, Olaf

    2006-01-01

    the similarities and differences between key components of continuous and collaborative improvement by assessing what is specific for continuous improvement, what for collaborative improvement, and where the two areas of application meet and overlap. The main conclusions are that there are many more similarities...... between continuous and collaborative improvement. The main differences relate to the role of hierarchy/market, trust, power and commitment to collaboration, all of which are related to differences between the settings in which continuous and collaborative improvement unfold....

  7. A Report Card on Continuous Quality Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, David; Kilo, Charles M.

    1998-01-01

    Efforts to incorporate the principles of continuous quality improvement (CQI) into health care have been underway for about ten years. In order to understand the lessons of this decade of experience, senior organizational leaders and experts in the field of health care were interviewed. This select group agreed that there have been concrete accomplishments: the tactic of assigning blame for mistakes to individuals is gradually giving way to an emphasis on detecting problems with process; there is a new focus on the health care customer; and many valuable projects have been inaugurated. Nevertheless, the interviews underlined the reality that the movement has not yet made a sizable impact on the U.S. health care system. Until there is a profound, organization-wide recognition of the need for change, universal commitment to CQI principles will not be achieved. PMID:9879305

  8. Teacher Research as Continuous Process Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Charles; Castle, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Teacher research (inquiry) has been characterized as practice improvement, professional development and action research, among numerous names and descriptions. The purpose of this paper is to support the case that teacher research is also a form of quality improvement known as continuous process improvement (CPI).…

  9. Managerial implications for improving continuous production processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capaci, Francesca; Vanhatalo, Erik; Bergquist, Bjarne

    2017-01-01

    . In this article we highlight SPC and DoE implementation challenges described in the literature for managers, researchers and practitioners interested in continuous production process improvement. The results may help managers support the implementation of these methods and make researchers and practitioners aware......Data analytics remains essential for process improvement and optimization. Statistical process control and design of experiments are among the most powerful process and product improvement methods available. However, continuous process environments challenge the application of these methods...... of methodological challenges in continuous process environments...

  10. Continuous Improvement and Collaborative Improvement: Similarities and Differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middel, H.G.A.; Boer, Harm; Fisscher, O.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    A substantial body of theoretical and practical knowledge has been developed on continuous improvement. However, there is still a considerable lack of empirically grounded contributions and theories on collaborative improvement, that is, continuous improvement in an inter-organizational setting. The

  11. Occupational Analysis: A Continuous Improvement Approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duffy, Tom

    1998-01-01

    .... In doing so, the Air Force has implemented "Quality Air Force (QAF)" (AF Handbook 90-502). QAF is a leadership commitment that inspires trust, teamwork, and continuous improvement everywhere in the Air Force...

  12. Continuous improvement methods in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heising, Carolyn D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate management methods for improved safety in the nuclear power industry. Process improvement management, methods of business process reengineering, total quality management, and continued process improvement (KAIZEN) are explored. The anticipated advantages of extensive use of improved process oriented management methods in the nuclear industry are increased effectiveness and efficiency in virtually all tasks of plant operation and maintenance. Important spin off include increased plant safety and economy. (author). 6 refs., 1 fig

  13. Human Resource Management for Continuous Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; Boer, Harry; Laugen, Bjørge

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the relationship between HRM practices and Continuous Improvement (CI) activities in order to gain an understanding of how the HRM function may be utilized to improve CI implementation success, and consequently, organizational performance. The paper i...

  14. Human Resource Management for Continuous Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; Laugen, Bjørge Timenes; Boer, Harry

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between HRM practices and Continuous Improvement (CI) activities in order to gain an understanding of how the HRM function may be utilized to improve CI implementation success, and consequently, company performance. The paper begins with a brief review...... of the HRM and CI literature and then presents statistical analyses of data collected from the Continuous Improvement Network Survey (2003), which demonstrate that HRM has a significant effect on CI behaviour and company performance, with the strongest relationship between HRM, CI and performance occurring...

  15. Improving Student Achievement in Math and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Nancy G.; Hamsa, Irene Schulz; Heath, Panagiota; Perry, Robert; White, Stacy J.

    1998-01-01

    As the new millennium approaches, a long anticipated reckoning for the education system of the United States is forthcoming, Years of school reform initiatives have not yielded the anticipated results. A particularly perplexing problem involves the lack of significant improvement of student achievement in math and science. Three "Partnership" projects represent collaborative efforts between Xavier University (XU) of Louisiana, Southern University of New Orleans (SUNO), Mississippi Valley State University (MVSU), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Stennis Space Center (SSC), to enhance student achievement in math and science. These "Partnerships" are focused on students and teachers in federally designated rural and urban empowerment zones and enterprise communities. The major goals of the "Partnerships" include: (1) The identification and dissemination of key indices of success that account for high performance in math and science; (2) The education of pre-service and in-service secondary teachers in knowledge, skills, and competencies that enhance the instruction of high school math and science; (3) The development of faculty to enhance the quality of math and science courses in institutions of higher education; and (4) The incorporation of technology-based instruction in institutions of higher education. These goals will be achieved by the accomplishment of the following objectives: (1) Delineate significant ?best practices? that are responsible for enhancing student outcomes in math and science; (2) Recruit and retain pre-service teachers with undergraduate degrees in Biology, Math, Chemistry, or Physics in a graduate program, culminating with a Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction; (3) Provide faculty workshops and opportunities for travel to professional meetings for dissemination of NASA resources information; (4) Implement methodologies and assessment procedures utilizing performance-based applications of higher order

  16. Fibromyalgia syndrome: Can improvement be achieved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Vladimirovna Chichasova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Research Institute of Rheumatology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow The paper gives data on the prevalence, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and treatment of fibromyalgia (FM syndrome. It is stated that the ratio of all clinical symptoms of FM syndrome should be borne in mind when treating patients with this disease. Various specialists should be attracted to the treatment of these patients. Psychotropic medications that are prescribed by a psychiatrist are indicated where there is a preponderance of psychological disorders; the duration of this therapy is variable, but not more than 2—3 months. Most patients need proper analgesia, improved sleep quality and duration, and diminished fatigability that frequently leads to lower (none working capacity. Pregabalin (lyrica promptly suppresses the major manifestations of FM; the onset of its action is seen just after one week of treatment; the use of the drug may be continued as long as it is effective and safe.

  17. Continue service improvement at CERN computing centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, M Barroso; Everaerts, L; Meinhard, H; Baehler, P; Haimyr, N; Guijarro, J M

    2014-01-01

    Using the framework of ITIL best practises, the service managers within CERN-IT have engaged into a continuous improvement process, mainly focusing on service operation. This implies an explicit effort to understand and improve all service management aspects in order to increase efficiency and effectiveness. We will present the requirements, how they were addressed and share our experiences. We will describe how we measure, report and use the data to continually improve both the processes and the services being provided. The focus is not the tool or the process, but the results of the continuous improvement effort from a large team of IT experts providing services to thousands of users, supported by the tool and its local team. This is not an initiative to address user concerns in the way the services are managed but rather an on-going working habit of continually reviewing, analysing and improving the service management processes and the services themselves, having in mind the currently agreed service levels and whose results also improve the experience of the users about the current services.

  18. A Typology of Continuous Improvement Implementation Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijnders, Sander; Boer, Harry

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a typology of continuous improvement (CI) implementation processes. The typology is based on an empirical study of 26 companies engaged in the implementation of CI. The data underpinning the typology was collected through retrospective interviews guided by a semi-structured ......This article presents a typology of continuous improvement (CI) implementation processes. The typology is based on an empirical study of 26 companies engaged in the implementation of CI. The data underpinning the typology was collected through retrospective interviews guided by a semi...

  19. Software Maintenance Management Evaluation and Continuous Improvement

    CERN Document Server

    April, Alain

    2008-01-01

    This book explores the domain of software maintenance management and provides road maps for improving software maintenance organizations. It describes full maintenance maturity models organized by levels 1, 2, and 3, which allow for benchmarking and continuous improvement paths. Goals for each key practice area are also provided, and the model presented is fully aligned with the architecture and framework of software development maturity models of CMMI and ISO 15504. It is complete with case studies, figures, tables, and graphs.

  20. The Continuous Improvement Model: A K-12 Literacy Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jennifer V.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if the eight steps of the Continuous Improvement Model (CIM) provided a framework to raise achievement and to focus educators in identifying high-yield literacy strategies. This study sought to determine if an examination of the assessment data in reading revealed differences among schools that fully,…

  1. A Continuous Improvement Capital Funding Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Matt

    2001-01-01

    Describes a capital funding model that helps assess facility renewal needs in a way that minimizes resources while maximizing results. The article explains the sub-components of a continuous improvement capital funding model, including budgeting processes for finish renewal, building performance renewal, and critical outcome. (GR)

  2. Continuous Improvement in State Funded Preschool Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Sarah L.

    2012-01-01

    State funded preschool programs were constantly faced with the need to change in order to address internal and external demands. As programs engaged in efforts towards change, minimal research was available on how to support continuous improvement efforts within the context unique to state funded preschool programs. Guidance available had…

  3. Continuous improvement: A win-win process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, T.M.; Wichert, A.

    1992-01-01

    The strategies used within PanCanadian Petroleum Limited's production division to successfully introduce the continuous improvement (CI) process are discussed. Continuous improvement is an operating philosophy and management style which allows all employees to participate in and improve the way an organization performs its day-to-day business. In the CI work environment the supervisor's traditional role changes from one of monitoring and controlling, to one of inspiring, motivating and leading people by communicating a clear vision. Employees at all levels in the work environment are organized into teams and armed with a good working knowledge of the problem-solving tools which allow them to pursue and implement improvement initiatives. The outcome of the process is an ongoing win-win situation for both PanCanadian and its people. Employees are gaining more trust, eliminating job irritants, and enjoying their work in a team environment. The company is benefiting through increased production, improved safety and reduced operating expenses, thanks to the many innovative ideas introduced by employees. 4 refs

  4. Human Resource Development's Contribution to Continuous Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; Hyland, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Continuous Improvement (CI) is an approach to organizational change that requires active involvement of skilled and motivated employees, which implies an important role for HRD practitioners. The findings from a literature review and a survey of 168 Danish manufacturing companies indicate however...... that HRD is rarely integrated with CI. The paper contributes by offering a model that depicts how HR and HRD functions could be exploited to support successful CI development and implementation....

  5. Genetic improvement of tropical acacias: achievements and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential for genetic improvement in form traits and wood properties has also been demonstrated. Genetic improvement objectives must now give heavy weighting to improving disease resistance and tolerance. Ganoderma root rot and Ceratocystis stem wilt have destroyed large areas of acacia plantations in Indonesia ...

  6. Continuous Improvement in Action: Educators' Evidence Use for School Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannata, Marisa; Redding, Christopher; Rubin, Mollie

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the article is the process educators use to interpret data to turn it into usable knowledge (Honig & Coburn, 2008) while engaging in a continuous improvement process. The authors examine the types of evidence educators draw upon, its perceived relevance, and the social context in which the evidence is examined. Evidence includes…

  7. Improving Outcome Measures Other Than Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Anderson Moore

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Research indicates that educational, economic, and life success reflect children’s nonacademic as well as academic competencies. Therefore, longitudinal surveys that assess educational progress and success need to incorporate nonacademic measures to avoid omitted variable bias, inform development of new intervention strategies, and support mediating and moderating analyses. Based on a life course model and a whole child perspective, this article suggests constructs in the domains of child health, emotional/psychological development, educational achievement/attainment, social behavior, and social relationships. Four critical constructs are highlighted: self-regulation, agency/motivation, persistence/diligence, and executive functioning. Other constructs that are currently measured need to be retained, including social skills, positive relationships, activities, positive behaviors, academic self-efficacy, educational engagement, and internalizing/emotional well-being. Examples of measures that are substantively and psychometrically robust are provided.

  8. Continuous improvement: A win... win process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, T.; Wichert, A.

    1993-01-01

    Implementing a continuous improvement (CI) process within PanCanadian's oil and gas production operations might have been a simple assignment if one were not also trying to capture the hearts and imaginations of the people in a changing work environment. Meeting the challenge is resulting in big payoffs to both the organization and its people. The plan used within the Company's Production Division to successfully introduce the CI process is discussed. A brief insight is provided on the process philosophy, with emphasis placed on planning, training and coaching used to launch the process. Also reviewed at length are the impediments to change and the challenges faced when changing an organization's culture. In a CI work environment, the supervisor's traditional role changes from one of monitoring and controlling to one of inspiring, motivating and leading people by communicating a clear vision. Employees at all levels in the work environment are organized into teams and armed with a good working knowledge of the problem solving tools which allow them to pursue and implement improvement initiatives. The outcome of the process is an ongoing 'win-win' situation for both the Company and its people. Employees are gaining more trust, eliminating job irritants and enjoying their work more in a team environment. The Company is winning through increased production, improved safety and reduced operating expenses, thanks to many innovative ideas which the employees have implemented. 4 refs

  9. Achieving improved ohmic confinement via impurity injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessenrodt-Weberpals, M.; Soeldner, F.X.

    1991-01-01

    Improved Ohmic Confinement (IOC) was obtained in ASDEX after a modification of the divertors that allowed a larger (deuterium and impurity) backflow from the divertor chamber. The quality of IOC depended crucially on the wall conditions, i.e. IOC was best for uncovered stainless steels walls and vanished with boronization. Furthermore, IOC was found only in deuterium discharges. These circumstances led to the idea that IOC correlates with the content of light impurities in the plasma. To substantiate this working hypothesis, we present observations in deuterium discharges with boronized wall conditions into which various impurities have been injected with the aim to induce IOC conditions. Firstly, the plasma behaviour in typical IOC discharges is characterized. Secondly, injection experiments with the low-Z impurities nitrogen and neon as well as with the high-Z impurities argon and krypton are discussed. Then, we concentrate on optimized neon puffing that yields the best confinement results which are similar to IOC conditions. Finally, these results are compared with eperiments in other tokamaks and some conclusions are drawn about the effects of the impurity puffing on both, the central and the edge plasma behaviour. (orig.)

  10. How can we recognize continuous quality improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Lisa; Khodyakov, Dmitry; Hempel, Susanne; Danz, Margie; Salem-Schatz, Susanne; Foy, Robbie; O'Neill, Sean; Dalal, Siddhartha; Shekelle, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Continuous quality improvement (CQI) methods are foundational approaches to improving healthcare delivery. Publications using the term CQI, however, are methodologically heterogeneous, and labels other than CQI are used to signify relevant approaches. Standards for identifying the use of CQI based on its key methodological features could enable more effective learning across quality improvement (QI) efforts. The objective was to identify essential methodological features for recognizing CQI. Previous work with a 12-member international expert panel identified reliably abstracted CQI methodological features. We tested which features met rigorous a priori standards as essential features of CQI using a three-phase online modified-Delphi process. Primarily United States and Canada. 119 QI experts randomly assigned into four on-line panels. Participants rated CQI features and discussed their answers using online, anonymous and asynchronous discussion boards. We analyzed ratings quantitatively and discussion threads qualitatively. Main outcome measure(s) Panel consensus on definitional CQI features. /st> Seventy-nine (66%) panelists completed the process. Thirty-three completers self-identified as QI researchers, 18 as QI practitioners and 28 as both equally. The features 'systematic data guided activities,' 'designing with local conditions in mind' and 'iterative development and testing' met a priori standards as essential CQI features. Qualitative analyses showed cross-cutting themes focused on differences between QI and CQI. We found consensus among a broad group of CQI researchers and practitioners on three features as essential for identifying QI work more specifically as 'CQI.' All three features are needed as a minimum standard for recognizing CQI methods.

  11. Continual Improvement In Small Soaps Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borget Alfred Anoye

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper using quality management tools we track root causes and principal causes of the rising manufacturing cost of the bar soaps and propose solution to solve the problem. First we identify and analyze the roots causes of problem with the Fishbone Diagram. We use multivoting approach to reduce roots causes to main causes from which we identify classify and analyze principal causes using the Pareto Diagram. We then perform a deep analysis of these principal causes using the 5 whys analysis technique. Three principal causes were found amp61480high level of overtime poor machine performance and poor employees performanceamp61481 and were weighing 55 of the problem. For that reason working on these areas was necessary to address the problem of the rising manufacturing cost of the bar soaps. With the result we then use the PDCA 7 steps of TQM method to solve the problem of the rising manufacturing cost by testing whether expanding production capacity leads to performance improvements of these areas. We decide to expand production capacity by adding two more machine groups. Six months after implementation of the proposed solution the result shows an enhanced workload and schedule an increased production capacity an elimination of the overtime issue an increased machines performance and an improved workers performance. Two main savings were achieved as wage costs and maintenance costs. As a result while competitors bar soaps prices increased the company bar soaps price decreased by 50 making the company bar soaps more attractive on market as this performance permitted the company to apply price reduction at the retailer level.

  12. Continuous improvement projects: an authorship bibliometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Aleu, Fernando; Van Aken, Eileen M

    2017-06-12

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe the current research on hospital continuous improvement projects (CIPs) from an author characteristics' perspective. This work addresses the following questions: who are the predominant research authors in hospital CIPs? To what extent are the research communities collaborating in distinct research groups? How internationalized has hospital CIPs research become with respect to author location? Design/methodology/approach A systematic literature review was conducted, identifying 302 academic publications related to hospital CIPs. Publications were analyzed using: author, quantity, diversity, collaboration, and impact. Findings Hospital CIPs are increasingly attracting new scholars each year. Based on the authors' analysis, authors publishing in this area can be described as a relatively new international community given the countries represented. Originality/value This paper describes the current hospital CIP research by assessing author characteristics. Future work should examine additional attributes to characterize maturity such as how new knowledge is being created and to what extent new knowledge is being disseminated to practitioners.

  13. Organisational learning: A tool for continuous improvement of the organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, J. L.; Esteban, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    We are used to hear a success company in today's world is not possible unless a continuous improvement is developed. How can we be successful in the nuclear plant? We have to achieve safety for workers, people and environment in the first step, and for the second step availability and reliability for systems and components to avoid failure of components that could reduce availability. The aim is to search for new measures to reach this way. One of the improvements implemented in the plants to improve continuously was mainly Operating Experience activities, which was based in event analysis in the plants, causes identification, and to implement corrective actions. For External Operating Experience the aim was to learn from others to avoid occurrence of events in our plants. This was the lessons learned from Three Mile Island event. This was the learning process implemented so far, to get a continuous improvement. So far, the developed capabilities for process improvement follow the Operating Experience process that could be considered classical and will be revitalized nowadays. (Author)

  14. Achievements and trends of using induced mutations in crop improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichterlein, K.; Maluszynski, M.; ); Bohlmann, H.; Nielen, S.; )

    2000-01-01

    Mutation techniques have been employed for the genetic improvement of crops and ornamentals leading to the official release of more than 2200 improved varieties. Some of them have made a major impact on crop productivity and achieved great economic success. Induced mutations play an important role in plant genome research to understand the function of genes aiming to improve food security and diversity. (author)

  15. Case Studies in Continuous Process Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, A.

    1997-01-01

    This study focuses on improving the SMT assembly process in a low-volume, high-reliability environment with emphasis on fine pitch and BGA packages. Before a process improvement is carried out, it is important to evaluate where the process stands in terms of process capability.

  16. The Effect of School Improvement Planning on Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, David J.; Conway, James M.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the hypothesis that schools in Connecticut's Alliance Districts (lowest-performing districts) with higher-quality school improvement plans (SIPs) would have higher levels of student achievement. An exploratory research question evaluated whether SIPs predicted achievement of particular subgroups. SIPs were obtained and scored…

  17. A Health Care Project Management Office's Strategies for Continual Change and Continuous Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Aubry, Monique; Richer, Marie-Claire; Cyr, Guylaine

    Health care organizations need project and change management support in order to achieve successful transformations. A project management office (PMO) helps support the organizations through their transformations along with increasing their capabilities in project and change management. The aim of the present study was to extend understanding of the continuous improvement mechanisms used by PMOs and to describe PMO's strategies for continual change and continuous improvement in the context of major transformation in health care. This study is a descriptive case study design with interviews conducted from October to December 2015 with PMO's members (3 managers and 1 director) and 3 clients working with the PMO after a major redevelopment project ended (transition to the new facility). Participants suggested a number of elements including carefully selecting the members of the PMO, having a clear mandate for the PMO, having a method and a discipline at the same time as allowing openness and flexibility, clearly prioritizing projects, optimizing collaboration, planning for everything the PMO will need, not overlooking organizational culture, and retaining the existing support model. This study presents a number of factors ensuring the sustainability of changes.

  18. Improved specifications for continuous emission monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dene, C.E.; Eggleston, T.E.; Gray, W.C. Jr.; Bisha, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Continuous emission monitoring (CEM) in the electric utility industry historically has been plagued by poor performance and inconsistent system reliability. These problems have, in part, been caused by the complexity and diversity of the various systems available, and the dissimilarity of continuous emission monitors CEMs relative to conventional power plant instrumentation. Recognizing the problems faced by the utility industry in implementing CEM programs, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) initiated a multi-phase project to define the current state of technology for CEMs and to provide a comprehensive guide for the purchase and installation of a CEM system. The second phase of this project was the application of these guidelines to the actual purchase, installation, and operation of a CEM system for an electric utility generating station. Through this application of the guidelines it has been possible to determine further research needs and areas of the manual which require clarification or enhancement. This paper describes the development of the guidelines and modifications to the guidelines, and discusses EPRI's plans for future activities in the area of continuous emission monitoring

  19. Continuous improvement in teams : The (mis)fit between improvement and operational activities of improvement teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ros, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    Since the 1970s and 1980s, increasing attention has been paid to the Japanese ways of organising production. One of the subjects often discussed is the importance of continuous incremental improvements. Nowadays, for many organisations, continuous improvement has become an important topic; many

  20. Involving vendors in continuous quality improvement efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, M C

    1995-03-01

    In the hospital environment, vendors supply a wide range of items, from surgical sutures to the latest in high-cost technological equipment. Also, many clinical and support services, such as respiratory therapy, transcription, and computer databanks are now outsourced to commercial vendors. Interaction with such vendors is often less than satisfactory, with prolonged timelines and disruption of an important process that is being computerized. Although hospitals deal with very few vendors in long-term relationships, such as those seen in manufacturing, this should not preclude the formation of a supplier-customer relationship that goes beyond management's interaction with the sales representative in response to a request for proposal. This is especially true when a process improvement team has studied an internal process and defined a key quality characteristic.

  1. Continuing education for performance improvement: a creative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Patti-Ann; Hardesty, Ilana; White, Julie L; Zisblatt, Lara

    2012-10-01

    In an effort to improve patient safety and health care outcomes, continuing medical education has begun to focus on performance improvement initiatives for physician practices. Boston University School of Medicine's (BUSM) Continuing Nursing Education Accredited Provider Unit has begun a creative project to award nursing contact hours for nurses' participation in performance improvement activities. This column highlights its initial efforts. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. NOTE TAKING PAIRS TO IMPROVE STUDENTS‟ SENTENCE BASED WRITING ACHIEVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Testiana Deni Wijayatiningsih

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Students had skill to actualize their imagination and interpret their knowledge through writing which could be combined with good writing structure. Moreover, their writing skill still had low motivation and had not reached the standard writing structure. Based on the background above, this research has purpose to know the influence Note Taking Pairs in improving students‘sentence based writing achievement. The subject of this research was the second semester of English Department in Muhammadiyah University of Semarang. It also used statistic non parametric method to analyze the students‘ writing achievement. The result of this research showed that Note Taking Pairs strategy could improve students‘sentence based writing achievement. Hopefully this research is recommended into learning process to improve students‘writing skill especially in sentence-based writing subject.

  3. Continuous improvement of environmental aspect in Juzbado factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    ENUSA's Fuel Assembly Factory in Juzbado (Salamanca), conscious of its responsibilities with the environment where its activities are carried out, has an Environmental Management System (EMS) certified by AENOR (N. CGM-99/31) according to the requirements of Standard UNE E N-ISO 14001 and afterwards, as a result of compromise with continuous improvement of its environmental performance, joined the European Regulation 761/2001(EMAS), which has allowed the EMS to achieve levels of excellence in environmental management, doing it in a much more transparent and participative way and letting the public and other interested parts to have access to the information referring its environmental activities, as demanded by society, by the elaboration and verification of an Environmental Statement (VDM-03/010) on a yearly basis. (Author)

  4. La Hague Continuous Improvement Program: Enhancement of the Vitrification Throughput

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitjean, V.; De Vera, R.; Hollebecque, J.F.; Tronche, E.; Flament, T.; Pereira Mendes, F.; Prod'homme, A.

    2006-01-01

    The vitrification of high-level liquid waste produced from nuclear fuel reprocessing has been carried out industrially for over 25 years by AREVA/COGEMA, with two main objectives: containment of the long lived fission products and reduction of the final volume of waste. At the 'La Hague' plant, in the 'R7' and 'T7' facilities, vitrified waste is obtained by first evaporating and calcining the nitric acid feed solution-containing fission products in calciners. The product-named calcinate- is then fed together with glass frit into induction-heated metallic melters to produce the so-called R7/T7 glass, well known for its excellent containment properties. Both facilities are equipped with three processing lines. In the near future the increase of the fuel burn-up will influence the amount of fission product solutions to be processed at R7/T7. As a consequence, in order to prepare these changes, it is necessary to feed the calciner at higher flow-rates. Consistent and medium-term R and D programs led by CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission, the AREVA/COGEMA's R and D and R and T provider), AREVA/COGEMA (Industrial Operator) and AREVA/SGN (AREVA/COGEMA's Engineering), and associated to the industrial feed back of AREVA/COGEMA operations, have allowed continuous improvement of the process since 1998: - The efficiency and limitation of the equipment have been studied and solutions for technological improvements have been proposed whenever necessary, - The increase of the feeding flow-rate has been implemented on the improved CEA test rig (so called PEV, Evolutional Prototype of Vitrification) and adapted by AREVA/SGN for the La Hague plant using their modeling studies; the results obtained during this test confirmed the technological and industrial feasibility of the improvements achieved, - After all necessary improved equipments have been implemented in R7/T7 facilities, and a specific campaign has been performed on the R7 facility by AREVA/COGEMA. The flow-rate to the

  5. CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT PRACTICE IN LARGE ENTERPRISES: STUDY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Stadnicka

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Continuous improvement is indispensable for ensuring the company's development and its survival on the constantly changing global market. Continuous improvement is particularly important in the quality and production management systems. A company should deliver a product compliant with a client's requirements in a specified time and at an appropriate price. That is why, continuous improvement refers to different areas of an organization's functioning and it is an integral part of Lean Manufacturing. This article presents the results of the study conducted in production enterprises on a limited area. The aim of the study was the assessment of the implementation of continuous improvement in Lean Manufacturing, and, in particular, employees' involvement in the problem identification and in reporting improvements as well as the way of motivating employees to involve themselves. The authors also tried to identify the factors influencing the elements of a continuous improvement system.

  6. AEL Continuous School Improvement Questionnaire. User Manual and Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Merrill L.; Cowley, Kimberly S.; Craig, James R.; Balow, Nancy; Childers, Robert D.

    The Continuous School Improvement Questionnaire (CSIQ) developed by the AEL helps a school staff gauge its performance on six dimensions related to continuous school improvement. Each member of the staff responds to the CSIQ individually. Although results might be used at the district or regional level, the most widely intended unit for applying…

  7. Continuous Improvement and its Barriers in Electrical and Electronic Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Md Fauzi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous improvement is one of the core strategies for manufacturing excellent and it is considered vital in today’s business environment. Continuous improvement is an important factor in TQM implementation. However, manufacturers in Electrical and Electronic Industry is facing variety of challenges such as, time constraint, quality issue, headcount issue, human issue and competition in domestic as well as the global market. This paper presents total quality management practices in Electrical and Electronic (EE Industry. These manufacturers have to keep improving in key activities and processes to cope the challenges. Therefore, EE industry realize the importance of continuous improvement in helping the industries by setting clear goals and priorities for the area of improvement. The aims of this study are to determine the main factor in implementing continuous improvement practices, identify tools of continuous improvement that have been used and their obstacle in implementing continuous improvement practices. 200 questionnaires had been distributed to the employees in Electrical and Electronic Industry located at Bayan Lepas, Penang, Malaysia. A total of 41 questionnaires were answered which represented about 20.5% response rates. Survey result shows that teamwork and training and learning are respectively the importance factor and the most practices factor in Electrical and Electronic Industry. Most of the Electrical and Electronic Industry emphasis is on using Lean Manufacturing as the tool of continuous improvement practices. Besides that, Electrical and Electronic Industry faced the problems of lack of budget and lack of worker commitment.

  8. Behaviour and school achievement in patients with early and continuously treated phenylketonuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stemerdink, B.A.; Kalverboer, A.F.; Meere, J.J. van der; Molen, M.W. van der; Huisman, J.; Jong, L.W.A. de; Slijper, F.M.E.; Verkerk, P.H.; Spronsen, F.J. van

    2000-01-01

    Thirty patients with early and continuously treated phenylketonuria (PKU) between 8 and 20 years of age were compared with 30 controls, matched individually for age, sex, and educational level of both parents, on behaviour rating scales for parents and teachers as well as a school achievement scale.

  9. Applying lean principles to achieve continuous flow in 3PLs’ outbound processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overboom, M.A.; Small, J.S.; Naus, A.J.A.M.; de Haan, J.A.C.

    2013-01-01

    The article offers information on the application of lean principles to achieve continuous flow in third party logistics providers (3PLs). It mentions that lean management principles and practices have been traditionally applied to manufacturing systems and try to make products flow through the

  10. Continuous improvement of the MHTGR safety and competitive performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichenberg, T.W.; Etzel, K.T.; Mascaro, L.L.; Rucker, R.A.

    1992-05-01

    An increase in reactor module power from 350 to 450 MW(t) would markedly improve the economics of the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR). The higher power level was recommended as the result of an in-depth cost reduction study undertaken to compete with the declining price of fossil fuel. The safety assessment confirms that the high level of safety, which relies on inherent characteristics and passive features, is maintained at the elevated power level. Preliminary systems, nuclear, and safety performance results are discussed for the recommended 450 MW(t) design. Optimization of plant parameters and design modifications accommodated the operation of the steam generator and circulator at the higher power level. Events in which forced cooling is lost, designated as conduction cooldowns are described in detail. For the depressurized conduction cooldown, without full helium inventory, peak fuel temperatures are significantly lowered. A more negative temperature coefficient of reactivity was achieved while maintaining an adequate fuel cycle and reactivity control. Continual improvement of the MHTGR delivers competitive performance without relinquishing the high safety margins demanded of the next generation of power plants

  11. 2003 Stewardship progress report : committed to continuous improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-12-01

    The stewardship initiative is a mandatory requirement for members of the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP). It involves performance management and benchmarking, voluntary audits and verification, as well as training and improved communication inside and outside the industry. This fourth annual progress report describes the environment, health, safety and socio-economic stewardship initiative. This report presents an aggregate of industry performance. Stewardship of Excellence awards were presented in 2003, celebrating outstanding performance by members who demonstrated their commitment to responsible development and continuous improvement within a business framework. The awards were presented in three categories, namely environment, health and safety, and socio-economic. Northrock Resources was presented with the award in the environment category for its voluntary waste gas reduction. The health and safety recognition went to Burlington Resources Canada Ltd. for superior office ergonomics, while the award in the socio-economic category was presented to Suncor Energy Inc. for Aboriginal business development. A brief overview of the achievements of each of these three companies was presented. tabs., figs.

  12. Can Schools Meet the Promise of Continuous Improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgart, Mark A.

    2018-01-01

    Continuous improvement is "an embedded behavior within the culture of a school that constantly focuses on the conditions, processes, and practices that will improve teaching and learning." The phrase has been part of the lexicon of school improvement for decades, but real progress is rare. Based on its observations of about 5,000…

  13. Continuous Improvement Implementation in the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust: A Case Study of a Continuous Improvement Programme & Project

    OpenAIRE

    Velzen, Jeena

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims at identifying the extent to which the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust has fulfilled literature requirements for successful continuous improvement as exemplified by its Better for You programme and chemotherapy service improvement project. Both the theory and ideals of the continuous improvement programme, along with the actualization of these philosophies and methodologies in the context of the particular project,were compared against a framework for the enabling...

  14. A model for continuous improvement at a South African minerals benefication plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ras, Eugene Ras

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available South Africa has a variety of mineral resources, and several minerals beneficiation plants are currently in operation. These plants must be operated effectively to ensure that the end-users of its products remain internationally competitive. To achieve this objective, plants need a sustainable continuous improvement programme. Several frameworks for continuous improvement are used, with variable success rates, in beneficiation plants around the world. However, none of these models specifically addresses continuous improvement from a minerals-processing point of view. The objective of this research study was to determine which factors are important for a continuous improvement model at a minerals beneficiation plant, and to propose a new model using lean manufacturing, six sigma, and the theory of constraints. A survey indicated that managers in the industry prefer a model that combines various continuous improvement models.

  15. The soul of the machine: continual improvement in ISO 14001

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, M.A.C.; van Koppen, C.S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Continual improvement is a key component of ISO 14001, but in contrast to most other specifications in the standard, it is difficult to assess. Based on interviews with 19 certified companies in the chemical, food, and environmental services sectors, this article explores the dynamics of continual

  16. The soul of the machine: continual improvement in ISO 14001.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, M.A.C.; Koppen, van C.S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Continual improvement is a key component of ISO 14001, but in contrast to most other specifications in the standard, it is difficult to assess. Based on interviews with 19 certified companies in the chemical, food, and environmental services sectors, this article explores the dynamics of continual

  17. Continuous improvement and the mini-company concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leede, Jan; Looise, Jan C.

    1999-01-01

    The key issue of continuous improvement (CI) seems to be the problem of combining extensive employee involvement with market orientation and continuation of CI. In this article we review some existing organisational designs for CI on these three essential characteristics of CI. As an alternative to

  18. Continuous Improvement and its Barriers in Electrical and Electronic Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Md Fauzi; Yan Toh Li; Wei Chan Shiau; Aizat Ahmad Ahmad Nur; Raja Mohd Rasi Raja Zuraidah; Abdul Rahman Nor Aida; Muhd Nor Nik Hisyamudin; Hassan Mohd Fahrul; Hashim Fatan Adibah

    2017-01-01

    Continuous improvement is one of the core strategies for manufacturing excellent and it is considered vital in today’s business environment. Continuous improvement is an important factor in TQM implementation. However, manufacturers in Electrical and Electronic Industry is facing variety of challenges such as, time constraint, quality issue, headcount issue, human issue and competition in domestic as well as the global market. This paper presents total quality management practices in Electric...

  19. The program of continuous improvements in factory in Juzbado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto, M.

    2015-01-01

    This articles describes the historical development of the continuous improvement program at Juzbado Factory, since its beginning to nowadays. The evolution throughout the ideas of Total Quality, ISO, EFQM, Six Sigma, and so on, leading to the present situation in which all these tools and methodologies live together is shown. all this has led to a philosophy and business culture focused on safety, quality and continuous improvement. (Author)

  20. Continuous quality improvement in the ambulatory endoscopy center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, John F

    2002-04-01

    What does quality assessment have to do with the practicing gastroenterologist? Why should one spend the time and effort to incorporate CQI activities into an already busy practice? First and foremost, quality improvement should directly benefit the patient by ensuring that they receive the highest quality of care possible. For example, comparing endoscopic use or outcomes, such as procedure success or complications, with national standards or other endoscopists in the same community may identify physicians who could benefit from additional training. Similar analyses may likewise identify outstanding physicians who might serve as resources for other physicians. Surveys of patient satisfaction may reveal deficiencies, which might be unknown to a physician who is otherwise technically excellent; deficiencies that would never have been uncovered by traditional measures of quality. Second, applying the techniques of CQI to study one's own practice can provide a competitive edge when vying for managed care or corporate contracts. In this regard, CQI can be used to document physician or practice performance through tracking of endoscopic use, procedure success and complication rates, and patient satisfaction. Finally, the rising concern among various patient advocacy groups has led to an increased emphasis on quality improvement, and in most cases it is a required activity as part of the accreditation process. Steps to quality improvement There is more to quality improvement than simply selecting and implementing a performance improvement plan. A number of steps have been suggested to achieve fundamental improvement in the quality of medical care [3]. The first is to use outcomes management for improvement rather than for judgment. One of the major criticisms of QA is that it will be used to judge physicians providing care. It is feared that CQI will be used to identify poor performers who will then be punished. This strategy leads to fear and inhibits an honest pursuit

  1. Improving preschoolers' mathematics achievement with tablets: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schacter, John; Jo, Booil

    2017-09-01

    With a randomized field experiment of 433 preschoolers, we tested a tablet mathematics program designed to increase young children's mathematics learning. Intervention students played Math Shelf, a comprehensive iPad preschool and year 1 mathematics app, while comparison children received research-based hands-on mathematics instruction delivered by their classroom teachers. After 22 weeks, there was a large and statistically significant effect on mathematics achievement for Math Shelf students (Cohen's d = .94). Moderator analyses demonstrated an even larger effect for low achieving children (Cohen's d = 1.27). These results suggest that early education teachers can improve their students' mathematics outcomes by integrating experimentally proven tablet software into their daily routines.

  2. Online formative tests linked to microlectures improving academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwmeester, Rianne A M; de Kleijn, Renske A M; Freriksen, Astrid W M; van Emst, Maarten G; Veeneklaas, Rob J; van Hoeij, Maggy J W; Spinder, Matty; Ritzen, Magda J; Ten Cate, Olle Th J; van Rijen, Harold V M

    2013-12-01

    Online formative tests (OFTs) are powerful tools to direct student learning behavior, especially when enriched with specific feedback. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of OFTs enriched with hyperlinks to microlectures on examination scores. OFTs, available one week preceding each midterm and the final exams, could be used voluntarily. The use of OFTs was related to scores on midterm and final exams using ANOVA, with prior academic achievement as a covariate. On average, 74% of all students used the online formative tests (OFT+) while preparing for the summative midterm exam. OFT+ students obtained significantly higher grades compared to OFT-students, both without and with correction for previous academic achievement. Two out of three final exam scores did not significantly improve. Students using online formative tests linked to microlectures receive higher grades especially in highly aligned summative tests.

  3. Improving pediatric immunization rates: description of a resident-led clinical continuous quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kyle Bradford; Gren, Lisa H; Backman, Richard

    2014-09-01

    Increased emphasis is being placed on the continuous quality improvement (CQI) education of residents of all specialties. This article describes a resident-led continuous quality improvement (CQI) project, based on a novel curriculum, to improve the immunization rates of children under 2 years old at the Madsen Family Health Center (MHC). All third-year residents were trained in the FOCUS-PDSA CQI methodology through concurrent didactic lectures and experience leading the CQI team. The CQI team included clinical staff led by a third-year family medicine resident and mentored by a member of the family medicine faculty. Immunization records were distributed to provider-medical assistant teamlets daily for each pediatric patient scheduled in clinic as the intervention. Compliance with the intervention (process measure), as well as immunization rates at 2 and 5 months post-intervention (outcome measure), were monitored. Immunization records were printed on 84% of clinic days from October 24, 2011 to March 31, 2012. The percentage of patients immunized at baseline was 66%. The percentage immunized as of December 31, 2011 was 96% and was 91% as of March 31, 2012. An important educational experience was organized for third-year family medicine residents through learning CQI skills, leading a CQI team, and directing a CQI project to completion. Significant improvement in the percentage of patients under 2 years old immunized at the MHC was achieved by presenting provider-medical assistant teamlets with immunization records of all pediatric patients on the daily clinic schedule.

  4. Implications of Continuous Quality Improvement for Program Evaluation and Evaluators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Melvin M.; Pines, Edward

    1995-01-01

    Explores the implications that continuous quality improvement (CQI) programs are likely to have for evaluation. CQI, often known as total quality management, offers a structured approach to the analysis of an organization's processes and improvement that should provide advantages to evaluators once they have gained experience with the approach.…

  5. Continuous Improvement in Schools and Districts: Policy Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Jane; Dunlap, Allison

    2014-01-01

    Discussions about improving public education often focus on outcomes without considering how schools and districts can accomplish those outcomes. Research shows that using a continuous improvement process has proven successful in healthcare, manufacturing, and technology, and may hold potential for use in education as well. This brief defines and…

  6. Closing the Loop on a Continuous Program Improvement Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Vickie; Booth, Larry

    2010-01-01

    The WebBSIT, a Bachelor of Science in Information Technology, is a fully online degree offered through a consortium of five University System of Georgia institutions. This paper begins by summarizing the change management system developed for continuous program improvement. Analysis of data should drive improvement, closing the loop. The balance…

  7. Creating a Cycle of Continuous Improvement through Instructional Rounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Looze, Catherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Instructional Rounds is a continuous improvement strategy that focuses on the technical core of educational systems as well as educators collaborating side-by-side. Concentrating on collective learning, this process only makes sense within an overall strategy of improvement. This case study examined the Instructional Rounds process in a northern…

  8. The Keys to Effective Schools: Educational Reform as Continuous Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Willis D., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Working in tandem with the powerful National Education Association's KEYS initiative (Keys to Excellence in Your Schools), this second edition focuses on how to change a school's organizational structure and culture to improve the quality of teaching and learning. Each chapter, revised and updated to address continuous improvement and narrowing…

  9. Continuous Improvement in Nursing Education through Total Quality Management (TQM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Wai Mun

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Total Quality Management (TQM has generally been validated as a crucial revolution in the management field. Many academicians believe that the concept of TQM is applicable to academics and provides guiding principles towards improving education. Therefore, an increasing number of educational institutions such as schools, colleges and universities have started to embrace TQM philosophies to their curricula.Within the context of TQM, this paper would explore the concept of continuous improvement by using the Deming philosophy. Subsequently, this paper would elaborate on the application of TQM to bring about continuous improvement in the current education system.

  10. Continuous quality improvement in nephrology: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Julie Wright; Seagull, F Jacob; Rao, Panduranga; Segal, Jonathan H; Mani, Nandita S; Heung, Michael

    2016-11-24

    Continuous quality improvement (CQI) has been successfully applied in business and engineering for over 60 years. While using CQI techniques within nephrology has received increased attention, little is known about where, and with what measure of success, CQI can be attributed to improving outcomes within nephrology care. This is particularly important as payors' focus on value-based healthcare and reimbursement is tied to achieving quality improvement thresholds. We conducted a systematic review of CQI applications in nephrology. Studies were identified from PubMed, MEDLINE, Scopus, Web of Science, CINAHL, Google Scholar, ProQuest Dissertation Abstracts and sources of grey literature (i.e., available in print/electronic format but not controlled by commercial publishers) between January 1, 2004 and October 13, 2014. We developed a systematic evaluation protocol and pre-defined criteria for review. All citations were reviewed by two reviewers with disagreements resolved by consensus. We initially identified 468 publications; 40 were excluded as duplicates or not available/not in English. An additional 352 did not meet criteria for full review due to: 1. Not meeting criteria for inclusion = 196 (e.g., reviews, news articles, editorials) 2. Not nephrology-specific = 153, 3. Only available as abstracts = 3. Of 76 publications meeting criteria for full review, the majority [45 (61%)] focused on ESRD care. 74% explicitly stated use of specific CQI tools in their methods. The highest number of publications in a given year occurred in 2011 with 12 (16%) articles. 89% of studies were found in biomedical and allied health journals and most studies were performed in North America (52%). Only one was randomized and controlled although not blinded. Despite calls for healthcare reform and funding to inspire innovative research, we found few high quality studies either rigorously evaluating the use of CQI in nephrology or reporting best practices. More rigorous

  11. Teacher Tweets Improve Achievement for Eighth Grade Science Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Van Vooren

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the Digital Age teachers have fallen far behind the technical skills of their "digital native" students. The implementation of technology as a tool for classroom communication is foreign for most teachers, but highly preferred by students. While teenagers are using Facebook, Twitter, and other social networks to communicate, teachers continue to respond through face-to-face conversations, telephone calls, and email messaging. Twitter, a platform for short message service text, is an online social network site that allows users to send and receive messages using 140 characters or less called Tweets. To analyze the relationship of the teacher's use of Twitter with student academic achievement, a correlation study conducted by Bess collected data from two matched samples of eighth grade science students: one utilizing Twitter and one not utilizing Twitter to reinforce classroom instruction. Two tests matching the science standards were given to both samples of students. The results of the tests were used as primary data. The findings suggested a positive correlation between the use of Twitter and student performance on the standardized tests. Implications for this study indicate that young teenagers may prefer Twitter as a mode of communication with their teacher, resulting in higher academic achievement in a middle school science class.

  12. STUDENT TEAMS-ACHIEVEMENT DIVISION TO IMPROVE STUDENTS’ WRITING SKILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Wahyuni

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Acquiring writing skill needs a lot of practices, and to produce a piece of writing needs a long process; hence, the appropriate method of the teaching and learning is very important to help students master writing skill. This article aims at reporting a research on the implementation of Student Teams-Achievement Division (STAD as an alternative teaching method to improve students’ writing skill. Through Classroom Action Research design, the researcher did the research at fourth semester students of English Education study program of STAIN Kediri in academic year 2012-1013. The research procedures are planning, implementing, observing, and reflecting. The findings show that the implementation of STAD can improve the students’ writing skill which were indicated by the high percentage of the students’ active involvement and positive response on the implementation, and the students’ product of writing in which all of writing components can achieve good level in marking scheme as the minimum level.

  13. The continuous improvement process and ergonomics in ultrasound department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffin, Carolyn T

    2013-01-01

    Continuous improvement processes, such as Lean, Six Sigma and Quality Control Circles, have been implemented in the manufacturing industries in an effort to increase productivity, eliminate waste, and engage employees in problem solving. These processes can be adapted to the healthcare sector as medical facilities strive to improve the patient experience, increase financial returns, and improve worker safety and morale. In the ultrasound department, productivity can be improved and the quality of patient care can be ensured by standardizing exam protocols and decreasing work related musculoskeletal disorders among sonography professionals. This article summarizes the more commonly used continuous improvement processes and provides a description of how one method might be applied to the ultrasound department.

  14. Measure to succeed: How to improve employee participation in continuous improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurburg, M.; Viles, E.; Tanco, M.; Mateo, R.; Lleó, A.

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: Achieving employee participation in continuous improvement (CI) systems is considered as one of the success factors for the sustainability of those systems. Yet, it is also very difficult to obtain because of the interaction of many critical factors that affect employee participation. Therefore, finding ways of measuring all these critical factors can help practitioners manage the employee participation process accordingly. Design/methodology/approach: Based upon the existing literature, this paper presents a 4-Phase (9 steps) diagnostic tool to measure the main determinants associated with the implementation of CI systems affecting employee participation in improvement activities. Findings: The tool showed its usefulness to detect the main weaknesses and improvement opportunities for improving employee participation in CI through the application in two different cases. Practical implications: This diagnostic tool could be particularly interesting for companies adopting CI and other excellence frameworks, which usually include a pillar related to people development inside the organization, but do not include tools to diagnose the state of this pillar. Originality/value: This diagnostic tool presents a user’s perspective approach, ensuring that the weaknesses and improvement opportunities detected during the diagnose come directly from the users of the CI system, which in this case are the employees themselves. Given that the final objective is to identify reasons and problems hindering employee participation, adopting this user’s perspective approach seem more relevant than adopting other more traditional approaches, based on gathering information from the CI system itself or from the CI managers.

  15. Measure to succeed: How to improve employee participation in continuous improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurburg, M.; Viles, E.; Tanco, M.; Mateo, R.; Lleó, A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Achieving employee participation in continuous improvement (CI) systems is considered as one of the success factors for the sustainability of those systems. Yet, it is also very difficult to obtain because of the interaction of many critical factors that affect employee participation. Therefore, finding ways of measuring all these critical factors can help practitioners manage the employee participation process accordingly. Design/methodology/approach: Based upon the existing literature, this paper presents a 4-Phase (9 steps) diagnostic tool to measure the main determinants associated with the implementation of CI systems affecting employee participation in improvement activities. Findings: The tool showed its usefulness to detect the main weaknesses and improvement opportunities for improving employee participation in CI through the application in two different cases. Practical implications: This diagnostic tool could be particularly interesting for companies adopting CI and other excellence frameworks, which usually include a pillar related to people development inside the organization, but do not include tools to diagnose the state of this pillar. Originality/value: This diagnostic tool presents a user’s perspective approach, ensuring that the weaknesses and improvement opportunities detected during the diagnose come directly from the users of the CI system, which in this case are the employees themselves. Given that the final objective is to identify reasons and problems hindering employee participation, adopting this user’s perspective approach seem more relevant than adopting other more traditional approaches, based on gathering information from the CI system itself or from the CI managers.

  16. Matrix Wings: Continuous Process Improvement an Operator Can Love

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    key processes in our normal operations. In addition to the almost inevitable resistance to change, one of the points of pushback is that members of...Fall 2016 | 9 Matrix Wings Continuous Process Improvement an Operator Can Love Dr. A. J. Briding, Colonel, USAF, Retired Disclaimer: The views and...Operations for the 21st Century (AFSO21), the latest comprehensive effort at finding the right ap- proach for implementing a continuous process

  17. Agile kaizen managing continuous improvement far beyond retrospectives

    CERN Document Server

    Medinilla, Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Agile teams have been struggling with the concept of continuous improvement since the first Agile frameworks were developed, and still very little has been written about the practice of continuous improvement in Agile environments. Although team retrospectives have been prescribed and some practices have been introduced in order to implement and facilitate them, the truth is that most Agile teams are conducting dull retrospectives that end with a list of things that have been done wrong, just to repeat the same list two weeks later at the next meeting.Instead of listing hundreds of Japanese-la

  18. Continuous improvement comparison between Danish and Mexican companies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Bøhm

    2004-01-01

    This article investigates continuous improvement tools that are used in two countries on two continents. For that purpose two surveys were conducted in the metropolitan area of Mexico City and in Denmark using the same scales and having about the same sample size. The continuous improvement tools...... comprise such concepts as TQM, Kaizen, Six Sigma and Lean Manufacturing. The paper shows the results of the analysis and a comparison of how and to what degree such tools are used in different places, which allow us to address similarities and dissimilarities of the application. The results are discussed...

  19. Concept Evaluation Using the PDSA Cycle for Continuous Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverentz, Delois Meyer; Kumm, Sharon

    As concept-based nursing education gains popularity, there is little literature on how to sustain quality after initiation of the curriculum. Critical appraisal of concepts in a university program revealed varying definitions, attributes, and exemplars resulting in student confusion. The Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) cycle for continuous quality improvement was used for concept evaluation. The goals of the evaluation project were: 1) to develop common definition and attributes for concepts and 2) to develop horizontal and vertical leveling of exemplars to build on prior student learning. The continuous quality improvement process can be used to prevent "concept creep" and ensure internal consistency of concept definitions, attributes, and exemplars.

  20. Design of launch systems using continuous improvement process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard W.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify a systematic process for improving ground operations for future launch systems. This approach is based on the Total Quality Management (TQM) continuous improvement process. While the continuous improvement process is normally identified with making incremental changes to an existing system, it can be used on new systems if they use past experience as a knowledge base. In the case of the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), the Space Shuttle operations provide many lessons. The TQM methodology used for this paper will be borrowed from the United States Air Force 'Quality Air Force' Program. There is a general overview of the continuous improvement process, with concentration on the formulation phase. During this phase critical analyses are conducted to determine the strategy and goals for the remaining development process. These analyses include analyzing the mission from the customers point of view, developing an operations concept for the future, assessing current capabilities and determining the gap to be closed between current capabilities and future needs and requirements. A brief analyses of the RLV, relative to the Space Shuttle, will be used to illustrate the concept. Using the continuous improvement design concept has many advantages. These include a customer oriented process which will develop a more marketable product and a better integration of operations and systems during the design phase. But, the use of TQM techniques will require changes, including more discipline in the design process and more emphasis on data gathering for operational systems. The benefits will far outweigh the additional effort.

  1. Continuous quality improvement program for hip and knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Deborah A; Christiansen, Tanya; Smith, Christopher; Squire Howden, Jane; Werle, Jason; Faris, Peter; Frank, Cy

    2015-01-01

    Improving quality of care and maximizing efficiency are priorities in hip and knee replacement, where surgical demand and costs increase as the population ages. The authors describe the integrated structure and processes from the Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) Program for Hip and Knee Replacement Surgical Care and summarize lessons learned from implementation. The Triple Aim framework and 6 dimensions of quality care are overarching constructs of the CQI program. A validated, evidence-based clinical pathway that measures quality across the continuum of care was adopted. Working collaboratively, multidisciplinary experts embedded the CQI program into everyday practices in clinics across Alberta. Currently, 83% of surgeons participate in the CQI program, representing 95% of the total volume of hip and knee surgeries. Biannual reports provide feedback to improve care processes, infrastructure planning, and patient outcomes. CQI programs evaluating health care services inform choices to optimize care and improve efficiencies through continuous knowledge translation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Jump starting of continuous improvement through self-assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; Boer, Harry; Gertsen, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The innumerable accounts of successful implementation of kaizen in Japan during more than 40 years has led to the expectation that continuous improvement (CI) might offer companies a means to gain and maintain a competitive advantage in the turbulent 1980s and 1990s. However, the majority of CI i...

  3. From Continuous Improvement to Organisational Learning: Developmental Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Peter; Chapman, Ross

    2003-01-01

    Explores continuous improvement methods, which underlie total quality management, finding barriers to implementation in practice that are related to a one-dimensional approach. Suggests a multiple, unbounded learning cycle, a holistic approach that includes adaptive learning, learning styles, generative learning, and capability development.…

  4. Sustainable production. The ultimate result of a continuous improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ron, de A.J.

    1998-01-01

    To fulfil market requirements, companies have introduced cost awareness, quality programs and techniques to become flexible. These items should be handled as a continuous process of improvement. The cost awareness implies that e.g. material waste is avoided during production, the quality programs

  5. Promoting Continuous Quality Improvement in Online Teaching: The META Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmar, Eileen; McCracken, Holly

    2012-01-01

    Experienced e-learning faculty members share strategies for implementing a comprehensive postsecondary faculty development program essential to continuous improvement of instructional skills. The high-impact META Model (centered around Mentoring, Engagement, Technology, and Assessment) promotes information sharing and content creation, and fosters…

  6. Infrastructure under construction: continuous improvement and learning in projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieskes, J.F.B.; ten Broeke, André M.

    2000-01-01

    Continuous improvement and learning are popular concepts in management literature and practice. Often they are situated in an environment where the work is of a repetitive nature. However, there are a lot of organisations where (part of) the primary processes are carried out by means of projects. An

  7. Continuous restraint control systems: safety improvement for various occupants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, E. van der; Jager, B. de; Veldpaus, F.; Steinbuch, M.; Nunen, E. van; Willemsen, D.

    2009-01-01

    Occupant safety can be significantly improved by continuous restraint control systems. These restraint systems adjust their configuration during the impact according to the actual operating conditions, such as occupant size, weight, occupant position, belt usage and crash severity. In this study,

  8. Lean management systems: creating a culture of continuous quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David M; Silvester, Kate; Knowles, Simon

    2013-08-01

    This is the first in a series of articles describing the application of Lean management systems to Laboratory Medicine. Lean is the term used to describe a principle-based continuous quality improvement (CQI) management system based on the Toyota production system (TPS) that has been evolving for over 70 years. Its origins go back much further and are heavily influenced by the work of W Edwards Deming and the scientific method that forms the basis of most quality management systems. Lean has two fundamental elements--a systematic approach to process improvement by removing waste in order to maximise value for the end-user of the service and a commitment to respect, challenge and develop the people who work within the service to create a culture of continuous improvement. Lean principles have been applied to a growing number of Healthcare systems throughout the world to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of services for patients and a number of laboratories from all the pathology disciplines have used Lean to shorten turnaround times, improve quality (reduce errors) and improve productivity. Increasingly, models used to plan and implement large scale change in healthcare systems, including the National Health Service (NHS) change model, have evidence-based improvement methodologies (such as Lean CQI) as a core component. Consequently, a working knowledge of improvement methodology will be a core skill for Pathologists involved in leadership and management.

  9. Building a Culture of Continuous Quality Improvement in an Academic Radiology Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzman, Gregory L; Paushter, David M

    2016-04-01

    As we enter a new era of health care in the United States, radiologists must be adequately prepared to prove, and continually improve, our value to our customers. This goal can be achieved in large part by providing high-quality services. Although quality efforts on the national and international levels provide a framework for improving radiologic quality, some of the greatest opportunities for quality improvement can be found at the departmental level, through the implementation of total quality management programs. Establishing such a program requires not only strong leadership and employee engagement, but also a firm understanding of the multiple total quality management tools and continuous quality improvement strategies available. In this article, we discuss key tools and strategies required to build a culture of continuous quality improvement in an academic department, based on our experience. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Continuous improvement in manufacturing and inspection of fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domingon, A.; Ruiz, R.

    2015-01-01

    The manufacturing and inspection process of fuel assemblies in ENUSA is characterized by its robustness acquired over the last thirty years of experience in manufacturing. The reliability of these processes is based on a qualified processes and continuous improvement in the design and upgrading of equipment and optimization of software and manufacturing processes. Additionally, management and quality control systems have been improved in both software and measuring business objectives. this article emphasizes the improvements made over the past five years in management, production and inspection of fuel assemblies. (Author)

  11. Applying PPM to ERP Maintenance and Continuous Improvement Initiatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Tal, Nada Maria; Fonnesbæk, Majbrit; Kræmmergaard, Pernille

    2006-01-01

    to gain business benefits from the systems. However the ERP literature on how to do this is limited. The purpose of this article is to explore how Project Portfolio Management (PPM) from the Research and Development (R&D) literature can be applied to an ERP second wave context, when companies...... are to prioritize and select maintenance and continuous improvement initiatives. This is done by reviewing the existing literature in the fields of PPM from R&D literature and then by reviewing the existing literature about maintenance and improvement initiatives in the ERP literature, after which the two...... are compared and discussed using three case-studies. The paper contributes with a discussion on how PPM from R&D can be applied to maintenance and continuous improvement initiatives in the second wave of ERP. The paper ends with arguing that emphasis needs to be given to this field, since a conscious...

  12. Strategy for continuous improvement in IC manufacturability, yield, and reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreier, Dean J.; Berry, Mark; Schani, Phil; Phillips, Michael; Steinberg, Joe; DePinto, Gary

    1993-01-01

    Continual improvements in yield, reliability and manufacturability measure a fab and ultimately result in Total Customer Satisfaction. A new organizational and technical methodology for continuous defect reduction has been established in a formal feedback loop, which relies on yield and reliability, failed bit map analysis, analytical tools, inline monitoring, cross functional teams and a defect engineering group. The strategy requires the fastest detection, identification and implementation of possible corrective actions. Feedback cycle time is minimized at all points to improve yield and reliability and reduce costs, essential for competitiveness in the memory business. Payoff was a 9.4X reduction in defectivity and a 6.2X improvement in reliability of 256 K fast SRAMs over 20 months.

  13. IMHEX fuel cell repeat component manufacturing continuous improvement accomplishments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakaitis, L.A.; Petraglia, V.J.; Bryson, E.S. [M-C Power Corp., Burr Ridge, IL (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    M-C Power is taking a power generation technology that has been proven in the laboratory and is making it a commercially competitive product. There are many areas in which this technology required scale up and refinement to reach the market entry goals for the IMHEX{reg_sign} molten carbonate fuel cell power plant. One of the primary areas that needed to be addressed was the manufacturing of the fuel cell stack. Up to this point, the fuel cell stack and associated components were virtually hand made for each system to be tested. M-C Power has now continuously manufactured the repeat components for three 250 kW stacks. M-C Power`s manufacturing strategy integrated both evolutionary and revolutionary improvements into its comprehensive commercialization effort. M-C Power`s objectives were to analyze and continuously improve stack component manufacturing and assembly techniques consistent with established specifications and commercial scale production requirements. Evolutionary improvements are those which naturally occur as the production rates are increased and experience is gained. Examples of evolutionary (learning curve) improvements included reducing scrap rates and decreasing raw material costs by buying in large quantities. Revolutionary improvements result in significant design and process changes to meet cost and performance requirements of the market entry system. Revolutionary changes often involve identifying new methods and developing designs to accommodate the new process. Based upon our accomplishments, M-C Power was able to reduce the cost of continuously manufactured fuel cell repeat components from the first to third 250 kW stack by 63%. This paper documents the continuous improvement accomplishments realized by M-C Power during IMHEX{reg_sign} fuel cell repeat component manufacturing.

  14. Community-University Partnerships: Achieving continuity in the face of change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Silka

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A challenge that community-university partnerships everywhere will face is how to maintain continuity in the face of change. The problems besetting communities continually shift and the goals of the university partners often fluctuate. This article describes a decade-long strategy one university has successfully used to address this problem. Over the past ten years, a community-university partnership at the University of Massachusetts Lowell has used summer content funding to respond creativity to shifting priorities. Each summer a research-action project is developed that targets a different content issue that has emerged with unexpected urgency. Teams of graduate students and high school students are charged with investigating this issue under the auspices of the partnership. These highly varied topics have included immigrant businesses, youth asset mapping, women owned businesses, the housing crisis, social program cutbacks, sustainability, and economic development and the arts. Despite their obvious differences, these topics share underlying features that further partnership commitment and continuity. Each has an urgency: the information is needed quickly, often because some immediate policy change is under consideration. Each topic has the advantage of drawing on multiple domains: the topics are inherently interdisciplinary and because they do not “belong” to any single field, they lend themselves to disciplines pooling their efforts to achieve greater understanding. Each also has high visibility: their salience has meant that people were often willing to devote scarce resources to the issues and also that media attention could easily be gained to highlight the advantages of students, partners, and the university working together. And the topics themselves are generative: they have the potential to contribute in many different ways to teaching, research, and outreach. This paper ends with a broader consideration of how partnerships can

  15. Continuous improvement in the Netherlands: A survey-based study into the current practices of continuous improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middel, H.G.A.; op de Weegh, S.; Gieskes, J.F.B.; Schuring, R.W.

    2004-01-01

    Continuous Improvement is a well-known and consolidated concept in literature and practice and is considered vital in today¿s business environment. In 2003 a survey, as part of the international CINet survey, has been performed in the Netherlands in order to gain insight into the current practices

  16. Continuous improvement program in ENUSA: personnel participation and six sigma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes Navarro, J.

    1998-01-01

    Since the beginning of its activities ENUSA has been a company committed with the quality of its products and services. To talk about quality is something inherent in ENUSA's daily work ENUSA's position in the market depends on its capacity to satisfy customers expectations with the best products and services, as a result of an efficient management of its processes. The word quality in its broadest sense, means that any activity can be improved. ENUSA has implemented a continuous improvement program as part of its company change project. That program consists of six basic steps: 1.- Managers commitment. 2.- Organization for continuous improvement. 3.- Quality goals. 4.- Training and informing. 5.- Personnel participation. 6.- Methodology. ENUSA has introduced these six steps during 1997-98 period. It is important to point out the commitment degree at all the company levels, focusing the organization to the continuous improvement in a multifunctional way, following the business processes: - Board of Directors - Quality Steering Committee - Quality Improvement Groups (GMC) - Quality Operative Groups (GOC) - Suggestions Mailboxes The following GMC's have been set up and are operative. - Manufacturing GMC - Supplies GMC - Installation GMC - Design GMC - Quality System GM - Projects GMC - Administrative GMC These GMC's have established thirty-six Quality Operative Groups which carry out the improvement projects. The methodology chosen by ENUSA is known as ''SIX SIGMA''. Six sigma programs have proved their huge power in big companies as MOTOROLA and, recently, GE being recognized in all the quality fields. It is, by itself, a change program in which a quality improvement methods is structured with an excellent view of processes, products and services. (Author)

  17. How to Sustain Change and Support Continuous Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Samuel A; McQuillan, Rory; Harel, Ziv; Weizman, Adam V; Thomas, Alison; Nesrallah, Gihad; Bell, Chaim M; Chan, Christopher T; Chertow, Glenn M

    2016-05-06

    To achieve sustainable change, quality improvement initiatives must become the new way of working rather than something added on to routine clinical care. However, most organizational change is not maintained. In this next article in this Moving Points in Nephrology feature on quality improvement, we provide health care professionals with strategies to sustain and support quality improvement. Threats to sustainability may be identified both at the beginning of a project and when it is ready for implementation. The National Health Service Sustainability Model is reviewed as one example to help identify issues that affect long-term success of quality improvement projects. Tools to help sustain improvement include process control boards, performance boards, standard work, and improvement huddles. Process control and performance boards are methods to communicate improvement results to staff and leadership. Standard work is a written or visual outline of current best practices for a task and provides a framework to ensure that changes that have improved patient care are consistently and reliably applied to every patient encounter. Improvement huddles are short, regular meetings among staff to anticipate problems, review performance, and support a culture of improvement. Many of these tools rely on principles of visual management, which are systems transparent and simple so that every staff member can rapidly distinguish normal from abnormal working conditions. Even when quality improvement methods are properly applied, the success of a project still depends on contextual factors. Context refers to aspects of the local setting in which the project operates. Context affects resources, leadership support, data infrastructure, team motivation, and team performance. For these reasons, the same project may thrive in a supportive context and fail in a different context. To demonstrate the practical applications of these quality improvement principles, these principles are

  18. Continuous Improvement in Education. Advancing Teaching--Improving Learning. White Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sandra; Hironaka, Stephanie; Carver, Penny; Nordstrum, Lee

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, "continuous improvement" has become a popular catchphrase in the field of education. However, while continuous improvement has become commonplace and well-documented in other industries, such as healthcare and manufacturing, little is known about how this work has manifested itself in education. This white paper attempts…

  19. Continuous quality improvement for the clinical decision unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Sharon E

    2004-01-01

    Clinical decision units (CDUs) are a relatively new and growing area of medicine in which patients undergo rapid evaluation and treatment. Continuous quality improvement (CQI) is important for the establishment and functioning of CDUs. CQI in CDUs has many advantages: better CDU functioning, fulfillment of Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations mandates, greater efficiency/productivity, increased job satisfaction, better performance improvement, data availability, and benchmarking. Key elements include a database with volume indicators, operational policies, clinical practice protocols (diagnosis specific/condition specific), monitors, benchmarks, and clinical pathways. Examples of these important parameters are given. The CQI process should be individualized for each CDU and hospital.

  20. Improved USGS methodology for assessing continuous petroleum resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents an improved methodology for estimating volumes of continuous (unconventional) oil and gas resources within the United States and around the world. The methodology is based on previously developed U.S. Geological Survey methodologies that rely on well-scale production data. Improvements were made primarily to how the uncertainty about estimated ultimate recoveries is incorporated in the estimates. This is particularly important when assessing areas with sparse or no production data, because the new methodology allows better use of analog data from areas with significant discovery histories.

  1. Successful integration of ergonomics into continuous improvement initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Kimberly; Fick, Faye; Joshi, Madina

    2012-01-01

    Process improvement initiatives are receiving renewed attention by large corporations as they attempt to reduce manufacturing costs and stay competitive in the global marketplace. These initiatives include 5S, Six Sigma, and Lean. These programs often take up a large amount of available time and budget resources. More often than not, existing ergonomics processes are considered separate initiatives by upper management and struggle to gain a seat at the table. To effectively maintain their programs, ergonomics program managers need to overcome those obstacles and demonstrate how ergonomics initiatives are a natural fit with continuous improvement philosophies.

  2. A continuous quality improvement program to focus a college of pharmacy on programmatic advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Philip D; Dipiro, Joseph T; Rowen, Randall C; McNair, David

    2013-08-12

    To enhance the achievement of a college of pharmacy's goals for education, research, and service missions by implementing an excellence program based on the Studer Group model for continuous quality improvement. The Studer model was combined with university strategic planning for a comprehensive quality-improvement program that was implemented over 5 years. The program included identifying and measuring key performance indicators, establishing specific "pillar" goals, aligning behaviors with goals and values, and training leaders. Assessment of key performance indicators over 5 years demonstrated progress toward achieving college goals for student and faculty satisfaction, research funding, numbers of students seeking formal postgraduate training, and private giving. Implementation of a continuous quality-improvement program based on the Studer program enabled the college to focus on and meet its yearly and strategic goals for all components of its mission.

  3. Good Schools: What Research Says about Improving Student Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Willis D.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This journal, presented in monograph form, reviews research findings in order to identify elements that influence student academic achievement. Sections focus on effective teaching, effect of school leadership on achievement, schoolwide learning environment, learning resources, and parent involvement. An extensive bibliography is included. (DF)

  4. Continuous improvement of the BNFL transport integrated management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hale, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    The integrated Management System of BNFL Transport and Pacific Nuclear Transport Limited (PNTL) is subject to continuous improvement by the application of established improvement techniques adopted by BNFL. The technique currently being used is the application of a Total Quality Management (TQM) philosophy, involving the identification of key processes, benchmarking against existing measures, initiating various improvement projects and applying process changes within the Company. The measurement technique being used is based upon the European Foundation for Quality Management Model (EFQM). A major initiative was started in 1996 to include the requirements of the Environmental Management Systems standard ISO 14001 within the existing integrated management system. This resulted in additional activities added to the system, modification to some existing activities and additional training for personnel. The system was audited by a third party certification organisation, Lloyds Register Quality Assurance (LRQA), during 1997. This paper describes the arrangements to review and update the integrated management system of BNFL Transport and PNTL to include the requirements of the environmental standard ISO 14001 and it also discusses the continuous improvement process adopted by BNFL Transport. (authors)

  5. Paths to continuous improvement of a CRM strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís G. Renart

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of relationship marketing has led to a paradigm change in marketing. Over the last few decades, numerous studies have analyzed the impact of customer relationship management (CRM programs on customer satisfaction and loyalty. Quite a few CRM programs have been found to have little or no impact. Having already published several articles and cases on the subject, in this paper we set out to answer the following question: assuming a company already has a reasonably successful CRM strategy in place, how can it continuously adapt and improve that strategy? Our recommendation is that such companies implement a continuous improvement process at four different but complementary levels: first, review and reinforce the company’s mission, culture and values; second, reconsider and, if necessary, redesign the CRM strategy; third, manage the various relationship-building activities more effectively; and lastly, review and, if necessary, improve the quality of material and human resources, program execution and process governance. A systematic review of these four levels or “paths” of improvement should help generate and maintain high quality relationships over time.

  6. Improving Our Odds: Success through Continuous Risk Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Phillip O.

    2009-01-01

    Launching a rocket, running a business, driving to work and even day-to-day living all involve some degree of risk. Risk is ever present yet not always recognized, adequately assessed and appropriately mitigated. Identification, assessment and mitigation of risk are elements of the risk management component of the "continuous improvement" way of life that has become a hallmark of successful and progressive enterprises. While the application of risk management techniques to provide continuous improvement may be detailed and extensive, the philosophy, ideals and tools can be beneficially applied to all situations. Experiences with the use of risk identification, assessment and mitigation techniques for complex systems and processes are described. System safety efforts and tools used to examine potential risks of the Ares I First Stage of NASA s new Constellation Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) presently being designed are noted as examples. Recommendations from lessons learned are provided for the application of risk management during the development of new systems as well as for the improvement of existing systems. Lessons learned and suggestions given are also examined for applicability to simple systems, uncomplicated processes and routine personal daily tasks. This paper informs the reader of varied uses of risk management efforts and techniques to identify, assess and mitigate risk for improvement of products, success of business, protection of people and enhancement of personal life.

  7. CONTINUOUS QUALITY IMPROVEMENT (CQI FRAMEWORK: A CASE OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tooba Sikander

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to present an educational framework for outcomes based continuous quality improvement. Well defined program outcomes, program educational objectives and assessment process have been developed to ensure graduates’ outcomes achievement. Direct and indirect tools have been used for assessment process. Course evaluation surveys, alumni surveys, and employer surveys have been deployed for indirect outcome assessment. Exams, quizzes, assignments and projects, on the other hand, have been used for direct outcome assessment. In developed framework, the educational processes committees and facilities committees have been integrated to continuously evaluate and monitor the educational processes. Furthermore, program outcomes and course learning outcomes are proposed to be evaluated and continuously monitored by programs goals committee and continuous course improvement committee respectively. Forms and procedures have been developed to assess student outcomes.

  8. Compression planning for continuous improvement in quality programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, Y.A.; Hood, F.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes Compression Planning, an innovative approach for planning in groups. This participative and structured approach is especially suitable for technical and highly regulated organizations. Compression Planning was applied to the first organization-wide effort at training integration for regulatory compliance, at Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), a multi-program national laboratory. The planning process was judged as measurably superior to PNL's customary planning. Within 10 days a training policy was issued and an action plan drafted. The participants produced a report identifying and prioritizing 33 key training issues; began to data gather and solicit input from personnel Lab-wide, producing a 2-volume training inventory; and formulated 14 recommendations for implementation. Two years later the plan is still evolving, as PNL training continues to develop, consistent with Continuous Improvement Process objectives

  9. Risk reduction and TQM: A corporate culture of continuous improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nau, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    A company supplying products and services to the nuclear industry that implements a cultural commitment to continuous improvement, in addition to providing higher quality products and services, also represents a significant reduction in operational risk to that industry. The implementation of a culture of total quality management (TQM), initiated by Sorrento Electronics (SE) in 1989, involves total commitment to the basic TQM principles: continuous improvement, people performing the work are the best sources of how to do it better, and employees must be empowered to make the improvements. What this means to the nuclear industry is a significant reduction in operational risk through: (1) products based on simpler, standardized, proven designs with established operational track records, enhancing confidence that they will perform as expected; (2) the highest confidence that products and supporting documentation are delivered with zero defects; (3) critical power plant schedules can be supported through the shortest possible equipment delivery times; (4) highly motivated employees with extremely positive attitudes, working together in cross-functional teams, virtually eliminate the possibility of deliberate product tampering or sabotage

  10. R and D techniques and how to continuously improve them?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massaut, V.; Collard, G.

    2005-01-01

    Although decommissioning of nuclear installations has been carried out successfully in different countries, and decommissioning is sometimes considered as a mature industrial activity, Research and Development can still improve the operations, and is also needed to keep the current know how. The research and development can bring reduction of costs, limitation of radioactive waste generation, and improve the safety and radioprotection aspects. When one consider that less than 100 facilities are currently in decommissioning for more than 800 reactors (power plants and research reactors, almost half and half) worldwide, the present used technology can be considered as the prehistory of D and D. The paper will focus on the needs for improvements and developments, on the attached constraints and restriction, and will then look at the potential ways to continue R and D and technology improvement. Regarding the rather recent development of the D and D technology and the large remaining market for D and D of nuclear installations, there is still a large field of open development for techniques and technologies for the dismantling of nuclear installations worldwide. Although D and D of all kinds of nuclear installations have proven to be feasible, improvements are surely needed to reduce the costs and waste of D and D, therefore reducing the burden to the plant owners, and to improve the radioprotection of the operations. The same applies for the improvement of the overall operators safety during such operations. There are different ways to go in this direction and the groups to gather the necessary experience and technological data are existing, but the will has to be present to go forward, in a competitive environment. It is difficult to believe that such improvements in the technologies and the approach of decommissioning can rely only on commercial and private initiatives. Therefore, organized international R and D should be promoted wherever it is possible, enhancing

  11. Continual improvement: A bibliography with indexes, 1992-1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This bibliography lists 606 references to reports and journal articles entered into the NASA Scientific and Technical Information Database during 1992 to 1993. Topics cover the philosophy and history of Continual Improvement (CI), basic approaches and strategies for implementation, and lessons learned from public and private sector models. Entries are arranged according to the following categories: Leadership for Quality, Information and Analysis, Strategic Planning for CI, Human Resources Utilization, Management of Process Quality, Supplier Quality, Assessing Results, Customer Focus and Satisfaction, TQM Tools and Philosophies, and Applications. Indexes include subject, personal author, corporate source, contract number, report number, and accession number.

  12. Student Engagement and Classroom Variables in Improving Mathematics Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So-Young

    2005-01-01

    The study explored how much student engagement and classroom variables predicted student achievement in mathematics. Since students were nested within a classroom, hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) was employed for the analysis. The results indicated that student engagement had positive effects on student academic growth per month in math after…

  13. Improving academic achievement after First year Studentship in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study therefore recommended that the negative experiences should be part of the orientation given to first year students in the University. Second, that universities should not use the grade point average obtained during the first year to compute the final GPA for graduating students. Keywords:Academic Achievement ...

  14. Framework for continuous performance improvement in small drinking water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereskie, Ty; Haider, Husnain; Rodriguez, Manuel J; Sadiq, Rehan

    2017-01-01

    Continuous performance improvement (CPI) can be a useful approach to overcome water quality problems impacting small communities. Small drinking water systems (SDWSs) struggle to meet regulatory requirements and often lack the economic and human resource flexibility for immediate improvement. A CPI framework is developed to provide SDWS managers and operators an approach to gauge their current performance against similar systems and to track performance improvement from the implementation of the new technologies or innovations into the future. The proposed CPI framework incorporates the use of a water quality index (WQI) and functional performance benchmarking to evaluate and compare drinking water quality performance of an individual water utility against that of a representative benchmark. The results are then used to identify and prioritize the most vulnerable water quality indicators and subsequently identify and prioritize performance improvement strategies. The proposed CPI framework has been demonstrated using data collected from SDWSs in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), Canada and using the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) WQI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Achieving improved financing for low-income producers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For the poor with relatively fewer assets, improved access to finance allows them to manage risk and smooth consumption; finance technological and capital improvements and thereby raise productivity; acquire working capital to obtain inputs in a timely way; and take advantage of market opportunities that contribute to ...

  16. Partnering through Training and Practice to Achieve Performance Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a partnership effort among managers, trainers, and employees to spring to life performance improvement using the performance templates (P-T) approach. P-T represents a process model as well as a method of training leading to performance improvement. Not only does it add to our repertoire of training and performance management…

  17. Three success factors for continual improvement in healthcare: an analysis of the reports of improvement team members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandrud, Aleidis Skard; Schreiner, Ada; Hjortdahl, Per; Helljesen, Gro Sævil; Nyen, Bjørnar; Nelson, Eugene C

    2011-03-01

    The objectives of the Breakthrough Series Collaborative are to close the gap between what we know and what we do, and to contribute to continuous quality improvement (CQI) of healthcare through collaborative learning. The improvement efforts are guided by a systematic approach, combining professional and improvement knowledge. To explore what the improvement teams have learnt from participating in the collaborative and from dealing with promoting and inhibiting factors encountered. Qualitative interviews with 19 team members were conducted in four focus groups, using the Critical Incident Technique. A critical incident is one that makes significant contributions, either positively or negatively, to an activity. The elements of a culture of improvement are revealed by the critical incidents, and reflect the eight domains of knowledge, as a product of collaborative learning. The improvement knowledge and skills of individuals are important elements, but not enough to achieve sustainable changes. 90% of the material reflects the need for a system of CQI to solve the problems that organisations experience in trying to make lasting improvements. A pattern of three success factors for CQI emerges: (1) continuous and reliable information, including measurement, about best and current practice; (2) engagement of everybody in all phases of the improvement work: the patient and family, the leadership, the professional environment and the staff; and (3) an infrastructure based on improvement knowledge, with multidisciplinary teams, available coaching, learning systems and sustainability systems.

  18. Improving Reference Service: The Case for Using a Continuous Quality Improvement Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluri, Rao

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the evaluation of library reference service; examines problems with past evaluations, including the lack of long-term planning and a systems perspective; and suggests a method for continuously monitoring and improving reference service using quality improvement tools such as checklists, cause and effect diagrams, Pareto charts, and…

  19. Teacher Tweets Improve Achievement for Eighth Grade Science Students

    OpenAIRE

    Carol Van Vooren; Corey Bess

    2013-01-01

    In the Digital Age teachers have fallen far behind the technical skills of their "digital native" students. The implementation of technology as a tool for classroom communication is foreign for most teachers, but highly preferred by students. While teenagers are using Facebook, Twitter, and other social networks to communicate, teachers continue to respond through face-to-face conversations, telephone calls, and email messaging. Twitter, a platform for short message service text, is an online...

  20. The Divisional Approach to Achieving Hospital Improvement Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortazzo, Arnold D.; Allen, Robert M.

    1971-01-01

    The divisional or horizontal approach, rather than the traditional or vertical model, was employed in improving the major organizations and programatic and service structure of a residential facility for retardates, Sunland Training Center (Miami, Florida). (KW)

  1. achieving improved financing for low-income producers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KEY WORDS: Approaches, Improved Access, Finance, Low-income, Producers. INTRODUCTION .... either by setting up a dual-purpose financial institution, or by making ..... management information systems (Braverman and. Huppi, 1991).

  2. Steam generator replacement: a story of continuous improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sills, M.S.; Wilkerson, R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the history of steam generator replacement in the US focusing on the last five years. From the early replacements in the 1980s, there have been major technology improvements resulting in dramatically shorter outages and reduced radiological exposure for workers. Even though the changes for the last five years have been less dramatic, the improvement trend continues. No two steam generator replacement (SGR) projects are the same and there are some major differences including; the access path for the components to containment (is a construction opening in containment required), type of containment, number of steam generators, one piece or two piece replacement, plant type (Westinghouse, CE or B and W) and plant layout. These differences along with other variables such as delays due to plant operations and other activities not related to the steam generator replacement make analysis of performance data difficult. However, trends in outage performance and owner expectations can be identified. How far this trend will go is also discussed. Along with the trend of improved performance, there is also a significant variation in performance. Some of the contributors to this variation are identified. This paper addresses what is required for a successful outage, meeting the increasing expectations and setting new records. The authors will discuss various factors that contribute to the success of a steam generator replacement. These factors include technical issues and, equally important, organizational interface and the role the customer plays. Recommendations are provided for planning a successful steam generator replacement outage. (author)

  3. Improving continuing medical education by enhancing interactivity: lessons from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Seyed Aliakbar; Khankeh, Hamid Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Jalil; Soltani Arabshahi, Seyed Kamran; Faghih, Zahra; Parikh, Sagar V; Shirazi, Mandana

    2016-04-01

    Continuing Medical Education (CME) has been considered as a lifelong commitment for doctors to provide the optimal care for patients. Despite a long history of creating CME programs, outcomes are far from ideal. The present qualitative study aims to clarify the barriers affecting effectiveness of the CME programs in Iran based on the experiences of general practitioners. Sixteen general practitioners were recruited to participate in in-depth interviews and field observations concerning experiences with CME. The study was performed using a qualitative content analysis method. The codes, categories and themes were explored through an inductive process in which the researchers moved from specific to general. The participants' experiences identified a number of barriers, particularly insufficient interaction with the instructors; additional problems included the teachers' use of an undifferentiated approach; unreal and abstract CME; and ignorance of the diverse reasons to participate in CME. Based on the study results, there are multiple barriers to effective implementation of CME in Iran. The key barriers include insufficient interaction between the trainees and providers, which must be considered by other stakeholders and program designers. Such interactions would facilitate improved program design, invite more specific tailoring of the education to the participants, allow for more effective educational methods and set the stage for outcome evaluation from the learners actually applying their new knowledge in practice. Replication of these findings with another sample would improve confidence in these recommendations, but these findings are broadly consistent with findings in the educational literature on improving the efficacy of CME.

  4. Performance indicators: A tool for continuous quality improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi M Bhatnagar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Performance monitoring is an important tool which can be used for setting priorities for process improvement. At our centre, we have been monitoring every step in the processes, right from inventory of consumables (both critical and routine to number of donors reactive for TTI. We conducted a study to measure the impact of monitoring Performance Indicators and how it could be used as a tool for Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI. Materials and Methods: The present study was a retrospective study where the performance indicator (PI data of blood bank was analyzed for over four years. For certain parameters, benchmarks or thresholds were set that represented warning limits or action limits. The yearly data were collated from monthly data. "Shifts" or "Trends", if any, were identified and Corrective and Preventive Action (CAPA taken accordingly. At the end, outcomes of the analysis were charted. Results: After the yearly data evaluation, outcomes obtained were used to plan, correct and amend processes and systems in the blood center. It was observed that the workload of the center showed an upward trend. This helped us to plan for the purchase of consumables and management of manpower. The monitoring of usage and discard of blood helped in the efficient management of blood stocks. The need for any new equipment could also be judged by the trends in workload. Conclusion: Performance indicators are indispensible tools which various stakeholders in the Blood Transfusion centres should implement to improve on quality performance.

  5. Performance indicators: A tool for continuous quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Nidhi M; Soni, Shital; Gajjar, Maitrey; Shah, Mamta; Shah, Sangita; Patel, Vaidehi

    2016-01-01

    Performance monitoring is an important tool which can be used for setting priorities for process improvement. At our centre, we have been monitoring every step in the processes, right from inventory of consumables (both critical and routine) to number of donors reactive for TTI. We conducted a study to measure the impact of monitoring Performance Indicators and how it could be used as a tool for Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI). The present study was a retrospective study where the performance indicator (PI) data of blood bank was analyzed for over four years. For certain parameters, benchmarks or thresholds were set that represented warning limits or action limits. The yearly data were collated from monthly data. Shifts or Trends, if any, were identified and Corrective and Preventive Action (CAPA) taken accordingly. At the end, outcomes of the analysis were charted. After the yearly data evaluation, outcomes obtained were used to plan, correct and amend processes and systems in the blood center. It was observed that the workload of the center showed an upward trend. This helped us to plan for the purchase of consumables and management of manpower. The monitoring of usage and discard of blood helped in the efficient management of blood stocks. The need for any new equipment could also be judged by the trends in workload. Performance indicators are indispensible tools which various stakeholders in the Blood Transfusion centres should implement to improve on quality performance.

  6. Innovative Outcome Assessment in Graduate Business Education and Continuous Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay Satya P.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The changed environment of global economy with painful austerity and restructuring measures causing severe economic dislocations in many diverse parts of the world have brought into focus the usefulness and value of management education in general and graduate management education in particular. The various accrediting bodies in America, Europe and Asia in recent years have shifted their emphasis to ensuring that learning outcomes of students in the program are tied to the goals and missions of the academic institution and meet the needs of the external partners of the academic enterprise that the students go on to serve. This has resulted in rapid advances in the field of innovative outcome assessment, and measurement of competency in performing higher order tasks as well as demonstration of traits related to successful transition into the business world and contribution to the success of the enterprise where the students are employed. The mere assessment/measurement of traits is not the end, but rather the first step in the cycle of continuous improvement in the tradition of the Plan-Do-Study-Act tradition of TQM. The goal is to identify shortcomings or opportunities for improvement via the assessment process and then to “close the loop” by introducing planned changes to improve system performance.

  7. Quantitative research versus quality assurance, quality improvement, total quality management, and continuous quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelsang, J

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a review of the scientific method used in the quantitative research studies for consumers, evaluators, and applied nurse researchers. The fundamental characteristics of the problem-solving/ performance-improvement processes of quality assurance, quality improvement, total quality management, and continuous quality improvement are described. Research is compared with these processes, and is followed by a discussion about the publication of quantitative research findings.

  8. Development of the Continued Improvement System for Nuclear Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H. C.; Park, H. G.; Park, Y. W.; Park, J. Y.

    2016-01-01

    It has been found that almost 80 % of the incidents and accidents occurred recently, such as the Fukushima Daiichi disaster and Domestic SBO accident etc. were analyzed to be caused from human errors. (IAEA NES NG-G-2.1) Which strongly claims the importance of the safety culture system. Accordingly, it should be away from a cursory approach like one-off field survey or Snap shop which were being conducted at present for the continued improvement of safety culture. This study introduces an analytical methodology which approaches the generic form of the safety both consciously and unconsciously expressed with behavior, thoughts, and attitude etc. This study was implemented only for open materials such as Inspection report, incidents and accidents reports, QA documents because of the limitation in accessibility to data. More effective use with securing operational data will be possible in future

  9. Modelling the Role of Human Resource Management in Continuous Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; Hyland, Paul; Kofoed, Lise B.

    2006-01-01

    Although it is widely acknowledged that both Human Resource Management (HRM) and Continuous Improvement have the potential to positively influencing organizational performance, very little attention has been given to how certain HRM practices may support CI, and consequently, a company...... developed by de Leede and Looise (2005) serve as the framework for examining how specific bundles of HRM practices utilized during different phases of the CI implementation process may contribute to sustained organizational performance and enhanced operational performance. The primary contribution...... of the paper is theoretical in nature, as the model developed provides a greater understanding of how HRM can contribute to CI; however, the model also has practical value in that it suggests important relationships between various HRM practices and the behaviors necessary for successful CI. The paper...

  10. Pump Early, Pump Often: A Continuous Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatz, Diane L; Froh, Elizabeth B; Schwarz, Jessica; Houng, Kathy; Brewster, Isabel; Myers, Carey; Prince, Judy; Olkkola, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Research demonstrates that although many mothers initiate pumping for their critically ill children, few women are successful at maintaining milk supply throughout their infants' entire hospital stay. At the Garbose Family Special Delivery Unit (SDU) at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, we care for mothers who have critically ill infants born with complex cardiac and congenital anomalies. Human milk is viewed as a medical intervention at our institution. Therefore, nurses on the SDU wanted to ensure best practice in terms of pumping initiation. This article describes a continuous quality improvement project that ensured mothers pumped early and often. Childbirth educators can play a key role in preparing mothers who are anticipating an infant who will require hospitalization immediately post-birth.

  11. Development of the Continued Improvement System for Nuclear Safety Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H. C.; Park, H. G.; Park, Y. W.; Park, J. Y. [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    It has been found that almost 80 % of the incidents and accidents occurred recently, such as the Fukushima Daiichi disaster and Domestic SBO accident etc. were analyzed to be caused from human errors. (IAEA NES NG-G-2.1) Which strongly claims the importance of the safety culture system. Accordingly, it should be away from a cursory approach like one-off field survey or Snap shop which were being conducted at present for the continued improvement of safety culture. This study introduces an analytical methodology which approaches the generic form of the safety both consciously and unconsciously expressed with behavior, thoughts, and attitude etc. This study was implemented only for open materials such as Inspection report, incidents and accidents reports, QA documents because of the limitation in accessibility to data. More effective use with securing operational data will be possible in future.

  12. The continuous improvement system of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera C, A.

    2009-10-01

    This paper describes the continuous improvement system of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde and the achievements in implementing the same and additionally two study cases are presents. In February 2009 is noteworthy because the World Association of Nuclear Operators we identified as a learning organization, qualification which shows that the continuous improvement system has matured, and this system will expose as I get to learn to capitalize on our own experiences and external experiences diffused by the nuclear industry. In 2007 the management of nuclear power plants integrates its improvement systems and calls it continuous improvement system and is presented in the same extensive report that won the National Quality Award. This system is made up of 5 subsystems operating individually and are also related 1) human performance; 2) referential comparison or benchmarking; 3) self-assessment; 4) corrective action and 5) external operating experience. Five subsystems that plan, generate, capture, manage, communicate and protect the knowledge generated during the processes execution of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, as well as from external sources. The target set in 2007 was to increase the intellectual capital to always give response to meeting the security requirements, but creating a higher value to quality, customer, environment protection and society. In brief each of them, highlighting the objective, expectations management, implementation and some benefits. At the end they will describe two study cases selected to illustrate these cases as the organization learns by their continuous improvement system. (Author)

  13. Six Years Into Its Mission, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory Continues to Achieve Scientific Firsts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    In August 1999, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory opened for business. Six years later, it continues to achieve scientific firsts. "When Chandra opened its sunshade doors for the first time, it opened the possibility of studying the X-ray emission of the universe with unprecedented clarity," said Chandra project scientist Dr. Martin Weisskopf of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. "Already surpassing its goal of a five-year life, Chandra continues to rewrite textbooks with discoveries about our own solar system and images of celestial objects as far as billions of light years away." Based on the observatory's outstanding results, NASA Headquarters in Washington decided in 2001 to extend Chandra s mission from five years to ten. During the observatory s sixth year of operation, auroras from Jupiter, X-rays from Saturn, and the early days of our solar system were the focus of Chandra discoveries close to home -- discoveries with the potential to better understand the dynamics of life on Earth. Jupiter's auroras are the most spectacular and active auroras in the solar system. Extended Chandra observations revealed that Jupiter s auroral X-rays are caused by highly charged particles crashing into the atmosphere above Jupiter's poles. These results gave scientists information needed to compare Jupiter's auroras with those from Earth, and determine if they are triggered by different cosmic and planetary events. Mysterious X-rays from Saturn also received attention, as Chandra completed the first observation of a solar X-ray flare reflected from Saturn's low-latitudes, the region that correlates to Earth's equator and tropics. This observation led scientists to conclude the ringed planet may act as a mirror, reflecting explosive activity from the sun. Solar-storm watchers on Earth might see a surprising benefit. The results imply scientists could use giant planets like Saturn as remote-sensing tools to help monitor X-ray flaring on portions of the sun

  14. Mutation breeding in crop improvement - achievements and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharkwal, M.C.

    2004-01-01

    Crop improvement programmes through induced mutations were initiated about seven decades ago. Majority of the mutant varieties have been released during the last two decades. In terms of the development and release of mutant varieties, China (605), India (309), Russia (204), the Netherlands (176), USA (125) and Japan (120) are the leading countries. Radiation, especially gamma radiation was the most frequently used mutagen for inducing mutations in crop plants. Out of 1072 mutant varieties of cereals, rice alone accounts for 434 varieties followed by barley (269). Mutation breeding has made significant contribution in increasing the production of rice, ground nut, castor, chickpea, mungbean and urd bean in the Indian subcontinent. The future mutation breeding programmes should be aimed at improving the root characters, nodulation in legumes, alteration of fatty acid composition in oil seeds, host pathogen interactions, photo- insensitivity and apomixix in crop plants

  15. Continuous quality improvement using intelligent infusion pump data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breland, Burnis D

    2010-09-01

    The use of continuous quality-improvement (CQI) processes in the implementation of intelligent infusion pumps in a community teaching hospital is described. After the decision was made to implement intelligent i.v. infusion pumps in a 413-bed, community teaching hospital, drug libraries for use in the safety software had to be created. Before drug libraries could be created, it was necessary to determine the epidemiology of medication use in various clinical care areas. Standardization of medication administration was performed through the CQI process, using practical knowledge of clinicians at the bedside and evidence-based drug safety parameters in the scientific literature. Post-implementation, CQI allowed refinement of clinically important safety limits while minimizing inappropriate, meaningless soft limit alerts on a few select agents. Assigning individual clinical care areas (CCAs) to individual patient care units facilitated customization of drug libraries and identification of specific CCA compliance concerns. Between June 2007 and June 2008, there were seven library updates. These involved drug additions and deletions, customization of individual CCAs, and alterations of limits. Overall compliance with safety software use rose over time, from 33% in November 2006 to over 98% in December 2009. Many potentially clinically significant dosing errors were intercepted by the safety software, prompting edits by end users. Only 4-6% of soft limit alerts resulted in edits. Compliance rates for use of infusion pump safety software varied among CCAs over time. Education, auditing, and refinement of drug libraries led to improved compliance in most CCAs.

  16. Student Achievement Goal Setting: Using Data to Improve Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stronge, James H.; Grant, Leslie W.

    2009-01-01

    The first book in the James H. Stronge Research-to-Practice series focuses on improving student achievement through academic goal setting. It offers the tools and plan of action to use performance data to improve instructional practice and increase student achievement. The book is divided into three parts: (1) How Student Achievement Data Can Be…

  17. Implementing a customer focused continual business improvement program to improve the maintenance process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharshafdjian, G.; Fisher, C.; Beres, T.; Brooks, S.; Forbes, S.; Krause, M.; McAuley, K.; Wendorf, M.

    2006-01-01

    Global market pressures and increasing competition demands that successful companies establish a continual business improvement program as part of implementing its business strategy. Such programs must be driven by the definition of quality from the customer's perspective. This customer quality focus often requires a change in all aspects of the business including products, services, processes and culture. This paper will describe how Atomic Energy of Canada Limited implemented a Continual Business Improvement Program in their Nuclear Laboratories Business Unit. In particular, to review how the techniques were applied to improve the maintenance process and the status of the project. Customer (internal users of the processes at CRL) feedback has shown repeatedly there is dissatisfaction of the maintenance process. Customers complain about jobs not getting done to schedule or being deferred. A project has been launched with the following goals: to improve the maintenance process customer satisfaction and increase trades wrench time by 30 minutes / trade / day. DMAIC (Define-Measure-Analyze-Improve-Control) methodology was applied to find out the Root Cause(s) of the problem, provide solutions, and implement improvements. The expected Operational Benefits include: Executing work efficiently to quality standards and business performance of the site, improve maintenance efficiencies, reduce cycle time for maintenance process and improve process yield, and improve customer and employee satisfaction. (author)

  18. Implementing a customer focused continual business improvement program to improve the maintenance process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharshafdjian, G.; Fisher, C.; Beres, T.; Brooks, S.; Forbes, S.; Krause, M.; McAuley, K.; Wendorf, M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Global market pressures and increasing competition demands that successful companies establish a continual business improvement program as part of implementing its business strategy. Such programs must be driven by the definition of quality from the customer's perspective. This customer quality focus often requires a change in all aspects of the business including products, services, processes and culture. This paper will describe how Atomic Energy of Canada Limited implemented a Continual Business Improvement Program in their Nuclear Laboratories Business Unit. In particular, to review how the techniques were applied to improve the maintenance process and the status of the project. Customer (internal users of the processes at CRL) feedback has shown repeatedly there is dissatisfaction of the maintenance process. Customers complain about jobs not getting done to schedule or being deferred. A project has been launched with the following goals: to improve the maintenance process customer satisfaction and increase trades wrench time by 30 minutes / trade / day. DMAIC (Define-Measure-Analyze-Improve-Control) methodology was applied to find out the Root Cause(s) of the problem, provide solutions, and implement improvements. The expected Operational Benefits include: Executing work efficiently to quality standards and business performance of the site, improve maintenance efficiencies, reduce cycle time for maintenance process and improve process yield, and improve customer and employee satisfaction. (author)

  19. What drives continuous improvement project success in healthcare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelson, Paul; Hille, Joshua; Eseonu, Chinweike; Doolen, Toni

    2017-02-13

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present findings from a study of factors that affect continuous improvement (CI) project success in hospitals. Design/methodology/approach Quantitative regression analysis was performed on Likert scale survey responses. Qualitative thematic analysis was performed on open-ended survey responses and written reports on CI projects. Findings The paper identifies managerial and employee factors that affect project success. These factors include managerial support, communication, and affective commitment. Affective commitment is the extent to which employees perceive the change as being needed or necessary. Practical implications The results highlight how managerial decisions, approaches to communication - including communication before, during and after CI projects affect project success. The results also show that success depends on the way employees perceive proposed changes. This suggests the need for a more individualized approach to CI, lean, and broader change initiatives. Originality/value This research is the first to fuse project success and sustainability theory to CI projects, beyond Kaizen events, in healthcare environments. The research is particularly important at a time when healthcare organizations are required to make rapid changes with limited resources as they work toward outcome-based assessment and reimbursement rules.

  20. Benchmarking: a method for continuous quality improvement in health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettorchi-Tardy, Amina; Levif, Marie; Michel, Philippe

    2012-05-01

    Benchmarking, a management approach for implementing best practices at best cost, is a recent concept in the healthcare system. The objectives of this paper are to better understand the concept and its evolution in the healthcare sector, to propose an operational definition, and to describe some French and international experiences of benchmarking in the healthcare sector. To this end, we reviewed the literature on this approach's emergence in the industrial sector, its evolution, its fields of application and examples of how it has been used in the healthcare sector. Benchmarking is often thought to consist simply of comparing indicators and is not perceived in its entirety, that is, as a tool based on voluntary and active collaboration among several organizations to create a spirit of competition and to apply best practices. The key feature of benchmarking is its integration within a comprehensive and participatory policy of continuous quality improvement (CQI). Conditions for successful benchmarking focus essentially on careful preparation of the process, monitoring of the relevant indicators, staff involvement and inter-organizational visits. Compared to methods previously implemented in France (CQI and collaborative projects), benchmarking has specific features that set it apart as a healthcare innovation. This is especially true for healthcare or medical-social organizations, as the principle of inter-organizational visiting is not part of their culture. Thus, this approach will need to be assessed for feasibility and acceptability before it is more widely promoted.

  1. A formula for continued improvement: Audit follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maday, J.H. Jr.

    1989-10-01

    In his book Management Audits, Allan J. Sayle states, ''QA standards stipulate that corrective action, required as a result of performing an audit, be followed up and closed out. There would, indeed, be little point in performing audits, requiring corrective action, or having a QA system at all if the auditee knows that the auditor will never verify that the corrective action has been efficaciously implemented.'' The QA auditor has an obligation to include follow-up in the overall audit planning. All too often the auditor will go to great lengths to plan and perform an audit only to have a recurring finding in the next audit. The proposed corrective action was only promissory and was not designed to stop the problem from recurring or to identify its root cause. Auditors do a disservice to the overall QA program and particularly to the customer when they fail to follow up and verify that an audit corrective action has been effectively implemented. In this paper, the techniques used by the quality assurance auditors at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) will be presented. Although PNL is a research and development laboratory, the techniques outlined in this paper could be applied to any industry conducting quality assurance audits. Most important, they provide a formula for continued improvement by assuring that audit follow-up is timely, meaningful, and permanent

  2. From continuous improvement to collaborative improvement: scope, scale, skill and social networking in collaborative improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middel, H.G.A.; Groen, Arend J.; Fisscher, O.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    More than ever, companies are challenged to improve their performance and respond quickly and accurately to changes within the market. As competitive battlefield is moving towards the level of networks of organisations, the individual firm is an inadequate entity for identifying improvements.

  3. Achieving continuity of care: facilitators and barriers in community mental health teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belling, Ruth; Whittock, Margaret; McLaren, Susan; Burns, Tom; Catty, Jocelyn; Jones, Ian Rees; Rose, Diana; Wykes, Til

    2011-03-18

    The integration of mental health and social services for people diagnosed with severe mental illness (SMI) has been a key aspect of attempts to reform mental health services in the UK and aims to minimise user and carer distress and confusion arising from service discontinuities. Community mental health teams (CMHTs) are a key component of UK policy for integrated service delivery, but implementing this policy has raised considerable organisational challenges. The aim of this study was to identify and explore facilitators and barriers perceived to influence continuity of care by health and social care professionals working in and closely associated with CMHTs. This study employed a survey design utilising in-depth, semi-structured interviews with a proportionate, random sample of 113 health and social care professionals and representatives of voluntary organisations. Participants worked in two NHS Mental Health Trusts in greater London within eight adult CMHTs and their associated acute in-patient wards, six local general practices, and two voluntary organisations. Team leadership, decision making, and experiences of teamwork support were facilitators for cross boundary and team continuity; face-to-face communication between teams, managers, general practitioners, and the voluntary sector were facilitators for information continuity. Relational, personal, and longitudinal continuity were facilitated in some local areas by workforce stability. Barriers for cross boundary and team continuity were specific leadership styles and models of decision making, blurred professional role boundaries, generic working, and lack of training for role development. Barriers for relational, personal, and longitudinal continuity were created by inadequate staffing levels, high caseloads, and administrative duties that could limit time spent with users. Incompatibility of information technology systems hindered information continuity. Flexible continuity was challenged by the

  4. Achieving Continuity of Care: Facilitators and Barriers in Community Mental Health Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Ian Rees

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integration of mental health and social services for people diagnosed with severe mental illness (SMI has been a key aspect of attempts to reform mental health services in the UK and aims to minimise user and carer distress and confusion arising from service discontinuities. Community mental health teams (CMHTs are a key component of UK policy for integrated service delivery, but implementing this policy has raised considerable organisational challenges. The aim of this study was to identify and explore facilitators and barriers perceived to influence continuity of care by health and social care professionals working in and closely associated with CMHTs. Methods This study employed a survey design utilising in-depth, semi-structured interviews with a proportionate, random sample of 113 health and social care professionals and representatives of voluntary organisations. Participants worked in two NHS Mental Health Trusts in greater London within eight adult CMHTs and their associated acute in-patient wards, six local general practices, and two voluntary organisations. Results Team leadership, decision making, and experiences of teamwork support were facilitators for cross boundary and team continuity; face-to-face communication between teams, managers, general practitioners, and the voluntary sector were facilitators for information continuity. Relational, personal, and longitudinal continuity were facilitated in some local areas by workforce stability. Barriers for cross boundary and team continuity were specific leadership styles and models of decision making, blurred professional role boundaries, generic working, and lack of training for role development. Barriers for relational, personal, and longitudinal continuity were created by inadequate staffing levels, high caseloads, and administrative duties that could limit time spent with users. Incompatibility of information technology systems hindered information

  5. Continued SOFC cell and stack technology and improved production methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wandel, M.; Brodersen, K.; Phair, J. (and others)

    2009-05-15

    Within this project significant results are obtained on a number of very diverse areas ranging from development of cell production, metallic creep in interconnect to assembling and test of stacks with foot print larger than 500 cm2. Out of 38 milestones 28 have been fulfilled and 10 have been partly fulfilled. This project has focused on three main areas: 1) The continued cell development and optimization of manufacturing processes aiming at production of large foot-print cells, improving cell performance and development environmentally more benign production methods. 2) Stack technology - especially stacks with large foot print and improving the stack design with respect to flow geometry and gas leakages. 3) Development of stack components with emphasis on sealing (for 2G as well as 3G), interconnect (coat, architecture and creep) and test development. Production of cells with a foot print larger than 500 cm2 is very difficult due to the brittleness of the cells and great effort has been put into this topic. Eight cells were successfully produced making it possible to assemble and test a real stack thereby giving valuable results on the prospects of stacks with large foot print. However, the yield rate is very low and a significant development to increase this yield lies ahead. Several lessons were learned on the stack level regarding 'large foot print' stacks. Modelling studies showed that the width of the cell primarily is limited by production and handling of the cell whereas the length (in the flow direction) is limited by e.g. pressure drop and necessary manifolding. The optimal cell size in the flow direction was calculated to be between approx20 cm and < 30 cm. From an economical point of view the production yield is crucial and stacks with large foot print cell area are only feasible if the cell production yield is significantly enhanced. Co-casting has been pursued as a production technique due to the possibilities in large scale production

  6. Continuous Process Improvement at Tinker Air Logistics Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    attempt to level-load the workflow, or achieve the heijunka principle of TPS. Simply implementing these tools with a less than full understanding of...down in modular workstations in an attempt to level-load the workflow, or achieve the heijunka principle of TPS. Simply implementing these tools

  7. Report: EPA Needs to Improve Continuity of Operations Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #10-P-0017, October 27, 2009. EPA has limited assurance that it can successfully maintain continuity of operations and execute its mission essential functions during a significant national event such as a pandemic influenza outbreak.

  8. Studying Implementation within a Continuous Continuous-Improvement Process: What Happens When We Design with Adaptations in Mind?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichnor-Wagner, Ariel; Allen, Danielle; Socol, Allison Rose; Cohen-Vogel, Lora; Rutledge, Stacey A.; Xing, Qi W.

    2018-01-01

    Background/Context: This study examines the implementation of an academic and social-emotional learning innovation called Personalization for Academic and Social-Emotional Learning, or PASL. The innovation was designed, tested, and implemented using a continuous continuous-improvement model. The model emphasized a top-and-bottom process in which…

  9. Course Development Cycle Time: A Framework for Continuous Process Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Erinn

    2003-01-01

    Details Edinboro University's efforts to reduce the extended cycle time required to develop new courses and programs. Describes a collaborative process improvement framework, illustrated data findings, the team's recommendations for improvement, and the outcomes of those recommendations. (EV)

  10. Achieving quality improvement in the nursing home: influence of nursing leadership on communication and teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelsmeier, Amy; Scott-Cawiezell, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Leadership, communication, and teamwork are essential elements of organizational capacity and are linked to organizational performance. How those organizations actually achieve improved performance, however, is not clearly understood. In this comparative case study, nursing leadership who facilitated open communication and teamwork achieved improvement while nursing leadership who impeded open communication and teamwork did not.

  11. Using measures to guide the continuous improvement journey: a partnership between quality assurance and toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, P E; Sites, D L

    1994-03-01

    It has been said that you cannot improve what you cannot measure. At Eli Lilly and Company, measurement is one of the five pillars of Total Quality. Quality Assurance and Toxicology have partnered in the use of measures to drive improvements in both areas. Quality Assurance and Toxicology have embarked on a journey in Total Quality to achieve customer satisfaction and drive continuous improvement. Measurement in the research and development world has traditionally not been well received. Contrary to popular belief, we have found that many processes can be measured in the research and development environment. Measurement is critical to the continuous improvement of processes because improvements are made using data. In Quality Assurance and Toxicology, the initial measures were put in place to gather baseline data. As we learned from our measures, we customized them to align with all of our processes. This article describes the journey of measuring Quality Assurance and Toxicology, including highlights of implementation strategies and lessons learned along the way.

  12. A theoretical model of continuity in anxiety and links to academic achievement in disaster-exposed school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, Carl F; Scott, Brandon G; Taylor, Leslie K; Cannon, Melinda F; Romano, Dawn M; Perry, Andre M

    2013-08-01

    This study tested a theoretical model of continuity in anxious emotion and its links to academic achievement in disaster-exposed youth. An urban school based sample of youths (n = 191; Grades 4-8) exposed to Hurricane Katrina were assessed at 24 months (Time 1) and then again at 30 months (Time 2) postdisaster. Academic achievement was assessed through end of the school year standardized test scores (~31 months after Katrina). The results suggest that the association of traumatic stress to academic achievement was indirect via linkages from earlier (Time 1) posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms that predicted later (Time 2) test anxiety. Time 2 test anxiety was then negatively associated with academic achievement. Age and gender invariance testing suggested strong consistency across gender and minor developmental variation in the age range examined. The model presented advances the developmental understanding of the expression of anxious emotion and its links to student achievement among disaster-exposed urban school children. The findings highlight the importance of identifying heterotypic continuity in anxiety and suggest potential applied and policy directions for disaster-exposed youth. Avenues for future theoretical refinement are also discussed.

  13. APPLICATION OF FAILURE MODE & EFFECT ANALYSIS (FMEA FOR CONTINUOUS QUALITY IMPROVEMENT - MULTIPLE CASE STUDIES IN AUTOMOBILE SMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigar Doshi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA is a quality tool used to identify potential failures and related effects on processes and products, so continuous improvement in quality can be achieved by reducing them. The purpose of this research paper is to showcase the contribution of FMEA to achieve Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI by multiple case study research. The outcome research conducted by implementing FMEA; one of the Auto Core Tools (ACTs, in the automobile Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs in Gujarat, India is presented in this paper which depict various means of Continuous Quality Improvements. The case study based research was carried out in four automobile SMEs; all of them are supplied to automotive Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM. The FMEA was implemented with the help of Cross Functional Team (CFT to identify the potential failure modes and effects, in overall effect on Continuous Quality Improvement. The outcome of FMEA at four companies' reveals the scope of improvement exists in the manufacturing process. Implementation of those improvement points shows the definite signs of continuous improvement of the quality of process and product as well. The FMEA and subsequent implementations had reduced the quality rejections around 3% to 4% in case companies.

  14. Evolution of Technology for Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy: Forty Years of Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, Claudio

    2018-01-01

    Continuous arteriovenous hemofiltration (CAVH) was proposed in 1977 as an alternative treatment for acute renal failure in patients in whom peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis was clinically or technically precluded. In the mid-1980s, this technique was extended to infants and children. CAVH presented important advantages in the areas of hemodynamic stability, control of circulating volume, and nutritional support. However, there were serious shortcomings such as the need for arterial cannulation and limited solute clearance. These problems were solved by the introduction of continuous arteriovenous hemodiafiltration and continuous arteriovenous hemodialysis, where uremic control could be achieved by increasing countercurrent dialysate flow rates to 1.5 or 2 L/h as necessary, or by venovenous techniques utilizing a double-lumen central venous catheter for vascular access. Thus, continuous venovenous hemofiltration replaced CAVH because of its improved performance and safety. From the initial adoptive technology, specific machines have been designed to permit safe and reliable performance of the therapy. These new machines have progressively undergone a series of technological steps that have resulted in the evolution of highly sophisticated equipment utilized today. A significant number of advances have taken place since the time continuous renal replacement therapy was initiated. In particular, there have been successful experiments with high-volume hemofiltration and high-permeability hemofiltration. The additional and combined use of sorbent has also been tested successfully. Progress has been made in the technology as well as the understanding of the pathophysiology of acute kidney injury. Today, new biomaterials and new devices are available and new frontiers are on the horizon. Although improvements have been made, a lot remains to be done. Critical care nephrology is expected to further evolve in the near future, especially in the area of information and

  15. 78 FR 40625 - National School Lunch Program: Direct Certification Continuous Improvement Plans Required by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-08

    ... National School Lunch Program: Direct Certification Continuous Improvement Plans Required by the Healthy... Continuous Improvement Plans Required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010'' on February 22, 2013... performance benchmarks and to develop and implement continuous improvement plans if they fail to do so. The...

  16. Improving the Relationship between Continuing Education Leadership and Marketing Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Jim

    2009-01-01

    In this economy, college and university continuing education units will not automatically reap the benefits of returning adult learners as in past recessions: this economy caused a drastic reduction of resources available to the workforce and for personal revenue. As a result of decreased personal income and workforce training funding, competition…

  17. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure: does bubbling improve gas exchange?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, C J; Lau, R; De Paoli, A; Davis, P G

    2005-07-01

    In a randomised crossover trial, 26 babies, treated with Hudson prong continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) from a bubbling bottle, received vigorous, high amplitude, or slow bubbling for 30 minutes. Pulse oximetry, transcutaneous carbon dioxide, and respiratory rate were recorded. The bubbling rates had no effect on carbon dioxide, oxygenation, or respiratory rate.

  18. X-rays taken by radiologists. Influence on a continuous quality improvement process?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtz, C.; Freiburg Univ.; Czapp, W.; Trampe, I.; Leppek, R.; Klose, K.J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate how the training of radiology residents in taking radiographs influences the work of radiographers and the established quality standards. Methods: A first year radiology resident was trained for 4 weeks in focusing and exposure techniques by radiographers. In a second period the resident took 582 radiograms, which were compared with those taken by technicians for error estimation on a daily basis. During a third period the radiographs were produced in a contest between the resident and a skilled radiographer. Errors were analysed by two independent experts according to established guidelines of the German Medical Association. Results: At the beginning of the second period the average error rate of the resident was 11.9% as compared to 8.9% in the technicians team, in the following month 9.2% versus 15.9%. In the third period no relevant difference in errors could be observed. Finally, unexpected quality improvements were implemented like an improved standardization of focusing and exposure techniques as well as dose reduction. Conclusions: Radiology residents easily learn focusing and exposure techniques and achieve comparable results as radiographers within a short period of time. The additionally achieved knowledge improves the technical process of taking radiographs. We recommend to include a two plane radiography training period in the curriculum of radiology residents. It reinforces the radiologist's role in continuous quality improvements of the diagnostic process. (orig.) [de

  19. The Social Intelligence of Principals: Links to Teachers' Continuous Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuade, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Despite multiple efforts to reform 21st education to better meet the needs of all students, school improvement successes have been sporadic and debatable. Research suggests that significant improvement lies within the purview of teachers and principals, and this current research provided the underpinnings for the study. Based on neuroscience…

  20. Insight into the Effects of Reinforcement Shape on Achieving Continuous Martensite Transformation in Phase Transforming Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xudong; Ren, Junqiang; Wang, Xiaofei; Zong, Hongxiang; Cui, Lishan; Ding, Xiangdong

    2017-12-01

    A continuous martensite transformation is indispensable for achieving large linear superelasticity and low modulus in phase transforming metal-based composites. However, determining how to accurately condition the residual martensite in a shape memory alloy matrix though the reinforcement shape to achieve continuous martensite transformation has been a challenge. Here, we take the finite element method to perform a comparative study of the effects of nanoinclusion shape on the interaction and martensite phase transformation in this new composite. Two typical samples are compared: one reinforced by metallic nanowires and the other by nanoparticles. We find that the residual martensite within the shape memory alloy matrix after a pretreatment can be tailored by the reinforcement shape. In particular, our results show that the shape memory alloy matrix can retain enough residual martensite phases to achieve continuous martensite transformation in the subsequent loading when the aspect ratio of nanoreinforcement is larger than 20. In contrast, the composites reinforced with spherical or low aspect ratio reinforcement show a typical nonlinear superelasticity as a result of a low stress transfer-induced discontinuous martensite transformation within the shape memory alloy matrix.

  1. Process Evaluation and Continuous Improvement in Community Youth Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer V. Trachtenberg

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A method of using process evaluation to provide improvement plans in order to promote community youth programs is described. The core elements of this method include the following: (1 collection and analysis of baseline data, (2 feedback provided to programs describing their strengths and limitations, (3 programs provided with assistance in preparing improvement plans in regard to their baseline data, and (4 follow-up evaluation assessed program changes based on their improvement plans and baseline data. A case study of an inner-city neighborhood youth center is used to demonstrate this method.

  2. Observations of human factors as a continuous improvement tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, P.

    2015-01-01

    Principles for Excellence in Human Performance should promote behaviors throughout an organization that support safety and reliable operation of the plant. Such behaviors must be clearly defined, communicated and reinforced by managers, on a continuous basis. To identify if workers behaviors are in compliance with those expected is paramount to have an observations program in place, which in one hand identifies deviations from expectations to correct them, and on the other promotes the desired behaviors through positive reinforcement. (Author)

  3. Modular Approach for Continuous Cell-Level Balancing to Improve Performance of Large Battery Packs: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muneed ur Rehman, M.; Evzelman, M.; Hathaway, K.; Zane, R.; Plett, G. L.; Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Maksimovic, D.

    2014-10-01

    Energy storage systems require battery cell balancing circuits to avoid divergence of cell state of charge (SOC). A modular approach based on distributed continuous cell-level control is presented that extends the balancing function to higher level pack performance objectives such as improving power capability and increasing pack lifetime. This is achieved by adding DC-DC converters in parallel with cells and using state estimation and control to autonomously bias individual cell SOC and SOC range, forcing healthier cells to be cycled deeper than weaker cells. The result is a pack with improved degradation characteristics and extended lifetime. The modular architecture and control concepts are developed and hardware results are demonstrated for a 91.2-Wh battery pack consisting of four series Li-ion battery cells and four dual active bridge (DAB) bypass DC-DC converters.

  4. Multidisciplinary Prerounding Meeting as a Continuous Quality Improvement Tool: Leveraging to Reduce Continuous Benzodiazepine Use at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Alexander H; Thompson Bastin, Melissa L; Montgomery-Yates, Ashley; Hook, Corrine; Cassity, Evan; Eaton, Phillip M; Morris, Peter E

    2018-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine often has many barriers to overcome prior to implementation in practice, hence the importance of continuous quality improvement. We report on a brief (≤10 minutes) multidisciplinary meeting prior to rounds to establish a dashboard for continuous quality improvement and studied the success of this meeting on a particular area of focus: continuous infusion benzodiazepine minimization. This was a prospective observational study of patients admitted to the medical intensive care unit (MICU) of a large academic medical center over a 4-month period. A morning multidisciplinary prerounding meeting was implemented to report on metrics required to establish a dashboard for MICU care for the previous 24 hours. Fellows and nurse practitioners on respective teams reported on key quality metrics and other important data related to patient census. Continuous benzodiazepines were tracked daily as the number of patients per team who had orders for a continuous benzodiazepine infusion. The aim of this report is to describe the development of the morning multidisciplinary prerounding meeting and its impact on continuous benzodiazepine use, along with associated clinical outcomes. The median number of patients prescribed a continuous benzodiazepine daily decreased over this time period and demonstrated a sustained reduction at 1 year. Furthermore, sedation scores improved, corresponding to a reduction in median duration of mechanical ventilation. The effectiveness of this intervention was mapped post hoc to conceptual models used in implementation science. A brief multidisciplinary meeting to review select data points prior to morning rounds establishes mechanisms for continuous quality improvement and may serve as a mediating factor for successful implementation when initiating and monitoring practice change in the ICU.

  5. Professional Learning Communities: Teachers Working Collaboratively for Continuous Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Louise Ann

    2009-01-01

    Current research indicates that a professional learning community (PLC) is an effective means for helping teachers to bridge the gap between research and practice. A PLC is a team of educators systematically working together to improve teaching practice and student learning. This study evaluated the PLC formed by teachers at a public elementary…

  6. With Scale in Mind: A Continuous Improvement Model for Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Christopher; Cannata, Marisa; Taylor Haynes, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    The conventional approach to scaling up educational reforms considers the development and testing phases to be distinct from the work of implementing at scale. Decades of research suggest that this approach yields inconsistent and often disappointing improvements for schools most in need. More recent scholarship on scaling school improvement…

  7. Cyberbullying: Assessment of Student Experience for Continuous Improvement Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Paris S.; Strom, Robert D.; Wingate, Julius J.; Kraska, Marie F.; Beckert, Troy E.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the use of polling students to improve conditions of learning in their school. Students from three schools (N = 2,006) in Grades 5, 6, 7, and 8 completed an online poll about how cyberbullying affects their personal lives. Principals' impressions about the benefits of student polling are explained along with the Cyberbullying…

  8. Improved achievable secrecy rate of visible light communication with cooperative jamming

    KAUST Repository

    Zaid, Hajar; Rezki, Zouheir; Chaaban, Anas; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2016-01-01

    constraint on the input distribution which renders Gaussian inputs not admissible. We provide an achievable secrecy rate that improves upon a recently established one in a concurrent work by Mostafa and Lampe. Our scheme follows from both the secrecy capacity

  9. Improving Education Achievement and Attainment in Luxembourg. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 508

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, David; Ernst, Ekkehard

    2006-01-01

    Improving education achievement in Luxembourg is a priority for strengthening productivity growth and enhancing residents' employment prospects in the private sector, where employers mainly hire cross-border workers. Student achievement in Luxembourg is below the OECD average according to the 2003 OECD PISA study, with the performance gap between…

  10. Economy of Force: Continuous Process Improvement And The Air Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    CPI to fix the delinquent areas. Paragraph 1.5.11.3 states that “Functional Managers will . . . Take appropriate actions to correct identified...the power of data-driven decisions to include Statistical Quality Control (SQL), Acceptable Quality Level (AQL), and the Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA... statistical analysis and process improvement from Shewhart while working at Bell Telephone Laboratories, and Deming put his mark on the world when he

  11. Keeping the "continuous" in continuous quality improvement: exploring perceived outcomes of CQI program use in community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Todd A; Bishop, Andrea C; Duggan, Kellie; Reid, Carolyn; Mahaffey, Thomas; MacKinnon, Neil J; Mahaffey, Amelia

    2014-01-01

    Given the significant potential of continuous quality improvement (CQI) programs in enhancing overall levels of patient safety, community pharmacies in North America are under increasing pressure to have a formal and documented CQI program in place. However, while such initiatives may seem great on paper, in practice the outcomes of such programs to community pharmacy practice remain unclear. To explore the perceived outcomes identified by community pharmacies that adopted and actively used a standardized (i.e., common across pharmacies) CQI program for at least 1 year and to develop a framework for how such outcomes were achieved. A multi-site study of SafetyNET-Rx, a standardized and technologically sophisticated (e.g., online reporting of medication errors to a national database) CQI program, involving community pharmacies in Nova Scotia, Canada, was performed. During the summer and fall of 2011, 22 interviews were conducted with the CQI facilitators in 12 Nova Scotia community pharmacies; equally split between independent/banners and corporate chains. Of the CQI facilitators, 14 were pharmacists, while the remaining eight were pharmacy technicians. Thematic analysis following the procedures presented by Braun and Clarke was adopted to identify and explore the major outcomes. Results of the thematic analysis highlighted a number of perceived outcomes from the use of a standardized CQI program in community pharmacies, specifically: (1) perceived reduction in the number of medication errors that were occurring in the pharmacy, (2) increased awareness/confidence of individual actions related to dispensing, (3) increased understanding of the dispensing and related processes/workflow, (4) increased openness to talking about medication errors among pharmacy staff, and (5) quality and safety becoming more entrenched in the workflow (e.g., staff is more aware of their roles and responsibilities in patient safety and confident that the dispensing processes are safe and

  12. The assessment of instructional leadership as an aspect to improve learner achievement.

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    M.Ed. The school effectiveness studies that began appearing in the 1970's have suggested that leadership in schools with improving learner achievement differed from leadership in schools with declining learner achievement. The difference was mainly due to the fact that principals of schools that were improving were seen to be instructional leaders who are focused on the implementation of effective instructional programmes (Sybouts and Wendel, 1994: 19). The research by Hallinger and Heck t...

  13. Breaking through barriers: using technology to address executive function weaknesses and improve student achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David M

    2014-01-01

    Assistive technologies provide significant capabilities for improving student achievement. Improved accessibility, cost, and diversity of applications make integration of technology a powerful tool to compensate for executive function weaknesses and deficits and their impact on student performance, learning, and achievement. These tools can be used to compensate for decreased working memory, poor time management, poor planning and organization, poor initiation, and decreased memory. Assistive technology provides mechanisms to assist students with diverse strengths and weaknesses in mastering core curricular concepts.

  14. A story of success: continuous quality improvement in cystic fibrosis care in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quon, Bradley S; Goss, Christopher H

    2011-12-01

    Continuous quality improvement (CQI) in healthcare can be described as a reiterative approach to improving processes to reduce unexpected variation in health outcomes. CQI represents one model to achieve quality improvement (QI) and has long been recognized as a key to success in the manufacturing industry with companies like Toyota leading the way. Healthcare, and specifically pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine represent ideal settings for the application of CQI. This opinion piece will describe QI and CQI initiatives in the US Cystic fibrosis (CF) population. QI in CF care in the United States has been ongoing since inception of the US CF Foundation (CFF) in 1955. This effort has included work to improve the quality of clinical care provided at CF centers and work to improve clinical outcomes in CF. More recently, QI methods have been applied to the conduct of clinical research. The CF community has become a leader in the area of QI and has pointed out the opportunities for others to follow in the area of lung diseases.

  15. Improving training tools for continuing operator qualification in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marti, F.; San Antonio, S.

    1991-01-01

    There are currently nine nuclear power plants in service in Spain; the most recent started commercial operation in 1988. Spanish legislation requires operators to have an academic technical background of at least 3 yr. The turnover rate is <5%, and in recent years, symptom-based emergency procedure has been introduced. These facts have given rise to a situation in which Spanish licensed operators are demanding more in-depth training to avoid a stagnant routine and boredom. In responding to this challenge, Tecnatom has had to significantly update its two simulators for boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PSR) plants, to ensure coverage of the emergency procedures and has had to create a tool - the Interactive Graphics Simulator - that allows these problems to be ameliorated. With a view to updating its simulators, Tecnatom initiated in 1985 a project known as advanced simulation models (MAS), which was completed at the end of 1990. The TRACS code is a real-time advanced thermohydraulic code for upgrading Tecnatom's nuclear plant simulators. The interactive graphic simulator, (SGI) is a system that provides a graphic display of the models of a full-scope simulator by means of color monitors. The two new tools used are enabling higher levels of motivation to be achieved among the plant operations personnel, especially with respect to requalification

  16. Continuous improvement processes using Lean Management tools. A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pârv Luminița

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes how Lean Management may be applied in the university setting to improve the management processes. The correlation of didactic, educational and research activities with the stakeholders needs is one of the main objectives of the university. In this respect, an indicator used to analyse a university, for the purposes of fulfilling its mission, respectively for the purposes of streamlining its didactic and scientific activity, is related to the number of graduates on the labour market, acting in their area of specialization. This work presents a best practice of Lean Management at Transilvania University of Brasov, Romania.

  17. The innovation scorecard for continuous improvement applied to translational science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotarba, Joseph A; Wooten, Kevin

    2017-10-01

    This paper reports on the baseline stage of a qualitative evaluation of the application of the Innovative Scorecard (ISC) to the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) at Galveston. The ISC is adopted from the established Balanced Scorecard system for strategic planning and performance management. In formulating the evaluation, we focused on the organizational identity literature. The initial evaluation consisted of a series of semi-structured interviews with 22 participants of the ISC Boot Camp conducted in July 2015. The logic of grounded theory pointed to the clustering of perceptions of the ISC around respondents' occupational locations at UTMB. Administrators anticipate the expansion of planning activities to include a wider range of participants under the current CTSA award period (2015-2020) than under our first CTSA approval period (2009-2014). A common viewpoint among the senior scientists was that the scientific value of their work will continue to speak for itself without requiring the language of business. Junior scientists looked forward to the ISC's emphasis on increasingly horizontal leadership that will give them more access to and more control over their work and resources. Postdocs and senior staff welcomed increased involvement in the total research process at UTMB. The report concludes with strategies for future follow-up.

  18. A calculation technique to improve continuous monitoring of containment integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    The containment envelope of nuclear plants is a passive and extremely effective safety feature. World experience indicates, however, that inadvertent breaches of envelope integrity can go undetected for substantial time periods. Consequently, continuous monitoring of integrity is being closely examined by many containment designers and operators. The most promising approach is to use sensors and systems that automatically measure changes in the mass of air in containment, time integrate any known air mass flow rates across containment boundaries, and perform a mass balance to obtain the air mass leaked. As fluctuations in such measurements are typically too large to enable leakage to be calculated to the desired precision, filtering and statistical techniques must be used to filter out random and time-dependent fluctuations. Current approaches cannot easily deal with nonrandom or systematic fluctuations in the measurements, including pressure changes within the containment. As a result, sampling periods must be kept short, or data measured during periods of varying containment pressure must be discarded. The technique described allows for much longer sampling periods under conditions of fluctuating containment pressure and eliminates the invalidation of data when the containment pressure fluctuation is nonrandom. It should therefore yield a much more precise value for the containment leakage characteristic. It also promises to be able to distinguish the presence of systematic errors unrelated to systematic pressure changes and to establish whether the containment leakage characteristic is laminar or turbulent

  19. Integrating empowerment evaluation and quality improvement to achieve healthcare improvement outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandersman, Abraham; Alia, Kassandra Ann; Cook, Brittany; Ramaswamy, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    While the body of evidence-based healthcare interventions grows, the ability of health systems to deliver these interventions effectively and efficiently lags behind. Quality improvement approaches, such as the model for improvement, have demonstrated some success in healthcare but their impact has been lessened by implementation challenges. To help address these challenges, we describe the empowerment evaluation approach that has been developed by programme evaluators and a method for its application (Getting To Outcomes (GTO)). We then describe how GTO can be used to implement healthcare interventions. An illustrative healthcare quality improvement example that compares the model for improvement and the GTO method for reducing hospital admissions through improved diabetes care is described. We conclude with suggestions for integrating GTO and the model for improvement. PMID:26178332

  20. Integrating empowerment evaluation and quality improvement to achieve healthcare improvement outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandersman, Abraham; Alia, Kassandra Ann; Cook, Brittany; Ramaswamy, Rohit

    2015-10-01

    While the body of evidence-based healthcare interventions grows, the ability of health systems to deliver these interventions effectively and efficiently lags behind. Quality improvement approaches, such as the model for improvement, have demonstrated some success in healthcare but their impact has been lessened by implementation challenges. To help address these challenges, we describe the empowerment evaluation approach that has been developed by programme evaluators and a method for its application (Getting To Outcomes (GTO)). We then describe how GTO can be used to implement healthcare interventions. An illustrative healthcare quality improvement example that compares the model for improvement and the GTO method for reducing hospital admissions through improved diabetes care is described. We conclude with suggestions for integrating GTO and the model for improvement. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Continuously Growing Ultrathick CrN Coating to Achieve High Load-Bearing Capacity and Good Tribological Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zechao; Wang, Yongxin; Cheng, Xiaoying; Zeng, Zhixiang; Li, Jinlong; Lu, Xia; Wang, Liping; Xue, Qunji

    2018-01-24

    Continuous growth of traditional monolayer CrN coatings up to 24 h is successfully achieved to fabricate ultrathickness of up to 80 μm on the 316 stainless steel substrate using a multiarc ion plating technique. The microstructures, mechanical properties, and tribological properties evolution with the CrN coating continuously growing was evaluated in detail. The transmission electron microscopy observations and inverse Fourier-filtered images reveal a relaxation mechanism during the continuous growth of CrN coating, which can lead to a decrease in the residual stress when coating growth time exceeds 5 h. The scratch test and friction test results both show that the load-bearing capacity of coating is significantly increased as CrN coatings growing thicker. During the scratch test, the ultrathick CrN coating of thickness 80.6 μm is not failed under the load of 180 N, and the dominant failure mechanism is the cohesive failure including wedge spallation and cracking. The dry-sliding friction test results show the mean coefficient of friction and the wear rate of ultrathick CrN are respectively decreased by 17.2 and 56.8% at most compared with the thin coating (thickness is 5.4 μm). The ultrahigh load-bearing capacity and excellent tribological property are attributed to the relaxation mechanism and limited contact pressure as the coating grows continuously.

  2. A System for Continual Quality Improvement of Normal Tissue Delineation for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breunig, Jennifer; Hernandez, Sophy; Lin, Jeffrey; Alsager, Stacy; Dumstorf, Christine; Price, Jennifer; Steber, Jennifer; Garza, Richard; Nagda, Suneel; Melian, Edward; Emami, Bahman [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois (United States); Roeske, John C., E-mail: jroeske@lumc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To implement the 'plan-do-check-act' (PDCA) cycle for the continual quality improvement of normal tissue contours used for radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: The CT scans of patients treated for tumors of the brain, head and neck, thorax, pancreas and prostate were selected for this study. For each scan, a radiation oncologist and a diagnostic radiologist, outlined the normal tissues ('gold' contours) using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) guidelines. A total of 30 organs were delineated. Independently, 5 board-certified dosimetrists and 1 trainee then outlined the same organs. Metrics used to compare the agreement between the dosimetrists' contours and the gold contours included the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), and a penalty function using distance to agreement. Based on these scores, dosimetrists were re-trained on those organs in which they did not receive a passing score, and they were subsequently re-tested. Results: Passing scores were achieved on 19 of 30 organs evaluated. These scores were correlated to organ volume. For organ volumes <8 cc, the average DSC was 0.61 vs organ volumes {>=}8 cc, for which the average DSC was 0.91 (P=.005). Normal tissues that had the lowest scores included the lenses, optic nerves, chiasm, cochlea, and esophagus. Of the 11 organs that were considered for re-testing, 10 showed improvement in the average score, and statistically significant improvement was noted in more than half of these organs after education and re-assessment. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate the feasibility of applying the PDCA cycle to assess competence in the delineation of individual organs, and to identify areas for improvement. With testing, guidance, and re-evaluation, contouring consistency can be obtained across multiple dosimetrists. Our expectation is that continual quality improvement using the PDCA approach will ensure more accurate treatments and dose

  3. A System for Continual Quality Improvement of Normal Tissue Delineation for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breunig, Jennifer; Hernandez, Sophy; Lin, Jeffrey; Alsager, Stacy; Dumstorf, Christine; Price, Jennifer; Steber, Jennifer; Garza, Richard; Nagda, Suneel; Melian, Edward; Emami, Bahman; Roeske, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To implement the “plan-do-check-act” (PDCA) cycle for the continual quality improvement of normal tissue contours used for radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: The CT scans of patients treated for tumors of the brain, head and neck, thorax, pancreas and prostate were selected for this study. For each scan, a radiation oncologist and a diagnostic radiologist, outlined the normal tissues (“gold” contours) using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) guidelines. A total of 30 organs were delineated. Independently, 5 board-certified dosimetrists and 1 trainee then outlined the same organs. Metrics used to compare the agreement between the dosimetrists' contours and the gold contours included the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), and a penalty function using distance to agreement. Based on these scores, dosimetrists were re-trained on those organs in which they did not receive a passing score, and they were subsequently re-tested. Results: Passing scores were achieved on 19 of 30 organs evaluated. These scores were correlated to organ volume. For organ volumes <8 cc, the average DSC was 0.61 vs organ volumes ≥8 cc, for which the average DSC was 0.91 (P=.005). Normal tissues that had the lowest scores included the lenses, optic nerves, chiasm, cochlea, and esophagus. Of the 11 organs that were considered for re-testing, 10 showed improvement in the average score, and statistically significant improvement was noted in more than half of these organs after education and re-assessment. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate the feasibility of applying the PDCA cycle to assess competence in the delineation of individual organs, and to identify areas for improvement. With testing, guidance, and re-evaluation, contouring consistency can be obtained across multiple dosimetrists. Our expectation is that continual quality improvement using the PDCA approach will ensure more accurate treatments and dose assessment in

  4. [Improving the continuous care process in primary care during weekends and holidays: redesigning and FMEA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañada Dorado, A; Cárdenas Valladolid, J; Espejo Matorrales, F; García Ferradal, I; Sastre Páez, S; Vicente Martín, I

    2010-01-01

    To describe a project carried out in order to improve the process of Continuous Health Care (CHC) on Saturdays and bank holidays in Primary Care, area number 4, Madrid. The aim of this project was to guarantee a safe and error-free service to patients receiving home health care on weekends. The urgent need for improving CHC process was identified by the Risk Management Functional Unit (RMFU) of the area. In addition, some complaints had been received from the nurses involved in the process as well as from their patients. A SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) analysis performed in 2009 highlighted a number of problems with the process. As a result, a project for improvement was drawn up, to be implemented in the following stages: 1. Redesigning and improving the existing process. 2. Application of failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) to the new process. 3. Follow up, managing and leading the project. 4. Nurse training. 5. Implementing the process in the whole area. 6. CHC nurse satisfaction surveys. After carrying out this project, the efficiency and level of automation improved considerably. Since implementation of the process enhancement measures, no complaints have been received from patients and surveys show that CHC nurse satisfaction has improved. By using FMEA, errors were given priority and enhancement steps were taken in order to: Inform professionals, back-up personnel and patients about the process. Improve the specialist follow-up report. Provide training in ulcer patient care. The process enhancement, and especially its automation, has resulted in a significant step forward toward achieving greater patient safety. FMEA was a useful tool, which helped in taking some important actions. Finally, CHC nurse satisfaction has clearly improved. Copyright © 2009 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Positioning Continuing Education: Boundaries and Intersections between the Domains Continuing Education, Knowledge Translation, Patient Safety and Quality Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitto, Simon; Bell, Mary; Peller, Jennifer; Sargeant, Joan; Etchells, Edward; Reeves, Scott; Silver, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Public and professional concern about health care quality, safety and efficiency is growing. Continuing education, knowledge translation, patient safety and quality improvement have made concerted efforts to address these issues. However, a coordinated and integrated effort across these domains is lacking. This article explores and discusses the…

  6. Automated monitoring: a potential solution for achieving sustainable improvement in hand hygiene practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchenko, Alexander I; Boscart, Veronique M; Fernie, Geoff R

    2014-08-01

    Adequate hand hygiene is often considered as the most effective method of reducing the rates of hospital-acquired infections, which are one of the major causes of increased cost, morbidity, and mortality in healthcare. Electronic monitoring technologies provide a promising direction for achieving sustainable hand hygiene improvement by introducing the elements of automated feedback and creating the possibility to automatically collect individual hand hygiene performance data. The results of the multiphase testing of an automated hand hygiene reminding and monitoring system installed in a complex continuing care setting are presented. The study included a baseline Phase 1, with the system performing automated data collection only, a preintervention Phase 2 with hand hygiene status indicator enabled, two intervention Phases 3 and 4 with the system generating hand hygiene reminding signals and periodic performance feedback sessions provided, and a postintervention Phase 5 with only hand hygiene status indicator enabled and no feedback sessions provided. A significant increase in hand hygiene performance observed during the first intervention Phase 3 was sustained over the second intervention Phase 4, with the postintervention phase also indicating higher hand hygiene activity rates compared with the preintervention and baseline phases. The overall trends observed during the multiphase testing, the factors affecting acceptability of the automated hand hygiene monitoring system, and various strategies of technology deployment are discussed.

  7. Identifying continuous quality improvement publications: what makes an improvement intervention ‘CQI’?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Susanne; Lim, Yee-Wei; Danz, Marjorie S; Foy, Robbie; Suttorp, Marika J; Shekelle, Paul G; Rubenstein, Lisa V

    2011-01-01

    Background The term continuous quality improvement (CQI) is often used to refer to a method for improving care, but no consensus statement exists on the definition of CQI. Evidence reviews are critical for advancing science, and depend on reliable definitions for article selection. Methods As a preliminary step towards improving CQI evidence reviews, this study aimed to use expert panel methods to identify key CQI definitional features and develop and test a screening instrument for reliably identifying articles with the key features. We used a previously published method to identify 106 articles meeting the general definition of a quality improvement intervention (QII) from 9427 electronically identified articles from PubMed. Two raters then applied a six-item CQI screen to the 106 articles. Results Per cent agreement ranged from 55.7% to 75.5% for the six items, and reviewer-adjusted intra-class correlation ranged from 0.43 to 0.62. ‘Feedback of systematically collected data’ was the most common feature (64%), followed by being at least ‘somewhat’ adapted to local conditions (61%), feedback at meetings involving participant leaders (46%), using an iterative development process (40%), being at least ‘somewhat’ data driven (34%), and using a recognised change method (28%). All six features were present in 14.2% of QII articles. Conclusions We conclude that CQI features can be extracted from QII articles with reasonable reliability, but only a small proportion of QII articles include all features. Further consensus development is needed to support meaningful use of the term CQI for scientific communication. PMID:21727199

  8. Identifying continuous quality improvement publications: what makes an improvement intervention 'CQI'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Sean M; Hempel, Susanne; Lim, Yee-Wei; Danz, Marjorie S; Foy, Robbie; Suttorp, Marika J; Shekelle, Paul G; Rubenstein, Lisa V

    2011-12-01

    The term continuous quality improvement (CQI) is often used to refer to a method for improving care, but no consensus statement exists on the definition of CQI. Evidence reviews are critical for advancing science, and depend on reliable definitions for article selection. As a preliminary step towards improving CQI evidence reviews, this study aimed to use expert panel methods to identify key CQI definitional features and develop and test a screening instrument for reliably identifying articles with the key features. We used a previously published method to identify 106 articles meeting the general definition of a quality improvement intervention (QII) from 9427 electronically identified articles from PubMed. Two raters then applied a six-item CQI screen to the 106 articles. Per cent agreement ranged from 55.7% to 75.5% for the six items, and reviewer-adjusted intra-class correlation ranged from 0.43 to 0.62. 'Feedback of systematically collected data' was the most common feature (64%), followed by being at least 'somewhat' adapted to local conditions (61%), feedback at meetings involving participant leaders (46%), using an iterative development process (40%), being at least 'somewhat' data driven (34%), and using a recognised change method (28%). All six features were present in 14.2% of QII articles. We conclude that CQI features can be extracted from QII articles with reasonable reliability, but only a small proportion of QII articles include all features. Further consensus development is needed to support meaningful use of the term CQI for scientific communication.

  9. Improving the Achievement of Second Year Natural Resource Management Students of Madawalabu University through Cooperative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulahi, Mohammed Mussa; Hashim, Hakim; Kawo, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this action research is to improve the achievement of students in general and, to examine the perception of students and teachers about cooperative learning, to identify major factors affecting the implementation of cooperative learning and to identify the possible strategies used to improve cooperative learning in Madawalabu…

  10. School Improvement Plans and Student Achievement: Preliminary Evidence from the Quality and Merit Project in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Andrea; Rastelli, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    This study provides preliminary evidence from an Italian in-service training program addressed to lower secondary school teachers which supports school improvement plans (SIPs). It aims at exploring the association between characteristics/contents of SIPs and student improvement in math achievement. Pre-post standardized tests and text analysis of…

  11. Training Theory of Mind and Executive Control: A Tool for Improving School Achievement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloo, Daniela; Perner, Josef

    2008-01-01

    In the preschool years, there are marked improvements in theory of mind (ToM) and executive functions. And, children's competence in these two core cognitive domains is associated with their academic achievement. Therefore, training ToM and executive control could be a valuable tool for improving children's success in school. This article reviews…

  12. Indicators of the management for the continuous improvement of the radiological safety in a radioactive facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amador B, Z. H.

    2006-01-01

    The use of safety indicators is common in the nuclear industry. In this work the implementation of indicators for the efficiency analysis of the radiological safety management system of a radioactive installation is presented. Through the same ones the occupational exposure, the training Y authorization of the personnel, the control of practices Y radioactive inventory, the results of the radiological surveillance, the occurrence of radiological events, the aptitude of the monitoring equipment, the management of the radioactive waste, the public exposure, the audits Y the costs of safety are evaluated. Its study is included in the periodic training of the workers. Without this interrelation it is not possible to maintain the optimization of the safety neither to achieve a continuous improvement. (Author)

  13. Technical integrity and continuous improvement: Key to survival beyond the nineties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorogood, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Drilling decisions made before a rig reaches location make a significant contribution to an oil company's financial success. Of value to the company is not the ability to drill wells, but the ability to plan with confidence in the knowledge of what is possible. In spite of this, operators have tended to over-work day to day decisions about drilling out of proportion to their significance. Recognition of this fact has resulted in the present wave of contracting initiatives. A major challenge for the industry is to achieve the necessary transfer of responsibility without compromising the operator's license to operate. These changes will compel the service sector to develop a new culture of technical integrity and continuous improvement. To operate safely, measure performance and manage drilling risk, the transformation will oblige the service sector to adopt many technologies presently owned by oil companies

  14. Organizational climate survey: management model tool on continuous improvement promotion in Finantial Institutional Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Amancio da Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The organizational climate survey has been an important tool in the corporate world, the way in which the institutions can assess and ascertain through the results, the degree of satisfaction of its employees and look through plan of action, achieve better results in both performance and production. Through an empirical research, exploratory qualitative research, with collection of secondary data, it was found that the implementation of the organizational climate survey, "Speak Frankly" from Itaú Unibanco, it could analyze data and make a plan of effective action aiming at continuous improvement in the organizational environment, serving as personnel management model. The results were favorable in the period from year 2012 to 2014 with an increase of the degree of satisfaction in four 4% and maintained excellent adherence to answer questions reaching 90% the number of employees.

  15. Sense of agency in continuous action: Assistance-induced performance improvement is self-attributed even with knowledge of assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kazuya; Takeda, Yuji; Kimura, Motohiro

    2017-02-01

    In a task involving continuous action to achieve a goal, the sense of agency increases with an improvement in task performance that is induced by unnoticed computer assistance. This study investigated how explicit instruction about the existence of computer assistance affects the increase of sense of agency that accompanies performance improvement. Participants performed a continuous action task in which they controlled the direction of motion of a dot to a goal by pressing keys. When instructions indicated the absence of assistance, the sense of agency increased with performance improvement induced by computer assistance, replicating previous findings. Interestingly, this increase of sense of agency was also observed even when instructions indicated the presence of assistance. These results suggest that even when a plausible cause of performance improvement other than one's own action exists, the improvement can be misattributed to one's own control of action, resulting in an increased sense of agency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. How to achieve and prove performance improvement - 15 years of experience in German wastewater benchmarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertzbach, F; Franz, T; Möller, K

    2012-01-01

    This paper shows the results of performance improvement, which have been achieved in benchmarking projects in the wastewater industry in Germany over the last 15 years. A huge number of changes in operational practice and also in achieved annual savings can be shown, induced in particular by benchmarking at process level. Investigation of this question produces some general findings for the inclusion of performance improvement in a benchmarking project and for the communication of its results. Thus, we elaborate on the concept of benchmarking at both utility and process level, which is still a necessary distinction for the integration of performance improvement into our benchmarking approach. To achieve performance improvement via benchmarking it should be made quite clear that this outcome depends, on one hand, on a well conducted benchmarking programme and, on the other, on the individual situation within each participating utility.

  17. Ergonomics, quality and continuous improvement--conceptual and empirical relationships in an industrial context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, J

    1997-10-01

    This paper reviews the literature comparing the fields of ergonomics and quality, mainly in an industrial context, including mutual influences, similarities and differences. Relationships between ergonomics and the factors: work conditions, product design, ISO 9000, continuous improvements and TQM are reviewed in relation to the consequence, application, and process domains. The definitions of ergonomics and quality overlap substantially. Quality deficiencies, human errors and ergonomics problems often have the same cause, which in many cases can be traced to the design of work, workplace and environment e.g. noise, light, postures, loads, pace and work content. In addition, the possibility of performing to a high standard at work is an important prerequisite for satisfaction and well-being. Contradictions between the two fields have been identified in the view of concepts such as standardization, reduction of variability and copying of best practice, requiring further research. The field of quality would gain by incorporating ergonomics knowledge, especially in the areas of work design and human capability, since these factors are decisive for human performance and also therefore the performance of the systems involved. The field of ergonomics, on the other hand, would benefit from developing a stronger emphasis on methodologies and structures for improvement processes, including a clearer link with leadership and company strategies. Just as important is a further development of practicable participative ergonomics methods and tools for use at workplaces by the workers themselves, in order to integrate the top-down and the bottom-up processes and achieve better impact. Using participative processes for problem-solving and continuous improvement, focusing ergonomics and quality jointly has a great potential for improving working conditions and quality results simultaneously, and satisfying most of the interested parties.

  18. Improving prehospital trauma care in Rwanda through continuous quality improvement: an interrupted time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, John W; Nyinawankusi, Jeanne D'Arc; Enumah, Samuel; Maine, Rebecca; Uwitonze, Eric; Hu, Yihan; Kabagema, Ignace; Byiringiro, Jean Claude; Riviello, Robert; Jayaraman, Sudha

    2017-07-01

    Injury is a major cause of premature death and disability in East Africa, and high-quality pre-hospital care is essential for optimal trauma outcomes. The Rwandan pre-hospital emergency care service (SAMU) uses an electronic database to evaluate and optimize pre-hospital care through a continuous quality improvement programme (CQIP), beginning March 2014. The SAMU database was used to assess pre-hospital quality metrics including supplementary oxygen for hypoxia (O2), intravenous fluids for hypotension (IVF), cervical collar placement for head injuries (c-collar), and either splinting (splint) or administration of pain medications (pain) for long bone fractures. Targets of >90% were set for each metric and daily team meetings and monthly feedback sessions were implemented to address opportunities for improvement. These five pre-hospital quality metrics were assessed monthly before and after implementation of the CQIP. Met and unmet needs for O2, IVF, and c-collar were combined into a summative monthly SAMU Trauma Quality Scores (STQ score). An interrupted time series linear regression model compared the STQ score during 14 months before the CQIP implementation to the first 14 months after. During the 29-month study period 3,822 patients met study criteria. 1,028 patients needed one or more of the five studied interventions during the study period. All five endpoints had a significant increase between the pre-CQI and post-CQI periods (pRwanda. This programme may be used as an example for additional efforts engaging frontline staff with real-time data feedback in order to rapidly translate data collection efforts into improved care for the injured in a resource-limited setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Adhesion improvement of fibres by continuous plasma treatment at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom; Sørensen, Bent F.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon fibres and ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibres were continuously treated by a dielectric barrier discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure for adhesion improvement with epoxy resins. The plasma treatment improved wettability, increased the oxygen containing polar...

  20. Prevention of respiratory complications of the surgical patient: actionable plan for continued process improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscic, Katarina J; Grabitz, Stephanie D; Rudolph, Maíra I; Eikermann, Matthias

    2017-06-01

    Postoperative respiratory complications (PRCs) increase hospitalization time, 30-day mortality and costs by up to $35 000. These outcomes measures have gained prominence as bundled payments have become more common. Results of recent quantitative effectiveness studies and clinical trials provide a framework that helps develop center-specific treatment guidelines, tailored to minimize the risk of PRCs. The implementation of those protocols should be guided by a local, respected, and visible facilitator who leads proper implementation while inviting center-specific input from surgeons, anesthesiologists, and other perioperative stakeholders. Preoperatively, patients should be risk-stratified for PRCs to individualize intraoperative choices and postoperative pathways. Laparoscopic compared with open surgery improves respiratory outcomes. High-risk patients should be treated by experienced providers based on locally developed bundle-interventions to optimize intraoperative treatment and ICU bed utilization. Intraoperatively, lung-protective ventilation (procedure-specific positive end-expiratory pressure utilization, and low driving pressure) and moderately restrictive fluid therapy should be used. To achieve surgical relaxation, high-dose neuromuscular blocking agents (and reversal agents) as well as high-dose opioids should be avoided; inhaled anesthetics improve surgical conditions while protecting the lungs. Patients should be extubated in reverse Trendelenburg position. Postoperatively, continuous positive airway pressure helps prevent airway collapse and protocolized, early mobilization improves cognitive and respiratory function.

  1. [Recommendations for the evaluation and follow-up of the continuous quality improvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurellet-Evrard, S; Daunizeau, A

    2013-06-01

    Continual improvement of the quality in a medical laboratory is based on the implementation of tools for systematically evaluate the quality management system and its ability to meet the objectives defined. Monitoring through audit and management review, addressing complaints and nonconformities and performing client satisfaction survey are the key for the continual improvement.

  2. Continuous Improvement in the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering Programme at Kuwait University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldowaisan, Tariq; Allahverdi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the process employed by the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering programme at Kuwait University to continuously improve the programme. Using a continuous improvement framework, the paper demonstrates how various qualitative and quantitative analyses methods, such as hypothesis testing and control charts, have been…

  3. Organizational structure and continuous improvement and learning: Moderating effects of cultural endorsement of participative leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaowen Huang; Joseph C Rode; Roger G Schroeder

    2011-01-01

    Building upon the culturally endorsed implicit theory of leadership, we investigated the moderating effects of national culture on the relationship between organizational structure and continuous improvement and learning. We propose that the relationship between organic organizations (characterized by flat, decentralized structures with a wide use of multifunctional employees) and continuous improvement and learning will be stronger when national cultural endorsement for participative leaders...

  4. Improving Students' Achievement in Writing Descriptive Text by Using Movie Posters

    OpenAIRE

    Saleha, Ayu -; -, Sumarsih -

    2014-01-01

    This study concerns on Improving Students' Achievement in Writing Descriptive Text by Using Movie Posters. The underlying objective of this study is to investigate whether teaching descriptive by using movie posters potentially improves students' skill. The research was conducted by using Classroom Action Research (CAR). The subject of the research was class X of SMA SWASTA UTAMA MEDAN. The number of the students was 28. The procedure of the research was administrated into two cycles which ea...

  5. NUMBER OF SUCCESSIVE CYCLES NECESSARY TO ACHIEVE STABILITY OF SELECTED GROUND REACTION FORCE VARIABLES DURING CONTINUOUS JUMPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmes M.W. Brownjohn

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Because of inherent variability in all human cyclical movements, such as walking, running and jumping, data collected across a single cycle might be atypical and potentially unable to represent an individual's generalized performance. The study described here was designed to determine the number of successive cycles due to continuous, repetitive countermovement jumping which a test subject should perform in a single experimental session to achieve stability of the mean of the corresponding continuously measured ground reaction force (GRF variables. Seven vertical GRF variables (period of jumping cycle, duration of contact phase, peak force amplitude and its timing, average rate of force development, average rate of force relaxation and impulse were extracted on the cycle-by-cycle basis from vertical jumping force time histories generated by twelve participants who were jumping in response to regular electronic metronome beats in the range 2-2.8 Hz. Stability of the selected GRF variables across successive jumping cycles was examined for three jumping rates (2, 2.4 and 2.8 Hz using two statistical methods: intra-class correlation (ICC analysis and segmental averaging technique (SAT. Results of the ICC analysis indicated that an average of four successive cycles (mean 4.5 ± 2.7 for 2 Hz; 3.9 ± 2.6 for 2.4 Hz; 3.3 ± 2.7 for 2.8 Hz were necessary to achieve maximum ICC values. Except for jumping period, maximum ICC values took values from 0.592 to 0.991 and all were significantly (p < 0.05 different from zero. Results of the SAT revealed that an average of ten successive cycles (mean 10.5 ± 3.5 for 2 Hz; 9.2 ± 3.8 for 2.4 Hz; 9.0 ± 3.9 for 2.8 Hz were necessary to achieve stability of the selected parameters using criteria previously reported in the literature. Using 10 reference trials, the SAT required standard deviation criterion values of 0.49, 0.41 and 0.55 for 2 Hz, 2.4 Hz and 2.8 Hz jumping rates, respectively, in order to approximate

  6. DEVELOPMENT SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY BASED TEACHING MATERIALS ON DYNAMIC FLUIDS TO IMPROVE STUDENTS ACHIEVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeliana Veronika Sirait

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to investigate whether the developed scientific inquiry-based teaching materials can improve the students’ response, the students’ activity and the students’ achievement. This study is development which based on Borg & Gall product development. Samples were selected randomly by raffling 4 classes into one class, applied teaching materials based scientific inquiry. The instruments which are used in this study consisted of three namely quetionnaires used for validation of teaching material by the expert of the material and the expert of design, the evaluation of physics teacher and students’ response toward teaching materials and observation sheet of students’ activity used in learning process and also test for students’ achievement in the form of multiple choice consisted of 10 quetions provided for end of the learning. The results of this study showed that the developed scientific inquiry-based teaching materials can improve the students’ response, the students’ activity and the students’ achievement in every session.

  7. The important to growing self-efficacy to improve achievement motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benawa, Arcadius

    2018-03-01

    The long-term goal of this research is to accommodate the students’ perceptions of the influence of the lecturer’s leadership in teaching and learning activities and the students’ self-efficacy to the students’ achievement motivation. This research used questionnaires which distributed to the respondents and the data obtained were processed quantitatively with path analysis. The results showed that the significance influence of leadership on the lecturer only accounted for 1.4%, while the effect of self-efficacy of the student is very significant on the students’ achievement motivation, which amounted to 84.5%. The conclusions are that the lecturer leadership has no significant effect on the students’ achievement motivation, but self-efficacy has a great effect. The implication of this conclusion is that important to growing self-efficacy’s students to improve the students’ achievement motivation.

  8. Improving the Achievement on Writing Narrative Text through Discussion Starter Story Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purba, Rodearta

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study is to find out whether discussion starter story significantly improves the achievement on narrative text of the first grade students of Senior High School. This study was conducted by applying Classroom Action Research (CAR). The subject of this study is the first grade students of SMA Negeri 2 Pangururan in academic…

  9. The Effectiveness of Blended Learning in Improving Students' Achievement in Third Grade's Science in Bani Kenana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khader, Nisreen Saleh Khader

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed at identifying the effectiveness of blended learning in improving students' achievement in the third grade's science in the traditional method. The study sample consisted of (108) male and female students, who were divided into two groups: experimental and control. The experimental group studied the units and changes of the…

  10. Improving Students' Creative Thinking and Achievement through the Implementation of Multiple Intelligence Approach with Mind Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiana, I. Wayan; Jampel, I. Nyoman

    2016-01-01

    This classroom action research aimed to improve the students' creative thinking and achievement in learning science. It conducted through the implementation of multiple intelligences with mind mapping approach and describing the students' responses. The subjects of this research were the fifth grade students of SD 8 Tianyar Barat, Kubu, and…

  11. Improving the Study Skills of Discrepant Achieving Seventh Grade Students. Research and Development Report 30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Roger G.; Pappas, James P.

    Three approaches to the problem of helping underachieving seventh grade boys improve their study habits are compared: (1) behavior modification; (2) group counseling; and (3) didactic instruction. A pre-post criteria format sought to measure change in terms of: (1) academic achievement as measured by grade point average; and (2) study habits and…

  12. Improving Student Achievement and Teacher Effectiveness through Scientifically Based Practices. NCREL Viewpoints, Number 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, Linda, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Viewpoints" is a multimedia package containing two audio CDs and a short, informative booklet. This volume of "Viewpoints" focuses on using scientifically based practices to improve student achievement and teacher effectiveness. The audio CDs provide the voices, or viewpoints, of various leaders from the education field who have worked closely…

  13. Organizational learning and continuous quality improvement: examining the impact on nursing home performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondeau, Kent V; Wagar, Terry H

    2002-01-01

    Interest is growing in learning more about the ability of total quality management and continuous quality improvement (TQM/CQI) initiatives to contribute to the performance of healthcare organizations. A major factor in the successful implementation of TQM/CQI is the seminal contribution of an organization's culture. Many implementation efforts have not succeeded because of a corporate culture that failed to stress broader organizational learning. This may help to explain why some TQM/CQI programs have been unsuccessful in improving healthcare organization performance. Organizational performance variables and organizational learning orientation were assessed in a sample of 181 Canadian long-term care organizations that had implemented a formal TQM/CQI program. Categorical regression analysis shows that, in the absence of a strong corporAte culture that stresses organizational learning and employee development, few performance enhancements are reported. The results of the assessment suggest that a TQM/CQI program without the backing of a strong organizational learning culture may be insufficient to achieve augmented organizational performance.

  14. Employing continuous quality improvement in community-based substance abuse programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinman, Matthew; Hunter, Sarah B; Ebener, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to describe continuous quality improvement (CQI) for substance abuse prevention and treatment programs in a community-based organization setting. CQI (e.g., plan-do-study-act cycles (PDSA)) applied in healthcare and industry was adapted for substance abuse prevention and treatment programs in a community setting. The authors assessed the resources needed, acceptability and CQI feasibility for ten programs by evaluating CQI training workshops with program staff and a series of three qualitative interviews over a nine-month implementation period with program participants. The CQI activities, PDSA cycle progress, effort, enthusiasm, benefits and challenges were examined. Results indicated that CQI was feasible and acceptable for community-based substance abuse prevention and treatment programs; however, some notable resource challenges remain. Future studies should examine CQI impact on service quality and intended program outcomes. The study was conducted on a small number of programs. It did not assess CQI impact on service quality and intended program outcomes. Practical implications- This project shows that it is feasible to adapt CQI techniques and processes for community-based programs substance abuse prevention and treatment programs. These techniques may help community-based program managers to improve service quality and achieve program outcomes. This is one of the first studies to adapt traditional CQI techniques for community-based settings delivering substance abuse prevention and treatment programs.

  15. Integrating Quality Improvement and Continuing Professional Development: A Model From the Mental Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Tehrani, Hedieh; Lin, Elizabeth; Lieff, Susan; Harris, Ilene; Soklaridis, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    To explore the perspectives of leaders in psychiatry and continuing professional development (CPD) regarding the relationship, opportunities, and challenges in integrating quality improvement (QI) and CPD. In 2013-2014, the authors interviewed 18 participants in Canada: 10 psychiatrists-in-chief, 6 CPD leaders in psychiatry, and 2 individuals with experience integrating these domains in psychiatry who were identified through snowball sampling. Questions were designed to identify participants' perspectives about the definition, relationship, and integration of QI and CPD in psychiatry. Interviews were recorded and transcribed. An iterative, inductive method was used to thematically analyze the transcripts. To ensure the rigor of the analysis, the authors performed member checking and sampling until theoretical saturation was achieved. Participants defined QI as a concept measured at the individual, hospital, and health care system levels and CPD as a concept measured predominantly at the individual and hospital levels. Four themes related to the relationship between QI and CPD were identified: challenges with QI training, adoption of QI into the mental health care system, implementation of QI in CPD, and practice improvement outcomes. Despite participants describing QI and CPD as mutually beneficial, they expressed uncertainty about the appropriateness of aligning these domains within a mental health care context because of the identified challenges. This study identified challenges with aligning QI and CPD in psychiatry and yielded a framework to inform future integration efforts. Further research is needed to determine the generalizability of this framework to other specialties and health care professions.

  16. Continuous Calibration Improvement in Solar Reflective Bands: Landsat 5 Through Landsat 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Nischal; Helder, Dennis; Barsi, Julia; Markham, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Launched in February 2013, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on-board Landsat 8 continues to perform exceedingly well and provides high science quality data globally. Several design enhancements have been made in the OLI instrument relative to prior Landsat instruments: pushbroom imaging which provides substantially improved Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), spectral bandpasses refinement to avoid atmospheric absorption features, 12 bit data resolution to provide a larger dynamic range that limits the saturation level, a set of well-designed onboard calibrators to monitor the stability of the sensor. Some of these changes such as refinements in spectral bandpasses compared to earlier Landsats and well-designed on-board calibrator have a direct impact on the improved radiometric calibration performance of the instrument from both the stability of the response and the ability to track the changes. The on-board calibrator lamps and diffusers indicate that the instrument drift is generally less than 0.1% per year across the bands. The refined bandpasses of the OLI indicate that temporal uncertainty of better than 0.5% is possible when the instrument is trended over vicarious targets such as Pseudo Invariant Calibration Sites (PICS), a level of precision that was never achieved with the earlier Landsat instruments. The stability measurements indicated by on-board calibrators and PICS agree much better compared to the earlier Landsats, which is very encouraging and bodes well for the future Landsat missions too.

  17. Drivers of Dashboard Development (3-D): A Curricular Continuous Quality Improvement Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroyer, A Laurie; Lu, Wei-Hsin; Chandran, Latha

    2016-04-01

    Undergraduate medical education (UME) programs are seeking systematic ways to monitor and manage their educational performance metrics and document their achievement of external goals (e.g., Liaison Committee on Medical Education [LCME] accreditation requirements) and internal objectives (institution-specific metrics). In other continuous quality improvement (CQI) settings, summary dashboard reports have been used to evaluate and improve performance. The Stony Brook University School of Medicine UME leadership team developed and implemented summary dashboard performance reports in 2009 to document LCME standards/criteria compliance, evaluate medical student performance, and identify progress in attaining institutional curricular goals and objectives. Key performance indicators (KPIs) and benchmarks were established and have been routinely monitored as part of the novel Drivers of Dashboard Development (3-D) approach to curricular CQI. The systematic 3-D approach has had positive CQI impacts. Substantial improvements over time have been documented in KPIs including timeliness of clerkship grades, midclerkship feedback, student mistreatment policy awareness, and student satisfaction. Stakeholder feedback indicates that the dashboards have provided useful information guiding data-driven curricular changes, such as integrating clinician-scientists as lecturers in basic science courses to clarify the clinical relevance of specific topics. Gaining stakeholder acceptance of the 3-D approach required clear communication of preestablished targets and annual meetings with department leaders and course/clerkship directors. The 3-D approach may be considered by UME programs as a template for providing faculty and leadership with a CQI framework to establish shared goals, document compliance, report accomplishments, enrich communications, facilitate decisions, and improve performance.

  18. The efficacy of a continuous quality improvement (CQI) method in a radiological department: comparison with non-CQI control material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurila, J.; Standertskjoeld-Nordenstam, C.G.; Suramo, I.; Tolppanen, E.M.; Tervonen, O.; Korhola, O.; Brommels, M.

    2000-01-01

    To study the efficacy of continuous quality improvement (CQI) compared to ordinary management in an on-duty radiology department. Because of complaints regarding delivery of on-duty radiological services, an improvement was initiated simultaneously at two hospitals, at the HUCH (Helsinki University Central Hospital) utilising the CQI-method, and at the OUH (Oulu University Hospital) with a traditional management process. For the CQI project, a team was formed to evaluate the process with flow-charts, cause and effect diagrams, Pareto analysis and control charts. Interventions to improve the process were based on the results of these analyses. The team at the HUCH implemented the following changes: A radiologist was added to the evening shift between 15:00 - 22:00 and a radiographer was moved from the morning shift to 15:00 - 22:00. A clear improvement was achieved in the turn-around time, but in the follow-up some of the gains were lost. Only minimal changes were achieved at the OUH, where the intervention was based on traditional management processes. CQI was an effective method for improving the quality of performance of a radiology department compared with ordinary management methods, but some of this improvement may be subsequently lost without a continuous measurement system

  19. The Big Improvement in PISA 2009 Reading Achievements in Serbia: Improvement of the Quality of Education or Something Else?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragica Pavlović Babić

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The PISA 2009 results in Serbia show a big improvement in reading literacy compared to 2006 – the average score is 41 points higher, which is equal to the effect of a whole year of schooling in OECD countries and represents the second highest improvement ever recorded in a PISA study. In the present paper, we discuss potential reasons for such a big improvement based on analysis of the PISA 2009 reading achievements in different countries, with a special focus on countries from the same region (Croatia, Slovenia, Montenegro, Bulgaria, Romania and Albania. The analysis shows that the largest part of the improvement was realised at lower achieving levels, suggesting that the dominant method of teaching in schools is a traditional method oriented towards the acquisition and reproduction of academic knowledge. Findings of data analysis support the conclusion that the improvement is mainly the result of certain contextual factors, such as higher student motivation and a high level of official support for the PISA study in Serbia, rather than representing a real improvement in the quality of education.

  20. Lean Transformation Guidance: Why Organizations Fail To Achieve and Sustain Excellence Through Lean Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Hamed Ahmed

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Many companies are complaining that lean didn’t achieve their long-term goals, and the improvement impact was very short-lived. 7 out of each 10 lean projects fail as companies try to use lean like a toolkit, copying and pasting the techniques without trying to adapt the employee’s culture, manage the improvement process, sustain the results, and develop their leaders. When the Toyota production system was created, the main goal was to remove wastes from the shop floor using some lean techniques and tools. What was not clear is that this required from Toyota a long process of leadership development, and a high commitment to training and coaching their employee. A Failure to achieve and sustain the improvement is a problem of both management and leadership as well as the improper understanding of the human behavior, and the required culture to success.

  1. The Implementation of Aptitude Treatment Interaction (ATI to Improve Learning Motivation of Low Achievement Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syawal - Syawal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This research was classroom action research, which aims at improving students' motivation of their poor performance through learning model Aptitude Treatment Interaction (ATI on VII.3 grade students of SMP Negeri 6 Parepare. Aptitude Treatment Interaction (ATI can serve individual student differences by adjusting treatment or learning method with students' abilities. The use of this model was emphasizing to create small groups of students that have achievement alike. Students with have low academic achievement based on test results and teacher interview will be grouped into one group and will be given preferential treatment by tutoring intensity rather than the group of high academic achievement. Subjects of this research were students of class VII.3 SMP Negeri 6 Parepare which is consist of 25 students. This research was conducted in two cycles. The procedure of this research involved four phases: (1 planning, (2 Implementation of action, (3 observation, (4 Reflection. The data collection was done by observation, tests, and questionnaires for each cycle after giving treatment through learning model Aptitude Treatment Interaction (ATI. Data collected were analyzed using quantitative and qualitative analysis. The results of this research indicate that the Aptitude Treatment Interaction (ATI can be an alternative method to improve learning motivation of low achievement students. The results of this research also showed that the Aptitude Treatment Interaction (ATI can be an alternative to problem-solving in the classroom, especially for low achievement students.

  2. Nurse managers' experiences in continuous quality improvement in resource-poor healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakyo, Tracy Alexis; Xiao, Lily Dongxia

    2017-06-01

    Ensuring safe and quality care for patients in hospitals is an important part of a nurse manager's role. Continuous quality improvement has been identified as one approach that leads to the delivery of quality care services to patients and is widely used by nurse managers to improve patient care. Nurse managers' experiences in initiating continuous quality improvement activities in resource-poor healthcare settings remain largely unknown. Research evidence is highly demanded in these settings to address disease burden and evidence-based practice. This interpretive qualitative study was conducted to gain an understanding of nurse managers' Continuous Quality Improvement experiences in rural hospitals in Uganda. Nurse managers in rural healthcare settings used their role to prioritize quality improvement activities, monitor the Continuous Quality Improvement process, and utilize in-service education to support continuous quality improvement. The nurse managers in our sample encountered a number of barriers during the implementation of Continuous Quality Improvement, including: limited patient participation, lack of materials, and limited human resources. Efforts to address the challenges faced through good governance and leadership development require more attention. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. An action research study; cultural differences impact how manufacturing organizations receive continuous improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattman, Braden R.

    National culture and organizational culture impact how continuous improvement methods are received, implemented and deployed by suppliers. Previous research emphasized the dominance of national culture over organizational culture. The countries studied included Poland, Mexico, China, Taiwan, South Korea, Estonia, India, Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, and Japan. The research found that Canada was most receptive to continuous improvement, with China being the least receptive. The study found that organizational culture was more influential than national culture. Isomorphism and benchmarking is driving continuous-improvement language and methods to be more universally known within business. Business and management practices are taking precedence in driving change within organizations.

  4. ThedaCare's business performance system: sustaining continuous daily improvement through hospital management in a lean environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnas, Kim

    2011-09-01

    For 2003-2008, ThedaCare, a community health system in Wisconsin, achieved significant improvements in quality and the elimination of waste through the development of an improvement system, which included Value Stream analysis, rapid improvement events, and projects applied to specific processes. However, to meet its continuous daily improvement goals, particularly the goal of increasing productivity by 10% annually, ThedaCare needed to change the way its managers and leaders (in its hospital division) conduct and manage their daily work. Accordingly, it developed its Business Performance System (BPS) to achieve and sustain continuous daily improvement. BUILDING THE BPS: ThedaCare devised a multipart pilot project, consisting of "learning to see" and then, "problem solving." On completion of the 15-week alpha phase (6 units) in July 2009, the BPS was spread to the beta pilot (12 units; September 2009-January 2010) and then to cohort 3 (10 units; September 2010-January 2011). Each alpha unit improved performance on (1) the key driver metric of increasing productivity from 2008 to year-end 2009 (by 1%-11%) and (2) its respective safety/ quality drivers over the respective 2008 baselines. For 2010, improvements across the alpha, beta, and cohort 3 units were found for 11 of the 14 safety/quality drivers-85% of the 11 customer satisfaction drivers, 83% of 6 people engagement drivers; and 48% of 23 financial stewardship drivers. The tools developed for the BPS have enabled teams to see, prioritize, and pursue continuous daily improvement opportunities. Unit leaders now have a structured management reporting system to reduce variation in their management styles. Leaders all now follow leadership standard work, and their daily work is now consistently aligned with the hospital and system strategy.

  5. Strategies to Improve Students’ Educational Achievement Motivation at Guilan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdokht Taheri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In view of the fact that motivation is linked directly to the learning process and educational achievement, this study endeavored to identify strategies to improve students’ educational achievement motivation at Guilan University of Medical Sciences. Methods: To conduct this descriptive-analytical study, 368 students from Guilan University of Medical Sciences were selected using simple random sampling from 2013-2014. All of the Guilan University of Medical Sciences’ students met the general eligibility criteria except guest students. The questionnaire included five domains of economic, socio-cultural, educational, geo-regional, and personality factors in educational achievement motivation. Through using descriptive and inferential statistics (Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests, the compiled data were analyzed at the significance level of 0.05. Results: Data analysis revealed that socio-cultural factors have the maximum score (64.14 ± 9.92 and geo-regional factors have the minimum score (19.01±3.63 on the participants’ educational achievement motivation. What is more, a significant difference was revealed between educational field and educational effective factors as well as educational level and educational effective factors (p<0.011, p<0.004, respectively. Conclusion: Given that the socio-cultural factors had the maximum score on the students’ educational achievement motivation, it is recommended that university officials take these factors into account, and attempt to plan to provide appropriate strategies to enhance their students’ motivation, specifically their educational achievement motivation.

  6. Bordetella Pertussis virulence factors in the continuing evolution of whooping cough vaccines for improved performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorji, Dorji; Mooi, Frits; Yantorno, Osvaldo; Deora, Rajendar; Graham, Ross M; Mukkur, Trilochan K

    2018-02-01

    Despite high vaccine coverage, whooping cough caused by Bordetella pertussis remains one of the most common vaccine-preventable diseases worldwide. Introduction of whole-cell pertussis (wP) vaccines in the 1940s and acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines in 1990s reduced the mortality due to pertussis. Despite induction of both antibody and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses by aP and wP vaccines, there has been resurgence of pertussis in many countries in recent years. Possible reasons hypothesised for resurgence have ranged from incompliance with the recommended vaccination programmes with the currently used aP vaccine to infection with a resurged clinical isolates characterised by mutations in the virulence factors, resulting in antigenic divergence with vaccine strain, and increased production of pertussis toxin, resulting in dampening of immune responses. While use of these vaccines provide varying degrees of protection against whooping cough, protection against infection and transmission appears to be less effective, warranting continuation of efforts in the development of an improved pertussis vaccine formulations capable of achieving this objective. Major approaches currently under evaluation for the development of an improved pertussis vaccine include identification of novel biofilm-associated antigens for incorporation in current aP vaccine formulations, development of live attenuated vaccines and discovery of novel non-toxic adjuvants capable of inducing both antibody and CMI. In this review, the potential roles of different accredited virulence factors, including novel biofilm-associated antigens, of B. pertussis in the evolution, formulation and delivery of improved pertussis vaccines, with potential to block the transmission of whooping cough in the community, are discussed.

  7. 78 FR 69018 - Improving the Resiliency of Mobile Wireless Communications Networks; Reliability and Continuity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... consumers value overall network reliability and quality in selecting mobile wireless service providers, they...-125] Improving the Resiliency of Mobile Wireless Communications Networks; Reliability and Continuity... (Reliability NOI) in 2011 to ``initiate a comprehensive examination of issues regarding the reliability...

  8. Government/contractor partnerships for continuous improvement. A Goddard Space Flight Center example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagler, Richard C.

    1992-01-01

    The efforts of a government organization and its major contractors to foster a continuous improvement environment which transcends the traditional government/contractor relationship is discussed. This relationship is aimed at communication, partnership, and trust - creating benefits for all involved.

  9. The implementation of assessment model based on character building to improve students’ discipline and achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusijono; Khotimah, K.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of implementing the assessment model based on character building to improve discipline and student’s achievement. Assessment model based on character building includes three components, which are the behaviour of students, the efforts, and student’s achievement. This assessment model based on the character building is implemented in science philosophy and educational assessment courses, in Graduate Program of Educational Technology Department, Educational Faculty, Universitas Negeri Surabaya. This research used control group pre-test and post-test design. Data collection method used in this research were observation and test. The observation was used to collect the data about the disciplines of the student in the instructional process, while the test was used to collect the data about student’s achievement. Moreover, the study applied t-test to the analysis of data. The result of this research showed that assessment model based on character building improved discipline and student’s achievement.

  10. Using Goal Achievement Training in juvenile justice settings to improve substance use services for youth on community supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jacqueline Horan; Becan, Jennifer E; Harris, Philip W; Nager, Alexis; Baird-Thomas, Connie; Hogue, Aaron; Bartkowski, John P; Wiley, Tisha

    2018-04-30

    The link between substance use and involvement in the juvenile justice system has been well established. Justice-involved youth tend to have higher rates of drug use than their non-offending peers. At the same time, continued use can contribute to an elevated risk of recidivism, which leads to further, and oftentimes more serious, involvement with the juvenile justice system. Because of these high rates of use, the juvenile justice system is well positioned to help identify youth with substance use problems and connect them to treatment. However, research has found that only about 60% of juvenile probation agencies screen all youth for substance involvement, and even fewer provide comprehensive assessment or help youth enroll in substance use treatment. This paper describes an integrated training curriculum that was developed to help juvenile justice agencies improve their continuum of care for youth probationers with substance use problems. Goal Achievement Training (GAT) provides a platform for continuous quality improvement via two sessions delivered onsite to small groups of staff from juvenile justice and behavioral health agencies. In the first session, participants are taught to identify goals and goal steps for addressing identified areas of unmet need (i.e., screening, assessment, and linkage to treatment services). In the second session, participants learn principles and strategies of data-driven decision-making for achieving these goals. This paper highlights GAT as a model for the effective implementation of cost-efficient training strategies designed to increase self-directed quality improvement activities that can be applied to any performance domain within juvenile justice settings. Efforts to monitor implementation fidelity of GAT within the specific context of the juvenile justice settings are highlighted. Challenges to setting the stage for process improvement generally, as well as specific hurdles within juvenile justice settings are discussed

  11. Lean Transformation Guidance: Why Organizations Fail To Achieve and Sustain Excellence Through Lean Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Hamed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Many companies are complaining that lean didn’t achieve their long-term goals, and the improvement impact was very short-lived. 7 out of each 10 lean projects fail as companies try to use lean like a toolkit, copying and pasting the techniques without trying to adapt the employee’s culture, manage the improvement process, sustain the results, and develop their leaders. When the Toyota production system was created, the main goal was to remove wastes from the shop floor us...

  12. Improving critical thinking and clinical reasoning with a continuing education course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Dina Monteiro; Pimenta, Cibele Mattos; Lunney, Margaret

    2009-03-01

    Continuing education courses related to critical thinking and clinical reasoning are needed to improve the accuracy of diagnosis. This study evaluated a 4-day, 16-hour continuing education course conducted in Brazil.Thirty-nine nurses completed a pretest and a posttest consisting of two written case studies designed to measure the accuracy of nurses' diagnoses. There were significant differences in accuracy from pretest to posttest for case 1 (p = .008) and case 2 (p = .042) and overall (p = .001). Continuing education courses should be implemented to improve the accuracy of nurses' diagnoses.

  13. The continuous improvement of the Internal Audits Process assurance the effective compliance of ISO 17025:2005 requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Di Candia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Continuous Improvement Process started in LATU in 1996. The Impact was so important that covered all the organization. Nowadays LATU has almost all its processes certificated and most than 200 tests accredited. The Internal Audits process began in 1996 with an annual planning for all the laboratory's areas. For the UKAS accreditation in 1998, LATU improves the internal audits planning auditing not only the system but also the tests. In 1999 LATU was certified by SQS and accredited the calibrations by DKD. Since 2004 internal audits was managed as a process; in order to that was defined objectives, indicators, achievements and the necessary resources of the internal audit programme and process. The internal audit programme has a pre defined tri annual planning that includes all the laboratory areas. The results of the measures obtained till now demonstrate the improvement in the internal audit and all the laboratory processes. Auditors final staff increase their technical competence. As a consequence of managing the internal audits as a process, the internal communication has an important relevance to feedback the continuous improvement of the laboratory. This was evidence in a decrease of the documentaries non conformities, improvement of the calibrations and maintenance programme, optimization trainings and qualifications of the staff, common internal trainings, creation of a quality assurance team to improvement the tests control, improvement in the relationship with the support areas. Most of this requirements are included in ISO 17025:2005; that assurance the effective compliance of this standard.

  14. Performance measures for improving the prevention of venous thromboembolism: achievement in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kenneth C; Merli, Geno J

    2011-10-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common complication during and after hospitalization for acute medical illness or surgery. Despite the existence of evidence-based guidelines for VTE prevention, real-world prescribing practices are frequently suboptimal. Specific performance measures relating to VTE prevention and treatment have been developed by US health care organizations to increase adherence with best-practice recommendations and ultimately reduce the number of preventable VTE events. Two measures developed by the Surgical Care Improvement Project have been endorsed by the National Quality Forum (NQF) and focus on VTE prevention. In addition, six measures have been developed recently by The Joint Commission in collaboration with the NQF; three measures relate to VTE prevention and three focus on treatment. To attain widespread achievement of these performance goals, it is essential to raise awareness of their existence and specifications. It is also imperative that hospitals develop and implement effective VTE protocols. The use of multiple, active strategies, such as computer decision support systems with regular audit and feedback, may be particularly valuable approaches to improve current practices within an integrated quality improvement program. During practical implementation of VTE protocols at Norton Healthcare (Kentucky's largest healthcare system), strong leadership, physician engagement, and caregiver accountability were identified as key factors influencing the process. As such, more hospitals may be able to increase adherence with guidelines, improve achievement of quality goals, and help to reduce the substantial burden associated with avoidable VTE.

  15. Creating Sustainable Education Projects in Roatán, Honduras through Continuous Process Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, Arjan; Randolph, Adriane B.; Heil, Shelli

    2010-01-01

    The investigators worked together with permanent residents of Roatán, Honduras on sustainable initiatives to help improve the island's troubled educational programs. Our initiatives focused on increasing the number of students eligible and likely to attend a university. Using a methodology based in continuous process improvement, we developed…

  16. Continuous improvement, burnout and job engagement: a study in a Dutch nursing department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benders, J.G.J.M.; Bleijerveld, H.; Schouteten, R.L.J.

    2017-01-01

    Continuous improvement (CI) programs are potentially powerful means to improve the quality of care. The more positive nurses perceive these programs' effects, the better they may be expected to cooperate. Crucial to this perception is how nurses' quality of working life is affected. We studied this

  17. Using Surveys of Students' Social-Emotional Learning and School Climate for Accountability and Continuous Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, Heather; Kalogrides, Demetra; Loeb, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    The research featured in this paper is part of the CORE-PACE Research Partnership, through which Policy Analysis for California Education (PACE) has partnered with the CORE districts to conduct research designed to support them in continuous improvement while simultaneously helping to improve policy and practice in California and nationwide.…

  18. The RISE Framework: Using Learning Analytics to Automatically Identify Open Educational Resources for Continuous Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodily, Robert; Nyland, Rob; Wiley, David

    2017-01-01

    The RISE (Resource Inspection, Selection, and Enhancement) Framework is a framework supporting the continuous improvement of open educational resources (OER). The framework is an automated process that identifies learning resources that should be evaluated and either eliminated or improved. This is particularly useful in OER contexts where the…

  19. Achieving continuous manufacturing: technologies and approaches for synthesis, workup, and isolation of drug substance. May 20-21, 2014 Continuous Manufacturing Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxendale, Ian R; Braatz, Richard D; Hodnett, Benjamin K; Jensen, Klavs F; Johnson, Martin D; Sharratt, Paul; Sherlock, Jon-Paul; Florence, Alastair J

    2015-03-01

    This whitepaper highlights current challenges and opportunities associated with continuous synthesis, workup, and crystallization of active pharmaceutical ingredients (drug substances). We describe the technologies and requirements at each stage and emphasize the different considerations for developing continuous processes compared with batch. In addition to the specific sequence of operations required to deliver the necessary chemical and physical transformations for continuous drug substance manufacture, consideration is also given to how adoption of continuous technologies may impact different manufacturing stages in development from discovery, process development, through scale-up and into full scale production. The impact of continuous manufacture on drug substance quality and the associated challenges for control and for process safety are also emphasized. In addition to the technology and operational considerations necessary for the adoption of continuous manufacturing (CM), this whitepaper also addresses the cultural, as well as skills and training, challenges that will need to be met by support from organizations in order to accommodate the new work flows. Specific action items for industry leaders are: Develop flow chemistry toolboxes, exploiting the advantages of flow processing and including highly selective chemistries that allow use of simple and effective continuous workup technologies. Availability of modular or plug and play type equipment especially for workup to assist in straightforward deployment in the laboratory. As with learning from other industries, standardization is highly desirable and will require cooperation across industry and academia to develop and implement. Implement and exploit process analytical technologies (PAT) for real-time dynamic control of continuous processes. Develop modeling and simulation techniques to support continuous process development and control. Progress is required in multiphase systems such as

  20. Science achievement of students in the Republic of Yemen and implications for improvement of science instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Nageeb Kassem

    The purpose of this study was to establish a research base from which strategies could be developed for improving science education in Yemen. The study measured the achievement in general science of Yemeni students attending primary, preparatory, and secondary schools, and their counterparts attending three- or five-year education programs in primary teacher training institutions. A sample of 1,984 students from six major cities in Yemen was given the Second International Science Study test in May 1988. Achievement scores of these selected groups were compared. The mean achievement in general science was 11.93 for science track students, 9.21 for three-year teacher training institution students, and 8.49 for five-year teacher training institution students. These mean scores were based on a total of 35 items. This low level of achievement was further verified by making comparisons of the achievement of selected groups from Yemeni high schools in six cities with each other. The following factors were measured in this study: location, grade level, gender and type of science program studied. Selected groups from Yemeni high schools were also compared to their peers in other nations. The researcher compared students of the science track and teacher training institutions to their counterparts in 13 nations and students of the literature track to their counterparts in eight nations. Fifth and ninth grade students' scores were compared with the scores of their counterparts in 15 and 17 nations respectively. In every comparison, every Yemeni group ranked at the bottom of the achievement list. (Jacobson W., & Doran, R. 1988) The outcomes of this research indicate the profound need for improving science programs in all grade levels in Yemen. The research recommendations for improvement in science education in Yemen fall into four areas: a change in attitudes toward education, a change in teacher education, a change in classroom conditions, and a change in educational

  1. Discovery learning with hierarchy concept to improve analysis ability and study achievement hydrolysis subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leny Yuliatun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to applied Discovery Learning (DL by the support of hierarchy concept to improve analysis ability and chemistry study achievement in the Hydrolysis subject at eleventh-grade students of Science 1 of SMA N Karangpandan at the academic year of 2016/2017. This research is using Classroom Action Research which using two cycles. In each cycle has four steps of action, they are planning, implementing, observing, and reflecting. The research subject is the eleventh-grade students of science one which consists of 40 students. The data source is using teacher and students and the data were taken by interviewing, observing, documenting, testing, and using questionnaire. Data analysis technique is using descriptive qualitative analysis. Based on the research shows that the achievement of analysis cycle I am from 52,5% increase into 65% in the cycle II. Meanwhile, the rise in students’ achievement in cognitive aspect increase from 57,5% in cycle I to 75% in cycle II. Achievement in an affective aspect in cycle I am 90% become 92,5% in cycle II. Therefore, there is the increase meant of students number in this aspect although in cycle I all of the indicator has been reached.

  2. Energy thrift and improved performance achieved through novel railway brake discs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirovic, Marko

    2009-01-01

    A disc with radial vanes and circumferential pillars proves to be successful in operation and achieves energy efficiency improvements compared with those of traditional design. Cooling characteristics of this novel design are practically identical to the disc with tangential vanes but the equivalent aerodynamic (air pumping) losses are approximately 50% less. It is shown that these reductions in pumping losses can lead to substantial energy savings in train operations. When developing new designs and/or comparing different railway disc designs, the proposed disc cooling to aerodynamic efficiency ratio (η v ) was found to be a very useful parameter to assess. This 'efficiency ratio' - a ratio of convective power dissipation to aerodynamic power losses can help in achieving adequate balance of cooling efficiency and aerodynamic losses to suit particular application. The use of CFD is of enormous benefit in generating discs that fulfil these demanding requirements, with the spin rig being exceptionally useful for experimental work

  3. Think Pair Share (TPS as Method to Improve Student’s Learning Motivation and Learning Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetika Hetika

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to find out the application of Think Pair Share (TPS learning method in improving learning motivation and learning achievement in the subject of Introduction to Accounting I of the Accounting Study Program students of Politeknik Harapan Bersama. The Method of data collection in this study used observation method, test method, and documentation method. The research instruments used observation sheet, questionnaire and test question. This research used Class Action Research Design which is an action implementation oriented research, with the aim of improving quality or problem solving in a group by carefully and observing the success rate due to the action. The method of analysis used descriptive qualitative and quantitative analysis method. The results showed that the application of Think Pair Share Learning (TPS Method can improve the Learning Motivation and Achievement. Before the implementation of the action, the obtained score is 67% then in the first cycle increases to 72%, and in the second cycle increasws to 80%. In addition, based on questionnaires distributed to students, it also increases the score of Accounting Learning Motivation where the score in the first cycle of 76% increases to 79%. In addition, in the first cycle, the score of pre test and post test of the students has increased from 68.86 to 76.71 while in the second cycle the score of pre test and post test of students has increased from 79.86 to 84.86.

  4. How to improve patient satisfaction when patients are already satisfied: a continuous process-improvement approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesner, Dan; Neufelder, Donna; Raisor, Janet; Bozman, Carl S

    2009-01-01

    The authors present a methodology that measures improvement in customer satisfaction scores when those scores are already high and the production process is slow and thus does not generate a large amount of useful data in any given time period. The authors used these techniques with data from a midsized rehabilitation institute affiliated with a regional, nonprofit medical center. Thus, this article functions as a case study, the findings of which may be applicable to a large number of other healthcare providers that share both the mission and challenges faced by this facility. The methodology focused on 2 factors: use of the unique characteristics of panel data to overcome the paucity of observations and a dynamic benchmarking approach to track process variability over time. By focusing on these factors, the authors identify some additional areas for process improvement despite the institute's past operational success.

  5. ACHIEVING MATURITY (AND MEASURING PERFORMANCE THROUGH MODEL-BASED PROCESS IMPROVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Marcelo Almeida Prado Cestari

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the approach adopted by a software development unit in order to achieve the maturity level 3 of CMMI-DEV and therefore obtaining better performance. Through historical research and secondary data analysis of the organization, the paper intends to answer the following research question: "Could the adoption of maturity/best practices models bring better performance results to small and medium organizations?" Data and analysis conducted show that, besides the creation of indicator’s based management, there are some quantitative performance improvements in indicators such as: Schedule Deviation Rate, Effort Deviation Rate, Percent Late Delivery, Productivity Deviation and Internal Rework Rate

  6. Problem Lah! Learning to Tell the Story of Continuous Assessment and Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Hanken, Tamera

    2014-01-01

    To succeed organizations rely on the purposeful application of the management functions, planning, organizing, leading and controlling, i.e., assessment. Assessment involves the collection and analysis of service and performance data to inform planning, organizing and leading-- opening the door to a culture of assessment and continuous improvement. Like other organizations responding to ever challenging economies and ever changing customer expectations, libraries are examining continuous impr...

  7. Visual Acuity Improvement in Continuous vs Divided Occlusion in Anisometropic Amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfani, Irawati; Feriyanto, Feri; Oktarima, Primawita; Kartasasmita, Arief

    2018-01-01

    To compare visual acuity improvement between continuous and split part-time occlusion for the treatment of moderate and severe anisometropic amblyopia. Randomised clinical trials in 6 - 13 y.o children with moderate and severe anisometropic amblyopia. Each patient was consecutively selected with continuous or split part-time occlusion. Best corrected visual acuity's improvement was followed up to six weeks and statistical data were analyzed using chi square and unpaired t-test. Best corrected visual acuity's improvement was comparable between continuous and split part-time occlusion (0.20±0.27 vs 0.21±0.25; p = 0.79). Split part-time occlusion may be considered as an alternative treatment for moderate and severe anisometropic amblyopia treatment.

  8. Parent Involvement on School Committees as Social Capital to Improve Student Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravik Karsidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores how the participation of parents on school committees improves student achievement. In decentralized education systems like the one in Indonesia, parents’ participation has become a focal point for improving the quality of education. The data for this study were collected using questionnaires distributed to 250 students in state senior high schools, selected by quota-purposive sampling. The qualitative findings of this research are threefold: most parents participated in student learning only by providing material aspects, such as tuition and books; most parents had a misconception that it was the school that should solely be responsible for the education of their children; busy parents tended to ignore the progress of their children’s learning. In order to create social capital for their children, parents need to be active in the learning process, cooperate with school officials, and get involved in the planning of social activities.

  9. A modified Continuous Quality Improvement approach to improve culturally and socially inclusive care within rural health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Olivia; Malatzky, Christina; Bourke, Lisa; Farmer, Jane

    2018-03-23

    The sickest Australians are often those belonging to non-privileged groups, including Indigenous Australians, gay, lesbian, bisexual, transsexual, intersex and queer people, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, socioeconomically disadvantaged groups, and people with disabilities and low English literacy. These consumers are not always engaged by, or included within, mainstream health services, particularly in rural Australia where health services are limited in number and tend to be generalist in nature. The aim of this study was to present a new approach for improving the sociocultural inclusivity of mainstream, generalist, rural, health care organisations. This approach combines a modified Continuous Quality Improvement framework with Participatory Action Research principles and Foucault's concepts of power, discourse and resistance to develop a change process that deconstructs the power relations that currently exclude marginalised rural health consumers from mainstream health services. It sets up processes for continuous learning and consumer responsiveness. The approach proposed could provide a Continuous Quality Improvement process for creating more inclusive mainstream health institutions and fostering better engagement with many marginalised groups in rural communities to improve their access to health care. The approach to improving cultural inclusion in mainstream rural health services presented in this article builds on existing initiatives. This approach focuses on engaging on-the-ground staff in the need for change and preparing the service for genuine community consultation and responsive change. It is currently being trialled and evaluated. © 2018 National Rural Health Alliance Ltd.

  10. An integrated approach to hospital strategic planning, quality assurance, and continuous quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, G; Gardner, S; Herba, C

    1995-01-01

    Like many other healthcare organizations today, the authors' facility, a 306-bed acute care community hospital in Michigan, strives to visualize and make a transition from traditional quality assurance to continuous quality improvement. The Juran Trilogy provided the insight that strategic planning, measurement, and continuous improvement must exist side by side. At the authors' facility, this realization resulted in the hospital quality plan, which treats each of these components as part of the foundation for quality. The authors explain this model and the reporting and communication mechanisms that support it.

  11. PDCA cycle as a part of continuous improvement in the production company - a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Jagusiak-Kocik

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a case study of the practical use of Deming cycle in a manufacturing company, from the plastics processing industry, from the sector of small and medium-sized enterprises. The paper is a study of literature in the field of continuous improvement and characterized by a cycle of continuous improvement, called the Deming cycle, or PDCA cycle. This cycle was used as a solution to quality problems which occurred during production of photo frames: discolorations and scorches on the surface of the frame. When measures were introduced to reduce the number of nonconformities, a decrease by more than 60% was observed.

  12. Employee Perceptions of Progress with Implementing a Student-Centered Model of Institutional Improvement: An Achieving the Dream Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, Annesa LeShawn

    2011-01-01

    Achieving the Dream is a national initiative focused on helping more community college students succeed, particularly students of color and low-income students. Achieving the Dream's student-centered model of institutional improvement focuses on eliminating gaps and raising student achievement by helping institutions build a culture of evidence…

  13. Lifestyle intervention for improving school achievement in overweight or obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Anne; Saunders, David H; Shenkin, Susan D; Sproule, John

    2014-03-14

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity in childhood and adolescence is high. Excessive body fat at a young age is likely to persist into adulthood and is associated with physical and psychosocial co-morbidities, as well as lower cognitive, school and later life achievement. Lifestyle changes, including reduced caloric intake, decreased sedentary behaviour and increased physical activity, are recommended for prevention and treatment of child and adolescent obesity. Evidence suggests that lifestyle interventions can benefit cognitive function and school achievement in children of normal weight. Similar beneficial effects may be seen in overweight or obese children and adolescents. To assess whether lifestyle interventions (in the areas of diet, physical activity, sedentary behaviour and behavioural therapy) improve school achievement, cognitive function and future success in overweight or obese children and adolescents compared with standard care, waiting list control, no treatment or attention control. We searched the following databases in May 2013: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, ERIC, IBSS, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DARE, ISI Conference Proceedings Citation Index, SPORTDiscus, Database on Obesity and Sedentary Behaviour Studies, Database of Promoting Health Effectiveness Reviews (DoPHER) and Database of Health Promotion Research. In addition, we searched the Network Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (NDLTD), three trials registries and reference lists. We also contacted researchers in the field. We included (cluster) randomised and controlled clinical trials of lifestyle interventions for weight management in overweight or obese children three to 18 years of age. Studies in children with medical conditions known to affect weight status, school achievement and cognitive function were excluded. Two review authors independently selected studies, extracted data, assessed quality and risk of bias and cross-checked extracts

  14. Interprofessional Curbside Consults to Develop Team Communication and Improve Student Achievement of Learning Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwin, Jennifer; Greenwood, Kristin Curry; Rico, Janet; Nalliah, Romesh; DiVall, Margarita

    2017-02-25

    Objective. To design and implement a series of activities focused on developing interprofessional communication skills and to assess the impact of the activities on students' attitudes and achievement of educational goals. Design. Prior to the first pharmacy practice skills laboratory session, pharmacy students listened to a classroom lecture about team communication and viewed short videos describing the roles, responsibilities, and usual work environments of four types of health care professionals. In each of four subsequent laboratory sessions, students interacted with a different standardized health care professional role-played by a pharmacy faculty member who asked them a medication-related question. Students responded in verbal and written formats. Assessment. Student performance was assessed with a three-part rubric. The impact of the exercise was assessed by conducting pre- and post-intervention surveys and analyzing students' performance on relevant Center for the Advancement of Pharmacy Education (CAPE) outcomes. Survey results showed improvement in student attitudes related to team-delivered care. Students' performance on the problem solver and collaborator CAPE outcomes improved, while performance on the educator outcome worsened. Conclusions. The addition of an interprofessional communication activity with standardized health care professionals provided the opportunity for students to develop skills related to team communication. Students felt the activity was valuable and realistic; however, analysis of outcome achievement from the exercise revealed a need for more exposure to team communication skills.

  15. Continuing medical education, continuing professional development, and knowledge translation: improving care of older patients by practicing physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David C; Johnston, Bree; Dunn, Kathel; Sullivan, Gail M; Brett, Belle; Matzko, Marilyn; Levine, Sharon A

    2006-10-01

    Many community-based internists and family physicians lack familiarity with geriatrics knowledge and best practices, but they face overwhelming fiscal and time barriers to expanding their skills and improving their behavior in the care of older people. Traditional lecture-and-slide-show continuing medical education (CME) programs have been shown to be relatively ineffective in changing this target group's practice. The challenge for geriatrics educators, then, is to devise CME programs that are highly accessible to practicing physicians, that will have an immediate and significant effect on practitioners' behavior, and that are financially viable. Studies of CME have shown that the most effective programs for knowledge translation in these circumstances involve what is known as active-mode learning, which relies on interactive, targeted, and multifaceted techniques. A systematic literature review, supplemented by structured interviews, was performed to inventory active-mode learning techniques for geriatrics knowledge and skills in the United States. Thirteen published articles met the criteria, and leaders of 28 active-mode CME programs were interviewed. This systematic review indicates that there is a substantial experience in geriatrics training for community-based physicians, much of which is unpublished and incompletely evaluated. It appears that the most effective methods to change behaviors involved multiple educational efforts such as written materials or toolkits combined with feedback and strong communication channels between instructors and learners.

  16. Modifying the Toyota Production System for continuous performance improvement in an academic children's hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, F Bruder; Hendricks, James; Hagan, Patrick; DelBeccaro, Mark

    2009-08-01

    The Toyota Production System (TPS) has become a successful model for improving efficiency and eliminating errors in manufacturing processes. In an effort to provide patients and families with the highest quality clinical care, our academic children's hospital has modified the techniques of the TPS for a program in continuous performance improvement (CPI) and has expanded its application to educational and research programs. Over a period of years, physicians, nurses, residents, administrators, and hospital staff have become actively engaged in a culture of continuous performance improvement. This article provides background into the methods of CPI and describes examples of how we have applied these methods for improvement in clinical care, resident teaching, and research administration.

  17. Expanding Continuous Quality Improvement Capacity in the Medical Intensive Care Unit: Prehealth Volunteers as a Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Kelsey C; Lobingier, Hannah; McCully, Nancy; Lombard, Jackie; Hansen, Mark; Uchiyama, Makoto; Hagg, Daniel S

    2016-01-01

    Health care delivery systems are challenged to support the increasing demands for improving patient safety, satisfaction, and outcomes. Limited resources and staffing are common barriers for making significant and sustained improvements. At Oregon Health & Science University, the medical intensive care unit (MICU) leadership team faced internal capacity limitations for conducting continuous quality improvement, specifically for the implementation and evaluation of the mobility portion of an evidence-based care bundle. The MICU team successfully addressed this capacity challenge using the person power of prehealth volunteers. In the first year of the project, 52 trained volunteers executed an evidence-based mobility intervention for 305 critically ill patients, conducting more than 200 000 exercise repetitions. The volunteers contributed to real-time evaluation of the project, with the collection of approximately 26 950 process measure data points. Prehealth volunteers are an untapped resource for effectively expanding internal continuous quality improvement capacity in the MICU and beyond.

  18. Using a Client Survey to Support Continuous Improvement: An Australian Case Study in Managing Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besch, Janice

    2014-01-01

    With the arrival of online survey tools that are low-cost, readily available and easy to administer, all organizations have access to one of the most effective mechanisms for determining quality improvement priorities and measuring progress towards achieving those priorities over time. This case study outlines the use made of this simple tool by a…

  19. Management of continual improvement for facilities and activities: A structured approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-04-01

    In recent years there has been an upward trend in the safety and operational performance of nuclear installations. Safe, efficient operation is their goal. Continual improvement of the processes of organizations has led to enhanced safety performance and efficiency benefits such as cost reductions and improved cycle times. Many organizations have experienced significant cost improvement largely by or through better financial management and a common drive to reduce costs brought on by commercial pressures. Without the use of a structured methodology to identify and implement improvements, changes to an organization to reduce costs through cutting staff and activities could eventually fail to produce the desired changes and even have a negative effect on safety and overall performance. The following fundamental principles are considered essential to the effective introduction of structured continual improvement: - Long term commitment from senior management throughout the entire organization; - The implementation in the organization of a process management approach such as that advocated by IAEA Safety Standards, ISO 9001, Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Award and European Foundation for Quality Management Business Excellence model; - The alignment of the processes with the objectives of the organization through the organization's business plan; - The utilization by Management of the process information as an input to managing the organization; - The employment of the information derived from the process performance to identify and prioritize the processes that require improvement; - The active participation of all staff of the organization to using its processes in order to contribute to continual process improvement (CPI). This publication defines a structured approach for continual improvement and focuses on the way an organization can improve its processes. It is recognized that there are many different approaches and methods available in the marketplace to

  20. Continuous Improvement and Employee Engagement, Part 2: Design, Implementation, and Outcomes of a Daily Management System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Marsha; Browall, Pamela; Phelan, Cynthia; Sanchez, Sandra; Sulmonte, Kimberlyann; Wandel, Jane; Wang, Allison

    2018-04-01

    A daily management system (DMS) can be used to implement continuous quality improvement and advance employee engagement. It can empower staff to identify problems in the care environment that impact quality or work flow and to address them on a daily basis. Through a DMS, improvement becomes the work of everyone, every day. The authors of this 2-part series describe their work to develop a DMS. Part 2 describes the implementation and outcomes of the program.

  1. Can there be mutual support between hospital marketing and continuous quality improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, D E

    1992-01-01

    Marketing the results of continuous quality improvement in hospitals builds a growing bank of loyal customers in an increasingly competitive and quality-oriented environment: If healthcare institutions want to survive and flourish, they must develop a lasting relationship with their customers. The long-term goal of CQI is to provide quality products and services. If marketing managers can sell these improved services, hospitals will build a solid client foundation.

  2. Analysis of development achievement of overseas resources and study of plans of system improvement (bituminous coal, general mineral resources)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, J N [Korea Energy Economics Institute, Euiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-05-01

    Development policy of overseas resources of Korea should be carried out as a part of long-term resources security policy that can prepare for the stable supply and demand of needed resources under the proper economic size and industrial structure. This study tried to search for the ways to promote overseas development of bituminous coal and, general mineral resources, and support them more effectively per field. For this, development achievements so far, domestic and foreign pending issues, and operation status of the support system are studied, analyzed, and the improvement plans are drafted per field. Financial support for overseas resources development should be more expanded than the present in the future. For this, the current collateral system centered on real right should be improved and financial support centered on the credit of enterprise should be reinforced. Besides, in the related tax support system, related tax laws and systems should be improved in order to alleviate the tax burden of business operators so that they can carry out the overseas resources development business with more advantageous conditions through the additive introduction of current deduction system of indirect payment tax. Since payback period of overseas resources development business tends to become long-term, it should be continuously carried out based on future-oriented development investment plan and will of more than twenty (20) years rather than on temporary development support plan based on short-term market trend. 25 refs., 73 tabs.

  3. Paediatric ED BiPAP continuous quality improvement programme with patient analysis: 2005-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramo, Thomas; Williams, Abby; Mushtaq, Samaiya; Meredith, Mark; Sepaule, Rawle; Crossman, Kristen; Burney Jones, Cheryl; Godbold, Suzanne; Hu, Zhuopei; Nick, Todd

    2017-01-16

    In paediatric moderate-to-severe asthmatics, there is significant bronchospasm, airway obstruction, air trapping causing severe hyperinflation with more positive intraplural pressure preventing passive air movement. These effects cause an increased respiratory rate (RR), less airflow and shortened inspiratory breath time. In certain asthmatics, aerosols are ineffective due to their inadequate ventilation. Bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) in acute paediatric asthmatics can be an effective treatment. BiPAP works by unloading fatigued inspiratory muscles, a direct bronchodilation effect, offsetting intrinsic PEEP and recruiting collapsed alveoli that reduces the patient's work of breathing and achieves their total lung capacity quicker. Unfortunately, paediatric emergency department (PED) BiPAP is underused and quality analysis is non-existent. A PED BiPAP Continuous Quality Improvement Program (CQIP) from 2005 to 2013 was evaluated using descriptive analytics for the primary outcomes of usage, safety, BiPAP settings, therapeutics and patient disposition. PED BiPAP CQIP descriptive analytics. Academic PED. 1157 patients. A PED BiPAP CQIP from 2005 to 2013 for the usage, safety, BiPAP settings, therapeutic response parameters and patient disposition was evaluated using descriptive analytics. Safety, usage, compliance, therapeutic response parameters, BiPAP settings and patient disposition. 1157 patients had excellent compliance without complications. Only 6 (0.5%) BiPAP patients were intubated. BiPAP median settings: IPAP 18 (16,20) cm H 2 O range 12-28; EPAP 8 cmH 2 O (8,8) range 6-10; inspiratory-to-expiratory time (I:E) ratio 1.75 (1.5,1.75). Pediatric Asthma Severity score and RR decreased (pimproved therapeutics times, very low intubations and decreased PICU admissions. CQIP analysis demonstrated that using a higher IPAP, low EPAP with longer I:E optimises the patient's BiPAP settings and showed a significant improvement in PAS, RR and tidal volume. Bi

  4. Continuous Plasma Treatment of Ultra-High-Molecular-Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) Fibres for Adhesion Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teodoru, Steluta; Kusano, Yukihiro; Rozlosnik, Noemi

    2009-01-01

    A dielectric barrier discharge in Ar, He, He/O2, N2 or O2 at atmospheric pressure was used for the continuous plasma treatment of UHMWPE fibres. The influence of the input power of the discharge and the gas flow rate on surface modification is studied with the aim of adhesion improvement. Surface...

  5. Factors Influencing Team Performance in a Continuous Quality Improvement Process in the Wisconsin Technical College System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietz, Victoria Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) programs are growing in popularity in higher education settings and a key component is the use of work groups, which require active employee involvement. The problem addressed in this research was the lack of employee engagement in the Quality Review Process (QRP), which is a statewide CQI model developed by…

  6. (Mis)Perceptions of Continuing Education: Insights from Knowledge Translation, Quality Improvement, and Patient Safety Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitto, Simon C.; Bell, Mary; Goldman, Joanne; Peller, Jennifer; Silver, Ivan; Sargeant, Joan; Reeves, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Minimal attention has been given to the intersection and potential collaboration among the domains of continuing education (CE), knowledge translation (KT), quality improvement (QI), and patient safety (PS), despite their overlapping objectives. A study was undertaken to examine leaders' perspectives of these 4 domains and their…

  7. Continuous Improvement: A Way of Integrating Student Enrollment, Advising, and Retention Systems in a Metropolitan University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, Karl J.; Moehl, Pamela J.

    1996-01-01

    The University of Missouri-St. Louis has discovered the value of continuous quality improvement methods in upgrading its core student-related administrative processes. As a result, it is increasing efficiency and personalizing a traditionally bureaucratic system of student service. Concurrent goals are to increase retention and decrease time to…

  8. Continuous improvement in managing R&D: A TQM approach at SkogForsk, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus Larsson

    1999-01-01

    Continuous improvement is an imperative process for any organization) even in the R&D field) who wants to stay competitive and alive. Our experience is that the most important ingredients in this process are engagement and participation by everybody) shared visions) and a holistic view of the organization. Structural changes and quick fixes cannot accomplish this....

  9. Record of Assessment Moderation Practice (RAMP): Survey Software as a Mechanism of Continuous Quality Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Genevieve Marie

    2015-01-01

    In higher education, assessment integrity is pivotal to student learning and satisfaction, and, therefore, a particularly important target of continuous quality improvement. This paper reports on the preliminary development and application of a process of recording and analysing current assessment moderation practices, with the aim of identifying…

  10. Using Reflective Learning to Improve the Impact of Continuing Education in the Context of Work Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, Brigitte; Durand, Marie-Jose; LeBlanc, Jeannette

    2010-01-01

    Reflective learning has been described as a promising approach for ameliorating the impact of continuing education (CE) programs. However, there are still very few studies that have investigated how occupational therapists use reflection to improve the integration of CE program content in their decision-making processes. The study objectives were…

  11. Demystifying Data: Designing and Implementing Data-Driven Systems and Practices for Continuous Quality Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugly, Andrew; Stein, Amanda; Centeno, Maribel G.

    2014-01-01

    Data-based decision making should be the driving force in any early care and education setting. Data usage compels early childhood practitioners and leaders to make decisions on the basis of more than just professional instinct. This article explores why early childhood schools should be using data for continuous quality improvement at various…

  12. Using Data to Drive Success in Educator Prep: Massachusetts and Endicott College Collaborate for Continuous Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data Quality Campaign, 2016

    2016-01-01

    For educator preparation programs (EPPs) to produce effective teachers, they must engage in a process of continuous improvement using timely, high-quality information about the performance of their respective graduates in the classroom as measured by student outcomes. While states have the capacity to provide this information through their…

  13. Re-Culturing Educator Preparation Programs: A Collaborative Case Study of Continuous Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Jennifer; Dismuke, Sherry; Zenkert, A. J.; Loffer, Carolyn

    2017-01-01

    Teacher educators at one institution of higher education collaborated to reculture systems for a focus on continuous improvement even within mounting accountability pressures. A framework of social network theory allowed for themes to develop around layered interactions of faculty, processes, and professional capital. Findings focused on people,…

  14. A Study of Leadership and Continuous Improvement at Leadership Preparatory Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina Araujo, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    This capstone project examines how an elementary school principal and her leadership team transformed Leadership Prep Academy in Capital City into a collaborative, high performing community school. This five-year process of continuous improvement involved engaging students, staff, parents, and members of the community in developing a culture of…

  15. Integrating the development of continuous improvement andinnovation capabilities into engineering education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; Kofoed, Lise B.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a study is presented in which engineering students at a Danish university developed Continuous Improvement (CI) and innovation capabilities through action research and experientiallearning methods. The paper begins with a brief overview of the literature on CI and innovation...

  16. Achieving Outcomes With Innovative Smart Pump Technology: Partnership, Planning, and Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, Jennifer; Vitoux, Rachel R; Zavotsky, Kathleen Evanovich; Pontieri-Lewis, Vicky; Colineri, Lori

    2018-04-09

    A 5-time designated Magnet academic medical center partnered with its infusion systems supplier to successfully integrate 1327 smart pumps across 45 departments with an aggressive 3-month timeline. The team also achieved quality improvement (QI) outcomes through increased drug library compliance and decreased alerts with their new technology. This large academic medical center needed to implement innovative wireless infusion pump technology in a short time frame. The approach involved a strong partnership from the medical center and the supplier, with extensive planning and collaboration among the clinical nurse specialists and consultants from both organizations to accomplish QI goals. Lean principles were also followed to enhance efficiency and accountability. Quality improvement outcomes included 100% drug library compliance across all 6 intensive care units, a decrease in pump alert rates from 4.18% to 0.79%, and a decrease in pump programming correction rate from 0.36% to 0.06%. A partnership led to a large implementation being completed efficiently across an academic medical center. Through these joint efforts, quality of care was improved within a short period of time.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  17. Building district-level capacity for continuous improvement in maternal and newborn health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Kim Ethier; Tesfaye, Solomon; Frew, Aynalem Hailemichael; Mohammed, Hajira; Barry, Danika; Alamineh, Lamesgin; Teshome, Abebe; Hepburn, Kenneth; Sibley, Lynn M

    2014-01-01

    The Maternal and Newborn Health in Ethiopia Partnership (MaNHEP) adapted a collaborative improvement strategy to develop woreda (district) leadership capacity to support and facilitate continuous improvement of community maternal and neonatal health (CMNH) and to provide a model for other woredas, dubbed "lead" woredas. Community-level quality improvement (QI) teams tested solutions to improve CMNH care supported by monthly coaching and regular meetings to share experiences. This study examines the extent of the capacity built to support continuous improvement in CMNH care. Surveys and in-depth interviews assessed the extent to which MaNHEP developed improvement capacity. A survey questionnaire evaluated woreda culture, leadership support, motivation, and capacity for improvement activities. Interviews focused on respondents' understanding and perceived value of the MaNHEP improvement approach. Bivariate analyses and multivariate linear regression models were used to analyze the survey data. Interview transcripts were organized by region, cadre, and key themes. Respondents reported significant positive changes in many areas of woreda culture and leadership, including involving a cross-section of community stakeholders (increased from 3.0 to 4.6 on 5-point Likert scale), using improvement data for decision making (2.8-4.4), using locally developed and tested solutions to improve CMNH care (2.5-4.3), demonstrating a commitment to improve the health of women and newborns (2.6-4.2), and creating a supportive environment for coaches and QI teams to improve CMNH (2.6-4.0). The mean scores for capacity were 3.7 and higher, reflecting respondents' agreement that they had gained capacity in improvement skills. Interview respondents universally recognized the capacity built in the woredas. The themes of community empowerment and focused improvement emerged strongly from the interviews. MaNHEP was able to build capacity for continuous improvement and develop lead woredas. The

  18. Continuous improvement in manufacturing and inspection of fuel; Mejora continua en fabricacion e inspeccion de combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingon, A.; Ruiz, R.

    2015-07-01

    The manufacturing and inspection process of fuel assemblies in ENUSA is characterized by its robustness acquired over the last thirty years of experience in manufacturing. The reliability of these processes is based on a qualified processes and continuous improvement in the design and upgrading of equipment and optimization of software and manufacturing processes. Additionally, management and quality control systems have been improved in both software and measuring business objectives. this article emphasizes the improvements made over the past five years in management, production and inspection of fuel assemblies. (Author)

  19. Longitudinal Analysis of the Role of Perceived Self-Efficacy for Self-Regulated Learning in Academic Continuance and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Fida, Roberta; Vecchione, Michele; Del Bove, Giannetta; Vecchio, Giovanni Maria; Barbaranelli, Claudio; Bandura, Albert

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined the developmental course of perceived efficacy for self-regulated learning and its contribution to academic achievement and likelihood of remaining in school in a sample of 412 Italian students (48% males and 52% females ranging in age from 12 to 22 years). Latent growth curve analysis revealed a progressive decline in…

  20. Improved achievable secrecy rate of visible light communication with cooperative jamming

    KAUST Repository

    Zaid, Hajar

    2016-02-25

    In this paper we study the problem of securing a visible light communication (VLC) link against passive eavesdropping, with the help of a (friendly) jammer. Differently from radio frequency (RF) communications, VLC imposes a peak amplitude constraint on the input distribution which renders Gaussian inputs not admissible. We provide an achievable secrecy rate that improves upon a recently established one in a concurrent work by Mostafa and Lampe. Our scheme follows from both the secrecy capacity result by Wyner and the artificial noise scheme by Goel and Negi, but using truncated Gaussian input distributions instead of uniform ones. Via numerical results, we show that our secrecy rate outperforms the concurrent rate in different settings. © 2015 IEEE.

  1. Development of a method of continuous improvement of services using the Business Intelligence tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V. Kulikova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to develop a method of continuous improvement of services using the Business Intelligence tools.Materials and methods: the materials are used on the concept of the Deming Cycle, methods and Business Intelligence technologies, Agile methodology and SCRUM.Results: the article considers the problem of continuous improvement of services and offers solutions using methods and technologies of Business Intelligence. In this case, the purpose of this technology is to solve and make the final decision regarding what needs to be improved in the current organization of services. In other words, Business Intelligence helps the product manager to see what is hidden from the “human eye” on the basis of received and processed data. Development of a method based on the concept of the Deming Cycle and Agile methodologies, and SCRUM.The article describes the main stages of development of method based on activity of the enterprise. It is necessary to fully build the Business Intelligence system in the enterprise to identify bottlenecks and justify the need for their elimination and, in general, for continuous improvement of the services. This process is represented in the notation of DFD. The article presents a scheme for the selection of suitable agile methodologies.The proposed concept of the solution of the stated objectives, including methods of identification of problems through Business Intelligence technology, development of the system for troubleshooting and analysis of results of the introduced changes. The technical description of the project is given.Conclusion: following the work of the authors there was formed the concept of the method for the continuous improvement of the services, using the Business Intelligence technology with the specifics of the enterprises, offering SaaS solutions. It was also found that when using this method, the recommended development methodology is SCRUM. The result of this scientific

  2. Cardiorespiratory dynamics measured from continuous ECG monitoring improves detection of deterioration in acute care patients: A retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Matthew T.; Calland, James Forrest; Enfield, Kyle B.; Voss, John D.; Lake, Douglas E.; Moorman, J. Randall

    2017-01-01

    Background Charted vital signs and laboratory results represent intermittent samples of a patient’s dynamic physiologic state and have been used to calculate early warning scores to identify patients at risk of clinical deterioration. We hypothesized that the addition of cardiorespiratory dynamics measured from continuous electrocardiography (ECG) monitoring to intermittently sampled data improves the predictive validity of models trained to detect clinical deterioration prior to intensive care unit (ICU) transfer or unanticipated death. Methods and findings We analyzed 63 patient-years of ECG data from 8,105 acute care patient admissions at a tertiary care academic medical center. We developed models to predict deterioration resulting in ICU transfer or unanticipated death within the next 24 hours using either vital signs, laboratory results, or cardiorespiratory dynamics from continuous ECG monitoring and also evaluated models using all available data sources. We calculated the predictive validity (C-statistic), the net reclassification improvement, and the probability of achieving the difference in likelihood ratio χ2 for the additional degrees of freedom. The primary outcome occurred 755 times in 586 admissions (7%). We analyzed 395 clinical deteriorations with continuous ECG data in the 24 hours prior to an event. Using only continuous ECG measures resulted in a C-statistic of 0.65, similar to models using only laboratory results and vital signs (0.63 and 0.69 respectively). Addition of continuous ECG measures to models using conventional measurements improved the C-statistic by 0.01 and 0.07; a model integrating all data sources had a C-statistic of 0.73 with categorical net reclassification improvement of 0.09 for a change of 1 decile in risk. The difference in likelihood ratio χ2 between integrated models with and without cardiorespiratory dynamics was 2158 (p value: <0.001). Conclusions Cardiorespiratory dynamics from continuous ECG monitoring detect

  3. Comprehensive approach to improving maternal health and achieving MDG 5: report from the mountains of Lesotho.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hind Satti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although it is now widely recognized that reductions in maternal mortality and improvements in women's health cannot be achieved through simple, vertical strategies, few programs have provided successful models for how to integrate services into a comprehensive program for maternal health. We report our experience in rural Lesotho, where Partners In Health (PIH in partnership with the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare implemented a program that provides comprehensive care of pregnant women from the community to the clinic level. METHODS: Between May and July 2009, PIH trained 100 women, many of whom were former traditional birth attendants, to serve as clinic-affiliated maternal health workers. They received performance-based incentives for accompanying pregnant women during antenatal care (ANC visits and facility-based delivery. A nurse-midwife provided ANC and delivery care and supervised the maternal health workers. To overcome geographic barriers to delivering at the clinic, women who lived far from the clinic stayed at a maternal lying-in house prior to their expected delivery dates. We analyzed data routinely collected from delivery and ANC registers to compare service utilization before and after implementation of the program. RESULTS: After the establishment of the program, the average number first ANC visits increased from 20 to 31 per month. The clinic recorded 178 deliveries in the first year of the program and 216 in the second year, compared to 46 in the year preceding the program. During the first two years of the program, 49 women with complications were successfully transported to the district hospital, and no maternal deaths occurred among the women served by the program. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that it is possible to achieve dramatic improvements in the utilization of maternal health services and facility-based delivery by strengthening human resource capacity, implementing active follow-up in the

  4. Independent assessment to continue improvement: Implementing statistical process control at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, T.A.; Lo, J.C.

    1994-11-01

    A Quality Assurance independent assessment has brought about continued improvement in the PUREX Plant surveillance program at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site. After the independent assessment, Quality Assurance personnel were closely involved in improving the surveillance program, specifically regarding storage tank monitoring. The independent assessment activities included reviewing procedures, analyzing surveillance data, conducting personnel interviews, and communicating with management. Process improvement efforts included: (1) designing data collection methods; (2) gaining concurrence between engineering and management, (3) revising procedures; and (4) interfacing with shift surveillance crews. Through this process, Statistical Process Control (SPC) was successfully implemented and surveillance management was improved. The independent assessment identified several deficiencies within the surveillance system. These deficiencies can be grouped into two areas: (1) data recording and analysis and (2) handling off-normal conditions. By using several independent assessment techniques, Quality Assurance was able to point out program weakness to senior management and present suggestions for improvements. SPC charting, as implemented by Quality Assurance, is an excellent tool for diagnosing the process, improving communication between the team members, and providing a scientific database for management decisions. In addition, the surveillance procedure was substantially revised. The goals of this revision were to (1) strengthen the role of surveillance management, engineering and operators and (2) emphasize the importance of teamwork for each individual who performs a task. In this instance we believe that the value independent assessment adds to the system is the continuous improvement activities that follow the independent assessment. Excellence in teamwork between the independent assessment organization and the auditee is the key to continuing improvement

  5. Using the Continuous Improvement Process to optimize opencast mining operations; Nutzung des kontinuierlichen Verbesserungsprozesses zur Optimierung des Tagebaubetriebs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oster, Arthur [RWE Power AG, Eschweiler (Germany). Tagebau Inden

    2011-11-15

    The value chain in the energy industry has changed over the last few years. Several stages, such as energy trading, have gained in significance while the character of others, for instance electricity generation, has changed. RWE Power is actively participating in shaping this change process and is a driving force of change. One focus of RWE Power's strategic alignment is on a highly efficient and integrated core business in lignite mining and lignite-based electricity generation. The Continuous Improvement Process ''immer:besser'' (getting better) ensures the continuous achievement and development of operational and commercial excellence in our daily operations. As a corporate culture this determines the requirements to be met by entrepreneurial ideas. It also ensures an increase in performance as well as cost reduction in our daily business. Obtaining cost reductions and efficiency increases with the aid of the Continuous Improvement Process as a kind of value-adding self-renewal process to ensure that lignite remains competitive, forms the basis for further increases in profitability and growth.

  6. How PEPFAR's public-private partnerships achieved ambitious goals, from improving labs to strengthening supply chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturchio, Jeffrey L; Cohen, Gary M

    2012-07-01

    The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), established in 2003, is widely recognized as one of the most ambitious and successful bilateral programs ever implemented to address a single disease. Part of the program's success is attributable to the participation of the private sector, working in partnership with the US and local governments and implementing organizations to maximize the reach and effectiveness of every dollar spent. We examined key public-private partnerships that grew out of PEPFAR to identify features that have made them effective. For example, PEPFAR's Supply Chain Management System took advantage of private industry's best practices in logistics, and a partnership with the medical technology company BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company) improved laboratory systems throughout sub-Saharan Africa. We found that setting ambitious goals, enlisting both global and local partners, cultivating a culture of collaboration, careful planning, continuous monitoring and evaluation, and measuring outcomes systematically led to the most effective programs. The Office of the US Global AIDS Coordinator and PEPFAR should continue to strengthen their capacity for private-sector partnerships, learning from a decade of experience and identifying new ways to make smart investments that will make the most efficient use of taxpayer resources, expand proven interventions more rapidly, and help ensure the sustainability of key programs.

  7. Achievement for All: improving psychosocial outcomes for students with special educational needs and disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Neil; Lendrum, Ann; Barlow, Alexandra; Wigelsworth, Michael; Squires, Garry

    2013-04-01

    Students with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) are at a greatly increased risk of experiencing poor psychosocial outcomes. Developing effective interventions that address the cause of these outcomes has therefore become a major policy priority in recent years. We report on a national evaluation of the Achievement for All (AfA) programme that was designed to improve outcomes for students with SEND through: (1) academic assessment, tracking and intervention, (2) structured conversations with parents, and (3) developing provision to improve wider outcomes (e.g. positive relationships). Using a quasi-experimental, pre-test-post-test control group design, we assessed the impact of AfA on teacher ratings of the behaviour problems, positive relationships and bullying of students with SEND over an 18-month period. Participants were 4758 students with SEND drawn from 323 schools across England. Our main impact analysis demonstrated that AfA had a significant impact on all three response variables when compared to usual practice. Hierarchical linear modelling of data from the intervention group highlighted a range of school-level contextual factors and implementation activities and student-level individual differences that moderated the impact of AfA on our study outcomes. The implications of our findings are discussed, and study strengths and limitations are noted. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. How Visual Management for Continuous Improvement Might Guide and Affect Hospital Staff: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulhassan, Waqar; von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica; Westerlund, Hugo; Sandahl, Christer; Thor, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Visual management (VM) tools such as whiteboards, often employed in Lean thinking applications, are intended to be helpful in improving work processes in different industries including health care. It remains unclear, however, how VM is actually applied in health care Lean interventions and how it might influence the clinical staff. We therefore examined how Lean-inspired VM using whiteboards for continuous improvement efforts related to the hospital staff's work and collaboration. Within a case study design, we combined semistructured interviews, nonparticipant observations, and photography on 2 cardiology wards. The fate of VM differed between the 2 wards; in one, it was well received by the staff and enhanced continuous improvement efforts, whereas in the other ward, it was not perceived to fit in the work flow or to make enough sense in order to be sustained. Visual management may enable the staff and managers to allow communication across time and facilitate teamwork by enabling the inclusion of team members who are not present simultaneously; however, its adoption and value seem contingent on finding a good fit with the local context. A combination of continuous improvement and VM may be helpful in keeping the staff engaged in the change process in the long run.

  9. Wound Care Center of Excellence: A Process for Continuous Monitoring and Improvement of Wound Care Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Raelina S; Kohan, Lauren S; Woods, Jon S; Criscitelli, Theresa; Gillette, Brian M; Donovan, Virginia; Gorenstein, Scott

    2018-05-01

    To provide information about a study using a new process for continuous monitoring to improve chronic wound care quality.This continuing education activity is intended for physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care.After completing this continuing education activity, you should be better able to:1. Recognize problems associated with chronic wound care.2. Identify methods used in this project to improve care.3. Illustrate the findings from this and similar projects and implications for providing improved wound care.Patients with chronic wounds require complex care because of comorbidities that can affect healing. Therefore, the goal of this project was to develop a system of reviewing all hospitalized patients seen by the study authors' wound care service on a weekly basis to decrease readmissions, morbidity, and mortality. Weekly multidisciplinary conferences were conducted to evaluate patient data and systematically assess for adherence to wound care protocols, as well as to create and modify patient care plans. This review of pathology and the performance of root-cause analyses often led to improved patient care.

  10. Ongoing Evaluation of Clinical Ethics Consultations as a Form of Continuous Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Ongoing evaluation of a clinical ethics consultation service (ECS) allows for continuous quality improvement, a process-based, data-driven approach for improving the quality of a service. Evaluations by stakeholders involved in a consultation can provide real-time feedback about what is working well and what might need to be improved. Although numerous authors have previously presented data from research studies on the effectiveness of clinical ethics consultation, few ECSs routinely send evaluations as an ongoing component of their everyday clinical activities. The primary purpose of this article is to equip and encourage others to engage in ongoing evaluation of their own ECS. Toward that end, the following resources are shared: (1) the survey tool used to gather the evaluation data, (2) the procedure used to elicit and collate responses, and (3) how the resulting data are used to support continuous quality improvement and justify the continued financial support of the ECS to hospital administration. Copyright 2017 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  11. Design improvements and R and D achievements for VV and in-vessel components towards ITER construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioki, K.; Barabaschi, P.; Barabash, V.

    2003-01-01

    During the preparation of the procurement specifications for long lead-time items, several detailed vacuum vessel (VV) design improvements are being pursued, such as elimination of the inboard triangular support, adding a separate interspace between inner and outer shells for independent leak detection of field joints, and revising the VV support system to gain a more comfortable structural performance margin. Improvements to the blanket design are also under investigation, an inter-modular key instead of two prismatic keys and a co-axial inlet outlet cooling connection instead of two parallel pipes. One of the most important achievements in the VV R and D has been demonstration of the necessary assembly tolerances. Further development of cutting, welding and nondestructive tests (NDT) for the VV has been continued, and thermal and hydraulic tests have been performed to simulate the VV cooling conditions. In FW/blanket and divertor, full-scale prototypical mock-ups of the FW panel, the blanket shield block, and the divertor components, have been successfully fabricated. These results make us confident in the validity of our design and give us possibilities of alternate fabrication methods. (author)

  12. Harnessing the genetics of the modern dairy cow to continue improvements in feed efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VandeHaar, M J; Armentano, L E; Weigel, K; Spurlock, D M; Tempelman, R J; Veerkamp, R

    2016-06-01

    Feed efficiency, as defined by the fraction of feed energy or dry matter captured in products, has more than doubled for the US dairy industry in the past 100 yr. This increased feed efficiency was the result of increased milk production per cow achieved through genetic selection, nutrition, and management with the desired goal being greater profitability. With increased milk production per cow, more feed is consumed per cow, but a greater portion of the feed is partitioned toward milk instead of maintenance and body growth. This dilution of maintenance has been the overwhelming driver of enhanced feed efficiency in the past, but its effect diminishes with each successive increment in production relative to body size and therefore will be less important in the future. Instead, we must also focus on new ways to enhance digestive and metabolic efficiency. One way to examine variation in efficiency among animals is residual feed intake (RFI), a measure of efficiency that is independent of the dilution of maintenance. Cows that convert feed gross energy to net energy more efficiently or have lower maintenance requirements than expected based on body weight use less feed than expected and thus have negative RFI. Cows with low RFI likely digest and metabolize nutrients more efficiently and should have overall greater efficiency and profitability if they are also healthy, fertile, and produce at a high multiple of maintenance. Genomic technologies will help to identify these animals for selection programs. Nutrition and management also will continue to play a major role in farm-level feed efficiency. Management practices such as grouping and total mixed ration feeding have improved rumen function and therefore efficiency, but they have also decreased our attention on individual cow needs. Nutritional grouping is key to helping each cow reach its genetic potential. Perhaps new computer-driven technologies, combined with genomics, will enable us to optimize management for

  13. An Experimental Investigation to Facilitate an Improvement in the Design of an Electromagnetic Continuous Casting Mould

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lintao Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An electromagnetic continuous casting mould designed is proposed with a non-uniform slit distribution structure. This design has aimed to reduce the number of slits so that the mould’s strength is enhanced, whilst maintaining a similar metallurgy effect. In this paper, the metallurgy effect for the designed mould is investigated through the magnetic field distribution along the casting direction, the uniformity feature in the vicinity of the meniscus region, the temperature variation of the molten alloy pool and the mould wall. The results show that the designed mould achieved a similar effect as compared to the original mould; however, the configuration is simplified. This research highlights the topic of mould structure optimization, which would enable the Electromagnetic continuous casting (EMCC technique to be utilized with greater ease by industry.

  14. GP's consult and health behaviour change project. Developing a programme to train GPs in communication skills to achieve lifestyle improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, G A

    2007-08-01

    The European definition of General Practice states that GPs should use their core competence, amongst others, in their communication with patients. Their communication skills are particularly challenged in the field of lifestyle improvements. Most GPs feel they lack efficacy in achieving lifestyle changes. In November 2002 the Prevention Department of the Scientific Society of Flemish GPs (now Domus Medica) decided to start a project "consulting & behaviour change". Under this project, every Flemish GP should by the year 2007, have (amongst others things) a basic knowledge of the principles of lifestyle improvements and should be able to give a short advice to high risk patients. A literature search was conducted to make an inventory of models that could be used to train GPs. Experts at specific methods and topics were consulted to get acquainted with their specific approaches. Experts in the field of CME were gathered to discuss barriers and solutions to these barriers. During steering group meetings, several possible solutions were discussed. The Trans Theoretical Model (TTM-as theoretical framework) and brief motivational interviews (MI-as communication skill) were evaluated as offering the best opportunities for adapting the work situation of the GP. We promoted this approach to the GPs as an ABC concept (Anamnesis/Ask; Be the guide/Decision tree ("Beslissingsboom" in Dutch); Continuity) applied on different topics (smoke stop, alcohol, healthy food, physical activity). In our guidelines we pay more attention to brief motivational interviews for health behaviour changes. Recently we started developing an e-learning website as part of a larger learning project, this in cooperaion with different Flemish partners and disciplines. The Trans Theoretical Model and the brief motivational interviewing approach seem to be accepted by health care, educational and scientific organisations. The process of integrating this approach in the GP's daily practice has to be

  15. A summary of deliberations on strategic planning for continuous quality improvement in laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybicki, Dana Marie; Shahangian, Shahram; Pollock, Anne M; Raab, Stephen S

    2009-03-01

    On September 24-26, 2007, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention convened the 2007 Institute on Critical Issues in Health Laboratory Practice: Managing for Better Health to develop an action plan for change for the immediate and long-term future. A wide variety of stakeholders, including pathologists, pathologist extenders, clinicians, and researchers, examined means to improve laboratory service communication, quality parameters, and potential future laboratory contributions to health care. In this summary document, we present the identified gaps, barriers, and proposed action plans for improvement for laboratory medicine in the 6 quality domains identified by the Institute of Medicine: safety, effectiveness, patient centeredness, timeliness, efficiency, and equity. Five major recommendations emerged from concluding discussions and included focusing on preanalytic and postanalytic processes as areas of potential quality improvement and recruiting a multidisciplinary group of nonlaboratory stakeholders to work with laboratory personnel to achieve improvement goals.

  16. Continuous desalting of refolded protein solution improves capturing in ion exchange chromatography: A seamless process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Nicole; Jungbauer, Alois

    2017-06-01

    Truly continuous biomanufacturing processes enable an uninterrupted feed stream throughout the whole production without the need for holding tanks. We have utilized microporous anion and cation exchangers into which only salts, but not proteins, can penetrate into the pores for desalting of protein solutions, while diafiltration or dilution is usually employed for feed adjustments. Anion exchange and cation exchange chromatography columns were connected in series to remove both anions and cations. To increase operation performance, a continuous process was developed comprised of four columns. Continuous mode was achieved by staggered cycle operation, where one set of columns, consisting of one anion exchange and one cation exchange column, was loaded during the regeneration of the second set. Refolding, desalting and subsequent ion exchange capturing with a scFv as the model protein was demonstrated. The refolding solution was successfully desalted resulting in a consistent conductivity below 0.5 mS/cm from initial values of 10 to 11 mS/cm. With continuous operation process time could be reduced by 39% while productivity was increased to 163% compared to batch operation. Desalting of the protein solution resulted in up to 7-fold higher binding capacities in the subsequent ion exchange capture step with conventional protein binding resins. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Identifying effective pathways in a successful continuous quality improvement programme: the GEDAPS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodicoat, Danielle H; Mundet, Xavier; Gray, Laura J; Cos, Xavier; Davies, Melanie J; Khunti, Kamlesh; Cano, Juan-Franciso

    2014-12-01

    Continuous quality improvement programmes often target several aspects of care, some of which may be more effective meaning that resources could be focussed on these. The objective was to identify the effective and ineffective aspects of a successful continuous quality improvement programme for individuals with type 2 diabetes in primary care. Data were from a series of cross-sectional studies (GEDAPS) in primary care, Catalonia, Spain, in 55 centres (2239 participants) in 1993, and 92 centres (5819 participants) in 2002. A structural equation modelling approach was used. The intervention was associated with improved microvascular outcomes through microalbuminuria and funduscopy screening, which had a direct effect on microvascular outcomes, and through attending 2-4 nurse visits and having ≥1 blood pressure measurement, which acted through reducing systolic blood pressure. The intervention was associated with improved macrovascular outcomes through blood pressure measurement and attending 2-4 nurse visits (through systolic blood pressure) and having ≥3 education topics, ≥1 HbA1c measurement and adequate medication (through HbA1c). Cholesterol measurement, weight measurement and foot examination did not contribute towards the effectiveness of the intervention. The pathways through which a continuous quality improvement programme appeared to act to reduce microvascular and macrovascular complications were driven by reductions in systolic blood pressure and HbA1c, which were attained through changes in nurse and education visits, measurement and medication. This suggests that these factors are potential areas on which future quality improvement programmes should focus. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. The association between event learning and continuous quality improvement programs and culture of patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Lukasz; Chera, Bhishamjit; Mosaly, Prithima; Taylor, Kinley; Tracton, Gregg; Johnson, Kendra; Comitz, Elizabeth; Adams, Robert; Pooya, Pegah; Ivy, Julie; Rockwell, John; Marks, Lawrence B

    2015-01-01

    To present our approach and results from our quality and safety program and to report their possible impact on our culture of patient safety. We created an event learning system (termed a "good catch" program) and encouraged staff to report any quality or safety concerns in real time. Events were analyzed to assess the utility of safety barriers. A formal continuous quality improvement program was created to address these reported events and make improvements. Data on perceptions of the culture of patient safety were collected using the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality survey administered before, during, and after the initiatives. Of 560 good catches reported, 367 could be ascribed to a specific step on our process map. The calculated utility of safety barriers was highest for those embedded into the pretreatment quality assurance checks performed by physicists and dosimetrists (utility score 0.53; 93 of 174) and routine checks done by therapists on the initial day of therapy. Therapists and physicists reported the highest number of good catches (24% each). Sixty-four percent of events were caused by performance issues (eg, not following standardized processes, including suboptimal communications). Of 31 initiated formal improvement events, 26 were successfully implemented and sustained, 4 were discontinued, and 1 was not implemented. Most of the continuous quality improvement program was conducted by nurses (14) and therapists (7). Percentages of positive responses in the patient safety culture survey appear to have increased on all dimensions (p continuous quality improvement programs can be successfully implemented and that there are contemporaneous improvements in the culture of safety. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Organisational learning and continuous improvement of health and safety in certified manufacturers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granerud, Lise; Rocha, Robson Sø

    2011-01-01

    and raise goals within health and safety on a continuous basis. The article examines how certified occupational and health management systems influence this process to evaluate how far they hinder or support learning. It presents a model with which it is possible to identify and analyse improvement......Certified management systems have increasingly been applied by firms in recent decades and now cover the management of health and safety, principally through the OHSAS 18001 standard. In order to become certified, firms must not only observe the relevant legislation, but also improve performance...... processes. The model is applied to five cases from a qualitative study of Danish manufacturers with certified health and safety management systems. The cases illustrate the wide variation in health and safety management among certified firms. Certification is found to support lower levels of continuous...

  20. Implementing a Course Review Process for a Continuous Quality Improvement Model for a Medical School Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Cassandra S; Andrade, Amy; Walker-Winfree, Lena

    2018-01-01

    In 1901, Abraham Flexner, a research scholar at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, visited 155 medical schools in the United States and Canada to assess medical education. Flexner's recommendations became the foundation for the Liaison Committee on Medical Education accreditation, a voluntary, peer-reviewed quality assurance process to determine whether a medical education program meets established standards. The Meharry Medical College School of Medicine, a historically Black college/university (HBCU) established the Office of Curriculum Evaluation and Effectiveness in 2013 to ensure the consistent monitoring of the medical education program's compliance with accreditation standards. The motto and logo, LCME 24/7, highlight the school's emphasis on meeting accreditation standards. The school uses the 1994 Plan-Do-Study-Act Cycle for Learning and Improvement for continuous review of course content, outcomes, and evaluations. This process identifies strengths, challenges, and opportunities for innovative steps for continuous quality improvements to the curriculum.

  1. Continuous improvement, burnout and job engagement: a study in a Dutch nursing department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benders, Jos; Bleijerveld, Hans; Schouteten, Roel

    2017-10-01

    Continuous improvement (CI) programs are potentially powerful means to improve the quality of care. The more positive nurses perceive these programs' effects, the better they may be expected to cooperate. Crucial to this perception is how nurses' quality of working life is affected. We studied this in a nursing department, using the job demands-resources model. We found that two job demands improved, and none of the job resources. Job engagement did not change significantly, while the burnout risk decreased slightly. Overall, the nurses felt the impact to be small yet the changes were in a positive direction. CI can thus be used to improve nurses' working lives and, by restructuring the work processes, the quality of care. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Improving the Quality of Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision through Use of the Continuous Quality Improvement Approach: A Pilot in 30 PEPFAR-Supported Sites in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opio, Alex; Calnan, Jacqueline; Njeuhmeli, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Uganda adopted voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) (also called Safe Male Circumcision in Uganda), as part of its HIV prevention strategy in 2010. Since then, the Ministry of Health (MOH) has implemented VMMC mostly with support from the United States President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) through its partners. In 2012, two PEPFAR-led external quality assessments evaluated compliance of service delivery sites with minimum quality standards. Quality gaps were identified, including lack of standardized forms or registers, lack of documentation of client consent, poor preparedness for emergencies and use of untrained service providers. In response, PEPFAR, through a USAID-supported technical assistance project, provided support in quality improvement to the MOH and implementing partners to improve quality and safety in VMMC services and build capacity of MOH staff to continuously improve VMMC service quality. Methods and Findings Sites were supported to identify barriers in achieving national standards, identify possible solutions to overcome the barriers and carry out improvement plans to test these changes, while collecting performance data to objectively measure whether they had bridged gaps. A 53-indicator quality assessment tool was used by teams as a management tool to measure progress; teams also measured client-level indicators through self-assessment of client records. At baseline (February-March 2013), less than 20 percent of sites scored in the “good” range (>80%) for supplies and equipment, patient counseling and surgical procedure; by November 2013, the proportion of sites scoring “good” rose to 67 percent, 93 percent and 90 percent, respectively. Significant improvement was noted in post-operative follow-up at 48 hours, sexually transmitted infection assessment, informed consent and use of local anesthesia but not rate of adverse events. Conclusion Public sector providers can be engaged to address the quality of

  3. Improving the Quality of Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision through Use of the Continuous Quality Improvement Approach: A Pilot in 30 PEPFAR-Supported Sites in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byabagambi, John; Marks, Pamela; Megere, Humphrey; Karamagi, Esther; Byakika, Sarah; Opio, Alex; Calnan, Jacqueline; Njeuhmeli, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Uganda adopted voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) (also called Safe Male Circumcision in Uganda), as part of its HIV prevention strategy in 2010. Since then, the Ministry of Health (MOH) has implemented VMMC mostly with support from the United States President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) through its partners. In 2012, two PEPFAR-led external quality assessments evaluated compliance of service delivery sites with minimum quality standards. Quality gaps were identified, including lack of standardized forms or registers, lack of documentation of client consent, poor preparedness for emergencies and use of untrained service providers. In response, PEPFAR, through a USAID-supported technical assistance project, provided support in quality improvement to the MOH and implementing partners to improve quality and safety in VMMC services and build capacity of MOH staff to continuously improve VMMC service quality. Sites were supported to identify barriers in achieving national standards, identify possible solutions to overcome the barriers and carry out improvement plans to test these changes, while collecting performance data to objectively measure whether they had bridged gaps. A 53-indicator quality assessment tool was used by teams as a management tool to measure progress; teams also measured client-level indicators through self-assessment of client records. At baseline (February-March 2013), less than 20 percent of sites scored in the "good" range (>80%) for supplies and equipment, patient counseling and surgical procedure; by November 2013, the proportion of sites scoring "good" rose to 67 percent, 93 percent and 90 percent, respectively. Significant improvement was noted in post-operative follow-up at 48 hours, sexually transmitted infection assessment, informed consent and use of local anesthesia but not rate of adverse events. Public sector providers can be engaged to address the quality of VMMC using a continuous quality improvement approach.

  4. Air quality continued to improve in 2014, but progress are still needed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Moullec, Aurelie

    2015-09-01

    The improvement in air quality that began some years ago continued. Average concentrations of pollutants decreased and exceedance of thresholds for protection of health was observed in fewer areas. Progress was, notably, the result of efforts made to reduce emissions, something made more difficult by the number and variety of sources of pollution. These improvements were, however, fragile as they were partially dependent on weather conditions. 2014 was, thus, marked by an important episode of particulate pollution. In addition, the progress made was not sufficient to bring France into full compliance with European standards, as was also the case for other European countries. (author)

  5. The continuous improvement in quality management for nuclear fuel manufacturing in CNNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoling

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear fuel plant has been keeping good records in quality. Only one pot failure has been found in the fuels loaded in the reactors at more than ten years. The paper describes quality management in nuclear fuel manufacturing and focuses on the continuous improvement on quality system and process by running the quality management system, process by quality control group, and data analyze, the requirements and the improvements for the quality system, the measurement system and the standardization system, the importance of clearance system. It also describes the future plans in quality management

  6. Development of a team-based framework for conducting self-assessment of Continuous Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; Gertsen, Frank; Boer, Harry

    2004-01-01

    The study presented in this article is based on two basic premises. First, successful continuous improvement (CI) is dependent on shop floor level involvement and participation in improvement efforts. Second, the term "self-assessment" clearly implies that those whose performance is being measured......, and who are involved in conducting the assessment process. Excerpts from longitudinal case studies in a single Danish manufacturing organization demonstrate how teams involved in the process of conducting self-assessment of CI developed a better understanding of the basic principles of CI. Furthermore...

  7. Embracing technology? Using change management strategies to improve the use of continuous lateral rotation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulski, Pamela; Zantinge, Johanna; Abbott-McNeil, Deanna

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this quality improvement initiative was to improve the utilization of continuous lateral rotation therapy (CLRT) in a nine-bed community hospital ICU within the context of a nurse-driven protocol. Nursing focus groups, analyzed using a strength, weakness, opportunity, threat (SWOT) approach, resulted in the implementation of four interventions over seven weeks. Change management strategies guided all aspects of the project. Results showed a modest increase in the utilization of CLRT. This initiative demonstrates that change management strategies may assist with the incorporation of technology into nursing practice by increasing empowerment and creating an attachment to and responsibility for outcomes.

  8. Organizational learning perspective on continuous improvement and innovation in product realization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Christina Villefrance

    with cross-functional collaboration in solving problems that subsequently restraining continuous improvement and innovation (CII) in product realization. This research project apply an organizational learning perspective on cross-functional problem solving in product realization processes. The research...... project has two main objectives, first to develop and test a CIIprogram that integrates cross-functional work practices into product realization. The second objective is to enhance understanding of organizational learning processes in cross-functional and multilevel settings within manufacturing....

  9. Clinical decision support systems for improving diagnostic accuracy and achieving precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaneda, Christian; Nalley, Kip; Mannion, Ciaran; Bhattacharyya, Pritish; Blake, Patrick; Pecora, Andrew; Goy, Andre; Suh, K Stephen

    2015-01-01

    As research laboratories and clinics collaborate to achieve precision medicine, both communities are required to understand mandated electronic health/medical record (EHR/EMR) initiatives that will be fully implemented in all clinics in the United States by 2015. Stakeholders will need to evaluate current record keeping practices and optimize and standardize methodologies to capture nearly all information in digital format. Collaborative efforts from academic and industry sectors are crucial to achieving higher efficacy in patient care while minimizing costs. Currently existing digitized data and information are present in multiple formats and are largely unstructured. In the absence of a universally accepted management system, departments and institutions continue to generate silos of information. As a result, invaluable and newly discovered knowledge is difficult to access. To accelerate biomedical research and reduce healthcare costs, clinical and bioinformatics systems must employ common data elements to create structured annotation forms enabling laboratories and clinics to capture sharable data in real time. Conversion of these datasets to knowable information should be a routine institutionalized process. New scientific knowledge and clinical discoveries can be shared via integrated knowledge environments defined by flexible data models and extensive use of standards, ontologies, vocabularies, and thesauri. In the clinical setting, aggregated knowledge must be displayed in user-friendly formats so that physicians, non-technical laboratory personnel, nurses, data/research coordinators, and end-users can enter data, access information, and understand the output. The effort to connect astronomical numbers of data points, including '-omics'-based molecular data, individual genome sequences, experimental data, patient clinical phenotypes, and follow-up data is a monumental task. Roadblocks to this vision of integration and interoperability include ethical, legal

  10. Overcoming institutional challenges through continuous professionalism improvement: the University of Washington experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer-Edwards, Kelly; Van Eaton, Erik; Goldstein, Erika A; Kimball, Harry R; Veith, Richard C; Pellegrini, Carlos A; Ramsey, Paul G

    2007-11-01

    The University of Washington (UW) School of Medicine is in the midst of an emerging ecology of professionalism. This initiative builds on prior work focusing on professionalism at the student level and moves toward the complete integration of a culture of professionalism within the UW medical community of including staff, faculty, residents, and students. The platform for initiating professionalism as institutional culture is the Committee on Continuous Professionalism Improvement, established in November 2006. This article reviews three approaches to organizational development used within and outside medicine and highlights features that are useful for enhancing an institutional culture of professionalism: organizational culture, safety culture, and appreciative inquiry. UW Medicine has defined professional development as a continuous process, built on concrete expectations, using mechanisms to facilitate learning from missteps and highlighting strengths. To this end, the school of medicine is working toward improvements in feedback, evaluation, and reward structures at all levels (student, resident, faculty, and staff) as well as creating opportunities for community dialogues on professionalism issues within the institution. Throughout all the Continuous Professionalism Improvement activities, a two-pronged approach to cultivating a culture of professionalism is taken: celebration of excellence and attention to accountability.

  11. Learning science as a potential new source of understanding and improvement for continuing education and continuing professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoof, Thomas J; Doyle, Terrence J

    2018-01-15

    Learning science is an emerging interdisciplinary field that offers educators key insights about what happens in the brain when learning occurs. In addition to explanations about the learning process, which includes memory and involves different parts of the brain, learning science offers effective strategies to inform the planning and implementation of activities and programs in continuing education and continuing professional development. This article provides a brief description of learning, including the three key steps of encoding, consolidation and retrieval. The article also introduces four major learning-science strategies, known as distributed learning, retrieval practice, interleaving, and elaboration, which share the importance of considerable practice. Finally, the article describes how learning science aligns with the general findings from the most recent synthesis of systematic reviews about the effectiveness of continuing medical education.

  12. Improving indoor air quality through the use of continual multipoint monitoring of carbon dioxide and dew point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearg, D W

    1998-09-01

    This article summarizes an approach for improving the indoor air quality (IAQ) in a building by providing feedback on the performance of the ventilation system. The delivery of adequate quantities of ventilation to all building occupants is necessary for the achievement of good IAQ. Feedback on the performance includes information on the adequacy of ventilation provided, the effectiveness of the distribution of this air, the adequacy of the duration of operation of the ventilation system, and the identification of leakage into the return plenum, either of outdoor or supply air. Keeping track of ventilation system performance is important not only in terms of maintaining good IAQ, but also making sure that this system continues to perform as intended after changes in building use. Information on the performance of the ventilation system is achieved by means of an automated sampling system that draws air from multiple locations and delivers it to both a carbon dioxide monitor and dew point sensor. The use of single shared sensors facilitates calibration checks as well as helps to guarantee data integrity. This approach to monitoring a building's ventilation system offers the possibility of achieving sustainable performance of this important aspect of good IAQ.

  13. Sustained participation in annual continuous quality improvement activities improves quality of care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAullay, Daniel; McAuley, Kimberley; Bailie, Ross; Mathews, Veronica; Jacoby, Peter; Gardner, Karen; Sibthorpe, Beverly; Strobel, Natalie; Edmond, Karen

    2018-02-01

    To determine whether participation in the continuous quality improvement (CQI) Audit and Best Practice for Chronic Disease programme improved care and outcomes for Indigenous children. Data were collected from 59 Australian primary health-care centres providing services to Indigenous people and participating in the programme (February 2008 and December 2013). Indigenous children aged less than 2 years and centres that completed three or more consecutive annual audits within the 6-year study period were included. Crude and adjusted logistic generalised estimating equation models were used to examine the effect of year of audit on the delivery of care. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. Outcomes were related to age-relevant health issues, including prevention and early intervention. These included administrative, health check, anticipatory guidance and specific health issues. During the audit period, there were 2360 files from 59 centres. Those that had a recall recorded, improved from 84 to 95% (OR 2.44, 95% CI 1.44-4.11). Hearing assessments improved from 52 to 89% (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.22-1.54). Improvement in anticipatory guidance, treatment and follow-up of medical conditions was almost universal. We documented significant improvements in quality of care of Indigenous children. Outcomes and their corresponding treatment and follow-ups improved over time. This appears to be related to services participating in annual CQI activities. However, these services may be more committed to CQI than others and therefore possibly better performing. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  14. Expanding Educators' Contributions to Continuous Quality Improvement of American Board of Medical Specialties Maintenance of Certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nora, Lois Margaret; Pouwels, Mellie Villahermosa; Irons, Mira

    2016-01-01

    The American Board of Medical Specialties board certification has transformed into a career-long process of learning, assessment, and performance improvement through its Program for Maintenance of Certification (MOC). Medical educators across many medical professional organizations, specialty societies, and other institutions have played important roles in shaping MOC and tailoring its overarching framework to the needs of different specialties. This Commentary addresses potential barriers to engagement in work related to MOC for medical school (MS) and academic health center (AHC) educators and identifies reasons for, and ways to accomplish, greater involvement in this work. The authors present ways that medical and other health professions educators in these settings can contribute to the continuous improvement of the MOC program including developing educational and assessment activities, engaging in debate about MOC, linking MOC with institutional quality improvement activities, and pursuing MOC-related scholarship. MS- and AHC-based educators have much to offer this still-young and continually improving program, and their engagement is sought, necessary, and welcomed.

  15. Adhesion improvement of fibres by continuous plasma treatment at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusano, Y.; Andersen, Tom L.; Soerensen, B.F.; Toftegaard, H.L.; Teodoru, S. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Wind Energy, Risoe Campus, Roskilde (Denmark); Hansen, Charles M. [Hoersholm (Denmark)

    2013-09-01

    Carbon fibres and ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibres were continuously treated by a dielectric barrier discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure for adhesion improvement with epoxy resins. The plasma treatment improved wettability, increased the oxygen containing polar functional groups at the surface, and subsequently improved adhesion to the epoxy and fracture resistance of epoxy composites. Hansen solubility parameters (HSP), quantitatively describing physical interactions among molecules, were measured for the UHMWPE fibre surfaces. The result identifies two distinct types of surfaces in both the plasma treated and the untreated fibres. One type is typical of polyethylene polymers while the other is characteristic of the oxygenated surface at much higher values of HSP. (Author)

  16. Advancing obstetric and neonatal care in a regional hospital in Ghana via continuous quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srofenyoh, Emmanuel; Ivester, Thomas; Engmann, Cyril; Olufolabi, Adeyemi; Bookman, Laurel; Owen, Medge

    2012-01-01

    To reduce maternal and neonatal death at a large regional hospital through the use of quality improvement methodologies. In 2007, Kybele and the Ghana Health Service formed a partnership to analyze systems and patient care processes at a regional hospital in Accra, Ghana. A model encompassing continuous assessment, implementation, advocacy, outputs, and outcomes was designed. Key areas for improvement were grouped into "bundles" based on personnel, systems management, and service quality. Primary outcomes included maternal and perinatal mortality, and case fatality rates for hemorrhage and hypertensive disorders. Implementation and outcomes were evaluated tri-annually between 2007 and 2009. During the study period, there was a 34% decrease in maternal mortality despite a 36% increase in patient admission. Case fatality rates for pre-eclampsia and hemorrhage decreased from 3.1% to 1.1% (Pcontinuous quality improvement were developed and employed. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Continuous improvement process and waste reduction through a QFD tool: the case of a metallurgic plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leoni Pentiado Godoy

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the use of QFD for the continuous improvement of production processes and waste reduction actions. To collect the information we used the simple observation and questionnaire with closed questions applied to employees, representing 88.75% of the population that works in the production processes of an industry of metal-mechanic sector, located inRio Grandedo Sul. QFD is an effective method of quality planning, because it provides a diagnosis that underpins the definition of improvement actions aimed at combating waste. Actions were set providing improved communication between the sectors, enabling the delivery of products with specifications that meet customer requirements, on time and the right amounts, at a minimum cost and satisfaction of those involved with the company. The implementation of these actions reduces waste, minimizes the extra work, maximizes effective labor and increases profitability.

  18. An improved method of continuous LOD based on fractal theory in terrain rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lan; Li, Lijun

    2007-11-01

    With the improvement of computer graphic hardware capability, the algorithm of 3D terrain rendering is going into the hot topic of real-time visualization. In order to solve conflict between the rendering speed and reality of rendering, this paper gives an improved method of terrain rendering which improves the traditional continuous level of detail technique based on fractal theory. This method proposes that the program needn't to operate the memory repeatedly to obtain different resolution terrain model, instead, obtains the fractal characteristic parameters of different region according to the movement of the viewpoint. Experimental results show that the method guarantees the authenticity of landscape, and increases the real-time 3D terrain rendering speed.

  19. Kaizen - continuous improvement of high voltage products; Kaizen - kontinuierliche Verbesserung bei Hochspannungsprodukten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, M. [ABB Calor Emag Schaltanlagen AG, Hanau-Grossauheim (Germany); Goessmann, T. [ABB Calor Emag Schaltanlagen AG, Mannheim (Germany)

    1999-07-12

    In the actual global competition only the company can survive who cares for the continuous improvement of all business activities. The ABB Calor Emag Schaltanlagen AG at his production site in Hanau-Grossauheim has installed a specific improvement programm called KVP what is based on the ideas of Kaizen. Aim is the improvement of processes, mainly in production, concerning quality, dates, costs and environment by activating all colleagues. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im heutigen globalen Wettbewerb kann sich nur der behaupten, der sich kontinuierlich in allen Unternehmensbereichen weiterentwickelt. Die ABB Calor Emag Schaltanlagen AG hat in ihrem Werk Hanau-Grossauheim nach den Ideen des Kaizen ein werkspezifisches Programm zur kontinuierlichen Verbesserung der Prozesse in der Fertigung eingefuehrt. Ziel ist die stetige Verbesserung von Fertigungsparametern, wie Qualitaet, Termine, Kosten und Umwelt unter Einbeziehung aller Mitarbeiter. (orig.)

  20. Method and apparatus for improved melt flow during continuous strip casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follstaedt, Donald W.; King, Edward L.; Schneider, Ken C.

    1991-11-12

    The continuous casting of metal strip using the melt overflow process is improved by controlling the weir conditions in the nozzle to provide a more uniform flow of molten metal across the width of the nozzle and reducing the tendency for freezing of metal along the interface with refractory surfaces. A weir design having a sloped rear wall and tapered sidewalls and critical gap controls beneath the weir has resulted in the drastic reduction in edge tearing and a significant improvement in strip uniformity. The floor of the container vessel is preferably sloped and the gap between the nozzle and the rotating substrate is critically controlled. The resulting flow patterns observed with the improved casting process have reduced thermal gradients in the bath, contained surface slag and eliminated undesirable solidification near the discharge area by increasing the flow rates at those points.

  1. Indigenous health: effective and sustainable health services through continuous quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailie, Ross S; Si, Damin; O'Donoghue, Lyn; Dowden, Michelle

    2007-05-21

    The Australian government's Healthy for Life program is supporting capacity development in Indigenous primary care using continuous quality improvement (CQI) techniques. An important influence on the Healthy for Life program has been the ABCD research project. The key features contributing to the success of the project are described. The ABCD research project: uses a CQI approach, with an ongoing cycle of gathering data on how well organisational systems are functioning, and developing and then implementing improvements; is guided by widely accepted principles of community-based research, which emphasise participation; and adheres to the principles and values of Indigenous health research and service delivery. The potential for improving health outcomes in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities using a CQI approach should be strengthened by clear clinical and managerial leadership, supporting service organisations at the community level, and applying participatory-action principles.

  2. THE ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGIES PTELR, ADRI AND CAE – THREE METHODOLOGIES FOR COORDINATING THE EFFORTS TO IMPROVE THE ORGANIZATIONAL PROCESSES TO ACHIEVE EXCELLENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Raluca POPESCU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the paper “The Assessment Methodologies PTELR, ADRI and CAE – Three Methodologies for Coordinating the Efforts to Improve the Organizational Processes to Achieve Excellence” the authors present the basic features of the assessment methodologies PTELR, ADRI and CAE that are designed to coordinate the efforts to improve the organizational processes in order to achieve excellence. In the first part of the paper (the introduction of the paper, the authors present the general background concerning the performance of management business processes and the importance of achieving excellence and furthermore correctly assessing/evaluating it. Aspects such as quality, quality control, quality assurance, performance and excellence are brought into discussion in the context generated by globalization, new technologies and new business models. Moreover, aspects regarding the methods employed to ensure the quality, maintaining it and continuous improvements, as well as total quality management, are also main pillars of this current research. In the content of the paper (the assessment methodologies PTELR, ADRI and CAE – as methodologies for coordinating the efforts to improve the organizational processes to achieve excellence, the authors describe the characteristics of the assessment methodologies PTELR, ADRI and CAE from a theoretical point of view.

  3. Continuous improvement of environmental aspect in Juzbado factory; Mejora continua del comportamiento ambiental de la fabrica de Juzbado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    ENUSA's Fuel Assembly Factory in Juzbado (Salamanca), conscious of its responsibilities with the environment where its activities are carried out, has an Environmental Management System (EMS) certified by AENOR (N. CGM-99/31) according to the requirements of Standard UNE{sub E}N-ISO 14001 and afterwards, as a result of compromise with continuous improvement of its environmental performance, joined the European Regulation 761/2001(EMAS), which has allowed the EMS to achieve levels of excellence in environmental management, doing it in a much more transparent and participative way and letting the public and other interested parts to have access to the information referring its environmental activities, as demanded by society, by the elaboration and verification of an Environmental Statement (VDM-03/010) on a yearly basis. (Author)

  4. Employees Motivation and Openness for Continuous Improvement: Comparative Study in Polish and Japanese Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadnicka Dorota

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently, companies must change and evolve to keep pace with the changing environment, customers’ requirements and to be better than their competitors. The changes result from the need to adapt the products to new customers’ requirements as well as to maintain competitive prices of their products. Therefore, companies should be flexible to guarantee short lead time and minimalize their costs to offer a good price for the customers. At the same time, companies should create good work environment for their employees in order to get them involved in improvement processes. In order to survive and develop companies should motivate and involve their employees into a continuous improvement process in different areas of the company. Unfortunately, as based on the companies’ practice and previous research, in many cases employees are not willing to engage in the company development. Continuous improvement is the basis of the philosophy of Quality Management and Lean Manufacturing, which come from Toyota Production System (TPS. The TPS eventually spread throughout the world, and it is held up as an example of the proper management of a production system. The assumptions of TPS system were used to build systems in other companies, but not always with the same success as it was in Toyota. For this reason, the authors of this paper seek to answer the question of whether there are differences in engagement in a continuous improvement process between employees in a Japanese company and a Polish company operating in the same industry and realizing the similar manufacturing. In order to verify this, the research was conducted in two manufacturing companies which operate in the automotive industry. The results of the study and their analysis are presented in the work.

  5. Using Surgeon-Specific Outcome Reports and Positive Deviance for Continuous Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, Jelena; Anstee, Caitlin; Ramsay, Tim; Gilbert, Sebastien; Maziak, Donna E; Shamji, Farid M; Sundaresan, R Sudhir; Villeneuve, P James; Seely, Andrew J E

    2015-10-01

    Using the thoracic morbidity and mortality classification to document all postoperative adverse events between October 2012 and February 2014, we created surgeon-specific outcome reports (SSORs) to promote self-assessment and to implement a divisional continuous quality improvement (CQI) program, on the construct of positive deviance, to improve individual surgeon's clinical performance. Mixed-methods study within a division of six thoracic surgeons, involving (1) development of real-time, Web-based, risk-adjusted SSORs; (2) implementation of CQI seminars (n = 6; September 2013 to June 2014) for evaluation of results, collegial discussion on quality improvement based on identification of positive outliers, and selection of quality indicators for future discussion; and (3) in-person interviews to identify facilitators and barriers to using SSORs and CQI. Interview transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. Interviews revealed enthusiastic support for SSORs as a means to improve patient care through awareness of personal outcomes with blinded divisional comparison for similar operations and diseases, and apply the learning objectives to continuous professional development and maintenance of certification. Perceived limitations of SSORs included difficulty measuring surgeon expertise, limited understanding of risk adjustment, resistance to change, and belief that knowledge of sensitive data could lead to punitive actions. All surgeons believed CQI seminars led to collegial discussions, whereas perceived limitations included quorum participation and failing to circle back on actionable items. Real-time performance feedback using SSORs can motivate surgeons to improve their practice, and CQI seminars offer the opportunity to review and interpret results and address issues in a supportive environment. Whether SSORs and CQI can lead to improvements in rates of postoperative adverse events is a matter of ongoing research. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic

  6. Promoting Continuous Quality Improvement in the Alabama Child Health Improvement Alliance Through Q-Sort Methodology and Learning Collaboratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifolt, Matthew; Preskitt, Julie; Rucks, Andrew; Corvey, Kathryn; Benton, Elizabeth Cason

    Q-sort methodology is an underutilized tool for differentiating among multiple priority measures. The authors describe steps to identify, delimit, and sort potential health measures and use selected priority measures to establish an overall agenda for continuous quality improvement (CQI) activities within learning collaboratives. Through an iterative process, the authors vetted a list of potential child and adolescent health measures. Multiple stakeholders, including payers, direct care providers, and organizational representatives sorted and prioritized measures, using Q-methodology. Q-methodology provided the Alabama Child Health Improvement Alliance (ACHIA) an objective and rigorous approach to system improvement. Selected priority measures were used to design learning collaboratives. An open dialogue among stakeholders about state health priorities spurred greater organizational buy-in for ACHIA and increased its credibility as a statewide provider of learning collaboratives. The integrated processes of Q-sort methodology, learning collaboratives, and CQI offer a practical yet innovative way to identify and prioritize state measures for child and adolescent health and establish a learning agenda for targeted quality improvement activities.

  7. Leadership, safety climate, and continuous quality improvement: impact on process quality and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Kathleen L; Stock, Gregory N; Gowen, Charles R

    2014-10-01

    Successful amelioration of medical errors represents a significant problem in the health care industry. There is a need for greater understanding of the factors that lead to improved process quality and patient safety outcomes in hospitals. We present a research model that shows how transformational leadership, safety climate, and continuous quality improvement (CQI) initiatives are related to objective quality and patient safety outcome measures. The proposed framework is tested using structural equation modeling, based on data collected for 204 hospitals, and supplemented with objective outcome data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The results provide empirical evidence that a safety climate, which is connected to the chief executive officer's transformational leadership style, is related to CQI initiatives, which are linked to improved process quality. A unique finding of this study is that, although CQI initiatives are positively associated with improved process quality, they are also associated with higher hospital-acquired condition rates, a measure of patient safety. Likewise, safety climate is directly related to improved patient safety outcomes. The notion that patient safety climate and CQI initiatives are not interchangeable or universally beneficial is an important contribution to the literature. The results confirm the importance of using CQI to effectively enhance process quality in hospitals, and patient safety climate to improve patient safety outcomes. The overall pattern of findings suggests that simultaneous implementation of CQI initiatives and patient safety climate produces greater combined benefits.

  8. Improvement production of bacterial cellulose by semi-continuous process in molasses medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakar, Fatih; Ozer, Işılay; Aytekin, A Özhan; Sahin, Fikrettin

    2014-06-15

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) has unique properties such as structural, functional, physical and chemical. The mass production of BC for industrial application has recently become attractive to produce more economical and high productive cellulose. In this study, to improve the productivity of bacterial cellulose (BC), BC production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus FC01 was investigated in molasses medium with static semi-continuous operation mode. Cell dry weight, polysaccharide, sugar and cellulose concentrations were monitored and cellulose was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The highest cellulose yield (1.637 g/L) was obtained in SCP50-7d, which molasses of 1/2 ratio for 7 days by static semi-continuous operation mode. The results show that BC can be highly produced by G. xylinus in molasses with static semi-continuous process than batch process. We claimed that low-cost medium with semi-continuous operation mode in static culture is a good candidate for industrial scale BC productions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Design improvements and R and D achievements for VV and In-vessel components towards ITER construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioki, Kimihiro; Barabaschi, P.; Barabash, V.

    2003-01-01

    There have been several detailed vacuum vessel (VV) design improvements, such as elimination of the inboard triangular support, separate interspace between inner and outer shells for independent leak detection of field joints and revised VV support system to gain a more comfortable margin in the structural performance. The blanket design has been updated; an inter-modular key instead of two prismatic keys and a co-axial inlet-outlet cooling connection instead of two parallel pipes. One of the most important achievements in the VV R and D has been demonstration of the necessary assembly tolerances. Further development of cutting, welding and non destructive tests (NDT) for the VV has been continued, and thermal and hydraulic tests have been performed to simulate the VV cooling conditions. With regard to the R and D for the FW/blanket and divertor, full-scale prototypical mock-ups of the FW panel, the blanket shield block and the divertor components have been successfully fabricated. These results make us confident in the validity of our design and give us possibilities of alternate fabrication methods. (author)

  10. Optimized distributed systems achieve significant performance improvement on sorted merging of massive VCF files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaobo; Gao, Jingjing; Jin, Peng; Eng, Celeste; Burchard, Esteban G; Beaty, Terri H; Ruczinski, Ingo; Mathias, Rasika A; Barnes, Kathleen; Wang, Fusheng; Qin, Zhaohui S

    2018-06-01

    Sorted merging of genomic data is a common data operation necessary in many sequencing-based studies. It involves sorting and merging genomic data from different subjects by their genomic locations. In particular, merging a large number of variant call format (VCF) files is frequently required in large-scale whole-genome sequencing or whole-exome sequencing projects. Traditional single-machine based methods become increasingly inefficient when processing large numbers of files due to the excessive computation time and Input/Output bottleneck. Distributed systems and more recent cloud-based systems offer an attractive solution. However, carefully designed and optimized workflow patterns and execution plans (schemas) are required to take full advantage of the increased computing power while overcoming bottlenecks to achieve high performance. In this study, we custom-design optimized schemas for three Apache big data platforms, Hadoop (MapReduce), HBase, and Spark, to perform sorted merging of a large number of VCF files. These schemas all adopt the divide-and-conquer strategy to split the merging job into sequential phases/stages consisting of subtasks that are conquered in an ordered, parallel, and bottleneck-free way. In two illustrating examples, we test the performance of our schemas on merging multiple VCF files into either a single TPED or a single VCF file, which are benchmarked with the traditional single/parallel multiway-merge methods, message passing interface (MPI)-based high-performance computing (HPC) implementation, and the popular VCFTools. Our experiments suggest all three schemas either deliver a significant improvement in efficiency or render much better strong and weak scalabilities over traditional methods. Our findings provide generalized scalable schemas for performing sorted merging on genetics and genomics data using these Apache distributed systems.

  11. Improvements of PKU PMECRIS for continuous hundred hours CW proton beam operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, S. X.; Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y.; Zhang, A. L.; Chen, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the source stability, a long term continuous wave (CW) proton beam experiment has been carried out with Peking University compact permanent magnet 2.45 GHz ECR ion source (PKU PMECRIS). Before such an experiment a lot of improvements and modifications were completed on the source body, the Faraday cup and the PKU ion source test bench. At the beginning of 2015, a continuous operation of PKU PMECRIS for 306 h with more than 50 mA CW beam was carried out after success of many short term tests. No plasma generator failure or high voltage breakdown was observed during that running period and the proton source reliability is near 100%. Total beam availability, which is defined as 35-keV beam-on time divided by elapsed time, was higher than 99% [S. X. Peng et al., Chin. Phys. B 24(7), 075203 (2015)]. A re-inspection was performed after another additional 100 h operation (counting time) and no obvious sign of component failure was observed. Counting the previous source testing time together, this PMECRs longevity is now demonstrated to be greater than 460 h. This paper is mainly concentrated on the improvements for this long term experiment

  12. Improvements of PKU PMECRIS for continuous hundred hours CW proton beam operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, S. X.; Zhang, A. L.; Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2016-02-01

    In order to improve the source stability, a long term continuous wave (CW) proton beam experiment has been carried out with Peking University compact permanent magnet 2.45 GHz ECR ion source (PKU PMECRIS). Before such an experiment a lot of improvements and modifications were completed on the source body, the Faraday cup and the PKU ion source test bench. At the beginning of 2015, a continuous operation of PKU PMECRIS for 306 h with more than 50 mA CW beam was carried out after success of many short term tests. No plasma generator failure or high voltage breakdown was observed during that running period and the proton source reliability is near 100%. Total beam availability, which is defined as 35-keV beam-on time divided by elapsed time, was higher than 99% [S. X. Peng et al., Chin. Phys. B 24(7), 075203 (2015)]. A re-inspection was performed after another additional 100 h operation (counting time) and no obvious sign of component failure was observed. Counting the previous source testing time together, this PMECRs longevity is now demonstrated to be greater than 460 h. This paper is mainly concentrated on the improvements for this long term experiment.

  13. Improvements of PKU PMECRIS for continuous hundred hours CW proton beam operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, S. X., E-mail: sxpeng@pku.edu.cn; Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, A. L.; Chen, J. E. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2016-02-15

    In order to improve the source stability, a long term continuous wave (CW) proton beam experiment has been carried out with Peking University compact permanent magnet 2.45 GHz ECR ion source (PKU PMECRIS). Before such an experiment a lot of improvements and modifications were completed on the source body, the Faraday cup and the PKU ion source test bench. At the beginning of 2015, a continuous operation of PKU PMECRIS for 306 h with more than 50 mA CW beam was carried out after success of many short term tests. No plasma generator failure or high voltage breakdown was observed during that running period and the proton source reliability is near 100%. Total beam availability, which is defined as 35-keV beam-on time divided by elapsed time, was higher than 99% [S. X. Peng et al., Chin. Phys. B 24(7), 075203 (2015)]. A re-inspection was performed after another additional 100 h operation (counting time) and no obvious sign of component failure was observed. Counting the previous source testing time together, this PMECRs longevity is now demonstrated to be greater than 460 h. This paper is mainly concentrated on the improvements for this long term experiment.

  14. 41 CFR 102-193.25 - What type of records management business process improvements should my agency strive to achieve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... management business process improvements should my agency strive to achieve? 102-193.25 Section 102-193.25...-193.25 What type of records management business process improvements should my agency strive to... correspondence; (b) Design forms that are easy to fill-in, read, transmit, process, and retrieve, and reduce...

  15. Assessing the impact of continuous quality improvement/total quality management: concept versus implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortell, S M; O'Brien, J L; Carman, J M; Foster, R W; Hughes, E F; Boerstler, H; O'Connor, E J

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study examines the relationships among organizational culture, quality improvement processes and selected outcomes for a sample of up to 61 U. S. hospitals. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SETTING: Primary data were collected from 61 U. S. hospitals (located primarily in the midwest and the west) on measures related to continuous quality improvement/total quality management (CQI/TQM), organizational culture, implementation approaches, and degree of quality improvement implementation based on the Baldrige Award criteria. These data were combined with independently collected data on perceived impact and objective measures of clinical efficiency (i.e., charges and length of stay) for six clinical conditions. STUDY DESIGN: The study involved cross-sectional examination of the named relationships. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS: Reliable and valid scales for the organizational culture and quality improvement implementation measures were developed based on responses from over 7,000 individuals across the 61 hospitals with an overall completion rate of 72 percent. Independent data on perceived impact were collected from a national survey and independent data on clinical efficiency from a companion study of managed care. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A participative, flexible, risk-taking organizational culture was significantly related to quality improvement implementation. Quality improvement implementation, in turn, was positively associated with greater perceived patient outcomes and human resource development. Larger-size hospitals experienced lower clinical efficiency with regard to higher charges and higher length of stay, due in part to having more bureaucratic and hierarchical cultures that serve as a barrier to quality improvement implementation. CONCLUSIONS: What really matters is whether or not a hospital has a culture that supports quality improvement work and an approach that encourages flexible implementation. Larger-size hospitals face more difficult

  16. What Effective Principals Do to Improve Instruction and Increase Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Elizabeth Anne

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this mixed method study were to (a) Examine the relationships among principal effectiveness, principal instructional leadership, and student achievement; (b) examine the differences among principal effectiveness, principal instructional leadership and student achievement; and (c) investigate what effective principals do to improve…

  17. Developing and Improving Modified Achievement Level Descriptors: Rationale, Procedures, and Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quenemoen, Rachel; Albus, Debra; Rogers, Chris; Lazarus, Sheryl

    2010-01-01

    Some states are developing alternate assessments based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS) to measure the academic achievement of some students with disabilities (Albus, Lazarus, Thurlow, & Cormier, 2009; Lazarus, Thurlow, Christensen, & Cormier, 2007). These assessments measure the same content as the general assessment for a given…

  18. Continuous Improvement and the Safety Case for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Geologic Repository - 13467

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Luik, Abraham; Patterson, Russell; Nelson, Roger [US Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office, 4021 S. National parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States); Leigh, Christi [Sandia National Laboratories Carlsbad Operations, 4100 S. National parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a geologic repository 2150 feet (650 m) below the surface of the Chihuahuan desert near Carlsbad, New Mexico. WIPP permanently disposes of transuranic waste from national defense programs. Every five years, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) submits an application to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to request regulatory-compliance re-certification of the facility for another five years. Every ten years, DOE submits an application to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) for the renewal of its hazardous waste disposal permit. The content of the applications made by DOE to the EPA for re-certification, and to the NMED for permit-renewal, reflect any optimization changes made to the facility, with regulatory concurrence if warranted by the nature of the change. DOE points to such changes as evidence for its having taken seriously its 'continuous improvement' operations and management philosophy. Another opportunity for continuous improvement is to look at any delta that may exist between the re-certification and re-permitting cases for system safety and the consensus advice on the nature and content of a safety case as being developed and published by the Nuclear Energy Agency's Integration Group for the Safety Case (IGSC) expert group. DOE at WIPP, with the aid of its Science Advisor and teammate, Sandia National Laboratories, is in the process of discerning what can be done, in a reasonably paced and cost-conscious manner, to continually improve the case for repository safety that is being made to the two primary regulators on a recurring basis. This paper will discuss some aspects of that delta and potential paths forward to addressing them. (authors)

  19. Impact of continuous quality improvement initiatives on clinical outcomes in peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yusheng; Zhou, Yan; Wang, Han; Zhou, Tingting; Li, Qing; Li, Taoyu; Wu, Yan; Liu, Zhihong

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated the role of a quality improvement initiative in improving clinical outcomes in peritoneal dialysis (PD). In a retrospective analysis of 6 years of data from a hospital registry, the period between 1 July 2005 and 30 June 2008 (control group) provided baseline data from before implementation of systemic outcomes monitoring, and the period between 1 July 2008 and 30 June 2011 [continuous quality improvement (CQI) group] represented the time when a CQI program was in place. Peritonitis incidence, patient and technique survival, cardiovascular status, causes of death, and drop-out were compared between the groups. In the 370 patients of the CQI group and the 249 patients of the control group, the predominant underlying kidney diseases were chronic glomerulonephritis and diabetic nephropathy. After implementation of the CQI initiative, the peritonitis rate declined to 1 episode in 77.25 patient-months from 1 episode in 22.86 patient-months. Ultrasound parameters of cardiac structure were generally unchanged in the CQI group, but significant increases in cardiothoracic ratio and interventricular septal thickness were observed in the control group (both p improve technique survival rates: 95.6%, 92.6%, and 92.6% in the CQI group compared with 89.6%, 79.2%, and 76.8% in the control group (p improve the quality of therapy and its outcomes. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  20. Environmental assessment, continual improvement and adaptive management within the AREVA sustainable development framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosaasen, A.; Frostad, S.

    2006-01-01

    COGEMA Resources Inc. (which is part of the AREVA Group) is a Canadian company with its head office in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. It owns and operates mining and milling facilities in northern Saskatchewan, which produce uranium concentrate. The McClean Lake Operation commenced production in 1999 and its environmental management system represents an integrated approach to environmental assessment, continual improvement and adaptive management based on operational results. In Canada, sustainable development is promoted through the application of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA). Environmental Assessment (EA) is a planning tool, which incorporates environmental considerations before irrevocable decisions are taken. The basic tenet of the Act is the determination of whether the potential environmental effects of a project are adverse, significant and likely, taking into consideration mitigation measures. Thus, project planning and design entails an iterative process that incorporates mitigation measures to minimize potentially significant adverse effects. As part of the EA process conservative approaches are taken to predict potential effects. Several important elements are generated through the EA process including: a set of environmental effects predictions, a compliance and environmental effects monitoring program, a follow-up program to address uncertainties in the prediction of environmental effects, and the identification of contingency measures that could be implemented should non-conservative assumptions be identified in the original assessment framework. The challenge is to integrate each of these elements into the environmental management framework of the operating facility and develop an iterative mechanism to evaluate operational performance relative to what was originally predicted. In Saskatchewan, a requirement of operational licenses is the periodic evaluation of the 'Status of the Environment' surrounding operational facilities. These

  1. POSSIBILITIES AND LIMITS OF THE CYCLE OF CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT -PDCA AS AN ELEMENT OF LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Machado Junior

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the possibilities and limits of the use of continuous improvement cycle, PDCA, as a tool that contributes to the development of individual learning in the organization. It is a qualitative, descriptive end uses the case study as a method. It was observed that the practice proposed by PDCA, can be used in the process of knowledge creation in line with the authors in the field, constituting a form of knowledge management within the organization, enabling the creation of tacit knowledge and its explicit transformation were not observed limits for their use.

  2. Continual summing-up, deepening the related researches and improving the interventional nursing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiufang; Zhang Xiumei; Ding Yue

    2011-01-01

    With the development of the medical technique in the field of clinical interventional radiology, the relevant interventional nursing team has also gradually grown and expanded. At present, there are certain differences in the development situation of interventional nursing between China and foreign countries. The experts in nursing fields in China should learn the matured experience from abroad to open up the features and superiorities of Chinese interventional nursing. Therefore, the nursing workers in China should continually to make summing-up, exert oneself to deepen the related researches and effectively improve the interventional nursing level. (authors)

  3. Good performance in Japan is proof of continuing safety and reliability improvement practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumi, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear power is a vital energy supply source for both security and economy for such countries as Japan whose sources of energy are dependent on imported materials. This is the very reason why Japan gives her national priority to the improvement of nuclear power safety and reliability. As of the end of 1986, total nuclear power capacity owned and operated by private utility companies in Japan amounted to 24521 MW with 32 units sharing -- 19% of the total generating capacity. Moreover, during 1986 these units scored a remarkably high capacity factor of 76.2% and shared almost 28% of the nationwide electric power production, thereby contributing to a considerable saving of imported sources of energy. This outstanding record has been achieved by the parties concerned who dedicated themselves to furthering nuclear plant safety and reliability improvement. In this connection, this paper summarizes those key factors contributing to the good nuclear power plant performance of the Kansai Electric Power Company

  4. A continuous quality improvement project to reduce medication error in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sara Bc; Lee, Larry Ly; Yeung, Richard Sd; Chan, Jimmy Ts

    2013-01-01

    Medication errors are a common source of adverse healthcare incidents particularly in the emergency department (ED) that has a number of factors that make it prone to medication errors. This project aims to reduce medication errors and improve the health and economic outcomes of clinical care in Hong Kong ED. In 2009, a task group was formed to identify problems that potentially endanger medication safety and developed strategies to eliminate these problems. Responsible officers were assigned to look after seven error-prone areas. Strategies were proposed, discussed, endorsed and promulgated to eliminate the problems identified. A reduction of medication incidents (MI) from 16 to 6 was achieved before and after the improvement work. This project successfully established a concrete organizational structure to safeguard error-prone areas of medication safety in a sustainable manner.

  5. Continuous Quality Improvement and Comprehensive Primary Health Care: A Systems Framework to Improve Service Quality and Health Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCalman, Janya; Bailie, Ross; Bainbridge, Roxanne; McPhail-Bell, Karen; Percival, Nikki; Askew, Deborah; Fagan, Ruth; Tsey, Komla

    2018-01-01

    Continuous quality improvement (CQI) processes for improving clinical care and health outcomes have been implemented by primary health-care services, with resultant health-care impacts. But only 10–20% of gain in health outcomes is contributed by health-care services; a much larger share is determined by social and cultural factors. This perspective paper argues that health care and health outcomes can be enhanced through applying CQI as a systems approach to comprehensive primary health care. Referring to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australian context as an example, the authors provide a systems framework that includes strategies and conditions to facilitate evidence-based and local decision making by primary health-care services. The framework describes the integration of CQI vertically to improve linkages with governments and community members and horizontally with other sectors to influence the social and cultural determinants of health. Further, government and primary health-care service investment is required to support and extend integration and evaluation of CQI efforts vertically and horizontally. PMID:29623271

  6. Continuous Quality Improvement and Comprehensive Primary Health Care: A Systems Framework to Improve Service Quality and Health Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janya McCalman

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Continuous quality improvement (CQI processes for improving clinical care and health outcomes have been implemented by primary health-care services, with resultant health-care impacts. But only 10–20% of gain in health outcomes is contributed by health-care services; a much larger share is determined by social and cultural factors. This perspective paper argues that health care and health outcomes can be enhanced through applying CQI as a systems approach to comprehensive primary health care. Referring to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australian context as an example, the authors provide a systems framework that includes strategies and conditions to facilitate evidence-based and local decision making by primary health-care services. The framework describes the integration of CQI vertically to improve linkages with governments and community members and horizontally with other sectors to influence the social and cultural determinants of health. Further, government and primary health-care service investment is required to support and extend integration and evaluation of CQI efforts vertically and horizontally.

  7. Improving physiotherapy services to Indigenous children with physical disability: Are client perspectives missed in the continuous quality improvement approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstein, Caroline; Lowell, Anne; Thomas, David Piers

    2016-06-01

    To compare the outcomes of two cycles of continuous quality improvement (CQI) at a paediatric physiotherapy service with findings from interviews with clients and their carers using the service. Case study based at one paediatric physiotherapy service Community-based paediatric allied health service in Northern Australia. Forty-nine clinical records and four staff at physiotherapy service, five Indigenous children with physical disability aged 8-21 years, and nine carers of Indigenous children aged 0-21 years (current or previous clients). The CQI process based on the Audit and Best Practice for Chronic Disease involved a clinical audit; a workshop where clinicians assessed their health care systems, identified weaknesses and strengths, and developed goals and strategies for improvement; and reassessment through a second audit and workshop. Twelve open-ended, in-depth interviews were conducted with previous or current clients selected through purposive and theoretical sampling. CQI and interview results were then compared. Comparison of findings from the two studies Both CQI and interview results highlighted service delivery flexibility and therapists' knowledge, support and advocacy as service strengths, and lack of resources and a child-friendly office environment as weaknesses. However, the CQI results reported better communication and client input into the service than the interview results. The CQI process, while demonstrating improvements in clinical and organisational aspects of the service, did not always reflect or address the primary concerns of Indigenous clients and underlined the importance of including clients in the CQI process. © 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  8. Continuous Quality Improvement and Comprehensive Primary Health Care: A Systems Framework to Improve Service Quality and Health Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCalman, Janya; Bailie, Ross; Bainbridge, Roxanne; McPhail-Bell, Karen; Percival, Nikki; Askew, Deborah; Fagan, Ruth; Tsey, Komla

    2018-01-01

    Continuous quality improvement (CQI) processes for improving clinical care and health outcomes have been implemented by primary health-care services, with resultant health-care impacts. But only 10-20% of gain in health outcomes is contributed by health-care services; a much larger share is determined by social and cultural factors. This perspective paper argues that health care and health outcomes can be enhanced through applying CQI as a systems approach to comprehensive primary health care. Referring to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australian context as an example, the authors provide a systems framework that includes strategies and conditions to facilitate evidence-based and local decision making by primary health-care services. The framework describes the integration of CQI vertically to improve linkages with governments and community members and horizontally with other sectors to influence the social and cultural determinants of health. Further, government and primary health-care service investment is required to support and extend integration and evaluation of CQI efforts vertically and horizontally.

  9. Improvement of two-way continuous-variable quantum key distribution using optical amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yi-Chen; Yu, Song; Gu, Wanyi; Li, Zhengyu; Sun, Maozhu; Peng, Xiang; Guo, Hong; Weedbrook, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The imperfections of a receiver's detector affect the performance of two-way continuous-variable (CV) quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols and are difficult to adjust in practical situations. We propose a method to improve the performance of two-way CV-QKD by adding a parameter-adjustable optical amplifier at the receiver. A security analysis is derived against a two-mode collective entangling cloner attack. Our simulations show that the proposed method can improve the performance of protocols as long as the inherent noise of the amplifier is lower than a critical value, defined as the tolerable amplifier noise. Furthermore, the optimal performance can approach the scenario where a perfect detector is used. (paper)

  10. Continuous Auditory Feedback of Eye Movements: An Exploratory Study toward Improving Oculomotor Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric O. Boyer

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available As eye movements are mostly automatic and overtly generated to attain visual goals, individuals have a poor metacognitive knowledge of their own eye movements. We present an exploratory study on the effects of real-time continuous auditory feedback generated by eye movements. We considered both a tracking task and a production task where smooth pursuit eye movements (SPEM can be endogenously generated. In particular, we used a visual paradigm which enables to generate and control SPEM in the absence of a moving visual target. We investigated whether real-time auditory feedback of eye movement dynamics might improve learning in both tasks, through a training protocol over 8 days. The results indicate that real-time sonification of eye movements can actually modify the oculomotor behavior, and reinforce intrinsic oculomotor perception. Nevertheless, large inter-individual differences were observed preventing us from reaching a strong conclusion on sensorimotor learning improvements.

  11. Evaluating online continuing medical education seminars: evidence for improving clinical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Christine M; Sciamanna, Christopher N; Nash, David B

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential for online continuing medical education (CME) seminars to improve quality of care. Primary care physicians (113) participated in a randomized controlled trial to evaluate an online CME series. Physicians were randomized to view either a seminar about type 2 diabetes or a seminar about systolic heart failure. Following the seminar, physicians were presented with 4 clinical vignettes and asked to describe what tests, treatments, counseling, or referrals they would recommend. Physicians who viewed the seminars were significantly more likely to recommend guideline-consistent care to patients in the vignettes. For example, physicians who viewed the diabetes seminar were significantly more likely to order an eye exam for diabetes patients (63%) compared with physicians in the control group (27%). For some guidelines there were no group differences. These results provide early evidence of the effectiveness of online CME programs to improve physician clinical practice.

  12. An Improved Continuous-Time Model Predictive Control of Permanent Magnetic Synchronous Motors for a Wide-Speed Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Su

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an improved continuous-time model predictive control (CTMPC of permanent magnetic synchronous motors (PMSMs for a wide-speed range, including the constant torque region and the flux-weakening (FW region. In the constant torque region, the mathematic models of PMSMs in dq-axes are decoupled without the limitation of DC-link voltage. However, in the FW region, the mathematic models of PMSMs in dq-axes are cross-coupled together with the limitation of DC-link voltage. A nonlinear PMSMs mathematic model in the FW region is presented based on the voltage angle. The solving of the nonlinear mathematic model of PMSMs in FW region will lead to heavy computation load for digital signal processing (DSP. To overcome such a problem, a linearization method of the voltage angle is also proposed to reduce the computation load. The selection of transiting points between the constant torque region and FW regions is researched to improve the performance of the driven system. Compared with the proportional integral (PI controller, the proposed CTMPC has obvious advantages in dealing with systems’ nonlinear constraints and improving system performance by restraining overshoot current under step torque changing. Both simulation and experimental results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method in achieving good steady-state performance and smooth switching between the constant torque and FW regions.

  13. Continuing Improvement in the Planetary Ephemeris with VLBA Observations of Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dayton L.; Folkner, William M.; Jacobson, Robert A.; Jacobs, Christopher S.; Romney, Jonathan D.; Dhawan, Vivek; Fomalont, Edward B.

    2016-06-01

    During the past decade a continuing series of measurements of the barycentric position of the Saturn system in the inertial International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) has led to a significant improvement in our knowledge of Saturn's orbit. This in turn has improved the current accuracy and time range of the solar system ephemeris produced and maintained by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Our observing technique involves high-precision astrometry of the radio signal from Cassini with the NRAO Very Long Baseline Array, combined with solutions for the orbital motion of Cassini about the Saturn barycenter from Doppler tracking by the Deep Space Network. Our VLBA astrometry is done in a phase-referencing mode, providing nrad-level relative positions between Cassini and angularly nearby extragalactic radio sources. The positions of those reference radio sources are tied to the ICRF through dedicated VLBI observations by several groups around the world. We will present recent results from our astrometric observations of Cassini through early 2016. This program will continue until the end of the Cassini mission in 2017, although future improvement in Saturn's orbit will be more incremental because we have already covered more that a quarter of Saturn's orbital period. The Juno mission to Jupiter, which will orbit Jupiter for about 1.5 years starting in July 2016, will provide an excellent opportunity for us to apply the same VLBA astrometry technique to improve the orbit of Jupiter by a factor of several. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. This work made use of the Swinburne University of Technology software correlator, developed as part of the Australian Major National Research Facilities Program and operated under license. Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract

  14. Dissemination of performance information and continuous improvement: A narrative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemire, Marc; Demers-Payette, Olivier; Jefferson-Falardeau, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Developing a performance measure and reporting the results to support decision making at an individual level has yielded poor results in many health systems. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the factors associated with the dissemination of performance information that generate and support continuous improvement in health organizations. A systematic data collection strategy that includes empirical and theoretical research published from 1980 to 2010, both qualitative and quantitative, was performed on Web of Science, Current Contents, EMBASE and MEDLINE. A narrative synthesis method was used to iteratively detail explicative processes that underlie the intervention. A classification and synthesis framework was developed, drawing on knowledge transfer and exchange (KTE) literature. The sample consisted of 114 articles, including seven systematic or exhaustive reviews. Results showed that dissemination in itself is not enough to produce improvement initiatives. Successful dissemination depends on various factors, which influence the way collective actors react to performance information such as the clarity of objectives, the relationships between stakeholders, the system's governance and the available incentives. This review was limited to the process of knowledge dissemination in health systems and its utilization by users at the health organization level. Issues related to improvement initiatives deserve more attention. Knowledge dissemination goes beyond better communication and should be considered as carefully as the measurement of performance. Choices pertaining to intervention should be continuously prompted by the concern to support organizational action. While considerable attention was paid to the public reporting of performance information, this review sheds some light on a more promising avenue for changes and improvements, notably in public health systems.

  15. [Study of continuous quality improvement for clinical laboratory processes via the platform of Hospital Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenqi; Shen, Ying; Peng, Xiaoxia; Tian, Jian; Wang, Hui; Xu, Lili; Nie, Xiaolu; Ni, Xin

    2015-05-26

    The program of continuous quality improvement in clinical laboratory processes for complete blood count (CBC) was launched via the platform of Beijing Children's Hospital Group in order to improve the quality of pediatric clinical laboratories. Fifteen children's hospitals of Beijing Children's Hospital group were investigated using the method of Chinese adapted continuous quality improvement with PDCA (Plan-Do-Check-Action). The questionnaire survey and inter-laboratory comparison was conducted to find the existing problems, to analyze reasons, to set forth quality targets and to put them into practice. Then, targeted training was conducted to 15 children's hospitals and the second questionnaire survey, self examinations by the clinical laboratories was performed. At the same time, the Group's online internal quality control platform was established. Overall effects of the program were evaluated so that lay a foundation for the next stage of PDCA. Both quality of control system documents and CBC internal quality control scheme for all of clinical laboratories were improved through this program. In addition, standardization of performance verification was also improved, especially with the comparable verification rate of precision and internal laboratory results up to 100%. In terms of instrument calibration and mandatory diagnostic rates, only three out of the 15 hospitals (20%) failed to pass muster in 2014 from 46.67% (seven out of the 15 hospitals) in 2013. The abnormal data of intraday precision variance coefficients of the five CBC indicator parameters (WBC, RBC, Hb, Plt and Hct) of all the 15 laboratories accounted for 1.2% (2/165) in 2014, a marked decrease from 9.6% (14/145) in 2013. While the number of the hospitals using only one horizontal quality control object for daily quality control has dropped to three from five. The 15 hospitals organized a total of 263 times of training in 2014 from 101 times in 2013, up 160%. The quality improvement program for

  16. Can continuous scans in orthogonal planes improve diagnostic performance of shear wave elastography for breast lesions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pan; Peng, Yulan; Zhao, Haina; Luo, Honghao; Jin, Ya; He, Yushuang

    2015-01-01

    Static shear wave elastography (SWE) is used to detect breast lesions, but slice and plane selections result in discrepancies. To evaluate the intraobserver reproducibility of continuous SWE, and whether quantitative elasticities in orthogonal planes perform better in the differential diagnosis of breast lesions. One hundred and twenty-two breast lesions scheduled for ultrasound-guided biopsy were recruited. Continuous SWE scans were conducted in orthogonal planes separately. Quantitative elasticities and histopathology results were collected. Reproducibility in the same plane and diagnostic performance in different planes were evaluated. The maximum and mean elasticities of the hardest portion, and standard deviation of whole lesion, had high inter-class correlation coefficients (0.87 to 0.95) and large areas under receiver operation characteristic curve (0.887 to 0.899). Without loss of accuracy, sensitivities had increased in orthogonal planes compared with single plane (from 73.17% up to 82.93% at most). Mean elasticity of whole lesion and lesion-to-parenchyma ratio were significantly less reproducible and less accurate. Continuous SWE is highly reproducible for the same observer. The maximum and mean elasticities of the hardest portion and standard deviation of whole lesion are most reliable. Furthermore, the sensitivities of the three parameters are improved in orthogonal planes without loss of accuracies.

  17. Strategic planning as a focus for continuous improvement. A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oneill, John W.; Gordon-Winkler, Lyn

    1992-01-01

    What do most of the successful people and organizations in our world have in common? Instead of worrying about the future, they work to create it. They have a plan, or a vision of what they want to accomplish and they focus their efforts on success. Strategic planning has been described as a disciplined, ongoing process to produce fundamental decisions and actions that shape what an organization is, what it does, and how it will respond to a changing environment. This case study discussion will evaluate the relationship between strategic planning and Total Quality Management (TQM), or continuous improvement, through the experience of the NASA Johnson Space Center in developing a strategy for the future. That experience clearly illustrates the value of strategic planning in setting the framework and establishing the overall thrust of continuous improvement initiatives. Equally significant, the fundamentals of a quality culture such as strong customer and supplier partnerships, participative involvement, open communications, and ownership were essential in overcoming the challenges inherent in the planning process. A reinforced management commitment to the quality culture was a clear, long-term benefit.

  18. Strategic planning as a focus for continuous improvement. A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oneill, John W.; Gordon-Winkler, Lyn

    What do most of the successful people and organizations in our world have in common? Instead of worrying about the future, they work to create it. They have a plan, or a vision of what they want to accomplish and they focus their efforts on success. Strategic planning has been described as a disciplined, ongoing process to produce fundamental decisions and actions that shape what an organization is, what it does, and how it will respond to a changing environment. This case study discussion will evaluate the relationship between strategic planning and Total Quality Management (TQM), or continuous improvement, through the experience of the NASA Johnson Space Center in developing a strategy for the future. That experience clearly illustrates the value of strategic planning in setting the framework and establishing the overall thrust of continuous improvement initiatives. Equally significant, the fundamentals of a quality culture such as strong customer and supplier partnerships, participative involvement, open communications, and ownership were essential in overcoming the challenges inherent in the planning process. A reinforced management commitment to the quality culture was a clear, long-term benefit.

  19. Continuous Improvement in Battery Testing at the NASA/JSC Energy System Test Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, William; Cook, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    The Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA) at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas conducts development and qualification tests to fulfill Energy System Division responsibilities relevant to ASA programs and projects. EST A has historically called upon a variety of fluid, mechanical, electrical, environmental, and data system capabilities spread amongst five full-service facilities to test human and human supported spacecraft in the areas of propulsion systems, fluid systems, pyrotechnics, power generation, and power distribution and control systems. Improvements at ESTA are being made in full earnest of offering NASA project offices an option to choose a thorough test regime that is balanced with cost and schedule constraints. In order to continue testing of enabling power-related technologies utilized by the Energy System Division, an especially proactive effort has been made to increase the cost effectiveness and schedule responsiveness for battery testing. This paper describes the continuous improvement in battery testing at the Energy Systems Test Area being made through consolidation, streamlining, and standardization.

  20. Safety implications of standardized continuous quality improvement programs in community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Todd A; Ho, Certina; Mackinnon, Neil J; Mahaffey, Thomas; Taylor, Jeffrey M

    2013-06-01

    Standardized continuous quality improvement (CQI) programs combine Web-based technologies and standardized improvement processes, tools, and expectations to enable quality-related events (QREs) occurring in individual pharmacies to be shared with pharmacies in other jurisdictions. Because standardized CQI programs are still new to community pharmacy, little is known about how they impact medication safety. This research identifies key aspects of medication safety that change as a result of implementing a standardized CQI program. Fifty-three community pharmacies in Nova Scotia, Canada, adopted the SafetyNET-Rx standardized CQI program in April 2010. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Canada's Medication Safety Self-Assessment (MSSA) survey was administered to these pharmacies before and 1 year into their use of the SafetyNET-Rx program. The nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to explore where changes in patient safety occurred as a result of SafetyNETRx use. Significant improvements occurred with quality processes and risk management, staff competence, and education, and communication of drug orders and other information. Patient education, environmental factors, and the use of devices did not show statistically significant changes. As CQI programs are designed to share learning from QREs, it is reassuring to see that the largest improvements are related to quality processes, risk management, staff competence, and education.

  1. Enabling Continuous Quality Improvement in Practice: The Role and Contribution of Facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Gillian; Lynch, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Facilitating the implementation of continuous quality improvement (CQI) is a complex undertaking. Numerous contextual factors at a local, organizational, and health system level can influence the trajectory and ultimate success of an improvement program. Some of these contextual factors are amenable to modification, others less so. As part of planning and implementing healthcare improvement, it is important to assess and build an understanding of contextual factors that might present barriers to or enablers of implementation. On the basis of this initial diagnosis, it should then be possible to design and implement the improvement intervention in a way that is responsive to contextual barriers and enablers, often described as "tailoring" the implementation approach. Having individuals in the active role of facilitators is proposed as an effective way of delivering a context-sensitive, tailored approach to implementing CQI. This paper presents an overview of the facilitator role in implementing CQI. Drawing on empirical evidence from the use of facilitator roles in healthcare, the type of skills and knowledge required will be considered, along with the type of facilitation strategies that can be employed in the implementation process. Evidence from both case studies and systematic reviews of facilitation will be reviewed and key lessons for developing and studying the role in the future identified.

  2. Increasing the use of 'smart' pump drug libraries by nurses: a continuous quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    The use of infusion pumps that incorporate "smart" technology (smart pumps) can reduce the risks associated with receiving IV therapies. Smart pump technology incorporates safeguards such as a list of high-alert medications, soft and hard dosage limits, and a drug library that can be tailored to specific patient care areas. Its use can help to improve patient safety and to avoid potentially catastrophic harm associated with medication errors. But when one independent community hospital in Massachusetts switched from older mechanical pumps to smart pumps, it neglected to assign an "owner" to oversee the implementation process. One result was that nurses were using the smart pump library for only 37% of all infusions.To increase pump library usage percentage-thereby reducing the risks associated with infusion and improving patient safety-the hospital undertook a continuous quality improvement project over a four-month period in 2009. With the involvement of direct care nurses, and using quantitative data available from the smart pump software, the nursing quality and pharmacy quality teams identified ways to improve pump and pump library use. A secondary goal was to calculate the hospital's return on investment for the purchase of the smart pumps. Several interventions were developed and, on the first of each month, implemented. By the end of the project, pump library usage had nearly doubled; and the hospital had completely recouped its initial investment.

  3. Continuous quality improvement process pin-points delays, speeds STEMI patients to life-saving treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Using a multidisciplinary team approach, the University of California, San Diego, Health System has been able to significantly reduce average door-to-balloon angioplasty times for patients with the most severe form of heart attacks, beating national recommendations by more than a third. The multidisciplinary team meets monthly to review all cases involving patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarctions (STEMI) to see where process improvements can be made. Using this continuous quality improvement (CQI) process, the health system has reduced average door-to-balloon times from 120 minutes to less than 60 minutes, and administrators are now aiming for further progress. Among the improvements instituted by the multidisciplinary team are the implementation of a "greeter" with enough clinical expertise to quickly pick up on potential STEMI heart attacks as soon as patients walk into the ED, and the purchase of an electrocardiogram (EKG) machine so that evaluations can be done in the triage area. ED staff have prepared "STEMI" packets, including items such as special IV tubing and disposable leads, so that patients headed for the catheterization laboratory are prepared to undergo the procedure soon after arrival. All the clocks and devices used in the ED are synchronized so that analysts can later review how long it took to complete each step of the care process. Points of delay can then be targeted for improvement.

  4. Continuous improvement in the Netherlands: current practices and experiences in Dutch manufacturing industry (awarded with ANBAR Citation of excellence)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieskes, J.F.B.; Baudet, F.C.M.; Baudet, Frank; Schuring, R.W.; Boer, Harm

    1997-01-01

    In order to get insight into the current continuous-improvement practices in European industry, EuroCINet carried out a survey in its member countries. In this article, continuous-improvement activities in a sample of 135 Dutch industrial companies are described. The results show that CI is a

  5. Continuous positive airway pressure improves gait control in severe obstructive sleep apnoea: A prospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Baillieul

    Full Text Available Severe obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA can lead to neurocognitive alterations, including gait impairments. The beneficial effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP on improving excessive daytime sleepiness and daily functioning have been documented. However, a demonstration of CPAP treatment efficacy on gait control is still lacking. This study aims to test the hypothesis that CPAP improves gait control in severe OSA patients.In this prospective controlled study, twelve severe OSA patients (age = 57.2±8.9 years, body mass index = 27.4±3.1 kg·m-2, apnoea-hypopnoea index = 46.3±11.7 events·h-1 and 10 healthy matched subjects were included. Overground gait parameters were recorded at spontaneous speed and stride time variability, a clinical marker of gait control, was calculated. To assess the role of executive functions in gait and postural control, a dual-task paradigm was applied using a Stroop test as secondary cognitive task. All assessments were performed before and after 8 weeks of CPAP treatment.Before CPAP treatment, OSA patients had significantly larger stride time variability (3.1±1.1% vs 2.1±0.5% and lower cognitive performances under dual task compared to controls. After CPAP treatment, stride time variability was significantly improved and no longer different compared to controls. Cognitive performance under dual task also improved after CPAP treatment.Eight weeks of CPAP treatment improves gait control of severe OSA patients, suggesting morphological and functional cerebral improvements. Our data provide a rationale for further mechanistic studies and the use of gait as a biomarker of OSA brain consequences.

  6. Breaking continuous potato cropping with legumes improves soil microbial communities, enzyme activities and tuber yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shuhao; Yeboah, Stephen; Cao, Li; Zhang, Junlian; Shi, Shangli; Liu, Yuhui

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the changes in soil microbial populations, enzyme activity, and tuber yield under the rotation sequences of Potato–Common vetch (P–C), Potato–Black medic (P–B) and Potato–Longdong alfalfa (P–L) in a semi–arid area of China. The study also determined the effects of continuous potato cropping (without legumes) on the above mentioned soil properties and yield. The number of bacteria increased significantly (p continuous cropping soils, respectively compared to P–C rotation. The highest fungi/bacteria ratio was found in P–C (0.218), followed by P–L (0.184) and then P–B (0.137) rotation over the different cropping years. In the continuous potato cropping soils, the greatest fungi/bacteria ratio was recorded in the 4–year (0.4067) and 7–year (0.4238) cropping soils and these were significantly higher than 1–year (0.3041), 2–year (0.2545) and 3–year (0.3030) cropping soils. Generally, actinomycetes numbers followed the trend P–L>P–C>P–B. The P–L rotation increased aerobic azotobacters in 2–year (by 26% and 18%) and 4–year (40% and 21%) continuous cropping soils compared to P–C and P–B rotation, respectively. Generally, the highest urease and alkaline phosphate activity, respectively, were observed in P–C (55.77 mg g–1) and (27.71 mg g–1), followed by P–B (50.72 mg mg–1) and (25.64 mg g–1) and then P–L (41.61 mg g–1) and (23.26 mg g–1) rotation. Soil urease, alkaline phosphatase and hydrogen peroxidase activities decreased with increasing years of continuous potato cropping. On average, the P–B rotation significantly increased (p improve soil biology environment, alleviate continuous cropping obstacle and increase potato tuber yield in semi–arid region. PMID:28463981

  7. Continuous Flushing of the Bladder in Rodents Reduces Artifacts and Improves Quantification in Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Deleye

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated the partial volume effect (PVE of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG tracer accumulation in the bladder on the positron emission tomographic (PET image quantification in mice and rats suffering from inflammatory bowel disease. To improve the accuracy, we implemented continuous bladder flushing procedures. Female mice and rats were scanned using microPET/computed tomography (CT at baseline and after induction of acute colitis by injecting 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS intrarectally. During the scans, the bladder was continuously flushed in one group, whereas in the other group, no bladder flushing was performed. As a means of in vivo and ex vivo validation of the inflammation, animals also underwent colonoscopy and were sacrificed for gamma counting (subpopulation and to score the colonic damage both micro- and macroscopically as well as biochemically. At baseline, the microPET signal in the colon of both mice and rats was significantly higher in the nonflushed group compared to the flushed group, caused by the PVE of tracer activity in the bladder. Hence, the colonoscopy and postmortem analyses showed no significant differences at baseline between the flushed and nonflushed animals. TNBS induced significant colonic inflammation, as revealed by colonoscopic and postmortem scores, which was not detected by microPET in the mice without bladder flushing, again because of spillover of bladder activity in the colonic area. MicroPET in bladder-flushed animals did reveal a significant increase in 18F-FDG uptake. Correlations between microPET and colonoscopy, macroscopy, microscopy, and myeloperoxidase yielded higher Spearman rho values in mice with continuously flushed bladders during imaging. Comparable, although somewhat less pronounced, results were shown in the rat. Continuous bladder flushing reduced image artifacts and is mandatory for accurate image quantification in the pelvic region for both mice

  8. The WHO Health Promoting School framework for improving the health and well-being of students and their academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Rebecca; Bonell, Christopher P; Jones, Hayley E; Pouliou, Theodora; Murphy, Simon M; Waters, Elizabeth; Komro, Kelli A; Gibbs, Lisa F; Magnus, Daniel; Campbell, Rona

    2014-04-16

    The World Health Organization's (WHO's) Health Promoting Schools (HPS) framework is an holistic, settings-based approach to promoting health and educational attainment in school. The effectiveness of this approach has not been previously rigorously reviewed. To assess the effectiveness of the Health Promoting Schools (HPS) framework in improving the health and well-being of students and their academic achievement. We searched the following electronic databases in January 2011 and again in March and April 2013: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Campbell Library, ASSIA, BiblioMap, CAB Abstracts, IBSS, Social Science Citation Index, Sociological Abstracts, TRoPHI, Global Health Database, SIGLE, Australian Education Index, British Education Index, Education Resources Information Centre, Database of Education Research, Dissertation Express, Index to Theses in Great Britain and Ireland, ClinicalTrials.gov, Current controlled trials, and WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. We also searched relevant websites, handsearched reference lists, and used citation tracking to identify other relevant articles. We included cluster-randomised controlled trials where randomisation took place at the level of school, district or other geographical area. Participants were children and young people aged four to 18 years, attending schools or colleges. In this review, we define HPS interventions as comprising the following three elements: input to the curriculum; changes to the school's ethos or environment or both; and engagement with families or communities, or both. We compared this intervention against schools that implemented either no intervention or continued with their usual practice, or any programme that included just one or two of the above mentioned HPS elements. At least two review authors identified relevant trials, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias in the trials. We grouped different types of

  9. Improving Students' Achievement in Reading Comprehension Through Think Pair Share Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Handayani, Umami -

    2014-01-01

    This research is designed to improve the students' reading comprehension in English through Think Pair Share strategy. the objective of the research is to develop Think Pair Share to improve the students' reading comprehension. The research was conducted by using classroom action research. The finding showed that Think Pair Share strategy was successful in improving students' reading comprehension. The improvement couls be seen from the increase of students' reading scores. Besides, the fin...

  10. The role of the continuous improvement tools of procesess in building relationships in supply chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Urbaniak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this paper is to determine the importance of the quality management and environmental management systems as well as operational improvement tools (such as TPS, Six Sigma, and Lean Management in building partnerships in supply chain. Methods: This paper contains the results of survey in companies operating in Poland and an analysis of the requirements for suppliers in the implementation of the quality and environmental management systems elements as well as recommendation for them to implement process improvement tools (such as elements of the TPS, the concept of Lean Management and Six Sigma methodologies. Results: The results of the survey and the analysis of the examples show that companies that are buyers in the B2B market often define the very individualized to suppliers needs through detailed specifications defining the requirements for quality assurance, performance increases, (for example, shortening implementation cycles, efficiency (cost reduction, safety, reducing the negative impact on the environment. Conclusions: The effectiveness of the action on improving the quality of processes and products by building relationships with suppliers depends largely on the support provided to them. To achieve these objectives many companies introduce special development programs for suppliers.

  11. Continuous quality improvement intervention for adolescent and young adult HIV testing services in Kenya improves HIV knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Anjuli D; Mugo, Cyrus; Bluemer-Miroite, Shay; Mutiti, Peter M; Wamalwa, Dalton C; Bukusi, David; Neary, Jillian; Njuguna, Irene N; O'Malley, Gabrielle; John-Stewart, Grace C; Slyker, Jennifer A; Kohler, Pamela K

    2017-07-01

    To determine whether continuous quality improvement (CQI) improves quality of HIV testing services for adolescents and young adults (AYA). CQI was introduced at two HIV testing settings: Youth Centre and Voluntary Counseling and Testing (VCT) Center, at a national referral hospital in Nairobi, Kenya. Primary outcomes were AYA satisfaction with HIV testing services, intent to return, and accurate HIV prevention and transmission knowledge. Healthcare worker (HCW) satisfaction assessed staff morale. T tests and interrupted time series analysis using Prais-Winsten regression and generalized estimating equations accounting for temporal trends and autocorrelation were conducted. There were 172 AYA (Youth Centre = 109, VCT = 63) during 6 baseline weeks and 702 (Youth Centre = 454, VCT = 248) during 24 intervention weeks. CQI was associated with an immediate increase in the proportion of AYA with accurate knowledge of HIV transmission at Youth Centre: 18 vs. 63% [adjusted risk difference (aRD) 0.42,95% confidence interval (CI) 0.21 to 0.63], and a trend at VCT: 38 vs. 72% (aRD 0.30, 95% CI -0.04 to 0.63). CQI was associated with an increase in the proportion of AYA with accurate HIV prevention knowledge in VCT: 46 vs. 61% (aRD 0.39, 95% CI 0.02-0.76), but not Youth Centre (P = 0.759). In VCT, CQI showed a trend towards increased intent to retest (4.0 vs. 4.3; aRD 0.78, 95% CI -0.11 to 1.67), but not at Youth Centre (P = 0.19). CQI was not associated with changes in AYA satisfaction, which was high during baseline and intervention at both clinics (P = 0.384, P = 0.755). HCW satisfaction remained high during intervention and baseline (P = 0.746). CQI improved AYA knowledge and did not negatively impact HCW satisfaction. Quality improvement interventions may be useful to improve adolescent-friendly service delivery.

  12. Continuous quality improvement in a Maltese hospital using logical framework analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttigieg, Sandra C; Gauci, Dorothy; Dey, Prasanta

    2016-10-10

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present the application of logical framework analysis (LFA) for implementing continuous quality improvement (CQI) across multiple settings in a tertiary care hospital. Design/methodology/approach This study adopts a multiple case study approach. LFA is implemented within three diverse settings, namely, intensive care unit, surgical ward, and acute in-patient psychiatric ward. First, problem trees are developed in order to determine the root causes of quality issues, specific to the three settings. Second, objective trees are formed suggesting solutions to the quality issues. Third, project plan template using logical framework (LOGFRAME) is created for each setting. Findings This study shows substantial improvement in quality across the three settings. LFA proved to be effective to analyse quality issues and suggest improvement measures objectively. Research limitations/implications This paper applies LFA in specific, albeit, diverse settings in one hospital. For validation purposes, it would be ideal to analyse in other settings within the same hospital, as well as in several hospitals. It also adopts a bottom-up approach when this can be triangulated with other sources of data. Practical implications LFA enables top management to obtain an integrated view of performance. It also provides a basis for further quantitative research on quality management through the identification of key performance indicators and facilitates the development of a business case for improvement. Originality/value LFA is a novel approach for the implementation of CQI programs. Although LFA has been used extensively for project development to source funds from development banks, its application in quality improvement within healthcare projects is scant.

  13. Improvement in Physical Activity in Persons With Obstructive Sleep Apnea Treated With Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Raymonde E; Duttuluri, Manideep; Gibson, Charlisa D; Mir, Sadaf; Fuhrmann, Katherine; Eden, Edward; Supariwala, Azhar

    2017-03-01

    Exercise improves sleep quality, yet people with untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may engage in less physical activity (PA) due to fatigue and daytime sleepiness. We examined changes in PA and sleep quality before and after treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in OSA patients. In this prospective longitudinal study, persons with a primary diagnosis of OSA were enrolled at a community-based hospital in New York City. At 3 time intervals pre- and post-CPAP (3-8 months), we measured sleep quality using validated questionnaires, perceived PA using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), and actual PA using pedometer steps per day. We sought to investigate how CPAP use and changes in sleep quality impacted the number of steps taken, as recorded in pedometer steps. In total, 62 patients were enrolled in the study from March 2012 to July 2014. In all, patients averaged 53 years of age, and 26 patients (42%) were female. Among all participants, 86% of persons had moderate to severe sleep apnea (AHI ≥15). Approximately 73% of participants were compliant with CPAP use. Poor sleep quality correlated with lower actual PA (P = .004) at baseline. At 3 and 7 months, there was significant improvement in sleep quality (Δ -2.63 ± 3.4 and Δ -3.5 ± 3.8; P improvement in sleep quality and actual PA.

  14. A combined continuous and interval aerobic training improves metabolic syndrome risk factors in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari-Sarraf V

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Vahid Sari-Sarraf,1 Akbar Aliasgarzadeh,2 Mohammad-Mahdi Naderali,3 Hamid Esmaeili,1 Ebrahim K Naderali4 1Department of Exercise Physiology, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, University of Tabriz, 2Bone Research Centre, Endocrine Unit, Department of Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; 3The School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, 4Faculty of Science, Liverpool Hope University, Liverpool, UK Abstract: Individuals with metabolic syndrome have significantly higher risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes leading to premature death mortality. Metabolic syndrome has a complex etiology; thus, it may require a combined and multi-targeted aerobic exercise regimen to improve risk factors associated with it. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of combined continuous and interval aerobic training on patients with metabolic syndrome. Thirty adult male with metabolic syndrome (54±8 years were randomly divided into two groups: test training group (TTG; n=15 and control group (CG; n=15. Subjects in TTG performed combined continuous and interval aerobic training using a motorized treadmill three times per week for 16 weeks. Subjects in CG were advised to continue with their normal activities of life. Twenty-two men completed the study (eleven men in each group. At the end of the study, in TTG, there were significant (for all, P<0.05 reductions in total body weight (-3.2%, waist circumference (-3.43 cm, blood pressure (up to -12.7 mmHg, and plasma insulin, glucose, and triacylglyceride levels. Moreover, there were significant (for all, P<0.05 increases VO2max (-15.3% and isometric strength of thigh muscle (28.1% and high-density lipoprotein in TTG. None of the above indices were changed in CG at the end of 16-week study period. Our study suggests that adoption of a 16-week combined continuous and interval aerobic training regimen in men

  15. Making Employee Recognition a Tool for Achieving Improved Performance: Implication for Ghanaian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoatemaa, Abena Serwaa; Kyeremeh, Dorcas Darkoah

    2016-01-01

    Many organisations are increasingly making use of employee recognition to motivate employees to achieve high performance and productivity. Research has shown that effective recognition occurs in organisations that have strong supportive culture, understand the psychology of praising employees for their good work, and apply the principles of…

  16. Effectiveness of a Metacognitive Reading Strategies Program for Improving Low Achieving EFL Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Nasrah Mahmoud; Tawalbeh, Tha'er Issa

    2015-01-01

    As the training of language learners was a main concern of EFL teachers, this study aimed to assess the effectiveness of metacognitive reading strategies instruction (MRSI) on Taif University EFL students who achieved low results in reading. The final sample of this study was (21) female university students. The sample was divided into two groups;…

  17. 3D Game-Based Learning System for Improving Learning Achievement in Software Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su,Chung-Ho; Cheng, Ching-Hsue

    2013-01-01

    The advancement of game-based learning has encouraged many related studies, such that students could better learn curriculum by 3-dimension virtual reality. To enhance software engineering learning, this paper develops a 3D game-based learning system to assist teaching and assess the students' motivation, satisfaction and learning achievement. A…

  18. Using Weblog in Cooperative Learning to Improve the Achievement of History Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Lim Hooi; Leng, Chin Hai; Abedalaziz, Nabeel

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates the use of Weblog in Cooperative Learning to enhance students' learning of History. The main issues of this study were the lack of interest and low achievement scores in History learning. The objectives of this study are to explore the incorporation of Weblog in Cooperative Learning within the teaching and learning…

  19. Improving Astronomy Achievement and Attitude through Astronomy Summer Project: A Design, Implementation and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türk, Cumhur; Kalkan, Hüseyin; Iskeleli', Nazan Ocak; Kiroglu, Kasim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of an astronomy summer project implemented in different learning activities on elementary school students, pre-service elementary teachers and in-service teachers' astronomy achievement and their attitudes to astronomy field. This study is the result of a five-day, three-stage, science school,…

  20. Leveraging Quality Improvement to Achieve Student Learning Assessment Success in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Nancy Gentry

    2009-01-01

    Mounting pressure for transformational change in higher education driven by technology, globalization, competition, funding shortages, and increased emphasis on accountability necessitates that universities implement reforms to demonstrate responsiveness to all stakeholders and to provide evidence of student achievement. In the face of the demand…

  1. Improving grade 7 students’ achievement in initial algebra through a technology-based intervention.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jupri, A.; Drijvers, P.H.M.; Van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Digital technology plays an increasingly important role in daily life, mathematics education and algebra education in particular. To investigate the effect of a technology-rich intervention related to initial algebra on the achievement of 12–13 year old Indonesian students, we set up an experiment.

  2. Physically Active Math and Language Lessons Improve Academic Achievement : A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mullender-Wijnsma, Marijke J,; Hartman, Esther; de Greeff, Johannes W.; Doolaard, Simone; Bosker, Roel J.; Visscher, Chris

    OBJECTIVES: Using physical activity in the teaching of academic lessons is a new way of learning. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an innovative physically active academic intervention ("Fit & Vaardig op School" [F&V]) on academic achievement of children. METHODS: Using

  3. A Mobile Gamification Learning System for Improving the Learning Motivation and Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, C-H.; Cheng, C-H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate how a gamified learning approach influences science learning, achievement and motivation, through a context-aware mobile learning environment, and explains the effects on motivation and student learning. A series of gamified learning activities, based on MGLS (Mobile Gamification Learning System), was developed and…

  4. Is There a Relationship between the Play Attention Program and Improved Student Achievement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Jenny Ann

    2011-01-01

    Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and its effects on student academic achievement have been researched for many years. There have been many interventions that have been used in treating ADHD that have been found successful when implemented consistently. Some of the interventions that have been researched in the past are behavior…

  5. In praise of conscious awareness: a new framework for the investigation of 'continuous improvement' in expert athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John eToner

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A key postulate of traditional theories of motor skill learning (e.g., Fitts and Posner, 1967; Shiffrin and Schneider, 1977 is that expert performance is largely automatic in nature and tends to deteriorate when the performer ‘reinvests’ in, or attempts to exert conscious control over, proceduralized movements (Masters and Maxwell, 2008. This postulate is challenged, however, by recent empirical evidence (e.g., Nyberg, in press; Geeves et al., in press which shows that conscious cognitive activity plays a key role in facilitating further improvement amongst expert sports performers and musicians – people who have already achieved elite status (Toner and Moran, in press. This evidence suggests that expert performers in motor domains (e.g., sport, music can strategically deploy conscious attention to alternate between different modes of bodily awareness (reflective and pre-reflective during performance. Extrapolating from this phenomenon, the current paper considers how a novel theoretical approach (adapted from Sutton, McIlwain, Christensen, and Geeves, 2011 could help researchers to elucidate some of the cognitive mechanisms mediating continuous improvement amongst expert performers.

  6. In praise of conscious awareness: a new framework for the investigation of "continuous improvement" in expert athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, John; Moran, Aidan

    2014-01-01

    A key postulate of traditional theories of motor skill-learning (e.g., Fitts and Posner, 1967; Shiffrin and Schneider, 1977) is that expert performance is largely automatic in nature and tends to deteriorate when the performer "reinvests" in, or attempts to exert conscious control over, proceduralized movements (Masters and Maxwell, 2008). This postulate is challenged, however, by recent empirical evidence (e.g., Nyberg, in press; Geeves et al., 2014) which shows that conscious cognitive activity plays a key role in facilitating further improvement amongst expert sports performers and musicians - people who have already achieved elite status (Toner and Moran, in press). This evidence suggests that expert performers in motor domains (e.g., sport, music) can strategically deploy conscious attention to alternate between different modes of bodily awareness (reflective and pre-reflective) during performance. Extrapolating from this phenomenon, the current paper considers how a novel theoretical approach (adapted from Sutton et al., 2011) could help researchers to elucidate some of the cognitive mechanisms mediating continuous improvement amongst expert performers.

  7. Improvement in headaches with continuous positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnea: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karin G; Ziemba, Alexis M; Garb, Jane L

    2013-02-01

    We aimed to identify clinical features in patients with severe headaches that predicted obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and determine clinical and sleep study characteristics that predicted headache improvement with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Many patients with headaches complain of sleep symptoms and have OSA. There is often improvement of headaches with CPAP treatment. We conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients referred to adult neurology clinic for headaches and sent for polysomnography between January 2008 and December 2009. Follow-up ranged from 18 to 42 months. Eighty-two headache patients (70 females, 12 males) were studied. Mean age was 45±13 years (females 45±13, males 43±11) and mean body mass index was 32±9. Headache types included 17% chronic migraine without aura, 22% episodic migraine without aura, 32% migraine with aura, 21% tension-type headache, 6% chronic post-traumatic headache, 11% medication overuse headache, and 7% other types. All patients were receiving standard treatment for their headaches by their neurologist. Fifty-two patients (63%) had OSA. Increasing age, female gender, and chronic migraine without aura were predictive of OSA. Of the patients with OSA, 33 (63%) used CPAP and 27 (82%) were adherent to CPAP. Headache improvement was reported by 40 patients (49%) due to either standard medical therapy or CPAP. Patients with OSA who were CPAP adherent (21/27) were more likely to have improvement in headaches than patients intolerant of CPAP (2/6), those that did not try CPAP (8/19), and those who did not have OSA (16/30) (P=.045). Of the 33 patients who used CPAP, 13 reported improvement in headaches specifically due to CPAP therapy and 10 additional patients noted benefit in sleep symptoms. The presence of witnessed apneas (P=.045) and male gender (P=.021) predicted improvement in headaches due to CPAP. Headache patients should be evaluated for the presence of OSA. Treating OSA improves headaches in some

  8. Continuous quality improvement: a shared governance model that maximizes agent-specific knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkoski, Vanessa; Yoon, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Motivate, Innovate, Celebrate: an innovative shared governance model through the establishment of continuous quality improvement (CQI) councils was implemented across the London Health Sciences Centre (LHSC). The model leverages agent-specific knowledge at the point of care and provides a structure aimed at building human resources capacity and sustaining enhancements to quality and safe care delivery. Interprofessional and cross-functional teams work through the CQI councils to identify, formulate, execute and evaluate CQI initiatives. In addition to a structure that facilitates collaboration, accountability and ownership, a corporate CQI Steering Committee provides the forum for scaling up and spreading this model. Point-of-care staff, clinical management and educators were trained in LEAN methodology and patient experience-based design to ensure sufficient knowledge and resources to support the implementation.

  9. A Marketing approach on how continuous processes improvement can contribute to hotel business Organic Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana-Simona IVASCIUC

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Generating sustainable growth and profits is like finding a unicorn for most managers. Organic growth should be considered as an alternative for long-term growth in the hotel business. Designing the service process to deliver what customers expect from the hotel offer is a crucial component of encounter marketing. Hotels need to embrace the changes and ensure that their internal processes are aligned not just to current trends, but also to the expected future changes. Keeping up with global changes and trends of any kind, evaluating their impact on your business, continuous improving of the services using PDCA cycle, Six Sigma or Lean principles, are the keys to long-term organic growth.

  10. THEORY OF REASONED ACTION FOR CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT CAPABILITIES: A BEHAVIORAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Siegler

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The importance of interaction between Operations Management (OM and Human Behavior has been recently re-addressed. This paper introduced the Reasoned Action Theory suggested by Froehle and Roth (2004 to analyze Operational Capabilities exploring the suitability of this model in the context of OM. It also seeks to discuss the behavioral aspects of operational capabilities from the perspective of organizational routines. This theory was operationalized using Fishbein and Ajzen (F/A behavioral model and a multi-case strategy was employed to analyze the Continuous Improvement (CI capability. The results posit that the model explains partially the CI behavior in an operational context and some contingency variables might influence the general relationsamong the variables involved in the F/A model. Thus intention might not be the determinant variable of behavior in this context.

  11. A toolbox for safety instrumented system evaluation based on improved continuous-time Markov chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardana, Awang N. I.; Kurniady, Rahman; Pambudi, Galih; Purnama, Jaka; Suryopratomo, Kutut

    2017-08-01

    Safety instrumented system (SIS) is designed to restore a plant into a safe condition when pre-hazardous event is occur. It has a vital role especially in process industries. A SIS shall be meet with safety requirement specifications. To confirm it, SIS shall be evaluated. Typically, the evaluation is calculated by hand. This paper presents a toolbox for SIS evaluation. It is developed based on improved continuous-time Markov chain. The toolbox supports to detailed approach of evaluation. This paper also illustrates an industrial application of the toolbox to evaluate arch burner safety system of primary reformer. The results of the case study demonstrates that the toolbox can be used to evaluate industrial SIS in detail and to plan the maintenance strategy.

  12. The new health-care quality: value, outcomes, and continuous improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, S J; Lanning, J A

    1991-01-01

    No longer convinced that their viewpoint on quality is the only one, different stakeholders in the health-care arena are sharing perspectives to piece together the quality picture. Although still preoccupied with the cost of health care, purchasers are concerned about value--efficiency, appropriateness, and effectiveness--as well as price. Faced with evidence of medically unnecessary procedures and unexamined medical theory, practitioners are searching for appropriateness guidelines, useful outcome measures, and methods to elicit informed patient preferences about elective surgeries. Underlying this search for reliable indicators of quality--now expanded to include patient satisfaction--is a new interest in the Japanese notion of "Kaizen" or continuous quality improvement. The end product of this ferment may determine whether good medicine drives out the bad--or vice versa.

  13. Engineering Ethics Education on the Basis of Continuous Education to Improve Communication Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahara, Kenji; Kajiwara, Toshinori

    The paper proposes the engineering ethics education method for students on the basis of continuous education to improve communication ability. First, through a debate, the students acquire the fundamental skills required to marshal their arguments, to construct the rebuttals and to summarize the debates. Secondly, the students study the fundamental techniques to make a presentation on technical subjects related to electrical engineering. Following these classes, in the lecture of engineering ethics, the students probe the cause of each accident and consider the better means for avoiding such an accident, each other. In most cases, the students can express right and commonsensical opinions from an ethical standpoint. However, they can hardly make judgments when the situations such as the human relations in the above accidents are set concretely. During the engineering ethics class, the students come to know that human relations behind the case make the ethical matters more complicated. Furthermore, they come to understand that facilitating daily communications with co-workers and/or bosses is very important in order to avoid the accidents. The recognition of the students is just the results of the continuous education through three years. It can be said that the engineering ethics education thus constructed makes the students raise such spontaneous awareness and their ethical qualities as engineers.

  14. Can outcome-based continuing medical education improve performance of immigrant physicians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castel, Orit Cohen; Ezra, Vered; Alperin, Mordechai; Nave, Rachel; Porat, Tamar; Golan, Avivit Cohen; Vinker, Shlomo; Karkabi, Khaled

    2011-01-01

    Immigrant physicians are a valued resource for physician workforces in many countries. Few studies have explored the education and training needs of immigrant physicians and ways to facilitate their integration into the health care system in which they work. Using an educational program developed for immigrant civilian physicians working in military primary care clinics at the Israel Defence Force, we illustrate how an outcome-based CME program can address practicing physicians' needs for military-specific primary care education and improve patient care. Following an extensive needs assessment, a 3-year curriculum was developed. The curriculum was delivered by a multidisciplinary educational team. Pre/post multiple-choice examinations, objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE), and end-of-program evaluations were administered for curriculum evaluation. To evaluate change in learners' performance, data from the 2003 (before-program) and 2006 (after-program) work-based assessments were retrieved retrospectively. Change in the performance of program participants was compared with that of immigrant physicians who did not participate in the program. Out of 28 learners, 23 (82%) completed the program. Learners did significantly better in the annual post-tests compared with the pretests (p educators, facing the challenge of integrating immigrant physicians to fit their health care system, may consider adapting our approach. Copyright © 2011 The Alliance for Continuing Medical Education, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on CME, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  15. Issues and Challenges in the Establishment of Continuous Improvement in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuong Anh Nguyen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of Vietnamese management is important for both practitioners and academics because of the huge and continuing growth of business activity in Vietnam. In particular, information about the Vietnamese use of continuous improvement (CI practices is valuable because these have underpinned the success of both western and Asian companies in recent decades. Using the case-study method based on over 60 in-depth interviews with executives, managers, supervisors, and employees of nine leading companies in Vietnam and information gathered from discussions with 440 business and non-business leaders, practitioners, and academics, this paper shows that Vietnamese organizations face numerous challenges when implementing and sustaining CI practices. The findings highlight the tendency of Vietnamese organizations to pursue “shortcut” strategies that prevent them from competing higher up the value-added chain. Maintaining “face” is vital to the Vietnamese and this is a major cultural challenge for organizations in their CI efforts. The paper recommends that Vietnamese organizations address these challenges by pursuing CI more aggressively and investing in human resource development to build capabilities for the future. The Vietnamese government, which is the main engine of change in the country, should promote the use of CI by funding education and training in its methods.

  16. A Hierarchical structure of key performance indicators for operation management and continuous improvement in production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ningxuan; Zhao, Cong; Li, Jingshan; Horst, John A

    2016-01-01

    Key performance indicators (KPIs) are critical for manufacturing operation management and continuous improvement (CI). In modern manufacturing systems, KPIs are defined as a set of metrics to reflect operation performance, such as efficiency, throughput, availability, from productivity, quality and maintenance perspectives. Through continuous monitoring and measurement of KPIs, meaningful quantification and identification of different aspects of operation activities can be obtained, which enable and direct CI efforts. A set of 34 KPIs has been introduced in ISO 22400. However, the KPIs in a manufacturing system are not independent, and they may have intrinsic mutual relationships. The goal of this paper is to introduce a multi-level structure for identification and analysis of KPIs and their intrinsic relationships in production systems. Specifically, through such a hierarchical structure, we define and layer KPIs into levels of basic KPIs, comprehensive KPIs and their supporting metrics, and use it to investigate the relationships and dependencies between KPIs. Such a study can provide a useful tool for manufacturing engineers and managers to measure and utilize KPIs for CI.

  17. An Improved Real-Coded Population-Based Extremal Optimization Method for Continuous Unconstrained Optimization Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Qiang Zeng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a novel evolutionary optimization method, extremal optimization (EO has been successfully applied to a variety of combinatorial optimization problems. However, the applications of EO in continuous optimization problems are relatively rare. This paper proposes an improved real-coded population-based EO method (IRPEO for continuous unconstrained optimization problems. The key operations of IRPEO include generation of real-coded random initial population, evaluation of individual and population fitness, selection of bad elements according to power-law probability distribution, generation of new population based on uniform random mutation, and updating the population by accepting the new population unconditionally. The experimental results on 10 benchmark test functions with the dimension N=30 have shown that IRPEO is competitive or even better than the recently reported various genetic algorithm (GA versions with different mutation operations in terms of simplicity, effectiveness, and efficiency. Furthermore, the superiority of IRPEO to other evolutionary algorithms such as original population-based EO, particle swarm optimization (PSO, and the hybrid PSO-EO is also demonstrated by the experimental results on some benchmark functions.

  18. USING THINK-PAIR-SHARE TO IMPROVE SPEAKING ACHIEVEMENT OF THE SECOND SEMESTER ENGLISH STUDY PROGRAM OF TRIDINANTI UNIVERSITY PALEMBANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Elvinna Manurung

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at improving the speaking achievement of the second semester students of Tridinanti Palembang by using Think-Pair-Share strategy (TPR. This study was an action research study. The steps in conducting the study were planning, actions and observation of action and reflections. The population of the study was all of the second semester students of Tridinanti University in the academic year 2016/2017. The sample used one class (10students. The data collections used by the researcher were tests and observation. The learning improvement indicators included in two things; (1 learning achievement, (2 teaching and learning process. In the study, the implementation was conducted into two cycles. The results showed that the average score of students’ speaking achievement was 66 in cycle I and the observation result was 62.82. The result had not been reached the target yet that was >70. At least more than 85% students could achieve the score above 70. Thus, cycle II was necessary to be implemented. In cycle II, the average score of speaking test was 81and the observation result was 81.06. The students had reached the target and the cycle was stopped. In conclusion, the implementation of TPR had brought significant improvement to the students’ speaking achievement.

  19. Kaizen Award in Romania: the KAIZEN™ way in obtaining the continuous improvement success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bratu Julien

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the times when the economic performance and sustainable management are representing two of the most challenging characteristics of the business environment, there are some methods and techniques that passed the test of time. The great majority of companies are using in the present the KAIZEN™ Business System, a system of management which has been expanding in all over the world, by having and implying the power of continuous improvement and standardization. Having as “role-model” the well-known Toyota Production System, KAIZEN™ Business System has become the fundamental way of managing a business, which led to the creation of personalized management systems for companies. In Romania, it was also developed the Kaizen by Harmony concept, as an approach of KAIZEN™ Business System, its results being highly appreciated at the international level. In the daily challenging task of changing the paradigms and mentalities, several companies succeeded in understanding the importance of KAIZEN™ Business System and have been applying the Kaizen by Harmony concept ever since. Their results are impressive, few companies reaching to the international benchmark level in their fields of activity and becoming leaders of the Romanian or European markets. Therefore, the Kaizen Award in Romania has become the proper way of acknowledging their results and efforts to strive for excellence in the endless cycle of the continuous improvement. The aim of this paper is to describe the competitive advantage offered by KAIZEN™ Business System and Kaizen by Harmony, in strong correlation with the practical approach of the case-studies representing the amazing stories of the Kaizen Award in Romania winners until the present moment. The use of these best practices will underline once again some important business characteristics that must exist in every company, for it to become and remain competitive.

  20. Accuracy of subcutaneous continuous glucose monitoring in critically ill adults: improved sensor performance with enhanced calibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelarathna, Lalantha; English, Shane W; Thabit, Hood; Caldwell, Karen; Allen, Janet M; Kumareswaran, Kavita; Wilinska, Malgorzata E; Nodale, Marianna; Haidar, Ahmad; Evans, Mark L; Burnstein, Rowan; Hovorka, Roman

    2014-02-01

    Accurate real-time continuous glucose measurements may improve glucose control in the critical care unit. We evaluated the accuracy of the FreeStyle(®) Navigator(®) (Abbott Diabetes Care, Alameda, CA) subcutaneous continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device in critically ill adults using two methods of calibration. In a randomized trial, paired CGM and reference glucose (hourly arterial blood glucose [ABG]) were collected over a 48-h period from 24 adults with critical illness (mean±SD age, 60±14 years; mean±SD body mass index, 29.6±9.3 kg/m(2); mean±SD Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation score, 12±4 [range, 6-19]) and hyperglycemia. In 12 subjects, the CGM device was calibrated at variable intervals of 1-6 h using ABG. In the other 12 subjects, the sensor was calibrated according to the manufacturer's instructions (1, 2, 10, and 24 h) using arterial blood and the built-in point-of-care glucometer. In total, 1,060 CGM-ABG pairs were analyzed over the glucose range from 4.3 to 18.8 mmol/L. Using enhanced calibration median (interquartile range) every 169 (122-213) min, the absolute relative deviation was lower (7.0% [3.5, 13.0] vs. 12.8% [6.3, 21.8], P<0.001), and the percentage of points in the Clarke error grid Zone A was higher (87.8% vs. 70.2%). Accuracy of the Navigator CGM device during critical illness was comparable to that observed in non-critical care settings. Further significant improvements in accuracy may be obtained by frequent calibrations with ABG measurements.

  1. Economic Impact of a Peritoneal Dialysis Continuous Quality Improvement Program in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhija, Dilip U; Walton, Surrey M; Mora, Juan P; Sanabria, Rafael M

    2017-01-01

    ♦ BACKGROUND: There is little information regarding the financial burden of peritonitis and the economic impact of continuous quality improvement (CQI) programs in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. The objectives of this study were to measure the costs of peritonitis, and determine the net savings of a PD CQI program in Colombia. ♦ METHODS: The Renal Therapy Services (RTS) network in Colombia, along with Coomeva EPS, provided healthcare resource utilization data for PD patients with and without peritonitis between January 2012 and December 2013. Propensity score matching and regression analysis were performed to estimate the incremental cost of peritonitis. Patient months at risk, episodes of peritonitis pre- and post-CQI, and costs of CQI were obtained. Annual net savings of the CQI program were estimated based on the number of peritonitis events prevented. ♦ RESULTS: The incremental cost of a peritonitis episode was $250. In an 8-year period, peritonitis decreased from 1,837 episodes per 38,596 patient-months in 2006 to 841 episodes per 50,910 patient-months in 2014. Overall, the CQI program prevented an estimated 10,409 episodes of peritonitis. The cost of implementing the CQI program was $147,000 in the first year and $119,000 annually thereafter. Using a five percent discount rate, the net present value of the program was $1,346,431, with an average annual net savings of $207,027. The return on investment (i.e. total savings-program cost/program cost) of CQI was 169%. ♦ CONCLUSION: Continuous quality improvement initiatives designed to reduce rates of peritonitis have a strong potential to generate cost savings. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  2. Coconut (Cocos nucifera L. genetic improvement in Vanuatu: overview of research achievements from 1962 to 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labouisse Jean-Pierre

    2004-07-01

    Compared to higher-yielding hybrids, the improved VTT populations offer the advantage of being totally tolerant of coconut foliar decay and of being reproducible by farmers themselves. The merits of setting up decentralized seed gardens in the Vanuatu archipelago from improved populations at the research station, or from locally surveyed material, are discussed.

  3. Using Shared Leadership to Achieve School Improvement Goals: A Qualitative Study of One High School's Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, Leigh Ann

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological study examined the impact of shared leadership committees on school improvement efforts. The research identified which leadership factors lead to successful shared leadership committees and which supports and structures were needed for the committees to be meaningful in regards to school improvement. Certified…

  4. The continuous improvement system of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde; El sistema de mejora continua de la central nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera C, A. [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Km. 42.5 Cardel-Nautla, Veracruz (Mexico)], e-mail: arr99999@cfe.gob.mx

    2009-10-15

    This paper describes the continuous improvement system of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde and the achievements in implementing the same and additionally two study cases are presents. In February 2009 is noteworthy because the World Association of Nuclear Operators we identified as a learning organization, qualification which shows that the continuous improvement system has matured, and this system will expose as I get to learn to capitalize on our own experiences and external experiences diffused by the nuclear industry. In 2007 the management of nuclear power plants integrates its improvement systems and calls it continuous improvement system and is presented in the same extensive report that won the National Quality Award. This system is made up of 5 subsystems operating individually and are also related 1) human performance; 2) referential comparison or benchmarking; 3) self-assessment; 4) corrective action and 5) external operating experience. Five subsystems that plan, generate, capture, manage, communicate and protect the knowledge generated during the processes execution of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, as well as from external sources. The target set in 2007 was to increase the intellectual capital to always give response to meeting the security requirements, but creating a higher value to quality, customer, environment protection and society. In brief each of them, highlighting the objective, expectations management, implementation and some benefits. At the end they will describe two study cases selected to illustrate these cases as the organization learns by their continuous improvement system. (Author)

  5. Waste Minimization Improvements Achieved Through Six Sigma Analysis Result In Significant Cost Savings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousseau, Jeffrey D.; Jansen, John R.; Janke, David H.; Plowman, Catherine M.

    2003-01-01

    Improved waste minimization practices at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) are leading to a 15% reduction in the generation of hazardous and radioactive waste. Bechtel, BWXT Idaho, LLC (BBWI), the prime management and operations contractor at the INEEL, applied the Six Sigma improvement process to the INEEL Waste Minimization Program to review existing processes and define opportunities for improvement. Our Six Sigma analysis team: composed of an executive champion, process owner, a black belt and yellow belt, and technical and business team members used this statistical based process approach to analyze work processes and produced ten recommendations for improvement. Recommendations ranged from waste generator financial accountability for newly generated waste to enhanced employee recognition programs for waste minimization efforts. These improvements have now been implemented to reduce waste generation rates and are producing positive results

  6. Improving Continuous-Variable Measurement-Device-Independent Multipartite Quantum Communication with Optical Amplifiers*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Zhao, Wei; Li, Fei; Huang, Duan; Liao, Qin; Xie, Cai-Lang

    2017-08-01

    The developing tendency of continuous-variable (CV) measurement-device-independent (MDI) quantum cryptography is to cope with the practical issue of implementing scalable quantum networks. Up to now, most theoretical and experimental researches on CV-MDI QKD are focused on two-party protocols. However, we suggest a CV-MDI multipartite quantum secret sharing (QSS) protocol use the EPR states coupled with optical amplifiers. More remarkable, QSS is the real application in multipartite CV-MDI QKD, in other words, is the concrete implementation method of multipartite CV-MDI QKD. It can implement a practical quantum network scheme, under which the legal participants create the secret correlations by using EPR states connecting to an untrusted relay via insecure links and applying the multi-entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state analysis at relay station. Even if there is a possibility that the relay may be completely tampered, the legal participants are still able to extract a secret key from network communication. The numerical simulation indicates that the quantum network communication can be achieved in an asymmetric scenario, fulfilling the demands of a practical quantum network. Additionally, we illustrate that the use of optical amplifiers can compensate the partial inherent imperfections of detectors and increase the transmission distance of the CV-MDI quantum system.

  7. Climate change: A threat towards achieving ‘Sustainable Development Goal number two’ (end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingirai S. Mugambiwa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to assess the impacts of climate change towards the achievement of Sustainable Development Goal number two (SDG 2 as well as examining the poverty alleviation strategies by subsistence farmers in South Africa. Widespread hunger and poverty continue to be among the most life-threatening problems confronting mankind. Available statistics show that global poverty remains a serious challenge around the world. Across the globe, one in five people lives on less than $1 a day and one in seven suffers from chronic hunger. Similarly, the developing world is adversely affected by poverty and hunger. In the sub-Saharan Africa, research has revealed a higher prevalence of hunger, malnutrition, poverty and food insecurity. SDG 2 focuses more on eliminating hunger and promoting sustainable agriculture. The study employed an exploratory design and a qualitative method. Snowball sampling was used in selecting relevant sources which led the researchers to other research work on the same field through keywords and reference lists. The researchers employed discourse analysis to analyse data. The study discovered that there are numerous potential effects climate change could have on agriculture. It affects crop growth and quality and livestock health. Farming practices could also be affected as well as animals that could be raised in particular climatic areas. The impact of climate change as well as the susceptibility of poor communities is very immense. The article concludes that climate change reduces access to drinking water, negatively affects the health of people and poses a serious threat to food security.

  8. Experimental Evaluations of Two Strategies to Improve Reading Achievement in Kenya: Enhanced Literacy Instruction and Treatment of Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukes, Matthew; Dubeck, Margaret; Brooker, Simon; Wolf, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    There is less quality evidence on how malaria may affect cognitive abilities and educational achievement or on how schools can tackle the problem of malaria among school children. A randomised trial among Sri Lankan children showed that weekly malaria chemoprophylaxis with chloroquine can improve school examination scores. The Health and Literacy…

  9. A University Engagement Model for Achieving Technology Adoption and Performance Improvement Impacts in Healthcare, Manufacturing, and Government

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnis, David R.; Sloan, Mary Anne; Snow, L. David; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2014-01-01

    The Purdue Technical Assistance Program (TAP) offers a model of university engagement and service that is achieving technology adoption and performance improvement impacts in healthcare, manufacturing, government, and other sectors. The TAP model focuses on understanding and meeting the changing and challenging needs of those served, always…

  10. Acupuncture attenuates hyperglycaemia and improves ovarian function in female rats subjected to continuous light exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xuezhi; Jia, Lina; Li, Yaming; Zhang, Xu

    2017-10-01

    Exposure to unnatural light cycles is increasingly associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on glucose metabolism and ovarian function in female rats subjected to long-term continuous light exposure. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (n=24) were divided into three experimental groups: an LD group that was maintained under a normal light-dark cycle (healthy control); an LL group that was exposed to continuous light for 21 weeks but remained untreated; and an LL+EA group that received EA at ST36 and SP6 during weeks 17 to 21 of continuous light exposure. Oestrous cycles of female rats kept in a continuously lit environment for 21 weeks were disordered and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)-like changes occurred, accompanied by increased fasting blood glucose (6.23±0.33 vs 5.27±0.40 mmol/L in week 17, p=0.015) and reduced fasting levels of serum testosterone (0.07±0.018 vs 0.12±0.058 ng/L, p=0.043) and insulin (0.89±0.20 vs 1.43±0.46 ng/L, p=0.006). After 5 weeks of EA treatment at ST36 and SP6, ovarian cycle disruption was mitigated and blood glucose levels showed a gradual decline (5.18±0.37 vs 5.80±0.55 mmol/L, p=0.017; and 5.73±0.31 vs 6.62±0.13 mmol/L, p=0.004; in the fourth and fifth weeks of EA treatment, respectively). EA also attenuated the reductions otherwise seen in serum insulin and testosterone levels. Prolonged exposure to light can lead to a decline in ovarian and pancreatic function. EA at ST36 and SP6 may reduce abnormally elevated blood glucose levels and improve ovarian and pancreatic hormone levels. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Dramatic improvement in genome assembly achieved using doubled-haploid genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Tan, Engkong; Suzuki, Yutaka; Hirose, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Shigeharu; Okano, Hideyuki; Kudoh, Jun; Shimizu, Atsushi; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Watabe, Shugo; Asakawa, Shuichi

    2014-10-27

    Improvement in de novo assembly of large genomes is still to be desired. Here, we improved draft genome sequence quality by employing doubled-haploid individuals. We sequenced wildtype and doubled-haploid Takifugu rubripes genomes, under the same conditions, using the Illumina platform and assembled contigs with SOAPdenovo2. We observed 5.4-fold and 2.6-fold improvement in the sizes of the N50 contig and scaffold of doubled-haploid individuals, respectively, compared to the wildtype, indicating that the use of a doubled-haploid genome aids in accurate genome analysis.

  12. Improvement for enhancing effectiveness of universal power system (UPS) continuous testing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriratana, Lerdlekha

    2018-01-01

    This experiment aims to enhance the effectiveness of the Universal Power System (UPS) continuous testing process of the Electrical and Electronic Institute by applying work scheduling and time study methods. Initially, the standard time of testing process has not been considered that results of unaccurate testing target and also time wasting has been observed. As monitoring and reducing waste time for improving the efficiency of testing process, Yamazumi chart and job scheduling theory (North West Corner Rule) were applied to develop new work process. After the improvements, the overall efficiency of the process possibly increased from 52.8% to 65.6% or 12.7%. Moreover, the waste time could reduce from 828.3 minutes to 653.6 minutes or 21%, while testing units per batch could increase from 3 to 4 units. Therefore, the number of testing units would increase from 12 units up to 20 units per month that also contribute to increase of net income of UPS testing process by 72%.

  13. Does an outcome-based approach to continuing medical education improve physicians' competences in rational prescribing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaily, Hamideh M; Savage, Carl; Vahidi, Rezagoli; Amini, Abolghasem; Dastgiri, Saeed; Hult, Hakan; Dahlgren, Lars Owe; Wahlstrom, Rolf

    2009-11-01

    Continuing medical education (CME) is compulsory in Iran, and traditionally it is lecture-based, which is mostly not successful. Outcome-based education has been proposed for CME programs. To evaluate the effectiveness of an outcome-based educational intervention with a new approach based on outcomes and aligned teaching methods, on knowledge and skills of general physicians (GPs) working in primary care compared with a concurrent CME program in the field of "Rational prescribing". The method used was cluster randomized controlled design. All GPs working in six cities in one province in Iran were invited to participate. The cities were matched and randomly divided into an intervention arm for education on rational prescribing with an outcome-based approach, and a control arm for a traditional program on the same topic. Knowledge and skills were assessed using a pre- and post-test, including case scenarios. In total, 112 GPs participated. There were significant improvements in knowledge and prescribing skills after the training in the intervention arm as well as in comparison with the changes in the control arm. The overall intervention effect was 26 percentage units. The introduction of an outcome-based approach in CME appears to be effective when creating programs to improve GPs' knowledge and skills.

  14. Continued improvement of cardiovascular mortality in Hungary - impact of increased cardio-metabolic prescriptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozan Peter

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last 35 years the poor ranking of Hungary on the list of life expectancy at birth among European countries, has not changed. In 1970 our lag behind the leading European countries was the smallest. The gap was growing between 1970 and 1993 but from 1994 onwards the life expectancy at birth in Hungary has increased continuously and somewhat faster than in other European countries. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between decreasing cardiovascular mortality rates, as a main cause of death and the increase in cardio-metabolic prescriptions and possible changes in lifestyle behavior. Methods Analyses were conducted on national data concerning cardiovascular mortality and the number of cardio-metabolic drug prescription per capita. The association between yearly rates of cardiovascular events and changes in antihypertensive, antilipidemic and antidiabetic prescription rates was analyzed. The changes in other cardiovascular risk factors, like lifestyle were also considered. Results We observed a remarkable decline of mortality due to stroke and acute myocardial infarction (AMI. The fall was significantly associated with all prescription rates. The proportion of each treatment type responsible for suppression of specific mortality rates is different. All treatment types comparably improved stroke mortality, while antilipidemic therapy improved AMI outcome. Conclusions These results emphasize the importance of a comprehensive strategy that maximizes the population coverage of effective treatments. Hungary appears to be at the beginning of the fourth stage of epidemiologic transition, i.e. it has entered the stage of delayed chronic noninfectious diseases.

  15. Continuous Quadrupole Magnetic Separation of Islets during Digestion Improves Purified Porcine Islet Viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weegman, Bradley P; Kumar Sajja, Venkata Sunil; Suszynski, Thomas M; Rizzari, Michael D; Scott Iii, William E; Kitzmann, Jennifer P; Mueller, Kate R; Hanley, Thomas R; Kennedy, David J; Todd, Paul W; Balamurugan, Appakalai N; Hering, Bernhard J; Papas, Klearchos K

    2016-01-01

    Islet transplantation (ITx) is an emerging and promising therapy for patients with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. The islet isolation and purification processes require exposure to extended cold ischemia, warm-enzymatic digestion, mechanical agitation, and use of damaging chemicals for density gradient separation (DG), all of which reduce viable islet yield. In this paper, we describe initial proof-of-concept studies exploring quadrupole magnetic separation (QMS) of islets as an alternative to DG to reduce exposure to these harsh conditions. Three porcine pancreata were split into two parts, the splenic lobe (SPL) and the combined connecting/duodenal lobes (CDL), for paired digestions and purifications. Islets in the SPL were preferentially labeled using magnetic microparticles (MMPs) that lodge within the islet microvasculature when infused into the pancreas and were continuously separated from the exocrine tissue by QMS during the collection phase of the digestion process. Unlabeled islets from the CDL were purified by conventional DG. Islets purified by QMS exhibited significantly improved viability (measured by oxygen consumption rate per DNA, p < 0.03) and better morphology relative to control islets. Islet purification by QMS can reduce the detrimental effects of prolonged exposure to toxic enzymes and density gradient solutions and substantially improve islet viability after isolation.

  16. Continuous Quadrupole Magnetic Separation of Islets during Digestion Improves Purified Porcine Islet Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley P. Weegman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Islet transplantation (ITx is an emerging and promising therapy for patients with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. The islet isolation and purification processes require exposure to extended cold ischemia, warm-enzymatic digestion, mechanical agitation, and use of damaging chemicals for density gradient separation (DG, all of which reduce viable islet yield. In this paper, we describe initial proof-of-concept studies exploring quadrupole magnetic separation (QMS of islets as an alternative to DG to reduce exposure to these harsh conditions. Three porcine pancreata were split into two parts, the splenic lobe (SPL and the combined connecting/duodenal lobes (CDL, for paired digestions and purifications. Islets in the SPL were preferentially labeled using magnetic microparticles (MMPs that lodge within the islet microvasculature when infused into the pancreas and were continuously separated from the exocrine tissue by QMS during the collection phase of the digestion process. Unlabeled islets from the CDL were purified by conventional DG. Islets purified by QMS exhibited significantly improved viability (measured by oxygen consumption rate per DNA, p<0.03 and better morphology relative to control islets. Islet purification by QMS can reduce the detrimental effects of prolonged exposure to toxic enzymes and density gradient solutions and substantially improve islet viability after isolation.

  17. APPLICATION OF QC TOOLS FOR CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT IN AN EXPENSIVE SEAT HARDFACING PROCESS USING TIG WELDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Yunus

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study is carried out to improve quality level by identifying the prime reasons of the quality related problems in the seat hardfacing process involving the deposition of cobalt based super alloy in I.C. Engine valves using TIG welding process. During the Process, defects like stellite deposition overflow, head melt, non-uniform stellite merging, etc., are observed and combining all these defects, the rejection level was in top position in Forge shop. We use widely referred QC tools of the manufacturing field to monitor the complete operation and continuous progressive process improvement to ensure ability and efficiency of quality management system of any firm. The work aims to identify the various causes for the rejection by the detailed study of the operation, equipment, materials and the various process parameters that are very important to get defects-free products. Also, to evolve suitable countermeasures for reducing the rejection percentage using seven QC tools. To further understand and validate the obtained results, we need to address other studies related to motivations, advantages, and disadvantages of applying quality control tools.

  18. Evaluation of a guided continuous quality improvement program in community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinthammit, Chanadda; Rupp, Michael T; Armstrong, Edward P; Modisett, Tara; Snead, Rebecca P; Warholak, Terri L

    2017-01-01

    The importance of creating and sustaining a strong culture of patient safety has been recognized as a critical component of safe medication use. This study aims to assess changes in attitudes toward patient safety culture and frequency of quality-related event (QRE) reporting after guided implementation of a continuous quality improvement (CQI) program in a panel of community pharmacies in the United States (U.S.). Twenty-one community pharmacies volunteered to participate in the project and were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. Pharmacy staff in the intervention group received guided training to ensure full implementation of a CQI program while those in the control group partially implemented the program. Pharmacy staff in both groups completed retrospective pre-post safety culture questionnaires and reported medication errors and near misses that occurred in their practices. Rasch analysis was applied to assess questionnaire validity and reliability and to confirm if the ordinal level data approximated interval level measures. Paired t-tests and repeated measure analysis of covariance tests were subsequently used to compare observed changes in the attitudes of subjects and frequency of QREs reporting in intervention and control groups. Sixty-nine employees completed the questionnaire, a 43.9% response rate. Improvement in attitudes toward patient safety was statistically significant in the intervention group in six domains: staff, training, and skill ( p  = 0.017); patient counseling ( p  = 0.043); communication about mistakes ( p  continuous improvement ( p  < 0.001); and overall patient safety perceptions ( p  = 0.033). No significant differences were observed in QRE reporting rates between intervention and control groups. However, differences were observed in the types of QREs reported (e.g., incorrect safety cap) and the point in the prescription processing workflow where a QRE was detected (e.g., partner check station, and drug

  19. Continuing Medical Education Improves Gastroenterologists' Compliance with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Quality Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Tamar; Moreo, Kathleen; Carter, Jeffrey D; Greene, Laurence; Patel, Barry; Higgins, Peter D R

    2016-07-01

    Low rates of compliance with quality measures for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been reported for US gastroenterologists. We assessed the influence of quality improvement (QI) education on compliance with physician quality reporting system (PQRS) measures for IBD and measures related to National Quality Strategy (NQS) priorities. Forty community-based gastroenterologists participated in the QI study; 20 were assigned to educational intervention and control groups, respectively. At baseline, randomly selected charts of patients with moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis were retrospectively reviewed for the gastroenterologists' performance of 8 PQRS IBD measures and 4 NQS-related measures. The intervention group participated in a series of accredited continuing medical education (CME) activities focusing on QI. Follow-up chart reviews were conducted 6 months after the CME activities. Independent t tests were conducted to compare between-group differences in baseline-to-follow-up rates of documented compliance with each measure. The analysis included 299 baseline charts and 300 follow-up charts. The intervention group had significantly greater magnitudes of improvement than the control group for the following measures: assessment of IBD type, location, and activity (+14 %, p = 0.009); influenza vaccination (+13 %, p = 0.025); pneumococcal vaccination (+20 %, p = 0.003); testing for latent tuberculosis before anti-TNF-α therapy (+10 %, p = 0.028); assessment of hepatitis B virus status before anti-TNF-α therapy (+9 %, p = 0.010); assessment of side effects (+17 %, p = 0.048), and counseling patients about cancer risks (+13 %, p = 0.013). QI-focused CME improves community-based gastroenterologists' compliance with IBD quality measures and measures aligned with NQS priorities.

  20. Improved vascularization of planar membrane diffusion devices following continuous infusion of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, N; Steil, G M; Colton, C K; Bonner-Weir, S; Weir, G C

    2000-01-01

    Improving blood vessel formation around an immunobarrier device should improve the survival of the encapsulated tissue. In the present study we investigated the formation of new blood vessels around a planar membrane diffusion device (the Baxter Theracyte System) undergoing a continuous infusion of vascular endothelial growth factor through the membranes and into the surrounding tissue. Each device (20 microl) had both an inner immunoisolation membrane and an outer vascularizing membrane. Human recombinant vascular endothelial growth factor-165 was infused at 100 ng/day (low dose: n = 6) and 500 ng/day (high dose: n = 7) for 10 days into devices implanted s.c. in Sprague-Dawley rats; noninfused devices transplanted for an identical period were used as controls (n = 5). Two days following the termination of VEGF infusion, devices were loaded with 20 microl of Lispro insulin (1 U/kg) and the kinetics of insulin release from the lumen of the device was assessed. Devices were then explanted and the number of blood vessels (capillary and noncapillary) was quantified using morphometry. High-dose vascular endothelial growth factor infusion resulted in two- to threefold more blood vessels around the device than that obtained with the noninfused devices and devices infused with low-dose vascular endothelial growth factor. This increase in the number of blood vessels was accompanied by a modest increase in insulin diffusion from the device in the high-dose vascular endothelial growth factor infusion group. We conclude that vascular endothelial growth factor can be used to improve blood vessel formation adjacent to planar membrane diffusion devices.

  1. Radiation safety infrastructure in developing countries: a proactive approach for integrated and continuous improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrabit, Khammar

    2008-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (the Agency) is authorized, by its statute, to establish or adopt safety standards for the protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property, and to provide for their application to its own operations as well as to operations under its control or supervision. The Agency has been assisting, since the mid 1960 's, its Member States through mainly its Technical Cooperation Programme (TCP) to improve their national radiation safety infrastructures. However up to the early nineties, assistance was specific and mostly ad hoc and did not systematically utilize an integrated and harmonized approach to achieving effective and sustainable national radiation safety infrastructures in Member States. An unprecedented and integrated international cooperative effort was launched by the Agency in 1994 to establish and/or upgrade the national radiation safety infrastructure in more than 90 countries within the framework of its TCP through the so-called Model project on upgrading radiation protection infrastructure. In this project proactive co-operation with Member States was used in striving towards achieving an effective and sustainable radiation safety infrastructure, compatible with the International basic safety standards for protection against ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources (the BSS) and related standards. Extension to include compatibility with the guidance of the Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources occurred towards the end of the Model Project in December 2004, and with the more recent ensuing follow up projects that started in 2005. The Model Project started with 5 countries in 1994 and finished with 91 countries in 2004. Up to the end of 2007 more than one hundred Member States had been participating in follow up projects covering six themes - namely: legislative and regulatory infrastructure; occupational radiation protection; radiation protection in

  2. Researching achievement and inclusion to improve the educational experiences and outcomes of all learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lani FLORIAN

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers some of the key issues that must be taken into account when conducting research on inclusive education in an era of standards based reform. It challenges the widely held assumption that high levels of educational inclusion are incompatible with high levels of academic achievement in schools and presents the Framework for Participation, a research tool developed by the authors, which supports practitioners (and other researchers who wish to examine the development of inclusive practice in their own schools.

  3. Achieving best practice tariff may not reflect improved survival after hip fracture treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan SK

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sameer K Khan,1 Mark DF Shirley,2 Clare Glennie,1 Paul V Fearon,1 David J Deehan1 1The Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, 2School of Biology, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK Objective: The best practice tariff (BPT incentivizes hospitals in the England and Wales National Health Service to provide multiprofessional care to patients with hip fractures. The initial six targets included: 1 admission under consultant-led joint orthopedic–geriatric care, 2 multidisciplinary assessment protocol on admission, 3 surgery within 36 hours, 4 geriatrician review within 72 hours, 5 multiprofessional rehabilitation, and 6 assessment for falls and bone protection. We aimed to examine the relationship between BPT achievement and important patient outcomes and whether the BPT could predict these independently of other validated predictors.Materials and methods: A retrospective review was conducted on 516 patient episodes. Four outcomes were defined: 1 30-day mortality, 2 365-day mortality, 3 postoperative length of stay on trauma ward (LOS-T, and 4 total post-operative hospital LOS (LOS-H. Patient episodes were grouped as follows: 1 group 1, pre-BPT, 2 group 2, BPT achievers, 3 group 3, BPT fails. These were compared for mortality (χ2 test and for LOS (Kruskal–Wallis test. Event analysis was done for groups 2 and 3 using generalized linear modeling, with age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists grade, hemoglobin, albumin, creatinine, and BPT achievement evaluated as predictors.Results: The three groups did not differ significantly in baseline characteristics or outcomes. In the event analysis, the risk of 30-day mortality was related only to abnormal creatinine (P=0.025; mortality at 365 days was related significantly to low albumin (P=0.023 and weakly to abnormal creatinine (P=0.089. The risks of both increased LOS-T and LOS-H were related to age only (P=0.052, P<0.001, respectively.Conclusion: Achieving BPT does not

  4. Continuous sea-level reconstructions beyond the Pleistocene: improving the Mediterranean sea-level method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, K.; Rohling, E. J.; Amies, J.

    2017-12-01

    Sea-level (SL) reconstructions over glacial-interglacial timeframes are critical for understanding the equilibrium response of ice sheets to sustained warming. In particular, continuous and high-resolution SL records are essential for accurately quantifying `natural' rates of SL rise. Global SL changes are well-constrained since the last glacial maximum ( 20,000 years ago, ky) by radiometrically-dated corals and paleoshoreline data, and fairly well-constrained over the last glacial cycle ( 150 ky). Prior to that, however, studies of ice-volume:SL relationships tend to rely on benthic δ18O, as geomorphological evidence is far more sparse and less reliably dated. An alternative SL reconstruction method (the `marginal basin' approach) was developed for the Red Sea over 500 ky, and recently attempted for the Mediterranean over 5 My (Rohling et al., 2014, Nature). This method exploits the strong sensitivity of seawater δ18O in these basins to SL changes in the relatively narrow and shallow straits which connect the basins with the open ocean. However, the initial Mediterranean SL method did not resolve sea-level highstands during Northern Hemisphere insolation maxima, when African monsoon run-off - strongly depleted in δ18O - reached the Mediterranean. Here, we present improvements to the `marginal basin' sea-level reconstruction method. These include a new `Med-Red SL stack', which combines new probabilistic Mediterranean and Red Sea sea-level stacks spanning the last 500 ky. We also show how a box model-data comparison of water-column δ18O changes over a monsoon interval allows us to quantify the monsoon versus SL δ18O imprint on Mediterranean foraminiferal carbonate δ18O records. This paves the way for a more accurate and fully continuous SL reconstruction extending back through the Pliocene.

  5. Fully automated whole-head segmentation with improved smoothness and continuity, with theory reviewed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Huang

    Full Text Available Individualized current-flow models are needed for precise targeting of brain structures using transcranial electrical or magnetic stimulation (TES/TMS. The same is true for current-source reconstruction in electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG. The first step in generating such models is to obtain an accurate segmentation of individual head anatomy, including not only brain but also cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, skull and soft tissues, with a field of view (FOV that covers the whole head. Currently available automated segmentation tools only provide results for brain tissues, have a limited FOV, and do not guarantee continuity and smoothness of tissues, which is crucially important for accurate current-flow estimates. Here we present a tool that addresses these needs. It is based on a rigorous Bayesian inference framework that combines image intensity model, anatomical prior (atlas and morphological constraints using Markov random fields (MRF. The method is evaluated on 20 simulated and 8 real head volumes acquired with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at 1 mm3 resolution. We find improved surface smoothness and continuity as compared to the segmentation algorithms currently implemented in Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM. With this tool, accurate and morphologically correct modeling of the whole-head anatomy for individual subjects may now be feasible on a routine basis. Code and data are fully integrated into SPM software tool and are made publicly available. In addition, a review on the MRI segmentation using atlas and the MRF over the last 20 years is also provided, with the general mathematical framework clearly derived.

  6. Fully automated whole-head segmentation with improved smoothness and continuity, with theory reviewed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Parra, Lucas C

    2015-01-01

    Individualized current-flow models are needed for precise targeting of brain structures using transcranial electrical or magnetic stimulation (TES/TMS). The same is true for current-source reconstruction in electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG). The first step in generating such models is to obtain an accurate segmentation of individual head anatomy, including not only brain but also cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), skull and soft tissues, with a field of view (FOV) that covers the whole head. Currently available automated segmentation tools only provide results for brain tissues, have a limited FOV, and do not guarantee continuity and smoothness of tissues, which is crucially important for accurate current-flow estimates. Here we present a tool that addresses these needs. It is based on a rigorous Bayesian inference framework that combines image intensity model, anatomical prior (atlas) and morphological constraints using Markov random fields (MRF). The method is evaluated on 20 simulated and 8 real head volumes acquired with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1 mm3 resolution. We find improved surface smoothness and continuity as compared to the segmentation algorithms currently implemented in Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM). With this tool, accurate and morphologically correct modeling of the whole-head anatomy for individual subjects may now be feasible on a routine basis. Code and data are fully integrated into SPM software tool and are made publicly available. In addition, a review on the MRI segmentation using atlas and the MRF over the last 20 years is also provided, with the general mathematical framework clearly derived.

  7. [AMD Annals: a model of continuous monitoring and improvement of the quality of diabetes care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    in recent years, several initiatives have been launched by the Associazione medici diabetologi (AMD) in the context of a national quality improvement program.These activities include: identification of specific indicators of quality of diabetes care, development of a software to calculate such indicators by using routine clinical data, creation of a network of diabetes clinics and analysis and publication of the results in ad hoc reports (AMD Annals). Through the best performer approach, each centre could compare its own performance not only with the theoretical targets suggested by existing guidelines, but also with the results achieved by the best centres operating within the same healthcare system.We evaluated whether the involvement of diabetes clinics into the AMD Annals initiative improved the quality of care over 4 years. a controlled before and after study was performed to compare data collected from 2004 to 2007 by two groups of centres: group A included centres that had been involved in the project since the first edition of AMD Annals; group B included centres only involved in the last edition. overall, 124 diabetes clinics provided data on over 100,000 type 2 diabetes patients/year seen from 2004 to 2007. process indicators included the proportion of patients with at least one measurement of HbA1c, blood pressure and lipid profile during the previous 12 months. Intermediate outcomes included percentages of patients with levels of HbA1c ≤ 7%, blood pressure ≤ 130/85 mmHg and LDL-cholesterol improvements in the proportion of patients with LDL-cholesterol at target were documented in both groups (group A: +10.5%; group B: +12.2%.) The proportion of patients treated with insulin increased in group A only (+5.8%), while the use of statins grew by 20%in both groups.The proportion of individuals treated with two or more antihypertensive drugs increased by 3.6% in group A and by 1.6% in group B. the AMD Annals approach can be considered as a case model for

  8. Improving appropriate use of echocardiography and single-photon emission computed tomographic myocardial perfusion imaging: a continuous quality improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas V; Rose, Geoffrey A; Fenner, Deborah J; Rozario, Nigel L

    2014-07-01

    Appropriate use criteria for cardiovascular imaging have been published, but compliance in practice has been incomplete, with persistent high rates of inappropriate use. The aim of this study was to show the efficacy of a continuous quality improvement (CQI) initiative to favorably influence the appropriate use of outpatient transthoracic echocardiography and single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) in a large cardiovascular practice. In this prospective study, a multiphase CQI initiative was implemented, and its impact on ordering patterns for outpatient transthoracic echocardiography and SPECT MPI was assessed. Between November and December 2010, a baseline analysis of the application of appropriate use criteria to indications for outpatient transthoracic echocardiographic studies (n = 203) and SPECT MPI studies (n = 205) was performed, with studies categorized as "appropriate," "inappropriate," "uncertain," or "unclassified." The CQI initiative was then begun, with (1) clinician education, including didactic lectures and case-based presentations with audience participation; (2) system changes in ordering processes, with redesigned image ordering forms; and (3) peer review and feedback. A follow-up analysis was then performed between June and August 2012, with categorization of indications for transthoracic echocardiographic studies (n = 206) and SPECT MPI studies (n = 206). At baseline, 73.9% of echocardiographic studies were categorized as appropriate, 16.7% as inappropriate, 5.9% as uncertain, and 3.4% as unclassified. Similarly, for SPECT MPI studies 71.7% were categorized as appropriate, 18.5% as inappropriate, 7.8% as uncertain, and 1.9% as unclassified. Separate analysis of the two most important categories, appropriate and inappropriate, demonstrated a significant improvement after the CQI initiative, with a 63% reduction in inappropriate echocardiographic studies (18.5% vs 6.9%, P = .0010) and a 46% reduction

  9. Improving the provision of pregnancy care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women: a continuous quality improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson-Helm, Melanie E; Rumbold, Alice R; Teede, Helena J; Ranasinha, Sanjeeva; Bailie, Ross S; Boyle, Jacqueline A

    2016-05-24

    Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) women are at greater risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes than non-Indigenous women. Pregnancy care has a key role in identifying and addressing modifiable risk factors that contribute to adverse outcomes. We investigated whether participation in a continuous quality improvement (CQI) initiative was associated with increases in provision of recommended pregnancy care by primary health care centers (PHCs) in predominantly Indigenous communities, and whether provision of care was associated with organizational systems or characteristics. Longitudinal analysis of 2220 pregnancy care records from 50 PHCs involved in up to four cycles of CQI in Australia between 2007 and 2012. Linear and logistic regression analyses investigated associations between documented provision of pregnancy care and each CQI cycle, and self-ratings of organizational systems. Main outcome measures included screening and counselling for lifestyle-related risk factors. Women attending PHCs after ≥1 CQI cycles were more likely to receive each pregnancy care measure than women attending before PHCs had completed one cycle e.g. screening for cigarette use: baseline = 73 % (reference), cycle one = 90 % [odds ratio (OR):3.0, 95 % confidence interval (CI):2.2-4.1], two = 91 % (OR:5.1, 95 % CI:3.3-7.8), three = 93 % (OR:6.3, 95 % CI:3.1-13), four = 95 % (OR:11, 95 % CI:4.3-29). Greater self-ratings of overall organizational systems were significantly associated with greater screening for alcohol use (β = 6.8, 95 % CI:0.25-13), nutrition counselling (β = 8.3, 95 % CI:3.1-13), and folate prescription (β = 7.9, 95 % CI:2.6-13). Participation in a CQI initiative by PHCs in Indigenous communities is associated with greater provision of pregnancy care regarding lifestyle-related risk factors. More broadly, these findings support incorporation of CQI activities addressing systems level issues into primary care

  10. Water activity control: a way to improve the efficiency of continuous lipase esterification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombié, S; Tweddell, R J; Condoret, J S; Marty, A

    1998-11-05

    During continuous lipase-catalyzed oleic acid esterification by ethanol in n-hexane, the oleic acid conversion, initially at 95%, decreases to 20% after 2 h. This decrease is caused by the accumulation of the water produced in the course of the reaction in the packed-bed reactor (PBR). In order to improve the PBR efficiency, it is necessary to evacuate the water produced. In this study, different approaches have been tested to control the water content in the PBR during continuous esterification. The first approach consisted in improving the water solubility by increasing the reaction medium polarity. The addition of polar additives to n-hexane, the use of more polar solvents, and the use of solvent-free reaction medium were tested as a means to favor the water evacuation from the PBR. First of all, the use ofn-hexane supplemented with acetone (3 M) or 2-methyl-2-propanol (1 M) enabled the conversion to be maintained at higher values than those obtained in pure n-hexane. The replacement of n-hexane by a more polar solvent, like the 5-methyl-2-hexanone, resulted in the same effect. In all cases, conversions at steady-state were always less than 95%, as obtained in pure n-hexane. This is explained by a decrease in the enzyme activity due to the increase in the medium polarity. Nevertheless, an increase in enzyme quantity allowed 90% conversion to be maintained during 1 week using 3 M acetone amended n-hexane. Good results (a steady-state conversion of about 80%) were obtained when esterification was carried out in a solvent-free reaction medium containing 2 M 2-methyl-2-propanol as a polar additive. The second approach consisted in the evaporation of the accumulated water by use of an intermittent airflow. Although this process did not enable constant esterification rate to be maintained, it did enable the initial conversion (95%) to be restored intermittently. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. Teachers Unions and Management Partnerships: How Working Together Improves Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Saul A.; McCarthy, John E.

    2014-01-01

    For more than a decade, the debate over public school reform has created friction between teachers unions, administrators, school boards, parents, policymakers, and other stakeholders in public education and has fueled disagreements over how to improve the quality of teaching and learning for children. While many factors make consensus elusive…

  12. Achieving Aichi Biodiversity Target 11 to improve the performance of protected areas and conserve freshwater biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego Juffe-Bignoli; Ian Harrison; Stuart HM Butchart; Rebecca Flitcroft; Virgilio Hermoso; Harry Jonas; Anna Lukasiewicz; Michele Thieme; Eren Turak; Heather Bingham; James Dalton; William Darwall; Marine Deguignet; Nigel Dudley; Royal Gardner; Jonathan Higgins; Ritesh Kumar; Simon Linke; G Randy Milton; Jamie Pittock; Kevin G Smith; Arnout van Soesbergen

    2016-01-01

    1. The Strategic Plan for Biodiversity (2011–2020), adopted at the 10th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity, sets 20 Aichi Biodiversity Targets to be met by 2020 to address biodiversity loss and ensure its sustainable and equitable use. Aichi Biodiversity Target 11 describes what an improved conservation network would look...

  13. Assessing the Contribution of Distributed Leadership to School Improvement and Growth in Math Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Ronald H.; Hallinger, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Although there has been sizable growth in the number of empirical studies of shared forms of leadership over the past decade, the bulk of this research has been descriptive. Relatively few published studies have investigated the impact of shared leadership on school improvement. This longitudinal study examines the effects of distributed…

  14. Incomplete reporting of enhanced recovery elements and its impact on achieving quality improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, R W; Fielder, S; Calhoun, J

    2015-01-01

    per cent), length of stay (47, 94 per cent) and mortality (45, 90 per cent). CONCLUSION: The current standard of reporting is frequently incomplete. To transfer knowledge and facilitate implementation of pathways that demonstrate improvements in perioperative care and recovery, a consistent structured...

  15. Energy management information systems : achieving improved energy efficiency : a handbook for managers, engineers and operational staff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooke, J.H.; Landry, B.J.; Hart, D. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Office of Energy Efficiency

    2004-07-01

    There are many opportunities for industrial and commercial facilities to improve energy efficiency by minimizing waste through process optimization. Large energy users can effectively reduce energy costs, improve profits and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by using computing and control equipment. This book covers all aspects of an Energy Management Information System (EMIS) including metering, data collection, data analysis, reporting and cost benefit analyses. EMIS provides relevant information to businesses that enables them to improve energy performance. EMIS deliverables include early detection of poor performance, support for decision making and effective energy reporting. EMIS also features data storage, calculation of effective targets for energy use and comparative energy consumption. Computer systems can be used to improve business performance in terms of finance, personnel, sales, resource planning, maintenance, process control, design and training. In the 1980s, the Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation (CIPEC) developed 2 versions of an energy accounting manual to help industrial, commercial and institutional sectors implement energy-accounting systems. The manual was revised in 1989 and is a useful energy management tool for business and other organizations. The EMIS examples described in this booklet reflect that energy is a variable operating cost, not a fixed overhead charge. 8 tabs., 38 figs.

  16. Improving Climate and Achievement in a Troubled Urban High School through the Talent Development Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, James; Balfanz, Robert; Jordan, Will; Legters, Nettie

    1998-01-01

    A case study of a large nonselective urban high school in Baltimore (Maryland) describes the design and implementation of a comprehensive package of school reforms, the Talent Development Model with Career Academies. Qualitative and quantitative evidence is provided on significant improvements in school climate, student attendance, promotion…

  17. Increasing Student Achievement and Improving Self-Esteem through a Community Building Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Concetta M.

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on improving students' self-esteem through community building at an elementary school in a low socioeconomic community where over 55% of the students live below the poverty line. Orefield and Yun state in their 1999 article, "Resegregation of America's schools," "school level poverty is related to many…

  18. Improving Aerospace Engineering Students' Achievements by an Open Aero Control Experiment Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, QingHua; Zhang, WeiHua; Huang, ZheZhi; Dong, RongHua

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an aero control experiment apparatus (ACEA) for use in aerospace control practical courses. The ACEA incorporates a systematic multihierarchy learning and teaching method, and was designed to improve aerospace engineering students' understanding of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) control systems. It offers a…

  19. Understanding Research Strategies to Improve ERA Performance in Australian Universities: Circumventing Secrecy to Achieve Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diezmann, Carmel M.

    2018-01-01

    Many Australian universities have prioritised improving discipline performance on the national research assessment--Excellence for Research in Australia. However, a "culture of secrecy" pervades "Excellence in Research for Australia" (ERA). There are no specified criteria for the assignment of ratings on a 5-point scale ranging…

  20. The program of continuous improvements in factory in Juzbado; El programa de mejora continua en la Fabrica de Juzbado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto, M.

    2015-07-01

    This articles describes the historical development of the continuous improvement program at Juzbado Factory, since its beginning to nowadays. The evolution throughout the ideas of Total Quality, ISO, EFQM, Six Sigma, and so on, leading to the present situation in which all these tools and methodologies live together is shown. all this has led to a philosophy and business culture focused on safety, quality and continuous improvement. (Author)

  1. Improving University Ranking to Achieve University Competitiveness by Management Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dachyar, M.; Dewi, F.

    2015-05-01

    One way to increase university competitiveness is through information system management. A literature review was done to find information system factors that affect university performance in Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) University Ranking: Asia evaluation. Information system factors were then eliminated using Delphi method through consensus of 7 experts. Result from Delphi method was used as measured variables in PLS-SEM. Estimation with PLS-SEM method through 72 respondents shows that the latent variable academic reputation and citation per paper have significant correlation to university competitiveness. In University of Indonesia (UI) the priority to increase university competitiveness as follow: (i) network building in international conference, (ii) availability of research data to public, (iii) international conference information, (iv) information on achievements and accreditations of each major, (v) ease of employment for alumni.

  2. Improvement of formability for fabricating thin continuously corrugated structures in sheet metal forming process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Woo; Park, Sang Hu; Park, Seong Hun; Ha, Man Yeong; Jeong, Ho Seung; Cho, Jong Rae

    2012-01-01

    A stamping process is widely used for fabricating various sheet metal parts for vehicles, airplanes, and electronic devices by the merit of low processing cost and high productivity. Recently, the use of thin sheets with a corrugated structure for sheet metal parts has rapidly increased for use in energy management devices, such as heat exchangers, separators in fuel cells, and many others. However, it is not easy to make thin corrugated structures directly using a single step stamping process due to their geometrical complexity and very thin thickness. To solve this problem, a multi step stamping (MSS) process that includes a heat treatment process to improve formability is proposed in this work: the sequential process is the initial stamping, heat treatment, and final shaping. By the proposed method, we achieved successful results in fabricating thin corrugated structures with an average thickness of 75μm and increased formability of about 31% compared to the single step stamping process. Such structures can be used in a plate-type heat exchanger requiring low weight and a compact shape

  3. Quality Improvement of Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Yi; Chou, An-Kuo; Chen, Yu-Lien; Chou, Hung-Chieh; Tsao, Po-Nien; Hsieh, Wu-Shiun

    2017-06-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) therapy is widely used in neonates, but the clinical practice varies. However, nursing practice differs among individuals, and an inappropriate application method may delay the respiratory therapy, influence the beneficial effect of NCPAP, and increase complications. We introduced a quality improvement project to expedite the application of NCPAP therapy and decrease the incidence of nasal trauma. A new strategy of mobile NCPAP cart with prepacked fixation kits and a written protocol was implemented from April 2006. All medical staff answered a questionnaire to assess their basic knowledge before and after intensive training. The records of the patients who were treated with NCPAP from October 2005 to November 2006 were reviewed. Fifty-nine medical staff were involved in the project, and their mean score for the questionnaire improved from 69.2 points to 98.3 points after training. From October 2005 to November 2006, 113 infants were recruited in total and 82 of them were admitted after the protocol was implemented. The NCPAP cart dramatically shortened the preparation time (from 520 seconds to 72 seconds) and the application time (from 468 seconds to 200 seconds). The use of the nursing protocol significantly decreased the incidence of nasal trauma in the study population (45.2% vs. 19.6%, p = 0.006), but not in infants with a birth weight of < 1000 g. Risk factors for nasal skin trauma included lower gestational age and birth weight, longer duration of NCPAP use, and lack of standardized nursing care. The mobile NCPAP cart with prepacked fixation kits is a practical way of expediting the initiation of NCPAP therapy. The written nursing protocol decreased the incidence of nasal trauma in infants, except for those with an extremely low birth weight. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Accreditation of Medical Education Programs: Moving From Student Outcomes to Continuous Quality Improvement Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Danielle; Tekian, Ara

    2018-03-01

    Accreditation of undergraduate medical education programs aims to ensure the quality of medical education and promote quality improvement, with the ultimate goal of providing optimal patient care. Direct linkages between accreditation and education quality are, however, difficult to establish. The literature examining the impact of accreditation predominantly focuses on student outcomes, such as performances on national examinations. However, student outcomes present challenges with regard to data availability, comparability, and contamination.The true impact of accreditation may well rest in its ability to promote continuous quality improvement (CQI) within medical education programs. The conceptual model grounding this paper suggests accreditation leads medical schools to commit resources to and engage in self-assessment activities that represent best practices of CQI, leading to the development within schools of a culture of CQI. In line with this model, measures of the impact of accreditation on medical schools need to include CQI-related markers. The CQI orientation of organizations can be measured using validated instruments from the business and management fields. Repeated determinations of medical schools' CQI orientation at various points throughout their accreditation cycles could provide additional evidence of the impact of accreditation on medical education. Strong CQI orientation should lead to high-quality medical education and would serve as a proxy marker for the quality of graduates and possibly for the quality of care they provide.It is time to move away from a focus on student outcomes as measures of the impact of accreditation and embrace additional markers, such as indicators of organizational CQI orientation.

  5. Continuous quality improvement in daily clinical practice: a proof of concept study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A Lorch

    Full Text Available Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI is an iterative process of: planning to improve a product or process, plan implementation, analyzing and comparing results against those expected, and corrective action on differences between actual and expected results. It is little used in clinical medicine. Anemia, a complex problem in End Stage Renal Disease patients, served to test the ability of an unique electronic medical record (EMR optimized for daily care to empower CQI in practice. We used data collected during daily care, stored in the EMR, and organized to display temporal relationships between clinical, laboratory, and therapeutic events. Our aims were optimal hemoglobin with minimum epoetin, and maintaining stable hemoglobin and epoetin. The study was done on 250 patients treated by maintenance hemodialysis (HD, receiving epoetin prior to February 1, 2010 and followed to July 31, 2011. Repleting iron, ensuring iron sufficiency, slow epoetin reduction, and decision support tools enabling data display over long periods in patient-centered reports were key elements. Epoetin dose, adjusted 6-8 weekly, was based on current clinical conditions and past responses. Hemoglobin increased by months 1-2; epoetin decreased from month 4. By months 16-18, epoetin had decreased 42% to 9,720 units/week while hemoglobin increased 8% to 123.6 g/L. Hemoglobin and epoetin were stable from month 7 onward. New epoetin orders decreased 83%. Transferrin saturation increased after the study start. Individual patient hemoglobin variation decreased by 23%, range by 27%. Mortality, 11.78 per 100 patient years, was 42% less than United States dialysis patient mortality. Allowable epoetin charges decreased by $15.33 per treatment and were $22.88 less than current Medicare allowance. The study validates the hypothesis that an EMR optimized for daily patient care can empower CQI in clinical medicine and serve to monitor medical care quality and cost.

  6. Continuous positive air pressure improves orthonasal olfactory function of patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walliczek-Dworschak, Ute; Cassel, Werner; Mittendorf, Luisa; Pellegrino, Robert; Koehler, Ulrich; Güldner, Christian; Dworschak, Philipp Otto Georg; Hildebrandt, Olaf; Daniel, Hanna; Günzel, Thomas; Teymoortash, Afshin; Hummel, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies have suggested that patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) might be affected by olfactory impairment. However, more evidence is needed on the effect that OSA has on the chemical senses (olfaction and gustatory) of these patients, and whether continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment might help to reverse possible impairment. A prospective study was conducted with 44 OSA patients (17 female and 27 male, mean age 54 ± 9.9 years) who were diagnosed via polysomnography and eligible for CPAP treatment. Orthonasal olfactory and gustatory function was measured with the extended Sniffin' Sticks test battery and "taste strips," respectively, before and after CPAP treatment. Baseline olfaction was decreased in OSA patients and after CPAP therapy olfactory scores (odor threshold-discrimination-identification score [TDI]: baseline 29.4 ± 4.11 after CPAP 32.3 ± 4.82; p = 0.001; odor threshold [THR]: baseline 5.28 ± 1.69 after CPAP 6.78 ± 2.61; p = 0.000; odor identification [ID]: baseline 12.9 ± 1.95 after CPAP 13.6 ± 1.33; p = 0.013) improved significantly. In contrast, neither baseline taste function in OSA patients nor gustatory function after treatment seemed to be affected. Orthonasal olfactory function in patients with OSA improves under CPAP therapy; however, gustatory function is not impaired in OSA patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUES OF ENGLISH READING COMPREHENSION MEDIATED BY TECHNOLOGIES TO IMPROVE COLLEGE STUDENT’S ACHIEVEMENT.

    OpenAIRE

    Ochoa-Vásquez, Miguel A.; Ramírez-Montoya, María S.

    2016-01-01

    Improving reading comprehension skills is fundamental to those students willing to enroll in undergraduate studies. This sequential-explanatory mixed methods research design attempted to measure the impact that English reading comprehension assessment had on 96 college students’ school performance, after receiving a 15-hour instruction on reading evaluating techniques in technological-enriched environments. The data was collected through reading comprehension pre/post-tests and a semi-structu...

  8. A text of two titles: Kant's 'A renewed attempt to answer the question: "is the human race continually improving"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zammito, John H

    2008-12-01

    The essay, 'A renewed attempt to answer the question: "Is the human race continually improving?"' appeared as Part II of Kant's 1798 publication, The conflict of the faculties, where it was subordinated under a second title: 'The conflict of the philosophy faculty with the faculty of law'. How did this new situation (and title) affects the meaning of the essay? My argument considers first, the conflict of the faculty of philosophy with the faculty of law; second, the earlier philosophy of history Kant had developed; and, finally, the revision of this position in 'A renewed attempt'. The situation of his argument in the contest between the philosophical and the legal faculties points to other veins of argumentation in Kant's political theory, particularly his appeal to a principle of publicity, but they hardly achieve the theoretical clarity or the systematic centrality they should command. They are displaced in the quest for prediction of the future history of mankind. The question of human progress exceeds the frame of the coordination of the university, and the main question must remain: what was new in Kant's approach to the question of human progress, and was it in fact an enhancement of his philosophy of history? In those terms, 'A renewed attempt' must be regarded a distinct failure. Its innovations prove problematic. Its retreats and equivocations, moreover, threaten to undermine the grander vision of Kant's philosophical history and his political theory, entangling them in an unacceptably theological recourse.

  9. The Influence of a Continuing Medical Education Campaign on New Strategies to Improve Appropriate Use of Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda A. Bucklin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Widespread use of antibiotics has led to drug-resistant bacteria and reports of drug-resistant infections. A continuing medical education (CME campaign was used to improve antibiotic use among primary care providers. Methods. The Office of CME and Professional Development at the University of Colorado School of Medicine produces a semiannual, week-long course for primary care providers. A 2-year multifaceted CME campaign consisted of course content on antibiotic use, a practice audit, and two surveys to measure perceptions of the problem of antibiotic overuse, potential barriers to achieving appropriate use, and strategies to overcome barriers. Results. The overall response rate in the 2nd part of the campaign was 68.4%. Sixty-six percent of respondents had implemented at least one strategy to reduce antibiotic overuse. The rate was significantly higher among those who had attended previous reviews (81.0% compared with those who had attended neither (54%, p=0.0002. However, there was no “dose effect” on the rate of implementing a new strategy. Conclusions. Overuse of antibiotic therapy has important public health implications. Results suggest that mixed interactive and didactic CME program was effective in increasing awareness of antibiotic overuse and strategies for reducing antibiotic administration.

  10. Asthma outcomes improve with continuous positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Pariente, J; Plaza, V; Soriano, J B; Mayos, M; López-Viña, A; Picado, C; Vigil, L

    2017-05-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in asthma patients with concomitant obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) seems to have a favorable impact on asthma, but data are inconsistent due to methodological limitations of previous studies. Prospective, multicenter study. We examined asthma outcomes after 6 months of CPAP in 99 adult asthma patients (mean age 57 years) with OSAS (respiratory disturbance index ≥20). Asthma control and quality of life were assessed with the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) and the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (MiniAQLQ), respectively. Data were analyzed by intention-to-treat basis. The mean ± SD score of the ACQ decreased from 1.39 ± 0.91 at baseline to 1.0 ± 0.78 at 6 months (P = 0.003), the percentage of patients with uncontrolled asthma from 41.4% to 17.2% (P = 0.006), and the percentage of patients with asthma attacks in the 6 months before and after treatment from 35.4% to 17.2% (P = 0.015). The score of the mAQLQ increased from 5.12 ± 1.38 to 5.63 ± 1.17 (P = 0.009). There were also significant improvements in symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux and rhinitis, bronchial reversibility, and exhaled nitric oxide values (all P obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. © 2016 The Authors. Allergy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Identification of Barriers Towards Change and Proposal to Institutionalize Continuous Improvement Programs in Manufacturing Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvair Silveira Torres Jr.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A multi case research unfolded into a study in a sample of Brazilian manufacturing companies concerning their Continuous Improvement (CI program in manufacturing operations. Stakeholders interviews and performance analyses were conducted. The study aims to analyze the existence or absence of the institutionalization of a CI culture in manufacturing operations, identify barriers and difficulties within the process and propose a model for change. As a result of the research, it was observed that despite the considerable motivation of staff, rapid gains of the company and superior results during the early phases of the CI program, time and again such results were either not upheld or faded out over time, delivering no significant mid-term or long term results, due to poor management of changes. This happened mainly as a result of lack of strategic alignment at all levels of the organization, translated in measureable activities and projects, coached and mentored by the middle and upper management throughout the implementation and maintenance of the program. The selected cases showed a declining in performance after two years of CI program start up. Learning, union and process ownership among participants by means of interactions, are necessary to absorb and incorporate changes, instead of merely "smart words" .

  12. Hearing the voices of women in war through continuous quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, M; Farrell, J D

    1998-04-01

    During the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina (BIH), the infrastructure of the health care system was destroyed and health officials, health care providers, and women experienced the war from their own perspectives. Using the principles of continuous quality improvement (CQI), these perspectives were honored and served as the basis for an international training program to hear the voices of women in war and the concerns of those who cared for them. With the results of a comprehensive national survey of all partners, the World Health Organization's European Regional Office held a five-day workshop that used CQI methods. The facilitators and 18 nurses, midwives, and physicians from six cantons developed interventions to address the women's needs, as detailed from the women's stories and from the professional perspectives of governmental authorities and health providers. The effort illustrates the ways in which the principles and tools of CQI can be used to capture the needs of the users of the services with those responsible for restructuring the health service and those with overall responsibility for the health of woman throughout the country.

  13. Continuous quality improvement in substance abuse treatment facilities: How much does it cost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Priscillia; Hunter, Sarah B; Levan, Deborah

    2017-06-01

    Continuous quality improvement (CQI) has grown in the U.S. since the 1970s, yet little is known about the costs to implement CQI in substance abuse treatment facilities. This paper is part of a larger group randomized control trial in a large urban county evaluating the impact of Plan-Study-Do-Act (PDSA)-CQI designed for community service organizations (Hunter, Ober, Paddock, Hunt, & Levan, 2014). Operated by one umbrella organization, each of the eight facilities of the study, four residential and four outpatient substance abuse treatment facilities, selected their own CQI Actions, including administrative- and clinical care-related Actions. Using an activity-based costing approach, we collected labor and supplies and equipment costs directly attributable to CQI Actions over a 12-month trial period. Our study finds implementation of CQI and meeting costs of this trial per facility were approximately $2000 to $10,500 per year ($4500 on average), or $10 to $60 per admitted client. We provide a description of the sources of variation in these costs, including differing intensity of the CQI Actions selected, which should help decision makers plan use of PDSA-CQI. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Assessing Continuous Quality Improvement in Public Health: Adapting Lessons from Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Robert; Cohen, Joanna; Manson, Heather; Scott, Fran

    2017-01-01

    Context: Evidence of the effect of continuous quality improvement (CQI) in public health and valid tools to judge that such effects are not fully formed. Objective: The objective was to adapt and apply Shortell et al.'s (1998) four dimensions of CQI in an examination of a public health accountability and performance management initiative in Ontario, Canada. Methods: In total, 24 semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with informants from public health units and the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. A web survey of public health managers in the province was also carried out. Results: A mix of facilitators and barriers was identified. Leadership and organizational cultures, conducive to CQI success were evident. However, limitations in performance measurement and managerial discretion were key barriers. Conclusion: The four dimensions of CQI provided insight into both facilitators and barriers of CQI adoption in public health. Future research should compare the outcomes of public health CQI initiatives to the framework's stated facilitators and barriers. PMID:28277203

  15. High efficient and continuous surface modification of carbon fibers with improved tensile strength and interfacial adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingfeng; Zhao, Feng; Yao, Yue; Jin, Zhen; Liu, Xu; Huang, Yudong

    2017-08-01

    Most of the surface modification technologies for carbon fibers, no matter in laboratory scale or for commercial manufacture, are accompanied by a simultaneous decrease in tensile strength. In this paper, a feasible and high efficient strategy for carbon fiber treatment which could obviously improve both tensile strength and interfacial adhesion was proposed. Continuously moving carbon fibers were treated with atmospheric helium plasma for 1 min, followed by a 5 min pyrolytic carbon deposition using ethanol as precursor at 800 °C. The effects of the new approach were characterized by SEM, AFM, nanoindentation, XPS, Raman, wettability analysis, single fiber tensile strength testing and single fiber pull-out testing. After modification, pyrolytic carbon coating was deposited on the fiber surface uniformly, and the roughness and surface energy increased significantly. The single fiber tensile testing results indicate that the resulting fiber strength increased 15.7%, rising from 3.13 to 3.62 GPa. Meanwhile, the interfacial shear strength of its epoxy composites increased from 65.3 to 83.5 MPa. The comparative studies of carbon fibers modified with commercial anodic oxidation and sizing were also carried out. The results demonstrate that the new method can be utilized in the carbon fiber manufacture process and is more efficient than the traditional approaches.

  16. Sirolimus formulation with improved pharmacokinetic properties produced by a continuous flow method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solymosi, Tamás; Angi, Réka; Basa-Dénes, Orsolya; Ránky, Soma; Ötvös, Zsolt; Glavinas, Hristos; Filipcsei, Genovéva; Heltovics, Gábor

    2015-08-01

    The oral bioavailability of Sirolimus is limited by poor dissolution of the compound in the gastrointestinal tract resulting in a low bioavailability and large inter-individual differences in blood levels. Several different formulation approaches were applied to overcome these disadvantageous pharmacokinetic properties including the marketed oral solution and a tablet form containing wet milled nanocrystals. These approaches deliver improved pharmacokinetics, yet, they share the characteristics of complex production method and composition. We have developed a nanostructured Sirolimus formulation prepared by the controlled continuous flow precipitation of the compound from its solution in the presence of stabilizers. We have shown that contrary to the batch production the process could be easily intensified and scaled up; apparently the uniformity of the precipitation is heavily dependent on the production parameters, most likely the mixing of the solvent and antisolvent. We compared the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of the nanostructured formula with the marketed nanoformula. We found that our method produces particles in the size range of less than 100nm. The solid form redispersed instantaneously in water and in biorelevant media. Both the solid form and the redispersed colloid solution showed excellent stability even in accelerated test conditions. The oral administration of the nanostructured formula resulted in faster absorption, higher exposure and higher trough concentrations when compared to the marked form. These advantageous properties could allow the development of solid oral Sirolimus formulae with lower strength and gel based topical delivery systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessing Continuous Quality Improvement in Public Health: Adapting Lessons from Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Alex; Schwartz, Robert; Cohen, Joanna; Manson, Heather; Scott, Fran

    2017-02-01

    Evidence of the effect of continuous quality improvement (CQI) in public health and valid tools to judge that such effects are not fully formed. The objective was to adapt and apply Shortell et al.'s (1998) four dimensions of CQI in an examination of a public health accountability and performance management initiative in Ontario, Canada. In total, 24 semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with informants from public health units and the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. A web survey of public health managers in the province was also carried out. A mix of facilitators and barriers was identified. Leadership and organizational cultures, conducive to CQI success were evident. However, limitations in performance measurement and managerial discretion were key barriers. The four dimensions of CQI provided insight into both facilitators and barriers of CQI adoption in public health. Future research should compare the outcomes of public health CQI initiatives to the framework's stated facilitators and barriers. Copyright © 2017 Longwoods Publishing.

  18. The potential of Arachis pintoi biomass to improve quality of soil continuously used for cassava cropping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Muddarisna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment that was aimed to elucidate the effects of application of Arachis pintoi biomass and animal dung on quality of soil continuously used for cassava cropping was conducted at Jatikerto Village, Kromengan District of Malang Regency. Eight treatments tested were 100% NPK inorganic fertilizer, 100 kg N Arachis pintoi/ha, (3 100 kg N chicken dung/ ha, 100 kg N cow dung /ha, 100 kg N goat dung /ha, 100 kg N Arachis pintoi + chicken dung /ha, 100 kg N Arachis pintoi + cow dung /ha, and 100 kg N Arachis pintoi + goat dung /ha. Monitoring quality of top soil (0-20 cm was carried out at planting time and 3 months after planting. Soil samples were collected and analyzed for chemical and physical properties. Yield of cassava was measured at 6 months after planting. Results of this study showed that application of organic fertilizer in forms of green manure (Arachis pintoi biomass, and animal dung significantly improved physical and chemical properties of soil. Application of 50% NPK combined with organic manures did not significantly gave different tuber yield with that of 100% NPK.

  19. Organisational learning: A tool for continuous improvement of the organization; Aprendizaje Organizativo: una herramienta para la mejora continua de la organizacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, J. L.; Esteban, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    We are used to hear a success company in today's world is not possible unless a continuous improvement is developed. How can we be successful in the nuclear plant? We have to achieve safety for workers, people and environment in the first step, and for the second step availability and reliability for systems and components to avoid failure of components that could reduce availability. The aim is to search for new measures to reach this way. One of the improvements implemented in the plants to improve continuously was mainly Operating Experience activities, which was based in event analysis in the plants, causes identification, and to implement corrective actions. For External Operating Experience the aim was to learn from others to avoid occurrence of events in our plants. This was the lessons learned from Three Mile Island event. This was the learning process implemented so far, to get a continuous improvement. So far, the developed capabilities for process improvement follow the Operating Experience process that could be considered classical and will be revitalized nowadays. (Author)

  20. Mentoring At-risk Youth: Improving Academic Achievement in Middle School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellie C. Johnson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Research supports the implementation of mentoring programs as potentially successful approaches to meeting the needs of at-risk students. This study examined a mentoring program entitled: LISTEN (Linking Individual Students To Educational Needs. The LISTEN mentoring program was a district-sponsored, school-based program in which at-risk, middle school students were identified by the school system and mentors were recruited specifically to assist these students with school performance or related issues. Mentors, in this study, were classroom teachers, school counselors, administrators, custodians, librarians, teaching assistants, retired teachers, and cafeteria employees. Archival data from the 2003–04 and 2004–05 academic years were analyzed. A statistically significant difference was found for all three of the study’s criterion variables (GPAs, discipline referrals, and attendance records between those measured in the 2003–04 academic year (pre-intervention and those measured in the 2004–05 academic year (post-intervention. Forty-nine of the fifty-four LISTEN participants experienced academic achievement gains in all three areas of the study.

  1. Anti-idiotypic antibodies as cancer vaccines: achievements and future improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladjemi, Maha Z.

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), researchers have tried to develop immune-based anti-cancer therapies. Thanks to their specificity, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) offer the major advantage to induce fewer side effects than those caused by non-specific conventional treatments (e.g., chemotherapy, radiotherapy). Passive immunotherapy by means of mAbs or cytokines has proved efficacy in oncology and validated the use of immune-based agents as part of anti-cancer treatment options. The next step was to try to induce an active immune protection aiming to boost own’s host immune defense against TAAs. Cancer vaccines are thus developed to specifically induce active immune protection targeting only tumor cells while preserving normal tissues from a non-specific toxicity. But, as most of TAAs are self antigens, an immune tolerance against them exists representing a barrier to effective vaccination against these oncoproteins. One promising approach to break this immune tolerance consists in the use of anti-idiotypic (anti-Id) mAbs, so called Ab2, as antigen surrogates. This vaccination strategy allows also immunization against non-proteic antigens (such as carbohydrates). In some clinical studies, anti-Id cancer vaccines indeed induced efficient humoral and/or cellular immune responses associated with clinical benefit. This review article will focus on recent achievements of anti-Id mAbs use as cancer vaccines in solid tumors.

  2. improvement of the programs of formation of Asco in the period 2010-2015. achievements and actions in March

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Heredia, R.

    2015-01-01

    The improvement plan is one of the plans of action included in the Strategic Plan of ANAV and is focused on achieving and consolidating the commitment of managers with the training, being them the training program for their unit owners. also the gradual implementation of the methodology Systematic Approach to Training and consolidate the structure of committees of training as a tool of management of training programmes. (Author)

  3. Randomized Trial of the Availability, Responsiveness and Continuity (ARC) Organizational Intervention for Improving Youth Outcomes in Community Mental Health Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glisson, Charles; Hemmelgarn, Anthony; Green, Philip; Williams, Nathaniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The primary objective of the study was to assess whether the Availability, Responsiveness and Continuity (ARC) organizational intervention improved youth outcomes in community based mental health programs. The second objective was to assess whether programs with more improved organizational social contexts following the 18-month ARC…

  4. Implementation of Total Employee Involvement as Part of a Continuous Improvement Program at a Fortune 500 Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Kathy Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Over the last several decades, Continuous Improvement (CI) type initiatives have been implemented in companies across the United States to improve quality, reduce process variation, eliminate waste and ultimately reduce costs. Approximately five years ago, one particular Fortune 500 company implemented CI in its manufacturing facilities. A key…

  5. TSO assistance towards the improvement of nuclear safety in Lithuania: achievements and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butcher, P.; Bystedt, P.; Chouha; Weber, J.P.; Zilys, K.

    2001-01-01

    This paper explores the improvements that have taken place at INPP (Ignalina nuclear power plant) in both the engineering and operational aspects of nuclear safety, discussing as example some areas where there has been a large involvement of international experts. The development of the Lithuanian Nuclear Regulatory Authority VATESI, and also the technical support organisations for both the regulator and the NPP are discussed. In each of these sections the paper describes some of the successes and also the areas where there have been some problems. Many of the problems have been resolved but challenges remain for the future. The paper only deals with the assistance towards enhancing the safety of the NPP up to the time of its closure. Regulation of decommissioning is an important area for the future and is receiving urgent attention and active planning at the present time. (authors)

  6. Approximate Arithmetic Training Improves Informal Math Performance in Low Achieving Preschoolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Szkudlarek

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that practice with approximate and non-symbolic arithmetic problems improves the math performance of adults, school aged children, and preschoolers. However, the relative effectiveness of approximate arithmetic training compared to available educational games, and the type of math skills that approximate arithmetic targets are unknown. The present study was designed to (1 compare the effectiveness of approximate arithmetic training to two commercially available numeral and letter identification tablet applications and (2 to examine the specific type of math skills that benefit from approximate arithmetic training. Preschool children (n = 158 were pseudo-randomly assigned to one of three conditions: approximate arithmetic, letter identification, or numeral identification. All children were trained for 10 short sessions and given pre and post tests of informal and formal math, executive function, short term memory, vocabulary, alphabet knowledge, and number word knowledge. We found a significant interaction between initial math performance and training condition, such that children with low pretest math performance benefited from approximate arithmetic training, and children with high pretest math performance benefited from symbol identification training. This effect was restricted to informal, and not formal, math problems. There were also effects of gender, socio-economic status, and age on post-test informal math score after intervention. A median split on pretest math ability indicated that children in the low half of math scores in the approximate arithmetic training condition performed significantly better than children in the letter identification training condition on post-test informal math problems when controlling for pretest, age, gender, and socio-economic status. Our results support the conclusion that approximate arithmetic training may be especially effective for children with low math skills, and that

  7. Approximate Arithmetic Training Improves Informal Math Performance in Low Achieving Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkudlarek, Emily; Brannon, Elizabeth M

    2018-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that practice with approximate and non-symbolic arithmetic problems improves the math performance of adults, school aged children, and preschoolers. However, the relative effectiveness of approximate arithmetic training compared to available educational games, and the type of math skills that approximate arithmetic targets are unknown. The present study was designed to (1) compare the effectiveness of approximate arithmetic training to two commercially available numeral and letter identification tablet applications and (2) to examine the specific type of math skills that benefit from approximate arithmetic training. Preschool children ( n = 158) were pseudo-randomly assigned to one of three conditions: approximate arithmetic, letter identification, or numeral identification. All children were trained for 10 short sessions and given pre and post tests of informal and formal math, executive function, short term memory, vocabulary, alphabet knowledge, and number word knowledge. We found a significant interaction between initial math performance and training condition, such that children with low pretest math performance benefited from approximate arithmetic training, and children with high pretest math performance benefited from symbol identification training. This effect was restricted to informal, and not formal, math problems. There were also effects of gender, socio-economic status, and age on post-test informal math score after intervention. A median split on pretest math ability indicated that children in the low half of math scores in the approximate arithmetic training condition performed significantly better than children in the letter identification training condition on post-test informal math problems when controlling for pretest, age, gender, and socio-economic status. Our results support the conclusion that approximate arithmetic training may be especially effective for children with low math skills, and that approximate arithmetic

  8. Survey of sustainability of continuous improvement systems: a comparison of two manufacturing communities in Spain and Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Jaca

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: During the last 50 years industrial companies have adopted continuous improvement systems to improve their competitiveness. However, the maintenance of improvement systems is not an easy matter. Some companies, after an initial period of one to two years, abandon the system for various reasons. This article aims to examine the level of application of Continuous Improvement Systems and the factors which support sustainability over time in two different regions.Design/methodology/approach: In order to obtain a comparative result between two different regions, a survey was conducted in two industrial zones—one in the north of Spain and another in Mexico—that are important industrial clusters these countries. The study was conducted through the analysis of survey data. Specifically, the survey was directed at large industrial enterprises who had participated in activities supported by local foundations for the promotion of quality and improvement.Findings and Originality/value: We suggest the following three keys for sustainable improvement: greater involvement of task forces in the improvement program, a PDCA improvement cycle for improvement and a clear purpose for continuous improvement, integration of the continuous improvement system in the organization, and the establishment of indicators associated with the system.Research limitations/implications: The comparative study focused on only two industrial zones in Spain and Mexico. In that sense, the findings of the research are limited to the Basque zone and geographical zone of Toluca-Lerma.Practical implications: Some of the companies have started to apply some continuous improvement techniques in a sustainability way. Therefore, these findings could be very useful for general and operation managers that are involved in continuous improvement systems in industrial companies in Spain and Mexico.Social implications: As a consequence, slow and small transformations in certain

  9. Pulsatile operation of a continuous-flow right ventricular assist device (RVAD) to improve vascular pulsatility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Boon C; Kleinheyer, Matthias; Smith, Peter A; Timms, Daniel; Cohn, William E; Lim, Einly

    2018-01-01

    Despite the widespread acceptance of rotary blood pump (RBP) in clinical use over the past decades, the diminished flow pulsatility generated by a fixed speed RBP has been regarded as a potential factor that may lead to adverse events such as vasculature stiffening and hemorrhagic strokes. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of generating physiological pulse pressure in the pulmonary circulation by modulating the speed of a right ventricular assist device (RVAD) in a mock circulation loop. A rectangular pulse profile with predetermined pulse width has been implemented as the pump speed pattern with two different phase shifts (0% and 50%) with respect to the ventricular contraction. In addition, the performance of the speed modulation strategy has been assessed under different cardiovascular states, including variation in ventricular contractility and pulmonary arterial compliance. Our results indicated that the proposed pulse profile with optimised parameters (Apulse = 10000 rpm and ωmin = 3000 rpm) was able to generate pulmonary arterial pulse pressure within the physiological range (9-15 mmHg) while avoiding undesirable pump backflow under both co- and counter-pulsation modes. As compared to co-pulsation, stroke work was reduced by over 44% under counter-pulsation, suggesting that mechanical workload of the right ventricle can be efficiently mitigated through counter-pulsing the pump speed. Furthermore, our results showed that improved ventricular contractility could potentially lead to higher risk of ventricular suction and pump backflow, while stiffening of the pulmonary artery resulted in increased pulse pressure. In conclusion, the proposed speed modulation strategy produces pulsatile hemodynamics, which is more physiologic than continuous blood flow. The findings also provide valuable insight into the interaction between RVAD speed modulation and the pulmonary circulation under various cardiovascular states.

  10. Implementation of a continuous quality improvement program reduces the occurrence of peritonitis in PD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianwen; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Ke; Yi, Bin; Liu, Yan; Liu, Jishi; Zhang, Xianming; Ji, Ying

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the causes of peritonitis in patients with peritoneal dialysis (PD) using continuous quality improvement (CQI) to develop effective interventions and reduce the occurrence of peritonitis. A quality control team consisting of 10 members, including the department head, four nephrologists and four nurses, all specialized in PD care, and the head nurse, was established at the Peritoneal Dialysis Center of the Third Xiangya Hospital of Central South University. All patients with peritonitis occurring between 1 July 2010 and 31 December 2011 (pre-CQI period) were analyzed and compared with data obtained between January 2012 (implementation of CQI) and March 2013 to investigate possible causes of peritonitis and to develop corresponding interventions. Fishbone analysis, including laboratory parameters, was carried out monthly. Gastrointestinal tract dysfunction, nonstandard procedures and malnutrition were found to be the top three risk factors for peritonitis. Gastrointestinal tract dysfunction was the likely cause of peritonitis in 42.8% of the subjects before CQI and 36.0% after CQI (p<0.05). Nonstandard procedures were the cause of peritonitis in 33.3% of the subjects before CQI and 24.0% after CQI (p<0.05). The overall incidence of peritonitis reduced from once every 40.1 patient months before the CQI to once every 70.8 patient months after CQI (p<0.05). The incidence of Gram-positive bacteria peritonitis reduced from once every 96.9 patients per month before CQI to once every 209.1 patient months after CQI (p<0.05), whereas the incidence of Gram-negative bacteria peritonitis reduced from once every 234.2 patient months before CQI to once every 292.8 patient months after CQI. CQI can effectively reduce the occurrence of PD-related peritonitis.

  11. Implicit and Explicit Knowledge Both Improve Dual Task Performance in a Continuous Pursuit Tracking Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewolds, Harald E; Bröker, Laura; de Oliveira, Rita F; Raab, Markus; Künzell, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of predictability on dual-task performance in a continuous tracking task. Participants practiced either informed (explicit group) or uninformed (implicit group) about a repeated segment in the curves they had to track. In Experiment 1 participants practices the tracking task only, dual-task performance was assessed after by combining the tracking task with an auditory reaction time task. Results showed both groups learned equally well and tracking performance on a predictable segment in the dual-task condition was better than on random segments. However, reaction times did not benefit from a predictable tracking segment. To investigate the effect of learning under dual-task situation participants in Experiment 2 practiced the tracking task while simultaneously performing the auditory reaction time task. No learning of the repeated segment could be demonstrated for either group during the training blocks, in contrast to the test-block and retention test, where participants performed better on the repeated segment in both dual-task and single-task conditions. Only the explicit group improved from test-block to retention test. As in Experiment 1, reaction times while tracking a predictable segment were no better than reaction times while tracking a random segment. We concluded that predictability has a positive effect only on the predictable task itself possibly because of a task-shielding mechanism. For dual-task training there seems to be an initial negative effect of explicit instructions, possibly because of fatigue, but the advantage of explicit instructions was demonstrated in a retention test. This might be due to the explicit memory system informing or aiding the implicit memory system.

  12. Evaluation of the BD BACTEC FX blood volume monitoring system as a continuous quality improvement measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coorevits, L; Van den Abeele, A-M

    2015-07-01

    The yield of blood cultures is proportional to the volume of blood cultured. We evaluated an automatic blood volume monitoring system, recently developed by Becton Dickinson within its BACTEC EpiCenter module, that calculates mean volumes of negative aerobic bottles and generates boxplots and histograms. First, we evaluated the filling degree of 339 aerobic glass blood cultures by calculating the weight-based volume for each bottle. A substantial amount of the bottles (48.3%) were inadequately filled. Evaluation of the accuracy of the monitoring system showed a mean bias of -1.4 mL (-15.4%). Additional evaluation, using the amended software on 287 aerobic blood culture bottles, resulted in an acceptable mean deviation of -0.3 mL (-3.3%). The new software version was also tested on 200 of the recently introduced plastic bottles, which will replace the glass bottles in the near future, showing a mean deviation of +2.8 mL (+26.7%). In conclusion, the mean calculated volumes can be used for the training of a single phlebotomist. However, filling problems appear to be masked when using them for phlebotomist groups or on wards. Here, visual interpretation of boxplots and histograms can serve as a useful tool to observe the spread of the filling degrees and to develop a continuous improvement program. Re-adjustment of the software has proven to be necessary for use with plastic bottles. Due to our findings, BD has developed further adjustments to the software for validated use with plastic bottles, which will be released soon.

  13. Improved peak detection in mass spectrum by incorporating continuous wavelet transform-based pattern matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Pan; Kibbe, Warren A; Lin, Simon M

    2006-09-01

    A major problem for current peak detection algorithms is that noise in mass spectrometry (MS) spectra gives rise to a high rate of false positives. The false positive rate is especially problematic in detecting peaks with low amplitudes. Usually, various baseline correction algorithms and smoothing methods are applied before attempting peak detection. This approach is very sensitive to the amount of smoothing and aggressiveness of the baseline correction, which contribute to making peak detection results inconsistent between runs, instrumentation and analysis methods. Most peak detection algorithms simply identify peaks based on amplitude, ignoring the additional information present in the shape of the peaks in a spectrum. In our experience, 'true' peaks have characteristic shapes, and providing a shape-matching function that provides a 'goodness of fit' coefficient should provide a more robust peak identification method. Based on these observations, a continuous wavelet transform (CWT)-based peak detection algorithm has been devised that identifies peaks with different scales and amplitudes. By transforming the spectrum into wavelet space, the pattern-matching problem is simplified and in addition provides a powerful technique for identifying and separating the signal from the spike noise and colored noise. This transformation, with the additional information provided by the 2D CWT coefficients can greatly enhance the effective signal-to-noise ratio. Furthermore, with this technique no baseline removal or peak smoothing preprocessing steps are required before peak detection, and this improves the robustness of peak detection under a variety of conditions. The algorithm was evaluated with SELDI-TOF spectra with known polypeptide positions. Comparisons with two other popular algorithms were performed. The results show the CWT-based algorithm can identify both strong and weak peaks while keeping false positive rate low. The algorithm is implemented in R and will be

  14. The sustainability of improvements from continuing professional development in pharmacy practice and learning behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Karen J; Delate, Thomas; Newlon, Carey L

    2015-04-25

    To assess the long-term sustainability of continuing professional development (CPD) training in pharmacy practice and learning behaviors. This was a 3-year posttrial survey of pharmacists who had participated in an unblinded randomized controlled trial of CPD. The online survey assessed participants' perceptions of pharmacy practice, learning behaviors, and sustainability of CPD. Differences between groups on the posttrial survey responses and changes from the trial's follow-up survey to the posttrial survey responses within the intervention group were compared. Of the 91 pharmacists who completed the original trial, 72 (79%) participated in the sustainability survey. Compared to control participants, a higher percentage of intervention participants reported in the sustainability survey that they had utilized the CPD concept (45.7% vs 8.1%) and identified personal learning objectives (68.6% vs 43.2%) during the previous year. Compared to their follow-up survey responses, lower percentages of intervention participants reported identifying personal learning objectives (94.3% vs 68.6%), documenting their learning plan (82.9% vs 22.9%) and participating in learning by doing (42.9% vs 14.3%) in the sustainability survey. In the intervention group, many of the improvements to pharmacy practice items were sustained over the 3-year period but were not significantly different from the control group. Sustainability of a CPD intervention over a 3-year varied. While CPD-trained pharmacists reported utilizing CPD concepts at a higher rate than control pharmacists, their CPD learning behaviors diminished over time.

  15. Do social functioning and symptoms improve with continuation antidepressant treatment of persistent depressive disorder? An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellerstein, David J; Hunnicutt-Ferguson, Kallio; Stewart, Jonathan W; McGrath, Patrick J; Keller, Samantha; Peterson, Bradley S; Chen, Ying

    2017-03-01

    To determine efficacy of continued treatment with the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor duloxetine on symptom reduction and functional improvement in outpatients with dysthymia. Fifty outpatients with DSM-IV-TR diagnosed dysthymia who had participated in a 10 week double-blind, placebo-controlled study of duloxetine received open treatment for three months. Nineteen duloxetine responders continued duloxetine, 24 patients initially treated with placebo started open duloxetine treatment, and 7 duloxetine non-responders were treated with desvenlafaxine or bupropion, selected by clinician choice. Patients continuing duloxetine maintained symptom improvement, 84% meeting response and 63% remission criteria at week 22. Patients initially treated with placebo showed similarly high levels of response (83%) and remission (62%) at week 22, and most duloxetine non-responders subsequently responded to other antidepressants. Duloxetine-continuation patients improved modestly between weeks 10 and 22 on measures of social and cognitive functioning and temperament. Despite this improvement concurrently across several functional domains, 66.7% of patients continuing duloxetine remained in the impaired range of functioning according to the Social Adjustment Scale (SAS). Continued duloxetine treatment appears to be effective in maintaining symptom response in dysthymic disorder, and has positive effects on social functioning. However, the majority of patients do not show normalization of functioning, even when controlling for remission status. Additional treatments should be considered to target residual impairments in social functioning in mood remitted patients with persistent depressive disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Exploring the potential of a multi-level approach to improve capability for continuous organizational improvement and learning in a Swedish healthcare region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, M E; Höög, E; Garvare, R; Andersson Bäck, M; Terris, D D; Hansson, J

    2018-05-24

    Eldercare and care of people with functional impairments is organized by the municipalities in Sweden. Improving care in these areas is complex, with multiple stakeholders and organizations. Appropriate strategies to develop capability for continuing organizational improvement and learning (COIL) are needed. The purpose of our study was to develop and pilot-test a flexible, multilevel approach for COIL capability building and to identify what it takes to achieve changes in key actors' approaches to COIL. The approach, named "Sustainable Improvement and Development through Strategic and Systematic Approaches" (SIDSSA), was applied through an action-research and action-learning intervention. The SIDSSA approach was tested in a regional research and development (R&D) unit, and in two municipalities handling care of the elderly and people with functional impairments. Our approach included a multilevel strategy, development loops of five flexible phases, and an action-learning loop. The approach was designed to support systems understanding, strategic focus, methodological practices, and change process knowledge - all of which required double-loop learning. Multiple qualitative methods, i.e., repeated interviews, process diaries, and documents, provided data for conventional content analyses. The new approach was successfully tested on all cases and adopted and sustained by the R&D unit. Participants reported new insights and skills. The development loop facilitated a sense of coherence and control during uncertainty, improved planning and problem analysis, enhanced mapping of context and conditions, and supported problem-solving at both the individual and unit levels. The systems-level view and structured approach helped participants to explain, motivate, and implement change initiatives, especially after working more systematically with mapping, analyses, and goal setting. An easily understood and generalizable model internalized by key organizational actors is an

  17. Importance of an Interprofessional Team Approach in Achieving Improved Management of the Dizzy Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Amanda I; Zupancic, Steven; Song, Michael M; Cordero, Joehassin; Nguyen, Tam Q; Seifert, Charles

    2017-03-01

    Because of its multifaceted nature, dizziness is difficult for clinicians to diagnose and manage independently. Current treatment trends suggest that patients are often referred to the otolaryngologist for intervention despite having a nonotologic disorder. Additionally, many individuals with atypical presentations are often misdiagnosed and spend a significant amount of time waiting for consultation by the otolaryngologist. Few studies have alluded that implementation of an interprofessional team approach in the diagnosis and management of the dizzy patient can improve clinical decision-making. However, to the authors' knowledge, there is no information specifically quantifying the outcomes and potential benefits of using an interprofessional balance care team approach. To compare dizziness diagnoses trends and referral practices with and without the use of an interprofessional management approach within a university healthcare system. Over the course of a 3-yr period, a retrospective review of the diagnosis and management of dizziness was performed with and without implementation of an interprofessional team. To observe potential differences, year 3 incorporated the interprofessional management approach while years 1-2 did not. The two periods were then compared to each other. A total of 134 patients referred to a university hearing clinic for a vestibular and balance function evaluation. Diagnoses and management trends were examined with descriptive statistics (percentages and frequencies). Fisher's exact tests, analysis of contingency tables, were conducted to evaluate the influence of interprofessional management on dizziness diagnoses and treatment patterns. Results demonstrated that before implementation of an interprofessional team approach, (1) referring clinicians used unspecific dizziness diagnosis codes (e.g., dizziness and giddiness), (2) a low number of patients with dizziness were referred for balance function testing, (3) diagnoses remained

  18. Achieving the same for less: improving mood depletes blood glucose for people with poor (but not good) emotion control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niven, Karen; Totterdell, Peter; Miles, Eleanor; Webb, Thomas L; Sheeran, Paschal

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have found that acts of self-control like emotion regulation deplete blood glucose levels. The present experiment investigated the hypothesis that the extent to which people's blood glucose levels decline during emotion regulation attempts is influenced by whether they believe themselves to be good or poor at emotion control. We found that although good and poor emotion regulators were equally able to achieve positive and negative moods, the blood glucose of poor emotion regulators was reduced after performing an affect-improving task, whereas the blood glucose of good emotion regulators remained unchanged. As evidence suggests that glucose is a limited energy resource upon which self-control relies, the implication is that good emotion regulators are able to achieve the same positive mood with less cost to their self-regulatory resource. Thus, depletion may not be an inevitable consequence of engaging in emotion regulation.

  19. Evaluation and capacity building to improve precollege science and mathematics achievement in the US: 10 CFR, Part 605

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The National Center for Improving Science Education has undertaken activities to achieve evaluation goals for DOE's Precollege programs: develop means to determine program quality; develop means for determining the contribution of DOE precollege programs to both teacher enhancement and student achievement; provide evaluation designs and instruments and reports of program quality and impact; and strengthen both DOE's and the Labs' capacity to do both short- and long-term planning as well as deliver effective programs and evaluation. Appendices include evaluation/technical assistance report, profiling teacher research participation and teacher development programs, teacher surveys, impact assessment design, and teacher research participation programs anecdotes for 8 labs.

  20. Improvement of two-way continuous variable quantum cryptography by using additional noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Minjie; Pan Wei

    2010-01-01

    The performance of quantum key distribution such as one-way continuous variable protocols, can be increased by adding some noise on the reference side of error correction in the error-correction phase. For this reason, we here study this possibility in the case of two-way continuous variable system. Finally, the numerical results show that the using of additional noise gives two-way schemes better security performance in terms of secret key rates and resistance to channel excess noise.