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Sample records for achieve tight glycemic

  1. Tight glycemic control in the ICU - is the earth flat?

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    Steil, Garry M; Agus, Michael S D

    2014-06-27

    Tight glycemic control in the ICU has been shown to reduce mortality in some but not all prospective randomized control trials. Confounding the interpretation of these studies are differences in how the control was achieved and underlying incidence of hypoglycemia, which can be expected to be affected by the introduction of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). In this issue of Critical Care, a consensus panel provides a list of the research priorities they believe are needed for CGM to become routine practice in the ICU. We reflect on these recommendations and consider the implications for using CGM today.

  2. Achieving glycemic control differs between patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus starting on metformin and sulfonylureas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamberts, Egbert J.F.; Souverein, Patrick C.; Hugtenburg, Jacqueline G.; Nijpels, Giel; Bouvy, Marcel L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Antidiabetic medication is aimed at attaining tight glycemic control, but patients do not always achieve guideline recommended targets. Available observational studies focusing on both drug treatment and glycemic control have some methodological limitations. Objectives: To describe the r

  3. Subjecting Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients to Continuous Tube Feeding and an Intensive Computerized Protocol Establishes Tight Glycemic Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, N. D.; Biessels, G. J.; Vriesendorp, T. M.; DeVries, J. H.; Hoekstra, J. B. L.; Elbers, P. W.; Kappelle, L. J.; Portegies, P.; Vermeulen, M.; Roos, Y. B. W. E. M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Tight glycemic control (TGC) after ischemic stroke may improve clinical outcome but previous studies failed to establish TGC, principally because of postprandial glucose surges. The aim of the present study was to investigate if safe, effective and feasible TGC can be achieved with cont

  4. Perioperative glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas in patients undergoing total pancreatectomy: tight glycemic control may be justified in order to avoid brittle diabetes.

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    Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Masaki; Tsukamoto, Yuuki; Kinoshita, Yoshihiko; Munekage, Masaya; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    I dedicate this paper to the late Prof. Yukihiko Nosé with all my heart. In 2001, under the direction of Prof. Nosé and Prof. Brunicardi at Baylor College of Medicine, we published a review article entitled "Artificial endocrine pancreas" in JACS. Subsequently, we reported that perioperative tight glycemic control (TGC) using an artificial pancreas (AP) with a closed-loop system could stably maintain near-normoglycemia in total-pancreatectomized dogs. Based on this experimental study in Houston, since 2006, we have introduced perioperative TGC using an AP into clinical use in Kochi. As of 2011, this novel TGC method has provided safe and stable blood glucose levels in more than 400 surgical patients. In this paper, we report new clinical findings regarding perioperative TGC using an AP in total-pancreatectomized patients. TGC using an AP enables us to achieve stable glycemic control not only without hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia but also with less variation in blood glucose concentration from the target blood glucose range, even in patients with the most serious form of diabetes, so-called "brittle diabetes", undergoing total pancreatectomy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first clinical report of TGC using an AP in patients undergoing total pancreatic resection.

  5. Second pilot trials of the STAR-Liege protocol for tight glycemic control in critically ill patients

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    Penning Sophie

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Critically ill patients often present increased insulin resistance and stress-induced hyperglycemia. Tight glycemic control aims to reduce blood glucose (BG levels and variability while ensuring safety from hypoglycemia. This paper presents the results of the second Belgian clinical trial using the customizable STAR framework in a target-to-range control approach. The main objective is reducing measurement frequency while maintaining performance and safety of the glycemic control. Methods The STAR-Liege 2 (SL2 protocol targeted the 100–140 mg/dL glycemic band and offered 2-hourly and 3-hourly interventions. Only insulin rates were adjusted, and nutrition inputs were left to the attending clinicians. This protocol restricted the forecasted risk of BG  Results During the SL2 trial, 91 measurements were taken over 194 hours. BG levels were tightly distributed: 54.9% of BG within 100–140 mg/dL, 40.7% were ≥ 140 mg/dL and 4.4% were  0.05 with significantly reduced measurement frequency for SL2 (p  Conclusions The SL2 protocol succeeded in reducing clinical workload while maintaining safety and effectiveness of the glycemic control. SL2 was also shown to be safer and tighter than hospital control. Overall results validate the efficacy of significantly customizing the STAR framework.

  6. Convergence of continuous glucose monitoring and in-hospital tight glycemic control: closing the gap between caregivers and industry.

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    Miller, Michaela; Skladany, Matthew J; Ludwig, Christopher R; Guthermann, Joshua S

    2007-11-01

    The convergence of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and tight glycemic control protocols is approaching. As with the diffusion of any innovative technology, there will be challenges that will likely delay widespread adoption. With the objective of assessing the current mindset of health care professionals toward CGM adoption in the hospital intensive care unit (ICU) setting and resulting implications to industry, Boston Biomedical Consultants surveyed >60 U.S. ICU managers and nurses during Spring 2007. The underlying sentiment expressed by survey respondents toward CGM was positive, with many citing potential benefits of CGM adoption, such as labor savings, improved glycemic control, and assistance with insulin dosing. While the demand for CGM in the hospital clearly exists, early stage product acceptance will remain limited given the substantial education, market development, and economic hurdles.

  7. First pilot trial of the STAR-Liege protocol for tight glycemic control in critically ill patients.

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    Penning, Sophie; Le Compte, Aaron J; Moorhead, Katherine T; Desaive, Thomas; Massion, Paul; Preiser, Jean-Charles; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2012-11-01

    Tight glycemic control (TGC) has shown benefits in ICU patients, but been difficult to achieve consistently due to inter- and intra- patient variability that requires more adaptive, patient-specific solutions. STAR (Stochastic TARgeted) is a flexible model-based TGC framework accounting for patient variability with a stochastically derived maximum 5% risk of blood glucose (BG) below 72 mg/dL. This research describes the first clinical pilot trial of the STAR approach and the post-trial analysis of the models and methods that underpin the protocol. The STAR framework works with clinically specified targets and intervention guidelines. The clinically specified glycemic target was 125 mg/dL. Each trial was 24 h with BG measured 1-2 hourly. Two-hourly measurement was used when BG was between 110-135 mg/dL for 3 h. In the STAR approach, each intervention leads to a predicted BG level and outcome range (5-95th percentile) based on a stochastic model of metabolic patient variability. Carbohydrate intake (all sources) was monitored, but not changed from clinical settings except to prevent BGLiege (Liege, Belgium). Nine patient trials were undertaken after obtaining informed consent. There were 205 measurements over all 9 trials. Median [IQR] per-patient results were: BG: 138.5 [130.6-146.0]mg/dL; carbohydrate administered: 2-11 g/h; median insulin:1.3 [0.9-2.4]U/h with a maximum of 6.0 [4.7-6.0]U/h. Median [IQR] time in the desired 110-140 mg/dL band was: 50.0 [31.2-54.2]%. Median model prediction errors ranged: 10-18%, with larger errors due to small meals and other clinical events. The minimum BG was 63 mg/dL and no other measurement was below 72 mg/dL, so only 1 measurement (0.5%) was below the 5% guaranteed minimum risk level. Post-trial analysis showed that patients were more variable than predicted by the stochastic model used for control, resulting in some of the prediction errors seen. Analysis and (validated) virtual trial re-simulating the clinical trial using

  8. Tight glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas may play an important role in preventing infection after pancreatic resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuhiro Hanazaki

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that perioperative hyperglycemia is the main cause of infectious complications after surgery.To improve perioperative glycemic control,we wish to highlight and comment on an interesting paper published recently by the Annals of Surgery entitled:"Early postoperative hyperglycemia is associated with postoperative complications after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD)" by Eshuis et al.The authors concluded that early postoperative glucose levels more than 140mg/dL was significantly associated with complications after PD.Since we recommend that perioperative tight glycemic control (TGC) is an effective method to prevent postoperative complications including surgical site infection after distal,proximal,and total pancreatic resection,we support strongly this conclusion drawn in this article.However,if early postoperative glucose control in patients undergoing PD was administrated by conventional method such as sliding scale approach as described in this article,it is difficult to maintain TGC.Therefore,we introduce a novel perioperative glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas against pancreatogenic diabetes after pancreatic resection including PD.

  9. Achieving glycemic control in special populations in hospital: perspectives in practice.

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    Cheng, Alice Y Y

    2014-04-01

    Achieving and maintaining glycemic control in patients with diabetes admitted to hospital is challenging because of the many competing factors of nutrition, pharmacotherapy and other patient-related and systemic factors. For patients receiving enteral or parenteral feeding, eating irregularly or receiving glucocorticoid therapy, the challenges are even greater. The basic principles to follow when managing glycemia in these populations are as follows: 1) Recognition of those at risk for hyperglycemia; 2) frequent bedside glucose monitoring; 3) a proactive approach with routine insulin administration based on the predicted glucose patterns; 4) constant reassessment of the glycemic status and titration of the routine insulin accordingly.

  10. Motor vehicle crashes in diabetic patients with tight glycemic control: a population-based case control analysis.

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    Donald A Redelmeier

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Complications from diabetes mellitus can compromise a driver's ability to safely operate a motor vehicle, yet little is known about whether euglycemia predicts normal driving risks among adults with diabetes. We studied the association between glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c and the risk of a motor vehicle crash using a population-based case control analysis. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We identified consecutive drivers reported to vehicle licensing authorities between January 1, 2005 to January 1, 2007 who had a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and a HbA1c documented. The risk of a crash was calculated taking into account potential confounders including blood glucose monitoring, complications, and treatments. A total of 57 patients were involved in a crash and 738 were not involved in a crash. The mean HbA1c was lower for those in a crash than controls (7.4% versus 7.9%, unpaired t-test, p = 0.019, equal to a 26% increase in the relative risk of a crash for each 1% reduction in HbA1c (odds ratio = 1.26, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.54. The trend was evident across the range of HbA1c values and persisted after adjustment for measured confounders (odds ratio = 1.25, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.55. The two other significant risk factors for a crash were a history of severe hypoglycemia requiring outside assistance (odds ratio = 4.07, 95% confidence interval 2.35-7.04 and later age at diabetes diagnosis (odds ratio per decade = 1.29, 95% confidence interval 1.07-1.57. CONCLUSIONS: In this selected population, tighter glycemic control, as measured by the HbA1c, is associated with an increased risk of a motor vehicle crash.

  11. Design and Fabrication of Double-Focused Ultrasound Transducers to Achieve Tight Focusing

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    Jang, Jihun; Chang, Jin Ho

    2016-01-01

    Beauty treatment for skin requires a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer to generate coagulative necrosis in a small focal volume (e.g., 1 mm3) placed at a shallow depth (3–4.5 mm from the skin surface). For this, it is desirable to make the F-number as small as possible under the largest possible aperture in order to generate ultrasound energy high enough to induce tissue coagulation in such a small focal volume. However, satisfying both conditions at the same time is demanding. To meet the requirements, this paper, therefore, proposes a double-focusing technique, in which the aperture of an ultrasound transducer is spherically shaped for initial focusing and an acoustic lens is used to finally focus ultrasound on a target depth of treatment; it is possible to achieve the F-number of unity or less while keeping the aperture of a transducer as large as possible. In accordance with the proposed method, we designed and fabricated a 7-MHz double-focused ultrasound transducer. The experimental results demonstrated that the fabricated double-focused transducer had a focal length of 10.2 mm reduced from an initial focal length of 15.2 mm and, thus, the F-number changed from 1.52 to 1.02. Based on the results, we concluded that the proposed double-focusing method is suitable to decrease F-number while maintaining a large aperture size. PMID:27509500

  12. Pilot proof of concept clinical trials of Stochastic Targeted (STAR) glycemic control

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Alicia; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Le Compte, Aaron; Tan, Chia*-Siong; Ward, Logan; Steel, James,; Pretty, Christopher G; Pfeifer, Leesa; Penning, Sophie; Suhaimi, Fatanah; Signal, Matthew; Desaive, Thomas; Chase, J. Geoffrey

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Tight glycemic control (TGC) has shown benefits but has been difficult to achieve consistently. STAR (Stochastic TARgeted) is a flexible, model-based TGC approach directly accounting for intra- and inter- patient variability with a stochastically derived maximum 5% risk of blood glucose (BG) < 4.0 mmol/L. This research assesses the safety, efficacy, and clinical burden of a STAR TGC controller modulating both insulin and nutrition inputs in pilot trials. METHODS: Seven...

  13. Influence of HbA1c levels on platelet function profiles associated with tight glycemic control in patients presenting with hyperglycemia and an acute coronary syndrome. A subanalysis of the CHIPS Study ("Control de HIperglucemia y Actividad Plaquetaria en Pacientes con Síndrome Coronario Agudo").

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    Vivas, David; García-Rubira, Juan C; Bernardo, Esther; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Martín, Patricia; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso; Núñez-Gil, Iván; Macaya, Carlos; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2013-02-01

    Patients with hyperglycemia, an acute coronary syndrome and poor glycemic control have increased platelet reactivity and poor prognosis. However, it is unclear the influence of a tight glycemic control on platelet reactivity in these patients. This is a subanalysis of the CHIPS study. This trial randomized patients with hyperglycemia to undergo an intensive glucose control (target blood glucose 80-120 mg/dL), or conventional glucose control (target blood glucose <180 mg/dL). We analyzed platelet function at discharge on the subgroup of patients with poor glycemic control, defined with admission levels of HbA1c higher than 6.5%. The primary endpoint was maximal platelet aggregation following stimuli with 20 μM ADP. We also measured aggregation following collagen, epinephrine, and thrombin receptor-activated peptide, as well as P2Y12 reactivity index and surface expression of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa and P-selectin. A total of 67 patients presented HbA1c ≥ 6.5% (37 intensive, 30 conventional), while 42 had HbA1c < 6.5% (20 intensive, 22 conventional). There were no differences in baseline characteristics between groups. At discharge, patients with HbA1c ≥6.5% had significantly reduced MPA with intensive glucose control compared with conventional control (46.1 ± 22.3 vs. 60.4 ± 20.0%; p = 0.004). Similar findings were shown with other measures of platelet function. However, glucose control strategy did not affect platelet function parameters in patients with HbA1c < 6.5%. Intensive glucose control in patients presenting with an acute coronary syndrome and hyperglycemia results in a reduction of platelet reactivity only in the presence of elevated HbA1c levels.

  14. Glycemic index and diabetes

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    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000941.htm Glycemic index and diabetes To use the sharing features on ... GI diet also may help with weight loss. Glycemic Index of Certain Foods Low GI foods (0 to ...

  15. Tight turns

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    The Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN) has successfully tested the first model of a new fast-ramping curved dipole magnet. This is great news for CERN, which sees the advance as holding potential for the future of the SPS.   The first model of a new fast-ramping curved dipole magnet being prepared for cryogenic testing at the LASA laboratory (INFN Milano, Italy). On 16 July INFN introduced an innovative dipole magnet. With a length of some 4 metres, it can produce a 4.5 Tesla magnetic field and achieve a tighter bend than ever before (the bending radius has been squeezed to a remarkable 66.7 metres). This new magnet was designed in the first instance for GSI’s SIS300 synchrotron (in Germany), which will require 60 dipoles of this type. "Achieving such a tight bend demanded a major R&D effort," stressed Pasquale Fabbricatore, the spokesman of the INFN collaboration responsible for the magnet’s development. "We had to not o...

  16. Achieving a Seamless Mobility in the 3G and WLAN Networks Integration when the WLAN AP is Tightly Coupled to the SGSN of the 3G Network

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    George Chukwudi Nganya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in demand for real-time applications such as video and audio streams data transfer has resulted in the need to find a means of managing the increasing numbers of users in the mobile wireless system without affecting the quality of service (QoS requirements. In their work, A. K. Salkintzis, C. Fors, and R. Pazhyannur, stated that one of the approaches to meeting the high user demands is to interwork two different but complementary networks, the Universal Mobile Telecommunication Systems (UMTS which has a high mobility but low-data rate circuit-switched and packet-switched services, and the Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN which has a high-data rate circuit-switched service but limited mobility coverage confined to a smaller area called the hot-spot [1]. The idea is to interwork the two networks such that seamless mobility could be achieved. In this paper, the tight coupling of the WLAN at the SGSN of the UMTS for the possibility of achieving a seamless mobility is examined. The performance of this integration approach is evaluated using this QoS parameters, namely buffer overflow, Ethernet delay, throughput and Ethernet load. A simulation of this integration approach using an OPNET Modeler 14.0 is performed and the simulation results analyzed. We performed a simulation of the WLAN AP tightly coupled to the SGSN node of the UMTS network. Also performed in this research are simulations of different scenarios of the tight coupling approach at the SGSN by varying the number of users in the integrated UMTS and WLAN network to show the effect the number of users connected to both networks has towards achieving seamless mobility in the interworked network. From our study review and the simulation results of this interworking approach, we propose that coupling the WLAN AP and the UMTS network at the SGSN of the UMTS, and using a suitable mobility protocol, has the possibility of providing a seamless mobility between these complementary

  17. Health and economic impact of combining metformin with nateglinide to achieve glycemic control: Comparison of the lifetime costs of complications in the U.K

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    Salas Maribel

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To reduce the likelihood of complications in persons with type 2 diabetes, it is critical to control hyperglycaemia. Monotherapy with metformin or insulin secretagogues may fail to sustain control after an initial reduction in glycemic levels. Thus, combining metformin with other agents is frequently necessary. These analyses model the potential long-term economic and health impact of using combination therapy to improve glycemic control. Methods An existing model that simulates the long-term course of type 2 diabetes in relation to glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c and post-prandial glucose (PPG was used to compare the combination of nateglinide with metformin to monotherapy with metformin. Complication rates were estimated for major diabetes-related complications (macrovascular and microvascular based on existing epidemiologic studies and clinical trial data. Utilities and costs were estimated using data collected in the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS. Survival, life years gained (LYG, quality-adjusted life years (QALY, complication rates and associated costs were estimated. Costs were discounted at 6% and benefits at 1.5% per year. Results Combination therapy was predicted to reduce complication rates and associated costs compared with metformin. Survival increased by 0.39 (0.32 discounted and QALY by 0.46 years (0.37 discounted implying costs of £6,772 per discounted LYG and £5,609 per discounted QALY. Sensitivity analyses showed the results to be consistent over broad ranges. Conclusion Although drug treatment costs are increased by combination therapy, this cost is expected to be partially offset by a reduction in the costs of treating long-term diabetes complications.

  18. Understanding basic carbohydrate counting, glycemic index, and glycemic load for improved glycemic control in Hispanic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

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    Ortiz, Lidia Guadalupe Compeán; Berry, Diane C; Ruiz, Octelina Castillo; González, Eunice Reséndiz; Pérez, Paulina Aguilera; Rivas, Elva Del Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Hispanic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus generally have poor glycemic control. Constant hyperglycemia in individuals with type 2 diabetes can cause microvascular and macrovascular complications that lead to early morbidity and mortality. Good glycemic control requires a balance between diet, exercise, and medication, but dietary balance is difficult to achieve for many patients. Of the macronutrients, carbohydrates mostly affect blood glucose levels. Basic carbohydrate counting, glycemic index, and glycemic load are important tools for patients to master to control their blood glucose levels.

  19. Relationship between perioperative glycemic control and postoperative infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuhiro Hanazaki; Hiromichi Maeda; Takehiro Okabayashi

    2009-01-01

    Perioperative hyperglycemia in critically ill surgery patients increases the risk of postoperative infection (POI), which is a common, and often costly, surgical complication. Hyperglycemia is associated with abnormalities in leukocyte function, including granulocyte adherence, impaired phagocytosis, delayed chemotaxis,and depressed bactericidal capacity. These leukocyte deficiencies are the cause of infection and improve with tight glycemic control, which leads to fewer POIs in critically ill surgical patients. Tight glycemic control, such as intensive insulin therapy, has a risk of hypoglycemia.In addition, the optimal targeted blood glucose range to reduce POI remains unknown. Since 2006, we have investigated tight perioperative blood glucose control using a closed-loop artificial endocrine pancreas system,to reduce POI and to avoid hypoglycemia. In this Topic Highlight, we review the relationship between perioperative glycemic control and POI, including the use of the artificial pancreas.

  20. Dietary glycemic index: health implications.

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    Brand-Miller, Jennie; McMillan-Price, Joanna; Steinbeck, Katherine; Caterson, Ian

    2009-08-01

    Weight loss can be achieved by any means of energy restriction, but the challenge is to achieve sustainable weight loss and prevent weight "creep" without increasing the risk of chronic disease. The modest success of low fat diets has prompted research on alternative dietary strategies, including high protein diets and low glycemic index (GI) diets. Conventional high carbohydrate diets, even when based on wholegrain foods, increase postprandial glycemia and insulinemia and may compromise weight control via mechanisms related to appetite stimulation, fuel partitioning, and metabolic rate. This paper makes the case for the benefits of low glycemic index diets over higher protein diets. Both strategies are associated with lower postprandial glycemia, and both are commonly labeled as "low glycemic load," but the long-term health effects are likely to be different. A large body of evidence, which now comprises observational prospective cohort studies, randomized controlled trials, and mechanistic experiments in animal models, provides robust support for low GI carbohydrate diets in the prevention of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Although lower carbohydrate, higher protein diets increase the rate of weight loss, cohort studies and meta-analyses of clinical trials suggest the potential for increased mortality.

  1. Glycemic index, glycemic control and beyond.

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    Derdemezis, Christos S; Lovegrove, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    It is currently estimated that over 370 million individuals have diabetes, making diabetes a major public health issue contributing significantly to global morbidity and mortality. The steep rise in diabetes prevalence over the past decades is attributable, in a large part, to lifestyle changes, with dietary habits and behaviour as significant contributors. Despite the relatively wide availability of antidiabetic medicine, it is lifestyle approaches that still remain the cornerstone of diabetes prevention and treatment. Glycemic index (GI) is a nutritional tool which represents the glycemic response to carbohydrate ingestion. In light of the major impact of nutrition on diabetes pathophysiology, with the rising need to combat the escalating diabetes epidemic, this review will focus on the role of GI in glycemic control, the primary target of diabetic treatment and beyond. The review will present the evidence relating GI and diabetes treatment and prevention, as well as weight loss, weight maintenance and cardiovascular disease risk factors.

  2. Glycemic index and disease.

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    Pi-Sunyer, F Xavier

    2002-07-01

    It has been suggested that foods with a high glycemic index are detrimental to health and that healthy people should be told to avoid these foods. This paper takes the position that not enough valid scientific data are available to launch a public health campaign to disseminate such a recommendation. This paper explores the glycemic index and its validity and discusses the effect of postprandial glucose and insulin responses on food intake, obesity, type 1 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Presented herein are the reasons why it is premature to recommend that the general population avoid foods with a high glycemic index.

  3. A survey on the current status of type 2 diabetic patients who failed to achieve the glycemic control target%2型糖尿病血糖控制未达标患者现状调查报告

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈名道; 潘长玉; 杨立勇; 李延兵; 肖新华; 冯波; 张秋梅; 李成江

    2011-01-01

    目的 调查2型糖尿病血糖未达标患者的现状,为制定应对策略提供理论依据.方法 201.年8至10月,收集全国26个城市181家医院血糖未达标的2型糖尿病患者进行问卷调查,调查未达标患者的血糖水平、生活方式干预、血糖监测、药物使用情况等,得到资料比较完整的问卷3 861份,分析患者未达标原因.结果 在统计的未达标患者中,HbA1c均值7.9%,空腹血糖均值8.2 mmol/L,餐后血糖均值11.5 mmol/L.生活方式干预方面,仅25.6%的患者能按医嘱严格进行饮食控制,44.5%的患者基本不进行体育锻炼.分别有35.8%和47.8%的患者不进行空腹和餐后血糖的监测.60岁以上的患者,血糖控制水平与其他年龄组并无差别,但其低血糖发生率高达35.5%,较其他两组(分别为20.8%和21.4%)明显为高(均P<0.05).药物治疗方面,单药治疗及联合治疗患者比例分别为46.1%和51.7%.>60岁的老年组联合用药比例更高(58.7%,与其他年龄组比,P<0.05).75%的患者进行了治疗方案的调整.结论 药物治疗方案不够强化或不适当是患者血糖未达标的主要原因;另外,生活方式不佳,血糖监测不够,患者依从性差也是血糖未达标的重要原因.对于未达标患者,需要进一步强化患者教育,加强生活方式干预,选择更加强化,同时安全、依从性好的降糖治疗方案.对于老年患者降糖的目标值应适当放宽.%Objective To investigate the current status of type 2 diabetic patients who failed to achieve the glycemic control target, and provide theoretic evidences for making corresponding strategies. Methods The 2 diabetic patients who failed to reach the glycemic target were recruited from 181 hospitals in 26 cities and received a standard questionnaire, the conditions of their blood glucose level, lifestyle intervention, blood sugar monitoring, and drug therapy were recorded. Totally 3 861 questionnaires with complete information were collected

  4. Glycemic index, glycemic load and childhood obesity: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several evidences have been reported so far in terms of the relationship between obesity and glycemic index and glycemic load in children. However, the number of review studies that have dealt with recent findings is quite low. The purpose of present study is to review the existing evidences in this regard. Materials and Methods: First of all, the phrases: "Glycaemic index", "Glycaemic load", "Glycemic index" OR "Glycemic load" accompanied by one of the words: "Adolescent", "Y...

  5. Glycemic management in ESRD and earlier stages of CKD.

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    Williams, Mark E; Garg, Rajesh

    2014-02-01

    The management of hyperglycemia in patients with kidney failure is complex, and the goals and methods regarding glycemic control in chronic kidney disease (CKD) are not clearly defined. Although aggressive glycemic control seems to be advantageous in early diabetic nephropathy, outcome data supporting tight glycemic control in patients with advanced CKD (including end-stage renal disease [ESRD]) are lacking. Challenges in the management of such patients include therapeutic inertia, monitoring difficulties, and the complexity of available treatments. In this article, we review the alterations in glucose homeostasis that occur in kidney failure, current views on the value of glycemic control and issues with its determination, and more recent approaches to monitor or measure glycemic control. Hypoglycemia and treatment options for patients with diabetes and ESRD or earlier stages of CKD also are addressed, discussing the insulin and noninsulin agents that currently are available, along with their indications and contraindications. The article provides information to help clinicians in decision making in order to provide individualized glycemic goals and appropriate therapy for patients with ESRD or earlier stages of CKD.

  6. Glycemic index, glycemic load and childhood obesity: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Rouhani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several evidences have been reported so far in terms of the relationship between obesity and glycemic index and glycemic load in children. However, the number of review studies that have dealt with recent findings is quite low. The purpose of present study is to review the existing evidences in this regard. Materials and Methods: First of all, the phrases: "Glycaemic index", "Glycaemic load", "Glycemic index" OR "Glycemic load" accompanied by one of the words: "Adolescent", "Young", "Youth" "Children" OR "Child" were searched in texts of articles existing in ISI and PUBMED databases which were obtained out of 1001 articles. Among these, some articles, which reviewed the relationship of obesity with glycemic index and glycemic load, were selected. Finally, 20 articles were studied in current review study. Results: The majority of cross-sectional studies have found children′s obesity directly linked with glycemic index and glycemic load; however, cohort studies found controversial results. Also, the intervention studies indicate the negative effect of glycemic index and glycemic load on obesity in children. Conclusion: Published evidences reported inconsistent results. It seems that existing studies are not sufficient and more studies are needed in this regard.

  7. Impact of glycemic treatment choices on cardiovascular complications in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Irene A; Valiquette, Guy; Schwarcz, Monica D

    2009-01-01

    As the diabetic population has significant morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD), much of its medical care focuses on CVD prevention and treatment. Some medications used to treat hyperglycemia may have beneficial effects on CV outcomes, others may have negative effects, while still others seem to have no direct effect. Although past epidemiological studies have shown a relationship between glycated hemoglobin levels and CV events in patients with type 2 diabetes, recent large randomized clinical trials (ACCORD, ADVANCE, and VADT) lasting 3.5 to 5.6 years have found that intensive glycemic control either has no impact on CV outcomes or even worsens them. Results of the 10-year follow-up of the UKPDS suggest that tight glycemic control of younger, newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes may have CV benefits many years later. Because the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis spans decades, it may be that beneficial effects of tight glycemic control on CV outcomes are mainly in younger patients without established macrovascular disease. There is an emerging notion that tight glycemic control may be beneficial in primary prevention of CVD in younger patients with diabetes, but may become deleterious in older patients with established or subclinical CVD. Thus, while tight control may lessen microvascular disease, it may increase the risk of hypoglycemia and possibly of adverse CV events. In each patient, the goals of glycemic control need to be individualized based on age, overall prognosis, presence of macrovascular disease, and risk of hypoglycemia.

  8. Dietary Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, and Risk of Cancer: A Prospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    George, Stephanie Materese; Mayne, Susan T.; Leitzmann, Michael F; Park, Yikyung; Schatzkin, Arthur; Flood, Andrew; Hollenbeck, Albert; Subar, Amy F

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have provided limited evidence for a harmful effect of high glycemic index and dietary glycemic load on cancer. The authors analyzed associations among glycemic index, glycemic load, and risk of cancer in women and men in the National Institutes of Health–AARP Diet and Health Study. Published glycemic index values were assigned to 225 foods/food groups. Glycemic load was calculated by multiplying the glycemic index, carbohydrate content, and intake frequency of individual foo...

  9. Alternative Assessment of Glycemic Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greven, W.L.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease associated with development of microvascular and macrovascular complications. Optimal glycemic control, usually measured by HbA1c is the cornerstone for prevention of complications. In this thesis glycemic variability (which resembles actual glucose levels, gl

  10. Prime tight frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemvig, Jakob; Miller, Christopher; Okoudjou, Kasso A.

    2014-01-01

    to suggest effective analysis and synthesis computation strategies for such frames. Finally, we describe all prime frames constructed from the spectral tetris method, and, as a byproduct, we obtain a characterization of when the spectral tetris construction works for redundancies below two.......We introduce a class of finite tight frames called prime tight frames and prove some of their elementary properties. In particular, we show that any finite tight frame can be written as a union of prime tight frames. We then characterize all prime harmonic tight frames and use thischaracterization...

  11. Honey and Glycemic Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Silici

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Honey is a natural substance produced by honeybees (Apis mellifera L. from the nectar of blossoms or from secretions of living parts of plants or excretions of plant sucking insects on the living parts of plants, which honeybees collect, transform and combine with specific substances of their own, store and leave in the honey comb to ripen and mature. Besides being of carbohydrate-rich food, honey has been used as a functional food for its potential health benefits. To explain how different kinds of carbohydrate-rich foods directly affect blood sugar, the researchers developed the concept of the “glycemic index” (GI that ranks carbohydrates on a scale based on how quickly and how much they raise blood sugar levels after eating. The diet should include adequate and healthy balance of nutrients, and according to many health professionals the concept of GI provides a useful means of selecting the most appropriate carbohydrate containing foods for the maintenance of health and the treatment of several disease states. There have been some studies on determining the GI of honey. Further more, we need to determine the GI of various honey types with different botanical and geografical origin. Researches on the issue will serve to bring awareness in the public consciousness.

  12. The glycemic index: physiological significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, Amin; Wong, Julia M W; Mirrahimi, Arash; Srichaikul, Korbua; Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C

    2009-08-01

    The glycemic index (GI) is a physiological assessment of a food's carbohydrate content through its effect on postprandial blood glucose concentrations. Evidence from trials and observational studies suggests that this physiological classification may have relevance to those chronic Western diseases associated with overconsumption and inactivity leading to central obesity and insulin resistance. The glycemic index classification of foods has been used as a tool to assess potential prevention and treatment strategies for diseases where glycemic control is of importance, such as diabetes. Low GI diets have also been reported to improve the serum lipid profile, reduce C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations, and aid in weight control. In cross-sectional studies, low GI or glycemic load diets (mean GI multiplied by total carbohydrate) have been associated with higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), with reduced CRP concentrations, and, in cohort studies, with decreased risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In addition, some case-control and cohort studies have found positive associations between dietary GI and risk of various cancers, including those of the colon, breast, and prostate. Although inconsistencies in the current findings still need to be resolved, sufficient positive evidence, especially with respect to renewed interest in postprandial events, suggests that the glycemic index may have a role to play in the treatment and prevention of chronic diseases.

  13. Dietary glycemic load, glycemic index and colorectal cancer risk: Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijenberg, M.P.; Mullie, P.F.F.; Brants, H.A.M.; Heinen, M.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2008-01-01

    Since hyperinsulinemia is implicated in the development of colorectal cancer, determinants of serum insulin levels, like the glycemic load and the glycemic index of the diet, could influence cancer risk. Our objective was to evaluate whether a diet with a high glycemic load or glycemic index is asso

  14. Glycemic index and glycemic load of selected Chinese traditional foods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen; Heung-sang; Wong

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To determine the glycemic index(GI)and glycemic load(GL)values of Chinese traditional foods in Hong Kong.METHODS:Fifteen healthy subjects(8 males and 7 females)volunteered to consume either glucose or one of 23 test foods after 10-14 h overnight fast.The blood glucose concentrations were analyzed immediately before,15,30,45,60,90 and 120 min after food consumption using capillary blood samples.The GI value of each test food was calculated by expressing the incremental area under the blood glucose respon...

  15. Dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, and risk of cancer: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Stephanie Materese; Mayne, Susan T; Leitzmann, Michael F; Park, Yikyung; Schatzkin, Arthur; Flood, Andrew; Hollenbeck, Albert; Subar, Amy F

    2009-02-15

    Previous studies have provided limited evidence for a harmful effect of high glycemic index and dietary glycemic load on cancer. The authors analyzed associations among glycemic index, glycemic load, and risk of cancer in women and men in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study. Published glycemic index values were assigned to 225 foods/food groups. Glycemic load was calculated by multiplying the glycemic index, carbohydrate content, and intake frequency of individual foods reported on a food frequency questionnaire. From 1995 through 2003, the authors identified 15,215 and 33,203 cancer cases in women and men, respectively. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate multivariate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals. For women and men, respectively, the relative risks for total cancer for high versus low glycemic index were 1.03 (P(trend)=0.217) and 1.04 (P(trend)=0.012) and, for glycemic load, were 0.90 (P(trend)=0.024) and 0.93 (P(trend)=0.01). Associations with total cancer held only among the overweight for glycemic index and among those of healthy weight for glycemic load. These findings suggest that glycemic index and glycemic load are not strong predictors of cancer incidence. The direction and small magnitude of associations might be explained by the manner in which high glycemic index and glycemic load track with overall diet and lifestyle patterns.

  16. Skin Autofluorescence and Glycemic Variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordzij, M. J.; Lefrandt, J. D.; Graaff, R.; Smit, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is accelerated during glycemic and oxidative stress and is an important predictor of complications in diabetes mellitus (DM). Study Design: Here we both review and present original data on the relationship between skin autofluorescen

  17. The glycemic index: methodology and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Cyril W C; Augustin, Livia S A; Emam, Azadeh; Josse, Andrea R; Saxena, Nishta; Jenkins, David J A

    2006-01-01

    The glycemic index concept owes much to the dietary fiber hypothesis that fiber would reduce the rate of nutrient absorption and increase the value of carbohydrate foods in the maintenance of health and treatment of disease. However, properties and components of food other than its fiber content contribute to the glycemic and endocrine responses postprandially. The aim of the glycemic index classification of foods was therefore to assist in the physiological classification of carbohydrate foods which, it was hoped, would be of relevance in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases such as diabetes. Over the past two decades low glycemic index diets have been reported to improve glycemic control in diabetic subjects, to reduce serum lipids in hyperlipidemic subjects and possibly to aid in weight control. In large cohort studies, low glycemic index or glycemic load diets (glycemic index multiplied by total carbohydrate) have also been associated with higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, reduced C-reactive protein concentrations and with a decreased risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. More recently, some case-control and cohort studies have also found positive associations between the dietary glycemic index and the risk of colon, breast and other cancers. While the glycemic index concept continues to be debated and there remain inconsistencies in the data, sufficient positive findings have emerged to suggest that the glycemic index is an aspect of diet of potential importance in the treatment and prevention of chronic diseases.

  18. Glycemic load, glycemic index, and body mass index in Spanish adults12345

    OpenAIRE

    Mendez, Michelle A.; Covas, Maria Isabel; Marrugat, Jaume; Vila, Joan; Schröder, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Background: Studies on obesity and glycemic index (GI) or glycemic load (GL) have had inconsistent results, perhaps in part because of underreporting or to heterogeneous dietary patterns across food cultures.

  19. Metabolic responses to high glycemic index and low glycemic index meals: a controlled crossover clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Bressan Josefina; Cecon Paulo R.; Marins João CB; Pereira Letícia G; Cocate Paula G; Alfenas Rita CG

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The consumption of low glycemic index (LGI) foods before exercise results in slower and more stable glycemic increases. Besides maintaining an adequate supply of energy during exercise, this response may favor an increase in fat oxidation in the postprandial period before the exercise compared to high glycemic index (HGI) foods. The majority of the studies that evaluated the effect of foods differing in glycemic index on substrate oxidation during the postprandial period b...

  20. Glycemic Index, Carbohydrates, Glycemic Load, and the Risk of Pancreatic Cancer in a Prospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Diets with high glycemic index and glycemic load have been associated with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance has been implicated in the etiology of pancreatic cancer. We prospectively investigated the associations between glycemic index, carbohydrates, glycemic load, and available carbohydrates dietary constituents (starch and simple sugar) intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer. We followed the participants in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study from 1995/1996 through December 2003. A ...

  1. Glycemic index and glycemic load in relation to glucose intolerance among Greenland's Inuit population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Aerde, Marieke A; Witte, Daniel Rinse; Jeppesen, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Intake of carbohydrates which elicit a large glycemic response is hypothesized to increase the risk of diabetes. However, studies assessing the relationship between glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) and diabetes are inconsistent. Only few studies have studied the relationship between GI ...

  2. Glycemic index and glycemic load in relation to glucose intolerance among Greenland's Inuit population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aerde, van M.A.; Witte, D.R.; Jeppesen, C.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intake of carbohydrates which elicit a large glycemic response is hypothesized to increase the risk of diabetes. However, studies assessing the relationship between glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) and diabetes are inconsistent. Only few studies have studied the relationship be

  3. Continuous Shearlet Tight Frames

    KAUST Repository

    Grohs, Philipp

    2010-10-22

    Based on the shearlet transform we present a general construction of continuous tight frames for L2(ℝ2) from any sufficiently smooth function with anisotropic moments. This includes for example compactly supported systems, piecewise polynomial systems, or both. From our earlier results in Grohs (Technical report, KAUST, 2009) it follows that these systems enjoy the same desirable approximation properties for directional data as the previous bandlimited and very specific constructions due to Kutyniok and Labate (Trans. Am. Math. Soc. 361:2719-2754, 2009). We also show that the representation formulas we derive are in a sense optimal for the shearlet transform. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  4. Relation of Dietary Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load to Coronary Artery Calcium in Asymptomatic Korean Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yuni; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Cho, Juhee; Kim, Mi Kyung; Ahn, Younjhin; Lee, Jung Eun; Sung, Eunju; Kim, Boyoung; Ahn, Jiin; Kim, Chan-Won; Rampal, Sanjay; Zhao, Di; Zhang, Yiyi; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto; Lima, Joao A C; Chung, Eun Chul; Shin, Hocheol; Guallar, Eliseo

    2015-08-15

    The relation between glycemic index, glycemic load, and subclinical coronary atherosclerosis is unknown. The aim of the study was to evaluate the associations between energy-adjusted glycemic index, glycemic load, and coronary artery calcium (CAC). This study was cross-sectional analysis of 28,429 asymptomatic Korean men and women (mean age 41.4 years) without a history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease. All participants underwent a health screening examination between March 2011 and April 2013, and dietary intake over the preceding year was estimated using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Cardiac computed tomography was used for CAC scoring. The prevalence of detectable CAC (CAC score >0) was 12.4%. In multivariable-adjusted models, the CAC score ratios (95% confidence intervals) comparing the highest to the lowest quintile of glycemic index and glycemic load were 1.74 (1.08 to 2.81; p trend = 0.03) and 3.04 (1.43 to 6.46; p trend = 0.005), respectively. These associations did not differ by clinical subgroups, including the participants at low cardiovascular risk. In conclusion, these findings suggest that high dietary glycemic index and glycemic load were associated with a greater prevalence and degree of CAC, with glycemic load having a stronger association.

  5. Glycemic load, glycemic index and breast cancer risk in a prospective cohort of Swedish women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Susanna C; Bergkvist, Leif; Wolk, Alicja

    2009-07-01

    High-glycemic load diets have been hypothesized to increase the risk of breast cancer but epidemiologic studies have yielded inconsistent findings. We examined the associations of carbohydrate intake, glycemic index and glycemic load with risk of overall and hormone receptor-defined breast cancer in the Swedish Mammography Cohort, a population-based cohort of 61,433 women who completed a food frequency questionnaire at enrollment in 1987-1990. During a mean follow-up of 17.4 years, we ascertained 2,952 incident cases of invasive breast cancer. Glycemic load but not carbohydrate intake or glycemic index was weakly positively associated with overall breast cancer risk (p for trend = 0.05). In analyses stratified by estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status of the breast tumors, we observed statistically significant positive associations of carbohydrate intake, glycemic index and glycemic load with risk of ER+/PR- breast cancer; the multivariate relative risks comparing extreme quintiles were 1.34 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.93-1.94; p for trend = 0.04] for carbohydrate intake, 1.44 (95% CI = 1.06-1.97; p for trend = 0.01) for glycemic index and 1.81 (95% CI = 1.29-2.53; p for trend = 0.0008) for glycemic load. No associations were observed for ER+/PR+ or ER-/PR- breast tumors. These findings suggest that a high carbohydrate intake and diets with high glycemic index and glycemic load may increase the risk of developing ER+/PR- breast cancer.

  6. Understanding the Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load and Their Practical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarim, Fernanda Lorenzi; Stancanelli, Mirtes; Brenzikofer, Rene; de Macedo, Denise Vaz

    2009-01-01

    We have introduced the study of synthesis pathways using two experiments: 1--the determination of the glycemic index (GI) of some foods and the effects of fiber and fat on the GI; 2--the determination of blood glucose levels after the ingestion of meals with high and low glycemic loads (GL). After a practice assembly, when the foods and meals that…

  7. Pharmacist Glycemic Control Team Improves Quality of Glycemic Control in Surgical Patients with Perioperative Dysglycemia

    OpenAIRE

    Mularski, Karen SP; Yeh, Cynthia P; Bains, Jaspreet K; Mosen, David M.; Hill, Ariel K; Mularski, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Perioperative hyperglycemia is a risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality. Improved glycemic control has been demonstrated to reduce surgical site infections, reduce perioperative morbidity, and reduce length of stay. However, safe and effective perioperative glycemic control can be limited by expert clinician availability.

  8. Oxidative stress and glycemic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriello, A

    2000-02-01

    Oxidative stress is an acknowledged pathogenetic mechanism in diabetic complications. Hyperglycemia is a widely known cause of enhanced free radical concentration, whereas oxidative stress involvement in glycemic regulation is still debated. Glucose transport is a cascade of events starting from the interaction of insulin with its own receptor at the plasma membrane and ending with intracellular glucose metabolism. In this complex series of events, each step plays an important role and can be inhibited by a negative effect of oxidative stress. Several studies show that an acute increase in the blood glucose level may impair the physiological homeostasis of many systems in living organisms. The mechanisms through which acute hyperglycemia exerts these effects may be identified in the production of free radicals. It has been suggested that insulin resistance may be accompanied by intracellular production of free radicals. In adipocytes cultured in vitro, insulin increases the production of hydrogen peroxide, which has been shown to mimic the action of insulin. These data allow us to hypothesize that a vicious circle between hyperinsulinemia and free radicals could be operating: insulin resistance might cause elevated plasma free radical concentrations, which, in turn, might be responsible for a deterioration of insulin action, with hyperglycemia being a contributory factor. Data supporting this hypothesis are available. Vitamin E improves insulin action in healthy, elderly, and non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects. Similar results can be obtained by vitamin C administration.

  9. The glycemic index concept in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Helen L

    2008-01-01

    The glycemic concept is already being used as a means of differentiating products in the food industry. The aim of this summary is to show how the glycemic concept is being used by the food manufacturing industry, how it is perceived and understood by consumers, and how different countries rate its importance in terms of regulatory provision and consequent labeling implications. The use of the glycemic index (GI) is the most prominent form of labeling in the marketplace to date, and the use of GI symbol programs and other labeling initiatives are considered. The Australian market has been exposed to the GI phenomenon the longest, and consumer awareness in this market is very high. However, on a global scale, the picture is very different, and consumer awareness varies considerably. A broader view of how the global consumer uses nutritional labels is given. I also review how consumers are willing to adopt foods that offer health benefits in general and, more specifically, from the glycemic concept. I also summarize aspects to be addressed for consumers to benefit from the glycemic concept in action in the longer term.

  10. Glycemic goals in diabetes: trade-off between glycemic control and iatrogenic hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryer, Philip E

    2014-07-01

    The selection of a glycemic goal in a person with diabetes is a compromise between the documented upside of glycemic control-the partial prevention or delay of microvascular complications-and the documented downside of glycemic control-the recurrent morbidity and potential mortality of iatrogenic hypoglycemia. The latter is not an issue if glycemic control is accomplished with drugs that do not cause hypoglycemia or with substantial weight loss. However, hypoglycemia becomes an issue if glycemic control is accomplished with a sulfonylurea, a glinide, or insulin, particularly in the setting of absolute endogenous insulin deficiency with loss of the normal decrease in circulating insulin and increase in glucagon secretion and attenuation of the sympathoadrenal response as plasma glucose concentrations fall. Then the selection of a glycemic goal should be linked to the risk of hypoglycemia. A reasonable individualized glycemic goal is the lowest A1C that does not cause severe hypoglycemia and preserves awareness of hypoglycemia, preferably with little or no symptomatic or even asymptomatic hypoglycemia, at a given stage in the evolution of the individual's diabetes.

  11. Influence of glycemic index and glycemic load of the diet on the risk of overweight and adiposity in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellen Cristine Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To investigate the association between the glycemic index and the glycemic load of the diet with the risk of overweight and high adiposity in children with 5 years of age. Methods: Cross-sectional study nested in a cohort of 232 children born and living in Diamantina (MG, Brazil. Parents and/or guardians provided the food intake data, using a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire, past history and socioeconomic conditions. Anthropometric and fatness data were collected from the children. The dietary glycemic index and the glycemic load were calculated from the food intake. The glycemic index and glycemic load effect on overweight and adiposity in children was assessed by the Poisson regression (p<0.05. Results: The prevalence of overweight by body mass index was 17.3%, and high adiposity was observed in 3.4% and 6.9% by triceps skinfold and subscapular skinfold, respectively. No difference was reported between the mean body mass index, triceps skinfold and subscapular skinfold according to the glycemic index and glycemic load tertiles; however, the overweight group presented a higher carbohydrate intake (p=0.04. No association was found between glycemic index and glycemic load with overweight and adiposity among the children assessed. Conclusions: The glycemic index and glycemic load of the diet were not identified as risk factors for overweight and adiposity in this cross-sectional study.

  12. Verification of glycemic profiles using continuous glucose monitoring: cases with steroid use, liver cirrhosis, enteral nutrition, or late dumping syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Miyako; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Glycemic control is often difficult to achieve in patients with diabetes, especially in the presence of comorbid diseases or conditions such as steroid-use or liver cirrhosis, or in patients receiving enteral nutrition. Moreover, reactive hypoglycemia due to late dumping syndrome in people having undergone gastrectomy is also a matter of concern. Empirically and theoretically, the typical glycemic profiles associated with these conditions have been determined; however, what actually happens during a 24-h span is still somewhat obscure. In order to verify and provide information about the 24-h glycemic profiles associated with these conditions, 8 patients with the 4 above-mentioned conditions were monitored using a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS). For all 8 patients, CGMS provided detailed information regarding the 24-h glycemic profiles. The CGM results showed typical glycemic patterns for each condition, and we were moreover able to observe the effects of various practical treatments. Based on these cases, we conclude that the CGMS is highly useful for determining the glycemic patterns of patients with the aforementioned conditions in a practical setting; and this system may be used to monitor the treatment success of such cases.

  13. Impact of Hunt-Hess grade on the glycemic status of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayantani Ghosh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study has explored the impact of Hunt-Hess (H-H grade of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH on the glycemic status of such patients during their intensive care unit (ICU stay and has also analyzed whether H-H grade predicts their outcome independent of their glycemic status. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective case record review of prospectively maintained database of 1090 previously non-diabetic aSAH patients admitted to Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia. H-H grade of SAH, serum and CSF glucose on admission, serum glucose on the day of surgery and 14 days post-surgery, as well as the extended Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS-E score at discharge were noted. After univariate analysis, significant variables (P 200 mg/dl (P < 0.001 during the 14-day period of ICU stay. Also, the relationship between serum and CSF glucose levels at admission increased with HH grades 1 through 4, but became negative and more tightly bound at H-H grade 5. Admission H-H grades 4-5 contributed to poor outcome compared to lower H-H grades (P < 0.0001. Conclusion: Poor admission H-H grades lead to poor immediate glycemic status as well as poor short-term outcome, and it is dependent on serum glucose but independent of CSF glucose in predicting the outcome.

  14. Dietary Glycemic Index, Dietary Glycemic Load, Blood Lipids, and Coronary Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To examine the associations of dietary glycemic index (GI) and dietary glycemic load (GL) with blood lipid concentrations and coronary heart disease (CHD) in nondiabetic participants in the Health Worker Cohort Study (HWCS). Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional analysis was performed, using data from adults who participated in the HWCS baseline assessment. We collected information on participants' socio-demographic conditions, dietary patterns and physical activity via self-adm...

  15. Dietary carbohydrate intake, glycemic index, and glycemic load and endometrial cancer risk: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Helen G; Kitahara, Cari M; Murray, Liam J; Dodd, Kevin W; Black, Amanda; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Cantwell, Marie M

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer risk has been directly associated with glycemic load. However, few studies have investigated this link, and the etiological role of specific dietary carbohydrate components remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate associations of carbohydrate intake, glycemic index, and glycemic load with endometrial cancer risk in the US Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Recruitment took place in 1993-2001. Over a median of 9.0 years of follow-up through 2009, 386 women developed endometrial cancer among 36,115 considered in the analysis. Dietary intakes were assessed using a 124-item diet history questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards models were applied to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Significant inverse associations were detected between endometrial cancer risk and total available carbohydrate intake (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.66, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.49, 0.90), total sugars intake (HR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.52, 0.96), and glycemic load (HR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.46, 0.84) when women in the highest quartile of intake were compared with those in the lowest. These inverse associations were strongest among overweight and obese women. No associations with endometrial cancer risk were observed for glycemic index or dietary fiber. Our findings contrast with previous evidence and suggest that high carbohydrate intakes and glycemic loads are protective against endometrial cancer development. Further clarification of these associations is warranted.

  16. Practice of strict glycemic control in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Marcus J; de Graaff, Mart J; Royakkers, Annic A N M; van Braam Houckgeest, Floris; van der Sluijs, Johannes P; Kieft, Hans; Spronk, Peter E

    2008-11-01

    Blood glucose control aiming at normoglycemia, frequently referred to as "strict glycemic control", decreases mortality and morbidity of critically ill patients. We searched the medical literature for export opinions, surveys, and clinical reports on blood glucose control in intensive care medicine. While strict glycemic control has been recommended standard of care for critically ill patients, the risk of severe hypoglycemia with strict glycemic control is frequently mentioned by experts. Some rationalize this risk, though others strongly point out the high incidence of hypoglycemia to be (one) reason not to perform strict glycemic control. Implementation of strict glycemic control is far from complete in intensive care units across the world. Frequently local guidelines accept higher blood glucose levels than those with strict glycemic control. Only a minority of retrieved manuscripts are on blood glucose regimens with the lower targets as with strict glycemic control. Hypoglycemia certainly is encountered with blood glucose control, in particular with strict glycemic control. Reports show intensive care-nurses can adequately and safely perform strict glycemic control. Implementation of strict glycemic control is far from complete, at least in part because of the feared risks of hypoglycemia. The preference for hyperglycemia over intermittent hypoglycemia is irrational, however, because there is causal evidence of harm for the former but only associative evidence of harm for the latter. For several reasons it is wise to have strict glycemic control being a nurse-based strategy.

  17. Glycemic index, carbohydrates, glycemic load, and the risk of pancreatic cancer in a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Li; Flood, Andrew; Subar, Amy F; Hollenbeck, Albert R; Schatzkin, Arthur; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael

    2009-04-01

    Diets with high glycemic index and glycemic load have been associated with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance has been implicated in the etiology of pancreatic cancer. We prospectively investigated the associations between glycemic index, carbohydrates, glycemic load, and available carbohydrates dietary constituents (starch and simple sugar) intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer. We followed the participants in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study from 1995/1996 through December 2003. A baseline self-administered food frequency questionnaire was used to assess the dietary intake and exposure information. A total of 1,151 exocrine pancreatic cancer cases were identified from 482,362 participants after excluding first-year of follow-up. We used multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models to calculate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for pancreatic cancer. There were no associations between glycemic index, total or available carbohydrates, gycemic load, and pancreatic cancer risk. Participants with high free fructose and glucose intake were at a greater risk of developing pancreatic cancer (highest compared with lowest quintile, RR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.04-1.59; P trend = 0.004 and RR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.10-1.67; P trend = 0.005, respectively). There were no statistically significant interactions by body mass index, physical activity, or smoking status. Our results do not support an association between glycemic index, total or available carbohydrate intake, and glycemic load and pancreatic cancer risk. The higher risk associated with high free fructose intake needs further confirmation and elucidation.

  18. Suboptimal glycemic control in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nefs, Giesje; Pouwer, F; Denollet, J;

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies examining the relationship between depression and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes have yielded mixed findings. One explanation may lie in the heterogeneity of depression. Therefore, we examined whether distinct features of depression...... were differentially associated with suboptimal glycemic control. Cross-sectional baseline data from a dynamic cohort study of primary care patients with type 2 diabetes from the Eindhoven region, The Netherlands, were analyzed. A total of 5772 individuals completed baseline measurements of demographic...... adjustment for the other depression measures (OR 1.33, 1.11-1.59). Alcohol consumption and physical activity met criteria for mediation, but did not attenuate the association between anhedonia and glycemic control by more than 5%. Although diabetes duration was identified as a confounder and controlled for...

  19. Diabetes, Glycemic Control, and Risk of Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Leegaard, Anne; Riis, Anders; Kornum, Jette B; Prahl, Julie B.; Thomsen, Vibeke Ø; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Horsburgh, C. Robert; Thomsen, Reimar W

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the association between diabetes, glycemic control, and risk of tuberculosis (TB). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted a population-based case-control study in Northern Denmark. Cases of active TB were all individuals with a first-time principal hospital diagnosis of TB between 1980 and 2008. Each case subject was matched with up to five population control subjects with similar age, sex, place and length of residence in Denmark, and country of emigration. We computed...

  20. Glycemic control in critically ill: A moving target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash Todi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycemic control targets in intensive care units (ICUs have three distinct domains. Firstly, excessive hyperglycemia needs to be avoided. The upper limit of this varies depending on the patient population studied and diabetic status of the patients. Surgical patients particularly cardiac surgery patients tend to benefit from a lower upper limit of glycemic control, which is not evident in medically ill patient. Patient with premorbid diabetic status tends to tolerate higher blood sugar level better than normoglycemics. Secondly, hypoglycemia is clearly detrimental in all groups of critically ill patient and all measures to avoid this catastrophe need to be a part of any glycemic control protocol. Thirdly, glycemic variability has increasingly been shown to be detrimental in this patient population. Glycemic control protocols need to take this into consideration and target to reduce any of the available metrics of glycemic variability. Newer technologies including continuous glucose monitoring techniques will help in titrating all these three domains within a desirable range.

  1. Glycemic and blood pressure control in older patients with hypertension and diabetes: association with carotid atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Wei Du; Jia-Yue Li; Yao He

    2011-01-01

    Backgroud Numerous studies have confirmed the effectiveness of slowing the progression of atherosclerosis by blood pressure (Bp)control in patients with hypertension and several studies also showed the efficacy of intensive glycemic control in decreasing progression of carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.However, few studies have compared the relative importance of glycemic vs.Bp control in patients with diabetes and hypertension.We aimed to investigate the association between Bp and glycemic control and subclinical carotid atherosclerosis in older patients with hypertension and type 2 diabetes.Methods In a cross-sectional study, B-mode high-resolution ultrasonography of the carotid artery was performed in 670 subjects (508 males and 162 females) aged 60 years or over who had self-reported hypertension and diabetes but no history of coronary heart disease or stroke.Subjects were categorized by their systolic blood pressure: tight control, < 130 mmHg; usual control, 130-139 mmHg; or uncontrolled, > 140 mmHg,and by their hemoglobin Alc (HbAlc) level: tight control, < 6.5%; usual control, 6.5%-7.5%; or uncontrolled, ≥ 7.5%, respectively.Results The mean CIMT was 8.20 ± 0.11 mm, and carotid plaque was found in 52.5% (352/670) subjects.Overall, 62.1% of the subjects had subclinical carotid atherosclerosis, defined as having either carotid plaque or elevated CIMT (≥1.1 mm).The mean CIMT was significantly different between Bp control categories (7.60 ± 0.09 mm, 7.90 ± 0.08 mm, and 8.60 ± 0.12 mm, respectively, P = 0.03) but not between glycemic control categories (8.20 ± 0.10 mm, 8.1 ± 0.08 mm, and 8.40 ± 0.14 mm, respectively, P = 0.13) using ANCOVA analysis.Multivariable logistic regression adjusting for potential confounding factors showed that usual or uncontrolled Bp control were associated with having carotid plaque (OR = 1.08 and OR = 1.42, respectively), or elevated CIMT [Odd ratio (OR) = 1

  2. Cassava Flour Substitution Modulates Glycemic Responses and Glycemic Index of Wheat Breads in Apparent Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, Ebelechukwu N; Erukainure, Ochuko L; Ozumba, Augusta U; Adewale, Chris O; Kayode, Funmi O; Asieba, Godfrey O; Adesegha, Olubukola I; Elemo, Gloria N

    2017-07-04

    Different carbohydrate foods produce different glycemic responses even with little or no difference in macronutrient composition. Cassava constitutes one of the major staples in Nigeria. Four blends of cassava-wheat bread samples with 0, 10, 15, and 20% cassava flour inclusion were fed individually to groups of healthy human volunteers. Subjects were studied on separate occasions in the morning after a 10-12-hr overnight fast. Blood glucose responses were measured at intervals of 30 min over a period of 2 hr. Glucose was used as a reference food. There were normal glucose responses to the bread samples studied. Increase in cassava incorporation led to less significant glycemic responses. The glycemic index values ranged from 91-94. Results from this study indicate that the inclusion of cassava flour in bread production might not pose a threat to blood glucose response of individuals.

  3. Effect of the glycemic index of carbohydrates on Acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Rebecca C; Lee, Stephen; Choi, James Y J; Atkinson, Fiona S; Stockmann, Karola S; Petocz, Peter; Brand-Miller, Jennie C

    2010-10-01

    Acne vulgaris may be improved by dietary factors that increase insulin sensitivity. We hypothesized that a low-glycemic index diet would improve facial acne severity and insulin sensitivity. Fifty-eight adolescent males (mean age ± standard deviation 16.5 ± 1.0 y and body mass index 23.1 ± 3.5 kg/m(2)) were alternately allocated to high or low glycemic index diets. Severity of inflammatory lesions on the face, insulin sensitivity (homeostasis modeling assessment of insulin resistance), androgens and insulin-like growth factor-1 and its binding proteins were assessed at baseline and at eight weeks, a period corresponding to the school term. Forty-three subjects (n = 23 low glycemic index and n = 20 high glycemic index) completed the study. Diets differed significantly in glycemic index (mean ± standard error of the mean, low glycemic index 51 ± 1 vs. high glycemic index 61 ± 2, p = 0.0002), but not in macronutrient distribution or fiber content. Facial acne improved on both diets (low glycemic index -26 ± 6%, p = 0.0004 and high glycemic index -16 ± 7%, p = 0.01), but differences between diets did not reach significance. Change in insulin sensitivity was not different between diets (low glycemic index 0.2 ± 0.1 and high glycemic index 0.1 ± 0.1, p = 0.60) and did not correlate with change in acne severity (Pearson correlation r = -0.196, p = 0.244). Longer time frames, greater reductions in glycemic load or/and weight loss may be necessary to detect improvements in acne among adolescent boys.

  4. Influence of high glycemic index and glycemic load diets on blood pressure during adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Bamini; Flood, Victoria M; Rochtchina, Elena; Baur, Louise A; Smith, Wayne; Mitchell, Paul

    2012-06-01

    We aimed to prospectively examine the association between the glycemic index and glycemic load of foods consumed and the dietary intakes of carbohydrates, sugars, fiber, and principal carbohydrate-containing food groups (eg, breads, cereals, and sugary drinks) with changes in blood pressure during adolescence. A total of 858 students aged 12 years at baseline (422 girls and 436 boys) were examined from 2004-2005 to 2009-2011. Dietary data were assessed from validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires. Blood pressure was measured using a standard protocol. In girls, after adjusting for age, ethnicity, parental education, parental history of hypertension, baseline height, baseline blood pressure, change in body mass index, and time spent in physical and sedentary activities, each 1-SD (1-SD = 7.10 g/d) increase in baseline dietary intake of total fiber was associated with a 0.96-, 0.62-, and 0.75-mmHg decrease in mean systolic (P = 0.02), diastolic (P = 0.01), and arterial blood pressures (P = 0.002), respectively, 5 years later. In girls, each 1-SD increase in dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, carbohydrate, and fructose was concurrently related to increases of 1.81 (P = 0.001), 4.02 (P = 0.01), 4.74 (P = 0.01), and 1.80 mm Hg (P = 0.03) in systolic blood pressure, respectively, >5 years. Significant associations between carbohydrate nutrition variables and blood pressure were not observed among boys. Excessive dietary intake of carbohydrates, specifically from high glycemic index/glycemic load foods, could adversely influence blood pressure, particularly in girls, whereas fiber-rich diets may be protective against elevated blood pressure during adolescence.

  5. Carbohydrate intake, glycemic index, glycemic load and risk of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarević, Konstansa; Nagorni, Aleksandar; Jeremić, Miroslav

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine relationship between dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index, glycemic load and gastric cancer risk. This hospital based case-control study was conducted in Nis (Serbia) between 2005 and 2006. Subjects (n=102) with histologically confirmed gastric cancer and controls (n=204) selected from non-cancer patients were interviewed. The structured questionnaire included information on socio-demographic and lifestyle habits. Data from dietary habits were based on Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). We found reductions in gastric cancer risk for diets high in carbohydrate (OR for highest versus the lowest tertile = 0.07, 95% CI: 0.02-0.23) and mono- and disaccharides (OR = 0.03, 95% CI: 0.01-0.09) and increased risk (OR = 4.13, 95% CI: 1.73-9.86) for high polysaccharide intake. Total carbohydrate intake (OR = 0.17, 95% CI: 0.04-0.66) and mono- and disaccharides intake (OR = 0.06, 95% CI: 0.02-0.20) was associated with a reduction in gastric cancer risk, while polysaccharide intake was associated with an increased risk (OR = 4.85, 95% CI: 1.67-14.09) for the diffuse type only. In both histological subtypes, there was not significant association between glycemic index, glycemic load and the risk of gastric cancer. Our results suggest that increased intake of foods rich in carbohydrate, particularly mono- and disaccharides, as well as reduced consumption of food rich in polysaccharides, may lower the risk of diffuse type of gastric cancer. Our data do not support association between glycemic index, glycemic load and the risk of gastric cancer.

  6. Adverse effects of depression on glycemic control and health outcomes in people with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, Francois; Nefs, Giesje; Nouwen, Arie

    2013-01-01

    In the past decades, important advances have been achieved in the psychological aspects of diabetes. This article reviews the associations between diabetes, depression, and adverse health outcomes. The article provides an update on the literature regarding the prevalence of depression in diabetes......, discusses the impact of depression on diabetes self-care and glycemic control in people with diabetes, and summarizes the results of longitudinal studies that have investigated depression as a risk factor for adverse health outcomes....

  7. High dietary glycemic load and glycemic index increase risk of cardiovascular disease among middle-aged women : a population-based follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beulens, Joline W. J.; de Bruijne, Leonie M.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Bots, Michiel L.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this work was to assess whether high dietary glycemic load and glycemic index are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Background The associations of dietary glycemic index and glycemic load with risk of CVD are not well established, particularly

  8. High dietary glycemic load and glycemic index increase risk of cardiovascular disease among middle-aged women - A population-based follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beulens, Joline W. J.; de Bruijne, Leonie M.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Bots, Michiel L.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this work was to assess whether high dietary glycemic load and glycemic index are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Background The associations of dietary glycemic index and glycemic load with risk of CVD are not well established, particularly

  9. Dietary Carbohydrate, Glycemic Index, and Glycemic Load in Relation to Colorectal Cancer Risk in the Women’s Health Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Evidence implicating hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in the etiology of colorectal cancer suggests that a diet characterized by a high glycemic index and load may increase the risk of this disease, but previous studies have yielded inconsistent results. We assessed the association between intake of total carbohydrates, sugars, fiber, and the glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) of individual diets, and risk of developing colorectal cancer among 158,800 participants in the Women’...

  10. Dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, fiber, simple sugars, and insulin resistance - The Inter99 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lau, Cathrine; Pedersen, Oluf; Færch, Kristine

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - To examine the relationship between daily glycemic index daily glycemic, load, simple sugars, dietary fiber, and the prevalence of a measure of insulin resistance in 30- to 60-year-old nondiabetic Danish men and women. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - The inter99 study is a nonpharmacolo......OBJECTIVE - To examine the relationship between daily glycemic index daily glycemic, load, simple sugars, dietary fiber, and the prevalence of a measure of insulin resistance in 30- to 60-year-old nondiabetic Danish men and women. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - The inter99 study...... is a nonpharmacological intervention study. We used baseline data and examined cross-sectional associations between carbohydrate-related dietary factors and an estimate of insulin resistance in 5,675 subjects at 30 - 60 years. The dietary intake was estimated from a self-administered food frequency questionnaire......, and insulin resistance was estimated using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Multiple regressions were performed with HOMA-IR as the dependent variable and carbohydrate-related factors as explanatory variables. All models were adjusted for age, sex, smoking, physical activity...

  11. Equivalent glycemic load (EGL: a method for quantifying the glycemic responses elicited by low carbohydrate foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spolar Matt

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycemic load (GL is used to quantify the glycemic impact of high-carbohydrate (CHO foods, but cannot be used for low-CHO foods. Therefore, we evaluated the accuracy of equivalent-glycemic-load (EGL, a measure of the glycemic impact of low-CHO foods defined as the amount of CHO from white-bread (WB with the same glycemic impact as one serving of food. Methods Several randomized, cross-over trials were performed by a contract research organization using overnight-fasted healthy subjects drawn from a pool of 63 recruited from the general population by newspaper advertisement. Incremental blood-glucose response area-under-the-curve (AUC elicited by 0, 5, 10, 20, 35 and 50 g CHO portions of WB (WB-CHO and 3, 5, 10 and 20 g glucose were measured. EGL values of the different doses of glucose and WB and 4 low-CHO foods were determined as: EGL = (F-B/M, where F is AUC after food and B is y-intercept and M slope of the regression of AUC on grams WB-CHO. The dose-response curves of WB and glucose were used to derive an equation to estimate GL from EGL, and the resulting values compared to GL calculated from the glucose dose-response curve. The accuracy of EGL was assessed by comparing the GL (estimated from EGL values of the 4 doses of oral-glucose with the amounts actually consumed. Results Over 0–50 g WB-CHO (n = 10, the dose-response curve was non-linear, but over the range 0–20 g the curve was indistinguishable from linear, with AUC after 0, 5, 10 and 20 g WB-CHO, 10 ± 1, 28 ± 2, 58 ± 5 and 100 ± 6 mmol × min/L, differing significantly from each other (n = 48. The difference between GL values estimated from EGL and those calculated from the dose-response curve was 0 g (95% confidence-interval, ± 0.5 g. The difference between the GL values of the 4 doses of glucose estimated from EGL, and the amounts of glucose actually consumed was 0.2 g (95% confidence-interval, ± 1 g. Conclusion EGL, a measure of the glycemic impact of

  12. Use of the glycemic index in nutrition education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Galvão Cândido

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the lack of studies providing practical guidance for the use of the glycemic index has been indicated as the cause of its little use in nutrition education. The aim of this study is to give instructions on the use of the glycemic index as a tool to be used in nutrition education to estimulate the consumption of low glycemic index foods. Studies published over the past 12 years, in addition to classic studies on this topic, found in the databases MedLine, ScienceDirect, SciELO and Lilacs exploring the importance of the glycemic index and the factors that affect the glycemic index were selected for this article. The preparation of lists grouping foods according to their glycemic index should be based on information found in tables and specific web sites. This is an interesting strategy that must be very carefully conducted, considering the eating habits of the assisted people. To reduce the postprandial blood glucose response, high glycemic index foods should be consumed in association with the following foods: high protein and low fat foods, good quality oils and unprocessed foods with high fiber content. Caffeine should also be avoided. The glycemic index should be considered as an additional carbohydrate-selection tool, which should be part of a nutritionally balanced diet capable of promoting and/or maintaining body weight and health.

  13. Glycemic management after antenatal corticosteroid therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antenatal corticosteroids (ACS are recommended for use in antenatal mothers at risk of preterm delivery before 34 weeks. One common side-effect of these drugs is their propensity to cause hyperglycemia. A PubMed search was made using terms ′steroid,′ ′dexamethasone,′ ′betamethasone′ with diabetes/glucose. Relevant articles were extracted. In addition, important cross-reference articles were reviewed. This review, based upon this literature search, discusses the available evidence on effects on glycemic status as well as management strategies in women with pre-existing diabetes, gestational diabetes mellitus, as well as normoglycemic women after ACS use in pregnancy.

  14. Glycemic Index values of some Jaffna fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selladurai Pirasath

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of diabetes mellitus has recently increased in developing countries. Scientific data on glycemic index values of common meals is essential to modify the diets for diabetes mellitus patients. This study aimed to evaluate the glycemic index (GI values of fruits such as ‘Kathali’ (Yellow plantain, ‘Kappal’ (Golden plantain, and ‘Itharai’ (Green plantain varieties of plantains, jack fruit and papaya. The results will be helpful to physicians and the general public to decide the benefits ofthe consumption of fruits, particularly by diabetic and coronary heart disease patients.Methods: Healthy volunteers (20 Nos. of 21.05(±0.92 years, 53.90 (±9.36 kg body weights, 153.92 (±9.15 m heights, and 20.55 (±2.22 kgm-2body mass indexes were selected with their written consent. After overnight fasting, 75g glucose and each test fruit containing 75g digestible carbohydrate were administered at different instances and blood glucose levels were measured half hourly for two hours. The glycemic response and GI values were calculated and analyzed by Randomized Complete Block Design using SAS analytical package.Results: The mean GI values of the ‘Kathali’, ‘Kappal’, ‘Itharai’ varieties of plantains, jack fruit and papaya were 54.45 (±9.26, 50.43 (±5.79, 48.47 (±10.13, 65.36 (±8.00 and 34.80 (±12.78 % respectively. The GI value of papaya differed significantly (P<0.05 from other fruits. The GI value of ‘Itharai’ variety of plantain differed significantly (P<0.05 from other fruits except the ‘Kappal’ varietyof plantain.Conclusion: The three varieties of plantains and papaya were low GI fruits, and jack fruit was found to be an intermediate GI fruit. The presence of dietary fiber, esp. soluble fiber, reduces the glycemicresponse and glycemic index of foods.

  15. Weakly tight functions and their decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Khare

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the study of a weakly tight function and its relation to tight functions. We obtain a Jordan-decomposition-type theorem for a locally bounded weakly tight real-valued function defined on a sublattice of IX, followed by the notion of a total variation.

  16. Intraoperative glycemic control procedures and the use of an artificial pancreas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koichi Yamashita; Tomoaki Yatabe

    2009-01-01

    Strict intraoperative glycemic control can significantly decrease the incidence of postoperative infection;however, anesthesiologists must carefully control blood glucose levels as well as properly manage the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. However,standard blood glucose measurement systems and insulin dosing algorithms, which are necessary for achieving strict glycemic control, have not yet been developed. An artificial pancreas (STG-22TM;Nikkiso Co., Tokyo, Japan) is considered a highly accurate blood glucose monitoring system capable of closedloopcontrol of blood glucose. The device has, however,many problems to be addressed since it is a large and expensive system with little versatility, and it requires a large amount of blood to be collected. Therefore,the development of less invasive and inexpensive systems with future technological progress is greatly anticipated.

  17. Dietary fiber, carbohydrates, glycemic index, and glycemic load in relation to breast cancer prognosis in the HEAL cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belle, F.N.; Kampman, E.; McTiernan, A.; Bernstein, L.; Baumgartner, K.; Baumgartner, R.; Ambs, A.; Ballard-Barbash, R.; Neuhouser, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dietary intake of fiber, carbohydrate, glycemic index (GI), and glycemic load (GL) may influence breast cancer survival, but consistent and convincing evidence is lacking. METHODS: We investigated associations of dietary fiber, carbohydrates, GI, and GL with breast cancer prognosis among

  18. Dietary carbohydrates, glycemic index, glycemic load, and endometrial cancer risk within the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cust, Anne E.; Slimani, Nadia; Kaaks, Rudolf; van Bakel, Marit; Biessy, Carine; Ferrari, Pietro; Laville, Martine; Tjonneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Overvad, Kim; Lajous, Martin; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Linseisen, Jakob; Rohrmann, Sabine; Noethlings, Ute; Boeing, Heiner; Palli, Domenico; Sieri, Sabina; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Skeie, Guri; Engeset, Dagrun; Gram, Inger Torhild; Quiros, J. Ramon; Jakszyn, Paula; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Larranaga, Nerea; Navarro, Carmen; Ardanaz, Eva; Wirfalt, Elisabet; Berglund, Goran; Lundin, Eva; Hallmans, Goeran; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Du, Huaidong; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Bingham, Shelia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Allen, Naomi E.; Key, Timothy J.; Jenab, Mazda; Riboli, Elio

    2007-01-01

    The associations of dietary total carbohydrates, overall glycemic index, total dietary glycemic load, total sugars, total starch, and total fiber with endometrial cancer risk were analyzed among 288,428 women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort (1992-2004), inc

  19. A Randomized Trial about Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load Improves Outcomes among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Carla K.; Gutschall, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Glycemic index (GI) represents the postprandial glucose response of carbohydrate foods, and glycemic load (GL) represents the quantity and quality of carbohydrate consumed. A diet lower in GI and GL may improve diabetes management. A 9-week intervention regarding GI and GL was evaluated among adults in the age range of 40-70 years who had had type…

  20. Relation between Breast Cancer and High Glycemic Index or Glycemic Load: A Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullie, Patrick; Koechlin, Alice; Boniol, Mathieu; Autier, Philippe; Boyle, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest form of cancer in women worldwide. It has been suggested that chronic hyperinsulinemia associated with insulin resistance plays a role in breast cancer etiology. To test the hyperinsulinemia hypothesis, a dietary pattern associated with a high glycemic index and glycemic load, both proxies for chronic hyperinsulinemia, should be associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. A meta-analysis restricted to prospective cohort studies was undertaken using a random effects model with tests for statistical significance, publication bias and heterogeneity. The metric for analysis was the risk of breast cancer in the highest relative to the lowest glycemic index and glycemic load dietary pattern. A dietary pattern with a high glycemic index was associated with a summary relative risk (SRR) of 1.05 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.11), and a high glycemic load with a SRR of 1.06 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.13). Adjustments for body mass index [BMI], physical activity and other lifestyle factors did not influence the SRR, nor did menopausal status and estrogen receptor status of the tumor. In conclusion, the current evidence supports a modest association between a dietary pattern with high glycemic index or glycemic load and the risk of breast cancer.

  1. Carbohydrates, glycemic index, glycemic load, and colorectal cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aune, D.; Chan, D.S.; Lau, R.; Vieira, R.; Greenwood, D.C.; Kampman, E.; Norat, T.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load are thought to influence colorectal cancer risk through hyperinsulinemia. We review and quantitatively summarize in a meta-analysis the evidence from prospective cohort studies. METHODS: We searched the PubMed database for prospecti

  2. Carbohydrates, glycemic index, glycemic load, and colorectal cancer risk : a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aune, D.; Chan, D.S.M.; Lau, R.; Vieira, R.; Greenwood, D.C.; Kampman, E.; Norat, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load are thought to influence colorectal cancer risk through hyperinsulinemia. We review and quantitatively summarize in a meta-analysis the evidence from prospective cohort studies. Methods We searched the PubMed database for prospective

  3. Dietary Fiber, Carbohydrates, Glycemic Index, and Glycemic Load in Relation to Breast Cancer Prognosis in the HEAL Cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belle, F.N.; Kampman, E.; McTiernan, A.; Bernstein, L.; Baumgartner, K.; Baumgartner, R.; Ambs, A.; Ballard-Barbash, R.; Neuhouser, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dietary intake of fiber, carbohydrate, glycemic index (GI), and glycemic load (GL) may influence breast cancer survival, but consistent and convincing evidence is lacking. Methods: We investigated associations of dietary fiber, carbohydrates, GI, and GL with breast cancer prognosis among

  4. Correlation bethealtyy ween dietary glycemic index and glycemic load and blood lipid levels in a group of women from Ahvaz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Shishebor

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: There are limited number of studies conducted on the correlation between Glycemic index and Glycemic load of a food program and metabolic factors such as blood lipids in Asian countries including Iran. Therefore, this study aimed at analyzing the correlation between Glycemic index and Glycemic load of Iranian food program and blood lipids. Materials & Methods: The subjects were 95 women working in Ahvaz University of Medical Sciences in the range of 20 to 55 years old. Glycemic index and Glycemic load of the food program was analyzed with 24-hour food recall questionnaires (4-6 recall. For calculating GI and GL, Iranian food GI tables, and also, international GI and GL table were used. The levels of blood lipids including HDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triglycerides of the blood were measured and the level of LDL Cholesterol was calculated using Friedewald formula. Also, Anthropometric measurements were done using standard methods. Resulst: The mean age of subjects in this study was 36 years. GI mean was 72.1 and GL mean was 153.2. In this study, there was no significant relation between HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol and Blood TG with Glycemic index and Glycemic load of food program. Conclusion: Unlike findings of west and Asian countries, both dietary GI and GL were not correlated with metabolic factors including blood lipid levels in this study , underreporting of individuals may influence the results of the study.

  5. Thermal Hydraulic Performance of Tight Lattice Bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yasushi; Akiba, Miyuki; Morooka, Shinichi; Shirakawa, Kenetsu; Abe, Nobuaki

    Recently, the reduced moderation spectrum BWR has been studied. The fast neutron spectrum is obtained through triangular tight lattice fuel. However, there are few thermal hydraulic test data and thermal hydraulic correlation applicable to critical power prediction in such a tight lattice bundle. This study aims to enhance the database of the thermal hydraulic performance of the tight lattice bundle whose rod gap is about 1mm. Therefore, thermal hydraulic performance measurement tests of tight lattice bundles for the critical power, the pressure drop and the counter current flow limiting were performed. Moreover, the correlations to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic performance of the tight lattice bundle were developed.

  6. Glycemic index of common Malaysian fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, S Daniel; Ismail, Aziz Al-Safi; Winn, Than; Wolever, Thomas M S

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to measure the glycemic index of durian, papaya, pineapple and water-melon grown in Malaysia. Ten (10) healthy volunteers (5 females, 5 males; body mass index 21.18+/-1.7 kg/m2) consumed 50 g of available carbohydrate portions of glucose (reference food) and four test foods (durian, papaya, pineapple and watermelon) in random order after an overnight fast. Glucose was tested on three separate occasions, and the test foods were each tested once. Postprandial plasma glucose was measured at intervals for two hours after intake of the test foods. Incremental areas under the curve were calculated, and the glycemic index was determined by expressing the area under the curve after the test foods as a percentage of the mean area under the curve after glucose. The results showed that the area under the curve after pineapple, 232+/-24 mmolxmin/L, was significantly greater than those after papaya, 147+/-14, watermelon, 139+/-8, and durian, 124+/-13 mmolxmin/L (pfoods. The validity of these results depends on the accuracy of the data in the food tables upon which the portion sizes tested were based.

  7. Glycemic Variability Assessed by Continuous Glucose Monitoring and Short-Term Outcome in Diabetic Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: An Observational Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annunziata Nusca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Poor glycemic control is associated with unfavorable outcome in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI, irrespective of diabetes mellitus. However a complete assessment of glycemic status may not be fully described by glycated hemoglobin or fasting blood glucose levels, whereas daily glycemic fluctuations may influence cardiovascular risk and have even more deleterious effects than sustained hyperglycemia. Thus, this paper investigated the effectiveness of a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM, registering the mean level of glycemic values but also the extent of glucose excursions during coronary revascularization, in detecting periprocedural outcome such as renal or myocardial damage, assessed by serum creatinine, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL, and troponin I levels. High glycemic variability (GV has been associated with worse postprocedural creatinine and NGAL variations. Moreover, GV, and predominantly hypoglycemic variations, has been observed to increase in patients with periprocedural myocardial infarction. Thus, our study investigated the usefulness of CGM in the setting of PCI where an optimal glycemic control should be achieved in order to prevent complications and improve outcome.

  8. Sterilization in a liquid of a specific starch makes it slowly digestible in vitro and low glycemic in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severijnen, Chantal; Abrahamse, Evan; van der Beek, Eline M; Buco, Amra; van de Heijning, Bert J M; van Laere, Katrien; Bouritius, Hetty

    2007-10-01

    Diabetics are recommended to eat a balanced diet containing normal amounts of carbohydrates, preferably those with a low glycemic index. For solid foods, this can be achieved by choosing whole-grain, fiber-rich products. For (sterilized) liquid products, such as meal replacers, the choices for carbohydrate sources are restricted due to technological limitations. Starches usually have a high glycemic index after sterilization in liquids, whereas low glycemic sugars and sugar replacers can only be used in limited amounts. Using an in vitro digestion assay, we identified a resistant starch (RS) source [modified high amylose starch (mHAS)] that might enable the production of a sterilized liquid product with a low glycemic index. Heating mHAS for 4-5 min in liquid increased the slowly digestible starch (SDS) fraction at the expense of the RS portion. The effect was temperature dependent and reached its maximum above 120 degrees C. Heating at 130 degrees C significantly reduced the RS fraction from 49 to 22%. The product remained stable for at least several months when stored at 4 degrees C. To investigate whether a higher SDS fraction would result in a lower postprandial glycemic response, the sterilized mHAS solution was compared with rapidly digestible maltodextrin. Male Wistar rats received an i.g. bolus of 2.0 g available carbohydrate/kg body weight. Ingestion of heat-treated mHAS resulted in a significant attenuation of the postprandial plasma glucose and insulin responses compared with maltodextrin. mHAS appears to be a starch source which, after sterilization in a liquid product, acquires slow-release properties. The long-term stability of mHAS solutions indicates that this may provide a suitable carbohydrate source for low glycemic index liquid products for inclusion in a diabetes-specific diet.

  9. Undersampled MR Image Reconstruction with Data-Driven Tight Frame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Undersampled magnetic resonance image reconstruction employing sparsity regularization has fascinated many researchers in recent years under the support of compressed sensing theory. Nevertheless, most existing sparsity-regularized reconstruction methods either lack adaptability to capture the structure information or suffer from high computational load. With the aim of further improving image reconstruction accuracy without introducing too much computation, this paper proposes a data-driven tight frame magnetic image reconstruction (DDTF-MRI method. By taking advantage of the efficiency and effectiveness of data-driven tight frame, DDTF-MRI trains an adaptive tight frame to sparsify the to-be-reconstructed MR image. Furthermore, a two-level Bregman iteration algorithm has been developed to solve the proposed model. The proposed method has been compared to two state-of-the-art methods on four datasets and encouraging performances have been achieved by DDTF-MRI.

  10. Undersampled MR Image Reconstruction with Data-Driven Tight Frame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianbo; Wang, Shanshan; Peng, Xi; Liang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Undersampled magnetic resonance image reconstruction employing sparsity regularization has fascinated many researchers in recent years under the support of compressed sensing theory. Nevertheless, most existing sparsity-regularized reconstruction methods either lack adaptability to capture the structure information or suffer from high computational load. With the aim of further improving image reconstruction accuracy without introducing too much computation, this paper proposes a data-driven tight frame magnetic image reconstruction (DDTF-MRI) method. By taking advantage of the efficiency and effectiveness of data-driven tight frame, DDTF-MRI trains an adaptive tight frame to sparsify the to-be-reconstructed MR image. Furthermore, a two-level Bregman iteration algorithm has been developed to solve the proposed model. The proposed method has been compared to two state-of-the-art methods on four datasets and encouraging performances have been achieved by DDTF-MRI.

  11. Metabolic responses to high glycemic index and low glycemic index meals: a controlled crossover clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bressan Josefina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The consumption of low glycemic index (LGI foods before exercise results in slower and more stable glycemic increases. Besides maintaining an adequate supply of energy during exercise, this response may favor an increase in fat oxidation in the postprandial period before the exercise compared to high glycemic index (HGI foods. The majority of the studies that evaluated the effect of foods differing in glycemic index on substrate oxidation during the postprandial period before the exercise are acute studies in which a single meal is consumed right before the exercise. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of consuming two daily HGI or LGI meals for five consecutive days on substrate oxidation before the exercise and in the concentrations of glucose, insulin and free fatty acids before and during a high intensity exercise. Methods Fifteen male cyclists, aged 24.4 ± 3.8 years, with body mass index of 21.9 ± 1.4 kg.m-2 and a VO2 max of 70.0 ± 5.3 mL.kg-1.min-1, participated in this crossover study. All test meals were consumed in the laboratory. On days 1 and 5, substrate oxidation (30 minutes before and 90 minutes after breakfast (HGI or LGI and diet-induced thermogenesis (90 minutes postprandial were assessed before the exercise. The levels of glucose, insulin, and free fatty acids were determined during 2 h after breakfast on these same days. Ninety minutes after breakfast, subjects completed a 30 min cycloergometric exercise at 85 to 95% of their maximum heart rate, during which lactate concentrations were assessed. Results The consumption of HGI meals resulted in higher areas under the glycemic and insulinemic curves in the postprandial period. However, glycemia did not differ by study treatment during exercise. There were no differences in free fatty acids in the postprandial period or in lactate levels during exercise. LGI meals resulted in lower fat oxidation and higher carbohydrate oxidation than the

  12. Sotagliflozin improves glycemic control in nonobese diabetes-prone mice with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Powell DR

    2015-02-01

    diabetic mice maintained on a low insulin dose. This sotagliflozin-mediated improvement in glycemic control was comparable to that achieved by raising the insulin dose alone, but was not accompanied by the increased rate of hypoglycemia measurements observed with the higher insulin dose. Keywords: insulin, glucose, hypoglycemia, hemoglobin A1c

  13. Fingerprinting with Equiangular Tight Frames

    CERN Document Server

    Mixon, Dustin G; Kiyavash, Negar; Fickus, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Digital fingerprinting is a framework for marking media files, such as images, music, or movies, with user-specific signatures to deter illegal distribution. Multiple users can collude to produce a forgery that can potentially overcome a fingerprinting system. This paper proposes an equiangular tight frame fingerprint design which is robust to such collusion attacks. We motivate this design by considering digital fingerprinting in terms of compressed sensing. The attack is modeled as linear averaging of multiple marked copies before adding a Gaussian noise vector. The content owner can then determine guilt by exploiting correlation between each user's fingerprint and the forged copy. The worst-case error probability of this detection scheme is analyzed and bounded. Simulation results demonstrate the average-case performance is similar to the performance of orthogonal and simplex fingerprint designs, while accommodating several times as many users.

  14. Diagnosing the tight building syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, S.A.

    1987-12-01

    Formaldehyde is but one of many chemicals capable of causing the tight building syndrome or environmentally induced illness (EI). The spectrum of symptoms it may induce includes attacks of headache, flushing, laryngitis, dizziness, nausea, extreme weakness, arthralgia, unwarranted depression, dysphonia, exhaustion, inability to think clearly, arrhythmia or muscle spasms. The nonspecificity of such symptoms can baffle physicians from many specialties. Presented herein is a simple office method for demonstrating that formaldehyde is among the etiologic agents triggering these symptoms. The very symptoms that patients complain of can be provoked within minutes, and subsequently abolished, with an intradermal injection of the appropriate strength of formaldehyde. This injection aids in convincing the patient of the cause of the symptoms so he can initiate measure to bring his disease under control.

  15. Invasive tightly coupled processor arrays

    CERN Document Server

    LARI, VAHID

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces new massively parallel computer (MPSoC) architectures called invasive tightly coupled processor arrays. It proposes strategies, architecture designs, and programming interfaces for invasive TCPAs that allow invading and subsequently executing loop programs with strict requirements or guarantees of non-functional execution qualities such as performance, power consumption, and reliability. For the first time, such a configurable processor array architecture consisting of locally interconnected VLIW processing elements can be claimed by programs, either in full or in part, using the principle of invasive computing. Invasive TCPAs provide unprecedented energy efficiency for the parallel execution of nested loop programs by avoiding any global memory access such as GPUs and may even support loops with complex dependencies such as loop-carried dependencies that are not amenable to parallel execution on GPUs. For this purpose, the book proposes different invasion strategies for claiming a desire...

  16. Why tight-binding theory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Walter A.

    2002-12-01

    In the context of computational physics other methods are more accurate, but tight-binding theory allows very direct physical interpretation and is simple enough to allow much more realistic treatments beyond the local density approximation. We address several important questions of this last category: How does the gap enhancement from Coulomb correlations vary from material to material? Should the enhanced gap be used for calculating the dielectric constant? For calculating the effective mass in k-dot-p theory? How valid is the scissors approximation? How does one line up bands at an interface? How should we match the envelope function at interfaces in effective-mass theory? Why can the resulting quantum-well states seem to violate the uncertainty principle? How should f-shell electrons be treated when they are intermediate between band-like and core-like? The answers to all of these questions are given and discussed.

  17. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-30

    potential field data, the GGRB was divided into partitions that will be used to analyze the resource potential of the Frontier and Mesaverde Upper Cretaceous tight gas play. A total of 20 partitions were developed, which will be instrumental for examining the Upper Cretaceous play potential. (5) Partition Analysis. Resource assessment associated with individual partitions was initiated starting with the Vermilion Sub-basin and the Green River Deep (which include the Stratos well) partitions (see Chapter 5). (6) Technology Transfer. Tech transfer was achieved by documenting our research and presenting it at various conferences.

  18. Glycemic index: overview of implications in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C; Augustin, Livia S A; Franceschi, Silvia; Hamidi, Maryam; Marchie, Augustine; Jenkins, Alexandra L; Axelsen, Mette

    2002-07-01

    The glycemic index concept is an extension of the fiber hypothesis, suggesting that fiber consumption reduces the rate of nutrient influx from the gut. The glycemic index has particular relevance to those chronic Western diseases associated with central obesity and insulin resistance. Early studies showed that starchy carbohydrate foods have very different effects on postprandial blood glucose and insulin responses in healthy and diabetic subjects, depending on the rate of digestion. A range of factors associated with food consumption was later shown to alter the rate of glucose absorption and subsequent glycemia and insulinemia. At this stage, systematic documentation of the differences that exist among carbohydrate foods was considered essential. The resulting glycemic index classification of foods provided a numeric physiologic classification of relevant carbohydrate foods in the prevention and treatment of diseases such as diabetes. Since then, low-glycemic-index diets have been shown to lower urinary C-peptide excretion in healthy subjects, improve glycemic control in diabetic subjects, and reduce serum lipids in hyperlipidemic subjects. Furthermore, consumption of low-glycemicindex diets has been associated with higher HDL-cholesterol concentrations and, in large cohort studies, with decreased risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Case-control studies have also shown positive associations between dietary glycemic index and the risk of colon and breast cancers. Despite inconsistencies in the data, sufficient, positive findings have emerged to suggest that the dietary glycemic index is of potential importance in the treatment and prevention of chronic diseases.

  19. Should glycemic index and glycemic load be considered in dietary recommendations?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare-Bruun, Helle; Nielsen, Birgit M.; Grau, K.

    2008-01-01

    emphasizes the need to investigate the effects of carbohydrate on diet-related conditions and diseases. This review examines the epidemiological literature linking GI and GL to heart disease, insulin sensitivity, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, and obesity among initially healthy people. The evidence...... for associations between GI and particularly GL and health among free-living populations is mixed. Only the positive association between GI and development of type 2 diabetes was consistent across cross-sectional and longitudinal studies for both sexes. Low GI/GL may protect against heart disease in women......High glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) have been proposed to be associated with increased risk of lifestyle diseases. Since protein intake varies little in humans, adherence to the common recommendation to reduce fat intake probably leads to increases in carbohydrate intake, which...

  20. Lower glycemic load meals reduce diurnal glycemic oscillations in women with risk factors for gestational diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizirian, Nathalie V; Goletzke, Janina; Brodie, Shannon; Atkinson, Fiona S; Markovic, Tania P; Ross, Glynis P; Buyken, Anette; Brand-Miller, Jennie P

    2017-01-01

    Objective Maternal glycemia plays a key role in fetal growth. We hypothesized that lower glycemic load (GL) meals (lower glycemic index, modestly lower carbohydrate) would substantially reduce day-long glucose variability in women at risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Research design and methods A crossover study of 17 women (mean±SD age 34.8±4 years; gestational weeks 29.3±1.3; body mass index 23.8±4.7 kg/m2) who consumed a low GL or a high GL diet in random order, 1-day each, over 2 consecutive days. Diets were energy-matched and fiber-matched with 5 meals per 24 hours. All food was provided. Continuous glucose monitoring was used to assess diurnal glycemia. Results Maternal glucose levels were 51% lower on the low GL day with lower incremental area under the curve (iAUC±SEM 549±109 vs 1120±198 mmol/L min, p=0.015). Glycemic variability was significantly lower on the low GL day, as demonstrated by a lower average SD (0.7±0.1 vs 0.9±0.1, p<0.001) and lower mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (2.1±0.2 vs 2.7±0.2 mmol/L, p<0.001). Conclusions A lower GL meal plan in pregnancy acutely halves day-long maternal glucose levels and reduces glucose variability, providing further evidence to support the utility of a low GL diet in pregnancy.

  1. Glycemic index, glycemic load and mammographic breast density: the EPIC Florence longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masala, Giovanna; Assedi, Melania; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Ermini, Ilaria; Occhini, Daniela; Sieri, Sabina; Brighenti, Furio; Del Turco, Marco Rosselli; Ambrogetti, Daniela; Palli, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    A few studies have evaluated the association between diet and mammographic breast density (MBD) and results are inconsistent. MBD, a well-recognized risk factor for breast cancer, has been proposed as a marker of cumulative exposure to hormones and growth factors. Diets with a high glycemic index (GI) or glycemic load (GL) may increase breast cancer risk, via an effect on the insulin-like growth factor axis. We have investigated the association between carbohydrate intake, GI, GL and MBD in a prospective study. We identified a large series of women, in the frame of the EPIC-Florence cohort, with a mammogram taken five years after enrolment, when detailed information on dietary and lifestyle habits and anthropometric measurements had been collected. Mammograms have been retrieved (1,668, 83%) and MBD assessed according to Wolfe's classification. We compared women with high MBD (P2+DY Wolfe's categories) with those with low MBD (N1+P1) through logistic models adjusted for age, education, body mass index, menopause, number of children, breast feeding, physical activity, non-alcohol energy, fibers, saturated fat and alcohol. A direct association between GL and high MBD emerged in the highest quintile of intake in comparison with the lowest quintile (OR = 1.73, 95%CI 1.13-2.67, p for trend = 0.048) while no association with glycemic index was evident. These results were confirmed after exclusion of women reporting to be on a diet or affected with diabetes, and when Hormone Replacement Therapy at the date of mammographic examination used to assess MBD was considered. The effect was particularly evident among leaner women, although no interaction was found. A positive association was suggested for increasing simple sugar and total carbohydrates intakes limited to the highest quintiles. In this Italian population we observed an association between glycemic load, total and rapidly absorbed carbohydrates and high MBD. These novel results warrant further investigations.

  2. Glycemic index, glycemic load and mammographic breast density: the EPIC Florence longitudinal study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Masala

    Full Text Available A few studies have evaluated the association between diet and mammographic breast density (MBD and results are inconsistent. MBD, a well-recognized risk factor for breast cancer, has been proposed as a marker of cumulative exposure to hormones and growth factors. Diets with a high glycemic index (GI or glycemic load (GL may increase breast cancer risk, via an effect on the insulin-like growth factor axis. We have investigated the association between carbohydrate intake, GI, GL and MBD in a prospective study. We identified a large series of women, in the frame of the EPIC-Florence cohort, with a mammogram taken five years after enrolment, when detailed information on dietary and lifestyle habits and anthropometric measurements had been collected. Mammograms have been retrieved (1,668, 83% and MBD assessed according to Wolfe's classification. We compared women with high MBD (P2+DY Wolfe's categories with those with low MBD (N1+P1 through logistic models adjusted for age, education, body mass index, menopause, number of children, breast feeding, physical activity, non-alcohol energy, fibers, saturated fat and alcohol. A direct association between GL and high MBD emerged in the highest quintile of intake in comparison with the lowest quintile (OR = 1.73, 95%CI 1.13-2.67, p for trend = 0.048 while no association with glycemic index was evident. These results were confirmed after exclusion of women reporting to be on a diet or affected with diabetes, and when Hormone Replacement Therapy at the date of mammographic examination used to assess MBD was considered. The effect was particularly evident among leaner women, although no interaction was found. A positive association was suggested for increasing simple sugar and total carbohydrates intakes limited to the highest quintiles. In this Italian population we observed an association between glycemic load, total and rapidly absorbed carbohydrates and high MBD. These novel results warrant further

  3. Hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia and glycemic variability in the elderly: a fatal triad?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monami, Matteo; Aleffi, Sara

    2016-06-22

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most important causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality; the incidence of chronic complications of diabetes appears to be closely related to the degree of hyperglycaemia. However, results of clinical trials showed that intensive treatment of hyperglycaemia prevents microvascular complications, but has little or no effect on the incidence of cardiovascular events. Different hypoglycaemic drugs show different effects on cardiovascular risk. However, those trials have shown a neutral effect on cardiovascular mortality. This paradoxical result could be explained with the frequent use, in the past, of glucose-lowering agents capable of increasing the risk of hypoglicemia, glycemic variability and weight gain. In conclusion, an adequate glycemic control, in particular in elderly patients, should be achieved, whenever possible, using agents not inducing hypogycemia, glucose fluctuations, and weight gain. In fact, hypoglycaemia and glucose variability should be considered as independent cardiovascular risk factors to a similar extent to hyperglycemia. In this article, the author will review literature supporting the hypothesis that hyperglycemia, hypoglycaemia and glycemic variability are a fatal triad capable of increasing morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  4. Upper gastrointestinal function and glycemic control in diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reawika Chaikomin; Christopher K Rayner; Karen L Jones; Michael Horowitz

    2006-01-01

    Recent evidence has highlighted the impact of glycemic control on the incidence and progression of diabetic micro- and macrovascular complications, and on cardiovascular risk in the non-diabetic population.Postprandial blood glucose concentrations make a major contribution to overall glycemic control, and are determined in part by upper gastrointestinal function.Conversely, poor glycemic control has an acute,reversible effect on gastrointestinal motility. Insights into the mechanisms by which the gut contributes to glycemia have given rise to a number of novel dietary and pharmacological strategies designed to lower postprandial blood glucose concent rations.

  5. Dietary glycemic index and the regulation of body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, David S

    2003-02-01

    Prevalence rates of overweight and obesity have risen precipitously in the United States and other developed countries since the 1960s, despite comprehensive public health efforts to combat this problem. Although considerable attention has been focused on decreasing dietary fat and increasing physical activity level, the potential relevance of the dietary glycemic index to obesity treatment has received comparatively little scientific notice. This review examines how the glycemic and insulinemic responses to diet may affect body weight regulation, and argues for the potential utility of low glycemic index diets in the prevention and treatment of obesity and related complications.

  6. Use of the glycemic index in nutrition education

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the lack of studies providing practical guidance for the use of the glycemic index has been indicated as the cause of its little use in nutrition education. The aim of this study is to give instructions on the use of the glycemic index as a tool to be used in nutrition education to estimulate the consumption of low glycemic index foods. Studies published over the past 12 years, in addition to classic studies on this topic, found in the databases MedLine, ScienceDirect, SciELO and Li...

  7. Dietary carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load in relation to colorectal cancer risk in the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Geoffrey C; Shikany, James M; Beresford, Shirley A A; Caan, Bette; Neuhouser, Marian L; Tinker, Lesley F; Rohan, Thomas E

    2008-12-01

    Evidence implicating hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in the etiology of colorectal cancer suggests that a diet characterized by a high glycemic index and load may increase the risk of this disease, but previous studies have yielded inconsistent results. We assessed the association between intake of total carbohydrates, sugars, fiber, and the glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) of individual diets, and risk of developing colorectal cancer among 158,800 participants in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI). We used a GI/GL database developed specifically for the WHI food-frequency questionnaire. Over an average of 7.8 years of follow-up, 1,476 incident cases of colorectal cancer were identified. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the association between dietary factors classified by quintiles and risk of colorectal cancer, with adjustment for covariates. Total carbohydrate intake, glycemic index, glycemic load, and intake of sugars and fiber showed no association with colorectal cancer. Analyses by cancer subsite also yielded null results, with the exception of a borderline positive association between glycemic load and rectal cancer (HR for the highest versus lowest quintile 1.84, 95% confidence interval 0.95-3.56, p for trend 0.05). Analyses stratified by tertiles of body mass index and physical activity showed no evidence of effect modification by these factors. Results of this large study do not support of a role of a diet characterized by high glycemic index or load in colorectal carcinogenesis in postmenopausal women.

  8. Personalized Nutrition by Prediction of Glycemic Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeevi, David; Korem, Tal; Zmora, Niv; Israeli, David; Rothschild, Daphna; Weinberger, Adina; Ben-Yacov, Orly; Lador, Dar; Avnit-Sagi, Tali; Lotan-Pompan, Maya; Suez, Jotham; Mahdi, Jemal Ali; Matot, Elad; Malka, Gal; Kosower, Noa; Rein, Michal; Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Dohnalová, Lenka; Pevsner-Fischer, Meirav; Bikovsky, Rony; Halpern, Zamir; Elinav, Eran; Segal, Eran

    2015-11-19

    Elevated postprandial blood glucose levels constitute a global epidemic and a major risk factor for prediabetes and type II diabetes, but existing dietary methods for controlling them have limited efficacy. Here, we continuously monitored week-long glucose levels in an 800-person cohort, measured responses to 46,898 meals, and found high variability in the response to identical meals, suggesting that universal dietary recommendations may have limited utility. We devised a machine-learning algorithm that integrates blood parameters, dietary habits, anthropometrics, physical activity, and gut microbiota measured in this cohort and showed that it accurately predicts personalized postprandial glycemic response to real-life meals. We validated these predictions in an independent 100-person cohort. Finally, a blinded randomized controlled dietary intervention based on this algorithm resulted in significantly lower postprandial responses and consistent alterations to gut microbiota configuration. Together, our results suggest that personalized diets may successfully modify elevated postprandial blood glucose and its metabolic consequences. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  9. Tight Junctions in Salivary Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga J. Baker

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial cell tight junctions (TJs consist of a narrow belt-like structure in the apical region of the lateral plasma membrane that circumferentially binds each cell to its neighbor. TJs are found in tissues that are involved in polarized secretions, absorption functions, and maintaining barriers between blood and interstitial fluids. The morphology, permeability, and ion selectivity of TJ vary among different types of tissues and species. TJs are very dynamic structures that assemble, grow, reorganize, and disassemble during physiological or pathological events. Several studies have indicated the active role of TJ in intestinal, renal, and airway epithelial function; however, the functional significance of TJ in salivary gland epithelium is poorly understood. Interactions between different combinations of the TJ family (each with their own unique regulatory proteins define tissue specificity and functions during physiopathological processes; however, these interaction patterns have not been studied in salivary glands. The purpose of this review is to analyze some of the current data regarding the regulatory components of the TJ that could potentially affect cellular functions of the salivary epithelium.

  10. Effect of macronutrients and fiber on postprandial glycemic responses and meal glycemic index and glycemic load value determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Huicui; Matthan, Nirupa R; Ausman, Lynne M; Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2017-02-15

    Background: The potential confounding effect of different amounts and proportions of macronutrients across eating patterns on meal or dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) value determinations has remained partially unaddressed.Objective: The study aimed to determine the effects of different amounts of macronutrients and fiber on measured meal GI and GL values.Design: Four studies were conducted during which participants [n = 20-22; women: 50%; age: 50-80 y; body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 25-30)] received food challenges containing different amounts of the variable nutrient in a random order. Added to the standard 50 g available carbohydrate from white bread was 12.5, 25, or 50 g carbohydrate; 12.5, 25, or 50 g protein; and 5.6, 11.1, or 22.2 g fat from rice cereal, tuna, and unsalted butter, respectively, and 4.8 or 9.6 g fiber from oat cereal. Arterialized venous blood was sampled for 2 h, and measured meal GI and GL and insulin index (II) values were calculated by using the incremental area under the curve (AUCi) method.Results: Adding carbohydrate to the standard white-bread challenge increased glucose AUCi (P < 0.0001), measured meal GI (P = 0.0066), and mean GL (P < 0.0001). Adding protein (50 g only) decreased glucose AUCi (P = 0.0026), measured meal GI (P = 0.0139), and meal GL (P = 0.0140). Adding fat or fiber had no significant effect on these variables. Adding carbohydrate (50 g), protein (50 g), and fat (11.1 g) increased the insulin AUCi or II; fiber had no effect.Conclusions: These data indicate that uncertainty in the determination of meal GI and GL values is introduced when carbohydrate-containing foods are consumed concurrently with protein (equal amount of carbohydrate challenge) but not with carbohydrate-, fat-, or fiber-containing foods. Future studies are needed to evaluate whether this uncertainty also influences the prediction of average dietary GI and GL values for eating patterns. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials

  11. Consumption of a high glycemic load but not a high glycemic index diet is marginally associated with oxidative stress in young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikawa, Andrea Y; Jakits, Holly E; Flood, Andrew; Thomas, William; Gross, Myron; Schmitz, Kathryn H; Kurzer, Mindy S

    2015-01-01

    Research studies have suggested that chronic consumption of high glycemic index foods may lead to chronically high oxidative stress. This is important because oxidative stress is suspected to be an early event in the etiology of many disease processes. We hypothesized that dietary glycemic index and glycemic load were positively associated with oxidative stress assessed by plasma F2-isoprostanes in healthy, premenopausal women (body mass index [BMI] = 24.7 ± 4.8 kg/m(2) and age 25.3 ± 3.5 years, mean ± SD). We measured plasma F2-isoprostanes in 306 healthy premenopausal women at the baseline visit for the Women In Steady Exercise Research study, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Dietary glycemic index and load were calculated from the National Cancer Institute Diet History Questionnaire, and participants were divided into quartiles of dietary glycemic index and of glycemic load. Plasma F2-isoprostanes were compared across quartile groups of dietary glycemic index and glycemic load using linear regression models. Plasma F2-isoprostanes (pg/mL) increased with quartile of glycemic load (test for linear trend, P = .033), and also increased with quartile of glycemic index in participants with BMI ≥ 25 (P = .035) but not in those with BMI glycemic index and P = .065 for quartiles of glycemic load).

  12. Dietary Glycemic Load, Glycemic Index, and Carbohydrate and Risk of Breast Cancer in the Women’s Health Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Dietary glycemic load (GL), glycemic index (GI), and carbohydrate could be associated with breast cancer risk by influencing long-term blood glucose and insulin concentrations. We examined associations between GL, GI, and carbohydrate and incident breast cancer in 148,767 Women’s Heath Initiative (WHI) participants. Dietary variables were estimated from food frequency questionnaires administered at baseline. Self-reported breast cancers during follow-up were confirmed by medical records revie...

  13. Vascular Glucose Sensor Symposium: Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems (CGMS) for Hospitalized and Ambulatory Patients at Risk for Hyperglycemia, Hypoglycemia, and Glycemic Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jeffrey I; Torjman, Marc C; Strasma, Paul J

    2015-07-01

    Hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and glycemic variability have been associated with increased morbidity, mortality, length of stay, and cost in a variety of critical care and non-critical care patient populations in the hospital. The results from prospective randomized clinical trials designed to determine the risks and benefits of intensive insulin therapy and tight glycemic control have been confusing; and at times conflicting. The limitations of point-of-care blood glucose (BG) monitoring in the hospital highlight the great clinical need for an automated real-time continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) that can accurately measure the concentration of glucose every few minutes. Automation and standardization of the glucose measurement process have the potential to significantly improve BG control, clinical outcome, safety and cost.

  14. Link between Hypoglycemia and Cardiac Arrhythmias: An Answer to Why Tight Glycemic Control May Increase Mortality in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ... us get closer to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes. Other Ways to ...

  15. Glycemic index and glycemic load of carbohydrates in the diabetes diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Kate; Barclay, Alan; Colagiuri, Stephen; Brand-Miller, Jennie

    2011-04-01

    Medical nutrition therapy is the first line of treatment for the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes and plays an essential part in the management of type 1 diabetes. Although traditionally advice was focused on carbohydrate quantification, it is now clear that both the amount and type of carbohydrate are important in predicting an individual's glycemic response to a meal. Diets based on carbohydrate foods that are more slowly digested, absorbed, and metabolized (i.e., low glycemic index [GI] diets) have been associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, whereas intervention studies have shown improvements in insulin sensitivity and glycated hemoglobin concentrations in people with diabetes following a low GI diet. Research also suggests that low GI diets may assist with weight management through effects on satiety and fuel partitioning. These findings, together with the fact that there are no demonstrated negative effects of a low GI diet, suggest that the GI should be an important consideration in the dietary management and prevention of diabetes.

  16. Carbohydrate Intake, Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, and Stroke: A Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xianlei; Wang, Chen; Wang, Shan; Cao, Gaoyang; Jin, Chao; Yu, Jiawei; Li, Xiuyang; Yan, Jing; Wang, Fudi; Yu, Wei; Ding, Fang

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate associations between carbohydrate intake/glycemic index (GI)/glycemic load (GL) and stroke risk. A literature search of MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, and CBM databases was performed to retrieve eligible studies published up to March 2014. Pooled relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to evaluate the strength of this association. Publication bias was assessed by the Egger's regression asymmetry test and Begg's rank correlation test with Begg's funnel plot. All analyses were conducted using software STATA 12.0 (StataCorp LP, College Station, TX) and SAS version 9.1 (SAS Institute Inc, Cary, NC). We identified 7 prospective studies that met the inclusion criteria and processed data from cohort studies to update available evidence. There were 25 independent estimates and 225 000 participants free of diabetes from 6 different countries; 3046 stroke events were included; and the follow-up range was 5 to 18 years. High GI was not associated with risk of stroke events (pooled RR = 1.10; 95% CI: 0.99-1.21); GL was a risk factor for stroke (pooled RR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.05-1.36). There was no significant association between high carbohydrate intake and stroke risk (RR = 1.12; 95% CI: 0.93-1.35). A daily high GL diet is the risk factor of stroke event, and further researches need to verify the meta-analyses results and study associated mechanisms.

  17. Dietary glycemic index and glycemic load and their relationship to cardiovascular risk factors in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Zhu, Yanna; Cai, Li; Ma, Lu; Jing, Jin; Guo, Li; Jin, Yu; Ma, Yinghua; Chen, Yajun

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the cross-sectional associations between dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in Chinese children. A total of 234 Chinese schoolchildren aged 8-11 years in Guangdong participated in the study. Dietary intake was assessed via a 3-day dietary record. Seven established cardiovascular indicators were analyzed in this study: fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure. Higher dietary GI was significantly associated with higher TG levels (P = 0.037) and lower HDL-C levels (P = 0.005) after adjusting for age, sex, nutritional intake, physical activity, and body mass index z score. LDL-C was found to differ across tertiles of dietary GL. The middle tertile tended to show the highest level of LDL-C. TC, FPG, and blood pressure were independent of both dietary GI and GL. Our findings suggest that higher dietary GI is differentially associated with some CVD risk factors, including lower HDL-C and higher TG, in school-aged children from south China.

  18. Should glycemic index and glycemic load be considered in dietary recommendations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare-Bruun, Helle; Nielsen, Birgit M; Grau, Katrine; Oxlund, Anne L; Heitmann, Berit L

    2008-10-01

    High glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) have been proposed to be associated with increased risk of lifestyle diseases. Since protein intake varies little in humans, adherence to the common recommendation to reduce fat intake probably leads to increases in carbohydrate intake, which emphasizes the need to investigate the effects of carbohydrate on diet-related conditions and diseases. This review examines the epidemiological literature linking GI and GL to heart disease, insulin sensitivity, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, and obesity among initially healthy people. The evidence for associations between GI and particularly GL and health among free-living populations is mixed. Only the positive association between GI and development of type 2 diabetes was consistent across cross-sectional and longitudinal studies for both sexes. Low GI/GL may protect against heart disease in women, and cross-sectional studies indicate low GI/GL may reduce high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels in both sexes. Based on the evidence found in this review, it seems premature to include GI/GL in dietary recommendations.

  19. Dietary Glycemic Index, Dietary Glycemic Load, Blood Lipids, and Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Denova-Gutiérrez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine the associations of dietary glycemic index (GI and dietary glycemic load (GL with blood lipid concentrations and coronary heart disease (CHD in nondiabetic participants in the Health Worker Cohort Study (HWCS. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional analysis was performed, using data from adults who participated in the HWCS baseline assessment. We collected information on participants' socio-demographic conditions, dietary patterns and physical activity via self-administered questionnaires. Dietary GI and dietary GL were measured using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Anthropometric and clinical measurements were assessed with standardized procedures. CHD risk was estimated according to the sex-specific Framingham prediction algorithms. Results. IIn the 5,830 individuals aged 20 to 70 who were evaluated, dietary GI and GL were significantly associated with HDL-C, LDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C ratio, and triglycerides serum levels. Subjects with high dietary GI have a relative risk of 1.56 (CI 95%; 1.13–2.14, and those with high dietary GL have a relative risk of 2.64 (CI 95%; 1.15–6.58 of having an elevated CHD risk than those who had low dietary GI and GL. Conclusions. Our results suggest that high dietary GI and dietary GL could have an unfavorable effect on serum lipid levels, which are in turn associated with a higher CHD risk.

  20. [Glycemic, insulinemic index, glycemic load of soy beverage with low and high content of carbohydrates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres y Torres, Nimbe; Palacios-González, Berenice; Noriega-López, Lilia; Tovar-Palacio, Armando R

    2006-01-01

    Consumption of soy has increased in Western countries due to the benefits on health and the attitude of the people to consume natural products as alternative to the use of pharmacological therapies. However, there is no evidence whether the consumption of 25 g of soy protein as recommended by the Food and Drug Administration has some effect on glucose absorption and consequently on insulin secretion. The aim of the present study was to determine glycemic index (GI), insulinemic index (InIn), and glycemic load (GL) of several soy beverages containing low or high concentration of carbohydrates, and compare them with other foods such as peanuts, whole milk, soluble fiber and a mixed meal on GI and InIn. The results showed that soy beverages had low or moderate GI, depending of the presence of other compounds like carbohydrates and fiber. Consumption of soy beverages with low concentration of carbohydrates produced the lowest insulin secretion. Therefore, these products can be recommended in obese and diabetic patients. Finally soy beverages should contain low maltodextrins concentration and be added of soluble fiber.

  1. [The glycemic index of some foods common in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frati-Munari, A C; Roca-Vides, R A; López-Pérez, R J; de Vivero, I; Ruiz-Velazco, M

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the increase of glycemia due to the ingestion of usual food in Mexico, portions with 50 g of carbohydrate form white corn tortilla, yellow corn tortilla, spaghetti, rice, potatoes, beans brown and black, nopal (prickle pear cactus) and peanuts, compared with white bread, were given to 21 healthy and 27 non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects. Serum glucose and insulin were measured every 30 min for 180 min long. Glycemic index was obtained as: (area under curve of glucose with test food/area under curve of glucose with white bread) X 100. A corrected index was calculated subtracting the area corresponding to initial values. Insulin index was obtained similarly. Each sample was studied 14-18 times. Glycemic and insulin indexes of white and yellow corn tortilla, spaghetti, rice and potatoes were not different from bread (P greater than 0.05). Corrected glycemic indexes of brown beans (54 +/- 15, +/- SE) and black beans (43 +/- 17) were low (p less than 0.05), as well as corrected insulin indexes (69 +/- 11 and 64 +/- 10 respectively, (P less than 0.02). Peanuts had low glycemic (33 +/- 17, P less than 0.01), but normal insulin index. Nopal had very low glycemic and insulin indexes (10 +/- 17 and 10 +/- 16, P less than 0.0001). These data might be useful in prescribing diets for diabetic subjects.

  2. Trees, Tight-Spans and Point Configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Herrmann, Sven

    2011-01-01

    Tight-spans of metrics were first introduced by Isbell in 1964 and rediscovered and studied by others, most notably by Dress who gave them this name. Subsequently, it was found that tight-spans could be defined for more general maps, such as directed metrics and distances, and more recently for diversities. In this paper, we show that all of these tight-spans can be defined in terms of point configurations. This provides a useful way in which to study these objects in a unified and systematic way. We also show that by using point configurations we can recover results concerning one-dimensional tight-spans for all of the maps we consider, as well as extend these and other results to more general maps such as symmetric and unsymmetric maps.

  3. Lifting scheme of symmetric tight wavelets frames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANG BoJin; YUAN WeiTao; PENG LiZhong

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a method to realize the lifting scheme of tight frame wavelet filters. As for 4-channel tight frame wavelet filter, the tight frame transforms' ma-trix is 2×4, but the lifting scheme transforms' matrix must be 4×4. And in the case of 3-channel tight frame wavelet filter, the transforms' matrix is 2×3, but the lifting scheme transforms' matrix must be 3×3. In order to solve this problem, we intro-duce two concepts: transferred polyphase matrix for 4-channel filters and trans-ferred unitary matrix for 3-channel filters. The transferred polyphase matrix is sym-metric/antisymmetric. Thus, we use this advantage to realize the lifting scheme.

  4. Advanced Hydraulic Fracturing Technology for Unconventional Tight Gas Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Holditch; A. Daniel Hill; D. Zhu

    2007-06-19

    The objectives of this project are to develop and test new techniques for creating extensive, conductive hydraulic fractures in unconventional tight gas reservoirs by statistically assessing the productivity achieved in hundreds of field treatments with a variety of current fracturing practices ranging from 'water fracs' to conventional gel fracture treatments; by laboratory measurements of the conductivity created with high rate proppant fracturing using an entirely new conductivity test - the 'dynamic fracture conductivity test'; and by developing design models to implement the optimal fracture treatments determined from the field assessment and the laboratory measurements. One of the tasks of this project is to create an 'advisor' or expert system for completion, production and stimulation of tight gas reservoirs. A central part of this study is an extensive survey of the productivity of hundreds of tight gas wells that have been hydraulically fractured. We have been doing an extensive literature search of the SPE eLibrary, DOE, Gas Technology Institute (GTI), Bureau of Economic Geology and IHS Energy, for publicly available technical reports about procedures of drilling, completion and production of the tight gas wells. We have downloaded numerous papers and read and summarized the information to build a database that will contain field treatment data, organized by geographic location, and hydraulic fracture treatment design data, organized by the treatment type. We have conducted experimental study on 'dynamic fracture conductivity' created when proppant slurries are pumped into hydraulic fractures in tight gas sands. Unlike conventional fracture conductivity tests in which proppant is loaded into the fracture artificially; we pump proppant/frac fluid slurries into a fracture cell, dynamically placing the proppant just as it occurs in the field. From such tests, we expect to gain new insights into some of the critical

  5. Expansion of Frames to Tight Frames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Feng LI; Wen Chang SUN

    2009-01-01

    We show that every Bessel sequence (and therefore every frame) in a separable Hilbert space can be expanded to a tight frame by adding some elements. The proof is based on a recent generalization of the frame concept, the g-frame, which illustrates that g-frames could be useful in the study of frame theory. As an application, we prove that any Gabor frame can be expanded to a tight frame by adding one window function.

  6. Tightness of the thermal envelope of office and educational buildings; Klimaskaermens taethed i kontor- og undervisningsbygninger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergsoee, N.C. (SBi, Aalborg (Denmark)); Radisch, N.H.; Nickel, J.; Treldal, J. (Ramboell Danmark A/S, Koebenhavn (Denmark)); Bundesen, E.W.; Nielsen, Carsten (DanEjendomme, Hellerup (Denmark))

    2011-07-01

    In 2006 tightening of the energy regulations in the Danish Building Regulations were introduced including requirements regarding the tightness of the building envelope. The requirements are, with minor changes, continued in the current Building Regulations, BR10. During the past few years experience has been gained regarding both the actual execution of air tightness measurements and solutions that will lead to more air tight building envelopes. Experiences, however, are primarily related to single family houses. The report presents results of measurements in large buildings and discusses reasons for lack of knowledge and experience on the tightness of the building envelope in large buildings. Apparently, there is a need for dissemination of knowledge on the importance of a tight building envelope both in terms of energy consumption and indoor climate and in terms of the difficulties and costs associated with repairing leaks in a completed envelope. Air tightness must be brought into focus at an early stage in the planning process, and during the construction phase air tightness measurements should be performed, e.g. on facade sections or in parts of the building. The project team has attended a number of measurements in large buildings and further gained access to results of a large number of measurements. In summary, the results show that it is possible to achieve the required tightness, and in most buildings the results are better than the requirement of a maximum of 1.5 l/s per m{sub 2}. (Author)

  7. Effect of glycemic control on periodontitis in type 2 diabetic patients with periodontal disease

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims/Introduction Diabetes mellitus and periodontitis are closely related. A huge number of reports has addressed the effect of periodontal intervention therapy on glycemic control, but no reports have addressed the effect of glycemic intervention therapy on periodontal disease in type 2 diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of improved glycemic control by glycemic intervention therapy on periodontitis in type 2 diabetic patients. Materials and Methods A ...

  8. The relation between leisure activities and glycemic levels from deaf adults

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The aim has been to check the association among leisure activities and glycemic levels from deaf adults. Transversal study made with 36 deaf adults in an Audiocomunicação school, making use of a semi-structured questionnaire. Chi-square, Fisher and Contingency Coefficient tests were made. Unfed capillary glycemic average showed up close to values considered usual, however, there are participants with risky glycemic level. Participants with altered glycemic levels totalized 11,1%. We checked a...

  9. Glycemic Control for Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-peng XIAO; Juan CHEN

    2009-01-01

    @@ The risk of myocardial infarction increases in patients with diabetes mellitus. The incidence of myocardial in-farction is similar in patients with type 2 diabetes without history of myocardial infarction and in non-diabetic pa-tients with history of myocardial infarction. Diabetes mellitus was considered as a coronary disease equivalent by the National Cholesterol Education Program. Strict glycemic control can improve the long-term outcome of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Whatever with diabetic or non-diabetic, strict glycemic control with in-tensive insulin therapy can reduce the mortality of criti-cally ill patients in hospital. After myocardial infarction, there would be a worse outcome for patients with poor glycemic control, whatever in diabetic or non-diabetic patients with stress hyperglycemia.

  10. Glycemic targets in hospital and barriers to attaining them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David B

    2014-04-01

    The importance of glycemic control in hospitalized patients has been a relatively recent revelation. There is somewhat contradictory evidence concerning the optimal glycemic target in critically ill patients. There is only indirect evidence in non-critically ill patients. This article reviews the evidence for glycemic targets in hospitalized patients. It also investigates which hospital-based treatments can act as barriers to attaining optimal blood glucose levels in hospital and system barriers to attaining those optimal levels. The systematic approach to and evaluation of in-hospital diabetes management has a short history. The first large clinical trial, the DIGAMI trial of peri-myocardial infarction insulin therapy, was published in 1995 (1). The first guideline discussion of in-hospital diabetes management occurred briefly in 2003, more fully in 2008 and 2013 (2-4) by the Canadian Diabetes Association; in 2005 and annually since then by the American Diabetes Association (5,6). Recently, there have been many more publications on the topic. A recent PubMed search, limited to the last 5 years, "hospital" and "diabetes" as a Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) major topic, revealed more than 5000 English-language clinical trials (PubMed.gov; accessed 6 Oct 2013). Still, relatively little is certain about appropriate glycemic targets in hospital. This has left us, in 2014, with consensus recommendations only for glycemic targets in non-critically ill patients from both the Canadian Diabetes Association Clinical Practice Guidelines (4) and the American Diabetes Association Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes (6). This article reviews recommended glycemic targets in various in-hospital populations and the barriers to obtaining them.

  11. Fruit and Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Allan Stubbe; Viggers, Lone; Gregersen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Health professionals often advise subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D) to restrict fruit intake. We show here that there is no supportive scientific evidence for this. At least 19 studies have tested intake of fruit on postprandial glucose in T2D. Only two long-term intervention studies have...... investigated the impact of fruit intake on glycemic control in T2D. The studies show that fruit has neutral or positive glycemic effects. By restraining fruit intake, T2D subjects add an additional risk of disease and premature death. Further, there is no evidence to support that fructose contained in fruit...

  12. Dietary glycemic load and glycemic index and risk of cerebrovascular disease in the EPICOR cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Sieri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies on the association of stroke risk to dietary glycemic index (GI and glycemic load (GL have produced contrasting results. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relation of dietary GI and GL to stroke risk in the large EPIC-Italy cohort (EPICOR recruited from widely dispersed geographic areas of Italy. DESIGN: We studied 44099 participants (13,646 men and 30,453 women who completed a dietary questionnaire. Multivariable Cox modeling estimated adjusted hazard ratios (HRs of stroke with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI. Over 11 years of follow-up, 355 stroke cases (195 ischemic and 83 hemorrhagic were identified. RESULTS: Increasing carbohydrate intake was associated with increasing stroke risk (HR = 2.01, 95%CI = 1.04-3.86 highest vs. lowest quintile; p for trend 0.025. Increasing carbohydrate intake from high-GI foods was also significantly associated with increasing stroke risk (HR 1.87, 95%CI = 1.16-3.02 highest vs. lowest, p trend 0.008, while increasing carbohydrate intake from low-GI foods was not. Increasing GL was associated with significantly increasing stroke risk (HR 2.21, 95%CI = 1.16-4.20, highest vs. lowest; p trend 0.015. Dietary carbohydrate from high GI foods was associated with increased both ischemic stroke risk (highest vs. lowest HR 1.92, 95%CI = 1.01-3.66 and hemorrhagic stroke risk (highest vs. lowest HR 3.14, 95%CI = 1.09-9.04. GL was associated with increased both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke risk (HR 1.44, 95%CI = 1.09-1.92 and HR 1.56, 95%CI = 1.01-2.41 respectively, continuous variable. CONCLUSIONS: In this Italian cohort, high dietary GL and carbohydrate from high GI foods consumption increase overall risk of stroke.

  13. Influence of dietary glycemic index and glycemic load on the occurrence of ischemic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Maja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. There are no recommendations for the dietary intake of carbohydrates compared with the dietary intake of lipids in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD. The aim of the study was to assess the influence of high dietary glycemic load (GL on the occurrence of IHD. Methods. The case-control study was carried out between 2003 and 2004. The study group consisted of 290 patients with IHD hospitalized in the Clinical Center in the town of Niš. There were 290 controls admitted to the same medical institution as cases for a wide spectrum of acute conditions unrelated to known or potential risk factors for IHD. The data about risk factors for IHD were collected by the epidemiological questionnaire. The data about nutrition were collected by administered food frequency questionnaire. A total GL for each patient was calculated by the international tables and the standard for the glycemic index (GI was used. Standard anthropometric measurements were applied. A total level of lipids and cholesterol was determined, too. Multivariate odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals were obtained by multiple logistic regression models. Statistical analysis was performed with Epi Info Programme (Version 6.04 and with the SPSS for Windows (Release 8.0. Results. The patients with IHD had statistically significantly different intake of carbohydrate compared with the patients of the control group but the risk of IHD occurrence was not associated with the total intake of carbohydrate. The total average GL in the patients of the study group was statistically significantly higher compared with the patients of the control group (p < 0.05 and a high GL was independent risk factor for IHD (OR = 1.99. Conclusions. In prevention of IHD it is recommended to intake food with lower GI, for example vegetables and fruit.

  14. Discrete Sliding Mode control of small UAS in tight formation flight under information constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Bolting , Jan; Fergani, Soheib; Biannic, Jean-Marc; Defay, François; Stolle, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a new control strategy based on discrete sliding mode control of small Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) in tight formation flight under information constraints. Tight formation flight enables, among other advantages, significant performance benefits due to wake vortex interactions. A discrete robust control strategy based on the sliding mode approach and a leader-follower scheme is proposed to achieve the desired flight performances while assuming realistic informati...

  15. Role of Parenting Style in Achieving Metabolic Control in Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Shorer, Maayan; David, Ravit; Schoenberg-Taz, Michal; Levavi-Lavi, Ifat; Phillip, Moshe; Meyerovitch, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the role of parenting style in achieving metabolic control and treatment adherence in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Parents of 100 adolescents with type 1 diabetes completed assessments of their parenting style and sense of helplessness. Parents and patients rated patient adherence to the treatment regimen. Glycemic control was evaluated by HbA1c values. RESULTS An authoritative paternal parenting style predicted better glycemic control and...

  16. Association between dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, and body mass index in the Inter99 study: is underreporting a problem?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lau, C.; Toft, U.; Tetens, Inge

    2006-01-01

    Background: The few studies examining the potential associations between glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), and body mass index (BMI) have provided no clear pictures. Underreporting of energy intake may be one explanation for this. Objective: We examined the associations between GI, GL......, and BMI by focusing on the confounding factor of total energy intake and the effect of exclusion of low energy reporters (LERs). Design: This was a cross-sectional study of 6334 subjects aged 30 - 60 y. Dietary intake was estimated from a food-frequency questionnaire. GI and GL were estimated by using...

  17. Classifying tight Weyl-Heisenberg frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazsazza, P.; Janssen, A. J. E. M.; Christensen, Ole

    1999-01-01

    A Weyl-Heisenberg frame for L^2(R) is a frame consisting of translates and modulates of a fixed function. In this paper we give necessary and sufficient conditions for this family to form a tight WH-frame. This allows us to write down explicitly all functions g for which all translates and modula......A Weyl-Heisenberg frame for L^2(R) is a frame consisting of translates and modulates of a fixed function. In this paper we give necessary and sufficient conditions for this family to form a tight WH-frame. This allows us to write down explicitly all functions g for which all translates...

  18. Topological games and productively countably tight spaces

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The two main results of this work are the following: if a space $X$ is such that player II has a winning strategy in the game $\\gone(\\Omega_x, \\Omega_x)$ for every $x \\in X$, then $X$ is productively countably tight. On the other hand, if a space is productively countably tight, then $\\sone(\\Omega_x, \\Omega_x)$ holds for every $x \\in X$. With these results, several other results follow, using some characterizations made by Uspenskii and Scheepers.

  19. Adiposity and Glycemic Control in Children Exposed to Perfluorinated Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, Clara Amalie G.; Rossing, Laura I.; Grontved, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Our objective was to explore whether childhood exposure to perfluorinated and polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs), widely used stain- and grease-repellent chemicals, is associated with adiposity and markers of glycemic control. Materials and Methods: Body mass index, skinfold thickness, w...

  20. Dietary glycemic index, glycemic load and incidence of type 2 diabetes in Japanese men and women: the Japan public health center-based prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background Japanese diets contain a relatively high amount of carbohydrates, and its high dietary glycemic index and glycemic load may raise the risk of diabetes in the Japanese population. The current study evaluated the associations between the dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, and the risk of type 2 diabetes in a population based cohort in Japan. Methods We observed 27,769 men and 36,864 women (45–75 y) who participated in the second survey of the Japan Public Health Center-based Pros...

  1. Utility of different glycemic control metrics for optimizingmanagement of diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Klaus-Dieter Kohnert; Peter Heinke; Lutz Vogt; Eckhard Salzsieder

    2015-01-01

    The benchmark for assessing quality of long-termglycemic control and adjustment of therapy is currentlyglycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Despite its importanceas an indicator for the development of diabeticcomplications, recent studies have revealed that thismetric has some limitations; it conveys a rather complexmessage, which has to be taken into considerationfor diabetes screening and treatment. On the basis ofrecent clinical trials, the relationship between HbA1cand cardiovascular outcomes in long-standing diabeteshas been called into question. It becomes obvious thatother surrogate and biomarkers are needed to betterpredict cardiovascular diabetes complications and assessefficiency of therapy. Glycated albumin, fructosamin,and 1,5-anhydroglucitol have received growing interestas alternative markers of glycemic control. In additionto measures of hyperglycemia, advanced glucosemonitoring methods became available. An indispensibleadjunct to HbA1c in routine diabetes care is selfmonitoringof blood glucose. This monitoring methodis now widely used, as it provides immediate feedbackto patients on short-term changes, involving fasting,preprandial, and postprandial glucose levels. Beyondthe traditional metrics, glycemic variability has beenidentified as a predictor of hypoglycemia, and it mightalso be implicated in the pathogenesis of vasculardiabetes complications. Assessment of glycemicvariability is thus important, but exact quantificationrequires frequently sampled glucose measurements. Inorder to optimize diabetes treatment, there is a needfor both key metrics of glycemic control on a day-to-daybasis and for more advanced, user-friendly monitoringmethods. In addition to traditional discontinuous glucosetesting, continuous glucose sensing has become auseful tool to reveal insufficient glycemic management.This new technology is particularly effective in patientswith complicated diabetes and provides the opportunityto characterize glucose dynamics. Several

  2. The relation between leisure activities and glycemic levels from deaf adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inacia Sátiro Xavier de França

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim has been to check the association among leisure activities and glycemic levels from deaf adults. Transversal study made with 36 deaf adults in an Audiocomunicação school, making use of a semi-structured questionnaire. Chi-square, Fisher and Contingency Coefficient tests were made. Unfed capillary glycemic average showed up close to values considered usual, however, there are participants with risky glycemic level. Participants with altered glycemic levels totalized 11,1%. We checked association among deaf glycemic people having leisure activities, go shopping (p=0,034 and visiting relatives (p=0,012. Leisure activities may have influence over glycemic levels of deaf people, and nurses are supposed to consider stimuli and orientation of leisure activities in nurse processes, as a potential intervention to promote health of those people, and prevent implications caused by altered glycemic levels.

  3. Dipeptidyl-Peptidase IV inhibitors and glycemic control in type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokendra Bahadur Sapkota

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a progressive disease, characterized by insulin resistance, impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion, inappropriately elevated glucagon concentrations, and hyperglycemia. Many patients cannot obtain satisfactory glycemic control with current therapies. New and more effective agents, targeted not only at treatment, but also at prevention of the disease, its progression, and its associated complications, are, therefore, required. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors are a newer class of oral drugs for the treatment of T2DM. They inhibit the breakdown of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP thereby increasing the incretin effect in patients with T2DM. In clinical practice they are associated with significant reductions in HbA1c, no weight gain and a low risk of hypoglycemia. Since incretin response is markedly diminished in Asian populations, these agents can be used to achieve satisfactory glycemic control in Nepalese T2DM patients.JCMS Nepal. 2016;12(1:28-32.

  4. Moderate Glucose Control Is Associated With Increased Mortality Compared With Tight Glucose Control in Critically Ill Patients Without Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshberg, Eliotte L.; Phillips, Gregory D.; Holmen, John; Stoddard, Gregory; Orme, James

    2013-01-01

    Background: Optimal glucose management in the ICU remains unclear. In 2009, many clinicians at Intermountain Healthcare selected a moderate glucose control (90-140 mg/dL) instead of tight glucose control (80-110 mg/dL). We hypothesized that moderate glucose control would affect patients with and without preexisting diabetes differently. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of all patients treated with eProtocol-insulin from November 2006 to March 2011, stratifying for diabetes. We performed multivariate logistic regression for 30-day mortality with covariates of age, modified APACHE (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation) II score, Charlson Comorbidity score, and target glucose. Results: We studied 3,529 patients in 12 different ICUs in eight different hospitals. Patients with diabetes had higher mean glucose (132 mg/dL vs 124 mg/dL) and greater glycemic variability (SD = 41 mg/dL vs 29 mg/dL) than did patients without diabetes (P < .01 for both comparisons). Tight glucose control was associated with increased frequency of moderate and severe hypoglycemia (30.3% and 3.6%) compared with moderate glucose control (14.3% and 2.0%, P < .01 for both). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the moderate glucose target was independently associated with increased risk of mortality in patients without diabetes (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.01-1.84; P = .05) but decreased risk of mortality in patients with diabetes (OR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.45-0.93; P = .01). Conclusions: Moderate glucose control (90-140 mg/dL) may confer greater mortality in critically ill patients without diabetes compared with tight glucose control (80-110 mg/dL). A single glucose target does not appear optimal for all critically ill patients. These data have important implications for the design of future interventional trials as well as for the glycemic management of critically ill patients. PMID:23238456

  5. Impact of Air Tightness on the Evaluation of Building Energy Performance in Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Šadauskienė

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to fulfil the European Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD requirements for the reduction of energy consumption, European national requirements have been created for building envelope thermal properties and calculation methodology to determine if building energy efficiency is created. This is however not true in all methodologies. The necessity of building air tightness appears only for new A class buildings, and there are no requirements for air tightness for other building classes. Therefore, the aim of this work is to improve the methodology for the calculation of energy efficiency of buildings, while taking into account the air tightness of the buildings. In order to achieve this aim, the sum energy consumption of investigated buildings was calculated, energy efficiency classes were determined, air tightness of the buildings was measured, and reasons for insufficient air tightness were analyzed. Investigation results show that the average value of air tightness of A energy efficiency class buildings is 0.6 h−1. The results of other investigated buildings, corresponding to B and C energy efficiency classes, show insufficient air tightness (the average n50 value is 6 h−1; herewith, energy consumption for heating is higher than calculated, according to the energy efficiency methodology. This paper provides an energy performance evaluation scheme, under which performed evaluation of energy performance of buildings ensures high quality construction work, building durability, and the reliability of heat-loss calculations.

  6. Approaches to reduce the glycemic response of gluten-free products: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capriles, V D; Arêas, J A G

    2016-03-01

    This article aims to discuss the current approaches used to reduce the postprandial glycemic response (GR) of starchy gluten-free products (GFP) and to provide some further prospects. The GR is evaluated through in vivo trials to determine the glycemic index (GI) and the glycemic load (GL) of foods or using the in vitro starch digestibility method to predict the GI. The reviewed studies demonstrated that a reduction in the GR of GFP can be achieved by replacing traditionally used refined flours and starches with nutrient-dense alternative raw materials due to an increase in dietary fiber, resistant starch and protein contents, which can alter the rate of starch digestion, reduce the GI and dilute the amount of available carbohydrate; both the factors contribute to reduce the GL. The addition of viscous dietary fibers could also be a successful way to reduce the GR of GFP. Some studies have demonstrated the potential of germination of GF grains and sourdough fermentation in decreasing the GR of GF bread. Further studies could evaluate alternative GF flours, soluble fibers, resistant starch, and other formulation factors that may affect the GR of different types of GFP. New studies should be performed to test and optimize processing methods by considering the reduction of GR of GFP. Another key aspect for further investigation is the confirmation of the promising results obtained through in vitro assays by in vivo GI evaluation.

  7. Tight adversary bounds for composite functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoyer, P.; Spalek, R.

    2005-01-01

    The quantum adversary method is a very versatile method for proving lower bounds on quantum algorithms. It has many equivalent formulations, yields tight bounds for many computational problems, and has natural connections to classical lower bounds. One of its formulations is in terms of the spectral

  8. A Tight Bound for the Lamplighter Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Ganapathy, Murali K.; Tetali, Prasad

    2006-01-01

    We settle an open problem, raised by Y. Peres and D. Revelle, concerning the $L^2$ mixing time of the random walk on the lamplighter graph. We also provide general bounds relating the entropy decay of a Markov chain to the separation distance of the chain, and show that the lamplighter graphs once again provide examples of tightness of our results.

  9. Vitamin D Daily short-term Supplementation does not Affect Glycemic Outcomes of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysostomou, Stavri

    2017-01-27

    There is currently insufficient evidence of a beneficial effect to recommend vitamin D supplementation for optimizing glycemic status in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Taking into consideration the significant extra-skeletal effect of vitamin D on pancreatic β-cell function and insulin secretion and the large number of scientific evidence supporting the inverse association between vitamin D status and hyperglycemia, this review article aims to examine whether vitamin D supplementation therapies are beneficial to patients with T2DM considering specific factors through randomized controlled trials (RCTs). EBSCOhost and Medline databases were searched from the beginning of 2009 until the end of 2014 for RCTs in patients with T2DM. Parameters, such as baseline vitamin D levels, frequency/dosage of supplementation, length of the study and type of supplementation, were independently assessed, based on their effect on glycemic status. Although all different types of supplementation were safe and effective in the achievement of vitamin D sufficiency in a dose-dependent way, the impact on glycemic status was different. 14 RCTs were included with daily supplementations ranging from 400-11.200 IU/daily, 40.000-50.000 IU/weekly and 100.000-300.000 IU/intramuscularly or once given, for a period from 8 to 24 weeks. Daily supplementation of vitamin D (up to 11.200 IU) showed no effect, whereas combined supplementation, with calcium (≥300 mg), and with vitamin D doses similar to the RDA, showed positive effects. Additionally, high weekly doses of vitamin D (40.000-50.000 IU) were effective on glycemic outcomes but available data are limited.

  10. Management of diabetes mellitus in individuals with chronic kidney disease: therapeutic perspectives and glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betônico, Carolina C R; Titan, Silvia M O; Correa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia C; Nery, Márcia; Queiroz, Márcia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic options for diabetes treatment and their potential side effects, in addition to analyzing the risks and benefits of tight glycemic control in patients with diabetic kidney disease. For this review, a search was performed using several pre-defined keyword combinations and their equivalents: "diabetes kidney disease" and "renal failure" in combination with "diabetes treatment" and "oral antidiabetic drugs" or "oral hypoglycemic agents." The search was performed in PubMed, Endocrine Abstracts and the Cochrane Library from January 1980 up to January 2015. Diabetes treatment in patients with diabetic kidney disease is challenging, in part because of progression of renal failure-related changes in insulin signaling, glucose transport and metabolism, favoring both hyperglycemic peaks and hypoglycemia. Additionally, the decline in renal function impairs the clearance and metabolism of antidiabetic agents and insulin, frequently requiring reassessment of prescriptions. The management of hyperglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease is even more difficult, requiring adjustment of antidiabetic agents and insulin doses. The health team responsible for the follow-up of these patients should be vigilant and prepared to make such changes; however, unfortunately, there are few guidelines addressing the nuances of the management of this specific population.

  11. An Objective Measure of Noseband Tightness and Its Measurement Using a Novel Digital Tightness Gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Noseband tightness is difficult to assess in horses participating in equestrian sports such as dressage, show jumping and three-day-eventing. There is growing concern that nosebands are commonly tightened to such an extent as to restrict normal equine behaviour and possibly cause injury. In the absence of a clear agreed definition of noseband tightness, a simple model of the equine nose-noseband interface environment was developed in order to guide further studies in this area. The normal force component of the noseband tensile force was identified as the key contributor to sub-noseband tissue compression. The model was used to inform the design of a digital tightness gauge which could reliably measure the normal force component of the noseband tensile force. A digital tightness gauge was developed to measure this parameter under nosebands fitted to bridled horses. Results are presented for field tests using two prototype designs. Prototype version three was used in field trial 1 (n = 15, frontal nasal plane sub-noseband site). Results of this trial were used to develop an ergonomically designed prototype, version 4, which was tested in a second field trial (n = 12, frontal nasal plane and lateral sub-noseband site). Nosebands were set to three tightness settings in each trial as judged by a single rater using an International Society for Equitation Science (ISES) taper gauge. Normal forces in the range 7–95 N were recorded at the frontal nasal plane while a lower range 1–28 N was found at the lateral site for the taper gauge range used in the trials. The digital tightness gauge was found to be simple to use, reliable, and safe and its use did not agitate the animals in any discernable way. A simple six point tightness scale is suggested to aid regulation implementation and the control of noseband tightness using normal force measurement as the objective tightness discriminant. PMID:28045955

  12. Glycemic index, glycemic load, dietary carbohydrate, and dietary fiber intake and risk of liver and biliary tract cancers in Western Europeans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedirko, V.; Lukanova, A.; Bamia, C.; Trichopolou, A.; Trepo, E.; Noethlings, U.; Schlesinger, S.; Aleksandrova, K.; Boffetta, P.; Tjonneland, A.; Johnsen, N. F.; Overvad, K.; Fagherazzi, G.; Racine, A.; Boutron-Ruault, M. C.; Grote, V.; Kaaks, R.; Boeing, H.; Naska, A.; Adarakis, G.; Valanou, E.; Palli, D.; Sieri, S.; Tumino, R.; Vineis, P.; Panico, S.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B(as).; Siersema, P. D.; Peeters, P. H.; Weiderpass, E.; Skeie, G.; Engeset, D.; Quiros, J. R.; Zamora-Ros, R.; Sanchez, M.J.; Amiano, P.; Huerta, J. M.; Barricarte, A.; Johansen, D.; Lindkvist, B.; Sund, M.; Crowe, F.; Khaw, K. T.; Ferrari, P.; Romieu, I.; Chuang, S. C.; Riboli, E.; Jenab, M.; Werner, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    The type and quantity of dietary carbohydrate as quantified by glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL), and dietary fiber may influence the risk of liver and biliary tract cancers, but convincing evidence is lacking. The association between dietary GI/GL and carbohydrate intake with hepatocellula

  13. Glycemic index and glycemic load in relation to food and nutrient intake and metabolic risk factors in a Dutch population 1-3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, H.; A, van der D.L.; Bakel, van M.M.E.; Kallen, van der C.J.H.; Blaak, E.E.; Greevenbroek, van M.M.J.; Jansen, E.H.J.M.; Nijpels, Giel; Stehouwer, C.D.A.; Dekker, J.M.; Feskens, E.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Previous studies on the glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) reported inconsistent findings on their association with metabolic risk factors. This may partly have been due to differences in underlying dietary patterns. Objective: We aimed to examine the association of GI and GL wit

  14. Dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, and digestible carbohydrate intake are not associated with risk op type 2 diabetes in eight European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, van der I.; Beulens, J.W.J.; Schouw, van der Y.T.; Buckland, G.; Kuijsten, A.; Schulze, M.B.; Amiano, P.; Ardanaz, E.; Balkau, B.; Boeing, H.; Gavrila, D.; Feskens, E.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    The association of glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) with the risk of type 2 diabetes remains unclear. We investigated associations of dietary GI, GL, and digestible carbohydrate with incident type 2 diabetes. We performed a case-cohort study nested within the European Prospective Investiga

  15. Dietary Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, and Digestible Carbohydrate Intake Are Not Associated with Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Eight European Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, Ivonne; Beulens, Joline W. J.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; van der A, Daphne L.; Buckland, Genevieve; Kuijsten, Anneleen; Schulze, Matthias B.; Amiano, Pilar; Ardanaz, Eva; Balkau, Beverley; Boeing, Heiner; Gavrila, Diana; Grote, Verena A.; Key, Timothy J.; Li, Kuanrong; Nilsson, Peter; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Quiros, J. R.; Rolandsson, Olov; Roswall, Nina; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Sieri, Sabina; Slimani, Nadia; Spijkerman, Annemieke M. W.; Tjonneland, Anne; Tumino, Rosario; Sharp, Stephen J.; Langenberg, Claudia; Feskens, Edith J. M.; Forouhi, Nita G.; Riboli, Elio; Wareham, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    The association of glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) with the risk of type 2 diabetes remains unclear. We investigated associations of dietary GI, GL, and digestible carbohydrate with incident type 2 diabetes. We performed a case-cohort study nested within the European Prospective Investiga

  16. In vitro starch digestibility and expected glycemic index of pound cakes baked in two-cycle microwave-toaster and conventional oven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-zaragoza, Francisco J; Sánchez-Pardo, María E; Ortiz-Moreno, Alicia; Bello-Pérez, Luis A

    2010-11-01

    Bread baking technology has an important effect on starch digestibility measured as its predicted glycemic index tested in vitro. The aim of this work was to evaluate the changes in predicted glycemic index of pound cake baked in a two-cycle microwave toaster and a conventional oven. The glycemic index was calculated from hydrolysis index values by the Granfeldt method. Non-significant differences (P > 0.05) were found in hydrolysis index (60.67 ± 3.96 for the product baked in microwave oven and 65.94 ± 4.09 for the product baked in conventional oven) and predicted glycemic index content (60.5 for product baked in microwave oven and 65 for the product baked in conventional oven) in freshly-baked samples. Results clearly demonstrate that the baking pound cake conventional process could be replicated using a two-cycle multifunction microwave oven, reducing the traditional baking time. Further research is required in order to achieve pound cake crumb uniformity.

  17. Tight-binding treatment of conjugated polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Thomas Bastholm

    This PhD thesis concerns conjugated polymers which constitute a constantly growing research area. Today, among other things, conjugated polymers play a role in plastic based solar cells, photodetectors and light emitting diodes, and even today such plastic-based components constitute an alternative...... of tomorrow. This thesis specifically treats the three conjugated polymers trans-polyacetylene (tPA), poly(para-phenylene) (PPP) and poly(para-phe\\-nylene vinylene) (PPV). The present results, which are derived within the tight-binding model, are divided into two parts. In one part, analytic results...... are derived for the optical properties of the polymers expressed in terms of the optical susceptibility both in the presence and in the absence of a static electric field. In the other part, the cumputationally efficient Density Functional-based Tight-Binding (DFTB) model is applied to the description...

  18. Slowly digestible starch: concept, mechanism, and proposed extended glycemic index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Genyi; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2009-11-01

    Starch is the major glycemic carbohydrate in foods, and its nutritional property is related to its rate and extent of digestion and absorption in the small intestine. A classification of starch into rapidly digestible starch (RDS), slowly digestible starch (SDS), and resistant starch (RS) based on the in vitro Englyst test is used to specify the nutritional quality of starch. Both the RDS and RS fractions have been extensively studied while there are only limited studies on the intermediate starch fraction of SDS, particularly regarding its structural basis and slow digestion mechanism. The current understanding of SDS including its concept, measurement method, structural basis and mechanism, physiological consequences, and approaches to make SDS is reviewed. An in vivo method of extended glycemic index (EGI) is proposed to evaluate its metabolic effect and related health consequences.

  19. Optimizing glycemic control and minimizing the risk of hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley S Schwartz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications arise from hyperglycemia, presenting an increasing healthcare burden as the diabetic population continues to grow. Clinical trial evidence indicates that antihyperglycemic medications are beneficial with regard to microvascular disease (retinopathy, renal impairment, and perhaps neuropathy; however, the benefit of aggressive use of these medications with regard to cardiovascular risk has been less clear in recent studies. These studies were confounded by the propensity of the antihyperglycemic medications involved to cause hypoglycemia, which itself presents cardiovascular risk. This article presents additional context for these seemingly discordant results and maintains that the achievement of glycemic targets is warranted in most patients and provides cardiovascular benefit, provided that hypoglycemia is avoided and the treatment regimen is tailored to the needs of the individual patient. A treatment approach that is driven by these principles and emphasizes diet and exercise, a combination of noninsulin antidiabetic agents, not including sulfonylureas and glinides, and judicious use of insulin is also presented.

  20. Sleep and glycemic control in type 1 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Barone,Mark Thomaz Ugliara; Wey,Daniela; Schorr, Fabiola; Franco,Denise Reis; Carra, Mario Kehdi; LORENZI FILHO,GERALDO; Menna-Barreto,Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our aim in the present study was to elucidate how type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and sleep parameters interact, which was rarely evaluated up to the moment. Materials and methods Eighteen T1DM subjects without chronic complications, and 9 control subjects, matched for age and BMI, were studied. The following instruments used to evaluate sleep: the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, sleep diaries, actimeters, and polysomnography in a Sleep Lab. Glycemic control in T1DM individuals was evalua...

  1. Glycemic response of mashed potato containing high-viscocity hydroxypropylmethylcellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightowler, Helen J; Henry, C Jeya K

    2009-08-01

    Potatoes generally have one of the highest glycemic index values of any food. Relatively small differences in the glycemic response (GR) of regularly consumed starch foods have shown beneficial effects on health. Lowering the GR of a potato-based meal has potentially wide-reaching health benefits. High-viscosity hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HV-HPMC) is a modified cellulose dietary fiber extensively used in the food industry. We hypothesized that the GR of a high-glycemic index product such as mashed potato would be lower with the addition of HV-HPMC. In a nonblind, randomized, repeat-measure, crossover controlled trial, 15 healthy adults consumed portions of mashed potato with different doses (0%, 1%, 2%, and 4%) of a specially selected and optimized HV-HPMC and a reference food (glucose) on separate occasions. Five subjects were excluded from the final analysis due to noncompliance with study procedures. Capillary blood glucose was measured in fasted subjects and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after starting to eat. For each sample, the incremental area under the blood glucose response curve was calculated and the GR determined. There was a significant lowering effect of HV-HPMC on GR (P < .001) of mashed potato. Glycemic responses for all mashed potato samples with the HV-HPMC were significantly lower than the standard mashed potato: 1% level (P < .05), 2% level (P < .05), and 4% level (P < .05). However, there was no significant effect of the HV-HPMC dose on GR. We conclude that addition of select HV-HPMC to mashed potato blunts GR.

  2. Glycemic Index and Pregnancy: A Systematic Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aim. Dietary glycemic index (GI) has received considerable research interest over the past 25 years although its application to pregnancy outcomes is more recent. This paper critically evaluates the current evidence regarding the effect of dietary GI on maternal and fetal nutrition. Methods. A systematic literature search using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, SCOPUS, and ISI Web of Science, from 1980 through September 2010, was conducted. Results. Eight studies were incl...

  3. Glycemic control in diabetes in three Danish counties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lone G M; Petersen, Per Hyltoft; Heickendorff, Lene;

    2005-01-01

    monitoring of diabetes using HbA1c-DCCT aligned was initiated in 2001. We estimated the incidence of monitored patients in the population. The progress in patients with originally diabetic HbA1c levels was investigated by cumulative probability plots, and the individual trend in clinical outcome...... percentage above the treatment target (>or=6.62% HbA1c) was 51% in 2003 compared to 59% in 2001, and the percentage with poor glycemic control (>or=10.0% HbA1c) was reduced from 19% to 4%. Of patients with originally diabetic HbA1c levels, 15% showed progress in glycemic control, and 28% reached treatment...... targets. In patients with originally normal HbA1c, 75% showed an upward trend in HbA1c levels, which reached diabetic concentrations in 17%. CONCLUSION: Patients with diabetic first HbA1c concentrations (>or=6.62% HbA1c) showed on average 15% improved glycemic control in the first year. Further...

  4. Effects of a pharmaceutical care model on medication adherence and glycemic control of people with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung WW

    2014-09-01

    provision of PC, with a higher proportion in the intervention group than in the control group achieving it (75.0% versus 58.7%; P=0.007. Conclusion: The provision of PC has positive effects on medication adherence as well as the glycemic control of people with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, the PC model used in this study should be duplicated in other health care settings for the benefit of more patients with type 2 diabetes. Keywords: pharmaceutical care, medication adherence, glycemic control, type 2 diabetes mellitus 

  5. Measurement and Visualization of Tight Rock Exposed to CO2 Using NMR Relaxometry and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haitao; Lun, Zengmin; Lv, Chengyuan; Lang, Dongjiang; Ji, Bingyu; Luo, Ming; Pan, Weiyi; Wang, Rui; Gong, Kai

    2017-03-01

    Understanding mechanisms of oil mobilization of tight matrix during CO2 injection is crucial for CO2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration engineering design. In this study exposure behavior between CO2 and tight rock of the Ordos Basin has been studied experimentally by using nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time (NMR T2) spectrum and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) under the reservoir pressure and temperature. Quantitative analysis of recovery at the pore scale and visualization of oil mobilization are achieved. Effects of CO2 injection, exposure times and pressure on recovery performance have been investigated. The experimental results indicate that oil in all pores can be gradually mobilized to the surface of rock by CO2 injection. Oil mobilization in tight rock is time-consuming while oil on the surface of tight rock can be mobilized easily. CO2 injection can effectively mobilize oil in all pores of tight rock, especially big size pores. This understanding of process of matrix exposed to CO2 could support the CO2 EOR in tight reservoirs.

  6. Significance of intensive glycemic control on early diabetic nephropathy patients with microalbuminuria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the therapeutic effect of intensive glycemic control on patients with early diabetic nephropathy. Methods A total of 41 type 2 diabetes patients who developed microalbuminuria were divided into two groups randomly. Patients in Group A received intensive glycemic control and the blood glucose in Group B was regularly controlled. Glycemic monitoring and control were followed for 12 weeks to observe the changes of microalbuminuria in both groups; meanwhile the levels of serum lipids an...

  7. Predicting the Glycemic Response to Gastric Bypass Surgery in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    John B Dixon; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Chong, Keong; Chen, Shu-Chun; Lambert, Gavin W; Straznicky, Nora E.; Lambert, Elisabeth A.; Lee, Wei-Jei

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To find clinically meaningful preoperative predictors of diabetes remission and conversely inadequate glycemic control after gastric bypass surgery. Predicting the improvement in glycemic control in those with type 2 diabetes after bariatric surgery may help in patient selection. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Preoperative details of 154 ethnic Chinese subjects with type 2 diabetes were examined for their influence on glycemic outcomes at 1 year after gastric bypass. Remission was defi...

  8. Impact of different protein sources in the glycemic and insulinemic responses Impacto de diferentes fuentes proteicas en la respuesta glucémica e insulinémica

    OpenAIRE

    F. C. Esteves de Oliveira; A. C. Pinheiro Volp; R. C. Alfenas

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The maintenance of normal blood glucose concentrations is a crucial factor to the achievement of a good health status throughout life. However, the occurrence of abnormalities in this parameter has become increasingly common, which can result in several non-transmissible diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to discuss the role of protein sources in the glycemic and insulinemic responses. Methods: In this review pape...

  9. Exenatide once weekly: sustained improvement in glycemic control and cardiometabolic measures through 3 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacConell L

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Leigh MacConell, Richard Pencek, Yan Li, David Maggs, Lisa PorterAmylin Pharmaceuticals, LLC, San Diego, CA, USABackground: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a progressive metabolic disease necessitating therapies with sustained efficacy and safety over time. Exenatide once weekly (ExQW, an extended-release formulation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist exenatide, has demonstrated improvements in glycemic and cardiometabolic measures from 30 weeks to 2 years of treatment. Here, the efficacy and safety of treatment with ExQW for 3 years are described.Methods: Patients were initially randomized to receive either ExQW (2 mg or exenatide twice daily for 30 weeks. Following the initial 30 weeks, all patients were treated with ExQW in an open-label extension. Analyses of primary glycemic endpoints, beta-cell function, and cardiometabolic measures were assessed for patients who completed 3 years of ExQW treatment and for the intention-to-treat population. Safety and tolerability analyses were provided for the intention-to-treat population.Results: Sixty-six percent of the intention-to-treat population (n = 295 completed 3 years of treatment (n = 194. At 3 years, a significant reduction in hemoglobin A1c (least squares mean ± standard error of -1.6% ± 0.08% was observed, with 55% and 33% of patients achieving hemoglobin A1c targets of <7% and ≤6.5%, respectively. Consistent with a sustained reduction in hemoglobin A1c, improvements in beta-cell function were also observed. Body weight was significantly reduced by -2.3 ± 0.6 kg. Reductions in blood pressure, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides were also observed. Adverse events reported most frequently during both controlled and uncontrolled periods included diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting of mostly mild intensity. The incidence of these adverse events decreased over time. Incidence of minor hypoglycemia was low and no major hypoglycemia was observed

  10. Effect of two intensive insulin therapy regimens on perioperative glycemic control in bone fracture patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Wei; HUO Li-li; LAN Ling; L(U) Yan-wei; WANG Man-yi

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently,there are no uniform standards and methods for perioperative glycemic control in bone fracture patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).We retrospectively analyzed the efficacy and safety of two intensive insulin therapy regimens administered to bone fracture patients with T2DM in the perioperative period,to explore the best method of achieving perioperative glycemic control.Methods A number of 159 bone fracture patients with T2DM were divided into two groups.One group (n=81) received multiple subcutaneous insulin injections (MSⅡ group) and the other (n=78) received continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSⅡ group).Blood glucose (BG) levels,time to achieve glycemic target,insulin dosage,and the incidence of hypoglycemia and complications were compared between groups.Results Both regimens reduced BG to desired levels before surgery.The time to reach glycemic target in CSⅡ group (2.5 days) was significantly shorter than that in the MSII group (7.3 days; P<0.001).Mean insulin dosage in the CSⅡ group (0.66 IU·kg-1·d-1) was significantly lower than that in the MSⅡ group (0.74 IU·kg1·d-1; P=0.005),as were the incidences of hypoglycemia (15.4% vs 32.1%) and infection (6.4% vs.23.5%).Multiple regression analysis showed that the time to reach glycemia target was associated with the insulin therapy regimen and dosage.The insulin dosage on reaching glycemia target was positively associated with body mass index (BMI),diabetes mellitus course,glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c),and β-hydroxybutyric acid,and was negatively associated with age.Conclusion The efficacy and safety of CSⅡ was superior to that achieved with MSⅡ,suggesting that CSⅡ should be considered as initial therapy to control perioperative BG in bone fracture patients with T2DM.

  11. TIGHT-BINDING DESCRIPTION OF TICx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I.Ivashchenko

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A parametrized non-orthogonal tight-binding (TB method combined with the coherent-potential-approximation is applied to the study of the electronic structure of disordered off-stoichiometric TiCx, the lattice relaxation and the electronic spectra of the TiC (001 surface, the local relaxation and energetic states of TiC structures with one or two vacancies in both the non-metal and metal sublattices. The calculated results are in good agreement with available experimental and theoretical data. The importance of the overlap matrix elements of the TB Hamiltonian in describing the electronic structure of this class of compounds is emphasized.

  12. Atom laser dynamics in a tight waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campo, A del; Lizuain, I; Muga, J G [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica, UPV-EHU, Apartado. 644, Bilbao (Spain); Pons, M [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, E.U.I.T. de Minas y Obras Publicas, UPV-EHU, 48901 Barakaldo (Spain); Moshinsky, M [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: adolfo.delcampo@ehu.es

    2008-02-15

    We study the transient dynamics that arise during the formation of an atom laser beam in a tight waveguide. The time dependent density profile develops a series of wiggles which are related to the diffraction in time phenomenon. The apodization of matter waves, which relies on the use of smooth aperture functions, allows to suppress such oscillations in a time interval, after which there is a revival of the diffraction in time. The revival time scale is directly related to the inverse of the harmonic trap frequency for the atom reservoir.

  13. Inward Leakage in Tight-Fitting PAPRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank C. Koh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A combination of local flow measurement techniques and fog flow visualization was used to determine the inward leakage for two tight-fitting powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs, the 3M Breathe-Easy PAPR and the SE 400 breathing demand PAPR. The PAPRs were mounted on a breathing machine head form, and flows were measured from the blower and into the breathing machine. Both respirators leaked a little at the beginning of inhalation, probably through their exhalation valves. In both cases, the leakage was not enough for fog to appear at the mouth of the head form.

  14. Transferable Tight-Binding Potential for Hydrocarbons

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Y; Wang, Yang

    1994-01-01

    A transferable tight-binding potential has been constructed for heteroatomic systems containing carbon and hydrogen. The electronic degree of freedom is treated explicitly in this potential using a small set of transferable parameters which has been fitted to small hydrocarbons and radicals. Transferability to other higher hydrocarbons were tested by comparison with ab initio calculations and experimental data. The potential can correctly reproduce changes in the electronic configuration as a function of the local bonding geometry around each carbon atom. This type of potential is well suited for computer simulations of covalently bonded systems in both gas-phase and condensed-phase systems.

  15. Tight Reference Frame–Independent Quantum Teleportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Verdon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We give a tight scheme for teleporting a quantum state between two parties whose reference frames are misaligned by an action of a finite symmetry group. Unlike previously proposed schemes, ours requires no additional tokens or data to be passed between the participants; the same amount of classical information is transferred as for ordinary quantum teleportation, and the Hilbert space of the entangled resource is of the same size. In the terminology of Peres and Scudo, our protocol relies on classical communication of unspeakable information.

  16. Bioabsorbable thread for tight tying of bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, K; Tomita, N; Tamai, S; Ikada, Y

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a bioabsorbable thread for tight fixation of fractured bones and to examine its mechanical performance in an in-vitro simulation study. The thread is a blend of bioabsorbable poly(L-lactic acid); (PLLA) and poly(epsilon-caprolactone); (PCL) fibers and can be tightly connected by fusion welding of the PCL fibers. The tying strength of the PLLA-PCL blend thread was 39.7 N, which was comparable to that of stainless steel wire. A testing machine was fabricated to measure the fatigue strength of the tying by simulating bone fixation. The results showed that metal wires always failed because of breakage within 25,000 loading cycles, whereas the blend threads did not fail until 50,000 loading cycles. The looseness of tying for simulated bone fixation by the blend thread was within 1mm even after 50 000 loading cycles. In-vivo testing using rats revealed that the blend thread did not cause any severe inflammatory reaction.

  17. Factors Predicting Glycemic Control in Middle-Aged and Older Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Ju Chiu, PhD

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionFew studies have prospectively assessed the explanatory effects of demographics, clinical conditions, treatment modality, and general lifestyle behaviors on glycemic control in large heterogeneous samples of middle-aged and older adults with type 2 diabetes. We hierarchically examined these factors, focused especially on the effects of modifiable factors (ie, general lifestyle behaviors, and compared predictive patterns between middle-aged and older adults.MethodsWe used nationally representative data from the 1998 and 2000 Health and Retirement Study (HRS and the HRS 2003 Diabetes Study. We analyzed data from 379 middle-aged adults (aged 51-64 y and 430 older adults (aged ≥65 y who self-reported having type 2 diabetes at baseline.ResultsAmong middle-aged adults, demographic factors and clinical conditions were the strongest predictors of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c levels. However, among older adults, treatment modality (diet only, oral medication, or insulin only or in combination with other regimens significantly affected HbA1c levels. Lifestyle (physical activity, smoking, drinking, and body weight control, independent of the effects of demographics, clinical conditions, and treatment modality, significantly affected HbA1c levels. An increase of 1 healthy behavior was associated with a decrease in HbA1c levels of more than 1 percentage point.ConclusionOur findings provide support for current diabetes guidelines that recommend a lifestyle regimen across the entire span of diabetes care and highlight the need to help both sociodemographically and clinically disadvantaged middle-aged adults with type 2 diabetes as well as older adults who exhibit poor adherence to medication recommendations to achieve better glycemic control.

  18. The Potential of an in Vitro Digestion Method for Predicting Glycemic Response of Foods and Meals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina Argyri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Increased interest in glycemic response derives from its linkage with chronic diseases, including obesity and type 2 diabetes. Our objective was to develop an in vitro method that predicts glycemic response. We proposed a simulated gastrointestinal digestion protocol that uses the concentration of dialyzable glucose (glucose in the soluble low molecular weight fraction of digests as an index for the prediction of glycemic response. For protocol evaluation, dialyzable glucose from 30 foods or meals digested in vitro were compared with published values for their glycemic index (GI (nine foods, glycemic load (GL (16 foods and glycemic response (14 meals. The correlations were significant when comparing dialyzable glucose with GL (Spearman’s rho = 0.953, p < 0.001, GI (Spearman’s rho = 0.800, p = 0.010 and glycemic response (Spearman’s rho = 0.736, p = 0.003. These results demonstrate that despite limitations associated with in vitro approaches, the proposed protocol may be a useful tool for predicting glycemic response of foods or meals.

  19. Is there a need to optimize glycemic control in hemodialyzed diabetic patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    2006-01-01

    The report of Williams et al. gives rise to at least two important questions regarding diabetic patients on maintenance hemodialysis: (1) Does glycemic control play a significant role? (2) Is HbA1c a reliable measure of glycemic control? These questions are discussed. It is recommended that you...

  20. GLYCEMIC INDEX, CHOLECYSTOKININ, SATIETY AND DISINHIBITION: IS THERE AN UNAPPRECIATED PARADOX FOR OVERWEIGHT WOMEN?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The clinical utility of a low glycemic index (GI) diet for appetite and food intake control is controversial. Complicating the issue is psychological and behavioral influences related to eating. The aim of the present study was to investigate the satiety and glycemic response to high and low GI meal...

  1. Diets with high or low protein content and glycemic index for weight-loss maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Meinert; Dalskov, Stine-Mathilde; Baak, Marleen van;

    2010-01-01

    Studies of weight-control diets that are high in protein or low in glycemic index have reached varied conclusions, probably owing to the fact that the studies had insufficient power.......Studies of weight-control diets that are high in protein or low in glycemic index have reached varied conclusions, probably owing to the fact that the studies had insufficient power....

  2. Indicators of glycemic control in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Kunihiko; Koga, Masafumi

    2015-07-25

    Recently, it has become clear that mild abnormal glucose tolerance increases the incidence of perinatal maternal-infant complications, and so the definition and diagnostic criteria of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have been changed. Therefore, in patients with GDM and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus, even stricter glycemic control than before is required to reduce the incidence of perinatal maternal-infant complications. Strict glycemic control cannot be attained without an indicator of glycemic control; this review proposes a reliable indicator. The gold standard indicator of glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus is hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c); however, we have demonstrated that HbA1c does not reflect glycemic control accurately during pregnancy because of iron deficiency. It has also become clear that glycated albumin, another indicator of glycemic control, is not influenced by iron deficiency and therefore might be a better indicator of glycemic control in patients with GDM and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus. However, large-population epidemiological studies are necessary in order to confirm our proposal. Here, we outline the most recent findings about the indicators of glycemic control during pregnancy including fructosamine and 1,5-anhydroglucitol.

  3. Interaction between functional health literacy, patient activation, and glycemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woodard LD

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available LeChauncy D Woodard, Cassie R Landrum, Amber B Amspoker, David Ramsey, Aanand D Naik Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development Center for Innovations in Quality, Effectiveness and Safety, Michael E DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and Section of Health Services Research, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA Background: Functional health literacy (FHL and patient activation can impact diabetes control through enhanced diabetes self-management. Less is known about the combined effect of these characteristics on diabetes outcomes. Using brief, validated measures, we examined the interaction between FHL and patient activation in predicting glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c control among a cohort of multimorbid diabetic patients.Methods: We administered a survey via mail to 387 diabetic patients with coexisting ­hypertension and ischemic heart disease who received outpatient care at one regional VA medical center between November 2010 and December 2010. We identified patients with the study conditions using the International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision-Clinical ­Modification (ICD-9-CM diagnoses codes and Current Procedure Terminology (CPT ­procedures codes. Surveys were returned by 195 (50.4% patients. We determined patient activation levels based on participant responses to the 13-item Patient Activation Measure and FHL levels using the single-item screening question, “How confident are you filling out medical forms by yourself?” We reviewed patient medical records to assess glycemic control. We used multiple logistic regression to examine whether activation and FHL were individually or jointly related to HbA1c control.Results: Neither patient activation nor FHL was independently related to glycemic control in the unadjusted main effects model; however, the interaction between the two was significantly associated with glycemic control (odds ratio 1.05 [95% confidence

  4. Diabetic nephropathy: new approaches for improving glycemic control and reducing risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schernthaner, Guntram; Schernthaner, Gerit Holger

    2013-01-01

    Nephropathy is a common consequence of diabetes, with a high prevalence in patients with type 1 (15%-25%) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM; 30%-40%). Nephropathy is associated with a poor prognosis and high economic burden. The risk of developing nephropathy increases with the duration of diabetes, and early diagnosis and treatment of risk factors for nephropathy (e.g., tight control of glycemia and hypertension) can reduce the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of renal complications associated with diabetes and the etiology of nephropathy have identified additional risk factors for nephropathy, and novel therapeutic options are being explored. This review discusses the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy and common risk factors. Furthermore, we discuss emerging treatments for T2DM that could potentially slow or prevent the progression of diabetic nephropathy. The use of incretin-based therapies, such as the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs, is growing in patients with T2DM, due to their efficacy and tolerability profiles. As renal safety is a key factor when choosing treatment options to manage patients with T2DM, drugs that are suitable for use in patients with varying degrees of renal impairment without a requirement for dose adjustment, such as the DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin, are of particular use. The ongoing advances in T2DM therapy may allow optimization of glycemic control in a wide range of patients, thereby helping to reduce the increasing morbidity and mortality associated with diabetic nephropathy.

  5. The Cost Implications of Less Tight Versus Tight Control of Hypertension in Pregnancy (CHIPS Trial)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rashid J.; Gafni, Amiram; Hu, Zheng Jing; Pullenayegum, Eleanor; von Dadelszen, Peter; Rey, Evelyne; Ross, Susan; Asztalos, Elizabeth; Murphy, Kellie E.; Menzies, Jennifer; Sanchez, J. Johanna; Ganzevoort, Wessel; Helewa, Michael; Lee, Shoo K.; Lee, Terry; Logan, Alexander G.; Moutquin, Jean-Marie; Singer, Joel; Thornton, Jim G.; Welch, Ross; Magee, Laura A.

    2016-01-01

    The CHIPS randomized controlled trial (Control of Hypertension in Pregnancy Study) found no difference in the primary perinatal or secondary maternal outcomes between planned “less tight” (target diastolic 100 mm Hg) and “tight” (target diastolic 85 mm Hg) blood pressure management strategies among women with chronic or gestational hypertension. This study examined which of these management strategies is more or less costly from a third-party payer perspective. A total of 981 women with singleton pregnancies and nonsevere, nonproteinuric chronic or gestational hypertension were randomized at 14 to 33 weeks to less tight or tight control. Resources used were collected from 94 centers in 15 countries and costed as if the trial took place in each of 3 Canadian provinces as a cost-sensitivity analysis. Eleven hospital ward and 24 health service costs were obtained from a similar trial and provincial government health insurance schedules of medical benefits. The mean total cost per woman–infant dyad was higher in less tight versus tight control, but the difference in mean total cost (DM) was not statistically significant in any province: Ontario ($30 191.62 versus $24 469.06; DM $5723, 95% confidence interval, −$296 to $12 272; P=0.0725); British Columbia ($30 593.69 versus $24 776.51; DM $5817; 95% confidence interval, −$385 to $12 349; P=0.0725); or Alberta ($31 510.72 versus $25 510.49; DM $6000.23; 95% confidence interval, −$154 to $12 781; P=0.0637). Tight control may benefit women without increasing risk to neonates (as shown in the main CHIPS trial), without additional (and possibly lower) cost to the healthcare system. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01192412. PMID:27550914

  6. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    Building upon the partitioning of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) that was conducted last quarter, the goal of the work this quarter has been to conclude evaluation of the Stratos well and the prototypical Green River Deep partition, and perform the fill resource evaluation of the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play, with the goal of defining target areas of enhanced natural fracturing. The work plan for the quarter of November 1-December 31, 1998 comprised four tasks: (1) Evaluation of the Green River Deep partition and the Stratos well and examination of potential opportunity for expanding the use of E and P technology to low permeability, naturally fractured gas reservoirs, (2) Gas field studies, and (3) Resource analysis of the balance of the partitions.

  7. On the Countable Tightness of Product Spaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan LIU; Shou LIN

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the countable tightness of products of spaces which are quotient simages of locally separable metric spaces, or k-spaces with a star-countable k-network. The main result is that the following conditions are equivalent: (1) b = ω1; (2) t(Sω× Sω1 ) >ω; (3) For any pair (X, Y),which are k-spaces with a point-countable k-network consisting of cosmic subspaces, t(X × Y) ≤ωif and only if one of X, Y is first countable or both X, Y are locally cosmic spaces. Many results on the k-space property of products of spaces with certain k-networks could be deduced from the above theorem.

  8. The effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-glycemic index diet on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Mavropoulos John C; Yancy William S; Westman Eric C; Marquart Megan; McDuffie Jennifer R

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Objective Dietary carbohydrate is the major determinant of postprandial glucose levels, and several clinical studies have shown that low-carbohydrate diets improve glycemic control. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a diet lower in carbohydrate would lead to greater improvement in glycemic control over a 24-week period in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Research design and methods Eighty-four community volunteers with obesity and type 2 diabetes were ra...

  9. A nationwide survey of diabetes education, self-management and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xiao-hui; YUAN Li; LOU Qing-qing; SHEN Li; SUN Zi-lin; ZHAO Fang; DAI Xia; HUANG Jin; YANG Hui-ying

    2012-01-01

    Background Diabetes management could be improved by diabetes education,through influencing attitudes towards diabetes,knowledge and behaviors of patients.The purpose of this study was to characterize the impact of diabetes education on glycemic control,and to assess the attitude,knowledge and self-care behavior in patients with type 2 diabetes in China.Methods This questionnaire-based survey was conducted in 50 medical centers across China from April to July of 2010.The patients with type 2 diabetes were eligible for the study.The information of glycemic control and diabetes education was collected.The diabetes attitude scale-3 formulae,a questionnaire of diabetes knowledge and Summary of Diabetes Self-care Activities scale were used to assess attitude,knowledge and the self-care of patients,respectively.Results Among the 5961 eligible respondents (3233 males; mean age (59.50±12.48) years; mean hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) (8.27±2.23)%),most patients (79.8%) considered themselves educated on diabetes.Compared with patients without diabetes education,their educated counterparts showed significant lower value of HbA1c,after controlling for age,gender,body mass index and duration of diabetes (P <0.01).The patients who received diabetes education also performed significant higher scores on attitude,knowledge and self-care than their uneducated counterparts.Patients with lower income or education level tended to have higher glucose levels,and showed lower percentage of patients received diabetic education.Conclusions Chinese patients with diabetes education achieved better glycemic control than un-educated patients.Our study indicates effort is required to provide professional education to patients,with emphasis on lower income and lower education level populations.

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and Nrf2 repression in circulating cells of type 2 diabetic patients without the recommended glycemic goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozzini, C; Garbin, U; Stranieri, C; Pasini, A; Solani, E; Tinelli, I A; Cominacini, L; Fratta Pasini, A M

    2015-03-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays a role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) and ER apoptosis in β-cells. The aim of the study is investigating the role of the prolonged glycemic, inflammatory, and oxidative impairment as possible UPR and ER apoptosis inductors in triggering the ER stress response and the protective nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant-related element (ARE) activation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of T2DM patients without glycemic target. Oxidative stress markers (oxidation product of phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine [oxPAPC], and malondialdehyde [MDA]), the UPR and ER apoptosis, the activation of the pro-inflammatory nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) with its inhibitory protein inhibitor-kBα, and the expression of the protective Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were evaluated in PBMC of 15 T2DM patients and 15 healthy controls (C). OxPAPC concentrations (in PBMC and plasma), MDA levels (in plasma), the expressions of the glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa (or BiP) as representative of UPR, and of the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein as representative of ER apoptosis were significantly higher (p glycemic target achievement, there is an activation of the UPR and of the ER apoptosis, which may be related to the chronic exposure to hyperglycemia, to the augmented inflammation, and to the augmented oxidative stress, without a corresponding Nrf2/ARE defense activation.

  11. Repaglinide/metformin fixed-dose combination to improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G Moses

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Robert G MosesClinical Trials and Research Unit, South East Sydney and Illawarra Area Health Service, New South Wales, AustraliaAbstract: Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease associated with high levels of morbidity and mortality and for which there is both a large and growing prevalence worldwide. Lifestyle advice plus metformin is commonly recommended initially to manage hyperglycemia and to minimize the risk of vascular complications. However, additional agents are required when glycemic targets cannot be achieved or maintained due to the progressive nature of the disease. Repaglinide/metformin fixed-dose combination (FDC therapy (PrandiMet®; Novo Nordisk, Bagsværd, Denmark has been approved for use in the USA. This FDC is a rational second-line therapy given the complementary mechanisms of action of the components. Repaglinide is a rapidly absorbed, short-acting insulin secretagogue targeting postprandial glucose excursions; metformin is an insulin sensitizer with a longer duration of action that principally regulates basal glucose levels. A pivotal, 26-week, randomized study with repaglinide/metformin FDC therapy has been conducted in patients experiencing suboptimal control with previous oral antidiabetes therapy. Repaglinide/metformin FDC improved glycemic control and weight neutrality without adverse effects on lipid profiles. There were no major hypoglycemic episodes and patients expressed greater satisfaction with repaglinide/metformin FDC than previous treatments. Repaglinide/metformin FDC is expected to be more convenient than individual tablets for patients taking repaglinide and metformin in loose combination, and it is expected to improve glycemic control in patients for whom meglitinide or metformin monotherapies provide inadequate control.Keywords: type 2 diabetes, metformin, repaglinide, PrandiMet®, fixed-dose combination

  12. Glycemic control and implant stabilization in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, T W; Dowell, S; Robinson, M; McMahan, C A

    2009-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered a relative contra-indication for implant therapy. However, the effect of glycemic level on implant integration in persons with diabetes remains poorly understood. The hypothesis of this research was that poor glycemic control is directly related to short-term-impairment implant stabilization. This prospective clinical study evaluated 10 non-diabetic individuals (12 implants) and 20 persons with type 2 diabetes (30 implants). Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels ranged from 4.7-12.6%. Implant stability was assessed by resonance frequency analysis over 4 months following placement. Minimum stability levels were observed 2-6 weeks following placement for all 42 implants. Persons with HbA1c > or = 8.1% had a greater maximum decrease in stability from baseline and required a longer time for healing, as indicated by return of stability level to baseline. This study demonstrates alterations in implant stability consistent with impaired implant integration for persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus in direct relation to hyperglycemic conditions.

  13. A moderate glycemic meal before endurance exercise can enhance performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, J P; O'Gorman, D; Evans, W J

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether presweetened breakfast cereals with various fiber contents and a moderate glycemic index optimize glucose availability and improve endurance exercise performance. Six recreationally active women ate 75 g of available carbohydrate in the form of breakfast cereals: sweetened whole-grain rolled oats (SRO, 7 g of dietary fiber) or sweetened whole-oat flour (SOF, 3 g of dietary fiber) and 300 ml of water or water alone (Con). The meals were provided 45 min before semirecumbent cycle ergometer exercise to exhaustion at 60% of peak O2 consumption (VO2peak). Diet and physical activity were controlled by having the subjects reside in the General Clinical Research Center for 2 days before each trial. Blood samples were drawn from an antecubital vein for glucose, free fatty acid (FFA), glycerol, insulin, epinephrine, and norepinephrine determination. Breath samples were obtained at 15-min intervals after meal ingestion and at 30-min intervals during exercise. Muscle glycogen concentration was determined from biopsies taken from the vastus lateralis muscle before the meal and immediately after exercise. Plasma FFA concentrations were lower (P glycemic index 45 min before prolonged moderately intense exercise significantly enhances exercise capacity.

  14. Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load and Their Association with C-Reactive Protein and Incident Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geertruida J. van Woudenbergh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate whether the Glycemic Index (GI or Glycemic Load (GL of a diet is associated with C-reactive Protein (CRP and risk of type 2 diabetes in a prospective study. Materials and Methods. Our analysis included 4,366 participants who did not have diabetes at baseline. During follow-up 456 diabetes cases were confirmed. Dietary GI and GL were derived from a food-frequency questionnaire and its association with CRP was examined cross-sectionally using linear regression models. The association of GI and GL with diabetes incidence was examined using Cox proportional hazard models. Results. GL, but not GI, was associated with lnCRP at baseline (bGL=0.11 per 50 units; P=.01. When comparing the highest to the lowest tertile of GI with respect to diabetes incidence, a Relative Risk (RR of 0.95 [95%CI 0.75, 1.21] was found after adjustment for lifestyle and nutritional factors. For GL the RR for diabetes incidence was 1.00 [95%CI 0.74, 1.36]. Additional adjustment for CRP did not change RRs. Conclusion. Since GI was not associated with CRP and risk of type 2 diabetes, it is unlikely that a high GI diet induces the previously shown positive association between CRP and risk of type 2 diabetes by increasing CRP concentrations.

  15. Effects of Carbohydrate and Dietary Fiber Intake, Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load on HDL Metabolism in Asian Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Hidekatsu; Katsuyama, Hisayuki; Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Abe, Shinichi; Tada, Norio; Sako, Akahito

    2014-10-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a lipoprotein which has anti-atherogenic property by reverse cholesterol transport from the peripheral tissues to liver. Low HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are associated with the development of coronary artery diseases (CADs). Various epidemiological studies have suggested that the development of CAD increase in individuals with less than 40 mg/dL of HDL-C. In spite of accumulation of evidences which suggest a significant association between low HDL-C and cardiovascular diseases, effects of dietary factors on HDL metabolism remained largely unknown. There may be interracial differences in effects of dietary factors on HDL metabolism. Here we reviewed published articles about effects of carbohydrate and dietary fiber intake, glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL), on HDL-C metabolism, regarding meta-analyses and clinical studies performed in Asian population as important articles. Low carbohydrate intake, GI and GL may be beneficially associated with HDL metabolism. Dietary fiber intake may be favorably associated with HDL metabolism in Asian populations.

  16. Dietary glycemic load, glycemic index, and carbohydrate and risk of breast cancer in the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikany, James M; Redden, David T; Neuhouser, Marian L; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Rohan, Thomas E; Simon, Michael S; Liu, Simin; Lane, Dorothy S; Tinker, Lesley

    2011-01-01

    Dietary glycemic load (GL), glycemic index (GI), and carbohydrate could be associated with breast cancer risk by influencing long-term blood glucose and insulin concentrations. We examined associations between GL, GI, and carbohydrate and incident breast cancer in 148,767 Women's Heath Initiative (WHI) participants. Dietary variables were estimated from food frequency questionnaires administered at baseline. Self-reported breast cancers during follow-up were confirmed by medical records review. Cox proportional hazards regression modeled time to breast cancer within quintiles of GL, GI, and carbohydrate. There were 6,115 total breast cancers after a median follow-up of 8.0 yr. We observed no associations between GL, GI, or carbohydrate and total incident breast cancer, with hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the highest vs. lowest quintiles of 1.08, 0.92-1.29 (P for trend = 0.27); 1.01, 0.91-1.12 (P = 0.74); and 0.95, 0.80-1.14 (P = 0.98), respectively. There was a trend toward significance for the positive association between GL and in situ cancers (1.40, 0.94-2.13; P = 0.07). Although there was no evidence of associations between GL, GI, or carbohydrate and total breast cancer risk in WHI participants, the suggestion of an association between GL and risk of in situ cancers requires further investigation.

  17. Myelin architecture: zippering membranes tightly together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhti, Mostafa; Aggarwal, Shweta; Simons, Mikael

    2014-04-01

    Rapid nerve conduction requires the coating of axons by a tightly packed multilayered myelin membrane. In the central nervous system, myelin is formed from cellular processes that extend from oligodendrocytes and wrap in a spiral fashion around an axon, resulting in the close apposition of adjacent myelin membrane bilayers. In this review, we discuss the physical principles underlying the zippering of the plasma membrane of oligodendrocytes at the cytoplasmic and extracellular leaflet. We propose that the interaction of the myelin basic protein with the cytoplasmic leaflet of the myelin bilayer triggers its polymerization into a fibrous network that drives membrane zippering and protein extrusion. In contrast, the adhesion of the extracellular surfaces of myelin requires the down-regulation of repulsive components of the glycocalyx, in order to uncover weak and unspecific attractive forces that bring the extracellular surfaces into close contact. Unveiling the mechanisms of myelin membrane assembly at the cytoplasmic and extracelluar sites may help to understand how the myelin bilayers are disrupted and destabilized in the different demyelinating diseases.

  18. Stochastic homothetically revealed preference for tight stochastic demand functions

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Heufer

    2009-01-01

    This paper strengthens the framework of stochastic revealed preferences introduced by Bandyopadhyay et al. (1999, 2004) for stochastic homothetically revealed preferences for tight stochastic demand functions.

  19. Intensive Insulin Therapy: Tight Blood Sugar Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... insulin therapy can help you achieve desired blood sugar control and what intensive insulin therapy requires of ... aggressive treatment approach designed to control your blood sugar levels. Intensive insulin therapy requires close monitoring of ...

  20. Patterns of glycemic control using glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunpreet Singh Kahlon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : Till now estimation of blood glucose is the highly effective method for diagnosing diabetes mellitus but it provides a short-term picture of control. More evidence is required to prove that plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels together gives a better estimate of glycemic control and compliance with treatment. Indian diabetes risk score (IDRS is a simplified screening tool for identifying undiagnosed diabetic subjects, requires minimum time, and effort and can help to considerably reduce the costs of screening. Objective : To study patterns of glycemic control using glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic patients. To find out correlation between levels of plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetics and to calculate IDRS of the study population. Materials and Methods : A cross sectional study was conducted among 300 known diabetic patients attending outpatient department of a rural medical college in Haryana, India. Following standard procedures and protocols FPG and glycosylated hemoglobin were measured to find out a pattern of glycemic control in them after taking their written and informed consent. A correlation between the levels of glycosylated hemoglobin and fasting blood glucose was also calculated. These patients were made to fill a performa and their demographic and clinical risk factors were noted and based on this, their IDRS was calculated. This was done to validate the IDRS in Indian rural population. Results : Fifty-two percent of the population had fasting plasma glucose level between 125-150 mg/dl, 21% had this level between 151-175 mg/dl. Thirteen percent of the study subjects had HbA1C between 6.5-7.5, more than half (57.3% had this value between 7.5-8.5, 12% and 18% had values between 8.5-9.5 and 9.5-10.5, respectively. Twelve percent of the participants had HbA1C level higher than 10.5. Correlation of fasting plasma glucose level and HbA1C was also studied and found that correlation coefficient came

  1. US production of natural gas from tight reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-18

    For the purposes of this report, tight gas reservoirs are defined as those that meet the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) definition of tight. They are generally characterized by an average reservoir rock permeability to gas of 0.1 millidarcy or less and, absent artificial stimulation of production, by production rates that do not exceed 5 barrels of oil per day and certain specified daily volumes of gas which increase with the depth of the reservoir. All of the statistics presented in this report pertain to wells that have been classified, from 1978 through 1991, as tight according to the FERC; i.e., they are ``legally tight`` reservoirs. Additional production from ``geologically tight`` reservoirs that have not been classified tight according to the FERC rules has been excluded. This category includes all producing wells drilled into legally designated tight gas reservoirs prior to 1978 and all producing wells drilled into physically tight gas reservoirs that have not been designated legally tight. Therefore, all gas production referenced herein is eligible for the Section 29 tax credit. Although the qualification period for the credit expired at the end of 1992, wells that were spudded (began to be drilled) between 1978 and May 1988, and from November 5, 1990, through year end 1992, are eligible for the tax credit for a subsequent period of 10 years. This report updates the EIA`s tight gas production information through 1991 and considers further the history and effect on tight gas production of the Federal Government`s regulatory and tax policy actions. It also provides some high points of the geologic background needed to understand the nature and location of low-permeability reservoirs.

  2. Glycemic index of cereals and tubers produced in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Xin Yang; Hong-Wei Wang; Hong-Mei Cui; Yan Wang; Lian-Da Yu; Shi-Xue Xiang; Shui-Ying Zhou

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the GI of some cereals and tubers produced in China in an effort to establish the database of glycemic index (GI) of Chinese food.METHODS: Food containing 50 g carbohydrate was consumed by 8-12 healthy adults after they have been fasted for 10 h and blood glucose was monitored for 2 h.Glucose was used as reference food. GI of food was calculated according to a standard method.RESULTS: GI of 9 types of sugar and 60 kinds of food were determined.CONCLUSION: Food GI is mainly determined by nature of carbohydrate and procession. Most of cereals and tubers produced in China have similar GI with their counterparts produced in other countries.

  3. Carbohydrates, glycemic index, and pregnancy outcomes in gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Jimmy Chun Yu; Brand-Miller, Jennie C; Moses, Robert G

    2013-02-01

    This review critically evaluates the current evidence regarding the effect of the dietary glycemic index (GI) on pregnancy outcomes in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Current evidence, although limited, consistently supports the advantages of, and has demonstrated no disadvantages of, a low-GI diet. We conclude that pregnant women with GDM are likely to benefit from following a low-GI meal pattern, with no significant side effects, and consideration of the GI should be given when formulating a diet for GDM. However, until larger scale intervention trials are completed, an exclusive low-GI diet should not replace the current recommended diets for GDM from relevant government and health agencies. Further studies that intervene at an earlier stage of pregnancy are required.

  4. Digital Rock Studies of Tight Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silin, Dmitriy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-08-07

    This technical report summarizes some recently developed approaches to studies of rock properties at a pore scale. Digital rock approach is complementary to laboratory and field studies. It can be especially helpful in situations where experimental data are uncertain, or are difficult or impossible to obtain. Digitized binary images of the pore geometries of natural rocks obtained by different imaging techniques are the input data. Computer-generated models of natural rocks can be used instead of images in a case where microtomography data are unavailable, or the resolution of the tools is insufficient to adequately characterize the features of interest. Simulations of creeping viscous flow in pores produce estimates of Darcy permeability. Maximal Inscribed Spheres calculations estimate two-phase fluid distribution in capillary equilibrium. A combination of both produce relative permeability curves. Computer-generated rock models were employed to study two-phase properties of fractured rocks, or tight sands with slit-like pores, too narrow to be characterized with micro-tomography. Various scenarios can simulate different fluid displacement mechanisms, from piston-like drainage to liquid dropout at the dew point. A finite differences discretization of Stokes equation is developed to simulate flow in the pore space of natural rocks. The numerical schemes are capable to handle both no-slip and slippage flows. An upscaling procedure estimates the permeability by subsampling a large data set. Capillary equilibrium and capillary pressure curves are efficiently estimated with the method of maximal inscribed spheres both an arbitrary contact angle. The algorithms can handle gigobytes of data on a desktop workstation. Customized QuickHull algorithms model natural rocks. Capillary pressure curves evaluated from computer-generated images mimic those obtained for microtomography data.

  5. Glycemic Variation in Tumor Patients with Total Parenteral Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Cheng Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hyperglycemia is associated with poor clinical outcomes and mortality in several patients. However, studies evaluating hyperglycemia variation in tumor patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between glycemia and tumor kinds with TPN by monitoring glycemic variation in tumor patients. Methods: This retrospective clinical trial selected 312 patients with various cancer types, whose unique nutrition treatment was TPN during the monitoring period. All patients had blood glucose (BG values assessed at least six times daily during the TPN infusion. The glycemic variation before and after TPN was set as the indicator to evaluate the factors influencing BG. Results: The clinical trial lasted 7.5 ± 3.0 days adjusted for age, gender, family cancer history and blood types. There were six cancer types: Hepatic carcinoma (HC, 21.8%, rectal carcinoma (17.3%, colon carcinoma (CC, 14.7%, gastric carcinoma (29.8%, pancreatic carcinoma (11.5%, and duodenal carcinoma (DC, 4.8%. The patients were divided into diabetes and nondiabetes groups. No statistical differences in TPN glucose content between diabetes and nondiabetes groups were found; however, the tumor types affected by BG values were obvious. With increasing BG values, DC, HC and CC were more represented than other tumor types in this sequence in diabetic individuals, as well as in the nondiabetic group. BG was inclined to be more easily influenced in the nondiabetes group. Other factors did not impact BG values, including gender, body mass index, and TPN infusion duration time. Conclusions: When tumor patients are treated with TPN, BG levels should be monitored according to different types of tumors, besides differentiating diabetes or nondiabetes patients. Special BG control is needed for DC, HC and CC in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients. If BG overtly increases, positive measurements are needed to control BG

  6. Glycemic index: effect of food storage under low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Cassab Carreira

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to evaluate the influence of food storage under low temperature (-20ºC and the resistant starch formation, both on the glycemic index (GI. The GI of only cooked and cooked and stored foods under -20ºC for 30 days was evaluated in short-term tests with humans. Significant increase on the RS content was evidenced for all the stored foods. The food storage resulted in a significant decrease on the GI of beans and chick-peas; the GI of pasta remained the same and the GI of corn meal increased. Thus, the RS formation showed reduced influence on the glycemic index. The storage of starchy foods under low temperature can collaborate to the RS intake but its effect on the GI will depend on the characteristics of the carbohydrates of each food.O estudo foi realizado para avaliar a influência do armazenamento de alimentos sob baixa temperatura e a formação de amido resistente sobre o índice glicêmico (IG. O IG de alimentos cozidos ou cozidos e armazenados a -20ºC por 30 dias foi avaliado em ensaios de curta duração com humanos. Aumento significativo no conteúdo de AR foi evidenciado para todos os alimentos armazenados. O armazenamento dos alimentos resultou em significativa redução no IG do feijão e do grão de bico. O IG do macarrão foi o mesmo e da polenta sofreu aumento. Desta forma, a evidenciada formação de AR mostrou reduzida influência no IG. O armazenamento de alimentos fonte de amido sob baixa temperatura pode colaborar com a ingestão de AR, mas o efeito sobre o IG vai depender das características dos carboidratos de cada alimento.

  7. The effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-glycemic index diet on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavropoulos John C

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Dietary carbohydrate is the major determinant of postprandial glucose levels, and several clinical studies have shown that low-carbohydrate diets improve glycemic control. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a diet lower in carbohydrate would lead to greater improvement in glycemic control over a 24-week period in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Research design and methods Eighty-four community volunteers with obesity and type 2 diabetes were randomized to either a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet (1c. Results Forty-nine (58.3% participants completed the study. Both interventions led to improvements in hemoglobin A1c, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and weight loss. The LCKD group had greater improvements in hemoglobin A1c (-1.5% vs. -0.5%, p = 0.03, body weight (-11.1 kg vs. -6.9 kg, p = 0.008, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (+5.6 mg/dL vs. 0 mg/dL, p Conclusion Dietary modification led to improvements in glycemic control and medication reduction/elimination in motivated volunteers with type 2 diabetes. The diet lower in carbohydrate led to greater improvements in glycemic control, and more frequent medication reduction/elimination than the low glycemic index diet. Lifestyle modification using low carbohydrate interventions is effective for improving and reversing type 2 diabetes.

  8. Achieving Standardization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    competitive, national customs and regional economic organizations are seeking to establish a standardized solution for digital reporting of customs data. However, standardization has proven hard to achieve in the socio-technical e-Customs solution. In this chapter, the authors identify and describe what has...

  9. Achieving Standardization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    competitive, national customs and regional economic organizations are seeking to establish a standardized solution for digital reporting of customs data. However, standardization has proven hard to achieve in the socio-technical e-Customs solution. In this chapter, the authors identify and describe what has...

  10. Differences between tight and loose cultures : A 33-nation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelfand, M.J.; Raver, R.L.; Nishii, L.; Leslie, L.M.; Lun, J.; Lim, B.C.; Van de Vliert, E.

    2011-01-01

    With data from 33 nations, we illustrate the differences between cultures that are tight (have many strong norms and a low tolerance of deviant behavior) versus loose (have weak social norms and a high tolerance of deviant behavior). Tightness-looseness is part of a complex, loosely integrated multi

  11. Construction of Multivariate Tight Framelet Packets Associated with Dilation Matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Firdous A Shah; Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for constructing multivariate tight framelet packets associated with an arbitrary dilation matrix using unitary extension principles.We also prove how to construct various tight frames for L2(Rd) by replac-ing some mother framelets.

  12. Localization of Tight Closure in Two-Dimensional Rings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kamran Divaani-Aazar; Massoud Tousi

    2005-02-01

    It is shown that tight closure commutes with localization in any two-dimensional ring of prime characteristic if either is a Nagata ring or possesses a weak test element. Moreover, it is proved that tight closure commutes with localization at height one prime ideals in any ring of prime characteristic.

  13. Random non-Hermitian tight-binding models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinello, G.; Pato, M. P.

    2016-08-01

    For a one dimensional system tight binding models are described by sparse tridiagonal matrices which describe interactions between nearest neighbors. In this report, we construct open and closed random tight-binding models based in the tridiagonal matrices of the so-called,β-ensembles of random matrix theory.

  14. The Elastic Continuum Limit of the Tight Binding Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weinan E; Jianfeng LU

    2007-01-01

    The authors consider the simplest quantum mechanics model of solids, the tight binding model, and prove that in the continuum limit, the energy of tight binding model converges to that of the continuum elasticity model obtained using Cauchy-Born rule. Thet echnique in this paper is based mainly on spectral perturbation theory for large matrices.

  15. Glycemic index and glycemic load of thirteen year old children whose waist circumference (WC ≥ 90 percentile dependent on BMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzanna Goluch-Koniuszy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. One of the reasons for the accumulation of fat tissue (including visceral fat tissue in the body is an unbalanced diet in respect of the amount and the structure of carbohydrates and the value of the glycemic index (GI and the glycemic load (GL. The research describing the dependence between the BMI (Body Mass Index, WC (Waist Circumference, WHtR (Waist-to-Height Ratio, and GI and GL indexes in adults exists but only a limited number of works discuss children during the pubertal spurt. Therefore the objective of this research is the evaluation of the state of nutrition of 13-year-old children with waist circumference ≥ 90 percentile with various BMI, taking into consideration GL and GL of their meals. Material and methods.The state of nutrition (BMI, WC, WHtR of 871 thirteen-year-old children of both sexes was evaluated and 230 children with WC ≥ 90 percentile were selected (26.4% of the total number examined and divided into three groups regarding the BMI. In 71 children (30.9% of the selected group the method of nutrition, energy and nutritive value of menus, structure of consumption of food groups and GI and GL value were evaluated, on the basis of the analysis of their three day menus, which had been documented. Results.Significantly higher values of BMI and WC were ascertained in boys than in girls. No essential differences in values of WHtR index were ascertained between boys and girls. The analysis of children’s menus, in both sexes with a waist circumference ≥ 90 percentile showed, regardless of BMI value, a low realisation of recommended energetic value of the diet and low realisation of recommended supply of: dietary fibre, fat, mineral components (K, Ca, P, Mg, Fe, Zn, Cu, vitamins (E, B1, PP and liquids with simultaneous occurrence of protein in general and animal protein, sodium and vitamins (A, B2, B6 supply. A significantly higher supply of the most of aforementioned ingredients was ascertained in the

  16. Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load of diets in children and young people with Down’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzanna Goluch-Koniuszy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Down’s Syndrome (DS belongs to the most frequent aberrations of autosomal chromosomes of all known chromosome disorders. The most frequent diseases accompanying Down’s Syndrome include diabetes and obesity. One of the causes of fatty tissue, including visceral tissue accumulation in body is an ill balanced diet in terms of, among others, the quantity and structure of carbohydrates, as well as values of glycemic index (GI and glycemic load (GL. As in Down’s Syndrome the incidence of both obesity and diabetes is higher than in healthy population, it seems essential to evaluate and correct the diet in terms of not only carbohydrates level, but also of GI and GL. The object of this study was to evaluate the nutritive status and nutritional patterns of children and adolescents (both sexes with Down’s Syndrome (DS taking into account the GI and GL of their meals. Material and methods. The state of nutrition was assessed in October and November 2009 in 24 people with clinically-diagnosed trisomy of chromosome 21 including 16 boys (aged 10-22 and 8 girls (aged 13-18 pupils of two school-and-educational centres from the West Pomerania Province. Methods of feeding evaluation that is energy and nutritive value, consumption patterns of groups of food products, GI and GL values were based on analysis of three days menu by currently noting. Results.Among the young people under research 54% were overweight and obese and among those 41% with visceral obesity. Analysis of menus of the young people with Down’s Syndrome has shown low energy value of diet, low realization of the recommended supply of fibre, Ca, Mg, Zn, B vitamin and fluids. The par- ticipation of energy coming from fat and saccharose was too high and too low from carbohydrates compared to the recommended values. Resultant GI of meals of the young people under research exceeded average values and the whole day GL exceeded high values. Conclusions.Everyday food rations of both

  17. Trace elements, oxidative stress and glycemic control in young people with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Chiang; Huang, Hsiu-Hua; Hu, Chiung-Wen; Chen, Bai-Hsiun; Chong, Inn-Wen; Chao, Yu-Ying; Huang, Yeou-Lih

    2014-01-01

    Trace elements and oxidative stress are associated with glycemic control and diabetic complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus. In this study, we analyzed the levels of serum copper, zinc, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) and urinary MDA and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in 33 type 1 diabetic patients with optimal and suboptimal glycemic control (HbA1Cdiabetic controls to evaluate the differences between these markers in different glycemic control states. Diabetic patients, especially poor-glycemic-control subjects (HbA1C≥9%), exhibited significantly lower levels of serum zinc and increased levels of serum copper (and, therefore, increased serum copper-to-zinc ratios), serum SOD, blood MDA, and urinary MDA and 8-OHdG, relative to non-diabetic subjects. Furthermore, significant correlations existed in these patients between the serum copper, serum copper-to-zinc ratio, and urinary MDA (all pdiabetic complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  18. Almond consumption improved glycemic control and lipid profiles in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond consumption is associated with ameliorations in obesity, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia. The hypothesis of this 12-wk randomized crossover clinical trial was that almond consumption would improve glycemic control and decrease risk to cardiovascular disease in 20 Chinese type ...

  19. Dietary glycemic index and glycemic load and risk of colorectal cancer: results from the EPIC-Italy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieri, S; Krogh, V; Agnoli, C; Ricceri, F; Palli, D; Masala, G; Panico, S; Mattiello, A; Tumino, R; Giurdanella, M C; Brighenti, F; Scazzina, F; Vineis, P; Sacerdote, C

    2015-06-15

    A carbohydrate-rich diet, resulting in high blood glucose and insulin, has been hypothesized as involved in colorectal cancer etiology. We investigated dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL), in relation to colorectal cancer, in the prospectively recruited EPIC-Italy cohort. After a median 11.7 years, 421 colorectal cancers were diagnosed among 47,749 recruited adults. GI and GL were estimated from validated food frequency questionnaires. Multivariable Cox modeling estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for associations between colorectal cancer and intakes of total, high GI and low GI carbohydrate and GI and GL. The adjusted HR of colorectal cancer for highest versus lowest GI quartile was 1.35; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.78; p trend 0.031. Increasing high GI carbohydrate intake was also significantly associated with increasing colorectal cancer risk (HR 1.45; 95% CI 1.04-2.03; p trend 0.034), whereas increasing low GI carbohydrate was associated with reducing risk (HR 0.73; 95% CI 0.54-0.98; p trend 0.033). High dietary GI and high GI carbohydrate were associated with increased risks of cancer at all colon sites (HR 1.37; 95% CI 1.00-1.88, HR 1.80; 95% CI 1.22-2.65, respectively), whereas high GI carbohydrate and high GL were associated with increased risk of proximal colon cancer (HR 1.94; 95% CI 1.18-3.16, HR 2.01; 95% CI 1.08-3.74, respectively). After stratification for waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), cancer was significantly associated with GI, and high GI carbohydrate, in those with high WHR. These findings suggest that high dietary GI and high carbohydrate intake from high GI foods are associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer.

  20. A two scale analysis of tight sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, P. M.; Davy, C. A.; Song, Y.; Troadec, D.; Hauss, G.; Skoczylas, F.

    2015-12-01

    Tight sandstones have a low porosity and a very small permeability K. Available models for K do not compare well with measurements. These sandstones are made of SiO_2 grains, with a typical size of several hundreds of micron. These grains are separated by a network of micro-cracks, with sizes ranging between microns down to tens of nm. Therefore, the structure can be schematized by Voronoi polyhedra separated by plane and permeable polygonal micro-cracks. Our goal is to estimate K based on a two scale analysis and to compare the results to measurements. For a particular sample [2], local measurements on several scales include FIB/SEM [3], CMT and 2D SEM. FIB/SEM is selected because the peak pore size given by Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry is of 350nm. FIB/SEM imaging (with 50 nm voxel size) identifies an individual crack of 180nm average opening, whereas CMT provides a connected porosity (individual crack) for 60 nm voxel size, of 4 micron average opening. Numerical modelling is performed by combining the micro-crack network scale (given by 2D SEM) and the 3D micro-crack scale (given by either FIB/SEM or CMT). Estimates of the micro-crack density are derived from 2D SEM trace maps by counting the intersections with scanlines, the surface density of traces, and the number of fracture intersections. K is deduced by using a semi empirical formula valid for identical, isotropic and uniformly distributed fractures [1]. This value is proportional to the micro-crack transmissivity sigma. Sigma is determined by solving the Stokes equation in the micro-cracks measured by FIB/SEM or CMT. K is obtained by combining the two previous results. Good correlation with measured values on centimetric plugs is found when using sigma from CMT data. The results are discussed and further research is proposed. [1] Adler et al, Fractured porous media, Oxford Univ. Press, 2012. [2] Duan et al, Int. J. Rock Mech. Mining Sci., 65, p75, 2014. [3] Song et al, Marine and Petroleum Eng., 65, p63

  1. Glycemic index and glycemic load in relation to changes in body weight, body fat distribution, and body composition in adult Danes 1-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare-Bruun, Helle; Flint, Anne; L. Heitmann, Berit

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: A diet with a high glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) may promote overconsumption of energy and increase the risk of weight gain.Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate the relation between GI and GL of habitual diets and subsequent 6-y changes in body...... born in 1922, 1932, 1942, or 1952. A baseline health examination and a dietary history interview were carried out in 1987 and 1988; a follow-up health examination was performed in 1993 and 1994. Results: Positive associations between GI and changes in bodyweight (¿BW), percentage body fat (%BF......), and waist circumference (¿WC) were observed in women after adjustment for covariates.Significant GI X sex X physical activity interactions for ABSTRACTBackground: A diet with a high glycemic index (GI) and glycemicload (GL) may promote overconsumption of energy and increase therisk of weight gain...

  2. The effect of protein and glycemic index on children's body composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadaki, Angeliki; Linardakis, Manolis; Larsen, Thomas Meinert;

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect of protein and glycemic index (GI) on body composition among European children in the randomized, 6-month dietary intervention DiOGenes (diet, obesity, and genes) family-based study.......To investigate the effect of protein and glycemic index (GI) on body composition among European children in the randomized, 6-month dietary intervention DiOGenes (diet, obesity, and genes) family-based study....

  3. Laboratory Measurement and Interpretation of the Changes of Physical Properties after Heat Treatment in Tight Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yili Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevention of water blocking and optimization of multiscale flow channels will increase gas production of tight reservoirs. Physical properties of samples from representative tight gas reservoirs were measured before and after high temperature treatment. Results show that, with the increase of treatment temperature, mass decreases, acoustic transit time increases, and permeability and porosity increase. Permeability begins to increase dramatically if treatment temperature exceeds the threshold value of thermal fracturing, which is 600~700°C, 500~600°C, 300~500°C, and 300~400°C for shale, mudstone, tight sandstone, and tight carbonate rock, respectively. Comprehensive analyses indicate that the mechanisms of heat treatment on tight porous media include evaporation and dehydration of water, change of mineral structure, generation of microfracture, and network connectivity. Meanwhile, field implementation is reviewed and prospected. Interpretations indicate that, according to the characteristics of multiscale mass transfer in tight gas formation, combining heat treatment with conventional stimulation methods can achieve the best stimulation result.

  4. Three-dimensional measurement of a tightly focused laser beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangsheng Xie

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The spatial structure of a tightly focused light field is measured with a double knife-edge scanning method. The measurement method is based on the use of a high-quality double knife-edge fabricated from a right-angled silicon fragment mounted on a photodetector. The reconstruction of the three-dimensional structures of tightly focused spots is carried out with both uniform and partially obstructed linearly polarized incident light beams. The optical field distribution is found to deviate substantially from the input beam profile in the tightly focused region, which is in good agreement with the results of numerical simulations.

  5. Glycemic Variation in Tumor Patients with Total Parenteral Nutrition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Cheng Yang; Yuan-Yuan Dai; Li-Ming Wang; Yi-Bin Xie; Hai-Yan Zhou; Guo-Hui Li

    2015-01-01

    Background:Hyperglycemia is associated with poor clinical outcomes and mortality in several patients.However,studies evaluating hyperglycemia variation in tumor patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) are scarce.The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between glycemia and tumor kinds with TPN by monitoring glycemic variation in tumor patients.Methods:This retrospective clinical trial selected 312 patients with various cancer types,whose unique nutrition treatment was TPN during the monitoring period.All patients had blood glucose (BG) values assessed at least six times daily during the TPN infusion.The glycemic variation before and after TPN was set as the indicator to evaluate the factors influencing BG.Results:The clinical trial lasted 7.5 ± 3.0 days adjusted for age,gender,family cancer history and blood types.There were six cancer types:Hepatic carcinoma (HC,21.8%),rectal carcinoma (17.3%),colon carcinoma (CC,14.7%),gastric carcinoma (29.8%),pancreatic carcinoma (11.5%),and duodenal carcinoma (DC,4.8%).The patients were divided into diabetes and nondiabetes groups.No statistical differences in TPN glucose content between diabetes and nondiabetes groups were found;however,the tumor types affected by BG values were obvious.With increasing BG values,DC,HC and CC were more represented than other tumor types in this sequence in diabetic individuals,as well as in the nondiabetic group.BG was inclined to be more easily influenced in the nondiabetes group.Other factors did not impact BG values,includiug gender,body mass index,and TPN infusion duration time.Conclusions:When tumor patients are treated with TPN,BG levels should be monitored according to different types of tumors,besides differentiating diabetes or nondiabetes patients.Special BG control is needed for DC,HC and CC in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients.If BG overtly increases,positive measurements are needed to control BG values.The ClinicalTrials.gov ID is NCT

  6. Association between glycemic control and antidiabetic drugs in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with cardiovascular complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huri HZ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hasniza Zaman Huri,1,2 Doris Yew Hui Ling,1 Wan Azman Wan Ahmad2,3 1Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2Clinical Investigation Centre, University Malaya Medical Centre, Lembah Pantai, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3Cardiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Purpose: Cardiovascular disease (CVD is a macrovascular complication in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. To date, glycemic control profiles of antidiabetic drugs in cardiovascular (CV complications have not been clearly elucidated. Therefore, this study was conducted retrospectively to assess the association of antidiabetic drugs and glycemic control with CV profiles in T2DM patients. The association of concurrent medications and comorbidities with glycemic control was also investigated.Methods: A total of 220 T2DM patients from the University of Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia, who had at least one CV complication and who had been taking at least one antidiabetic drug for at least 3 months, were included. The associations of antidiabetics, cardiovascular diseases, laboratory parameters, concurrent medications, comorbidities, demographics, and clinical characteristics with glycemic control were investigated.Results: Sulfonylureas in combination (P=0.002 and sulfonylurea monotherapy (P<0.001 were found to be associated with good glycemic control, whereas insulin in combination (P=0.051, and combination biguanides and insulin therapy (P=0.012 were found to be associated with poor glycemic control. Stroke (P=0.044 was the only type of CVD that seemed to be significantly associated with good glycemic control. Other factors such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (P=0.026, elderly patients (P=0.018, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (P=0.021, and fasting plasma glucose (P<0.001 were found to be significantly correlated with good glycemic control

  7. Correlation between 1,5-anhydroglucitol and glycemic excursions in type 2 diabetic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jie; DOU Jing-tao; WANG Xian-ling; YANG Guo-qing; L(U) Zhao-hui; ZHENG Hua; MA Fang-ling; LU Ju-ming; MU Yi-ming

    2011-01-01

    Background The accurate and comprehensive assessment of glycemic control in patients with diabetes is important for optimizing glycemic management and for formulating personalized diabetic treatment schemes.This study aimed to analyze the correlation between 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG) and glycemic excursions in type 2 diabetic patients.Methods Seventy-one outpatients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were randomly recruited from Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital.Using a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS),these patients' blood glucose levels were monitored for three consecutive days to obtain mean blood glucose (MBG) data.Intraday glycemic excursions were evaluated using the mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE),the largest amplitude of glycemic excursions (LAGE),standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG) and the M-value.Interday glycemic excursion was assessed by absolute mean of daily difference (MODD).Postprandial glycemic fluctuations were evaluated using postprandial glucose excursions (PPGE) and postprandial incremental area under the curve (iAUC).Fasting venous blood samples were collected to measure serum 1,5-AG,whole-blood hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and serum glycated albumin (GA).Clinical markers of glycemia and parameters of glycemic excursions from CGMS were analyzed using the Pearson correlation coefficient and multivariate stepwise regression.Results Pearson correlation analysis revealed that 1,5-AG was significantly correlated with MAGE,SDBG,M-value,LAGE,PPGE and iAUC (r values were -0.509,-0.430,-0.530,-0.462,-0.416 and -0.435,respectively,P <0.01),especially in moderately and well-controlled patients,based on defined HbA1c levels.Multivariate stepwise regression analysis revealed a negative correlation between 1,5-AG and the above parameters,but not HbA1c and GA.Finally,HbA1c and GA were positively correlated with MBG and fasting blood glucose (FBG).Conclusions 1,5-AG was much better than HbA1c and GA as a marker of

  8. Glycemic acute changes in type 2 diabetics caused by low and high glycemic index diets Las variaciones de la glucosa aguda en individuos con diabetes tipo 2 causada por las dietas de bajo y alto índice glucémico

    OpenAIRE

    C. E. Gonçalves Reis; J. Dullius

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Low-glycemic index diets may improve the glycemic control in type 2 diabetes but the debate over their effectiveness continues. Objectives: To test the effects of low-glycemic index diets on acute glycemic control (2 days) by measuring capillary blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: This was a crossover randomized clinical trial with 12 type 2 diabetics which were randomly divided into 2 groups and targeted the following draft diets for low and high glycemic i...

  9. Organoleptic and glycemic properties of chickpea-wheat composite breads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Tasleem A; Al-Hassawi, Fatima; Al-Khulaifi, Fatima; Al-Rayyes, Ghanima; Waslien, Carol; Huffman, Fatma G

    2015-04-01

    Prevalence of obesity and type-2-diabetes requires dietary manipulation. It was hypothesized that wheat-legume-composite breads will reduce the spike of blood glucose and increase satiety. Four pan bread samples were prepared: White bread (WB) as standard, Whole-wheat bread (WWB), WWB supplemented with chickpea flour at 25 % (25%ChB) and 35 % (35%ChB) levels. These breads were tested in healthy female subjects for acceptability and for effect on appetite, blood glucose, and physical discomfort in digestion. The breads were rated >5.6 on a 9-point hedonic scale with WB significantly higher than all other breads. No difference in area under the curve (AUC) for appetite was found, but blood glucose AUC was reduced as follows: 35%ChB 25%ChB = WWB or 35%ChB. We conclude that addition of chickpea flour at 35 % to whole wheat produces a bread that is acceptable to eat, causing no physical discomfort and lowers the glycemic response.

  10. Assessing inpatient glycemic control: what are the next steps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Curtiss B; Wellik, Kay E; Kongable, Gail L; Shu, Jianfen

    2012-03-01

    Despite the emergence of glucometrics (i.e., systematic analysis of data on blood glucose levels of inpatients) as a subject of high interest, there remains a lack of standardization on how glucose parameters are measured and reported. This dilemma must be resolved before a national benchmarking process can be developed that will allow institutions to track and compare inpatient glucose control performance against established guidelines and that can also be supported by quality care organizations. In this article, we review some of the questions that need to be resolved through consensus and review of the evidence, and discuss some of the limitations in analyzing and reporting inpatient glucose data that must be addressed (or at least accepted as limitations) before hospitals can commit resources to gathering, compiling, and presenting inpatient glucose statistics as a health care quality measure. Standards must include consensus on which measures to report, the unit of analysis, definitions of targets for hyperglycemia treatment, a definition of hypoglycemia, determination of how data should be gathered (from chart review or from laboratory information systems), and which type of sample (blood or point of care) should be used for analysis of glycemic control. Hospitals and/or their representatives should be included in the discussion. For inpatient glucose control to remain a focus of interest, further dialogue and consensus on the topic are needed.

  11. Glycemic index and pregnancy: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Jimmy Chun Yu; Brand-Miller, Jennie C; Markovic, Tania P; Ross, Glynis P; Moses, Robert G

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aim. Dietary glycemic index (GI) has received considerable research interest over the past 25 years although its application to pregnancy outcomes is more recent. This paper critically evaluates the current evidence regarding the effect of dietary GI on maternal and fetal nutrition. Methods. A systematic literature search using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, SCOPUS, and ISI Web of Science, from 1980 through September 2010, was conducted. Results. Eight studies were included in the systematic review. Two interventional studies suggest that a low-GI diet can reduce the risk of large-for-gestational-age (LGA) infants in healthy pregnancies, but one epidemiological study reported an increase in small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infants. Evidence in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), though limited (n = 3), consistently supports the advantages of a low-GI diet. Conclusion. There is insufficient evidence to recommend a low-GI diet during normal pregnancy. In pregnancy complicated by GDM, a low-GI diet may reduce the need for insulin without adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes. Until larger-scale intervention trials are completed, a low-GI diet should not replace the current recommended pregnancy diets from government and health agencies. Further research regarding the optimal time to start a low-GI diet for maximum protection against adverse pregnancy outcomes is warranted.

  12. Variable classifications of glycemic index determined by glucose meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meng-Hsueh Amanda; Wu, Ming-Chang; Lin, Jenshinn

    2010-07-01

    THE STUDY EVALUATED AND COMPARED THE DIFFERENCES OF GLUCOSE RESPONSES, INCREMENTAL AREA UNDER CURVE (IAUC), GLYCEMIC INDEX (GI) AND THE CLASSIFICATION OF GI VALUES BETWEEN MEASURED BY BIOCHEMICAL ANALYZER (FUJI AUTOMATIC BIOCHEMISTRY ANALYZER (FAA)) AND THREE GLUCOSE METERS: Accue Chek Advantage (AGM), BREEZE 2 (BGM), and Optimum Xceed (OGM). Ten healthy subjects were recruited for the study. The results showed OGM yield highest postprandial glucose responses of 119.6 +/- 1.5, followed by FAA, 118.4 +/- 1.2, BGM, 117.4 +/- 1.4 and AGM, 112.6 +/- 1.3 mg/dl respectively. FAA reached highest mean IAUC of 4156 +/- 208 mg x min/dl, followed by OGM (3835 +/- 270 mg x min/dl), BGM (3730 +/- 241 mg x min/dl) and AGM (3394 +/- 253 mg x min/dl). Among four methods, OGM produced highest mean GI value than FAA (87 +/- 5) than FAA, followed by BGM and AGM (77 +/- 1, 68 +/- 4 and 63 +/- 5, pOGM are more variable methods to determine IAUC, GI and rank GI value of food than FAA. The present result does not necessarily apply to other glucose meters. The performance of glucose meter to determine GI value of food should be evaluated and calibrated before use.

  13. Low Glycemic Index Carbohydrates versus All Types of Carbohydrates for Treating Diabetes in Pregnancy: A Randomized Clinical Trial to Evaluate the Effect of Glycemic Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otilia Perichart-Perera

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Due to the higher prevalence of obesity and diabetes mellitus (DM, more pregnant women complicated with diabetes are in need of clinical care. Purpose. Compare the effect of including only low glycemic index (GI carbohydrates (CHO against all types of CHO on maternal glycemic control and on the maternal and newborn’s nutritional status of women with type 2 DM and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. Methods. Women (n=107, ≤29 weeks of gestation were randomly assigned to one of two nutrition intervention groups: moderate energy and CHO restriction (Group 1: all types of CHO, Group 2: low GI foods. Results. No baseline differences in clinical data were observed. Capillary glucose concentrations throughout pregnancy were similar between groups. Fewer women in Group 2 exceeded weight gain recommendations. Higher risk of prematurity was observed in women in Group 2. No differences in glycemic control were observed between women with type 2 DM and those with GDM. Conclusions. Inclusion of low GI CHO as part of a comprehensive nutrition intervention is equally effective in improving glycemic control as compared to all types of CHO. This strategy had a positive effect in preventing excessive maternal weight gain but increased the risk of prematurity.

  14. Effects of diets differing in glycemic index and glycemic load on cardiovascular risk factors: review of randomized controlled-feeing trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite a considerable amount of data available on the relationship between dietary glycemic index (GI) or load (GL) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, in aggregate, the area remains unsettled. The aim of the present review was to summarize the effect of diets differing in GI/GL on CVD r...

  15. Paracellular drug absorption enhancement through tight junction modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Lemmer, Hendrik Jacobus Righard; Josias H. Hamman

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Inclusion of absorption-enhancing agents in dosage forms is one approach to improve the bioavailability of active pharmaceutical ingredients with low membrane permeability. Tight junctions are dynamic protein structures that form a regulated barrier for movement of molecules through the intercellular spaces across the intestinal epithelium. Some drug absorption enhancers are capable of loosening tight junctions and thereby facilitate paracellular absorption of drug molecules. ...

  16. Western tight gas sands advanced logging workshop proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, J B; Carroll, Jr, H B [eds.

    1982-04-01

    An advanced logging research program is one major aspect of the Western Tight Sands Program. Purpose of this workshop is to help BETC define critical logging needs for tight gas sands and to allow free interchange of ideas on all aspects of the current logging research program. Sixteen papers and abstracts are included together with discussions. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 12 papers. (DLC)

  17. Glycemic index and glycemic load are associated with some cardiovascular risk factors among the PREMIER study participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao-Hwa Lin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical significance of glycemic index (GI and glycemic load (GL is inconclusive. Objective : This study was conducted to examine the association of GI and GL with clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors including body weight, blood pressure (BP, serum lipids, fasting glucose, insulin and homocysteine over time among the PREMIER participants. Design: PREMIER was an 18-month randomized lifestyle intervention trial, conducted from 2000 to 2002, designed to help participants reduce BP by following the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH dietary pattern, losing weight, reducing sodium and increasing physical activity. GI and GL were estimated from 24 h diet recall data at baseline, 6 and 18 months after intervention. PROC MIXED model was used to examine the association of changes in GI or GL with changes in CVD risk factors. Results: A total of 756 randomized participants, 62% females and 34% African Americans and who averaged 50.0±0.3 years old and 95.3±0.7 kg, were included in this report. Neither GI nor GL changes was associated with changes in any risk factors at 6 months. At 18 months, however, the GI change was significantly and positively associated with total cholesterol (TC change only (p<0.05, β = 23.80±12.11 mg/dL or 0.62±0.31 mmol/L with a significant age interaction. The GL change was significantly associated with TC (p=0.02, β = 0.28±0.15 mg/dL or 0.01±0.00 mmol/L positively and with low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C changes negatively (p=0.03, β = − 0.01±0.00 mg/dL or −0.00±0.00 mmol/L, and significant age interactions were observed for both. Conclusion: GI and GL was associated with TC and LDL-C after controlling for energy, fat and fiber intake and other potential confounders and the associations were modified by age. Further investigation into this relationship is important because of its potential clinical impact.

  18. The correlation of dawn phenomenon with glycemic variability parameters in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Gabriela

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Dawn phenomenon could have deleterious effect on overall glycemic control. Glycemic variability may be an independent risk factor for the development of diabetes chronic complications. The study aimed to evaluate any correlations between the dawn phenomenon and parameters of glycemic variability in a cohort of type 2 diabetes patients (T2DM. Material and methods. This retrospective observational study included 131 T2DM patients. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM has been performed. Data from the first 24h of full recording were used for analysis of glycemic variability indices: mean level of 24h interstitial glucose value and standard deviation; % coefficient of variation; J index; mean amplitude of glycemic excursion - MAGE; continuous overall net glycemic action (CONGA at 1, 2, 4 and 6 hours; mean of daily differences (MODD index. Results. Mean age was 56.04 ± 9.91 years, 35.9% women, 17.6% on diet, 53.4% on oral therapy and 29% on insulin. Dawn phenomenon was more frequent in patients below 60 years (70% and in oral therapy group (72.85%. Significant correlations between the dawn phenomenon and j-index, MAGE, CONGA-4 and CONGA-6 have been found in T2DM patients on diet therapy alone. The amplitude of dawn phenomenon was 46.10 ± 24.40 mg/dl and significantly correlated (p<0.05 after adjustment for age, gender and treatment with % CV, MAGE, CONGA-1, CONGA-2, CONGA-4, CONGA-6 and MODD. Conclusions. The dawn phenomenon significantly increases the glycemic variability parameters in drug-naive T2DM patients, with no impact in T2DM on oral or insulin therapy.

  19. Regulation of Tight Junctions in Upper Airway Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kojima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mucosal barrier of the upper respiratory tract including the nasal cavity, which is the first site of exposure to inhaled antigens, plays an important role in host defense in terms of innate immunity and is regulated in large part by tight junctions of epithelial cells. Tight junction molecules are expressed in both M cells and dendritic cells as well as epithelial cells of upper airway. Various antigens are sampled, transported, and released to lymphocytes through the cells in nasal mucosa while they maintain the integrity of the barrier. Expression of tight junction molecules and the barrier function in normal human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs are affected by various stimuli including growth factor, TLR ligand, and cytokine. In addition, epithelial-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP, which is a master switch for allergic inflammatory diseases including allergic rhinitis, enhances the barrier function together with an increase of tight junction molecules in HNECs. Furthermore, respiratory syncytial virus infection in HNECs in vitro induces expression of tight junction molecules and the barrier function together with proinflammatory cytokine release. This paper summarizes the recent progress in our understanding of the regulation of tight junctions in the upper airway epithelium under normal, allergic, and RSV-infected conditions.

  20. Key Elements Controlling Oil Accumulation within the Tight Sandstones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiyan Hu; Zhiping Zeng; Jianzhang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Tight oil sandstone reservoirs with low porosity and permeability, which are an uncon-ventional petroleum resource, have been discovered in the Jurassic intervals of the central Junggar Ba-sin, the northwestern China. To reveal the accumulation mechanism, a relatively comprehensive re-search was conducted, including oil-source correlation, porosity evolution, and hydrocarbon charging history. The results show that crude oil of these tight sandstone reservoirs were mainly from Permian source rocks with some contribution from Jurassic source rocks. The reservoirs were buried at shallow depth (5%). In contrast, the sandstone reservoir had already become tight and did not provide available space to ac-cumulate oil due to severe compaction and cementation when hydrocarbon from Jurassic source rock filled, evidenced by low GOI values (<5%). Therefore, reservoir porosity controls the oil accumulation within tight sandstone. Whether tight sandstone reservoirs accumulate oil depends on the reservoir quality when hydrocarbons charge. Before the exploration of tight oil sandstone reservoirs, it should be required to investigate the relationship between oil charging history and porosity evolution to reduce the exploration risk and figure out the available targets.

  1. Tightness-looseness across the 50 united states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Jesse R; Gelfand, Michele J

    2014-06-01

    This research demonstrates wide variation in tightness-looseness (the strength of punishment and degree of latitude/permissiveness) at the state level in the United States, as well as its association with a variety of ecological and historical factors, psychological characteristics, and state-level outcomes. Consistent with theory and past research, ecological and man-made threats--such as a higher incidence of natural disasters, greater disease prevalence, fewer natural resources, and greater degree of external threat--predicted increased tightness at the state level. Tightness is also associated with higher trait conscientiousness and lower trait openness, as well as a wide array of outcomes at the state level. Compared with loose states, tight states have higher levels of social stability, including lowered drug and alcohol use, lower rates of homelessness, and lower social disorganization. However, tight states also have higher incarceration rates, greater discrimination and inequality, lower creativity, and lower happiness relative to loose states. In all, tightness-looseness provides a parsimonious explanation of the wide variation we see across the 50 states of the United States of America.

  2. Frequency and predictors of suboptimal glycemic control in an African diabetic population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kibirige D

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Davis Kibirige,1 George Patrick Akabwai,2 Leaticia Kampiire,3 Daniel Ssekikubo Kiggundu,4 William Lumu5 1Department of Medicine/Diabetic and Hypertension Clinics, Our Lady of Consolota Hospital, Kisubi, 2Baylor College of Medicine, Children’s Foundation, 3Infectious Diseases Research Collaboration, Kampala, 4Nephrology Unit, Mulago National Referral and Teaching Hospital, Kampala, 5Department of Medicine and Diabetes/Endocrine Unit, Mengo Hospital, Mengo, Uganda Background: Persistent suboptimal glycemic control is invariably associated with onset and progression of acute and chronic diabetic complications in diabetic patients. In Uganda, studies documenting the magnitude and predictors of suboptimal glycemic control in adult ambulatory diabetic patients are limited. This study aimed at determining the frequency and predictors of suboptimal glycemic control in adult diabetic patients attending three urban outpatient diabetic clinics in Uganda. Methods: In this hospital-based cross-sectional study, eligible ambulatory adult diabetic patients attending outpatient diabetic clinics of three urban hospitals were consecutively enrolled over 11 months. Suboptimal glycemic control was defined as glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c level ≥7%. Multivariable analysis was applied to determine the predictors. Results: The mean age of the study participants was 52.2±14.4 years, and the majority of them were females (283, 66.9%. The median (interquartile range HbA1c level was 9% (6.8%–12.4%. Suboptimal glycemic control was noted in 311 study participants, accounting for 73.52% of the participants. HbA1c levels of 7%–8%, 8.1%–9.9%, and ≥10% were noted in 56 (13.24%, 76 (17.97%, and 179 (42.32% study participants, respectively. The documented predictors of suboptimal glycemic control were metformin monotherapy (odds ratio: 0.36, 95% confidence interval: 0.21–0.63, p<0.005 and insulin therapy (odds ratio: 2.41, 95% confidence interval: 1.41–4.12, p=0

  3. Glycemic control and antidiabetic drugs in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with renal complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huri HZ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hasniza Zaman Huri,1,2 Lay Peng Lim,1 Soo Kun Lim3 1Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 2Clinical Investigation Centre, University Malaya Medical Centre, 3Renal Unit, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Background: Good glycemic control can delay the progression of kidney diseases in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients with renal complications. To date, the association between antidiabetic agents and glycemic control in this specific patient population is not well established.Purpose: This study aimed to identify antidiabetic regimens as well as other factors that associated with glycemic control in T2DM patients with different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD.Patients and methods: This retrospective, cross-sectional study involved 242 T2DM inpatients and outpatients with renal complications from January 2009 to March 2014 and was conducted in a tertiary teaching hospital in Malaysia. Glycated hemoglobin (A1C was used as main parameter to assess patients’ glycemic status. Patients were classified to have good (A1C <7% or poor glycemic control (A1C ≥7% based on the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association.Results: Majority of the patients presented with CKD stage 4 (43.4%. Approximately 55.4% of patients were categorized to have poor glycemic control. Insulin (57.9% was the most commonly prescribed antidiabetic medication, followed by sulfonylureas (43%. Of all antidiabetic regimens, sulfonylureas monotherapy (P<0.001, insulin therapy (P=0.005, and combination of biguanides with insulin (P=0.038 were found to be significantly associated with glycemic control. Other factors including duration of T2DM (P=0.004, comorbidities such as anemia (P=0.024 and retinopathy (P=0.033, concurrent medications such as erythropoietin therapy (P=0.047, a-blockers (P=0.033, and antigouts (P=0.003 were also correlated with A1C.Conclusion: Identification of

  4. A randomized controlled trial to prevent glycemic relapse in longitudinal diabetes care: Study protocol (NCT00362193

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Dianne

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is a common disease with self-management a key aspect of care. Large prospective trials have shown that maintaining glycated hemoglobin less than 7% greatly reduces complications but translating this level of control into everyday clinical practice can be difficult. Intensive improvement programs are successful in attaining control in patients with type 2 diabetes, however, many patients experience glycemic relapse once returned to routine care. This early relapse is, in part, due to decreased adherence in self-management behaviors. Objective This paper describes the design of the Glycemic Relapse Prevention study. The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal frequency of maintenance intervention needed to prevent glycemic relapse. The primary endpoint is glycemic relapse, which is defined as glycated hemoglobin greater than 8% and an increase of 1% from baseline. Methods The intervention consists of telephonic contact by a nurse practitioner with a referral to a dietitian if indicated. This intervention was designed to provide early identification of self-care problems, understanding the rationale behind the self-care lapse and problem solve to find a negotiated solution. A total of 164 patients were randomized to routine care (least intensive, routine care with phone contact every three months (moderate intensity or routine care with phone contact every month (most intensive. Conclusion The baseline patient characteristics are similar across the treatment arms. Intervention fidelity analysis showed excellent reproducibility. This study will provide insight into the important but poorly understood area of glycemic relapse prevention.

  5. Family system dynamics and type 1 diabetic glycemic variability: a vector-auto-regressive model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Moritz Philipp; Winker, Peter; Böttcher, Claudia; Brosig, Burkhard

    2013-06-01

    Statistical approaches rooted in econometric methodology, so far foreign to the psychiatric and psychological realms have provided exciting and substantial new insights into complex mind-body interactions over time and individuals. Over 120 days, this structured diary study explored the mutual interactions of emotions within a classic 3-person family system with its Type 1 diabetic adolescent's daily blood glucose variability. Glycemic variability was measured through daily standard deviations of blood glucose determinations (at least 3 per day). Emotions were captured individually utilizing the self-assessment manikin on affective valence (negative-positive), activation (calm-excited), and control (dominated-dominant). Auto- and cross-correlating the stationary absolute (level) values of the mutually interacting parallel time series data sets through vector autoregression (VAR, grounded in econometric theory) allowed for the formulation of 2 concordant models. Applying Cholesky Impulse Response Analysis at a 95% confidence interval, we provided evidence for an adolescent being happy, calm, and in control to exhibit less glycemic variability and hence diabetic derailment. A nondominating mother and a happy father seemed to also reduce glycemic variability. Random shocks increasing glycemic variability affected only the adolescent and her father: In 1 model, the male parent felt in charge; in the other, he calmed down while his daughter turned sad. All reactions to external shocks lasted for less than 4 full days. Extant literature on affect and glycemic variability in Type 1 diabetic adolescents as well as challenges arising from introducing econometric theory to the field were discussed.

  6. The media of sociology: tight or loose translations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggenheim, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Sociologists have increasingly come to recognize that the discipline has unduly privileged textual representations, but efforts to incorporate visual and other media are still only in their beginning. This paper develops an analysis of the ways objects of knowledge are translated into other media, in order to understand the visual practices of sociology and to point out unused possibilities. I argue that the discourse on visual sociology, by assuming that photographs are less objective than text, is based on an asymmetric media-determinism and on a misleading notion of objectivity. Instead, I suggest to analyse media with the concept of translations. I introduce several kinds of translations, most centrally the distinction between tight and loose ones. I show that many sciences, such as biology, focus on tight translations, using a variety of media and manipulating both research objects and representations. Sociology, in contrast, uses both tight and loose translations, but uses the latter only for texts. For visuals, sociology restricts itself to what I call 'the documentary': focusing on mechanical recording technologies without manipulating either the object of research or the representation. I conclude by discussing three rare examples of what is largely excluded in sociology: visual loose translations, visual tight translations based on non-mechanical recording technologies, and visual tight translations based on mechanical recording technologies that include the manipulation of both object and representation.

  7. Testosterone regulates tight junction proteins and influences prostatic autoimmune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jing; Mostaghel, Elahe A; Vakar-Lopez, Funda; Montgomery, Bruce; True, Larry; Nelson, Peter S

    2011-06-01

    Testosterone and inflammation have been linked to the development of common age-associated diseases affecting the prostate gland including prostate cancer, prostatitis, and benign prostatic hypertrophy. We hypothesized that testosterone regulates components of prostate tight junctions which serve as a barrier to inflammation, thus providing a connection between age- and treatment-associated testosterone declines and prostatic pathology. We examined the expression and distribution of tight junction proteins in prostate biospecimens from mouse models and a clinical study of chemical castration, using transcript profiling, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. We determined that low serum testosterone is associated with reduced transcript and protein levels of Claudin 4 and Claudin 8, resulting in defective tight junction ultrastructure in benign prostate glands. Expression of Claudin 4 and Claudin 8 was negatively correlated with the mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate caused by testosterone deprivation. Testosterone suppression also induced an autoimmune humoral response directed toward prostatic proteins. Testosterone supplementation in castrate mice resulted in re-expression of tight junction components in prostate epithelium and significantly reduced prostate inflammatory cell numbers. These data demonstrate that tight junction architecture in the prostate is related to changes in serum testosterone levels, and identify an androgen-regulated mechanism that potentially contributes to the development of prostate inflammation and consequent pathology.

  8. Two-Layer Tight Frame Sparsifying Model for Compressed Sensing Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xi; Dong, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Compressed sensing magnetic resonance imaging (CSMRI) employs image sparsity to reconstruct MR images from incoherently undersampled K-space data. Existing CSMRI approaches have exploited analysis transform, synthesis dictionary, and their variants to trigger image sparsity. Nevertheless, the accuracy, efficiency, or acceleration rate of existing CSMRI methods can still be improved due to either lack of adaptability, high complexity of the training, or insufficient sparsity promotion. To properly balance the three factors, this paper proposes a two-layer tight frame sparsifying (TRIMS) model for CSMRI by sparsifying the image with a product of a fixed tight frame and an adaptively learned tight frame. The two-layer sparsifying and adaptive learning nature of TRIMS has enabled accurate MR reconstruction from highly undersampled data with efficiency. To solve the reconstruction problem, a three-level Bregman numerical algorithm is developed. The proposed approach has been compared to three state-of-the-art methods over scanned physical phantom and in vivo MR datasets and encouraging performances have been achieved. PMID:27747226

  9. Tight coupling UFMArcGIS for simulating inundation depth in densely area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S. H.

    2010-07-01

    The integration of hydrological models and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) usually takes two approaches: loose coupling and tight coupling. This paper presents a tight coupling approach within a GIS environment that is achieved by integrating the urban flood model with the macro language of GIS. Such an approach affords an uncomplicated way to capitalize on the GIS visualization and spatial analysis functions, thereby significantly supporting the dynamic simulation process of hydrological modeling. The tight coupling approach is illustrated by UFMArcGIS (Urban Flood Model with ArcGIS), which is a realization of an urban flood model integrated with the VBA (visual basic of application) language of ArcGIS. Within this model, major stages of model structures are created from the initial parameter input and transformation of datasets, intermediate maps are then visualized, and the results are finally presented in various graphical formats in their geographic context. This approach provides a convenient and single environment in which users can visually interact with the model, e.g. by adjusting parameters while simultaneously observing the corresponding results. This significantly facilitates users in the exploratory data analysis and decision-making stages in terms of the model applications.

  10. Dietary Glycemic Index during Pregnancy Is Associated with Biomarkers of the Metabolic Syndrome in Offspring at Age 20 Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Inge; Granström, Charlotta; Haldorsson, Thorhallur;

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that metabolic syndrome is rooted in fetal life with a potential key role of nutrition during pregnancy. The objective of the study was to assess the possible associations between the dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) during pregnancy and biomarkers...

  11. Impact of weight loss and maintenance with ad libitum diets varying in protein and glycemic index content on metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadaki, Angeliki; Linardakis, Manolis; Plada, Maria

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of weight loss and maintenance with diets that varied with regard to protein content and glycemic index (GI) on metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) status.......We investigated the effects of weight loss and maintenance with diets that varied with regard to protein content and glycemic index (GI) on metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) status....

  12. The Importance of Social Support on Glycemic Control in Low-Income Latinos with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotberg, Britt; Junqueira, Yasmine; Gosdin, Lucas; Mejia, Roberto; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The U.S. Latino population exhibits poorer glycemic control than the white population, leading to more frequent health complications and greater disease severity. Social support has been shown a significant factor in health and well-being. Purpose: To determine the association between glycemic control and social support in patients…

  13. Interactions between Starch, Lipids, and Proteins in Foods: Microstructure Control for Glycemic Response Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parada, Javier; Santos, Jose L

    2016-10-25

    In real food, starch is usually forming part of a matrix with lipids and proteins. However, research on this ternary system and interactions between such food components has been scarce so far. The control of food microstructure is crucial to determine the product properties, including sensorial and nutritionals ones. This paper reviews the microstructural principles of interactions between starch, lipids, and proteins in foods as well as their effect on postprandial glycemic response, considering human intrinsic differences on postprandial glycemic responses. Several lines of research support the hypothesis that foods without rapidly digestible starch will not mandatorily generate the lowest postprandial glycemic response, highlighting that the full understanding of food microstructure, which modulates starch digestion, plays a key role on food design from a nutritional viewpoint.

  14. The Glycemic Index of Rice and Rice Products: A Review, and Table of GI Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Bhupinder; Ranawana, Viren; Henry, Jeyakumar

    2016-01-01

    Rice is the principle staple and energy source for nearly half the world's population and therefore has significant nutrition and health implications. Rice is generally considered a high glycemic index (GI) food, however, this depends on varietal, compositional, processing, and accompaniment factors. Being a major contributor to the glycemic load in rice eating populations, there is increasing concern that the rising prevalence of insulin resistance is as a result of the consumption of large amounts of rice. Devising ways and means of reducing the glycemic impact of rice is therefore imperative. This review gathers studies examining the GI of rice and rice products and provides a critical overview of the current state of the art. A table collating published GI values for rice and rice products is also included.

  15. Glycemic Variability Is Associated With Reduced Cardiac Autonomic Modulation in Women With Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleischer, Jesper; Lebech Cichosz, Simon; Hoeyem, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    and 39 women with non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetes and a known duration of diabetes sensor for 3 days, and the mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE) was calculated to obtain individual glycemic variability. Cardiac......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the sex differences in cardiac autonomic modulation in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and to determine whether cardiac autonomic modulation is associated with glycemic variability. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We investigated a cohort consisting of 48 men...... variability as assessed by MAGE. This was not the case in men. The association in women persisted in a multivariate regression analysis controlling for weight, mean heart rate, blood pressure (systolic), and triglycerides. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with newly diagnosed and well-controlled type 2 diabetes...

  16. The obesity epidemic: is glycemic index the key to unlocking a hidden addiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornley, Simon; McRobbie, Hayden; Eyles, Helen; Walker, Natalie; Simmons, Greg

    2008-11-01

    High body mass index (BMI) is an important cause of a range of diseases and is estimated to be the seventh leading cause of death globally. In this paper we discuss evidence that food consumption shows similarities to features of other addictive behaviours, such as automaticity and loss of control. Glycemic index is hypothesised to be the element of food that predicts its addictive potential. Although we do not have substantive evidence of a withdrawal syndrome from high glycemic food abstinence, anecdotal reports exist. Empirical scientific and clinical studies support an addictive component of eating behaviour, with similar neurotransmitters and neural pathways triggered by food consumption, as with other drugs of addiction. The public health implications of such a theory are discussed, with reference to tobacco control. Subtle changes in the preparation and manufacturing of commonly consumed food items, reducing glycemic index through regulatory channels, may break such a cycle of addiction and draw large public health benefits.

  17. Maize and resistant starch enriched breads reduce postprandial glycemic responses in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brites, Carla M; Trigo, Maria J; Carrapiço, Belmira; Alviña, Marcela; Bessa, Rui J

    2011-04-01

    White wheat bread is a poor source of dietary fiber, typically containing less than 2%. A demand exists for the development of breads with starch that is slowly digestible or partially resistant to the digestive process. The utilization of maize flour and resistant starch is expected to reduce the release and absorption of glucose and, hence, lower the glycemic index of bread. This study was undertaken to investigate the hypothesis that a diet of maize bread, as produced and consumed in Portugal, would have beneficial metabolic effects on rats compared to white wheat bread. We also hypothesized that the effect of resistant starch on glycemic response could be altered by the use of different formulations and breadmaking processes for wheat and maize breads. Resistant starch (RS) was incorporated into formulations of breads at 20% of the inclusion rate of wheat and maize flours. Assays were conducted with male Wistar rats (n = 36), divided into four groups and fed either wheat bread, RS-wheat bread, maize bread, and RS-maize bread to evaluate feed intake, body weight gain, fecal pH, and postprandial blood glucose response (glycemic response). Blood triglycerides, total cholesterol concentrations, and liver weights were also determined. The maize bread group presented higher body weight gain and cholesterol level, lower fecal pH, and postprandial blood glucose response than the wheat bread group. The RS-wheat bread group showed significant reductions in feed intake, fecal pH, postprandial blood glucose response, and total cholesterol. The RS-maize group displayed significant reductions of body weight gain, fecal pH, and total cholesterol levels; however, for the glycemic response, only a reduction in fasting level was observed. These results suggest that maize bread has a lower glycemic index than wheat bread, and the magnitude of the effect of RS on glycemic response depends of type of bread.

  18. The association between diabetes related medical costs and glycemic control: A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barron John

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this research is to quantify the association between direct medical costs attributable to type 2 diabetes and level of glycemic control. Methods A longitudinal analysis using a large health plan administrative database was performed. The index date was defined as the first date of diabetes diagnosis and individuals had to have at least two HbA1c values post index date in order to be included in the analyses. A total of 10,780 individuals were included in the analyses. Individuals were stratified into groups of good (N = 6,069, fair (N = 3,586, and poor (N = 1,125 glycemic control based upon mean HbA1c values across the study period. Differences between HbA1c groups were analyzed using a generalized linear model (GLM, with differences between groups tested by utilizing z-statistics. The analyses allowed a wide range of factors to affect costs. Results 42.1% of those treated only with oral agents, 66.1% of those treated with oral agents and insulin, and 57.2% of those treated with insulin alone were found to have suboptimal control (defined as fair or poor throughout the study period (average duration of follow-up was 2.95 years. Results show that direct medical costs attributable to type 2 diabetes were 16% lower for individuals with good glycemic control than for those with fair control ($1,505 vs. $1,801, p Conclusion Almost half (44% of all patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are at sub-optimal glycemic control. Evidence from this analysis indicates that the direct medical costs of treating type 2 diabetes are significantly higher for individuals who have fair or poor glycemic control than for those who have good glycemic control. Patients under fair control account for a greater proportion of the cost burden associated with antidiabetic prescription drugs.

  19. The effects of glycemic control on seizures and seizure-induced excitotoxic cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schauwecker Paula

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder after stroke, affecting more than 50 million persons worldwide. Metabolic disturbances are often associated with epileptic seizures, but the pathogenesis of this relationship is poorly understood. It is known that seizures result in altered glucose metabolism, the reduction of intracellular energy metabolites such as ATP, ADP and phosphocreatine and the accumulation of metabolic intermediates, such as lactate and adenosine. In particular, it has been suggested that the duration and extent of glucose dysregulation may be a predictor of the pathological outcome of status. However, little is known about neither the effects of glycemic control on brain metabolism nor the effects of managing systemic glucose concentrations in epilepsy. Results In this study, we examined glycemic modulation of kainate-induced seizure sensitivity and its neuropathological consequences. To investigate the relationship between glycemic modulation, seizure susceptibility and its neuropathological consequences, C57BL/6 mice (excitotoxin cell death resistant were subjected to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, followed by systemic administration of kainic acid to induce seizures. Glycemic modulation resulted in minimal consequences with regard to seizure severity but increased hippocampal pathology, irrespective of whether mice were hypoglycemic or hyperglycemic prior to kainate administration. Moreover, we found that exogenous administration of glucose following kainic acid seizures significantly reduced the extent of hippocampal pathology in FVB/N mice (excitotoxin cell death susceptible following systemic administration of kainic acid. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that modulation of the glycemic index can modify the outcome of brain injury in the kainate model of seizure induction. Moreover, modulation of the glycemic index through glucose rescue greatly diminishes the extent of seizure

  20. Packing tight Hamilton cycles in 3-uniform hypergraphs

    CERN Document Server

    Frieze, Alan; Loh, Po-Shen

    2010-01-01

    Let H be a 3-uniform hypergraph with N vertices. A tight Hamilton cycle C \\subset H is a collection of N edges for which there is an ordering of the vertices v_1, ..., v_N such that every triple of consecutive vertices {v_i, v_{i+1}, v_{i+2}} is an edge of C (indices are considered modulo N). We develop new techniques which enable us to prove that under certain natural pseudo-random conditions, almost all edges of H can be covered by edge-disjoint tight Hamilton cycles, for N divisible by 4. Consequently, we derive the corollary that random 3-uniform hypergraphs can be almost completely packed with tight Hamilton cycles w.h.p., for N divisible by 4 and P not too small. Along the way, we develop a similar result for packing Hamilton cycles in pseudo-random digraphs with even numbers of vertices.

  1. Tightly coupled long baseline/ultra-short baseline integrated navigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Pedro; Silvestre, Carlos; Oliveira, Paulo

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a novel integrated navigation filter based on a combined long baseline/ultra short baseline acoustic positioning system with application to underwater vehicles. With a tightly coupled structure, the position, linear velocity, attitude, and rate gyro bias are estimated, considering the full nonlinear system dynamics without resorting to any algebraic inversion or linearisation techniques. The resulting solution ensures convergence of the estimation error to zero for all initial conditions, exponentially fast. Finally, it is shown, under simulation environment, that the filter achieves very good performance in the presence of sensor noise.

  2. Schematic baryon models, their tight binding description and their microwave realization

    CERN Document Server

    Sadurní, E; Kuhl, U; Mortessagne, F; Seligman, T H

    2013-01-01

    A schematic model for baryon excitations is presented in terms of a symmetric Dirac gyroscope, a relativistic model solvable in closed form, that reduces to a rotor in the non-relativistic limit. The model is then mapped on a nearest neighbour tight binding model. In its simplest one-dimensional form this model yields a finite equidistant spectrum. This is experimentally implemented as a chain of dielectric resonators under conditions where their coupling is evanescent and good agreement with the prediction is achieved.

  3. Schematic baryon models, their tight binding description and their microwave realization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadurní, E.; Franco-Villafañe, J. A.; Kuhl, U.; Mortessagne, F.; Seligman, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    A schematic model for baryon excitations is presented in terms of a symmetric Dirac gyroscope, a relativistic model solvable in closed form, that reduces to a rotor in the non-relativistic limit. The model is then mapped on a nearest neighbour tight binding model. In its simplest one-dimensional form this model yields a finite equidistant spectrum. This is experimentally implemented as a chain of dielectric resonators under conditions where their coupling is evanescent and a good agreement with the prediction is achieved.

  4. Vibrationally resolved UV/Vis spectroscopy with time-dependent density functional based tight binding

    CERN Document Server

    Rüger, Robert; van Lenthe, Erik; Heine, Thomas; Visscher, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    We report a time-dependent density functional based tight-binding (TD-DFTB) scheme for the calculation of UV/Vis spectra, explicitly taking into account the excitation of nuclear vibrations via the harmonic approximation. The theory of vibrationally resolved UV/Vis spectroscopy is first summarized from the viewpoint of TD-DFTB. The method is benchmarked against time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations for strongly dipole allowed excitations in various aromatic and polar molecules. Using the recent 3ob:freq parameter set of Elstner's group, excellent agreement with TD-DFT calculations using local functionals was achieved.

  5. Tight bound on coherent-state-based entanglement generation over lossy channels

    CERN Document Server

    Azuma, Koji; Koashi, Masato; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2009-01-01

    The first stage of the hybrid quantum repeaters is entanglement generation based on transmission of pulses in coherent states over a lossy channel. Protocols to make entanglement with only one type of error are favorable for rendering subsequent entanglement distillation efficient. Here we provide the tight upper bound on performances of these protocols that is determined only by the channel loss. In addition, we show that this bound is achievable by utilizing a proposed protocol [arXiv:0811.3100] composed of a simple combination of linear optical elements and photon-number-resolving detectors.

  6. Quantifying the Effect of Metformin Treatment and Dose on Glycemic Control

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer A Hirst; Farmer, Andrew J.; Ali, Raghib; Roberts, Nia W.; Stevens, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Metformin is the first-line oral medication recommended for glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. We reviewed the literature to quantify the effect of metformin treatment on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in all types of diabetes and examine the impact of differing doses on glycemic control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched from 1950 to June 2010 for trials of at least 12 weeks’ duration in which diabetic patients w...

  7. Perception of family support is correlated with glycemic control in Greeks with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilias, I; Hatzimichelakis, E; Souvatzoglou, A; Anagnostopoulou, T; Tselebis, A

    2001-06-01

    We studied 98 native Greek patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Their degree of glycemic control, evaluated with glycated hemoglobin A1c levels, was correlated with perceived family support, assessed with the Family Support Scale. The different social context of Greece--and its corresponding perception of family support--influence glycemic control in a way that is at variance from data of some studies of Anglo-Saxon families. In conclusion, family support should be taken into consideration in the management of native Greek patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  8. Glycemic profile and prebiotic potential "in vitro" of bread with yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Moura Rolim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to elaborate bread with yacon flour at two different levels (6% and 11% and to analyze their proximate composition, their glycemic indices and their prebiotic potentials in vitro. Bread with 6% and 11% of yacon flour presented, simultaneously, low and moderate glycemic index. As for the prebiotic potentials, it was evident the presence of probiotic bacteria, particularly Lactobacillus. The results showed that, the addition of yacon flour on bread rendered products from low to moderate GI, with prebiotic potential, low fat and high fiber contents, according to the Brazilian food legislation.

  9. Tight Sample Complexity of Large-Margin Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Sabato, Sivan; Tishby, Naftali

    2010-01-01

    We obtain a tight distribution-specific characterization of the sample complexity of large-margin classification with L_2 regularization: We introduce the \\gamma-adapted-dimension, which is a simple function of the spectrum of a distribution's covariance matrix, and show distribution-specific upper and lower bounds on the sample complexity, both governed by the \\gamma-adapted-dimension of the source distribution. We conclude that this new quantity tightly characterizes the true sample complexity of large-margin classification. The bounds hold for a rich family of sub-Gaussian distributions.

  10. Glycemic index and glycemic load in relation to changes in body weight, body fat distribution, and body composition in adult Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare-Bruun, Helle; Flint, Anne; Heitmann, Berit L

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A diet with a high glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) may promote overconsumption of energy and increase the risk of weight gain. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to investigate the relation between GI and GL of habitual diets and subsequent 6-y changes in body weight...... born in 1922, 1932, 1942, or 1952. A baseline health examination and a dietary history interview were carried out in 1987 and 1988; a follow-up health examination was performed in 1993 and 1994. RESULTS: Positive associations between GI and changes in body weight (DeltaBW), percentage body fat (Delta...... observed in men, and no significant associations with GL were observed in either sex. CONCLUSIONS: High-GI diets may lead to increases in BW, body fat mass, and WC in women, especially in sedentary women, which suggests that physical activity may protect against diet-induced weight gain. No associations...

  11. Taking a low glycemic index multi-nutrient supplement as breakfast improves glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Di; Zhang, Peiwen; Guo, Honghui; Ling, Wenhua

    2014-12-10

    Dietary therapy is the mainstay of treatment for diabetes. This study examined the effect of a low glycemic index (GI) multi-nutrient supplement, consumed in place of breakfast, on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 71 participants were randomized at a 2:1 ratio into either a breakfast replacement group or a normal breakfast group for a 12-week interventional study. The primary outcome measure was change in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Nutrition status and somatometry were studied as secondary outcomes. The breakfast replacement group displayed a -0.2% absolute reduction in HbA1c (95% CI (confidence interval), -0.38% to -0.07%, p = 0.004), while the HbA1c of the control group increased 0.3% (95% CI, 0.1% to 0.5%, p = 0.005). The baseline Mini Nutritional Assessment score for both groups was 26.0 and no significant changes occurred following intervention. However, there was a statistically significant difference in body mass index between the treatment and control groups (p = 0.032) due to the weight gain in the control group (increased 0.5 kg, 95% CI was 0.2 to 0.9, p = 0.007). These data suggest that breakfast replacement with a low GI multi-nutrient supplement can improve glycemic and weight control in T2DM.

  12. Taking a Low Glycemic Index Multi-Nutrient Supplement as Breakfast Improves Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dietary therapy is the mainstay of treatment for diabetes. This study examined the effect of a low glycemic index (GI multi-nutrient supplement, consumed in place of breakfast, on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. A total of 71 participants were randomized at a 2:1 ratio into either a breakfast replacement group or a normal breakfast group for a 12-week interventional study. The primary outcome measure was change in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c. Nutrition status and somatometry were studied as secondary outcomes. The breakfast replacement group displayed a −0.2% absolute reduction in HbA1c (95% CI (confidence interval, −0.38% to −0.07%, p = 0.004, while the HbA1c of the control group increased 0.3% (95% CI, 0.1% to 0.5%, p = 0.005. The baseline Mini Nutritional Assessment score for both groups was 26.0 and no significant changes occurred following intervention. However, there was a statistically significant difference in body mass index between the treatment and control groups (p = 0.032 due to the weight gain in the control group (increased 0.5 kg, 95% CI was 0.2 to 0.9, p = 0.007. These data suggest that breakfast replacement with a low GI multi-nutrient supplement can improve glycemic and weight control in T2DM.

  13. The tight pants syndrome--a sporting variant.

    OpenAIRE

    Jowett, N I; Robinson, C G

    1996-01-01

    Tight neoprene 'warm pants' are increasingly utilised by sportsmen to prevent muscular injury. However, they may impede venous flow from the legs. We describe a case of extensive proximal deep vein thrombosis with subsequent pulmonary embolism in a fit young man with previous hip trauma.

  14. Si Tight-Binding Parameters from Genetic Algorithm Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimeck, G.; Bowen, R.; Boykin, T.; Salazar-Lazaro, C.; Cwik, T.; Stoica, A.

    1999-01-01

    Quantum mechanical simulations of carrier transport in Si require an accurate model of the complicated Si bandstructure. Tight-binding models are an attractive method of choice since they bear the full electronic structure symmetry in them and they can discretize a realistic device on an atomic scale.

  15. Impact of lifestyle modification on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandita B Sanghani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Current treatment guidelines support the role of lifestyle modification, in terms of increasing the quantity and quality of physical activity to achieve target glycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Objective: To assess the effect of structured exercise training and unstructured physical activity interventions on glycemic control. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized six-month exercise intervention study conducted with previously inactive 279 patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Before randomization, all enrolled T2DM participants (n: 300; 30 to 60 year old, having diabetes for more than a year with HbA1c levels of 6.5% or higher entered a one-month run-in phase to reduce dropout and maintain adherence. Results: A recommendation to increase physical activity was beneficial (0.14% HbA1c reduction; P = 0.12, but was not bringing significantly declines in HbA1c, whereas, structured exercise training is associated with a significant HbA1c decline of 0.59%. ( P = 0.030. In a subgroup analysis limited to participants with a baseline HbA1c value > 7%, both the unstructured (0. 48%; P = 0.04 and structured exercise training (0.77%; P < 0.01 groups experienced significant decline in HbA1c Vs the control, whereas among participants with baseline hemoglobin A1c values less than 7%, significant reduction occurred only in the structured exercise training group. Changes in blood pressure; total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol (high-density lipoprotein, LDL-cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein and the atherogenic index factors did not statistically significantly differ within (baseline to follow-up and among groups. Conclusion: Supervised structured training was more efficacious than unstructured activity in achieving declines in HbA1c. Although both structured and unstructured training provide benefits, only the former was associated with significant reductions in HbA1c levels. Therefore, T2DM patients should be stimulated to

  16. Estimated glycemic index and dietary fiber content of cookies elaborated with extruded wheat bran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Pérez, Faviola; Salazar-García, María Guadalupe; Romero-Baranzini, Ana Lourdes; Islas-Rubio, Alma Rosa; Ramírez-Wong, Benjamín

    2013-03-01

    The increasing demand for high-fiber products has favored the design of numerous bakery products rich in fiber such as bread, cookies, and cakes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the dietary fiber and estimated glycemic index of cookies containing extruded wheat bran. Wheat bran was subjected to extrusion process under three temperature profiles: TP1;(60, 75, 85 and 100 °C), TP2;(60, 80, 100 and 120 °C), and TP3;(60, 80, 110 and 140 °C) and three moisture contents: (15, 23, and 31 %). Cookies were elaborated using extruded wheat bran (30 %), separated into two fractions (coarse and fine). The dietary fiber content of cookies elaborated with extruded wheat bran was higher than the controls; C0 (100 % wheat flour) and C1 (30 % of no extruded bran coarse fraction) and C2 (30 % of no extruded bran fine fraction). The higher values of dietary fiber were observed on cookies from treatments 5 (TP1, 31 % moisture content and coarse fraction) and 11 (TP2, 31 % moisture content and coarse fraction). The estimated glycemic index of cookies ranged from 68.54 to 80.16. The dietary fiber content of cookies was increased and the lowest glycemic index corresponded to the cookies elaborated with extruded wheat bran. Cookie made with the treatment 11 had a better dietary fiber content and lower estimated glycemic index.

  17. Informing food choices and health outcomes by use of the dietary glycemic index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considerable epidemiologic evidence links consuming lower glycemic index (GI) diets with good health, particularly upon aging. The GI is a kinetic parameter that reflects the ability of carbohydrate (CHO) contained in consumed foods to raise blood glucose in vivo. Newer nutritional, clinical, and ex...

  18. Effect of Glycemic Index of a Pre-exercise Meal on Endurance Exercise Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burdon, Catriona A.; Spronk, Inge; Cheng, Hoi Lun; O’Connor, Helen T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Low glycemic index (GI) pre-exercise meals may enhance endurance performance by maintaining euglycemia and altering fuel utilization. However, evidence for performance benefits is equivocal. Objective: To evaluate the effect of a low GI (LGI) versus a high GI (HGI) pre-exercise meal o

  19. Magnesium in type 2 diabetes mellitus and its correlation with glycemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehal Hamdy El-said

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: hypomagnesaemia is closely linked to type 2 diabetes mellitus and it is strongly correlated to glycemic control. We recommend to measure serum Mg in type 2 diabetes and patients who need supplementation should be considered. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(8.000: 1958-1963

  20. Improved Glycemic Control With Intraperitoneal Versus Subcutaneous Insulin in Type 1 Diabetes A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logtenberg, Susan J.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Houweling, Sebastiaan T.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Gans, Reinold O.; van Ballegooie, Evert; Bilo, Henk J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - Continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion (CIPII) with an implantable pump has been available for the past 25 years. CIPII, with its specific pharmacodynamic properties, may be a viable treatment alternative to improve glycemic control in patients with type I diabetes for whom other th

  1. Effect of cooling of cooked white rice on resistant starch content and glycemic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonia, Steffi; Witjaksono, Fiastuti; Ridwan, Rahmawati

    2015-01-01

    Cooling of cooked starch is known to cause starch retrogradation which increases resistant starch content. This study aimed to determine the effect of cooling of cooked white rice on resistant starch content and glycemic response in healthy subjects. Resistant starch contents were analyzed on freshly cooked white rice (control rice), cooked white rice cooled for 10 hours at room temperature (test rice I), and cooked white rice cooled for 24 hours at 4°C then reheated (test rice II). The results showed that resistant starch contents in control rice, test rice I, and test rice II were 0.64 g/100 g, 1.30 g/100 g, and 1.65 g/100 g, respectively. Test rice II had higher resistant starch content than test rice I, hence used in the clinical study along with control rice to characterize glycemic response in 15 healthy adults. The clinical study was a randomized, single-blind crossover study. In the clinical study, test rice II significantly lowered glycemic response compared with control rice (125±50.1 vs 152±48.3 mmol.min/L, respectively; p=0.047). In conclusion, cooling of cooked white rice increased resistant starch content. Cooked white rice cooled for 24 hours at 4°C then reheated lowered glycemic response compared with freshly cooked white rice.

  2. Erectile function in men with diabetes type 2: correlation with glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, H; Salem, A; Gadalla, A; El Wafa, N Abou; Mohamed, O A

    2010-01-01

    Men with diabetes have an increased risk for erectile dysfunction (ED) than those without diabetes. The diabetes control and complications trial clearly showed that better long-term control of blood glucose in diabetes type 1 is associated with decreased frequency and delayed the onset of microvascular complications. The aim of this study is to explore the role of glycemic control, and its correlation to sexual function in patients with diabetes type 2. One hundred patients were selected for the study according to the following criteria: all the cases were presenting with diabetes type 2 as a single risk factor for ED, age being between 35 and 50 years and free of liver and kidney failure, and blood dyscrasis. The selected patients were evaluated for sexual function by asking the patients to complete the abridged form of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). The evaluation of glycemic control was based on the measurement of hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) values. Our results showed that the level of HbA(1c) is significantly higher with declining degrees of potency (P-value=0.003). Also, there is an association between potency degree and glycemic control (P=0.002). We conclude that glycemic control is independently and inversely associated with ED in men with diabetes type 2.

  3. Influence of Dapagliflozin on Glycemic Variations in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng-fei; Gao, Gu; Li, Qian; Zhu, Hong-hong; Su, Xiao-fei; Wu, Jin-dan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To observe changes in blood glycemic variations and oxidative stress level before and after dapagliflozin treatment in patients with newly diagnosed T2DM. Methods. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial. A total of 28 patients with newly diagnosed T2DM with HbA1c levels of 7.5–10.5% were randomly selected to receive dapagliflozin or placebo treatment for 24 weeks. After baseline data were collected, we analyzed glycemic variations and plasma 8-iso PGF2α level at baseline and at the endpoint. Primary outcome was the changes of mean amplitude glycemic excursion (MAGE) within groups. Results. After 24-week dapagliflozin therapy, our data showed the significant improvement of MAGE with dapagliflozin therapy (P = 0.010). Compared with control group, patients in dapagliflozin group exhibited reduction in 24-hour MBG (P = 0.026) and lower mean plasma glucose concentrations, especially during periods from 2400 to 0200 and 1300 to 1800 (P < 0.05, resp.). In addition, plasma 8-iso PGF2α level was notably decreased in the treatment group compared to the control group (P = 0.034). Conclusions. In conclusion, this study shows the ability of dapagliflozin to improve glycemic variations and associate with reduction of oxidative stress in patients with T2DM, which may benefit the cardiovascular system.

  4. Bile acid sequestrants for glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Sonne, David P; Mikkelsen, Kristian H

    2017-01-01

    by the control group and no evidence of publication bias or small study effects. CONCLUSIONS: Our analyses found that BAS treatment improves glycemic control. The size of the effect was clinically relevant and despite limited safety data, our findings support the inclusion of BASs in current diabetes management...

  5. Adiponectin and cardiovascular risk factors in relation with glycemic control in type 2 diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniebetabasi S. Obot

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adiponectin has been associated with insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in Type 2 diabetes, though the mechanism of association is still uncertain. The adiponectin levels and lipid profile in relation to glycemic control were investigated in type 2 diabetics. Methods: Forty two diabetic subjects (35-64 years and 33 age-matched non-diabetic subjects were recruited into this case control study. Socio-demographic characteristics, anthropometric indices and blood pressure were obtained. Total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, low density lipoprotein (LDL, high density lipoprotein, (HDL, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c were estimated using colorimetric methods, atherogenic index (AI was calculated, while serum adiponectin was determined by ELISA method. Results: Adiponectin levels of type 2 diabetics were not significantly different from the non-diabetics studied (p>0.05. Higher TG levels were observed in diabetics with poor glycemic control compared with those with good glycemic control (p0.05. Conclusion: Type 2 diabetics do not have lower adiponectin levels. Gender, duration of diabetes and glycemic control does not seem to exert any influence on adiponectin levels in type 2 diabetes. Adiponectin may be associated with reduced risk of atherosclerosis through its effects on HDL cholesterol metabolism. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(4.000: 563-570

  6. Impact of type 1 diabetes and glycemic control on fetal aneuploidy biochemical markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Helen Nordahl; Ekelund, Charlotte Kvist; Tørring, Niels;

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the influence of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) on the first trimester serum markers of fetal aneuploidy; pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) and free beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (free β-hCG) and to evaluate the influence of glycemic control on...

  7. Glycemic Control in a Clinic-Based Sample of Diabetics in M'Bour Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    BeLue, Rhonda; Ndiaye, Khadidiatou; NDao, Fatou; Ba, Fatou Niass Niang; Diaw, Mor

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) including Senegal is faced with a significant and increasing burden of type 2 diabetes. However, little information is available about diabetes management among Senegalese diabetics. Purpose: The current study aims to describe the level of glycemic control among a convenience sample of diabetics who receive…

  8. Association between Social Relationship and Glycemic Control among Older Japanese: JAGES Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawachi, Ichiro; Kondo, Katsunori; Kondo, Naoki; Nagamine, Yuiko; Tani, Yukako; Shirai, Kokoro; Tazuma, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    Aim The present study examined whether social support, informal socializing and social participation are associated with glycemic control in older people. Methods Data for this population-based cross-sectional study was obtained from the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study (JAGES) 2010 linked to the annual health check-up data in Japan. We analyzed 9,554 individuals aged ≥65 years without the certification of needed long-term care. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to assess the effect of social support, informal socializing and social participations on glycemic control. The outcome measure was HbA1c ≥8.4%. Results 1.3% of the participants had a level of HbA1c over 8.4%. Better glycemic control was significantly associated with meeting with friends one to four times per month (odds ratio [OR] 0.51, 95% confidence interval [CI]0.30–0.89, compared to meeting with friends a few times per year or less) and participation in sports groups (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.26–0.97) even after adjusting for other variables. Meeting with friends more than twice per week, receiving social support, and being married were not associated with better control of diabetes. Conclusions Meeting with friends occasionally is associated with better glycemic control among older people. PMID:28060887

  9. Comparison of two diets of varying glycemic index on carotid subclinical atherosclerosis in obese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannuzzi, Arcangelo; Licenziati, Maria Rosaria; Vacca, Maria; De Marco, Donata; Cinquegrana, Giorgio; Laccetti, Marco; Bresciani, Alessandro; Covetti, Giuseppe; Iannuzzo, Gabriella; Rubba, Paolo; Parillo, Mario

    2009-11-01

    Childhood obesity is associated with an increased carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and stiffness. Increased carotid wall thickening and rigidity are considered markers of subclinical atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to test the effect of two hypocaloric diets of varying glycemic index on weight loss and markers of subclinical atherosclerosis in obese children. Seventy consecutive obese children attending the Outpatient Weight Clinic of the Department of Pediatrics were invited to participate in an intensive dietary protocol. Twenty-six accepted and were randomly assigned to two different groups: the first group followed a hypocaloric low-glycemic index diet and the second a hypocaloric high-glycemic index diet. Anthropometric measures and biochemical tests were performed in all children. Quantitative B-mode ultrasound scans were used to measure intima-media thickness (IMT) and diameters of the common carotid artery. Considering both groups together, at 6 months, body mass index decreased from 28.3 +/- 3.1 to 25.8 +/- 3.3 kg/m(2), systolic blood pressure from 119 +/- 12 to 110 +/- 11 mmHg (Pglycemic index diet. These results justify the advice to obese children to follow a low-glycemic index diet in order to improve their cardiometabolic profile.

  10. Dietary hyperglycemia, glycemic index and age-related metabolic retinal diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The glycemic index (GI) indicates how fast blood glucose is raised after consuming a carbohydrate-containing food. Human metabolic studies indicate that GI is related to patho-physiological responses after meals. Compared with a low-GI meal, a high-GI meal is characterized with hyperglycemia during ...

  11. Impact of food processing on the glycemic index (GI) of potato products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potatoes are one of the most popular carbohydrate foods in industrialized and some developing countries. However, contradicting arguments and misconceptions on potatoes as a high glycemic index (GI) food is directly affecting potato consumption during the past years. Potato varieties, maturity level...

  12. Determination of Factors Effected Dietary Glycemic Index in Turkish University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Huseyin; Akdevelioglu, Yasemin; Bulduk, Sidika

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine how factors such as smoking, regular activity, etc. affected dietary glycemic index in university students. Methods: This study was carried out at Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey. The participants were 577 randomly selected Turkish healthy female university students aged 17-32 years. The survey included a questionnaire that…

  13. Postprandial lipid responses to standard carbohydrate challenges used to determine glycemic index values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior studies assessing metabolic effects of different types of carbohydrate have focused on their glycemic response. Not considered has been the response of postprandial cardiometabolic risk indicators. This study assessed the postprandial lipid responses to two forms of carbohydrates used as ref...

  14. Acute effects of dietary glycemic index on antioxidant capacity in nutrient-controlled feeding study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative stress, caused by an imbalance between antioxidant capacity and reactive oxygen species, may be an early event in a metabolic cascade elicited by a high glycemic index (GI) diet, ultimately increasing the risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. We conducted a feeding study to evalua...

  15. Glycemic index treatment using Japanese foods in a girl with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumada, Tomohiro; Hiejima, Ikuko; Nozaki, Fumihito; Hayashi, Anri; Fujii, Tatsuya

    2013-05-01

    We introduced a low glycemic index treatment using Japanese ethnic foods to a 13-year-old girl with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome caused by tuberous sclerosis complex. She had previously refused the modified Atkins diet within 2 weeks of diet treatment because of its restrictiveness. The low glycemic index treatment was implemented by limiting the daily carbohydrate intake to 50 g of foods with a glycemic index of less than 50 relative to that of glucose, which included udon, soba, and unpolished Japonica rice with natto. One month after the initiation of the diet therapy, the clusters of tonic seizures for 30 to 60 minutes during sleep were reduced from two or three times per week to once or twice per month, and the frequent myoclonic seizures in the awake state disappeared. She has been on the diet therapy for more than 1 year, and the efficacy of the diet has been sustained. Low glycemic index treatment should be considered for patients with medication-resistant epilepsy who cannot tolerate restrictive diet therapies. Japanese ethnic foods can be used for this diet therapy.

  16. Experience and acceptability of diets of varying protein content and glycemic index in an obese cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McConnon, A; Horgan, G W; Lawton, C

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objectives:To investigate acceptability and tolerability of diets of different protein and glycemic index (GI) content aimed at weight maintenance following a phase of rapid weight loss, as part of a large pan-European dietary intervention trial.Subjects/Methods:The Diogenes study (www...

  17. Exercise strategies to optimize glycemic control in type 2 diabetes : a continuing glucose monitoring perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Jan-Willem; van Loon, Luc J C

    2015-01-01

    IN BRIEF The introduction of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) several years ago enabled researchers to investigate the impact of exercise strategies on 24-hour glycemic control. Such unique information on the glucoregulatory properties of exercise will ultimately lead to more effective exercise p

  18. Linagliptin increases incretin levels, lowers glucagon, and improves glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauch, Thomas; Graefe-Mody, Ulrike; Deacon, Carolyn F;

    2012-01-01

    Linagliptin is a xanthine-based dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitor that is now available in numerous countries worldwide for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aim of this study was to evaluate further the mechanisms underlying the improvements in glycemic control observed...

  19. Hindbrain DPP-IV inhibition improves glycemic control and promotes negative energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mietlicki-Baase, Elizabeth G; McGrath, Lauren E; Koch-Laskowski, Kieran; Krawczyk, Joanna; Pham, Tram; Lhamo, Rinzin; Reiner, David J; Hayes, Matthew R

    2017-01-22

    The beneficial glycemic and food intake-suppressive effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) have made this neuroendocrine system a leading target for pharmacological approaches to the treatment of diabetes and obesity. One strategy to increase the activity of endogenous GLP-1 is to prevent the rapid degradation of the hormone by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV). However, despite the expression of both DPP-IV and GLP-1 in the brain, and the clear importance of central GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signaling for glycemic and energy balance control, the metabolic effects of central inhibition of DPP-IV activity are unclear. To test whether hindbrain DPP-IV inhibition suppresses blood glucose, feeding, and body weight gain, the effects of 4th intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of the FDA-approved DPP-IV inhibitor sitagliptin were evaluated. Results indicate that hindbrain delivery of sitagliptin improves glycemic control in a GLP-1R-dependent manner, suggesting that this effect is due at least in part to increased endogenous brainstem GLP-1 activity after sitagliptin administration. Furthermore, 4th ICV injection of sitagliptin reduced 24h body weight gain and energy intake, with a selective suppression of high-fat diet, but not chow, intake. These data reveal a novel role for hindbrain GLP-1R activation in glycemic control and also demonstrate that DPP-IV inhibition in the caudal brainstem promotes negative energy balance.

  20. The Effect of Pre-Exercise Carbohydrate Feeding with Different Glycemic Index on Endurance Exercise Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Salarkia

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Although, it is known that feeding with carbohydrate (CHO during exercise improves endurance performance, the effects of glycemic index (GI of carbohydrate intake are less clear. This study was carried out to assess the effect of glycemic index of pre-exercise carbohydrate feeding on endurance exercise capacity. In a randomized clinical trial 52 endurance – trained men with mean age 21.7 ± 3 years, weight 69.3 ± 9 kg, height 178.4 ± 2 cm and BMI 22.6 ± 2 were studied. Subjects performed exercise treadmill at 70% VO2max after ingestion: Lentil, a low glycemic index; potato, a high glycemic index; glucose and water (as a control one hour before exercise. Blood samples were collected before and one hour after test meal and 30 minutes after exercise. To assess aerobic capacity VO2max (maximum oxygen uptake was measured at the end of the exercise trial. Endurance time was found to be longer after lentil than after the potato, glucose and control respectively (P < 0.05. At the end of exercise, the glucose group and control both gave lower plasma glucose concentrations. Changes of VO2max in lentil. Potato, glucose and control group which were not statistically significant. This study showed that a low GI meal eaten before an event increases endurance capacity during exercise. Furthermore, the low GI meal was found to maintain glucose at higher concentrations during the later stages of exercise.

  1. Glycemic index differences of high-fat diets modulate primarily lipid metabolism in murine adipose tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schothorst, van E.M.; Bunschoten, J.E.; Verlinde, E.; Schrauwen, P.; Keijer, J.

    2011-01-01

    A low vs. high glycemic index of a high-fat (HF) diet (LGI and HGI, respectively) significantly retarded adverse health effects in adult male C57BL/6J mice, as shown recently (Van Schothorst EM, Bunschoten A, Schrauwen P, Mensink RP, Keijer J. FASEB J 23: 1092–1101, 2009). The LGI diet enhanced whol

  2. Indicators of glycemic control in patients with gestationaldiabetes mellitus and pregnant women with diabetesmellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it has become clear that mild abnormal glucosetolerance increases the incidence of perinatal maternalinfantcomplications, and so the definition and diagnosticcriteria of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) havebeen changed. Therefore, in patients with GDM andpregnant women with diabetes mellitus, even stricterglycemic control than before is required to reduce theincidence of perinatal maternal-infant complications.Strict glycemic control cannot be attained without anindicator of glycemic control; this review proposesa reliable indicator. The gold standard indicator ofglycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus ishemoglobin A1c (HbA1c); however, we have demonstratedthat HbA1c does not reflect glycemic controlaccurately during pregnancy because of iron deficiency.It has also become clear that glycated albumin, anotherindicator of glycemic control, is not influenced by irondeficiency and therefore might be a better indicator ofglycemic control in patients with GDM and pregnantwomen with diabetes mellitus. However, largepopulationepidemiological studies are necessary inorder to confirm our proposal. Here, we outline themost recent findings about the indicators of glycemiccontrol during pregnancy including fructosamine and1,5-anhydroglucitol.

  3. Glycemic control and long-acting insulin analog utilization in patients with type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Heintjes (Edith); T.L. Thomsen (Trine Lyager); F.J.A. Penning-Van Beest (Fernie); T.E. Christensen (Torsten); R.M.C. Herings (Ron)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The objective was to compare glycemic control, insulin utilization, and body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) initiated on insulin detemir (IDet) or insulin glargine (IGlar) in a real-life setting in the Netherlands. Methods: Insulin-naïve patients with T2D, st

  4. Comparative evaluation of several parameters of glycemic homeostasis in patients with functional pituitary adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Rostislavovna Mikityuk

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate glycemic homeostasis in patients with acromegaly and hyperprolactinaemia due to functional pituitary adenoma.Materials and Methods. We enrolled 48 patients with somatotropinoma (Group 1, 19 patients with somatomammotropinoma (Group 2 and 24 patients with prolactinoma (Group 3 with no history of glycemic disorders. Median age was 48.63±9.98 years; median disease duration was 13.1±6.9 years. The comparison group was composed of overweight or obese patients (n=75. We conducted a comparative analysis of glycemic parameters (Glc0, immunoreactive insulin, HOMA2_S%, HOMA2_B% и HOMA2_IR, Ssum and S under isolated segments of the glycemic curve. We also tested their correlation with plasma levels of growth hormone, prolactin and IGF-1.Results. We detected hyperinsulinemia (>20 μU/mL in 35.1% of participants from Group 1, 33.3% and 25% from groups 2 and 3, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between glycemic parameters of the study groups, though patients were mildly insulin resistant (HOMA2_IR 1.88 to 2.38 units independantly from tumour secretory activity. Groups 1 and 2 were characterized by significantly higher fasting blood glucose levels vs. comparison group (though still within the reference values, and glucose homeostasis was maintained with lower activity of pancreatic β-cells. Average Ssumanalysis showed lower glucose tolerance in groups 1 and 2 vs. Group 3. Median S values under isolated glycemic curve segments were significantly higher than in comparison group. Plasma levels of growth hormone did not correlate with Ssum and S parameters in groups 1 and 2. There was a linear correlation between Ssum and plasma IGF-1 levels in patients from Group 1 (r=0.45; p=0.006. We also noted that Ssum had a non-linear correlation with plasma prolactin levels in patients from Group 3 (r=0.41; p<0.05.Conclusion. Postprandial area under the glycemic curve has positive linear association with

  5. Glycemic response to carob (ceratonia siliqua L) in healthy subjects and with the in vitro hydrolysis index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milek Dos Santos, Luciana; Tomzack Tulio, Lindamir; Fuganti Campos, Leticia; Ramos Dorneles, Marcelo; Carneiro Hecke Krüger, Claudia

    2014-09-12

    The purpose of this study was to determine the in vivo glycemic index of carob tablets with healthy subjects and to determine the in vitro glycemic index of carob tablets and carob flour by the hydrolysis index. Seven healthy volunteers consumed portions of carob tablets containing 26g of available carbohydrate. Their capillary blood was taken at intervals after carob or glucose consumption. The glycemic hydrolysis index by an in vitro technique was based in the release of glucose after enzymatic treatment of carob tablets and carob flour. The determination of the fiber content was performed using the enzymatic- gravimetric method. By the in vivo determination, the estimated glycemic index of carob tablets could be considered low (≤ 55). By the in vitro determination, the estimated glycemic index ranged from 40.1+0.02 of carob tablets to 40.6+0.05 of carob flour. The total fiber values obtained for carob flour samples were from 42.6% ± 0.49 to 42.9% ± 0.68 with no statistical significant differences between samples. Carob tablets and carob flour could be classified as low glycemic index food and low glycemic load food. Carob flour is a high fiber food, containing mainly high levels of insoluble fiber.

  6. The role of genetic factors and kidney and liver function in glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients on long-term metformin and sulphonylurea cotreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klen, Jasna; Goričar, Katja; Janež, Andrej; Dolžan, Vita

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of genetic polymorphisms of metformin transporters on long-term glycemic control and lipid status in type 2 diabetes patients in the everyday clinical setting. In total 135 patients treated with combination of metformin and sulphonylurea for at least 6 months were genotyped for SLC22A1 rs628031 and SLC47A1 rs2289669 polymorphisms. Relatively good blood glucose control with median HbA1c 6.9 (6.4-7.6) % was achieved on prescribed metformin dosage of 2550 (2000-2550) mg per day. Only 28 (20.7%) patients experienced mild hypoglycemia events, while no severe hypoglycemia events were observed. Most patients had normal or mildly impaired renal function. Parameters indicating renal function were not correlated with fasting glucose, HbA1c, or lipid parameters. Rs628031 and rs2289669 had minor allele frequencies of 0.385 and 0.355, respectively, and were not associated with HbA1c levels. Rs628031 was marginally associated with risk for hypoglycemia events (P = 0.046; OR = 0.51; 95% CI 0.26-0.99), while significant correlation was observed between rs2289669 and total cholesterol levels (P = 0.018). In conclusion, in patients on long-term metformin and sulphonylurea combination treatment, metformin transporters polymorphisms do not play a major role in glycemic control; however, they may influence lipid status.

  7. The Role of Genetic Factors and Kidney and Liver Function in Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Patients on Long-Term Metformin and Sulphonylurea Cotreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna Klen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of genetic polymorphisms of metformin transporters on long-term glycemic control and lipid status in type 2 diabetes patients in the everyday clinical setting. In total 135 patients treated with combination of metformin and sulphonylurea for at least 6 months were genotyped for SLC22A1 rs628031 and SLC47A1 rs2289669 polymorphisms. Relatively good blood glucose control with median HbA1c 6.9 (6.4–7.6 % was achieved on prescribed metformin dosage of 2550 (2000–2550 mg per day. Only 28 (20.7% patients experienced mild hypoglycemia events, while no severe hypoglycemia events were observed. Most patients had normal or mildly impaired renal function. Parameters indicating renal function were not correlated with fasting glucose, HbA1c, or lipid parameters. Rs628031 and rs2289669 had minor allele frequencies of 0.385 and 0.355, respectively, and were not associated with HbA1c levels. Rs628031 was marginally associated with risk for hypoglycemia events (P=0.046; OR = 0.51; 95% CI 0.26–0.99, while significant correlation was observed between rs2289669 and total cholesterol levels (P=0.018. In conclusion, in patients on long-term metformin and sulphonylurea combination treatment, metformin transporters polymorphisms do not play a major role in glycemic control; however, they may influence lipid status.

  8. THE EFFECT OF INTENSIVE GLYCEMIC CONTROL ON THE FACTORS DETERMINING PREDICTION COMPLICATIONS OF ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Fedotova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine predictors of complications of myocardial infarction (MI in patients with type 2 diabetes (2TDM and it’s value of intensive glycemic control during insulin infusion.Methods. The study included 112 patients with MI and 2TDM at first day of hospital admission with blood glucose level above 7.8 mmol/l. Prognosis of combined study endpoint included the death and ma-jor complications of MI for the hospital and long-term (6-month stages. The statistical analysis was per-formed (Statistica 6.0 for Windows. The predictive value was assessed with ROC-curves analysis meth-od.Results. Intensive glycemic control with insulin infusion reduced the activity of lipid peroxidation and improve prediction of study endpoint. Predictors of adverse hospital prognosis of MI in association with type 2 diabetes were hyperglycemia on admission above 10 mmol/l, and increase of C-peptide. The in-crease of C-peptide in the 1st and 7th day, hs-CRP on day 1, diene conjugates on the 7th day and glucose level on admission above 8.9 mmol/l (patients without 2TDM and 14.3 mmol/l (patients with 2TDM had the 6-month predictive value.Conclusion. The strict achievement of the target level of glucose in acute MI improves it’s prognosis at the hospital and at a 6-month prospective study.

  9. Prevalence of microalbuminuria in relation to glycemic control in type-2 diabetic patients in Mymensingh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, M J; Muqueet, A; Sharmeen, A; Hoque, M R

    2015-01-01

    Microalbuminuria is a renal marker of generalized vascular endothelial damage and early atherosclerosis. Patients with microalbuminuria are at increased risk of microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes mellitus like myocardial infarction, stroke and nephropathy. Poor glycemic control increases the risk of microalbuminuria. This study was conducted to determine the frequency of microalbuminuria in type 2 diabetes and compare the frequency of microalbuminuria in poor and good glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. One Hundred and twenty two type 2 diabetic patients were included in the study. Data on age, gender, duration of diabetes, microalbuminuria and HbA1c were recorded. Urine and blood samples were collected and analyzed for microalbuminuria, blood glucose and HbA1c. All patients of both genders with type 2 diabetes for over 2 years were selected in this study. Patients with other causes of proteinuria were excluded. Out of 120 cases 93(77.5%) were male and 27(22.5%) were female. Mean age of patients was 57.8±14.7 years and average duration of diabetes was 9.2 years. Microalbuminuria was found 76.9% of male and 23.1% of female. Patients with poor glycemic control and good glycemic control have frequency of microalbuminuria of 55% and 54% respectively. Uncontrolled diabetes is strongly associated with prevalence of microalbuminuria. Screening for microalbuminuria and HbA1c test should be done both in newly and already diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients as an early marker of renal dysfunction and glycemic control.

  10. Factors Influencing Glycemic Control in Children with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seher Çakır

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are a plenty of factors influencing glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM. The aim of this study was to determine the factors influencing metabolic control in children with type 1 DM. Materials and Method: The study was performed in 200 children with type 1 DM between the ages 6 months to 18 years. This study was conducted by interviewing individually with the children and their families and completing the questionnaires related to their demographic features and data associated with their illness. The laboratory findings and medical information of the patients from the charts were also retrospectively recorded. Results: There were a total of 200 patients including 104 (52% girls and 96 (48% boys. The mean age of the patients was 11.7 (±4.26 years. The mean duration of diabetes was 3.8 years (6 months to 14 years. Eighty-nine percent of all patients and all of the patients between 12 and 18 years of age were on intensive insulin therapy. Mean insulin dose was 0.84±0.19 units/kg/day. The mean HbA1c value was 8.8%. Body mass index (BMI mean z-score was -0.06±1.19. There were no correlations between HbA1c and the duration of diabetes or age although a positive correlation was found with insulin dose (r=0.27 p<0.01. It was found that intensive therapy did not lower HbA1c values or the risk of severe hypoglycemia. Nevertheless, there was a decrease in HbA1c values of 72 (36% patients whose therapy was converted from conventional therapy to intensive therapy (p<0.05. HbA1c values were found to be higher in patients who lived with more than 4 persons in the house, who were non-compliant to follow-up or diet, who had more than 3 symptomatic hypoglycemia in the last 6 months, who had episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA, who were adolescent at the time of diagnosis, and who were admitted with diabetic ketoacidosis at the time of diagnosis (p<0.05. Although there was a correlation between insulin doses and

  11. Endoscopes and robots for tight surgical spaces: use of precurved elastic elements to enhance curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remirez, Andria A.; Webster, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Many applications in medicine require flexible surgical manipulators and endoscopes capable of reaching tight curvatures. The maximum curvature these devices can achieve is often restricted either by a strain limit, or by a maximum actuation force that the device's components can tolerate without risking mechanical failure. In this paper we propose the use of precurvature to "bias" the workspace of the device in one direction. Combined with axial shaft rotation, biasing increases the size of the device's workspace, enabling it to reach tighter curvatures than a comparable device without biasing can achieve, while still being able to fully straighten. To illustrate this effect, we describe several example prototype devices which use flexible nitinol strips that can be pushed and pulled to generate bending. We provide a statics model that relates the manipulator curvature to actuation force, and validate it experimentally.

  12. Preparation of gas-tight strontium-doped lanthanum cobaltate by an aqueous sol-gel process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, C.H.; Kruidhof, H.; Bouwmeester, H.J.M.; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    Gas-tight dense membranes of highly Sr-doped LaCoO3 (such as the composition La0.3Sr0.7CoO3 chosen in this study) are difficult to prepare using usual synthesis processes. This report presents an aqueous sol-gel route using metal acetates as precursors to achieve this goal. Hydrogen peroxide and amm

  13. Multi-scale glycemic variability: a link to gray matter atrophy and cognitive decline in type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingran Cui

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM accelerates brain aging and cognitive decline. Complex interactions between hyperglycemia, glycemic variability and brain aging remain unresolved. This study investigated the relationship between glycemic variability at multiple time scales, brain volumes and cognition in type 2 DM. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Forty-three older adults with and 26 without type 2 DM completed 72-hour continuous glucose monitoring, cognitive tests and anatomical MRI. We described a new analysis of continuous glucose monitoring, termed Multi-Scale glycemic variability (Multi-Scale GV, to examine glycemic variability at multiple time scales. Specifically, Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition was used to identify five unique ultradian glycemic variability cycles (GVC1-5 that modulate serum glucose with periods ranging from 0.5-12 hrs. RESULTS: Type 2 DM subjects demonstrated greater variability in GVC3-5 (period 2.0-12 hrs than controls (P<0.0001, during the day as well as during the night. Multi-Scale GV was related to conventional markers of glycemic variability (e.g. standard deviation and mean glycemic excursions, but demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity to conventional markers, and was associated with worse long-term glycemic control (e.g. fasting glucose and HbA1c. Across all subjects, those with greater glycemic variability within higher frequency cycles (GVC1-3; 0.5-2.0 hrs had less gray matter within the limbic system and temporo-parietal lobes (e.g. cingulum, insular, hippocampus, and exhibited worse cognitive performance. Specifically within those with type 2 DM, greater glycemic variability in GVC2-3 was associated with worse learning and memory scores. Greater variability in GVC5 was associated with longer DM duration and more depression. These relationships were independent of HbA1c and hypoglycemic episodes. CONCLUSIONS: Type 2 DM is associated with dysregulation of glycemic variability over multiple

  14. Maximally Localized Radial Profiles for Tight Steerable Wavelet Frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pad, Pedram; Uhlmann, Virginie; Unser, Michael

    2016-05-01

    A crucial component of steerable wavelets is the radial profile of the generating function in the frequency domain. In this paper, we present an infinite-dimensional optimization scheme that helps us find the optimal profile for a given criterion over the space of tight frames. We consider two classes of criteria that measure the localization of the wavelet. The first class specifies the spatial localization of the wavelet profile, and the second that of the resulting wavelet coefficients. From these metrics and the proposed algorithm, we construct tight wavelet frames that are optimally localized and provide their analytical expression. In particular, one of the considered criterion helps us finding back the popular Simoncelli wavelet profile. Finally, the investigation of local orientation estimation, image reconstruction from detected contours in the wavelet domain, and denoising indicate that optimizing wavelet localization improves the performance of steerable wavelets, since our new wavelets outperform the traditional ones.

  15. Tight inequalities for qutrit state-independent contextuality

    CERN Document Server

    Cabello, Adan; Gühne, Otfried; Kleinmann, Matthias; Larsson, Jan-Ake

    2012-01-01

    Recently, Yu and Oh have proposed a noncontextuality inequality [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 030402 (2012)] which involves the simplest and hence most fundamental scenario for state-independent quantum contextuality. As we show, Yu and Oh's inequality is neither tight (i.e., it does not belong to the minimal set which completely separates contextual and noncontextual correlations) nor optimal (i.e., its quantum violation is not maximal). Moreover, we provide a method for obtaining state-independent noncontextuality inequalities with the maximal violation and, using it, we identify two essentially different state-independent tight inequalities with maximal quantum violation for Yu and Oh's scenario. These inequalities allow for an easier and more significant experimental test of qutrit state-independent quantum contextuality.

  16. Differences between tight and loose cultures: a 33-nation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Michele J; Raver, Jana L; Nishii, Lisa; Leslie, Lisa M; Lun, Janetta; Lim, Beng Chong; Duan, Lili; Almaliach, Assaf; Ang, Soon; Arnadottir, Jakobina; Aycan, Zeynep; Boehnke, Klaus; Boski, Pawel; Cabecinhas, Rosa; Chan, Darius; Chhokar, Jagdeep; D'Amato, Alessia; Ferrer, Montse; Fischlmayr, Iris C; Fischer, Ronald; Fülöp, Marta; Georgas, James; Kashima, Emiko S; Kashima, Yoshishima; Kim, Kibum; Lempereur, Alain; Marquez, Patricia; Othman, Rozhan; Overlaet, Bert; Panagiotopoulou, Penny; Peltzer, Karl; Perez-Florizno, Lorena R; Ponomarenko, Larisa; Realo, Anu; Schei, Vidar; Schmitt, Manfred; Smith, Peter B; Soomro, Nazar; Szabo, Erna; Taveesin, Nalinee; Toyama, Midori; Van de Vliert, Evert; Vohra, Naharika; Ward, Colleen; Yamaguchi, Susumu

    2011-05-27

    With data from 33 nations, we illustrate the differences between cultures that are tight (have many strong norms and a low tolerance of deviant behavior) versus loose (have weak social norms and a high tolerance of deviant behavior). Tightness-looseness is part of a complex, loosely integrated multilevel system that comprises distal ecological and historical threats (e.g., high population density, resource scarcity, a history of territorial conflict, and disease and environmental threats), broad versus narrow socialization in societal institutions (e.g., autocracy, media regulations), the strength of everyday recurring situations, and micro-level psychological affordances (e.g., prevention self-guides, high regulatory strength, need for structure). This research advances knowledge that can foster cross-cultural understanding in a world of increasing global interdependence and has implications for modeling cultural change.

  17. Preconditioning Filter Bank Decomposition Using Structured Normalized Tight Frames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Ehler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We turn a given filter bank into a filtering scheme that provides perfect reconstruction, synthesis is the adjoint of the analysis part (so-called unitary filter banks, all filters have equal norm, and the essential features of the original filter bank are preserved. Unitary filter banks providing perfect reconstruction are induced by tight generalized frames, which enable signal decomposition using a set of linear operators. If, in addition, frame elements have equal norm, then the signal energy is spread through the various filter bank channels in some uniform fashion, which is often more suitable for further signal processing. We start with a given generalized frame whose elements allow for fast matrix vector multiplication, as, for instance, convolution operators, and compute a normalized tight frame, for which signal analysis and synthesis still preserve those fast algorithmic schemes.

  18. Automatic generation of matrix element derivatives for tight binding models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elena, Alin M.; Meister, Matthias

    2005-10-01

    Tight binding (TB) models are one approach to the quantum mechanical many-particle problem. An important role in TB models is played by hopping and overlap matrix elements between the orbitals on two atoms, which of course depend on the relative positions of the atoms involved. This dependence can be expressed with the help of Slater-Koster parameters, which are usually taken from tables. Recently, a way to generate these tables automatically was published. If TB approaches are applied to simulations of the dynamics of a system, also derivatives of matrix elements can appear. In this work we give general expressions for first and second derivatives of such matrix elements. Implemented in a tight binding computer program, like, for instance, DINAMO, they obviate the need to type all the required derivatives of all occurring matrix elements by hand.

  19. Influence of the glycemic index and glycemic load of the diet in the glycemic control of diabetic children and teenagers Influencia del índice glicémico y la carga glucémica de la dieta en el control glucémico de niños y adolescentes diabéticos

    OpenAIRE

    Queiroz, K.C.; I. Novato Silva; R. de Cássia Gonçalves Alfenas

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the influence of the glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) of the diet in the glycemic control of children and teenagers with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1). Methods: A total of 146 subjects, aged 7-19 years, monitored at the Division of Pediatric Endocrinology at the HC/UFMG participated in the study. The consumed diet was evaluated using a quantitative food frequency questionnaire previously validated and tested in a pilotproject. The GI of the participant´s diet wa...

  20. Hepatic tight junctions:From viral entry to cancer metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nikki; P; Lee; John; M; Luk

    2010-01-01

    The tight junction (TJ) is a critical cellular component for maintenance of tissue integrity, cellular interactions and cell-cell communications, and physiologically functions as the "great wall" against external agents and the surrounding hostile environment. During the host-pathogen evolution, viruses somehow found the key to unlock the gate for their entry into cells and to exploit and exhaust the host cells. In the liver, an array of TJ molecules is localized along the bile canaliculi forming the blood-...

  1. Symmetry-Based Tight Binding Modeling of Halide Perovskite Semiconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Boyer-Richard, Soline; Katan, Claudine; Traoré, Boubacar; Scholz, Reinhard; Jancu, Jean-Marc; Even, Jacky

    2016-01-01

    International audience; On the basis of a general symmetry analysis, this paper presents an empirical tight-binding (TB) model for the reference Pm-3m perovskite cubic phase of halide perovskites of general formula ABX3. The TB electronic band diagram, with and without spin orbit coupling effect of MAPbI3 has been determined based on state of the art density functional theory results including many body corrections (DFT+GW). It affords access to various properties, including distorted structu...

  2. Tightness for Maxima of Generalized Branching Random Walks

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Ming

    2010-01-01

    We study generalized branching random walks, which allow time dependence and local dependence between siblings. Under appropriate tail assumptions, we prove the tightness of $F_n(\\cdot-Med(F_n))$, where $F_n(\\cdot)$ is the maxima distribution at time $n$ and $Med(F_n)$ is the median of $F_n(\\cdot)$. The main component in the argument is a proof of exponential decay of the right tail $1-F_n(\\cdot-Med(F_n))$.

  3. Ab initio calculation of tight-binding parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahan, A.K.; Klepeis, J.E.

    1997-12-01

    We calculate ab initio values of tight-binding parameters for the f- electron metal Ce and various phases of Si, from local-density functional one-electron Hamiltonian and overlap matrix elements. Our approach allows us to unambiguously test the validity of the common minimal basis and two-center approximations as well as to determine the degree of transferability of both nonorthogonal and orthogonal hopping parameters in the cases considered.

  4. Tightly Coupling GPS with Lane Markings for Autonomous Vehicle Navigation

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Tightly coupling GPS pseudorange and Doppler measurements with other sensors is a way to increase accuracy and integrity of the positioning information particularly when it is computed autonomously. Highly accurate digital maps are also more and more key components for autonomous vehicle navigation and can enhance the localization system. In this paper, a video camera is used to get relative information with respect to lane markings and dead-reckoning sensors are also ...

  5. Índice glicêmico e carga glicêmica de dietas consumidas por indivíduos obesos Glycemic index and glycemic load of diets consumed by obese individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Alves de Carvalho Sampaio

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o índice glicêmico e a carga glicêmica de dietas de indivíduos obesos. MÉTODOS: Trata-se de estudo retrospectivo, que analisou as fichas clínicas de 80 adultos obesos, acompanhados em um serviço privado localizado em Fortaleza, Ceará. Determinaram-se o índice glicêmico e a carga glicêmica da dieta. Para verificação da associação entre índice glicêmico e carga glicêmica, e dessas variáveis com a ingestão energética diária e com o índice de massa corporal dos indivíduos, utilizou-se o teste de correlação de Pearson. O teste "t" de Student foi utilizado para verificar diferenças entre os dois índices e o sexo. Em ambos os testes adotou-se pOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the glycemic index and glycemic load of diets of obese individuals. METHODS: This is a retrospective study that analyzed the medical records of 80 obese adults attending a private health care service in Fortaleza, Ceará. The glycemic index and load of their diet was determined. The Pearson correlation test was used to verify if there was an association between glycemic index and glycemic load and of these variables with their daily energy intake and body mass index. The Student's "t" test was used to verify the differences between the two indexes and gender. A significance level of p<0.05 was adopted for both tests. RESULTS: Inadequate (moderate or high glycemic index prevailed at breakfast (82.9%, afternoon snack (60.0% and dinner (64.6%. The daily glycemic index was inadequate for 78.7% of the group and predominantly moderate according to the mean found (59.23, however it was less inadequate than the daily glycemic load which was high (143.8 and worse among males. The body mass index of the group, in general and according to gender, was not associated with any of the indices. Daily energy intake was associated only with glycemic load, both generally and taking gender into account. CONCLUSION: The results point toward a higher glycemic load in

  6. Effect of the carbohydrate counting method on glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dias Viviane M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of achieving and maintaining an appropriate metabolic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1 has been established in many studies aiming to prevent the development of chronic complications. The carbohydrate counting method can be recommended as an additional tool in the nutritional treatment of diabetes, allowing patients with DM1 to have more flexible food choices. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of nutrition intervention and the use of multiple short-acting insulin according to the carbohydrate counting method on clinical and metabolic control in patients with DM1. Methods Our sample consisted of 51 patients with DM1, 32 females, aged 25.3 ± 1.55 years. A protocol of nutritional status evaluation was applied and laboratory analysis was performed at baseline and after a three-month intervention. After the analysis of the food records, a balanced diet was prescribed using the carbohydrate counting method, and short-acting insulin was prescribed based on the total amount of carbohydrate per meal (1 unit per 15 g of carbohydrate. Results A significant decrease in A1c levels was observed from baseline to the three-month evaluation after the intervention (10.40 ± 0.33% and 9.52 ± 0.32%, respectively, p = 0.000. It was observed an increase in daily insulin dose after the intervention (0.99 ± 0.65 IU/Kg and 1.05 ± 0.05 IU/Kg, respectively, p = 0.003. No significant differences were found regarding anthropometric evaluation (BMI, waist, hip or abdominal circumferences and waist to hip ratio after the intervention period. Conclusions The use of short-acting insulin based on the carbohydrate counting method after a short period of time resulted in a significant improvement of the glycemic control in patients with DM1 with no changes in body weight despite increases in the total daily insulin doses.

  7. A systematic review on the effect of sweeteners on glycemic response and clinically relevant outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebe Natasha

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major metabolic complications of obesity and type 2 diabetes may be prevented and managed with dietary modification. The use of sweeteners that provide little or no calories may help to achieve this objective. Methods We did a systematic review and network meta-analysis of the comparative effectiveness of sweetener additives using Bayesian techniques. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL and CAB Global were searched to January 2011. Randomized trials comparing sweeteners in obese, diabetic, and healthy populations were selected. Outcomes of interest included weight change, energy intake, lipids, glycated hemoglobin, markers of insulin resistance and glycemic response. Evidence-based items potentially indicating risk of bias were assessed. Results Of 3,666 citations, we identified 53 eligible randomized controlled trials with 1,126 participants. In diabetic participants, fructose reduced 2-hour blood glucose concentrations by 4.81 mmol/L (95% CI 3.29, 6.34 compared to glucose. Two-hour blood glucose concentration data comparing hypocaloric sweeteners to sucrose or high fructose corn syrup were inconclusive. Based on two ≤10-week trials, we found that non-caloric sweeteners reduced energy intake compared to the sucrose groups by approximately 250-500 kcal/day (95% CI 153, 806. One trial found that participants in the non-caloric sweetener group had a decrease in body mass index compared to an increase in body mass index in the sucrose group (-0.40 vs 0.50 kg/m2, and -1.00 vs 1.60 kg/m2, respectively. No randomized controlled trials showed that high fructose corn syrup or fructose increased levels of cholesterol relative to other sweeteners. Conclusions Considering the public health importance of obesity and its consequences; the clearly relevant role of diet in the pathogenesis and maintenance of obesity; and the billions of dollars spent on non-caloric sweeteners, little high-quality clinical research has been done. Studies are

  8. Controle glicêmico e terapia insulínica em sepse e doença crítica Glycemic control and insulin therapy in sepsis and critical illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Garcia Branco

    2007-11-01

    , there is no consensus on the efficacy and safety of glycemic control. We describe the possible mechanisms involved in glucose toxicity and the beneficial effects of glycemic control. Initial studies showed that use of insulin to achieve glycemic control reduced morbidity and mortality in adult intensive care; however, recent studies have failed to confirm these findings. Importantly, it is evident that glycemic control is associated with increased incidence of hypoglycemia. The efficacy of glycemic control has not yet been studied in critically ill children. CONCLUSION: Glycemic control is a novel therapeutic option in critical care. Conflicting evidence in adults means that before we apply this approach to pediatrics it will need to be assessed in clinical trial.

  9. Study of Adiponectin Level in Diabetic Adolescent Girls in Relation to Glycemic Control and Complication of Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soha M. Abd El Dayem

    2015-10-01

    CONCLUSION: Serum adiponectin level is high in adolescent type 1 diabetic girls. It can be used as a predictor of diabetes complications rather than a sensitive biochemical marker for glycemic control.

  10. Impact of postoperative glycemic control and nutritional status on clinical outcomes after total pancreatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hao-Jun; Jin, Chen; Fu, De-Liang

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the impact of glycemic control and nutritional status after total pancreatectomy (TP) on complications, tumor recurrence and overall survival. METHODS Retrospective records of 52 patients with pancreatic tumors who underwent TP were collected from 2007 to 2015. A series of clinical parameters collected before and after surgery, and during the follow-up were evaluated. The associations of glycemic control and nutritional status with complications, tumor recurrence and long-term survival were determined. Risk factors for postoperative glycemic control and nutritional status were identified. RESULTS High early postoperative fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels (OR = 4.074, 95%CI: 1.188-13.965, P = 0.025) and low early postoperative prealbumin levels (OR = 3.816, 95%CI: 1.110-13.122, P = 0.034) were significantly associated with complications after TP. Postoperative HbA1c levels over 7% (HR = 2.655, 95%CI: 1.299-5.425, P = 0.007) were identified as one of the independent risk factors for tumor recurrence. Patients with postoperative HbA1c levels over 7% had much poorer overall survival than those with HbA1c levels less than 7% (9.3 mo vs 27.6 mo, HR = 3.212, 95%CI: 1.147-8.999, P = 0.026). Patients with long-term diabetes mellitus (HR = 15.019, 95%CI: 1.278-176.211, P = 0.031) and alcohol history (B = 1.985, SE = 0.860, P = 0.025) tended to have poor glycemic control and lower body mass index levels after TP, respectively. CONCLUSION At least 3 mo are required after TP to adapt to diabetes and recover nutritional status. Glycemic control appears to have more influence over nutritional status on long-term outcomes after TP. Improvement in glycemic control and nutritional status after TP is important to prevent early complications and tumor recurrence, and improve survival.

  11. Evaluation of nutritional profiles of starch and dry matter from early potato varieties and its estimated glycemic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinhero, Reena Grittle; Waduge, Renuka Nilmini; Liu, Qiang; Sullivan, J Alan; Tsao, Rong; Bizimungu, Benoit; Yada, Rickey Y

    2016-07-15

    To identify healthier potatoes with respect to starch profiles, fourteen early varieties were evaluated for their dietary fiber, total starch, rapidly digestible (RDS), slowly digestible (SDS), and resistant (RS) starch for nutrition and with regard to estimated glycemic index (eGI) and glycemic load (eGL). While all these profiles were highly dependent on the potato variety, eleven out of fourteen varieties were classified as low GL foods (pstarch factors contributing to eGI.

  12. Evaluating the Effect of U-500 Insulin Therapy on Glycemic Control in Veterans With Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawarskas, Ann D.; Resch, Nina D.; Vigil, Justina M.

    2015-01-01

    IN BRIEF This article describes a single-center, retrospective chart review to determine the glycemic effect of converting from U-100 to U-500 regular insulin in veterans with type 2 diabetes and the effect of this change, if any, on the frequency of provider contacts. Results showed that U-500 insulin improved glycemic control without significantly increasing the risk of hypoglycemia or total daily insulin dose, even when follow-up contacts with providers were not structured or frequent. PMID:25653468

  13. Longitudinal relationships between glycemic status and body mass index in a multiethnic study: evidence from observational and genetic epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishola, Adeola F; Gerstein, Hertzel C; Engert, James C; Mohan, Viswanathan; Diaz, Rafael; Anand, Sonia S; Meyre, David

    2016-08-02

    We investigated the relationship between glycemic status and BMI and its interaction with obesity single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a multi-ethnic longitudinal cohort at high-risk for dysglycemia. We studied 17 394 participants from six ethnicities followed-up for 3.3 years. Twenty-three obesity SNPs were genotyped and an unweighted genotype risk score (GRS) was calculated. Glycemic status was defined using an oral glucose tolerance test. Linear regression models were adjusted for age, sex and population stratification. Normal glucose tolerance (NGT) to dysglycemia transition was associated with baseline BMI and BMI change. Impaired fasting glucose/impaired glucose tolerance to type 2 diabetes transition was associated with baseline BMI but not BMI change. No simultaneous significant main genetic effects and interactions between SNPs/GRS and glycemic status or transition on BMI level and BMI change were observed. Our data suggests that the interplay between glycemic status and BMI trajectory may be independent of the effects of obesity genes. This implies that individuals with different glycemic statuses may be combined together in genetic association studies on obesity traits, if appropriate adjustments for glycemic status are performed. Implementation of population-wide weight management programs may be more beneficial towards individuals with NGT than those at a later disease stage.

  14. Longitudinal relationships between glycemic status and body mass index in a multiethnic study: evidence from observational and genetic epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishola, Adeola F.; Gerstein, Hertzel C.; Engert, James C.; Mohan, Viswanathan; Diaz, Rafael; Anand, Sonia S.; Meyre, David

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between glycemic status and BMI and its interaction with obesity single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a multi-ethnic longitudinal cohort at high-risk for dysglycemia. We studied 17 394 participants from six ethnicities followed-up for 3.3 years. Twenty-three obesity SNPs were genotyped and an unweighted genotype risk score (GRS) was calculated. Glycemic status was defined using an oral glucose tolerance test. Linear regression models were adjusted for age, sex and population stratification. Normal glucose tolerance (NGT) to dysglycemia transition was associated with baseline BMI and BMI change. Impaired fasting glucose/impaired glucose tolerance to type 2 diabetes transition was associated with baseline BMI but not BMI change. No simultaneous significant main genetic effects and interactions between SNPs/GRS and glycemic status or transition on BMI level and BMI change were observed. Our data suggests that the interplay between glycemic status and BMI trajectory may be independent of the effects of obesity genes. This implies that individuals with different glycemic statuses may be combined together in genetic association studies on obesity traits, if appropriate adjustments for glycemic status are performed. Implementation of population-wide weight management programs may be more beneficial towards individuals with NGT than those at a later disease stage. PMID:27480816

  15. Peanut Allergens Alter Intestinal Barrier Permeability and Tight Junction Localisation in Caco-2 Cell Cultures1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwan B. Price

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Allergen absorption by epithelia may play an important role in downstream immune responses. Transport mechanisms that can bypass Peyer's patches include transcellular and paracellular transport. The capacity of an allergen to cross via these means can modulate downstream processing of the allergen by the immune system. The aim of this study was to investigate allergen-epithelial interactions of peanut allergens with the human intestinal epithelium. Methods: We achieved this using the human Caco-2 cell culture model, exposed to crude peanut extract. Western and immunofluorescence analysis were used to identify the cellular and molecular changes of peanut extract on the intestinal epithelium. Results: Following exposure of Caco-2 cells to peanut extract, binding of the peanut allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 to the apical cellular membrane and transcytosis across the monolayers were observed. Additionally, the co-localisation of the transmembrane tight junction proteins occludin, JAM-A and claudin-1, with the intracellular adhesion protein ZO-1 was modified. Conclusion: Disruption of Caco-2 barrier integrity through tight junction disruption may enable movement of peanut proteins across the intestinal epithelium. This accounts for peanut's increased allergenicity, compared to other food allergens, and provides an explanation for the potency of peanut allergens in immune response elicitation.

  16. Tight ceramic UF membrane as RO pre-treatment: the role of electrostatic interactions on phosphate rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Ran; Verliefde, Arne R D; Hu, Jingyi; Zeng, Zheyi; Lu, Jie; Kemperman, Antoine J B; Deng, Huiping; Nijmeijer, Kitty; Heijman, Sebastiaan G J; Rietveld, Luuk C

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate limitation has been reported as an effective approach to inhibit biofouling in reverse osmosis (RO) systems for water purification. The rejection of dissolved phosphate by negatively charged TiO2 tight ultrafiltration (UF) membranes (1 kDa and 3 kDa) was observed. These membranes can potentially be adopted as an effective process for RO pre-treatment in order to constrain biofouling by phosphate limitation. This paper focuses on electrostatic interactions during tight UF filtration. Despite the larger pore size, the 3 kDa ceramic membrane exhibited greater phosphate rejection than the 1 kDa membrane, because the 3 kDa membrane has a greater negative surface charge and thus greater electrostatic repulsion against phosphate. The increase of pH from 6 to 8.5 led to a substantial increase in phosphate rejection by both membranes due to increased electrostatic repulsion. At pH 8.5, the maximum phosphate rejections achieved by the 1 kDa and 3 kDa membrane were 75% and 86%, respectively. A Debye ratio (ratio of the Debye length to the pore radius) is introduced in order to evaluate double layer overlapping in tight UF membranes. Threshold Debye ratios were determined as 2 and 1 for the 1 kDa and 3 kDa membranes, respectively. A Debye ratio below the threshold Debye ratio leads to dramatically decreased phosphate rejection by tight UF membranes. The phosphate rejection by the tight UF, in combination with chemical phosphate removal by coagulation, might accomplish phosphate-limited conditions for biological growth and thus prevent biofouling in the RO systems.

  17. Improving Glycemic Control and Insulin Ordering Efficiency for Hospitalized Patients With Diabetes Through Carbohydrate Counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Kristina K; Reiland, Sarah A; Meara, John G O; Brown, Julie K; Fedraw, Leslie A; Mapes, David L

    2016-01-01

    Glycemic control in hospitalized patients is challenging but important for optimal outcomes. Insulin dosing through carbohydrate counting may address patient, provider, and institutional factors that complicate hospital glycemic management. On two surgical units at a tertiary care teaching hospital, we pilot tested postmeal insulin dosing based on carbohydrate counting (plus basal insulin) rather than the current process of ordering scheduled premeal insulin without knowledge of the patient's consumption. Analysis assessed hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, insulin orders, and nurse and provider satisfaction and confidence. On general surgery, mean glucose level improved from 188 to 137 mg/dl (p satisfaction improved for providers (preintervention, 60%; postintervention, 100%), general surgery nurses (preintervention, 72%; postintervention, 100%), and cardiovascular surgery nurses (preintervention, 69%; postintervention, 84%). Confidence in insulin dose accuracy improved for providers (preintervention, 50%; postintervention, 100%), general surgery nurses (preintervention, 59%; postintervention, 100%), and cardiovascular surgery nurses (preintervention, 48%; postintervention, 84%). Carbohydrate counting is effective and efficient and improved staff satisfaction and confidence in hospital mealtime insulin dosing.

  18. The Association of Binge Eating Disorder with Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Canan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our aim was to assess the prevalence of binge eating disorder (BED in individuals with type 2 diabetes and to investigate whether a comorbidity with BED would affect glycemic control in these patients. Materials and Methods: Eighty-two type 2 diabetic patients were enrolled. The participants were assessed for eating disorders by a psychiatrist. Blood samples were drawn and HbA1c and other biochemical parameters were measured. Results: Of the 82 subjects, 27 (34.1% met the criteria for BED. No other types of eating disorders were detected. HbA1c was significantly higher in individuals with BED (p<0.05. Conclusion: Our findings reveal that BED is highly prevalent among type 2 diabetic patients and it impairs glycemic control. Thus, patients with type 2 diabetes should be assessed carefully for eating disorders. Turk Jem 2011; 15: 26-7

  19. The combination of colesevelam with sitagliptin enhances glycemic control in diabetic ZDF rat model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shang, Quan; Liu, Matthew K; Saumoy, Monica;

    2012-01-01

    Bile acid sequestrants have been shown to reduce glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. We previously reported that the bile acid sequestrant colesevelam HCl (Welchol) (COL) induced the release of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and improved glycemic control in insulin-resistant rats....... In the present study, we tested whether adding sitagliptin (Januvia) (SIT), which prolongs bioactive GLP-1 half life, to COL would further enhance glycemic control. Male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats were assigned to four groups: diabetic model without treatment (the model), the model treated with 2% COL or 0.......4% (120 mg/day) SIT alone, or with the combination (COL+SIT). After 4 wk of treatment, the glucose area under the curve (AUC) was reduced more in the COL+SIT than the COL although both groups showed decreased glucose AUC with increased AUC of bioactive GLP-1 (GLP-1A) compared with the model group...

  20. Effect of preexercise meals with different glycemic indices and loads on metabolic responses and endurance running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya Jun; Wong, Stephen H; Wong, Chun Kwok; Lam, Ching Wan; Huang, Ya Jun; Siu, Parco M

    2008-06-01

    This study examined the effect of ingesting 3 isocaloric meals with different glycemic indices (GI) and glycemic loads (GL) 2 hr before exercise on metabolic responses and endurance running performance. Eight male runners completed 3 trials in a randomized order, separated by at least 7 days. Carbohydrate (CHO) content (%), GI, and GL were, respectively, 65%, 79, and 82 for the high-GI/high-GL meal (H-H); 65%, 40, and 42 for the low-GI/low-GL meal (L-L); and 36%, 78, and 44 for the high-GI/low-GL meal (H-L). Each trial consisted of a 1-hr run at 70% VO2max, followed by a 10-km performance run. Low-GL diets (H-L and L-L) were found to induce smaller metabolic changes during the postprandial period and during exercise, which were characterized by a lower CHO oxidation in the 2 trials (p metabolic responses.

  1. Glycemic index of American-grown jasmine rice classified as high.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Teresa H; Yuet, Wei Cheng; Hall, Micki D

    2014-06-01

    The primary objective was to determine the glycemic index (GI) of jasmine rice grown in the United States (US). Secondary objective was to compare the GI of US grown jasmine rice to those grown in Thailand. Twelve healthy subjects were served all four brands of jasmine rice and a reference food (glucose), each containing 50 g of available carbohydrate. Fingerstick blood glucose was measured at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after consumption following a fasting state. The GI was calculated using the standard equation. The GI values for test foods ranged from 96 to 116 and were all classified as high GI foods. No difference in GI was found between American-grown and Thailand-grown jasmine rice. Although not statistically significant, observations show glycemic response among Asian American participants may be different. GI should be considered when planning meals with jasmine rice as the main source carbohydrate.

  2. Magnesium in type 2 diabetes mellitus and its correlation with glycemic control

    OpenAIRE

    Nehal Hamdy El-said; Noha Adly Sadik; Nagwa Abd EL-Ghaffar Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypomagnesaemia may have negative impact on glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. This study was done to compare serum Mg levels in type 2 diabetic patients with non diabetic healthy control subjects and to assess the correlation between serum Mg levels and glycemic control in Egyptian patients. Methods: 60 type 2 diabetic patients attending the outpatient clinic of diabetes at Kasr Al Aini hospital faculty of medicine Cairo University and 30 healthy age matched control ...

  3. Which Foods May Be Addictive? The Roles of Processing, Fat Content, and Glycemic Load

    OpenAIRE

    Schulte, Erica M.; Avena, Nicole M.; Gearhardt, Ashley N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We propose that highly processed foods share pharmacokinetic properties (e.g. concentrated dose, rapid rate of absorption) with drugs of abuse, due to the addition of fat and/or refined carbohydrates and the rapid rate the refined carbohydrates are absorbed into the system, indicated by glycemic load (GL). The current study provides preliminary evidence for the foods and food attributes implicated in addictive-like eating. Design Cross-sectional. Setting University (Study One) and ...

  4. Metformin regulates glycemic homeostasis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus as an NO donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Sergeevich Kuznetsov

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the influence of metformin on nitric oxide bioavailability in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM regarding glycemic homeostasis, and to investigate a correlation between metformin dosage and NO levels in vivo.Materials and Methods. Two groups – primary and control – were assembled for the clinical section of this study. Patients with newly diagnosed T2DM on metformin therapy were included to the primary group, while drug-naïve T2DM patients were enrolled as control subjects. Glycemic parameters and NO bioavailability was tested in both groups prior to and after the follow-up period. Experimental section was dedicated to the elucidation of potential dose-dependent effects of metformin on NO bioavailability. Mice were intraperitoneally infused with metformin at 0.5; 1.1; 5.6 mg per subject. Tissue detection of NO was performed with diethyldithiocarbamate (DETC iron complexes to form mononitrosyl iron compounds (MIC with paramagnetic properties. Control rodents were intraperitoneally infused with metformin without spin trapping.Results. We found nitrite and methaemoglobin (a marker for NO bioavailability to increase in parallel along with glycemic compensation in the primary but not control group. In vivo rodent models showed linear correlation between accumulation of DETC/MIC and dose of metformin, as well as formation of dinitrosyl iron complexes, known as endogenous NO transporters.Conclusion. Our data suggests that metformin benefits glycemic homeostasis in T2DM as an NO donor via formation of dinitrosyl iron complexes.

  5. Evaluation of a novel artificial pancreas: closed loop glycemic control system with continuous blood glucose monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Yuuki; Kinoshita, Yoshihiko; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Munekage, Masaya; Munekage, Eri; Takezaki, Yuka; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Yamashita, Koichi; Yamazaki, Rie; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Tarumi, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Masaki; Mishina, Suguru; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2013-04-01

    A closed-loop glycemic control system using an artificial pancreas has been applied with many clinical benefits in Japan since 1987. To update this system incorporating user-friendly features, we developed a novel artificial pancreas (STG-55). The purpose of this study was to evaluate STG-55 for device usability, performance of blood glucose measurement, glycemic control characteristics in vivo in animal experiments, and evaluate its clinical feasibility. There are several features for usability improvement based on the design concepts, such as compactness, display monitor, batteries, guidance function, and reduction of the preparation time. All animal study data were compared with a clinically available artificial pancreas system in Japan (control device: STG-22). We examined correlations of both blood glucose levels between two groups (STG-55 vs. control) using Clarke's error grid analysis, and also compared mean glucose infusion rate (GIR) during glucose clamp. The results showed strong correlation in blood glucose concentrations (Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient: 0.97; n = 1636). Clarke's error grid analysis showed that 98.4% of the data fell in Zones A and B, which represent clinically accurate or benign errors, respectively. The difference in mean GIRs was less than 0.2 mg/kg/min, which was considered not significant. Clinical feasibility study demonstrated sufficient glycemic control maintaining target glucose range between 80 and 110 (mg/dL), and between 140 and 160 without any hypoglycemia. In conclusion, STG-55 was a clinically acceptable artificial pancreas with improved interface and usability. A closed-loop glycemic control system with STG-55 would be a useful tool for surgical and critical patients in intensive care units, as well as diabetic patients.

  6. Role of betahistine in glycemic control of obese subjects: a placebo- controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hayder H. Al-Anbari; Ahmed S. Sahib; Amer O. Al-Mukhtar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Poor glycemic control, insulin resistance and abnormal beta cell function are of the most important complications that associated with obesity, targeting of such complications with pharmacological agents depending on the already existing central mechanism may decrease the incidence of morbidity and mortality among obese subjects. Betahistine is an anti-vertigo drug, commonly prescribed to patients with balance disorders or to improve vertigo symptoms associated with Meniere's dise...

  7. Pasta added with chickpea flour: chemical composition, In vitro starchdigestibility and predicted glycemic index

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Pasta was prepared with of durum wheat flour mixed with chickpea flour at two different levels and its chemical composition, in vitro starch digestibility and predicted glycemic index were assessed. Protein, ash, lipid, and dietary fiber content increased while total starch decreased with the chickpea flour level in the composite pasta, all in accordance to the composition of the legume flour. Potentially available starch decreased and resistant starch (RS) increased by adding chickpea flour ...

  8. Plasma adiponectin concentrations are associated with dietary glycemic index in Malaysian patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Beng-In; Sathyasuryan, Daniel Robert; Mohamed, Hamid Jan Jan

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin, an adipocyte-derived hormone has been implicated in the control of blood glucose and chronic inflammation in type 2 diabetes. However, limited studies have evaluated dietary factors on plasma adiponectin levels, especially among type 2 diabetic patients in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of dietary glycemic index on plasma adiponectin concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 305 type 2 diabetic patients aged 19-75 years from the Penang General Hospital, Malaysia. Socio-demographic information was collected using a standard questionnaire while dietary details were determined by using a pre-validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Anthropometry measurement included weight, height, BMI and waist circumference. Plasma adiponectin concentrations were measured using a commercial ELISA kit. Data were analyzed using multiple linear regression. After multivariate adjustment, dietary glycemic index was inversely associated with plasma adiponectin concentrations (β =-0.272, 95% CI -0.262, - 0.094; pglycemic index that plasma adiponectin level reduced by 0.3 μg/mL. Thirty two percent (31.9%) of the variation in adiponectin concentrations was explained by age, sex, race, smoking status, BMI, waist circumference, HDL-C, triglycerides, magnesium, fiber and dietary glycemic index according to the multiple linear regression model (R2=0.319). These results support the hypothesis that dietary glycemic index influences plasma adiponectin concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlled clinical trials are required to confirm our findings and to elucidate the underlying mechanism.

  9. High hydrostatic pressure processing reduces the glycemic index of fresh mango puree in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo-Montemayor, Leticia; Hernández-Brenes, Carmen; Ramos-Parra, Perla A; Moreno-Sánchez, Diana; Nieblas, Bianca; Rosas-Pérez, Aratza M; Lamadrid-Zertuche, Ana C

    2015-04-01

    Dietary guidelines recommend the daily consumption of fruits; however, healthy and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) subjects receive conflicting messages regarding ingestion of fruits, such as mango, because of its sugar content. We investigated the effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) processing of fresh mango puree (MP) on the glycemic indexes (GIs) and postprandial glycemic responses of 38 healthy Mexican subjects in a randomized cross-over clinical trial. Physicochemical characterization of MP included sugar profiles by HPLC-ELSD, starch, fibers, moisture, viscosity, swelling capacity and solubility properties of alcohol insoluble residue (AIR). The mean GI for HHP-MP was significantly lower (32.7 ± 13.4) than that of unprocessed-MP (42.7 ± 19.5). A significantly higher proportion of subjects showed a low GI following the consumption of HHP-MP compared to unprocessed-MP and none of them showed a high GI for the HHP-MP, compared to a significantly higher proportion for the unprocessed-MP. The viscosity and AIR solubility values of HHP-MP samples were significantly higher, which influenced glucose peaking later (Tmax) at 45 minutes and induced 20% lower AUC values than unprocessed-MP, corresponding to greater retardation indexes. The study findings support data stating that low GI fruits are appropriate for glycemic control and that mango may be included as part of healthy subjects' diets and potentially T2DM subjects' diets. Furthermore, HHP processing of mango may offer additional benefits for glycemic control, as its performance regarding GI, AUC and Tmax was significantly better than that of the unprocessed-MP. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the impact of this commercial non-thermal pasteurization technology on glucose metabolism.

  10. Determinants of glycemic control and quality of Life in type 2 diabetic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Rodrigo A. P.; Cassyano J. Correr; Melchiors,Ana Carolina; Sanches, Andreia C. C.; Wiens, Astrid; Pontarolo, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of socio-economic, clinical and pharmacotherapeutic determinants, adherence to therapy on the quality of life and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We conducted a cross-sectional study exploratory. Data collection was conducted through structured interviews and analysis of medical records. We interviewed 146 adult patients. Increasing age, body mass index, number of antidiabetic medications used and blacks, were rel...

  11. Exercise Strategies to Optimize Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes: A Continuing Glucose Monitoring Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    van Dijk, Jan-Willem; van Loon, Luc J. C.

    2015-01-01

    IN BRIEF The introduction of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) several years ago enabled researchers to investigate the impact of exercise strategies on 24-hour glycemic control. Such unique information on the glucoregulatory properties of exercise will ultimately lead to more effective exercise programs to prevent and treat type 2 diabetes. This article reviews the role of exercise and physical activity in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, complemented by recent data obtained by CGM.

  12. Effect of Algerian Varieties Dates on Glycemic, Arterial Blood Pressure and Satiety Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Gourchala Freha, Mihoub Fatma, Derradj Meriem, Henchiri Cherifa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to determine the Glycemic Indexes (GIs)of three Algerians varieties of dates in healthy subjects, evaluate the satiety and effect on arterial pressure after their consumption. We have first documented the chemical composition of the dates. 10 healthy subjects consumed the dates (carbohydrates content of 50 g) in order to determine the GIs. The responses of glycaemia were monitored during two hours after the dates taking and compared to the reference glucose. In a r...

  13. Glycemic index of cracked corn, oat groats and rolled barley in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose-Cunilleras, E; Taylor, L E; Hinchcliff, K W

    2004-09-01

    Muscle glycogen synthesis depends on glucose availability. This study was undertaken to determine the glycemic and insulinemic response of horses to equal amounts of hydrolyzable carbohydrates (starch and sugar) in the form of one of three grain meals or intragastric administration of a glucose solution. In a randomized crossover design, seven horses were fed each of three grain meals (cracked corn, steamed oat groats, or rolled barley) or were infused intragastrically with glucose solution at 2 g of hydrolyzable carbohydrate (starch plus sugar) per kilogram of BW. The quantity of hydrolyzable carbohydrate ingested was not different among all treatments (P = 0.70). Plasma glucose concentration peaked in all four treatments by 1.5 to 2 h after feeding. Plasma glucose concentration remained higher than baseline in oat groats or barley-fed horses throughout 8 h, whereas plasma glucose returned to baseline by 5 to 6 h in corn-fed horses or after glucose administration. Meal consumption was slower in oat groats-fed horses than in corn-fed ones, which may confound the glycemic and insulinemic responses observed after grain feeding. Plasma glucose area under the curve (AUC) was 63% both in corn and oat groats and 57% in barley-fed horses compared with that of horses administered glucose (P = 0.13). Serum immunoreactive insulin concentration peaked between 2 and 3 h after feeding or glucose administration, and barley-fed horses had lower serum immunoreactive insulin concentration by 3 to 4 h than corn-fed horses or after glucose administration (P oat groats, corn, and barley result in similar plasma glucose AUC and, compared with the glycemic index of 100 as the glucose reference, corn, oat groats, and barley had a glycemic index of approximately 60.

  14. Informing food choices and health outcomes by use of the dietary glycemic index

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Considerable epidemiologic evidence links consuming lower glycemic index (GI) diets with good health, particularly upon aging. The GI is a kinetic parameter which reflects the ability of carbohydrate (CHO)-contained in consumed foods to raise blood glucose in vivo. Newer nutritional, clinical, and experimental data link intake of lower dietary GI foods to favorable outcomes of chronic diseases, and compel further examination of the record. Based upon the new information there are 2 specific q...

  15. Dietary fiber and the glycemic index: a background paper for the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations 2012

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review recent data on dietary fiber (DF) and the glycemic index (GI), with special focus on studies from the Nordic countries regarding cardiometabolic risk factors, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and total mortality. In this study, recent guidelines and scientific background papers or updates on older reports on DF and GI published between 2000 and 2011 from the US, EU, WHO, and the World Cancer Research Fund were reviewed, as well as prospective...

  16. Glycemic index claims on food labels: review of Health Canada's evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolever, T M S

    2013-12-01

    Recently Health Canada (HC) published its opinion that including glycemic index (GI) values on food labels would be misleading and not add value to nutrition labeling and dietary guidelines to help consumers make healthier food choices. Important areas of concern were identified by HC, but the discussion of them is scientifically invalid. HC concluded that GI has poor precision for labeling purposes based on incorrect application of the standard deviation. In fact, GI methodology is precise enough to distinguish, with high probability, low-GI (GI ≤ 55) from high-GI (GI ≥ 70) foods and to pass the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Nutrition Compliance Test procedure. HC rightly concluded that GI does not respond to portion size, whereas glycemic response does, but no valid evidence was provided to support the assertion that a lower-GI food could have a higher glycemic response. HC's focus on glycemic response could promote a low-carbohydrate diet inconsistent with nutrition recommendations. HC correctly concluded that GI is unresponsive to the replacement of available- with unavailable-carbohydrate but this is irrelevant to GI labeling. HC is rightly concerned about promoting unhealthy low-GI foods; however, this could be avoided by prohibiting GI labeling on such foods. Therefore, HC has provided neither a helpful nor scientifically valid evaluation of GI for labeling purposes but has contributed to the wealth of misinformation about GI in the literature. Currently, Canadian consumers only have access to unregulated and misleading information about GI; well-crafted guidelines for GI labeling would provide consumers accurate information about GI and help them make healthier food choices.

  17. Maternal glycemic control and hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetic pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Kinsley, Brendan; Amiel, Stephanie A

    2007-01-01

    with HI. A1C was comparable with human insulin in second (IAsp-HI -0.04 [-0.18 to 0.11]) and third (-0.08 [-0.23 to 0.06]) trimesters. A total of 80% of subjects achieved an A1C ... in basal-bolus therapy with NPH insulin in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes and may potentially offer some benefits in terms of postprandial glucose control and preventing severe hypoglycemia....

  18. The association between dietary glycemic index, glycemic load and diet quality indices in Iranian adults: results from Isfahan Healthy Heart Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadbakht, Leila; Mohammadifard, Noushin; Akhavanzanjani, Mohsen; Taheri, Marzieh; Golshahi, Jafar; Haghighatdoost, Fahimeh

    2016-01-01

    To assess the association between dietary glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL) and dietary quality indices in Iranian adults. This cross section was conducted among 1571 Iranian adults aged  ≥19 years. GI, GL and diet quality indices were estimated by 24-h recall and DDS was calculated using a validated 48-item food frequency questionnaire. Participants who were in the top tertile of GI had lower healthy eating index (HEI) (57.2 ± 7.8 versus 55.6 ± 8.7; p < 0.001), dietary diversity score (DDS) (3.6 ± 0.9 versus 3.3 ± 1.1; p < 0.001) and nutrient adequacy ratios (NARs) for Zn, Ca, vitamin C and B2. Individuals in the lowest tertile of GL had lower HEI, MAR and NARs for Zn, vitamin B2, B3, B6, B12, vitamin D. Both GI and GL were positively related to dietary diversity score (DED) (p < 0.001). The inverse associations for GI and GL with diet quality indices may suggest the relevance of carbohydrate source in determining the diet quality indices.

  19. Higher glycemic index and glycemic load diet is associated with increased risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamian, Ghazaleh; Jessri, Mahsa; Hajizadeh, Bahareh; Ibiebele, Torukiri I; Rashidkhani, Bahram

    2013-09-01

    Several studies have indicated the association between intake of foods high in dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) with an increased risk of digestive tract cancers. We hypothesized that GI and GL may be associated with risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in a high-risk population in Iran. In total, we interviewed 47 cases with incident of ESCC and 96 frequency-matched hospital controls, then calculated the average dietary GI and GL via a validated food frequency questionnaire. Dietary GL was calculated as a function of GI, carbohydrate content, and frequency of intake of certain foods. Dietary GI and GL levels were significantly higher among the ESCC cases compared with the controls (P < .05). After adjustment for potential confounders, those in the highest tertile of dietary GI had 2.95 times higher risk of ESCC compared with those in the lowest (95% confidence interval, 1.68-3.35; P for trend = .002). In addition, being in the highest tertile of dietary GL was positively associated with an ESCC risk (odds ratio, 3.49; 95% confidence interval, 2.98-4.41; P for trend = .001). Findings of the present study indicate that diets with high GI and GL might have potentially unfavorable effects on ESCC risk and suggest a possible role for excess circulating insulin and related insulin-like growth factor 1 in esophageal cancer development.

  20. In vitro colonic fermentation and glycemic response of different kinds of unripe banana flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Elizabete Wenzel; Dan, Milana C T; Cardenette, Giselli H L; Goñi, Isabel; Bello-Pérez, Luis Arturo; Lajolo, Franco M

    2010-12-01

    This work aimed to study the in vitro colonic fermentation profile of unavailable carbohydrates of two different kinds of unripe banana flour and to evaluate their postprandial glycemic responses. The unripe banana mass (UBM), obtained from the cooked pulp of unripe bananas (Musa acuminata, Nanicão variety), and the unripe banana starch (UBS), obtained from isolated starch of unripe banana, plantain type (Musa paradisiaca) in natura, were studied. The fermentability of the flours was evaluated by different parameters, using rat inoculum, as well as the glycemic response produced after the ingestion by healthy volunteers. The flours presented high concentration of unavailable carbohydrates, which varied in the content of resistant starch, dietary fiber and indigestible fraction (IF). The in vitro colonic fermentation of the flours was high, 98% for the UBS and 75% for the UBM when expressed by the total amount of SCFA such as acetate, butyrate and propionate in relation to lactulose. The increase in the area under the glycemic curve after ingestion of the flours was 90% lower for the UBS and 40% lower for the UBM than the increase produced after bread intake. These characteristics highlight the potential of UBM and UBS as functional ingredients. However, in vivo studies are necessary in order to evaluate the possible benefit effects of the fermentation on intestinal health.

  1. Hemorheological and Glycemic Parameters and HDL Cholesterol for the Prediction of Cardiovascular Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sung Woo [Division of Cardiology - Department of Internal Medicine - Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Division of Cardiology - Department of Medicine - Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung Gyu; Kim, Byung Ok; Byun, Young Sup; Goh, Choong Won; Rhee, Kun Joo [Division of Cardiology - Department of Internal Medicine - Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyuck Moon; Lee, Byoung Kwon, E-mail: cardiobk@yuhs.ac [Division of Cardiology - Department of Internal Medicine - Gangnam Severance Hospital - Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Hemorheological and glycemic parameters and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are used as biomarkers of atherosclerosis and thrombosis. To investigate the association and clinical relevance of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), fibrinogen, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and HDL cholesterol in the prediction of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and coronary heart disease (CHD) in an outpatient population. 708 stable patients who visited the outpatient department were enrolled and followed for a mean period of 28.5 months. Patients were divided into two groups, patients without MACE and patients with MACE, which included cardiac death, acute myocardial infarction, newly diagnosed CHD, and cerebral vascular accident. We compared hemorheological and glycemic parameters and lipid profiles between the groups. Patients with MACE had significantly higher ESR, fibrinogen, fasting glucose, and HbA1c, while lower HDL cholesterol compared with patients without MACE. High ESR and fibrinogen and low HDL cholesterol significantly increased the risk of MACE in multivariate regression analysis. In patients with MACE, high fibrinogen and HbA1c levels increased the risk of multivessel CHD. Furthermore, ESR and fibrinogen were significantly positively correlated with HbA1c and negatively correlated with HDL cholesterol, however not correlated with fasting glucose. Hemorheological abnormalities, poor glycemic control, and low HDL cholesterol are correlated with each other and could serve as simple and useful surrogate markers and predictors for MACE and CHD in outpatients.

  2. Association Between Cardiorespiratory Fitness and the Determinants of Glycemic Control Across the Entire Glucose Tolerance Continuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas P. J.; Malin, Steven K.; Karstoft, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max) is associated with glycemic control, yet the relationship between VO2max and the underlying determinants of glycemic control is less clear. Our aim was to determine whether VO2max is associated with insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion...... underwent measurements of body composition, HbA1c, fasting glucose, oral glucose tolerance (OGTT), and VO2max. OGTT-derived insulin sensitivity (SiOGTT), glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSISOGTT), and the disposition index (DIOGTT) (the product of SiOGTT and GSISOGTT) were measured, and associations...... between VO2max and these determinants of glycemic control were examined. RESULTS: A low VO2max was associated with high HbA1c (r = -0.33), high fasting glucose (r = -0.34), high 2-h OGTT glucose (r = -0.33), low SiOGTT (r = 0.73), and high early-phase (r = -0.34) and late-phase (r = -0.36) GSISOGTT...

  3. Glycemic control and periodontal disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav Tandon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus (DM is a chronic, noncommunicable disease with concomitant oral manifestations that impact on dental care. Aim: To determine the correlation between glycemic control and periodontitis among 35-45 years aged patients with DM type 2 (DM2. Materials and Methods: A convenient sample of 40 subjects aged 35-45 years with DM2 on oral medication were recruited for the study. Glycosylated, hemoglobin(HbA1c, probing pocket depth (PPD, gingival index (GI, plaque index (PI, and the relevant drug history were recorded. The data were analyzed using unpaired student t-test to compare the means of PPD, GI, PI between different HbA1c levels, gender, and duration of drug, and the Pearson correlation was used to find correlation between HbA1c and PPD, GI, PI, duration of drug. Results: With the increase in HbA1c values there was a significant rise in PPD, PI scores, and GI scores (P < 0.001. Diabetic males had a higher PPD, PI, and GI score as compared to females. With the increase in duration of the drug, there was an increase in PPD, which was found to be statistically nonsignificant. Conclusion: Patients are having poor glycemic level had more severe periodontitis as compared to patients having a fair glycemic level.

  4. The association between glycemic control and microalbuminuria in Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showail, Anwar Ali; Ghoraba, Medhat

    2016-05-01

    Microalbuminuria is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and renal out- come in a patient with Type 2 diabetes. The evidence that intensive glycemic control reduces the microvascular complications of diabetes is based almost exclusively on prevention of micro- albuminuria. To evaluate the association between microalbuminuria and glycemic control and other factors in Type 2 diabetes, we studied retrospectively 551 patients with Type 2 diabetes. The patients were divided into two groups: 175 patients with microalbuminuria in the case group and 376 with normal urine albumin-creatinine ratio in the control group. Our data indicated that there was a significant association between the uncontrolled glycemia and development of microalbuminuria and that was more obvious if HbA1c level was >11%. Our data also indicate that there was a statistical significant association between male gender, age, the systolic and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) levels, and the microalbuminuria in crude odds ratios (ORs). We conclude that there was a clear association between the glycemic control and microalbuminuria, and microalbuminuria was associated with older age, male gender, and systolic and DBP in crude ORs.

  5. [Glycemic response to consumption of a cereals and legume (Phaseolus vulgaris) bar on healthy individuals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano, Rosaura; Granito, Marisela; Valero, Yolmar

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this work was to formulate a cereals and legume (Phaseolus vulgaris) bar and assess its impact on the glycemic response of healthy individuals, in order to contribute to the healthy food supply beneficial to consumers. A mixture of cereals (corn and oats) and different percentages (20 and 30%) of Phaseolus vulgaris was used to formulate the bar. Additionally, a legume cereal bar without legumes (bar control) was prepared. The bar with 30% of Phaseolus vulgaris was selected through sensory evaluation, being scored with better flavor and texture. This combination of cereals and legumes aminoacid improves complementation and reaches the formulation criteria previously established. Chemical characterization indicated a higher protein content in the bar with 30% of Phaseolus vulgaris (13.55%) relative to the bar control (8.5%). The contents of fat, ash and dietary fiber did not differ between the two bars evaluated. However, the soluble fiber and resistant starch of the selected bar was a 32.05% and 18.67%, respectively, than in the control bar; this may contribute to decreasing the rate of glucose uptake. The selected bar presented a low glycemic index (49) and intermediate glycemic load (12.0) in healthy volunteers, which could lead to a possible reduction in the rate of absorption of glucose into the bloodstream, associated with a carbohydrate content of slow absorption. This bar represents a proposal of a healthy snack for the consumer.

  6. PULMONARY FUNCTIONS IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE-2 DIABETES MELLITUS AND CORRELATION WITH DURATION AND GLYCEMIC INDEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available There is an alarming increase in incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Asian Indians, since diabetes is a multisystem disorder which may affect many organs of the body it becomes important to study long term effect of diabetes mellitus on lung functions and also correlate the glycemic index with lung functions. Hence the present study was undertaken to establish the correlation between duration of diabetic mellitus and glycemic index with pulmonary function test. METHODOLOGY: 40 Type 2 diabetics taken as cases and controls and PFT was performed and documented and statically analyzed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: there was a decline in pulmonary functions FVC, FEV1, FEF25-75 and PEFR with increasing duration of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (P <0.05, however there was no changes seen with respect to Glycemic index and was not significant. In Type 2 Diabetes mellitus there is a mixed pattern of abnormality seen, restrictive and obstructive type of pulmonary pathology with increasing duration of Type 2 Diabetes mellitus.

  7. 24-hour glucose profiles on diets varying in protein content and glycemic index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baak, Marleen A

    2014-08-04

    Evidence is increasing that the postprandial state is an important factor contributing to the risk of chronic diseases. Not only mean glycemia, but also glycemic variability has been implicated in this effect. In this exploratory study, we measured 24-h glucose profiles in 25 overweight participants in a long-term diet intervention study (DIOGENES study on Diet, Obesity and Genes), which had been randomized to four different diet groups consuming diets varying in protein content and glycemic index. In addition, we compared 24-h glucose profiles in a more controlled fashion, where nine other subjects followed in random order the same four diets differing in carbohydrate content by 10 energy% and glycemic index by 20 units during three days. Meals were provided in the lab and had to be eaten at fixed times during the day. No differences in mean glucose concentration or glucose variability (SD) were found between diet groups in the DIOGENES study. In the more controlled lab study, mean 24-h glucose concentrations were also not different. Glucose variability (SD and CONGA1), however, was lower on the diet combining a lower carbohydrate content and GI compared to the diet combining a higher carbohydrate content and GI. These data suggest that diets with moderate differences in carbohydrate content and GI do not affect mean 24-h or daytime glucose concentrations, but may result in differences in the variability of the glucose level in healthy normal weight and overweight individuals.

  8. Effects of processing methods on amaranth starch digestibility and predicted glycemic index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capriles, V D; Coelho, K D; Guerra-Matias, A C; Arêas, J A G

    2008-09-01

    Amaranth has attracted a great deal of interest in recent decades due to its valuable nutritional, functional, and agricultural characteristics. Amaranth seeds can be cooked, popped, roasted, flaked, or extruded for consumption. This study compared the in vitro starch digestibility of processed amaranth seeds to that of white bread. Raw seeds yielded rapidly digestible starch content (RDS) of 30.7% db and predicted glycemic index (pGI) of 87.2, the lowest among the studied products. Cooked, extruded, and popped amaranth seeds had starch digestibility similar to that of white bread (92.4, 91.2, and 101.3, respectively), while flaked and roasted seeds generated a slightly increased glycemic response (106.0 and 105.8, respectively). Cooking and extrusion did not alter the RDS contents of the seeds. No significant differences were observed among popped, flaked, and roasted RDS contents (38.0%, 46.3%, and 42.9%, respectively), which were all lower than RDS content of bread (51.1%). Amaranth seed is a high glycemic food most likely because of its small starch granule size, low resistant starch content (< 1%), and tendency to completely lose its crystalline and granular starch structure during those heat treatments.

  9. Polyphenol content and glycemic load of pasta enriched with Faba bean flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imma Turco

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Legumes contain elevated levels of health functional components. The objective of the present paper was to evaluate the nutritional properties and the post-prandial glycaemic responses of pasta obtained using 35% Vicia Faba (VF bean flour, which is an important source of fiber and phytochemical compounds. Results: Protein and fiber content were higher in VF pasta compared with durum wheat semolina (DWS pasta. The total phenol content in VF pasta was about two fold higher compared to that of DWS pasta. A higher total flavonoid content, higher antioxidant activity against peroxyl radicals evaluated by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC assay was also observed in VF pasta. The comparison of post-prandial increase of glucose after VF intake or DWS demonstrated significant differences and VF pasta exhibited a lower glycemic index value, a lower glycemic load and higher glycemic profile compared with DWS pasta. Conclusion: The results suggest that enrichment with 35% Vicia faba bean has potential health benefits and that VF flour can be used as an ingredient to prepare added-value products.

  10. Leukocyte peroxidase and leptin: an associated link of glycemic tolerance and bronchial asthma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Parco

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Sergio ParcoImmunopathology Unit, Laboratory of the Department of Medicine, Children’s Hospital, IRCCS Burlo Garofolo, Trieste, ItalyAbstract: Recent observations suggest the presence of an interaction between leptin and the inflammatory system during bronchial asthma. Although there is evidence of a positive association between asthma and obesity in adults and children, little is yet known about the role of serum leptin, as a potential mediator for bronchial epithelial homeostasis, and intraleukocyte myeloperoxidase (MPO, a hemoprotein with a molecular weight of 140 kDa, expression of the inflammatory system, in asthmatic children. Glycemic tolerance is an important pathogenetic element in developing type 2 mellitus diabetes and a confirmed predictor of incident asthma-like symptoms in adults. This work is aimed at assessing a possible correlation between basal leukocyte myeloperoxidase levels, basal leptin and insulin-glycemic tolerance in obese children. Thirty obese children aged between 7 and 15 years were examined. The analyzed data showed a normal response to the insulinemic stimulus in children of both sexes whose basal leptin and MPO values, expressed as MPO intracellular index, werewithin the normal range.Keywords: leptin, myeloperoxidase, glycemic tolerance, asthma

  11. The glycemic index: methodological aspects related to the interpretation of health effects and to regulatory labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    The glycemic index (GI) is an experimental system that classifies carbohydrates (CHO) and CHO-containing foods according to their blood glucose-raising potential. It is based on the glycemic response following the ingestion of a test food containing a defined amount of available CHO relative to that of an equi-carbohydrate portion of either white bread or glucose. The concept has been extended to mixed meals and whole diets where the GI of the meal/diet is expressed as the weighted average of the GI of each food, based on the percentage of the total mealldiet CHO provided by each food. Over the last few decades, a substantial number of epidemiological and interventional studies have reported beneficial associationsleffects of lower GI diets across a wide spectrum of pathophysiological conditions, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obesity, and certain forms of cancer. This has prompted proponents of the GI to recommend its use for dietary planning and labeling purposes. However, the currently recommended GI methodology is not well standardized and has several flaws, which brings into question the strength of evidence attributed to the health effects of low-GI diets. This review focuses exclusively on the methodological aspects of the GI, how they might impact the interpretation of data related to the purported health benefits of low GI diets, and the considerations for the use of the GI in food labeling. In addition, alternative systems for classifying the glycemic effects of CHO-containing foods are briefly discussed.

  12. The Role of Prestroke Glycemic Control on Severity and Outcome of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Hjalmarsson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Relatively few studies have investigated the association of prestroke glycemic control and clinical outcome in acute ischemic stroke (IS patients, regardless of presence of diabetes mellitus (DM. The aim of this study was to investigate the importance of prestroke glycemic control on survival, stroke severity, and functional outcome of patients with acute IS. Methods. We performed a retrospective survival analysis of 501 patients with IS admitted to Sahlgrenska University Hospital from February 15, 2005, through May 31, 2009. The outcomes of interest were acute and long-term survival; the stroke severity (NIHSS and the functional outcome, mRS, at 12 months. Results. HbA1c was a good predictor of acute (HR 1.45; CI, 1.09 to 1.93, P=0.011 and long-term mortality (HR 1.29; CI 1.03 to 1.62; P=0.029. Furthermore, HbA1c >6% was significantly correlated with acute stroke severity (OR 1.29; CI 1.01 to 1.67; P=0.042 and predicted worse functional outcome at 12 months (OR 2.68; CI 1.14 to 6.03; P=0.024. Conclusions. Our study suggests that poor glycemic control (baseline HbA1c prior to IS is an independent risk factor for poor survival and a marker for increased stroke severity and unfavorable long-term functional outcome.

  13. Glycemic Control after Total Pancreatectomy for Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm: An Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laith H. Jamil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Glycemic control following total pancreatectomy (TP has been thought to be difficult to manage. Diffuse intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN is a potentially curable precursor to pancreatic adenocarcinoma, best treated by TP. Objective. Compare glycemic control in patients undergoing TP for IPMN to patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM. Design/Setting. Retrospective cohort. Outcome Measure. Hemoglobin A1C(HbA1C at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after TP. In the control group, baseline was defined as 6 months prior to the first HbA1c measure. Results. Mean HgbA1C at each point of interest was similar between TP and type I DM patients (6 months (7.5% versus 7.7%, P=0.52, 12 months (7.3% versus 8.0%, P=0.081, 18 months (7.7% and 7.6%, P=0.64, and at 24 months (7.3% versus 7.8%, P=0.10. Seven TP patients (50% experienced a hypoglycemic event compared to 65 type 1 DM patients (65%, P=0.38. Limitations. Small number of TP patients, retrospective design, lack of long-termfollowup. Conclusion. This suggests that glycemic control following TP for IPMNcan be well managed, similar to type 1 DM patients. Fear of DM following TP for IPMN should not preclude surgery when TP is indicated.

  14. Materials processing with a tightly focused femtosecond laser vortex pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatovsky, Cyril; Shvedov, Vladlen G; Krolikowski, Wieslaw; Rode, Andrei V

    2010-10-15

    In this Letter we present the first (to our knowledge) demonstration of material modification using tightly focused single femtosecond laser vortex pulses. Double-charge femtosecond vortices were synthesized with a polarization-singularity beam converter based on light propagation in a uniaxial anisotropic medium and then focused using moderate- and high-NA optics (viz., NA=0.45 and 0.9) to ablate fused silica and soda-lime glass. By controlling the pulse energy, we consistently machine micrometer-size ring-shaped structures with <100nm uniform groove thickness.

  15. A characterization of tight and dual generalized translation invariant frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Mads Sielemann; Lemvig, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    We present results concerning generalized translation invariant (GTI) systems on a second countable locally compact abelian group G. These are systems with a family of generators {gj, P}jεJ, pεPJ ⊂ L2(G), where J is a countable index set, and Pj, j ε J are certain measure spaces. Furthermore, for...... such systems form tight frames, and when two GTI Bessel systems form dual frames for L2(G). In particular, this offers a unified approach to the theory of discrete and continuous frames and, e.g., yields well known results for discrete and continuous Gabor and wavelet systems....

  16. Scattering matrix of arbitrary tight-binding Hamiltonians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, C.; Medina-Amayo, L. A.

    2017-03-01

    A novel efficient method to calculate the scattering matrix (SM) of arbitrary tight-binding Hamiltonians is proposed, including cases with multiterminal structures. In particular, the SM of two kinds of fundamental structures is given, which can be used to obtain the SM of bigger systems iteratively. Also, a procedure to obtain the SM of layer-composed periodic leads is described. This method allows renormalization approaches, which permits computations over macroscopic length systems without introducing additional approximations. Finally, the transmission coefficient of a ring-shaped multiterminal system and the transmission function of a square-lattice nanoribbon with a reduced width region are calculated.

  17. Relativistic tight-binding model: Application to Pt surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchernatinsky, A.; Halley, J. W.

    2011-05-01

    We report a parametrization of a previous self-consistent tight-binding model, suitable for metals with a high atomic number in which nonscalar-relativistic effects are significant in the electron physics of condensed phases. The method is applied to platinum. The model is fitted to density functional theory band structures and cohesive energies and spectroscopic data on platinum atoms in five oxidation states, and is then shown without further parametrization to correctly reproduce several low index surface structures. We also predict reconstructions of some vicinal surfaces.

  18. Effective-medium tight-binding model for silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Chetty, N.; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    1994-01-01

    A method for calculating the total energy of Si systems, which is based on the effective-medium-theory concept of a reference system, is presented. Instead of calculating the energy of an atom in the system of interest, a reference system is introduced where the local surroundings are similar. Th...... and detailed description of the method is given together with test calculations of the energies of phonons, elastic constants, different structures, surfaces, and surface reconstructions. We compare the results to calculations using an empirical tight-binding scheme....

  19. Tight Lower Bounds on Envy-Free Makespan Approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Fiat, Amos

    2012-01-01

    In this work we give a tight lower bound on makespan approximations for envy-free allocation mechanism dedicated to scheduling tasks on unrelated machines. Specifically, we show that no mechanism exists that can guarantee an envy-free allocation of jobs to $m$ machines with a makespan of less than a factor of $O(\\log m)$ of the minimal makespan. Combined with previous results, this paper definitively proves that the optimal algorithm for obtaining a minimal makespan for any envy-free division can at best approximate the makespan to a factor of $O(\\log m)$.

  20. Effects of gastrocnemius tightness on forefoot during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazeau, Cyrille; Stiglitz, Yves

    2014-12-01

    The gastrocnemius is the main muscle of the posterior compartment of the leg. As a biarticular muscle it has specific biomechanical propertiess. This article discusses these properties combining the major biomechanical topics of anatomy, dynamics, kinetics, and electromyography. This muscle is remarkable in that it has very low energy consumption and very high mechanical efficacy. In addition to the biomechanical features, the consequences of its tightness are discussed. The dysfunction also appears in all the biomechanical topics and clarifies the reasons of the location of symptoms in the midfoot and on the plantar aspect of the forefoot.

  1. Convergence of obesity and high glycemic diet on compounding diabetes and cardiovascular risks in modernizing China: An emerging public health dilemma

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Abstract As China is undergoing dramatic development, it is also experiencing major societal changes, including an emerging obesity epidemic, with the prevalence of overweight and obesity doubling in the past decade. However, the implications of a high glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) traditional Chinese diet are adversely changing in modern times, as a high-glycemic diet is becoming a greater contributor to diabetes and cardiovascular risks in a population with rising obesity and d...

  2. Impact of Phone Call Intervention on Glycemic Control in Diabetes Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized, Controlled Trials

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Telephone-delivered intervention can provide many supports in diabetes self-management to improve glycemic control. Several trials showed that telephone intervention was positively associated with glycemic outcomes in diabetes. The objective of this meta-analysis was to assess the impact of telephone contact intervention (intervention group) on glycemic control compared with standard clinical care (control group). METHODS: Randomized control studies of telephone intervention in di...

  3. GLYCEMIC BEHAVIOR IN 48 HOURS POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD OF PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS AND NON DIABETIC SUBMITTED TO BARIATRIC SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Although there is no indication for surgery taking only into account the glycemic condition, results have shown that benefits can be obtained in glycemic control with bariatric surgery. Aim : To compare the glycemic behavior among type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic patients within 48 h after bariatric surgery, and clarify whether there is a reduction in blood glucose level in obese patients with diabetes before the loss of weight excess. Methods : Descriptive epidemiological study with prospect...

  4. IMPACC: A Tightly Integrated MPI+OpenACC Framework Exploiting Shared Memory Parallelism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seyong [ORNL; Vetter, Jeffrey S [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    We propose IMPACC, an MPI+OpenACC framework for heterogeneous accelerator clusters. IMPACC tightly integrates MPI and OpenACC, while exploiting the shared memory parallelism in the target system. IMPACC dynamically adapts the input MPI+OpenACC applications on the target heterogeneous accelerator clusters to fully exploit target system-specific features. IMPACC provides the programmers with the unified virtual address space, automatic NUMA-friendly task-device mapping, efficient integrated communication routines, seamless streamlining of asynchronous executions, and transparent memory sharing. We have implemented IMPACC and evaluated its performance using three heterogeneous accelerator systems, including Titan supercomputer. Results show that IMPACC can achieve easier programming, higher performance, and better scalability than the current MPI+OpenACC model.

  5. Vibrationally resolved UV/Vis spectroscopy with time-dependent density functional based tight binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüger, Robert; Niehaus, Thomas; van Lenthe, Erik; Heine, Thomas; Visscher, Lucas

    2016-11-01

    We report a time-dependent density functional based tight-binding (TD-DFTB) scheme for the calculation of UV/Vis spectra, explicitly taking into account the excitation of nuclear vibrations via the adiabatic Hessian Franck-Condon method with a harmonic approximation for the nuclear wavefunction. The theory of vibrationally resolved UV/Vis spectroscopy is first summarized from the viewpoint of TD-DFTB. The method is benchmarked against time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations for strongly dipole allowed excitations in various aromatic and polar molecules. Using the recent 3ob:freq parameter set of Elstner's group, very good agreement with TD-DFT calculations using local functionals was achieved.

  6. Mechanical Control of ATP Synthase Function: Activation Energy Difference between Tight and Loose Binding Sites

    KAUST Repository

    Beke-Somfai, Tamás

    2010-01-26

    Despite exhaustive chemical and crystal structure studies, the mechanistic details of how FoF1-ATP synthase can convert mechanical energy to chemical, producing ATP, are still not fully understood. On the basis of quantum mechanical calculations using a recent highresolution X-ray structure, we conclude that formation of the P-O bond may be achieved through a transition state (TS) with a planar PO3 - ion. Surprisingly, there is a more than 40 kJ/mol difference between barrier heights of the loose and tight binding sites of the enzyme. This indicates that even a relatively small change in active site conformation, induced by the γ-subunit rotation, may effectively block the back reaction in βTP and, thus, promote ATP. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  7. MANAGING TIGHT BINDING RECEPTORS FOR NEW SPEARATIONS TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DARYLE H BUSCH RICHARD S GIVENS

    2004-12-10

    Much of the earth's pollution involves compounds of the metallic elements, including actinides, strontium, cesium, technetium, and RCRA metals. Metal ions bind to molecules called ligands, which are the molecular tools that can manipulate the metal ions under most conditions. This DOE-EMSP sponsored program strives (1) to provide the foundations for using the most powerful ligands in transformational separations technologies and (2) to produce seminal examples of their applications to separations appropriate to the DOE EM mission. These ultra tight-binding ligands can capture metal ions in the most competitive of circumstances (from mineralized sites, lesser ligands, and even extremely dilute solutions), but they react so slowly that they are useless in traditional separations methodologies. Two attacks on this problem are underway. The first accommodates to the challenging molecular lethargy by developing a seminal slow separations methodology termed the soil poultice. The second designs ligands that are only tight-binding while wrapped around the targeted metal ion, but can be put in place by switch-binding and removed by switch-release. We envision a kind of molecular switching process to accelerate the union between metal ion and tight-binding ligand. Molecular switching processes are suggested for overcoming the slow natural equilibration rate with which ultra tight-binding ligands combine with metal ions. Ligands that bind relatively weakly combine with metal ions rapidly, so the trick is to convert a ligand from a weak, rapidly binding species to a powerful, slow releasing ligand--during the binding of the ligand to the metal ion. Such switch-binding ligands must react with themselves, and the reaction must take place under the influence of the metal ion. For example, our generation 1 ligands showed that a well-designed linear ligand with ends that readily combine, forms a cyclic molecule when it wraps around a metal ion. Our generation 2 ligands are

  8. Maximal entanglement achievable by controlled dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Serafini, Alessio

    2009-01-01

    We consider the feedback control of quantum systems comprised of any number of bosonic degrees of freedom. We derive a general upper bound for the logarithmic negativity achievable, at steady state, with continuous Gaussian measurements on the environment and linear driving on the system. Our results apply to rotating wave system-bath couplings and to any quadratic system's Hamiltonian. Furthermore, we apply this upper bound to parametric processes, show it to be tight, and compare it to feedback strategies limited to local measurements.

  9. Design and methods of the GLYNDIET study: assessing the role of glycemic index on weight loss and metabolic risk markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martí Juanola-Falgarona

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glycemic index and/or glycemic load have been explored as an alternative for the prevention and/or management of obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cancer. Objective: The purpose of the manuscript is to describe the design and methods used in the GLYNDIET Project, a study designed to simultaneously address the questions related to the exactly role of low glycaemic index carbohydrates has on weight loss. Methods: This study was designed as a 6-months randomized, parallel, controlled clinical trial aiming to evaluate the effect of the dietary glycemic index on weight-loss, satiety, glucose and insulin metabolism, lipid profile, inflammation and other emergent metabolic risk markers. Eligible subjects were community-dwelling men and women aged between 30 and 60 years, with a body mass index between 27 and 35 kg/m². Subjects were randomly assigned to three different dietary intervention groups (low glycemic index diet, high glycemic index diet or low-fat diet, that were isocaloric, and did not differ in the amount of dietary fibre. Monthly, study subjects were scheduled for control visits where anthropometry, blood pressure, dietary habits, satiety and physical activity were assessed. Blood, urine and subcutaneous adipose tissue samples were collected at baseline and at the end of the study to further molecular and biochemical measurements. Discussion: The GLYNDIET study was designed to determine if there is a greater effectiveness of a carbohydrate restricted diet with low glycemic index compared to an isocaloric diet with carbohydrates of high glycemic index or low-fat diet on weight loss in middle long-term.

  10. Ischemic preconditioning enhances integrity of coronary endothelial tight junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhao [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007 (United States); Jin, Zhu-Qiu, E-mail: zhu-qiu.jin@sdstate.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007 (United States)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac tight junctions are present between coronary endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ischemic preconditioning preserves the structural and functional integrity of tight junctions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Myocardial edema is prevented in hearts subjected to ischemic preconditioning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ischemic preconditioning enhances translocation of ZO-2 from cytosol to cytoskeleton. -- Abstract: Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is one of the most effective procedures known to protect hearts against ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury. Tight junction (TJ) barriers occur between coronary endothelial cells. TJs provide barrier function to maintain the homeostasis of the inner environment of tissues. However, the effect of IPC on the structure and function of cardiac TJs remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that myocardial IR injury ruptures the structure of TJs and impairs endothelial permeability whereas IPC preserves the structural and functional integrity of TJs in the blood-heart barrier. Langendorff hearts from C57BL/6J mice were prepared and perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer. Cardiac function, creatine kinase release, and myocardial edema were measured. Cardiac TJ function was evaluated by measuring Evans blue-conjugated albumin (EBA) content in the extravascular compartment of hearts. Expression and translocation of zonula occludens (ZO)-2 in IR and IPC hearts were detected with Western blot. A subset of hearts was processed for the observation of ultra-structure of cardiac TJs with transmission electron microscopy. There were clear TJs between coronary endothelial cells of mouse hearts. IR caused the collapse of TJs whereas IPC sustained the structure of TJs. IR increased extravascular EBA content in the heart and myocardial edema but decreased the expression of ZO-2 in the cytoskeleton. IPC maintained the structure of TJs. Cardiac EBA content and edema were reduced in IPC hearts. IPC

  11. The Role of the Rock on Hydraulic Fracturing of Tight Shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Rivera, R.; Green, S.; Stanchits, S.; Yang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Successful economic production of oil and gas from nano-darcy-range permeability, tight shale reservoirs, is achieved via massive hydraulic fracturing. This is so despite their limited hydrocarbon in place, on per unit rock volume basis. As a reference, consider a typical average porosity of 6% and an average hydrocarbon saturation of 50% to 75%. The importance of tight shales results from their large areal extent and vertical thickness. For example, the areal extent of the Anwar field in Saudi Arabia of 3230 square miles (and 300 ft thick), while the Marcellus shale alone is over 100,000 square miles (and 70 to 150 ft thick). The low permeability of the rock matrix, the predominantly mineralized rock fabric, and the high capillary forces to both brines and hydrocarbons, restrict the mobility of pore fluids in these reservoirs. Thus, one anticipates that fluids do not move very far within tight shales. Successful production, therefore results from maximizing the surface area of contact with the reservoir by massive hydraulic fracturing from horizontal bore holes. This was the conceptual breakthrough of the previous decade and the one that triggered the emergence of gas shales, and recently oily shales, as important economic sources of energy. It is now understood that the process can be made substantially more efficient, more sustainable, and more cost effective by understanding the rock. This will be the breakthrough of this decade. Microseismic monitoring, mass balance calculations, and laboratory experiments of hydraulic fracturing on tight shales indicate the development of fracture complexity and fracture propagation that can not be explained in detail in this layered heterogeneous media. It is now clear that in tight shales the large-scale formation fabric is responsible for fracture complexity. For example, the presence and pervasiveness of mineralized fractures, bed interfaces, lithologic contacts, and other types of discontinuities, and their orientation

  12. Glycemic index, glycemic load and glycemic response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustin, Livia S A; Kendall, Cyril W C; Jenkins, David J A

    2015-01-01

    . There was consensus that diets low in GI and GL were relevant to the prevention and management of diabetes and coronary heart disease, and probably obesity. Moderate to weak associations were observed for selected cancers. The group affirmed that diets low in GI and GL should always be considered in the context...

  13. Some Bivariate Smooth Compactly Supported Tight Framelets with Three Generators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. San Antolín

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For any dilation matrix with integer entries and , we construct a family of smooth compactly supported tight wavelet frames with three generators in . Our construction involves some compactly supported refinable functions, the oblique extension principle, and a slight generalization of a theorem of Lai and Stöckler. Estimates for the degrees of smoothness are given. With the exception of a polynomial whose coefficients must in general be computed by spectral factorization, the framelets are expressed in closed form in the frequency domain, in terms of elementary transcendental functions. By means of two examples we also show that for low degrees of smoothness the use of spectral factorization may be avoided.

  14. S0 Tight Loop Studies on ICHIRO 9-Cell Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, Fumio [KEK; Konomi, T. [KEK; Saito, Kenji [KEK; Bice, Damon [Fermilab; Crawford, Anthony C. [JLAB; Geng, Rongli [JLAB

    2009-11-01

    We have continued high gradient R&D of ICHIRO 9-cell cavities at KEK. ICHIRO 9-cell cavity #5 (I9#5) that has no end groups on beam tube to focus on high gradient sent to Jlab as S0 tight loop study. Surface treatments and vertical test were repeated 3 times at Jlab, and then I9#5 sent back to KEK. We also repeated surface treatments and test at KEK. Maximum gradients were 36.5MV/m at Jlab, and 33.7MV/m at KEK so far. Now we are struggling with the puzzle why the results of singles do not work well on 9-cell cavities.

  15. Propagation equation for tight-focusing by a parabolic mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couairon, A; Kosareva, O G; Panov, N A; Shipilo, D E; Andreeva, V A; Jukna, V; Nesa, F

    2015-11-30

    Part of the chain in petawatt laser systems may involve extreme focusing conditions for which nonparaxial and vectorial effects have high impact on the propagation of radiation. We investigate the possibility of using propagation equations to simulate numerically the focal spot under these conditions. We derive a unidirectional propagation equation for the Hertz vector, describing linear and nonlinear propagation under situations where nonparaxial diffraction and vectorial effects become significant. By comparing our simulations to the results of vector diffraction integrals in the case of linear tight-focusing by a parabolic mirror, we establish a practical criterion for the critical f -number below which initializing a propagation equation with a parabolic input phase becomes inaccurate. We propose a method to find suitable input conditions for propagation equations beyond this limit. Extreme focusing conditions are shown to be modeled accurately by means of numerical simulations of the unidirectional Hertz-vector propagation equation initialized with suitable input conditions.

  16. Tight focusing of femtosecond elliptically polarised vortex light pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Li-Min; Chen Bao-Suan; Chen Zi-Yang; Pu Ji-Xiong

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the tight focusing properties of femtosecond elliptically polarised vortex light pulses. Based on Richards-Wolf vectorial diffraction integral, the expressions for the electric field, the velocity of the femtosecond light pulse and the total angular momentum of focused pluses are derived. The numerical calculations are also given to illustrate the intensity distribution, phase contour, the group velocity variation and the total angular momentum near the focus. It finds that near the focus the femtosecond elliptically polarised vortex light pulse can travel at various group speeds, that is, slower or faster than light speed in vacuum, depending on the numerical aperture of the focusing objective system. Moreover, it also studies the influence of the numerical aperture of the focusing objective and the time duration of the elliptically polarised vortex light pulse on the total angular momentum distribution in the focused field.

  17. An efficient LDA+U based tight binding approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Simone; Hourahine, B; Gallauner, Th; Frauenheim, Th

    2007-07-01

    The functionals usually applied in DFT calculations have deficiencies in describing systems with strongly localized electrons such as transition metals or rare earth (RE) compounds. In this work, we present the self-consistent charge density based functional tight binding (SCC-DFTB) calculation scheme including LDA+U like potentials and apply it for the simulation of RE-doped GaN. DFTB parameters for the simulation of GaN and a selection of rare earth ions, where the f electrons were explicitly included in the valence, have been created. The results of the simulations were tested against experimental data (where present) and against various more sophisticated but computationally more costly DFT calculations. Our approach is found to correctly reproduce the geometry and the energetic of the studied systems.

  18. Pilot study on the additive effects of berberine and oral type 2 diabetes agents for patients with suboptimal glycemic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Villanova, Nicola; Agostini, Federica; Marzocchi, Rebecca; Soverini, Valentina; Marchesini, Giulio

    2012-01-01

    Background Suboptimal glycemic control is a common situation in diabetes, regardless of the wide range of drugs available to reach glycemic targets. Basic research in diabetes is endeavoring to identify new actives working as insulin savers, use of which could delay the introduction of injectable insulin or reduce the insulin dose needed. Commonly available as a nutraceutical, berberine is a potential candidate. Methods and results Because its low oral bioavailability can be overcome by P-glycoprotein inhibitors like herbal polyphenols, we have tested the nutraceutical combination of Berberis aristata extract and Silybum marianum extract (Berberol®) in type 2 diabetes in terms of its additive effect when combined with a conventional oral regimen for patients with suboptimal glycemic control. After 90 days of treatment, the nutraceutical association had a positive effect on glycemic and lipid parameters, significantly reducing glycosylated hemoglobin, basal insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides. A relevant effect was also observed in terms of liver function by measuring aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase. The product had a good safety profile, with distinctive gastrointestinal side effects likely due to its acarbose-like action. Conclusion Although further studies should be carried out to confirm our data, Berberol could be considered a good candidate as an adjunctive treatment option in diabetes, especially in patients with suboptimal glycemic control. PMID:22924000

  19. α-2-Macroglobulin in Saliva Is Associated with Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Aitken

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2 require an adequate glycemic control to avoid diabetic complications. Currently, saliva biomarkers are used as a diagnostic tool and can be indicative of the degree of progression and control of various diseases. Several studies indicate that α-2-macroglobulin levels are elevated in diabetic patients. Methods. 120 subjects with DM2 were enrolled and classified into two groups according to their glycemic control (percentage of glycated hemoglobin-A1c (HbA1c, 7% inadequate glycemic control group. The relationship between α-2-macroglobulin levels from saliva samples and HbA1c was subsequently evaluated. Results. We found a positive correlation between α-2-macroglobulin and HbA1c (r=0.778 and P<0.0001. Area under the receivers operating characteristic (ROC curve of α-2-macroglobulin indicated a positive discrimination threshold of α-2-macroglobulin (AUC = 0.903, CI 95%: 0.847–0.959, P<0.0001 to diagnose glycemic control. Conclusions. Our data strongly suggest that the level of saliva α-2-macroglobulin is an indicator for the degree of glycemic control in diabetic patients and represents a promising alternative method to evaluate this parameter.

  20. The role of parent-adolescent attachment in the glycemic control of adolescents with Type 1 diabetes: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Tziporah; Shields, Cleveland G

    2009-09-01

    This pilot study explored the associations between parent and adolescent reports of adolescent attachment and glycemic control in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized that more secure attachment would correlate with more optimal diabetes control. Thirty-one families completed written self-report questionnaires about adolescent attachment, demographic data, and diabetes control. Adolescents and parents reported on their perceptions of adolescents' attachment to mothers and fathers. Mean HbA1c for the sample was 7.6% (SD = 1.14). Mothers' perceptions of adolescents' attachment were significantly correlated with adolescents' hemoglobin A1c (r = -.42, p = .022), indicating that maternal perceptions of more secure attachment was associated with better glycemic control. Neither fathers' perceptions nor adolescents' reports of attachment was significantly correlated with glycemic control. Attachment appears to be associated with glycemic control in this population though the mechanisms are unclear. Mothers' perceptions of attachment had the strongest associations with control, not adolescent reports. Further research is needed to understand the mechanisms through which parent reports of adolescent attachment are associated with glycemic control.

  1. Comparison of multiple and novel measures of dietary glycemic carbohydrate with insulin resistant status in older women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Neill Sheila

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous epidemiological investigations of associations between dietary glycemic intake and insulin resistance have used average daily measures of glycemic index (GI and glycemic load (GL. We explored multiple and novel measures of dietary glycemic intake to determine which was most predictive of an association with insulin resistance. Methods Usual dietary intakes were assessed by diet history interview in women aged 42-81 years participating in the Longitudinal Assessment of Ageing in Women. Daily measures of dietary glycemic intake (n = 329 were carbohydrate, GI, GL, and GL per megacalorie (GL/Mcal, while meal based measures (n = 200 were breakfast, lunch and dinner GL; and a new measure, GL peak score, to represent meal peaks. Insulin resistant status was defined as a homeostasis model assessment (HOMA value of >3.99; HOMA as a continuous variable was also investigated. Results GL, GL/Mcal, carbohydrate (all P Conclusion A dietary pattern with high peaks of GL above the individual's average intake was a significant independent predictor of insulin resistance in this population, however the contribution was less than daily GL and carbohydrate variables. Accounting for energy intake slightly increased the predictive ability of GL, which is potentially important when examining disease risk in more diverse populations with wider variations in energy requirements.

  2. Effect of low glycemic load diet on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in poorly-controlled diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaee, Amir; Afaghi, Ahmad; Sarreshtehdari, Majied

    2011-12-29

    Different carbohydrate diets have been administrated to diabetic patients to evaluate the glycemic response, while Poor-controlled diabetes is increasing world wide. To investigate the role of an alternative carbohydrate diet on glycemic control, we explored the effect of a low glycemic load (Low GL)-high fat diet on glycemic response and also glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) of poor-controlled diabetes patients. Hundred poorly-controlled diabetes patients, HbA1c > 8, age 52.8 ± 4.5 y, were administrated a low GL diet , GL = 67 (Energy 1800 kcal; total fat 36%; fat derived from olive oil and nuts 15%; carbohydrate 42%; protein 22%) for 10 weeks. Patients did their routine life style program during intervention. Fasting blood glucose and HbA1c before and after intervention with significant reduction were: 169 ± 17, 141 ± 12; 8.85% (73 mmol/mol) ± 0.22%, and 7.81% (62 mmol/mol) ± 0.27%; respectively (P HbA1c by 1.1% (11 mmol/mol) ± 0.3% (P=0.001). There was positive moderate correlation between HbA1c concentration before intervention and FBS reduction after intervention (P diet can be effective in glycemic control.

  3. Experiments on Exhaust Noise of Tightly Integrated Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James E.; Brown, Clifford A.; Bozak, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    A wide-ranging series of tests have been completed that seek to map the effects of installation, including jet by jet interaction effects, on exhaust noise from various nozzles in forward flight. The primary data was far-field acoustic spectral directivity. The goals of the test series were (i) to generate enough data for empirical models of the different effects, and (ii) to provide data for advanced computational noise predictions methods applied to simplified yet realistic configurations. Data is presented that demonstrate several checks on data quality and that provide an overview of trends observed to date. Among the findings presented here: (i) Data was repeatable between jet rigs for single nozzles with and without surfaces to within +/- 0.5 dB. (ii) The presence of a second jet caused a strong reduction of the summed noise in the plane of the two plumes and an increase over the expected source doubling in most other azimuthal planes. (iii) The impact of the second jet was reduced when the jets were unheated. (iv) The impact of adding a second isolated rectangular jet was relatively independent of the nozzle aspect ratio up to aspect ratio 8:1. (v) Forward flight had similar impact on a high aspect ratio (8:1) jet as on an axisymmetric jet, except at the peak noise angle where the impact was less. (vi) The effect of adding a second round jet to a tightly integrated nozzle where the nozzle lip was less than a diameter from the surface was very dependent upon the length of the surface downstream of the nozzle. (vii) When the nozzles were rectangular and tightly integrated with the airframe surface the impact of a second jet was very dependent upon how close together the two jets were. This paper serves as an overview of the test; other papers presented in the same conference will give more detailed analysis of the results.

  4. Dietary glycemic load and glycemic index and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke in Dutch men and women: the EPIC-MORGEN study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koert N J Burger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The associations of glycemic load (GL and glycemic index (GI with the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD are not well-established, particularly in men, and may be modified by gender. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether high dietary GL and GI increase the risk of CVD in men and women. METHODS: A large prospective cohort study (EPIC-MORGEN was conducted within the general Dutch population among 8,855 men and 10,753 women, aged 21-64 years at baseline (1993-1997 and free of diabetes and CVD. Dietary intake was assessed with a validated food-frequency questionnaire and GI and GL were calculated using Foster-Powell's international table of GI. Information on morbidity and mortality was obtained through linkage with national registries. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed to estimate hazard ratios (HRs for incident coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke, while adjusting for age, CVD risk factors, and dietary factors. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 11.9 years, 581 CHD cases and 120 stroke cases occurred among men, and 300 CHD cases and 109 stroke cases occurred among women. In men, GL was associated with an increased CHD risk (adjusted HR per SD increase, 1.17 [95% CI, 1.02-1.35], while no significant association was found in women (1.09 [0.89-1.33]. GI was not associated with CHD risk in both genders, while it was associated with increased stroke risk in men (1.27 [1.02-1.58] but not in women (0.96 [0.75-1.22]. Similarly, total carbohydrate intake and starch intake were associated with a higher CHD risk in men (1.23 [1.04-1.46]; and 1.24 [1.07-1.45], but not in women. CONCLUSION: Among men, high GL and GI, and high carbohydrate and starch intake, were associated with increased risk of CVD.

  5. Dietary glycemic index, but not glycemic load, is positively associated with serum homocysteine concentration in free-living young Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Kentaro; Sasaki, Satoshi; Uenishi, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that diets which enhance diurnal insulin secretion, such as a high glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) diet, can be expected to increase homocysteine levels. We investigated the hypothesis that dietary GI and GL are positively associated with serum homocysteine concentration in a group of free-living young Japanese women. This preliminary cross-sectional study included 1050 female Japanese dietetic students aged 18 to 22 years. Dietary intake was assessed using a validated, self-administered, comprehensive diet history questionnaire. Fasting blood samples were collected and serum homocysteine concentrations were measured. Adjustment was made for survey year, region, municipality level, current smoking, current alcohol consumption, dietary supplement use, physical activity, body mass index, energy intake, and intakes of B vitamins (folate, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, and riboflavin). After adjustment for nondietary confounding factors, both dietary GI and GL were positively associated with homocysteine concentration (both P for trend=.001). The positive association between dietary GI and homocysteine concentration remained after further adjustment for intakes of B vitamins. Mean (95% confidence interval) values of serum homocysteine concentration for each quintile of dietary GI were 6.9 (6.7-7.2), 7.1 (6.8-7.3), 7.0 (6.7-7.2), 7.4 (7.2-7.7), and 7.3 (7.0-7.6) μmol/L, respectively (P for trend = .04). Conversely, there was no association between dietary GL and homocysteine concentration after further adjustment for intakes of B vitamins (P for trend = .40). To conclude, in a group of free-living young Japanese women, dietary GI, but not GL, was independently and positively associated with serum homocysteine concentration.

  6. Leader as achiever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienemann, Jacqueline

    2002-01-01

    This article examines one outcome of leadership: productive achievement. Without achievement one is judged to not truly be a leader. Thus, the ideal leader must be a visionary, a critical thinker, an expert, a communicator, a mentor, and an achiever of organizational goals. This article explores the organizational context that supports achievement, measures of quality nursing care, fiscal accountability, leadership development, rewards and punishments, and the educational content and teaching strategies to prepare graduates to be achievers.

  7. A high dietary glycemic index increases total mortality in a Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itandehui Castro-Quezada

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Different types of carbohydrates have diverse glycemic response, thus glycemic index (GI and glycemic load (GL are used to assess this variation. The impact of dietary GI and GL in all-cause mortality is unknown. The objective of this study was to estimate the association between dietary GI and GL and risk of all-cause mortality in the PREDIMED study. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The PREDIMED study is a randomized nutritional intervention trial for primary cardiovascular prevention based on community-dwelling men and women at high risk of cardiovascular disease. Dietary information was collected at baseline and yearly using a validated 137-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ. We assigned GI values of each item by a 5-step methodology, using the International Tables of GI and GL Values. Deaths were ascertained through contact with families and general practitioners, review of medical records and consultation of the National Death Index. Cox regression models were used to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR and their 95% CI for mortality, according to quartiles of energy-adjusted dietary GI/GL. To assess repeated measures of exposure, we updated GI and GL intakes from the yearly FFQs and used Cox models with time-dependent exposures. RESULTS: We followed 3,583 non-diabetic subjects (4.7 years of follow-up, 123 deaths. As compared to participants in the lowest quartile of baseline dietary GI, those in the highest quartile showed an increased risk of all-cause mortality [HR = 2.15 (95% CI: 1.15-4.04; P for trend  = 0.012]. In the repeated-measures analyses using as exposure the yearly updated information on GI, we observed a similar association. Dietary GL was associated with all-cause mortality only when subjects were younger than 75 years. CONCLUSIONS: High dietary GI was positively associated with all-cause mortality in elderly population at high cardiovascular risk.

  8. Oral salmon calcitonin improves fasting and postprandial glycemic control in lean healthy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigh, M; Nielsen, R H; Hansen, C; Henriksen, K; Christiansen, C; Karsdal, M A

    2012-02-01

    A novel oral form of salmon calcitonin (sCT) was recently demonstrated to improve both fasting and postprandial glycemic control and induce weight loss in diet-induced obese and insulin-resistant rats. To further explore the glucoregulatory efficacy of oral sCT, irrespective of obesity and metabolic dysfunction, the present study investigated the effect of chronic oral sCT treatment on fasting and postprandial glycemic control in male lean healthy rats. 20 male rats were divided equally into a control group receiving oral vehicle or an oral sCT (2 mg/kg) group. All rats were treated twice daily for 5 weeks. Body weight and food intake were monitored during the study period and fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin and insulin sensitivity were determined and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) performed at study end. Compared with the vehicle group, rats receiving oral sCT had improved fasting glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance, as measured by homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), with no change in body weight or fasting plasma insulin. In addition, the rats receiving oral sCT had markedly reduced glycemia and insulinemia during OGTT. This is the first report showing that chronic oral sCT treatment exerts a glucoregulatory action in lean healthy rats, irrespective of influencing body weight. Importantly, oral sCT seems to exert a dual treatment effect by improving fasting and postprandial glycemic control and insulin sensitivity. This and previous studies suggest oral sCT is a promising agent for the treatment of obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

  9. Starch digestibility and predicted glycemic index of fried sweet potato cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaka Odenigbo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L. is a very rich source of starch. There is increased interest in starch digestibility and the prevention and management of metabolic diseases.Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of starch fractions and predicted glycemic index of different cultivars of sweet potato. Material and Method: French fries produced from five cultivars of sweet potato (‘Ginseng Red’, ‘Beauregard’, ‘White Travis’, ‘Georgia Jet clone #2010’ and ‘Georgia Jet’ were used. The level of total starch (TS, resistant starch (RS, digestible starch (DS, and starch digestion index starch digestion index in the samples were evaluated. In vitro starch hydrolysis at 30, 90, and 120 min were determined enzymatically for calculation of rapidly digestible starch (RDS, predicted glycemic index (pGI and slowly digestible starch (SDS respectively. Results: The RS content in all samples had an inversely significant correlation with pGI (-0.52; P<0.05 while RDS had positive and significant influence on both pGI (r=0.55; P<0.05 and SDI (r= 0.94; P<0.01. ‘White Travis’ and ‘Ginseng Red’ had higher levels of beneficial starch fractions (RS and SDS with low pGI and starch digestion Index (SDI, despite their higher TS content. Generally, all the cultivars had products with low to moderate GI values. Conclusion: The glycemic index of these food products highlights the health promoting characteristics of sweet potato cultivars.

  10. Glycemic Effects of Rebaudioside A and Erythritol in People with Glucose Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Hee; Lee, Ji Hye; Kang, Myung Shin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Jeong, Su Jin; Kim, Sang Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Rebaudioside A and erythritol are nonnutritive sweeteners. There have been several studies of their glycemic effects, but the outcomes remain controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the glycemic effects of rebaudioside A and erythritol as a sweetener in people with glucose intolerance. Methods This trial evaluated the glycemic effect after 2 weeks of consumption of rebaudioside A and erythritol as sweeteners in a pre-diabetic population. The patients were evaluated for fructosamine, fasting plasma glucose, C-peptide, insulin, and 2-hour plasma glucose before and after consumption of sweetener. The primary outcome was a change in fructosamine levels from the baseline to the end of treatment. Secondary outcomes were the changes in levels of fasting plasma glucose and 2-hour plasma glucose. Results From the baseline to the end of experiment, the changes in fructosamine levels after consumption of rebaudioside A and erythritol, did not differ significantly (244.00±19.57 vs. 241.68±23.39 µmol/L, P=0.366). The change in levels from the baseline to end of the study for rebaudioside A and erythritol were fasting plasma glucose (102.56±10.72 vs. 101.32±9.20 mg/dL), 2-hour plasma glucose (154.92±54.53 vs. 141.92±42.22 mg/dL), insulin (7.56±4.29 vs. 7.20±5.12 IU/mL), and C-peptide (2.92±1.61 vs. 2.73±1.31 ng/mL), respectively, and also did not differ significantly (P>0.05 for all). Conclusion Our study suggests that consumption of rebaudioside A and erythritol does not alter the glucose homeostasis in people with glucose intolerance. PMID:27352150

  11. The Glycemic Index of standard and diabetes-specific enteral formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Zandrie; De Van Drunen, Jenneke; Kuipers, Harm

    2006-01-01

    A recent meta-analysis showed that foods with a low Glycemic Index (GI) have a clinically useful effect on glycemic control in patients with diabetes. Although diabetes-specific enteral formulas are commonly used for diabetic patients with insufficient oral intake, not much is known about the GI of these formulas. Therefore the purpose of this study was to assess the GI of several diabetes-specific formulas and to compare them with standard formulas. The randomised, double blinded, crossover study included twelve products which were tested in 7-10 individuals from a pool of 14 healthy volunteers. After an overnight fast, volunteers were given a portion of a product containing 25 grams of carbohydrate or the reference feed (200 ml containing 25 gram glucose) on different occasions in random order. Postprandial blood glucose levels were measured in venous whole blood for two hours after intake of the products and positive incremental area under the curve (AUC) was calculated for both the products and the reference feed. The GI of the test products was determined by dividing AUC (test products) by the AUC (reference feed). Enteral formulas varied widely in their GI values with the diabetes-specific enteral formulas being characterized by a significant (P=0.004) lower GI (average +/-SEM: 19.4 +/- 1.8) than standard formulas (42.1 +/- 5.9). However, there was an overlap between the two types of formulas. Three of the diabetes-specific formulas had significantly lower GI than 3 of the standard products. Although there is some overlap with the GI of diabetes-specific and standard formulas, certain diabetes-specific formulas had very low GI values, which may be clinically beneficial due to better glycemic control. Therefore the use of diabetes-specific formulas with a low GI should be the preferred option for the nutritional management of diabetic patients in need of nutritional support.

  12. The relationship between breakfast skipping, chronotype, and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutrakul, Sirimon; Hood, Megan M; Crowley, Stephanie J; Morgan, Mary K; Teodori, Marsha; Knutson, Kristen L

    2014-02-01

    Breakfast skipping is associated with obesity and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Later chronotypes, individuals who have a preference for later bed and wake times, often skip breakfast. The aim of the study was to explore the relationships among breakfast skipping, chronotype, and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients. We collected sleep timing and 24-h dietary recall from 194 non-shift-working type 2 diabetes patients who were being followed in outpatient clinics. Mid-sleep time on free days (MSF) was used as an indicator of chronotype. Hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) values were obtained from medical records. Hierarchical linear regression analyses controlling for demographic, sleep, and dietary variables were computed to determine whether breakfast skipping was associated with HbA1C. Additional regression analyses were performed to test if this association was mediated by chronotype. There were 22 participants (11.3%) who self-reported missing breakfast. Breakfast skippers had significantly higher HbA1C levels, higher body mass indices (BMI), and later MSF than breakfast eaters. Breakfast skipping was significantly associated with higher HbA1C values (B = 0.108, p = 0.01), even after adjusting for age, sex, race, BMI, number of diabetes complications, insulin use, depressive symptoms, perceived sleep debt, and percentage of daily caloric intake at dinner. The relationship between breakfast skipping and HbA1C was partially mediated by chronotype. In summary, breakfast skipping is associated with a later chronotype. Later chronotype and breakfast skipping both contribute to poorer glycemic control, as indicated by higher HbA1C levels. Future studies are needed to confirm these findings and determine whether behavioral interventions targeting breakfast eating or sleep timing may improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  13. Design of full-k-space flat bands in photonic crystals beyond the tight-binding picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Changqing; Wang, Gang; Hang, Zhi Hong; Luo, Jie; Chan, C T; Lai, Yun

    2015-12-11

    Based on a band engineering method, we propose a theoretical prescription to create a full-k-space flat band in dielectric photonic crystals covering the whole Brillouin Zone. With wave functions distributed in air instead of in the dielectrics, such a flat band represents a unique mechanism for achieving flat dispersions beyond the tight-binding picture, which can enormously reduce the requirement of permittivity contrast in the system. Finally, we propose and numerically demonstrate a unique application based on the full-k-space coverage of the flat band: ultra-sensitive detection of small scatterers.

  14. Reducing Mechanical Formation Damage by Minimizing Interfacial Tension and Capillary Pressure in Tight Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Arshad; Talib Shuker, Muhannad; Rehman, Khalil; Bahrami, Hassan; Memon, Muhammad Khan

    2013-12-01

    Tight gas reservoirs incur problems and significant damage caused by low permeability during drilling, completion, stimulation and production. They require advanced improvement techniques to achieve flow gas at optimum rates. Water blocking damage (phase Trapping/retention of fluids) is a form of mechanical formation damage mechanism, which is caused by filtrate invasion in drilling operations mostly in fracturing. Water blocking has a noticeable impact on formation damage in gas reservoirs which tends to decrease relative permeability near the wellbore. Proper evaluation of damage and the factors which influence its severity is essential to optimize well productivity. Reliable data regarding interfacial tension between gas and water is required in order to minimize mechanical formation damage potential and to optimize gas production. This study was based on the laboratory experiments of interfacial tension by rising drop method between gas-brine, gas-condensate and gas-brine. The results showed gas condensate has low interfacial tension value 6 - 11 dynes/cm when compared to gas-brine and gas- diesel which were 44 - 58 dynes/cm and 14 - 19 dynes/cm respectively. In this way, the capillary pressure of brine-gas system was estimated as 0.488 psi, therefore diesel-gas system was noticed about 0.164 psi and 0.098 psi for condensate-gas system. A forecast model was used by using IFT values to predict the phase trapping which shows less severe phase trapping damage in case of condensate than diesel and brine. A reservoir simulation study was also carried out in order to better understand the effect of hysteresis on well productivity and flow efficiency affected due to water blocking damage in tight gas reservoirs.

  15. Effect of tighter glycemic control on cardiac function, exercise capacity, and muscle strength in heart failure patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bent Roni Ranghøj; Wiggers, Henrik; Thomsen, Henrik Holm;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and heart failure (HF), the optimal glycemic target is uncertain, and evidence-based data are lacking. Therefore, we performed a randomized study on the effect of optimized glycemic control on left ventricular function, exercise capacity, muscle...

  16. Blood profile of proteins and steroid hormones predicts weight change after weight loss with interactions of dietary protein level and glycemic index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Ping; Holst, Claus; Andersen, Malene R;

    2011-01-01

    Weight regain after weight loss is common. In the Diogenes dietary intervention study, high protein and low glycemic index (GI) diet improved weight maintenance.......Weight regain after weight loss is common. In the Diogenes dietary intervention study, high protein and low glycemic index (GI) diet improved weight maintenance....

  17. Prevalence of Dyslipidemia and Its Association with Glycemic Control in Indian Type 2 Diabetes Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaithala Charitha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. Diabetes mellitus is considered as one of the major health problems in India. With nearly one million diabetic deaths every year, India turned out as the “diabetic capital of the world”. Diabetes is considered as one of the seven major controllable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Dyslipidemia is considered as one of the most important cardiovascular risk factors among type 2 diabetic population. In the current study we aimed to evaluate the prevalence of dyslipidemia and its association with glycemic control among the type 2 diabetic population.

  18. Association of blindness to intensification of glycemic control in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalets, E; Galstyan, G; Starostina, E; Antsiferov, M; Chantelau, E

    1994-01-01

    Intensive glycemic control (IGC) in previously hyperglycemic insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) patients is associated with a decreased long-term risk of progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR); up to 12 months after institution of IGC, however, the risk of progression of DR transiently increases. In an observational study, a cohort of 122 patients with IDDM was followed prospectively for changes in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1, normal 2% per year is associated with a high risk of progression of antecedent diabetic retinopathy to blindness in IDDM patients with an extremely high initial HbA1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Accuracy of Continuous Glucose Monitoring Measurements in Normo-Glycemic Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akintola, Abimbola A; Noordam, Raymond; Jansen, Steffy W

    2015-01-01

    a 24-hour period. Validity of CGM-derived individual glucose measurements, calculated measures of glycemia over daytime (09:00h-23:00h) and nighttime (23:00h-09:00h), and calculated measures of glycemic variability (e.g. 24h standard deviation [SD]) were assessed by Pearson correlation coefficients......, mean absolute relative difference (MARD) and paired t-tests. RESULTS: The median correlation coefficient between CGM and venous glucose measurements per participant was 0.68 (interquartile range: 0.40-0.78), and the MARD was 17.6% (SD = 17%). Compared with venous sampling, the calculated measure...

  20. Diets with high or low protein content and glycemic index for weight-loss maintenance

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, T.M.; Dalskov, S.M. (S.M.); Van-Baak, M.A. (M.A.); Jebb, S. A.; Papadaki, A.; Pfeiffer, A.F.; Martinez, J A; HANDJIEVA-DARLENSKA, T.; Kunesova, M; Pihlsgård, M. (M.); Stender, S; Holst, C; Saris, W.H.; Astrup, A

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of weight-control diets that are high in protein or low in glycemic index have reached varied conclusions, probably owing to the fact that the studies had insufficient power. METHODS: We enrolled overweight adults from eight European countries who had lost at least 8% of their initial body weight with a 3.3-MJ (800-kcal) low-calorie diet. Participants were randomly assigned, in a two-by-two factorial design, to one of five ad libitum diets to prevent weight regain...

  1. Starch digestibility and predicted glycemic index of fried sweet potato cultivars

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background: Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is a very rich source of starch. There is increased interest in starch digestibility and the prevention and management of metabolic diseases.Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of starch fractions and predicted glycemic index of different cultivars of sweet potato. Material and Method: French fries produced from five cultivars of sweet potato (‘Ginseng Red’, ‘Beauregard’, ‘White Travis’, ‘Georgia Jet clone #2010’ and ‘G...

  2. A Low-Glycemic Diet Lifestyle Intervention Improves Fat Utilization during Exercise in Older Obese Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas; Haus, Jacob M; Cook, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    lipid was reduced (P foods for reversing metabolic defects in obesity.......Objective: To determine the influence of dietary glycemic index on exercise training-induced adaptations in substrate oxidation in obesity. Design and Methods: Twenty older, obese individuals undertook 3 months of fully supervised aerobic exercise and were randomized to low- (LoGIX) or high....... Results: Weight loss (-8.6 ± 1.1%) and improvements (P fasting lipemia, and metabolic flexibility were similar for both LoGIX and HiGIX groups. During submaximal exercise, energy expenditure was higher following the intervention (P

  3. Balanced sparse model for tight frames in compressed sensing magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunsong Liu

    Full Text Available Compressed sensing has shown to be promising to accelerate magnetic resonance imaging. In this new technology, magnetic resonance images are usually reconstructed by enforcing its sparsity in sparse image reconstruction models, including both synthesis and analysis models. The synthesis model assumes that an image is a sparse combination of atom signals while the analysis model assumes that an image is sparse after the application of an analysis operator. Balanced model is a new sparse model that bridges analysis and synthesis models by introducing a penalty term on the distance of frame coefficients to the range of the analysis operator. In this paper, we study the performance of the balanced model in tight frame based compressed sensing magnetic resonance imaging and propose a new efficient numerical algorithm to solve the optimization problem. By tuning the balancing parameter, the new model achieves solutions of three models. It is found that the balanced model has a comparable performance with the analysis model. Besides, both of them achieve better results than the synthesis model no matter what value the balancing parameter is. Experiment shows that our proposed numerical algorithm constrained split augmented Lagrangian shrinkage algorithm for balanced model (C-SALSA-B converges faster than previously proposed algorithms accelerated proximal algorithm (APG and alternating directional method of multipliers for balanced model (ADMM-B.

  4. Family Density and SES Related to Diabetes Management and Glycemic Control in Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Caccavale, Laura J.; Weaver, Patrick; Chen, Rusan; Streisand, Randi; Holmes, Clarissa S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Youth with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) from single-parent families have poorer glycemic control; a finding confounded with socioeconomic status (SES). Family density (FD), or youth:adult ratio, may better characterize family risk status. Methods Structural equation modeling assessed the relation of single-parent status, SES, and FD to parenting stress, diabetes-related conflict, parental monitoring, adherence, and glycemic control using cross-sectional parent and youth data (n = 257). Res...

  5. The effects of different quantum feedback types on the tightness of the variance-based uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao; Zhang, Guo-Feng

    2017-03-01

    The effect of the quantum feedback on the tightness of the variance-based uncertainty, the possibility of using quantum feedback to prepare the state with a better tightness, and the relationship between the tightness of the uncertainty and the mixedness of the system are studied. It is found that the tightness of Schrodinger-Robertson uncertainty (SUR) relation has a strict liner relationship with the mixedness of the system. As for the Robertson uncertainty relation (RUR), we find that the tightness can be enhanced by tuning the feedback at the beginning of the evolution. In addition, we deduce that the tightness of RUR has an inverse relationship with the mixedness and the relationship turns into a strict linear one when the system reach the steady state.

  6. THE CONTENT OF MICROELEMENTS IN BLOOD SERUM AND ERYTHROCYTES IN CHILDREN WITH DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE I DEPENDING ON LEVEL OF GLYCEMIC CONTROL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluschenko, N; Vasylyshyn, Kh; Roschupkin, A; Lekishvili, S; Gladchenko, O

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the content of chromium, cobalt and nickel in serum and erythrocytes in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus, depending on the level of glycemic control. The study was conducted on 68 children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The patients were divided into four groups based on glycemic control. Group I was composed of 9 children with optimal level of glycemic control. Group II - 25 children with suboptimal level of glycemic control. Group III - 34 children with a high risk to life level of glycemic control. Group IV (control group) consisted of 30 healthy children. Compensation state of type 1 diabetes was evaluated according to ISPAD (Consensus for the Management of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Children and Adolescens 2000). The content of trace elements in biological agents was determined by atomic absorbtion spectrophotometry method with C-115M1 mass-spectrophotometer, manufactured by «Selmi» enterprise (Ukraine). It is found that there is a decrease in serum concentrations of chromium and erythrocyte content of cobalt in patients with optimal level of glycemic control. The deficiency of chromium is accompanied by the deficiency of cobalt in patients with suboptimal level of glycemic control. The lower levels of cobalt and nickel are recorded simultaneously, but there is theexcess of chromium in the erythrocytes of these patients. Patients, who suffer from 1 type diabetes mellitus and high risk for life level of glycemic control have considerable polideficiency of cobalt, nickel and chromium in serum.The increasing level of chromium was recorded only in the erythrocytes. The level of glycemic control and the duration of 1 type diabetes mellitus are important in the forecasting of the development of chronic diabetic complications. It is found that the duration of 1 type diabetes mellitus influences the levels of cobalt and nickel in serum mostly, while the level of glycemic control influences the chromium content.

  7. Effect of mode of hydrocortisone administration on glycemic control in patients with septic shock: a prospective randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisa, Pekka; Parviainen, Ilkka; Tenhunen, Jyrki; Hovilehto, Seppo; Ruokonen, Esko

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Low-dose hydrocortisone treatment is widely accepted therapy for the treatment of vasopressor-dependent septic shock. The question of whether corticosteroids should be given to septic shock patients by continuous or by bolus infusion is still unanswered. Hydrocortisone induces hyperglycemia and it is possible that continuous hydrocortisone infusion would reduce the fluctuations in blood glucose levels and that tight blood glucose control could be better achieved with this approach. Methods In this prospective randomized study, we compared the blood glucose profiles, insulin requirements, amount of nursing workload needed, and shock reversal in 48 septic shock patients who received hydrocortisone treatment either by bolus or by continuous infusion with equivalent dose (200 mg/day). Duration of hydrocortisone treatment was five days. Results The mean blood glucose levels were similar in the two groups, but the number of hyperglycemic episodes was significantly higher in those patients who received bolus therapy (15.7 ± 8.5 versus 10.5 ± 8.6 episodes per patient, p = 0.039). Also, more changes in insulin infusion rate were needed to maintain strict normoglycemia in the bolus group (4.7 ± 2.2 versus 3.4 ± 1.9 adjustments per patient per day, p = 0.038). Hypoglycemic episodes were rare in both groups. No difference was seen in shock reversal. Conclusion Strict normoglycemia is more easily achieved if the hydrocortisone therapy is given to septic shock patients by continuous infusion. This approach also reduces nursing workload needed to maintain tight blood glucose control. Trial Registration Number ISRCTN98820688 PMID:17306016

  8. Claudin-21 Has a Paracellular Channel Role at Tight Junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Tanaka, Hiroo

    2016-01-05

    Claudin protein family members, of which there are at least 27 in humans and mice, polymerize to form tight junctions (TJs) between epithelial cells, in a tissue- and developmental stage-specific manner. Claudins have a paracellular barrier function. In addition, certain claudins function as paracellular channels for small ions and/or solutes by forming selective pores at the TJs, although the specific claudins involved and their functional mechanisms are still in question. Here we show for the first time that claudin-21, which is more highly expressed in the embryonic than the postnatal stages, acts as a paracellular channel for small cations, such as Na+, similar to the typical channel-type claudins claudin-2 and -15. Claudin-21 also allows the paracellular passage of larger solutes. Our findings suggest that claudin-21-based TJs allow the passage of small and larger solutes by both paracellular channel-based and some additional mechanisms. © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Tight-binding model for materials at mesoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-12-21

    TBM3 is an open source package for computational simulations of quantum materials at multiple scales in length and time. The project originated to investigate the multiferroic behavior in transition-metal oxide heterostructures. The framework has also been designed to study emergent phemona in other quantum materials like 2-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides, graphene, topological insulators, and skyrmion in materials, etc. In the long term, we will enable the package for transport and time-resolved phenomena. TBM3 is currently a C++ based numerical tool package and framework for the design and construction of any kind of lattice structures with multi-orbital and spin degrees of freedom. The fortran based portion of the package will be added in the near future. The design of TBM3 is in a highly flexible and reusable framework and the tight-binding parameters can be modeled or informed by DFT calculations. It is currently GPU enabled and feature of CPU enabled MPI will be added in the future.

  10. Symmetry-Based Tight Binding Modeling of Halide Perovskite Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer-Richard, Soline; Katan, Claudine; Traoré, Boubacar; Scholz, Reinhard; Jancu, Jean-Marc; Even, Jacky

    2016-10-06

    On the basis of a general symmetry analysis, this paper presents an empirical tight-binding (TB) model for the reference Pm-3m perovskite cubic phase of halide perovskites of general formula ABX3. The TB electronic band diagram, with and without spin orbit coupling effect of MAPbI3 has been determined based on state of the art density functional theory results including many body corrections (DFT+GW). It affords access to various properties, including distorted structures, at a significantly reduced computational cost. This is illustrated with the calculation of the band-to-band absorption spectrum, the variation of the band gap under volumetric strain, as well as the Rashba effect for a uniaxial symmetry breaking. Compared to DFT approaches, this empirical model will help to tackle larger issues, such as the electronic band structure of large nanostructures, including many-body effects, or heterostructures relevant to perovskite device modeling suited to the description of atomic-scale features.

  11. Mechanical properties of metallic nanowires using tight-binding model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aish, Mohammed; Starostenkov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of Nickel nanowires have been studied at different temperatures using molecular dynamics simulations. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out on pure Nickel (Ni) crystal with face-centered cubic (FCC) lattice upon application of uniaxial tension at nanolevel with a speed of 20 m/s. The deformation corresponds to the direction . To the calculated block of crystal, free boundary conditions are applied in the directions , . A many body interatomic potential for Ni within the second moment approximation of the tight binding model (the Cleri-Rosato potentials) was employed to carry out three dimensional molecular dynamics simulations. MD simulation used to investigate the effect of temperature of Ni nanowire on the nature of deformation and fracture. Temperature effect on the extension property of metal nanowire is discussed in detail. The mechanical strengths and the mechanical strain of the nanowires decrease linearly with the increasing temperature. The feature of deformation energy can be divided into four regions: quasi-elastic, plastic, flow and failure. Experiments have shown that when the temperature increases the yielding stress decreases, the first stage of deformation was narrowed, and the second stage was widened. The results showed that breaking position depended on temperature.

  12. Paroxysmal dystonic choreoathetosis: Tight linkage to chromosome 2q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, J.K.; Rainier, S.; Wilkowski, J.; Jones, S.M. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Paroxysmal dystonic choreoathetosis (PDC) is characterized by attacks of involuntary movements that last up to several hours and occur at rest both spontaneously and following caffeine or alcohol consumption. We analyzed a Polish-American kindred with autosomal dominant PDC and identified tight linkage between the disorder and microsatellite markers on chromosome 2q (maximum two-point LOD score 4.77; recombination fraction 0). Our results clearly establish the existence of a locus for autosomal dominant PDC on distal chromosome 2q. The fact that three other paroxysmal neurological disorders (periodic ataxia with myokymia and hypo- and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis) are due to mutation in ion-channel genes raises the possibility that PDC is also due to an ion-channel gene mutation. It is noteworthy that a cluster of sodium-channel genes is located on distal chromosome 2q, near the PDC locus. Identifying the PDC locus on chromosome 2q will facilitate discovery whether PDC is genetically homogeneous and whether other paroxysmal movement disorders are also genetically linked to the PDC locus. 28 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Diagnosing the tight building syndrome or diagnosing chemical hypersensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, S.A. (Northeast Center for Environmental Medicine, Syracuse, NY (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The abrupt exposure to urea foam formaldehyde insulation served as an alert to its spectrum of symptoms, including attacks of headache, flushing, laryngitis, dizziness, nausea, extreme weakness or exhaustion, arthralgia, an inability to concentrate, unwarranted depression, arrhythmia, or muscle spasms, and baffled physicians from many specialties. Later it was learned that toluene, xylene, benzene, natural gas, trichloroethylene, and many other chemicals were also capable of triggering chemical hypersensitivity. Other names for this condition include Environmentally Induced Illness (EI), the Tight Building Syndrome (TBS), the Sick Building Syndrome, and Building-Related Illness. The very symptoms patients complain of can be provoked within minutes and then subsequently alleviated with an intradermal injection of the appropriate strength of the triggering chemical. This technique aids in convincing the patient of the EI or TBS triggers so that the patient can begin to relate symptoms to environmental exposures and initiate measure to bring the disease under control. The key to safer buildings is increased ventilation, increased filtration of air, and decreased use of off-gassing synthetic materials.

  14. Nanoscale capacitance: A quantum tight-binding model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Feng; Wu, Jian; Li, Yang; Lu, Jun-Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Landauer-Buttiker formalism with the assumption of semi-infinite electrodes as reservoirs has been the standard approach in modeling steady electron transport through nanoscale devices. However, modeling dynamic electron transport properties, especially nanoscale capacitance, is a challenging problem because of dynamic contributions from electrodes, which is neglectable in modeling macroscopic capacitance and mesoscopic conductance. We implement a self-consistent quantum tight-binding model to calculate capacitance of a nano-gap system consisting of an electrode capacitance C‧ and an effective capacitance Cd of the middle device. From the calculations on a nano-gap made of carbon nanotube with a buckyball therein, we show that when the electrode length increases, the electrode capacitance C‧ moves up while the effective capacitance Cd converges to a value which is much smaller than the electrode capacitance C‧. Our results reveal the importance of electrodes in modeling nanoscale ac circuits, and indicate that the concepts of semi-infinite electrodes and reservoirs well-accepted in the steady electron transport theory may be not applicable in modeling dynamic transport properties.

  15. Experimental verification on tightly focused radially polarized vortex beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du Fu-Rong; Zhou Zhe-Hai; Tan Qiao-Feng; Yang Chang-Xi; Zhang Xiao-Qing; Zhu Lian-Qing

    2013-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental results of tightly focused radially polarized vortex beams are demonstrated.An auto-focus technology is introduced into the measurement system in order to enhance the measurement precision,and the radially polarized vortex beams are generated by a liquid-crystal polarization converter and a vortex phase plate.The focused fields of radially polarized vortex beams with different topological charges at numerical apertures (NAs) of 0.65 and 0.85 are measured respectively,and the results indicate that the total intensity distribution at focus is dependent not only on the NA of the focusing objective lens and polarization pattem of the beam but also on the topological charge l of the beam.Some unique focusing properties of radially polarized vortex beams with fractional topological charges are presented based on numerical calculations.The experimental verification paves the way for some practical applications of radially polarized vortex beams,such as in optical trapping,near-field microscopy,and material processing.

  16. Self consistent tight binding model for dissociable water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, You; Wynveen, Aaron; Halley, J. W.; Curtiss, L. A.; Redfern, P. C.

    2012-05-01

    We report results of development of a self consistent tight binding model for water. The model explicitly describes the electrons of the liquid self consistently, allows dissociation of the water and permits fast direct dynamics molecular dynamics calculations of the fluid properties. It is parameterized by fitting to first principles calculations on water monomers, dimers, and trimers. We report calculated radial distribution functions of the bulk liquid, a phase diagram and structure of solvated protons within the model as well as ac conductivity of a system of 96 water molecules of which one is dissociated. Structural properties and the phase diagram are in good agreement with experiment and first principles calculations. The estimated DC conductivity of a computational sample containing a dissociated water molecule was an order of magnitude larger than that reported from experiment though the calculated ratio of proton to hydroxyl contributions to the conductivity is very close to the experimental value. The conductivity results suggest a Grotthuss-like mechanism for the proton component of the conductivity.

  17. A tight-binding study of single-atom transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hoon; Lee, Sunhee; Fuechsle, Martin; Miwa, Jill A; Mahapatra, Suddhasatta; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L; Simmons, Michelle Y; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2015-01-21

    A detailed theoretical study of the electronic and transport properties of a single atom transistor, where a single phosphorus atom is embedded within a single crystal transistor architecture, is presented. Using a recently reported deterministic single-atom transistor as a reference, the electronic structure of the device is represented atomistically with a tight-binding model, and the channel modulation is simulated self-consistently with a Thomas-Fermi method. The multi-scale modeling approach used allows confirmation of the charging energy of the one-electron donor charge state and explains how the electrostatic environments of the device electrodes affects the donor confinement potential and hence extent in gate voltage of the two-electron charge state. Importantly, whilst devices are relatively insensitive to dopant ordering in the highly doped leads, a ∼1% variation of the charging energy is observed when a dopant is moved just one lattice spacing within the device. The multi-scale modeling method presented here lays a strong foundation for the understanding of single-atom device structures: essential for both classical and quantum information processing.

  18. A tight quantitative version of Arrow's impossibility theorem

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    The well-known Impossibility Theorem of Arrow asserts that any Generalized Social Welfare Function (GSWF) with at least three alternatives, which satisfies Independence of Irrelevant Alternatives (IIA) and Unanimity and is not a dictatorship, is necessarily non-transitive. In 2002, Kalai asked whether one can obtain the following quantitative version of the theorem: For any $\\epsilon>0$, there exists $\\delta=\\delta(\\epsilon)$ such that if a GSWF on three alternatives satisfies the IIA condition and its probability of non-transitive outcome is at most $\\delta$, then the GSWF is at most $\\epsilon$-far from being a dictatorship or from breaching the Unanimity condition. In 2009, Mossel proved such quantitative version, with $\\delta(\\epsilon)=\\exp(-C/\\epsilon^{21})$, and generalized it to GSWFs with $k$ alternatives, for all $k \\geq 3$. In this paper we show that the quantitative version holds with $\\delta(\\epsilon)=C \\cdot \\epsilon^3$, and that this result is tight up to logarithmic factors. Furthermore, our res...

  19. Macronutrient Balance and Dietary Glycemic Index in Pregnancy Predict Neonatal Body Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie V. Kizirian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of maternal macronutrient balance and dietary glycemic index (GI on neonatal body composition has received little study. We hypothesized that the overall quantity and quality of macronutrients, particularly carbohydrate, in the maternal diet could have trimester-specific effects on neonatal growth and body composition in women at risk of gestational diabetes. Maternal diet was assessed using 3-day food records in mid (n = 96 and late (n = 88 pregnancy as part of the GI Baby 3 study. Neonatal body composition was assessed by air-displacement plethysmography within 48 h of birth, adjusted for length, and expressed as fat mass index (FMI and fat-free mass index (FFMI. In mid pregnancy, higher maternal intake of carbohydrate energy was negatively correlated with infant FFMI (p = 0.037. In late pregnancy, higher dietary GI was associated with lower FFMI (p = 0.010 and higher carbohydrate energy predicted lower FMI (p = 0.034. Higher fat intake (%E and saturated fat, but not protein, also predicted neonatal body composition (higher FFMI in mid pregnancy and higher FMI in late pregnancy. Depending on pregnancy stage, a high carbohydrate-low fat diet, particularly from high glycemic sources, may reduce neonatal indices of both lean mass and adiposity.

  20. Macronutrient Balance and Dietary Glycemic Index in Pregnancy Predict Neonatal Body Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizirian, Nathalie V.; Markovic, Tania P.; Muirhead, Roslyn; Brodie, Shannon; Garnett, Sarah P.; Louie, Jimmy C. Y.; Petocz, Peter; Ross, Glynis P.; Brand-Miller, Jennie C.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of maternal macronutrient balance and dietary glycemic index (GI) on neonatal body composition has received little study. We hypothesized that the overall quantity and quality of macronutrients, particularly carbohydrate, in the maternal diet could have trimester-specific effects on neonatal growth and body composition in women at risk of gestational diabetes. Maternal diet was assessed using 3-day food records in mid (n = 96) and late (n = 88) pregnancy as part of the GI Baby 3 study. Neonatal body composition was assessed by air-displacement plethysmography within 48 h of birth, adjusted for length, and expressed as fat mass index (FMI) and fat-free mass index (FFMI). In mid pregnancy, higher maternal intake of carbohydrate energy was negatively correlated with infant FFMI (p = 0.037). In late pregnancy, higher dietary GI was associated with lower FFMI (p = 0.010) and higher carbohydrate energy predicted lower FMI (p = 0.034). Higher fat intake (%E) and saturated fat, but not protein, also predicted neonatal body composition (higher FFMI in mid pregnancy and higher FMI in late pregnancy). Depending on pregnancy stage, a high carbohydrate-low fat diet, particularly from high glycemic sources, may reduce neonatal indices of both lean mass and adiposity. PMID:27164136

  1. Diet, Inflammation, and Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes: An Integrative Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Y. Nowlin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is a growing national health problem affecting 35% of adults ≥20 years of age in the United States. Recently, diabetes has been categorized as an inflammatory disease, sharing many of the adverse outcomes as those reported from cardiovascular disease. Medical nutrition therapy is recommended for the treatment of diabetes; however, these recommendations have not been updated to target the inflammatory component, which can be affected by diet and lifestyle. To assess the current state of evidence for which dietary programs contain the most anti-inflammatory and glycemic control properties for patients with T2D, we conducted an integrative review of the literature. A comprehensive search of the PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, and Web of Science databases from January 2000 to May 2012 yielded 786 articles. The final 16 studies met the selection criteria including randomized control trials, quasiexperimental, or cross-sectional studies that compared varying diets and measured inflammatory markers. The Mediterranean and DASH diets along with several low-fat diets were associated with lower inflammatory markers. The Mediterranean diet demonstrated the most clinically significant reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c. Information on best dietary guidelines for inflammation and glycemic control in individuals with T2D is lacking. Continued research is warranted.

  2. Glycemic Index of (Zummita A Commonly Barley Based Consumed Traditional Libyan Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ahmida

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In Libya especially in Benghazi, Zummita is a traditional Libyan food consisting of 85% whole barley flour and is commonly consumed as a breakfast meal, and. Due to an increase in Type 2 diabetes and a lack of information on the effects of Zummita consumption on glycemic response, this study was performed to determine the glycemic index (GI of Zummita. Fasted healthy subjects (6 males and 6 females volunteered to consume either glucose or Zummita. The blood glucose concentrations were analyzed using capillary blood samples immediately before, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after glucose or Zummita consumption. The GI value of Zummita was calculated by expressing the incremental area under the blood glucose response curve (IAUC value for Zummita as a percentage of each subject’s average IAUC value for the glucose. The GI value of Zummita was found as 46.90 ± 7.56. This result indicates that Zummita should be classified as low GI food. More importantly, our result provides the GI value of a Libyan traditional food which was not determined previously. This valuable information will be significant for management and the prevention of diabetes mellitus in Libya and other countries having similar food tradition.

  3. The Consumption of Bicarbonate-Rich Mineral Water Improves Glycemic Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinnosuke Murakami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hot spring water and natural mineral water have been therapeutically used to prevent or improve various diseases. Specifically, consumption of bicarbonate-rich mineral water (BMW has been reported to prevent or improve type 2 diabetes (T2D in humans. However, the molecular mechanisms of the beneficial effects behind mineral water consumption remain unclear. To elucidate the molecular level effects of BMW consumption on glycemic control, blood metabolome analysis and fecal microbiome analysis were applied to the BMW consumption test. During the study, 19 healthy volunteers drank 500 mL of commercially available tap water (TW or BMW daily. TW consumption periods and BMW consumption periods lasted for a week each and this cycle was repeated twice. Biochemical tests indicated that serum glycoalbumin levels, one of the indexes of glycemic controls, decreased significantly after BMW consumption. Metabolome analysis of blood samples revealed that 19 metabolites including glycolysis-related metabolites and 3 amino acids were significantly different between TW and BMW consumption periods. Additionally, microbiome analysis demonstrated that composition of lean-inducible bacteria was increased after BMW consumption. Our results suggested that consumption of BMW has the possible potential to prevent and/or improve T2D through the alterations of host metabolism and gut microbiota composition.

  4. Low glycemic index lunch on satiety in overweight and obese people with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jiménez-Cruz

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that isocaloric diets have different effects on satiety. The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of lunches with different glycemic indexes (GI in type 2 diabetics. Ten men and women with type 2 diabetes participated in the study. Subjects were given two experimental lunches with glycemic indexes of 43 and 88. Visual analogue rating scales were completed before and after each experimental meal periodically to record subjective feelings of satiety. Satiety Area Under the Curve was 1024 ± 160 mm after the low GI diet and 711 ± 190 mm after the high GI diet. Eating a lunch with a low GI index resulted in higher satiety perception. These results suggest the need to promote culturally based combined foods with high fiber and low GI. This approach might contribute to the prevention of obesity by increasing the perception of satiety while also improving metabolic control of diabetics. In addition, this is a low cost approach for people with limited financial resources.

  5. Glycemic index role on visceral obesity, subclinical inflammation and associated chronic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Feliciano Pereira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is believed that the glycemic index (GI may be used as a strategy to prevent and control noncommunicable diseases (NCD. Obesity is a multifactorial condition, a risk factor for development of other NCDs. Among the different types, abdominal obesity is highlighted, which is essential for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome, and it is related to insulin resistance, dyslipi-demia, hypertension and changes in levels of inflammatory markers. Such indicators are closely related to the development of Type 2 Diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Objectives: Discuss the role of GI as a strategy for the prevention and/or treatment of visceral obesity, subclinical inflammation and chronic diseases. Results and discussion: The intake of low GI diets is associated with glycemic decreases, and lower and more consistent postprandial insulin release, avoiding the occurrence of hypoglycemia. Moreover, consumption of a low GI diet has been indicated as beneficial for reducing body weight, total body fat and visceral fat, levels of proinflammatory markers and the occurrence of dyslipidemia and hypertension. The intake of low GI foods should be encouraged in order to prevent and control non-communicable diseases.

  6. Protein Rich Flour from Hyacinth Bean as Functional Food Ingredient with Low Glycemic Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Nafi’

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein-rich flour (PRF produced from Hyacinth bean (Lablab purpureus (L Sweet shows good potency as a functional food ingredient. The PRF was extracted from hyacinth bean using water followed by protein precipitation at its isoelectric point. The precipitate was neutralized using 1 N NaOH and the slurry was dried, ground and sieved. The objective of this research was to characterize the nutritive value of PRF i.e., protein content and amino acid profile, trypsin inhibitors activity, content of vitamins B1 and B2, the amylose and amylopectin ratio of starch and its glycemic index. The results showed that the PRF contained high protein (58.4±4.5%. The major amino acid was glutamic acid, while methionine was found as the limited amino acid of the PRF. The activity of trypsin inhibitor was low (20.4±1.6 unit/g. Moreover, PRF contains 0.2 and 3.6 mg/100 g of vitamins B1 and B2 respectively. With a high ratio of amylose (30.0±2.0% and high content of resistance starch (7.97 g/100 g, the PRF showed a low glycemic index (43.50. Based on its characteristics, this PRF can be promoted as a new food ingredient, especially for diabetic diet.

  7. A low-glycemic-index diet reduces plasma PAI-1 activity in overweight women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lotte

    Introduction An elevated level of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in plasma is a core feature of the metabolic syndrome. Plasma PAI-1 is elevated in obesity and might be responsible for some of the secondary effects of obesity as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. PAI-1 has been shown...... diet. Still, the relevance of GI in preventing the metabolic syndrome is controversial. Objectives The main purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of 10 weeks intake of a low glycemic index vs. a high glycemic index high-carbohydrate, low fat ad libitum diet on plasma PAI-1 activity...... and antigen levels in overweight women. Methods 45 healthy overweight women (BMI 27.6 ± 0.2 kg/m2) were randomly assigned to a parallel 10 week intervention with a low GI (n=23) or high GI (n=22) diet. Fasting blood samples were obtained before and after the 10 weeks. To study the postprandial effect of LGI...

  8. Response to Acute Psychophysical Stress and 24-Hour Glycemic Control in Healthy Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loretta DiPietro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the relation between stress reactivity and 24 h glycemic control in 17 inactive, healthy older people (≥60 years under both a novel psychophysical stress and a seated control condition. Plasma cortisol was measured over the course of the stress and recovery periods. Glycemic control was determined over the subsequent 3 h from an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT and over 24 h via continuous glucose monitoring (CGM. We observed significant (P<0.05 elevations in perceived stress, cardiovascular activity, and peak cortisol response at 30 min (10.6±3.1 versus 8.6±2.6 μg·dL−1, resp. during the stress compared with the control condition; however, 3 h OGTT glucose and insulin responses were similar between conditions. The CGM data suggested a 30–40 min postchallenge delay in peak glucose response and attenuated glucose clearance over the 6 h following the stress condition, but these alterations were not statistically significant. Healthy older people may demonstrate minimal disruption in metabolic resiliency following everyday psychological stress.

  9. EVALUATION OF NUTRITION AND GLYCEMIC INDEX OF SWEET POTATOES AND ITS APPROPRIATE PROCESSING TO HYPOGLYCEMIC FOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Made Astawana

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia placed the fourth biggest diabetics in the world after India, China, and the USA with prevalence amounting to 8.6% of the population. Diabetes is an abnormal carbohydrate metabolism. Therefore, nutrition plays a key role in the management of the disease. This study aimed to find hypoglycemic sweet potatoes and appropriate processing to create low glycemic foods. Eight Indonesian sweet potato varieties/clones were used in this experiment, i.e. Kidal, Sukuh, Sari, Ungu, Jago, BB00105.10, B0464, and BB00106.18. Samples were firstly analyzed for their physicochemical and nutritional properties, which then followed by evaluation of their hypoglycemic responses. The selected variety was processed into three different basic processing methods, i.e. boiling, baking, and frying, and then their glycemic indexes (GI were evaluated. Result showed that among eight sweet potato varieties/clones studied, BB00105.10 clone indicated the best hypoglycemic response. The highest hypoglycemic activity was supported with the highest resistant starch content (3.8%, protein content (5.47%, and low starch digestibility (51.4%. The sweet potato tubers contained medium to high amylose (24.94%. Processing methods influenced the GI value of foods. Fried sweet potatoes had the lowest GI (47, followed by the boiled one (GI = 62 and the baked one (GI = 80.

  10. THE EFFECT OF GLYCEMIC INDEX ON PLASMA IL-6 IN SUB-MAX EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasani S.H.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study examined the effect of a pre-exercise meal with different glycemic index (GI on plasma IL-6 concentration and glucose metabolism during sub-max exercise (endurance performance run. Material : Ten men completed 1 h running at 70%-75% VO2max on a level treadmill on three occasions. In each trial, one of the three prescribed beverages as meal, i.e. high GI and low GL or placebo was consumed by the subjects 45 min before exercise. Blood samples were collected before, after, 1h and 24h after exercise. Result: Concentration of Plasma IL-6 in LGI group was less than HGI and Pla groups, IL-6 tended to significantly increase after exercise in groups (all P < 0.05, also there was significant difference for plasma IL-6 concentration between placebo and low glycemic groups in after exercise (P=.003 and 1hour after exercise (P=.005 . CK was significantly elevated at all- time points after exercise in 3 groups (all P < 0.05. Concentration of serum CK in LGI group was less than HGI and Pla groups but there not significantly. The consumption of the LGI beverage before exercise could minimize the increasing of plasma IL-6 concentration immediately after exercise and during the 1 h recovery period compared with the HGI beverage and Pla. Conclusion: This result suggested that the LGI beverage consumed as pre-exercise meal could modify the inflammatory response in prolonged exercise.

  11. Characterisation, in vitro digestibility and expected glycemic index of commercial starches as uncooked ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Annalisa; Mackie, Alan; Farina, Federica; Aponte, Maria; Sarghini, Fabrizio; Masi, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    In this study native starches as ingredients (corn, rice, wheat, tapioca and potato) were characterized for microstructure, physicochemical, functional and thermal properties, in vitro digestibility and glycemic index. There was a significant variation in the granule shape and size distribution of the starches. Particle size monomodal (corn, tapioca, potato) and bimodal (rice, wheat) distribution was observed amongst the starches. The potato starch showed the biggest size granules while the rice showed the smallest. The examined properties and nutritional characteristics of starches were significantly different. Thermal properties were studied using Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). DSC results showed that the transition temperatures (58.8-78.7 °C) and enthalpies of gelatinization (2.3-8.2 J/g) of the starches appeared to be greatly influenced by microstructure and chemical composition (e.g. resistant starch). Nutritional properties such as slowly digestible starch and expected glycemic index values followed the order: rice > wheat > tapioca > corn > potato. In particular, the highest resistant starch was recorded for potato starch.

  12. Glycemic index and quality evaluation of little millet (Panicum miliare) flakes with enhanced shelf life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Kavita B; Chimmad, Bharati V; Itagi, Sunanda

    2015-09-01

    Little millet is a minor cereal crop contains several nutraceutical components. Ready To Cook (RTC) flakes of the millet exhibited higher total dietary fiber content (22.40 %) compared to dehulled grain (15.80 %). One serving (30 g) of RTC flakes provided 2.25 g of protein, 0.13 g of fat, 0.13 g of total minerals, 9.67 mg of iron and zero trans fats. The flakes possessed a medium Glycemic Index (GI) of 52.11 ranging from 41.57 to 61.80 among normal volunteers. Glycemic Load (GL) of the flakes was a low of 9.24. The RTC flakes exhibited an acceptability index of 81.11. The flakes possessed a shelf life of more than 6 months with an acceptability index of 67.55, moisture content of 11.82 per cent and Free fatty acid content of 18.02 per cent at the end of sixth month of storage period.

  13. Association of Helicobacter pylori Infection with Glycemic Control in Patients with Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chika Horikawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the association between Helicobacter pylori (HP infection and glycemic control in patients with diabetes through a meta-analytic approach. Research Design and Methods. Electronic literature searches were conducted for cross-sectional studies that examined the hemoglobin A1c (A1C level by whether patients with diabetes were or were not carriers of HP. Mean differences in A1C between groups with and without HP infection were pooled with a random-effects model. Results. Thirteen eligible studies were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, the HP carriers did not have significantly higher A1C levels compared with HP noncarriers (mean difference (95% CI, 0.19% (−0.18 to 0.46, P = 0.16. When the analysis was limited to studies targeting patients with type 1 diabetes, there was also no significant difference in A1C (0.69% (−0.31 to 1.68, P = 0.18. Conclusions. There was insufficient evidence that HP infection worsened glycemic control in patients with diabetes.

  14. Health Canada's evaluation of the use of glycemic index claims on food labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Alfred; Dumais, Lydia; Barber, Jennifer

    2013-08-01

    The glycemic index (GI) is a system that ranks foods according to the blood glucose-increasing potential of servings of foods that provide the same amount of available carbohydrate. The GI was originally developed as a tool for carbohydrate exchange in the dietary management of glycemia in persons with diabetes, and studies have generally supported modest benefits of low-GI diets in this population. Despite inconsistent results for the utility of the GI in the nondiabetic population, there is some interest in its universal application on food labels to assist consumers in making food choices that would help them meet their dietary goals. The objective of this review was to evaluate the usefulness of including the GI values of foods as part of the information on food labels in Canada. Health Canada's assessment identified 3 areas of concern with respect to GI labeling: 1) the GI measure has poor accuracy and precision for labeling purposes; 2) as a ratio, the GI does not vary in response to the amount of food consumed and the partial replacement of available carbohydrates with unavailable carbohydrates, whereas the glycemic response does; and 3) an unintended focus on the GI for food selection could lead to food choices that are inconsistent with national dietary guidelines. Hence, Health Canada's current opinion is that the inclusion of the GI value on the label of eligible food products would be misleading and would not add value to nutrition labeling and dietary guidelines in assisting consumers to make healthier food choices.

  15. Relationship between Glycemic Load and Blood Lipid Level in Hospitalized Adult Chinese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic diseases in China have been on the rise in recent decades, partially due to reduced cereal consumption and excessive intake of low glycemic index (GI foods such as meat and oil. Although the relationship between dietary glycemic load (GL and various metabolic diseases has been extensively studied worldwide, it is unclear whether dietary GL is related to blood lipid levels and dyslipidemia risk in Chinese. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between dietary GL and blood lipid levels and dyslipidemia risk in hospitalized Chinese adults.Dietary GL in 2258 hospitalized Chinese adults was calculated based upon GI, carbohydrate content and daily intake of individual foods. In addition, fasting total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, HDL cholesterol (HDL-C and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C data were collected. Multiple regression and logistic regression analysis were used to determine the relationship between dietary GL and plasma lipid levels or dyslipidemia risk.Dietary GL remained inversely associated with blood total cholesterol (TC and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C (P0.05.High GL diet, as represented by traditional Chinese dietary pattern, may contribute to reduced risk of dyslipidemia in Chinese adults.

  16. [Glycemic index of two varieties of pasta and two varieties of rice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridner, Edgardo; Di Sibio, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    The IG has been extensively studied as an indicator of the physiological effects of a carbohydrate meal with applications in the management and prevention of diabetes, dyslipidemia and obesity. A standard assay was performed to measure the glycemic index (GI) of two significant sources of carbohydrates following the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended methodology, determining the incremental area under the blood glucose response curve of a 50g carbohydrate portion of the test food compared to the same amount of carbohydrate from a glucose solution by the same subject measured in capillary whole blood before and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 minutes after ingestion in a total of 9 subjects. The following results were obtained: Parboil rice: 73, Long Grain White Rice: 59; Pasta of durum wheat (Triticum durum): 71, Pasta of regular flour (Triticum aestivium): 38. This test confirms the low glycemic index of pasta made from durum wheat, and is the first measurement for pasta of common wheat flour properly characterized. It also indicates the values of the prevailing presentations of rice in the region, adding a reference for professionals and authorities.

  17. Glycemic index differences of high-fat diets modulate primarily lipid metabolism in murine adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schothorst, Evert M; Bunschoten, Annelies; Verlinde, Eline; Schrauwen, Patrick; Keijer, Jaap

    2011-08-16

    A low vs. high glycemic index of a high-fat (HF) diet (LGI and HGI, respectively) significantly retarded adverse health effects in adult male C57BL/6J mice, as shown recently (Van Schothorst EM, Bunschoten A, Schrauwen P, Mensink RP, Keijer J. FASEB J 23: 1092-1101, 2009). The LGI diet enhanced whole body insulin sensitivity and repressed HF diet-induced body and white adipose tissue (WAT) weight gain, resulting in significantly reduced serum leptin and resistin levels and increased adiponectin levels. We questioned how WAT is modulated and characterized the molecular mechanisms underlying the glycemic index-mediated effects using whole genome microarrays. This showed that the LGI diet mainly exerts its beneficial effects via substrate metabolism, especially fatty acid metabolism. In addition, cell adhesion and cytoskeleton remodeling showed reduced expression, in line with lower WAT mass. An important transcription factor showing enhanced expression is PPAR-γ. Furthermore, serum levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, and HDL- and LDL-cholesterol were all significantly reduced by LGI diet, and simultaneously muscle insulin sensitivity was significantly increased as analyzed by protein kinase B/Akt phosphorylation. Cumulatively, even though these mice were fed an HF diet, the LGI diet induced significantly favorable changes in metabolism in WAT. These effects suggest a partial overlap with pharmacological approaches by thiazolidinediones to treat insulin resistance and statins for hypercholesterolemia. It is therefore tempting to speculate that such a dietary approach might beneficially support pharmacological treatment of insulin resistance or hypercholesterolemia in humans.

  18. Effect of Grewia asiatica fruit on glycemic index and phagocytosis tested in healthy human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesaik, Muhammad Ahmed; Ahmed, Asif; Khalid, Ahmed Shukralla; Jan, Saleem; Siddiqui, Afaq Ahmed; Perveen, Shahida; Azim, Muhammad Kamran

    2013-01-01

    The Grewia asiatica (commonly known as Phalsa or Fasla) is a shrub or small tree found in southern Asia. It produces purple to black color fruit when ripe. In folk medicine the edible Grewia asiatica fruit is used in a number of pathological conditions. The current study described the effects of Grewia asiatica fruit on glycemic index (GI) and phagocytosis in healthy non-diabetic human subjects. The results showed that Grewia asiatica fruit has low GI value of 5.34 with modest hypoglycemic activity. Luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assay was carried out to determine the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the oxidative burst activity of whole blood. ROS production was found to be significantly affected, having the 78.3, 58.6 and 30.8% when the subjects were fed with D-glucose, mixture of D-glucose and Grewia asiatica fruit and Grewia asiatica fruit alone respectively as compared to the control. The aqueous, methanolic and butanolic extracts of Grewia asiatica fruits were found to produce a stimulatory effect on ROS production however; the chloroform, hexane and ethanol-acetate extracted exerted significant inhibitory effect. These results demonstrated that Grewia asiatica fruit has desirable effects on blood glucose metabolism manifested as low glycemic response and modulation of ROS production.

  19. 心血管疾病风险与食物血糖指数和血糖负荷相关性分析%Correlation analysis of cardiovascular disease risk, food glycemic index and glycemic load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓燕; 杨彬婕; 何晓健; 陈昌海; 张丹

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo explore and analyze the correlation between cardiovascular disease risk, food glycemic index and glycemic load correlation.MethodSelected 2137 cases of 50~70 years old general physical examination as the research objects in our hospital check-up from January 2007 to January 2009 by followed-up 5 years, statistical study cases complicated with cardiovascular disease, and analyzed the possible inlfuencing factors.ResultThere were medical examination of 65 cases complicated with cardiovascular disease in 2137 cases in the 5 years, through a single factor chi-square test shows that, high glycemic load, high glycemic index, obesity, smoking, drinking, and negative emotions could easily induce cardiovascular disease, after multiple Logistic regression analysis for risk factors from big to small respectively was glycemic index (OR=20.950,P=0.000), high glycemic load (OR=6.716,P=0.000), obesity (OR=2.808,P=0.000) and alcohol (OR=1.683,P=0.00).ConclusionFood glycemic index and glycemic load can be used as a blood glucose reaction after eating two important indexes, the introduction of concept of glycemic index and glycemic load food to eating healthy education can improve human glycosylated hemoglobin, blood lipid, insulin resistance and break traditional food exchange and to prevent cardiovascular complications, such as worthy of further popularization and application in clinic.%目的:探究并分析心血管疾病风险与食物血糖指数和血糖负荷的相关性。方法选取2007年1月至2009年1月2137例于本院体检的50~70岁体检者为研究对象。随访5年,统计研究对象并发心血管疾病的例数,并对可能的影响因素进行分析。结果随访结束后,2137例体检者中65例并发心血管疾病,单因素χ2检验显示:高血糖负荷、高血糖指数、肥胖、吸烟、饮酒和负性情绪等因素易诱发心血管疾病,多因素Logistic回归分析得到危险因素由大至小分

  20. Improved Glycemic Control Without Hypoglycemia in Elderly Diabetic Patients Using the Ubiquitous Healthcare Service, a New Medical Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Soo; Kang, Seon Mee; Shin, Hayley; Lee, Hak Jong; Won Yoon, Ji; Yu, Sung Hoon; Kim, So-Youn; Yoo, Soo Young; Jung, Hye Seung; Park, Kyong Soo; Ryu, Jun Oh; Jang, Hak C.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To improve quality and efficiency of care for elderly patients with type 2 diabetes, we introduced elderly-friendly strategies to the clinical decision support system (CDSS)-based ubiquitous healthcare (u-healthcare) service, which is an individualized health management system using advanced medical information technology. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted a 6-month randomized, controlled clinical trial involving 144 patients aged >60 years. Participants were randomly assigned to receive routine care (control, n = 48), to the self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG, n = 47) group, or to the u-healthcare group (n = 49). The primary end point was the proportion of patients achieving A1C <7% without hypoglycemia at 6 months. U-healthcare system refers to an individualized medical service in which medical instructions are given through the patient’s mobile phone. Patients receive a glucometer with a public switched telephone network-connected cradle that automatically transfers test results to a hospital-based server. Once the data are transferred to the server, an automated system, the CDSS rule engine, generates and sends patient-specific messages by mobile phone. RESULTS After 6 months of follow-up, the mean A1C level was significantly decreased from 7.8 ± 1.3% to 7.4 ± 1.0% (P < 0.001) in the u-healthcare group and from 7.9 ± 1.0% to 7.7 ± 1.0% (P = 0.020) in the SMBG group, compared with 7.9 ± 0.8% to 7.8 ± 1.0% (P = 0.274) in the control group. The proportion of patients with A1C <7% without hypoglycemia was 30.6% in the u-healthcare group, 23.4% in the SMBG group (23.4%), and 14.0% in the control group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS The CDSS-based u-healthcare service achieved better glycemic control with less hypoglycemia than SMBG and routine care and may provide effective and safe diabetes management in the elderly diabetic patients. PMID:21270188

  1. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P

    2012-01-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have increased the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes...... risk (q...

  2. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scott, Robert A.; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P.; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E.; Luan, Jian'an; Maegi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Yengo, Loic; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C. D.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V.; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Evans, David M.; St Pourcain, Beate; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tonu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M.; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Morris, Andrew P.; Rayner, Nigel W.; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Willems, Sara M.; Chines, Peter S.; Jackson, Anne U.; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M.; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F.; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A.; An, Ping; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S.; North, Kari E.; Forouhi, Nita G.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V.; Hallmans, Goeran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B.; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H.; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Fowkes, Gerard R.; Kovacs, Peter; Lindstrom, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H.; Basart, Hanneke V.; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Province, Michael A.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Bergman, Richard N.; Collins, Francis S.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F.; Dedoussis, George V.; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Morris, Andrew D.; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A.; Beilby, John P.; Koerner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Lakka, Timo A.; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S.; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D.; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Saaristo, Timo E.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josee; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B.; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L.; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I.; Franks, Paul W.; Meigs, James B.; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Florez, Jose C.; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Ines

    2012-01-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have increased the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes ri

  3. The relationship between mean amplitude of glycemic excursions and cognitive impairment in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新玲

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between mean amplitude of glycemic excursions(MAGE) and cognitive impairment in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods Totally 80 patients(aged >60 years) with type 2 diabetes were selected. According to the Montreal

  4. Sleep Duration and Glycemic Control in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus: Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bu Kyung; Kim, Bong Sun; An, So-Yeon; Lee, Min Suk; Choi, Yong Jun; Han, Seung Jin; Chung, Yoon-sok; Lee, Kwan-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Short sleep duration has been reported to increase the risk of diabetes. However, the influence of sleep duration on glycemic control in diabetic patients has not been clarified. In this study we evaluated the association between sleep duration and glycemic control in diabetic patients. We analyzed the data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) 2007-2010. Sleep duration was classified into five groups: <6, 6, 7, 8, and ≥9 h/day. Fasting blood glucose and HbA1c showed a U-shaped trend according to sleep duration. Sleep duration of 7 h/day had the lowest HbA1c (7.26%) among the subjects (P=0.026). In the older age group (≥65 yr), a sleep duration of 6 h/day was associated with the lowest HbA1c (7.26%). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of worse glycemic control (HbA1c ≥7.0%) in group of sleep duration of ≥9 h/day was 1.48 (1.04-2.13) compared with the group of 7 h/day. This relationship disappeared after adjusting duration of diabetes (OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 0.93-2.03). Our results suggest that sleep duration and glycemic control in diabetic patients has U-shaped relationship which was mainly affected by duration of diabetes. PMID:24015039

  5. Whole grains, bran, and germ in relation to homocysteine and markers of glycemic control, lipids, and inflammation 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Majken K; Koh-Banerjee, Pauline; Franz, Mary;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intake of whole grains is inversely associated with risk of diabetes and ischemic heart disease in observational studies. The lower risk associated with high whole-grain intakes may be mediated through improvements in glycemic control, lipid profiles, or reduced inflammation. OBJECTIV...

  6. Dietary starch type affects body weight and glycemic control in freely fed but not energy-restricted obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Alfred A; Kenney, Laura S; Goulet, Benoit; Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed

    2009-10-01

    This study comprised 2 experiments that tested the hypothesis that a high-amylose starch diet (AMO) would improve body weight and glycemic control relative to a high-amylopectin starch diet (AMN) in rats with diet-induced obesity. After inducing obesity with a high-fat and -energy diet (Expt. 1), male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 46) were divided into 4 groups and given free or restricted access to either an AMN or an AMO diet for 4 wk (Expt. 2). After 3 wk, rats from each group underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. At the end of the experiment, food-deprived rats were killed by decapitation and blood and tissues were collected for analyses. AMO led to lower total energy intake, weight gain, fat pad mass, and glycemic response but higher insulin sensitivity index than AMN, only when consumed ad libitum (AL) (P resistant starch content rather than its glycemic index. We conclude that starches high in AMO can be effective in weight and glycemic control in obesity.

  7. Cfh genotype interacts with dietary glycemic index to modulate age-related macular degeneration-like features in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of visual impairment worldwide. Genetics and diet contribute to the relative risk for developing AMD, but their interactions are poorly understood. Genetic variations in Complement Factor H (CFH), and dietary glycemic index (GI) are major ris...

  8. Glycemic index differences of high-fat diets modulate primarily lipid metabolism in murine adipose tissue [Mus musculus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schothorst, van E.M.; Keijer, J.; Bunschoten, J.E.; Verlinde, E.; Schrauwen, P.

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that a low versus high glycemic index (GI) diet on a high fat (30% kcal fat) background (LGI and HGI, respectively) significantly retarded adverse health effects in C57BL/6J male mice. The LGI diet enhanced whole body insulin sensitivity and repressed high fat diet-induced bod

  9. The Comparative Evaluation of the Effect of the Foods with Different Glycemic Indices on Blood Glucose and Serum Free Fatty Acids in Cycling, Male Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadi, J. (PhD

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Carbohydrates are considered as the major source of energy in physical activity. Studies show that consumption of carbohydrate foods before exercise can balance blood glucose and free fatty acids and increase athletes’ performance. In this study , we compared the effect of three kinds of foods with different glycemic indices on blood glucose (BG and serum free fatty acids (FFA in cycling ,male athletes. Material and Methods: In this clinical trial, 21 members of national cycling team randomly allocated to three equal groups of glucose (low glycemic index ، lentil (low glycemic index and potato (high glycemic index. First, Fasting blood samples (5ml were obtained to measure BG and FFA . Then the subjects were asked to eat their foods. After 45 mins of rest, they pedaled with maximal oxygen consumption VO2max for two hours and again their blood samples were taken to compare with the levels of before interventions. Results: Glucose consumption resulted in a significant decrease in FFA level after 2 hours of pedaling (P = 0.01 but no significant change in BG level. Plasma glucose was higher after eating lentil than that of potato (P<0.05, but it was not true for FFA level of both groups. Conclusion: Based on the results, the pre-exercise use of low glycemic index (lentil compared to high glycemic index (potato can better lead to increased blood glucose during exercise. Keywords: Glycemic Index; Blood Glucose; Serum Free Fatty Acids; Cyclists

  10. Exploring a Transformative Orientation to Sustainability in Universities: A Question of Loose and Tight Framings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, William A. H.

    2015-01-01

    This review essay examines three new books on higher education and sustainability. It explores a number of the issues raised in the books, in particular, the meaning of a transformative orientation towards sustainability. The idea of loose and tight conceptual framings of sustainability is employed. A tight framing is where an institution embodies…

  11. Tightness of M-estimators for multiple linear regression in time series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren; Nielsen, Bent

    We show tightness of a general M-estimator for multiple linear regression in time series. The positive criterion function for the M-estimator is assumed lower semi-continuous and sufficiently large for large argument: Particular cases are the Huber-skip and quantile regression. Tightness requires...

  12. 42 CFR 84.1142 - Isoamyl acetate tightness test; respirators designed for respiratory protection against dusts...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Isoamyl acetate tightness test; respirators... Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1142 Isoamyl acetate tightness test; respirators designed for respiratory protection...

  13. Is glycemic index of food a feasible predictor of appetite, hunger, and satiety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwano, Yoshimi; Adachi, Takashi; Kashimura, Jun; Sakata, Takashi; Sasaki, Hajime; Sekine, Kazunori; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Yonekubo, Akie; Kimura, Shuichi

    2009-06-01

    This review assesses the feasibility of using glycemic index (GI) as a predictor of appetite, hunger and satiety by surveying published human intervention studies. We also discuss the relationship between GI and two appetite/satiety control hormones, leptin and ghrelin. Ingestion of high-GI food increased hunger and lowered satiety in short-term human intervention studies. This effect may be attributed to the rapid decline in blood glucose level following a hyperinsulinemic response caused by a sharp and transient increase in blood glucose level that occurs after the ingestion of high-GI food, which is defined as the glucostatic theory. However, appetite, hunger and satiety after the ingestion of foods with varying GI were inconsistent among long-term human intervention studies. From the few relevant long-term studies available, we selected two recent well-designed examples for analysis, but they failed to elicit clear differences in glycemic and insulinemic responses between high- and low-GI meals (consisting of a combination of different foods or key carbohydrate-rich foods incorporated into habitual diets). One of the reasons that these studies could not predict glycemic response to mixed meals is presumably that the GI of each particular food was not reflected in that of the mixed meals as a whole. Thus, it is difficult to conclude that the GI values of foods or mixed meals are a valid long-term predictor for appetite, hunger and satiety. Both insulin and insulin-mediated glucose uptake and metabolism in adipose tissue affect blood leptin concentration and its diurnal pattern. Circulating ghrelin level is suppressed by carbohydrate-rich meals, presumably via glycemia and insulinemia. Accordingly, low-GI foods may not necessarily increase satiety or suppress appetite and/or hunger because of the lack of insulin-mediated leptin stimulation and ghrelin suppression. However, insulin-mediated leptin stimulation and ghrelin suppression per se is not consistent among

  14. Pilot study on the additive effects of berberine and oral type 2 diabetes agents for patients with suboptimal glycemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Pierro F

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Di Pierro,1 Nicola Villanova,2 Federica Agostini,2 Rebecca Marzocchi,2 Valentina Soverini,2 Giulio Marchesini21Scientific Department, Velleja Research, Milano, 2Diseases of Metabolism, S Orsola Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, ItalyBackground: Suboptimal glycemic control is a common situation in diabetes, regardless of the wide range of drugs available to reach glycemic targets. Basic research in diabetes is endeavoring to identify new actives working as insulin savers, use of which could delay the introduction of injectable insulin or reduce the insulin dose needed. Commonly available as a nutraceutical, berberine is a potential candidate.Methods and results: Because its low oral bioavailability can be overcome by P-glycoprotein inhibitors like herbal polyphenols, we have tested the nutraceutical combination of Berberis aristata extract and Silybum marianum extract (Berberol® in type 2 diabetes in terms of its additive effect when combined with a conventional oral regimen for patients with suboptimal glycemic control. After 90 days of treatment, the nutraceutical association had a positive effect on glycemic and lipid parameters, significantly reducing glycosylated hemoglobin, basal insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides. A relevant effect was also observed in terms of liver function by measuring aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase. The product had a good safety profile, with distinctive gastrointestinal side effects likely due to its acarbose-like action.Conclusion: Although further studies should be carried out to confirm our data, Berberol could be considered a good candidate as an adjunctive treatment option in diabetes, especially in patients with suboptimal glycemic control.Keywords: berberine, silymarin, glycosylated hemoglobin, diabetes

  15. Glycosylated hemoglobin and albumin-corrected fructosamine are good indicators for glycemic control in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Ying Lee

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Diabetes mellitus (DM is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease and is an important risk factor for morbidity and mortality after dialysis. However, glycemic control among such patients is difficult to assess. The present study examined glycemic control parameters and observed glucose variation after refilling different kinds of fresh dialysate in peritoneal dialysis (PD patients. METHODS: A total of 25 DM PD patients were recruited, and continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS was applied to measure interstitial fluid (ISF glucose levels at 5-min intervals for 3 days. Patients filled out diet and PD fluid exchange diaries. The records measured with CGMS were analyzed and correlated with other glycemic control parameters such as fructosamine, albumin-corrected fructosamine (AlbF, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, and glycated albumin levels. RESULTS: There were significant correlations between mean ISF glucose and fructosamine (r = 0.45, P<0.05, AlbF (r = 0.54, P<0.01, and HbA1c (r = 0.51, P<0.01. The ISF glucose levels in glucose-containing dialysate increased from approximately 7-8 mg/dL within 1 hour of exchange in contrast to icodextrin dialysate which kept ISF glucose levels unchanged. CONCLUSION: HbA1c and AlbF significantly correlated with the mean ISF glucose levels, indicating that they are reliable indices of glycemic control in DM PD patients. Icodextrin dialysate seems to have a favorable glycemic control effect when compared to the other glucose-containing dialysates.

  16. Extended-release niacin/laropiprant significantly improves lipid levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus irrespective of baseline glycemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bays HE

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Harold E Bays,1 Eliot A Brinton,2 Joseph Triscari,3 Erluo Chen,3 Darbie Maccubbin,3 Alexandra A MacLean,3 Kendra L Gibson,3 Rae Ann Ruck,3 Amy O Johnson-Levonas,3 Edward A O’Neill,3 Yale B Mitchel3 1Louisville Metabolic & Atherosclerosis Research Center (L-MARC, Louisville, KY, USA; 2Utah Foundation for Biomedical Research, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 3Merck & Co, Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA Background: The degree of glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM may alter lipid levels and may alter the efficacy of lipid-modifying agents. Objective: Evaluate the lipid-modifying efficacy of extended-release niacin/laropiprant (ERN/LRPT in subgroups of patients with T2DM with better or poorer glycemic control. Methods: Post hoc analysis of clinical trial data from patients with T2DM who were randomized 4:3 to double-blind ERN/LRPT or placebo (n=796, examining the lipid-modifying effects of ERN/LRPT in patients with glycosylated hemoglobin or fasting plasma glucose levels above and below median baseline levels. Results: At Week 12 of treatment, ERN/LRPT significantly improved low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and lipoprotein (a, compared with placebo, with equal efficacy in patients above or below median baseline glycemic control. Compared with placebo, over 36 weeks of treatment more patients treated with ERN/LRPT had worsening of their diabetes and required intensification of antihyperglycemic medication, irrespective of baseline glycemic control. Incidences of other adverse experiences were generally low in all treatment groups. Conclusion: The lipid-modifying effects of ERN/LRPT are independent of the degree of baseline glycemic control in patients with T2DM (NCT00485758. Keywords: lipid-modifying agents, hyperglycemia, LDL, HDL, triglycerides

  17. Diabetes, glycemic control and risk of medical glaucoma treatment: A population-based case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte G Welinder

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Lotte G Welinder1, Anders H Riis2, Lars L Knudsen1, Reimar W Thomsen21Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aalborg hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, DenmarkPurpose: To examine the association between diabetes and risk of medical glaucoma treatment and to assess the role of long-term glycemic control in the putative association. Design: Population-based case-control study.Methods: Cases of treated glaucoma were all persons filling at least three prescriptions for glaucoma medication for the first time within one year between 2001 and 2006 in Northern Jutland, Denmark. We used risk set sampling to select 10 gender- and age-matched general population controls per case using the Danish Civil Registration System. Data on diabetes, comorbidities, and laboratory tests, including glycosylated hemoglobin (as a measure of glycemic control were obtained from population-based medical registries. We calculated odds ratio (OR as an estimate of relative risk for treated glaucoma comparing patients with and without diabetes, adjusted for comorbid conditions and medication use.Results: We included 5,991 persons with incident medical glaucoma treatment and 59,910 population controls. The adjusted OR for treated glaucoma for patients with diabetes was 1.81 (95% confidence interval: 1.65–1.98. The strength of the association between diabetes and glaucoma risk did not vary by diabetes duration or by the level of glycemic control. Conclusions: Regardless of glycemic control, diabetes is associated with a substantially increased risk for medical glaucoma treatment.Keywords: diabetes, glaucoma, glycemic control, prescriptions, population-based case-control study

  18. The Effect of Glycemic Control on Plasma Ghrelin and Serum IGF-1 Levels in Type 1 Diabetic Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Altuğ Şen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of glycemic control on plasma ghrelin levels and serum IGF-1 levels in girls with type 1 diabetes. Materials and Method: The study group composed of 32 diabetic girls between the ages of 14.0-20.0 years with Tanner pubertal stage 5; and 15 healthy girls in similar ages with Tanner pubertal stage 5 formed the control group. Diabetic girls were classified as well glycemic controlled (n=18 and poor glycemic controlled (n=14 according to last year’s mean glycosylated hemoglobin levels. All subjects were tested for fasting plasma ghrelin and serum IGF-1 levels. Results: The mean fasting plasma ghrelin levels in girls with well controlled diabetes, in girls wtih poor controlled diabetes and in control group were 483.4±221.9 pg/ml, 310.7±110.2 pg/ml, 471.9±175.0 pg/ml respectively. The mean serum IGF-1 levels in girls with well controlled diabetes was 233.9±59.2 ng/ml, in girls with poor controlled diabetes 183.9±36.7 ng/ml, and in healthy controls 247.3±48.5 ng/ml. Plasma ghrelin levels and serum IGF-1 levels were similar in girls with well controlled diabetes and in the control group, however it was significantly supressed in those with poorly controlled diabetes. Conclusion: The metabolic control may be a determinative factor on plasma ghrelin and serum IGF-1 levels of type 1 diabetics. Plasma ghrelin and serum IGF-1 levels were similar in well glycemic controlled diabetics and control group, while they were suppressed in only poor glycemic controlled diabetics. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2009; 7: 104-10

  19. The glycemic response to fibre rich foods and their relationship with gastric emptying and motor functions: an MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopirajah, R; Raichurkar, Keshav Prakash; Wadhwa, Rajkumar; Anandharamakrishnan, C

    2016-09-14

    The chief motor functions of human stomach, namely receiving, storing, mixing and emptying, influence the absorption of ingested food and hence determine the glycemic response to the meal. However, among these functions, the gastric emptying pattern of the stomach is essentially regulated by the meal characteristics such as particle size, volume, nutrient composition and viscosity. Understanding the complex relationship between the stomach motor functions and the physicochemical characteristics of meal on glycemic control needs more attention in the formulation of functional foods. Hence, the objective of this study is to employ the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique in ten healthy human volunteers to elucidate the relationship between the motor functions of the stomach and the glycemic response to fibre rich foods. For this, wheat and oat based breakfast meals were selected as fibre rich foods with low (0.042 Pa s) and high (0.266 Pa s) viscosity, respectively. Although wheat meal had a lower viscosity compared to oatmeal, the gastric emptying was found to be delayed for the former due to its high caloric density. This was reflected in the glycemic response as well, with wheat meal having a lower area under the curve (AUC) value than oatmeal. The antral contraction frequency is significantly reduced (P < 0.05) with delayed gastric emptying in the case of high nutrient wheat meal. Overall, the study demonstrated the synergistic effect of gastric emptying, stomach motor functions and physicochemical characteristics of food on the glycemic response to a meal. This information will aid in the development of functional foods with specific end applications.

  20. Across-Time Change and Variation in Cultural Tightness-Looseness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Anne; Realo, Anu

    2015-01-01

    Cultural tightness-looseness, a dimension which describes the strength, multitude, and clarity of social norms in a culture, has proved significant in explaining differences between cultures. Although several studies have compared different cultures on this domain, this study is the first that targets both within-country differences and across-time variation in tightness-looseness. Using data from two nationally representative samples of Estonians, we found that the general tightness level had changed over a period of 10 years but the effect size of the change was small. A significant within country variance in 2002 had disappeared by 2012. Our results suggest that tightness-looseness, similarly to cultural value orientations, is a relatively stable and robust characteristic of culture-that is, change indeed takes place, but slowly. Future studies about across-time change and within-country variance in tightness-looseness should target more culturally diverse and socially divided societies.

  1. Educational Leadership in Singapore: Tight Coupling, Sustainability, Scalability, and Succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimmock, Clive; Tan, Cheng Yong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: While Singapore's outstanding educational achievements are well known worldwide, there is a disproportionate paucity of literature on school leadership practices that contribute to and support pedagogical initiatives that--along with socio-cultural factors--are normally considered responsible for its educational success. The aim of this…

  2. GPU-based Iterative Cone Beam CT Reconstruction Using Tight Frame Regularization

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Xun; Lou, Yifei; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-01-01

    X-ray imaging dose from serial cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans raises a clinical concern in most image guided radiation therapy procedures. It is the goal of this paper to develop a fast GPU-based algorithm to reconstruct high quality CBCT images from undersampled and noisy projection data so as to lower the imaging dose. For this purpose, we have developed an iterative tight frame (TF) based CBCT reconstruction algorithm. A condition that a real CBCT image has a sparse representation under a TF basis is imposed in the iteration process as regularization to the solution. To speed up the computation, a multi-grid method is employed. Our GPU implementation has achieved high computational efficiency and a CBCT image of resolution 512x512x70 can be reconstructed in about ~139 sec. We have tested our algorithm on a digital NCAT phantom and a physical Catphan phantom. It is found that our TF-based algorithm leads to much higher CBCT quality than those obtained from a conventional FDK algorithm in the context of undersamp...

  3. Intramyocellular lipid content and insulin sensitivity are increased following a short-term low-glycemic index diet and exercise intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haus, Jacob M; Solomon, Thomas; Lu, Lan

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between intramyocellular (IMCL) and extramyocellular lipid (EMCL) accumulation and skeletal muscle insulin resistance is complex and dynamic. We examined the effect of a short-term (7-day) low-glycemic index (LGI) diet and aerobic exercise training intervention (EX) on IMCL...... in FPI (r = -0.78, P = 0.002) and HOMA-IR (r = -0.61, P = 0.03). These data suggest that increases in the IMCL pool following a low glycemic diet and exercise intervention may represent lipid repartitioning from EMCL. The lower systemic glucose levels that prevail while eating a low glycemic diet may...

  4. 'No delays achiever'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    The latest version of the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement's 'no delays achiever', a web based tool created to help NHS organisations achieve the 18-week target for GP referrals to first treatment, is available at www.nodelaysachiever.nhs.uk.

  5. Sorghum flour fractions: correlations among polysaccharides, phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity and glycemic index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Érica Aguiar; Marineli, Rafaela da Silva; Lenquiste, Sabrina Alves; Steel, Caroline Joy; de Menezes, Cícero Beserra; Queiroz, Valéria Aparecida Vieira; Maróstica Júnior, Mário Roberto

    2015-08-01

    Nutrients composition, phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity and estimated glycemic index (EGI) were evaluated in sorghum bran (SB) and decorticated sorghum flour (DSF), obtained by a rice-polisher, as well as whole sorghum flour (WSF). Correlation between EGI and the studied parameters were determined. SB presented the highest protein, lipid, ash, β-glucan, total and insoluble dietary fiber contents; and the lowest non-resistant and total starch contents. The highest carbohydrate and resistant starch contents were in DSF and WSF, respectively. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities were concentrated in SB. The EGI values were: DSF 84.5 ± 0.41; WSF 77.2 ± 0.33; and SB 60.3 ± 0.78. Phenolic compounds, specific flavonoids and antioxidant activities, as well as total, insoluble and soluble dietary fiber and β-glucans of sorghum flour samples were all negatively correlated to EGI. RS content was not correlated to EGI.

  6. Diabetes and tuberculosis: a review of the role of optimal glycemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niazi Asfandyar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Developing countries shoulder most of the burden of diabetes and tuberculosis. These diseases often coexist. Suboptimal control of diabetes predisposes the patient to tuberculosis, and is one of the common causes of poor response to anti-tubercular treatment. Tuberculosis also affects diabetes by causing hyperglycemia and causing impaired glucose tolerance. Impaired glucose tolerance is one of the major risk factors for developing diabetes. The drugs used to treat tuberculosis (especially rifampicin and isoniazid interact with oral anti-diabetic drugs and may lead to suboptimal glycemic control. Similarly some of the newer oral anti-diabetic drugs may interact with anti-tuberculosis drugs and lower their efficacy. Therefore diabetes and tuberculosis interact with each other at multiple levels – each exacerbating the other. Management of patients with concomitant tuberculosis and diabetes differs from that of either disease alone. This article reviews the association between diabetes and tuberculosis and suggests appropriate management for these conditions.

  7. Fasts, feasts and festivals in diabetes-1: Glycemic management during Hindu fasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This communication is the first of a series on South Asian fasts, festivals, and diabetes, designed to spread awareness and stimulate research on this aspect of diabetes and metabolic care. It describes the various fasts observed as part of Hindu religion and offers a classification scheme for them, labeling them as infrequent and frequent. The infrequent fasts are further sub-classified as brief and prolonged, to facilitate a scientific approach to glycemic management during these fasts. Pre-fast counseling, non-pharmacological therapy, pharmacological modification, and post-fast debriefing are discussed in detail. All available drug classes and molecules are covered in this article, which provides guidance about necessary changes in dosage and timing of administration. While in no way exhaustive, the brief review offers a basic framework which diabetes care professionals can use to counsel and manage persons in their care who wish to observe various Hindu fasts.

  8. Assigning glycemic index to foods in a recent Australian food composition database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, J C Y; Barclay, A W; Brand-Miller, J C

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the compilation of a special edition of the AUSNUT2011-2013 food composition database that includes glycemic index (GI) values. A 6-step, systematic methodology was used to assign GI to 5644 foods included in AUSNUT2011-2013. A total of 1752 (31%) foods were assigned a GI of 0 owing to low carbohydrate content; 363 (6%) had a direct match in 1 of the 4 data tables used; 1738 (31%) were assigned the GI of a 'closely related' food item; 1526 (27%) were assigned the weighted mean GI of ingredients; 205 (4%) were assigned the median GI of their corresponding food subgroup; 49 (<1%) were assigned a GI of 0 because they were not a significant source of carbohydrate in typical diets; and 5 (<1%) were assigned a default GI. We propose that this database should be used for all future Australian GI research until a subsequent version/update is compiled.

  9. Dietary glycemic index modulates the behavioral and biochemical abnormalities associated with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currais, A; Farrokhi, C; Dargusch, R; Goujon-Svrzic, M; Maher, P

    2016-03-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder of unknown etiology, but very likely resulting from both genetic and environmental factors. There is good evidence for immune system dysregulation in individuals with ASD. However, the contribution of insults such as dietary factors that can also activate the immune system have not been explored in the context of ASD. In this paper, we show that the dietary glycemic index has a significant impact on the ASD phenotype. By using BTBR mice, an inbred strain that displays behavioral traits that reflect the diagnostic symptoms of human ASD, we found that the diet modulates plasma metabolites, neuroinflammation and brain markers of neurogenesis in a manner that is highly reflective of ASD in humans. Overall, the manuscript supports the idea that ASD results from gene-environment interactions and that in the presence of a genetic predisposition to ASD, diet can make a large difference in the expression of the condition.

  10. Effect of popping on sorghum starch digestibility and predicted glycemic index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathakattur Saravanabavan, Sanddhya; Manchanahally Shivanna, Meera; Bhattacharya, Sila

    2013-04-01

    Effect of popping on carbohydrate, protein, phytic acid and minerals of three varieties (pop sorghum, maldandi and red sorghum) of sorghum were studied. Significant changes (p ≤ 0.05) in the starch degradability including total and soluble amylose content, and resistant starch occurred due to popping; in-vitro protein digestibility along with the content of albumin proteins increased. Starch characteristics had substantial differences among these three varieties which are based on the nature of endosperm and amylose content. Phytic acid content had a reduction of 20%-25% after popping. Glycemic index (GI) determined from kinetic study of enzymatic hydrolysis of sorghum starch was between 85 and 92; the rate constant for hydrolysis for these three varieties were in the range of 0.025 and 0.029 min(-1). Popping helped to control phytic acid content in sorghum and enhanced protein as well as starch digestibility.

  11. Informing food choices and health outcomes by use of the dietary glycemic index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chung-Jung; Liu, Simin; Willett, Walter C; Wolever, Thomas Ms; Brand-Miller, Jennie C; Barclay, Alan W; Taylor, Allen

    2011-04-01

    Considerable epidemiologic evidence links consuming lower glycemic index (GI) diets with good health, particularly upon aging. The GI is a kinetic parameter that reflects the ability of carbohydrate (CHO) contained in consumed foods to raise blood glucose in vivo. Newer nutritional, clinical, and experimental data link intake of lower dietary GI foods to favorable outcomes of chronic diseases, and compel further examination of the record. Based upon the new information there are two specific questions: 1) should the GI concept be promoted as a way to prolong health, and 2) should food labels contain GI information? Further, what are the remaining concerns about methodological issues and consistency of epidemiological data and clinical trials that need to be resolved in order to exploit the benefits of consuming lower GI diets? These issues are addressed in this review.

  12. High-glycemic index carbohydrates abrogate the antiobesity effect of fish oil in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hao, Qin; Lillefosse, Haldis Haukås; Fjære, Even;

    2012-01-01

    Fish oil rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids is known to attenuate diet-induced obesity and adipose tissue inflammation in rodents. Here we aimed to investigate whether different carbohydrate sources modulated the antiobesity effects of fish oil. By feeding C57BL/6J mice isocaloric high......-fat diets enriched with fish oil for 6 wk, we show that increasing amounts of sucrose in the diets dose-dependently increased energy efficiency and white adipose tissue (WAT) mass. Mice receiving fructose had about 50% less WAT mass than mice fed a high fish oil diet supplemented with either glucose...... or sucrose, indicating that the glucose moiety of sucrose was responsible for the obesity-promoting effect of sucrose. To investigate whether the obesogenic effect of sucrose and glucose was related to stimulation of insulin secretion, we combined fish oil with high and low glycemic index (GI) starches. Mice...

  13. Prediction of glycemic index among high-sugar, low-starch foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trout, D; Behall, K M

    1999-03-01

    A weighted mean of the glycemic index (GI) values of the constituent sugars of a non-starchy fruit is known to give a rough estimate of the GI of that fruit. Previously observed GI values (GIob) were, on average, lower than the calculated GI of the sugar mixture (GIsm) for nine acidic fruits (pH of 3.24-4.17) and tended to exceed the GIsm for six near-neutral non-starchy foods (pH formula for predicting GI from GIsm and food pH was developed, and it accounted for 69% of the sum of squares for the 15 GIob values. A model that proposed that organic acids and their acidic anions slow gastric emptying and thereby lower GI was developed, and it was found to account for 57% of the GIob sum of squares. The substances responsible for lowering GI in acid fruits and the mechanisms of their action remain to be identified.

  14. Continuous Glucose Monitoring for Evaluation of Glycemic Excursions after Gastric Bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia Halperin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia with neuroglycopenia is a rare complication of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB. We hypothesized that continuous glucose monitoring (CGM would be useful to characterize glycemic variability after RYGB. Methods. CGM and mixed meal tolerance testing (MMTT were performed on sixteen post-RYGB subjects, ten with a history of neuroglycopenia on medical treatment and six asymptomatic controls. Results. 9 of 10 subjects with neuroglycopenia developed hypoglycemia defined by glucose <70 mg/dL on CGM, and 3 of 9 on MMTT. In asymptomatic subjects, 3 of 6 had asymptomatic hypoglycemia during CGM, and 3 of 5 on MMTT. Therefore, the sensitivity and specificity to detect clinically significant hypoglycemia was 90% and 50% for CGM and 33% and 40% for MMTT.Conclusions. Asymptomatic hypoglycemia after RYGB is more frequent than commonly recognized. For clinicians evaluating patients for postbypass neuroglycopenia, CGM may be a valuable diagnostic tool.

  15. Effect of Wheat Flour Noodles with Bombyx mori Powder on Glycemic Response in Healthy Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Wanhee; Kim, JiEun; Kim, Do-Yeon; Lim, Hyunjung; Choue, Ryowon

    2016-01-01

    Recent trial results suggest that the consumption of a low glycemic index (GI) diet is beneficial in the prevention of high blood glucose levels. Identifying active hypoglycemic substances in ordinary foods could be a significant benefit to the management of blood glucose. It has been hypothesized that noodles with Bombyx mori powder are a low GI food. We evaluated GI and changes in postprandial glucose levels following consumption of those noodles and compared them with those following consumption of plain wheat flour noodles (control) and glucose (reference) in healthy subjects. Thirteen males (age: 34.2±4.5 years, body mass index: 23.2±1.1 kg/m2) consumed 75 g carbohydrate portions of glucose and the 2 kinds of noodle after an overnight fast. Capillary blood was measured at time 0 (fasting), 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, and 180 min from the start of each food intake. The GI values were calculated by taking the ratio of the incremental area under the blood glucose response curve (IAUC) for the noodles and glucose. There was a significant difference in postprandial glucose concentrations at 30 and 45 min between the control noodles and the noodles with Bombyx mori powder: the IAUC and GI for the noodles with Bombyx mori powder were significantly lower than those for glucose and plain wheat flour noodles. The wheat flour noodles with Bombyx mori powder could help prevent an increase in postprandial glucose response and possibly provide an alternative to other carbohydrate staple foods for glycemic management. PMID:27752491

  16. Glycemic and insulinemic response to selected snack bars in trained versus sedentary individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompers, Willeke; Perry, Tracy L; Rose, Meredith C; Rehrer, Nancy J

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether glycemic index (GI) is influenced by training state. Participants were tested in a randomized order: twice with a reference solution containing 50 g glucose and once each with 2 commercially available snack bars (Griffin's Fruitli bar and Peak Fuel's Summit bar) containing 50 g available carbohydrate. Eleven of the participants (6 men and 5 women, M + or - SD age 20.8 + or - 2.0 yr) were endurance trained (ET; VO(2max) 57.5 + or - 8.4 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1) ), and 9 participants (2 men and 7 women, M + or - SD age 22.4 + or - 1.8 yr) were sedentary (SE; VO(2max) 43.7 + or - 9.1 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1) ). After an overnight fast, participants consumed either the glucose solution or snack bar, with blood samples taken before eating and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after eating began. The mean incremental area under the curve (IAUC) of the glucose reference was 31% lower (95% CI 3-52%, p = .03), and the Fruitli bar 38% lower (95% CI 0-61%, p = .05) in ET than in SE participants. There was a trend for the IAUC for the Summit bar to be 35% lower in ET than in SE participants (95% CI -7% to 61% p = .09). There was no significant interaction between training state and test food. The GIs of the Fruitli and Summit bars was not significantly different between ET and SE participants (p = .65 and .54, respectively). ET participants had a lower glycemic response than SE participants; however, training state did not influence GI.

  17. Serum Magnesium Concentrations in the Canadian Population and Associations with Diabetes, Glycemic Regulation, and Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertinato, Jesse; Wang, Kuan Chiao; Hayward, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Total serum magnesium (Mg) concentration (SMC) is commonly used to assess Mg status. This study reports current SMCs of Canadians and their associations with demographic factors, diabetes, and measures of glycemic control and insulin resistance using results from the Canadian Health Measures Survey cycle 3 (2012–2013). Associations were examined in adults aged 20–79 years using linear mixed models. Mean SMCs and percentile distributions for 11 sex-age groups between 3 and 79 years (n = 5561) are reported. SMCs were normally distributed and differences (p < 0.05) among sex and age groups were small. Between 9.5% and 16.6% of adult sex-age groups had a SMC below the lower cut-off of a population-based reference interval (0.75–0.955 mmol·L−1) established in the United States population as part of the NHANES I conducted in 1971–1974. Having diabetes was associated with 0.04 to 0.07 mmol·L−1 lower SMC compared to not having diabetes in the various models. Body mass index, glycated hemoglobin, serum glucose and insulin concentrations, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance were negatively associated with SMC. This is the first study to report SMCs in a nationally representative sample of the Canadian population. A substantial proportion of Canadians are hypomagnesaemic in relation to a population-based reference interval, and SMC was negatively associated with diabetes and indices of glycemic control and insulin resistance. PMID:28304338

  18. Effect of glycemic control on microalbuminuria development among type 2 diabetes with high-normal albuminuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Zhi; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Wen, Yu-Wen; Ning, Hsiao-Chen; Gau, Bing-Ru; Huang, Yu-Yao

    2014-03-01

    This study was aimed at revealing the factors and the interrelationships between factors on microalbuminuria development among type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. Between 2004 and 2011, 461 T2D patients with a baseline urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) of 60 mL/min were evaluated retrospectively. Sixty-eight (14.8%) subjects had developed microalbuminuria in a mean follow-up of 6.82 years. Statistical analysis had revealed that the higher baseline UACR (10 mg/g; sensitivity, 80.9%, specificity, 63.6%; AUC = 0.774) and glycohemoglobin level (HbA1c) (8%; sensitivity, 72.1%, specificity, 61.6%; AUC = 0.698) were the two independent microalbuminuria risk factors. When considering the risk of microalbuminuria, the data were normalized with respect to subjects with low-normal UACR ( 8%, high-normal UACR/HbA1c 8% were 2.59 (p = 0.107), 6.15 (p = 0.001), and 16.96 (p 10%) showed a progressively increase of the hazard risk in baseline high-normal UACR group. But the same correlation was not shown in the low-normal UACR group. This study identified the relationships of high-normal albuminuria and glycemic control on microalbuminuria development among T2D patients. Glycemic control is especially beneficial for T2D patients with baseline high-normal UACR in preventing microalbuminuria development.

  19. In vitro starch digestibility and in vivo glycemic response of foxtail millet and its products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xin; Chen, Jing; Molla, Mohammad Mainuddin; Wang, Chao; Diao, Xianmin; Shen, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Foxtail millet, as a leading variety in arid and semi-arid areas of Asia and Africa, can provide broad potential benefits to human health. However, its digestion properties have not been reported. So in this study, the in vitro starch digestibilities and in vivo glycemic indices (GI) of foxtail millet and pure millet products were investigated. The results showed that starch digestibility of the foxtail millet flour is obviously lower than that of wheat flour. However, deproteinization and heating significantly increased its rapidly digestible starch and decreased its slowly digestible starch and resistant starch. The GIs of pure millet products were in the following order: millet porridge (93.6 ± 11.3) > millet steamed bread (89.6 ± 8.8) > No. 1 millet pancake (75.0% millet flour and 25.0% extrusion flour, 83.0 ± 9.6) > No. 2 millet pancake (without extrusion flour, 76.2 ± 10.7) > cooked millet (64.4 ± 8.5). They were significantly positively correlated with the rapidly digestible starch (r = 0.959), degree of gelatinization (r = 0.967) and estimated glycemic index (r = 0.988). Both in vitro and in vivo tests suggested that boiling, steaming and extrusion enhanced the formation of digestible starch and subsequently increased the GI values. Additionally, the No. 1 millet pancake and cooked millet had a relatively gentle stimulation on β-cell. Therefore, foxtail millet, especially the cooked millet, may serve as a potential source of nutraceutical and functional food that could delay the development of type 2 diabetes.

  20. Chemical composition and glycemic index of Brazilian pine (Araucaria angustifolia) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordenunsi, Beatriz Rosana; De Menezes Wenzel, Elizabete; Genovese, Maria Inés; Colli, Célia; De Souza Gonçalves, Alessandra; Lajolo, Franco Maria

    2004-06-02

    The seeds of Parana pine (Araucaria brasiliensis syn. Araucaria angustifolia), named pinhão, are consumed after cooking and posterior dehulling, or they are used to prepare a flour employed in regional dishes. Native people that live in the South of Brazil usually consume baked pinhão. As a result of cooking, the white seeds become brown on the surface due to the migration of some tinted compounds present in the seed coat. In this work, the proximate composition, minerals, flavonoids, and glycemic index (GI) of cooked and raw pinhão seeds were compared. No differences in moisture, lipids, soluble fiber, and total starch after boiling were found. However, the soluble sugars and P, Cu, and Mg contents decreased, probably as a consequence of leaching in the cooking water. Also, the boiling process modified the profile of the phenolic compounds in the seeds. No flavonols were detected in raw pinhão seeds. The internal seed coat had a quercetin content five times higher than that of the external seed coat; also, quercetin migrated into the seed during cooking. The internal seed coat had a high content of total phenolics, and seeds cooked in normal conditions (with the seed coat) showed a total phenolics content five times higher than that of seeds cooked without the seed coat. Cooking was then extremely favorable to pinhão seeds bioactive compounds content. The carbohydrate availability was evaluated in a short-term assay in humans by the GI. The GI of pinhão seeds cooked with the coat (67%) was similar to that of the seeds cooked without a coat (62%) and lower than bread, showing that cooking does not interfere with starch availability. The low glycemic response can be partly due to its high content of resistant starch (9% of the total starch).